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UFPKY NEH LSTA



The Lake City reporter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01568
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 4/29/2011
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
System ID: UF00028308:01568
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text






Rematch
Columbia softball
meets Ed White


for third
Sports,


Little Scholars
Pop Warner honors
local student-athletes.


000017 120511 ****3-DIGIT 326
LIB OF FLORIDA HISTORY
PO BOX 117007
205 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-1943


NFL Draft
Panthers select
Cam Newton with
No. I pick in draft.
Sports, IB


Lake uity Keporter


Friday,April 29, 201 I


.www.lakecityreporter.com


Vol. 137, No. 82 0 75 cents


Today's Schedule
FRI., APRIL 29 GATES OPEN 1:00 PM.


Fans enjoy a soggy second day of River Jam


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter


Fans sing along as country singer Tyler Farr takes the stage Thursday during the Suwannee River Jam at the Spirit of the
Suwannee Music Park. Heavy rains swept through the area, delaying4estivites for an hour.



SHAKESPEAREAN EFFORT


2:00 p.m.
2:35 p.m.
2:55 p.m.
3:10 pm.
3:25 p.m.
3:40 pim.
4:30 p.m.
4:45 p.e.
5:00 p.m.
5:30 p.m.
7:30 p.m.
9:30 p.m


State of Mind Band
justin Freeman.
Katie Gifard
John Markham
Jimmy Coteman

Steee Bridge Band
Jimmy Coleman
Katie Gillard
State of Mind Band
Li*zz Faith & Isabella Station
Sondra Hunt & Black fack


Steele Bridge Band


Actors adapt to
heavy storms,
perform inside.

By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com

going to
keep Linda
McDonald of
Fort White
from seeing her daughter,
Emily, and other young
actors perform "Romeo
and Juliet"
"They are a pretty awe-
some group," she said.
McDonald was among
the crowd at the Theater
Under The Stars produc-
tion of "Romeo and Juliet"
Thursday at Fort White
High School.
Rain storms moved
the play, which featured
the Fort White High
School Thespians Guild
and Alligator Community
Theater, into the school's
gymnasium.
Frank Hubert of
Alligator Community
Theater directed the pro-
duction, set in the Civil
War. The star-crossed
lovers journey through
Florida locations such as
Olustee, Lake City and
Fernandina.
Fort White High School
read "A Land Remembered"
by Patrick Smith school-
wide and the production
was adapted to incorporate
Florida, said Jeanie Wilks,


6:15 p.m.

8:15 p.m.
1t0:30 p.m.


ANTONIA ROBINSON/ Lake City Reporter
Hannah Dubi, Kezia Dubi and Pat McAlhaney demonstrate homefront skills from the Civil
War as part of reenacting before the start of 'Romeo and Juliet' Thursday at Fort White High
School.


executive producer.
"Shakespeare is every-
where," she said.
School officials made
the decision to host the
play inside at 3 p.m., said
Principal Keith Hatcher.
The cast and crew readily
adapted.
'They did an awesome
job," he said. "They always
do an awesome job."
Recreating the staging
indoors for the perfor-
mance was a stretch of


creativity for the cast and
crew, Wilks said.
'We prefer to be outside
but the weather didn't
allow it," she said.
Several groups and indi-
viduals within the commu-
nity helped with this year's
production, including
the Lake City/Columbia
County Historical
Museum, First Florida
Infantry Co. C, Collins
Lighting, Starlight Sound
and Recording and Annita


Leonard with costuming
and makeup.
"Each production gets
more and more commu-
nity support," Wilks said.
Quite a few people were
in attendance at the event
despite the rain, said Pat
McAlhaney of the histori-
cal museum.
"The group has estab-
lished itself," she said.
"People expect it's going
to be a good production
worth your time."


LoCash Cowtbys

Kellie Pickler
Gary Allan


Shuttle launch


brings plenty of


tourists, traffic


Countdown to
Endeavour's
final flight is on.
By MIKE SCHNEIDER
Associated Press
TITUSVILLE Florida
Space Coast hotels are
sold out, residents are
renting bedrooms and
restaurants are doubling
food supplies as thou-
sands of tourists arriv-
ing for Friday's launch of
space shuttle Endeavour
are boosting a region fear-
ing its economic future.
The launch is the next-
to-last for the program and
President Barack Obama
and his family will be in
attendance.
'The shuttle program
is winding down and this
is something that is on
everybody's bucket list,"
said Rob Varley, the area's


top tourism official. "For
many people, it's like 'Uh-
oh. Weonly have two more
chances to see one.'"
The mission is also
attracting extra attention
because its commander is
Mark Kelly, whose wife is
Arizona Congresswoman
Gabrielle Giffords. She
was shot in the head in
a January assassina-
tion attempt, but arrived
at Cape Canaveral on
Wednesday and is expect-
ed to watch the launch
from a private location.
Crowd estimates' vary
widely Brevard County
expects 250,000 visi-
tors will attend. NASA's
launch director says more
than 500,000. And Varley
is guessing 700,000. That
figure would rival John
Glenn's space shuttle
launch in 1998 and those
LAUNCH continued on 6A


County weighing its options to balance budget


Job cuts could
result if budget
cuts are applied.
By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com
If the county was faced with a 5
percent or 10 percent budget cut
to only the board's department,
it would be forced to cut jobs,
officials said Thursday.


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400


The announcement came at
the Columbia County Board of
County Commissioners' third
budget workshop, held in the
County Extension Office con-
ference room at the Columbia
County Fairgrounds, where the
board's department was the first
of all county departments to give
its budget presentation.
The board's total budget is
more than $1.2 million. Without
elected officials' salaries and ben-


84
Sunny
WEATHER, 2A


efits putting the budget at a
balance of more than $940,000
- a 5 percent budget reduc-
tion would be more than $47,000
and a 10 percent reduction would
equal more than $94,000.
Lisa Roberts, assistant county
manager, said she can't make
either of those reduction amounts
without sacrificing at least one
job.
"You've got to get into the per-
sonal services cost in order to


make those kinds of cuts," said
Dale Williams, county manager.
The board's department must
have a certain amount of nton-sal-
aried expenses in order to oper-
ate, Dale Williams said.
"You can't very well say, 'We
won't have copy paper, we won't
have a copy machine and we
won't provide these things and
still be open for business,'" he
said. "So there's only so much of
those expenses you can cut and


Opinion ................ 4A .
Around Florida ........... 2A
Calendar ................ 5A ... -
Advice & Comics......... 4B
Puzzles ................. 2B


keep the door open."
Commissioner Jody
DuPree, board chairman, and
Commissioner Ron Williams said
the county should revisit the idea
of instituting furlough days tak-
ing a board-determined amount
of holidays unpaid for county
employees, a decision it approved
in August 2010 for the current
fiscal year's budget and then did
BUDGET continued on 3A


COMING
SATURDAY
High schoolers
prepare for prom.


TODAY IN
NATION
Tornadoes
ravage South.


I1 I ii!. 1 1











LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING FRIDAY, APRIL 29, 2011


(AH 3 Thursday:
Afternoon: 0-1-3
Evening: 8-5-3


Thursday:
Afternoon: 2-5-3-7
Evening: 6-1-2-5


ezOiatcdz
Wednesday:
11-23-29-33-36


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



Trump takes credit for Obama birth info


DOVER, N.H.

ing Barack Obama was
born in Africa, Donald
Trump hastened to boast
that he had forced the
Democratic president to release
a detailed Hawaii birth certificate
disproving that claim, painting an
apparent setback as a victory within
minutes of arriving in the first-in-the-
nation primary state.
The developer and reality TV
show host, who is considering a
White House run, again showed the
difficulty establishment Republicans
are having in controlling the early
stages of their wide-open nominating
contest. He also proved himself a
nimble messenger, or spinner.
'Today I am very proud of myself
because I have accomplished
something that nobody else has
been able to accomplish," Trump
told reporters Wednesday shortly
after his black and red helicopter,
.emblazoned 'TRUMP" on the side,
touched down in Portsmouth.
* He arrived not long after the
White House released the presi-
dent's long-form birth certificate
from Hawaii. He said he was hon-
ored "to have played such a big role
in hopefully hopefully getting
rid of this issue. Now, we have to
look at it, we have to see, is it real."
Trump said he hoped the birth
certificate "checks out beautifully,"
but he used the opportunity before
television cameras to again sharply
criticize Obama on several fronts,
including Libya policy and gasoline
prices.

Richie Sambora to
leave Bon Jovi tour
NEW YORK Bon Jovi
announced that guitarist Richie
Sambora will miss concert tour dates
amid reports that he is heading to
rehab.


Donald Trump, a possible 2012 presidential candidate, talks with reporters at the
Pease International Tradeport Wednesday in Portsmouth, N.H.


In a statement
released Thursday,
the group said its
support for Sambora
was "absolute" and
that he remained a
member of the band.
But it also said he
Sambora would miss an unde-
termined number of concerts and
that it looked forward to his "healthy
return."
Neither the band nor its publicist
would confirm or deny reports that
Sambora planned to enter rehab. He
went to rehab a few years ago.

Larry King returns to
CNN lineup for a night
NEW YORK In his first CNN
special since step-
ping down from his
nightly talk show,
Larry King visits
a Las Vegas clinic
where Alzheimer's
disease is studied.
He is accompanied
King by former President
Ronald Reagan's son Ron.
King's special, "Unthinkable: The


Alzheimer's Epidemic," airs Sunday
at 8 p.m. EDT/PDT on CNN. It
features interviews with several
celebrities touched by the disease,
including Maria Shriver, whose
father Sargent Shriver hadit,-and
actor Seth Rogen. The mother of
Rogen's fiancie was diagnosed with
Alzheimer's at age 55, and he wanted
to talk about it to make clear that not
only old people are affected.

Danes and Hudson in
Brazil for AIDS benefit
SAO PAULO Actresses Claire
Danes and Jennifer Hudson have
come to Brazil to promote the
American Foundation for AIDS
Research.
The foundation said on its website
that Thursday night's fundraiser in
Sao Paulo is the first benefit it has
held in South America.
Brazilian designer Francisco Costa
will be honored at the event for his
work in raising HIV/AIDS aware-
ness And advancing AIDS research.
He is the women's creative director
for the Calvin Klein Collection,

N Associated Press


Celebrity Birthdays


* Tennis player Andre Agassi N Country singer James
is 41. Bonamy is 39.
* Rapper Master P is 41. 0 Actor Zane Carney is 26.


Daily Scripture
"In your relationships with
one another, have the same
mindset as Christ Jesus:Who,
being in very nature God, did
not consider equality with God
something to be used to his
own advantage; rather, he made
himself nothing by taking the
very nature of a servant, being
made in human likeness.And
being found in appearance as
a man, he humbled himself by
becoming obedient to death
even death on a cross!"
Philippians 2:5-8


Lake City
HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293
Fax number ............. 752-9400
Circulation .......... 755-5445
Online... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Srvice
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, RO. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson .....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
Assistant Editor CJ Risak..754-0427
After 1:00 p.m.
(crisak@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Ashley Butcher ...754-0417
(abutcher@lakecityreporter.com)
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440.


Reporter
BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon....754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 730
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation ...............755-5445
(circulation @lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks .................. $26.32
24 Weeks ..................$48.79
52 Weeks .................. $83.46
Rates indude 7% sales tax.
Mail rates
12 Weeks .................. $41.40
24 Weeks ..................$82.80
52 Weeks .................$179.40


CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run
in this space. And thanks for reading.


Undercover officer,
2 suspects shot
PALATKA -
Authorities said a North
Florida officer and two
suspects were shot during
an undercover operation.
Florida Department of
Law Enforcement spokes-
man Keith Kameg said
the officer was meeting
three suspects Thursday
afternoon for a narcotics
and gun sale in Putnam
County. When the suspects
arrived, they immediately
produced firearms, and a
shootout followed.
Two suspects were shot.
One died at the scene,
while the other was taken
to a nearby hospital. It
wasn't clear who shot the
suspects.

Man charged
with fatal beating
MIAMI A South
Florida man has been
charged with beating his
girlfriend's young daugh-
ter to death.
Jail records show that
Calvin Morris Lewis, 21,
was arrested Wednesday
.and charged with first-
degree murder and aggra-
vated child abuse. He was
being held without bail set.
Miami Fire Rescue
responded a home Sunday
night and found the
S4-year-old girl unrespon-
sive. She was rushed to
a nearby hospital, where
she was later pronounced
dead. A medical examiner
ruled the death a homi-
cide, saying there was
extensive trauma to the
child's organs.

House repeals
'potty parity' law
TALLAHASSEE The
Florida House has voted
to repeal a state law that
mandated a male-to-female
toilet ratio in public build-
ings.
All but two House mem-


Group wins big at ceremony
Members of the bachata music group Aventura accept an
award during the Latin Billboard Awards Thursday in Coral
Gables.


bers voted on Thursday
to repeal the provision.
A staff analysis said
that the inclusion of the
International Plumbing
Code into Florida's
Building Code provides a
better standard based on
overall building occupancy.
The "potty parity" law
was first enacted in 1992
in response to women hav-
ing to endure long lines
at restrooms at football
games.

Man convicted
in fatal robbery
JACKSONVILLE A
Jacksonville man has been
convicted of killing a man
during a robbery.
A Duval County jury
found Benjamin Ishmael
Price, 30, guilty Thursday
of first-degree murder and
armed robbery. He faces a
mandatory life sentence at
a June hearing.
Authorities said
Price's girlfriend, Erica
Nicole Thomas, lured
Jimmy Ray Daughtery,
54, of Kingsland, Ga., to
a Jacksonville hotel in
October 2007. Thomas,
who has pleaded guilty to
second-degree murder, tes-,
tified that the robbery plot
was Price's idea. Defense
attorneys questioned the
validity of the woman's


testimony.

Bill to help private
school athletes
TALLAHASSEE -
Certain private school
students could play sports
at public schools under a
bill that has passed in the
Florida House.
The bill (HB 797) that
won unanimous approval
Thursday would apply just
to students whose private
schools don't offer the
sport they want to play.
Students also must
attend private schools
that aren't members of
the Florida High School
Athletic Association. They
could only play at the pub-
lic school that is zoned for
their home.

Senate bill on due
deductions stalled
TALLAHASSEE A
Senate bill banning state
government from deduct-
ing public-employee union
dues for political purposes
has again been postponed.
The bill (SB 830) had
been put on the Senate's
calendar for Wednesday.
Then it was rolled to
Thursday. Now it is on
again for Friday.


THE WEATHER



SUNNY SUNNY MOSTLY PARTLY SCT.
SUNNY CLOUDY i T-

HI2 H86050 I "STORMS:
HI.5 HI 86 .57 7 HI 89 UL 61 HI 90 U) 63 "" HI LO- iii


I



Pensacola
81/59


Tallahassee
83/51


~ub


., lh
83/50
I ak Pit


a83e
83/


* Jacksonville
18 ,,53


City
Cape Canaveral


Saturday
29 6.5 -.
81/65/s
85/72/pc
89/65/s
86/56/s
83/58/s
85/77/pc
86/57/s
84/73/pc
88/65/s-
86/56/s
86/64/s
83/65/s
84/66/s
87/56/s
86/66/s
87/58/s
83'68'pr


Sunday
0 6t. :,
80/63/s
83/74/s
88/66/s
89/60/s
84/60/pc
84/75/s
89/60/pc
84/74/s
88/67/s
87/60/s
87/63/s
77/62/pc
84/68/pc
86/58/s
87/68/s
90/61/s
_.2'71 '


1 An exclusive
S, | | service
I 1 brought to
l EiE our readers
10 mutestoun mby

Sulr..,:,i The Weather
Sr ,,jn r, Channel.



weather.com

f 4#V Forecasts, data and
i ,, graphics 2011 Weather
St1/ wI Central, LP, Madison, Wis.
weather J www.weatherpubllsher.com


TEMPERATURES
High Thursday
Low Thursday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Thursday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


93
71
83
57
95 in 1991
41 in 1978


0.00"
0.69"
11.00"
2.70"
13.86"


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise torm.
Sunset torm.

MOON
Moonrise today
Moonset today
Moonrse torm.
Moonset torm.


6:50 a.m.
8:07 p.m.
6:49 a.m.
8:07 p.m.


4:32 a.m.
5:11 p.m.
5:01 a.m.
6:04 p.m.


May May May May
3 10 17 24
New First Full Last


S_,"t' : .


73
Friday


Ip 7p la 6a 1f
Saturday


Forcasted temwran "FeelsIke tmpenrbe
... .. ; t. ...


N Associated Press


Oir,n ihi .1.- r.
1992, record cold
temperatures were
felt across much
of the East, includ-
ing a record low of
32 in Spartanburg,
S.C. Record highs
were felt across the
West, including a
record high of 102
in Tucson, Ariz.


Get Connected


AROUND FLORIDA


Ga
Panama City e
82/56


,'Lj ,,.., Datona Beach
/52 Ft.Lauderdale
inesville Daytona Bead Fort Myers
13/51 80e61 Gainesville
Ocala Jacksonville
,84/52 ey West
Orlando Cape Canaveral Key West
84/61 80/65 Lake City
Miami
Tampa Naples
84/65 West Pahn Beach Ocala
87/68 Orlando
Ft Lauderdale Panama City
Ft Myers 88/71 Pensacola
88/65 *Naples Tallahassee
91/69 Miami Tampa
S 89/71 Valdosta
Key West W. Palm Beach
87 76


...vw l.A r~a~r~


Page Editor: Jason M. Walker, 754-0430


r


I










LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE FRIDAY, APRIL 29, 2011


File photo
Goats graze in an open field at Magnolia Farms in Live Oak.


Magnolia Farms to host expo


By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com

Curious about how to
make cheese or soap, raise
a baby goat or start an
organic garden?
People will have the
opportunity to learn those
skills and more at the
SSustainable Homesteading
Expo at Magnolia Farms in
Live Oak Saturday.
The day-long event will
offer almost 10 hands-on
classes for attendees to sign
up for taught by a variety of
North Florida farmers.
Classes include bottle-
raising goats and goat herd
milk production, cheese-
making, soap-making, can-
ning and food preservation,
organic gardening, learning
the medicinal values of wild
fresh herbs and a backyard
poultry flock where people
will learn production of eggs
and meats.
Darlene McElwee, co-
owner of Magnolia Farms,
said the farmers teaching
the classes will be there to
pass on their knowledge to
guests.
"The ones that are com-


Bars of soap made from goat's milk are displayed.


ing are really going to learn.
some new things that day
and I think it's going to be
very fun," she said.
While children will not
be turned away, the classes
are geared toward adults,
McElwee said.
Attendees are also wel-
come to bring a brown-bag
lunch.
McElwee said she is
hosting the expo to teach
people sustainable, home-
steading skills because of
hard economic times.
"My intentions with this
is to make sure that people
try a little harder to learn
new things and utilize them
to provide more for their


File photo


families in the difficult
times ahead," she said.
Farmers teaching the
classes will have booths
with their products for
sale at the event and
Magnolia Farms' barn
store will also be open.
Visitors not participat-
ing in classes may visit
the farm free of charge
to peruse the store and
booths, McElwee said.
Admission to the
Sustainable Homesteading
Expo'is $45 per person or
$75 per couple. Attendees
must register in advance
and choose the classes
they wish to attend by vis-
iting magnoliafarms.org.


Take Back Day set for Saturday


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com

Local residents will have
the opportunity to rid their
homes of old prescription
drugs Saturday through
a program offered by the
Columbia County Sheriff's
Office in partnership with
the U.S. Drug Enforcement
Administration.
The sheriff's office will
take part in National Take-
Back Day, which will pro-
vide residents a chance to
get rid of expired, unwant-
ed or unused pharmaceuti-
cal controlled substances
and other medications.
From 10 a.m. 2 p.m.
Saturday, authorities will
collect the expired medica-
tions. The collection site
hosted by the Columbia
County Sheriff's Office will
be located at the Park-n-
Ride lot at the intersection
of U.S. Highway 90 and
Commerce Boulevard.
"The purpose of Take
Back Day is to provide an
opportunity and a mecha-


nism for the public to turn
in unused or unwanted pre-
scription medication," said
Sgt. Ed Seifert, Columbia
County Sheriff's Office
public information officer.
"Unused and or unwanted
prescriptions in the home
may fuel an existing or start
a new addiction. A medi-
cal hazard may also exist if
someone takes a prescrip-
tion medicine that is not
specifically prescribed to
them."
Seifert said a 2008 survey
by the Drug Enforcement
Agency shows that pre-
scription medication addic-
tion is greater than cocaine,
methamphetamine and
other-hallucinogenic drugs
combined.
"It is important that
these unused prescription
medicines are disposed of
properly and safely," Seifert
said. "Simply flushing them
down the drain is not the
answer. We certainly do
not want to introduce these
medicines to our sensitive
Florida aquifer or water


treatment facilities."
All solid dosage phar-
maceutical products and
liquids in consumer con-
tainers will accepted.
The public may drop off
medication in its original
container or by removing
the medication from its
container and disposing of
it directly at the collection
site. No illegal narcotics will
be accepted. Intravenous
solutions, injectibles and
syringes will not be accept-
ed due to potential blood
borne pathogen hazards.
Seifert said last year, the
first year of the event, was
very successful and the
Columbia County Sheriff's
Office took in over 20
pounds of prescription
medications in a four-hour
period.
"Based on the success
of last year, the sheriff's
office is again eager to
assist the community by
providing a safe outlet for
them to dispose of their
unused/unwanted medica-
tions," Seifert said.


Gun bills approved by Senate


By JAMES L. ROSICA
Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE -
The Florida Senate on
Thursday, by a succession
of mostly party-line votes,
approved a trio of bills that
supporters say will ensure
citizens' constitutionally-
protected gun rights.
One measure restricts
doctors from asking
patients about gun own-
ership, and another pro-
hibits local governments
from passing stricter gun
laws than the state. Those
two already have been
approved by the House


and await Republican Gov.
Rick Scott's signature.
The third, which began
life as a proposed "open
carry" law, was modified to
decriminalize the acciden-
tal showing of a concealed
weapon. It goes to the
House, which is expected
to also approve it
The guns and doctors
bill has drawn the most
national attention, with
the American Academy
of Pediatrics saying it will
interfere with patient care.
S"Pediatricians don't
need to be muzzled dis-
cussing this issue with our


patients," said Dr. Louis St.
Petery, a Tallahassee pedi-
atrician who appeared on
CNN's Anderson Cooper
show in January to speak
against the bill. "This sim-
ply means that more chil-
dren will be injured and
killed by firearms."
Other critics have pre-
viously said doctors need
to talk about gun safety
especially when there are
small children in a home,
and have likened it to ask-
ing a parent about a pool to
make sure there's a fence
around it.


LCCA students attend rally for school choice at state capitol


COURTESY PHOTO
Gov. Rick Scott talks to a group of students, includ-
ing 120 from Lake City Christian Academy, about
school choice during a rally at the state capitol in
Tallahassee Tuesday.


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com

More than 100
Lake City Christian
Academy students
went to Tallahassee
earlier in the week to
take part in the annu-
al school choice rally
showing their support
for school choice.
The rally was held
at the state capitol
in Tallahassee on
Tuesday.
Lake City Christian
Academy director Tana
Norris said 120 stu-
dents from Lake City
Christian Academy
attended the rally along
with more than 1,500
students from other
statewide schools.
"We went there
to talk to the sena-
tors and the gover-


nor about supporting
school choice for the
students of Florida,"
she said. "The rally
was very important
because we want all
students in Florida to
have a choice of what
kind of education they
want. I believe that par-
ents should make the
choice of where their
children go to school
- not the govern-
ment"
Norris said there are
bills in the Senate now
to increase virtual and
charter school oppor-
tunities, as well as dis-
cussions about scholar-
ships for children with
disabilities.
She said the deci-
sions made by legis-
lators in Tallahassee
will have an impact on
Lake City Christian


Academy.
'This will give peo-
ple another opportu-
nity," she said. "If they
would like for their
children to get into pri-
vate school they can."
Lake City Christian
Academy students,
parents and adminis-
trators have attended
the school choice rally
for 10 years and Norris
said its important to
-continue showing sup-
port for school choice.
"We know that par-
ents need to make the
choice of where they
want their children
to go to school," she
said. "Public schools
are great for some
students, but children
learn differently and
some children need an
alternative."


COURTESY PHOTO
Stephen Stanforth, 9, from Lake City Christian
Academy, displays his sign showing support'for
school choice during his visit to the state capitol
Tuesday.


BUDGET: Several options discussed

Continued From Page 1A


away with in September
2010.
"Before I would like to
see employees laid off due
to the budget crunch, we
should visit that again,"
Ron Williams said.
Dale Williams said that
furloughing employees is
a county-wide strategy to
save money, while what
Roberts presented was a
departmental strategy.
The board also reviewed
its non-departmental
expenditures for fiscal year
2010 to 2011, like retire-


ment, which costs more
than $2.8 million; employ-
ee health insurance, which
it pays more than $2.6 mil-
lion for annually; and Social
Security, which costs more
than $1.4 million.
It will continue to review
more non-departmental
expenditures at its next
budget workshop May 12.
Three other county
departments facilities
management, emergency
management and safety -
are also slated to give their
budget presentations.


The next budget work-
shop will be held at 6
p.m. at the Columbia
County School Board
Administrative Complex
auditorium.




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OPINION


Friday,April 29, 2011


AN


A N
OPINION


A real


question


for


Obama

Forget the birth
certificate. The real
question is: Where is
Obama's leadership?
Obama has proven
to be aloof and withdrawn
on issues both at home and
abroad, leaving us so far with a
fuzzy picture of his leadership.
The Trump-for-president
campaigners have been
obsessed with whether
President Obama was actually
born in the United States. The
really intriguing question,
-however, is not "Where was he
born?" but "Who is he?"
During the 2008 campaign,
Mr. Obama sent shivers down
the spines of many Americans
with electrifying oratory that
swept him into the White
House on a tsunami of public
anticipation and excitement.
By many accounts, he has
since proved to be a president
of aloofness and withdrawal on
issues both at home and abroad
an approach that defies
attempts to define his vision
and leaves us so far with a fuzzy
picture of his leadership.
Is he an overcautious
politician, practicing a
sphinxlike reticence to avoid
damaging his aura? Or is
he simply incapable of the
resolute decisionmaking that
a President Rboial Reagan or
even a President Bill Clinton
would have brought to these
turbulent times?
On the international scene,
Obama backed and filled on
whether to push Egypt's
Hosni Mubarak off his
throne. On the issue of Libya,
he procrastinated on taking
action while Muammar Qaddafi
waged a brutal campaign
against
pro-democracy insurgents.
On the home front, Obama
has given lip service to
addressing America's
mind-boggling debt, but
has offered few specifics.
He has seemed disengaged
from the budget-cutting
recommendations of his
own appointed deficit
commission.
Christian Science Monitor

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman


LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
' signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
* verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,


Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


Worst property
insurance idea
of the year: Gov.
Rick Scotfs
reported plan
to eliminate or shrink Citizens
Property Insurance by leaving
its 1.3 million policyholders at
the mercy of a problematic pri-
vate market and the unregulat-
ed "surplus lines" market where
the sky's the limit on premiums.
Over the weekend, a report
in the Sarasota Herald-Tribune
that was compiled from mul-
tiple documents and sources
said the current Citizens bill
in the Legislature originated
with a notion by the Governor's
Office to completely phase
out Citizens. This week, Brian
Burgess, Scott's spokesman,
said the governor never sup-
ported that plan.
If this is what the governor
ever had in mind, he's smart
to back away. The bill under
consideration in the Legislature
is bad enough, but drasti-


www.lakecityreporter.com


What poetry gives us


"It is difficult to get the
news from poems yet men die
miserably every day for lack of
what is found there."
From "Asphodel, That
Greeny Flower" by William
Carlos Williams

and you ought
to tune in. If you
already have and get
the poem-a-day e-
mail offering from KnopfPoetry.
com, you maybe encountered
'The Coat," as I did, and then
read Deborah Digges saying,
"I wore your clothes when you
went out of town."
She explains that she wore
tl1s person's shirts as pajamas
and this person's coats when
she walked their dogs, and you
figure she is writing about her
husband. Soon enough, when
she sees a face like his "through
those last wretched months of
your long illness," you know
that "out of town" means the
husband is dead.
"Forgive me," says the poet,
after mentioning the lookalike,
"I was happy in your coat to see
you!" I found great sweetness
in that line and then re-read
the introduction to the poem,
focusing on how Digges, full of
grief, had committed suicide in
2009.
"Oh my goodness," I said,
and my wife in the next room
asked what was wrong, and I
said, "Nothing." I had simply
read a poem along with some
extra-poetic information, and
had a lesson in grief but also
a lesson in how Digges had
had a sense of seeing her
lost husband again, of being


- a '
Jay Ambrose
Speaktojoy@aol.com
reunited with him. Before her
desperation had become too
much for her, she had brief
relief. I cannot explain in prose
all the implications I felt in
that remarkable line. Poetry is
mostly its pwn explanation.
The analysis we find in
criticism does have its place,
but it examines after the fact
while poetry gives immediate
experience. Like other forms of
art, it takes you someplace and
then collides and colludes with
you. The amazing consequence
can often be a seeming flash
of insight, revivification, a new
awareness. If all of that does not
keep you from misery, as the
poet William Carlos Williams
suggests in the lines above, it
often does connect you with the
universe in an astonishing way.
I think that by turning to
poems, at least the good ones,
we enrich ourselves, and that
entering this world is not so
forbidding as some may believe.
Move on from the confusing
poems and find enchantment
in the best of the past and
the new, in Shakespeare's
sonnets, for instance, in William
Butler Yeats and Alfred Lord
Tennyson, in Walt Whitman and
Emily Dickinson, in T.S. Eliot, in
Robert Frost, Edna St. Vincent
Millay and Elizabeth Bishop, in


one of my favorite anthologies,
something called "Staying
Alive."
The Internet swarms with
outstanding poetry, as in the
site I mentioned, but in many,
many more, and if you explore
enough, you will find what
works for you.
The best way to talk about
thisis to talk about poems
themselves, such as "The
Artilleryman's Vision" by the
19th century's Whitman. It was
offered up by KnopfPoetry.com
in an e-mail in commemoration
of the 150th anniversary of the
start of the Civil War.
Whitman, a combat nurse,
tells us of a veteran in bed
after the war with his wife,
listening to his infant child
breathe nearby, then having the
contrasting sights and sounds of
the battlefield come back to him
and envelop his senses.
The spared artilleryman tells
us he is focused on the show,
parenthetically explaining that
he does not heed the dying or
the wounded dripping their red
blood. But what we know, of
course, is that the dying and
the wounded are exactly what
he does heed in the comfort of
his home, that their dreadful
fate is a reason this nagging,
thundering vision has come to
him and may never leave him
alone.
Engage with this poem, and
you learn about the Civil War in
a special way.
* Jay Ambrose, formerly
Washington director of editorial
policy for Scripps Howard news-
papers and the editor of dailies in
El Paso, Texas, and Denver, is a
columnist living in Colorado.


cally shrinking or eliminating
Citizens at this time would be
a disaster for Florida residents
and businesses.
The report said even insur-
ance industry lobbyists at a
secret meeting with the gov-
ernor's staff in February were
appalled because the private
insurance market can't absorb
policies from those million-plus
Citizens policyholders. The only
option for many beleaguered
consumers would be the surplus
lines market, where rates are
unregulated and not backed by
a state guarantee fund.
A frustrated Sen. Mike
Fasano, Republican of New Port
Richey, called the governor
"clueless" regarding the plight
of policyholders who every year
must face steeply rising wind-
storm insurance costs far out of
line with inflation, not to men-
tion salaries and incomes.
In the Senate, SB 1714,
sponsored by Sen. Alan Hays,
R-Umatilla, would increase rates


for customers of Citizens up
to 25 percent a year and force
some policyholders out of the
program. A House version caps
the increases at 15 percent. The
current limit is "only" 10 per-
cent, and there's talk of a com-
promise at 20 percent. That may
be Tallahassee's idea of a com-
promise; from the standpoint of
policyholders, it's price gouging.
Supporters of rate increases
say Citizens has gotten far too
big and, in case of a hurricane
disaster, would leave every
insurance consumer in Florida
holding the bag for billions of
dollars in claims that the state
insurer must repay by adding
new surcharges to future poli-
cies for years to come. That's
on top of existing surcharges
for previous years of disastrous
storms.
Shrinking Citizens is a wor-
thy goal, but simply putting the
monkey on the backs of policy-
holders is the wrong approach.
* Miami Herald


4A


Betsy Hart
betsysbfog.com


A dream

to change

the world


junior high,
I wanted to
someday be
president of
the United States. I think it
was late high school by the
time that plan evolved into
whatever the next thing was :
But, I had this idea that I want-
ed to do something significant:
and influential. Something that
would last. It seemed to me :
that had to be something BIG;
in a worldly sense. And the
bigger the better, right?
Fast forward to my birthday.
this week. I'm at the age where
my mother started saying as
we celebrated hers each year,
"I'm 29 winters and a few sum-
mers!" I'll just leave it at that..
So anyway, as I reflect on
my own years on the planet,
how is that plan for "signifi-
cance" going for me? Judging.
by the cover of Time maga-
zine this week, not well. The
cover blares: 'The World's T
Most Influential People." Time
featured Rep. Paul Ryan, R-
Wis., Facebook founder Mark,
Zuckerberg, Oprah Winfrey
(of course), Pixar creator John
Lasseter and so on. Many on'
the list are younger than I anr..
It's dial-a-letdown material,
for sure. Of course, politicians,
actresses, philanthropists and-:
inventors are changing the
world, or at least brightening :
it a bit It's a fair story for the -:
magazine.
But what about the rest of
us?
Today it seems that if high-
school kids aren't digging wells
in sub-Saharan Africa or finding
a cure for cancer, good colleges
aren't interested in them. And ,
after college? We'll typically tell,
these same young people to
find work they love and to pur-.
sue their passions. A couple of
generations ago, the focus wasg
on getting a good job you could
keep your whole life so you
could care for your family.
How times have changed.
I do happen to have at
least one child whom I think
might well change the world.
However, I don't know yet
whether it's for good or bad.
But still, what I want to teach
my children is something
that's taken me many winters
and a few summers to learn
myself: that "the world's most,
influential people" aren't
always the most well-known or
the ones whose contributions
are the most obvious on some
grand scale.
They're often simply people
of integrity. The folks who are
faithful in their relationships
and their work. Who quietly
put others ahead of themselves.
Who stay in a marriage going
through a tough time or stick
with a church even if the
new pastor isn't as exciting
as the one down the street,
just because someone else is '
depending on them. The people
who aren't so worried about
their egos. The folks who don't
ask first, "Am I happy?," but
rather, "Am I doing the right -
thing here?" Such people are -
often more significant and influ-
ential than they know.
I've mentioned this well-
known story before: Three
men are found smashing boul-'
ders with iron hammers. When
asked what they are doing, the
first man says, "Breaking big
rocks into little rocks." The
second says, "Feeding my fam-
ily." The third says, "Building a
cathedral."
Betsy Hart hosts the "It Takes a
Parent" radio show on WYLL-AM-
1160 in Chicago.


OTHER OPINION


Insurance nightmare:


Don't eliminate Citizens


I-----i









LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL FRIDAY, APRIL 29, 2011


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


* To submit your Community
Calendar item, contact Antonia
Robinson at 754-0425 or by
e-mail at arobinson@
lakecityreporter.com.


Today
River Jam
Suwannee River Jam is
April 29 30 at the Spirit
of Suwannee Music Park.
Performances include
Ronnie Dunn, Kellie
Pickler and more. Tickets
are'available at S&S Food
Stores. Contact the park at
386-364-1683. Order online
at SuwanneeRiverJam. com.

Choir anniversary
The Choirs' Anniversary
celebration is 7 p.m. today
at St. Paul Missionary
Baptist Church. Adult and
youth choirs as well as
praise dance teams will
participate. The church is
located at 222 Oosterhoudt
Lane,

Tree giveaway
The National Arbor
Day Tree Giveaway is 10
a.m. today at Memorial
Stadium. Two trees per
person will be available.
Everyone must show
identification proving they
live in Columbia County.
Offered trees will include
live oak, dahoon holly,
American Elm, sweet gum,
southern magnolia, red
maple, tulip popular and
dogwood. Seedlings will
also be available.

HSCT play
"Moments of Weakness"
runs weekends through
May 8 at the High Springs
Community Theater.
Tickets available at The
Framery, 341 S. Marion
St, corner of Knox or pur-
chase online at highspring-
scommunitytheatercom.

Saturday
Take-Back Day
SNational Take-Back Day
is 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Saturday
at the Park-n-Ride lot at
the intersection of U.S.
90 West and Commerce
Blvd (across from Arby's).
This event will provide
an opportunity for local
residents to surrender
expired, unwanted or
unused pharmaceutical
controlled substances and
other medications. The
collection site is hosted
by the Columbia County
Sheriff's Office.

Freedom Fund Luncheon
NAACP 29th Annual
Freedom Fund Luncheon
is noon Saturday at
Winfield Recreation
Center. The theme is
"NAACP: Affirming
America's Promise."
Tickets are $35 and must
be purchased in advance.
Call 752-4070.
Fill The Banks Day
Donations of clothing,
money, food and blood will
be collected for Christian
Service Center, Suwannee
Valley Food Bank,
LifeSouth Blood Bank and
other area charities and
non-profits 9 a.m.-5 p.m.
Saturday.

Fill The Banks Day
Donations of clothing,
money, food and blood will
be collected for Christian
Service Center, Suwannee
Valley Food Bank,
LifeSouth Blood Bank and
other area charities and
non-profits 9 a.m.-5 p.m.
Saturday.

Cemetery association
meeting
The Mt. Tabor
Cemetary Association is
having its annual busi-
ness meeting at 10 a.m.
Saturday at Bethlehem
Lutheran Church.


Cookbooks will be sold for
$20 as a fundraiser. The
money is put toward the
cemetery fund. Contact
752-1219. The church is
on Emma Burns Lane
off of US 441 South near
Ellisville.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter

Gainesville bound
Columbia High School seniors perform the Gator Chomp after signing to the University of.
Florida Tuesday morning at the CHS Academic Signing 2011 celebration. At least 30 students
signing to 13 different schools participated in the event.


Show and sale
Arts and crafts show
and sale is 8 a.m.-5 p.m.
Saturday at the Fort White
Depot on Hwy. 27. Items
will include paintings,
jewelry, fused glass, soaps
and more. Call 965-6113.

Homestading Expo
Sustainable
Homesteading Expo is
10 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday
at Magnolia Farms. Calls
include soap making,
home dairying, goat herd
dairy production and
more. Visit www.magno-
liafarms.org for complete
class details. Call 364-6450.

Sunday
Family Reunion
Descendants of William
Joseph & Harriet Green
Owens are having their
annual family reunion
Sunday at the Mason City
Community Center, US
41 South of Lake City. A
covered dish lunch will be
shared at 1 p.m. All friends
and relatives are invited to
attend. Call Danny Owens
at 752-8497.

Monday
Zumbathon Charity
event
A Tough Enough to
Wear Pink Zumbathon
Charity event is 6-7:30
p.m. Monday at the
Columbia County
Fairgrounds Banquet Hall.
A $10 donation will benefit
the organization's breast
cancer awareness and cri-
sis fund. Wear pink. Call
758-0009.

Donors Wanted
LifeSouth Bloodmobile
needs donors 9 a.m.-5 p.m
Monday at the Columbia
County Courthouse. All
donors receive a LifeSouth


Call today to place a
surprise ad for your
child, grandchild,
God child or anyone
you think deserves
something extra on
their special day!


ball cap.

Tuesday
Community Garden
Meeting
A community garden
meeting is 6 p.m. Tuesday
at Richardson Community
Center. Anyone interested
in gardening is invited.
Contact Elishia Parker at
754-7095.

Wednesday
Newcomers and Friends
Luncheon
The May Friendship
Luncheon of the Lake City
Newcomers and Friends
is-ll:30 a.m. Wednesday
at Kazbor's in the Publix's
shopping plaza. All mem-
bers, guests and friends
are welcome. Call 438-8100
or 754-7227.

Donors Wanted
LifeSouth Bloodmobile
needs donors 10 a.m.-5
p.m. Wednesday at the
Department of Children
& Families. All donors
receive a LifeSouth ball
cap.

Friday, May 6
Spring Concert
The Richardson Middle
School annual Spring
Concert is 6:30 p.m. May
6 in the RMS auditorium.
Under the direction of
Sherod Keen, the fol-
lowing bands will per-
form; Beginning Band,
Symphonic Band, Jazz
Band and Drumline, this
will be the final concert of
the school year.

Relay For Life
Relay for Life begins at
6 p.m. May 6 and contin-
ues May 7 at Columbia
High Tiger Field. More
than 40 team sites will


Call

755.5440 or

755.5441
between 8am & 4pm

SODeadline:
Ads have to be placed by 4pm, 3-days prior
to appearance in the Lake City Reporter.


have food, games and
more to benefit the
American Cancer Society.
There will be continuous
entertainment except dur-
ing the silent inspiring
Luminary Ceremony hon-
oring cancer victims. Call
288-2871 or 7524198.

Saturday, May 7
Lulu Homecoming Day
The 32nd Annual Lulu
Homecoming Day is 10:30
a.m. May 7 at the Lulu
Community Center. Lunch
is at 12:30 p.m: Bring a
bikest lunch for everyone
in your party. Bring lawn
charis and come enjoy a
day for food, games, music
and more.

Wild Florida event
Wild Florida is 10 a.m.
-3 p.m. May 7 in the
Craft Square at Stephen
Foster State Park in White
Springs. Nature and wild-
life experts from around
the state will talk about
the flora, the fauna and the
wild animals that make
Florida a unique place to
live. Call 397-1920 or visit
www.floridastateparks. org/
stephenfoster

Steer Competition
The beginning Steer
weigh-in is 8-10 am. May
7 at the Columbia County
Fair.

Annual ChariTEA
The Fourth Annual
ChariTEA is noon May 7
at the Woman's Club of
Lake City. Doors open at
11:30 a.m. The event will


feature a silent auction and
is a fundraiser for Another
Way Inc. Call 719-2700 for
ticket information.

Living History demo
A Civil War Living
History Demonstration
is 9 a.m.-4 p.m. May 7
at Stephen Foster Folk
Culture Center State
Park in White Springs.
Admission to the park is'
$5 per vehicle (up to eight
people). Additional fees
may apply for workshops
offered in the craft square.
Call the park at 397-4331.

Fundraising dinner
The Tough Enough to
Wear Pink fundraising
dinner is 6 p.m. May 7
at the Columbia County
Fairgrounds Banquet Hall.
The event will include din-
ner, casino style gambling,
live and silent auctions
and more. Tickets are $25
per person and available at
Wilson's, The Money Man,
Chasteens, Smitty's and
the fair office. The event
raises money for breast
cancer awareness and the
Columbia County Crisis
Fund. Call 752-8822.

Coffee House
The Stephen.Foster
Coffee House, hosted by
Cathy DeWitt, is 7 p.m.
May 7 in the Stephen
Foster Folk Culture Center
State Park auditorium. The
Coffee House event invites
folks on-stage for 10 min-
utes to sing, play a musical
instrument, read some
original poetry or tell a
story. The event offers pot-
luck goodies and sweets
provided by volunteers,
which are sold at Coffee
House, help to keep this
event going. Anything on
the dessert table sells for
$1. Contact Park Ranger
Larry Hoover at 397-2733
or for more information
visit www.floridastateparks.
org/stephenfoster.

Sunday, May 8
Mother's Day Luncheon
A Mother's Day
Luncheon, "Her Special
Day, Her Cherished
Moments" is 1-3 p.m.
May 8 at the LifeStyle
Enrichment Center.
Tickets must be bought
in advance. The event will
feature music by Harry
Wuest & Company, dedica-
tion of Margaret's Garden
and butterfly release after
lunch. The meal is $25
fir adults and includes
choice of entree, prime
rib or chicken cordon blu.
Children menu for ages


10 and Under is chicken
strips, mashed potatoes
and green beans. Call 984-
9382 or 752-5655.

Monday, May 9
Donors Wanted
LifeSouth Bloodmobile
needs donors 11 a.m.-6
p.m. May 9 at Moe's
Southwest Grill. All donors
receive a LifeSouth ball
cap and $5 in Moe Bucks.

Women's meeting
Sheriff Mark Hunter
is the guest speaker at
the Columbia Federated
Republican Women's
meeting at 7 p.m. May 9.
A brown bag dinner and
social time is at 6:30 p.m.
The group meets at the
old Guardian ad Litem
yellow house on Duval
Street just east of the First
Baptist Church and across
from Advanced Auto.
Contact President Gayle
Cannon, 303-2616, gcan-
non@atlantic.net.

Florida Trail Association
The Suwannee Chapter
of the Florida Trail
Association is meeting
from 7-9 p.m. May 9 at
the Suwannee River Water
Management District
Office, 9225 CR 49, Live
Oak. The program will fea-
ture Megan Wetherington,
senior professional engi-
neer with the Suwannee
River Water Management
District Contact Sylvia
Dunnam, 362-3256, dun-
nams@windstream. net.

Tuesday, May 10
Mentoring program
Calling all middle and
high school girls for
Welcome to Womanhood
mentoring program 5-8
p.m. May 10 at 532 Marion
St Contact Sandra Price at
867-1601. Dinner included.
Transportation can be
provided if contacted one
week in advance.

Wednesday, May
11
Newcomers Meeting
The regular meeting of
the Lake City Newcomers
and Friends is 11 a.m. May
11 at Guangdong Chinese
Restaurant in the Mall.
Luncheon cost is $10. The
guest speaker is Theresa
Morgan-attorney on legacy
planning. All members,
guests and friends along
with any newcomers to
the area are welcome. Call
752-4552 or 7554051.


see what


sunday

has i store

America by the Numbers
Take a look at surprising stats and fun facts from
our 50 States in a special feature called America
by the Numbers.

My Dad, Cary Grant
In an exclusive excerpt from her book "Good
Stuff", Jennifer Grant shares a scrapbook of
things that made growing up with her dad,.
Cary Grant, so special.

Stay Healthy
Find out the answers to your health questions.
Plus, check out health by the numbers and the
smart move of the week.
Intelligence Report: Fighting for Freedom
It's the 50-year-anniversary of the Freedom Rides. Survivors share their stories
of the rides, which began in 1961 as busloads of volunteers headed South to
fight for the end of segregation. 6

Views: 2 Eggs, OVR EZ, HLD BCN
At some restaurants, texting your order to your waiter is now the new way.
Pulitzer Prize-winning writer Connie Schultz shares how this quick alternative
can rob us of special memories and time-honored conversation.


:Je CiMay Rep1, 2011 D d www.para
Lake City Reporter www.parade.com


Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424










LAKE CITY REPORTER NATION & STATE FRIDAY, APRIL 29, 2011


ASSOCIATED PRESS
This is an aerial view of damage to downtown Cullman, Ala. Thursday. Dozens of tornadoes
ripped through the South, flattening homes and businesses and killing at least 248 people in
six states in the deadliest outbreak in nearly 40 years.


Tornadoes devastate South


GREG BLUESTEIN and
HOLBROOK MOHR
Associated Press

PLEASANT GROVE,
Ala. Firefighters
searched one splintered
pile after another for sur-
vivors Thursday, combing
the remains of houses and
neighborhoods pulverized
by the nation's 'deadliest
tornado outbreak in almost
four decades. At least 280
people were killed across
six states more than two-
thirds of them in Alabama,
where large cities bore the
half-mile-wide scars the
twisters left behind.
The death toll from
Wednesday's storms
seems out of a bygone era,
before Doppler radar and
pinpoint satellite forecasts
were around to warn com-
munities of severe weather.
Residents were told the
tornadoes were coming
up to 24 minutes ahead of
time, but they were just
too wide, too powerful and
too locked onto populated
areas to avoid a horrifying
body count
"These were the most
intense. super-cell thunder-
storms that I think anybody
who was out there forecast-
ing has ever seen," said
meteorologist Greg Carbin
at the National Weather
Service's Storm Prediction
Center in Norman, Okla.
"If you experienced
a direct hit from one of
these, you'd have to be in
a reinforced room, storm
shelter or underground" to
survive, Carbin said.
The storms seemed to
hug the interstate high-
ways as they barreled
along like runaway trucks,
obliterating neighborhoods
or even entire towns from
Tuscaloosa to Bristol, Va.
One family rode out the
disaster in the basement of
a funeral home, another by
huddling in a tanning bed.
In Concord, a small town
outside Birmingham that
was ravaged by a tornfa-
do, Randy Guyton's fam-
ily got a phone call frotn
a friend warning them to
take cover. They rushed to
the basement garage, piled
into a Honda Ridgeline and
listened to the roar as the
twister devoured the house
in seconds. Afterward, they
saw daylight through the
shards of their home and
scrambled out.
"The whole house caved
in on top of that car," he
said. "Other than my boy
screaniing to the Lord to
save us, being in that car is
what saved us."
Son Justin remembers
the dingy white cloud mov-
ing quickly toward the
house.
'To me it 'sounded like
destruction," the 22-year-
old said. "It was a mean,
mean roar. It was awful."
At lezst tl*ee people
died in a Pleasant Grove
subdivision southwest
of Birmingham, where
residents trickled back
Thursday to survey the
damage. Greg Harrison's
neighborhood was some-
how unscathed, but he
remains haunted by the
wind, thunder and lightning
as they built to a crescendo,


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Firefighters search the rubble of a home in the Alberta City
section of Tuscaloosa, Ala. on Thursday.


then suddenly stopped.
"Sick is what I feel," he
said. 'This is what you see
in Oklahoma and Kansas.
Not here. Not in the
South."
Alabama Gov. Robert
Bentley said his state had
confirmed 194 deaths.
There were 33 deaths
in Mississippi, 33 in
Tennessee, 14 in Georgia,
five in Virginia and one in
Kentucky. Hundreds if not
thousands of people were
injured 600 in Tuscaloosa
alone.
Some of the worst dam-
age was about 50 miles
southwest of Pleasant
Grove in Tuscaloosa, a city
of more than 83,000 that is
home to the University of
Alabama. A tower-mounted
news camera there cap-
tured images of an aston-
ishingly thick, powerful
tornado flinging debris as
it leveled neighborhoods.
That twister and others
Wednesday were several
times more severe than a
typical tornado, which is
hundreds of yards wide,
has winds around 100 mph
and stays on the ground for
a few miles, said research
meteorologist Harold
Brooks at the Storm
Prediction Center.
'There's a pretty good
chance some of these were
a mile wide, on the ground
for tens of miles and had
wind speeds over 200 mph,"
he said.
The loss of life is the
greatest from an outbreak
of U.S. tornadoes since
April 1974, when 329 people
were killed by a storm that
swept across 13 Southern
and Midwestern states.
Brooks said the torna-
do that struck Tuscaloosa
could be an EF5 the
strongest category of tor-
nado, with winds of more
than 200 mph and was
at least the second-highest
category, an EF4.
Search and rescue teams
fanned out to dig through
the rubble of devastated
communities that bore
eerie similarities to the
Gulf Coast after Hurricane
Katrina in 2005, when town
after town lay flattened for
nearly 90 miles.


President Barack Obama
said he would travel to
Alabama on Friday to view
storm damage and meet
Gov. Robert Bentley and
affected families. As many
as a million homes and
businesses there were
without power, and Bentley
said 2,000 National Guard
troops had been activated
to help. The governors of
Mississippi and Georgia
also issued emergency
declarations for parts of
their states.
"We can't control when
or where a terrible storm
may strike, but we can
control how we respond
to it," Obama said. "And I
want every American who
has been affected by this
disaster to know that the
federal government will
do everything we can to
help you recover and we
will stand with you as you
rebuild."
The storm prediction
center said it received 164
tornado reports around
the region, but some tor-
nadoes were probably
reported multiple times
and it could take days to
get a final count.
In fact, Brooks said
50 to 60 reports from
the Mississippi-Alabama
line, through Tuscaloosa
and Birmingham and into
Georgia and southwestern
Tennessee might end
up being a single tornado.
If that's true its path would
be one of the longest on
record for a twister, rival-
ing a 1925 tornado that
raged for 219 miles.
Brooks said the weather
service was able to provide
about 24 minutes' notice
before the twisters hit.
"It was a well-forecast-
ed event," Brooks said.
"People were talking about
this week being a big week
a week ago."
Gov. Bentley said fore-
casters did a good job
alerting people, but there's
only so much they can do
to help people prepare.
Carbin, the meteorolo-
gist, noted that the warn-
ing gave residents enough
time to hunker down, but
not enough for them to
safely leave the area.


LAUNCH: Lift off scheduled for today


Continued From Page L1

from some of the Apollo
moon launches in the
1960s and 1970s.
Endeavour's launch may
be one of the last econom-
ic jolts the region gets as
the space shuttle program
winds down this summer.
Economic prospects for the
area are precarious. The
Space Cohst is still reel-
ing from Florida's housing
slump, NASA contractors
already have laid-off thou-
sands of workers and the
unemployment rate is over
11 percent Empty store-
fronts dot some shopping
malls and vacant condos are
common along the beach.
Shuttle launches usually
generate about $5 million
in economic activity for
the Space Coast Given the
huge crowds expected, the
Endeavour launch could
generate more than $15
million, Varley said.
By Thursday morning,
spectators had started set-
ting up tents and camp-
ers along the Indian River
in Titusville, a spot that
offers an unobstructed
view of the launch pad.


Among them was Clint
Kelly who had driven with
his mother the previous
night from Springdale,
Ark. He pitched an orange
tent in the bed of his pick-
up truck which was now
parked between two camp-
ers on the Indian River.
He paid $20 a night for the
spot along the river which
was roped off from other
motorists with orange
tape.
"It's kind of like a big
barbecue," said Kelly, 31, a
public school maintenance
worker. "Everybody is real
friendly because we're all
here for the same thing."
Hotel reservations
are almost impossible to
get, so some homeown-
ers and apartment build-
ing managers are renting
out spare bedrooms and
empty units.
Tony Simons placed an
ad on Craigslist hoping
to rent two empty units
at the Seacoast Arms
Apartments in Titusville,
about a mile from one of
the most popular places to
view shuttle launches on


the Indian River. "Come
be a part of that history!!!"
the ad said.
He got one rented for
the launch but was still
looking Wednesday for
tourists willing to spend;
$300 a night on the two-
bedroom, one-bathrooni
apartment with a three-
night minimum, just like,
the hotels. The launch is
providing some extra cash
for Simons, the apart-
ment complex's manager;
especially as the reces-
sion forced him to lower
rents from $750 to $500 a
month.
"Heaven yes!" Simons
said when asked if he was
expecting a small econom-
ic pop from the launch,
Other businesses are too.:
The storage space at
Dixie Crossroads Seafood
Restaurant is jammed;
full with extra dry goods;
paper plates and nap4
kins. Owner Lauralee
Thompson expects busi-
ness to more than double
on Friday from the usual
1,500 daily diners to more
than 3,000.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Richard Hutto and and his wife Glenda, who arrived from South Carolina on Monday, sit
by their camper along the Indian River just east of the Max Brewer Bridge Wednesday in
Titusvsille for front row seats for today's shuttle launch. They have been coming to see all -
the shuttle launches since 1982 with exceptions of health reasons and the birth of grand-
children.


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Lake City Reporter





SPORTS


Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-042
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com


Friday,April 29, 2011


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


CHEAP SEATS


l


A
Tim Kirby
Phone:(386) 754-0421
tkirby@lakeatyreportercom


Tracking

a state

champ

Fort White's
A.J. Legree is
returning to
state in the
high jump and
is one of the favorites to
win the championship.
Legree is one of four
athletes to qualify for
state with a 6-foot-6
jump. Brandon Hollifield
of Godby High is the
top qualifier at 6-8, and
Legree got a look at him
in region competition.
Legree also
competed at region
against 6-6 jumpers
Garrett Scantling of
Episcopal and Traevis
Livingston of Godby.
The other 6-6 qualifier is
Jarvis Davis of Golden
Gate in Naples, who won
the Class 2A competition
last year at 6-8.
Three athletes
qualified at 6-4.
Sitia Martinez qualified
for state in the 300-meter
hurdles and the 100
meters.
Her best shot at state
is in the hurdles where
her 45.63 time was sixth
out of the 16 qualifiers.
Khadeeja Darling of
American Heritage in
Delray Beach is the.top
qualifier in 45.08.
Martinez is 15th in
the 100-meter field, but
experience was all she
could hope for this year.
Octavious Freeman
of Lake Wales is the
top qualifier in 11.41.
Freeman is a three-time
defending champion in
the event.
The FHSAA Finals in
track are at Showalter
Field in Winter Park and
the 2A competition is
Saturday.
Micheal Kirkman got
his promised call-up
from Texas after
starting the season with
the Rangers' Triple
A minor league club,
Round Rock Express. He
was moved up on April
15 after Colby Lewis
went on paternity leave.
Kirkman played on
April 19 against the
Angels and was
ineffective. He pitched 12
innings with six hits (one
home run), six runs (five
earned), one walk, a wild
pitch and one strikeout.
He was back at Round
Rock the next day.
Kirkman has struggled
in three minor league
starts. He is 0-2 with
an 11.57 ERA. In 112/
innings, he has walked
three and struck out 10.
In the topsy-turvy
5-3A softball district,
where top seed Santa
Fe and No. 2 Fort White
were eliminated in the
semifinals, Williston won
district and Suwannee
was runner-up.
Both lost 5-4 in the
opener of the playoffs.
Trinity Catholic beat
Suwannee and Crystal
River beat Williston.


* Tim Kirby covers sports
for the Lake City Reporter.


Lady Tigers


look to charm


Ed White for


third time


Columbia hosts
5A state playoff
game at 7 p.m.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com
Its hard to beat any team
threp times. Columbia High
will have that task before its
Lady Tigers' softball team
tonight at 7 p.m. as it hosts
Ed White High.
The two competitors
last met in the District
4-5A championship where
the Lady Tigers won 7-1
on Apr. 21. Jessica Keene
held Ed White to three
hits and struck out six dur-


Pop


ing the contest. The Lady
Commanders' only run was
unearned.
Columbia also defeated
Ed White, 7-4, in the regu-
lar season.
Despite scoring seven
runs in each of its contest
against Ed White, coach
Jimmy Williams feels that
pitcher Amanda Andrews
is one of the best the Lady
Tigers have faced this sea-
son.
"She's as good as we've
seen," he said. "She beat
us back in 09' in regionals.
She's got three good pitch-
es and we have to be more
CHS continued on 3B


War


Little


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High's Jordan Williams (left) and Stephanie Pilkington smile after making a play
against Chiles High in the Lady Tigers' 9-2 win in the first round of the 5A playoffs on
Tuesday.


'ner honors





Scholars


TIM KIRBY/Lake City Reporter
Lake City Pop Warner football players named Pop Warner All-American Scholars are Ethan Goodrich (from left), Ronnie Collins, Aaron Barber and
Kaleb Thomas.

Each player had at least 96 percent GPA


By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter. com
In addition to football and
cheerleading, Pop Warner
celebrates academics
through Pop Warner Little
Scholars.
Lake City players Aaron
Barber, Ronnie Collins,
Henry Godbolt, Ethan
Goodrich and Kaleb
Thomas were recently
named as Pop Warner All-
American Scholars.
The Little Scholars pro-
gram requires a 96 percent
grade point average to apply
for All-American status.
Pop Warner determines
National First Team All-
Americans, which consists
of 35 football players and
35 cheerleaders per grade
(fifth grade and higher).
Lake City's players were
National Second Team
All-Americans, made up
of the next 65 percent of


applicants. There also
are National Honorable
Mention Scholars.
After the GPA qualifica-
tion is met, the All-American
designation is determined
on non-sport related extra-
curricular activities such as
clubs, church activities and
volunteer work.
Pop Warner All-
Americans are 2 percent of
the 410,000 national football
and spirit participants.
The All-Americans are
invited to attend the 2011
All-American National
Banquet, which is in
Chicago.
Lake City Pop Warner is
in its third year and has
expanded to four teams.
The program is spon-
sored by the Richardson
Community Center/Annie
Mattox North Advisory
Council. There are games in
nine cities in North Central
Florida.


Goodrich, 11, achieved
All-American status for the
second year. He played
right guard for the Pee
Wee team. A sixth-grader at
Richardson Middle School,
Goodrich is in the SAIL pro-
gram and
band. He
completed
a science
project
and his
social stud-
ies proj-
ect is on Godbolt
dragons
and the
Chinese culture.
"I like going out there and
playing football," Goodrich
said. "I like Pop Warner
better than city football
because you get to travel
around and play games."
Barber, 13, is a seventh-
grader at Lake City Middle
School, and a defensive
back for the Pee Wees. He


plays baseball and made
county in the science fair.
He participates in rodeos.
"I wish I would have
played last year," Barber
said. "And I wish I could do
it again."
Collins, 12, also is in the
sixth grade at Richardson.
He played fullback and line-
backer for the Pee Wees
and also plays basketball.
Collins is in the SAIL pro-
gram and his social studies
project is on the Leaning
Tower of Pisa.
"It was great," Collins
said. "It was a lot of fun
traveling. I got to see more
stuff than I had ever seen
before."
Thomas, 13, is a sev-
enth-grader at LCMS. He
played fullback and defen-
sive end for the Pee Wees.
Thomas played baseball for
the Falcons and is going
out for the football team.
He is vice-president of the


seventh grade and likes to
hunt and fish.
"It was fun," Thomas said.
"You get to see kids you
don't know and hit them.
When they get mad, they
can't come to school the
next day and get you."
Godbolt, 11, is a sixth-
grader at Richardson where
he is in the SAIL program.
He is a past spelling bee
winner at Melrose Park
Elementary and has perfect
attendance for five years.
His social studies project is
on Sherpas. Godbolt played
middle linebacker, fullback
and quarterback for the Jr.
Pee Wees. *
"I liked traveling around
North Florida," Godbolt
said. "I like playing with
people I don't know and
people I used to play with
in the city league. I like
to learn teamwork with
people I used to play
against."


- ---17 -IF -- - -











LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS FRIDAY, APRIL 29, 2011


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TV sports
Today
AUTO RACING
10:30 a.m.
SPEED NASCAR, Nationwide
Series, final practice for Bubba Burger
250, at Richmond,Va.
Noon
SPEED NASCAR, Sprint Cup,
practice for Matthew and Daniel Hansen
400, at Richmond,Va.
2:30 p.m.
SPEED NASCAR, Sprint Cup,
"Happy Hour Series:' final practice for
Matthew and Daniel Hansen 400, at
Richmond,Va.
4 p.m.
SPEED NASCAR, Nationwide
Series, pole qualifying for Bubba Burger
250, at Richmond,Va.
5:30 p.m.
SPEED NASCAR, Sprint Cup, pole
qualifying for Matthew and Daniel Hansen
400, at Richmond,Va.
7:30 p.m.
SPEED NASCAR, Nationwide
Series, Bubba Burger 250, at Richmond,
Va.
CYCLING
II p.m.
VERSUS Tour de Romandie, stage
3, Thierrens to Neuchatel, Switzerland
(same-day tape)
GOLF
9 a.m.
TGC European PGA Tour,
Ballantine's Championship, second round,
at Seoul, South Korea (same-day tape)
12:30 p.m.
TGC LPGA,Avnet Classic, second
round, at Mobile,Ala.
3 p.m.
TGC PGA Tour, Zurich Classic,
second round, at Avondale, La.
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
7:30 p.m.
MLB St. Louis at Atlanta
NBA BASKETBALL
9 p.m.
ESPN Playoffs, first round, game 6,
San Antonio at Memphis
NFL FOOTBALL
6 p.m.
ESPN, NFL Draft, rounds 2-3, at
NewYork
8 p.m.
ESPN2 Draft, rounds 2-3, at New
York
NHL HOCKEY
7 p.m.
VERSUS Playoffs, conference semi-
finals, game I,Tampa Bay atWashington
10 p.m.
VERSUS Playoffs, conference semi-
finals, game I, Detroit at San Jose

BASEBALL

AL standings


East Division
W L
13 8
12 .11
11I 13
10 12
10 13
Central Division
W L
15 8
ty 12 12
12 13
9 13


Chicago 10 15 .400 6
West Division
W, L Pet GB
Texas 15 9 .625 -
LosAngeles 14 II .560 I'h
Oakland 12 13 .480 3'A
Seattle II 15 .423 5
Thursday's Games
Seattle 7, Detroit 2
Tampa Bay 15, Minnesota 3, Ist game
Toronto 5,Texas 2
Boston at Baltimore (n)
Chicago White Sox at N.Y.Yankees (n)
Kansas City at Cleveland (n)
Tampa Bay at Minnesota, 2nd game (n)
Today's Games
Detroit (Scherzer 4-0) at Cleveland
O.Gomez 0- 1), 7:05 p.m.
Toronto (R.Romero 1-3) at N.Y.
Yankees (F.Garcia 1-0), 7:05 p.m.
LA. Angels (E.Santana 0-3) at Tampa
Bay (Price 3-2), 7:10 p.m.
Seattle (Vargas 0-2) at Boston
(Matsuzaka 2-2), 7:10 p.m.
Baltimore (Arrieta 2-1) at Chicago
White Sox (Danks 0-3), 8:10 p.m. .
Minnesota (S.Baker 1-2) at Kansas
City (Chen 3-1), 8:10 p.m.
Texas (C.Wilson 3-0) at Oakland
(Cahill 3-0), 10:05 p.m.
Saturday's Games
L.A.Angels atTampa Bay, 1:10 p.m.
Texas at Oakland, 4:05 p.m.
Toronto at N.Y.Yankees, 4:05 p.m.
Detroit at Cleveland, 6:05 p.m.
Baltimore at Chicago White Sox,
7:10 p.m.
Minnesota at Kansas City, 7:10 p.m.
Seattle at Boston, 7:10 p.m.

NL standings
East Division
W L Pct GB
Philadelphia 16 8 .667 -
Florida 15 8 .652 '
Atlanta 13 13 .500 4
NewYork II 13 .458 5
Washington 10 13 .435 5'
Central Division
W L Pet GB
St. Louis 13 I1' .542 -
Cincinnati 13 12 .520 'A
Milwaukee 12 12 .500. I
Pittsburgh II 14 .440 2'A
Chicago 10 13 .435 2'
Houston 9 15 .375 4
West Division
W L Pct GB
Colorado 16 7 .696 -
Los Angeles 13 13 .500 4'A
San Francisco 12 12 .500 4'k
Arizona 10 13 .435 6
San Diego 9 16 .360 8
Thursday's Games
San.Francisco 5, Pittsburgh 2
N.Y. Mets atWashington (n)
St. Louis at Houston (n)
Chicago Cubs at Arizona (n)
Today's Games
N.Y. Mets (Pelfrey 1-2) at Philadelphia
(Blanton 0-I), 7:05 p.m.
San Francisco (Lincecum 2-2) at
Washington (Marquis 2-0), 7:05 p.m.
Florida (Vazquez 1-2) at Cincinnati
(T.Wood 1-2), 7:10 p.m.
St. Louis (Carpenter 0-2) at Atlanta
(T.Hudson 3-2), 7:35 p.m.
Milwaukee (Marcum 2-1) at Houston
(Myers 1-0), 8:05 p.m.
Pittsburgh (Correia 3-2) at Colorado
(Hammel 2-1),8:40 p.m.
Chicago Cubs (Zambrano 2-1) at
Arizona (Galarraga 3-1), 9:40 p.m.
San Diego (Richard 1-1) at L.A.
Dodgers (Lilly 1-2), 10:10 p.m.
Saturday's Games
N.Y. Mets at Philadelphia, 1:10 p.m.


St. Louis atAtlanta, 1:10 p.m.
San Francisco atWashington, 4:05 p.m.
Milwaukee at Houston, 7:05 p.m.
Florida at Cincinnati, 7:10 p.m.
Chicago Cubs at Arizona, 8:10 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Colorado, 8:10 p.m.
San Diego at LA. Dodgers, 10:10 p.m.

BASKETBALL

NBA playoffs
FIRST ROUND
Wednesday
Miami 97, Philadelphia 91, Miami wins
series 4-1
San Antonio 110, Memphis 103, OT,
Memphis lads series 3-2
; Oklahoma City 100, Denver 97,
Oklahoma City wins series 4-1
Thursday
Orlando at Atlanta (n)
LA. Lakers at New Orleans (n)
Dallas at Portland (n)
Today
San Antonio at Memphis, 9 p.m.

AUTO RACING

Race week
NASCAR
SPRINT CUP
Matthew and Daniel Hansen 400
Site: Richmond,Va.
Schedule:Today, practice (Speed, noon-
3:30 p.m.), qualifying (Speed, 5:30-7 p.m.);
Saturday, race, 7:30 p.m. (FOX, 7- 1 p.m.).
Track: Richmond International
Raceway (oval, 0.75 miles).
Race distance: 300 miles, 400 laps.
NATIONWIDE
Bubba Burger 250
Site: Richmond,Va.
Schedule: Today, practice (Speed,
10:30 a.m.-noon), qualifying (Speed,
4-5:30 p.m.); race, 7:30 p.m. (Speed,
7-10:30 p.m.).
Track: Richmond International.
Race distance: 187.5 miles, 250 laps.
INDYCAR
Sao Paulo Indy 300
Site: Sao Paulo.
Schedule: Saturday, practice, qualifying
(Versus, 6-7 p.m.); Sunday, race, 12:20 p.m.
(Versus, noon-4 p.m.).
Track: Streets of Sao Paulo (street
course, 2.6 miles).
Race distance: 195 miles, 75 laps.
NHRA FULLTHROTTLE
O'Reilly Auto Parts
NHRA Spring Nationals
Site: Baytown,Texas.
Schedule: Today, qualifying; Saturday,
qualifying (ESPN2, 6-8 p.m.); Sunday, final
eliminations (ESPN2, 7-10 p.m.).
Track: Royal Purple Raceway.

HOCKEY

NHL playoffs
FIRST ROUND
Wednesday
Boston 4, Montreal 3, OT, Boston win
series 4-3
Tampa Bay I, Pittsburgh 0,Tampa Bay
wins series 4-3
CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS
(Best-of-7)
Thursday
Nashville atVancouver (n)
Today
Tampa Bay atWashington, 7 p.m.
Detroit at San Jose, 10 p.m.


BRIEFS


GOLF
'The Edge' event
set for Saturday
Rountree-Moore
Automotive Group
Presents "The Edge" golf
tournament is at Quail
Heights Country Club on
Saturday. The annual
tournament, hosted by
Shayne Edge, serves as
a fundraiser for school
and recreational sports,
and other organizations.
Cost is $100 per player for
the four-person scramble
event.
Registration is at Quail
Heights (752-3339) and
Brian's Sports (755-0570).

SEMI-PRO FOOTBALL
Falcons to honor
veterans Saturday
The Lake City Falcons
semi-pro football team will
honor veterans and show
support for the troops at
their home game Saturday.
Fans are encouraged to
wear, yellow for the
festivities that begin at
5 p.m. The Falcons will
play the Savannah Venom
at 7 p.m. Admission:
adult-$7 ($5 with yellow
shirt); seniors-$5 ($3 with
yellow shirt); children 8
and younger and military
with ID-free.
For details qn honoring
a veteran, call Elaine at
(386) 292-3039.

DANCE
Zumbathon set
for Monday
Tough Enough to Wear
Pink has a Zumbathon


Charity Event planned
for 6-7:30 p.m. Monday
at the Columbia County
Fairgrounds' Banquet
Hall. Donation is $10. All
proceeds go to benefit the
cancer awareness and
crisis fund.
For details, call 758-0009.

INDIANS CHEERLEADING
Tryouts begin
Monday at gym
Fort White High
cheerleading tryouts for
varsity, junior varsity and
middle school squads are
3:30 p.m. Monday through
Wednesday in the high
school gym. Tryouts are
open to all fifth- through
11th-graders. Information
packets are available at the
front office.



Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
I ADIYS I


For details, call Kathy
Harrell, Stephanie Cruse
or Amber Bussey at
497-5952.

GATORS
Gator Club
meeting Tuesday
The North Florida Gator
Club will meet at 6 p.m.
Tuesday at Beef O' Brady's
on Main Boulevard. The
club is not limited to
Florida, graduates, but is
for all Gator fans. The club
sponsored 11 UF
scholarships in the
five-county area last year
and needs help to continue
the program.
For details, call Diane at
752-3333.

From staff reports

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek


TKAECJ MAPV HIM FEEL-
TKAECJW [


e

Ye


Sp -- Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon. 52

Answer: 55
(Answers tomorrow) 58
sterda Jumbles: WHEAT WHINY GOSSIP VACANT
SAnswer: The garbage man was this while putting in so
much overtime WASTING AWAY 4-29


Tough enough




for Zumbathon


By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com

Tough Enough to Wear
Pink is riding the Zumba
wave as part of its fundrais-
ing efforts.
With proceeds to ben-
efit its breast cancer aware-
ness and crisis fund, Tough
Enough to Wear Pink has a
Zumbathon Charity Event
planned for 6-7:30 p.m.
Monday at the Columbia
County Fairgrounds
Banquet Hall.


Zumbathon donation is
$10.
Sarah Sandlin is con-
ducting the Zumbathon
for Tough Enough to Wear
Pink. She is the Zumba
instructor for the Lake
City Parks and Recreation
Department.
Sandlin heads up four
classes during the week
at Teen Town Recreation
Center. Lake CityRecreation
Department athletic direc-
tor Heyward Christie said
there are about 60 partici-


pants in each class.
"Sarah had done an
event previously for anoth-
er organization and it was
very successful," Columbia
County Resources manag-
er Linda Dowling said. "We
have been challenging peo-
ple to come out on Monday.
Everybody is wearing pink.
Be sure to mention it is
inside the air-conditioned
banquet hall."
The Sixth Annual Tough
Enough to Wear Pink
Fundraising Dinner is May 7.


Celtics, Heat knew they


were on collision course


By TIM REYNOLDS
Associated Press

MIAMI Long
the playoffs began
before this season s
the Miami Heat and I
Celtics both suspect
same thing.
A postseason m
was inevitable.
Sure enough, they
absolutely correct.
"Its finally here,"
forward Paul Pierce,
Want drama?
Eastern Conference
final series will hav
bunches.
Miami's Big3vs. Bi
Big 3. Dwyane Wac
ting a chance to
Boston's season, aft
Celtics knocked the
out in 2010's opening
and sparked last sun
whirlwind of Miami
changes. LeBron'
trying to avoid being
nated by the Celtics
third time in four
Shaquille O'Neal po
ly derailing the title
of a Heat franchise t
helped carry to the
in 2006. Pierce, Ray
and Kevin Garnett p
girding up for one
championship run.
.'This is going to be
series," Celtics fo

ACROSS

1 Hot spring
4 Civil War prez
7 Amt.
10 Hairpiece
11 Pan's opposite
13 Unalloyed
14 Luau music
15 Squandered
16 Move freight
17 Not great
19 Small brook'
20 -Magnon
man
21 Done
23 Carnation color
26 They may be
counted
28 Promissory
note
29 Memo abbr.
30 Reeves of
"Speed"
34 Languor
36 Bro's sibling
38 Wine cask
39 Cornered
41 Leap in a tutu


Glen Davis said Thursday.
"I don't think no laughing
will be going on. ... It's
before going to be a fight"
,even The best-of-seven starts
tarted, Sunday in Miami.
Boston They danced around the
:ed the topic for days, neither the
Heat nor the Celtics want-
atchup ing to say they were hoping
to face off in the Eastern
y were Conference semifinals,
and certainly not saying it
Celtics before Miami finished off
said. its first-round series with
This the Philadelphia 76ers.
semi- No need for caution any-
e it in more. The matchup the
Heat, the Celtics and
oston's probably most of the NBA
de get- wanted is going to hap-
o end pen.
:er the "I think we always felt
e Heat it would happen at some
*round point," James said. "We
nmer's didn't know if it was going
roster to be first round, second
James round, Eastern Conference
elimi- finals. But we always felt
for the that at some point we
years, would have to go through
tential- Boston and play Boston to
hopes get where we want to get
hat he So it's here now."
crown Celtics coach Doc Rivers
Allen echoed those sentiments.
perhaps "We assumed, when they
more put this team together, at
some point that if we want-
e a real ed to put another banner
)rward up that we were probably

42 Halley's dis-
covery Answe
44 Self
46 About 2.2 M U L C
pounds AMPL
47 Encourages X A N A
52 Osiris' beloved
53 von S
Bismarck C B S
54 Small bark
55 Laird ALOE
56 Dance move R I N D
57 Just scrape by C N N
58 Distress signal
59 Lime cooler S|KY
60 Morning damp-
ness R

DOWN O R N


Done laps
Long spear
Like good
brandy
Leafy recess
Theater level
Constantly
Actor Dennis
Sincerely


going to have to go through
them," Rivers said.
Boston won three of the
four regular-season meet-
ings, though only one
wound up being decided by
double digits that being
Miami's 100-77 home win
over the Celtics on April
10. Two of the matchups
came, in the season's first
two weeks, wheh the Heat
were still in the earliest
processes of jelling.
So it seems fitting their
seasons started against one
another in Boston on Oct.
26, and in one case, will end
against the other.
"This is what we came
here for," said Heat forward
Chris Bosh, who'll make
his second-round debut in
this series. "We're still on
our journey. And we know
that we have a long way
to go. And the reward is a
battle with Boston. That's
going to be a long, long
series. We have to start the
process ... and just keep
our heads in it, start get-
tirg mentally prepared for
them."
For Wade, ousting
Philadelphia on Wednesday
and winning the first-round
series in five games was
particularly sweet
The last time he won a
playoff series was 2006.


r to Previous Puzzle


.. I I ..

LOCH PVC
S MHO RAH
ALB COLE
OIpfDlA VIE|R
ONO LOT
o i CDNIOvO
0 M M 1-I r P,:


9 Raise one's
voice
12 Jugs
13 Putkinowords
18 Ugh!
22 Cartoon shrieks


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com
12 13 4 15 16 7 18 19 I


2011 by UFS, Inc.


23 Bakery pur-
chase
24 Charged parti-
cle
25 Cloister
dweller
27 River to the
Seine
29 Dragon's
breath
31 Gladiator's
hello
32 "King" Cole
33 Sporty truck
35 Most extreme
37 Formed
thoughts
40 Cultural mores
41 Scribble down
42 Kid who rode
Diablo
43 Hodgepodges
45 Search blindly
46 Hug's com-
panion
48 Singer James
49 Checked out
50 Winged god-
dess
51 Erupt


New York
Tampa Bay
Toronto
Baltimore
Boston

Cleveland
Kansas Cit
Detroit
Minnesota


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420









LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS FRIDAY, APRIL 29, 2011


And with the first pick of the 2011 NFL Draft...


By BARRY WILNER
Associated Press

NEW YORK Auburn
quarterback Cam Newton
is the first pick of the 2011
NFL draft, going to the
Carolina Panthers.
The Heisman Trophy
winner' was projected as
the player most likely to be
called first and he was,
by Commissioner Roger
Goodell, who was repeat-
edly booed by fans at Radio
City Music Hall.
Goodell told them "I hear
you" as fans, reacting to
the current labor dispute,
chanted, "We want foot-
ball."
Newton led Auburn to an
undefeated season and it
first national championship
since 1957. Carolina was
2-14 last year, using four
quarterbacks, two of them
rookies.
"Man, it's a great feel-
ing to be up here," said
Newton, the third straight
quarterback taken first
overall. "It's a great
feeling to be a Carolina
Panther."
Texas A&M linebacker
Von Miller, who is suing
the league, was the second
pick, selected by Denver.
Miller, a plaintiff in the anti-
trust lawsuit players filed
to block the lockout, strode
across the stage with tears


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Auburn quarterback Cam Newton (right) holds up a jersey with NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell after he was selected as
the No. 1 overall pick by the Carolina Panthers in the first round of the NFL football draft at Radio City Music Hall Thursday in


New York.

in his eyes and hugged said, referring to winding
Goodell. up with the Broncos.
"I didn't have a clue about Buffalo selected Alabama
what would happen," Miller nose tackle Marcell Dareus,


who gave Goodell an even
bigger hug. Of course,
Dareus weighs 308 pounds,
about 70 more than Miller


- and at least 100 more
than Goodell.
Cincinnati, perhaps
calling the bluff of quar-


terback Carson Palmer,
who is demanding a trade,
instead took the top receiv-
er in this crop, AJ. Green of
Georgia.
Arizona, also in need of
a quarterback, selected the
top cornerback available,
Patrick Peterson of LSU.
The labor strife caused
speculation not many trades
would be made Thursday.
But just six picks in, Atlanta
cut a deal with Cleveland
and moved up from No. 27
to grab Alabama receiver
Julio Jones the fifth
Southeastern Conference
player in the first six.
The Falcons have made
a bold draft-day trade to
select the Alabama wide
receiver.
The Falcons acquired
the No. 6 overall pick from
Cleveland on Thursday
night for 'a package of
five draft picks, including
Atlanta's No. 27 overall pick
in the first round this year
and the team's first-round
pick in 2012.
The Browns also acquired
the Falcons' second- and
fourth-round picks this
year and fourth-round pick
in 2012.
The Falcons will pair the
physical Jones, with their
Pro Bowl receiver Roddy
White, giving quarterback
Matt Ryan another top
target.


NFL tells teams, players


it's OK to work again


By DAVE CAMPBELL
Associated Press

MINNEAPOLIS -
Finally, the NFL is getting
back to football.
Five days after a federal
judge declared the lock-
out was illegal and nearly
seven weeks after it began,
the NFL said players can
talk with coaches, work out
at team headquarters and
look at their playbooks.
The NFL said all of that
can begin Friday, when it
is also expected to release
-detailed guidelines for
free agency, trades and
other roster moves in the
absence of a collective bar-
gaining agreement.
"That's great news,"
said linebacker Joe Mays,
one of 10 Denver Broncos
players who showed up at
the team's headquarters
Thursday. "It's something
we've been trying to do,
get back to work."
It was a welcome step
forward on a day members
of the Tennessee Titans
showed up to find two
armed security guards at
their locked-up facility, no
sign of their new coach.
New players in particular
will benefit from the new
guidelines.
"These rookies, there's
a lot going on for them,"
New York Giants center
Shaun O'Hara said. "So
Sany info they can get, any
things they can study, is
good. If the lockout hap-
pens again, they'll have
plenty to study from their
teams."
That's certainly what the
NFL wants.
The league has asked
the 8th U.S. Circuit Court
of Appeals in St. Louis to
restore the lockout as soon
as possible. The court
is considered a friend-
lier venue for businesses
than the federal courts in
Minnesota.
The NFL wants an imme-
diate stay of U.S. District
Judge Susan Richard
Nelson's decision on
Monday to lift the 45-day
lockout so it can argue that
it should be overturned
altogether. The players
were told to respond to the
league's motion for a stay
by midday Friday, and the
NFL's reply to that is due
on Monday morning.
Michael Gans, the
appeals court clerk, said
a three-judge panel for the
appeal had not been set.
NFL Commissioner
Roger Goodell said he


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Pittsburgh Steelers football players Ryan Clark (left)
and Charlie Batch arrive at the teams' training facility in
Pittsburgh, Tuesday.


feared the fight could last
for a while.
"I think the litigation,
unfortunately, could go on
for some period of time,"
he told the NFL Network.
He said. he was looking
forward to the next round
of court-ordered talks on
May 16.
"I think that it's impor-
tant to get back to that,"
he said. "That's the type of
thing that should happen
- real bargaining across
the table."
Goodell, who penned an
opinion piece in the Wall
Street Journal this week
suggesting Nelson's rul-
ing could "endanger" the
league if it is upheld on
appeal, conceded the legal
fight was weighing on
him.
"It's frustrating," he
said. "We have so much
potential. Our game is in
such a great place."
At least now, four days
after Nelson lifted the lock-
out, there are guidelines to
follow.
Mandatory minicamps
and voluntary offseason
practices can begin under
rules of the collective bar-
gaining agreement that
expired March 11. Team-
supervised workouts will
count toward bonuses in


player contracts, and play-
ers can also work out on
their own at team facilities
if they have health insur-
ance in place.
The league will arrange
for substance abuse
and steroid programs to
resume, and players can
participate in team-spon-
sored community and
charity functions.
Agent Angelo Wright
said he has told play-
ers under contract not
to worry about visiting
headquarters this week-
end out of fairness to the
teams so they can focus
on the draft. He said they
should plan to show up on
Monday, and said
he'd start calling team
executives about unsigned
players as soon as Sunday
night.
Agent Drew Rosenhaus
said he'd like for signing
and trades to take place
during the draft, which
runs through Saturday.
"I've been calling teams,
and I've been told they've
been advised by the NFL
to hold off on signing or
trades until further notice,"
Rosenhaus said.
Attorneys for the play-
ers said the decision to
lift the lockout "is in full,
immediate force."


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High's Jessica Keene pulls back before releasing the pitch against Chiles High in a
5A State Playoff game in Lake City Tuesday.

CHS: Takes on Ed White High today


Continued From Page 11

disciplined to only swing at
strikes."
After the loss to Ed
White, 5-3, in regionals,
Williams envisioned his
pitcher taking on the same
style. It's one that she has
mastered in her junior year
to help lead the Lady Tigers
to a 25-3 record and a No. 5
state ranking.
'"They're very similar,"
Williarfs said. "Andews was
what I wanted Jessica to be
back when she was a ninth
grader. Jessica will keep you
guessing and off balance.
She's got a similar change-
up and is also a three-pitch
pitcher. She's not afraid to
take batters deep into the
count and she's never going
to give into a batter."
With Ed White losing the
last two matchups against
Columbia, Williams expects
it totiave a little extra moti-
vation. Still, he expects the
Lady Tigers to bring in just
as much of a swagger.
"Andrews is a senior and
I'm sure they want to send
her out with a bang, but
we still have a bad taste in
our mouth from the home-


regional loss," Williams
said. "We'll never forget
it. Them coming into our
house and being able to
beat us is like a bad cold
that you can't get rid of."
Williams believes that the
Lady Tigers' bats can con-
tinue to make a difference
for Columbia. He hopes to
have the Lady Tigers match
their seven runs scored in
each of the previous two
outings with Ed White.
"This team definitely
takes pride in its ability to
hit," Williams said.
That's a new mantra
for the Lady Tigers under
Williams, who has usually
prided his team on defense
and small ball.
"I use to' be a coach
where I felt teams could
give away more runs than
we can score," Williams
said. "We'd play defense,
pick people off on bases
and minimize our mistakes.
This year, we've got the
perfect blend of bats and
playing defense. They just
love hitting."
The Lady Tigers haven't
just produced at any one


spot in the order. Williams
notes that its been a host
of Columbia players to step
up.
"Every night its one
or two girls to step up,"
Williams said. "Holly Borris
had the night where she
was 2-for-3. Brandy Morgan
had the night where she had
a triple and two doubles.
Kvistad's had multiple home
runs in a game. Hollianne
Dohrn's delivered, Jessica's
delivered. They all know
that they can count on each
other. They want to do
something big and they're
offensive minded."
Tonight's winner will
move on to play the winner
of Niceville and Navarre
high schools at 7 p.m.
Tuesday. Columbia would
host given a win.
First thing is first, and
Williams is calling for con-
tinued fan support.
'We need a good crowd,"
he said. "We've been hav-
ing a good crowd. I've had
a lot of text wishing me
good luck. We just need two
more (wins) for the Final
Four."


Dayton 500 champion


Trevor Bayne in hospital


Associated Press

CHARLOTTE, N.C. -
Daytona 500 winner Trevor
Bayne has been hospitalized
for symptoms that could be
related to an insect bite this
month.


Roush Fenway Racing
officials say Bayne will
not race this weekend at
Richmond International
Raceway.
Bayne was hospitalized
briefly for an apparent reac-
tion to an insect bite on his


left elbow.
Roush Fenway President
.Steve Newmark said
Thursday that Bayne
was not feeling well this
week, and is being evalu-
ated for potential lingering
symptoms.


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420










LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS FRIDAY, APRIL 29, 2011


DILBERT
DOGBERT'S PASSWORD
RECOVERY SERVICE


I HATE THIS STUPID
COMPLICATED PLANET!
I AM SO OUT OF HERE! i
\Ar .


AND THAT IS HOW
FLOYD BECAME THE
FIRST PERSON TO HOLD
HIS BREATH AND JUFMP
TMTA nO ITFR cPACr


DEAR ABBY


Dating his late wife's nurse

distresses widower's family


BABY BLUES


BLONDE


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE


SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS


GARFIELD


B.C.


FRANK & ERNEST


DEAR ABBY: My hus-
band's darling mother died of
cancer last summer. During
the last month of her illness
she was confined to bed, so we
hired a nurse, "Lois," to cover
the night shift.
The day after the funeral,
my husband's father started
calling Lois. Dad swore they
were "just friends," but con-
tinued pursuing her despite
our strong disapproval. Two
months later, they were dat
ing. Last Thanksgiving, our
first holiday without Mom, he
cancelled plans to be with us
and the grandkids to spend it
with "friends" guess who?
On Christmas it was the same
story.
This has hit my husband
hard. Dad and Mom were
married for 50 years. We have
always had a close family, par-
ticularly at holiday time. Are
we wrong to feel that Dad and
Lois are disrespecting Mom's
memory and to feel hurt and
angry? GRIEVING IN
MINNESOTA
DEAR GRIEVING: Please
accept my sympathy for your
family's loss. While it may ap-
pear your father-in-aw jumped
quickly into a relationship, it
could be he grieved during the
time his wife was ill and has
concerns that his own time
may be limited, so he wants to
enjoy life while he can.
As to missing the holi-
days, being there with his wife
of 50 years conspicuously miss-
ing may have been more than
he could face. So please, try


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearabby.com
to be understanding because
I'm sure your mother-in-law's
death has been painful for all
of you.
DEAR ABBY: After hav-
ing a stroke, my mother spent
the last few years of her life'
in a wonderful nursing facil-
ity. She was an accomplished
gardener and enjoyed sharing
her bounty. Instead of sending
her a fresh flower bouquet for
Mother's Day, I'd have some
potted tomato plants delivered
to her nursing home. On her
death bed last year, she re-
minded us to water her tomato
plants. Sadly, those plants out-
lived her.
I cannot think of a more
fitting tribute to her memory
than to encourage your read-
ers to provide living vegetable
plants for their senior relatives.
Most nurseries or florists will
accommodate your request
and, perhaps, could be per-
suaded to donate a plant or two
to a local senior care center.'
The joy of nurturing a liv-
ing plant will continue through
the summer. CAROLE IN
SAN CLEMENTE
DEAR CAROLE: What a
sweet idea. Your mother ap-
pears to have been a generous


and caring woman, and your
letter shows the apple doesn't
fall far from the tree.
DEAR ABBY: When I was
in high school, I was very pop-
ular and part of a large social
group. That was three years
ago. Since graduation, I have
been dealing with an anxiety
disorder. It has reached the
point where I can no longer
work,' go to school or have
much of a social life. I am cur-
rently seeking treatment.
Whenever I'm in touch
with someone I was close to
in high school, I am always
asked where I'm working now
or what school I'm attending.
I feel embarrassed because
of my disorder and often I
don't respond because I don't
know what to say. Any ideas?
SPEECHLESS IN ILLI-
NOIS
DEAR SPEECHLESS:
You could say that you haven't
been well and needed to take
some time to recover- or, if you
don't want to reveal that much,
say, "I decided to take some
time to find myself," which is
common and sufficiently eu-
phemistic. And the surest way
to find treatment for your anxi-
ety disorder would be to tell
your family doctor you need to'
consult a mental health profes-
sional who specializes in anxi-
ety disorders. Once you find
one, you can quickly return to
the mainstream of life.
* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069,


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-April
S 19): You'll feel anxious and
will question what others
are doing and thinking. Your
S suspicion is probably unwar-
IE ranted. Accusing someone
RE without enough evidence
AD can turn into a costly battle.
For now, concentrate on
Your hobbies and personal
interests. A**
TAURUS (April 20-
May 20): Think before
you jump into a situation
that could hurt your profes-
sional standing. A fast talker
is likely to lead you astray.
Lean on someone you know
and trust for advice. Handle
a problem with a boss or su-
perior carefully. ****
GEMINI (May 21-June
20): Don't let anyone talk
you into spending too much
on a cause you know noth-
S ing about. Catch up on cor-
respondence or paperwork
you've neglected. A part
time business or job will
come in handy. **
S CANCER (June 21-July
22): Reassess your motives
and your direction. You will
meet individuals you can
relate to if you participate in
recreational activities. Take
a serious look at your per-
S sonal situation before mak-
ing a move. *****
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):
You will be persuasive, in-
triguing and enticing today.
Go after what you want, per-
sonally and professionally,


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

and you will not be denied.
Small business projects
have the potential to turn
into something much big-
ger. Property investments
will pay off and please the
ones you love. ***
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Being environmen-
tally friendly will enhance
your reputation in groups
you want to join. This is a
good day to get rid of bad
habits and non-productive,
demanding people. A money
matter must be taken care of
quickly. ***
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): Choose your activities
with care. Taking part in in-
tellectual games will not only
challenge you, but will bring
you in contact with someone
who works in a field you find,
interesting. Socializing with
clients or colleagues will
pay off. Love is highlighted.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-
Nov. 21): Do things with
organizations that deal with
children or seniors. Your
hands-on help will lead to
interesting offers. You can
make allies if you discuss
your grievances and offer
solutions. Creative changes
at home will pay off. ***
SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): Someone you


live with will be impressed
with the way yotu make
things happen. Your quick
response and easy way of
turning a negative into a
positive will lead to special
rewards. A residential move
or renovations will pay off.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-
Jan. 19): Changes in your
neighborhood will be a little
unnerving but, in the end,
beneficial. Disagreements
are likely to disrupt, causing
you grief and standing in the
way of your progress. Do
things by yourself for best
results. **
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Group activities
will lead to opportunities as
well as competition. Don't
let anyone know your plans
or your strategy and you will
have a fighting chance of
being first to the finish line..
Help others solve their per-
sonal dilemmas. Someone
from your past will make a
new impact on you. ****
PISCES (Feb. 19-
March 20): Visit someone
who needs a little encour-
agement. You will feel good
and will come to terms with
some of the things in your
life you have been ques-
tioning. Make mental and
physical changes that will
improve your life. Don't let
your emotions get the better
of you. ***


CELEBRITY CIPHER


by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: A equals W
"S TRVBC VL B DNC EVTBWKV S
FWKC TNWDLY'C KSC BYL LN
RNJVANPH. S WKWBDDZ KBC YVUC
CN KNJVNYV VUCPVJVDZ KJBPC."
DVNYBPLN LSTBOPSN
PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "If you really want to help the American theater, don't
'be an actress, dahling. Be an audience." Tallulah Bankhead
(c) 2011 by NEA, Inc. 4-29


FOR BETTER OR WORSE


CLASSIC PEANUTS


ITIS PHIL. HE LIKES T I RT -HREE O'CLOCK IN
PRAnCTiCE HIS TRUMPET I -THE OiORNING..1
BEFOR HE-iGOES T' I E
RB 0


4 OH, SORRY! L- THIS
WHAT' YOU SAY? FAITALE
I'M WATCHING THE EPIC IS
STREAMING VIDEO TESTINEO TO
OF PRINCE WILLIAM BECOME 1THE
AND KATE'S MILESTONE 1
WEDDING L\ E OF OUR
MILLENNIUM!'


THAT'5.FUJNNY, ALvAYS THOUGHT
\ THeY kR 9~
\^ ,^^^\ TRUMPfTf9S.


Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415












Classified Department: 755-5440


SELL-IT

I5NDi
F Tjy


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED FRIDAY, APRIL 29, 2011

Lake City Reporter





CLASSIFIED


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FAX: 386-752-9400 Please
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Advertising copy is subject to
approval by the Publisher who
reserves the right to edit; reject,
or classify all advertisements under
appropriate headings. Copy should
be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the first day of pub-
lication. Credit for published errors
will be allowed for the first insertion
for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the
Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nor for any general,
special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply
with Federal, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
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020 Lost & Found

LOST: Lg 3 yr old white Calico
female cat. Goes by "Hannah".
Lives on 240/Itchetucknee. 9 yr
old daughter brokenhearted. Please
call 386-288-3916 REWARD!!!


100 Job
100 Opportunities
Busy office seeking
experienced, energetic person for
receptionist position.
Fax resume to 386-961-8802

Energetic person w/initiative
needed to teach adult learners.
Eve classes, 40 hrs/mo, $11/hr
To apply go to:
expresstrainingservices.com/jobs

Guang Dong Chinese
SRestaurant in the Lake City
Mall is now hiring.
Come in for applications.
Licensed Insurance Salesperson,
for.non-smoking office, 2-20
P & C Licensed preferred
Contact fmcknight81@cox.net
Live Oak CPA Firm seeks
full-time Secretary/Receptionist.
Please see Employment
Opportunity at
www.liveoakcpa.com.

Sales Position available for moti-
vated individual Rountree -Moore
Toyota, Great benefits, paid train-
ing/vacation. Exp. a plus but not
necessary. Call Anthony Cosentino
386-623-7442
Wanted Highly motivated
individual for Sales Position.
Rountree -Moore Automotive
Group, Great benefits, paid vaca-
tion: Exp. a plus but not necessary.
Call Tony Reese 386-344-7517

120 Medical
Employment'


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
3RD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
FILE NO: 2011-63-CP
PROBATE DIVISION
INRE :ESTATEOF
LIBBY SHAW AUSGOOD MER-
RICK
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of,
LIBBY SHAW AUSGOOD MER-
RICK, deceased, whose
date of death was September 8,
2010; File Number 2011-63-CP is
pending in the Circuit Court for
Columbia County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is
P.O. Box 2069, Lake City, Florida
32056. The names and addresses of
the personal representative and the
personal representative's attorney
are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and oth-
er persons having claims or demands
against decedent's
estate, on whom a copy of this notice
has been served, must file their
claims with this court WITHIN THE
LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER
THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUB-
LICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR
30 DAYS AFTER THE TIME OF
SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent
and other persons having claims or
demands against decedent's
estate must file their claims with this
court WITHIN,3 MONTHS AFTER
THE DATE OF THE FIRST .
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED
,WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO
(2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER
THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF
DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this
notice is: April 29, 2011
By /s/: RHETT BULLARD, P.A.
Attorney for Petitioner
Florida Bar No.: 175986
100 South Ohio Averue
Live Oak, Florida 32064
Attorney for Petitioner
By /s/: TRONNA AUSGOOD
DEMPS
Petitioner/Personal Representative
04544588
April 29, 2011
May 5, 2011

Public Auction
1997 Cadillac
VIN#1G6KS52Y5VU815820
at Auto Emporium of Lake City Inc.
2832 SE Main Blvd
Lake City FL. 32025
in Columbia Co. at 10:00 AM on
May 17, 2011
04544595
April 29, 2011


010 Announcements


-I


100 Job
00 Opportunities 310 Pets & Supplies
310 Pets & Supplies


05525772
Customer Service Rep
needed for established Insurance
Agency; Health Ins & 401K .
plan available,Send reply to Box
05060, C/O The Lake City
Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL, 32056

Aurora Diagnostics; Part time
Courier Position; Must have a
clean Driving record. Please fax
resume to 386-758-1791
*Please no phone calls*

AVON!!!, EARN up to 50%!!!
Only $10 for Starter Kit,
1-800-275-9945 pin #4206
www.youravon.com/tdavies
Barber/Hair Stylist needed.
Experience preferred. No clientele
needed. Great pay, no chair rent,
call 386-984-0101







Lawn & Landscape Service

Clean Pine Straw,
You pick it up, $1.85 a bale
Delivery of 100 bales $260
386-688-9156
Landscape Maintenance Company
You can trust for knowledge &
pride, Mention this AD!
Mow Green, LLC 386-288-6532

Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.


Land Services

Back Hoe, Dozer, Chopping, root
raking, bush hog, seeding, sod,
disking, site prep, ponds &
irrigation. Free Est! 386-623-3200


PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.

330 Livestock &
Supplies

04544561
Black Angus
Cows & Heifers
Registered & Commercial
Prices Vary
386-719-4802 or 386-623-9427



361 Farm Equipment
84 Ford 4610 Tractor. Runs good.
Solid 2WD. New front tires,
350hr on 2005 motor. Dependable.
$7500. obo. 386-867-0005


407 Computers

HP Computer,
$100.00
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170

IBM Computer,
$65
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170


420 Wanted to Buy

K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.

Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$250 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.


430 Garage Sales






Fri-Sun, 8-? 144 SE Butler Ct.
100A down from Spires. Look for
signs. Baby items, furn, kids/adults
clothes, tools, more 386-719-4768
Friday & Sunday only 8 am-3pm,
Lots of Miscellaneous Items!
132 NW Broomsage Ct
(Southern Oaks Country Club)
Garage/Estate Sale. Fri. & Sat.
8-2. Woodhaven S/D Off Country
Club Rd. Follow signs to194 SE
Crow Ct. Home furnishings, etc.
386-752-1818
Huge Multi Family Sat 8a-lp, plus
size women/xxl men/kids clothing,
fashion jewelry, electronics, furn,
books, toys & tools, Lake City
Country Club, behind Arby's 271
NW Mallard Place, No Early Birds
MOVING SALE; Fri & Sat. 9-?
Branford Hwy to 242, turn R go 4-
S mi. Signs. 6683 SW CR 242
Too much to List! All must Go!






PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.


Sat only, 7-?, Grandview Subdiv
386-697-5120, Bedrm set, TV,lug-
gage, dressers, dell monitor,uni-
forms, armoir, ent. center, tools
Saturday Only, 9am-4pm,
desk, bunk/youth beds, tools,
clothing, refridge, much more, 722
Biscayne Glenn off Chapple Hill


440 Miscellaneous
Special Ends Soon!
M & M Fitness
Call Today!
386-752-0749
Tow Behirnt Grill/Smoker
$1,250 OBO.
386-249-3104 or
386-719-4802
WHAT A STEAL!
Restored 5 ft Cast Iron Claw Foot
Tub, white finish w/gold claw feet
$250 obo, Call Pete 386-344-5764

630 Mobile Homes
6 for Rent
i UNDER NEW MANAGEMENT
Oakview Mobile Home Park.
Clean well maintained 2/2 units in
nice park. 2 miles to downtown
Lake City. 386-984-8448
14x70 MH, 2Br/2Ba Real Clean
Good Location! CH/A $550/Mo.
+ $200 Dep. NO PETS.
(386)755-0064 or (904)771-5924
2&3 BR MH. $395 $650. mo.
plus deposit. Water & sewer fur-
nished. Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
2/2 Newly remodeled MH New
Floors/counter tops. Lg lot, quiet
area No pets 1st, last & sec. $450
mo $300 sec will work w/payment
plan. Call Jenn 386-454-7724
2/2 Units, clean, well maintained,
nice safe park setting, 2 miles to
downtown Lake City, $550 month
+ $550 sec dep, 386-984-8448
2br /2ba SWMH; also Residential
RV lots for rent between Lake City
& G'ville. Access to 1-75 & 441-
(352)317-1326 Call for terms
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White Contact 386-623-3404
or 386-365-1919
New 2br/2ba off Country Club. 1/2
ac. lot Front, back porch & storage
bldg. $600 mo. $600 sec. No Pets!
38.6-752-5911 or 466-2266
Nice clean 2&3 bdrm, Five Points,
SNO PETS, also 3 bd on the
Westside, 3 bdrm house on
Monroe St 386-961-1482






Quiet, Country Branford area
3/2 $400 dep, $600 month
386-867-1833 or 386-590-0642
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
X-CLEAN 2/2 SW, 8 mi
NW of.VA. Clean acre lot, nice
area. $500. mo + dep No dogs
386-961-9181

64 Mobile Homes
640 0 for Sale

06 MH 3br/2ba open floor plan
w/lg kit w/ island, fireplace. 3 Riv-
ers Est, river access, MLS# 75661
Eastside Village Realty, Inc.
Denise Millgan-Bose 752-5290
3/2 DWMH over 1700 sqft. New
Roof & CH/A. Doublesided fire-
place, custom kit w/breakfast nook
& wet bar. $89,500 MLS# 73861
386-623-6896 Access Realty
Hallmark Real Estate. DWMH
4/2 on 5 ac. 24X36 workshop.
Fireplace, kitchen island w/drop
down and more. $114,900.
MLS# 76188 386-867-1613
Owner Financing-3/2
TWMH in Wellborn. Only
$89,900! Call Taylor Goes
of Access Realty @ 386-344-7662.


710 orRhedApt 805 Lots for Sale


J5525556-
Move in as low as $325
Call today for details!
386-758-8455
Windsong Apts

05525655
SPRING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans;
some with garages.
Call 386-454-1469
or visit our website:
www.springhillvillage.net

1 & 2 Bedroom Apartments
Move in for as low as
$199
386-755-2423
2 br Apt. Close to shopping
and the VA Medical Center.
$525. mo plus deposit.
386-344-2972
A Landlord You Can Love!
2 br Apts $575. & up + sec. Great
area. CH/A washer/dryer hookups.
386-758-9351/352-208-2421
Great location W of 1-75, spacious
deluxe 2BR apts., garage, W/D
hook up. patio. $600 &f up, + SD,
386-344-3715 or 386-965-5560
Large & clean. Ibr/lba apt.
CH/A Ig walk in closet. Close to
town. $395. mo and $350. dep.
(904)563-6208
Nice Apt. downtown. Remodeled,
kit., 1 bd/ba, LR, dining & extra
room. Ref. req. $450. mo & sec.
386-362-8075 or 386-754-2951.
The Lakes Apts. Studios & 1Br's
from $135/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $450. + sec.
Call Michelle 386-752-9626

720 Furnished Apts.
72 0For Rent

Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. 4reekly
386-752-5808


Small furnished Studio Apt. for
Rent. $450. mo. $50. Deposit.
Utilities included. Non-smoking
environment. 386-438-8000


7 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent.

3/2 Recently Built CustomHome,
1340 sq ft, stainless steel applian-
ces, custom cabinets, $920 mo,
S1st. Last & Sec,off 1-75 & 47
Call Andrew 386-623-6066
3br/2ba brick, 2 car carport. Fire-
place, Florida room. Large 4 acre
yard. Country Club Rd. South
$950 month. 386-365-8504
Ft White, 2/1, CH/A, 2010 W2 &
ref's from current landlord req'd,
Access to Rivers $625 mo,
$600 sec., 386-497-4699

750 Business &
S Office Rentals
For Lease: E Baya Ave. Two -
1000 sqft office space units or
combined for 2000 sqft. 386-984-
0622 or weekends 386-497-4762
OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$695. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor


790 Vacation Rentals

Horseshoe Beach Spring Special
Gulf Front 2br, w/lg porch, dock,
,fish sink. wkend $345./wk $795.
(352)498-5986/386-235-3633
alwaysonvacation.com #419-181

805 Lots for Sale

5 Acre Lot, Secluded & Cleared,
MLS# 67871 $60,000
Call Lisa Waltrip
@ 386-365-5900
westfieldrealtygroup.com
A high & dry buildable wooded
.734 of ac.,Forest Country. MLS#
76668 Eastside Village Realty,
Inc. Denise Milligan-Bose
@386-752-5290
Beautiful .92 Acre Lot-
3 Rivers-Ft. White-High & Dry!
Only $11,900.
Call Taylor Goes of Access Realty
@ 386-344-7662.
Forest Country building lot,
scattering of trees, Motivated
Seller $19,999 MLS#75140
Remax Professionals, Inc.
Jo Lytte 386-365-2821
Hallmark Real Estate. Cleared
2.57 ac. fenced w/32' Dutchman
camper. In O'Brien. Close to Live
Oak, Lake City, Branford. $25,000
MLS# 74534 386-867-1613
Nice 4 acre parcel located in
O'Brien. Won't last long at only
$13,500. Call Taylor Goes of
Access Realty @386-344-7662.
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the


law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
Impaired is 1-800-927-9275.


810 Home for Sale
3/2 Brick Home in town, fenced
back yard w/12xl2 workshop
$79,900 Call Nancy @ R.E.O.
Realty 386-867-1271MLS# 77414
nancytrogers@msn.com
3/2 Custom Western Cedar Home
on 2 acre lakefront lotMLS#74681
Call Jo Lytte at Remax
Professionals, Inc. 386-365-2821
jolytte@remaxnfl.com
3/2 in Creekside S/D. Fenced bdck
yard, sprinklers, large
screened rear lanai.
$175,000. MLS# 77385
386-623-6896 Access Realty
3/2 in town, lots of upgrades,
currently leased, MLS#76658,
$49,900 Call Jo Lytte at
Remax Professionals, Inc.
386-365-2821
3/2 in Woodhaven w/Fla Room,
fenced back yard MLS#75499,
$114,900 Call Pam @
Remax 386-303-2505 or
email- remaxpamb@gmail.com
3/2 MH on 1.5 acres, fenced,
porches, wkshp,well maintained
$49,900 MLS# 77309 Call Josh
Grecian 386-466-2517
westfieldrealtygroup.com
3/2 on 4.84 Acres, fireplace, sheds,.
many fruit trees, Call Jo Lytte at
Remax $68,900, MLS#72427
386-365-2821, www.jolytte.
florida-property-search.com
3/2 on 8.7 acres w/Fla room,
several storage bldgs, fenced,
MLS#75295 Call Pam Beauchamp
@ 386-758-8900 Remax,
$179,000 www.visitpam.com
4/2 with 1000 sq ft workshop,
fenced back yard, 2 car garage,.
MLS#77602, Bring Offers!
$174,900, Call Nancy @
R.E.O. Realty 386-867-1271
5 acre Home w/Horse Barn,
Wood floors, New Kitchen,
'Gazebo & Koi Pond MLS#76039
$169,900 Call Aaron @ Westfield
Realty Group 386-867-3534
SBeautiful Home For Sale -
The Preserve at Laurel Lake
4/2 or 3/2 $194,900 MLS#77257
Call Scott Stewart 386-867-3498
westfieldrealtygroup.com
CBC 3/1 home, inside city limits,
fenced backyard, detached carport
w/office MLS#77411 $82,900
Call R.E.O.Realty,
Nancy Rogers @ 386-867-1271
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
Nice home with eat in kitchen and
a nice sized living room. Pleanty
of room for entertaining.
MLS# 77584 $89,900
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
3/2 on 9.7 acres, fenced& cross
fenced. Separate pastures. Animals
are negotiable. Owners motivated.
MLS# 77431 $179,900
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
3/2 on 5 acres. Large master suite
and open kitchen. Back 2 ac.
fenced for horses.
MLS# 75830 $102,900
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
3br and Ig open floor plan
w/separate office. Beautifully
landscaped. Private access to Lake
Jeffery. MLS# 76231 $199,000
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
Lots of acerage. All brick home.
Screened in porch. Extra big
closets. Mature pines.
MLS# 76765 $115,000
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
Welcome home. 3br/2ba brick.
'Great location on the east side.
Priced to sell.
MLS# 776867 $69,900
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
Well maintianed 3/2 1/2 acre
minutes from town. 20x40
Workshop, screened porch.
MLS# 73787 $99,000
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
3/2 Brick home on .59 acre, on the
lake with back sunroom. Garage &
storage building.
MLS# 76769 $222,900
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
Two for the price of one. Updated
main home w/a 3/2 guest home. A
lot of living space for the price.
MLS# 77348 $244,900
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
1999 Doublewide,
3/2 fenced back yard
on 1 acre.
MLS# 76315 $64,900
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
Custom built home with many
upgrades. Screened back porch,
16x24 workshop.
MLS# 77178 $184,500
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
Great house in Piccadilly S/D. 2
car garage and inground pool.
Newly painted inside & out.
MLS# 76786 $133,500
Charming Remodeled Home
in Beautiful Neighborhood
MLS#74765 $142,900 Call
Charlie Sparks @ Westfield
Realty Group 386-755-0808
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
4br 1/5ba. 1332 sqft. Great floor
plan, noce yard, close to town.
Only $84,900 Lori Geibeig
Simpson. 386-365-5678
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty


5br/4ba on 5+ac. 3 car garage,
inground pool/hot tub and more.
MLS #75854 $569,900 Lori
Geibeig Simpson. 386-365-5678


Aurora Diagnostics; Medical
Billing Representative needed;
1-2 yrs Medical Billing exp,
preferred but no required. This
position is temporary with the
opportunity to become permanent.
Please fax resume to
386-758-1791
-*Please no phone calls*

Experienced LPN wanted to work
in busy medical practice. Knowl-
edge with pediatric & adults de-
sired. No weekends or nights,
competitive salary & benefits
Fax Resume to 386-758-5628
Licensed, Experienced, PTA
for busy outpatient clinic
Send resume to P.O. Box 714
Lake City, FL 32056 or
Email to: pta714@hotmail.com


130 Part Time

Nursery Position Available
Southside Baptist Church,
Hours on Wednesdays and
Sunday during regular church
service. Please call 386-755-5553
for more information

240 Schools&
Education

04544505
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-04/25/10

Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-05/09/11

Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com


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810 Home for Sale
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Superbly maintained home in
Creekside. Oversized garage &
storage. Many extras. Elaine K.
Tolar 386-755-6488 $209,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
New home in Mayfair S/D. 4br on
comer lot. Split plan. $214,900
MLS# 76919 Elaine K. Tolar.
386-755-6488
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Home on the lake in town. 4br/3ba
MLS# 76085 Elaine K. Tolar 386-
755-6488 or Mary Brown White-
hurst. 386-965-0887 $299,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Great home in Woodcrest S/D 3/2
home, covered back porch, nice
yard.MLS# 75198 Elaine K. Tolar
386-755-6488 $129,900
Country Home on 2.5 Acres,
$95,000 MLS#77039
Remax Professionals, Inc.,
jo lytte@remaxnfl.com
386-365-2821
Custom, 3/2.5 built in 2007,
on 10.8 manicured acres,
completely fenced, Owner Fin.
avail., MLS#77382 Call Patti
386-623-6896 Access Realty
Ft White MH on 16.27 Acres,
near many recreational activities
MLS#77404 $149,900
Jo Lytte Remax Professionals
386-365-2821
Great Opportunity!,
Currently rented, Seller will
assist w/buyer's closing costs
MLS# 77335, Call Michael at
Westfield 386-867-9053 $99,900
Gwen Lake area. Beautiful up-
grades 4/3 w/tile & laminate
floors, fireplace, new kitchen, Ig
den, fenced yard. $125,000, 386-
397-4766 Hallmark Real Estate
Hallmark Real Estate. Brick 3/2.
Many upgrades. Gas fireplace,
Grotto tile. Great location on cul-
de-sac! $149,900.
MLS# 75931 386-867-1613
Historical Home on Lake Isabel-
la. 3/3 w/basement! Great as a pri-
vate residence or a wonderful pro-
fessional office. $240,000 386-
719-0382 Hallmark Real Estate
Home on 15 Acres w/2500 sq ft,
workshop, MLS# 77552 $235,000
Call Brittany Stoeckert at
Results Realty
386-397-3473
Just Reduced 4/2 on 1.57 acres,
fireplace. partially fenced, MLS#
77412, Call Nancy Rogers at
R.E.O. Realty Group
386-867-1271 $64,900
Large Brick, 3/1, 4.43 acres, metal
roof, MLS# 77415 $104,888
Call Nancy Rogers @ R.E.O.
Realty Group, Inc. 386-867-1271
nancytrogers@msn.com
Large Home on 1 acre, 4/2,
Fla Rm, wrap around front porch
MLS#77292 $148,000
Call Brittany Stoeckert at
Results Realty386-397-3473
Lg home on corer lot w/garage,
Eastside Village. Clubhouse,
heated pool MLS# 71901 Eastside
Village Realty, Inc. Denise
Milligan-Bose 386-752-5290
Luxury 3/2 Log Home, Cypress
interior, whole house generator,
$269,900 MLS# 76899 Call
Roger Lovelady @386-365-7039
westfieldrealtygroup.com
Make an Offer! 3 br brick, quiet
resid'l street in Live Oak. HUD
home is sold "as is" Hallmark
Real Estate 386-365-5146
www.hudhomestore.com
Nearly 17 Acres w/House
on paved road, Very Spacious!
MLS#76902 $194,900
Call 386-487-7484 Speak to
Brodie Westfield Realty Group
On Golf Course w/lake view. 3/2
home w/lg rooms, 3 fireplaces, wet
bar & big deck. Newly reduced to
$214,900. Hallmark Real Estate
386-365-2135
Open for Bid! 3/2 DW w/corer
stone fireplace, fenced yard & Ig
kit. HUD property, sold "as is"
MLS 77290- 386-365-3886 Deb-
bie King Hallmark Real Estate
Owner Fianncing! wooded 1/4 ac.
lots in Suwannee County, close to
River, high & dry. Bring your SW
or DW or RV. $6,500
Derington Properties.965-4300
Ready for Fun & Family. 4br/2ba
custom home on 33.84 ac. has
stocked fish pond & huge 54x60
shop. $325,000. Hallmark Real
Estate 386-719-0382
Rolling Oaks, 3/3 + Bonus Rm,
5 acres, back porch & more!
MLS#77528 Call Pam Beauchamp
at 386-758-8900 Remax $284,900
remaxpamb@gmail.com
Solid Brick Home on 5 Acres,
Close to town but in the country!
MLS#76063 Must See!$129,888
Call Brittany Stoeckert at
386-397-3473 Results Realty
Spacious, Open Floor Plan Home,
fenced back yard, screen porch,
$179,900 MLS#76796 Call Jo
Lytte@Remax Professionals, Inc.
386-365-2821
Well Cared For 3/2 on 1.4 Acres,
open floor plan, MLS#75702
$199,900, Call Carrie Cason
at 386-487-1484
westfieldrealtygroup.com


LAKE CITY REPORTER


810 Home for Sale
You can't beat this Price! 1995
SWMH on 3/4 ac. Paved road,
1216 sf, 2/2 split bedroom plan.
Needs work! $29,900
Derington Properties. 965-4300

820 Farms &
Acreage
10 acres, with Travel Trailer &
Electricity, close to Itchetucknee
Springs, $38,000, MLS# 76264
Call MillardGillen at
Westfield Realty 386-365-7001
4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$69,900. $613mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
4 acres, Wellborn, New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down, $39,900, $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
5.82 ac Rolling Oaks off Lake
Jeffrey. High, dry & cleared.
Restricted site built homes only.
Equestrian community.
$65,000.obo. 386-965-5530
for information & pictures
Between Lake City & Ft. White.
6.44 rolling acres. DWMH, 3/2.
1836 sf, great value on paved road.
Need repairs. $49,900
Derington Properties. 965-4300
Half to ten acre lots. Some w/
well, septic, pp. We finance; low
dwn pmt. Deas Bullard Properties.
386-752-4339. www.landnfl.com.
Heavily Wooded Land, 10 Acres
MLS#75784 $94,900
Call Jo Lytte
Remax Professionals, Inc.
386-365-2821,

Q8 0 Commercial
80 Property
Multiple Use 12,000 sq ft
of Office & Warehouse space,
Loading dock, Storage yard,
MLS#77349 $395,000, Charlie
386-755-0808 Westfield Realty
850 Waterfront
8O5 Property
DWMH on Ten Acres w/lakefront,
surrounded by oaks, $115,900
MLS#75571, Call Jo Lytte at
Remax Professionals 386-365-
2821, jolytte@remaxnfl.com
River Cabin on Suwannee River,
workshop, patio, deck & dock,
$349,900 MLS#76336 Call -
Jo Lytte at Remax Professionals
386-365-2821
River Front Property 6.45 Acres,
in White Spfgs close to Big Shoals
Park, Shelter for entertaining,
$124,888 MLS# 77417 Call Nancy
@ R.E.O. Realty 386-867-1271

890 Resort Property
Furnished Home on Itchetucknee
River, Wrap around covered decks
on twb levels,MustSEE! $375,000
MLS#77006 Call Jo Lytte
Remax 386-365-2821


River Access, Refurbished Rent-
al Units & Home + Lot,
Barn, Pool, Hot Tub $329,900
Call Jo Lytte 386-365-2821
MLS#76734 Remax Professionals








at the paper.

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CLASSIFIED FRIDAY, APRIL 29, 2011


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.- 0tBO East valStL
lakeCity,Forida 32055


LS & WATERCRAFT rT


2004 Dodge Ram
Quad Cab
V8, 4.7L AT w/tow
package. 112,500 mi.
Lots of extras.
$9,999
Call
386-755-9894


24' Pontoon Boat
Bass Tracker, 115hp
Mariner, new carpet &
lights, Bimini top, trolling
motor, depth finder.
$4,500
Call
386-752-2863