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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01575
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 6/7/2011
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01575
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text








Nadal prevails
f Spaniard defeats Roger
*' Federer in four sets,
wins French Open.
O 1 1 ***3O DIGIT 326
LIB OF FLORIDA HISTORY
PO BOX 117007
205 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-1943


Up and running
Fort White football
team begins summer
conditioning program.
Sports, I B


A free man
Former Giants wide
receiver released from
prison, eyes NFL return.
Sports, I B


Reporter


Tuesday, June 7, 2011


www.lakecityreporter.com


Vol. 137, No. I 15 75 cents


Counting their blessings

*.' Y .. ah


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Kali Kitaif (right), 16, consoles her mother DeeDee Norris after she sees a tree measuring at least 70-feet-high resting on the roof of her home
after a storm passed through Lake City Monday afternoon. No one was hurt. '1 guess we're lucky it's not in the bedroom,' Norris said. 'I didn't think
it was a tree, I thought it was a limb.' See Page 3A for more on the storm.


1 killed,

3 hurting

weekend

wrecks

Lake City man dies;
woman, 2 children
seriously injured.

By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
A Lake City man died and three
others were hospitalized in weekend
crashes in Columbia and Suwannee
counties.
Larry Baxter, 50, was traveling
south on 1-75 with two children as
passengers Sunday afternoon when
his vehicle was rear-ended by a
pickup truck. Baxter's vehicle left
the roadway and overturned, lead-
ing to his death.
Passenger Tavis Harnage, 2, of
Lake City, was lifeflighted to Shands
at the University of Florida with
serious injuries. ,Another passen-
ger, Kyia Bunch, 8, of Gainesville
was transported to Shands UF by
Columbia County EMS with serious
CRASHES continued on 3A


FCAT: Science scores

among bright spots


Newversion of exam
requires critical thinking
analysis, say officials.

By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.comrn
Florida Comprehesive Assestment
Test scores are in for Columbia County.
FCAT 2.0 scores were released by
the Florida Department of Education
Monday.
School officials are starting to pick
apart the test results by subject and
grade level, said Superintendent Mike
Millikin. I
"We're encouraged that we continue
to grow in the science level," he said.


"Our. elementary schools in general
have improved from last year, and that
is encouraging as well."
Grade levels increased in percentage
proficiency for the following areas:
Fourth grade increased by seven
points in math and six points in.read-
ing.
Fifth grade increased by four points
itn math and reading and one point in
science.
Sixth grade increased by two points
in math.
There was no change in seventh
grade reading.
Eighth grade increased by three
points in science.
Math scores for ninth grade.are not
FCAT continued on 3A


St. Margaret spray fields:

City, FDEP reach accord


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
The City of Lake City
Council unanimously
approved a consent
order Monday night
between the City and the
Florida Department of
EnvironmentalProtection
regarding 'disposal of
treated effluent gener-
ated by the St. Margaret
Wastewater Treatment
Plant.
The plant generates
biosolids as a byproduct
of the biological waste-
water treatment process,
according to the consent
order. Treated wastewa-
ter from, St. Margaret is


discharged to a Branford
Road biosolids applica-
tion site through spray
irrigation of fields total-
ing more than 380 acres.
However, it is not cur-
rently 'a permitted biosol-
ids application site.
The FDEP determined
the City was in violation
of state law and regula-
tions governing disposal
of such material, accord-
ing to the consent order.
The consent order
allows the City to conduct
an 18-month study at the
Branford Road site to col-
lect data on the impact
of wastewater discharge
on the area, said Dave
Clanton, utilities execu-


tive director. Ideally the
findings from the study
will support continued
use of the location as a
biosolids application site.
Temporary application
of the biosolids at the
site will cause no harm to
groundwater, he said.
In other business:
The Community
Redevelopment Agency
met prior to the council
meeting and approved
payment for appraisals
on four parcels on land.
The council adopted
a resolution to authorize
the City to convey title
to 6.43 acres of land to
ACCORD continued on 3A


MOCK SHOOTER SCNEt'O


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Lake City Police Department officers Brian Bruenger (from left), Juan Cruz and David Broom
move to an unsecured part of the Pinemount Elementary School campus while looking for a
mock gunman in.a training exercise Monday. 'An active shooter situation like this can help us
mentally prepare for what could happen,' Bruenger said.


GUNMAN DRILL

LOOKED ALL TOO REAL


Exercise simulated
armed invasion
of local school.

By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com
"Code Red, lockdown.
Code Red, lockdown."
These words rang outfrom
Pinemount Elementary's
public announcement sys-
tem Monday after several
gunshots from weapons
DRILL continued on 3A


JASON MATTHEW WALKERILake City Reporter
Jeh Howell (left) of Factory of Effects applies makeup to a fake
gunshot wound on Lauren Markham's chest Monday in prepara-
tion for the Pinemount Elementary Active Shooter Exercise.


I1!1I1!A111 LL US:
(386)752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
1 842 6400020 1 Fax: 752-9400


94
Afternoon Storms
WEATHER, 2A


Opinion ................ 4A
Around Florida ........... 2A
School.................. 6A
Advice & Comics ......... 3B
Puzzles................. 2B


TODAY IN
SCHOOL
Teacher of the
Universe.


COMING
WEDNESDAY
Heat, Mavericks face
off in Game 4.


_ty


A-


W rx











LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING TUESDAY, JUNE 7, 2011


FLORID A"' 3.
m fl Saturday: I
5-8-16-18-21-51
X 3


Monday:
Afternoon: 4-1-0
Evening: 8-9-9


Play4D
"
"***,


Monday:
Afternoon: 9-6-1-8
Evening: 7-4-5-2


Sunday:
7-14-20-22-31


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS

Pattinson sinks teeth into MTV Movie Awards


UNIVERSAL CITY
The MTV Movie Awards
was more like "The Team
Edward Show."
"Twilight" star Robert
Pattinson sucked up the
spotlight and some popcorn-
shaped trophies at Sunday's she-
nanigan-packed ceremony. Among
the goofy actor's moments: winning
three different awards, unexpect-
edly kissing co-star Taylor Lautner,
and slipping the F-word past censors
when presenting Reese Witherspoon
with the special MTV Generation
Award.
"Ift's not always a bad thing to have
sexual chemistry with your mother,"
joked Pattinson, who played the
son of Witherspoon's character in
"Vanity Fair" and her love interest in
"Water for Elephants."
For his role as vampire Edward
Cullen in "The Twilight Saga:
Eclipse," Pattinson won best male
performance, best fight with Bryce
Dallas Howard and Xavier Samuel,
and best kiss with Kristen Stewart.
Instead of smooching each other,
Pattinson declared he didn't "feel
like kissing" Stewart before he
descended back into the audience
and planted his lips on Lautner.
Team Jacob also earned some
love from "Saturday Night Live" star
Jason Sudeikis, the show's host, who
kicked off the silly ceremony at the
Gibson Amphitheater by starring in
his own version of "The Hangover"
in which he went in search of a lost
Lautner. The other 'Twilight" win-
ners were Stewart for best female
performance and "Eclipse" for best
movie.

Dr. Dre settles lawsuit
over 'Chronic' sales
LOS ANGELES Dr. Dre has .
settled a lawsuit against the new
incarnation of Death Row Records
over damages he's owed from unau-
thorized online sales of his album


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Actors Taylor Lautner (from left), Robert Pattinson and Kristen Stewart are seen
onstage at the MTV Movie Awards on Sunday in Los Angeles.


'"The Chronic."
Attorneys for
the rap superstar
informed a judge
that the case had
settled Monday, one
day before a jury
Dr. Drd trial to determine
how much Dre was
owed. No details of the settlement
were filed.

Daniel Radcliffe to
sing at Tony Awards
NEW YORK If you want to see
Daniel Radcliffe sing, tune in early to
the Tony Awards.
The "Harry Potter" star saed.
he'll perform the
song "Brotherhood
of Man" from his
Broadway show
"How to Succeed in
Business Without
'. j Really Trying" early
Radcliffe in Sunday's telecast.
Said Radcliffe: "I
think we're one of the first, if not the
first"


Radcliffe revealed the news
.Monday while welcoming hundreds
of New York City students as they
made their Broadway debuts per-
forming routines from musicals on
the Majestic Theatre .stage. *
Radcliffe was passed over for a
Tony nomination, but said he's pull-
ing for co-stars John Larroquette and
Tammy Blanchard, who are up for
awards.

Disney to lay off nearly
250 employees at studio
LOS ANGELES A person famil-
'iar with the matter said The Walt
Disney Co. is preparing to lay off,
under 5 percent of the employees at
its studio, or up to about 250 people,
next week.
Most of the people work in
home video distribution, which was
merged with the theatrical distribu-
tion division late last year, the person
said.
DVD sales have been plunging
industrywide and the studio is look-
ing to cut costs.
Associated Press


SCelebrity Birthdays


* Movie director James Ivory
is 83.
M Actress Virginia McKenna,
is 80.
* Singer Tom Jones is 71.
* Poet Nikki Giovanni is 68.
M Actor Ken Osmond ("Leave


HOW TO REACH US
Main number........ (386) 752-1293
Faq number ..............752-9400
Circulation ...............755-5445
Online.... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press..
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without( the permis-
sion of th6 publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.q. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056.
Publisher ToddWilson.....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
Editor Robert Bridges .... .754-0428
(rbridges@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Ashley Butcher ...754-0417
(abutcher@lakecityreporter.com)
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440


It to Beaver") is 68.
* Former talk show host
Jenny Jones is 65.
* Actress Anne Twomey is
60.
* Actor Liam Neeson is 59.
* Actress Colleen Camp is 58.


BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon.... 754.0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed y 6.30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 730
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In all otrer counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Clrculatqon ...............755-5445
(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks.................. $26.32
24 Weeks................... $48.79
52 Weeks.................. $83.46
Rates include% sales tax.
Mail rates
12 Weeks................ $41.40
24 Weeks................... $82.80
52 Weeks..................$179.40


CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run
in this space. And thanks for reading.


AROUND FLORIDA


THE WEATHER


Paint trail leads
police to suspect
PALM HARBOR-
Authorities said a trail of.
paint led them to a Tampa
Bay area man suspected of
vandalizing more than 20
vehicles in his neighbor-
hood.
The Pinellas County
Sheriff's Office reports
that Ramsey Charles
Sheard, 21, was charged
with arson Monday, but
additional charges were.
forthcoming. He was being
held on $20,000.
Residents of a Palm
Harbor neighborhood
awoke Monday morning
to find numerous tires
slashed, several vehicles.
covered in paint and one
vehicle that had been set
on fire.

Deputies: Stun
gun kills suspect
OAKLAND PARK -
Authorities said a sus-
pect died shortly after a
Broward County deputy
used a stun gun on him.
The sheriff's office
reports that deputies
arrested James Doe, 31,
early Monday morning
after he kicked in the front
door of his ex-girlfriend's
apartment Deputies had
already told him to leave
the area several hours
earlier.
Deputies put Doe in the
back seat of a patrol car,
where authorities said he
began kicking the doors
and windows. Deputies
reported that they told
Doe to stop several
times before one deputy
shot him with a Taser.
Doe became unrespon-
sive shortly after being
stunned.

4 more homeless
activists arrested
ORLANDO Four
more activists have been
arrested for feeding pan-


- A


House mistakenly fore
Todd Allen, attorney for Warren and Mauree
speaks to the media outside a Bank of Ame
Davis Boulevard, in Naples while deputies r
bank manager inside. Bank of America tried
the Nyerges' fully-paid, Golden Gate Estates
starting.a legal battle with the couple, who h
the home in 2009.


cakes and donuts to the
homeless in downtown
Orlando.
Police officers hand-
cuffed the activists and
loaded them into a police
van Monday just after they
had distributed food to
about 30 homeless people
in defiance of a city ordi-
nance.
The Orlando ordinance
requires groups to get a
permit to feed 25 or more
people in parks in a down-
town district The rules
also restrict the groups to
two permits per year for
each park.

Tampa teens
killed in shooting
TAMPA Tampa police
have named a person of
interest in the fatal shoot-
ings of teen siblings over
the weekend.
Jeremi Brito, 13, died at
Tampa General Hospital
on Monday. He and his
sister, Kiara Brito, 16, were
the only ones home early
Sunday morning when
they were shot in their
South Tampa house.
Police said the teens
were shot multiple times


M FOG, i ISOLATED PARTLY PARTLY [ OLATED
STORMS 1 -STORMS CLOUDY CLOUDY -STORMS


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ASSOCIATED PRESS Tallahassee *
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94 65
Ocala
93167


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and that the home was tar-
geted. It didn't appear that
the shooter forced his way
inside, officials said.

Gov. on trade
mission to Canada
TALLAHASSEE Gov.
Rick Scott is on a week-
long trade mission in
Canada as part of his
efforts to attract new busi-
ness and jobs to Florida.
Scott left Monday with
a delegation of Florida
business and community
leaders.
Gray Swoope, president
of the state's public-private
economic development
agency, Enterprise Florida,
also is on the trip to
Montreal and Toronto.
This is Scott's second
trade mission since the for-
mer corporate CEO took
office in January. He went
in March to Panama.
Scott said it makes
sense to visit Canada since
that country is Florida's
top economic partner
counting trade, investment
and tourism. He plans to
discuss opportunities for
increasing trade.
* Associated Press


Daytona Beach
Ft. Lauderdale
Daytona Beach Fort Myers
88 73 Gainesville
Jacksonville
Orlando Cape Canaveral Ley esty
92 7 8;73 Miake City
Naples
West Palm Beach Ocala
87 76 0 Orlando


86! 70pc
87 75..'pc
93/7 pc
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An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.


a


TEMPERATURES
High Monday
Low Monday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Monday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


97
75
89
67
100 in 1927
58 in 1958


0.01"
0.01"
14.12"
1.16"
18.41"


SUN
Sunrise today 6:29 a.m.
Sunset today 8:30 p.m.
Sunrise tom. 6:29 a.m.
Sunset tom. 8:31 p.m.

MOON
Moonrise today 12:04 pim.
Moonset today 12:22 a.m.
Moonrise torn. 1:07 p.m.
Moonset tom. 12:58 a.m.


June June June July
8 15 23 1
First Full Last New


On this date in
1972, Richmond,
Va. experienced
its worst flood of
record as rains from
Hurricane Agnes
pushed the water
level at the city
locks to a height of
36.5 feet.


11

10 mktes tD bln
Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk


for the area on ....
a scale from 0
to 10+..

weathr.com

S Forecasts, data and
S graphics O 2011 Weather
l central, LP, Madison, Wis.
weatherJ www.weatherpubllsher.comi


M Connected
,:^^^
-*^^ ^^
'^^m-_
' mOKK^Ks^^^^^^^^^^^^^v
IgTOnffCTt^fflffa
iHHiMIINlMMMMMNIMB


Daily Scripture
"So that Christ may dwell in
your hearts through faith.And I
pray that you, being rooted and
established in love."
Ephesians 3:17

Thought for Today
"That would be a good thing
for them to cut on my tomb-
stone: 'Wherever she went,
including here, it was against
her better judgment."
Dorothy Parker,
American writer (1893-1967)

Lake City Reporter


FL Lauderdale Panama City
FL Myers 87, 76 Pensacola
93,'72 *Naples Tallahassee
90, 74 Miani Tampa
88,76 Valdosta
Key West* W. Palm Beach
87/79


Page Editor: Jason M. Walker, 754-0430


( R!3! TPCZBED BY


F,


I


19











LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL TUESDAY, JUNE 7, 2011


CRASHES: 1 killed, 3 injured

Continued From Page 1A


injuries as well. Harnage
and Bunch were secured
by means of a booster seat
and seat belt, resectively.
The driver of the pick-
up, William Charles Hale,
81, of Longwood, suffered
minor injuries.
The wreck occurred
around 2:30 p.m. Sunday
near the 421 milemarker in
Columbia County.
According to Florida
Highway Patrol reports,
Hale was southbound in
the middle lane in a 2007
Ford F-150 pickup truck.
Baxter was traveling at a
"very low rate of speed" in
the outside lane in a 1991
Jeep Cherokee SUV when
Hale changed lanes. As
he did so, traffic in front
of Baxter slowed and the
right front of the pickup
struck the rear of Baxter's
SUV. The vehicle traveled
onto the grassy shoulder
and overturned. Reports do.


not explain why Baxter was
driving slowly or whether
heavy traffic may have been
a factor. FHP officials were
unable to provide further
details when questioned by
the Lake City Reporter.
Baxter was pronounced
dead at the scene by a
Columbia County Fire
Rescue first responder.
Hale suffered minor inju-
ries but was not taken by
ambulance to the hospital.
Charges in connection
with the wreck are pend-
ing completion of an FHP
crash investigation, reports
said.
On Saturday morning a
Lake City woman was seri-
ously injured in a single
vehicle wreck when she
ran a stop sign and struck a
tree, according to FHP.
Mari Beth Espinosa,
29, was lifeflighted to a
Gainesville hospital with
serious injuries.


The crash occurred
around 11:10 a.m. at the
intersection of 93rd Road
and 86th Street in Suwannee
County.
According to reports,
Espinosa was driving a 1992
Isuzu SUV northbound on
93rd' Road approaching
86th Street.
For unknown reasons
Espinosa didn't stop at the
stop sign on 93rd Road and
the vehicle traveled across
86th Street onto the west-
bound shoulder of the road-
way and struck a tree with
its front and stopped.
Espinosa was treated at
the scene by Suwannee
County EMS personnel
then taken by helicopter to
Shands at the University of
Florida for treatment.
Charges in connection
with the wreck are pend-
ing completion of an FHP
investigation, reports
said.


FCAT: Science scores on the rise

Continued From Page 1A


reported due to the End-of-
Course Exam in algebra.
Math scores increased by
one point for 10th grade.
Science scores
increased by seven points
for 11th grade.
There were also areas of
decrease: .
Sixth grade decreased
by four percentage points
in reading.
Seventh grade dropped
by one percent in reading.
Eighth grade dropped
three points in math and
one percent in reading.
Ninth grade dropped
by six points in reading.
Reading scores
dropped by two points for
10th grade.
Writing scores wer6 pre-
viously released for fourth,
eighth and 10th 'grades,
Millikin said. Students did
very well across the board.


Percentage proficiency
decreases can be attrib-
uted to students testing
based on new standards,
said Kitty McElhaney,
director of 'curriculum,
assessment and account-
ability. This is the first
year students were tested
on FCAT 2.0.
"It's on a different set of
standards," she said. "The
FCAT 2.0. has more rig-
orous standards and more
critical thinking application
and analysis."
The school district sup-
ports higher standards
and needed a baseline
year to measure how it
is doing in teaching the
students, Millikin said. A
gradual shift at the high
school level will led to a
greater focus on End of
Course -Exams-rather than
FCAT.


DRILL: Training exercise a

Continued From Page 1A


loaded with simiulated
munitions rang out, mark-
ing the beginning of a prac-
tice scenario with various
run-throughs that lasted
almost two hours.
Columbia County School
District officials and faculty,
responders from Columbia
County Emergency Medical
Services and Columbia
County Fire Rescue, and
law enforcement members
from the Columbia County
Sheriff's Office, Lake City
Police Department and
Florida Highway Patrol par-
ticipated in the scenario, in
which an actor portraying
an armed gunman "invad-
ed" the school.
After the shots were
fired, law enforcement
'moved through the school
with simunition-loaded
guns poised, pursuing the
invader and rescuing "vic-
tims" school district
faculty with mock gunshot
wounds created by means
of moulage, a realistic
make-up treatment for por-
traying injuries.
Law enforcement helped
the victims to safety, deliv-
ering them to EMS and
Fire Rescue responders,
who then used the vic-
tims to practice patient
triage.
LCPD Capt. Robert
Smith, FHP Lt. Barry
Tierney and CCSO Sgt Tim
Ball said, respectively, that
participating in the exer-
cise prepared officers to
respond to real situations,
showed law enforcement
members how to work
together and provided an
opportunity to train for the
unexpected.
Smith, Tierney and Ball
also said that their agen-
cies would actively work
toward keeping children
safe, should this type of


situation occur.
"Law enforcement offi-
cers will of course go in
and try to stop what's hap-
pening," Smith said, "and
at the same time care for
those who are injured. Our
ultimate goal is to. reunite
the students at the school
with their family members
and try to make sure those
students are back at home
with their loved ones."
Shayne Morgan,
Columbia County
Emergency Management
director and exercise orga-
nizer, said the responders
would do their best to keep
children safe in such a situ-
ation.
"It's going to depend on
the magnitude of the event
and exactly what goes on,"
he said, "but our respond-
ers will be responding to
it to make sure that maxi-
mum safety is maintained
for our children."
Mike Millikin, superin-
tendent. of schools, said
student safety in an armed
invasion is a priority.
"We (the district) are
absolutely committed to
providing a safe environ-
ment for our students


"We want to address the
areas we did not do well in
for future years," he said.
"That's our biggest chal-
lenge this first year is to get
a baseline set of scores."
Each of the schools
is delving into the data
to determine their
strengths and weaknesses,
McElhaney said.
Additional professional
development will also be
available for teachers to
provide different train-
ing on the standards and
instruction on its delivery,
McElhaney said,
The most important work
will be done over the sum-
mer, Millikin said.
"I'm sure our staff is very
anxious to see which of the
new standards they need to
pay more attention to next
year," he said.


success


and our staff in such an
uncertain world," he said.
"Exercises like this, as well
as periodic meetings with
law enforcement through-
out the year, help us all stay
attuned to student safety
and keeping it in the fore-
front"


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Lake City resident Mary Kolovitz piles up oak limbs that fell around her home in Lakewood
Acres during a storm Monday. Strong winds also damaged a structure on Kolovitz's property.


Storm brings heavy


wind, light rain, hail


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com

An afternoon storm
bearing heavy wind, light-
ning, hail and light rain
pushed its way across
Columbia County Monday,
uprooting trees and dam-
aging at least one home as
it headed west. .
No injuries were report-
ed.
"It was just winds and
rains just another
storm with heavy winds,"
said Columbia County
Emergency Management
director Shayne Morgan.
The storm came
through the area around
3:45 4 p.m. accompanied
by heavy winds, lightning,
thunder and rain show-
ers.
"There were some
trees that were uproot-
ed," Morgan said. "There
was one tree that fell on


a house on Northwest
Emerald Lakes Drive. No
one was at home when it
happened. It's hard to tell
what the damage amount
was, but it appeared to me
to be damage that can be
repaired."
The most severe dam-
age was on the west side of
the county where a home
owned by DeeDee Norris
was damaged when a tree
fell on it.
Norris said she .felt
lucky that the fallen tree
did not land in her bed-
room.
Mary Kolovitz's home
in Lakewood Acres was
not damaged by any felled
trees, but the high winds
caused damage to other-
structures on her prop-
erty, north of the Emerald
Lakes subdivision.
"It was scary," she said
of the passing storm. "The
wind was so strong. I know


I wanted rain. I asked for
rain but not for'this."
Morgan said there were
no reported tornadoes in
the area and the National
Weather Service showed
no circulation on its radar.
In addition to the rain
and winds, hail was also
reported in the central
Columbia County area.
"There were reports
of hail on Branford
Highway," Morgan said,
noting the hail was small-
er than a penny in size.
He said no hail damage
was reported.
Morgan said he took
photographs of the dam-
aged h6one, but the coun-
ty damage assessment
team was not activated
because there was only
a limited amount of dam-
age.


ACCORD: City, FDEP come to terms

Continued From Page 1A


the Lake City-Columbia
County Humane Society.
Councilman Jake
Hill was selected as the


voting delegate at the
Florida League of Cities
Annual Conference for
August.


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Lake City, FL 32025
Bus. 386-752-7521


The next City of Lake
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at 7 p.m. June 20 in City
Hall.


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Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424


.b














OPINION


Tuesday, June 7, 2011


www.lakecityreporter.com


AN


AN
OPINION


Debt

ceiling

do-or-die

Last week's sour news
about unemployment
prompted calls for
the government to
do more to boost the
.economy. Unfortunately, history
shows that there's no magic
wand Washington can wave to
put people quickly back to work.
What it can do is calm some
of the anxieties investors have
about the future in particu-
lar, the nervousness about the
government's fiscal health.
The news on that front isn't
very good either. Washington
has hit the statutory limit on bor-
rowing, and Moody's Investor
Services warned Thursday that
it might downgrade the United
States' credit rating if lawmakers
can't agree soon to raise the debt
ceiling. Such a move could take
a painful toll on Washington and
many other borrowers.
Meanwhile, negotiators for
the two parties seem far apart
on a debt-limit deal that would
also slash projected deficits.
Democrats demand that any plan
include raising tax revenue by
winnowing the thicket of deduc-
tions, exemptions and credits in
the tax code. Republicans insist
that taxes are off the table and
that lawmakers must significantly
slow the growth in Medicare and.
Medicaid spending.
Republicans are right that
Washington's long-term fiscal
problems cannot be fixed with-
out addressing the spiraling
growth in healthcare costs. But
it's quixotic at best to think that
congressional leaders could over-
haul Medicare and Medicaid in a
few weeks of closed-door
meetings.
The sharp division between
the two parties over how to
solve Washington's long-term
fiscal problems mirrors the lack
of public consensus on what
to cut and what to keep. That
consensus may not emerge until
after the next election, when
competing plans for solving
Washington's fiscal problems
are expected to take center
stage. In the meantime, however,
Congress has to raise the debt
ceiling. The long-term solution
has to take a back seat to the
country's vital interest in avoid-
ing default
* Los Angeles Times

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary.goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished.
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Robert. Bridges, editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman

LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be.
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,


Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


Afghan strategy


rethought-


President Barack
Obama and his
national-security team
held their regular
monthly meeting on
Afghanistan Monday and report-
edly on the table was a proposal
for an accelerated drawdown of
U.S. forces.
When the president com-
mitted 30,000 more troops to
Afghanistan in December 2009,
he promised "significant" with-
drawals, reportedly with an initial
drawdown in the 3,000-to-5,000
range, beginning next month. .
But some of his advisers
believe the dynamics of the war
have changed, at least from the
U.S. standpoint. Al-Qaida leader
Osama bin Laden is dead, after
a nearly 10-year hunt. Then
it was credibly reported that,
last Friday, a U.S. drone killed
Muhammad Ilyas Kashmiri, the
head of al-Qaida's military oper-
ations in Pakistan and said to be
anfong bin Laden's possible suc-
cessors. In any event, al-Qaida
in Afghanistan has been erased
as a significant presence.
In some ways, this debate
harks back to administration
deliberations before the surge
when Vice President Joe Biden
argued against a major U.S.
military presence in favor of
highly mobile special-operations
forces, drones and trainers for


Dale McFeatters
mcfeattersd@shns.com
the Afghan army.
The military's preference is
for a gradual, conditions-based
withdrawal with a significant
combat presence through
next year. Over the weekend,
Robert Gates, making his final
visit to Afghanistan as defense
secretary, said, "I would try to
maximize my combat capability
as long as this process goes on
- that's a no-brainer."
The Taliban, who ruled
Afghanistan until their ouster
in 2001, are still fighting and, in
fact, have begun a serious sum-
mer offensive. But there's evi-
dence of serious war weariness
among the Taliban command-
ers, and some believe if this
offensive earns them nothing
but heavy casualties, they will
be ready for peace talks this fall.
That may not be a misplaced
hope. Unlike al-Qaida, the
Taliban are not united by an
overarching messianic religious
ideology, but by complex tribal


y being


again

grievances, a desire to regain
power and the perks that go
with it, and simple hostility
toward a foreign presence in
their country.
The great variable in
Afghanistan is how soon and
how capably the Afghan army
and police can take over their
country's security.
In the United States, there
are other compelling factors at
work. Almost three quarters of
Americans think the war is not
worth fighting, that our work
there is. done. Increasingly, .
Congress feels that way, too.
Republicans have been the
strongest supporters of the
war. But even there the newly
cost-conscious GOP lawmak-
ers are beginning to wonder: If
.we really want to cut spending,
the $100 billion a month we're
spending on Afghanfistan may
be a good place to start.
Obama is said to be prepar-
ing to share the results of these
deliberations with an address
to the nation next month. This
summer may mark the moment
when, at whatever speed and in
whatever increments it comes,
the end of our longest war is in
sight.

Dale McFeatters is editorial
writer for Scripps Howard News
Service.


ANOTHER OPINION

What's the secret to


Canada's miracle economy?


A mericans may be
looking north of the
border with envy
these days. The
Canadian dollar -
previously an object of mockery
- now trades higher than its
US counterpart and our banks
weathered the global financial
crisis with alarming stability.
How have Canadians pulled this
off?
We very cleverly situated
ourselves next to a superpower
with a love of freedom similar
to ours, one that we count on
to protect us militarily. While
we can and sometimes do
with great courage participate
in international missions, it is
hardly required. We haven't
had to spend nearly as much
(proportionately) on our military
as has the United States, nor
do we have to take the endless
grief and criticism of the rest
of the world if we A) act too
much, B) act not at all, or C) act
incorrectly. Free-riding is good.
We have clung to the quaint
notion that banks should be
regulated and that one should
have income in order to buy a
house. Canadian mortgages are


"full recourse," meaning that if
your home-is under (figurative)
water, you cannot simply walk
away from payments. This is
where our Scottish heritage has
come in handy and this is where
we are truly conservative. Gays
can get married here, but if they
want to buy a home and make
it fabulous, they had better be
able to afford it.
We have not, therefore,
suffered a sub-prime crisis,
nor have we had to spend
a fortune bailing out banks
- all have remained solvent.
We suffered no crash in real
estate; currently, we have a
housing boom. Former US
Fed Chairman Paul Volcker,
speaking in Toronto in 2009,
about the financial crisis, said,
"It's interesting that what I'm
arguing for looks more like
the Canadian system than the
American system."
As our economy has
long depended on natural
resources, we have not been
as squeamish about extracting
and exploiting them as have
our neighbors. Americans may
imagine Canadians romping
and canoeing our way across


a pristine landscape, but we
have not let the equivalent of
an Environmental Protection
Agency prevent us from making
as much as we possibly can
from the fact that we have far
more oil than we need. Whether
it's drilling off the coast of
Newfoundland or exploiting
the politically incorrect oil
sands of Alberta, we are willing
to go there. (The province of
Alberta ranks second, after
Saudi Arabia, in global crude
oil reserves.) Canada supplies
more oil to the United States
than anybody else in the world.
Americans can forget all that
nonsense about supporting
hostile regimes every time you
rev up your engine. You aren't
supporting terrorists. You are
supporting Justin Bieber. So it's
much, much worse.
Canadians have learned from
our mistakes. We've been where
you are. Once upon a time
we elected (and elected, and
elected, and elected) a prime
minister named Pierre Trudeau.
He was terribly attractive,
charismatic, and arrogant.
* Christian Science Monitor


John Crisp
jcrisp@delmaredu


Death

comes

quietly for

Kevorkian

Dr. Jack
Kevorkian's
lawyer, Mayer
Morganroth,
told the Detroit
Free Press that, at the end, Dr.
Death suffered a pulmonary
thrombosis when a blood
clot lodged in his heart.
Morganroth says, "It was
peaceful; he didn't feel a
thing."
How fitting. It appears that
Kevorkian lucked into the
quiet death that all of us covet,
but which will be denied to
most
What's death like? Death
really is the last great frontier,
the boundary beyond which
lies the terra incognita of
oblivion or a mansion in
Heaven. Or maybe something
else. Really, no one knows.
But Kevorkian was less
concerned with what lies
beyond than with how we
get there, and he devoted his
life's energies into easing the
passage. We all desire the
quiet transition that'he appears
to have %achieved. But in Dr.
Sherwin Nuland's book "How
We Die," he testifies from his
observations of the deaths of
hundreds of patients that the
point of death rarely resembles
the tranquil departure depicted
in the movies. Death, he says,
is often maybe usually
- a prolonged, miserable
experience that comes at the
end of days, weeks, or months
of dehumanizing suffering.
Kevorkian imagined that
things could be different. He
was no theoretical advocate
of assisted suicide; he helped
some 130 terminal patients
avoid the suffering inherent
in their diseases and achieve
some of the dignity that
comes with controlling the
circumstances of one's own
death. As a result, he spent
eight years in prison.
He may not have helped
his cause with his outlandish,
disheveled, publicity-thirsty
persona. In one of his many
court appearances, Kevorkian
showed up in knee britches, a
powdered wig, and a colonial
era tri-cornered hat, his effort
to dramatize his opinion that
our attitudes toward
assisted suicide are provincial
and backward. The image
reminds me of the lives of two
colonial characters, Jonathan
Edwards and Benjamin
Franklin.
For the Puritan theologian
Edwards the human journey
for most people was about
suffering, both before death
and afterwards in hellfire.
On the other hand, his
contemporary, Franklin, knew
how to enjoy life despite his
praise for frugality, self-denial,
and hard work. He easily
left behind the hardcore
Puritanism of the world he
was born into and structured
his long life around a deep
appreciation for its pleasures
and rewards.
In his later years, however,
Franklin suffered terribly
from gout and kidney stones,
maladies that laid him up for
weeks at a time. Nevertheless,
he approached death with
equanimity. During his last 10
days, his lungs failed him and,
without modern treatments
and painkillers, he suffered
terribly before he died.
* John M. Crisp teaches in the
English Department at Del Mar
College in Corpus Christi, Texas.


4A














LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL TUESDAY, JUNE 7, 2011


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


* To submit your Community
Calendar item, contact Antonia
Robinson at 754-0425 or by
e-mail at arobinson@
lakecityreporter., com.


Today
Lulu Ladies host
community baby shower
The Lulu Ladies are
having a community baby
shower at 7 p.m. today
at the Lulu Community
Center. The event will
benefit the Pregnancy
Care Center. The public
is invited to attend and
baby gifts are appreci-
ated. Call Eva Nelson at
755-6574 for more infor-
mation.

Lions meeting
The Lake City Lions
meet 7:30 p.m. every
Tuesday at the lake City
Country Club. Visitors
are welcome.

Art Show ceremony
The awards ceremony
and reception for the jur-
ied Art Show is 5:30 p.m.
today at the West Branch
Library The Friends
of the Library and the
North Florida Art League
will award $1,000 in prize
money to the winners.
The event is open to the
public. For more informa-
tion, please call 758-2101.

Payment due for Senior
Services meal
Payment for the
Columbia County Senior
Services Inc. Wednesday
homecooked meal is
due 10 a.m. today at the
LifeStyle Enrichment
Center. The menu is
baked ziti, garden salad,
mixed vegetables, garlic
break and peanut butter
pie. Call 386-755-0235 for
more information.


Fort White FFA
fundraiser
The Fort White FFA
Chapters will be holding
a fundraiser night 5 to 9
p.m. today at McAllister's
Deli to raise funds for the
upcoming 83rd Florida
- FFA Convention in
Orlando. *

Wednesday
Senior Services to offer
live entertainment
Columbia County Senior
Services Inc. is hosting
live entertainment 11-
11:45 a.m. Wednesday at
the LifeStyle Enrichinent
Center. Call (386) 755-0235
for more information.

Newcomers and Friends
meeting
The Lake City
Newcomers and Friends
are meeting 11 a.m. -
Wednesday at the Eastside
Village Clubhouse. The
program is the annual
picnic. Lunch will be pro-
vided by Blue Roof Cafe
and is $10. All members,
guest and newcomers are
welcome. Call 961-9335 or
7524552 for more informa-
tion.

Friday
Watertown Reunion
The Watertown Reunion
is 7 p.m. June 10 and 12
p.m. Friday at First Full
Gospel Church. A country
gospel sing is Friday fea-
turing Billy Earl Sanders
of Nashville, Tenn.
Dinner on the grounds is
Saturday. Bring a lunch to
share. The church is locat-
ed at Washington Street
and Jones Way.

Saturday
FACS of Lake City


announces events
The Filipino American
Cultural Society of
Lake City is hosting an
Induction of Officers/


ANTONIA ROBINSON/Lake City Reporter


A celebration of cancer survivors


Midge Starling of Lake City shows off the survivor T-shirt she received at the Cancer
Survivors Day celebration Sunday at Community Cancer Center in Lake City. This was the
second year of the event. 'I think it's fabulous they honor the survivors,' Starling said. 'It's a
long, hard struggle and battle. Everyone is affected, not just the patient but the family as well.'


Board and Filipino
Independence\Day
Dinner Party 6 p.m. June
11 at Epiphany Catholic
Church Social Hall.
The event will include a
social time, buffet din-
ner and program. The
program will feature
FACS Cultural Dancers,
a guest speaker, and a ,
night of fun and dancing.
Members please bring
your best covered dish
to share and Filipino
attire is suggested. Non-
Members are always wel-
come, but there is a $10
per person cover charge
at the door for this event.
Contact Bob Gavette -
(386) 965-5905 for more '
information.

Columbia High School
50th reunion
The Columbia High
School Class of 1961 is
having its 50th reunion
6 p.m. June 11 at the
County Club of Lake
City. The cost is $50 per
couple or $25 per person.
All 1961 classmates are
invited to attend. Call
Shirley at 961-8105 or
Sharon at 752-7943 for
more information.

Farmers Market
The Lake DeSoto
Farmers Market opens 8
a.m. 12 p.m. at Wilson
Park. The day will fea-


ture the Summer Fun &
Safety Program with eh
Lake City Police and Fire
Departments. Vendors
are welcome. Contact
Jackie Kite, community
redevelopment adminis-
trator, at (386) 719-5766
or kitej@lcfla.com.

Legion Riders Ribfest
and Street Dance
Legion Riders Ribfest
and Street Dance is
noon-10 p.m. Saturday
at the American Legion
Post 57 on Hwy. 41 S.
Plates will be serviced
from noon to 7 p.m. The
meal is $10 and includes
a half slab, baked beans,
coleslaw and includes a
beverage ticket. Seconds
are $5.. Also available are
$5 wristbands for draft
beer. The street dance
is 6-10 p.m. Music is by
Skattergun.' The 50-50
Raffles will take place
each hour.


Monday, June 13
Florida Trail Association
The Suwannee
Chapter of the Florida
Trail Association
is meeting 7-9
p.m. June 13 at the
Suwannee River Water
Management District
Office, 9225 CR 49,
Live Oak. The pro-
gram will feature a
series of photos taken
by various members
during the 2010-2011
hiking and paddling "
season. Contact Chapter
Chair, Sylvia Dunnam,
362-3256, dunnams@
windstream.net, or Irvin
Chance, .(386) 330-2424.

Tuesday, June 14
Welcome to
Womanhood
Calling all middle and


high school girls for
Welcome to Womanhood
mentoring program 5-
8 p.m. June 14 at 532
Marion Street. Contact
Sandra Price at 386-
867-1601. Dinner
included. Transportation
can be provided if con-
tacted one week in
advance.

Homecooked meal
Payment for the
Columbia County Senior
Services Inc. Wednesday
homecooked meal is due
10 a.m. Tuesday at the
LifeStyle Enrichment
Center. The menu is
honey ham, collard
greens, macaroni and
cheese, corn bread and
chocolate delight. Call
(386) 755-0235 for more
information.

Wed., June 15
Lanny & Dennie Jones
performance
Columbia County
Senior Services Inc.
is hosting a Lanny &
Dennie Jones perfor-
mance 11-11:45 a.m.
June 15 at the LifeStyle
Enrichment Center. Call
(386) 755-0235 for more
information.

Thursday, June 16
A free Medicaid work-
shop is 2 p.m. June 16 at
the LifeStyle Enrichment
Center. Teresa Byrd
Morgan of Morgan Law
Center for Estate &
Legacy Planning will expel
the myths and expand
the opportunities with
Medicaid Planning. The
LEC is located at 628 S.E.
Allison Court Call Shana
Miller at (386) 755-1977 to
RSVP or for more informa-
tion.


Friday, June 17
Tobacco Treatment
The Third Annual
Tobacco Treatment
Summit is 8 a.m. 4:45
p.m. June 17 at Pine
Grove Baptist Church in
Trenton. Lunch is provid-
ed. Contact Susie Lloyd at
slloyd@srahec.org or visit
www.ahecregistration. org
and select the Suwannee
River region.,

Saturday, June 18
Rockin' in the 50's
Rockin' in the 50's,
benefiting March of
Dimes, is 7 p.m. June 18
at the American Legion,
located at Hwy. 41 S. DJ
Mike Mullis will provide
the music. There will be
chance drawings, con-
-tests with prizes, food
for sale and a cash bar.
Also, smoked chickens
and Boston butts will be
available. Tickets are $10
at Moe's Southwest Grill,
US 90 West, or call Linda
Waldron 755-2753 or
Maureen Lloyd 752-4885
for tickets or to pre-order
chickens or Boston butts.
Come early and see the
antique car display.

'Squares & Stars'
The Second Annual All
White Affair, "Squares &.
Stars," is 8 p.m. 1 a.m.
June 18 at the Winfield
Community Center.
Donations are $10 in
advance and $15 at the
door. The event is hosted
by Gold Standard Lodge
#167 and Gold Standard
Chapter #48. Contact.
Leondra Fleming at
(386) 984-9853, Shontez
Strawder at (254) 317-3980,
Chris Mirra at (386) 623-
3611 or Raymond Brady at
(386) 365-2535.


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Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424











LAKE CITY REPORTER SCHOOLS TUESDAY, JUNE 7, 2011


Bulletin Board




Students plant vegetable garden


By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com

A fresh vegetable garden
is in full bloom at Melrose
Park Elementary due to the
sweat equity and respon-
sibility of after-school pro-
gram students.
More than 120 students
in grades kindergarten
through fifth enrolled in
Melrose Park Elementary's
21st Century After School
Program nicknamed
Maximizing Academic
eXcellence (MAX) got
their hands dirty planting
the garden in April and have
been caring for it since. The
garden serves as the after-
school program's service
learning component, said
Laurie Fike, program site
coordinator.
About a quarter of an
acre in size, the garden
has rows of corn, potatoes,
cucumbers, beans, squash,
watermelon, onions and bell
peppers.
"The students planted
everything," Fike said.
"They put the fertilizer on


it, they weeded it, they kept
it up and harvest the pro-
duce."
After the vegetables are
picked, they are donated to
the MAX students' families,
Fike said, which encour-
ages gardening and proper
nutrition.
The program's students
use the garden to do grade-
appropriate math and sci-
ence exercises, Fike said,
like measuring and graph-
ing the daily growth of a
watermelon or counting
how many watermelons the
garden produces.
"And the watermelons
almost double in size each
day," Fike said. "Ifs amaz-
ing, so they (the students)
get to see the difference."
Outside of subject-based
skills, Fike said working
in the garden has helped
students learn about nutri-
tion and has encouraged
participation, responsibil-
ity and collaboration among
students, parents and busi-
ness partners. Fike noted
that parents have donated
time and items like fertilizer


LEANNE TYO/Lake City Reporter
Anthony Caldwell (from left), 11, and Walker Lord, 12, both
fifth-graders who participated in Melrose Park Elementary's
21st Century After School Program, hoe for weeds Friday
in the garden that the after-school program students plant-
ed on the school campus.


to support the garden.
The garden has inspired
students to garden at home
and encouraged them to eat
more vegetables, Fike said.
"They've learned a lot
about nutrition," she said,
"and we have found that
students who would not


normally eat vegetables,
because these children have
participated in growing the
garden, these families are
saying they will eat it"
Students have also
learned where food comes
from, Fike said, and the
importance of working hard.


STUDENT PROFILE


Name: Taylor Dampier
Age: 11
Parents: Chris and
Becky Dampier
School and grade:
Pinemount Elementary
School, fifth grade
Achievements: "A"
Honor Roll
Clubs or organiz-
tions: At Piniemount
Elementary -e Art Club,
Chorus and Upward
Basketball. At Parkview
Baptist Church church
member, GA's, Olympians,,
Kids Worship and Sunday


School.
What do you like
best about school? I
love math and science, but
I especially love the arts.
Also, I like going to RE.
What would you like
to do when you com-
plete your education?
When I get out of school,
I'd'like to be a part of
the Women's National
Basketball Association or
I'd like to be a mission-
ary.
Teacher Mikki
Jones' comments:
Taylor is not only a won-


derful student, but she is
a wonderful person. She
is dependable, smart and
always helpful when she
can be.
Principal Donna
McAdams' comments:
Taylor is the kind of stu-
dent that every school
wants. She excels in aca-
demics and will certainly
reach whatever goals she
has for herself. She is a
great role model for our
younger students.
Student's comments
concerning honor: I am
flattered and humbled.


COURTESY PHOTO
Taylor Dampier


ON CAMPUS


Melrose Park Elementary

Melrose Park
Elementary School will be
offering Voluntary Pre-K
classes in a Voluntary Pre-
K Summer Program for
students that are age 4 by
Sept 1 or children that are
ready to go into kindergar-
ten, but have riot attended
a VPK program.
The length of the sum-
mer program is considered
one full year in VPK if the
child attends all summer
long. Therefore, students
that are currently attend-
ing a VPK program are not
eligible for the summer
program.
We are accepting stu-
dents from all school zones
for the summer program.
If you plan on your child
attendingg a VPK program
during school year 2011 to
2012, please do not enroll
them for the summer pro-
gram as they will not be
able to attend during the
school year.
The summer program is
Monday through Thursday
from 7:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.
The program will begin
June 9 and end August 10.
To register for the sum-
mer program, you will need
a VPK Voucher from the
Early Learning Coalition.
The following documents
are required for a VPK
Voucher proof of child's
age and proof of parent/
guardian's residency.
After you receive a
voucher, you may enroll
your child for the summer
program at Melrose Park.
You will need the follow-
ing items to enroll VPK
voucher, birth certificate,
current immunization
record, current physical
record and proof of par-


ent/guardian's residency.

Columbia County Aquatic
Complex
2011 youth and adult
swimming lesson. classes
meet Monday through
Friday for two-week long
sessions made up of 10
classes.
Classes are held at 8
a.m., 9 am., 10 a.m., 11 a.m.,
5:15 p.m. and 6:10 p.m. "Mom
& Tot" classes are held at 11
a.m. and 6:10 p.m.
Most swimming levels
are offered at each time.
Each class is 45 min-
utes long. Adult classes
are 30 minutes in length.
If one class has only one
child, the class is 30 min-
utes in length.
Each two-week long
session cost $50 per child
or adult
Registration'is done
in person at the pool on
the following registration
dates register June 1
from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. or
June 2 or 3 all day for
Session 1, which will be
held June 6 through 17;
register June 15 from 5
p.m. to 7 p.m. or June 16
or 17 all day for Session 2,
which will be held June 20
through 30; register July
6 from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m.
or July 7 or 8 all day for
Session 3, which will be
held July 11 through 22;
register July 20 from 5 p.m.
to 7 p.m. or July 21 or 22 all
day for Session 4, which
will be held from July 25
through Aug. 5; register.
Aug. 3 from 5 p.m. to 7
p.m. or Aug. 4 or 5 all day
for Session 5, which will be
held Aug. 8 through 19.
There is no phone
registration, no early reg-


istration and no refunds.
Classes will be held
indoors on rainy days.


The Columbia County
Aquatic Complex can be
reached at (386) 755-8195.


For Life Insurance
Go With
Someone You Know
John Bums, III Mary H. Summer
Agent Financial Services Rep.

L. 234 SW Main Blvd. 752-5866


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Contact your local office at
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Teacher of the Universe
Jeremy Barwick (right), 15, of Lake City presents Roger Little,
his past third-grade teacher at Five Points Elementary, with a
'Teacher of the Universe' certificate Friday. Barwick presented
the certificate to Little when he stopped by the school after
receiving a four-year college scholarship through Take Stock in
Children. Little's certificate, which Barwick made, read 'Thank
you for caring enough to make a positive impact and change
in someone's life ... mine.'

Robert Woodard
Edward JoneS Financial Advisor
MAKING SENSE OF INVESTING
.. .. 148 North Marion Ave Downtown
..i 'Lake City, FL 32055-3915
Bus. 386-755-1215
TF Fax 800-217-2105
TF. 888-752-1215
robert woodard@edwardjones.com
www.edwardjones.com



Bri hway
INSURANCE
Auto I Home I Business I Life
386.752.2345
vance.cox@brightway.com
brightway.com
1742 SE Baya Dr., Suite 102
Lake City




t ur ay, une am
Buy One Lake Property at: Subdividable Lakefront Lot
Only with 389ft of Shoreline
$19900Was $164,800
Get the adjoining lot Now $39,900
1/2 OFF! 75% OFF!






Sir Figalot Wins Again!
BEXAR COUNTY- Ricky Taylor. after using Thera-Gsic on his sore
shoulder due to a tip fiom local resident Tom W., \ as able to \win his
4th Fig Eating Contest in a rm\. lie ate 3.9 Ibs. offigs
in 10 minutes to secure the Blue Ribbon and retain his
title of "Sir Figalot.,


C*' 2


Go Painlessly
BUY, SAVE, WIN
with THERA-GESIC


'r ., r II d ~s^ ^ I I P S
Il*fodiile.
Lak City Reporter
1 1,l- L ., I .. .. .1


Lake City Reporter


Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424








LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVERTISEMENT TUESDAY, JUNE 7, 2011 7A
PAID ADVERTISEMENT

HUNDREDS OF PEOPLE CASH IN ON

MODERN DAY GOLD RUSH!


By Jason Delong
STAFF WRITER


Gold and silver pour


into yesterday's Roadshow due to highest prices in 40 years.


Yesterday at the Holiday Inn, hundreds lined
up to cash in antiques, collectibles, gold and jew-
elry at the Treasure Hunters Roadshow. The free
event is in Lake City all week, buying gold, sil-
ver, antiques and collectibles. One visitor I spoke
with yesterday said, "It's unbelievable, I brought
in some old coins that had been in a little cigar
box for years and some old herringbone necklac-
es-in less than fifteen rninutes I left with a check
for $700. That stuff has beer in my jewelry box

TREASURE HUNTERS ROADSHOW
HAS BEEN TOURING THE WORLD
SINCE 2001. THIS YEAR ALONE,
WE WILL VISIT 3,000 CITIES AND
OVER HALF A MILLION PEOPLE
WILL CASH IN!

and dresser for at least 20 years." Another gentle-
man brought in an old' Fender guitar his father
had bought years ago. The man said, "Dad had
less than fifty bucks in that guitar." The Roadshow
specialist that assisted him made a few phone
calls and a veterinarian in Seattle, Washington
bought the guitar for $5,700.00. The seller con-
tinued, "I got another $150.00 for a broken
necklace and an old class ring. It's not every day
that someone comes to town bringing six thou-
sand dollars with your name on it."


Jeff Parsons, President of the Treasure Hunters
Roadshow, commented, "Lots of people have
items that they know are valuable but just don't
know where to sell them. Old toys, trains, swords,
guitars, pocket watches and jewelry is valuable to
collectors. These collectors are willing to pay big
money for those items that they are looking for."
This week's Roadshow is the best place to
get connected with those collectors. The process
is free and anyone can bring items down to the
event. If the Roadshow specialists find items that


COINS Any and all coins made before
1964: silver and gold coins, dollars, half
dollars, quarters, dimes, nickels and pennies.
All conditions wanted!
GOLD & SILVER PRICES AT 40 YEAR
HIGH for platinum, gold and silver during this
event. Broken jewelry, dental gold, old coins,
pocket watches, Krugerrands, gold bars,
Canadian Maple Leafs, etc.
JEWELRY Gold, silver, platinum, diamonds,
rubies, sapphires, all types of stones and
metals, rings, bracelets, necklaces, etc.
(including broken jewelry). Early costume
jewelry wanted.


WRIST & POCKET WATCHES Rolex,
Tiffany, Hublot, Omega, Chopard, Cartier,
Philippe, Ebel, Waltham, Swatch, Elgin, Bunn
Special, Railroad, Illinois, Hamilton, all others.


If you go to the Roadshow, you can
cash-in your items for competitive prices.
Roadshow representatives will be avail-
able to assess and purchase your items at
the Holiday Inn, this week through Satur-
day, in Lake City.

their collectors are interested in; offers will be
made to purchase them. About 80% of the guests
that attend the show end up selling one or more
items at the event..
Antiques and collectibles are not the only
items the Roadshow is buying. "Gold and silver
markets are soaring," says Archie Davis, a. Road-
show representative. "Broken jewelry and gold
and'silver coins add up very quickly. I just finished
working with a gentleman that had an old class
ring,. two bracelets and a handful of silver dollars.
His check was for over $650.00. I would say
that there were well over 100 people in here yes-
terday that sold their scrap gold."
One gentleman holding his check for over
$1,250.00 in the lobby of .the event yesterday
had this comment: "I am so happy I decided to
come to the Roadshow. I saw th- newspaper ad
for the event and brought in an old German
sword I had brought back from World War II and
some old coins, and here is my check. What a
great thing for our community. I am heading home
now to.see what else I have that they might be
terested in."
The Roadshow continues today starting at
m. The event is free and no appointment is
l ded.


p


.. -. .


TOYS, TRAINS, DOLLS All maker's and
types of toys made before 1965: Hot Wheels,
Tonka, Buddy L, Smith Miller, Nylint, Robots,
Battery Toys, Mickey Mouse, train sets-Mark-
lin, American Flyer, Lionel, Hafner, all other
trains (all .gaues, accessories, individual cars),
Barbie dolls, GI Joe, Shirley Temple, charac-
ters, German.













MILITARY ITEMS & SWORDS
Revolutionary War, Civil War, WWI, WWII,
etc: swords, badges, clothes, photos, medals,
knives, gear, letters. The older the swords, the
better.


attic, garage, basement, etc. There is
no limit to the amount of items you can
bring.
*No appointment is necessary.
*Ilf you decide to accept the offer, we
will pay you on the spot and ship the
item to the collector. The collector pays
all shipping and handling charges.
*You get 100% of.the offer with no hid-
den fees.


SEE YOURSELF


ON TV
FILMING THISWE


GUITARS & OTHER INSTRUMENTS
Fender, Gibson, Martin, Rickenbacker, Gretsch,
new and vintage amps, saxophones, wood
winds, mandolins and all others.


TREASUREHUNTERSROADSHOW.COM








8A LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVERTISEMENT TUESDAY, JUNE 7, 2011


PAID ADVERTISEMENT

Gold & Silver Reaches Highest Price

Ever Recorded, Cash In This Week Only!
Got Gold? This week, there has never been a better time to sell your


unwanted gold jewelry, mismatched earrings, broken herringbone necklaces.


Buyers in town this week only Paying

Cash for all Gold & Silver
Paying. Cash for all Gold Jewelry, Broken Jewelry, Silver Jewelry


GOLD JEWELRY


SILVER JEWELRY


IA -q
r



4 A


S


A W~.~Iq.1-A,5 ..r,~-,.


it


PURCHASING.
SCRAP GOLD
& SILVER,
I', 'TEA SETS, ROUNDS,".'
GOLD BARS '
& STERLING.


STERUNG SILVER


Buying


all coins made before 1965, including Gold Coins, Silver Coins, Gold Bullion,
Investment Gold, anything marked .999 Bring it down to the show!


Gold Coins




$10 INDIAN
GOLD COIN
UP TO $5,500*


$20 ST. GAUDENS
GOLD COIN
UP TO $6,800*


$5 DRAPED BUST
RIGHT LE
UP TO $40,000*


FLOWING HAIR STELLA
GOLD COIN
UP TO $125,000*


Silver Coins


1995 W US EAGLE PROOF
UP TO $3800*


BARBER HALF DOLLAR
UP TO $6,750*


MORGAN SILVER DOLLAR
UP TO $100,000*


1797$1
UP TO $200,000*


UP T $20.oo,


Investment Gold and Silver
INVESTMENT GOLD


.999 FINE SILVER




,. .
:\ -


PEACE DOLLAR
UP TO $3,000*


S ITEMS WE WILL
ACCEPT INCLUDE:











*This amount depends upon rarity, condition
S nd what collectors are willing to pay


PLATINUM


WE BUY SCRAP
GOLD & GOLD
JEWELRY


*aMvkr
-14r
t^


I I













Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby @okeatyreporter com


Lake City Reporter





SPORTS


Tuesday. lune 7. 201 I


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


BRIEFS

FISHING
Bass tournament
set for June 25
An open bass
tournament to benefit the
Suwannee River Breast
Cancer Awareness
Association is June 25
at Clay Landing. Cost
is $70 per boat with
an optional big bass
pot of $10. There is 60
percent payback on the
tournament and 100
percent on big bass
For details, call Jamie
Albritton at (386)
209-0166, Donnie Feagle
at (386) 365-1191 or
Ruben Thonias at (386)
288-4691.

YOUTH VOUIEYBAU.
Future Lady
Tiger camp June
27-28
The third annual
Future Lady Tiger
Volleyball Camp is 9 a.m.
to noon June 27-28 at the
Columbia High gym. The
camp is for girls entering
the sixth through 12th
grades, with instruction
by members of the
CHS staff and returning
varsity players. Cost of
$50 includes camp T-
shirt. Registration is in
the CHS front office from
8 a.m. to 4.p.m. through
Monday.
For details, call coach
Casie McCallister at
(386) 365-3158.

SWIMMING
Lessons offered
June 20-30
Youth and adult
swimming lessons are
offered at the Columbia
County Aquatic Complex.
Classes meet for two
weeks and six daily times
are offered, plus there
are two daily mom and
tot classes. Four sessions
remain with the next,
session June 20-30. Cost
is $50 per person.
Registration is at tle
pool (755-8195) from 5-7
p.m. June 15 and all day
June 16-17.

VOUTH FOOTBALL
Jackson camp in
High Springs
Fort White High
football coach Demetric
Jackson is conducting a
football camp for elemen-
tary and middle school
children at First Baptist
Church in High Springs
on June 24-25. Cost of
the camp is $40, with
a $5 discount for each
additional sibling.
For details, call
Jackson at 365-3304.

POP WARNER FOOTBALL
Cheerleading
interest sought
Lake City Pop Warner
football registration for
new players is under
way from 3-6 p.m. week-
days through June 20 at
Richardson Community
Center. Pop Warner also
is looking for girls ages
5-12 interested-in cheer-
leading.
For details, call sec-
retary Kim Stephens at
623-2954 or e-mail kimste-
phensl972@yahoo. cornm.


* From staff reports


With 10 Slam titles,

Nadal is gaining on

Federer's record


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Rafael Nadal of Spain holds the trophy during the award ceremony after defeating Roger
Federer of Switzerland in four sets, 7-5, 7-6, 5-7, 6-1, in the men's final of the French Open
tennis tournament in Roland Garros stadium in Paris on Sunday.


getting


FortWhite
begins summer
conditioning.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporte[.com
FORT WHITE As
the sun began to rise on
Monday morning, summer
conditioning began for the
Fort White High football
team. Only a few short
weeks removed from' a
spring game victory against
Orange Park High, the
Indians 'began to train for
the 2011 season.
"We worked outway' on
the blacktop doing things
such as dot drills, plyomet-
rics and things with foot
quickness," Fort White
head coach Demetric
Jackson said. "We were flip-
ping tires and had a couple
of different stations. Guys
would rotate through that"
The biggest test for some
of the players was the Indian
mile. The Indian mile con-
sist of running a mile while
also running stadium steps.
It wasn't all conditioning
of the body, however, as the
INDIAN$Scontinued on 2B


Spaniard adds
sixth French title
to resume.
By HOWARD FENDRICH
Associated Press
PARIS Rafael Nadal is
gaining on Roger Federer.
Quickly.
. By winning four of the
past five Grand Slam tour-
naments capped by a
victory over Federer in the
French Open final Nadal
has raised his career haul
to 10 major championships.
That's only six fewer than
Federer's proudly held
record of 16.
"Ten Grand Slams is
a lot," Federer said. "He


knows this. I know this.
Everybody knows this."
Seven men in the history
of tennis have managed
to win at least that many:
Federer, Pete Sampras (14),
Roy Emerson (12), Bjorn
Borg (11), Rod Laver (11),
Bill Tilden (10), and Nadal.
Of that group, only Borg
was younger when he cra-
dled his 10th Grand Slam
trophy than Nadal, who was
two days past his 25th birth-
day when he beat Federer
7-5, 7-6 (3), 5-7, 6-1 Sunday
at Roland Garros.
Nadal's six French Open
trophies tying Borg's
record for the most in Paris
- now sit alongside two
NADA. continued on 2B


started


SBfANDON FINLEY/Lake City Reporter
Fort White High's Soron Williams performs the'bench press during the Indians' summer conditioning program on Monday.


Burress leaves

prison for NFL,

uncertain career


WR spent nearly
two year in prison
on gun charges.
By JOHN KEKIS
Associated Press
ROME, N.Y. Clad
nearly all in black hood-
ed sweat shirt, athletic
shorts, sneakers and a
white T-shirt, the tall, lanky
man walked alone through
a gate in a chain-link fence
topped by swirls of barbed
wire.
Plaxico Burress looked
around for something
familiar, and his agent
Drew Rosenhaus ran up
and jumped into his arms
as both men smiled
broadly.
Freedom at last for
Burress, the former New
York Giants receiver. He
was released from prison
around 9 a.m. Monday
after spending nearly two


years behind bars on a gun
charge.
"I just want to thank God
for bringing me through
one of the most trying times
in my life," Burress said
in a brief exchange with
reporters outside Oneida
Correctional Facility in cen-
tral New York. "It's a beauti-
ful day. It's a beautiful day
to be reunited with my fam-
ily. I want to go home and
spend some quality time
with them.
"I'd like to thank every-
body for their prayers and
words of encouragement,"
Burress said as the fog-
shrouded morning gave
way to brilliant sunshine.
"I'd like to thank all my
fans all around the world
for the thousands of let-
ters, for their unwavering
support. As far as football
is concerned, if and when
everything gets settled,
when they get back on the
field, I'll be ready."


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Former New York Giants star Plaxico Burress is released from the Oneida County Correction
Facility in Rome, N.Y. on Monday. Burress was released from prison after spending nearly
two years behind bars on'ra gun charge.

















LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS TUESDAY. JUNE 7, 2011 Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
COLLEGE SOFTBALL
8 p.m.
ESPN2 -World Series championship
series, game 2,Arizona State vs. Florida, at
Oklahoma City
CYCLING
5 p.m.
VERSUS Criterium du Dauphine,
stage 2, Voiron to Lyon, France (same-
day tape)
7 MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
7 p.m.
MLB Regional coverage, Boston
at N.Y. Yankees or L.A. Dodgers at
Philadelphia
NBA BASKETBALL
;. 9 p.m.
ABC Playoffs, finals, game 4, Miami
at Dallas

BASEBALL

AL standings


East Division
W L
New York 33 24
Boston 33 26
Tampa Bay 30 29
Toronto 30 29
Baltimore 26 31
Central Division
W L
Cleveland 33 24
Detroit 31 27
Chicago 28 33
Kansas City 25 34
Minnesota 21 37
West Division
W L
Texas 34 26
Seattle 31 28
Los Angeles 30 31
Oakland 27 33


Saturday's Games
Boston 9, Oakland 8, 14 Innings
Tampa Bay 3, Seattle 2
Texas 4, Cleveland 0
'Baltimore 5.Toronto 3
Detroit 4, Chicago White Sox 2
Minnesota 7, Kansas. City 2
N.Y.Yankees 3, LAAngels 2
Sunday's Games
Texas 2, Cleveland 0
Boston 6, Oakland 3
Toronto 7, Baltimore 4
Detroit 7, Chicago White Sox 3
Minnesota 6, Kansas City 0
N.Y.Yankees 5, LA.Angels 3
Seattle 9,Tampa Bay 6
Monday's Games
Minnesota at Cleveland (n)
,, Oakland at Baltimore (n)
Detroit atTexas (n)
Seattle at.Chicago White Sox (n)
Toronto at Kansas City (n)
Tampa B*atcta Agelus-( -
,ii Toa, e" ;i-
Boston (Lester 7-2) at N.Y. Yankees
* (EGarcia 4-4), 7:05 p.m.
Minnesota (Uriano 3-5) at Cleveland
(C.Carrasco 4-3), 7:05 p.m.
Oakland (Undecided) at Baltimore
Jakubauskas 0-0), 7:05 p.m.
-' Detroit (Porcello 5-3) at Texas
,, (.Harrison 5-4), 8:05 p.m.
Seattle (EHemandez 6-4) at Chicago
White Sox (Humber 4-3). 8:10 p.m.
Toronto (Drabek 3-4) at Kansas City
-.(Mazzaro 0-0), 8:10 p.m.
Tampa Bay (Cobb 0-0) at LA. Angels
(Haren 5-3), 10:05 p.m.

-NL standings

East Divion
W L Pct GB
Philadelphia 35 24 .593 -
Florida 31 26 .544 3
k Atlanta 32 28 .533 3%'
;,kNewYork 28 31 .475 7
Washington 26 33 .441 9
Central Division
W L Pct GB
,St. Louis 36 25 .590 -
Milwaukee 33 26 .559 2
Cincinnati 30 30 .500 5%
'Pittsburgh 28 30 .483 6'A
,Chicago 23 34 .404 II
Houston 23 37 .383 12'%
West Divison
W L Pct GB
San Francisco 33 26 .559 -
Arizona 33 27 .550 'A
Los Angeles 28 32 .467 5'
Colorado 27 31 .466 5%'
San Diego 27 33 .450 6%'

Sunday's Games
LA. Dodgers 9, Cincinnati 6
Milwaukee 6, Florida 5, II innings
Philadelphia 7, Pittsburgh 3
St. Louis 3, Chicago Cubs 2, 10
innings
San Francisco 2, Colorado I
Washington 9, Arizona 4, II innings
San Diego 7, Houston 2
N.Y. Mets 6,Atlanta 4
Monday's Games
LA. Dodgers at Philadelphia (n)
Chicago Cubs at Cincinnati (n)
Milwaukee at Florida (n)
Colorado at San Diego (n)
Washington at San Francisco (n)
Today's Games
Arizona (D.Hudson 6-5) at Pittsburgh
(Correia 8-4), 7.-05 p.m.
LA. Dodgers (PRDe La Rosa 1-0) at
Philadelphia (Oswalt 3-3), 7:05 p.m.
Atlanta (Hanson 6-4) at Florida (Hand
0-0), 7:10 p.m.
Chicago Cubs (D.Davls 0-4) at
Cincinnati (Volquez 3-2), 7:10 p.m.
St. Louis (Westbrook 5-3) at Houston
(Myers 2-4), 8:05 p.m.
N.Y. Mets (Capuano 3-6) at Milwaukee


(Marcum 6-2),8:10 p.m.
Colorado (Jimenez 1-5) at San Diego
(Stauffer 1-4), 10:05 p.m.
Washington (Zimmermann 3-6) at San
Francisco (J.Sanchez 4-3), 10:15 p.m.

NCAA regionals

Saturday
Jacksonville 5, Manhattan 4, Manhattan
eliminated
Florida 5, Miami 4
Sunday
Miami 6, Jacksonville 3, Jacksonville
eliminated
Florida I I, Miami 4

Saturday
UCF 16, Bethune-Cookman 5, B-C
eliminated
Florida State 9,Alabama 5
Sunday
Alabama 12, UCF 5, UCF eliminated
Florida State 8, Alabama I, play sus-
pended
Monday
Florida State 8,Alabama I

Saturday
Maine 4, Florida International I, FIU
eliminated
North Carolina 14, James Madison 0
Sunday
James Madison 5, Maine 2, Maine
eliminated
North Carolina 9,James Madison 3

Saturday
N.C. State 5,Georgia Southern 2,GSU
eliminated
South Carolina I I, Stetson 5
Sunday
Stetson 5, N.C. State 3
South Carolina 4, Stetson I, play sus-
pended
Monday
South Carolina 8, Stetson 2

BASKETBALL

NBA Finals

Miami vs. Dallas
Miami 92, Dallas 84
Dallas 95, Miami 93
Sunday
Heat 88, Mavericks 86.
Today
Miami at Dallas, 9 p.m.
Thursday
Miami at Dallas, 9 p.m.

WNBA schedule

Saturday's Games
Seattle 78, Phoenix 71
Connecticut 89,Washington 73
Indiana 65, Chicago 57
San Antonio 93,Tulsa 73
Sunday's Games
New York 94,Atdanta 88, OT
Minnesota 86, Los Angeles 69
r '-odiay's Game-
Tulsa at Minnesota, 8 p.m.

TENNIS

French Open champions

Men's Singles Rafael Nadal (I),
SSpain
Women's Singles Li Na (6), China
Men's Doubles Max Mirnyi, Belarus,
and Daniel Nestor (2), Canada
Women's Doubles Andrea
Hiavackova and Lucle Hradecka, United
SStates
Mixed Doubles Casey Dellacqua,
Australia, and Scott Upsky, United States
Men's Legends Doubles Fabrice
Santoro, France, and Todd Woodbridge,
Australia
Men's Over 45 Legends Doubles -
Guy Forget and Henri Leconte, France
Women's Legends Doubles Undsay.
Davenport, United States, and Martina
Hlngis, Switzerland
Boy's Singles Bjorn Fratangelo,
United States
Girl's Singles Ons Jabeur (9),
Tunisia
Boy's Doubles Andres Artunedo
Martinavarr and Roberto Carballes Baena
(4), Spain
Girl's Doubles Irina Khromacheva,
Russia, and Maryna Zanevska (2), Ukraine
Men's Wheelchair Singles Maikel
Scheffers, Netherlands
Women'sWheelchair Singles Esther
Vergeer (I), Netherlands
Men's Wheelchair Doubles Shingo
Kunieda, Japan, and Nicolas Peifer, France
Women's Wheelchair Doubles
Esther Vergeer and Sharon Walraven,
Netherlands

AUTO RACING

STP 400

Sunday
At Kansas Speedway
Kansas City, Kan.
Lap length: 1.5 miles
(Start position in parentheses)
1. (25) Brad Keselowskl., Dodge, 267
laps, 102.4 rating, 47 points, $216,633.
2. (28) Dale Eamhardt Jr., Chevrolet,
267,87.5,42, $181,825.
3. (15) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 267,
105.6,42, $183,950.
4. (22) Jeff G6rdon, Chevrolet, 267,
I !2.4,40, $156,26 1.
5. (7) Carl Edwards, Ford, 267, 121.7,
40,$154,391.
6. (21) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 267, 104.2,
38,$141,91 1.
*7. (31) JImmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 267,
103.1,37,$142,486.
8. (1.3) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 267,
117.5.37,$140,408.


9. (I) Kurt Busch, Dodge, 267, 135,
37, $139,225.
10. (14) Greg Biffle, Ford, 267, 96, 34,
$101,675.
I I.(10) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 267,
102.8, 33, $133,236.
12. (3) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 267, 106.9,
33,$132,641.
13. (19) David Ragan, Ford, 267, 89.9,
31, $90,550.
14. (17) Kasey Kahne, Toyota, 267,
83.5, 30, $104,133.
15. (12) .Ryan Newman, Chevrolet,
267,68.9,29, $118,125.
16. (4) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 267,74.8,
28, $105,789.
17. (2) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet,
266,80.3,28, $115,308.
18. (27) Clint Bowyer, Chevrolet, 266,
78.8,26, $119,233.
19. q) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 266,
78.5,25,"85,875.
20. (8) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 266,
74.2,24, $85,975.
21. (18) Mark Martin, Chevrolet, 266,
65.6,23, $85,150.
22. (23) David Reutimann,Toyota, 266,
59,22, $104,708.
23. (5) joey Logano, Toyota, 266, 76.3,
21, $86,125.
24. (11) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 266,
62.6,20, $102,520.
25. (16) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 266;
67.1,19, $84,475.
26. (35) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 266,
59.7, 18, $105,516.
27. (26) A J Allmendinger, Ford, 266,
63.3, 17,$112,161.
28. (20) Bobby Labonte, Toyota, 266,
53.1, 16,$102,270.
29. (6) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet,
266,53.3, 15,$110,339.'
30. (40) Patrick Carpentier, Ford, 265,
37.6,0, $90,483. -
31. (39) Andy Lally, Ford, 265, 40.7,
13, $83,275.
32. (42) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet, 264,
41.9, 12, $82,708.
33. (38) David Gilliland, Ford, 263,43.4,
llI, $81,347.
34. (30) Travis Kvapil, Ford, 243, 34.2,
0, $70,625.
35. (24) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, 190,
41.6,0, $70,450.
36. (41) Johnny Sauter, Dodge, brakes,
101,32.5,0, $70,250.
37. (33) Casey Mears, Toyota, ignition,
100,43.6,8, $70,050.
38. (32) J.J.Yeley, Chevrolet, brakes, 38,
36.9,.6, $69,850.
39. (29) David Stremme, Chevrolet,
brakes, 37, 35.3, 5, $69,700.
40. (43) Mike Skinner, Toyota, ignition,
34,28.8,0, $69,550.
41. (37) Michael McDowell, Toyota.
electrical, 33,35.6, 3, $69,400.
42. (36) Scott Riggs, Chevrolet, rear
gear, 20,31.9,0, $69,275.
43. (34) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, rear
gear, 19,30,0, $69,640.

Race Statistics
Average Speed of Race Winner:
137.184 mph.
Time f Race: 2 hours, 55 minutes,
10 seconds.
., Margin ofVictory 2.8 seconds. .
Caution Flags: 5 for 22 laps.
Lead Changes: 17 among 9 drivers.
Lap Leaders: J.Montoya I; Ky.Busch
2-8; J.Montoya 9-17; Ku.Busch 18-45;
L.Cassill 46; C.Mears 47; Kui.Busch, 48-
83; C.Edwards 84-112; Ky.Busch 113-116;
D.Hamlin 117-140; T.Stewart 141-153;
D.Hamlin 154-159; Ku.Busch 160-204;
T.Stewart 205-211; D.Hamlin 212-215;
Ku.Busch 216-258; B.Keselowski 259-267.
Leaders Summary (Driver, Times Led,
Laps Led): Ku.Busch, 4 times for 152 laps;
D.Hamlin, 3 times for 34 laps; C.Edwards,
I time for 29 laps; T.Stewart, 2 tires
for 20. laps; Ky.Busch, 2 times for II
laps; J.Montoya, 2 times for 10 laps;
B.Keselowski, I time for 9 laps; LCassill,
I time for I lap; C.Mears. I time for
I lap.
Top 12 in Points: I. C.Edwards, 485;
2. J.Johnson, 445; 3. D.Earnhardt Jnr.444;
4. K.Harvick, 442; 5. Ky.Busch, 425; 6.
Ku.Busch, 414; 7. M.Kenseth, 412; 8.
T.Stewart, 393; 9. C.Bowyer, 391; 10.
R.Newman, 382; II. D.Hamlin, 381; 12:
G.Biffle, 377.


SOFTBALL

CAA World Series


AtASA Hall of Fame Stadium
Oklahoma City
Saturday
California 6, Oklahoma State 2, OSU
eliminated
Missouri 4, Oklahoma I, OU
eliminated
Florida 5, California 2, Cal
eliminated
Baylor I, Missouri 0, 13 innings,
Missouri eliminated'
Sunday
Florida 16,Alabama 2,5 innings
Game 12 Arizona State 4, Baylor
0
Game 13 Florida 9, Alabama 2
x-Game 14 Game 12 winner vs.
Game 12 loser, 9:30 p.m.
Championship Series
(Best-of-3)
Monday
Florida vs.Arizona State (n)

HOCKEY

Stanley Cup

Boston vs.Vancouver
Vancouver I, Boston 0
Saturday
Vancouver 3, Boston 2, OT
Monday
Vancouver at Boston (n)
Wednesday
Vancouver at Boston, 8 p.m.


INDIANS: Also prepare mental game


Continued From Page 11

Indians also looked to build
.on their mental makeup.
"The guys watched film so
that we can evaluate how we
did things last year," Jackson
said. "We want to know how
-to attack a defense. We want


to pick out tendencies so
that we know what play
works better against it"
The big thing for Jackson
is having the team look at
conditioning as easy once
the fall rolls around.


"Especially in this heat,
once you get the pads on,
doing it in the fall in a game
will be easier," Jackson said.
'This won't be the first time
their going through it, and
it'll also build chemistry."


from Wimbledon and one
apiece from the U.S. Open
and Australian Open.
"If I win this tournament,
I know my year is fantastic,"
Nadal said Sunday evening.
"You are able to play with
less pressure the rest of the
season. You are able to keep
playing ... with the same
positive attitude ... but with
less pressure than before
and with better confidence
than before."
When Federer was win-
ning Grand Slam title after
Grand Slam title three
per season in 2004, 2006
and 2007, for example -
many assumed it was the
sort of display that wouldn't
be duplicated, at least not
anytime soon.
But Nadal is putting
together the same sort of
run, with two major cham-
pionships in 2008 and three
last season. The Spaniard is
about six months younger
than Federer was when he
collected his 10th Grand
Slam title at the 2007
Australian Open.
Nadal leads their head-
to-head series 17-8. More
significantly, Federer is 2-
6 against Nadal in major
finals, 14-1 against everyone
,_else,.That's.pjfoi.why-_the_.
Grand Slam gap between-
them is nmrroiMrtg: Not
only is Nadal picking up
titles, he's also preventing
Federer from adding to his
total.
All of which leads some
to say Nadal is on his way to
being considered the best
tennis player in history,
Andre Agassi, for one,
thinks that discussion is
still open.
'While Rafa can say, 'He


, 1 I

4

81
12 1
13 '
14 I

15
17 .
18 I
19
20 I


might be the best of all the time," he said. "So I have
time, but I beat him and to adapt my game another
I was better than him,' I time and' try to remember
do believe that you have what I did well on grass,
to leave a little room for why I played well on grass,
matchup. Some people can what I have to do to have
just be inherently at a disad- the same feeling."
vantage, based on a certain Play starts at Wimbledon
style of play," said Agassi, in two weeks, and in addi-
who, retired in 2006 with tion to tracking Nadal there,
eight Grand Slam titles. tennis fans will want to keep
"Will it take Rafa as many a close eye on two other
Slams to prove that he's men: Federer and Novak
better than Roger? I don't Djokovic.
think so. But you have to Until losing to Federer
separate yourself from the in a thrill-a-minute French
field. That's what makes Open semifinal; Djokovic
somebody great how far was 41-0 in 2011 and on
you separate yourself from a 43-match winning streak
the field, across all sur- overall. The 24-year-old
faces," added Agassi, who Serb has won two Australian
completed his career Grand Open titles, in 2008' and this
Slam by winning the 1999 January, but he has yet to
French Open. go beyond the semifinals at
"Rafa's won a couple at Wimbledon.
Wimbledon. Roger, ifnot for Djokovic also is 4-0
Rafa, would have won four against Nadal this season,
or five (at Roland Garros). and would have moved
I think Roger has separated up from No. 2 to No. 1 in
himself from the field more the rankings if he'd gotten
in his time than Rafa has past Federer on Friday or if
done yet But there's still Nadal had lost on Sunday.
time for Rafa." And Federer? Well, all
Now they move to he's done at Wimbledon is
Wimbledbn, where Nadal take home six titles, one
is the defending champion shy of Pete Sampras' mod-
and won the title each of the ern-day mark.
..past, two ti~ps he entered /That's obviously the
:tie toknament (h..-wit4-.. huge priority right now, to
drew in 2009 ,.citing 'kne .'in Wimbledon in, a few
-injii-y)I. weeks" time. That's always,
Nadal, who kept his No. 1 for me, the sort of No. 1
rankingMondaythanksto his goal in the season," Federer
French Open championship, said. "This is where it all
was heading straight from started for me back in
France to England, where he 2003."
will make the transition from While he lost in the
clay to grass at the Queen's Wimbledon quarterfinals a
Club tournament year ago, Federer proved
"Always a big change. in Paris that, even as his
Even if I had success on 30th birthday in August
grass (in past) years, for approaches, he is still some-
me, (it's) a big change all one to be reckoned with.


ACROSS 38 Enormous
39 Parking lot
Prefix for clas- sight
sic 40 Tumbler's pad
Guns the 41 Medico
engine 43 Yeah (hyph.)
Package- 46 Confronted
Linen vestment 50 Sallies forth
Skip 51 DJ's count-
Famed down (2 wds.)
lioness 54 Ancient harp
Weather zones 55 Jean Stein best
Sketch seller
Hologram 56 Clock numeral
maker 57 Patio view
Writer's 58 Antler wearer
NNW opposite 59 Roll of bills


22 Used to be
23 Crams in
26 Still snoozing
28 Extend
31 Capp or Gump
32 Round
container
33 Meadow
34 and outs
35 Moon or eye
36 Plagiarize
37 1865 yielder


DOWN


Salt, in the lab
Vocalist
Fitzgerald
Kimono sashes
Thunders
CPR pro
Compete for
Ave. crossers
Onto -


L
Answer to Previous Puzzle

LTIDM CIAISA K EJA
ERE M DA DAM APT
G UA C AML E T IM
S ELLERSLBLOCS


S RV E ASRAN
IDE E T IA N







F AA CES T RMI
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SIPY VES LOS-


Potpourri
Leatherneck
org.
Foul-smelling
Cluttered
A..f l


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21 Not cook (2
wds.)
22 Like frog feet
23 Clink or cooler
24 A Bronte sis-
ter
25 Consumer
S gds.
27 Small town
28 Matty of the
diamond
29 Cabinet div.
30 The Banana
Boat Song
(hyph.)
36 Chocolate
bean
38 Nasty laugh
40 Ruminated
42 Volunteer
43 Like gargoyles
44 Georgetown
athlete
45 Monsieur, in
Bonn
47 Black bird
48 Long-active
volcano
49 Tinted
51 Mr. Turner
52 Kind of poem
53 Dessert cart
item


6-7 2011 UFS, Inc. Dist. by Universal UClick for UFS


'2B


SCOREBOARD


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Rafael Nadal of Spain celebrates defeating Roger Federer of Switzerland in four sets, 7-5,
7-6, 5-7, 6-1, in the men's final of the French Open tennis tournament in Roland Garros
stadium in Paris on Sunday.


NADAL: Beats Federer for Slam title

Continued From Page 1B


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


NC


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS TUESDAY, JUNE 7, 2011














LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS TUESDAY, JUNE 7, 2011


BABY BLUES


BLONDIE


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE


B.C.


FRANK & ERNEST


DEAR ABBY


Daughter's clothing choices

should be largely her own


DEAR ABBY: While I un-
derstand "Loose and Baggy
in San Francisco's" (April 23)
mother's wish to get the most
out of her daughter's clothing
budget, as one whose career
has been studying the social
psychology of appearance, I
disagree with your response.
A girl's early teen years are
crucial to her development of
self-image and overall self-es-
teem. This is a major reason
for their obsession with their
appearance.
Parents who want to assist
their daughters through the
quagmire of appearance-re-
.lated issues associated with
these years should work with
their daughters by being open
to their needs, yet not allow
them to exceed boundaries of
decency, etc. A 13-year-old who
wants clothing that fits should
be accommodated. Otherwise,
she stands to become ashamed
of her appearance, inclined to
act out through her appear-
ance once she gains control
over what she wears, and be
overly obsessed with it well be-
yond her teen years. KAR-
EN KAIGLER-WALKER,
PH.D. BURBANK, CALIF.
DEAR DR. KAIGLER-
WALKER: Thank you for
your opinion. Many readers
also empathized with "Loose
and Baggy." Read on for their
views on the subject-

DEAR ABBY: I had the
same problems when I was 13.
My mom always made me buy
clothes that were too large, too


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearabby.com
long, etc. But my grandmother
was a clever seamstress who
helped "nip and tuck" the extra
material away until I needed it
She could also add new cool-
looking details to the clothes.
"Loose and Baggy" may also
have a relative with a talent for
clothing alterations, or if not,
she most likely has a.tailor or
alteration shop nearby.
.I'm 15 now and still have
many of the same clothes. It
has saved money in the long
run because we can just let the
stitches out instead of buying
new clothes. At 13, she still
has some room for growth.
- GRANDDAUGHTER OF
A TOP-LEVEL TAILOR

DEAR ABBY: I empathize
with "Loose and Baggy." When
my mom and I would go shop-
ping, it always ended in a big
fight with me in tears. I was
teased mercilessly by the oth-
er children for dressing like
a "40-year-old" and never had
the cool things the other kids
were wearing even though my
clothes cost just as much.
I vowed never to do that with
my daughter, and by the time
she was 12 she was shopping
for her own clothes. Our only


rule was that she had to fol-
low the three B's no butt,
no boobs and no belly. At 16
she has an amazing sense of
fashion and is often emulated.
"Loose and Baggy" should
be given some boundaries
and then allowed to buy what
she wants. REFORMED
FRUMP IN TEXAS

DEAR ABBY: When my
daughter was younger, she
had specific style tastes that
included expensive, trendy
clothes. I implemented a bud-
get that allowed her to have a
set amount of money on the
first day of the new season.
The money was given to her in
cash or, later, in her checking
account. She was responsible
for budgeting the amount her-
-self for her clothes during that
season,
Because of this she has
learned how to manage money,
shop "high end" on sale and roll
over unused amounts to the
next season. She has become a
responsible teenager who un-
derstands the value of the dol-
lar. She also trades outfits with
her friends or consigns them
to resale stores. "Loose and
Baggy" sounds like part of the
"entitlement" generation and
probably would learn more if
she was part of the solution.
- SMART MOM/SMART
DAUGHTER
* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-April
19): Learn whatever willadd
to your skills and knowledge
and you will have, greater
interest in making changes
that will improve your life.
Keep company with people
who motivate and. inspire
you. Don't let love stand in-
your way.*****

TAURUS (April 20-May
20): Common. sense and
practicality won't be your
strong points. Emotional
situations will develop if you
don't walk away from people
who are a poor influence. If
you don't stand up for what
you want, no one else will.


GEMINI (May 21-June
20): Manipulation is appar-
ent Keep things simple, be a
good listener, make up your
own mind and be aware of
all the possibilities. Sincerity
will make it difficult for oth-
ers to give you a hard time.


CANCER (June 21-July
22): There are many sides
to a situation you face. You
have to give everyone the
opportunity to reveal his or
her position before you make
up your mind and make a
move. Suggestions will be
received much better than
demands.***

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):
Don't make decisions if you


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

are emotional about the situ-
ation you face. Financial or
contractual: deception is ap,
parent. Don't let a' past part-
ner or experience interfere
with what you do now. ***

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Listen carefully and
respond with thoughtfulness
and you will not only main-
tain control, you will capti-
vate your audience. Don't let
the serious side of life hold
you hostage. Allow time for
adventure and personal grati-
fication. ***

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): Get involved in events,
activities or social functions
that will bring you in touch
with people who inspire you
to move forward with your
creative dreams. Hard work,
preparation and good organi-
zation will be key. Avoid any
financial or contractual offer
that sounds too good to be
true. ****

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov.
21): A contract, deal or pro-
posal will start to pay off. Op-
portunity is apparent and the
people you connect with now
will be significant in your life
for some time to come. Don't
let your lover distract you
from what you must finish.
****


SAG1HTARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): Past mistakes
will come lack to haunt you.
It's best to make amends and
resolve old debts before they
turn into something.unman-
ageable: Domestic or I per-
sonal changes can improve
a partnership. Keep steady
progress in a positive direc-
tion.**

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-
Jan. 19): The changes you
make to your personal assets
or other investments will pay
off royally in the future. Ren-
ovating or making a residen-
tial move will be favorable.
Love is in the stars, so social-
ize or nurture a current rela-
tionship. *****

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
18): Assess your situation
honestly. It's your inability to
Look at the real cause or situ-
ation you face that will lead to
a poor decision. Rely on the
people who have supported
and advised you in the past
A change of scenery will do
you good. ***

PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): Face adversity head-on.
It's being honest and brave
enough to deal with makers
thatwill bringyou the respect
and the support you require.
Secret affairs will not turn
out well. A friend or relative
will object to something you
are doing. ***


CELEBRITY CIPHER


by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: M equals Y
"C XWCX OPGRA DCR AN ZGOP OPW
YOHW CT, ILO N RK M C KGSGRA
OPGRA DCR AN CAC GR YO GO "
AGKIWHO J. DPWYOWHONR

PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "As I see it, men fight for the right to give their
independence to those who love and respect it." Audie Murphy

(c) 2011 by NEA, Inc. 6-7


FOR BETTER OR WORSE


YOU DON'T HAVE TO EACHH
/ 0 "GOOGLE MAPSO--- Tfi LITTI-
r HOU$eS AMg RIGHT HRE.! ,


Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415


CLASSIC PEANUTS













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Lake City Reporter




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4 lines days line $1s55
personal merchandise ttalng $4000 or less.
Each Item must Include a price.
This is a non-refundable rate.




av Each additional
lines days line $1655
private Individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling 50,000 or less
Each item must Include a price.
This Is a non-retundable rate.


Ihn


4 lines i 7 50
3 days iA
Includes 2 Sign Fadn dditfl line165


Limited to service type advertis-
ing only.
4 lines, one month....s92.00
$10.80 each additional line
Includes an additional $2.00 per
ad for each Wednesday insertion.


You can call us at 755-5440,
Monday through Friday from 8:00
a.m: to 5:00 p.m.
Some people prefer to place their
classified ads in person, and some
ad categories will require prepay-
ment. Our office is located at 180
East Duval Street.
You can also fax or email your ad
copy to the Reporter.
FAX: g86-752-9400 Please
direct your copy to the Classified
Department.
EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityre-
porter.com





Ad Is to Appear: Call by: FaxEmall by:
Tuesday Mon.,10:00 a.m. Mon.,9:100a.m.
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Thursday Wed., 10:00a.m. Wed.,,9:00a.m.
Friday Thurs., 10:00a.m. Thurns.,9:00a.m.
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These deadlines are subject to change without notice.




Ad Errors- Please read your ad
on the first day of publication.
We accept responsibility for only
the first incorrect insertion, and
only the charge for the ad space
In error. Please call 755-5440
immediately for prompt correc-
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Cancellations- Normal advertising
deadlines apply for cancellation.
Billing Inquiries- Call 755-5440-
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Advertising copy is subject to
approval by the Publisher who
reserves the right to edit, reject,
or classify all advertisements under
appropriate headings. Copy should
be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the first day of pub-
lication. Credit for published errors
will be allowed for the first insertion
for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the
Publisher shall not'be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nor for any general,
special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply
with Federal, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
nation in employment, housing and
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In Print and Online
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Legal


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
3RD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT. OF
FLORIDA, IN AND FOR COLUM-
BIA COUNTY
Case #: 2008-CA-000828
Division #
Trustee for the registered holders of
MASTR Asset Backed Securities
* Trust 2007-WMC1 Mortgage Pass-
Through Certificates Series 2007-
WMC1
Plaintiff,
-vs.-
Esther Catherine Durrill;
Defendant(s)
NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to an Order of Final Judgment
of Foreclosure dated May 26, 2011,
entered in Civil Case No. 2008-CA-
000828 og the Circuit Court of the
3rd Judicial Circuit in and for Co-
lumbia County, Florida, wherein U.S
Bank National Association, as Trust-
ee for the registered holders of
MASTR Asset Backed Securities
Trust 2007-WMC1 Mortgage Pass-
Through Certificates Series 2007-
WMC1, Plaintiff and Esther Cather-
ine Durrill are defendantss, I will
sell to the highest and best bidder for
cash AT THE WEST FRONT
DOOR OF THE COLUMBIA
COUNTY COURTHOUSE, LO-
CATED AT 173 HERNANDO
STREET, LAKE CITY, COLUM-
BIA COUNTY, FLORIDA, AT
11:00 A.M. on September 28, 2011,
the following described property as
set forth in said Final Judgment, to-
wit:
LOTS 29 AND 30, VILLAGE-
WOOD, UNIT 2, A SUBDIVISION
ACCORDING TO THE" PLAT
THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN
PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE 77, OF THE
PUBLIC RECORDS OF COLUM-
BIA COUNTRY, FLORIDA.
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN IN-
TEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM
THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER
AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS
PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE
SALE.
P. DEWITT (CASON
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
Columbia County, Florida
By: /sfB. Scippio
DEPUTY CLERK OF COURT
Submitted BY: ATTORNEY FOR
PLAINTIFF:
SHAPIRO & FISHMAN, LLP
4630 Woodland Corporate Blvd..
Suite 100
Tampa, FL 33614
(813) 880-8888
(813) 880-8800
: 08-120588
04545146
June 7, 14, 2011


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 2010-CA-000669
COLUMBIA BANK,
Plaintiff,
vs.
MERIDIAN FINANCIAL, INC., A
Florida corporation, JUSTIN M.
FITZHUGH, OLIVIA FITZHUGH
and DANIEL M. MAGSTADT,
Defendants.
CLERK'S NOTICE OF SALE UN-
DER F.S. CHAPTER 45
NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accord-
ance with the Summary Final Judg-
ment of- Foreclosure dated May 25,
2011, in the above-styled cause. I
will sell to the highest and best bid-
der for cash at the Columbia County
Courthouse, Courtroom '1, 173
Northeast Hernando Avenue, Lake
City, Florida 32055 at 11:00 a.m. on
July 13, 2011, the following descri-
bed property:
Begin at the Northeast comer of the
S 1/2 Lot or Block 55 in the Central
Division of the City of Lake City,
Florida, and run 55 feet; South along
Hernando Street; thence West;
thence run North 55 feet; thence run
East 1091/2 feet to the Point of Be-
ginning, lying and being in Columbia
County, Florida, all in Block/ 55,
Central Division of the City of Lake
City, Florida.
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN IN-
TEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM
4THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER
AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS
PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE
SALE.
Dated May 31, 2011
P. DeWitt Cason
Clerk of Court
By:/s/ B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
04545193
June 7, 14, 2011







Land Clearing

Back Hoe, Dozer, Chopping, root
raking, bush hog, seeding, sod,
disking, site prep, ponds &
irrigation. Free Est! 386-623-3200


Lawn & Landscape Service

Clean Pine Straw,
You pick it up, $1.85 a bale
Delivery of 100 bales $260
386-688-9156

Landscape Maintenance Company
You can trust for knowledge &
pride, Mention this AD!
Mow Green, LLC 386-288-6532


Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
CASE NO. 11-124-CP
IN RE: ESTATE OF
MARY ETTA FEAGLE LOWE,
deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of
MARY ETTA FEAGLE LOWE, de-
ceased, whose date of death was
April 10, 2011; File Number 11-124-
CP, is pending in the Circuit Court
for Columbia County, Florida, Pro-
bate Division, the address of which
is 173 NE Hemando Avenue, Lake
City, Florida 32055. The names and
addresses of the personal representa-
tive and the personal representative's
attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and oth-
er persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate, on whom a
copy of this notice is required to be
served, must file their claims with
this court WITHIN THE LATER OF
3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AF-
TER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF
A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent
and other persons having claims or
demands against decedent's estate
must file their claims with this court
WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITH-
IN THE TIME PERIODS .SET
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this
notice is: June 7, 2011.
Personal Representatives:
/s/ Ronald A. Feagle
RONALD A. FEAGLE
578 SE Feagle Avenue
Lake City, Florida 32025
/s/ Olivia Feagle Greene
OLIVIA FEAGLE GREENE
864 NW Fairway Drive
Lake City, Florida 32055
Attorney for Personal Representa-
tives:
FEAGLE & FEAGLE, ATTOR-
NEYSIP.A.
By: /s/ Marlin M. Feagle
Marlin M. Feagle
Florida Bar No. 0173248
Attorneys for Personal Representa-
tives
153 NE Hernando Avenue
Post Office Box 1653
Lake City, Florida 32056-1653
386/752-7,191 .
04545172
June7,14,2011

Public Auction
1996 FORD
VIN# 1FMDU32X5TUC43202
To be held 06/15/2011, 8:00am at
Bryant's Tire and Towing
1165 East Duval St. Lake City FL
32055
04545201
June 7, 2011
Public Auction
1998 FORD
VIN# 1FMRU18W5WLB71940
1995 MAZDA
VIN# 1YVGE22C8S5306222
1998 HONDA
VIN# 1HGEJ8142WL126842
1983 FORD
VIN#1FABP26A7DF181591
1990 FORD
VIN# 1FBJS31Y5LHB63855
To be held 06/30/2011, 8:00am at
Bryant's Tire and Towing
1165 East Duval St. Lake City FL
32055
04545200
June 7,2011


020 Lost & Foylnd

104545099 -


100 Opportunities

04545173
First Federal Bank of Florida
has an open position for a
Consumer Underwriter.
Responsible for the underwrit-
ing of loan applications and
making approvals within the
guidelines. Ensures loan
documents are complete and
accurate. Prepares in house or.
real estate collateral. Orders and
reviews third party title work,
appraisals and flood certificates
for real estate loans. Bachelor's
degree in business or related
field preferred. Two or more
years of experience in
financial/loan setting.
Understanding and knowledge
of financial institution products
and services. Applications may
be obtained from any First
Federal Branch and submitted to
Human Resources, P.O. Box
2029, Lake City, FI 32056 or
mailed to
Turbeville.J(l)ffsb.com
Bilingual candidates encouraged
to apply. Equal Employment
Opportunity Employer.
Associate Reps
SUMMER WORK/GREAT PAY
Immediate FT/PT openings,
Customer sales/service,
No exp needed, conditions,
Apply Now all ages 17+
(386) 269-0883
BULLDOZER OPERATOR
Call
F.J. Hill Construction
386-752-7887
Cashiers needed, Experience
Preferred, Drug free workplace,
all applicants will be drug tested
Ellisville Exxon,
Hwy 441, No Phlone Calls Please.
CDL A Flatbed Truck Driver
needed for F/T OTR SE area, 3
years exp or mosi Medical
benefits offered. Contact
Melissa or Mary @ 386-935-2773
Convenience Store Manager need-
ed. Lake City area. Experience
preferred. Background & Drug test
req'd. Call 386-362-2935 for info.
Experienced mechanic with own
tools. Apply 9AM 2PM only
Deadline Thurs June 9th. 247 NW
Hillandale Glen Lake City
No phone calls
MECHANIC NEEDED
Must have own tools.
Apply at 113 SW Nassau Street
Lake City
Stylist Needed
Call
386-752-4614
Southern Exposure

no Sales
1 Employment

Seeking Route Sales
Representative-Daily Base Pay,
Service Incentive, Sales Commis-
sion, New Customer Incentive;
Pre-established & Growing
Customer Base; Sales &
Management Training; & more.
For immediate consideration apply
online at www.schwansjobs.com.
Local info call 386-755-1790

240 Schools &
SEducation

04544843
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-05/23/10
Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-07/11/11
Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com

White Springs HOPE Program
will be accepting applications for
volunteers and employee positions
for the summer youth enrichment
program until
Wednesday, June 8, 2011.
Please send applications to
Town of White Springs, Drawer D
White Springs, Florida 32096
or call 386-397-1333
Equal Opportunity Employer
Tobacco Free Facility


310 Pets & Supplies
FREE KITTENS in Ft. White 8"
wks old. 3 males & 1 female. Buff
& white. Cute & cuddly. Ready to
go. 386-497-3808 or 288-6165

Golden Retriever pups CKC.
Shots. 3 females, 5 males
Available July 3 $350. Each
POP. 386-623-1577
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.
YORKIE PUPPY.
Has shots. 9 weeks old.
$300.00
386-697-6163

330 Livestock &
30 Supplies

Black Angus Cows & Heifers
Prices Vary
Registered & Commercial
386-719-4802 ,

QUALITY wnlg BEEF
Heifers Limousin/Angus Cross,
Vaccinated, A.I. Sired $550 Each
386-755-3541

361 Farm Equipment

84 Ford 4610 Tractor.
2WD, Solid
2005 motor,$7,500. OBO
386-867-0005

407 Computers
Dell Desktop Computer,
$,75
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170

408 Furniture
110 Window AC unit
$75.00
386-292-3927 or
386-755-5331


GE Dishwasher.
$100.00 obo
386-292-3927 or
386-755-5331


408 Furniture
Nice Oak Dinette Set.
Table (w/leaf) & six chairs.
Must See! $285. obo
386-292-3927 or 386-755-5331
Nice Table & chairs.
Off white.
Chairs need TLC. $75.00
386-292-3927 or 386-755-5331


420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$250 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.


430 Garage Sales






PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.



440 Miscellaneous
Murray automatic Riding mower
Runs Great. 42 in cut.
$375.00
386-292-3927 or 386-755-5331
Stop gnat & Mosquito bites! Buy
Swamp Gator All natural insect re-
pellent. Family safe. Use head to
toe; Available at The Home Depot.
Summer Barbecue Special
Tow Behind
Grill/Smoker, $1,250 OBO.
386-719-4802
Wii System w/2 games,
6 games down loaded, 2 GB
memory card. 1 controller w/joy
stick. $135.00 386-984-6510

450 Good Things
.4 to Eat- I

BLUEBERRYHILL
U-PICK opens
May 30th
386-963-4220

REPORTER Classifieds
In Print and On Line
www.lakecityreporter.com


Family Owned and Operated

Dealership
(Huntin' a good fit)
New & Used Car Sales
Motivated Self-SJparter
Honesty &.Good Character
$50,OO000 plus a year
Benefit Pkg.

Apply in person at


L_, i rMacclenny, FL
B UR KIN S 273 E. Macclenny, Ave.
CHEIROLET














IfB ye Off, i eII


Cookie is missing. Last seen
05/26 around noon, in the
Country Club Road area. Please
help us find her. 386-397-3124


--
confused?



Call Lake City Reporter Classifieds!


WE CAN HELP 386-755-5440


li~iilr
BUY Iii^


SELLIT


LAKE CITY REPORTER


I


1


I














LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED TUESDAY, JUNE 7, 2011


630 Mobile Homes
630 for Rent
2 BR/1 BA, Clean, on private
landscaped acre, W/D, quiet area,
no pets, $500 per mo. 1st/Last +
$200 dep.,no utilities. dep.,
smoke free, 386-752-7027.
2&3 BR MH. $395 $650. mo.
plus deposit. Water & sewer fur-
nished. Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
2B/1BA. MH., quiet living. Clean.
New stove, new carpet, carport.
NO PETS!,lst & deposit.
Adult community. Smoke free
environment. 386-758-3963
2br /2ba SWMH; also Residential
RV lots for rent between Lake City
& G'ville. Access to 1-75 & 441
(352)317-1326 Call for terms
3/2 S of Lake City, (Branford area)
$400 dep, $600 month
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
DWMH for Rent. 3br/2ba
Handicapped accessible.
$650. mo. $500. Dep. INo Pets.
386-984-9634, ask for Amber.
Great area! Very clean 2Br/2Ba,
MH, CH/A, Nice kitchen.
$550. mo. + $200 Dep. NO PETS.
(386)755-0064 or (904)771-5924
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White. Contact 386-623-34p4
or 386-365-1919


SOUTH 41 2br/lba. Washer/
Dryer Outlet. Satallite TV incl.
Pets ok on approval. New paint
$550. mo + dep. 386-758-2408.


640 Mobile Homes
4 for Sale
2010 Lot Model 32x80
Den/LR.3BR/2BA
2280SF 1/2". SR
Call Charles @
Royals Homes 754-6737
2010 Lot Model 3BR/2BA
1624 SF. 1/2" Sheetrock
Vaulted Ceiling.
Charles @ :
Royals Homes 754-6737
2011 Claytin Single
14x76 2BR/2BA
3 walk in Closets
Call Charles @ Royals
Homes 754-6737
2011 Clayton Homes 4BR/2BA
9' Side Walls,
Energy Star Home
Call Charles @ Royals
Homes 754-6737
2011 Legacy Model 1980 SF
Wood Cab, 3BR/2BA
Deluxe Int.erior
Call Charles @
Royals Homes 754-6737
2011 SE Triple wide
16" OC Home WZII
Total upgrade call Charles
@ Royals Homes 754-6737
4/2 DWMH at Timberlane Park,
Long Carport, 2 porches/shed
$38,500.
.- 386-752-42,8 .,-8 .
;Any Size, Any Shape
we have the home for you
Call Royals Homes @
386-754-6737
Architect Designed,
Green Engineered
Energy Homes
@Royals Homes
www.royalshomesales.com
Ask about our Energy Star Top
Insulation & Windows, Better
Built,Better Comfort, Phil @
Royals Homes 386-754-6737
Custom Built Modular's,
Bring your plans to.
Royals Homes
386-754-6737
www.royalshomesales.com
Finance Manager on Site,
Know's how to get it done,
not a Salesman Guessing
Call Phil @ Royals
Homes 386-754-6737
Flashy? Pretty?
Whatabout Construction?
Homesto last a Lifetime
Royals Homes
386-754-6737


Hallmark Real Estate. 2004
DWMH just minutes from the riv-
er. Detached carport. Front & back
screened porches. MLS#77398
Paula Lawrence 386-623-1973
Only a Few Left
2010 Models must go!
Call Royals Homes @
386-754-6737
Only at Royals Homes
Can your home be
prepared for real brick?
Call Bo @ 754-6737
Pre-Owried 2BR/1 Bath
Priced to move 754-6737
Only @ Royals Homes
www.royalshomesales.com
Sales Price Doubled?
Not at Royals, Honest people,
Quality Homes.
Call Royals Homes
@ 386-754-6737
Service Manager on Site
makes sure your satisfied, not
someone doing it all
Royals Homes 386-754-6737
There is a Difference.
Just ask our Customers
We do what we say
Call Phil@ Royals Homes
386-754-6737

650 Mobile Home
650 &Land
67.5 ac.Ranch, fenced & cross
fenced. Spacious mobliq home
w/large front deck & RV hookup
MLS 75607 $299,000. Access
Realty. Patti Taylor. 386-623-6896
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
DWMH on 5 ac. 3br/2ba Back 2
ac. fenced. Owners motivated.
Debbie Myles 386-719-1224
MLS#, 75830 $99,900
Hallmark Real Estate. 3/2
DWMH 1/2 ac south of town.
Columbia City. Paved frontage,
comer lot. $57,500
MLS#77654 Janet Creel 719-0382
Owner Finance, Nice 3/2, S of
Lake City, small down/$625 mo
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com


710 Unfurnished Apt. 810 Home for Sale
70For Rent


05525655
SPRING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans;
some with garages.
Call 386-454-1469
or visit our website:
www.springhillvillage.net

1 & 2 Bedroom Apartments
Move in for as low as
$199
386-755-2423
Great location W of 1-75, spacious
deluxe 2br apts., garage, W/D
hookup. patio. $600/700 & up, +
Sec, 386-344-3715 or 965-5560
The Lakes Apts. Studios & IBr's
from $135/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Seo 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
'From $450. + sec.
Call Michelle 386-752-9626

720 Furnished Apts.
72 For Rent
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

7 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent
2 bedrootm1 Ibath on
5 -acrbs. $7Q0.00 per month.
Firit;last and security.
386-590-5333
3br/2ba Nice Brick home
for rent comer of Baya &
Defender. $950. mo. $950. dep.
386-344-5065
4br/2ba in town.
Good neighborhood. $900. mo
1st & $900 security. No Pets.
386-755-6916
Family Hm 3/2, Ir, dr, fam rm w/
fireplace,garage, fenced yd. Nice
area. $1050 mo + dep. Martha Jo
Khachigan, Realtor 623-2848
LULU, FL 3/2 recently
remodeled. CH/A, large porches.
$650. mo + dep.,
386-752-3444 or 961-3031
Private House for Rent
Newly Remodeled,'S of Lake City
Call The Adams Agency @
386-752-1444
Home for Rent.
3/2 in City Limits. No pets.
$900. per month. Call Susan,
Realtor. 3861623-6612

750 Business &
Office Rentals
FOR LEASE: Downtown office
space. Convenient to
Court house.
Call 386-755-3456
For Lease: E Baya Ave. Two -
1000 sqft office space units or
combined for 2000 sqft. 386-984-
0622 or weekends 386-497-4762
OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$695. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor
788 S Marion Ave, Commercial
bldg with.hwy frontage,
near downtown.
Call Scott Stewart at Westfield
Realty Group. 386-867-3498


770 Condos For Rent
Furnished or unfurnished
Townhomes on the golf course.
$900. mo. plus security. Includes
water. 386-752-9626


790 Vacation Rentals


Horseshoe Beach Scalloping Spcl
Gulf Front 2br, w/lg porch, dock,
fish sink. wkend $395./wk $895.
386-235-3633/352-498-5986
alwaysonvacation.com #419-181
"Florida's Last Frontier"


805 Lots for Sale
5 Acre Lot, Secluded & Cleared,
MLS# 67871 $55,000
Call Lisa Waltrip
@ 386-365-5900
westfieldrealtygroup.com
Great Package Deal $43,500
Nicely wooded. 3 lots in Emerald
Cove. (1)Private cul-de-sac.
Aafon Nickelson 386-867-3534
Westfield Realty Group
Hallmark Real Estate. Owner
Finance with $5K down with
terms negotiable. Below assessed
value for the county. MLS# 74484
$17,900 Jay Sears 386-867-1613
Land for Sale. 12 acres in
nice area south of town.
MLS#77469 $55,000
Carrie Cason 386-623-2806
Westfield Realty Group
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race,,color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination."' Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.


3/2 1056 sqft Brick home in town.
Fenced back yard w/12x12 work-
shop Just Reduced! $79,900
MLS# 77414 Call 386-243-8227
R.E.O.Realty Group, Inc
3/2 in Woodhaven w/Fla Room,
fenced back yard MLS#75499,
$114,900 Call Pam @
Remax 386-303-2505 or
email- remaxpamb@gmail.com
4/2 on 10 ac. in Bell. Over 2200
sqft in a country setting. 10x20
frame shade. Bring offers! $89,000
MLS 76582 Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty 386-397-3473
4/2 with 1000 sq ft workshop,
fenced yard, 2 car garage, Fairly
new roof & HVAC MLS#77602,
Bring Offers! $169,900,
R.E.O. Realty Group 243-8227
4br brick on .51 ac. comer lot. For-
mal dining and a large open floor
plan. Brick patio. $159,888
MLS 76763 Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty 386-397-3473
A Pilots Dream home 3br/2.5ba.
Pool, stocked pond, detached ga-
rage w/living quarters MLS#77756
$399,900 Westfield Realty
GroupJosh Grecian 386-466-2517
Access Realty Stylish 3/2 + pool
house w/1/2 bath on 2.25 acres.
Rear deck, 2 car garage & carport.
MLS 78103 $194,500.
Patti Taylor.623-6896
Brick 3/1 family home, 4.43 acres.
w/metal roof. MLS# 77415
Short sale acceptance w/lenders
approval. $99,000. 386-243-8227
R.E.O. Realty Group, Inc
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
3br/1. Updated kitchen, bath. Open
living room w/all classic & elegant
light fixtures. 386-752-6575
MLS# 78099 $79,900
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
3/2 lin Spring Estates. 20x40
workshop. Screened back porch &
all appliances. Kayla Carbono
623-9650 MLS# 73787 $99,900
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
Picadilly Park All brick 3/2, comer
lot w/inground pool. Screen porch
& fenced yard. Jessica Sheelly
288-2403 MLS# 73787 $99,900
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
Eastside Village 2br/2ba. Extra Ig.
Master suite. Florida room & 2
sheds. Ginny Smith 386-623-4277
623-4277 MLS# 70160 $79,900
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
Laurel Lake S/D. 4br/2ba w/ ap-
prox. 2275 sqft. Fenced back yard,
storage shed. Susan Sloan 386-
965-2847 MLS# 76106 $189,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
4bi/1.5ba brick. 1332 sq ft. Great
floor plan, nice yard, close to
town. 1 ac landscaped. Lori
Geibeig MLS# 75713 $84,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Remodeled 2/2 (could be 3/2).
Split floor plan. Great home, great
price. Mary Brown Whitehurst
965-0887 MLS# 77943 $105,000
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
3/2 brick home in Woodcrest. Lg
lot completely fenced. Easy access
to amenities. Elaine K. Tolar 386-
752-6488 MLS# 78148 $129,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
New home in Mayfair. 4 bedroom
on comer lot. Covered Porch.
Elaine K. Tolar 386-752-6488
MLS# 76919 $214,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
3/3 in beautiful area. 2414sqft.
Private yard & patio with storage
bldg. Lori G Simpson 386-365-
5678 MLS# 78175 $159,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
* Brick 3/2 on lake front. Lots of up-
dates. Glassed in room with fantas-
tic views. Lori 'G Simpson 386-
365-5678 MLS# 78092 $249,900
Country Home 2br/2ba on 5 ac.
detached garage w/workshop.
MLS# 77005 $179,900 Call Roger
Lovelady 386-365-7039
Westfield Realty Group
CYPRESS LANDING!
3BR/2BA built in 2005 w/large
kitchen $115,000
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #75794
DESIRABLE GWEN LAKE area!
Nice 3BR/2BA home on
comer lot $112,000
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. .755-5110 #77307
Eastside Village a 55+ Retirement
Community. lots of Storage. Ig
deck off 2br suite. Carport w/more
storage. MLS# 77462 Eastside
Village Realty, Inc. 752-5290
Eastside Village a 55+ Retirement
Community. 2br/2ba. Lg office
/craft room. Oversized garage.
$89,900 MLS# 71901 Eastside
Village Realty, Inc. 752-5290
Eastside Village a 55+ Retirement
Community. Open floor plan
w/breakfast nook. 2 Ig bedrooms.
$104,999 MLS# 77779 Eastside
Village Realty, Inc. 752-5290
Featured Home 55+ acres, 5 pas-
tures fenced & cross fenced. 2,700
sqft, 4br/3ba home built in 1996.
Call for details! 386-243-8227
R.E.O. Realty Group
Fixer Upper on Suwannee River.
Needs TLC. Owner motivated &
will finance. $45,000
MLS 77337 Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty 386-397-3473
GREAT STARTER HOME!
3BR/2BA w/lots of closet space &
nice lawn $79,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #76432
Great Starter Home. Well cared


for. New countertops, tile floors &
metal roof. $79,900 MLS#77524
Brodie Alfred 386-623-0906
Westfield Realty Group
Hallmark Real Estate. Brick
home w/fine landscaping. Dream
kitchen w/double pantry.
Split bedroom plan MLS#77846
Paula Lawrence 386-623-1973
Hallmark Real Estate. Country
Estate. Sit in the swing of the big
oak tree and watch the horses
graze on 10ac. fenced. 39 ac total.
MLS#78139 Janet Creel 719-0382
Hallmark Real Estate. Pool &
Patio. 3br/2ba. brick home on
1.69 ac. Workshop &
SWMH on property. MLS#78117
Tanya Shaffer 386-397-4766


810 Home for Sale
Home near the River. 3br/2ba,
1470 sqft. needs a little TLC.
MLS#76390 $34,900
Mike Lienemann 386-867-9053
Westfield Realty Group
Home on 15 ac. w/over 2,500 sqft
home.Very Ig bedrooms w/private
baths. 24x24 workshop $235,000
MLS 77552 Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty 386-397-3473
HOME OR OFFICE on
Alachua St; remodeled 1,207 SqFt
home $82,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #77724
Hallmark Real Estate. 2006
2200SF home. 2br/2ba w/mother-
in-law suite, 4 car garage, endless
hot water heater. MLS# 77547
$309,900 Jay Sears 386-867-1613
Hallmark Real Estate. 3br/2ba
new roof & AC. Comes w/SWMH
& 30x30 steel bldg. Completely
fenced. MLS# 76752
$179,900 Jay Sears 386-867-1613
Just Reduced 3/2 home, inside city
limits, fenced backyard, detached
carport w/office MLS#77411
$79,900 Call R.E.O.Realty,
@ 386-243-8227 Make Offer!
Just Reduced 4/2 on 1.57 acres,
fireplace. partially fenced, MLS#
77412, Call Nancy Rogers at
R.E.O. Realty Group
386-243-8227 $64,900
Lg. 4/3 family home. 16x20
screened porch, workshop. 4.5 ac.
fenced/cross fenced MLS 74339
$229,900. N Fla Homeland Realty
Darlene Hart 386-288-2878
Lg. home on 1 ac. Granite floors
throughout. 4br/2ba. Nice open
kitchen & Florida room. $148,000
MLS 77292 Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty 386-397-3473
Like New. 3br/2ba on 3 ac. New
kitchen cabinets, counters, carpet
& more. $179,900 MLS#77372
Charlie Sparks 386-755-0808
Westfield Realty Group
LOTS OF UPGRADES!
Remodeled kitchen in this
2BR/1BA home $29,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #77505
Mayfield S/D, nice fenced in back
yard w/small lake behind property.
Very nice. $99,888
MLS 77092 Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty 386-397-3473
Neat as a pin! Split floor plan
. w/well manicured lawn. 10x12
storage shed. $129K MLS 77932
Darlene Hart 386-288-2878
N Fla Homeland Realty
Owner Finance. Custom built 3/2.5
10.8 ac. Granite, fireplace, vaulted
ceilings, surround sound. lanai,
gazebo. MLS 77382 Access Real-
ty. Patti Taylor $249K 623-6896
Remax Professionals Charming
w/manly upgrades. 3br/2ba. 2 mas-
ter suites. MLS# 76779, $105,000
Missy Zecher @ 386-623-0237
www.missyzecher.cdri .
Remax Professionals Motivated
seller. All brick family home
w/many upgrades. MLS# 78168,
$129,000 www.missyzecher.com
Missy Zecher 386-623-0237
Remax Professionals Spacious
home on comer lot. Private access
to Lake Jeffery. MLS# 77783,
$198,900 www.missyzecher.com
Missy Zecher @ 386-623-0237
Spacious 4/2 home on 1 ac. Split
floor plan. Great neighborhood.
Easy access to 1-75 $220K MLS
77859 Darlene Hart 386-288-2878
N Fla Homeland Realty
SPACIOUS home built in
1995 has 2BR/2BA & 1,636 SqFt
on 1 acre $89,900
DANIEL CRAPPS'AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #76887
Starter/Investment Home, 3/2 +
Bonus room on 1 acre, remodeled,
fenced MLS#77562 $99,900
Call Pam @ Remax
Professionals 386-303-2505
Well Maintained 3/2 on dead-end
street, quiet, country, close to
downtown $105,000 MLS#77800
Lisa Waltrip 386-365-5900
Westfield Realty Group
Well Maintained 3/2 w/open floor
plan,on 1/2 acre, fenced, shed
MLS# 78136 $134,900
Call Pam Beauchamp @ Remax
Professionals 386-758-8900

820A Farms &
U v Acreage
4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$69,900. $613mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com


Fifth Wheel
w/2 slide-outs, camp or
reside, good condition.
$5,000
Call
386-362-1826
Leave Message .


820 Farms &
O2 Acreage
4 acres, Wellborn, New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down, $39,900, $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
6.45 ac river front property in
White Springs, cloe to Big Shoals.
Covered shelter for entertaining.
MLS# 77417 $124,888 386-243-
8227 R.E.O. Realty Group, Inc
Bring the horses. Peaceful &
ready for your home. Convenient
location. $38,000 MLS#76264
Millard Gillen 386-365-7001
Westfield Realty Group
FARM- 7 stall barn, Apt.
17+ acres cross fenced.
Close in $950. mo.
386-961-1086
Half to ten acre lots. Some w/
well, septic, pp. We finance; low
dwn pmt. Deas Bullard Properties.
386-752-4339. www.landnfl.com
Look at all the Upgrades
s Completely remodeled.
$106,500 MLS#77483
Brodie Alfred 386-623-0906
Westfield Realty Group
Pretty piece of land. 2 acres close
to interstate 75 for under 20K.
Mobile Homes or residential ok.
MLS# 77400 Call 386-243-8227
R.E.O. Realty Group, Inc

83O Commercial
830 Property
Great Investment/Owner Finance
1400 sq ft building on 2 acres
Creative terms, owner flexible.
CLose to 1-75. 386-867-1190
Hallmark Real Estate. Commer-
cial Business Location on South
Main w/offices & service bldg.
Frontage, warehouse & storage
MLS#76280 Janet Creel 623-1973
Prime Commercial Location.
Just across from plaza. Frontage
on Baya w/2 curbcuts. $350,000
MLS# 77485 Call 386-243-8227
R.E.O.Realty Group, Inc

951 Recreational
5 Vehicles
1996 33ft Fifth Wheel
w/2 slideouts. camp or
reside. Good cofnd. $5,000.
386-362-1826. Leave message.


.. ..i..

TUontact us, C


at te paper,


tj
!; Z ,


2006 EF250
Ford Van
3/4 ton, metal work
shelves/ladder rack,
60K miles, exc. cond.

$10,500
Call
386-555-5555
If you don't sell your vehicle
during the first 10 days, you
can run the same vehicle ad
for 10 additional days for
only $15.00
Terms and conditions remain the
same for the additional run.

To et ou
Vehicle Sol,* al
Mar orBrige
(386) 55-544


...to never miss a day's
worth of all the
Lake City Reporter
has to offer:
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To subscribe call
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^^ ^ ^ 1


NativeRealtorWayne.com
Wayne Lowthorp
(954) 648-1919

3/2 DW, SR 47, 1/2 AC, 64,900
3/2 DW, SR 47, 1/2 AC, 55,900
3/2 DW, SR 47, 1/2 AC, 64,900
3/2 MH, 1 ACRE, 69,900
16 ACRES, AGR, 69,900
3/2 DW, 5 ACRE, 99,900
Coral Shores Realty




ON WHEELS & WATERCRAFT r;


Bring the picture in or
we will take it for you!
* Ad runs 10 consecutive days
with a description and photo in the
newspaper and online E-edition.
* Ad runs 10 consecutive days as a
classified line ad online.
* You must include vehicle price.
* All ads are prepaid.
* Private party only.


REPORTER Classifieds,

In Print and On Line
www.lakecityreporter.com


Classified Department: 755-5440











LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS TUESDAY, JUNE 7, 2011


Childress fined $150,000 for altercation


By JENNA FRYER
Associated Press

CHARLOTTE, N.C.
- Richard Childress was
fined $150,000 on Monday
for assaulting Kyle Busch,
the latest incident in an
ongoing feud between
NASCAR's most polarizing
driver and Childress' race
teams.
NASCAR also placed
Childress on probation
through the end of the
year, finding the team
owner solely at fault for
Saturday's incident at
Kansas Speedway. The 65-
year-old grandfather appar-
ently approached Busch
after the Trucks race,
placed him in a headlock,
and punched him several
times.
. "We feel this action is
appropriate and are confident
all parties involved under-
stand our position on this
matter and will move forward


appropriately," NASCAR said
in a statement
Childress, who dodged a
suspension from NASCAR,
was upset that Busch had
bumped into Joey Coulter
on the cool-down lap after
the race.
He said in a statement
that he accepts the penalty,
but he did not apologize for
his actions.
"First of all, I'm respon-
sible for my actions, plain
and simple," he said. "As
you know, I am a very prin-
cipled person and have a
passion for what we do at
Richard Childress Racing.
I believe passionately in
defending my race teams
and my sponsor partners.
In this instance, I let that
passion and my emotions
get the best of me.
"I accept the penalty
NASCAR announced
today and, as a company,
we will now focus on this
week's races at Pocono


Raceway and Texas Motor
Speedway."
Its not clear what proba-
tion means in relation to
Childress as a car owner.
Generally considered to be
nothing more than a slap on
the wrist, NASCAR chairman
Brian France defined proba-
tion last month as "a different
set of eyes and expectations"
for drivers, adding they
would have limited flexibility
on the race track.
For Childress, it could
only mean he must stay
away from Busch for the
rest of the year.
Busch and Kevin
Harvick, RCR's top driver,
have feuded on and off
for years, and the tension
was reignited last month
after a race at Darlington.
A move by Busch late in
the race caused Harvick to
wreck with teammate Clint
Bowyer, and Harvick tried
to express his displeasure
after stopping his car in


front of Busch on pit road
after the race.
Harvick tried to punch
Busch while Busch was still
seated in his car, but Busch
instead rammed Harvick's
car out of the way so he
could drive off Harvick's car
turned into the pit road wall.
Both Busch and Harvick
were fined $25,000 each for
the incident, and placed on
probation through June 15.
But it was apparently the
final straw for Childress,
who let it be known he
would not tolerate Busch
damaging any more RCR
equipment. So after racing
Coulter hard in the closing
laps at Kansas on Saturday,
Busch bumped into the 21-
year-old on the cool-down
lap, presumably to show
his displeasure over some-
thing Coulter had done
during the race.
The act is fairly common
in racing, and likely hap-
pens between two drivers


following every event.
Still, it appeared to be the
final straw for Childress,
who according to some
reports, removed his watch
and handed it to grand-
son Austin Dillon before
approaching Busch.
"I wonder if Pop Pop
will get a senior citizen dis-
count on his fine?" Dillon
posted on his Twitter
page after the penalty was
announced.
NASCAR met individu-
ally Sunday morning with
Busch, his team owner
Joe Gibbs, and Chi"dress,
before announcing that
Busch played no role in
the altercation and was ndt
at fault for anything that
occurred. All the blame
was placed on Childress,
who was allowed to stay
for Sunday's race because
NASCAR determined his
four-car organization would
be without leadership if the
owner was kicked out.


FSU beats Alabama 11-1


in NCAA regional game


Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE After
winning the program's 27th
regional title Monday, the
Seminoles will play host to
a Super Regional for the
fourth straight season.
"It feels normal, I guess,"
senior pitcher/outfielder
Mike McGee said.
McGee and Scott Sitz
combined on a five-hit-
ter and Florida State had
a season-high 19 hits as
the Seminoles defeated
Alabama 11-1 to win the
Tallahassee Regional
Monday afternoon.
McGee (4-3) allowed
just two hits through five
innings before yielding a
solo home run to Taylor
Dugas to lead off the sixth
on Sunday night.
But then rain and light-
ning postponed the game
until Monday. Florida State
was leading 8-1 in the top
of the sixth when play was
halted.
Sitz then pitched four
scoreless innings to earn
his first save of the sea-
son as Florida State (45-17)
needed just 49 minutes on
Monday to advance to play
host to a Super Regional
against the Texas A&M-
Arizona winner.
A sophomore right-
hander, Sitz worked quick-
ly, striking out three bat-
ters and generating easy
ground balls.
Sitz admitted that he lost
sleep Sunday night despite
the fact that he would be
pitching with a seven-run
lead.
"It's hard to blow a
seven-run lead," Sitz said.
"I didn't really have any
pressure."
Coach Mike Martin, who
is in his 32nd season at
Florida State, said he was
also nervous about waiting
to play the conclusion of
the game.
"I don't know when I've
spent a night in 32 years
in which I was as anxious
because of the fear of los-
ing an 8-1 lead," Martin
said. "That was a very anx-
ious moment for me but I
am very, very pleased at
the way we played."
The Seminoles are still
in search of the program's
first College World Series


title, but they have been
dominant in the regional
round. FSU has reached
the Super Regional round
10 times in the 12 years
since the format was intro-
duced in 1999.
And in the win over
Alabama, FSU enjoyed its
best game at the plate this
season as seven Seminoles
had multi-hit games.
Taiwan Easterling went 4
for 4 with two runs scored,
McGee went 3 for .5 with


three doubles and Jayce
Boyd had a home run, dou-
ble and two RBIs.
Regional MVP James
Ramsey went 3 for 4 with
two runs scored. He has
reached base in 51 straight
games.
Dugas had two of the five
hits for Alabama (35-28).
Adam Windsor (3-3) took
the loss for the Tide.
'This was a rebuilt team,"
Alabama coach Mitch
Gaspard said.


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,. rIm not algning
one letter to each square, I forthat. It' no good
to form four ordinary words. I to me broken.


I Z Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon,'

Answer here:
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterda'sI Jumbles: DERBY UNIFY MARKET DELUXE
I Answer: When they climbed up to see his new fort, it
created a FAMILY TREE


Due to client expansion Sitel is adding
130 Positions in Lake City
Sitel will be hosting an on-site
Job Fair on Tuesday, June 7 at , i
the SiteL facility. AppLicants
interested in joining the
Lake City team are '
encouraged to come by the
site on June 7 at 11:00 a.m
2:00 p.m. or 6:00 p.m. ET.


Adoption

PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? A
childless energetic, spiritual, committed couple seeks
to adopt. Financially secure. Healthcare professionals.
Expenses paid. Gil & Dave (888)580-ADOPT (2367).
FL Bar#0150789

Business Opportunities

Investors Outstanding and immediate returns in'
equipment leasing for frac industry. Immediate lease
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equipment! (800)491-9029

Equipment For Sale

SAWMILLS -Band/Chainsaw -SPRING SALE
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Financial Services


CASH NOW! Cash for your structured settlement or
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$$$ ACCESS LAWSUIT CASH NOW!!! $$$ As
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Help Wanted

ASAP! New Pay Increase! 34-46 cpm. 300 Newer
Trucks. Need 2 months CDL-A Driving Exp (877)258 '
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Driver-Drivers .choose from Weekly or Daily
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Drivers Earn Up to 39/mi HOME SEVERAL
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CDL-A DRIVERS. Central Florida company
seeks Solo & Team Drivers. Tank and Dry Van
positions offering some regional. lyr OTR & Good
MVR required. (877)882-6537 or apply www.
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Land for Sale

LAND SALE STEINHATCHEE, FL 10 Acres
$39,900 $900 Down, $326/Mo. Great Hunting/
Fishing. Near Gulf and River. Call (352)542-7835
cell: (352)356-1099


Miscellaneous


ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home.
*Medical, *Business, *Paralegal, *Accounting,
*Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance.
Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. Call
(888)203-3179, www.CenturaOnline.coin

AIRLINES ARE HIRING Train for high paying
Aviation Career. FAA approved program. Financial
aid if qualified ; Job placement assistance. CALL
Aviation Institute of Maintenance (877)741-9260.

Mortgages

Access Reverse Mortgage! Florida-based:
Application & closing in your home. Experience:
almost 1,000 reverse mortgages funded. Award-
winning customer service. BBB A rating. NMLS
#4566. 1(800)806-7126


Real Estate


NC mountain property must go. 4.5 acres with,
outstanding views and privacy. $25,000 OBO, great
for home or cabin. (828)394-9298. Ask for Richard

DEVELOPER FORCED LIQUIDATION Smoky
Mtn. Lake Property Priced @ Foreclosure/Short sale,
Up to 100% Finaricing/5% interest. Hurry-Only 30
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Schools & Instruction,

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connected online. Attend college on your own time.
Job placement assistance. Computer available.
Financial Aid if qualified. Call (800)481-9409 www.
CenturaOnline.com I

Heat & Air JOBS Ready'to work? 3 week
accelerated program. Hands on environment.
Nationwide certifications and Local Job Placement
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PageEdior:Branon inly, 74-020'


USC

stripped!

oftitde

Associated Press

The Bowl Championship
Serieshas strippedSouther4
California of its 2004 title
and will leave that season
without a BCS champion. f
The announcement
Monday is no surprise.
BCS officials had sai4
USC was in danger of hav-
ing its championship vacat-
ed after the Trojans were hit
with heavy NCAA sanctions
last year for rules violations
committed during the 2004'
and '05, seasons.
USC appealed the sanc.
tions, which included a two|
year ban from postseasoru
play and a loss of 30 schol-
arships over three seasons;,
and the BCS waited until
the NCAA ruled on the
appeal to make a decision
about its championship.