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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01566
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 5/29/2011
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
System ID: UF00028308:01566
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text

A Look Back
CHS had plenty of
success during the
2010-1 I sports season.
Sports, I B


TODAY'S



I aii 4 ir, R'Ln.,ilLf
I MAY 29,2011


A Good Cause
S&S GolfTourney
raises big money
000016 120511 **3-DCIT 3'
LIB OF FLORIDA HISTORY
PO BOX 117007
205 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-1943



lake e


Reporter


Sunday May, 29, 2011


www.lakecityreporter.com


Vol. 137, No. 108 0 $ 1.00


COURTESY PHOTO
The above graphic shows the mass of the Honey Prairie
Fire and the new Racepond Fire.


New blaze adds

to Honey Prairie

Wildfire efforts


Racepond Fire
has consumed
4,000 acres.
Staff Reports

While the Honey
Prairie Fire remains at
70 percent containment,
crews are now dealing
with a new fire near Race
Pond, Ga. which began
Wednesday.
The Racepond Fire is
located northeast of the
Honey Prairie fire and
has consumed about
4,000 acres to date and
is currently 15 percent
contained, according
to Florida Division of
Forestry officials. The
cause of the new fire is


under investigation.
The Honey Prairie Fire
has consumed 149,550
acres since a lightning
strike ignited it on April
28.
Both fires are being
managed by one incident
management team that
is currently using a com-
bined total of 274 person-
nel in the effort
Saturday crews were
scheduled to mop up hot
spots along control lines
for the Honey Prairie
Fire. They also planned
to continue build a dozer
line around the perimeter
and attack spots across
the line, paying particular
attention to the northwest
portion of the Racepond
Fire.


FESTIVAL


Second day
draws bigger
crowd to event.
By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
WHITE SPRINGS
Lawn chairs,- sun
screen, bottled
water and lots of
free time were
the key ingredi-
ents to being able to enjoy
the second day of the
59th Annual Florida Folk
Festival.
Apparently, thousands
of people possessed those
ingredients, as attendance
levels for the second day
of the largest continuous
folk festival in the country
soared.
Bob Giarda, ParkServices,
Specialist at Stephen Foster
Folk Culture Centef State
Park, said hundreds of
school children were at the
park on Friday, but with
Saturday not being a tradi-
tional work day, attendance
was definitely up.
"I think the attraction to
the park is that people are
off work, we've got great
weather, it's a holiday week-
end and the ticket prices
are very reasonable," he
said. "It's a great opportu-
nity to come out with the
family and enjoy Florida. I
know our attendance num-
bers are up from last year.
We can tell because the
parking areas are full and
we're definitely showing an
attendance increase over
last year."
Saturday's event, includ-
ed the state fiddle com-
petition, while the state
banjo competition is slated
for today.
The 'patriarch of Florida
Folk Music,' Frank
Thomas, is slated to per-
form today, as well at Tom
Shed and several other
performers.
The festival, which cel-
ebrates Florida, its histo-
ry, its music, arts, crafts,
cuisine and Floridians,
kicked off Friday and is
FUN continued on 3A


FUN


PHOTOS BY JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
ABOVE: Jan Buncik shows country singer Billy Dean random lyrics she wrote down while he
was playing a melpdy. Buncik said that the lyrics might one day blossom into a new song.
BELOW: Blues performer Ben Prestage plays for a crowd at the 59th Annual Florida Folk
Festival held at the Stephen Foster Folk Culture State Park.


TONY BRITT/Lake City Reporter
Tubing season underway
Isabella (far left), Braden, Cassandra, and Ro Oliver tube down the Ichetucknee River
Saturday afternoon. Park officials said thousands of tubes floated along the river Saturday.


Moment of Remembrance

honors fallen soldiers


Citizens asked to
give moment of
silence Monday.
By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
Alden Bethea Jr., a
U.S. Marine from New
Port Richey, served his
country as a solder in the
War on Terror.
Bethea and other sol-
diers in his squad were
hit by an IED (impro-
vised exploding device)
while on duty that killed
two of his friends who
were standing less than
30 feet in front of him.
Bethea's knee was


shattered.
He went through sur-
gery f6r a total knee
replacement. Metal
screws were placed in
his right foot, while six
rods were placed in his
left foot. He has a metal
plate in his head, is suf-
fering from a traumatic
brain injury and has a
bullet in his leg that doc-
tors have not been able
to remove.
There's no doubt that
Bethea's body been bro-
ken physically, but his
spirit appeared to be
unconquered when dur-
4ing a recent Memorial
Day Ceremony, residents
thanked him for the ser-


vices he rendered to his
country.
"It feels good to come
to a Memorial Day cere-
mony and be thanked for
service I've provided for
the country, but it's very
emotional," he said with
tears streaming down his
cheeks. "I appreciate it.
I lost friends over there,
but I'm grateful that
other people have come
in and shown support for
the fallen and wounded
soldiers."
Bethea and other vet-
erans are hoping more
Americans take the time
to remember the troops
MOMENT continued on 3A


1 ~-?E... 000?' P


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400


93 66
T-Storm Chance
WEATHER, 6A


Opinion .. .......
Business .. .....
Obituaries .
Around Florida . . ....
Puzzles .. .


TODAY IN
BUSINESS
Firm celebrates
60th anniversary.


COMING
TUESDAY
Tubing the
Ichetucknee.


.i


A ty








LAKE CITY REPORTER SUNDAY REPORT SUNDAY, MAY 29, 2011


C o (A$H3. PiayAl TO

Friday: Friday: Saturday: Saturday: Saturday: Saturday:
5-23-32-35 17 4-6-19-27-35 Afternoon: 9-3-3 Afternoon: 4-0-9-0 1-5-13-24-28-52 4-23-31-42-50 PB23
Evening: 0-8-1 Evening: 9-9-1-7


AROUND FLORIDA



1 boater missing, 1 dead; cause not yet released


ST PETERSBURG
he Coast
'Guard is
searching for
one boater
beneath the
Sunshine Skyway bridge
in St. Petersburg after
finding the body of a sec-
ond person.
Authorities said anoth-
er boater pulled two peo-
ple out of the water late
Friday after finding an
unmanned boat below the
bridge. The Coast Guard
later found a third person
in the water. But several
agencies were helping in
the search for a fourth
person on Saturday.
One of those pulled
from the water was later
reported dead. Authorities
have not yet released the
condition of the two res-
cued boaters. It's also not
clear how they ended up
in the water.
The Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation
Commission is investigat-
ing.

Risk of wildfire
remains high
TALLAHASSEE
- State officials said the
danger of wildfire is very
high throughout Florida
due to a lack of rain, low
humidity and windy con-
ditions.
Florida Division of
Forestry director Jim
Karels said people plan-
ning to visit forests or
parks over the holiday
weekend should call


COURTESY PHOTOS


St. Augustine Air Show gives VIP performance
Residents of Lake City's Jenkins Veterans Domiciliary Home were the special VIP guests of the St. Augustine Air Show
Friday. The residents were greeted upon arrival at the airport by Air Show staff and welcomed to the hospitality tent where
they enjoyed lunch with the show's performers.
LEFT: Equipped with all the conveniences of home, David Treadaway sits comfortably on his motorized scooter as the "Heavy
Metal" civilian jet team bring their performance in close. '
RIGHT: Aldridge Keith (right) lifts his camera to take a picture during one of the performances.


ahead to learn whether
campfires or charcoal
grills are permitted.
Burn bans are in place
in several counties,
including Baker, Citrus,
Flagler, Glades, Hendry,
Marion, Martin, Nassau,'
Osceola, Palm Beach,
Putnam,,Seminole, St.
Lucie and Volusia.
Forestry officials said
2,664 wildfires have
burned 128,675 acres
throughout Florida since
Jan. 1. That's nearly
twice as many fires as
the Division of Forestry
responded to during the
same period last year.
For more wildfire infor-


mation, visit www.fl-dof
comrn/wildfire/information.
html.

Plane crashed
due to slow speed
SANTA ROSA BEACH
- Federal investigators
said slow speed contribut-
ed to a small plane crash
in the Gulf of Mexico off
the Florida Panhandle
last year, killing two
people.
The National
Transportation Safety
Board released a prob-
ably cause report
Thursday. It said the


pilot, 60-year-old Evan
Zeiger Jr., failed to main-
tain air speed needed to
perform a low-altitude
stunt. Zeiger was flying
his World War II-era AT-
6-Texan in a formation
with other airplanes on
March 6, 2010, when the
plane' crashed in Walton
County. His wife, 52-year-
old Peggy Zeiger, also
died in the wreck.
The NTSB report also
said that the pilot's loss
of "situational awareness"
and his decision to per-
form the maneuver, in the
first place also contrib-
uted to the crash.


2nd suspect
sought in slaying
SARASOTA -'Sarasota
detectives are looking
for another possible sus-
pect and "crucial pieces"
of forensic evidence in
the fatal shooting of two
British tourists more than
a month ago.
Prosecutors filed court
records Friday that said
another person was
involved in the April 16
shootings of 24-year-old
Jamnes Kouzaris and 25-
year-old James Cooper.
On April 18, detec-
tives arrested 16-year-old


Shawn Tyson on murder
charges. He is being held
at the county jail and will
be tried as an adult.
The tourists were
fatally shot in a housing
project. Police are trying
to figure out how the men
got to the neighborhood
after a night of drinking
in Sarasota bars.

'Brazen Bandit'
gets 52 years
FORT LAUDERDALE
A South Florida
bank robber authori-
ties dubbed the "Brazen
Bandit" for his aggres-
sive and violent tactics
has been sentenced to 52
years in prison.
A Fort Lauderdale fed-
eral judge imposed the
sentence Friday on 44-
year-old Michael Anthony
Price of Coconut Creek.
Price was convicted of
several charges related to
a pair of 2010 armed bank
robberies in Broward
County.
In one of the robberies,
Price shot and wounded a
67-year-old bank custom-
er who remains paralyzed
from the neck down. In
another robbery, Price
.pointed a gun'at a bank
teller and told her she
had 15 seconds to fill his
backpack with cash. She
complied.
The getaway driver in
each robbery pleaded
guilty and is scheduled to
be sentenced next week.

Associated Press


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS


Musician Gil Scott-Heron dies in NYC


NEWYORK
usician Gi'l Scott-
Heron, who helped
lay the groundwork
for rap by fusing.
minimalistic percus-
sion, political expression and spoken-
word poetry on songs such as "The
Revolution Will Not Be Televised"
but saw his brilliance undermined
by a years-long drug addiction, died
Friday at age 62.
A friend, Doris C. Nolan, who
answered the telephone listed for his
Manhattan recording company, said
he died in the afternoon at St. Luke's
Hospital after becoming sick upon
returning from a trip to Europe.
"We're all sort of shattered," she
said.
Scott-Heron was known for work
that reflected the fury of black
America in the post-civil rights era
and also spoke to the social and
political disparities in the country.
His songs often had incendiary
titles "Home is Where the Hatred
Is," or "Whitey on the Moon," and
through spoken word and song, he
tapped the frustration of the masses.
Yet much of his life was also
defined by his battle with crack
cocaine, which also led to time in
jail. In a 2008 interview with New
York magazine, he said he had been
living with HIV for years, but he still
continued to perform and put out
music; his last album, which came
out this year, was a collaboration
with artist Jamie xx, 'We're Still
Here," a reworking of Scott-Heron's
acclaimed "I'm New Here," which
was released in 2010.


Musician Gil Scott-Heron, who helped p


The panel blamed the lawyers for
failing to sufficiently brief the point
and said they had no obligation to con-
sider it
They quoted case law saying,
"Issues do not have a life of their own:
if they are not raised ... we consider
the issues waived."
Spector, a legendary rock music
producer, was convicted two years
ago of fatally shooting actress Lana
Clarkson at his Alhambra mansion
in 2003. He is serving 19 years to life
in prison on a second-degree murder
conviction.

Sllw ..nn.. .....u. .an &-


ASSOCIATED PRESS
pioneer rap music, died Friday at age'62.


- whose debut "Disc-Overy" is mul-
tiplatinum in the U.K is hoping to
mirror Adele's success with the U.S.
release of his album.
"You know its very, very inspiring
... and I know Adele personally so it
kind of resonates a lot more," he said
in an interview this week. "Her album
is not moving off of the top spot, and
'neither is her single."
Tempah said he wants to do for
British rappers what Adele has done
for British singers.
'When you sing you can't really
tell where you're from based on how
you sing ... which is why I think that
rapping and somebody being able to
break out here being a rapper from a
different country is a very, very big
deal," he said.
The 22-year-old said back home
most of the musicians are close.
Tempah knows singers like Taio
Cruz, Jessie J and Ellie Goulding,
and his friendships with Jay Sean
and Mr. Hudson acts signed to
Lil Wayne and Kanye West's label
imprints, respectively helped him
land a recording contract.

Associated Press


Spector's appeal
LOS ANGELES An appeals
court on Friday refused to recon-
sider music producer Phil Spector's
appeal of his murder conviction,
saying there was overwhelming evi-
dence of his guilt.
The California 2nd District Court of
Appeal panel acknowledged it did not
consider an issue that defense lawyers
now say was critical to his conviction.


NEW YORK This year Adele
has dominated*the music charts: back
home in the U.K, in the U.S. and
around the world.
In America, her sophomore album,
"21" is platinum and spending its ninth
week on top of the Billboard charts.
Her single, "Rolling In the Deep," is
currently No. 1 on the U.S. pop charts.
And she's had even more success in
Europe.
British rapper Tinie Tempah


Celebrity Birthdays


* Actor Kevin Conway
("Gods and Generals") is 69.
* Sirager Rebbie Jackson
is 61.
* Bassist Michael Porcaro of
Toto is 56.
* Singer LaToya Jackson
is 55.
* Actor Ted Levine ("Monk,"
"The Silence of the Lambs")
is 54.
* Actress Annette Bening
is 53.



Daily Scripture


* Singer Melissa Etheridge
is 50.
* Singer Jayski McGowan of
Quad City DJ's is 44.
* Guitarist Noel Gallagher of
Oasis is 44.
* Guitarist Chan Kinchla of
Blues Traveler is 42.
* Singer Melahie Brown
("Scary Spice") of the Spice
Girls is 36.
* Actor Brandon Mychal
Smith is 12.


""Rejoice with those who
rejoice; mourn with those who
mourn."

Romans 12:15


Lake City
HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293
Fax number..........7....52-9400
Circulation ................755-5445
Online ... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
*E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056.
PublisherTodd Wilson.....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
Assistant Editor CJ Risak..754-0427
After 1:00 p.m.
(crisak@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Ashley Butcher ...754-0417
(abutcher@lakecityreporter.com)
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440.


Reporter
BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon ....754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter:com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7.30
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
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In Columbia County, customers should
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In all other counties where home delivery
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CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will
run in this space. And thanks for reading.


Un rapper wainItsi
Court won't reconsider mirror Adele's success


Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424








LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE SUNDAY, MAY 29, 2011


Casey Anthony's mother,


ex-boyfriend testify


ORLANDO The
mother of a Florida woman
accused of killing her 2-
year-old daughter gave a
tour of the family home,
including a playhouse
built for the toddler and
the above-ground pool the
defense team claims the
girl drowned in.
Cindy Anthony testified
Saturday at her daughter's
murder trial that she and
Caylee went swimming on
June 15, 2008 the last
day she saw her grand-
daughter. She said she
removed a ladder used to
help Caylee get into the
pool something she did
every time the pool wasn't
being used.
Casey Anthony, who is
charged with first-degree


murder in the toddler's
summer 2008 death,
wiped away tears with a
tissue during her mother's
testimony. Prosecutors
contend Casey Anthony
suffocated the girl with
duct tape. If convicted,
she could be sentenced
to death.
Cindy Anthony was not
asked directly Saturday
whether she thought the
young girl drowned. The
trial will resume Tuesday
in Orlando.
Through most of her
testimony, a photo of
young Caylee remained on
display on television moni-
tors along the courtroom,
where evidence is dis-
played for the jury, media
and spectators. Anthony


eventually interrupted
her questioning, asking
prosecutors to remove the
photo.
"I can't look at my grand-
daughter without getting
upset," she said.
Casey Anthony's for-
mer boyfriend, Anthony
Lazzaro, also testified
Saturday about the hours
after the Anthonys reported
Caylee's disappearance to
authorities. He described a
text message exchange in
which he was trying to get
Casey Anthony to reveal
where the toddler was.
"If they don't find her
guess who gets blamed and
spends eternity in jail?" the
text message read.

* Associated Press


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Tampa resident Lita Swindle (left) and Eva Jo Callahan, of McIntosh, demonstrate how to
spin sheep's wool into yarn at the 59th Annual Florida Folk Festival.


FUN: Crowd grows at Folk Festival

Continued From Page 1A


scheduled to conclude
tonight around 11 p.m.
During the three-day
festival, which is expect-
ed to draw at least 30,000
people to the area, fes-
tival attendees can take
part in various musical
Workshops, listen to
Florida folklore, look at
art exhibits, eat cuisine
from different parts of


the state, or listen to
Florida musicians.
Columbia County resi-
dent Donald Johns had
the opportunity to see
several of the musicians
on a close and personal
basis.
Johns works with
Starlight Sounds &
Recording, which provid-
ed the sound system on


the amphitheater stage.
"We do this kind of work
all the time, it's what we do,"
he said. "The benefits of
doing this is we meet great
people, quality musicians in
a quality atmosphere, It's
long days 14 hours on
the (sound) console but
we enjoy it. We love music
and if you love music,
you'll love it here."


~**% -


ASSOCIATED PRESS
The crew of space shuttle Endeavour and the International Space Station gather for a joint
news conference from the from the International Space Station Thursday. Commander
Mark Kelly, second row right, says he can't wait to see his wife, Rep. Gabrielle Giffords, D-
Ariz., for the first time from orbit and show her some cosmic views of his spaceship and the
planet Earth.


Astronauts pack up on


next-to-last shuttle flight


MARCIA DUNN
AP Aerospace Writer

CAPE CANAVERAL
- Endeavour's astro-
nauts took care of some
last-minute space station
chores Saturday before
packing up to come home
and end the next-to-last
shuttle flight.
The space shuttle and
its crew of six will depart
the International Space
Station late Sunday night.
They worked to repair
one of the space station's
air purifiers and straight-
ened out the suits that
were used in four space-
walksl The final space-
walk of the mission, on
Friday, completed the
U.S. portion of station
construction.
Now that the space-
walks are over, Mission
Control told the astro-
nauts they "can bask in
the glow of a job well
done."
Shuttle pilot Gregory
Johnson said it will be
bittersweet to leave.
He and his crewmates
installed a $2 billion
physics experiment at
the orbiting outpost, as
well as an, extension
pole and a platform full
of spare parts.
"It's been a fantastic
mission," Johnson said
in a series of news inter-
views. "It's the sort of


mission that astronauts
-dream of having."
Johnson said he and
his colleagues are spend-
ing their final hours at
the space station doing
"everything we can do
to help the space station'
out before ,we return
to Earth." The station
is so big now, he said,
that sometimes he takes
a wrong turn and finds
himself in the wrong
chamber.
Endeavour is sched-
uled to return to Florida
before dawn Wednesday,
16 days after blasting off.
After Sunday night's
undocking, Johnson
will. guide Endeavour


through a victory lap
around the space sta-
tion. He said he'll try
to maintain a good posi-
tion for the shuttle, "so
we can get great pho-
tos of one of the final
fly-arounds of the space
station." The shuttle
crew also will test out
an experimental naviga-
tion system for future
spacecraft.
This is the final voyage
of Endeavour; the young-
est in the shuttle fleet.
NASA is closing down
the shuttle program this
summer after 30 years.
Atlantis will fly one last
time to the space station
in July.


Medic I sn t wiIth







ifor Buy Medcalffice.


Pat-imePosiation


MOMENT: Veterans to be honored

Continued From Page 1A


during Memorial Day.
.A National Moment of
Remembrance will take
place 3 p.m. on Memorial
Day. -The moment will
last for one minute and is
intended to be a unifying
act of remembrance for
Americans of all ages.
Locally, the Moment of
Remembrance has been
promoted lby officials at
S&S Food Stores as part
of a promotion through
the National Grocers
Association, which has
promoted the event for
close to five years.
"The reason we want-
ed to do it is because
MemorialDayis supposed
to be about remembering
those military and service
people who died fighting
for our freedoms," said
Keith Brown, S&S Food
Stores vice president of
marketing. "A lot of peo-
ple forget their sacrifice.
This is just our little way
of reminding everybody
it's not just a holiday
weekend, but it has some
meaning."
Michael Nimmesh,


Commander of the
Military Order of Purple
Hearts Chapter 772
in Lake City, said the
Moment of Remembrance
is special to him.
"The biggest thing to
me is that this originated
with school kids when
they were in Washington
D.C. and it's'a carry-over
from them," he said. "For
the kids to remember
and bring it to us adults
and veterans attention, to
remember fellow veter-


ans and soldiers at 3 p.m.
on that day is special to
me.".
Wilbur Corbitt, who
is also a member of the
Military Order of the
Purple Hearts Chapter
772 in Lake City, said the
Moment of Remembrance
is a day of true remem-
brance.
"I remember a lot of
fallen comrades and
wounded comrades from
Korea and Vietnam that I
served with," he said.


David Adams
U.S. NAVY

It is hard to believe you
are no longer with us.
Your friends miss you.
Thank you for your
service to our country,
your kindness, your
gentle spirit, the funny
stories and laughter
we shared. You helped
heal my heart with
your friendship. Until *
we meet again, you are
remembered with love.
-Barbara


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Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424















OPINION


Sunday, May 29, 201 I


www.lakecityreporter.com


OUR
OPINION



Take time

for those

that gave

their lives

The Memorial
Day holiday
that labeling
contradiction should
cause Americans
to stop and think, to reflect on
why anyone would call a day
meant to honor the dead a
holiday.
Picnics and parties are fine,
but let's not lose sight of what
Memorial Day is. It should be
a time of reflection, of who we
are and how we got here.
This observance dates
back to the end of the Civil
War, when it was known as
Decoration Day, derived from
the practice of people visiting
and decorating the graves of
soldiers.
An estimated 620,000 men
lost their lives in the Civil War,
as well as an unknown number
of civilians. Decoration Day
was first observed nationwide
on May 30, 1868 the date
chosen because no famous
battle had been fought at that
time. The name was officially
changed to Memorial Day in
1882.
At first, it was meant only to
remember those who gave their
lives in the Civil War.
After the First World War,
it was expanded to include
all soldiers who died serving
America.
Serving America. The
ultimate sacrifice a person can
make for their country is to
give their life.
Countless lives have been
given for that very reason, so
that others could be saved.
Remembering those who
died is why we have our flags
displayed on this date, putting
them at half staff until noon,
then raising them to full staff.
But knowing why we have .
this day of honor is equally
important
The National Moment of
Remembrance will be at
3 p.m. Monday, a chance to
remember those who have
fallen for us.
Give them their due.
Remember why they died, so
that their sacrifice was not in
vain.


Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers ,
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work. -
Todd Wilson, publisher
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman


LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,


Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


Tea Party remains movement

in search of a leader


T he question on the
table today is wheth-
er revolutionary Tea
Party sentiments that
unseated 25 percent
of the Democrats in Congress in
2010 have now vanished into a
whimper.
Supporters of the current
administration would have us
believe that this is the case. And
at first glance, it seems they
may have a point If it is the
case, then in all likelihood, we
have a second term of President
Barack Obama to look forward
to.
The latest "proof' of the
fizzling of the Tea Party is'
the special election just held
in New York's 26th district in
which a Democrat captured
a congressional seat held by
Republicans since 1970. Yes, the
same seat held by legendary
Republican tax cutter and
reformer Jack Kemp. ,
The Republican proposal
to reform Medicare was a
key issue in the campaign, so
Democrats are interpreting this
as a generic Republican, and
Tea Party, repudiation.
A Gallup poll of just a few
weeks ago reported that 47
percent now have a negative
view of the Tea Party, the
highest negative reported since
Gallup began tracking the
movement
And, along with this,
President Obama's approval
ratings have now pushed again
over 50 percent, ten points
higher than his unfavorable
ratings.
Fox commentator and
Tea Party icon Glenn Beck,
who attracted hundreds of
thousands to the National Mall


Star Parker
parker@urbancure.org
in Washington last summer with
his "Restoring Honor" rally, will
soon 1le packing his bags and
leaving Fox.
Is it all over?
Certainly not. But nothing
remains the same and the Tea
Party movement is in a different
place today with new needs.
Republicans have a tough
job. They must convey to the
American people that we cannot
continue our entitlements
programs as they are and
still remain a free country.
This is what lies at the heart
of Wisconsin Republican
Paul Ryan's plan to change
Medicare.
We either find ways to
deliver the same services
more efficiently by turning to
ownership and markets, which
is basically what Ryan is doing,
or we resolve to not change, to
continue as we are, and finance
the massive deficits caused by
entitlement spending with taxes.
Entitlements consumed
less than five percent of our
economy and took less than a
quarter of tax revenue in 1970.
Today they consume 10 percent
of our economy and take more
than half our tax revenue. In
another 25 years they will
consume 20 percent of our
economy and take all our tax
revenue.


On the path we are on, by
mid-century, government at all
levels will be taking more than
half oti economy. We will be a
different nation.
The Republican challenge
here is certainly a short run
advantage to Democrats.
It is much easier to grow
government than to reduce it It
is much easier to spend money
than to conserve. It is much
easier for politicians to give
things to their constituents than
to deny things.
I recall an anecdote conveyed
by a teacher during the 2008
presidential campaign about
an.election his students held in
their class.
A little boy who was running
stood before his classmates and
shared his ideas and vision.
The little girl running against
him told her classmates that
whoever voted for her would get
ice cream.
Needless to say who won.
The Tea Party is not dead.
It is at a different stage. It now
needs a national leader who
can embody its sentiments to
preserve America as a free
nation and crystallize these
sentiments into a practical,
believable, and inspiring
message and agenda.
This is the kind of candidate
Republicans must nominate for
2012. Business as usual won't
cut it
It's why I get excited thinking
about a Michele Bachmann
or a Sarah Palin carrying the
Republican banner.
* Star Parker is president of
CURE, Coalition
on Urban Renewal and Education
(www.urbancure.org) and author
of three books.


ANOTHER OPINION

Fiddling while Medicare goes bankrupt


Democrats scored
a political victory
last Tuesday by
winning a spe-
cial election in a
Republican congressional bas-
tion in upstate New York where
Medicare was the main issue.
They should enjoy it while they
can because this momentary
triumph will turn to ashes if
they think they can win next
year's national elections on
the slogan that they did noth-
ing to stop the soaring cost of.
Medicare.
Poll after poll shows that the
American people are worried
about the budget and the unsus-
tainable national debt Medicare
is the biggest contributor to
the debt and the annual budget
deficit. Doing nothing is not an
option.
But too many Americans like
to have their cake and eat it,
too. When proposed cuts affect
the benefits they receive from


'entitlements like Medicare
and Social Security, they balk.
Don't touch my Medicare! In
New York's 26th Congressional
District race, Democrats suc-
cessfully preyed on those
fears by claiming the GOP's
reform plan would victimize
seniors.
In fact, the plan authored by
Rep. Paul Ryan, R-Wisc., wouldn't
affect seniors over 55 and would
not take full effect until 2021.
Claiming that it amounts to
throwing Grandma off the train
is sheer demagoguery. It's as
phony as the notion of "death
panels" leveled at President
Obama's Affordable Care Act
("Obamacare").
Yet even without the hype,
Rep. Ryan's plan is flawed and
impractical. It changes a gov-
ernment program into a limited
voucher plan that would leave
many future seniors short of
adequate medical coverage.
It shifts costs to seniors rath-


er than controlling the costs.
And it's based on a number of
accounting gimmicks: Presumed
"savings" are achieved by say-
ing the government's contribu-
tions to Medicare and Medicaid
won't grow at a rate greater than
inflation.
That'll be the day. Healthcare
costs grow at a rate several
times greater than inflation. Any
plan that doesn't take that into
account is a fantasy. When the
Democratic-controlled Senate
forced a vote on the Ryan plan
last week, it also went down
to defeat, with the help of five
GOP senators who know the
plan won't work.
From the Democratic point of
view, this makes for great poli-
tics but bad policy. Where's
the party's response? What's
the Democratic message We
fiddled while Medicare went
bankrupt?
* Miami Herald


Jose De La Isla
joseisla3@yahoo.com

How to

stop dirty

money and

open arms

The Mexican
government
has retained the
services of legal
help from abroad
in a new initiative to stem gun
running and money laundering
from the United States.
Reid Collins & Tsai LLP,
an Austin, Texas, law firm,
will serve as counsel to the
Mexican Attorney General's
office, reported Reforma,
one of this city's leading -:
newspapers, attributing CBS
News and Associated Press
sources in late April.
A flushed out version
of the same story by Bill
Conroy in NarcoSphere.
com, which reports on drug
war intricacies, detailed from
Department of Justice public
records that Berg Associates
of Miami, Florida, will provide.
expertise on financial crimes..
The legal team is researching
and investigating potential
litigation.
In particular, the firms
are looking into how RICO,
the Racketeer Influenced
and Corrupt Organizations
Act, can be used in the fight
with the drug cartels, RICO
extends criminal penalties
and civil action against crime...
organizations.
Under RICO, people who
participate in crime syndicates
can be tried for crimes they .
ordered, had others commit,
or assisted in. The act
closes loopholes that allowed
someone who gave the
orders but did not actually do'
the criminal act to get away
with it.
Some criminals who act as:,
accessories may have limited-,
legal protection. Gun handlers
and distributors may in some"
cases not be held responsible
for the crimes.
However, there are
enough issues about who is .
an accessory, under what
circumstances, and who is part
of the syndicate in the first
place that the small and big
fish may get held responsible
through both criminal and civil
prosecution.
Mexicans increasingly
considered the drug-war
policies as failing, after
40,000 murders many of "
innocent civilians in the four
years since President Felipe
Calderon authorized the use of
the military to help wage that
"war.."
Under U.S. pressure to "win"
the war and domestic criticism
that he picked the bloodiest
way to do it, Calderon's party
is flagging in popularity going
into next year's presidential
election. Even though, the
Mexican economy has proven
especially resilient after the
2009 world financial meltdown
when exports suffered,
insecurity is now eclipsing
concerns about the economy.
In the mix, criticism
is growing about low
responsiveness by elected
officials. Here government
is mostly looked to for every
type of economic and social
improvement
Non-partisan public interest
foundations, private initiatives
and community
organizations have been
prominent but not necessarily
influential.

* Jos6 de la Isla, author of "The
Rise of Hispanic Political Power"
writes a weekly commentary for
Hispanic Link News Service.


4A









Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, MAY 29, 2011


Today
Southside Summer
Camp
Registration is open for
Southside Summer Camp.
Only 80 spots are avail-
able. Camp is $225 for
nine weeks running June
13-Aug. 12. The camp is
open to boys and girls ages
7 -14 and is 7:30 a.m.-5:30
p.m. Monday-Friday June
13-Aug. 3. Trips include
Blue Springs, bowling,
swimming, skating, movies,
Chuck E. Cheese and more.
Call Wayne Jernigan at 758-
5448 for more information.

Boys Club summer
program
The Boys Club of
Columbia County is hosting
a summer program June
6-Aug. 13. Boys and girls
6-14 are eligible to attend.
The club offers a variety of
activities including sports,
game rooms, arts and crafts
and special events. Skating
and bowling is also avail-
able. Fees for the program
are $275. Call 752-4184.

Columbia County offers
summer day camp
Registration for
the Columbia County
Recreation Department
summer day camp pro-
gram is 8 a.m.-5 p.m. at
Richardson Community
Center. The camp, for
boys and girls ages 7-14,
is open 7:30 a.m.-5:30
p.m. Monday-Friday June
13 -Aug. 3. Cost for the
eight-week camp is $225,
which includes daily
activities, free breakfast,
lunch and weekly field
trips. Space is limited to
the first 60 participants
Contact Mario Coppock
or Nicole Smith at 754-
7095 or 754-7096 for more
information.

Summer Reading Camp
registration open
Registration is now
open for Summer
Reading Camp at Miracle
Tabernacle. The first 40
children will be admitted.
Camp is $25 per week.
The camp features read-
ing, as well as math, sci-
ence, hand writing, black
history, exercise and con-
versational Spanish in the
curriculum. Camp is 8:30
a.m.-4 p.m. Monday-
Thursday June 6-Aug.
12. Breakfast and lunch
will be provided. Call
Cynthia Robinson at 249-
3572 or Pastor Steele at
758-8452 for more infor-
mnation.

Girls Club summer
program
Registration for the
Girls Club summer pro-
gram is open. The cost
for the summer camp is
$225. Girls must be 6-13 to
attend. Call Terri Phillips
at (386) 719-5840 for more
information.

Monday
UfeSouth seeks donors
LifeSouth Bloodmobile
is seeking donors 10
a.m.-6 p.m. Monday at
Winn Dixie. Donors will
be entered to win an X-Box
with Kinect system.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter

Chief speaks at Baccalaureate service
Lake City Police Chief Argatha Gilmore gives an impassioned speech Thursday to the Columbia High School graduating class
of 2011 during the Baccalaureate service held at Christ Central Ministries. 'You've got to focus on the mission,' Gilmore said.
'You can boldly go where no man has gone before. Never surrender your dreams to noisy negatives.'


physical or mental impair-
ments that keep them
from working. These ser-
vice can help with medical
treatment, job placement
and training. Columbia and
Union Counties call (386)
754-1675 for more informa-


Beginners Spanish Class
10-11 a.m., free blood
pressure checks 11 a.m.-12
p.m. and a Kyle Houston
performance 11-11:45 a.m.
Wednesday at the LifeStyle
Enrichment Center. Call
(386) 755-0235 for more
information.


Columbia County Thursday
Wood Carvers meeting
Leads Club to host


The Columbia County
Wood Carvers meet every
Monday at 1 p.m. at the
LifeStyle Enrichment
Center. Contact Ken
Myer at 719-9629 or
Charles Kime at 755-
4937 for more informa-
tion.

Tuesday
Couponing 101
workshop
A Couponing 101 work-
shop is 7 p.m. Tuesday
at the Bristro at Christ
Central Ministries. The
cost is free.

UfeSouth seeks donors
The LifeSouth
Bloodmobile is seeking
donors 11 a.m.-5 p.m.
Tuesday at Walmart.
Food, fun, and giveaways.
Donors are entered to
win an X-Box with Kinect
system.

Fees for Senior
Services meal due
Payment for the
Columbia County Senior
Services Inc. Wednesday
homecooked meal is due
10 a.m. Tuesday at the
LifeStyle Enrichment
Center. The menu is fried
fish, baked beans, cole
slaw, hush puppies and
banana pudding. Call (386)
755-0235 for more informa-
tion.


Wednesday


VUocationail enanIUIIILion
offers job seekers help Beginners Spanish
Un-fP._ >i-_,._.r; Class


Vocationalil Rehabilitation
provides services for
eligible people who have


Columbia County Senior
Services Inc. is hosting


open house event
A Leads Club open
house is 4-6 p.m.
Thursday at the Holiday
Inn & Suites of Lake
City. The open house is
an opportunity to meet
the group of Chamber
partners who meet bi-
monthly to exchange
business leads and ideas
with fellow business:
professionals. Learn how
to become a Leads Club
member Admission is
free. Door prizes, compli-
mentary hors d'oeuvres
and refreshments. Cash
Bar will also be available.
Visitors are welcome to
attend. There is a $20
registration fee for Leads
members from both
groups 1 and 2. Leads
members need to contact
Theresa Westberry at
386-754-1411, ext. 106
or e-mail events@hilake-
cityfl.com. Contact the
Chamber office at (386)
752-3690 for more infor-
mation.

Saturday
Reading Program to
feature Cultural Fair .
The Columbia County
Library Summer Reading
Program will feature a
Cultural Fair from 2-4
p.m. Saturday at the Main
Branch.


Modern and classical
Ballet pieces including
Swan Lake, Sleeping
Beauty and more. Tickets
may be available at the
doorl5 minutes prior to
show time for $7.50. Call
the studio at (386) 755-
8869 for more information.

Art Show coming to
Ubrary's West Branch
Art is due 10
a.m.-noon Saturday at
the Columbia County
Library West Branch
for the Sixth Annual Art
Show. The show is June
4-Aug. 6. Applications
are available at the
Columbia County Public
Library branches, the
Fabric Art Shop and The
Frame Shop and Gallery
in Live Oak. Two and
three dimension artwork
of all media is eligible
for the show. Contact
Wally Reichert 758-7853
for more information.

Sunday, June 5
Author visits for Friends
of the Ubrary program
A Friends of the Library
Author Program featuring
M. C. Finotti, author of
The Treasure of Amelia
Island will be held at the
Main Library at 2 p.m.
Sunday, June 5.
Finotti is a journalist
who writes "I do, I do," a
weekly wedding column
in the Florida Times
Union. A former teacher
who lives in Atlantic
Beach, Ms. Finotti will
talk about writing his-
torical fiction and give
a "mini" writing lesson.
She is also the co-author
of The Insiders' Guide to
Jacksonville.


Lake City Dance Arts Tuesday, June 7


to host dance recital
Lake City Dance Arts
presents its 16th annual
recital, "All About Dance"
3 p.m. June 4-5 at the
FGC Performing Arts
Center. It will feature
Clogging, Jazz, Hip Hop,


Lulu Ladies community
baby shower
The Lulu Ladies are
having a community
baby shower at 7 p.m.
June 7 at the Lulu
Community Center. The
event will benefit the


OBITUARIES


Marshall E. Palmer Sr.
Marshall E. Palmer Sr. 63, of
Lake Butler passed away sud-
denly, May 26, 2011, in an auto-
motorcycle accident in Lake City.
He was born in Jacksonville, liv-
ing most of his life in Lake But-
ler and Wahneta, Fl. He served


in the U.S Army Viet Nam. He
retired from the Department of
Corrections after 22 years of ser-
vice. He is a member of the Lake
Butler Ward of Church of Je-
sus Christ of Latter Day Saints.
He is survived by his loving wife
of43 years: Julianne Kerce Palm-
er. His son, Marshall Palmer Jr.


Three grandchildren: Samantha,
Zackery and Kiersten and his sis-
ter: Ethel Palmer of Lake Butler.
Funeral services will be held
Tuesday morning at 10:00 A.M.
in the Lake Butler Ward of the
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter
Day Saints with Bishop Bobby
Cabral conducting the services.


ARCHER FUNERAL HOME
OF LAKE BUTLER is in charge
of arrangements. Family will re-
ceive friends at the funeral home
from 6 to 8 Monday evening.
Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


Pregnancy Care Center.
The public is invited to
attend and baby gifts are
appreciated. Call Eva
Nelson at 755-6574 for


* To submit your Community
Calendar item, contact Antonia
Robinson at 754-0425 or by
e-mail at arobinson@
lakecityreporter., com.


more information.

Wednesday, June
8
Senior Services to offer
live entertainment
Columbia County Senior
Services Inc. is hosting
live entertainment 11-11:45
a.m. June 8 at the LifeStyle
Enrichment Center. Call
(386) 755-0235 for more
information.

Saturday, June 11

FACS of Lake City
announces events
The Filipino American
Cultural Society of
Lake City is hosting an
Induction of Officers/
Board and Filipino
Independence Day
Dinner Party 6 p.m. June
11 at Epiphany Catholic
Church Social Hall.
The event will include a
social time, buffet din-
ner and program. The
program will feature
FACS Cultural Dancers,
a guest speaker, and a
night of fun and dancing.,
Members please bring
your best covered dish
to share and Filipino
attire is suggested. Non-
Members are always wel-,,
come, but there is a $10
per person cover charge,
at the door for this event.
Contact Bob Gavette
(386) 965-5905 for more
information.


GRADUATION GIFTS



Knives

...hrethe altmeetsyour.
tervis tumbler
.3oiSE Bay D(3 5-7


Ads haetr be plae y4m
3'-aspi ort perneI
tihehLke ityRprtr i


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


I 8th ANNuAI WEllboRN

Blueberry Festival
JUNE 3 & 4, 2010
FRidaY, 94M-9pM SAIURdA, 7aM-5pm






For directions, information or schedule,
www.dellborncommunityassociation.com
call 386-963-1157


LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, MAY 29, 2011


Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424










LAKE CITY REPORTER WEATHER SUNDAY, MAY 29, 2011


THE WEATHER


1 '41
SMOSTL
SUN


HIM LO


MOSTLY
'j SUNNY


H191 LOS61


_-STORMS



l I91 LG066


SNATIONAL FORECAST: A frontal boundary extending from the Southwest, across the central
Plains and into the Midwest will be responsible for widespread showers and thunderstorms
today. Thunderstorms associated with this system will be possible for the central Plains, por-
tions of the Midwest and Great Lakes, and the Northeast.



NAIONLFRCS T MAP 3p I.toa


R FR.M IP o Suday I.My


Taahassee *
91/68
Pensac *
89/72 Panama Ciy7
88/73


* Va6ta City
92/ 66 d a oJaSle Cape Canaveral
Lake C 88/74 Daytona Beach.
93/66 Ft. Lauderdale
ese Dayma Beach Fort Myers
92/66 85 71 Gainesville
Ocla Jacksonville
92/67 Key West
Odando.Cape Calnedral
91/71 84/71 LakeCity
91/, Miami
Tampa Naples
91/70 WrPaa Ocala
84/79 Orlando
.. Ft Laudela Panama City
F MR. ,L 86/76 Pensacola
92/70 aples Tallahassee
91/71 Miami Tampa
87/77 Valdosta
Key West* W. Palm Beach


LA YAL ANA


TEMPERATURES
High Saturday
Low Saturday
Normal high -
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Saturday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date.
Normal year-to-date


93
66
88
65
99 in 1953
52 In 1901


0.00"
2.63"
14.11"
2.74"
16.76".


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunnse tom.
SUnset tom.

MOON
Moonrise today
Moonset today
Moonrise torn.
Moonset toDr.


6:30 a.m;
8:26 p.m.
6:30 a.m.
8:26 p.m.


4:06 a.m.
5:45 p.m.
4:42 a.m.
6:41 p.m.


OinKtehm
Today's
ultra-violet
radIation risk
for the area
a scale fromrr
to 10+
;k*Ate-


Ij


June June June June J Lv
,1 8 15' 23
New First Full last
meaarS. J


Monday
83/73/pc
85/71/pc
86/75/t
92/69/t
91/66/s
87/72/s
87/78/sh
92/66/s
87/76/t
90/71/t
91/67/s
90/71/t
88/73/pc
88/74/s
91/66/pc
91/71/t
91/67/pc
84/76/t


Tuesday
84/ 71.'p
85/70/pc
86/75/pc
90/68/pc
90/65/s
86/72/pc
87/78/pc
90/65/s
85/75/pc
88/69/1
89/66/pc
90/70/pc
87/71/pc
86/72/s
91/67/pc
90/69/pc
90/66/pc
83/77/pc


An exclusive
| seffvice
broagtitto
our reader
by
The Weather
k Chafnel.
Son





Forecasts, data and
graphics O 2011. Weather
Central, LP, Madison, Wis.
www.weatherpubllsher.com


our"d I,,. - 5~~~







MIS
.. ..... .

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Orlando Warm Front
o91171
Miami Stationary
a Front
i87/77 AAA
Occluded
Front

Egg gYQiA'Alg


Saturday Today


CITY HI/Lo/Pcp.
Albany NY 85/59/0
Albuquerque 86/65/0
Anchorage 56/48/0
Atlanta 86/64/0
Baltimore 83/64/0
Billings 59/36/0
Birmingham 90 62 0
Bismarck 57/43/0
Boise 49/36/0
Boston 69/60/0
Buffalo ; 68 52 0
Charleston SC 88/70/.01
Charleston WV 83/60/0
Charlotte 84/66/0
Cheyenne 52 4.3, 09
Chicago 62/51/.01
Cincinnati 7,'57.0
Cleveland 75/54/0
Columbia SC 87/68/0
Dallas 95/75/0
Daytona Beach 88.68.0
Denver 66/46/0


HI/LO/W CITY
83/65/t Des Molnes
89/55/s Detroit
62/44/c El Paso
91/69/pc Fairbanks
8 7' 71/pc Greensboro
54/44/sh Hartford
91 67/, Honolulu
62/49/c Houston
60/45/sh Indianapolis
82/66/c Jackson MS
74. 66-1 Jacksonville
82, 1, p.: Kansas City
91/64/pc Las Vegas
88/66/pc Uttle Rock
58. 4 3 sn Los Angeles
73/66/t Memphis
89/69/s Miami,
84/72/t Minneapolis
90. 617.'pc Mobile
95/74/pc New Orleans
85171/pc New York
68/48/c Oklahoma City


Saturday Today
HI/Lo/Pcp. HI/Lo/W CITY'
64 55.'03 79 67 t Omaha
70/54/0 81/66/t Orlando
94/75/0 101/70/w Philadelphia
76/56/0 81/53/t Phoenix
82,'63, 34 88/68/pc Pittsburgh
82/67/0 85/65/c Portland ME
82/76/0 89/74/s Portland OR
94/78/0 94/78/pc Raleigh
72/55.'0 "88/71/pc. Rapid City
94. 6J. u 93/67/s Reno
88.67 0 88e73 pc Richmond
68 51 0 88/73/pc Sacramento
82, 69.0 68/57/c St. Louis
89/65/0 90/68/s Salt Lake City
66/58/0 69/55/s San Antonio
90/65/0 92/70/s San. Diego
91,,75 0 87, 7?.t San Francisco
69 50 0 69/58/sh Seattle
90/68/0 90.71 s Spokane
91/73/0 88/72/s Tampa
84,67 0 84. 70'c: Tucson
91, 70 0 93/72/w Washington


Saturday Today


HI/Lo/Pcp.
71/57/.07
91/69/0
85/68/0
97/77/0
78/60/0
58/54/0
56/45/.01
85/65/0
64/36/0
55/42/0
84/62/0
66/46/0
72/60/0
60/48/0
95/75/0
66/63/0
61/53/0
57/45/.01
51/38/0
90/74/0
97.66/0
82/66/0


HI/Lo/W
74/67/t
91/71/pc
87/71/c
91/62/pc
88/65/t
73/59/c
62/50/c
89/67/pc
52/47/sh
56/40/sh
90/69/pc
73/49/pc
92/73/pc
53/41/sh
97/78/pc
64/55/s
63/48/pc
63/49/sh
67142.'t
91/70/f
93,60's
88. 70. pc


I7~iiI~ ~jp :On. thai date in


INTERATIOAL


CITY
Acapulco
Amsterdam
Athens a
Auckland
BeUing
Berlin
Buenos Alres
Cairo
Geneva
Havana
Helsinki
Hong Kong
Kingston


Saturday
HI/Lo/Pcp.
91-.9 0
. 61/48/0
73/62/0,
63/55/0
91/64.,0
64/46/0
61/43/0
90/72/0
70/43/0.
90/70/0
59/48/0
88/75/0
86/79/0


Today
HVLO/W
S91/79/t
64, 50, c
'77/64/s
60/52/s
89/70/c
73/52/pc
65/48/c
86/71/s
75/50/pc
90/70/t
'59/45/sh
88/77/s
86/75/t


CITY
LaPaz
Uma
London
Madrid
Mexico C
Montreal
Moscow
Nairobi
Nassau
New Delh
Oslo
Panama
Paris


Saturday
HlI/Lo/Pcp.
61 30 0
;2, 66, 0
61, 48/0
8; ". U
ity 86/63/0
66/50/0
77/41/0
81/57/0
90/75/0
100/81/0
55/45/0
88/77/0
72/43/0


KEY TO CONDITIONS: c-cloudy, dr-drizzle, f-fair, fg-fog, h=hazy, i-ice, pc-partly cloudy, r-rain, s-sunny,
sh-showers, sn-snow, ts-thunderstorms, w-windy.


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Today
HV/Lo/W
60/32/s
70/65/pc
66/54/pc
81/57/pc
85/59/t
74/61/sh
79/61/t
77/61/s
86/75/pc
105/86/s
37-41'srn
88/75/pc
77/53/pc


CITY
Rio
Rome
St. Thomas VI
San Juan PR
Santiago
Seoul
Singapore
Sydney
Tel Aviv
Tokyo
Toronto
Vienna
Whrsaw


Saturday
HI/Lo/Pcp.
72/66/.02
75/66/0
86/78/.21
87/77/0
64/37/0
82/55/0
90, 79 0
63/48/0
90/73/0
68/64/0
64'52,'0
5;, 50 0'
61/53/.11


Today]I
Hi/Lo/W'
72.67 s
84/61/s
85/79/t
87/77/t
66,40/pc
; 7.59 c
91/78/t
65/45/sh
78/67/s
68/64/r
70.57,-sh
75, 55 s
72/55/c


[3 0MON


Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424


tIr


.1









Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@akecityreporter.com


Lake City Reporter





SPORTS


Sunday. May 29.2011 '


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


Back-to-back
state trips a first
for girls' tennis.
By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com
Among the 35 sports
teams at Columbia High
and Fort White High, seven
excelled in the competi-
tion framework set forth
by the Florida High School
Athletic Association.
The goals begin with dis-
trict play and move steadily
upward to state.
Two county teams were
district champions in the
2010-11 school year and
both set new standards for
their sport.
Columbia's girls^ tennis
team won District 4-3A for
the second straight year.
These Lady Tigers, and
several were on last year's
team, also won the two
regional steps to qualify for
state.
Last year's team was the
first' to make state since
1991 and the back-to-back
appearances are the first
for Columbia. Tabatha
McMahon coached CHS
both seasons.
The Lady Tigers were led
by district singles champi-
ons Susy Romero and
Kelsey Mercer and run-
ner-up Chrissie Reichert.
Columbia also had both
district doubles champions
Reichert and Romero at
No. 1 and Taylor Owens
and Mercer at No. 2.
With eight playoffs
appearances since 1995 and
three wins in the postsea-
son, Columbia softball con-
tinues to be on the map.
Coach Jimmy Williams'
team won its second dis-
trict championship in three
, years and the fifth title for
the school. This team went
one step better, becom-
ing the first CHS team to
advance to the third round
of the playoffs.
Williams, who won his
100th game during the sea-
son, loses just one senior
and could be back knocking
on the final four door next
year.
Members of the dis-
trict championship team
TEAMS continued on 3B


BRANDON FINLEY/LaKe City Reporter
ABOVE: Columbia.High's
girls softball team shows off
its District 4-5A championship
trophy on April 21. The Lady \
Tigers beat Ed White High,
7-1, in the tournament final.

COURTESY PHOTO
Columbia High's District 4-3A
champion girls tennis team
players pose with.the first-
place trophy. The Lady Tigers
who competed in the tourna-
ment and advanced to state
are Heather Benson (from
left), Taylor Owens, Susy
Romero, coach
Tabatha McMahon, Kelsey
Mercer and Chrissie
Reichert.


:~ ,. K.irlknman


back in bigs


Photo courtesy of Dallas Morning News
Lake City's Michael Kirkman was called up by the Texas Rangers from the team's Triple A farm club on
Friday and saw action against the Kansas City Royals.


Local pitcher will
be in Tampa Bay on
Monday with Texas.
By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com
Michael Kirkman got the call
from his big league club and the
bullpen all in the same day.
Texas brought up the Lake City
native from its Triple A farm club
in Round Rock, Texas, on Friday.
When the Rangers went 14 innings
against the Kansas City Royals on
Friday night, Kirkman was called on
to pitch in the 13th inning. He got
two outs, but the Royals went on to
win 12-7 in the 14th. *
RangersmanagerRonWashington
said Kirkman, 24, can help with
the workload for fellow left-handers
Darren Oliver and Arthur Rhodes,
both of whom are ov6r 40 years old.


Oliver has the most appearances of
any pitcher on the staff with 20.
'We're trying to protect the two
lefties we've got," Washingtort
told Louis Horvath of MLB.com.
"They've been getting the ball pret-
ty often. Kirkman's been throwing
the ball well, and he's another guy
who can give us some length. He
can throw more than one inning
when he comes in." ,
Kirkman was struggling at Round(
Rock as a starter, but has bounced
back coming out of the bullpen."
Four of his five most recent appear-
ances have been out of the bullpen.,
He has allowed no earned runs in 7
2/3 innings and recorded his first
win of the season. Kirkman has an
ERA of 1.37 in his last six appear-,
ances.
The Rangers host Kansas City
today and will be at Tampa Bay for
a. series beginning Monday. The
Monday game is at 6:40 p.m.










LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, MAY 29, 2011


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
AUTO RACING
7:30 a.m.
SPEED ,Formula One, Monaco
Grand Prix
Noon
ABC IRL, IndyCar, Indianapolis 500
5:30 p.m.
FOX NASCAR, Sprint Cup,
Coca-Cqla 600, at Concord, N.C.
COLLEGE BASEBALL
2 p.m.
ESPN2 Southeastern Conference,
championship game, at Hoover,Ala.
FSN Big 12 Conference, champion-
ship game, at Oklahoma City
COLLEGE SOFTBALL
I p.m.
ESPN Regional coverage, NCAA
Division I playoffs, super regionals, game
2, California at Kentucky
3:30 p.I.
ESPN Regional coverage, NCAA
Division I playoffs, super regionals, game 3,
California at Kentucky (if necessary)
7 p.m.
ESPN2 Regional coverage, NCAA
Division I playoffs, super regionals, game
2,Washington at Missouri
9:30 p.m.
ESPN2 Regional coverage, NCAA
Division I playoffs, super regionals, game 3,
Washington at Mi;souri (if necessary)
GOLF
r9:30 a.m.
TGC European PGA Tour, BMW
PGA Championship, final round, at Surrey,
England
3 p.m.
CBS PGA Tour, Byron Nelson
Championship, final round, at Irving,Texas
NBC PGA of America, Senior PGA
Championship, final round, at Louisville,
Ky.
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
I p.m.
TBS Boston at Detroit
2:10 p.m.
WGN Pittsburgh at Chicago Cubs.
8 p.m.
ESPN Cincinnati at Atlanta
MOTORSPORTS
12 Midnight
SPEED AMA Pro Racing, at Salt
Lake City (same-day tape)
TENNIS
Noon
NBC French Open, round of 16, at
Paris (same-day tape)

Monday
AUTO RACING
2 p.m.
SPEED Rolex Sports Car Series,
Memorial Day Classic, at Lakeville, Conn.
COLLEGE BASEBALL
12:30 p.m.
ESPN NCAA Division I, World
Series Selection Show, at Bristol, Conn.
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
I p.m.
MLB Regional coverage, Minnesota
at Detroit or San Diego at Atlanta
2:10 p.m.
WGN Houston at Chicago Cubs
7 p.m.
MLB Regional coverage, Milwaukee
at Cincinnati or Chicago White Sox at
Boston
MEN'S COLLEGE LACROSSE
3:30 p.m.
ESPN NCAA Division I, champi-
onship game, Virgin!a-Denver winner vs.
Maryland-Duke winner, at Baltimore
MOTORSPORTS
5 p.m.
SPEED FIM World Superbike, at
Salt Lake City (same-day tape)
II p.m.
SPEED AMA Pro Racing, at Salt
Lake City (samd-day tape)
TENNIS
Noon
ESPN2 French Open, round of
16, at Paris

HOCKEY

NHL playoffs

CONFERENCE FINALS
Friday
Boston 1, Tampa Bay 0, Boston wins
series 4-3

BASEBALL

AL standings

East Division
W L Pct GB
Boston 29 22 .569 -
New York 27 22 .551 I
Tampa Bay 27 23 .540 I
Toronto 25 26 .490 4
Baltimore 24 25 .490 4
Central Division "
W L Pet GB
Cleveland 30 18 .625 -
Detroit 25 25 .500 6
Kansas City 23 27 .460 8
Chicago 24 29 .453 8'A
Minnesota 16 33 .327 14'A
West Division
W L Pet GB
Texas 26 25 .510 -
Los Angeles 27 26 .509 -
Seattle 25 25 .500 'A
Oakland 25 27 .481 IA
Saturday's Games
Blue Jays 9,White Sox 8, 14 Innings
Cleveland at Tampa Bay (n)
Boston at Detroit (n)
Kansas City at Texas (n)
LA.Angels at Minnesota (n)
Baltimore at Oakland (n)
N.Y.Yankees at Seattle (n)
Today's Games
Boston (Beckett 4-1) at Detroit
(Verlander 4-3), 1:05 p.m.


Chicago White Sox (Danks 0-7) at
Toronto (R.Romero 4-4), 1:07 p.m.
Cleveland (Masterson 5-2) at Tampa
Bay (Hellickson 5-3), 1:40 p.m.
LA. Angels (Haren 4-3) at Minnesota
(Pavano 2-4), 2:10 p.m.
Kansas City (Duffy 0-0) at Texas
(Ogando 5-0), 3:05 p.m.
Baltimore (Britton 5-2) at Oakland
(Moscoso 1-0), 4:05 p.m.
N.Y.Yankees (Sabathia 5-3) at Seattle
(Vargas 3-2),4:10 p.m.
Monday's Games


Minnesota at Detroit, 1:05 p.m.
N.Y.Yankees at Oakland, 4:05 p.m.
Baltimore at Seattle, 4:10 p.m.
LA.Angels at Kansas City, 4:10 p.m.
Texas at Tampa Bay, 6:40 p.m.
Cleveland at Toronto, 7.07 p.m.
Chicago White Sox at Boston,
7:10 p.m.

NL standings

East Division
W L Pct GB
Philadelphia 32 19 .627 -
Florida 29 20 .592 2
Atlanta 28 24 .538 4h
NewYork 23 27 .460 8'
Washington 22 28 .440 9h,
Central Division
W L Pct GB
St. Louis 31 21 .596 -
Milwaukee 27 24 .529 3h
Cincinnati 27 25 .519 4
Pittsburgh 23 26 .469 6hl
Chicago 22 27 .449 7%'
Houston 19 32 .373 1IA1
West Division
W L Pct GB
San Francisco 28 22 .560 -
Arizona 27 24 '529 IA
Colorado 24 26 .480 4
Los Angeles 23 29 .442 6
San Diego 20 31 .392 S'h
Saturday's Games
Pittsburgh 10, Chicago Cubs 0
San Diego 2,Washington I
San Francisco at Milwaukee (n)
Arizona at Houston (n)
Cincinnati at Atlanta (n)
Philadelphia at N.Y. Mets (n)
St. Louis at Colorado (n)
Florida at LA. Dodgers (n)
Today's Games
.Philadelphia (Worley 2-0) at N.Y. Mets
(Niese 3-5), 1:10 p.m.
San Diego (Moseley 1-6) atWashington
(Detwiler 0-0), 1:35 p.m.
Arizona (Collmenter 3-1) at Houston
(Happ 3-6), 2:05 p.m.
San Francisco (Cain 3-3) at Milwaukee
(Gallardo 6-2), 2:.10 pm.
Pittsburgh (Karstens 3-3) at Chicago
Cubs (Dempster 3-4), 2:20 p.m.
St. Louis (Lohse 6-2) at Colorado
(Chacin 5-3),3:10 p.m.
Florida (Nolasco 4-0) at LA. Dodgers
(Kershaw 5-3), 4:10p.m.
Cincinnati (Cueto 2-1) at Atlanta
Jurrjens 6-1), 8:05 p.m.
Monday's Games
Philadelphia atWashington, 1:05 p.m.
San Diego at Atlanta, j:05 p.m.
Houston at Chicago Cubs, 2:20 p.m..
San Francisco at St. Louis, 4:15 p.m.
Milwaukee at Cincinnati, 7:10 p.m.
Pittsburgh at N.Y. Mets, 7:10 p.m.
Colorado at L.A. Dodgers, 8:10 p.m.
Florida at Arizona, 8:10 p.m.

ACC tournament

Friday
Virginia 6, Miami 4
Saturday
Florida State 4, Georgia Tech 2
Clemson 6, NC State 3
North Carolina vs.Wake Forest (n)
Miami vs.Wake Forest (n)
Virginia vs. North Carolina (n)
Today
Championship game, I p.m.

SEC tournament

Friday
Arkansas 4,Alabama I
Georgia 4, South Carolina 2
Saturday
Georgia 4, Florida 3
Vanderbilt 3,Arkansas 2
Today
Championship game, I p.m.

TENNIS

French Open singles

Third Round
Men
Viktor Troicki (15), Serbia, def.
Alexandr Dolgopolov (21), Ukraine, 6-4,
3-6, 6-3,6-4.
Rafael Nadal (I), Spain, def. Antonio
Veic, Croatia, 6-1, 6-3, 6-0.
Andy Murray (4), Britain, def. Michael
Berrer, Germany, 6-2, 6-3, 6-2.
Juan Ignacio Chela, Argentina, def.
Lukas jLosol, Czech Republic, 6-2, 6-4,
3-6,7-6 (5).
Novak Djokovic (2), Serbia, def. Juan
Martin del Potro (25),Argentina, 6-3, 3-6,
6-3,6-2.
Gilles Simon (18), France, def. Mardy
Fish (10), United States, 6-3, 6-4, 6-2.
Alejandro Falla, Colombia, def. Lukasz
Kubot, Poland, 6-7 (4), 6-4,7-5, 6-4.
Ivan Ljubicic, Croatia, def. Fernando
Verdasco (16), Spain, 6-3, 7-6 (6), 6-4.
Robin Soderling (5), Sweden, def.
Leonardo Mayer,.Argentina, 6-I,6-4,6-3.
Women
SLt Na (6), China, def. Sorana Cirstea,
Romania, 6-2,6-2.
Victoria Azarenka (4), Belarus, def.
Roberta Vinci (30), Italy, 6-3,6-2.
Petra Kvitova (9), Czech Republic, def.
Vania King, United States, 6-4, 6-2.
Ekaterina Makarova, Russia, def. Kaia
Kanepl (16), Estonia,6-4,7-5.
Andrea Petkovic (15), Germany, def.
Jarmila Gajdosova (24), Australia, 6-2,
4-6.6-3.
Agnieszka Radwanska (12), Poland, def.
YaninaWickmayer (21), Belgium, 6-4,6-4.
Maria Sharapova (7), Russia, def. Chan
Yung-jan,Taiwan, 6-2, 6-3.
Maria Kirilenko (25), Russia, def.
Arantxa Rus, Netherlands, 6- I, 6-1.

AUTO RACING

Coca-Cola 600 lineup


At Charlotte Motor Speedway
Race today
(Car number in parentheses)
I. (2) Brad Keselowski, Dodge, 192.089
mph.
2. (43) A J Allmendinger, Ford,
191.693.
3. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford:; 191.686.
4.(1 I) Denny Hamlln.Toyota, 191.367.
5. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet,
191.245.
6. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet,
191.069.
7. (00) David Reutimann, Toyota,


190.921.
8. (6) David Ragan, Ford, 190.799.
9. (21) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford,
190.752.
10. (33) Clint Bowyer, Chevrolet,
190.705.
II. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet,
190.604.
12. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet,
190.564.
13. (5) Mark Martin, Chevrolet,
190.409.
14. (56) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota,
190.201.
15.(16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 190.161.
16. (27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet,
190.067.
17. (4) Kasey Kahne,Toyota, 189.893.
18. (83) Brian VickersToyota, 189.867.
19. (17) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 189.86.
20. (78) Regan Smith, Chevrolet,
189.767.
21. (18) Kyle Busch,Toyota, 189.44.
22. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet,
189.414.
23. (20) Joey Logano, Toyota, 189.321.
24. (9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford,
189.288.
25. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet,
188.937.
26. (22) Kurt Busch, Dodge, 188.844.
27. (47) Bobby Labonte, Toyota,
188.653.
28. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet,
188.416.
29. (42) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet,
188.16. ;.
30. (34) David Gilllland, Ford, 188.048.
31. (38) Travis Kvapil, Ford, 187.99.
32. (95) David Starr, Ford, 187.944.
33. (66) Michael McDowell, Toyota,
187.682.
34. (46) JJ.Yeley, Chevrolet, 187.513.
35. (I) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet,
187.201.
36. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota,
'187.169.
37. (13) Casey Mears,Toyota, 186.994.
38. (30) David Stremme, Chevrolet,
186.916.
39. (32) Mike Bliss, Ford, 186.413.
-40. (09) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet,
Owner Points.
41. (7) Robby Gordon, Dodge, Owner.
42. (36) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet,
Owner Points.
43. (60) Mike SkinnerToyota, 186.774.


Indianapolis 500 lineup


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Defending champion Spain's Rafael Nadal returns the ball to Croatia's Antonio Veic during
their third round match of the French Open tennis tournament, at the Roland Garros stadium
in Paris, Saturday.



Djokovic, Nadal



win easily in Paris


B
A


S

F
ti
a

b
c
d
S
d
E
b


At Indianapolis Motor Speedway SE
Race today
(Car number In parentheses) P
All cars Dallara chassis, Honda engine tl
I. (77) AlexTagliani, 2 minutes, 38.2613
seconds (227.472 mph). c;
2. (9) Scott Dixon, 2:38.3528 D
(227.340).
3. (2) Oriol Servia, 2:38.4727 (
(227.168). n
4. ,(99) Townsend Bell, 2:38.6696
(226.887). S]
5. (12) Will Power, 2:38.7493
(226.773). a
6. (98) Dan Wheldon, 2:38.9477 in
(226.171). in
7. (44) Buddy Rice, 2:39.4431 aJ
(225.786). St
8. (67) Ed Carpenter, 2:39.9137
(225.121). a
9. (10) Dario Franchitti, 2:39.0253 C
(226.379).
10. (5) Takuma Sato, 2:39.4785 th
(225.736).
II. (14) Vitor Meira, 2:39.5814 sE
(225.590). fi
12. (4) JR Hildebrand, 2:39.5895 ag
(225.579). eN
13. (06) James Hinchcliffe, 2:39.5942
(225.572).
14. (30) Bertrand Baguette, 2:39.7973 V(
(225.285). h1
15. (II) Davey Hamilton, 2:39.8223
(225.250).
16. (3) Hello Castroneves, 2:39.8464
(225.21.6). 1
17. (43) John Andretti, 2:40.0133
(224.981). 4
18. (59) EJ Viso, 2:40.1907 (224.732). 8
19. (22) Justin Wilson, 2:40.3488 11
(224.511).
20. (88) Jay Howard, 2:40.3685 13
(224.483).
21. (07) Tomas Scheckter, 2:40.4040 14
(224.433). 15
22. (82) Tony Kanaan, 2:40.4156 16
(224.417). 18
23. (78T) Simona de Silvestro, 20
2:40.4335 (224.392). 21
24. (23) Paul Tracy, 2:40.0433 22
(224.939). 24
25. (7) Danica Patrick, 2:40.0987
(224.861).
26. (6T) Ryan Briscoe, 2:40.2572 27
(224.639).
27. (26) Marco Andretti, 2:40.2648 30
(224.628).
28. (83) Charlie Kimball, 2:40.3574 31
(224.499).
29. (38) Graham Rahal, 2:40.4424 32
(224.380). 34
30. (19) Alex Lloyd, 2:40.7451 34
(223.957).
31. (36) Pippa Mann, 2:40.7600
(223.936). 36
32. (24) Ana Beatriz, 2:40.8012 :I.
(223.819).
33. (41) Ryan Hunter-Reay, 2:40.2203
(224.691)
Note: No. 41 car originally qualified 17
19th by Bruno Junquelr%
11
SOFTBALL
15

NCAA super regionals 18

Friday
Florida 9, Oregon I
Alabama 10, Stanford 0, 5 Innings
Alabama I, Stanford 0, Alabama 24
advances
Oklahoma State 3, Houston 0 30
Arizona State 4,Texas A&M 2,Arizona
State advances 34
Oklahoma 6,Arizona 0
Saturday
Florida 7, Oregon 0
California I, Kentucky 0
Houston I, Oklahoma State 0
Oklahoma vs.Arizona (n) 42
Baylor at Georgia (n)
Washington at Missouri (n) -
Today 49
California vs. Kentucky, I p.m. (if 1
necessary game 3:30 p.m.) 54
Baylor vs. Georgia, 3:30 p.m. (if __
necessary game 6 p.m.) 57
Washington vs. Missouri, 7 p.m. (if
necessary game 9:30 p.m.)


By HOWARD FENDRICH
associated Press

PARIS What was
having up as a struggle
or Novak Djokovic at the
French Open suddenly
turned into something of
stroll.
Tied, at a set apiece with
ig-hitting 2009 U.S. Open
champion Juan Martin
el Potro when play was
suspended because of
arkness a night earlier,
)jokovic quickly faced two
reak points Saturday. He
aved those, then broke del
?otro in the next game, and
hat was pretty much that
"If he serves well, he
an beat anybody, really,"
)jokovic said. "I went
into) the match a bit more
ervous than usual."
If that's so, it didn't really
how. Djokovic completed
6-3, 3-6, 6-3, 6-2 victory
n the third round, push-
ig his 2011 record to 40-0
nd stretching his winning
streak to 42 matches over-
ll, including two Davis
up matches in December.
"He was much better
ian me," said the 25th-
eeded del Potro, a semi-
nalist in Paris two years
go. "He has everything;
everything perfect He has
ery good movement. He's
ery fast. He's improved
is serve. He's beating all


I
C
n
I
I



s

c
C
C
IE
C

C
Ic
E

IC

C
'


the players very, very easy,
and I'm one more victim of
his game."
Djokovic's 42-match run
is tied for the third-lon-
gest by a man in the Open
era, which began in 1968;
Guillermo Vilas won 46 in a
row in 1977. And Djokovic
is off to the second-best
start to a season, trailing
only John McEnroe's 42-0
in 1984.
As it happens, the 24-year-
old Serb ran into McEnroe
at Roland Garros on
Saturday, and they chatted.
Asked whether McEnroe
was one of his favorite play-
ers, Djokovic replied with a
smile: "Nothing against his
age, but it's just that I was
still quite young when he
stopped playing."
McEnroe said recently
he finds Djokovic's streak
more impressive than his
own, because of the cur-
rent depth in men's ten-
nis, and because it includes
a Grand Slam title at
January's Australian Open,
which was played at sea-
son's end in 1984.
Djokovic, who will be in
action for a third straight
day Sunday when he faces
No. 13 Richard Gasquet of
France, said a third major
championship and first
at the French Open takes
priority over any other pos-
sible goal at the moment.


ACROSS 37 Tracked down
39 Hartman and
Cowboy's affir- Bonet
native 40 Kind of quiz
Pulpit 41 Rain slicker
Leather punch 42 Flapjack fran-
Mlumbai nanny chise
Aswan Dam 45 Is real
site 49 Space
No, to a laird 53 Onion's kin
Metric prefix 54 100 percent
Competitors 55 Sense
Dependable organs
Cast a ballot 56 Abominable
Deli bread Snowman
Mine yield 57 Opposite
Covert of paleo-
comment 58 Gull's perch
Vitamin B com- 59 Comfy spot


ponent
Archeological
sites
Big name
in soccer
TV hookup
Bullring cheer
Hits the wrong
key
Madonna ex


DOWN


1 Talks on and
on
2 Shed, as light
3 Blanch
4 In the blink of

5 Least amt.


If he gets to the final, he'll
take over the No. 1 ranking
from Rafael Nadal.
Djokovic is 4-0 this year
against Nadal, including
wins in two clay-court tour-
nament finals this month,
and some have speculated
those results chipped away
at the Spaniard's self-belief.
NadAl. felt much better
about himself and his game
after reaching the fourth
round by beating Croatian
qualifier Antonio Veic 6-1,
6-3, 6-0.
"Solutions don't come
from heaven. I mean, you
can't change everything
in one day. And you know
what? I had not forgotten
how to play tennis for a
week, but I played better
today," said Nadal, who was
pushed to five sets in the
. first round.
He's 41-1 in his French
Open career and bidding
to tie Bjorn Borg's mark of
six titles at the clay-court
Grand Slam tournament.
The man Nadal beat for
trophy No. 5 in last year's
final, Robin Soderling, also
reached the fourth round,
as did three-time Grand
Slam runner-up Andy
Murray, No. 15 Viktor
Troicki, No. 18 Gilles
Simon, and unseeded Ivan
Ljubicic, who eliminated
No. 16 Fernando Verdasco
6-3, 7-6 (6), 6-4.


Answer to Previous Puzzle

RA PMAC WEAK
YRS PEIRU0OK LA
ENSONCE RELY
E 0THOS ED D Y


|PLA[T]E B UREAU|


CAMS L I PS TSE
REPAST EMORY
RUE AV G
PIAF TEMPE
GIGI CHARTERS
ATEN OARS SOU
MARS MMIN TSP


Quick lunch
Not neathh
Part of A.D.
Light-bulb unit
- majeste
Squirrels away


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


17 Yves' with
19 Do Easter
eggs
22 Lubricants
23 "The Facts of
Life" star
24 Big fuss
25 Fine sediment
26 Disney CEO
Bob
27 Brainy one,
maybe
28 Currier's partner
29 Rose Bowl
org.
31 Trial run
33 Med. person-
nel
35 Kind of system
36 Palermo locale
38 Dr.'s visit
39 Careless
41 Unkempt
42 Dreaded czar
43 Comet -
Bopp
44 King Harald's
capital
46 Tournament
favorite
47 Chapeau's
place
48 Pelt
50 Beak of a bird
51 de cologne
52 Box-office
sign, once


2011 UFS, Inc.


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420











LOOKING BACK AT 2010-2011


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Fort White High's football team qualified for the 2010 state playoffs with a runner-up finish in District 2-2B.


COURTESY PHOTO
Fort White High's track and field team was runner-up in District 3-2A, which consisted of 10
teams. The Lady Indians gather with their trophy following the district meet at Yulee High on
April 15.


-7



TIM KIRBY/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High's girls golf team was runners-up in District 2-2A, which earned the Lady
Tigers a spot in the region tournament. Team members are Ashley Mixon (from left), Brandy
Springer, Darian Ste-Marie, Shelby Camp, Brittany Boris and coach Candace Christie.


COURTESY PHOTO
Columbia High's bowling team was runner-up in District 2 to qualify for the state tournament.
The Lady Tigers placed ninth at the FHSAA finals at Boardwalk Bowl in Orlando. Team
members at state are (front row, from left) Shea Spears and Jordan Williams. Back row (from
left) are Courtney Schmitt, Tori Wise, Linden Barney and Christine Peters.



Georgia stays alive.


with win over Florida


Associated Press

HOOVER, Ala. Zach
Cone drove in two runs
and Michael Palazzone
allowed only one unearned
run in four innings of relief
to help Georgia keep its
season going with a 4-3 win
over Florida Saturday in the
Southeastern Conference
tournament
The Bulldogs (31-29)
became eligible for an
NCAA regional with the
win, but have to beat the
Gators (43-16) again to
advance to the SEC cham-
pionship game.
Cone had an RBI triple
in the first inning and sin-
gled home a run in the
third. Palazzone (10-4),
who started and threw 98
pitches against Vanderbilt
on Wednesday, allowed
three hits.
Tyler Maloof polished
off a scoreless ninth with
a double play grounder for
his second straight save.
Florida starter Brian
Johnson was knocked out
of the game with a con-
cussion in the first inning.
Johnson was struck in the
back of the head while
crouching on the mound
by a low throw to second
by catcher Mike Zunino.

Florida State 4,
Georgia Tech 2
DURHAM, N.C. -


James Ramsey drove in a
run and kept his 48-game
on base streak alive as
Florida State beat-Georgia
Tech 4-2 on Saturday in the
Atlantic Coast Conference
baseball tournament.
The Seminoles (42-16)
finish 2-1 in Pool B play and
can still make Sunday's title
game, while the loss left
the Yellow Jackets 1-2 in
the round robin format and
eliminated them from win-
ning the championship.
Florida State scored
three runs in the third
inning on a bases-loaded
walk, a sacrifice fly and
a wild pick-off attempt at
second base with the bases
loaded again.
Ramsey put the
Seminoles ahead 4-0 in the
fourth with a single.
Georgia Tech (40-19)
cut its deficit to 4-2 in the
seventh on Zane Evans'
single. The Yellow Jackets
had two men on base in the
ninth, but lost one runner
on a pick-off play before
a strikeout and pop out
ended the game.

Clemson 6, NC State 3
DURHAM, N.C. -
Richie Shaffer hit a home
run in the sixth inning to
give Clemson the lead for
good as the Tigers beat
North Carolina State 6-3
on Saturday in the Atlantic
Coast Conference baseball


tournament.
The win in the final
game of Pool B action sent
Florida State to Sunday's
championship game. The
Wolfpack (34-25) could
have played for the title
with a win, but finished
pool play 1-2.
The Tigers (41-18) fin-
ished 2-1 in the round-
robin format, but lost head-
to-head to the Seminoles.
Clemson starter
Jonathan Meyer had to
leave the game in the sec-
ond after taking a line drive
to the knee in the first
inning. The Tigers used
seven pitchers in the win,
with only two of them fac-
ing more than six batters.
Andrew Ciencin had
two hits for the Wolfpack,
including a second inning
double that scored a run.

Vanderbilt 3,
Arkansas 2
HOOVER, Ala.
- Connor Harrell hit a
two-run homer in the
second inning, and five
Vanderbilt pitchers made
the early lead hold up in
Saturday's 3-2 victory over
Arkansas to advance to the
Southeastern Conference
tournament championship
game.
The Commodores (47-
9) will play for the title
for the fifth time in eight
years.


TIM KIRBY/Lake City Reporter
Fort White High's volleyball team was District 5-3A runner-up to earn the Lady Indians a spot
in the state playoffs. Team members are (front row, from left) Sarah Stringfellow,
Brigitte LaPuma, Lync6 Stalnaker and Kaycee Baker. Second row (from left) are Brett Sealey,
Angel Dowda and Alison Wrench. Back row (from left) are Ashley Beckman and Holly Polhill.


TEAMS: Martinez, Jones lead Indians


Continued From Page 11

are Stephanie Pilkington,
Michaela Burton, Kayli
Kvistad, Hollianne Dohrn,
Jessica Keene, Keeley
Murray, Holly Boris, Jordan
Williams, Brandy Morgan,
Lauren Eaker, Brittany
Morgan, Ashley Blodgett,
Caliegh McCaulley, Jessica
Shimmell and Payton Sund.
Columbia's bowling team
also advanced to the state
tournament. The Lady
Tigers had a straight shot
to state by finishing sec-
ond at the District 2 tourna-
ment.
Coach Brian Saunders'
team tied for ninth at state.
Fort White's football
team returned to the state


playoffs for the third time
in four years under coach
Demetric Jackson.
The Indians were runner-
up in District 2-2B, which-,
included football crazy
schools like Union County,
Florida High, Taylor County
and Bradford, as well as
East Gadsden High.:
Fort White's volleyball
team was runner-up in
District 5-3A and made the
state playoff field for the
third consecutive year under
coach Doug Wohlstein. '
The three-year streak
matches the playoff run by
the Lady Indians in 2000-02.
Fort White's girls track
and field team also was a


runner-up in District 3-2A.
It is individuals only that
advance in track, but the
Lady Indians were strong in
a 10-team district.
Coach Kem Jackson's
squad was led by Sitia
Martinez and Sydni Jones,
who each won three district
titles. Martinez won the 100
meters, 200 meters and 300-
meter hurdles. Jones won
the 800 meters, 1600 meters
and 3200 meters.
Columbia's girls golf team
was runner-up in District 2-
2A. The Lady Tigers earned
a spot in the region tourna-
ment for the second straight
year under coach Candace
Christie.


Barcelona beats Manchester

United 3-1 in Champions final


By STUART CONDIE
Associated Press

WEMBLEY, England
- Lionel Messi scored one
goal and created another
Saturday, leading Barcelona
to a 3-1 victory over
Manchester United and a
third Champions League
title in six years.
Barcelona dominated
play at Wembley with trade-
mark one-touch passing,
but the Spanish champions
needed the Argentine strik-
er to conjure a 54th-minute
solo strike from the edge of
the penalty area to take the
lead for the second time.


There seemed to be no
space as Messi was tracked
by fullback Patrice Evra.
But the two-time world
player of the year spotted
a gap between the central
defenders and hit a shot
down the middle, beating
goalkeeper Edwin van der
Sar.
Messi followed his 53rd
goal of a remarkable season
with a fake and run that led
to David Villa taking pos-
session on the edge of the
area. From there, the Spain
striker curled a shot into
the top corner of the net.
With Pedro Rodriguez
scoring the opening goal


midway through the first
half from an imagina-
tive through ball from
Xavi Hernandez, the win
was as comprehensive as
Barcelona's 2-0 victory over
United in the final two years
ago.
United improved upon its
performance back then in
Rome and did the score in
the 34th on a goal by Wayne
Rooney. But it could do lit-
tle to disrupt Barcelona, the
prevailing force of European
soccer.
After a shaky open-
ing, Barcelona simply
outclassed the English
champions.


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, MAY 29, 2011


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420








LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, MAY 29, 2011
I


Penske's 2-car team is an enigma


By JENNA FRYER
Associated Press

CONCORD, N.C. To
hear Kurt Busch talk, his
race team is struggling
mightily and maybe some
behind-the-scenes changes
will save the season.
Then there's Brad
Keselowski, excited about
three weeks of progress that
have him enjoying his best
stretch yet in NASCAR's
elite Sprint Cup Series.
That's the enigma that is
Penske Racing right now.
Keselowski will start the
Coca-Cola 600 from the
pole, while defending race
winner Busch will go off
26th in Sunday's race.
Keselowski doesn't
sugarcoat things, and read-
ily admits the NASCAR
side of Penske's motors-
ports operation has areas
that need improvement.
But he does it thoughtfully
and with an eagerness that
good things are coming.
Busch is quite the oppo-
site. He's beyond being
hopeful, and his assess-
ments and outlook both
seem dreary. He's 'also
angry with the media for
harping on his in-race radio
communications, which
have gone from maniacal
rants to near despondency
over the last month.
Ifs created the good cop-
bad cop perception, even
though both drivers want
the same thing.
"He definitely has a differ-
ent approach," Keselowski


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Kurt Busch waits in his car before practice for Sunday's NASCAR Sprint Cup series Coca-Cola 600 auto race in Concord,
N.C., Saturday.


said. 'To be. honest, if he
didn't have that approach,
I probably would adopt it
because you keep trying
different things until you
get what you want. I spent
all last year being quiet and
not saying, 'Hey, this car
is really, really bad' to the
media. But they were really,
really bad.
"At the same time, Kurt
was runningwell and I didn't
have a leg to stand on with
that. This year, obviously
my cars have gotten better.
Kurt has had his struggles.


But it's somewhat refresh-
ing to have someone that
can speak up have a voice,
have the credibility of being
a past champion and past
winner and those around
him perhaps listen more
intently."
Busch apparently does
make things happen behind
the scenes.
His radio tirade at
Richmond earlier this
month was epic, and the
fallout led to some serious
organizational meetings
that Busch believed would


spur some changes. Less
than two weeks later, tech-
nical director Tom German,
left the organization in
what the team said was a
long-planned opportunity
to attend an elite graduate
program at MIT.,
"There were people that
had good things to say
about him and people that
had bad things to say about
him," Keselowski said of
German. "Either way, the
change there has opened
doors that would have never
opened before. The jury is


Double-file restarts for Indy 500 adjusted


By CUFF BRUNT
Associated Press

INDIANAPOLIS -
IndyCar has compromised
with drivers who were wor-
ried that double-file restarts
would be particularly unsafe
at the Indianapolis Motor
Speedway.
After considering mark-
ing .the restart zone for
Sunday's Indianapolis 500
about 900 feet from the
start/finish line, officials
decided instead to move it
back to the entrance t6 turn


four. The change will give
drivers more room to adjust
, to traffic.
"The owners, along with
the IndyCar series, decid-
ed to make a compromise
and move it into the north
chute starting so they
can be more single file as
they enter turn one," said
two-time Indy winner Al
Unser Jr., an IndyCar driv-
ing coach and consultant.
"Indianapolis is very unique
as far as single groove. It's
not a banked track like, say,
Texas, where they run two


abreast comfortably."
Race officials also will add
two sweepers at each end of
the track. Before the race
restarts, one set of sweep-
ers will drive through the
first two turns at the north
end of the track, while the
other two will clean up the
two turns at the south end.
The intent of staggering the
sweepers side-by-side is to
create a clean track.
Double-file restarts
debuted in IndyCar this sea-
son, and Sunday will be the
first time they're used at an


oval. The drivers have spo-
ken out against the move
all month, calling it a ter-
rible idea. But when Unser
Jr. mentioned the double-
file restarts during the
public driver's meeting on
Saturday morning, a cheer
went up from the crowd.
Barnhardt Ill: IndyCar
director of competition
Brian Barnhart missed
Saturday's driver's meeting
with flu-like symptoms, but
IndyCar spokeswoman Amy
Konrath said he should be
ready for Sunday.
Barnhart normally reads
the instructions to the driv-
ers. Instead two-time Indy
winner Al Unser Jr. stepped
in.


* still out whether thafs good
or bad."
Its such a far cry from
Roger. Penske's esteemed
IndyCar operation, which
will attempt to win its 16th
Indianapolis 500 on Sunday.
Will Power, who will start
from the second row, has
two wins this season and
leads the points standings.
'Teammates Helio
Castroneves and Ryan
Briscoe have struggled at
times this season and this
month at Indy, and Briscoe
will race in a backup



Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
ECERH
I I IV I '


Sunday.
Back in NASCAR, the two
Penske teams have been all
over the map.
Busch opened the sea-
son as the driver to beat at
Daytona, winning two exhi-
bition races leading into the
season-opener. Top-10 fin-
ishes in the first four races
made him the points leader
for two weeks, but he hasn't
had a top-10 since and has
dropped to eighth in thq
standings. C,
Despite, the drop-o(f,
which has left Busch clearly
frustrated, he begins each
weekend with optimism
only to learn shortly after
the green flag that his car
is not capable of contending
for a win.
"I feel like we have to
go into each race optimistic
and positive so that you can
find good results," Busch
said. "At the end of the day,
Roger Penske and I agree
that as long as you put
yourself in position to do
well, no matter what the
outcome is, those are good
days. But when you're run-
ning 15th just clawing to
hang onto the lead lap,
those aren't days that we
need.
"We need to \be up there
leading laps and having
good results. Sometimes,
it's a surprise in practice
that we hit on something
and then you get into the
race and our car reacts a
little different in that dirty
air compared to the com-
petitior."

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek


K- .t--3-
TRUE COMPENSAT10N
FOR EVERYTHN& THEY
PIP IS MPO55Oie-E,
UrT WE CAN --
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, asr
suggested by the above cartoon.


Answer: P
(Answers tomorrow)
Saturday's I Jumbles: WEDGE FLUID FERRET BOTANY
I Answer: The first goose to arrive in Florida for the
winter was one AN EARLY BIRD


FOR SALE

La FLe e Jeev'fV S
DAY 'PA SALON ,
AY "


S
S
S


ASSOCIATED PRESS
IndyCar driver Dario Franchitti, of Scotland, is seen on the track on the final day of
practice for the Indianapolis 500 auto race at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway in
Indianapolis, Friday.


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Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


GACORU" '
7" I .









Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

C.J. Risak
Assistant Editor
754-0427
crisok@lakeityreportercom

Sunday, May 29, 201 I


BUSINESS


www.lakecityreporter.com


Accounting firm


to celebrate


60th anniversary


By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com
Lake City's larg-
est accounting
business, a
long-standing
firm which has
been deeply rooted in the
community, will soon be
celebrating a milestone
reached by providing a
range of financial services
to its clients and surpass-
ing their expectations.
Wednesday marks
the 60th anniversary of
Odom, Moses & Company
LLP, Certified Public
Accountants.
"It's a feeling of pride
that we've made a differ-
ence in this community
for over 60 years," said
Tammy Hall, one of the
firm's four partners.
To commemorate its
60th anniversary, the firm
planted a tree on Arbor
Day in January, has gifts
for its clients, will host
a Lake City/Columbia
County Chamber of
Commerce mixer in
August and will hold a
company-wide volunteer
workday for Habitat for
Humanity.
The firm was estab-
lished June 1, 1951 as
DarbyrDarby & Odoim
by DrakonB. "Haves"


Odom of Lake City, C.
Dwight Darby of Lake City
and Richard E. Darby of
Tampa. It had offices in
Lake City 4nd Tampa.
In 1980, the Lake City
firm was reorganized to
become Odom, Moses
& Company, and Philip
Moses Jr., who now serves
as the firm's managing
partner, made partner in
1981. Three other part-
ners, all CPAs, currently
serve alongside Moses
Hall, Cammy Scott and
Patricia Stuart.
The Lake City office
made its home in three
different Lake City loca-
tions, first in the People's
Hardware building on
Marion Avenue, then at
1420 S. First Street in
1961, and its present loca-
tion at 4424 NW American
Lane, where it moved in
2006.
Before Odom died
in 2007, he contrib-
uted much to the firm.
His accomplishments
included being the first
CPA between Jacksonville
and Tallahassee, serv- .
ing as chairman of the
Florida State Board
of Accountancy in the
late 1960s, serving as
president of the Florida
Institute of Certified
Public Accountants from


1970 to 1971, and being
recognized as an hon-
orary member for 50
years of membership in
the American Institute
of Certified Public
Accountants in 2001.
Services the firm
provided early in its his-
tory included audits of
the University of Florida
and the Florida Milk
Commission, and it was
the independent auditor of
both Columbia County and
the City of Lake City.
Now, with a staff of 17
members, the firm annual-
ly generates approximately'
$2.4 million in revenue and
serves about 1,400 clients
in the Southeastern United
States, about 1,000 of
which are in North Florida
and about five of which-
have been with the firm for
60 years. Odom, Moses &
Company provides tax and
accounting services and a
range of expanded finan-
cial services, like advice
on estate planning, income
tax, business acquisition
sale, investment, retire-
ment and tax-planning.
The firm is affiliated
with First Federal Bank of
Florida through its finan-
cial services, Moses said,
a partnership the firm is
proud of.
Moses noted that in the


COURTESY PHOTO
The four partners of Qdom, Moses & Company LLP Cammy Scott (left), Tammy Hall
(front), Patricia Stuart (back) and Philip,Moses Jr., managing partner pose for a photograph
in their office's board room. The firm, which was established June 1,1951 and has been
serving the Lake City community and other clients since its inception, will celebrate its 60th
anniversary Wednesday.


state of Florida, Odom was
the 443rd CPA certified in
1948, he himself was certi-
fied as number 4,819 in
1975, and the firm's most
recent addition, Charlie
Cowen, was certified as
number 43,170 in January.


"That gives you a little
perspective on our his-
tory," Moses said, "just the
length of service that our
firm has provided account-
ing services to our clients
and this community."
Stuart said the firm is


"forward-looking" and pro,
active with technology to
better serve its clients, and
Scott agreed.
"We're very proud of
our history," Scott said,


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LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS SUNDAY, MAY 29, 2011


$400 Million Donuts?
QI read that Dunkin' Donuts
is planning a $400 million
initial public offering (IPO). With
close to 10,000 locations world-
wide, shouldn't the company be
worth more than that? Starbucks
has a market cap of more than $25
billion. M.R., Denver
A When a company first issues
shares to the public, it often
sells off just a portion of itself,
in order to raise money. If Dunkin'
Donuts were selling all of itself,
that would indeed reflect a total
value of $400 million. But if it's
selling just 10 percent, then the
implied value is $4 billion. Once
the shares debut and are trading
in the market, their price, will
reflect how investors are valuing
the comparty.

Q Which brokerages charge very
low commissions to buy or sell
stock? '- N.C., Watertown, Wis.
ATrading commissions are as
/ ow as $8 to $10 per trade
at E*TRADE, Fidelity, Charles
Schwab and TD Ameritrade. It's $7
at Scottrade and Firstrade, and you
can find even lower rates elsewhere.
Look at more than commissions,
though. After all, ifyou buy or
sell stocks only a few times da year,
finding the lowest commission rate
won't save you all that much and
other brokerage features might /
be more valuable to you. Mean- _
while, some brokerages have
been charging quarterly account
fees just for having an account
with them. These are often w\ai\ ed
if your account is large enough.
When shopping for a broker-
age, look at all the fees it charges
and consider its conveniences (such
as local branches, a wide variety
of mutual funds or check-writing
services) and how well it meets
your needs.
For comparison data on broker-
ages, visit www.broker.Fool.com,
or look up SmanMoney magazine's
annual brokerage review.

Got a question for the Fool? Send it in
-see Write to Us


The Motley Foor

To Educate, Amuse & Enrich


II Fool's choll


Nuggets From Omaha
Here are some words of wisdom
from superinvestors Warren Buffett
and Charlie Munger from the recent
Berkshire Hathaway annual meet-
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(It's an important factor for him, as
Berkshire Hathaway owns compa-
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owns a major real estate brokerage .
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Communication skills are what he
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On great expectations: Buffett:
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Read Buffett's letters to sharehold-
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and Roger Lowenstein's "Buffett: The
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Phones and
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One of my worst investments
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popularity of mobile phones continu-
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Not only will the drugs that CVS.
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Fool@fool.com or via regular mail c/o this newspaper, attn: The
Motley Fool. Sorry, we can't provide individual financial advice.
.e e eee. o.S So S@**S**** S


Oil up slightly


as long weekend


approaches


'By CHRIS KAHN
AP Energy Writer

NEW YORK Oil
wavered Friday in
light trading before the
Memorial Day weekend.
Benchmark crude for
July delivery added 21
cents to $100A4 per bar-
tel in early afternoon on
the New York Mercantile
Exchange. In London,
Brent crude fell 7 cents to
$114.98 per barrel on the
ICE Futures Exchange.
Demand for oil ~nd
gasoline has been falling,
and a Friday report on
U.S. consumer spending
was weak. Still, analysts
believe investors are cau-
tious about selling ahead
of a long holiday break. In
February, oil prices shot
up more than $7 per bar-
rel as the ,Libyan upris-
ing escalated over the
President's Day weekend
Fighting continues in
. Libya and there are other
anti-government protests
throughout the oil-rich
Middle East. In Syria,
security forces opened
fire on demonstrators
Friday, and tribesmen in
Yemen said they'd seized
a Republican Guard mili-
tary camp.
Energy experts say
Libya's 1.5 million barrels
of daily oil exports will
remain offline for at least
several months. That loss
continues to put pressure
on other oil producers to
make up the difference.
As world oil demand
increases, Wall Street is
betting that tightened sup-
plies will inevitably push
oil close to record levels.
Goldman Sachs said
this week that benchmark
West Texas Intermediate


crude will hit $135 per
barrel by the end of 2012.
Morgan Stanley said
Brent will average $120
per barrel this year, while
J.P. Morgan thinks Brent
will be $130 per barrel in
the third quarter.
Oil is down about 12
percent in May'and WTI
has recently traded in a
range of $97 to $101. U.S.
pump prices, which tend
to lag oil prices, dropped
about 3 percent and are
now at $3.80 per gallon.
Tom. Kloza, an analyst
at Oil Price Information
Services, expects gas to
fall to between $3.50 and
$3.60 in June.
But a rebound in price
later this year close to
what in investment banks
are forecasting would put
pressure on the global
economy and squeeze
drivers. At those levels for
oil, gasoline will likely rise
to around $4.25 per gallon
($1.12 a liter), Kloza said.
"That would hurt," he
said. "Gasoline prices are
at the top of everyone's
mind right now."
Consumer gasoline
demand already has
dropped during the, past
inme weeks as the national
average approached $4
per gallon.
"We've seen some real
damage to the consumer's
psyche," Kloza said.
The national average
for gas has declined for
15 straight days to $3.809
per gallon ($1.05 a liter),
according to auto club
AAA, Wright Express
and Oil Price Information
Service. A gallon of regu-
lar unleaded is $1.05 more
expensive than the same
time last year.


April consumer spending shows


weak gain; food, energy costs rise


By MARTIN CRUTSINGER
AP Economics Writer

WASHINGTON -
Consumers spent more
in April but much of the
increase was eaten up by
higher food and energy
prices.. After discount-
ing for the jump in prices,
spending barely budged
and after-tax incomes were
flat for a second straight
month.
Consumer spending rose
0.4 percent, reflecting a
surge in the category that
covers food and gasoline,
areas which showed big
price gains last month, the
Commerce Department
reported Friday. Excluding
price changes, spending
rose a much smaller 0.1
percent .
Incomes rose 0.4 per-
cent but after-tax incomes
adjusted for inflation were
flat for a second straight
month.
Analysts are worried that
weak income growth and
big gains in gasoline and
food prices are leaving con-
sumers with little left to
spend on other products.
That could dampen eco-
nomic growth. Consumer
spending is closely watched
because it accounts for 70
percent of economic activ-
ity. .
The government report-
ed Thursday that the over-


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Monday photo, customer Gabriel Sanchez shops
for fresh fruit at a Superior Grocers store in Los Angeles.
Consumers spent more in April but much of the increase was
eaten up by higher food and energy prices.


all economy grew at an ane-
mic annual rate of 1.8 per-
cent in the January-March
period with consumer
spending advancing at just
half the pace of the previ-
ous three months. That big
slowdown was blamed on
the sharp spike in energy
prices.
However, analysts think
that consumer spending will
strengthen, at least mod-
estly, in coming months,
especially if energy prices
continue to decline. Since
peaking at $3.98 a gallon on
May 6, gasoline prices have
fallen 4.4 percent with the


nationwide average now
down to $3.81, according to
AAA. Some economists are
forecasting the price will
keep falling to around $3.50
over the next few weeks.
"If gasoline prices con-
tinue to fall, we could see
som4 pick up in spend-
ing as we go through the
summer," said Joel Naroff,
chief economist at Naroff
Economic Advisors.
Many economists are
forecasting that overall eco-
nomic growth will rebound
to around 2.5 percent in the
current April-June quarter
with enough strengthening


in the second half of the
year for the economy to
turn in growth of around 3
percent for all of 2011, little
changed from the 2.9 per-
cent increase in 2010.
The April income and
spending report, showed
that the savings rate was
unchanged at 4.9 percent of
after-tax incomes, the same
as March.
Both months represent-
ed the smallest savings
rate since October 2008,
the month the country was
plunged into a deep finan-
cial crisis which contrib-
uted to the worst recession
since the 1930s. During
the recession, Americans
worked to build up savings
out of concerns that they
needed a deeper cushion in
the face of massive job lay-
offs. The savings rate high
a high of 8.2 percent in May
2009, the month before the
recession ended.
A key inflation gauge
preferred by the Federal
Reserve showed prices
rose 0.3 percent in April,
the fifth straight month
of gains of 0.3 percent or
higher. However, excluding
food and energy, inflation
was up just 0.2 percent in
April and 1 percent over
the past 12 months, well
below the level where the
Fed would be worried that
inflation could be a threat
to the economy.


ACCOUNTANTS: Will celebrate 60th year in business

Continued From Page 1C


"but we're also looking toward the
future."
'We have young, Certified Public
Accountants who are positioned to
provide ongoing services to this
community and we expect to cele-
brate our 100th anniversary," Moses
said.


Hall and Stuart said Odom, Moses
& Company credits its success to
exceeding its clients' expectations
and developing long-lasting, personal
relationships with them.
"You almost become family with
the client," Hall said.
"You've helped them set their


goals, you're measuring those goals
along the way and you get to see
those goals achieved and it's like
family," she said. 'We're not just
their advisor, we're their trusted
advisor. And I think it's that feeling
of trust that's made us so success-
ful."


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


I














Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS & HOME SUNDAY, MAY 29, 2011


THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW *THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW *THE WEEK IN REVIEW


The Week in Review


8,386.34 +28.81


Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
Sequansn 15.30 +6.18 +67.8
ZaleCp 5.77 +1.62 +39.0
Goldcpwt 3.18 +.88 +-38.3
KrispKrnn 8.80 +2.40 +37.5
Lentuo n 5.99 +1.52 +34.0
KV PhrnA 3.38 +.80 +31.0
MStewrt 5.14 +1.21 +30.8
AmrRlty 3.23 +.70 +27.7
TorchEngy 2.45 +.50 +25.6
KVPhmB 3.44 +.67 +24.2

Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
ChinaGreen 4.68 -1.82 -28.0
ChNBorun n 6.50 -1.75 -21.2
EmpDist 18.72 -4.03 -17.7
XuedaEd n 8.95 -1.93 -17.7
ProUSSIvrs16.62 -3.06 -15.5
PilgdrimsP 4.87 -.87 -15.2
CollctvBrd 15.66 -2.77 -15.0
NoahHid n 12.82 -2.02 -13.6
Orbitz 2.24 -.35 -13.5
Frontline 17.74 -2.68 -13.1

Most Active ($1 or more)
Name. Vol (00) Last Chg
S&P500ETF6415854133.51 -.10
BkofAm 5761683 11.69 +.11
SprintNex 4063584 5.85 +.38
SPDR Fnc3166073 15.68 -.04
AmIntlGrp 2986132 28.88 -1.92
FordM 2698832 14.60 -.40
iShR2K 2432905 83.65 +.79
iShEMkts 2292741 47.75 +.68
iShSilver 2182754 37.03 +2.85
GenElec 1976627 19.44 -.18

Diary
Advanced 1,829
Declined 1,328
New Highs 231
New Lows 84
Total issues 3,224
Unchanged 67
Volume 16,737,571,977


A Amex
2,419.03 +34.12


Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
OrsusXelrs 2.16 +1.07 +98.2
PcEpfAcIdd101.60+21.60 +27.0
PcE pfBdd102.20+21.70 +27.0
PcE pfCddd00.70+18.70 +22.8
UraniumEn 3.30 +.55 +.20.0
Cover-All 2.50 +.40 +19.0
Engex 3.93 +.6Q +18.0
Hyperdyn 4.68 +.66 +16.4
DenisnMg 2.36 +.33 +16.3
RFexSolu 2.76 +.37 +15.5

Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
T3Motnrs 4.40 -1.32 -23.1
SoCTBcp 3.66 -.49 -11.8
CagleA 4.91 -.64 -11.5
HalfidGp 21.00 -2.00 -8.7
TravelCtrs 5.36 -.50 -8.5
ChiMarFd 2.92 -.26 -8.2
PyramidOil 5.48 -.45 -7.6
OdrentPap 3.54 -.27 -7.1
StreamGSv 2.96 -.22 -6.9
T3 Motnsun 3.49 -.26 -6.9

Most Active ($1 or more
Name Vol(00) Last Chg
CheniereEn401801 11.56+1.52
Hyperdyn 199094 4.68 +.66
NovaGldg 144265 11.52+1.08
KodiakOg 139287 6.79 +.44
TravelCtrs 130150 5.36 -.50
NAPall g 127855 3.88 +.38
GtPanSilvg123362 3.22 +.32
NwGoldg 120510 10.03 +.62
NthnO&G 116463 20.28 -.45
GrtBasGg 113396 2.11 +.15

Diary


Advanced
Declined
New Highs
New Lows
Total issues
Unchanged
Volume


311
219
24
25
551
21
534,290,466


Nasdaq
S2,796.86 -6.46


Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
CleanDslrs 8.45 +4.12 +95.2
AdvATech 6.03 +2.27 +60.4
MagicJk rs 26.38 +6.83 +34.9
NaturesSun 13.59 +3.51 +34.8
RaptorPhm 5.32 +1.33 +33.3
PaciraPhn 14.59 +3.62 +33.0
QuantFurs 5.03 +1.24 +32.7
Toreador 6.76 +1.61 +31.3
CombiMtrx 3.72 +.87 +30.4
Achillion 7.17 +1.60 +28.7

Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
PlugPwrrs 2.34 -1.48 -38.7
MecoxLn 3.40 -1.58 -31.7
Spherixrs 2.55 -1.15 -31.1
Elbitlmg 7.38 -2.81 -27.6
SigmaDsg 8.62 -3.21 -27.1
ChinaBiot 7.40 -2.63 -26.2
FuweiFilm 3.53 -1.16 -24.7
ChinaInfo 2.00 -.62 -23.7
JiangboPh 3.14 -.94 -23.0
Ku6Media 3.71 -1.09 -22.7

Most Active ($1 or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
SiriusXM 4846374 2.37 +.15
Leve13 4417333 2.33 +.37
Cisco 2786408 16.46 -.07
Intel 2758782 22.21 -1.01
Microsoft 2602201 24.76 +.27
PwShs QQ187971957.43 -.34
MicronT 1484204 10.02 +.02
Dell Inc 1288105 15.79 -.22
Yahoo 1194308 16.02 -.28
Oracle 1115734 33.70 -.57

Diary
Advanced 1,413
Declined 1,322
New Highs 169
New Lows 178
Total issues 2,801
Unchanged 66
Volume 9,012,280,802


Weekly Stock Exchange Highlights


Money Rates
Last Pvs Weel
Prime Rate 3.25 3.25
Discount Rate 0.75 0.75
Federal Funds Rate .00-25 .00-.25
Treasuries
3-month 0.04 0.05
6-month 0.10 0.09
5-year 1.71 1.79
10-year 3.07 3.15
30-year 4.23 4.30


Weekly Dow Jones


Dow Jones Industrials
Close: 12,441.58
1-week change: -70.46 (-0.6%)
13,000 .......... .... .... .....


-130.78 -25.05 38.45 8.10 38.82


MON TUES


WED THUR FRI


STOCKS OF LOCAL INTEREST
WMy Wkly YTD Wkly Wkly YTD
Name Ex Div Last Chg %Chg %Chg Name Ex Div Last Chg%Chg %Chg
AT&Tinc NY 1.72 31.29 -.03 -0.1 +6.5 JPMorgChNY 1.00 42.79 -.34 -0.8 +.9
AlcatelLuc NY ... 5.65 -.15 -2.6 +90.9 Level3 Nasd ... 2.33 +37 +18.6+137.2
AmlnitGrp NY ...28.88 -1.92 -6.2 .2 Lowes NY .56 24.25 -.21 -0.9 -3.3
ApldMatf Nasd .32 13.43 -.58 -4.1 -4.4 McDnlds NY 2.44 81.62 -.10 -0.1 +6.3
AutoZone NY ... 296.71 +20.11 +7.3 +8.8 MicronT Nasd ... 10.02 +.02 +0.2 +24.9
BkofAm NY .04 11.69 +.11 +0.9 -12.4 Microsoft Nasd .64 24.76 +.27 +1.1 -11.3
BobEvans Nasd .80 31.36 ... ... -4.9 NY Times NY ... 7.80 +.11 +1.4 -20.4
CNBFnPANasd .66 13.46 +.36 +2.7 -9.1 NextEraEnNY 2.20 57.35 -.43 -0.7 +10.3
CSX NY 1.44 77.93 +.89 +1.2 +20.6 NobltyH Nasd ... 8.20 +39 +5.0 +1.1
Chevron NY 3.12 103.21 +.64 +0.6 +13.1 OcciPet NY 1.84 106.57 +6.17 +6.1 +8.6
Cisco Nasd .24 16.46 -.07 -0.4 -18.6 Oradcle Nasd .24 33.70 -.57 -17 +7.7
Cidgrprs NY .04 40.97 -.04 -0.1 -13.4 Penney NY .80 36.00 -.10 -0.3 +11.4
CocaCola NY 1.88 66.51 -1.79 -2.6 +1.1 PepsiCo NY 2.06 70.40 -.90 -1.3 +7.8
Delhaize NY 2.45 82.00-1.01 -1.2 +11.2 Pfizer NY .80 20.93 +.24 +1.2 +19.5
Dell Inc Nasd ... 15.79 -.22 -1.4 +16.5 Potash s NY .28 55.99 +3.95 +7.6 +8.59
DeltaAir NY ... 10.00 -1.51 -13.1 -20.6 PwShsO QQQNasd .39 57.43 -.34 -0.6 +5.5
EIPasoCp NY .04 20.91 +1.53 +7.9 +52.0 Ryder NY 1.06 54.45 -.20 -0.4 +3.4
FamilyDIr NY .72 55.56 +1.91 +3.6 +11.8 S&P500ETFNY 2.34 133.51 -.10 -0.1 +6.2
FordM NY ... 14.60 -.40 -2.7 -13.0 SearsHIdgsNasd ... 70.83 -1.21 -1.7 -4.0
FMCGs NY 1.00 51.73 +3.35 +6.9 -13.8 SiriusXM Nasd ... 2.37 +.15 +6.8 +45.4
GenFJec NY .60 19.44 -.18 -0.9,+6.3 SouthnCo NY 1.89 39.80 -.67 -1.7 +4.1
HewlettP NY .48 36.96 +.98 +2.7 -12.2 SprintNex NY ... 5.5 +38 +6.9 +38.3
HomeDp NY 1.00 36.00 -1.05 -2.8 +2.7 SPEngy NY 1.05 76.34 +1.71 +2.3 +11.9
iShJapn NY .14 10.09 +.08 +0.8 -7.5 SPDRFndcINY .16 15.68 -.04 -0.3 -1.7
iShSilver NY ... 37.03 +2.85 +8.3 +22.7 TimeWarn NY .94 36.12 -.43 -1.2 +12.3
iShEMkts NY .64 47.75 +.68 +1.4 +.2 WalMart NY 1.46 54.70 -.59 -1.1 +1.4
iShR2K NY .89 83.65 +.79 +1.0 +6.9 WellsFargo NY .48 28.14 +.14 +0.5 -9.2
Intel Nasd .84 22.21 -1.01 -4.3 +5.6 Yahoo Nasd ... 16.02 -.28 -1.7 -3.7

Stock Footnotes: = Dividends and earnings in Canadian dollars, h = Does not meet continued-lisling standards.
I = Late filing with SEC. n = New in past 52 weeks. pf = Preferred. rs= Stock has undergone a reverse stock split
ot'at least 50 percent within the past year. rt = Right to buy security at a.specified price, s = Stock has split by at
least 20 percent within the last year. un = Units. vi = In bankruptcy or receivership. wd = When distributed. wi =
When issued. wt= Warrants.
Mutual Fund Footnote: b = Fee covering market cost is paid from fund assets. d = Deferred sales-charge, or
redemption fee. t = front load (sales charges). m = Multiple fees are charged. NA= not available, p = previous dWay's
net asset value. s = fund split shares during the week. x = fund paid a distribution during the week.Gatners and
Losers must be worth at least $2 to be listed in tables at left. Most Actives must be worth at least $1. Volume in
hundreds of shares. Source: The Associated Press. Sales figures are unofficial.


New York Stock Exchange


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name DIv YId PE Chg %Chg Last


AES Corp ...
AFLAC 1.20 2.5
AK Steel .20 1.3
AMR
AT&T Inc 1.72 5.5
AU Optron ..
AbtLab 1.92 3.7
Accenture .90 1.6
AMD ...
Aeropost ...
Aetna .60 1.4
Agilent
AlcatelLuc ...
Alcoa .12 .7
Allstate .84 2.7
AlphaNRs ...
Altria 1.52 5.4
AMovilL .52 1.0
AEagleOut .44 3.4
AEP 1.84 4.8
AmExp .72 1.4
AmlntlGrp ...
AmTower
Anadarko .36 .5
AnalogDev 1.00 2.5
Annaly 2.62 14.5
ArcelorMit .75 2.3
ArchCoal .44 1.5
ArchDan .64 2.0
ATMOS 1.36 4.1
Avon .92 3.1
BB&TCp .64 2.3
BHP BillLt 1.82 1.9
BakrHu .60 .8
BcoBrades .80 4.1
BcoSantSA .79 6.9
BcoSBrasil .70 6.3
BkofAm .04 .3
BkNYMel .52 1.9
Bar iPVixnrs...
BamesNob ...
BarrickG .48 1.0
Baxter 1.24 .2.1
BerkH B ...
BestBuy .60 1.9
BigLots ... ...
Blackstone .40 2.3
BlockHR .60 3.8
Boeing 1.68 2.2
BostonSci ... ...
BrMySq 1.32 4.6
BrkfldOPrt ...
CB REIlis ...
CBSB .40 1.4
CF Minds .40 .3
CIGNA .04 .1
CVS Care .50 1.3
Cameron ...
CampSp 1.16 3.3
CdnNRs gs .36 ..:
CapOne .20 .4
CapillSrce .04 .6
Carnival 1.00 2.6
Catqrpillar 1.76 1.7
Cemex .43 ...
CenterPnt .79 4.11
CntryLink 2.90 6.7
ChesEng .30 1.0
Chevron 3.12 3.0
Chicos .20 1.3
Chimera .66 16.9
ChinaUni .23 1.1
Citigrp rs .04 .1
CliffsNRs .56 .6
Coach .90 1.4
CocaCola 1.88 2.8
CocaCE .52 1.8
Coeur
CollctvBrd ... ...


16 -.26
9 -1.57
... +1.16
-.31
9 -.03
... +.41
13 -1.96
19 -.51
9 -.13
7 +.78
10 -1.47
.21 -1.10
... -.15
23 +.22
13 -.56
49. +3.02
15 +.20
16 +1.35
17 -.45
15 -.23
14 -.06
2 -1.92
60 +1.27
:.. +4.08
14 '-1.00
7 +.07
17 +.35
21 +.28
10, +.95
15 -.40
18 -.72
22 +.74
... +1.27
30 +3.34
... +.95
... +.31
... +.36
21 +.11
13 -.47
... -.82
... +1.23
13 +1.91
16 -1.22
15 -.68
10 +.26
11 -1.13
... +.10
13 -.36
17 -.53
20 +.24
15 +.10
... -.04
36 -.21
22 +.99
17+16.13
9 +.33
16 +.40
21 -.79
14 -.60
... +.60
8 -1.03
19 +.03
16 -1.16
19 +.27
... +.17
17 +.12
13 -.17
11 +.49
10 +.64
22 +1.11
6 -.04
... +.39
14 -.04
9 +3.66
22 +4.43
13 -1.79
15 -.86
... +2.10
12 -2.77


Wkly YTD WklyA
Name Div YId PE Chg %Cha Last


ASML Hid .58
ActivsBliz .17
AdobeSy ...
AdvATech ...
AkamaiT ...
AlteraCp If .24
Amarin
Amazon
AmCapLtd ...
Amgen
A123 Sys ...
Apple Inc ...
ApldMatl .32
ArenaPhm ...
AriadP
ArmHId .13
ArubaNet ...
Atmel
Autodesk ..
AutoData 1.44
AvagoTch .32
AvanirPhm ...
Baidu
BioSante ...
BrigExp
Broadcom .36
BrcdeCm ...
CA Inc .20
Cadence
CalifPizza ...
CpslnTrbh ...
Celgene
CellTher rsh...
CienaCorp ...
Cirrus
Cisco .24
CitrixSys ...
Clearwire ...


... -1.49 -.7 38.07
27 -.15 -8.0 11.45
20 -1.02 +11.4 34.29
... +2.27 +50.4 6.03
36 -.54 -28.5 33.66
18 -.72 +32.2 47.05
... +1.04+137.8 19.50
84 -4.52 +7.8 194.13
3 -.02 +29.6 9.80
12 -1.51 +8.1 59.35
... +.36 -36.9 6.02
16 +2.19 +4.6 337.41
11 -.58 -4.4 13.43
... +.09 -14.5 1.47
14 +.05 +72.7 8.81
... +.48 +37.4 28.51
... +1.06 +34.9 28.16
15 +.58 +20.9 14.90
41 +.15 +11.3 42.50
23 -.04 +17.0 54.13
21 +.62 +23.2 35.01.
... +.33 +14.5 4.67
11 -.76 +38.7 133.93
... +.28 +77.4 2.91
... +1.13 +13.5 30.93
18 +3.01 -16.1 36.52
23 -.06 +25.0 6.61
14 -.29 -6.3 22.89
15 +.02 +28.8 10.64
.. +1.57 +6.7 18.44
... +83.3 1.76
31 -.61 +1.3 59.88
... +.08 -1.4 2.16
... +.26 +26.0 26.52
6 +.27 +1.5 16.22
13 -.07 -18.6 16.46
55 +2.88 +27.4 87.16
... +.04 -11.5 4.56


Name


Comerica .40
CompSci .80
ConAgra .92
ConocPhil 2.64
ConsolEngy .40
ConEd 2.40
ConstellEn .96
Coming .20
Covidien .80
Cummins 1.05
DCT Indl .28
DR Horton .15
DTE 2.35
DeanFds ...
Deere 1.64
DeltaAir
DenburyR ..
DeutschBk 1.07
DevonE .68
DrSCBr rs ...
DirFnBr rs ..
DrxEBear rs...
DrxFnBull ...
DirxSCBull ...
DirxEnBull .05
Discover .24
Disney .40
DomRescs 1.97
DowChm 1.00
DukeEngy .98
EMC Cp ...
EIPasoCp .04
Elan
EmersonEl 1.38
EnCanag .80
EndvSilvg ...
ENSCO 1.40
Exelon 2.10
ExxonMbl 1.88
FirstEngy 2.20
FootLockr .66
FordM
ForestOil ...
FMCG s 1.00
Freescale n...
FrontierCm .75
Frontline 1.85
Gaflsa SA .29
GameStop...
Gannett .16
Gap .45
GenGrPr n .40
GenMarit
GenMillss 1.12
GenMot n ...
GenOn En ...
Genworth
Gerdau .27
GoldFLtd .19
Goldcrp g .41.
GoldmanS 1.40
Goodyear ..
Guess .80
Hallibrtn .36
HartfdFn .40
HeclaM
Hertz
Hess .40
HewlettP .48
HomeDp 1.00
HonwillntI 1.33
HostHotls .08
iShGolds ...
iSAstla .82
iShBraz 2.53
iShGer .29
iSh HK .45
iShJapn .14
iSh Kor -.44




Name Div
CognizTech...
Comcast .45
Comc spcl .45
Compuwre ...
ConvOrgh ...
Costco .96
Cree Inc
Ctrip.com ...
CubistPh
CypSemi .36.
Dell Inc
Dndreon
DirecTV A...
DryShips
ETrade rs ..
eBay ...
EleclArts
Ener1
EricsnTel .37
Expedia .28
ExpScrips ...
F5 Netwks ...
FiberTwr
FifthThird .24
Finisar
FstNiagara .64
FstSolar ...
Rextm ...
FocusMda ...
GT Solar ...
GileadSci ...
GluMobile ...
GreenMtC...
HercOffsh ...
HudsCity .32
Identive
Intel .84
Intuit


Wkly YTD Wkly
DIv YId PE Chg %Chg Last


20 -.56 -15.0 35.91
8 -4.54 -19.3 40.04
17 -.48 +10.9 25.04
10 +.03 +6.7 72.64
25 +1.75 +4.1 50.75
15 -1.18 +6.4 52.73
16 -.40 +20.8 36.99
9 -.03 +2.8 19.87
17 -2.38 +19.4 54.53
17 -1.44 -4.6 104.97
... +.13 +5.3 5.59
86 +.18 +.4 11.98
15 -.78 +12.8 51.12
30 +.21 +53.5 13.57
15 +.99 +3.2 85.74
16 -1.51 -20.6 10.00
60 +.67 +13.4 21.64
... +.94 +12.0 58.30
10 +.49 +6.2 83.34
...-1.12 -26.0 34.66
... +.02 -8.3 43.31
... -.99 -35.3 14.59
... -.10 -1.5 27.42
.. +2.10 +17.8 85.30
+4.35 +31.5 76.85
10 -1.15 +28.3 23.77
18 +,02 +10.7 41.52
15 -.55 +10.6 47.23
19 -.41 +4.3 35.60
13 -.39 +4.5 18.62
31 +.37 +24.1 28.43
29 +1.53 +52.0 20.91
... +.75 +63.9 9.39
18 +.03 -5.3 54.12
97 +.50 +16.7 33.99
... +1.15 +36.0 9.98
13 -1.65 +1.1 53.99
14 -.56 +.1 41.70
12 +1.06 +13.0 82.63
16 -.41 +19.8 44.35
1 -.19 +27.0 24.92
7 -.40 -13.0 14.60
21 -1.64 -21.7 29.74
10 +3.35 -13.8 51.73
... +1.7 18.65
63 ... -9.5 8.81
9 -2.68 -30.1 17.74
... +.25 -27.0 10.60
10 +.33 +23.3 28.21
6 -.60. -6.7 14.08
10 -.02 -12.9 19.20
... +.26 +5.3 16.30
... .-.30 -52.0 1.56
16 -.43 +10.4 39.29
8 +.10 -15.1 31.28
+14 +6.0 4.04
55 -.03 -15.6 11.09
... +.62 -22.5 10.84
3 +.35 -11.6 16,03
16 +1.30 +8.7 49.97
15 +4.02 -17.5 138.66
... -.06 +47.8 17.51
15 +3.77 -4.8 45.05
21 +3.06 +22.8 50.15
7 -.46 +.2 26.53
40 +.47 -24.5 8.50
26 +.06 +11.0 16.08
10 +.68 +2.7 78.60
9 +.98 -12.2 36.96
17 -1.05 +2.7 36.00
20 +.20 +11.3 59.19
... +.60 -1.6 17.59
... +.22 +8.0 15.01
... -.08 +4.3 26.54
... +2.41 -4.0 74.34
.. -.10 +9.9 26.30
... -.14 +.3 18.97
... +.08 -7.5 10.09
... +.64 +6.0 64.89


WITH SO MANY CHOICES,

WHY WOULD YOU CHOOSE


TO PAY TAXES?




1.56% TO 5.19% *

*Yield effective 05/24/2011, subject to availability. Yield and market value may fluctuate if
sold pnior to maturity and the amount you receive from the sale of these securities may be less
than, equal to, or more than the amount originally invested. Bond investments are subject to
interest rate risk such that when interest rates rise, the prices of bonds can decrease and the
investor can lose principal value. Any bond called prior to maturity results in reinvestment
risk for the dwner of the bond. May be subject to alternative minimum tax. Municipal bonds
may have original issue discount.
Some of the available issues of'bonds are callable. Contact your local'Edward Jones financial
advisor for more information about maturity dates and applicable call provisions.

lb invest in tax-free bonds, call or visit your local
financial advisor today.
f lH Steve Jones, CFP
Financial Advisor
2929 West U S Highway 90
Suite 114
Lake City, FL 32055
386-752-3847 www.edwardjones.com, Member SIPC


S *ard^ones
MAKING SENSE OF INVESTING^^^^


Name


Wkly YTD Wkly
DIv YId PE Cho %Cha Last


iSTaiwn .29
iShSilver
iShChina25 .63
iShEMkts .64
iShB20 T 3.99
iS Eafe 1.42
iShR2K .89
iShREst 1.98
IngrmM
IBM 3.00
Intl Coal ...
IntlGame .24
IntPap 1.05
Interpublic .24
Invesco .49
ItauUnibH .67
JPMorgCh 1.00
JanusCap .20
JohnJn 2.28
JohnsnCti .64
JnprNtwk ...
KB Home .25
KeyEngy ...
Keycorp .12
Kinross g .10
Kohls 1.00
Kraft 1.16
KrispKrm ...
LDK Solar ...
LSI Corp ...
LVSands ...
LenderPS .40


.-.03
+2.85
+.16
+.68
+1.15
+.32
+.79
+.69
10 -.32
14 -2.66
50 +.02
20 -.62
12 -.40
24 -.03
18 -.67
... +.96
10 -.34
11 +.07
15 +1.65
17 +.71
32 -1.81
... +.69
23 +1.80
11 +.08
24 +1.17
14 -1.04
20 -.48
52 +2.40
7 -.24
... -.20
50, -.36
8 -.40


Name


Wkly YTD Wkly
Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last


LennarA .16
UllyEli 1.96
Limited .80
Linkedln ...
LloydBkg
LyonBas A .10
MBIA
MEMC
MGIC
MGM Rsts ...
Macys .40
ManpwrGp .80
MarathonO 1.00
MktVGold .40
MktVRus .18
MktV Agri .33
MarlntA .40
Marshals .04
Masco .30
MasseyEn .24
MedcoHIth ...
Medtmic .90
Merck 1.52
MetUfe .74
MetroPCS ...
MitsuUFJ ..
MobileTele 1.06
Molycorpn ...
Monsanto 1.12
MorgStan .20
Mosaic .20
NCR Corp ..


28 +.94
8 -.59
16 -.11
-4.77
+.09
+2.74
5 +.25
60 -.18
+.46
.. +.02
13 +.28
., -1.54
12 +2.17
... +2.16
... +1.20
... +1.58
32 +.70
... -.10
... +.04
... +3.02
17 -5.64
13 -1.90
16 -.85
12 -.46
29 +.43
... +.09
29 -.07
... +3.32
29 +3.31
12 +.24
14 +4.54
14 -.31


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name DIv YId PE Cha %Chg Last


NYSE Eur 1.20
Nabors ...
NBkGreece .29
NatGrid 2.92
NOilVarco .44
NatSemi .40
NewellRub .32
NewmtM .80
Nexen g .20
NextEraEn 2.20
NiSource .92
NobleCorp 1.06
NokiaCp .55
NorflkSo 1.60
Novartis 2.53
Nucor 1.45
OcciPet 1.84
OfficeDpt ...
OilSvHT 2.36
PG&E Cp 1.82
PMI Grp
PPL Corp 1.40
PatriotCoal ...
PeabdyE .34
Penney .80
PepsiCo 2,06
Petrohawk ...
PetrbrsA 1.34
Petrobras 1.28
Pfizer .80
PhilipMor 2.56
Polo RL .80
Potash s .28
PS USDBull...
Pridelntl ...
PrUShS&P ..
ProUltQQQ ...
PrUShQQQ rs...
ProUltSP .39
ProUShL20...
ProUSSP500...
ProUSSIv rs...
ProgsvCp 1.40
ProLogis .45
ProUSR2K rs...
Prudentl 1.15
PufteGrp ...
RadianGrp .01
RadioShk .25
Raytheon 1.72
RegionsFn .04
Renren n ...
RioTinto 1.08
RiteAid
SKTIcm
SLMCp .40
SpdrDJIA 3.04
SpdrGold ..
S&P500ETF2.34
SpdrHome .31
SpdrKbwBk .15
SpdrRetl .50
SpdrOGEx .49
SpdrMetM .41
Safeway .58
StJude .84
Salesforce ...
SandRdge ...
Sanofi 1.82
SaraLee .46
Schlmbrg 1.00
Schwab .24
SemiHTr .57
Sequansn ...
SiderurNac .81
SilvWhtn g .12
SilvrcpMg .08
SouthnCo 1.89
SwstAirl .02


Nasdaq Most Active


Wkly YTD Wkly
YId PE Chg %Chg Last
... 29 +.72 +2.0 74.77
1.8 18 -.23 +13.8 24.89
1.9 18 -.28 +13.1 23.43
... .20 -.86 -14.2 10.01
... ... +.04 -51.3 .19
1.2 25 -1.87 +12.9 81.53
.. 27 +1.45 -33.8 43.61
... 43 -.70 +9.0 44.10
.. 25 +2.47 +78.9 38.29
1.5 40 +1.28 +25.7 23.36
.. 9 -.22 +16.5 15.79
...... +3.40 +21.4 42.38
... 18 -.13 +25.0 49.93
6 -.09 -32.1 3.73
+.11 -1.8 15.71
... 22 -1.80 +10.2 30.68
...... +.26 +45.9 23.90
... ... -.13 -71.0 1.10
2.5 ... -.41 +27.0 14.64
1.0 19 +.19 +10.4 27.69
.... 25 -1.50 +8.2 58.48
... 47 +5.89 -13.3 112.85
... ... +.72 -65.9 1.52
1.9 16 +.21 -11.9 12.93
22 +.27 -20.1 23.72
4.5 18 -.16 +.6 14.07
... 17 -5.01 -6.7 121.37
... 9 +.31 -9.4 7.11
... 22 -1.58 +43.2 31.40
... 9 -.79 +26.4' 11.53
... 13 +.21 +13.7 41.19
... ... +1.07 +140.6 4.98
... ...+5.89 +151.2 82.54
... ... +.06 +81.0 6.30
3.5 ... -.14 -28.9 9.06
... ... -.54 -.8 2.50
3.8 10 -1.01 +5.6 22.21
... 26 -1.61 +8.3 53.37


16 -.09 +19.0
84 +.77 +17.7
... -.03 -22.6
... -.09 +15.7
19 +5.10 +8.3
19 +.12 +78.6
17 -.13 -2.9
13 +2.31 -8.2

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AMEX Most Active


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name DIv YId PE Chg %Cha Last


JA Solar ...
JDS Uniph ...
JetBlue
LawsnSft ...
Level3
UbtyMIntA ...
LifeTech ...
UnearTch .96
lululemn g ...
MarinaBrs ..
MarvellT
Mattel .92
MelcoCrwn ...
MicronT
Microsoft .64
NXP Sem n ...
NasdOMX ...
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Netflix
NewsCpA .15
NewsCpB .15
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OCZ Tech ...
OmniVisn h ...
OnSmcnd ...
Opnext
Oracle .24
Orthovta ... *
PMC Sra ...
PattUTI .20
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Popular
Power-One...
PwShs QQQ .39
Powrwav
Qlogic
Qualcom .86
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4 +.09 -18.1 5.67
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Name Div
AbdAsPac .42
Adventrx ...
AlexcoR g ...
AlldNevG ...
AmApparel ...
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AntaresP ...
Aurizon g .
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BarcUBS36...
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CelSci
CFCdag .01
CheniereEn...
ChinaShen ...
Crossh g rs ...
Crystallxg ...
DejourE g ...
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Gastar grs ...
GenMoly ...
GoldResrc .48
GoldStrg ...
GranTrrag ...
GrtBasG g ...
GtPanSilvg 9...
Hyperdyn ...
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InovioPhm ...
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MadCatzg ...
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YId PE Chg %Chg Last


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Div YId PE Cho %Cha Last


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OpkoHIth ...
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PHC Inc ...
ParaG&S ...
PhrmAth
PionDrill
Quepasa
RadientPh
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Richmnt g ...
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Uranerz
UraniumEn ...
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YM Bio q ...


12,500................


12,000.....- ............... .....


11,500 ............. . . ................................. ......

11,0 D J F M A M



MUTUAL FUNDS
Total Assets Total Return/Rank Pct Min InIt
Name Ob) ($Mlns) NAV 4-wk 12-mo 5-year Load Invt
PIMCOTotRetls Cl 140,180 11.05 +0.6 +8.3/B +8.8/A NL 1,000,000
American Funds GrthAmA m LG 68,531 32.01 -2.1 +21.2/D +3.0/D 5.75 250
FidelityContra LG 64,782 71.01 -1.9 +23.5/C +5.1/B NL 2,500
Vanguard TotStldx LB 63,493 33.67 -1.6 +24.4/A +3.6/B NL 3,000
American Funds CaplncBuA m IH 61,219 52.44 -0.6 +21.1/C +4.2/C 5.75 250
Vanguard ihstldxl LB 60,369 122.15 -1.6 +23.1/B +3.0/B NL 5,000,000
American Funds CpWIdGrlA m WS 58,144 37.68 -2.2 +25.9/C +4.5/B 5.75 250
Vanguard 500Adml LB 56,098 123.01 -1.6 +23.1/B +3.0/B NL 10,000
American Funds IncAmerA m MA 55,798 17.51 -0.8 +21.5/A +4.5/B 5.75 250
Vanguard TotStlAdm LB 53,201 33.68 -1.6 +24.5/A +3.7/B NL 10,000
American Funds InvCoAmA m LB 50,714 29.30 -2.2 +20.0/D +2.4/C 5.75 250
Dodge & Cox IntlStk FV 48,440 37.02 -3.4 +27.6/C +3.2/A NL 2,500
Dodge & Cox Stock LV 46,344 115.67 -1.0 +22.9/B +0.2/D NL 2,500
American Funds WAMutinvA m LV 41,374 29.10 -1.3 +24.4/A +2.5/B 5.75 250
American Funds EurPacGrA m FB 40,871 43.14 -3.5 +26.2/0 +4.9/A 5.75 250
Vanguard InstPlus LB 38,581 122.16 -1:6 +23.1/B +3.0/B NL 200,000,000
FrankTemp-Franklin Income A m CA 37,027 2.27 -0.4 +20.7/A +6.1/A 4.25 1,000
American Funds FnlnvA m LB 36,110 39.05 -2.2 +25.2/A +4.0/A 5.75 250
Vanguard Totilnl d FB 35,783 16.32 -3.8 +27.9/C +3.0/B NL 3,000
American Funds NewPerspA m WS 35,113 29.93 -2.9 +25.6/C +5.6/A 5.75 250
PIMCOTotRetAdmb Cl 33,187 .11.05 +0.6 +8.0/B +8.6/A NL 1,000,000
American Funds BalA m. MA 33,122 18.79 -0.9 +18.7/B +4.4/B 5.75 250
Vanguard 5001nv LB 33,007 122.98 -1.6 +22.9/B +2.9/B NL 3,000
Fidelity GrowCo LG 30,889 91.74 -1.8 +31.5/A +7.6/A NL 2,500
Harbor ntllnstl d 'FB 30,567 64.44 -3.8 +33.6/A +6.1/A NL 50,000
Vanguard WeltnAdm MA 30,011 56.39 -0.9 +17.8/C +6.0/A NL 50,000
Fidelity LowPriSk d MB 29,083 41.65 -1.5 +26.9/D +5.7/B NL 2,500
CA -CosewalveAlcation, CI --InterfateTenBonid,ES auope Std( FB -Fore led,FG-Fgn FV -F
Lare Vakle, IH -WorldAlIocali, LB 4.ure Red. LG .aeGrowth, LV .= Vale Va, MA -Moderate leocalon -ImM .a ^Bln.
,d-CVap Vie SH -Sped hty.n WS .Wm Std= Total Return: Chn NAV swl dividends reisvted. Rank: How fund vs.
otherswith sameobje0s :Ais in top 20%,E I beottrn20%. Min Int nvtIuknium$neededtoinvestin und.Source:Momrgslr.


Currencies
Last Pvs Day
Australia .9365 .9402
Britain 1.6473 1.6389
Canada .9775 .9788
Euro .7001 .7072
Japan 80.91 81.30
Mexico 11.6195 11.6681
Switzerlnd .8535 .8661
British pound expressed in U.S. dollars. All oth-
ers show dollar in foreign currency.


... +.30 -15.9
... -.00 +15.6
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... +.38 -44.1
... +1.23 -12.0
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16 +.71 +62.4
... +,06 +24.7
... +.41 +54.9












LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, MAY 29, 2011

Lake City Reporter





CLASSIFIED


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lication. Credit for published errors
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In Print and Online
www.lalkecitvreporter.coin


Legal

A public invitation to participate:
Columbia County is in the process of
enhancing the Risk Assessment por-
tion of our Columbia County Local
Mitigation Strategy (LMS) this year.
The risk assessment provides the
foundation for our LMS strategy by
identifying our communities' risks
and vulnerabilities.
Join us for the third meeting on
Wednesday, June 1, 2011 at 9 a.m. at
the Columbia County Combined
Communications Center, 263 NW
Lake City Avenue, Lake City, FL
32055. Following the third meeting
at 11 a.m. the Risk Assessment will
be opened up for public review and
comments until 12 p.m. Come be a
part of the mitigation process and
learn about mitigation in your com-
munity!
http://www.columbiacountyem.com
04544913
May 25, 29, 2011


020 Lost & Found

Missing Shih-tzu. Last seen
Thurs., 5/12, Nash Road area. Was
my daughters dog before her pass-
ing. Please return. 386-752-7545

100 Job
0 Opportunities

04544565
Ladies and Gentleman
if you have A Class A CDL,
we have a Lease/with a lease
purchase plan.
We accept PTD! Certified
students. O/Operators. No
New England States, 100%
fuel surcharge. Carolinas to
the great NW!
Call today to join us!
Buel Inc
866-369-9744

04544834
Owner Operators: Home Daily
with Dedicated Runs.
Excellent Rates & Paid FSC.
80% Drop & Hook.
Great Fuel & Tire Discount
Programs. CDL-A with
1 yr Tractor-Trailer experience
and TWIC req'd.
Call Comtrak at 800-224-2641
ext 4978, or apply online at
www.corntrakinc.com

04544903
First Federal Bank of Florida
has a position available for an
Executive Adm. Asst. to
perform detailed administrative
assignments. Requires excellent
computer skills, organizational
and communication skills.
Ability to multi-task and strong
attention to detail with complete
confidentiality. Three to five
years previous administrative
experience required. Full
benefits package. Applications
may be, obtained from any First
Federal Branch and submitted to
Human Resources,
P.O. Box 2029, Lake City, Fl.
32056 or emailed to
Turbeville.J@ffsb.com
Bilingual candidates encouraged
to apply. Equal Employment
Opportunity Employer

04544933
Drag Line Operator
World Class Cement Manufac-
turer in North Florida mine in
need of Drag Line Operator
with: 10 years experience
preferred; 8 yd to 20yd
machine experience; friction and
electric knowledge required;
experience in digging
underwater rock; past
experience in MHSA mine.
Must be able to operate mobile
equipment and assist with
department needs as necessary.
HS Diploma or equivalent
preferred. Must be willing to
work overtime and accept call-
ins after hours. Company offers
a competitive salary and an
excellent benefits package. EOE
& Drug Free Workplace with
random drug testing policy.
Suwannee American Cement,
PO Box 410,
Branford, FL 32008
Call Human Resources
386-935-5001

04544963
CONSTRUCTION
SUPERINTENDENT
NEEDED. Experience and
travel required. Please contact
352-333-3233 or fax your
resume and salary requirements
to 800-218-7809.
www.conceptcompanies.net

04544971
C Cancer


Fast paced, high volume medical
facility seeking two positions:
Financial Specialist. Duties in-
elude collecting, posting, submit-
ting claims and managing account
payments. Applicants must have
knowledge of all major insurance
carriers, collections, CPT and
ICD-9 coding, proficient in Excel.
Min. 2 yrs exp in medical coding
and billing preferred.
Checkout Clerk. Duties include
Cash handling, schedule appoint-


100 Job
100 Opportunities

04545022
Early Learning Position
Assists with the coordination of
early childhood services
delivered through various child
care programs. Provides on-
going support for early
childhood staff. Helps coordi-
nate professional development
for early childhood staff.
Ensures that programs are
licensed, accredited and that
there is appropriate curriculum,
parent education, etc. Assists
with identification of program
problems and solutions and
serves as liaison with potential
and existing child care
programs.
Degree in early childhood
education or related field or
CDA preferred and minimum of
three years relevant experience
in chjld care or related field.
Ability to advocate for high
quality programming and to
implement change where
necessary. Must have good
organizational skills, observa-
tion skills, communication skills
and computer skills. Must be
able to visit child care programs
throughout the service area.
Must be willing to participate in
professional development.
For additional information,
please visit our website at
www.elc-fg.org
Submit resume to:
Early Learning Coalition of
Florida's Gateway, Inc
Attn: IHR
1104 SW Main Blvd
Lake City, FL 32025

Associate Reps
SUMMER WORK/GREAT PAY
Immediate FT/PT openings,
Customer sales/service,
No exp needed, conditions,
Apply Now all ages 17+
(386) 269-0883,
ATTENTION: student and 0/0
Lease and a Lease Purchase Plan
100% fuel Sucharge, health and
life Insurance available, Spouse
Rider Program, Pet Policy, Never
Roam alone again, NO New
England States! Independent
Contractors needed! GO West!!
Buel, Inc. 866-369-9744
AVON!! Only $10 to start!
Earn bonus $ up to $150+
1-800-275-9945 pin #4206
www.youravon.com/tdavies
Cashiers needed, Experience
Preferred, Drug free workplace,
all applicants will be drug tested
Ellisville Exxon,
Hwy 441, No Phone Calls Please.
CDL A Flatbed Truck Driver
needed for F/T OTR SE area, 3
years exp or more. Medical
benefits offered. Contact
Melissa or Mary @ 386-935-2773
CNC Machinist position available
Will train. Good math skills
req'd. Metal working exp. helpful.
Must pass basic shop math test.
Send resume to 174 NE Cortez
Terr.-Lake City, Fl. 32055.
CONSUMER LENDER
F/T position in Lake City. Exp
selling financial products, proven
customer relations expertise, and
lending exp REQ. Great pay and
benefits! App REQ and available
at www.sunstatefcu.org. Fax to
386-462-7823 DFWP/EOE
Contract Wood
Haulers needed.
386-288-6875
for information
Hiring Locally This Week
Liberty National Life
Insurance Company
Full Training Provided Potential
of $60K+ Annually. 401K, BCBS
Insurance & Pension for those who
qualify. Call 1-800-257-5500 to
set up an interview.
Experienced estimator needed
for site work & underground utili-
ty contractor. Must be familiar
w/construction software & project
management. DFWP. Fax resume:
386-364-2802, call 386-362-7814
Security Officers
needed Lake City Area, must have
current D Security Lie., Clear
background, Drivers Lic, phone,
Diploma/GED. Benefits, DFWP
EEO Must Apply at:
www.dsisecurity.com MB 1000084

Call
386-752-4614
Southern Exposure

Wanted Highly motivated
individual for Sales Position.
Rountree -Moore Automotive
Group, Great benefits, paid vaca-
tion. Exp. a plus but not necessary.
Call Tony Reese 386-344-7517


120 Medical
Employment

Counselor for substance abuse pro-
gram in Baker Correctional Institu-
tion. BA w/2yrs exp., M-F day
shift F/T, $30,000 to start, E-mail
resume to sheliarand@aol.com.or
fax to 386-752-2387





Get Connected


mew ~Ea~,t1.apo,1ae ,o,,


120n Medical
120 Employment

04545087
Meridian Behavioral
Healthcare Inc.
www.mbhci.org
Please visit our website to view
current open opportunities and
to apply online :
Meridian is an active partner
with the National Health Service
Corps
Therapists:
Licensed, or Master's Level
in Outpatient
Bachelor's-Level in
Counselor Support
Case Management (adult &
child)
Master's Therapist in
Methadone Clinic
Administration:
Director of Dietary Svcs
(Gville)
Medical Services
RN Nursing Manager (
Gville)
PRN RN, LPN, C.N.A.
Recovery Specialist
(Direct Care)
LPN (2) for Methadone
Clinic (new )

To see our current openings in
Mental Health and to apply on-
line, please go to:
www.mbhci.org
EOE, DFWP, E-Verify








130 Part Time


TELLER
P/T position in Lake City. Strong
customer service skills, high
volume cash handling or teller exp
and professional appearance req.
App REQ & avail at www. ,
sunstatefcu.org. Fax to
386-462-7823 DFWP, EOE
240 Schools &
Education

04544843
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-05/23/10


* Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-07/11/11

* Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com



310 Pets & Supplies
FREE KITTENS
TO GOOD HOME,
Litter trained
Call 386-365-7360
HYBRID WOLF Pup female.
Up to date shots.
On Preventative. $500.
386-984-6887
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local .
office for information.

330 Livestock &
Supplies

Black Angus Cows & Heifers
Prices Vary
Registered & Commercial
386-719-4802

361 Farm Equipment

84 Ford 4610 Tractor.
2WD, Solid
2005 motor,$7,500. OBO
386-867-0005


407 Computers

Dell Desktop Computer,
$75
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170



Set your sight
on something


BETTER



SrTEL
Apply in person or onlinE

M TT 7fAamT=


416 Sporting Goods
GUN CASE, holds 6 long
guns. Glass front with light oak
finish.Top & bottom cabinet locks.
$75.00 SOLD


420 Wanted to Buy

K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.

Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$250 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
*NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.


430 Garage Sales






PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.



440 Miscellaneous

Medical Reclining Lift.
Chair. Great Shape,
$200 obo. Call Pete @
386-344-5764

Stop gnat & Mosquito bites! Buy
Swamp Gator All natural insect re-
pellent. Family safe. Use head to
toe. Available at The Home Depot..

Summer Barbecue Special
Tow Behind
Grill/Smoker, $1,250 OBO.
386-719-4802

4 0 Good Things
450 to Eat

BLUEBERRY HILL
U-PICK opens
May 30th
386-963-4220


^463 Building
463 Materials

JOB SURPLUS: 2x4xl0ft (6pcs)
3/4" x 4ft x 8ft OSB (1 sheet)
2x4 and lx4 various lengths
$50 for all. 386-754-1595

Mobile Homes
630 for Rentt
2&3 BR MH. $395 $650. mo.
plus deposit. Water & sewer fur-
nished. Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422

2/2 Newly remodeled MH New
Floors/counter tops. Lg lot, quiet
area No pets 1st, last & sec. $400
mo $300 sec will work w/payment
plan. Call Jenn 386-454-7724


2/2 Units, clean, well maintained,
nice safe park setting, 2 miles to
downtown Lake City, $550 month
+ $550 sec dep, 386-984-8448

2B/1BA. MH., quiet living. Clean.
New stove, new carpet, carport.
NO PETS! 1st & deposit.
Adult community. Smoke free
environment. 386-758-3963

2br /2ba SWMH; also Residential
RV lots for rent between Lake City
& G'ville. Access to 1-75 & 441
(352)317-1326 Call for terms


630 (Mobile Homes
630 for Rent

3/2 S of Lake City, (Branford area)
$400 dep, $600 month
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com


Land Clearing

Back Hoe, Dozer, Chopping, root
raking, bush hog,*seeding, sod,
disking, site prep, ponds &
irrigation. Free Est! 386-623-3200

Lawn & Landscape Service

Clean Pine Straw,
You pick it up, $1:85 a bale
Delivery of 100 bales $260
386-688-9156
Landscape Maintenance Company
You can trust for knowledge &
pride, Mention this AD!
Mow Green, LLC 386-288-6532

Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.


FLORIDA
,jGATEWAY

ADJUNCT INSTRUCTORS
FALL 2011
EDUCATION PREPARATION INSTITUTE
Master's Degree in Curriculum and Instruction,
Exceptional Student Education, Reading,
Elementary Education, or a related field
required. Must have a minimum of 18 graduate
hours in teaching and learning courses and
experience teaching in the public school setting.
Requirements include the ability to teach on
campus one night a week and in online learning
environments. Desired qualifications include
'clinical educator training, reading and/or ESOL
endorsement, experience with students with
special needs, experience teaching middle or
high school and/or integrated instruction.
Contact Pamela Carswell at 386-754-4469 or
irv..e0a9.ls.w lgc tcp.ed;Id for details.
INSTRUMENTATION AND PROCESS
CONTROLS
Must have Master's Degree in electrical
engineering and at least five years of experience
in the installation, maintenance, operation and
troubleshooting of current technology used for
automated process control and associated
systems; including PLC's. variable frequency
drives and instrumentation. A valid Florida
Teacher Certification is also required.
Experience with training both technicians and
operating personnel is a plus. For additional
information contact Bob Deckon at 386-754-4442
or robert.deckon fdfac.edu.
NURSING CLINICAL
BSN Required. Master's degree in nursing
preferred. At least two years of recent clinical
experience required. Contact Mattie Jones at
306-754-4368 or nialti( .Jqnc!sufg.at..d.
COMMERCIAL DRIVERS LICENSE (CDL)
PROGRAM
CDL instructors needed for growing CDL
program at Florda Gateway College. QOelified
individuals must hold a CDL and have at least
four years of driving experience with a clean
driving record. Prefer individuals with teaching
experience in a truck driving school selling Email
resumes to Stephanie Glenn at
stephanie. tennifac.edu or call the Banner
Center for Global Logistics at 386-754-4492 for
more information.
LOGISTICS AND SUPPLY CHAIN
MANAGEMENT
The Banner Center for Global Logistics is
-, .; ..I ..:;, ,, , _
Master's degree with at least 18 credits in
Operations Management, Logistics, Supply Chain
or related field is required. Email resumes

386-754-4492 for more information.

with a translation and i vdallaon Application
available ar \.. .f
l''i ^ oiialiri fi-li S mU!KI;* an usimn w n,'rl-ii-f d-


SATURDAY, JUNE 11, 10:00 AM JASPER, FL
SATURDAY, JUNE 18, 10:00 AM MADISON, FL
2-Story Brick Home, Lots of Antiques & Collectibles,
Some Furniture "Period Pieces", Hickory Chair
Furniture, Meissen, Boehm, Art Glass, Doll Collection
10% Buyer's Premhum
FREE Brochure! 800-334-9724 or Online
www.professionalauctioneer. co






Family Owned and Operated

Dealership


(Huntin' a good fit)
New & Used Car Sales
Motivated Self-Starter
Honesty & Good Character

$50,000 plays a year
Benefit Pkg.

Apply in person at


I7 E Macclenny, FL
B UR KINS 273 E. Macclenny, Ave.


Z



Li
ts
9






e-


7IEWOLET


NI


ments, data entry. Knowledge of
medical terminology and insur-
ance. Applicant must be profi-
cient in practice management soft-
ware (Intergy).
Please submit job title and resume
with salary requirements to
ipapesh(acancercare
northflorida.com
or fax to 386-628-9231.


hth'ir

BUY ITJ


SE nLL


f










LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, MAY 29, 2011


Mobile Homes
630 for Rent
Eastside Village a 55+ Retirement
Community offers 2br/2ba Manu-
factured home fully furnished. No
pets. Leases for $650 + utilities.
1st, last, security. Eastside Village
Realty, Inc. 752-5290 for info.
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White Contact 386-623-3404
or 386-365-1919
SOUTH 41 2br/lba. Washer/
Dryer Outlet. Satallite TV incl.
Pets ok on approval. New paint
$550. mo + dep. 386-758-2408.
X-CLEAN 2/2 SW, 8 mi
NW of VA. Clean acre lot, nice
area. $500. mo + dep No dogs
386-961-9181

Mobile Homes
640 for Sale

04545078
Palm Harbor Homes
Has closed 2 Model Centers
Save up to 60K on select models
Call Today! 800-622-2832

04545079
Palm Harbor Homes
Has 3 Modular Homes
Available at HUGE Savings
Over 40K Off
Call Today! 800-622-2832

04545080
Palm Harbor Homes
Repo's/Used Homes/Short Sales
3 or 4 Bedroom Doublewides
Won't Last!! 3,500-40K
Call Today! 800-622-2832

04545081
Palm Harbor Homes
Red Tag Sale
Over 10'Stock Units Must Go
Save Up To 35K!
800-622-2832
Access Realty Make Offer! 3/2
MH w/over 1700 SF & move in
ready. Convenient to schools,
shopping & hospitals. MLS 73861
$89,500. Patti Taylor.623-6896

650 Mobile Home
0 & Land
FOR SALE: $68,000 CASH FOR
QUICK SALE: In McAlpin.
10 Acres W/2006 DW,
863-634-5283 for details.
MH on 1 Acre in Live Oak near
Peacock Lake, owner finance
$42,500 MLS#77598 Call Roger
Lovelady 386-365-7039 @
Westfield Realty Group
Owner Finance, Nice 3/2, S of
Lake City, small down/$625 mo
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com

710 Unfurnished Apt.
7 For Rent
05525655
SPRING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans;
some with garages.
Call 386-454-1469
or visit our website:
www.springhillvillage.net







1 & 2 Bedroom Apartments
Move in for as low as
$199
386-755-2423
A Landlord You Can Love!
2 br Apts $575. & up + sec. Great
area. CH/A washer/dryer hookups.
386-758-9351/352-208-2421
Great location W of 1-75, spacious
deluxe 2br apts., garage, W/D
hookup. patio. $600/700 & up, +
Sec, 386-344-3715 or 965-5560
The Lakes Apts. Studios & lBr's
from $135/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $450. + sec.
Call Michelle 386-752-9626

720 Furnished Apts.
720 For Rent
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
.cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

7301 Unfurnished
SHome For Rent
lbr duplex $600.mo $600 sec.
All utilities incl
on Nassau Street
386-697-9950
lbr/lba Free ele. Utilities incl. 4mi
S. Lake City. $300dep. $375mo.
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
2 bedroom 1 bath 6n
S5 acres.700.00 per month.
First,last and security.
386 590-5333
Eastside Village a 55+ Retirement
Community offers 2br/lba Duplex,
no pets. Leases for $600 + utilities.
First, last, security. Eastside
Village Realty, Inc. 752-5290


Large 2/1 newly remodeled, near
school, $575 mo, + dep, no pets!,
pls lv mess. 386-365-1920 or 454-
7764 after 6p. 843 SE Putnam St.
Live Oak, nice 2/1 brick, near
hospital, quiet well kept area.
Lawn & garbage. $850.
386-963-2611/cell 817-988-3284
Private House for Rent
Newly Remodeled, S of Lake City
Call The Adams Agency @
386-752-1444
Home for Rent.
3/2 in City Limits. No pets.
$900. per month. Call Susan,
Realtor. 386-623-6612
TOWNHOUSE 2br plus
bonus room. w/1.5 bath.
Quail Heights CC. $750. mo plus
$250 damage dep. 386-752-8553


750 Business &
5 Office Rentals
For Lease: 1,500 17,000sf
1525 S. Ohio Ave, Live Oak, FL
Call Scott Stewart@ Westfield
Realty Group 386-867-3498
FOR LEASE: Downtown office
space. Convenient to
Court house.
Call 386-755-3456
For Lease: E Baya Ave. Two -
1000 sqft office space units or
combined for 2000 sqft. 386-984-
0622 or weekends 386-497-4762
Office Space For Lease
2112sf, 7 rms, Irg conf rm, 4 baths,
private parking MLS#76508
$1760/mo, Call Pam @ Remax
386-303-2505
OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$695. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor

790 Vacation Rentals
Horseshoe Beach Summer Spcl
Gulf Front 2br, w/lg porch, dock,
fish sink. wkend $345./wk $795.
386-235-3633/352-498-5986
alwaysonvacation.com #419-181
"Florida's Last Frontier"

805 Lots for Sale
5 Acre Lot, Secluded & Cleared,
MLS# 67871 $55,000
Call Lisa Waltrip
@ 386-365-5900
westfieldrealtygroup.com
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Fort White, 5 ac. lot. Cleared,
grass, paved street, high and dry.
MLS# 77031
Sherry 386-365-8414 $23,999
Hallmark Real Estate. Cleared
2.57 ac. fenced w/32' Dutchman
camper. In O'Brien. Close to Live
Oak, Lake City, Branford. $25,000
MLS# 74534 386-867-1613
Hallmark Real Estate. Owner
Finance with $5K down with
terms negotiable. Below assessed
value for the county. MLS# 74484
$17,900 Jay Sears 386-867-1613
-PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal.
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD tollfree at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

810 Home for Sale
3/2 Brick Home in town, fenced
back yard w/12x12 workshop
$79,900 Just Reduced!
MLS# 77414 R.E.O.Realty
Group, Inc 386-243-8227.
3/2 Brick Home w/1 car garage,
detach carport MLS#77780
$109,900, Call Jo Lytte Remax
386-365-2821
www.jolytte.florida-property-search.com
3/2 Cute Home, Remodeled, on 2
acres, partially fenced $114,900
MLS# 77396
R.E.O. Realty Group
386-243-8227
3/2 in Lake City Airpark
pool, porch, pond, detach garage
large hangar w/living quarters
MLS#77756 $399,900 Westfield
Call Josh G 386-466-2517
4/2 on 10.5 acres w/ detached
garage, patio, above ground pool,
MLS# 77410 $189,888
R.E.O. Realty Group, Inc
386-243-8227
Brick Home, Screened Porch
$185,900 MLS#77893
Call Charlie Sparks @
Westfield Realty Group
386-755-0808,
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
6br/3.5ba brick. Lake views from
back. 39.7 ac., private paved road.
MLS# 76111 Mary Brown White-
hurst. 386-965-0887 $1,200,000
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Home on the lake in town. 4br/3ba
MLS# 76085 Elaine K. Tolar 386-
755-6488 or Mary Brown White-
hurst. 386-965-0887 $299,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
New home in Mayfair S/D. 4br on
comer lot. Split plan. $214,900
MLS# 76919 Elaine K. Tolar.
386-755-6488
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
4br/3ba 2 story brick on cul-de-
sac. 1 ac landscaped. Lori Geibeig
or Mary Brown Whitehurst.
386-965-0887 $299,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
4br/1.5ba brick. 1332 sq ft. Great
floor plan, nice yard, close to
town. 1 ac landscaped. Lori
Geibeig MLS# 75713 $84,900
CYPRESS LANDING!


3BR/2BA built in 2005
w/large kitchen $115,000
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #75794
DESIRABLE GWEN LAKE
area! Nice 3BR/2BA home
on comer lot $112,000
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #77307
Eastside Village a 55+ Retirement
Community. 2br/2ba home with
garage, screen porch. Choose wall
color, flooring. MLS# 76483 East-
side Village Realty, Inc. 752-5290
Great Family Home in S/D,
MLS# 77325, $109,000
Call Missy Zecher @ Remax
Professionals 386-623-0237
www.missyzecher.com


810 Home for Sale
Great Home in Great Neighbor-
hood, Can be 4/2 or 3/2 w/study
MLS#77284 $164,900
Call Carrie Cason @Westfield
386-623-2806
GREAT STARTER HOME!
3BR/2BA w/lots of closets
space & nice lawn $79,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #76432
Hallmark Real Estate. 3/2 Brick
home w/large screened porch.
Back yard has wooded privacy.
MLS#69482 Janet Creel 719-0382
or Paula Lawrence 62341973
Hallmark Real Estate. Bring the
horses. 3/2 HUD, 4 ac. Sold "as is"
$106,000 Bids are being accepted.
www.hudhomestore.com MLS#
72068 Martin Tavener 965-7773
Hallmark Real Estate. DWMH on
5 ac south of town. Back porch,
new metal roof wood burning fire-
place & wired workshop. $82,500
MLS#77185 Janet Creel 719-0382
Hallmark Real Estate. Glassed
porch overlooks wooded backyard
in the Plantations. Pool,
sprinkler system. $204,900
MLS#75429 Janet Creel 719-0382
Hallmark Real Estate. Time to go
to the River. Stilt home w/covered
decking. Floating dock,out bldgs
& covered RV parking. $188K.
MLS#72068 Janet Creel 719-0382
Home on 15 Acres, 2500sf, new
appliances, workshop, MLS 77552
$235,000 Call Brittany @
Results Realty 386-397-3473
HOME OR OFFICE on
Alachua St; remodeled
1,207 SqFt home $82,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #77724
Hallmark Real Estate. 2006
2200SF home. 2br/2ba w/mother-
in-law suite, 4 car garage, endless
hot water heater. MLS# 77547
$309,900 Jay Sears 386-867-1613
Hallmark Real Estate. 3/3 Brick
w/over 2500 SF. Great location
with nice one acre pond in back.
Detached workshop MLS# 75222
$179,900 Jay Sears 386-867-1613
Hallmark Real Estate. 4/2 Brick,
3100 SF, Granddaddy Oaks on 5
acres. Double detached carport/ga-
rage w/workshop. MLS# 77877
$119,900. Jay Seats 386-867-1613
Just Reduced 3/2 home, inside city
limits, fenced backyard, detached
carport w/office MLS#77411
$82,900 Call R.E.O.Realty,
@ 386-243-8227 Make Offer!
Just Reduced 4/2 on 1.57 acres,
fireplace. partially fenced, MLS#
77412, Call Nancy Rogers at
R.E.O. Realty Group
386-243-8227 $64,900
Large affordable home in S/D on 2
Acres, fishing rights to Timberlake
Property Owner's Assoc. $64,900
MLS#74862 Call Brittany @
Results Realty386-397-3473
Large Brick, 3/1, 4.43 acres, metal
roof, MLS# 77415 $104,888
R.E.O. Realty Group, Inc.
386-243-8227
Large Home in the Country on
3.66 acres, fireplace, 2 outbldgs,
MLS#76471, $89,900 Call Jo
Lytte @ Remax 386-365-2821
jolytte@remaxnfl.com
Large Home w/Open Floor Plan,
back yard & porch, krg oaks, fire-
., place, MLS#76122 $115,000
Call Missy Zecher @ Remax 386-
623-0237,mzecher@remax.net
LOTS OF UPGRADES!
Remodeled kitchen in this
2BR/1BA home $29,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY
INC. 755-5110 #77505
Luxury Log Home,
Whole House Generator, $269,900
MLS# 76899 Call Roger
Lovelady @386-365-7039
westfieldrealtygroup.com
Nice, large 4/2 on 1 acre
w/florida room, granite floors,
wrap around front porch, $148,000
Call Brittany Stoeckert @
Results Realty 386-397-3473
Norwegian Brick Home, fire-
place/family rm, open floor plan,
screen porch, fenced back yard,
MLS#76796 $179,900
Jo Lytte Remax 386-365-2821
Owner Finance. Custom built 3/2.5
10.8 ac. Granite, fireplace, vaulted
ceilings, surround sound. lanai,
gazebo. MLS 77382 Access Real-
ty. Patti Taylor $249K 623-6896
Priced Reduced! 3/2 w/2346 sf.
.67 ac. Creekside S/D. Shade,
surround sound, vaulted ceilings.
MLS 77385 $169,900. Access
Realty. Patti Taylor. 386-623-6896
Rose Creek S/D, 5/4, 3269sf, on
2.2 acres, bonus rm, many
upgrades Reduced! MLS#75485
Reduced! $234,900, Call Pam @
Remax 386-303-2505
Spacious Brand New Split Floor
Plan Home, Fenced Yard
MLS#77493 $229,900
Call Mike Lienemann @ Westfield
Realty Group 386-867-9053
SPACIOUS home built in
1995 has 2BR/2BA & 1,636
SqFt on 1 acre $89,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110
Sturdy 3/2on 4.35 acres, fruit &
pecan trees, Minutes from town
MLS#77878 $105,000 '
Call Jo Lytte @ Remax
386-365-2821/www.jolytte.com
Totally Remodeled 4 Bd Home
Spacious Must See!
MLS#77782 $135,000


Missy Zecher 386-623-0237
www.missyzecher.com
Well Maintained 3/2 on dead-end
street, quiet, country, close to
downtown $105,000 MLS#77800
Call Lisa Waltrip @Westfield
Realty Group 386-365-5900

820 Farms &
2 Acreage
4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$69,900. $613mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
FARM- 7 stall barn, Apt.
17+ acres cross fenced.
Close in $1000. mo.
386-961-1086


820 Farms &
SAcreage

4 acres, Wellborn, New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down, $39,900, $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com

Half to ten acre lots. Some w/
well, septic, pp. We finance; low
dwn pmt. Deas Bullard Properties.
386-752-4339. www.landnfl.com
Hallmark Real Estate. 40 ac hunt-
ing tract w/camper. Water & septic
already in place. Stands & feeders
in place. MLS# 75532
$84,000 Jay Sears 386-867-1613
Three One Acre Lots available
@ $14,900 ea & One 1.65 Acre
lot for $19,900 MLS#76050
Call Brodie Alfred 386-623-0906
Westfield Realty Group

830 Commercial
0 v Property

Commercial Property For Sale
Currently Leased $495,000
MLS#75953 Call Aaron
Nickelson @ 386-867-3534
Westfield Realty Group

Great Investment/Owner Finance
1400 sq ft building on 2 acres
Creative terms, owner flexible.
CLose to 1-75. 386-867-1190


$


830 Commercial
830- Property

Hallmark Real Eslate. Downtown
Restaurant. Gigantic BBQ Smoker
Clean kitchen w/equip. Handle any
type of food svc. MLS# 77902
$189,900 Vic Lantroop 623-6401

Mini Storage (204 Units), -
gated, fenced 5 acres, $1,300,000,
MLS#76048 Call Millard Gillen
@ Westfield Realty Group
386-365-7001

Q850 Waterfront
850 Property

Upscale River Cabin Mof
Suwannee River, Shop, Dock
MLS#76336 $349,900
Call Jo Lytte @ Remax
386-365-2821

860 oInvestment
8 Property

3/2 Renovated Home in town,
front porch, new appliances, cur-
rently leased MLS#76658 $49,900
Jo Lytte/Remax 386-365-2821
www.jolytte.florida-property-search.com

Great Income Opportunity!
Mobile Home Park For Sale
MLS#77228 $195,000
Call Pam Beauchamp @, Remax
386-758-8900


Lj~L~j


Wave Runner 96
Polaris
W/galvanized trailer, only.
64 hrs, many extra parts.
$1,500 obo
Call
386-234-1019


Only


4 LINES


Bring the picture in or
we will take it for you!
* Ad runs 10 consecutive days
with a description and photo in the
newspaper and online E-edition.
* Ad runs 10 consecutive days as a
classified line ad online.
* You must include vehicle price.
* All ads are prepaid.
* Private party only.





,2006 EF250
Ford Van
3/4 ton, metal work
shelves/ladder rack,
60K miles, exc. cond.
$10,500
1 C ll
386-555-5555
If you don't sell your vehicle
during the first 10 days, you
can run the same vehicle ad
for 10 additional days for
only $15.00
Terms and conditions remain the
same for the additional run.

To GetYoAur.
Vehicle SoldCa


50


* 3 DAYS


2 FREE SIGNS!






(386) 755-5440


and e moke cash






ADVERTISE YOUR





GARAGE SALE


WITH THE

LAKE CITY REPORTER


Classified Department: 755-5440








6C. LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, MAY 29, 2011


First Ballot Chosen .... $100

Second Ballot.......... a50
FILL OUT THE BALLOT (Must complete 50% of ballot to be counted)
ENTER YOUR NAME for the RANDOM DRAWING.
ANYONE CAN WIN. . WHY NOT YOU?


ENTER & WIN! 2010 Official Entry Ballot
(Simply Write In Your Choice For Columbia County's Best and Return Ballot by June 6, 2011)


Name

Addre


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SS


State


~______Zip_______


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MAIL TO: The Reader's Choice Awards
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Phone.


Age


Best All-around Restaurant_
Best Bar
Best Bar B Que_
Best Breakfast
Best Buffet
Best Burger_
Best Caterer_
Best Country Style Restaurant_
Best Deli
Best Dinner Under $10_
Best Donuts_
Best Drive Thru_
Best Early Bird Dinner_
Best Fried Chicken.____________
Best Hot Dog_
Best Hot Wings_
Best Lunch Special _
Best Mexican Restaurant_
Best Oriental Restaurant_
Best Pizza
Best Place to Buy Ice Cream_
Best Restaurant Atmosphere
Best Salad Bar_
Best Sandwich_
Best Seafood_
Best Steak
Best Sub


Best Attorney _
Best Chiropractor
Best Dentist_
Best Doctor_
Best Home Builder_
Best Insurance Agent_
Best Orthodontist_
Best Plumber_
Best Real Estate Agent_
Best Tattoo Artist_
Best Veterinarian


Best Auto Body Shop,
Best Auto Electronics .
Best Auto Service.
Best Bank_
Best Barber Shop_
.Best Carpet Cleaner_
Best Cellular Store_
Best Child Care Center
Best Cleaning Service_
Best Credit Union_
Best Dance Studio_
Best Day Spa_
Best Dry Cleaner_
Best Funeral Home_
Best Gym
Best Hair Salon_
Best Hearing Center_
Best Heating & Air Company_
Best Home Health Care Provider_
-Best Hospital_____ ________
Best Karate School_
Best Lawn Care_
Best Medical Clinic_
Best Motorcycle Repair_
Best Nail Salon
Best Oil Change
Best Optical Store_
Best Pest Control
Best Pet Boarding
Best Pet Grooming_
Best Pharmacy_____
Best Place for a Massage
Best Pool/Spa Service and Repair
Best Printer
Best Real Estate Agency____
Best Swimming Pool Sales/Installation_
Best Tanning Salon_
Best Towing Company____
Best Window Tintina


Best Antique Store__________
, Best Appliance Dealer___
Best Bedding_
Best Boat Dealer_______
Best Consignment/Thrift Store_
Best Convenience Store
Best Domestic Auto Dealer
Best Fabric Store_______
Best Feed Store_
Best Floor Covering Store
Best Florist
Best Furniture Store
Best Garden/Nursery_
Best Gift Store
Best Hardware Store
Best Import Auto Dealer
Best Jewelry Store
Best Manufactured Housing Dealer
Best Motorcycle/ATV Dealer
Best Pawn Shop
Best Pet Shop
Best Picture Frame Shop_
Best Place to Buy Tires
Best Produce
Best Scrapbook Store
Best Shoe Store
Best Spa/Hot Tub Dealer
Best Sporting Goods Store
Best Truck Dealer
Best Used Auto Dealer


Best Apartment Complex____
Best Golf Course
Best Hotel/Motel
Best Place for a Wedding Reception
Best Retirement Community_
Best Campground


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Story ideas?

Contact
C.J. Risak
Assistant Editor
754-0427
crisak@lakecityreporter.com


Lake City Reporter





LIFE


Sunday, May 29, 2011


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section D


GARDEN TALK


S&S Golf Tournament a major fundraiser


Nichelle Demorest
dndemorest@ufl.edu


It's hot

enough

for fire

ants

f you have ever
been stung by fire
ants, you are prob-
ably watchful for
mounds showing
up in your yard. Fire ants
are dreaded for their pain-
ful, burning stings that
result in pustules. These
pustules can persist up to
ten days and, if broken,
can become infected. The
itch that accompanies
the sting is intense and
relentless. Fire.ants
attack anything that dis-
turbs their nest including
you, your pets, livestock
and wildlife.
These aggressive little
ants are reddish brown to
black, and are about 1/8
inch long. Imported fire
ants usually build their
dome-shaped mounds of
soil in sunny, open areas.
Our lawns and gardens are.
prime locations for. colo-
nies of fire ants to establish
their mounds. Colonies
include adults, immature
cream-colored ants, eggs
and larvae. A single queen
in an established colony
can lay more than 2,000
eggs per day.
Worker ants go out and
forage for food to feed
everyone back home.
They scout around and
report to other workers
when a food source is
located. These expedi-
tions can take them as
far away as one hundred
feet from the nest They
forage day and night,
whenever temperatures
are between 70 and 90
degrees.
If you've ever waged a
turf war with fire ants, you
know the ants will eventu-
ally win. Even after you
think you have run them
off, they'll return with
larger numbers. When
chemical treatments are
used, native ant species are
also destroyed. When the
fire ant returns, they go
into a rapid reproductive
mode so they will outcom-
pete the return of other ant
species.
The good news is
there are several reliable
treatments including
baits and mound applica-
tions that you can use in
the lawn and garden. I
recommend that you con-
centrate on smaller areas
where the children play
or where yot have cook-
outs. Don't take on the
entire yard. Be careful,
and don't attempt home
remedies that are danger-
ous or contaminate the
environment
Remember... they
will be back.
For more on fire ant
control visit http://solu-
tionsforyourltfe.com or call
the UF Master Gardeners
at 752-5384. Visit the
Master Gardeners at the
Fort White Library from
1-4 p.m. Wednesday.
* D. Nichelle Demorest is
a horticulture agent with the
Columbia County Extension
ofjthe University of Florida
Institute of Food and
Agricultural Sciences.


By C.J. RISAK
crisak@lakecityreporter.com
Any competitive
golf tourna-
ment will have
winners and
those who
fell short, and the S&S
Charities Tournament was
definitely a competitive.
event However, the S&S
Tournament has defied
accepted logic by becom-
ing a winners-only affair.
This is possible because,
whatever the scoresheet
says, the winners were the
organizations that benefit-
ted from the fundraiser.
With the nation's econ-
omy still sliding, it can be
difficult to find those with
something to give. But
S&S managed, collecting
$62,339.07 in donations
at the tournament, to be
split between Take Stock
in Children at Florida
Gateway College and the
Christian Service Center.
'This was our 11th
year," said Kristi Eberlin of
S&S. "Ifs our biggest char-
ity event of the year. We've
always had Take Stock (as
a beneficiary), and we will
rotate the other, although


this was the third-straight
year for Christian Service
Center."
It was a welcome gift.
Each organization was
given more than $31,000.
For Take Stock in
Children, which provides
college scholarships, the
S&S Tournament "is the
biggest single contribution
of the year," according to
Penny Faris from FGC.
"We're thankful."
The Take Stock in
Children program, found-
ed in 1995, provides a two-
year associate's degree
scholarship at FGC to stu-
dents who are nominated
by someone within their
school after eighth grade.
To qualify, students must
maintain a 2.0 grade-point
average, must meet with a
mentor on a'regular basis,
must be drug free and
crime free, and must abide
by their school's code of
conduct during and out-
side of school hours.
Take Stock will provide
-35 scholarships this year
to students within its five-
county area, including 13
to Columbia County stu-
dents worth $203,000
overall, with $93,000


FILE PHOTO
Paul Messine (right) places a court jester's hat on top of Preston Hewlett's head April 15
during the S&S Charities Golf Tournament held at the Country Club at Lake City. 'I love it,'
Hewlett said. 'I'm out here for every one of them. I have the most fun at these tournaments.'


spent on scholarships for
Columbia'County students.
While everyone par--
ticipating in the S&S
Tournament may be called
a winner, there were those
who took home trophies.
The best-ball tourna-


ment, played April 15 at
the Country Club of Lake
City, included 36 four-man
teams. The best low gross
score went to the team of
Jeff Chadwick, Rick Perry,
Phil Mac and Brendan
Ehlers, whose 54 edged


the foursome of Steve
Peters, Mike McKee,
Jordan Hale and Dennis
Crawford by a single
stroke.
Third place went to
GOLF continued on 2D


FILE PHOTOS
ABOVE: Simone Luke (right) watches as Mike Summers fol-
lows through on a swing on hole No. 12 April 15 at the S&S
Charities Golf Tournament held at the Country Club at Lake
City.
LEFT: Philip Powell (from left), Don Benton and Brian Bolena
laugh at John Moore because he has to tee off from the
ladies' hole.


Safety tips for holiday

grilling, backyard parties


By LEANNE ITALIE
Associated Press

NEW YORK For
many, Memorial Day's
unofficial start of summer
means grilling, pool par-
ties and kids wildly happy
to be at the end of another
school year.
For John Drengenberg,
a safety expert and dad
in suburban Chicago, it's
a dangerous time for the
law of unintended conse-
quences, especially in the
backyard.
The electrical engineer
by training is the con-
sumer safety director for


Underwriters Laboratories,
the independent, nonprofit
product safety testing and
certification organization.
He's not looking to kill
summer's early buzz, but
he'd like you to know:
Nearly half of a little
more than 12,000 kids up to
age 19 who died as a result
of unintentional injuries did
so in June, July and August,
according to the Centers
for Disease Control and
Prevention.
Each summer, about
2.7 million children visit the
ER as a result of injuries
around the pool or back-
yard. About 200,000 chil-
dren under 14 wind up in


ASSOCIATED PRESS
This undated photo courtesy of Underwriters Laboratories/
Jonathan Cohon shows mom Andrea Gritis, right, and mom
Maegan Shipp, left, as they watch Lillian Cetera, 1, stand-
ing in the background, Jennifer Gritis, 2, seated in pink suit,
Jackson Cetera, 4, foreground, and Ryan Gritis, 4, seated
right, as they play in a baby pool in Lisle, Illinois.


the ER for playset-related
injuries every year.
Barbecue grill fires
result in about 8,000 home
fires annually, according to
the National Fire Protection
Association.
Whether you're planning
a staycation or an outdoor
bash, exercise your safety
muscles and take stock
of play equipment, grills,
pools and other potential
hazards. Some tips from
UL, the mark you should
look for, by the way, if you'd
like to make sure flotation
devices are worthy.
GRILLING: Charcoal
can heat to a temperature
of 1,000 degrees. Don't
bury embers in sand or
a corner of the backyard
before dousing them with
a hose or buckets of water
first It's likely people are
running around barefoot.
Yikes, it's raining! It's
not a good idea to drag
your grill into the garage
or plop your hibachi in the
sink. Never grill indoors or
near garages or porches.
In fact, stay at least 10 feet
from any structures.
Keep a spray bottle or fire
extinguisher within reach.
Flare-ups can't always be
anticipated. "You get a flare-
up and you're not there,
your whole garage can be
engulfed," Drengenberg
said. "Spray at the base of
the flames. It won't ruin
your food."
Don't use gasoline or


ASSOCIATED PRESS
This undated photo courtesy of Underwriters Laboratories/
Jonathan Cohon shows a fire extinguisher and a gas grill in
Lisle, III. For many, Memorial Day's unofficial start of summer
means grilling, pool parties and kids wildly happy to be at the
end of another school year.


kerosene to light a charcoal
fire. Andrea Branagan, who
lives in rural Christmas,
Fla., outside Orlando, no
longer thinks lighter fluid
is a good idea, either. One
humid night Branagan and
her family tossed some on
a pile of sticks in their fire
pit with a disastrous out-
come.
"I lit it with a little piece


of newspaper and it had
a weird mushroom cloud
explosion," she said. '"There
was an immediate flare that
stretched out across the
ground and caught my leg
on fire."
The mother of three
dropped and rolled in the
grass and was left with a
SAFETY continued on 2D










LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, MAY 29, 2011


Making the most of life's many lessons


I had a great time teach-
ing a psychology class
in human growth and
development at Florida
Gateway College this
spring semester. That's the
study of the way people experi-
ence growth and change at each
stage of their lives.
We all go through stages
like infancy, toddlerhood, early
childhood, middle school, the
teens, young and middle adult-
hood, and late adulthood. Each
stage shows changes in body,
mind, and spirit Each stage also
has developmental milestones,
like beginning school, getting a
driver's license, or events like
marriage and retirement Each
stage presents tasks that must
be accomplished and problems
to solve before moving on to the
next stage.
When we enter a new stage,
we may miss recognizing the
problem that life presents, and
may not realize the opportunity
to learn and grow. We may have
never been taught how to solve


Robert Denny
8ob.Denny8@gmail.com


problems. How did you learn to
solve problems? We often learn
from watching others, mainly
our parents. Or, the discomfort
we felt from the problem may
have pushed us into trial and
error. We may have just learned
to put off the problem, or avoid
it all together.
You may have noticed that
in western culture we tend to '
be herded together with people
our own age. All through grade
school and high school we are
placed with people within a year
of our age. Our modern families
tend to be small. Anthropologists


tell us that before civilization,
or even today in tribal societ-
ies, humans typically grew up in
small groups of people of all ages.
Tribes have an opportunity to be
close to people in all stages of life.
Each stage of life comes with
its own lessons we can learn
from. Tribes and extended fami-
lies provide a good chance to see
the big picture, and to see life
in a different perspective, with a
new dimension.
It's still possible to take
advantage of the opportunities
life in our complex society has
to offer. We can seek out and
get to know people of different
ages, and enjoy the relationships
and opportunities to learn from
them. Who was it that said, "we
can learn something from every-
one we. meet," or how about
"When the student is ready,
the teacher will appear?" If we
accept these ideas, we can seek
out these folks and benefit from
their lessons.
Last year on the local news
channel there was a story


about an apartment building in
Gainesville that was built for the
exclusive use of senior citizens.
One of the older folks there
was interviewed, and she said,
"When we came here, they told
us it would just be for retired
people. But now there are all
ages, with young people with
their noise and music. It's not
right." The next scene showed
some teenagers hanging out
in a common area, listening to
loud music. I thought what a
shame it is, that these folks don't
recognize the situation as an
opportunity rather than a prob-
lem. It's a chance for old and
young to reach out to each other
with a smile and a kind word,
and build a generational bridge
instead of a generational gap.
Young people can learn from and
appreciate seniors, and seniors
can benefit so much from having
young people around them. I've
seen older folks light up when
young folks visit them in a rest
home, or when they can teach a
child something, or hold a baby.


It's another way to make life the
best it can be. And children and
teens can befriend and learn
from adults of all ages.
What can you do? Maybe your
church has activities involving all
ages. Join scouts or FFA. Many
service clubs welcome youth aux-
iliaries. Take up golf or bowling,
join teams. Volunteer for commu-
nity service. Find a way to make a
difference, and rub shoulders with
people of all ages. Friends come in
all ages.
Life may not wait long when it
presents us with opportunities.
Life abounds with second chanc-
es. See problems life presents you
as challenges and opportunities.
I believe that in the Chinese lan-
guage the word for "crisis" is the
same as the word for "opportuni-
ty." Whatever stage of life you find
yourself in, grab up the challenge
that life offers, and use it to learn
and grow. Make the most of what
you have to work with.
* Robert Denny is an instruc-
tor at Florida Gateway College
Contact him at (386) 454-4950.


Right at home: Highlights

from the furniture fair


By KIM COOK
For The Associated Press

With furnishings that
run the gamut from edgy
to elegant, ethnic to other-
worldly, the International
Contemporary
Furniture Fair is a favorite
of serious design lovers.
Highlights at this year's
fair, which was held last
week in New York:
Luminous Lighting
Several booths showed
sculptural lighting that
resembled clouds, puffs of
smoke, 6r some evocation
of a heavenly bird's nest
Vancouver-based Molo
created LED-lit, honey-
combed, polyethylene pen-
dants in various sizes that
could be clustered and even
dimmed to create a stormy
atmosphere. Interesting


fibers were spun into cot-
ton-candy-like fixtures at
Hive. At DCS Corp, washi
paper formed a table lamp
complete with a "down-
pour" made of thin brass
rods. At Aqua Creations,
there were single and mul-
tiple pleated silk disks that
created lit mobiles resem-
bling an extraterrestrial
midnight garden, or a flo-
tilla of sea urchins. All were
an inspirational take on an
ethereal shape that worked
perfectly for lighting.
Cardboard's Cache
The lowly cardboard box
has become the darling of
eco-mindful designers look-
ing for an intriguing new
material. At Graypants,,
corrugated paper formed
bulbous, textural pendent.
lampshades. At Molo, stiff
unbleached Kraft paper was


fanned into sturdy stools and
loungers. The honeycomb
layers of cardboard really
amp up the textural element
of these pieces. Most were
left in their caramel color,
which gave the furnishings
a nice "patina." Graypants
put Edison bulbs in their
fixtures, which made them
glow warmly; several other
designers used the bulbs as
well. Edisons are reproduc-
tions of early light bulbs;
their carbon or tungsten fila-
ments emit a pleasing, low-
watt glow.
Wood Laminates
Plywood was every-
where at this year's show.
Designers like its versa-
tility, so there were lots
of interesting plywood
chairs, tables and book-
shelves. Brooklyn design-
er April Hannah's collec-


SAFETY: Being careful during holiday

Continued From Page 1D


third-degree burn.
If you've got a new gas grill, make sure
all its parts are tight For older grills,
check hoses for cracking, brittleness or
leaks.
LIGHTING: Looking to add a little
ambiance to ypur lawn party? Don't con-
nect more than three strings of midget
lights. Light strings with screw-in bulbs
should have no more than 50 bulbs. Not
all lighting is created equal. Check for the
UL mark or other indications that samples
have been tested responsibly.
POOL SAFETY: Warm-weather par-
ties can mean a dozen or more kids run-
ning around as the grown-ups gab. Good
pool supervision means scanning the area
every 20 seconds when children are in
the water, with an adult no more than 10
seconds away.
Good pool supervision is NOT telling
the 12-year-old to keep an eye on the little
ones, no matter how strong a swimmer the
older child might be. "Some 12-year-olds
are baby sitters and some 12-year-olds
need baby sitters," Drengenberg said.
A 4-foot fence around a pool with a
self-closing, self-latching gate and locks
beyond a child's reach are recommended.
Don't stack chairs, other furniture or pool
equipment near a fence to avoid children
climbing. The same goes for leaving toys
in the pool that can entice kids back into
the pool area after water playtime is over.
Cut back tree limbs extending over a pool
.fence to discourage climbing.
Keep in mind, Drengenberg said,
"Pool deaths are called the silent killer.
Sometimes kids just slide under the water
with hardly a splash and they never come
out again." If a child goes missing and
there's a pool around, head there first Not


there? Head to the neighbor's pool and the
other neighbor's pool.
"Many drowning 'accidents happen
when children have been missing for less
than five minutes," he said.
Empty small wading pools when not in
use. Infants can drown in as little as an
inch of water, Drengenberg said. Inflatable
toys aren't safety devices. "They can snag
an edge of a pool and deflate. They're not
substitutes for parental supervision."
Cover drains in pools and spas. The suc-
tion can be dangerous to children.
PIAYSETS: Kids grow. Play structures
don't, so take heed of older daredevils
looking to climb and swing higher than
the structure was built to withstand when
you got it years ago.
According to the Consumer Product
Safety Commission, 70 percent of all play-
ground-related deaths occur on home
playground equipment.
Make sure equipment is anchored safely
in the ground, all pieces are in good work-
ing order, S-hooks connecting chains to
swings or ladders are entirely closed and
all bolts are not protruding, Drengenberg
said.
Lay down mulch, sand or a rubberized
surface around a play structure.
If all of this feels like common sense, it
should, Drengenberg said, but this is the
time of year when many of us are antsy for
summer to begin and might be looking to
cut corners.
"We're in a hurry. That happens in parts
of the country that have been waiting for
nice weather much of the year," he said.
"All of a sudden you're getting out the
grill and the wading pool and it's hurry up
before fall."


ASSOCIATED PRESS
ABOVE: This undated photo courtesy of April Hannah shows a treehouse-inspired kids' table
and chairs set by Hannah. Brooklyn designer April Hannah's collection of treehouse-inspired
kids' furniture inclOded an eco-friendly, maple- or walnut-veneer play table and chairs.
BELOW: This image shows a pendant light made from corrugated paper. The lowly cardboard
box has become the darling of eco-mindful designers looking for an intriguing new material.


tion of treehouse-inspired
kids'. furniture included
an eco-friendly, maple- or
walnut-veneer play table
and chairs. Philadelphia
University's Industrial
Design students used bam-
boo plywood to craft an
array of furnishings with
architectural flair. Laurie
Beckerman's Ionic Bench
for Voos Furniture was
a curvy swoop of Baltic
birch plywood. Wisconsin-
based Drift Studio printed
subway maps and other
graphic motifs on plywood
panels that were bolted
together into versatile
cubes; modular storage
was. another trend seen


throughout the show.
Industrial Chic
The chic edginess of
industrial style continues
to find favor with design-
ers. In some hands, such
as Chicago studio akmd,


it had a mid-century vibe.
They carved faux casters
out of oak, oversized them,
and put them on the legs
of a dining table and beau-
tifully dovetailed compart-
mental storage pieces.


GOLF: S&S holds charity tournament

Continued From Page 1D


Mike Milo, Ernie Reiter,
Brian Parent and Pat
Womble with a 58.
Of the low net scores
(handicap included), top
honors went to Jason
Bass, Steve Bass, George
Burnham and Nick Slay in
a tiebreaker against John
Moore, Phillip Powell,
Don Benton and Brian


Bolena. Each finished with
a 55. James Pucci, Josh
Olmstead, Josh Boris and
Kevin Labruno were third
with a 57.
The longest men's
drive award was given to
Jordan Hale, while Jackson
Mobley got closest to the
pin honors. Longest wom-
en's drive was earned by


Simone Luke, with Boris
collecting straightest drive
accolades and George
Burnham winning the lon-
gest putt.
It figures to be a busy
summer at S&S, which will
celebrate its 50th anniver-
sary Aug. 13 at the county
fairgrounds. The public is
invited.


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427











LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & CROSSWORD SUNDAY, MAY 29, 20101


DEAR ABBY


HOROSCOPES


Perfect husband may be


hiding imperfect secret

DEAR ABBY: My husband should we say? -- FRIENDS
is gentle, romantic, strong, IN TEXAS
kind and considerate. He's the DEAR FRIENDS: The
"perfect 10." The problem is, I thoughtful thing to do would
think he has an "afternoon de- be to approach the couple
light" ,.~ shortly before you make the
He's home every night and public announcement and tell
tells me every day that he them that you will be announc-
loves me. We have been mar- Abigail Van Buren ing the pregnancy in church
tried many years. We're young www.derabby.com but because you are so close,
at heart, but not so young in gradually. Start out by describ- you thought they should know
years. I'm not asking for ad- ing the qualities he has that first.
vice, because leaving him is you find special his sense of DEAR ABBY: Three
not an option. The signs have humor, his intellect, his style months ago, my boyfriend,
been .there, and I have proof. of dress, his wonderful man- "Doug," gave me a promise
Our home life is good. ners, how kindly he treats oth- ring. I was proud and happy
I just want to understand ers. Another time, tell him how to show it to everyone. But
why this has been going on. much you enjoy his company, Doug's parents, siblings and
Do some men need more than and how comfortable you feel his three children don't know
just marriage? FOR BET- with him because of the things he has given me the ring.
TER OR WORSE, TREN-, you have in common. Tell It feels odd that he's keep-
TON, NJ. him he looks wonderful if he ing this milestone of our rela-
DEAR BEITER OR makes the extra effort. tionship a secret. He says it's
WORSE: There is a name Paying compliments will get because he's a private person
for men who need more than your message across. Unless and doesn't tell his family
just marriage. They are called he walks around with his head about his personal life. What
bachelors. Married men who in a bucket, he'll understand do you think about this? -- SE-
stray are known as cheaters what you're trying to.convey. CREILY PROMISED IN
and adulterers. If your hus- Trust me. PORTLAND, MAINE
band has someone on the side, DEAR ABBY: My husband DEAR SECRETLY
then the surest way to find out and I recently found out that I PROMISED: I think Doug
why it's happening is to inform am pregnant We are, of course, may not yet be ready to settle
him the jig is up, explain that very excited. We have decided down. Or, he may have strained
you have proof,. and demand to wait until I have completed relationships with his parents,
an explanation. my first trimester before tell- siblings and three children.
DEAR ABBY: It has been a ing family and friends. Before this romance goes
long time since I've told a man We are friends with a couple any further, you need to be
I'm interested in him or that who is having a difficult time very clear on exactly what
I really like him. What advice getting pregnant, and we want Doug is "promising" because
could you give me to keep me to be sensitive to their feelings. this scenario doesn't ring true
from feeling like an idiot and We attend the same church from where I'm sitting.
saying the wrong thing? He's and we plan on announcing
a special guy and I don't want our pregnancy in church. Do N Write Dear Abby at
to screw this up. --NERVOUS you think we should inform www.DearAbby.com or
IN READING, PA. the couple privately? If so, what P.O. Box 69440, Los
DEAR NERVOUS: Do it Angeles, CA 90069.


ARIES (March 21-April
19): Walk away from anyone
trying your patience, insinu-
ating you are to blame for
something or demanding you
step up and take action. Be
direct in your approach but
don't forget how to be hum-
ble, kind and forgiving. At the
end of the day, you don't want
regrets. ***
TAURUS (April 20-May
20): You'll be able to accom-
plish a lot if you focus on
projects or hobbies you enjoy.
A short trip or visit will bring
about new ideas and concepts
that will enhance what you
are trying to achieve. Love is
highlighted. ***
GEMINI (May 21-June
20): Your ability to take
action will grab the attention
of someone looking for exact-
ly what you have to offer.
A proposal is apparent that
can change your life and your
direction. Contracts, legali-
ties and financial matters will
unfold positively. ****
CANCER (June 21-July
22): You'll be torn between
what you want to do and what
you have to do. Taking on
responsibilities will entitle
you to greater insight. In


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Word

the end, you will feel good
about your own situation and
will enjoy your evening with
someone who shares your
interests. **
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):
Be careful not to step on
anyone's toes. Being outgo-
ing and outspoken will lead
to opposition and trouble,
personally and professionally.
Keep your thoughts to your-
self and avoid gossip. **
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Seplt.
22): Enjoy your friends,
neighbors and relatives. You
will connect with someone
who shares your views and
your life goals if you take a
day trip. Consider changing
your geographical location.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): Take a look at your per-
sonal papers. There is some-
thing that needs to be updat-
ed or changed. A real estate
deal or property investment
has the potential to do well.
Being diverse or expanding
your options should be your
goal. ***


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another
Today's clue: 0 equals C
GS GR NMMY GR L VEI J B ME F SM
DM K B E SL DPE JLM IGPI. BVSLPB
JP R LM KYI SLVEA FMI SLVS RKOL
D PE Y G Z PI ." F PMB F P R XVSSM E
PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "I believe every human has a finite number of
heartbeats. I don't intend to waste any of mine." Neil Armstrong
(c) 2011 by NEA, Inc. 5-30


SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov.
21): Put time and energy into
nurturing your partnership.
Having a greater understand-
ing of how you can both ben-
efit from the connection you
have will enable you to reach
much higher goals. Love is on
the rise. ***
SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): Uncertainty
regarding an opportunity
will leave you in limbo. Try
not to worry too much about
the outcome when what you
should be doing is looking
for alternatives. A change at
home will. benefit you emo-
tionally and financially. ***
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-
Jan. 19): You can accom-
plish a lot and impress the
people you love. Taking stock
of what you have and plan-
ning a sale to unload what ybu
don't need will put enough in
the bank to help pay for some-
thing recreational. *****
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): An acquaintance
'or someone new you meet
will take advantage of you.
A change in your current
job or professional direction
will help you secure a better
position. Good fortune can
be yours if you stick to basics
and avoid making an unrealis-
tic promise. ****
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): Let your imagination
lead the way and create a ser-
vice you can offer to people
from all walks of life. Follow
your heart and you will come
up with a plan that combines
an old concept with a new,
updated twist. ***


SUNDAY CROSSWORD


HAPPY BIRTHDAY, NEW YORK PUBLIC LIBRAIY! By Bob Klahn / Edited by Will.Shortz 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 110 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19

NOTE: THE NEW YORK PUBLIC LIBRARY TURNED 100 ON MAY 23. 20 21 1 22 23


Across
I Be bratty
6 Chaplin chapeau
11 Center of
emotions
16 Long-range
weapon, for"
short
20 Spa spot
21 It's got game,
often
22 At just the right
'time
23.Pants, in brief
24 The Library's
rare first-edition
printing of "The
Star-Spangled
Banner" is, to its
publisher's
chagrin, _. .
28 Pont Neuf's
locale
29 Tractor-trailer
30 Betty of "Dizzy
Dishes"
31 King at Karnak
32 Wingding
33 Unmanned
vehicle that
found the Titanic
35 "Yankee Doodle
Dandy" Oscar
winner
37 Piggish
38 Spanish treasure
39 Heavy cart
40 Very
41 Go out
For any three answers,
call from a touch-tone
phone: 1-900-285-5656,
1.49 each minute; or,
with a credit card, 1-800-
814-5554.


43 Norbert Pearlroth
spent 52 years of
60-hour weeks in
the Library's
Reading Room
collecting
material for ___
51 Fabulous writer?
52 "The Creation"
composer
53 Ring site
54 Jagged chain
56 Lee, e.g.: Abbr.
58 Big name in
country
59 This is not going
anywhere
61 Cry of praise
65 Do some grilling
67 Rail org.
68 Amigo
69 The Library's
Special
Collections
include one of
George
Washington's
creations, ___
76 Uganda's Amin
77 Some chest-
pounding,
briefly
78 Have something
79 Boxes
80 Progresso
offering
85 Take to a higher
power
88 Plot thickener
89 Smooth as silk
90 Article used by
Einstein
91 Grace in film
93 Fashionable
beach resorts


97 The Library's
Periodicals
Room was the
source of most
of the excerpted
material in the
first issue of
101 Thermal
opening?
102 A Lincoln
103 KFC side dish
104 Dye container
105 Hines of jazz
109 Pull-up pullers
112 Fret
113 Tease
114 Pinafores
116 Spot on the
staff?
117 Neighbor of
Swe.
118 Button ridge
120 The handle of
Charles
Dickens's ivory
letter opener, in
the Library's
collection, is

125 Reddish purple
126 Without
digressing
127 John who wrote
"The Bastard"
128 Go-between
129 Goes on to say
130 Cartoonist Bil
131 Indolence
132 Irascible

Down
1 Bozo
2 Informal talk
3 Stretchy garments
4 Disconnect
5 Hassle
6 Internet option,
briefly


7 Vitamin-rich
snack
8 Kind of wave
9 Crow
10 Short agreement
11 "Jabberwocky"
birds
12 Lyonnaise sauce
ingredient
13& 14 Visually
investigate
15 Predecessor of
Rabin
16 Caller ID?
17 Sign of the
times?
18 Ulna and fibula
19 Cartoon criminal
25 Lachrymose
26 Humble
27 Wales, in
medieval times
32 Roman squares
34 Torrent
35 Borneo borderer
36 Besides
39 Bank (on)
40 Hag
42 Pear variety
44 The Hub hub
45 Look on
46 Wonderland cake
message
47 Inflamed
48 Hockey goal part
49 Small African
antelopes
50 Barnstormers
55 Llullaillaco's
locale
57 Shanghai-to-
Beijing dir.
60 Easily handled,
as a ship
61 H'uzzahs
62 Words of worry
63 H616ne or
Genevi ve


64 Missile paths
66 You may get
them in a bunch
70 Products with
earbuds
71 Set straight
72 Melancholy,
musically
73 Chart checkers,
for short
74 Mandatory
recycling, e.g.
75 Andalusian port
81 Andalusian aunt


82 Where "Parks
and Recreation"
is set
83 High-pH
solutions
84 Heyday
86 Alphabetical
order?
87 Setting of Johnny
Depp's feature
film debut
92 Noah Webster's
alma mater
94 Splits


95 Tilted
96 Dickens's Mr.
Pecksniff
98 Good name for a
thief
99 Goggles
100 Goggles
105 Mullah's edict
106 Honeydew
producer
107 Drift
108 They may be
high
110 ___ dignitatem


111 Folkie Leonard
112 Show-stopping
113 Bench warmer?
115 Love letters
117 Actress Patricia
119 Spruce
121 Words of praise
122 Spinmeisters?
123 Can opener?
124 Communication
syst. for the deaf


Answers to last Sunday's Crossword.
B UIBBIE A LiOT P NB C S LOB
A L L E N S AR I R 0 P pOU R
NEARTO SWEETBIRDOFUTE
DEBT I EN ICE GO I S I DE
CREES DEN ANNE SOD

TAHOE ASMAD ADAGIO E

T L L-ENS GA-G NA




ABS ARIE CODAS RAVEN

TAUNTS LARAMS ALLNEW

SYRIA ARID ICKY ENNE
PROLIX ATARI RO YAL
AAA DRIP ERR AM NGER

SCRO0Y0 G E S 0 Y UA N IIM E B


ALER NEWT ASTO NEOCON
NASA ESO STAN STENT


8 9 9 6 LZE 8 _L


L 8996 9 L 9





9 6 LCS V8 L 9 Z





9 C ZZ/6 9 8 l L

z !89 96LL



C 9 6Z L L 8 9
IL9lV86 -
~f799 I


Page Editor: Dave Kimler, 754-0413










LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE suNDAY, MAY 29, 2011


How to update your furniture


By SARAH WOLFE
For The Associated Press

For many homeowners,
spring has brought the
itch for change but not the
money to do much about
it
But that doesn't mean
you're stuck with Aunt
Edna's floral couch another
year.
More and more home-
owners are rolling up their
sleeves and refurbishing
tables, chairs and couches
themselves, designers say.


"Frugality and practical-
ity are still at the forefront
of people's minds right now,
so updating and making the
best of what you already
have is a surefire way to
save money and recycle,"
said Rachael Liska, senior
editor at Fresh Home mag-
azine.
It may seem daunting,
especially if you're a do-it-
yourself newbie, but start-
ing small and taking your
time can ease stress or
anxiety.
"The way we sort of


think of it here is you're
dressing your furniture on
a level that everyone really
is comfortable with," said
Danielle Claro, home editor
at Real Simple magazine.
"Think about getting a hair-
cut, jewelry or clothes for
yourself. You don't have to
completely remake a piece.
You get can a lot of bang for
your buck, even if you're
not super handy."
Have a clear idea of what
you want to do before you
dive in, Liska said.
"Look to magazines,


ASSOCIATED PRESS
This undated photo courtesy of Fresh Home magazine/freshhomeideas.com shows a repaint-
ed chandelier and chair. Dress up an old chandelier and chair with a coat of vibrant turquoise
paint. Top off the chandelier with new shades trimmed in turquoise ribbon and cover the seat
of the chair with new fabric.


Do you fawn over deer? Not

likely if you're a gardener


bloggers and designers, or
even artwork for inspira-
tion," she said. "And be
sure to have everything
you need all your sup-
plies on hand."
PAINTING
Painting is by far the eas-
iest way to spruce up an old
piece of furniture.
A dull pine table can
become a sleek modern
piece with a coat or two of
glossy black paint Enamel
paint is cheap, and spray
paints now come in almost
any color you can imagine,
and adhere to just about
any surface, said Cindy
Thomas, editor and owner
of Frugalsimplicity.com.
Claro suggested paint-
ing a mirror's frame with
a glossy color, or taking an
old wooden Windsor chair
and sanding it, priming it
and coating it with a fresh*
spring color like orange or
turquoise.
"That's the kind of thing
where if you have a white
kitchen and you throw an
orange chair in there it can
revive the whole room,"
she said.
But, Claro stressed, don't
paint a piece you love, and
certainly riot an antique.
Emily Henderson, host
of HGTV's "Secrets From A'
Stylist," agreed, and offered
a strict rule for painting
furniture: "If the pieces are
over 50 years old, don't do
it," she said. "You'll lose the


ASSOCIATED PRESS
This undated photo courtesy of Fresh Home magazine/fresh-
homeideas.com shows a gilded chair. Gilding, the craft of
applying thin layers of.gold or silver leaf to a surface, is a
great way to update an old chair or other piece of wood fur-
niture.


charm and age that makes
the piece beautiful."
STAINING/WAXING,
Instead of painting,
Henderson suggests strip-
ping and waxing old furni-
ture to bring out the woqd's
beauty and color.
Stripping and staining is
a bit more work, but is
still a relatively inexpen-
sive way to change things
up while keeping the furni-
ture's original look.
Don't choose a stain
that's much darker than the
natural wood, Henderson
said, but "stick in the same
tone of wood."
You'll likely need to


-remove the original finish
with a paint and varnish
remover first and sand
out any imperfections.
Then add the stain based
on the package directions,
and apply a coat of vati
nish to protect the surface,
Thomas said.
"Reupholstering can be
an expensive mistake, but
when it comes to refih-
ishing, in general it can
always be stripped back,"
Henderson said. "I've
totally done that. I had
one chair where we triea
it three different times
before we got something
we liked."


By DEAN FOSDICK
For The Associated Press

Sometimes even a doe-
eyed Bambi will wear out its
welcome. Deer have been
banned from many gar-
dens, orchards and wood-
lots because they damage
or destroy so many tender
shoots, fragile saplings and
emerging blooms.
"At high density, deer
will eat just about anything
on the landscape," said Paul
Curtis, an extension wild-
life specialist with Cornell
University, in Ithaca, N.Y.
"Orchard and nursery
industry crops are particu-
larly susceptible. It's almost
impossible to plant without
some kind of deer protec-
tion."
That can range from net-
ting and fences (the lat-
ter at least 8 feet high and
electrified) to free ranging
dogs, repellents and deer-
resistant plants often in
combination.
The problem is huge.
Deer numbers have bal-
looned from. fewer than
500,000 nationwide in the
early 1900s to a current 25
million to 30 million.
"New houses out in
rural areas have become
deer sanctuaries," Curtis
said. "Most (subdivisions)
become no-hunting zones.
That makes for subsidized
grazing."
Deer bring other costs,
too, including automobile


. accidents, Lyme disease,
and extensive wildflower
and forest losses.
'"They can really do a
job on hardwood seedlings
browsed during the win-
ter months," Curtis said.
'Trillium and several kinds
of Lady's Slippers (orchids)
are particularly sensitive to
deer grazing. We have a
seven-acre wildflower gar-
den on campus and we've
had to put a 10-foot-high
fence around it."
Not everyone likes
installing physical barriers,
however.
"Part of having a gar-
den is surely an attitude of
wanting to be part of nature
rather than shutting your-
self off," said Ruth Clausen,
author of the new "50
Beautiful Deer-Resistant
Plants" (Timber Press).
No plant is deer-proof,
Clausen said, but the ani-
mals are selective feeders
and will ignore certain
plants if offered alterna-
tives.
"Many stunning plants
are unpalatable to deer
because of their poisonous
compounds, fuzzy or aro-
matic leaves, tough, spiny
or bristly textures," she
said.
Well-known plants
that Clausen labels "deer
candy," likely to attract the'
foraging critters, include:
phlox, azalea, chrysanthe-
mum, clematis, daylilies,
hostas, hydrangea, leaf let-


tuce, petunias, strawber-
ries and ornamental sweet
potato vines.
Plants considered deer-
resistant, include: certain
marigolds, peonies, yarrow,
bleeding hearts, many hel-
lebores, English lavender,
weigela, Japanese painted
ferns, daffodils and orna-
mental grasses.
Other suggestions for
reducing damage from
deer:
-Use combination plant-
ing in mixed beds and bor-
ders. Integrate at-risk plant
species with deer-unfriend-
ly natives.
-Hang them high. That
includes plants and bird-
feeders. Remove shrtabs or
understory plants that give
deer shelter and invite them
to linger. Prune low-hang-
ing limbs on fruit trees.
-Place plant containers
near the house or beyond
the animals' reach on pati-
os and decks.
-Add yard art or orna-
ments that frighten deer.
Strips of light-reflecting
aluminum and objects with
moving parts often prove
effective, Clausen said.
-Orchard fruits, vineyard
grapes and acorns litter-
ing the ground constitute
a deer feast, Clausen said.
Gather them up.
-"Plants that are strong-
ly aromatic usually are
left alone," she said. "That
includes most herbs."


ITNESS Westfield Square
ENTER LAKE CITY, FL
'TCENTER 386-752-0749
"Serving the fitness needs of the commnlty since 1986A"


. ,,...:, ..; ,. ... ., :.,_, -' ..-. www.aspe nlakaclty.com


ASSOCIATED PRESS
This photo shows a Sitka Blacktail deer and her two fawns pause along the Mitkof Highway
on Mitkof Island near Petersburg, Alaska. Around the country, deer have been banned from
many gardens, orchards and woodlots because they damage or destroy so many tender
shoots, fragile saplings and emerging blooms.


"It's Summertime
& the Tanning is easy"
1 MONTH (Regular Tanning)

SP20.00
(Limit 3 Per person,)


Tnnin g Siln
Open 7Daysa Week


265


l t annrig lorons & mo.sunzers
I TAKE AN ADDITIONAL
25% OFF!


10% OFF!
ALL LARGER & HIGH
INTENSIVE PACKAGES

SW Malone Ave 752-4970


VotedBet tanning olon I o tars I a ow.
Sale ends August 15,2011


kim s Y.m '


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427