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The Lake City reporter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01574
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 6/5/2011
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01574
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text








Season's Best
Lake Oty Reporter
Athletes of the Year.
000018 120511 ****3-DIGIT 326
LIB OF FLORIDA HISTORY
PO BOX 11700'7
205 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-1943


it's only a drill
Mock attack on school
set for Monday.
Inside, 5A


TODAY'S



ll.e 5it R11 pr r .
JUNE 5,2011


i evity


Reporter


Sunday, June 5, 2011


www.lakecityreporter.com


Vol. 137, No. 114 N $1.00


Crash


claims


a life

Passenger killed
in early morning
accident Saturday.
From staff reports
A Lake City woman died in a
crash early Saturday morning in
Columbia County, according to
Florida Highway Patrol reports.
Tracy Russell Wurmnest, 40,
died at the scene of the crash,
which took place at the intersec-
tion of CR 252A and CR 252 at
approximately 1:25 a.m.
Wurmnest was a passenger in
a 1989 Dodge Pickup driven by
Glen Fleming, 41, of Lake City. Her
seatbelt was not in use, reports
show.
Fleming was traveling south on
CR 252A and approached the inter-
section of CR 252, according to the
release. He reportedly failed to
stop and ran through the intersec-
tion.
The vehicle exited the south
shoulder of the roadway as a result,
and the front right side struck
a tree. The truck stopped facing
west
Wurmnest was pronounced
dead at the scene by paramedics.
Fleming had minor injuries and
charges are pending,, according to
the FHE


Culture

on display

at library

By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
From tasting mochi to making
matryoshka paper dolls, families
spent the afternoon on a mini world
tour during a cultural fair Saturday
at the Columbia County Library
Main Branch.
The event was the kick-off for
the Summer Reading Program,

CULTURE continued on 5A


.18th annual event
draws 5,000-plus to
Wellborn. Perfect
weather didn't hurt.
By ANTONIA ROBINSON
aroblnson@/lakecityreporter.com ,
.H is first time attend-
ing the Wellborn
Blueberry Festival
was an enjoyable
experience for
Brian Mathews of Wellborn.
"I've never been and wanted
to check itout," he said. "I love
it. Everything is different and I
like blueberries."
Mathews joined the crowds
at the 18th annual Blueberry
Festival Saturday.
Morefhan 5,000 people
attended the two-day event,
said Wendell Snowden,
Wellborn Community
Association president The
association hosts the festival
as not only a fundraiser but a
celebration of the blueberry
harvest.
"I can't believe the successful
turnout," he said. "It's beyond
what I imagined."
One festival-goer told him, "I


Photos by JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
TOP: Wendell Snowden, the Wellborn Community Association presjdent/Wellborn Blueberry Festival chair-,
man, and Pearl Turner organize blueberry products such as pies, cobblers, syrups and jams, muffins, can-
dies and ice creams Friday. ABOVE: Plump blueberries on the vine. ...


was born and raised here and
never seen this many people in
Wellborn," Snowden said.
The association has worked


, to build the festival up over
the last five years, he said.
Having the annual parade with
the Navy Southeast Marching


Band was a highlight last
year and the group returned
BLUEBERRY continued on 3A


Come July 4, the show

wll go on in Lake City

Fireworks shows have
been canceled in some
places. Not here. .. ..
By LEANNE TMO EP DiN
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com m E
A spectacular. fireworks dis-
play will once again be the focal
point of Lake City's Fourth of July
Celebration, set for downtown at
Lake DeSoto on Independence
Day.
The celebration event and the
fireworks show will be hosted by
FIREWORKS continued on 3A


Bridges named editor


From staff reports


Robert Bridges has been
named editor of the Lake City
Reporter, according to pub-
lisher Todd Wilson.
Bridges, former group edi-
tor of Live Oak Publications,
took over duties in thenhews-
room on Thursday.
"Robert is a passionate
newsman who has an excel-
lent track record of serving
readers in North Florida
communities," Wilson said.
"He is an editor who always
has the reader in mind and
he has a knack for finding
the interesting stories in com-
munities our size. I'm glad to
welcome him to our team at
the Lake City Reporter."


A longtime resident of
Live Oak, Bridges recently
relocated to Lake City. In his
previous
post, he
managed
editorial
operations
at the
Suwannee
Democrat,
Bridges j asper
News and
Mayo Free Press.
During his tenure, the
Suwannee Democrat was
named Newspaper of the
Year for 2010 in itA division
nationally by parent compa-
ny Community Newspaper
Holdings, Inc.
"I look forward to bring-


ing plenty of news to this com'.
munity," Bridges said. "I've
long admired the Lake City
Reporter and its hard-work-
ing staff. Beyond that, I look
forward to being an active
member of the Columbia
County community. This is
my home now, and I'm hqppy
to be here."
Bridges earned a bache-
lor's degree in English from
the University of Florida.
Besides Live Oak, he has
lived in Orange County,
Calif. During his career, he
has worked in several capaci-
ties in journalism as both a
reporter and an editor. He
has also worked in sales and
taught at both the high school
and university level.


I1 I1464 0002 8


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400


9669
Mostly Sunny ..
WEATHER, 2A


Opinion ................
Obituaries ..............
Life ....................
Around Florida,-..........
Puzzles .................


TODAY IN
BUSINESS
Ne.,. market
coming.


COMING
TUESDAY
City council
meeting coverage.


BLUE SKIES FOR




BLUEBERRY FEST


^^*^'ir Il













LAKE CITY REPORTER SUNDAY REPORT SUNDAY, JUNE 5, 2011


N .$H3e : ^ FLORIDA

Friday: Friday: Saturday: Saturday: Wednesday: Wednesday:
10-37-39-42 9 2-4-6-7-16 Afternoon: 3-8-4 Afternoon: 3-9-1-3 8-14-15-34-41-42 8-18-38-46-56 31
Evening: Unavailable Evening: Unavailable


AROUND FLORIDA




Boy, 12, charged with first-degree murder


JACKSONVILLE-
A 12-year-
old boy in
Jacksonville
has been
charged with
first-degree murder in
the death of his 2-year-old
half brother.
State Attorney Angela
Corey says a grand jury
indicted the boy ofn
Thursday. Corey .said
the case poses questions
about public safety that
.would be best decided in
Sthe adult court system,.
so the boy will be trans-
ferred from a juvenile
holding facility where he
has been held for months
to the Duval County jail,'
where he will be held
with other juveniles. It
also' means the boy faces
a life sentence if con-
victed.
The boy is charged
with beating the toddler
to death in March at
Sthe family's apartment.
Assistant Public Defender
Rob Mason says the boy
is a victim of sexual bat-
tery and other family
turmoil. Mason says the
defense team believes the
boy can be rehabilitated.

Accused baby
killer arrested'
FORT WALTON


BEACH A man accused
of killing a 6-month-
old baby in the Florida
Panhandle has been
arrested in Alabama and is
awaiting extradition.


ASSOCIATED PRESS

Spelling Bee semifinalist'
Grace Remmer, 12, from Jacksonville spells her word during the semifinals of the National
Spelling Bee, in National Harbor, Md., Thursday.


Fort Walton Beach
police say. Charles Lenear
Colvin Jr. was arrested
Thursday in Opp, Ala.
The 24-year-old is
charged with murder in
the death of Xavier Boyd
on Feb. 9.
According to a police
report, Colvin told police
the baby had choked on
some formula and stopped
breathing. The baby died


at a Pensacola hospital.
A medical examiner con-
cluded the baby died from
blunt force trauma to the
back of his head.
Fort Walton Beach
police say Colvin fled after
an arrest warrant was
issued April 21.
Police spokesman Rick -
* Hord says investigators
recently received tips that
Colvin was in Alabama.


Former FBI chief
finishes review
MIAMI--A retired FBI
chief says he doesn't consid-
er a string of fatal shootings
by Miami police officers to
be a drastic increase from
previous years.
Paul Philip is the former
head of the FBI's Miami
office. The city hired him
in Jantiary to review Police


Chief Miguel Exposito's '
performance and depart-
ment policies.
Philp's report notes
that Exposito is due to
retire and recommends
the-city start looking
for his replacement He
did not say whether the
fatal shootings of seven
black suspects over seven
months were justified.
City Manager Tony
Crapp says the report will
help .the police department
move forward. Mayor
Tomas Regalado says the
report "sends a message
to the troops that there
will be changes."
Exposito said .concerns
cited in the report will be
discussed with Crapp.

Teacher won't
be charged
.BROOKSVILLE -
Prosecutors say they won't
charge a Tampa Bay-area
high school teacher who
punched a student in an
incident caught on another
student's cell phone video
camera.
The state attorney's office
in Brooksville, north of,
Tampa, said this week that
the video does not provide
conclusive evidence that
64-year-old Sandra Hadsock
was not acting in self-
defense when she swung
at a student who called
her vulgar names. She was
arrested after the incident
last month.
Prosecutor Brian Trehy
said students who wit-


nessed the incident said the
teen made contact first and
the teacher was respond-
ing to that Hadsock landed
at least one punch on the
student's face.
The 22-year veteran
teacher said she hopes
she'll be allowed to return
to the classroom, but it's
still unclear if that will hap-
pen.

770-pound woman
to get new home
LAKEIAND-- A 770-
pound woman who had
to be extracted from her
apartment for medical care
will be getting a new home,
thanks to an anonymous
donor.
Because of Yvonne
Gallimore's size, medical
crews tore through a wall
of her Section 8 apartment
May 19 to transport her
to an area hospital to be
treated for lymphedema,
a condition that prevents
bodily fluid from draining. ,
Gallimore's apartment
wasn't livable afterward.
An anonymous donor has
agreed to work with Habitat
for Humanity to come up
with a plan for building
Gallimore a new home.
A spokeswoman for
Lakeland Habitat for
Humanity says the mys-
terious donor is suppos-,
edly a relation of a wealthy
Florida business family
with millions of dollars
behind their name.

E Associated Press


PEOPLE IN THEa NEWS



Rat Pack-era casino closes


LAS VEGAS
Now that the Sahara
hotel-casino is closed
in Las Vegas after 59
years, everything must
go.
The owners of the Rat Pack-era
casino are planning a liquidation
sale of all items inside the property.
exactly one month after closing the
casino's doors.
Things for sale include the casi-
no's poker room sign, bedroom fur-
nishings and chandeliers in several
shapes and sizes.
The sale set to begin June 16
is being organized by Ohio-based
National Content Liquidators, a firm
that ran previous liquidation sales for
other casinos.
Company spokeswoman Meredith
Lunsford said she expects the sale to
attract nostalgic fans and commercial
buyers interested in things like esca-
lators and restaurant equipment.
"You've got people from all over
wanting to take home a piece of his-
tory," Lunsford said.
Owner SBE Entertainment has not
yet detailed its plans for the property
on the north end of the Las Vegas
Strip.
The Sahara is remembered for
attracting big celebrities in its hey-
day, where nightly lounge acts set.
standards for other casinos that
opened later. Don Rickles and Louis
Prima were regulars, while Sonny
and Cher and Judy Garland also took
the stage.

Rihanna defends video,
says victims need a voice
NEW YORK-- Rihanna is defend-
. ing her latest music video, which
opeffs with a man being shot in the
head.
"Man Down," which premiered
Tuesday on BET, is a song about a
girl who shoots her abuser in pub-
Slic. The video also portrays sexual
assault.
On Wednesday, the Parents
*Television Council called the clip
"disturbing" and asked BET to stop
airing it.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
This file photo shows the marquee of the Sahara Hotel and Casino on the Las
Vegas Strip.


But on Thursday's "106 & Park,"
BETs music video countdown show,
Rihanna said the video is "art with a
message."
"We just wanted to hone in on a
very serious matter that people are
afraid to address, especially if you've
been victimized in this scenario,"
Rihanna said.

Kid ready to Rock
Detroit baseball park
DETROIT Kid Rock stormed
a Detroit riverfront beach with
friends by paddleboard Thursday to
announce a hometown concert at the
city's baseball park this summer.
Rock, Detroit Red Wings captain
Nicklas Lidstrom and retired Red


Wings defenseman Chris Chelios
used paddleboards to cross the
Detroit River to Belle Isle. A bare-
footed Rock then '"
S strolled to a beach-
front microphone
and lectern and
said during a news
conference that
he'd be playing
Comerica Park
Rock Aug. 12 with open-
ing act Sammy
Hagar and the Wabos.
The hit-making rocker said he
decided to combine both activities
after Chelios called him a day earlier
and asked if he wanted to go paddle-
boarding..

* Associated Press


Celebrity Birthdays


* Guitarist Fred Stone of
Sly and the Family Stone
is 65.
* Saxophonist Kenny G is
55.-
* Actor Ron ULivingston is 44.


* Singer Brian McKnight
is 42. '
* Actor-singer Mark Wahl-
berg is 40.
* Actress Navi Rawat
("Numb3rs") is 34.


Daily Scripture


"Yours, LORD, is the great-
ness and the power and the
glory and the majesty and
the splendor, for everything
in heaven and earth is yours.
Yours, LORD, is the kingdom;
you are exalted as head over
-all."


- 1 Chronicles 29:11 NIV


Lake City
HOW TO REACH US
Main number........(386) 752-1293
Fax number...............752-9400
Circulation ..............755-5445
Online... www.lskecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter,; an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Ra. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Ra.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein Is property of the Lake
City Reporter- Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Ra. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson .....-754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
Editor Robert Bridges .... 754-0428
(rbridges@lakecityreportet.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Ashley Butcher ...754-0417
(abutcher@lakecityreporter.com)
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440


Reporter

BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 630 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7:30
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
10.30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation ..............755-5445
(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12Weeks .................. $26.32
24 Weeks ...................$48.79
52 Weeks ...................$83.46
Rates include 7% sales tax.
Mall rates
12 Weeks .................. $41.40
24 Weeks...................$82.80
52 Weeks .................. $179.40


CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion,
please call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifica-
tions will run in this space. And thanks for reading.


Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424















Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, JUNE 5, 2011


FIREWORKS: The show will go on

Continued From Page 1A


the Lake City/Columbia
County Chamber of
Commerce, with the Lake
City Reporter as the event's
title sponsor.
A variety of musical
performers will provide
entertainment at the event
beginning at 5 p.m. and
kids' games hosted by First
Baptist Church will also
begin at 5.
The fireworks display
will begin at 9:20 p.m.,
lasting approximately 30
minutes and ending with a
grand finale, said Dennille
Folsom, Chamber execu-
tive director.
Todd Wilson, Lake City
Reporter publisher, said
the newspaper is excited
to again partner with. the
Chamber in helping to
provide the annual holiday
celebration in Columbia
County, especially when
other larger cities are can-
celing their fireworks dis-
plays.
"There's nothing more
American than watching
fireworks on the Fourth of
July," he said, "and once
again we're honored to


partner with the Chamber
of Commerce to be the title
sponsor of this year's cel-
ebration.
"Many cities much larger
than Lake City are cancel-
ing their fireworks shows,
but once again, the busi-
ness community and local
government has rallied
around this event to pre-
serve it," Wilson said. "Tu'e
25,000 people who will visit
downtown for the fireworks
will not be disappointed in
the quality of this show
over Lake DeSoto."
Folsom agreed that the
. community's business sup-
port of the Independence
Day celebration has been
strong to keep the event
alive.
"So many local towns,
Gainesville being one of
them," Folsom said, "have
eliminated their Fourth of
July just because of budget
reasons. So Lake City is
really one of the local areas
that is still hosting this cele-
bration and that's the point,
because all of the business
support we've got here in
town has stepped up and


helped us put it on."
Harvey Campbell,
Columbia County Tourist
Development Director,
formerly coordinated the
July 4th fireworks event
with the former Downtown
Action Corporation and
was instrumental in seek-
ing and obtaining donations
to help purchase the fire-
works. For the fireworks
event, Campbell continues
to assist the Chamber in
the same capacity.
Fireworks are an
Independence Day tradi-
tion, Folsom said, and the
Fourth of July Celebration
as a whole is a way to com-
memorate the holiday as a
community.
"It's just an all-around
good day that we can get
together to celebrate our
community and our nation's
independence," she said.
Vendor booth spaces are
available for staging around
Lake DeSoto during the
event. For more informa-
tion on purchasing a vendor
space, call the Chamber at
(386) 752-3690.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Lake City resident Angela Glover (from left) and Lisa Eaking, of Ft. Lauderdale, visit a vendor
while attending the 18th annual Wellborn Blueberry Festival Friday. 'I'm having a wonderful
time,' Eaking said.


BLUEBERRY: Festival draws thousands

Continued From Page 1A


Osceola National Forest

to get federal funds for

environmental education


By TONY BRITr
tbritt@lakecityreporter.comr

A pavilion designed to
serve as an educational
building will be erected on
Osceola National Forest
property in Baker County
with federal funding.
Columbia and Baker
County officials are slated
to receive $120,000 from
the U.S. Forestry Service
for an Osceola Safety and
Environmental Education
project in the Osceola
National Forest
The federal funding is a
portion of $750,000 that will
come to Florida for projects
recommended by a citizens
committee to benefit the
three National Forests in
the state. The Apalachicola,
Osceola and Ocala National
Forests are in Florida.
Denise Rains, U.S. Forest
Service public affairs offi-
cer for the National Forests
in Florida, said this is the
first time the funding has
been disbursed to the
counties. The funding is
from the Secure Rural
Schools legislation.
"It's actually four
years of funding and we
put together a resource
advisory committee that
looked at applications for
projects," Rains said, not-
ing the committee mem-
bers had to be approved
by the U.S. Secretary of
Agriculture. "The way
that its set up is that
the Resource Advisory
Committee would work
on those projects in col-
laboration with the U.S.
Forest Service."
The Resource.
Advisory Committee
is a 15-member board
that reviewed the appli-
cation. There are three
representatives from
Columbia County on
the committee, the larg-


BELK.COM


est number of any county,
Rains said.
The U.S. Forest
Service, in conjunction
with Columbia and Baker
County officials, plan to
develop a curriculum for
environmental education
that would teach people
about the forest and what
resources are there, includ-
ing endangered species,
plants and animals, as well
as recreational opportuni-
ties.
"The U.S. Forest Service
is going to develop the
curriculum and we have
people that are experts in
environmental education
that we're going to use to
develop the curriculum,"
Rains said. "The money
that has been established
is really for developing the
curriculum and establish-
ing a place on the Osceola
National Forest where
the education would take


place."
Officials are planning to
construct a pavilion on U.S.
Forest Service property
near Ocean Pond, where
the program's curriculum
will be taught as part of
summer camps.
The timeframe for the
project has not yet been
completed, but Rains said
officials are starting work
on the project
"They want to try to get it
ready, at least for next year,
for the summer camps,"
she said. "Probably this
year would be too soon for
summer camps, but they're
going to start working on it
right away."
All the counties in the
state that have national for-
ests within their boundaries
. receive a payment under
the Secure Rural Schools
Legislation.

OSCEOLA continued on 5A


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Saturday. A new parade
addition was a Shriners
group performing in their
mini cars.
"We've built the parade
up where people want to
be in it," Snowden said.
Maria Cress of Branford
enjoyed the parade, espe-
cially the Navy Southeast
Marching Band, she said.'
The festival provided activ-
ities for families to enjoy
for relatively little money.
Everyone looks forward
to the festival, Cress said.
"It's very nice and very
well done," she said. "It's a
good festival."
Items at the country
store went quickly dur-
ing the festival and were
expected to sell out,


* Painting
* Pottery
* Gardening
* Stained Glass
* Leather Works

& More!


Snowden said.
The festival wouldn't be
such a big success without
the volunteers that help
put it together, he said.
They spend all day work-
ing the festival.
"We do all this with 30
people," Snowden said.
"I owe them all one big
thanks."
The volunteers' hard
work has paid off over the
years for the festival.
"We can tell it's grown
over time," said Pam
Christy of Wellborn.
This was her third time
visiting the festival which
helps bring diversity to the
community, she said. This
year was just as enjoyable as
past ones and had an added


bonus clear skies.
"I'm glad it didn't rain,"
Christy said. "The few I've
been to rained."
Faye Roberts of Live
Oak came to the festival
-with her daughters and
grandchildren.
She enjoyed seeing the
different arts and crafts
Sand picking out accesso-
ries for her granddaughter
who will be participating
in an Independence Day
pageant.
"You know how grand-
mothers are," Roberts
said.
The festival provides an
opportunity for the com-
munity to come together
and fellowship with each
other, she said.


Susmp for Joy!





Iur e Idventure *
Rrt Workshops


Explore a new workshop
S.adventure each week.
To register call 386-397-1920
Space is limited to small groups ages 6 to 15.

S$5 per class plus park admission fee.
Classes Now Open until July 21st

Stephen Foster Folk Culture Center State Park
11016 Lillian Saunders Drive / Hwy 41
White Springs, Florida 32096
877-635-3655 / 386-397-2733
Admission -- $5rida0 per car at Ranger Station ate
Admission -- $5.00 per car at Ranger Station Gate


+S T A T F PAR K


MODERN. SOUTHERN. STYLE.




MODERN. SOUTHERN. STYLE.


TueS., June 7
Customers 55 and older






1 'ek sale & clearance
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i In store only'
with any other form of payment
xn O sale & clearance
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going on now!


Your Gift includes:
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Make summer last and last with your choice of
moisturizer in a 14-day supply, the season's best ,
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excludes Red Dot, Earlybirds, Night Owls, Doorbusters, Bonus Buys, Everyday Values, Alegria, Assets, b.tempt'd, BCBG, Ladies' Better
Swimwear, Brighton, Buffalo, Burberry, Cosmetics/Fragrances, Casio, Coach, Dansko, designer sunglasses, Donna Karan/DKNY, Ed
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Stuart Weitzman, Citizens of Humanity, Cole Haan, Columbia, Donald J Pliner. Dooney & Bourke, Ferragamo, Furla, Joe's Jeans, Juicy
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Austin Reed, Levi's, Dockers, Lilly Pulitzer, Mattel, Merrell, Munro, Nautica. Original Penguin, Ben Sherman, Ralph Lauren/Polo, Seven
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lease depts. and Belk gift cards. Not valid on prior purchases or special orders Cannot be redeemed for cash, credit or refund, used
in combination with any other discount or coupon offer. Valid June 7, 2011


OB/QYN

SDANA WGREENE, MD
* WOMEN S HEALTH WITH A WOMAN S TOUCH


" " iir i, .f: -r,, '.: l


I


LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, JUNE 5, 2011


Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424














OPINION


Sunday, June 5, 2011


www.lakecityreporter.com


AN
OPINION


Proud,


of losing


$14B

Ift's a sign of grim times
indeed when the Obama
administra tion is touting
a potential $14 billion
loss to the taxpayers as a
great economic success.
The White House is running
on its auto bailouts as coura-
geous acts that saved the indus-
trial Midwest It's a telling point
of pride. In bragging about the
bailouts of GM and Chrysler,
the administration is boasting
of a process shot through with
lawlessness and political favorit-
ism not to mention reckless
disregard for taxpayer dollars.
The administration believes
it trumps all criticism with one
data point GM and Chrysler
are still with us. GM has even
been making money, and had
the biggest IPO in American
history last November.
,Yet, as The Atlantic's Megan
McArdle tartly observes, it
shouldn't have been in doubt
that if government threw $80
billion at two companies, not
expecting to get all of it back, it
could save them. She points out
that the loss from the bailouts
(the administration's estimate is
$14 billion) will be close to the
entire market capitalization of
GM in 2007. It will be several
times as big as the company's
2008 market capitalization.
McArdle figures-that, at a
cost of roughly $10 billion to
$20 billion, we might as well
have given GM's pre-bankrupt-
cy workforce of 75,000 hourly
workers $250,000 each and -
called it a day.
The government has also
given GM a special tax break
that will save it $14 billion on
its US tax bill, and is trying
to induce consumers to buy
GM's signature new product,
the absurdly expensive electric
Chevy Volt, by giving them a
$7,500 tax credit on its $41,000,
sticker price.
With all this support, GM
should be the world's great-
est industrial concern. It's
hardly that, although it's
much improved. We can thank
Chapter 11, the tried-and-true
method for turning around
bankrupt companies that still
have value.
* N.Y. Post

,Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publishh distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
.This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Sue Brannon, controller
: Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman


LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per honth published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:


news@lakecityreporter.com


Colleges treat athletes,


academic stars unequally


any of America's
"prestigious"
big-time
colleges and
universities
will pay nearly anything to a
successful coach and offer full'
rides to outstanding athletes in
football and basketball, whether
they need it or not But getting
them to do the same for worthy
students based' on academics
seems to be quite another story.
On the other hand,
less-noticed institutions trying
to entice better-heeled, upper-
strata prep-school graduates are
willing to offer huge discounts
without considering need. It is
just another sordid chapter in
the annual admissions ritual,
in a system where a numbing
$50,000-plus annual price tag is
increasingly common.
Early in the application
process, a young lady I know
well whose high-school
grades, test scores and out-
of-classroom activities were
superlative was offered
$16,000 a year for four years to
attend a little-known school with
good accreditation. The money
could be applied to tuition,
room and board. The full cost
was $32,000, which her parents
could well afford.
She turned down the offer
to pick from four highly
rated schools, all of which
chose her for their honors
programs but failed to offer
any financial relief. Three
of these institutions are
extraordinarily difficult to get
into. One is among the nation's
most selective for out-of-state
students, rejecting students on
a par with the media-hyped Ivy
League institutions. All four


Germany's stunning
decision this week
to switch off nucle-
ar power by 2022
may prevent a polit-
ical meltdown for Chancellor
Angela Merkel and her party.
But for Germans, who live in
Europe's largest economy, it
will likely generate costs eco-
nomic, environmental, and even
geopolitical.
Pure and simple, politics drove
Chancellor Merkel to this unwise
policy reversal. She has ardently
supported nuclear power,
which generates 23 percent of
Germany's electricity. Earlier,
she had decided to extend the
life of Germany's atomic plants
until 2036, more than a decade
longer than a scheduled phaseout
agreed to in the previous center-
left government


Dan K.Thomasson
schools have sports programs
that provide even the wealthiest
players scholarships worth
$150,000 to $200,000 for four
years of eligibility.
And don't think the elite
Ivies, which long ago forewent
"athletic scholairhips," are
adverse to massaging their
strict standards when it comes
to soliciting athletes for their
favorite sports programs like'
lacrosse, rowing and soccer.
Young men and (especially)
women who have good records
in these activities frequently
get preference over those with
top grades and tests scores
and outside activities like band
or orchestra. A good friend
talked about his daughter, a
lacrosse player, being accepted
at Yale with a "little less grade
average." Another said that her
son, who is in a high-priced
Eastern prep school, is being
rushed a year before graduation
by nearly every Ivey League
school because of his hockey
skills. His grades are good but
not overwhelming.
So what do young students do
when faced with the prospect of
spending what a few years ago
would be an almost unheard-of
amount for a bachelor's degree,
even if their parents are willing
to sacrifice to make it happen?
Apparently, more and more of
them have come to realize that a


But when Japan's earthquake
and tsunami caused a partial
meltdown of nuclear reactors
at the Fukushima Daiichi plant
in March, that also triggered
earth-moving protests against
nuclear power in Germahy. In
local elections, the issue caused
Merkel's conservative Christian
Democrat party to lose political
control of a state that it had his-
torically dominated. Her nuclear
"nein, danke" now opens the
way to a possible coalition with
the popular Green party after
the next national election.
Since the calamity at
Fukushima, countries have
rightly launched safety reviews
of this energy industry. Given
the threat of global warming
and dependence on foreign oil,
the proper course is to update
and improve nuclear design


BA or B.S. degree doesn't have
to come from the top 50 schools
listed by U.S. News and World
Report, that many good schools
can provide the same education
without breaking the bank.
In the case of the first young
lady, she turned down the
extremely selective university
for one in her own state with
an equal reputation. "It doesn't
make much sense to spend
$30,000 a year more for the
same quality," she explained.
"If they had offered me an
academic grant for the honors
program, I would have gone
there in a heartbeat Instead,
they bombarded me with letters
urging me to reconsider. It
wasn't enough."
I have such a soft spot for
the rejected school that I would
have rushed to enroll, but her
decision was far wiser and
mature. She saw no reason to
put extra financial stress on
her parents, especially when
the quality of education was
not going to be diminished and
the degree earned would be as
prestigious.
It is, of course, a shame
that so many of our top-flight
institutions have failed to put
the same value on those who
excel in the classroom as they
do on those who do so on the
sporting fields. If there is an
honors program, all of those
who are selected for it should
receive some sort of relief
from high costs, whatever their
parents' income. I say that as
the father of three former full-
scholarship football players.
Dan K. Thomasson is former
editor of Scripps Howard News
Service.


and safety, not abandon a clean
energy source.
Most of the world appears
to agree with this, though Italy
and Switzerland have moved
away from plans for new plants.
Japan has abandoned its goal of
substantially increasing nuclear
power and scrapped plans for
14 plants an understandable
pause considering its location
in an extreme earthquake and
tsunami zone.
But even Japan is not dialing
down to zero in a decade. For
Germany, the costs are already
foreseeable:
Electricity prices are cer-
tain to rise as the government
pushes more expensive and less
reliable renewables to make up
for the nuclear gap.
* Christian Science Monitor


Star Parker
parker@urbancure.org


Why 2012

election

looks a lot

like 1860
.A s the season of
presidential politics
2012 unfolds, I'm
struck by similari-
ties between today
and the tumultuous period in
our history that led up to the
election of Abraham Lincoln
and then on to the Civil War.
So much so that I'm finding
it a little eerie that this year we
are observing the 150th anni-
versary of the outbreak of the
Civil War.
No, I am certainly not
predicting, God forbid, that
today's divisions and tensions
will lead to brother taking up
arms against brother.
But profound differences
divide us today, as was the
case in the 1850's.
-The difference in presiden-
tial approval rates between
Democrats and Republicans
over the course of the Obama
presidency and the last few
years of the Bush presidency
has been in the neighborhood
of 70 points. This is the most
polarized the nation has been
in modern times.
This deep division is driven,
as was the case in the 1850's,
by fundamental differences in
world-view regarding what this
country is about
Then, of course, the ques-
tion was can a country "con-
ceived in liberty', in Lincoln's
words, tolerate slavery.
Today the question is can a
country "conceived in liberty"
tolerate almost half its econo-
my consumed by government,
its citizens increasingly submit-
ting to the dictates of bureau-
crats, and wanton destruction
of its unborn children.
We wrestle today, as they
did then, with the basic ques-
tion of what defines a free
society.
It's common to hear that
"democracy" is synonymous
with freedom. We also com-
monly hear that questions
regarding economic growth
are separate and apart from
issues tied to morality so
called "social issues."
But Stephen Douglas, who
famously debated Abraham
Lincoln in 1858, argued both
these points. In championing
the idea of "popular sovereign-
ty" and the Kansas Nebraska
Act, he argued that it made
sense for new states to deter-
mine by popular vote whether
they would permit slavery.
By so doing, argued
Douglas, the question of slav-
ery would submit to what he
saw as the core American insti-
tution democracy and, by
handling the issue in this fash-
ion, slavery could be removed
as an impediment to growth of
the union.
Lincoln rejected submitting
slavery to the vote, arguing
that there are first ind invio-
lable principles of right and
wrong on which this nation
stands and which cannot be
separated from any issue,
including considerations of
growth and expansion.
The years of the 1850's saw
the demise of a major politi-
cal party the Whigs and
the birth of another the
Republican Party. And the
Democratic Party, in the elec-
tion of 1860, splintered into
two.

Star Parker is president of
CURE, Coalition
on Urban Renewal and Education
(www.urbancure.org) and author
of three books.


4A


ANOTHER OPINION

Germany's costly decision


to give up nuclear power


'-ATT
BCHI(













LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, JUNE 5, 2011


Relax, it's only a drill


Active shooter' scenario
will help show officials
how to respond to an
armed intruder at local
schools, should the
need arise. Don't worry,
the kids won't be there.

By LEANNE TYO
ltyo@lakecityreporter.com

Guns loaded with marking bullets
instead of live ammunition will be fired
at Pinemount Elementary when an actor
portraying an armed intruder "attacks"
the school in a realistic training exercise
Monday.
Thirty to 40 law enforcement mem-
bers and Columbia County Emergency
Medical Services responders, plus
Columbia County School District officials
' and faculty, will learn how to respond to
a potential crisis at a local school in the
Pinemount Elementary Active Shooter
Exercise.
"Ifs a chance for law enforcement to
test their abilities and test their plans for
how they would handle if an active shoot-
er was to infiltrate one of the schools,"
said Shayne Morgan, Columbia County
Emergency Management director and
exercise organizer. "Itll be the same
basic thing for EMS. Ifs a chance for
them to practice what they would do in
the event they were called to respond to
an active shooter incident"
Since school ended for summer break
Friday, students will not be present for
the exercise.
"We've scheduled the exercise after
school is out so we wouldn't interfere
with the regular school schedule,"
Morgan said. "There will be faculty
doing stuff on Monday during the drill."


Law enforcement and EMS training
will begin at 9 a.m. at the school. The
exercise itself will begin at 12:30 p.m.
and run to about 2 p.m.
Participating law enforcement agen-
cies will be the Florida Highway Patrol,
the Lake City Police Department and the
Columbia County Sheriffs Office.


The exer-
cise is provided
through a por-
tion of a U.S.
Department
of Homeland
Security grant
worth almost
$50,000 award-
ed to Columbia
Co u nty
Emergency
Management
this fiscal year,
Morgan said.
During the
exercise, an
actor will play
the role of an
armed invader
atthe school and


going off."
A number of volunteer actors will
be undergo a makeup treatment called
moulage so as to appear injured, Morgan
said. As victims are identified, they'll be
sent to the EMS responders, where the
responders will perform their proce-
dures, he said.


'You respond how you
practice,' said exer-
cise organizer Shayne
Morgan,'so. it's impor-
tant for them to get this
training. It's a controlled
scenario, but we try to
keep it with a realistic
touch so if an event like
this should happen, our
responders are as ready
as they can be.'


notification will be made of the shooter's
presence on the campus, Morgan said.
Law enforcement will then be sent in to
search for the shooter, he said, following
prescribed procedures.
"All of the law enforcement will be
pursuing the active shooter," Morgan
said.
The 'shooter and law enforcement
members will be using "simunitions"
during the exercise in place of live bul-
lets, Morgan said. According to Capt.
John Blanchard, LCPD public informa-
tion officer, simunitions are soft projec-
tiles that mark where they strike.
"I think its going to be ay very realistic
scenario," Morgan said, "because its my
understanding that when the simuni-
tions go off that ift'll be like its a real gun


Law enforce-
mentand EMS sce-
narios will occur
simultaneously,
Morgan said, with
law enforcement
practicing their
procedures to cap-
ture the shooter
and EMS practic-
ing response and
patient triage.
"You respond
how you practice,"
Morgan said, "so
its important for
them to get this
training. It's a con-
trolled scenario,
but we try to keep
it with a realistic


touch so if an event like this should hap-
pen, our responders are as ready as they
can be."
Dorothy Spradley, CCSD volunteer/
education marketing coordinator, willalso
act as the exercise's public information
coordinator, participating in mock inter-
views on the drill.
Morgan said the exercise will help pre-
pare all participants for such an event
"We want to make sure that should
something like this come our way, our
responders and personnel are ready and
trained for this type of event," he said.
Morgan wanted to make sure everyone
knows the event is only a drill, however.
"We just want everybody to be aware
that it is an exercise thafs going on
Monday," he said.


CULTURE: From Page 1A


runs until July 15.
The program's theme
is "One World, Many
Stories."
Displays for 13 differ-
ent countries featured
books, games, arts and
crafts and foods.
"(Tihe fair's) been
great," said Stephanie
Tyson, children's librar-
ian. "People have tasted
things they haven't tried
before."
Summer Reading
Program participants
must read two-and-a-
half hours each week
and track their prog-
ress with book logs.
The logs are available
at the library and can'
be turned in for prizes.
Her son, Dustin,
loves to read and will
be participating in the
program, said Jennifer
Connor, of Lake City.
The reading program
keeps students learning
despite school ending.
"Its an excellent way


to keep kids active in
reading during the sum-
mer," she said.
Each week the sum-
mer reading program
will feature a special
event in addition to
story times for all ages.
The next event is a
drawing workshop with
author Michael White
11 a.m. and 2 p.m.
Friday. The morning
session is at Fort White
Community Center and
the afternoon workshop
is at the Main Branch.
Call the library at 758-
2106.
Special events will
range from belly danc-
ing to tribal drumming,
and will broaden partici-
pants' horizons, Tyson
said.
Brenna Beckstine, 15,
of Lake City attended the
fair after hearing about it
from her mother.
"I (had) a really good
time," she said. "I learned
a lot of new things."


OSCEOLA: From Page 3A


"The counties
receive payment in lieu
of taxes payments and
that's .the funding they
get for having federal
lands 'that are taken
off the tax rolls," she
said. 'Then, the Secure
Rural Schools legisla-
tion was set up to help
fund schools and roads
in rural counties that


have national forests in
their boundaries."
The five Florida
counties with forests
within their boundaries
are Columbia, Baker,'
Marion, Wakulla and
Liberty.
The Osceola National
Forest occupies 85,345'
acres. in Columbia,
County.


Ruth Witt Larisey
Mrs. Ruth Witt Larisey, 89 of
Lake City passed away on Fri-
day, June 3, 2011 at the Avalon
Healthcare and Rehabilitation
Center in Lake City. A native
of Columbia County, Florida,
Mrs. Larisey was a daugh-
ter to the late John J. and Iva
Criswell Witt. Mrs. Larisey
was a graduate of Mason City
High School and along with her
husband, Bonnie Lee Larisey,
owned and operated "Record
City" in Jacksonville for many
years. After, they sold the store
they moved to their lake home
in Melrose before moving back
to Lake City in 1989. She en-
joyed gardening, traveling and
listening to gospel music. Mrs.
Larisey loved cooking country
and southern food to share with
her friends and family. She was
of the Baptist faith and a mem-
ber of Hopeful Baptist Church.
Mrs. Larisey was preceded in
death by one sister, Elsie Lee
Thompson, a son in law, Ray
Conner and one great-grand-
daughter, Brittany Shay Conner.
Mrs. Larisey is survived by her
husband of 72 years, Mr. Bon-
nie Lee Larisey, Lake City, one
daughter, Betty Larisey Con-
ner, Lake Charles, LA, one
sister, Iva Enoree Jones, Lake
City and three grandchildren,
Timothy Conner (Diane), Vin-
ton, LA, Eric Conner (Shan-
non), Lake Charles, LA and
Paula Conner Foley (Kyle),
Kingwood, TX. Nine great
grandchildren, Lauren, Grant,
Jordan and Zachery Conner
all of Lake Charles, LA, Ca-
leb Conner, Vinton, LA, Laura
Dougherty (Danny), Hunts-
ville, TX, Chase Domingue,


OBITUARIES

Lake Charles, LA and Con-
ner and Blake Foley, both of
Kingwood, TX and numerous
nieces and nephews also survive.
Funeral services for Mrs. Larisey
will be conducted on Tuesday,
June 7, 2011 at 11:00 AMlin the
Chapel of Guerry Funeral Home
with Rev. Ivan Clements officiat-
ing and assisted by Dr. Rodney
Baker. Interment will follow at
Bethlehem Lutheran Cemetery.
Visitation with the family will
be one hour prior to the service
from "10-11:00 AM on Tues-


day morning. In lieu of flow-
ers donations may be made to
the Bethlehem Lutheran Church
Fund or to the Hopeful Baptist
Church Youth Fund in memo-
ry of Mrs. Larisey. Arrange-
ments are under the direction
of GUERRY Funeral Home,
2659 SW Main Blvd., Lake
City. Please sign the guestbook
at www.guerryfuneralhome.net.
Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


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Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424










LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, JUNE 5, 2011


COMMUNITY CALENDAR

Today
Author visits for Friends
of the Library program
A Friends of the Library
Author Program featuring
M. C. Finotti, author of
The Treasure of Amelia
Island will be held at the
Main Library at 2 p.m.
today.
Finotti is a journalist'
who writes "I do, I do," a
weekly wedding column
in the Florida Times
Union. A former teacher
who lives in Atlantic
Beach, Ms. Finotti will
talk about writing his-
torical fiction and give
a "mini" writing lesson.
She is also the co-author
of The Insiders' Guide to
Jacksonville.

Family reunion ,


at Providence Village
Community Center. The
family will gather for a
prayer of thanksgiving.
Dinner will follow at 1 p.m.
Bring your favorite cov-
ered dish or dessert


* To submit your Community
Calendar item, contact Antonia
Robinson at 754-0425 or by
e-mail at arobinson@
lakecityreporter.com.'


Dinner Party 6 p.m. June
11 at Epiphany Catholic
Church Social Hall.
The event will include a
social time, buffet din-
ner and program. The
program will feature
FACS Cultural Dancers,'
a guest speaker, and a
night of fun and dancing.,
Members please bring "
your best covered dish .
to share and Filipino
attire is suggested. Nonr
Members are always wel1-
come, but there is a $10Q;.
per person cover charge
at the door for this event
Contact Bob Gavette
(386) 965-5905 for more.
information.

Columbia High School;
50th reunion
The Columbia High ;
School Class of 1961 is :
having its 50th reunion :
6 p.m. June 11 at the -
County Club of Lake
City. The cost is $50 per
couple or $25 per person.
All 1961 classmates are 6
invited to attend. Call
Shirley at 961-8105 or
Sharon at 752-7943 for :
more information.


Extreme Tour
Extreme Tour is '4 p.m.
today in Downtown Lake
City on Marion Street
near the Ichetucknee
mural. The event is free
to the community and will
feature a concerns from
several bands from a vari-
ety of genres.

Boys Club summer
program
The Boys Club of
Columbia County is
hosting a summer pro-
gram June 6-Aug. 13.
Boys and girls 6-14 are
eligible to attend. The
club offers a variety
of activities including ..
sports, game rooms,
arts and crafts and spe-
cial events. Skating and
bowling is also available.
Fees for the program
are $275. Call 752-4184
for more information.

Summer Reading Camp
at Miracle Tabernacle
Registration is now
open for Summer
Reading Camp at Miracle
Tabernacle. The first 40
children will be admitted.
Camp is $25 per week.
The camp features read-
ing, as well as math, sci-
ence, hand writing, black
history, exercise and con-
versational Spanish in the
curriculum. Camp is 8:30
a.m.-4 p.m. Monday-
Thursday June 6-Aug. 12.
Breakfast and lunch will
be provided. Call Cynthia
Robinson at 249-3572 or
Pastor Steele at 758-8452
for more information.

UfeSouth seeks blood
donors
LifeSouth Bloodmobile
is seeking donors 10
a.m.-6 p.m. today at
i.ake City Mall. All
donors receive free
juice, cookies and a rec-
ognition item.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter

Fort White High School graduate lets out a scream

Fort White High School student Josh Faulkner yells out Friday as a fellow football player walks across the stage to receive his
diploma during the commencement ceremony held at Arrowhead Stadium. One hundred eighty four students graduated from
the school, its biggest graduating class to date.


Assistance for those
with impairments
Vocational
Rehabilitation provides
services for eligible peo-
ple who have physical or
mental impairments that
keep them from working.
These service can help
-with medical treatment,
job placement and train-
ing. Columbia and Union
Counties call (386) 754-
1675.

Monday
Wood Carvers meeting
The Columbia County
Wood Carvers meet every
Monday at 1 p.m. at the
LifeStyle Enrichment
Center. Contact Ken
Myer at 719-9629 or
Charles Kime at 755-4937
for more information.

Southside Summer
Camp
Registration is open
for Southside Summer
Camp. Only 80 spots are
available. Camp is $225
for nine weeks running
June 13-Aug. 12. The
camp is open to boys
and girls ages 7 -14 and
is 7:30 a.m. -5:30 p.m.
Monday Friday June
13 -Aug. 3. Trips include
Blue Springs, bowling,
swimming, skating, mov-
ies, Chuck E. Cheese and
more. Call Wayne Jernigan
at 758-5448.

Summer day camp
Summer Day Camp
Registration for


the Columbia County
Recreation Department
summer day camp pro-
gram is 8 a.m.-5 p.m. at
Richardson Community
Center. The camp is open
to boys and girls ages 7
-14 and is 7:30 a.m.-5:30
p.m. Monday-Friday June
13-Aug. 3. The cost for
the eight-week camp is
$225 and will include a
variety of daily activities,
free breakfast, lunch and
weekly field trips. Space is
limited to the first 60 par-
ticipants. Contact Mario
Coppock or Nicole Smith
at 754-7095 or 754-7096 for
more information.

Summer girls program
Summer program
Registration for the Girls
Club summer program
is open. The cost for the
summer camp is $225.
Girls must be 6-13 to
attend. Call Terri Phillips
at (386) 719-5840 for more
information.

Tuesday
Lulu Ladies host
community baby shower
The Lulu Ladies are
having a community baby
shower at 7 p.m. Tuesday
at the Lulu Community
Center. The event will
benefit the Pregnancy
Care Center. The public
is invited to attend and
baby gifts are appreci-
ated. Call Eva Nelson at
755-6574 for more infor-
mation.

Lions meeting
The Like City Lions


meet.7:30 p.m. every
Tuesday at the lake City
Country Club. Visitors
are welcome.

Art Show ceremony
The awards ceremony
and reception for the
juried Art Show is 5:30
p.m. Tuesday at the West
Branch Library The
Friends of the Library
and the North Florida Art
League will award $1,000
in prize money to the win-
ners. The event is open
to the public. For more
information, please call
758-2101.

Payment due for Senior
Services meal
Payment for the
Columbia County Senior
Services Inc. Wednesday
homecooked meal is due
10 a.m. Tuesday at the
LifeStyle Enrichment
Center. The menu is
baked ziti, garden salad,
mixed vegetables, garlic
break and peanut butter
pie. Call 386-755-0235 for
more information.


Fort White FFA
fundraiser
The Fort White FFA
Chapters will be hold-
ing a fundraiser night
5 to 9 p.m. Tuesday at
McAllister's Deli to raise
funds for the upcom-
ing 83rd Florida FFA
Convention in Orlando.

Wednesday
Senior Services to offer
live entertainment


Columbia County Senior
Services Inc. is hosting
live entertainment 11-
11:45 a.m. Wednesday at
the LifeStyle Enrichment
Center. Call (386) 755-0235
for more information.


Farmers Market
The Lake DeSoto
Farmers Market opens 8
a.m. 12 p.m. at Wilson
Park. The day will fea-
ture the Summer Fun &
Safety Program with eh
Lake City Police and Fire
Departments. Vendors
are welcome. Contact"
Jackie Kite, community
redevelopment adminis-
trator, at (386) 719-5766
or kitej@lcfla.com for
more information.


Newcomers and Friends Legion Riders Ribfest
meeting and Street Dance


The Lake City
Newcomers and Friends
are meeting 11 a.m.
Wednesday at the Eastside
Village Clubhouse. The
program is the annual
picnic. Lunch will be pro-
vided by Blue Roof Cafe
and is $10. All members,
guest and newcomers are
welcome. Call 961-9335 or
752-4552 for more informa-
tion.

Friday
Watertown Reunion
The Watertown Reunion
is 7 p.m. June 10 and 12
p.ni. Friday at First Full
Gospel Church. A country
gospel sing is Friday fea-
turing Billy Earl Sanders of
Nashville, Tenn. Dinner on
the grounds is Saturday.
Bring a lunch to share.
The church is located at
Washington Street and
Jones Way.

Saturday
FACS of Lake City
announces events
The Filipino American
Cultural Society of
Lake City is hosting an
Induction of Officers/
Board and Filipino
Independence Day


Legion Riders Ribfest
and Street Dance is
noon-10 p.m. Saturday
at the Americanl Legion
Post 57 on Hwy. 41 S.
Plates will be serviced
from noon to 7 p.m. The
meal is $10 and includes
a half slab, baked beans,
coleslaw and includes a
beverage ticket. Seconds
are $5. Also available are
$5 wristbands for draft
beer. The street dance
is .6-10 p.m. Music is by
Skattergun. The 50-50
Raffles will take place
each hour.

Monday, June 13
Florida Trail Association
The Suwannee
Chapter of the Florida
Trail Association
is meeting 7-9
p.m. June 13 at the
Suwannee River Water
Management District
Office, 9225 CR 49,
Live Oak. The program
will feature a series of
photos taken by various
members during the
2010-2011 hiking and
paddling season. Contact
Chapter Chair, Sylvia
Dunnam, 362-3256, dun-
nams@windstream. net,
or Irvin Chance, (386)
330-2424 for more infor-
mation.


POLICE REPORTS


The following informa-
tion was provided by local
law enforcement agencies.
The following people have
been arrested but not con-
victed. All people are inno- .
cent unless proven guilty.

Wednesday, May 25
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office
Charles Dwight Higgs,
no age given, 10297 NW
Third Ave., Miami, war-
rant: Violation of probation.
Robert Lee Dionne, no
age given, 131 SW Raven
Lane, larceny and dealing


in stolen property.
Joseph Micheal
Brenton, no age given, 230
NW Hamby Glen, warrant:
Violation of probation.

Thursday, May 26
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office

*John Patrick Woodman,
21, 143 SE Laurence Court,
possession of marijuana
with intent to sell/manufac-
ture or deliver, possession
of drug paraphernalia and
cultivating marijuana.

From staff reports.


The Columbia County Tobacco Free
Partnership and the Columbia County
Health Department have come together
to form a partnership in order to create a
S f tobacco free community. This year, the
o.rfclrq. partnership is focusing on polices that
d effect our youth. We are working to-
wards developing 100% tobacco free
schools. Please come join us and help
protect our youth.
All community members, service
workers, and school aged youth...are in-
vited to attend.


FLORI DA DEPARTMENT OF
HEALTH


Event: Columbia County Tobacco Free Partnership
Meeting
When: Tuesday, June 7, 2011
Where: Central School Board Office Room 153
409 SW St. Johns ST.
Lake City, FL 32055
Time: 1:00-2:00pm


All partnership meetings are open to the public.
For more information on how to become involved
in you local Tobacco Free Partnership, please
contact:
Kyle Roberts
Columbia County Health Department
386-754-7083 or Kyle-_Roberts@doh.state.fl.us.


Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424


^^^^^^^Columbia County^^^

^^^^Tobacco Free Partnership













LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVERTISEMENT SUNDAY, JUNE 5, 2011 7A


First Ballot Chosen .... $100

Second Ballot ......... 0 50
FILL OUT THE BALLOT (Must complete 50% of ballot to be counted)
ENTER YOUR NAME for the RANDOM DRAWING.
ANYONE CAN WIN, WHY NOT YOU?


ENTER & WIN! 2010 Official Entry Ballot
(Simply Write In Your Choice For Columbia County's Best and Return Ballot by June 6, 2011)

Name '

Address


State


~______Zip_______


Phone


.Age_


KServices


Best All-around Restaurant_
Best Bar
Best Bar B Que_
Best Breakfast________
Best Buffet________
* Best Burger
Best Country Style Restaurant_
Best Deli
Best Dinner Under $10_
Best Donuts_
Best Drive Thru_
Best Early Bird Dinner_
Best Fried Chicken_
Best Hot Dog_
Best Hot Wings_
Best Lunch Special_____________
Best Mexican Restaurant
Best Oriental Restaurant_
Best Pizza_
Best Place to Buy Ice Cream_
Best Restaurant Atmosphere_
Best Salad Bar_________________
Best Sandwich_
Best Seafood
Best Steak_
Best Sub_
Best Sushi


Best Attorney____
Best Chiropractor_
Best Dentist_
Best Doctor________________
Best Home Builder_
Best Insurance Agent_
Best Orthodontist_
Best Plumber_
Best Real Estate Agent_
Best Tattoo Artist_
Best Veterinarian


Best Auto Body Shop_
Best Auto Electronics_
Best Auto Service_
Best Bank
QDma D122hgm Qhrn


Dest DBlar
Best Carp
Best Cellu
Best Child
Best Clea
Best Cred
Best Dane
Best Day
Best Dry (
Best Fune
Best Gym
Best Hair


>et Cleaner_
ular Store
d Care Center_
ning Service_
lit Union
ce Studio_
Spa
Cleaner
Dral Home_

Salon .


Best Hearing Center
Best Heating & Air Company____
Best Home Health Care Provider_____
Best Hospital_'
Best Karate School_
Best Lawn Care_
Best Medical Clinic____
Best Motorcycle Repair_
Best Nail Salon
Best Oil Change
Best Optical Store_
Best Pest Control
Best Pet Boarding
Best Pet Grooming _
Best Pharmacy______
Best Place for a Massage_
Best Pool/Spa Service and Repair_
Best Printer_
Best Real Estate Agency_____
Best Swimming Pool Sales/Installation__
Best Tanning Salon_
Best Towing Company_
Best Window Tintina


Best Antique Store_
Best Appliance Dealer
Best Bedding_
Best Boat Dealer
Best Consignment/Thrift Store
Best Convenience Store
Best Domestic Auto Dealer
Best Fabric Store
Best Feed Store
Best Floor Covering Store
Best Florist
Best Furniture Store
Best Garden/Nursery.
Best Gift Store
Best Hardware Store
Best Import Auto Dealer
Best Jewelry Store
Best Manufactured Housing Dealer
Best Motorcycle/ATV Dealer
Best Pawn Shop
Best Pet Shop_
Best Picture Frame Shop
Best Place to Buy Tires
Best Produce
Best Scrapbook Store
Best Shoe Store
Best Spa/Hot Tub Dealer
Best Sporting Goods Store
Best Truck Dealer
Best Used Auto Dealer






Best Apartment Complex
Best Golf Course
Best Hotel/Motel
Best Place for a Wedding Reception
Best Retirement Community
Best Campground


BINflMSTRUCT~iB'ION N F IILR L S n nr omprhueol.Etisms esbitdo fiiletybalt htcpe n abnntacpe.Ms
b e 8 y a s f a e t o e t r B l o s m u t i c ud a e a e d re s a d t e e h n n m e E n r e ot m e i g h s r te ia il ot b t b la e n r nt r d n th ra i g o $ 5
woiranitih of c ash p izes. TheLk iyRpotrrsre hergtt~eif l nre ndt lmnt nyctgr o ayrao.Etie utb otm re yJn 01admie


MAIL TO: The Reader's Choice Awards
Lake City Reporter PO Box 1709
Lake City, FL 32056 YES NO
ARE YOU A CURRENT SUBSCRIBER? O '0
WOULD YOU LIKE TO SUBSCRIBE? 0 0














LAKE CITY REPORTER WEATHER SUNDAY, JUNE 5, 2011


THE WEATHER


mASU A


MOSTLY ISOLATED Il$OLATED
SUNNY WT-STORMS T-STORMS


HI 96 L 69
HI196 LO69 H19LO 72 HI97LO71j


ISOLATED
-T- STO RM S



HI195 LO70


- -- .* .. ,. l


P95/sac75a
95/75


Talaassee.*
99/73 ..

* Paiama City
91/74


TEMPERATURES
High Saturday
Low Saturday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Saturday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date "


VAosta
99/71
Lake City
96/69
Gainesvlle *
96/69
Ocala
'95/70


Tampa


9. ,


96'
69
89
67
102 in 1985
60 in 1933


0.00"
0.00"
14.11"
0.75"
18.00"


City
* Jacksonville Cape Canaveral
S93/ 70 Daytona Beach
Ft. Lauderdale
Daytona Beach Fort Myers
88J68 Gainesville
* Jacksonville

Orando Cape Canaveral ke Cites
91/70 85/69 Miami


Naples


2 West Palm Beach Ocala
85/75 Orlando
FL Lauderdale Panama I
FL Myli. 85/77 6 Pensacol
91/70 Naples Tallahass
91/71 Miami Tampa
ka "wa 8q/76 Valdosta
KeK West ttn1


y t
88/79


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise tom.
'Sunset tom.

MOON
Moonrise today
Moonset today
Moonrise tom.
Moonset tom.


6:29 a.m..
8:29 p.m.
.6:29 a.m.\
8:30 p.m.


9:59 a.m.
11:43 p.m.
11:01 a.m.


City
a
ee


Monday
89 72, p.:
90/73/pc
86/76/pc
93/72/pc
97/71/s
96/73/t
88/78/pc
98/72/pc
87/76/pc
87/73/pc
96/72/pc
93/12/pc
94/77/t
95/75/s
102/74/t
93/76/pc
.01/72/pc


W. Palm Beach 86/74/pc


10 nmiestobum
Today's
ultra-violet
radiation ris
for the area
a scale from
to 10+.


June June June July V .
8 15 23 1 *
First Full Last New Jiflm
weather Jo-m


Tuesday
89 74 4.
92/72/s
89/77/pc
94/73/pc
97/71/s
95/72/pc
89/78/s
97/71/pc
90/76/pc
90/75/pc
97/72/s
94/73/pc
92/77/pc
96/75/pc
l00/73/pc
91/76/pc
98/70/pc
88/75/pc


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
k Channel.
on
nO


weather.com

Forecasts, data and
graphics 20li Weather
Central, LP, Madison, WIs.
wvw.weatherpubllsher.com


NATIONAL FORECAST: A storm system is expected to generate showers and thunderstorms
from the Mid-Atlantic to the Ohio Valley today. Some of these storms may be severe. A few
weaker showers and thunderstorms will also be possible over portions of the Northeast. In
the West, a Pacific storm will continue to spread rain showers into California and Oregon.







Fallst











Sn Co Front



aM am
SI t on8ry


SOcFcluded
Cold >Front

YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL EXTREMESHIgh: 1040, Milkon, Fa. Low: 21, Yel ne N tinat
r T'*' :*;. '' ^ j'^' '*j^ Occluded~tw


Saturday Today


CITY
Al y NY
Albuquerqu6
An horage
Atlanta
Batmore
Blll|ngs
Birmhingham
Bl4marck
BOse
Boston
Buffalo
Charleston SC
Charleston WV
Charlotte
Cheyenne
Chicago
CincInnati
Cleveland
Columnbla SC
Dallas
Daytona Beach
Denver


HV/L/Pcp.
';8 43JiJ
91/62/0'
55/47/0'
91/74/0
81/50/0
67/43/0
..96/70/0
'68/50/0
74/47/0
64/56/0
65/51/.33
89/73/0
. 8 54 0i
88/58/0
70/40/0
91/74/0
1,92/57/0 ,
91/59/0
90.68 0
94/71/0
86/68/0
74/48/0


HI/Lo/W
76/57/t
90/65/s
59/45/sh
96/71/s
'82/62/t
83/55/s
98 73 p.:
83. 58 'p.
82, 55 p.:
67/57/pc
73/58/s
95/75/s
85/58/t
93/68/t
88/54/s
74/55/t
87/63/t
73/55/pc
97/70/t
98/75/pc
88/68/s
91/62/s


CITY
Des Morines
Detroit
El Paso
Fairbanks
Greensboro
Hartford
Honolulu
'Houston,
Indianapolis
Jackson MS
Jacksonylile
Kansas'City
Las Vegas
Uttle Rock
Los Angeles
Memphis
Miami
Minneapolis
Mobile
New Orleans
New York
Oklahoma City


Saturday Today


HI/Lo/Pcp.
84/73/0
92/61/0
96/68/0
57/53/0
87/62/0
. 77/48/0
77/69/.22
97/71/0,
94/67/0d
100/72/0
90/70/0
90/73/0
87/65/0
98/73/0
.64/55/0
98/77/0
89 79 0
83/65/0
102 72.0
98/75/0
,75/59/0
.94/64/0


HI/Lo/W CITY
84/69/pc Omah
80/58/pc Odrlan
95/73/s Philam
65/47/r Phoel
90/66/t Pittst
73/58/pc Portia
87/73/s Portia
97/72/pc Raleill
86/64/t Rapid
99/72/pc Reno
93/70/s. Richm
93/73/pc Sacra
95/70/s St. L
97/71/pc Salt L
67/57/c San A
99/78/pc San D
85/76/s San F
80/63/pc Seatt
96/72/pc' Spoks
94/76/pc Tamp
75/62/t Thcsc
94/69/pc Wash


la
do
delphia
nix
burgh
and ME
anid OR
gh
City
iond
imento
Muls
.ake Ci
Antonio
liego
Franclsc
tie
ane
a
lo-
ington


Saturday Today
HI/Lo/Pcp. HI/Lo/W
86 69 0 90/67/pc
91/67/0 91/70/s
79/56/0 81/63/t
'99/69/0 106/78/s
85/53/0 81/54/pc
64/46/0 67/49/pc
t 81\/51/0 81/53/pc'
88/56/0 91/66/t
70/41/0 83/59/pc
64/51/0 72/51/pc
8* .6,"0 88/66/t
59/55/.36 68/53/sh
98 ,9 0, 96/74/t,
ty 73/44/0 87/58/s.
94/73/0 98,'69, oc
66/60/0 68/56/pc
co 60/55/.66' 66/53/sh
72/50/0 78 53 i
69/45/0 79, 5. DC
93/73/0 91/72/s
98/59/0 103; 70, s
84/61/0 '83/63/t


INERATIOAL


.. .On this date irn
a (4 16 ..7!0 -, la Ga .- .r--


CITY
Acapulco
Amsterdam
* Athens
Auckland
Belling
Berlin
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Geneva
Havana
Helsinki
Hong Kong
Kingston


Saturday Today Saturday Today
HI/Lo/Pcp. HI/Lo/W CITY HI/Lo/Pcp. HI/Lo/W CITY
90/77/0 93/79/pc La Paz 55/34/0 60/29/s Rio
79/61/0 72/55/sh Uma 72/66/0 70/63/pc Rome
68/57/.20 1/60/s London 79/54/0. 72/48/c St. Thomas VI
63/59/0 65/56/sh Madrid 77/54/0 79/59/s San Juan PR
90/64/0 88/71/pc' Mexico City 79/52/0 75/57/t Santiago
84/55/0 87/71/pc Montreal 68/48/0 70/61/sh Seoul
54/36/0 59/45/s Moscow 70/52/0 79/54/s Singapore
91/68/0 91/70/s Nairobi 75/54/0 78/60/t Sydney
79/57/0 72/54/t Nassau 91/77/0 87/74/pc Tel Aviv
88/75/0 90/72/pc New Delhi 104/79/0 106/85/s Tokyo
77,52,0 66/50/pc Osleo 75/52/0 66/50/pc Toronto
90810 87/81/t Panama 90/75/0 88/75/t Vienna
82, 151'J0 82 751 Paris, . 86 63,0 7 59,.1 Warsaw'
KEY TO CONDITIO dS .:-,i..,'.. 1-,.j,-. i, r ,, -i ,- ..t = i ... *=,: ,.' c = .11,..l.:.ud, =, ir
sh-showers, sn-snow,'ts-thunderstorms, w-windy.


Saturday Today'.
HI/Lo/Pcp. HI/Lo/WV
79/66/0 70/62/s
82/64/0 81/63/t
87/78/.02 85/78/t
84/76/.08 86/76/t
61 30 0 52/38/sh
73/61/0 80/61/pc
88/77/0 89, 78,1
68/52/0 65/49/s
-81/68/0 82 68 E
75/66/0 75,/6,
63,54,'0 75/55/sA
81/59/0 82/64/9',
19/59,0 82/61/s-'
-:u ,


I Ge htraturn e fonracoladdiw~~x it mion.esI


tA-p



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e 'RomH-ii IgilsCo mos920 W39hAv. Ocaa 397 W oleg R. atgcaa,44 E SlerSpins lv. et*aron ] .5 ,3d outgd.S*mefe*]75gSH .4


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II I II II II I I II I I II-1-- -I II-. . . . . . . . . . .


LA KECIT YALMAN


Like Cilv Reporter
ol te,


Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424


1


n L. 00 17A I-











Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirbygokecityreporter.com


SPORTS


Sunday, June 5, 2011


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


Athletes


of


the


year


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Ali Wrench of Fort White High is a three-sport star and the Lake City Reporter Female Athlete of the Year. Wrench's favorite sport is softball and she has played on travel teams since she
was 8 years old. She played outfield and shortstop for the Lady Indians.



Ali Wrench excels in three sports


By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com
FORT WHITE
Louisiana State football
coach Les Miles
recently stated his
support for two-sport
athletes in college.
Participating in multiple sports
is a cornerstone of the Lake City
Reporter's selection process for
its top athletes.
Ali Wrench of Fort White High
personifies that ideal and is the
2010-11 Female Athlete of the


Year.
While many athletes
participate in sportswvith related
skills, Wrench's team sports are
diverse and she excels in all of
them.
Wrench played softball, soccer
and volleyball for the Lady
Indians, and was a starter on all
three teams.
Wrench's first name is Alison,
but she prefers the shorter
version. "The only time they call
me Alison is if I'm in trouble,"
.she said.
Anyway, Ali works witlh her


family nickname of "Gator."
"My uncle and grandparents
began calling me that when I was
young," Wrench said. "I am a big
Gator fan, so I like that name."
In softball, where Fort White
had a 14-5 record, Wrench hit
.397 with 23 hits, 14 runs, eight
RBIs and six stolen bases. She
batted in the lead-off or No. 2
spot, and played her normal
outfield position as well as
shortstop.
"Ali is determined and
dependable both on and off the
field,"'coach Cassie Sparks said.


"She knows and understands her
role as a team player and how
to do the job on the field. She
thinks like an athlete and you
don't have to repeat what you
want from her she gets it and
does what you ask."
Wrench has played varsity
softball since the seventh grade,
her second year at Fort White
High.
"I love the game, being out
there and playing," Wrench said.
"I am trying to get a scholarship
for softball. We did really good. It
was probably our best year."


Wrench has played varsity
soccer since the eighth grade
and had been captain since she
was a freshman. She played
sweeper on the defensive side
and filled in at goalkeeper when
Meghan Binge was injured.
"She is right there as far as
our best player," coach Perry
Sauls said. "With her quality of
play and attitude, she is the best
player I have got. She is an on-
the-field leader and has great
character."


WRENCH continued on 3B


Jernigan's star shines in

football, weightlifting


By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com
Timmy Jernigan
wasn't the first
person to put
Lake City on
the map, but
his impact was felt around
the nation this season.
Jernigan starred on the
football field, played in the
U.S. Army All-American
Game and finished runner-
up in the FHSAA 2A state
weightlifting finals.
For all of his
accomplishments, Jernigan
was named*the Lake City
Reporter's 2010-2011 male
athlete of the year.
It's an honor that
Jernigan considers
toward the top of his
achievements.
"It's a blessing and an
honor to be named athlete
of the year behind some of
the guys that have already
won it," he said. 'To walk
in their footsteps and be
considered is an honor.
It's right up there with the


Army All-American Game."
Jernigan's play on the
football field was good
enough to be recognized
around the state. He was
considered one of the top
recruits in the nation and
had more than 50 offers
to play football at the
Division-I level.
Florida State eventually
won the recruiting battle
over the likes of Alabama,
Florida and Tennessee
when Jernigan announced
on ESPN as part of their
national signing day
coverage.
He'll certainly go
on to greater things at
the collegiate level, but
Jernigan said that his time
in Lake City won't soon be
forgotten.
"I would say that the
moments with my parents,
coaches and teammates
were the most important,
because I'll never get them
back," he said. "You just
can't replace that. I was
closer to some of the guys
on the team that some


members of my family. I
hate to say that, but we
were like brothers. It was
a blessing to play with
them."
Not only did Jernigan
have to deal with
the things that most
teenagers deal with on
an everyday basis, but
he also had to deal with
semi-celebrity status in
recruiting circles. He was
continually featured on
recruiting sites such as
Rivals.com and Scout.com.
Coaches phoned him on
a daily basis. He spoke to
recruiters and journalist
from across the country on
a daily basis.
For some, it could have
taken its toll, but Jernigan
stayed grounded on the
field and academically
to qualify to play for the
Seminoles.
"You get calls every
day," he said. "I'm not
going to lie, it got to me
at times. It takes time out
JERNIGAN continued on 3B


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High's Timmy Jernigan was a two-sport star for the Tigers where he excelled on
the football field and the weight room. Jernigan was also the first player in the history of the
school to participate in the U.S. Army All-American Game.













LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, JUNE 5, 2011


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
AUTO RACING
12:30 p.m.
FOX NASCAR, Sprint Cup, STP
400, at Kansas City, Kan.
4:30 p.m.
ESPN2 NHRA, Supernationals, at
Englishtown, N.J. (same-day tape)
COLLEGE SOFTBALL
I p.m.
ESPN World Series, game I, at
Oklahoma City
3:30 p.m.
ESPN World Series, game 12, at
Oklahoma City
7 p.m.
ESPN2 World Series, game 13, at
Oklahoma City (if necessary)
9:30 p.m.
ESPN2 World Series, game 14, at
Oklahoma City (if necessary)
CYCLING
7 p.m.
VERSUS Criterium du Dauphine
Libere, prologue, at Saint-Jean-de-
Maurienne, France (same-day tape)
8 p.m.,
VERSUS Philadelphia International
Championship (same-day tape)
GOLF
9 a.m.
TGC European PGA Tour, Wales
Open, final round, at Newport, Wales
Noon
TGC PGA Tour, the Memorial
Tournament, final round, at Dublin, Ohio
2 p.m.
TGC Nationwide Tour, Prince
George's County Open, final round, at
College Park, Md. -
2:30 p.m.
CBS PGA Tour, the Memorial
Tournament, final round, at Dublin. Ohio
4:30 p.m. ,
TGC ShopRite LPGA Classic, final
round, at Galloway, N.J.
7:30 p.m.
TGC Champions Tour, Principal
Charity Classic, final round, at Des Moines,
Iowa (same-day tape)
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
2 p.m.
TBS Chicago Cubs at St. Louis
WGN Detroit at Chicago White
Sox
8 p.m.
ESPN -Atlanta at N.Y. Mets
MOTORSPORTS
8 a.m.
SPEED MotoGP World
Championship, Catalunyan Grand Prix, at
Barcelona, Spain
6 p.m.
SPEED MotoGP Moto2, Catalunyan
Grand Prix, at Barcelona, Spain (same-
day tape) "
12 Midnight
SPEED -AMA Pro Racing, at Elkhart
Lake,Wis. (siame-day tape)
NBA BASKETBALL
8 p.m.
ABC Playoffs, finals, game 3, Miami
at Dallas
RUGBY
2 p.m.
VERSUS Sevens Collegiate
'Championship, semifinals, at Philadelphia
4 p.m.
NBC Sevens Collegiate
Championship, bronze medal and
championship matches, at Philadelphia
SOCCER
2 p.m.
ESPN2 Women's national teams,
exhibition, U.S. vs. Mexico, at Harrison,
N.J.
TENNIS
9 a.m.
NBC French Open, men's
championship match, at Paris (live and
same-day tape)

Monday
COLLEGE SOFTBALL
8 p.m.
ESPN2 -World Series championship
series, game I, at Oklahoma City
CYCUNG
5 p.m.
VERSUS Criterium du Dauphine,
stage I, Albertville to Saint-Pierre-de-
Chartreuse, France (same-day tape)
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
7 p.m.
ESPN LA. Dodgers at Philadelphia
NHL HOCKEY
8 p.m.
VERSUS Playoffs, finals, game 3,
Vancouver at Boston

BASEBALL

AL standings

East Division
W L Pet GB
NewYork 31 24 .564 -
Boston 31 26 .544 I
Tampa Bay 29 28 .509 3
Toronto 29 28 .509 3
'Baltimore 25 30 .455 6
Central Division
W L Pet GB
Cleveland 33 22 .600 -
Detroit 29 27 .518 4'k
Chicago 28 31 I .475 7
Kansas City 25 32 .439 9
Minnesota 19 37 .339 14'i
West Division
W L Pct GB
Texas 32 26 .552 -
Seattle 30 27 .526 I'k
Los Angeles 30 29 .508 21'
Oakland 27 31 .466 5
Today's Games
Texas (C.Wilson 5-3)' at Cleveland
(Talbot 2-1), 1:05 p.m.
Oakland (Anderson 3-5) at Boston
(Lackey 2-5), 1:35 p.m.
Toronto (jo-.Reyes 1-4) at Baltimore
(Guthrie 2-7), 1:35 p.m.


Detroit (Penny 4-4) at Chicago White
Sox (Peavy 2-0), 2:10 p.m.
Minnesota (Duensing 2-5) at Kansas
City (Francis 2-5), 2:10 p.m.
N.Y.Yankees (Colon 3-3) at LA.Angels
(Pineiro 2-2), 3:35 p.m.
Tampa Bay (W.Davis 4-5) at Seattle
(Bedard 3-4),4:10 p.m.
Monday's Games
Minnesota at Cleveland, 7:05 p.m.
SOakland at Baltimore, 7:05 p.m.
Detroit at Texas, 8:05 p.m.
Seattle at Chicago White Sox,


8:10 p.m.
Toronto at Kansas City, 8:10 p.m.
Tampa Bay at LA.Angels. 10:05 p.m.

NL standings

East Division
W L Pct Gl
Philadelphia 34 23 .596 -
Florida 31 24 .564
Atlanta 32 26 .552 2
New York 26 31 .456
Washington 25 32 .439
Central Division


St. Louis
Milwaukee
Cincinnati
Pittsburgh
Chicago
Houston


San Francis
Arizona
Colorado


W L
34 25
31 26
30 28
27 29
23 32
23 35
West Division
W L
co 32 25
32 26
26 30


Pct
.576
.544
.517
.482
.418
.397


Los Angeles 26 32 .448 6'A
San Diego 25 33. .431 7h
Today's Games
LA. Dodgers (Billlngsley 4-4) at
.Cincinnati (T.Wood 4-3), 1:10 p.m.
Milwaukee (Narveson 2-4) at Florida
(Ani.Sanchez 5-l),.1:10 p.m.
Philadelphia (Halladay 7-3) at
Pittsburgh (ja.McDonald 3-3), 1:35 p.m.
Chicago Cubs (Zambrano 5-2) at St.
Louis (Carpenter I-5), 2:15 p.m.
Colorado .(Hammel 3-5) at San
Francisco (Vogelsong 3-I), 4:05 p.m.
Washington (Marquis 6-2) at Arizona
(I.Kennedy 6-2), 4:10 p.m.
Houston (Lyles 0-0) at San Diego
(Latos 3-6), 6:35 p.m.
.Atlanta (T.Hudson 4-4) at N.Y. Mets
(Dickey 2-6), 8:05 p.m.
Monday's Games
LA Dodgers at Philadelphia; 7:05 p.m.
Chicago Cubs at'Cincinnati, 7:10 p.m.
Milwaukee at' Florida, 7:10 p.m.
Colorado at San Diego, 10:05 p.m.


Washington at San
10:15 p.m.

NCAA regionals

Friday
Miami '7,Jacksonville 2
Florida 17, Manhattan 3
Saturday


Francisco,


Game 3 Jacksonville 5, Manhattan

Game 4 Miami vs. Florida (n)
Today
Game 5 Game 3 winner vs. Game
4 loser, Noon
Game 6 Game 4 winner vs. Game
5'winher, 4 p.rp..

Friday
Alabama 5, UCF 3
Florida St. 6, Bethune-Cookman 5
Saturday
Game 3 UCF vs. Bethune-
Cookman
Game 4 Alabama vs. Florida St. (n)"
Today
Game 5 Game 3 winner vs. Game
4 loser, Noon
Game 6 Game 4 winner vs. Game
5 winner, 6 p.m..

Friday
James Madison I I, Fla. International 7
North Carolina 4, Maine 0
Saturday
Game 3 Maine 4, FIU 0
Game 4 James Madison vs. North
Carolina (n)
Today
Game 5 Game 3 winner vs. Game
4 loser, I p.m.
Game 6 Game 4 winner vs. Game
5 winner, 6 p.m..

Friday
Stetson 8, N.C. State 7
South Carolina 2, Georgia Southern I
Saturday
Game 3 N.C. State vs. Georgia
Southern
Game 4 Stetson vs. South Carolina
(n)
Today
Game 5 Game 3 winner vs. Game
4 loser, I p.m.
Game 6 Game 4 winner vs. Game
5 winner, 7 p.m.
Note: If necessary games in the
double elimination format will be played
Monday.

BASKETBALL

NBA Finals

Miami vs. Dallas
Miami 92, Dallas 84 -
Dallas 95, Miami 93
Today
Miami at Dallas, 8 p.m.
Tuesday'
Miami at Dallas, 9 p.m.
Thursday
Miami at Dallas, 9 p.m.

WNBA schedule

Friday's Game
Los Angeles 82, Minnesota 74
Saturday's Games.
Phoenix at Seattle (n)
Washington at Connecticut (n)
Chicago at Indiana (n)
Tulsa at San Antonio (n)
Today's Games
New York atAtlanta, 3 p.m.
Los Angeles at Minnesota, 3:30 p.m.

TENNIS

French Open

At Stade Roland Garros
Paris
Late Friday
Singles
Men
Semifinals
Roger Federer (3), Switzerland, def.
Novak Djokovic (2), Serbia, 7-6 (5), 6-3,
3-6,7-6 (5).
Doubles
Women
Championship
Andrea Hlavackova and Lucie
Hradecka, Czech Republic, def. Sania
Mirza, India, and Elena Vesnina (7), Russia,


6-4,6-3.
Junior Singles
Boys
Semifinals
Dominic Thiem (14),Austria, def. Mate
Delic, Croatia, 3-6,6-3,6-1.
junior Doubles
Girls
Semifinals
Irina Khromacheva, Russia, and Maryna
Zanevska (2), Ukraine, def.Tang Hao Chen
and Tian Ran, China, 6-3, 6-0.
Wheelchair
Singles
Men
Championship
Maikel Scheffers, Netherlands, def.
Nicolas Peifer, France, 7-6 (3), 6-3.
Women
Championship
Esther Vergeer (I), Netherlands, def.
Marjolein Buis, Netherlands, 6-0, 6-2.
Doubles
Men
Championship
Shingo Kn'ieda, Japan, and Nicolas
Peifer, France. def. Robiei Ammerlaan,
Netherlands, and Stefan Olsson, Sweden,
6-2,6-3.


AUTO RACING

Race week


NASCAR
STP 400
Site: Kansas City, Kan.
Schedule: Today, race,


I p.m. (FOX,


12:30-4:30 p.m.).
Track: Kansas Speedway (oval, 1.5,
miles).
Race distance: 400.5 miles, 267 laps.
NHRA FULL THROTTLE
t NHRA Supernationals
Site: Englishtown, N.J.
Schedule: Today, final eliminations
(ESPN2,4:30-7 p.m.).
Track: Old Bridge Township Raceway
Park.

STP 400 qualifying.

1. (22) K4rt Busch, Dodge, 174.752.
2. (42) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet,
174.154.
3. (18) Kyle Busch.Toyota, 174.081.
4. (83) Brian Vickers.Toyota, 173.991.
5. (20) Joey Logano,Toyota,'173.851.
6. (1) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet,
173.706.
7. (99) Carl Edwards. Ford, 173.65.
8. (56) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota,
173.61 1,
9. (27) 'Paul Menard, Chevrolet,
173.589.
10. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet,
173.494.
.11. (78) Regan Smith, Chevrolet,
173.422.. .
12. (39) Ryans'Newman, Chevrolet,
173.388.
13. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet,
173.36.
14.(16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 173.249.
15. (II11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota,
173.193.
16. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet,
173.099.
17. (4) Kasey Kahne,Toyota, 173.033.
18. (5) Mark Martin, Chevrolet,
172.905.
19. (6) David Ragan, Ford, 172.855.
20. (47) Bobby Labonte, Toyota,
172.772.
21. (17) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 172.756.
22. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet,
172.75.
23. (00) David Reutimann, Tqyota,
172.723.
24. (51) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet,
172.717.
25. (2) Brad Keselowski, Dodge,
172.507.
26.' (43) A J Allmendinger, Ford,
172.232.
27. (33) Clint Bowyer, Chevrolet,
172.035.
28. (88) Dale Eamhardt Jr., Chevrolet,
171.881.
29. (30) David Stremme, Chevrolet,
171.876.
30. (38) Travis Kvapil, Ford, 171.723.
31. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet,
171.576.
32. (46) J.J.Yeley, Chevrolet, 171.516.
33. (13) Casey Mear;,Toyota, 171.499.
34. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota,
171.445.
35. (9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford,
171.249.
36. (81) Scott Riggs, Chevrolet,
170.983:
37. (66) Michael McDowell, Toyota,
'170.8.
38. (34) David Glillland,'Ford, 170.751.
39. (71) Andy Lally, Ford, 170.589.
40. (60) Mike Skinner,Toyota,. 170.063.

SOFTBALL

NCAA World Series

AtASA Hall of Fame Stadium
Oklahoma City
Friday
Alabama 3, Baylor 0
Arizona State 6, Florida 5
Saturday
Game 7 California 6, Oklahoma
State
Game 8 Oklahoma vs. Missouri
(n)
Game 9 Baylor vs. Game 7
winner (n)
Game 10 Florida vs. Game 8
winner (n)
Today
Game II -Alabama (53-9) vs. Game
9 winner, I p.m.
Game 12 Arizona State (57-6) vs.
Game 10 winner, 3:30 p.m.
Game 13 Game II winner vs.
Game II loser, 7 p.m. (if necessary)
Game 14 -.Game 12 winner vs.
Game 12 loser, 9:30 p.m. (if necessary)
Note: If only one game is necessary, it
will be played at 7 p.m.. *

HOCKEY

Stanley Cup
Boston vs.Vancouver
Vancouver 1, Boston 0
Saturday
Boston atVancouver (n)


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Ji Na'of China celebrates defeating Francesca Schiavone of Italy in two sets 6-4, 7-6, in
the women's final of the French Open tennis tournament inRoland Garros stadium in Paris,
Saturday.



Li Na wins French Open,


1st major tite for China


By CHRIS LEHOURITES
Associated Press

PARIS Li Na ended
China's long wait for
a Grand Slam .cham-
pion Saturday, defeating
Francesca Schiavone 6-4,
7-6 (0) in the French Open
final.
The Australian Open run-
ner-up celebrated 'by falling
flAt on her back in the red
clay after Schiavone hit a
backhand long on match'
point '
'Today is the dream
come, true," Li said. "Not
so many player can win (a)
Grand Slam,"'
The crowd at' Roland
Garros was dotted with red
Chinese flags and a small
vocal group- supporting.
Schiavone. They watched,
as Li dropped her 'serve
for the only time late in the
second set. .
"I was nervous, but I
didn't' want to show to my
opponent," said Li, won
the final nine points of the
match to earn her first
major title. "I was a little bit
shaking." .
On 'Sunday, five-time
champion Rafael Nadal will
face Roger Federer in the
men's final. .
The title was only the
fifth in Li's career, and her
first on clay. But it is the
biggest victory on a tennis.
court for China, which has


1i
4

8
11
12
13
14
16

17
18
20 (


already started savoring
the moment
The official Xinhua News'
Agency sent out a news
flash shortly after Li's victo-,
ry, saying "In such a great
final, Li Na deserved the
win."
.Li, however, won't
return home to relish in
her achievement until after
Wimbledon.
"If I' (don't) do 'well in
Wimbledon, maybe people
forget me already," said Li,
with a smile.
She was broken only.
once by -'the defending,-
champion, while convert-
ing two .of her eight break
points -- one in each set
She finished with 31 win-
ners to 12 for Schiavone.
"I couldn't really push
forward from the base-
line," Schiavone said. "She
deserved to win. One has
to los10e, one has to win. She
deserves everything."
Li took a 3-2' lead, in the
first set when Schiavone
sent a forehand wide. She
held at love in the next two
games, and then won .the
set when Schiavone sent a
forehand long.
"She (kept) me really far
away from the net or inside
the court, so I was always
too (defensive)," the Italian
said. "With the slice, (it)
was not easy because she
has good timing and she
has good preparation with


ACROSS 39 Deadly snake
40 Invisible sub-
London Inc. stance
Hombre's 41 Amherst sch.,
dwelling 44 Chase
Green parrot 48 Pilot licensing
Prior to org.
Respectful title 49 Freezing rains
Pertinent (2 wds.)
Avocado dip 51 Not just mine
Director 52 Grunge
Burton 53 Invite
Merchants 54 Just a taste
Alliances 55 'Actor Montand
Creeping vine 56 Part of LAX


21 Sheep call
22 Work for
25 Loser(hyph.)
29 fixe
30 Pablo's aunt
31 Ms. Hagen of,
films
32 Guided
33 Website clutter
34 Knowing look
35 Like ocean
breezes
38 Maneuvered
slowly


DOWN


Ankle sites
For real
Merger or buy-
out
Toyota model
Commotions
"My gal"
of'song
Protozoans
Green Hornet's
valet


(her) legs."
The Chinese player
opened the second set
with her second break of
the match, and then saved
Schiavone's first break
.point in the next game
with an ace. But Schiavone
broke back in the eighth
game to even the score 4-
4..
Both players held the rest
of the way, but Schiavone
came within two points
of winning the, set on five
occasions, three times at 5-
4 and twice more at 6-5.
The point that first put
Schiavone that .close -was
a bit awkward. Schiavone
sent a backhand return
straight at Li, but the ball
skidded off the whiteibase-
line and under Li's racket,
'causing her to take a big
swing and miss.
Schiavone' raised her
hand to apologize, and then
lost the next point when
she stretched for a fore-
hand and sent it wide.
In the 12th game,
Schiavone contested a line
call, arguing a shot by Li
was out The chair umpire
ran across the court to
investigate and 'ruled that
the ball touched the line.
"That ball was out," said
Schiavone, who put a back-
hand into the net on the
next point and then lost
all seven points in the tie-
breaker. .


Answer to Previous Puzzle

ITEM URE SOIR


A DAME RIGATONIO R




B NTUE GI OR





S A S SOT T O
CDEE RES K

MADE ART SKY OS


9 Spectacular
10 They need a PIN
12 Ms. Binchy
15 Novelist
Cussler
19 Mekong native


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


9 10


21 Lesage here
Gil
22 Corn holder
23 Garden site
24 Lipstick
shades
25 Helper
26 Is sorryabout
27 To --
(exactly)
28 Ancient oint-
ment
30 Rain cover '
34 Roundup gear
36 Orders for din-
ner
37 Turn to bone
38 Peopled plan-
et
40 Blows hard
41 ETs' crafts
.42 Hawaiian isle
43 Org. for
seniors
44 Volcano god-
dess
45 Europe-Asia
range
46 "- -
Excited"
47 Reproving
clucks
50 LII twice


6-6 2011 UFS, Inc. Dist. by Universal UClick for UFS


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420













] JERNIGAN: Will represent Lake City at FSU


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
After playing volleyball since the sixth grade for Fort White
High, Ali Wrench Vioved up to the varsity this season and
helped lead the Lady Indians to the state playoffs. Wrench
had 655 assists, which ranked among the .top five players in
the area. She served at a 93 percent clip that included more
than 50 aces and 300 service points, and she had 150-plus
digs.

:WRENCH: A 3-sport star
Continued From Page 1B


.Filling in at keeper was a
challenge for Wrench, who
got her soccer start playing
in CYSA leagues.
"I like sweeper and
began playing defense
two years ago," Wrench
Said. "Playing goalie when
Meghan got hurt was an
experience. It was fun.
I like running back and
Forth, but softball is my
Main thing."
Wrench has played
volleyball since the sixth
grade, then made her move
to the varsity this season
and helped the Lady
Indians to a spot in the
state playoffs.
Coach Doug Wohlstein
said Wrench had 655
assists, which ranked
among the top five
players in the area. She
served at a 93 percent clip
I that included more than
50 aces and 300 service
- points, and she had 150-
i plus digs.
S "I was on Coach
Wohlstein's travel team
and started playing for the
Schooll" Wrench said. "I
tried it and I really liked it
We had a good year."
Wrench said she planned.
I to play all three sports next
year, but her summer will
be spent concentrating on
softball. She plays.on the
STsunami 16-under team out
of Jacksonville.
Wrench also played
travel ball with the
Gainesville Gold at the 12-
under and 14-under levels.
"I first started playing
with Taylor Douglass when
I was 8 years old," Wrench


Unscramble these four.Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
RDEYB 1

@2011 Tribune Media Services, Inc. '
All Rights Reserved.
FUIYN


RMTKEA

.5
UEXDLE
I U .


said. "Our parents started
a travel team. The Tsunami
will be in Sarasota next
week. (The travel ball) gets
us seen by college scouts
and they talk with us."
Wrench's parent% are
Sandra and Gary Williams,
and dad coaches for Fort
White.
"He used to coach me
when I was little," Wrench
said. "It doesn't bother
me when he's out there
because he does not treat
me any differently."
Wrench was born in
North Carolina and came
to Lake City when she
was young. She and her
mother first stayed with
grandparents Nancy and
John Palmer.
,"Mom has always been
there for me," Wrench
said., "She has taken care of
me forever." .
Wrench enjoys Fort
White High where she will
be a senior in 2011-12.
"I have gone there since
the sixth grade," Wrench
said. "It is small and I like
smallness. We all know
each other. It is like a big
family." "
Wrench would like to be
an orthodontist
"I like science and
kind of like math, but it is
hard," Wrench said. "All
the schools I am looking
at have the dentistry and
medical things I need."
Going to the river and
hanging with friends is
something Wrench enjoys,
when she can.
"I don't have alot of
spare time," she said.

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek


WHEN THEY CL-MBEV UP
TO SEE HI5 NEW FORT, T
CREATED A --
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


Answer:; .U 11 1Li l
(Answers tomorrow)
Saturday's Jumbles: CRAZY COUNT HELPED HERBAL
Answer: Having one would have given the inmate a
chance to win the contest A "CELL" PHONE


Continued From Page 1
from school, from your
team and family. It's a
burden, but you have to
keep your priorities in
order. I didn't let it get
to my head, and I never
wanted to walk around like
I was better than anyone."
The pinnacle of his high
school football career
came in the Army All-
American game on Jan. 8.
Jernigan was injured for
most of the week while
practicing with his East
team, but overcame the
pain to record a late sack
and help the East beat the
West, 13-10. '
"Being out there was
a dream," he said. "I was
hurt all week, but it was a
chance to go against the
best I think I did fairly
well. That's the kind of
competition I'll be going
against every Saturday.,
You have to make the play
in the first two seconds.
But you know, you can't
coach meanness. I told
myself if I wasn't the best
out there, I was going to
be the meanest."
While he may have a
mean streak, Jernigan's
persona off the field is
anything but that Dennis
Dotson was Jernigan's


defensive coordinator for
the Tigers, and found him
a pleasure to coach.
"He was not only a
pleasure to coach for
three years, but he's
also the best athlete for
a defensive lineman that
I've ever been around in
high school or college,"
Dotson said. "He was
amazing and could do
it all with his God-given
talent"
Dotson was among
one of many coaches that
Jernigan credited with
developing his talent
Others included Jeff
Tyre, Vernon Amerson
and Quinton Callum,
who coached Jernigan in
weightlifting.
Jernigan tied for the
state championship in
weightlifting, but due to
weighing more than his
opponent settled for a
runner-up finish. Still, he
knows in his heart that he
was the better lifter that day.
"In my eyes, I won," he
said. "I know I could have
lifted more, and every
man in the building knew
it too. We could have
tried to go higher, but we
played it safe. I'lluse it as
motivatiQn though, and


Sears


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High's Timmy Jernigan was named the Lake City
Reporter's Male Athlete of the Year.


carry it as a chip on my
shoulder."
Still, Jernigan is proud
of the distance he's
made up in the weight
room since coming in to
Columbia.
"When I got here,
I didn't like to lift, but
thanks to coach Callum,
love to lift," he said. "He
wouldn't let me miss a d
or he'd call me to -find ot
where I am at If it wasn
for Callum, there's no w
I'd be the player I am."
And Callum may


describe Jernigan the best.
"He's the last of a dying
d breed," Callum said. '
Now, he'll take with him
the weight of a city as he
moves on to a bigger scale
at Florida State.
"It'll mean a lot,'" he
'said. have to represent
I ake City the rest of my
life. They'll always be.
ay No. 1 in my heart This is
it, home and I'll give witness.
't I want to do for others
ay what guys like Jerome
Carter and Brian Allen
have done for-me."


AT THIS STORE ONLY

LAKE CITY
2724 W. US Highway 90


Sale Ends June 15,20 1i and is Limited to Quantities onHand


COME IN AND SHOP FOR GREAT VALUES


ALL

Refrigerators/

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ALL TVs and

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Including Washers &

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Dishwashers, Ovens,

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Electrolux products are not included.


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& Accessories

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LOOK FOR UNADVERTISED IN STORE SPECIALS!
THIS STORE IS NOT PARTICIPATING IN CURRENT SEARS CIRCULARS.


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, JUNE 5, 2011


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420









LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVERTISEMENT


PAID ADVERTISEMENT

ROADSHOW PAYING CASH ON THE SPOT FOR

ANTIQUES, GOLD JEWELRY, SILVER COINS AND MORE!


By Jason Delong
STAFF WRITER
Clean out your attics, closets and lock boxes,
because the Treasure Hunters Roadshow is com-
ing to Lake City. Roadshow specialists are in
town examining antiques, collectibles, gold and
silver.
While the Roadshow will accept anything
that's old, they.will be focusing on: gold and
silver coins made before 1964, military items,
toys and trains, musical instruments, pocket and
wrist watches. Scrap gold is expected to be a
popular category this week due to soaring gold
prices.
Buyers for the roadshow have noticed a tre-
mendous increase in the amount of qold coming


-.r .. t,.. .- : -."" _..., .-. -

Above-Roadshow specialist, Mike Delong, sits
who is eagerly anticipating the assessment of his

to the Roadshow, and for good reason. Record
gold prices have Roadshow guests cashing in on
broken or outdated jewelry with our fair and
honest purchase offers.
The Roadshow encourages anyone planning
a visit to take a minute and examine their jew-
elry box or their lock box at the bank and gather
anything that is gold. If a guest is not sure if
something is gold, bring it anyways and the


*Gather items of interest from your attic,
garage, basement, etc. There is no limit
to the amount of items you can bring.
*No appointment is necessary.
e*If you decide to accept the offer, we will
pay you on the spot and ship the item to
the collector. The collector pays all ship-
ping and handling charges.
*You get 100% of the offer with no
hidden fees.


Got gold? This week, visitors can cash in on antiques, collectibles, gold, silver, coins


Roadshow staff will test it for free. Other gold
.items of interest include gold coins, gold ounc-
es, gold proof sets and dental gold.
Other types of items Roadshow specialists
hope to see include old toys and train sets. Ar-
chie Davis, the Roadshow's toy specialist, spoke
about some of the top toys getting great offers.
"Old tin wind-up toys from the late 1 800's
through the 1960's are in great demand right
now,".said Davis, "especially those that are
character related. Mickey Mouse, Donald Duck,
the Flintstones or any other character toys are
sought after. Old Buddy L toys from the 1920's
to the 1960's are especially in high demand."
Basically any toys made be-
fore 1965 are wanted.
Train sets made by Lionel,
American Flyer, Mar lin and
others have the potential to
fetch a large sum. Davis
also stressed, "Toys with
boxes and in mint condition
bring sensational prices.
Most of the toys that come
~ -. o the Roadshow are not in

p' bring good prices from col-
lectors."
with a gentleman When specialist Tom
s collectibles. Fuller was asked what he
enjoyed most about working
at the Roadshow, he was quick to answer, "Old
coins and paper currency-for as long as I can
remember, I have been fascinated with collect-
ing coins. I would go through the change in my
parents' grocery store, looking for rare dates
and errors. Once, I found a silver quarter that I
sold for $300. Not bad for an 8 year old."
Fuller went on to explain that any U.S. coins
made before 19.64 are the most sought after by
collectors. Coins made before 1964 are 90%'

"U.S. COINS MADE BEFORE 1964 ARE
THE MOST SOUGHT AFTER BY
COLLECTORS. COINS MADE BEFORE
1964 ARE 90% SILVER, AND
VALUABLE BECAUSE OF EITHER THE
SILVER CONTENT OR EVEN MORE
VALUABLE IF ONE HAPPENS TO BE A
RARE DATE."

silver, and valuable because of either the silver
content.,oreven more valuable if one happens to
be a rare date. Fuller explained, "We help peo-
ple sort through their coins for unique dates. We
buy all .types of coins at the Roadshow-from
wheat pennies to buffalo grickels, and from sin-
gle coins to entire truckloads. See you at the
Roadshow."


SEE YOURSELF


ION Tv

IN PRTLA D, O


COINS Any and all coins made before
1964: silver and gold coins, dollars, half
dollars, quarters, dimes, nickels and pennies.
All conditions wanted!

GOLD & SILVER PRICES AT 40 YEAR
HIGH for platinum, gold and silver during this
event. Broken jewelry, dental gold, old coins,
pocket watches, Krugerrands, gold bars,
Canadian Maple Leafs, etc.

JEWELRY Gold, silver, platinum, diamonds,
rubies, sapphires, all types of stones and
metals, rings, bracelets, necklaces, etc.
(including broken jewelry) Early costume
jewelry wanted.


WRIST & POCKET WATCHES Rolex,
Tiffany, Hublot, Omega, Chopard, Cartier,
Philippe, Ebel, Waltham, Swatch, Elgin, Bunn
Special, Railroad, Illinois, Hamilton, all others.


TOYS, TRAINS, DOLLS All makers and
types of toys made before 1965: Hot Wheels,
Tonka, Buddy L, Smith Miller, Nylint, Robots,
Baitery Toys, Mickey Mouse, train sets-Mark-
lin, American Flyer, Lionel, Hafner, all other
trains (all gauges, accessories, nd,.i,ual
cars), Barbie dolls, GI Joe, Shirley Temple,
characters, German.


MILITARY ITEMS & SWORDS
Revolutionary War, Civil War, WWI, WWII,
etc: swords, badges, clothes, photos, medals,
knives, gear, letters. The older the swords, the
better.
GUITARS & INSTRUMENTS Fender,
Gibson, Martin, Rickenbacker, Gretsch, new
and vintage amps, saxophones, wood winds,
mandolins and o!' others.


TREASUREHUNTERSROADSHOW. COM


4B


SUNDAY, JUNE 5, 2011


! ....


,A, ,1











Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

Robert Bridges
Editor
754-0428
rbridges@lakecityreportercom

Sunday, June 5, 2011


BUSINESS


www.lakecityreporter.com


Fifth Generation Farms Market nears opening


By ANTONIA'ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.comrn
A soon-to-open
meat and pro-
duce market is
a family affair
for Delvey and
Cindy Dicks and their chil-
dren.
Fifth Generation Farms
Market is tentatively set to
open in July, said Cindy
Dicks. The business is
owned by the couple and
their children, Brady,
Haley and Matt and his
wife Abigail.
"We're excited about
this," she said. "We're still
working, on a lot of the
details."
The name for the mar-
ket comes from the fact
her husband is a fifth gen-
eration farmer and ranch-
er, Dicks said.
"We've been thinking
about it for a very long
time," she said. "My hus-
band has been in agri-
culture for a number of
years."
The business came
about as a result of the fam-
ily wanting to market the
angus beef that is produced
on their farms, Dicks said.
The Dicks' meat, North
Florida National Black
Angus Beef, contains no
antibiotics or hormones.
Soon the idea led to
including more than just
meat.
"We realized the best
thing to do would be to
have meat as well as pro-
duce," she said.
The market will be
located at the site of the


Shoney's Restaurant on
US Hwy. 90, Dicks said.
Construction began April
13, and the area space
is roughly 6,000 square
feet, which includes the
meat cutting area and
storage cooler. A total of
4,000 square feet will be
used for retail space in the
store front.
"We've been at it, work-
ing toward it for a long
time," she said.
The market will fea-
ture a full meat counter,
Dicks said. The meat and
produce at the market
will come from local fam-
ily farms in Florida and
Georgia as much as pos-
sible. A few things might
have to be sourced from
outside of the area, but
ultimately the market will
promote local producers.
"The whole concept is
to promote Florida agri-
cultural and be a place
where people can connect
with the producers and
put a face to the food,"
she said.
The upcoming business
is already creating a buzz
in the community.
. "We've been getting a lot
of very positive encourage-
ment," Dicks said.
The market will help
benefit area producers and
provide another avenue to
market their products, she
said. It will.also be a place
where people can learn
more about how food is
produced
"We're hoping to see that
it will have a real positive
affect to help producers,"
Dicks said.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Shawn Kell uses scissor shears to cut off a piece of fiberglass reinforced panel Friday while working at the new Fifth
Generation Farms Market that is being built in the old Shoney's Restaurant on U.S. Highway 90 West.


Once construction is
complete the market will
have a soft opening to work
the kinks out, she said. A
bigger grand opening will
take place in the future.


"We look forward to
being a place people can
come and enjoy, and not


only get nutritional food
but be able to connect with
local producers," Dicks


said. 'We want to be a great
place for family and friends
to come."


COZY BUNGALOW-STYLE HOME w/1,328 SqFt has 2 living areas
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Lake City, Florida, 32055
m,,. (386) 755-5110 www.danielcrapps.com


4520 W US Highway 90 Lake City, FL 755-0601


Section C













LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS SUNDAY, JUNE 5, 2011 Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424


Is Facebook Bubbling?
I've heard that Facebook is
being valued at around $100
billion. Is that too high? T.G.,
Boulder, Colo.
A To a great degree, a com-
pany's value is in the eyes of
its beholders. You may sell your
shares of Acme Explosives (ticker:
KBOOM) when its market value
hits $1 billion, thinking that's too
high but someone will buy those
shares, thinking the value is too low.
With Facebook, we can lo6k.
at a'few numbers td assess its sug-
gested value. One estimate is that
it will earn $2 billion (before taxes
and interest) in 2011. If so, then
its implied price-to-earnings (P/E)
ratio will top 50, whichlis on the
steep side ($100 billion divided by
$2 billion is 50). ,
Apple's fbrward-looking P/E
ratio was recently around 12, and .
Google's around 13 .
For more context, consider the
rotgh market values of Apple ($300
billion), General Electric ($200 bil-
lion), Google ($170 billion) and
Amazon.com ($90 billion). Looking
at those, does a $100 billion value
for Facebook seem reasonable?
Think about how reliable the compa-
ny's expected earnings and growth
rates are, and how sure you are that
it will still be around in five or 10
years. With new companies it can be
smart to wait for a promising track
record before investing.
(The Motley Fool owns
shares of Google and Apple,
and our newsletter services have
recommended Apple, Google and
Amazon.com.)

How many mutual funds are
there? M.R., 'Gainesville, Fla.
A According to the Investment
A Company Institute, at the end
of 2010, there were 8,545 mutual
funds in existence. No wonder it can
be hard to find outstanding funds!
(There are some temfic ones out
there, though learn more at
www.fool.com/mutualfunds/
mutualfunds.htm.)
Got a quesnon bfor the Fool? Send it in
CW. RWI - I - -


The State of U.S.
Manufacturing
Many Americans believe that U.S.
manufacturing is dying. Fortunately,
it's not really true. We're making
more things today than almost ever
before. Even adjusted for inflation,
manufacturing output is near an all-
time high. In real terms, we're mak-
ing more than twice as much today
as we were in the early 1970s.
So where's the disconnect? It's this
Manufacturing jobs have been turn--
bling for decades, and they're falling
- at an increasing pace. There were
more than 19 million manufacturing
jobs in 1980. Today, there are a little
more than 11 million. The decline in
manufacturing employment is real.
It's bad. And it's getting worse.
Blame productivity. Manufacturers
have grown incredibly efficient over
the past se% eral decades. They're
able to build the same amount of
stuff with far fe er people.
Take the auto industry. In 1990,
the a\ erage Amencan autoworker's
share of total auto production Was
7.15 \ eucles per y.ear. By 2010,
each worker \\ as producing 11.2


vehicles annually. That means
fewer auto workers are needed
today than 20 years ago.
As tragic as the loss in manufac-
turing jobs has been for many, this
is how the economy is supposed
to work over time. Technology
improves, businesses find ways to
do things with fewer people, and the
world goes on changed,' but better.
In 1900, 44 percent of all jobs were
in agriculture. Tremendous improve-
ments in farm productivity pushed
that number to 2.4 percent by 2000.
We could, as we do with manufactur-
ing jobs, become nostalgic about the
days When farm jobs were aplenty.
Don't. Those who would have once
plowed fields now work in more pro,
ductive endeavors programming,
computers, curing cancer, building '
roads, what have you. We don't want
those farm jobs back.
The question now is where laid-
off manufacturing workers will go
next. We already know to an extent:
High-tech companies collectively.
employ millions, up from almost
none a half-century ago.
That trend will continue, and then
some. Where else? Health-care.
Clean energy. And fields we can't
imagine yet. Our economic recov-
ery just needs to gain more steam.


S S 0 00 0 0a 0 0S 000 0





S2011 THE MOTLEY FOOL/DAs. BY UNIVERSAL UCLICK (FOR RELEASE 6/2/2011)
(EDITORS: For editorial questions, contact Alan McDermott at amcdermott@amuniversal.com.)




Unemployment rises to 9.1 percent


Name That Conipany

I trace my roots back to London
in the 1700s and to companies in the.
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.'" I'm the world's leading education com-
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and a major general publisher. My properties
include the Penguin brand, the Financial Times
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Benjamin Cummings, Longman, Putnam, Viking,
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HP Offers Excuses,
Not Answers

Hewlett-Packard's (NYSE:
HPQ) second-quarter results met
low expectations, but the company
lowered its full-year forecast again.
That sent shares downward.
H-P explained its dour outlook by
pointing to fallout from the disas-
ters in Japan, slow sales of con-
sumer PCs, and an underperforming
enterprise services segment.
The Japanese excuse is interesting,
as neither Cisco Systems nor IBM
played the earthquake and tsunami
card this quarter. Cisco mentioned a
reshuffling of its components inven-
tories to handle Japanese business
disruptions. Big Blue gets 11 percent
of its.revenue from Japan, but saw
no reason to complain. Did H-P suf-,
fer from the catastrophe in ways its
peers just didn't? Hmmm.
New CEO Leo Apotheker aims
to beef up the company's software
offerings. He also aims to offer the
WebOS operating system H-P got
via its Palm acquisition on all H-P
PCs, along with Windows.
Hewlett-Packard shares have .
recently been trading near a price-to-
earnings (P/E) ratio of 9, compared
to its five-year average of 15. That's
attractive, as are its strong returns, on
equity and invested capital. Many
are doubting the company's strategy
and promise, though. So do a little
digging and see what you think.
(The Motley Fool owns shares
of IBM, and its newsletter services
have recommended Cisco Systems.)


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billion annually. Who am I? (Answer: Steelcase)
Write to Us! Send questions for Ask the Fool, Dumbest (or Smart-


BY CHRISTOPHER S.
RUGABER
AP Economics Writer

WASHINGTON --
Employers in May added
the fewest jobs in eight
months, and the unemploy-
ment rate inched up to 9.1
percent. The weakening
job market raised concerns
about an economy ham-
pered by high gas prices
and the effects of natural
disasters here and abroad.
The key question is
whether the meager 54,000
jobs added last month
mark a temporary setback
or are evidence of a more
chronic problem. That total
is far lower than the previ-
ous three months' average
of 220,000 new jobs per
month.
Private companies hired
only 83,000 new workers in
May the fewest in nearly
a year.
Stocks on Wall Street
fell for the third straight
day. The Dow Jones indus-
trial average was down 76
points in late-morning trad-
ing. Broader indexes also
dropped.
Many analysts suggest
the economy will improve
later this year, particularly
if gas prices continue to
decline.
But Friday's report
underscores that the recov-
ery will likely remains weak
and unemployment high
for many months.
"The recovery has not
been derailed, but it's
slow," said Michelle Meyer,
an economist at Bank of
America Merrill Lynch.
"We're still in a muddle-
through period."
Among the deepest job
cuts were in local govern-
ments, which cut 28,000
jobs last month, the most
since November. Nearly


18,000 of those jobs were
in education. Cities and
counties have cut jobs for
22 straight months and
have shed 446,000 posi-
tions since September
2008.
The anemic pace of job
creationposesachallengeto
President Barack Obama's
re-election prospects next
year. The Conference
Board, a business research
group, predicts that the
unemployment rate will
.be 8.5 percent by the end
of next year. That would
mean Obama would face
re-election with a higher
unemployment rate than
any other post-war presi-
denthas.
Yet there's little appetite
on Capitol Hill for addition-
al stimulus spending. And
the Federal Reserve plans
to wrap up its most recent
effort to pump money into
the economy at the end of
this month.
White House economist
Austan Goolsbee said the
burden is now on the pri-
vate sector to create jobs,
as the days of a govern-
ment-led recovery are near-
ing an end.
"You've seen corporate
profits high," he said. "It's
now time to get that trans-
lated ... into the adding of
jobs, building of factories
and buying of equipment
here at home."
The jobs report fol-
lowed a string of sluggish
economic data in the past
month that suggest the
economy is growing more
slowly.
The manufacturing sec-
tor, a key driver of the
recovery, grew at its slow-
est pace in 20 months in
May. Home prices in big
metro areas have reached
their lowest level since
2002.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Job seeker Silvestre Tellez, left, inquires about job openings at Vons stand at the 10th annual Skid Row Career Fair held at
the Los Angeles Mission Thursday. Employers hired only 54,000 new workers in May, the fewest in eight months, and the
unemployment rate rose to 9.1 percent.


Higher gas prices have
left less money for consum-
ers to spend on other pur-
chases. And average wages
aren't even keeping up
with inflation. As a result,
consumer spending, which
fuels about 70 percent of
the economy, is growing
sluggishly.
Companies that depend
on consumer spending shed
jobs last month. Retailers
cut 8,500 positions, after
adding 64,000 in April. And
leisure and hospitality,
which includes restaurants
and hotels, cut 6,000 jobs.
That came after they added


an average of 43,000 in the
previous three months.
Economists have said
that most of the factors
slowing the economy are
temporary. But some are
now concerned that their
impact is greater than they
first envisioned.
"Economic activity has
clearly hit a soft patch,"
said Steven Wood, chief
economist for Insight
Economics. "The open
question is whether this is
temporary and will quickly
reverse itself over the next
couple of months or wheth-
er this is an adjustment to a


slower permanent growth
rate."
Nariman Behravesh,
chief economist at HIS,
called it a "pretty bad
report. It's tempting to say
it's an outlier, but I'm a little
worried." .
More jobs are needed
to sustain the economic
recovery. They provide
the income needed to
support consumer spend-
ing, which accounts for
about 70 percent of the
economy.
Wages and salaries
aren't providing much
help. Average hourly earn-


ings rose 1.8 percent in the
past year, to $22.98 not
enough even to keep up
with inflation.
More people entered
the work force in May. But
most' of the new entrants
couldn't find work. That
pushed the unemployment
rate up from 9 percent
in April. The number of
unemployed rose to 13.9
million.
And the government
revised the previous
months' job totals to show
39,000 fewer jobs were cre-
ated in March and April
than first estimated.


' The Motley Fool

To Educate, Amuse & Enrich


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lurow the answer? Send it to us with Foolish Trivia on the top and you'll Fool@fool.com or via regular mail c/o this newspaper, attn: Thb
e b entered prize! Motley Fook Sorry, ,we can't provide individual financial advice.


LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS SUNDAY, JUNE 5, 2011


Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424

















Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424


LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS SUNDAY, JUNE 5, 2011


THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW


S

. ~,: ~


. The Week in Review


8, 222.15-1NYSE Amex Nasdaq
8,222.15 -164.19 2,380.14 -38.89 2,732.78 -64.08


Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
Hill Intl .31 +2.20 +53.5
CVtPS 34.20 +9.88 +40.6
AcomIntl 5.80 +1.46 +33.6
iPSER2K 31.98 +5.75 +21.9
ITT Ed 86.19+15.32 +21.6
Orbitz 2.69 +.45 +20.1
FtBcppfB 17.80 +2.80 +18.7
CascdeCp 47.44 +7.41 +18.5
FtBcppfC 17.36 +2.53 +17.1
PhxNMda n 13.30 +1.93 +17.0

Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
Goldcp wt 2.38 -.80 -25.2
ChiZenix n 4.73 -1.28 -21.3
NBGrepfA 13.45 -3.55 -20.9
GushanE rs 2.55 -.65 -20.3
AmrRIty 2.61 -.62' -19.2
NokiaCp 6.66 -1.54 -18.8
RealD n 25.39 -5.51 -17.8
.PilgrimsP 4.05 -.82 -16.8
Nautilus h 2.11 -.42 -16.6
DaqoNEn n 9.28 -1.67 -15.3

Most Active ($1 or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
S&P500ETF7084629130.42-3.09
BkofAm 5816369 11.28 -.40
NokiaCp 4522711 6.66-1.54
SPDR Fncl4042120 15.22 -.46
FordM 2711220 14.01 -.59
SprintNex 2673919 5.67 -.18
iShR2K 2527554 80.88-2.77
GenElec 2058061 18.82 -.62
iShEMkts 1877755 47.87 +.12
iShSilver 1870733 35.34-1.69

Diary
Advanced 879
Declined 2,298
New Highs 298
New Lows 77
Total issues 3,233
Unchanged 56
Volume 15,899,645,396


Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
HeraldNB 3.93 +.94 +31.4
StreamGSv 3.70 +.74 +25.0
SamsO&G 3.30 +.57 +20.9
StreamGun 3.80 +.58 +18.0
VimetX 27.63 +3.51 +14.6
NewEnSys 3.74 +.47 +14.4
Quepasa 8.95 +1.09 +13.9
PitWVa 12.32 +1.29 +11.7
Medgenicn 3.38 +.31 +10.1
ExtorreG g 11.71 +1.04 +9.8

Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
EslnLtCap 3.06 -.94 -23.5
CoastlD 2.92 -.63 -17.7
RFexSolu 2.34 -15.2
QuestRM g 6.71 -1.07 -13.7
NthnO&G 17.55 -2.73 -13.5
EntreeGold 2.14 -.33 -13.4
T3 Motn un 3.05 -.44 -12.6
Inuevors 2.29 -.31 -11.9
GrahamCp 21.12 -2.61 -11.0
VoyagerOG 2.68 -.32 -10.7

Most Active ($1 or more
Name Vol(00) Last Chg
CheniereEn249588 10.74 -.82
Hyperdyn. 147433 4.34 -.34
Neoprobe 135548 4.79 -.47
NAPallg 131427 3.67 -.21
Vantagedr 125199 1.97 +.03
VimetX 121015 27.63+3.51
KodiakOg 112056 6.48 -.31
TmsatlPet. 104307 2.09 -.14
NwGoldg 101786 9.72 -.31
GoldStrg 99827 2.60 -.02

Diary
Advanced 224
Declined 302
New Highs 32
New Lows 22
Total issues 542
Unchanged 16
Volume 478,550,287


Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
Agilysys 7.70 +2.92 +61.1
Sphedx rs 4.00 +1.45 +56.9'
Meadelnst 5.24 +1.51 +40.4
BkVA 2.18 +.58 +36.3
Zion wtl2-122.88 +.73 +34.0
Yongye 4.97 +1.22 +32.5
CodnthC 5.05 +1.19 +30.8
RadaElec 3.90 +.90 +30.0
Atrins rsh 3.05 +.66 +27.6
MetaFiRndcl 17.67 +3.79 +27.3

Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
ChinaBio 10.35 -5.75 -35.7
VlyNBcwt 2.31 -.89 -27.8
Orexigen 2.12 -.74 -25.9
AmSupr 7.73 -2.52 -24.6
ChinaNGas 3.30 -.94 -22.2
VBradleyn 39.07-10.98 -21.9
SevArts rs 2.28 -.63 -21.6
ExideTc 7.76 -2.00 -20.5
NaturiAlt 3.45 -.88 -20.3
SkyPFrtJ 2.24 -.57 -20.3

Most Active ($1 or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
SiriusXM 5849326 2.18 -.20
Cisco 2527869 16.01 -.45
Microsoft 2444986 23.91 -.86
Level3 2414936 2.23 -.10
Intel 2199090 21.73 -.48
PwShs QQQ189981456.35-1.08
MicronT 1557117 9.16 -.86
Oracle 1235440 32.33 -1.37
Dell Inc 1121820 15.59 -.20
Yahoo 1120651 15.68 -.34

Diary
Advanced 632
Declined 2,110
New Highs 199
New Lows 152
Total issues 2,801
Unchanged 59
Volume 8,732,434,125


Wkly Wkly YTD
Name Ex DIv Last Chg %Chg %Chg
AT&T Inc NY 1.72 30.65 -.64 -2.0 +4.3
ApIdMati Nasd .32 12.96 -.47 -3.5 -7.8
AutoZone NY ... 285.48 -11.23 -3.8 +4.7
BkofAm NY .04 11.28 -.40 -3.4 -15.4
BariPVix rsNY ... 22.37 +.43 +2.0 -40.5
BobEvans Nasd .80 29.72 -1.44 -4.6 -9.8
BrcdeCm Nasd ... 7.11 +.50 +7.6 +34.4
CNBFnPA Nasd .66 12.61 -.85 -6.3 -14.9
CSX NY 1.44 75.74 -2.19 -2.8 +17.2
Chevron NY 3.12 101.00 -2.21 -2.1 +10.7
Cisco Nasd .24 16.01 -.45 -2.7 -20.9
Citigrprs NY .04 39.85 -1.12 -2.7 -15.8
CocaCola NY 1.88 65.53 -.98 -1.5 -.4
Delhaize NY 2.45 80.72 +1.18 +1.5 +9.5
Dell nc Nasd ... 15.59 -.20 -1.3 +15.1
DrxFnBull NY ... 25.11 -2.31 -8.4 -9.8
FamilyDIr NY .72 52.38 -3.18 -5.7 +5.4
FordM NY ... 14.01 -.59 -4.0 -16.6
GenElec NY .60 18.82 -.62 -3.2 +2.9
HomeDp NY 1.00 34.63 -1.37 -3.8 -1.2
iShJapn NY .14 10.06 -.03 -0.3 -7.8
iShSilver NY ... 35.34 -1.69 -4.6 +17.1
iShEMkts NY .64 47.87 +.12 +0.3 +.5
iSEafe NY 1.42- 60.93 +.13 +0.2 +4.7
iShR2K NY .89 80.88 -2.77 -3.3 +3.4
Intel Nasd .84 21.73 -.48 -2.2 +3.3
JPMorgCh NY 1.00 41.57 -1.22 -2.9 -2.0
Level3 Nasd ... 2.23 -.10 -4.1+127.6


Wkly Wkly YTD
Name Ex DIv Last Chg%Chg %Chg
Lowes NY .56 23.40 -.85 -3.5 -6.7
McDnlds NY 2.44 80.54 -1.08 -1.3 +4.9
MicronT Nasd ... 9.16 -.86 -8.6 +14.2
Microsoft Nasd .64 23.91 -.86 -3.5 -14.3
NY Times NY ... 8.06 +.26 +3.3 -17.8
NextEraEnNY 2.20 55.68 -1.12 -2.0 +7.1
NobltyH Nasd ... 8.07 -.13 -1.6 -.5
NokiaCp NY .55 6.66 -1.54 -18.8 -35.5
OcciPet NY 1.84 104.20 -2.37 -2.2 +6.2
Oracle Nasd .24 32.33 -1.37 -4.1 +3.3
Penney NY .80 32.26 -3.74-10.4 -.2
PepsiCo NY 2.06 68.97 -.91 -1.3 +5.6
Pfizer NY .80 20.84 -.09 -0.4 +19.0
Potash s NY .28 55.17 -.82 -1.5 +6.9
PwShsQQQNasd .39 56.35 -1.08 -1.9 +3.5
Ryder NY 1.08 52.09 -2.36 -4.3 -1.0
S&P500ETFNY 2.34 130.42 -3.09 -2.3 +3.7
SearsHdgs Nasd ... 66.89 -3.94 -5.6 -9.3
SiriusXM Nasd 2.18 -.20 -8.2 +33.4
SouthnCo NY 1.89 39.37 -.43 -1.1 +3.0
SprintNex NY ... 5.67 -.18 -3.1 +34.0
SPEngy NY 1.05 75.26 -1.08 -1.4 +10.3
SPDR FnclNY .16 15.22 -.46 -2.9 -4.6
SPInds NY .64 36.10 -1.19 -3.2 +3.5
TimeWarn NY .94 35.17 -.95 -2.6 +9.3
WalMart NY 1.46 53.66 -1.04 -1.9 -.5
WellsFargo NY .48 26.86 -1.28 -4.5 -13.3
Yahoo Nasd ... 15.68 -.34 -2.1 -5.7


Weekly Dow Jones

Dow Jones Industrials CLOSED 128.21 -279.
Close: 12,151.26 ) U .
1-week change: -290.32 (-2.3%) MON TUES WE
13,000


12,500 .........

12,000 ... .


11,500


1.1 ,000


D ............ ... ......... ..... . . ..... M


MUTUAL FUNDS
Total Assets Total Return/Ra
Name Obj ($Mlns) NAV 4-wk 12-mo !
PIMCO TotRetls Cl 142,457 11.06 +0.6 +8.2/B
American Funds GrthAmA m LG 68,531 31.38 -4.0 +18.6/D
Vanguard TotStldx LB 63,574 32.85 -3.8 +21.4/B
Fidelity Contra. LG 63,341 69.68 -3.1 +20.1/C
American Funds CaplncBuA m IH 61,219 52.24 -1.4 +20.5/B
Vanguard Instldxl LB 59,613 119.34 -3.9 +20.2/B
American Funds CpWIdGrIA m WS 58,144 37.49 -3.2 +25.1/C
American Funds IncAmerA m MA 55,798 17.34 -2.0 +20.4/A
Vanguard 500Adml LB 55,332 120.18 -3.9 +20.2/B
vanguard TotStlAdm LB 52,734 32.87 -3.8 +21.5/B
American Funds InvCoAmA m LB 50,714 28.64 -4.6 +17.6/D
Dodge & Cox IntlStk FV 48,440. 36.98 -4.2 +27.7/C
Dodge & Cox Stock LV 46,344 113.18 -3.7 +20.5/B
American Funds WAMutlnvA m LV 41,374 28.49 -3.7 +22.0/A
Anenican Funds EurPacGrA m FB 40,871 43.24 -3.3 +26.2/D
Vanguard InstPlus LB 38,775 119.35 -3.9 +20.2/B
FrankTemp-Franklin Income A m CA 37,117 2.25 -1.2 +20.1/A
American Funds FnlnvA m LB 36,110 38.37 -3.8 +23.0/A
American Funds NewPersp.A m WS 35,113 29.71 -3.7 +24.3/C
Vanguard Totlrinfl d FB. 35,062 16.32 -3.5 +27.8/C
American Funds BalA m MA 33,122 18.52 -2.7 +17.2/B
PIMCOTotRetAdm b Cl 33,011 11.06 +0.5 +8.0/B
Vanguard 5001nv LB 32,019 120.15 -3.9 +20.1/B
Fidelity GrowCo LG 30,427 89.66 -2.3 +26.8/A
Harbor Intllnstl d FB 29,967 64.79 -2.9 +33.9/A
Vanguard WelltnAdm MA 29,966 55.72 -2.5 +16.6/B
Vanguard TotBdAdml Cl 28,473 10.78 +1.3 +6.1/D
CA -Cosevafive Allocation, Cl -Intermediate-Term Bond, ES -Europe Stock, FB -Foreign Large Blend, FE
Large Value, IH -World Allocation, LB -Large Blend, LG -Large Growth, LV -Large Value, MA -Moderate /
Mid-Cap Value, SH -Spedatly-heath, WS -World Stock, Tota Return: Chng NAV with dividends reinve
others with same objective: A is in top 20%, E In bottom 20%. Min Init Invt: Minimum $ needed to invest in


New York Stock Exchange


Wkly YTD Wkly
DIv YId PE Chg %Chg Last Name


AES Corp ... ... 15 -.30 +2.3 12.46
AFLAC 1.20 2.6 9 -1.53 -17.7 46.47
AK Steel .20 1.3 .... -.30 -8.4 14.99
AMR ... ... ... -.39 -23.5 5.96
AT&Tlnc 1.72 5.6 9 -.64 +4.3 30.65
AbtLab 1.92 3.8 13 -.47 +6.6 51.08
AMD ... ... 8 -.52 -2.6 7.97
Aetna .60 1.4 10 -.39 +41.6 43.20
Agilent ... ... 20 -2.17 +14.5 47.43
AlcatelLuc ... ... ... +90.9 5.65
Alcoa .12 .8 22 -.56 +3.4 15.92
Allstate .84 2.7 12 -.57 -3.8 30.67
AlphaNRs ... ... 46 -3.10 -16.8 49.97
Altria 1.52 5.5 14 -.34 +12.1 27.60
AMovilL .52 1.1 15 -3.27 -14.4 49.09
AEagleOut .44 3.4 16 -.27 -12.5 12.80
AEP 1.84 4.9 15 -.81 +4.3 37.51
AmExp .72 1.5 14 -1.85 +14.8 49.28
AmlntlGrp ... ... 2 -1.23 -42.7 27.65
AriTower ... ... 56 -3.70 -.8 51.21
Anadarko .36 .5 -... -1.68 +1.1 76.98
Annaly 2.62 14.4 7 +.15 +1.7 18.22
ArcelorMit .75 2.3 16 -.67 -15.7 32.16
4rchCoal .44 1.6 20 -2.30 -22.1 27.30
ArchDan .64 2.1 9 -1.82 +1.0 30.39
ArmourRsdl.44 19.0 ... -.13 -3.2 7.56
ATMOS 1.36 4.3 14 -1.18 +2.3 31.91
3B&TCp .64 2.5 21 -1.18 :.-.6.. 26.12
3akrHu .60 .8 30 +1.12 +30.5 74.58
3coBrades .80 4.0 ... +.22 -1.7 19.94
3coSantSA .79 6.7 ... +.36 +10.5 11.77
3coSBrasil .70 6.2 ... +.07 -17.1 11.27
3kofAin .04 .4 21 -.40 -15.4 11.28
3kNYMel .52 1.9 13 -.82 -10.9 26.90
3ar iPVix rs ... ...... +.43 -40.5 22.37
3arrickG .48 1.0 13 -1.56 -13.8 45.83
3axter 1.24 2.1 16 -1.17 +14.5 57.94
3erkHB ... ... 14 -1.79 -4.8 76.25
3estBuy .60 2.0 10 -.96 -10.7 30.63
3igLots ... ... 11 +.11 +6.8 32.53
3lockHR .60 3.7 13 +.14 +35.3 16.11
3oeing 1.68 2.2 17 -2.15 +14.7 74.84
3ostonSci ... ... 20 -.17 -9.2 6.87
3rMySq 1.32 4.7 14 -.49 +5.7 27.98
3rkfldOP rt... ... ... -.02 -83.0 .02
3BREllis ... ... 35 -.92 +25.0 25.59
3BSB .40 1.5 21 -.78 +42.8 27.20
'MS Eng .84 4.3 14 +.04 +6.1 19.74
'VS Care .50 1.3 15 -.83 +9.2 37.97
Zameron ... ... 21 -1.10 -8.8 46.27
3dnNRsgs .36 ... ... -.93. -6.3 41.64
ZapOne .20 .4 8 -2.49 +21.1 51.55
ZapitlSrce .04 .7 18 -.32 -14.4 6.08
Zamival 1.00 2.7 15 -1.75 -20.5 36.65
caterpillar 1.76 1.7 18 -3.50 +7.9 101.10
3emex .43 ...... -.11 -19.1 8.33
.enterPnt .79 4.1 17 +.01 +21.4 19.09
ZntryLink 2.90 7.0 13 -1.04 -10.6 41.26
ZhesEng .30 1.0 10 -.58 +17.8 30.53
Chevron 3.12 3.1 10 -2.21 +10.7 101.00
Zhicos .20 1.4 20 -.93 +18.7 14.28
3himera .66 17.4 6 -.11 .-7.8 3.79
3itigrp rs .04 .1 13 -1.12 -15.8 39.85
Z1iffsNRs .56 .6 9 -2.38 +11.9 87.29
coachh .90 1.5 21 -2.67 +10.3 61.01
'ocaCola 1.88 2.9 13 -.98 -.4 65.53
DocaCE .52 1.8 15 -.21 +13.5 28.40
ZogdSpen .40 6.5 ... +.12 +5.7 6.13
ZonAgra .92 3.8 16 -.57 +8.4 24.47
'onocPhil 2.64 3.6 10 -.25 +6.3 72.39
DonsolEngy.40 .8 25 -.50 +3.1 50.25
ZonEd 2.40 4.6 14 -.41 +5.5 52.32
DonstellEn .96 2.6 16 -.28 +19.8 36.71
Zoning .20 1.1 9 -.84 -1.5 19.03
Zovidien .80 1.5 17 -.31 +18.7 54.22
DCT IndI .28 5.3 ... -.27 +.2 5.32
3RHorton .15 1.3 83 -.39 -2.8 11.59
)TE 2.35 4.7 14 -.86 +10.9 50.26
Danahers .08 .2 19 -2.55 +10.0 51.89



Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last


ActivsBliz .17
AdobeSy ...
AEtema g ...
Affymetrix ...
AgFeed
AkamaiT
AllscriptH ...
AlteraCp If .24
Amazon
AmCapLtd ...
AmSupr
4mgen
4123 Sys ...
ApolloGrp
Apple Inc ...
ApldMatl .32
ArenaPhm ...
AriadP
ArmHld .13
AmubaNet ...
Atmel
Autodesk ...
AutoData 1.44
AvagoTch .32
AvanirPhm ...
3aidu
3edBath ...
3ioSante
3rigExp
3roadcom .36
3rcdeCm
ZA Inc .20
Cadence
SpstnTrb h ..
3areerEd ...
3ephln
3ienaCorp ...
Zisco .24


28 +.39 -4.8 11.84
19 -1.02 +8.1 33.27
... +.05 +40.7 2.42
... +1.26 +44.1 7.25
... -.03 -61.9 1.12
35 -.83 -30.2 32.83
... -.35 +2.5 19.75
17 -1.49 +28.0 45.56
82 -5.81 +4.6 188.32
3 -.53 +22.6 9.27
9 -2.52 -73.0 7.73
12 -.66 +6.9 58.69
... -.25 -39.5 5.77
17 +5.82 +16.6 46.04
16 +6.03 +6.5 343.44
11 -.47 -7.8 12.96
;.. -.09 -19.8 1.38
13 -.92 +54.7 7.89
... -.37 +35.6 28.14
... -.05 +34.6 28.11
14 -.60 +16.1 14.30
40 -1.66 +6.9 40.84
22 -.85 +15.1 53.28
20 -1.12 +19.3 33.89
... -.21 +9.3 4.46
11 -.72 +38.0 133.21
17 -1.85 +5.0 51.61
... +.10 +83.5 3.01
.. -2.07 +5.9 28.86
17 -2.07 -20.9 34.45
25 +.50 +34.4 7.11
14 -.32 -7.7 22.57
15 -.09 +27.7 10.55
... -.16 +66.7 1.60
11 +2.74 +18.6 24.59
12 -.10 +29.1 79.68
... -1.69 +18.0 24.83
13 -.45 -20.9 16.01


Name Div
Clearwire
Comcast .45
Comc spcl .45
Compuwre ..
CorinthC ...
Costco .96
Cree Inc
CypSemi .36
Dell Inc
Dndreon
DirecTVA ...
DonlleyRR 1.04
DrmWksA ...
DryShips
E-Trade
eBay
ElectArts ...
Enerl
EricsnTel .37
ExideTc
Expedia .28
ExpScrip s ...
FiberTwr
FifthThird .24
Finisar
FstNiagara .64
Flextm
FuelCell
GT Solar ...
GileadSci ...
GluMobile ..
GreenMtC ...
GrifolsSA n ..
HercOffsh ...
HudsCity .32
Intel .84
Intuit
JA Solar ...


Wkly YTD Wkly
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DeanFds ... ... 30 -.16 +51.7 13.41
Deere 1.64 2.0 14 -3.54 -1.0 82.20
DeltaAir ... ... 15 -.38 -23.7 9.62
DenburyR ... ... 58 -.69 +9.7 20.95
DevelDiv .16 1.2 ... -.50 -1.4 13.89
DrSCBr rs ... ...... +3.35 -18.8 38.01
DirFnBr rs ... ...... +3.46 -1.0 46.77
DrxEBearrs... ...... +.61 -32.6 15.20
DrxFnBull ... ... ... -2.31 -9.8 25.11
DirxSCBull ... ... ... -8.43 +6.1 76.87
DirxEnBull .05 .1 ... -3.43 +25.6 73.42
Discover .24 1.0 10 -.57 +25.2 23.20
Disney .40 1.0 17 -2.14 +5.0 39.38
DollarGen ... 17 -2.82 +3.8 31.84
DomRescs1.97 4.2 15 -.08 +10.4 47.15
DowChm 1.00 2.8 19 -.40 +3.1 35.20
Dresserf ... ... 31 -.26 +20.7 51.41
DukeEngy .98 5.3 13 -.17 +3.6 18.45
Dynegy ... ... ... -.18 +2.1 5.74
EMC Cp ... ... 30 -.50 +22.0 27.93
Eaton s 1.36 2.8 16 -2.47 -3.6 48.91
ElPasoCp .04 .2 28 -.50 +48.3 20.40
Eln ... ... ... +.20 +67.4 9.59
EldorGldg .10 ... 38 -1.13 -20.0 14.86
EmersonEll.38 2.7 17.-2.90 -10.4 51.22
EnCana g .80- 2.4 95 -.73 +14.2 33.26
EndvSilvg ... ... ... -.71 +26.3 9.27
.ENSCO .1.40. .2.5 14,,+2.28 +5.4.. 56.27


ExcoRes .16
Exelon 2.10
ExxonMbl 1.88
FirstEngy 2.20
FootLockr .66
FordM
ForestLab ...
FMCG s 1.00
FrontierCm .75
Gafisa SA .29
GameStop ...
Gannett .16
Gap .45
GenDynaml.88
GenGrPrn .40
GenMarit
GenMillss 1.12
GenMotn ...
GenOn En ...
Genworth ...
Gerdau .27
GoldFLtd .19
Goldcrp g .41
GoldmanS 1.40
Goodyear ...
HCA HIdn ..
HCP Inc 1.92
Hallibrtn .36
HartfdFn .40
HeclaM' ...
Heinz 1.92
Hertz
HewlettP .48
HomeDp' 1.00
HonwllntI 1.33
HostHotls .08
Huntsmn .40
iShGold s ...
iSAstla .82
iShBraz 2.53
iSCan .50
IShGer .29
iSh HK .45
iShJapn .14
iSh Kor .44
iSTaiwn .29
iShSilver ...
iShChina25 .63
iSSP500 2.46
iShEMkts .64
iShB20 T 4.01


... -.90 -.9 19.25
14 -.23 -.4 41.47
12 -1.45 +11.0 81.18
16 -.68 +18.0 43.67
1 -1.29 +20.4 23.63
7 -.59 -16.6 14.01
10 +1.12 +15.4 36.90
10 -1.80 -16.8 49.93
61 -.29 -12.4 8.52
... +.25 -25.3 10.85
10 -1.48 +16.8 26.73
6 -.25 -8.6 13.79
10 -1.28 -18.7 17.92
10 -.66 -.5 70.60
... -.07 +4.8 16.23
.. +.17 -46.8 1.73
15 -1.35 +6.6 37.94
7 -2.16 -21.0 29.12
... -.13 +2.6 3.91
54 -.36 -18.3 10.73
... -.05 -22.9 10.79
3 -.13 -12.3 15.90
16 -.87 +6.8 49.10
15 -3.33 -19.5 135.33
...-1.00 +39.3 16.51
... -.60 +10.1 34.14
41 -.34 +.2 36.88
21 +.13 +23.1 50.28
6 -1.10 -4.0 25.43
38 -.60 -29.8 7.90
17 -1.48 +7.6 53.20
25 -.77 +5.7 15.31
9 -.85 -14.2 36.11
17 -1.37 -1.2 34.63
19 -1.94 +7.7 57.25
... -.70 -5.5 16.89
17 -.82 +16.3 18.15
... +.04 +8.3 15.05
... -.65 +1.8 25.89
+.56 -3.2 74.90
S-.73 +2.7 31.85
+.52 +12.0 26.82
+.09 +.7 -19.06
-.03 -7.8 10.06
-.08 +5.9 64.81
... +.44 +.8 15.75
...-1.69 +17.1 35.34
... -.47 +1.4 43.71
... -3.12 +3.7 130.88
.. +.12 +.5 47.87
... +.22 +2.3 96.33


WITH SO MANY CHOICES,

WHY WOULD YOU CHOOSE


TO PAY TAXES?





1.93% TO 5.14% *

* Yield effective 05/31/2011, subject to availability. Yield and market value may fluctuate if -
sold prior to maturity and the amount you receive from the sale of these securities may be less
than, equal to, or more than the amount originally invested. Bond investments are subject to
interest rate risk such that when interest rates rise, the prices of bonds can decrease and the
investor can lose principal value. Any bond called prior to maturity results in reinvestment
risk for the owner of the bond. May be subject to alternative minimum tax. Municipal bonds
may have original issue discount.
Some of the available issues of bonds are callable. Contact your local Edward Jones financial
advisor for more information about maturity dates and applicable call provisions.

'b invest in tax-free bonds, call or visit your local


Steve Jones, CFP
Financial Advisor
2929 West US Highway 90
Suite 114
Lake City, FL 32055
386-752-3847 www.edwardjones.com Member SiPC


Wkly YTD Wkly
DIv YId PE Chg %Chg Last


iS Eafe 1.42
iShR2K. .89
iShREst 1.98
ITW 1.36
IngrmM
IBM 3.00
Intll Coal
IntlGame .24
IntPap 1.05
Interpublic .24
Invesco .49
ItauUnibH .67
JPMorgCh 1.00
JanusCap .20
JohnJn 2.28
JohnsnCtl .64
JnprNtwk ...
KT Corp
KV PhmA
KeyEngy ...
Keycorp .12
Kimco .72
Kinross g .10
Kohls 1.00
Kraft 1.16
LDK Solar ..:
LSI Corp ...
LVSands
LennarA .16
LillyEli 1.96
Limited .80
LincNat .20


Nasdaq Most Active


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YId PE Chg %Chg Last
... ... -.52 -21.6 4.04
1.9 18 -.66 +10.8 24.23
2.0 17 -.59 +10.3 22.84
... 20 -.40 -17.7 9.61
... ... +1.19 -3.1 5.05
1.2 24 -3.72 +7.8 77.81
... 25 -2.47 -37.6 41.14
1.6 38 -1.17 +19.4 22.19
... 9 -.20 +15.1 15.59
... ... -1.03 +18.4 41.35
... 18 -1.01 +22.5 48.92
5.0 15 -.27 +18.1 20.63
... 13 -1.59 -21.1 23.24
7 +.42 -24.4 4.15
... ... -11.22 -9.4 14.49
... 21 -.38 +8.9 30.30
... ... +.13 +46.7 24.03
... ... +.26 -64.1 1.36
2.5 ... +.20 +28.7 14.84
24 -2.00 -17.5 7.76
1.0 19 -.06 +10.1 27.63
... 24 -1.75 +5.0 56.73
... ... -.23 -71.1 1.29
1.9 15 -.54 -15.6 12.39
... 19 -2.57 -28.8 21.15
4.7 18 -.35 -1.8 13.73
... 9 -.23 -12.4 6.88
... ... +.29 -24.2 1.75
... 11 +2.00 +48.4 13.53
... 13 -.14 +13.3 41.05
... ... +.07 +144.0 5.05
... ... -3.24 +141.3 79.30
... ... ... -3.3 7.40
... ... -.33 +71.6 5.97
3.7 ... -.46 -32.5 8.60
3.9 10 -.48 +3.3 21.73
... 25 -1.95 +4.3 51.42
... 4 +.04 -17.5 5.71


Name DIv YId
JDS Uniph ...
JetBlue
JoyGlbl .70 .8
LamResrch ...
LawsnSft ...
Level3
UbtyMlntA ...
LifeTech
UnearTch .96 2.9
MarvellT
Mattel .92 3.6
Maximlntg .84 3.2
MediCo
MelcoCrwn ...
Microchp 1.38 3.7
MicronT
Microsoft .64 2.7
NetApp
Netflix
NewsCpA .15 .9
Novavax
Novlus
Nvidia
OnSmcnd ...
OptimerPh ...
Oracle .24 .7
Orexigen
PDL Bio .60 9.5
PMC Sra ...
Paccar .48 1.0
PattUTI .20 .6
Paychex 1.24 4.1
PeopUtdF .63 4.9
Popular
PwShs QQQ .39 .7
Powrwav
PriceTR 1.24 2.1
Qualcom .86 1.5


.... +.13 +4.7 60.93
...-2.77 +3.4 80.88
-.82 +8.8 60.90
15 -.96 +5.0 56.08
10 -.73 -6.0 17.95
14 -2.45 +12.5 165.05
50 +.05 +88.2 14.57
19 -.63 -6.3 16.57
11 -1.03 +9.7 29.88
23 '-.46 +7.3 11.40
17 -1.27 -4.2 23:06
... +.36 -4.3 22.87
9 -1.22 -2.0 41.57
10 -.75 -26.6 9.52
15 -.68 +6.9 66.09
16 -1,41 -1.4 37.65
28 -4.72 -12.4 32.33
-.83 -11.5' 18.41
+.51 +52.5 3.89
23 ,... +35.1 17.53
11 -39 -8.9 8.06
... -.48 +3.5 18.68
24 -.21 -16.1 15.90
14 -2.95 -6.8 50.67
20 -,65 +8.2 34.10
7 -.24 -33.0 6.78
... -.29 +17.2 7.02
51 +.70 -8.4, -42.08
27 -.92 -4.1 17.98
8 -.80 +5.7 37.05
15 -1.91 +21.8 37.44
10 -1.42 -1.3 27.45



Wkly YTD Wkly
PE Chg %Chg Last
69 -1.50 +28.0 18.54
18 -.38 -13.8 5.70
18 -.24 +2.3 88.78
8 -.14 -11.5 45.82
40 +.08 +20.4 11.14
... -.10+127.6 2.23
18 -.33 +12.4 17.72
25 -1.57 -9.3 50.33
14 -1.43 -5.7 32.63
11 -1.02 -18.3 15.15
14 -.42 +1.0 25.69
19 -1.48 +9.5 25.87
8 -.50 +26.5 17.88
... +.50 +80.0 11.45
17 -1.76 +9.2 37.37
6 -.86 +14.2 9.16
6 -,86 -14,3 23.91
32 -3.39 -5.5 51.94
92 +9.19 +55,8 273.70
14 -.80 +18.0 17.18
... -.16 -10.3 2.18
10 -.51 +9.4 35.36
45 -1.04 +19.9 18.46
14 -.60 +6.4 10.51
86 +.76 +21.5 13.74
21 -1.37 +3.3 32.33
... -.74 -73.8 2.12
10 -.25 +1.6 6.33
36 -.26 -12.7 7.50
30 -2.08 -17.4 47.37
26 -.77 +43.5 30.92
22 -1.40 -1.2 30.54
31 -.38 -8.4 12.83
... -.07 -10.8 2.80
... -1.08 +3.5 56.35
51 -.17 +.40.2 3.56
22 -3.47 -8.6 58.97
25 -.31 +15.3 57.04


Name


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DIv YId PE Chg %Cho Last


LloydBkg ...
LyonBasA .10 .3
MBIA
MEMC
MFAFncl .94 11.7
MGM Rsts ...
Macys .40 1.5
ManpwrGp .80 1.4
MarathonOl.00 1.9,
MktVGold .40 .7
MktVRus .18 .5
MktV Agri .33 .6
MarlntA .40 1.1
MarshM .88' 2.9
Marshlls .04 .5
Masco .30 2.3
MedcoHith ...
Medtmic .90 2.3
Merck 1.52 4.2
MetLife .74 1.8
MetroPCS ...
Molycorpn ...
Monsanto 1.12 1.6
MonstrWw...
Moodys .56 1.4
MorgStan .20 .9
Mosaic .20 .3
NCR Corp ...
,NYSE Eur 1.20 3.4
Nabors
NBkGreece .29
NatGrid 2.92 5.9


... -.25 -22.9 3.17
...-2.85 +16.0 39.89
5 -.30 -27.8 8.66
57 -.48 -14.4 9.64
9 -.13 -1.3 8.05
...-1.21 -4.4 14.19
12 -1.37 +8.9 27.54
... -2.95 -8.8 57.24
12 -1.57 +39.9 51.80
... -1.43 -8.1 56.49
... -.18 +.1 37.96
... -.81 +.7 53.90
30 -1.61 -12.7 36.25
18 -.49 +10.7 30.27
... -.11 +12.3 7.77
"... -.99 +5.1 13.30.
17 -.87 -5.7 57.79
13 -1.04 +5.9 39.27
16 -.39 -.6 35.82
12 -1.99 -6.0 41.77
28 -.60 +39.0 17.56
... -.48 +24.6 62.20
28 -.85 -1.2 68.79
...-1.46 -42.5 13.58
17 +.64 +48.6 39.43
12 -.95 -15.0 23.12
14 -1.05 -9.7 68.99
14 -.29 +23.2 18.94
16 +.13 +19.4 35.80
83 -.17 +17.0 27.45
... +.21 -10.1 1.51
... -.31 +10.7 49.14


Wkly YTD Wkly.
Name DIv YId PE Chg %Chg Last
NOilVarco .44 .6 19 +.48 +9.1 73.34
NatSemi .40 1.6 19 -.01 +78.6 24.57
NYCmtyB 1.00 6.4 13 -.41 -16.5 15.74
NYTimes ... ... 12 +.26 -17.8 8.06
NewellRub .32 2.1 14 -2.68 -17.7 14.97
NewmtM .80 1.5 12 -1.64 -10.9 54.75
NextEraEn 2.20 4.0 14 -1.12 +7.1 55.68
NiSource .92 4.7 19 -.55 +11.7 .19.69
NobleCorp 1.06 2.6 14 -.78 +14.0 40.77
NokiaCp .55 8.3 ... -1.54 -35.5 6.66
NorflkSo 1.60 2.3 17 -1.85 +12.6 70.72
Novartis 2.53 4.0 15 +.53 +7.9 63.62
Nucor 1.45 3.6 49 -1.69 -7.8 40.40
OcciPet 1.84 1.8 17 -2.37 +6.2 104.20
OfficeDpt ... ... ... -.29 -28.3 3.87
OilSvHT 2.36 1.2 ... -.44 +8.4 152.34
PG&ECp 1.82 4.3 16 -.75 -11.5 42.35
PNC 1.40 2.4 9 -3.20 -2.3 59.34
PPLCorp 1.40 5.0 12 -.09 +5.5 27.77
PatriotCoal ... ... ... -1.13 +11.8 21.66
PeabdyE .34 .6 19 -2.86 -8.2 58.76
Penney .80 2.5 19 -3.74 -.2 32.26
PepsiCo 2.06 3.0 18 -.91 +5.6 68.97
Petrohawk ... ...... +.12 +44.7 26.40
PetrbrsA 1.34 4.4 ... -.15 -10.1 30.73
Petrobras: 129 3.8 -:.49 -10.0 34.05
Pfizer .80 3.8 20 -.09 +19.0 20.84
PhilioMor 2.56 3.7 17 -1.53 +17.9 68.99-
Potashs .28 .5 24 -.82 +6.9 55.17
PS USDBull... ... ... -.35 -7.1 21.09
ProLogis 1.12 3.3 ... -2.49 +7.2 34.00
PrUShS&P ... ...... +.93 -9.8 21.44
ProUltQQQ ... ...... -3.42 +5.9 86.25
PrUShQQQ rs... ...... +1.79 -10.0 52.33
ProUItSP .39 .8 ... -2.48 +6.8 51.34
ProUShL20 ... ...... -.23 -10.6 33.10
ProUSSP500... ... ... +1.04 -15.0 16.49
ProUSSIv rs... ...... +1.35 -54.3 17.97
ProgsvCp 1.40 1.9 12 -.61 +5.5 20.97
ProUSR2K rs... ...... +2.70 -11.8 44.30
PrudentI 1.15 1.9 9 -1.91 +4.3 61.26
PulteGrp ... ... ... -.38 +4.0 7.82
QntmDSS ... ...... +.30 -9.4 3.37
QksilvRes ... ... 7 -.16 -2.2 14.42
Quiksilvr ... ... ... +.46 -.6 5.04
RadianGrp .01 .2 ... -.39 -45.5 4.40
RadioShk .25 1.8 9 -1.61 -23.9 14.08
Raytheon 1.72 3.5 8 -1.22 +6.2 48.81
RegalEnt .84 6.7 45 -1.16 +6.8 12.54
RegionsFn .04 .6 ... -.62 -9.1 6.36
ReneSola ... ... 3 -.95 -28.5 6.25
Renren n ... ... ... -.31 -29.5 12.69
RepubSvc .80 2.6 20 -.93 +2.5 30.61
RioTinto 1.08 1.6 ... -2.15 -5.9 67.44
RiteAid ... ... ... +.02 +22.3 1.08
SKTlcm ... ......-.25 -2.6 18.15
SLMCp .40 2.5 9 -.44 +29.5 16.30
SpdrDJIA 3.04. 2.5 ... -2.91 +4.9 121.32
SpdrGold ... ... ... +.52 +8.3 150.22
S&P500ETF2.34 1.8 ... -3.09 +3.7 130.42
SpdrHome .31 1.7 ... -.80- +2.9 17.90
SpdrKbwBk.15 .6 ...-1.02 -8.3 23.75
SpdrLehHY4.41 10.3 ... -.46 +.9 40.05
SpdrRetl .50 1.0 ... -2.46 +5.9 51.23
SpdrOGEx .49 .8 ... -1.74 +10.8 58.47
SpdrMetM .41 .6 ... -2.57 -.8 68.20
Safeway .58 2.6 14 -2.24 -.9 22.28
'Saks ... ... 32 -.27 +2.2 10.94
SandRdge ... ... ... -.35 +51.5 11.09
Sanofi 1.82 4.7 ... -.31 +19.1 38.37
SaraLee .46 2.5 .26 -.70 +7.0 18.74
Schlmbrg 1.00 1.2 23 +.33 +1.8 85.04
Schwab .24 1.4 29 -.78 -2.0 16.76
SealAir .52 2.4 15 -3.33 -14.0 21.89
SemiHTr .57 1.7 ... -1.17 +5.0 34.16
SiderurNac .81 5.8 ... -.10 -16.4 13.93
SilvWhtn g .12 .3 34 -1.36 -9.9 35.17
SouthnCo 1.89 4.8 17 -.43 +3.0 39.37
SthnCopperl.83 5.3 19 -1.77 -28.8 34.72


Name DIv YId
SwstAirl .02 .2
SwstnEngy ...
SpectraEn 1.04 3.8
SprintNex ... ...
SPMatls 1.23 3.2
SP HIthC .61 1.7
SP CnSt .81 2.6
SP Consume .56 1.4
SPEngy 1.05 1.4
SPDR Fncl .16 1.1
SP Inds .64 1.8
SP Tech .33 1.3
SP Util 1.31 3.9
StarwdHtl .30 .5
StateStr .72 1.7
StillwtrM
Suncorgs .44
Suntech
SunTrst .04 .2
Supvalu .35 3.9
Synovus .04 1.8
Sysco 1.04 3.3
'TiJX -, .76, 1.5
TaiwSemi .47 3.4
TalismE g .27
,Target..., .1,00 2.1
TataMotors .32 1.4
TeckRes g .60
TelNorL .52 2.9
TenetHIth
Teradyn
Tesoro
Texinst .52 1.6
Textron .08 .4
TimeWam .94 2.7
TollBros
Total SA 3.16 5.7
Transocn .79 1:2
Travelers 1.64 2.7
Tycolntl 1.00 2.1
Tyson .16 .9
UBSAG
USAirwy
UtdCont ...
UtdMicro .08 3.0
UPS B 2.08 2.9
US Bancrp .50 2.0
USNGss ...
US OilFd ...
USSteel 20 .5
UtdhlthGp 65 1.3
ValeSA 90 2.6
Vale SA pt 90 3.2
ValeroE .20 .
VangEmg .82 17
VangEAFE .90 24
VeriFone
VerizonCi 1 5 5.5
ViacomB 1,00 2,0
Visa .60 .8
Walgm ,70 1,6
Weathfintl ,,,-
WellsFargo .48 1,8
WendyArby .08 1.7
WstnRelin ...
WstnUnion .32 1.6
Weyerh .60 2,9
WhitingPts s.
WmsCos 50 1.6
XL Grp .44 2.0
Xerox .17 1.7
Yamanag .18 1.4
YingliGm
YumBmds 1.00 1 8


AMEX Most Active


Name


Div YId


RF MicD ...
RschMotn ...
Riverbed s ...
SanDisk
SeagateT .72
Sequenom ...
Slcnware .41
Sina
SidusXM ...
SkywksSol
Sonus
Staples .40
StarScient ...
Starbucks .52
StlDynam .40
Symantec ...
TD Ameritr .20
Tellabs .08
Telvent
TeslaMotn ...
TevaPhrm .83
TibcoSft
TiVo Inc
Travelzoo
TriQuint
UTStrcm ...
UrbanOut ..
Vedsign 5.75
VirgnMda h .16
Vivus ...
Vodafone 1.44
Windstrm 1.00
Xilinx .76
Yahoo
Yandexn
Yonqye


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PE Chg %Chg Last Name DIv YId PE Chg %Chg Last


13 -.29 -20.3 5.86
6 -4.62 -32.9 38.98
... -.93 +5.2 37.00
8 -1.78 -11.2 44.26
5 -.56 +5.8 15.90'
... +.43 +3.1 8.28
22 +.27 +9.6 6.52
... -4.44 +62.2 111.60
-.20 +33.4 2.18
23 -2.44 -19.5 23.06
... -.19 +13.9 3.04
13 -.74 -30.5 15.82
... -.34 +136.9 4.62
25 -1.30 +9.4 35.16
20 -.55 -10.0 16.47
24 -.71 +10.6 18.51
19 -1.02 +5.6 20.06
21 -.16 -36.1 4.33
... +6.71 +50.6 39.80
... +.58 +13.1 30.13
15 -.36 -3.8 50.14
54 -1.67 +35.2 26.64
... -.02 +19.9 10.35
-4.52 +59.4 65.96
11 -.29 +4.7 12.24
... -.21 -12.6 1.80
19 -1.27 -18.5 29.19
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... -.01 +18.1 32.17
... -.59 -12.0 8.25
... -.23 +1.7 26.89
22 -.28 -5.8 13.13
14 -1.19 +16.4 33.73
18 -.34 -5.7 15.68
... -.95 -13.7 33.50
5 +1.22 -40.8 4.97


AbdAsPac .42
AdeonaPh ...
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AntaresP
Aurizon g
AvalRare n ..
Banrog
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CelSci
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Crystallx g ...
DenisnM g ...
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GenMoy ...
GoldResrc .48
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GrtBasG g ...
GtPanSilvg ...
Hyperdyn
ImpOil gs .44
InovioPhm ...
KimberR g ...
KodiakOg ... 9
LadThalFn ...
LucasEngy ...
MadCatz g ..
Neoprobe ...
Nevsun q .06


... +.10 +8.4
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-.24 -24.7
-.64 +11.9
... +.07 -14.9
... +.16 +2.1
... -.03 +2.2
... -.05 -28.6
... -3.7
-.01 -28.1
-.72 +2.1
... -.82 +94.6
... -.05 -64.7
... -.01 -68.2
... -.24 -38.0
26 -.31 -8.7
... +.01 -2.0
... +.14 -17.4
... -.16 -31.5
... '-.71 -8.0
... -.02 -43.4
... -.25 -15.5
... -.09 -31.8
... -.31 +3.6
... -.34 -12.5
...-1.51 +16.5
.., +.03 -31.3
... +.02 +21.4
... -.31 -1.8
... -.06 +5.1
... +.25 +32.2
9 -.09 +66.7
... -.47+132.5
... -.14 -17.8


Name DIv YId
NwGoldg ...
NA Pallg ...
NDynMn g .
NthnO&G
NthgtM g
NovaGldc g
Oilsandsg ..
OpkoHllh
ParaG&S
PhrmAlh
PionDill ,
Protalix
Quepasa
RadiontlPh
RaoSyst
RareEle g
Rentech
RexahnPh
Rubicon g
SamsO&G
SulphCo
TanzRy g
Taseko
TrnsatlPet
TravelCtrs
TriValley
TriangPet
Uluru
Ur-Energy .
Uranerz
UraniumEn .
VantageDrd ..
VimetX .50
VistaGold
WT DrfBz 3.24
WizzardSft .
YM Bioq ...


Weekly Stock Exchange Highlights STOCKS OF LOCAL INTEREST


Stock Footnotes: g = Dividends and earnings in Canadian dollars, h = Does not meet continued-listing standards.
If = Late filing with SEC. n = New In past 52 weeks. pf = Preferred. rs = Stock has undergone a reverse stock split
of at least 50 percent within the past year. rt = Right to buy security at a specified price, s = Stock has splIt by at
least 20 percent within the last year. un = Units. vj = In bankruptcy or receivership. wd = When distributed. wl =
When Issued, wt = Warrants.
Mutual. Fund Footnotes: b = Fee covering market costs is paid from fund assets. d = Deferred sales charge, or
redemption fee. f = front load (sales charges), m = Multiple fees are charged. NA = not available, p = previous day's
net asset value. s = fund split shares during the week. x = fund paid a distribution during the week.Galrirs and
Losers must be worth at least $2 to be listed In tables at left. Most Actives must be worth at least $1. Volume in
hundreds of shares. Source: The Associated Press. Sales figures are unofficial.


Money Rates
Last Pvs Week
Prime Rate 3.25 3.25
Discount Rate 0.75 0.75
Federal Funds Rate .00-25 .00-25
Treasuries
3-month 0.04 0.04
6-montlv 0.09 0.10
5-year 1.60 1.71
10-year 2.99 3.07
30-year 4.23 4.23


Currencies
Last Pvs Day
Australia .9319 .9368
Britain 1.6418 1.6362
Canada .9773 .9760
Euro .6838 .6905
Japan 80.26 80.84
Mexico 11.6543 11.6439
Switzerind .8362 .8424
British pound expressed In U.S. dollars. All oth-
ers show dollar in foreign currency.


_________________________________________________r".------------X--------------


f .












LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, JUNE 5, 2011

Lake City Reporter




CLASSIFIED


Classified Department: 755-5440


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

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Monday through Friday from 8:00
a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Some people prefer to place their
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ad categories will require prepay-
ment. Our office is located at 180
East Duval Street.
You can also fax or e-mail your ad
copy to the Reporter.
FAX: 386-752-9400 Please
direct your copy to the Classified
Department.
EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityre-
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on the first day of publication.
We accept responsibility for only
the first incorrect Insertion, and
only the charge for the ad space
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Cancellations- Normal advertising
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Billing Inquiries- Call 755-5440.
Should further information be
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Advertising copy is subject to
approval by the Publisher who
reserves the right to edit, reject,
or classify all advertisements under
appropriate headings. Copy should
be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the first day of pub-
lication. Credit for published errors
will be allowed for the first insertion
for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the
Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nor for any general,
special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply
with Federal, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
nation in employment, housing and
public accommodations. Standard
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not be abbreviated.

In Print and Online
iww.lakecityreporter.com


Legal

PUBLIC NOTICE
ON
INVITATION TO BID
ITB-026-2011
Sealed bids will be accepted by the
City of Lake City, Florida, 205 N
Marion Avenue, Lake City, Florida
32055 until June 14, 2011 at 11:00
A.M. at which time all bids will be
opened and read aloud in the City
Council Chambers located on the
2nd floor of City Hall, 205 N Marion
Avenue, Lake City, Florida.
PAINTING MEMORIAL STADI-
UM
Bid specifications may be viewed on
the City website
http://www.lcfla.com/purchasing.ht
m; by contacting
purchasing@lcfla.com. or by phone
(386) 719-5818 or (386) 719-5816.
04545189
June 5, 2011


020 Lost & Found

104545099


Cookie is missing. Last seen
05/26 around noon, in the
Country Club Road area. Please
help us find her. 386-397-3124

100 Job
100 Opportunities

Convenience Store Manager need-
ed. Lake City area. Experience
preferred. Background & Drug test
req'd. Call 386-362-2935 for info.


Land Clearing

Back Hoe, Dozer, Chopping, root
raking, bush hog, seeding, sod,
disking, site prep, ponds &
irrigation. Free Est! 386-623-3200


Lawn & Landscape Service

Clean Pine Straw,
You pick it up, $1.85 a bale
Delivery of 100 bales $260
386-688-9156

Landscape Maintenance Company
You can trust for knowledge &
pride, Mention.this AD!
Mow Green, LLC 386-288-6532

Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
othencourt approved forms-
386-961-5896.


100 Job
Opportunities

04545022
Early Learning Position
Assists with the coordination of
early childhood services '
delivered through various child
care programs. Provides on-
going support for early
childhood staff. Helps coordi-
nate professional development
for early childhood staff.
Ensures that programs are
licensed, accredited and that
there is appropriate curriculum,
parent education, etc. Assists
with identification of program
problems and solutions and
serves as liaison with potential
and existing child care
programs.
Degree in early childhood
education or related field or
CDA preferred and minimum of
three years relevant experience
in child care or related field.
Ability to advocate for high
quality programming and to
implement change where
necessary. Must have good
organizational skills, observa-
tion skills, communication skills
and computer skills. Must be
able to visit child care programs
throughout the service area,
Must be willing to participate in
professional development.
For additional information,
please visit our website at
www.elc-fg.org
Submit resume to:
Early Learning Coalition of
Florida's Gateway, Inc
Attn: HR
1104 SW Main Blvd
Lake City, FL 32025

04545113
Owner Operators: Home Daily
with Dedicated Runs.
Excellent Rates & Paid FSC.
80% Drop & Hook.
Great Fuel & Tire Discount
Programs. CDL-A with
lyr Tractor-Trailer experience
and TWIC req'd.
Call Comtrak at 800-224-2641
ext 4978, or apply online at
www.comtrakinc.com

05525934
MOTIVATED
INDIVIDUALS NEEDED
Earn extra money delivering the
new Area Wide Lake City
Telephone Directory.
Working as an independent
contractor during your
available daylight hours.
Must be 18 years old with
valid drivers license and
proof of insurance.
A great way to earn extra money
for yourself, family or locally
sponsored organization.
If interested please call
1-877-878-9445 or e-mail:
bekiknapp@gmail.com

Hiring Locally This Week
Liberty National Life
Insurance Company
Full Training Provided Potential
of $60K+ Annually. 401K, BCBS
Insurance & Pension for those who
qualify. Call 1-800-257-5500 to
set up an interview.


Family Owned and Operated

Dealership
(Huntin' a good fit)
New & Used Car Sales
Motivated Self-Starter
Honesty & Good Character
$50,000 plus a year
Benefit Pkg.
Apply in person at


J'7 Macclenny, FL
BURKINS 273 E. Macclenny, Ave.
CHERMOLET


100 Job
Opportunities
04545173
First Federal Bank of Florida
has an open position for a
Consumer Underwriter.
Responsible for the underwrit-
ing of loan applications and
making approvals within the
guidelines. Ensures loan
documents are complete and
accurate. Prepares in house or
real estate collateral. Orders and
reviews third party title work,
appraisals and flood certificates
for real estate loans. Bachelor's
degree in business or related'
field preferred. Two or more
years of experience in
financial/loan setting.
Understanding and knowledge
of financial institution products
and services. Applications may
be obtained from any First
Federal Branch and submitted to
Human Resources, P.O. Box
2029, Lake City, FI 32056 or
emailed to
Turbeville.J(S)ffsb.com
Bilingual candidates encouraged
to apply. Equal Employment
Opportunity Employer.
Associate Reps
SUMMER WORK/GREAT PAY
Immediate FT/PT openings,
Customer sales/service,
No exp needed, conditions,
Apply Now all ages 17+
(386) 269-0883
Cashiers needed, Experience
Preferred, Drug free workplace,
all applicants will be drug tested
Ellisville Exxon,
Hwy 441, No Phone Calls Please.
CDL A Flatbed Truck Driver
needed for F/T OTR SE area, 3
years exp or more. Medical
benefits offered. Contact
Melissa or Mary @ 386-935-2773
Experienced mechanic with own
tools. Apply 9AM 2PM only
Deadline Thurs June 9th. 247 NW
Hillandale Glen Lake City
No phone calls
MECHANIC NEEDED
Must have own tools.
Apply at 113 SW Nassau Street
Lake City
PART TIME ENTRY LEVEL
STUDENT OR MOM
for small office data entry,
computer bookkeeping, general
office. Up to 20 flexible hours per
week, $9,00/hour to start. Send
confidential resume and keyboard
skills to P.O. Box 821,
Lake City, F1 32056-0821
Stylist Needed
Call
386-752-4614
Southern Exposure

White Springs HOPE Program
will be accepting applications for
volunteers and employee positions
for the summer youth enrichment
program until
Wednesday, June 8, 2011.
Please send applications to
Town of White Sproigs, Drawer D
White Springs, Florida 32096
or call 386-397-1333
Equal Opportunity Employer
Tobacco Free Facility


110 Sales
Employment
Seeking Route Sales
Representative-Daily Base Pay,
Service Incentive, Sales Commis-
sion, New Customer Incentive;
Pre-established & Growing
Customer Base; Sales &
Management Training; & more.
For immediate consideration apply
online at www.schwansjobs.com.
Local info call 386-755-1790
1 Medical
120 Employment

04545169
Medical Billing
several years experience in all
aspects of Medical Insurance
Billing required.
Please e-mail resume to
admin(Snfsc.comcastbiz.net or
fax to 385-438-8628.
Certified Medical Assistant
Full time, exp preferred in
Pediatrics and/or Family Practice.
Experience in injections & taking
accurate vital signs. Excellent
communication and
documentation, organizational
and assessment skills.
Fax Resume: 386-758-5628


We're on target!


Lake City Reporter
lakecityreporter.com CURRENTS >i acineo
Subscribe Today
386-755-5445


120 ^Medical
120 Employment

04545197




Meridian Behavioral
Healthcare Inc.
www.mbhci.or
Please visit our website to view
current open opportunities
and to apply online:
Meridian is an active partner
with the National Health Service
Corps
Therapists:
Licensed, or Master's Level
in Outpatient
Bachelor's-Level in
Counselor Support
Case Management
(adult & child)
Master's Therapist in
Methadone Clinic
Administration:
Director of Dietary Svcs
.(Gville)
Medical Services
RN Nursing Manager
(Gville)
PRN RN, LPN, C.N.A.
Recovery Specialist
(Direct Care )
LPN (2) for Methadone
Clinic ( new)
To see our current openings in
Mental Health and to apply on-
line, please go to:
www.mbhci.org
EOE, DFWP, E-Verify


To place your
classified ad call

755-5440
D irt~teT fZiij'W


t Si I
Heia Ass:istat it..


REPORTER Classifieds In Print and On Line

www.lakecityreporter.com


confused?


Call Lake City Reporter Classifieds!



WE CAN HELP 386-755-5440


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LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, JUNE 5, 2011


2 Schools &
240 Education
(4P544843
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-05/23/10
Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-07/11/11
Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com


310 Pets & Supplies
FREE KITTENS in Ft. White 8
wks old. 3 males & 1 female. Buff
& white. Cute & cuddly. Ready to
go. 386-497-3808 or 288-6165
Golden Retriever pups CKC.
Shots. 3 females, 5 males
Available July 3 $650. Each
POP. 386-623-1577
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.
Purebred Rottweillers 4 male
8 weeks. Price negotiable to the
best homes. Serious inquires only.
386-208-0059 or 288-0272. Must
be treated as part of your family
YORKIE PUPPY.
Has shots. 9 weeks old.
$300.00
386-697-6163

330 Livestock &
SSupplies
Black Angus Cows & Heifers
Prices Vary
Registered & Commercial
386-719-4802
QUALITY wnlg BEEF
Heifers Limousin/Angus Cross,
Vaccinated, A.I. Sired $550 Each
386-755-3541

361 Farm Equipment
84 Ford 4610 Tractor.
2WD, Solid
2005 motor,$7,500. OBO
386-867-0005

407 Computers
Dell Desktop Computer,
$75.
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170

408 Furniture
110 Window AC unit
$75.00
386-292-3927 or
* 386-755-5331
GE Dishwasher.
$100.00 obo
386-292-3927 or
386-755-5331
Nice Oak Dinette Set.
Table (w/leaf) & six chairs.
Must See! $285. obo
386-292-3927 or 386-755-5331
Nice Table & chairs.
Off white.
Chairs need TLC. $75.00
386-292-3927 or 386-755-5331

420 Wanted to Buy


K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans
$250 & up CASH! Free Pick U1
NO title needed !386-878-926(
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.


430 Garage Sales






PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.


To place your
classified ad call
755-5440


440 Miscellaneous
Murray automatic Riding mower
Runs Great. 42 in cut.
$375.00
386-292-3927 or 386-755-5331
Stop gnat & Mosquito bites! Buy
Swamp Gator All natural insect re-
pellent. Family safe. Use head to
toe. Available at The Home Depot.
Summer Barbecue Special
Tow Behind
Grill/Smoker, $1,250 OBO.
386-719-4802
Wii System w/2 games,
6 games down loaded, 2 GB
memory card. 1 controller w/joy
stick. $135.00 386-984-6510

450 Good Things
45 to Eat
BLUEBERRY HILL
U-PICK opens
May 30th
386-963-4220

Mobile Homes
630 for Rent.
2&3 BR MH. $395 $650. mo.
plus deposit. Water & sewer fur-
nished. Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
2B/1BA. MH., quiet living. Clean.
New stove, new carpet, carport.
NO PETS! 1st & deposit.
Adult community. Smoke free
environment. 386-758-3963
2br /2ba SWMH; also Residential
RV lots for rent between Lake City
& G'ville. Access to 1-75 & 441
(352)3117-1326 Call for terms
3/2 S of Lake City, (Branford area)
$400 dep, $600 month
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
DWMH for Rent. 3br/2ba
Handicapped accessible.
$650. mo. $500. Dep. No Pets.
386-984-9634. ask for Amber.
Great area! Very clean 2Br/2Ba,
MH, CH/A, Nice kitchen.
$550. mo. + $200 Dep. NO PETS.
(386)755-0064 or (904)771-5924
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White. Contact 386-623-3404
or 386-365-1919
SOUTH 41 2br/lba. Washer/ ,
Dryer Outlet. Satallite TV incl.
Pets ok on approval. New paint
$550. mo + dep. 386-758-2408. ,

4A0 Mobile Homes
4 40'for Sale
2010 Lot Model 32x80
Den/LR 3BR/2BA
2280SF 1/2" SR
Call Charles @
Royals Homes 754-6737
2010 Lot Model 3BR/2BA
1624 SF 1/2" Sheetrock
Vaulted Ceiling.
Charles @
Royals Homes 754-6737
2011 Claytin Single
14x76 2BR/2BA
3 walk in Closets
Call Charles @ Royals
Homes 754-6737
2011 Claytonh Homes 4BR/2BA
9' Side Walls,
Energy Star Home
Call Charles @ Royals
Homes 754-6737
2011 Legacy Model 1980 SF
Wood Cab, 3BR/2BA
Deluxe Interior
Call Charles @
Royals Homes 754-'6737


2011 SE Triple wide
16" QC Home WZLI
Total upgrade call Charles
@ Royals Homes 754-6737
Any Size, Any Shape
we have the home for you
Call Royals Homes @
386-754-6737,


Architect Designed,
Green Engineered
Energy Homes
- (@Royals Homes
s-: www.royalshomesales.com


Ask about our Energy Star Top
Insulation & Windows, Better
Built,Better Comfort, Phil @
Royals Homes 386-754-6737
Custom Built Modular's,
Bring your plans to
Royals Homes
386-754-6737
www.royalshomesales.com
Finance Manager on Site,
Know's how to get it done,
not a Salesman Guessing
Call Phil @ Royals
Homes 386-754-6737
Flashy? Pretty?
Whatabout Construction?
Homesto last a Lifetime
Royals Homes
386-754-6737,
Hallmark Real Estate. 2004
DWMH just minutes from the riv-
er. Detached carport. Front & back'
screened porches. MLS#77398
Paula Lawrence 386-623-1973


Cu.CONDO AUCTION

Ocean View Vilas Amelia Island /(THREE) 3BF3.5BA UNrTS l
Ubstnjucted Ocean Views/BeachiAccess within 500 ft

UnWitdC1owtyCrlfd RS EMaHAB2MS4-AU272-10%aP k A U L l Ut



I SaeI pime


Private Es
Within the city lim
ful older home
landscaping and
6 Br., 3.5 baths,
private paved
acres of proper
with home. Call
showing! $1,20'
$3,000/mo. fo





1.U dI


state
nits. Beauti-
with mature
lake views,
3 fireplaces,
drive. 39.7
y included
for info &
0,000.
Dr rent.


Classified Department: 755-5440


Mobile Homes
640 for Sale
Only a Few Left .
2010 Models must go!
Call Royals Homes @
386-754-6737

Only at Royals Homes
Can your home be
prepared for real brick?
Call Bo @ 754-6737

Pre-Owned 2BR/1 Bath
Priced to move 754-6737
Only @ Royals Homes
www.royalshomesales.com
Sales Price Doubled?
Not at Royals, Honest people,
Quality Homes.
Call Royals Homes
@ 386-754-6737
Service Manager on Site
makes sure your satisfied, not
someone doing it all
Royals Homes 386-754-6737
There is a Difference.
Just ask our Customers
We do what we say
Call Phil@ Royals Homes
386-754-6737

650 Mobile Home
650 & Land
67.5 ac.Ranch, fenced & cross
fenced. Spacious moblie home
w/large front deck & RV hookup
MLS 75607 $299,000. Access
Realty. Patti Taylor. 386-623-6896
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
DWMH on 5 ac. 3br/2ba Back 2
ac. fenced. Owners motivated.
Debbie Myles 386-719-1224
S MLS# 75830 $99,900
Owner Finance, Nice 3/2, S of
Lake City, small down/$625 mo
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com

710 Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent







1 & 2 Bedroom Apartments
Move in for as low as
$199
386-755-2423


71 Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent

SPRING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans;
some with garages.
Call 386-454-1469
or visit our website:
www.springhillvillage.net

A Landlord You Can Love!
2 br Apts $575. & up + sec. Great
area. CH/A washer/dryer hookups.
386-758-9351/352-208-2421
Great location W of 1-75, spacious
deluxe 2br apts., garage, W/D
hookup. patio. $60(0700 & up, +
Sec, 386-344-3715 or 965-5560
The Lakes Apts. Studios & lBr's
from $135/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $450. + sec.
Call Michelle 386-752-9626

720 Furnished Apts.
72 For Rent
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly


386-752-5808

REPORTER Classifieds
In Print and On Line
www.lakecityreporter.com


1996 33 Ft.
Fifth Wheel
w/2 slide-outs, camp or
reside, good condition.
$5,000
Call
386-362-1826
Leave Message


Y Z B
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S S W
K B Y
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A J K
M H A
M S Z
J E E
R A P


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M C U


G Q V C Q S L
U C A T F I S
U Q E P T W G
S X Y T A N Z
O E O Z S H I


3322 W US Hw V90
386-755-2502




OCEAN


Updated apartments w/tile I
floors & fresh paint. I
Excellent location
From 1425 + sec dep I
Michelle l(i86) 2 626 E


LEagle

Properties
(386) 752-9626 n
Ca[L for info l


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A S L T
H L S J


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DP


B A Ci E Y E
: R P I 0 C
I S H 1I G L


*C L N H W
A 0 C 0 P
B K D P H
T Y J H S
H K S G A
U D U T A
L I B U T
X V T D K
K L V X H
P I E S 0
T R L K Z
M E K T R
E T U Z W


F S C N W
T Y Z V T
O X W P H
I 0 M J P
C X Z I V


t730 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent
lbr/lba Free ele. Utilities incl. 4mi
S. Lake City. $300dep. $375mo.
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
2 bedroom 1 bath on
5 acres. $700.00 per month.
First, last and security.
386-590-5333
3br/2ba Nice Brick home
for rent comer of Baya &
Defender. $950. mo. $950. dep.
'386-344-5065
Family Hm 3/2, lr, dr, fam n rm w/
fireplace,garage, fenced yd. Nice
area. $1050 mo + dep. Martha Jo
Khachigan, Realtor 623-2848
Family Home 3/2, Ir, dr, fam rm
w/fireplace,garage, fenced back
yd. Nice area. $1050 mo + dep.
Martha Jo Khachigan, Realtor
623-2848
LULU, FL 3/2 recently
remodeled. CH/A, large porches.
$650. mo + dep.
386-752-3444 or 961-3031
Private House for Rent
Newly Remodeled, S of Lake City
Call The Adams Agency @
.386-752-1444
Home for Rent.
3/2 in City Limits. No pets.
$900. per month. Call Susan,
Realtor. 386-623-6612


S X E B A G L
0 A N Q S Q S
N P Y A E W K
Y F i L U U K
Z J F 0 P J 0
C D C F R Z


K C


I R C R L E


NATIONAL


Listing Agent Mary Brown Whitehurst

(386) 965-0887

or co-owner (386)397-5131


ON WHEELS aWATERCHAFT









Bring the picture in or
we will take it for you!
Ad runs 10 consecutive days
,with a description and photo in the
newspaper and online E-edition.
Ad runs 10 consecutive days as a
classified line ad online.
You must include vehicle price.
All ads are prepaid,
Private party only.





2006 EF250
Ford Van
3/4 ton, metal work
shelves/ladder rack,
60K miles, exc. cond.

$10,500
Call
386-555-5555
If you don't sell your vehicle
during the first 10 days, you
can run the same vehicle ad
for 10 additional days for
only $15.00
Terms and conditions remain the
same for the additional run.























T5R&EON




V h.- Scholarships
S; Available
M Research based
instruction in a caring

atmosphere.

386-758-4710
S ne hilgenerat:onihool or


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Al


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Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, JUNE 5, 2011


750 Business &
5 Office Rentals
FOR LEASE: Downtown office
space. Convenient to
Court house.
Call 386-755-3456
For Lease: E Baya Ave. Two -
1000 sqft office space units or
combined for 2000 sqft. 386-984-
0622 or weekends 386-497-4762
OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$695. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor
788 S Marion Ave, Commercial
bldg with hwy frontage,
near downtown.
Call Scott Stewart at Westfield
Realty Group. 386-867-3498

770 Condos For Rent
Furnished or unfurnished
Townhomes on the golf course.
$900. mo. plus security. Includes
water. 386-752-9626

790 Vacation Rentals
Horseshoe Beach Summer Spcl
Gulf Front 2br, w/lg porch, dock,
fish sink. wkend $345./wk $795.
386-235-3633/352-498-5986
alwaysonvacation.com #419-181
"Florida's Last Frontier"

805 Lots for Sale
5 Acre Lot, Secluded & Cleared,
MLS# 67871 $55,000
Call Lisa Waltrip
@ 386-365-5900
westfieldrealtygroup.com
Great Package Deal $43,500
Nicely wooded. 3 lots in Emerald
Cove. (l)Private cul-de-sac.
Aaron Nickelson 386-867-3534
Westfield Realty Group
Hallmark Real Estate. Owner
Finance with $5K down with
terms negotiable. Below assessed
value for the county. MLS# 74484
$17,900 Jay Sears 386-867-1613
Land for Sale. 12 acres in
nice area south of town.
MLS#77469 $55,000
Carrie Cason 386-623-2806
Westfield Realty Group
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
- All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
> housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of.
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
.. law. Our leaders ar hereby in- .-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

810 Home for Sale
3/2 1056 sqft Brick home in town.
Fenced back yard w/12x12 work-
shop Just Reduced! $79,900
MLS# 77414 Call 386-243-8227
R.E.O.Realty Group, Inc
3/2 infWoodhaven w/Fla Room,
fenced back yard MLS#75499,
$114,900 Call Pam @
Remax 386-303-2505 or
email- remaxpamb@gmail.com
4/2 on 10 ac. in Bell. Over 2200
sqft in a country setting. 10x20
frame shade. Bring offers! $89,000
MLS 76582 Brittany Stoeckert *
Results Realty 386-397-3473
4/2 with 1000 sq ft workshop,
fenced yard, 2 car garage, Fairly
new roof & HVAC MLS#77602,
Bring Offers! $169,900,
R.E.O. Realty Group 243-8227
4br brick on .51 ac. comer lot For-
mal dining and a large open floor
plan. Brick patio. $159,888
MLS 76763 Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty 386-397-3473
A Pilots Dream home 3br/2.5ba.
Pool, stocked pond, detached ga-
rage w/living quarters MLS#77756
$399,900 Westfield Realty
GroupJosh Grecian 386-466-2517
Access Realty Stylish 3/2 + pool
house w/1/2 bath on 2.25 acres.
SRear deck, 2 car garage & carport.
MLS 78103 $194,500.
.Patti Taylor.623'6896
Brick 3/1 family home, 4.43 acres.
w/metal roof. MLS# 77415
Short sale acceptance w/lenders
approval. $99,000. 386-243-8227
R.E.O. Realty Group, Inc
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
3br/1. Updated kitchen, bath. Open
living room w/all classic & elegant
light fixtures. 386-752-6575
MLS# 78099 $79,900
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
3/2 lin Spring Estates. 20x40
workshop. Screened back porch &
all appliances. Kayla Carbono
623-9650 MLS# 73787 $99,900
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.


Picadilly Park All brick 3/2, comer
lot w/inground pool. Screen porch
& fenced yard. Jessica Sheelly
288-2403 MLS# 73787 $99,900
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
Eastside Village 2br/2ba. Extra Ig.
Master suite. Florida room & 2
sheds. Ginny Smith 386-623-4277
623-4277 MLS# 70160 $79,900
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
Laurel Lake S/D. 4br/2ba w/ ap-
prox. 2275 sqft. Fenced back yard,
storage shed. Susan Sloan 386-
965-2847 MLS# 76106 $189,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
4br/1.5ba brick. 1332 sq ft. Great
floor plan, nice yard, close to
town. 1 ac landscaped. Lori
Geibeig MLS# 75713 $84,900


810 Home for Sale
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Remodeled 2/2 (could be 3/2).
Split floor plan. Great home, great
price. Mary Brown Whitehurst
965-0887 MLS# 77943 $105,000
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
3/2 brick home in Woodcrest. Lg
lot completely fenced. Easy access
to amenities. Elaine K. Tolar 386-
752-6488 MLS# 78148 $129,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
New home in Mayfair. 4 bedroom
on comer lot. Covered Porch.
Elaine K. Tolar 386-752-6488
MLS# 76919 $214,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
3/3 in beautiful area. 2414sqft.
Private yard & patio with storage
bldg. Lori G Simpson 386-365-
5678 MLS# 78175 $159,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Brick 3/2 on lake front. Lots of up-
dates. Glassed in room with fantas-
tic views. Lori G Simpson 386-
365-5678 MLS# 78092 $249,900
Country Home 2br/2ba on 5 ac.
detached garage w/workshop.
MLS# 77005 $179,900 Call Roger
Lovelady 386-365-7039
Westfield Realty Group
CYPRESS LANDING!
3BR/2BA built in 2005 w/large
kitchen $115,000
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #75794
DESIRABLE GWEN LAKE area!
Nice 3BR/2BA home on
comer lot $112,000
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #77307
Eastside Village a 55+ Retirement
Community. lots of Storage. Ig
deck off 2br suite. Carport w/more
storage. MLS# 77462 Eastside
Village Realty, Inc. 752-5290
Eastside Village a 55+ Retirement
Community. 2br/2ba. Lg office
/craft room. Oversized garage.
$89,900 MLS# 71901 Eastside
Village Realty, Inc. 752-5290
Eastside Village a 55+ Retirement
Community. Open floor plan
w/breakfast nook. 2 Ig bedrooms.
$104,999 MLS# 77779 Eastside
Village Realty, Inc. 752-5290
Featured Home 55+ acres, 5 pas-
tures fenced & cross fenced. 2,700
sqft, 4br/3ba home built in 1996.
Call for details! 386-243-8227
R.E.O. Realty Group
Fixer Upper on Suwannee River.
Needs TLC. Owner motivated &
will finance. $45,000
MLS 77337 Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty 386-397-3473
GREAT STARTER HOME!
3BR/2BA w/lots of closet space &
nice lawn $79,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #76432
Great Starter Home. Well cared
for. New countertops, tile floors &
metal roof. $79,900 MLS#77524
Brodie Alfred 386-623-0906
Westfield Realty Group
Hallmark Real Estate. 3/2
IDWMH 1/2 ac south of town.
Columbia City. Paved frontage,
comer 16t. $57,500
MLS#77654 Janet Creel 719-0382
* Hallmark Real Estate. Brick
home w/fme landscaping. Dream
kitchen w/double pantry.
Split bedroom plan MLS#77846
Paula Lawrence 386-623-1973
Hallmark Real Estate. Country
Estate. Sit in the swing of the big
oak tree and watch the horses
graze on lOac. fenced. 29 ac total.
MLS#78139 Janet Creel 719-0382
Hallmark Real Estate. Pool &
Patio. 3br/2ba. brick home on
1.69 ac. Workshop &
SWMH on property. MLS#78117
Tanya Shaffer 386-397-4766
Home near the River. 3br/2ba,
1470 sqft. needs a little TLC.
MLS#76390 $34,900
Mike Lienemann 386-867-9053'
Westfield Realty Group
Home on 15 ac. w/over 2,500 sqft
home.Very Ig bedrooms w/private
baths. 24x24 workshop $235,000
MLS 77552 Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty 386-397-3473
HOME OR OFFICE on
Alachua St; remodeled 1,207 SqFt
home $82,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #77724.
Hallmark Real Estate. 2006
2200SF home. 2br/2ba w/mother-
in-law suite, 4 car garage, endless
hot water heater. MLS# 77347
$309,900 Jay Sears 386-867-1613
Hallmark Real Estate. 3br/2ba
new roof & AC. Comes w/SWMH
& 30x30 steel bldg. Completely
fenced. MLS# 76752
$179,900 Jay Sears 386-867-1613
Just Reduced 3/2 home, inside city
limits, fenced backyard, detached
carport w/office MLS#77411
$79,900 Call R.E.O.Realty,
@ 386-243-8227 Make Offer!
Just Reduced 4/2 on 1.57 acres,
fireplace, partially fenced, MLS#
77412, Call Nancy Rogers at
R.E.O. Realty Group
386-243-8227 $64,900
Lg. 4/3 family home. 16x20
screened porch, workshop. 4.5 ac.
fenced/cross fenced MLS 74339
$229,900. N Fla Homeland Realty
Darlene Hart 386-288-2878
Lg. home on 1 ac. Granite floors
throughout. 4br/2ba. Nice open
kitchen & Florida room. $148,000
MLS 77292 Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty 386-397-3473
Like New. 3br/2ba on 3 ac. New


kitchen cabinets, counters, carpet
& more. $179,900 MLS#77372
Charlie Sparks 386-755-0808
Westfield Realty Group
LOTS OF UPGRADES!
Remodeled kitchen in this
2BR/1BA home $29,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #77505
Mayfield S/D, nice fenced in back
yard w/small lake behind property.
Very nice. $99,888
MLS 77092 Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty 386-397-3473
Neat as a pin! Split floor plan
w/well manicured lawn. 10x12
storage shed. $129K MLS 77932
Darlene Hart 386-288-2878
N Fla Homeland Realty


810 Home for Sale
Owner Finance. Custom built 3/2.5
10.8 ac. Granite, fireplace, vaulted
ceilings, surround sound. lanai,
gazebo. MLS 77382 Access Real-
ty. Patti Taylor $249K 623-6896
Remax Professionals Charming
w/many upgrades. 3br/2ba. 2 mas-
ter suites. MLS# 76779, $105,000
Missy Zecher @ 386-623-0237
www.missyzecher.com
Remax Professionals Motivated
seller. All brick family home
w/many upgrades. MLS# 78168,
$129,000 www.missvzecher.com
Missy Zecher 386-623-0237
Remax Professionals Spacious
home on comer lot. Private access
to Lake Jeffery. MLS# 77783,
$198,900 www.missyzecher.com
Missy Zecher @ 386-623-0237
Spacious 4/2 home on 1 ac. Split
floor plan. Great neighborhood.
Easy access to 1-75 $220K MLS
77859 Darlene Hart 386-288-2878
N Fla Homeland Realty
SPACIOUS home built in
1995 has 2BR/2BA & 1,636 SqFt
on 1 acre $89,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #76887
Starter/Investment Home, 3/2 +
Bonus room on 1 acre, remodeled,
fenced MLS#77562 $99,900
Call Pam @ Remax
Professionals 386-303-2505
Well Maintained 3/2 on dead-end
street, quiet, country, close to
downtown $105,000 MLS#77800
Lisa Waltrip 386-365-5900
Westfield Realty Group
Well Maintained 3/2 w/open floor
plan,on 1/2 acre, fenced, shed
MLS# 78136 $134,900
Call Pam Beauchamp @ Remax
Professionals 386-758-8900

820 Farms &
2 Acreage
4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$69,900. $613mo 352-215-1018.
.www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
4 acres, Wellborn, New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down, $39,900, $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
6.45 ac river front property in
White Springs, cloe to Big Shoals.
Covered shelter for entertaining.
MLS# 77417 $124,888 386-243-
8227 R.E.O. Realty Group, Inc
Bring the horses. Peaceful &
ready for your home. Convenient
location. $38,0000 MLS#76264
Millard Gillen 386-365-7001
Westfield Realty Group
FARM- 7 stall bam, Apt.
17+ acres cross fenced.
Close in $950. mo.
386-961-1086
Half to ten acre lots. Some w/
well, septic, pp. We finance; low
dwn pmt. Deas Bullard Properties.
386-752-4339. www.landnfl.com
Look at all the Upgrades
s Completely remodeled.
$106,500 MLS#77483
Brodie Alfred 386-623-0906
Westfield Realty Group
Pretty piece of land. 2 acres close
to interstate 75 for under 20K.
Mobile Homes or residential ok.
MLS# 77400 Call 386-243-8227
R.E.O. Realty Group, Inc

Commercial
O830 Property
Great Investment/Owner Finance
1400 sq ft building on 2 acres
Creative terms, owner flexible.
CLose to 1-75. 386-867-1190
Hallmark Real Estate. Commer-
cial Business Location on South
Main w/offices & service bldg.
Frontage, warehouse & storage
MLS#76280 Janet Creel 623-1973
Mini Storage (204 Units),
gated, fenced 5 acres, $1,300,000,
MLS#76048 Call Millard Gillen
@ Westfield Realty Group


to .. . , " - -, * *- "
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Rear Engine Rider


S1,399oo
12.5 hp Briggs & Stratton
28" HI Vac Deck
2 Year Warranty
12 months
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Moore Toyota Bucks at
time of purchase. No cash
value. No reproductions
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IRONWOOD HOMES


LOCAL
SERVICE


n Sn 1 ce I 1973


Locally Built No Freight
4109 US Hwy 90 W, Lake City, FL 32055 3864754.8844


386-365-7001 E
Prime Commercial Location. 3 M months
Just across from plaza. Frontage
on Baya w/2 curbcuts. $350,000 FREE Ae
MLS# 77485 Call 386-243-8227
R.E.O.Realty Group, Inc
plus tax Aq. a &- uS e
Recreational Regularly $130
951 Vehicles. a "; f' 1 OPEN 71
1996 33ft Fifth Wheel | ITNESSC
w/2 slideouts. camp or W T ESS
reside. Good cond. $5,000. 1 CENTER
386-362-1826. Leave message. L. E
a en cp pS, serving the fitness needs


Contact us -1 -

atthe paper.Ne


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386-755-5440


SUBSCRIPTION
386-755-5445


ALL OTHER DEPARTMENTS
386-752-1293


ELECTRONIC ADS SEND. TO'
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,-
Tas REPORTERS F W)



180 East w St.
Lake M, Rila325


Childcare

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)AYS A WEEK
Westfield Square
LAKE CITY, FL
386-752-0749
s of Lake City for 25 years.


265 SW Malone Ave 752-4970
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Story ideas?

Contact
Robert Bridges
Editor
754-0428
rbridges@lakecityreporter.com

Sunday, June 5, 2011


Lake City Reporter





LIFE


www.lakecityreporter.com


GARDEN TALK


Nichelle Demorest
dndemorest@ufl.edu

Drought

tolerant

plants are

preferable

Most people
are aware
that planting
drought-tol-
erant plants
will help the quality of their
environment. But what are
drought-tolerant plants, and
why are they so important
in Florida where we get
such abundant rainfall?
We certainly don't live in
a desert. We have wonder-
ful underground aquifers,
and our average rainfall is
well over 50 inches each
year. These don't sound like
reasons to be concerned
about water. Our rainfall is
very seasonal, however, and
sandy soils just don't hold
moisture. Living through
periodic droughts is just a
way of life for plants that
thrive in Florida.
When we go through
periods of little or no rain,
the immense draw of water
from the underground
aquifers for irrigation of
landscape and crop plants
is a big concern in Florida.
Since dry spells are going
to happen, planting drought-
tolerant plants in the land-
scape is one way to ease
the demand on our water
resources.
Plant drought stress
results when the plant roots
just can't take in enough
water to replace the plant's
water loss. The plant stops
growing and reduces pro-
cesses such as photosynthe-
sis so it can live with less
water. If drought continues,
the leaves may even wilt
and fall, and the plant could
eventually die.
Some plants can toler-
ate dry spells much better
because of certain char-
. acteristics that help them
retain water. Plants such as
our American holly have an
extra thick waxy coating of
their leaves called "cuticle"
which helps keeps water
from evaporating from the
leaves. That beautiful waxy
shine on the holly leaf is
there for more reasons
than just looking good to
us.
Another feature that helps
a plant conserve water is
a "hairy" leaf. The hairs
reduce water evaporation by
keeping down air movement
around the leaf surface.
When shopping for drought
tolerant plants, a fuzzy leaf
is a good thing.
Thick leaves and small or
narrow leaves are also char-
acteristics of some drought
tolerant plants. This is the
reason why some of our
favorites, such as live oaks
and Indian hawthorn, are so
tough.
To learn more about
drought tolerant plants for
North Florida, visit the
UF/IFAS website at www.
solutionsforyourlife.com or
ask the Master Gardeners
by calling 752-5384.

* D. Nichelle Demorest is
a horticulture agent with the
Columbia County Extension
of the University of Florida
Institute of Food and
Agricultural Sciences.


Cancer support group pledges



to help victims with hardships


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
Teresa and Donnie
Feagle have seen and
experienced the hard-
ships associated with
overcoming cancer.
Teresa Feagle is a breast can-
cer survivor and a few years ago
she and her husband Donnie
were in the fight of their lives as
they battled the deadly disease.
From the sickness associated
with the medicines to the finan-
cial hardships of traveling, losing
a household income and paying
for the medications, the Feagles
have experienced their share of
challenging times in overcoming
cancer.
As a way of helping others
deal with the financial hardships
that it takes to battle the dis-
ease, the Feagles and their friend
Jamie Albritton founded a local
organization to help .residents
who may experience hardships
while fighting various forms
of cancer The Suwannee
River Breast Cancer Awareness
Association.
The Suwannee River Breast
Cancer Awareness Association is
a 501 C-3 non-profit organization
recently founded which plans
to raise funds for local families
in Columbia and surrounding
counties to defray costs associ-
ated with cancer treatments. The
group was founded in Lake City
in January.
"We've been going through
this process since June 2010,"
said Donnie Feagle.
Donnie Feagle serves as the
organization's president, while
Teresa Feagle is its vice presi-
dent and Jamie Albritton is sec-
retary/treasurer. The group
is governed by a, board of
directors.
"The purpose of the organiza-
tion is to give back to the commu-
nity and families who are suffer-
ing hardships as they are going
through cancer treatments it's
going to serve as a resource for
them," Teresa Feagle said.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Those who are battling breast cancer or who has family members or friends who are or were diagnosed have
a new organization to turn to the Suwannee River Breast Cancer Awareness Association. Pictured are
the organization's President Donnie Feagle, Secretary/Treasurer Jaime Albritton, and Vice President Teresa
Feagle, a breast cancer survivor.


Donnie Feagle said the group
plans to have several fundraisers
and keep all the funding that it
generates for use on the local
level.
"We're going to try to make
the funding go to individuals
in the community," he said.
"Instead of sending the money
off to organizations we really
don't know what they do with
the money, we'll know and the
community will know where
their funds go."
The Suwannee River Breast
Cancer Awareness Association
plans to host a series of fund-
raisers to raise funding for


local residents. The fundrais-
,ers include a bass fishing tour-
nament, sale of raffle tickets,
potentially a saltwater fishing
tournament and a chicken pilau
dinner fundraiser.
The bass fishing tournament
is scheduled June 25 on the
Suwannee River.
"This is our first big fundraiser
and hopefully it grows," Teresa
Feagle said. "I think once we get
our name and purpose out there
it will help to get more people
interested in what we're about."
Teresa Feagle said as the
organization raises funding and
becomes aware of people who


will benefit from the organiza-
tion's financial support, the orga-
nization's board of directors will
determine where the funding is
directed.
Albritton said there will be an
application process where people
seeking funding from the organi-
zation will have to qualify.
"Our main goal is to help peo-
ple who are trying to deal with
this disease," he said.
Teresa Feagle is a breast can-
cer survivor and her husband
Donnie said he knows the kinds
of financial hardships a family can
SUPPORT continued on 4D


For working dogs, retirement


can present a serious.challenge


BY SUE MANNING
Associated Press
LOS ANGELES For
nine years, Brac has
worked like a dog at a
private golf club, chasing
geese and sparing mem-
bers the indignity of goose
poop in their spikes.
But the 10-year-old
black-and-white border
collie has arthritis in his
legs, cataracts in his eyes
and he's lost interest in
the birds, so it's time for
him to retire.
Larry Jones, assistant
superintendent at the
Roaring Fork Club in
Basalt, Colo., can't keep
him and has been trying
to find him a good home.
"He loves everybody.
He's really a sweet dog.
And even though he's los-
ing his working mojo, he
still has a lot of pet mojo
left," Jones said.
Working dogs like
Brac are often forced to
retire by age, illness or
injury. But finding adop-
tive homes for retired
working dogs can some-
times be challenging if
they require medical care
or have behavioral issues.
Some working dogs like
Brac spend their lives


ASSOCIATED PRESS
K9 Search and Rescue Specialists Inc., Tracy Sargent plays with her dogs Chance, top, Cinco, left, and Randy on her
property in Cedartown, Ga. Chance and Cinco worked with Sargent while searching for people following the tornadoes
in Tuscaloosa, Ala. last month. Sargent has responded to hundreds of calls ranging from missing persons to plane
crashes to natural disasters. If a dog works for her, it retires with her, she said.


outdoors and may not be
housetrained. Others may
have trouble acclimating
to basic daily routines like
riding in a car or climbing
stairs.
Marie Turino, 35, of


Freehold, N.J., fostered home before, never seen
nearly 30 racing grey- a mirror or stairs," she
hounds before she adopt- said. She adopted Anna
ed two. and Jasmine in 2002 and
"All they've ever seen 2003, from different race-
is a track and a crate. tracks, when both dogs
They've never been in a were 2.


"They don't know nor-
mal house sounds. The
first morning, I turned
on my blow dryer and
Jasmine came flying, then
WORKING continued on 2D


Section D












LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, JUNE 5, 2011


ENGAGEMENTS


Johnson-Lydick
Mr. and Mrs. NeilJohnson
of Lake City announce the
engagement and approach-
ing marriage of their daugh-
ter, Dawn Marie Johnson of
Lake City, to Christopher
Michael of Lake City.
He is the son of Mr. and
Mrs. Michael Lydick.
The bride is also the
daughter of the late Donna
Johnson.
The bride-elect is a gradu-
ate of Lake City Community
College and is employed
as a RN at the Lake City
Veterans Hospital.
The future groom has a
undergraduate degree from
the University of Florida,
a graduate degree from
Florida State University and
is a district archeologist for
the Osceola National Forest
US Forestry.
The wedding date will be
set at a later time.


McLeod-Drawdy

Kevin and Denise
McLeod of Wellborn
announce the engage-
ment and approaching
marriage of their daugh-
ter, Lindsey Beth McLeod
of Cheyenne, Wyo., to
Lance Wade Drawdy
of Cheyenne, Wyo. He
is the son of Larry and
Wilda Drawdy of Lake
City.
The bride-elect is a 2010
graduate of Suwannee
High School. She enjoys
sports and time with fam-
ily and friends. She plans
to obtain her degree and
become a pharmacy tech-
nician.
The future groom is a
2008 graduate of Columbia
High School, where he
was a member of the Tiger
Football and Wrestling


teams. He attended Lake
City Community College
from 2008 to 2009 and
joined the United States
Air Force in 2010. He is
currently serving our
country.
The wedding is planned


for 5 p.m. Saturday, June
18 at Stephen Foster
Cultural Center State Park
in White Springs. A recep-
tion will follow at Stephen
Foster Banquet Hall. All
family and friends are
invited.


ANNIVERSARIES

Goble. ., -
Sylvia Jean Goble of Lake .
City and Louie- Gordon Goble
of Prestonsburg, Ky. were
united in marriage June 17,
1961 in Lake City.
They will celebrate their
50th anniversary at 6:30 p.m.
Friday, June 17 with family
and friends at a party in their
honor given by their chil- fI
dren.
The couple have three ,
children: Selina Jones (Dale),
Richard Goble (Jody) and
Teresa McCullough. They
have five grandchildren and
two great-grandchildren. -
The couple has lived in "'
Lake City for 50 years. .


WORKING: Retired dogs find homes

Continued From Page 1D


stopped on a dime, staring
at me." One of her foster
dogs "went crazy when she
saw a mirror and kept pok-
ing it with her nose."
She has cared for dogs
with ticks, broken bones,
infections and cuts on their
noses from muzzles.
But not all aspects of
care are difficult. '"They
are crate-trained so they
are easy to housebreak and
they don't shed much," she
said. "It's easy to brush
their teeth, clip their nails
and clean their ears."
In some fields, retiring
dogs are typically adopted
by the people who workwith
them. About 90 percent of
the dogs in the Sacramento
K-9 unit retire with their
handlers, Sacramento
County sheriff's Deputy
Brian Amos said. The rest
of the deputies find homes
for the dogs.
Amos and his dog Jimmy
had been together four
years when Jimmy was
injured in training and
forced to retire in 2005.
The hardest part for Amos
came each morning when
he left for work with his
new dog; Jesse.
Jimmy would bark and
whine. "I felt like I was
cheating on him."
Jimmy has since died
of old age, but he even-,
tually took to retirement,
becoming more relaxed
and less anxious, Amos
said.
Since 1950, Dalmatians
with names like King, Bud,
Brewer, Barley and Hops
have been working with
teams of Clydesdale hors-
es to promote Anheuser-
Busch, based in St. Louis,
Mo.
Puppies are taught basic
skills at the St. Louis sta-
bles, then go out with a
Clydesdale team to learn
from an older dog, said
Jeff Knapper, general
manager of the company's
Clydesdale operations.
They usually retire after
four or five years on the job
and are nearly always adopt-
ed by their handlers. Ifnot,
there is a high demand for


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this file photo shows K9 Search and Rescue Specialists
Inc., Tracy Sargent as she works with her cadaver dog
Chance as they climb a pile of rubble during a search for sur-
vivors following tornadoes in Tuscaloosa, Ala.


them because Budweiser
dogs "spend a lot of time
greeting the public, have
a great temperament and
are very social," Kriapper
said.
Sled dogs pose a vari-
ety of challenges as house
pets. Often they walk in
circles because they've
been tied to posts all their
lives. They also need to
be housetrained and learn
how to walk on a leash,
climb stairs, walk across
.slick floors without falling
and ride in a car without
vomiting, according to Seth
Sachson, who's adopted
eight sled dogs. Sachson
serves as executive direc-
tor of the Aspen Animal
Shelter and the Aspen
Boarding, Kennel in Aspen,
Colo.
Tracy 'Sargent of
Cedartown, Ga., runs
K9 Search & Rescue
Specialists, Inc., which has


responded to hundreds of
calls ranging from missing
persons to plane crashes
to natural disasters. If a
dog works for her, it retires
with her, she said.
But just like people, some
dogs have a tough time
adjusting to retirement,
Sargent said. She uses rides,
mini-training camps in the
yard, more ball play, longer
walks and extra attention to
help them make the tran-
sition. Brooke, a German
shepherd, worked full-time
until she was 10. Then she
slowed down, her vision
dimmed and she had trou-
ble jumping in and out of a
rescue vehicle. Sargenttook
more than a year to fully
retire Brooke, taking her
on shorter trips and using
her for confined searches.
Eventually Brooke seemed
happy to stay home and
rest. She lived to be nearly
16, Sargent said.


Mason Hunter Nelson

Justin and Samantha Nelson of
Tallahassee announce the' birth of
their son, Mason Hunter Nelson, May
17 at Tallahassee Memorial Hospital in
Tallahassee.
He weighed 8 pounds, 7 ounces and
measured 20 and 3/4 inches.
Grandparents are Mike and Brenda
Nelson and Rodney and Lisa Revell.


Aspen Elizabeth Ward

Chris and Jessica Ward of Lake City
announce the birth of their daughter,
Aspen Elizabeth Ward, April 28 at North
Florida Regional Hospital in Gainesville.
She weighed 6 pounds, 3 ounces and
measured 18 and a half inches.
Grandparents are Mike and Brenda
Nelson, Jonathan L. Ward Sr. and Linda
and the late Mike Green.


*frNOWi"
Singer-songwriters '

at sea on cruises 1Ey gsg

BY STEVEN WINE musicians tune. Or so it Includes lenses & frames.
Associated Press seemed. Some Restrictions Apply.
Not to quibble: The COUPON REQUIRED. EXPIRES JUNE 30, 2011 .
MIAIMI Caamoon- ui i ,, t ML ia=


IVl.tum t- d.Jw., C u.ll-.n V/,,i,1
certs are different in sever-
al ways. They start on time.
They. last only an hour. And
the speakers hanging from
the ceiling tend to sway.
Sometimes the musicians
do, too.
"Usually I go where I
want on stage," John Prine
said. "But here I go where
the ship takes me."
Cayamo is an annual
music festival at sea featur-
ing performers of Prine's ilk
- singer-songwriters with
acoustic guitars and devoted
fans. There are bands, too,
and amplifiers, and all of
the attractions that go with
any other Caribbean trip.
That means sunshine, shore
excursions, a laid-back vibe
and too much food.
Mostly the 2,000 passen-
gers come for music. That
was the case when my wife
and I took our first cruise in
February to enjoy Cayamo
aboard the Norwegian
Pearl.
It was a seven-day excur-
sion six days of concerts
and one day listening to


m sbic was greaL. lViani
attractions included Prine,
Brandi Carlile, the Indigo
Girls, Steve Earle, Patty
Griffin, Richard Thompson,
Loudon Wainwright III and
Buddy Miller. But one of the
delights was discovering
lesser-known acts such as
Scott Miller, Chuck Cannon
and Roddie Romero and the
Hub City All-Stars.
A partial lineup for
February. 2012 includes
Prine, Thompson,
Wainwright, Lyle Lovett,
John Hiatt and Keb' Mo'.
For now, all cabins for
the trip are booked, but
Cayamo anticipates some
cancellations and will keep
a waiting list.
Acts perform in half a
dozen cozy venues, the
largest seating about 800
people. On our trip, shows
began in the afternoon,
and music continued into
the wee hours each night.
One jam session in the
atrium lasted until 2 a.m.
and involved more than a
dozen musicians from five
bands.


---a- --a--

SNOWI*I

2, C mp.letet Pav ,
Eyeglasses
Includes Lenses & Frames
Some Restrictions Apply. "
COUPON REQUIRED. EXPIRES JUNE 30, 2011
-. a a - - a a a a a a -*


-AE




Sam Day -.- .


Service
Inclues Saurda


China, Crystal, ,
Flatware and Gifts
Couples registered:
Laurie Little
Robert Evans, Jr.
June 4, 2011

Jessica Clark
Tommy McAllister
June 24, 2011

Ashley Cloninger
Justin Brimmer
'September 24, 2011

Jill Peck
Bryson Johnson
September 24, 2011
We know exactly what
they want in-a wedding
or shower gift. We update
their list as gifts are
purchased, and gift wrap.

WARD'S
JEWELRY & GIFTS
156 N. Marion Ave.
Lake City
752-5470


BIRTH ANNOUNCEMENTS


Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424














LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & CROSSWORD SUNDAY, JUNE 5, 2011


DEAR ABBY


Breadwinner is out of


patience for her family


DEAR ABBY: I'm running
out of energy to compassion-
ately relate with all the ad-
dicts and mentally ill people
in my family. My mother is
an alcoholic. My aunt is bipo-
lar and schizophrenic. She is
addicted to and abusing pre-
scription painkillers and anti-
anxiety medicines.
My husband is an alcoholic
in denial who lies about his
alcohol consumption, and my
stepmother is mentally abu-
sive and, I strongly suspect,
also bipolar. These people
are all retired, while I work
a physically and mentally de-
manding full-time job.
I'm usually the one who is
blamed when things don't go
right Mother asked me to
remove all alcohol from her
home so she could stop drink-
ing. When I didn't find it all,
it was MY fault she drank. I
escorted my aunt on a cruise
during which she abused
drugs to the point she could
barely walk, and I had to find
her wheelchairs at every stop.
Now I hear she is blaming me
for her illness.
When my husband drinks,
he runs up our credit card to
the tune of $20,000. My job
with medical benefits allowed
him to retire from his job. My
stepmother no longer com-
municates with my brother
and me and seems to be alien-
ating my father from his fam-
ily.
I'm exhausted! I don't
think I can take much more.
I know you'll tell me to see


--. -
Abigail Van Buren
www.dearabby.com

a counselor, but I'm the one
who has the full-time job and
little vacation/sick time I can
use. Short of "divorcing" all of
them and starting a new life
in an undisclosed location,
what advice can you offer? --
NEARLY SUCKED DRY

DEAR NEARLY: Since
you can't get away to see a
counselor because of the
demands of your job, pick
up a couple of books on co-
dependency and read them
cover-to-cover. Then practice
protecting yourself by learn-
ing to say "No!" when an alco-
holic makes you responsible
for clearing the booze out of
her house, or a drug-addicted
relative invites you to take a
"vacation" that guarantees
you'll become her nurse. Dis-
cuss with a lawyer how to sep-
arate your finances from your
deadbeat husband so he can't
dig you deeper into debt the
next time he chooses to go
on a bender. You don't have
to "divorce" anyone as long
as you learn how to draw the
line.
P.S. Al-Anon can be reached
toll-free at (888) 4ALANON


((888) 425-2666). There are
meetings at various times in
many locations. Check it out.
**
DEAR ABBY: My sister is
always late sending birthday
presents to my kids some-
times up to a month or two
after their birthdays. I find
it disrespectful and a bad
example, so I asked that she
either send them on time or
not at all. It did no good. She
complained that I am being
"unfair to hold her to a dead-
line."
My sister has all year to
plan around these events, and
I feel she needs to be more
responsible. It's affecting our
relationship. Please advise. --
CALENDAR GAL, ROCH-
ESTER, N.Y.

DEARCALENDARGIRL:
If you could see all of the let-
ters I receive from readers
complaining that they receive
NO gifts, you would realize
that your children are lucky
to be remembered. While I
agree that sending birthday
presents as long as a month
or two after the fact sends a
message that their special
day is not of primary impor-
tance to your sister, please
do not let this create a rift.
Explain to your children that
Auntie loves them, but she is
extremely disorganized. (A
ditzz"!)
* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-April
19): You'll be questioned
and criticized if you pretend
to be something you are not.
An emotional issue regarding
a child, parent or grandpar-
ent will surface and must be
dealt with properly to avoid
greater upset or unnecessary
expense. **
TAURUS (April 20-May
20): Take time for a little
pampering. You need to feel
good about yourself and the
way you look if you want to
present what you have to of-
fer with confidence. You are
on a high learning curve.

GEMINI (May 21-June
20): You can talk all you
want as long as you are hon-
est in the way you present the
information you are offering.
Don't deviate in any way or it
may cost you your reputation
and possibly your position.
Refrain from taking a risk.

CANCER (June 21-July
22): Once you begin to for-
mulate the old with the new,
you will come up with a viable
option that can lead to a won-
derful partnership and a prof-
itable venture. Don't limit the
possibilities by trying to start


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Word
big rather than small. 3 stars
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):
Don't play guessing games
or leave anything to chance.
You know what you want and
you have to go after it with-
out hesitation. An emotional
situation must not be allowed
to slow you down. Cut your
losses and prepare to move
forward fast. *** ,
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Someone will make you
look bad if given the chance.
Take the initiative. Holding a
meeting or attending a func-
tion that allows you to utilize
your skills appropriately will
help stop any rumors. Love is,
in the stars. *--
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22):
Get involved in courses, re-
search or conversations that
will highlight something that
interests you. Once you re-
alize what you can do with
what you have learned, you
can begin an endeavor that
increases your income and
brings you satisfaction.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov.
21): Put your time and ener-
gy,into your home and family.


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created rom quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each leTtter in the cipher stands tfor another.
Today's clue: A equals Y
V N F NPP FX, Y PO T F B MX TWZ X MP
F B M X X W BFCP 'XMPFZ
OEPHPOEPO GP X W X MW NP UMW
W CP V OE Z PNHPG X FX." VIE F P
IZ H M A
'REVIOUS SOLUTION: "Create your own visual style ... let it be unique for
ourself and yet identifiable for others." Orson Welles
(c) 2011 by NEA, Inc. 6-6


A creative approach to what-
ever you do will help you gain
interest, support and the help
you need. An unusual profes-
sional opportunity will grab
your attention. 2 stars
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-
Dec. 21): Set your sights high
and go aftel your goals. You
can make some important
decisions and changes that
will jumpstart you in a new
direction. Get any promises
in writing and take whatever
measures are necessary to
get your way. *****
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-
Jan. 19): Fix up your digs
or look for an investment that
will build a stronger portfolio
and make a huge difference
to the way you conduct your
professional plans. A rela-
tionship with someone who
shares financial and moral
values will play an important
role. ***
AQUAIRIUS (Jan. 20-
-Feb. 18): Stabilize your fu-
ture by taking care of your
personal papers and invest-
ments. Protecting your assets
and knowing exactly where
you stand financially will help
you make a wise decision
regarding your home and
family. Secure your future by
making the right move now.
***
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): You may not be see-
ing things as clearly as you
should. Don't let self-decep-
tion or disillusionment lead
you down a slippery slope.
Focus more on being cre-
ative and socializing with
people with whom you share
common interests. Love is in
the stars. *****


SUNDAY CROSSWORD


YOU'LL GET THROUGH THIS By Jeremy Newton and Tony Orbach / Edited by Will Shortz 1 12 3 [4 5 6 17 8 19 [10 11 12 [13"]14 115 |16 17 18 119 |20 |


NOTE: THE GRID REPRESENTS A MAZE. ENTER THE ROOM AT THE UPPER LEFT AND EXIT AT THE LOWER RIGHT, FOLLOWING A PATH
THAT WILL BECOME APPARENT AS YOU SOLVE THE CROSSWORD. WHEN THE PUZZLE IS DONE, READ THE CIRCLED LETTERS IN THE
ORDER IN WHICH THE ROOMS ARE VISITED TO SPELL A QUOTE BY 153-ACROSS.


Across
1 Herbert Hoover
and Richard
Nixon, e.g.
8 Go canvassing,
say
12 Partner of
whistles
17 Cop squad in
"Monk": Abbr.
21 Surround
22 "Dies ___"
23 How olives may
be packed
24 "Can't argue
there"
25 Done for, finito,
kaput
26 Execute perfectly
27.Auto security
feature
28 Canal part
29 Knock off
30 Demander of
special
treatment
31 Suffix with exist.
32 Univ., e.g.
35 Firmed up
-36 Course after trig
40 Singer Redding
41 Is for you?
42 Pull in
46 Back on the
ranch?
47 Backwoods
48 Drag wrap
49 Elands, to lions
50 Muse for
Whitman
51 Sen. McCain's
alma mater
55 Superlative
suffix
56 "Hells Bells"
band
For. any three answers,
call from a touch-tone
phone: 1-900-285-5656,
1.49 each minute; or,
with a credit card, 1-800-
814-5554.


57 Some fun in the
sun
60 Petty
manipulations
61 Spring (from)
62 Parade paths:
Abbr.
64 W.W. II beach
craft
65 ___-Magnon
66 Author R. L. __-
67 Hot
68 Mashed, e.g.
69 Dazed and
confused
71 Cornerstone abbr.
72 What sgts. turn
in at HIQ's
73 Shrub used in
dyeing
74 Some Nissan cars
75 Teaser on party
fliers
76 Cherish
77 Light reflector
82 Diminish
86 Show a bit, of
courtesy (for)
88 Unwrap
89 Runs (around),
informally
93 Nothin'
97 Under debate
98 Quite"a tale
99 Bajillions
100 Turn away
102 Java
103 Mine blower
104 Creator of
Genesis
105 Surfeit
106 Secretary of
state under
Carter
107 One of TV's
Clampetts
108 Suffix with
senior
110 Pre-sneeze
sounds
111 Moolah
112 Parting of the
Pacific?


113 It may be touch-
screen
114 Diamond stat
115 Hilton or Westin
welcomer
116 "Holy
mackerel!"
119 Cusp
120 Bajillion
121 Rice pad
125 Linear, for short
126 I love, to Luis
127 Assn.
128 Funny Caroline
129 Sticks up
131 Off the shore
135 Opening letters
136 Conductor in a
white turtleneck
141 Burrowing
arthropods
142 Classic Alfa
Romeo roadsters
146 Chrysler 300,
e.g.
147 Chair toted on
poles
148 It rarely has
more than one
part
149 Walloped
150 It rolls on a
Rolls
151 "I'm outta
here!"
152 Compatriot
153 [See blurb]

Down
1 Argument ender
2 A, in Amiens
3 Actress Gardner
4 "The original
sneaker"
sloganeer
5 Carrier to Ben-
Gurion
6 Parks in a bus
7 Neuter
8 Brie exterior
9 Hold 'emr
declaration


10 Less
sophisticated
11 Treat in Torino
12 Repeating heart
monitor sound
13 Musician Brian
14 Fan setting
15, Rewrite history,
in a way
16 Photog's choice
17 Fifth-century
pope
18 UPS drop-off'
site, often
19 Emilio of fashion
20 Hockey fake-outs'
32' Portable cutter
33 Italian appetizer,
literally "little
toasts".
34 All-weather
resort amenity
36 Run, as an
exhibit
37 Literary duelist
38 Unexpressed
39 Hush-hush
powwow
42 UV index
monitor
43 Light in a
floodlight
44 Macy's logo
feature
45 One in a line at
J.F.K. or La
Guardia
47 Rules, quickly
51 Country that
disappeared in
'91
52 How-to unit
53 Seinfeld vis-h-
vis Kramer
54 Author Tan and
others
57 Noel starter
58 Minor
59 Cast
63 Actress Ward
70 Gossipy Smith
77 Practiced
actively


78 Some of them are
turnoffs: Abbr.
79 "We've waited -
long enough!"
80 Pushed (aside)
81 Satisfying
82 Headaches
83 Do, by all
accounts
84 Touch
85 Keeping under
glass, e.g.
86 Muslim trek
87 Missouri River
native


89 Involuntary
extension of
troop tours
90 Pueblo vessel
91 Its winner beats
the loser with a
stick
92 Lid problem
93 Bygone missile
with a tribal
name
94 Literary paradise
95 Mark
96 Colosseum
entrance, e.g.
101 Blue-green


109 Go after
116 Daily talk show
beginning in
2005
117 Unprincipled
118 Harsh
pronouncement
from a judge
121 Pub order
122 "Whoopee!"
123 Happen again
124 Nifio producer
130 Nimble
131 Tennis's Arthur
132 Filtered stuff


133 Home to the
'sport of hurling
134 P.O. box, e.g.
136 Pre-C.I.A. grp.
137 Capital of
Zaire?
138 Suffix on fruit
names
139 Exceptionally
140 Santa ___
143 Apathetic
reactions
144 Hit 2011
animated film
145 Place to buy
tkts.


Answers to last Sunday's Crossword.
C Tu 0PlDERBY BOS|OMM I C BM
A U NI A SNARE ON CIU E T R O U
SU B T i TLE D AP R I OT IC SONG
SE I NjE RI RB0 O P RAMSES
E TE ARGO CAG N EY ME S S Y
ORO DRAY OHSO EBB
I P LE SBEL I VE ITORNOT
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Page Editor: Dave Kimler, 754-0413













LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, JUNE 5, 2011 Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this file photo, WWII veteran Wally Bell stops in front of the entrance to the World War II
display at the Navy UDT-SEAL Museum in Fort Pierce.



Bin Laden's death boosts

Navy SEAL museum


BY MATT SEDENSKY
Associated Press

FORT PIERCE The
biggest attraction at the
Navy SEALs' national
museum isn't memorial-
ized in any artifact or men-
tioned in any display. But
that doesn't keep visitors
from asking.
The May 2 killing
of Osama bin Laden at
the hands of SEALs has
brought a spike in visitors
to the National Navy UDT-
SEAL Museum, seeking a
behind-the-scenes glimpse
of how the mission was
pulled off. Attendance has
roughly tripled since the
raid, visitors are pummel-
ing docents with ques-
tions and people wanting
to express their gratitude
have flooded the museum
with letters of thanks. .
"They're hoping to get
ground truth here," said
Michael Howard, the muse-
um's executive director and
a former SEAL.
Visitors hankering for an
in-depth look at the raid
likely won't get what they're
looking for not yet at
least. But the museum's
history of the SEALs and
their predecessors gives a
glimpse into their secretive
world, and the type of men
called to conduct such a
mission.
The museum is built


at the birthplace of the
SEALs. From 1943 to 1946,
Fort Pierce was home to a
makeshift training encamp-
ment for Naval Combat
Demolition Teams and
Underwater Demolition
Teams, the forerunners to
the SEALs. The 26-year-old
museum chronicles that
history from the start.
Mannequins are dressed
in uniforms worn by the
elite squads through the
years, cases memorialize
their most notable mem-
bers, and weapons and
equipment from the past
60. years are contained
throughout. Outside, there
is a. Huey helicopter, mini
submarines and even the
lifeboat from the SEALs'
daring rescue of a cargo
ship captain from the hands
of pirates two years ago.
Cases are filled with anti-
quated life jackets, gauges
and breathing devices,
and other items, inc. hiding
a tattered Japanese flag
and a surrender document
signed by the head of the
Imperial Army at the end of
World War II.
For now, the museum
is heavy on the decades-
past story of the SEALs,
in places lite the World
War II battles of Normandy,
Okinawa and Iwo Jima. But
the stories of the men of
those earlier years of the
squad are perhaps most


inspiring because they had
so little history and tech-
nology on their side.
"We had junk," said Chuck
Thiess, the head docent and
a former member of a UDT
team. '"We didn't have any
manuals, we didn't have any-
thing to go by, but it was
fabulous."
The stories of men like
Thiess are what bring this
museum to life. He knew he
wanted to be a Navy diver
and even today, he swims
frequently. Sometimes, he'll
even put his underwater
skills to test, though he can't
hold his breath for nearly
the three-plus minutes he
did in his younger days.
"I challenge my grandchil-
dren every now and again
and sometimes I'll whip
'em," said Thiess, who at 81,
grips a wooden cane in his
left hand and sports a faded
tattoo of an anchor' on his
right forearm.
The very idea of a muse-
um devoted to the secre-
tive SEALs befuddles some.
Howard says he constantly
asks himself "Is this accept-
able? Are we saying too
much here?" when design-
ing exhibits.
The museum is prepar-
ing to open a new. wing.
- more than twice the
size of the original build-
ing which its staff hopes
to focus on the post-9/11
world of the SEALs.


Food pyramid out, 'My

Plate' in for healthy eating


BY MARY CLARE JALONICK
Associated Press

WASHINGTON The
Agriculture Department
unveiled a new symbol for
healthy eating Thursday,
abandoning a food pyra-
mid that has guided some
Americans' food choices
while confusing others.
The new guide is a
plate, divided into four
slightly different sized
quadrants, with fruits and
vegetables taking up half
the space and grains and
protein making up the
other half. The vegetable
and grains portions are
slightly larger.
Agriculture Secretary
Tom Vilsack says "My
Plate" aims to show that
nutrition doesn't have
to be complicated. After
almost 20 years of preach-
ing nutrition through a
food pyramid that USDA
officials now say was over-
ly complex, obesity rates
have skyrocketed. The
new symbol, unveiled by
Vilsack Thursday at the
department with first lady
Michelle Obama in atten-
o. dance, is simple and gives
diners an idea of what
should be on their plates
when they sit down at the
dinner table.
"Parents don't have
the time to measure out
exactly 3 ounces of pro-
tein," Mrs. Obama said
as she introduced the
new graphic. "We do
have time to look at our
kids' plates."
To get that message
out, the department is
planning to use social
media posting advice
every day on Twitter, for
example. The address of
the accompanying web-
site, choosemyplate.gov,
is written on the chart.
-That website will eventu-


ASSOCIATED PRESS
First lady Michelle Obama talks with Surgeon General
Regina Benjamin at the Agriculture Department in
Washington, Thursday during an event to unveil the new
My Plate food icon.


ally feature interactive
tools that help people
manage their weight and
track exercise.
Robert Post of USDA's
Center for Nutrition Policy
and Promotion, who has
sperit two years develop-
ing the plate and the web-
site, said the new chart
is designed to be "more
artistic and attractive" and
to serve as a visual cue for
diners.
Gone are any references
to sugars, fats or oils, and
what was once a category
called "meat and beans"


is now simply "proteins,"
making way for seafood
and vegetarian options
like tofu. Next to the plate
is a blue circle for dairy,
which could be a glass
of milk or a food such as
cheese or yogurt.
Vilsack stresses that
the plate is supposed to be
suggestion, not direction.
"We are not telling peo-
ple what to eat, we are
giving them a guide," he
said. "We're not suggest-
ing they should not have
a cookie or dessert, that's
not what it's about."


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Teresa Feagle, 36, has been cancer-free for six years, having been diagnosed with breast
cancer at the tender age of 29. 'I'm grateful and thankful that I was able to be blessed with
the doctors and support staff that helped me to survive cancer,' Feagle said. 'Be aggressive
with your treatments. I dealt with it in a positive way and didn't let it slow me down. Cancer
was a speed bump that God put in front of me. The best advice I could give is to listen to the
cues your body gives you.'


SUPPORT: Group helps cancer victims

Continued From Page 1D


endure as they deal with
medical; fuel and lodging
costs associated with get-
ting treatment for the dis-
ease.
'The ultimate goal
of the Suwannee River
Breast Cancer Awareness


Association is to give back
to the community as they
experience hardships," she
said. "This organization
has really been funded by
personal experience. Most
everyone on the board of


cancer in their immediate
families. I think we've all
experienced hardships as
a result of cancer and can-
cer treatments every day
or hardships due to life


directors has experienced changes.'


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LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, JUNE 5, 2011


Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424