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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01580
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 6/12/2011
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01580
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text







History revisited
Dekle pens textbook
on Ted Bundy case.
000018 12051I ****3-DIGIT 326
LIB OF FLORIDA HISTORY
PO BOX 117007 FLORIDA
205 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA-1943
GAINESVILLE FL 326111943


paK e City


Reporter


Sunday, June 12, 2011


www.lakecityreporter.com


Vol. 137, No. 120 U $ 1.00


Smoke

persists

as fire

takes its

course

Blaze could double
in size before its
fuel is exhausted.

From staff reports

Smoke from the Impassable
Bay fire blanketed Lake City
much of Saturday and could con-
tinue depending oih wind condi-
tions, according to the Florida
Division of Forestry Suwannee
Forestry Center.
The wildfire had grown to
4,252 acres as of 8:30 p.m. Friday.
More recent figures were not
available at press time.
The fire is in the Osceola
National Forest along the
Baker-Columbia County line
and began with a lighting strike
during an area storm Monday.
The smoke makes breathing
difficult for some, and citizens
with respiratory problems are
encouraged to stay inside with
the air conditioner on, said Kurt
Wisner, Suwannee Forestry
Center public information offi-
cer.
"If it's causing respiratory
discomfort, please stay inside
and get medical help," he said.
Smoky conditions lifted,
somewhat Saturday as the day
wore on.
Authorities are trying to keep
the fire within a specific area, he
said. The blaze remains within
US Forest Service boundaries.
There was an escape onto
private land at the northwest-
ern boundary of the fire Friday
night, but it was contained at 40
acres, according to Wisner. No
structures were threatened.
Operational objectives for
Saturday included air drops of
water and fire retardant along
the northern front.
The fire could eventually
encompass the entire northeast-
ern quadrant of the swamp in
which it is centered and double
fire-impacted acreage, accord-
ing- to Wisner. However, allow-
ing vegetative fuels to burn
is often the only viable option
in areas that will not support
heavy fire fighting equipment,
Wisner said.
Crews will continue mop up
previously burned areas, and
will monitor and improve fire
lines, away from the burnout
operations.
All wildfires other than
Impassable Bay are contained
and holding in. Columbia
County.
Citizens are asked to avoid
outdoor burning, Wisner said.
"Most of the first listed have
been lightning fires," he said.
'That gives you an idea of how
dry and dangerous a situation
is if lightening can spark a fire
from a week ago."
Report any sightings of
smoke or suspicious activity to
the Suwannee Forestry Center
at (386) 758-5700.


84264 00021 8


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400


Alcohol and energy drinks: A growing national trend Sununer
Underage drinking 'is there's lots of free time to


nothing new in communi-
ties across America, but
that doesn't mean local
officials aren't doing every-
thing in their power to edu-
cate teens on the hazards
of the practice. As Leanne
Tyo reports in today's lead
story, the danger only rises
when school is out and
*


be filled. Add energy drinks
to the mix with their power-
ful stimulants and it can
become a matter of life and
death.
For a national perspective
on the problem, see today's
issue of Parade magazine
inside this edition.
Editor


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Underage drinking is a nationwide issue that hits close to home. Making things worse is the
trend of mixing alcohol with certain energy drinks. The combination of alcohol and caffeine and
other stimulants can lead to dangerous even deadly -- results. For purposes of this illustra-
tion, the vodka in this bottle has been replaced with water.


is drinking


season for


some teens

Mixing alcohol with
energy drinks only
compounds problem.

By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com

Columbia County students, offering
weeks' worth of free time for behav-
iors both safe and risky.
With Columbia County's unem-
ployment rate at 9.6 percent, teens may have
trouble finding summer work, freeing up even
more time for activities such as drinking.
"My feeling would be starting with spring
break and on through the summer, you would
have more students participating in that activ-
ity (teen drinking) than you would at other
times," said Gloria Spivey, district Safe Schools
coordinator. "It's kind of a holiday. It's summer-
time, they can be on the water, it's party time.
They're out late at night and don't have to be at
school the next day, so I think it's a lot easier
for them to participate in that activity from
spring break on to the end of summer. The
opportunity's just there."
According to the 2010 Florida Youth
Substance Abuse Survey, 29.9 percent of
Columbia County middle-schoolers and high-
schoolers surveyed reported having used
alcohol within the past 30 days. Just over 54
percent reported that they'd tried alcohol at
least once. Both figures are slightly above the
state average.
Compounding the problem is the national
TEEN DRINKING continued on 3A


Expo offers boost to small businesses


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
Local businesses had the
opportunity to introduce them-
selves to the community during
a small business expo Saturday
at the Lake City Mall. -
The event was hosted by
SCORE of Suwannee Valley and"
the Lake City Mall and featured
about 17 businesses.


SCORE, the Service Corps of
Retired Executives, hosts several
events during the year to aid new
and existing small businesses,
said Sheri Carder, counselor.
The expo included a program on
what businesses needed to know
to be successful.
Many were interested in learn-
ing what the businesses had to
offer, said Maria Pelham of the
Greater Lake City Community


Development Corporation. The
program was also a good oppor-
tunity for businesses to network.
"Lake City needs to know
what's out here and how they can
help or be helped," she said.
Robert Morgan of YP Supplier
thought the small business expo
was an excellent idea.
"I'd like to see more of it," he
said. "A lot of people and small
businesses need some guidance


ANTONIA ROBINSON/Lake City Reporter
Good, safe fun
Grace Gonzalez, 4, of Lake City receives a coloring book from officer Mike Lee as Mary Knabb
of Lake City talks with officer Staci Brownfield about summer safety. Lake City police and
fire departments presented Summer Fun & Safety Day at the Lake DeSoto Farmers Market
Saturday. See story, Page 3A.


95 70
T-Storm Chance
WEATHER, 2A


|p Opinion ................. 4A
SBusiness ................IC
Obituaries .............. 5A
Around Florida........... 2A
Puzzles ................. 2B
-* ".


that SCORE can provide."
His wife, Dee, is the owner of
the company, and they participat-
ed in the expo to let people know
about their product, Mr. Stacky,
and see a small business that is
successful, Morgan said.
SCORE is available five days
a week to provide free ser-
vices for small businesses. Call
-SCORE at 752-2000 for more
information.


Roadwork

may delay

area drivers
From staff reports

Several road construction projects
underway by the Florida Department of
Transportation may impact traffic until
Friday in Columbia County.
County Road 245, Price Creek Road, is
closed at the Olustee Creek Bridge about
a mile north of State Road 238 to' replace
the bridge.
Northbound traffic is detoured to State
Road 238 to US 441 to CR 349 and back
to CR 245.
Southbound traffic is detoured to CR
349 to US 441 to SR 238 and back to CR
245. The road is scheduled to reopen by
the end of June.
Interstate 75 has nighttime lane clo-
sures beginning at 6 p.m. for southbound
traffic Sunday through Thursday nights
ROADWORK continued on 3A


TODAY IN COMING
BUSINESS TUESDAY
Lending a Latest on
helping hand. area wildfires.











LAKE CITY REPORTER SUNDAY REPORT SUNDAY, JUNE 12, 2011


Friday: Friday: Saturday: Saturday: Wednesday: Wednesday:
8-28-33-42 18 2-15-16-19-28 Afternoon: 3-6-4 Afternoon: 5-0-7-1 5-30-34-44-47-49 14-37-44-45-53 PB29
Evening: Unavailable .Evening: Unavailable


AROUND FLORIDA



Insect expert testifies in Anthony trial


ORLANDO
A n insect expert
says he found
flies related to
decomposition
in the trunk
of a car that belonged to
Florida woman accused
of killing her 2-year-old
daughter.
Forensic entomologist
Neal Haskell testified
Saturday that the evi-
dence was consistent with
a body being in the trunk
of the vehicle for a short
period of time and then
removed. Prosecutors
believe the toddler's
body was kept in the car
before being left in a
wooded area near Casey
Anthony's home.
Anthony has been
charged with first-degree
murder in her daughter's
death. If convicted she
could face the death pen-
alty.
Prosecutors say
she suffocated Caylee
Anthony with duct tape.
The defense contends the
girl died in her grandpar-
ents' swimming pool.

Man shot by officer
during drug bust
ORLANDO Police in
Orlando say a man suf-
fered non-life-threatening
injuries after being shot
by an officer in a drug
'bust operation.
Authorities say
the Orlando Police
Department's Drug
Enforcement Unit was
conducting an investi-
gation Friday evening


ASSOICATED PRESS
During a sidebar in the Casey Anthony trial, attorneys and the judge discuss an issue. at the
Orange County Courthouse Friday in Orlando. Anthony, 25, is charged with killing her daugh-
ter Caylee in the summer of 2008.


around 10:30 a.m.
During the operation,
a man ran from police.
When officers caught up
to him, they say he made
a movement an officer
perceived as a threat.
The man, who has
not been identified, was
transported to a local
hospital. The officer
was not injured and has
been placed on admin-
istrative leave with pay.
The Florida Department
of Law Enforcement is
investigating.


Missing boater
found in Tampa
TAMPA Authorities
say a boater last seen
in an inflatable'kayak
in Tampa Bay has been
found clinging to a mana-
tee sign.
Tonya Lee Collins was
reported missing by her
husband on Friday eve-
ning. Coast Guard and
Tampa police marine
units searched the waters
and located her boat
South, of.theHoward ,. .


Franklin Bridge.,
Collins was not inside
the vessel.
Several hours later a
Fish and Wildlife rescue
boat located her 400
yards offshore hanging
on to a Tnanatee sign.
Tampa police say she
was not injured and.
refused medical attention.

Rare whale found
dead on beach
FORT PIERCE A
..field biologist counting.


sea turtle nests made
a surprising find on a
Florida beach: the body
of a rare beaked whale.
Grant Baysinger
made the discovery
Thursday morning on a
South Hutchinson Island
Beach. The biologist with
Ecological Associates
says the whale looked
recently deceased and
had several shark bites.
Stephen McCulloch,
founder of the Marime
Mammal Research and
Conservation Program
says leaked whales are
very rare, and that the
.carcass is a treasure
trove of information to
help learn, more about
them.
Researchers are con-
ducting a necropsy to
determine the whale's
cause of death.

Mother cleared
of wrongdoing
PENSACOLA A
Pensacola third-grader
had something to show
her teacher.
The girl reached into
her jacket pocket and
handed over what she
said was "some of my
mom's weed."
The teacher informed
authorities of the girl's
impromptu show and tell
on April 19, but Friday
her. mother was cleared
of wrongdoing.
Escambia County
deputies and the Florida
Department of Children
and Families closed their
investigations of ,49-year-


old Cynthia Benson.
She denied the marijua-
na her daughter took to
Lincoln Park Elementary
school belonged to her.
Benson also had a
negative result on a urine
test, according to an
investigative report.
She told investigators
her daughter may have
worn the jacket around
two men involved in
drug activities her
father, now in prison, and
a former boyfriend of
Benson's.

Vigil held for
missing woman
INDIAN ROCKS
BEACH A vigil for a
missing Florida police
cadet is scheduled to be
held in her home state of
Maryland.
The candlelight cer-
emony for Kelly Rothwell
will be held Saturday at
the Community College of
Baltimore County-Essex
Campus from 7-11 p.m.
Rothwell, who was born
arid raised in Maryland,
was last seen by a friend
on March 12. Kelly told
that friend that she was
going home to break up
with her boyfriend, David
Perry. Pinellas County
detectives say Perry won't,
answer their questions
about her disappearance,
which is classified as a miss-
ing person case. Perry left
Florida on March 13 for
Elmira, NY, where he had
lived previously.

Associated Press


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS


Troops celebrate Queen's. birthday


LONDON
ith his face half-
hidden under
a bearskin hat,
Prince William .
rode through cen-
tral London on horseback Saturday
as part of his grandmother Queen
Elizabeth II's official birthday cel-
ebration.
The newlywed prince is taking
part in the annual 'Trooping the
Colour," a procession held every
year to mark the monarch's birth-
day.
His new bride Kate Middleton
- now officially the Duchess of
Cambridge joined the royal
family, riding in a horse-drawn car-
riage alongside William's younger
brother Prince Harry, Camilla the
Duchess of Cornwall and Prince
Andrew, the Duke of York. She
wore an ivory jacket and black hat,
and had pulled a blanket with a tar-
tan blanket over her knees to ward
off the early summer chill.
The queen turned 85 in April, but
the public party for the monarch's
birthday is held on a Saturday in
June when the weather is better.
The custom dates from 1748.
William wore same red Irish
Guards tunic with a blue sash that
he wore at his April 29 wedding at
Westminster Abbey and rose on a
gray charger.
Earlier on, the queen had award-
ed a set of honors on actors, sports-
men, academics, civil servants and
members of the public who are
judged to have made an exceptional
contribution to society.
British actor Colin Firth, who.
won an Oscar for por trying the
queen's father King George VI in
"The King's Speech," was named
a Commander of the British
Empire or CBE in the Birthday
Honors List.
Britain's honors are bestowed
twice a year by the monarch at
New Year's and on her official
birthday in June but recipients
are selected by committees of civil
servants from nominations made
by the government and the public.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
British Guardsmen march towards the Horse Guards Parade for the Trooping the
Colour ceremony to mark the official birthday of the Queen, in London, Saturday.

Jolie-Pitt Foundation Trapy Morgan apologizes
makes donation to Joplin for anti-gay comedy rant


JOPLIN, Missouri Brad Pitt
and Angelina Jolie are donating
$500,000 from their foundation to
help Joplin rebuild from the deadly
tornado that struck the southwest
Missouri town last month.
The Community Foundation of
'the Ozarks says the gift from the
Jolie-Pitt Foundation will go to mid-
and long-term needs in the tor-
nado-ravaged city. The Community
Foundation announced the gift
Friday in a news release.
Pitt grew up in southwest
Missouri and says in the release
that he spent much of his child-
hood in the area and knows the
people to be "especially resil-
ient."
The May 22 tornado destroyed
more than 8,000 homes and 400
businesses. The death toll was 151
as of Friday, including several vic-
tims who died as a result of injuries
suffered in the storm.


NEW YORK Tracy Morgan
said Friday that he was sorry for
telling' an'audience in Nashville,
Tenn., that if his son were gay, he
would "pull out a knife and stab"
him.
The comedian and "30 Rock"
actor apologized to his fans and
the gay and lesbian community
for what he called "my choice of
words" during his June 3 appear-
ance at the Ryman Auditorium.
A Facebook account posted
-by an audience member said
Morgan's stand-up performance
was full of homophobic refer-
ences. The Ryman issued its own
apology afterward for Morgan's
behavior.
Morgan's outbursts triggered
heated comment on Twitter,
making him a "trending" topic
Thursday and Friday.

Associated Press


Celebrity Birthdays


* Singer Via Damone is 83.
* Actor-singer Jim Nabors
is 81.
Ii Jazz musician Chick
Corea is 70.
* Drummer Bun E. Carlos of
Cheap Trick is 60.
* Singer Meredith Brooks
is 53.
* Actress Jenilee Harrison
("Dallas," "Three's Com-



Daily Scripture


pany") is 53.
* Accordionist-keyboardist
John Linnell of They Might
Be Giants is 52.
* Actor Jason Mewes
("Clerks") is 37.
* Blues guitarist Kenny
Wayne Shepherd is 34.
* Singer Robyn is 32.
* Country singer Chris
Young is 26.


"He says,'Be still, and know
that I am God; I will be exalt-
ed among the nations, I will be
exalted in the earth.'"

-Psalm 46:10 NIV,


Lake City Reporter
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CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion,
please call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifica-
tions will run in this space. And thanks for reading.


Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424














Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY JUNE 12, 2011


TEEN DRINKING: Problem persists

Continued From Page 1A


trend of teens mixing
alcohol with energy
drinks.
Officer Steve Shaw,
Lake City Police
Department alternate
public information officer,
said while LCPD has not
seen a "high ratio" of that
practice specifically com-
pared to juvenile drinking
in general, he's sure it's
happening.
"I'm sure it's out there
as it is in any society,"
he said, "but we haven't
encountered more of a
problem with that than we
have with any other prob-
lem on a day-to-day basis."
Spivey said the district
tries to keep abreast of
trends like mixing energy
drinks with alcohol. She
said she is aware of the
practice on a local level.
"I know that there are
students within our coun-
ty that have participated
in that," she said, "but I
don't know the degree of
their participation or how
many."
Students try trendy,
risky behaviors because
. they feel invincible, Spivey
said.
"They like to experi-
ment and try things and
they have that feeling that
nothing happens to them,"
she said, 'That's not
going to happen to me.'"
Mixing energy drinks
that have caffeine a
stimulant with alcohol
a depressant and
consuming the concoction
can be dangerous, Shaw
said.
"When you mix the two
together, it's kind of like
a shock to your system
and it's like an overdrive,"
he said. "Your body can't
absorb that and it's actu-
ally very damaging to
your liver."
In addition, the stimu-
lants prevent the drinker
from passing out the
body's natural defense
against excess alcohol
consumption.
-Meanwhile, one local
retailer is taking action on
the problem.
Lester Scaff, owner of
S&S Food Stores, said
Friday that he is looking
into removing from store
shelves alcoholic bever-
ages that are not clearly
identified as containing
alcohol.
Some energy drinks
with alcohol con ent were
taken off S&S shelves
about four years ago for
the same reason, Scaff
said.
"We took them right out
of there because it looked
like something else (other
than alcohol) really," he
said. '"They didn't like
us for it, but we said,
'We aren't going to do it,
period.'"
His stores .currently
stock Four Loko, an
alcoholic malt beverage
produced by Phusion'
Projects, but only after
the Four Loko products
were reformulated in
November 2010 to remove
caffeine, guarana and
taurine.
Lisa Gandiana, an S&S
supervisor, said Four
Loko drinks with the
original ingredients were
pulled from S&S shelves
when controversy arose
surrounding the safety of
the products. They were
replaced only after the
reformulation.
Both Shaw and Ed
Seifert, Columbia County
Sheriff's Office public
information officer, said
neither of their agencies
have encountered deaths
in the past year caused
by underage drinking
with or without energy
drinks.
Since January, LCPD


has not made any arrests
for underage drinking,
Shaw said.
Seifert said CCSO
makes a "handful" of
arrests every three or
four months of teens
either in possession or
under the influence of
alcohol.


Age-appropriate educa-
tion against underage
drinking occurs at all lev-
els of the school district.
Kindergartners through
eighth-graders are taught
a Too Good for Drugs
curriculum, Spivey said,
which teaches how to
make healthy choices
regarding alcohol,
tobacco and other drugs.
High school students are
presented a variety of
events relating to alcohol,
tobacco or drugs through-
out the year, she said.
High school prevention
presentations are also
made around events like
homecoming, Christmas
break and graduation,
Spivey said.
For the past five years,
CCSO and the Florida
Highway Patrol have
administered breatha-
lyzer tests to every student
entering county high
schools',proms, Spivey
said. The breathalyzer tests
were also available at high
school graduation for the
first time this year for any
student suspected to have
been drinking, she said.
Spivey said while ufider-
age drinking is not usually
a problem county schools
encounter on their cam-
puses, the district has
worked hard for the past
five to six years to educate
its students onwhy they
shouldn't participate in
such behavior.
"We all are aware that
this takes place after
school when kids get
together," she said. "We
are aware that kids do
that The schools most
definitely want to discour-
age it and we do on a lot
of different levels."
Seifert said CCSO is
also aware of the under-
age drinking issue, and
that district and parent
involvement have made a


positive impact regarding
that issue.
"We do recognize
the issue, not only in
Columbia County, but
nationwide," he said, "but
locally we have a fantastic
school system with fantas-
tic teachers and staff and
our parents are fantastic
and they're involved."
Seifert noted that
School Resource Officers
in the district are involved
in the education process
regarding drugs and alco-
hol.
"School resource depu-
ties are actively involved
in the lives of the students
and try to be active men-
tor and a positive role
model on educating stu-
dents on what's right and
wrong and what's legal
and not legal," he said.
Mike Millikin, superin-
tendent of schools, said
district students have
undergone confidential
surveys for years on
behaviors like teen drink-
ing.
The district is commit-
ted to educating both the
community and its stu-
dents on the dangers of
risky behaviors, he said.
"I think it's important
to keep on the forefront
among families and
parents that teens don't
always make the right
decisions," Millikin said.
"And we try to educate
the community about
what's happening with our
teens and are their risky
behaviors trending up or
trending down. We just
think it's part of our duty
to show our children and
our community the dan-
gers of risky behaviors,
how to avoid them, how
to react positively when
you're put in questionable
situations and get through
these sometimes trying
and difficult teen years."


Kids' safety is focus of


farmers market program


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com

Parents learned
about Summer Fun &
Safety during the Lake
DeSoto Farmers Market
Saturday.
The market partnered
with the Lake City police
and fire departments for
the program.
The farmers market is
an ideal location to share
information with the
community, said officer
Michael Lee. Children
are out of school and for
the summer and they, as
well as parents, need to
know how to ensure they
stay safe.
Also, the event helped
introduce children to local
law enforcement, said
officer Staci Brownfield.
The department provided
crayons, coloring books
and other materials to
children.
Public awareness is
a component of public
safety, said firefighter


'There's a nice, friendly atmosphere
out here. It's family friendly. It's a
really nice place.

Jackie Kite
Lake City community
redevelopment administrator


Gerald Ford, public edu-
cation director for LCFD.
Working together to pro-
vide information at the
farmers market lets citi-
zens know both agencies
are accessible.
"We want to educate
them about what we're
here for," he said. "We
want to let them know
we're available."
Next weekend's farm-
ers market will feature
Florida Gateway College
with its mobile lab and
other exhibits, said Jackie
Kite, Lake City communi-
ty redevelopment admin-
istrator.
Bluegrass and
Americana musical
guests Amanda and Scott


Anderson featuring the
Walker Brothers will pro-
vide entertainment.
Fresh. produce, arts
and crafts, baked goods
and other items will also
be available throughout
the day.
The Lake DeSoto
Farmers Market is open 8
a.m. to noon every Saturday
in Wilson Park. It is located
along Lake DeSoto between
the Columbia County
Courthouse and Shands
Lakeshore Hospital. For
more information call (386)
719-5766.
"There's a nice, friend-
ly atmosphere out here,"
Kite said. "It's family
friendly. It's a really nice
place."


ROADWORK: Delays expected

Continued From Page 1A


to mill and repave from
south of the rest area
to the Alachua County
line:
One lane will be closed
beginning at 6 p.m., and
two lanes will be closed
between 9 p.m. and 6
a.m.
The speed limit is
reduced to 60 mph dur-
ing lane closures and will
remain at 60 mph in the
two-mile section that is
being resurfaced because
of the milled surface of


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the' roadway.
Also, crews will be
working on widening the
southbound rest area
entrance ramp but they
should not impact the
traffic entering the rest
area. The paved shoul-
ders may be closed dur-,
ing daytime hours while
crews work on the dirt
shoulders.
State Road 100 will have
possible daytime lane clo-
sures after 9 a.m. at the
intersection with Price


Creek Road, County Road
245, to replace the traffic
signals.
US 27 will have crews
repainting the roadway
lines between the Santa Fe
River and the Suwannee
County line.
US 90 East will see
no further lane closures
between State Road
100/County Road 100A
and Florida Gateway
College as this resur-
facing project has been
completed.


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Well, we thought you'd like something productive on
your pad to prove to your spouse that it's really a useful
tool for financial management. Well worth the invest-
ment you made to buy it. And so much more than just
a toy for playing Angry Birds.
See, you actually can do something useful with this new
technology. You can see if you've got paid yet, balance
your checkbook, pay a few bills, make a loan payment,
transfer funds to your kids away at college, and more!
Or you can just act like you're taking notes at that meet-
ing instead of updating your facebook page.
We also have old-fashioned internet banking for those
who've not yet convinced their spouse that they really
need the newest pad devices or cell phones.
But keep in mind, if you want
p to get the red tootsie pops,
you're going to have to come
visit us to get one. Peoples
State Bank. Now that's Bank-
ing!





3882 W~~~~~~. U w QLk iyFL30s E P
Telehone386.54.002
www.ps :.bize mbrFI


LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, JUNE 12, 2011


Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424


IN


4A -7















OPINION


Sunday, June 12,2011


OUR


OUR
OPINION


Do your


part to


prevent


wildfires

Drought condi-
tions here have
gone from seri-
ous to danger-
ous and we're
at the point where a spark
can become a wildfire in
minutes.
We saw this happen
last week when a light-
ning strike in the Osceola
National Forest sparked
a fire that tripled in size
in a matter of hours and
remains a challenge to
contain.
Conditions are possible
for this to occur anywhere
in and around Columbia
County until we receive a
substantial, soaking rain-
fall.
That means the responsi-
bility for being careful with
fire outside falls on indi-
viduals. Campers need to
refrain from campfires in
the forest. People clearing
brush need to refrain from
burning brush or other
debris during this period
of drought. \
An alarming number of
wildfires are started each
year by careless people
driving down rural roads
and flicking a cigarette out
th ,dwindow.'Theydrive
away, ad.,n4e.verg.e ,.the
carriage this creates as dry
grassilin teditdh catchess
fire and spreads to nearby
trees.
Something as simple as
a car or all-terrain vehicle
backfiring on dry grass
pan cause a spark that
smolders into an uncon-
trolled wildfire. Conditions
persist everywhere, so
there can be no careless
i istakes.
We can't stop lightning
strikes from starting wild-
fires, but we can and
must do our part to
prevent carelessness
from torching our rural
landscapes and endanger-
ing homes and lives of
residents and emergency
responders.


Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
.Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -'Newspapers
get things done"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
'dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Robert Bridges, editor
Sue Brannon, controller

Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman

LETTERS
POLICY
* Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,


Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com
I


www.lakecityreporter.com


Democrats' solution to


Medicare? Demagoguery


Demagoguery
is defined by
Webster's as stir-
ring up the people
by appeals to emo-
tion, prejudice or fear to achieve
selfish ends. And there is a
whole lot of it going around in
the early stages of the presiden-
tial campaign from both ends of
the political spectrum.
There is hardly a better
example than scaring the
hell out of the old folks over
. Medicare that without some
sensible reform may just end
the world as Americans know
ituigt the Democrats seem
to have decided that rather
than win at the polls next year
through positive resolution of
the most serious financial crisis
in decades, they will do just that
- dredge up the boogie man,
who in this case is Republican
Congressman Paul Ryan, author
of a plan, they contend will
end the entitlement program
that almost 50 million seniors
depend upon.
Lawmakers like Democratic
national chair Debbie
Wasserman Shultz and
Democratic Congressional
Campaign Committee head
Steve Israel rail against those
who would rob the elderly while
padding the pockets of the
rich with tax breaks. But they
have no alternative to offer for
changing entitlements designed
decades ago for a vastly differ-
ent demographic. Neither does
the current occupant of the
White House despite almost uni-
versal agreement that without
major overhaul of those'pro-
grams financial collapse is only
a short distance away.
When Medicare came into
being in 1965, health care was
2.6 percent of the national
budget It is now 26.5 percent
and expected to climb to nearly


r




Dan K.Thomasson

one-third five years from now.
National 'defense accounts for
only about 20 percent, accord-
ing to recently published
figures. At their inception,
Medicare and Medicaid com-
bined were projected never to
go higher than $100 billion."
Medicare is now approaching
$600 billion alone and the states
are having a hard time meeting
their Medicaid obligations.
What should we do? That's
what we elect and pay our lead-
ers to figure out. So far, how-
ever, the only thing they have
been able to understand is that
people of an advanced age vote
and influence their younger
relatives to vote and they don't
vote for those who threaten the
status quo. A pilot once told me
that the hardest thing to do was
talk someone into abandoning
an airplane that was running out
of gas but still flying as though
it weren't They just feel safe
until it's too late, he said.
Ryan's proposal to partially
privatize the system by pro-
viding vouchers for buying
insurance plans from non-gov-
ernment vendors has a lot of
holes, but what it does have
is initiative, an effort to attack
the problem, a starting point
for serious discussion. The
Democrats, obviously realizing
a political advantage when they
see it, lon't want to play, fend-
ing off questions about where
they stand by pointing to a
committee assembled by Vice


President Joe Biden.
Great! That's what we need,
another committee, whose rec-
ommendations will ultimately
be ignored, just as were the
imperatives of a bipartisan blue
ribbon debt reduction panel
headed by former White House
staff chief Erskine Bowles and
former Sen. Alan Simpson.
The panel's leaders continue
to trumpet the need for painful
action to thwart ever-looming
fiscal disaster.
Is Barack Obama vulnerable?
Is his seeming lack of enthusi-
asm for offering specific solu-
tions contributing to reelection
concerns? It certainly would
seem so. Recent polls show that
he is in a dead heat with former
Massachusetts Governor Mitt
Romney, who is considered
the weakest frontrunner for
the GOP nomination in recent
memory. The, president appar-
ently has lost the bounce he
received from the slaying of
Osama bin Laden and is now
facing an electorate increasingly
upset about a flagging economy
and joblessness.
It is a long time before next
year's election. But one thing
is clear in Obama's declining
poll numbers. Almost three
years into his presidency, he no
longer has the luxury of blam-
ing his predecessor, George
W. Bush, for everything. The
mess, including high unemploy-
ment and a declining housing
market and a crushing debt,
now belongs to him, lock stock
and barrel. Come on, Mr.
President, take hold with bbth
hands and lead, even if it's with
your chin. It's time to stop the
demagoguery.

* Dan K. Thomasson is former
editor of Scripps Howard News
Service.


ANOTHER OPINION

The West finally finds its courage


When the his-
tory of the Arab
Spring is written,
the narrative
theme will be -
this: Fear was mastered.
The world has already wit-
nessed how the Arab people's
spontaneous desire for freedom
compelled them to cast out old
fears of a dictator's wrath and
demand civic ideals.
But the West is being forced
down a similar path, slowly dis-
solving its fear of the unknown
and trying to end its hand-wring-
ing anxiety over what might hap-
pen in the collapse of the Arab
world's old order of oligarchs.
By now, many of the West's
fears are well known: Will
Islamists gain power? Can Israel
survive? Will the oil stop flowing?


Might Iran gain influence? Will
tribal or religious violence erupt?
And most of all, is it too costly to
intervene?
These are all valid concerns,
worthy of debate. But they can
also be paralyzing unless
measured against the immense
benefit of bringing freedom,
democracy, hope, and respect for
life to the Middle East and North
Africa.
First in Tunisia and then in
Egypt and Libya, the West fal-
tered before finding its proper
role in assisting these democratic
revolutions. Now it is Syria that
calls out for courage.
Up to now, the West seemed
to worry more about a violent
breakdown of Syria a diverse *
country that is also a pivotal piece
in the Mideast's jigsaw puzzle of


power than in saving lives or
assisting the Syrians' aspirations.
This week, however, the
US and much of Europe were
emboldened to act They asked
the United Nations Security
Council to condemn the regime's
attacks on its people, even sug-
gesting that such actions amount
to crimes against humanity the
first step toward international
action, including tougher sanctions.
"We will be on the right side of
history if and when this comes
to a vote," said Susan Rice, US
ambassador to the UN. And, in a
reference to opposition by China
and Russia, she added: "If others
are unable to, or unwilling to,
then that will be their responsibil-
ity to bear."
The Christian Science Monitor


4A


Todd Wilson
twilson@lakecityreporter.com


Bundy case

always a

sensitive

subject

Anytime we run a
story that mentions
the Ted Bundy
case, we are very
mindful that, to our
readers, this is much more
than the sensational story of
the end of a notorious serial
killer.
To Lake City residents, this
is our personal tragedy, and
one that still touches a sensi-
tive nerve with any mention of
that terrible time in the early
spring and summer of 1978.
The cover story of the Life
section in today's issue is
about former Assistant State
AttOrney Bob Dekle's new
book chronicling the investiga-
tion, prosecution and execu-
tion e^Ted Bundy. Dekle, 30
year old at the time, was at a
um .e ,rossroads in criminal
law ry -- an up-and-com-
ing & cutor at the same
time bundy was shackled and
brought to justice for a first-
degree murder in Columbia
County.
Dekle led a team of dozens
of investigators in compiling
evidence and courtroom pro-
ceedings to organize the case,
that lasted six weeks, after" a-,.
change of venue placed the i *
trial in an Orlando courtroom.
The book covers the proce-
.dures that were part of each
step of the process. It's very
detailed, but reads quickly. I
think it summarizes the whole
Bundy trial story, at least from
the Florida perspective, better
than anything ever written on
the subject
"For the first 15-20 years
after it, I was averse to writ-
ing it," Dekle said. 'Too much
emotional baggage. Through
the years, it eased up and I
could tell the story."
Dekle's personality and
perspective certainly come
through as he fills in the
details of how he organized
everything from witness testi-
mony to dealing with the pres-
sure of a crushing media pres-
ence during proceedings.
In the end, the book, and
today's coverage remind-
ing us about this tragedy, is
a part of Lake City history.
I would ask all readers to
remember the victim, an
innocent 12-year-old Kimberly
Leach. Prosecuting, convict-
ing and executing Bundy was
about obtaining justice for the
Leach family.
Dekle's book is dedicated
'To the memory of Kimberly
Diane Leach."
Besides the portrait of Dekle
with his book, we debated on
how to illustrate this story in
the newspaper.
We chose not to sensational-
ize Bunty by printing any of
our archived photos of the
psychopath. We chose not to
focus on him.
Instead, we chose to run
a small portrait of Kimberly
Leach from our files.
We do this out of respect, so
that no one forgets the victim,
in hopes that our readers will
continue to keep the Leach
family, friends and classmates
- many of whom still live in
Lake City in their thoughts
and prayers.
If we offend or upset any-
one, I apologize, but we feel it
is important to preserve the
memory of this innocent crime
victim.
To focus elsewhere would
be the wrong thing to do.
* Todd Wilson is publisher of the
Lake City Reporter.














Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, JUNE 12, 2011


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


M To submit your Community
Calendar item, contact Antonia
Robinson at 754-0425 or by
e-mail at arobinson@
lakecityreporter.com.


Today
Assistance for those
with impairments
Vocational Rehabilitation
provides services for
eligible people who have
physical or mental impair-
ments that keep them
from working. These ser-
vice can help with medical
treatment, job placement
and training. Columbia
and Union Counties call
(386) 754-1675 for more
information.

Southside Summer
Camp
Registration is open
for Southside Summer
Camp. Only 80 spots are
available. Camp is $225
for nine weeks running
June 13-Aug. 12. The
camp is open to boys
and girls ages 7-14 and
is 7:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m.
Monday-Friday June
13-Aug. 3. Tiips include
Blue Springs, bowling,
swimming, skating, mov-
ies, Chuck E. Cheese
and more. Call Wayne
Jernigan at 758-5448 for
more information.

Summer Day Camp
registration
Summer Day Camp
Registration for the
Columbia County
Recreation Department
summer day camp pro-
gram is 8 a.m.-5 p.m.
at Richardson
Community Center. The
camp is open to boys
and girls ages 7-14 and
is 7:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m.
Monday-Friday June
13 -Aug. 3. The cost for
the eight-week camp is
$225 and will include a
variety of daily activities,
free,breakfast, lunch and
weekly field trips. Space
is limited to the first
60 participants Contact
Mario Coppock or Nicole
Smith at 754-7095 or 754-
7096 for more informa-
tion.

Summer program
registration
Summer program
Registration for the Girls
Club summer program '
is open. The cost for the
summer camp is $225.
Girls must be 6-13 to
attend. Call Terri Phillips
at (386) 719-5840 for more
information.


COURTESY PHOTO

Habitat for Humanity welcomes new board members
New board members were elected June 7 at the Habitat for Humanity Lake City/Columbia County Inc. board meeting. Front
row from left, James Giebeig, Rachelle Lilly, Vanessa George and Polly Tyler; back, Jay Poole, Jeremy Striebel, Jay Larick,
Linda Ivory and James Montgomery; not pictured are Alvin Baker and Andy Mangrum. Current board members for Habitat are:
Anne Carroll, Jerry Sue Fatzinger, treasurer Sally Huggins Treasurer, Sheila Burnham, Judy Conklin, Mary Melum and Debra
Robarts, Larry Lee, chairman George Burnham, Gary King, Carl Fatzinger, Mike Millikin, Robert Jordan, Ashley Staples,
Derriel Cribbs and Paul LeClair.


Monday

Florida Trail Association
meeting
The Suwannee
Chapter of the Florida
Trail Association
is meeting 7-9
p.m. Monday at the
Suwannee River Water
Management District
Office, 9225&CR!49,iz. :
Live Oak. The program
will feature a series of
photos, taken by various
members during the
2010-2011 hiking and
paddling season. Contact
Chapter Chair, Sylvia
Dunnam, 362-3256, dun-
nams@windstream.net,
or Irvin Chance, (386)
330-2424 for more infor-
mation.

Wood Carvers meeting
The Columbia County
Wood Carvers meet
every Monday at 1


p.m. at the LifeStyle
Enrichment Center..
Contact Ken Myer at 719-
9629 or Charles Kime at
755-4937 for more infor-
mation.

Republican Women's
meeting
Terry Marques,
Director of the Lake
City/Columbia County
iHumane-Society is the,
guest speaker at the
Columbia Federated
Republican Women's
monthly meeting 7 p.m.
Monday. A brown bag
dinner and social time
is 6:30 p.m. The meet-
ing location is at the
old Guardian ad Litem
yellow house on Duval
Street just east of the
First Baptist Church and
across from Advanced
Auto. Contact President
Gayle 'Cannon at (386)
303-2616 or gcannon@.
atlantic.net for more
information.


Women's Cancer
Support Group
The Women's Cancer
Support Group of Lake
City will meet at Baya-
Pharmacy East, 780 SE
Baya Drive from 5:30
to 6:30 p.m. Monday.
Call (386) 752-4198 or
(386)755-0522 for ipore
information.

Kindergarten
registration
Kindergarten regis-
traion is 7:30 a.m. until 5
p.m. Monday Thursday
at each elemetarty
school. Children must
be 5-years-old on or
before Sept. 1. The fol-
lowing items are needed
to register a child: Birth
Certificate, Immunization
Record, Record of
Physical Examination,
-which must have been
completed within a year
before school begins and
a Social Security Card if
available.


OBITUARIES


George William "Bill"
Solomon, Jr.
George William "Bill" Solo-
inon, Jr. passed away on June 3,
2011 at the Haven Hospice in
. Lake City, Florida. Bill was sur-
rounded by his loved ones when
he passed into God's hands.
Bill was born in Key West, Flor-
ida, on August 17, 1942, a 5th
generation Conch, son of George
and Nell Rose
Gwynn Solo-
mon. Bill was
raised in Key
West and grad-
uated with the
class of 1960
from Key West
High School
where he played baseball with
the state championship Conchs
during his high school years. Bill
has lived in Lake City, FL since
1961. Bill loved baseball and
coached various baseball teams
in Lake City for many years. He
worked in management at Aero
Corporation in Lake City and
with Occidental Patroleum in
White Springs. Bill was pre-
ceded in death by his parents,
George and Nell Rose Solomon,
sister JoLynn Solomon, and
brother-in-law David Walker.
He is survived by his loving and
devoted wife of 38 years, Gayle,
son Bryan, sisters Gloria Walker
of Lake City, Judith (Thomas)
Hayden of Upland, PA, Glenda
(Gene) Meyer of Chico, CA,
and brother Harold (Susan)
of Lake City, nieces Sheryll
Walker, Christine Hayden, Erin
Meyer-Smiley, Monica Meyer-
Podolsky, Rebah Solomon, and
nephew Thomas Hayden III.
He is also survived by a spe-
cial Christian friend George
Skinner who, for eight months,
helped him through his illness.


Bill was blessed with many
friends who will remember him
for his outgoing personality, his
contagious smile, and his gen-
erous nature. Bill never knew a
stranger. It is his unique sense of
humor and his spirit of love and
compassion for others that we re-
member as we celebrate his life.t
A memorial service will be held
at the Christian Heritage Church
at SR 47 and Hudson Lane,


Lake City, on Saturday, June
18, 2011 at 3:00 p.m., with Pas-
tor Chris Jones, officiating. In
lieu of flowers, contributions
in his memory may be made to,
the Haven Hospice in Lake City
or to your favorite charity. Fi-
nal arrangements by ICS
CREMATION & FUNER-
AL HOME, 386-752-3436.


Albert Hendricks
Albert Hendricks, 40, of Lake
City, Florida died Friday, June 10,
2011. Arrangements are incom-
plete. Gateway-Forest Lawn
Funeral Home. (386) 752-1954.

Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


Tuesday
Welcome to
Womanhood
Calling all middle and
high school girls for
Welcome to Womanhood
mentoring program 5-
8 p.m. Tuesday at 532
Marion Street Contact
Sandra Price at (386)
867-1601. Diinnier .
included. Transportation
caq be provided if contact-
ed one week in advance.

Homecooked meal
Payment for the
Columbia County Senior
Services Inc. Wednesday
homecooked meal is due
10 a.m. Tuesday at the
LifeStyle Enrichment
Center. The menu is
honey ham, collard
greens, macaroni and


cheese, corn bread and
chocolate delight. Call
(386) 755-0235.

Wednesday
Lanny & Dennie Jones
performance
Columbia County Senior
Services Inc. is hosting
a Lanny & Dennie Jones
performance 11-11:45 a.m.-
Wednesday at the LifeStyle
Enrichment Center. Call '
(386) 755-0235.

Thursday
Medicaid workshop
A free Medicaid work-
shop is 2 p.m. Thursday at
the LifeStyle Enrichment
Center. Teresa Byrd
Morgan of Morgan Law
Center for Estate &
Legacy Planning will expe4
the myths and expand
the opportunities with
Medicaid Planning. The
LEC is located at 628 S.E.
Allison Court Call Shana
Miller at (386) 755-1977 to.
RSVP or for more informa-
tion.

Camera Club meeting
The Branford Camera
Club is meeting 7 p.m.
Thursday at the Branford
Public library. The pro-
gram this month is pre-
sented by Skip Weigel, a
retired portrait photogra-
pher.



would like to
S sincerely thank

everyone for your
prayers, cards,
flowers,calls, food,
vsifattois andaW l
acts of kindness
during our time of
bereavement.
Your expressions
of love and
sympathy brought
comfort to all of
Sus. May GodBless
you all.


W Cady Drain and family wishes to thank #
the Lake City Masonic Lodge #27
and especially
V Charles Peeler
for organizing a medical
fundraiser on our U
behalf There ar no ,,. o
words to express our
gratitude towards all
Those who contributed g
their time and effort '.
0for us. It is overnhelming W
,the amount of caring










KatW yand ddie Norris
Srom our community. '- wit
cou Thank you one a nd all anniversary


















in ...me town ofKe et ,'pt.4,1956She
.. .
















service.* He retiredfrom the Dept. of Transportation
B BIRTH DAY/ANNIVERSARY








ith 49years ofservice T hy anved Eddie NoCity
., I "W ~ celebrated two very

4,. specda occasions with



hile stei S in luncheon at tmre
'in h sernoe CluW on May 219
-, r wh o the Cit of 130 great friends
r andfamil.H It iras Eddie's 80r birthday and taion






with 49 years of service. They have lived in Lake City
since their marriage. i
, .. ,, ,2 ,- .) i., =. l .f'


"Government Gone Wild"
The Tea Party Edition

Presented by GGW's Blaise Ingoglia


This informative and entertaining seminar will
give you a glimpse into the Federal Government's
out-of-control spending debt crisis!


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Tuesday,June 14,2011

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Lake City, FL
Info: (386) 935-0821


LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, JUNE 12, 2011


Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424











LAKE CITY REPORTER NATION SUNDAY, JUNE 12, 2011


Troubles ahead for Obama in Florida?


By BRENDAN FARRINGTON
Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE -
President Barack Obama
has problems in Florida
that he didn't have when
he won the prized state in
2008.
The state's economy
is worse than elsewhere.
Foreclosures are high.
Property values are low.
As president, Obama
could be blamed.
Voters' shifting atti-
tudes show the degree
to which the atmosphere
has changed since his
first campaign. Florida
Democrats made gains in
2008 with Obama on the
top of the ticket, but the
GOP won big two years
later.
All that explains why
Florida Democrats are
redoubling their efforts to
re-energize the rank and
file, including at the state
party's Jefferson-Jackson
dinner Saturday night.
And it's why Obama's
campaign team has been
on the ground training vol-
unteers 17 months before
the election and why the
president has been such
a frequent visitor to the
Sunshine State.
Over the past 10 months,
he has played mini-golf
and hit the waves in
Panama City Beach, eaten
a corned beef sandwich
at a Miami Beach deli,


visited Cape Canaveral,
addressed community col-
lege graduates in Miami
and headlined fundraisers
for Florida politicians.
He's set to return in
the coming week for three
fundraisers.
Florida offers 29 elec-
toral votes, more than
10 percent of the 270 he
needs to win a second
*term.
"The president can win
the White House re-elec-
tion without Florida, but
it's certainly easier if he
does win Florida," said
Steve Schale, Obama's
Florida director in 2008.
Florida's unemployment
rate was 10.8 percent in
April, or nearly 2 percent-
age points higher than
the national average. The
state has been hit harder
by foreclosures and loss
in property values than
most of the country.
After Florida Democrats
made gains in 2008, vot-
ers went quickly in the
opposite direction in 2010.
Republicans won the gov-
ernorship, a U.S. Senate
seat and three other
statewide offices, plus
huge majorities in the
Legislature.
Obama's job performance
rating in Florida has hovered
between 44 percent and 47 per-
cent, exceptfor a slightincrease
to 51 percent in a Quinnipiac
University poll after Osama bin
Laden's death.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
President Barack Obama, center, and Rep. Kendrick Meek, D-Fla., second from right, pose for photos at Jerry's Famous
Deli after a fundraiser for Florida Democrats, in this Aug. 18, 2010 file photo taken in Miami Beach. Obama has problems in
Florida that he didn't have when he won the pivotal swing state in 2008. The challenges show why Obama has been a fre-
quent visitor to the Sunshine State.


The sluggish economic
recovery is to blame.
"Things haven't got-
ten better," said Christian
Ferry, a Republican who
was Sen. John McCain's
deputy campaign man-
ager in the 2008 presi-
dential race. "And it cer-
tainly hasn't gotten bet-


ter in Florida. He's got
some big challenges to
explain how it is that his
economic messages, his
economic plan is improv-
ing the situation in Florida
for Floridians who are still
struggling."
For all the troubles,
Republicans acknowledge


it won't bq easy defeating
Obama.
"The pendulum swings so
fast now," said Tallahassee-
based GOP strategist David
Johnson. "You can't under-
estimate that guy. You do
so at your peril."
* Plus, he added, "he'll
have the powers to come


down here on that big blue
plane, and that big blue
plane excites people."
Democrats hope that the
GOP wave of 2010 is dissi-
pating. They're betting that
voters will be turned off
by the conservative agenda
pushed by Republicans in
Florida and Washington.


With Weiner unlikely to


run, NYC mayor race shifts


By SAMANTHA GROSS
Associated Press

NEW YORK -: There '
are many things that Rep.;
Anthony Weiner was never
shy about, and one was
telling people he hoped to
become New York City's'
mayor. *
But with a 2013 candidacy
all but out of the picture for
the embattled Democrat,
and with Mayor Michael
Bloomberg approaching the
halfway mark of his third and
final term, Weiner's Internet
sex scandal has reshaped the
political fight already sim-
mering beneath the surface
of New York City politics. It
has even led a celebrity, "30
Rock" actor Alec Baldwin, to
publicly toy with the idea of
jumping in to the game.
Weiner "combined appeal
to striving, middle-class peo-
ple in the outer boroughs
with the ideological left,"
.many of them wealthier
Manhattanites, said Hunter
College political science
professor Kenneth Sherrill.
'That's avery hard combina-
tion to pull off."
More .than half of city vot-
ers saying in a recent poll
that Weiner shouldn't make


Co
Todd Sampson
514 SW State Road 47
Lake City, FL 32025
(386) 487-3117


LENDER


a City Hall bid, leaving up
for grabs the broad swath of
votes that seemed destined
for the Queens congress-
man. ;; ,
A seven-term Demdcrat,
Weiner acknowledged this
week that he sent sexually
explicit messages over Twitter
to six women over the past
three years and then lying
about it He got married last
year; his wife is pregnant with
the couple's first child.
On Friday, Weiner acknowl-
edged that among those he'd
talked to on Twitter was a
17-year-old Delaware girl He
said the messages were "nei-
ther explicit nor indecent"
Police in Delaware inter-
viewed the girl and said she
didn't say anything about ille-
gal conduct.
It's debatable who could
most benefit from Weiner's
downfall. Sherrill argues that
one of those with the most to
gain is Manhattan Borough
President Scott Stringer,
who runs the risk of fad-
ing into the background if
the race becomes crowded
with white male candidates.
Now he could gain support-
ers from the ranks of Weiner
fans who loved the congress-
man for his very public


)me See or Cal
-OR-


and very loud opposition
to Republicans on national
issues. Stringer, the profes-
sor said, can be similarly
aggressive and authentic.
"You see him, you hear
him, you say, 'That's a New
Yorker,' as you do with
Weiner," Sherrill said.
City Public Advocate Bill
de Blasio and former city
Comptroller Bill Thompson,
the 2009 Democratic nomi-
nee for mayor, could also
win support from those
same progressives.
Many of Weiner's middle-
class supporters living out-,
side of Manhattan could
shift to current Comptroller
John Liu, a union ally who
like Weiner is based in
Queens, and who enjoys
strong support among the
Asian community there,
Sherrill said.' De Blasio,
too, is closely allied with
the city's unions and lives
in Brooklyn, where Weiner
grew up and has many sup-
porters. Meanwhile, City
Council Speaker Christine
Quinn's work on housing
issues and her own middle-
class background could also
win her some of those outer-
borough votes.
Weiner's scandalmay have


I...
Blake Cannon
514 SW State Road 47
Lake City, FL 32025
(386) 487-3169


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prompted one politician into
action. Though Thompson
had said he intended to run
again, he long remained the
only presumptive candidate
who hadn't started furidrais-
ing. But on Friday, he for-
mally registered with the city
Campaign Finance Board as
a mayoral candidate.
The historic nature of her
as-yet-undeclared campaign
- if elected, she would be
the first openly gay and the
first female mayor could
further help her as she rais-
es more. Roughly one-third
of her campaign donations
have come from outside of
the city.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Rep. Anthony Weiner, D-N.Y., carries his laundry to a laun-
*dromat hear his home in the Queens borough of New York
Saturday. The 46-year-old congressman acknowledged
Friday that he had online contact with a 17-year-old girl from
Delaware but said there was nothing inappropriate.


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Family, activist among 11 killed in Iraq attacks


By BUSHRA JUHI
Associated Press
BAGHDAD Twin car
bombings in the northern
Iraq, and separate attacks
on the homes of a school-
teacher and a human rights
activist left at least 11 peo-
ple dead on Saturday, gov-
ernment officials said.
Violence is raking Iraq as
the Shiite-led government
and other political factions
are debating a request
for some American forces
to remain in the country
beyond the Dec. 31 dead-
line for all U.S. troops to
withdraw after more than
eight years.
While violence is well
below what it had been dur-
ing intense Shiite-Sunni sec-
tarian fighting in 2006 and
2007, militants are again
stepping up deadly attacks.
That has led to concerns
about what happens when
the 47,000 remaining U.S.
troops are withdrawn.
Police and hospital offi-
cials in the northern city of
Mosul said two car bombs
exploded in quick succes-
sion, killing six people.
At least one of the bombs
seemed aimed at a police
patrol. Mosul is Iraq's third


largest city, 225 miles (360
kilometers) northwest of
Baghdad. It has been one
of the most stubborn insur-
gent strongholds.
Abdul-Rahim al-Shimmari,
a member of the provincial
council, said 52 people were
wounded in the blast
The force of the explosion
shattered the windows and
mirrors in a nearby barber
shop, and caused the false
ceiling to collapse.
"Fortunately, none of us
were wounded, but one of
my' customers, whose hair
was half cut, ran away out of
fear," said the owner, Mahir
al-Abbawi.
Security forces opened
fire randomly in all direc-,
tions after the first. explo-
sion, he said.
"After about four minutes,
we saw a ball of fire com-
ing out of another car that
was about 10 meters away
from the first explosion," he
added. Al-Abbawi said he
could see people bleeding
and women and children
screaming and crying.
In another attack, eight
gunmen stormed the
house of a schoolteacher
overnight and killed his
three sons and daughter,
said Mohammed al-Asi,


ASSOCIATED PRESS
People inspect the scene of two car bombs in-Mosul, 225 miles (360 kilometers) northwest of Baghdad, Iraq Saturday. Police
and hospital officials in Mosul said two car bombs exploded in quick succession, killing and wounding number of people. At
least one of the bombs seemed aimed at a police patrol.


the spokesman for central
Salahuddin province.
He said the gunmen
were in a minibus and fled
after the midnight attack in
a village outside of Tikrit.
Authorities were investi-


gating whether the killings
were an act of insurgents
or tribal conflict, he added.
Tikrit is Saddam
Hussein's hometown and is
located 80 miles (130 kilo-
meters) north of Baghdad.


Authorities in a suburb in
western Baghdad, police in
Abu Ghraib found the body
of a human rights activist,
Namir Ryhan, inside his
home, a police and hospital
official said. Both officials


said assailants beheaded
the activist.
There was no immedi-
ate claim of responsibility;
Sunni militants, including
al-Qaida, have been known
to behead their victims.


Clinton.warns


Africa of 'new


colonialism'


By MATTHEW LEE
Associated Press
DAR ES SALAAM,
Tanzania U.S. Secretary
of State Hillary Rodham
.Clinton on Saturday warned
of a creeping "new colonial-
ism" in Africa from foreign
investors and governments
interested only in extracting
natural resources to enrich
'themselves.
African leaders must
ensure that foreign projects
are sustainable and benefit
all their citizens, not only
elites, she said.
Clinton did not identify
-any perceived culprits, but
a day earlier she had urged
scrutiny of China's large
investments and business
interests in Africa so that
the African people are not
taken advantage of. She
said U.S. diplomats in Africa
qbad been asked to provide
.Washington with assess-
ments of Chinese projects
in the countries to which
they are assigned.
S "We saw that during
colonial times, it is easy to
c 6ome in, take out natural
resources, pay off leaders
and leave," Clinton said
-Saturday in the Zambian
capital of Lusaka before
flying to Tanzania. "And
when you leave, you don't
leave much behind for the
,people who are. there. We
.don't want to see a new
colonialism in Africa."
Although she didn't
mention China by name,
officials traveling with
Clinton said she wanted to
stress that African coun-
tries should hold Chinese
investors to the same stan-
"dards that they apply to
Americans and Europeans.
Clinton said the United
States didn't want any foreign
governments or investors
,to fail in Africa, but wanted


to make sure that they give
back to local communities.
'We want them to do well,
but also we want them to do
good," she said. ,
"We don't want them to
undermine good gover-
nance, we. don't want them
to basically deal with just
the top elites, and frankly
too often pay for their con-
cessions or their opportuni-
ties to invest"
Clinton said that
American development aid
and -public works projects
come with good gover-
nance conditions and that
the Obama administration
is interested in Africa and its
people. Their success, she
said, is in everyone's long-
term interest
Her comments, in a
pan-African television
interview in Lusaka, came
immediately after she pre-
sided over the handover
of a U.S. built pediatric
hospital in Lusaka to the
Zambian government.

JUSTARRIVED
in time for
FATHER'S DAY


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MUGS


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LAKE CITY
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Sale Ends June 15,2011 and is Limited to Quantities on Hand


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THIS STORE IS NOT PARTICIPATING IN CURRENT SEARS CIRCULARS. I


LAKE CITY REPORTER WORLD SUNDAY, JUNE 12, 2011


7A


Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424














LAKE CITY REPORTER WEATHER SUNDAY, JUNE 12, 2011


THE WEATHER
I F'.


CHANCE CHANCE CHANCE CHANCE
STORMS STORMS J!-STORMS AT-STORMS



v HI 0 LO H, LO H1I 5LO H195 LO
HIiO, -..


v ~


- Z", J J -


Tadiahassee*
96/73 ,.

*PainaaoCity
91/75


SVAdosta
98/72 Jacksonville
Lake City, 91, 70
95/ 70
Gaiesde Daytona Beacd
94/69 89J71
Ocala *
"J 13 a


Tampa.
91/76


FL Myer
91.74


City
Cape Canaveral
Daytona Beach
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers .
Gainesville
Jacksonville


& Key West
Orlando Cape Canaveral Key West
93/72 87/72 Lake City
Miami
Naples
West Palm Beach Ocala
88 74 0 Orlando
FL Lauderdale Panama City
s 89177 0 Pensacola
Naples Tallahassee
88, 75 Miami Tampa


89 76
SKey West*
88,'79

A. f -.


Valdosta
W. Palm Beach


Monday
90.';4
94 74
90/78/
92/74/
94/70/p
95/71/
87/79/s
95/70/p
91/77/
89/74/
94/71/p
95 74,
94 78
95 77 p
98 72
92 79
98 69 p
90 75


SUN 1- ,,".'.
Sunrise today 6:28 a.m. ,
Sunset today 8:32 p.m.
Sunrise tom. 6:28 a.m. EXl: : , ;,
Sunset tom. 8:33 p.m. 10 mites to Imn
SToday'
MOON ultra-vioiet <. At'-.l 1:f
Moonrise today 5:30 p.m. radialon nsk. a l.
Moonset today 3:31 a.m. ior [he area on h
a scale rrorr 0 i
Moonrise tom. 6:37 p.m. a scale o
Moonset tom. 4:18 a.m. .,r

lir i .:lw "' eather.com

June June July July 4 Forecasts, data and
15 23 1 8 : ^ graphics 20i1 Weather
Full Last New First ij, i Central LP. Madison. Wis.


NATIONAL FORECAST: A low pressure system will generate showers and thunderstorms
throughout much of the Eastern Seaboard today. High pressure will build in behind this sys-
tem, bringing dry and pleasant weather to the Great Lakes. Meanwhile, showers and thun-
derstorms will be possible from Arkansas and Missouri into the northern Plains and northern
Rockies.


ISOLATED
T-STORMS



HI93 LO





y Tuesday
1 90 74,I ,
1 94 7J D
't 90/79. p.;
It 94/75 pC-
c 94/71 pC
It 95/72, pc
h 87/79 ',
c 95/71, pi:
't 91/78 I
't 91/76, pc
c 95/70. p:
t 96 74 p,;',
t 92 7. p.:
.: 95 78 pC
-. *1_ '


y9 71 p,.'
90 78 p:
96'71 pf
91 76 ii


S.. . .


TEMPERATURES
High Saturday
Low Saturday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Saturday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


94
67
90
68
100 in 1907
52 in 1960


0.00"
0.14"
14.25"
2.27"
19.52"


2.~













at, ,*flwa


, www.weatherpubllsher.com


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Occluded
Fmnt


YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL EXTREMES

Saturday Today
CITY. HI/Lo/Pcp. HI/Lo/W CITY
Albany NY 65/57/1.80 74/55/t Des M
Albuquerque 83/59/0 93/62/s Detro
Anchorage 57/45/0 60/48/c El Pa
Atlanta 88/72/0 92/69/t Falrba
Baltimore 86/71/0 89/64/t Green
Billings 70/47/0 71/51/t Hartf
Birmingham 95/70/0 95/72/t Honol
Bismarck 66/34/0 73/58/t Houst
Bolse 70/48/0 74/52/pc Indlan
Boston 64/57/.19 65/56/t' Jacks
Buffalo 76/59/0 67/51/sh Jacks
Charleston SC 89/65/0 90/72/t Kansa
Charleston WV 87/67/.20 80/56/pc Las V
Charlotte 91/70/0 90/66/t Little
Cheyenne 72/45/0 79/48/pc Los A
Chicago 63/54/.02 64/54/s Mem|
Cincinnati 86/66/1.11, 76/55/s Miam
Cleveland 83/64/0 64/57/pc Minn
Columbia SC 92/71/0 93/71/t Mobil
Dallas 95/76/0 100/75/s New
Daytona Beach 88/69/0 89/71/t New'
Denver 80/53/0 87/55/s Oklah


I


High: 101,Wink.Texas Low: 280,Trickee, Calif.


Saturday Today


lolnes i
it
so
inks
asboro
ord
ulu
ton
napolls
on MS
onville
is City,
egas
Rock
ngeles
phls
eapolls
e'
Orleans
York
oma City


HI/Lo/Pcp.
71/60/0
81/59/0
96/68/0
62/50/.07
91/67/0
67/59/.51
80/73/.01
93/71/0
80/66/.10
93/70/.01
88/65/.04
77/59/0
91/75/0
95/72/0
63/59/0
95/75/0
91/76/0
65/52/.02
93/67/0
94/75/0
71/61/.52
90/68/.21


HI/Lo/W
75/60/t
69/54/s
100/73/pc
72/49/pc
92/64/t
75/57/t
89/75/pc
98/76/s
74/56/s
98/73/t
91/70/t
76/69/t
93/72/s
93/72/pc
64/58/pc
92/74/pc
89/76/t,
73/58/pc
95/73/t
93/76/t
79/61/t
100/73/s


S 9
Saturday Today Saturday Today saturday TOday I


CITY
Acapulco
Amsterdam
Athens
Auckland
Beijing
Berlin
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Geneva
Havana
Helsinki
Hong Kong
Kingston


Saturday
HI/Lo/Pcpt
.86/79/0
61 48 0
82./73 0
63, 55.
,-84/66/0
.73/50/0
S70/54/0
91/72/0
68/55/0
86/72/0
82/57/0
95/79/0
86/81/0


Today
HI/Lo/W
92/81Yt
68/55/pc
80/70/s
62/55/sh
92/70/s
77/52/pc
65/42/pc
88/74/s
70/55/c
88/73/c
81/57/pc
87/82/t
86/79/pc


CITY
La Paz
Uma
London
Madrid
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Nairobi
Nassau
New Delhi
Oslo
Panama
Paris


Saturday
HI/Lo/Pcp.
59721/0
70/66/0
64 '45.0
82/54/0
72/52/0
70/59/0
79/55/0
81/61/0
90/79/0
106/81/0
59/54/0
81/77/0
64/48.0


Today
HI/Lo/W
58/29/s
70/65/pc
.59/55/sh
82/63/s
80/53/t
68/52/sh
72/55/pc
79/62/pc
87/76/c
105/78/s
63/45/pc
91/77/t
68,-5.55 ,.


KEYTO CONDMONS: c-cloudy, dr-drizzle, f-i=ar i-fo.: r-: ..' .rij, cloudy, r-rain, s-sunny,
sh-showers, so-Su.c.. =tdnUn lrrms 5-r.*/,d


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Saturday Today


CITY
Omaha
Orlando
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland ME
Portland OR
Raleigh
Rapid City
Reno
Richmond
Sacramento
St. Louis
Salt Lake City
San Antonio
San Diego
San Francisco
Seattle
Spokane
Tampa
Tucson
Washington


HI/Lo/Pcp.
73/55/0
93/71/0
83/72/0
95/74/0
79/63/.11
62/54/.10
64/55/0
94/70/0
70/45/0
73/50/0
91/68/0
71/53/0
82/69/.04
74/55/0
94/75/0
65/61/0
58/52/0
61/52/0
64/52/.01
93/74/0
96/63/0
91/76/0


HI/Lo/W'
76/63/t,
93/72/t
87/63/t
102/73/s
73/51/pc ;
57/50/sh -
72/55/pc
94/65/t
79/55/t -
79/55/s
91/64/t
81/56/s ;
83/64/pc
78/54/pc
100/72/s
65/56/pc
65/55/pc
68/52/pc i'
71/49/pc
91/76/t
99/67/s
90/65/t


CITY
Rio
Rome
St. Thomas VI
San Juan PR
Santiago
Seoul
Singapore
Sydney
Tel Aviv
Tokyo
Toronto
Vienna
Warsaw


Saturday
HI/Lo/Pcp.
75/64/0
75/63/0
88/81/0
89/73/2.06
70/37/0
81/63/0
88/75/0
59/54/0
82/73/0
73/70/0
68/61/0
73/50/0
72/54/0


Today]
HI/Lo/W
74/63/s
81/64/s
87/80/t
85/78/t
62/36/s
80/62/pc
90/76/t
63/50/sh
91/70/s
75/68/c
68/54/pc
72/57/pc
75/55/pc


I-.


.... Membership is open to everyone in Alachua, Clay and Columbia counties2
U+ oW *t:r L CAMPUS LOANS OFFERd r F ,' NEV'. LOIN.ri OLY r .IAN 4OT BE r:C'.M8rjED ,'.'-TTH ,r, ,.TIHiER OFFC R I (ri.3, approval required. Your rate may be higher based on creditworthiness, vehicle and term of
|IC U Aloan. For exa [ a' 1r30.000 loan ith no mor.e n 31own 2 I2 r .a m.:.rir A. s.uld *.qu ,'l' .1 rr .ir, ,-,, r,,,- r. ,,L t .t "- a..o a ,-ral D,1 ,m ri .31 r 1645.20, finance charge of $1,408.36, for a total of payments of $31,589.06. The amount
a^- i ,, l P,:', ,._finar,.ed -5 -30.105 70 the APR -s 2 37-z'. ,< = Orlrj. ri le Z:. ,:. $" ,- .au ..fl i,',,,:.,,67,S, i. id ar, A eil waive the $15 new member fee.


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428


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Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@lakecityreportercom


Lake City Reporter





SPORTS


Sunday. lune 12.201 I


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


BRIEFS
YOUTH VOUEYBALL
Final sign-up for
Lady Tiger camp
Final registration for
the third annual Future
Lady Tiger Volleyball
Camp is 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Monday in the office
at Columbia High. The
camp is 9 a.m. to noon
June 27-28 in the school
gym. The camp is for
girls entering the sixth
through 12th grades,
with instruction by
members of the CHS
staff and returning
varsity players. Cost of
$50 includes camp
T-shirt.
For details, call Casie
McCallister at 365-3158.
SU-ER CAMP
County sign-up
ends Monday
Final registration for
the Columbia Cofnty
Recreation Department's
Summer Camp Program
is Monday. Cost for the
camp is $225, which
includes breakfast and
lunch, four field trips and
six mini camps.
For details, call Nicole
Smith at 754-7095.


Alligator permits
end on Monday
The second application
phase for alligator
harvest ends at
11:59 p.m. Monday.
Permits (ages 18 and
older by Aug. 15) are on
a first come-first served
basis and limited to one
permit. Those who pur-
chased a permit in phase
one may not apply. Apply
at county tax collector's
office, license agent or
www.fl. wildlifelicense. com.
For details, visit
MyFWC. corn/Alligator.
SWIMMING
Lessons sign-up
open this week
Youth and adult
swimming lessons are
offered at the Columbia
County Aquatic Complex.
Classes meet for two
weeks and six daily times
are offered, plus there
are two daily mom and
tot classes. The next
session is June 20-30.
Cost is $50 per person.
Registration is at the
pool (755-8195) from
5-7 p.m. Wednesday and
all day Thursday and
Friday.
YOUTH FOOTBALL
Jackson camp
in High Springs
Fort White High
football coach Demetric
Jackson is conducting a
football camp for
elementary and middle
school children at First
Baptist Church in High
Springs on June 24-25.
Cost of the camp is $40,
with a $5 discount for
each additional sibling.
For details, call
Jackson at 365-3304.
ADULT BASKETBALL
Men's games
at Richardson
Open basketball games
for men 18 and older are
played at Richardson
Community Center from
5-8 p.m. on Sundays.
Cost is $3 per session.
For details, call John
Henry Young Jr. at
623-4817.


. From staff reports


Terry's trophy tattoo


quite a premonition


Mavericks guard
one win away
from real trophy.
By JAIME ARON
Associated Press
DALLAS Jason Terry
put his faith in these Dallas
Mavericks in ink. On the
inside of his right biceps.
With one more win-, he'll
get to keep his tattoo of
the NBA's championship
trophy plus have the real
thing. ,


Terry had his title hopes
injected into his arm in
October, during aget-togeth-
er at teammate DeShawn
Stevenson's house. At the
start of the playoffs, Terry
vowed to have it removed
if the Mavericks didn't win
it all.
Thanks largely to: him
regaining his shooting
touch in that inked-up arm,
Terry and the Mavs flew to.
Miami on Friday closer to
a title than ever before in
franchise history. It could
belong to them as soon as


Sunday night.
"We put ourselves in
the situation we wanted,
to go back there with this
opportunity," center Tyson
Chandler said. "But we
can't get too ahead of our-
selves. We can't get caught
up in all the hoopla."
In their previous 30
seasons, the closest the
Mavericks came to being
champs was in 2006, when
they held a 2-0 series lead.
over the Heat and a big, late
TERRY continued on 3B


next


Columbia High's Timniy Jernigan (8) leads a defensive charge into the backfield during the kickoff classic
Fort White High on Aug. 27.


'Walked on'


Mississippi State
wins on home
run in 9th inning.
Associated Press

GAINESVILLE The
original plan was for Nick
Vickerson to bunt. It's a
good thing Mississippi
State coach John Cohen
reconsidered.
The senior second base-
man hammered the first
pitch he saw over the fench


in left-center field for a two-'
run homer in the bottom of
the ninth inning Saturday,
giving the Bulldogs a 4-3
victory over Florida and
tying up their best-of-three
NCAA Super Regional.
"He had a look in his eye
like, 'I definitely want to
swing it here,'" Cohen said.
"And I'm a big believer in
letting a player make that
decision. 'Do you want to
bunt here? Do you want to
GATORS continued on 3B


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Dallas' Jason Terry celebrates after the Mavericks won
Game 5 of the NBA Finals, 112-103, in Dallas on Thursday
to take a 3-2 series lead.


step


CHS's Je i *gan
leaves for Florida
State on Thursday.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com
Later this week, Timmy
Jernigan will have a new
place to lace up his cleats.
The Parade All-American
defensive tackle from
Columbia High will official-
*ly makte-theran5ition from
Tiger to Seminole.
Jernigan checks in on
Thursday, when he will
begin his career at Florida
State. During his final
mimputes in Lake City, he's
spending the majority of his
time preparing for what's
next.
"I'm just working out and
running," he said. "I'm try-
ing to get bigger, stronger
and faster."
His goal when he goes in
is to earn the respect of the
Seminoles' coaching staff
and his teammates.
"I'm getting ready for the
great competition I'll see,"
Jernigan said. "I'll be fight-
ing for playing time, and 'I
feel the only person that can
stop me is me."
Jernigan wasn't trying
to sound cocky. He's just
showing a belief in his abili-
ties.
"If I don't run, the only
person I'm hurting is
myself," Jernigan said. "I(
do what I'm suppose to dI,
I feel like I'll play. If I don't.I
only have myself to blame;"
He will have a little mo'e
than 10 days to become accli-
mated with the Tallahasse
environment before begip-
ning classes.
"I'll be in the dorm, bt
class starts on June 271"
Jernigan said. "I think I'i
going to major in business
SFILE PHOTO management or sports
game at
JERNIGAN continued on 3B


Seminoles
trail, 6-2
From staff reports

Texas A&M rallied
with four runs in the sev-
enth inning to lead host
Florida State, 6-2, in the
ninth inning at press time
on Saturday.
The teams will play
game two in the best-of-3
super regional series at
4 p.m. today.
The Seminoles took a
2-1 lead on a home run by
Jayce Boyd in the sixth
inning.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Mississippi State's Nick Vickerson (21) is hugged by
teammates after he hit a game-winning home run against
Florida in in Gainesville on Saturday.


The













LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, JUNE 12, 2011


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
AUTO RACING
6 a.m.
SPEED 24 Hours of Le Mans, finish
of race, at Le Mans, France
I p.m.
FOX Formula One, Canadian
Grand Prix, at Montreal
TNT NASCAR. Sprint Cup, Pocono
500, at Long Pond, Pa.
COLLEGE BASEBALL
I p.m. ,
ESPN NCAA Division I playoffs,
super regionals, game 3, Mississippi St.
at Florida
4 p.m.
ESPN NCAA Division I playoffs,
super regionals, game 3, North Carolina
vs. Stanford or Oregon St. at Vanderbilt
(if necessary)
7 p.m.
ESPN2 NCAA Division I playoffs,
super regionals, game 3, Arizona St. at
Texas or Oregon St. at Vanderbilt (if
necessary)
10 p.m.
ESPN2 NCAA Division I playoffs,
super regionals, game 3, or Oregon St. at
Vanderbilt (if necessary)
CYCLING
2 p.m.
VERSUS Criterium du Dauphine,
final stage, Pontcharra to La Toussuire,
France (same-day tape)
4 p.m.
VERSUS Tour de Suisse, stage 2,
Airolo to Crans-Montana, Switzerland
(same-day tape)
GOLF
8 a.m.
TGC European PGA Tour, Italian
Open, final round, at Turin, Italy
I p.m.
TGC Champions Tour, Greater
Hickory Classic, final round, at Conover,
N.C.
3 p.m.
CBS PGA Tour, St.Jude Classic, final
round, at Memphis,Tenn.
7 p.m.
TGC LPGA, State Farm Classic,
final round, at Springfield, IlI. (same-day
tape)
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
I p.m.
TBS Cleveland at N.Y.Yankees
1:30 p.m.
WGN Chicago Cubs at
Philadelphia
8 p.m.
ESPN Cincinnati at San Francisco
MOTORSPORTS
I p.m.
SPEED MotoGP Moto2, British
Grand Prix, at Silverstone, England (same-
day tape)
2 p.m.
SPEED MotoGP World
Championship, British Grand Prix, at
Silverstone, England (same-day tape)
3 p.m.
SPEED FIM World Superbike, at
San Marino (same-day tape)
NBA BASKETBALL
8 p.m.
ABC Playoffs, finals, game 6, Dallas
at Miami

Monday
COLLEGE BASEBALL
I p.m.
ESPN2 NCAA Division I playoffs,
super regionals, game 3, teams TBD (if
necessary)
4 p.m.
ESPN2 NCAA Division I playoffs,
super regionals, game 3, teams TBD (if
necessary)
7 p.m.
ESPN2 NCAA Division I playoffs,
super regionals, game 3, teams TBD (if
necessary)
CYCLING
'7 p.m.
VERSUS Tour de Suisse, stage 3,
Brig-Gils to Grindelwald, Switzerland
(same-day tape)
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
7 p.m.
ESPN Cleveland at N.Y.Yankees
NHL HOCKEY
8 p.m.
NBC Playoffs, finals, game 6,
Vancouver at Boston

Tuesday
CYCUNG
7 p.m.
VERSUS Tour de Suisse, stage
4, Grindelwald to Huttwil, Switzerland
(same-day tape)
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
7 p.m.
MLB Regional coverage, Boston at
Tampa Bay or Toronto at N.Y.Yankees
o10p.m.
MLB Regional coverage,Cincinnati at
LA. Dodgers or Kansas City at Oakland
NBA BASKETBALL
9 p.m.
ABC Playoffs, finals, game 7, Dallas
at Miami (if necessary)
WNBA BASKETBALL
7 p.m.
ESPN2 -Tulsa at Indiana

BASEBALL

AL standings


East Division
W L
Boston 38 26 .
NewYork 35 27 .
Tampa Bay 33 30 .
Toronto 32 33 .
Baltimore 30 31 .
Central Division
W L
Cleveland 34 28 .
Detroit 34 29 .
Chicago 31 35 .4
Kansas City 28 36 .4
Minnesota '24 39 .
West Division
W L
Texas 36 29 .
Seattle 33 31 .
Los Angeles 30 35 .
Oakland 28 37 .
Friday's Games
N.Y.Yankees 11, Cleveland 7
Seattle 3, Detroit 2
Baltimore 7,Tampa Bay 0


Boston 5,Toronto I
Oakland 7, Chicago White Sox 5
Texas 9, Minnesota 3
Kansas City 4, LA.Angels 2
Saturday's Games
N.Y.Yankees 4, Cleveland 0
Boston 16,Toronto 4
Texas at Minnesota (n)
Seattle at Detroit (n)
Tampa Bay at Baltimore (n)
Oaldand at Chicago White Sox (n)
Kansas City at LA.Angels (n)
Today'sGames
Cleveland (Tomlin 7-3) at N.Y.Yankees
(F.Garcia 4-5), I :05 p.m.
Seattle (EHernandez 6-5) at Detroit
(Porcello 6-3), 1:05 p.m.
Boston (Lester 8-2) at Toronto
(Drabek 4-4), 107 p.m.
Tampa Bay (W.Davis 4-5) at Baltimore
(Matusz 1-0), 1:35 p.m.
Oakland (Moscoso 2-2) at Chicago
White Sox (Humber 5-3), 2:10 p.m.
Texas (M.Harrison 5-5) at Minnesota
(Urlano 3-6),2:10 p.m.
Kansas City (Mazzaro 0-1) at LA
Angels (Chatwood. 3-3), 3:35 p.m.
Monday's Games
Cleveland at N.Y.Yankees, 7:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Detroit, 7:05 p.m.
LAAngels at Seattle, 10:10 p.m.

NL standings

East Division
W L Pct GB
Philadelphia 38 26 .594 -
Atlanta 36 28 .563 2
Florida 32 30 .516 5
New York 31 32 .492 6'A
Washington 28 36 .438 10
Central Division


St. Louis
Milwaukee
Cincinnati
Pittsburgh
Chicago
Houston


W L
38 27
36 28
33 32
30 32
25 37
24 40
West Division


W L Pct GB
San Francisco 36 28 .563 -
Arizona 34 30 .531 2
Colorado 31 32 .492 4%
Los Angeles 29 36 .446 7%
San Diego 29 36 .446 7'h
Friday's Games
Philadelphia 7, Chicago Cubs 5
N.Y. Mets 8, Pittsburgh I
Florida 6,Arizona 4
Atlanta II, Houston 4
Milwaukee 8, St. Louis 0
Colorado 6, LA Dodgers 5
Washington 2,San Diego I
San Francisco 3, Cincinnati 2
Saturday's Games
Chicago Cubs at Philadelphia (n)
Cincinnati at San Francisco (n)
Atlanta at Houston (n)
"N.Y. Mets at Pittsburgh (n)
Arizona at Florida (n)
St. Louis at Milwaukee (n)
LA. Dodgers at Colorado (n)
Washington at San Diego (n)
Today's Games
Arizona (D.Hudson 6-5) at Florida
(Hand 0-1), 1:10 p.m.
Chicago Cubs (D.Davis 0-5) at
Philadelphia (Oswalt 3-4), 1:35 p.m.
N.Y. Mets (Capuano 4-6) at Pittsburgh
(Correia 8-4), 1:35' p.m.
Atlanta (Hanson 7-4) at Houston
(Myers 2-5),2:05 p.m..
St. Louis (Westbrook 6-3) at
Milwaukee (Marcum 6-2), 2.10 p.m.
LA Dodgers (R.De La Rosa 2-0) at
Colorado (jimenez 1-6), 3:10 p.m.
Washington (Zimmermann 4-6) at San
Diego (Stauffer 2-4), 4:05 p.m.
Cincinnati (Volquez 4-2) at San
Francisco (.Sanchez 4-4), 8:05 p.m.
Monday's Games
N.Y. Mets at Pittsburgh, 7:05 p.m.
Arizona at Florida; 7:10. p.m. "
Atlanta at Houston, 8:05 p.m.
Milwaukee at Chicago Cubs, 8:05 p.m.
San Diego at Colorado, 8:40 p.m.
Cincinnati at LA. Dodgers, 10:10 p.m.

NCAA super regionals
(Best-of-3)
At Gainesville
Friday
Florida I I, Mississippi State I
Saturday
Mississippi State 4, Florida 3
Today
Florida (49-17) vs. Mississippi State
(38-24), I p.m.

At Chapel Hill, N.C.
Friday
North Carolina 5, Stanford 2
Saturday
North Carolina vs. Stanford (n)
Today
North Carolina vs. Stanford,;4 p.m. (if
necessary)

At Nashville,Tenn.
Friday
Vanderbllt 11I,Oregon State I
Saturday
Vanderbilt vs. Oregon State (n)
Today
Vanderbilt vs. Oregon State, 4,7 or 10
p.m. (if necessary)

At Austin,Texas
Friday
Arizona State 3,Texas I
Saturday
Texas vs. Arizona State (n)
Today
Texas vs. Arizona State, 7 p.m. (if
necessary)

AtTallahassee
Saturday
Florida State vs.TexasA&M (n)
Today
Florida State vs.Texas A&MI 4 p.m.
Monday
Florida State vs.Texas A&M, I, 4 or 7
p.m. (if necessary)

At Charlottesville,Va.
Saturday
Virginia 6, UC Irvine 0
Today
Virginia vs. UC Irvine, I p.m.
Monday
Virginia vs. UC Irvine, 1, 4 or 7 p.m.
(if necessary)

At Columbia, S.C.
Saturday
Connecticut vs. South Carolina (n)
Today


Connecticut vs. South Carolina, 7 p.m.
Monday
Connecticut vs. South Carolina, 1.4 or
7 p.m. (if necessary)

At Santa Clara, Calif.
Saturday
Dallas Baptist vs. California (n)
Today
Dallas Baptist vs. California, 10 p.m.
Monday
Dallas Baptist vs. California, 4 or 7 p.m.
(if necessary)

BASKETBALL

NBA Finals

Miami vs. Dallas
Miami 92, Dallas 84
Dallas 95, Miami 93
Miami 88, Dallas 86
Dallas 86, Miami 83
Dallas 112, Miami 103
Today
Dallas at Miami, 8 p.m.

WNBA schedule

Friday's Games
NewYork 81, Indiana 80
San Antonio 93,Tulsa 62
Chicago 78, Connecticut 75
Los Angeles 98, Phoenix 84
Saturday's Games
Indiana at NewYork (n)
Chicago atWashington (n)
Atlanta at San Antonio (n)
Today's Games
Tulsa at Connecticut, 3 p.m.

AUTO RACING

Race week

NASCAR
Pocono 500
Site: Long Pond, Pa.
Schedule: Today, race, I p.m. (TNT,
noon-5:30 p.m.).
Track: Pocono Raceway (triangle, 2.5
miles),'
Race distance: 500 miles, 200 laps.
FORMULA ONE
Canadian Grand Prix
Schedule: Today, race, I p.m. (FOX,
1-3 p.m.).
Track- Circuit Gilles Villeneuve (road
course, 2.71 miles).
Race distance: 189.7 miles; 70 laps.

Pocono 500 qualifying

At Pocono Raceway
Long Pond, Pa.
Saturday qualifying; race today
(Car number in parentheses)
I. (22)- Kurt Busch, Dodge, 171.579.
2. (27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet,
171.422.
3. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 171.35.
4. (I I) Denny Hamlin,Toyota, 171.174.
5. (78) Regan Smith, Chevrolet,
171.164.-
6. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 171.057.
7. (9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 170.836.
8. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet,
170.532.
9. (00) David Reutimann, Toyota,
170.348.
10. (5) Mark Martin, Chevrolet, 170.2.
I I. (6) 'David Ragan, Ford, 170.177.
12. (33) Clint Bowyer, Chevrolet,
170.126.
13. (I) Jarnle McMurray, Chevrolet,
169.907.
14. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet,
169:872.
15. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet,
169.856.
16.(42)Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet,
169.702.
17. (4) Kasey Kahne,Toyota, 169.67.
18. (47) Bobby Labonte, Toyota,
169.607.
19. (20) Joey Logano,Toyota, 169.52.
20. (2) Brad Keselowski, Dodge,
169.501.
21. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet,
169.447.
22. (46) J.J.Yeley, Chevrolet, 169.444.
23. (83) Brian Vickers,Toyota, 169.44.
24. (71) Andy Lally, Ford, 169.37.
25. (51) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet,
169.307.
26. (38) Sam Hornish Jr., Ford,
169.278.
27. (17) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 169.224.
28. (43) A J AIIlmendinger, Ford,
169.176.
29. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota,
169.17.
30. (34) David Gilliland, Ford, 169.119.
31. (56) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota,
169.113.
132. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet,
169.084.
33. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet,
168.932. -
34.(18) Kyle Busch,Toyota, 168.89.
35. (13) Casey Mears,Toyota, 168.666.
36. (66) Michael McDowell, Toyota,.
168.218,.
37.(16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 167.773.
38. (37) Tony Raines, Ford, 167.395.
39. (81) Scott Riggs, Chevrolet,
167.264.
40. (36) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet,
167.056.
41. (32) Mike Bliss, Ford, 166.868.
42. (7) Scott Wimmer, Dodge, owner
points.
43.(50)T.J.Bell,Toyota, 166.633.
Failed to Qualify
44: (60) Mike Skinner, Toyota, 164.902.

HOCKEY

Stanley Cup

Vancouver 3, Boston 2
Friday
Vancouver I, Boston 0


Monday
Vancouver at Boston, 8 p.m.

Boston 0 0 0 0
Vancouver 0 0 I I
First Period-None.
Second Period-None.
Third Period-1,Vancouver, Lapierre 2
(Bieksa,Torres),.4:35.
Shots on Goal-Boston 12-9-10-31.
Vancouver 6-12-7-25.
Goalies-Boston, Thomas. Vancouver,
Luongo.A-18,860 (18,810).T-2:33.


Kurt Busch wins




pole at Pocono


By DAN GELSTON
Associated Press

LONG POND, Pa. -
Kurt Busch's reward for
slapping the wall at practice
was a backup No. 22 Dodge
that was better than his
regular ride.
For that, Busch had
plenty of people to thank,
starting with his team at
Penske Racing.
"'Just an honest thank
you to my guys," Busch
said.
It's been quite a reversal
for Busch a month after
he launched into a foul-
mouthed tirade against his
race team at Richmond.
He made it it two straight
poles on Saturday, turning
a fast lap of 171.579 mph at
Pocono Raceway.
Busch damaged his
No. 22 Dodge in Friday's
practice and was forced to a
backup car. He also spun at
practice last week a sort
of bad luck-good luck habit
He wound up first last week
at Kansas Speedway, then
topped Jeff Gordon in one
of the final qualifying runs
at Pocono.
The two-time winner at
the 2'-mile track, Busch
became the first pole win-
ner under the new Sprint
Cup qualifying rules.
Qualifying was deter-
mined based on practice
speeds --from slowest to
fastest with those times
now coming from the first
practice session. The quali-
fying order also will'no. lon-
ger be separated between
teams that are locked into
the race and teams that
must qualify on speed.
Busch was impressed
that Penske could produce
a pole-winning backup car.
"That's something you
really wouldn't hear about
back in the day," he said. "It
would be, 'All right, you'll
have to struggle during the
weekend.'"
Busch, who is sixth in
points, finished ninth last
week at "Kansas for his
second straight top-10 fin-
ish. After some early strug-
gles caused concern and
ill feelings at Penske, the


ACROSS

1 Garden hopper
5 Look at
8 Motel amenity
11 Syrup brand
12 Footed vases
14 Weep
15 Fruit drink
17 Literary compi-
lation
18 Decorous
19 Reliable
21 Shoe preserver
23 Tex-Mex snack
24 Wobbled, as a
rocket
27 Swerve
29 - creek
30 Navigator's
guide
34 Bluegrass
State
37 Mdse. bars
38 Feed the kitty
39 Busybody
41 Wisecrack
43 Self-satisfied
45 European capital


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Kurt Busch watches the last few cars qualify for today's
NASCAR Sprint Cup Series auto race at Pocono in
Long Pond, Pa. Busch qualified on the pole on Saturday


with a speed of 171.579 mph.

drivers are getting their
programs turned around.
Busch's teammate, Brad
Keselowski, won the pole
two races ago at Charlotte
and took the checkered
flag last week at Kansas.
Richmond was certainly
the boiling point for Busch
- and looks like the turn-
ing point.
He blamed Penske
Racing's shortcomings
on technical director
Tom German over a radio
frequency available to the
public. German has since
left the team.
"I took the apple tree and
sh6ok it as hard as I could
at Richmond," Busch said.
"We saw which apples fell
and which ones were still
there. It was honestly, 'Hey,
do we want to make the
Chase? We've got to make
some changes. Heading
into the direction we were,
we were just scraping those
top 10s. That's not going to
get it done when you want
to win the championship.'"
Busch often doesn't react
well when his team fails to
make the needed adjust-
ments to get his car caught


47 Pond growth
50 Want-ad letters
51 Audience
54 Maude por-
trayer
55 Pentathlon
event
56 Special-inter-
est grps.
57 Tunnel blaster
58 Stockholm car-
rier
59 Hired muscle

DOWN

1 Marciano stat
2 Galley slaves'
need
3 Trapped like -

4 Give
5 Type of jacket
6 Distinct period
7 Winds down
8 Newton or
Asimov
9 Owned apart-
ment


up with the leaders. He total-
ly lost it at Richmond when
he ran into Ryan Newman's
spinning race car.
The 2004 champion was
in a great mood on Saturday
- one of the perks that
come with starting first.
Paul Menard joined him
on the front row. Gordon,
Denny Hamlin and Regan
Smith rounded out the top
five.
The new qualifying rules
meant most of NASCAR's
heavy hitters hit the track
at the end. Hamlin held the
pole, then Gordon, before
Busch came along and
snagged it for good. Points
leader Carl Edwards went
last and qualified sixth.
"That is a pole-winning
car right there," Edwards
said. "It's nice to be dis-
appointed about a sixth-
place qualifying position. It
should be a really good run
for us."
Sam Hornish Jr., a for-
mer Penske driver, starts
26th in his first Cup race of
the season. Dale Earnhardt
Jr. starts 21st a week after
a second-place finish at
Kansas.


Answer to Previous Puzzle

MOW MAPS TEAL



A -B I
DO ABEL YAWL
CO AVERAGE CRAB
ERECTS WOOLS





SA IEPSTDATE
LPEE TERN ANI
BA I AWRY JAK


N I I
COTANA ILED
SARI POSTDATE
ALMIA PLEA V ON
PEEL T-ERN ANY


10 Auction site
13 Medium-sized
sofa
16 Surround
20 Snakes lack
them


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


22 Calls forth
24 Hearty laugh
25 Goodall sub-
ject
26 Hardly rosy
28 England's Isle
of -
30 Interest amt.
31 Winery cask
32 Unusually
bright
33 Electronics
mfr.
35 Follow, as a
gumshoe
36 Clean one's
desk
39 Festive log
40 Holiday quaff
41 Pageant win-
ner
42 "Das Boot"
craft (hyph.)
44 Hubbies
45 Mortgage
46 Pinches off
48 Space preced-
er
49 Proof word
52 Deep water
53 Worker's no.


2011, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS.


SCOREBOARD


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421


I L-














Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421


LAKE CITY REPORTER


SPORTS


SUNDAY, JUNE 12, 2011


GATORS: Play at 1 p.m.
Continued From Page 1B -


swing it? How are you see-
ing this thing?' You have to
let your players make good
decisions."
The two teams will meet
again today with the winner
going to the College World
Series.
"I was just trying to hit a
ball hard and thankfully it
went out of the park," said
Vickerson, who had struck
out twice in his three previ-
ous at-bats. "I didn't know if
I got it up enough. I knew
it wasn't getting caught I
didn't know if it was going
out or not
Jarrod Parks led off
the ninth with a single
off Florida reliever Nick
Maronde.
Gators coach Kevin
O'Sullivan went to the bull-
pen and Steven Rodriguez,
another left-hander, who


struck out Vickerson both
times he had faced him this
season.
This time, Vickerson
came out on top.
O'Sullivan said he consid-
ered leaving in Maronde,
who had a 1.66 ERA and
two saves, but went with
Rodriguez, who was 3-2
with a 1.44 ERA.
The Gators had built a
2-0 lead on Nolan Fontana's
sacrifice fly in the third and
Josh Adams' solo home run
in the sixth inning.
The Bulldogs (38-24) tied
the game with two runs
in the seventh on back-
to-back RBI singles by
Cody Freeman and Brent
Brownlee, but Florida
(49-17) regained the lead
in the eighth on Tyler
Thompson's triple to deep
center field.


COURTESY PHOTO

Fort White softball closing ceremonies
Fort White Girls Softball Association's closing ceremonies for its spring league was May 31. Front row T-ball players
(from left) are Dallas McDaniel, Dylan Holderfield, Mikah McCoy, Tristan. Johnson, Kaeryn Tally, Brenton Morris,
Gellisa Pruinski, Madison Bishop, Kathryn Morris, Taylor Holloway, Tierra Fleming and Christian Lando. Second row 8-under
players (from left) are Jennifer Allen, Miranda Showalter, Danica Harding, Trista Sommers, Alexis Johnston, Cason Jolly
and Kaylee Waxier. Third row 10-under players (from left) are Kacey Carter, Gisselle Lando, Delayna Feagin, Kali Corrao,
Cassidy Bruce, Aubrey Callum, Cheyenne Hodges, Emily Noah, Kierra Carver and Gabby Marinko. Fourth row 12-under.
players (from left) are Kathryn Sheddan, Shelby DuBose, Sypress Moore, Sarah Williams, Chelby Romine, Sydney Oadrain,
Jessica Burns, Madison Hewes, Kalynn Spradley, Cierra Arganbright and Jamie Tolkinnen. Back row 14-under players
(from left) are Kayla Redwine, Shania Pelham, Gabby McIntosh, Kateri Allen, Ashley Chesney, Shea Chesney,
Brianna Selgas, Caitlyn Bruce, Bella Valdes, Mariah Stearman, Krystal Griffin and Amber Weston.



JERNIGAN: Has texted roommate Nick Waisome
Continued From Page 1B


management"
And Jernigan doesn't
plan to have much free
time. -
"I've already looked at
the schedule and there's


a lot of school and foot-
ball," Jernigan said. "If you.
don't have your mind right,.
there's a lot of chances to
get in trouble. Days are
going to run from 7 in the


morning to 9 at night. It's
going to be a grind for
me."
Jernigan is set to room
with fellow freshman Nick
Waisome,


'We texted a little when
recruiting was still going
on," he said. "He enrolled
early and said that it is what
they said it was. There's
nothing like it."


------m------m---m--- ------


V G A L L I C A L T- R- Z.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Dallas Mavericks forward Dirk Nowitzki (41) shoots over
Miami Heat's Joel Anthony (50) during Game 5 of the
NBA Finals in Dallas on Thursday.

TERRY: Game 6 tonight


'Continued From Page 1B
lead in Game 3.
Dallas ended up blowing
it in six games. The Mavs
had to watch the Heat cel-
Sebrate on their own home
floor. So the chance to close
it out in Game 6, in Miami,
is a delicious bit of payback
to Terry and Dirk Nowitzki,
the only holdovers.
"Game 6," Terry said,
savoring the notion. "We
must go out, play aggres-
sively and take advantage of
our opportunity."
The Mavs have done that
all postseason.
Every time they've got-
ten three wins a series, the
fourth has followed right
away. They are 3-0 in knock-
out chances.'
Only one was on the
road, but it was in one of the
NBA's niost hostile arenas,
in Portland. Dallas already
has tamed the Miami crowd,
handing the Heat their first
home loss of the postse'ason
in Game 2.
"It's going to be hard to
go in there in Miami and
win, but we know we are
capable of doing it," for-
ward Shawn Marion said.
"Ifs going to be crazy. We
know what's at stake here.
It's going to be exciting."
The Mavs are keeping
their excitement level under


wraps.
They've been in anti-
celebration mode since
Game 2 of the second
round, when Nowitzki was
upset about how giddy guys
got over a second straight
victory in Los Angeles. He's
remained stoic regardless
of the circumstances, even
walking out of the Western
Conference title celebration
before it was over.
On Thursday night, fol-
lowing the most significant
win in franchise history,
with fans going bonkers,
all Nowitzki did was wearily
raise his arms.
"I really can't enjqy it
much," he said, still snif-
fling a bit because of a sinus
infection that gripped him
in Game 4, but now is as
much of a nuisance as the
splint on his left middle fin-
ger, which isn't much.
"In the playoffs, for some
reason, you're always on
the edge," he said. "You
don't sleep much. You think
basketball 24-7."
The Mavs have needed
fourth-quarter rallies in
each of their three wins.
But they keep getting small-
er, from 12 to nine to four.
In the last game, Dallas had
the luxury of playing from
ahead most of the night.


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
I RPEIC


HYORIP TEA








3322 W US Hwy 90
386-755-2502


SOIL


Updated apartments w/tile
floors & fresh paint.
Excellent location
From '425 + sec dep
Michelle (386) 752-9626

1Eagle

Properties
(386) 752-9626
SCa[ for info

T*tORi$


Allstate.


MARY T. SLAY
Agency Owner
3861 755-6801
677 SW Bascom Noris Dr B101
Lake City FL 32025
L',I r H- lIth I Auto I H.I,,T. I F.1,,b,t.. H,-,I
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rose.




Find all 18 of the 'Rose'words hidden in the
word search above. Words can be found in the
banners on the ads shown here. Complete the
puzzle and return itto the Lake City Reporter,
180 E. Duval Street, Lake City, FL by Wednes-
day, June 15 5:00pm, for your chance t' wini *

Deadline is Wednesday, June 15, 2011

Lake City Reporter
lakecityreporter.com CURRL NT ..c.n.


ENTRY FORM

Name:
Phone Number:


Address:


Subscriber:


I -- -Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
S -- -suggested by the above cartoon.

Print your answer here: L I I I
(Answers tomorrow)
Saturday's I Jumbles: DECAY HABIT CELERY BEHIND
Answer: Having one helped the tightrope walker stay
in shape BALANCED DIET


I-I Yes II No


CENTWfoub'


FOR .iM ll


I

j. Scholarships
,. Available
'I Research basgd
instruction in a caring
I atmosphere.

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I www newgenerationschool orq
'FORTLANP















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Syour active Mjliiiir,-f i i.1
I i ,

























pir-i Juni'i *N 261
I ................- - - - - -

Lake City



your 3clve Mh i .r
for your e ve ,'i I ,, ,_)a r .

Reservati,:ns re ,- i -

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Story ideas?

Robert Bridges
Editor
754-0428
rbridges@iakecityreporter.com

Sunday, June 12, 2011


Lake City Reporter





BUSINESS


www.lakecityreporter.com


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
s statewide
unemployment
, tinue to climb,
SJ Floridians are
using all the resources
available to them to find
employment opportunities.
Local residents with
disabilities may also be
able to utilize Vocational
Rehabilitation as they
attempt to find and retain
unemployment
Vocational Rehabilitation
is a statewide organization
that provides services for
persons with disabilities the
skills they need to capitalize
on employment opportuni-
ties.
"We provide a variety
of services depending on
what the person with dis-
abilities needs to become
employed," said Rachel
Smith, Vocational Services
communications direc-
tor. "Each Vocational
Rehabilitation customer
meets with his/her coun-
selor to complete an indi-
vidual plan for employment
After that, they decide what
services are needed for the
customer to become gain-
fully employed in their cho-
sen field."
The total number of
Vocational Rehabilitation
customers receiving ser-


vices statewide as of May
30 has been listed at 38,622
customers.
The Vocational
Rehabilitation office in Lake
City, 1389 U.S. Highway 90
West, provides services fr
residents with disabilities
in Columbia, Union, Dixie
and Gilchrist counties. The
office provides services for
more than 500 people with
disabilities annually.
-During fiscal year 2009-
10, Vocational Rehabilitation
helped 3,874 people with
significant disabilities
become employed; the total
average monthly caseload
was 45,912 and the aver-
age monthly caseload for
Vocational Rehabilitation
counselors was 121.
In 1920, the first public
rehabilitation program pro-.
viding training, prostheses
and placement services for,
persons with disabilities
.began with the passing of'
the Smith-Fess Act
Vocational Rehabilitation
began providing services
for Florida residents with
disabilities in 1925 and the
program was state funded
in 1926.
Smith said its important
to have an agency such as
Vocational Rehabilitation
because it provides valuable
services to the community.
"Helping people become
employed benefits the
entire community," Smith


TONY BRflr/Lake City Reporter
Helen H. Davis (right), an intake specialist with Vocational
Rehabilitation, shows a client brochures which list the ser-
vices offered through Vocational Rehabilitation.


said. "The employer ben-
efits from getting a well-
trained and skilled worker.
The person with a disabil-
ity benefits because they
become independent and
part of the working world,
and the community benefits
because the person with
disabilities becomes a tax-
payer and he/she is able to
purchase items frorii other
businesses in the commu-
nity.
"Many employers are


hesitant to hire a person
with disabilities because
they think that it will be
expensive to accommodate
them," Smith continued.
"Actually, most accom-
modations cost less than
$500 with many of them
being free and Vocational
Rehabilitation will, pay for
any accommodations that
are needed. Employers may
also receive tax benefits for
hiring people with disabili-"
ties."


Germany, ECB


in standoff


over Greek aid


By DAVID McHUGH
AP Business Writer
FRANKFURT, Germany
- Europe's biggest finan-
cial powers have worked
themselves into a standoff
over how to haul Greece
out of its debt ditch, with
the European Central
Bank publicly opposing
Germany's demand to
make Greece's private
creditors share the bur-
den.
The impasse which
pits the region's top mon-
etary authority against its
economic powerhouse and
pankroller- has unnerved
markets as each side seems
to have dug into positions
that will be difficult to rec-
oncile.
Someone will have to
back down by the end
of the month, when offi-
cials will need to agree
on more aid for Greece
to keep it afloat. Officials
say Greece's funding
needs 'to be secured a
year in advance for the
International Monetary
fund to pay its part of
Greece's next loan instiall-
ment, due June 29.
Because Greece isr still
short of money despite
last year's eurQ110 billion
rescue package, it will


need more loans.
But Germany's parlia-
ment on Friday backed
demands from Finance
Minister Wolfgang
Schaeuble that Greece
only get more rescue loans
. if investors agree to get
repaid seven years late on
their Greek bonds. That
would give the country
more time to get a handle
on its euro340 billion in
debt.
"The situation in Greece
and therefore in Europe
as a" whole is serious,"
Schaeuble told deputies.
He warned that without
agreement on how to keep
aid flowing to Greece there
was "an acute danger of
Greece being unable to
pay its debts, with grave
consequences for the euro
area."
Germany's demand
on bondholders is a key
condition to rally support
among the public and
lawmakers in Chancellor
Angela Merkel's coalition,
some of whom are rest-
less at the-idea of giving
Greece more money.
The vote is a gesture of
support .for Schaeuble as
he gets ready for a June
20 meeting of finance
ministers on more aid for
Greece.


PP BmI 4Winu 1. -*wa1umm I -- Wa I
NICELY REMODELED 2BR/1.5BA CLEAN & READY! 3BR/2BA single- WOW IN WELLBORNI 4BR/2BA mfg
brick home or office in city limits wide mfg home built in 2006 on home w/2,280 SqFt built In 2001
on large corner lot; separate 320 .97-acre south of Ft. White on has fireplace, garden tub, dining
SqFt bldg built in 1965 (could paved road w/lots of trees; close room all on 5 ACRES only $74,900
be mother-in-law suite) S82,900 to area rivers & ONLY S59,000 #78317
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this remodeled 1,742 SqFt home
w/fenced backyard on Tribble
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countertops, A/C & more ONLY
$79,900 #78340


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Fully furnished 3BR/2BA double-
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in pristine conditions Country
living at its best Priced to sell at
$99,900 #78345


BELOW APPRAISED VALUE! 5,250 EXECUTIVE UNITS on GOLF QUAIL HEIGHTS GOLF COURSE!
SqFt commercial bldg on 2.24 COURSE! 2-story concrete block Nice 2-story townhomes; 2 units
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James Avenue plus large inven- units in great shape all on acre each unit ONLY $175,000 #78323
tory included $650,000 #78338 ONLY $395,000 #78342
.5O O IN F .OR.: .--..


HE AND/OR SORTSA ROPERIES
. FAST... THESE DO NOT LAST,





DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY, INC.
Land Development Investments Residential---
2806 West US Highway 90, Suite 101
Lake City, Florida, 32055
AjRM (386) 755-5110 www.danielcrapps.com 0


This June, Mercantile Bank customers can
expect even more from their bank.


Soon, we'll be open earlier and open later. We'll serve you at
over 1,250 locations and thousands of TD Bank ATMs from Maine
to Florida. You'll have access to Live Customer Service 24/7.
And that's just the beginning this June, Mercantile Bank will
become TD Bank, America's Most Convenient Bank.


SAf
c
IT^SOUND


MERCANTILE BANK


800.238.8681


www.bankmercantile.com


.-.F-. C D M-, r;le Bai'i; J. r.J ,,J,, T[ 5.3. B.. I T[, B' .l:.u :, rr. .:,.-,.. f,,, ". T.,...',:-Dominion Bank. Used with permission. For
J ji -1..al T:, r ...j: Ic.. F r, r, .i. ,, c ..' ,....... ,. a ..]..1 TC. .'k r, .i r.rpF ,... 1.: . . .. .-.. ,1i j Credit Ratings are not recommendations to
purchase, sell, or hold a financial obligation inasmuch as they do not comment on market price or suitability for a particular investor. Ratings are subject to revision
or withdrawal at any time by the rating organization.


Local agency helps people with


disabilities gain employment


Section C


More Hours.


N'tore Locations.


'-Nlorc Scrvice.


More To Come.


I
i











LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS SUNDAY, JUNE 12, 2011


OK to Be LinkedOut
Q Should I be regretting missing
out on LinkedIn's hot initial
public offering last month? -
A. W., San Antonio
ANot at all. Linkedln is a great
eminder of why it's often best
to watch hot IPOs from the side-
lines. Here's how it all worked:
The shares were ultimately
priced at $45 by the Wall Street
underwriters Morgan Stanley and
Merrill Lynch, who pocketed
around $25 million for their ser-
vices. The. newly minted shares
were distributed by the underwrit-
ers, and typically, these shares go
to wealthy, favored clients not
to small investors such as us.
The shares commenced trading,
though, at $83, giving initial inves-
tors an immediate $38-per-share
gain. Unfavored investors who
rushed in quickly snagged shares at
anywhere from $83 to $122 on the
stock's first day.
That might make you lick your
chops, but the share price started
falling later in the day, as many
people sold to lock in gains or avoid
losses. After all, many of those folks
weren't long-term investors in the
company, but short-term speculators.
The shares closed that day around
$94, and were recently below $80.
Many people lost money on the
stock, and even the company itself
might have done better. Since the
7.84 million shares it sold could
have been priced higher, it left
gobs of money on the table -much
of which went to the underwriters'
clients.
The best PO strategy isto give
a new stock time to settle down and
the company time to establish a
track record.

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Bonds sold by the U.S. govern-
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corporate bonds (sometimes '
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Companies perceived as lower in
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Most corporate bonds have a par
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Over the long run, though, bonds
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Dow falls below 12K; stocks

approach 6th down week


DANIEL WAGNER
AP Business Writer

The Dow Jones indus-
trial average below 12,000
on Friday, the first time
the Dow has dropped
-below that mark since
March. Fears that the
global economic recovery
has stalled also weighed
on other indexes.
The Dow fell 142 points,
or 1.2 percent, to 11.981 in
afternoon trading.
The Standard & Poor's'
500 index fell 15, or 1.1
percent, to 1,274. The
Nasdaq dropped 3q0, or
1.1 percent, at 2,654. The
Nasdaq has now given up
nearly all its gains for the
year. The Dow is still up
3.5 percent for 2011 and
the S&P 1.4 percent.
The losses were broad;
wvith declines across all 10"
of the S&P 500's industry
groups. All but two of the,
30 companies in the Dow
also fell.
The stock market is on
track for its sixth .straight
weekly loss, which wouiild
be the longest weekly los-
ing streak since the fall
of 2002. If the losses con-
tinue into next week, it
would be the first time
in 10 years that th6 mar-
ket suffered a seven-week
stretch of losses,. The last
such stretch began in May
2001 as the dot-corn bub-
ble deflated..
Weak economic news
has dampened hopes for
a speedy recovery, send-
ing stocks down. Traders
worry that weaker hiring,
sluggish industrial output,
and a moribund housing
market are reversing a
bull market that has lifted
the Dow 20 percent over
the past year.
The Dow has fallen 4.6
percent since the begin-
ning of June.
Shares had bounced


,. :ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this photo taken May 31, 2011, trader Gregory Rowe, right,
works on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange. Global
growth concerns-weighed on stocks again Friday while the
euro was hurf by a sharp disagreement in Europe over. how
to deal with Greece's debt crisis


back Thursday, breaking
six straight days of losses
after U.S. exports unex-
pectedly hit a record in
April. By Friday morning,
those gains had evapo-
rated.
Analysts said the pull-
back reflects traders' inse-
curity about the pace of
the recovery. But several
said it does not signal a
longer-term retreat.
Jack Ablin, chief invest-
ment officer, at Harris
Private Bank, said strong
corporate earnings and
widespread economic
growth, however slow,
should lead to more gains
in the coming months.
""Anyone selling shares
today has to be pricing
in a recession," he says.
That's something he does


not believe is warranted.
He also noted that trading
volume was light on a hot,
summer Friday as many
traders ended their week
early. Lighter volume can
make trading more vola-
tile.
Ablin suggested that
Friday's losses were
driven by the Federal
Reserve's unloading mil-
lions in risky mortgage
bonds onto the market.
As big banks buy those
securities, they are off-
setting the risk by dump-
ing assets such as stocks
and high-yield corporate
bonds.
Karyn Cavanaugh,
vice president and mar-
ket strategist with ING

DOW continued on 5C


In latest attack, hackers


steal Citibank card data


KELVIN CHAN and PALLAVI
GOGOI
AP Business Writers

NEW YORK About
200,000 Citibank credit
card customers in North
America have had their
names, account numbers
and email addresses sto-
len by hackers who broke
into Citi's bnline account
.site.
Citigroup Inc. said it
discovered that account
information for about 1
percent of its credit card
customers had been
viewed by hackers. Citi
has more than 21 million
credit card customers in
North America, according
to its 2010 annual report
The New York-based
bank, which discovered
the problem during rou-
tine monitoring, didn't
say exactly how many
accounts were breached.
Citi said it was contacting
those customers.
The bank said hack-
ets weren't able to gain
access to social security
numbers, birth dates, card
expiration dates or card
security codes. That kind
of information often leads
to identity theft, where
cyber criminals empty
out bank accounts and
apply for multiple credit
cards. That can debilitate
the finances and credit
of victims. Citi customers
could still be vulnerable
other problems. Details
about their bank accounts
and financial information
linked to them could be
acquired using the email
information and account
numbers hackers stole.
Federal regulators
have taken notice and are
asking banks to improve
security.
"Both banks and regula-
tors must remain vigilant,"


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Nov. 23, 2010 file photo, the corporate logo for
Citigroup is shown, in New York. Citigroup Inc. said
Thursday that hackers accessed the credit card informa-
tion of tens of thousands of its North American customers.


said Sheila Bair, chair
of the Federal Deposit
Insurance Corporation.
She said federal agencies,
including the FDIC, are
developing new rules to
push banks to enhance
online account access.
The Citi data breach
was the latest in a series
of recent high-profile data
attacks against a number
of major firms.
On June 1, Google
Inc. said that the personal
Gmail accounts of several
hundred people, including
senior U.S. government
officials, military person-
nel and political activists,
had been breached.
On May 30, broad-
caster PBS confirmed
that hackers cracked the
network's website and
posted a phony story
claiming dead rapper
Tupac Shakur was alive
in New Zealand.
On May 28, defense
contractor Lockheed
Martin Corp. said it had
detected a "significant
and tenacious attack"
against its computer net-
works. The company said
it took swift and deliber-


ate actions to protect the
network and the systems
remain secure.
In April, media and
electronics company
Sony Corp.'s PlayStation
Network was shut down
in April after a massive
security breach that
affected more than 100
million online accounts.
Also in April, hack-
ers penetrated a network
operated by a data mar-
keting firm Epsilon. The
company handles email
communications for com-
panies like Best Buy Co.
and Target Corp.
The number of data
breaches in the last two
months sets a "high water
mark," said John Ottman,
CEO of Application
Security Inc., a New York-
based firm that specializ-
es in securing databases,
the big repositories com-
panies use to organize
account information and
other data.
"Attackers have real-
ized that most organiza-
tions have not properly
protected databases,"

HACKERS continued on 5C


Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424


* *










LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS SUNDAY, JUNE 12, 2011


By SAMANTHA BOMKAMP
AP Airlines Writer
NEW YORK Being
bumped from a flight this
summer may not be worth
the travel voucher or cash
refund you get in return.
Planes are booked full.
So the next available flight
could be hours or even
days away. And if you're
stuck overnight, the hotel
is often on your own
dime.
Bumping happens
because most big airlines
regularly oversell their
flights to account for no-
shows usually about
one in ten passengers. It's
often prevalent around
the busy Christmas or
Thanksgiving holidays.
But more travelers could
f be denied boarding this
summer than a year ago
because traffic is up while
the airlines are limiting
the number of available
seats.
The Fourth of July
weekend could be espe-
cially bad because of the
number of travelers tak-
ing to the skies, says Anne
Banas, executive editor of
smartertravel.com.
If you involuntarily
lose your seat, the airline
has to give you cash or a
voucher for $400 or $800
depending on how long
you're delayed from fly-
ing. The amounts rise to
$650 to $1,300 staring in
August.
But even the new
amounts may not be
enough to make up for
vacation days lost, espe-
cially if you've booked a
cruise or a nonrefundable
hotel room.
Here are some tips for


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this April 16, 2010 photo, Continental Airlines's Vivian Shepard helps a customer at a ticket
counter at George Bush Intercontinental Airport,-in Houston. Being bumped from a flight this
summer may not be worth the travel voucher or cash refund you get in return.


staying on your original
flight:
No seat? No go.
If the booking site
doesn't let you select a
seat on your chosen flight,
don't book it. The, flight is
probably oversold.
Check in early
and beware the "seat
request."
Gate agents often rank
passengers based on their


check-in times, so be sure
to check in a full day ahead
online. Those without a
seat assignment will see
the words "seat request."
If this happens, check
in with an agent at the
gate once you get to the
airport. Seeing your face
before other passengers
will help you avoid getting
pushed off the flight.
Know your airline.


Airlines vary widely
.in how many passengers
they bump. You have the
best shot at staying on
the plane with JetBlue,
Hawaiian and Delta.
JetBlue doesn't oversell
its flights. It bumped just
26 of 6 million passengers
in the first three months
of the year. Regional car-
BUMPED continued on 5C


Budget deficit

moves closer

to $1 trillion


By MARTIN CRUTSINGER
AP Economics Writer
WASHINGTON-The
federal budget deficit is
on pace to break the $1
trillion mark for a third
straight year. Record
deficits are putting pres-
sure on Congress and the
Obama administration
to come up with a plan
to rein in government
spending.
Already, the deficit
through the first eight
months of this budget
year is $927.4 billion,
according to the latest
report from the Treasury
Department released
Friday.
Three years ago that
would have ranked as
- the highest ever for a full
year. Instead, this year's
deficit will likely exceed
last year's $1.29 trillion
imbalance and nearly
match the $1.41 trillion
record reached in 2009.
The budget year ends on
Sept. 30.
For May, the month-
ly deficit was $57.6 bil-
lion. That compared to
$135.9 billion deficit for
the same month last
year. But much of that
improvement came from
a $45 billion write down
in the estimated cost of
the financial bailout pro-
gram.
The latest Treasury
report does show that
riore people are work-
ing and paying taxes
this budget year, a posi,
tive sign. Government
revenues have totaled
$1.48 trillion for the eight
months ended in May,
a 10.3 percent increase
over the same stretch


in the Wrevious budget
year.
Still, government out-
lays totaled $2.41 trillion
through May. And one of
the fastest growing parts
of the budget is the inter-
est on the national debt.
That rose 13.6 percent to
total $165.3 billion.
The government is
at risk of defaulting on
those debt payments.
That would likely happen
if Congress fails to raise
the nation's $14.3 trillion
borrowing limit by early
August. A default on the
debt would rattle markets
and send interest rates
soaring, making mort-
gages and other consum-
er loans more expensive.
The increase in the
debt limit is being held
up by Republicans, who
want President Barack
Obama and Democrats to
first agree to deep spend-
ing cuts equal in size.
A Washington Post-
ABC News poll showed
that a large majority of
Americans believe the
country could suffer seri-
ous harm if Congress
fails to broaden the
government's borrow-
ing authority. But barely
half of those polled said
they support such an
increase.
The White House
and Democrats want to
trim the deficit through
spending cuts and also
by ending tax cuts for the
wealthy, which were first
passed when President
George W. Bush was in
office and later extended
by Obama.
Republicans reject
DEFICIT continued on 5C


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UNDER


Being bumped could be


a bummer this summer


Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424


::MONDAY,


JU Y 4TH I


-i

















LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS SUNDAY, JUNE 12, 2011


Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424


THE WEEK IN REVIEW oTHE WEEK IN REVIEW *THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW *THE WEEK IN REVIEW




SThe Week in Review


3 NYSE 3 Amex Nasdaq
8,016.39 -205.76 2,319.24 -60.90 2,643.73 -89.05


Gainers ($2 or morp)
Name Last Chg %Chg
Temopelnld 29.66 +7.97 +36.7
Gramrcy 2.77 +.58 +26.5
iPSXRIK 34.45 +6.45 +23.0
VlyNBwtl8 2.67 +.47 +21.4
GpoRadio 10.03 +1.60 +19.0
iPSER2K 37.73 +5.76 +18.0
DirChiBear 17.20 +2.33 +15.7
iPSEEafe 78.75 +9.90 +14.4
ConsEP 2.75 +.33 +13.6
DREBearrs14.03 +1.61 +13.0

Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
Talbots 2.92 -1.66 -36.2
ChinHydro 3.26 -1.26 -27.9
Renren n 9.35 -3.34 -26.3
Sequans n 12.50 -4.45 -26.3
Syswin n 3.94 -1.38 -25.9
ECDang n 13.30 -4.26 -24.3
iSoftStn n 11.64 -3.65 -23.9
Youku n 31.31 -9.69 -23.6
NBGre pfA 10.53 -2.92 -21.7
PepBoy 10.61 -2.90 -21.5

Most Active ($1 or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
BkofAm 8602633 10.80 -.48
S&P500ETF8066801127.60-2.82
SPDR Fnd4687680 14.83 -.39
FordM 3527483 13.35 -.66
iShR2K 2950317 78.00-2.88
Citigrprs 2886841 37.92-1.93
iShEMkts 2638228 46.47-1.40
GenElec 2595594 18.32 -.50
SprintNex 2577708 5.22 -.45
WellsFargo2310446 26.28 -.59

Diary
Advanced .631
Declined 2,544
New Highs -97
New Lows 174
Total issues 3,218
Unchanged 43
Volume 18,748,245,386


Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
OrsusXel rs 3.81 +2.27 +147.4
Accelr8 7.13 +2.01 +39.3
GoldRsvg 2.32 +.50 +27.5
Innsuites 2.00 +.35 +21.2
AntaresP 2.07 +.26 +14.4
T3Molnrs 4.90 +.46 +10.4
ComstkMn 3.30 +.28 +9.3
Bacterin n 3.71 +.29 +8.5
T3 Motn un 3.31 +.26 +8.5
Walterlnv 17.98 +1.20 +7.2

Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
YM Bio g 2.78 -.89 -24.3
ThajCap 9.56 -2.84 -22.9
Neoprobe 3.75 -1.04 -21,7
ChinaShen 3.03 -.81 -21.1
HKN 2.11 -.52 -19.8
NDynMn g 9.50 -2.04 -17.7
Engex 3.26 -.67 -17.0
RareEleg 9.75 -1.91 -16.4
NewEnSys 3.13 -.61 -16.3
CheniereEn 9.10 -1.64 -15.3

Most Active ($1 or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg


CheniereEn210415
NovaGld g 194096
KodiakO g 182241
Neoprobe 160870
VantageDi 155943
NwGold g 136323
YMBiog 131131
Hyperdyn 129412
GoldStr g 121844
NA Pall g 117697


9.10-1.64
9.71 -1.48
5.97 -.51
3.75 -1.04
1.80 -.17
9.21 -.51
2.78 -.89
4.56 +.22
2.44 -.16
3.73 +.06


Diarv
Advanced 150
Declined 377
New Highs 13
New Lows 41
Total issues 546
Unchanged 19
Volume 573,572,244


Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
ReconTech 2.67 +1.21 +82.9
CoffeeH 13.26 +5.85 +78.9
ADA-ES 17.12 +7.12 +71.2
eOnComm 2.33 +.56 +31.6
CascdeBrs 10.54 +2.49 +30.9
Majesco 4.00 +.93 +30.3
ImmuCell 5.70 +1.29 +29.3
RespGene 2.95 +.60 +25.5
VlyNBc wt 2.88 +.57 +24.7
WestgS rsh 2.00 +.35 +21.2

Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
ChinaBiot 3.78 -2.26 -37.4
ChiCache n 7.07 -3.84 -35.2
ChinaYida 3.65 -1.85 -33.6
SunesisPrs 2.12 -.89 -29.6
Trunkbw n 2.30 -.96 -29.4
FFinSvc 2.62 -.99 -27.4
GeneticTh 4.90 -1.85 -27.4
AcuraPh 3.82 -1.32 -25.7
QuinStreet 11.15 -3.82 -25.5
Boingo n 7.65 -2.52 -24.8

Most Active ($1 or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
SiriusXM 4268461 2.00 -.18
Cisco 4083850 15.12 -.89
Intel 2462020 21.38 -.35
PwShs QQQ234839854.64-1.71
MicronT 2321584 8.44 -.72
Microsoft 2262562 23.71 -.20
Level3 1905193 2.20 -.03
Dell inc 1363917 15.47 -.13
Oracle 1300610 31.18 -1.15.
HuntBnk 996879 6.20 +.02

Diary
Advanced 670
Declined 2,078
New Highs 83
New Lows 290
Total issues 2,806
Unchanged 58
Volume 9,516,373,991


Name Ex Div


Wkly Wkly YTD
Last Chg %Chg %Chg Name


AT&Tlnc NY 1.72 30.34 -.31 -1.0 +3.3
AlcatelLuc NY ... 5.22 -.43 -7.6 +76.4
AutoZone NY ... 290.20 +4.72 +1.7 +6.5
BkofAm NY .04 10.80 -.48 -4.3 -19.0
Bar iPVix rsNY ... 22.86 +.49 +2.2 -39.2
BobEvans Nasd .80 32.20 +2.48 +8.3 -2.3
CNBFnPA Nasd .66 12.90 +.29 +2.3 -12.9
CSX NY 1.44 73.48 -2.26 -3.0 +13.7
Chevron NY 3.12 99.67 -1.33 -1.3 +9.2
Chimera NY .66 3.55 -.24 -6.3 -13.6
Cisco Nasd .24 15.12 -.89 -5.6 -25.3
Citigrp fs NY .04 37.92 -1.93, -4.8 -19.8
CocaCola NY 1.88 65.39 -.14 -0.2 -.6
Delhaize NY 2.45 77.55 -3.17 -3.9 +5.2
Dell Inc Nasd ... 15.47 -.13 -0.8 +14.1
DrxFnBull NY ... 23.05 -2.06 -8.2 -17.2
FamilyDIr NY .72 52.36 -.02 ... +5.3
FordM NY ... 13.35 -.66 -4.7 -20.5
GenElec NY .60 18.32 -.50 -2.7 +.2
HomeDp NY 1.00 33.47 -1.16 -3.3 -4.5
iShSilver NY ... 35.25 -.09 -0.3 +16.8
iShEMkts NY .64 46.47 -1.40 -2.9 -2.5
iShR2K NY' .89 78.00-2.88 -3.6 -.3
Intel Nasd .84 21.38 -.35 -1.6 +1.7
JPMorgCh NY 1.00 41.05 -.52 -1.3 -3.2
Level3 Nasd ... 2.20 -.03 -1.3+124.5
Lowes NY .56 22.26 -1.14 -4.9 -11.2
MGM Rsts NY ... 12.55 -1.64-11.6 -15.5


Wkly Wkly YTD
Ex Div Last Chg %Chg %Chg


McDnlds NY 2.44
MicronT Nasd
Microsoft Nasd .64
NY Times NY
NextEraEn NY 2.20
NobilityH Nasd
NokiaCp NY .55
OcciPet NY 1.84
Oracle Nasd .24
Penney NY .80
PepsiCo 'NY 2.06
Pfizer NY .80
Potash s NY .28
PwShs QQQNasd .39
PrUShS&PNY
RegionsFn NY .04
Ryder NY 1.08
S&P500ETFNY 2.34
SearsHldgsNasd ...
SiriusXM Nasd
SouthnCo NY 1.89
SprintNex NY
SPEngy NY i1.05
SPDR FndclNY .16
SP Inds NY .64
TimeWam NY .94
WalMart NY 1.46
WellsFargo NY .48


-0.2 +4.7
-7,9 +5.2
-0.8 -15.1
-2.6 -19.9
-0.3 +6.7
-0.2 -.7
-5.6 -39.1
-0.3 +5.4
-3.6 -.4
-7.3 -7.4
-0.4 +5.1
-3.5 +14.8
-0.1 +8.8
-3.0 +.3
+4.5 -5.7
-3.5 -12.3
-3.1 -4.2
-2.2 +1.5
+2.2 -7.3
-8.0 +22.7
-0.1 +2.9
-7.9 +23.4
-2.6 +7.4
-2.6 -7.0
-2.5 +1.0
-1.5 +7.6
-1.8 -2.2
-2.2 -15.2


Stoe Footnotes: g = dividends and earning In Canadian dollars. h= Does not meet continued-listing standards.
If = Late'filing with SEC. n = New in past 52 weeks. pf = Preferred. rs = Stock has undergone a reverse stock split
of at least 50 percent within the past yeal rt = Right to buy security at a specified prices = Stock has split by at
least 20 percent within the last year. ur= Units- v = Inh bankruptcy or receivership, wd = When distributed. wl i
When issued. wt= Warrants.
Mutual Fln Footnotes: b = Fee covering market costs is paid from fund assets, d = Deferred sales charge. or
redempton fee. f = front load (sales e m Mltipl fees are charged. NA = not available., p = previous day's
net asset value =' fund split shares dtiring the week. x = fund paid a distribution during the week.Gainers and
Losers must be worth at least $2 to be listed in tables at left. Most Actives must be worth at least $1. Volume in
hundreds of s .ales. Soure: The Associated Press. Sales figures are unofficial.


Money Rates
Last Pvs Week
Prime Rate 3.25 3.25
Discount Rate 0.75 0.75
Federal Funds Rate .00-25, .00-25
Treasuries
3-month 0.04 0.04
^ ^ ^ ^


5-year


1.60


10-year 2.9/ 2.99
30-year 4.18 4.23


Currencies
Last Pvs Dav


Weekly Dow Jones

Dow Jones Industrials -61.30 -19.15 -21.87 75.42 -172.45
Close: 11,951.91 ,40 ,
1-week change: -199.35 (-1.6%) MON TUES WED THUR FRI
13,000
1 3 0 0 .. .. .. . . .. .. ..... .. .. .... .










11,000o :- -1-1 .... ....... ... ....... .. ........ .....,... ... ...- ....1M....^ ...... ...
11,000 J F M A M J



MUTUAL FUNDS
Total Assets Total Return/Rank Pct MI Innt
NaeObI ($Mlna) NAV 4-wk, 12-mo 5-year Load Invt


PIMCO TotRetIs
American Funds GrthAmA m
Vanguard TotStldxa
Fidelity Contra
American Funds CaplncBuA mI
Vanguard Instldxl I
American Funds CpWIdGrIA mo
American Funds IncAmerA mo
Vanguard 500Adml
Vanguard TotStlAdm
American Funds InvCoAmA x
Dodge & Cox InflStk
Dodge & Cox Stock
American Funds WAMutlnvA m
American Funds EurPacGrA m
Vanguard instPlus
FrarnTTem-FPai.l,r, Iun'me A m
ArrnencanFunds FnlnA mo
V.anguadd TolaIna d
irpfa F dq NwPmn mA %


, I Amercan un s ew m


a ilartsuA


.946


PIMCOTotRetAdm b


.......-....... II. Amenecan Funds BalA m
Britain 1.6239 1.6369 anouard 00bnv
Ru""",U----I Il~aguard 5001ny


Canada
Clr,


Japan
Mesnico


.9767
6966R


80.32


.9738
j98eo


80.26


11.8679 1t.7784


turo .


Fdelity GrowCo
Harbor Intlins d
Vanguard WelltnAdm
Vanguard TotBdAdml


142,457
66,606
63,574
63,341
60,731
59,613
56,815
55,356
55,332
52,734
49,434
47,018
45,565
40,746
39,594
38,775
37,117
35,358
35,062
34,184
33,011
32,769
32,019
30,427
29,967
29,966
28,473


+7.9/B
+17.2/D
+20.6/B
+18.6/D
+18.6/B
+19.2/B
+22.3/C
+18.8/A
+19.2/B
+20.7/A
+16.6/D
+24.0/C
+19.1/B
+20.7/A
+22.9/D
+19.3/B
+19.1/A
+20.7/A
+24.6/C
+21.8/C
+7.7/C
+16.3/B
+19.1/C
+27.0/A
+28.1/A
+15.6/C
+6.0/D


+8.8/A
+2.7/D
+3.0/B
+4.,8/B
+4.2/C
+2.5/8
+4.7/B
+4.1/B
+2.5/B
+3.1/B
+1.9/C
+3.6/A
-0.3/D
+2.1/B
+5.6/A
+2.5/B
+5.7/A
+3.8/A
+3.7/B
+5.8/A
. +8.5/A
+4.2/B
+2.4/C
+7.1/A
+7.1/A
+5.8/A
+6.5/B


NL 1,000,000
5.75 250
NL 3,000
NL 2,500
5.75 250
NL 5,000,000
5.75 250
5.75 250
NL 10,000
NL 10,000
5.75 250
NL 2,500
NL 2,500
5.75 250
5.75 250
NL 200,000,000
4.25 1,000
5.75 250
NL 3,000
5.75 250
NL 1,000,000
5.75 250
NL 3,000
NL 2,500
NL 50,000
NL 50,000
NL 10,000


Switzerlnd .8420 .8420 CA- ansevanNeAlocalon. CI-Inlnertiate-Term Bond, ES -Europe Stock, FB-Foreign Large Bland,FG -Foreign LgeGrth. FV-Fo
Large Vae, IH -Word Allocation, LB .Large Blend, LG -Large mGrowth, LV .Large Value, MA -Moderate Alocrain, MB Cap Blend,
British pound expressed in U.S. dollars. All oth- lidMCap Value, SH -Spedy-eath, W -Wo Stock, To Return: Chin h V with d ends e vested. Rank: How und p o ned v
ers show dollar in foreign currency. otrswith same abedie: A is In top 20%, E in bollom 20%. Min init invt:Minrm $ needed to invest in fund. Source: Momingar.


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name DIv YId PE Chg %Chg Last
AES Corp ... ... 15 -.15 +1.1 12.31
AFLAC 1.20 2.7 9 -1.61 -20.5 44.86
AK Steel .20 1.3 ... +.23 -7.1 15.22
AMR ... ... ... -.26 -26.8 5.70
AT&T lnc 1.72 5.7 9 -.31 +3.3 30.34
AU Optron ... ...... -.43 -27.1 7.60
AbtLab 1.92 3.8 13 -.18 +6.2 50.90
AberFitc .70 1.1 27 -7.35 +12.9 65.09
AMD ... ... 8 -.38 -7.2 7.59
Aetna .60 1.4 10 -.34 +40.5 42.86
Agilent ... ... 21 +.76 +16.3 48.19
AlcatelLuc ... ... *... -.43 +76.4 5.22
Alcoa .12 .8 22 -.64 -.7 15.28
Allstate .84 2.8 12 -1.02 -7.0 29.65
AlphaNRs ... ... 42 -4.28 -23.9 45.69
Altria 1.52 5.6 14 -.59 +9.7 27.01
AMovilL .52 1.1 15 -.99 -16.1 48.10
AEagleOut .44 3.5 16 -.12 -13.3 12.68
AEP 1.84 5.0 15 -.39 +3.2 37.12
AmExp .72 1.5 13 -1.54 +11.2 47.74
AmlntlGrp ... ... 2 +1.31 -40.0 28.96
AmTower ... ... 54 -1.21 -3.2 50.00
Anadarko .36 .5 ... -4.10 -4.4 72.79
Annaly 2.62 14.4 7 -.04 +1.5 18.18
ArcelorMit .75 2.3 17 +.20 -15.1 32.36
ArchCoal .44 1.7 19 -1.40 -26.1 25.90
ArchDan .64 2.2 9 -.85 -1.8 29.54
ATMOS 1.36 4.3 14 -.33 +1.2 31.58
Avon .92 3.4 17 -.90 -5.8 27.36
BB&TCp .64 2.5 21 -.29 -1.7 25.83
BRFBrasil .18 1.1 ... -2.13 -4.7 16.08
BakrHu .60 .8 29 -2.49 +26.1 72.09
BcoBrades .80 4.2 ... -.71 -5.2 19.23
BcoSantSA .79 7.1 ... -.70 +3.9 11.07
BcoSBrasiI .70 6.6 ... -.62 -21.7 10.65
BkofAm .04 .4 20 -.48 -19.0 10.80
BkIrelnd ... ... ... -.36 -55.5 1.18
BkNYMel .52 2.0 13 -.63 -13.0 26.27
Bar iPVix rs ... ... ... +.49 -39.2 22.86
BarrickG .48 1.1 12 -2.27 -18.1 '43.56
BerkHB ... ... 17 -2.19 -7.6 74.06
BestBuy .60 2.1 9 -2.20 -17.1 28.43
Blackstone .40 2.4 ... +.13 +17.3 16.60
BlockHR .60 3.9 12 -.57 +29.2 15.39
Boeing 1.68 2.3 16 -2.15 +11.4 72.69
BostonSci ... ... 19 -.11 -10.7 6.76
BrMySq. 1.32 4.8 14 -.53 +3.7 27.45
Buenaveqt .49 1.3 14 -4.72 -23.8 37.32
CBREllis ... ... 33 -1.29 +18.7 24.30
CBSB .40 1.5 21 -.90 +37.5 26.20
CIGNA .04 .1 9 -.52 +33.9 49.09
CVS Care .50 1.3 15 -.76 +7.0 37.21
CablvsnNY .60 1.7 27 +.60 +4.2 35.26
Cameron ... ... 20 -1.49 -11.7 44.78
CapOne' .20 .4 .7 -2.01 +16.4 49.54
CapitlSrce .04 .7 18 -.01 -14.5 6.07
Carnival 1.00 .2.8 15 -.85 -22.4 35.80
Caterpillar 1.84 1.9 17 -4.31 +3.3 96.79
Cemex ... ... ... -.62 -25.1 7.71
CenterPnt .79 4.2 17 -.23 +20.0 18.86
CntryUnk 2.90 7:2 12 -1.17 -13.2 40.09
ChesEng .30 1.0 10 -1.29 +12.9 29.24
Chevron 3.12 3.1 '10 -1.33 +9.2 99.67
Chicos .20 1.5 19 -.84 +11.3 13.39
Chimera .66 18.6 6 -.24 -13.6 3.55.
Citigrp rs .04 .1 13 -1.93 -19.8 37.92
Citigp wtA ... ... ... -.03 -31.6 .65
CliffsNRs .56 .7 9 -2.47 +8.7 84.82
Coach :90 1.5 20 -1.89 +6.9 59.12
CocaCola 1.88 2.9 13 -.14 -.6 65.39
ConAgra .92 3.8 16 -.29 +7.1 24.18
ConocPhil 2.64 3.7 10 -.90 +5.0 71.49
ConEd 2.40 4.6 14 -.49 +4.6' 51.83
ConstellEn .96 2.6 16 +.30 +20.0 36.77
Coming .20 1.1 8 -.66 -4.9 18.37
Covidien .80 1.5 16 -.68 +17.3 53.54
Cummins 1.05 1.1 15 -8.53 -15.6 92.87
DCTIndl .28 5.7 ... -.43. -7.9 4.89
DR Horton .15 1.4 77 -.83 -9.8 10.76

,, aD, / '

Wkly YTD .Wkly
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last


ActivsBliz .17
AdobeSy ...
AEtema g ,.
Affymetrix ...
AkamaiT ...
AlteraCp If .24
Amarin
Amazon
ACapAgy 5.60
AmCapLtd ...
Amgen
A123 Sys ...
ApolloGrp ...
Apple Inc ...
ApIdMatl .32
AriadP
ArmHid .13
ArubaNet ...
Atmel
Autodesk
AutoData 1.44
AvagoTch .36
AvanirPhm ...
Baidu
BedBath ...
BioSante
BrigExp
Broadcom .36
BrcdeCm ...
CA Inc .20
Cadence ...
CpstnTrbh ...
ChinaBiot ...
CienaCorp ...
Cirrus
Cisco .24
CitzRepBh ...
Clearwire ...


1.4 27 -.38 -7.9 11.46
... 19 -1.60 +2.9 31.67
...... -.14 +82.6 2.28
... ... -.15 +41.2 7.10
... 31 -3.38 -37.4 29.45
.5 16 -1.90 +22.7 43.66
...... -2.90 +90.6 15.63
... 81 -1.79 +3.6 186.53
18.6 4 -.24 +4.7 30.10
.. 2 -.52 +15.7 8.75
... 12 -.70 +5.6 57.99
...... -1:25 -52.6 4.52
... 17 -2.45 +10.4 43.59
...16-17.54 +1.0 325.90
2.5 11 -.38 -10.5 12.58
... 15 +1.67 +87.5 9.56
.5 ... -.35 +33.9 27.79.
...... -2.63 +22.0 25.48
... 13 -.68 +10.6 13.62
... 37 -2.94 -.8 37.90
2.8 21 -.98 +12.2 51.94
1.1 17 -.12 +18.9 33.77
... ... -.83 -11.0 3.63
... 10-11.52 +26.1 121.69
... 17 +1.30 +7.7 52.91
-.42 +57.9 2.59
98 -1.34 +1.0 27.52
1.1 17 -1.35 -24.0 33.10
... 23 -.35 +27.8 6.76
.9 13 -1.06 -12.0 21.51
... 14 -.49 +21.8 10.06
... ... +.05 +71.9 1.65
... 3 -2.26 -74.3 3.78
.. -5.79 -9.5 19.04
5 -1.46 -11.8 14.09
1.6 12 -.89 -25.3 15.12
... ... -.11 +16.9 .72
... ... -.05 -22.5 3.99


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name DIv YId PE Chg %Chg Last


DTE 2.35
DeanFds ...
Deere 1.64
DeltaAir, ...
DenburyR ...
DevelDiv .16
DevonE .68
DrSCBrrs ...
DirFnBr rs ...
DrxEBear rs...
DrxFnBull ...
DlrxSCBull...
DirxEnBull .05
Discover .24
Disney .40
DomRescs 1.97
DowChm 1.00
DukeEngy .98
DukeRity .68
ECDahgn ...
EMC Cp ...'
Eaton s 1.36
ElPasoCp .04
Elan
EldorGld g .10
EmersonEl 1.38
EndvSilvg ...
ENSCO 1.40
ExcoRes .16
Exelon 2.10
ExxonMbl 1.88
FedExCp .52
FstHorizon .04
FirstEngy 2.20
RagstBcp ..
FordM
ForestLab ...
FMCGs 1.00
FrontierCm .75
Fusion-ion ...
Gafisa SA .29
GameStop ...
Gap .45
GenGrPr n .40
GenMot'n ..
GenOn En ..
Genworth ...
Gerdau .27
GoldFLtd .19
Goldcrp g .41
GoldmanS 1.40
Goodyear ...
Hallibrtri .36
HartfdFn .40
HeclaM ...
Hertz
Hess .40
HewlettP .48
l-omeDp 1.00
HonwllIntl 1.33
HostHotls .08
HovnanE
Huntsmn .40
iShGolds ...
iSAstia .82
IShBraz 2.53
iSh HK .45
iShJapn .14
iSTaiwn .29
iShSilver
iShChina25 .63
iShEMkts .64
iShB20 T 4.01
iS Eafe 1.42
iShR2K .89
iShREst 1.98
IngerRd .48
IBM 3.00
Intl Coa ...


14 -.92 +8.9
28 -.89 +41.6
14 -.40 -1.5
15 -.40 -26.8
56 -.94 +4.8
... -.78 -7.0
9 -2.75 +1.31
... +4.07 -10.1
... +3.80 +7.01
.. +1.04 -28.01
... -2.06 -17.2'
...-8.21 -5.2
...-5.43 +16.3
10 -.68 +24.5'
17 -.88 +2.6
15 +.38 +11.3
18 -.13 +2.7
13 -.17 +2.6
... -.91 +7.9
... -4.26 -50.9
29 -1.61 +14.9
15 -3.10 -9.7
27 -.62 +43.8
... +.67 +79.1
36 -.75 124.0
17 +.15 -10.1
... -1.25 +9.3
13 -2.67 -.2
... -.28 -2.3
14 +.39 +.5
11 -1.40 +9.1
19 -4.77 -8.2
... -.46 -18.5
15 -.460 +16.7
... -.13 -26.4
6 -.66 -20.5
11 +1.05 +18.7
10 -1.00 -18.5
56 -.43 -18.8
... +6.7
... -.44 -28.4
10 -.47 +14.8
10 -.20 -19.6
... -.69 +.4
7 -.27 -21.7
... +.08 +4.7
51 -.63 -23.1
... -.42 -25.9
3 -1.31 -19.5
15 -1.94 +2.6
15 +.59 -19.2
... -1.52 +26.5
20 -2.28 +17.6
6 -1.17 -8.4
35 -.52 -34.5
23 -.1.21. -2.7
10 -4.12 -4.8
9 -.86 -16.3,
16 -1.16 -4.5
19 -1.72 +4.5
... -1.09 -11.6
-.52 -52.8
17 -.49 +13.1
-.09 +7.6
... -.56 -.4
.. -2.73 -6.8
... -.58 -2.3
... -.06 -8.3
... -.43 -1.9
... -.09 +16.8
-1.39 -1.8.
... -1.40 -2.5
... +.81 +3.2
... -1.80 +1.6
... -2.88 -.3
... -2.42 +4.5
... -2.77 -6.4
14 -1.87 +11.2
50 +.01 +88.4


Name DIv
Comcast .45
Comc spcl .45
CorinthC ...
Costco .96
Cree Inc
Ctrip.com ...
CypSemi .36
Dell Inc
DeltaPtrh ...
Dndreon
DirecTV A .
DonlleyRR 1.04
DryShips ...
E-Trade ...
eBay
ElectArts ...
EricsnTel .37
Exelixis
Expedia .28
ExpScripts...
F5 Netwks ...
FiberTwr ...
FifthThird .24
Finisar
FstNiagara .64
Flextm ...
FocusMda ..
FuelCell ...
GT Solar ...
GileadSci ...
GluMobile ...
GrifolsSAn ...
HarbinElec ...
HercOffsh ..
HudsCity .32
Incyte
Intel .84
Intuit


Wkly YTD Wkly
YId PE Chg %Chg Last


18 -.34 +9.2
17 -.23 +9.2
... -.80 -18.4
24 +.49 +8.4
24 -2.81 -41.8
39 -4.41 +.1
36 -1.04 +13.8
9 -.13 +14.1
-.16 -32.9
... -2.30 +11.8
17 -2.20 +17.0
14 -1.16 +11.4
6 -.39 -31.5
... -.83 -14.6
21 -.34 +7.7
...-1.23 +39.2
...-1.02 +19.9
...-1.77 +11.1
18 -.63 +7.6
24 -.32 +4.4
44 -4.31 -19.0
... -.10 -73.3
15 -.14 -16.6
17 -2.94 -38.7
18 -.07 -2.3
9 +.15 -10.4
19 -3.26 +24.2
... -.36 -39.8
10 -1.14 +35.9
13 -.82 +11.0
... -.35+127.1
... -.18 -5.6
8 +1.74 -6.2
-.54 +56.0
-.43 -35.9
... +1.06 +6.1
10 -.35 +1.7
24 -1.06 +2.2


New York Stock Exchange


WITH SO MANY CHOICES,


WHY WOULD YOU CHOOSE



TO PAY TAXES?





2.51% TO 5.04% *

* Yield effective 06/07/11, subjectto availability. Yield and market value may fluctuate if sold
prior to maturity and the amount you receive from the sale of these securities may be less
than, equal to, or more than the amount originally invested. Bond investments are subjectto
interest rate risk such that when interest rates rise, the prices of bonds can decrease and the
investor can lose principal value. Any bond called prior to maturity results in reinvestment
risk for the owner of the bond. May be subject to alternative minimum tax. Municipal bonds
may have original issue discount.

Some of the available issues of bonds are callable. Contact your local Edward Jones financial
advisor for mole information about maturity dates and applicable call provisions.

To invest in tax-free bonds, call or visit your local
financial advisor today.
Steve Jones, CFP.
Financial Advisor
2929 West U'S Highway 90
Suite 114
Lake City, FL 32055
386-752-3847 www.edwardjones.coni Member siPC


W
Nante DIv YId PE C


IntlGame .24 1.5
IntPap 1.05 3.7
Interpublic .24 2.1
Invesco .49 2.1
ItauUnibH .67 3.0
JPMorgCh 1.00 2.4
JanusCap .20 2.2
JohnJn 2.28 3.4
JohnsnCtl .64 1.8
JnprNtwk ...
KB Home .25 2.4
Keycorp .12 1.5
Kimco .72 4.2
Kinrossg .10 .6
Kohls 1.00 2.0
Kraft 1.16 3.4
LDK Solar ... ...
LSICorp ...
LVSands
LennarA .16 1.0
LillyEli 1.96- 5.3
Limited .80 2.2
UncNat .20 .8
UoydBkg ...
Lorillard 5.20 5.2
LyonBasA .10 .3
MBIA
MEMC
MFA Fncl .94 12.1
MGIC
MGM Rsts ...
Macys .40 1.5


TI y MAIN SES WklyI WkVES TING ly


;ha %Che


18 -.70
11 -1.58
23 +.16
17 -.12
... -.85
9 -.52
10 -.41
15
15 -1.69
27 -1.56
... -.96
11 -.05
... -1.45
23 -.40
13 -.66
20 -.31
7
... -.21
47 -3.27
25 -1.29
8
14 -1.82
10 -1.15
... -.13
14 -7.88
... -.59
4 -.83
52 -.88
9 -.29
... -1.50
... -1.64
12 -.31


Last Name


MagHRes ...
ManpwrGp .80
Marathon 1.00
MktVGold .40
MktVRus .18
MarlntA .40
MarshM .88
Marshlls .04
Masco .30
MedcoHith ...
Medtmic .90
Merck 1.52
MetLife .74
MetrOPCS ...
MitsuUFJ ...
Molycorpn ...
Monsanto 1.12
Moodys .56
MorgStan .20
Mosaic .20
MotrdaSoln ...
NCR Corp ...
NV Energy .48
NYSE Eur 1.20
Nabors
NBkGreece .29
NatGrid 2.92
NOilVarco .44
NatSemi .40
NY Times ...
NewellRub .32
NewmtM .80


DIv YId PE Cho


%Chn Last


... +.08
... -2.53
11 -1.55
-3.09
+.89
28 -2.41
18 -.66
-.17
... -1.49
17 -1.45
12 -1.25
15 -.37
11 -.86
26 -1.24
... -.10
...-10.71
28 -.02
18 +1.75
12 -.43
13 -1.25
... -1.17
13 -.96
16 +.48
15 -1.56
79 -1.32
-.16
... -1.00
18 -2.49
21 +.05
12 -.21
14 -.36
12 -2.65


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div YId PE Chg %Cha Last


JA Solar ...
JDS Uniph ...
JetBlue ... ...
LawsnSft ...
Level3
UbtyMintA ...
UfeTech ...
lulutemn g ...
Majesco
MarinaBrs ...
MarvellT ... ...
Mattel .92 3.6
Maximlntg .84 3.4
MelcoCrwn...
MicronT
Microsoft .64 2.7.
NetApp
Netflix ... ...
NewsCpA .15 .9
Novlus
NuanceCm ...
Nvidia
OnSmcnd ...
Oracle .24 .8
PDL Bio .60 10.3
PMC Sra ...
Paccar .48 1.0
PacEth rs ...
PattUTI .20 .7
Paychex 1.24 4.2
Peo)UtdF .63 4.9
Popular
Power-One...
PwShs QQ0.39 .7
Powrwav ... ...
PriceTR 1.24 2.2
Qualcom .86 1.6
RF MicD ...


3 -.69 -27.5 5.04
62 -1.68 +16.4 16.86
18 -.09 -15.1 5.61
40 +.04 +20.8 11.17
... -.03 +124.5 2.20
17 -.85 +7.0 16.87
25 -.29 -9.8 50.04
53 +3.28 +31.5 89.94
80 +.93+419.5 4.00
... +.03 -81.9 .28
11 -.75 -22.4 14.40
14 -.32 -.2 25.37
18 -1.11 +4.8 24.76
...-1.03 +63.7 10.41
6 -.72 +5.2 8.44
6 -.20 -15.1 23.71
30 -2.93 -10.8 49.01
87-15.08 +47.2 258.62
14 -.80 +12.5 16.38
10 -1.51 +4.7 33.85
34 -.16 +13.0 20.55
42 -1.34 +11.2 17.12
13 -.30 +3.3 10.21
21 -1.15 -.4 31.18
10 -.33 -6.1 5.85
35 -.16 -14.6 7.34
29 -1.60 -20.2 45.77
1 -.92 -73.9 1.32
25 -1.27 +37.6 29.65
21 -.83 -3.9 29.71
31 -.09 -9.1 12.74
... -.07 -13.1 2.73
7 -.29 -20.6 8.10
... -1.71 +.3 54.64
44 -.46 +22.0 3.10
21 -1.95 -12.1 56.71
24 -2.44 +10.3 54.60
13 -.16 -22.4 5.70


Name


Wkly YTD Wkly
Div YId PE Cha %Chg Last


RXi Phrm
RschMotn .
Riverbeds ...
SanDisk
SavientPh ...
SeagateT .72
Sequenom ...
Sina .
SiriusXM ...
SlwksSol
Sohu.cm
Sonus
Staples .40
StarScient ...
Starbucks .52
StlDynam .40
SunPowerA ...
SunPwrB ...
Symantec ...
TD Ameritr .20
TakeTwo
Tellabs .08
TevaPhrm .83
TibcoSft
TriQuint
UrbanOut
VarianSemi ...
Verigy
VertxPh
VirgnMda h .16
Vodafone 1.44
Windstrm 1.00
Wynn 2.00
Xilinx .76
Yahoo
ZionBcp .04


-.26 -59.7
6 -2.42 -37.1
.,. -2.97 -3.2
8 -1.73 -14.7
...-1.09 -37.5
5 -.65 +1.5
... -.34 -1.1
...-22.27 +29.8
... -.18 +22.7
24 +1.26 -15.1
18 -8.53 +9.3
... -05 +12,0
12 -1.03 -35.0
... -.21 +126.2
25 -.05 +9.3
19 -.38 -12.1
76 +.22 +65.0
75 +.29 +68.8
24 -.01 +10.5
18 -1.32 -1.3
28 -.58 +27.1
19 -.29 -40.4
15 -1.09 -5.9
52 -1.13 +29.4
10 -.56 -.1
19 -.16 -18.9
18 -.14 +65.9
53 +.83 +14.9
... -6.56 +37.6
... -.96 +14,4
-1.11 -2.5
22 -.32 -8.1
54-11.42 +27.1
14 -.17 +15.8
18 -.48 -8.6
... -.86 -9.1


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name DIv YId PE Chg %Chg Last
NextEraEn 2.20 4.0' 14 -.19 +6.7 55.49
NiSource '.92 4.7 18 -.29 +10.1 19.40
NobleCorp 1.06 2.7 13 -2.14 +8.0 38.63
NokiaCp .55 8.7 ... -.37 -39.1 6.29
Nordstrm .92 2.2 15 -1.40 -.6 42.13
NorflkSo 1.60 2.3 17 -.35 +12.0 70.37
Novarfis 2.53 4.2 14 -2.99 +2.8 60.63
Nucor 1.45 3.6 49 -.42 -8.8 39.98
OcciPet 1.84 1.8 17. -.35 +5.4 103.39
OfficeDpt ... ... ... -.46 -36.9 3.41
OfficeMax ... ... 10 -1.23 -64.6 6.27
OilSvHT 2.36 1.2 ... -6.02 +4.1 146.28
PG&ECp 1.82 4.4 16 -.80 -13.1 41.55
PMI Grp ... ... ... -.25 -66.1 1.12
PNC 1.40 2.4 9 -.27 -2.7 59.07
PPLCorp 1.40 5.2 12 -.47 +2.4 26.95
PatriotCoal ... ... ... -.81 +7.6 20.85
PeabdyE .34 .6 18 -3.43 -13.5 55.33
Pennej .80 2.7 18 -2.34 -7.4 29.92
PepsiCo 2.06 3.0 18 -.28 +5.1 68.69
Petrohawk ... ... ... -1.29 +37.6 25.11
PetrbrsA 1.34 4.5 ... -.66 -12.0 30.07
Petrobras 1.28 3.9 ... -.84 -12.2 33.21
Pfizer .80 4.0 19 -.73 +14.8 20.11
PhilipMor 2.56 3.8 16 -1.64 +15.1 67.35
PimcoHil 1.46 11.8 ... -2.26 -2.3 12.42
Potash s .28 .5 24 -.03 +6.8 55.14
PS USDBul ... ... ... +.31 -5.8 21.40
ProLogis 1.12 3.5 ... -1.91 +1.2 32.09
ProSht$&P ... ... +.90 -2.8 42.63
PrUShS&P ... ...... +.96 -5.7 22.40
ProUftQQQ ... ... ... -5.24 -.5 81.01
PrUShQQQrs... ... ...+3.29 -4.4 55.62
ProUltSP .39 .8 ...-2.24 +2.2 49.10
ProUShL20 ... ...... -.57 -12.2 32.53
ProUSSP500... ... ... +1.11 -9.3 17.60
ProUSSlIvrs... ...... -.15 -54.6 17.82
ProgsvCp. 1.40 2.0 12 -.96 +.7 20.01
ProUSR2K rs... ...... +3.23 -5.4 47.53
Prudentl 1.15 1.9 9 -2.22 +.6 59.04
PulteGrp ... ... ... -.89 -7.8 6.93
Questars .61 3.5 ... +.45 +1.1 17.60
QksilvRes ... .... 7 +.42 +.7 14.84
RadianGrp .01 .3 ... -.74 -54.6 3.66
.RadioShk .25 2.0 8 -1.42 -31.5 12.66
Raytheon 1.72 3.6 8 -.53 +6.0 48.28
RegalEnt .84 7.0 43 -.60 +1.7 11.94
RegionsFn .04 .7 ... -.22 -12.3 6.14
ReneSola ... ... 2 -1.01 -40.0 5.24
Renrenn ... ... ... -3.34 -48.1 9.35
RioTinto 1.08 1.6 ... -.84 -7.1 66.60
RiteAid ... ... ... -.04 +17.8 1.04
RylCarb ... ... 13 -3.77 -29.4 33.19
SLMCp .40 2.5 9 -.55 +25.1 15.75
SpdrDJIA 3.04 2.5 ... -1.95 +3.2 119.37
SpdrGold ... ... ..-.98 +7.6 149.24
S&P500ETF2.34 1.8 -2.82 +1.5 127.60
SpdrHome .31 1.8 ... -.83 -1.8 17.07
SpdrKbwBk .15 .6 ... -.47 -10.2 23.28
SpdrLehHY4.41 10.4 ... -.53 -.5 39.52
SpdrKbwRB.36 1.5 ... -.46 -8.7 24.14
SpdrRell .50 1.0 ... -1.75 +2.3 49.48
SpdrOGEx .49 .9 ... -1.92 +7.2 56.55
SpdrMetM .41 .6 ... -2.77 -4.9 65.431
Safeway .58 2.6 14 -.19 -1.8 22.09
StJude .84 1.7 17 +.77 +14.2 48.84
SandRdge ... ...... -.58 +43.6 10.51
SaraLee .46 2.5' 26 -.19 +5.9 18.55
Schlmbrg 1.00 1.2 23 -1.38 +.2 83.66
Schwab .24 1.5 28 -.72 -6.3 16.04
SealAir .52 2.2 16 +1.53 -8.0 23.42
SemiHTr .57 1.7 ... -1,05 +1.8 33.11
SiderurNac .81 6.4 ... -1.20 -236 12.73
SilvWhtng .12 .4 31 -3.06 -17.8 32.11
SilvrcpM g .08 ... 23 -1.42 -31.6 8.78
SouthnCo 1.89 4.8 17 -.04 +2.9 39.33
SthnCopperl.94' 6.2 17 -3.21 -35.4 31.51
SwstAirl .02 .2 18 -.62 -15.8 10.93
SwstnEngy ... ... 26 -1.51 +12.8 42.22


Name DIv
AbdAsPac .42
Accelr8
AlexcoR g ...
AldNevG ...
AlmadnMg ...
AmApparel ...
AntaresP
ArcadiaRs ...
Aurizong
AvalRare n ...
BarcGSOil
Brigus grs ...
CAMAC En ...
CanoPet
CFCdag .01
CheniereEn...
ChinNEPet ...
ChinaShen ...
DenisnM g ...
GabGldNR 1.68
GascoEngy...
Gastar grs ...
GenMoly ...
GoldResrc .48
GoldStrg ...
GranTrra g ..
GrtBasG g ...
GtPanSilvg ...
Hemisphrx ...
Hyperdyn
ImpOil gs .44
InovioPhm ...
KimberR g ..
KodiakOg ...
LucasEngy ...
MadCatzg ...
MdwGoldg ...


22.03 Neoprobe ...


YId PE


Name Div
SpectraEn 1.04
SprintNex ...
SP Malls 1.23
SP HIthC .61
SP CnSt .81
SP Consume .56
SP Engy 1.05
SPDRFnci .16
SP Inds .64
SP Tech .33
SP Util 1.31
StdPac
StarwdHtl .30
StateStr .72
Suncorgs .44
Sunoco .60
SunTrst .04
Supvalu .35
Synovus .04
Sysco 1.04
TCF Fncl .20
TJX .76
TaiwSemi .47
Talbots
TalismE g .27
Target 1.20
Templelnld .52
TenetHIth ...
Teradyn
Tesoro
Texlnst .52
Textron .08
3M Co 2.20
TimeWarn .94
Total SA. 3.16
Transocn .79
Travelers 1.64
TrinaSolar
TwoHrblnv 1.52
Tycolntl 1.00
Tyson .16
UBSAG ...
US Airwy ...
UtdContl ...
UtdMicro .08
UPS B 2.08
US Bancrp .50
US NGsrs ...
US OilFd ...
USSteel .20
UtdhlthGp .65
ValeSA .90
Vale SA pf .90
ValeroE .20
VangEmg .82
VerizonCm 1.95
ViacomB 1.00
Visa .60
Walgm .70
WsteMlnc 1.36
Weathflntl ...
WellsFargo .48
WendyArby .08
WDigital
WstnRefin
WstnUnion .32
Weyer .60
WmsCos .50
XL Grp .44
Xerox .17
Yamanag .18
YingliGm ...
Youku n
YumBmds 1.00


Wkly YTD Wkly
YId PE Chg %Chg Last
3.9 17 -.21 +7.7 26.92
...... -.45 +23.4 5.22
3.3 ... -.49 -2.1 37.59
1.8 ... -.39 +10.5 34.81
2.6 ... -.40 +5.5 30.91
1.5 ... -1.06 +1.2 37.86
1.4 ... -1.93 +7.4 73.33
1.1 ... -.39 -7.0 14.83
1.8 ... -.89 +1.0 35.21
1.3 ... -.77 -1.7 24.77
4.0 ... -.22 +5.2 32.97
... ... -.45 -28.0 3.31
.5 22 -3.05 -9.5 54.98
1.7 14 -.79 -7.8 42.71
... 21-1.55 +1.5 38.86
1.5 36 +.49 +.1 40.37
.2 70 -.67 -14.7 25.18
4.1 ... -.52 -11.8 8.49
1.9 ... -.16 -21.2 2.08-
3.4 16 -.73 +3.4 30.40
1.5 14 -.75 -8.0 13.62
1.5 16 -1.53 +11.5 49.49
3.6 ... -.59 +4.1 13.05
8 -1.66 -65.7 2.92
-.04 -10.5 19.86
2.6 11 -.70 -22.3 46.70
1.8 17 +7.97 +39.6 29.66
... 3 -.34 -11.7 5.91
... 7 -.72 +1.2 14.21
... 12 -1.64 +13:5 21.04
1.6 12 -1.35 -1.1 32.15
S .4 51 -.88 -11.1 21.02
2,4 16 +.03 +5.1 90.73
2.7 15 -.54 +7.6 34.63
5.8 ... -1.36 +1.9 54.47
1.3 21 -3.93 -9.6 62.85
2.8 8 -1.56 +6.3 59.21
5 -2.34 -18.4 19.11
14.6 9 -.20 +6.5 10.43
2.2 15 -.56 +12.2 46.48
.9 7 -.64 -.6 17.12
...... -1.07 +9.8 18.08
... 4 -.79 -19.1 8.10
... 16 -.86 -8.2 21.87
3.0 8 ... '-15.8 2.66
.3.0 18 -2.65 -5.6 68.50
2.1 13 -.22 -9.8 24.33
:.. ... +.15 +.8 12.08
.... ... -.59 +.2 39.07
.5 ... +.04 -25.8 43.33
1.3 42 +.56 +36.8 49.41
2.9 ... -.78 -1.0.6 30.92
3.2' ... -.7 1 -7.9 27.83
.8 26 -1.37 +8.0 24.96
1.7 ... -1.31 -1.9 47.22
5.5 21 -.44 -1.6 35.19
.2.1 15 -1.38 +21.5 48.13
.8 17 -4.44 +6.1 74.69
1.6 18 -.18 +10.3 42.97
3.7 18 -1.38 -.9 36.54
... ... -1.18 -20.6 18.11
1.8 11 -.59 -15.2 26.28
1.8 ... -.20 -2.2 4.52
10 -1.00 +.2 33.96
52 -1.03 +42.2 15.04
1.6 14 -.17 +5.7 19.631
2.9 ... -.37 +7.8 20.40
1.7 22 -.92 +18.7 29.34
2.1 12 -1.57 -4.4 20.87
1.8 20 -.60 -18.4 9.40
1.6 16 -1.13 -10.2 11.50
... 5 -.46 -20.7 7.83
... ... -9.69 -10.6 31.31
1.9 21 -1.62 +7.6 52.80


AMEX Most Active


Wkly YTD Wkly
Cha %Chg Last Name


5.8 ... -.14 +6.4
... 48 +2.01 +620.2
... -.39 -10.6
... ... -3.36 +17.9
... ... -.25 -33.2
... ... -.15 -47.6
... ... +.26 +21.8
... ... -.02 -67.1
-.08 -25.8
... ... -.72 +.3
... ... -.43 +.5
... ... -.03 -30.0
... ... +.03 -33.2
... -.02 -8.1
... ... -.13 +1.5
... ... -1.64 +64.9
... 2 -.10 -43.8
... ... -.81 -63.9
... ... -.32 -47.4
9.5 ... -.45 -8.4
... ... -.12 -37.1
... ... -.24 -23.0
... ... -.12 -33.3
2.0 ... -2.94 -18.2
... ... -.16 -46.8
... ... -.29 -19.1
... ... -.13 -36.1
... ... -.26 -5.7
-.07 -21.1
+.22 -8.1
... ... -1.18 +13.6
... ... -.11 -40.4
... ... -.20 +7.1
... ... -.51 -9.5
... -.09 +28.3
... 10 +.02 +68.6
... +.12 +107.1
... ... -1.04 +82.0


v Y kly YTD Wkly
Div YId PE Cha %Chg Last


Nevsun g .06
NwGold g ...
NAPallg ...
NDynMn g ...
NthnO&G ...
NthgtM g ..
NovaGldg ...
Oilsands g ...
OpkoHith ...
OrsusXel rs ...
ParaG&S ...
PhrmAth ...
PionDrill ...
PolyMetg ...
Quepasa
RadientPh ..
RareEle g ...
Rentech ...
RexahnPh
Rubicong
SamsO&G
SeabGid g
SulphCo
TanzRyg ...
Taseko
TmsatlPet .
TravelCtrs ...
TriValley ...
Ur-Energy ...
Uranerz
UraniumEn ...
VantageDrt ...
VimetX .50
VoyagerOG ...
Walterlnv 2.00
WizzardSft ...
YM Bio a ...


-.43 -23.5
-.51 -5.6
+.06 -46.3
-2.04 -33.5
+1.27 -30.8
-.09 -13.8
-1.48 -32.0
-.03 -11.2
-.14 -6.8
+2.27 +86.8
+.06 -17.3
-.55 -23.6
-.95 +51.5
-.12 -37.2
-1.00 -32.1
+.01 -79.2
-1.91 -39.3
-.03 -31.1
-.07 +8.9
-.34 -26.8
-.42+118.2
-1.97 -14.4
-.03 -83.5
-.24 -6.4
-.39 -12.0
-.04 -384
-.61 +24A4
-.06 +14.0
-.03 -49.8
+.02 -21.3
-.17 -50.0
-.17 -11.3
-.97 +79.5
-.21 -54.3
+1.20 +.2
+.01 -32.0
-.89 +19.3


Weekly Stock Exchange Highlights- 1STOCKS OF LOCAL INTEREST


Nasdaq Most Active


,------------------------------------3:--------s_----,--


It














Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS SUNDAY, JUNE 12, 2011


Oil down over 2 percent on

expected Saudi production


By CHRIS KAHN
AP Energy Writer

NEW YORK Saudi
Arabia's still the boss when
it comes to oil.
Prices sank 2.6 percent
Friday on reports that the
world's biggest oil exporter
will increase production 13
percent from May levels
to 10 million barrels per
day. The move, reported
by a Saudi Arabian newspa-
per, comes just days after
OPEC snubbed its request
to raise production quotas.
Analysts see it as a bold
step by the Saudis to reas-
sert their dominance over
the cartel.
"They're reminding
everyone who the sheriff is
in town," independent ana-
lyst Jim Ritterbusch said.
Benchmark West Texas
Intermediate crude for
July delivery lost $2.66
at $99.27 per barrel in
afternoon trading on the
New York Mercantile
Exchange.
If Saudi Arabia makes
good on the new produc-
tion level, it will pump into
the market another 1.14
million barrels per day
above May levels. That
will come close to cover-
ing a shortfall in global
oil supply expected in
the third quarter. OPEC
says 'world demand will
exceed supply by 1.45
million barrels per day
in the third quarter. The
U.S. Energy Information
Administration puts the
shortfall at 1.81 million


ASSOCIATED PRESS,
In this file photo, Saud Arabia's Minister of Petroleum and
Mineral Resources Ali Ibrahim Naimi talks to journalists
before the start of the meeting of the Organization of the
Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) at its headquarters In
Vienna, Austria.


barrels per day.
Saudi oil ministers had
called for higher produc-
tion from OPEC mem-
bers. But its attempt to
boost quotas was rejected
by Iran and several other
countries. Friday's report
in al-Hayat newspaper
gave investors a glimpse
at how the Saudis will
respond.
"They're going to uni-
laterally decide for them-
selves when to supply the'


market," analyst Andrew
Lipow said.
Saudi Arabia, the only
country in the world that
can significantly increase oil
production quickly, already
exceeds its OPEC quota,
analysts said. The Saudis
previously said they were
ready to supply even more
oil if the world needed it,
but analysts wondered if
they would do that, given
recent increases to'Saudi
domestic spending.


HACKERS: 10,000 customers at risk

Continued From Page 2C


Ottman said.
' -Cyber attackers have a
variety of less-dangerous
motivations, from mischief
to online activism. For
example, a group ideri:
tifying itself as LulzSec
claimed credit for the fake
PBS article calling it retali-
ation for a documentary
about WikiLeaks, the web-
site that publishes classi-
fied documents.
But often such data
breaches are an attempt to
steal personal data, which
is likely the case with. Citi.
Hackers also will pose as
legitimate companies in a
tactic known as "phishing,"
where they try to get users
to supply additional infor-
mation like social security
numbers and email or bank
passwords to get access to
their financial information.
The factthatthe Citi hack-
ers only got a few pieces of
personal data on customers
may limit what crooks can
do with the information,
said Susan Grant, director
of consumer protection at
Consumer. Federation of


ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Citibank logo is shown on a branch office in this April 11,
2007 file photo taken in New York.


America, a consumer advo-
cacy group. .
"But any ID theft is wor-
risome for consumers,"
Grant said. She believes
companies are responsible
for protecting their custom-
ers' information from inter-
nal and external abuse.
In an emailed statement,


Sean Kevelighan, a spokes-
man for Citi said the bank
is contacting affected cus-
tomers and enhancing pro-
cedures to prevent a simi-
lar security breach from
happening again.
"For the security of these
customers, we are not disclos-
ing further details," he said.


BUMPED: Travel vouchers losing value

Continued From Page 3C


riers contracted by big-
ger airlines bump the most
passengers. American
Eagle, the regional carrier
for American, was tops
from January to March. It
bumped about 3 percent,
or about 6,2b0 of 3.6 mil-
lion passengers.
Be an early bird and
fly direct.
Travel as early in the
day as possible to avoid
getting bumped by pas-
sengers who got bumped
or cancelled earlier in the
day. And select nonstop
flights whenever possible.
The more legs a flight has,
the greater the chance
you'll run into trouble.
Listen up.
Be ready to board
immediately when your
row or group is called. A
gate agent could give your
seat to a standby passen-
ger while you're hanging


back.
Another way to avoid
bumping, if you can afford
it, is to pay for an upgrade
to premium economy,
business or first class.
Coach passengers get
bumped first. Building up
loyalty points by -joining
an airline's frequent flier
program will also help.
.Summer travel also
means more cancellations
because of thunderstorms.
That could also mean
a long wait for another
flight.
'There are ways to pre-
pare for a cancellation.
Airlines are required to
display on-time perfor-
mance on their websites.
That includes the per-
centage of cancellations,
if a flight gets scrapped
more than 5 percent of
the time.
Print out a copy of the


airline's contract of car-
riage, available on its web-
site. That spells out what
you're entitled to if your
flight is cancelled.
The airline's customer
service number comes in
handy as well. You can
call it while also waiting in
the customer service line,
a double-teaming strategy
that gets quicker results.
And jot down information
for other flights leaving
around the time you're
scheduled to depart.
That's ammunition for
rescheduling your flight.
Even with that prepa-
ration, there's a chance
you'll be stuck overnight
- often without your
checked bag. So, keep a
change of clothes in your
carryon. That's also the
place to keep your tooth-
brush and any medica-
tions you need.


TBW execs involved in


$3B fraud sentenced


- 1
,.


I


BY MATTHEW BARAKAT
AP Business Writer

ALEXANDRIA, Va. -
Two executives at what
had been the nation's
largest private mortgage
lender were sentenced
to six and two-and-a-half
years for their roles in a $3
billion fraud that officials
have called the biggest
criminal case to develop
out of the nation's housing
and financial crises.
Prosecutors had sought
slightly longer terms
of eight and five years,
respectively, for Desiree
Brown, treasurer at Ocala,
Fla.-based Taylor Bean &
Whitaker, and Raymond
Bowman, the company's
president. At the same
time,, though, prosecu-
tors gave both credit for
their cooperation in help-
ing to unravel a series of
complex financial frauds
and deliver a guilty convic-
tion against Taylor Bean's
owner and chairman, Lee
Farkas, who is expected to
receive a significantly lon-
ger term when he is sen-
tenced later this month.
"These TBW execu-
tives helped pull off one
of the largest, longest-run-
ning bank fraud schemes
in history," said Neil
MacBride, U.S. Attorney
for the Eastern District
of Virginia. '"They knew
that without their fraud
scheme, TBW would fail.
They helped Lee Farkas
do what they knew was
wrong, and now they will
pay for their crimes. At the
same time, these defen-
dants agreed to cooper-
ate with the government


Investment
Management, also
advised investors to stick
out the market's recent
turbulence.
"The market doesn't
go up indefinitely; it's not
a straight line and it does'
get choppy at times," she
said. Cavanaugh said
seven straight quarters
of stronger-than-expected
corporate earnings are a
clear signal that the bull
market is continuing.
Strong demand from
faster-growing econo-
mies overseas is offset-
ting weak consumer
spending in the U.S., she
said. '
Earlier Friday, a smaller
than anticipated Chinese
trade surplus in May and
a bigger than expected
decline in British indus-
trial production in April
led to fears that growth
is also slowing overseas,
.not just in the U.S.
A sian markets were
mixed after the report
showing weak imports
to China suggested that
demand might decrease


for commodities such as
oil and iron ore.
Economists say
Beijing's efforts to tem-
per rapid growth by curb-
ing lending and investing
could cool its economy
too quickly. Weakness
in China could hurt the
global commodities trade
if it cuts into demand for
oil, iron ore and other
industrial inputs for
which China is a key cus-
tomer.
China's mixed trade
report followed surpris-
ingly strong data for
U.S. trade tlat helped
lift stocks on Thursday.
The government said
on Thursday that U.S.
exports hit a record in
April. Trade factors into
the government's broad
calculation of economic
growth, known as gross
domestic product.
The euro fell below
its recent highs on signs
that European policy-
makers have reached an
impasse over how to han-
dle Greece's drawn-out
debt crisis.


The yield on the bench-
mark 10-year Treasury
note fell as investors
put money into low-
risk investments. The
yield fell to 2.96 percent
Friday afternoon, having
traded above 3 percent
Thursday as the stock
market rallied. Bond
yields fall and their pric-
es rise when demand for
them increases.
In corporate news,
shares of solar chip
maker MEMC Electronic
Materials Inc. fell 3 per-
cent after an analyst
downgraded the stock,
saying prices for solar
wafers are falling rapidly
because of overproduc-
tion in China.
Goodyear Tire fell 7
percent, the most in the
S&P 500, after the compa-
ny agreed to sell its Asian
wire business to South
Korea's Hyosung Corp.
for $50 million. Analysts
with J.P. Morgan Chase
& Co. said they expect.
"significantly weaker"
demand for replacement
Stores.


DEFICIT: Moves closer to $1 trillion

Continued From Page 3C


approach, saying it
amounts to a tax increase.
Their plan would focus
exclusively on cutting
spending. They have
also proposed further tax
cuts for the wealthiest
Americans.
The government had a
surplus of $127 billion in
2001, the year President
Bush took office. It was
projected to run surplus-
es totaling $5.6 trillion
over the next decade.
But by 2002, the coun-
try was back in the red.
The deficits grew after
Bush won approval for
broad tax cuts, pushed
a major drug benefit
program for seniors
- which wasn't offset


with revenue to pay for
it and the invasions
of Iraq and Afghanistan
were launched.
In 2008, Bush's last full
year in office, the deficit
had grown to $454.8 bil-
lion, a record at the time.
And when the economy
soured, it jumped into
the $1 trillion-plus range.
The Bush administra-
tion pushed a $700 bil-
lion bailout program
in 2008 to rescue the
nation's banks, financial
firms and automakers.
The following year, the
Obama administration
continued the bailouts
and also backed a $787
billion stimulus program
to boost the economy.


Higher spending for
unemployment insurance
and food stamps, and the
sharp contraction in tax
revenues, also widened
the deficit. And it grew
even more this year after
Obama and congressional
Republicans signed off
on a deal that extended
,the Bush tax cuts for two
years and also reduced
Social Security payroll
taxes for one year.
The estimated losses
from the financial bail-
out have been shrink-
ing. The administration
now projects those loss-
es will total $48 billion,
down from an estimate
of $341 billion two years
ago.


DOW: Stocks approach down week

Continued From Page 2C


and that cooperation was
clearly taken into account
in the sentences imposed
today."
Taylor Bean cheated
three banks, including
Alabama-based Colonial
Bank, out of nearly $3 bil-
lion over nearly a decade
before the scheme unrav-
eled in 2009, resulting in
the collapse of Taylor Bean
and the loss of jobs for its
2,000 workers, as well as
the collapse of Colonial,
which had been one of
the 25 largest banks in
America.
In large part, Taylor
Bean concealed its fraud
by selling or using as col-
lateral mortgages that had
already been sold to other
investors. Mid-level exec-
utives at Colonial partici-
pated in the scheme and
helped conceal the mas-
sive hole in Taylor Bean's
account, at first to pre-
serve their relationship
with Taylor Bean and later
because they were com-
plicit and felt they had no
choice but to continue.
Deutsche Bank and
BNP Paribas were the
other banks that were
cheated in the fraud. They
lost roughly $1.5 billion
in commercial paper -
essentially IOUs that
were supposed to be fully
collateralized but had next
to nothing backing them
up.
The scheme also
included a failed attempt
to use the cooked books at
Colonial and Taylor Bean
to try to obtain more than
$500 million in emergency
fufiding from the govern-
ment's Troubled Asset


LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS SUNDAY, JUNE 12, 2011


Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424


Relief Program (TARP).
Brown, 45, who received
the six-year sentence,
started at Taylor .Bean
as a receptionist and was
elevated to treasurer and
earned $500,000 annual-
ly even though she held
only a high-school degree.
Prosecutor Patrick Stokes
said at Friday's sentenc-
ing that Farkas elevated
Brown because he could
easily manipulate her due
to her lack of experience.
"She -was blinded by
her loyalty to Mr. Farkas,"
Stokes said.
Brown apologized for
her actions.
"It was never my intent
to commit a crime," she
told U.S. District Judge
Leonie Brinkema. "I'm
very angry at myself for ...
letting someone manipu-
late me into going against
my morals."
Bowman, who received
a two-and-a-half year term,
may be called to testify
against others in what is
an ongoing investigation,
said prosecutor Charles
Connolly. Bowman, and
Brown were the first two
to be sentenced out of
seven, including Farkas,
who have already been
convicted.
Bowman, 45, told
Brinkema that "all ,the
people in this are basi-
cally decent people" who
made mistakes. He asked
Brinkema to show lenience
toward Colonial executive
Catherine Kissick, who will
be sentenced next week.
Bowman said that he and
Farkas put Kissick in an
.impossible position and
"basically ran her over."















LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, JUNE 12, 2011

Lake City Reporter




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lication. Credit for published errors
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for that portion of the advertisement
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Advertising language must comply
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In Print and Online
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Legal

NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETING
OF THE SCHOOL BOARD OF CO-
LUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
The School District of Columbia
County, Florida announces they will
hold an Administrators Best Practice
and Data Analysis Training to which
all persons are
invited to attend as follows:
DATE: Wednesday, June 22, 2011
TIME: 8:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m.
PLACE: Holiday Inn Hotel and
Suites
213 SW Commerce Drive
Lake City, Florida 32025
PURPOSE: To discuss issues per-
taining to Data Analysis and school
Best
Practices within the District. No ac-
tion will be taken at this meeting.
Pursuant to the provisions of the
American with Disabilities Act, any
person requiring special accommo-
dations to participate in the above
workshop is asked to advise the
School Board at-least 48 hours be-
fore the workshop by contacting
Mrs. Lynda Croft at (386) 755-8003.
School Board of Columbia County,
Florida
By: Michael F. Millikin
Superintendent of Schools
04545220
June 12, 2011

100 Job
Opportunities

04545088
Suwannee Valley 4Cs, area
grantee for nationally
recognized high-quality early
childhood program seeks
applicants interested in a
teaching career in a professional
work environment.
Lead Teachers for 3-5 yrs old
(Head Start-Lake City)
Must have a 2 yr degree or
be currently enrolled in an
Early Childhood Education
or related degree program OR a
Child Care Professional Certifi-
cate (CDA, FCCPC or ECPC),
3 yrs classroom exp w/young
children required (relevant age
preferred)
Teachers for Birth to 3 yrs old
(Early Head Start-Lake City &
Live Oak)
Must have a Child Care
Professional Certificate (CDA,
FCCPC or ECPC),
3 yrs classroom exp w/infants or
toddlers preferred;
Starting pay $8.65-
$11.01 per hour
Current 1st Aid/CPR preferred.
Allapplicants must pass
physical & DCF background
screenings.
Excellent Benefits, Paid
Holidays, Paid Sick/Anmual
Leave, Health/Dental Insurance,
Training/Scholarship
Opportunities and more.
Apply in person at:
236 SW Columbia Ave
Lake City, 32025
(754-2222) or
843 Marymac Ave SW
Live Oak, 32060
(362-4944)
Or send resume
by email: arobinson(@)sv4cs.org
or Fax (386) 754-2220. EOE

04545113
Owner Operators: Home Daily
with Dedicated Runs.
Excellent Rates & Paid FSC.
80% Drop & Hook.
Great Fuel & Tire Discount
Programs. CDL-A with
lyr Tractor-Trailer experience
and TWIC req'd.
Call Comtrak at 800-224-2641
ext 4978, or apply online at
www.comtrakinc.com

05526037
REEFER DRIVERS
NEEDED!
More Freight = Top Earnings!
Paid CDL Training
Available & Benefits
877-491-1112 or
www.primeinc.com


Columbia County Clerk of Court
Job Opening. Information
Technology Administrator
www.columbiaclerk.com


Land Clearing

Back Hoe, Dozer, Chopping, root
raking, bush hog, seeding, sod,
disking, site prep, ponds &
irrigation. Free Est! 386-623-3200

Lawn & Landscape Service

Clean Pine Straw,
You pick it up, $1.85 a bale
Delivery of 100 bales $260
386-688-9156
Landscape Maintenance Company
You can trust for knowledge &
pride, Mention this AD!
Mow Green, LLC 386-288-6532

Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.

Summer Cleaning done your
way. Let me Clean your home be-
fore you leave on Vacation. Come
back home & relax. 386-303-1496.


100 Job0
Opportunities

04545246
Savage Services is hiring
professional drivers for local
hauls in the Lake City area.
Class A CDL with Haz-mat and
tanker endorsements is required
and experience with
tankers is preferred. We are
very interested in
career-oriented applicants.
We offer:
Competitive Pay
Family Insurance
Retirement Plans
S401K Plan
Home every day
Quarterly Incentive/Safety
Bonus
Paid Holidays/Vacations
Career Opportunities
Must pass drug screen and
physical. Savage is an EOP
employer. Apply at
Savage Services
228 NE McCloskey Ave. Lake
City, FL between 11am and
3pm Monday thru Friday.

SAVAGE
05 4

04545254



Fast paced, high volume medical
facility seeking two positions:
Financial Specialist. Duties in-
clude collecting, posting, submit-
ting claims and managing account
payments. Applicants must have
knowledge of all major insurance
carriers, collections, CPT and
ICD-9 coding, proficient in Excel.
Min. 2 yrs exp in medical coding
and billing preferred.
Checkout Clerk. Duties include
Cash handling, schedule appoint-
ments, data entry. Knowledge of
medical terminology and insur-
ance. Applicant must be profi-
cient in practice management soft-
ware (Intergy).
Please submit job title and resume
with salary requirements to
jpapesh(S&cancercare
northflorida.com
or fax to 386-628-9231.

05526006
Office Manager/Accounting
Specialist
Administers division revenue;
acctg; reconciles time and rate
charges; admin. POs; creates
revenue reports; purchasing;
invoicing; new hire prep;
and drug testing..
4 year accounting degree;
2 to 4 years experience; strong
people skills; work without
supervision; valid drivers
license; able to travel.
Apply online at
www.thompsonind.com
or fax resume to
803-773-6585

05526017
Local Real Estate Agency
looking for Real Estate
Assistant: a self-starter with
advanced skills in MS Word-
Excel-Outlook-PowerPoint-
Publisher, Adobe Photoshop,
website maintenance & online
social media applications. Other
requirements include excellent
administrative & communica-
tion skills & high standards of
professionalism & organization.
Experience in a real estate office
is a plus but not required.
Interested applicants apply
through Florida Crown
Workforce by faxing resume to
386-487-1218 ATTN: Terri
Williams, reference
JO# 9580650.

Hiring Locally This Week
Liberty National Life
Insurance Company
Full Training Provided Potential
of $60K+ Annually. 401K, BCBS
Insurance & Pension for those who
qualify. Call 1-800-257-5500 to
set up an interview.
Receptionist, Full Time. Able to
work flexible schedule. Medical or
aesthetic background helpful.
Computer & phone skills
necessary. Please send resume to:
ofcmgrrss@(aol.com or
fax to 386-719-9488
Associate Reps "
SUMMER WORK/GREAT PAY
Immediate FT/PT openings,
Customer sales/service,
No exp needed, conditions,
Apply Now all ages 17+
(386) 269-0883
Accepting applications for
Housekeeping/Weekend Breakfast
attendant.. Apply in person at
Cabot Lodge 3525 US
Hwy 90W. No phone calls.
CDL Class A Truck Driver.
Flatbed exp. for F/T SE area.
3 years exp or more. Medical
benefits offered. Contact
Melissa or Mary @ 386-935-2773
PT janitorial position. Exp pre-
fered. 2/3 hrs per day 5 days per
wk. Position open immediately.
352-331-0502 or Fax 352-373-
6012 or Barbara@allcleanfl.com
Teacher caregiver,
exp w/developmental delayed
preferred. 25 hrs week
Email resume' and references
to PCAposition@yahoo.com


REPORTER Classifieds

In Print and On Line
www.lakecityreporter.com


100 Job
100 Opportunities


05526028
Meridian Behavioral
0 Healthcare Inc.
www.mbhci.org
Please visit our website to view
current open opportunities
and to apply online :
Meridian is an active partner.
with the National Health Service
Corps
Therapists:
Licensed, or Master's Level
in Outpatient
Bachelor's-Level in .Counse-
lor Support
Case Management (adult &
child)
Master's Therapist in Metha-
done Clinic
Administration:
* Director of Dietary Svcs
(Gville)
Medical Services
4 RN Nursing Manager (Gville.
)
* PRN RN, LPN, C.N.A.
* Recovery Specialist ( Direct
Care)
* LPN (2) for Methadone
Clinic (new )
To see our current openings in
Mental Health and to apply
online, please go to:
www.mbhci.ore





EOE, DFWP, E-Verify


.FLORIDA
a GATEWAY
: -COLLEGE
S* * *A
(Formerly Lake City Community College)
EDUCATION AND TRAINING
SPECIALIST TEACHER
PREPARATION ACADEMY
Grant Funded
(12 Month Position)
The primary responsibilities of the
Education and Training Specialist at
FGC are to act as a Career Pathways
(CP) liaison between the college and
five school districts in the service ,
area, administer CP testing, oversight
of CP student articulation information,
help with budgeting and planning of
consortium funds, routine travel to
district sites to meet with CTE
students and teacher, and provide
instruction/training to the Career and
Technical Education (CTE) classroom
teachers in the region. The person in
this position is expected to allocate
time for scheduled training,
presenting to CTE faculty and
students, office hours during which
the students may have access to the
Education and Training Specialist
which would include some evenings,
and for planning and support for
programs in the Occupational
Programs division. Must hold a
Bachelor's degree in an appropriate
area and have public pre K-12
teaching experience. Valid Florida
driver's license.
Salary: $37,500 annually, plus benefits
Application Deadline: 6/24/11
Persons interested should provide
College application, vita, and
photocopies of transcripts. All foreign
transcripts must be submitted with
official translation and evaluation.
Position details and applications
available on web at: www.fqc.edu
Human Resources
Florida Gateway College
149 S.E. College Place
Lake City, FL 32025-2007
Phone (386) 754-4314
Fax (386) 754-4814
E r I ;i i, :. .._ .2- _' i..
t1le Sonutien, Awoc ion r'Colleges nd Schools
VI','IS)AASA [ 1 c0College l tiucatinm and
11n0li ,-nt-1


120 Medical
120 Employment

Certified Medical Assistant
Full time; exp preferred in
Pediatrics and/or Family Practice.
Experience in injections & taking
accurate vital signs. Excellent
communication and
documentation, organizational
and assessment skills.
Fax Resume: 386-758-5628

04545143
AMEDISYS
You can have it all.
Life Balance. Competitive
Salary. Bar-setting Benefits.
Due to tremendous growth,
Amedisys Home Health of
Gainesville, FL is actively
seeking the following:
Clinical Manager, RN
Licensed Practical Nurse
(PRN)
Psych Registered Nurse
(PRN)
Registered Nurses
(Full-time, PRN and weekends)
Speech Language
Pathologist (PRN)
Apply online at
careers.amedisys.com.
For additional information,
please contact Dana Branim at
(866) 998-7565 or
dana.branim@(amedisys.com.
EOE/M/F/D/V


Home Health Care


240 Schools &
240 Education

04544843
Interested, in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
* Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-05/23/10 ,
* Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-07/11/11

* Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com

04545222
OBTAIN YOUR
COMMERCIAL DRIVERS
LICENSE
CLASSES FORMING NOW
AT FLORIDA GATEWAY
COLLEGE
CJ.ASSROOM TRAINING,
STATE-OF-THE-ART
SIMULATOR, BEHIND THE
WHEEL DRIVING
FINANCING AVAILABLE
FOR QUALIFIED
APPLICANTS


310 Pets & Supplies


Golden Retriever pups CKC.
Shots. 3 females, 5 males
Available July 3 $350. Each
POP. 386-623-1577

MOVING: FREE to Good Home.
8 week old male & female kittens
Loving and playful.
Call anytime. 386-235-6723
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
,weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.
Purebred Rottweillers 2 male
8 weeks. Price negotiable to the
best homes. Serious inquires only.
386-208-0059 or 288-0272. .


Family Owned and Operated

Dealership

(Huntin' a good fit)
New & Used Car Sales
Motivated Self-Starter
Honesty & Good Character
$50,000 plus a year
Benefit Pkg.

Apply in person at


Z77 Macclenny, FL

BURKINS 273 E. Macclenny, Ave.
CHE"WMOLET


330 Livestock &
30 Supplies

Black Angus Cows & Heifers
Prices Vary
Registered & Commercial
386-719-4802


361 Farm Equipment
84 Ford 4610 Tractor.
2WD, Solid
2005 motor,$7,500. OBO
386-867-0005

407 Computers
Compaq Computer, Many extras.
Complete Computer
$80.00
*386-755-9984 or 386-292-2170

413 Musical
SMerchandise
BEAUTIFUL BLACK Spinet
Acrosonic Baldwin Piano with real
ivory keys and bench. $1,800 obo.
Call (352)509-1855 leave message


420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.

Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$250 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.


430 Garage Sales






PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.



440 Miscellaneous
3 PUSH Mowers.
Need TLC. (1) Craftsman,
(1) Bolen (1) Yardman.
$100.00 for all. 386-755-6963

NEW STANLEY 1/4 hp.
Garage door opener.
Made in USA. $100.00
386-755-6963
SOLID KNOTTY pine wood.
Sturdy, nice rocking chair with 6in
cushions, (seat and back).
$100.00 386-755-6963

Stop gnat & Mosquito bites! Buy
Swamp Gator All natural insect re-
pellent. Family safe. Use head to
toe. Available at The Home Depot.
Summer Barbecue Special
Tow Behind
Grill/Smoker, $1,250 OBO.
386-719-4802

45 Good Things
450 to Eat

BLUEBERRY HILL
U-PICK opens
May 30th
386-963-4220

630 Mobile Homes
630 for Rent

2&3 BR MH. $395 $650. mo.
plus deposit. Water & sewer fur-
nished. Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422

2/2 Units, clean, well maintained,
nice safe park setting, 2 miles to
downtown Lake City, $575 month
+ $575 sec dep, 386-984-8448
13th Month FREE!!
2B/1IBA. MH., quiet living. Clean.
New stove, new carpet, carport.
NO PETS! 1st & deposit.
Adult community. Sfnoke free
environment. 386-758-3963
2br /2ba SWMH; also Residential
RV lots for rent between Lake City
& G'ville. Access to 1-75 & 441
(352)317-1326 Call for terms

3/2 S of Lake City, (Branford area)
$400 dep, $600 month
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleypropcrties.com
DWMH for Rent. 3br/2ba
Handicapped accessible.
$650. mo. $500. Dep. No Pets.
386-984-9634. ask for Amber.
Great area! Very clean 2Br/2Ba,
MH. CH/A. Nice kitchen.
$550. mo. + $200 Dep. NO PETS.
(386)755-0064 or (904)771-5924
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs. Lake City & Ft.
White Contact 386-623-3404
or 386-365-1919
SOUTH 41 2br/lba. Washer/
Dryer Outlet. Satellite TV incl.
Pets ok on approval. New paint
$550. mo + dep. 386-758-2408.


SiTEL ,
Apply in person or online .


B U Y I T


iSELLT


F~INDITI


LE!R r -3


EM












LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, JUNE 12, 2011


640 rMobile Homes
640 for Sale
(1) 4/2 DWMH at Timberlane
Park, Long Carport,
2 porches/shed $38,500.
386-752-4258
2010 Lot Model 32x80
Den/LR 3BR/2BA
2280SF 1/2" SR
Call Charles @
Royals Homes 754-6737
2010 Lot Model 3BR/2BA
1624 SF. 1/2" Sheetrock
Vaulted Ceiling.
Charles @
Royals Homes 754-6737
2011 Claytin Single
14x76 2BR/2BA
3 walk in Closets
Call Charles @ Royals
Homes 754-6737
2011 Clayton Homes 4BR/2BA
9' Side Walls,
Energy Star Home
Call Charles @ Royals
Homes 754-6737
2011 Legacy Model .1980 SF
Wood Cab, 3BR/2BA
Deluxe Interior
Call Charles @
Royals Homes 754-6737
2011 SE Triple wide
16" OC Home WZII
Total upgrade call Charles
@ Royals Homes 754-6737
Any Size, Any Shape
we have the home for you
Call Royals Homes @
386-754-6737
Architect Designed,
Green Engineered
Energy Homes
@Royals Homes
www.royalshomesales.com
Ask about our Energy Star Top
Insulation & Windows, Better
Built,Better Comfort, Phil @
Royals Homes 386-754-6737
Custom Built Modular's,
Bring your plans to
Royals Homes *
386-754-6737
www.royalshomesales.com ,
Finance Manager on Site,
Know's how to get it done,
not a Salesman Guessing
Call Phil @ Royals
Homes 386-754-6737
Flashy? Pretty?
Whatabout Construction?
Homesto last a Lifetime
Royals Homes
386-754-6737
Hallmark Real Estate. 2004
DWMH just minutes from the riv-
er. Detached carport. Front & back
screened porches. MLS#77398
Paula Lawrence 386-623-1973
Only a Few Left
2010 Models must go!
Call Royals Homes @
386-754-6737
Only at Royals Homes
Can your home be
prepared for real brick?
Call Bo @ 754-6737
Pre-Owned 2BR/1 Bath
Priced to move 754-6737
Only @ Royals Homes
www.royalshomesales.com
Sales Price Doubled?
Not at Royals, Honest people,
Quality Homes.
Call Royals Homes
@ 386-754-6737
,Service Manager on Site
makes sure your satisfied, not
someone doing it all
Royals Homes 386-754-6737
There is a Difference.
Just ask ouir Customers .
We do what we say
Call Phil@ Royals Homes
386-754-6737

Mobile Home
650 & Land
67.5 ac.Ranch, fenced & cross
fenced. Spacious mobile home
w/large front deck & RV hookup
MLS 75607 $299,000. Access
Realty. Patti Taylor. 386-623-6896
Century 21/The Darby Rogers.Co.
DWMH on 5 ac. 3br/2ba Back 2
ac. fenced. Owners motivated.
Debbie Myles 386-719-1224
MLS# 75830 $99,900
Hallmark Real Estate. 3/2
DWMH 1/2 ac south of town.
Columbia City. Paved frontage,
comer lot. $57,500
MLS#77654 Janet Creel 719-0382
Owner Finance, Nice 3/2, S of
Lake City, small down/$625 mo
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com

"71 Unfurnished Apt.
7 For Rent








SPRING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans;
some with garages.
Call 386-454-1469
or visit our website:
www.springhillvillage.net

1 & 2 Bedroom Apartments
Move in for as low as
$199
386-755-2423


A Landlord You Can Love!
2 br Apts $575. & up + sec. Great
area. CH/A washer/dryer hookups.
386-758-9351/352-208-2421
Convienent, very nice Apt. Very
clean & quiet, Ft. White. In town.
2/1, screen porch, W/D hook up,
$550 mo + dep. 386-497-1116
Great location W of 1-75, spacious
deluxe 2br apts., garage, W/D
hookup. patio. $600/700 & up, +
Sec, 386-344-3715 or 965-5560
The Lakes Apts. Studios & IBr's
from $135/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh aint. Excellent location.
From $450. +sec.
Call Michelle 386-752-9626


720 Furnished Apts.
2 For Rent
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

730 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent

04545232
Really cute 2/1 bungelow
with privacy fence for
$575./mo...
169 SE James St.
3/2 new home with 1106 sf.
$750./mo...
204 NW Guerdon Rd.
Nice 3/2 brick home on 1+
acre with fenced back yard.
$875./mo....143 Zebra Terrace
Secluded 3/1.5 brick home
just off SR 47 near 1-75.
$895./mo....3083 SW SR 47
Newer upscale 3/2 home on
.58 acre. Great location with
many upgrades.
$1350./mo...250 SW Wise Dr.
3/2 in Callaway on a
culdesac. Great for entertain-
ing. $1500./mo.....
390 SW Wilshire Dr.
Kayla Carbono 386-623-9650
or BJ Federico 386-365-5884.

2 bedroom 1 bath on
5 acres. $700.00 per month.
First, last and security.
386-590-5333"
3br/1.5ba. Very clean, CH/A
Fenced (privacy) large back yard.
Nice area/location. $800. mo.$800.
dep. Ref's req'd. (941)920-4535
4br/2ba in town.
Good neighborhood. $900. mo
1st & $900 security. No Pets.
386-755-6916
Callaway S/D. Beautiful 4/2.
2250sf. 1/2 ac. privacy fenced lot.
Office, Ig. screened porch., fire-
place, hardwood floors. No pets.
$1500 mo. Avail. 8/1. 623-7617.
Suwanee River Frontage. 2/1 in
Columbia Co. ,near 1-75/White
Spgs Jane S.Usher Lic. Real Estate
Broker 386-755-3500 or 365-1352

750 Business &
SOffice Rentals
FOR LEASE: Downtown office
space. Convenient to
Court house.
Call 386-755-3456
For Lease: E Baya Ave. Two -
1000 sqft office space units or
combined for 2000 sqft. 386-984-
0622 or weekends 386-497-4762
OFFICE SPACE for lease:
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$695. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor
788 S Marion Ave, Commercial
bldg with hwy frontage,
near downtown.
Call Scott Stewart at Westfield
Realty Group. 386-867-3498


770 Condos For Rent
Furnished or unfurnished
Townhomes on the golf course.
$750. mo. plus security. Includes
water. 386-752-9626

790 .Vacation Rentals


'Horseshoe Beach Scalloping Spcl
Gulf Front 2br, w/lg porch, dock,
fish sink. wkend $395./wk $895.
386-235-3633/352-498-5986
alwaysonvacation.com #419-181
"Florida's Last Frontier"

805 Lots for Sale
5 Acre Lot, Secluded & Cleared,
MLS# 67871 $55,000
Call Lisa Waltrip
@ 386-365-5900
westfieldrealtygroup.com
Great Package Deal $43,500
Nicely wooded. 3 lots in Emerald
Cove. (1)Private cul-de-sac.
Aaron Nickelson 386-867-3534
Westfield Realty Group,
Hallmark Real Estate. Owner
Finance with $5K down with
terms negotiable. Below assessed
value for the county. MLS# 74484
$17,900 Jay Sears 386-867-1613
Land for Sale. 12 acres in
nice area south of town.
MLS#77469 $55,000
Carrie Cason 386-623-2806
Westfield Realty Group
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
'All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

810 Home for Sale
3/2 1056 sqft Brick home in town.
Fenced back yard w/12x12 work-
shop Just Reduced! $79,900
MLS# 77414 Call 386-243-8227
R.E.O.Realty. Group, Inc
3/2 in Woodhaven w/Fla Room,
fenced back yard MLS#75499,
$114,900 Call Pam @
Remax 386-303-2505 or
email- remaxpamb@gmail.com


810 Home for Sale
4/2 on 10 ac. in Bell. Over 2200
sqft in a country setting. 10x20
frame shade. Bring offers! $89,000
MLS 76582 Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty 386-397-3473
4/2 with 1000 sq ft workshop,
fenced yard, 2 car garage, Fairly
new roof & HVAC MLS#77602,
Bring Offers! $169,900,
R.E.O. Realty Group 243-8227
4br brick on .51 ac. corner lot. For-
mal dining and a large open floor
plan. Brick patio. $159,888
MLS 76763 Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty 386-397-3473
A Pilots Dream home 3br/2.5ba.
Pool, stocked pond, detached ga-
rage w/living quarters MLS#77756
$399,900 Westfield Realty
GroupJosh Grecian 386-466-2517
Access Realty Stylish 3/2 + pool
house w/1/2 bath on 2.25 acres.
Rear deck, 2 car garage & carport.
MLS 78103 $194,500.
Patti Taylor.623-6896
Brick 3/1 family home, 4.43 acres.
w/metal roof. MLS# 77415
Short sale acceptance w/lenders
approval. $99,000. 386-243-8227
R.E.O. Realty Group, Inc
Callaway. Beautiful 4/2. 2250sf.
1/2 ac. privacy fenced. Office,
screened porch, fireplc, hardwood
floors. 10x16 shed, new paint/
carpet. $209,900 386-623-7617
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
3br/1. Updated kitchen, bath. Open
living room w/all classic & elegant
light fixtures. 386-752-6575
MLS# 78099 $79,900
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
3/2 Iin Spring Estates. 20x40
workshop. Screened back porch &
all appliances. Kayla Carbono
623-9650 MLS# 73787 $99,900


Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
Picadilly Park All brick 3/2, comer
lot w/inground pool. Screen porch
.& fenced yard. Jessica Sheelly
288-2403 MLS# 73787 $115,900
" Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
Eastside Village 2br/2ba.-Extra Ig.
Master suite. Florida room & 2
sheds, Ginny Smith 386-623-4277
623-4277 MLS# 70160 $79,900


Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
Laurel Lake S/D. 4br/2ba w/ ap-.
prox. 2275 sqft. Fenced back yard,
storage shed. Susan Sloan 386-
965-2847 MLS# 76106 $189,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
4br/1.5ba brick. 1332 sq ft. Great
floor plan, nice yard, close to
town. 1 ac landscaped. Lori
Geibeig MLS# 75713 $84,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Remodeled 2/2 (could be 3/2).
Split floor plan. Great home, great
price. Mary Brown Whitehurst,
965-0887 MLS# 77943 $105,000
CoIdwell Banker/Bishop Realty
3/2 brick home in Woodcrest. Lg
lot completely fenced. Easy access
to amenities. Elaine K. Tolar 386-
752-6488 MLS# 78148 $129,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
New home in Mayfair. 4 bedroom
on comer lot. Covered Porch.
Elaine K. Tolar 386-752-6488
MLS# 76919 $214,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
3/3 in beautiful area. 2414sqft.
Private yard & patio with storage
bldg. Lori G Simpson 386-365-
5678 MLS# 78175 $159,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Brick 3/2 on lake front. Lots of up-
dates. Glassed in room with fantas-
tic views. Lori G Simpson 386-
365-5678 MLS# 78092 $249,900
Country Home 2br/2ba on 5 ac.
detached garage w/workshop.
MLS# 77005 $179,900 Call Roger
Lovelady 386-365-7039
Westfield Realty Group
CYPRESS LANDING!
3BR/2BA built in 2005 w/large
kitchen $115,000
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #75794
DESIRABLE GWEN LAKE area!
Nice 3BR/2BA home on
corner lot $112,000
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #77307
Eastside Village a 55+ Retirement
:Community. lots of Storage. Ig
deck off 2br suite. Carport w/more
storage. MLS# 77462 Eastside
Village Realty, Inc. 752-5290
Eastside Village a 55+ Retirement
Community. 2br/2ba. Lg office
/craft room. Oversized garage.
$89,900 MLS# 71901 Eastside
Village Realty, Inc. 752-5290
Eastside Village a 55+ Retirement
Community. Open floor plan
w/breakfast nook. 2 Ig bedrooms.
$104,999 MLS# 77779 Eastside
Village Realty, Inc. 752-5290
Featured Home 55+ acres, 5 pas-
tures fenced & cross fenced. 2,700
sqft, 4br/3ba home built in 1996.
Call for details! 386-243-8227
R.E.O. Realty Group
Fixer Upper on Suwannee River.
Needs TLC. Owner motivated &
will finance. $45,000
MLS 77337 Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty 386-397-3473
GREAT STARTER HOME!
3BR/2BA w/lots of closet space &
nice lawn $79,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #76432
Great Starter Home. Well cared
for. New countertops, tile floors &
metal roof. $79,900 MLS#77524
Brodie Alfred 386-623-0906
Westfield Realty Group
Hallmark Real Estate. Brick
home w/fine landscaping. Dream
kitchen w/double pantry.
Split bedroom plan MLS#77846
Paula Lawrence 386-623-1973
Hallmark Real Estate. Country
Estate. Sit in the swing of the big
oak tree and watch the horses
graze on 10ac. fenced. 39 ac total.
MLS#78139 Janet Creel 719-0382
Hallmark Real Estate. Pool &
Patio. 3br/2ba. brick home on
1.69 ac. Workshop &
SWMH on property. MLS#78117
Tanya Shaffer 386-397-4766
Home near the River. 3br/2ba,
1470 sqft. needs a little TLC.
MLS#76390 $34,900
Mike Lienemann 386-867-9053
Westfield Realty Group


810 Home for Sale
Home on 15 ac. w/over 2,500 sqft
home.Very Ig bedrooms w/private
baths. 24x24 workshop $235,000
MLS 77552 Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty 386-397-3473
HOME OR OFFICE on.
Alachua St; remodeled 1,207 SqFt
home $82,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #77724
Hallmark Real Estate. 2006
2200SF home. 2br/2ba w/mother-
in-law suite, 4 car garage, endless
hot water heater. MLS# 77547
$309,900 Jay Sears 386-867-1613
Hallmark Real Estate. 3br/2ba
new roof & AC. Comes w/SWMH
& 30x30 steel bldg. Completely
fenced. MLS# 76752
$179,900 Jay Sears 386-867-1613
Just Reduced 3/2 home, inside city
limits, fenced backyard, detached
carport w/office MLS#77411
$79,900 Call R.E.O.Realty,
@ 386-243-8227 Make Offer!
Just Reduced 4/2 on 1.57 acres,
fireplace. partially, fenced, MLS#
77412, Call Nancy Rogers at
R.E.O. Realty Group
386-243-8227 $64,900
Lg. 4/3 family home. 16x20
screened porch, workshop. 4.5 ac.
fenced/cross fenced MLS 74339
$229,900. N Fla Homeland Real-
ty Darlene Hart 386-288-2878
Lg. home on 1 ac. Granite floors
throughout. 4br/2ba. Nice open
kitchen & Florida room.. $148,000
MLS 77292 Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty 386-397-3473


Like New. 3br/2ba on 3 ac. New
kitchen cabinets, counters, carpet
& more. $179,900 MLS#77372
Charlie Sparks 386-755-0808
Westfield Realty Group
LOTS OF UPGRADES!
Remodeled kitchen in this
2BR/IBA home $29,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #77505
Mayfield S/D, nice fenced in back
yard w/small lake behind property.
Very nice. $99,888
MLS 77092 Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty 386-397-3473
Neat as a pin! Split floor plan
w/well manicuredd lawn. 10x12,
storage shed. $129K MLS 77932
Darlene Hart 386-288-2878
N Fla Homeland Realty


Owner Finance. Custom built 3/2.5
'10.8 ac. Granite, fireplace, vaulted
ceilings, surround sound. lanai,
gazebo. MLS 77382 Access Real-
ty. Patti Taylor $249K 623-6896
Remax Professionals Charming
w/many upgrades. 3br/2ba. 2 mas-
ter suites. MLS# 76779, $105,000
Missy Zecher @ 386-623-0237'
www.missyzecher.com
Remax Professionals Motivated
seller. All brick family home
w/many upgrades. MLS# 78168j
$129,000 www.missvzecher.com
Missy Zecher 386-623-0237
Remax Professionals Spacious
home on comer lot. Private access
to Lake Jeffery. MLS# 77783,
$198,900 www.missyzecher.com
Missy Zecher @ 386-623-0237
Spacious 4/2 home on 1 ac. Split
floor plan. Great neighborhood.
Easy access to 1-75 $220K MLS
77859 N Fla Homeland Realty
Darlene Hart 386-288-2878
SPACIOUS home built in
1995'has 2BR/2BA & 1,636 SqFt
on 1 acre $89,900 .
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #76887
Starter/Investment Home, 3/2 +
Bonus room on 1 acre, remodeled,
fenced MLS#77562 $99,900
Call Pam @ Remax
Professionals 386-303-2505



















Bring the picture in or
we will take it for youl
Ad runs 10 consecutive days
with a description and photo in the
newspaper and online E-edition.
Ad runs 10 consecutive days as a
classified line ad online.
You must include vehicle price.
All ads are prepaid.
Private party only.





2006 EF250
Ford Van
3/4 ton, metal work
shelves/ladder rack,
60K miles, exc. cond.
$10,500
Call*
386-555-5555
If you don't sell your vehicle
during the first 10 days, you
can run the same vehicle ad
for 10 additional days for
only $15.00
Terms and conditions remain the
same for the additional run.

To GtYur
Vehile oldCal
MayorBidget
(38 ) SS-44


810 Home for Sale
Well Maintained 3/2 on dead-end
street, quiet, country, close to
downtown $105,000 MLS#77800
Lisa Waltrip 386-365-5900
Westfield Realty Group
Well Maintained 3/2 w/open floor
plan,on 1/2 acre, fenced, shed
MLS# 78136 $134,900
Call Pam Beauchamp @ Remax
Professionals 386-758-8900

820 Farms &
20 Acreage
4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$69,900. $613mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
4 acres, Wellborn, New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down, $39,900, $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
6.45 ac river front property in
White Springs, cloe to Big Shoals.
Covered shelter for entertaining.
MLS# 77417 $124,888 386-243-
' 8227 R.E.O. Realty Group, Inc
Bring the horses. Peaceful &
ready for your home. Convenient
location. $38,000 MLS#76264
Millard Gillen 386-365-7001
Westfierd Realty Group
FARM- 7 stall barn, Apt.
17+ acres cross fenced.
Close in $950. mo.
386-961-1086
Half to ten acre lots. Some w/
well, septic, pp. We finance; low
dwn pmt. Deas Bullard Properties.
386-752-4339. www.landnfl.com
Look at all the Upgrades
s Completely remodeled.
$106,500 MLS#77483
Brodie Alfred 386-623-0906
Westfield Realty Group
Pretty piece of land. 2 acres close
to interstate 75 for under 20K.
Mobile Homes or residential ok.
MLS# 77400 Call 386-243-8227
R.E.O. Realty Group, Inc

830 Commercial
8 Property
Hallmark Real Estate. Commer-
cial Business Location on South
Main w/offices & service bldg.
Frontage, warehouse & storage
MLS#76280 Janet Creel 719-0382
Prime Commercial Location.
Just across from plaza. Frontage
on Baya w/2 curbcuts. $350,000
MLS# 77485 Call 386-243-8227
R.E.O.Realty Group, Inc

9 Vans & Sport
J a ,Util. Vehicles
HONDA ODYSSEY, 2000
White, very good condition ,
leather 7 passenger. $5400,00
Call 386-365-2479 -

REPORTER Classifieds

In Print and On Line

www.lakecityreporter.com


...to never miss a day's
(. worth of all the
Lake City Reporter
has to offer:
Home delivery.
To subscribe call
755-5445


S.CONDO AUCTION
Sat, June 25 @ 10AM 2705 DolphinAvenue I
ocean viewasAmNie Wsland;fT(REEl)3BR F3 5BA UN jS .
Unabstrucl OceanViewss/leachAccesswrhn500 n




Local Real Estate Agency looking

for Real Estate Assistant:

A self-starter with advanced skills in MS Word -
Excel Outlook PowerPoint Publisher, Adobe
Photoshop, website maintenance & online social
media applications. Other requirements include
excellent administrative & communication
skills & high standards of professionalism &
organization. Experience in a real estate office
is a plus but not required. Interested applicants
apply through Florida Crown Workforce by
faxing resume to 386-487-1218 ATTN: Terri
Williams, reference Job Order #9580650.


& WATERCRAFT


1996 33 Ft.
Fifth Wheel
w/2 slide-outs, camp or
reside, good condition.
$5,000
Call
386-362-1826
Leave Message


A-

Honda Odyssey
2000
White, very good condition,
leather, 7 passenger.
$5,400


Call
386-365-2479


Private Estate
Within the city limits. Beauti-- -
ful older home with mature
landscaping and lake views,
6 Br., 3.5 baths, 3 fireplaces,
private paved drive. 39.7
acres of property included
with home. Call for info &
showing! $1,200,000.
$3,000/mo. for rent.

Listing Agent Mary Brown Whitehurst

L 4 (386) 965.0887
or co-owner (386)397-5131


Classified Department: 755-5440








8C LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, JUNE 12, 2011


SPRING IN FOR"
Ke~b ONLY $1991
SC(all for availability .


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* ~~i "n ....!TiT Tf '" ^'1
St t. ': I... ..... .

'-- i-, ; tl .'. l. <'- :,, --d-el...


=il-rrr lrri ,l .lN .._...:L .Rtiz ,.;!,-, ...,.


I "It's Summertime
& the Tanning is easy"
1 MONTH (Regular Tanning)


nl oiori ,nin mio mo lti j tS.
TAKE AN ADDITIONAL
25% OFF!/

10% OFF!
ALL LARGER & HIGH
INTENSIVE PACKAGES
5 SW Malone Ave 752-4970
Voted l t ltnAugu ~ 1,20e ow
Sole uils August 1 S, 2011


Rear Engine Rider
$1,39900
* 12.5 hp Brigga &Stratton
*28" HI Vac Deck
* 2 Year Warranty
12 months
defared Intmret
with m tir ^B monthly, .
paymmntdue
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GRAVELY COMMERCIAL
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ura
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7 gauge mower deck
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Gravely Commercial ZT-HD
* 60" Mower Deck 4
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Special Pricing $4,99900oo


Gravely Pro Turn


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Trimmers
Chain Saws
Blowers
Backpack Blowers


* Accessories


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S YDLER MOTOR SALES
& EQUIPMENT


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IRONWOOD HOMES

FREE LOCAL;
FACTORY SERVICE
TOURS
Since 1973
Locally Built No Freight
4109 US Hwy 90 W, Lake City, FL 32055 386-754.8844


J















Story ideas?

Contact
Robert Bridges
Editor
754-0428
rbridges@lakecityreporter.com

Sunday, June 12, 2011


Lake City Reporter





LIFE


www.lakecityreporter.com


THE LAST


Local attorney pens

historical textbook of

prosecuting Ted Bundy.


By TODD WILSON
* twilson@lakecityreporter.com
Bob Dekle said it
was a historical
Lake City story.
that needed
to be told and
it also is an account with
enough technical legal
merit to help teach the


next gen-
eration of
prosecuting
attorneys
how to prop-
erly maneu-
ver through
a high-profile
murder case.
S That's
why it was
time to write
'The Last
Murder. The
Investigation,
Prosecution,
and
Execution of
Ted Bundy,"
a story that
centers on
Dekle's role
as lead pros-
ecutor in
serial killer
Ted Bundy's
first-degree
murder con-
viction. Dekle
prosecuted
the case in
connection
with the
abduction
and murder
of 12-year-old
Kimberly


* 1.:'*


be executed for the Lake
City crime in 1989.
Dekle, a longtime
Lake City resident, spent
30 years working as an
assistant state attorney
in the Third Judicial
,Cirquit. Since his retire-
ment in 2005, he's taught a
"prosecution clinic" third-
year course at the Levin


The Book
"The Last .. urder:The .
Investigation, Prosecution
and Executioh of Ted
Bundy" ,
'By Geore'R."Bob" D6kle
Sr .
Hardback, 221 pages, plus
index, Praeger Publishers,
$44.95
Available at amazon.com;
bn.com; overstock.com
(Book is classified as a
textbook, so it is not
available on shelves in
commercial bookstores;
also not available in digital
formatt until the publisher
sells a print quota.)
_.Other Published Works-
by Bob Dekle:
"Prosecution Principles:
A Clinical Handbook"
(2007)
'"Cross Examination
Handbook Persuasion,
Strategies and Technique"
(2010),


Leach in 1978 in Lake City.
The conviction saw Bundy,
who eventually confessed
to 30 murders nationally,
get the death penalty and


College of
Law at the
University of
Florida. The
class is part
classroom
lecture and
part in-court
training, as
students
work as
interns with
licensed
prosecutors
at locations
around the
state.
"Students
go into the
field of being
a prosecu-
tor because
they love it,"
Dekle said.
"My students
are on fire to
learn, eager
to learn
prosecution
methods."
And that
takes him
back to 1978,
when he was
a 30-year-old
,attorney with
three years


experience as a prosecu-
tor.
The terrible news came
on Feb. 9, 1978. A young
girl had gone missing


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Former prosecutor Bob Dekle of Lkke City, the man who led the prosecution against serial killer Ted Bundy for the 1978
murder of 12-year-old Kimberly Leach of Lake City, with his new book chronicling the case.


from Lake City Junior
High School.
A-week later, Bundy
was in custody on:
unrelated charges in
Pensacola, but was being
linked to a heinous crime
in Tallahassee. By July
1978, Dekle, with the
assistance of dozens of
investigators, had built
a grand jury indictment
and Bundy, already facing
murder charges in con-
nection with two student
murders in Tallahassee,
then was charged with
Leach's abduction and
murder.


"After Bundy was in
custody, a task force was
formed and'I was elected -
legal adviser to the task
force and media spokes-
man," Dekle said. "It just
kept growing and grow-
ing and pretty soon, all I
was doing was working
on this case. That's how I
got assigned to it."
S'"The Last Murder" is
classed and published -
as a textbook, but is an
easy read for anyone
interested in the facts of
the case. It chronicles the
crime scene investigation,
how the grand jury indict-


ment was constructed,
how the trial strategy was
--organized and conducted,
the conviction and sen-
tencing and the long
wait.through the appeals
process before Bundy's
execution more than a
decade later.
The book is detailed,
but not gruesome. It
describes the horrific
acts of a serial killer with
a vague, muted delivery.
The published work is
more about the method
of collecting and pro-
cessing evidence and its
proper presentation in


a court proceeding. It's
interesting, but it's not
Hollywood. Dekle said he
wanted to be respectful
of anyone who might pick
up the book.
, "I worked very hard to
not be gruesome and I
worked very hard to tell
the story with as much
decorum as possible," he
said. "I'm not interested
in. sensationalism. I tried
to write this book with
two objectives: To tell a
good story and to. offer
guidance to any young


BOOK continued on 2D


About the author
George R. "Bob" Dekle Sr.


leorge R. "Bob"
Dekle Sr., 63,
was born in

G and grew up
on a family farm in Union
County until the age of 13
when the family moved to
the "big city" of Lake City.
Dekle played defensive
guard on the football team
at Columbia High School
and graduated from CHS
in 1966. He
attended the
University of
Florida and
walked on
to the Gators
football team
and was on
the squad as
a. freshman
during Steve
Spurrier's
1966 Heisman
Trophy win-
ning season.
In those
days, freshmen
were not allowed to play
in games, but Dekle start-
ed for the Gators fresh-
men team that went 4-0,
winning games at Miami
and at Georgia, then win-
ning home games against
Florida State and Auburn.
He earned a bachelor's
degree in history from
UF, then returned to Lake
City where he taught 10th-
grade history at CHS for
one year before enroll-
ing in law school at UE


4
He graduated with a law
degree in 1973 and once
again returned to Lake
City.
Dekle worked as an
assistant public defender.
for two 'years from 1973-
75, then switched to pros-
ecution when he joined.the
state attorney's office in
1975 and worked there for
30 years until he retired
in 2005. He began
teaching a
S "prosecu-
tion clinic"
for third-
year stu-
dents at
UF's Levin
College of
Law shortly
after his
retirement.
Since join-
ing the UF
faculty,
he has
developed
a course in prosecuto-
rial ethics and has anoth-
er law course covering
Florida rules of criminal
procedures scheduled to
be implemented in the
Fall 2011 semester at the
school.
Dekle has published two
law school textbooks and
has three additional works
in progress. The books in
progress include:
0 'The Case Against
AUTHOR continued on 2D


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Section D


MURDER
















BOOK: Former assistant state attorney recounts Ted Bundy prosecution

Continued From Page 1D


prosecutor who might
be in the same situation
some day."
Dekle said he realized
quickly in depositions
with Bundy that he was
dealing with an emotion-
ally deranged madman.
"He was very person-
able, intelligent and
witty," Dekle said, "but
he was a cold-blooded
killer. I had represented
three psycfiopaths dur-
ing my time as a' public
defender, so I knew how
to pick up the character-
istics. It didn't take long,
even before we knew
everything he did, to fig-
ure out he was a
psychopath."
Dekle is quick to share
the credit for the success-
ful investigation and pros-
ecution with the dozens
who worked closely with
the case.
"Bundy was one per-
son who made a horrible
mess of things, but it
always takes more than


FILE PHOTO
The book is dedicated to the
memory of Kimberly Leach.

one person to clean up a
horrible mess," he said.
"It takes law enforce-
ment agents, prosecutors,
investigators ... it took
everybody to do this. It
took a lot of people to get
him to the death
chamber."


Dekle mentions many
names in the book that
will be familiar to local
readers. People' who
worked closely on the
case who are mentioned
in the book, to name
a few, include the late
Circuit Judge Wallace
Jopling; the late Public
Defender Milo Thomas;
former State's Attorney
Arthur Lawrence, the
late Columbia County
Sheriff Glen Bailey, the
late Lake City Police
Chief Paul Philpot; for-
met Lake City Police
Department detec-
tives Larry Daugherty
and Dale Parrish; for-
mer State's Attorney
Investigator and for-
mer Suwannee County
Sheriff Al Williams;
former State's Attorney
Investigator and for-
mer Columbia County
Sheriff Tom Tramel;
former Lake City Junior
High assistant princi-
pal Morris Williams; -


Public Defender's
administrative director
Don Kennedy; former
Florida Highway Patrol
Lt. Ken Boatright; the
late FHP Trooper Ken
Robinson; former FHP
'Sgt. Talmage Pace and
former State's Attorney
Jerry Blair.
The book's final chap-
ter, "Death Sentence to
Death Chamber," focuses
primarily on what became
a decade-long appeals
chess match between
Bundy's defenders and
the state.
In.the end, only the
book's final page-and-
a-hlalf is devoted to
describing Dekle's view
- from the second row,
less than 10 feet away
- of Bundy's final,
moments .in the heavy,
three-legged, oak elec-
tric chair on Jan; 24,
1989.
. "Compared to what he
did, he got off easy," Dekle
said.


FILE PHOTO
Assistant State Attorney George R. "Bob" Dekle Sr., circa 1978.


AUTHOR: Deklde now teaches law at UF

Continued From Page 1D


Christ: A Critique .of the
Prosecution of Jesus."
This book is scheduled
for release in 2012, Dekle
said. He researched
the topic through the
accounts in the Gospels,
plus, "I read every
account of criminal tri-,
als of the first century
that I could find," Dekle
said. "Jesus was basically
charged with treason and
there were about 40 of
these type of trials docu-
mented, so I studied the


details of these and read
descriptions of 127 other
similar ancient trials. I
went all the way back
to the trial of Socrates,
around 300 B.C. and
started there because his
trial. was very similar to
-the trial of Jesus."
"Florida. Criminal
Procedures." This is a
textbook that will be used
as part of the curricu-
lum of' Dekle's develop-
ing law school course of
Florida Rules of Criminal


Procedures. It is, set for
release later this year.
"Lincoln's Almanac
Murder Trial." This book
focuses on Abraham
Lincoln's, final murder
defense case as an Illinois
attorney before his presi-
dential campaign of 1860.
Lincoln earned an acquit-
tal for his client based on,
contradicting testimony
as to the position of the
moon on the night of the
crime. The release date is
not set. ;


ENGAGEMENTS


Campbell Griffin
Tea Campbell of Orlando
and Arnold Griffin of
Orlando announce their
engagement and upcoming
marriage.
She is the daughter of
the late Alonzo and Annie
Campbell. He is the son
of Arnold Griffin Sr. and
Veronica Shakespeare of
Fort White.
The bride-elect is a 1995
graduate of Columbia High
School. She also graduat-
ed from the University of
Florida.
The future groom is a
1998 graduate of Columbia
High School.
The wedding is planned
for 5 p.m. Saturday, June


18 at
Hotel


Paramount Plaza
in Orlando. "A


reception will
the hotel.


ANNIVERSARIES


Nettles
Shirley. V. Nettles of
Olustee and Nevin C. Ndttles
of Lake City were united in
' marriage June 18, 1961 in
Lake City.
They will celebrate their
50th anniversary at 6 p.m.
Saturday, June 18 at their
home with a party in their
S honor given by their children.
The couple have four
children: Jimmy (Cheryle),
Belinda,, Timmy (Charolet)
; and Scott. They, have 15
grandchildren.
The couple has lived in
Columbia County for 50
years. set at a later time.


Norris

Kathy Norris of Key
West and Eddie Norris
of Lake City were united
in marriage Sept. 4, 1956
in Key West.
The couple celebrated
the groom's 80th birth-
day and their 55th anni-
versary May 21 during
a BBQ luncheon at the
Shrine Club with 130
family and friends.


They met while stu-
dents at Florida State
University in 1953.
The bride retired'
from the City of Lake
City with 33 years of
service.
The groom retired
from the Department of
Transportation with 49
years of service.
The couple has lived
in Lake City since their
marriage.


follow


Gifts for the modern dad


BY KIM COOK
Associated Press

Pipe and slippers?
Today's dad is more likely
to be trail biking with the
kids, downloading sports,
apps or jamming with his
own weekend band.
So this Father's Day,
consider giving him some-
,thing that honors his cre-
ative, fun-loving and adven-
turous spirit
Cloud 9 Living is an
"experience gift" company;
they'll organize a day's
adventure that's sure to get
the adrenaline pumping.
Bungee jumping in Azusa,
Calif.; caving in Marengo,
Ind.; bike touring in
Chicago; and bull riding in
Denver or Houston are just
a few of the offerings.
There are tamer pursuits


too, such as an hour with a
gqlf pro or an archery les-
son, but there are sure" to
be dads who'd relish the
thought of a private ninja
lesson or a ride on a stock-
car track. Music lovers
might appreciate a couple
of hours with a real DJ
learning how to spin vinyl.
There are food,. wine
and brew tours as well.
Cloud 9 offers experiences
in or near many major cit-
ies. You can select a day's
adventure, or get Dad a gift
certificate and leave the
choosing to him. He has
a year to use it plenty of
time to screw up his cour-
age, if necessary.
If Dad's a "stuff' lover
when it comes to gifts,
there are several cool-and-
unusual items to consider.
Restoration Hardware's


Aviator collection was envi-
sioned by Chairman and
'Co-CEO Gary Friedman,
who was fascinated by
designs from the "Golden
Age" of aviation. He want-
ed to reinterpret the sleek
lines of those built-for-
speed designs for a modern
market The Devon'Spitfire
chair is a swashbuckling
swoop of stainless steel,
aluminum and leather.
Evoking a WWII airplane
seat, it would be a neat
home-office chair for the
family's paternal Snoopy.
Gelaskins has inter-
esting covers for the art
lover's iPad, including art-
ist Philip Straub's lush,
fantastic landscape and
architecture images, and
former Marvel Comics art-
ist Frank Miller's art from
"Sin City" and "300."
1


Ronnie Frost
Ronnie
Frost of
lake City
recently
gradu-
ated U.S.
Air Force
'basic train-
Frost. ing in San
Antonio, Texas.
Frost is a 2008 graduateof
Columbia High School


He is the son of Sharon
FrostandDeakerSterling and
brother of Fallon Sterling.

Brittany Marie
Guynn
Brittany Marie Guynn of
Lake City recently gradu-
ated from .U.S. Air Force
basic training in San
Antonio, Texas.
Guynn is a 2007 graduate


of Columbia High School.
She
is the
daughter
of Richard
and Marie
Guynn
andgrand-
daughter
Guynn of Pie and
Edwyn
Guynn. She is also the sis-
ter of Codey and Brandon
Guynn.


at
: NOW*




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mma. M i iM i miMM li MI1


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=*,* *








b a r

REMEMBER,


MILITARY ANNOUNCEMENTS


LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, JUNE 12, 2011


Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424













LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & CROSSWORD SUNDAY, JUNE 12, 2011


DEAR ABBY


Family members hide from


Grandma's talk marathons


DEAR ABBY: No .one in
my family will tell my grand-
mother the reason .they
don't call her is she talks too
much. None of us is retired
like she is, and our evenings
are chaotic enough without
a two-hour conversation with
her. Relatives ask me to relay
messages on their behalf so
they won't have to call her.
She's always crying and tell-
ing me I'm the only one who
is "good to her."
I'd feel guilty if I had to tell
Grandma the truth but
I, as well as the rest of.the
family, have had enough of
her long, guilt-inducing talks
and trips down memory lane
from 1940. How can I get the
point across without devas-
tating her sensitive nature?
CAPTIVE, AUDIENCE
IN FLORI)A
DEAR CAPTIVE.
AUDIENCE: The next
time your grandmother
tells you you're the only
one who is good to her, you
need to tell her she'd have
better., luck with the other
relatives if she limited the
length of her phone calls to
them. Encourage het to find
other interests so she isn't
as lonely and dependent as
she appears to be. To do so
isn't cruel; you'll be doing her
a favorbecause Whafs driving
people away is her neediness.
I 'don't know 'what your,
grandmother retired from,


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearabby.com

but she should have retired
TO something more than'
her phone. Unless she lives
in the wilderness, encourage
her to get out and volunteer.
DEAR ABBY: I received
aweddinginvitation from my
step-cousin. She has been
part of the family since we
were kids. We have always
had a friendly relationship.
My problem is, my last
name is misspelled on the
invitation. I'm married, so
I no longer use the family
name. I'd like to correct her
for future reference- (and so
the place card is correct at
the wedding reception), but
I don't want to hurt any-
one's feelings. What's the
proper thing to do?- DROP
THE "E," PLEASE, N
PITTSBURGH
DEAR DROP THE "E":
Whoever addressed your
invitation may have been in a
hurry, or your married name
may have been incorrectly
entered into a database.,
Because you are friendly
with' your step-cousin, call


her and remind her about
the proper spelling of your
married name. Wouldn't you
want to know? I would.
DEAR ABBY: When I1
was in fourth grade, I was a
bully. I remember one girl,
Margaret, whose life I made
particularly miserable with
verbal and physical abuse.:
When I did it, I immediately,
felt guilty because I saw how.
devastated and unhappy she
was. I knew her pain because
I had a rotten home life.
I grew up to be a respon-
sible citizen and loving
mother, but as I approach
80, I still wish I could, tell
Margaret how sorry I am.
How do I resolve this?
FORMER BULLY IN
ALBUQUERQUE
DEAR FORMER
BULLY: Because you know
Margaret's age and place of
. birth, try Googling her. If you
find her, offer the apology If
she is deceased, you'll have to
work on forgiving yourself
. Today, many schools have
programs that discourage or
prevent bullying. Its sad for
you' and Margaret that there
was no one.to reach out to who
could have made things better
for both ofyou. Had there been,
.it might have made both your
childhoods more pleasant.
* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-April 19):
Work alongside the people
who have supported you in
the past Speak up and letyour
thoughts bring new life to an
old idea. Short trips or spend-
ing more time with someone
you love will enhance your
relationship. ***
TAURUS (April 20-May
20): Don't give in to temp-
tation or underestimate the
cost or value of something
someone does for you. Work
toward stabilizing your life
with simplicity and modera-
tion. A romantic gesture may
help you get something you
want ***
GEMINI (May 21-June 20):
Evaluate how you can make
the most of your talents. A
service you have to offer will
turn out to have more inter-
est than you imagined. With
a little extra work, you can
develop an idea you have far
beyond your initial expecta-
tions. *** .
CANCER (June 21-July.
22): Your vision, insight and
awareness will guide you in
the right direction. Getting
involved in a cause will bring
you in touch-with someone
who can change your life and


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Word

your future. Socialize and net-
work. *****
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):
Instability at home and in
your personal life are appar-
ent Someone will overreact,
causing disruption to your
day. Remove yourself from
the turmoil and focus on what
you can do for' people who
appreciate you. **
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept 22):
Be careful what you say and
do. Someone who can make a
difference to your status, posi-
tion and future will judge yqu.
Focus on learning and broad-
ening your horizons. Now is
not the time to complain or
criticize. Be open and recep-.
tive. ****
LIBRA (Sept 23-Oct 22):
.You will grab attention with
yoer point of view and your
ability to be diverse and adapt-
able. Greater discipline and
direct application of what you
know will put you ahead of
any competition. Love is in the
Stars. ***
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov.
21): Focus on love and posi-


CELEBRITY CIPHER.
Sby Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: D equals G
W C X I K B S C N C K R P"N B X, C V R Y X T X Y
JXRW ... VR K REGGXRR., XTXB
.WCNEDC W C X SN'MY P IK O SMVW,X .C VI
P N S B K HK V Y E M X. J. G. NM J X R
PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "Truth-tellers are not always palatable. There is a
preference for candy bars." Gwendolyn Brooks
(c) 2011 by NEA, Inc. 6-13


tive action. You will reach a
spot that satisfies you and
allows you to develop a closer
bond with someone special A
creative plan could be costly.
An unusual financial situation
is likely to broadside you.


SAG1ITARIUS (Nov. 22-
Dec. 21): Love is on the rise.
With a few kind words and
gestures, you can attract the
affection you desire and make
personal plans for the future.
Don't be too eager to donate
to a cause you know little
about ***
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19): You can be at your very
best if you invest in acquiring
greater knowledge or spend-
ing a bit to update your image.
An idea you have for bringing
in extra cash should be devel-
oped. Don't spend a lot A
change of plans will favor you.
in the end. ****
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Your contribution
to friends, family and plans
you have for the future will
enable you to make a giant
leap toward your goal Don't
allow negative influences to
interfere. Alter your current
lifestyle to lead to positive peo-'
ple who support your deci-
sions. **
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): Discipline will be required
if you are being enticed by
individuals who don't have
your best interests at heart'
Don't bend to fit in. Your
strength and courage ,to fol-
low your own path will lead to
a proposal you cannot refuse.
,*** *


SUNDAY CROSSWORD


CAGEY ANSWERS By Yaakov Bendavid / Edited by Will Shortz 1 2 3 4i 5 6 7 18 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18


Across
1 Chickens, e.g.
6 Workers with
hammers
12 Punch relative
15 Captain of
fiction,
,19 Enthusiastically
accepted
20 Facing
21 Coffeehouse
fixture /
22 Take ___ (go
swimming)
23 Not secure
24 How organized
philosophers
deal with ideals?
27 Like about 20%
of the.world's
land area
28 Gillette product
29 Bronchodilator
user
30 Highway S-
curve?
34 Vex
.35 Comp.oser
Charles .
36 Playbook figures *
39 Pulled off
42 Reinforcing .
bracket
45 Bygone copy
48.Suffix with .
Ecuador
49 Software basis
50 Spanish article'
51 Countess
bankrupts St.
Louis N.H.L.
team?
55 Some 35mm
cameras
57 Actor Wilson
For any three answers,
call from a touch-tone
phone: 1-900-285-5656,
1.49 each minute; or,
'with a credit card, 1-.800-'
814-5554.


58 Digital' *
communication?:
Abbr.
5.9 Words on an
"Animal'House"
cake-float' '
60 Legendary
-' Onondaga chiief,
63 Alien craft
66 Cackler
67 Warning before
I driving past'the
town dump?.
73 Some Windows
systems
74 'Start of a .
S selection process
75 Break up
77 Down time
80 100%
82. Marvel Comics
'herb
84 Denials
85 Wayne Gretzky?
91 Soph..and jr.
92 Holder of a
runoff?
93 French river or
department
94 Reliever
95 Must
97 Fr. holy title
98 Ancient Cretan.
writing system I
100 _._ Pictures
101'Readily. recite,
with "off"
, 103 Being too large
to fail?
1.10 Onetime Robin
Williams co-star
114So-called Mother
of Presidents
11.5 "Shucks!" .
116 Singles bar ,
Pickup strategy.
119 Flying monster
of film:
120 "Baywatch"
actress ___ Lee
i Nolin


121 Rocket.from
China
122 Notice
123 Bit of Weather
j Channel news
124 By all --___
125 Kind of card
126 Chucks
127 Pick up

Down
1 Israel's Ehud
2 Grammatically
proper
identification
3 Nail polish
ingredient
4 Loser of 1988
5 "Casino Royale,"
for one
6 Animals with
black-tipped
tails
7 One of a dozen
8 "If___ you ..."
9 Subject of
Genghis Khan
10 Princely abbr.
11 Arms race inits.
12 Diving seabirds
13 "Nuts!"
14 Make a queen,
e.g.
.15 Present at birth
16 Deleted
17 Maurice
Chevalier song .
1 &Ecuador and
Venezuela are in
it
25 Zilch
26 Friends of
Frangois
'31 Crumbly cheese
32 Symbols of
strength
33 Dilbert co-
worker
37 Safari equipment


38 "Matilda" author,
1988
40 As; above, in a
footnote
41 Not those, in
Brooklyn
42 Ooh and aah
43 Dark
44 Hebrew
matriarch
45 Classic song that
begins "And now
the end is near"
46 Vapour trail?
47 Jiffy
49 Ikeor Billy at
the O.K. Corral
52 Qatar's capital
53 Prince Albert's,
home: Abbr.
54 Root crop
56 Con
61 N.L. Central
player
62 Co. ID's
64 Flipper
65 Biblical
breastplate
stones
66 Part of. 1.0-Down,-
maybe
68 Mirror image?
69 Old ballad
"Robin _" _
70 Philatelist
George, founder
of the largest
weekly
newspaper for
stamp collectors
71 Frank __ two-.
time Oscar-
winning director
72 Turn outward
76 Onetime Texaco
competitor


77 GPS options:
Abbr.
78'Answer to the old'
riddle "What lies
flat when empty,
sits up when
full?"
79 "Forget I said
anything"
80 Scote right
before a win,
maybe
81 Unique


83 G.I..'s food
86 Train systems
87 Actress Hatcher
88Den__
Nederland
89 Cluster
90 Wives in Sao
Paulo
96 Mask feature
98 Puddle producer,
perhaps
99 Incantation
.opener


100 Hybrid clothing
for women
102 Actresses Best
and Purviance
104 Marina sights
105 "Now I see"
106 Kathleen
Kennedy
Townsend, to
J.F.K.
107 City south of
Brigham City


108 Raises
109. "Fiddler on the
Roof" role
110 When doubled,
a Samoan port
111 Wowed
112 Start of some
congregation
.names
113 Land in Genesis
117 Summer hours
in L.A.
118 Auto monogram


Answers.to last Sunday's Crossword.
.UI AIKIE RISER IIN GIMIB|ETLILISMSIFIP|D
EIN IV rELIOIP I I RIAIE IIN 10111 1 MT


R H M RON|BllllE] RMB S0A SE A
A B CID 0OZ AWIA T R A PiP11lsP I D
F OIUIRIIIISEDAN HAI RE HARD
T YRE SEEYA ALLY EMER


4 2 9


9 4


1 5 8


4 3258


45 3


7 3 6


3 1 2


2 3 1 6


8 7 5 1 9


6 JL798 L 9L8


9 1.9 8 L 9 L 6V









8 S 9 L 6 9 L





V Z C 98 L9L6

LIL iL, 6I8t19
____________ ________________________ _________________________________


Page Editor: Todd Taylor 754-0424










ADVERISMENT


~zii


.*:I


p.,


LAKE CITY REPORTER


SUNDAY. JUNE 12. 2011


".-. *" '1
,., '* '^