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The Lake City reporter
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Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01569
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 02-25-2011
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01569
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text







District win
LadyTigers run
net record to 5-0.

000015 12051i **
LI OF FLORID HISTORY
P0 BOX 117007
205 NS UNIV OF FLORIDA
FAIiNESVILLE FL 32611-1943






Friday, February 25, 201 I


FINAL

Last launch
for world's
most traveled
spaceship.

By MARCIA DUNN
AP Aerospace Writer
CAPE CANAVERAL
discovery, the
world's most
traveled space-
ship,thundered
Into orbitforthe
final time Thursday, head-
ing toward the International
Space Station on a journey
that marks the beginning of
the end of the shuttle era.
The six astronauts, on
board, all experienced
space fliers, were thrilled to
be on their way after a delay
of nearly four months for
fuel tank repairs. But it puts
Discovery on the cusp of
retirement when it returns.
in 11 days and eventually
heads to a museum.
Discovery is the oldest
of NASA's three surviving
space shuttles and the first
to be decommissioned this
year. Two missions remain,
first by Atlantis and then
Endeavour, to end the 30-
year program.
It was Discovery's 39th
launch and the 133rd shut-
tie mission overall.
"Enjoy the ride," the
test conductor radioed just
before liftoff. Commander
Steven Lindsey thanked
everyone for the work in
getting Discovery ready to
go: "And for those watch-
ing, get ready to witness
the. majesty and the power.
of Discovery as she lifts off
one final time." Space sl
Emotions ran high as Canaver
SHUTTLE continued on 3A Multipurl


326




A v


Down to the Wire
CHS picks up 6-5
softball win at Middleburg.

Sports, IB





Reporter


:ityreporter.com


DISCOVERY


ASSOCIATED PRESS
shuttle Discovery lifts off from Pad 39A at the Kennedy Space Center in Cape
ral Thursday. Discovery, on its last mission, will carry the Leonardo Permanent
pose Module, or PMM, to the International Space Station.


Vol. 137, No. 29 0 75 cents


NY jury clears LC

man facing 3 1/2

years in prison


Traffic stop led
to concealed-
weapons charge.
By JENNIFER PELTZ
Associated Press
NEW YORK A Lake
City man's unwanted intro-
duction to.New York's gun
laws ended Thursday with
him being cleared of a
weapon-possession charge
stemming from a pistol he
said he'd forgotten he had
in his glove compartment.
Jonathan Ryan sobbed
with relief after a Manhattan
jury acquitted him of the
charge, which would have
sent him to prison for at
least 3 1/2 years had he
been convicted.
"I knew I was an innocent
man," the 29-year-old land-


scaping supervisor said,
thanking God, his family
and his lawyer as he left
court. "I wanted to show
that that's what integrity's
about you stand your
ground."
Ryan was arrested in
February 2010 while on a
1,000-mile road trip to help
his girlfriend move. back
to Florida from New York
City after she finished a
temporary job with "The
Late Show With David
Letterman."
A self-described "fish out
of water" in city traffic, he
got pulled over for making
a right turn on a red light,
not knowing that's illegal
in the city, he said. As he
fetched his registration,
police spotted his 9 mm
CLEARED continued on 3A


Emotional day at

Suwannee MS after

student's death


Cause of death
has not yet been
released by police.
By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
LIVE OAK Middle
school students are coping
with the death of a sixth-
grade student, Suwannee
County school officials said
Thursday.
Suwannee County law
enforcement officers are
investigating the girl's
death, but have notreleased


any information.
Suwannee County Sheriff
Tony Cameron was not
immediately available for
comment Thursday.
Norri Steele, Suwannee
County Middle School prin-
cipal, said reaction to the
news -of the child's death
varied among the school's
students.
"The mood was emotion-
al. It was an emotional day,"
she said in a telephone
interview. "Not all the stu-
dents knew her well. We
MOURNING continued on 3A


Tonight it's show time!


Lake City girl will
appear on Fox's hit
show 'Fringe.'
By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com
Karley Scott Collins of Lake
City got to learn about her
favorite subject of science
in a way most students will
never experience filming
on the set of the hit TV show
"Fringe."
Today, the 11-year-old child
actress will appear through-
out an all-new episode of the
Fox network show in the role
of young FBI Special Agent
Olivia Dunham, a lead charac-
ter in the series.
The episode, titled "Subject
13," will air at 9 p.m. EST.
"She is in the entire hour,"
said Scott Collins, Karley
Collins' father. "It's going to
be a great chance to see her."
Set in Boston, Mass.,
"Fringe" is an American
science fiction TV series in
its third season. The show
follows the casework of the
FBI's Fringe Division, which
is made up of the show's main
characters Olivia, scientist
Walter Bishop and Waiter's


1 84264 00020 1


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400


COURTESY PHOTOS
Above: Karley Scott Collins portrays Justine from 'Pulse 2:
Afterlife,' the straight-to-DVD sequel of the 2006 film 'Pulse.'

Below: Lake City resident Karley Scott Collins will be featured on
the science fiction series 'Fringe' at 9 p.m. tonight on Fox.
son, Peter.
Karley Collins' episode, set
in Jacksonville, will take view-
ers through a flashback to a '-
significant period of time for '
both the Bishops and Olivia.
"It's a very important epi-
sode for 'Fringe' fans because
it answers a lot of questions ,
they've had for the past three
years," Scott Collins said.
Scott Collins said Karley
Collins didn't audition for the

FRINGE continued on 3A


79 s
Isolated showers
WEATHER, 2A


Florida Supreme Court

justice speaks out on

merits of volunteering


Wanting to 'make a
difference' eventually
led Perry to law school.
By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
Florida Supreme Court Justice
James E.C. Perry knows what it's
like to work as a volunteer attorney.
He began his career as a legal aide
attorney and progressed through
the ranks to earn a spot on the
state's top judicial body.
"The reason I went to law school
was to make a difference," Perry
said. "I understand the commitment
and it's not about money, it's about
trying to make a difference. It's a
thankless job in a lot of instances
and people don't really understand
or appreciate it."
Perry has been a Florida Supreme
Court Justice for two years, but
was in Lake City Thursday night
as the keynote speaker for the
Fifth Annual Third Judicial Circuit
Private Bar Involvement Reception.
The event was attended by more
than 50 people who were at the
reception to honor the agency's vol-
unteer attorneys.


Opinion ................ 4A
Around Florida........... 2A
Obituaries .............. 5A
Advice & Comics......... 3B
Puzzles ................. 2B


TOD
Wc
ti'. iil


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Florida Supreme Court Justice James
E.C. Perry speaks at the 5th Annual
Third Judicial Circuit Private Bar
Involvement Reception on Thursday.
With Perry's experience as a
legal aide attorney, he seemed to be
the ideal keynote speaker as Three
Rivers Legal Services honored more
JUDGE continued on 3A

)AY IN COMING
)RLD SATURDAY
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- l. L-,:i~ l.; f tl t ._:,(' ",,.:.-,_',. ,









LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2011


(A$H 3 Thursday:
SAfternoon: 6-8-1
Evening: 1-2-8


-,:<,-'/ Thursday:
Afternoon: 4-1-7-5
Evening: 9-3-1-2


ezmatcdz
Wednesday:
12-27-30-32-35


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



Zeta-Jones receives royal honor


LONDON


Catherine Zeta-Jones
has received a royal
honor from Prince
Charles at Buckingham
Palace.
The Swansea, Wales-born actress
became a Commander of the Order
of the British Empire at the ceremo-
ny Thursday, where she was accom-
panied by husband Michael Douglas
and their two children Carys-and
Dylan.
Zeta-Jones, 41, said she was "very
emotional and rather nervous" to
receive the honor, which was given
for her services to the film industry
and her charity efforts.
She said "it was worth (it) to have
Michael in good health to be able to
enjoy it with me."
Douglas has been fighting throat
cancer.
Zeta-Jones said Prince Charles
.had expressed his sympathy and was
"happy to hear" that Douglas was
recovering.

White House comes alive
with Motown legends
WASHINGTON The White
House is crawling with top pop stars
and genuine Motown legends as
Barack and Michelle Obama pay
tribute to the music that was a big
part of the soundtrack-of their youth.
An impressive lineup of stars
including John Legend, Jamie Foxx
and Smokey Robinson will headline
a Thursday evening concert in the
SEast Room.
But first, Michelle Obama is host-
ing more than 100 students from
around the country for an afternoon
tutorial with some of the musical
celebrities about the history of
Motown and its influence on society.
Bob Santelli, executive director


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Hollywood actress Catherine Zeta
Jones (right) is invested as a
Commander of the British Empire (CBE)
by Prince Charles at Buckingham
Palace in London Thursday. The Oscar-
winning Welsh-born actress receives
the royal honour for herservices to the
film industry and to charity.

of the GRAMMY Museum, which
helps sponsor the event, said that
Motown's music helped to break
color barriers.

Prince William, Kate
dedicate lifeboat
TREARDDUR BAY, Wales It
was only a lifeboat yet the occa-
sion gave hundreds of people a
chance to cheer Thursday as Prince
William and fiancee Kate Middleton
made an official visit to Wales to
dedicate the new boat.
In a ceremony in Anglesey, Wales,


:1


Celebrity Birthdays


* Country singer Ralph
Stanley is 84.
* Actor Tom Courtenay is 74.
* Actress Diane Baker is 73.
* Actress Karen Grassle is
67.
* Humorist Jack Handey is
62.
* Rock musician Dennis
Diken (The Smithereens) is
54.

Daily Scripture


* Rock singer-musician Mike
Peters (The Alarm) is 52.
* Actress Tea Leoni is 45.
* Comedian Carrot Top is
44.
* Actor Sean Astin is 40.
* Latin singer Julio Iglesias
Jr. is 38.
* Actors James and Oliver
Phelps ("Harry Potter" mov-
ies) are 25.


the prince made a short statement
asking that all those who used the
boat be blessed, and then Middleton,
with a big smile, poured champagne
over the lifeboat
"I do the talking, she does the fun
bit," William joked.
The champagne bottle was not
broken over the boat, as is tradition-
al, because the lifeboat was an inflat-
able and it would ndt have been easy
to crack.a bottle on its bow.
Middleton looked elegant and
comfortable in her new role as a
princess-to-be. She wore a three-
quarter length tailored beige coat
designed by British designer
Katherine Hooker, and had her long
hair swept back and topped by a chic
feathery hat
The hat was adorned with a badge
of the Royal Welsh Fusiliers, an infan-
try regiment of the British army.
Prince William named the
Trearddur Bay Lifeboat Station's
new boat the "Hereford Endeavour"
at the ceremony 300 miles northwest
of London.
He and Middleton joined the
crowd in singing "God Save the
Queen," followed by the Welsh
national anthem.

Couric compiles advice
for 'Extraordinary Lves'
NEW YORK Katie Couric and
some famous friends are sharing tips
on how to succeed.
The CBS television anchor has
compiled 'The Best Advice I Ever
Got: Lessons from Extraordinary
Lives." The book features contribu-
tions from Alex Rodriguez, Meryl
Streep, Condoleezza Rice and more
than 100 others. Random H6use
announced Thursday that it is sched-
uled to come out April 12.

* Associated Press


Reporter
BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon... ;754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7:30
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
10.30 a.m., next day redelivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation ...............755-5445
(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
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Rates indude 7% sales tax
Mail rates
12Weeks ................ $41.40
24 Weeks ................$82.80
52 Weeks....... .......$179.40


CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run
in this space. And thanks for reading.


Scott asks to cut
government
TALLAHASSEE
Florida's legislative ses-
sion set to start March 8
could be one of the most
explosive in years, with
thousands of state jobs on
the line as new Gov. Rick
Scott presses to cut back
on the size and cost of
state government,
Whittling down state
government was one of
former Gov. Jeb Bush's
goals and it's been
attempted by other gover-
nors across the country,
too, although not often
successfully.
But with Florida's
economy in the dol-
drums, a budget shortfall
of at least $3.6 billion
and a desire to cut taxes,
Scott and a conservative
Republican Legislature
see a chance to elimi-
nate or curtail programs
they see as unneeded or
wasteful.
Rank-and-file state
employees, who haven't
seen a pay raise in five
years, will lose ground
again with changes in
their pension and health
benefits. Key government
services also face cuts.
Scott and legislators are
-taking dead aim at educa-
tion, social services and
even law enforcement,
with police agencies con-
cerned that they'll have to
release some inmates to
save housing and feeding
costs.


Senate panel calls
for admonition
TALLAHASSEE
A legislative panel said
Senate President Mike
Haridopolos should get a
letter of admonition, but
no fine, for financial disclo-
sure violations.
The Senate Rules
Committee voted unani-


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter

Black History Month Talent Show

Florida Gateway College student Zac Holder, 22, kicks a
hacky sack up in the air while performing during the college's
Black History Month Festival and Talent Show on Wednesday.


mously Thursday to send
that recommendation to
the full chamber.
The Merritt Islafid
Republican failed to fully
disclose his financial inter-
ests for five years 2004
through 2008.
Haridopolos omitted
information such as his
earnings from teaching at
the University of Florida
and the names of his con-
sulting clients. He also
misstated the values of a
home and mortgage.
Haridopolos, who is
seeking the GOP's U.S.
Senate nomination, said
the errors were unin-
tended.
The panel based its
decision on two similar
House cases in 2000.


Marine killed in
Afghanistan
CAMP LEJEUNE, N.C.
- Military officials said
a Marine based at Camp
Lejeune has died in com-
bat in Afghanistan.
The Defense
Department said 23-year-
old Cpl. Johnathan W.
Taylor of Homosassa, Fla.,
died Tuesday in Helmand
province, Afghanistan.
Taylor had been
assigned to the 2nd
Battalion, 8th Marine
Regiment, 2nd Marine
Division, II Marine
Expeditionary Force at
North Carolina's Camp
Lejeune.


THE WEATHER



ISOLATED CHANCE PARTLY
SHOWERS -STORMS CLOUDY


HI79 58 H175L053 H182L56


CHANCE
T-STORMS


SHI 79 L0 53


MOSTLY
,SUNNY


HI 71 L0 41


IONL ORCAT APfo Fiday Fbrar. 2


75Pe/5saola
75/50


Tallahassee *
77/51 ..

Panama Cit
70/50


SVadosta
79/54 *Jacksonvle
Lake City ',81/54
79/58
Gainesville Daytona Beach
y "80/57 80 ,59
Ocala *
"81/56 i
S Orlando Cape Ca
83/59 78/!
STapst Pa "
76/00/, West Palm B


laveral
59


S82/62 *'
S\i Ft.Lauderdale
Ft Myers 81/67 *
82/60 Naples *
,80/61 Miami


Key West,
80/69


TEMPERATURES
High Thursday
Low Thursday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Thursday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


79
57
71
46
88 in 1962
25 in 1989


0.00"
3.59"
7.27"
2.87"
6.38"


.11 I'


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise torm.
Sunset tom.


8 i/66
, *"


7:01 a.m.
6:26 p.m.
7:00a.m.
6:27 p.m.


MOON
Moonrise today 1:44 a.m.
Moonset today 12:07 p.m.
Moonrise tom. 2:40 a.m.
Moonset tom. 1:03 p.m.


March March March March
4 12 19 26
New First Full Last


On nms date in
1922. e terrpera
lure at Los Angeles.
Calif. soared to 92
degrees to establish
a record for the
month of February.


City Saturday
Cape Canaveral 78, 59; pc
Daytona Beach 77/57/t
Ft. Lauderdale 80/69/pc
Fort Myers 82/61/pc
Gainesvllle 77/53/pc
Jacksonville 74/55/t
Key West 79/68/pc
Lake City 75/53/pc
Miami 81/68/pc
Naples 79/62/pc
Ocala 77/54/pc
Orlando 82/58/pc
Panama City 70/58/pc
Pensacola 70/60/s
Tallahassee 77/54/pc'
Tampa 78/60/pc,
Valdosta 77/53/pc
W. Palm Beach 81/65/pc


Sunday
79, 63, pc
81/61/pc
81/71/pc
81/63/s
81/58/pc
79/57/pc
80/70/s
82/56/pc
82/69/pc
84/64/pc
81/57/pc
83/61/pc
70/60/pc
73/63/t
78/58/pc
78/63/pc
80/56/c
81/70/pc


An exclusive
service
8 brought to
VHGmI l our readers
15 indismo n
Today's by
ultra-violet The Weather
radiation risk Channel.
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+.

weather.com

I Forecasts, data and
,.J'; graphics 0 2011 Weather
Central, LP, Madison, WIs.
www.weatherpubllsher.comn


el Connected

"t.,


* Associated Press


"For I know the plans I have for
you," declares the Lord, "plans
to prosper you and not to harm
you, plans to give you hope and
a future.Then you will call on
me and come and pray to me,
and I will listen to you."
-Jeremiah 29:11-13


AROUND FLORIDA


-"---1 1311 1~11~--1 1 I


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


r, IAKEC9TY'AMiilllH


Lake City
HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293
Fax number...........752-9400
Circulation ............755-5445
Online... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at180
E. Duval St, Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and'
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson .....754-0418
(twllson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
Assistant Editor CJ Risak..754-0427
After 1:00 p.m.
(crisak@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Kathryn Peterson..754-0417
(kpeterson@lakecityreporter.com)
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440.


\ach











Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2011


SWAT students post 'No Smoking' signs at LCMS


By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com

After Lake City Middle School
students found a number of ciga-
rette butts and empty chewing
tobacco cans while picking up
litter on campus, they chose to
put a stake to the problem.
Literally.
The students, who belong to
the Columbia County Health
Department's LCMS chapter
of SWAT (Students Working
Against Tobacco), asked the
department's tobacco preven-
tion program and the school dis-
trict arranged to install a new
tobacco-free sign at LCMS. The
sign was posted at the school's
entrance Thursday.
"The students wanted to make
people more aware of the current
tobacco policy," said Adrienne
Clemons, county health depart-
ment SWAT coordinator.
The school district policy pro-
hibits the use of tobacco prod-
ucts on school campuses and
school board properties at all
times.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
ColumbiaCounty Assistant Superintendent of Schools Lex Carswell
(from left) congratulates Lake City Middle School students Hunter
Williams, 12, Haley Cunningham, 13, Josh Garbett, 12, Ron'nia
Robinson, 12, and Barry Bing, 11, for their participation in keeping the
school tobacco free.


'This is the sign that sends
that message to everyone," said
Lex Carswell, assistant superin-
tendent of schools.
"We really want to remind
the community that school cam-


puses are tobacco free whether
you're sitting in line waiting to
pick your student up, you're on
a campus," Clemons said, "or
whether you're at a stadium
watching a football game, you're


on a school campus."
The health department makes
a work plan for its tobacco pre-
vention program, Clemons said,
which outlines initiatives that
SWAT clubs can choose from to
work on. The LCMS SWAT club
chose to focus on the initiative
of making its school 100 percent
tobacco free, she said.
Signs similar to LCMS' will be
posted at every school entrance
in the district within weeks,
Carswell said. LCMS was the
first to receive its sign because
its SWAT club is the most active
in the tobacco-free schools initia-
tive, he said.
About five to 10 years ago, the
district had posted tobacco-free
signs at its schools, but some of
the signs have fallen into disre-
pair, Carswell said.
Genna Breitberg, 13, an
eighth-grade LCMS SWAT mem-
ber, said the new sign will make
the LCMS campus more safe.
"It's important so that every-
one knows that there's no tobac-
co allowed on school campuses
at all," she said.


MOURNING:

Continued From Page 1A

tried to help the students out as
best we could."
Steele said the middle school's
staff and faculty was notified
about the incident Wednesday
night, and plans were made to
break the news to students.
'We started out with a meeting
this morning (Thursday) to. let
them (faculty and staff) all know
what had occurred for those who
hadn't heard," she said. "It was
to help them know how to speak
to their students this morning to
help them with it."
School officials requested guid-
ance counselors, in their capacity
as grief counselors, the school
district's director of student ser-
vices and a pastor from a local
church to be present on campus
Thursday to help students cope
with the news of the girl's death.
'We had a lot of people who
are used to and can work with
this type of crisis intervention,"
Steele said, noting that the coun-
selors will be available along as
needed. *


SHUTTLE: Last flight of Discovery

Continued From Page 1A


Discovery rocketed off its
seaside pad into a late after-
noon clear blue sky, and
arced out over the Atlantic
on its farewell flight. There
were a tense few minutes
before liftoff when an Air
Force computer problem
popped up. The issue was
resolved and Discovery
took off about three min-
utes late, with just a few
seconds remaining in the
countdown.
Discovery will reach
the space station Saturday,
delivering a small cham-
ber full of supplies and an
experimental humanoid
robot. "Look forward to
having company here on
ISS in a couple days," sta-
tion commander Scott Kelly
said in a Twitter message.
The orbiting lab was
soaring ever the South
Pacific when Discovery
blasted off.
"Discovery now mak-
ing one last reach for the
stars," the Mission Control
commentator said once the
shuttle cleared the launch
tower.
On-board TV cameras
showed some pieces of
foam insulation breaking
off the external fuel tank
four minutes into the flight,
but shouldn't pose any safe-
ty concerns because it was
late enough after liftoff.
NASA is under presiden-
tial direction to retire the
shuttle fleet this summer,
let private companies take
over trips to orbit and focus
on getting astronauts to
asteroids and Mars.
An estimated 40,000
guests gathered at Kennedy
Space Center to witness his-
tory in the making, includ-
ing a small delegation from
Congress and Florida's new


Gov. Rick Scott. Discovery
frenzy took over not only
the launch site, but neigh-
boring towns.
Roads leading to the
launching site were
jammed with cars parked
two and three deep; rec-
reational vehicles snagged
prime viewing spots along
the Banana River well
before dawn. Businesses
and governments joined in,
their signs offering words
of encouragement. "The
heavens await Discovery,"
a Cocoa Beach church pro-
claimed. Groceries stocked
up on extra red, white and
blue cakes with shuttle
pictures. Stores ran out of
camera batteries.
The launch team also got
into the act. A competition
was held to craft the depart-
ing salutation from Launch
Control: "The final liftoff of
Discovery, a tribute to the
dedication, hard work and
pride of America's space
shuttle team." Kennedy's
public affairs office nor-
mally comes up with the
parting line. Souvenir pho-
tos of Discovery were set
aside for controllers in the
firing room. Many posed
for group shots.
Lindsey and his crew
paused to take in the sig-
nificance of it all, before
boarding Discovery. They
embraced in a group hug at
the base of the launch pad:
Unlike the first try back
in November, no hydro-
gen gas leaked during
Thursday's fueling.
NASA also was confident
no cracks would develop
in the external fuel tank;
nothing serious was spot-
ted during the final checks
at the pad. Both problems
cropped up during the


initial countdown in early
November, and the repairs
took almost four months.
The cracks in the midsec-
tion of the tank, which
holds instruments but no
fuel, could have been dan-
gerous.
The lengthy postpone-
ment kept one of the brigi-
nal crew from flying.
Astronaut Timothy
Kopra, the lead space-
walker, was hurt when he
wrecked his bicycle last
month. Experienced space-
walker Stephen Bowen
stepped in and became the
first astronaut to fly back-
to-back shuttle missions.
Packed aboard Discovery
is Robonaut 2, or R2, set to
become the first humanoid
robot in space. Tle experi-
mental machine looking
human from the waist up
- will remain boxed until
after Discovery departs. Its
twin was at the launch site,
perched atop a rover, wav-
ing goodbye.
"I'm in space! HELLO
UNIVERSE!!!" R2
announced in a tweet sent
by a human still on Earth.
Discovery already has
143 million miles to its
credit, beginning with its
first flight in 1984. By the
time this mission ends, the
shuttle will have tacked on
another 4.5 million miles.
And it will have spent 363
days in space and circled
Earth 5,800 times when it
returns March 7.
No other spacecraft has
been launched so many
times.
Discovery is expected to
be eventually put on dis-
play by the Smithsonian
Institution.


FRINGE: Local girl on hit TV show

Continued From Page 1A


part, but received a hope-
ful telephone call about
the role from her man-
ager during her birthday
party in Lake City. After
that, the part became a
direct offer, he said.
This particular role is
not Karley Collins' first.
Her exposure to acting
came when she was 5 at a
Gainesville acting camp,
her father said. Karley
Collins' first job was a
reoccurring role on CBS
TV show "The Class" in
2006.
Her most recent
television appearances
include an episode of
"Private Practice" in
2007, Lifetime movie
"Amish Grace" in 2010
with Kimberly Williams-
Paisley and voiceovers of
two different characters
in the Christmas episode
of the Fox show "Family
Guy" in 2010.
She was also named
one of web-based Dream
Magazine's 'Top 16 under
16" in 2010.


Karley Collins, along
with her father and
mother, Nena, spent three
weeks in Vancouver,
Canada, for her "Fringe"
episode's filming.
When she is on set,
Karley Collins said
she likes working with
"strong themes," which
"Fringe" has. And young
Olivia's character traits
are similar to her own,
she said.
"She's a really fun girl
and I had a lot in com-
mon with her so it was
fun to play her," Karley
Collins said. "She's
strong, she's a tomboy
just like me. She's smart
and what she actually
does is pretty much
science in her job and
that's like, one of my
favorite subjects ever."
Playing characters
like young Olivia affords
Karley Collins the oppor-
tunity to learn both about
the character and herself.
S"It's just really fun to
learn new things because


sometimes the character
is interested in things and
I can learn about what
they are," Karley Collins
said. "It's also really
fun for me to learn new
things about myself when
I'm being the character."
All of her family and
friends will be watch-
ing the episode's airing,
Karley Collins said.
"Me and my dad,
we actually really love
that show," she said,
"so whenever I got the
chance to be on that show
I. was so excited because
a lot of people watch that
show. It'll be really cool
for a lot of people to get
to see me on TV."



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JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Supreme Court Justice James E.C. Perry (from left) speaks with Suwannee County Judge
William 'Lin' Williams and his wife Myong during the reception Thursday. 'It was terrific
speaking with him,' Williams said. 'He's an interesting individual. I always enjoy talking to
him.'

JUDGE: Speaks about volunteering

Continued From Page 1A


than 40 volunteer attorneys.
He said it was important to have a
reception honoring the volunteers.
'That's about all they get honor
and recognition, because they certainly
aren't paid," Perry said. "These people
are really here for those people who can
least help themselves."
During the event several volunteer
attorneys were given certificates for their
services by Donna S. MacRae, pro-bono
project director and managing attorney
for Three Rivers Legal Services in Lake
City.
"This is our opportunity to thank the
volunteer attorneys for donating their
time, to say how needed they are and to
tell the rest of the legal community about
the different members who are volunteer-
ing with us and the benefits of volunteer-
ing," she said. "Without the volunteers
we wouldn't be able to assist near the
number of clients that we're able to assist


now. We simply don't have enough staff
members to provide services to all of the
eligible clients."
Three River Legal Services was estab-
lished in 1977 and provides free civil legal
services in 17 North Florida counties.
The Lake City office provides free civil
legal services to Third Judicial Circuit
residents.
Nancy Holliday Fields, chairman of the
board, said volunteer attorneys make a
huge difference for the agency as they
fight foreclosures, wrongful evictions,
housing discrimination and work on
bankruptcy representations.
"It's very important to recognize the
devotion of the attorneys who volunteer
their time and efforts who take cases that
sometimes last for years," she said. "The
effort they put into it really means a lot to
us and the clients. It's only right that we
recognize them and that they know how
important they are."


CLEARED: Gun charge dismissed

Continued From Page 1A


pistol and a detached, load-
ed magazine in his truck's
glove box.
Ryan was.charged under
a New York law that gener-
ally bars people from hav-
ing loaded guns outside their
homes or workplaces.
Ryan bought the gun legal-
ly in Florida in 2007. He said
he'd long since forgotten the
pistol was in his glove box
and wasn't familiar with New
York's gun laws.
His lawyer, Mark A
Bederow, said the case


amounted to "criminaliza-
tion of a mistake."
Jurors deliberated for
less than an hour before
acquitting Ryan. Manhattan
District Attorney Cyrus R
Vance Jr. said in a statement
that prosecutors respect-
ed the verdict, but "guns
brought illegally into New
York City for any reason
- violate well-established
state law and are a threat
to our public safety."
As he left court with his
girlfriend, parents and sib-


HAPYBIRTDAY MOM OL






.S.
.2.


Your Smile and Your Laugh
Are Our Inspiration.

Love Daddy'O, Janis, Margaret,
George Jr., Becky


lings, Ryan said the experi-
ence left him with "no bit-
terness at all."
'This shows that the jus-
tice system, and the peo-
ple, are still fair," he said.
And, he noted, "I think
New York City is a beauti-
ful city."


LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2011


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427













OPINION


Friday, February 25, 201 I


OTHER


OTHER
OPINION



Stumbling

toward a

shutdown

The leadership of the
Senate Democrats
and the House
Republicans are ada-
mant that they don't
want a shutdown of the federal
government and will work
mightily to prevent that from
happening.
The Republican leadership,
mindful that their party took
the blame the last time the gov-
ernment shut down in 1995-96
and never recovered its politi-
cal momentum, are particularly
forceful.
"Let me be clear, a govern-
ment shutdown is not an
acceptable outcome," said
House Republican leader Eric
Cantor. Let's stipulate that
the leadership is truly sincere
about this.
The variable in this equation
is the 87 Republican newcom-
ers, many of them that the Tea
Party backed, in the House.
Some of them seem to want a
shutdown to show their sup-
porters that they really are
tough on spending. Others, one
suspects, are simply curious as
to what will happen.
The answer is: Nothing
good.
The national parks, the fed-
eral museums, the national
monuments close down and
go dark. Passport applica-
tions stack up untouched.
New Social Security claims go
unclaimed.
Processing veterans' benefits
and claims slows to a trickle.
Communities with a large fed-
eral presence begin to struggle
as furloughed workers stop
spending.
The angry citizens can't
complain to the federal gov-
ernment. It's closed. So they
complain to their local member
of Congress. And complain and
complain.
As the lawmakers begin
straggling back to Congress
after their Presidents Day
recess, they face the real pos-
sibility of blundering into a
government shutdown that no
responsible lawmakers wanted
and their leaders strove might-
ily to avoid.

* Scripps Howard News Service

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Sue Brannon, controller
Dipk NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman


LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
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and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,


Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180; E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
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www.lakecityreporter.com


Start drilling for oil in the US


NEW YORK

please?
At this writing,
circumstances in
the Middle East
may change between this sen-
tence and my last paragraph.
What began in mid-December
as an uprising that sent
Tunisian President Ben Ali into
Saudi exile on Jan. 14 quickly
inspired Cairo's Tahrir Square
rebellion. Hosni Mubarak, who
ruled Egypt for 29 years, eight
more than Cleopatra, hastily
retired when his people hound-
ed him from Heliopolis Palace
into his vacation compound in
Sharm el-Sheikh.
Just outside Mubarak's hide-
away, two Iranian war ships this
week floated north through
the Suez Canal. This was the
Iranian Navy's first appearance
in the Arab equivalent of the
Panama Canal since 1979's rev-
olution installed the Ayatollah
Khomeini and his joyless, sex-
ist, bloodthirsty theocracy.
Eastern Libya now is con-
trolled by regular citizens,
freshly armed by soldiers
who largely disobeyed orders
to shoot their fellow citizens.
Strongman Moammar Gadhafi
ordered. two fighter jets to
bomb his constituents, prompt-
ing the pilots to defect to Malta.
"I have not yet ordered the
use of force," Gadhafi said
Tuesday night. "When I do,
everything will burn."
Time.com reports that
Gadhafi has instructed his
operatives to sabotage Libya's
oil fields, supposedly to show
Libyans that without Gadhafi,
things could get really crazy.
Libyan production already is
down 25 percent, and Italy's Eni
and Spain's Repsol have sus-
pended operations there.
In Bahrain's capital of
Manama, Pearl Square witness-
es daily protests and occasional
state-sponsored bullets aimed


LETTER


Deroy Murdock
deroy.murdock@gmail.com
squarely into the stomachs of
peaceful demonstrators.
Yemen could spin into total
disarray, with Al-Qaeda in the
Arabian Peninsula led by
American-born radical Muslim
Anwar al-Awlaki waiting
to pounce on any emerging
opportunity. He reportedly has
advised accused crotch bomber
Umar Farouk Abdulmutallab
and alleged Fort Hood shooter,
Major Nidal Malik Hasan.
Next door, Saudi Arabia's
ruthless rqyal family nervously
watches these developments.
So do Israelis, who must feel
like residents of the nicest man-
sion in Malibu just as the neigh-
bors' homes catch fire, and the
Santa Ana-wind-driven flames
race up the canyon with menac-
ing urgency.
Americans absorb all of this
in justifiable bewilderment.
We hope that matters evolve
as well as they did in autumn
1989, when one Communist
domino toppled into the next,
and Karl Marx tumbled onto
the ash heap of history, exactly
as Ronald Reagan promised.
Americans also worry that the
Arab street, happy today to
shed the shackles of decades-
old dictatorships, soon might
look less cheerful. This hap-
pened in Iran, where the Shah's
heavy hand yielded to the iron
fists of the globally meddlesome
mullahs.
Flowing through this real-
life Hieronymus Bosch canvas
is the same ingredient in the
paints that define his master-
pieces: Oil.


Petroleum futures Thursday
reached $103.41per barrel
before falling back below
$100, their highest price since
September 2008. Unleaded
gasoline averages $3.24 per gal-
lon -up 55 cents, year-on-year.
Summer road trips may push
prices higher.
Amid all of this, the Obama
administration treats America's
domestic petroleum supply
like the Smithsonian's Hope
Diamond: Something to be
observed and admired, but not
touched.
'The Bureau of Land
Management has created a
lot of uncertainty related to
onshore leases," says the
American Petroleum Institute's
Erik Milito. 'They are adding
layers that delay opportunities
for oil and gas development on
federal land."
The picture at sea is no better.
'The administration has at
least 40 exploration plans and
40 development plans that have
not been acted upon. We under-
stand that dozens of oil spill
response plans require action
as well. ... They cannot approve
permits to allow drilling to com-
mence until they address those
items."
Like it or not, America relies
heavily on oil today, for jobs,
commerce, and our very exis-
tence. Alas, oil comes mainly
from an area that is as stable
as a prison riot. "Precarious"
barely describes America's pre-
dicament.
And yet, a huge part of the
solution domestic oil and gas
- lies just beneath our feet, if
only President Barack Obama
would let us open the basement
door and light this dormant
furnace.
May we drill now, please?
* New York commentator
Deroy Murdock is a columnist
with the Scripps Howard News
Service and a media fellow with
the Hoover Institution on War,
Revolution and Peace at Stanford
University.


TO THE EDITOR


Reconsider privatization of EMS


he Columbia County
Board of County
Commissioners have
taken the first step to
privatize the county's
Emergency Medical Services
(EMS).
They will be seeking private
emergency ambulance ser-
vices to respond to a Request
for Qualifications (RFQ) in
an attempt to privatize EMS
for unincorporated Columbia
County and the Town of Fort
White.
I am not in favor of this action
and I hope that citizens in this
county will share my concerns.


There has not been solid evi-
dence presented to support that
this will save the taxpayers. I
believe that there will be addi-
tional costs that are not being
paid for now, including higher
costs to operate the county's fire
department.
The private companies have
to make a profit and they will,
one way or the other. They will
insist on collecting more money
from the people using the ambu-
lance or they will insist that
the county pay them more to
stay. What will happen if I can't
afford to pay for their service?
And what happens if they leave


because they are not making
enough profit?
My wife and I retired to this
county and have had to call the
ambulance already.
I was pleased with the
response and level of care that
was provided by the county
ambulance. I am concerned and
nervous about what to expect
from a private ambulance ser-
vice.
I hope that others will voice
their concerns on this issue in
order to convince the commis-
sioners to reconsider.
Charles Dolamore
Lake City


4A


Betsy Hart
betsysblog.com


Men are


meant to


protect


women

In an Iowa-state high-
school wrestling tour-
nament recently, Joel
Northrup forfeited an
early match because it
would have meant going up
against a girl. He said his per-
sonal and religious convictions
prevented him from engaging
in such activity against a young
woman. The wrestler, one of
the favorites to win his weight
class, said in a statement,
according to the Chicago Sun-
Times:
S"I have a tremendous
amount of respect for Cassy
and Megan (the young women
who qualified for the tourna-
ment) and their accomplish-
ments. However, wrestling is
a combat sport and it can get
violent at times. As a matter of
conscience and my faith, I do
not believe that it is appropri-
ate for a boy to engage a girl in
this manner."
Now, that's a real man.
I love his instinct. Real men
physically protect women. And
our society should back them
up on it. The physical-strength
advantage thAt most males
have over most females puts
them at a huge advantage over
women. So men with all
that testosterone behind that
strength can do a couple of
different things with it: They
can use it to intimidate and
dominate women, or they can
use it to protect them and, of
course, children, too.
There's a reason that most
of our prison inmates are men,
and the vast majority of those -
are single. When a man doesn't
have a woman and children to
provide and care for he can
too easily turn that strength
and aggression to base pur-
poses and, wow, can it lead to
trouble.
There is concern in our cul-
ture now, and rightly so, about
the prolonged adolescence of
young men, who in ever-larger
numbers are delaying mar-
riage, living in their parents'
basements and flitting from
woman to woman. The latter of
whom are more likely today to
have steady jobs and their own
apartments.
The Manhattan Institute's
Kay Hymowitz put it this
way in a recent piece in The
Wall StreetJournal, "Where
Have the Good Men Gone?"
Speaking to this new era in
which we see a plethora of
young single men, she wrote
that "relatively affluent, free
of family responsibilities, and
entertained by an array of
media devoted to his every
pleasure, the single young man
can live in pig heaven and
often does."
Exactly.
In a civilized society, men
protect and care for women
and children. And women
should learn to expect that
from a good man. When that
equation breaks down, trouble
ensues.
In the case at hand, all the
parties involved apparently
operated with grace. But Joel
Northruip behaved as a real
man in a culture that increas-
ingly stands against such fel-
lows. In my book, the "win"
goes to him.

a Betsy Hart hosts the "It Takes a
Parent" radio show on WYLL-AM
1160 in Chicago.









LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2011


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


* To submit your Community
Calendar item, contact Antonia
Robinson at 754-0425 or by
e-mail at arobinson@
lakecityreporter.com.


Today
HSCT production
The High Springs Community
Theater presents "Sherlock's
Last Case," a play by Charles
Marowitz 8 p.m. Feb. 25. The
theater is located in High
Springs at 130 NE First Ave.
Tickets are available at The
Framery in Lake City on Baya,
386-754-2780, at The Coffee
Clutch in High Springs, 386-454-
7593, online at highspringscom-
munitytheatercom or at the door.
Prices are $11 adults, $8 youth
12 and younger; and Seniors
Sunday only' $9.

CF Car Show
The Fort White CF Car Show
to benefit the Cystic Fibrosis
Foundation 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
March 5 at the Fort White
Community Center. Pre-register
by Feb. 25th for $20. Day of the
show registration is $25. Call
386497-1481.

Saturday
Pet Day
Project Starr is 10 a.m. to
2 p.m. Saturday at Martin
Orthodontics. Contests include:
best costume at 11:30 a.m. and
best trick at 12:30 p.m. Pets
can have their picture taken
and owners will receive a free
4x6 photo. Dr. Celia Martin will
make a donation to the Lake City
Humane Society and other pet
rescue groups for every picture
taken. The office is located at
701 SW State Road 47. Any dona-
tions for the humane society
brought in will enter the donor
into a drawing for an iPod and
other prizes.

The Two and Only
A one show only of "Jay
Johnson: The.Two and Only"
is 7 p.m. Saturday in the Levy
Performing Arts Center of
Florida Gateway College, 149
SE College Place. Tickets are
$15 for adults, $14 for seniors
(age 55 and older) and $13 for
students. For tickets or further


SpongeBob is all square for fundraising in Lake City
Ashley Griffith (center) and Adurey Griffith pose with SpongeBob during a Relay for Life fundraising eve
at McAlister's Deli on Feb. 15. A portion of the proceeds and tips go to local cancer care and research.


information call the box office at
(386) 754-4340.

4th Annual Bridal Expo
Everything a bride needs for a
successful wedding is on display
10 a.m.- 3 p.m. Saturday at Lake
City Mall. The event will feature
caterers with food samples, flo-
rists, carriage and limousine ser-
vices, wedding planners a bridal
gown fashion show and more.
Admission is free.

HSCT production
The High Springs Community
Theater presents "Sherlock's
Last Case," a play by Charles
Marowitz 8 p.m. Saturday. The
theater is located in Historic
High Springs at 130 NE First
Ave. Tickets are available at The
Framery in Lake City on Baya,
386-754-2780, at The Coffee
Clutch in High Springs, 386-454-


7593, online at highspringscom-
munitytheatercomor at the door.
Prices are $11 adults, $8 youth
12 and younger; and Seniors
Sunday only $9.

Fundraising Banquet
The Greater Lake City
Community Development
Corporation, Inc. presents its
6th annual fundraising banquet
beginning 6 p.m. Saturday at the
Columbia County Fairground
Exhibition Hall located at 438
SW County Road 247. The black
tie affair will feature a social
mixer, dinner, silent auction and
will end the evening with music
and dancing. Keynote speaker
will be Dr. Kurt B. Young Ph. D.,
and tickets will sell for $30 per
person, or $55 per couple. Call
386-752-9785.

Cattle Baron's Ball
American Cancer Society's


Rubies and Rodeos Cattl
Barons' Ball is 6:30 p.m.
Saturday at Camp Weed
Youth Conference Center
Oak. It will feature an ev(
full of fun and entertain
including live music, din
and silent auctions'and a
A VIP reception begins a
p.m. For tickets or more
nation contact (352)376-
ext. 5061.

Blood drive
The LifeSouth Bloodm
is stopping 2-8 p.m. Satu
at Sweepstakes at Panda-
Yum. Donors receive a fr
movie ticket, a free buffe
200 sweepstake credits.

Sunday
HSCT production
The High Springs Con


Theater presents "Sherlock's
Last Case," a play by Charles
Marowitz 2 p.m. Sunday. The
theater is located in Historic
High Springs at 130 NE First
Ave. Tickets are available at The
Framery in Lake City on Baya,
386-754-2780, at The Coffee
Clutch in. High Springs, 386-454-.
7593, online at highspringscom-
munitytheatercom or at the door.
Prices are $11 adults, $8 youth
12 and younger; and Seniors
Sunday only $9.

Blood drive
The LifeSouth Bloodmobile
is stopping 12-5 p.m. Sunday at
Winn Dixie. Donors receive a
free movie ticket.

Monday

Closing ceremony
Black History 2011 closing
ceremony and elders banquet
is 6 p.m. Monday at Richardson
COURTESY Community Center. The event
is sponsored by It's About My
Efforts. The month-long theme
is "Self Sufficiency is Key." Visit
nt held .e"
www. itsaboutmyefforts. org or call
386-697-6075 for details.

e Columbia FFA meeting

Cerveny The Columbia FFA Booster/
r in Live Alumni is meeting 6:30 p.m.
ening Monday at the agriculture land
nent, lab located on the CHS cam-
ner, live pus. All FFA students, parents,
casino. alumni and community leaders
t 5:30 are invited to attend. Please
infor- bring a covered dish for dinner.
6866 The group meets on the fourth
Monday of every month to help
promote agriculture education
and provide support to the FFA
chapters in Columbia County.
obile
rday Kiwanis fundraiser

oee Kiwanis Day is Monday at
t and Beef 'O'Brady's. The restaurant
will donate 10 percent of the
bill to Kiwanis Club of Lake
City for every person who eats
at Beef 'O'Brady's and brings ,:,
in the organization's flier. Beef
'O'Brady's is open for breakfast, ,
imunity lunch and dinner.


OBITUARIES


Dewey Worth Blount
Dewey Worth Blount, age 85,
of Interlachen, FL, passed away
Wednesday, February 23, 2011
at Kiva Assisted .
Living of Pal-
atka. A native
of Sarasota, he
lived in Miami,
Sarasota, Lake City for 30 years
and in the Interlachen area for
,the past 23 years. Dewey served
in World War II in the Pacific in
the Navy Constriction Battalion.
He was a carpenter and operated
his own construction company
in Lake City for almost 20 years,
retiring at age 62. He enjoyed
fishing, wood-working and
painting. Dewey was a member
of the Lake City Church of God
for over 30 years and a member
of the Bethel Assembly of God in
Interlachen for nearly 20 years.
He was preceded in death by
his parents, Charlie and Viola
Blount, 7 siblings and a grand-
son, Chad Howard Spradley.
He is survived by his wife of
65 years, Dorothy Mae McNeal
Blount of Interlachen, 3 daugh-
ters, Elizabeth Welch and hus-
band Pete of Tallahassee, Ruth
Philips and husband David of
Augusta, GA and Sue Nestor and
husband Mike of Interlachen, 7
grandchildren, Terry Milam,
Robert Spradley, Kim Morrison,
Tesha Brock, Rose Edwards,
Betsy Pittinger, Leandra Casey
and 16 great-grandchildren.
Services celebrating Dewey's
life will be at 2:00 P.M. Satur-
day, February 26, 2011 at the
Lake City Church of God with
Pastor Carroll Lee and Pas-
tor Mike McColley officiating.
Burial will follow at Memorial
Cemetery in Lake City. Visi-
tation will be Friday from 6-8
P.M. at Johnson-Overturf Fu-
neral Home, 1230 Hwy 20 West
in Interlachen, FL. The family
will also receive friends Satur-
day at the church from 1:00
P.M. till the time of services.
In lieu of flowers, the fam-
ily requests memorial dona-
tions be made to Hospice of
the Nature Coast, 6721 Crill
Ave., Palatka, FL 32177.
Memories and condolences
may be sent to the family at www.
JohnsonOverturfFuherals. com.
Arrangements are under
the direction of JOHNSON-
OVERTURF FUNER-
AL HOME in Interlachen.


Oma Lee Edwards
Oma Lee Edwards, 87, a resi-
dent of Lake City, Florida passed
away Wednesday February 23,
2011 at the Suwannee Valley
Care Center, Lake City, Florida.
Mrs. Edwards was born in St.
Albans, West Virginia and has
resided in Lake City, Florida for
the past ten years. Prior to living
in Lake City she had resided in
Loxahatchee, Florida and is the
daughter of the late Okey and
Georgia Ball Ballard. She was a
homemaker and a member of the
First Baptist Church, Lake Worth,
Florida. She was past President
of the Florida State Firemans
Womens Auxiliary, 'a member
of the Florida Board of Realtors
and she taught Sunday School
and vacation Bible School.
Survivors include her loving
husband of sixty-eight years,
Buford J. Edwards, Lake City,
Fl. Two sons and daughters-in-
laws, John (Donna) Edwards,
West Palm Beach, Florida and
Danny (Suzanne) Edwards, Lake
City, Florida. One sister: Betty
Pierce, Boynton Beach, Fl. Two
Grandchildren, Stacey Brews-
ter and Cherie Castle and five
great grandchildren also survive.
Funeral services for Mrs. Ed-
wards will be conducted Friday,
February 25, 2011 at 2:00 P.M.
in the Chapel of Guerry Funeral
Home with the Rev. John Har-
rison, officiating. Interment
will follow in the Salem Primi-
tive Baptist Cemetery, Lake
City, Florida. The family will
receive friends Friday from 1-
2:00 P.M. just prior to the service
at the funeral home. In lieu of
flowers donations may be made
to the charity of your choice.
GUERRY FUNERAL HOME,
2659 SW. Main Blvd. Lake City,
Florida is in charge of all arrange-
ments. Please sign the guest-
book at guerryfuneralhome.net




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Our customers receive
a Complimentary
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Lake City Reporter
when they drop off&
pickup their cleaning
SWhile Sunnlies Last


Terry Bernice Jones
Mrs. Terry Bernice Jones
On Tuesday, February 22, 2011,
Mrs. Terry Bernice Jones, age
90, peace-
fullS passed
away in Ocala,
Florida. Born
in Wellborn,
Florida, to the
late Mr. Rus-
sell B. Baker,
Sr. and Mrs,
Effie Gaskins Baker, she was
joined in holy matrimony to
the late Reverend Norman Joel
Jones, Sr. and resided in Lake
City, Florida. From this union
ten children were born. Mrs.
Jones was a well-respected
woman of integrity and known
throughout her Springville com-
munity as "Miss Terry". She
:oved to fish in the ponds and
lakes around Lake City and sur-
rounding areas. Plus, she had a
passion for embroidery, sewing,
crocheting and quilting. She was
preceded in death by two sons,
Robert and Julius, and a devoted
grandson, Derryl. Mrs. Jones is
survived by six daughters, Inez
Coats, Hilda Stafford, Patsy
Wise, Maxine Stewart, Effie Ad-
ams, and Bonnie Williams; three
sons, Isadore, Emory, and Talin
Jones; two step-daughters, Min-
nie Brown and Geneva Cooper
and two step-sons, Harold and
Edward Jones; 26 grandchildren
and a host of other relatives and
friends. Arrangements entrusted
to Mizell's Funeral Home, 365
NW Washington Street, Lake
City, Florida. Family will re-
ceive friends from 6:00-8:00
P.M. on Friday, February 25,
2011 at MIZELL'S FUNERAL
HOME. Funeral services will
be held Saturday, February 26,
2011 at 3:00 P.M. at Mt. Pleas-
ant Baptist, 3817 NW Suwan-
nee Valley Road, White Springs,
(Springville Community) Flor-
ida. Please sign guest register
at www.mizellfuneralhome.com


Shirley Elizabeth
Lammons
Shirley Elizabeth Lammons, 69,
resident of Lake City, Florida,
went home to be with her Lord
surrounded by family on Febru-
ary 22, 2011
at her home
after an ex-
tended illness.
She was the'
daughter of
the late An-
drew and Mar-
garet Magyari.
She, had lived in Lake City for
the last 42 years. She was a
member of Pine Grove Baptist
Church where she enjoyed fel-
lowship and worship with her
brothers and sisters in Christ. At
16, after her father's unexpected
death, she quit school to help
her mother with the financial
responsibilities for her younger
brothers and sisters. In her early
years, she worked as a waitress,
but later she worked and ulti-
mately retired from the ITT Met-
al Product Division. She was a
loving wife, mother, sister, and
friend who enjoyed shopping,
cooking and spending time with
her grand & great grand chil-
dren. She is preceded in death
by her brother, Paul A. Magyari
and her sister, Linda Thomas.
She is survived by her husband
of 51 years, Joseph E. Lam-
mons of Lake City, FL; daugh-
ters, Debbie Lammons of San
Antonio, TX, Cheri Lammons
& Jackie (Johnny) Statham
both of Lake City, FL; her baby
brother and sister which she
helped raise, William Thomas
and Phyllis (Dave) Shull both
of Lake City, FL; brothers, Rob-
ert Magyari of Lake City, FL,
Frederick (Linda) Magyari and
Glen Magyari both of Starke,
FL; sisters, Barbara Thomas of
Hampton, Fl and Sandra (Da-
vid) Wilkerson of Lawtey, FL;
three grandchildren and four
great grandchildren also survive.
Visitation with the family will


be held on Friday, February 25,
2011 from 5:00 p.m. until 7:00
p.m. at GATEWAY-FOREST
LAWN FUNERAL HOME,
3596 South U.S. Hwy 441, Lake
City, FL 32025 (386) 752-1954.
Funeral services will be con-
ducted on Saturday, February
26, 2011 at 1:00 p.m. with Pas-
tor Ron Thompson officiating at
Pine Grove Baptist Church, 1989
North U.S. Hwy 441, Lake City,
FL 32055. Interment,will fol-
low in Lee Memorial Cemetery,
Lee, Florida. In lieu of flowers
the family asks that donations in
Mrs. Lammons name be made to
the Suwannee Valley Care Center
(Haven Hospice), 6037 U.S. Hwy
90 West, Lake City, FL 32055

William "Bill" Lewis
Mr. William "Bill" Lewis, 76, co'
owner of Windmill Ranch and
Auction of Branford, Florida,
died Wednesday February 16,
2011 at North Florida Regional
Medical Center in Gainesville,
FL. He was the son of the late
Donnie Grodzicki. He had lived
here for the past twelve years
after moving from Ft. Lauder-


dale. He loved fishing, was a
member of the Masonic Lodge
in Forest Park, Ga., the So-
cial Order of the Shrine. The
Yaarab Temple, Atlanta, GA:,
he was a loving husband, grand- i
father, and great grandfather.
He is survived by his wife of
forty seven years Gloria Lewis,
Branford, FL., one son David
Williams Lewis Dallas, TX.,'
five daughters Rhonda Lynn,
Wisconsin, -Robin Dalton,
Branford, FL., Rebecca Lewis,
Branford, FL., Melanie Cosien-
tino, Lake City, FL., Cynthia
Lewis, Branford, FL., seven-
teen grandchildren and thirteen: '
grandchildren also survive.
Service will be held at a later
day. Cremation arrangements
are under the direction of
GATEWAY-FOREST LAWN
FUNERAL HOME in Lake
City, FL., 441 south Us Hwy
441 Lake City, FL., 32025.
www.gatewayforestlawn. com


Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


Donl.'t iss.

Theall


Call


Mary or Bridget
TODAY to place a


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424









LAKE CITY REPORTER


NATION & WORLD


FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2011


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


Dems

consider

cuts in

spending

By DAVID ESPO
Associated Press
WASHINGTON -
Senate Democrats signaled
Thursday they will call
for sending cuts as part
of legislation to keep the
government in operation
through the end of the fis-
cal year, accepting a bed-
rock Republican demand
for immediate reductions
and easing the threat of a
March 4 shutdown of feder-
al programs and services.
No decisions had been
made on what size cuts
to include in'legislation
expected on the Senate
floor next week, these, offi-
cials said, adding that $8.5
billion in funding for previ-
ously approved congres-
sionally-approved earmark
projects is on the chopping
block.
In addition, aides
are reviewing $24.7 bil-
lion worth of proposals
President Barack Obama
recently made to reduce
or eliminate programs
beginning in 2012, to see
whether any should be
accelerated.
One obvious candi-
date for elimination is an
alternative engine for the
Pentagon's next-generation
fighter aircraft, a program
that the White House and
Defense Secretary Robert
Gates oppose, and that the
House recently voted to jet-
tison at a savings of about
$450 million.
The disclosure comes as
the two parties maneuver
for position in advance of
March 4, when funding
authority expires for much
of the government. Leaders
in both parties say they
hope no shutdown occurs.
Each also accuses the
other of seeking one, and
hopes to avoid political
blame if it occurs.
The House passed legis-
lation last week to extend
funding authority through
the Sept. 30 end of the
fiscal year, including $61
billion in spending cuts and
a blockade on selected fed-
eral regulations on some
polluters, large Internet
providers and other indus-
tries.
The bill also blocks the
use of federal funds to
implement the year-old
health care law, a key
priority of the 87-mem-
ber class of first-term
Republicans elected last
fall with the support of tea
party activists.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Anti-government protesters make victory signs on an army tank in the east Libyan city of Albayda Thursday. Army units
and militiamen loyal to. Moammar Gadhafi struck back Thursday against rebellious Libyans who have risen up in cities
close to the capital.


Gadhafi forces strike back


By PAUL SCHEMM
and SARAH EL DEEB
Associated Press

BENGHAZI, Libya Foreign
mercenaries and Libyan militiamen
loyal to Moammar Gadhafi tried to
roll back the uprising against his
rule that has advanced closer to his
stronghold in Tripoli, attacking two
nearby cities in battles that killed
at least 17 people. But rebels made
new gains, seizing a military air
base, as Gadhafi blamed Osama bin
Laden for the upheaval.
The worse bloodshed was in
Zawiya, 30 miles (50 kilometers)
west of the capital Tripoli. An
army unit loyal to Gadhafi opened
fire with automatic weapons on a
osq'bie where residents-- some
armed ith hunting rifles for protec-
tion have been holding a sit-in to
support protesters in the capital, a
witness said.
The troops blasted the mosque's
minaret with an anti-aircraft gun. A
doctor at a field clinic set up at the
mosque said he saw the bodies of
10 dead, shot in the head and chest,
as well as around 150 wounded. A
Libyan news website, Qureyna, put
the death toll at 23 and said many
of the wounded could not reach
hospitals because of shooting by
"security forces and mercenaries."
A day earlier, an envoy from
Gadhafi had come to the city from
Tripoli and warned the protesters:
"Either leave or you will see a mas-
sacre," the witness said. On Tuesday
night, Gadhafi himself called on his
supporters to hunt down opponents
in their homes.
Zawiya, a key city close to an oil


ASSOCIATED PRESS
A Libyan gunman flashes a V sign as he stands Thursday on a military truck
loaded with launcher rockets at AI-Katiba military base after it fell to anti-
Moammar Gadhafi protesters few days ago, in Benghazi, Libya.


port and refineries, is the nearest
population center to Tripoli to fall
into the hands of the anti-Gadhafi
rebellion that began Feb. 15.
Hundreds have died in the unrest.
Most of the eastern half of Libya
has already broken away, and dip-
lomats, ministers and even a high-
ranking cousin have abandoned
Gadhafi, who has ruled Libya for
41 years. He is still believed to be
firmly in control only of the capital,
some towns around it, the far desert
south and parts of Libya's sparsely
populated center.
Gadhafi's crackdown has been
the harshest by any Arab leader in
the wave of protests that has swept
the Middle East the past month,
toppling the presidents of Libya's
neighbors Egypt and Tunisia.
The New York-based Human Rights


Watch has put the death toll in
Libya at nearly 300, according to
a partial count. Italy's Foreign
Minister Franco Frattini said esti-
mates of some 1,000 people killed
were "credible."
The upheaval in the OPEC nation
has taken most of Libya's oil pro-
duction of 1.6 million barrels a day
off the market, and crude prices
have jumped 20 percent to two-year
highs in just a week reaching
$99.77 per barrel in afternoon trad-
ing in New York and $114.20 in
London on Thursday. Most of the oil
goes to Europe.
Hours after the attack in Zawiya,
Gadhafi called in to state TV and
in a rambling speech expressed
condolences for the dead but then
angrily scolded the city's residents
for siding with the uprising.


BRIEFS


Freddie Mac posts
$1.7B loss for Q4
WASHINGTON
- Government-controlled
mortgage buyer Freddie
Mac managed a narrower
loss of $1.7 billion for the
October-December quar-
ter of last year. But it has
asked for an additional
$500 million in federal aid
- up from the $100 million
it sought in the previous
quarter.
Freddie Mac also posted
a $19.8 billion loss for all of
2010.
The government rescued
Freddie Mac and sibling
company Fannie Mae in
September 2008 to cover
their losses on soured
mortgage loans. It esti-
mates the bailouts will cost
taxpayers as much as $259
billion.
Freddie Mac's October-
December loss attributable
to common stockholders
works out to 53 cents a
share. It takes into account
$1.6 billion in dividend pay-
ments to the government.
It compares with a loss
of $7.8 billion, or $2.39 a
share, in the fourth quarter
of 2009.
The company said the
recovery of the housing
market is still fragile.

Toyota recalls 2.17
million vehicles
WASHINGTON
- Toyota Motor Corp.
recalled 2.17 million vehi-
cles in the United States on
Thursday to address accel-
erator pedals that could
become entrapped in floor
mats or jammed in driver's
side carpeting, prompting
federal regulators to close
its investigation into the
embattled Japanese auto-
maker.
The Transportation
Department said it had
reviewed more than
400,000 pages of Toyota
documents to determine
whether the scope of the
company's recalls for pedal
entrapment was sufficient.
"As a result of the agen-
cy's review, (the National
Highway Traffic Safety
Administration) asked
Toyota to recall these
additional vehicles, and
now that the company has
done so, our investigation
is closed," said NHTSA
administrator David
Strickland.
Toyota has now recalled
more than 14 million
vehicles globally to fix gas
pedals and other safety
problems since 2009. U.S.
regulators said earlier
this month that electronic
flaws were not to blame for
reports of sudden, unin-
tended acceleration.


Saudi man charged with


plotting terrorist attack


By ADAM GOLDMAN
and BETSY BLANEY
Associated Press

LUBBOCK, Texas A
college student from Saudi
Arabia who studied chemi-
cal engineering in Texas
bought explosive chemi-
cals online as part of a plan
to hide bomb materials
inside dolls and baby car-
riages to blow up dams,
nuclear plants or the Dallas
home of former President
George W. Bush, the Justice
Department said Thursday.
"After mastering the
English language, learning


how to build explosives and
continuous planning to tar-
get the infidel Americans,
it is time for jihad," or holy
war, Khalid Ali-M Aldawsari
wrote in
his private
journal,
according
to court
documents.
The 20-
year-old
Aldawsari Aldawsari
wrote that he was planning
an attack in the United
States for years, even'
before coming to the U.S.
on a scholarship.


He said he was influ-
enced by Osama bin
Laden's speeches and that
he bemoaned the plight of
Muslims.
One of the chemical com-
panies, Carolina Biological
Supply of Burlington, N.C.,
reported $435 in suspicious
order by Aldawsari to the
FBI on Feb. 1.
Separately, Con-way
Freight, the shipping com-
pany, notified Lubbock
police and the FBI the
same day with similar sus-
picions because it appeared
the order wasn't intended
for commercial use.


see what


sunday


has in store




SOscar's Cinderella Story
Win or lose, True Grit nominee Hailee Steinfeld
is living her dream on Hollywood's biggest night.

a "Intelligence Report:
The 9/11 Memorial Needs You
The national memorial on the site of the twin
towers opens on the 10th anniversary of 9/11.
Find out how you can make this tribute extra special.


American Stories: Coast-to-Coast Crusade
Four-time author and marathon runner Dean Karnazes shares his life mission to
cure what he calls children's "globesity."

Sunday with...John Lasseter
The Pixar czar talks about 'toons, toys, and emotions that make even grown
men teary.

Sunday Dinner: A Father-Son Favorite
Author Salman Rushdie shares this Lamb Korma dish as he recalls the
deliciously spicy meals of his childhood in India.


', February 27, 2011
Lake City Reporter www.parade.com


"









Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@~akectyreporter.com


SPORTS


Friday. February 25. 201 I


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


CHEAP SEATS


Boynton gets hot,

Florida bulldozes

71-62 over Georgia


Tim Kirby
Phone: (386) 754-0421
tkirby@lakecityreportercom

More

districts

finalized
A t last look,
Fort White
football is still
in a two-team
district.
That guarantees the
Indians a spot in the state
playoffs before the first
snap in the fall, as 3-3A
champion or runner-up.
There is one other
two-team district among
the 96 football districts in
the state. North Florida
Christian and FAMU
make up 1-2A.
With the release of the
proposed soccer districts,
Fort White is going in
the other direction.
The Lady Indians are
one of eight teams in
District 5-2A.
Santa Fe, Bradford,
Keystone Heights,
Interlachen, Newberry,
EK Yonge and Williston
round out the district.
Fort White's boys are
in the same basic district
with the exception of
Bradford and Williston.
Fort White's new
District 5-4A for other
team sports is similar
- Bradford, Interlachen,
Keystone Heights, Santa
Fe and Williston.
Gridiron Alumni is an
organization that
promotes football games
for those 18 and older
interested in playing a
full contact game.
Teams are pitted
against old rivals for
one final shot at glory.
Gridiron Alumni supplies
the equipment and sets
up the games.
There is a fee and
Gridiron Alumni looks to
make a profit, but
representative Tracy
Cavendar said the
organization tries to
coordinate the games as
fundraisers.
Gridiron Alumni is a
nationwide enterprise
and will be coming to
Florida in April and May.
For details, call
(775) 538-2002, or visit
Gridironalumni. com.

North Florida Fusion
Volleyball coach Casie
McCallister reported on
the results at the Disney
AAU Classic in January.
NFFVs 14s team
placed fifth out of 28
teams, while the 15s
were 17th out of 24
teams and the 18s were
11th out of 15 teams.
It was the second
tournament for the 14s
and the first for the other
two squads. McCallister
said the teams will play
in five tournaments.
Jordan Burgess of
Berkeley Prep was
named Miss Volleyball
by the Florida Dairy
Farmers. Her coach,.
Randy Dagostino, was
named Coach of the Year.
Berkeley Prep won the
Class 3A state title.
Dagostino won the
inaugural volleyball
award in 1992.

* Tim Kirby is sports editor
of the Lake City Reporter.


Gators clinch
share of SEC
East win victory.
By MARK LONG
Associated Press

GAINESVILLE Kenny
Boynton scored 18 points,
half of them coming on
three consecutive 3-pointers
that changed the game, and
No. 13 Florida beat Georgia
71-62 Thursday night.
Erving Walker added
15 points, and Chandler
Parsons chipped in 16 in his
return from a thigh injury.
The Gators clinched
at least a share of the


Southeastern Conference's
Eastern Division for the
first time since 2007 and
could secure a No. 1 seed
in the league's postseason
tournament.
Florida (22-5, 11-2 SEC)
has won 14 of its last 16
games, including six in
a row. The Gators swept
Georgia (18-9, 7-6) for the
first time since 2008 and
extended their home win-
ning streak against the
Bulldogs to nine.
Boynton had a lot to do
with the latest victory.
The junior guard scored
12 consecutive points for
GATORS continued on 2B


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Florida's Kenny Boynton (1) goes for two points as Georgia's Sherrard Brantley (23) and
Chris Barnes (4) defend during A NCAA college basketball game in Gainesville Thursday.


Down to the wire


Columbia picks
up 6-5 'oad win
at Middleburg.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com

MIDDLEBURG In a
battle of the previous two
District 4-5A champions,
it was Columbia High that
came away with the 6-5
win on the road against
Middleburg High.
Middleburg upset the
Lady Tigers in last year's
district tournament, knock-
ing Columbia out of the
playoffs. This date was cir-
cled on Columbia's calen-
dar from the beginning of
the year.
The win moved the Lady
Tigers to 5-0 on the sea-
son and gave Columbia its
third-consecutive district
win on its quest for the
No. 1 seed.
"It's a good quality win in
a district road game, but the
next one is the one that mat-
ters," Columbia head coach
Jimmy Williams said.
The next time the two
teams meet could come in
the District 4-5A tourna-
ment, which will be held at
Columbia High this season.
Columbia broke onto
the scoreboard early with


CHS continued on 2B


Photos by BRANDON FINLEY/
Lake City Reporter


ABOVE: Columbia High's
Payton Sund connects
against Middleburg High in
Middleburg Thursday.



LEFT: Columbia High's
Kayli Kvistad tags out
Middleburg's Brianna Little
during the Lady Tigers' 6-5
win Thursday.


Clean


sweep


for


netters

Tigers' tennis
team comes away
with 7-0 victory.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com
Middleburg High had
nothing to match the fire-
power of Columbia High
Thursday as the Tigers' ten-
nis team came away with a
7-0 district victory on the
road.
"I'm just really proud of
the guys," Columbia head
coach Russell Waters said.
"They played great today."
Octavious Buiey started
out Columbia with a win at
the No.1 singles position,
8-4. Columbia never looked
back.
"It was a back-and-forth
battle, but Octavious was
able to pull it out," Waters
said.
Anthony Broome
matched Buiey's 8-4 score
in the No. 2 position.
Shyam Patel picked up
an 8-2 victory'at the No. 3
position and Carter Jackson
TIGERS continued on 2B


Lady Tigers make easy


work of Middleburg


COURTESY PHOTO
Columbia High's Kelsey Mercer returns a shot against
Ridgeview High earlier this season.


Columbia moves
to 5-0 on season
with district win.

By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com
Columbia High continued
its strong play at the top of
the seeding with as the Lady
Tigers picked up a 6-1 win
on the road at Middleburg
High Thursday.
Columbia's only loss came
in the No. 4 position, but it
involved the No. 6 seed play-
ing up due to injury in her
first district match.
Heather Rountree fell in
the contest.
"It was a big step' up
for her, but we did it with
the hope that she'll gain
that experience for next
season," Columbia head
coach Tabatha McMahon
said.
The rest of singles play
wasn't close.


Chrissie Reichert cruised
to an 8-3 victory at the No. 1
singles position.
Susy Romero was impres-
sive in an 8-1 victory at the
No. 2 position and Kelsey
Mercer doubled up her
opponent, 8-4, at the No. 3
position.
Heather Benson, also
playing up in seeding,
came away with a hard-
fought win, 8-5, at the No. 5
position.
In doubles, Columbia was
taken to the limit in the No.
2 position.
Taylor Owens and
Mercer teamed up for an
8-6 victory.
"They're a great team to
play against," McMahon
said. "Their No. 3 and
No. 4 players combine to
make a great No. 2 doubles
team. I'm glad that our girls
were able to dig deep and
pull out the win. It was an
excellent match."
At the No. 1 doubles posi-


tion the team of Reichert
and Romero are coming
together nicely according
to McMahon.
It showed on the court.
against Middleburg as the
duo combined for a shutout
victory, 8-0.
"They are practic-
ing working together as
a team and working on
their signals," McMahon
said. "They're working. on
hand signs and rushing the
net."
Columbia takes the rest of
the week off before return-
ing home against Oak Hall
Academy at 3:30 p.m. on
Monday.
The Lady Tigers also
made a change to their
schedule with the March
4 match being moved to
two days earlier against
Vanguard High. The match
will be played at Jonesville
Tennis Complex in
Gainesville, where districts
take place.


Il I










LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2011


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TV sports
Today
AUTO RACING
II a.m.
SPEED NASCAR,Truck Series, final
practice for Lucas Oil 150, at Avondale,
Ariz.
I p.m.
SPEED NASCAR, Nationwide
Series, practice for Bashas' Supermarkets
200, at Avondale,Ariz.
2:30 p.m.
SPEED NASCAR, Sprint Cup, prac-
tice for Subway Fresh Fit 500, atAvondale,
Ariz.
4 p.m.
SPEED NASCAR, Nationwide
Series, final practice for Bashas'
Supermarkets 200, at Avondale,Ariz.
5 p.m.
SPEED NASCARTruck Series, pole
qualifying for Lucas Oil 150, at Avondale,
Ariz.
6 p.m.
SPEED NASCAR, Sprint Cup,
"Happy Hour Series," final practice for
Subway Fresh Fit 500, at Avondale, Ariz.
8 p.m.
SPEED NASCAR, Truck Series,
Lucas Oil 150, atAvondale,Arim.
BOWLING
6 p.m.
ESPN2 PBA, U.S. Open, at North
Brunswick, N.J.
BOXING
9 p.m.
ESPN2 Featherweights,Juan Carlos
Burgos (25-1-0) vs. Frankie Archuleta (27-
7-I), atTulsa, Okla.
GOLF
11:30a.m.
TGC LPGA, HSBC Women's
Champions, second round, at Singapore
(same-day tape)
2 p.m.
TGC PGA Tour/WGC, Accenture
Match Play Championship, third round, at
Marana,Ariz.
6:30 p.m.
TGC PGA Tour, Mayakoba Classic,
second round, at Riviera Maya, Mexico
(same-day tape)
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
7 p.m.
ESPN2 Siena at Fairfield
NBA BASKETBALL
8 p.m.
ESPN Oklahoma City at Orlando
10:30 p.m.
ESPN Denver at Portland

BASKETBALL

NBA schedule


Wednesday's Games
San Antonio 109, Oklahoma City 105
Houston 124, Cleveland 119
Indiana 102, Detroit 101
Sacramento II I, Orlando 105
Philadelphia 117,Washington 94
Toronto 118, Chicago 113
NewYork 114, Milwaukee 108
Memphis 104, Minnesota 95
Dallas 118, Utah 99
Phoenix 105,Atlanta 97
New Orleans 98, LA Clippers 87
LA. Lakers 106, Portland 101, OT
Thursday's Games
Miami at Chicago (n).
Boston at Denver (n)
Today's Games
Sacramento at Charlotte, 7 p.m.
Utah at Indiana, 7 p.m.
Detroit at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Phoenix at Toronto, 7 p.m.
New York at Cleveland, 7:30 p.m.
Washington at Miami, 7:30 p.m.
New Orleans at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Oklahoma City at Orlando, 8 p.m.
New Jersey at San Antonio, 8:30 p.m.
Atlanta at Golden State, 10:30 p.m.
LA. Clippers at LA. Lakers. 10:30
p.m.
Denver at Portland, 10:30 p.m.
NBA calendar

Thursday -Trade deadline, 3 p.m.
April 13 Regular season ends.
April 14 Rosters set for playoffs,
3 p.m.
April 16 Playoffs begin.
May 17- NBA draft lottery.
June 2 NBA Finals begin (possible
move up to May 3 1).
June 16 Latest possible date for
the finals.

GOLF

Golf week

WORLD GOLF CHAMPIONSHIPS
Accenture Match Play
Championship
Site: Marana,Ariz.
Schedule:Today-Sunday.
Course: Dove Mountain. The Ritz-
Carlton Golf Club (7,791 yards, par 72).
Purse: $8.5 million. Winner's share:
$1.4 million. i
Television: Golf Channel (Today, noon-
6 p.m., 7:30 p.m.-1:30 a.m.; Thursday,
2-6 p.m., 8:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m.; Friday,
2-6 p.m., 9:30 p.m.-I:30 a.m.; Saturday,
noon-2 p.m., 9:30-11:30 p.m.; Sunday,
9 a.m.- p.m., 9:30-1 1:30 p.m.) and NBC
(Saturday-Sunday, 2-6 p.m.).
Online: httpl//www.pgatour.com
PGA European Tour site: http://www.
europeantour.com


PGATOUR
Mayakoba Golf Classic
Site: Playa Del Carmen, Mexico.
Schedule:Thursday-Sunday.
Course: Mayakoba Resort, El Camaleon
Golf Club (6,923 yards, par 70).
Purse: $3.7 million. Winner's share:
$666,000.
Television: Golf Channel (Thursday,
6:30-8:30 p.m.; Friday, 1-3 a.m., 6:30-
8:30 p.m.; Saturday, 2-4 a.m., 6:30-
8:30 p.m.; Sunday, 1-3 a.m., 7-9:30 p.m.;
Monday, 1-3 a.m.).
LPGATOUR
HSBC Women's Champions
Site: Singapore.
Schedule:Thursday-Sunday.
Course: Tanah Merah Country Club,
Garden Course (6,547 yards, par 72).
Purse: $1.4 million. Winner's share:
$210,000.
Television: Golf Channel (Thursday-
Friday, II a.m.-I p.m.; Saturday, 10 a.m.-
noon; Sunday, 2-4 p.m.).
Online: http:/www.lpga.com
NATIONWIDE TOUR
Panama Championship
Site: Panama City.
Schedule:Thursday-Sunday.
Course: Golf Club of Panama (7,102
yards, par 70).
Purse: $550,000. Winner's share:
$99,000.
Television: None.
CHAMPIONSTOUR
Next event Toshiba Classic, March
11-13, Newport Beach Country Club,
Newport Beach, Calif.


HOCKEY

NHL schedule

Wednesday's Games
Buffalo 4,Atlanta I
Ottawa 5, Florida I
San Jose 3, Pittsburgh 2, OT
Tampa Bay 8, Phoenix 3
Edmonton 5, Colorado I
Los Angeles 3,Anaheim 2
Thursday's Games
Philadelphia 4, N.Y. Islanders 3, OT
Dallas 4, Detroit I
Toronto 5, Montreal 4
Chicago at Nashville (n)
St. Louis atVancouver (n)
Minnesota at Los Angeles (n)
Today's Games
N.Y. Rangers atWashington, 7 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Carolina, 7 p.m.
Phoenix at Columbus, 7 p.m.
Ottawa at Buffalo, 7:30 p.m.
Florida at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m.
New Jersey atTampa Bay, 7:30 p.m.
SartJose at Calgary, 9 p.m.
St. Louis at Edmonton, 9 p.m.
Minnesota atAnaheim, 10 p.m.


GATORS: Rallies from 28-18 to win
C"' a'titi d F'om Page 1B


Florida in the second half.
He converted a three-point
play on a fast break, then
got hot from long range. He
hit three straight 3-pointers,
essentially shooting Georgia
out of its zone defense, and
then followed with an assist
that put the Gators up 63-53
with 5:09 to play.
Georgia answered, turn-
ing to Trey Thompkins
inside, and, cut the lead to
63-59 with 3:38 remaining.
But Parsons had a clutch
putback and the Gators
made enough free throws
down the stretch to avoid
any uneasy moments.
Travis Leslie led the
Bulldogs with 20 points, six
rebounds and four assists.
Thompkins finished with 16
points and seven boards.
Georgia dominated
much of the first half. The
Bulldogs shot 60 percent
from the field' and opened
up a double-digit lead, 28-18,
on Dustin Ware's 3-pointer
with 5:20 remaining. Most
of the damage was done
inside, with Georgia scor-
ing 20 points in the paint.


Thompkins and Jeremy
Price had their way with
whatever defense Florida
played. Leslie was even
more disruptive, breaking
down Florida's guards and
getting easy buckets in
transition. Leslie, one of the
most athletic guards in the
SEC, had nine points, five
rebounds and four assists
in the first 20 minutes.
Leslie's three-point play
put Georgia ahead 31-20
with 3:24 to play before the
break.
But the Gators closed
out the first half strong and
opened the second half the
same way. Parsons was the
key early, then Boynton
took over.
Parsons, a versatile for-
ward who leads the team
in assists and rebounds,
sustained a deep thigh
bruise against Tennessee
two weeks ago. He missed
'Florida's game at LSU last
weekend, but was back on
the court Thursday night
Parsons made a driving
layup late in the first half,
then had a dunk and a put-


back to open the second
half. Georgia coach Mark
Fox called timeout in hopes
of slowing the momentum,
but the Gators kept it roll-
ing.
Alex Tyus, who had a
nifty putback just before the
half to cut the lead to 33-26,
hit a jumper and Parsons
followed with a 3-pointer
from the top of the arc.
Vernon Macklin, who
was quiet in the first half,
converted a three-point
play to tie the game at 42.
Walker sliced through
the lane on the next
possession and converted
an acrobatic layup that put
the Gators ahead for the
first time since they led
10-8.
Parsons followed with
another 3, this one from the
elbow. He pounded his chest
three times as he backped-
aled near midcourt.
Boynton was the one
celebrating a few minutes
later, shaking his head as
he remained uncovered.
The Bulldogs could have
done the same.


CHS: Keene comes through in win


Continued From Page 11
Michaela Burton steal-
ing home on a wild pitch
from Florida commitment
Brianna Little.
Base running continued
to play a role for the Lady
Tigers two innings later as
Columbia took a 2-0 lead
when Stephanie Pilkington
scored rom second on an
infield ground ball by Kayli
Kvistad.
The game appeared to
be all Columbia as the Lady
Tigers opened up a 5-0 lead
in the fifth inning.
With the bases loaded,
Jordan Williams drew a walk
to bring in Pilkington for a 3-0
lead. Keeley Murray followed
up with'a double on the next
at-bat to score Lauren Eaker,
who was a courtesy runner
for pitcher Jessica Keene, and
Payton Sund.
The Lady Broncos began
to battle back in the bottom


half of the inning, however,
and cut Columbia's lead to
5-3.
Julie Leduc's double
scored Kayla Geiger to
start off the rally. On the
next at-bat Amber Johns'
connected for a hit to bring
in Little and Leduc.
Middleburg continued
its comeback with another
run in the bottom of the
sixth. Again Geiger scored,.
but this time off of a Little'
hit.
Columbia showed
patience at the plate in the
top of the seventh and the
Lady Tigers were able to
pick up an extra run, which
would end up being the dif-
ference.
Johns replaced Little
on the mound and found
trouble throwing across the
plate with 10 walks in four
innings. The last one scored


Sund on a walk by Michaela
Burton. It gave Columbia a
two run edge heading into
the final inning.
Williams stuck with-
Keene in the final inning,
and she was able to get
out of a jam. After Chelsea
Ojeda's hit to bring in
Shelby Lacy, Middleburg
had the bases loaded with
two outs. Needing only one
out, Keene got Abby Skeen
to ground back to her and.
made the play at first to end
the game.
"This win showed the
character of our team,"
Williams said. "The bottom
of the order did a really
good job of showing disci-
pline there at the end to get
the final run."
Keene (5-0) ended the
game with six strikeouts,
three walks and eight hits
in the win.


Perkins leads the big


bodies moving at deadline


By BRIAN MAHONEY
Associated Press

Big bodies replaced big
names on the final day of
the NBA's trading season.
Boston traded starting
center Kendrick Perkins,
while Hasheem Thabeet,
Nenad Krstic, Joel Przybilla
and Nazr Mohammed
were some other men in
the middle who were dealt
Thursday before the 3 p.m.
EST deadline.
Baron Davis and Gerald
Wallace were among the
former All-Stars who moved
on a busy day that fea-
tured plenty of action but
no blockbusters like the
ones that landed Carmelo
Anthony in New York and
Deron Williams in New
Jersey earlier in the week.
The Celtics traded
Perkins, their starting center
who had recently returned
from a knee injury sustained
in Game 6 of the NBA finals,
along with Nate Robinson
to Oklahoma City for Jeff
Green, Krstic, a future first-
round draft pick and cash.
"He's a team-first guy,,
plays great low-post
defense," Chicago coach
Tom Thibodeau, a former
Boston assistant, said of
Perkins. 'There miay not be


TIGERS
Continued From Page 1B

finished off his opponent,
8-4, at the No. 4 position.
George Parker just
missed a shutout with an
8-1 victory at the No. 5
position.
Waters mixed up the usual
doubles' pairing, teaming
together Buiey and Patel in
the No. 1 position. The duo
made short work in their
match with an 8-2 win. ,
Broome paired with
Jiackson in the No. .2 dou-
bles' match and came away
with a shutout, 8-0.
Columbia will take the
week off before returning
to action against Vanguard
High at 3:30 p.m. on
March 4 at Jonesville
Tennis Complex in


Gainesville.
,ACROSS


1 Throw a party
for
5 Ben--
8 Edinburgh duo
11 Salary
increase
13 Mine yield
14 Sarcastic
retort
15 Cousins'
moms
16 Undermines
18 October's
stone
20 Antique brooch
21 School kid
23 Amt.
24 Biddy
25 Genesis hunter
27 S&L deposit
31 Electric bridge
32 Pop-top bever-
age
33 Metric pound
34 Apply gold leaf
36 Butler, to
Gable


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this March 3, 2010 file photo, Boston Celtics center
Kendrick Perkins dunks against the Charlotte Bobcats
during a NBA basketball game in Boston. Perkins was traded
to Oklahoma City Thursday for Jeff Green and Nenad Krstic.


a better low-post defender
in the league."
Bostoi also dealt backup
big man Senlih Erden and
reserve swingman Marquis
Daniels, an active day for
the team that began the


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

I KULCC I


night percentage points
ahead of the Miami Heat
for the best record in the
Eastern Conference.
They get back Green, the
power forward they drafted
at No. 5 in 2007.

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek


'-I --I : -- QUtEST-IONED.
WHERDS QU 5TIONFV.
SNow arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.

Print answer here: T
(Answers tomorrow)
Yest s Jumbles: FOYER ALBUM BEWARE POISON
SAnswer: How the novice skier felt when he started
down the slope HE WAS "UP" FOR IT


38 Furniture
mover
39' Large number
40 Where Japan is
41 Kind of cube
42 Rand of."Atlas
Shrugged"
44 Dress
46 Really excited
49 Talking bird
50 Emerge
52 Piano compo-
sition
56 TNT part
57 RSVP word
58 Tailoring job
59 NASA destina-
tion
60 Edge a doily
61 Catch cattle

DOWN

1 Monastery
dweller
2 Perfume label
word
3 Metal in
pewter


Answer to Previous Puzzle


MARTHA VIRILE
ALDERS ABLEST
'SBESO NILE



MTN OKRA NIP
Z IRCON CANOE
UNION SERENE
NOB OATH MRS
ITEM DREG
INDAY AGAVE
ENTREE AMORAL
REREAD BEGINS
ROUST ERODE


Bar legally
Dog's plaint
Scottish actress
Mary
Laugh or cry
The other guys


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


9 Dwindle
10 Chan rejoinder
(2 wds.)
12 Glimpses
17 Arctic craft
19 Loser(hyph.)
21 Hazard
22 "I give!"
23 Meet require-
ments
24 Crones
26 Hubbubs
28 Kind of duty
29 Rattle
30 Vocal sound
35 Miniature
37 Wage- -
43 Brewer's sup-
ply
45 Tom Mix film
46 spumante
47 Minks, e.g.
48 Pupil locale
49 Soften
51 FBI counter-
part
53 Alien space-
craft
54 Chips go-with
55 Summer, to
Pierre


2-25 2011 by UFS, Inc.


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420









Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS. FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2011 3B


DILBERT
II


COMPANY LAWYER


BABY BLUES


BLONDIE


BEETLE BAILEY


SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS


GARFIELD


B.C.


FRANK & ERNEST


NOW THE SOFTWARE
COMPANY CLAIMS
THEY CAN HARVEST
MY ORGANS.


DO YOU THEY
SEE ANY MENTION
HOLES IN HOLES...
THEIR IN THE
CONTRACT? CONTEXT


DEAR ABBY


Pregnant teen needs worried

friend's support, not a lecture


DEAR ABBY: I'm con-
cerned about my friend
"Nyla." She's 15 and preg-
nant Nyla and her family are
happy about it! As her friend,
I'm not I think she should
have waited.'
I keep telling her that her
life is ruined and shell regret
having a baby this early, but
she doesn't listen. It would
be better if she had help, but
she doesn't Nyla's family is
poor.
Now she is angry with
me because of what I keep
telling her. What can I do to
help her understand me, and.
not get mad when I tell her
something? VIRGINIA
TEEN
DEAR VIRGINIA
TEEN: If you want Nyla to
"understand" you, quit lec-
turing her because it's only
making her defensive. De-
fensive people don't listen.
How any family, rich or poor,
could be "happy" about the
pregnancy of an unwed 15-
year-old is beyond me. But
your friend IS pregnant and
she's keeping the baby.
So be a real friend and
encourage her to finish high
school so she can prepare
herself for a job that will en-
able her to support her little
one. If she completes her
education, the chances are
better that her child will,


C- b. -


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearabby.com
too. But if she doesn't, the
reverse is also true, and the
repercussions will go on for
another generation.
DEAR ABBY: I need
help. When we started dat-
ing, my (now) husband told
me he didn't care about past
relationships because "the
past is the past and it's over."
Now he has begun grilling
me about every boyfriend
I've ever had, demanding
details about every aspect of
the relationships, physical,
emotional whatever.
He makes snide remarks
and asks if I would like him
to track them down and if I'd
like to sleep with them again.
At first, I thought he was jok-
ing, but it has escalated to
text messages and threats of
divorce if I don't tell him ev-
erything he wants to know. I
have been sick to'my stom-
ach the last few days, and I
think this fits the definition
of emotional abuse. I don't
know whether to suggest
counseling or just tell him to
go.


He was wonderful when
we first got together, but
now he says marrying me
was just a ruse to get sex.
What can I do? I miss the
person he used to be. He has
always seemed concerned
that I would eventually cheat
on him, although I have
given him no reason to think
so and have assured him
repeatedly that I want only
him. Why is this happening?
-- SICK TO MY STOM-
ACH IN OHIO
DEAR SICK TO YOUR
STOMACH: It's because
you didn't really know the
man you married. The way
he presented himself was, in
his words, "all a ruse" to con-
vince you to marry him "to
Sget sex." He appears to have
increasing anxiety about
how he measures up to your
past lovers.
Harassing you for details
and threatening to contact
them is, frankly, sick behav-
ior. He needs counseling,
and unless he seeks it im-
mediately you should get
out of there. If you stay, the
emotional abuse could esca-
late to physical abuse. To en-
sure your safety, contact the
National Domestic Violence
Hotline (800) 799-7233.
Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-
April 1): Keep your se-
crets locked up tight. Being
too open about personal mat-
ters will lead to rumors that
can hurt your reputation.
Instead, put the emphasis
on others, showing interest
in whatever pursuits they
are tackling. An opportunity
will arise. *****
TAURUS (April 20-
May 20): A sudden and
unexpected turn of events
will ignite your personal and
romantic lives. Be ready to
follow through so ybu don't
miss out on what's being of-
fered. Your knowledge and
offer of time and services
will put you in the limelight

GEMINI (May 21-June
20): This is no time to take
chances with your reputa-
tion. Expect emotional mat-
ters to lead to a confrontation
if you have taken matters
into your own,hands with-
out sufficient knowledge or
understanding. ***
CANCER (June 21-
July 22): You can go two
ways today: the know-it-all
way or the interest-in-learn-
ing-more scenario. It's your
future and the choice you
make will influence your
personal and professional
status. Keep things simple.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):
You'll be in a partying mood


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

but, even so, you must avoid
overindulgence. Your best
bet is to do something that
improves or updates yoUr
lifestyle, looks or knowl-
edge. Different cultural tra-
ditions and ways of doing
things will help you make
the right choice. *****
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): You'll be drawn to un-
usual people who can offer
you an insightful view into
people, activities and skills
that are foreign to you. What
you learn from others will
lead to an interesting union
or partnership that can turn
into a profitable enterprise.

LBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): Watch your back. Not
everyone is on your side.
Don't overreact or you will
be open for criticism. Keep
your thoughts to yourself
and keep close tabs on what
so-called friends and ac-
quaintances are doing and
saying. ****
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-
Nov. 21): You can work
from home and accomplish
personal and professional
goals. Your ability to see
what needs to be done and
to follow through will bring
about a new set of rules to
live by. A celebration will
enhance your love life and


your attitude. ***
SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): Trouble on
the home front will escalate
if you don't do some dam-
age control. Be upfront and
honest and,, although not
everyone you deal with will
agree with you, at least you
will know where you stand
and what you need to do
next. ***
CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): Remember-
ing dreams, hopes and
wishes from your youth will
help you make some deci-
sions about your future. You
can make personal changes
both physically and with the
company you keep, leading
to more entertaining and
profitable endeavors. ***
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): If you haven't
been working at a job you
enjoy, it's time to look at
what's available that allows
you to utilize your skills and
is more meaningful to you.
Talk to someone you trust
to guide you in the most
suitable direction. ****
PISCES (Feb. 19-
March 20): Don't let your
emotions interfere with
what needs to be done or
said. If you take what's go-
ing on personally, you will
not stand a chance of get-
ting what you want. Be
open-minded and adaptable.
**


CELEBRITY CIPHER


by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: L equals K
"JXIK GYXGCY PXBL TFIK ZNBH
YWXFUZ WXK KX UYK DMBYH NWH
UYK GNMH TFIK YWXFUZ JXWYO


WXK KX AFM K."


- UYXBUY VNBCMW


PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "Heights don't bother me... it's falling and cracking my
skull that freaks me outl" Actor Jason Marsden
(c) 2011 by NEA, Inc. 2-25


FOR BETTER OR WORSE


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LImte tem pert ad aderi
Lines daysEach additional
ad forle W nesay ie $1.65
Rate apples pr e individuals selling
perona merchandise totain 6.000 or less.
Ean. O lm.r Ir ie i c a pn 8







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laio i 2 Sim Eac adlimonal lne 165


Limited to service type advertis-
ing only.
4 lines, one month....'92.00
$10.80 each additional line
Includes an additional $2.00 per
ad for each Wednesday insertion.



You can call us at 755-5440,
Monday through Friday from 8:00
a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Some people prefer to place their
classified ads in person, and some
ad categories will require prepay-
ment. Our office is located at 180
East Duval Street.
You can also fax or e-mail your ad
copy to the Reporter.
FAX: 386-752-9400 Please
direct your copy to the Classified
Department
EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityre-
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the first incorrect insertion, and
only the charge for the ad space
In error. Please call 755-5440
Immediately for prompt correc-
tion and billing adjustments.
Cancellations- Normal advertising
deadlines apply for cancellation.
Billing Inquiries- Call 755-5440.
Should further information be
required regarding payments or
credit limits, your call will be trans-
ferred to the accounting depart-
ment.


Advertising copy is subject to
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reserves the right to edit, reject,
or classify all advertisements under
appropriate headings. Copy should
be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the first day of pub-
lication. Credit for published errors
will be allowed for the first insertion
for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the
Publisher shall not be liable for any

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Advertising language must comply
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In Print and Online
www.lakeeityreporter.com


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR COLUMBIA COUN-
TY, FLORIDA
JUVENILE DIVISION
IN THE INTEREST OF:
CASE NO.: 2010-18-DP
N.D.
DOB: 8/29/2004
K.W.
DOB: 7/27/2006
MINOR CHILDREN.
SUMMONS AND NOTICE OF AD-
VISORY HEARING FOR TERMI-
NATION OF PARENTAL RIGHTS
AND GUARDIANSHIP
STATE OF FLORIDA:
TO: Jemilla Dortly
(address unknown)
WHEREAS, a Petition for Termina-
tion of Parental Rights under oath
has been filed in this court regarding
the above-referenced childrenn, a
copy of which is on file with the
Clerk of the Court,
YOU ARE HEREBY COMMAND-
ED TO APPEAR before the Honora-
ble E. Vernon
Douglas, Circuit Judge, at the Co-
lumbia County Courthouse, Lake
City, Florida, on MARCH 16, 2011,
at 10:20 A.M., for a Termination of
Parental Rights Advisory Hearing.
YOU MUST APPEAR ON THE
DATE AND AT THE TIME SPECI-
FIED HEREIN.
*****FAILURE TO PERSONAL-
LY APPEAR AT THIS ADVISORY
HEARING CONSTITUTES CON-
SENT TO THE TERMINATION OF
PARENTAL RIGHTS TO THIS
CHILD (OR CHILDREN). IF YOU
FAIL TO APPEAR ON THE DATE
AND TIME' SPECIFIED YOU
MAY LOSE ALL LEGAL RIGHTS
TO THE CHILD (OR CHILDREN)
NAMED IN THE PETITION ON
FILE WITH THE CLERK OF THE
COURT*****
WITNESS my hand and seal of this
Court at Lake City, Columbia Coun-
ty, Florida, on this 8th day of Febru-
ary 2011.
P. DEWITT CASON
Clerk of Circuit Court
(SEAL)
By: /s/:Trisha Brewington, Deputy
Clerk
Tracy L. Sorcek, Esq.
Florida Bar No. 46860
Children's Legal Services
1389 West US Highway 90, Suite
110
Lake City, FL 32055
(386) 758-1437
Special Accommodations. In ac-
cordance with the Americans with
Disabilities Act, if you are a person
with a disability who needs any ac-
commodation in order to participate
in this proceeding, you are entitled,
at no cost to you, to the provision of
certain assistance. Please contact
Carrina Cooper, Court Administra-
tion, 173 NE Hemando Avenue,
Room 408, Lake City, Florida
32055, Telephone (386) 758-2163, at
least seven (7) days before your
scheduled court appearance or imme-
diately upon receiving this notifica-
tion if the time before the scheduled
appearance is less than seven (7)
days. If you are hearing impaired or
voice impaired, call 711.
04543468
February 11, 18, 25, 2011
March 4, 2011
PUBLIC AUCTION to be held
March 26, 2011 at 8AM at
Ozzie's Towing & Auto, 2492 SE
Baya Ave. Lake City FL, 32025.
(386)719-5608
Following Vin Numbers:
Vin #1B7GL12X22S669559
02 Dodge
05525208
February 25, 2011
We will sell the following units at
Community Self Storage 814 SW
State Road 247/Branford Hwy.,
March 18, 2011 at 10:00A.M.
WE SELL FOR CASH ONLY
386-961-9926
JAMES GERMANY B-3
Household Goods
SIERRA GOODBREAD C-12
Household Goods
CHRISTOPHfER SIMMONS C-15
Household Goods
JOSH W. CAPUTO D-2
Household Goods
LYNDAMEDARIES E-3
Household goods
HOWARD STEVENS F-1
Household Goods
RASHIETTA JONES K-2
Household Goods
TERRELLJOHNSON K-3
Household goods


Home Improvements

Carpentry, remodeling, paint,
repairs, additions, Lic. & Ins.
Since 1978 FREE estimates
386-497-3219 or 954-649-1037
Handicap accessible modifications
for veterans. 38 yrs experience.
386-752-4072 DON REED
CONSTRUCTION, INC
Licensed and insured CGC036224

Lawn & Landscape Service

Clean Pine Straw,
You pick it up, $1.85 a bale,
delivery 100 bales, $285,
386-688-9156

Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.


Legal


CHARLOTTE EAGLE AA-5
Household Goods
PATRICIA KING BB-33
Household Goods
WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO
REFUSE ALL BIDS.
04543556
February 25, 2011
March 4, 2011


010 Announcements









020 Lost & Found








FOUND DOG,
She is a gorgeous Chocolate
brown with some white markings.
Found on CR 137 between
Hwy 240 & Hwy 242.
Please call to identify. She wants
to go home. 396-963-4120
LOST Black Male, Toy Poodle,
on Tues 2/15, in the 252 & Coun-
try Club area.Reward being
offered Please call 386-752-9300
LOST Purse (Navy Blue) in
Winn-Dixie Parking Lot
on February 14th
386-755-4791
Lost Female Dog on 2/12 Sat.,
near Richardson Middle School.
Medium sized brown/black, looks
like a fox, Reward, 386-752-8920
Prescription bi-focals LOST @
Columbia Courthouse parking lot
on Wed 2/16, black & white
Please call 386-752-1893

100 Job
Opportunities
05525172



Now accepting applications for
servers and cashiers
Apply in person at
3177 W Hwy 90 Lake City
DFW/EOE

05525200
Field Service Technician,
Service medical equipment in
North Florida,
established company, will train,
knowledge of electricity a plus,
Send resume to
PO Box 494273
Port Charlotte, FL 33949

05525206
Painters Needed
The Health Center of Lake City
has openings for Temporary
Full-Time Painters
EOE/ADA
Drug Free Workplace
Apply in person at
The Health Center of Lake City
560 SW McFarlaneAve
Lake City, FL 32025

05525215
Administrative Assistant II
(Health Services Lake City)
HS Dip/GED, 5 yrs data entry
exp., 5 yrs computer exp., 2 yrs
exp. in records and/or case
management, valid Fl driver's
license; safe driving record and
valid personal auto Insurance
Teacher (Early Head Start Lake
City, Birth to 3 yrs old) HS
Dip/GED, Must have FCCPC
/CDA; 3 yrs of classroom; exp.
working with infants/toddlers
pref., or min. of 2 yr degree in
early childhood ed. or child
development; individuals who
have completed the DCF 40 hrs
and 5 hr Lit may also apply.
ALL positions must pass
physical/DCF background
requirements, Bilingual
(Span/Eng) pref.; current 1st
Aid/CPR pref. Excellent
benefits-paid holidays, sick/
annual Leave, health insurance,
retirement + add'l benefits ;
Apply in person at
236 SW Columbia Ave
(754-2222) or mail resume to
SV4Cs PO Box 2637,
Lake City, FL 32056-2637,
by email: arobinson(sv4cs.org
or Fax (386) 754-2220. EOE

A/C SERVICE Tech
Min 5 yrs experience
F/T with benefits
Please call 386-454-4767
AVON!!!, EARN up to 50%!!!
Only $10 for Starter Kit,
1-800-275-9945 pin #4206
www.youravon.com/tdavies
CDL A Drivers needed for Target
dedicated acct, good pay,
great home time, Call Shawn
904-517-4620/Fred 404-671-6362
Cloth Cutter in small
Sewing Plant
Call Hafner's


386-755-6481
Cosmetologist wanted. Cut N Up
Family Hair Salon has stations
available for rent. Call Sharon
386-365-8402 or 752-1777


100 Job
Opportunities
Hair Stylist,
Full service, exp pref,
great pay, no chair rent,
call 386-984-0101
Jr & High school Math teacher
needed. Also, daycare teacher,
must have CDA. Please fax
resumes to: 386-758-3018
SECURITY OFFICERS
FT/PT, Great Pay and Benefits.
Lake City/Alachua Area.
Must have Sec. Lic., clean
background, pass drug screen.
Call: 866-458-9523 EOE
Security Officers
needed Lake City Area, must have
current D Security Lic., Clear
background, Drivers Lic, phone,,
Diploma/GED.
Benefits, DFWP EEO Apply at:
www.dsisecurity.com MB 1000084
Subway is now hiring.
Management Experience a plus.
Send resumes to:
lakecitymanager@yahoo.com
Wanted Highly motivated
individual for Sales Position.
Rountree -Moore Ford Lincoln
Mercury Great benefits, paid vaca-
tion. Exp. a plus but not necessary.
Call Chris. @ 386-755-0630

120 Medical
Employment

05525197
Front Office/Medical Billing
Several years experience
in medical office and
insurance billing required
Please email resume to
admin@nfsc.comcastbiz.net
or fax to 386-438-8628

AMIkids Family Services Program
seeks Case Managers for
community based program work-
ing w/ at risk youth &
families. Bachelor's degree req'd.
Req's travel to 7 counties.
Fax resume to 386.362.0932.
PT CNA needed.
Send resume to
826 SW Main Blvd Ste 102.
Lake City, FL. 32025.


141 Babysitters

Will babysit in our home,,any time
day or night, clean atmosphere,
in Branford in town
Please Call 386-935-4226

240 Schools&
240 Education

04543680
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-03/28/10

Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-04/11/11

Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com



310 Pets & Supplies

PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.

361 Farm Equipment

84 Ford 4610 Tractor. Runs good.
Solid 2WD. New front tires,
350hr on 2005 motor. Dependable.
$7500. obo. 386-867-0005


401 Antiques

CASH CASH CASH CASH
Pre 1964 Silver Coins, Sterling,
Flatware, Costume Jewelry,
Unusual Antiques .386-963-2621

407 Computers

DELL COMPUTER
$100.
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170


416 Sporting Goods

Columbia White Dot Bowling
Ball 13 lbs,caramel, silver & black
in color, used twice, need to sell
$40 386-362-7441


420 Wanted to Buy
I BUY WORKING AND
NON WORKING
APPLIANCES!
CALL 386-365-1915
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$250 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.


REPORTER Classifieds

In Print and On Line
www.lakecitreporter.com


430 Garage Sales






Fri & Sat, 7:30 ?
Tools and Household items,
125 SW Whitetail Cir,
of off 252B, follow signs






PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid. -



440 Miscellaneous

King Comforter Set. Shams,
bedskirt, 3 designer pillows. Floral
design w/blue background. Excel-
lent condition. $75. 386-454-4947
Tow Behind Grill/Smoker
$1,250 OBO.
386-249-3104 or
386-719-4802

4 Building
463 Materials

ROOFING Are you bothered
by a leaking roof?
Call Reed Roofing today for a free
estimate. 386-752-4072
RCC00455399 Insured
ROOFING:Looking to replace
your Roof? Call Reed Roofing
today for a free estimate
386-752-4072 RC0055399
References available


520 Boats for Sale

Bass Tender Boat 2 Seater
10'2",can fit in back of truck
$500 386-965-2215
Great for pond or lake!

6 Mobile Homes
630 for Rent
2&3 BR MH. $395 $650. mo.
plus deposit. Water & sewer fur-
nished. Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
2/1 1/2,SWMH, water,sewage,gar-
bage pick up included, screened
deck, $450 mo, $200 dep, NO pets
386-292-0050
2/1 w/screen porch. Lg yard in
quiet, clean, safe, well maintained
10 unit park. Water, garbage incl.
$475.mo $475.dep. 386-965-3003
3/2 MH 1064 sq ft,remodeled in
small/quiet park, near FGC, Small
pets ok, $500 dep $575 mo
386-752-1971 or 352-281-2450
3BR/2BA Doublewide on 1 ac.
Lg. Rooms. $750 a month.
1st month and full security.
Please call 386-965-7534.
CLEAN SOLID REDONE
2/2 SW, private, quiet acre.
8 mi to VA. $450. mo + dep
No dogs 386-961-9181
Country setting. DWMH 3br/2ba
with washer/dryer on 1 ac.
$700. mo plus $500. security.
Avail March 1st. 386-719-4957
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White Contact 386-623-2465
or 386-623-3404






Small Mobile Home at Wilson
Springs in Ft. White. $400. mo or
$100. per week. $200. Deposit
386-623-9026 or 497-1315
SWMH 2 BR/1BA. Washer/
Dryer. In country on 2 acres. Off
of SR 47. $450. mo + deposit.
386-961-9990 before 9pm.
Very clean & well maintained 2/2
units in nice park. $599.mo
w/$500. dep. Rent incl water,
sewer, trash p/u. Close to town
386-984-8448 or 623-7547
Very Clean Remodeled 3br/2ba
DWMH on 2 ac. 10 mi. SW of LC.
Private. NO PETS!
$750.mo. + sec.. 386-984-7478.

640 Mobile Homes
64 for Sale
$216 a month remodeled,
like new, 2Bd/2Ba S Wide
Delivered & blocked, appliances,
A/C $2500 down, 8 year fin.
Possible owner financing. Ready
now. Call Gary 386 758-9824
*Lot Model Sale*
Save 1,000's @ Royals Homes
Call Charles @ 386-754-6737
For Model Info and Details
05524942
Palm Harbor Homes
Factory Liquidation Sale
2009 Model Homes MUST GO!'
Call for FREE color brochures
800-622-2832

12 X 56, 2/1 SWMH,
axles avail, tongue attached
$2,500 OBO
386-965-1882
Come in and see the
Future in Manufactured Homes.


Royals Homes making
people smile
386-754-6737
Come See all New Lot Models
Royals Homes. Honesty! Integrity!
Customer Satisfaction
386-754-6737


Mobile Homes
640 for Sale
Looking for a Modular?
Come see the Specialists
at Royals Homes and ask for Bo
386-754-6737
New 2011 Homes are Here
3BR/4BR at Royals Homes
Call Charles @ 386-754-6737
Homes Built Your Way!
New,2010 MH,never been
occupied, front & back deck,
$99,900 MLS#76635 Call
Roger Lovelady 386-365-7039
@ Westfield Realty
Royals Homes is Quality!
We treat you like Family.
Stop in or Call Catherine
386-754-6737

10 Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent

05524728
SPRING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans;
some with garages.
Call 386.454-1469
or visit our website:
www.springhillvillage.net
5524833
No Application Fee +
$200 OFF!!
BEST PRICES IN TOWN!
Windsong Apts.
386-758-8455
1, 2 & 3 Bedroom Apartments
& Mobile Homes
starting at $350 per month
386-755-2423
2 br Apt. Close to shopping
and the VA Medical Center.
$525. mo plus deposit.
386-344-0579
3BR/2BA DUPLEX
Gatorwood on the Westside
Rent $650. per month.
Call 386-867-1212 for details.
A Landlord You Can Love!
2 br Apts $575. & up + sec. Great
area. CH/A washer/dryer hookups.
386-758-9351/352-208-2421
Great location W'of 1-75, spacious
deluxe 2BR apts., garage, W/D
hook up. patio. $600 & up, + SD,
386 965-0276
Nice Apt. downtown. Remodeled,
kit., 1/bd, ba, LR, dining & extra
room. Ref. req. $450. mo & sec.
386-362-8075 or 386-754-2951.
Quail Heights 2br/lba Duplex.
Secluded, private, safe. W/D
hookup. $700. mo. $500 security.
386-754-1155
The Lakes Apts. Studios & IBr's
from $135/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $525. + sec.
Call Michelle 386-752-9626

720 Furnished Apts.
720 For Rent
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

730n Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent

04543633
LANDLORDS, let our gold
standard work for you!
Call today for additional
information on managing your
residential rentals.
16884 53rd Wellborn
3/2 well kept DWMH with great
floor plan and 2 car garage
$850./mo. + $800 security
642 Chris Terrace Lake City
Nice upscale 3/2 with 1623 sf.
Close to Town but far enough
out for privacy. $1150./mo
$1150./security.
143 Zebra Terrace Lake City
3/2 well maintained brick home
on 1 acre +. Bonus room. could
be 4th bedroom or nice family
room. $900./mo. +
$900. security.
BJ. Federico 386-365-5884
Kayla Carbono 386-623-9650
(habla espalol)
Century 21
The Darby Rogers Co.

3/2 on 2.1 acres, 2 car garage,
ceramic tile, front & rear porches,
$995 mo, plus 2 mo sec.
Lease with the option to buy
386-758-9996 or 386-365-5434
3/2, family rm w/fireplace, 2 car
garage, Irg fenced yard,
near park & schools
Call 386-365-3953
3BR/1.5BA. BLOCK HOME.
Fenced (privacy) back yard.
$825. mo $825. dep. References
req'd. 386-364-2897
Eastside Village Realty
386-752-5290
A 55+Retirement Living,.
Site built home
2br/2bth For Lease
Ft White, 2/1, CH/A, 2010 W2 &
ref's from current landlord req'd,
Access to Rivers $675 mo,
$600 sec., 386-497-4699
House for rent. Everything new.


4br/2ba plus study. Carport. Great
neighborhood. $1000 mo last plus
security. 386-867-2283
TOWNHOUSE 2br plus
bonus room. w/1.5 bath.
Quail Heights CC. $750. mo plus
$250 damage dep. 386-752-8553


I


I1


m










LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2011


750 Business &
SOffice Rentals
1800 SQ FT $1100. Office
furniture available and
cubicle dividers.Water,
sewer and garbage fees included.
386-752-4072 Ready to move in!
OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$695. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor
SE Baya Ave Office Furnished
1800 Sq Ft $1125.00
Ideal for Engineers & Professional
Quiet and safe environment
Security available 386-752-4072

770 Condos For Rent

04543682
Golf Course Condo for rent,
2BR/2BA, 1420 s.f., $1200/mo.
Rent includes all appliances,
basic cable, water/sewer/
garbage, pool & tennis ct.
access. Realtor/owner
call 386-344-0433.


780 Condos for Sale
3 bdrm Condo Nit, back patio,
HOA fees include ext maintenance
of home, lawn & pool MLS#76797
$110,000, Call Missy Zecher @
Remax 386-623-0237

805 Lots for Sale
I acre lot outside the city limits.
Homes only subdivision. Priced
below the assessed value with the
county, $16,900 Hallmark Real
S Estate 386-867-1613 Call Jay S
2 ac lot in River Access
community. Suwanne River
1 mile away. Owner will finance.
$13,500 Hallmark Real Estate
386-867-1613 Call Jay Sears
Beautiful 5+ acre lot, partially
cleared w/large oaks, Homes only,
$38,000, MLS 75038 Call Roger
Lovelady @ Westfield Realty
386-365-7039
Charming Turn of the Century,
property, close to
downtown,MLS# 74814
$94,900 386-755-0808
Charlie Sparks @ Westfield
Nice 4.5 acre parcel w/S/P/W
older SWMH $39,900
MLS# 76182 Call
Roger Lovelady 386-365-7039
Westfield Realty


PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
-on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

810 Home for Sale
2/1,on nearly an acre, living/dining
rm, kitchen nook, until rnn, fenced,
back porch,2 car carport close to
town, $60,000 386-754-5818
2/3 on 5 acres, wrap around porch,.
family rm w/fireplace, detached
garage, $179,900 MLS# 77005
call Roger Lovelady @
Westfield Realty 386-365-7039
3/2 home w/1758 sq ft, Storage
bldg, enclosed patio & deck,
$168,000 Call Carrie Cason @
Westfield Realty 386-623-2806
MLS# 73410
3/2 w/over 1700 sq ft, fireplaces,
modem kitchen, fenced yard, 2
sheds, convenient location
$89,500 MLS#73861 Call Patti
@Access Realty 386-623-6896
4 bdrm + office, 2 living & dining
areas, front & back porch
$279,900 MLS# 72831
Call Charlie Sparks @ Westfield
S Realty 386-755-0808


810 Home for Sale
4/2 2300 plus sq ft,Palm Harbor
Home on 2 lots, Good Condition
$69,888 Call Nancy Rogers @
386-867-1271 Results Realty
4/2 1,800 sq ft on 10.5 acres,
newly remodeled inside, detached
garage, above ground pool
$189,888, Call Nancy,
Results Realty 386-867-1271
5 bedroom Home on 5 acres south
of Lake City, Big Rooms
lots of space $229,500
Charlie Sparks 386-755-0808
MLS# 72928 Westfield Realty
5/2, 1800sf, 24 acres, family rm,
screened back porch, RV
parking,newly painted close to VA
& DOT, Call Pam @ Remax
386-303-2505
5/3 Triplewide MH (2200) sq ft,
w/2 master bdrms, on 10 fenced
acres, fireplace. MLS# 76226
$75,000 Call Patti Taylor
386-623-6896 Access Realty
AFFORDABLE 3BR/2BA mfg
home in Woodgate Village only
$27,000 #76741
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 386-755-5110
Beautifully Landscaped 3/1 on
1.11 ac, 16x24 detached garage,
screen porched bldg, water
purification system, Call Pam @
Remax 386-303-2505
Brick home with 2,700 sqft under
roof. Large master w/bath on .5'
acres completely fenced. $167,500
Hallmark Real Estate
386-867-1613 Call Jay Sears
Brick, .59 ac. 3br/2ba w/large
spacious rooms. Split floor plan.
2 car garage & storage $222,900.
Century 21/The Darby
Rogers Co. 386-752-6575
Close to town, 2 story home
w/stone, fireplace, downstairs
master bdrm, $144,900
MLS# 77050 Call Carrie Cason
386-623-2806 Westfield Realty
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Brick, Woodcrest. Great area, split
plan. Screened back porch. Elaine
K. Tolar. 386-755-6488 $139,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
6br/3.5ba. 3 Fireplaces. 39.7 acres
included. Mary Brown Whitehurst.
386-965-0887 $1,200,000
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Reduced, brick w/over 2,000 sqft,
5 ac. 3br/2ba.Lots of extras. Elaine
K. Tolar 755-6488 $149,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Lakeview home in town, Old
charm w/many-upgrades Elaine K.
Tolar. 386-755-6488 $189,900.
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
2 Story, 4br/2.5ba-2160 sqft. Spa-
cious plan w/garage Lori Geibeig
Simpson 365-5678 $149,900


Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
3br/2ba close to town. 1620 sqft
w/covered patio& more. Lori Gei-
beig Simpson 365-5678 $117,900
Coral Shores Realty 2004
. Custom built home; 23:fenke dac.
1700 ft paved frontage. Lg
kitchen/pantry, master/bath.
386-965-5905 Bob Gavette


Corer lot in Piccadilly Park.
Newly painted in/out. New carpet
/vinyl. 2 car garage. Inground
pool. $133,500. Century 21/The
Darby Rogers Co. 386-752-6575
Custom 4/2, Screened back porch.
16x20 workshop w/elec. & water.
Ceramic/wood floors & more
$189,900. Century 21/The Darby
Rogers Co. 386-752-6575
Custom 4/2, Screened back porch.
16x20 workshop w/elec. & water.
Ceramic/wood floors & more
$189,900. Century 21/The Darby
Rogers Co. 386-752-6575
CUSTOM-BUILT 4BR mfg
home w/screen porch, front deck,
shed $87,500
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 386-755-5110 #73893
Cute 3/2 nicely remodeled home,
2 acres, partially fenced
$115,888
Call Brittany @ Results Realty
386-397-3473
Derington Properties, LLC
3/2 MH, large deck and
screened porch, 5 ac.
$46,500 386-965-4300
Derington Properties, LLC
DWMH, 5 ac. Screened front/back
porches. 20x40 shop fully equip-
ped w/bath. $74,900. 965-4300
Eastside Village Realty
386-752-5290
A 55+ Retirement Living
Fully furnished 2br/2ba @
$83,000


810 Home for Sale
Eastside Village Realty
386-752-5290
A 55+ Retirement Living
3BR/2BA
$99,999
Family home in Subdivision
4 bdrm Lots of space, newer
roof/carpet MLS#76283 Call
Missy Zecher@ Remax 386-
623-0237 www.missyzecher.com
Great Investment Property!
House needs lots of TLC, close to
shopping and schools, $35,000,
Bring all offers, Results Realty
Call Brittany 386-397-3473
LIKE NEW! 3BR/2BA mfg
home near Wellborn on
5+ acres ONLY $79,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 386-755-5110 #76768
Log Cabin home, located on
5 acres, wrap around porch
$199,000 MLS#75550
Call Missy Zecher @
386-623-0237 Remax Realty
Lrg Brick Home, well-established
neighborhood, in town,
$129,900 MLS#77016
Call Carrie Cason
Westfield Realty 386-623-2806
Must See! 4/2 2368SF Home,
island kitchen, den, fire place,
storage, auto gate entry,
Call Pam @ Remax
386-303-2505
Owners Motivated! Multiple
dwellings. Main house and 2 mo-
bile homes Pecans, cedar & aza-
leas. $199,900. Century 21/The
Darby Rogers Co. 386-752-6575
Perfect starter home. Quiet area.
Wood laminate floors, Ig dining,
French doors. 1 car garage/work-
shop $84,900. Century 21/The
Darby Rogers Co. 386-752-6575
Qualified General Contractor
doing top Quality work!
386-752-4072 Licensed and
Insured CGC036224
Don Reed Construction, Inc.
READY TO MOVE IN!
Living rm, dining rm, family rm,
lots of space ONLY $55,000
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #75210
REDUCED TO $61,500 in
Eastside Vlg! Immaculate
2BR/2BA w/lg rooms
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 386-755-5110 #76753
Solid Home! Needs updating.
Country eat in kitchen & formal
dining.Some windows replaced,
$70,000 Century 21/The Darby
Rogers Co. 386-752-6575
SPACIOUS 2BR/2BA home on 1
ac w/attached garage &
2-story shed $89,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 386-755-5110 #76887


Totally refurbished 2/2 w/
workshop on 1.25 fenced acres
$94,900 Call Millard Gillen @
Westfield Realty 386-365-7001
MLS#75417, .
T,, io sior Mhl. lucdicd in.
Wellborii'ni 2 66 jare', porctls ;
and fireplaces, 9 bdrms/3bths
$163,900 Patti Taylor .
Access Realty 386-623-6896
Very Nice 4/2 on 4 acres w/open
floor plan, 2 living rooms, eat in
kitchen, dining rm and rec rm
w/wet bar $89,900 Call Brittany
Results Realty 386-397-3473
Well maintained 3/2 DWMH,
1568 sq ft, acres, new roof,
$65,000, MLS#76187
Call Millard Gillen @
Westfield Realty 386-365-7001

820 Farms &
Acreage
10 ac lots, some w/well, septic, pwr
pole. Lowered prices. Owner finance
w/low dn pmnt Deas Bullard Proper-
ties 386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com
4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$69,900. $613mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
4 acres, Wellborn, New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down, $39,900, $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com

830 Commercial
Property
Coral-Shores Realty. Prime
commercial, located on Hwy 41 &
Gibson Ln. 26X54 concrete block.
$76,000-,386-965-5905
Call Bob Gavette


H T ON WHEELS & WATERCRAFT


2002 Fleetwood
Revolution 40'
Prestine cond. New tires &
flushed trans., kept covered.
Will sell tow vehicle.
$75,000
Call
386-752-6090


'04 Rialta Motorhome
58k mi. Self-contained,
generator. Like new. Too
many goodies to list.
Open for offers.
$19,800
Call
386-758-7683


1977 GMC
Motqrhome
Classic Palm Beach Model.
Last year built, self-contained.
$18,500 or
OBO or Trade
Call
386-754-6693


2010 Puma Travel
Trailer 32ft. %
2 slide outs, air awning,
King Island bed. Many
extras.
$18,900
Call
863-660-8539


830 Commercial
83 Property
Downtown & borders 3 streets.
Aprox. 10,000 sqft fenced parking.
"as is" Bob Gavette. $73,000. 386-
965-5905 Coral Shores Realty
Prime Commercial Property
across from plaza, frontage on
Baya 3.27 acres, room for building
$398,888 386-867-1271
Call Nancy @ Results Realty

940 Trucks







950 Cars for Sale
GET CASH TODAY!!
For your car, truck, van or SUV.
(Running or not). C41l anytime.
(352)653-5691
951 Recreational
1 Vehicles






04 Rialta Motor home 58k mi.
Self contain, generator. Like new.
Too many goodies to list. Open for
offers. $19,800. 386-758-7683


.-- .. .
1977 GMC Motor Home Classic
Palm Beach Model,Self-
Contained, $18,500 or
obo or trade 386-754-6693
2009 FREEDOM Spirit
18 ft. Tag along travel trailer.
Excellent condition $8,300.
386-438-5560


IIII.liS^i ... r.-. _
2010 Puma Travel Trailer 32 ft, 2
slide outs, air awning, King Island
bed, Many Extras $18,900
Call 863-660-8539 will deliver

952 Vans& Sport
952 Util. Vehicles


NEED HELP!

Let Us Write
Your
Classified Ad



ForYou1. aii7555 Tda


and Makesn, W
ajlake some ca~h
S cash


ADVERTISE YOUR



GARAGE SALE

WITH THE
LAKE CITY REPORTER


Only





g7,,-

4 LINES 3 DAYS

2 FREE SIGNS!


2004 QMC Yukon XLT White
with gfay leather Int. 169k mi.
3rd row seats. $8,500.
386-755-2276







L eiR-
t`iaftla 1 ."-- ",: .









Lake City Reporter


10-- -s








Bring the picture in or
we will take it for youl
* Ad runs 10 consecutive days
with a description and photo in the
newspaper and online E-edition.
* Ad runs 10 consecutive'days as a
classified line ad online.
* You must include vehicle price.
* All ads are prepaid.
* Private party only.


2006 EF250
Ford Van
3/4 ton, metal work
shelves/ladder rack,
60K miles, exc. cond.
$10,500
Call
386-555-5555
If you don't sell your vehicle
during the first 10 days,you
can run the same vehicle ad
for 10 additional days for
only $15.00
Terms and conditions remain the
same for the additional run.


To Ge You
Vehice Sol, Cal


Classified Department: 755-5440





3 LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2011


HURRY! LOW, LOW PRICES ON ROWS OF QUALITY USED CARS, TRUCKS, VANS & SUVS


SPER MO. N
www.sunbelthonda.com
386-755-6500


@UHONDA


2018 SW Main Blvd.,
Lake City, FL


/ 652630 F