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UFPKY NEH LSTA



The Lake City reporter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01563
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 5/26/2011
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
System ID: UF00028308:01563
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text






Rope Winners Making Noise
Offensive, defensive Columbia graduate
o0000oo-1 r mhia's excels with Auburn


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Another Win
Djokovic advances to
third round, remains
undefeated in 201 1.
Sports, 2B


Reported


Thursday, May 26, 201 I www.lakecityreporter.com Vol. 137, No. 105 O 75 cents


Professor offers

pointers for Lake

City professionals


Columbia .
4 Chamber hosts
business series.
By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
; One simple initiative can
keep customers coming
back to a business, creating
an experience, said William
J. Rossi of Gainesville.
SRossi was the speaker at
the second session of the
Lake City Columbia
County Chamber of
Commerce Better Business
Series Wednesday at Christ
Central Ministries.
A clinical .professor of
entrepreneurship at the
University of Florida's
Center for Entrepreneurship
in Gainesville, Rossi founded
and operated a number of
businesses before he began
teaching.
As an example of how sim-
ple things can help a busi-
ness, Rossi spoke about a
dry cleaners in Gainesville
he has patronized for nine
years. The business once
replaced a button on a shirt
without him even asking.
After breaking a favorite
pair of glasses, he sent it to
the company where the item
was purchased, and they
fixed it for free, Rossi said.
'"They created a customer
experience," he said.
Businesses have to think
about the customer and not
just offer good products and
services but create a good
customer experience, he
said. People go to Starbucks
or purchase Harley Davidson


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
University of Florida profes-.
sor Dr. William Rossi ges-
tures as he speaks during the
Lake City-Columbia County
Chamber of Commerce
Better Business Series lun-
cheon Wednesday held at
Christ Central Ministries.

motorcycles for that reason.
"It's the experience," Rossi
said. "That's what you want
to try to create,. an experi-
ence in your business."
Walt Disney formed a
group of the best of the best
to become the Imagineers,
he said. They had one mis-
sion while creating Disney
theme parks to make
people smile.
Rossi said to think about
customers and nof just what
they need but what they
would love. Businesses
should implement a chief
customer officer or CCO to
aid that goal.
' "I really believe how you
do what you do is what really
matters," Rossi said.


Vendors offer
tips to more
than 200 seniors.
By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com
M artha
Johns
of Lake
City took
the time
to learn how she could
improve her overall well-
being at the Lake City
Medical Center Senior
Health and Fitness Fair
Wednesday.
"I'm here to see how I
can improve my health,
be more active and stay
out of ,a hospital," Johns,
66, said, while she stood
in line to have her blood
pressure taken.
Almost 50 community
organizations, private
businesses and state and
federal agencies targeting
the health of senior adults
set up vendor booths at
the fair at the Columbia
County Fairgrounds ban-
quet hall.
"Anyone that would
have value to seniors is
here," said Kathy Wisner,
Lake City Medical Center
.H2U and volunteer ser-
vices coordinator.
Vendors offered informa-
tion to the more than 200
seniors in attendance about
their health and provided
free health screenings, like
blood pressure, cholesterol
and body mass index.
"We wanted a place
where we could bring in all
aspects of their (seniors')
general wellness, as well as
their specific health prob-
lems," Wisner said. 'We


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
LeAnne Fair (right), the senior community liaison for Omni Home Care, takes Arline Craft's
blood pressure Wednesday at the Lake City Medical Center Senior Health and Fitness
Fair held at the Columbia County Fairgrounds banquet hall.


want them to be happy,
healthy and giggling."
The fair was beneficial
to both its vendors and
attendees, she said.
"From the standpoint of
local businesses, it gives
them an opportunity to
showcase their services
and products and gives


them a chance to meet
their absolute target mar-
ket," Wisner said. "From
the standpoint of seniors,
it provides them with
information, some evalua-
tions and they learn where
they can get support"
Josh Snellgrove, Lake
City Medical Center direc-


tor of marketing, said the
fair was a way to extend
the Medical Center's
belief in preventative med-
icines, offering aspects
like screenings to provide
a "baseline" for people to
know if they need to see

HEALTH continued on 3A


Drama class creates garden

CHS students aim
to bring hope to
Avalon residents.


ByLEANNETYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com
Residents at Avalon Healthcare
& Rehabilitation Center now have
a butterfly garden complete with
plants, butterfly house, abirdbath
and a spinning sprinkler thanks to
the efforts of two Columbia High
student groups.
SColumbia High drama students
and the school's building and con-
struction class collaborated on the
service project Wednesday, com-
pleting the butterfly garden for
Avalon residents to enjoy.
S"It's so exciting to see that
this has actually happened," said
drama student Annabelle Blevins,
15.
CHS drama students have been
working to raise money for the
project through various fundrais-
ers, like a basketball game and
their spring play, since April.
Plants for the 8 feet by 8 feet
garden were donated by G & K
Nursery and Lowe's gave the
class a discount on all other mate-
rials, said Wendy Cousino, drama
teacher.
S"Everything else was the hard
work of the students and gener-
ous donations from the faculty,"
she said.
While the drama students took
care of designing the garden and


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High School student Libby Taylor, 16, plants yellow milkweed in a
garden at the Avalon Healthcare & Rehabilitation Center.


planting it, the building and con-
struction students dealt with the
woodworking and assembly, said
Jimmy Williams, building and con-
struction teacher.
"By us joining forces, this
expands our ability to help the
community," he said.
Drama student Heather Coody,
16, said the garden will hopefully
be healing for the residents.
"They stay in their rooms a lot
and they don't get to go outside a
lot," she said. 'We figured it would
help them heal, especially with it
being right by the rehabilitation
room."
"Hopefully it will change the
mood from dreary to happy,"


Blevins said.
Monich Culbreath, Avalon activ-
ities director, said the new garden
will remind residents pf when they
used to farm or garden.
"This is a good reminiscing tool
for them," she said. "It just brings
back a lot of memories for them."
Ernestine Lathinghouse, an
Avalon resident, said she was
thankful the students planted the
garden.
"I think it's neat because so
many kids nowadays don't like to
get involved," she said.
Lathinghouse also said she
plans on enjoying the garden, its
flowers and the butterflies it will
attract.


LEANNE TYO/Lake City Reporter
Jody Lee (center), a fifth-grade teacher at Westside Elementary, is
honored with a certificate by the Columbia County School Board
at its meeting Tuesday. Lee was named 2010 to 2011 Outstanding
Social Studies Teacher of the Year for Columbia County by the
Florida Council for Social Studies. Also pictured is Mike Millikin (left),
superintendent of schools, and Linard Johnson, board chairman.

Excellence rewarded


Jody Lee named
Social Studies
Teacher of the Year..
By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com
Creative social studies teach-
ing methods, dedication and
doing an overall exceptional
job as a Westside Elementary
fifth-grade teacher won Jody
Lee a special recognition
Tuesday.
The Columbia County
School Board recognized
Lee at its regular meeting for


being named the 2010 to 2011
Outstanding Social Studies
Teacher of the Year for
Columbia County, an award
given annually by the Florida
Council for Social Studies.
"I just can't believe it," Lee
said. "It's really nice to be rec-
ognized for hard work. I don't
look at it as work because I
try to make it fun for my stu-
dents. I have as much fun as
they do."
Dorothy Spradley, district
volunteer/education market-
ing coordinator, said the 14
REWARDED continued on 3A


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
1 Fax: 752-9400


93 65
Partly Cloudy
WEATHER, 2A


ci-


Opinion ................ 4A
Health. ................. 6A
Obituaries .............. 5A
Advice & Comics......... 3B
Puzzles ................. 2B


',: ~TODAY IN
p. t PEOPLE
C'~r Oprah says
opf" goodbye.


COMING
FRIDAY
Astronaut speaks
to CHS graduates.


HEALTH HELPERS


~~~oia~~


W aaP09w.-










LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING THURSDAY, MAY 26, 2011


Wednesday:
Afternoon: 6-4-3
Evening: 1-3-5


Wednesday:
Afternoon: 8-0-9-7
Evening: 2-9-1-6


2 Tuesday:
2-7-13-16-25


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



Winfrey finale devoted to fans


CHICAGO

or vacations. No favorite
things or makeovers. No
celebrity guests on stage
though there were
plenty in the audience.
The finale of Oprah Winfrey's
talk show, taped Tuesday and aired
Wednesday, was all about the one
,thing that made her a billion-dollar
success: the unique connection she
made with millions of viewers for 25
years. In what she called her "love
letter" to fans, she made clear that
to her, all those TV friendships went
both ways.
"Something in me connected with
each of you in a way that allowed me
to see myself in you and you in me,"
: Winfrey said. "I listened and grew,
and I.know you grew along with
me."
Winfrey was the only person on
stage with little background music
and short flashback clips. The show
went to commercials with 'Twenty-
Five Years," a soft song that musi-
cian Paul Simon wrote and recorded
for her.
She called fans her "safe har-
bor" and became teary eyed when
reflecting on her upbringing in rural
Mississippi.
Wednesday's show was the last
piece of a months-long sendoff, but
as the hour wrapped up, Winfrey
stopped short of saying farewell.

Kim Kardashian is
engaged to NBA player
NEW YORK Another hoops
*star will join the Kardashian clan.
People magazine reported
SWednesday that reality star Kim
Kardashian is engaged to her boy-
friend of six months, New Jersey
Nets forward Kris Humphries. Sister


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Kimberly Adams waits outside Harpo Studios before the final taping of 'The Oprah
Winfrey Show' in Chicago Tuesday. The finale aired Wednesday.


Khloe Kardashian and Los Angeles
Laker Lamar Odom were married in
2009.
Kim Kardashian
told People that
she was in"shock"
when she entered
her Beverly Hills,
Calif., home last
week to discover
Humphries on
Kardashian bended knee with
"will you marry
me" spelled out in rose petals.
Humphries, 26, gave Kardashian,
30, a 20.5-carat Lorraine Schwartz
diamond ring.

Hines Ward wins
'Dancing' competition
LOS ANGELES It's become
a proud athletic tradition: Winning
"Dancing With the Stars."


When Hines Ward took home
the mirrorball trophy on the hit
show Tuesday, he joined its win-
ningest group of alumni: Athletes.
Professional athletes have taken the
"Dancing" title six times in the past
12 seasons.
Since the show premiered state-
side in 2005, three Olympians,
two football stars and one race-car
driver have been named "Dancing."
champs.
Three other NFL stars and an
Olympic skater finished the popular
show in second place.
Ward, a Pittsburgh Steelers
wide receiver and former Super
Bowl most valuable player, credits
his professional dance partner,
Kym Johnson, with their dance vic-
tory.

* Associated Press


Celebrity Birthdays


" Actor James Arness is 88.
" Sportscaster Brent Mus-
burger is 72.
" Singer Stevie Nicks is 63.
" Actress Pam Grier is 62.
i Country singer Hank Wil-
liams Junior is 62.
* Comedian Bobcat Goldth-
wait is 49.
* Actress Genie Francis


("General Hospital") is 49.
* Singer Lenny Kravitz is 47.
* Actress Helena Bonham
Carter is 45.
* Drummer Phillip Rhodes of
The Gin Blossoms is 43.
* Actor Joseph Fiennes is
41.
* "South Park" co-creator
Matt Stone is 40.


,Lake City
HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293
Fax number ..............752-9400
Circulation ...............755-5445
Online... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Ra. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake Cit, Ra.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson .....754-0418
(twilson@lakectyreporter.com)
NEWS
Assistant Editor CJ Risak..754-0427
After 100 p.m.
(crisak@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Ashley Butcher ...754-0417
(abutcher@lakectyreporter.com)
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440.


rReporter
BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon....754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake CityReporter
should be completed by Q:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 730
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 1030 a.m. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
1030 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
Is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation ..............755-5445
(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates '
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks ................ $26.32
24 Weeks .................48.79.
52 Weeks ................ $83.46
Rates include 7% sales tax.
Mail rates
12Weeks ................ $41.40
24 Weeks..................$82.80
52 Weeks ..................$179.40


CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will
run in this space: And thanks-for reading. -


Second of 7
whales euthanized
KEY LARGO Officials
at a Florida Keys-based
marine mammal rehabili-
tation center have eutha-
nized the second of seven-
surviving pilot whales that
stranded May 5 off the
lower Florida Keys.
Robert Lingenfelser said
Wednesday that an adult
female whale had contin-
ued to deteriorate.,
Lingenfelser, who directs
stranding operations for
the Marine Mammal
Conservancy, says a nec-
ropsy was scheduled for
Wednesday afternoon.
Officials said one other
whale remains in critical
condition, one in guarded
condition and one in stable
condition.
Lingenfelser cited a con-
tinued need for volunteers
during the round-the-clock
effort to assist the remain-
ing whales.
One whale was eutha-
-nized earlier this month
and two were healthy
enough to be released two
days after the stranding.

Dentist scuffles
over dentures
DELTONA Authorities
said a central Florida dentist
was charged with four fel-
ony charges after a scuffle
over an 85-year-old woman's
dentures.
Volusia County Sheriff's
officials said Virginia
Graham started scream-
ing in pain as 57-year-old
Michael Hammonds adjust-
ed her dentures Tuesday
afternoon.
Sheriffs spokesman
Brandon Haught said
Graham pulled out the
dentures and threw them
'at Hammonds, demand-
ing a refund. When he
refused, Graham grabbed
at the dentures and the two
scuffled over them. Graham
told deputies she bit the


Courtesy photo

Teen Summit winners
Nakeria Dobson was awarded a $1,000 savings bond as the
winner of an essay contest held during the Teen Summit in
February. Dobson also became president of the Ambassador
Leadership Council. Pictured from left are Dobson; Davanae
Melvin, second place finalist and vice president; and Caitlin.
Green, third-place finalist and secretary. Dobson and Green


are both Lake City residents.

dentist's fingers to make
him let go.
Deputies said Hammonds
screamed in the woman's
face.
When she tried to leave,
" deputies said Hammonds
grabbed her arms. When
deputies arrived, she had
blood on her arms and
shirt
Hammonds faces charges
including false imprison-
ment, battery and assault on
a person over 65.

Cause of fatal
fire unknown
CITRA The State Fire
Marshal's Office could not
determine the cause of a
fire that killed five children
in North Florida.
In a recently released
report, the agency con-
cluded there was "no evi-
dence of suspicious/crimi-
nal actions" in the Nov. 8
fire. The report said the
fire started in the living
room of the wood-frame,
five-bedroom home.
When the fire started,
31-year-old Krista Jordan


and her 54-year-old mother
Linda Cole, got out of the
house. Neighbors pulled
Jordan's 22-year-old sister,
Kyla Cole, from the burn-
ing house.- But Jordan's
five children, ages 6, 8, 12,
13 and 15, died.

Doctor convicted
of over prescribing
DESTIN A Panhandle
doctor faces life in prison for
contributing to the deaths of
two of his patients.
Dr. Robert Bourlier was
convicted Tuesday of unlaw-
fully dispensing addictive
narcotics and defrauding
federal health providers.
Prosecutors said the
55-year-old Destin doctor
continued to prescribe
controlled substances
even after he learned
patients were addicted to
the drugs, had suffered
overdoses from them,
were doctor shopping to
get more drugs, or were,
in some cases, selling the
drugs on the street.


THE WEATHER


PARTLY CHANCE VIOLATED -.. PARTLY -SOLATED
'j CLOUDY RMS Jj-STORMS 1j CLOUDY i-STORMS


H193 65 191 L66 HI 91 L66 HI 92 L 67 HI 93 L 67


N THia N re *^3 69a0/so50vll
T aaassee. LakeCity %90/70


83/74


'91/68 U Ft. Lauderdale
Cainesvlle. Dayt ead Fort Myers
Panama C 93/65 8'69 Gainesville
82/70 Ocd"a Jacksonville
,3/67 and a naveralKey West
90/69 4/73 Lake City
90/09 84(73
., *Miami
S r T' Tampa, Naples
West PahBch Ocala
84/78 Orlando
S\*Y FL Lauderdale Panama City
FL Myerst 86/75 0 Pensacola
S3/69 Naples Tallahassee
"', '90/73 Miai Tampa
S' Wt / 8~/75 Valdosta
Key West. WD.- 1-


I L C.M


TEMPERATURES
High Wednesday
Low Wednesday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Wednesday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


95
65
88
64
98 in 1956
52 in 1931

0.00"
2.63"
14.11"
2.31"
16.33"


7a p 7p la 6a
Thursday Friday







rF stetanWtmra *Fs IFs inepabin


* Associated Press


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise tom.
Sunset tom.


87/76/t
93/69/t
91/65/t
89/70/t
87/78/pc
91/66/t
87/76/t
88/71/t
92/66/t
90/71/t
84/70/t
84/73/pc
88/68/t
93/70/t
89/67/t
87/76/t


87/76/pc
92/70/t
91/66/pc
88/69/pc
87/78/pc
91/66/pc
87/76/pc
90/72/t
91/67/pc
90/70/pc
86/70/bc
89/73/pc
89/68/pc
91/71/t
91/67/pc
86/76/pc


6:31 a.m.
8:24 p.m.
6:31 a.m.
8:25 p.m.


MOON
Moonrise today 2:33 a.m..
Moonset today 3:04 p.m.
Moonrise tom. 3:02 a.m.
Moonset tom. 3:57 p.m.


June June June June
1 8 15 23
.New First Full Last


On this date in
1982, the tempera-
ture in Cut Bank,
Mont., was 35
degrees with a mix
of snow and rain
falling. The high
temperature the
day before was 78
degrees.


An exclusive
service
brought to
ill our readers
l0niuitsbolbuini
Today's by
ultra-violet The Weather
radiation risk Channel.
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+.

weather.com

Fc Forecasts, data and
w graphics 0 2011 Weather
Central, LP, Madison, Wls.
weatherY www.weatherpubllsher.com


Get Connected


^H3.


Daily Scripture


"[Listening and Doing] My
dear brothers and sisters,
take note of this: Everyone
should be quick to listen, slow
to speak and slow to become
angry."
-James 1: 19


AROUND FLORIDA


THURSI9


r28 SATURO.A
tly


-- I


'NI^j


[30 MN!AJ


Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424


C~SPONSORED BY


87/78 -


W. Palm Beach











Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL THURSDAY, MAY 26, 2011


Memorial Day tribute


for veterans Friday


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com

The Lake CityVAMedical
Center staff, patients and
administrators will partner
with local community resi-
dents to pay tribute to vet-
erans during the annual VA
Medical Center Memorial
Day program Friday.
The Lake CityVAMedical
Center's 17th Annual Catch
the Spirit Memorial Day
Ceremony will take place
10 am. Friday on the Lake
City VA Medical Center's
front lawn. Several local
officials, including Third
Judicial Circuit Public
Defender Dennis Roberts
and Lake City Vice Mayor,
Melinda Moses, will take
part in the program.
"This annual event pro-
vides those in our area
an opportunity to gather
together to pay tribute to
and honor those service-
men and women who paid
the ultimate price to ensure
the democratic principles
that our nation was found-
ed upon," said Maureen
Wilkes, acting associate
director of the Lake City
VAMC.
The keynote speaker for
the 2011 event will be Ian
James Gray, an Operation
Enduring Freedom and
Operation Iraqi Freedom
veteran.
Gray served in the United
States Marine Corps from


2002-2006 during the War
on Terrorism with the 3rd
Battalion 6th Marine regi-
ment 2nd Marine Division.
He graduated from high
school as a dual enrolled
college student in 2001 and
left Florida to attend college
on a scholarship. After the
Sept 11 terrorist attacks,
he enlisted in the military
service.
Gray ultimately turned
down offers for intelligence
work and the tempta-
tion of his first true love,
the infantry. During his
time of service, he was
deployed to Cuba, Africa,
Afghanistan and Iraq. Of
the numerous commenda-
tions he received, the two
that are truly close to his
heart are his Certificate of
Commendation for actions
under fire in Afghanistan
and his Navy Achievement
Medal, received for actions
under fire in Iraq.
Gray was honorably dis-
charged from the Marine
Corps in 2006 and imme-
diately transitioned toward
higher education. In 2008
he received his bachelor's
degree from the University
of Florida. He is currently
on track for gaining admis-
sion to a master's program
so that he may eventually
assist with the healing,
and reintegration process,
of veterans as a counselor.
Gray resides in Alachua.
Cindy Gaylord, assistant


public affairs officer, North
Florida/South Georgia
Veterans Health System,
said the ceremony is a
great opportunity for those
in the community to listen
to an Operation Enduring
Freedom and Operation
Iraqi Freedom Veteran who
made a decision in his life
to serve his country after
the attacks of 9-11.
"With the upcoming 10
-year anniversary of the
attacks of 9-11, this is the
time for all to come togeth-
er and remember the lives
that were lost that day and
have been lost since," she
said.
Gaylord also noted that
there will be a Moment of
Remembrance at 3 p.m.
on Memorial Day. The
Moment of Remembrance
is slated to last one minute.
'The Moment does not
replace the traditional
Memorial Day obser-
vances," she said. "It is
intended to be a unifying
act of remembrance for
Americans of all ages. The
Moment of Remembrafice
reminds all Americans of
the importance of remem-
bering those who sacri-
ficed for their freedom
and what it means to be an
American. The Moment
provides Americans
throughout the world an
opportunity to join this
expression of gratitude in
an act of unity."


HEALTH: Event assists seniors

Continued From Page 1A


a doctor.
"We want our com-
munity to be healthy,"
Snellgrove said, "because
that's ultimately what we
want for our community,
to be as healthy, as pos--
sible."
Vivian Hall, 61, of Lake-
City said the fair was help-


ful for the community to
learn about various ser-
vices available for seniors
and to make people aware
of their health.
"A lot of people can't
-afford to go-to the doctor
and this is a good chance
to come out and get input
on it" Hall said.


Glenda Mosely, 64, of
Lake City agreed, and said
the fair could alert people
to possible health issues
that they may need to see
a doctor for, including her-
self.
"At my age, I need to
keep up with my health,"
Mosely said.


REWARDED: Teacher earns award

Continued From Page 1A


district schools are given
the opportunity to nomi-
nate a social studies teacher
based on criteria including
professionalism, variety of
teaching methods, positive
attitude and maintaining
constructive relationships
with students, parents and
colleagues.
Spradley congratulated
Lee for surpassing those
areas and more as a social
studies teacher.
"You serve as an outstand-
ing example for our entire
educational community," he
said.
ThreeNiblackElementary
pre-kindergarten teach-
ers, their respective assis-


tants and the school's
early literacy coach were
also recognized by North
East Florida Educational
Consortium representatives
for their hard work in help-
ing Niblack Elementary
become a model demonstra-
tion site for NEFEC's Raising
Expectations for All Children
(REACH) project.
Niblack Elementary is one
of five Florida school district
sites to become a demon-
stration site for this particu-
lar project, said Jo Hudson,
NEFEC reading program
specialist/early childhood
coordinator.
Sandy Lewis, pre-kinder-
garten project coordinator,


said that according to assess-
ments, Niblack Elementary's
pre-kindergarten students
have made the highest
learning gains of any of the
project's students, surpass-
ing all criteria benchmarks.
"The demonstration class-
room, it's not really about
them (the teachers, assis-
tants and the early literacy
coach) getting an award,"
Lewis said. "What that
means is they have met
the challenge of becoming
exceptional teachers and
now their classrooms can be
opened up for other teachers
to come in and learn what
needs to be done with pre-
school children."


CHS students set for graduation


By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com

About 400 Columbia High
seniors will officially receive
what they've ,worked hard
to earn for the past 12 years
- their high school dipld-
mas.
The seniors will gradu-
ate at the Columbia High
School Class of 2011
Commencement Ceremony
at 7 p.m. Friday at the
school's stadium.
Led by the Columbia
County School Board, the
graduates will march to the
stadium where their family
and friends will be seated.
Valedictorian Jordan Hogan,
17, will give a speech, diplo-
mas will be awarded and a
brief fireworks presentation,
organized by the senior
class' parents group, will
follow the ceremony, said
Terry Huddleston, CHS
principal.
Hogan said achieving
class valedictorian has been
a goal since fourth grade.
"I told my mom at the
end of my fourth-grade
year that I wanted to be
valedictorian," he said,
"and to have this goal actu-
ally become a reality is really


breathtaking."
At the ceremony, Hogan
said he plans to speak on
both the senior class' memo-
ries and its future.
"It's not necessarily what
we're doing in life that's
important, but the people
that we are when we get
there," Hogan said.
Salutatorians Kellan
Graham, Sarah Reichert,
Susana Romero-Martinez
and Brittany Strickland, all
18 years old, will also be rec-
ognized at the ceremony.
In the case of severe weath-
er, students will be taken
back inside the school while
the weather is monitored,
Huddleston said. When the
weather has cleared, stu-
dents will return to the sta-
dium and the ceremony will


continue, he said.
Huddleston advised grad-
uates' family and friends to
arrive at the ceremony early
and to park in the parking
lot directly adjacent to the
school's agricultural farm,
where shuttles to the stadium
will be provided.
The senior class gradua-
tion is a milestone in the stu-
dents' lives where their hard
work and determination will
be celebrated, Huddleston
said. He noted that this par-
ticular class was instrumen-
tal in leading the school to
its "B" Florida School Grade
from a "D."
'Truly this has been a
very fine senior class," he
said, "and I appreciate all
that they've done the last
four years."


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LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL THURSDAY, MAY 26, 2011


Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424


I%


,,
,,r!














OPINION


Thursday, May 26, 201 I


www.lakecityreporter.com


AN


A N
OPINION


Noah quick

to apologize

for mistake

oakim Noah has
endeared himself to
Chicago Bulls fans by
being a free spirit, a
wild-haired, arms-wav
citable giant. Sunday
night, however, Noah's pas-
sion led him to make a big
mistake.
In the midst of the Bulls'
loss to the Miami Heat
Sunday, he cursed at a Miami
fan,.using profanity and a
gay slur. According to press
reports, the fan had been
heckling Noah with some
pretty rough language. But
it was Noah's response that
was caught on camera.
Noah quickly said he was
wrong.
"It was a bad decision
on my part," he affirmed
Monday.
He seems sincere, and
there's no sense piling on
here. Still, he used a slur
that's offensive on the street,
in the schoolyard, anywhere,
including an NBA arena.
The NBA has used its high
visibility to discourage bias
against gays and lesbians.
In a public service ad aired
during games, NBA stars
criticize the use of "gay" as
a generic insult. The league
levied .a $100,000 fine against
the Lakers' Kobe Bryant,
after he directed a far more
offensive word the same
word Noah used at a ref-
eree. The league hit Noah on
Monday with a $50,000 fine.
That's justified. Sports
are a diversion, yes, but the
players do have an impact on
fans of the game, young and
old.
The NBA ought to look at
how it handled the abusive
fan too. Fans are free to
heckle and yell, that's part
of sports. They paid for their
tickets and all that. But a
point comes when the most
abusive fans ruin the game
for other fans.
But it's Noah who is the
player, the role model, here.
He's going to pay a hefty
price for his mistake. Let
his quick contrition be what
people remember from this.

* Chicago Tribune


Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of.
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman



LETTERS
POLICY.
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,


Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


Let's all drink to Guinness


ing sight,
the pictures
of President
Barack Obama
having a pint of Guinness in an
Irish pub on Monday left me
feeling sorry for myself as a
member of a hitherto unidenti-
fied group of societal victims.
I consider Guinness to be the
very nectar of the Irish gods.
What sane adult wouldn't want
a Guinness? If not the liquid
soul of Ireland, the black bever-
age crowned with creamy foam
is at least a goodly lubricant
of all the poetry, humor and
spirituality of the Irish people.
I have heard that Guinness
makes a fine lunch, too -
probably better than my usual
salad, which lacks a frothy
head, as much as I shake the
balsamic dressing bottle.
To see Mr. O'bama knock
back his Guinness in four
slurps, well, it was one of
those moments that made me
proud to be an American. One
of you conservative fellahs is
going to say that he needed a
Teleprompter to do the slurp-
ing but nothing spoils the
moment for me.
Why, I feel like going down
to the nearest Irish pub to rec-
reate the scene. There's just
one little problem. I don't like
the taste of Guinness. I just
like the idea of Guinness.
That is the special sorrow
for people like me. I expect
that millions of us are out here
suffering silently. We have
been pressured by society into
liking certain cultural icons
that we don't actually like.
As this syndrome has never
been described before, it falls
to me to name it Wish We
Did Syndrome. I know the
WWDS sounds like the call
sign of a country music sta-
tion, but our hearts have been
cruelly broken, too.


Reg Henry
rhenry@post-gazette.com
Every WWDS sufferer will
have his or her list of things
that they would really like to
like but don't. Being a vintage
journalist, I am also ashamed
of not liking Scotch whisky.
A fine single malt whisky is
said to be a glorious thing that
opens up the heavens so that
choirs of kilted angels sing for
the drinker. Not for me, they
don't. Scotch tastes like cough
mixture to me, although appar-
ently it is good for coughs -
also porridge poisoning, damp
knees and sporran chafing.
Still, I would like nothing
better than to sit back in a
dimly lit club with a glass of
scotch or Guinness in hand,
listening to really good jazz.
This is America's authentic art
form, a vibrant strand plucked
from the nation's rich cultural
tapestry.
You guessed it. I don't
like jazz either. I know jazz
is wonderful, but to me it
sounds like forgetful musi-
cians trying.to find their way
back to the tune after several
glasses of scotch.
At least it doesn't move
*me to,dancing, which, being
rhythm-challenged, I don't like
doing. Sure, I would like to be
a good dancer, with women
marveling at my moves, but
I couldn't dance if my pants
were on fire. Women are left
to marvel at my inertia.
With the rug safe from me
cutting it up, I would like to
be a bird watcher, traversing
forest and field with binocu-


lars on the trail of the tufted
titmouse or the common loon,
the only bird known to nest in
radio talk show studios.
The sheer eccentricity of
the pastime appeals to me, yet
once again the reality is not so
appealing. You watch the bird.
The bird watches you. That's
it. Time to go home for an
acceptable drink.
One note of hope for WWDS
sufferers: Tastes do change.
For years, I wanted to like
lasagna but didn't. There is
social pressure to like lasa-
gna because it is a food often
volunteered for potluck din-
ners. I am sure someone will
helpfully bring a lasagna to a
Memorial Day picnic near you.
Lasagna is cheap, familiar and
feeds lots of people.
But it seemed to me a primi-
tive food on the evolutionary
tree of pasta, not yet one thing
or the other, neither strands of
spaghetti nor pieces of penne.
I just didn't like its sprawling,
saucy attitude.
I got over my distaste eventu-
ally, although even today I don't
clap my hands in glee and shout
"lasagna, lasagna" when the cas-
serole dish arrives.
It's time for WWDS suffer-
ers to come out of the shadows
and form a support group. Why,
there is probably some poor
unfortunate in Pittsburgh who
wants to like football or hockey,
but doesn't, and is crying out
for sympathy and understand-'
ing. Unfortunately, nothing can
be done in such extreme cases
of deviancy, but for everybody
else help is at hand.
Of course, it may require
a field trip to Ireland, where
the Guinness is said to taste
better. I know a fellow named
O'Henry who would like to
lead it.
a Reg Henry is a columnist for the
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette.


ANOTHER OPINION


A Memorial Day without-war


memorial Day
famously honors
America's war
dead. At first it
was the fallen
Union and Confederate soldiers
of the Civil War. But now it rec-
ognizes a long line of patriots
stretching back to Lexington and
Concord and continuing to this
day with the wars in Iraq and
Afghanistan.
This weekend will mark the
ninth consecutive Memorial Day
when our nation has been at war
after being forcibly wrenched
into combat by the events of
9/11, concocted by violent reli-
gious fanatics operating with
the permission of Afghanistan's
Taliban government
'In an impressive feat of arms,
U.S. and coalition forces entered
Afghanistan in October of 2001,
and a few months later al-Qaeda
and the Taliban had been run
out of the country's major cities
and their leaders were fleeing to
Pakistan where they remain to
this day.


But it was not the kind of war
that would bring about a quick
or clean ending. Last June, with
a duration of 104 months, it sur-
passed Vietnam as America's lon-
gest war. But the dynamics of the
war changed dramatically when
Navy SEALS, again in an impres-
sive feat of arms, flew deep into
foreign territory and killed al-
Qaeda's leader and binding icon,
Osama bin Laden.
The Taliban do not have al-
Qaeda's deep religious and philo-
sophical loathing of the West or
its grandiose vision of an Islamic
caliphatee stretching from south
Asia to the Atlantic. Their griev-
ances are tribal and local and
negotiations are not out of the
question.
President Barack Obama
plans to go forward with a vague
commitment to begin troop with-
drawals beginning this July and
continuing a "conditions-based"
pullout lasting into 2014 when
the Afghan security forces will
be responsible for the entire
country.


With the death of bin Laden,
pressure from Congress and the
public to accelerate that pace will
grow. Something like 60 percent
of the country believes the war is
no longer worth the cost
In Iraq, which we invaded in,
March, 2003, and disposed of the
Iraqi regular army in less than
six weeks, the last of the 47,000
troops are due to be out by the
end of the year, leaving a small
residual force behind, largely as
trainers for the Iraqis.
Regardless of where one
stands on these wars, there is no
denying the courage, skill and
resolve of the professional, vol-
unteer military that fought them
- and at some cost, currently
4,421 dead in Iraq and 1,471 in
Afghanistan.
We should especially honor
them this Memorial Day, and
reflect on the fact that it is not
naively optimistic that one May
soon we will have a Memorial
Day without a war.

a Scripps Howard News Service


Jack Levine
jack@4Gen.org


Use holiday

to pledge to

participate

M memorial Day is
our nation's com-
memoration of the
sacrifices made by
those whose lives
were put on the line for the free-
doms we hold sacred.
Whether our veterans survived
their military service, or were lost
on the field of battle, our country
owes each of them, and their fami-
lies, a debt of gratitude.
I am not a veteran. In the
Summer of 1969, the year of the
nation's first draft lottery, my birth-
day, June 26th, had number 327
drawn. For those not aware of the
significance of that, my birthday
could have come up number One
or number 365. I was fortunate to
be so far down the list, and there-
fore assured to be free from the
call up to the Vietnam War.
One of my closest friends drew
number six, another the low 20's.
Both were ineligible for student
deferment and were drafted. One
was sent to duty at a NATO base .
in Europe because he had strong
language skills, the other was
deployed to Vietnam where he was"
seriously wounded in 1970 and
sent home. He never fully recov-
ered from his wounds.
As we look back at the wars
proposed by presidents, declared
by Congress, and supported to
varying degrees by our citizens,
lets remember that none of these
conflicts were or, to this day, are
immune from controversy. But we
should never confuse debate over
military policy with the need to be
respectful of those whose lives are
at risk on the battlefield, in the air,
or on the seas.
Our nation has been the des-
tination of choice for immigrants
from the world's most frightening
and repressive nations. My father
and maternal grandparents were
three of those immigrants, and
perhaps your family has its story
of freedom-seekers. Even for
our African-American neighbors,
whose ancestors came shackled
in the holds of slave ships, and
Native-Americans whose ances-
tors were slaughtered or subjected'
to racist cruelties, the children of
most American families enjoy the
opportunity to be free from the
threats of oppression and terror.
That freedom was earned, bled for,
and in many cases, died for.
In honor of those who we've
lost, let's not be passive about the
importance of their sacrifice. In
their honor, let's pledge to par-
ticipate in the following advocacy
activities:
Register, vote, and urge others
to do the same.
Actively communicate with
our elected officials about issues
affecting families, including mili-
tary families.
Share your thoughts in the
media by writing letters to the edi-
tor and interviewing with report-
ers.
Motivate youth to exercise
their voice in matters which affect
them.
Confront those who think that
complaining about problems is suf-
ficient
Compliment community lead-
ership and promote active involve-
ment by friends, colleagues and
neighbors as volunteers.
Support causes which focus
on advocating positive change.
Memorial Day presents the
chance to gather our thoughts
and honor the military service
of our parents and grandparents,
sons and daughters, brothers and
sisters, aunts, uncles and cousins.
Those who wore the uniform of
our armed forces, and gave all or
a portion of their lives in service
to our nation and its allies deserve
our gratitude and sincere respect..
every one of them.
* Jack Levine is the founder of the
4Generations Institute.


4A











LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL THURSDAY, MAY 26, 2011


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


* To submit your Community
Calendar item, contact Antonia
Robinson at 754-0425 or by
e-mail at arobinson@
lakecityreporter.com.


Today

Safety demonstration
A safety demonstra-
tion with the Florida
Highway Patrol featuring
its Rollover Simulator
is 3:30 p.m. today at the
Columbia County Public
Library. This event is
geared toward children
7 and up, but everyone
is invited to attend. Call
the Library at (386) 758-
2106 for more informa-
tion.

NCF Tea Party Meeting
The next monthly meet-
ing of the North Central
Florida Tea Party is 7
p.m. today at the Taylor
Building. KrisAnne Hall
is the speaker. She will
have her new book,
"Not a Living, Breathing
Document Reclaiming
our Constitution," avail-
able. The group will
discuss its mission, goals
and finalizing commit-
tees. Contact John at
(386) 935-1705, Sharon
at (386) 935-0821 or
visit www.northcentral-
floridateaparty.org. The
Taylor Building is located
at 128 SW Birley Ave.

MOAA meeting
The Suwannee
River Valley Chapter of
the Military Officers
Association of America is
meeting 6:30 p.m. today at
the Lake City Elks' Lodge.
Retired or former military
officers are invited. RSVP to
Susan Palmer at 697-6828 or
Vernon Lloyd at 752-4885.
.The lodge is located at 259
NE Hernando St.


ANTONIA ROBINSON/Lake City Reporter

Elks Lodge Scholarship winner
Home-schooled student Ashley Martin was awarded a $500 scholarship from the Lake City
Elks Lodge #893 May 18. Pictured with Martin is Exalted Ruler Fred Lammers. The lodge also
gave scholarships during awards ceremonies to Jazmyne Bradley-Maxwell, a Columbia High
School student, and Caitlin Jones and Catherine Trish, both Fort White High School students.


Memorial Service
A memorial service for
Mary Lyons, who dedi-
cated her life to teaching
in the community, is 5:30-
6:30 p.m. today at New
Bethel Missionary Baptsit
Church. The church is
located at 550 NE Martin
Luther King St

Friday

Yard Sale
The Columbia County
Chapter of the Bethune-


Cookman College Alumni
Chapter is having 'a yard
sale and dinner fundraiser
Friday. The meal is $7
and includes fish, grits
or cole slaw, old fashion
bake beans, hush puppies
and dessert. Sandwiches
are $4. Water or can soda
is $.75. The location is
behind Minnie J. Niblack
Elementary School's
playground at the corner
of Baily and Coldwater
Avenue. Call in orders
start at 8 a.m. Call (386)
752-1319.


Health and Wealth
Program
The registration dead-
line for the Small Steps
to Health and Wealth
program is Friday. The
program encourages par-
ticipants to make positive
behavior changes to simul-
taneously improve health
and personal finances.
Classes are 5:30-7 p.m.
Thursday June 2-July 21.
The cost of the program
is $7 per person or $10
per couple. Call the UF/


IFAS Columbia County
Extension Service at (386)
752-5384 for more informa-
tion.

Mike Mullis Band
The Mike Mullis
Band performs 8 p.m.
Friday at the Spirit of the
Suwannee Music Hall.
Music, grapefruit/panty-
hose race, Mike's Wild
and Wacky version of the
Hokey-Pokey for the kids
and more will take place.
Reservations are highly
recommended. Call (386)
364-1703.

Folk Festival
The 59th Annual
Florida Folk Festival is
Friday through Sunday,
at Stephen Foster Folk
Culture Center State
Park. Opening cer-
emonies will begin at
6:30 p.m. on Friday.
Headlining this year's
festivities will be
Florida's own super-
stars John Anderson,
and Billy Dean, plus
hundreds more folk
music legends from
throughout the Sunshine
State. Visit www.
FloridaFolkFestival.
cor or www.floridastate-
parks. org/stephenfoster.

Saturday

Farmers Market
The Lake DeSoto
Farmers Market opens
8 a.m.-12 p.m. Saturday
at Wilson Park. The
day will feature musical
guests Tony Buzzella and


Friends playing all types
of music, In honor of
Memorial Day, the band
will feature a musical
tribute to each branch of
the military and recog-
nize all that have served
our country. Vendors are
welcome. Contact Jackie
Kite, community redevel-
opment administrator, at
(386) 719-5766 or kitej@
lcfla.com.

Donors wanted
LifeSouth Bloodmobile
is seeking donors 9 am. to
2 p,m. Saturday at the Lake
City Mall and 3-6:30 p.m.
at the International Gospel
Explosion downtown.

International Gospel
Explosion
The 3rd Annual
International Gospel
Explosion Event is 3-6 p.m.
Saturday at the downtown
Olustee Park. The com-
munity resource event will
feature speakers from local
agencies. It will include
food, resources, music, fun
and more. Contact ohthe-
bloodoflesus77@yahoo.com,'
call (386) 951-4587 or (386)
466-2239 for more informa-
tion or visit www. Isthaitia
nbaptistchurchoflakecity.
corn.

Band opportunities
Home-schooled children'
and parents interested
in participating in the
Columbia High School
band can contact Ryan
Schultz at 755-8000, dur-
ing the school day, for
more information.


OBITUARIES


Oneal Belford
Mr. Oneal Belford, 52, passed
away May 20, 2011. Mr. Belford
was born December 12, 1958 in
Glenn St. Mary, Florida to Thel-
ma B. Walker and Charlie Bel-
ford, Sr. Oneal
was raised in
Baker County
and was edu-
cated in the
public school M
system there.
He worked for
Glenn Cash,
and worked in many capacities
on several jobs during his life
span. Mr. Belford is predeceased
by his parents, son, Rashard Bel-
ford and daughter, Molly Belford.
Left to cherish memories; wife,
Catherine Belford; sons, Jer-
maine Belford, Sanderson,
FL, Blake Lee, Lake City, FL.,
Teddy Belford, Macclenny, FL;
daughter, Missy Belford, Lake
City, FL; brothers, Charlie Bel-
ford (Lou Ann), Hosea Belford
(LaShawn), Johnny and Mark
Belford; sisters, Brenda Bones
(Tyrone), Susie Givens (John-
ny), Arlene Mathis (Ronnie),
Ruby Belford, Janice Hosely;
other brothers and sisters-In-
law; five grandchildren, hosts
of uncles, aunts, nieces, neph-
ews, other relatives and friends.
Funeral services for Mr. Bel-
ford will be 11:00 A.M. Sat-
urday, May 28, 2011.at New
Jerusalem Church of God
In Christ, Margaretta, FL.
Visitation will be from 5:00-
7:00 P.M. Friday, May 27,
2011 at New Jerusalem
C.O.G.I.C. Margaretta, FL.
Arrangements entrusted to
COMBS FUNERAL HOME.
292 NE Washington Street.
Lake City, FL. (386) 752-4366.
Marq Combs-Turner, L.F.D.
"The Caring Professionals"

Earl "Bud" Brady
Mr. Earl "Bud" Brady better
known as "Pops", 81, a lifelong
resident of Columbia County,
passed away peacefully on
Wednesday
May 25, 2011
in the Haven
Hospice of
the Suwannee
Valley fol-
lowing a brief
illness. Born
in the Water-
town Commu-
nity of Colum-
bia County Mr. -
Brady was the
son of the late Nelson and Ag-
nus Murray Brady. He was a
U.S. Navy veteran of the Korean
Conflict having served on the
USS Telfair and the USS Grand
Canyon. Following his deploy-
ment Mr. Brady returned to Co-
lumbia County and worked for
thirty years as a plumber with
the Columbia County School


System. Mr. Brady was an ac-
tive member of the Tabernacle
Baptist Church. In his spare
time he enjoyed hunting, fishing,
camping and raising his farm
animals. His favorite time was
spent spoiling his grandchildren
and his great-grandchildren. Mr.
Brady was preceded in death
by his parents and six siblings.
He is survived by his wife of
forty three years, Carolyn Bry-
ant Brady; his children, Felecia
(Steve) McKenney and Robert
Brady; his grandchildren, Joni
McKenney Wilson (Gary); Holli
McKenney and his great grand-
children, Kaidence Altman and
BryceWilson all of Lake City.
His sister Alice "Dinky" Park-
er of Lake City also survives.
Funeral services for Mr. Brady
will be conducted at 10:00 A.M.
on Saturday, May 28, 2011 in the
Tabernacle Baptist Church with
Pastor Mike Norman and Rev.
James Brown officiating. Inter-
ment will follow in the Corinth
Cemetery (located on Hwy. 441
North of Lake City). The family
will receive friends in the chapel
Sof the funeral home from 5:00-
7:00 Friday evening. In lieu of
flowers the family requests that
memorial donations be made to
the Tabernacle Baptist Academy,
144 SE Montrose Ave., Lake
City, FL 32025 or to the Haven
Hospice, 6037 U.S. Highway
90 West, Lake City, FL 32055.
Arrangements are under the
direction of the DEES-PAR-
RISH FAMILY FUNERAL
HOME, 458 S. Marion Ave.,
Lake City, FL 32025 (386)752-
1234' please sign our on-
line family guestbook at
parrishfamilyfuneralhome. cor

Alonza Campbell Sr.
Mr. Alonza Campbell Sr., 61,
of Fort White, Florida passed
Saturday, May 21, 2011. God
reached down, wrapped His
arms around him and carried
him home.
Alonza was
born Septem-
ber 20, 1949
in Lake City,
Florida to the
parentage of
Mr. Harry and
Mrs. Lizzie
Campbell, both
preceded him in
death. He attend-
ed Richardson "
High School graduating with the
class of 1967. Mr. Campbell was
a Decorated United States Ma-
rine, having earned the Purple
Heart and the Silver Star, during
the Vietnam War. After serv-
ing his country, he returned to
Lake City and married his High
School sweetheart, Annie Jean
Coker. Alonza was a Christian
and a devoted member of his
family church, The Church ofl


God In Christ, in Ft. White, FL.
Employment included Columbia
County School System, Volk-
swagon of Lake City, Caesars
Funeral Home, Raiford Prison,
and the VA Hospital from which
he retired due to health reasons.
He will be greatly missed by ev-
eryone who knew him especially,
his family. He leaves to cherish
his memories; his loving wife of
42 years, Annie Campbell; three
sons, Alonza Campbell, Jr., Da-
vid Campbell (Kristina), Douglas
Campbell, all of Ft. White, FL;
three daughters, Tena Johnson
(T.J.), Tonia Williams, (Clifton)
both of Ft. White, FL, Theathe-
ola Campbell (Arnold), Orlando,
FL; three devoted grandsons,
Auntrez and Clifton Williams,
III, Trevon Johnson; one special
granddaughter, Teaunna John-
son; two brothers, Jeff Gaskins,
Sammy Stanford; brothers and
sisters-in-law; a special cousin,
Mamie Wilson King; a special
niece Sandy Jackson (Charles);
devoted friends, Videl Griffin,
Bobby Ivory, Andrew Jones,
Ryan Acosta, Moses Ortiz; a
host of other nieces, nephews,
other relatives and friends,
and his devoted pet, Ponchito.
Funeral services will be 1:00
P.M. Friday, May 27, 2011
at Combs Funeral Home.
The family will receive friends
from 5-7:00 P.M. Thursday, May
26, 2011 at the funeral home.


Arrangements entrusted to
COMBS FUNERAL HOME
292 NE Washington Street.
Lake City, FL. (386) 752-4366.
Marq Combs-Turner, L.F.D.
"The Caring Professionals"

Wendy Copeland-Simmons
Wendy Copeland-Simmons, a
resident of Baker County passed
away May 24, 2011. Funeral ar-
rangements are incomplete and
will be announced at a later date.
Arrangements entrusted to
COMBS FUNERAL HOME.
292 NE Washington Street. Lake
City, Florida. (386) 752-4366.
Marq Combs-Turner, L.F.D.
"The Caring Professionals"

Shirley Ann Stokes
Shirley Ann Stokes, 60 passed
on Sunday, May 22, 2011.
She was born in Jacksonville,



onS STCLASS
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FL to the late Willie Stokes
and Mamie Freeney Stokes.
She was a
member of
Bethlehem
United Meth-
odist Church,
A graduate of
Richardson
High Class
of 1969,8
and Employed with Ex-
actech. She was preceded in
death by her brothers Isaac
"Hawk" Stokes, Jr., Earl Ron-
nie Stokes and Erwin Johnson.
She is survived by her daughter
Denetria LeSean Stokes, grand-
son Izaya Latham and grand-
daughter Sanaa Latham all of
Fort White; sister Irish (Carlton)


Hill ofGainesville; a host of niec-
es, nephews, cousins and friends.
Funeral services for Ms. Stokes
will be held Saturday, May 28,
2011 at 11:'00 AM at Bethle-
hem U M Church, Rev. Clar-
ence DeSue, Pastor. Burial
will follow in Bethlehem Cem-
etery. Visitation will be Fri-
day 6-8PM at funeral home.
Arrangements entrusted to
A. JEROME BROWN FU-
iNERAL HOME, 1560 N W 1st
Avenue, High Springs, Florida



Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


I 8th ANNual WEllboRN

Blueberry Festival
JUNE 3 & 4, 2010
FRidAy, 9AM-9pM SatURdAy, 7AM-5pM







For directions, information or schedule,
ww.wellborncomm nunityassociation.com
call 386-963-1157P


Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424










LAKE CITY REPORTER HEALTH THURSDAY, MAY 26, 2011


Help needed


in choosing


probiotics


DEAR DR. GOIT: In
a recent column in the
Monterey County (Califf)
Herald, you suggested
a woman try an array
of products, including
probiotics that might
help her overcome flatu-
lence. Would you be kind
enough to write a column
explaining the uses of
probiotics, including the
way in which a person
would select the appropri-
ate product?
The quantity and range
of these products is diz-
zying and confusing, and
the "expertise" is limited,
at best. Doctors and
other practitioners sel-
dom (in my experience)
specify what sort-of pro-
biotics to buy and merely
suggest that we go to a
good health-food store.
That is not helpful.
When we go to a good
health-food store, we find
ourselves confronted
with product names and
ingredients that are com-
pletely unfamiliar. Worse,
these products contain a
range of ingredients that,
presumably, are intended
to treat a wide range of
conditions. But the pack-
ages don't give specific
information. Also, probi-
otics may come in cap-
sule form and be stable
at room temperature, or
they may come in powder
form and require refrig-
eration and mixing just
prior to use. How are we
to know which is best?
My husband and I
were desperate for a pro-
biotic following courses
of antibiotics to treat (of
all things we're in our
70s!) whooping cough.
We did find, with the help
of a salesperson at our
local health-food store,
Jarro-Dophilus EPS,
which comes in capsule
form and can be taken up
to four times a day. We
began with the four and,
after a couple of weeks,
were able to cut the dos-
age down to one per day.
It has been helpful, but I
have no idea whether it
would be the right dose
in every case or not. And
I have no idea Whether
this is something we
should continue to take.

DEAR READER:
Probiotics are live micro-
organisms, referred
to as "good" bacteria,
used to treat illness
and support wellness.
Good bacteria within
the body are essential
for proper development
of the immune system,
as they protect against
harmful microorganisms
that could cause disease.
They aid digestion and


ON HEALTH


Dr. Peter Gott


help with the absorption
of nutrients. Probiotics
can balance the effects of
skin; vaginal, respiratory
and stomach infections;
irritable bowel syndrome;
may reduce the severity
of a cold or flu; and are
used to treat diarrhea
.brought on by the use of
antibiotics.
They are available
in specific foods and as
dietary supplements in
powder, tablet and capsule
forms. Food items with
good bacteria include
yogurts, some juices, fer-
mented and unfermented
milk, soy beverages, soy-
beans and soybean paste
popular for Asian cooking.
The U.S. Department of
Agriculture does not regu-
late dietary supplements.
.Therefore, a probiotic can
be marketed and sold with
minimal or absolutely no
research available on its
safety or on how well it
works. Therefore, it is criti-
cal that readers check with
their personal physicians
Before beginning a regi-
men. Dietary supplements
can cause side effects, may
cause allergic reactions,
and can interfere with
other medications.
The safety of probiotics
has not been studied long
enough to make specific
recommendations as to
which type of ingestion is
best, with consideration
of age, dosing and treat-
ment of individuals with
compromised immune
systems being fac; -rs.
Labeling varies, and there
are more than 25 differ-
ent supplements from
which to choose, each
with its own guidelines
for use for boosting
the immune system, not
for specific problems!
With some, the organ-
Sisms are released into the
stomach within 30 minutes
of ingestion. Once you dis-
continue the probiotic, the
cells clear the body within
five to seven days. Beyond
this, I cannot offer precise
information for varied dis-
orders. The field is simply
too vague.
Dr. Peter Gott is a
retired physician and
the author of the book
"Dr. Gott's No Flour, No'.
Sugar Diet," and the
/recently published "Dr.
Gott's No Floure No Sugar
Cookbook."


Teen battles transplant fear


By LAURAN NEERGAARD
AP Medical Writer
WASHINGTON -
Courtney Montgomery's
heart was failing fast, but
the 16-year-old furiously
refused when her doctors,
and her mother, urged a
transplant.
Previous surgeries
hadn't helped and the
North Carolina girl didn't
believe this scarier opera-
tion would either. It would
take another teen who's
thriving with a new heart
to change her mind.
"I was like, 'No, I don't
want this. If I'm going to
die, I'm going to die,"'
Courtney recalls. "Now I
look back, I realize I wasn't
thinking the way I should
have been."
Teenagers can add
complex psychology to
organ transplantation: Even
though they're minors, they
need to be on board with a
transplant because it's up to
them to take care of their
new organ. Depression,
anger and normal adoles-
cent pangs that tug-of-
war with parents, trying to
fit in can interfere. Its
not just a question of hav-
ing the transplant, but how
motivated they are to stick
with anti-rejection treatment
for years to come.
"The decision-making
process that we go through,
in terms of our ability to
weigh factors in a rational
sense, probably doesn't
mature until you're in your
late 20s," says Dr. Robert
Jaqiiss, pediatric heart
surgery chief at Duke
University Medical Center,
where Courtney eventually
was transplanted. "It intro-
duces an enormous level
of complexity to caring for
these kids."
Then there's the sense
of isolation. Far fewer ado-
lescents than older adults
undergo an organ trans-
plant, making it unlikely
that a teen has ever seen
how fast their peers can
bounce back.
Between 700 and 800
adolescents, ages 11 to 17,
have some type of organ
transplant each year. That's
nearly 40 percent of the
roughly 2,000 annual pedi-
atric transplants. Teens
fare better than any other
age child or adult the
first year after surgery. But
long-term, adolescents do
a bit worse than younger
children, and the reason
isn't biological, Jaquiss says.
Its that teens, and young
adults as well, tend to start
slipping on all the required
follow-up care.
One study found up to
40 percent of adolescent
liver recipients eventually
miss medication doses or
checkups. It can be normal
development, as teens.start
sleeping late and simply
forgetting morning doses,
or sometimes it's rebel-


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this photo taken May 19, Courtney Montgomery shows
the scars of her heart transplant at Duke University Medical
Center in Durham, N.C. Given a choice Courtney had refused
a heart transplant; but then she met another teen who'd just
had one and was doing well.


liousness. Then there are
medication side effects
that Jaquiss says can be
especially troubling to this
image-conscious age group:
weight gain, acne and
unwanted hair growth.
And at the Children's


Hospital of Pittsburgh, sepa-
rate research with heart
recipients has found chron-
ological age is unrelated to
"medical maturity." Young
patients who had a hard
time accepting a transplant
as normal and who avoided


family discussion of prob-
lems, for example, were less
likely to stick with care.
Courtney's mother,.
Michelle Mescall, said that
when the medical center
advised that her daughter
needed to agree to go on
the transplant waiting list,
"I said, Well she's a minor,
what do you mean? I'm
going to make this deci-
sion.' I was just floored that
it was now her decision."
Legally, the hospital could
have proceeded with mom's
OK But clinical social work-
er Shani Foy-Watson says if
that happened, Courtney's
resentment could have
torpedoed her recovery,
setting up just those kinds
of problems with follow-up
care.
Foy-Watson says it's not
unusual for kids who've
lived with serious illness
for years to have a hard
time imagining normalcy
- at the same age when
its normal to seek more
independence from their
terrified parents.
Courtney, of Asheville,
N.C., was diagnosed at age
8 with hypertrophic car-
diomyopathy, a thickened
and hard-to-pump heart
thafs the leading cause
of sudden death in young
athletes. Her mother tried
to shield her from doctors'
death warnings, but says
Courtney became anxious
and depressed early on.


FLORIDA PAIN AND REHABILITATION CENTER
A Formerly Comprehensive Pain Management of Nortft F 'I
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^IBp^^iR^^^P ^^W


IESVILLE OFFICE
OW 1,1th Place
ille, FL 32605
k2-331-0909
r l-0970 -
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LAKE CITY OFFICE
440 SW Perimeter Glen
Lake City, FL 32605
Phone (386) 719-9663
Fax (386)719-9662


LIVE OAK OFFICE
1441 Ohi Ave North
Live Oak, FL 32064
Phone: 386-330-0163
* Fax:386-330-0270


Measles cases on rise


Associated Press

ATLANTA Health offi-
cials say 118 cases of mea-
sles have been reported in
the United States so far this
year the highest number
this early in the year since
1996.
The Centers for Disease
Control and Prevention on
Tuesday released the count
for January 1 through May

( EYE CEN
SGeneral Eye


,I 'A-A
,,~S


20. Cases were seen in 23
states. None of the patients
died, but about 40 percent
were hospitalized.
The U.S. 'normally sees
about 50 cases of measles
in a year, thanks to vaccina-
tions. About 90 percent of
the cases this year were
unvaccinated.
Measles is highly conta-
gious and up to 90 percent
of those exposed gets sick.


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Surgery
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386.754.DOCS (3627)
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Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


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Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com


Lake. City Reporter





SPORTS


Thursday. May 26. 201 I


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


BRIEFS


Future Lady Tiger
camp June 27-28
The third annual
Future Lady Tiger
Volleyball Camp is 9 a.m.
to noon June 27-28 at the
Columbia High gym. The
camp is for girls entering
the sixth through 12th
grades, with' instruction
by members of the CHS'
staff and returning
varsity players. Cost of
$50 includes camp T-shirt.
Registration is in the CHS
front office from 8 am. to
4 p.m. through June 13.
For details, call coach
Casie McCallister at
365-3158.


Lessons at pool
begin in June
Youth and adult
swimming lessons will be
offered at the Columbia
County Aquatic Complex,
beginning in June. Classes
meet for two weeks and
six daily times are offered,
plus there are two daily
mom. and:tot classes.
Five sessions are
offered with the first
session June 6-17. Cost is
$50 per person.
Registration is at the
pool (755-8195) from
5-7 p.m. June 1 and all
day June 2-3.
POP ANERFOOTBALL
Registration for
returning players:
Lake City Pop Warner
football registration fdr
returning players at
Richardson Community
Center is 9 a.m. to.
5 p.m. through Tuesday.
Pop'Warner is seeking
girls ages 5-12.
For details, call Kim
Stephens at 623-2954.


College tryouts
at St. Johns
St Johns River State
College has baseball
tryouts planned Saturday
and June 11 at the on-
campus Tindall Field in
Palatka. The camps are
open to 2011, 2012 and
2013 high school
graduates..
Registration begins at
9:15 a.m. on camp day.
Pitcher-only registration
is at noon. Cost is $50 for
each combine.
For details, call the
St Johns River baseball
office at (386) .3124174.
YOUTH SOCCER
CYSA final
sign-up today
Final registration for
Columbia Youth Soccer
Association's Recreational
Summer Soccer
League (ages 3-16) is
6-7:30 p.m. today at the
CYSA Complex behind
Summers Elementary.
Cost is $65. *
For details, call Scott
Everett at 288-2504.
* From staff reports


Battle, Woods


win Allen's


rope award


Coach happy
with effort put
forth in spring.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com
With any new coaching
staff comes a new tradition.,
Head coach Brian Allen's
first tradition with the
Tigers comes in the form
of a rope.
Allen told the Tigers
to imagine if they were
falling off a cliff and had a
teammate responsible for
pulling them up.
Rakeem Battle was cho-
sen the offensive player
to hold the rope, while


Felix Woods was picked to
represent the defense.
"We wanted to know
which player would hold
the rope with his hands
bleeding,' Allen said.
"Which guy would be hold-
ing .the r6pe knowing that
if they dropped it, their
teammate is dead. There
were two players we felt
we wanted holding the rope
because of the way they
practiced."
Allen did say it was close
and there was a lot put into
the decision.
"We came in as a coach-
ing staff, each night aind
evaluated who we felt
CHS continued on 6B


Stellar


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High's Rakeem Battle (1)'carries the ball during the Purple & Gold game.


sophomore


COURTESY PHOTOS
LEFT: Lake City native Blayne Barber follows through on a shot for the Auburn Tigers earlier
this season.
ABOVE: Barber lines up a putt for Auburn during the 2011 season.


Lake City native Barber

making noise for Tigers


By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com
Former Columbia
High golfer
Blayne Barber
continues to pull
in the accolades
during his sophomore
season at the University of
Auburn.
Barber added two
accomplishments to his
resume recently by being .
named to the All-SEC
team and representing the
United States in the Palmer
Cup.
Barber led the Tigers
with a 70.93 scoring
average and six top-five
finishes during the 2011


season. He had 15 rounds
under par with 12 rounds
in the 60s. His best
finish for the season was
at the 2010 Bridgestone
Collegiate where he shot
rounds of 71, 66 and 65 to
win for the second time in
his collegiate career.
"The Bridgestone
Collegiate definitely sticks
out in my mind," Barber
said. "I went bogey free
over the last two rounds
and shot 13-under with 65
and 66."
For his accomplish-
ments, he was chosen as
part of the All-SEC team.
"It's certainly a
humbling honor," Barber
said. "I'm grateful for the


success, but it's kind of
something that just
happened and sometimes
I don't feel worthy. Its a
result of the work put in
week in and week out."
Barber will compete in
the Palmer Cup from June
9-11 at The Stanwich Club
in Greenwich, Conn. He is
one of eight collegiate
golfers to represent the
United States.
"I am definitely honored
to be chosen," he said. "It
will be a lot of fun, and I
know most of the guys on
the team."
Arnold Palmer will be
in attendance and CBS
BARBER continued on 6B


I r











LAKE CITY REPORTER


SPORTS


THURSDAY, MAY 26, 2011


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
AUTO RACING
8 am.
SPEED Formula One, practice for
Monaco Grand Prix
2 p.m.
SPEED NASCAR, Nationwide
Series, practice for Top Gear 300, at
Concord, N.C.
3:30 p.m.
SPEED NASCAR, Sprint Cup,
practice for Coca-Cola 600, at Concord,
N.C.
5 p.m.
SPEED NASCAR, Nationwide
Series, final practice for Top Gear 300, at
Concord, N.C.
7 p.m.
SPEED NASCAR, Sprint Cup, pole
qualifying for Coca-Cola 600, at Concord,
N.C.
COLLEGE SOFTBALL
8 p.m.
ESPN NCAA Division I playoffs,
super regionals, game I, Stanford at
Alabama
10 p.m.
ESPN2 NCAA Division I playoffs,
super regionals, game I, Texas A&M at
Arizona St.
GOLF
9 a.m.
TGC European PGA Tour, BMW
PGA Championship, first round, at Surrey,
England
Noon
TGC PGA of America, Senior PGA
Championship, first round, at Louisville,
Ky.
3 p.m.
TGC PGA Tour, Byron Nelson
Championship, first round, at IrvingTexas
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
I p.m.
MLB Regional coverage, Boston at
Detroit or Cincinnati at Philadelphia
2:10 p.m.
WGN N.Y. Mets at Chicago Cubs
8:30 p.m.
MLB Arizona at Colorado
NBA BASKETBALL
8:30 p.m.
TNT Playoffs, -conference finals,
game 5, Miamiat Chicago
NHL HOCKEY
9 p.m.
VERSUS Playoffs, conference
finals, game 6, Vancouver at San Jose (if
necessary)
TENNIS
Noon
ESPN2 French Opeh, second
round, at Paris

BASEBALL

AL standings

East Division
NewYork: :* - '17 ':I1:: ::563' -
Boston 27 22 .551 ; 'A
Tampa Bay 26 23 .531 I'A
Toronto 24 25 .4906 3'A
Baltimore 22 24 .478 4
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Cleveland 30 17 .638 -
Detroit 25 23 .521 5'h
Kansas City 22 25 .468 8
Chicago 23 28 .451 9
Minnesota 16 32 .333 14'h
West Division
W L Pct GB
Texas 26 24 .520 -
Los Angeles 25 25 .500 I
Seattle 24 25 .490 'A
Oakland 23 26 .469 2'Ah
Wednesday's Games
Boston 14, Cleveland 2
N.Y.Yankees 7,Toronto 3
Tampa Bay at Detroit, ppd., rain
Seattle 3, Minnesota 0 .
Texas 2, Chicago White Sox I
Kansas City at Baltimore (n)
Oakland at LA.Angels (n)
Today's Games
Kansas City (Francis 1-5) at Baltimore
(Guthrie 2-6), 12:35 p.m.
Boston (Aceves 1-0) at Detroit
(Scherzer 6-1), 1:05 p.m.
Oakland (Anderson 2-4) at L.A.Angers
(Pineiro 2-0), 3:35 p.m.
Chicago White Sox (Humber 3-3) at
Toronto (Morrow 2-2), 7:07 p.m.
Friday's Games
Boston at Detroit, 7:05 p.m.
Chicago White Sox at Toronto,
7:07 p.m.
Cleveland at Tampa Bay, 7:10 p.m.
Kansas City at Texas, 8:05 p.m.
L.A.Angels at Minnesota, 8:10 p.m.
Baltimore at Oakland, 10:05 p.m.
N.Y.Yankees at Seattle, 10:10 p.m.


NL standings
East Division
W L
Philadelphia 29 19
Florida 27 19


Atlanta 28 23
NewYork 22 25
Washington 21 28
Central Division


St. Louis
Milwaukee
Cincinnati
Pittsburgh
Chicago
Houston


W L
30 20
27 23
26 23
22 26
21 25
19 31
West Division


W L Pct GB
San Francisco 27 20 .574 -
Colorado 24 23 .511 3
Arizona 24 24 .500 3'h
Los Angeles 22 29 .431 7
San Diego 19 30 .388 99
Wednesday's Games
Atlanta 4, Pittsburgh 2,11 I innings
Milwaukee 6,Washington 4
Houston 2, LA. Dodgers I
St. Louis at San Diego (n)
Cincinnati at Philadelphia (n)
N.Y. Mets at Chicago Cubs (n)
Arizona at Colorado (n)
Florida at San Francisco (n) I
Today's Games
Cincinnati (Bailey 3-1) at Philadelphia
(CI.Lee 3-4), 1:05 p.m.
N.Y. Mets (Dickey 2-5) at Chicago
Cubs (Zambrano 4-2), 2:20 p.m.
Florida (Ani.Sanchez 3-1) at San
Francisco (Vogelsong 3-0), 3:45 p.m.
Arizona (Owings 0-0) at Colorado
(Mortensen I-I), 8:40 p.m.
Friday's Games
Pittsburgh at Chicago Cubs, 2:20 p.m.
San Diego at Washington, 7:05 p.m.
Philadelphia at N.Y. Mets, 7:10 p.m.
Cincinnati atAtlanta, 7:35 p.m.
Arizona at Houston, 8:05 p.m.
San Francisco at Milwaukee, 8:10 p.m.
St. Louis at Colorado, 8:40 p.m.
Florida at LA. Dodgers, 10:10 p.m.

BASKETBALL


NBA playoffs

CONFERENCE FINALS *
Tuesday
Miami 101, Chicago 93, OT, Miami
leads series 3-1
Wednesday
Oklahoma City at Dallas (n)
Today
Miami at Chicago, 8:30 p.m.

TENNIS

French Open singles

At Stade Roland Garros
Paris
Wednesday
Men
Second Round
Roger Federer (3), Switzerland, def.
Maxime Teixeira, France, 6-3, 6-0, 6-2.
Janko Tipsarevic (29), Serbia, def. Pere
Riba, Spain, 6-1,6-3, 6-0.
Sergiy Stakhovsky (31), Ukraine, def.
Kei Nishikorijapn, 13'-6. -l3, 7-6'(3).
David Ferrer (7), Spain, def. Julien
Benneteau, France, 6-3, 6-4, 6-2.
Gael Monfils (9), France, def. Guillaume
Rufin, France, 6-3, 1-6, 6-1,6-3.
Steve Darcis, Belgium, def. Philipp
Petzschner, Germany, 7-5, 6-4, 6-4.
Juan Martin del Potro (25),Argentina,
def. Blaz Kavcic, Slovenia, 6-3, 6-2, 6-4.
Thomaz Bellucci (23), Brazil, def.
Andreas Seppi, Italy, 6-1,6-2, 6-4.
Richard Gasquet (13), France, def.
Marcel Granollers, Spain, 4-6, 6-3, 6-2,
6-4.
Mikhail Youzhny (12), Russia, def.
Mikhail Kukushkin, Kazakhstan, 6-3, 7-5,
6-4.
Albert Montanes, Spain, def. Ruben
Ramirez Hidalgo, Spain, 6-7 (5), 6-4, 6-I,
6-2.
Novak Djokovic (2), Serbia, def.Victor
Hanescu, Romania, 6-4, 6-1, 2-3, retired.
Fabio Fognini, Italy, def..Stephane
Robert, France, 6-2, 6-1, 6-0.
Jo-Wilfried Tsonga (17), France, def.
IgorAndreev, Russia, 6-3, 7-6 (4), 6-3.
Stanislas Wawrinka (14), Switzerland,
def. Thomas Schoorel, Netherlands, 6-3,
6-2,6-4.
Guillermo Garcia-Lopez (30), Spain,
def. Marsel llh'an, Turkey, 6-4, 1-6, 6-2,
4-6, 13-1 1.
Women
Second Round
Anastasia Rodlonova, Australia, def.
Edina Gallovits-Hall, Romania, 6-1, 6-4.
Sam Stosur (8),Australia, def. Simona
Halep, Romania, 6-0,6-2.
Gisela Dulko, Argentina, def.Tsvetana
Pironkova (32), Bulgaria, 6-4, 6-2.
Caroline Wozniacki (I), Denmark, def.
AleksandraWozniak, Canada, 6-3, 7-6 (6).
Julia Goerges (17), Germany, def. Lucie
Safarova, Czech Republic, 2-6, 7-5, 6-2.
Bethanie Mattek-Sands, United States,
def. Varvara Lepchenko, United States,
6-3,2-6,6-3.
Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova (14), Russia,
def. Mona Barthel, Germany, 6-0, 7-6 (5).
Nuria LlagosteraVives, Spain, defAlize


Cornet, France, 6-0,6-2.
Svetlana Kuznetsova (13), Russia, def.
Irina-Camelia Begu, Romania, 6-1,6-I.
Jelena Jankovic (10), Serbia, def. Vera
Dushevina, Russia, 6-3, 6-2.
Rebecca Marino, Canada, def. Maria
Jose Martinez Sanchez, Spain, 2-6, 6-3,
6-3.
Peng Shuai (29), China, def. Polona
Hercog, Slovenia, 7-5, 6- .
Daniela Hantuchova (28), Slovakia, def.
Sara Errani, Italy, 6-1, 6-2.
Marion Bartoli (II), France, def. Olga
Govortsova, Belarus, 6-4, 6-7 (1), 6-2.
Francesca Schiavone (5), Italy, def.
Vesna Dolonts, Russia, 6-I,6-2.
Vera Zvonareva (3), Russia, def. Sabine
Lisicki, Germany, 4-6,7-5,7-5.

SOFTBALL

NCAA super regionals

(Best-of-3)
Today
Stanford (41-15) at Alabama (49-8),
8 p.m.
Texas A&M (44-13) at Arizona State
(53-6), 10 p.m.
Friday
Oregon (42-14) at Florida
(50-10), 2 p.m.
Houston (43-16) vs. Oklahoma State
(40-17), 7 p.m.
Oklahoma (40-17) at Arizona (43-16),
11:30 p.m.
Saturday
California (42-10) at Kentucky
(39-14), Noon
Baylor (43-12) at Georgia (50-12),
7:30 p.m.
Washington (37-14) at Missouri
(38-5), 9 p.m.

HOCKEY

NHL playoffs

CONFERENCE FINALS
Tuesday
Vancouver 3, San Jose 2, Vancouver
wins series 4-1
Wednesday
Boston atTampa Bay (n)

AUTO RACING


Race week

INDYCAR
Indianapolis 500
Site: Indianapolis.
Schedule: Friday, Carb Day, including
Firestone Freedom 100 Indy Lights race
(Versus, II a.m.-4 p.m.); Sunday, race,
noon (ABC, II a.m.-4 p.m.).
Track: Indianapolis Motor Speedway
(oval, 2.5 miles).
Race distance: 500 miles, 200 laps.
Next races: Firestone Twin 275s, June
I Texas Motor Speedway, Fort Worth,
Texas. I 1
Online: http://www.indycDr.com
NASCAR
SPRINT CUP
Coca-Cola 600
Site: Concord, N.C.
Schedule: Today, practice (Speed,
3:30-5 p.m.), qualifying (Speed, 7-9 p.m.);
Saturday, practice (Speed, 1'1:30 a.m.-
2 p.m.); Sunday, race, 6 p.m. (FOX, 5:30-
1I p.m.).
Track: Charlotte Motor Speedway
(oval, 1.5 miles).
Race distance: 600 miles, 400 laps.
Next race: STP 400, June 5, Kansas
Speedway, Kansas City, Kan.
Online: http:llwww.noscar.com
NATIONWIDE
Top Gear 300
Site: Concord, N.C.
Schedule: Today, practice (Speed,
2-3:30 p.m., 5-6:30 p.m.); Saturday,
qualifying (ESPN2, 10-11 a.m.), race,
2:30 p.m. (ABC, 2-5:30 p.m.).
Track: Charlotte Motor Speedway
(oval, 1.5 miles).
Race distance: 300 miles, 200 laps.
Next race: STP 300, June 4,
Chicagoland SpeedwayJoliet, IIl.
CAMPING WORLD TRUCKS
Next race: O'Reilly Auto Parts 250,
June 4, Kansas Speedway, Kansas City,
Kan.
FORMULA ONE
Monaco Grand Prix
Site: Monte Carlo. Monaco.
Schedule: Today, practice (Speed,
8-9:30 a.m.); Saturday, practice, qualifying
(Speed, 8-9:30 a.m.); Sunday, race, 8 a.m.
(Speed, 7:30-10 a.m.).
Track: Circuit de Monaco (street
course, 2.075 miles).
Race distance: 161.9 miles, 78 laps.
Next race: Canadian Grand Prix,June
12, Circuit Gilles Villeneuve, Montreal.
Online: http://www.formul I.com
NHRA FULLTHROTTLE
Next event: NHRA Supernationals,
June 2-5, Old Bridge Township Raceway
Park, Englishtown, N.J.
Online: http://www.nhro.com


Lakers turn to Brown


By GREG BEACHAM
Associated Press

LOS ANGELES The
Los Angeles Lakers have
reached an agreement
in principle with former
Cleveland coach Mike
Brown to succeed Phil
Jackson, the team said
Wednesday.
"We've met with Mike
and are very impressed
with him," said a statement
issued by the Lakers. "In
addition, we have arn outline
for an agreement in place
and hope to sign a contract
within the next few days."
Brown will get a four-
year deal worth roughly $18
million, a person with knowl-
edge of the discussions told


The Associated Press on
Wednesday on condition
of anonymity because the
Lakers hadn't yet formally
hired Brown.
With a strong inter-
view last weekend, Brown
jumped to the front of the
line of candidates for the
daunting challenge of suc-
ceeding the 11-time NBA
champion Jackson with one
of the NBA's iconic fran-
chises. Brown will be the
22nd coach of the Lakers,
whose 16 NBA titles trail
only the Boston Celtics' 17
in league history.
Rather than promoting
one of Jackson's assistant
coaches, the Lakers are
changing course after an
abrupt end to their two-year


title reign and the long-
anticipated departure of
Jackson, the coach with
the most championship
rings in NBA history.
After nearly quitting last
summer, Jackson retired
earlier this month after the
Dallas Mavericks swept
the. defending two-time
champion Lakers out of
the second round of the
playoffs.
Although Kobe Bryant
endorsed Jackson assis-
tant Brian Shaw for ,the
vacancy, Jim Buss the
Lakers' executive vice pres-
ident of player personnel
and the son of owner Jerry
Buss became intrigued
by Brown after Saturday's
interview.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Novak Djokovic of Serbia returns in his match against Victor Hanescu of Romania during
the second round match of the French Open tennis tournament at Roland Garros stadium
in Paris, Wednesday.



Djokovic, Federer reach


3rd round at French Open


By CHRIS LEHOURITES Spain, No. 9 Gael Monfils Federer defeated French
Associated Press of France and former wild card Maxime Teixeira
U.S. Open champion Juan 6-3, 6-0, 6-2 to reach the
PARIS Novak Martin del Potro made it third round. Teixeira is 1-1
Djokovic's perfect sea- through. at the French Open after
son is still intact and Defending champion winning his first tour-level
his clay-court form still Schiavone cruised past match on Sunday.
looks devastating after he Vesna Dolonts of Russia The 16-time Grand Slam
reached the third round 6-1, 6-2, winning 11 games champion, despite being
of the French Open when in a row. broken early in the match,
Victor Hanescu retired Djokovic, who won made it look easy by win-
Wednesday because of three clay-court tour- ning 13 straight games
injury. naments leading up to from the first set to the
The second-seeded Serb, Roland Garros and beat third.
who joined 2009 champion top-ranked Rafael Nadal in "He fought hard, and
Roger Federer in the third two of them, won seven afterwards he was try-
'round at Roland Garros, straight games at one ing to get the best score,"
improved to 39-0 in 2011 point and didn't face any Federer said of his 22-year-
after Hanescu retired trouble from his Romanian old opponent "The score
while trailing 6-4, 6-1, opponent. was balanced for 1'k sets,
2-3. Djokovic has won 41 Hanescu called for a but even then he fought
straight matches dating to trainer to look at his left hard."
last year's Davis Cup final, leg after losing the second Federer didn't face
"I keep on thinking only set. The trainer came back a single break point in
about the winning. I'm tak- out after Hanescu held to his opening match, and
ing one match at a time," make it 3-2 in the third. Teixeira managed only
Djokovic said. "Really, I'm Djokovic then won the one on Wednesday and
not thinking about when next two points before he converted it After the
this streak this amaz- Hanescu called it quits. Frenchman held to go to
ing streak wi'l end. SoI In' the next round, 3-3, Federer dominated and
guess that's the right met F- BjokovicWill fade Del Potro, didn't lose another game
tal approach"' ':' who defeateBlaz Kavcic of- until the Teixeira made it
If he makes the final, Slovenia 6-3, 6-2, 64. 4-1 in the third set
Djokovic will be assured of "Well,'it's a big challenge Teixeira had beaten
the No. 1 ranking in men's for both of us," Djokovic another French wild card,
tennis for the first time. said. "He's a fantastic play- Vincent Millot, in the first
Top-ranked Caroline er who always deserved round.
Wozniackiand 2010 French to be in the top five in the "I gave it all. I did what
Open finalists Francesca world, and I'm sure he's I could," Teixeira said. 'To
Schiavone and Sam Stosur going to come back very play against Roger is an
also advanced to the third quickly there, because incredible experience. I'll
round. On the men's side,, he has amazing ground- never forget it and it will be
No. 7 David Ferrer of strokes and a big serve." great memories."


1
I
6
11
12
13
15 E
16
18
19 i

21

22


ACROSS 40 Headphones,
slangily
Bellowed like a 41 Road "beetles"
cow 42 News channel
Army chaplain 43 Pipe bowl,
Prefix with red maybe
Stair part 46 Meadow flower
Affidavit taker 48 Big name in
Bwana's trip trains
Rough drawing 50 Skilled per-
Service charge sons
Chief Ouray's 54 "Lou Grant"
tribe guy
Overwhelming 55 Super-duper
wonder 56 Down and out
Rubaiyat 57 Way in


author
23 Sharpen
25 Blonde shade
28 Young girl
30 Gamble
31 Erwin of films
32 Acorn dropper
33 Indy 500
month
35 UFO passen-
ger
37 Go-aheads
38 One opposed


DOWN


Hr. part
Plastic Band
Many times
Pencil ends
Moonless
Egyptian god
Woof!
Unhearing
Hard to find
Ms. Adams


Answer to Previous Puzzle

JUTES BAFFLE


SCORE ADO BES
=-!-!---SAIDOI IE






BOAlUS E IM BU E
SERIES I pN ARE
SUDSY G IS NAT
MAP OHS SAL
ORD E EK
ARGUED ROOSTS
DIESEL SNARES
SANELY SL IIDE


14 Uh-huh
15 of the crime
17 Lumber yard
buy (hyph.)
19 Aleut craft
20 Chores


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


22 Melville novel
24 Depot info
25 From Japan
26 Grim
27 Rome wreck-
ers
29 Incan singer
Sumac
34 Smithy's block
36 Reading desk
39 Cuba, to
Castro
43 Large family
44 River to the
Seine
45 Doggie treat
46 "- funny!"
47 Beat slightly
49 Jarrett of
NASCAR
51 Four-footed
pal
52 Pothole filler
53 Shoat's home


2011 by UFS, Inc.










Page EdItor: Dave Kimle, 754-0413 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS THURSDAY, MAY 26, 2011


SLETS SUAVE
tp A OUR "ENDS!



^ULP. VJ


>f \ v5a.4S


BLONDIE


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGAR THE HORRIBLE
WAr ]70MIWONA REM'd O I


SNUFFY SMITH


...SO PAW SAYS, "BAH !! TH' 1 THEN TH' BIG FELLER SAYS, "OH, YEAH ?
BIGGER THEY ARE, TH' WELL, TH' SMALLER THEY ARE, TH'
HARDER THEY FALL !!" W h EASIER THEY ARE TO SQUISH !! \-


ZITS


GARFIELD


B.C.


DEAR ABBY


Mother's outbursts suggest

something's seriously wrong


DEAR ABBY: My dad
died four years ago. He and
Mom had many friends and
did everything together,
including raising nine chil-
dren.
Mom was always in
charge of things. Dad re-
inforced any decisions she
made and vice versa. Since
his death, Mom has become
progressively more bitter.
Eight children are alive to-
day, and we all avoid her if
we can. She cries because
no one stops by to see her,
but if we do, she has a long
chore list waiting. I have my
own home, work two jobs
and don't want what little
time I have with her spent
working as her slave.
If by chance I feel brave
enough to take her out in
public, she embarrasses me
with her verbal outbursts.
She waits until I start to
pay, then asks loudly, "Are
you sure you have enough
money in the bank to pay
for that?" Another time, she
stopped a complete strang-
er, told him I was single and
asked if he wanted to know
my bra size!
I have tried talking to
her. She just gets mad and
makes my life even more
miserable. Mom will be 70
in a few months. I want to
enjoy her and what time we
have left together, but I find
myself running away from


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearobby.com
her wrath! I don't want to
live without her, but I don't
want to live with her, ei-
ther. Please tell me what to
do. -- DRIVEN AWAY IN
GEORGIA
DEAR DRIVEN AWAY:
Was your mother always this
way? If not, please under-
stand that she may be seri-
ously ill. You have described
some symptoms of the on-
set of dementia. Instead of
shunning her, you and your
siblings need to encourage
her to see her doctor be-
cause she needs a thorough
physical and neurological
examination. Offering you
to a strange man was ex-
tremely inappropriate, and
her chore list may indicate
that she's no longer able to
do what's on it for herself.
Your mother NEEDS all of
you right now. Go with her
to the doctor, and be sure
her physician knows what's
been going on. It may take
insistence from all of you to
get her there. Please don't
let her down. You have my
sympathy and so does she.


DEAR ABBY: I am a
single dad of three kids.
For the past three years I
have promised to take them
to Disney World. The first
year, my youngest got sick
and had to have surgery.
'The following year, I had a
stroke and was laid up for
a while. This year, as I was
on my wayto get the tickets,
my car broke down.
I work so hard to give my
kids what they need, but I
can't give them a vacation
they can remember for the
rest of their lives. I feel like
I have let them down. How
can I make this feelinggo
away? NO MAGIC FOR
US IN OHIO
DEAR NO MAGIC: For
one thing, stop beating your-
self up over circumstances
that are beyond your control.
As a single parent, you are
giving your children love,
support and memories of a
caring father that WILL last
a lifetime. You'll take them to
Disney World at a time when
it is feasible. Until then, for-
give yourself for not having
been able to deliver on your
promise immediately.
N Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-April
19): Your emotions will run
deep. You need to strength-
en your position, not leave
it wide open for criticism
or a force play by someone
looking to take advantage of
your vulnerability. Recognize
whatever service you have to
offer. ***

TAURUS (April 20-May
20): Commune with people
who think, live and do things
differently from you. You will
learn skills and information
that enable you to adVance.
Love is enhanced. Interact
with someorie emotionally or
personally, whether you are
single or in a relationship.


GEMINI (May 21-June
20): You will be caught in
the act if you don't stick to
the truth and follow through
with the promises you made.
Separate your emotions .from
the equation if you are deal-
ing with colleagues or em-
ployers. Stick to what you do
best and avoid gossip. **

CANCER (June 21July
22): Share your thoughts,
your insight and your ideas.
Rely on past experience to
help you make the best choic-
es with regard to work and
potential direction. Befriend
someone who can teach you
how to diversify. Love is in
the stars. *****


THE LAST WORD.
Eugenia Last

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):
What's required is expanding
your knowledge and choos-
ing the direction that best
suits you. Let go of people,
places and things that are no
longer of use to you. It will be
your first step to personal and
emotional freedom. ***

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Travel for business or
knowledge. Your hard work
will pay off and gain you the
respect you deserve. It's the
satisfaction you derive from
what you do that will count.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): Pay closer attention to
your health and your habits.
If you haven't been doing
what's best for you, make
whatever adjustments are
necessary. You need more
downtime to spend with
friends or family or to pam-
per yourself. ***

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov.
21): Put more emphasis on
your relationships. Commu-
nication will help yoiu deci-
pher where to put your en-
ergy.. A trip to visit someone
who inspires you will open
a window of opportunity, al-
lowing you to use your skills
in an unusual way. *****


SAGITARIUS


22-Dec. 21): You'll have to
tie up loose ends before you
take off on your next adven-
ture. Use your past connec-
tions and experience to help
you finish a project that can
determineyour future. Don't
think about what you need to
do, get started. **

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19): Listen to what's being
said. Once you get a bet-
ter feel for the situation you
face, obstacles will be lifted.
Focus on home, family and
your personal space and you
will develop the perfect spot
to combine work and play.


AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Not everyone will
see things as you do. Be
careful with whom you share
your plans. Get rid of the
negativity in your life so you
can make the most of your
plans for the future. Believe
in yourself. ***

PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): People you have worked
or studied with will be of help
now. Explain how you can
make what you have to offer
something your community
or a group you-volunteer for
needs. A friend, lover or col-
league from your past should
be contacted. ***


(Nov.


CELEBRITY CIPHER


FRANK & ERNEST


by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter In the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: V equals 0C
"U V C Z R PL RP ZF U JHUPZFUZRE ZFJZ
KIGGP ZFU WJRH CS PZIWRKRZB."
SDJHA G U J F B
"R JL J KUUWGB PIWUDSRERJG
WUDPCH." JHKB MJDFCG
PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "I always think of melodrama as the thing we are all
capable of that's swept under the rug." Sidney Lumet
(c) 2011 by NEA, Inc. 5-26


FOR BETTER OR WORSE
LWoK OUT! T HoRm I RND DFRRRAH- I
PLAYEPR HR LARPED I BRFNGETH THEE.
HIs FIRSTfglt/cHEcKt.! ^lh ME; C


CLASSIC PEANUTS


DILBERT


LAKE CITY REPORTER


Page Editor: Dave Kimle, 754-0413


ADVICE & COMICS THURSDAY, MAY 26, 2011










Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED THURSDAY, MAY 26, 2011

Lake City Reporter




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regarding the prohibition of discrimi-.
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100 Job
Opportunities

AVON!! Only $10 to start!
Earn bonus $ up to $150+
1-800-275-9945 pin #4206
www.youravon.com/tdavies


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO 11-61-CA
TD BANK, N.A., d/b/a MERCAN-
TILE.BANK,
Plaintiff,
vs.
JOSEPH LAMAR DUPREE, JR.,
SANDRA LYNETTE DUPREE arid
THE UNITED STATES OF AMER-
ICA
Defendants
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
real property located in Columbia
County, Florida, described as fol-
lows:
All of Lot 6 as lies South of State
Road No. 10, also better known as
U.S.Highway No. 90 and all of Lots
7,8,9,10
and
N 1/2 of Lot 11, all in Block No. 10
of Country Club Estates, a subdivi-
sion as per map filed in the Office of
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Co-
lumbia County, Florida on October
26, 1925, the parcel of land descri-
bed above situate in SW 1/4 of NW
1/4 of Section 34, Township 3 South,
Range 17 East.
Columbia County Parcel No. 34-3S-
17-07068-000
Columbia County Parcel No. 34-3S-
17-07069-000
Shall be sold by the Clerk of this
Court, at public sale, pursuant to the
Summary Final Judgment of Fore-
closure rendered in the above styled
action dated May 16, 2011 at the Co-
lumbia County Courthouse, in Lake
City, Columbia County Florida, at
11:00 A.M. on Wednesday, June 29,
2011, to the best and highest bidder
for cash.
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN IN-
TEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM
.THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER,
AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS
PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE
SALE.
WITNESS my hand and'official seal
in the State and County aforesaid this
16th day of May, 2011
Dewitt Cason
Clerk of Court
By:/s/B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
05525986
May 26, 2011
June 2, 2011
Registration of Fictitious Names
We the undersigned, being duly
sworn, do hereby declare under oath
that the names of all persons interest-
ed in the business or profession car-
ried on under the name of LAKE
CITY PRODUCE at 728 E. DUVAL
ST., LAKE CITY, FL., 32055

Contact Phone Number: 386-755-
9130 and the extent of the interest of
each, is as follows:
Name: ADAM'R. WASDEN
Extent of Interest: 100%
by:/s/Adam R. Wasden
STATE OF FLORIDA
COUNTY OF COLUMBIA
Sworn to and subscribed before me
this 23 day of May, A.D. 2011.
by:/s/ KATHLEEN A. RIOTTO
04544917
May 26, 2011

Registration of Fictitious Names
We the undersigned, being duly
sworn, do hereby declare under oath
that the names of all persons interest-
ed in the business or profession car-
ried on under the name of TWO
PAWS UP at 141 SE SEARS CT.,
LAKE CITY, FL., 32025

Contact Phone Number: 386-755-
4729 and the extent of the interest of
each, is as follows:
Name: KATHLEEN MCCLENI-
THAN
Extent of Interest: 100%
by:/s/ Kathleen McClenithan
STATE OF FLORIDA
COUNTY OF COLUMBIA
Sworn to and subscribed before me
this 23.day of May, A.D. 200_.
by:/s/ KATHLEEN A. RIOTTO
04544918
May 26, 2011

Registration of Fictitious Names
We the undersigned, being duly
sworn, do hereby declare under oath
that the names of all persons interest-
ed in the business or profession car-
ried on under the name of VISION
. WOODWORKS at 729 SW BLAY-
LOCK CT., LAKE CITY, FL.,
32024
Contact Phone Number' 386-755-
7220 and the extent of the interest of
each, is as follows:
Name: VISION PROJECT MAN-
AGEMENT, LLC
Extent of Interest: 100%
by:/s/ JOSHUA J. WILLEMS
STATE OF FLORIDA
COUNTY OF COLUMBIA
Sworn to and subscribed before me
this 23 day of May, A.D. 2011.
by:/s/LISA MARTIN
04544922
May 26, 2011


020 Lost & Found

Missing Shih-tzu. Last seen
Thurs., 5/12, Nash Road area. Was
my daughters dog before her pass-
ing. Please return. 386-752-7545


Counselor for substance abuse pro-
gram in Baker Correctional Institu-
tion. BA w/2yrs exp., M-F day
shift F/T, $30,000 to start, E-mail
resume to sheliarand@aol.com.or
fax to 386-752-2387


100 Job
100 Opportunities
04544933
Drag Line Operator
World Class Cement Manufac-
turer in North Florida mine in
need of Drag Line Operator
with: 10 years experience
preferred; 8 yd to 20yd
machine experience; friction and
electric knowledge required;
experience in digging
underwater rock; past .
experience in MHSA mine.
Must be able to operate mobile
equipment and assist with
department needs as necessary.
HS Diploma or equivalent
preferred. Must be willing to
work overtime and accept call-
ins after hours. Company offers
a competitive salary and an
excellent benefits package. EOE
& Drug Free Workplace with
random drug testing policy.
Suwannee American Cement,
PO Box 410,
Branford, FL 32008
Call Human Resources
386-935-5001
Associate Reps
SUMMER WORK/GREAT PAY
Immediate FT/PT openings,,
Customer sales/service,
No exp needed, conditions,
Apply Now all ages 17+
(386) 269-0883
ATTENTION: student and 0/0
Lease and a Lease Purchase Plan
100% fuel Sucharge, health and
life Insurance available, Spouse
Rider Program, Pet Policy, Never
Roam alone again, NO New
England States! Independent
Contractors needed! GO West!!
Buel, Inc. 866-369-9744
Cashiers needed, Experience
Preferred, Drug free workplace,
all applicants will be drug tested
Ellisville Exxon,
Hwy 441, No Phone Calls Please.
CDL A Flatbed Truck Driver
needed for F/T OTR SE area, 3
years exp or more, Contact .
Melissa or Mary @ 386-935-2773
CNC Machinist position available
Will train. Good math skills
req'd. Metal working exp. helpful.
Must pass basic shop math test.
Send resume to 174 NE Cortez
Terr.-Lake City, Fl. 32055.
CONSUMER LENDER
F/T position in Lake City. Exp
selling financial products, proven
customer relations expertise, and
lending exp REQ. Great pay and
benefits! App REQ and available
at www.sunstatefcu.org. Fax to
386-462-7823 DFWP/EOE
Contract Wood
Haulers needed.
386-288-6875
for information
Experienced estimator needed
for site work & underground utili-
ty contractor. Must be familiar
w/coristruction software & project
management. DFWP. Fax resume:
386-364-2802, call 386-362-7814
4 TEMP Farmworkers needed
6/20/11 12/31/11. Workers will
cultivate, cut, house, & strip
tobacco; cultivate & harvest corn
& soybeans. Random drug
testing at employer's expense.
Guaranteed 3/4 of contract hours.
Tools provided at no cost.
Free housing provided for
non-commuting workers.
Transportation & subsistence
reimbursed to worker upon
completion of 50% of contract, or
earlier. $9.48/hr. Worksites in
Todd & Logan Co KY. Report or
send a resume to nearest local FL
Agency of Workforce Innovation
office & reference Job # KY
0425883. Penick Farms -
Allensville, KY
Physical laborer needed. CDL
license req'd. Must have respect
for electricity & ability to work in
water & mud. Call 386-752-1854
SECURITY OFFICERS
FT/PT, Great Pay and Benefits.
Lake City/Alachua Area.
Must have Sec. Lic., clean
background, pass drug screen.
Call: 866-458-9523 EOE
Security Officers
needed Lake City Area, must have
current D Security Lic., Clear
background, Drivers Lic, phone,
Diploma/GED. Benefits, DFWP
EEO Must Apply at:
www.dsisecurity.com MB 1000084
Stylist Needed
Call
386-752-4614
Southern Exposure
Wanted Highly motivated
individual for Sales Position.
Rountree -Moore Automotive
Group, Great benefits, paid vaca-
tion. Exp. a plus but not necessary.
Call Tony Reese 386-344-7517
Wanted P/f Farm Hand in
exchange for Free Rent. For info.
386-466-2557 (leave message) or
rebadear@gmail.com.
Background required.

120 Medical
Employment
CNA/home attendant needed in
private home. Will work with oth-
er caregivers. Nights & weekends
req'd. Send resume to: PO Box
3719 Lake City, Florida 32056


130 Part Time
TELLER
P/T position in Lake City. Strong
customer service skills, high
volume cash handling or teller exp
and professional appearance req.
App REQ & avail at www.
sunsiatefcu.org. Fax to
386-462-7823 DFWP, EOE

2A4 Schools &
240 Education

04544843
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-05/23/10
Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-07/11/11
Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com


310 Pets & Supplies
HYBRID WOLF Pup female.
Up to date shots.
On Preventative. $500.
386-984-6887
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external .
parasites. Many species of wild'-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.

330 Livestock&
30 Supplies

Black Angus Cows & Heifers
Prices Vary
Registered & Commercial
386-719-4802
Pig
For Sale
$35
386-758-2978
Single Lane Farms
(1) 5 yr old registered Angus bull.:
Duane Hingson. 386-776-1090
Wayne Parrish Bull.

361 Farm Equipment
84 Ford 4610 Tractor.
2WD, Solid
2005 motor,$7,500. OBO
386-867-0005

407 Computers
Dell Desktop Computer,
$75
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170

SMedical
412 Supplies

Invacare Electronic Hospital Bed,
like new mattress,
$200
386-965-9822

416 Sporting Goods
GUN CASE, holds 6 long
guns. Glass front with light oak
finish.Top & bottom cabinet locks.
$75.00 386-243-8086

420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.

Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$250 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.


430 Garage Sales

BYRDS STORE CR 49. Fri.
Sat.& Sun, (8-5). 247-240R CR
49R, 247 Beachville. CR 49N, 252
Pinemount Rd CR 49L. Lots of
antiques, new items inside, outside
if no Rain watch for signs.


430 Garage Sales






PUBLISHER'S NOTE'
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.



440 Miscellaneous
3 PUSH Mowers.
Need TLC. (1) Craftsman,
(1) Bolen (1) Yardman.
$100.00 for all. 386-755-6963
4 ROOM USED CARPET
AND PADDING. Off white.
You move, haul away and clean
the carpet. $60.00 386-755-6963
500 9.5 in x 4.5 in #10
White secutiry enveolpes
with window. $45.00
386-755-6963
King Size Mattress,
very good condition,
$50
386-965-9822
Medical Reclining Lift.
Chair. Great Shape,
$200 obo. Call Pete @
,386-344-5764
SOLID KNOTTY pine wood.
Nice rocking chair with 6in
cushions, (seat and back).
$100. 00 386-755-6963
Summer Barbecue Special
Tow Behind
Grill/Smoker, $1,250 OBO.
386-719-4802

4 0 Good Things
5 to Eat
BLUEBERRY HILL
U-PICK opens
May 30th
386-963-4220

463 Building
463 Materials
JOB SURPLUS: 2x4xl0ft (6pcs)
3/4" x 4ft x 8ft OSB (1 sheet)
2x4 and 1x4 various lengths
$50 for all. 386-754-1595

510 Jet Ski's
510 for sale
Wave Runner 96 Polaris.
w/galvanized Trailer, only
64 hrs, many extra parts
$T,500 obo 386-234-1019"

1,' Mobile Homes
630 for Rent
2&3 BR MH. $395 $650. mo.
plus deposit. Water & sewer fur-
nished. Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
* 2/2 Newly remodeled MH New
Floors/counter tops. Lg lot, quiet
area No pets 1st, last & sec. $400
mo $300 sec will work w/payment
plan. Call Jenn 386-454-7724
2/2 Units, clean, well maintained,
nice safe park setting, 2 miles to
downtown Lake City, $550 month
+ $550 sec dep, 386-984-8448
2B/IBA. MH., quiet living. Clean.
New stove, new carpet, carport.
NO PETS! 1st & deposit.
Adult community. Smoke free
environment. 386-758-3963
2br /2ba SWMH; also Residential
RV lots for rent between Lake City
& G'ville. Access to 1-75 & 441
(352)317-1326 Call for terms
3/2 S of Lake City, (Branford area)
$400 dep, $600 month
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
wwvy.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
CLEAN 3br/lba, In quiet,
private park. Large lot
Call: 386-752-6269
lv message if no answer.
DWMH,On Private Location
CR 252, Close to Town 3/2
CH/A $500 monthly
386-755-0242
Eastside Village a 55+ Retirement
Community offers 2br/2ba Manu-
factured home fully furnished. No
pets. Leases for $650 + utilities.
1st, last, security. Eastside Village
Realty, Inc. 752-5290 for info.
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White Contact 386-623-3404
or 386-365-1919
SWMH w/additon on
Birley Ave.
Off Pinemount. $550 mo.
386-288-6875


MIWUY


SE L Tai.^

FIND IJT


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

755-5440


630 Mobile Homes
6 0 for Rent
X-CLEAN 2/2 SW, 8 mi
NW of VA. Clean acre lot, nice
area. $500. mo + dep No dogs
386-961-9181

640l Mobile Homes
640 for Sale
Access Realty Make Offer! 3/2
MH w/over 1700 SF & move in
ready. Convenient to schools,
shopping & hospitals. MLS 73861
$89,500. Patti Taylor.623-6896
650n Mobile Home
650 & Land
FOR SALE: $68,000 CASH FOR
QUICK SALE: In McAlpin.
10 Acres W/2006 DW,
863-634-5283 for details.
MH on 1 Acre in Live Oak near "
Peacock Lake, owner finance
$42,500 MLS#77598 Call Roger
Lovelady 386-365-7039 @
Westfield Realty Group
Owner Finance, Nice 3/2, S of
Lake City, small down/$650 mo
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com

y710 Unfurnished Apt.
/1 A For Rent

05525655
SPRING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans;
some with garages.
Call 386-454-1469
or visit our website: .
www.springhillvillage.net







1 & 2 Bedroom Apartments
Move in for as low as
$199-
386-755-2423
Great location W of 1-75, spacious
deluxe 2BR apts., garage, W/D
hook up. patio. $600 & up, + SD,
386-344-3715 or 386-965-5560
The Lakes Apts. Studios & 1Br's
from $135/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $450.. + sec.
Call Michelle 386-752-9626

720 Furnished Apts.
2 For Rent
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

730 Unfurnished
Home For Rent

Eastside Village a 55+ Retirement
Community offers 2br/lba Duplex,
no pets. Leases for $600 + utilities.
First, last, security. Eastside
Village Realty, Inc. 752-5290







Land Clearing

Back Hoe, Dozer, Chopping, root
raking, bush hog, seeding, sod,
disking, site prep, ponds &
irrigation. Free Est! 386-623-3200

Lawn & Landscape Service

Clean Pine Straw,
You pick it up, $1.85 a bale
Delivery of 100 bales $260
386-688-9156
Landscape Maintenance Company
You can trust for knowledge &
pride, Mention this AD!
Mow Green, LLC 386-288-6532

Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.


Valley
Electric
B Cooperative
Suwannee Valley Electric Cooperative, Inc.
Member Assistance Representative
Suwannee Valley Electric Cooperation, Inc. has an immediate opening for
a Member Assistance Representative position. This position reports to
the Member Services Manager and will be responsible for assisting the
Cooperative's members in a pleasant, efficient and productive manner. This
position requires a High School Diploma, an excellent personality and some
computer skills including Microsoft Office.

Applications and job descriptions may be picked up at the Suwannee
Valley Electric administration building, 11340 100th St., Live Oak. The jobs
description can be. viewed on www.svec-coop.com. Resumes and applications
can be turned in at the above address with Attn: Vicky Talmadge, or emailed
to vickyt()svec-coop.com. The deadline for accepting applications is
Wednesday, June 1, 2011.
SVEC is an equal opportunity employer.











LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED THURSDAY, MAY 26, 2011


730 i Unfurnished
J Home For Rent
Home for Rent.
3/2 in City Limits. No pets.
$1000. per month. Call Susan,
Realtor. 386-623-6612
Large 2/1 newly remodeled, near
school, $575 mo, + dep, no pets!,
pls Iv mess. 386-365-1920 or 454-
7764 after 6p. 843 SE Putnam St.
Live Oak, nice 2/1 brick, near
hospital, quiet well kept area.
Lawn & garbage. $850.
386-963-2611/cell 817-988-3284
Private House for Rent
Newly Remodeled, S of Lake City
Call The Adams Agency @
386-752-1444

750 Business &
50 Office Rentals
For Lease: 1,500 17,000sf
1525 S. Ohio Ave, Live Oak, FL
Call Scott Stewart@ Westfield
Realty Group 386-867-3498
FOR LEASE: Downtown office
space. Convenient to
Court house.
Call 386-755-3456
For Lease: E Baya Ave. Two -
1000 sqft office space units or
combined for 2000 sqft. 386-984-
0622 or weekends 386-497-4762
Office Space For Lease
2112sf, 7 rms, Irg conf rm, 4 baths,
private parking MLS#76508
$1760/mo, Call Pam @ Remax
386-303-2505
OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$695. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor

790 Vacation Rentals
Horseshoe Beach Summer Spcl
Gulf Front 2br, w/lg porch, dock,
fish sink. wkend $345./wk $795.
386-235-3633/352-498-5986
alwaysonvacation.com #419-181
"Florida's Last Frontier"

805 Lots for Sale
5 Acre Lot, Secluded & Cleared,
MLS# 67871 $55,000
Call Lisa Waltrip
@ 386-365-5900
westfieldrealtygroup.com
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Fort White, 5 ac. lot. Cleared,
grass, paved street, high and dry.
I MLS# 77031
Sherry 386-365-8414 $23,999
Hallmark Real Estate. Cleared
2.57 ac. fenced w/32' Dutchman
camper. In O'Brien. Close to Live
Oak, Lake City, Branford. $25,000
MLS# 74534 386-867-1613
Hallmark Real Estate. Owner
Finance with $5K down with
terms negotiable. Below assessed
value for the county. MLS#.74484
$17,900 Jay Sears 386-867-1613
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this,,
newspaper is suj'et to mtfe fair
housing act'which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

810 Home for Sale
3/2 Brick Home in town, fenced
back yard w/12x12 workshop
$79,900 Just Reduced!
MLS# 77414 R.E.O.Realty
Group, Inc 386-243-8227
3/2 Brick Home w/1 car garage,
detach carport MLS#77780
$109,900; Call Jo Lytte Remax
386-365-2821
www.jolytte.florida-property-search.com


810 Home for Sale
3/2 Cute Home, Remodeled, on 2
acres, partially fenced $114,900-
MLS# 77396
R.E.O. Realty Group
S386-243-8227
3/2 in Lake City Airpark
pool, porch, pond, detach garage
large hangar w/living quarters
MLS#77756 $399,900 Westfield
Call Josh G 386-466-2517
4/2 on 10.5 acres w/ detached
garage, patio, above ground pool,
MLS# 77410 $189,888
R.E.O. Realty Group, Inc
386-243-8227
Brick Home, Screened Porch
$185,900 MLS#77893
Call Charlie Sparks @
Westfield Realty Group
386-755-0808
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
6br/3.5ba brick. Lake views from
back. 39.7 ac., private paved road.
MLS# 76111 Mary Brown White-
hurst. 386-965-0887 $1,200,000
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Home on the lake in town. 4br/3ba
MLS# 76085 Elaine K. Tolar 386-
755-6488 or Mary Brown White-
hurst. 386-965-0887 $299,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
New home in Mayfair S/D. 4br on
comer lot. Split plan. $214,900
MLS# 76919 Elaine K. Tolar.
386-755-6488
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
4br/3ba 2 story brick on cul-de-
sac. 1 ac landscaped. Lori Geibeig
or Mary Brown Whitehurst.
386-965-0887 $299,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
4br/1.5ba brick. 1332 sq ft. Great
Floor plan, nice yard, close to
town. 1 ac landscaped. Lori
Geibeig MLS# 75713 $84,900


CYPRESS LANDING!
3BR/2BA built in 2005
w/large kitchen $115,000
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #75794
DESIRABLE GWEN LAKE
area! Nice 3BR/2BA home
on corer lot $112,000
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #77307
Eastside Village a 55+ Retirement
Community. 2br/2ba home with
garage, screen porch. Choose wall
color, flooring. MLS# 76483 East-
side Village Realty, Inc. 752-5290
Great Family Home in S/D
MLS# 77325, $109,000
Call Missy Zecher @ Remax
Professionals 386-623-0237
www.missyzecher.cbom
Great Home in Great Neighbor-
hood, Can be 4/2 or 3/2 w/study
MLS#77284 $164,900
Call Carrie Cason @Westfield
386-623-2806
GREAT STARTER HOME!
3BR/2BA w/lots of closets
space & nice lawn $79,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #76432
Hallmark Real Estate. 3/2 Brick
home. w/lage.-reened porch.
Back.yard has wooded privacy.
MLS#69482 Janet Creel.719-0382
or Paula Lawrence 623-1973


Hallmark Real Estate. Bring the
horses. 3/2 HUD, 4 ac. Sold "as is"
$106,000 Bids are being accepted.
www.hudhomestore.com MLS#
72068 Martin Tavener 965-7773
Hallmark Real Estate. DWMH on
5 ac south of town. Back porch,
new metal roof wood burning fire-
place & wired workshop. $82,500
MLS#77185 Janet Creel 719-0382
Hallmark Real Estate. Glassed
porch overlooks wooded backyard
in the Plantations. Pool,
sprinkler system. $204,900
MLS#75429 Janet Creel 719-0382
Hallmark Real Estate. Time to go
to the River. Stilt home w/covered
decking. Floating dock,out bldgs
& covered RV parking: $188K.
MLS#72068 Janet Creel 719-0382
Home on 15 Acres, 2500sf, new
appliances, workshop, MLS 77552,
$235,000 Call Brittany @
Results Realty 386-397-3473
HOME OR OFFICE on
Alachua St; remodeled
1,207 SqFt home $82,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #77724
Hallmark Real Estate. 2006
2200SF home. 2br/2ba w/mother-
in-law suite, 4 car garage, endless
hot water heater. MLS# 77547
$309,900 Jay Sears 386-867-1613


Family Owned and Operat ,

Dealership

(Huntin' a good fit) .
New & Used Car Sales
Motivated Self-Starter
Honesty & Good Character;
$50,000 plus a year .
Benefit Pkg.
SApply in person at


i .J-2 Macclenny, FLr:
SUR N "S 273 E. Macclenny, 'Av :"
CAIEXOLET *


810 Home for Sale.
Hallmark Real Estate. 3/3 Brick
w/over 2500 SF Great location
with nice one acre pond in back.
Detached workshop MLS# 75222
$179,900 Jay Sears 386-867-1613
Hallmark Real Estate. 4/2 Brick,
3100 SF, Granddaddy Oaks on 5
acres. Double detached carport/ga-
rage w/workshop. MLS# 77877
$119,900. Jay Sears 386-867-1613
Just Reduced 3/2 home, inside city
limits, fenced backyard, detached
carport w/office MLS#77411
$82,900 Call R.E.O.Realty,
@ 386-243-8227 Make Offer!
Just Reduced 4/2 on 1.57 acres,
fireplace. partially fenced, MLS#
77412, Call Nancy Rogers at
R.E.O. Realty Group
386-243-8227 $64,900
Large affordable home in S/D on 2
Acres, fishing rights to Timberlake
Property Owner's Assoc. $64,900
MLS#74862 Call Brittany @
Results Realty386-397-3473
Large Brick, 3/1, 4.43 acres, metal
roof, MLS# 77415 $104,888
R.E.O. Realty Group, Inc.
386-243-8227
Large Home in the Country on
3.66 acres, fireplace, 2 outbldgs,
MLS#76471, $89,900 Call Jo
Lytte @ Remax 386-365-2821
jolytte@remaxnfl.com
Large Home w/Open Floor Plan,
back yard & porch, Irg oaks, fire-
place, MLS#76122 $115,000
Call Missy Zecher @ Remax 386-
623-0237,mzecher@remax.net
LOTS OF UPGRADES!
Remodeled kitchen in this
2BR/1BA home $29,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY
INC. 755-5110 #77505


Luxury LogHome,
Whole House Generator, $269,900
MLS# 76899 Call Roger
Lovelady @386-365-7039
westfieldrealtygroup.com
Nice, large 4/2 on 1 acre
w/florida room, granite floors,
wrap around front porch, $148,000
Call Brittany Stoeckert @
Results Realty 386-397-3473
Norwegian Brick Home, fire-
place/family rm, open floor plan,
screen porch, fenced back yard,
MLS#76796 $179,900
Jo Lytte Remax 386-365-2821
Owner Finance. Custom built 3/2.5
10.8 ac. Granite, fireplace, vaulted
ceilings, surround sound. lanai,
gazebo. MLS 77382 Access Real-
ty. Patti Taylor $249K 623-6896
Priced Reduced! 3/2 w/2346 sf.
.67 ac. Creekside S/D. Shade,
surround sound, vaulted ceilings.
MLS 77385 $169,900. Access
Realty. Patti Taylor. 386-623-6896
Rose Creek S/D, 5/4, 3269sf, on
2.2 acres, bonus rm, many
upgrades Reduced! MLS#75485
Reduced! $234,900, Call Pam @
Remax 386-303-2505


Spacious Brand New Split Floor'
"" Plant Home, Fenred Yard
MLS#77493 $229,900
Call Mike Lienemann @ Westfield
Realty Group 386-867-9053
SPACIOUS home built in
1995 has 2BR/2BA & 1,636
SqFt on 1 acre $89,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110
Sturdy 3/2 on 4.35 acres, fruit &
pecan trees, Minutes from town
MLS#77878 $105,000
Call Jo Lytte @ Remax
386-365-2821/www.jolytte.com
Totally Remodeled 4 Bd Home
Spacious Must See!
MLS#77782 $135,000
Missy Zecher 386-623-0237
www.nissyzecher.com


Bring the picture in or
we will take it for youl
* Ad runs 10 consecutive days
with a description and photo ir the
newspaper and online E-edition.
* Ad runs 10 consecutive days as a
classified line ad online.
* You must include vehicle price.
* All ads are prepaid.
* Private party only.





2006 EF250
Ford Van
3/4 ton, metal work
shelves/ladder rack,
60K miles, exc. cond.
$10,500
Call
386-555-5555
If you don't sell your vehcl
during the first 10 days, you
can run the same vehicle ad
for 10 additional days for
only $15.00
Terms and conditions remain the
same for the additional run.
__________I __


810 Home for Sale
Well Maintained 3/2 on dead-end
street, quiet, country, close to
downtown $105,000 MLS#77800
Call Lisa Waltrip @Westfield
Realty Group 386-365-5900

820 Farms &
Acreage
4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$69,900. $613mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
4 acres, Wellborn, New Well.
installed, Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down, $39,900, $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
FARM- 7 stall barn, Apt.
17+ acres cross fenced.
Close in $1000. mo.
386-961-1086

Half to ten acre lots. Some w/
well, septic, pp. We finance; low
dwn pmt. Deas Bullard Properties.
386-752-4339. www.landnfl.com

Hallmark Real Estate. 40 ac hunt-
ing tract w/camper. Water & septic
already in place. Stands & feeders
in place. MLS 75532
$84,000 Jay Sears 386-867-1613

Three One Acre Lots available
@ $14,900 ea & One 1.65 Acre
lbt for $19,900 MLS#76050
Call Brodie Alfred 386-623-0906
Westfield Realty Group


3.) Click:


830 Commercial
830 Property
Commercial Property For Sale
Currently Leased $495,000
MLS#75953 Call Aaron
Nickelson @ 386-867-3534
Westfield Realty Group
FOR SALE or Lease, Commercial
Bldg, Prime Location, formerly
Church on the Way,
approx 2700sf 386-755-0242
Great Investment/Owner Finance
1400 sq ft building on 2 acres
Creative terms, owner flexible.
CLose to 1-75. 386-867-1190
Hallmark Real Estate. Downtown
Restaurant. Gigantic BBQ Smoker
Clean kitchen w/equip. Handle any
type of food svc. MLS# 77902
$189,900 Vic Lantroop 623-6401
Mini Storage (204 Units),
gated, fenced 5 acres, $1,300,000,
MLS#76048 Call Millard Gillen
@ Westfield Realty Group
386-365-7001

850 Waterfront
Property
Upscale River Cabin on
Suwannee Rivdr, Shop, Dock
MLS#76336 $349,900
Call Jo Lytte @ Remax
386-365-2821
860 Investment
Property
3/2 Renovated Home in town,
front porch, new appliances, cur-
rently leased MLS#76658 $49,900
Jo Lytte/Remax 386-365-2821
www.jolytte.florida-property-search.com


Submt Photo s


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5.). Select the best album for your photo.

d.) Complete the form and Submit

Albums will change during the year.
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Lake ity Reporter


860 Investment
860 'Property
Great Income Opportunity!
Mobile Home Park For Sale
MLS#77228 $195,00
Call Pam Beauchamp @ Remax
386-758-8900


950 Cars for Sale
1996 Mercury Sable,
Good Condition, $2000,
White, Power,
386-965-9822


We're on target!


Lake City Reporter
lakecityreporter.com CURRENTS myiazin
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Wave Runner 96
Polaris
W/galvanized trailer, only
64 hrs, many-extra parts.
$1,500 obo
Call
386-234-1019


Classified Department: 755-5440










6B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS THURSDAY, MAY 26, 2011 Page EdItor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


NFL sees signs fans are turned off


By BARRY WILNER
Associated Press

INDIANAPOLIS The
NFL is seeing the early
signs of cracks in fan
loyalty.
Ten weeks into the own-
ers' lockout of the play-
ers, Commissioner Roger
Goodell noted Wednesday
the negative effect the
labor dispute is having on
pro football.
"Clearly it has had'an
impact on the fans,"
Goodell said as the own-
ers completed their spring
meetings. "We see it in
various metrics. There's
been a noticeable change,
TV ratings were down on
the draft roughly 4 million
people. NFL.com traffic (is
down), we see that."
Ticket sales also are
down.
"Fans want certainty,"
Goodell added. "We can't
underestimate that the fans
are going through chal-
lenges just in the general
economy."
That certainty isn't likely
to come soon. Both sides
have a date in 8th U.S.
District Court on June 3 for
hearings on the league's
appeal to uphold the
lockout A decision prob-
ably won't come for several
weeks, and while another
set of mediation sessions
is scheduled to start June
7, not much is expected
from those discussions
while the appeal is being
considered.
The owners' meetings
included lengthy talks
about the labor dispute, but
no deadlines have been set
- yet for the opening of
training camps, which usu-
ally happens in late July.
That drop-dead date "obvi-
ously is coming," Goodell
said, barring a collective
bargaining agreement
"We've made it clear
that (revenue loss) is cur-
rent and will continue to


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Robert Kraft (left), owner of the New England Patriots, talks
with NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell while arriving at the
NFL football owners meetings in Indianapolis on Tuesday.


accelerate and impact on
the. ability of ownership to
make an offer (the players)
find attractive," he said.-
Owners were presented,
the full range of plans for
opening weekend, from
the first game on Thursday
night at Lambeau Field to
commemorations of the
Sept. 11 attacks on the first
full Sunday of games.
Those dates are not in
jeopardy yet, but the lon-
ger the impasse, the more
in danger they would
become, particularly with
the ,league's marketing
partners, sponsors and
advertisers who must com-
mit dollars to those events
well in advance.
"We're not at an
Armageddon date," Eric
Grubman, executive vice
president of business oper-
ations for the NFL, told The
Associated Press. "We're not
staring that in the face this


week."
Several teams already
have begun to consider
adjusting where they hold
training camp. Fifteen
teams trained last sum-
mer at complexes other
than their in-season facili-
ties, and.some have dead-
lines as early as July 1 to
decide whether, to return,
to those locales or hold a
truncated training camp at
home.
"If it dragged on or there
was a shorter camp, some-
thing like that might not be
inconceivable," Colts owner
Jim Irsay said. The Colts
training camp is held about
an hour from Indianapolis
at Anderson University,
One day after cancel-
ing the rookie symposium
scheduled for June 26 in
Canton, Ohio the first
NFL event victimized by
the lockout Goodell reit-
erated the league's intent


to play a full schedule this
season. He recognized the
need not only for some
sort of training camps
but also for a free agency
signing period once a new
CBA is reached.
"The uncertainty is
something we have to
consider in getting play-
ers ready to play, and we
have talked about differ-
ent concepts," he said.
A portion of these meet-
ings was spent on adopt-
ing rules amendments for
player safety. The league
also announced a policy
of "club accountability"
for teams whose players
repeatedly are fined for
flagrant hits.
Punishments for the
teams will be financial,
but also could include
further discipline by
Goodell, including strip-
ping of draft picks, for
repeat offenders some-
thing Goodell said he has
"not contemplated yet"
That announcement
brought a strong reac-
tion from two Pittsburgh
Steelers linebackers:
LaMarr Woodley and the
oft-fined James Harrison.
'Thoughts on "the steel-
ers rule"??? lol im sorry
that im not sorry we hit 2
hard," Woodley tweeted.
Harrison's tweet was:
"I'm absolutely sure now
after this last rule change
that the people making.
the rules at the NFL are
idiots."
Local reporters, con-
cerned about next
February's Super Bowl at
Lucas Oil Stadium, asked
several owners and Goodell
whether the title game is in
danger.
'You're going to have
the Super Bowl here, I'm
confident of that," Giants
owner John Mara said.
"We're approaching
2011," Goodell added,
"as we would any other
season."


UNDER REVIEW






Phn e
Todd Taylor
Phone:(386) 754-0424
ttaylor@lakecityreportercom

Jaguars

change

direction

ago, the
Jacksonville
Jaguars were
a defensive-
minded football team.
From 2004-07 the
Jaguars' defense ranked
among the league's elite.
During that time they post-
ed no losing seasons and
made the playoffs twice.
Over the past three sea-
sons the Jaguars' defense
has steadily eroded into
what it became in 2010
one of the worst units
in the NFL. It ranked 28th
overall; 27th in points
allowed; 31st in sacks; and
.last in the league with 18
takeaways. As a result the
Jaguars haven't had awin-
ning season or a playoff
appearance since 2007.
The 2011 Draft pre-
sented an opportunity
for the Jaguars to rebuild
their defense. In a division
with quarterbacks Peyton
Manning and Matt Schaub
who combined for
9,070 passing yards and 57
touchdown passes in 2010
finding a pass rusher
and shoring up the second-
ary seemed to be obvious
priorities for Jacksonville.
However, the Jaguars
went a completely'dif-
ferent direction, trading
away their second-round
pick to move up and select
Missouri quarterback
Blaine Gabbert with the
No. 10 overall selection.


Jacksonville didn't draft
a defensive player until the
end of the fourth round,
when they took a safety with
the 121st pick. The Jaguars
walked away from the draft
with two defensive picks.
Gabbert's arrival is
essentially a ticket out of
town for David Garrard.
Ironically, Garrard is
coming off one of his
best seasons. He threw a
career-high 23 TDs; com-
pleted 64.5 percent of his
passes; and posted a 90.8
passer rating. Not bad
considering Maurice Jones-
Drew compiled just seven
100-yard games and five
touchdown runs.
No, Garrard hasn't lived
up to the expectations
the Jaguars had when
they signed him to a big
contract in 2008, but he
hasn't had much help. The
past three seasons the
Jaguars' top receivers have
been Matt Jones (2008),
Mike Sims-Walker (2009)
and Mike Thomas (2010)
- not exactly Pro-Bowl
caliber talent
Even if y6u aren't a
Garrard believer, what
do we really know about
Gabbert? Last year he threw
16 TDs and nine INTs a
significant drop off from
his sophomore season in
2009. In his two bowl game
appearances, he posted an
0-2 record with two TD
passes and four picks.
Yes, Gabbert has all the
measurable, but is trading
into the top 10 for him a
sound decision?
Clearly, the Jaguars'
draft shows they are look-
Sing to the future. But with
a dwindling fan base and
rumors the franchise may
move out of Jacksonville, it
seems the future is now.
On the bright side, the
Jaguars' defense can't get
much worse. Although with a
schedule that pits the league's
28th-ranked pass defense
against Manning and Schaub
each, Matt Ryan, Drew
Brees, Philip Rivers, Ben
Roethlisberger, Joe Flacco,
Mark Sanchez and Josh
Freeman... it just might


BARBER: Will try for U.S. Open


Continued From Page 1B

Sports' Jim Nantz'will
reside over the opening
ceremony.
Tim Poe of Central
Missouri.will coach the
United States.
Three days prior to the
Palmer Cup, Barber will
attempt to qualify for the
U.S. Open at sectional
qualifying in Vero Beach, at



CHS
From Page 1B

exemplified hard work,
was a playmaker and is
dedicated," Allen said.
"We weren't looking for
average."
And there was more than
one player considered for
the award.
"Javere Smith is a name
that came up," Allen said.
"He was-in the hunt as
much as anyone. lie was
an offensive guy that we
brought to defense and he
has a chance to be seen on
Saturday.
"Shaq Johnson is a guy,
Laremy Tunsil, Nigel
Atkinson and Braxton
Stockon are guys, but those
two were heard more than
anyone else."


Quail Valley Golf Club.
"It's a typical Florida
course that's fairly open
with a couple of bunkers
and palm trees," Barber
said. "The course's major
defense is its green. They
are some of the fastest I've
played in Florida."
Right now, Barber is
enjoying a two-week stay in



Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.


Lake City before returning
to his summer schedule.
"I always enjoy being '
back in Lake City," he
said. "I enjoy being able
to go out and play both
courses with some of the
people I grew up playing
with. It's a joy to be home
and Lake City will always
be a part of me."

-THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek


, I I Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.

Print your answer here:
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's Jumbles: UNITY CRAMP SKETCH DEBTOR
IAnswer: Part of Sylvester Stallone's long-term success
can be attributed to his "ROCKY" START


Smainstreet




888-807-FAST

3278


mainstreetbb.com
i'ronimdleswdielrt Si t ien manA iti*ntalsf r ld,
mrett aldm Sut^ oErldl Wl llfim fMll dtetiL
ito, -. ^ ... ., ...... ^ . .. .


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS THURSDAY, MAY 26, 2011


6B