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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01565
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 5/28/2011
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
System ID: UF00028308:01565
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text





Wanting More Award Winners
Sweep in 2007 NBA Columbia softball
Finals still weighs team names two MVPs
000016 120511 *R O at annual banquet.

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Big Upset
Daniela Hantuchova
knocks off No. I seed
at French Open.
Sports, IB




eportei


Saturday, May 28, 2011


www.lakecityreporter.com


Vol. 137, No. 107 E 75 cents


Pedestrian hit, killed by truck


Woman struck
in early morning
accident.
By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
A Lake City woman was
killed Friday morning
when she walked into the
path of a vehicle on U.S.
Highway 41.


Jeanette M. Woods, 34,
of Lake City, was killed in
the incident.
The incident occurred
around 12:30 a.m. Friday
on U.S: Highway 41, south
of Southwest Michigan
Avenue.
According to Florida
Highway Patrol reports,
Gregory S. Williams Jr.,
30, of Branford, was driv-
ing a 2008 Chevrolet pick-


up truck south on U.S.
Highway 41 in the outside
lane.
At the same time,
Woods was walking on
the west shoulder of the
roadway and reportedly
walked into the south-
bound lanes and into the
path of Williams' truck,
where, the front of his
truck struck her.
As a result of the impact,


Woods was thrown onto
the western shoulder of
the roadway. She was pro-
nounced dead at 12:41
a.m. by an attending para-
medic.
Williams was not injured
in the wreck.
Charges in connection
with the wreck are pend-
ing completion of an FHP
investigation, reports
said.


PAYING TRIBUTE


Annual ceremony
features emotional
keynote speech.
By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
It wasn't just the voic-
es of Richardson Middle
School chorus students
singing patriot songs.
Nor was it the letters or
proclamations from local
and state elected officials
thanking veterans for their
services to this country.
It was a combination
of both of those things,
combined with the heart-
felt words of the Lake
City VA Medical Center's
Memorial Day keynote
speaker Ian James Gray,
that turned an annual
salute to veterans into an
inspiring, tear-filled, emo-
tional event where many
veterans remembered
their comrades who stood
beside them in foxholes
and trenches, but made
the ultimate sacrifice to
preserve freedom.
The 17th Annual "Catch
the Spirit" Memorial Day
Ceremony took place at
the Lake City VA Medical
Center's front lawn Friday
morning with close to 150
people attending the cer-
emony "to honor those
who gave all".
Gray, who served in the
TRIBUTE continued on 3A


Photos by JASON MATTHEW WALKER/
Lake City Reporter
ABOVE: lIan Gray (from
right), a veteran of Operation
Enduring Freedom and
Operation Iraqi Freedom, is,
accompanied by Columbia
High School JROTC student
Skyler Treverrow, 18, and
U.S. Army veteran Janet
White during the 'Laying of
the Wreath' ceremony.
LEFT: Sergio Lopez, 62,
who was a private in the
U.S. Marine Corps from
1967 to 1973, looks on dur-
ing Friday's ceremony.,


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Alyson Dal Ponte of Wellborn (right) strums a cigar box banjo
made by Homosassa resident Greg Nason Friday during the
59th Annual Florida Folk Festival held at the Stephen Foster
Folk Culture State Park. .


Florida Folk

Festival off to

a rousing start


Celebration offers
lasting impression
for attendees.
By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
WHITE SPRINGS Jam
sessions with unfamiliar
musicians; alligator tail,,
frog legs and Jamaican beef
patties to eat; sculptures
created from wood; and
singers galore are leaving
a lasting impression at the
59th Annual Florida Folk
Festival.
The event began Friday
and will conclude Sunday
evening. It has been held
at the Stephen Foster Folk
Culture Center State Park
since 1953.
"The purpose of the
Florida Folk Festival is to
celebrate Florida, its music,


arts, crafts, cuisine and the
people," said Bob Giarda,
Park Services Specialist
at Stephen Foster Folk
Culture Center State Park.
"This year is a celebration
on the Florida Panhandle
counties the fishermen
and the different kind of
folk life that is found in the
Panhandle counties."
Officials are expecting
more than 30,000 people
to attend the three-day fes-
tival.
Festival attendees can
see more than 300 per-
fqrmers, taste foods from
all over the state, look' at
displays created by Florida
artists, listen to narrative
accounts of Florida history
and visit the park's muse-
um and carillon tower.
"The anticipated high-
FOLK continued on 3A


Seniors honored at commencement ceremony


About 400
CHS students
earn diplomas.
By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.corn
Columbia High School's
seniors turned their
tassles from left to right
and received their high
school diplomas one by
one Friday, 'marking an
achievement they've antic-
ipated for their entire edu-
cational careers.
Approximately 400 CHS
students graduated as
the Class of 2011 at the
school's commencement
ceremony, which was held
at Tiger Stadium.
"It represents 13 years
of hard work," said
Desirae Williams, 18,
before the ceremony. "It's
a big accomplishment to
be able to get your diplo-
ma tonight."


Students wore robes
of either purple or white,
with white signifying the
students graduating with
either honors or high hon.-
ors. White-robed students
were also decorated with
either silver or gold cords,
indicating honors or high
honors, respectively.
Terry Huddleston, CHS
principal, said graduation
is probably the first major
milestone in somebody's
life.
"It's just a tremendous
accomplishment of dedi-
cation and perseverance
over 12 years," he said.
An education at CHS
prepares students to be
competitive with any other
student in Florida or even
the United States, he said,
as the school offers a vari-
ety of courses such as hon-
ors, advanced placement
and dual enrollment.
Haley Dicks, 18, said the
dual enrollment program


has prepared her to study
at Florida Gateway College
and eventually pursue a
Bachelor's degree in exer-
cise science and a doctor-
ate in physical therapy at
the University of Florida
in Gainesville.
"It's really helped me
to get a good feel of what
college classes are like,"
Dicks said.
Williams said CHS'
classes and teachers chal-
lenged her and readied
her to study marketing at
the University of Central
Florida in Orlando.
"They (CHS) have real-
ly hard classes and really
good teachers who are
willing to dedicate their
time to make you the best
you can be," she said.
Korey Nicholson, 18,
agreed, and said his crimi-
nal justice teacher, Roger
Lizotte, invested in his
SENIORS continued on 3A


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Devante Bell (right) high-fives Darren Faulkner after receiving his diploma Friday at Columbia
High School's commencement ceremony.


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400


93 65
T-Storm Chance
WEATHER, 2A


Opinion .. 4A
Faith .. 6A
Obituaries . . . 5A
Advice & Comics ..... 4B
Puzzles . . .. 2B


TODAY IN
FAITH
Catholics call
for rtefton',


COMING
SUNDAY
Folk Festival
coverage.


I


I I C- ,C 2 C(


-. -" -. i- tt.*-'-a'. ji. sci. ".:. "--'7... ;. '









LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING SATURDAY, MAY 28, 2011


$H Friday:
Afternoon: 2-1-4
Evening: 2-5-9


lay.4) Friday:
Afternoon: 7-8-6-0
Evening: 5-2-8-1


vnatch-
S Thursday:
10-15-20-23-28


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



Amy Winehouse checks into rehab


NEW YORK
A representative for Amy
Winehouse said the
singer has checked into
a treatment program in
London.
Spokesman Chris Goodman said
Friday that the 27-year-old song-
stress wants to be sure she's ready
to perform in Europe this summer.
The rep said she'll stay at the
clinic on "doctors' advice." It was not
clear what treatment she'll get at the
Priory Clinic. It offers treatment for
a range of psychiatric problems, as
well as drug and alcohol addiction.
Winehouse's breakthrough disc,
2006's "Back to Black," won her five
Grammy Awards and helped her
achieve worldwide stardom, but her
music has been overshadowed by
drug use and legal run-ins.
Winehouse has not released much
music since, but she performed a
short tour in Brazil in January.

Film on Bin Laden,
Black Ops set for 2012
LOS ANGELES Kathryn
Bigelow and Mark Boal's movie about
the Black Ops hunt for Osama Bin
.Laden is set for release next year.
Columbia Pictures, which
acquired the domestic distribution
rights to the film earlier this week,
said the untitled movie will come out
at the end of 2012.
Bigelow and Boal each won a pair
of Oscars for producing, directing and
writing last year's best picture, "The
Hurt Locker." The two began develop-
ing the film about the Black Ops' mis-
sion to capture Bin L#den in 2008.
Co-Chairman of Sony Pictures
Entertainment Amy Pascal said
Bigelow and Boal "have an outstand-
ing perspective on the team that was
hunting the most wanted man in the
world."


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Jan. 20, 2010 file photo, British
singer Amy Winehouse arrives at
Magistrates Court in Milton Keynes,
England.


'Taxi,' 'Grease' star Jeff
Conaway dies at 60
LOS ANGELES Actor Jeff
Conaway, who starred in TV's 'Taxi"
and the movie musical "Grease," has
died.
Spokeswoman
Kathryn Boole
said the 60-year-old
M actor died Friday
M ^ morning at the
Encino Tarzana
Medical Center,'
where he had been
Conway hospitalized in a
coma since May 11.
His manager, Phil Brock, has said


Conaway had tried to treat himself,
with pain pills and cold medicine
while in weakened health.
The actor had long battled drug
and alcohol addiction, which he
blamed in part on back problems
and repeated surgeries. The reality
series "Celebrity Rehab" showed his
struggle for sobriety.
Conaway played high school
bad-boy Kenickie in the 1978 movie
"Grease" and appeared in the
Broadway version of the musical.
He played struggling actor Bobby in
the sitcom 'Taxi" from 1978 to 1981.

Abdul, Cowell getting
along on 'X Factor'
SINGAPORE Paula Abdul"
sail Friday her reunion with Simon
Cowell on his new talent show is
going great, for now.
'We're still in the honeymoon
phase, which will probably only last
another minute," the 48-year-old
Abdul told reporters in Singapore.
"Simon and I ended up having a
wonderful, exquisite, challenging
and frightening relationship."
The two famously bickering for-
mer "American Idol" judges will be
joining forces again to assess would-
be singing stars on Fox's "The X
Factor," which taped its first judging
session earlier this month and will
debut this fall in the U.S.
Abdul is looking to bounce back
from "Live to Dance," a talent com-
petition series she starred in that
premiered on CBS in January and
was a ratings disappointment
. The tension and teasing between
Cowell and Abdul helped make
"Idol" one of the most popular tele-
vision shows. She left the show in
2009 over a contract dispute after
eight seasons.

M Associated Press


Celebrity Birthdays


M Actress Carroll Baker is
80.
* Singer Gladys Knight is
67.
* Singer John Fogerty is 66.
* Actor Brandon Cruz is 49.
* Country singer Phil Vassar
is 49.
* Singer Chris Ballew of


Presidents of the United
States of America is 46.
* Singer Kylie Minogue is
43.
* Actor Justin Kirk
("Weeds") is 42.
* "The View" co-host Elisa-
beth Hasselbeck is 34.
* Singer Colbie Caillat is 26.


Daily Scripture


"However, I consider my life
worth nothing to me; my only
aim is to finish the race and
complete the task the Lord
Jesus has given me the task
of testifying to the good news
of God's grace."
-Acts 20:24


Lake City
HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293
Fax number .............752-9400
Circulation ..............755-5445
Online... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc.; is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Ra.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson.....754-0418
(twilson@lakeoityreporter.com)
NEWS
Assistant Editor CJ Risak..754-0427
After 1:00 p.m.
(crisak@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Ashley Butcher ...754-0417
(abutcher@lakecityreporter.com)
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440.


Reporter
BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake pity Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 730
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 1030 a.m. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation ..............755-5445
(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks................. $26.32
24 Weeks............... $48.79
52 Weeks....................$83.46
Rates indude 7% sales tax.
Mail rates
12 Weeks .................. $41.40
24 Weeks ...................$82.80
52 Weeks ..................$179.40


CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion,
please call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifica-
tions will run in this space. And thanks for reading.


Gator veto
placates activists
TALLAHASSEE Gov.
Rick Scott has made
amends with animal rights
activists.
They had been unhappy
with his alligator hide boots.
They also were dis-
pleased by his recent corn-.
.ments that alligators were
his least favorite Florida
animal and that he wouldn't
mind shooting one.
But on Friday the
Animal Rights Foundation
of Florida issued a news
release praising Scott's
line item budget veto of
-$150,000 to promote alliga-
tor products. ,
Spokesman Don
Anthony said the founda-
tion is happy that Scott
r."ecognizes in a difficult
year, marketing the meat
and skin of alligators killed
iin Florida" should not be a
state priority.


ST. CLOUD A cen-
tral Florida firefighter has
been charged with steal-
ing 10 guns from a house
where he responded to an
emergency call.
According to the sheriffs
office, Osceola County Fire
'Rescue firefighter Douglas
Werk responded to a May
27, 2010, burglary call at a
St Cloud home. The victim
was taken to the hospital by
ambulance.
Authorities said that sev-
eral days later when the
victim returned home, she
reported 10 guns missing.
In February, Werk was
arrested for trespassing
and possessing a con-
cealed weapon in an unre-
lated case. Sheriff's office
detectives found several
guns in the 27-year-old's
home and confirmed one
had been stolen from the
St. Cloud home.
Werk was held Friday on


JASON |MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter

Rollover simulator on display
Lt. Patrick Riordan, a public information officer with the
Florida Highway Patrol, speaks to a group of children
Thursday at the Columbia County Public Library main branch.
Riordan demonstrated with a simulator how passengers can
be ejected from a vehicle after experiencing a rollover.


charges of armed burgl y


Rare coins spill
onto median
DELAND Talk
about some loose change:
Authorities in central
Florida said around $1
million in rare coins and
currency spilled onto a
highway median when an
SUV overturned.
Florida Highway Patrol
Sgt. Kim Montes said 47-
year-old Demetrio Cirillo
of Boca Raton was driving
north on Interstate 95 in
Volusia County when his
SUV blew a tire Thursday
afternoon. Montes said
Cirillo lost control of the
vehicle and overturned
on the grass median.
Some of the coins
spilled from the SUV
when it flipped. Cirillo
and his wife were both
injured.
Morites said Cirillo
called several friends to
pick up the coins before
he would let rescue crews
take him to a hospital.


nIUpdtai sInooUIng
ORLANDO Police
in Orlando have identified
the gunman who killed a
surgeon in a parking garage
at Florida Hospital and then
fatally shot himself.
Authorities said Friday
that 53-year-old Nelson
Flecha had a patient-doctor
relationship with the multi-
organ transplant surgeon,
41-year-old Dmitriy Nikitin.
They said a motive was
still being determined.
The shooting occurred
Thursday near the eleva-
tors on the first floor of the
garage used by employees
and patients' families.
Nikitin taught at the
University of Central
Florida's College of
Medicine. Last year, he
was part of a surgical team
that set a Florida Hospital
record for the most num-
ber of transplants ever
done in a weekend.


THE WEATHER


CHANCE .OLATED PARTLY MOST MOSTLY
T-STORMS -SRMSMS f CLOUDY SUN SUNNY


HI H193L065 HI92L066 H1I90L066 HI90L065 H1I91L066
2111-TOM


I


... *__,_ ... .U.
Taliahassee Lake
91/67 ,. 93/
Ga
Pensacola ,, ". .Ga
86/71 a Pama aCity 9
87/70-


TEMPERATURES
High Friday
Low Friday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Friday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


92
71
88
65
100 in 1953
49 in 1979

0,00"
2.63"
14.11"
2.59"
16.61"


N Associated Press


C/9 ',


lacksonile
,89/68


City Sunday
Cape Canaveral 84., 74/pc


Daytona Beach


/b u'Ft. Lauderdale
inesville Daytona Beach Fort Myers
91/65 86j70 Gainesville
Oca1la Jacksonville
g,1/66 e
Orlando Cap Canaveral Key West
S 90/70 85/72 Lake City
Miami
Tampa.. \ Naples
90/74 West Palm Beach Ocala
\ 86/75 Orlando
FtL auderdale Panama City
Ft. Myers 87/77 Pensacola
92/71 e Naples Tallahassee
.90/71 Miami Tampa
87/76 Valdosta
y est. -" W. Palm Beach


15(/78


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise tom.
Sunset tom.

MOON
Moonrise today
Moonset today
Moonrise tom.
Moonset tom.


6:31 a.m.
8:25 p.m.
6:30 a.m.
8:26 p.m.

3:33 a.m.
4:50 p.m.
4:06 a.m.
5:45 p.m.


10

10 nkes to bum
Today's
ultra-violet.
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+.


86/71/pc
86/77/t
92/71/t
91/66/pc
88/68/pc
87/78/sh
92/66/pc
87/76/t
91/71/t
91/67/pc
91/70/pc
89/72/pc
89/72/s
93/68/pc
91/72/t
91/68/pc
85/75/t


Monday
85,' 74/pc
85/71/pc
86/77/s
91/70/s
90/66/pc
86/68/pc
87/78/pc
90/66/pc
87/76/s
91/70/pc
89/67/pc
91/70/pc
88/71/pc
88/73/s
91/66/pc
90/71/s
90/67/pc
86/75/s


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.


0003L J wercom
June June June June AV& Forecasts, data and
1 8 15 23 w graphics 0 201 iWeather
New First Full Last I i central, LP, Madison, WIs.
weather J www.weatherpubllsher.com


On this date in
1983, a late-season
major snowstorm
struck Montana.
Snow accumulations
of up to 4 feet were
recorded in some
areas. The .snow
drifted to depths
over 10 feet.


Get Connectel




mom


AROUND FLORIDA


grand theft and a weapons
Fireligher charged charge
with stealing guns Surgeon killed in


..... .. .. . 1 4 l-I


Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424


| [ ]/ ,:Iuf ii M I MI......... .


[ WMHER''BY -WHOUR al








LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE SATURDAY, MAY 28, 2011


FOLK: Annual festival begins

Continued From Page 1A


lights of this year's festival
will be John Anderson per-
forming Saturday night as
well as 15 other featured
performers and another
300 artists," Giarda said.
"They are all unique to
what they do, they're from
Florida and this is a music
and arts festival that cel-
ebrates Florida. I encour-
age everyone to come
out."
Lynnae Dehoss drove
from the West Palm Beach
area with her family to
attend this year's folk fes-
tival.
"I'm excited to be
here," she said. "We were
here last year, we really
had a great time and I.
have an 8-year-old who
loves the museum and he
even tried frog legs and
gator tail and he wants
to go swimming in the
" Suwannee River."
Dehoss' husband is a
musician with Matthew
Sabatella and the
Rambling String Band
and the group decided to


camp at the festival.
"We all get to have the
camping experience and
kind of hang out together,"
she said. "I look forward
to the camping experience
for the family as much
hanging out with the
band."
Merrilee Hobgood
drove from Louisiana to
see her friends perform in
the folk festival.
"I was born and raised in
Florida and I like to come
back to my home state
every once in a while," she
said. "I'm having a won-
derful time. I like coming
to the festival because of
.all of the untapped talent
that's here."
Bob Ingram, a musician
and scheduled performer,
was at the same campsite
as Hobgood and noted
that he's been attending
the festival for the last five
years.
Ingram, a guitarist
from Miami, will be play-
ing with a fellow musician
from Miami who plays


the fiddle.
'"We just enjoying play-
ing and jamming and
what I really enjoy is the
campground music and
community of musicians
in the campground," he
said. "This festival is pres-
tigious in the sense that
ifs the oldest folk festival
in America. I started com-
ing here because I always
wanted to come here. This
is a wonderful little town
- it ain't Miami."
Giarda said it's impor-
tant to have a Florida Folk
Festival each year to cele-
brate the state's residents
and the talent of artist
from across the state.
"If there wasn't a Florida
Folk Festival every year
there would not be as
strong of an attempt by
so many people to cap-
ture and celebrate Florida,
what makes it unique and
why we call it home," he
said.
For additional informa-
tion, go to floridafolkfesti-
val.com.


TRIBUTE: Fallen heroes honored

Continued From Page 1A


Marine Corps from 2002-
2006, gave the audience
a personalized tribute to
four of his fellow Marines
- his personal friends -
who were killed'in action.
From his friend
Justin Thacker who was
ambushed in a moun-
tain pass in Afghanistan
fiercely fighting to his
last M16 round or John
Stalvey, whose Humvee
was blown-up by an impro-
vised explosive device in
the streets or Iraq.
Gray told their stories.
From Nathaniel "Doc"
Martens, who served as
the platoon corpsman and
was killed in a vehicle
crash caused by sabotage
of an Iraqi roadway to
Matthew Hayner, who was
assigned to same scout
sniper team as Gray and
watched over Gray when
he slept and even gave
Gray some of his body
heat when the two were in
enemy territory and tem-
peratures fell below freez-
ing. Hayner died after
struggling with symptoms
appearing in Afghanistan
which mimicked radiation
poisoning.
Gray told their stories.
'These men were my
brothers," Gray said, his
eyes welling with tears
and his voice straining
to contain his emotions.
"Here today, I told their
story. Yet, there are so
many stories to be told
and as part of his fam-
ily of service members,
those stories are yours to
tell. In this way, we will
remember them and lift
each other. Because not a


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
lan Gray, a veteran of Operation Enduring Freedoim and
Operation Iraqi Freedom, speaks to a group of about 150
people Friday at the Lake City VA Medical Center's 17th
Annual 'Catch the Spirit' Memorial Day Ceremony about
his combat experience and his fellow soldiers who died in
combat.


day goes by that I do not
think of them and miss,
them dearly, as I do all my
brothers who have sacri-
ficed their lives."
Gray's address ended
with a standing ovation
from the crowd and he was
later met with handshakes
and hugs from veterans of
other wars who told him
they knew how he felt and
they too remembered fall-
en comrades.


"I try to avoid of think-
ing of them as being
killed; I see it as they
gave," he said of his
friends. "There is a need
to give. For me when I
would think about this
day (Memorial Day) and
what it meant to me, hon-
estly the speech wrote
itself. It was just letting it
come out onto the paper.
For me to say it out loud
meant so much."


SENIORS: CHS students graduate

Continued From Page 1A


educational experience.
"The school overall has
been great," he said. "I
have no complaints."
Both Dicks and
Nicholson said graduation
is a significant transition in
their lives.
"It just signifies the step


from childhood to adult-
hood," Nicholson said.
"It's the final step of child-
hood."
"It signifies the next
step as we go on in our
lives," Dicks said.
As the seniors move
on in their futures,
JASON MATTHEW WALKER/
Lake City Reporter
Korey Nicholson
(right) embraces
CHS Salutatorian
Kellan Graham dur-
ing the commence-
ment ceremony.
Nicholson graduat-
ed with high honor
and is a member of
the Honor Society
and the Hall of
Fame.


Huddleston encouraged
them in their post-gradu-
ation plans.
S"They have been a very
good senior class and
all faculty and staff wish
them well as they pursue
endeavors after gradua-
tion," he said.


Evidence takes center


stage in Anthony trial


BY KYLE HIGHTOWER
Associated Press

ORLANDO The ran-
cor among attorneys heated
up Friday as the prosecution
introduced key testimony
and evidence during the
fourth day of testimony in
the murder trial of a Florida
woman accused of killing
her daughter.
The manager of a towing
yard where Casey Anthony's
car Was kept for more than
two weeks during the sum-
mer of 2008 testified that
he smelled an odor coming
from her car consistent with
decomposing bodies he'd
smelled in the past
Simon Birch was eas-
ily the strongest prosecution
witness to date and went
largely unchallenged under
defense cross-examination.
The state also showed a
series of videos of Anthony
going on a shopping spree
over several days in late June
and early July 2008.
Prosecutors are portray-
ing Anthony as carefree and
cheerful in the weeks after
the child, Caylee, was last
seen in June 2008, hang-
ing out with friends and
hitting the clubs. Caylee
Anthbny was reported
missing a month later and
her remains were found
that December.
Anthony, 25, has pleaded
not guilty to first-degree mur-
der. Prosecutors contend
she suffocated Caylee with
duct tape. Anthony's defense
team says the child drowned
accidently in a family pool.
If convicted, she could be
sentenced to death..
'Birch said he has spent 30
years in the towing business
as well as two years in waste
management, and had come
across deceased bodies at
least eight times. He said he
firstnoticed the smell coming
from Anthony's' car on the
fourth day her 1998 Pontiac
was parked on his yard. The
car had been towed after
spending four days in an
Amscot parking lot It stayed
there from June 30 to June
15, when Anthony's parents
retrieved it.
"In my opinion and experi-
ence, the smell of decompo-
sition is unique in compari-
son to rotten food or rotting
garbage," Birch said.
The defense argued in its
opening statement that the
smell was actually from a
bag of trash Anthony left in
her car.
"'The instant flash in my
mind was 'Oh, I know what
that smells like,'" Birch said
about noticing the odor.
George Anthony, Casey's
father, testified for the third
time in four days Friday and
said his mind was racing
when he arrived to pick up
the car and observed the
smell.
'That particular smell,
whenever you smell it, is
something you'll never for-
get," he said. "I don't know
if I said it out loud or whis-
pered, but I said 'Please God,
don't let this be Casey or
Caylee."'
Under cross-examination,
defense attorney Jose Baez
tried to shake the father on
some details of the tow yard
visit, including why he knew
to bring a can of gas with
him for the car and wheth-
er it was Anthony or Birch
who first decided to open
the trunk. Anthony and Baez


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Casey Anthony listens to the testimony of Mallory Parker dur-
ing Anthony's trial at the Orange County Courthouse Friday.


*also clashed over if it was a
bag of trash in the trunk or
the trunk itself that was the
source of the odor.
Later state attorney Jeff
Ashton became agitated
at questions he repeatedly
objected to as argumenta-
tive. He also took issue with
a suggestion to Anthony
by Baez that the reason he
might not have wanted to
touch the bag of trash was
because he knew its con-
tents could be evidence of
Cayjee's death.
Part of the defense's the-
ory is that George Anthony
found Caylee drowned and
helped dispose of the body.
Mallory Parker, the fian-
c6e of Casey Anthony's
brother Lee, was the pros-
ecutors' first witness of the,
day. She described how she
and Lee searched for Casey
in Orlando bars in the sum-
mer of 2008 when her fam-
ily hadn't seen her in many
days.
But Parker also said that
Anthony had a special rela-
tionship with her daughter
and at one point broke down
in tears under cross exami-


nation when Baez asked
here to describe the interac-
tions between them. Casey
also wiped away tears during
Parker's testimony.
"It was amazing," Parker
said. "Casey and Caylee had
a special bond."
Prosecutors failed late in
the day to survive a defense
challenge of their attempt to
introduce computer instant
messages between Anthony
and an ex-boyfriend.
With the jury sent out of
the room by Judge Belvin
Perry, the state argued the
messages, which includ-
ed sexually laced chatter
between Anthony ,and Tony
Lazzaro, help establish the
motive for killing her 2-year-
old daughter. Judge Belvin
Perry was shaky on that
premise and initially request-
ed extra time to review all of
the content
"What does that tend to
prove or disprove?" Perry
asked at one point
But after a recess the pros-
ecution withdrew its motion
to introduce the evidence,
though it could try to get it
admitted later.


I 8ih AivLUAl \\EllboRRN

Blueberry Festival
JuNE 3 & 4, 2010
FRidAy, 9AM-9pm SATruRda, 7AM-5pm






For directions, information or schedule.

call 386-963-1157







Well, we thought you'd like something productive on
your pad to prove to your spouse that it's really a useful
tool for financial management. Well worth the invest-
ment you made to buy it. And so much more than just
a toy for playing Angry Birds.
See, you actually can do something useful with this new
technology. You can see if you've got paid yet, balance
your checkbook, pay a few bills, make a loan payment,
transfer funds to your kids away at college, and more!
Or you can just act like you're taking notes at that meet-
ing instead of updating your facebook page.
We also have old-fashioned internet banking for those
who've not yet convinced their spouse that they really
need the newest pad devices or cell phones.
. I But keep in mind, if you want
p, '.' to get the red tootsie pops,
you're going to have to come
visit us to get one. Peoples
State Bank. Now that's Bank-


iBlood Drw Eprec






I d TT I *jT'Ti I
inforBuyMeialOfie

Part-tfime Positio


Mn.-Fr^i. 3pmtt-ijm

Plesefax esue38-5297


Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424












OPINION


Saturday, May 28, 201 1


www.lakecityreporter.com


AN


AN
OPINION

Critics don't

help peace

process

Only a few minutes
after President
Obama finished
his carefully bal-
anced speech on
the Middle East last week,
Republican presidential can-
didates and lawmakers began
twisting his words to suggest
that he was calling for an epoch-
al abandonment of Israel.
"President Obama has thrown
Israel under the bus," said Mitt
Romney. Tim Pawlenty wrongly
said Mr. Obama had called for
Israel to return to its 1967 borders,
which he called "a disaster waiting
to happen." Rick Santorum said
Mr. Obama "just put Israel's very
existence in more peril."
Others went further.
Representative Michele
Bachmann and Mike Huckabee
said Mr. Obama had "betrayed
Israel."
Some Democrats were
also piling on, evidently afraid
Republicans will paint them as
anti-Israel.
Pandering on Israel in the
hopes of winning Jewish support
is hardly a new phenomenon
in American politics, but there
is something unusually dishon-
est about this fusillade. Most
Republicans know full well that
Mr. Obama is not calling on Israel
to retreat to its 1967 borders. He
said those borders, which define
the West Bank and Gaza, would
be the starting point for talks
about land swaps.
Do the president's critics even
agree on the need for a Palestinian
state next to Israel, as Prime
Minister Berijamin Netanyahu of
Israel says he does? It is not clear
that several of the Republicans
would go as far as the prime min-
ister, who at least noted that Mr.
Obama does not want to return to
the 1967 lines. But even those who
do should admit that two-state pro-
posals have always been along the
lines sketched out by the president
In 2007 Mr. Romney told The
Jerusalem Post that his admin-
istration would "actively work
toward a two-state solution to
the Arab-Israeli conflict" What
could the outline of that solution
be if not the one Mr. Obama
ihentioned? Mr. Romney doesn't
address that question in his
speeches. It is one thing to make
noise on the campaign trail. It is
quite another to lead a quest for
peace.
* The New Y6rk Times

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman

LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.


BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


Yet another campaign


dominated by Medi-Scare


Oh dear. Another
election that will
be won or lost on
Medi-Scare.
Yes, we must
start thinking seriously about the
cost of Medicare who pays
it and how we can cut the cost
while preserving a program that
every working American must
pay into with each paycheck.
But, apparently, we are not going
to have this conversation any
time soon. More's the pity, let
alone actually do anything to
solve the problem.
House Republicans pushed
through a dramatic plan to
overhaul Medicare that would
make people currently 55 and
under pay about $6,000 a year
more for Medicare benefits
when they become eligible
While insurance firms would
vie to sell coverage with the
government contributing to the
cost of premiums.
At the same time, 273
Republicans in Congress signed
a pledge promising not to raise
taxes. Then the Senate nixed
the House plan.
Democrats, led by President
Barack Obama, charge that
Republicans want to "end
Medicare as we know it"
They ridicule the tax pledge
as assuring that for every mil-
lion dollars in income, wealthy
Americans will save $100,000.
And then Democrats were
elated when a Democrat defeat-
ed a Republican for a long-time
Republican congressional seat
in New York this month. (GOP
ads ignored the dominant
Medicare issue while weirdly
portraying the Democrat as a
Nancy Pelosi wannabe.) This
proves, Democrats said, that
the GOP is 'unfair, clueless and
favors the rich over the poor
and middle-class.
In truth, the Republicans
have been courageous in


LETTERS


Ann McFeatters
amcfeatters@ntionoalpress.com


embracing the need to deal
with Medicare, at least until
they saw how unpopular their
plan, devised by House Budget
Committee chairman Paul Ryan,
has become. Democrats were
disingenuous when they sug-
gested that raising taxes on the
wealthy would bring in sufficient
revenue to pay upcoming short-
falls in the Medicare program.
Meanwhile, the budget imbroglio
goes on and on and on.
Those of us hoping for a seri-
otis 2012 presidential campaign
and election debate on the
future of the nation, including
Medicare, and how we rescue
ourselves from fiscal insanity are
likely to be disappointed. To wit
Sarah "if-you're-not-with-me-
you're-against-me" Palin now
seems to be getting into the
. race after her erratic behavior
and commentary convinced fel-
low Republicans for months she
would not run. In Iowa, home of
the first voting in the 2012 prima-
ries, she is unveiling a two-hour
"documentary," which portrays
her as a cross between a mod-
ern-day Joan of Arc and Saint
Teresa.
(An unflattering new biog-
raphy of her by a former top
aide claims she wrote gush-
ing letters in praise of herself
for others to sign to become
governor of Alaska, a job she
abandoned in mid-term. She
also has reportedly bought a
$1.7 million home for cash in
upscale Scottsdale, Arizona,
where it is easier to mount a


presidential campaign than in
Wasilla, Alaska.)
Mitt "the-position-I-take-today-
won't-be-the-same-as-the-one-I-
took-yesterday" Romney ranted
against bailout loans for the
automakers, saying they would
destroy the industry. Now that
the automakers are paying back
the lbans and hiring more work-
ers, his campaign is taking credit
for saving Detroit
Newt "believe-what-I-tell-
you-now-not-what-I-told-you-
five-minutes-ago" Gingrich
daily, changes his positions
and excuses; we have no
idea what he'd do if elected.
He also stammers ineffec-
tively trying to explain how
he racked up a $250,000-to-
$500,000 bill at Tiffany's, a
jewelry store to the super-
rich unpatronised by the vast
majority of Americans.
Tim "I-m-just-an-aw-shucks-
nice-Minnesota-guy-who-hates-
spending-taxpayer-money"
Pawlenty, former governor of the
land with 10,000 lakes, wiped out
the state's rainy-day fund and left
it with a $5 billion deficit
Jon "I-am-still-trying-to-find-out-
where-Iowa-and-New-Hampshire-
are" Huntsman, Obama's former
ambassador to China and ex-
governor of Utah, is the other
Mormon lusting after the White
House. He's a hottie, but, really,
we have no idea who he is.
. It's clear we have to do
something to "save" Medicare
by preserving seniors' right to
health care but making it less
expensive. So far, no one either
running or thinking of running
for president in 2012, including
Obama, has put forth a viable
plan.
We should be scared.

* Scripps Howard columnist
Ann McFeatters has covered
the White House and national
politics since 1986.


TO THE EDITOR


Scott overpaying new staff members


To the editor:
In the past, county commis-
sioners and other elected offi-
cials have said they could not
voluntarily reduce their salary
because it was set by the state.
The House and Senate passed a
bill that allows state and county
elected officials to voluntarily
reduce their salary and it is up
to Gov. Rick Scott to sign the
legislation. He is expected to do
so in the next few weeks.
However, don't get too excited.
Rick Scott has also brought in
new staff from other states to
run Florida's government and
he is making sure they are paid
very well. Even more than some
of our elected officials, one of
Scott's new staff member's sala-


ries would pay for 2 or 3 of the
teachers who are being laid off.
Teachers being laid off, EMS
being privatized with staff losing
their jobs because of county mis-
management, as I said in my last
letter get out and vote!
Now the taxpaying voting pub-
lic will see which elected officials
are in it for the money and ben-
efits or who is more concerned
with public/community/service.
I know that most state employ-
ees have not had a pay increase
in six years, but state and local
elected officials enjoy pay
increases every fiscal year.
Go on the internet and check
to see what your elected official
and Scott's new staff members
are paid compared to state, coun-


ty and most private employees.
Clara Crews
Lake City
To the editor:
I would like to thank the
lady that knocked on my door
(Thursday) to tell me my
garage was on fire and she had
already notified 911. Things
were a little wild and I didn't
get her name to thank her.
Because of her kindness we
were able to save many things
that could not be replaced. We
lost a great deal, but could have
lost our home. It showed me
that there really are folks who
care about others.
Thank you so much!
Noni Shearer
Lake City


Deroy Murdock
deroy.murdock@gmail.com

A new war

declared on

debit cards

Senator Dick Durbin,
D-Ill., is here to help.
Grab your debit card
and run!
Thanks to his latest
kindness, many of America's 185
million debit-card owners soon
will endure new fees and lose
existing benefits. Other consum-
ers can kiss their free checking
accounts goodbye. Durbin's
bright idea even could shutter
some banks.
Thank you, Dick!
Banks currently earn 1.14
percent fees to process debit-card
purchases. Imagine that someone
buys a new HDTV with a debit
card. Citibank wires $1,000 from
its ledger into K-Mart's coffers,
and charges K-Mart $11.40 for
that service.
Durbin decided to fix this.
Under his amendment to last
year's Dodd-Frank financial-regu-
lation juggernaut, the Federal
Reserve decreed a Cuban-style
price control. Come summer,
banks must charge 12 cents per
transaction, regardless of size
or risk. So, when someone puts
a $1,000 HDTV on a debit card,
Citibank will earn 12 cents for the
same service. This illustrates an
$11.28 (99.98 percent) loss versus
Citibank's income before Durbin
stomped into the picture.
U.S. bankers, who expect to
lose some $12 billion in debit-
card swipes annually, are not just
sitting there.
According to The American
Banker, Wells Fargo may hike
minimum balances, charge
money for debit cards, and dump
free checking so that it can
recoup some $1.3 billion in losses
stemming from Durbin's need-
less meddling.
For its part, Regions Bank,
which earned $346 million from
debit cards last year, will manage
expected losses by abandoning
risky commercial real estate lend-
ing. This is dreadful for small
businesses.
In Fantasyland, where Durbin
lives, retailers magically will take
billions in savings from lower
debit-card fees and hand them to
consumers. But in the real world,
merchants gladly will pocket this
bonanza.
None of this is surprising,
unless your next-door neighbors
are Donald Duck and Snow
White.
As if hammering consumers
did not suffice, Durbin could
mean curtains for some banks.
Most pernicious, Durbin's
amendment is erasing incentives
to spend one's own money via
debit cards. Instead, like relaps-
ing ex-smokers who re-embrace
their Camels, many Americans
will redeploy their credit cards,
borrow other people's money,
and wind up chin-deep in debt
America tumbled into a ravine
in 2008, largely because over-
extended borrowers could not
service their debts. Since then,
Durbin hasn't learned a thing.
He is making a U-turn and .speed-
ing from today's feeble recovery
back to the Great Recession.
Senators John Tester, D-Mont,
and Bob Corker, R-Tenn., wisely
hope to delay Durbin's disaster
for two years and study its pos-
sible effects. The 15 sitting GOP
senators who foolishly backed
Durbin last year should find
their inner Reagans and support
Tester and Corker's legislation.
Meanwhile, whenever Senator
Durbin feels the impulse to
prove that "Dick knows best," he
should lie down until it passes.


* New York commentator Deroy
Murdock is a columnist with the
Scripps Howard News Service and
a media fellow with the Hoover
Institution on War, Revolution and
Peace at Stanford University.


4A









LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SATURDAY, MAY 28, 2011


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


* To submit your Community
Calendar item, contact Antonia
Robinson at 754-0425 or by
e-mail at arobinson@
lakecityreporter.com.


Today
Miss Fort White
Pageant
The Miss Fort White
Pageant is 6 p.m. today
at the Fort White High
Gymnasium. The theme
is "A Red Carpet Affair:
Honoring the Past,
Inspiring the Future."

Farmers Market
features musical artists
The Lake DeSoto
Farmers Market opens
8 a.m.-12 p.m. today at
Wilson Park. The day
will feature musical
guests Tony Buzzella and
Friends playing all types
of music, In honor of
Memorial Day, the band
will feature a musical
tribute to each branch of
the military and recog-
nize all that have served
our country. Vendors are
welcome. Contact Jackie
Kite, community redevel-
opment administrator, at
(386) 719-5766 or kitej@
Icfla. com.

Donors wanted
LifeSouth Bloodmobile
is seeking donors 9 a.m.
to 2 p.m. today at the Lake
City Mall and 3-6:30 p.m.
at the International Gospel
Explosion downtown.

International Gospel
Explosion
The 3rd Annual
International Gospel
Explosion Event is 3-6 p.m.
today at the downtown
Olustee Park. The com-.
munity resource event will
feature speakers from local
agencies. It will include
food, resources, music, fun
and more. Contact ohthe-
bloodofjesus77@yahoo. com,
call (386) 9514587 or (386)
466-2239 for more informa-
tion or visit www. 1sthaitia
nbaptistchurchoflakecity.
com.

Band opportunities for
home-schooled
Home-schooled children
and parents interested
in participating in the
Columbia High School
band can contact Ryan
Schultz at 755-8000, dur-
ing the school day, for
more information.

Sunday
Southside Summer
Camp
Registration is open for
Southside Summer Camp.
Only 80 spots are avail-
able. Camp is $225 for nine
weeks running June 13-
Aug. 12. The camp is open
to boys and girls ages 7
-14 and is 7:30 a.m.-5:30
p.m. Monday-Friday June
13-Aug. 3. Trips include
Blue Springs, bowling,
swimming, skating, mov-
ies, Chuck E. Cheese and
more. Call Wayne Jernigan
at 758-5448 for more infor-
mation.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter

Lending a helping hand
Columbia High School drama students Miranda Delk (left), 16, and Chandler Douglas, 16, dump out bags of soil and
cow manure Wednesday to be mixed while preparing a butterfly garden at the Avalon Healthcare & Rehabilitation
Center.


Boys Club summer
program
The Boys Club of
Columbia County is host-
ing a summer program
June 6-Aug. 13. Boys and
girls 6-14 are eligible to
attend. The club offers a
variety of activities includ-
ing sports, game rooms,
arts and crafts and special
events. Skating and bowl-
ing is also available. Fees
for the program are $275.
Call 752-4184 for more
information.


Tabernacle. The first 40
children will be admitted.
Camp is $25 per week.
The camp features read-
ing, as well as math, sci-
ence, hand writing, black
history, exercise and con-
versational Spanish in the
curriculum. Camp is 8:30
a.m.-4 p.m. Monday-
Thursday June 6-Aug.
12. Breakfast and lunch
will be provided. Call
Cynthia Robinson at 249-
3572 or Pastor Steele at
758-8452 for more infor-
mation.

Girls Club summer


Columbia County offers
summer day camo


Registration for
the Columbia County
Recreation Department
summer day camp pro-
gram is 8 a.m.-5 p.m. at
Richardson Community
Center. The camp, for
boys and girls ages 7-14,
is open 7:30 a.m.-5:30
p.m. Monday-Friday June
13 -Aug. 3. Cost for the
eight-week camp is $225,
which includes daily
activities, free breakfast,
lunch and weekly field
trips. Space is limited to
the first 60 participants
Contact Mario Coppock
or Nicole Smith at 754-
7095 or 754-7096 for more
information.

Summer Reading Camp
registration open
Registration.is now
open for Summer
Reading Camp at Miracle


Registration for the
Girls Club summer pro-
gram is open. The cost
for the summer camp is
$225. Girls must be 6-13 to
attend. Call Terri Phillips
at (386) 719-5840 for more
information.

Monday
Donors Wanted
LifeSouth Bloodmobile
is seeking donors 10
a.m.-6 p.m. Monday at
Winn Dixie. Donors are
entered to win an X-Box
with Kinect system.

Vocational Rehabilitation
offers job seekers help
Vocational Rehabilitation
provides services for
eligible people who have
physical or mental impair-
ments that keep them
from working. These ser-


vice can help with medical
treatment, job placement
and training. Columbia and
Union Counties call (386)
754-1675 for more informa-
tion.

Wood Carver meeting
The Columbia County
Wood Carvers meet
every Monday at 1
p.m. at the LifeStyle
Enrichment Center.
Contact Ken Myer at
719-9629 or Charles
Kime at 755-4937 for
more information.

Tuesday
Couponing 101
workshop
A Couponing 101 work-
shop is 7 p.m. Tuesday
at the Bristro at Christ
Central Ministries. The
cost is free.

Donors wanted
The LifeSouth
Bloodmobile is seeking
donors 11 a.m.-5 p.m.
Tuesday at Walmart.
Food, fun, and giveaways.
Donors are entered to
win an X-Box with Kinect
system..

Fees for Senior
Services meal due
Payment for the
Columbia County Senior
Services Inc. Wednesday
homecooked meal is due
10 a.m. Tuesday at the
LifeStyle Enrichment


OBITUARIES


Irma Lanier
Mrs. Irma Lanier, 87, for-
merly of Alford, died Thurs-
day, May 26, 2011 in Haven
Hospice of Lake City, Fl.
She was a homemaker
and a member of Salem
Free Will Baptist Church.
She is preceded in death by
her husband, Roy Lanier; two
sons, Joe and Mike Lanier.
Survivors include three daugh-
ters, Debra Cassady of Alford,
Fl; Gloria McGee and hus-
band, Tom of Lake City, FI ,
and Lyvonne Yelton of Lithia
Springs, Fl.; 15 Grandchildren,
29 Great-Grandchildren and
two Great-great grandchildren.
Funeral services will be 2 pm
Friday, May 27, 2011 at Maddox
Chapel with Rev. Donnie Hussey
officiating. Burial will follow in
Alford Cemetery with JAMES
& SIKES FUNERAL HOME
Maddox Chapel directing.
The family will receive
friends from 1 PM until ser-
vice time at Maddox Chapel.
Expressions of sympathy may


be made online at www.james-
andsikesfuneralhome.com

Marilyn Nettles Little
Mrs. Marilyn Nettles Little, age
77, passed away on Thursday,
May 26, 2011 at her home sur-
rounded by her family who had
lovingly cared for her during her
illness of the past several months.
She was born in Okahumpka,
Florida on November 15, 1933
to the late Rosa Lee Shaw Net-
tles and William Jackson Nettles
and moved to Columbia County
with her parents at an early age.
She was a retired educator with
the Columbia County School
System having received a Bach-
elor's Degree in elementary edu-
cation from Valdosta State Uni-
versity and a Master's Degree
from the University of Florida
in five areas of certification, ele-
mentary education, reading, cur-
riculum development, guidance
and administration/supervision.
She taught first grade and read-
ing at Five Points School and


served as a Guidance Counselor
at Five Points, the Kindergarten
Center and Fort White School
until retiring in 1994. During
her more than thirty years as an
educator, she touched the lives
of thousands of young people in
Columbia County. She was an
avid reader and loved to travel
having traveled extensively
in the United States, Europe,
Mexico and Costa Rica, but her
favorite destination was "The
Little Place", the family's sum-
mer home in Franklin, North
Carolina, especially when her
children, grandchildren and
great-grandchildren were visit-
ing. She was an active member
of the Church of Jesus Christ of
Latter Day Saints holding sever-
al leadership positions including
Primary teacher, visiting teacher
and Relief Society President.
Mrs. Little is survived by her
husband of fifty-nine years,
Ralph Little; a son, Roger Little
of Lake City; a daughter, Terri
Metrick (Ray) of Fort White;
five grandchildren, Roger Little,
Jr., Laurie Little, Ronnie Robin-
son, Kelly Robinson, and Will


Robinson; four great-grandchil-
dren, Taylor, Daisy, Carly and
Jackson Robinson; a sister, Fran-
ces Wilson (Carl) of Fort White
and a brother, Howell Nettles
(Shirley) of Glen St. Mary.
Funeral services for Mrs. Little
will be conducted at 11:00 A.M.
on Monday, May 30, 2011 in the
Church of Jesus Christ of Lat-
ter Day Saints located on Old
Country Club Road with Bishop
Jeffro Thomas officiating. Inter-
ment will follow in the Pleasant
Grove United Methodist Church
Cemetery. The family will re-
ceive friends in the Chapel of
the funeral home from 2:00 until
4:00 on Sunday afternoon. Ar-
rangements are under the direc-
tion of the DEES-PARRISH
FAMILY FUNERAL HOME,
458 S. MarionAve., Lake City, FL
32025 (386)752-1234 please sign
our on-line family guestbook at
parrishfamilifuneralhomee.comrn

Obituaries' are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


Center. The menu is fried
fish, baked beans, cole
slaw, hush puppies and
banana pudding. Call (386)
755-0235 for more informa-
tion.

Wednesday
Beginners Spanish
Class
Columbia County Senior
Services Inc. is hosting
Beginners Spanish Class
10-11 a.m., free blood
pressure checks 11 a.m.-12
p.m. and a Kyle Houston
performance 11-11:45 a.m.
Wednesday at the LifeStyle
Enrichment Center. Call
(386) 755-0235 for more
information.

Thursday
Leads Club to host
open house event
A Leads Club open
house is 4-6 p.m.
Thursday at the Holiday
Inn & Suites of Lake
City. The open house is
an opportunity to meet
the group of Chamber
partners who meet bi-
monthly to exchange
business leads and ideas
with fellow business
professionals. Learn how
to become a Leads Club
member Admission is
free. Door prizes, compli-
mentary hors d'oeuvres
and refreshments. Cash
Bar will also be available.
Visitors are welcome to
attend. There is a $20
registration fee for Leads
members from both
groups 1 and 2. Leads
members need to contact



Honoring

Those We Love!

CALL Mary or Bridget
TODAY to place an
In Memory Ad for
someone you miss!

755-5440 or
755-5441
between 8:00am & 5:00pm



341^r


Theresa Westberry at
386-754-1411, ext. 106
or e-mail events@hilake-
cityfl.com. Contact the
Chamber office at (386)
752-3690 for more infor-
mation.

Saturday, June 4
Cultural Fair
The Columbia County
. Library Summer Reading
Program will feature a
Cultural Fair from 2-4
p.m. June 4 at the Main
Branch.

Lake City Dance Arts
to host dance recital
Lake City Dance Arts
present its 16th annual
recital, "All About Dance"
3 p.m. June 4 and June 5t
at the FGC Performing
Arts Center. It will fea-
ture Clogging, Jazz, Hip
Hop, Modern and classi-
cal Ballet pieces includ-
ing Swan Lake, Sleeping
Beauty and more. Tickets
may be available at the
doorl5 minutes prior to
show time for $7.50. Call
the studio at (386) 755-
8869 for more information.

Art Show coming to
Library's West Branch
Art is due 10 a.m.-noon
June 4 at the Columbia
County Library West
Branch for the Sixth
Annual Art Show. The
show is June 4-Aug. 6.
Applications are available
at the Columbia County
Public Library branches,
the Fabric Art Shop and
The Frame Shop and
Gallery in Live Oak. Two
and three dimension
artwork of all media is eli-
gible for the show. Contact
Wally Reichert 758-7853
for more information.

Sunday, June 5
Author visits for Friends
of the library program
A Friends of the Library
Author Program featuring
M. C. Finotti, author of
The Treasure of Amelia
Island will be held at the
Main Library at 2 p.m.
Sunday, June 5. Finotti is
a journalist who writes "I
do, I do," a weekly wed-
ding column in the Florida
Times Union. A former
teacher who lives in
Atlantic Beach, Ms. Finotti
will talk about writing
historical fiction and give
a "mini" writing lesson.
She is also the co-author
of The Insiders' Guide to
Jacksonville.

Tuesday, June 7
Lulu Ladies community
baby shower
The Lulu Ladies are
having a community baby
shower at 7 p.m. June 7
at the Lulu Community
Center. The event will
benefit the Pregnancy
Care Center. The public
is invited to attend and
baby gifts are appreci-
ated. Call Eva Nelson at
755-6574 for more infor-
mation.


In Loving Memory
You served with
honor, love & pride.
You gave your all
from deep inside.
Now we go on
without you here.
But know our child
we miss you dear.
Your Family


Adshav t beplaedby pm
r ~ ~ ~ ~~ "-hv nvin t- n**Illqffft ^K^^^^^^^RB^M^M in^^


OUdURUCe t-h--e-)Lra.klej'.C-i;y.-Re-pljoprt-er-


Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424


I I i I II 11111I InIm


II


I












FAITH


Saturday, May 28, 201 I v


&


VALUES


,ww.lakecityreporter.com


HEART MATTERS


Angie Land
angieland3@windstream.net


First prom:

A night to

remember
'm a bit sleepy, but
my mind is pondering
the huge differences
between raising boys
and girls. My two
boys came along first, then
my girl. So, for those of
you who have been there,
you can only imagine what
a shock last Saturday was
to my system:
My daughter went to her
first prom.
Now, I am no "prom-
mom" amateur, because
between my two boys, we
have done our share of tux
rentals, corsage purchases
and pictures. But this time
was different, really differ-
ent.
Let me give you a little
background info, so you
know why I wasn't quite
prepared for this: She asked
me a few months ago if she
could go to the prom with
a group of friends. "I bor-
rowed a dress," she said, "so
it won't be a big deal."
Famous last words. Her
Daddy reluctantly gave
permission. So Saturday
finally came, and when I tell
you we spent all day getting
ready, I literally mean all day.
My boys just slid into
their tuxes a few minutes -
before picking up their
dates! And pictures if I
could convince the boys to
- let me take a couple of pic-
tures it was amazing.
But we have tons and
tons of pictures of the
dress, of her hair, of her
friends, of other prom
couples who came to take
pictures. She even wanted
to take a picture with me.
What? I haven't had time to
even comb my hair today!
So if you have to stand in
line for a long time at the
photo center at Wal-Mart,
I apologize ahead of time.
That will be me.
Oh, and remember that I
told you that I was sleepy?
Well, I am so not a night
owl. When it gets dark, I
get sleepy. And with my
boys out of the nest for
over a year, I am out of
practice waiting up.
So I dozed off and on till
her curfew, and then she
came in, and piled in the
bed with me and gave me
all the details (did I tell you
that I'm loving this?).
That never happened with
boys. "How was the prom?"
was always answered with
"Fine. Good night" They
will just leave you hanging.
Pull a few teeth the next day
and you might find out a
detail or two.
So anyway it was really
late by the time she and I
went to bed. As she walked
out, she kissed me good-
night and said, "Thanks,
Mama, for spending the
day helping me get ready. it
was a great day."
Before I fell asleep, I
couldn't help but thank
God for my boys and for
my girls, and offer thanks
to God for spending every
day with me for helping
me get ready for whatever
comes next and for some
really great days.
Heart Matters is a weekly
column written by Angie
Land, director of the Family
Life Ministries of the Lafayette
Baptist Association, where
she teaches bible studies,
leads marriage and family
conferences, and offers bibli-
cal counseling to individuals,
couples and families.


German Catholics call for reform


By MELISSA EDDY
Associated Press
AUGSBURG, Germany

sex scandal rocked
Roman Catholics in
Pope Benedict XVI's
homeland, German
intellectuals and faithful alike are
turning their backs on the church,
calling for change or simply leav-
ing the congregation.
German theologians and others
have aired their discontent in a
series of petitions to church lead-
ers calling for changes including
more transparency, an end to celi-
bacy, and women's ordination.
"After their initial horror, many
responsible Christians, women and
men, in ministry and outside of
ministry, have come to realize that
deep-reaching reforms are neces-
sary," wrote leading German theo-
logians in, a petition, to the nation's
highest Catholic officials.
Germany has long been a cra-
dle of religious thought and agita-
tion for reform, stemming from
Martin Luther in the 1500s up
to today's outspoken Swiss-born
Vatican critic, Hans Kung. The
pope himself, before moving to
Rome, taught theology at German
universities.
The Vatican has not responded
to the petitions, but the German
Bishops Conference sought to
address the issue in March by
announcing a series of platforms


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this picture taken April 8 members talk during a meeting of the
Pentecosan declaration in Landsberg am Lech, southern Germany. A year
after a widespread sex scandal rocked Roman Catholics in Pope Benedict
XVI's homeland, German intellectuals and faithful alike are turning their,
backs on the church, calling for change or simply leaving the congregation.


for dialogue "aimed at giving our
church in Germany a theological
profile 'and sense of cohesion in
this new century."
Many would welcome a signal
from the pope that he supports
such discussion, but there are
no exchanges with parishioners
or lay people scheduled during
his Sept. 22-25 visit to Berlin and
eastern Germany.
Gerhard Kruip, a theology pro-
fessor at Mainz University who
helped write the petition from the
theologians does not expect that


to happen.
"The bishops will not want to
confront the pope with the prob-
lems facing Germany's church,"
Kruip said.
There are nearly 25 million
Catholics in Germany, but num-
bers gathered by The Associated
Press indicate a spike in people
leaving the congregation last year
as allegations of sexual and physi-
cal abuse of hundreds of children
by clergy surfaced.
"These major abuse cases need
to be taken into account by church


leaders," said Rev. Max. Stetter,,
a priest in the Augsburg diocese,
who formed a group calling for
change. N
,While tens of thousands of
Germans formally "quit" the
church every year, 2010 saw ;a
jump in the number of walkoutsr:
German authorities easily track the
numbers, because members pays
a church tax, unless they formally.;
leave the congregation.
Official numbers from the;
seven archbishoprics and 20 dio-
ceses have not yet been released,;
but data acquired by AP show an.
increase ranging from 19 percent
in Magdeburg, to more than 60
percent in diocese of Passau and
Wuerzburg in the pope's home-
land.
Augsburg, also in Bavaria, was
among those hardest hit Some
12,065 Catholics resigning their
membership last year, compared;
with 7,000 in 2009, the diocese said.
Fearing such a bleeding of the faith-
ful, Stetter joined hundreds of other
priests and lay people to appeal to
their bishop to change.
"There is the impression that a
/ page has been turned and things
are going on, without anyone
looking into the cause of the scan-
dals and finding new structures to
void such things," Stetter said.,
Austria, which also taxes
church members in a way similar
to those in Germany also saw a
significant drop in the number of
departures.


CHURCH NOTES


Today
Gospel Explosion
The 3rd Annual International
Gospel Explosion Event is
3-6 p.m. today at the downtown
Olustee Park. The community
resource event will feature speak-
ers from local agencies. It will
include food, resources, music,
fun and more. Contact ohthe-
bloodofiesus77@yahoo.com, call
(386) 951-4587 or (386) 466-2239.
Visit www. lsthaitianbaptistchurch
oflakecity.com.

Sunday
Christian Forum
A monthly Christian Forum is
.6 p.m. Sunday at New Beginnings
of Life Church. The Men of God
Ministries in Christ is the host
The forum is for men and women
and will discuss the state of man,
the Way of salvation, the doom
of sinners and the happiness of
believers. The church is located
at 184 SW Windswept Glen.
Contact mogmicpr@yahoo.com or
mogmicmlm@comcast. net

Missionary Society
The Queen E. Carter Women
Missionary Society Anniversary
is 3 p.m. Sunday. The guest
speaker is Rev. Cynthia Bailey,
Greater Allen AME Church of
Starke pastor. Contact Val Wallace
at 758-9257. The church is located
at 357 NW Queen Road.


Memorial Service
The annual Memorial Service
is 4 p.m. Sunday at DaySpring
Missionary Baptist Church.
Pastor Aaron Lewis Sr. is the
speaker. The church choir and
Gospel Harmonieers will per-
form. The church is located at
849 NE Congress Ave.

Tuesday
Greater Visions
Greater Visions Support Group
hosts a faith-based addictions
support group at 7 p.m. every
Tuesday at Christ Central Church
on Sister's Welcome Road and
9:30 a.m. every Thursday at the
Suwannee Coalition office on
North Ohio Avenue in Live Oak.
The group provides spiritual and
emotional support in a non-judg-
mental setting. Call 208-1345:

Faithful and True meetings
Faithful and True meetings are
7 p.m. every Tuesday at Christ
Central Church in Lake City. The
perils of pornography and other
addictive sexual behaviors are dis-
cussed. Men are taught how to live
in freedom consistently everyday.
The group is strictly anonymous.
Call Tom at (386) 965-6377.

Thursday -
English and literacy classes
Free English speaking


and literacy classes provided
by Columbia County School
District's Career and Adult
Education Program is from 5:30-
8 p.m. every Thursday at Unity of
God Ministries, Inc. in Wellborn.
Activities for children will be pro-
vided. Call (386) 755-8190. The
church is located at 12270 County
Road 137.

Saturday, June 4
Needy families
The Parkview Baptist Church
College & Career Department is
distributing peanut butter, jelly
and bread for free to any needy
family on a first come, first serve
basis beginning 10 a.m. June 4
.at Young's Park on Lake Jeffrey
Road.

Save Now to Preserve
A workshop, "Save Now to
Preserve the Future Pulse Health
Education" is 10 a.m. -1 p.m.
June 4 at Union AME Church.
Speakers include attorney Mamie
Davis on budgeting, Connie
Anderson on banking, Kristen
Lee on coupons and Brandy
Fennell on diabetes education:
The church is located at 357 NW
Queen Road.

Sunday, June 5
Open Door Ministries
Open Door Ministries is having
a Holy Ghost anointing and heal-


God: He works for all of our


Somans
Chapter 8
is one of
the most
encouraging
chapters in the Bible for
Christians. It contains
one of the most quoted
verses in the Bible (v28)
although often used out
of context.
Romans 8:28 teaches
us a great deal about
God's providence. We
see in it His providen-
tial care for those who
are called by His name;
those who love Him
because He first loved
them. In the previous
verses of this passage,
we see that we do not
even know what we
should pray for, but that
it is His Spirit that helps
us, even in such a simple


Hugh Sherrill Jr.
ems-hugh43@comcastnet
conversation with our
Father.
J. N. Darby says, "...
another side of the truth,
that which God does,
and that which God is for
us, outside ourselves, to
assure us of all blessing.
The Holy Ghost is life in
us; He bears witness to
our glorious position; He
acts in divine sympathy
in us, according to our


actual position of infirmity
in this poor body and this
suffering creation; He
becomes, and makes us,
the voice of this suffering
before God. God orders
all things in favor of those
who are called according
to His purpose. For that is
the source of all good and
of all happiness in us and
for us."
There are things God
does for us that are out-
side ourselves, meaning
they have nothing to do
with what we do and have
done but everything to do
with who we are. There
is something that God is
to us, His children, which
has everything to do with
what we are because of
what His Son is. We set
aside what we are, apart
from Him. As long as we


are His children (and what
child ever ceases to be a
parent's progeny?) divine
blessing does indeed
take place in us because,
and only because, of that
which He is in Himself.
Our privileges never fail.
because "He remains
faithful." Regardless of our
own faithlessness, we are
blessed above all measure.
Our experience of such
blessing definitely depends
upon our own faithfulness,
but the reality of it rests
only in Him. He is perfect,
from beginning to end, and
so is the salvation He so
flawlessly executed. He has
rescued us from the world,
the devil and our own flesh;
complete and finished.
This life we live is lived in
assurance of a perfect vic-
tory.


ing service 10 a.m. June 5 at Fort
White Community Center.

VBS program
The 2011 Vacation Bible
School Program "Big Apple
Adventure" is 5:30-8 p.m.
June 5-10 at Southside Baptist
Church. Call Mike Linnane at
386-755-5553.

Summer Worship Schedule
The First Presbyterian Church
will have one Sunday worship
service beginning June 5 through
August. The new summer sched-
ule will feature Sunday School
at 9 a.m. and morning service is
10 a.m. The choir and the Praise
Team will alternate leading the
worship service. The praise team.,
begins leading the service June 5;-

"Big Apple Adventure"
"Big Apple Adventure"
Vacation Bible School is 9 a.m.
- noon June 13-17 at Parkview
Baptist Church Early registration
is recommended. Call the office
for further information at (386)
752-0681.


Submit Church Notes by e-mail
to arobinson@lakecityreporter.com,
fax to (386) 752-9400 or drop-off
at 180 E. Duval St., Lake City.
Call (386) 754-0425 with ques-
tions. Church Notes run as space
is available each Saturday.


good

We always look for
triumph over this sin or
that sin to be the proof of
8:28, but only when we
cease to look for anything
but Him who provides
that victory, will we have
that rest so completely.
'And though we don't wish
to fail before Him, He
works even our failures
together for our good and
His glory. It is that truth
that drives us closer to
Him, whether we be near
of far away, because it is
grace, and him who is the
Author of such beauty,
that speaks to the child of
the living God. All things
work in our favor, and
that, from faith to faith!

* Hugh Sherrill is a preach-
er in Lake City available for
pulpit supply and revivals.


6A









LAKE CITY REPORTER


ADVERTISEMENT


SATURDAY, MAY 28, 2011


Rememberi'nga


O n Memorial Day we remember those
who died while serving in our Armed

Forces. They fought for the future of our country

and experienced overwhelming and difficult

circumstances. For many of us it is impossible

to conceive of the price they paid for us. This

Memorial Day, as you visit the gravesides of those

who gave their lives in service, give thanks to God

for their great gift.







Scriptures Selected by The American Bible Society
2011, Keister-Williams Newspaper Services, P.O. Box 8187, Charlottesville, VA 22906, www.kwnews.com


North Florida
Pharmacy
7 Locations to Serve You
Lake City, Ft. White, Branford,
Chiefland, Mayo & Keystone Heights


To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440



Supercenter
"LOWPRICESEVERYDAY"
US90 WEST755-2427

GWHunter, Inc.
Cmro Chevron Oil
wp Jobber





"Quality ,ork at a reasonable price"
We also do solar hook-ups
(386) 755-5944j


FOOD STORES
Open 7 Days a Week
1036 E. Duval St., Lake City FL.
(386) 752-0067
Fresh Meat, Fresh Produce!
"I can do all things through Christ which strngtheneth me"
Philippiam 4:13

To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440

To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440


RICK'S CRANE SERVICE
Located at 25A '
(Old Valdosta Hwy)
386-752-5696 or
386-867-2035
after hours

To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440


FirstAdventChristian
1881 SWMcFarlane Ave.
386-752-3900-
Sunday School: 9-45AM
Sunday Service- I lI.0,AM
Wednesday Service: 7:0iPM

GLAD TIDINGS ASSEMBLY OF GOD
993 NWV Lake leffery Road
386-752-0620
Sunday Worship 10:30AM1 & 6PM
Wed. Far. Bible Study. 7 oiPM..
"A Lhuich where [ESUS is eal"


BEREABAPISTCHURCH
SR47 S' 755-0900
Sunday School 9:30AM
Sunday Worship 10:45AM &6PM
Wednesday Eve. Service 7PM
Intenin Pastor Kenneth Edenfield
EASTSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
196 SE JamesAve.a386-752-2860
Sun. Bible Study 9:45AM
Sun. Worship I[AM & 6PM
Wed. Prayer Ntg/Bible Study 6PM
Rev. Brandon G. Wit
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Sunday Bible Study 4:15AM
Sunday Worship 10 30AM & 6.00PM
Wed 6:00PM Prayer Service, &
Children Mirnsry 6.15PM
DoWT, tTi Lake Lit) 75-5422
Re. SIephen.Ahrens, Paitor

OUv MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH
541 N.E Dans Snteel
(386) 752.-1 0i
Ronald V Walters, Pastor
Sunday School 9:45AM
Sunday MomingWorship 11::00AM,
Wed. Mid-WeekWorship 6:00PM
In God'sWord, Will &Way"

PINE GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH
1989NUSHwy441
386-752-2664
,Sunday Bible Study 9:45AM
Sunday Worship 11 AM & 6PM
Wed. Kids &Youth Ministry 6:30PM
Pastor Ron Thompson
SALEM PRIMITIVE BAPTIST
Sunday Service: 10.30 AM
Pastor: Elder Herman Griffin
752-4198


SOUTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
388 S.E. Baya Drive* 755-5553


Bible Study
Morning Worship /
Evening Worship
Wednesday:
AWANA .
Prayer & Bible Study


9:15AM
10:30AM
6:15PM


5:45PM
6:15 PM


TABERNACLE BAPTIST CHURCH
(Independent Baptist)
144 SE Montrose Ave.* 752-4274
Sunday School 10 AM
Sun. Mom. Worship 11 AM
Sunday Eve. 6PM
Wed. Prayer Meeting 7:30 PM
Pastor: Mike Norman

EPIPHANY CATHOLIC CHURCH *
1905 SW Epiphany Court 752-4470
Saturday Vigil Mass 5:00 PM
Sunday Mass 8:15 AM, 10:30 AM,
5:00 PM (Spanish/English)
Sunday School/Religious Education
S 9:00-AM-10:15AM .


CHISTIANSCIENCESOCIETY
239SEBayaAve.
Sunday Service 11:00AM
Wednesday Evenitig Service 7:30 PM
LAKE CITY CHRISTIAN CHURCH
Hwy 247 S. 755-9436
Sunday School 9:30 AM
Sun. Mom. Worship 10 30 AM
Wed Prayei Meeting, 7PM

i'' ,: 'NEW HORIZON .
Church of Christ
Directions & Ilres J86-6.3-7438
lack E-xuanii, MinMer

LAKE CITY CHURCHOFGOD
167.Ermine St 752-5965
Sunday School 9:45AM
Sun. Worship 10 30AM& 6.00PM
Wed. FamilyNight 7PM
Wed. Youth Service 7PM
Pastor:Carroll Lee
EVANGEL CHURCH OF GOD
370 SWMonitor Glen* 755-1939
Sunday School 9:45 AM
Sunday Worship 10:50 & 6:30
Wed. Spintual Ennchment ?PM
"Shock louit Church"
Boys and Girls Clubs
Bible Study
Pastor cohn R Hdihaway

ST. JAMES EPISCOPAL CHURCH
24.3 S, Basiorr Nori Dr. DL.e
City. FIJ32025- 38,6 .752-221
Email: snameeepis33U-'bellsouth nei
Holy Eucharist
Sun. 8& 10AM
Wednesday: 5:15pm
Priest: The Rev. Michael Armstrong
Deacon: The Rev. limmie Hunsinger
Director of Music Dr. Alfonso Levy

OUR REDEEMER LUTHERAN CHURCH
LCMS
1 12 miles S. of 1-75 onSR 47
755-4299
Sunday Services 9:30AM
(Nursery Provided)
Christian Education Hour
For all ages at 10:45AM
Pastor: Rev. Bruce Alkire
SPIRIT OF CHRIST LUTHERAN
Hwy 90,1.5 miles West of 1-75 752-3807
Sunday Worship 10:00AM
NurseryAvail.
Wed. Pot Luck 6PM Worship 7PM
Vicar John David Bryant


BETHEL UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
4869 US 441 South
Sunday Worship Services,
Traditional Services 8:30 & 11:00AM
386-755-1353
mybethelumc.com
First United Methodist Church
973S. Marion Ave.
386-752-4488
Sunday School 9:45AM
Sunday Morning Worship
Casual Worship Service 8:50AM
Traditional Service 11:00AM
Program opportunities available in all
areas for all ages.
For a complete schedule
contact church office at
752-4488


WESLEY MEMORIAL UNITED
1272 SW McFarlane* 752-3513
(Adjacent to Summers School)
Worship 8:00 & 10:00AM
Sunday School 9:00AM
Nursery provided
Praise & Worship 6:OOPM
AWANA-Wednesdays 5:00PM
Pastor The Rev. J. Louie Mabrey
www.wesleymem.com
WATERTOWN CONGREGATIONAL
METHODISTCHURCH
U.S. 90.E. turn on Cortez (next to Quality
Ind.) right on Okinawa.
Sunday School 9:45 AM
Sun. Worship 11AM&6PM
Wed. Night Service 7PM
Pastor, Randy Ogburn


LAKE CIY CHURCH OFTHE NAZARENE
Services:
Sunday School 9:45AM
SundayWorship 10:45AM
Wednesday 6:30PM
Adult, Youth Ministry, Children's Ministry
Pastor Craig Henderson
Nursery Provided
SW SR 47 and Azalea Park Place

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
629 SWBaya Drive* 752-0670
SSunday Contemporary 9 OAMN
Sunday School 10.00AM
Tradinonal Service 11:00 AM
NURSERY PROWiDED
Pastor Dr. RoyA Martin
DireLiorol Nlus,: Bill Poplin

FIRST FULL GOSPEL CHURCH
NE Iones Woy NE Washingtonr S
Sunday Sthciol l0 0U AMI
Mimmg Wnrship 1 00A,1
Evangelisnc Servce F.00 PM
Vouth Seraces Wednesday 7:1i PM
NLid eek Serice -Wednesday 7 U0 PM
For inf o i-all 55-341i8. Everyone Vwrliumet
Pasiur Rev Sian Elis


CHRISTr CENTRAL MINISTRIES
Leadership Semces 9 OOAM
Sunday Morning II 10AM
Wednesday Service 7 00PM
217 DyalAve., from Hwy 90 take
SistersWelcome Rd., go 5 miles, South,
church on left. *755-2525
Lead Pastor lrnnie Johns
"A Church on the Move"
CHRISTIAN HERITAGE CHURCH
Comer SR. 47 & Hudson Circle
Sunday Celebration 10:30 AM
Pastor Chris Jones *752-9119
FAILING CREEK CHAPEL
Falling CreekRoad *755-0580 -
Firsi and Third Sundays 9:3i A.M.
Second and Fourth Sundays 3 OU PM
Pasior: Rev .Cheryl R Pingel
NEW BEGINNING CHURCH
-Highway 242 F oi Branford Highwdy
Sunday School 10:00AM
MomingWorship 11:00AM
SundayEvening 6:00PM
Wednesday 7:00PM
A Full Gospel Church EveryoneWelcomed
(386) 755-5197


To List


Your


Church


on the


Church

Directory


Call


752-1293!


Toadetie nths hrc ir-etoy alA75-44


iSl ay Electric Cooperative, Inc.
Competitive rates, non-profit,
right here in your community.
Lake City District 386-752-7447
clayelectric.com

To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440

| ,-


Tires for every need
US 90 West acros-s trom Wai-Man
752-0054

Morrell's
Your Complete decorating and
home furnishings store
_VV O.pur, lit ['i.,'i,- L :.11 i lr r ..r .)T I
'. A..,:1 .':I r I x "4'. ,2 .
.i:..._'it ,ll .5 Sr ,-i ,,il'" )'i .l


ANDEBISON (OLUMII.A CO.. INC.
ASPHI,%LT PAVING
COMMERCIAL INDUSTRIALL
ISie Prpuirin n R..d i bult.ii; P vi.r.i uL.
S rijniriig Dr.i nig.I
752-7585
871 NW Guerdon Si Lake City

HARRY'S
q ^ H-,,H ea ij .& A,( Condmaonrg Inr


P"o 752-2308 f r

To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440


Central States
Enterprises
Columbia (ounry's Feed Headquarters
FEED PET SUPPLIES LV',N & GARDEN
ANIMAL HEALTH
668 NW Waldo St. 386-755-7445

MIKELS POWER EQUIPMENT, INC.
Your Lawn & Garden Headquarers
MOWERS CHAIN SAl tS TRIMMERS
1152' US 9 WEST-* LAkE CIT. FL
386-752-8098



LAKE CITY
VIM. 755-7050


To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440


To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440

BAYWAYj.,itoriai Services
FIRE & Water Restoration
Floor & Carpet Care
Residential & Commerckd
755-6142








To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440






LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SATURDAY, MAY 28, 2011


Columbia High School graduate O'Shawn Arthur runs to greet his family Friday after the commencement ceremony held at Tiger Stadium. About 400
students graduated from CHS.




GRADUATION


DAY


Columbia High School
seniors earn their diplomas.


Photos by
JASON MATTHEW
WALKER
Lake City Reporter


Kalyn Coker shakes hands with Columbia County Superintendent of
Schools Mike Millikin as he hands her a diploma Friday. Coker is a
member of the Hall of Fame.


Austin Raymer, 18, shows off his new haircut with '2011' etched on the
side of his head. 'I got it because nobody else would have it,' Raymer
said.


ABOVE: Columbia High School Salutatorians Kellan Graham (from
left), Susana Romero-Martinez, Brittany Strickland, Sarah Reichert and
Valedictorian Jordan Hogan listens to speakers during the commence-
ment ceremony Friday.

BELOW: Charley Jo Civis (left) makes bunny ears behind Ace Bond's
head as he poses for a picture while waiting in the school auditorium for
commencement to begin.


Columbia County School Board member Steve Nelson places a medallion around Courtney Clark, 18,
before receiving her diploma Friday.


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427









Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tklrby@lakeatyreporter.com


Lake City Reporter





SPORTS


Saturday, May 28, 201 I


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


FROM THE SIDELINE






Brandon Finley
Phone:(386) 754-0420
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com

So long

to 2011

athletes
Even if I tried, I
couldn't begin
to name them
all, but they
have each left
their mark on Columbia
High.
The 2011 sports year is
over and the seniors, took
their final steps as Tigers
last night, but years from
now they will remember
what was an amazing
year in sports.
The Tigers' football
team gained more press
than it has in most
years, and it didn't even
win its district Timmy
Jernigan brought much
attention to the team,
however, with his
national recruitment.
Surely, he will be missed
along with the rest of the
2011 seniors from Tiger
football, but the best
days seem to be ahead
under new coach
BrianAllenp. ..
Su yon..er e will
no dutibt remember'--
her senior season as
a member of the Lady
Tigers' tennis team. She
went undefeated while
helping lead the Lady
Tigers to consecutive
state championships.
Jordan Williams may
have been the only
senior on the Lady
Tigers' softball team,
but she made her team
proud. As an extra coach
on the field, Williams
was part of a district
championship team that
went further than any
Columbia team before it
in the state playoffs.
There are certainly
many more moments
that could be recalled.
Many of those moments
will only be special for
those athletes.
Whether it was a
sack on a quarterback,
a pivotal shot in a
basketball game or
a walk-off homer to
help win a game, each
graduating Tiger will
have some story to relive
for years.
They call them the
best years of our lives,
but in truth, it's the
moments that make any
life special. This is only
the beginning of many
moments left to come for
the senior class of 2011.
The road could lead
these athletes in many
different directions.
Some players have
drearns of playing on
Sunday in the NFL.
Others will just be happy
to continue playing at
the collegiate level. Then
there are those that have
played their final games.
No matter which
category a graduate
falls in, they will always
have their moments
from Columbia with
their peers. Everything
after this is special, but
nothing may compare
to the moments with
the people they grew up
with.
* Brandon Finley covers
sports for the Lake City


Reporter.


No. 1 Wozniacki

loses in French

Open's 3rd round


Djokovic's match
suspended due
to darkness.
By HOWARD FENDRICH
Associated Press
PARIS If Caroline
Wozniacki truly was torn
up inside about her latest
loss at a 'Grand Slam tour-
nament, she certainly hid
it well.
Wozniacki smiled and
shrugged her shoulders
while deflecting questions
about being No. 1 in the


rankings despite never hav-
ing won a major title. Her
wait for a breakthrough was
extended Friday, when she
was beaten 6-1, 6-3 by 28th-
seeded Daniela Hantuchova
of Slovakia in the third
round of the French Open.
After the match,
Wozniacki was consoled
by her father. She said he
told her: "The world still
goes on, and we still have
the next tournament next
week. There is nothing you
can do about it now, so just
FRENCH continued on 3B


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Daniela Hantuchova of Slovakia serves in her match against Caroline Wozniacki of Denmark
in the third round 'of the French Open tennis tournament at Roland Garros stadium in Paris
on Friday. Hantuchova won in two sets 6-1, 6-3.


Too good for one MVP


Williams says
goodbye to lone
senior at banquet.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com
After a district champion-
ship season and a playoff
run, all that was left for
the Columbia High softball
team was a chance to give
out postseason awards.
Coach Jimmy Williams did
just that by naming Jessica
-Ke'ene affd Stephanie
Pilkington MVPs for the
2011 season.
"It was a record setting
year, and I am honored
to have been a part of it,"
Williams said.
Other varsity award win-
ners were: Kayli Kvistad,
Offensive Player of the Year;
Michaela Burton, Defensive
Player of the Year; Hollianne
Dohrn and Brandy Morgan,
Rookies of the Year and
Jordan Williams, Academic
Award winner.
Williams was also the
only graduating senior.
"She did a great job being
a leader for this team,"
Jimmy Williams said. "As
the only senior, she didn't
have anyone else to bounce
things off of. A lot of the
burden fell on her, but she
kept our morale. We're
going to miss her. She was
like a coach on the field for
us."
Junior varsity award
winners were: Stephanie
Pillars, Infielder of the Year;
Kaitlyn Hill, Outfielder of
the Year; Callie McCauley,
Rookie of the Year;
Jessica Shimmell, Offensive
Player of the Year;
Jessie Thomas, Academic
Award winner; and, Brittany
Morgan, Rookie of the
Year.


COURTESY PHOTOS
ABOVE: Columbia High's varsity award winners are (from left) Stephanie Pilkington, Jessica Keene, Kayli Kvistad, Jordan
Williams, Hollianne Dohrn, Brandy Morgan and Michaela Burton.

BELOW: Junior varsity award winners are (from left) Stephanie Pillars, Kaitlin Hill, Callie McCauley, Jessica Shimmell, Jessie
Thomas and Brittney Morgan.


LeBron: No

vindication,

not yet, anyway


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Miami Heat forward LeBron James sits on the floor during the first quarter of Game 5 of the
NBA basketball Eastern Conference finals against Chicago Bulls on Thursday in Chicago.


James still thinks
about NBA Finals
sweep in 2007.
By TIM REYNOLDS
Associated Pres's
MIAMI Whenever
he wants to feel humbled,
LeBron James pops in the
tapes of the 2007 NBA
finals.
No matter what, the out-
come never changes. He


got swept. San Antonio sim-
ply outclassed Cleveland
four years ago in the title
series, and that still serves
as a colossal source of moti-
vation for James who
makes no secret that he's
fueled by slights and disap-
pointments.
Since then, he's won two
MVP awards and earned
somewhere in the neighbor-
hood of $200 million.. Still,
JAMES continued on 3B











LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SATURDAY, MAY 28, 2011


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
AUSTRALIAN RULES FOOfBALL.
5 a.m.
ESPN2 G*elong at Gold Coast
AUTO RACING
8 a.m.
SPEED Formula One, qualifying for
Monaco Grand Prix
10 a.m.
ESPN2 NASCAR, Nationwide
Series, pole qualifying for Top Gear 300,
at Concord, N.C.
1 1:30 a.m.
SPEED NASCAR, Sprint Cup,'
practice for Coca-Cota 600, at C6ncord,
N.C.
'12:30 p.m.
SPEED NASCAR.' rint_ C4..
"Happy Hour Series" ial- pcticefor
Coca-Cola 600, at Concord, N.. -
S2:30 p.m. "" ,.
ABC NASCAR.NatdonwljdSt-?e,
Top Gear 300, at Charlotte, N.C.
COLLEGE SOFTBALL
Noon '-
ESPN NCAA Division I playoffs,
super regionals, game 2, Oregon at Florida
2:30,p.m.
ESPN NCAA Division I playoffs,
super regionals. game 3,Oregon at Florida
(if necessary)
5 p.m.
ESPN NCAA Division I playoff.
super regionals, game 2, Oklahoma at-
Arizona
7:30 p.m.
ESPN NCAA Division I playoffs,
super regionals, game 3, Ofiahorns at
Arizona (if necessary)
9 p.m.
ESPN2 NCAA Division I playoffs,
super regionals, game I. Washinton at
Missouri
GOLF
9:30 a.m.
TGC European PGA Tour, BMW
PGA Championship, third round, at
Surrey, England
3 p.m.
CBS PGA Tour, Byron Nelson
Championship, third round, at. Irling,
Texas
NBC PGA of America, Senior PGA
Championship, third round, at Louisville,
Ky.
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
I p.m.
WGN Chicago White Sox at
Toronto,
4 p.m.
MLB Regional coverage, San
Francisco at Milwaukee or Cleveland at
Tampa Bay
7 p.m, .
FOX-Regional coverage, Phlikdelphia
at N.Y. Mets, Boston at Detroit, Cncindnati
atAtlanta, LAAngels at Minnesota, Kansas
City at Texas, or St. Louis at Colorado
10 p.m.
MLB Regional cover gs,.Forit*at
LA. podgeiSor N.Y.YankeBtte Seatle
MEI'S C0.;LEGE LACROSSE
4p.m.. .
ESPN2 NCAA Division I payoffs,
semifinal,Virginia vs. Denver, at Baltimore
6:30 p.m.
ESPN2 NCAA Division p0il,i
semifinal, Maryland vs. Duke, t
MOTORSPOT I S
10 p.m.
SPEED -AMA Pro Motocross450,t,..
Wortham,Texas (same-day tape)
II p.m.
SPEED -AMA Pro Mtoro6 ..,t
Wortham,Texas (samne-daytlp) ,
SOCCER
2 p.m.
FOX UEFA Champions League,
championship match, Barclona vs.
Manchester United, at London
TENNIS
Noon
NBC French Open, third round, at
Paris (same-day tape)


BASKETBALL

'NBA playoffs

CONFERENCE FINALS
Thursday
Miami 83, Chicago 80, Miami wins
' series 4-1
(NBA Finals start'Tuesday)'


HOCKEY

NHL playoffs

CONFERENCEFINALS

Tampa Bay at Boston (n)
(Stanley Cup starts Wednesday)


BASEBALL

AL standings

East Division
W L Pct GB
New York 27 21 .563 -
,Boston 28 22 .560 --
hanpapBsy 26 21 531 I '
,Baltimore 24 24 .500 3
.Toronto 24 26 .'480 4
Central Division
=, W L Pct GB
'Cleveland 30 17 .638 -
Detroit 25 24 .510 6
Chicago 24 28 .46. 8
ansas City 22 27. .449 9
innesota 16 31 3 33 14I
West Divisioen
W L Pct GB
'Texas 26 24 .520 -
Los Angeles 26 26 .500 I
Seattle 24 25 .490 I'
.Oakland 24 27 .471 2'A
Friday's Games


Boston at Detroit (n)
Chicago White Sox at Toronto (n)
Cleveland atTampa Bay (n)
Kansas City at Texas (n)
LAAngels at Minnesota (n)
Baltimore at Oakland (n)
N.Y.Yankees at Seattle (n)
Today's Games
Chicago White Sox (E.Jackson 4-5) at
Toronto (Vlllanueva 2-0), 1.07 p.m. "
Cleveland (C.Carrasc 3-2) at Tampa
Bay (Shields 5-2), 4:10 p.m.
Boston (C.Buchholz 4-3) at Detroit


(Oliver 0-0), 7:10 p.m.
Kansas Cjty (O'Sullivan 2-3) at Texas
(Harrison 4-4), 7:10 p.m.
LA.Angels (Weaver 6-4) at Minnesota
(Uriano 3-5),7:10 p.m.
Baltimore (Bergesen 1-5) at Oakland
(Outnan 0-0), 10:05 p.m.
N.Y. Yankees (Nova 4-3) at Seattle
(FHernandez 5-4), 10:10 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Boston at Detroit, 1:05 p.m.
Chicago White Sox at Toronto,
1:07 p.m.
Cleveland atTampa Bay, 1:40 p.m.
L.A.Angels at Minnesota, 2:10 p.m.
Kansas City at Texas, 3:05 p.m.
Baltimore at Oakland, 4:05 p.m.
N.Y.Yankees at. Seattle, 4:10 p.m.


,NL standings'

East Division
W L
"Phtedelphia 31 19
Plerlda 29 19
Atdanta 28 23
New York 23 26
Washington 21 28
Central Division


St. Louis
Milwaukee
Cincinnati
Chicago
Pittsburgh
Houston


W L
30 21
27 23
26 25
22 26
22 26
19 31
West Division


W L Pct GB
San Francisco 27 22 .551 -
Arizona 26 24 .520 I'
Colorado 24 25 .490 3
Los Angeles 22 29 .431 6
San Diego 20 30 .400 7'h
Friday's Games
Pirates 4, Cubs 2
San Diego atWashington (n)
Philadelphia at N.Y. Mets (n)
Cincinnati at Atlanta (n)
Arizona at Houston (n)
San Francisco at Milwaukee (n)'
St. Louis at Colorado (n)
Florida at LA. Dodgers (n)
Today's Games
Pittsburgh (Maholm 1-7) at Chicago
Cubs (R.Wells 1-0), 1: 05 p.m.
San Diego (Stauffer 0-3) atWashington
(Zimmermann 2-5), 1:05 p.m.
San Francisco (.Sanchez 3-3) at
Milwaukee (Wolf 4-4), 4:10 p.m.
Arizona (Duke 0-0) at Houston
(W.Rodriguez 3-3), 7:05.p.m.
Cincinnati (Arroyo 3-5) at Atlanta
(D.Lowe 3-4), 7:10 p.m.
Philadelphia (Hamels 6-2) at N.Y. Mets
(Pelfrey 3-4), 7:10 p.m.
St. Louis (J.Garcia 5-0) at Colorado
(Nicasia 0-0), 7:10 p.m.
Florida (Sanches 3-1) at LA. Dodgers
(Kuroda 5-4), 10(10 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Philadelphia at N.Y. Mets, 1: 10 p.m.
San Diego atWashington, 1:35 p.m.
Arizona at Houston, 2:05 p.m.
San Francisco at Milwaukee, 2:10 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Chicago Cubs, 2:20 p.m.
St. Louis at Colorado, 3:10 p.m.
Florida at LA. Dodgers, 4:10 p.m.
Cincinnati at Atlanta, 8:05 p.m.

ACC tournament

Thursday
Miami 7, North Carolina 5
Florida St. 6, Clemson 3
-Georg Tech. 6, N.C. State 5, 15
innings'
Friday
: i .Vrginla vs. Miami (n)
North Carolina vs.Wake Forest (n)
Today
Florida State vs. Georgia Tech,
9 a.m.
-Clemson vs. N.C. State, II aJm.
Miami vs.Wake Forest, 3 p.m.
Virginia vs. North Carolina, 7 p.m.
Sunday
Championship game, I p.m.

SEC tournament

Thursday
Georgia 3,Auburn 2
Arkansas 7. Mississippe State 2
Florida 6,Alabama 9
Vanderbilt 7, South Carolina 2
Friday
Arkansas 4,Alabama I
Georgia vs. South 'Carolina (n)
Today
Florida vs. Arkansas/Alabama
winner, 9:30 a.m.
Vanderbilt vs. South Carolina/Georgia
winnerTBD
Sunday
Championship game, I p.m.


TENNIS

French Open singles

At Stade Roland Garros
Paris
Friday
Men
Third Round
David Ferrer (7), Spain, .def. Sergiy
Stakhovsky (31), Ukraine, 6-1,6-1,6-3.
Roger Federer (3), Switzerland, def.
JannW Tipsravi (219), Serbia, 61.6-4, 6-3.
Fabio Fognini, Italy, def. Guillermo
Garcla-Lopez (30), Spain, 4-6, 6-3, 6-3,
6-1.
Gael Monfils (9), France, def. Steve
Darcis, Belgium, 6-3,6-4,7-5.
Albert Montanes, Spain, def. Mikhail
Youzhny (12), Russia, 6-1,7-6 (0), 6-I1.
Richard Gasquet (13), France, def.
Thomaz Btelucci (23), Brazil, 6-2, 6-3,
3-6,6-3.
Stanislas Wawrinka (14), Switzerland,
def. Jo-Wilfriled Tsonga (17), France, 4-6,
6-7 (3), 7-6 (5), 6-2, 6-3.
Juan Martin del Potro (25), Argentina,
vs. Novak Djokovic (2), Serbia, 3-6, 6-3,
susp., darkness.
Women
Third Round
Francesca Schiavone (5), Italy, def. Peng
Shual (29), China, 6-3, 1-2, retired.
GIsela Dulko, Argentina, def. Sam
Stosur (8),Australia, 6-4,6-1, 6-3.
Jelena Jankovic (10), Serbia, def.
Bethanie Mattek-Sands, United States, 6-
2, 6-2.
Svetlana Kuznetsova (13), Russia, def.
Rebecca Marino, Canada, 6-0, 6-4.
Marion Bartoli (II), France, def. Julia
Goerges (17), Germany, 3-6, 6-2, 6-4.


Daniela Hantuchova (28), Slovakia, def.
Caroline Wozniacki (I), Denmark, 6-1,
6-3.
Vera Zvonareva (3)., Russia, def.
Anastasia Rodionova,Australia, 6-2, 6-3.
Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova (14), Russia,
def. Nuria Uagostera Vives, Spain, 3-6,
6-3,6-3.


AUTO RACING

Race week

INDYCAR
Indianapolis 500
Site: Indianapolis.
Schedule: Sunday, race, noon (ABC,
II a.m.-4 p.m.).
Track: Indianapolis Motor Speedway
(oval, 2.5 miles).
Race distance: 500 miles, 200 laps.
NASCAR
SPRINT CUP
Coca-Cola 600
Site: Concord, N.C.
Schedule: Today, practice (Speed,
11:30 a.m.-2 p.m.); Sunday, race, 6 p.m.
(FOX, 5:30- I p.m.).
Track: Charlotte Motor Speedway
(oval, 1.5 miles).
Race distance: 600 miles, 400 laps.
FORMULA ONE
Monaco Grand Prix
Site: Monte Carlo, Monaco.
Schedule: Today, practice, qualifying
(Speed, 8-9:30 a.m.); Sunday, race, 8 a.m.
(Speed, 7:30- 10 a.m.).
Track: Circuit. de Monaco (street
course, 2.075 miles).
Race distance: 161.9 miles, 78 laps. k

Coca-Cola 600 lineup

At Charlotte Motor Speedway
Concord, N.C.
Thursday qualifying; race Sunday
(Car number in parentheses)
I. (2) Brad Keselowski, Dodge, 192.089
mph.
2. (43) A J AIImendinger, Ford,
191.693.
3. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 191.686.
4. ( I1) Denny Hamlin,Toyota, 191.367.
5. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet,
191.245.
6. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet,
191.069.
7. (00) David Reutimann, Toyota,
190.921.
8. (6) David RaganFord, 190.799.
9. (21) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford,
190.752.
10. (33) Clint Bowyer, Chevrolet,
190.705.
11I. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet,
190.604.
12. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet,
190.564.
13. (5) Mark Martin, Chevrolet,
190.409. "
14. (56) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota,
190.201.
15. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 190.161.
16. (27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet,
190.067.
17. (4) Kasey Kohne,Toyota, 189.893.
18. (83) Brian Vickers,.Toyota, 189.867.i
19. (17) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 189.86.
20. (78) Regan Smith, Chevrolet,
189.767.
21. (18) Kyle Busch,Toyota, 189.44.
22. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet,
189.414.
23. (20) Joey Logano, Toyota, 189.321.
24. (9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford,
189.288.
25. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet,
188.937.
26. (22) Kurt Busch, Dodge, 188.844.
27. (47) Bobby Labonte, Toyota,
188.653.
28. (29) Kevin Harvick. Chevrolet,
188.416.
29. (42) Juan Pablo Montoya,Chevrolet,
188.16.
30. (34) David Gilliland, Ford, 188.048.
31. (38) Travis Kvapil, Ford, 187.99.
32. (95) David Starr, Ford, 187.944.
33. (66) Michael McDowell, Toyota,
187.682.
34. (46) J.J.Yeley, Chevrolet, 187.513.
35. (1) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet,
187.201.
36. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota,
187.169.
37. (13) Casey Mears,Toyota, 186.994.
38. (30) David Stremme, Chevrolet,
186.916.
39. (32) Mike Bliss, Ford, 186.413.
40. (09) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet,
Owner Points.
41. (7) Robby Gordon, Dodge, Owner
Points.
42. (36) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet,
Owner Points.
43. (60) Mike Skinner.Toyota, 186.774.
Failed to Qualify
44. (71) Andy Lally, Ford, 186.651.
45. (50)T.J. Bell,Toyota, 186.567.
46. (77) Scott Wimmer, Dodge,
186.213.
47. (37) Tony Raines, Ford, 184.483.
48. (81) Scott Riggs, Chevrolet,
183.73.


SOFTBALL

NCAA super regionals

Thursday
Stanford 5,Alabama 2
Arizona State 3,Texas A&M 2
Friday
Florida 9, Oregon I
Alabama 10, Stanford 0
SHouston vs. Oklahoma State (n)
Texas A&M vs.Arizona State (n)
Oklahoma atArizona (n)
Today
Oregon vs. Florida, Noon (if necessary
game 2:30 p.m.)
California (42-10) at Kentucky
(39-14), Noon
Houston vs. Oklahoma State, 2:30 p.m.
(if necessary game 5 p.m.)


Oklahoma vs. Arizona, 5 p.m. (if
necessary game 7:30 p.m.)
Baylor (43-12) at Georgia (50-12),
7:30 p.m.
Washington (37-14) at Missouri
(38-5), 9 p.m.
Sunday
California vs. Kentucky, I p.m. (if
necessary game 3:30 p.m.)
Baylor vs. Georgia, I or 3:30 p.m. (if
necessary game 3:30 p.m. or 6 p.m.)
Washington vs. Missouri, 3:30 or
7 p.m. (if necessary game TBA)


Wolves hoops at Sunshine State Games

ABOVE: The Wolves sixth-grade and younger USSSA basketball team won first place in
the Sunshine State Games tournament in Gainesville on May 20-23. The Wolves defeated
Tampa Bay Inferno, 39-33, in the championship game. Team members (front row, from left)
are Bobby Fulton III, Tray Miller, Dedrick Vanover, D'Angelo Perry and Jordan Smith.
Back row (from left) are coach Demario Mernck, Derontay Levy,.Derius Anders,
Derontae Jordan, Kaylon Jonas and Marcel Bell. In the championship game, Levy scored
13 points, Jordan scored 10 and both Vanover and Perry scored six.

BELOW: The Wolves eighth-grade USSSA basketball team placed fourth in the Sunshine
State Games tournament in Gainesville. Team members, pictured at the Stampede
Shootout Tournament on April 2-3, (front row, from left) are Jordan Coppock, Roger Cray
and Tamarick Vanover. Back row (from left) are coach Mardell Jackson, Lonnie Underwood,
Darrell Jones, Terrivio Williams, Wayne Broome, Ja'Marea Frierson and Dariaun Dallas.
Alexis Ortiz also is on the team. The Wolves USSSA basketball teams are sponsored by the
Lake City Recreation Department, Richardson Community Center and Annie Mattox Park
North Inc.


| C s L Get 0 connected = www .l eporterro
SB11s '460000 Lake City
d .r -.. f sOlpir. Reporter


1
4
7
11
12 E

13
14 (
16 E
17 (
18
19
20
21


ACROSS 41 Regret
42 Batting stat
Seance sound 43 "La Vie en
PC rival Rose" singer
Vulnerable 45 Fiesta Bowl
Time divs. site
Bolivia neigh- 48 Chevalier
bor musical
Tulsa's st. 49 Hires, as a bus
Get cozy 52 Two fives for
Bank on --
Group values 53 Paddles
Dust devil 54 -'wester
Time period 55 Scratches
Oahu welcome 56 2001 to Ovid
Shallow dish 57 Kitchen meas.


DOWN

1 Deli loaf
2 British com-
poser
3 "Hey, you!"
4 High-IQ club
5 Curve
6 Stage signal
7 More.long-
winded
8 Barely managed


24 Bedroom furni-
ture
27 Tayback or
Damone
28 500 sheets
30 Send overnight
32 Rotating
machine parts
34 They may be
read
36 Mao -tung
37 Meal
39 Atlanta campus


Answer to Previous Puzzle

SODE RTE CAT
LAO ARLO JADE
U HF DEAL ODIN
RUFFIANS LEON
LIT EDITS
CHOY ERNIE
HA W ODE ETHAN
TDLED ATM AKA
JOWLS DICE
OPERA UK E
BRIG FINALIST
ABET TSAR ALB
SICS SAME GOA
ETE K IN OER


9 Foeopposite
10 Boastful knight
12 Not as good
15 Guitarist Atkins
18 Constantly, to
Poe


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


20 Piece of sugar
21 Newer pipes
22 Dishonest one
23 Pinnacle
24 Minnows
25 Vehicle
26 Soyuz launch-
er
29 If not
31 Yo!
33 Ankle injuries
35 Cuts off
38 Wieder-
sehen
40 The brass, for
short
42 Video arcade
name
43 Gyro pocket
44 Disney CEO
Bob
46 Bug spray vic-
tim
47 Psyche's
beloved
48 Whale herd
49 Web suffix
50 Scenery chewer
51 Have dinner


5-28 2011 by UFS,' Inc.


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421









Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420 LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SATURDAY, MAY 28, 2011


FRENCH: Djokovic to continue match today
Continued From Page 1B


don't beat yourself up too
much."
Wozniacki's early exit
came a day after No. 2 Kim
Clijsters was eliminated by
114th-ranked Arantxa Rus,
marking the first time that
the top two seeded women
failed to make the round
of 16 at any Grand Slam
tournament in the Open
era, which began in 1968. It
never had happened at the
French Open since it began
admitting foreign entrants
in 1925.
Add that to the absenc-
es of the Williams sisters,
who are sidelined by health
issues, and there is a real
lack of star power in Paris
now.
"Kim had a tough loss
yesterday; I had a tough
loss today. That's what hap-
pens," said Wozniacki, a
Dane who reached No. 1 in
October and has been there
every week but one since
then. "Since we're No. 1 and
2, it nieans that we must be
doing something right. It's
just unfortunate to lose in a
Grand Slam, but that's what
happens, and we just need
to move forward."
Hantuchova explained
the surprises this way:
"It just shows how strong
women's tennis is at the
moment. It's very open."
As if to prove that point,
another French Open title
contender, 2010 runner-
up and 2009 semifinalist
Sam Stosur of Australia,
was beaten 6-4, 6-1, 6-3 by
Gisela Dulko of Argentina.
But defending champion
Francesca Schiavone of Italy
advanced when her (Oppo-
nent, No. 29 Peng Shuai
of China, stopped playing
because she has a cold and
couldn't breathe properly.
The most anticipated
matchup of the day did not
begin until early evening
- and did not finish Friday.
Two-time Australian Open
champion Novak Djokovic,


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Serbia's Novak Djokovic returns the ball to Argentina's Juan
Martin del Potro during their third round match of the French
Open tennis tournament, at the Roland Garros stadium in
Paris, Friday.


who is on a 41-match win-
ning streak, was tied at a set
apiece with 2009 U.S. Open
champion Juan Martin del
Potro when play was sus-
pended at 9:15 p.m. because
of darkness.
The second-seeded
Djokovic won the first set
6-3, but No. 25 del Potro
took the second by the
same score. Right after del
Potro held serve to even
the match, the chair umpire
announced play would stop
for the day; there are no
artificial lights on the courts
at Roland Garros.
Earlier, 16-time Grand
Slam champion Roger
Federer saved the only
break point he faced in a
6-1, 6-4, 6-3 victory over
No. 29 Janko Tipsarevic of


Rose vows Bulls

will get better

after loss to Heat


By ANDREW SELIGMAN
Associated Press

CHICAGO Derrick
Rose vowed to learn from
this, to get better, and
insisted the Chicago Bulls
would come back hungri-
er after the Miami Heat
knocked them out in the
Eastern Conference finals.
Clearly, the standards
are soaring now.
As good as they were
this season, the Bulls came
up short They blew a late
12-point lead and bowed
out with a 83-80 loss to
the Heat in Game 5 on
Thursday.
The Bulls were aiming
for more after back-to-back
41-win seasons and first-
round playoff exits, and
did they ever get it. They
boasted the league's MVP
in Rose, the Coach of the
Year in Tom Thibodeau
and a league-leading 62
wins while advancing to
the conference finals for
the first time in 13 years.
Not since Michael
Jordan and Scottie Pippen
were here had the Bulls
generated such a buzz and
sent expectations rocket-
ing like this.
How they did it is well-
documented. Where they
go from here is the ques-
tion.
For Rose, it was a disap-
pointing finish to an oth-
erwise outstanding season
in which he became the
league's youngest MVP
and joined Jordan as the
only Bulls player to win
the award. If anyone could
sympathize with him,
Miami's LeBron James
would be the guy.
"I've been in situations
where I say why me at
this point?" said James,
searching for his first
championship. "But you
have to keep working and


be put in those positions
time after time after time
where if you fail, you have
to be ready to take that
challenge again and again
and again. When you're
a leader, D-Rose he
earned the MVP. He's a
great talent, unbelievable
player. Chicago got not
only a great basketball
player, but a great kid, too.
What he's done for this
city and what he's done
for this franchise in just
three years is remarkable.
The sky is the limit for that
guy.
"I mean, wow, as a fan,
he's going to get better
and better," he continued.
"Hopefully we don't have
to continue to see him in
the postseason."
Dwyane Wade chimed
in: 'We will."
And James said: "Yeah,
we will."
To many, Chicago-Miami
has the makings of a long
rivalry. The question is
whether the Bulls will be
like the 1990s Jazz and
Knicks, good teams that
couldn't quite win it all.
Or will the Heat be more
like those Pistons teams of
yesteryear?
Detroit eliminated the
Bulls three years in a row
before Jordan, Pippen and
Co. swept them in the 1991
conference finals on the
way ,to their first champi-
onship.
"A lot of us haven't been
here before," forward Luol
Deng said. "We've got to
take this as a learning
experience."
Only once since the
dismantling of the dynas-
ty following the 1997-98
championship season
had the Bulls advanced
past the first round. That
was in 2007, when they
swept defending champion
Miami and lost to Detroit.


Serbia.
"I'm at peace with my
game right now. I'm physi-
cally fine. I think I had a
good preparation, so there's
no reason to get nervous,"
said Federer, who hasn't
dropped a set heading into
his next match, against his
2008 Beijing Olympics dou-
bles partner Stan Wawrinka.
"I'm still in the tournament.
It's always nice to advance
in the draw so well, so
quickly."
Schiavone will play
No. 10 Jelena Jankovic of
Serbia, who beat Bethanie
Mattek-Sands of the United
States 6-2, 6-2. Hantuchova,
meanwhile, meets No. 13
Svetlana Kuznetsova, who
won the 2004 U.S. Open
and 2009 French Open.


After defeating Rebecca
Marino of Canada 6-0, 6-4,
Kuznetsova was asked by
a reporter to look ahead
to facing Wozniacki, whose
match against Hantuchova
was barely under way at
the time.
The assumption was
that Hantuchova wouldn't
present too much of a chal-
lenge, in part because she
entered the day 0-3 against
Wozniacki and 0-6 against
women ranked No. 1. But
the 5-foot-ll Hantuchova,
a semifinalist at the 2008
Australian Open and former
top-five player herself, says
she is a more mature player
and person at 28 than she
was at 20, when she famous-
ly fought tears while losing
a second-round match at
Wimbledon in 2003.
"I feel like the experience
is starting to pay off. I mean,
I have been around for quite
some time. I know what to
expect in the big tourna-
ments and I think I'm much
more calmer than I was
before," she said. "It's just
about putting it all together
and mentally being really
strong on the court"
She needed that when
Wozniacki cut a 4-1 deficit
in the second set to 4-3..
Instead of being shaken,
Hantuchova stayed steady
and took the next two
games to end it
"She played very, very
well today, better than
me for sure," Wozniacki
said. "She knew what she
was going to go out there
and do. She was just too
good."
Wozniacki's best showing
at a major tournament came
at the U.S. Open in 2009,
when she lost to Clijsters
in the final. Still, Wozniacki
isn't the only woman to be
No. 1 without owning Grand
Slam title No. 1 Dinara
Safina and Jankovic share
that sort of resume and
she is only 20, after all.


JAMES: Wants ring


Continued From Page 1B

nothing fills the void cre-
ated by those four losses.
Here comes his chance
to change that.
James is heading to the
finals for the second time,
after he, Dwyane Wade
and Chris Bosh carried the
Miami Heat to a wild series-
clinching comeback victory
in Game 5 of the Eastern
Conference title series in
Chicago. The season's final
challenge is the Dallas
Mavericks, who visit Miami
in Game 1 of the finals on
Tuesday night.
"I think about it all the
time," James said of that
2007 series. "f even go back
and watch some of those
games and see how I wasn't
that good of a player, espe-
cially on both ends of the
floor. You just try to use
those moments. I feel like
there's no way I should be
out on the floor and the
team that I'm on can't win a
game in a series. I use that
as motivation. ... I've got a
lot of motivation."
What's transpired in the
last 12 months being
called a quitter by his for-
mer fans in Cleveland,
getting knocked for a sup-
posed inability to finish, the
continual hits the Heat have
taken for the moves they
made last summer have
only topped off that tank of
motivational fuel for James,
and he's done his part to
silence some of those criti-
cisms with an array of sen-
sational finishes in these
playoffs.
Among the highlights:
The 10 straight points
against Boston to wrap
up Game 5 over the now-
dethroned East champs in
the second round. The nine
points in an 11-2 run that
decided Game 2 of the East
finals against Chicago. The
combined 71 feet of three
made jump shots in a 97-
second span late in Game 5
against the Bulls, including
the shot with 30 seconds
left that put Miami ahead


for good after it had trailed
by 12 late in the fourth
quarter.
Afterward, he called
Thursday's finish the best
few minutes of his life.
Might not be overstating
things, either.
'"We know what kind of
player he is," Bosh said.
"We know how bad he
wants to be in this situation.
He's back in the finals. He's
been here before. He has
that pain. He carries that
pain with him everywhere
he goes. It's going to help
him. It's going to help us as
a team."
He was so good in the
East finals that his rank
among the game's greats
became a source of debate
Friday sparked, somewhat
ironically, by a six-time NBA
champion and Chicago
icon. In an interview with
ESPN Radio, Scottie
Pippen said his longtime
Bulls teammate Michael
Jordan may be the game's
best all-time scorer, but
James in his estimation
- could be the game's
greatest player.
A championship ring
could add some credence
to that argument.
"That's what we came
together for," James said.
"That's the goal. The only
goal."
Anyone who watches
James play can marvel at
his talents on the floor, of
course.
Including playoffs, his
27.8-point average is third-
best in NBA history behind
only Jordan and Wilt
Chamberlain. After eight
seasons, he ranks 11th on
the league's list of active
scorers everyone else
above him on that list has
played at least five more
seasons.
But where he's truly
impressed the Heat is how
he works off the court,
the side they had to learn
most in their first season
together.


BRIEFS


SWIMMING
Classes offered at
Aquatic Complex
Youth and adult
swimming lessons will .be
offered at the Columbia
County Aquatic Complex,
beginning in June. Classes
meet for two weeks and
six daily times are offered,
plus there are two daily
mom and tot classes. Five
sessions are offered with
the first session June 6-17.
Cost is $50 per person.
. Registration is at the
pool (755-8195) from
5-7 p.m. Wednesday and
all day Thursday and
Friday.

SOFTBALL
Adult league
registration set
Registration for the
Lake City Recreation
Department's summer
co-ed, commercial and.
women's adult softball
leagues is 8:30 a.m. to
5 p.m. weekdays through
June 10 at Teen Town
Recreation Center. Fee is
$350 for a minimum of 10
games, and due with
roster by June 10.
For details, call
Heyward Christie at
754-3607.

POP WARNER FOOTBALL
Registration for
returning players
Lake City Pop Warner
football registration for
returning players is
under way at Richardson
Community Center.
Sign-up is 9 am. to 5 p.m.
Tuesday. Regular
registration begins
Wednesday. Pop Warner
also is looking for girls
ages 5-12 interested in
cheerleading.
For details, call
secretary Kim Stephens at
623-2954 or e-mail kim
stephensl972@yahoo.com.

YOUTH VOLLEYBALL


events. Hole sponsorships
are available for $125.
Proceeds benefit the 3rd
Judicial Circuit Guardian
ad Litem program.
For details, call Jason
Medlin or Ms. Hitt at
755-3379, Ext. 0.

SUMMER CAMP
County summer
program sign-up
Registration for
the Columbia County
.Recreation Department's
Summer Camp Program
has been extended
through June 13. Cost for
the camp is $225.00 and
includes breakfast and
lunch, four field trips and
six mini camps.
For details, call Nicole
Smith at 754-7095.

BASEBALL
College tryouts
at St. Johns
St. Johns River State
College has baseball
tryouts June 11 at the
on-campus Tindall Field
in Palatka. The camps are
open to 2011, 2012 and
2013 high school
graduates. Registration
begins at 9:15 a.m. on
camp day. Pitcher-only
registration is at noon.
Cost is $50 for each
combine.
For details, call the St.
Johns River baseball office
at (386) 3124164.

YOUTH FOOTBALL
Jackson camp
in High Springs
Fort White High
football coach Demetric
Jackson is conducting a
football camp for
elementary and middle
school children at First
Baptist Church in High
Springs on June 24-25.
Cost of the camp is $40,
with a $5 discount for
each additional sibling.
For'details, call Jackson
at 365-3304.


Future Lady Tiger GIRLS SOFTBALL
camp June 27-28 Crushers clinic


The third annual
Future Lady Tiger
Volleyball Camp is 9 a.m.
to noon June 27-28 at the
Columbia High gym. The
camp is for girls entering
the sixth through 12th
grades, with instruction
by members of the CHS
staff and returning
varsity players. Cost of
$50 includes camp T-shirt
Registration is in the CHS
front office from 8 a.m. to
4 p.m. through June 13.
For details, call coach
Casie McCallister at
365-3158.


set July 11-15
Columbia Crushers
Softball Organization is
holding an elite softball
clinic for girls of all ages
from 8 a.m. to noon on
July 11-15. There will
be instruction in the
fundamentals of fielding
and hitting. Registration
is at Brian's Sports on
U.S. Highway 90 west
Registration deadline is
July 5.
For details, go to colum
biacrushers@gmail.com or
call 755-4271.


GOLF ADULT BASKETBALL
Voices for Men's games
Children tourney at Richardson


The Voices for Children
of the Suwannee Valley
Inc.'s second annual golf
tournament is June 10 at
Quail Heights Country
Club. Registration is at
8 a.m. with a shotgun
start at 9 a.m. Entry fee of
$60 per person/$240 per
four-person team includes
lunch and special contest


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words. _
I EGWDE I


Open basketball games
for men 18 and older are
played at Richardson
Community Center from
5-8 p.m. on Sundays. Cost
is $3 per session.
For details, call John
Henry Young Jr. at
.623-4817.

From staff reports
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
He should I be here yet.


TH FIRST GOO5F TO7
ARRIVE IN FLORIPA FOR
THE WINTER WAS ONE.
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


Answer: AN
(Answers Monday)
I Jumbles: COUGH BLESS DECENT TRUDGE
Yesterday's I Answer: He got in trouble for smoking because of all
the DETECTORS


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SATURDAY, MAY 28, 2011


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


v


RFETRE1
|

ABNTYO
/^ 1s ^
sy -^ ^










LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS SATURDAY, MAY 28, 2011 Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415


DILBERT


BABY BLUES


BLONDIE


HAGAR THE HORRIBLE


SNUFFY SMITH


GARFIELD


B.C.


FRANK & ERNEST


DEAR ABBY


Freshman girl is unschooled

in teenage social system


DEAR ABBY: I'm a 14-
year-old girl in my first year
of high school. I'm not sure
what to do about boys or
how to make friends. All I
ever learned at home was
what NOT to do.
I'm not allowed to date
until I'm 16, but I really like
this boy in my math class.
What should I do? I'm so
confused. My parents have
protected me against things
for so long, and I've had to
learn from my friends' and
my mistakes. I wonder
sometimes if I have to be
obedient to my parents or
if I should make my own
choices. Help! DATE-
LESS AND CLUELESS
IN NEVADA
DEAR DATELESS:
At 14 it's normal to have
a crush on a classmate.
It's also normal for your
parents to want to protect
you. You say you have had
to learn from your friends'
and your own mistakes.
That's normal, too. It's how
we all learn about life.
Until you're old enough
to date, become active
in events at school. It's a
healthy way to make friends
and learn social skills. And
continue being obedient to
your parents. That's how
teens build enough trust so
that their parents gain the


Abigail Van Buren
www.deorobby.com
confidence to give then
more freedom.
DEAR ABBY: "Carl"
and I have been married 23
happy years. He's a great
guy, an awesome dad to our
teenage girls and an excel-
lent provider. There's only
one problem. Lately he's
boring.
Carl doesn't have a phys-
ically demanding job, so he
can'tblame it on being tired.
I always make the plans
for entertainment because
if I didn't, we'd never go
anywhere or do anything.
When we go out, I feel like'
he's just along for the ride
and would rather be home
in front of the TV.
I can see he tries to en-
joy himself when we're with
friends, but when I ask him
afterward, he says, "It was
OK," or, "They're not my fa-
vorite people." When I ask
if he'd like to plan the next
outing, he says he's happy
just staying home.
I work, go to school and


have a busy life, but I need
more in it and I'd like to
include my husband. My
friends are all couples so,
naturally, I'd like to have
Carl at my side. Whatever I
suggest for fun, he's never
enthusiastic about any of
it. If I have to stay home
one more Friday night and
Watch a movie on pay-per-
view, Ill scream! Please
help. TIRED OF FRI-
DAY NIGHT BLUES
DEAR TIRED: You say
"lately" your husband is
boring. What was he like
before that? A man who is
listless, lethargic and disen-
gaged should see his doc-
tor to make sure there is
nothing physically wrong
and if he could be suffer-
ing from a mild depression.
Suggest he have a physical
and, if possible, go with him
so you can voice your con-
cerns.
If nothing is wrong with
Carl, you two need to find
some activity you can do
together that you both will
enjoy something that
doesn't involve either tele-
vision or people your hus-
band doesn't particularly
relate to.
* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-
April 19): Nothing will be
constant in your life. You'll
act on impulse and ride the
emotional rollercoaster. It
will be a good time to get rid
of any of the pent-up hostil-
ity. Temper your response
with physical activity. ***
TAURUS (April 20-
May 20): Not everyone
will be as forthcoming as
you. Consider carefully be-
fore sharing your thoughts.
Practice patience, tolerance
and compassion. ***
GEMINI (May' 21-
June 20): Volunteer work
will lead to new beginnings
and friendships. Don't feel
obliged to donate money
when your time is the best
gift. Greater stabilization,
security and confidence
will come from what you do
for others. ****
CANCER (June 21-
July 22):. Do what you
want, not what others want
you to do. Offer your servic-
es to a community event or
group you believe in; you'll
make friends with someone
with whom you have a lot
in common. Love is in the
stars. **
LEO (July. 23-Aug.
22): Don't let work-related
matters interfere with your
personal life and emotions.
You need to take a short
trip or go to new places to
take your mind off any trou-


tHE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

bles that are causing stress.
Avoid any sort of aggres-
sive action. *****
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Why is it that money
matters always seem to
stand in the way? Don't get
angry about your finances
when all you have to do is
set up a budget and stick
to it. If you need help, turn
to someone you trust to go
over your current situation.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): Avoid any form of
overindulgence. Put a cap
on your spending. Your
best bet is to take part in
something that adds to
your knowledge or experi-
ence through association
or actual hands-on learning.
Keep the peace and balance
your emotions. ***
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-
Nov. 21): You'll be drawn
to people who are unique,
creative and into unusual
pastimes. A change of di-
rection will be easier than
you think, once you get the
ball rolling. It's all a matter
of the people you encounter
and with whom you form
partnerships. ***
SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): Get together
with friends who share your
interests. Socializing will


lead to new friendships and
a greater interest in chang-
ing your current personal
situation and home envi-
ronment. Now is not the
time to waffle, when there
are so many opportunities
available. *****
CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): Stay away
from anyone trying to upset
you or start a fight Stick
closer to home and to the
people who know and un-
derstand you. A neighbor or
peer will take advantage of
what you can do. Don't give
in to the demands. **
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Think about
the jobs you have done
in the past and what your
strong points are. Once
you establish what you
enjoy doing most, you can
set your sights on a direc-
tion that suits you. Follow
your instincts and use your
strengths as a barometer.

PISCES (Feb. 19-
March 20): Let your
dreams become your re-
ality. A plan that includes
ideas from your past, as
well as current possibili-
ties will lead to something
worthwhile. Touch base
with someone you used to
work with. Love is on the
rise and romance should
be planned for the evening
hours. ***


CELEBRITY CIPHER


by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: 0 equals W
"H PBKH B I B BIBEM tFCDWG FWR W
VHGHYB GCDPBE ZV FBWEYPBWYR. H
LZG'Y HGYBGL YZ O W R Y B WGM ZV


D H G B "


GBHK WEDRYEZGU


PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "Breathe. Let go. And remind yourself that this very
moment is the only one you know you have for sure." Oprah Winfrey
(c) 2011 by NEA, Inc. 5-28


FOR BETTER OR WORSE


Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415


LAKE CITY REPORTER


CLASSIC PEANUTS


ADVICE & COMICS SATURDAY, MAY 28, 2011










Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SATURDAY, MAY 28, 2011

Lake City Reporter





CLASSIFIED


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

755-5440


BtUY Ii


SEHLL 111


FND ITn


250

R9 te A lin o pdvsiay Each additional I
One Item pe ad ne .
4 lines 6 days d5it o en s
Rate applies to private Individuals selling
personal merchandise totalilg $500 or lees..
Each em must Include a price.




One em per totaling $100 or
4 lines 6 days |ach add onat
Rate applies to private Individuals selling
1 personal merchandise totalling $500 or less.
Each item must Include a price
This Isa non-refundable rate.



One Item per ad 61 j
4 lines 6 days achddt onal




Personal merchandise totaling n ,000 or0 le.
Each Item must include a price.
This Isa non-refundable rate



One Item er ad $
4 lines 6 days Each additional




Rate apples to private Individuals selling
personal merchandise totaling r less o
Each Ia em must Include a price.
This Is a non-refundable rate..



|One n- p ad1

Rate applies to private individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling or less.
S Each tem usat Include a price.
Thin Isa non.refundable rate.


/1750
days 1 50
ladei.D 2 SgHs Each additional lIn'1.65


Limited to service type gdvertis-
ing only. ,
4 lines, one month....$92.00
$10.80 'each' additional line -
Includes an additional $2.00 per
ad for each Wednesday insertion.



You can call us at 755-5440,
Monday through Friday from 8:00
a.m. to 5;00 p.m.
Some people prefer to place their
classified ads in person, and some
ad categories will require prepay-
ment. Our office is located at 180
East Duval Street.
You can also fax or email your ad
copy to the Reporter.
FAX: 386-752-9400 Please
direct your copy to the Classified
Department.
EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityre-
porter.com





AdIstoAppera Call by: FaxEnmall by:
Tuesday Mon., 10:00a.m. Mon., 9:00 a.m.
Wednesday Mon., 10:00a.m. Mon.,9:00a.m.
Thursday Wed., 10:001 a.m. Wed., 9:00 am.'
Friday Thurs.,10:00aim. Thurs.,9:00a.m.
Saturday Fri., 10:00 a.m. Fri., 9:00 a.m.
Sunday Ft.,10:00 a.m. Fri., 9:00am.
These deadlines are subject to change without notice.




Ad Errors- Please read your ad
on the first day of publication.
We accept responsibility for only
the first incorrect insertion, and
only the charge for the ad space
in error. Please call 755-5440
Immediately for prompt correc-
tion and billing adjustments.
Cancellations- Normal advertising
deadlines apply for cancellation.
Billing Inquiries- Call 755-5440.
Should further information be
required regarding payments or
credit limits, your call will be trans-
ferred to the accounting depart-
ment.


Advertising copy is subject to
approval by the Publisher who
reserves the right to edit, reject,
or classify all advertisements under
appropriate headings. Copy should
be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the first day of pub-
lication. Credit for published errors
will be allowed for the first insertion
for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the
Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nor for any general,
special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply
with Federal, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
nation in employment, housing and
public accommodations. Standard
abbreviations are acceptable; how-
ever, the first word of each ad may
not be abbreviated.


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT CIVIL COURT
'OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL CIR-
CUIT OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY
CIVIL DIVISION
Case No. 12-2010-CA-000353
.Division
FIRST FEDERAL BANK OF
FLORIDA
Plaintiff,
vs.
LARRY W. NORMAN and DELLA
R. NORMAN, FIRST FEDERAL
SAVINGS BANK OF FLORIDA;
DEER CREEK LANDING HOME-
OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC.,
AND UNKNOWN
TENANTS/OWNERS,
Defendants
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given, pursuant to
Final Judgment of Foreclosure for
Plaintiff entered in this cause on May
12, 2011, in the Circuit Court of Co-
lumbia County, Florida, I will sell
the property situated in Columbia
County, Florida described as:
LOT 32, DEER CREEK, PHASE II,
ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR
PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED
IN PLAT BOOK 7, PAGES 11-12,
OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA.
TOGETHER WITH THAT CER-
TAIN 1999 FLEETWOOD RV,
INC. VIN#
GAFLW05A28083CW21 &
GAFLW05B28083CW21 Mobile
VIN GAFLW05A28083CW21 &
GAFLW05B28083CW21 and com-
monly known as: 523 SW WHITE-
TAIL CIR #32, LAKE CITY, FL
32024; including the building, appur-
tenances, and fixtures located there-
in, at public sale, to the highest and
best bidder, for cash, AT THE
FRONT DOOR OF THE COLUM-
BIA COUNTY COURTHOUSE,
145 N. HERNANDO STREET,
LAKE CITY, FLORIDA, on June
15, 2011 at 11:00 a.m.
Any person claiming an interest in
the surplus form the sale, if any, oth-
er than the property owner as of the
date of the lis pendens must file a
claim within 60 days after the sale.
Dated this 13 day of May, 2011
P. DeWitt Cason
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By:/s/ B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
04544849
May 21,28, 2010
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
FIRST FEDERAL BANK OF
FLORIDA, a Banking corporation
organized under the laws of the Unit-
ed States of America, f/k/a FIRST
FEDERAL SAVINGS BANK OF
'FLORIDA ,
Plaintiff,
v.
MARK A. SLOAN, ET AL
Defendants.
CASE NO.: 10-765-CA
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE
SALE
NOTICE is hereby given that P.
DEWITT CASON, Clerk of the
Court of Columbia County, Florida,
will on the 15 day of June, 2011, at
11:00 a.m. at the Columbia County
Courthouse, 173 N.E. Hernando
Avenue, Lake City, Florida offer for
sale and sell at public outcry to the
highest and best bidder for cash, the
following described property situated
in Columbia County, Florida, to-wit:
SEE EXHIBIT A ATTACHED
HERETO AND BY REFERENCE
MADE A PART HEREOF.
Commence where the East line of the
Southeast Quarter (SE 1/4) of the
Northeast Quarter (NE 1/4) of Sec-
tion 10, Township 4 South, Range 16
East, Columbia County, Florida, in-
tersects the North right-of-way line
of Troy Road and run thence North
89"43'00" West, along said right-of-
way line, 621.05 feet to the Point of
Beginning; thence continue North
89"43'00" West, along said right-of-
way line, 116.22 feet; thence run
North 00"29'00" East, a distance of
281.10 feet; thence run South
89"00'07" East, 116.22 feet; thence
run South 00'29'00" West, a distance
of 279.65 feet to the Point of Begin-
ning.
Pursuant to the Final Judgment of
Foreclosure entered in a case pend-
ing in said Court, the style of which
is as set out above, and the docket
number of which is 10-765-CA. Any


Legal

person claiming an interest in the
surplus from the sale, if any, other
than the property owner as of the
date of the lis pendens must file a
claim within sixty (60) days after the
sale.
WITNESS my hand and the official
seal of said Court, this 13 day of
May, 2011.
P. DeWitt Cason
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Columbia County, Florida
By: /s/ B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
04544795
May 21, 28, 2011


020 Lost & Found

Missing Shih-tzu. Last seen
Thurs., 5/12, Nash Road area. Was
my daughters dog before her pass-
ing. Please return. 386-752-7545

too Job
104 Opportunities
4 Temporary Farm Workers
needed. Employer: Edwin Dyer -
Breckinridge Co, KY. Tobacco
Production & Alternative Work.
Employment Dates: 07/25/11 -
01/30/12. Wage of $9.48/hr.
Worker guaranteed 3/4 of contract
hours. Tools provided at no
cost. Free housing provided to
non commuting workers.
Transportation & subsistence
reimbursed when 50% of contract
is met. Apply for this job at the
nearest KY Office of Employment
&'Training Division of Workforce
& Employment Services Office
referencing the job order
#KY0428395.


04544933
Drag Line Operator
World Class Cement Manufac-
turer in North Florida mine in
need of Drag Line Operator
with: 10 years experience
preferred; 8 yd to 20yd
machine experience; friction and
electric knowledge required;
experience in digging
underwater rock; past
experience in MHSA mine.
Must be able to operate mobile
equipment and assist with
department needs as necessary.
HS Diploma or equivalent
*preferred. Must be willing to
work overtime and accept call-
ins after hours. Company offers
a competitive salary and an
excellent benefits package. EOE
& Drug Free Workplace with
random drug testing policy.
Suwannee American Cement,
PO Box 410,
Branford, FL 32008
Call Human Resources
*386-935-5001

04544963
CONSTRUCTION
SUPERINTENDENT
NEEDED. Experience and
travel required. Please contact
352-333-3233 or fax your
resume and salary requirements
to 800-218-7809.
www.conceptcompanies.net


100 Job
100 Opportunities

04544971

&Cancer

Fast paced, high volume medical
facility seeking two positions:
Financial Specialist. Duties in-
clude collecting, posting, submit-
ting claims and managing account
payments. Applicants must have
knowledge of all major insurance
carriers, collections, CPT and
ICD-9 coding, proficient in Excel.
Min. 2 yrs exp in medical coding
and billing preferred.
Checkout Clerk. Duties include
Cash handling, schedule appoint-
ments, data entry. Knowledge of
medical terminology and insur-
ance. Applicant must be profi-
cient in practice management soft-
ware (Intergy).
Please submit job title and resume
with salary requirements to
jpapesh(alcancercare
northflorida.com
or fax.to 386-628-9231:
Associate Reps
SUMMER WORK/GREAT PAY
Immediate FT/PT openings;
Customer sales/service,
No exp needed, conditions,
Apply Now all ages 17+
(386) 269-0883


ATTENTION: student and 0/0
Lease and a Lease Purchase Plan
100% fuel Sucharge, health and
life Insurance available, Spouse
Rider Program, Pet Policy; Never
Roam alone again, NO New
England States! Independent
Contractors needed! GO West!!
Buel, Inc. 866-369-9744
AVON!! Only $10 to start!
Earn bonus $ up to $150+
1-800-275-9945 pin #4206
www.youravon.cqm/tdavies
Cashiers needed, Experience
Preferred, Drug free workplace,
all applicants will be drug tested
Ellisville Exxon,
Hwy 441, No Phone Calls Please.
CDL A Flatbed Truck Driver
needed for F/T OTR SE area, 3
years exp or more. Medical
benefits offered. Contact
Melissa or Mary @ 386-935-2773
CNC Machinist position available
Will train. Good math skills
req'd. Metal working exp. helpful.
Must pass basic shop math test.
Send resume to 174 NE Cortez
Terr.-Lake City, Fl. 32055.


CONSUMER LENDER
F/T position in Lake City. Exp
selling financial products, proven
customer relations expertise, and
Lending exp REQ. Great pay and
benefits! App REQ and available
at www.sunstatefcu.org. Fax to
386-462-7823 DFWP/EOE


Contract Wood
Haulers needed.
386-288-6875
for information
Experienced estimator needed
for site work & underground utili-
ty contractor. Must be familiar
w/construction software & project
management. DFWP. Fax resume:
386-364-2802, call 386-362-7814
12 Temporary Farm Workers
needed. Employer: Frank Turner
DBA Turner Farms Daviess Co,
KY. Tobacco, Straw/Hay, Row
Crop, Row Crop Produce &
Alternative Work. Employment
Dates: 07/21/11 01/15/12. Wage
of $9.48/hr. Worker guaranteed
3/4 of contract hours. Tools
provided at no cost. Free housing
provided to non commuting
workers. Transportation &
subsistence reimbursed when 50%
of contract is met. Apply for this
job at the nearest KY Office of
Employment & Training Division
of Workforce & Employment
Services Office referencing the job
order #KY0428389.
Security Officers
needed Lake City Area, must have
current D Security Lic., Clear
background, Drivers Lic, phone,
Diploma/GED. Benefits, DFWP
EEO Must Apply at:
www.dsisecuritv.com MB 1000084


100 Job
Opportunities
4 Temporary Farm Workers
needed. Employer: HHR LLC -
Bracken Co#KY. Tobacco, .
Straw/Hay, & Alternative Work.
Employment Dates: 07/15/11 -
02/28/12. Wage of $9.48/hr.
Worker guaranteed 3/4 of contract
hours. Tools provided at no
cost. Free housing provided to
non commuting workers.
Transportation & subsistence
reimbursed when 50% of contract
is met. Apply for this job at the
nearest KY Office of Employment
& Training Division of Workforce
& Employment Services Office
referencing the job order
#KY0427576.


5 Temporary Farm Workers
needed. Employer: Nicholas
Stivers Henry Co, KY. Tobacco
Production, Straw/Hay, Row Crop
& Alternative Work. Employment
Dates: 07/20/11 01/31/12. Wage
of $9.48/hr. Worker guaranteed
3/4 of contract hours. Tools
provided at no cost. Free housing
provided to non commuting
workers. Transportation &
subsistence reimbursed when 50%
of contract is met. Apply for this-
job at the nearest KY Office of
Employment & Training Division
of Workforce & Employment
Services Office referencing the job
order #KY0427965.
4 Temporary Farm Workers
needed. Employer: Phillips, Taul,
Husband LLC Breckinridge Co,
KY. Tobacco Production & Alter-
native Work. Employment Dates:
07/15/11 -01/31/12. Wage of
$9.48/hr. Worker guaranteed 3/4
of contract hours. Tools provided
at no cost. Free housing provided
to non commuting workers.
Transportation & subsistence
reimbursed when 50% of contract
is met. Apply for this job at the
nearest KY Office-of Employment
& Training Division of Workforce
& Employment Services Office
referencing the job order
#KY0427962.


7 Temporary Farm Workers
needed. Employer: Sandyhill
Farms LLC Meade Co, KY.
Tobacco, Straw/Hay, &
Alternative Work. Employment
Dates: 07/12/11 12/31/11. Wage
of $9.48/hr. Worker guaranteed
3/4 of contract hours. Tools
provided at no cost. Free housing'
provided to non commuting
workers. Transportation &
subsistence reimbursed when 50%
of contract is met. Apply for this
job at the nearest KYOffice of
Employment & Training Division
of Workforce & Employilent
Services Office referencing the job
order #KY0427602.


Stylist Needed
Call
386-752-4614
Southern Exposure
Wanted Highly motivated
individual for Sales Position.
Rountree -Moore Automotive
Group, Great benefits, paid vaca-
tion. Exp. a plus but not necessary.
Call Tony Reese 386-344-7517


100 Jb0
100 Opportunities
Wanted P/T Farm Hand in
exchange for Free Rent. For info.
386-466-2557 (leave message) or
rebadear@gmail.com.
Background required.

120 Medical
Employment
Counselor for substance abuse pro-
gram in Baker Correctional Institu-
tion. BA-w/2yrs exp., M-F day
shift F/T, $30,000 to start, E-mail
resume to sheliarand@aol.com.or
fax to 386-752-2387

130 Part Time

TELLER
P/T position in Lake City. Strong
customer service skills, high
volume cash handling or teller exp
and professional appearance req.
App REQ & avail at www.
sunstatefcu.org. Fax to
386-462-7823 DFWP, EOE

240 Schools &
240 Education

04544843
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-05/23/10

Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-07/11/'11

Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com


Land Clearing

Back Hoe, Dozer, Chopping, root
raking, bush hog, seeding, sod,
disking, site prep, ponds &
irrigation. Free Est! 386-623-3200

Lawn & Landscape Service

Clean Pine Straw,
You pick it up,-$1.85 a bale
Delive-y of 10Ubales $260
386-688-9156
Landscape Maintenance Company
You can trust for knowledge &
pride, Mention this AD!
Mow Green, LLC 386-288-6532


Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.


Family Owned and Operated

Dealership

(Huntin' a good fit)
New & Used Car Sales
Motivated Self-Starter
Honesty S.Good Character
$50,000 plus a year
Benefit Pkg.

Apply in person at


El .J K Macclenny, FL
B LI IN S 273 E. Macclenny, Ave.
CHEJVR'OLET


Loo fo th laestcouon*alus e Ok


week n*y*u Sunay*paer, ad*s

money witout skimpng on th .',
stuf. ou'l indbigvaleson verda



essntals fomoilch* gst. had-



grceis o yglses dtrgn t :,'*X


diigotadomc oe



Over $ 1, 000


I..


In Print and Online
www.lalikecityreporter.com


04544903
First Federal Bank of Florida
has a position available for an
Executive Adm. Asst. to
perform detailed administrative
assignments. Requires excellent
computer skills, organizational
and communication skills.
Ability to multi-task and strong
attention to detail with complete
confidentiality. Three to five
years previous administrative
experience required. Full
benefits package. Applications
may be obtained from any First
Federal Branch and submitted to
Human Resources,
P.O. Box 2029, Lake City, Fl.
32056 or emailed to
Turbeville.J@ffsb.com
Bilingual candidates encouraged
to apply. Equal Employment
Opportunity Employer


* ADvantage


*
*










LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SATURDAY, MAY 28, 2011


Classified Department: 755-5440


310 Pets & Supplies
FREE KITTENS
TO GOOD HOME,
Litter trained
Call 386-365-7360
HYBRID WOLF Pup female.
Up to date shots.
On Preventative. $500.
386-984-6887
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.

330 Livestock &
33 Supplies
Black Angus Cows & Heifers
Prices Vary
Registered & Commercial
386-719-4802


361 Farm Equipment
84 Ford 4610 Tractor.
2WD, Solid
2005 motor,$7,500. OBO
386-867-0005

403 Auctions
ON SITE AUCTION
G'Ville Gym. NW 6th St. & 3rd
Ave. Sat May 28th. 10:30am
auctionzip.com Complete
Gym/Exercise work outs, tan beds,
lockers,.5 hp air compressor.
Red Williams AU437/AB270
10% B.P. 386-454-4991

407 Computers
Dell Desktop Computer,
$75
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170

416 Sporting Goods
GUN CASE, holds 6 long
guns. Glass front with light oak
finish.Top & bottom cabinet locks.
$75.00 SOLD


- 420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$250 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.

430 Garage Sales
BYRDS STORE CR 49. Fri.
Sat.& Sun, (8-5). 247-240R CR
49R, 247 Beachville. CR 49N, 252
Pinemount Rd CR 49L. Lots of
antiques, new items inside, outside
if no Rain watch for signs.





Garage sale Saturday Only -
Appliances, jeep accessories,
385 NW Emerald Lakes Dr.,
Lake City
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
A.A-..th.^ i- P.^ i-;A


Must be Pre-Paidu


440 Miscellaneou


Medical Reclining Lift.
Chair. Great Shape,
$200 obo. Call Pete @
386-344-5764
Stop gnat & Mosquito bites! Buy
Swamp Gator All natural insect re-
pellent. Family safe. Use head to
toe. Available at The Home Depot.
Summer Barbecue Special
Tow Behind
Grill/Smoker, $1,250 OBO.
386-719-4802

450 Good Things
S to Eat
BLUEBERRY HILL
U-PICK opens
May 30th
386-963-4220

463 Buildin
463 Materials
JOB SURPLUS: 2x4xl0ft (6pcs)
3/4" x 4ft x 8ft OSB (1 sheet)
2x4 and 1x4 various lengths
$50 for all. 386-754-1595

630 Mobile Homes
6 forRent
2&3 BR MH. $395 $650. mo.
plus deposit. Water & sewer fur-
.nished. Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
2/2 Newly remodeled MH New
Floors/counter tops. Lg lot, quiet
'area No pets 1st, last & sec. $400
mo $300 sec will work w/payment
plan. Call Jenn 386-454-7724
2/2 Units, clean, well maintained,
nice safe park setting, 2 miles to
downtown Lake City, $550 month
+ $550 sec dep, 386-984-8448
2B/1BA. MH., quiet living. Clean.
New stove, new carpet, carport.
NO PETS! 1st & deposit.
Adult community. Smoke free
environment. 386-758-3963
2br /2ba SWMH; also Residential
RV lots for rent between Lake City
& G'ville. Access to 1-75 & 441
(352)317-1326 Call for terms
3/2 S of Lake City, (Branford area)
$400 dep, $600 month
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com


630 (Mobile Homes
630 for Rent
Eastside Village a 55+ Retirement
Community offers 2br/2ba Manu-
factured home fully furnished. No
pets. Leases for $650 + utilities.
1st, last, security. Eastside Village
Realty, Inc. 752-5290 for info.
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White Contact 386-623-3404
or 386-365-1919
SOUTH 41 2br/lba. Washer/
Dryer Outlet. Satallite TV incl.
Pets ok on approval. New paint
$550. mo + dep. 386-758-2408.

6(4 Mobile Homes
640 for Sale"
Access Realty Make Offer! 3/2
MH w/over 1700 SF & move in
ready. Convenient to schools,
shopping & hospitals. MLS 73861
$89,500. Patti Taylor.623-6896
Mobile Home
650 & Land
FOR SALE: $68,000 CASH FOR
QUICK SALE: In McAlpin.
10 Acres W/2006 DW,
863-634-5283 for details.
MH on 1 Acre in Live Oak near
Peacock Lake, owner finance
$42,500 MLS#77598 Call Roger
Lovelady 386-365-7039 @
Westfield Realty Group
Owner Finance, Nice 3/2, S of
Lake City, small down/$625 mo
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com

Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent

05525655
SPRING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans;
some with garages.
Call 386-454-1469
or visit our website:
www.springhillvillage.net







1 & 2 Bedroom Apartments
Move in for as low as
$199
386-755-2423


A Landlord You Can Love!
2 brApts $575. & up + sec. Great
area. CH/A washer/dryer hookups.
386-758-9351/352-208-2421
Great location W of 1-75, spacious
deluxe 2br apts., garage, W/D
hookup. patio. $600/700 & up, +
Sec, 386-344-3715 or 965-5560
The Lakes-Apts. Studios & IBr's
from $135/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec .8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $450. + sec.
Call Michelle 386-752-9626

720 Furnished Apts.
720 For Rent
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
* or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

730 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent
lbr duplex $600.mo $600 sec.
All utilities incl
on Nassau Street
386-697-9950


lbr/lba Free ele. Utilities incl. 4mi
S. Lake City. $300dep. $375mo.
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
S www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com


2 bedroom 1 bath on
5 acres.700.00 per month.
First,last and security.
386 590-5333
Eastside Village a 55+ Retirement
Community offers 2br/lba Duplex,
no pets. Leases for $600 + utilities.
First, last, security. Eastside
Village Realty, Inc. 752-5290
Large 2/1 newly remodeled, near
school, $575 mo, + dep, no pets!,
pls lv mess. 386-365-1920 or 454-
7764 after 6p. 843 SE Putnam St.
Live Oak, nice 2/1 brick, near
hospital, quiet well kept area.
Lawn & garbage. $850.
386-963-2611/cell 817-988-3284
Private House for Rent
Newly Remodeled, S of Lake City
Call The Adamis Agency @
386-752-1444
Home for Rent.
3/2 in City Limits. No pets.
$900. per month. Call Susan,
Realtor. 386-623-6612

750 Business &
Office Rentals
For Lease: 1,500 17,000sf
1525 S. Ohio Ave, Live Oak, FL
Call Scott Stewart@ Westfield
Realty Group 386-867-3498
FOR LEASE: Downtown office
space. Convenient to
Court house.
Call 386-755-3456
For Lease: E Baya Ave. Two -
1000 sqft office space units or
combined for 2000 sqft. 386-984-
0622 or weekends 386-497-4762
Office Space For Lease
2112sf, 7 rms, Irg conf rm, 4 baths,
private parking MLS#76508
$1760/mo, Call Pam @ Remax
386-303-2505
OFFICE SPACE for lease.,
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$695. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor

790 Vacation Rentals

Horseshoe Beach Summer Spcl
Gulf Front 2br, w/lg porch, dock,
fish sink. wkend $345./wk $795.
386-235-3633/352-498-5986
alwaysonvacation.com #419-181
"Florida's Last Frontier"


805 Lots for Sale'
5 Acre Lot, Secluded & Cleared.
MLS# 67871 $55,000
Call Lisa Waltrip
@ 386-365-5900
westfieldrealtygroup.com
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Fort White. 5 ac. lot. Cleared,
grass. paved street, high and dry.
MLS# 77031
Sherry 386-365-8414 $23,999
Hallmark Real Estate. Cleared
* 2.57 ac. fenced w/32' Dutchman
camper. In O'Brien. Close to Live
Oak. Lake City, Branford. $25,000
MLS# 74534 386-867-1613
Hallmark Real Estate. Owner
Finance with $5K down with
terms negotiable. Below assessed
value for the county. MLS# 74484
$17,900 Jay Sears 386-867-1613
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

810 Home for Sale
3/2 Brick Home in town, fenced
back yard w/12x12 workshop
$79,900 Just Reduced!
MLS# 77414 R.E.O.Realty
Group, Inc 386-243-8227
3/2 Brick Home w/1 car garage,
detach carport MLS#77780
$109,900, Call Jo Lytte Remax
386-365-2821
www.jolytte.florida-property-search.com
3/2 Cute Home, Remodeled, on 2
acres, partially fenced $114,900'
MLS# 77396
R.E.O. Realty Group
386-243-8227
3/2 in Lake City Airpark
pool, porch, pond, detach garage
large hangar w/living quarters
MLS#77756 $399,900 Westfield
Call Josh G 386-466-2517
4/2 on 10.5 acres w/ detached
garage, patio, above ground pool,
MLS# 77410 $189,888.
R.E.O. Realty Group, Inc
386-243-8227
Brick Home, Screened Porch
$185,900 MLS#77893
Call Charlie Sparks @
Westfield Realty Group
386-755-0808
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
6br/3.5ba brick. Lake views from
back. 39.7 ac., private paved road.
MLS# 76111 Mary Brown White-
hurst. 386-965-0887 $1,200,000
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Home on the lake in town. 4br/3ba
MLS# 76085 Elaine K. Tolar 386-
755-6488 or Mary Brown White-
hurst. 386-965-0887 $299,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
New home in Mayfair S/D. 4br on
comer lot. Split plan. $214,900
MLS# 76919 Elaine K. Tolar.
386-755-6488
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
4br/3ba 2 story brick on cul-de-
sac. 1 ac landscaped. Lori Geibeig
or Mary Brown Whitehurst.
386-965-0887 $299,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
4br/1.5ba brick. 1332 sq ft. Great
floor plan, nice yard, close to
town. 1 ac landscaped. Lori
Geibeig MLS# 75713 $84,900
CYPRESS LANDING!
3BR/2BA built in 2005
w/large kitchen $115,000
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #75794
DESIRE BLE GWEN LAKE
area! Nice 3BR/2BA home
on comer lot $112,000
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #77307
Eastside Village a 55+ Retirement
Community. 2br/2ba home with
garage, screen porch. Choose wall
color, flooring. MLS# 76483 East-
side Village Realty, Inc. 752-5290
Great Family Home in S/D
MLS# 77325, $109,000
Call Missy Zecher @ Remax
Professionals 386-623-0237
www.missyzecher.com
Great Home in Great Neighbor-
hood, Can be 4/2 or 3/2 w/study
MLS#77284 $164,900
Call Carrie Cason @Westfield
386-623-2806
GREAT STARTER HOME!
3BR/2BA w/lots of closets
space & nice lawn $79,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #76432
Hallmark Real Estate. 3/2 Brick
home w/large screened porch.
Back yard has wooded privacy.
MLS#69482 Janet Creel 719-0382
or Paula Lawrence 623-1973


Hallmark Real Estate. Bring the
'horses. 3/2 HUD, 4 ac. Sold "as is"
$106,000 Bids are being accepted.
www.hudhomestore.com MLS#
72068 Martin Tavener 965-7773
Hallmark Real Estate. DWMH on
5 ac south of town. Back porch,
new metal roof wood burning fire-
place & wired workshop. $82,500
MLS#77185 Janet Creel 719-0382
Hallmark Real Estate. Glassed
porch overlooks wooded backyard
in the Plantations.- Pool,
sprinkler system. $204,900
MLS#75429 Janet Creel 719-0382
Hallmark Real Estate. Time to go
to the River. Sti9t home w/covered
decking. Floating dock,out bldgs
& covered RV parking. $188K.
MLS#72068 Janet Creel 719-0382


810 Home for Sale
Home on 15 Acres, 2500sf. new
appliances, workshop, MLS 77552
$235,000 Call Brittany @
Results Realty 386-397-3473
HOME OR OFFICE on
Alachua St; remodeled
1,207 SqFt home $82,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #77724
Hallmark Real Estate. 2006
2200SF home. 2br/2ba w/mother-
in-law suite, 4 car garage, endless
hot water heater. MLS# 77547
$309,900 Jay Sears 386-867-1613
Hallmark Real Estate. 3/3 Brick
w/over 2500 SF. Great location
with nice one acre pond in back.
Detached workshop MLS# 75222
$179,900 Jay Sears 386-867-1613
Hallmark Red l Estate. 4/2 Brick,
3100 SF, Granddaddy Oaks on 5
acres. Double detached carport/ga-
rage w/workshop. MLS# 77877
$119,900. Jay Sears 386-867-1613
Just Reduced 3/2 home, inside city
limits, fenced backyard, detached
carport w/office MLS#77411
$82,900 Call R.E.O.Realty,
@ 386-243-8227 Make Offer!
Just Reduced 4/2 on 1.57 acres,
fireplace. partially fenced, MLS#
77412, Call Nancy Rogers at
R.E.O. Realty Group
386-243-8227 $64,900
Large affordable home in S/D on 2
Acres, fishing rights to Timberlake
Property Owner's Assoc. $64,900
MLS#74862 Call Brittany @
Results Realty386-397-3473
Large Brick, 3/1, 4.43 acres, metal
roof, MLS# 77415 $104,888
R.E.O. Realty Group, Inc.
386-243-8227
Large Home in the Country on
3.66 acres, fireplace, 2 outbldgs,
MLS#76471, $89,900 Call Jo
Lytte @ Remax 386-365-2821
jolytte@remaxnfl..com
Large Home w/Open Floor Plan,
back yard & porch, Irg oaks, fire-
place, MLS#76122 $115,000
Call Missy Zecher @ Remax 386-
623-0237,mzecher@remax.net
LOTS OF UPGRADES!
Remodeled kitchen in this
2BR/1BA home $29,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY
INC. 755-5110 #77505
Luxury Log Home,
Whole House Generator, $269,900
MLS# 76899 Call Roger
Lovelady @386-365-7039
westfieldrealtygroup.com
Nice, large 4/2 on 1 acre
w/florida room, granite floors,
wrap around front porch, $148,000
Call Brittany Stoeckert @
Results Realty 386-397-3473
Norwegian Brick Home, fire-
place/family rm, open floor plan,
screen porch, fenced back yard,
MLS#76796 $179,900
Jo Lytte Remax 386-365-2821
Owner Finance. Custom built 3/2.5
10.8 ac. Granite, fireplace, vaulted
ceilings, surround sound. lanai,
gazebo. MLS 77382 Access Real-
ty. Patti Taylor $249K 623-6896


810 Home for Sale
Priced Reduced! 3/2 w/2346 sf.
.67 ac. Creekside S/D. Shade,
surround sound, vaulted ceilings.
MLS 77385 $169,900. Access
Realty. Patti Taylor. 386-623-6896
Rose Creek S/D. 5/4, 3269sf, on
2.2 acres, bonus rm, many
upgrades Reduced! MLS#75485
Reduced! $234,900, Call Pam @
Remax 386-303-2505
Spacious Brand New Split Floor
Plan Home, Fenced Yard
MLS#77493 $229,900
Call Mike Lienemann @ Westfield
Realty Group 386-867-9053
SPACIOUS home built in
1995 has 2BR/2BA & 1,636
SqFt on 1 acre $89,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110
Sturdy 3/2 on 4.35 acres, fruit &
pecan trees, Minutes from town
MLS#77878 $105,000
Call Jo Lytte @ Remax
386-365-2821/www.jolytte.com
Totally Remodeled 4 Bd Home
Spacious Must See!
MLS#77782 $135,000
Missy Zecher 386-623-0237
www.missyzecher.com
Well Maintained 3/2 on dead-end
street, quiet, country, close to
downtown $105,000 MLS#77800
Call Lisa Waltrip @Westfield
Realty Group 386-365-5900

820 Farms &
SAcreage
4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$69,900. $613mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
4 acres, Wellborn, New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down, $39,900, $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
FARM- 7 stall barn, Apt.
17+ acres cross fenced.
Close in $1000. mo.
386-961-1086
Half to ten acre lots. Some w/
well, septic, pp. We finance; low
dwn pmt. Deas Bullard Properties.,
386-752-4339. www.landnfl.com
Hallmark Real Estate. 40 ac hunt-
ing tract w/camper. Water & septic
already in place. Stands & feeders
in place. MLS# 75532
$84,000 Jay Sears 386-867-1613
Three One Acre Lots available
@ $14,900 ea & One 1.65 Acre
lot for $19,900 MLS#76050
Call Brodie Alfred 386-623-0906
Westfield Realty Group

830 Commercial
S Property
Commercial Property For Sale
Currently Leased $495,000
MLS#75953 Call Aaron
Nickelson @ 386-867-3534
Westfield Realty Group
Great Investment/Owner Finance
1400 sq ft building on 2 acres
Creative terms, owner flexible.
CLose to 1-75. 386-867-1190


"1


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we will take it for youl
* Ad runs 10 consecutive days
with a description and photo in the
newspaper and online E-edition.
* Ad runs 10 consecutive days as a
classified line ad online.
* You must include vehicle price.
* All ads are prepaid.
* Private party only.





2006 EF250
Ford Van
3/4 ton, metal work
shelves/ladder rack,
60K miles, exc. cond.
$10,500
Call
386-555-5555
If you don't sell your vehicle
during the first 10 days, you
can run the same vehicle ad
for 10 additional days for
only $15.00
Terms and conditions remain the
same for the additional run.



Mary orBri'dge-
(386)^ 755-5440r"Hen -


ON WHEELS & WATERCRAFT ,.,;


Wave Runner 96
Polaris
W/galvanized trailer, only
64 hrs, many extra parts.
$1,500 obo
Call
386-234-1019


Tell 'em L.C. Reporter sent ya.





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830 Commercial
8 Property
Hallmark Real Estate. Downtown
Restaurant. Gigantic BBQ Smoker
Clean kitchen w/equip. Handle any
type of food svc. MLS# 77902
$189,900 Vic Lantroop 623-6401
Mini Storage (204 Units),
gated, fenced 5 acres, $1,300,000,
MLS#76048 Call Millard Gillen
@ Westfield Realty Group
386-365-7001

850 Waterfront
8 Property
Upscale River Cabin on
Suwannee River, Shop, Dock
MLS#76336 $349,900
Call Jo Lytte @ Remax
386-365-2821
Q860 Investment
Property

3/2 Renovated Home in town,
front porch, new appliances, cur-
rently leased MLS#76658 $49,900
Jo Lytte/Remax 386-365-2821
www.jolytte.florida-property-search.com

Great Income Opportunity!
Mobile Home Park For Sale
MLS#77228 $195,000
Call Pam Beauchamp @.Remax
386-758-8900

To place your
classified ad call

755-5440