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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01567
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 5/31/2011
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
System ID: UF00028308:01567
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text







Nadal Advances at French Open Tressel Quits
Straight-sets win puts him in quarters. Controversy leads to
.& Sports, I B, OSU coach's resignation
000016 120511 1 **3-DIGIT 326 Sports, IB


LIB -o FEORID.UA H- STORY
PO BOX 117007
205 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-1943


Tuesday, May 31, 201 I


aty


n.


Big Seasons
Fort White's Legree
leads with state title.
Sports, I B


Reporter


www.lakecityreporter.com


Vol. 137, No. 109 E 75 cents


TUBING


SEASON


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Fort White residents Lisa Boling (from left) and Beth Weston splash around with Derek Reid, of Fernandina Beach, at the
Ichetucknee Springs head Thursday in an attempt to beat the crowds for Memorial Day Weekend.


Floating down the *

Ichetucknee a long-
time summer tradition.


From staff reports

p ubing season
is officially
here.
Memorial
Day weekend
kicked off the summer tub-
ing season at Ichetucknee
Springs State Park.
The season runs
through Labor Day, dur-
ing which thousands will
float down the Ichetucknee
River each day.
The river is made up of
nine springs: Blue Hole
Springs, Ichetucknee
Springs, Cedar Head
Springs, Roaring Springs,
Singing Springs, Boiling
Springs, Grassy Hole
Springs, Mill Pond Springs


and Coffee Springs.
The river's current
moves about one mile per
hour.
Tubers can choose one
of three locations to start
their float down the river:
A three-hour float,
available from the North
Entrance off CR 238.
There is a limit of 750
tubers per day, and the
entrance is only open dur-
ing the summer season;
Mid-point Launch at
the South Entrance off US
27, a 90-minute float.
The carrying capacity is
2,250 tubers per day;
A 45-minute float from
Dampier's Landing at the
South Entrance off US 27.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Krissy Morgan (bottom), 18, swims ahead of Samantha
Massey, 18, as they travel down the Ichetucknee River -
Thursday.


Rental tubes are avail-
able from vendors outside
of the park. Visitors can
also bring their own tubes,
which must be smaller
than five feet in diameter.
Tubing is available on a


first-come first-serve basis..
Visitors are encouraged
to arrive as early as 7 a.m.
to ensure a space before
reaching the daily limit for
TUBING continued on 3A








A group of teenagers
lazily float down the
Ichetucknee River.







JASON MATTHEW WALKER
Lake City Reporter


Traffic signal

replacement

work to begin


Intersection
identified as one
needing service.
By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
Local motorists can
expect traffic delays and
laneclosuresthisweekdur-
ing a Florida Department
of Transportation project
aimed at replacing a traf-
fic signal at the intersec-
tion of State Road 100 and
Price Creek Road (County
Road 245).
Gina Busscher, DOT
public information offi-
cer, said motorists should
expect daytime lane clo-
sures weekdays after 9
a.m. for the next 45 days
while the work is com-
pleted.
She said the work is
part of what officials call
a "push button" contract,
where the DOTs traffic
mobilizations office iden-
tifies intersections that


need work.
"Throughout the year
we bid out a contract with
a specific amount of money
'in it and as. we identify
projects that are needed,
then they are able to go
to work on that project
without having to do a big
set of plans and individual
bids like we normally do,"
Busscher said.
Traffic Control Devices
of Jacksonville is the
company doing the work
for the DOT at a cost of
$43,000.
Busscher said the City
of Lake City is respon-
sible for the maintefiance
of the traffic signal system
in Columbia County.
The existing traffic sig-
nal will be replaced and
a new controller will be
installed. Sensors will also
be embedded into the
pavement to allow the sig-
nal to operate on an "as
needed" basis as vehicles
SIGNAL continued on 3A


Road work will

affect traffic

through June


Several DOT
projects may
require detours.
From staff reports
Roadwork underway by
the Florida Department
of Transportation may
impact traffic in Columbia
County throughout June.
Projects include:
County Road 245,
Price Creek Road, is
closed at the Oliistee
Creek Bridge about a mile
north of State Road 238
through the end of June.
Northbound traffic is
detoured to State Road
238 to US 441 to CR 349
and back to CR 245.
Southbound traffic is
detoured to CR 349 to US
441 to SR 238 and back to
CR 245.
The road is scheduled
to reopen by the end of
June.
Interstate 75 has
nighttime lane closures
beginning at 6 p.m. for
southbound traffic Sunday
through Thursday nights


to mill and repave from
the rest area just south
of the US 41/441 inter-
change, Exit 414, to two
miles south.
One lane will be closed
beginning at 6 p.m. and
two lanes will be closed
between 9 p.m. and 6 a.m.
The speed limit is
reduced to 60 mph dur-
ing lane closures and will
remain at 60 mph in the
two-mile section that is
being resurfaced because
of the milled condition of
the roadway.
Also, the emergency
lanes southbound begin-
ning three miles north of
US 41/441 will be closed
while the call boxes are
replaced.
US 41 will have day-
time lane closures while
the roadway markings
are repainted from US 90
to the Hamilton County
line, Suwannee River, just
south of White Springs.
US 90 East will have
daytime lane closures after
CLOSINGS continued on 3A


FAM Fest delivers needed funds


Second-annual event
raises $7,000 to help
Haven Hospice.
From staff reports
More than 75 runners partici-
pated in the 5K fun run around
Lake DeSoto at the Second Annual
Fitness, Arts and Music Festival
May 14 in downtown Lake City.
The festival raised more than
$7,000 to benefit Haven Hospice
before getting rained out.

CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
1 i.;. w'iu. j 1 Fax: 752-9400


Local artists and vendors dis-
played items including the Art
League of North Florida and Glass
Creations by Barbara Kaste.
Healing Cafe and Yoga Studio,
American Family Fitness and
Lake City Zumba provided dem-
onstrations for attendees.
The Lake City Humane Society
-brought several animals who are
up for adoption. The festival also
included street performers and
health information booths.
Sponsors for the event included


95
T-Storm Chance
WEATHER, 2A


Anderson Columbia Company,
Baya Pharmacy, City of Lake City,
CMS Professional Transport,
Columbia Bank, Emerald Coast
Inventory, First Federal Bank of
Florida, James H. Montgomery,
Mercantile Bank, Quest Aviation
and Vernon and Maureen Lloyd.
All of the proceeds from the
Second Annual EA.M. Fest sup-
ports patient care, services and
the many programs provided by
Haven Hospice that are otherwise
unfunded.


j-y --C Opinion ................
Around Florida ...........
< -r Obituaries ..............
Advice & Comics . . . .
'b ~Puzzles .................


COURTESY PHOTO
Runners make their way around Lake DeSoto at the Second Annual
F.A.M. Fest May 14.


TODAY IN
SCHOOL
'Student., ,Taugl-t
F ,- ,;; G ..:.,1


COMING
WEDNESDAY
Fre. e.. ,f::,
Bluet, er- Fe-ti 11










LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING TUESDAY, MAY 31, 2011


Monday:
Afternoon: 4-7-7
Evening: 7-3-5


PIay4


Monday:
Afternoon: 1-4-4-0
Evening: 5-4-8-9


"| h 4 Sunday:
4-25-29-31-36


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



-Shields: Education helped me survive


PRINCETON, N.J.
The four years Brooke
Shields spent hitting
the books at Princeton
University gave her the
skills to survive the tribu-
lations of show business, the actress
told students at her alma mater
Monday.
Urging them to live life to the full-
est and take nothing for granted,
Shields teared up as she delivered
the keynote speech at Princeton's
annual Class Day ceremony to honor
graduating seniors.
"My education enabled me to
survive this industry one that
predicates itself on eating its young,"
she said.
Shields, who was a prominent
Calvin Klein model when she
enrolled at Princeton, reminisced
about her college experiences, such
as having her entire academic record
printed in Life magazine.
"Or when George Michael tells
you he doesn't want to date you
*because he wants to focus on his
solo career then you find out he's
-gay," she said, rolling her eyes.
The model and actress jok-
ingly reminded the a capella singing
-group that rejected her decades ago
-that she'll be starring in her fifth.
Broadway musical later this year.
She questioned how far down she
,was on the list of preferred headlin-
ers for the ceremony.
"Who couldn't they get? Why did
Snooki pass?" she mused, referring
to Nicole "Snooki" Polizzi, star of the
reality TV show "Jersey Shore," who
spoke at nearby Rutgers University
in March.
Shields played the title character
,-in the late 1990s television series
"Suddenly Susan" and also starred in
TV's "Lipstick Jungle" and the film
"The Blue Lagoon." She graduated
from Princeton with honors in 1987,
with a degree in Romance languages


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Actress and Princeton University gradu-
ate Brooke Shields reacts as she listens
Monday in Princeton, N.J. during the
school's Class Day celebration. Keynote
speaker Shields, a 1987 graduate, told
. the class of 2011 at her alma mater to
live life to the fullest and take nothing
for granted.
and literatures.
"You'll spill out of here untethered,
unguided and unstoppable," Shields
assured the senior class. "You will
leave here to do the same thing all
of us have done before you: make
mistakes."

William and Kate on
Canada, US tour
LONDON Prince William and
his bride will travel thousands of
miles (kilometers) from Canada's
north to Southern California on their
first official overseas trip, royal offi-
cials said Monday.
William and the former Kate
Middleton will visit Canada from
June 30 to July 8, taking in the coun-
try's north, south, east and west.


Palace officials said the couple will
visit Canada's capital, Ottawa and
the surrounding region; Montreal
and Quebec City in the francophone
province of Quebec; Charlottetown
and Summerside on Prince Edward
Island; the Northwest Territories
capital of Yellowknife and the oil
boom town of Calgary, Alberta.
Their Alberta visit coincides with the
opening of the city's world-famous
rodeo event, the Calgary Starhpede.

Blanchett, other Aussies
back carbon tax
CANBERRA, Australia Actress
Cate Blanchett and former conserva-
tive Prime Minister Malcolm Fraser
are among prominent Australians
who threw their support Monday
behind the unpopular government
plan to tax major polluters for the
carbon gas they emit
Blanchett and Fraser were among
. 140 personalities and organizations
who signed a petition distributed
to federal lawmakers supporting
the center-left government's plan to
make polluters pay for every ton of
carbon gas they produce in a bid to
reduce the nation's greenhouse gas
emissions.
The petition whose signato-
ries also include a Roman Catholic
bishop and a Nobel Laureate scien-
tist is part of a $1 million national
newspaper and television advertising
campaign funded by environmental
groups and unionists.
The conservative opposition
Liberal Party is opposed to making
polluters pay. The governing Labor
Party wants to tax polluters starting
in July 2012, and is locked in negotia-
tions with the minor Greens party
and independent lawmakers on how
much the tax should be.

Associated Press


Celebrity Birthdays


* Actor-director Clint East-
wood is 81.
* Singer-musician Augie
Meyers is 71.:
* Football Hall-of-Famer Joe
Namath is 68.
* Actor Tom Berenger is 61.
* Actor Gregory Harrison is
61.
* Actor Kyle Secor is 54.

Daily Scripture


* Comedian Chris Elliott is
51.
* Actress Lea Thompson is
50.
* Actor Hugh Dillon is 48.
* Rapper DMC is 47. '
* Actress Brooke Shields is
46.
* Country musician Ed Ad-
kins (The Derailers) is 44.


"In God, whose word I praise-
in God I trust and am not
afraid.What can mere mortals
do to me?"

Psalm 56:4


Lake City Reporter
HOW TO REACH US BUSINESS
Main number ........(386) 752-1293 Controller Sue Brannon ....754-0419
Fax number .............752-9400 (sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
Circulation ...............r755-5445
Online... www.lakecityreporter.com CIRCULATION
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub- should be completed by 6.30 a.m.
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180 Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7.30
E. Duval St., Lake. City, Fla. 32055. a.m. on Sunday.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
The Associated Press. problems with your delivery service.
All material herein is property of the Lake In Columbia County, customers should
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or call before 10:30 am. to report a ser-
in part is forbidden without the permnis- vice error, for same day re-delivery. After
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service 10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
No. 310-O0. vice related credits will be issued.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes In all other counties where home delivery
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(twilson@lakecityreporter.com) Circulation ...............755-5445
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CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run
in this space. And thanks for reading. ,


Kingston moved
to ICU after crash-
MIAM Hip-hop
singer Sean Kingstpn has
been stabilized and moved
to the intensive care unit
at a hospital after crashing
his watercraft into a Miami
Beach bridge, his publicist
said Monday.
The publicist, Joseph
Carozza, said Kingston's
family is grateful for every-
one's prayers and support
Kingston and a female
passenger were injured ,
when the watercraft hit the
Palm Island Bridge around
6 p.m. Sunday, Florida Fish
and Wildlife Conservation
Commission spokesman
Jorge Pino said.
The Miami Herald
reports that a passing
boater saw the accident
and took the two on board
his vessel.
Both were hospitalized
early Monday at Ryder
Trauma Center, but Pino
said he didn't know their
conditions.
Authorities are inves-
tigating the crash, and
"nothing at this point
would indicate that alcohol
played a role," Pino said.
Kingston rose to fame
, with his 2007 hit "Beautiful
Girls" and was also fea-
tured on songs by artists
including Justin Bieber.
SHis self-titled debut album
sold over 1 million copies
"worldwide.

3 officers injured
in 2 shootings
MIAMI BEACH, -
Three Miami Beach police
officers are in the hospital
after two early morning
shootings.
Sgt. Alejandro Bello said
the officers' injuries are
not life-threatening.
Detective Jenny
Velazquez told The Miami
Herald that details about
Monday's .shootings


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In a file photo, Sean Kingston arrives at the premiere of the
documentary film 'Justin Bieber: Never Say Never,' in Los
Angeles. Kingston was rushed to a hospital Sunday after
crashing his personal watercraft into a Miami Beach bridge.


remain "very cloudy" due
to the number of officers
frdm different agencies
helping patrol the South
Beach crowds for the holi-
day weekend.
Velazquez said police
opened fire in one shoot-
ing just before 4 a.m. when
a driver got into an alterca-
tion with an officer. The
driver was killed and four
bystanders were injured.
In the second shooting,
police said another driver
accelerated toward an offi-
cer in a blocked-off area.
The officer fired at the
driver until he crashed, but
no one was injured. The
driver was arrested.

Wildfire burns in
Central Florida
ORLANDO -
Firefighters are stamping
out a 1,000-acre brush fire
near a Lockheed Martin


facility in Central Florida,
More than 30 Orange
County firefighters
joined Florida Division of
Forestry teams Sunday to
get the blaze under con-
trol.
Authorities said there
are no residential struc-
tures within miles of the
fire, but the Maryland-
based defense contractor
does have several build-
ings on the property.
The Orange County Fire
Rescue Department said
firefighters first responded
to the area early Sunday
, afternoon after a column
of smoke was spotted.
Authorities said it took
several hours to get the
fire under control.
Cliff Frazier of the
forestry department's
Orlando district said the
fire was about 75 percent
contained Monday.


THE WEATHER


MOSTLY PA PARTLY PARTLY PARTLY PARTLY
SUNNY CLOUDY CLOUDY CLOUDY CLOUDY


H1 95L061 HI195LO67 HI93L0O68 H192LO 68 H1I94L0O69


I IM I. 'A


Talliassee
93/68 .
Pensacola "
87/72 Panam Ciy
88/71


TEMPERATURES
High Monday
Low Monday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low
PRECIPITATION
Monday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


7a 1p 7p la 6a
Tuesday Wednesday







Foeastedtemperatbn "FusIketmpiiturean
Tiinniiininni~iiiniiiimniiwmi.j wwi.....ij, mom 11 i


-
Oliando Cape Canaveral KeyWest
90/70 83/73 Lake Cty
Miami
Naples


West Palm Beah Ocala
\ 85/75 Orlando
Ft Ft Lauderdale Panama City
Ft Myer, 87/76 Pensacola
92/70 Naples Tallahassee
93/70 Miami Tampa
Key Wst 87/76 Valdosta
ey 8t 0 W. Palm Beach


June June June June
1 8 15 23
New First Full Last


On this date in
1830, a tornado
hit the town of
Shelbyville, Tenn.,
and turned the town
into "a heap of
ruins." The tornado
blew a book 7 miles
away.


I I weather.com
4r- ~ Forecasts, data and
S graphics 0 2011 Weather
m I i Y Central, LP, Madison, WIs.
weather www.weatherpubllsher.com


Get Connected
,.i -i i >

*5-it...

iMi^i^y^BBsa
^^^^^^^^^^^3


* Associated Press


S Saturday: A
7-36-41-42-44-47 :.


AROUND FLORIDA


*Jadcksonville
,90/74

Daytona Beachdi
8 %
86'.72
* S


Wednesday Thursday


al
h


.,*...94-68 .
Lake City,
95/67
Gainesville
,95/66
Ocala
94/66

Tampa *
Qi 79


Cape Canavera
* Daytona Beac
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Jacksonville


84,/72/s
85/71/pc
86/76/pc'
91/70/pc
94/68/pc
89/70/pc
87/78/pc
95/67/pc
86/77/pc
91/71/pc
92/68/pc
90/71/pc
89/73/pc
89/76/s
96/69/pc
90/70/pc
96/67/pc
86/76/pc'


85/,73/pc
86/71/pc
86/77/t
92/70/t
90/68/pc
88/72/pc
87/78/sh
93/68/pc
86/77/sh
90/73/t
90/68/pc
90/72/pc
91/73/pc
89/74/pc
95/69/pc
92/71/pc
96/68/pc
85/76/sh


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise tom.
Sunset torn.
MOON
Moonrise today
Moonset today
Moonrise tom.
Moonset torn.


94
66
89
65
99 in 1908
55 in 1971

0.00"
2.63"
14.11"
3.06"
17.08"


9

15nutiestol i
Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+.


6:30 a.m.
8:27 p.m.
6:30 a.m.
8:27 p.m.

5:23 a.m.
7:37 p.m.
6:09 a.m.
8:33 p.m.


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


WEDNESB


M=. -


rill


rL4 SATUR y
, : I fi


'LAKE CITY ALMANAC


H=TSP53|SOREDBY


UJ/


3











Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & NATION TUESDAY, MAY 31, 2011 3A


Shuttle Endeavour gone


forever from space station


By MARCIA DUNN
AP Aerospace Writer

CAPE CANAVERAL
Endeavour and its crew
of six left the International
Space Station and headed
home to close out NASA's
next-to-last shuttle flight,
pausing just long enough
Monday to perform a vic-
tory lap and test equipment
for a future interplanetary
ship.
"Endeavour looks real
nice out there," space sta-
tion resident Ronald Garan
Jr. called out.
The space station crew
beamed down video of the
departing shuttle, the last
ever shot of Endeavour in
orbit. It was a dark, solitary
image against the blue,
cloud-covered Earth and
grew increasingly smaller.
NASA's youngest shuttle
- the baby of the fleet
with just 25 space voyages
- is due back in Florida
early Wednesday. Its next
stop after that will be a
museum in Los Angeles for
what some consider to be
an early retirement.
Endeavour undocked
close to midnight Sunday,
ending 11 1/2 days of joint
flight. The two spacecraft
were soaring more than
200 miles above Bolivia
when they parted.
By the time they were
over eastern Europe, the
shuttle astronauts could
see the $2 billion cosmic
ray detector they installed
on the space station, as well
as the new platform hold-
ing spare parts.
"We're the ones that get
to see this incredible view,
but you're all with us in
spirit, and this is really a
new day for science aboard
the space station," shuttle
commander Mark Kelly
told Mission Control.
Endeavour and its crew:
left behind a space station
that now has a mass of


ASSOCIATED PRESS
An image made from NASA Television shows the Endeavoour as it does it's fly around of
the International Space Station Monday May 30, 2011, before returning home on NASA's
penultimate shuttle mission. The shuttle is viewed from the Space Station as they pass over
Australia.


905,000 pounds and is 100
percent complete, at least
as far as NASA's share of
the 12-year project. On
the fourth and final space-
walk of the mission Friday,
the astronauts attached
an extension pole and
declared the construction
effort over.
The Russian Space
Agency still intends to add
another compartment or
two. But the other partners
have all the major items
they need already up there
for the decade ahead.
Atlantis will make one
last supply run to the space
station this summer to close
out the 30-year shuttle pro-
gram.
Endeavour's final job in
orbit was to provide a plat-
form for a navigation exper-
iment, designed to assist
future spacecraft that may
fly to an asteroid or Mars
one day. The shuttle and its
,astronauts 'hung around a
few extra hours to accom-
plish the task, after photo-


graphing the station from
all sides.
"We're closing another
,chapter on the flight," astro-
naut Andrew Feustel radi-
oed when the experiment
ended. He asked if flight
controllers got enough
data. "We've got a room-
ful of happy people down
here," replied Mission
Control.
The lead shuttle flight
director, Gary Horlacher,
praised Kelly and his crew
for their "absolutely flaw-
less" 16-day mission. He
wished them "a safe voy-
age" and said he'd meet
them on the runway at
Kennedy Space Center.
Kelly promised to see
him there; although he
noted that stiff crosswind
might postpone the touch-
down. ,
Endeavour will aim for
a rare middle-of-the-night
touchdown. Landing time
is 2:35 a.m. Wednesday.
Just four hours before-
hand, Atlantis will begin


the three-mile trek from the.
hangar to the launch pad
one last time. Hundreds if
not thousands of Kennedy
Space Center employees
will be on hand for the dou-
ble-header events.
Built to 'replace the lost
Challenger, Endeavour will
have racked up 123 million
miles by flight's end, begin-
ning with its first journey in
1992, and have circled Earth
more than 4,670 times.
NASA's launch director has
mentioned on more than one
occasion that Endeavour still
looks new.
"It's kind of sad to see
it ending, but it's time to
move on to the next chap-
ter," Horlacher told report-
ers Monday morning.
One person missing all
the fanfare in Florida will
be Arizona congresswom-
an Gabrielle Giffords, the
wife of Endeavour's com-
mander. She attended the
May 16 launch, but under-
went skull reconstruction
two days later in Houston.


Obama prospects

might hinge on

voter registration


By KEN THOMAS
Associated Press

WASHINGTON In
2008, Barack Obama
tapped into a record of
nearly 15 million voters
who cast ballots for the
first time, a surge in reg-
istration that may be diffi-
cult to replicate next year.
Recent voter registration
data show that Democrats
have lost ground in key
states that Obama carried
in 2008, an early warning
siren for the president's re-
election campaign. While
Republican numbers have
also dipped in some states,
the drop in the Democrats'
ranks highlights the
importance of the Obama
campaign's volunteer base
and the challenge they
could have of registering
new voters.
"When you look back
at 2008 there has to be
a recognition that it was
a historic election, a his-
toric candidate, a histor-
ic moment in time and
potentially some type of
a ceiling -. I'm not sure
there is ever a hard ceiling
- in terms of voter regis-,
tration," said Democratic
strategist Chris Lehane.
He said the political map
in 2012 will likely look
more like it did going
into the close contests
of 2000 and 2004, which
hinged on swing states
like Florida and Ohio,
respectively, than in 2008,
when Obama won tradi-
tionally Republican states
like Indiana and North
Carolina.
Obama will have to
re-ignite the passions of
some Democrats who had
high hopes going into
his presidency and may
be ambivalent about him
now. Several states with
Republican governors have
tried to reduce the num-


ber of early voting days
and required photo IDs, a
move that Democrats say
will disenfranchise poor
and minority voters. Polls
have shown some politi-
cal independents drifting
away from Obama since
2008, meaning Democrats
need to register and turn
out more Hispanic and
black voters, college stu-
dents and women.
While Democratic reg-
istrations ballooned prior
to the 2008 election, the
numbers have declined in
several important states,
including:
Florida: Democrats
added more than 600,000
registered voters between
2006 and 2008, giving
Obama about 4.8 million
registered Democrats to
help his cause. Registered
Democrats now number
4.6 million in the Sunshine
State. Republican registra-
tions have slipped from 4.1
million in 2008 to about
4.05 million in mid-March,
the most recent data avail-
able. Nearly 2.6 million
voters in Florida are unaf-
filiated.
Pennsylvania:
Democrats maintain a
1.5 million voter advan-
tage in registrations over
Republicans, but their
numbers have dwindled
since Obama's election.
There were 4.15 million
registered Democrats
through mid-May, com-
pared with about 4.48 mil-
lion in 2008. Democrats
added bout a half-million
voters to their rolls in the
two years prior to the 2008
election. Republicans cur-
rently have more than 3
million registered voters,
compared with 3.2 million
in 2008. About 500,000
Pennsylvania voters are
unaffiliated.


DAR welcomes new officers at meeting


From staff reports

The 2011-2013 chapter
officers were installed dur-
ing the Edward Rutledge
Daughters of the American
Revolution monthly meet-
ing May 12.
Members wore a variety
of hats to say "hats off' to
Sthe officers.
Elena Kennedy,
Jacksonville's Fort San


Nicholas Chapter regent,
performed the installation
ceremony.
New officers are: Nancy
Wheaton, regent; Reta
Strattan, vice regent;
Margaret Henry, sec-
ond vice regent; Gigi
Register, chaplain; Marcia
Kazmierski, secretary;
Jeanette Kennedy, treasur-
er; Betty Wilson, registrar;
Tuckie Maultsby, historian;


and Gloria Kemp, librarian.
Betsy Burch, outgoing
regent, was presented a
gold Past Regent pin as a
thank you for her two years
of service.
Chapter member Bivian
Howell received a Woman
in American History Award
during the meeting.
Also, the chapter induct-
ed five new members. It
now has 110 members and


many more are pending
approval of documentation
in Washington, D.C.
This was the last regular
meeting until Oct. 12, but
the chapter will continue
to attend and host summer
events.
To learn more about
Edward Rutledge DAR, &all
(386) 755-5579 or for the
Live Oak area call (386)
362-2180.


COURTESY PHOTO


New 2011-2013 officers for the Edward
Rutledge Daughters of the American
Revolution Chapter were installed May
12. Front row, from left, Gigi Register,
Chaplain; Nancy Wheaton, regent; and
Reta Strattan, first vice regent. Back row,
Marcia Kazmierski, secretary; Tuckie
Maultsby, historian; Margaret Henry, sec-
ond vice regent; Gloria Kemp, librarian;
and Jeanette Kennedy, treasurer. Not
pictured is Betty Wilson, registrar.


SIGNAL: Work to last 45 days

Continued From Page 1A


trigger the signal to change
to green.
Busscher said the project
was commissioned because
the current traffic signal is
not working properly.
"There is an existing sig-
nal there now, but it's a
very old signal that's not
working properly, as people


specific entrances dur-
ing the weekend.
Visitors can also tube
during the week. Many
others also canoe or
kayak down the river to
avoid the crowds.
Food, drinks or other
disposable items are not
allowed on the river to


vyho use it will tell you," she
said. "Sometimes it doesn't
work at all if you're the
only one there. This will
upgrade all of the equip-
ment and bring the signal
up to our current standards
and it will operate much
more efficiently."
The project calls for new


help protect and keep it
clean.
The Ichetucknee
Springs State Park is
open 8 a.m. until sunset.
Admission is $6 for a
vehicle of up ot eight
people. Tubing, as well
as other activities are $5
per person.


wires, new traffic signal
heads and a new control
box. Busscher said the traf-
fic signal poles will not be
replaced.
"They will do that work
after 9 a.m. so as not to
impact people going to
work," Busscher said.


CLOSINGS

From Page 1A

8:30 a.m. between State Road
100/County Road 100A and
just east of Florida Gateway
College for paving.
Also, new median cross-
overs at Hudson Discount
Marine, Macatees Mobile
Home Park and East Street
Auto Brokers will be paved.


L


Laine Morgan Wiilson
December 5, 1978- May 31, 2003


I ipgt years have passed since you left us.
Nofarewells were spoken, no time to say
goodbye. You were gone beJbre iwe knew
it and only God knows why. Some loved
ones come into our lives and quickly go,
some stay awhile anmid leave footprints on
our hearts, and we are never the samw. We
were so blessed to have you in our lives for
k',i ..... .'4 years, aud are left with
d h bI.. 'i,.'. h hl it i l.,.l. h i.j h l
quick nit, that sense of humor
I andyourbeautiful smile. There
is not a day that goes by that we
"Itm't think of you. You are forever in
hearts, and willalways be loved
'of and missed.
our Loving Family and Friends


Let us help B

your business D


COMMERCIAL & RE
Janitorial Services *
Tile, Grout and General *
Floor Maintenance
Fire, Water and *
Storm Restoration *


The Bayway Group, LLC '
AYWAY
SERVICES
Meeting The Needs Of Home And Industry
RESIDENTIAL
Upholstery Cleaning
Emergency Water '"
Extraction & Dry Down
Carpet & Rug Cleaning
Odor Control


24 hours a day 7 days a week emergency ca'll out
(386) 362-2244 (386) 755-6142 1-888-849-8234

636 Helvenston St. SE, Live Oak, Florida
www.baywayservices.biz The Bayway Group, LLC dba Bayway Services


18th ANNuAI \\EllboRN

Blueberry Festival
JUNE 3 & 4, 2010
FRiday, 9AM-9pml SATURdAy, 7AM-5pM






For directions, information or schedule.
www.wellborncomm u nityassociation.com
call 386-963-1157


State Farm"
Providing Insurance and Financial Services
Home Office, Bloomington, Illinois 61710

JOHN A. KASAK, Agent CLU CPCU
904 SW SR 247 Branford Hwy
Lake City, FL 32025-1592
Bus (386) 752-7521 Fax (386) 752-5044
WWW.JOHNKASAK.COM AJ


TUBING: Season starts

Continued From Page 1A


m-9


3A


3A


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


E


LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & NATION TUESDAY, MAY 31, 2011













OPINION


Tuesday, May 31, 201 I


www.lakecityreporter.com


AN


AN
OPINION


Another

uphill fight

for Lance

Armstrong
t has been said that base-
ball is America's national
pastime. But events in the
cycling world lately seem
to have changed that.
The new national pastime
is former teammates mak-
ing up accusations about
Lance Armstrong, a genuine
American hero and seven-time
Tour de France winner after
overcoming testicular cancer,
and his alleged use of perfor-
mance-enhancing drugs.
For those keeping track, the
count is now four Frankie
Andreu, Floyd Landis, George
Hincapie and Tyler Hartilton
who are cooperating with
federal authorities looking
into doping allegations against
Armstrong. Hamilton made
his case a quite convincing
one on "60 Minutes" the
other night, describing in detail
Armstrong's alleged extensive
PED regimen.
Predictably, Armstrong's
camp has fired back with the
tenacity that the cyclist used
to attack the French Alps. The
accusers, the Armstrong side
says, are liars with their own
agendas jealousy, selling
books, justifying their own dop-
ing excesses, etc. Armstrong
reps point to the more than 500
drug tests he passed through-
out his epic career though
Hamilton stated that the U.S.
Cycling Federation had a lot to
do with Armstrong's passing.
The question one has to ask
is quite simple: Did Armstrong
ignore the temptations of a sport
Srife with doping and cheating
and win his races honestly? Or,
as his accusers insist, was some-
thing else at work here?
There is no denying
Armstrong's wonderful charity
work for cancer research. No
doubt lives have been saved
with the millions he has raised.
But that is immaterial as to
whether Armstrong cheated.
The mounting evidence, some
of it circumstantial, says he did.,
Armstrong insists he did not.
If the feds get their way,
Armstrong will get his day in
court to prove his innocence.
And that will prove harder than
pedaling up the steepest hill.
Scripps Howard News Service


Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman


LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.0, Box 1709,


Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


Florida schoolbooks now to


be selected by a chosen few


,W hen Gov. Rick
Scott signed
Florida's budget
into law last
week at the
Villages retirement community,
he virtually removed the con-
cept of "public" from the pro-
cess of adopting textbooks and
other instructional materials for
Florida's public schools."
Tucked away in SB 2120 is a
Republican-sponsored measure
that kills the decades-old meth-
od of using statewide commit-
tees of administrators, school
board members, teachers and
other Floridians to select text-
books. Despite what critics
say; this process is democratic,
bringing together diverse views
and different levels of knowl-
edge that enrich learning.
In addition to eliminating
the lay committees, SB 2120
requires schools to adopt digital
textbooks by the 2015-16 school
year and to spend 50 percent of
their textbook budget on digital
materials.
With a stroke of the gover-
nor's pen, Florida now has a
Texas-style textbook adoption
process. The commissioner of
education, who is appointed by
the governor, has been handed
control of which textbooks and
other materials will be used.
The commissioner selects three
state or national bureaucrats,
called "subject matter experts,"
who will.serve as the review
committee. Two of the experts
will review books, and the third
will act as a tiebreaker. School
districts then are free to appoint
a district curriculum specialist
or one classroom teacher to
review some of the books and
materials recommended by the
experts.
Exactly what motivated GOP
lawmakers to push for this
drastic change? Department of
Education officials argue that
the bill will save Florida money
'by transferring responsibility for


Bill Maxwell
maxwell@sptimes.com
textbook reviews from a network
of statewide committees, involv-
ing travel and hiring substitute
teachers, to a three-person team.
Although many committees had
begun to meet online to save
time and money, officials said the
department was having difficulty
finding enough volunteers for the
labor-intensive task.
Several-current and former
volunteers from around the
state told me they enjoyed the
work because they met other
volunteers and shared ideas and
experiences. They believe their
contributions are important to the
state's children.
"In my opinion, there is no
real need to change the adop-
tion process," said April Griffin,
a member of the Hillsborough
County School Board and a for-
mer textbook adoption commit-
tee member. "The use of a more
broad-based selection group that
includes practitioners, specialists,
school board members and com-
munity members has not resulted
in the selection of poor-quality
materials. I worry that this new
legislation will take away checks
and balances that keep the focus
on student achievement, and it
has the potential to allow politi-
cal agendas to play a more active
role in the process.....
"I do not see how it is possible
'that a few people can accurately
screen and select the materials
given time limitations. I also do
not know how it is possible that
a few people can have absolute
expertise in every course offered
in the K-12 public school sys-
tem."
Like many others who have


served on adoption committees,
Griffin also worries that the new
centralized system will face the
same problems that Texas faces,
including perpetual charges of
political corruption, publishers'
favoritism and religious influence.
As a result of such problems,
cultural battles stay in the head-
lines, all at a high cost to chil-
dren's education. Which version
of the human narrative should be
in textbooks, creation or evolu-
tion? What about the history of
black slavery and its significance?
How far should textbooks go in
discussing Islam and other non-
Christian religions? Which books '
teach math the "acceptable"
way? Which books teach reading
"correctly"? Who should decide?
Which publishers should profit?
These matters are so impor-
tant that the process for deciding
them should not be left to whims
of three appointed, ideologically
driven bureaucrats.
* As for the mandate that Florida
schools adopt digital textbooks by
the 2015-16 school year, Griffin
and many others who have
served on textbook committees
think the state has no choice but
to embrace the future. Change is-
inevitable.
Still, the concern is that while
centralization of the review and
adoption process may enrich
select publishers and their agents
and perhaps even save the state
money, public education in
Florida may not improve signifi-
cantly.
In an email, Griffin aptly
sums up what will be lost-
"Centralization of decision-mak-
ing ... can be viewed as a step
backward. The process of using a
broader base of those participat-
ing in the adoption process has
helped bolster credibility and
support for the materials and the
process."
N Bill Maxwell is a columnist
and editorial writer for the
St. Petersburg Times.


ANOTHER OPINION

Now the hard part governing Haiti


Since his recent inau-
guration, Haitian
President Michel
Martelly has been a
whirlwind of activity,
traveling around the country in
private helicopters to reassure
Haiti's exhausted people that his
new government means well.
The president's visibility is a
welcome change from the style
of his predecessor, but it's time
for him to make the transition
from campaigning to governing.
The overriding need is to put
a functioning government in
place. Former Prime Minister
Jean-Max Bellerive resigned, as
expected, when Mr. Martelly
took office. Since then, the gov-
ernment has been on auto-pilot.


Outgoing ministers don't know
who inherits their portfolios and
are hesitant to make a deal, sign
a legal document or make action
involving the routine chores of
government.
Meanwhile, the hurricane
season starts next week and
the international community is
ready to move on various fronts
as soon as it has a domestic gov-
erning partner that can inspire
confidence. Haiti has no time to
waste.
Then there is the not-so-small
matter of new constitutional pro-
visions passed with great fanfare
by Haiti's parliament. One provi-
sion bestowed dual nationality on
Haitians living overseas. Haitians
in South Florida and elsewhere


have been clamoring for this
for years. But a dispute over the
parliamentary process cast the
reforms into doubt. Mr. Martelly
needs to resolve this issue.
Corruption and lack of trans-
parency will be Mr. Martelly's
most pressing challenges. Given
Haiti's turbulent domestic poli-
tics, Mr. Martelly must surely
be aware that the honeymoon
won't last. He needs to move
quickly to reassure Haiti's
people, the international com-
munity and Haiti's diaspora that
he's capable of providing strong
leadership. Otherwise, the
honeymoon will end in buyer's
remorse before he knows it.

E Miami Herald


Phil Hudgins
phbdgins@cninewspapers.com


How 'Boiled

Penuts' stand

got its start

he red man came
o the moun-
tains of Southern
Appalachia, histo-
rians say, because
game was abundant there.
The white man came
because the region had fertile
soil, beautiful scenery, plenty
of water and good boiled pea-
nuts.
I made up the boiled pea-
nuts part, but I bet it's true.
Somebody in the South dis-
covered the art of boiling pea-
nuts just a century or so after
Hernando de Soto discovered
water in the Mississippi River.,
"Hmmmm," said the first
eater of peanuts, "these
legumes of the Arachis hypo-
gaea vine are not bad. I bet
they'd be good if I boiled them
in salty water."
So he did and they were
good.
But before he could sell
them to the tourist the
white man who came down
from the North to get away
from the cold, to look for a
time-share and to buy antiques
- he had to create an atten-
tion-getter. He scribbled
"Boiled Penuts" on a piece of
parchment, attached the sign
to a stick and stuck it in the
ground alongside the, trail.
He misspelled "peanuts" on
purpose because he knew
Yankees were attracted to
things of Southern quaintness.
He built a big fire around
a black pot filled with spring
water, dumped in the legumes
brought by mule fresh from
South Georgia, arranged a few
pumpkins and jars of honey in
an enticing display, sat down
in a cane-bottom chair, leaned
against a tree and waited.
A tourist from the North saw
the smoke and the big, black
pot and said, "Whoa," a term
he'd heard Southerners use to
stop their mules.
"What have you got in the
pot, Mister?" the Yankee said.
"Boiled Penuts," the
Southerner answered.
"Never heard of 'em," but
I'll try a few," the tourist said.
So the Southerner dipped a
pork'n'beans can filled with
holes into the boiling water
and brought up 50 cents' worth
of hot legumes, which he put
into a paper sack, recently
invented for the very purpose
of holding hot legumes.
"Not bad," the visitor said,
popping a second Boiled Penut
into his mouth, "but they're a
little tough, aren't they?"
"Well, Mister," the
Southerner said, "you're
s'posed to take 'em out of the
hulls first."
The Yankee climbed back on
his mule, whose rear end was:
now loaded with four pump-
kins and three jars of honey,
and said, "Giddyup," a term
he'd heard Southerners use to
start their mules.
"I'll tell my friends about your
Boiled Penuts," he said as he
rode out of sight. And he did.
Thus began the roadside stand
specializing in Boiled Penuts.
Centuries later, I stopped
at a stand in the mountains
to buy three dollars' worth of
hot legumes. A fire was burn-
ing about 20 yards from the
stand, but the peanuts actually
were being boiled in two steel
drums inside a shed, and this
fire was fed by propane gas.
"Why do you have the fire
out there?" I asked naively.
"It's just an attention-getter,"
the proprietor said.
What did I tell you?

Phil Hudgins is senior editor of
Community Newspapers Inc.


4A












Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL TUESDAY, MAY31, 2011


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


* To submit your Community
Calendar item, contact Antonia
Robinson at 754-0425 or by
e-mail at arobinson @
lakecityreporter.com.


Today
Couponing 101
workshop
A Couponing 101 work-
shop is 7 p.m. today at the
Bristro at Christ Central
Ministries. The cost is
free.

LifeSouth seeks donors
The LifeSouth
Bloodmobile is seeking
donors 11 a.m.-5 p.m.
today at Walmart. Food,
fun, and giveaways.
Donors are entered to
win an X-Box with Kinect
system.

Fees for Senior
Services meal due
Payment for the
Columbia County Senior
Services Inc. Wednesday
homecooked meal is
due 10 a.m. today at the
LifeStyle Enrichment
Center. The menu is fried
fish, baked beans, cole
slaw, hush puppies and
banana pudding. Call (386)
755-0235 for more informa-
tion.


Wednesday
Beginners Spanish
Class
Columbia County Senior
Services Inc. is hosting
Beginners Spanish Class
10-11 a.m., free blood
pressure checks 11 a.m.-12
p.m. and a Kyle Houston
performance 11-11:45 a.m.
Wednesday at the LifeStyle
Enrichment Center. Call
(386) 755-0235 for more
information.

Thursday
Leads Club to host
open house event ..
A Leads Club open
house is 4-6 p.m.
Thursday at the Holiday
Inn & Suites of Lake
City. The open house is
an opportunity to meet
the group of Chamber
partners who meet bi-
monthly to exchange
business leads and ideas
with fellow business
professionals. Learn how
to become a Leads Club
member Admission is
free. Door prizes, compli-
mentary hors d'oeuvres
and refreshments. Cash
Bar will also be available.
Visitors are welcome to
attend. There is a $20
registration fee for Leads
members from both
groups 1 and 2. Leads
members need to contact
Theresa Westberry at
386-754-1411, ext. 106
or e-mail events@hilake-
cityfjcom. Contact the "
Chamber office at (386)
752-3690 for more infor-
mation.

Saturday
Lake City Dance Arts
to host dance recital
Lake City Dance Arts
presents its 16th annual
recital, "All About Dance"
3 p.m. June 4-5 at the
FGC Performing Arts
Center. It will feature
Clogging, Jazz, Hip Hop,
Modern and classical


COURTESY PHOTO

Combining forces to clean up a neighborhood
The North Florida Gator Club partnered with Habitat for Humanity of Lake City to finish clean-
ing up lots on Lomond Avenue during a workday May 21. New homes for partner families
will be built on the lots. The Gator club participated in the community service event as part of
International Gator Day, which is held on the third Saturday in May.


Ballet pieces including
Swan Lake, Sleeping
Beauty and more. Tickets
may be available at the
doorl5 minutes prior to
show time for $7.50. Call
the studio at (386) 755-
8869 for more information.


Reading Program to
feature Cultural Fair
The Columbia County
Library Summer Reading
Program will feature a
Cultural Fair from 2-4
p.m. Saturday at the Main
Branch.

Art Show coming to
Library's West Branch
Art is due 10
a.m.-noon Saturday at
the Columbia County
Library West Branch
for the Sixth Annual Art
Show. The show is June
4-Aug. 6. Applications
are available at the
Columbia County Public
'Library branches, the
Fabric Art Shop and.The
Frame Shop and Gallery
in Live Oak. Two and
three dimension artwork
of all media is eligible
for the show. Contact
Wally Reichert 758-7853
for more information.

Sunday, June 5
Author visits for Friends
of the Library program
A Friends of the Library
Author Program featuring
M. C. Finotti, author of
The Treasure of Amelia
Island will be held .at the
Main Library at 2 p.m.
Sunday, June 5.
Finotti is a journalist
who writes "I do, I do," a
weekly wedding column
in the Florida Times
Union. A former teacher
who lives in Atlantic
Beach, Ms. Finotti will
talk about writing his-
torical fiction and give
a "mini" writing lesson.
She is also the co-author
of The Insiders' Guide to
Jacksonville.

Tuesday, June 7
Lulu Ladies community
baby shower
The Lulu Ladies are
having a community
baby shower at 7 p.m.


June 7 at the Lulu
Community Center. The


Park. The day will fea-
ture the Summer Fun &


June 15 at the LifeStyle
Enrichment Center. Call
(386) 755-0235.

Thursday, June 16
A free Medicaid work-
shop is 2 p.m..June 16 at
the LifeStyle Enrichment
Center. Teresa Byrd
Morgan of Morgan Law
Center for Estate & '
Legacy Planning will expel
the myths and expand
the opportunities with
Medicaid Planning. The
LEC is located at 628 S.E.
Allison Court. Call Shana
Miller at (386) 755-1977 to
RSVP.

Friday, June 17
Tobacco Treatment
The Third Annual
Tobacco Treatment
Summit is 8 a.m. 4:45
p.m. June 17 at Pine
Grove Baptist Church in


Trenton. Lunch is provid-
ed. Contact Susie Lloyd at
slloyd@srahec.org or visit
www. ahecregistration.org
and select the Suwannee
River region.

Saturday, June 18
Rockin' in the 50's
*Rockin' in the 50's,
benefiting March of
Dimes, is 7 p.m. June 18
at the American Legion,
located at Hwy. 41 S. DJ
Mike Mullis will provide
the music. There will be
chance drawings, con-
tests with prizes, food
for sale and a cash bar.
Also, smoked chickens
and Boston butts will be
available. Tickets are $10
at Moe's Southwest Grill,
US 90 West, or call Linda
Waldron 755-2753 or
Maureen Lloyd 752-4885
for tickets or to pre-order
chickens or Boston butts.


event will benefit the Safety Program with eh L '.. L. LLL_J .J L J_ L .. .
Pregnancy Care Center. Lake City Police and Fire. p- n i
The public is invited to Departments. Vendors I B O1 "-;
attend and baby gifts are are welcome. Contact MARLON IVEY BAIL BONDS
appreciated. Call Eva Jackie Kite, community [ ___ DOI NG CUSTOMERS
Nelson at 755-6574 for redevelopment adminis-
more information. trator, at (386) 719-5766 i .. -lr-,' ,-tLJ L
"0 _' tl henr Irngr g, g r,:nro.i, g aemea cal/
or kitej@lcfla.com. I Office: (386) 208-0645
Wednesday, June 8 Cell: (386) 344-2233
Senior Services to offer Monday, 'LJune 13 TD Maronvey 24Hourent service
live entertainment Florida Trail Association LL .L. A LL_ li_.
'-- TT 7 --T T-I----
r- -717IT1 Z:


Columbia County Senior
Services Inc. is hosting
live entertainment 11-11:45
a.m. June 8 at the LifeStyle
Enrichment Center. Call
(386) 755-0235 for more
information.

Saturday, June 11

FACS of Lake City
announces events-
The Filipino American
Cultural Society of
Lake City is hosting an
Induction of Officers/
Board and Filipino
Independence Day
Dinner Party 6 p.m. June
11 at Epiphany Catholic
Church Social Hall.
The event will include a
social time, buffet'din-
ner and program. The
program will feature
FACS Cultural Dancers,
a guest speaker, and a
night of fun and dancing.
Members please bring
your best covered dish
to share and Filipino
attire is suggested. Non-
Members are always wel-
come, but there is a $10
per person cover charge
at the door for this event.
Contact Bob Gavette
(386) 965-5905 for more
information.

50th reunion
The Columbia High
School Class of 1961 is
having its 50th reunion
6 p.m. June 11 at the
County Club df Lake City.
The cost is $50 per cou-
ple or $25 per person. All
1961 classmates are invit-
ed to attend. Call Shirley
at 961-8105 or Sharon at
752-7943.

Farmers Market
The Lake DeSoto
Farmers Market opens 8
a.m. 12 p.m. at Wilson


The Suwannee Chapter
of the Florida Trail
Association is meeting
7-9 p.m. June 13 at the
Suwannee River Water
Management District
Office, 9225 CR 49, Live
Oak. The program will
feature a series of photos
taken by various mem-
bers during the 2010-
2011 hiking and paddling
season. Contact: Chapter
Chair, Sylvia Dunnam,
362-3256, dunnams@
windstream. net, or Irvin
Chance, (386) 330-2424.

Tuesday, June 14
Welcome to
Womanhood
Calling all middle and
high school girls for
Welcome to Womanhood
mentoring program 5-
8 p.m. June 14 at 532
Marion Street. Contact
Sandra Price at 386-
867-1601. Dinner
included. Transportation
can be provided if con-
tacted one week in
advance.

Homecooked meal
Payment for the
Columbia County Senior
Services Inc. Wednesday
homecooked meal is due
10 a.m. Tuesday at the
LifeStyle Enrichment
Center. The menu is
honey ham, collard
greens, macaroni and
cheese, corn bread and.
chocolate delight. Call
386-755-0235.

Wed., June 15
Lanny & Dennie Jones
performance
Columbia County
Senior Services Inc.
is hosting a Lanny &
Dennie Jones perfor-
mance 11-11:45 a.m.


OBITUARIES


Dorothy B. (Dot) Hill
Dorothy B. (Dot) Hill, 92, cur-
rently of Sylvania, GA, passed
away May. 30, 2011, at the
Ogeechee Area Hospice, States-
boro, GA... She was preceded
in death by her father, Cleveland
Clarence Bearden, her mother,
Edith Pigott Bearden, both natives
of Pike County, MS; her brother
P. Neal Bearden, of Hattiesburg,
MS, and her husband, Jay Dee
Hill, of Lake City, FL. Mrs. Hill
graduated from Mississippi State
College for Women (now Mis-
sissippi University for Women)
in 1939, majoring in Home
Economics. Until her marriage
in 1943, she taught high school
home economics at Macon, MS
and later at Clarksdale, MS.
After the mwar, Mrs.'Hill and her


husband lived in Lake City for
a year until he was recalled to
the Air Force during the Korean
War. Following the war, she
continued to live in Lake City
while he flew for almost a year
on the Berlin AirLift. They were
later stationed at Robins AFB in
Warner Robins, GA, Denison,
TX, and Manston Royal Air
Force Base in County Kent, Eng-
land. When they returned to the
U.S. from England, they were
again stationed at Robins AFB
until her husband retired from
the Air Force in 1964. She and
her husband then moved back to
Lake City, where they made their
home until his death in 1996. In
2003, she relocated to Atlanta,
GA and later to Sylvania, GA
to live with her son and daugh-
ter-in-law. Mrs. Hill was an ac-


tive member of the First Baptist
Church of Lake City for many
years. She spent the better part
of her life making a comfortable
home for her husband and chil-
dren. Mrs. Hill was passionate
about cooking, and was never
hesitant to try out innovative
recipes. Her dishes, especially
her cakes, were always in great
demand whenever there was any
kind of function at her church.
Mrs. Hill is survived by two
sons: David Norman Hill (Judy)
of Sylvania, GA, and John Mi-
chael Hill of Concord, NC; a
sister: Carolyn Miller; three
grandchildren: Terri H. Sand-
ers, David Patrick Hill, and
Stephanie Michelle Hill; and
one great-grandchild: Jonathan
Scott Sanders; a niece, Lou
Catherine (Gerald) Cleland; two


nephews: Russell N. Bearden
and Clark E. Bearden; and sev-
eral great-nieces and -nephews.
A graveside service will be con-
ducted by the Reverend Robert
Davis at Forest Lawn Memorial
Gardens Cemetery, Lake City,
FL at 11:00 a.m. on Wednesday,
June 1, 2011. In lieu of flow-
ers, donations may be made to
the National Alzheimer's As-
sociation (www.alz.org) or the
First Baptist Church of Lake
City, 182 Northeast Justice
Street, Lake City, FL 32055.
Joiner Anderson Funeral
Home Screven Chapel is in
charge of all arrangements.
Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


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LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL TUESDAY, MAY 31, 2011


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427









LAKE CITY REPORTER SCHOOLS TUESDAY, MAY 31, 2011


Bulletin Board

NESABOT URS SCHOOL


ON
CAMPUS

Fort White
Elementary
Fort White
Elementary put on the
Ritz May 20 with an after-
school party for the 100
Point Club readers in
Accelerated Reading.
This year's AR theme
was "Reading on the Red
Carpet ... Lights, Camera,
Action ... Read!" Students
earned a ticket to the
party if they met their
individual reading goals
with at least 85 percent
or higher accuracy each
reading period.
Many students attended
the gala, but special rec-
ognition is due to three,
awesome readers. The
top point winners who
attended the red carpet
party were fourth-grader
Makya Watson with 628.6
points with a 95.6 per-
cent average, fifth-grader
Donald Crosby with 379.9
points with a 97.4 percent
average and fifth-grader
James Cantelo with 341.6
points and a 96.5 percent
average.
Attendees enjoyed
music, food and photos
and point winners also
had a special limousine
ride at the party.
A 50 Point Club recep-"
tion was held May 23 in
honor of 50 students who
earned the title. More
than 60 students in the
100 Point Club participat-
ed in a reception in their
honor May 24.
A grand t6tal of 30,008.3
AR points were earned at
Fort White Elementary
this year. Hats off to our
students for all the read-
ing and quiz-taking in AR
this school year.

Columbia County
Aquatic Complex
2011 youth and adult
swimming lesson classes
meet Monday through
Friday for two-week long
sessions made up of 10
classes.
Classes are held at
8 a.m., 9 a.m., 10 a.m., 11
a.m., 5:15 p.m. and 6:10
p.m. "Mom & Tot" classes
are held at 11 a.m. and
6:10 p.m.
Most swimming lev-
els are offered at each
time.
Each class is 45 min-
utes long. Adult classes
are 30 minutes in length.
If one class has only one
child, the class is 30 min-
utes in length.
Each two-week long
session cost $50 per child
or adult
. M Registration is done
in person at the pool on
the following registration
dates register June 1
from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. or
June 2 or 3 all day for
Session 1, which will be
held June 6 through 17;
register June 15 from 5
p.m. to 7 p.m. or June 16
or 17 all day for Session 2,
which will be held June 20
through 30;'register July
6 from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m.
or July 7 or 8 all day for
Session 3, which will be
held July 11 through 22;
register July 20 from 5
p.m. to 7 p.m. or July 21
or 22 all day for Session
4, which will be held from
July 25 through Aug. 5;
register Aug. 3 from 5
p.m. to 7 p.m. or Aug. 4"
or 5 all day for Session 5,
which will be held Aug. 8
through 19.
There is no phone
registration, no, early reg-
istration and no refunds.
Classes will be held
indoors on rainy days.


The Columbia County
Aquatic Complex can
be reached at (386) 755-
8195.


COURTESY PHOTO


Fort White Elementary's 'Caught Being Good'
Fort White Elementary School students 'Caught Being Good' winners for March and April
pose for a photograph at the school. The two months' winners were combined because of
Spring Break. AlthOugh school is winding down, the 'faculty and staff still expect students to
continue good behavior and make positive choices.


STUDENT PROFILE


Name: Sarah Elizabeth
Dicks
Age: 11
Parents: Susanna and
Brad Dicks
School and grade:
Eastside Elementary, fifth
grade
Achievements:
Student Council represen-
tative,.Honor Roll for the
entire year and met AR
goal for each nine weeks
Clubs or organiza- '
tons: Student Council,
riding at The Oaks
Equestrian Center, Fifth
Grade Enrichment Group,
Battle of the*Brains team
member
What do you like best


COURTESY PHOTO
Sarah Elizabeth Dicks
about school? Learning
new ways to do different
things.
What would you like
to do when you com-


plete your education?
Ride horses.
'Teacher Suzanne
Verducci's comments:
Sarah is a great student.
She's always positive. She
is a breath of fresh air.
Principal Todd
Widergren's comments:
We are so. proud of Sarah
and all that she has
accomplished. She is a
wonderful student and an
awesome Tiger.
Student's comments
'concerning honor:
Eastside is a fantastic
elementary school. The
teachers are awesome.
The fifth-graders have cool
science activities and have
super fun field trips.


LEANNE TYOILake City Reporter
KinderKids sing 'My Flag'
Eastside Elementary School's kindergarten chorus,
'KinderKids,' performs hand motions,while they sing 'My
Flag' at the opening of the Columbia County School
Board's regular meeting at the District auditorium May 24,






Lake City Reporter

For Life Insurance|
Go With
Someone You Know
John Burns, IlI -. MaryH.Surnmera
Agent Financial Services Rep.

234 SW Main Blvd. 752-5866


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JASUN MAI I tWV WWALi-ILK/Lae uly Reporter
CHS graduates draw a crowd
Thousands of friends and family members fill the bleachers
and line the fences to watch approximately 400 Columbia
High School students graduate on Friday.


JASON MATTHEW.WALKER/Lake City Report

Top CHS students earn honors
Columbia High School students gather around Thursday as
they wait for the Baccalaureate Ceremony to begin Thursday
at Christ Central Ministries. Former shuttle astronaut Col.
Robert Springer (Ret.) was the guest speaker.


FCAT scores unchanged


Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE -
Statewide third-grade read-
ing and math results on
Florida Comprehensive
Assessment Test this year
are unchanged from 2010.
The statewide figures
show 72 percent of stu-
dents passed the reading
test and 78 percent passed
the math test the same
as last year.


But Education
Commissioner Eric Smith
said Thursday that a new,
more difficult version of the
FCAT did produce results
for students, schools and
districts that differ from
their 2010 scores.
Smith said the results
were calculated on last
year's FCAT score scale
because a new one will not
be established until this
fall.


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Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427










Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@lakecityreportercom


Lake City Reporter





SPORTS


Tuesday, May 31, 2011


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


BRIEFS
POP WARNER FOOTBALL
Registration for
new players
Lake City Pop Warner
football registration
for new players
begins Wednesday at
Richardson Community
Center. Sign-up is
9 a.m. to 5 p.m. today for
returning players.
For details, call Kim
Stephens at 623-2954 or
e-mail kimstephensl972@
yahoo.com.
FORT WHITE FOOTBALL .
Q-back Club
meeting Monday
The Fort White
Quarterback Club will
meet at 7 p.m. Monday
in the teachers' lounge
at Fort White High.
Summer fundraisers will
be discussed. All
members and those
interested in becoming a
member are encouraged
to attend.
For details, call Shayne
Morgan at
(386) 3974954.
SWIMMING
Lessons sign-up
on Wednesday
Youth and adult
swimming lessons will be
,offered at the Columbia
County Aquatic Complex,
beginning in June. "
Classes meet for two
weeks and six daily times
are offered, plus there
are two daily mom and
tot classes. Five sessions
are offered with the first
session June 6-17. Cost is
$50 per person.
*Registration is at the
pool (755-8195) from
5-7 p.m. Wednesday and
all day Thursday and
Friday. /
SOFTBALL
Adult league
registration Set
Registration for the
Lake City Recreation
Department's summer
co-ed, commercial and
women's adult softball
leagues is 8:30 a.m. to
5 p.m. weekdays through
June. 10 at Teen Town
Recreation Center. Fee
is $350.
For details, call
Heyward Christie at
754-3607.
YOUTH FOOTBALL
Jackson camp
in High Springs
Fort White High
football coach Demetric
Jackson is conducting a
football camp for
elementary and middle
school children at First
Baptist Church in High
Springs on June 24-25.
Cost of the camp is $40,
with a $5 discount for
each additional sibling.
For details, call
Jackson at 365-3304.
GIRLS SOFTBALL
Crushers clinic
set for July
Columbia Crushers
Softball Organization is
holding an elite softball
clinic for girls of all ages
from 8 a.m. to noon on
July 11-15. There will be
instruction in the
fundamentals of fielding
and hitting. Registration
is at Brian's Sports on
U.S. Highway 90 west.
For details, go to
columbiacrushers@gmail.
corn or call 755-4271.


N From staff reports


Tressel resigns


Ohio State coach
gives in to growing
accusations, scandal.
By RUSTY MILLER
Associated Press
COLUMBUS, Ohio Jim
Tressel, who guided Ohio State
to its first national title in 34
years, resigned Monday amid
NCAA violations from a tattoo-
parlor scandal that sullied the
image of one of the country's top
football programs.
"After meeting with university
officials, we agreed that it is in
the best interest of Ohio State
that I resign as head football
coach," Tressel said in a state-


On


ment released by the university.
"The appreciation that (wife)
Ellen and I have for the Buckeye
Nation is immeasurable."
Luke Fickell will be the coach
for the. 2011 season. He already
had been selected to be the inter-
im head coach while Tressel
served a five-game suspension.
Ohio. State spokesman Jim
Lynch said he was unaware of
any buyout or severance pack-
age. He added that Tressel had
returned from vacation Sunday
night and met with athletic direc-
tor Gene Smith, who then met
with staff. Tressel typed his
resignation and submitted it to
Smith, he said.
The resignation was first
reported by The Columbus


the


Dispatch.
Clearly, the turmoil had been
building. The resignation comes
nearly three months after Ohio
State called a news conference
to announce it has suspended
Tressel for two games later
increasing the ban to five games
to coincide with the players'
punishment and fined him
$250,000 for knowing his players
had received improper benefits
from a local tattoo-parlor owner.
The school said at the time it was
"very surprised and disappoint-
ed" in Tressel. Yet, the school
still managed to crack jokes.
Asked if he considered firing
Tressel, Ohio State President
TRESSEL continued on 3B


state


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Ohio State football coach Jim Tressel (left)
sits next to Ohio State University president
E. Gordon Gee during a news conference in
Columbus, Ohio, on March 8.


stage


BRANDON FINLEY/Lake City Reporter
Fort White High's A.J. Legree wears his championship medal for winning the high jump at the
Class 1A state meet.


By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com
State champions are
special, and rare.
AJ. Legree of Fort White
High was the only high
school athlete in Columbia
County to win a state cham-
pionship in the 2010-11
school year.
Legree won state in the
high jump to bring home
the second state champion-
ship for the Indians in the
school's history.
Legree jumped 6-foot-10 to
beat out Class 2A defending
champion Jarvis Davis of
Golden Gate High. Legree
posted his personal best
in one try, while it took
Davis two attempts to get
the same height
Legree was district cham-
pion in the high jump, then
placed second in the event
at the region meet Legree
also won district in the
300-meter hurdles.
Teammate Sitia Martinez
joined Legree at the state
meet, as she qualified in
the 100 meters and the
300-meter hurdles. She was
District 3-2A champion in


both events, as well as the
200 meters.
Tim Jernigan of Columbia
High was the runner-up at
state in Class 2A weight-
lifting. Jernigan tied in the
total lift for the Unlimited
Division, but weighed more
that his opponent
Jernigan won his weight
class in the district qualify-
ing meet.
Columbia's Barnibas
Madison won the 154-pound
weight class in the district
qualifier and placed third in
the state meet
Fort White weightlift-
ers JR Dixon (183-pound
weight class), Kurtis Norris
(unlimited) and Anthony
Pearce (unlimited) qualified
for the Class 1A state meet.
Dixon and Norris won their
weight class at the district
qualifier. Norris placed
seventh at state.
In girls weightlifting,
Columbia's Tiara Robinson-
Smith and Fort White's
Brett Sealey (110-pound
weight class) qualified for
state. Robinson-Smith won
the district qualifier in the
STATE continued on 3B


Nadal advances to face

Soderling in quarters


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Rafael Nadal of Spain returns against Ivan Ljubicic of Croatia
in a fourth round match at the French Open tennis
tournament in Roland Garros stadium in Paris on Monday.


Sharapova, Li Na
win; Djokovic
gets walkover
By CHRIS LEHOURITES
Associated Press
PARIS Rafael Nadal
improved his record at
Roland Garros to 42-1,
beating Ivan Ljubicic 7-5,
6-3, 6-3 on Monday to reach
the. quarterfinals of the
French Open.
The .five-time champion
was not troubled on Court
Philippe Chatrier, and the
win kept him on course to
equal Bjorn Borg's record
of six titles on the Parisian
clay.
"I have improved since
the tournament started,"
said Nadal, who was pushed
to five sets in the first round.
"I'm able to play better and
I'm going to continue on
this path."
Novak Djokovic also


"I have improved
since the
tournament
started."
-Rafael Nadal,
French Open champion

had a successful day, even
though he wasn't scheduled
to play. The second-seeded
Serb reached the semi-
finals of the tournament -
where he could meet Roger
Federer when quarterfi-
nal opponent Fabio Fognini
withdrew because of injury.
"Walkover from Fognini.
Bad luck for him, hope he
recovers fast. Today i get
to enjoy Paris in a different
way :-)" Djokovic wrote on
Twitter.
Maria Sharapova also
advanced Monday, as did
Australian Open runner-up
Li Na.
Nadal won four straight


titles at the French Open
before losing to Robin
Soderling in the fourth
round in 2009. He will face
Soderling in the quarter-
finals this year after the
fifth-seeded Swede defeated
Gilles Simon of France 6-2,
6-3, 7-6 (5).
"For me it will be a tough
match;" Nadal said .minutes
before Soderling completed
his victory. "He's played
two finals here at Roland
Garros, so he knows what
this means. He's got to play
his best tennis."
Federer won the 2009
French Open to complete
a career Grand Slam, but
Nadal returned to win his
fifth title in 2010.
Djokovic, who will not
be credited with a victory
because Fognini withdrew,
is after his own records.
If he wins his semifinal
match, he would equal
FRENCH continued on 3B


Legree is Class 1A

high jump champion












LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS TUESDAY, MAY 31, 2011


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
7 p.m.
ESPN San Francisco at St. Louis
10 p.m.
MLB Regional coverage, Colorado
at LA. Dodgers or N.Y. Yankees at
Oakland
NBA BASKETBALL
9 p.m.
ABC Playoffs, Finals, game I, Dallas
at Miami
TENNIS
Noon
ESPN2 French Open, men's and
women's quarterfinals, at Paris

BASKETBALL

NBA Finals

Miami vs. Dallas
Today
Dallas at Miami, 9 p.m.
Thursday
Dallas at Miami, 9 p.m.
Sunday
Miami at Dallas, 8 p.m.
Tuesday, June 7
Miami at Dallas, 9 p.m.

BASEBALL

AL standings

East Division
W L Pct GB
Boston 30 23 .566 -
NewYork 29 23 .558 'A
Tampa Bay 28 24 .538 I'A
Toronto 27 26 .509 3
Baltimore 24 28 .462 5'h
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Cleveland 31 19 .620 -
Detroit 27 26 .509 5'A
Chicago 24 31 .436 9'
Kansas City 23 30 .434 9h'
Minnesota .17 35 .327 15
West Division
W L Pct GB
Texas 28 25 .528 -
Los Angeles 29 27 .518 '
Seattle 27 26 .509 I
Oakland 27 28 .491 2
Monday's Games
Detroit 6, Minnesota 5
N.Y.Yankees 5, Oakland 0
Seattle 4, Baltimore 3.
LA.Angels 10, Kansas City 8
Texas atTampa Bay (n)
Cleveland at Toronto (n)
ChicagoWhite Sox'at Boston (n)
Today's Games
Texas (C.Wilson 5-3) at Tampa Bay
' (Cobb 0-0), 6:40 p.m.
Minnesota (Duensing 2-5) at Detroit
.- (Sch'rzer 6.2),'7!0S p.m:h s...
Cleveland (Talbot 1-I) at Toronto
(Morrow 2-2), 7:07 p.m.
Chicago White Sox (Floyd 5-5) at
Boston (Aceves 2-0), 7:10 p.m.
LA. Angels (Pineiro 2-1) at Kansas
City (Francis I-5), 8:10 p.m.
N.Y.Yankees (FGarcia 3-4) at Oakland
(Anderson 3-4), 10:05 p.m.
Baltimore (Guthrie 2-6) at Seattle
(Bedard 3-4), 10:10 p.m.
Wednesday's Games
Texas atTampa Bay, 1:10 p.m.
Chicago White Sox at Boston,
1:35 p.m.
N.Y.Yankees at Oakland, 3:35 p.m.
Baltimore at Seattle, 3:40 p.m.
LA. Angels at Kansas City, 4:10 p.m.
Minnesota at Detroit, 7:05 p.m.
Cleveland atToronto, 7:07 p.m.

NL standings

East Division
W L Pet GB
Philadelphia 34 20 .630 -
Florida 30 21 .588. 2'h
Atlanta 30 25 .545 4h'
New York 24 28 .462 9
Washington 22 31 .415 II'k
Central Division
W L Pct GB
St. Louis 32 23 .582 -
Milwaukee 29 24 .547 2
Cincinnati 27 27 .500 4'A
Pittsburgh 24 27 .471 6
Chicago 23 29 .442 7'A
Houston 20 34 .370 II'A
West Division
W L Pct GB
Arizona 29 24 .547 -
San Francisco 29 24 .547 -
Colorado 25 27 .481 3'k
' Los Angeles 24 30 .444 5'A
San Diego 23 31 .426 6'/
Monday's Games
Philadelphia 5,Washington 4
San Diego 3,Atlanta 2, 10 innings
Houston 12, Chicago Cubs 7
San Francisco 7, St. Louis 3
Milwaukee at Cincinnati (n)
S. Pittsburgh at N.Y. Mets (n)
Colorado at LA. Dodgers (n)
Florida at Arizona (n)
Today's Games
Philadelphia (CI.Lee 4-4) atWashington
(Marquis 5-2), 7:05 pm.
San Francisco (Vogelsong 3-1) at St.
Louis (Carpenter I-5), 7:05 p.m.
Milwaukee (Greinke 3-1) at Cincinnati
(Reineke 0-0), 7:10 p.m.
Pittsburgh (Ja-McDonald 3-3) at N.Y.
Mets (Dickey 2-5), 7:10 p.m.
San Diego (Latos 2-6) at Atlanta
(Minor 0-1), 7:10 p.m.
Houston (Lyles 0-0) at Chicago Cubs
(Zambrano 5-2), 8:05 p.m.
Florida (Ani.Sanchez 4-1) at Arizona
*, (I.Kennedy 6-1),9:40 p.m.
Colorado (Mortensen I-2) at LA.
Dodgers (Lilly 3-4), 10:10 p.m.
Wednesday's Games


Philadelphia at Washington, 1:05 p.m.
Houston at Chicago Cubs, 2:20 p.m.
Milwaukee at Cincinnati, 7:10 p.m.
Pittsburgh at N.Y. Mets, 7:10 p.m.
San Diego at Atlanta, 7:10 p.m.
Florida at Arizona, 7:40 p.m.
San Francisco at St. Louis, 8:15 p.m.
Colorado at LA Dodgers, 10:10 p.m.

ACC tournament

Saturday
Florida State 4, GeorgiaTech 2


Clemson 6, N.C. State 3
North Carolina 9,Wake Forest 0
Miami 4,Wake Forest 2
Virginia 3, North Carolina 2
Sunday championship
Virginia 7, Florida State 2

SEC tournament

Saturday
Vanderbilt 3,Arkansas 2
Georgia 4-2, Florida 3-3
Sunday championship
Florida 5,Vanderbilt 0

TENNIS

French Open

At Stade Roland Garros
Paris
Monday
Men
Singles
Fourth Round
Juan Ignacio Chela, Argentina, def.
Alejandro Falla, Colombia, 4-6, 6-2, 1-6,
7-6 (5), 6-2.
Rafael Nadal (I), Spain, def. Ivan
Ljubicic, Croatia, 7-5, 6-3, 6-3.
Gael Monfils (9), France, def. David
Ferrer (7), Spain, 6-4, 2-6, 7-5, 1-6, 8-6.
Robin Soderling (5), Sweden, def. Gilles
Simon (18), France, 6-2,6-3, 7-6 (5).
Andy Murray (4), Britain, vs. Viktor
Troicki (15), Serbia, 4-6,4-6,6-3,6-2, susp.,
darkness.
Women
Singles
Fourth Round
U Na (6), China, def. Petra Kvitova (9),
Czech Republic, 2,6, 6-I, 6-3.
Victoria Azarenka (4), Belarus, def.
Ekaterina Makarova, Russia, 6-2,6-3.
Maria Sharapova (7), Russia, def.
Agnieszka Radwanska (12), Poland, 7-6
(4), 7-5.
Andrea Petkovic (15), Germany, def.
Maria Kirilenko (25), Russia, 6-2, 2-6, 6-4.
Doubles
Men
Quarterfinals
Juan Sebastian Cabal, Colombia, and
Eduardo SchwankArgentina, def. Daniele
Bracciali and Potito Starace, Italy, 6-4,
4-6,6-2.
Women
Quarterfinals
Andrea Hlavackova and Lucie
Hradecka, Czech Republic, def. Kveta
Peschke, Czech Republic, and Katarina
Srebptnik (2), Slovenia, 6-3, 7-5.
Sania Mirza, India, and Elena Vesnina
(7), Russia, def. Gisela Duiko, Argentina,
and Flavia Pennetta (I), Italy, 6-0,7-5.
Mixed
Quarterfinals
Katarina Srebotnlik, Slovenia, and
Nenad Zimonjic (I), Serbia, def. Iveta
Banesova, Czech Republic, and Leander
Paes (7), India, 7-6 (3), 6-3.
Casey Dellacqua, Australia, and Scott
Lipsky, United States, def. Vladimira
Uhlirova, Czech Republic; and Michal
Mertinak, Slovakia, 7-6 (4), 7-6 (6).

Sunday
Singles
Men
Fourth Round
Fablo Fognini, Italy, def. Albert
Montanes, Spain, 4-6,6-4.3-6,6-3,11-9.
Roger Federer (3), Switzerland, def.
Stanislas Wawrinka (14). Switzerland, 6-3,
6-2,7-5.
. Novak Djokovic (2),Serbia,def.Richard
Gasquet (13), France, 6-4,6-4,6-2.
Women
Fourth Round
Anastasia Pavlyucheakova (14), Russia,
def. Vera Zvonareva (3), Russia, 7-6 (4),
2-6,6-2.
Francesca Schiavone (5), Italy, def,
Jelena Jankovic (10), Serbia, 6-3, 2-6,6-4.
clarionn Bartoli (I I), France, def. Gisela
Dulko, Argentina, 7-5, 1-0, retired.
Svetlana Kuznetsova (13), Russia, def.
Danlela Hantuchova (28), Slovakla, 6-7
(6), 6-3,6-2.

AUTO RACING

Coca-Cola 600

At Charlotte Motor Speedway
Concord, N.C.
Sunday
(Start position in parentheses)
I. (28) Kevin Harvick. Chevrolet, 402
laps, 94.4 rating, 47 points, $406,786.
2. (8) David Ragan,'Ford, 402, 117.3,
43, $244,375.
3. (23) Joey Logano, Toyota, 402, 71.5,
41, $194,475.
4. (26) Kurt Busch, Dodge, 402, 90.6,
41, $190,900.
5. (2) A J Allmendinger, Ford, 402,
106.6,40,$186,861.
6. (24) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 402,
96.3, 39, $155,24 I.
7. (25) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet,
402, 103.6, 38, $131,575.
8. (20) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 402,
70, 36, $140,270.
9. (7) David Reutimann, Toyota, 402,
83.8, 35, $139,533.
10. (4) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 402,
1q 9.3,35, $165,800.
II. (9) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 402,
72.3,0, $106,175.
12.(29)Juan Pablo Montoya,Chevrolet,
402,78.2,33, $141,883.
13. (15) Greg Biffle, Ford, 402, 97, 32,
$121,750.
14.(19) Matt Kenseth, Ford,402, 124.4,
32,$162,186.
15. (10) Clint Bowyer, Chevrolet, 402,
77.7, 29,$144,033.
16. (3) CarI Edwards, Ford, 4102, 108,
29, $145,941.
17. (22) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 402,
73.3,28, $140,383.
18. (18) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 402,
65.1 26, $124,789.


19. (1) Brad Keselowski, Dodge, 402,
96.4,26, $164,708.
20. ( I1) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 401,
80.7,25,$138,61 I.
21. (5) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 401,
84.8,24, $104,525.
22. (17) Kasey Kahne, Toyota, 401,
80.3, 23, $117,583.
23. (37) Casey Mears,Toyota, 401,52.4,
22, $93,175.
24. (27) Bobby Labonte, Toyota, 400,
57.1,20,$117,970.
25. (31) Travis Kvapil, Ford, 398, 47.9,
0, $105,233.


26. (14) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 397,
57.6, 18, $98,125.
27. (42) Dave Bianey, Chevrolet, 396,
37.6, 17,$101,483.
28. (6) Jimmie Johnson. Chevrolet,
engine, 395, 89.9, 16, $140,736.
29. (16) Paul Menard, Chevrolet. 383,
69, 15, $93,950.
30. (39) Mike Bliss, Ford, 367, 39.6, 0,
$96,597.
31. (12) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet,
358,48, 13, $127,750.
32. (21) Kyle Busch, Toyota, accident,
344.86.5, 13, $133,391.
33. (30) David Gilliland, Ford, accident,
301,43.2, 11,$86,100.
34. (13) Mark Martin, Chevrolet,
accident, 301, 55, 10, $93,300.
35. (40) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet,
accident, 293, 37.1,0, $84,875.
36. (32) David Starr, Ford, accident,
286,43.4, 0, $84,750.
37. (35) Jamie McMurray, Cievrolet.
engine, 181, 57.3,8, $123,414.
38. (41) Robby Gordon, Dodge, brakes.
99,30.7,6, $84,410.
39. (33) Michael McDowell, Toyota,
engine, 40,33.4,5, $84,300.
40. (38) David Stremme, Chevrolet,
handling, 34, 30.3, 4, $84,165.
41. (36) Joe NemechekToyota, clutch,
28, 30.2, 0, $84,005.
42. (34) J.J.Yeley, Chevrolet, brakes, 22,
29.9, 2, $83,925.
43. (43) Mike SkinnerToyota, vibration,
6,29.5,0, $84,290.
Race Statistics
Average Speed of Race Winner:
132.414 mph.
Time of Race: 4 hours, 33 minutes,
14 seconds.
Margin of Victory: 0.703 seconds.
Caution Flags: 14 for 64 laps.
Lead Changes: 38 among 19 drivers.
Top 12 in Points: I. C.Edwards, 445;
2. K.Harvick, .409; 3. J.Johnson, 408;
4. D.Earnhardt Jr., 402; 5. Ky.Busch, 392;
6. Ku.Busch, 377; 7. M.Kenseth, 374;
8. C.Bowyer, 365; 9. T.Stewart, 356;
10. R.Newman, 353; II. G.Biffle, 343;
12. D.Hamlin, 339.

Indianapolis 500

At Indianapolis Motor Speedway
Indianapolis'
Sunday
(Starting position in parentheses)
All cars Dallara chassis, Honda engine
I. (6) Dan Wheldon, 200 laps.
2.(12)J.R. Hildebrand, 200.
3. (29) Graham Rahal, 200.
4. (22) Tony Kanaan, 200.
5. (2) Scott Dixon, 200.
6. (3) Oriol Servia, 200.
7(14) Bertrand Baguette, 200.
8. (21) Tomas Scheckter, 200.
9. (27) Marco Andretti, 200.
10. (25) Danica Patrick, 200.
I I. (8) Ed Carpenter, 200.
12. (9) Dario Franchitti, 200.
13.(28) Charlie Kimball, 199.
14. (5) Will Power, 199.
15.(llI)VitorMeira, 199.
16. (19) Justin Wilson. 199.
17. (16) Helio Castroneves, 199.
18. (7) Buddy Rice, 198.
19. (30) Alex Uoyd, 198.
20.(31) Pippa Mann, 198.
21. (32) Ana Beatriz, 197.
22. (17) John Andretti, 197.
23. (33) Ryan Hunter-Reay, 197.
24. (15) Davey Hamilton, 193.
25.(24) PaulTracy, 175.
26. (4) Townsend Bell, 157, Contact.
27. (26) Ryan Briscoe, 157, Contact.
28. (I) Alex Tagliani, 147, Contact.
29. (13) James Hinchcliffe, 99,
Contact
30. (20) Jay Howard, 60, Contact.
31. 123) Simona de Silvestro, 44,
Handling.
32. (18) E.J.Viso, 27, Contact.
33. (10) Takuma Sato, 20, Contact.
Race Statistics
Winners average speed: 170.265 mph.
Time of Race: 2 hours, 56 minutes,
11.7267 seconds:
Margin of Victory: Under caution.
Cautions: 7 for 40 laps.
Lead Changes: 23 among 10 drivers.
,Points: Power 194, Franchitti 178,
Servia 150, Kanaan 135, Dixon 129, Rahal
120, Briscoe I'14, Hildebrand 113,Tagliani
I IO, Conway 102.

SOFTBALL

NCAA super regionals

Saturday
Florida 7, Oregon 0, Florida
advances
California I, Kentucky 0
Houston I, Oklahoma State 0
Oklahoma State 6, Houston 5,
Oklahoma State advances
Oklahoma 5, Arizona 2, Oklahoma
advances
Baylor 5, Georgia I
Missouri 4.Washington 0
Sunday
Kentucky 8, California 0, 5 innings
California 9, Kentucky 0, California
advances
Georgia 14, Baylor 2,5 innings
Baylor 9, Georgia 2, Baylor advances
Missouri 6, Washington 3, Missouri
advances

NCAA World Series

At ASA Hall of Fame Stadium
Oklahoma City
(Double elimination)
Thursday
Game I California (44-I11) vs.
Alabama (51-9), I p.m.
Game 2 Oklahoma State (42-18)
vs. Baylor (45-13), 3:30 p.m.
Game 3 Oklahoma (42-17) vs.
Arizona State (55-6), 7 p.m.
Game 4 Missouri (52-8) vs.
Florida (52-I0), 9:30 p.m.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Miami Heat players Dwyane Wade (left) and LeBron James watch game film after a practice
session in Miami on Sunday.



Heat seek to justify



flap over free agency


By BRIAN MAHONEY
Associated Press

MIAMI LeBron
James and Dwyane Wade
joked often, smiled easily,
answered thoughtfully.
A few minutes later,
Dirk Nowitzki bounded up
to a podium and offered a
big "How we doin!" to the
assembled media.
You'd never know only
one of them is a "good
guy."
Less than a year after
solidifying their place as
the NBA's villains with their
high-profile partnership
last summer, James, Wade
and the Miami Heat are
in the NBA. finals against
the Dallas Mavericks and
Nowitzki, being portrayed
as a sort of anti-James for
sticking with his home
team instead of taking the
easy way out and going
elsewhere for a better shot
at a title.
And if you hated the
theatrics of last summer,
the light shows, pep rally,
and everything else Miami
did to celebrate winning
the championship of July,
better look away. The Heat
are just four wins from
the first of several titles
that many predicted when
James bolted Cleveland for
South Florida.
The way it happened
bothered plenty, but James


I1
4
7
11'

12

14 1

15 I
17 E
18 I
19 (

21

22 1
23 I
v


only cares about the result.
"You know, we've got a
lot of flack this year, most-
ly because of myself. And
we've tried to use that as
motivation every day we get
on the basketball court,"
James said Monday. "But
just play the game of bas-
ketball. That's all we can
do is play the game of bas-
ketball at a high level. Play
Miami Heat basketball."
Five years after Wade
largely overwhelmed the
Mavericks by himself to
win the Heat's first cham-
pionship, the teams arrive
at Game 1 of the rematch
today through decidedly
different constructions.
The Heat essentially sacri-
ficed seasons for salary-cap
space, making the playoffs
through Wade's greatness
but with no realistic chance
of winning. But the gamble
paid off in July, when James
and Chris Bosh agreed to
come and Wade committed
to stay, giving Miami the
Nos. 1, 2 and 3 players on
perhaps the greatest free-
agency list in NBA history.
Nowitzki's name was on
it, too, and he even said he
would have listened if had
James and Wade tried to
recruit him. His preference
was to remain in Dallas, as
long as owner Mark Cuban
would do what it takes
to give' the big German
another shot at a ring.


ACROSS 35 Impressive
vases
UK fliers 36 Wrinkle
Over and over 38 Seize forcibly
Spouted 39 Apple seed
"Rope-a-dope" 40 Tender pod
boxer 41 Cloud-seeding
Cleopatra's compound
wooer 44 Summer top
Time long 48 Execute per-
gone fectly
ndoor mall 49 Strike through
By Jove! (2 wds.)
Metaphor kin 51 Scare
C-3P0 and off a fly
R2D2 52 Fork part
Brown the 53 Before
bandleader 54 Woo-finishing
Technique oil
Musical key (2 55 PC key
wds.) 56 Distress call


26 Abdul-
Jabbar
29 He played Obi-
Wan
30 Get fresh
31 take forever!
33 Woody ex
34 "Ask Dr. -"


HOCKEY

Stanley Cup

Boston vs.Vancouver
Wednesday
Boston atVancouver, 8 p.m.
Saturday
Boston at Vancouver, 8 p.m.
Monday, June 6
Vancouver at Boston, 8 p.m.
Wednesday, June 8
Vancouver at Boston, 8 p.m.


DOWN


* "Ultimately, that's where
my heart was at. I almost
felt like we had unfin-
ished business after '06,"
Nowitzki.,said. "Had a great
meeting with Mark there,
free agency. All I needed
was reassurance that he
was going to keep going
and keep building around
this team, and keep putting
all his resources for us to
hopefully be up there one
day. We're here again at the
big stage. Hopefully we can
turn it around this year and
finish strong."
With reliable role play-
ers such as Jason Kidd,
Jason Terry and Shawn
Marion but no defined
second scorer, the
Mavericks arrived in the
postseason as an after-
thought, maybe even a
first-round upset loser to
Portland. Instead, a stun-
ning sweep of the Lakers
in the* second round was
followed by Nowitzki's
spectacular play against
Oklahoma City in the
Western Conference finals,
making the Mavs the last
hope for the Heat haters
who wanted .Boston or
Chicago to humble Miami.
'We are facing a very
tough team, a very good
team with a bunch of clos-
ers and leaders. 'And so
we've got to just go from
there and bring pur best
game," Nowitzki said.


Answer to Previous Puzzle

YIEP AMBO AIW L
AMAH NILE NAE
Ki(LO ENTRANTS
STEAD Y V OTE
R YE ORE
MA Y




AS IDE NIACIN
DIGS PELE VCR
OLE ERRS SEAN
TRACED LISAS

POP MAC
TRI


IHOP EXISTS
VASTNESS LEEK
ALL EARS YETI
NEO BUOn Y DEN


6 Numerical prefix
Dust collectors 7 So long! (hyph.)
Jai 8 Company
Thin coating emblem
Brunch favorite 9 Latin 101 verb
Ticket prices 10 Gets spliced


13 Teen fundrais-
er (2 wds.)
16 Fragrant
shrub
20 Bireme
movers
23 Emeril's
catchword
24 Paris cop
25 Tragic
monarch
26 Klondike -
27 Gael republic
28 Rockies,
briefly
30 Questionable
32 Summer hrs.
34 Plunder
35 Where Asia
begins
37 Novel closer
38 Ferret or mink
40 Make a call
41 Prof.
42 Surfing mecca
43 Pop's Celine
45 Sock tips
46 Franc's
replacer
47 Country
addrs.
50 Disposed of


2011 UFS, Inc.


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com
11 12 13 4 15 16 # 7 18 19 110 I


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421












Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421 LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS TUESDAY, MAY 31, 2011


No. 1 golfer settled in playoff


Associated Press

VIRGINIA WATER,
England Luke Donald
won a duel for No. 1 with
a, playoff victory over
fellow Englishman Lee
Westwood in the BMW
PGA Championship.
Donald, second behind
Westwood entering the
tournament, birdied the
par-5 18th in the playoff,
hitting his approach within
5 feet before Westwood's
wedge shot spun off the
green and into the water
hazard.
Donald closed with
a 1-under 70 to match
Westwood (68) at 6-under
278 on Wentworth's West
Course.
Donald joined Westwood
and Nick Faldo as the only
Englishmen to hold the
No. 1 spot since the
ranking was introduced
in 1986. The victory was
Donald's second in stroke
play in five years. He
won the European Tour's
Madrid Masters last year.
In February, he won the
World Golf Championships-
Match Play Championship
in Arizona.
Donald missed two pre-
vious chances to become
No. 1, losing to Ian Poulter
in the World Match Play
final last week in Spain and
falling to Brandt Snedeker
in a playoff at The Heritage
on the PGA Tour in April.
England's Simon Dyson
had a 68 to finish third at
4 under.

Byron Nelson
Championship .
IRVING,Texas-Keegan
Bradley won the Byron
Nelson Championship for
his first PGA Tour victory,
parring the first hole of a
playoff with Ryan Palmer.
Bradley, the nephew
of IPGA Tour great Pat
r:'Bradley, sank a 2-foot par


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Tom Watson waves to the crowd after sinking a birdie putt
to beat David Egers in a playoff t6 win the Senior PGA
Championship golf tournament at Valhalla Golf Club in
Louisville, Ky., on Sunday.


putt at the 419-yard 18th
hole in the playoff. Palmer's
approach wentinto the water
and he made a bogey.
About an hour earlier,
Bradley finished his closing
round of 2-under 68 with a
par at No. 18, dropping into
a squat and hopping a few
times in frustration when
his 10-foot birdie chance
slid by the hole.
Palmer (72)-and Bradley


finished at 3-under 277, the
highest winning score on
the PGA Tour this year.

Senior PGA
Championship
LOUISVILLE, Ky. -
Tom Watson blasted out of
a bunker to 3 feet to set up
his winning birdie on the
first hole off a playoff with
David Eger. in the Senior


PGA Championship.
The 61-year-old Watson,
down a shot with four holes
left in regulation, became
the oldest player to win a
major since the senior tour
was created in 1980.
Watson closed with
a 2-under 70 to finish at
10-under 278 en route to
his sixth Champions Tour
major and 14th overall.
He also won five -British
Opens, two Masters and a
U.S. Open.
Perhaps better known as
a rules official than as a
player, Eger closed with a
67.
Both Eger and Watson
missed short birdie putts'on
the 72nd green that would
have won it in regulation,
Eger pulling a 6-footer and
Watson pushing one from
4 feet.
Kiyoshi Murota, who had
,at least a share of the lead
'after each of the first three
rounds, shot a 72 to fin-
ish third, a shot out of the
playoff.
Five days before he turns
66, four-time Senior PGA
winner Hale Irwin had
a double bogey and two
bogeys in a 73 that left him
fourth at 8 under.

Brazil Cup
RIO DE JANEIRO -
Colombia's Mariajo Uribe
won the LPGA Tour's Brazil
Cup, closing with a 6-under
66 in rainy conditions
for a one-stroke victory
over Lindsey Wright in
the 36-hole exhibition
tournament.
Uribe birdied five of the
first seven holes on the
Itanhanga Golf Club course
and had two more birdies
and a bogey on the back
nine before closing with
four straight pars.
Wright, from Australia,
had her second straight 68.
Sweden's Maria Hjorth (67)
was third at 7 uhdet. "--


STATE: Sydni Jones, Martinez win 3 district titles
Continued From Page 1B


199-pound weight class.
Columbia wrestler Cole
Schreiber qualified for state
and placed sixth in the
103-pound weight class. It
was his second trip to state
and he advanced as District
2-2A champion and region
champion. Schreiber was
3-2 in state matches.
Monterance Allen
qualified for state in the
199-pound weight class. He
was district champion and
placed third at region. Allen
was 1-2 in state matches.
Daniel Graham and
Joseph Fields were district
runners-up, while Isaac
Henderson and Daniel
Devers placed third. The
top four advance to region.
Columbia swimmers
Heather Burns and Lindsay
Lee qualified for the state
meet. Burns made the state
field in the 500 freestyle and
200 freestyle. She placed
third in District 2-2A in both
events.
Lee qualified in the 100
backstroke, where she was
second at district. Lee was
fourth at district in the 50
freestyle.
The 200 medley relay
team of Lindsay Lee,
Katherine Mathis, Burns


TRESSEL: 106-22 at OSU
Continued From Page 1B


E. Gordon Gee said then:
"No, are you kidding? Let
me just be very clear: I'm
just hopeful the coach
doesn't dismiss me."
Tressel's downfall came
with public and media pres-
sure mounting on Ohio
State, its board of trustees,
Gee and Smith.
"We look forward to
refocusing the football
program on doing what we
do best representing
this extraordinary univer-
sity and its values on the
field, in the classroom,
and in life," Smith said in
a statement Monday. '"We
look forward to support-
ing Luke Fickell in his role
as our football coach. We
have full confidence in his
ability to lead our football
program."
Tressel and Ohio State
were to go before the
NCAA's infractions com-


mittee Aug. 12 to answer
questions about the player
violations and why Tressel
did not report them. He
denied knowledge of
improper benefits to play-
ers until confronted by
investigators with emails
that showed he had known
since April 2010.
The 58-year-old Tressel
had a record of 106-22-0
at Ohio State. He led the
Buckeyes to eight Bowl
Championship Series
games in his 10 years.
Combined with a 135-57-
2 record in 15 years at
Youngstown State, where
he won four Division I-AA
national 'championships,
Tressel's career mark. was
241-79-2. .
. The author of two books
about faith and integrity,
he remains a scapegoat to
many and' a hypocrite to
others.


FRENCH: Monfils.wins
Continued From Page 1B


John McEnroe's Open era
record of 42-0 for the best
start to a tennis season
and clinch the No. 1 rank-
ing. With three more vic-
tories, the second-seeded
Serb will match the record
of 46 straight wins set by
Guillermo Vilas in 1977.
The two-time Australian
Open champion has never
won the title at Roland
Garros, but he beat Nadal
in two clay-court finals
leading up to the French
Open.
"It's better for him,"
Nadal said. "He is going
to really rest ahead of his
semifinal."
Federer will have to beat
Gael Monfils to advance to
the semifinals. The ninth-
seeded Frenchman defeat-
ed David Ferrer 6-4, 2-6,
7-5, 1-6, 8-6 in a match that
stretched over two days.
S"NoW I need to recover
and at some point I'll stop
losing against this Swiss,"
said Monfils, who has lost
five of his six matches
against Federer.


Juan Ignacio Chela also
reached the quarterfinals.
The unseeded Argentine
beat Alejandro Falla of
Colombia 4-6, 6-2, 1-6, 7-6
(5), 6-2.
Sharapova won the
last four games to beat
12th-seeded Agnieszka
Radwanska of Poland 7-6
(4), 7-5 and reach her first
Grand Slam quarterfinal in
two years.
The seventh-seeded
Sharapova has won the
other three major tourna-
ments once each but is still
looking for her first title at
Roland Garros. Sharapova
will next face 15th-
seeded Andrea Petkovic
of Germany, who defeated
No. 25 Maria Kirilenko of
Russia 6-2, 2-6, 6-4.
Li became the first
Chinese player to reach
the quarterfinals at Roland
Garros after her 2-6,
6-1, 6-3 victory over No. 9
Petra Kvitova of the Czech
Republic. She will next face
No. 4 Victoria Azarenka of
Belarus.


COURTESY PHOTO
Columbia High wrestler Cole Schreiber (top), shown pinning an opponent from Chiles High in
the River City Challenge in Jacksonville, was a district and region champion and placed sixth
at state in the 103-pound weight class.


and Lauren Lee was district
runner-up.
Also advancing to region
were Mathis in the 200
IM, David Morse in the
100 breaststroke and the
400 freestyle relay team of
Burns, Mathis, Micheala
Polhamus and Lauren Lee.


BRANDON FINLEY/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High swimmers Lindsay Lee (left) and Heather
Burns qualified for the 2011 FHSAA Swimming and Diving
Finals in Orlando. Burns qualified in the 500 freestyle and
200 freestyle, while Lee qualified in the 100 backstroke.


In tennis, the Lady Tigers
qualified for state as a team.
Chrissie Reichert and Susy
Romero were District 4-3A
champions at No. 1 doubles,
which carries an automatic
entry to state.
Romero was district
champion at No. 2 singles,
and Kelsey Mercer was
district champion at No. 3
singles. Reichert was run-
ner-up at No. 1 singles.
Mercer and Taylor
Owens won district in
No. 2 doubles.
Fort White's Sydni Jones
won three district track and
field championships. Jones
topped the field in the 800
meters, 1600 meters and
3200 meters.
Matt Waddington was
district champion for the
Indians in the 1600 meters.
Both Jones and
Waddington also advanced
to region in cross country.
Also advancing to region
for Indians track and field
were Brittani Cason in the
high jump and triple jump,
Seaira Fletcher in the 800
meters and 1600 meters,
Ashley Jones in the 800


meters and the 4x100 relay
team of Desirae Roberts,
Shania Pelham, Danielle
Wooley and Marissa
Fletcher.
Columbia had a pair of
district champions in track
- Michaelle Charlotin in
the 1600 meters and Marcus
Amerson in the high jump.
Shaquille Johnson was
runner-up in the 400 meters,
as was Seth Peterson in the
800 meters.
Other CHS region quali-
fiers were Kaicie Chasteen
in the discus, Dalvin Kelly
in the 110-meter hurdles,
J.T. Bradley in the high
jump, and the 4x800 (Kiva
Bunkley, Wyatt Snook,
Peterson and Nick Jones)
and 4x100 (Trey Marshall,
Rakeem Battle, Cornelius
Montgomery and John
Fulton) relay teams.
Columbia's Courtney
Schmitt was runner-up in
District 2 bowling.
Columbia's Dean
Soucinek and Nick Jones
qualified as individuals for
region golf with their per-
formance in the district
tournament.


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words. 2
DAITM


@2011 Tribune Media Services, Inc E
All Rights Reserved.
ATOZP-

0

EWEABR



DEINIV
-TU-
^"^ ^ 0
__ ^ ^! __ __ ^ 0


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek


Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


Print your answer here: WL II
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's Jumbles: CHEER TRUMP PASTRY COUGAR
Answer: True compensation for everything they did is
impossible, but we can PAY RESPECT


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS TUESDAY, MAY 31, 2011


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421










LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS TUESDAY, MAY 31, 2011


DILBERT
THE COMPANY IS
CONSIDERING MOVING
FROM CUBICLES TO AN
OPEN JORKSPACE
ENVIRONMENT.


BLONDIE


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE


DEAR ABBY


Lonely mother-in-law suffers

consequences of critical past


DEAR ABBY: My wife
is a wonderful woman who
did a great job of rearing our
large family, but our house
was often too cluttered to
suit my mother who, in those
years, was judgmental and
critical of my wife.
Years later, things have
changed. My father passed
away, the kids are grown
and gone,' and my mother
is growing more lonely and
needy every day. She now
wants to spend time with us,
but because she never devel-
oped a close friendship with'
my wife, my wife tolerates
her but doesn't welcome her.
I love them both, but I'm
becoming frustrated having
to constantly choose and jug-
gle schedules so I can keep
Mom's feelings from getting
hurt. Abby, please tell moth-
ers-in-law to build bridges
while they can. Someday
it may be too late. But any
advice for me? SPREAD
THIN IN OKLAHOMA
DEAR SPREAD THIN:
Your cautionary tale de-
serves space in my column.
When your wife joined the
family, instead of building
bridges, your mother dyna-
mited them. It's not surpris-
ing your wife feels the way
she does at the prospect of
spending time with her moth-
er-in-law. Of course, while
some degree of compromise
is necessary, your mother


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearabby.com
should also be encouraged
to find activities and contem-
poraries whose company she
can enjoy without expecting
you to entertain her. And the
person to do that is you.
DEAR ABBY: I'm a wom-
an in my mid-40s. Over the
years I have diligently exer-
cised, eaten right and taken
good care of my skin. I keep
my hairstyle and clothing up-
to-date.
I am constantly taken to
be much younger than I am.
While some of my peers may
be jealous of this "problem,"
I find it extremely annoying.
It's especially bothersome
in a business situation when
someone my age or slightly
older treats me as though
he/she could be my parent.
I am not inclined to broad-
cast my age. Is there a profes-
sional way to deal with their
condescending attitude? -
LOOKS YOUNGER, BUT
ISN'T
DEAR LOOKSYOUNG-
ER: Yes. First, take the chip
off your shoulder. Then rec-
ognize that your colleagues
may not be condescending;


they may be trying to be help-
ful. Accept the suggestions',
they offer without becoming
defensive. The more of them-
selves these "mentors" invest
in you, the happier they'll be
about your successes.
DEAR ABBY: My hus-,
' band of almost a year and
I have discovered a great
technique to avoid scream-'
ing at each other in an argu-
ment. When we get aggra-:
vated with each other, one of
us goes to the refrigerator,
takes out one of our favorite
candy bars (we keep a supply
in there) and we split it. By
the time we're done eating
the candy, we can calmly dis-;
cuss our disagreement.
This helps because we lit-
erally take a break from the'
situation and share a mutual-
joy.It works because we both
love chocolate so much. We
wanted to share this solution(
with your readers. SWEETD
TOOTH IN ANGLETON,!
TEXAS
DEAR SWEET TOOTH:C
Ingenious. The two of you..
have discovered yet another
reason why chocolate isi
good for the heart. I hope as!
time goes by you'll sustain'
a high level of compatibility
because otherwise you're go-;
ing to weigh a ton.

N Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-
April 19): Learning from
experience will help you
reach your goal without
O- having to take so many de-
-T tours. Avoid deception but
AT don't give away your se-
UR crets. You'll walk a fine line
but steady progress can be
made. ***
TAURUS (April 20-
May 20): You'll be all
revved up when it comes
to personal matters. Proj-
ect a positive, aggressive
attitude. Network to hook
j ~ up with personal and pro-
4AT IT fessional people you want
'3B. to spend more time with in
the future. ***
GEMINI (May 21-June
20): You'll have a lot to
think about and to consider
with regard to money, con-
tracts and medical issues.
1 Don't neglect anything that
can alter your status, your
life or your position. Dis-
cipline will be required if
you want to maintain what
you've worked so hard to
acquire. ***
CANCER (June 21-
July 22): Take the initia-
tive and play a greater role
in helping and assisting
causes and people you be-
lieve in. Don't be threat-
ened by change; it's nec-
essary if you want your
current situation to evolve
into something bigger and
better. ****
LEO (July 23-Aug.


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

22): Don't step on some-
one's toes or you may find
that your job or life, as you
know it is in jeopardy. You
may welcome change but
be very careful what you
wish for. Protect what you
have. **
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): You have plenty to of-
fer to say and to do. Don't
wait for an invitation to
take charge. Your ability,
to express your opinions
persuasively will win a fol-
lowing. Travel and gaining
experience should be your
top priorities. *****
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): Serious consideration
should be given to your
financial situation. Fixing
up your home or buying
and selling possessions
you have will work in your
favor; don't waste time pro-
crastinating. Do whatever
is necessary now. ***
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-
Nov. 21): You'll be drawn
to certain people for differ-
ent reasons. Your intuition
is good and will guide you
to those who can offer you
the most through a busi-
ness or personal partner-
ship. There is a change
developing and you want
to be positioned to take on
whatever develops. ***
SAGITrARIUS (Nov.


CELEBRITY CIPHER


FRANK & ERNEST


22-Dec. 21): A window
of opportunity is apparent
both personally and profes-
sionally. Get more involved
in the social networks and
develop a good relationship
with' p-obfe who share your
interests and can offer you
insight and guidance. Don't
let emotional issues hold
you back. ***
CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): You need
to interact more with both
your personal and profes-
sional contacts. Socializ-
ing in order to get ahead
will work wonders for you
when it comes to business
ideas and advancement.
Keep things .simple; your
biggest fault will be going
overboard. ***
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): You'll find it diffi-
cult to listen to good advice.
Before you discount what
someone who cares about;
you has to say, remember
the past. A problem with a
friend, lover or superior in
your life must be avoided.
**
PISCES (Feb. 19-
March 20): Good things
will come to you if you
rely on past experience
and friends to help you get
ahead. Focus on your goals
and accept whatever chang-
es are required to get what
you want. Give and take will
help you win at the end of
the day. ****


FOR BETTER OR WORSE
OLC SIS SHooO0'VE rTHRT5 FINE
FINSA D HED E fAM-T lTH ME SHOE
I F SHF-- BSSE., SH I-- DESEEM _
SRID SHE'D PAINT N3HTOU.T-
S,,HF-ToNi --


CLASSIC PEANUTS


.I GREAT IDEA. CAN WE
EI ADD SOME CRYING
C BABIES AND THE SOUND
'I OF WATER DRIPPING?


MAYBE I'LL
YOU'RE BE SMARTER
BEING WHEN I HAVE
STUPID. MORE
DISTRAC-
TIONS.


SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS


GARFIELD


by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: L equals F
"ZCWXW'D FY HXWDWFZ. ZCWXW'D
YFVB ZCW ORRWTOJZW LAZAXW
JFT ZCW XWKWFZ HJDZ."
U W Y X U W K J X V O F

PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "It is foolish and wrong to mourn the men who died.
Rather we should thank God that such men lived." George S. Patton

(c) 2011 by NEA, Inc. 5-31


Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415











Classified Department: 755-5440


IBUI-




SEmL
FHIND 11


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED TUESDAY, MAY 31, 2011

Lake City Reporter




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Take ADvantage of the
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FAX: 386-752-9400 Please
direct your copy to the Classified
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Advertising language must comply
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Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
FILE NO. 11-111-CP
PROBATE DIVISION:
IN RE: ESTATE OF
DAVID WAYNE CAUDILL
Deceased
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of
DAVID WAYNE CAUDILL, de-
ceased, whose date of death was
February 4, 2011 is pending in the
Circuit Court for Columbia County,
Florida, Probate Division, file num-
ber 11-111-CP; the address of which
is Columbia County Courthouse, 173
NE Hernando Ave. Lake City, Flori-
da 32055, The names and addresses
of the Personal Representative and
the Personal Representative's attor-
ney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and oth-
er persons having claims' or demands
against decedent's estate on whom a
copy of this notice is required to be
served must file their claims with
this court WITHIN THE LATER OF
3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AF-
TER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF
A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent
and other persons having claims or
demands against decedent's estate'
must file their claims with this court
WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITH-
IN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this
notice is May 24, 2011.
Attorney for Personal Representa-
tive:
NORRIS & NORRIS P.A.
/s/ John E. Norris
John E Norris
Attorney for Petitioner
Florida Bar No. 058998
253 NW Main Blvd.
Post Office Drawer 2349
Lake City, Florida 32056-2349
Telephone: (386) 752-7240
Personal Representative:
/s/ Susan Faith Pintado
SUSAN FAITH PINTADO
225 SE Cherokee Way
Lake City, Florida 32025
05525996
May, 24, 31, 2011
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 2010-CA-000408
PERSONAL INVESTMENT, INC,
Plaintiff,
vs
CHARLES A. BONE,
Defendant
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE
SALE
Notice is hereby given that the un-
dersigned, Clerk of Circuit Court,
Columbia County, Florida, will on
the June 22, 2011, at 11:00 AM, at
the 3rd Floor Court Room (1) of the
Columbia County Courthouse, 173
NE Hernando Street, Lake City,
Florida, offer for sale and sell at pub-
lic outcry,y ne by one, to the highest
bidder for cash, the property located
in Columbia County, Florida, as fol-
lows:
The following described land, sit-
uate, lying and being in Columbia
County, Florida, to wit:
Lot 2, Block 10, COUNTRY CLUB
ESTATES Replat, a subdivision ac-
cording to plat thereof, recorded in
Plat Book 3, Page 32, public records,
Columbia County, Florida.
Subject to easements and restrictions
of record, if any; which are specifi-
cally not extended or reimposed
hereby.
pursuant to the Final Judgment of
Foreclosure entered on May 16,
2011, in the above-styled cause,
pending in said Court.
Any person claiming an interest in
the surplus from the sale, if any, oth-
er than the property owner as of the
date of the lis pendens must file a
claim within 60 days after the sale.
P. DeWitt Cason,
Clerk of Circuit Court
By:/s/ B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
James E. Sorenson, Esquire
Post Office Box 4128
Tallahassee, FL 32315-4128
Attorney for Plaintiff
05525985
May 24, 31,2011


REPORTER Classifieds

In Print and On Line

wwwIakecityrpordercom


Land Clearing

Back Hoe, Dozer, Chopping, root
raking, bush hog, seeding, sod,
disking, site prep, ponds &
irrigation. Free Est! 386-623-3200

Lawn & Landscape Service

Clean Pine Straw,
You pick it up, $1.85 a bale
Delivery of 100 bales $260
386-688-9156
Landscape Maintenance Company
You can trust for knowledge &
pride, Mention this AD!
Mow Green, LLC 386-288-6532

Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.


Family Owned and Operated

Dealership

(Huntin' a good fit)
New & Used Car Sales
Motivated Self-Starter
Honesty & Good Character
$50,000 plus a year
Benefit Pkg.

Apply in person at


L17 7 Maccienny, FL
B U R K IN S 273 E. Macclenny, Ave.
CHEL/RLLET'


100 Job
100 Opportunities
Associate Reps
SUMMER WORK/GREAT PAY
Immediate FT/PT openings,
Customer sales/service,
No exp needed, conditions,
Apply Now all ages 17+
(386) 269-0883

ATTENTION: student and 0/0
Lease and a Lease Purchase Plan
100% fuel Sucharge, health and
life Insurance available, Spouse
Rider Program, Pet Policy, Never
Roam alone again, NO New
England States! Independent
Contractors needed! GO West!!
Buel, Inc. 866-369-9744
AVON!! Only $10 to start!
Earn bonus $ up to $150+
1-800-275-9945 pin #4206
www.youravon.com/tdavies
Cashiers needed, Experience
Preferred, Drug free workplace,
all applicants will be drug tested
Ellisville Exxon,
Hwy 441, No Phone Calls Please.
CDL A Flatbed Truck Driver
needed for F/T OTR SE area, 3
years exp or more. Medical
benefits offered. Contact
Melissa or Mary @ 386-935-2773
Contract Wood
Haulers needed.
386-288-6875
for information
Experienced estimator needed
for site work & underground utili-
ty contractor. Must be familiar
w/construction software & project
management. DFWP. Fax resume:
386-364-2802, call 386-362-7814


100 JOpportunities
Security Officers
needed Lake City Area, must have
current D Security Lic., Clear
background, Drivers Lic, phone,
Diploma/GED. Benefits, DFWP
EEO Must Apply at:
www.dsisecurity.com MB 1000084
Stylist Needed
-Call
386-752-4614
Southern Exposure
Wanted Highly motivated
individual for Sales Position.
Rountree -Moore Automotive
Group, Great benefits, paid vaca-
tion. Exp. a plus but not necessary.
Call Tony Reese 386-344-7517

120A Medical
120 Employment
Counselor for substance abuse pro-
gram in Baker Correctional Institu-
tion. BA w/2yrs exp., M-F day
shift F/T, $30,000 to start, E-mail
resume to sheliarand@aol.com.or
fax to 386-752-2387


RECYCLE
YOUR
PAPER





J -
S. ,


Legal

NOTICE OF SHERIFF'S SALE
NOTICE is hereby given that pur-
suant to a Writ of Execution issued
in County Court, of Baker County,
Florida, on the 1st day of March,
2011. In the cause wherein Country
Federal Credit Union was Plaintiff
and Terry L. Cannon, II, was De-
fendant, being Case No. 02-2004-
122-SC, in said court, I, Mark Hunt-
er, As Sheriff of Columbla County,
Florida, have levied upon all the
right, title, and interest of the defend-
ant, Terry L. Cannon,. II, in -and to
the following described personal
property, to-wit:
1997 Chevrolet Silverado PK
(Green)
VIN: 1GCEC14W9VZ187307
I shall offer this property for sale, at
the Columbia County Detention Fa-
cility Compound, 389 N.W. Quinten
Street, Lake City, Florida 32055,
County of Columbia, State of Flori-
da, on July 6, 2011 at the hour of
10:00 A.M., or as soon thereafter as
possible. I will offer for sale all the
said defendant's, Terry L. Cannon,
II, right, title and interest in the
aforesaid personal property, at public
auction and will sell the same, sub-
ject to taxes, all prior liens, encum-
brances and judgments, if any to the
highest and best bidder for CASH IN
HAND. The proceeds to be applied
as far as may be to the payment of
costs and the satisfaction of the
above described execution.
Mark Hunter, As Sheriff of Colum-
bia County, Florida
BY: Sergeant Robert Holloway
Deputy Sheriff
04545032
May 31, 2011
June 8, 15, 22, 2011


020 Lost & Found

Missing Shih-tzu. Last seen
Thurs., 5/12, Nash Road area. Was
my daughters .dog before her pass-
ing. Please return. 386-752-7545


10U Opportunities

04544963
CONSTRUCTION
SUPERINTENDENT
NEEDED. Experience and
travel required. Please contact
352-333-3233 or fax your
resume and salary requirements
to 800-218-7809.
www.conceptcompanies.net


04544971



Fast paced, high volume medical
facility seeking two positions:
Financial Specialist. Duties in-
clude collecting, posting, submit-
ting claims and managing account
payments. Applicants must have
knowledge of all major insurance
carriers, collections, CPT and
ICD-9 coding, proficient in Excel.
Min. 2 yrs exp in medical coding
and billing preferred.
Checkout Clerk. Duties include
Cash handling, schedule appoint-
ments, data entry. Knowledge of
medical terminology and insur-
ance. Applicant must be profi-
cient in practice management soft-
ware (Intergy).
Please submit job title and resume
with salary requirements to
jpapeshlcancercare
northflorida.com
or fax to 386-628-9231.


3.) Click:


240 Schools &
k^?W Education

04544843
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
* Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-05/23/10
* Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-07/11/11
* Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com


310 Pets & Supplies

FREE KITTENS
TO GOOD HOME,
Litter trained
Call 386-365-7360

HYBRID WOLF Pup female.
Up to date shots.
On Preventative. $500.
386-984-6887

PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.


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LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED TUESDAY, MAY 31, 2011


Classified Department: 755-5440


330 Livestock &
3 Supplies

Black Angus Cows & Heifers
Prices Vary
Registered & Commercial
386-719-4802


361 Farm Equipment
84 Ford 4610 Tractor.
2WD, Solid
2005 motor,$7,500. OBO
386-867-0005

416 Sporting Goods

GUN CASE, holds 6 long
guns. Glass front with light oak
finish.Top & bottom cabinet locks.
$75.00 SOLD


420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.

Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$250 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.


430 Garage Sales






PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.



440 Miscellaneous

Stop gnat & Mosquito bites! Buy
Swamp Gator All natural insect re-
pellent. Family safe. Use head to
toe. Available at The Home Depot.

Summer Barbecue Special
Tow Behind
Grill/Smoker, $1,250 OBO.
386-719-4802

450 Good'Things
5U to Eat
BLUEBERRY HILL
U-PICK opens
May 30th
386-963-4220

463 Buildinm
463 Materials

JOB SURPLUS: 2x4xl0ft (6pcs)
3/4" x 4ft x 8ft OSB (1 sheet)
2x4 and lx4 various lengths
$50 for all. 386-754-1595

630 Mobile Homes
630 for Rent
2&3 BR MH. $395 $650. mo.
plus deposit. Water & sewer fur-
nished. Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422

2/2 Newly remodeled MH New
Floors/counter tops. Lg lot, quiet
area No pets 1st, last & sec. $400
mo $300 sec avill work w/payment
plan. Call Jenn 386-454-7724

2/2 Units, clean, well maintained,
nice safe park. setting, 2 miles to
downtown Lake City, $550 month
+ $550 sec dep, 386-984-8448

2B/1BA. MH., quiet living. Clean.
New stove, new carpet, carport.
NO PETS! 1st & deposit.
Adult community. Smoke free
environment. 386-758-3963

2br /2ba SWMH; also Residential
RV lots for rent between Lake City
& G'ville. Access to 1-75 & 441
(352)317-1326 Call for terms

3/2 S of Lake City, (Branford area)
$400 dep, $600 month
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com

Eastside Village a 55+ Retirement
Community offers 2br/2ba Manu'-
factured home fully furnished. No
pets. Leases for $650 + utilities.
1st, last, security. Eastside Village
Realty, Inc. 752-5290 for info.
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White. Contact 386-623-3404
or 386-365-1919


SOUTH 41 2br/lba. Washer/
Dryer Outlet. Satallite TV incl.
Pets ok on approval. New paint
$550. mo + dep. 386-758-2408.

X-CLEAN 2/2 SW, 8 mi
"NW of VA. Clean acre lot, nice
area. $500. mo + dep No dogs
386-961-9181
6 Mobile Homes
6 for Sale

04545078
Palm Harbor Homes
Has closed 2 Model Centers
Save up to 60K on select models
Call Today! 800-622-2832

04545079
Palm Harbor Homes
Has 3 Modular Homes
Available at HUGE Savings
Over 40K Off
Call Today! 800-622-2832

04545080
Palm Harbor Homes
Repo's/Used Homes/Short Sales
3 or 4 Bedroom Doublewides
Won't Last!! 3,500-40K
Call Today! 800-622-2832

04545081
Palm Harbor Homes
Red Tag Sale
Over 10 Stock Units Must Go
Save Up To 35K!
800-622-2832

Access Realty Make Offer! 3/2
MH w/over 1700 SF & move in
ready. Convenient to schools,
shopping & hospitals. MLS 73861
$89,500. Patti Taylor.623-6896


650 fMobile Home
650 & Land
MH on 1 Acre in Live Oak near
Peacock Lake, owner finance
$42,500 MLS#77598 Call Roger
Lovelady 386-365-7039 @
Westfield Realty Group
Owner Finance, Nice 3/2, S of
Lake City, small down/$625 mo
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com

710 fUnfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent

05525655
SPRING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans;
some with garages.
Call 386-454-1469
or visit our website:
www.springhillvillage.net,








1 & 2 Bedroom Apartments
Move in for as low as
$19R
386-755-2423
Great location W of 1-75, spacious
deluxe 2br apts., garage, W/D
hookup. patio. $600/700 & up, +
Sec, 386-344-3715 or 965-5560
The Lakes Apts. Studios & lBr's
from $135/wk..Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted; monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $450'. + sec.
Call Michelle 386-752-9626

'72 aFurnished Apts.
720 For Rent
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

7T30 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent

lbr duplex $600.mo $600 sed.
All utilities incl
on Nassau Street
386-697-9950
lbr/lba Free ele. Utilities incl. 4mi
S. Lake City. $300dep. $375mo.
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
2 bedroom 1 bath on
5 acres.700.00 per month.
First,last and security.
386 590-5333
Eastside Village a 55+ Retirement
Community offers 2br/lba Duplex,
no pets. Leases for $600 + utilities.
First, last, security. Eastside
Village Realty, Inc. 752-5290
Large 2/1 newly remodeled, near
school, $575 mo, + dep, no pets!,
pls lv mess. 386-365-1920 or 454-
7764 after 6p. 843 SE Putnam St.
Live Oak, nice 2/1 brick, near
hospital, quiet well kept area.
Lawn & garbage. $850.
386-963-2611/cell 817-988-3284
Private House for Rent
Newly Remodeled, S of Lake City
Call The Adams Agency @
386-752-1444
Home for Rent.
3/2 in City Limits. No pets.
$900. per month. Call Susan,
Realtor. 386-623-6612
TOWNHOUSE 2br plus
bonus room. w/1.5 bath.
Quail Heights CC. $750. mo plus
$250 damage dep. 386-752-8553

750 Business &
SOffice Rentals

For Lease: 1,500 17,000sf
1525 S. Ohio Ave, Live Oak, FL
Call Scott Stewart@ Westfield
Realty Group 386-867-3498


FOR LEASE: Downtown office
space. Convenient to
Court house.
Call 386-755-3456
* For Lease: E Baya Ave. Two -
1000 sqft office space units or
combined for 2000 sqft. 386-984-
0622 or weekends 386-497-4762
Office Space For Lease
2112sf, 7 rms, Irg conf rm, 4 baths,
private parking MLS#76508
$1760/mo, Call Pam @ Remax
386-303-2505
OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$695. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor


790 Vacation Rentals
Horseshoe Beach Summer Spcl
Gulf Front 2br, w/lg porch, dock,
fish sink. wkend $345./wk $795.
386-235-3633/352-498-5986
alwaysonvacation.com #419-181
"Florida's Last Frontier"


805 Lots for Sale
5 Acre Lot, Secluded & Cleared,
MLS# 67871 $55,000
Call Lisa Waltrip
@ 386-365-5900
westfieldrealtygroup.com
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Fort White, 5 ac. lot. Cleared,
grass, paved street, high and dry.
MLS# 77031
Sherry 386-365-8414 $23,999
Hallmark Real Estate. Cleared
2.57 ac. fenced w/32' Dutchman
camper. In O'Brien. Close to Live
Oak, Lake City, Branford. $25,000
MLS# 74534 386-867-1613
Hallmark Real Estate. Owner
Finance with $5K down with
terms negotiable. Below assessed
value for the county. MLS# 74484
$17,900 Jay Sears 386-867-1613
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800,-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.


810 Home for Sale
3/2 Brick Home in town, fenced
back yard w/12x12 workshop
$79,900 Just Reduced!
MLS# 77414 R.E.O.Realty
Group, Inc 386-243-8227
3/2 Brick Home w/1 car garage,
detach carport MLS#77780
$109,900, Call Jo Lytte Remax
386-365-2821
www.jolytte.florida-property-search.com
3/2 Cute Home, Remodeled, on 2
acres, partially fenced $114,900
MLS# 77396
R.E.O. Realty Group
386-243-8227
3/2 in Lake City Airpark
pool, porch, pond, detach garage
large hangar w/living quarters
MLS#77756 $399,900 Westfield
Call Josh G 386-466-2517
4/2 on 10.5 acres w/ detached
garage, patio, above ground pool,
SMLS#77410 $189,888
R.E.O. Realty Group, Inc
386-243-8227
Brick Home, Screened Porch
$185,900 MLS#77893
Call Charlie Sparks @
Westfield Realty Group
386-755-0808
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
6br/3.5ba brick. Lake views from
back. 39.7 ac., private paved road.
MLS# 76111 Mary Brown White-
hurst. 386-965-0887 $1,200,000
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Home on the lake in town. 4br/3ba
MLS# 76085 Elaine K. Tolar 386-
755-6488 or Mary Brown White-
hurst. 386-965-0887 $299,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
New home in Mayfair S/D. 4br on
comer lot. Split plan. $214,900
MLS# 76919 Elaine K. Tolar.
386-755-6488
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
4br/3ba 2 story brick on cul-de-
sac. 1 ac landscaped. Lori Geibeig
or Mary Brown Whitehurst.
386-965-0887 $299,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
4br/1.5ba brick. 1332 sq ft. Great
floor plan, nice yard, close to
town. 1 ac landscaped. Lori
Geibeig MLS# 75713 $84,900
CYPRESS LANDING!
3BR/2BA built in 2005
w/large kitchen $115,000
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #75794


810 Home for Sale
DESIRABLE GWEN LAKE
area! Nice 3BR/2BA home
on comer lot $112,000
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #77307
Eastside Village a 55+ Retirement
Community. 2br/2ba home with
garage, screen porch. Choose wall
color, flooring. MLS# 76483 East-
side Village Realty, Inc. 752-5290
Great Family Home in S/D
MLS# 77325, $109,000
Call Missy Zecher @ Remax
Professionals 386-623-0237
www.missyzecher.com
Great Home in Great Neighbor-
hood, Can be 4/2 or 3/2 w/study
MLS#77284 $164,900
Call Carrie Cason @Westfield
386-623-2806
GREAT STARTER HOME!
3BR/2BA w/lots of closets
space & nice lawn $79,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #76432
Hallmark Real Estate. 3/2 Brick
home w/large screened porch.
Back yard has wooded privacy.
MLS#69482 Janet Creel 719-0382
or Paula Lawrence 623-1973
Hallmark Real Estate. Bring the
horses. 3/2 HUD,,4 ac. Sold "as is"
$106,000 Bids are being accepted.
www.hudhomestore.com MLS#
72068 Martin Tavener 965-7773
Hallmark Real Estate. DWMH on
5 ac south of town. Back porch,
new metal roof wood burning fire-
place & wired workshop. $82,500
MLS#77185 Janet Creel 719-0382
Hallmark Real Estate. Glassed
porch overlooks wooded backyard
in the Plantations. Pool,
sprinkler system. $204,900
MLS#75429 Janet Creel 719-0382
Hallmark Real Estate. Time to go
to the River. Stilt home w/covered
decking. Floating dock,out bldgs
& covered RV parking. $188K.
MLS#72068 Janet Creel 719-0382
Home on 15 Acres, 2500sf, new
appliances, workshop, MLS 77552
$235,000 Call Brittany @
Results Realty 386-397-3473
HOME OR OFFICE on
Alachua St; remodeled
1,207 SqFt home $82,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #77724
Hallmark Real Estate. 2006
2200SF home. 2br/2ba w/mother-
in-law suite, 4 car garage, endless
hot water heater. MLS# 77547
$309,900 Jay Sears 386-867-1613
Hallmark Real Estate. 3/3 Brick
w/over 2500 SF. Great location
with nice one acre pond in back.
Detached workshop MLS# 75222
$179,900 Jay Sears 386-867-1613
Hallmark Real Estate. 4/2 Brick,
3100 SF, Granddaddy Oaks on 5
acres. Double detached carport/ga-
rage w/workshop. ML$# 77877
$119,900. Jay Sears 386-867-1613
Just Reduced 3/2 home, inside city
limits, fenced backyard, detached
carport w/office MLS#77411
$82,900 Call R.E.O.Realty,
@ 386-243-8227 Make Offer!
Just Reduced 4/2 on 1.57 acres,
fireplace. partially fenced, MLS#
77412, Call Nancy Rogers at
R.E.O. Realty Group
386-243-8227 $64,900
Large affordable home in S/D on 2
Acres, fishing rights to Timberlake
Property Owner's Assoc. $64,900
MLS#74862 Call Brittany @
Results Realty386-397-3473
Large Brick, 3/1, 4.43 acres, metal
roof, MLS# 77415 $104,888
R.E.O. Realty Group, Inc.
386-243-8227
Large Home in the Country on
3.66 acres, fireplace, 2 outbldgs,
MLS#76471,.$89,900 Call Jo
Lytte @ Remax 386-365-2821
jolytte@remaxnfl.com
Large Home w/Open Floor Plan,
back yard & porch, lrg oaks, fire-
place, MLS#76122 $115,000
Call Missy Zecher @ Remax 386-
623-0237,mzecher@remax.net
LOTS OF UPGRADES!
Remodeled kitchen in this
2BR/1BA home $29,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY
INC. 755-5110 #77505
Luxury Log Home,
Whole House Generator, $269,900
MLS# 76899 Call Roger
Lovelady @386-365-7039
westfieldrealtygroup.com
Nice, large 4/2 on 1 acre
w/florida room, granite floors,
wrap around front porch, $148,000
Call Brittany Stoeckert @
Results Realty 386-397-3473


810 Home for Sale
Norwegian Brick Home, fire-
place/family rm, open floor plan,
screen porch, fenced back yard,
MLS#76796 $179,900
Jo Lytte Remax 386-365-2821
Owner Finance. Custom built 3/2.5.
10.8 ac. Granite, fireplace, vaulted
ceilings, surround sound. lanai,
gazebo. MLS 77382 Access Real-
ty. Patti Taylor $249K 623-6896
Priced Reduced! 3/2 w/2346 sf.
.67 ac. Creekside S/D. Shade,
surround sound, vaulted ceilings.
MLS 77385 $169,900. Access
Realty. Patti Taylor. 386-623-6896
Rose Creek S/D, 5/4, 3269sf, on
2.2 acres, bonus rm, many
upgrades Reduced! MLS#75485
Reduced! $234,900, Call Pam @
Remax 386-303-2505
Spacious Brand New Split Floor
Plan Home, Fenced Yard
MLS#77493 $229,900
Call Mike Lienemann @ Westfield
Realty Group 386-867-9053
SPACIOUS home built in
1995 has 2BR/2BA & 1,636
SqFt on 1 acre $89,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110
Sturdy 3/2 on 4.35 acres, fruit &
pecan trees, Minutes from town
MLS#77878 $105,000
Call Jo Lytte @ Remax
386-365-2821/www.jolytte.com
Totally Remodeled 4 Bd Home
Spacious Must See!
MLS#77782 $135,000
Missy Zecher 386-623-0237
www.missyzecher.com
Well Maintained 3/2 on dead-end
street, quiet, country, close to
downtown $105,000 MLS#77800
Call Lisa Waltrip @Westfield
Realty Group 386-365-5900

820 Farms &
Acreage

4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$69,900. $613mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com.
4 acres, Wellborn, New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down, $39,900, $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
FARM- 7 stall bam, Apt.
17+ acres cross fenced.
Close in $1000. mo.
386-961-1086
Half to ten acre lots. Some w/
well, septic, pp. We finance; low
dwn pmt. Deas Bullard Properties.
386-752-4339. www.Iandnfl.com
Hallmark Real Estate. 40 ac hunt-
ing tract w/camper. Water & septic
already in place. Stands & feeders
in place. MLS# 75532
$84,000 Jay Sears 386-867-1613
Three One Acre Lots available
@ $14,900 ea & One 1.65 Acre
lot for $19,900 MLS#76050
Call Brodie Alfred 386-623-0906
Westfield Realty Group

830 Commercial
3 Property
Commercial Property For Sale
Currently Leased $495,000
MLS#75953 Call Aaron
Nickelson @ 386-867-3534
Westfield Realty Group
Great Investment/Owner Finance
1400 sq ft building on 2 acres
Creative terms, owner flexible.
CLose to 1-75. 386-867-1190
Hallmark Real Estate. Downtown
Restaurant. Gigantic BBQ Smoker
Clean kitchen w/equip. handle any
type of food svc. MLS# 77902
$189,900 Vic Lantroop 623-6401
Mini Storage (204 Units),
gated, fenced 5 acres, $1,300,000,
MLS#76048 Call Millard Gillen
@ Westfield Realty Group
386-365-7001


850 Waterfront
850 Property _
Upscale River Cabin on
Suwannee River, Shop, Dock
MLS#76336 $349,900
Call Jo Lytte @ Remax
386-365-2821

^860 Investment
860 Property
3/2 Renovated Home in town,
front porch, new appliances, dcir-
rently leased MLS#76658 $49,900
Jo Lytte/Remax 386-365-2821
www.jolytte.florida-property-search.dom
Great Income Opportunity!
Mobile Home Park For Sale
MLS#77228 $195,000
Call Pam Beauchamp @ Remax
386-758-8900


Lake City Reporter


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SWayne Lowthrop

Coral Shores (954) 648-1919
S ) F 1 L Tf Y ., NativeRealtorWayne.com


IF I