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The Lake City reporter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01560
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 5/22/2011
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
System ID: UF00028308:01560
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text




Macho Memory
Fondly remembering
Randy Savage.


-TDA H**3
007 STORy
-FL R2__IDA
11943


326


viiy


Mommy and Me
Christian class for moms
with pre-schoolers.

Life, I D


TODAY'S



Laket RpoI rt r.
MAY 22,2011


Sunday, May 22, 201 I www.lakecityreporter.com Vol. 137, No. 102 $ $1.00


CRA moving


forward with

updated plan


Public workshop
scheduled for
Monday night.
By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
Updating the
C o mm u n it y
Redevelopment Agency
master plan has been a
long process for the City of
Lake City, but the finished
product will move the dis-
trict forward, according to
officials.
"It's been interest-
ing," said Jackie Kite of
the CRA. "It's taken lon-
ger than I would like, but
expanding the area took
time to process."
The plan update has
included several steps
and the next is a public
workshop, 5:30 7:30 p.m.
Monday at Richardson
Community Center.
The community meet-
ing's purpose is to keep
citizens informed on the
process of the master plan
update, share information
regarding the study area
and receive any ideas for
the redevelopment area.
This is the second
public workshop held for
the update process, Kite
said. Property owners in
the area as well as other
community members are
encouraged to attend.
The City established the
CRA in 1981 to address
blight and create a more
vibrant district through
projects and services.
Tax Increment Financing
funds CRA projects.
A master plan to shape
the goals for the area
came with the creation of
the agency.
Through the years, the
CRA, downtown, and goals
for the area changed, Kite
said. An update of the plan
was necessary to fit the
needs of the area today.
"Our plan had not been
modified or adjusted since
the 80s," she said. '"That's
a long time."
The trend in the past
was for developments to
move to the west of the
community, Kite said. But


the core area cannot be
forgotten.
"If your core area is
still vibrant, the rest of
the community will be
vibrant," she said.
The IBI Group was
selected in February 2011
as the consulting service
to prepare the updated
plan. The new plan will
address all aspects of
development within the.
CRA, such as architecture
standards, public uses and
historic preservation.
The company first held
several focus groups last
June with targeted areas
of the community for the
initial project framework,
Kite said. Later, the com-
munity was invited to a
public workshop to pro-
vide feedback on the plan.
Citizens and busi-
ness owners in the area
expressed a desire to
expand the boundaries of
the CRA; Kite said.
After a study of neces-
sity, additional areas were
identified for boundary
expansion.
Boundaries for the CRA
were moved to the north
and the south by adop-
tion of a City Council ordi-
nance April 18.
Having the master plan
provides developers a
framework for land use
and specific projects to
enhance the area, Kite
said. Developers can
adhere to the wishes of
the community for a suc-
cessful project.
"It gives a guide to any-
one that comes here," she
said.
The consulting group
will take the information
from this next public work-
shop and complete a final-
ized draft of the plan, Kite
said. She is expecting to
* have a draft to the council
in June and receive final
approval by July.
A lot of behind-the-
scenes planning has taken
place on the project, Kite
said. Soon citizens will be
able to see a completed
plan.
"Our goal is to revitalize
and bring the area back to
life," she said.


TREE OF


HONOR


LEANNE TYO/Lake City Reporter
Girl Scout Troop 252 cadette Brandy Britt, 13, shovels dirt around the Crepe Myrtle tree the troop planted at the Haven
Hospice Care Center in Lake City on Armed Forces Day Saturday while cadettes Ashley Gonzalez (from left), 13, Liz Frier,
10, and Kayla Caslow, 11, look on. Also pictured is Scott Towne, troop co-leader.

Girls Scouts salute Armed Forces with planting


By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com

Honoring those who have
served or who are serv-
ing in the armed forces
was a priority for Lake
City's Girl Scout Troop
525 a cadette troop on Armed
Forces Day Saturday.
The troop held a special ceremony
and planted a Crepe Myrtle tree at
the Haven Hospice Care Center in
Lake City to pay homage to their
family, friends and community mem-
bers who have been a part of the
U.S. Military.
The ceremony and tree-planting
was one of the service projects the
troop chose to complete to earn their
American Patriotism Badge, said
Sandra Caslow, troop leader.
"They planted the tree as a living
legacy to the armed forces," she
said.
During the ceremony, the troop
presented the Colors, dedicated the
tree and expressed their thoughts
on the importance of patriotism and
honoring the armed forces.
"When I hear the word patriotism,
I think of the people who fight for
our freedom and protect us," said
cadette Brandy Britt, 13. "When


LEANNE TYO/Lake City Reporter
Girl Scout Troop 252 cadettes Brandy Britt (from left), 13, Liz Frier, 10, Ashley
Gonzalez, 13, and Kayla Caslow, 11, sing 'Proud to be an American." Also pictured
is Sandra Caslow, troop leader.


I look at this tree, it reminds me
that our country still stands strong
through thick and thin."
'To me, this tree is a small
reminder of our country," said
cadette Kayla Caslow, 11. "Always
changing, but always the same.
When it grows up and stands firm


and strong, it reminds me of our sol-
diers brave and bold."
Cadette Liz Frier, 10, gave a brief
history of Armed Forces Day and
cadette Ashley Gonzalez, 13, read
"Armed Forces Day," a poem by Del

SCOUTS continued on 3A


In this photo
released
by Vatican
newspaper
L'Osservatore
Romano, Pope
Benedict XVI
talks with
astronauts at
the Vatican
Saturday. The
12 astronauts
circling the
Earth received
a call from Pope
Benedict XVI,
the first-ever
papal call to
space.

ASSOCIATED PRESS





1 .. ....W 8


Pope makes first papal call to space


Blesses astronauts
and praises their
commitment.
By MARCI4 DUNN
AP Aerospace Writer
CAPE CANAVERAL
- Pope Benedict'XVI had
a direct line to the heav-
ens Saturday, with NASA's
help.
Speaking from the
Vatican, the pontiff
bestowed a historic bless-
ing upon the 12 astronauts
circling Earth during the
first-ever papal call to space,
wishing a swift recovery for
the shuttle commander's
wounded congresswoman


CALL US: 97
(386) 752-1293 ,97
SUBSCRIBE TO Early fog
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445 i A I 2A
Fax: 752-9400 WEATHER, 2A


<


wife and condolences for a
station astronaut mourning
his mother's death.
The "extraordinary"
conversation, as Benedict
described it, occurred after
the Endeavour astronauts
inspected a small gash
in the shuttle's belly, to
ensure their safe return to
Earth after departing the
International Space Station
in just over a week. It is the
next-to-last flight in NASA's
30-year shuttle program.
Seated at a table before
a television set tuned to
NASA's live broadcast from
orbit, Benedict told the
space travelers that "you
are our representatives
spearheading humanity's


A Opinion i 4A
Opinion ................4A
S Around Florida........... 2A
-. Obituaries .............. 5A
\ 'J Advice & Comics......... 3D


Puzzles ................


exploration of new spaces
and possibilities for our
future." He said he admired
their courage, discipline
and commitment.
"It must be obvious to
you how we all live togeth-
er on one Earth and how
absurd it is that we fight
and kill each one," the
pontiff said, reading from
prepared remarks. "I know
that Mark Kelly's wife was
a victim of a serious attack,
and I hope her health con-
tinues to improve."
Kelly, who's of Irish-
Catholic descent, thanked
the pope for his kind
words. His wife, U.S. Rep.
Gabrielle Giffords, had
surgery to repair her skull


TODAY IN
BUSINESS
Super 8 honors
the military.


Wednesday, four months
after being shot in the
head at a political event
in Tucson, Ariz. She was
nearly killed, yet managed
to attend her husband's
launch last Monday.
Kelly told the pope that
borders cannot be seen
from space and noted that
down on Earth, people usu-
ally fight for resources.
At the space station, solar
power provides unlimited
energy, "and if those tech-
nologies could be adapted
more on Earth, we could
possibly reduce some of
that violence," he said.
Benedict asked about
SHUTTLE continued on 3A


COMING
TUESDAY
CRA hosts open
meeting.


Lake


Reporter







LAKE CITY REPORTER SUNDAY REPORT SUNDAY, MAY 22, 2011


ezn, ri ch. ,k6 3"

Friday: Friday: Saturday: Saturday: Wednesday: Wednesday:
4-13-37-40 11 12-16-27-29-33 Afternoon: 5-1-4 Afternoon: 7-7-6-1 15-23-29-40-43-48 7-12-13-42-49 PB16
Evening: 0-2-7 Evening: 0-0-0-6


AROUND FLORIDA


Death still a mystery on pair's disappearance


DELTONA

From the side-
walk, the year-
old two-story
house looked
idyllic.
Its tall columns and deco-
rative windows highlighted
a trio of gables trimmed in
tasteful shades of white and
gray, separated from the
street by spongy green St
Augustine grass. But some-
thing was amiss on this
spring Saturday morning.
Joanne Miller arrived
home from a charity event
about 11 a.m. to find draw-
ers from a dresser that
had been dumped in her
bedroom. And where were
her brother, 10-year-old
Joshua Bryant, and their
grandmother, 77-year-old
Lillian Martin?
Ten years ago this
month Miller came to
the phone with a 9-1-
1 dispatcher and said:
"Someone's broken into
the house." The Volusia
County Sheriff's Office
recently released 120
pages of reports on the
case, which is still con-
sidered open. This story
is based on those reports
and interviews, both
recent and those dating
back to May 12, 2001,
when Miller's friend made
the initial call.
Miller had gone to the
Susan B. Komen 5K Race
for the Cure in Daytona
Beach, then had breakfast
at the Cracker Barrel res-
taurant on International
Speedway Boulevard.
Miller was then a 28-year-
old teacher at Timbercrest
Elementary School. She
and husband, John, a retail


manager, had bought the
house new in 2000 for
more than $200,000. They
lived in the home with
their 2-year-old son Tyler.
Joshua her brother
and their grandmother
lived in a mother-in-law
. suite behind the house.
In Martin's suite, the
television was on. Miller
told investigators she
could tell Martin had been
doing laundry because
some folded and some
unfolded items were on
the washer and dryer.
Martin's purse con-
taining her wallet, cell-
phone and checkbook
remained on a kitchen
* counter, next to her keys.
Neither Joanne nor John
Miller found anything
missing except, of
course, their brother and
grandmother.
When the two vanished,
an entire community got
involved. There were
gatherings and searches.
Neighbors accommodated
a throng of news media,
who camped out with their
vans and cameras and
cellphones in front of the
Miller home. For days,
questions'were asked.
Were they taken? Did they
walk away on their own?
What happened?
In the 10 years since
May 12, 2001, some of
those questions would be
answered. Volusia investi-
gators would pin the disap-
pearance on one of their.
earliest suspects. But not
before he killed and killed
again. And they might
never be able to explain
how Joshua Bryant and
Lillian Martin died or why.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter

Tourism award winner
Bob Giardi (left), a park services specialist for Stephen
Foster Folk Culture Center State Park, hugs Paulette Lord,
the Columbia County Tourist Development Council market-
ing director, Wednesday after she awards him with the 2010
'Always There Award' trophy for his contribution to the pro-
motion of Florida's Suwannee River Valley Marketing Group.


Possible furlough
day for teachers
WEST PALM BEACH
- Most of the 21,000
employees at the Palm
Beach County School
District could be asked to
take a one-day furlough to
help fill a $35 million bud-
get deficit.
The proposal would save
$5 million and allow the
district to restore some
previously proposed cuts


such as police officer and
psychologist positions.
The proposal was
approved Friday by the
district's Budget Advisory
Committee. It would have
to be bargained with the
district's largest employee
union.
A leader with the
Classroom Teachers
Association said teachers
are already facing health
insurance cost increases
and a new 3 percent pen-


sion contribution. Others
said teachers would favor
taking a furlough day if it
means saving jobs.

Officials tried
removing child
TAMPA Child protec-
tion investigators tried to
put a 13-month-old boy in
foster care twice before
authorities said he was
beaten to death by his
mother's boyfriend.
Ezekiel Mathis died
Wednesday. Twenty-
one-year-old Damarcus
Kirkland-Williams has
been charged with first
degree murder and aggra-
vated child abuse.
An autopsy determined
the child's cause of death
was blunt impact trauma
to the head and torso and
lacerations to the liver and
spleen.
Deputies said Kirkland-
Williams admitted to
attacking the child.
Child protection investi-
gators requested authority
to remove the baby but
were denied twice by the
state Attorney General's
Office. A spokeswoman for
the agency said the child
didn't show any signs of
physical abuse and the
mother had agreed to
remove her boyfriend from
the home.

Funding for
satellites a worry
MIAMI Funding for
storm-tracking satellites
is worrying the director
of the National Hurricane
Center and the admin-


istrator of the National
Oceanic and Atmospheric
Administration.
NOAA administra-
tor Jane Lubchenco told
reporters Thursday that
recent federal budget
wrangling put the agency's
hurricane-tracking satel-
lites at risk. She said that
future funding for NOAA's
satellite program was
"very much in limbo."
Lubchenco also said
NOAA already has delayed
the launch of one satellite.
that would have trans-
mitted information for
weather and climate fore-
casts. That means there's
no replacement for the
current satellite doing that
work.
Hurricane center
director Bill Read told
The Associated Press on
Friday that he shares
Lubchenco's concern. He.
worries that funding cuts
for satellites also would
mean cuts for other vital
equipment such as the "hur-
ricane hunter" aircraft.
Hurricane season
begins June 1.

Defendant
Tasered in court
VIERA, Deputies
used a Taser on a defen-
dant in a central Florida
courtroom when he
refused to be handcuffed.
A Brevard County judge
deemed Reginald Shorter
to be mentally incompe-
tent Friday, just moments
before deputies used the
Taser on him.

**Associated Press


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS


Idol finalist Suddeth a country girl'


ATLANTA
Every Wednesday night
since she was 12, Lauren
Alaina Suddeth belted
out a two'hour set at a
restaurant just across the
Tennessee border from her home-
town of Rossville, Ga.
She'd roll through "Midnight
Train to Georgia" and "Big Girls
Don't Cry," but her big number
was Miranda Lambert's "Famous in
a Small Town." That song doesn't
describe the 16-year-old "American
Idol" finalist anymore after she
charmed viewers with her bright
smile and powerful voice.
Now Suddeth faces 17-year-old
Scotty McCreery of Garner, N.C.,
on Tuesday night for a final perfor-
mance. A winner will be crowned on
Wednesday.
The bubbly Suddeth, whose nick-
name is "LaLa," has breezed through
round after round of "Idol" with her
signature country sound. Her suc-
cess on the top-rated show is no sur-
prise to the high school sophomore's
supporters back home.
"I didn't know when, I didn't
know how, but I knew it was going
to happen one way or another," said
Jennifer Lawhorn, owner of Magoo's
Restaurant in East Ridge, Tenn.,
where Suddeth performed weekly.
Friends describe her as a "country
girl" who loves cheerleading, volun-
teering with special needs children
and singing any chance she gets.
The straight-A student loves the
"Harry Potter" series and lists "Idol"
winner Carrie Underwood as one of
her biggest musical influences.

Schwarzenegger must
revamp image again
LOS ANGELES For 35 years,
Arnold Schwarzenegger has been
carefully crafting his public image,
from Austrian bodybuilder and inter-
national action star to family man
and Republican politician.
Now, with his split from Maria
Shriver and revelations that he
fathered a child with a member of
his housekeeping staff, where does


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this May 14 file photo, Lauren Alaina Suddeth, a finalist in the singing competi-
tion series "American Idol," waves to friends, fans and supporters as she rides by
in her red convertible during a parade down in Rossville, Ga.


Schwarzenegger go from here? Can
he have a future either in politics or
film, and how does he once again
reshape his image, especially in the
eyes of female fans?
"His biggest problem as an action
star has nothing to do with being an
adulterer. It has to do with being 63
years old and physically wrecked
- unless they're going to make
Terminator 6: The Golden Years,"'
said David Leibowitz, a Phoenix-
based public relations and crisis
communications consultant. "The
love child is almost the least of his
worries."
For decades, though,
Schwarzenegger was the safest of
box-office bets, with his bulging,
muscular physique and his quippy,
punny one-liners. The 'Terminator"
movies alone have made more than
$1 billion worldwide most of that
outside the United States.

Janet Jackson in Austria
for AIDS charity bash
VIENNA Janet Jackson says
every little bit helps when it comes
to fighting AIDS.
The singer says she's lost friends


to the disease and that raising aware-
ness about it is "close to my heart."'
She spoke to reporters Saturday
just hours before she joins former
U.S. President Bill Clinton, actress
Brooke Shields and other celebrities
at Vienna's annual Life Ball, a huge
party aimed at raising money for
people with HIV and AIDS'.

Cannes contenders:
Malick, silent film
CANNES, France Robert De
Niro, an actor of few words, and a
film of hardly any words could prove
a perfect match as the Cannes Film
Festival prepares to hand out its
awards.
Among titles competing for the
top prize Sunday at the world's most-
prestigious film festival is French
director Michel Hazanavicius' silent
movie '"The Artist," which charmed
Cannes audiences with a story about
early Hollywood likely to appeal to
an actor and filmmaker such as De
Niro, who heads the awards jury
that also includes Uma Thurman and
Jude Law.

* Associated Press


* Movie reviewer Judith Crist
is 89.
* Actor Michael Constantine
is 84.
* Actor-director Richard Ben-
jamin is 73.
* Actor Frank Converse is
73.
* Actress Barbara Parkins


Daily Scripture


is 69.
* Country musician Dana
Williams (Diamond Rio) is 50.
* Rock musician Jesse Va-
lenzuela is 49.
* Actor Mark Christopher
Lawrence is 47.
* Model Naomi Campbell is


"I appeal to you, in the name
of our Lord Jesus Christ, that all
of you agree with one another
in what you say and that there
be no divisions among you, but
that you be perfectly united in
mind and thought."
I Corinthians 1:10


Lake City
HOW TO REACH US
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Circulation ..............755-5445
Online ... www.lakecltyreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson.....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
Assistant Editor CJ Risak..754-0427
After 1:00 p.m.
(crisak@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Ashley Butcher ...754-0417
(abutcher@lakecityreporter.com)
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Reporter
BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
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CORRECTION


The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion,
please call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifica-
tions will run in this space. And thanks for reading.


Celebrity Birthdays


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427







LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE SUNDAY, MAY 22, 2011


LEANNE TYO/Lake City Reporte
Girl Scout Troop 252 cadette Kayla Caslow, 11, speaks on how the
tree the troop planted at the Haven Hospice Care Center in Lake
City can be a reminder of the service of those in the armed forces.
'This tree will always remind me and everyone else that walks by
about all of this country's accomplishments,' Caslow said.


the future of the planet and
the environmental risks it
faces, and wanted to know
what the astronauts' most
important message would
be for young people when
they return home.
Space station astronaut
Ronald Garan Jr. spoke
of the paper-thin layer of
atmosphere "that sepa-
rates every living thing
from the vacuum of space."
And shuttle crewman
Mike Fincke described
how he and his colleagues
"can look down and see
our beautiful planet Earth
that God has made."
"However, if we look up,
we can see the rest of the
universe, 'and the rest of
the universe is out there
for us to explore," Fincke
said. "The International
Space Station is just one
symbol, one example, of
what human beings can
,do when we work together
constructively."
Near the end of the
18-minute conversation,
Benedict expressed con-
cern for astronaut Paolo
Nespoli, whose 78-year-old
mother died in northern
Italy at the beginning of
May while he was serving
on the space station.
"How have you been liv-
ing through this time of
pain on the International
Space Station?" the pope
asked.
"Holy Father, I felt your
prayers and everyone's
prayers arriving up here
where outside the world ...
we have advantage point to
look at the Earth and we
feel everything around us,"
Nespoli replied in Italian.
Nespoli will end his five-
month space station mis-
sion Monday, returning
to Earth aboard a Russian
Soyuz capsule.
He will bring back with
him a silver medal that
shuttle astronaut Roberto
Vittori took up with him on
Endeavour, that was provid-
ed by the pope. It depicts
Michelangelo's "Creation
of Man," the painting on
the ceiling of the Sistine
Chapel.
Vittori floated the com-
memorative coin in front
of him, then gently tossed
it to Nespoli, positioned
on the opposite end of the
front row of astronauts.
"I brought it with me
to space, and he will take
down on Earth to then give
back to you," Vittori told
the pontiff. The astronaut
said he prays in space "for
me, for our families, for our
future."
The long-distance papal
audience was arranged
by the European Space
Agency and the Italian
Space Agency. NASA pro-
vided technical support
from Mission Control in
Houston.
Inside the ancient fres-
coed halls of the Vatican
where email wasn't even
in wide use until a few
years ago the call was
received with visible awe. .
The 84-year-old Benedict
chuckled when one of the
astronauts began floating
up at the end of the trans-
mission. He waved to the
U.S., Italian and Russian
crew at the beginning and
end of the call.
The Vatican spokes-


SCOUTS: Remember

Continued From Page 1A

"Abe" Jones.
The five U.S. Military veterans present were
asked to stand for recognition while the troop sang
"Proud to be an American."
After the ceremony, the cadettes planted their
tree outside, where Carolyn Long, Haven Hospice
volunteer coordinator, thanked them. All residents,
including veteran residents, can enjoy the tree, she
said.
"It will .bring a very healing presence to people
that are going through a very difficult time," Long
said.
The four troop cadettes said they wanted to com-
memorate the service of their parents, grandparents
and others who have served in the armed forces.
"I think it's really cool that we could do some-
thing for those people and for Armed Forces Day
because they protect us and protect our freedom,"
Britt said. "We have lots of rights, and thanks to
those people, we get to keep these rights."


SHUTTLE: Astronauts get papal blessing

Continued From Page 1A


VALDOSTA MALL
VALDOSTA, GA
1700 Norman Drive


man, the Rev. Federico
Lombardi, said the call
was evidence of the pope's
desire to communicate with
people however possible,
be it sending a text mes-
sage with a prayer of the
day or a YouTube channel
playing church teachings.
Pope Paul VI sent a
greeting to the moon with
Apollo 11's Neil Armstrong
and Buzz Aldrin in 1969,


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but it was in a silicon disk
that contained goodwill
messages from numerous
countries and was left on
the Sea of Tranquility. "I
look up at your heavens,
made by your fingers, at
the moon and stars you
set in place," said Paul VI,
quoting from Psalms 8.
Mission Control, mean-
while, was glowing. Flight
controllers 'watched on


monitors as the pope got
set up for the interview.
"It was just an amaz-
ing event, really a beauti-
ful event," said lead flight
director Derek Hassmann.
Before gathering for
the extra-special VIP call,
the astronauts conducted
an hourlong survey of the
gouge in Endeavour's belly,
using a 100-foot extension
boom.


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POLICE REPORTS


The following informa-
tion was provided by local
law enforcement agencies.
The following people have
been arrested but not con-
victed. All people are inno-
cent unless proven guilty.

Saturday, May 14
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office
m. Harley Issac Bradley,
30, 235 SW Dan Court,
Palm Bay, driving while
license suspended/
revoked (habitual offend-
er).
Joseph O'Brian
Diston, 27, 260 NW Marco
Terrace, warrant: Failure
to appear for driving
while license suspended/
revoked charges and tres-
passing and larceny.

Lake City
Police Department
Christopher Paul
Moore, 41, 56 NW 441
Avenue, warrant.


Sunday, May 15

Columbia County
Sheriff's Office
Charles Anthony
Peterson, 38, no address
given, warrant: Violation
of probation on original
charge of dealing in stolen
property.
Samuel Kenneth
Rice Jr., 25, 311 SE
Locklyn Terrace, driving
while license suspended/
revoked (habitual offend-
er).
*I Joseph Clayton Wilks,
31, 442 NW Wilks Lane,
warrant: Violation of pro-
bation on original charges
of aggravated battery with
a deadly weapon.

Monday, May 16
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office
Stanley C. Taylor, 76,
2016 U.S. Highway 90,
warrant: Violation of pro-
bation.


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- :-:::











OPINION


Sunday, May 22, 2011 I


www.lakecityreporter.com


OUR


OUR
OPINION


Extending

a vet a

helping

hand


It's a pursuit
common to most
Americans, a goal
with limitless
boundaries. But how often is
that pursuit for someone else?
And when it is, how often can
we, or do we, act upon it?
Mike Arthur and a dozen
others did. This local group,
labeling themselves Vets
Helping Vets although
several of them never-served in
the Armed Forces, they
respect those who did saw
an aging veteran in need and
took it upon themselves to help
him.
Many of them knew Teddy
"Bear" Milford. Most of them
didn't know Milford, a 78-year-
old Navy veteran, was living
in what barely qualified as a
shack.
Milford wasn't one to accept
charity, but Arthur wanted to
help his friend. So he formed
the group and found a place for
Milford to live while they
tore down his shack and
started building him a new
house.
This was no one-man job.
Arthur needed assistance.
So, he asked people for
help.
And they said yes. No
hesitation, no lengthy
explanations required. If
they could help, they
would.
Money was needed and
that was given, by many
sources. But that wasn't all
- materials were donated
and, most important, time.
People who labored long
hours to make ends meet in
this fragile economy have come
and helped build this new
house, which will serve as a
home to another needy veteran
after Milford.
, Their work on the house
continues. The hope is to have
it completed by the Fourth of
July.
1 Pursuing something better is
go disgrace.
Pursuing something better
to help someone else is a
Quality to be cherished and
honored.


Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman


LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,


Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


Gingrich lacks necessary restraint


Newt Gingrich has
had one really
important job in
his life and he
blew that. The
consummate historian paid no
attention to history and it cost
him the position that is third
in line for the presidency, the
speakership of the U. S. House
of Representatives.
Now he wants to be presi-
dent. After all, he said on
national television, it is an act
of good citizenship for him to
run, which reveals all one needs
to know about his ego. Even
* Henry Kissinger might blush.
Succeeding in that endeavor
of course demands the sort of
all out discipline that is the one
ingredient in his personal life
that has eluded-him both in his
marital relationships and his '
apparent inability to control his
baser instincts. After practically
riding his predecessor, Rep. Jim
Wright of Texas, out of town
on a rail in 1994, Gingrich went
about committing the same
indiscretions and with the same
results that overturned 40 years
of Democratic control. He was
out on his ear with mistakes that
one who possesses half of his
intelligence wouldn't have made.
Since then his mouth has
never stopped running as he
became the GOP policy guru
who constantly needed to prove
that he is the smartest guy in


LETTERS


Dan K.Thomasson
the room wherever that is and
whoever is in it. Unfortunately,
the image that this projects can
be summed up in one word,
"loser."
The fact that he now consid-
ers himself as a necessary can-
didate for the Republican presi-
dential nomination next year
speaks volumes about where
the party's White House poten-
tial is only 17 months ahead of
the election. The list of declared
or semi-declared-candidates is
not only bereft of stunning pros-
pects, several of them would
make perfect contestants on
the "Gong Show." Donald who?
Where is Chuck Barris when
we need him?
Given Gingrich's penchant for
jumping from one big thought
to the next without pausing,
it seems more than a small
stretch to take him seriously. A '
good comparison might be the
late George Wallace who even
' though he realized he had no
chance to win the presidency
couldn't overcome his political
narcissism. There have been


a number of other examples
of this malady but few have
been as smart as Gingrich, the
former Georgia congressman
who performed brilliantly in his
all out blitz of the Democratic
majority 17 years ago.
That's what is disturbing
about Gingrich. With more
self-control over his own pro-
nouncements and an improved
listeningskill, he might be a
great candidate. But it clearly is
too late to expect him to reign
in his pedantic urges and per-
sonal compulsiveness. He has
proven that over and over. He
even asked one ailing wife for a
divorce while she was in a hos-
pital room being treated for can-
cer, demonstrating a stunning
insensitivity and lack of concern
for anything that gets in the way
of his objectives.
This should warn voters who
might be seduced by Gingrich's
seemingly limitless grasp of
almost any world problem that
things may not actually be what
they seem here. Perhaps they
should reconsider support-
ing a candidate with such well
defined flaws. But then again'
they could.say that they at
least knew ahead of time what
they were getting, a rationaliza-
tion that sours quickly when it
arrives.
N Dan K. Thomasson is former
editor of Scripps Howard News
Service.


TO THE EDITOR


Here we go again at the tank


To the editor:
Here we go. A few months
back I predicted the price of
gasoline would blow past $4 a
gallon, on its way even higher. It
may drop back a little temporar-
ily, but the fundamentals haven't
changed. Global demand for oil
is still increasing, oil is getting
more expensive to extract, and
most importantly the Federal
Reserve is still printing money
like there's no tomorrow.
They say they're going to
stop at the end of June, but I
wouldn't bet on that lasting for
long.
The simple explanation why
this matters is that increasing
the *ipply of dollars makes
them less valuable. So foreign-
ers want more dollars to sell us
a barrel of oil.
Does this mean that we're
doomed to pay $4, $5, $6 for a
gallon for gas and end up in the
poorhouse because we can't
afford to drive to work? Only
if we sit around waiting for
somebody in Washington to fix
things.
I'm looking at a picture of a
tractor designed to run on alco-
hol. You can't buy this tractor
now, because it was last made
in the 1920s, before the oil com-
panies eliminated the competiti-
ion by driving the alcohol fuel
industry into the ground.
Most people think using
ethanol for fuel is a new idea,
but Henry Ford's Model A was
designed to run on alcohol or


gasoline. It had to be. There
weren't any gas stations to stop
at once you got outside the city,
but there were plenty of stills
producing alcohol out of every-
thing from apples to potatoes.
Alcohol was commonly used on
farms for lighting and as fuel.
Brazil's 1970s military gov-
ernment directed manufacturers
to produce cars that ran on pure
ethanol during the oil shocks
of that period. Six months later,
60 percent of the cars rolling
off the assembly lines were
optimized to use pure alcohol
as fuel.
There are all sorts of myths
about alcohol that I don't have
space to address here, but we
know they're false because
alcohol worked as a fuel in the
past. Alcohol is cheap, easy to
produce and best of all, we don't
have to send dollars overseas to
buy it. The money stays here in
our economy and creates jobs.
Maybe it's time we went
back to the future and solved
our problems at the local level.
Alcohol fuel could well be one
of the solutions.
John Farrell
Lake City

And debt continues to rise

To the editor:
So much for lowering the
debt. With union leaders and
union members making self-
ish demands throughout the
country, it is obvious the unions


will never be satisfied until they
bankrupt the country with their
uncaring demands for workers
pensions and benefits.
Are you ready for another tax-
payer bailout? Yes, you guessed
right Our U.S. Post Office will
be "bailed out" by taxpayers for
payments of health benefits for
former postal workers.
Despite billions of dollars
in operating losses, the U.S.
Postal Management Committee
has offered the Postal Workers
Union a four-and-a-half year
contract which includes a 3.5
percent pay raise, cost of living
wage hikes, pension and health
benefits, and a guarantee of no
layoffs.
There's more -The gov-
ernment's Postal Oversight
Committee is planning to under-
write more taxpayer pension
payments ($50 to $75 billion) to
pay retired postal workers pen-
sion benefits.
Are we expected to feel sorry
for postal union workers who
average $41 per hour wages?
The private sector averages $28.
No wonder we never hear of a
postal worker quitting his or her
job.
It is time to put the Post
Office in private hands.
Government-run businesses
have proven to be failures
because the elected officials
have no concept of making a
profit
Milton F. Muskewitz
Lake City


Phil Hudgins
phudgins@cninewspapers.com


Memorial

day a

time to

reflect
.Memorial Day:
For the Foster
brothers,
ifs a time to
remember.
What motivated you to join
the service?
That was the first question
to three brothers who chose
the United States Army for
their careers. Each one had
pretty much the same answer:
I just knew I wanted to be a
soldier. If the fourth brother
were still around, no doubt
he would have said the same
thing.
So they all went, and they
all fought. First was Roy
Foster, the oldest, who was a
combat soldier in W6rld War
II. Next came Darrell Foster,
who joined the day before the
Korean War ended. "They
must have gotten word that
SI joined," he said. Doug and
Ralph Foster followed their
brothers. None of them ever
considered any other career.
Darrell, Doug and Ralph
became officers and fought in
Vietnam. Roy was an enlisted
man. He died in 1986.
On his first tour, in 1965,
Doug was a platoon leader in
the unit made famous in the
book and movie called "We
Were Soldiers," the story
of the first major battle of
the American phase of the
war. One day, soldiers were
clearing an area for a fire base,
cutting brush and trees, when
some gas caught fire and
flashed back onto Doug.
His platoon sergeant pushed
him to the ground and held
him nose down in the dirt,
saving his face. Still, Doug
spent the next nine months
in a burn center and then was
assigned duty near Walter
Reed Hospital in Washington,
where he was treated for 18
more months.
His next tour in Vietnam,
in 1968, Doug commanded a
company that "fought a pretty
serious fight with a much
larger force for possession of a
hilltop," he said. He lost a few
men, but the enemy lost even
more. "We stayed on the hill,"
Doug said.
That was May 30, 1968.
Back home, folks were
observing Memorial Day.
So what are the Foster
brothers thinking as another
Memorial Day approaches?
What does the day mean to
them?
Well, it's not a day for
celebration, Doug said. It's
a day for remembering men
they served with, the brothers
agreed, especially those who
didn't make it home.
It's also a time to look
forward to seeing your fellow
soldiers again, men who
fought side by side, who
fought mostly for each other to
stay alive.
Doug and others have
tracked down more than 100
of the guys he served with on
his second Vietnam tour, and
they get together somewhere
in the world every other year.
'To me," he said, "that is the
greatest thing ever."
They could have done a
lot of different things with
their lives. But they chose
the military. This weekend,
Memorial Day weekend, the,
brothers will be home with
their families.
And their memories.


* Phil Hudgins is senior editor of
Community Newspapers Inc.


4A


I








Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, MAY 22, 2011


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


* To submit your Community
Calendar item, contact Antonia
Robinson at 754-0425 or by
e-mail at arobinson@
lakecityreporter.com.


Sunday
Class reunion
The Class of 1973 is
meeting 5 p.m. Sunday at
Richardson Community
Center. All class members
are invited to attend.

Monday
CRA workshop
The next Public
Workshop for the CRA
Plan Update is 5:30-
7:30 p.m. Monday at
Richardson Community
Center. The center is
located at 255 NE Coach
Anders Lane. Snacks
and refreshments will be
served. Call Jackie Kite
at 386-719-5766 or e-mail
kitej@lcfla.com.

Mentoring program
Calling all middle and
high school boys for
Building Strong Bonds
mentoring program
5-8 p.m. Monday at 532
Marion Street Contact
Al Nelson at 386-1867-
1601. Dinner included.
Transportation can be
provided if contacted one
week in advance.

Tuesday
Band opportunity for
home-schooled children
Home-schooled children
and parents interested
in participating in the
Columbia High School
band can contact Ryan
Schultz at 755-8000, dur-
ing the school day, for
more information.

Family Literacy Night
Family Literacy Night
is 5:30 p.m. Tuesday at
the Columbia County
Public Library. The
worm-themed program
will feature worm stories,
crafts, games and food.
There will be fun for the
Whole family. The event
is free. Call the Library at
386-758-2101.

Wednesday
Lady of the Lake
Quilting meeting
The Lady of the Lake
Quilting Guild is meet-
ing 9:30 a.m. Wednesday
at Teen Town, 533 NW
Desoto St., Lake City,
Florida. The program will
feature a Quilters Yard
Sale. This is the time to
come and buy quilting
supplies at bargain prices.
Contact President Loretta
Kissner, 386-754-9330
or vice-president Sunny
Nadort, 386-658-1555.

Health & Fitness Fair
The Lake City Medical
Center Health & Fitness
Fair is 8:30 a.m.-1
p.m. Wednesday at the
Columbia County Fair
Grounds Banquet Hall.
More than 30 area ven-
dors participate in the
fair being held in recogni-
tion of Senior Health and
Fitness Day. Vendors are
from medical practices
and clinics, health and
fitness centers, pharma-
cies, state organizations
and many more. There
will also be free blood
pressure, BMI, and cho-
lesterol screenings. Call
386-719-9040 for more
information.

Thursday
Safety demonstration
A safety demonstra-
tion with the Florida


Highway Patrol featuring
its Rollover Simulator is
3:30 p.m. Thursday at the
Columbia County Public
Library. This event is
geared toward children 7
and up, but everyone is
invited to attend. Call the
Library at 386-758-2106.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter

Playing with the ducks at Lake Isabella Park
Nathan Meade watches his nieces Yote Milton (center), 6, and her sister Ally, 4, play with
ducks and geese at Lake Isabella Park Friday. '1I love to see the way they react when they
see the ducks,' Meade said.


MOAA meeting
The Suwannee River
Valley Chapter of
the Military Officers
Association of America
is meeting 6:30 p.m.
Thursday at the Lake City


Elks' Lodge. Retired or
former military officers
are invited: RSVP to Susan
Palmer at 697-6828 or
Vernon Lloyd at 752-4885.
The lodge is located at 259
NE Hernando St.


Friday
Mike Mullis Band
The Mike Mullis Band
performs 8 p.m. Friday at
the Spirit of the Suwannee
Music Hall. Music, grape-


OBITUARIES


Bobby Joe Douglas
Bobby Joe Douglas, 64, of Ar-
cadia, passed away peacefully at
his home after a sudden illness.
He was born in Lake City, liv-
ing in Lake Butler until moving
to Arcadia in 1989. He was a
retired correctional officer with
the Department of Corrections
in Port Charlotte. He had worked
with the New River Dept. of Cor-
rections in Raiford for several
years. He was trhe son of the late
Edward Franklin Douglas and
Deloris Hurst Douglas. He was a


devoted husband and father. He
found peace in his favorite front
porch chair. He was a simple
man who was generous and hon-
est. He enjoyed nature, hunting,
fishing, NASCAR, football, gar-
dening, Westerns and socializing
from his golf cart. He enjoyed
grilling, smoking, deep frying.
He loved his family and friends.
He is survived by his loving
wife of 42 years: Trudy Hoff
Douglas. Daughters: Becky
Douglas; Bonnie D. Chisholm
(and husband Thomas). Brother:
Frankie Douglas of Lake But-


ler. Grandchildren: Brayton
Clune; Trinity O'Neill-Doug-
las; Johnny Elvis Chisholm.
Funeral services will be .-held
Tuesday morning at 11a.m. in the
Chapel of Archer Funeral Home
Lake Butler, with interment fol-
lowing in Douglas Cemetery
near Lulu. Family will receive
friends Monday evening from 6
to 8 p.m. at the Funeral Home.

Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


Wednesday, May


25


8:30am to 1:00pm


Columbia County Fair Grounds

Banquet Hall
438 SW SR 247, Lake City, FL 32025


Over 35 vendors!

FREE blood pressure, BMI &
cholesterol screenings!

Valuable information about healthcare
options right here in your community!


For more information, please call 386-719-9040.


fruit/pantyhose race,
Mike's Wild & Wacky ver-
sion of the Hokey-Pokey
for the kids and more will
take place. Reservations
are highly recommended.
Call 386-364-1703

Folk Festival
The 59th Annual Florida
Folk Festival is May 27-
29, at Stephen Foster
Folk Culture Center State
Park. Opening ceremonies
will begin at 6:30 p.m. on
Friday. Headlining this
year's festivities will be
Florida's own superstars
John Anderson, and Billy
Dean, plus hundreds more
folk music legends from
throughout the Sunshine
State .For more informa-
tion, please visit www.
FloridaFolkFestival. corn
or www.floridastateparks.
org/stephenfoster.

Sunday, May 29
Southside Summer
Camp
Registration is open
for Southside Summer


New


N.


Camp. Only 80 spots are
available. Camp is $225
for nine weeks running
June 13-Aug. 12. The
camp is open to boys
and girls ages 7 -14 and
is 7:30 a.m. 5:30 p.m.
Monday Friday June
13 -Aug. 3. Trips include -
Blue Springs, bowling,
swimming, skating, mov-
ies, Chuck E. Cheese and
more. Call Wayne Jernigan
at 758-5448.

Summer Day Camp
Registration for
the Columbia County
Recreation Department
summer day camp pro-
gram is 8 am. 5 p.m. at
Richardson Community
Center. The camp, for boys
and girls ages 7 -14, is
open 7:30 am. 5:30 p.m.
Monday Friday June 13
-Aug. 3. Cost for the eight-
week camp is $225, which
includes daily activities, free
breakfast, lunch and weekly
field trips. Space is limited
to the first 60 participants
Contact Mario Coppock or
Nicole Smith at 754-7095 or
754-7096.


,jWAEf/j Sandals
fr Mn. & X, Women


110JLIVI for Children
".. .,., >B" AF for Children


Si. Tumblers


or the many acts o love and support shown to us









hold goods, donations of all kinds; you called us,
sent upling cards and flowers, gave us a hug and
words of encouragement. You attended the Celebra-




tion ofLove service at Olivet Church on Tuesday. We
saw you there-and, Class of 1981, we know "Wags"



saw tou, e oYou provided us safe, expeditious es-

cort as we journeyed to the place of interment, and
we were touched as we observed your white-gloved
hands over your hearts. Most of all, you prayed for
us. We felt the strength ofyour prayers. Please con-
tinue to pray for Madelynn and all of us as we cope
with the loss of one so dear We thank God for you
and pray He will ever bless and keep you.
Phoe833
























Bettyhere U. Lane no- Madelynn M. L anngue W. Mikki Weston -



words ofencourage L. Griin and the family of the Celebra-te






Darryl Earl Lane X


LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, MAY 22, 2011


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


AKE CITY

cl, WTER




HEALTH,




FITNESS, FA.IR


"kPC ,.










Apocalypse believers await end, skeptics carry on


By GARANCE BURKE
Associated Press

OAKLAND, California
- They spent months
warning the world of the
apocalypse, some giving
away earthly belongings
or draining their bank
accounts. And so they wait-
ed, vigilantly, on Saturday
for the appointed hour to
arrive.
' When 6 p.m. came and
went at various spots
around the globe, and no
extraordinary cataclysm
occurred, Keith Bauer -
who hopped in his minivan
in Maryland and drove his
family 3,000 miles (4,800
kilometers) to California
for the Rapture took it
in stride.
. "I had some skepticism
but I was trying to push the
skepticism away because
I believe in God," he said
in the bright morning sun
outside the gated Oakland
headquarters of Family
Radio International, whose
founder, Harold Camping,
has been broadcasting the
apocalyptic prediction for
years. "I was hoping for
it because I think heaven
would be a lot better than
this earth,"
But he added, "It's God
who leads you, not Harold
Camping."
Bauer, a tractor-trailer
driver, began the voyage
west last week, figuring that
if he "worked last week, I
wouldn't have gotten paid
anyway, if the Rapture did
happen." After seeing the
nonprofit ministry's base of
operations, Bauer planned


to take a day trip to the
Pacific Ocean, and then
start the cross-country
drive back home Sunday
with his wife, young son
and another family rela-
tive.
The May 21 doomsday
message was sent far and
wide via broadcasts and
web sites by Camping,
an 89-year-old retired
civil engineer who has
built a multi-million-dollar
Christian media empire
that publicizes his apocalyp-
tic prediction. According to
Camping, the destruction
was likely to have begun
its worldwide march as it
became 6 p.m. in the vari-
ous time zones, starting
in New Zealand, although
believers said Saturday
the exact timing was never
written in stone.
Many followers said
though the sun rose
Saturday without the fore-
told earthquakes, plagues,
and other calamities, the
delay was a further test
from God to persevere in
their faith.
"It's still May 21 and
God's going to bring it,"
said Family Radio's spe-
cial projects coordinator
Michael Garcia, who spent
Saturday morning praying
and drinking two last cups
of coffee with his wife at
home in Alameda. "When
you say something and it
doesn't happen, your pride
is what's hurt. But who
needs pride? God said he
resists the proud and gives
grace to the humble."
At Chicago's Millennium
Park, hours before 6 p.m.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this 2002 file photo, Harold Camping speaks while hold--
ing the Bible, in San Leandro, Calif. A loosely organized
Christian movement has spread the word around the globe
that Jesus Christ will return to earth on Saturday, May 21,
2011, to gather the faithful into heaven. While the Christian
mainstream isn't buying it, many other skeptics are believing
it. The. prediction originates with Camping, the 89-year-old
retired civil engineer, who founded Family Radio Worldwide,
an independent ministry that has broadcast his prediction
around the world.


arrived locally, people con-
tinued to take photographs
of the famed Cloud Gate
as they do every other
Saturday and poked
fun at the Judgment Day
prophecy.
"Iguess the whole school
thing was a waste of time,"


said Sarah Eaton, a 19-year-
old college student visit-
ing the city from St. Paul,.
Minnesota. *
Mena Bishara, 24 of
Houston, said if he did
believe it he wouldn't be
walking around the park
with his sister.


"Skydiving," he said. "Or
I'd buy a motorcycle."
The New Orleans Secular
Humanist Association
planned to hold a Left
Behind balloon release and
costume party rather than
their usual monthly gather-
ing to hear a speaker.
"We're non-religious
people," said Harry
Greenberger, the group's
president. "This sort of
prophecy is really not of
any concern to us."
The Internet also was alive
with discussion, humorous
or not, about the end of the
world and its apparent fail-
ure to occur on cue. Many
tweets declared Camping's
prediction a dud or shared,
tongue-in-cheek, their relief
at not having to do week-
end chores, pay their bills or
take a shower.
"If this whole end-of-the-
world thingy is still going
on ... it's already past 6.00
in New Zealand and the
world hasn't ended," read
one posting on Twitter.
The top trends on Twitter
at midday included, at
No. 1, "endofworldconfes-
sions," followed by "myrap-
tureplaylist."
Camping's radio sta-
tions, TV channels, satel-
lite broadcasts and web-
site are controlled from
a modest building sand-
wiched between an auto
shop and a palm reader's
business. Family Radio
International's message
has been broadcast in 61
languages. He has said that
his earlier apocalyptic pre-
diction in 1994 didn't come
true because of a math-


ematical error.
"I'm not embarrassed
about it. It was just the fact
that it was premature," he
told The Associated Press
last month. But this time, he
said, "there is...no possibility
that it will not happen."
Camping has preached
that some 200 million peo-
ple would be saved, and that
those left behind would die
in a series of scourges visit-
ing Earth until the globe is
consumed by a fireball on
Oct. 21.
Christian leaders from
across the spectrum wide-
ly dismissed the prophe-
cy. One local church was
concerned that Camping's
followers could slip into
a deep depression come
Sunday.
Pastor Jacob Denys of,
Milpitas-based Calvary
Bible Church planned to
wait outside the nonprofit's.
headquarters on Saturday
afternoon, hoping to coufi-
sel believers who may be
disillusioned if the Rapture
does not occur.
'The cold, hard reality is
going to hit them that they
did this, and it was false
and they basically emptied
out everything to follow
a false teacher," he said.
'"We're not all about doom-
and gloom. Our message is
a message of salvation and
of hope."
As the day- drew nearer,
followers reported that
donations grew, allowing
Family Radio to spend mil-
lions on more than 5,000
billboards and 20 RVs plas-
tered with the doomsday
message.


Businessman Cain enters

2012 GOP presidential race


By GREG BLUESTEIN
and SHANNON McCAFFREY
Associated Press

ATLANTA Herman
Cain has run a pizza chain,,
hosted a talk radio show
and sparred with Bill
Clinton over health care.
He's never held elected
office. Now the tea party
favorite wants to be presi-
dent.
"In case you accidentally
listen to a skeptic or doubt-
ing Thomas out there, just
to be clear ... I'm running
for president of the United
States, and I'm not running
for second," he told a crowd
at Centennial Olympic
Park on Saturday. Chants
of "Herman" erupted from
the crowd of thousands in
downtown Atlanta.
The announcement by the
businessman, author and
radio talk show host that he
was joining the expanding
' Republican field came after
months of traveling around
the country, to introduce
himself to voters.
Now the 65-year-old will
see if he can use that grass-
roots enthusiasm to turn a
long-shot campaign into a
credible bid.
Cain supports' a strong
national defense, opposes
abortion, backs replac-
'ing the federal income tax
with a national sales tax
and favors a return to the
gold standard. He said
President Barack Obama
"threw Israel under the
bus" because he sought
to base Mideast border
talks partly on the pre-1967
war lines, and criticized
the Justice Department
for challenging Arizona's
tough crackdown on illegal
immigration.
"We shouldn't be suing
Arizona," he said to cheers.
'We ought to send them a
prize."
Cain lost a three-way
Republican U.S. Senate
primary bid in Georgia in
2004 with one-quarter of
the vote. His "Hermanator"
political action commit-
tee has taken in just over
$16,000 this year. He said
he's running "a bottoms-up,
outside-the-box campaign."
Supporters say he taps into
the tea party-fueled desire
for plain-speaking citizen
candidates.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Herman Cain announces his run for Republican candidate for
president at a rally Saturday in Atlanta. Cain has run a pizza
chain, hosted a talk radio show and sparred with Bill Clinton
over health care. He's never held elected office. Now the tea
party favorite wants to be president.


Born in Memphis, Tenn.,
and raised in Atlanta, Cain
is the son of a chauffeur and
a maid. He attended his-
torically black Morehouse
College, earned a mas-
ter's degree from Purdue
University and worked as a
mathematician for the Navy
before beginning to scale
the corporate ladder.
He worked at Coca-Cola,
Pillsbury and Burger King
before taking the helm
of the failing Godfather's
Pizza franchise, which he
rescued by shuttering hun-
dreds of restaurants.
He burstSonto the politi-
cal stage when he argued
with President Clinton over
the Democrat's health care
plan at a 1994 town hall
meeting.
"On behalf of all of those
business owners that are
in a situation similar to
mine," asked Cain, "my
question is, quite simply,
if I'm forced to do this,
what will I tell those people
whose jobs I will have to
eliminate?"
The late Jack Kemp, the
GOP vice presidential nomi-
nee in 1996, once described
Cain as having "the voice
of Othello, the looks of a
football player, the English
of Oxfordian quality and the
courage of a lion."
In 2006, Cain was diag-
nosed with liver and colon
cancer. He says he's been
cancer-free since 2007 and
credits the nation's health
care system with keeping
him alive. He says it's one
reason he's so opposed to


the health overhaul cham-
pioned by Obama.
At the speech, Cain tried
to build a foundation for his
run for the White House.
He said the American
dream is under attack from
runaway debt, a stagnant
economy, a muddled for-
eign policy and an influx of
illegal immigrants. He said
Americans should be infu-
riated because the Obama
administration's $787 bil-
lion stimulus program
"didn't stimulate diddly."
"It's time to get real,
folks. Hope and change
ain't working," he said.
"Hope and change is not a
solution. Hope and change
is not a job."


-mNOWm m


I 1 Pair:
"y Eyegiasss
I I
Includes lenses & frames.
Some Restrictions Apply.
COUPON REQUIRED. EXPIRES MAY 31, 2011
= mw :m m me m m m l m m m l

FREE GLASSES:

Buy one complete pair of glasses at
regular price & receive a














OW
2 Complete. Pair







Eyeglasses
Some Restrictions Apply.
COUPON REQUIRED. EXPIRES MAY 31, 2011



Il





Includes Lenses & Frames n

Some Restrictions Apply. '
COUPON REQUIRED. XPIRESMAY31, 2011
m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m


HWY 90


YOUR AD PRINTS ON GRADUATION DAY


Graduation 2011


Graduate's full name:
U Columbia High J Fort White High
Your special message:


PROUD PARENT


Call 755-5440


CHS, May, 27th Fort White, June 3rd


Tell everyone how proud you are
with this special graduation notice.


2 Ad Sizes Available

1 x4.....*45-00


2x4......80.oo

We have
all graduate photos.
Make sure you give the student's
complete name and school when using
their photo in your message.

Lake City Reporter


EYE


EXA MS






by Ineedn Optometri*st*


REMEMBER


LAKE CITY REPORTER NATION SUNDAY, MAY 22, 2011


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


3l A
A *MPg







LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVERTISEMENT SUNDAY, MAY 22, 2011 7A


allot hosen . . 100

Second Ballot, .a.a f. 50
FILL OUT THE BALLOT (Must complete 50% of ballot to be counted)
ENTER YOUR NAME for the RANDOM DRAWING.
.,. N CAN WINM. o WHY NOT YOU?


ENTER& WIN! 2010OfficiaEntry Ballot
(Simply Write In Your Choice For Columbia County's Best and Return Ballot by June 6, 2011)

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SBest All-around Restaurant
Best Bar
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Best Fried Chicken
Best Hot Dog
Best Hot Wings_______________
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Best Mexican Restaurant
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Best Place to Buy Ice Cream
Best Restaurant Atmosphere
Best Salad Bar
Best Sandwich
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Best Sushi


. I., i .. ,


P OPeople
Best Attorney_
Best Chiropractor
Best Dentist_
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Best Home Builder_
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Best Orthodontist_
Best Plumber_
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Best Auto Body Shop_
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Best Antique Store_
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Best Truck Dealer
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INSRUTINSAN OFIIA RLE: neenryfom'pe hushod.Enris us b sumite o of cialenrybalo Potcoie ad aronno acete. us
be 18 lears f age t enter Ballts mu ..inclde nam ageaddres 1and.telepone nu ber. ntriesnot meting hese citeri will otIbetabulaed, no enteediinlhe drwing fr 1$15


City

Phone


I


State Zip
Age


L








LAKE CITY REPORTER WEATHER SUNDAY, MAY 22, 2011


THE WEATH ER



AM DENSE' PARTLY MOSTLY, ISOLATED ISOLATED
FOG : CLOUDY SUNNY STORMS -STORMS

9 -- 9 .' H 3 .I 9 9 ,,
H197 : --95LO-- H193-LO 193 L0.O.; -. " .


-IE^X^^ ^^ ^ ''^ ^^ ^ ^'"
;'t ; f:j51,2^ o:*-"


NATIONAL FORECAST: Widespread thunderstorms will be likely across the eastern United
States. Some storms from northern Texas to the Mississippi River and the Ohio River Valley
could be strong to severe. The Gulf and Atlantic Coast will likely stay dry. To the west, show-
ers and possible thunderstorms will be scattered across the Intermountain West.


" "- .
.- . .- : # ',:.. ..Ian,
... . . . ..


Pensaola
85/71


96/
Talahassee ake
94/64 9

8Panama City
85/71


TEMPERATURES
High Saturday
Low Saturday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Saturday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


94
62
87
63
100 in 1938
50 in 1894


0.00"
2.63"
14.11"
1.81"
15.83"


costa
*Jacksonville
Pa.- "oI{rfa


City
Cape Canaveral


e Ciy / Daytona Beach
/65 Ft. Lauderdale
inesville Daytona Beach Fort Myers
96/66 89 68 Gainesville
Ocala Jacksonville
95/66 Key West
Odando Cape Canaveral Lake City
93/71 85/69 Miami
Tampa, Naples
92/71, West Palm Beach Ocala
85/77 0 Orlando
Ft Lauderdale Panama City
Ft Myers 87/77 0 Pensacola
93/72 Naples Tallahassee
92/72 Miami Tampa
87/77 Valdosta
Key West W. Palm Beach
87.79
-. a . .- .


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise torn.
Sunset torn.

MOON
Moonrise today
Moonset today
Moonrise torn.
Moonset torn.



May June
24 1
Last New


6:33 a.m
8:22 p.m
6:33 a.rr
8:22 p.m


12:24 a.m
11:28 a.m
1:00 a.m
12:24 p.m


June Jun
8 15
First Ful


. 10
i. VEY

Todad, s
i' ullr.5-.-i,,l
. ra n iS rr rn5"
for me area on
a -caile rcm 0 .i
Lo 10 l1+.
..
'4


e
ll


Monday
85/70/pc
86/68/s
86/76/s
91/70/s
94/67/pc
91/70/s
87/79/pc
95/68/pc
86/76/s
89/72/s
93/67/pc
91/72/s
82/71/s
87/74/s
95/66/s
93/73/s
96/67/pc
85/76/s


Tuesday
85/70/pc
87/67/pc
87/76/pc
92/72' pc
93/68/s
89/71/pc
87/79 p.:
93/68/pc i
86/77/pc
90/73/pc
91/68/s
91/71/pc
83/72 p.:
87/73 ,:
92/67 p.:
91/71 pc
91/67, -,
87/75/pc


E --A' EXRE E H : .F.o S a .. --...2... Monan erhol.A
YESTERDAYS NATIONAL EXTREMES High: 970, Fort Stewart, Ga. Low: 210, Monarch, Colo.


Saturday Today


U
CC.' n


4Vga1 Forecasts, data and
. graphics 2011 Weather
j1 I j V Central, LP, Madison, Wis.
weather www.weatherpubllsher.com


CITY HI/Lo/Pcp.
Albany NY 73/53/0
Albuquerque 72/43/0
Anchorage 53/38/0
Atlanta 89/65/0
Baltimore 82/53/0
Billings 56/48/.26
Birmingham 87/65/0
Bismarck 70/57/.43
Bolse 73/48/0
Boston 62/52/0
Buffalo 68/50/0
Charleston SC 91/67/0
Charleston WV 80/55/.01
Charlotte 85/55/0
Cheyenne 56/36/0
Chicago 71/50/0
Cincinnati 81/53/0
Cleveland 77/52/0
Columbia SC 90/68/0
Dallas 84/60/0
Daytona Beach 93/71/0
Denver 66/44/0


HI/LO/W
74/57/d
80/52/pc
56/42/sh
91/68/pc
85/64/t
64/46/h
92/68/pc
66/48/t
70/49/pc
56/49/c
77/63/t
86/70/s
87/64/t
91/66/t
69/42/pc
84/63/t
85/66/t
81/64/t
94/68/s
90/68/t
89/68/s
76/50/pc


CITY
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Fairbanks
Greensboro,
Hartford
Honolulu
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson MS
Jacksonville
Kansas City
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Memphis
Miami
Minneapolis
Mobile
New Orleans
New York
Oklahoma City


Saturday Today
HI/Lo/Pcp. HI/Lo/W CITY
75/63/.20 81/61/t Omaha
75/53/0 77/64/t Orlando
81/60/0 90/61/pc Philadelphia
69/45/0 72/47/sh Phoenix
81/57/0 91/65/t Pittsburgh
74/54/0 66/52/c Portland ME
81/74/.01 88/75/s Portland OR .
87/73/0 92/76/pc Raleigh
77/62/0 84/67/t Rapid City
90/69/.03 90/68/pc Reno
94/66/0 92/69/s Richmond
80/63/.01 84/65/pc Sacramento
85/64/0 86/67/pc St. Louis
81/65/.21 85/69/t Salt Lake City
66/56/0 64/55/pc San Antonio
85/66/.29 89/72/t San Diego
90/77/0 87/77/s San Francisco
70/61/1.33 74/56/t Seattle
91/65/0 '90/68/pc Spokane
90/76/0 87/74/pc Tampa
76/55/0 66/55/c Tucson
87/57/0 87/69/t Washington


Saturday Today
HI/Lo/Pcp. HI/Lo/W


76/63/.08
93/71/0
79/56/0
89/67/0
77/50/0
65/50/0,
60/50/.01
83/55/0
59/47/0
69/55/0
81/58/0
73/55/0
84/66/.03
66/48/0
89/74/0
68/62/0
61/53/0
52/48/.02
67/54/0
89/70/0
85/56/0
81/57/0


81/57/pc
93/71/s
75/60/c
92/70/pc
82/63/t
55/46/c
63/47/c
91/67/t
61/48/sh
71/46/sh
88/68/t
75/50/pc
88/69/t'
69/49/sh
93/76/pc
65/58/pc
64/48/pc
59/48/c
66/42/c
92/71/s
91/64/s
87/66/t


1989. se.en cit
, ,in ,he South
reported record nign
t temperatures for
tre date Presidi,.
Teaas was the rot
spot in the nartor,
wirh a rrign or 111
deg rees


- in -


' Saturday Today Saturday Today Saturday Today
CITY HI/La/Pcp. HI/Lo/W CITY HI/Lo/Pcp. HI/Lo/W CITY HI/Lo/Pcp. HI/Lo/W
Acapulco 90/79/0 92/78/t La Paz 57/23/0 55/34/sh Rio 79/63/0 78/66/s
Amsterdam 70/46/0 63/54/pc Uma 70/64/0 71/63/pc Rome 79/55/0 77/57/t
Athens 78/51/0 77764/pc London 70/46/0 61/46/pc St. Thomas VI 83/74/.07 84/73/t
Auckland 63/52/0 63/53/s Madrid 81/54/0 82/55/pc San Juan PR 86/69/.02 83/72/t
Beljing 79/48/0 86/62/s Mexico City 84/63/0 83/59/t Santiago 63/41/0 61/41/s
Berlin 73/55/0 82/55/t Montreal 73/59/0 73/58/sh Seoul 63/54/0 74/57/c
Buenos AIres 73/57/0 73/52/s Moscow 73/52/0 68/45/pc Singapore 88/77/0 91/78/t
Cairo 86/66/0 90/70/pc Nairobi 75/61/0 77/59/sh Sydney 75/54/0 73/58/sh
Geneva 79/50/0 70/52/t Nassau 90/77/0 89/75/pc Tel Aviv 79/64/0 82/64/s
Havana 91/70/0 90/70/t New Delhi 90/72/0 98/84/t Tokyo 77/68/0 77/61/sh
Helsinki 66/37/0 66/41/pc Oslo 57/45/0 63/39/sh Toronto 77/59/0 74/60/t
Hong Kong 88/77/0 84/79/t Panama 93/73/0 86/72/pc Vienna 81/57/0 81/58/s
Kingston 86/77/0 84/78/t Paris 77/45/0 70/45/pc Warsaw 77/59/.04 82/57/t


KEYTO CONDITIONS: c-cloudy, -drizzle, f-fair, fg-fog, h-hazy, i-ice, pc-partly cloudy, r-rain, s-sunny,
sh-showers, sn-snow, ts-thunderstorms, w-windy.


.1.


^ ^ ^ ,=.-S t-' / ' ...-. .






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t-,: ,,-. i : ,,- ,- .,-, ,,.. J l ,. , ,,.. , ,,. ,.,,I i I ,r, .. .,, l ,.,',- ,P,,,-,, i ." i '." ,,',i[,. i '-1 ',' I'1 ', ri < ,,,,;, j. ' "' hi, I 'p ,8.42 and a final p ym ent of$1,055.54,
finance charge of $183,322.62, for a total of paymenEs of $381,028.32. The amount financed is $197,705.70, the APR is 4.976%. APR = Annual Percentage Rate. Certain other restrictions apply. 2. Credit approval and initial $5 deposit required, Mention this ad and we'll waive the $15 new mnembership fee.


LENDER


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Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@aokecityreportercom


Lake City Reporter





SPORTS


Sunday. Mav 22. 201 I


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


FROM THE SIDELINE






Brandon Finley
Phone:(386) 754-0420
bfinley@lakecityreportercom

Savage

left many

'Macho'

memories
Snapping into a
Slim Jim will
never be quite
the same. After
all, it will only
make me think of one of"
my original childhood
heroes,
Randy "Macho Man"
Savage was the epitome
of cool to a 5-year-old
version of myself. With
his flashy clothes,
oversized sunglasses
and elbow off the top
rope, Savage stood for
everything that the
iconic 80's were about.
In a sense at least to
a young boy who didn't
yet know that wrestling
was fake the Macho
Man was bigger than this
world.
He had it all, even the
most beautiful woman in
the world of wrestling,
Mrs. Elizabeth. There
were many days that
I spent day dreaming
of becoming the next
Macho Man.
In second grade,
during a career day
poster contest, I
remember drawing the
adult version of myself
squaring off against my
favorite WWF superstar.
My art work was clearly
juvenile, but my heart
was in the right place.
There were many days
I spent home on summer
break practicing my
flying elbow off whatever
piece of furniture I
could climb. Needless
to say this also led to
many pieces of broken
furniture and more
punishments than I can
remember. At the time,
these were fruits of my
labor.
Macho Man gave
me a reason to dream.
His matches were so
incredible, especially
before I realized they
were scripted. I still have
vivid memories of his
classic rivalries with the
likes of Ric Flair, Rowdy,
Roddy Piper and the
legendary Hulk Hogan.
Back before the
days of DVD and.cable
television, in every
household there were
many-nights when I
visited the local video
store to rent Macho Man
the only way of checking
out the latest of the
wrestling scene at that
time and my favorites
were always those
including Savage.
He's been out of
the ring for some time
now and I have equally
been unenthused by
the wrestling scene, but
when I heard the news
Friday I immediately
pulled up a couple of his
old matches on YouTube.
It sent me back to my
childhood, if only for a
second, and made me
long for just one more
time hearing the Macho
Man utter his famous
"Oh yeahhhhh."
* Brandon Finley covers


sports for the Lake City
Reporter.


Fort White


is surging


into summer

Indians learn Fort White's defense
...., .- .-I, -.-. kept the Raiders out


tough in victory.
By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com
FORT WHITE It was
only a spring game, but
Fort White High's 17-14 win
over Orange Park showed
what can happen when a
team hangs tough.
Orange Park ran 32 plays
to 20 for the Indians in the
first half.
The Raiders totaled
191 yards and nine first
downs to 62 yards and
three first downs for the
Indians.
Yet, the score was 7-7 at
intermission.


of the end zone on their
opening drive, despite
facing a first-and-goal at
the 6. A.J. Legree ended
the next two Orange
Park possessions with
interceptions.
Orange Park finally put
together a scoring drive
and went up 7-0 with 3:48
left in the half.
The Indians responded
with a pair of first downs, as
Andrew Baker connected
with Trey Phillips for two
of their five completions,
but an interception seemed
to seal the fate of the first
half.
Fort White's defense
INDIANS continued on 4B


Flawless


Columbia ends
spring with 17-0
win over Tigers.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinleyy@lakecityreporter.com
It doesn't get much bet-
ter than the start new head
coach Brian Allen got off
to with the Columbia High
Tigers. Allen, in his return
to Lake City, guided the
Tigers to a 17-0 win against
Dunnellon High on Friday.
There were things that
didn't go right for Columbia,
including a turnover on the ,
first series, but for the most
part, the Tigers owned the
contest
With four turnovers,
Allen's defense under coor-
dinator Dennis Dotson was
in firm control of the game.
Dunnellon had a chance
to get on the scoreboard
during the first drive, but
Felix Woods picked up the
first of three fumble recov-
eries for -the Tigers in what
would be Dunnellons' clos-
est scoring opportunity.
Columbia's offense
struggled at points during
the game, but was able to
punch it in on one first-
half possession set up by a
turnover.
Solomon Bell fell on a
loose ball at the 14-yard line
and the Tigers needed only


CHS continued on 4B


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Fort White High quarterback Andrew Baker (back) drops back to pass during the indians'
17-14 win against Orange Park High on Friday.


victory


'-, .... . .... ... .



6 A. .- .,
: 4
^ S S;'. .': ..* ,.. .-...'... i


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High quarterback Jayce Barber (5) falls back'as he looks for an open man against Dunnellon High on Friday.


Amateur Tour

swings its way

through Columbia


BRANDON FINLEY/Lake City Reporter
Darren Rawlinson holds up the Titliest golf ball he used to make a hole-in-one on the Par-3
fifth hole at The Country Club of Lake City during Saturday's Golfweek Amateur Tour event
held at the course. Rawlinson competed in the A-flight at the event.


The Country Club
of Lake City hosts
Florida event.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.corn7
Competitive amateur
golf for all skill levels
passed through Lake City
on Saturday as part of the
Golfweek Amateur Tour.
One of 12 events sched-
uled for the Florida section
of the tour, The Country
Club of Lake City hosted
the sixth event as more


than 30 golfers showed up
to the course.
"It's competitive golf, but
it's for everyone based on
handicap," said Florida Tour
owner Donnie Thomas,
who also competeted in the
event.
With five flights ranging
from a championship flight
for scratch golfers and those
with a handicap below four
to the D-flight arranged for
all hackers, the Golfweek
Amateur Tour had some-
thing for everyone.
GOLF.continued on 2B










LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY MAY 22, 2011 Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TV sports
Today
AUTO RACING
7:30 a.m.
SPEED Formula One, Spanish
Grand Prix, at Barcelona, Spain
Noon
VERSUS IRL, Indianapolis 500
Bump Day
2 p.m.
ABC NASCAR, Nationwide Series,'
John Deere Dealers 250, at Newton,
Iowa
7 p.m.
ESPN2 NHRA, Summer Nationals,
at Topeka, Kan. (same-day tape)
COLLEGE SOFTBALL
I p.m.
ESPN NCAA Division I playoffs,
regionals, site 2/game 6
3:30 p.m.
ESPN NCAA Division I playoffs,
regionals, site 2/game 7 (if necessary)
CYCLING
6:30 p.m.
VERSUS Tour of Chlifornia, final
stage, Santa Clarita to Thousand Oaks,
Calif.
GOLF
9 a.m.
TGC European PGA Tour, Volvo
World Match Play Championship,
semifinal and championship matches, at
Casares, Spain
I p.m.
TGC Nationwide Tour, BMW
Charity Pro-Am, final round, at Greer,
S.C.
3 p.m.
CBS PGA Tour, Crowne Plaza
Invitational, final round, at Fort Worth,
Texas
4:30 p.m.
TGC ,- LPGA, Sybase Match
Play Championship, semifinal and
championship matches, at Gladstone, N.J.
(same-day tape)
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
I p.m.
TBS N.Y. Mets at N.Y.Yankees
2 p.m.
WGN L.A. Dodgers at Chicago
White Sox
8 p.m.
ESPN Chicago Cubs at Boston
NBA BASKETBALL
8:30 p.m.
TNT Playoffs, conference finals,
game 3, Chicago at Miami
NHL HOCKEY
3 p.m.
NBC Playoffs, conference finals,
game 4,Vancouver at San Jose
SOCCER
10:55 a.m.
ESPN2 Premier League, Blackpool
at Manchester United
TENNIS
I p.m.
ESPN2 French Open, first round,
at Paris

Monday'
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
7 p.m.
* ESPN2 Boston at Cleveland
NBA BASKETBALL
9 p.m.
ESPN Playoffs, conference finals,
game 4, Dallas at Oklahoma City
NHL HOCKEY
8 p.m.
VERSUS Playoffs, conference finals,
game 5,Tampa Bay at Boston

BASEBALL

AL standings


East Division
W L
Tampa Bay 25 20
Boston 24 20
New York 23 20
Toronto 22 22
Baltimore 19 24
Central Division


W L
Cleveland 27 15
Detroit 22 22
Kansas City 22 22
Chicago 20 26
Minnesota 15 28
West Division
W L
Texas 23 22
Los Angeles 23 23
Oakland 22 23
Seattle 20 24


Pct GB
.643 -
.500 6
.500 6
.435 9
.349 12'A


Monday's Games
Boston (C.Buchholz 4-3) at Cleveland
(Masterson 5-2), 7:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay (Hellickson 5-2) at Detroit
(Coke 1-5), 7:05 p.m.
Toronto (Villanueva 1-0) at N.Y.
Yankees (Colon 2-2), 7:05 p.m.
Chicago White Sox (Danks 0-6) at
Texas (Ogando 4-0), 8:05 p.m.
Seattle (Vargas 3-2) at Minnesota
(Pavano 2-4), 8:10 p.m.
Oakland (Undecided) at L.A. Angels
(Weaver 6-4), 10:05 p.m.

Interleague play

Saturday's Games
Toronto 7, Houston 5
Chicago White Sox 9, LA. Dodgers 2
St. Louis 3, Kansas City 0
Cincinnati at Cleveland (n)
Washington at Baltimore (n)
Tampa Bay at Florida (n)
Detroit at Pittsburgh (n)
Chicago Cubs at Boston (n)
N.Y. Mets at N.Y.Yankees (n)
Oakland at San Francisco (n)
Texas at Philadelphia (n)
Atlanta at LA.Angels (n)
Seattle at San Diego (n)
Minnesota at Arizona (n)
Today's Games
Cincinnati (Volquez 3-1) at Cleveland
(C.Carrasco 2-2), 1:05 p.m.
N.Y. Mets (Pelfrey 3-3) at N.Y.Yankees
(Nova 4-3), 1:05 p.m.
Houston (W.Rodriguez 2-3) at
Toronto (Drabek 3-2), 1:07 p.m.
Tampa Bay (Shields 4-2) at Florida (Jo.
Johnson 3-1), 1:10 p.m.
Detroit (Porcello 3-2) at Pittsburgh
(Maholm 1-6), 1:35 p.m.
Texas (Harrison 3-4) at Philadelphia
(Oswalt 3-1), 1:35 p.m.
Washington (Zimmermann 2-4) at
Baltimore (Tillman 2-3), 1:35 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers (Kuroda 5-3) at Chicago
White Sox (E.Jackson 3-5), 2:10 p.m.
St. Louis (J.Garcia 5-0) at Kansas City
(O'Sullivan 2-3),2:10 p.m.
Atlanta (D.Lowe 3-3) at L.A. Angels
(Chatwood 2-2), 3:35 p.m.
Oakland (G.Gonzalez 5-2) at San
Francisco (J.Sanchez 3-3), 4:05 p.m.
Seattle (F.Hernandez 4-4) at San Diego
(Stauffer 0-2), 4:05 p.m.
Minnesota (Liriano 3-5) at Arizona
(D.Hudson 4-5), 4:10 p.m.
Chicago Cubs (Garza 2-4) at Boston
(Wakefield 0-1), 8:05 p.m.

NL standings

East Division


W L
Philadelphia 27 17
Florida 25 18
Atlanta 25 22
New York 22 22
Washington 21 23
Central Division
W L
St. Louis 26 20
Cincinnati 25 20
Milwaukee 22 23
Pittsburgh 21 23
Chicago 19 24
Houston 16 29
West Division
W L
San Francisco 25 19
Colorado 23 20
Arizona 21 23
Los Angeles 21 25
San Diego 19 .26


Pct GB
.565 -
.556 h
.489 3h
.477 4
.442 5A
.356 9h%


Saturday's Game
Colorado at Milwaukee (n)
Today's Game
Colorado (Jimenez 0-3) at Milwaukee
(Wolf 3-4), 2:10 p.m.


Monday's Games
Cincinnati (Arroyo 3-4) at Philadelphia
(Hamels 5-2), 7:05 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers (Kershaw 5-3) at
Houston (Norris 2-3), 8:05 p.m.
Washington (Gorzelanny 2-3) at
Milwaukee (Gallardo 5-2), 8:10 p.m.
St. Louis (Lohse 5-2) at San Diego
(Moseley 1-6), 10:05 p.m.

BASKETBALL

NBA playoffs

CONFERENCE FINALS
Saturday
Dallas at Oklahoma City (n)
Today
Chicago at Miami, 8:30 p.m.
Monday
Dallas at Oklahoma City, 9 p.m.
Tuesday
Chicago at Miami, 8:30 p.m.
Wednesday
Oklahoma City at Dallas, 9 p.m.

AUTO RACING

Race week

NATIONWIDE
John Deere Dealers of Iowa 250
Site: Newton, Iowa.
Schedule: Today, race, 2 p.m. (ABC,
I-4:30 p.m.).
Track: Iowa Speedway (oval, 0.875
miles).
Race distance: 218.75 miles, 250 laps.
FORMULA ONE
Spanish Grand Prix
Site: Barcelona.
Schedule: Today, race, "8 a.m. (Speed,
7:30-10 a.m.; 4:30-7 p.m.).
Track: Circuit de Catalunya (road
course, 2.89 miles).
Race distance: 190.8 miles, 66 laps.
NHRA FULL THROTTLE
NHRA Summer Nationals
Site:Topeka, Kan.
Schedule: Today, final eliminations
(ESPN2, 7-10 p.m.).
Track: Heartland Park Topeka.

SOFTBALL

NCAA regionals

(Double elimination)
At Gainesville.
Saturday
Game 3: Florida 4, UCLA 2
Game 4: Jacksonville 8, Bethune-
Cookman 0
Game 5: Game 3 loser vs. Game 4
winner (n)
Today
Game 6: Game 3 winner vs. Game 5
winner, I p.m.
Game 7: Game 6 winner vs. Game 6
loser, 3:30 p.m. (if necessary)

At Athens, Ga.
Saturday
Game 3: Georgia 9, UAB 2
Game 4: Florida State 6, Georgia
State I
Game 5: Game 3 loser vs. Game 4
winner (n)
Today
Game 6: Game 3 winner vs. Game 5
winner, Noon 4
Game 7: Game 6 winner vs. Game 6
loser, 2:30 p.m. (If necessary)

HOCKEY

NHL playoffs

CONFERENCE FINALS
Friday
San Jose 4, Vancouver 3. Vancouver
leads series 2-1
Saturday
Tampa Bay 5, Boston 3
Today
Vancouver at San Jose, 3 p.m.
Monday
Tampa Bay at Boston, 8 p.m.


BRIEFS


LCMS FOOTBALL
Red & Black game
Tuesday at school
Lake City Middle
School's Red & Black
spring game is 5:30 p.m.
Tuesday at the field behind
the school. Admission for
adults is $1 and there is no
charge for students.
For details, call the
school at 758-4800.

SOFTBALL


June 27-28 at the Columbia
High gym. The camp is
for girls entering the sixth
through 12th grades, with
instruction by members of
the CHS staff and
returning varsity players.
Cost of $50 includes camp
T-shirt. Registration is in
the CHS front office from
8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday
through June 13.
For details, call coach
Casie McCallister at
(386) 365-3158.


swimming lessons will be
offered at the Columbia
County Aquatic Complex,
beginning in June. Classes
meet for two weeks and
six daily times are offered,
plus there are two daily
mom and tot classes. Five
sessions are offered with
the first session June 6-17.
Cost is $50 per person.
Registration is at the
pool (755-8195) from
5-7 p.m. June 1 and all day
June 2-3.


Adult league POP WARNER FOOTBALL GOLF

registration opens Registration for Elks charity
.... --I -I .....- J,........ I... 1A


Registration for the
Lake City Recreation
Department's summer
co-ed, commercial and
women's adult softball
leagues is 8:30 a.m. to
5 p.m. Monday through
June 10 at Teen Town
Recreation Center. Fee is
$350 for a minimum of 10
games, and due with
roster by June 10.
For details, call Heyward
Christie at 754-3607.


YOUTH VOLLEYBALL


Lake City Pop Warner
football registration for
returning players is
under way at Richardson
Community Center..
Sign-up is 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
weekdays through May 31.
Regular registration begins
June 1. Pop Warner also is
looking for girls ages 5-12
interested in cheerleading.
For details, call
secretary Kim Stephens at
623-2954 or e-mail kim
stephensl972@yahoo.com.


Future Lady Tiger
camp June 27-28 SWMMING
Classes offered at


The third annual Future
Lady Tiger Volleyball
Camp is 9 a.m. to noon


Aquatic Complex
Youth and adult


Lake City Elks Lodge
No. 893's annual
charity golf tournament
is 8:30 a.m. June 4 at The
Country Club at Lake City.
Entry fee for the
four-person scramble is
$50 and includes'lunch,
beverages and prizes. Hole
sponsorships are $100 and
include one golf entry.
Sign-up sheets for hole
sponsors and golfers are at
The Country Club at Lake
City and the Elks Lodge on
Hernando Street. Deadline
is May 27.
For details, call Carl
Ste-Marie at 752-2266.


COURTESY PHOTO


Indians' pancake fundraiser

Coach Ken Snider (center of table, seated) talks to some Fort White football players and
head coach Demetric Jackson (standing middle table), during Saturday mornings Fort White
Quarterback Club pancake breakfast. The event was held at the Fort White Community
Center and the proceeds go to supporting the Fort.White varsity and junior varsity teams.
Fort White middle school washed cars at the community center while the breakfast was
being served.


BRANDON FINLEY/Lake City Reporter
Donnie Thomas lines up a putt on the 10th hole at The Country Club of Lake City during
Saturday's Golfweek Amateur Tour held at the course.


GOLF: Amateur Tour passes through

Continued From Page 1B


The highlight of the used a knock-down 7-iron in-one. It was his third
tournament came from on the par-3 fifth hole from hole-in-one recorded as a
Darren Rawlinson as he 160 yards to make a hole- golfer.


1
5 .1
8

12 I
13 1

14 ,
15
16 I

18 I
20 I

21 1
22 $
23 I
26 1


ACROS$ 36 Like evening
gowns
Exchange 38 Subscribe
One, in Munich again
Granite 39 Electrical unit
or quartz 40 TD passers
HI or AK, once 41 LPGA star
Size above Lorena
med. 44 Looked good
Jai- on
Toward shelter 47 Knives and
Bread bakers forks
(2 wds.) 49 Claim
Painter's tool 51 Toolbox item
Breaks in rela- 52 Geol. forma-
tions tions
Tax org. 53 High-schooler
Support 54 Auctioneer's
Lacy call
Brisbane 55 Mare's tidbit
native 56 Goals


29 "- no kick

30 Blushing
31 Sheep
33 Horse com-
mand
34 Impudent
35 Thorny shrub


DOWN


RR terminal
Healthy
Territory
Tell in advance
Cherbourg shes


Answer to Previous Puzzle


AGED SCOW SRA

ETNA PR


GIRTH USED
PRE L I RA GORE
OILS COIL SEW

ARI KUDU


UNHEATED LABS
SOU LIVE ERAT
END MEAN DENS


6 Frankenstein's
gofer
7 PBS founder
8 Turbulent water
9 Canute's foe
10 Jargon


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


Smooch
Check for
weapons
Parched
Reunion
attendee
Sticky fruit
Developed
- -do-well
Spacious
Rust compo-
nent
Pave the way
Senor's coin
Tabby's plaint
Baloney!
Say again
Hammed it up
Diamond stat
Hero's journey
Switch posi-
tions
Ad award
Corridor
Young lady of
Sp.
Tied
Legal docu-
ment
-, amas, amat
Hosp. workers


* From staff reports


2011 by UFS, Inc.


g ninruter playerS tou 4


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, MAY 22, 2011


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


.~


-"











.. Heat, Bulls expect another


physical test in Game 3


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Luke Donald of England (left) shakes hands with Johan
Edfors of Sweden (right) after their match in the World Match
Play Golf Championship tournament in Casares, southern
Spain, Saturday.


World's No. 1

ranking on line at

World Match Play?


By STEVE DOUGLAS
Associated Press

CASARES, Spain Luke
Donald will meet Martin
Kaymer in the semifinals
of the World Match Play
Championship on Sunday,
with the No. 1 spot firmly
in their sights following the
shock elimination of top-
ranked Lee Westwood.
Westwood's loss to Ryder
Cup teammate Ian Poulter
in the final 16 Saturday
left him vulnerable at the
top of the rankings, and
his closest pursuers took
full advantage on the, Finca
Cortesin course.
Second-ranked Donald
struggled against Johan
Edfors, needing a playoff
to beat the Swedish out-
sider in the first knockout
round. But he rediscovered
his consistent best to defeat
Masters champion Charl
Schwartzel by 2 holes in
the quarterfinals.
Kaymer, the former top-
ranked player who has,
slipped to third, won two
of the last three holes to
defeat local favorite Alvaro
Quiros by 2 holes in the last
eight. The German player
eased past Soren Kjeldsen
3 and 2.
Donald or Kaymer will
become No. 1 if either wins
the tournament on the


Costa del Sol. The two met
in the final of the Accenture
Match Play in Arizona in
February, with Donald win-
ning 3 and 2.
"I suppose I have the
upper hand psychological-
ly," said Donald, who has
never been No. 1 but has
been a persistent challeng-
er at the top of the rankings
in recent weeks.
Belgium's Nicolas
Colsaerts,. who is No. 108
and claimed a first European
Tour title at the China Open
last month, will play Poulter
in the other semifinal.
But all eyes will be on the
Donald-Kaymer match-up,
especially with the bigger
prize hinging on the result.
Donald, who said he
felt "drained" while he
struggles with the effects
of a throat infection for
two weeks, is arguably
the toughest match-player
around. He's won his last
13 matches in that format,
including those in the
Ryder Cup. It has given the
soft-spoken Englishman an
intimidating aura out on the
course.
"Being consistent
throughout the bag is a use-
ful tool in match play. I think,
in 18-hole matches you can
wear your opponent down if
it's not too flashy," Donald
said.


By TIM REYNOLDS
Associated Press

MIAMI Dwyane
Wade's right arm had a
nasty gash that left him
unwilling to shoot the
ball for Miami down the
stretch. Omer Asik needed
stitches around his chin,
not to mention a Chicago
jersey that wasn't covered
in his own blood.
That was Game 2 of the
Eastern Conference finals.
And in Game 3, both
sides expect more of the
same.
"We haven't been able.
to ease into anything this
year," Heat forward LeBron
. James said.
Don't look for that to
change anytime soon,
either.
With a 2-1 series lead
at stake, the Bulls and
Heat renew acquaintances
Sunday in Miami, ending
a roughly 94-hour hiatus
in the already-physical
matchup. When Game 2
ended Wednesday, just
about everyone in the Heat
locker room had an icepack
strapped to something, anod
more than a few limped.
their way to the bus that
would carry them to the
airport.
Just think: They were
the winning side.
"Fortunately, we were
able to have some days to


MEDICAL


EMERGENCY


Call today to place a surprise ad for your child,
grandchild, God child or anyone you think
deserves something extra on their special dayl

SDeadline:
Ads have to be placed by 4pm, 3-days
prior to appearance in the Lake City Reporter.

Call 755.5440 or 755.5441
between 8am & 4prm


Unscramble these four'Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
IWRORA I


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
I That's not too much. )


Z~m Now arrange, the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.

Answer here: I ,
(Answers tomorrow)
Saturday's Jumbles: FLASH COMET BREEZY DAZZLE
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recuperate," Heat coach
Erik Spoelstra said. "Our
guys, they're not shying
away from it. Neither
team is. Both teams have
built these habits for.
the entire season. We've
proven we're an aggres-
sive, attacking, physical
defense that rebounds
the basketball. ... They've
proven to be the same. So
you have two things col-
liding into each other."
The Bulls the NBA's
top overall seed who no
longer has home-court
advantage in this series
- have shown they can
recover quickly. After
each of their three pre-
vious playoff losses,
Chicago answered with
a double-digit win in the
next game.
Plus, the Bulls haven't
lost consecutive games
since February 5-7.
"Don't jinx us like that,"
Bulls guard Derrick Rose
said.
Since 2006, when the
Heat won their lone title,
the winner of Game 3 of
the East title series has
advanced to the NBA
finals every time.
"This is going to be
a crazy game, where I
think they're going to have
a lot of confidence," said
Rose, the NBA's MVP
this season. "Some way,
somehow, we've just got


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ASSOCIATED PRESS
Chicago Bulls guard Derrick Rose (1) is fouled by Miami
Heat forward LeBron James (6) during the second quarter of
Game 2 of the NBA basketball Eastern Conference finals on
Wednesday in Chicago.


to come up with this win
no matter how we get it
We've just got to have more
intensity than them and
play way more aggres-


--- - - - - - - - -a
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T T B A
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I C C T H E L T
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Y E A J U U E X Y C F A E -S
Z A E L 0 R C C H N F J G N
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LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, MAY 22, 2011


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


I


'" :'







LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, MAY 22, 2011


INDIANS: Win 17-14
Continued From Page 1B


kept the Raiders pinned and
Terry Calloway recovered
a fumble at the Orange
Park 7 with -06t on the
clock.
The Indians got two plays
out of the time left and
Baker went to Legree
on a fade route The
state-champion high
jumper brought the second
throw down for the tying
touchdov.n.
"I called a time ,.,ut and
told them we had to find a
way to get the ball in the
end zone." Fort White head
coach Demetric Jackson
said
Fort White forced a
three-and-out to start
the second hal., then the
offense put together a 1-l
play drive. It came up short
on an interception at the
Orange Park 3, but a ground
game was established with
Jomar Gainer and Zach


Cormier combining for 13
yards
"I was ,,worried ab,.,t'il
could we run in the
second half." Jacks,.,n
said.
Fort White kept the
Raiders pinned and tuok
over at the Orange Park
36 after a punt. Cormier
ran 12 yards to set up a 31-
yard field goal b% Nathan
Escalante.
On the next play for
the Raiders, Fort White's
Braden King came up with
the ball and returned it 33
yards for a touchdown% n.
The Indians held on for
the win and summer work
suddenly seemed easier.
"Talking about
momentum." Jackson
said. "We had the best
winter workouts we ever
had and came out in the
spring and did the same
thing."


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Fort White High's A.J. Legree (3) is flagged with a horse collar penalty after taking down Orange Park High's Erick Hayward.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Seare Sheridan, a member of the Fort White varsity cheerleading squad, yells out Friday
during the spring game against Orange Park.


i




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Cori Calyniuk performs during the game against Dunnellon


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
High Friday.


CHS: Begins summer on June 13
Continued From Page 1B


two plays to score.
Braxton Stockton had
consecutive carries of 9 and
6 yards, scoring on.the sec-
ond attempt.
On Dunnellon's next
series, the defense would
cash in. This time, it was
Javere Smith recovering a
fumble and returning it 61
yards for the score. Hayden
Lunde made PATs after


each of the scores.
The Tigers only man-
aged one more score while
the varsity was on the field
during the three quarters
alotted by the two coaching
staffs in the 17-0 win. Lunde
connected on a 32-yard field
goal.
"Anytime you find a way
to win a game 17-0, you
won't be upset," Allen said


after the game.
Still, Allen said there
were sure to be moments
that the Tigers could have
performed better.
Columbia will take three
weeks off before returning
to the practice field on June
13. Allen plans on having the
Tigers attend camps such as
the FCA camp in Gainesville
from June 21-23.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Members of the Columbia High dance team perform during halftime of the Tigers' game
against Dunnellon High on Friday.


4520 W US Highway 90 Lake City, FL 755-0601


-= 'I I -I I I


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420;:







Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

C.J. Risak
Assistant Editor
754-0427
crisaok@lakecityreporter.com


BUSINESS


Sunday, May 22, 201 I


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section C


BP gets $1B
settlement
from Gulf
partner

By JANE WARDELL
AP Business Writer

LONDON BP said
Friday that one of its
minority partners in the
blown-out Gulf of Mexico
well agreed to cover
about $1.1 billion in costs.
That's raising hopes the
oil giant can get money
from other companies
involved and reduce its
bill for the disaster.
BP said that MOEX
Offshore 2007 LLC, which
had a 10 percent interest in
the Macondo well, agreed
to recognize findings by
the U.S. Presidential
Commission that the acci-
dent resulted from "over-
sights and outright mis-
takes by multiple parties
and a number of causes."
As a minority partner,
MOEX was obligated to
pay a percentage of the
cleanup costs. But it had
refused to pay BP on the
grounds that the incident
was the result of BP's neg-
ligence. MOEX's about-
face is important because
it's the first time another
company has agreed that
BP wasn't solely respon-
sible for the disaster.
MOEX, a unit of
Japanese trading house
Mitsui & Co., agreed' to
pay $1.065 billion to set-
tle all claims between the
companies.


Super 8 gives rooms to active military


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com

military per-
sonnel will be
the guests of
honor at Super
8 motels this summer as
the result of a promotion
aimed at honoring service
men and women.
American Motel
Management, the compa-
ny managing the Super 8
in Lake City, has launched
a promotion in which the
company will donate 100
room nights to active duty
military personnel at an
estimated value of more
than $6,000. The campaign
started May 11 and will
run through July 1.
About 10 years ago, the
company's owners had
a Best Western Motel in
Hendersonville, N. C., and
put a sign on their proper-
ty advertising a huge party
when Osama bin Laden
was captured.
In light of the recent
events, since the owners
now have 10 motels in the
American Motel Network,
they decided to host active
military with complimen-
tary rooms to thank them
for what they do to keep
our country safe.
Suzanne Moses, general
manager of the local Super
8, at 3954 SW State Road
47, said she hopes all the
rooms are given at the
local hotel.
"The owner has put


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
The staff of the Super 8 Motel, located at 3954 SW State Road 47 in Lake City, will continue to offer complimentary rooms
to active duty military personnel until June 30. Pictured are housekeepers Kim McBroom (from left), Crystal Debrule, mainte-
nance worker Paul Debrule, front desk associate Amber Tompkins, general manager Suzanne Moses, maintenance engineer
John Lawrence, and housekeepers Patricia Cook, Angel Thurston and Rachael Bolser. 'We are honoring out military heroes,'.
Moses said. 'It's a good opportunity to thank the people in service. It's a nice thing to give to somebody who deserves it.'


up 100 rooms as part of
this campaign and I want
them all in Lake City," she
said. "Business has been
slow and this has been
a positive promotion to
keep staff busy and work-
ing. It's an opportunity for
them (employees) to get
involved in community


service, too."
American Motel
Management properties
offers a 20 percent mili-
tary/government discount
at all times. The company
has a total of 10 lodging
properties throughout the
Southeast in Mississippi,
Florida, North Carolina,
Louisiana and Tennessee.
Moses said she's proud
the company is hosting


this promotion and she also
spoke of its importance.
"For us, this is to keep
our employees working,
to thank the military and
to generally provide some
community service and
(military) people that are
traveling a place to stay,"
she said, noting a compli-
mentary room for people in
the military allows them to
spend their money on other


things as they make trips.
"It allows them to spend
their money in Lake City."
Moses said active duty
military personnel need
only show their active mili-
tary identification to par-
ticipate in the campaign.
With the upcoming
Memorial Day holiday,
Moses suggested travelers
call ahead to set a reserva-
tion.


This June, Mercantile Bank customers can
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In late April, around 40,000
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investment is a bet. Almost all
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eral, viewing it like this: You buy and
hope that someone else is willing to
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in the world, put it together in a cube.
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it it isn't going to do anything.
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ductive assets (such as a business)
instead of speculating in commodi-
ties. Munger quipped, "There's
something peculiar about buying
an asset that will only go up if the
world goes to hell."
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most people would do well to buy
broad-market index funds (such as
those based on the S&P 500 or the
total stock market) if they're going
to invest consistently over time.
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hedge fund managers in America are
getting lower tax rates than physics
teachers. "That is demented."
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week. In the meantime, read Buf-
fett's letters to shareholders at
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evoke a famous work by Thackeray. My stock
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annually over the past 20 years. Who am I?


Ponzi Oil
Years ago, two friends in the oil
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The Auto Bailouts.
Were Worth It
Ford is making money hand over
fist and gaining around the world.
Solidly profitable General Motors is
the China sales king and is invest-
ing heavily in a new lineup of
products. And Chrysler has
just returned to profitability .
with help from partner Fiat.
As key competitors Toy-
ota and Honda reel from the effects
of the Japan disaster as well as
problems of their own making, each
of the once-Big Three are thriving
- despite a U.S. auto sales rate that
remains well below pre-2008 lev-
els. So how do you feel about those
auto bailouts now?
While Ford didn't need the kind
of aid that GM and Chrysler got,
it nevertheless benefited from the
bailouts. If its rivals had collapsed,
many of Ford's suppliers might
have followed suit.
The bailouts helped make pos-
sible one of the great turnarounds
in business history. They also kept
hundreds of thousands of Americans
employed, preventing a bad recession
from becoming something worse.
But will we ever be paid back?
Yes and maybe. Chrysler is aim-
ing to pay off its loan soon. General
Motors has technically paid its loan
back in cash and stock, but a higher
stock price is needed for Uncle Sam
to break even.
(General Motors is a "Motley Fool
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You may not have heard of me, but I've been around since 1818 (almost
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founded in Amsterdam as an import/export trading company. Today, based
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wheat, corn and fertilizers. I process and transport them, serving the food
service, farming and biofuel industries, among others. I make margarine in
Europe, and process soybeans in China and oilseeds in Brazil. Who am I?
(Answer: Bunge)
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Barnes & Noble shares buyout surge


By ANNE D'INNOCENZIO
AP Retail Writer

NEW YORK Barnes &
Noble Inc.'s shares jumped
more than 27 percent Friday
morning after the company
said media mogul John
Malone's Liberty Media
Corp. has offered to buy it
for about $1 billion.
Being part of a bigger
conglomerate could boost
Barnes & Noble's ability to
invest in remaking itself for
the age of electronic books,
analysts say.
Barnes & Noble said
Thursday that the cash offer
is worth $17 a share from
the conglomerate chaired
by billionaire Malone. The
offer values Barnes & Noble
shares 21 percent higher
than their Thursday closing
price of $14.11.
"As a public company
covered by retail analysts,
(Barnes & Noble) may
not have the leeway or
resources to keep up the
technology battle," wrote
Gary Balter, an analyst at
Credit Suisse in a report
published Friday. "Yet as a
division of a much larger
company, (Barnes & Noble)
can afford to fight the good
fight, and based on its suc-
cess to date, win."
Some even think Barnes
& Noble is worth more.
David Strasser of Janney
Capital Markets said in a
client note that the $17 per
share bid is not enough,
based on Barnes & Noble's
near- and long-term pros-
pects as it builds up its
e-book business and short-,
term advantages from the'
bankruptcy of brick-and-
mortar competitor Borders
Group Inc. Strasser values
Barnes & Noble's stock at
$20 per share.
Barnes & Noble's board
hasn't weighed in on the
deal yet, and the deal is
still subject to closing
conditions, including one
that founding Chairman
Leonard Riggio keep a


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Barnes & Noble Inc. on Thursday said that online retail, media and communications con-
glomerate Liberty Media Corp. offered to buy the book seller for $17 per share in cash. That
amounts to about $1.02 billion, based on the number of shares it had outstanding as of
March.


stake in the company and
remain in a management
position.
Liberty Media operates
three publicly traded com-
panies Liberty Interactive
Inc., Liberty Starz Group
and Liberty Capital Group
- through which it runs
home-shopping network
QVC, movie channel oper-
ator Starz LLC and holds
stakes in numerous other
online, media and communi-
cations companies.
Barnes & Noble, which
is based in New York, has
705 stores nationwide and
636 bookstores run by its
Barnes & Noble College
Booksellers LLC subsid-
iary. The company book
shoppers know today has
its roots in a single New
York bookstore, the Student
Book Exchange, which
Riggio opened in 1965. By
the 1970s, his business had
grown to include seven
college bookstores, and
he bought the then-failing
Barnes & Noble booksell-
ing brand and its existing
Barnes & Noble bookstore


on Fifth Avenue.
The company put itself
up for sale in August in
response to pressure from
billionaire activist share-
holder Ron Burkle. That
move came during a proxy
battle Burkle waged against
the company in opposition
to a poison pill plan that
limited any single investor
to a 20 percent stake. The
plan was ratified by share-
holders in late 2010.
Traditional book sellers
have been facing increas-
ing competition from online
retailers and discounters
such as Amazon.com Inc.
as consumers get increas-
ingly comfortable shop-
ping online and turn to the
Web to find lower prices on
books and, increasingly, to
buy e-books they can read
on an e-reader, smartphone
or iPad.
The changing climate
has already rocked much
smaller Borders Group:
The nation's second-largest
book store chain, which is
based in Ann Arbor, Mich.,
filed for bankruptcy court


protection in February. It
has since been carrying out
plans to close more than
a third of its 642 stores,
and is reportedly in talks
.to sell more than half of the
remaining stores. Barnes &
Noble CEO William Lynch
said in February that his
company might be interest-
ed in purchasing a "minor-
ity" of Borders' stores.
While Barnes & Noble
hasn't been hurt as badly
as Borders, its quarterly
results have been weighed
down recently by large
investments in its online
and e-reader businesses
- markets both companies
have turned to as ways to
stem the steady decline in
book sales in recent years.
Barnes & Noble reported
growth in its online store in
the most recent quarter,
and said both this and its
bricks-and-mortar stores
were helped by sales of its
Nook e-reader. The Nook
has gained fans but has not
managed to match the buzz
generated by Amazon's
Kindle e-reader.


Gas pump prices

painful for 4 in

10 Americans


By JENNIFER AGIESTA
and JENNIFER C. KERR
Associated Press

WASHINGTON As
$4 a gallon gasoline
becomes commonplace,
drivers have made tough
choices: scaling back
vacations, driving less or
ditching the car altogeth-
er. And a new Associated
Press-GfK poll shows the
impact of sustained high
prices is spreading among
seniors and higher-income
Americans.
According to the poll,
the share of all Americans
who say increases in the
price of gasoline will cause
serious financial hardship
for them or their families
in the next six months
now tops 4 in 10.
Overall, 71 percent said
rising prices will cause
some hardship for them
and their families, includ-
ing 41 percent who called
it a "serious" hardship.
Just 29 percent said rising
prices are not causing a
negative impact on their
finances.
While those with house-
hold incomes under
$50,000 were already feel-
ing strained in March, the
new poll shows financial
pain is increasingly spread-
ing to those with higher
incomes. Among those
with annual household
incomes over $50,000, 63
percent now say rising
prices are causing them
financial hardship, up from
55 percent in March.
For older Americans,
it's worse.
The share of seniors
expressing financial hard-
ship over gas prices hit 76
percent; it was 68 percent
in March.
Nettie Cash, 65, of
Dallas, Ga., is cutting back


on her medicine because
of the cost of fueling up
her Buick. Cash is still
taking her heart pills but
is forgoing her inhaler and
ulcer medicine for now.
"Ifs not easy," she said.
"You have to do what you
have to do."
The public's coping strat-
egies are largely unchanged
from March, with, 72 per-
cent having cut back on
other expenses, 66 percent
saying they've reduced the
amount of driving they do
and 48 percent changing
vacation plans.
Since January, gas pric-
es have shot up about 90
cents, with the national
average for a gallon of reg-
ular this week at $3.96.
Financial analyst Nicole
Polite in Baltimore sold
her Nissan Altima recent-
ly and is taking public
transportation, opting for
the bus, rails and walk-
ing to get to work. Gas
prices were just too high,
she says, so she and her
boyfriend downsized to a
one-car household. She
says they kept their Lexus
sedan, which requires
pricey premium gas.
"It's definitely a financial
strain because now you
have to reassess every-
thing," said Polite, 32. "We
don't go out as much. That
$20 that we could have used
to go to a movie now that
money has been absorbed
by the gas tank."
But analysts say relief is
coming. Fred Rozell, retail
pricing director at the Oil
Price Information Service,
expects the price at the
pump to drop as much as
40 cents in the next four
weeks.
Until that happens, Ross
Cobb in Boerne, Texas,
will still try to keep his
highway miles down.


The Motley FooAl

To Educate, Amuse & Enrich


7 -


0rri'n i-VMiE i


I -


LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS SUNDAY, MAY 22, 2011


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


/










Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS & HOME SUNDAY, MAY 22, 2011


THE WEEK IN REVIEW -THE WEEK IN REVIEW *THE WEEK IN REVIEW *THE WEEK IN REVIEW *THE WEEK IN REVIEW


Weekly Stock Exchange Highlights


Y NYSE
8,357.53 -14.14


Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
Primedia 7.03 +2.65 +60.5
Lentuo n 4.47 +1.22 +37.6
BamesNob 18.33 +4.35 +31.1
Jaguarg 5.35 +1.08 +25.3
EKodak 3.70 +.70 +23.3
Goldcp wt 2.30 +.38 +19.8
IndepHId 9.97 +1.54 +18.3
GrayTvA 2.55 +.31 +13.8
Valhi 39.55 +4.39 +12.5
WhtMtIns 392.55+43.54 +12.5

Losers ($2 or. more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
NoAmEng 7.80 -2.95 -27.4
CtySCkg n 12.42 -4.64 -27.2
TmsRty 2.28 -.76 -25.0
LDK Solar 7.26 -2.34 -24.4
Dex One 2.20 -.67 -23.3
FXCM n 9.37 -2.59 -21.7
KV PhmA 2.58 -.71 -21.6
Vancelnfo 25.43 -6.08 -19.3
ExcelM 3.13 -.72 -18.7
NetQin n 6.07 -1.37 -18.4

Most Active (si or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
S&P500ETF6789834133.61 -.43
BkofAm 6457022 11.58 -.35
iShSilver 3202648 34.18 -.21
SPDR Fncl3160947 15.72 -.05'
SprintNex 2906545 5.47 +.37
iShR2K 2772320 82.86 -.65
iShEMkts 2711368 47.07 +.15
Pfizer 2466188 20.69 -.23
FordM 2333902 15.00 -.08
GenElec 2266838 19.62 -.27

Diary *
Advanced 1,603
Declined 1,572
New Highs 338
New Lows 76
Total issues 3,228
Unchanged 53
Volume 17,916,153,356


Amex
2,384.92 +34.63


Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
T3 Motn rs 5.72 +1.72 +43.0
B&HO 4.13 +1.09 +35.9
OrionEngy 4.04 +.94 +30.3
NewEnSys 3.40 +.72 +26.9
CheniereEn 10.04 +2.11 +26.6
Accelr8 4.64 +.81 +21.1
Hyperdyn 4.02 +.70 +21.1
Quepasa 7.40 +1.28 +20.9
ConmedH 3.66 +.61 +20.0
RFlexSolu 2.39 +.34 +16.6

Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
TravelCbts 5.86 -2.01 -25.5
PemixTh 10.61 -2.39 -18.4
AmBiltrt 9.25 -1.92 -17.2
eMagin 6.53 -1.35 -17.1
Bacterinn 3.35 -.66 -16.5
CKX Lands 12.01 -2.13 -15.1
Medgenicn 3.20 -.57 -15.1
RevettM rs 3.67 -.63 -14.7
VoyagerOG 3.13 -.46 -12.8
ImpacMtg 2.89 -.41 -12.5

Most Active ($1 or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
NA Pall g 229593 3.50 -.40
NwGoldg 184906 9.41 +.14
CheniereEn 165432 10.04 +2.11
GtPanSilvg157113 2.90 -.21
KodiakO g 151536 6.35 +.32
AvalRaren 149408 7.25 +.01
NovaGldg 148395 10.44 +.10
GoldStrg 140740 2.68 +.07
Hyperdyn 139301 4.02 +.70
CFCdag 121353 20.59 -.11

Diary
Advanced 256
Declined 262
New Highs 27
New Lows 25
Total issues 544
Unchanged 26
Volume 573,606,955


The Week in Review


STOCKS OF LOCAL INTEREST


Wkly Wkly YTD
Name Ex Div Last Chg%Chg%Chg


AT&T Inc NY 1.72 31.32
AlcatelLuc NY .. 5.80
Alcoa NY .12 16.26
AutoZone NY ... 276.60
BkofAm NY .04 11.58
BariPVixrsNY ... 22.76
BobEvans Nasd .80 31.36
CNBFnPA Nasd .66 13.27
CSX NY 1.44 77.40
Chevron NY 3.12 102.57
Cisco Nasd .24 16.53
Citigrprs NY .04 41.02
CocaCola NY 1.88 68.30
Delhaize NY 2.02 83.01
Dell Inc Nasd ... 16.01
FamilyDir NY .72 53.65
FordM NY 15.00
FMCGs NY 1.00 48.38
GenElec NY .60 -19.62
HewletfP NY .32 35.98
HomeDp NY 1.00 37.05
iShJapn NY .14 10.01
iShSilver NY ... 34.18
iShEMkts NY .64 47.07
iShR2K NY .89 82.86
Intel Nasd .84 23.22
JPMorgCh NY 1.00 43.13
Level3 Nasd ... 1.96


-0.3 +6.6
-4.9 +95.9
-4.9 +5.7
-3.4 +1.5
-2.9 -13.2
-3.7 -39.5
-0.5 -4.9
... -10.4
+3.5 +19.8
+0.9 +12.4
-2.1 -18.3
-1.2 -13.3
+9.2 +3.8
+0.7 +12.6
-2.2 +18.2
+3.3 +7.9
-0.5 -10.7
+0.2 -19.4
-1.4 +7.3
-11.0 -14.5
+0.1 +5.7
-2.2 -8.2
-0.6 +13.3
+0.3 -1.2
-0.8 +5.9
-0.8 +10.4
+1.7
+3.7+100.0


Wkly Wkly YTD
Name Ex Div Last Chg%Chg%Chg


Lowes NY .44 24.46 -1.30
MGM Rsts NY ... 15.38 +.66
McDnlds NY 2.44 82.33 +1.59
MicronT Nasd ... 10.00 -.40
Microsoft Nasd .64 24.49 -.38
NY Times NY ... 7.69 +.20
NextEraEnNY 2.20 57.78 -.86
NobltyH Nasd ... 7.81 -.79
OcciPet NY 1.84 100.40 -1.96
Oracle Nasd .24 34.27 -.92
Penney NY .80 36.10 -2.34
PepsiCo NY 2.06 71.30 +.74
Pfizer NY .80 20.69 -.23
Potash s NY .28 52.04 +.46
PwShs QQQNasd .39 57.77 -.65
Ryder NY 1.08 54.65 -.13
S&P500ETFNY 2.34 133.61 -.43
SearsHIdgsNasd ... 72.04 -4.99
SiriusXM Nasd ... 2.22 -.02
SouthnCo NY 1.89 40.47 -.02
SprinINex NY ... 5.47 +.37
SP Engy NY 1.05 74.63 +.84
SPDRFndNY .16 15.72 -.05
Staples Nasd .40 16.37 -3.88
TimeWam NY .94 36.79 +.80
WalMart NY 1.46 55.29 -.43
WellsFargo NY .48 28.00 +.07
Yahoo Nasd ... 16.30 -.25


-5.0 -2.5
+4.5 +3.6
+2.0 +7.3
-3.8 +24.7
-1.5 -12.3
+2.7 -21.5
-1.5 +11.1
-9.2 -3.7
-1.9 +2.3
-2.6 +9.5
-6.1 +11.7
+1.0 +9.1
-1.1 +18.2
+0.9 +.8
-1.1 +6.1
-0.2 +3.8
-0.3 +6.3
-.5i -2.


Nasdaq
Y2,803.32 -25.15


Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
SevArts rs 3.45 +1.63 +89.6
eLongh 26.52+11.48 +76.3
HampRBrs 18.40 +6.94 +60.6
Orthovta 3.83 +1.10 +40.3
FuweiFilm 4.69 +1.20 +34.4
Jiayuan n 14.34 +3.64 +34.0
Opnext 2.60 +.66 +34.0
CellTher rsh 2.08 +.49 +3d.8
HSW Int h 5.85 +1.36 +30.1
Toplmage 2.62 +.57 +27.8

Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
FairptCm n 11.37 -5.06 -30.8
PlugPwrrs 3.82 -1.68 -30.5
SmartTgn 7.06 -2.80 -28.4
QuantFurs 3.79 -1.34 -26.1
ColdwtrCrk 2.16 -.74 -25.5
FriendFd n 5.83 -1.83 -23.9
Cit"Trends 16.68 -5.11 -23.5
VIyNBc wt 2.56 -.76 -22.9
Cytoriwt 3.18 -.92 -22.5
TibetPhm n 2.80 -.79 -22.0

Most Active ($1 or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
SiriusXM 4393996 2.22 -.02
Intel 3835750 23.22 -.19
Cisco 3664586 16.53 -.35
Microsoft 3128099 24.49 -.38
PwShs QQQ247196457.77 -.65
MicronT 2063858 10.00 -.40
LeveI3 2036201 1.96 +.07
Dell nc 2035710 16.01 -.36
Yahoo 1823044 16.30 -.25
Oracle 1280786 34.27 -.92

Diary
Advanced 1,020
Declined 1,732
New Highs 148
New Lows 162
Total issues 2,809
Unchanged 57
Volume 9,753,571,180


Weekly Dow Jones


Dow Jones industrials
Close: 12,512.04
1-week change: -83.71 (-0.7%)
13,000 .....


12,500 .. ... .. .......


12,000ooo ... .... ....... ... .


11,500


11,000 b


-47.38 -68.79 80.60 45.14


MON TUES WED THUR


F 4' M


6.32
+5.9 MUTUAL FUNDS
+9.3 Total Assets Total Return/Rank Pct Mim In
-1.4 Name ObI ($MIns) NAV 4-wk 12-mo 5-year Load -,Invt


14.4
+2.5
-9.6
-2.0


Stock Footnotes: g = Dividends and earnings in Canadian dollars. h = Does not meet continued-listing standards.
If = Late filing with SEC. n = New in past 52 weeks. pf = Preferred. rs = Stock has undergone a reverse stock spill
of at least 50 percent within the past year. rt = Right to buy security at a specified price. s = Stock has split by at
least 20 percent within the last year. un = Units. vj = In bankruptcy or receivership. wd = When distributed. wi
When Issued. wt = Warrants.
Mutual Fund Footnotes: b = Fee covering market costs is paid from fund assets. d = Deterred sales charge, or
redemption fee. I = front load (sales charges), m = Multiple fees are charged. NA = not available, p = previous day's
net asset value. s = fund split shares during the week. x = fund paid a distribution during the week.Galners and
Losers must be worth at least$2 to be listed in tables at left. Most Actives must be worth at least $1. Volume In
hundreds of shares. Source: The Associated Press. Sales figures are unofficial.


Money Rates
Last Pvs Week
Prime Rate 3.25 3.25
Discount Rate 0.75 0.75
Federal Funds Rate .00-25 .00-25
Treasuries
3-month 0.05 0.02
6-month 0.09 0.07


5-year
1 0-vear


I II I "


1,79 1.84
3.15 3.18


30-year 4.3U 4.32


Currencies
Last Pvs Day


a ilartsuA


r954


Britain 1.6276 1.6214


Canada


.9723


PIMCO TotRetls
American Funds GrthAmA m
Fidelity Contra
Vanguard TotStldx
American Funds CaplncBuA m
Vanguard Instldxl
American Funds CpWIdGrIA m
Vanguard 500Adml
American Funds IncAmerA m
Vanguard TotSUAdm
American Funds InvCoAmA m
Dodge & Cox IntlSIk
Dodge & Cox Stock
American Funds WAMutlnvA mI
American Funds EurPacGrA m
Vanguard InstPlus
FrinrtT.mp-Frariln Income A m
Amrrn-: in Fund. FninvA m
varnjuar1L Tullrii .1
American Funds NewPerspA m
PIMCO TotRetAdm b
American Funds BalA m
Vanguard 5001nv


Fired


Euro .7042 .6988 Harbo
Japan 81.57 81.63 Vangi


Menicn


11.6229 11.6339


tyGrowCo
r lntlnsfi d
guard WelltnAdm
y1LowPriStk d


140,180
68,531
64,782
63,493
61,219
60,369
58,144
56,098
55,798
53,201
50,714
48,440
46,344
41,374
40,871-
38,581
37,027
36,110
35,783
35,113
33,187
33,122
33,007
30,889
30,567
30,011
29,083


+7.5/B
+25.1/D
+27.9/C
+28.4/A
+22.9/C
+26.9/B
+29.0/C
+26.9/B
+23.6/A
+28.6/A
+22.6/E
+31.9/B
+27.3/B
+27.0/B
+29.7/D
+26.9/B
+22.4/A
+29.2/A
+31.4/C
+29.5/C
+7.3/B
+20.1/C
+26.7/B
+36.7/A
+36.7/A
+19.1/C
+29.9/D


NL 1,000,000
5.75 250
NL 2,500
NL 3,000
5.75 250
NL 5,000,000
5.75 250
NL 10,000
5.75 250
NL 10,000
5.75 250
NL 2,500
NL 2,500
5.75 250
5.75 250
NL 200,000,000
4.25 1,000
5.75 250
NL 3,000
5.75 250
NL 1,000,000
5.75 250
NL 3,000
NL 2,500
NL 50,000
NL 50,000
NL 2,500


Switzerind .8771 .8815 CA -Conseralive Alocation, Cl -Internedate-Term Bond, ES -Europe Stock, FB -Foreign Large Blend, FG -Foreign LargeGrowth, FV -Foreign
Large Value, IH -World Allocation, LB -Large Blend, LG -Large Growth, LV -Lar Value, MA-ModerateAllocaion, MB -MidCap Blend. MV
British pound expressed in U.S. dollars. All oth- Mid-Cap Value, SH -Spedalty.heah, WS -World Stock, Total Return: Chnn NV with dividends reinvested. Ranr How fund peromed vs.
ers show dollar in foreign currency. others with same objective: A is in lop 20%. E in boom 20%. Mint In v: Minimum $ needed to invest in fund. Source: Momingstar.


New York Stock Exchange


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last


ABB Ltd 1.12 4.3
AES Corp ...
AFLAC 1.20 2.4
AK Steel .20 1.4
AMR
AT&T Inc 1.72 5.5
AbtLab 1.92 3.6
AberFitc .70 .9
Accenture .90 1.6
AMD
Aeropostl ...
Aetna .60 1.3
Agilent
AlcatelLuc .
Alcoa .12 .7
Allergan .20 .2
Allstate .84 2.6
AlphaNRs ...
Altria 1.52 5.5
AMovilL .52 1.0
AEagleOut .44 3.3
AEP 1.84 4.8
AmExp .72 1.4
AmlntlGrp ...
AmTower ...
Anadarko .36 .5
AnalogDev 1.00 2.4
Annaly 2.62 14.6
Apache .60 .5
ArcelorMit .75 2.3
ArchCoal .44 1.5
ArchDan .64 2.0
ATMOS 1.36 4.0
BB&TCp .64 2.4
BHP BilLt 1.82 2.0
BakrHu .60 .9
BcoBrades .80 4.3
BcoSantSA .79 7.1
BcoSBrasil .70 6.5
BkofAm .04 .3
BkNYMel .52 1.8
Bar iPVix rs...
BamesNob ...
BarrickG .48 1.1
Baxter 1.24 2.1
BerkH B ...
BestBuy .60 1.9
BigLots
Blackstone .40 2.4
BlockHR .60 3.7
Boeing 1.68 2.2
BostonSci ...
BrMySq 1.32 4.7
BrkfldOPrt ... ...
CBS B .40 1.5
CNO Find ... '...
CSX 1.44 1.9
CVSCare .50 1.3
Cameron ...
CdnNRsgs .36 ...
CapOne .20 .4
CapitlSrce .04 .6
Carnival 1.00 2.5
Caterpillar 1.76 1.7
Cemex .43 ...
CenterPnt .79 4.2
CntryUnk 2.90 6.7
ChesEng .30 1.0
Chevron 3.12 3.0
Chicos .20 1.4
Chimera .66 16.8
Citigrp rs .04 .1
CliffsNRs .56 .7
CocaCola 1.88 2.8
Coeur
ConAgra .92 3.6
ConocPhil 2.64 3.6
ConsolEngy.40 .8
ConEd 2.40 4.5


... +.46
16 +.58
9 -4.15
... -.10
... +.28
9 -.09
14 +.02
30 -.04
19 +1.68
9 -.28
7 -3.27
10 +1.21
22 -1.88
... -.30
23 -.84
... +2.86
13 -.37
46 +1.61
14 +.43
16' +.21
19 -1.17
15 +.97
14 +1.70
3 +.38
58 +.70
... +.52
14 +1.01
7 +.33
13 -1.25
17 -.76
21 +.32
10 -.78
15 -.22
22 -.07
... +.55
29 +:85
... -.37
-.20
.. -.35
21 -.35
13 +.12
... -.87
... +4.35
13 +.59
17 +1.10
15 -.93
10 -.98
12 -4.98
... -.45
13 +.51
17 -1.51
19 -.04
15 -.44
... +.04
21 +1.05
11 -.01
18 +2.65
16 +.27
21 -1.49
... +1.26
8 +2.78
19 +.17
16 -1.21
19 -2.00
... +.09
17 +.23
13 +.78
10 +.84
10 +.96
20 -1.19
6 +.08
14 -.51
9 +1.64
14 +.12
... +.01
17
10 +1.84
24 +1.73
15 +.39


+17.2 26.32
+6.9 13.02
-12.2 49.57
-13.7 14.13
-14.5 6.66
+6.6 31.32
+11.7 53.51
+28.8 74.22
+18.4 57.42
+5.4 8.62
-25.7 18.30
+47.7 45.06
+22.4 50.70
+95.9 5.80
+5.7 16.26
+21.6 83.51
+.4 32.01
-16.6 50.05
+12.7 27.74
-11.0 51.01
-7.6 13.52
+7.1 38.55
+19.3 51.19
-36.2 30.80
+3.9 53.64
-2.1 74.58
+11.0 41.80
+.4 18.00
+3.2 123.00
-14.8 32.48
-16.1 29.43
+3.9 31.26
+8.4 33.83
+1.0 26.56
+.3 93.18
+22.7 70.12
-7.4 18.78
+4.2 11.10
-20.3 10.84
-13.2 11.58
-6.7 28.19
-39.5 22:76
+29.5 18.33
-14.3 45.60
+19.2 60.33
-1.7 78.72
-8.6 31.33
+10.1 33.55
+19.8 16.95
+37.1 16.33
+18.8 77.52
-10.2 6.80
+7.1 28.37
-25.0 .08
+41.7 26.99
+12.1 7.60
+19.8 77.40
+10.4 38.40
-5.1 48.16
-5.5 41.97
+29.4 55.07
-10.3 6.37
-14.2 39.56
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Name Div '
ConstellEn .96
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DCT Indl .28
DR Horton .15
DTE 2.35
Danahers .08
DeanFds
Deere 1.40
DellaAir
DenburyR ...
DicksSptg
DrSCBrrs ....
DirFnBrrs ...
DrxEBear rs...
DrxFnBull
DirxSCBull ...
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Elan
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FordM
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Wkly YTD Wkly
YId PE Chg %Chg Last
2.6 16 +.50 +22.1 37.39
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YOUR CONTRIBUTION


TO OUR COMMUNITY


HASN'T GONE UNNOTICED.

We understand the difference you make every day.
And we'd like to help make a difference in, your life. If you
work for a state or local government, Edward Jones can
explain options for your 457(b) retirement savings plan and
recommend a strategy that's best for you.


And if you change jobs or retire, we can help you roll your
-157(b) into an Edward Jones IRA tax free.


To learn wihy it makes sense to talk with Edward Jones
about your retirement savings, call or visit your local
financial advisor today.

Steve Jones, CFP
Financial Advisor
2929 West U S Highway 90
Suite 114
Lake City, FL 32055
386-752-3847 www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC


Wkly YTD
Name DIv YId PE Chg %Chg


iShSilver ...
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JnprNtwk ...
KB Home .25
KeyEngy ...
Keycorp .12
Kimco .72
Kinross g .10
Kohls 1.00
Kraft 1.16
L-1 Ident ..
LDK Solar ..
LSI Corp ..
LVSands ...


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Last Name


Div YId PE


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Masco .30
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Merck 1.52
MetLife .74
MetroPCS ...
Molycorpn ...
Monsanto 1.12
MonstrWw ..
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NCR Corp ...


Wkly YTD Wkly
Chg %Chg Last


27 +.44
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PatriotCoal ...
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PwshDB
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ProUShL20 ... ...
ProUSSP500...
ProUSSIvrs...
ProSUftSilv ...
ProgsvCp 1.40 1.8
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PulteGrp ...
QntmDSS ...
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RSC HIdgs ... ...
RadianGrp .01 .2
Raytheon 1.72 3.5
RegionsFn .04 .6
ReneSola ...
Renrenn ...
RioTinto 1.08 1.6
RiteAid
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SpdrKbwBk .15 .6
SpdrRetl .50, 1.0
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SandRdge ...
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Name


Wkly YTD Wkly
DIv YId PE Chg %Chg Last


SwstAiri .02
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StarwdHtl .30
StillwtrM ...
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Supvalu .35
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TJX .76
TaiwSemi .47
Talbots ...
TalismEg .27
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TeckRes g .60
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TenetHIth ...
Teradyn ...
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Texlnst. .52
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Tycolntl 1.00
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Name DIv
Level3
UbGlobA
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Wkly YTD
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STEC
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Sonus
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Name


Wkly YTD Wkly
DIv YId PE Chg %Chg Last


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NAPallg ...
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Taseko
TmsatlPet
TriValley
TriangPet ..
Uluu ...
Ur-Energy ...
Uranerz
UraniumEn ...
VantageDrl ...
VimetX .50
VistaGold ...
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YM Bio q ...


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-93.28


FRI


ARCAbio ...
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AkamajT
AllscriptH ...
AlteraCp If .24
Amarin
Amazon
AmCapLtd ...
Amgen
A123 Sys ...
Apple Inc ...
ApldMatl .32
AriadP
ArmHId .09
ArubaNet ...
Atmel
Autodesk ...
'; AutoData 1.44
AvanirPhm ...
Baidu
BioSante
BrigExp
Broadcom .36
BrcdeCm
CA Inc .20
Cadence
CpstnTrb h ...
Celgene
CellTher rsh...
CienaCorp ..
Cirrus
Cisco .24
Clearwire
CognizTech
Comcast .45


-0.9 +
+7.3 +
+1.1
-0.3
-19.2 -
+2.2 +
-0.8
+0.3
-1.5


Edad'oe


__j


III-


.9693


FidelF






Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, MAY 22, 2011

Lake City Reporter




CLASSIFIED


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

755-5440


ADvantage


One item per ad
liness. S days Each additional
Rate applies to pvate individual selling
n prennl mpg andlSe totallina S100 o r less




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ime iom per50 ad p
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Inclaessfn adsditin a$ personandsom
4 lines 6 daysreiepr




























You can calls fa or 7e5-mailyr a
4a linoS 6-500 pas..
Onec im per ad to cassie
4 lines o 6 days will:requreprepay


















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Limited to service type advertis-
4 lines, one month....$92.00

includes an additional $2.a00 per



TYou can call 1us at 755-5440, 9 am.










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Saturday Fri,,1:laJm, Fr., 9:00a.9
Sunda.m. to 5 :00 p a.m F., 9:00 am.
Some people ps refert to change thout notieir













Ad catErrories- Please read your ad
meon the Ourfice irst day of publicatedat180ion.












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only to the harge fpor the ad space
FAin error. Pleas386-752-94e 00call 755-5440












direct your copy to the Classifiedc-
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poeadlines apply for cancellation.























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Ad iShould further information bey:
Thursday oud. 10:00iam Wed,, 9:00a.m.









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eservades the right to change wit, rejectice






















or classify all advertisements under
ad Erpproriate hPleadings. read Copy hour ald










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fory the at portion or the advertisement
in error. Please call 755-5440



















which was incorrect. Further, the
Publisher shall not be liable forrec- any
tomission of and billing advertisements ordered



















to be published, nor for any general,
Advertising lations- Normal advertising
with Feder all, State or local lation.ws
BillingT n10uiries- Call 755-5440.m




















regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
ednation in employment, housing and-
rpublicd t accommodations. Standard


abbreviations are acceptable; how-

ever the first word of each ad may
iot be abbreviated bli. or


1'.


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 11-95-CA
DMAC OF LAKE CITY, INC.,
a Florida corporation,
Plaintiff,
vs.
YONETTE LEACOCK AND YON-
SON LEACOCK, IF EITHER OF
THEM BE LIVING, AND IF EI-
THER OF THEM BE DEAD,
THEIR RESPECTIVE UNKNOWN
SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES,
LEGATEES, GRANTEES, AS-
SIGNEES, LIENORS, CRED-
ITORS, OR TRUSTEES; AND THE
UNKNOWN SPOUSE, HEIRS, DE-
VISEES, LEGATEES, GRANTEES,
ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CRED-
ITORS, OR TRUSTEES OF CHER-
YL A. LEACOK, DECEASED,
Defendants.
AMENDED NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: YONSON LEACOCK
Last known address:
2516 NW 9th Place
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33311
AND to all unknown Defendants
listed in the caption above, whose
identities and whereabouts are un-
known
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action
the foreclose a Mortgage on the fol-
lowing described property:
Lots 3 and 4, Spring Hills West, a
subdivision according to the plat
thereof recorded in Plat Book 6, pa-
ges 52-52A, public records of Co-
lumbia County, Florida.
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to it on Ed-
die M. Anderson, Plaintiff's attor-
ney, whose address is Post Office
Box 1179, Lake City, Florida 32056-
1179, no later than thirty (30) days
after the first publication of this no-
tice, and file the original with the
Clerk of this Court either before
service on Plaintiff's attorney or im-
mediately thereafter; otherwise, a de-
fault will be entered against you
floor the relief demanded in the com-
plaint. There may be money owed to
you after a foreclosure sale. You
may contact the clerk of the court at
(386)758-1031 for information on
what you need to do to get the mon-
ey. You do not need to hire an attor-
ney or other representative to get this
money.
DATED ON May 11. 2011
P. DEWITT CASON
Clerk of the Court
By:/s/ B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
04544770
May 15, 22, 2011






Land Clearing

Back Hoe, Dozer, Chopping, root
raking, bush hog, seeding, sod,
disking, site prep, ponds & ,
irrigation. Free Est! 386-623-3200


Lawn & Landscape Service

Clean Pine Straw,
You pick it up, $1.85 a bale
Delivery of 100 bales $260
386-688-9156

Landscape Maintenance Company
You can trust for knowledge &
pride, Mention this AD!
Mow Green, LLC 386-288-6532


Services


DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms- White S
386-961-5896. or



Set your sights

'on something


BETTER


SiTEL
Apply in person or online


060 Services

LEARN TO
SPEAK ENGLISH
CALL (386) 963-5542,
LEAVE MESSAGE..

100 Job
100 Opportunities

04544565
Ladies and Gentleman
if you have A Class A CDL,
we have a Lease/with a lease
purchase plan.
We accept PTD! Certified
students. O/Operators. No
New England States, 100%
fuel surcharge. Carolinas to
the great NW!
Call today to join us!
Buel Inc
866-369-9744

04544834
Owner Operators: Home Daily
with Dedicated Runs.
Excellent Rates & Paid FSC.
80% Drop & Hook.
Great Fuel & Tire Discount
Programs. CDL-A with
1 yr Tractor-Trailer experience
and TWIC req'd.
Call Comtrak at 800-224-2641
ext 4978, or apply online at
www.comtrakinc.com

04544840
RECEPTIONIST/
SECRETARY POSITION *
LAKE SHORE HOSPITAL
AUTHORITY
The Lake Shore Hospital
Authority, located in Lake City,
FL is seeking applicants for
Receptionist/Secretary position.
This clerical position is
salaried and full-time. Position
requires performance of routine
office duties; answeringin com-
ing telephone calls, greeting the
public, typing, filing, and
clerical assignments using basic
office equipment. This position
requires excellent computer
skills. Also requires versatility
as it will be assisting all office
staff. A Position Description
document is available upon
request from Sue Fraze,
Administrative Director, at
386-755-1090, ext. 101, or
sue@lakeshoreha.org. It can
also be accessed online at
www.lakeshoreha.org.
To be considered, resumes
must be received by Friday,
June 3, 2011 at 3:00 p.m. in
the LSHA office as stated in the
Position Description.

04544870
Part Time Secretary
Strong computer skills.
Familiar w/ Quick Books.
Accounting experience.,
Dependable, honest & self
motivated. Flexible hours.
Excellent salary.
Send resume with references to
Box041 13, C/O The Lake City
Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL, 32056 A

AVON!! Only $10 to start!
Earn bonus $ up to $150+
1-800-275-9945 pin #4206
www.youravon.com/tdavies

White Springs HOPE Program
will be accepting applications
for volunteers and employee
positions for the summer youth
enrichment program until
Friday, May 27, 2011.
Please send applications to
Town of White Springs,


100 Opportunities
Associate Reps
SUMMER WORK/GREAT PAY
Immediate FT/PT openings,
Customer sales/service,
No exp needed, conditions,
Apply Now all ages 17+
(386) 269-0883
CDL A Flatbed Truck Driver
needed for F/T OTR SE area, 3
years exp or more, Contact
Melissa or Mary @ 386-935-2773
Hiring Locally This Week
Liberty National Life
Insurance Company
Full Training Provided Potential
of $60K+ Annually. 401K, BCBS
Insurance & Pension for those who
qualify. Call 1-800-257-5500 to
set up an interview.
Experienced estimator needed
for site work & underground utili-
ty contractor. Must be familiar
w/construction software & project
management. DFWP. Fax resume:
386-364-2802, call 386-362-7814
Physical laborer needed. CDL
license req'd. Must have respect
for electricity & ability to work in
water & mud. Call 386-752-1854
05525971
Teacher
(Early Head Start, Birth to 3
yrs old) Lake City
Must have FCCPC or
CHILD DEVELOPMENT
ASSOCIATE
CERTIFICATE, 3 yrs class-
room exp w/infants or
toddlers preferred;
Starting pay $8.65 per hour
Current 1st Aid/CPR preferred.
All applicants must pass physi-
cal/DCF background screening.
Excellent Benefits, Paid
Holidays, Sick, Annual Leave.
Apply in person at
236 SW Columbia Ave
(754-2222) or mail resume to
SV4C's PO Box 2637, Lake
City, FL 32056-2637, by e-mail:
arobinsoin@sv4cs.org or Fax
(386) 754-2220 EOE :


05525979
Admin Assistant II
(Health Services)
Must have 5 yrs data
entry/computer exp plus 2 yrs
exp records/case management;
valid Fla driver license and
safe driving record
Starting pay $9.54 per hour
All applicants must pass physi-
cal/DCF background screening.
Excellent Benefits, .Pai1 HQli-
days, Sick, Annual Leave.
Apply in person at 236 SW
Columbia Ave (754-2222) or
mail resume to SV4Cs
PO Box 2637, Lake City, FL
32056-2637, by email:
auobinson@sv4cs.org or Fax
(386) 754-2220. EOE

SECURITY OFFICERS
FT/PT, Great Pay and Benefits.
Lake City/Alachua Area.
Must have Sec. Lic., clean
background, pass drug screen.
Call: 866-458-9523 EOE


Security Officers
needed Lake City Area, must have
current D Security Lic., Clear
background, Drivers Lic, phone,
Diploma/GED. Benefits, DFWP
EEO Must Apply at:
www.dsisecurity.com MB 1000084
Stylist Needed
Call
386-752-4614
Southern Exposure
Wanted Highly motivated
individual for Sales Position.
Rountree -Moore Automotive
Group, Great benefits, paid vaca-
tion. Exp. a plus but not necessary.
Call Tony Reese 386-344-7517
WELDER WANTED
Experience needed. Please .apply
in person at 174 NE Cortez
Terrace, Lake City, FL. 32055


~g""4r


Suwannee

E lectric
Cooperative,
Suwannee Valley Electric Cooperative, Inc.
Member Assistance Representative
Suwannee Valley Electric Cooperation, Inc. has an immediate opening for
a Member Assistance Representative position. This position reports to
the Member Services Manager and will be responsible for assisting the
Cooperative's members in a pleasant, efficient and productive manner. This
position requires a High School Diploma, an excellent personality and some
computer skills including'Microsoft Office.

Applications and job descriptions may be picked up at the Suwannee
Valley Electric administration building, 11340 100th St., Live Oak. The jobs
description can be viewed on www.svec-coop.com. Resumes and applications
can be turned in at the above address with Attn: Vicky Talmadge, or emailed
to vickyt(svec-coop.com. The deadline for accepting applications is
Wednesday, June 1, 2011.
SVEC is an equal opportunity employer.


120 Medical
120 Employment

05525991



Meridian Behavioral
Healthcare, Inc.
www.mbhci.org
Please visit our website to view
current open opportunities
and to apply online:
Meridian is an active partner
with the National Health
Service Corps
Therapists:
Licensed, or Master's Level
in Outpatient
Bachelor's-Level in
Counselor Support
Case Management
(adult & child)
Master's Therapist in
Methadone Clinic
Administration
Director of Dietary Svcs
(G'Ville)
Medical Services
RN Nursing Manager (G'Ville)
PRN RN, LPN, C.N.A.
Recovery Specialist
(Direct Care)
LPN (2) for Methadone Clinic
(new)
To see our current openings in
Mental Health and to apply
online, please go to:
www.mbhci.ore
EOE, DFWP, E-Verify

CNA/home attendant needed in
private home. Will work with oth-
er caregivers. Nights & weekends
req'd. Send resume to: PO Box
3719 Lake City, Florida 32056

Counselor for substance abuse pro-
gram in Baker Correctional Institu-
tion. BA w/2yrs exp., M-F day
shift F/T. $30,000 to start, E-mail
resume to sheliarand@aol.com.or
fax to 386-752-2387


240 Schools &
240 Education

04-544843
Inteted in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
* Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-05/23/10
* Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-07/11/11
* Continuing education
Fees-incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com


310 Pets & Supplies
Kittens, FREE to good homes.
3 male, 2 female. -
Litterbox trained! ,
call 386-984-9634 leave message
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.

330 Livestock &
33 Supplies

04544790
Black Angus
Cows & Heifers
Registered & Commercial
Prices Vary
386-719-4802 or 386-623-9427
Pig
For Sale
$35
386-758-2978
Single Lane Farms
(1) 5 yr old registered Angus bull.
Duane Hingson. 386-776-1090
Wayne Parrish Bull.

361 Farm Equipment
84 Ford 4610 Tractor. Runs good.
Solid 2WD. New front tires,
350hr on 2005 motor. Dependable.
$7500. obo. 386-867-0005

412 Medical
412 Supplies
Invacare Electronic Hospital Bed,


11CklW i llmattlress,
To place your $200
classified ad call 386-965-9822

755-5440 REPORTER Classifieds
In Print and On Line
Twww.lakecityreporter.com

Family Owned and Operated

Dealership

, (Huntin' a good fit)
New & Used Car Sales
Motivated Self-Starter
Honesty & Good Character
$50,O'OO plus a year
Benefit Pkg.

Apply in person at

7 C -1... *


L /

BURKINS
CHEVROLET


IVIMaccilenny, I-L
273 E. Macclenny, Ave.


B -DawEx'4erien











MEDICAL


RECEPTIONIST

Needed for busy office.


Experience preferred,

but will train right person.

Fax resume to

386-752-9073
or e-mail to southerninternalmedicine34@yahoo.com


.) t..*..i


Drawer D
Springs, Florida 32096
call 386-397-1333


1


_ I








LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, MAY 22, 2011


413 Musical
413 Merchandise
CDG Karaoke System, Optimus,
with Manual,
$50
386-754-1595

415 Photo
Equipment
35 MM Camera Asahi Pentax
w/zoom, wide angle,
tele-photo, flash, carry case,
etc. 386-754-1595 $50

420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$250 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.


430 Garage Sales






Estate Sale, Memorial Day Week-
end, Fri. Sat & Sun May 27-29
291 SW Fantasy Glen, (Branford
Hwy, to Upchurch Ave to Fantasy)
Contents of 4 bdrm home must go!
Call Jim 305-522-3045
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.


440 Miscellaneous
3 PUSH Mowers.
Need TLC. (1) Craftsman,
(1) Bolen (1) Yardman.
$100.00 for all. 386-755-6963
4 ROOM USED CARPET
AND PADDING.
You move and haul away.
$60.00 386-755-6963
500 9.5 in x 4.5in #10
White secutiry enveolpes
with window. $45.00
386-755-6963
GUNSHOW: 05/21 & 05/22
@ The Columbia County
Fairgrounds, Hwy 247 Lake City.
Sat 9am 4pm, Sun 9am-3pm.
Info: 386-325-6114-
King Size Mattress,
very good condition,
$50
386-965-9822
New Central A/C, still in box,
with full ten year factory warranty
$1,795
Call 386-364-1090
SOLID KNOTTY pine wood.
Nice rocking chair with 6in
cushions, (seat and back).
$100. 00 386-755-6963 ,
Tow Behind Grill/Smoker
$1,250 OBO.
386-249-3104 or
386-719-4802

510 Jet Ski's
10 for sale
Wave Runner 96 Polaris
w/galvanized Trailer, only
64 hrs, many extra parts
$1,500 obo 386-234-1019

63a Mobile Homes
63U for Rent
i UNDER NEW MANAGEMENT
Oakview Mobile Home Park.
Clean well maintained 2/2 units in
nice park. 2 miles to downtown
Lake City. 386-984-8448
2&3 BR MH: $395 $650. mo.
plus deposit. Water & sewer fur-
nished. Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
2/2 Newly remodeled MH New
Floors/counter tops. Lg lot, quiet
area No pets 1st, last & sec. $450
mo $300 sec will work w/payment
plan. Call Jenn 386-454-7724
2/2 Units, clean, well maintained,
nice safe park setting, 2 miles to
downtown Lake City, $550 month
+ $550 sec dep, 386-984-8448
2br /2ba SWMH; also Residential
RV lots for rent between Lake City
& G'ville. Access to 1-75 & 441
(352)317-1326 Call for terms
3/2 S of Lake City, (Branford area)
$400 dep, $600 month
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.su.wanneevalleyproperties.com
CLEAN 3br/lba, In quiet,
private park. Large lot
Call: 386-752-6269
Iv message if no answer.
DWMH,On Private Location
CR 252, Close to Town 3/2
CH/A $500 monthly
386-755-0242
Eastside Village a 55+ Retirement
Community offers 2br/2ba Manu-
factured home fully furnished. No
pets. Leases for $650 + utilities.
1st, last, security. Eastside Village
Realty, Inc. 752-5290 for info.
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White. Contact 386-623-3404
or 386-365-1919
X-CLEAN 2/2 SW, 8 mi
NW of VA. Clean acre lot, nice
area. $500. mo + dep No dogs
386-961-9181


640 Mobile Homes
6 for Sale
Access Realty Make Offer! 3/2
MH w/over 1700 SF & move in
ready. Convenient to schools,
shopping & hospitals. MLS 73861
$89,500. Patti Taylor.623-6896

(650 Mobile Home
6 & Land
MH on 1 Acre in Live Oak near
S Peacock Lake, owner finance
$42,500 MLS#77598 Call Roger
Lovelady 386-365-7039 @
Westfield Realty Group
Owner Finance, Nice 3/2, S of
Lake City, small down/$650 mo
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com

710 Unfurnished Apt.
7 For Rent

05525655
SPRING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans;
some with garages.
Call 386-454-1469
or visit our website:
www.springhillvillage.net







1 & 2 Bedroom Apartments
Move in for as low as
$199
386-755-2423
2BR/2BA w/garage
on the west side of town.
Washer/Dryer hookups & more.
Call for details. 386-755-6867
A Landlord You Can Love!
2 br Apts $575. & up + sec. Great
area. CH/A washer/dryer hookups.
386-758-9351/352-208-2421
Great location W of 1-75, spacious
deluxe 2BR apts., garage, W/D
hook up. patio. $600 & up, + SD,
386-344-3715 or 386-965-5560
The Lakes Apts. Studios & lBr's
from $135/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $450. + sec.
Call Michelle 386-752-9626

7 0 Furnished Apts.
For Rent
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

730l Unfurnished
7*3 Home For Rent
3 br/lba. $550. mo. or
lbr duplex $600.mo Utilities incl
on Nassau Street
386-697-9950

3br/1.5ba. Very clean, CH/A
Fenced (privacy) large back yard.
Nice area/location. $800. mo $800.
dep. Ref's req'd. (941)920-4535
Eastside Village a 55+ Retirement
Community offers 2br/lba Duplex,
no pets. Leases for $600 + utilities.
First, last, security. Eastside
Village Realty, Inc. 752-5290
Home for Rent.
3/2 in City Limits. No pets.
$1000. per month. Call Susan,
Realtor. 386-623-6612
Large 2/1 newly remodeled, near
school, $575 mo, + dep, no pets!,
pls lv mess. 386-365-1920 or 454-
7764 after 6p. 843 SE Putnam St.
Private House for Rent
Newly Remodeled, S of Lake City
Call The Adams Agency @
386-752-1444

750 Business &
750 Office Rentals
For Lease: 1,500 17,000sf
1525 S. Ohio Ave, Live Oak, FL
Call Scott Stewart@ Westfield
Realty Group 386-867-3498
FOR LEASE: Downtown office
space. Convenient to
Court house.
Call 386-755-3456
For Lease: E Baya Ave. Two -
1000 sqft office space units or
combined for 2000 sqft. 386-984-
0622 or weekends 386-497-4762
Office Space For Lease
2112sf, 7 rms, Irg conf rm, 4 baths,
private parking MLS#76508
$1760/mo, Call Pam @ Remax
386-303-2505
OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$695. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor


790 Vacation Rentals
Horseshoe Beach Summer Spcl
Gulf Front 2br, w/lg porch, dock;
fish sink. wkend $345./wk $795.
386-235-3633/352-498-5986
alwaysonvacation.com #419-181
"Florida's Last Frontier"


805 Lots for Sale
5 Acre Lot, Secluded & Cleared,
MLS# 67871 $55,000
Call Lisa Waltrip
@ 386-365-5900
westfieldrealtygroup.com
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Fort White, 5 ac.-lot. Cleared,
grass, paved street, high and dry.
MLS# 77031
Sherry 386-365-8414 $23,999
Hallmark Real Estate. Cleared
2.57 ac. fenced w/32' Dutchman
camper. In O'Brien. Close to Live
Oak, Lake City, Branford. $25,000
MLS# 74534 386-867-1613
Hallmark Real Estate. Owner
Finance with $5K down with
terms negotiable. Below assessed
value for the county. MLS# 74484
$17,900 Jay Sears 386-867-1613
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.


810 Home for Sale
3/2 Brick Home in town, fenced
back yard w/12x12 workshop
$79,900 Just Reduced!
MLS# 77414 R.E.O.Realty
GCroup, Inc 386-243-8227
3/2 Brick Home w/1 car garage,
detach carport MLS#77780
$109,900, Call Jo Lytte Remax
386-365-2821
www.jolytte.florida-property-search.com
3/2 Cute Home, Remodeled, on 2
acres, partially fenced $114,900
MLS# 77396
R.E.O. Realty Group
386-243-8227
3/2 in Lake City Airpark
pool, pqrch, pond, detach garage
large hangar w/living quarters
MLS#77756 $399,900 Westfield
Call Josh G 386-466-2517
4/2 on 10.5 acres w/ detached
garage, patio, above ground pool,
MLS# 77410 $189,888
R.E.O. Realty Group, Inc
386-243-8227
Brick Home, Screened Porch
$185,900 MLS#77893
Call Charlie Sparks @
Westfield Realty Group
386-755-0808
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
6br/3.5ba brick. Lake views from
back. 39.7 ac., private paved road.
MLS# 76111 Mary Brown White-
hurst. 386-965-0887 $1,200,000
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Home on the lake in town. 4br/3ba
MLS# 76085 Elaine K. Tolar 386-
755-6488 or Mary Brown White-
hurst. 386-965-0887 $299,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
New home in Mayfair S/D. 4br on
comer lot. Split plan. $214,900
MLS# 76919 Elaine K. Tolar.
386-755-6488
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
4br/3ba 2 story brick on cul-de-
sac. I ac landscaped. Lori Geibeig
or Mary Brown Whitehurst.
386-965-0887 $299,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty.
4br/1.5ba brick. 1332 sq ft. Great
floor plan, nice yard, close to
town. 1 ac landscaped. Lori
Geibeig MLS# 75713 $84,900
CYPRESS LANDING!
3BR/2BA built in 2005
w/large kitchen $115,000
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #75794
DESIRABLE GWEN LAKE
area! Nice 3BR/2BA home


Eastside Village a 55+ Retirement
Community. 2br/2ba home with
garage, screen porch. Choose wall
color, flooring. MLS# 76483 East-
side Village Realty, Inc. 752-5290
FOR SALE by very motivated
owner. Now reduced $80,000 to
$119,000. Townhouse on Golf
course. 3br/3ba. Wood burning
fireplace. End unit. Remodeled
kitchen, first class appliances,
granite countertops. New Hunter
Douglas wdw treatments.
Cathedral ceiling. Pool, tennis
court. Call for appt. (904)246-6222


810 Home for Sale
Great Family Home in S/D
MLS# 77325, $109,000
Call Missy Zecher @ Remax
Professionals 386-623-0237
www.missyzecher.com
Great Home in Great Neighbor-
hood, Can be 4/2 or 3/2 w/study
MLS#77284 $164,900
Call Carrie Cason @Westfield
386-623-2806
GREAT STARTER HOME!
3BR/2BA w/lots of closets
space & nice lawn $79,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #76432
Hallmark Real Estate. 3/2 Brick
home w/large screened porch.
Back yard has wooded privacy.
MLS#69482 Janet Creel 719-0382
or Paula Lawrence 623-1973
Hallmark Real Estate. Bring the
horses. 3/2 HUD, 4 ac. Sold "as is"
$106,000 Bids are being accepted.
www.hudhomestore.com MLS#
72068 Martin Tavener 965-7773
Hallmark Real Estate. DWMH on
5 ac south of town. Back porch,
new metal roof wood burning fire-
place & wired workshop. $82,500
MLS#77185 Janet Creel 719-0382
Hallmark Real Estate. Glassed
porch overlooks wooded backyard
in the Plantations. Pool,
sprinkler system. $204,900
MLS#75429 Janet Creel 719-0382
Hallmark Real Estate. Time to go
to the River. Stilt home w/covered
decking. Floating dock,out bldgs
& covered RV parking. $188K.
MLS#72068 Janet Creel 719-0382
Home on 15 Acres, 2500sf, new
appliances, workshop, MLS 77552
$235,000 Call Brittany @
Results Realty 386-397-3473
HOME OR OFFICE on
Alachua St; remodeled
,1,207 SqFt home $82,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #77724
Hallmark Real Estate. 2006
2200SF home. 2br/2ba w/mother-
in-law suite, 4 car garage, endless
hot water heater. MLS# 77547
$309,900 Jay Sears 386-867-1613
Hallmark Real Estate. 3/3 Brick
w/over 2500 SF. Great location
with nice one acre pond in back.
Detached workshop MLS# 75222
$179,900 Jay Sears 386-867-1613
Hallmark Real Estate. 4/2 Brick,
3100 SF, Granddaddy Oaks on 5
acres. Double detached carport/ga-
rage w/workshop. MLS# 77877
$119,900. Jay Sears 386-867-1613
Just Reduced 3/2 home, inside city
limits, fenced backyard, detached
carport w/office MLS#77411
$82,900 Call R.E.O.Realty,
@ 386-243-8227 Make Offer!
Just Reduced 4/2 on 1.57 acres,
fireplace. partially fenced, MLS#
77412, Call Nancy Rogers at
R.E.O. Realty Group
386-243-8227 $64,900
Large affordable home in S/D on 2
Acres, fishing rights to Timberlake
Property Owner's Assoc. $64,900
MLS#74862-Call Brittany @
Results Realty386-397-3473
Large Brick, 3/1, 4.43 acres, metal
roof, MLS# 77415 $104,888
R.E.O. Realty Group, Inc.
386-243-8227
Large Home in the Country on
3.66 acres, fireplace, 2 outbldgs,
MLS#76471, $89,900 Call Jo
Lytte @ Remax 386-365-2821
jolytte@remaxnfl.com
Large Home w/Open Floor Plan,
back yard & porch, Irg oaks, fire-
place, MLS#76122 $115,000
Call Missy Zecher @ Remax 386-
623-0237,mzecher@remax.net
LOTS OF UPGRADES!
'Remodeled kitchen in this
2BR/1BA home $29,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY
INC. 755-5110 #77505
Luxury Log Home,
Whole House Generator., $269,900
MLS# 76899 Call Roger
Lovelady @386-365-7039
westfieldrealtygroup.com
Nice, large 4/2 on 1 acre
w/florida room, granite floors,
wrap around front porch, $148,000
Call Brittany Stoeckert @
Results Realty 386-397-3473
Norwegian Brick Home, fire-
place/family rm, open floor plan,
screen porch, fenced back yard,
MLS#76796 $179,900
Jo Lytte Remax 386-365-2821
Owner Finance. Custom built 3/2.5
10.8 ac. Granite, fireplace, vaulted
ceilings, surround sound, lanai,
gazebo. MLJ 77382 Access Real-
ty. Patti Taylor $249K 623-6896
Priced Reduced! 3/2 w/2346 sf.
.67 ac. Creekside S/D. Shade,
surround sound, vaulted ceilings.
MLS 77385 $169,900. Access
Realty. Patti Taylor. 386-623-6896
Rose Creek S/D, 5/4, 3269sf, on
2.2 acres, bonus rm, many
upgrades Reduced! MLS#75485
Reduced! $234,900, Call Pam @
Remax 386-303-2505


810 Home for Sale
Spacious Brand New Split Floor
Plan Home, Fenced Yard
MLS#77493 $229,900
Call Mike Lienemann @ Westfield
Realty Group 386-867-9053
SPACIOUS home built in
1995 has 2BR/2BA & 1,636
SqFt on 1 acre $89,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110
Sturdy 3/2 on 4.35 acres, fruit &
pecan trees, Minutes from town
MLS#77878 $105,000
Call Jo Lytte @ Remax
386-365-2821/www.jolytte.com
Totally Remodeled 4 Bd Home
Spacious Must See!
MLS#77782 $135,000
Missy Zecher 386-623-0237
www.missyzecher.com
Well Maintained 3/2 on dead-end
street, quiet, country, close to
downtown $105,000 MLS#77800
Call Lisa Waltrip @Westfield
Realty Group 386-365-5900

820 Farms &
Acreage
4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$69,900. $613mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
4 acres, Wellborn, New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down, $39,900, $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
FARM- 7 stall barn, Apt.
17+ acres cross fenced.
Close in $1000. mo.
386-961-1086
FOR SALE: $68,000 CASH FOR
QUICK SALE: In McAlpin.
10 Acres W/2006 DW,
863-634-5283 for details.
FSBO, Ten acres, Mason City off
Catherine Rd, fully fenced,
power accessible
$42,000 386-344-0504
Half to ten acre lots. Some w/
well, septic, pp. We finance; low'
d,*n pmt. Deas Bullard Properties.
386-752-4339. www.landnfl.com
Hallmark Real Estate. 40 ac hunt-
ing tractw/camper. Water & septic
already m place. Stands & feeders
in place. MLS# 75532
$84,000 Jay Sears 386-867-1613
Three One Acre Lots available
@ $14,900 ea & One 1.65 Acre
lot for $19,900 MLS#76050
Call Brodie Alfred 386-623-0906
Westfield Realty Group

83Q0 Commercial
Property
Commercial Property For Sale
Currently Leased $495,000
1MLS#75953 Call Aaron
Nickelson @ 386-867-3534
Westfield Realty Group

FOR SALE or Lease, Commercial
Bldg, Prime Location, formerly
Church on the Way,
approx 2700sf 386-755-0242
Great Investment/Owner Finance
1400 sq ft building on 2 acres
Creative terms, owner flexible.
CLose to 1-75. 386-867-1190
Hallmark Real Estate. Downtown
Restaurant. Gigantic BBQ Smoker
Clean kitchen w/equip. Handle any
type of food svc. MLS# 77902
$189,900 Vic Lantroop 623-6401
Mini Storage (204 Units),
gated, fenced 5 acres, $1,300,000,
MLS#76048 Call Millard Gillen
@ Westfield Realty Group
386-365-7001

850 Waterfront
5 Property
Upscale River Cabin on
Suwannee River, Shop, Dock
MLS#76336 $349,900
Call Jo Lytte @ Remax
386-365-2821
860 Investment
860 Property
3/2 Renovated Home in town,
front porch, new appliances, cur-
rently leased MLS#76658 $49,900
Jo Lytte/Remax 386-365-2821
www.jolytte.flgrida-property-search.com
Great Income Opportunity!
Mobile Home Park For Sale
MLS#77228 $195,000
Call Pam Beauchamp @ Remax
386-758-8900


950 Cars for Sale
1996 Mercury Sable,
Good Condition, $2000,
White, Power,
386-965-9822


Bring the picture in or
we will take it for you!
* Ad runs 10 consecutive days
with a description and photo in the
newspaper and online E-edition.
* Ad runs 10 consecutive days as a
classified line ad online.
* You must include vehicle price.
* All ads are prepaid.
* Private party only.





2006 EF250
Ford Van
3/4 ton, metal work
shelves/ladder rack,
60K miles, exc. cond.
$10,500
Call
386-555-5555
If you don't sell your vehicle
during the first 10 days, you
can run the same vehicle ad
for 10 additional days for
only $15.00
Terms and conditions remain the
same for the additional run.

To Su


VehcleSol, C 1


...to never miss a day's
worth of all the
Lake City Reporter
has to offer:
Home delivery.
To subscribe call
755-5445


^^^^^^^^I.


La,: ON WHEELS & WATERCRAFT


Wave Runner 96
Polaris
W/galvanized trailer, only
64 hrs, many extra parts.
$1,500 obo
Call
386-234-1019


4rI
F- I r


confused?



Call Lake City Reporter Classifieds!


WE CAN HELP 386-755-5440


Classified Department: 755-5440








6C LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, MAY 22, 2011


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Story ideas?

Contact
C.J. Risak
Assistant Editor
754-0427
crisak@lakectyreportercom


Lake City Reporter





LIFE


Sunday, May 22, 201 I


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section D


GARDEN TALK
." ',T i


Janyel Smith


The New
Blue:
French
Hydrangea

Are you look-
ing for a low
maintenance
flowering
plant to
add some color to your
landscape? The French
Hydrangea may be just
the right addition to your
landscape. It has been '
a prized flower for the
North Florida gardefi for
many years.
This lovely flower-
ing shrub is perfect
for summer gardens or
yards because it begins
to bloom in late spring
or early summer. The
French Hydrangea pro-
duces beautiful clusters
of vibrant blue flowers
that are very eye catch-
ing. Luckily for those
who don't have time to
water plants every day,
this plant is moderately
drought tolerant and is
able to withstand the
Florida heat.
Many yards in North
Florida are heavily or
partially shaded with. L.
large trees such as our
wide-spreading live oaks.
The French Hydrangea
is perfect for these shady
areas because it requires
shade, either full shade,
morning, or afternoon
shade. As long as the
hydrangea is in shade
for part ofithe day, it
will continue to grow
and thrive. Try to avoid
wet soils or planting too
deeply because the plant
could become stressed.
After the location has
been decided, be sure
to leave plenty of space
for your plant to grow
and develop. The French
Hydrangea often reaches
a mature size of six feet
tall and wide, so if you're
looking for something
smaller, look for a type
of blue hydrangea that
matures at a smaller size.
When it comes to prun-
ing this plant, little to
none is needed, unless
it outgrows the size that
was wanted originally
intended.
Another great char-
'acteristic of the French
Hydrangea is that it is
nearly pest-free as long
as it is given the right
growing conditions.
Whether you have a
green thumb for garden-
ing or just enjoy having
variety in your yard, the
French Hydrangea will
be an easy addition. So
do your yard a favor, and
add some color for the
summer months.
Master Gardeners are
available to help with
gardening questions
on Tuesday, Thursday,
and Friday mornings at
the UF IFAS Extension
office. 752-5384. Or visit
them on Wednesdays, 1
to 4 pm at the Fort White
Public Library.
* Janyel Smith is a
summer intern with the
Columbia County Extension
of the University of Florida
Institute of Food and
Agricultural Sciences and is
a senior at the University of
Florida.


Mommy and Me


introduces new


families to Christ


Mothers can bring their pre-school

kids to once-a-month meetings.


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
For Casandra Wheeler
of Lake City, the com-
munity was lacking a
special gathering for
mothers and childreri
that extended to a higher calling.
"We needed a Christian fellow-
ship for moms and their children,"
she said.
As a result, Wheeler formed
Mommy and Me.
"It was something the Lord
placed on my heart last summer,"
she said.
Mommy and Me is a Christian
Ministry for mothers, or grand-
mothers, and children from birth
through preschool age, Wheeler
said. The ministry is inter-denomi-
national and began meeting in
February.
"Ift's increasing and flowing bet-


ter each time," she said. "Each
time we have new people and
returning ones."
The program has several objec-
tives: minister to mothers and
provide an encouraging network of
Christ-centered friendships; teach
children about Jesus Christ through
music, Bible stories, crafts and cre-
ative play; and bring mothers and
their children together.
Sessions include prayer time,
songs, a children's minute, crafts,
a mommy minute and a fellowship
social. Sack lunches are provided
for the social.
"We want children to know
Jesus," Wheeler said. "Many times
parents will come to know Jesus
through their children."
Beverly Schulz, former Columbia
County Public Library children's
librarian, leads praise and worship
and story time at the meeting.
"Ift's a lot of fun and I'm glad


Naaala summers nelps ner zl-monm-ola son, Liam, aecorate
a cup during a Mommy and Me Ministries get-together.


they're having it," she said.
Schulz brings her granddaugh-
ter to the gatherings.
"One of the most important
things you can do for a child is tell
them about God's love," she said.
Children head to the play-
ground and the mothers have a
moment of spiritual uplifting and
encouragement through a Bible
reading during the mommy min-
ute, Wheeler said. Prayer requests
are also solicited.
"Ifs an opportunity to take a
break and take in the word and
fellowship," she said.
Each month, Alesha Waller of
Lake City brings her three chil-
dren Peyton, 3, Trevor, 5, and
Logan, 18 months to Mommy
and Me. She is a member of
Hopeful Baptist Church and was
invited by Wheeler to the group.
"I love how we share Jesus with
the kids and moms," she said.


God wants adults to come to
him like children, Waller said.
It's easier for children to accept
Christ because people become
more cynical as adults, and the
program helps strengthen that
relationship.
"It sows a seed to come to
Christ," she said. "I think it's a
great program."
The group meets 10:30 to 11:30
a.m. the third Tuesday of every
month at Christian Heritage
Church. The" church is located at
159 SW Hudson Lane.
Call Wheeler for more infor-
mation at 386-365-2168 or e-mail
johncasandra@hotmail.com.
'We want the community to
come, any denomination or no
church affiliation at all," she said.
"We have all kinds of people come
to this meeting, and you don't
have to be a Christian. We're very
open and welcoming."


ABOVE: Christy Lynn and her 20-month-old
daughter, Jayna, play with a tambourine while
singing children's songs.


LEFT: Georgia Chamberlin makes a face at her
son, Fletcher, 2, during a sing-along.


Photos by JASON MATTHEW WALKER
Lake City Reporter


Families adjusting to 4


college kids who are


home for the summer


By LINDSEY TANNER
Associated Press
CHICAGO Like
thousands of college stu-
dents this time of year,
Northwestern University
freshman Jim Sannes can't
wait to spend time at home
this summer.
Sannes, 19, is looking
forward to relaxing and
"just being around the sur-
roundings I grew up with,
the same house I grew
up with. It will be a nice
feeling." He grew up in
Kasson, Minn., 350 miles
from Northwestern's cam-
pus in Evanston, Ill.
But after nine months
away, campus and the
place where college stu-
dents grew up may seem
worlds apart. Summer at
home so often eagerly
awaited by the students,
their parents and siblings
- is often a mixed-up
time of happy reunions,
unexpected challenges and
weird new family dynam-
ics as not-quite adult kids
return temporarily to the
nest.


'They have a whole
new world, filled with new
friends and new ideas, new
independence," and that
sometimes clashes with
things back home, said
psychologist Karen Levin
Coburn, a consultant at
Washington University
in St. Louis and author of
"Letting Go: A Parent's
Guide to Understanding
the College Years."
Cindy Jez, a 55-year-old
real estate manager in
Richmond, Va., has'gone


through these transition
summers several times
with her two oldest boys,
a junior and senior in col-
lege.
"I remember crying
when they first went to
college. Now I'm crying
when they come home,"
she jokes.
Don't get her wrong
- Jez loves having the
boys back home. And
yet, she also knows their


ASSOCIATED PRESS
This May 12 photo shows Northwestern University freshman
Jim Sannes in his dorm room in Evanston, Ill.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
This May 12 photo shows Northwestern University freshman
Jim Sannes on the Northwestern campus in Evanston, III.
Like thousands of college students this time of year, Sannes
can't wait to spend time at home this summer. Sannes, 19,
is looking forward to relaxing and "just being around the sur-
roundings I grew up with, the same house I grew up with.
It will be a nice feeling." He grew up in Kasson, Minn., 350
miles from Northwestern's campus in Evanston.


-- I I I -- -











Tapping your wild mind, for your life


I ook we use in my
Principles of Writing
class is Writing for
Life. I've always liked
the way that sounded because I
think writing is something we all
use in some form or other every
day. I take it one step further in
my teaching and hope my stu-
dents get my message that really
we should all be writing for our
lives-as a way to understand
ourselves and share ourselves
with others.
My students seem to appreci-
ate the five-minute freewrites
I assign regularly as a way to
"clear their slates" and begin
writing on their next paragraph
or essay topic. Most of the writ-
ing my students do is narrative
nonfiction. They write about
something they care about and
have experience with. They
usually start with the kernel of
an idea and write continuously
without taking their pens off the
page for anywhere from five to
ten minutes.
The purpose of the assign-


Elizabeth Cobb
Associate Professor of English
Florida Gateway College

ment is to help them generate
ideas for their writing, but I also
suspect that this kind of writing
aids them in getting a handle
on their thoughts which in turn
helps them keep their lives in
perspective. Indeed, freewriting
could be beneficial to anyone,
student or not. It's constructive
in that it could result in a deci-
sion, a new question worth pur-
suing, an answer, and/or a new
life path.
If you've been feeling an incli-
nation to write at all, there's a
wonderful little book out there
that I can almost guarantee will
inspire you to put pen to paper.
The title is Wild Mind by Natalie


Goldberg. An important focus of
her book is to get her readers
to freewite in order to uncover
their most substantive "material"
for writing. Consider some of
her ideas:
Write about something you
really loved, that made you feel
whole the time you taught
your child how to swim or a
birthday party for which you
created the most beautiful cen-
terpiece. Try to zoom in on the
experience in great detail. For
example, tell how the sun's rays
glittered in the bubbles your son
blew when he successfully swam
underwater for the first time.
Memories of travel can also
conjure up the best details.
Goldberg suggests writing
about a car trip or about trains.
Write about a hotel you stayed
in. Make up twenty of your own
travel topics, and explore differ-
ent dimensions of your travels.
Once you start freewriting on a
travel-related topic, stop yourself
in the middle and write, "What
I really want to say is ... "This
forces you to get at the heart of


your piece. It cuts to the chase,
so to speak. Try this tactic in
any of your freewriting sessions.
Pursuing this kind of private
writing where the writer has an
audience of one, (him or herself)
can prove an important survival
skill in our very busy, chaotic
lives. I contend that writing is
also meant to be shared and can
be valuable to other people as
well.
While my students usually
start with a freewrite, they some-
times end up with a "useful"
piece for themselves and for oth-
ers. One student wrote a beauti-
ful description of his grandmoth-
er and how she was the matron
of a whole clan and presided
over weekly Sunday dinners. She
literally came alive on the page,
so one of my comments to him
was, "Why don't you give.this to
her as a gift?"
Perhaps your "travel writing"
from the exercise above will
drop you off in a new place to
begin a story to share with rela-
tives at a reunion or with friends
at your next get together. Maybe


forcing yourself to focus your
writing, as Goldberg suggests,
with the phrase, "What I really
want to say is ... will help you
start an important discussion
with your spouse.
Freewriting encourages us
to quickly get to who we are,
and if you go one step beyond
and share your writing with an
important person in your life,
then you are making a connec-
tion that might possibly help
you or the other person. I was.
reminded of how important this
process is when a student from
many years ago flagged me
down in Winn Dixie. She told me
how she found some of her writ-
ing from my class, and what joy
she took in sharing it with her
boyfriend. He was able to get a
glimpse of her as a teenager, and
it meant a lot to both of them.
She went on to explain how
this discovery inspired her to
start a journal. It comforts me to
know that she got my message,
and she embraces the idea that
writing will always help define
who she is.


2 Universal rides to get makeovers


By MITCH STACY
Associated Press

ORLANDO At Universal Orlando
says Spidey will soon go high-def, and
lots of "minions" will be up to no good
in a new attraction themed on the ani-
mated movie "Despicable Me."
The theme park announced plans
Thursday to reanimate the iconic
Spider-Man ride in digital high-defini-
tion. Universal also said it will close
its Jimmy Neutron-themed ride this
summer and replace it with a 3-D
attraction on "Despicable Me,"
which features minions as not-so-
smart sidekicks to the villain Gru.
Both revamped attractions will
open at the park sometime in 2012,
but specific dates have not been
announced.
"The Amazing Adventures of
Spider-Man," whose combination of
3-D animation, roving motion vehi-
cles and .special effects has made
it a crowd favorite for more than
a decade, will be updated with the
highest-quality HD resolution avail-
able, special effects and new details
in the film, which is projected onto
a towering screen. The cars hurtle
riders along ravaged city streets as
Spider-Man battles his archenemies,
protecting innocent citizens from the
likes of Doc Ock and Electro.
"A big part pf it is bringing it to a
point where the imaging, the char-
acters, the animation, the clarity, the
details will be at a point where it's
larger than life," said Thierry Coup,
senior vice president of Universal
Creative. "You'll feel even more like
you're in that world."
Springing from the pages of Marvel
Comics, Spider-Man has carried three
successful feature films with Tobey
Maguire as the superhero and his


ENGAGEMENTS


Pearce-Harrell
Brett and Mallory Sealey
of Lake City announce the
engagement and approach-
ing marriage of their moth-
er, Kathy Gayle Pearce of
Lake City to Lonnie Wayne
Harrell of Lake City.
He is the son of William
Lonnie and Pennie Harrell
of Lake City and Jennie
Harrell of Ocala. The bride
is also the daughter of the
late Lamar Pearce and
Elizabeth Pearce.
The bride-elect gradu-
ated in 1987 from Columbia
,High School and 1991 from
' Lake City Community
College with a degree in
business administration.
She is employed at Florida
*Gateway College.
The future groom gradu-


ASSOCIATED PRESS
This film publicity image courtesy of Universal Studios shows a scene from the
film "Despicable Me." Universal Orlando announced plans Thursday to reanimate
the iconic Spider-Man ride in digital high-definition. Universal also said it will close
its Jimmy Neutron-themed ride this summer and replace it with a 3-D attraction
based on the animated movie "Despicable Me," which features minions as not-so-
smart sidekicks to the villain Gru.


/alter ego, Peter Parker. A Broadway
version, though, has stumbled a
few times on the way to the stage.
"Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark" has
been fraught with problems, includ-
ing a bloated price tag and serious
injuries to a performer who fell dur-
ing an aerial stunt A retooled version
of the show was rolled out last week
in New York.
Universal hasn't yet announced
closing and reopening dates for the
Spider-Man ride, which debuted in
1999 in the Islands of Adventure
park.
In the Universal Studios park, the
"Despicable Me" ride will replace
the Jimmy Neutron's Nicktoon Blast
simulator, which has been running
only part-time since April and closes
permanently Aug. 18. Like the new
Spider-Man experience, it will utilize
a sophisticated Infitec 3-D projection


ated in 1987 from Columbia
High School and 1989 from
Lake City Community
College with a degree in
corrections. He is employed
at the Florida Department
of Corrections.
The wedding is planed
for 6:30 p.m. Thursday, May
26 at Falling Creek Chapel.
All family and friends are
invited.


ANNIVERSARIES

Thomas
Charles andcSandra Thomas
will celebrate their 50th wed-
ding anniversary with a party in
their honor given by their chil-
dren 2-4 p.m. Saturday, June 4
-. at Midway Baptist Church.
The church is located off
.us 27 N and CR 405 out of
Branford.
All family and friends are
invited.


system.
The animated film "Despicable
Me," which came out last year with
Steve Carell voicing Gru, grossed
more than $540 million worldwide.
Like the movie, the Universal ride
will feature Gru, his three adopted
daughters and, of course, the min-
ions. .Universal says riders will be
transformed into minions before
embarking on the 3-D adventure and
get to participate in a minion "dance
party" at the end of the ride.
"In the same way comedy and
sweetness and emotion were criti-
cal parts of the film, they will also
become very essential parts of the
experience in the ride," said Chris
Meledandri, who produced the, film
and is involved in creating the ride.
'That tonality that people loved in
the movie is absolutely going to be
consistent in the ride as well."


Dame's rocket

rocks, in a garden

or in the wild


By LEE REICH
For The Associated Press
In much of the country,
dame's rocket is now
blanketing the dappled
shade of woodlands and
roadsides with its white,
mauve, or purple flowers.
Its sweet scent is espe-
cially pervasive on late
spring and early summer
evenings.
You might think
dame's rocket (Hesperis
matronalis) is a native
plant; it can be seen, after
all, in Quebec, in Georgia,
in almost any state. But
dame's rocket is a native
of Europe and western
Asia that early On was
cultivated in American
gardens, then escaped to
find a happy home in the
wilds of eastern North
America.

FAMILY ASSOCIATIONS
Dame's rocket also
might be mistaken for
phlox. Both have sweetly
scented flowers in similar
shapes and colors, and
the flowers of both plants
are held clustered atop
2- or 3-foot-high stalks.
Look more closely,
though, and you'll find
that phlox flower parts
are in fives. Dame's
rocket, in contrast, has


, ; ," A, .,

Bail e .y' s ,> :, o.':*'+'- ; t




. ... .. W .




Gia-



S* A-'









.44
:D Servtces ..'o:"- '



















ra4


8 6 -


* ~.


four p5etals. And they are
in the shape of a cross,
which is a giveaway for
members of the cabbage
family.
That cabbage associa-
tion is how the "rocket"
got into the name. Many
cabbage relatives have
this in their name; it's
derived from the Latin
"eruca" for cabbage-like
plants. The now familiar
vegetable arugula also
cabbage kin has also
been called rucola or
rocket And if you think
it odd that a relative of
cabbage should have a
sweet scent, take a whiff
of sweet alyssum.

AN OLD-FASHIONED
FLOWER
Dame's rocket has a lot
going for it Besides being
pretty and scented, the
flowers bloom for weeks.
Judging from where the
plants have happily settled,
they obviously tolerate
cold and shade. They even
tolerate dry shade, with
some sacrifice to how long
they bloom. And pests?
None to speak of.



.,i L<







China, Crystal,
Flatware and Gifts
Couples registered:
Christine Moses
David Moor
May 21, 2011

Casey McDuffie
Tony de Moya
May 21, 2011

Laurie Little
Robert Evans, Jr.
June 4, 2011

Jessica Clark
Tommy McAllister
June 24, 2011

Ashley Cloninger
Justin Brimmer
September 24, 2011
We know exactly what
they want in a wedding
or shower gift. We update
their list as gifts are
purchased, and gift wrap.
SWARD'S "
JEWELRY & GIFTS
( 156 N. Marion Ave.
Lake City
752-5470


LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, MAY 22, 2011


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427








LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & CROSSWORD SUNDAY, MAY 22, 2011


DEAR ABBY


Woman's loose lips on sex


may sink ship of romance


DEAR ABBY: I met "An-
gie" on a dating site not long
ago. She's an intelligent, open-
minded woman. So when
one of our first conversations
turned to sexual preferences,
I felt at ease revealing one of
my "likes" to her even though
I 'didn't know her well.
Today when we were talk-
ing, Angie mentioned that she
had asked her girlfriend about
her experiences with what I
had discussed. Clearly her
intent wasn't to gossip, but
nevertheless, I felt betrayed. I
had discussed a personal part
of myself in a private conversa-
tion, and she had divulged what
I had said to someone with out'
asking me.
Now I'm riot sure I want to
continue talking to her. Confi-
dence is an essential part of any
relationship beyond a casual
friendship, and I don't want her
friends being privy to every-
thing that goes on between me
and her, even on a "promise not
to tell anyone" basis.
On the other hand, Angie
seemed concerned when she
realized I was upset, and her
intentions were not malicious.
Should I move on? If not, how
do I discuss my feelings with
Angie without being confron-
tational? WANTS IT PRI-
VATE IN TEXAS
DEAR WANTS IT PRI-
VATE: Angie is not only
open-minded, she is also open-
mouthed when discussing inti-
mate matters. She and her girl-


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearabby.com

friend talk about their sexual
preferences and activities, or
she wouldn't have known that
her friend has had the experi-
ence you discussed.
If you prefer your sex life
kept private, move on because
Angie isn't likely to change. If
you are so attracted to her that
you're willing to have your pri-
vate life become an open book
- continue confiding in her
because it will happen. Let this
be a lesson about opening the
door-to your innermost secrets
so quickly in the future.
DEAR ABBY: It's the time
of year when preschool and
elementary school teachers re-
ceive so many tokens of thanks
we don't know what to do with
them.
Why not give a gift that will
really be appreciated and
from which everyone will bene-
fit? Let your child help pick out
a book for the teacher's class-
room library. The kids know
what is already there and can
be involved in finding some-
thing new and exciting. It will
also help them understand how
important reading is to you.


Most teachers can always use
a new addition to their book-
shelf. READING IS FOR
EVERYONE
DEAR R.I.F.E.: I love
your suggestion. Reading IS
for everyone, and a way to con-
vey that message is for parents
of preschool and elementary
schoolchildren to read to them
and with them every day.
DEAR ABBY: While go-
ing through some old greeting
cards, I read the messages writ-
ten by our children when they
were kids. I thought I would
send them back one for each
occasion as a reminder of
good things from the past.
It seems some children
blame their parents, but forget
all the good that happened in
their lives. Seeing an old card
may be a positive reminder.
- RECYCLING WITH A
TWIST
DEAR RECYCLING: May-
be, maybe not. If you're having
problems with your adult chil-
dren, my advice would be to
resolve those issues in a forth-
right manner. Do not attempt
to "guilt" them, because it's ma-
nipulative. However, if you are
determined to send the cards,
be sure to write something on
each one about reconciliation
that carries a positive mes-
sage.,

* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.codm or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-April THE LAST WORD
19): Your heart is in the right
place but, before you are too Eugenia Word
willing to do for others, make emotional well-being. ***
sure that you aren't doing too LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):
much. Offering only sugges- You need a change, regard-
tions may be difficult but will less of whether or not it will
bring about better results. please someone in your life
--A A*who is being unreasonable.
TAURUS (April 20-May Stop catering to everyone
20): You may know what you around you. Do something
want but someone will have that will lift your spirits. A
different plans. Don't get an- little pampering will go a long
gry or disappointed, just go way.
about your business and let y GO(Aug. 23-Sep
everyone else do the same. 22): Don't worry about what
Arguments will be futile. -**
GEMINI (May 21-June anyone else is doing or about
G I (Ma c y es e u a job that you are called to
20): If change is required finish. You should be looking
that is something that will -into something you can incor-
come easily for you. Don't porate into youth life that can
take anything too person- subsidize your income. Get-
ally and you will benefit from ing together with friends or
whatever develops. A change ng together with friends or
of attitude will be directly you relax. ***
linked to your experiences. IeBRA (Sept 23-Oct.
22): You are on the right
CANCER (June 21-July track and should follow
!22): You'll be tempted to through with your plans. Get-
overcompensate, overspend ting involved in something
or overindulge in order, to that will help you gain experi-
deal with the guilt someone ence and knowledge is high-
is making you feel. Back away lighted but don't go over your
from anyone who doesn't have. budget. Change in a partner-
your best interests at heart. ship is apparent--*****
Protect your heart, assets and

CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos"
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's$. clue: Y equals B
"G CSCEC KM V NGALF. PKAL IL K H
"G CSCEC 'KM R VL VN'PLZCSE ND
L WO C Z K R F B OMRFKG L CSE
R N Z L H C SGL." AK P G CPTYLZZ
PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "If you are going to achieve excellence In big things,
you develop the habit in little matters." Colin Powell
(c) 2011 by NEA, Inc. 5-23


SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov.
21): There appears to be
trouble in paradise. Chances
are good that you are over-
looking something that will
lead to a situation that is dif-
ficult, if not impossible, to
reverse. An emotional matter
will be met with a stubborn
response. **
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-
Dec. 21): Consider a new lo-
cation to work or to live that
will better suit your needs and
plans for the future. A serious
look at skills and services you
can pull together and offer
will give you greater insight
into ways you can acquire
more cash. ****
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-
Jan. 19): Address any emo-
tional issues before they get
blown out of proportion. Mak-
ing some alterations to your
home or within your fam-
ily dynamics will smooth any
troubles that have been brew-
ing. Property investments will
be lucrative. *-*
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Look at the big
picture before it's too late to
reverse the situation you are
facing. There is plenty you
can do if you put your stub-
bornness behind you and put
your ability to find solutions
into play. Change is needed to
reach your goals. ***
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): A secret about your fam-
Sily, a friend or relative will
make a difference to someone
you want to get to know bet-
ter. Don't reveal any personal
information until you are sure
you will not get a negative re-
action. ***


SUNDAY CROSSWORD


INCLUDED HEREWIT By Cathy Allis / Edited by Will Shortz f11-2-1314 |51789 101112 1314 115 |11 |


Across
1 Jewish grandma
6 Crooked
10 "Laugh-In" airer
13 Barney Gumble
of "The
.Simpsons," e.g.
17 Woody. and Steve
19 Attire for an
Indian bride
20 Suffix with buck
22 Rain cats and
dogs
23 Close by
24 Salt Lake City
athlete's dear
hawk mascot?
27 Possible result of
a costly Italian
vacation?
29 Leave the
outdoors
30 First Nations
group
31 Place for Wii
play, say
32 Frank writing in
a diary
33 Turf
34 Sierra Nevada
lake
37 Comparable to a
March hare
39 Slowly, on scores
,41 Elvis ___ Presley
42 Hit show with ,
New Directions
singers
43 Some whiskeys
44 Gymnastics great
Comaneci

For any three answers,
call from a touch-tone
hone: 1-900-285-5656,
1.49 each minute; or,
with a credit card, 1-800-
814-5554.


48 Flurry of activity
50 Tribal healer
53 In pain
54 Shakespearean
fairy king
55 Jokes in a campy
196.0s IV
locale?'
58 Hazardous
I household gas
59 Marisa who
played 75-
Down's
girlfriend
62 Kyrgyzstan range
63 ___-Caps
64 Akin to milking a
cow?
69 Car safety'
feature, for short
72 Singer India. __
73 Musical endings
74 Baseball : Oriole
:: football :___
78 Bless butter with
a gesture?
82 Apt to fluctuate
83 Bullying words
84 Former SoCal
N.F.L. team
87 Never-before-
seen
88 Damascene's
homeland
89 Saharan
91 Gross
93 Equivalent of -
tri'x
94 Wordy
96 Video game
pioneer
.98 What we may be?
99 Like some
baseball teams
102 Leak sound
103 Slip up,


104 "A momentary
madness," per
Horace
106 Misers
108 Vessel for just
the two of us?
113 Role of a
boxer's
physician?
115 Tennis's
Goolagong
116 Yank or Ray
117 Politico
Gingrich
118 Concerning
1.19 Many a Bush
military adviser
120 Org. in a big
race of years
past
121 That, in a
bodega
122 Saxophonist
Getz
123 Surgical tube

Down
I Word after string
or rubber
2 Peter Fonda title
role
3 Tattle
4 What Ernie may
wish he had vis-
a-vis his
roommate?
5 Complete
6 Evaluates
7 It may be
manicured
8 Frozen tater brand
9 Like quilts
10 Catch
11 Quartermaster's
group
12 Alternatives to
Do's Equis


13 UV blockage nos.
14 Automaker
Chevrolet
15 Surpass
16 Shetland, e.g.
18 Loudness unit
2.1 Taking way too
many meds
25 X
26 Margin size,
maybe
28 Calf product
34 Small drum
35 One of the
Leeward Antilles
36 Scammed
38 Interjection of
disinterest
39 "The
Fountainhead"
author
40 Home of
Punchbowl
Crater
42 See 51-Down:
Abbr.
43 Teller
45 Darkens
46 Hip to
47 Soil: Prefix
49 Actress Anderson
51 First name
-alphabetically in
42-Down
52, Train part where
sorting was once
done
53 Gallic gal pal
56 One of
Chekhov's "three
sisters"
57 Feel one's ___
(be confident)
59 Cousin of a gull
60 Mayberry boy


61 Kellogg's cereal
65 Villainous group
-in "Get Smart"
66 Minute bit
67 Asia's ___ Sea
68 Non-choice for
restaurant
seating?
69 New Testament
book
70 Donkey's cry
71 Go bad


75. Film cousin
whose accent
this puzzle
spoofs
76 Justice Kagan
77 Stairway post
79 Short cut
80 Fame
81 Tablet
82 Was supine
85 War stat
86 Setting for "The
Office"


89 Property
recipient, in law
90 They cut wood
with the grain
92 Humane
95 Pipe holder
96 Restaurant lures
.97 Most faithful
98 Actor Keanu
99 City on the Nile
100 Fleet Amtrak
train


101 "Bedroom at
___" (classic
painting)
103 Image on the
back of a $1 bill
105 Feds
107 Other: Sp.
109 Architectural
pier
110 Formerly
111 Soon, poetically
112 Big top, e.g.
114 G.M. debut of
1964


Answers to last Sunday's Crossword.
NAT S I P I A A S I R RT JAP AN
ET'UI SORES RESEW IRABU
L 0 NRGSlHO S RA FR ARE R
SNL CALOR C .ROUNDFLATS
SOCALA WASABI EKES GTE AK GT E
NEWOLDS IFI ISLS GOER

ARS ENSURE ESTES ERI

TBARS NOURI TUT ELULU
ALLI BADFAIRGOODS DIDO


CAN SN AARON AYS
LAST INITIALS TRIAGE
OLLA INRI EGG PROCONS

TAPEDLIVES SIMIANS E RA
T A PENOLA TIvTHE TOPBOTTOMS

R I N K Y E NTER T EA AT
SASES EGADS WES ENO


2 3 .1 7


14 5 7 9


7 8 5


6 4 3


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8 5


269 3


19 6 4 2


9 642


z 7 9 6


9 L


6 9 E



8 9 8
8


Ct? 9


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Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427






LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, MAY 22, 2011


COLLEGE: Families adjust to having kids back home for the summer
Continued From Page 1A


return means piles of dirty
laundry, a perennially lost
TV remote, a disconnected
security alarm to accom-
modate their late nights
out, and jealousy from her
two younger sons as the
big men on campus sud-
denly get all the attention.
"The first time they
come back there's always
an adjustment period," Jez
said. They're used to the
freedom of college life, and
"there are still boundaries
at home."
"I try not to be a nag.
I try to recognize that
they're young adults," she
says of sons Nolan, 20,
and Cory, 22. 'They need
to have their own sense
of responsibility. At the
same time, I find myself
constantly doing remind-
ers. I'll send them texts:
'Picked up eight pairs of


filthy socks in the family
room last night."'
"It's a balancing act" for
everybody, Jez said.
Meryl Pearlstein, a
New York City public rela-
tions executive and writer,
experienced that last sum-
mer when her son, Evan,
returned home after fresh-
man year at the University
of Vermont. Having him
back home was a treat,
and knowing he'd success-
fully navigated that first
year away made Pearlstein
and her husband proud.
But with a younger son
at home, "there are turf
wars for the car, the living
room, the TV and more,"
Pearlstein said.
"I do hate having World
Wrestling Foundation
on TV and finding snack
wrappers in the living
room." And when Evan


would announce that he'd
be home at 3 a.m., "We
said, 'No you won't.' "
"There's a bit of give
and take over the sum-
mer," Pearlstein said.
Times have changed
since Coburn's book, now
in its fifth printing, was first
published, in 1988. Today's
college freshmen weren't
born, and talking with
mom and dad while away at
school often meant waiting
in line for the pay phone in
the dorm hallway.
"The whole concept of
helicopter parents didn't
exist," Coburn said.
Now, with ubiquitous cell
phones, texting, email,
and Skype, families often
communicate daily. That
can create an illusion that
things will be like they
always were. Coburn says
students and parents need


to "do a reality check."
"For many parents,
it's hard to let go of that
parental role, even after
nine months apart,"
Coburn said. "And kids
used to leaving dorms a,
mess, staying up all night,
need to realize that's not


LII


how it works in their par-
ents' house."
Families should discuss
expectations soon after
their students arrive back
home things like cur-
fews, household chores,
family dinners, and spend-
ing money, so everyone


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is one the same page,
Coburn said.
Despite all their new-
found independence, for
college kids, home "is still
their emotional touch-
stone. It's just important
for parents to be sensitive
to that," Coburn said.


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