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The Lake City reporter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01576
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 6/8/2011
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01576
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text








Injury bug
Tiger Woods skips
out of U.S. Open
ch n to leg issues.
000017 120511 ****3-DIGIT
LIB OF FLORIDA HISTORY
PO BOX 117007
205 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-1943


,.J aV


Finals action
Heat, Mavericks clash
in Dallas for Game 4
of the NBA Finals.
326 IB


Tiger talk
Columbia football
coach speaks to
Kiwanis Club.
Sports, I B


Reporter


Wednesday, June 8, 201 I


www.lakecityreporter.com


Vol. 137, No. 116 6 75 cents


Storm



sparks



6 fires

Largest blaze, at
Impassable Bay, has
consumed 400 acres.

By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
Lightning strikes from an electri-
cal storm on Monday sparked six
wildfires in the Columbia County
area, Florida Division of Forestry
officials said.
Kurt Wisner, Florida Division of
Forestry mitigation specialist and
public information officer, said the
largestfire is in the Osceola National
Forest on the Columbia/Baker
County line in the Impassable Bay
area and officials are calling it the
Impassable Bay fire. The fire has
consumed 400 acres.
'"The overall intent is to make
sure it stays within the swamplands
in Impassable Bay," Wisner said.
"We don't want it to escape and get
out into populated areas."
The smoke hovering over Lake
City most of Monday night and
Tuesday morning was from the
Impassable Bay Fire, Wisner
said.
The U.S. Forest Service is the
lead agency working to contain the
fire on Osceola National Forest
property.
"We collectively are putting what-
ever assets are necessary on the
fire," Wisner said. "They've done
one tanker drop on it with fire retar-
dant"
At last report, the fire was listed
as being zero percent contained.
"We only started the attack on it
this (Tuesday) morning," Wisner
said. "They worked at it last night,
but today (Tuesday) they started
mounting a larger .suppression
attack on the fire."
, Four of the fires are northeast
of Lake City in forested areas in
northern Columbia County- and
one 'of the four is north near the
Georgia border in an area called
Sandlin Bay. The others are in
the vicinity of the Benton Tower
area.
"The other fires are all small fires
ands we have lines around all of
them at this point," Wisner said. "Of
the remaining five fires, the largest
got to about eight acres and they've
all been contained."
Florida Division of Forestry offi-
cials have three units at Sandlin
FIRES continued on 3A


Raid targets local M.D.


Sealed search warrant
executed by state,
local, federal officers.,

By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.corn
A host of law enforcement offi-
cers from the local, state and
federal levels --- converged on a
Lake City doctor's office Tuesday
morning as Region 2 Pill Mill'
Strike Force agents executed a
civil search warrant
The search warrant was served


at the offices of Dr. Joseph
Hernandez, 826 SW Main Blvd.
Patients and staff were pres-
ent when the warrant was served
but all were evacuated without
incident
Sgt. Ed Seifert, Columbia
County Sheriffs Office public
information officer, said the search
warrants are sealed and addition-
al information will be released at a
later date.
"The search ivarrant affidavit
is sealed and we can't discuss the
circumstances as to why we are
RAID continued on 3A


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia County Sheriff Mark Hunter (left) speaks with. CCSO.Deputy
Winston Warner Tuesday at the Medical Clinic of North Florida at 826
SW Main Blvd. #102, where the Region 2 Pill Mill Strike Force executed
a civil search warrant.


JURY'S IN AT ART SHOW


Local woman claims
2 blue ribbons at
6th annual event.

By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
Winning was
twice as nice for
SDebra Laughlin
of Lake City,
who took home
first place in two categories at the
Sixth Annual Juried Art Show.
"There is a lot of really, really
nice artwork here," she said. "It
would be hard for me to pick or
narrow down the winners."
An awards ceremony and
reception for the art show was
Tuesday at the Columbia County
Public Library West Branch.
The annual event is sponsored
by the Friends of the Library and
the North Florida Art League,
said Wally Reichert, show coor-
dinator. A total of 91 pieces by
47 artists were entered in this
year's show.
"It's getting more talent and
it's getting larger each year," he
said.
Winners were named in four
categories:
Painting first place
Laughlin, second place Lisa
Williams and third place Marilyn
Jones.
Drawing first place
Laughlin, second and third place
Anda Chance.
Photography first place
Carolyn Tarkington, second
place Debbie Rice and third
place Stacy Whiteside.
Sculpture/creative arts
ART continued on 3A


Photos by JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter,
ABOVE: Debra Laughlin poses with her
granddaughter, Layla, 4, next to a colored
pencil drawing she made called 'Friendly
Fence,' which won first place in the divi-
sion. Laughlin also won first place for her
acrylic painting called 'Spring Drive.' 'I've
been drawing, and painting since I was
5,' Laughlin said. 'I just like pictures that
people think are sweet and can enjoy,
especially if they have children in them.'
LEFT: Del Porter (right) explains to Dr.
Marvin Hall how he came to rebuild a
discarded writing table for which he won
first place in the sculpture/creative arts
category in the Friends of the Library
and the North Florida Art League's Sixth
Annual Juried Art Show Tuesday. Carolyn
Tarkington won first place in the photogra-
phy division.


Thrift shop shuts down


House of Bargains
forced to close its
doors after 28 years.
By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
Lake City's oldest thrift shop has
closed its doors.
The House of Bargains, operated
by CARC-Advocates for Citizens
with Disabilities, ceased operations
after 28 years Saturday. The organi-
zation is moving to an online sales
operation.


'We're closing the House of
Bargains because'it no longer
generates enough profit to
support its services.
Mike Belle
CARC executive director

"We're closing the House of
Bargains because it no longer gen-
erates enough profit to support its
services," said Mike Belle, CARC
executive director.
June Olson and Carrie Barton


began what would become the
House of Bargains, which helped
provide funding for CARC. The
shop sold items such as second-
hand clothes, furniture and books,
which were collected from commu-
nity donations.
House of Bargains hasn't brought
in a significant amount of money
compared to the cost of services
over the last 10 years, Belle said. A
special meeting was called by the
CARC Board of Directors May 31.
The decision to close was made
THRIFT continued on 3A


Springs budget


cuts total $276K


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.comrn
The Ichetucknee Springs
Basin Working Group
lost an estimated $68,000
when the Department of
Environmental Protection
cut funding to the group
- along with three others in
the region in its 2011-12
budget
Thomas Frick, Chief
of Bureau of Watershed


Restoration, said in a letter
the funding loss was due to
reductions in the state bud-
get brought on by hard eco-
nomic times.
According to
the Department of
Environmental Protection's
communications office, the
total budget for the Springs
Initiative for 2010-11 was
$514,000.
BUDGET continued on 3A


1 18426 1ul4 0 0 1


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400


9464
Mostly Sunny
WEATHER, 2A


O pinion ................
Around Florida...........
Obituaries ..............
Advice & Comics.........
Puzzles .................


TODAY IN
PEOPLE
Wii introduces
new touchscreen.


COMING
THURSDAY
Farmers Market
preview.


- 2


l..K











LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING WEDNESDAY, JUNE 8, 2011


SCelebrity Birthdays


$H3 ( Tuesday:
Afternoon: 5-8-9
4'., Evening: 7-5-0


(Iay4 Tuesday:
Afternoon: 1-7-2-0
' Evening: 0-7-0-0


)flmtCh -
Monday:
4-7-15-21-24


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS


Nintendo debuts touchscreenWii successor


LOS ANGELES
Nintendo has introduced
the world to the Wii's
touchy new big brother:
the Wii U.
The Japanese gam-
ing giant on Tuesday unveiled the
Wii video game console's successor,
which will broadcast high-definition
video and feature a touchscreen
controller that can detect motion and
interact with what appears on a tele-
vision display.
"Up until now, home console
games had to occupy the TV screen
in order to be played," said Nintendo
president Satoru Iwata. "The new
controller for Wii U, with its 6.2-inch
screen built in, means you won't
need to give up your gameplay when
someone else comes in the room
and wants to watch a TV program."
The white touchscreen control-
ler, reminiscent of Apple Inc.'s iPad
and other tablet computers, can
broadcast standard-definition video
but also features a directional pad,
microphone, dual analog sticks,
speakers, two pairs of shoulder
buttons and a front-facing camera,
which can be used to make video
calls.
The console itself will use propri-
etary high-definition optical discs,
1080p HDMI output and internal
memory that can be upgraded with
USB and SD technology. No other
technical specifications were pro-
vided.

Surfing Madonna mosaic
draws mass following
ENCINITAS, California A
mosaic of a surfing
Madonna that is
stuck to a wall under
a train bridge in the
California beach city
of Encinitas is tech-
nically graffiti under,
the law.
Madonna But her beauty is


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Shigeru Miyamoto, the creator of the video game'lThe Legend of Zelda,' poses for
the audience during a Nintendo news conference at the E3 Gaming Convention in
Los Angeles Tuesday. Miyamoto announced four new titles in the 'Zelda' series,
which is celebrating its 25th anniversary this year.


drawing a mass following, and city
officials have spent thousands hiring
an art agency to see about removing
her without causing damage.
The Los Angeles-based art
conservation agency, Sculpture
Conservation Studio, on Tuesday
began testing ways to safely remove
the rock and glass mosaic.

Ooh-la-la! Ferguson's
show heads to Paris
NEW YORK Craig Ferguson is
taking "The Late Late Show" to the
City of Lights .
Ferguson
announced on
Monday's show that.
he'll travel from that
budget-strapped
Los Angeles home
Ferguson to tape in Paris the
Ferguson weekof June 13-17.
He jokes that "this is the first time
ii the history of this show that we've
been allowed outside."'


Kristen Bell will be among the
guests joining Ferguson for the epi-
sodes dubbed "Le Late Late Show
avec Craig Ferguson."

Author of 'The Cat Who'
series dies at 97 in SC
LANDRUM, S.C. The author
who wrote 29 books in the'"The Cat
Who ..." mystery series almost quit
writing after the third book was pub-
lished because popular tastes had
changed so much.
Lilian Jackson Braun, who died
last week in South Carolina, took
an 18-year hiatus between "The
Cat Who Turned On and Off' and
"The Cat Who Saw Red," published
in 1986. She resumed because her
husband encouraged her to return
to writing after she retired from The
Detroit Free Press in 1984.
"By the time I had written the
fourth one, tastes in mysteries had
changed,'.
* Associated Press


* Former First Lady Barbara
Bush is 86.
* Actor-comedian Jerry Stiller
is 84.
* Comedian Joan Rivers is
78.
* Actress Millicent Martin is
77.
* Actor James Darren is 75.
* Actor Bernie Casey is 72.


HOW TO REACH US
Main number.........(386) 752-1293
Fax number..............752-9400
Circulation ...............755-5445
Online... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055..
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson.... .754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
Editor Robert Bridges .....754-0428
(rbridges@lakecityreporter.cam)
ADVERTISING
Director Ashley Butcher .. .754-0417
(abutcher@lakecityreporter.com)
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440


E Singer Nancy Sinatra is 71.
E Singer Chuck Negron
(Three Dog Night) is 69.
0 Musician Boz Scaggs is 67.
N Actor Don Grady is 67.
E Rock musician Mick Box
(Uriah Heep) is 64.
E Author Sara Paretsky is 64.
0 Actress Sonia Braga is 61.
0 Actress Kathy Baker is 61.


BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon.... 754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7:30
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation ..............755-5445
(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks .............. $26.32
24 Weeks...................$48.79
52 Weeks.................;$83.46
Rates indude 7% sales tax.
Mail rates
12 Weeks .................. $41.40
24 Weeks...................$82.80
52 Weeks................ $179.40


CORRECTION


The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run
in this space. And thanks for reading.


AROUND FLORIDA


Suspected bani
robber tosses ca
GAINESVILLE P<
said a man suspected c
robbing a credit union
onto Interstate 75, whe
motorists saw him toss
cash out of his car wine
The Campus USA Cr
Union was held up arot
11 a.m. Tuesday. Minu
later, police received ca
from motorists heading
south on Interstate 75
about money being thr
from a car.
Authorities said the
suspect was pulled ove
about 11:30 a.m. in Ma
. County. No further det
about the robbery or s
pect were immediately
available.

500 cats remo
from sanctuary
S. HIGIh SPRINGS -
Alachua County Anima
Services is removing a
500 cats from a cat san
ary.
Veterinarians were
removing and examine
the cats on Tuesday. T
investigation was expe
to continue through
Wednesday.
Calls to the facil-
ity, Haven Acres Cat
Sanctuary, were not
returned. Officials said
they believe this is a c,
of hoarding.
Alachua Animal Ser
Director Dave Flagler
a staff member visited
the facility recently an
reported that it appear
some of the cats were
bad health. Then the a
cy got a search warrar
which was served Tue
morning.

Man accused o
Ponzi scheme
TAMPA- A Fort
Myers man has been
charged in Tampa fedE
court with bilking $16
lion from Polk County


FSU wins regionals over Alabama
Florida State's Jayce Boyd (right) celebrates with teammates
Sherman Johnson (from left) and James Ramsey after hitting
a two-run homer in the eighth inning of a rain delayedregion-
al college baseball game Monday in Tallahassee. Florida
State beat Alabama 11-1.


investors.
ved James Risher was
charged Friday with
money laundering and
conspiracy to commit mail
al and wire fraud. He was,
bout arrested in South Florida
ictu- during a joint investigation
of the FBI, the Internal
Revenue Service, Florida
ng Department of Law
.he Enforcement and U.S.
cted Postal Service.
U.S. Magistrate Judge
Thomas 13. McCoun III
has ordered that Risher
remain in the custody
of U.S. Marshals. A pre-
a liminary hearing is set for
ase June 17.

vice Doctor, 60,
said pleads guilty
dX JACKSONVILLE
red A 60-year-old doctor
in has pleaded guilty to dis-
igen- tributing pain pills at a
at, Jacksonville clinic.
*sday Officials, with the U.S.
Attorney's Office said
STuesday that Thomas
if V. Holland distributed
"significant amounts" of
pills, including oxyco-
done, Xanax and Soma to
patients without appropri-
eral ate assessments of their
mil- medical conditions.
According to court


documents, the owner of
these clinics paid the pre-
scribing physicians, includ-
ing Holland, a specific
negotiated dollar amount
per patient, ranging from
approximately $40 to $60
per patient Witnesses told
authorities that daily cash
deposits from the clinic
ranged between $10,000
and $90,000.
He faces a maximum
penalty of 20 years in fed-
eral prison and a $1 million
fine.

Woman admits
faking report
ST. PETERSBURG A
St. Petersburg woman
told police she filed a false
report after she went miss-
ing for three days in May.
Police say Samantha
Ann Gilman, 21, told them
she was abducted and
sexually assaulted by two
men.
When confronted by
detectives, Gilman admit-
ted she made up the story.
She said she had just want-
ed to spend some time
away from home.
Police said they spent
about 160 hours investigat-
ing the case.
N Associated Press


THE WEATHER



MOSTLY MOSTLY PARTLY PARTLY
SUNNY SUNNY CLOUDY. CLOUDY


HI 94 LO 64 HI93 66 j HI LOi HI f LO8
L2.1.61. '~
91 T~tV


Pensacola
90,/'174


Valdost
94/66 Jacksonville
Tallahassee Lake City 88. 66
94/68 ..... 94/64
* / .Gainesville Datna Beach
pgana aCity -,.93/66 86j,71
88/12 ~ ~ uci


Tam
91/


TEMPERATURES
High Tuesday 93
Low Tuesday 71
Normal high .89
Normal low 67
Record high 99 in 1985
Record low 58 in 2006

PRECIPITATION ,
Tuesday 0.00"
Month total 0.14"
Year total 14.25"
Normal month-to-date 1.37"
Normal year-to-date 18.62"


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise tom.
Sunset tom.

MOON
Moonrise today
Moonset today
Moonrise tom.
Moonset tom.


6:29 a.m.
8:31 p.m.
6:28 a.m.
8:31 p.m.


1:07 p.m.
12:58 a.m.
2:11 p.m.
1:34 a.m.


10 muiest b l
Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+.


PARTLY
CLOUDY


HI 93 LO 69


City Thursday
Cape Canaveral 85 72 pc


Daytona Beach
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Galnesville


87 72 ,
86/77/t
92/71/t
92/67/pc
89/68/s
86/79/t
93/66/pc
87/76/t
90/71/t
92/67/pc
91/71/pc
90/74/s
91/73/pc
94/67/s
90/74/t
,94/66/s
86/74/t


Friday
86 72 pD
85 72 pc.
87/78/pc
92/71/pc
91/66/pc
90/68/pc
87/78/t
92/67/pc
87/76/pc
91/72/pc
91/68/pc
90/71/pc
86/76/pc
92/75/s.
93/69/pc
90/74/pc
93/66/pc
87/76/pc


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.
U-


oc_ weather.com
June June June July Forecasts, data and
8 15 23 1 graphics 0 201. Weather
First Full Last New I m I V Central, LP, Madison, WIs.
weather J www.weatherpubllsher.com


-t 0aXa 12 I


7a tp 7p la 6a
. Wednesday Thursday







FOcasted nt -FIpratre els ie" twertire


1 On mhi-"j:a1-1 in
1951, for the first
time in the United
States, tornadoes
near Corn, Okla.,
were caught on film.


Daily Scripture
"Before the mountains were
born or you brought forth the
whole world, from everlasting
to everlasting you are God."
Psalm 90:2

Thought for Today
"Don't talk about what you
have done or what you are
going to do."
Thomas Jefferson,
third President of the United States (1743-1826)

Lake City Reporter


Oucaa Jacksonville
,93/66Key West
Orlando Cape Canaveral Key West
91/70 84/72 M Lake City
pa., Naples
73 ,' West Palm Beach Ocala
86/77 0 Orlando
"* Ft. Lauderdale Panama City
FL Myers 86/78 Pensacola
93/70 Naples Tallahassee.
92/73 Miami Tampa
Key st 87/77 Valdosta
Key West, Palm Beach
87/78


wimlakecity1 l por ]l II
Lake ity epoterS


11''11111'' IN '1 11


Page Editor: Jason M. Walker, 754-0430


89/72











LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & NATION WEDNESDAY, JUNE 8, 2011


Hearing Solutions to host


special event Thursday


Hearing Solutions Inc. in
Lake City will be holding a
special event from 9 a.m. to
5 p.m. Thursday, featuring
the Lyric hearing device.
According to Lyric's
website, the device is the
world's first and only 100


percent invisible hearing
device that can be worn at
all times while delivering
natural sound. There are
no batteries to change and
no daily hassles.
Risk-free, 30-day trials
for the device are available


at Hearing Solutions.
Call Hearing Solutions
at 1-877-500-1142 to sched-
ule an appointment. Their
office is located at 183 NW
Veterans Street.
Visit www.
HearingSolutionInc. com.


The local allocation had
been about half that total.
"We funded four work-
ing groups (Ichetucknee,
Silver, Rainbow and
Wakulla) during fiscal
year 2010-2011 for a total
of $276,000," said Dee
Ann Miller, of the DEP
press office.


The budget cuts took
an estimated $68,000 each
from the Ichetucknee
Basin, Rainbow and Silver
Springs Working groups
and slightly more than
that from the Wakulla
Springs Working group.
The working groups
were slated to get $68,000


annually for three years, as
their coordinators worked
on designing a restoration
plan to preserve and restore
springs in their areas.
The working groups were
originally formed by the
DEP and the DEP paid coor-
dinators to run quarterly
meetings.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
The Medical Clinic of North Florida was taped off Tuesday as agents from the Columbia
County Sheriffs Office; Florida Department of Law Enforcement; Florida Office of the Attorney
General, Medical Fraud Control Unit; Florida Department of Health; U.S. Department of
Health and Human Services, Office of Inspector General; and U.S. Drug Enforcement
Administration, Diversion Division executed a search warrant.


RAID: Doctor's office targeted

Continued From Page 1A


here," he said, as additional
authorities arrived on the
scene.
A Columbia County
Sheriff's Office cruiser was
parked in front of the doc-
tor's office, with emergency
lights flashing, as several
other law enforcement offi-
cers from other agencies,
parked adjacent to the build-
ing and headed inside the
offices to collect evidence.
Authorities cordoned
off the doctor's office with
police tape and continued to
trek in and out of the office
as they worked on executing


the search warrant
Representatives from the
Columbia County Sheriff's
Office, Florida Department
of Law Enforcement, Florida
Office of Attorney General
(Medicaid Fraud Control
Unit), Florida Department of
Health, U.S. Department of
Health and Human Services
(Office of Inspector General)
and U.S. Drug Enforcement
Administration (Diversion
Division) were on the scene
for several hours.
'We've been at this site for
several hours this (Tuesday)
morning and we intend to be


here throughout the day,"
Seifert said.
Hernandez was origi-
nally arrested in February
2010, when he faced drug-
related charges after a
year-long undercover
investigation found he was
allegedly trafficking in
Oxycodone.
His arrest came after an
undercover investigation,
where a search warrant was
issued, stemming from com-
plaints Hernandezwas issuing
prescriptions for pain medica-
tion that were not medically
necessary.


Wildfires ravage Arizona


By BOB CHRISTIE and
SUSAN MONTOYA BRYAN
Associated Press

SPRINGERVILLE, Ariz.
- Flames from a mammoth
forest fire licked the ridges
surrounding the eastern
Arizona town of Eagar on
Tuesday afternoon, forc-
ing the evacuation of about
half the 4,000 residents as
surrounding towns also pre-
pared to empty.
People started stream-
ing out of Eagar as sheriff's
deputies and police officers
directed traffic. Flames
were spotted on a ridge on
the southeastern side of
nearby Springerville and
columns of orange smoke
rose from the hills. Ash
rained from the sky, which
was filled with thick


smoke, and when the sun
peeked through, it was
blood-red.
Angie Colwell, her hus-
band Mike and their two
children were loading up
their belonging as authori-
ties ordered their Eagar
neighborhood to evacuate.
"We love the mountains
and we're just afraid of
what's going to be left
after the fire comes
through," the longtime
resident said.
The blaze has burned
486 square miles of
ponderosa pine forest,
driven by wind gusts of
more than 60 mph since
it was sparked on May
29 by what authorities
believe was an unattend-
ed campfire. It officially
became the second-larg-


est in Arizona history on
Tuesday.
No serious injuries have
been reported, but the fire
has destroyedfive buildings
so far. It has cast smoke as
far east as Iowa and forced
some planes to divert from
Albuquerque, N.M., some
200 miles away.
The Apache County
Sheriff's Office issued the
evacuation order for areas
south of Highway 260 and
east of Greer just before 4
p.m. The highway will be
closed after the evacua-
tion is complete.
Eagar has about
4,000 residents, while
Springerville has another
2,000. In all, about 7,000
people have been ordered
to prepare for evacuation
in recent days.


ART: Local woman wins twice

Continued From Page 1A


- first place Del Porter,
second place Regina
Ward and third place Ann
Openorth.
Honorable mentions
were also awarded to 16
people.
Cash prizes were
awarded in each cat-
egory. First place win-
ners received $100, sec-
ond $50 and third $25.
Honorable mentions also
received $15.
Winning first place
for her photography
was a surprise for
Tarkington because
of the stiff competi-
tion.
"There were so
many good works
there," she said. "I
was so impressed
with the quality of
work."
Her friends have
always encouraged
her to enter shows
and this was her first
one, Tarkington said.
"It's nice to have
your work acknowl-
edged by other peo-
ple, especially when
you enjoy it, she said.
"You want other peo-
ple to be able to enjoy
it as well."
Porter won last
year in the show and
entered again with
his marquetry work,,
he said. Marquetry
is the art of applying
pieces of veneer to a


structure to form deco-
rative patterns, .designs
or pictures.
Wining this year was a
wonderful repeat of his
success, Porter said.
"I've been doing (mar-
quetry) for 25 years," he
said. "I started off mak-
ing simple things like
furniture."
The show is open
through Aug. 6 and
patrons have the oppor-
tunity to vote for their


favorite work, Reichert
said. A cash prize will
be awarded for the top
choice, and voters will
also have the opportunity
to receive a free painting.
Porter encourages the
community to see the dis-
play of work before the
show closes.
'To think, here in this
little town we have so
many talented people," he
said. "Everybody should
come."


FIRES: 6 blazes reported

Continued From Page 1A


Bay, three units at Impassable
Bay working with U.S. Forest
Service personnel and three
units in the Benton Tower area.
Wisner said Monday's
afternoon thunder showers,
which will probably continue
throughout the summer, are
almost as much a curse as
they are a blessing.
"They don't bring that


much rain, but they bring
lightning and today is living
proof of that," he said. "We
would like for our citizens to
keep their eyes open after an
electrical storm and call us is
they see smoke the area."
To contact the Suwannee
Forestry Center, call 758-
5700, to report the location
of the smoke.


THRIFT: Shop closes

Continued From Page 1A


after a lengthy discussion.
Four retail sales staff
members are no longer with
the organization as a result
of the closing, he said. The
staff was the skeleton crew
that kept the store running
in conjunction with volun-
teers and clients.
The online operation
launches July 1 as an eBay
store, and it will sell dona-
tions brought to the CARC,
Belle said. The transition
to online sales will mean
much lower operating
expenses and increased
profits.
Coordination of the online
sales operation will take
place at the CARC main
location on Sisters Welcome
Road, which is behind the
Adult Day Training .Center,
Sunshine Enterprises.
It will provide additional
work opportunities for CARC
clients by providing training


for jobs such as packaging
and sorting items, he said.
'There are a diverse set'
of work opportunities for.
people with disabilities of all
levels with the online sales
operation," Belle said.
The House of Bargains
will open its doors one last
time for a going-out-of-busi-
ness sale June 24-26, he said.
Inventory is in transition to
the CARC main office, and
donations will be collected at
that site.
"We have a great opportu-
nity," he said. '"We can take
the donations that CARC
supporters have given gen-
erously for decades and sell
them on a global market In
fact, we will be able to track
sales and trends with preci-
sion to both price items com-
petitively and let the com-
munity know which items
we are most likely to sell
online."


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Change to a bank with a history of giving back to our communities.
Change to a bank that has helped thousands of people make the change.


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BUDGET: Cuts total $276,000

Continued From Page 1A


OB/ YN

DAINA GREENE.MD
WOMEN'S HEALTH WITH A WOMAN'S TOUCH







/ .4-
:\"- '




*Meet with a provider the day you come in
*Same day/next day OB appts.
*Dr. Greene is chief medical officer at Pregnancy
Care Center
*Free pregnancy tests
Call for appt. Mon.-Thurs. 8am-5:30pm
755-0500 449 SE Baya Dr. Lake City


Accepts All Insurance


Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424


*















OPINION


Wednesday, June 8, 2011


OUR


OUR
OPINION


Springs

will survive

-with

our help

The loss of $276,000
in state funding
for four springs
working groups was
certainly a blow, but
not a fatal one.
The solution to cleaner
freshwater springs and aquifers
is the same with or without
state funds: People must do the
right thing to preserve these
jewels of North Florida. No
amount of legislation or public
money can take the place of
personal responsibility by each
individual, business or industry
who lives or operates in the
region.
The springs working groups
have done excellent work in the
past and the volunteers who
make up these organizations
are passionate about our
environment Now, without any
state assistance, these groups
will be asked to work harder
and even more efficiently than
they have in the past
To make up any
deficiencies, local business and
governmental partners will
be asked to step up like never
before. But at the end of the
day, ifs the responsibility of
each individual in this region
to make springs protection a
priority. It must be a mindset, a
lifestyle and the rule of the day
whether money is behind
the effort or not
Protect it today. Drink from it
forever.
HIGHLIGHTS
IN HISTO RY
Today is Wednesday, June
8, the 159th day of 2011. There
are 206 days left in the year.
Today's Highlight in History:
On June 8, 1861, voters
in Tennessee approved an
Ordinance of Secession passed
the previous month by the
state legislature.
In A.D. 632, the prophet
Muhammad died in Medina.
In 1845, Andrew Jackson,
seventh president of the United
States, died in Nashville, Tenn.
In 1864, Abraham Lincoln
was nominated for another
term as president during the
National Union (Reptublican)
Party's convention in
Baltimore.

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Robert Bridges, editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman

LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,


Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


www.lakecityreporter.com


SCHOOL'S OUT..


Baby clothes always


keep growing

t took a while to find it,
the right box with the
right stuff. Now that I've
found it, I don't want to
put it away.
Baby clothes. As keepsakes
go, they're hard to beat And
even harder to part with.
I remember, as a little girl, Sharon Randall
how my grandmother taught www.sharonrandoll.com
me to crochet Or rather, how
she tried. I was not the sharpest the horsehair sofa tapping
needle in the pincushion. -my toe to the ticking of the
"Hold the yarn like this," she grandfather clock as she
said, "and the hook like that." created one masterpiece after
Like this and like that another, while I cranked out
OK so far. miles of unconnected chains.
"Now make a loop, catch the I was happy just watching her
yarn with the hook and pull it hands.
through until it's tight." I wish you could've seen
Make a loop, catch something them.
with something and ... do what? Years later, after I left the
After several failed attempts South, moved to California
left me on the verge of tears and of All Places, married a high-
her on the edge of losing her school basketball coach and
religion, she suddenly realized started a family, imagine my
the problem. surprise to receive in the mail
"You're right-handed!" she a package addressed by my
said, as if she'd just noticed that grandmother's unmistakable
I had two heads, "and I'm left- spidery hand.
handed! I've been teaching you Pregnant with my second
to do it backwards!" child, I was homesick for my
Switching hands helped family, so much so that before
considerably, but I would never opening the package, I held it
have the talent, let alone the for several moments hugged it
patience, to be anything like tight the way my grandmother
my grandmother, the Queen would hug me pressing my
of Crochet a spindly legged, face to its brown paper to inhale
potbellied, butter-churning, the faint musty scent of her old
God-fearing, snuff-dipping. Hoosier cabinet.
woman who could whip out an Then I ripped it apart
entire lace'tablecloth during "I made this for you and your
a single episode of "General sweet baby," she wrote in a
Hospital" and never miss her note. "It's yellow for either a girl
spit can or take her eyes off the or a boy. I surely hope I get to
TV. hold that baby someday."


I loved to sit beside her on


LETTERS


She hd crchete thetiy


on you
sweater and bonnet from the
softest cotton imaginable with
countless delicate stitches that
looked like the shells from a
thousand shores.
As I studied those stitches, I
could picture her hands skin
speckled with age, fingers bent
with arthritis, palms open to
whatever life held. Somehow I
wasn't homesick anymore.
Two months later, my
newborn daughter came home
from the hospital wearing that
sweater and bonnet, all bundled
up in a bright yellow blanket
Her 3-year-old "big" brother
said she looked like a banana
the most beautiful banana I'd
ever seen.
She was 18 months old before
we went to the South for a visit
But her great-grandmother
most surely got to hold her.
This morning, some 30 years
hence, with my grandmother
long departed, I opened a box,
found that sweater and bonnet,
and, once again, I saw her
hands.
I hope my daughter will see
them, as well, when she opens
the package I plan to give her.
I hope she will see, not just the
handiwork, but the hands.
When she was a little girl,
she loved to dress her Cabbage
Patch dolls in the sweater and
bonnet she had worn as a baby.
I suspect she'll also love, a
few months from now, seeing
her first real baby wear them,
too.
E Sharon Randall can be con-
tacted at P.O. Box 777394,
Henderson, NV 89077.


TO THE EDITOR


A missed opportunity


To the Editor:
How many 70-year class
reunions do you have the honor
of covering in the Lake City
Reporter?
The CHS Class of 1941 was
very disappointed that no one
showed up to cover our reunion
on Saturday, May 28. I talked
to C.J. three times prior to our
reunion. The last time was
the Wednesday before the


OTHER -
On this date:
In 1905, President Theodore
Roosevelt offered to act as a
mediator in the Russo-Japanese
War.
In 1915, Secretary of
State William Jennings Bryan
resigned in a disagreement with
President Woodrow Wilson over
U.S. handling of the sinking of
the Lusitania.


reunion.
We were promised that some-
one would be there to take a
picture and get information for
your paper. So much for keep-
ing promises!
We had 14 classmates along
with 14 other family and friends
attend. We had a delicious lunch
catered by Blue Roof Grill and
spent the afternoon catching up
with old friends.


IIGH LIGHTS IN
In 1953, the Supreme Court
ruled that restaurants in the
District of Columbia could not
refuse to serve blacks.
In 1966, a merger was
announced between the
National and American Football
Leagues, to take effect in 1970.
In 1967, 34 U.S. servicemen
were killed when Israel attacked
the USS Liberty, a Navy intel-


We would like to thank Lloyd
Peterson for the note he left our
classmates. Everyone attending
appreciated your thoughtful-
ness.
The Class of 1941 had a
grand time at Alligator Park. We
only wish the Reporter had been
there to cover this milestone!
Sincerely,
Bobbie Sue Blanton
Lake City


HISTORY
ligence-gathering ship in the
Mediterranean. (Israel later
said the Liberty had been
mistaken for an Egyptian
vessel.)
In 1978, a jury in Clark
County, Nev., ruled the so-called
"Mormon will," purportedly
written by the late
billionaire Howard Hughes, was
a forgery.


4A


Dale McFeatters
mcfeattersd@shns.com


Weiner

blindsided

by social

media; it's

not private


seems to sink
in: There is no
true privacy or
confidentiality
online, especially in the social
media. What is private tends
to become public, whether
through; carelessness, malice
or hackers.
Teenagers do seem to
learn this, but at some cost in
chagrin and embarrassment
At age 46 and a member of
Congress, Anthony Weiner
should have known this but
clearly did not
With incredible
recklessness, over three
years he carried on a secret
sex life through Facebook,
Twitter and email with women
he met online. Then the
inevitable happened. A photo
of-his crotch while wearing
underwear that he had sent
to a Seattle college student
surfaced on a conservative
website and a promising
political career ground to a
shame-faced halt
Weiner, a seven-term
Democrat from New York,
would have quite likely been
the next mayor of New York.
He had emerged as the chief
spokesman for his party's
liberal wing, and with his
in-your-face Big Apple style,
its chief combatant with
conservative Republicans. His
future in the party seemed
blessed when former President
Bill Clinton presided over his
marriage last year to an aide
to Secretary of State Hillary
Rodham Clinton.
When the lewd photo from
his Twitter account first
appeared two weeks ago,
Weiner said his account must
have been hacked. But under
relentless pressure from the
press, he grew increasingly
evasive; for example, he
said he could not say with
"certitude" that the groin in
the photo wasn't his.
On Monday, at a cringe-
inducing press conference,
Weiner conceded he had been
lying and that the photo was
his, as subsequent photos of
him bare-chested, another of
him leering at the camera in a
T-shirt, indubitably were.
The congressman, at
times crying, ran the ritual
gantlet of self-mortification
"a hugely regrettable
mistake," "a very dumb thing
to do," "destructive," "deeply
ashamed." He called it "an
aberration"; if so, it was an
aberration that went on for
three years and, if it had not
been detected, might still be
going on.
Despite Republican calls
for his resignation, he said
he would not resign, and
that he would welcome an
investigation by the House
ethics committee. On the
surface, what Weiner did
may have been stupid and
reckless, but not illegal. His
one vulnerability is a House
rule that requires members
to conduct themselves "at all
times in a manner that reflects
creditably on the House."
The committee may rap
his knuckles, but his raunchy
escapades fall short of grounds
for expulsion. His political
future rests in the hands of his
constituents.
* Dale McFeatters is editorial
writer for Scripps Howard News
Service.


It














LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL WEDNESDAY, JUNE 8, 2011 Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424


Today
Senior Services to offer
live entertainment
Columbia County Senior
Services Inc. is hosting
live entertainment 11-11:45
a.m. today at the LifeStyle
Enrichment Center. Call
(386) 755-0235 for more
information.

Newcomers and Friends
meeting
The Lake City
Newcomers and Friends
are meeting 11 a.m. today
at the Eastside Village
Clubhouse. The program
is the annual picnic. Lunch
will be provided by Blue
Roof Cafe and is $10. All
members, guest and new-
comers are welcome. Call
961-9335 or 752-4552 for
more information.

Thursday
Accelerated reading
camp
An accelerated read-
ing camp is available 8
a.m.-4:30 p.m. Monday-
Friday at Annie Mattox
Recreation Center. The
program is a partnership
with the Columbia County
Public Library. The cost
is $1 per day, per child.
Lunch and a snack is
provided. Contact Phyllis
Julks at 697-2059.

Friday
Watertown Reunion
The Watertown Reunion
is 7 p.m. Friday and noon
Sunday at First Full Gospel
Church. A country gospel
sing is Friday featuring
Billy Earl Sanders of
Nashville, Tenn. Dinner on
the grounds is Saturday.
Bring a lunch to share.
The church is located at
Washington Street and
Jones Way.

Author visits library
The Columbia County
Public Library is hosting
a drawing workshop with
author Michael White
11 a.m. at Fort White
Community Center and 2
p.m. at the Main Branch
Friday.


Students reap rewards from garden project

Joshua Eadie (left), 8, and his sister, Emily Eadie, 6, students in Melrose Park Elementary's 21st
Century After School Program, pose for a photograph holding yellow squash they picked in the
after-school program's garden at Melrose Park Elementary Friday.


Donors wanted
LifeSouth will be offer-
ing free movie tickets for
all donors at the Lake
City Mall and the Center
on State Road 47 from 10
a.m.-6 p.m. Friday.

Saturday
FACS of Lake City
announces events
The Filipino American
Cultural Society of


Lake City is hosting an
Induction of Officers/
Board and Filipino
Independence Day
Dinner Party 6 p.m. June
11 at Epiphany Catholic
Church Social Hall.
The event will include a
social time, buffet din-
ner and program. The
program will feature
FACS Cultural Dancers,
a guest speaker, and a
night of fun and dancing.
Members please bring
your best covered dish


to share and Filipino
attire is suggested. Non-
Members are always wel-
come, but there is a $10
per person cover charge
at the door for this event.
Contact Bob Gavette
(386) '965-5905 for more
information.

Columbia High School
50th reunion
The Columbia High
School Class of 1961 is
having its 50th reunion


6 p.m. June 11 at the
County Club of Lake
City. The cost is $50 per
couple or $25 per person.
All 1961 classmates are
invited to attend. Call
Shirley at 961-8105 or
Sharon at 752-7943 for
more information.

Farmers Market
The Lake DeSoto
Farmers Market opens 8
a.m. to noon Saturday at
Wilson Park. The day will
feature the Summer Fun
& Safety Program with eh
Lake City Police and Fire
Departments. Vendors
are welcome. Contact
Jackie Kite, community
redevelopment adminis-
trator, at (386) 719-5766
or kitej@lcfla.com.

Legion Riders Ribfest
and Street Dance
Legion Riders Ribfest
and Street Dance is
noon-10 p.m. Saturday
at the American Legion
Post 57 on Hwy. 41 S.
Plates will be serviced
from noon to 7 p.m. The
meal is $10 and includes
a half slab, baked beans,
coleslaw and includes a
beverage ticket. Seconds
are $5. Also available are
$5 wristbands for draft
beer. The street dance
is 6-10 p.m. Music is by
Skattergun. The 50-50
Raffles will take place
each hour.

Filipino Independence
Day Dinner Party
The Filipino American
Cultural Society of
Lake City is hosting an
Induction of Officers/
Board and Filipino
Independence Day
Dinner Party 6 p.m. June
11 at Epiphany Catholic
Church Social Hall.
The event will include a
social time, buffet din-
ner and program. The
program will feature
FACS Cultural Dancers,
a guest speaker, and a
night of fun and dancing.
Members please bring
your best covered dish to
share and Filipino attire is
suggested. Nonmembers
are always welcome, but
there is a $10 per person
cover charge at the door "
for this event. Contact


* To submit your Community
Calendar item, contact Antonia
Robinson at 754-0425 or by
e-mail at arobins.on@
lakecityreporter. com.


Bob Gavette (386) 965-
5905.

Sunday
Assistance for those
with impairments
Vocational Rehabilitation
provides services for
eligible people who have
physical or mental impair-
ments that keep them
from working. These ser-
vice can help with medical
treatment, job placement
and training. Columbia and
Union Counties call (386)
754-1675.

Southside Summer
Camp
Registration is open for
Southside Summer Camp.
Only 80 spots are avail- ,
able. Camp is $225 for nine
weeks running June 13-
Aug. 12. The camp is open
to boys and girls ages 7
-14 and is 7:30 a.m.-5:30
p.m. Monday-Friday June
13-Aug. 3. Trips include
Blue Springs, bowling,
swimming, skating, mov-
ies, Chuck E. Cheese and
more. Call Wayne Jernigan
at 758-5448.

Summer Day Camp
Summer Day Camp
Registration for
the Columbia County
Recreation Department
summer day camp pro-
gram is 8 a.m.-5 p.m. at
Richardson Community
Center. The camp is open
to boys and girls ages 7
-14 and is 7:30 a.m.-5:30
p.m. Monday-Friday June
13 -Aug. 3. The cost for
the eight-week camp is
$225 and will include a
variety of daily activities,
free breakfast, lunch and
weekly field trips. Space
is limited to the first
60 participants Contact
Mario Coppock or Nicole.
Smith at 754-7095 or 754-
7096.

Summer program
Summer program
Registration for the Girls
Club summer program
is open. The cost for the
summer camp is $225.
Girls must be 6-13 to
attend. Call Terri Phillips
at (386) 719-5840 for more
information.


OBITUARIES


Elizabeth Lusk Kramer
Elizabeth Lusk Kramer, age 95,
of Jennings, FL. passed away.
Sunday, June 5, 2011 in Lake
City, FL. Ms. Kramer was born
in Lawrence, South Carolina to
the late Emil and Paula Schultz
Haupt. Ms. Kramer was pre-
ceded in death by her husbands,
Frank Lusk and Failey Frank-
lin Kramer, her daughter, Pa-
tricia Hill of Jennings and a
son, Robert who died at birth.
Survivors include four sons,
Jack Lusk, Monks Corner, S.C.,
Earl, Lusk, Whitmere, S.C.,
Frankie Lusk, Columbia, S.C.,
and Jimmy Kramer, Madison,
FL.; two daughters, Betty Ad-
ams, Jennings, FL. and Fay
Robinson, Lake City, FL.; one
brother, Sonny Haupt, Summet-
ville, S.C.; a number of grand-
children, great grandchildren
and great-great grandchildren.
Funeral services will be held


at 2:00 p.m. Thursday, June
9,. 2011 at West Lake Church
of God. Interment will fol-
low at West Lake Cemetery.
The family will receive friends
between the hours of 5:00-7:00
P.M. Wednesday, June 8 at Harry
T. Reid Funeral Home, Jasper, FL.
In lieu of flowers, contributions
may be made to The Health


Center 560 SW McFarlane
Ave, Lake City, FL. 32054.
HARRY T. REID FUNER-
AL HOME, Jasper, FL. is
in charge of .arrangements.

Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


New WfEf Sandals
S_ for Men & Women
"A-E. F for Children



Tumblers

1 S L C. (8 7 0


IColumbia County's Most Wanted


Felisna Renee
Messer
DOB: 4/18/80
HEIGHT: 5' 4"* WEIGHT: 145 Ilbs.
HAIR: Brown EYES: Green
WANTED FOR: VOP Carrying a
Concealed Weapon by
Convicted Felon
**Prior Use or Possession
of Weapons"*


Jamaal Megail
Owens
DOB: 11/26/82
HEIGHT: 6' 0"
WEIGHT: 170 lbs.
HAIR: Black
EYES: Brown
WANTED FOR: Dealing in Stolen
Property


WANTED AS OF 6/6/11
ANYONE WITH INFORMATION ON THE WHEREABOUTS OF THESE INDIVIDUALS IS ASKED TO CALL CRIME STOPPERS OF COLUMBIA COUNTY.
WE DO NOT WANT YOUR NAME, JUST YOUR INFORMATION!
The likeness of suspects is supplied by the Columbia County Sheriff's Office Warrants Division and/or other law enforcement agencies.
The cases are active at the time of publication unless otherwise noted. Crime Stoppers of Columbia County, Inc., and their volunteers
are jointly and individually exempt from any and all liability which might arise as a result of the publication of public records.

SCALL (386) 754-7099 OR
SUBMIT A WEB TIP AT
OF OLUMBIA COUNTYS www.columbiacrimestoppers.net
Funded by the Crime Stoppers Trust Fund; Administered by the Office of the Attorney General


Pi-:- -!-----


S Eyglass

Includes lenses & frames.
Some Restrictions Apply.
m COUPON REQUIRED. EXPIRES JUNE 30, 2011
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Includes Lenses & Frames
Some Restrictions Apply.
COUPON REQUIRED. EXPIRES JUNE 30, 2011
-- m l m B--1i


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


SmDa


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sri
Inlue Satrda


LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL WEDNESDAY, JUNE 8, 2011


Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424













6A LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL, STATE, NATION WEDNESDAY, JUNE 8, 2011 Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428



Anthony trial: Testimony focuses on trash bag


ORLANDO An attor-
ney for a mother charged
with killing her ..2-year-
old daughter suggested
Tuesday that a crime scene
investigator altered crucial
evidence.
Casey Anthony's defense
attorney questioned crime
scene investigator Gerardo
Bloise about why he dried
out garbage found in a bag
in Anthony's car. The bag
is important since defense
attorneys say a foul odor
in the car came from the
garbage, while prosecu-
tors contend the smell was
from decomposing human
remains.
"You had no idea it would
alter significant 'items in
this case?" defense attor-
ney Jose Baez said during
cross-examination.
Bloise said he was fol-
lowing protocol, since dry-
ing out evidence preserves
it and makes it easier to
examine.
Caylee Anthony's skel-
etal remains were found in
a wooded area not far from
her grandparents' home in.


December 2008. Anthony
has pleaded not guilty to
killing her daughter, and-
if convicted, she could
be sentenced to death.
Her defense attorney has
said the toddler drowned
in the family's swimming
pool.
A scientist at the Oak
Ridge National Laboratory
also returned to the witness
stand Tuesday. Arpad Vass,
who developed a new tech-
nique for detecting decay-
ing bodies, was called back
because prosecutors had
showed him the wrong can
containing the odor from
Anthony's car during his
testimony Monday. They
showed him the correct can
Tuesday.
During Monday's tes-
timony, Vass described
smelling an "overwhelm-
ingly strong" odor of human
decomposition in the can
containing an air sample
from Anthony's car.
Vass has pioneered a way
of detecting human decom-
position from air samples
and detailed for jurors his


research on the chemi-
cal compounds observed
when a body breaks down.
Until Monday, the tests had
never been admitted in a
trial in the United States.
Vass told jurors the
amount of chloroform in
the car's trunk was "shock-
ingly high." Chloroform is
present during decomposi-
tion.
An FBI expert on
Tuesday appeared to con-
tradict Vass' assertions
about the amount of chlo-
roform in the car and said
the chemical also is pres-
ent in common household
cleaners.
"It was not the most
chloroform I've seen in 20
years," Michael Rickenbach
said under cross-examina-
tion.
Rickenbach said he
detected amounts of
chloroform in Anthony's
trunk comparable to that
of household cleaners.
He also noted the sub-
stance is present in water.
Rickenbach tested carpet
samples from the trunk's


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Defense attorney Jose Baez, left, smiles before the start of court in the trail of his client
Casey Anthony, right, at the Orange County Courthouse on Tuesday in Orlando. Anthony is
charged with killing her 2-year old daughter in 2008.


spare tire cover and from
the right and left sides of
the trunk.
Rickenbach acknowl-


edged, during later
questioning by pros-
ecutor Jeff Ashton, that
describing chloroform


levels as high or low is
subjective.
* Associated Press


Obama: No fears of

double-dip recession


By DESMOND BUTLER and
NANCY BENAC
Associated Press

WASHINGTON -
President Barack Obama
insisted Tuesday that the
country is not at risk of
slipping into a double-dip
recession, but he conceded
he does not know whether
a sudden slowdown in job
growth is a blip or an indi-
cation of a longer, more
worrisome trend. The pres-
ident said the nation is on
a solid but uneven path to
recovery and the'key is to
"not panic.:"
"I am concerned about
the fact that the recovery
that we're on is not pro-
ducing jobs as quickly as I
want it to happen," Obama
said at a joint news confer-
ence with visiting German
Chancellor Angela Merkel.
"Obviously we're experi-
encing some headwinds."
Obama spoke amid a
wave of short-term negative
economic news, including a
sharp drop in the number
of jobs added in America
in May after employment
growth had shown strong
signs for three straight
months. Obama said the
economy is rebounding
well from a disastrous blow'
dating tQ 2008 even though
millions still. endure hard
times. He promoted con-
tinuing steps already taken,
like tax breaks for business
investment, and his familiar
longer term agenda of debt
reduction and spending on
education, infrastructure
and energy research.
Given the jittery times,
a batch of economic data
can make people wonder,
"Well, are we going to go
back this terrible crisis?"
Obama said. "And that
affects consumer confi-
dence, and it affects busi-
ness confidence, it affects
the capital market. And so
our task is to not panic."


ASSOCIATED PRESS
President Barack Obama and German Chancellor Angela
Merkel take part in a joint news conference in the East Room
at the White House in Washington Tuesday.


The economy is the
overarching issue as
Obama heads into a 2012
re-election campaign, and
a Washington Post-ABC
News poll released Tuesday
found that disapproval with
how Obama is handling the
economy and the deficit
has reached a new high.
Obama also said he was
concerned that a Greek
-default on its debt could
cause enormous .complica-
tions for the U.S. economy
but he signaled that it was
a problem for Europe to
solve, adding that Germany
and other European coun-
tries needed to act together
to help. Greece stabilize
its economy. "We think it
would be disastrous for is
to see an uncontrolled spi-
ral and default in Europe
because that could trig-
ger a whole range of other


events," he said.
For her part, Merkel
weighed in on the United
States' own struggles in
reducing its debt, saying
"I think each and everyone
ought to deal with his or
her own problems."
"We in Europe have our
hands full already with
what we need to do," she
said. "And I'm absolutely
convinced that as we shoul-
der our responsibility and
meet our responsibility, so
will the United States of
America."
Merkel's visit is her
sixth trip to the United
States since Obama took
office. Later, Obama was
to treat Merkel to a night
of high pomp at the White
House, awarding her the
Presidential Medal of
Freedom during a black-
tie dinner.


,. New ,REEfN Sandals
for Men & Women
S ~ "f for Children




-" I ;I:. Tumblers


Columbia County's Most Wanted
Felisha Renee Jamaal Megail
Messer Owens
DOB: 4/18/80 DOB: 11/26/82
44 HEIGHT: 5'4" WEIGHT: 145 lbs. HEIGHT: 6' 0"
HAIR: Brown EYES: Green WEIGHT: 170 Ibs
WANTED FOR: VOP Carrying a E- HAIR: Black
C Concealed Weapon by HAIR: Black
Convicted Felon EYES: Brown
**Prior Use or Possession WANTED FOR: Dealing in Stolen
of Weapons** Property
WANTED AS OF 61/6/11
ANYONE WITH INFORMATION ON THE WHEREABOUTS OF THESE INDIVIDUALS IS ASKED TO CALL CRIME STOPPERS OF COLUMBIA COUNTY.
WE DO NOT WANT YOUR NAME, JUST YOUR INFORMATION!
The likeness of suspects is supplied by the Columbia County Sheriff's Office Warrants Division and/or other law enforcement agencies.
The cases are active at the time of publication unless otherwise noted. Crime Stoppers of Columbia County, Inc., and their volunteers
are jointly and individually exempt from any and all liability which might arise as a result of the publication of public records.

U m CALL (386) 754-7099 OR
SUBMIT A WEB TIP AT
F COLUMBIA COUT www.columbiacrimestoppers.net
Funded by the Crime Stoppers Trust Fund; Administered by the Office of the Attorney General


COURTESY PHOTO

Principal's Award winners
Columbia City Elementary fifth-graders who received the Principal's Award earning all
A's from second grade through fifth grade at the school's Fifth-Grade Graduation and
Awards Ceremony June 3 pose for a photograph with their trophies. Pictured are Jessica
Jewett (front, from left), Emily Harrington, Matthew Hunter (back, from left), Blake Scott,
Principal Lana Boone, Austin Nash, Carlie Carswell and Chace Curtis. Not pictured is
Winston Kam.


EX~AM





by IneedetOtoers

REMEMBER


PNOW


$Q 1 Pair


S Includes lenses & frames.
S Some Restrictions Apply.
COUPON REQUIRED. EXPIRES JUNE 30,2011
a- a a ,,aa a



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2 Complete Pair

EygEelasss
Includes Lenses & Frames
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LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVERTISEMENT WEDNESDAY, JUNE 8, 2011 7A
PAID ADVERTISEMENT

HUNDREDS OF PEOPLE CASH IN ON

MODERN DAY GOLD RUSH!


By Jason Delong
STAFF WRITER


Gold and silver pour


into yesterday's Roadshow dbe to highest prices in 40 years.


Yesterday at the Holiday Inn, hundreds lined.
up to cash in antiques, collectibles, gold and jew-
elry at the Treasure Hunters Roadshow. The free
event is in Lake City all week, buying gold, sil-
ver, antiques and collectibles. One visitor I spoke
with yesterday said, "It's unbelievable, I brought
.in some old coins that had been in a' little cigar
box for years and some old herringbone necklac-
es-in less than fifteen minutes I left with a check
for $700. That stuff has been in my jewelry box

TREASURE HUNTERS ROADSHOW
HAS BEEN TOURING THE WORLD
SINCE 2001. THIS YEAR ALONE,
WE WILL VISIT 3,000 CITIES AND
OVER HALF A MILLION PEOPLE
WILL CASH IN!

and dresser for at least 20 years."'. Another gentle-
man brought in an old Fender guitar his father
had bought years ago. The man said, "Dad had
less than fifty bucks in that guitar." The Roadshow
specialist that assisted him made a few phone
.calls and a veterinarian in Seattle, Washington
bought the guitar for $5,700.00. The seller con-
tinued,, "I got another $150.00 for a broken
necklace and an old class .ring: It's not every day.
that someone comes to town bringing six thou-
sand dollars with your name on it."





A


Jeff Parsons, President of the Treasure Hunters
Roadshow, commented, "Lots of people -have
items that they know are valuable but just don't
know where to sell them. Old toys, trains, swords,
guitars, pocket watches and jewelry is valuable to
collectors. These collectors are willing to pay big
money for those items that they are looking for."
This week's R.oadshow is the best place to
get connected with those collectors. The process
is free and anyone can bring items down to the
event. If the Roadshow specialists find items that


COINS Any and all coins made before.
1964: silver and gold coins, dollars, half
dollars, quarters, dimes, nickels and pennies.
All conditions wanted!
GOLD & SILVER PRICES AT 40 YEAR
HIGH for platinum, gold and.silver during this
event. Broken jewelry, dental gold, old coins,
pocket watches, Krugerrands, gold bars,
Canadian Maple Leafs, etc.
JEWELRY Gold, silver, platinum, diamonds,
rubies, sapphires, all types of stones and
metals, rings, bracelets, necklaces, etc.
(including broken jewelry). Early costume
jewelry wanted.


S -'A
, I


WRIST & POCKET WATCHES Rolex,
Tiffany, Hublot, Omega, Chopard, Cartier,
Philippe, Ebel, Waltham, Swatch, Elgin, Bunn
Special, Railroad, Illinois, Hamilton, all others.


If you go to the Roadshow, you can
cash-in your items for competitive prices.
Roadshow representatives will be avail-
able to assess and purchase your items. at
the Holiday Inn, this week through Satur-
day, in Lake City.

their collectors are interested in, offers will be
made to purchase them. About 80% of the guests
that attend the show end up selling one or more
items at the event.
Antiques and collectibles are not the only
items.the Roadshow is buying. "Gold and silver
markets are soaring," says Archie Davis, a Road-
show representative. "Broken jewelry and gold
and silver coins add up very quickly. I just finished
working with a gentleman that had an old class
ring, two bracelets and a handful' of silver dollars.
His check was for over $650.00. I would say
that there were well over 100 people in here yes-
terday that sold their scrap gold."
One gentleman holding his check for over
$1,250.00 in the lobby of the event yesterday
had this comment: "lam so happy I decided to
come to the Roadshow. I saw the newspaper ad
for the event and brought in an old German
sword I had brought back from World War II and
some old coins, and here is my check. What a
great thing for our community. I am heading home
now to see what else I have that they might be
terested in.'
The Roadshow continues today starting at
am. The event is free and no appointment is
eded.


TOYS, TRAINS, DOLLS All makers and
types of toys made before 1965: Hot Wheels,
Tonka, Buddy L, Smith Miller, Nylint, Robots,
Battery Toys, Mickey Mouse, train sets-Mark-
lin, American Flyer, Lionel, Hafner, all other
trains (all gauges, accessories, individual cars),
Barbie dolls, GI Joe, Shirley Temple, charac-
ters, German.


MILITARY ITEMS & SWORDS
Revolutionary War, Civil War, WWI, WWII,
etc: swords, badges,'clothes, photos, medals,
knives, gear, letters. The.older the swords, the
better.


t interest from your
attic, garage, basement, etc. There is
no limit to the amount of items you can
bring.
*No appointment is necessary.
*If you decide-to accept the offer, we
will pay you on the spot and ship the
item to the collector. The collector pays
all shipping and handling charges.
*You get 1 00% of the offer with no hid-
den fees.


SEE YOURSELF


ON TV
FILMIG THI WEE


GUITARS & OTHER INSTRUMENTS
Fender, Gibson, Martin, Rickenbacker, Gretsch,
new and vintage amps, saxophones, wood
winds, mandolins and all others.


TREASUREHUNTERSROADSHOW.COM


p








8A LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVERTISEMENT WEDNESDAY, JUNE 8, 2011


PAID ADVERTISEMENT

Gold a Silver Reaches Highest Price


Ever Recorded, Cash In This Week Only!
Got Gold? This week, there has never been a better time to sell your
unwanted goldjewelry, mismatched earrings, broken herringbone necklaces.


Buyers in town this week only Paying

Cash for all Gold & Silver
Paying Cash for all Gold Jewelry, Broken Jewelry, Silver Jewelry


GOLD JEWELRY


SILVER JEWELRY


.**j~* .-


- H ~r ~ ~ ~ -- ,~, A


5 T V


'1


I. ~
~d k~
U


PURCHASINGd
SCRAP .GOLD
& SItVER,
TEA SETS, ROUNDS,
GOLD BARS
& STERLING.


STERUNG SILVER "

Buying all coins made before 1965, including Gold Coins, Silver Coins, Gold Bullion,
Investment Gold, anything marked .999 Bring it down to'the show!


Gold Coins




$10 INDIAN
GOLD COIN
-UP TO $5,500*


$20 ST. GAUDENS
GOLD COIN
UP TO $6,800*


$5 DRAPED BUST
RIGHT LE
UP TO $40,000*


FLOWING HAIR STELLA
GOLD COIN
UP TO $125,000*


Silver Coins 4


1995 W US. EAGLE PROOF
UP TO $800*


BARBER HALF DOLLAR
. UP TO $6,750* .


MORGAN SILVER DOLLAR
UP TO $ 100,000*


1797 $1
UP TO $200,000*


UP TO $200,OOO*


Investment Gold and Silver
INVESTMENT GOLD
.^. ,.


.999 FINE SILVER


PEACE DOLLAR
UP TO $3,000*


Treasutr-IHuhters Roadshow
WHA I, Open tb thef.public to sell
their goid and silver
HEN:, June 7th 11 th
WHERE" Holiday Inn


ITEMS WE WILL
ACCEPT INCLUDE:


*This amount depends upon rarity, condition
and what collectors are willing to pay


PLATINUM


a



~ ..


0 OL
WE BUY SCRAP
BUY SCRAP
JE L
_W
D & G
GOL: OLD]
JEWELRY:


/*-


I


, ^











Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkrrby@lakecityreportercom


SPORTS


Wednesday, June 8, 2011


BRIEFS
OUTDOORS
Alligator permits
phase two opens
The second
application phase for
alligator harvest is
10 a.m. today through
11:59 p.m. Monday.
Permits (for ages 18 and
older by Aug. 15) are on
a first come-first served
basis and
limited to one permit.
Those who purchased
a permit in phase one
may not apply. Submit
applications at county tax
collector's office, license
agent (retail outlet that
sells hunting ahd
fishing licenses) or www.
fl.wildlifelicense.com.
For details, visit
MyFWC. corn/Alligator.
GOLF
Voices for
Children tourney
The Voices for
Children of the
Suwannee Valley Inc.'s
second annual golf
tournament is Friday at
Quail Heights Country
Club. Registration is at
8 a.m. with a shotgun
start at 9 a.m. Entry fee
of $60 per person/$240
per four-person team
includes lunch and
special contest events.
Hole sponsorships
are available for $125.
Proceeds benefit the 3rd
Judicial Circuit Guardian
ad Litem program.
For details, call Jason
Medlin or Ms. Hitt at
755-3379, Ext 0.
YOUTH GOLF
Junior tour
in Louisiana
The Arrowhead Junior
Golf Tour has a
tournament June 22-23 in
Broussard, La. The
36-hole event for ages
12-18 is ranked by
the National Junior
Golf Scoreboard.
Tournament fee is $235. ,
Recommended
accommodations are
available at the Comfort
Inn in Broussard, La. Call
(337) 856-8887 for
*reservations.
Registration deadline
is June 15. To enter, call
(318) 402-2446 or enter
online at
www. arrowheadjgt. corn.
SOFTBALL
Adult league
registration set
Registration for the
Lake City Recreation
Department's summer
co-ed, commercial and
women's adult softball
leagues is 8:30 a.m. to
5 p.m. through Friday at
Teen Town Recreation
Center. Fee is $350 for a
minimum of 10 games.
For details, call
Heyward Christie at
754-3607.


College tryouts
at St. Johns
St. Johns River State
College has baseball
tryouts Saturday at
Tindall Field in Palatka.
The camps are open
to 2011, 2012 and 2013
high school graduates.
Registration begins at
9:15 a.m. on camp day.
Pitcher-only registration
is at noon. Cost is $50 for
each combine.
For details, call the
St Johns River baseball
office at (386) 3124164.


* From staff reports


www.lakecityreporter.com


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Tiger Woods nearly fails backwards on April 9, after hitting out of the rough on the 17th hole
during the third round of the Masters golf tournament, in Augusta. Injuries to his left knee and
Achilles' are bad enough that Woods decided Tuesday to skip the U.S. Open for the first time
since 1994. The Masters is now the only major he has never missed as a pro.


Section B


Woods says


he'll skip


U.S. Open


Lingering issues
with leg will force
golfer out of major.
By DOUG FERGUSON
Associated Press
JACKSONVILLE -
Tiger Woods pulled out of
the U.S. Open on Tuesday
because of lingering issues
with his left leg, leaving him
uncertain how soon he can
resume his pursuit of Jack
Nicklaus' record for major
titles.
It will be the first time
Woods has missed the U.S.
Open since 1994, when he
had just graduated high
school.
"I am extremely disap-
pointed that I won't be play-
ing in the U.S. Open, but
it's time for me to listen to


Talk from the big


Coach Brian
Allen speaks to
Kiwanis Club.
By TIM.KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com
Columbia High football
coach Brian Allen is deter-
mine to develop the Tigers
into community leaders and
he was doing his part on
Tuesday.
Allen was guest speaker
at the Kiwanis Club of Lake
City's weekly meeting at
the Women's Club.
Allen introduced himself
as a 1996 graduate of CHS,
a member of the Florida
State football team, and a
third-round NFL Draft pick
by the St Louis Rams. Allen
played on the Seminoles'
1998 national championship
team and was on two Super
Bowl teams.
"I am like a sponge,"
Allen said. "I always try to
absorb things from people
around me. I had five years
at Florida State and five
years in the NFL and I took
advantage of the situation
and what those coaches
tried to instill in me. I tell
my kids they need to absorb
things, even it is something
they don't need to do."
Allen moved to Orlando
after his NFL career was
cut short by injury and got
into coaching. When his
alma mater came calling, he


my doctors and focus on
the future," Woods said on
his website. "I was hopeful
that I could play, but if I
did, I risk further damage
to my left leg. My knee
and Achilles tendon are not
fully healed."
Woods said he hoped
to be ready for the AT&T
National, which starts June
30 at Aronomink, and the
next two majors. Then
again, he said two weeks
ago he would do everything
possible to be ready for the
U.S. Open, which is far
more significant
"We're very disappointed
that he won't be playing in
the National Open," USGA
executive director Mike
Davis said, whom Woods
called Tuesday morning.
WOODS continued on 4B


Tiger


TIM KIRBY/Lake City Reporter
Kiwanis Club president Kyle Keen (left) welcomes Columbia High football coach Brian Allen. as guest speaker for the meeting
on Tuesday. Kiwanian of the Day Norbie S. Ronsonet (right) introduced Allen.


"jumped at the chance."
"I had a drive and pas-
sion to come back to the
community that helped me
so well," Allen said. "I have
had a real gracious welcome
since I've been home."
Allen is influenced by
basketball coaching legend
John Wooden's "Pyramid of


Success" principles, espe-
cially the cornerstones of
hard work and enthusiasm.
"I believe in hard work,
and we will understand that
as a football team," Allen
said. "If you wok your butt
off in practice, the games
*are easy. If you are doing
things the right way, the


Pryor giving up senior

season at Ohio State


Player most likely to
become available for
supplemental draft.
By RUSTY MILLER
Associated Press
COLUMBUS, Ohio Terrelle
Pryor's career at Ohio State, which
started with so much promise and
potential, came to an abrupt and
scandal-ridden end.
The Ohio State quarterback
announced through his attorney
Tuesday that he would not play
for the Buckeyes this season. He
had already been suspended for
the first five games for break-
ing. NCAA rules by accepting


improper benefits from the owner
of a tattoo parlor.
"In the best interests of my
teammates, I've made the decision
to forgo my senior year of foot-
ball at The Ohio State University,"
Pryor said in a statement issued
by Columbus lawyer Larry James.
Pryor will most likely make
himself available for an NFL sup-
plemental draft.
"I would hope so. Also, he would
hope so," said James, who added
that Pryor was not available for
comment "But he's going to take
the next couple of days to get his
head together."
The Cleveland Plain
Dealer first reported Pryor's
announcement


wins will come."
Allen vowed to take the
CHS program beyond wins
and losses. He invited all
the Kiwanians not only to
visit practice, but to come
to the first-period weight
training. '%
. "We want to bring this
thing around and develop


good community leaders,"
Allen said. "It comes down
to being disciplined, being
. accountable and being
respectful. Never embar-
rass your school, coaches
or family. Carry yourself as
a professional and that is
CHS continued on 4B


Mavericks bounce

back, tie series

with Heat at 2-2
Dallas beats Miami, poor quarters to score 10 of his
86-83, Game 5 set 21 points in the final period as
the Mavericks outscored the
for Thursday. Miami Heat 21-9 over the final
10:12 for an 86-83 victory in a
By JAIME ARON memorable Game 4 Tuesday
Associated Press night.
The Mavs avoided going down
DALLAS Dirk Nowitzki and 3-1, a deficit no team has ever
the Dallas Mavericks have pulled overcome in the finals, and guar-
off another stunning comeback, anteed the series will return to
tying the NBA finals at two games Miami for a Game 6 on Sunday
each. night.
And this time, Nowitzki did it Dwyane Wade scored 32 points,
while battling the flu. but fumbled an inbounds pass with
Nowitzki shook off three 6.7 seconds left.












LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS WEDNESDAY, JUNE 8, 2011


TELEVISION

TV sports
Today
COLLEGE SOFTBALL
8 p.m.
ESPN2 -World Series championship
series, game 3,Arizona State vs. Florida, at
Oklahoma City (if necessary)
CYCLING
5 p.m.
VERSUS Criterium du Dauphine,
stage 3, time trial, at Grenoble, France
(same-day tape)
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
12:30 p.m.
MLB Regional coverage, Chicago
Cubs at Cincinnati or Minnesota at
Cleveland (noon start)
7 p.m.
ESPN Boston at N.Y.Yankees
NHL HOCKEY
8 p.m.
VERSUS Playoffs, finals, game 4,
Vancouver at Boston

BASKETBALL

NBA Finals
Miami vs. Dallas
Miami 92, Dallas 84
Dallas 95, Miami 93
Miami 88, Dallas 86
Tuesday
Miami at Dallas (n)
Thursday
Miami at Dallas, 9 p.m.

WNBA schedule
Tuesday's Game
Tulsa at Minnesota (n)
Thursday's Games
Washington at Atlanta, 7 p.m.
Minnesota at Seattle, 10 p.m.

BASEBALL

AL standings q


New York
Boston
Tampa Bay
Toronto
Baltimore
Central Divis


East Division
W L
33 24
33 26
31 29
30 30
27 31
sion


Pct GB
.579 -
.559 I
.5173 1/2
.5004 1/2
.4666 1/2


W L Pct .C
Cleveland 33 25 .569
Detroit 32 27 .542 I I
Chicago 29 33 .468
Kansas City 26 34 .433
Minnesota 22 37 .37311 I
West Division
W L Pct C
Texas 34 27 .557 -
Seattle 31 29 .5172 I
Los Angeles 30 32 .4844 I
Oakland 34 ..443
Monday's Games
Minnesota 6, Cleveland 4
Baltimore 4, Oakland 2
Detroit 13,Texas 7
Chicago White Sox 3, Seattle I
Kansas City 3,Toronto 2, 11 innings
Tampa Bay 5, LAA.Angels I
Tuesday's Games
Boston 6, N.Y.Yankees 4
Cleveland I, Minnesota 0
Baltimore 4, Oakland 0
Detroit atTexas (n)
Seattle at Chicago White Sox (n)
-Toronto at Kansas City (n)
Tampa Bay at LA. Angels (n)
Today's Games


GB
/2
6
8
/2
GB
/2
/2
7


Minnesota (Pavano 3-5) at Cleveland
(Masterson 5-4), 12:05 Op.m.
Boston (Wakefield 2-1) at N.Y.Yankees
(A.J.Bumett 6-3), 7:05 p.m.
Oakland (Outman 1-0) at Baltimore
(Britton 5-4), 7:05 p.m.
Detroit (Coke 1-5) at Texas.(Ogando
6-0), 8:05 p.m.
Seattle (Vargas 4-3) at Chicago White
Sox (Floyd 6-5), 8:I0 p.m.
Toronto (Villanueva 3-0) at Kansas
City (Duffy0-1), 8:10 p.m.
Tampa Bay (Shields 5-4) at LA Angels
(Weaver 7-4), 10:05 p.m.
Thursday's Games
Toronto at Kansas City, 4:10 p.m.
Boston at N.Y.Yankees, 7:05 p.m.
Seattle at Detroit, 7:05 p.m.
Oakland at Chicago White Sox,
8:10 p.m.
Texas at Minnesota, 8:10 p.m.

NL standings


East Division
W L
Philadelphia 36 24
Florida 31 27
Atlanta 32 28
NewYork 28 31
Washington 26 34
Central Division
W L
St. Louis 36 25
Milwaukee 34 26
Cincinnati 31 30
Pittsburgh 28 30
Chicago 23 35
Houston 23 37
West Division
W L
San Francisco 34 26
Arizona 33 27
Colorado 28 31
Los Angeles 28 33
San Diego 27 34


Pct GB
.600 -
.534 4
.533 4
.4757 1/2
.433 10
Pct GB
.590 -
.567 I 1/2
.508 5
.4836 1/2
.39711 1/2
.383121/2
Pct GB
.567 -
.550 I
.4755 1/2
.4596 1/2
.4437 1/2


Monday's Games
Philadelphia 3, LA. Dodgers I
Cincinnati 8, Chicago Cubs 2
Milwaukee 7, Florida 2
Colorado 3, San Diego 0
San Francisco 5, Washington 4, 13


innings


Tuesday's Games


Pittsburgh 8,Arizona 5
LA. Dodgers 6, Philadelphia 2
Atlanta I, Florida 0
Cincinnati 8, Chicago Cubs 2
St. Louis at Houston (n)
N.Y. Mets at Milwaukee (n)
Colorado at San Diego (n)
Washington at San Francisco (n)
Today's Games
Chicago Cubs (Dempster 4-5) at
Cincinnati (Arroyo 4-5), 12:35 p.m.
Washington (Maya 0-1) at San
Francisco (Cain 4-4), 3:45 p.m.
Colorado (Cook 0-0) at San Diego


(Moseley 2-6), 6:35 p.m.
Arizona (Duke I-I1) at Pittsburgh
(Maholm 2-7), 7:05 p.m.
LA. Dodgers (Kuroda 5-6) at
Philadelphia (Hamels 7-2), 7:05 p.m.
Atlanta (D.Lowe 3-4) at Florida
(Nolasco 4-1),7:10 p.m.
St. Louis (J.Garcia 6-1) at Houston
(Norris 3-4), 8:05 p.m.
N.Y. Mets (Pelfrey 3-4) at Milwaukee
(Wolf 4-4), 8:10 p.m.
Thursday's Games
Arizona at Pittsburgh, 7:05 p.m.
Chicago Cubs at Philadelphia, 7:05 p.m.
Atlanta at Florida, 7:10 p.m..
St. Louis at Houston, 8:05 p.m.
N.Y. Mets at Milwaukee, 8:10 p.m.
LA. Dodgers at Colorado, 8:40 p.m.
Washington at San Diego, 10:05 p.m.
Cincinnati at San Francisco, 10:15 p.m.

MLB draft No. I picks
2011 Gerrit Cole, rhp (Pittsburgh
Pirates)
2010 Bryce Harper, c-of
(Washington Nationals)
2009 Stephen Strasburg, rhp
(Washington Nationals)
2008 Tim Beckham, ss (Tampa Bay
Rays)
2007 David Price, lhp (Tampa Bay
Devil Rays)
2006 Luke Hochevar, rhp (Kansas
City Royals)
2005 Justin Upton, ss (Arizona
Diamondbacks)
2004 Matt Bush, ss (San Diego
Padres)
2003 Delmon Young, of (Tampa Bay
Devil Rays)
2002 Bryan Bullington, rhp
(Pittsburgh Pirates)
2001 Joe Mauer, c (Minnesota
Twins)

GOLF

Golf week
PGATOUR
St. Jude Classic
Site: Memphis,Tenn.
Schedule:Thursday-Sunday.
Course: TPC Southwind (7,239 yards,
par 70).
Purse: $5.6 million. Winner's share:
$1,008,000,
Television: Golf Channel (Thursday-
Friday, 3-6 p.m., 8:30-11:30 p.m.) and CBS
(Saturday-Sunday, 3-6 p.m.).
Online: http://www.pgatour.com
LPGATOUR
LPGA State Farm Classic
Site: Springfield, Ill.
Schedule:Thursday-Sunday.
Course: Panther Creek Country Club
(6,746 yards, par 72).
Purse: $1.7 million. Winner's share:
$255,000.
Television: Golf Channel (Thursday,
6:30-8:30 p.m.; Friday, midnight.2 a.m.,
6:30-8:30 p.m.; Saturday, 2-4 a.m.,
7-9:30 p.m.; Sunday, 12:30-2:30 a.m., 7:30-
9 30 pm Monday m.dnighi-2 a m
Onling httpo:/www.lpga.com
CHAMPIONSTOUR
Greater Hickory Classic
Site: Conover, N.C.
Schedule: Friday-Sunday.
Course: Rock Barn Golf and Spa, Jones
course (7,090 yards, par 72).
Purse: $1.75 million. Winner's share:
$262,500.
Television: Golf Channel (Thursday-
Friday, 9:30-1. p.m.; Saturday, 8:30-
11:30 a.m., 4:30-6:30 p.m.; Sunday.
8:30 a.m.-noon, 4:30-6:30 p.m.).
EUROPEAN TOUR
Italian Open
Site:Turin, Italy.
Schedule:Thursday-Sunday.
Course: Royal Park I Roveri (7,272
yards, par 72).
Purse: $2.2 million. Winner's share:
$366,075. .
Television: Golf Channel (Thursday-
Friday, 9:30 a.m.-I p.m.; Saturday, 8:30-
11:30 a.m., 4:30-6:30 p.m.; Sunday,
8:30 a.m.-noon, 4:30-6:30 p.m.).
Online: httpJ/www.europeantour.com
NATIONWIDE TOUR
Rex Hospital Open
Site: Raleigh, N.C.
Schedule:Thursday-Sunday.
Course: TPC Wakefield Plantation
(7,257 yards, par 71).
Purse: $550,000. Winner's share:
$99,000.
Television: None.

SOFTBALL

NCAA World Series
AtASA Hall of Fame Stadium
Oklahoma City
Monday
SArizona State 14, Florida 4
Tuesday
Arizona State vs. Florida (n)
Today
Arizona State vs. Florida, 8 p.m. (if
necessary)

HOCKEY

Stanley Cup
Boston vs.Vancouver
Vancouver I, Boston 0
Vancouver 3, Boston 2, OT
Monday
Boston 8,Vancouver I
Today
Vancouver at Boston, 8 p.m.
Friday
Boston atVancouver, 8 p.m.
Vancouver 0 0 I I
Boston 0 4 4 8
First Period-None.
Second Period-I, Boston, IFerence 3
(Peverley, Krejci), : 11. 2, Boston, Recchi


4 (Ryder, Ference), 4:22 (pp). 3, Boston,
Marchand 7, 11:30 (sh). 4, Boston, Krejci
I (Ryder, Chara), 15:47.
Third Period-5, Boston, Paille 3
(Boychuk), 11:38 (sh). 6,Vancouver, Hansen
3 (Torres, Lapierre), 13:53. 7, Boston,
Recchi 5 (Marchand, Bergeron), 17:39. 8,
Boston, Kelly 5 (Paille, Chara), 18:06. 9,
Boston, Ryder 6 (Kaberle), 19:29 (pp).
Shots on Goal-Vancouver 12-16-
13-4 1.Boston 7-14-17-38.
Goalies-Vancouver, Luongo. Boston,
Thomas.A-17,565 (17,565).T-2:46.


GOLF REPORTS



Rhodes' two eagles includes ace


Dwight Rhodes had good
reason to celebrate his
second eagle on the front
nine in Wednesday's blitz.
It came on the par-3 No. 7
in the form of his second
career hole-in-one.
Despite the two eagles,
Rhodes' final score of +7
was only good enough for
second place in the blitz. .
Travis Timmons rolled
in five birdies to take
first place at +10. George
Burnham (+6) was in third
place.
To no one's surprise,
both of Rhodes' eagles
stood up in the skins game.
Timmons also picked up
two winners. Jordan Hale,
Steve Patterson and Mike
McCranie had the other
three skins.
The pot hole purse will
reach its maximum today
after another carryover.
J.C. Ross, Stanley
Chauncey, George
Dominique and Andrew
Haggerty notched a win
in the Elks Club scramble
with a net 55.
The team of Norbie
Ronsonet Sr., Ray -Walker,
Jim Spring and David


COUNTRY CLUB
at LAKE CITY
Ed Goff

Crawford finished in a tie for
second place, two strokes
behind the winners, with
the team of Jim Gonzales,
Derek Payne, Justin Payne
and Nate Lee.
Skill shot prizes went to
Lee for closest to the pin
and Dennis Duncan for
making the longest putt.
Steve Patterson birdied
No. 17 to secure a first-
place tie at +5 tie with Scott
Kishton in the Saturday
blitz.
Keith Shaw, Jim Carr,
Dave Mehl, Trey Jackson,
Jordan Hale, Patterson and
Kishton split a seven-way
payoff in the skins game.,
The LGA let players
throw out their worst score
on one hole on each nine in
this week's competition.
Sally Rivers got rid of a
couple of big numbers to
take'the win with a net 53.
Gloria Rowley (55) came
in second and Roberta
Whitaker tied Dottie Rogers
for third place at 57.


tt%


Rowley and Whitaker
both recorded chip-ins.
A late report from last
week's action noted that
Caroline Stevens recorded
an eagle 2 on No. 12.
The Good Old Boys con-
tinued their trend of close
matches.
In Match 1, Marc Risk,
Nick Whitehurst and Bobby
Simmons edged Stan
Woolbert, Dave Cannon
and Joe Persons, 7-6.
Match 2 was a three
way contest. Ed Snow, Jim
Bell, Carl Wilson and Dan
Stephens edged Eli Witt,
Monty Montgomery, Jim
Stevens and Bill Rogers, 9-
7, with Don Christensen,
Howard Whitaker; Mike
Spencer and Tony Branch
in third place with a single
team point
Risk's eagle on No.
9 pulled him into a tie
for medalist honors
with Montgomery and
Woolbert, all at 74. Witt
(77), Christensen'(78), and
Snow, with an eagle on the
par-4 No. 3 to finish at 79,
had the other noteworthy
scores.
Bell had the only nine-


hole win with 39 on the
front side.

Junior Golf Clinics

The first Junior Golf
Clinic is 8-11 a.m. Monday
through Friday. Cost of $65
for club members and $75
for non-members.
Drinks and snacks will
be provided. Clinics are
limited to 24 golfers.
Registration is at The
Country Club at Lake City
and Brian's Sports.
For details, call Ste-Marie
at 752-2266 or 623-2833.

Young's Tennis Camps

Johnny Young's Tennis
Camps will be offered at
The Country Club at Lake
City, starting this month.
Clinics are 8-11 a.m.
Monday through Friday
at a cost of $65 for club
members and $75 for non-
members.
Clinic dates are June
20-24, July 18-22, Aug. 1-5
and Aug. 15-19. Drinks and
snacks will be provided.
For details, call Young at
365-3827.


AT THS STOE ONL


AT THIS STORE ONLY


LAKE CITY

2724 W. US Highway 90


Sale Ends June 15,2011 and is Limited to Quantities on Hand



COME IN AND SHOP FOR GREAT VALUES


ALL BBQ Grills


& Accessories

Super Summer Value!


ALL Craftsman


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Great Father's Day Gifts!


eadmills


ipticals


in, Get Fit!


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ALL Riding Lawn Mowers


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Plus All


Lawn Mowers


LOOK FOR UNADVERTISED IN STORE SPECIALS!
THIS STORE IS NOT PARTICIPATING IN CURRENT SEARS CIRCULARS.


SCOREBOARD


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ALL TAsLand

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Coo Tos and More
Ern
/ /. St31O


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421













754-0415 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS WEDNESDAY, JUNE 8, 2011


DILBERT

I INVENTED A
SHOULDER HOLDER
FOPR MY PHONE.
t



0c


BLONDIE


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE


DEAR ABBY


Church teacher should say

'never on Sunday' for dates


I FELT BAD KEEPING
MY BEST FRIEND IN
MY POCKET.





ri)0


I JEALOUSY 15
NOT ATTRACTIVE.





0 /


came back six months later
and he/she died an agoniz-
ing, terrible death."
Abby, it's hard to remain
polite around such thought-
less, moronic individuals
when they blurt out some-
thing like this in my wife's
presence. I can't imagine
the fear she must experi-
ence hearing such remarks.
Can you offer an effective
retort? BAFFLED BY
THE IGNORANCE
DEAR BAFFLED:
Remarks such as you have
described usually are made
when people don't know
what to say, so they blurt out
the first thing that comes
to mind. A polite response
would be, "Thanks for your.
concern. My wife is doing
great."
Of course the appropri-
ate thing for friends and
relatives to say would be,
"I'm so glad you're better
- I care about you and I
was worried." To raise the
subject of someone who
died from the disease is
inappropriate and extreme-
ly insensitive. There's an
old Portuguese proverb:
Never mention a rope in
the house of a man who has
been hanged. It definitely
applies here.

* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ILL. HAVE YoU LAPIES
MNOW, TAIS NEST HAS
SEM ME THMROUsH SOME
HAPy TIMoSe 0-





II{Dst. by Creators Syndicate lH S


HA&N'TNOriC, .
won Tui E NSTo






wwwjohnHartStudlos.com


FRANK & ERNEST


IF YOU NfED P SVf9 ANCf TO f6 A
MUSICIAN, WHAT'S
/AL. THIS I
HIAR AlOuT
UNFINI*HEP'
pga frYMPHONIffI


FOR BETTER OR WORSE
S|STeRS.-THerviE RuLWVAS WHINING,
I PRIN IN THE- RLWfIYSGETIN'
SNECK -THEK OWNN ORV.


ARIES. (March 21-April
19): ,Organization will be
the key to your success.
Communication will be
important and will ensure
you get what you want and
when. Don't rely on anyone
who gives you a sob story
or appears to be emotionally
unstable.

TAURUS (April 20-May
20); Talks will make the dif-
ference, no matter whether
you are learning or teaching.
Greater involvement in activi-
ties conducive to improving
a personal relationship will
help you establish your posi-
tion and your plans for the
future.

GEMINI (May 21-June
20): You may be ques-
tioned about the way you
are doing things but, if you
have a plan and it is work-
ing for you, stick to it. The
less everyone knows about
what you are doing, the
easier it will be to finish.
Don't let a romantic situa-
tion stand in the way.

CANCER (June 21-July
22)6 Take a wait and see
approach. Once you have
had time to assess your situ-
ation, you can move swiftly
to reserve the spot you feel
most comfortable represent-
ing. You can outsmart and
outmaneuver anyone trying
to back you into a corner. 4
stars


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):
You don't need to be the one
who does everything. You
may be trying to iimpress
someone but falling, short
will not help. Focus on what
you. do best and keep things
simple. You may have to push
others to do their part

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Don't give up when the
going gets tough. Bypass
whatever doesn't need your
undivided attention and focus
on the root of the problem
you face. Emotions are likely
to get involved in a discus-
sion regarding responsibility.
3 stars

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22):
You've got plenty to look for-
ward to, so stop dwelling on
the past Once you let things
go that you cannot change,
you will forge ahead and
make great strides personally
and professionally. Remem-
ber that you have wisdom,
experience and courage.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov.
21): You may have spread
yourself a little thin. Neglect
will lead to complaints. A
trip or conversation with
someone knowledgeable will
ease your mind and help you
establish a workable financial
plan.


SAGITrARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): An emotional
matter will get you thinking
about future plans. Facing
responsibilities head-on isn't
your style but this time, end
one thing before starting
another. Change your plans
and set the record straight
and you'll send a positive
message. -

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-
Jan. 19): Entertain friends
or network with people
who share your interests.
You will make professional
contacts and develop new
partnerships. Taking care of
domestic issues or fixing up
your place to better suit your
needs should be on your
agenda. ,

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
18): Don't let personal
dilemmas stand in your way.
Size up your situation and
make changes that will allow
you to use your skills and
services. Talks should be
handled professionally, with-
out emotional undertones.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): Things can go either
way, depending on the way
you handle the people you
are dealing with. Don't be
smug or pretend to know it
all. Ask questions and show
interest in what others have
to offer. The choices you
make now will influence how
well you do in the future.
***


CELEBRITY CIPHER

by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: F equals J
"LNY'C FWLIV VBTR LBZ EZ CRV

RBPMVKC ZNW PVBO... EWC EZ CRV

KVVLK ZNW ODBYC!" PNEVPC D.

K CV M V Y K N Y
PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "A dead thing can go with the stream, but only a living
thing can go against it." Gilbert K. Chesterton
(c) 2011 by NEA, Inc. 6-8


CLASSIC PEANUTS


DEAR ABBY: I am a
48-year-old single male.
I teach an adult Sunday
school class. Two women
who have joined our group
have made it plain they
would like to have a roman-
tic relationship with me.
I'm not sure how to han-
dle this. I'd like to meet
someone special, too, but
I'm not certain this is the
right way. Please advise. -
TROUBLED TEACHER
IN THE SOUTH
DEAR TROUBLED
TEACHER: Tell the
women you have a policy
that you do not date your
students. To do otherwise
would be distracting and
disruptive to the class.
Once they have "gradu-
ated," there is nothing to
stop you from dating both
of them. One may turn out
to be that someone spe-
cial you have been looking
for, but if she's not, you'll
have saved everyone from
unnecessary drama.

DEAR ABBY: We are a
gay couple who have been
together for 37 years. We
were recently invited to the
wedding of a close nephew
in San Antonio. The invita-
tion was addressed to us
both, and we flew 5,000
miles to attend.
At the ceremony, my
partner, "Alan," was
seated in front with the


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearabby.com
groom's family. While we
were being shown to our
seats, I was told by the
groom's father, "Sorry. You
can sit somewhere else."
Alan and I were deeply
offended.
How should we express
our displeasure and prevent
this from happening again
when the niece marries?
Do we have a right to say
anything? SNUBBED
IN HONOLULU
DEAR SNUBBED: Of
course you do. The groom's
father was extremely rude
to separate you. The per-
son who issued the wed-
ding invitation should be
informed of how offensive
it was. And if it happens
again, the two of you should
respond, "We are a couple,
and we sit together."

DEAR ABBY: My wife
is a cancer survivor who is
doing well. When a friend
or relative learns she had
cancer, a common response
is, "Yeah, I knew someone
who had the same kind
of cancer. It was awful. It


ZITS


Page Editor: Emogene Graham,










LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS WEDNESDAY, JUNE 8, 2011


Haslem starring as the


Heat's 'glue' guy in finals


By TIM REYNOLDS
Associated Press

DALLAS For all the
glitzy personnel moves the
Miami Heat made last sum-
mer to largely reshape the
NBA's balance of power,
there was one deal the
Dallas Mavericks des-
perately wish never hap-
pened.
And we're not talking
about the ones LeBron
James, Dwyane Wade and
Chris Bosh signed.
Nope, the Mavs were
hoping to land Udonis
Haslem a year ago when he
hit the open market. Given
what he did against them
in the 2006 NBA finals
- and what he's doing
so far in the 2011 series
rematch, which resumed
Tuesday night with Game
4 in Dallas it's easy to
see why Haslem was in
such high demand.
He's averaging a less-
than-whopping 5 points
and 4.3 rebounds in the
first three games, but with
Haslem, the stat line never
tells anything remotely
close to the entire story.
He is Miami's grittiest play-
er, and the way he forced
Mavs' star Dirk Nowitzki
into a missed jumper on
the final possession of
Game 3 ensured that the
Heat would not only win
that night but reclaim the
home-court advantage in
these finals.
"We would have loved to
have him," Nowitzki said.
"Unfortunately, obviously,
he stayed there. I guess a
good move on his part."
Maybe a real good
move.
Haslem gave the Heat
one heck of a hometown
discount last summer, when
the Miami native agreed to
a deal worth $20 million for


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Miami Heat's Udonis Haslem (40) shoots past Dallas
Mavericks' lanr Mahinmi during the second half of Game 3 of
the NBA Finals basketball game Sunday in Dallas.


five seasons, over 40 per-
cent less than what he likely
potentially could have col-
lected from Dallas, Denver
or other suitors. That's what
being around family means
to Haslem, and when he
says that, he's not speaking
of his relatives. The Heat
are as dear to him as any-
thing, especially after they
took a chance on him eight
years ago.
"It wasn't a hard deci-
sion," Haslem said. "This
is where I wanted to be
and I couldn't see myself
leaving."
Haslem averaged 6.2
points and 6 rebounds in


Miami's six-game win over
Dallas in the 2006 finals,
yet it was what he did in
the title-clinching game
that made a giant impact
on the series.
Playing with an injured
shoulder, Haslem who
turns 31 on Thursday, when
Miami and Dallas will play
Game 5 scored 17 points
and grabbed 10 rebounds,
and nagged Nowitzki on
defense for much of that
game as well. He earned
a reputation as a bit of a
Dirk-stopper in that series,
and with control of the
2011 finals in the balance
on Sunday, Haslem took


a turn guarding Nowitzki
again.
Nowitzki caught an
inbounds pass at the
top of the key with 4.4
seconds remaining and
Dallas down by two, then
tried to drive right before
spinning back toward the
foul line. Haslem stayed
draped on him the whole
way, kept .his arms high
as Nowitzki tried to shoot,
then left them up until
the ball bounced harm-
lessly off the rim. Only
then did he punch the air
in celebration, knowing
the Heat had just gotten
their biggest win of the
season.
In Game 2, Nowitzki
made a game-winner at
the end, that time with
Bosh guarding him.
Haslem demanded the
job in Game 3.
"I was very confident
in UD, understanding he
wanted that challenge the
last game, and he wasn't
able to be put in that posi-
tion," Wade said. "Put him
back in that position this
time. I knew he was going
to at least make it tough.
If Dirk makes the shot, at
least do his job and make
sure he takes a fadeaway at
the end."
Haslem took the longest
of all possible routes to his
hometown team. He played
college ball at Florida
with now-Heat-teammate
Mike Miller, ballooned to
the neighborhood of 300
pounds, then started his
pro career in France and
shed the weight not-
ing many times since that
French food is not the easi-
est thing to surround your-
self with and still slim down
so dramatically. Now a lean
230, Haslem has beerin part
of Miami's rotation since
his arrival in 2003.


WOODS: Out since TPC


Continued From Page 1B

"He certainly brings excite-
ment to the event. He'll be
missed, but the U.S. Open
will go on. The event is big-
ger than one player, but he
certainly will be missed."
The U.S. Open starts June
16 at Congressional, where
Woods won the AT&T
National two years ago and
tied for 19th when the U.S.
Open was last played there
in 1997.
Woods was replaced
by Michael Whitehead, a
senior at Rice who was first
alternate from the Dallas
qualifier. Whitehead had to
win a playoff just to get out
of the first stage of 18-hole
qualifying, and was stunned
to get the news.
"They said on the phone
that Tiger has withdrawn
from the Open," Whitehead
.said. "So, 'Thanks, Tiger.' I
guess I'm glad he was lis-
tening to his doctors."
The future of Woods,
meanwhile, is as muddied
as ever.
"The hardest thing in
the world as a golfer, or
any athlete, is to stay out,"
two-time U.S. Open cham-
pion Curtis Strange said.
"It's smart what he's doing.


Unfortunately, the U.S. Open
falls in that time frame. But
every time something hap-
pens, and the longer he's
away from the game, its
going to make it tougher f6t
him to come back.
"It's going to be harder
and harder the long this
goes."
Woods hasn't won since
the2009Australian Masters,
a stretch of 22 tournaments.
He not only lost his No. '1
ranking late last year, hq
has plunged to No. 15 in
the world, his lowest spotiri
the ranking since the spring
of 1997.
Woods announced his
decision on Twitter: "Not
playing in US Open. Very
disappointed. Short-term
frustration for long-ternr
gain."
He had said in his most
recent press conference
that his injury was "not the
doomsday that some of the
press members are writing
about" Some inf his camp
believe if he had skipped
The Players Championship;
his left leg would have beeq
fully healed perhaps in tirn
for the Memorial, which he
missed last week.
aI,


ALLEN: Will be involved
Continued From Page 1B


how you will be perceived."
Allen said he had a
"bunch of good coaches,"
and named his staff and
their assignments. He said
out of 20 seniors, there
were 4-5 with a chance to
get scholarships.
"We hope to continue- the
maturation of those guys,"
Allen said. 'We want to see
how many kids we can get
in college, to help them go
out and see things out of
Lake City and bring that
experience back to Lake
City."
Allen's plans to get his


Tigers involved include
adopting a highway, visit!
ing veterans and inviting
youth teams to the football
games.
"I love Lake City the
town, community and
people," Allen said. "It
will always be my home.
Everything I do will b.e
for the betterment of the
community, team and
school. I want there to be a
mark on the program when
I leave. ,
"We will have a pretty
good ball club before all is
said and done."


This June, Mercantile Bank customers can
expect even more from their bank.


Soon, we'll be open earlier and open later. We'll serve you at.
over 1,250 locations and thousands of TD Bank ATMs from Maine
to Florida. You'll have access to Live Customer Service 24/7.
And that's just the beginning this June, Mercantile Bank will
become TD Bank, America's Most Convenient Bank.












MERCANTILE BANK

800.238.8681 www.bankmcrcantile.com



b ,Wr, FDIC Mercantile Bank is a trade name of TD Bank, N.A. TD Bank Group is a trade name for The Toronto-Dominion Bank. Used with permission. For
detailed credit ratings for The Toronto-Dominion Bank and TD Bank, N.A. visit https://www.td.corninvestor/creditjsp. Credit Ratings are not recommendations to
purchase, sell, or hold a financial obligation inasmuch as they do not comment on market price or suitability for a particular investor. Ratings are subject to revision
or withdrawal at any time by the rating organization,


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-042.0:


More Hours.


More Locations.


More Service.


More To Come..
















olumbia

Your marketplace source for Lake City and


WEDNESDAY, JUNE 8, 2011


LAKE CITY REPORTER


Chasteen's Downtown's home-style


feel keeps customers coming back


Great food and
friendly faces
are at the heart
of Chasteen's
Downtown.
The restaurant is owned
by Robert and Emmie
Chasteen and opened in
1999.
Previously the couple
opened a seafood restau-
rant in 1968, said Robert
Chasteen. The restaurant
was located across from the
airport
Customers had to make
a special trip to eat there,
Emmie Chasteen said. Over
time they decided to shift
their culinary focus and loca-
tion.
"We wanted to make a
change and always wanted to
move downtown," she said.
Naming the restaurant
Chasteen's Downtown indi-
cated a change from special-
izing in seafood, said Abbie
Chasteen, their daughter. It
capitalized on the family's
already well-known name in
the area.
Moving downtown
increased their visibility
to the community, Robert
Chasteen said. More custom-
ers can just walk into the
restaurant
'"We thought it would help
the downtown grow," he said.
The restaurant offers
home-style cooking for
breakfast and lunch. Menu


items include pancakes,
.breakfast sandwiches or
' omelets for breakfast At
lunch a variety of dishes such
as buffalo bites, hot soups or
salads are available.
The restaurant also offers
Take and Bake dishes where
customer can take their
favorite frozen casseroles
"from our kitchen to your
table," said Abbie Chasteen.
Items are available daily and
range from chicken pot pie to
squash casserole.
Take and Bake dishes
were incorporated into the
restaurant's offerings about
four years ago, Emmie
Chasteen said.
"The economy started
changing, and we had to
change the way we do some
things," she said.
It wasn't feasible to serve
items such as chicken
casserole or broccoli cas-
serole during lunch, Emmie
Chasteen said.
"Those were the kind of
things where if you didn't sell
it all it would go to waste,"
she said.
Specialty Take and Bake
items are also available dur-
ing the holidays, such as
dressing.
A recipe book filled with
-dishes from the restaurant is
available for purchase.
Emmie Chasteen said its
rewarding to know when cus-
tomers have tried their hand


at one of the recipes.
"People think its neat to
make them," she said.
The restaurant has eight
employees total, including
the couple. Some of the staff
members have been with
them for 20 years.
Many of the employees
have established a good rap-
port with customers, Abbie,
Chasteen said.
"A lot of them we know
what they want to eat
before they order," Emmie
Chasteen said.
Tlhe couple themselves are
very involved with the busi-
ness and are there everyday
creating homemade items for
customers, Abbie Chasteen
said.
The restaurant uses word-
of-mouth as well as advertis-
ing in Lake City Reporter pub-
lications, such as Currents
Magazine, to attract custom-
ers, Emmie Chasteen said.
"It reaches the whole
community," she said. "Ifs a
good way to getin touch with
people."
Chasteen's Downtown is
located at 204 N. Marion Ave.
The number is (386) 752-
7504. The restaurant is open
7:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. Monday
through Friday for dining in
or taking out
"We want people to feel
at home if they come here,"
Emmie Chasteen said.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Emmie and Robert Chasteen, owners of Chasteen's Downtown, in downtown Lake City,
pose for a photograph while in their restaurant.


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LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED WEDNESDAY, JUNE 8, 2011

Lake City Reporter




CLASSIFIED


Classified Department: 755-5440


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

755-5440


* ADvantage


aOne Item per ad |
4 lines 6 days a h additional
Rate applies to private Individuals selling



Personal merchandise totaltng 1500 or leo. .
Each Item must Include a price.
a This is a non-refundable rate..





EachOne e m per ad l pri





Sline as aysinach adional
Rate applies to private Individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling $15000 or le.
Each Item must Include a price.
This Is a non-refundablerate.
One Item per ad $23



4 lines 6 days ach additional
Rate applies to private Individuals selling
personal merchandise totaling ,000 or les.
Each item must Include a price.
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One Item per ad $ 7
4 lines 6 days Each additional
ROate applies to private Individuals selling
personal merchandise lotalling $,00 or les.
Each Hem must Include a price..
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One Item per ad |
4 lines 6 days E tional
Rate applies to private indIv0duals selling
personal merchandise totinIg $,000 or p s.
Each Item must include a price.
This is a rnon-refuniabl rate
pm~~I~


3 days 1 O
includes 2 Signs Ean uadiional line 3165


Limited to service type advertis-
ing only.
4 lines, one month....s92.00
$10.80 each additional line
Includes an additional $2.00 per
ad for each Wednesday insertion.



You can call us at 755-5440,
Monday through Friday from 8:00
a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Some people prefer to place their
classified ads in person, and some
ad categories will require prepay-
ment. Our office is located at 180
East Duval Street.
You can also fax or email your ad
copy to the Reporter.
FAX: 386-752-9400 Please
direct your copy to the Classified
Department.
EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityre-
porter.coml




Ad Is to Appear: Call by: Fax/Emall by:
Tuesday Mon.,10:00a.m. Mon., 00 a.m.
Wednesday Mon.,10:00a.m. Mon., 9:00am.
Thursday Wed., 10:00 am. Wed., 9:00 am.
Friday Thiu ,, 10:00a.m. Thlmrs., 9:00 a.m.
Saturday Fri.,10:00am. Fri.,9:00 am.
Sunday Fri.,10:00am. Fri., 9:00 a.m.
These deadlines are subject to change without notice.




Ad Errors- Please read your ad
on the first day of publication.
We accept responsibility for only
the first incorrect insertion, and
only the charge for the ad space
In error. Please call 755-5440
Immediately for prompt correc-
tion and billing adjustments.
Cancellations- Normal advertising
deadlines apply for cancellation.
Billing Inquiries- Call 755-5440.
Should further information be
required regarding payments or
credit limits, your call will be trans-
ferred to the accounting depart-
ment.


Advertising copy is subject to
approval by the Publisher who
reserves the right to edit, reject,
or classify all advertisements under
appropriate headings. Copy should
be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the first day of pub-
lication. Credit for published errors
will be allowed for the first insertion
for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the
Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nor for any general,
special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply
with Federal, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
nation in employment, housing and
public accommodations. Standard
abbreviations are acceptable; how-
ever, the first word of each ad may
not be abbreviated.

In Print and Online
ww .Ilakecitvreporter.com


Legal

COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
INVITATION TO BID
BID NO. 2011-0
APPLICATION OF DUST SUP-
PRESSANT
Please be advised that Columbia
County desires to accept bids on the
above referenced item. Bids will be
accepted through 2:00, P.M. on June
29, 2011 at the office of the Board of
County Commissioners, 135 NE
Hemando Ave., Room 203, Lake
City, Florida 32055.
Specifications and bid forms are
available for download at
http://www.columbiacountyfla.com/
PurchasingBids.asp or may be ob-
tained by contacting the office of the
Board of County Commissioners,
Columbia County, 135 NE Hemando
Ave., Room 203, Post Office Box
1529 Lake City, Florida 32056-1529
or by calling (386)758-1005. Colum-
bia County reserves the right to re-
ject any and/or all bids and to accept
the bid in the county's best interest.
Dated this 8th day of, June 2011.
Columbia County Board of
County Commissioners
Jody DuPree, Chairman
04545122
June 8, 15


1in Job
100U Opportunities
BULLDOZER OPERATOR
Call
F.J. Hill Construction
386-752-7887
0454-5221
Retail Auditor
S & S Office is hiring
A full-time Retail Auditor
Duties include: review and
check store paperwork.
Strong 10 key and excel
experience needed. Benefits
include: vacation, sick leave,
credit union, profit sharing,
dental, health and life insurance.
Drug Free Workplace EOE
Apply in person at
S & S Office
134 SE Colburn Ave.,
Lake City, FL 32025


I167H541 a .



Land Clearing

Back Hoe, Dozer, Chopping, root
raking, bush hog, seeding, sod,
disking, site prep, ponds &
irrigation. Free Est! 386-623-3200

Lawn & Landscape Service

Clean Pine Straw,
You pick it up, $1.85 a bale
Delivery of 100 bales $260
386-688-9156
Landscape Maintenance Company
You can trust for knowledge &
pride, Mention this AD!
Mow Green, LLC 386-288-6532

Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.

Summer Cleaning done your
way. Let me Clean your home be-
fore you leave on Vacation. Come
back home & relax. 386-303-1496.


100 Job
Opportunities

04545024
EMPLOYMENT
OPPORTUNITY
COLUMBIA COUNTY
Columbia County is accepting
Mechanic II applications.
Primary responsibility is skilled
mechanical work in mainte-
nance & repair on automotive,
draglines, trucks, tractors,
graders, bulldozers, front-end
loaders, fire & rescue vehicles &
other construction & mainte-
nance equipment. Includes both
gasoline & diesel fueled
apparatus. Min. requirements:
High School Diploma/GED, & 2
years journeyman level
experiencein automotive
mechanics, or graduation from
an approved course in the trade,
or equivalent combination of
training & experience. Valid FL
CDL Class B License required
w/in first ninety days of initial
employment. Must provide own
tools. Salary is $11.59 per hr.
plus benefits. Successful
applicant must pass pre-employ-
ment physical & drug screening.
Applications: Human Resources
Office, Board of County
Commissioners, 135 NE
Hemrnando, #203, Lake City, FL
32055, (386) 719-2025,
TDD 758-2139 or online at
www.columbiacountvfla.com
Deadline: 06/17/11.
AA/EEO/ADA/VP Employer.
Associate Reps
SUMMER WORK/GREAT PAY
Immediate FT/PT openings,
Customer sales/service,
No exp needed, conditions,
Apply Now all ages 17+
(386) 269-0883
Accepting applications for
Housekeeping/Weekend Breakfast
attendant.. Apply in person at
Cabot Lodge 3525 US
Hwy 90W. No phone calls.
Cashiers needed, Experience
Preferred, Drug free workplace,
all applicants will be -drug tested
Ellisville Exxon,
Hwy 441, No Phone Calls Please.
.CDL AFlatbed Truck Driver
needed for F/T OTR SE area, 3
years explor more. Medical
benefits offered. Contact
Melissa or Mary @ 386-935-2773
Experienced mechanic with own
tools. Apply 9AM.- 2PM only
Deadline Thurs June 9th. 247 NW
Hillandale Glen Lake City
No phone calls


100 Job
100 Opportunities

04545173
First Federal Bank of Florida
has an open position for a
Consumer Underwriter.
Responsible for the underwrit-
ing of loan applications and
making approvals within the
guidelines. Ensures loan
documents are complete and
accurate. Prepares in house eval-
uations of real estate collateral.
Orders and reviews third party
title work, appraisals and flood
certificates for real estate loans.
Bachelor's degree in business or
related field preferred. Two or"
more years of experience in fi-
nancial/loan setting.
Understanding and knowledge
of financial institution products
and services. Applications may
be obtained from any First
Federal Branch and submitted to
Human Resources, P.O. Box
2029, Lake City, Fl 32056 or
emailed to
Turbeville.J(@ffsb.com
Bilingual candidates encouraged
to apply. Equal Employment
Opportunity Employer.

04545205




Live Oak
THRIFT STORE
MANAGER
----------------------
Applicants must have at least
five (5) successful years of work
experience in a supervisory,
retail position.
----------------------
$36,000 Annually
Full-Time
EXCELLENT BENEFITS
APPLY IN PERSON OR BY
EMAIL TO:
Jeremy Buzbee
Sheriffs Ranches Enterprises
Director of Thrift Stores
9291 97th Lane
(Hwy 90 East)
Live Oak, FL 32060
jbuzbee@
youthranches.org
Deadline to apply is
Wednesday 6/15/2011
EOE/DFWP


m100 Job
100 Opportunities
Convenience Store Manager need-
ed. Lake City area. Experience
' preferred. Background & Drug test
req'd. Call 386-362-2935 for info.
MECHANIC NEEDED
Must have own tools.
Apply at 113 SW Nassau Street
Lake City
Stylist Needed
Call
386-752-4614
Southern Exposure

110 Sales
111 Employment
Seeking Route Sales
Representative-Daily Base Pay,
Service Incentive, Sales Commis-
sion, New Customer Incentive;
Pre-established & Growing
Customer Base; Sales &
Management Training; & more.
For immediate consideration apply
online at www.schwansiobs.com.
Local info call 386-755-1790

240 Schools &'
'V Education
04544843
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-05/23/10
Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-07/11/11
Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com


310 Pets & Supplies


FREE KITTENS in Ft. White 8
wks old. 3 males & 1 female. Buff
& white. Cute & cuddly. Ready to
go. 386-497-3808 or 288-6165
Golden Retriever pups CKC.
Shots. 3 females, 5 males
Available July 3 $350. Each
POP. 386-623-1577
YORKIE PUPPY.
Has shots. 9 weeks old.
$300.00
386-697-6163


REPORTER Classifieds In Print and On Line
www.Ilakecityreporter.com


Medca-ssstn- wt



Blod rawExerinc


I I I, 'I 0


310 Pets & Supplies
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife.' If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.

330 Livestock &
Supplies
Black Angus Cows & Heifers
Prices Vary
Registered & Commercial
386-719-4802

QUALITY wnig BEEF
Heifers Limousin/Angus Cross,
Vaccinated, A.I. Sired $550 Each
386-755-3541


361 Farm Equipment
84 Ford 4610 Tractor.
2WD, Solid
2005 motor,$7,500. OBO
386-867-0005


407 Computers
Dell Desktop Computer,
$75
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170


408 Furniture
110 Window AC unit
$75.00
386-292-3927 or
386-755-5331

White Springs HOPE Program
will be accepting applications for
volunteers and employee positions
for the summer youth enrichment
program until
Wednesday, Jufie 8, 2011.
Please send applications to
Town of White Springs, Drawer D
White Springs, Florida 32096
or call 386-397-1333.
Equal Opportunity Employer
Tobacco Free Facility


Family Owned and Operated

Dealership
(Huntin' a good fit)
New &. Used Car Sales
Motivated Self-Starter
Honesty & Good Character
*$50,000 plus a year

Benefit Pkg. .;,

Apply in person at


LZ Macclenny, FL
BURKINS 273 E. Macclenny, Ate.
CHEMROLET


confused?




Call Lake City Reporter Classifieds!



WE CAN HELP 386-755-5440


BUY ITJ
^Uhl^r


SELfL I ri













LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED WEDNESDAY, JUNE 8, 2011


408 Furniture
GE Dishwasher.
$100.00 obo
386-292-3927 or
386-755-5331
Nice Oak Dinette Set.
Table (w/leaf) & six chairs.
Must See! $285. obo
386-292-3927 or 386-755-5331
Nice Table & chairs.
Off white.
Chairs need TLC. $75.00
386-292-3927 or 386-755-5331

420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.


Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$250 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.


430 Garage Sales
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.


440 Miscellaneous
Mqrray automatic Riding mower
Runs Great. 42 in cut.
$375.00
386-292-3927 or 386-755-5331
Stop gnat & Mosquito bites! Buy
Swamp Gator All natural insect re-
pellent. Family safe. Use head to
toe. Available at The Home Depot.
Summer Barbecue Special
Tow Behind
Grill/Smoker, $1,250 OBO.
386-719-4802
Wii System w/2 games,
6 games down loaded, 2 GB
memory card. 1 controller w/joy
stick. $135.00 386-984-6510

450 Good Things
S to Eat
BLUEBERRY HILL
U-PICK opens
May 30th
386-963-4220

630 Mobile Homes
6 for Rent
2 BR/1 BA, Clean, on private
landscaped acre, W/D, quiet area,
no pets, $500 per mo. Ist/Last +
$200 dep.,no utilities. dep.,
smoke free,i386-752-7027..
2&3 BR MH. $395 $650. mo.
plus deposit. Water & sewer fur-
nished. Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
2B/1BA. MEH., quiet'living. Clean.
New stove, new carpet, carport.
NO PETS! 1st & deposit.. '
Adult community. Smoke free
environment. 386-758-3963


2br/2ba SWMH; also Residential
RV lots for rent between Lake City
& G'ville. Access to 1-75 & 441
(352)317-1326 Call for terms
3/2 S of Lake City, (Branford area)
$400 dep, $600 month
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
DWMH for Rent. 3br/2ba
Handicapped accessible.
$650. mo. $500. Dep. No Pets.
386-984-9634. ask for Amber.
Great area! Very clean 2Br/2Ba,
MH, CH/A, Nice kitchen.
$550. mo. + $200 Dep. NO PETS.
(386)755-0064 or (904)771-5924


630 [Mobile Homes
630 for Rent
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White Contact 386-623-3404
or 386-365-1919
SOUTH 41 2br/lba. Washer/
Dryer Outlet. Satellite TV incl.
Pets ok on approval.' New paint
$550. mo + dep. 386-758-2408.

Mobile Homes
640 for Sale
2010 Lot Model 32x80
Den/LR 3BR/2BA
2280SF 1/2" SR
Call Charles @
Royals Homes 754-6737
2010 Lot Model 3BR/2BA
1624 SF. 1/2" Sheetrock
Vaulted Ceiling.
Charles @
Royals Homes 754-6737
2011 Claytin Single
14x76 2BR/2BA
3 walk in Closets
Call Charles @ Royals
Homes 754-6737
2011 Clayton Homes 4BR/2BA
9' Side Walls,
Energy Star Home
.Call Charles @ Royals
Homes 754-6737
2011 Legacy Model 1980 SF
Wood Cab, 3BR/2BA
Deluxe Interior
Call Charles @
Royals Homes 754-6737
2011 SE Triple wide
16" OC Home WZH
Total upgrade call Charles
@ Royals Homes 754-6737
4/2 DWMH at Timberlane Park,
Long Carport, 2 porches/shed
$38,50p.
386-752-4258
Any Size, Any Shape
we have the home for you
Call royals Homes @
386-754-6737


Architect Designed,
Gr en Engineered
Energy Homes
@Royals Homes
www.royalshomesales.com
Ask about our Energy Star Top
Insulation & Windbws, Better
Built,Better Comfort, Phil @
Royals Homes 386-754-6737
Custom Built Modular's,
Bring your plans to
Royals Homes
386-754-6737
www.royalshomesales.com
Finance Manager on Site,
Know's how to get it done,
not a Salesman Guessing
Call Phil @ Royals.
Homes 386-754-6737
Flashy? Pretty?
Whatabout Construction?
Homesto last a Lifetime
Royals Homes
386-754-6737


Hallmark Real Estate. 2004
DWMH just minutes from the riv-
er. Detached carport. Front & back.
screened porches. MLS#77398
Paula Lawrence 386-,23-1973
I Only a Few Left
I 2010 Models must go!
Call Royals Homes @
386-754-6737
Only at Royals Homes
'Can your home be
prepared for real brick?
Call Bo @ 754-6737
Pre-Owned 2BR/1 Bath
Priced to move 754-6737
Only @ Royals Homes
www.royalshomesales.com,


640 Mobile Homes
640 for Sale
Sales Price Doubled?
Not at Royals, Honest people,
Quality Homes.
Call Royals Homes
@ 386-754-6737
Service Manager on Site
makes sure your satisfied, not
someone doing it all
Royals Homes 386-754-6737
There is a Difference.
Just ask our Customers
We do what we say
Call Phil@ Royals Homes
386-754-6737

60n Mobile Home
650 &Land
67.5 ac.Ranch, fenced & cross
fenced. Spacious moblie home
w/large front deck & RV hookup
MLS 75607 $299,000. Access
Realty. Patti Taylor. 386-623-6896
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
DWMH on 5 ac. 3br/2ba Back 2
ac. fenced. Owners motivated.
Debbie Myles 386-719-1224
MLS# 75830 $99,900
Hallmark Real Estate. 3/2
DWMH 1/2 ac south of town.
Columbia City. Paved frontage,
comer lot. $57,500
MLS#77654 Janet Creel 719-0382
Owner Finance, Nice 3/2, S of
Lake City, small down/$625 mo
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.cdm

\710 Unfurnished Apt.
1 For Rent







05525655
SPRING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans;
some with garages.
Call 386-454-1469
or visit our website:
www.springhillvillage.net

1 & 2 Bedroom Apartments
Move in for as low as .
$199
386-755-2423
Great location W of 1-75, spacious
deluxe 2br apts., garage, W/D
hookup. patio. $600/700 & up, +
Sec, 386-344-3715 or 965-5560.


The Lakes Apts. Studios & lBr's
from $135/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741


Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location,.
From $450. + sec. :
Call Michelle 386-752-9626

720 Furnished Apts.
2* For Rent
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135, -
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

SUnfurnished
730 Home For Rent
2 bedroom 1 bath on
5 acres. $700.00 per month.
First; last imd security.
386-590-5333
3br/2ba Nice Brick home
for rent comer of Baya &
Defender. $950. mo. $950. dep.
386-344-5065


730 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent
4br/2ba in town.
Good neighborhood. $900. mo
1st & $900 security. No Pets.
386-755-6916

Callaway S/D. Beautiful 4/2.
2250sf. 1/2 ac. privacy fenced lot.
Office, Ig. screened porch., fire-
place, hardwood floors. No pets.
$1500 mo. Avail. 8/1. 623-6717
Family Hm 3/2, Ir, dr, fam rm w/
fireplace,garage, fenced yd. Nice
area. $1050 mo + dep. Martha Jo
Khachigan, Realtor 623-2848
Private House for Rent
Newly Remodeled, S of Lake City
Call The Adams Agency @
386-752-1444
Home for Rent.
3/2 in City Limits. No pets.
$900. per month. Call Susan,
Realtor. 386-623-6612

750 Business &
75 Office Rentals
FOR LEASE: Downtown office
space. Convenient to
Court house.
Call 386-755-3456

For Lease: E Baya Ave. Two -
1000 sqft office space units or
combined for 2000 sqft. 386-984-
0622 or weekends 386-497-4762

OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$695. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor
788 S Marion Ave, Commercial
bldg with hwy frontage,
near downtown.
Call Scott Stewart at Westfield
Realty Group. 386-867-3498

770 Condos For Rent
Furnished or unfurnished
Townhomes on the golf course.
$750. mo. plus security. Includes
water. 386-752-9626


790 Vacation Rentals
Horseshoe Beach Scalloping Spcl
Gulf Front 2br, w/lg porch, dock,
fish sink. wkend $395./wk $895.
386-235-3633/352-498-5986
alwaysonvacation.com #419-181
"Florida's Last Frontier"

805 Lots for Sale
5 Acre Lot, Secluded & Cleared,
MLS# 67871 $55,000
Call Lisa Waltrip
.@ 386-365-5900
westfieldrealtygroup.comn
Great Package Deal $43,500
Nicely wooded. 3 lots in Emerald
Cove. (1)Private cul-de-sac.
Aaron Nickelson 386-867-S534
Westfield Realty Group
Hallmark Real Estate. Owner
Finance with $5K down with
terms negotiable. Below assessed
value for the county. MLS# 74484
$17,900 Jay Sears 386-867-1613 '


805 Lots for Sale

Land for Sale. 12 acres in
nice area south of town.
MLS#77469 $55,000
Carrie Cason 386-623-2806
Westfield Realty Group

PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
Sto advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.


810 Home for Sale

3/2 1056 sqft Brick home in town.
Fenced back yard w/12xl2 work-
shop Just Reduced! $79,900
MLS# 77414 Call 386-243-8227
R.E.O.Realty Group, Inc

3/2 in Woodhaven w/Fla Room,
fenced back yard MLS#75499,
$114,900 Call Pam @
Remax 386-303-2505 or
email- remaxpamb@gmail.com



Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

CMYER


810 Home for Sale
4/2 on 10 ac. in Bell. Over 2200
sqft in a country setting. 10x20
frame shade. Bring offers! $89,000
MLS 76582 Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty 386-397-3473
4/2 with 1000 sq ft workshop,
fenced yard, 2 car garage. Fairly
new roof & HVAC MLS#77602,
Bring Offers! $169,900.
R.E.O. Realty Group 243-8227
4br brick on .51 ac. comer lot. For-
mal dining and a large open floor
plan. Brick patio. $159,888
MLS 76763 Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty 386-397-3473
A Pilots Dream home 3br/2.5ba.
Pool, stocked pond, detached ga-
rage w/living quarters MLS#77756
$399,900 Westfield Realty
GroupJosh Grecian 386-466-2517
Access Realty Stylish 3/2 + pool
house w/l/2 bath on 2.25 acres.
Rear deck, 2 car garage & carport.
MLS 78103 $194,500.
Patti Taylor.623-6896
Brick 3/1 family home, 4.43 acres.
w/metal roof. MLS# 77415
Short sale acceptance w/lenders
approval. $99,000. 386-243-8227
R.E.O. Realty Group, Inc
Callaway. Beautiful 4/2. 2250sf.
1/2 ac. privacy fenced. Office,
screened porch, fireplc, hardwood
floors. 10x16 shed, new paint/
carpet. $209,900 386-623-6717
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
3br/1. Updated kitchen, bath. Open
living room w/all classic & elegant
light fixtures. 386-752-6575
MLS# 78099 $79,900
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
3/2 lin Spring Estates. 20x40
workshop. Screened back porch &
all appliances. Kayla Carbono
623-9650 MLS# 73787 $99,900

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek


WH:EN TlHI CAPTAIN
PIPNT GE-. HI5


'* *" ..... *I PROMOTION, IT
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Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
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A:
-' ,' (Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's Jumbles'f BLIMP TRACK JOVIAL HUNGRY
S Answer. What the postal.courier delivered after he
dropped the package JUNK MAIL


1 ACROSS


I Meats and veg-
gies
6 Joyous out-
burst
11 Elaborately
decorated
13 Hudson River
city
14 Pay a dividend
15 Make
thinner
16 Cave dweller
17 Peace
gesture
18 Current meas.
21. Sci-fi gofer
23 Rec rqom
26 Excessively
27 Wooded hol-
low
28 Free from con-
taminants
29 Spun
31 Water softener
32 Be in accord
33 Demonstration
35 Drain problem


36 Small songbird
37 Tennis-match
unit I
38 Baby beaver
39 Bucks
0 Marquee
4 notice, once
41 Status-
42 Maybes
44 Steal cattle
47 XC
51 More pale
52 Newspaper VIP
53 Sheds tears
54 Duelers'
weapons

DOWN

1 In favor of
2 Metal source
3 Sudbury's
prov.
4 Apply a mud-
pack
5 Fence-sit
6 Worked at a
trade
7 Up to the job


8 Perfume label
word
9 Kitchen pest
10'.PBS "Science
Guy"
12 Menu listing


13 Tylenol rival
18 Raid
19 "The Jungle
Book" hero
20 Christie sleuth
22 Seasoned vet
(2 wds.)
23 Force
24 Pencil end
25 Beside (2
wds.)
28 Lobster trap
30 Not decaf.
31 Genuine (2
wds.)
34 Do a brake job
36 Swain
39 Backless slip-
pers
41 Ear cleaner
(hyph.)
43 Fabric sample
44 Unfinished
45 Draw on
46 Seashell sell-
er?
48 Riviera sum-
mer
49 Foot digit
50 Soph. and jr.


2011 UFS, Inc. Dist. by Universal UClick for UFS


Answer to Previous Puzzle


AL 0 IT EL


L RL

J AMS ABEW ADD








LYREE

YARD DEER WAD


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


Classified Department: 755-5440


URGAAJ













LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED WEDNESDAY, JUNE 8, 2011


810 Home for Sale
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
Picadilly Park All brick 3/2, comer
lot w/inground pool. Screen porch
& fenced yard. Jessica Sheelly
288-2403 MLS# 73787 $99,900
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
Eastside Village 2br/2ba. Extra Ig.
Master suite. Florida room & 2
sheds. Ginny Smith 386-623-4277
623-4277 MLS# 70160 $79,900
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
Laurel Lake S/D. 4br/2ba w/ ap-
prox. 2275 sqft. Fenced back yard,
storage shed. Susan Sloan 386-
965-2847 MLS# 76106 $189,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
4br/1.5ba brick. 1332 sq ft. Great
floor plan, nice yard, close to
town. 1 ac landscaped. Lori
Geibeig MLS# 75713 $84,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Remodeled 2/2 (could be 3/2).
Split floor plan. Great home, great
price. Mary Brown Whitehurst
965-0887 MLS# 77943 $105,000
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
3/2 brick home in Woodcrest. Lg
lot completely fenced. Easy access
to amenities. Elaine K. Tolar 386-
752-6488 MLS# 78148 $129,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
New home in Mayfair. 4 bedroom
on comer lot. Covered Porch.
Elaine K. Tolar 386-752-6488
MLS# 76919 $214,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
3/3 in beautiful area. 2414sqft.
Private yard & patio with storage
bldg. Lori G Simpson 386-365-
5678 MLS# 78175 $159,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Brick 3/2 on lake front. Lots of up-
dates. Glassed in room with fantas-
tic views. Lori G Simpson 386-
365-5678 MLS# 78092 $249,900
Country Home 2br/2ba on 5 ac.
detached garage w/workshop.
MLS# 77005 $179,900 Call Roger
Lovelady 386-365-7039
Westfield Realty Group
CYPRESS LANDING!
3BR/2BA built in 2005 w/large
kitchen $115,000
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #75794
DESIRABLE GWEN LAKE area!
Nice 3BR/2BA home on
comer lot $112,000
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #77307
Eastside Village a 55+ Retirement
Community. lots of Storage. lg
deck off 2br suite. Carport w/more
storage. MLS# 77462 Eastside
Village Realty, Inc. 752-5290
Eastside Village a 55+ Retirement
Community. 2br/2ba. Lg office
/craft room. Oversized garage.
$89,900 MLS# 71901 Eastside
Village Realty, Inc. 752-5290
Eastside Village a 55+ Retirement
Community. Open floor plan
w/breakfast nook. 2 lg bedrooms.
$104,999 MLS# 77779 Eastside
Village Realty, Inc. 752-5290
Featured Home 55+ acres, 5 pas-
tures fenced & cross fenced. 2,700.
sqft, 4br/3ba home built in 1996.
Call for details! 386-243-8227
R.E.O. Realty Group
Fixer Upper on Spwannee River.
Needs TLC. Owner motivated &
will finance. $45,000
MLS 77337 Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty 386-397-3473"
GREAT STARTER HOME!
3BR/2BA w/lots of closet space &
nice lawn $79,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #76432
Great Starter Home. Well cared
for. New countertops, tile floors &
metal roof. $79,900 MLS#77524
Brodie Alfred 386-623-0906
Westfield Realty Group
Hallmark Real Estate. Brick
home w/fine landscaping. Drearf
kitchen w/double pantry.
Split bedroom plan MLS#77846
Paula Lawrence 386-623-197.3
Hallmark Real Estate. Country
Estate. Sit in the swing of the big
oak tree and watch the horses
graze on 10ac. fenced. 39 ac total.
MLS#78139 Janet Creel 719-0382
Hallmark Real Estate. Pool &
Patio. 3br/2ba. brick home on
1.69 ac. Workshop &
SWMH on property. MLS#78117
Tanya Shaffer 386-397-4766
Home near the River. 3br/2ba,
1470 sqft. needs a little TLC.
Mike Lienemann 386-867-9053
Westfield Realty Group
Home on 15 ac. w/over 2,500 sqft
home.Very Ig bedrooms w/private
baths. 24x24 workshop $235,000
MLS 77552 Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty 386-397-3473
HOME OR OFFICE on
Alachua St; remodeled 1,207 SqFt
home $82,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #77724
Hallmark Real Estate. 2006
2200SF home. 2br/2ba w/mother-
in-law suite, 4 car garage, endless
hot water heater. MLS# 77547
$309,900 Jay Sears 386-867-1613
Hallmark Real Estate. 3br/2ba
new roof & AC. Comes w/SWMH
& 30x30 steel bldg. Completely
fenced. MLS# 76752
$179,900 Jay Sears 386-867-1613
Just Reduced 3/2 home, inside city
limits, fenced backyard, detached
carport w/office MLS#77411
$79,900 Call R.E.O.Realty,
@ 386-243-8227 Make Offer!
Just Reduced 4/2 on 1.57 acres,


fireplace. partially fenced, MLS#
77412, Call Nancy Rogers at
R.E.O. Realty Group
386-243-8227 $64,900
Lg. 4/3 family home. 16x20
screened porch, workshop. 4.5 ac.
fenced/cross fenced MLS 74339
$229,900. N Fla Homeland Realty
Darlene Hart 386-288-2878
Lg. home on I ac. Granite floors
throughout. 4br/2ba. Nice open
kitchen & Florida room. $148,000
MLS 77292 Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty 386-397-3473
Like New. 3br/2ba on 3 ac. New
kitchen cabinets, counters, carpet
& more. $179,900 MLS#77372
Charlie Sparks 386-755-0808
Westfield Realty Group


810 Home for Sale
LOTS OF UPGRADES!
Remodeled kitchen in this
2BR/1BA home $29,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #77505

Mayfield S/D, nice fenced in back
yard w/small lake behind property.
Very nice. $99,888
MLS 77092 Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty 386-397-3473

Neat as a pin! Split floor plan
w/well manicured lawn. 10x12
storage shed. $129K MLS 77932
Darlene Hart 386-288-2878
N Fla Homeland Realty

Owner Finance. Custom built 3/2.5
10.8 ac. Granite, fireplace, vaulted
ceilings, surround sound. lanai,
gazebo. MLS 77382 Access Real-
ty. Patti Taylor $249K 623-6896

Remax Professionals Charming
w/many upgrades. 3br/2ba. 2 mas-
ter suites. MLS# 76779, $105,000
Missy Zecher @ 386-623-0237
www.missyzecher.com

Remax Professionals Motivated
seller. All brick family home
w/many upgrades. MLS# 78168,
$129,000 www.missyzecher.com
Missy Zecher 386-623-0237

Remax Professionals Spacious
home on comer lot. Private access
to Lake Jeffery. MLS# 77783,
$198,900 www.missyzecher.com
Missy Zecher @ 386-623-0237

Spacious 4/2 home on 1 ac. Split
floor plan. Great neighborhood.
Easy access to 1-75 $220K MLS
77859 Darlene Hart 386-288-2878
N Fla Homeland Realty
SPACIOUS home built in
1995 has 2BR/2BA & 1,636 SqFt
on 1 acre $89,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #76887

Starter/Investment Home, 3/2 +
Bonus room on 1 acre, remodeled,
fenced MLS#77562 $99,900
Call Pam @ Remax
Professionals 386-303-2505

Well Maintained 3/2 on dehd-end
street, quiet, country, close to
downtown $105,000 MLS#77800
Lisa Waltrip 386-365-5900
Westfield Realty Group

Well Maintained 3/2 w/bpen floor
plan,on 1/2 acre, fenced, shed
MLS# 78136 $134,900 -
Call Pain Beauchamp @ Remax
Professionals 386-758-8900


820 Farms &
2 Acreage
4 1/2 acre lot Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$69,900. $613mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
4 acres, Wellborn, New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down, $39,900, $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
6.45 ac river front property in
White Springs, cloe to Big Shoals.
Covered shelter for entertaining.
MLS# 77417 $124,888 386-243-
8227 R.E.O. Realty Group, Inc
Bring the horses. Peaceful &
ready for your home. Convenient
location. $38,000 MLS#76264
Millard Gillen 386-365-7001
Westfield Realty Group
FARM- 7 stall barn, Apt.
17+ acres cross fenced.
Close in $950. mo.
386-961-1086
Half to ten acre lots. Some w/
well, septic, pp. We finance; low
dwn pmt. Deas Bullard Properties.
386-752-4339. www.landnfl.com
Look at all the/Upgrades
s Completely remodeled.
$106,500 MLS#77483
Brodie Alfred 386-623-0906
Westfield Realty Group
Pretty piece of land. 2 acres close
to interstate 75 for under 20K.
Mobile Homes or residential ok.
MLS# 77400 Call 386-243-8227
R.E.O. Realty Group, Inc

Commercial
830 Property
Great Investment/Owner Finance
1400 sq ft building on 2 acres
Creative terms, owner flexible.
CLose to 1-75. 386-86f'-l1190
Hallmark Real Estate. Commer-
cial Business Location on South
Main w/offices & service bldg.
Frontage, warehouse & storage
MLS#76280 Janet Creel 719-0382


Prime Commercial Location.
Just across from plaza. Frontage
on Baya w/2 curbcuts. $350,000 )
MLS# 77485 Call 386-243-8227
R.E.O.Realty Group, Inc

951 Recreational
951 Vehicles: C
1996-33ftFifWheelCity Reporter
reside. Good cond. $5,000.
386-362-1826. Lease message


Classified Department: 755-5440




















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2010 Corolla's 2008 Buick Enclave CX........ 24,M79
t h182 2006 Cadillac CTS............... 14,876
2007 Cadllac STS................. 17,=88
.-. 2009 Chevy Aveo LT........... 10,805
2010 Chevy HHR LS......... '13,069
H 2003 Chevy Sllverado............'5,995
2005 Chevy lrallblazer LS .... 9,99
2008 Chrysler Sebring...........'13,997
S2000 Chrysler Voyager SE.... '3,409
2010 Dodge Charger SXT......196
2007 Dodge Dakota ST Quad '14,879
2010 Dodge Journey SXT ..- '17,789
W.. lW 2007 Dodge NItro SLT........... '14,949
I Toyota 09 Ford 2009 Ford Escape XLS..........'16,102
Yarls Focus SE 1999 Ford F-250....................'3,653
V PL Auto PW PL ,it i rSK Mi 2009 Ford Focus SE.............. 12,527
2007 Ford Fusion SE.............'13,498
2010 Ford Mustang................'18,199
2010 Ford Mustang.............. .18,994
2007 Ford Mustang................ 13,492
2000 GMC JImmy 4x4............'5,801
2005 Honda Accord EX......... 11,499


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,77,- 7-M.,77