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UFPKY NEH LSTA



The Lake City reporter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01559
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 5/21/2011
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
System ID: UF00028308:01559
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text




Tigers Cruise
Columbia shuts
out Dunnellon in
000018 120511 ****3-DIGIT 326
LIB OF FLORIDA HISTORY
PO BOX 117007
205 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-1943



ifaie e


Strong Start
Fort White earns
17-14 victory over
Orange Park.
Sports, I B


Match Play Set
Mcllroy, McDowell
to square off in
World Championships,
Sports, I B


ity


Reporter


Saturday, May 21, 201 I www.lakecityreporter.com Vol. 137, No..1 01 U 75 cents


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Alexander explains how upper body strength is used to power his cruiser bike, which is used for long distances.


NO

Local Vietnam
veteran learns to
handle obstacles.

By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
using the
limits of what
he can do is
a source of.
motivation for
Johnnie Alexander of Fort
White, who lost both of his
legs in Vietnam.
"I can do anything a man
with legs can do, and bet-
ter," he said. "I may have
to do it differently, but
there is nothing I can't do."
Alexander hopes to
motivate other wounded
veterans by participating
in Ride 2 Recovery bicycle
challenges. He rode in his
first challenge in Waco,
Texas March 28-April 2.
Alexander comes from a
military family and served
in Vietnam with .the U.S.
Army from 1968-70. He
was a prisoner of war for
163 days in Cambodia,
where he lost his legs.
Prisoners were kept in


BARRIERS


a hole most of the time,
with legs and arms pinned'
up behind their backs
and attached to bamboo,
he said. Anger combined
with the desire to live and
return home kept him
going until his release.
However, his return to
America was not a joyous
occasion, Alexander said.
He was angry at God and
everyone else.
"If I could, I would have
killed myself," he said.
Anger was the outlet to
get him through his feel-
ings, which led to some
' bad decisions, Alexander
said.
"That was not a good
thing," he said. "It's by
the grace of God I am
here. I took a lot of stupid
chances."
Several months ago,
Alexander heard about
Rides 2 Recovery from his
doctor.
Cycling is featured as
the core activity and rides
are held across the nation.
The challenge benefits men-
tal and physical rehabilita-
tion programs for the
BARRIERS continued on 3A


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Fort White resident Johnnie Alexander, 60, served three
tours and was a U.S. Army sergeant. In Vietnam he
was captured and was a prisoner of war for 163 days.
Alexander, who had both his legs amputated from the
knees down while a POW, bike rides competitively and
participates in Ride to Recover races and will also be at
the Tour de France. Alexander advises disabled amputee
veterans to 'stay busy. One of the worst things is when a
veteran goes to get his prosthetics and chair and when he
gets home he puts his legs in the closet and never uses
them. I love life. Life is too good to sit back and vegetate.'


Lake City woman injured in wreck


Vehicle hits tree, hospital
leaves driver in in the w
The w
serious condition. Friday c
one mil
250.
By TONY BRITT Accor
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com Patrol r
ing a 2
A Lake City woman was seri- northbo
ously injured in a single vehicle and due
wreck Friday afternoon when she control
suffered a medical emergency, When
lost control of the vehicle and it the car,
crashed into a tree, officials said. northbo
Brunhilde W. Lamonda, 82, of way and
Lake City, was taken to a Gainesville After the

I ll ||l|| CALL US:
(386) 752-1293 96
SUBSCRIBETO Mostly
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
41 42 64000200 1 Fax: 752-9400 WEATH


with injuries she suffered
reck.
wreck occurred 12:45 p.m.
on County Road 135, about
.e south of County Road
ding to Florida Highway
reports, Lamonda was driv-
2006 Chevrolet four-door
und on County Road 135
to medical issues she lost
of her vehicle.
Lamonda lost control of
the vehicle ran off the
und shoulder of the road-
struck a concrete culvert.
e impact the car continued


Sunny
ER, 2A


to travel on its northbound path off
the roadway and became airborne,
where it then struck a tree with its
front, approximately four feet off
the ground. The car came to final
rest at the base of the tree facing
north.
Columbia County Fire Rescue
Department and EMS personnel
treated Lamonda on scene and she
was then taken by helicopter to
Shands at Gainesville for treatment
of her injuries.
The Florida Highway Patrol is
continuing its investigation into
the wreck, but no charges have
been listed.


LEANNE TYO/Lake City Reporter
Aaron Johns, vice president of International Association of
Fire Fighters Local 3510 Columbia County EMS Association,
addresses the Columbia County Board of County
Commissioners at its regular meeting Thursday. The issue
of privatizing local Emergency Medical Services drew much
attention.



Lifeguard contract

leaves uncertainty

for EMS workers


County to save
$1.2M with new
agreement.
By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com
Local Emergency Medical
Services employees, and
union members are anx-
ious about their jobs since
the county unanimously
approved privatizing EMS,
union officials said Friday.
"We're nervous that we're
not guaranteed jobs," said
Aaron Johns, vice president
of International Association


of Fire
Fighters
Local 3510
Columbia
County EMS
Association.
"That's my
standpoint.
I'm nervous
that I'm not
guaranteed
employment
with this com-
pany."
At its regu-
lar meeting


"I'm nE
that I'r
guarai
employ
with
comp
Aaron
VR Cok
County


Thursday, the Columbia
County Board of County
Commissioners unani-
mously approved entering
into a zero-subsidy, five-year
contract with Lifeguard
Ambulance Service of
Florida to provide local EMS
in lieu of the county, saving,
the county $1.2 million annu-
ally in EMS subsidy costs.
Lifeguard will begin pro-
viding local EMS July 1.
Under the terms of the
agreement with Lifeguard,
the countycanofferLifeguard
two, three-year renewals on
its contract The commission
also unanimously approved
allowing Lifeguard the right


- Opinion ................
Faith ..................
Obituaries .............
Advice & Comics........
Puzzles .................


TODAY IN
FAITH
Pope sculpture
criticized.


to request a renewal at the
end of the company's fourth
operating year.
About 30 local jobs will be
available through Lifeguard,
said Jason Kimbrell,
Lifeguard regional director
of operations, ra; ig from
full-time and part-time para-
medics and emergency med-
ical technicians to adminis-
trative positions and billing
staff.
Currently, Columbia
County EMS has between
30 and 35 employees, includ-
ing fill-in positions and bill-
ing staff.
Kimbrell said he could
not promise
that all of
nervous the county's
EMS work-
m not ers would be
nteed' hired with
,ment Lifeguard,
this but said that
ays. Lifeguard
any. would give
I Johns the county-
umbia employees
V EMS a chance to
be hired.
Existing
county EMS
employees will not be tar-
geted as a group, he said,
but Lifeguard hopes they
will apply.
Columbia County's com-
munity will be the primary
target area for advertising
and hiring to keep jobs local,
Kimbrell said, and Lifeguard
will also conduct its search
in surrounding areas like
Gainesville, Jacksonville and
Tallahassee.
"We felt like it was going
to be in the best interest
of the organization and the
community to just move for-
ward with standard adver-
EMS continued on 3A


COMING
SUNDAY
CRA's plan for
downtown.


Don't i liss The

2011 Graduation

Special Section


(Columbia & Fort Wlire Graduates


Sunday, May 22

Lake City Reporter







LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING SATURDAY, MAY 21, 2011


A$H 3 Friday:
Afternoon: 6-1-3
Evening: 5-4-5


Friday:
Afternoon: 4-8-3-6
Evening: 1-7-4-0


.., Thursday:
2-5-15-19-28


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



Lohan granted restraining order


LOS ANGELES
A judge granted Lindsay
Lohan a restraining
order against a man
who left chocolates at
her house and sent her
bizarre text messages saying they
are engaged, court records show.
David Cocordan, 38, has been con-
tacting Lohan for nearly two years
and sent her more than 100 texts,
Including one that describes having
sex with the actress, the documents
state.
"Given this obsessive and harass-
ing behavior, I am frightened of Mr.
Cocordan and feel that my personal
safety, and the safety of those around
me, is in jeopardy," Lohan said in the
legal filing.
Superior Court Judge David
Cowan granted the temporary order
on Thursday, prohibiting Cocordan
from attempting td meet or contact
the actress.
The judge will.consider whether
to issue a three-year stay away order
on June 8.
Cocordan, who police believe is a
schizophrenic and is not taking med-
ication, has told authorities he does
not intend to contest the restraining
order, according to court filings.
A phone message left at a listing
for Cocordan was not immediately
returned Friday.
Lohan's publicist, Steve Honig,
said he would not comment on
Lohan's security matters.

AIDS gala raises
record 10M dollars
CAP D'ANTIBES, France -
Vertiginous fuchsia heels bedazzled
with 360 carats'-worth of precious
stones, a tennis match with Monaco's
Prince Albert and the rubberized sec-
ond-skin dress right off Gwen Stefani's
back were among the extravagant lots


ASSOCIATED PRESS
On Friday Lindsay Lohan obtained a
restraining order against a 38-year-old
man who she claims is obsessed with
her and has come to her under the
delusional belief they are engaged.

that helped a star-studded charity auc-
tion raise a record-breaking $10 mil-
lion for AIDS research.
A-listers turned up by the herd,
with Sean Penn, Karl Lagerfeld,
Janet Jackson, Freida Pinto and
Patrick Dempsey in attendance
Thursday's amfAR charity dinner-
cum-auction, held at the exclusive
seaside Hotel du Cap. Robert D6
Niro, who heads the jury at the
Cannes Film Festival which runs
through Sunday in the next town
over and jury members Jude Law


and Uma Thurman also attended.
Proceeds from the event go to
the American Foundation for AIDS
Research (amfAR), a nonprofit orga-
nization that supports HIV/AIDS
research.

Beatles concert
photo to be auctioned
NEW YORK It was 1964.
Beatlemania ruled. Two days after
their momentous debut on "The
Ed Sullivan Show," the Fab Four
boarded a train from New York for
Washington, D.C,, for their first U.S.
concert. An enterprising 18-year-old
Mike Mitchell was there, a press ,
pass in hand, shooting photographs
just feet away and even jumping onto
the stage for the group's brief pre-
concert press call.
Forty-seven years later, Mitchell
has made 50 silver gelatin prints
from his negatives of the event
on Feb. 11, 1964 at Washington
Coliseum and of the band's Sept, 13,
1964 performance at the Baltimnore
Civic Center. He's offering them for
sale at Christie's New York auction
house on July 20. The total pre-sale
estimate is $100,000; the images will
be sold individually.
Mitchell laughs when he describes
the scene at the indoor arena that
night not only of screaming fans
but also of his unrestricted access
to the stage. No cordoned-off media
pens, no tight security.
"It was a long time ago. Things
weren't that way then," the 65-year-
old said in a telephone interview
from Washington, where he lives
and works as an art photographer.
"It was as low-tech as the concert
itself. The concert was in a sports
venue and the sound system was the
sound system of a sports venue."

* Associated Press


Celebrity Birthdays


* Rhythm-and-blues singer
Ron Isley (The Isley Broth-
ers) is 70.
* Sen. Al Franken (D-Minn.)
is 60.
* Actor Mr. T is 59.
* Actor Judge Reinhold is
54.


Daily ScriDture


* Actor-director Nick Cas-
savetes is 52.
* Actress Lisa Edelstein is
45.
* Rapper Havoc (Mobb
Deep) is 37.
* Actor Scott Leavenworth
is 21.


"May the God who gives
endurance and encourage-
ment give you the same atti-
tude of mind toward each
other that Christ. Jesus had, so
that with one mind and one
voice you may glorify the God
and Father of our Lord Jesus
.Christ."
Romans 15:5-6


Lake City
HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293
Fax number..............752-9400
Circulation ................755-5445
Online... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake. City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.. _
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson.....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
Assistant Editor CJ Risak..754-0427
After 1:00 p.m.
(crisak@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Ashley Butcher .. .754-0417
(abutcher@lakecityreporter.com)
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440.


Reporter
BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon ....754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7.30
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 10.30 a.m. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home.delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation ..............755-5445
(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks................ $26.32
24 Weeks..................$48.79
52 Weeks..................$83.46
Rates indude 7% sales tax.
Mail rates '
12 Weeks................ $41.40
24 Weeks....................$82.80
52 Weeks... .... .......... $179.40


CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will
run in this space. And thanks for reading.


Disney 'Star Wars'
ride reopens
ORLANDO -- George
Lucas figures he's work-
ing on his third genera-
tion of "Star Wars" fans,
and plenty of them were
standing in line with their
parents Friday to get
first crack at Walt Disney
World's overhauled ride
based on the iconic movie
franchise.
The 67-year-old "Star
Wars" creator carime to
the park to celebrate the
reopening of the vener-
able Star Tours motion
simulator ride. The ride's
'25-year-old story and
visuals have been updat-
ed with a new tale, digital
projection system and 3-D
effects.
The reopening of the
"Star Wars"-themed rides
in both Disney Hollywood
Studios park in Florida and
at Disneyland in California
brings a new wave of
attention to the franchise,
which will get another
boost and likely gain new
fans in 2012 when all six-
original movies are re-
released in theaters as
3-D feature. Lucas said
the movies have now been
around so long that they've
become "part of the social
culture."

Famous wrestler
dies in wreck
Randy "Macho Man"
Savage, the professional
wrestler known for his
raspy voice, the sun-
glasses and bandanas he
wore in the ring and the
young woman named
Miss Elizabeth who often
accompanied him, died
in a car crash Friday in
Florida. He was 58.
A Florida Highway
Patrol crash report said
the former wrestler
- whose legal name was
'Randy Mario Poffo was
driving a Jeep Wrangler


ASSOCIATED PRESS
An actor portraying Darth Vader (center) is seen on stage
with Disney CEO Robert Iger (left) and Star Wars creator
George Lucas (right) during the reopening celebration of the
Star Tours motion simulation ride at the Disney Hollywood
Studios theme park in Lake Buerra Vista Friday.


when he lost control in
Pinellas County around
-9:25 a.m. The Jeep veered
over the raised concrete
median divider, crossed
over the eastbound lanes
and collided head-on with
a tree.
Police said he may have
suffered a "medical event"
before the accident, but
the report did not elabo-
rate, and it said officials
would need to perform an
autopsy to know for sure.
The report said a
woman in the vehicle,
identified as Barbara Poffo,
suffered minor injuries. A
statement from Stamford,
Conn.-based World
Wrestling Entertainment
said the passenger was the
wrestler's wife.
Savage was a char-
ismatic wrestler made
famous for his "Macho
Man" nickname and his
"Oooh Yeah!" catchphrase.
He was a champion in
Vince McMahon's World
Wrestling Federation,
and later Ted Turner's
now-defunct World
Championship Wrestling.


Student accused
of drugging drink
KISSIMMEE- A 13-
year-old central Florida
middle school student has
been charged after alleged-
ly sneaking a sleeping pill
into his teacher's drink.
Osceola County
Sheriff's deputies said the
Discovery Intermediate
School student confessed
to putting Clonidine, a
prescription blood pres-
sure medication, into his
teacher's drink because
she yelled at him in class.
The Associated Press is
not naming the student
because he is a minor.
Authorities said the
teacher told other teach-
ers she felt nauseous,
dizzy and drowsy and went
home sick orn May 16.
The student was
charged with poison of
food with the intent to
injure. He was booked into
Osceola County Juvenile
Detention Center without
bond.


MOSTLY MOSTLY
SUNNY I SUNNY


H HI 1w L0SC HI 96 L0 68
1A-saaRsiw.o- i njmo-s--m


Pensacola
87/71


Tallahas
94/6

84/


95/66
see Lake City
96.65
Gaines
la City 95/f
/68
,


Tan
91/


TEMPERATURES
High Friday
Low Friday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Friday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


93
65
87
63
97 in 1938
48 in 2007

0.00"
2.63"
14.11"
1.70"
15.72"


* Associated Press


SJacksonville
9 LrO


PARTLY
CLOUDY


HI m LO0 .


PARTLY
, CLOUDY


HI 93 LO 69


City Sunday Monday
Cape Canaveral 85.69 pc 38569 'pc


, Daytona Beach
Ft. Lauderdale
ville Daytona Beach Fort Myers
66 88/69 Gainesville
SOca4/67la Jacksonville
,i Orlando Cape Canaveral Key West
92/70 8871 Lake City
9270Miami
ld. \ Naples
73. West Palm Beach Ocala
87/75 Orlando
\ FL Lauderdale Panama City
Ft Myersm, 88/78 .Pensacola
91/71 Naples Tallahassee
92/72 Miami Tampa
Ke t,, 89/77 Valdosta
KeyW/s t W. Palm Beach
7/7 8


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise tom.
Sunset torn.

MOON
Moonrise today
Moonset today
Moonrise tom.
Moonset tom.


6:34 a.m.
8:21 p.m.
. 6:33 a.m.
8:22 p.m.


10:28 a.m.
12:24 a.m.
11:28 a.m.


ci@00--&


10 mnitestoD bIn
Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+.


88' 72. ,
87/ 77/s
92/71/s
96/68/pc
94/70/s
87/78/pc
96/68/pc
88/78/s
92/72/s
94/68/pc
92/71/s
83/70/s
88/73/s
94/66/s
90/73/s
96/64/s
86/77/s


88.,68, pc
84/76/pc
91/71/pc
94/67/pc
92/69/pc
87/78/pc
95/68/pc
87/76/pc
88/71/pc
93/67/pc
91/68/pc
84/70/pc
87/74/s
93/66/pc
89/74/pc
94/67/s
85/74/pc


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.


weather.comJ


une June June J Forecasts, data and
1 8 15 graphics 2011 Weather
ew First Full Central, LP, Madison, WIs.
weather www.weatherpubllsher.com


On lhi.Li date rin
1895, the tern- A
perature plummeted
to 19 degrees in
Norwalk, Ohio. This
set a state record
for the month of
May.

:Ll '''l (M I'l ^ lM ^J N]

t_ .. .. -


AROUND FLORIDA


THE WEATHER


I


I
M=l


Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424


~IEIEG&P


OEM, '- ---L -------=


;'i, u~


f


1 -







LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE SATURDAY, MAY 21, 2011


April unemployment rate drops to 10.8 percent


By BILL KACZOR
Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE For the
first time in more than a year
and a half, fewer than a million
Floridians were unemployed as
the state's jobless rate dropped
for the fourth straight month to
10.8 percent in April, state offi-
cials said Friday.
That's a 0.3 percentage point
decline from March.


The April unemployment rate
is Florida's lowest in 19 months
but still 1.8 percent above the
national rate of 9 percent.
It also means 996,000
Floridians were out of work.
The last time that number was
below a million was October
2009.
Florida's April rate is more
than a full percentage point
below December's 12 percent
figure.


"I remain focused on job cre-
ation, so it is great news that
this trend is continuing in the
right direction," Gov. Rick Scott
said in a statement. "I believe
we are on the path to getting
Florida back to work."
The Republican governor
made "Let's get back to work"
has campaign slogan last year.
He has promised to create
700,000 new jobs in seven years
over and above the million jobs


Florida is expected to add as
its economy recovers over that
span.
Agency for Workforce
Innovation Director Cynthia
Lorenzo said the figures are
"very encouraging for Florida's
employers and job seekers."
Florida added 14,900 jobs in
April, although that represents
only a 0.2 percent increase in
the state's labor force. Over. the
year from April to April the state


added 39,200 jobs, an increase of
just 0.5 percent. April, though,
marked the seventh consecu-
tive month Florida has had an
over-the-year increase in jobs.
Unemployment claims also
have been trending down as
Florida slowly recovers from
a housing bust and the Great
Recession that followed.
Initial claims were 75,648 in
April. That's down 22.3 percent
compared to a year ago.


Roadwork underway in area


Staff reports

The following is a list
of roadwork underway by
the Florida Department of
Transportation that may
impact traffic in Columbia
County:
County Road 245 (Price
Creek Road) The road is
closed at the Olhistee Creek
Bridge about a mile north of
State Road 238 through the
end of June. Northbound
traffic is detoured to State
Road 238 to US 441 to
CR 349 and back to CR
245. Southbound traffic is
detoured to CR 349 to US
441 to SR 238 and back to
CR 245. The road is sched-
uled to reopen by the end
of June.
M Ermine Street -
Possible daytime lane clo-


sures' north of Baya Drive
to allow crews to take road-
way samples in advance of
sidewalk work.
N Interstate 75 -
Nighttime lane closures
beginning at 6 p.m. for
southbound traffic Sunday
through Thursday nights
to mill and repave from
the rest area just south
of the US 41/441 inter-
change (Exit 414) to two
miles south. Also the lanes
leading into and exiting
the rest area will be milled
Sunday and Monday
nights with repaving to
begin Tuesday night.
One lane will be closed
beginning at 6 p.m. and
two lanes will, be closed
between 9 p.m. and 6 a.m.
The speed limit is reduced
to 60 mph during lane clo-


sures and will remain at 60
mph in the two-mile section
that is being resurfaced
because of the milled con-
dition of the roadway. Also,
the emergency lanes south-
bound beginning three
miles north of US 41/441
will be closed while the call
boxes are replaced.
State Road 47 Crews
will be repainting the road-
way lines from the Santa Fe
River to US 41.
US 90 East Daytime
lane closures after 8:30 a.m.
between State Road 100/
County Road 100A and just
east of Florida Gateway
College for paving. Also,
new median crossovers at
Hudson Discount Marine,
Macatees Mobile Home
Park and East Street Auto
Brokers will be paved.


Wildfire 66 percent contained


Staff reports

'Firefighting forestry
crews are continuing to
make progress in their bid
to douse the Honey Prairie
wildfire.
Georgia Forestry
Commission Incident
Management Team
officials Friday morn-
ing reported the Honey
Prairie fire is 66 percent
contained. The fire has
consumed 146,924 acres
since it was first ignited
April 28 by a lightning


strike.
Officials said small-
scale prescribed burns on
the northwest edge of the
fire strengthened control
lines to provide increased
protection to the Stephen
C. Foster State Park in
Georgia, and adjacent
uplands and high value
commercial timberlands.
The current firefight-
ing plan is to have fire-
fighters on the south and
west branches of the fire
continue mopping up hot
spots along the control


lines. Firefighters working
the east branch were slat-
ed to secure lines along
the Swamp Edge Break
and supply irrigation lines
to protect the boardwalk
at the Stephen C. Foster
State Park.
Officials are utiliz-
ing eight helicopters, 30
engines, 40 bulldozers/
plows, four water tenders,
142 fire support staff, one
hand crew, one camp crew
and a total of 332 person-
nel, as total containment
efforts continue.


EMS: Lifeguard to take over July 1

Continued From Page 1A


tising practices," Kimbrell
said, "but we hope that the
existing staff apply. We're
certainly giving them many,
many avenues to make that
opportunity available to
them."
"Its important that the
service that we provide is
community-centered," he
said, "and I'm not by any
way, shape or form saying
their (the county's) staff is
not community-centered,
but that staff is unfamiliar
to us. So we'd like to go
through the standard pro-
cess to make sure we've
got the right people in the
right places to get the right
results."
Johns said he is con-
cerned that Lifeguard may
not accept all of the coun-
ty's EMS employees if they
apply.
"They're going to use
whatever hiring process,"
he said, "which is by all
means their right, but that
doesn't reduce the anxiety
of some of the employees
who won't be offered a job,
including myself. In hard
economic times, that's hard.
to swallow that in a month,
me and some of my cowork-
ers are going to be out of a
job. Not to say they won't
offer me one, but there's no
guarantee that they will."
Interviews for the


Lifeguard positions will
be held Tuesday and
Wednesday, Kimbrell said,
and tentative job offers
could be made.
Johns' concerns with the
EMS privatization doesn't
stop with jobs. He said
he is "somewhat dissatis-
fied" with the commission
approving the privatiza-
tion because while it will
be saving $1.2 million in
annual subsidy, there is
more revenue that could be
generated through raising
Medicare rates to the com-
pliant rates and employing
more efficient electronic
run reporting software the
county already owns and
does not use.
"They (the county) claim
this is about money," Johns
said, "and the union has
done its part to try and
show them not only bet-
ter ways to collect it, but
efficiencies as well, and for
some reason, they're choos-
ing not to go with those
methods and have not gone
with those methods."
Kimbrell said Lifeguard
is "extremely excited"
about the commission
approving its contract for
Columbia County, not only
for the business, but for the
opportunity for economic
development by "growing
jobs exponentially" within


1290 NW Falling Creek Rd. 755-0580


several years.
"We are so excited
because we feel like this is
such a phenomenal fit," he
said. "Ifs such a great fit,
and it wasn't just a profes-
sional move. We knew that
this was a unique and spe-
cial community and now we
have no doubts that it was
the right decision on behalf
of Lifeguard."
'With Lake City being
the 'Gateway to Florida,' we
hope to geographically use
Columbia County to expand
our business model over and
beyond the services to be
provided to citizens through
911 and transports," he said.
'"We hope to bring in new
jobs and new opportunities
to citizens within Columbia
County."


BARRIERS: Veteran inspires others

Continued From Page 1A


country's wounded veter-
ans.
Many of the soldiers
return from Iraq and
Afghanistan "messed up,"
Alexander said. They com-
mit suicide, suffer from
depression or end up
divorced.
"A lot of soldiers come
back like me," he said.
"They're 21, 22 and think
since they lost their legs
and arms that life is over."
He understands the
emotions of soldiers
returning from the current
war.
"It took a long time to
get over my feelings,"
Alexander said. "It's a
long road. It's not an easy
road."
The ride is a way of
helping build up the
self-esteem of wounded
veterans, he said. The VA
hospital in Gainesville
helped him get his bicy-


cle, a Top-End handcrank
track three-wheeler, for
the ride.
Veterans from Vietnam
to Afghanistan participat-
ed in the five-day Texas
event.
"It was outstanding," he
said. "That doesn't even
describe it all."
Alexander received nine
medals from the ride cer-
emoniously awarded by
Medal of Honor winners.
"I'm surprised I did as
well as I did," he said.
He was invited to go to
France for the Tour de
France and to ride a leg on
the shores of Normandy as
a result.
Camaraderie was
formed between Alexander
and the other riders.
"It was'a dream being
with the guys and talking
about their problems," he
said.
Alexander tried to


encourage his fellow riders
who had suffered amputa-
tions. To him life is pre-
cious.
"I let them know even
though you're this way,
there is so much life has to
offer," he said.
Alexander will partici-
pate in several other Ride
2 Recover events before
heading to France, includ-
ing rides in Virginia,
Pennsylvanian and
Michigan. He had never
participated in a bike ride
before the Texas event.
His training includes
riding more than 50 miles
daily to Gainesville.
"It's a lot faster than you
think," he said.
Life is too short for peo-
ple to say they should've
or could've done some-
thing, Alexander said. He
hopes to reach someone
through his riding for a
cause.


POLICE REPORTS


The following information
was provided by local law
enforcement agencies. The
following people have been
arrested but not convicted.
All people are innocent
unless proven guilty.

Friday, May 6
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office
Travis Joe Lockwood
III, 21889 47th Drive, war-
rant Violation of probation
on original charge of child
abuse.

Saturday, May 7
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office
Adam Norman
Cashman, 30, 7160 SE 77th
Lane, Trenton, warrant
Violation of probation on
original charge of burglary
of a conveyance.
Jennifer Duniven
Davis, 36, 265 SW Lucky
Drive, possession of a con-
trolled substance, posses-
sion of methamphetamine
with intent to sell/manu-
facture/deliver, possession
of less than 20 grams of
marijuana and possession
of drug equipment (two
counts).

Sunday, May 8
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office
Timothy John Lawton,
28, 650 NW Turner Ave.,


criminal mischief.
John Henry
Gissendanner, 51, 640
SE Brown St., driving
while license suspended/
revoked.

Monday, May 9
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office
Terry Hall, 50, 1553 NE
Bascom Norris Road, deal-
ing in stolen property.
Wayne Anthony
Turner, 42, 468 SE First
St., Melrose, larceny (two
counts).

Tuesday, May 10
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office
Sean Lloyd Lewis, 19,
3678 SW Ichetucknee Ave.,
warrant Violation of proba-
tion on original charges of
possession of a controlled
substance.

Wednesday, May 11
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office
Madison John Race,
23, 1457 NW Wayne Place,
warrant Violation of proba-
tion on original charges of


criminal mischief.

Friday, May 13
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office
Heather Rachelle
Byrnes, 20, 14619 Avenida
De Palma, Winter Garden,
dealing in stolen property
(10 counts).
Selina Marie Green,
41, 6070 Raymar Lane,
Marianna, warrant:
Violation of probation
.on original charges of
obstructing a criminal
investigation.
Shelby David Koon, 19,
305 SW Randall Terrace,
dealing in stolen property
(eight counts).
Kobi Edward Koon, 21,
305 SW Randall Terrace,
dealing in stolen property
(eight counts).
Jack Carron Way, 57,
2685 N. U.S. Highway 441,
possession of a controlled
substance and possession of
drug paraphernalia.
Emmery Ryan
Williams, 20, 1557 SE
Alfred Markham St., deal-
ing in stolen property (traf-
ficking).


Well, we thought you'd like something productive on
your pad to prove to your spouse that it's really a useful
tool for financial management. Well worth the invest-
ment you made to buy it. And so much more than just
a toy for playing Angry Birds.
See, you actually can do something useful with this new
technology. You can see if you've got paid yet, balance
your checkbook, pay a few bills, make a loan payment,
transfer funds to your kids away at college, and more!
Or you can just act like you're taking notes at that meet-
ing instead of updating your facebook page.
We also have old-fashioned internet banking for those
who've not yet convinced their spouse that they really
need the newest pad devices or cell phones.
... But keep in mind, if you want
~~ to get the red tootsie pops,
you're going to have to come
S' visit us to get one. Peoples
.,, State Bank. Now that's Bank-
I I ing!


18 3ilh AINuAI WEllbORN

Blueberry Festival
JUNE 3 & 4, 2010
FRidAy, 9AM-9pM SATURdAy, 7AM-5pM






For directions, information or schedule,
www.wellborncommunityassociation.com
call 386-963-1157


Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424


i











OPINION


Saturday, May 21, 201 I


AN _


A N
OPINION


Birth issue

helping

Obama


candidacy, President
Barack Obama has
been dogged by
charges that he was
not born in the United States
and thus was ineligible to be
president.
These charges were amplified
by right-wing radio and cable TV
and taken up by a noisy crowd of
believers.
Nothing could dissuade them -
not the certificate of live birth,
a legal document, not contempo-
raneous birth announcements
in the Honolulu newspapers
and not the word of the cur-
rent governor of Hawaii, Neil
Abercrombie.
And it wasn't just the fringe
elements of the Republican
Party. Mike Huckabee insisted
Obama had been born in
Kenya. He later amended that to
Indonesia.
Rather than fizzling out like
other debunked conspiracy
theories, the birther movement
picked up fresh impetus when it
was taken up by Donald Trump.
Then Obama persuaded
Hawaii to let the White House
release his long-form birth cer-
tificate. "We do not have time for
this kind of silliness," the presi-
dent said. "We have better things
to do." The death of Osama bin
Laden proved that
Suddenly the birth issue
turned in Obama's favor. At the
White House correspondents'
dinner, he derided Trump.
As one observer said, what
had been a Republican issue was
now a Democratic issue.
S Now Republican conserva-
tives believe, in the face of
overwhelming evidence to the
contrary, that the whole birther
thing was concocted by the
Democrats, in the words of
one conservative commentator,
because "it makes Republicans
look like rubes."
The story had a sad denoue-
ment this week when Army
Lt Col. Terrence Lakin was
released from jail. He flushed a
promising career, was thrown
out of the military, forfeited
his retirement and served five
months in jail for refusing to
deploy to Afghanistan on the
grounds that Obama was not a
legitimate commander in chief.

Scripps Howard News Service


Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Sue Brannon, controllers
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman


LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to'the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.


BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


www.lakecityreporter.com


Ryan's budget plan can do


what Newt did to welfare


The most sweep-
ing reform signed
into law during
the Newt Gingrich
era as House
Speaker was the 1996 Personal
Responsibility and Work
Opportunity Reconciliation Act
popularly known as welfare
reform.
The landmark bill trans-
formed welfare from entitlement
to temporary safety net Instead
of welfare being available for-
ever to any individual who met
qualifying criteria, it was trans-
formed to a time limited assis-
tance program in which indi-
viduals had to also demonstrate
their efforts to get to work.
Democrats insisted during
debate on the issue that the
-reform would push millions
into poverty and then-Senate
DIemocratic Minority leader
Tom Daschle called the work
requirements "extremist"
Welfare reform was a
resounding success. Welfare
rolls plummeted by half and
record numbers of young for-
mer welfare mothers found their
way into the work force.
Now that other major entitle-
ment programs, Medicare and
Medicaid, are up for scrutiny,
the left wing is reacting as they
did in welfare reform. Predicting
nothing but gloom.
A new ad produced by a left
wing organization called the "
Agenda Project shows an elderly
woman in a wheel chair being
pushed over a cliff. The mes-
sage: this is what Republican
Medicare reform proposals will
do to the nation's elderly.
This is the sort of thing we
expect from the left.
But what about Newt?
As House Speaker, Newt
helped lead welfare reform in
1996. He dubbed the then new


Star Parker
parker@urbancure.org

Republican majority in congress
the "Republican Revolution" and
Newt then sounded like a genu-
ine warrior for change.
But what has happed to that
change warrior of the nineties?
Republican Newt Gingrich of
2011 sounds like Democrat Tom
Daschle of 1996 as he calls the
reforms of Medicare proposed
by Rep. Paul Ryan, R-Wisc.,
"radical" and "right wing social
engineering."
Is Gingrich a different man
today than he was in 1996?
Although Medicare is a con-
siderably larger program than
welfare, the scope of reforms of
Medicare that Ryan is proposing
is no more revolutionary than
the reforms of welfare that Newt
enthusiastically embraced in
1996.
Even more, the principles
by which Ryan has proposed
to reform Medicare are the
same principles by which we
reformed welfare.
That is, bureaucratic social
engineering is replaced by per-
sonal-responsibility and market
based incentives.
I would argue that Newt 2011
is the same man as Newt 1996
and understanding why helps us
understand why we need a new,
different kind of political leader-
ship today.
The huge fiscal problems with
Medicare, Medicaid, and Social
Security are not new. They were
well known in 1996.


The archives on websites
of think tanks like Heritage
Foundation and Cato Institute
can provide to any interested
party reams of research papers
going back 20 years explaining
the crisis in these various entitle-
ments programs.
Yet they were ignored by
both parties. News "Republican
Revolution" was not revolution-
ary enough to work on reforms
of entitlements programs. The
inaction, I'm sorry to say, was
more an absence of courage
than an absence of information.
And it's why the Republican
Party steadily went down hill.
Why were Newt and congres-
sional Republicans so bold with
.'reforming welfare but nothing
else?
It was relatively easy. It's
much easier to reform a pro-
gram where the prime benefi-
ciaries are poor black women
than a program where the
beneficiaries are every working
American adult
Polls showed high support
for reforming welfare. But
polling shows far less public
enthusiasm for Ryan's Medicare
reform.
But public skepticism comes
from lack of knowledge. Its why
Ryan is the kind of leader we
need today. Someone who is in
politics to do something rather
than to be somebody. Someone
with courage to see the truth,
tell it, and help fellow Americans
understand it.
The Ryan plan restores free-
dom, ownership, and personal
responsibility to center stage
of entitlement reform. Exactly
what we need.
* Star Parker is president of
CURE,'Coalition
on Urban Renewal and Education
(www.urbancure.org) and author of
three books.


ANOTHER OPINION


In the 2012 campaign,

environmentalists don't matter


Shortly after his par-
ty's "shellacking" in
the midterm election,
President Obama
ordered government
agencies to ensure that new
regulations took economic
growth into consideration
and that old ones be revoked
if they "stifle job creation or
make our economy less com-
petitive." Five months later, it's
becoming pretty clear what he
meant: The environment and
public health will be thrown
under a bus for the sake of his
reelection in 2012.
The latest victim of the admin-
istration's new political direction
is a proposed Environmental
Protection Agency rule to limit
emissions from industrial boil-
ers, which power oil refiner-
ies, chemical plants and other
factories. The EPA indefinitely
rescinded the proposal this
week, citing Obama's January
executive order on regulations
and claiming that the agency


hadn't had time to properly
address industry concerns
about the rule since a draft was
released in September. The EPA
first proposed a version of the
boiler rules in 2004, and it has
had ample time and input to get
it right by now.
Also put on a slow track by
the administration are new
rules on storing toxic coal ash,
an issue EPA Administrator
Lisa Jackson said she'd address
in the wake of a disastrous
Tennessee spill in 2008; earlier
this month, EPA officials said
they wouldn't get around to .
finishing the rules, which were
expected by the end of last year,
until at least 2012. The powerful
coal industry scored another
victory when the administration
delayed an EPA guideline on
mountaintop-removal mining last
month.
In the calculus of presiden-
tial politics, environmentalists
don't much matter in 2012. The
economy is the top subject on


Americans' minds, and Obama
no doubt figures he can blunt
criticism of his regulatory
record and maybe corral some
independent voters by cutting
smokestack industries a little
slack. Never mind that the eco-
nomic calculus doesn't pencil
out; according to EPA estimates,
the rule on industrial boilers
would cost polluters $1.4 billion
a year, but the value of its health
benefits would range from $22
billion to $54 billion. And never
mind that the rule would prevent
up to 6,500 premature deaths
each year.
But those are moral and
financial reasons to regulate, not
political ones. Here's an argu-
ment Obama and his political
advisors might grasp: It's pos-
sible for a president to so alien-
ate his base that it fails to show
up on election day. Something to
keep in mind before November
2012 rolls around.
* Los Angeles Times


4A


Betsy Hart
betsysblog.com


No Internet

causes big

problems.

waited, fearful and trem-
bling, for my children to
get home from school so I
could tell them.
Yep, it was that bad: Our
Internet was out of commission,
and likely would be for some 40
hours until the cable company
could get here to fix it
Knowing I would have to face
the kids with that news as they
walked in was right up there
with sharing news of a beloved
pefs death. Of course, I begged
and pleaded with the fellow from
Comcast to somehow get me ser-
vice sooner. He apparently sensed
my panic:
"Forty hours?? I've got four kids,
pal. I'm a single mom to those
four kids. Do you really want to be
responsible for what could happen
here without an Internet connec-
tion tq keep them occupied over
that span of time?"
He promised to include, as he
put it, a "begging for service" note
on my ticket Seriously. He got it.
After hanging up, I did what any
mom would do. I walked all over
the house with my laptop trying
to find a hot spot that-would pick
up a neighbor's Wi-Fi signal. What
is it with people so uptight about
"locking up" their wireless Internet
connections, anyway? Sheesh.
I braced myself for the
onslaught.
When it came, it washed over
me like waves. The first, daugh-
ter Tori, 14, had her mouth drop
to the floor. Her exact words: "I
won't know about my life until
Wednesday?" Her life apparently
being Facebook and email.
Daughter Madi, 12, had brought
a friend home and felt the need
to put her game face on as she
received the news. Two down. Son
Peter, the oldest at 17, refused to
believe it Now that's devotion.
The last, daughter Livey, 9, sim-
ply asked, "Did Madi use it too
much?"
But it was Livey who came
around the most quickly. "Well,
Mom," she said, "this is how old
people used to live in olden days. I
guess we can just play around like
they did for a while."
Back to figuring things out
I really don't like to come up
against a brick wall. I'm always
determined to find the back
door. My oven went on the blink
recently, constantly beeping
when, not actually on. I discov-
ered it had to do with a computer
chip that there was no way to
fix. Replacement? We're talking
$660. Morally outraged at the
idea of such a thing, I got back at
the fancy-pants-Thermador-oven
people by getting an inexpensive
toaster oven for the little things.
For the big ones, the kids are
now used to me calling down to
the basement, "Honey, can you
go to the fuse box and turn the
oven on?"
So, I decided to try wrestling
with the Internet connection
again myself, thinking failure just
couldn't be an option.
I pushed and I prodded the vari-
ous wires, and reset everything for
the 10th time. Finally, somehow,
there was a flicker of Internet a
teaser, really, before it went out
again. I just became more deter-
mined. Then, amazingly, it came
back on and has now been on for
several hours. Problem solved?
We'll see.
I know, I know I have a
lot to learn from all this about
depending way too much on
high-tech. Later. Right now, I'm
just trying to figure out how to
work into the monthly budget the
cost of putting a Comcast repair
guy on retainer.

* Betsy Hart hosts the "It Takes a
Parent" radio show on WYLL-AM
1160 in Chicago.


gFOOD 4ART









Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SATURDAY, MAY 21, 2011


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


* To submit your Community
Calendar item, contact Antonia
Robinson at 754-0425 or by
e-mail at arobinson @
lakecityreporter.com.


Today
Color Guard car wash
The Columbia High
School Band Color Guard
is having a car wash 9:30
a.m.-1 p.m. today at Lewis
Insurance, across from
the Highway Patrol Office
1313 Hwy. 90. All dona-
tions will help send the
members to the University
of Florida Auxiliary Camp
this July.

Extra bonus walk
Four Rivers Audubon
is hosting an extra bonus
walk 8 a.m. today in the
Osceola National Forest,
the trail off 90 across
from the prison where
there is a kiosk. RSVP to
Valerie Thomas at 239-
980-0311. This will be
the last formal birdwalk
until the fall. Loaner bin-
oculars will be available.
Wear good walking shoes
and bring hats, bug spray,
sunscreen and something
to drink.

Habitat lot clearing
The North Florida Gator
Club is partnering with
Habitat for Humanity of
Lake City for a workday
to clear four lots for future
partner families starting 8
a.m. today at 383 Lomond
Ave. SE, Lake City. Bring
your gloves, rakes, buck-
ets and shovels.

STARZ of Tomorrow
The Students of Fancy
Dancer will present
the 23rd annual recital
"STARZ of Tomorrow"
3 p.m. today at the
Alfonso Levy Performing
Arts Center at Florida
Gateway College. Tickets
will be on sale at the door
for $6. Call Elaine Owens


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Re

Excellence in tourism recognized
James Cornett, president/CEO of the Spirit of the Suwannee Music Park, accepts a certific
for the 2010 Director's Award for Excellence in Tourism on behalf of Teena Peavey, who is
park's marketing director.


at 386-965-2787.

Girl Scout ceremony
Girl Scout Cadette
Troop 525 is hosting a
ceremony 9:30 a.m. today
at Haven Hospice com-
munity room in honor of
armed forces. The troop
is also planting a tree at
Haven Hospice as a living
legacy to honor the Armed
Forces.

RHS roundup
The deadline to sign-
up for the Richardson
High School Roundup is
May 31. The event is July
29-31 at the Richardson
Community Center.
People who attended


OBITUARIES


the school are invited
to the event. The cost is
$50 per person. Call Ann
Anderson at 386-752-7812
or Ervin Fleming at 386-
752-8800.

Farmers Market
The Lake DeSoto
Farmers Market is 8
a.m.-noon today at
Wilson Park, 778 NE
Lake DeSoto Circle. The
Lake City Parks and
Recreation Department
is bringing its summer
program to the market
with dancing, arts and
crafts and more. Vendor
applications and more
information is available
at 386-719-5766 or e-mail
kitej@lcfla.com.


The "Backyard
Composting Rot to
Richness" UF Master
Gardener presentation is 2
p.m. today at the Columbia
County Public Library
main branch. Learn how
to turn your lawn waste,
into rich organic compost
for use in gardening. The
workshop is free.

Bid Whist Tournament
Gold Standard Chapter
#48 is hosting a Bid
Whist Tournament and
Fish Fry 11:30 a.m.-4
p.m. today at B&S Elks
Lodge #1599, 2510 E
Washington St. The
tournament is $20 per


Calling all middle and
high school boys for
Building Strong Bonds
mentoring program
5-8 p.m. Monday at 532
Marion Street Contact
Al Nelson at 386-1867-
1601. Dinner included.
Transportation can be
provided if contacted one
week in advance.

Tuesday
Band opportunity for
home-schooled children
Home-schooled children
and parents interested
in participating in the
Columbia High School


team and fish fry is $5
per plate. For tourna-
ment information contact
Marva Udell, 386-234-
1615 or Carlos Brown at
386-288-6235 and Eddie
McKenzie for Fish Fry at
386-623-1714.

Sunday
Class reunion
The Class of 1973 is
meeting 5 p.m. Sunday at
Richardson Community
Center. All class members
are invited to attend.

Monday
CRA workshop
The next Public
Workshop for the CRA
Plan Update is 5:30-
7:30 p.m. Monday at
Richardson Community
porter Center. The center is
located at 255 NE Coach
Anders Lane. Snacks
cate and refreshments will be
te served. Call Jackie Kite
at 386-719-5766 or e-mail
kitej@lcfla.com.


Roland "Ronnie" H. Ames
Mr. Roland "Ronnie" H. Ames,
78, of Lake City passed away
Thursday, May
19, 2011 fol-
lowing an ex- .
tended illness.
Mr. Ames was a
native of Bruns-
wick, Georgia, but had lived in
the Lake City area since 2002
after moving here from Murphy,
North Carolina. Mr. Ames was a
veteran of the United States Air
Force, who served in the Korean
Conflict. Mr. Ames retired from
CSX railways after working for
36 years as a conductor. In his
spare time, Mr. Ames loved to
play golf. Mr. Ames was a mem-
ber Free & Accepted Masons of
Florida in Jacksonville; he was
also a Senior Deacon at Lan-
tern Park Baptist Church here in
Lake City. Mr. Ames was pre-
ceded in death by a grandchild
Ricky Smith, mother Elizabeth
Ames, and father Roland Ames.
Mr. Ames is survived by his
wife of 56 years Vivian Ames, a
son Roland H. Ames, III (Bon-
nie) of Kings Mountain, North
Carolina, two daughters Teresa
Morgan (Dan) of Middleburg,
Elizabeth Ames (Mike West)
of Jacksonville, and a sister
Dorothy Tyson of Jackson-
ville. Four grandchildren, eight
great-grandchildren, and other
family members also survive.
A memorial service will be held
for Mr. Ames at the Lantern Park
Baptist Church 11:00 AM Mon-
day, May 23, 2011 with Pastor
Neal Howard officiating. In lieu
of flowers the family requests
memorial donations be made to
Haven Hospice of the Suwannee
Valley 6037 US Hwy 90 West,
Lake City, FL 32055. Arrange-
ments are under the direction
of the DEES-PARRISH FAM-
ILY FUNERAL HOME, 458
S. Marion Ave., Lake City, FL
32025 (386)752-1234 please sign
our on-line family guestbook at
parrishfamilyfuneralhome. corn

Robert Randolph Carter
Robert Randolph Carter, 72 of
Lake City Florida passed away
May 13 2011 at Suwannee
Health Care Center following a
lengthy illness. He was born and
raised in Bluefield, WV. Moved
to Johnson City, TN and then to
Padre Island TX. He served in
the U.S. Army Reserves as a mil-
itary police sergeant. He was a
member of the Wellborn United
Methodist Church. Robert was a
small business owner for most of
his life until he retired to Florida.
He was preceded in death by his


father Alfred S. Carter Sr., Moth-
*er Elsa G. Carter, Sisters Phyllis,
Elsa, Betty, and Brother Alfred Jr.
He is survived by his wife Shir-
ley Billings Carter, daughter
Catherine Carter Lady, son Rob-
ert D. Carter, Brothers Low-
ell, Alvin, and sister Dorris.
As per Roberts wishes he will
be cremated and a memorial ser-
vice will be held at a later date.
In lieu of flowers or cards the
family requests a donation be
made to Haven Hospice, 6037
W US Hwy 90, Lake City, FL
32055. Cremation arrangements
are under the direction of the
DEES-PARRISH FAMILY
FUNERAL HOME, 458 S.
Marion Ave., Lake City, FL
32025 (386)752-1234 please sign
our on-line family guestbook at
parrishfamilyfuneralhome. corn

James Langley Niblack, Jr.
Mr. James Langley Niblack, Jr.,
73 a resident of Chambrell in
Ocala, Florida passed away on
Wednesday, May 18, 2011 at
the Munroe Regional Medical
Center in Ocala. He was born
in Jacksonville, Florida to the
late James Langley and Clarissa
Godfrey Niblack. Mr. Niblack
was a graduate of Columbia
High School in Lake City, he at-
tended the University of Florida
in Gainesville, was a member of
the Florida National Guard and
had previously worked with the
First National Bank of Lake City.
He was of the Methodist faith
and member of the First United
Methodist Church in Ocala.
Mr. Niblack is survived by seven
cousins, Judith Hamre, Colum-
bia, SC, Tommy Nelson, Rob-
ert Nelson and George Nelson
all of Savannah, GA, Ann Bar-
ton and William Whitted both
of Fountain Inn, SC and Wil-
liam Peeples, Louisville, KY.
Graveside funeral services for
Mr. Niblack will be conducted
at 11:00 AM on Monday, May
23, 2011 at Oaklawn Cemetery
in Lake City with Pastor Louie
Mabrey of Wesley United Meth-
odist Church officiating. Inter-
ment will follow. Visitation with
the family will be from 9:30 AM
to 10:30 AM Monday morning
at the funeral home. Arrange-
ments are under the direction of
GUERRY FUNERAL HOME,
2659 SW Main Blvd, Lake City.
Please sign the guestbook at
www.guerryfuneralhome. net

Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


Graduation 2011


Graduate's full name:
L Columbia High L Fort White High'
Your special message:


PROUD PARENT


Call 755-5440


Tell everyone how proud you are
with this special graduation notice.


2 Ad Sizes Available

1 x4*.....45-00
$ oo*


Make sure you give the student's
complete name and school when using
their photo in your message.

Lake City Reporter


Gardener presentation Mentoring program


YOUR AD PRINTS ON GRADUATION DAY


* 2x4.....s80oo

We have
all graduate photos.


CITY OF LAKE CITY


NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City of Lake City has entered into
a contract with IBI Group, Inc. as the consultant relating to the preparation
of a new Community Redevelopment Agency Redevelopment Plan.
A Public Workshop will be held on Monday, May 23, 2011, from 5:30 PM
to 7:30 PM at the Richardson Community Center located at 255 Northeast
Coach Anders Lane, Lake City Florida.


The purpose of this Workshop is to educate the citizens on the anticipated
planning process, share preliminary findings related to the study area and to
brainstorm ideas and solutions for attracting future development within the
redevelopment area boundaries.


All interested persons are invited to attend.


SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS: If you require special aid or services as
addressed in the American Disabilities Act, please contact the Community
Redevelopment Administrator, Jackie Kite at (386) 719-5766.


AUDREY E SIKES
City Clerk


band can contact Ryan
Schultz at 755-8000, dur-
ing the school day, for
more information.

Family Literacy Night
Family Literacy Night
is 5:30 p.m. Tuesday at
the Columbia County
Public Library. The
worm-themed program
will feature worm stories,
crafts, games and.food.
There will be fun for the
whole family. The event -
is free. Call the Library at
386-758-2101.

Wednesday
Lady of the Lake
Quilting meeting
The Lady of the Lake
Quilting Guild is meet-
ing 9:30 a.m. Wednesday
at Teen Town, 533 NW
Desoto St., Lake City,
Florida. The program will
feature a Quilters Yard
Sale. This is the time to
come and buy quilting
supplies at bargain prices.
Contact President Loretta
Kissner, 386-754-9330
or vice-president Sunny
Nadort, 386-658-1555.

Health & Fitness Fair
The L4ke City Medical
Center Health & Fitness
Fair is 8:30 a.m.-1
p.m. Wednesday at the
Columbia County Fair
Grounds Banquet Hall.
More than 30 area ven-
dors participate in the
fair being held in recogni-
tion of Senior Health and
Fitness Day. Vendors are
from medical practices
and clinics, health and
fitness centers, pharma-
cies, state organizations
and many more. There
will also be free blood
pressure, BMI, and cho-
lesterol screenings. Call
386-719-9040 for more
information.


CHS, May, 27th Fort White, June 3rd


LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SATURDAY, MAY 21, 2011


Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424


of
1 M












FAITH


Saturday, May 21, 201 I


&


VALUES


Nww.lakecityreporter.com


BIBLICAL MEDITATION








Carlton McPeak
carlton mc@msn.com

Preparing

for the

end of

the world

For centuries
mankind has
wanted to know
when the world
would come to
an end. It probably is a
matter of curiosity. The
apostles of Jesus even
wanted to know when the
end would come (Matthew
24:3).
In response to their
question Jesus told them
about several things which
must take place before the
end of the world comes,
such as wars, earthquakes,
famines, false prophets, an
increase in lawlessness and
even the love which most
people have growing cold
(Matthew 24:6-12). The end
of the world will be simul-
taneous with the return of
the Lord and Jesus said,
"You do not know which
day your Lord is coming"
(Matthew 24:42). Jesus
then says that the coming
of the Lord will be like a
thief in the night and we
need to be prepared for the
"thief."
The encouraging words
that Jesus gives to his
readers is "the one who
endures to the end will
be saved (Matthew 24:13;
Mark 13:13). It seems very
strange that Jesus said "of
that day and hour no one
knows, not even the angels
of heaven, nor the Son, but
the Father only" (Matthew
24:36; Mark 13:32). Jesus
tells several parables
encouraging people to be
prepared for the end.
For us to try and figure
out when the end will be
is a waste of time. Our -
time would be spent far
more wisely if we will be
preparing our lives for the
return of the Lord or our
dwn death. Whichever of
these two events takes
place first, the next event
for us will be the judgment
(1 Thessalonians 4:13-5:11;
Hebrews 9:27).
What kind of prepara-
tions do we need to make
for the end of the world?
We need to restore our
relationship with God
after we have violated His
commands. We need to
"die" to sin so that we can
be "raised" in a new life
(Romans 6:1-11). Our living
should be "in holy conduct
and godliness" (2 Peter
3:11) and preparing our-
selves so that when Jesus
comes we will "be found by
Him in peace, spotless and
blameless" (2 Peter 3:14).
The words of the apostle
Peter may be the most rel-
evant to our subject: "You
therefore, beloved, know-
ing this beforehand, be on
your guard lest, being car-
ried away by the error of
unprincipled men, you fall
from your own steadfast-
ness, but grow in the grace
and knowledge of our Lord
and Savior Jesus Christ" (2
Peter 3:17, 18).
The "when" is not impor-
tant! Preparing IS.

Carlton G. McPeak is an


evangelist working with the
Lakeview Church of Christ in
Lake City. All Scriptural
quotations are from the New
American Standard Bible,
Holman Bible Publishers,
unless otherwise stated.


Pope's sculpture decried as'ugly'


By ALBA TOBELLA and
FRANCES D'EMILIO
Associated Press
ROME
Anew, modernist sculp-
ture of Pope John Paul
II is turning into a
monumental bust.
The Vatican on
Friday slammed the giant art-
work outside Rome's Termini
Train Station, saying it doesn't
even resemble the late pontiff.
Some Romans and tourists say
the bronze statue looks more like
Italy's wartime dictator Benito
Mussolini than the widely beloved
pope.
"How could they have given
such a kind pope the head of a
Fascist?" said 71-year-old Antonio
Lamonica.
As he pondered the statue in the
bustling square, his wife muttered:
"It's ugly. Really ugly. Very ugly."
The artist, Oliviero Rainaldi,
depicted the pontiff as if he is
opening his cloak to embrace the
faithful. But the Vatican newspa-
per. L'Osservatore Romano said
the effect of the nearly 5-meter
(16-foot) statue bears "only a dis-
tant resemblance to the pope."
Artistic intent aside, "we find
ourselves in the piazza before a
violent gash, like a bomb, that
ends up assimilating a cloak
that almost looks like a sentry
box, topped by a head of a pope
which comes off too roundish,"
critic Sandro Barbagallo wrote in
Friday's L'Osservatore.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
A giant bronze sculpture portraying Pope John Paul II is displayed outside
Rome's Termini train Station Friday. The Vatican is dismayed by a giant new
sculpture portraying Pope John Paul II, saying the towering bronze work
outside Rome's main train station doesn't even look like the late pontiff.


"Altogether, the result doesn't
seem to reach the intent," the
newspaper said, noting that it
wasn't alone in its criticism.
Rome Mayor Gianni Alemanno,
asked by APTN in an exclusive
interview if the city might take
down the statue, said public opin-
ion would be considered.
"There's an ancient saying:
'Vox populi, vox dei,'" Alemanno
said, using the Latin for "Voice of
the people, voice of God."
"And from this point of view we


cannot help but take into consid-
eration the opinion of the public,"
he added. "If public opinion con-
solidates around a negative opin-
ion, we'll have to take that into
consideration."
L'Osservatore Romano
acknowledged that the statue is a
modern work and called the city's
initiative to erect it "praisewor-
thy," but added that "the statue's
sin" is that'it is "hardly able to be
recognized."
Rainaldi, in comments reported


by the newspaper La Repubblica,
said he was sorry his work had
been misunderstood.
"I wasn't thinking about resem-
blance, but rather a work that was
able to synthesize, in the posture of
the head and body and in the drap-
ing of the cloak, the way the pope
went out into the world," Rainaldi
was quoted as saying.
The statue, paid for by a founda-
tion at no cost to the city of Rome,
was erected a few days ago to mark
what would have been John Paul's
91st birthday on May 18.
Pope Benedict XVI beatified
John Paul, the last formal step
before sainthood, on May 1 at
a ceremony that drew about 1.5
million admirers to Rome.
The website of the Silvana
Paolini Angelucci Foundation,
which is dedicated to humanitar-
ian efforts and which donated the
statue, makes no mention of the
controversy. Calls to the founda-
tion weren't returned Friday.
The city noted that Vatican cul-'
ture officials had seen a sketch of
the work and approved it.
The Rev. Federico Lombardi,
the Vatican's spokesman, con-
firmed that the sketch "received
a positive opinion by the culture
commission" of the Holy See.
He couldn't say what happened
between the sketch stage and the
final result.
Umberto Broccoli, Rome's
superintendent of cultural
heritage, agreed that a panel of
experts from the city and Holy
See had signed off on the work.


CHURCH NOTES


Today
Gospel sing
A gospel sing is 6 p.m.
today at Ramona Park
Church. The featured
singers are the Ramona
Park Choir. Refreshments
will be served a nursery
will be provided. The
church is located at US
41 South, 1 mile north of
Watermelon Park. Call
752-8870 for more infor-
mation.

Believe in God Concert
Judah III Believe in God
Conference and Concert
is 6 p.m. today at Miracle
Tabernacle Church. Guest
speakers are Prophet
Gregory Hawthorne Sr. of
Lake Wales and Dr. Eric
Mason of Savannah, Ga.
The church is located at
1190 SW Sister's Welcome
Road.

Revival
An Old Time Revival
service is 7:30 p.m.
today at The Church of
Faith and Deliverance
Through Christ Inc.
Prophetess Jennifer Long
of Conquering Gospel
Ministries in Jacksonville


is the speaker. The church
is located at 379 NW Long
St. Contact Pastor Minnie
Williams Gomes at 386-
466-1070 or 386-758-1886.

Sunday
Songs of Zion
Scripture songs that
build up faith, hope and
love will be presented 4:30
p.m. Sunday at Victory
Christian Teaching
Ministries. Featured sing-
ers are Souls' Harbor
Church of God in Christ,
Trinity Men Chorus and
New Spirit. The church
is located across from
Winn-Dixie and behind
McDonald's.

Visitor Sunday
Visitor Sunday is
9:30 a.m. Sunday at Our
Redeemer Lutheran
Church. A barbecue lunch
follows the service for
those in attendance. The
church is located on State
Road 47 1 mile past the
dollar store, on the right.

Anniversary celebration
The First Anniversary
Celebration in a new cen-


tury is Sunday at Wellborn
Baptist Church. Dinner
on the grounds, there will
be special programs and
a concert by Eva Kroon
Pike at 2 p.m. The church
is located on Highway
90 West between Live
Oak and Lake City at the
intersection with Lowe
Lake Road in Wellborn.
A love offering for will be
received. Visit www. well-
bornbaptist.com or call 386-
963-2231 for more details.

Usher Anniversary
An Usher Anniversary
celebration is 5 p.m.
Sunday at Shiloh
Missionary Baptist
Church. The church is
located at 948 Aberdeen
Ave.

Monday
Police chief speaks
Argatha Gilmore, Lake
City's Chief of Police, is
the keynote speaker at the
AGLOW meeting 7 p.m.
Monday at the Miracle
Tabernacle on Sister's.
Welcome Road. Call 935
4018, 752-1971 or 249-
4380.


Tuesday
Support group
Greater Visions Support
Group hosts a faith-based
addictions support group
at 7 p.m. every Tuesday
at Christ Central Church
on Sister's Welcome
Road and 9:30 a.m. every
Thursday at the Suwannee
Coalition office on North
Ohio Avenue in Live Oak.
The group provides spiri-
tual and emotional support
in a non-judgmental set-
ting. Call 208-1345.

Faithful and True
Faithful and True meet-
ings are 7 p.m. every
Tuesday at Christ Central
Church in Lake City. The
perils of pornography and
other addictive sexual
behaviors are discussed.
Men are taught how to
live in freedom consistent-
ly everyday. The group is
strictly anonymous. Call
Tom at 386-965-6377.

Thursday
Bible Study
The community is
invited to a weekly. Bible
study 10:30- 11:30 a.m.


Thursday at the First
Presbyterian Church in the
Education Building in room
106. The study is on the
book of Daniel and includes
records of his actions,
prophecies and visions
of things now, and things
to come. Dr. Roy Martin
teaches the study. The
study is free of charge and
open to the community. Call
the office at 752-0670 for
additional information.

English literacy classes
Free English speaking
and literacy classes pro-
vided by Columbia County
School District's Career
and Adult Education
Program is from 5:30-8
p.m. every Thursday at
Unity of God Ministries,
Inc. in Wellborn. Activities
for children will be pro-
vided. Call (386) 755-8190.
The church is located at
12270 County Road 137.

Submit Church Notes
by e-mail to arobinson@
lakecityreportercom, fax to
(386) 752-9400 or drop-off
at 180 E. Duval St., Lake
City. Call (386) 754-0425
with questions. Church
Notes run as space is 'avail-
able each Saturday.


Peace on Earth will come, according to the Bible


Revelation chap-
ter 20 speaks
of a time of
peace on earth
such as man
has never seen before.
It is referred to as the
Millennial Kingdom, or
the thousand-year reign
of the Lord Jesus Christ
as King of Kings and
Lord of Lords. A time
when He will sit on the
throne of David in the
city of Jerusalem and
"the government shall be
upon His shoulders," and,
"His name shall be called
Wonderful, Counselor;
The Mighty God, The
Everlasting Father, The'
Prince of Peace" (Isa 9:6).
Isaiah 9:7 says, "of the
increase of His govern-
ment and peace there
shall be no end."


BIBLE STUDY


Hugh Sherrill Jr.
ems-hugh43@comcost.net
There are many who
deny this great Bible
truth. Those who reject
the biblical account of a
literal 1,000-year reign
of Christ upon the earth
are in direct conflict with
God's Word. Those who
say the doctrine of the
Kingdom Age is based
upon one chapter of the
Bible prove themselves
ignorant of Scriptural
truth. Either they have


closed their minds on
that doctrine or they have
not studied God's Word.
Many passages were given
to us long before John,
"the Revelator," wrote
Revelation Chapter 20.
First of all, this proph-
ecy was given to Israel
in Genesis Chapter 49,
where we find the term
"the last days," and
Deuteronomy 33. These
scriptures must be done
away with if there is no
place on earth for them
to be fulfilled. Secondly,
there are scores of verses
that become totally
meaningless and empty
predictions if there is not
a literal thousand-year
reign. Consider the fol-
lowing verses, they make
clear that Christ's king-
dom occurs on earth, not


in Heaven, and they must
be fulfilled: Psalm 72:16;
Isaiah 11:4-6; 32:1;65:23;
Micah 4:4; Daniel 2:44;
Mal. 3:1; Zech 8:23.
The Lord Jesus Christ
referred to the period of
time during which these
events take place as the
"regeneration" (Mat. 19:28).
Many other scriptures can
be given but space will not
allow. Consider Ephesians
1:21; 2:10; Daniel 4:17,
Psalms 2:9, 72:15; 110:3;
and more. Only the spiritu-
ally blind can deny the fact
of a literal 1,000-year reign
on earth.
John wrote in Revelation
20:1-3: "He saw an angel
coming down from heav-
en, having the key to the
bottomless pit and a great
chain in his hand."
We can only imagine the


joy that rushed through
John as he saw this.
Remember, John only wrote
what he saw and what God
permitted him to "write".
John was actually caught up
into the future and he saw
these things.
Verse 2 says that he
saw the angel lay hold of
the dragon, that serpent
of old, who is the Devil
and Satan and bound him
for a thousand years. In
verse 3, he casts him into
the bottomless pit and
shuts him up, and sets a
seal on him, so that he
should deceive the nations
no more till the thousand
years were finished.
Yes, Christ will reign for
1,000 years on earth.
* Hugh Sherrill is a preach-
er in Lake City available for
pulpit supply and revivals.


6A


- I I I







LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVERTISEMENT SATURDAY, MAY 21, 2011 7A


Remembering


O n Memorial Day we remember those

who died while serving in our Armed

Forces. They fought for the future of our country

and experienced overwhelming and difficult

circumstances. For many of us it is impossible

to conceive of the price they paid for us. This

Memorial Day, as you visit the gravesides of those

who gave their lives in service, give thanks to God

for their great gift.







Scriptures Selected by The American Bible Society
2011, Keister-Williams Newspaper Services, P.O. Box 8187, Charlottesville, VA 22906, www.kwnews.com


North Florida
Pharmacy
7 Locations to Serve You
Lake City, Ft. White, Branford,
Chiefland, Mayo & Keystone Heights












--e Conh n. .. .p-


To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440



Supercenter
"LOW PRICES EVERYDAY"
.USI90 WEST755-2427


GI
Chevron


W


Hunter, Inc.
Chevron Oil
Jobber


S 'Inc.
"Quality rk at a reasonable price"
We also do solar hook-ups
(386) 755-5944


FOOD STORES
Open 7 Days a Week
1036 E.Duval St., Lake City FL.
(386) 752-0067
Fresh Meat. Fresh Produce!
I can do all things through Christ which strengthenedli me"
hl' pppmns 4:13

To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440

To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440


RICK'S RANGEE SERVICE
Located at 25A -,
(Old Valdosta Hwy)
386-752-5696 or or s
386-867-2035
after hours

To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440


FirstAdvent Christian
1881 SWMcFarlaneAve.
386-752-3900
Sunday School: 9:45AM
Sunday Service: 11:00AM
Wednesday Service: 7:00PM

GLAD TIDINGS ASSEMBLY OF GOD
993 NW Lake Jeffery Road
386-752-0620
SundayWorship r 10:30AM &6PM
Wed. Fam. Bible Study 7:00PM
"A church where JESUS is Real"

BEREA BAPTIST CHURCH
SR47S* 755-0900
Sunday School 9:30AM
Sunday Worship 10:45AM & 6PM
Wednesday Eve. Service' 7PM
Interim Pastor: Kenneth Edenfield
EASTSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
196 SE James Ave. 386-752-2860
Sun. Bible Study 9:45AM
Sun.Wdrship 11AM&6PM
Wed. Prayer Mtg/Bible Study 6PM
Rev. Brandon G.Witt

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Sunday Bible Study 9:15AM
Sunday Worship 10:30AM & 6:00PM
Wed. 6:00PM Prayer Service, &
Children Ministry 6:15PM
Downtown Lake City 752-5422
SRev. Stephen Ahrens, Pastor

OLIVETMISSIONARYBAPTISTCHURCH
541 N.E. Davis Street .
(386) 752-1990
Ronald V Walters, Pastor
Sunday School 9:45AM
Sunday Morning Worship 11:00AM
Wed. Mid-Week Worship 6:00PM
"In God's Word, Will & Way"

PINE GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH
1989 N US Hwy 441
386-752-2664
Sunday Bible Study 9:45AM
Sunday Worship 11AM & 6PM
Wed. Kids & Youth Ministry 6:30PM
Pastor: Ron Thompson

SALEM PRIMITIVE BAPTIST '
Sunday Services 10:30 AM
Pastor: Elder Herman Griffin
752-4198
SOUTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
388 S.E. Baya Drive* 755-5553
Sunday:
Bible Study 9:15AM
Morning Worship 10:30AM
Evening Worship 6:15PM
Wednesday:
AWANA 5:45PM
Prayer & Bible Study 6:15 PM
TABERNACLE BAPTIST CHURCH.
(Independent Baptist)
144 SE Montrose Ave.* 752-4274
Sunday School 10 AM
Sun.'Morn. Worship 11AM
Sunday Eve. 6PM
Wed. Prayer Meeting 7:30 PM
Pastor: Mike Norman

EPIPHANY CATHOLIC CHURCH
1905 SW Epiphany Court -752-4470
Saturday Vigil Mass 5:00 PM
Sunday Mass 8:15 AM, 10:30 AM,
5:00 PM (Spanish/English)
Sunday School/Religious Education
9:00.AM-10:1s5 AM


CHRISTIAN SCIENCE SOCIETY
239 SE Baya Ave.
SundayService 11:00AM
Wedriesdav Evening Service 7:301) PM

LAKE CI'CHRISTIAN CHURCH
Hwy 247 S. 755.94136
Sunday School 9:30 AM
Suh. Morn. Worship 10:30 AM
Wed. Prayer Meeting 7 PM

NEWHORIZON
Church of Christ
Directions & Times 386-623-7438
Jack Exim;Jir,Minister

LAKE CITY CHURCH OF GOD
167 Ermine St. 752-5965
Sunday School 9:45 AM
Sun. Worship : 10:30AM & 6:00PM
Wed. Family Night 7PM
Wed. Youth Service 7PM-
Pastor, Carroll ee '
EVANGEL CHURCH OF GOD
370 SW Monmor Glen *755-1939
Sunday School 9-45 AM
Sunday Worship 10:511 & 6:30
Wed. Spinmual Ennihmeni 7PM
:*Shock Youth Church
Boys, and Girb Clubs
Bible Study
Pastor: John' Hathaway:

ST. JAMES EPISCOPAL CHURCH
2423 SWBascom Norris Dr., Lake
City, Fl32025- 386-752-2218
Email:.stjamesepis330@bellsouth,net
Holy Eucharist
Sun. 8 & 10AM
Wednesday. 5:15pm
Priest: The Rev. Michael Armstrong
Deacon.The Rev. limmie Hunsinger
Director of Music Dr Alfonso Levy

OUR REDEEMER LUTHERAN CHURCH
LCMS
1 12 miles S, of 1-75 on SR 47
755-4299
Sunday Services 9:30AM
(Nursery Provided)
Christian Education Hour
For all ages at 10:45AM
Pastor: Rev. Bruce Alkire
SPIRIT OF CHRIST LUTHERAN
Hwy 90,1.5miles West of 1-75 752-3807
Sunday Worship 10:00AM
Nursery Avail.
Wed. Pot Luck 6PM Worship 7PM
Vicar John David Bryant


BETHEL UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
4869 US 441 South
SundayWorship Services,
Traditional Services 8:30 & 11:00AM
386-755-1353
mybethelumc.com
First United Methodist Church
973 S.Marion Ave,
386-752-4488
Sunday School '9:45AM
Sunday Morning Worship
Casual Worship Service 8:50AM
Traditional Service 11:00AM
Program opportunities available in all
areas for all ages.
For a complete schedule
contact church office at
752-4488


WESLEY MEMORIAL UNITED
1272 SW McFarlane* 752-3513
(Adjacent to Summers School)
Worship 8:00 & 10:00AM
Sunday School 9:00AM
Nursery provided
Praise & Worship 6:00PM
AWANA- Wednesdays 5:00PM
Pastor: The Rev. 1. Louie Mabrey
www.wesleymem.com
WATERTOWN CONGREGATIONAL
METHODIST CHURCH
U.S. 90 E. turn on Cortez (next to Quality
Ind.) right on Okinawa.
Sunday School 9:45 AM
Sun. Worship llAM&6PM
Wed. Night Service 7PM
Pastor, Randy Ogbum


LAKECITYCHURCHOFTHENAZARENE
Services:
Sunday School 9:45AM
SundayWorship 10:45AM
Wednesday 6:30PM
Adult, Youth Ministry, Children's Ministry
Pastor Craig Henderson ..
Nursery Provided
SW SR 47 and AzaleaPark Place,

FIRSI PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
6 SW1B, i nDrn 75-.U670 :,
Surida) Contempordry 9 l001A
Sunday School IIJ.OUAM
Tradinunal Service II I00 AM
NURSERY PROVDED
Pasior. Dr. Roy A Marnn
[Diecior cf Music: Bill Poplin

FIRST FULL GOSPEL CHURCH
NE Jones Way & NEWashington St
Sunday Schonl 10.1JI) AM
Morning Av'or:ip 1.1j' AM
EvarigrliriN Sei-ce 6 "i1 PM-
\outh Srrnce Wrdnesda 7 I00PM
Mid-week Sercr Wedresda ; 00' PM
F, inlio call '.5* 1(408 Eervono Welcome
Pasti:[ Rev Sran Elli:.


CHRIST CENTRALMINISTRIES
Leadership Services 9:00AM
Sunday Morning 11:00AM
WednesdayService 7:00PM
217 DyalAve., from Hwy 90 take.,
SistersWelcome Rd., go 5 miles, South,
church on left. 755-2525
Lead Pastor: Lonnie Johns
"A Church on the Move"
CHRISTIAN HERITAGE CHURCH
Comer SR. 47 & Hudson Circle
SSunday Celebration 10:30 AM
Pastor Chris Jones *752-9119
FALLING CREEK CHAPEL
Falling Creek Road 755-0580
First and Third Sundays 9:30 A.M.
Second and Fourth Sundays 3:00 RM.
Pastor: Rev. Cheryl R, Pingel
NEW BEGINNING CHURCH
Highway 242 E. of Branford Highway
Sunday School 10:00AM
MorningWorship 11:00AM
Sunday Evening 6:00PM
Wednesday 7:00PM
A Full Gospel Church Everyone Welcomed
(386) 755-5197


To List


Your


Church


on the ,


Church


Directory


SCall'


752-1293!1


To adveirtise n ,thIishrhDie r C -


Clay Electric Cooperative, Inc,
Competitive rates, non-profit,
right here in your community.
Lake City District 386-752-7447
clayelectric.com

To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755,5440











Tires for every need.
US '90 West across from Wal-Mart
752-0054

Morrell's
Your Complete decorating and
home furnishings store
SW Deputy Jeff Davis Lane (formerly Pinemount Rd.)
752-3910 or 1-800-597-3526
Mon.-Sal 8:00-5:30 Closed Sunday


ANDERSON COLUMBIA CO., INC.
ASPHALT PAVING
COMMERCIAL *INDUSTRIAL
Site Preparation Road Building Parking Lots
Grading & Drainage
752-7585
871 NW Guerdon St., Lake City I

HARRY'S
.,,at C.,. Heating & Air Conditioning Inc.
Harry Mosley, President

Pua 752-2308 i-

To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440


Central States
Enterprises
Columbia County's Feed Headquarters
FEED PET SUPPLIES LAWN & GARDEN
ANIMAL HEALTH
668 NW Waldo St. 386-755-7445

MIKELLS POWER EQUIPMENT, INC.
Your Lawn & Garden Headquarters
MOWERS CHAIN SAWS TRIMMERS
1152 US 90 WEST* LAKE CITY, FL.
386-752-8098




LAKE CITY
:S' 755-7050


To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440

::,..' 0..



a, '


To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440

BAYWAYjanitorial Services
FIRE & Water Restoration
Floor & Carpet Care
Residential & onmTerci:d
755-6142



,, I '.,
-,;:



To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440







LAKE CITY REPORTER STATE SATURDAY, MAY 21, 2011


Fragile Haiti a top worry


for hurricane season


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Florida Gov. Rick Scott speaks during the Governor's Hurricane Conference, .
Wednesday in Fort Lauderdale. The conference helps emergency managers,
meteorologists, first responders and government officials brace for the upcoming
storm season.


By JENNIFER KAY
Associated Press

FORT LAUDERDALE -
The director of the National
Hurricane Center said Friday
that Haiti's ability to respond
to a tropical storm while still
reeling from a January 2010
earthquake remains his top
concern for the Atlantic hur-
ricane season.
"I don't feel comfortable
that, should there be a direct
hit, there would be the capac-
ity to shelter everybody in
a safe place," director Bill
Read said at the end of the
weeklong Florida Governor's
Hurricane Conference.
The six-month Atlantic hur-
ricane season begins June 1,
and U.S. government forecast-
ers expect it to be ani above
average season.
As many as 18 named tropical
storms are expected to develop
before the season ends. Nov.
30, and three to six of those
could strengthen into .major
hurricanes with top winds of
111 mph or higher, forecasters
at the National Oceanic and
Atmospheric Administration
.said Thursdavy.
Haiti's extreme deforesta-


tion, from decades of over farm-
ing and the cutting of trees for
charcoal, compounds the flood
risk from even weak tropical
storms, Read said, and hun-
dreds of thousands of Haitians
are still living in tents after the
'earthquake.
Yvon Jerome, one of two
Haitian mayors who joined
meteorologists and officials at
the conference, said if a hurri-
cane or tropical storm strikes,
he can do little for the citizens
of his city, Carrefour, a sub-
urb of Haiti's capital. Carrefour
has no emergency shelters,
poor sanitation, few medical
resources and sometimes the
only vehicle available for gov-
ernment business is his own,
Jerome said.
Before Hurricane Tomas
brushed past Haiti as a
Category 2 on Nov. 5, killing
35 people, Jerome sent his
civilian protection team into
camps and neighborhoods
with megaphones and trucks
rigged with speakers to warn
people about the looming
storm.
All he could do was urge his
citizens to move somewhere
safe, and he said he'll have the
same message this year: "Don't


expect that any authorities will
take care of people. If you can
do something yourself, do it.
If you have somewhere else
more safe to go, just go."
He said some of the citizens
will refuse to leave. "Some say,
'We don't have anywhere to go,
we'll stay right there, and if we
have to die, we'll die there,"
he said.
The 2010 storm season was
one of the busiest on record,
with 19 named storms, includ-
ing 12 hurricanes. Several
storms hit Mexico and Central
America while Tomas caused
widespread damage in the
eastern Caribbean and parts of
Haiti. The U.S. escaped land-
fall from a major hurricane for
the fifth straight year.
Read worried that compla.
cent or cash-strapped coastal
residents in the U.S. would fail
to heed evacuation orders.
"Local officials are con-
cerned that their citizens may
not be-paying that much atten-
tion," Read said. "An added
concern is the still-soft econo-
my and the high price of gas,
and will that have an effect
on an individual's decision to
evacuate?"


Shuttle crew to take close-

up look at damaged tile


By SETH BORENSTEIN
AP Science Writer

HOUSTON NASA
ordered Endeavour's crew
to take an unusual close-up
look at a damaged tile in
the space shuttle's delicate
heat shield early Saturday
morning. ..
Using the shuttle's
robotic arm, astronauts will
scrutinize the gouge on the
shuttle's underbelly with a
high resolution camera and
a laser attached to a boom.
"There's nothing alarm-
ing here and we're not real-
ly concerned," said LeRoy
Cain, chairman of the shut-
tle mission management
team that decided Friday
to order what's called a
"focused inspection."
Cain said the two-hour
maneuver is being done out
of an abundance of caution
and won't cause any disrup-
tion to the crew or its 16-day
mission to the International
Space Station.
* The damaged tile was
spotted in photos snapped
by the station crew just
before the shuttle linked
up Wednesday. Initially, the
photos showed seven sites
with dings or gouges, but
six of them were further
analyzed and turned out
not to be a problem.


The one site that remains
a concern is the size of a
deck of cards, just below
the rear landing gear.
The location and size
gives engineers a bit of con-
fidence that the damage is
not the type that caused the
disintegration of the space
shuttle Columbia in 2003.
They also note that simi-
lar damage on Endeavour
in 2007 coincidentally
commanded by Scott
Kelly, brother of current
cormniakder Mark Kelly
- turned~toit not to be a
problem.
Cain told r porters
that it's so unlikely that
the gouge will be prob-
lematic that NASA hasn't
even considered making
contingency plans for fix-
ing the tile in flight NASA
can repair damaged tiles
using a souped-up version
of a caulking gun during a
spacewalk.
The delicate tiles' are
part of an intricate heat pro-
tection system that keeps
the shuttle; especially its
bottom and edges, from
burning up during its fiery
re-entry into Earth's atmo-
sphere. In 2003, damage to
the edges and tiles allowed
too much heat in, destroy-
ing Columbia and killing
seven astronauts.


Since then, shuttles have
been checked .in flight for
any ice or foam debris dam-
age from liftoff, to make
sure the shuttle is safe to
fly home. This is only the
fifth time an extra inspec-
tion has been needed in 21
flights.
For Saturday's inspec-
tion, the camera will take
just three close-up photos
from 7 feet away and the
laser will get two sets of
data. Officials expect that
will be enough, information.
to.plug into computer mod-
els to assure them that the
damage isn't anything to be
worried about.
This is Endeavour's
last flight, and the second
last of the 30-year space.
shuttle program. NASA is
shutting down the program
to focus -on eventual mis-
sions to a nearby asteroid
or other places further out
than Earth's orbit. Shuttle
Atlantis is tentatively set
to make the last flight on
July 8. with a load of sup-
plies and equipment for the
station. '
Friday turned out to be
a day of small concerns for
NASA, after an early morn-
ing routine spacewalk had
to be cut a tad short because
of a sensor problem on an
astronaut's spacesuit


ASSOCIATED PRESS
This Thursday, picture provided by NASA shows the space shuttle Endeavour docked with the
International Space Station and Italy seen in the background.

























Wednesday, May 25


8:30am t 1:00pm



Columbia County. Fair Grounds

Banquet Hall
438 SW SR 247, Lake City, FL 32025


Over 35 vendors!

FREE blood pressure, BMI &
cholesterol screenings!

Valuable information about healthcare
options right here in your community!


For more information, please call 386-719-9040.

LakeCityMedical.com


LAKE CITY-COLUMBIA COUNTY


CHAMBER
Belong Engage Lead Prosper

" 'presents


[ William J. Rossi

Clinical Professor of Entrepreneurship
Center for Entrepreneurship and Innovation
CEI Faculty Fellow
University of Florida
Gainesville, FL


_____________ r'Jn~:ltrL-prer eneurshij


Join us for a lunch killed with ideas & encouragement
for Lake Cin's small businesses.


\ihart: Chamber of Commerce's Better Business Series
Lunch catered by Mike's Cakr & Grille
When: May 25, 2011, 11:45 AM 1:00 PM
\.3Where: Christ Central Ministries, 21- Ddal Road, Lake City
Cost: $15 for members, $20 for non-members


Page Editor: C.J.. Risak, 754-0427








Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com


Lake City Reporter





SPORTS


Saturday, May 21, 201 I


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B'


FROM THE SIDELINE







Brandon Finley
Phone:(386) 754-0420
bfinleylakecityreportercom


Gomez

shining

for FSU
here wasn't a
long,
drawn- out
wait for
Celeste
Gomez to make an
impact with the Florida
State Seminoles.
The former Columbia
High star, in her
first season with the
Seminoles, has been a
major contributor for
the recently crowned
ACC Champions. Gomez
played an important part
in that process.
Despite going hitless
in the title game, Gomez
did enough to garner
recognition as part of
the All-ACC tournament
team. Gomez batted .300
with a home run and
scored twice during the
series.
It wasn't the first
time that she's made an
impact.
Throughout the
season, Gomez has
been one of the most
consistent performers
for the Seminoles. She
did something most
freshman only dream of
by batting in the cleanup
position.
It's a lot to ask of a
freshman, but Gomez
has never been an
underachiever. Her
strong point has always
been power and her
numbers showed such.
In only 83 attempts
at the plate, Gomez
produced 14 RBI's and
had a .446 slugging
percentage. She only had
two home runs during
the season, ,but one of
those came during the
ACC tournament when
the Seminoles needed it
most.
Gomez played in
nearly half of the
Seminoles 56 games as a
freshman and started 27
of those games.
For her play, she
was named one of the
Seminoles' freshman of
the year.
The Seminoles
finished the season
at 30-26 with a 9-11
record in the ACC, but
turned the wheels in the
right direction when it
shattered most.
For their efforts,
Florida State earned a
shot at the big dance
where they took on the
University of Alabama-
Birmingham on Friday.
The Seminoles didn't
come up with the win
like they would have
liked, but Gomez was
again solid in the effort.
In her first NCAA
tournament game,
Gomez delivered with a
1-for-3 performance at
the plate in the cleanup
position during a 2-0 loss.
It was one of only
two hits given up by
Alabama-Birmingham's
Leigh Streetman, who
possessed a 16-7 record
with a 1.09 ERA coming
into the contest.
* Brandon Finley covers
sports for the Lake City


Reporter.


Standout


Columbia beats
Dunnellon, 17-0,
in Alen's 1st win.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com
Columbia High coach
Brian Allen came into the
Tigers program with a
defensive pedigree. He no
'doubt liked what he saw in
Columbia's 17-0 win against
Dunnellon High to wrap up
the spring Friday at Tiger
Stadium.
With four turnovers and
a defensive touchdown, it
was the Tigers' defense that
was the difference starting
from the first drive.
After a Columbia inter-
ception was returned
to the 4-yard line, Felix
Woods capitalized on the
first Dunnellon turnover
of the game when he fell
on a loose ball. The Tigers
responded by driving the
ball to midfield, but were
forced into a punt on fourth-
and-three.
A mistake 'gave the
Tigers the ball right back as
a group of Tigers swarmed
to a second fumble, but
Columbia went three-and-
out on its second posses-
sion. Finally, on their third
attempt, the other Tigers
held securely to the foot-
ball. However, Columbia
forced Dunnellon to punt
after only four plays.
Nigel Atkinson hit J.T.
Bradley for a 17-yard com-
pletion on the first play of
the Tigers' following drive,
but a dropped pass on third
down forced Columbia into
another punt from Hayden
Lunde.
Columbia's third forced
turnover gave the Tigers
their best field position of
the night. Solomon Bell
fell on the loose ball at the
14-yard line and Columbia
was in business. Braxton
Stockton would do the rest.
The running back needed
only two carries including a
highlight reel spin move on
a six-yard touchdown run to
CHS continued on 3B


spring


Photos by JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
ABOVE: Columbia High's Rakeem Battle (left) is brought down by Dunnellon High's
Matt Landsbaugh in the Tigers' 17-0 win Friday at Tiger Stadium.

BELOW: Fort White High head coach Demetric Jackson speaks to the Indians during a
timeout in the Indians' win over Orange Park.
.. '


FortWhite High
knocks off Orange
Park, 17-14.
By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com
FORT WHITE There
was a David-and-Goliath fla-
vor to Fort White High's
spring football game.. And
the result was the same as
that first meeting long ago.
The Indians beat visiting
Orange Park High, 17-14,
in the spring finale for both
teams.
"Our defense was phe-
nomenal and 'we were
able to do some things on
offense," Fort White head
coach Demetric Jackson
said. "We've got work to do,
but I am proud of the effort
and where we are at."
Fort White produced
points in all three phases
to knock off a team that
dressed out more than'
twice as many players.
The Raiders knew about
A.J. Legree on offense, and'
he showed he could catch
the ball on defense, too.
Legree intercepted Orange
Park twice in the first half,
both times in Fort White.
territory.
The Raiders also were
stopped on four downs from
the Fort White 6 on their
first possession.
Orange Park broke
through with a nine-play,
76-yard scoring drive late in
the first half. Erick Hayward
scored on an eight-yard run
at 3:48 of the second quar-'
ter. Connor Lofton kicked
the extra point
Fort White moved across
the 50, but an interception
turned the ball over at the
Orange Park 12 late in the
half.
Terry Calloway kept play-
ing for the Indians' defense.
First, he broke through to
.nail the running back for
a seven-yard loss. He then
recovered a fumble at the
Raiders 7 with 6 seconds
left in the half.
That was enough time for
INDIANS continued on 3B


Mcllroy, McDowell to

meet in World Match Play


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Rory Mcllroy of Northern Ireland follows his shot during the
World Match Play Golf Championship tournament against
Nicolas Colsaerts of Belgium in Casares, southern Spain,
Friday.


Ryder Cup heros
to square off in
Sweet Sixteen.
By STEVE DOUGLAS
Associated Press

CASARES, Spain-Seven
months after joining forc-
es to help Europe reclaim
the Ryder Cup, Northern
Irish duo Rory McIlroy
and Graeme McDowell
will meet in the final 16
at the World Match Play
Championship.
McDowell won Group
D with two straight vic-
tories, while McIlroy fin-
ished runner-up in Group
E following a 3-and-2 defeat
to Denmark's Nicolas
Colsaerts on Friday.
The pair played togeth-
er three times against the
United States at Celtic
Manor in Wales, claiming 1'2
points for Europe's winning
cause. They also impressed
as a partnership in the Seve
Trophy in France in 2009,
their combination provid-
ing three points in a 16'12-
111/ win for Britain and
Ireland against Continental


Europe.
However, their friend-
ship will be put aside when
they meet in a. competitive
match for the first time
Saturday, with a place in
the quarterfinals at stake at
the Finca Cortesin course
in Andalusia.
"It will be a great game,
I'm excited about it,"
McDowell said.
Luke Donald and Martin
Kaymer, who. could sup-
plant Westwood as No.
1 if they win the tourna-
ment on the Costa del Sol,
also advanced as unbeaten
group winners.
Second-ranked Donald,
who won the Accenture
Match Play in Arizona in
February, maintained his
superb recent consistency,
beating defending cham-
pion Ross Fisher 3 and 1
in Group B. He will play
Sweden's Johan Edfors
next.
Third-ranked Kaymer
beat a second Korean
player in ,successive days,
downing Noh Seung-yul 2
and 1 to set up a match
against Denmark's Soren
Kjeldsen.


Of the 24 players to start
the group stages, eight were
eliminated Friday after two
defeats. The list included
four major winners: two-
time U.S. Open champion
Retief Goosen, reigning
British Open champion
Louis Oosthuizen, 2009
PGA winner Y.E. Yang and
1999 British Open cham-
pion Paul Lawrie.
The lone American in
the field, Ryan Moore, also
exited Friday after losing
the last four holes to go
.down by one to Englishman
Fisher.
Spain's Miguel Angel
Jimenez lost a three-way
playoff with Masters cham-
pion Charl Schwartzel and
Edfors to bow out after
each had won one match.
Denmark's Anders Hansen
and No. 9-ranked' Paul
Casey, the highest-ranked
casualty of the group
stage, are also on their way
home.
The other last-16 match-
es will be Colsaerts vs.
Jhonnatan Vegas, Alvario
Quiros vs. Noh, Schwartzel'
vs. Fisher and Francesco
Molinari vs. Baddeley.


- 'I I ,









LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SATURDAY, MAY 21, 2011


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
AUTO RACING
8 a.m.
SPEED Formula One, qualifying for
Spanish Grand Prix, at Barcelona, Spain
II a.m.
VERSUS IRL, pole qualifying for
Indianapolis 500
4:30 p.m.
VERSUS IRL, pole qualifying for
Indianapolis 500
5:30 p.m.
ESPN2 NHRA, qualifying for
Summer Nationals, at Topeka, Kan. (same-
day tape)
7 p.m.
SPEED NASCAR, Sprint Cup, All-
Star Race, at Concord, N.C.
BOXING
10 p.m.
HBO Light heavyweights, Chad
Dawson (29-1-0) vs. Adrian Diaconu
(27-2-0); champion Jean Pascal (26-I -I ) vs.
Bernard Hopkins (51-5-2), for WBC light
heavyweight title, at Montreal
II p.m.
FSN Welterweights, Alfonso
Gomez (22-4-2) vs. Calvin Green
(21-5- I), at Cabazon, Calif.
COLLEGE BASEBALL
7 p.m.
FSN -Texas A&M at Texas
COLLEGE SOFTBALL
Noon
ESPN NCAA Division I playoffs,
regionals, site 2/game 3
2:30 p.m.
ESPN NCAA Division I playoffs,
regionals, site 2/game 4
5 p.m.
ESPN NCAA Division I playoffs,
regionals, site 2/game 5
CYCLING
7 p.m.
VERSUS -Tour of California, stage 7,
Claremont to Mount Baldy, Calif.
GOLF
9 a.m.
TGC European PGA Tour, Volvo
World Match Play Championship, third
round and quarterfinal matches, at
Casares, Spain
I p.m.
TGC Nationwide Tour, BMW
charityy Pro-Am, third round, at Greer,
Mill Spring, and Spartanburg, S.C.
3 p.m.
CBS PGA Tour, Crowne Plaza
Invitational, third round, at Fort Worth,
Texas
4:30 p.m.
TGC LPGA, Sybase Match Play
Championship, third round and quarterfi-
nal matches, at Gladstone, N.J.
HORSE RACING
2:30 p.m.
VERSUS NTRA, Preakness under-
card, at Baltimore
4:30 p.m.
NBC NTRA, Preakness Stakes, at
Baltimore
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL'
2 p.m.
MLB Regional coverage,
L.A. Dodgers at Chicago White Sox or
St. Louis at Kansas City
7 p.m.
FOX Regional coverage, N.Y. Mets
at N.Y.Yankees, Chicago Cubs at Boston,
Oakland at San Francisco, or Texas at
Philadelphia
10 p.m.
MLB Regional coverage, Atlanta at
LA.Angels or Minnesota atArizona
MEN'S COLLEGE LACROSSE
Noon I
ESPN2 NCAA Division I
playoffs, quarterfinal,Virginia vs. Cornell, at
Hempstead, N.Y.
2:30 p.m.
ESPN2 NCAA Division I playoffs,
quarterfinal, Denver vs. John's Hopkins, at
Hempstead, N.Y.
NBA BASKETBALL
9 p.m.
ESPN Playoffs, conference finals,
game 3, Dallas at Oklahoma City
NHL HOCKEY
1:30 p.m.
NBC Playoffs, conference finals,
game 4, Boston atTampa Bay
SOCCER
10 p.m.
ESPN2 MLS, Los Angeles at Chivas
USA


BASEBALL

AL standings


East Division
W L
Tampa Bay 25 20
Boston 23 20
New York 23 20
Toronto 22 21
Baltimore 19 23
Central Division
W L
Cleveland 26 15
Detroit 22 21
Kansas City 21 22
Chicago 20 25
Minnesota 15 27
West Division
W L
Tekas 23 22
Oakland 22 22
Los Angeles 22 23
Seattle 19 24 -


Interleague play

Friday's Games
N.Y. Mets 2, N.Y.Yankees I
Philadelphia 3,Texas 2
Florida 5,Tampa Bay 3
Cincinnati at Cleveland (n)
Detroit at Pittsburgh (n)
Washington at Baltimore (n)
Houston at Toronto (n)
Chicago Cubs at Boston (n)
L.A. Dodgers at Chi.cagoWhite Sox
(n)
St. Louis at Kansas City (n)
Minnesota at Arizona (n)
Atlanta at L.A.Angels (n)
Seattle at San Diego (n)
Oakland at San Francisco (n)
Today's Games
Houston (Myers 1-3) at Toronto
(Morrow 2-2), 1:07 p.m.
LA. Dodgers (Garland 1-3) at Chicago
White Sox (Buehrle 3-3), 2:10 p.m.


St. Louis (Westbrook 3-3) at Kansas
City (Adcock 1-0), 2:10 p.m.
Cincinnati (Bailey 3-0) at Cleveland
(Tomlin 5-1), 4:05 p.m.
Washington (Lannan 2-4) at Baltimore
(Guthrie 1-6), 4:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay (Price 5-3) at Florida
(Vazquez 2-4), 4:10 p.m.
Detroit (Scherzer 6-0) at Pittsburgh
(Correia 5-4), 7:05 p.m.
Chicago Cubs (Zambrano 4-2) at
Boston (Aceves 1-0), 7:10 p.m.
N.Y. Mets (Capuano 3-4) at N.Y.
Yankees (A.J.Bumett 4-3), 7:10 p.m.
Oakland (Anderson 2-3) at San
Francisco (Lincecum 3-4), 7:10 p.m.
Texas (C.Lewis 4-4) at Philadelphia
(CI.Lee 2-4),7:10 p.m.
Atlanta (Hanson 5-3) at LA. Angels
(Pineiro 2-0), 10:05 p.m.
Seattle (Pineda 5-2) at San Diego
(Richard 2-4), 10:05 p.m.
Minnesota (S.Baker 2-3) at Arizona
(Owings 0-0), 10:10 p.m.

NL standings

East Division
W L Pct GB
Philadelphia 27 17 .614 -
Florida 25 18 .581 I'A
Atlanta 25 21 .543 3
NewYork 22 22 .500 5
Washington 20 23 .465 6h'
-Central Division


St. Louis
Cincinnati
Milwaukee
Pittsburgh
Chicago
Houston


W L
26 19
25 19
21 23
20 23
19 23
15 29
West Division


Pct GB
.578 -
.568 'A
.477 4'
.465 5
.452 5A
.341 10'A


W L Pct GB
San Francisco 24 19 .558 -
Colorado 23 19 .548 'h
Arizona 20 23 .465 4
Los Angeles 20 25 .444 5
San Diego 19 25 .432 5'h
Friday's Game
Colorado at Milwaukee (n)
Today's Game
Colorado (Mortensen 1-0) at
Milwaukee (Marcum 5-I), 7:10 p.m.
Sunday's Game
Colorado at Milwaukee, 2:10 p.m.


BASKETBALL

NBA playoffs

CONFERENCE FINALS
Thursday
Oklahoma City 106, Dallas 100, series
tied I-I
Today
Dallas at Oklahoma City, 9 p.m.
Sunday
Chicago at Miami, 8:30 p.m.
Monday
Dallas at Oklahoma City, 9 p.m.
Tuesday
Chicago at Miami, 8:30 p.m.
Wednesday
Oklahoma City at Dallas, 9 p.m.

SOFTBALL

NCAA-regionals

(Double elimination)
At Gainesville
Friday
UCLA 2,Jacksonville 0
Florida 8, Bethune-Cookman 0
Today
Game 3: UCLA (34-17) vs. Florida
(48-9), I p.m.
Game 4: Jacksonville (44-14) vs.
Bethune-Cookman (33-25), 3:30 p.m.
Game 5: Game 3 loser vs. Game 4
winner, 6 p.m.

At Athens, Ga.
Friday
UAB 2, Florida St. 0
Georgia 8, Georgia State 0
Today
Game 3: UAB (39-17) vs. Georgia
(48-12), Noon
Game 4: Florida State (30-27) vs.
Georgia State (36-24), 2:30 p.m.
Game 5: Game 3 loser vs. Game 4
winner, 5 p.m.

AUTO RACING

Race week

NASCAR
SPRINT CUP
All-Star Race
Site: Concord, N.C.
Schedule: Today, Sprint Showdown,
7:30 p.m., All-Star Race, approximately
9 p.m. (Speed, 4-11:30 p.m.).
Track: Charlotte Motor Speedway
(oval, 1.5 miles).
Race distances: Sprint Showdown, 60
miles, 40 laps, with only green-flag laps
counting in the final segment. All-Star
Race, 150 miles, 100 laps in segments of
50,20,20 and 10, with only green-flag laps
counting in the final segment.
NATIONWIDE
John Deere Dealers of Iowa 250
Site: Newton, Iowa.
Schedule: Today, practice, qualifying;
Sunday, race, 2 p.m. (ABC, 1-4:30 p.m.).
Track. Iowa Speedway (oval, 0.875
miles).
Race distance: 218.75 miles, 250 laps.
FORMULA ONE
Spanish Grand Prix
Site: Barcelona.
Schedule: Today, practice, qualifying
(Speed, 8-9:30 a.m.); Sunday, race, 8 a.m.
(Speed, 7:30-10 a.m.; 4:30-7 p.m.).
Track: Circuit de Catalunya (road
course, 2.89 miles).
Race distance: 190.8 miles, 66 laps.
NHRA FULL THROTTLE
NHRA Summer Nationals
Slte:Topeka, Kan.
Schedule: Today, qualifying (ESPN2,
5:30-7:30 p.m.); Sunday, final eliminations
(ESPN2, 7-I0 p.m.).
Track: Heartland Park Topeka.

All-Star Race qualifying

At Charlotte Motor Speedway
Concord, N.C.
Friday qualifying; race today
(Car number in parentheses)
I. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 135.916


mph.
2. (33) Clint Bowyer, Chevrolet,
135.377.
3. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 134.740.
4. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 134.236.
5. (25) Mark Martin, Chevrolet,
133.670.
6. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet,
133.657.
7. (4) Kasey Kahne.Toyota, 133.296.
8. (42) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet,
133.284.
9. (I) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet,
132.990.
10. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet,
132.737.
11. (5) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet,
132.639.
12. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet,
132.630.
13. (17) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 132.512.
14. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet,
132.158.
15. (II) Denny Hamlin, Toyota,
132.123.
16. (22) Kurt Busch, Dodge, 131.240.
17. (78) Regan Smith, Chevrolet,
130.091.
18. (00) David Reutimann, Toyota,
132.713.

Sprint Showdown lineup

1. (6) David Ragan, Ford, 191.68.
2. (43) A J AlImendinger, Ford,
191.469.
3. (27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet,
191.171.
4. (2) Brad Keselowski, podge,
190.772.
. 5. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet,
190.362.
6. (9) Marcos Amb'rose, Ford, 190.322.
7. (56) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota,
189.947.
8. (34) David Gilliland, Ford, 189.893.
9. (20) Joey Logano,Toyota, 189.261.
10. (83) Brian Vickers,Toyota, 188.752.
11. (13) Casey Mears.Toyota, 187.97.
12. (60) Mike SklnnerToyota, 187.878.
13. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet,
187.63.
14. (47) Bobby Labonte, Toyota,
187.422.
15. (09) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet,
187.065.
16. (38) Travis Kvapil, Ford, 186.8.
17.(66)Todd Bodine,Toyota, 186.432.
18. (81) J.J.Yeley, Chevrolet, 186.361.
19. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota,
185.771.
20. (71) Andy Lally, Ford, 184.944.
21. (50)T.J. Bell,Toyota, 184.489.
22. (95) David Starr, Ford, 184.281.
23. (37) Tony Raines, Ford, 183.805.
24. (32) Boris Said, Ford, 182.976.
25. (64) Derrike Cope, Ford, 181.781.
26. (30) David Stremme, Chevrolet,
180.204.
27. (92) Brian Keselowski, Dodge,
178.648.

TENNIS

French Open seeds

At Stade Roland Garros
Paris ,
(Sunday-June 5)
Men
1. Rafael Nadal, Spain
2. Novak Djokovic, Serbia
3. Roger Federer, Switzerland
4.Andy Murray, Britain
5. Robin Soderling, Sweden
6.Tomas Berdych, Czech Republic
7. David Ferrer, Spain
8.Jurgen Melzer, Austria
9. Gael Monfils, France
10. Mardy Fish, United States
11. Nicolas Almagro, Spain
12. MikhailYouzhny, Russia
13. Richard Gasquet, France
14. Stanislas Wawrlnka, Switzerland
15.Viktor Troickl, Serbia
16. Fernando Verdasco, Spain
S17.Jo-Wllfried Tsoriga, Franc'e
18. Gilles Simon, France
19. Marin Cilic, Croatia
20. Florian Mayer, Germany
21.Alexandr Dolgopolov, Ukraine
22. Michael Uodra, France .
23.Thomaz Bellucci, Brazil
24. Sam Querrey, United States
25.Juan Martin del Potro,Argentina
26. Milos Raonic, Canada
27. Marcos Baghdatis, Cyprus
28. Nikolay Davydenko, Russia
29. Janko Tipsarevic, Serbia
30. Guillermo Garcia-Lopez, Spain
31. Sergiy Stakhovsky, Ukraine
32. Kevin Anderson, South Africa
Women
I. Caroline Wozniacki, Denmark
2. Kim Clijsters, Belgium
3.Vera Zvonareva, Russia
4.Victoria Azarenka, Belarus
5. Francesca Schiavone, Italy
6. Li Na, China
7. Maria Sharapova, Russia
8. Sam StosurAustralia
9. Petra Kvitova, Czech Republic
I 0. Jelena Jankovic, Serbia
II. Marion Bartoli, France
12.Agnieszka Radwanska, Poland
13. Svetlana Kuznetsova, Russia
14.Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova, Russia
15.Andrea Petkovic, Germany
16. Kala Kanepi, Estonia
17. Julia Goerges, Germany
18. Flavia Pennetta, Italy
19. Shahar Peer, Israel
20.Ana Ivanovic, Serbia
21.YaninaWickmayer, Belgium
22. Dominika Cibulkova, Slovakia
23.Alisa Kleybanova, Russia
24. Jarmila GaJdosova,Australia
25. Maria Klrilenko, Russia
26. Nadia Petrova, Russia
27.Alexandra Dulgheru, Romania
28. Daniela Hantuchova, Slovakia
29. Peng Shuai, China
30. Roberta Vinci, Italy
31. Klara Zakopalova, Czech Republic
32.Tsvetana Pironkova, Bulgaria


HOCKEY

NHL playoffs

CONFERENCE FINALS
Thursday
Boston 2, Tampa Bay 0, Boston leads
series 2-1
Friday
Vancouver at San Jose (n)
Today
Boston at Tampa Bay, 1:30 p.m.


League reports
Results of Lake City Bowl league
play follow.
WATERGUARD
Final standings
League champions: 10 In The
Pitt won the league for the third
consecutive year.
High average: 1. Mary Lobaugh
185. 1. Zech Strohl 212.
SUNDAY NITE MERCHANTS
Final standings
Top three teams: 1. TAZ
(54.5-17.5); 2. Spare Us (43.5-28.5);
3. Train Wreck (39-33).
High average: 1. Norma Yeingst
169.22; 2. Liz Randall 159.59;
3. Gloria Dennis 158.42. 1. Bill Duncan
199.75; 2. Joe Cohrs 194.6; 3. Mark
Moore 193.65.
GOLDEN ROLLERS
Team standings: 1. Golden Niners
(91.5-52.5); 2. Gamblers (80.5-63.5);
3. Rolling Thunder (76-68). '


SCOREBOARD


BOWLING

High handicap game: 1. Joanne
Denton 246; 2. Maggie Battle 222;
3. Joyce Hooper 220. 1. Winton
Brewer 247; 2. Vernon Black 240;
3. Ray Denton 232.
High handicap series: 1. Debbie
Walters 653; 2. Pat Hale 631;
3. Shirley Highsmith 621. 1. Sandy
Sanders 716; 2. David Duncan 686;
3. George Walters 641.
High average: 1. Shirley Highsmith
157.21; 2. Elaine Nemeth 153.52;
3. Betty Carmichael 150.57. 1. David
Duncan 190.17; 2. Bill Dolly 184.35; 3.
George Mulligan 182.75.
(results from May 5)
HIT & MISS
Team standings: 1. The
Sandbaggers (47-25); 2. Spare Us
(45.5-26.5); 3. Lucky Strikers (39-33,
541 team average); 4. Alley Oops
(39-33,1507 team average).
High handicap game: 1. Karen
Clampett 246; 2. Cathy Pelley 225;
3. Susan Mears 222.


BRIEFS


FORT WHITE FOOTBALL For details, call the Christie at 754-3607.

Fundraiser for school at 758-4800.
CARDS
Quarterback Club .vOUTH VOu.YBALL Bid whist tourney,


The Fort White
Quarterback Club has a
pancake breakfast and
car wash from 8-11 a.m.
today at the Fort White
Community Center.
Pancake breakfast (eat
in or take out) is $5, and
donations will be accepted
for the car wash.
For details, call Kathy
D'Antonio at 590-9187.

GATORS

International

Gator Day today

The North Florida
Gator Club is teaming up
with Habitat for Humanity
to clean up a lot for a
future home as part of
International Gator Day.
Meet at 8 a.m. today at
KC's Produce on Baya
Avenue and bring yard
tools to help with the
clean-up.
For details, call Diane at
752-3333.

LCMS FOOTBALL

Red & Black

game on Tuesday

Lake City Middle
School's Red & Black
spring game is
5:30 p.m. Tuesday at the
field behind the school.
Admission for adults is $1
and there is no charge for
students.


ACROSS

1 "Star Trek"
android
5 Delicate hue
9 Tummy muscles
12 Mellow, as
brandy
13 Flat-bottomed
boat
14 Baja "Mrs."
15 Dance hall
group
16 Statue base
18 Tankards
20 Dry white wine
21 Active
volcano
22 EMT
technique
23 Circumference
26 Second-hand
30 Opposite
of post-
33 Milan
money, once
34 Injure in the
bullring
35 Greases


e rutuF Lady Tiger -
flSh fry fundraiser
ac mp June 27-28


v% III r Iqu o m -0%


The third annual Future
Lady Tiger Volleyball
Camp is 9 a.m. to noon
June 27-28 at the Columbia
High gym. The camp is
for girls entering the sixth
through 12th grades, and
features members of the
CHS staff and returning
varsity players. Cost of
$50 includes camp T-shirt
Registration is in the CHS
front office from 8 a.m. to
4 p.m. Monday through
June 13.
For details, call coach
Casie McCallister at
(386) 365-3158.

SOFTBALL

Adult league

registration set

Registration for the
.Lake City Recreation
Department's summer
co-ed, commercial and
women's adult softball
leagues is 8:30 a.m. to
5 p.m. Monday through
June 10 at Teen Town
Recreation Center. Fee is
$350 for a minimum of 10
games, and due with
roster by June 10. A
coaches meeting is set for
6:30 p.m. June 2 at the
Girls Club Center to
discuss rules and league
formats.
For details, call Heyward


37 Roll
of stamps
39 Embroider
40 Plug away
41 Pessimist,
often
43 Jackie's
second
45 Striped ante-
lope
48 Unshiny photo
finish
51 Conger catchers
53 Chilly, maybe.,
56 Big black dogs
57 '-'wester
58 Dwell
590Q.E.D.,part
60 Draw
to aAclose
61 Vicious
62 Hideaways

DOWN


Pats on
Playing marble
Doctrine
Extending


Answc


Gold Standard Chapter
No. 48 has a bid whist
tournament and fish fry
fundraiser from 11:30 a.m.
to 4 p.m. today at B&S
Elks Lodge No. 1599, 2510
E. Washington Street
Team entry for the
tournament is $20. The
fish fry is $5.
For details, call Marva
Udell at (386) 234-1615 or
Carlos Brown at 288-6235
for the tournament, and
Eddie McKenzie at
623-1714 for the fish fry.

GOLF

Elks charity

tourney June 4


Lake City Elks Lodge
No. 893's annual
charity.golf tournament
is 8:30 a.m. June 4 at The
Country Club at Lake City.
Entry fee for the
four-person scramble is
$50 and includes lunch,
beverages and prizes. Hole
sponsorships are $100 and
include one golf entry.
Sign-up sheets for hole
sponsors and golfers are at
The Country Club at Lake
City and the Elks Lodge
on Hernando Street
Deadline is May 27.
For details, call
Carl Ste-Marie at 752-2266
or the Elks Lodge at
752-2284.



er to Previous Puzzle


CO 0 CD BAIL
NURSEY O AGA
F A.TAE TRASCBUOD
URN SHH REEA


TOP FLUXRGIE
HOP TIN A E GO
EL LS L IMOil
MAYA EXPNE
CPO L R Y





BEINESIHH REIEIK


5 Sugar amts.
6 Wine cooler
7 Agree silently
8 Dweeb
9 -spinarte
10 Kind of muffin


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


11 Garage event
17 Shoulder
gesture
19 Wield a hammer
22 Mountain
range
24 Perfumer Nina
25 Where Priam
ruled
27 Coast Guard
alert
28 Before
29 It glistens
30 Food cooker
31 Ipanema
locale
32 Yalie
36 Dark-gray color
38 Have good
feelings about
42 Sorted out
44 Kingdom
46 "The Wreck of
the Mary -"
47 Not rural
48 Mull over
49 Unknown
auth.
50 Dull sound
51 Churchill
successor
52 Former JFK
arrivals
54 Bind up
55 Ms. Gabor


5-21 2011 by UFS, Inc.


High handicap series: 1. Anna
McDonald 633; 2. Cythe Shiver 626;
3. Sharon Tuning 610.
(results from May 17)
MONDAY NIGHT MAVERICKS
Team standings: 1. Team 8
(352.5-187.5); 2. Rountree Moore
Ford (344-196); 3. Ronsonet Buick
(321.5-218.5).
High scratch game: 1. Bill Duncan
268; 2. Murray Davis Jr. 267; 3. Zech
Strohl 258.
High scratch series: 1. Murray
Davis Jr. 718; 2. Zech Strohl 702;
3. Tanner Wayne 701.
High handicap game: 1. Murray
Davis Jr.. 291; 2. Tanner Wayne 275;
3. Bill Duncan 273.
High handicap series: 1. Murray
Davis Jr. 790; 2. Tanner Wayne 755;
3. Ron VanDeVoren 713.
High average: 1. Zech Strohl
223.46; 2. Dale Coleman 212.95;
3. Brian Meek 208.7.
(results from May 2)


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421







Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


LAKE CITY REPORTER


SPORTS


SATURDAY, MAY 21, 2011


CHS: Tigers win 17-0
Continued From Page 1B


give Columbia a 6-0 lead.
Lunde added the PAT to
go ahead 7-0.
Five-plays later,
Columbia would reach the
end zone again. This time,
it was the defense.
After a 30-yard run by
J'von Swoll, Dunnellon
looked to be on its way to
matching the Tigers, how-
ever, a third fumble cut the
drive short Javere Smith
had a 61-yard scoop and
score for the touchdown.
Lunde again added the
PAT for a 14-0 lead.
Columbia's defense
allowed only 10 plays the
rest of the half, but penal-
ties killed any drive the
Tigers' offense tried to put
together.
Dunnellon started the
second half the way it
played much of the first
half by turning the ball
over. Five plays into its
first drive a fumble on
fourth-and-one kept the
Tigers from converting a
first down.
Columbia's offense
stalled throughout much
of the third quarter, but


after a Darius Williams'
sack on Dunnellon's third
second-half possession,
the Tigers took over in
scoring position.
Jayce Barber replaced
Atkinson at quarterback
for the third quarter and
the Tigers' finally mus-
tered up some offense on
his last possession. A per-
sonal foul, late-hit penalty
kept the drive alive early,
but Barber hit Atkinson
for a nine-yard completion
and scrambled for eight
yard on consecutive plays
to move the chains.
As the third quarter
came to an end, Allen sent
on Lunde for a field goal to
finish out the varsity's time
on the field. Lunde con-
nected on a 32-yard field
goal as time expired in the
quarter to give Columbia a
17-0 victory.
"It's never as good or bad
as you think- it is," Allen
said. "After we look at film,
there will definitely be some
things to improve on. Well
just continue to get better
and build on the foundation
we laid this spring."


' ,


Photos by JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
ABOVE: Columbia High coach Brian Allen looks on from the
sideline during the Tigers' 17-0 win Friday.
BELOW: Columbia High's Blake Kuykendall makes a tackle
on Dunnellon High's J'von Swoll.


INDIANS: Win 17-14
Continued From Page 1B


two jump balls from quar-
terback Andrew Baker
to Legree and he caught
the second one in double
coverage for a touchdown.
Nathan Escalante kicked
the Indians even with no
time left on the clock.
It was the Indians that
put together the drives
after intermission. The
first ended with an inter-
ception. On the second
drive, Escalante respond-
ed with a 31-yard field goal
to put Fort White in the


lead, 10-7, with 7:39 left in
the game.
A bizarre play to open
the next series gave the
Indians some breathing
room. Orange Park was
pitching the ball around
in the backfield and Fort
White's Braden King came
up with it then raced 33
yards for a touchdown.
Escalante was again good
on the PAT.
The Raiders added a late
score on a 10-yard run by
Klari Hill.


Photos by JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
ABOVE: Fort White High's cheerleading squad performs a
stunt during the spring game against Orange Park High.
RIGHT: Fort White High's Trey Phillips comes down with a
catch while being corralled by Brandon Kuhn (left) and Taylor
Muth.


Tebow joins

teammates for

informal workout


By PAT GRAHAM
Associated Press

CENTENNIAL, Colo.
- Tim Tebow was focused
more on camaraderie than
competition when he joined
a dozen Denver Broncos
teammates for an infore-
mal offseason workout
Thursday.
The second-year player
tossed some tight spirals
to receiver Britt Davis, flew
through a series of wind
sprints and did some light
stretching, enjoying being
back in the company of
his colleagues after weeks
of training on his own in
Florida.
"I had a good workout
and enjoyed it," he said.
Fellow quarterback Kyle
Orton wasn't among the
Broncos who showed up*at
the South Suburban Sports
Dome for the sessions
,organized by safety Brian
Dawkins. The Broncos list
Orton atop the depth chart
but maintain the position
is up for grabs whenever
the NFL labor situation is
resolved.
Tebow was hardly con-
cerned about the looming
quarterback competition,
simply saying the situation
will sort itself out in time.
"You hope he does good,
because the better he does,
hopefully the better I'll do,
and vice versa," Tebow
said. "I've always relished
the opportunity to compete
my whole life. I think it will
make me better."
Tebow,'who was in New
York last week for an event
in his role as a Jockey
spokesman, has takensome
heat for working out on his
own during the NFL lockout
instead of in the Mile-High
City. That's something he
quickly dismissed.
"That doesn't bother me
if I'm 'not in "front"of the
cameras working out," he
said. "I honestly would rath-
er not be." -
Instead, Tebow has
been incorporating boxing,
sprinting and swimming


into his daily routine, along
with working on his throw-
ing mechanics.
Always more comfortable
working out of the shotgun
formation during his stellar
college career at Florida,
Tebow took steps to become
more proficient in dropping
back from under center.
"I haven't taken a rep out
of shotgun," this offseason,
Tebow said, grinning.
Tebow has been quickly
absorbing new coach John
Fox's playbook as the for-
mations remain basically
the same with only differ-
ent reads and wrinkles. The
fact that offensive coordina-
tor Mike McCoy is a hold-
over from fired coach Josh
McDaniels' staff is a plus for
Tebow, who started the final
three games last season.
"We've got a great rela-
tionship. I'm excited about
working with him," Tebow
said.
Although Tebow has
put in plenty work on the
field, his film study has
fallen behind. He's studied
the game tapes he cop-
ied before the labor strife
began. But without access
to more footage, he's had to
improvise.
"That's the one thing
that's disappointing,"Tebow
said. "I try to make up for
that by going through the
playbook more. Just not
looking at it, going out
there and walking through
things and really trying to
visualize how you're going
to attack different defenses
with those certain plays."
It didn't take long for
Tebow to get in tune with
Davis on Thursday, the two
carrying over their rapport
from last season. Davis
flew in from Chicago in the
morning and was feeling
the altitude in his first visit
to the informal offseason
workouts-in Denver. -
He also was feeling the
rhythm with Tebow.
"I don't think we missed
a beat today," Davis said.
"He was on-target. That's
what I just Tweeted."


Heat know road to the NBA


title goes through Miami


By TIM REYNOLDS
Associated Press

MIAMI Good news for
the Miami Heat: They're
the only team still unbeat-
en at home in this year's
playoffs. Better news for
the Heat: To win the NBA
championship, they only
need to stay that way.
And here's perhaps
some sobering news for
the Heat: Every other team
left in this postseason is
1-0 on Miami's home floor
this year.
So if there's a reason for
Miami to be more cautious
than celebratory, that's it.
Yes, winning Game 2 of the
Eastern Conference finals
in Chicago came with a
bonus the road to the
title now goes through
Miami, which wrestled
home-court advantage
from the Bulls and would
also have it in the NBA
finals against either Dallas
or Oklahoma City.
Still, just getting into the
driver's seat is a source of
pride for Miami, for obvi-
ous reasons.
'We beat the best team
in the league on their floor
and now the pressure is
to keep home-court advan-
tage and that's extreme-
ly important," Heat forward
Chris Bosh said Friday. "So,
yeah, if we defend home-
court from here on out,
you can do the math."
Game 3 of the East finals,
which are knotted at 1-1,
will be played Sunday night
in Miami.
The advantages that
come with being at home
are many, and most are easy


to figure out: Familiarity
with the court, encour-
agement from the, crowd,
sleeping in own beds.
There's intangibles as
well, and even the play-
ers involved can't quite fig-
ure all of them out. Since.
he turned pro, Dwyane
Wade's career regular-sea-
son winning percentage at
home is .674 (186-90). But
when the lights get play-
off-bright, that percentage
rockets up to .800 (32-8).
Why? Anyone's guess.
"That's a great question,"
said Heat forward Udonis
Haslem, who has been with
Wade for all those past
playoff games in Miami.
"I can't really say. Maybe
because there's less home
games in the playoffs, less
chances to lose, maybe. I
think our home crowd has
always upped the ante in
the playoffs."
The Heat are 6-0 at
home so far in the playoffs.
Dallas' loss to Oklahoma
City on Thursday night was
the Mavericks' first defeat
at home in seven games
there this postseason.
Of course, there's also a
flip side to this home-court-
edge stuff that being
this deep in the playoffs,
the road team is clearly
good, too. Chicago is tied
with Dallas for the NBA's
top playoff road record at
3-2, having allowed more
than 89 points in only one
of those five games.
Plus, the Bulls won- at
Miami on March 6, rallying
from a 12-point deficit to
prevail 87-86 in their lone
regular-season visit. And
starting from that week-


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Miami Heat forward LeBron James (6) dunks over Chicago
Bulls forward Carlos Boozer (left) and center Joakim Noah
during the first quarter of Game 2 of the NBA basketball
Eastern Conference finals on Wednesday in Chicago.


pnd, Chicago is 14-3 away
from home easily the
top mark in the league over
that span.
But the Bulls also insist
that winning in Miami
nearly three months ago
will mean very little on
Sunday night. 1
"Far away. So far away,"
Bulls guard and reigning
NBA MVP Derrick Rose
said Friday, asked how
long ago March seems
now. "But I know we're all
anxious to play. These days,
you just have time to think
about what you did wrong


in the game, what you did
right, analyze the game
when you're at home."
LeBron James sees it the
same way.
He's said it often in
recent weeks home-
court advantage guaran-
tees nothing, a lesson he
learned often when he
was with Cleveland. The
Cavaliers were the East's
top seed last season, and
the NBA's overall No. 1
seed in 2009, coming away
without a title both times.
'"There's no time for an
exhale," James said.


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,


to form four ordinary words. It's supposed to be Ight /
/-- L and I still gained weight.


2011 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
EMCTO



ZBEYER
S- WHEN HE TALKED TO
S I THE LAWYER ABOUT
SUING T-HA MBRFWERY, IT
DZELZA I CAME A---
S -1 Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
-- -suggested by the above cartoon.

Ans: L ( I
(Answers Monday)
Yesterday Jumbles: HUSKY AGAIN TRIPLE ODDITY
Answer: Setting this Jumble cartoon at night left a few
people IN THE DARK









Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415 LAKE CITYREPORTER ADVICE & COMICS SATURDAY MAY 21, 2011


DILBERT
I.i~


THERE WAS A
CONSENSUS IN THE
ROOM\ THAT YOU'RE
NOT IMPORTANT, SO
WE STARTED WITHOUT
YOU. ,


BABY BLUES


BLONDIE


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE


SNUFFY SMITH


WE HATE YOU FORP,
DISRESPECTING US
WITH YOUR LATENESS
AND WE EXPECT YOU'LL
BE LOST AND CONFUSED
BY THE REST OF THIS
,, MEETING. ___


B.C.


FRANK & ERNEST

/-LWLfC0- -^ __ucXJNtDS LIK A GOOP
[D/ 1,,' lWT v n
- -. ^1HOULDR UNIT
0e fY TH6DINA

7 ,., 7 o^ FIRgT. 1


DEAR ABBY


Guest dreads the surprise

at friend's birthday party


DEAR ABBY: My boy-
friend and I will be attending
a milestone birthday party
for a friend of his. The fian-
cee of the birthday guy stated
on the invitation, "There will
be a surprise during the eve-
ning." It has been suggested
that a stripper "may" be the
surprise.
Abby, I realize this might
be OK for some people and
it's just for fun, but I'd be un-
comfortable if this happens.
My boyfriend knows my feel-
ings, but I don't,know if we
would risk being ridiculed
if we left the party. What
should I do if I find myself in
this situation? HATE TO
BE A PARTY-POOPER
DEAR "PARTY-POOP-
ER": Contact the birthday
guy's fiancee and ask if what
you heard is true. Ifitis, spare
yourself the embarrassment
and have your boyfriend at-
tend the party without you.
DEAR ABBY: When
someone has a serious ill-
ness or major surgery, ev-
eryone thinks to bring food,
which is lovely. But I have a
better idea.
When my friend, who has a
young family, was diagnosed
with breast cancer, I offered
to do her laundry. Her recov-
ery was slow, and the chemo
and radiation therapies end-
less. Three years later, we're
nearing the end of a short
and brave life, and I still do
their laundry every week. It


hours to myself to do things
in a leisurely manner rather
than like running a mara-
thon.
I know people are busy,
but it would be great if some
of those who offered help
would call occasionally, tell
me they have an afternoon
or evening free (or even an
hour or two) and give me a'
little breathing room.
I don't begrudge one mo-
ment of the time I have spent
caring for my wife. She has,
for 50 years, been a marvel-
ous wife, a wonderful mother
and the center of our family.
Whatever I do for her can
never repay the comfort,
strength and joy she has
brought into my life. But I
cried (privately) on Christ-.
mas Day after the family had
finished our gift exchange,
because I had no time to go'
and buy her a gift.
Please advise your read-
ers that if the offer of help
they extend is real, to please
check their schedules, find
some time they are willing to
give, CALL that friend, neigh-
bor or relative and offer to sit
with their loved one. That
thoughtful gesture will be ap-
preciated beyond what they
could possibly ever imagine.
A FRIEND OF YOURS

Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES -(March 21-
April 19): Don't bite off
more than you can handle.
Someone will complain if
you fall short of a promise
made. Refuse to let some-
one else's indecisiveness
cause you to procrastinate.
Change is necessary if you
want to move forward. **
TAURUS (April 20-
May 20): You will be able
to set plans in motion in or-
der to achieve some of your
personal goals. Romance
is highlighted and greater
involvement with people
who have similar interests
should be your plans. Com-
munication will clear up un-
certairty. ******-
GEMINI (May21-June
20): Keep a clear head
when dealing with people
who can influence your life
personally or profession-
ally. Hear what others have
to say-before drawing a con-
clusion. Good insight will
help you determine what to
do next. ***
CANCER (June 21-
July 22): You'll tend to
overspend. Offer your time
and encouragement, noth-
ing more. Hands-on help
will bring you far greater
returns in terms of who you
meet and what you receive
in return. ***
LEO (July 23-Aug.
22): Be careful how. you


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

deal with the people around
you. Expect someone to
fight back if you aren't ac-
commodating. You may
want to mfiake a change but
some of the people who are
influenced by what you do
will not be sure you are do-
ing the right thing. ***
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Don't get emotional,
get moving. There is so
much you can accomplish
if you put your mind to it.
You deserve some time to
invest in yourself mentally,
physically or emotionally.
Love is on the rise and a
spectacular evening should
be planned. *****
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): Take things one step
at a time. A money venture
may be enticing but is prob-
ably not the best thing for
you to get involved in, given
your current financial situa-
tion. Instead, make a long-
term investment. **
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-
Nov. 21): You can sort
through any relationship
problems you've been fac-
ing by being honest about
the way you feel. Once you
have shared your thoughts,
you will get a better idea
where you stand. Take a dif-
ferent approach to whatever


problems arise. ****
SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): It may be the
weekend but there is work
to be done. Your hands-on
help and ability to complete
tasks will make a good im-
pression. Mixing business
with pleasure is a good way
to accomplish things. ***
CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): With a little
time and effort you can get
your place in tip-top shape.
Whether it's buying, sell-
ing or just making a resi-
dential change, your choice
will best suit your needs. A
personal relationship will
benefit from changes you
make. ***
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Be careful what
you say and to whom you
reveal personal informa-
tion. A relationship you are
in will be difficult, especially
if you cannot agree on what
needs to be done. Don't lim-
it your options. ***
PISCES (Feb. 19-
March 20): Do your best
to help old friends or to
take on a responsibility that
will ease someone's stress.
Your original and inven-
tive way of taking care of
matters will turn out better
than anticipated. You have
something to offer that can
turn into a moneymaker.
****


CELEBRITY CIPHER

by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: A equals Y
"JM ABD XOH TBJFT YB XIWJHK H
H V I H S S H F I H J F L J T YWJ FTN, ABD

ZHKHSBC YWH WXLJY JF SJYYSH
R X Y Y H ON ." I B SJ F CB U H S S
PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "We must free ourselves of the hope that the sea will
ever rest. We must learn to sail in high winds." Aristotle Onassis
(c) 201 1 by NEA, Inc. 5-21


FOR BETTER OR WORSE


IN SUtMMARY,
LATENESS IS ONE
OF THOSE THINGS
THAT DOESN'T WORK
FOR EVERYONE.


ZITS


GARFIELD


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearobby.com
has been a help to her, and I
have grown closer to her and
her family. When she's gone,
I will never again do a load
of wash without thinking of
her.
Perhaps your readers can
help another family this way.
- THE LAUNDRY FAIRY,
RlpCHESTER, MINN.
DEAR LAUNDRY
FAIRY: The support you
have given to that fam-
ily extends far beyond doing
laundry. Your presence over
the long haul has, I'm sure,
meant much more. Read on
for a view from the perspec-
tive of a caregiver:
DEAR ABBY: My wife
has dementia. Our children
don't live close by, so I'm
her only caregiver. One af-
ternoon a week I hire some-
one to stay with her so I can
grocery shop, do banking
and run necessary errands.
Neighbors and friends over
the years have offered the
standard, "If I can do any-
thing to help, let me know,"
but I'm not the type to call
and ask, although it would
be wonderful to have more


LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS SATURDAY, MAY 21, 2011


Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415


DILBERT


CLASSIC PEANUTS








Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SATURDAY, MAY 21, 2011

Lake City Reporter




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Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

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~I^Hjj


ISELBU I

FIND TI


OneItem per ad $250
14ins6 ldays $.
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lacld a 2 Sigas Et addsitAil int'165 -


Limited to service type advertis-
ing only.
4 lines, one month....$92.00
$10.80 each additional line
Includes an additional $2.00 per
ad for each Wednesday insertion.


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a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Some people prefer to place their
classified ads in person, and some
ad categories will require prepay-
Ioent. Our office is located at 180
East Duval Street.
You can also fax or e-mail your ad
copy to the Reporter.
FAX: 386-752-9400 Please
direct your copy to the Classified
Department.
EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityre-
porter.com .




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Friday This., 10:00a.m. Tinrs.,9:00a.m.
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These deadlines are subject o change without notice.



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on the first day of publication.
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the first incorrect Insertion, and
only the charge for the ad space
in error. Please call 755-5440
immediately for prompt correc-
tion and billing adjustments.
Cancellations- Normal advertising
deadlines apply for cancellation.
Billing Inquiries- Call 755-5440.
Should further information be
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Advertising copy is subject to
approval by the Publisher who
reserves the right to edit, reject,
or classify all advertisements under
appropriate headings. Copy should
be checked for errors by the

will be allowed for the first insertion
for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the
omission of advertisements ordered
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Advertising language must comply
with Federal, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
nation in employment, housing and
public accommodations. Standard


abbreviations are acceptable; how-
ever, the first word of each ad may
not be abbreviated.

In Print and Online
www.lakecityreporter.comn


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT CIVIL COURT
OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL CIR-
CUIT OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY
CIVIL DIVISION .
Case No. 12-2010-CA-000353
Division
FIRST FEDERAL BANK OF
FLORIDA
Plaintiff,
vs.
LARRY W. NORMAN and DELLA
R. NORMAN, FIRST FEDERAL
SAVINGS BANK OF FLORIDA;
DEER CREEK LANDING HOME-
OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC.,
AND UNKNOWN
TENANTS/OWNERS,
Defendants
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given, pursuant to
Final Judgment of Foreclosure for
Plaintiff entered in this cause on May
12, 2011, in the Circuit Court of Co-
lumbia County, Florida, I will sell
the property situated in Columbia
County, Florida described as:
LOT 32, DEER CREEK, PHASE II,
ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR
PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED
IN PLAT BOOK 7, PAGES 11-12,
OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA.
TOGETHER WITH THAT CER-
TAIN 1999 FLEETWOOD RV,
INC. VIN#
GAFLW05A28083CW21 &
GAFLW05B28083CW21 Mobile
VIN GAFLW05A28083CW21 &
GAFLW05B28083CW21 and com-
monly.known as: 523 SW WHITE-
TAIL CIR #32, LAKE CITY, FL
32024; including the building, appur-
tenances, and fixtures located there-
in, at public sale, to the highest and
best bidder, for cash, AT THE
FRONT DOOR OF THE COLUM-
BIA COUNTY COURTHOUSE,
145 N. HERNANDO STREET,
LAKE CITY, FLORIDA, .on June
15,2011 at 11:00 a.m.
Any person claiming an interest in
the surplus form the sale, if any, oth-
er than the property owner as of the
date of the lis pendens must file a
claim within 60 days after the sale.
Dated this 13 day of May, 2011
P. DeWitt Cason
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By:/s/ B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
04544849
May 21,28, 2010
Notice to Lake City Drinking Water
Customers
The city of Lake City Water Facili-
ties Department will be temporarily
converting its disinfectant process
from chloramines (a combination of
chlorine and ammonia) to free chlor-
ine residual beginning June 01, 2011
and ending on June 30, 2011.
This is a routine measure that is
common for water utilities using
chloramines as its primary disinfec-
tant. Water utilities using chlora-
mines must periodically change to
using chlorine alone, known as free
chlorine, to maintain optimal levels
of disinfection within the water dis-
tribution system.
Customers may notice a temporary
change in the taste, odor and/or color
of the water, which is not harmful.
Anyone who uses a kidney dialysis
machine at home should contact their
equipment supplier so the proper fil-
tering equipment may be installed.
Tropical fish or aquatic animal own-
ers should contact a local tropical
fish store for appropriate pretreat-
ment of water before adding water to .
tanks.
Again, this is an annual routine pre-
cautionary measure to ensure our
customers of clean, safe potable wa-
ter.
Please feel free to contact our office
during regular business hours at
(386) 466-3350 if you should have
any questions.
04544845
May 21, 2011
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
FIRST FEDERAL BANK OF
FLORIDA, a Banking corporation
organized under the laws of the Unit-
ed States of America, f/k/a FIRST
FEDERAL SAVINGS BANK OF
FLORIDA
Plaintiff,
v.
MARK A. SLOAN, ET AL
Defendants.
CASE NO.: 10-765-CA
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE
SALE
NOTICE is hereby given that P.
DEWITT CASON, Clerk of the
Court of Columbia County, Florida,
will on the 15 day of June, 2011, at
11:00 a.m. at the Columbia County
Courthouse, 173 N.E. Hemrnando
Avenue, Lake City, Florida offer for
sale and sell at public outcry to the
highest and best bidder for cash, the






Land Clearing

Back Hoe, Dozer, Chopping, root
raking, bush hog, seeding, sod,
disking, site prep, ponds &
irrigation. Free Est! 386-623-3200

Lawn & Landscape Service

Clean Pine Straw,
You pick it up, $1.85 a bale
Delivery of 100 bales $260
386-688-9156
Landscape Maintenance Company
You can trust for knowledge &
pride, Mention this AD!
Mow Green, LLC 386-288-6532

Services


Legal

following described property situated
in Columbia County, Florida, to-wit:
SEE EXHIBIT A ATTACHED
HERETO AND BY REFERENCE
MADE A PART HEREOF.
Commence where the East line of the
Southeast Quarter (SE 1/4) of the
Northeast Quarter (NE 1/4) of Sec-
tion 10, Township 4 South, Range 16
East, Columbia County, Florida, in-
tersects the North right-of-way line
of Troy Road and run thence North
89'43'00" West, along said right-of-
way line, 621.05 feet to the Point of
Beginning; thence continue North
89"43'00" West, along said right-of-
way line, 116.22 feet; thence run
North 00'29'00" East, a distance of
281.10 feet; thence run South
89'00'07" East, 116.22 feet; thence
run South 00'29'00" West, a distance
of 279.65 feet to the Point of Begin-
ning.
Pursuant to the Final Judgment of
Foreclosure entered in a case pend-
ing in said Court, the style of which
is as set out above, and the docket
number of which is 10-765-CA. Any
person claiming an interest in the
surplus from the sale, if any, other
than the property owner as of the
date of the lis pendens must file a
claim within sixty (60) days after the
sale.
WITNESS my hand and the official
seal of said Court, this 13 day of
May, 2011.
P. DeWitt Cason
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Columbia County, Florida
By: /s/ B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
04544795
May 21, 28, 2011


060 Services







04544 E40
LEARN TO




SPEAK ENGLISHOSPITAL
CALL (386) 963-5542,
LEAVE MESSAGE..
100 Job








FL is seeking applicants for
Receptionist/Secretary position.
This clerical position is
requires Opportunities
04544840
RECEPTIONIST/
SECRETARY POSITION
LAKE SHORE HOSPITAL
AUTHORITY


office duties; answering inctam-
ing telephone calls, greeting theCity,
pubic,typs seeking filing, ants for
Receptionist/Secretary position.


cleThis clcal assignments using basic
salaroffice equipment. This position
requires performance of routier
skills. Also requires versatiityncm-
ing telephone calls, greeting the
public,.typing; filing, and :
clerical assignments using basic
office equipment. This position
requires excellent computer
skills. Also requires versatility
as it will be assisting all office
staff. A Position Description
document is available upon
request from Sue Fraze,
Administrative Director, at
386-755-1090, ext. 101, or
sue@lakeshoreha.org. It can
also be accessed online at
www.lakeshoreha.6rg.
To be considered, resumes
must be received by Friday,
June 3, 2011 at 3:00 p.m. in
the LSHA office as stated in the
Position Description.
Associate Reps
SUMMER WORK/GREAT PAY
Immediate FT/PT openings,
Customer sales/service,
Apply Now all ages 17+
(386) 269-0883
AVON!! Only $10 to start!
Earn bonus $ up to $150+
1-800-275-9945 pin #4206
www.youravon.com/tdavies
CDL A Flatbed Truck Driver
needed for F/T OTR SE area, 3
years exp or more, Contact
Melissa or Mary @ 386-935-2773
CNC Machinist needed.
Metal Machine Shop exp req'd.
CNC exp desired, but not necessa-
ry. Must have strong math skills.
Send resume to: 174 NE Cortez
Terrace, Lake City, FL 32055
Experienced estimator needed
for site work & underground utili-
ty contractor. Must be familiar
w/construction software & project
management. DFWP. Fax resume:
386-364-2802, call 386-362-7814
3 Temporary Farm Workers
needed. Employer: Joel H. Porter
Grayson Co, KY. Tobacco &
Alternative Work. Employment
Dates: 07/04/11 01/10/12: Wage
of $9.48/hr. Worker guaranteed
3/4 of contract hours. Tools
provided at no cost. Free housing
provided to non commuting
workers. Transportation &
subsistence reimbursed when 50%
of contract is met. Apply for this
job at the nearest KY Office of
Employment & Training Division
of Workforce & Employment
Services Office referencing the
job order #KY0426878.
Physical laborer needed. CDL
license req'd. Must have respect
for electricity & ability to work in
water & mud. Call 386-752-1854

White Springs HOPE Program
will be accepting applications
for volunteers and employee
positions for the summer youth
enrichment program until
Friday, May 27, 2011.
Please send applications to
Town of White Springs,
Drawer D
White Springs, Florida 32096
or call 386-397-1333


100 Job
Opportunities
7 Temporary Farm Workers
needed. Employer: Michael
McKee DBA McKee Farms.-
Henry Co, KY. Tobacco,
Straw/Hay, Row Crop &
Alternative Work. Employment
Dates: 07/05/11 01/31/12. Wage
of $9.48/hr. Worker guaranteed
3/4 of contract hours. Tools
provided at no cost. Free housing
provided to non commuting
workers. Transportation &
subsistence reimbursed when 50%
of contract is met. Apply for this
job at the nearest KY Office of
Employment954 & Training
Division of Workforce &
Employment Services Office refer-
encing the job order #KY0426954.
Security Officers
needed Lake City Area, must have
current D Security Lic.; Clear
background, Drivers Lic, phone,
Diploma/GED. Benefits, DFWP
EEO Must Apply at:
www.dsisecurity.com MB 1000084
Stylist Needed
Call
386-752-4614
Southern Exposure
Wanted Highly motivated
individual for Sales Position.
Rountree -Moore Automotive
Group, Great benefits, paid vaca-
tion. Exp. a plus but not necessary.
Call Tqny Reese 386-344-7517
WELDER WANTED
Experience needed. Please apply
in person at 174 NE Cortez
Terrace, Lake City, FL. 32055


6 Temporary Farm Workers
needed. Employer: Four Windy
Hill Farms LLC Christian Co,
KY. Tobacco, Straw/Hay, Row
Crop & Alternative Work.
Employment Dates: 07/08/11 -
01/31/12. Wage of $9.48/hr.
Worker guaranteed 3/4 of contract
hours. Tools provided at no
cost. Free housing provided to
non commuting workers.
Transportation & subsistence
reimbursed when 50% of contract
is met. Apply for this job at the
nearest KY Office of Employment
& Training Division of Workforce
& Employment Services Office
referencing the job order
#KY0427302.

120 Medical
Employment
CNA/home attendant needed in
private home. Will work with oth-
er caregivers. Nights & weekends
req'd. Send resume to: PO Box
3719 Lake City, Florida 32056
Counselor for substance abuse pro-
gram in Baker Correctional Institu-
tion. BA w/2yrs exp., M-F day
shift F/T, $30,000 to start, E-mail
resume to sheliarand@aol.com.or
fax to 386-752-2387

240 Schools &
240. Education

04544843
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-05/23/10
Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-07/11/11
Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com


310 Pets & Supplies
Kittens, FREE to good homes.
3 male, 2 female.
Litterbox trained!
call 386-984-9634 leave message
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information. *

To place your
classified ad call

Ts-B O


330 Livestock &
3 Supplies


415 Photo
T415 Equipment


04544790 35 MM Camera Asahi Pentax
Black Angus w/zoom, wide angle,
Cows & Heifers tele-photo, flash, carry case,
Registered & Commercial etc. 386-754-1595 $50
Prices Vary
386-719-4802 or 386-623-9427
pig 420 Wanted to Buy


For Sale
$35
386-758-2978
Single Lane Farms
(1) 5 yr old registered Angus bull.
-Duane Hingson. 386-776-1090
Wayne Parrish Bull.

361 Farm Equipment
84 Ford 4610 Tractor. Runs good.
Solid 2WD. New front tires,
350hr on 2005 motor. Dependable.
$7500. obo. 386-867-0005

41 Medical
12 Supplies
Invacare Electronic Hospital Bed,
like new mattress,
$200
386-965-9822

413 Musical
413 Merchandise
CDG Karaoke System, Optimus,
with Manual,
$50
386-754-1595

REPORTER Classifieds
In Print and On Line
www.lakecityreporter.com


K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.

Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$250 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.


430 Garage Sales

BIG SALE Sat. 7-?. CR 47 past I-
75, Rt. on CR 242, Rt. on Arrow-
head, Rt on Chris Terr. Look for
signs. Too much to list.






Estate Sale, Memorial Day Week-
end, Fri, Sat & Sun May 27-29
291 SW Fantasy Glen, (Branford
Hwy, to Upchurch Ave to Fantasy)
Contents of 4 bdrm home must go!
Call Jim 305-522-3045

ESTATE SALE: Fri & Sat. 9-?
On Forrest Terrace, off Old Coun-
try Club Rd. Eastwood S/D. Furni-
ture & Lots of odds & ends.


Family Owned and Operated

Dealership
(Huntin' a good fit)
New & Used Car Sales
Motivated Self-Starter
Honesty & Good Character
$50,000 plus a year
Benefit Pkg.

Apply in person at


7 Macclenny, FL
B UIRKN 273-E. Macclefftl Ave.
CHEROLET


























MEDICAL


RECEPTIONIST

Needed for busy office.
Experience preferred,


but will train right person.

Fax resume to

386-752-9073

or e-mail to southerninternalmedicine34@yahoo.com


S uwannee
Valley
E electric
( ; Cooperative
Suwannee Valley Electric Cooperative, Inc.
Member Assistance Representative .
Suwannee Valley Electric Cooperation, Inc. has an immediate opening for
a Member Assistance Representative position. This position reports to
the Member Services Manager and will be responsible for assisting the
Cooperative's members in a pleasant, efficient and productive manner. This
position requires a High School Diploma, an excellent personality and some
computer skills including Microsoft Office.

Applications and job descriptions may be picked up at the Suwannee
Valley Electric administration building, 11340 100th St., Live Oak. The jobs
description can be viewed on www.svec-coop.com. Resumes and applications
can be turned in at the above address with Attn: Vicky Talmadge, or emailed
to vickyt@svec-coop.com. The deadline for accepting applications is
Wednesday, June 1, 2011.
SVEC is an equal opportunity employer.


DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.


* ADvantage -


i








LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SATURDAY, MAY 21, 2011


Classified Department: 755-5440


430 Garage Sales
MOVING SALE: 244 SW Wood-
view Way. Woodcrest S/D. off
Branford Hwy. Fri 20th & Sat.
21st. 8-1. Fum., hshold, clothing.
MULTI FAMILY Sat. 8-noon.
Southern Oaks Country Club,
Harris Loop, behind LCMC.
Too much to list!! Look for signs.
Multi-Family-Fri/Sat Old Pine-
mount Rd, 1st house on Rt., lots of
deco,lited X-mas tree, treadmill,
TV, Stereo, Bike, Bird Houses
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.


440 Miscellaneous
3 PUSH Mowers.
Need TLC. (1) Craftsman,
(1) Bolen (1) Yardman.
$100.00 for all. 386-755-6963
4 ROOM USED CARPET
AND PADDING.
You move and haul away.
$60.00 386-755-6963
500 9.5 in x 4.5 in #10
White secutiry enveolpes
with window. $45.00
386-755-6963
GUNSHOW: 05/21 & 05/22
@ The Columbia County
Fairgrounds, Hwy 247 Lake City.
Sat 9am 4pm, Sun 9am-3pm.
Info: 386-325-6114
King Size Mattress,
very good condition,
$50
386-965-9822
New Central A/C, still in box,
with full ten year factory warranty
$1,795
Call 386-364-1090
SOLID KNOTTY pine wood.
Nice rocking chair with 6in
cushions, (seat and back).
$100. 00 386-755-6963
Tow Behind Grill/Smoker
$1,250 OBO.
386-249-3104 or
386-719-4802

510 Jet Ski's
510 for sale
Wave Runner 96 Polaris
w/galvanized Trailer, only
64 hrs, many extra parts
$1,500 obo 386-234-1019

063 Mobile Homes
630 for Rent
I UNDER NEW MANAGEMENT
Oakview Mobile Home Park.
Clean well maintained 2/2 units in
nice park. 2 miles to downtown
Lake City. 386-984-8448
2&3 BR MH. $395 $650. mo.
plus deposit. Water & sewer fur-
nished. Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
2/2 Newly remodeled MH New

area No pets 1st, last & sec. $450
mo $300 sec will work w/payment
plan. Call Jenn 386-454-7724
2/2 Units, clean, well maintained,
nice safe park setting, 2 miles to
downtown Lake City, $550 month
+ $550 sec dep, 386-984-8448
2br /2ba SWMH; also Residential
RV lots for rent between Lake City
& G'ville. Access to 1-75 & 441
(352)317-1326 Call for terms
3/2 S of Lake City, (Branford area)
$400 dep, $600 month
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
CLEAN 3br/lba, In quiet,
private park. Large lot
Call: 386-752-6269
Iv message if no answer.
DWMH,On Private Location
CR 252, Close to Town 3/2
CH/A $500 monthly
386-755-0242
Eastside Village a 55+ Retirement
Community offers 2br/2ba Manu-
factured home fully furnished. No
pets. Leases for $650 + utilities.
1st, last, security. Eastside Village
Realty, Inc. 752-5290 for info.
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White. Contact 386-623-3404
or 386-365-1919
X-CLEAN 2/2 SW, 8 mi
NW of VA. Clean acre lot, nice
area. $500. mo + dep No dogs
386-961-9181

64O Mobile Homes
U U for Sale
Access Realty Make Offer! 3/2
MH w/over 1700 SF & move in
ready. Convenient to schools,
shopping & hospitals. MLS 73861
$89,500. Patti Taylor.623-6896
SMobile Home
650 &Land
MH on 1 Acre in Live Oak near
Peacock Lake, owner finance
$42,500 MLS#77598 Call Roger
Lovelady 386-365-7039 @
Westfield Realty Group
Owner Finance, Nice 3/2, S of
Lake City, small down/$650 mo
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com


710 R nhed Apt. 790 Vacation Rentals


05525655
SPRING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans;
some with garages.
Call 386-454-1469
or visit our website:
www.springhillvillage.net








I & 2 Bedroom Apartments
Move in for as low as
$199
386-755-2423
2BR/2BA w/garage
on the west side of town.
Washer/Dryer hookups & more.
Call for details. 386-755-6867
A Landlord You Can Love!
2 br Apts $575. & up + sec. Great
area. CH/A washer/dryer hookups.
386-758-9351/352-208-2421
Cute & clean, 2 br Apt. in town
Great area. Close to the VA
Medical Center. $515. mo plus
dep. Must see!!! 386-344-2972
Great location W of 1-75, spacious
deluxe 2BR apts., garage, W/D
hook up. patio. $600 & up, + SD,
386-344-3715 or 386-965-5560
The Lakes Apts. Studios & IBr's
from $135/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $450. + sec.
Call Michelle 386-752-9626

70A Furnished Apts.
S V For Rent
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

73 Unfurnished
v Home For Rent

04544776
/ 169 SE James St. 2/1 bunga-
low w/front deck & back yard.
Privacy fence. $575. mo + sec.
/ 390 Wilshire. 3/2 newer up-
scale home in Callaway availa-
ble June 1. $1500. mo + sec.
/ 143 Zebra Terrace. 3/2 home
on 1+ acre with fenced back
yard. $875./ mo + security.
1st month rent discounted
50% to qualified tenant.

/ 6206 CR 240. 3/1 CCB home
located in Columbia City
$725. mo + sec.

/ 204 NW Guerdon Rd. New
Construction! This 3/2 home has
never been lived in, all new ev-
erything. $750. mo + security.

/ 3083 SR 47 S. 3/1.5 brick
home on 1.5 acres. Available
June 1, 2011. $895. mo. + sec.
Century 21 The Darby
Rogers Co.
BJ Federico 386-365-5884
Kayla Carbono 386-623-9650

3 br/lba. $550. mo. or
lbr duplex $600.mo Utilities incl
on Nassau Street
386-697-9950
3br/1.5ba. Very clean, CH/A
Fenced (privacy) large back yard.
Nice area/location. $800. mo $800.
dep. Ref's req'd. (941)920-4535
Eastside Village a 55+ Retirement
Community offers 2br/lba Duplex,
no pets. Leases for $600 + utilities.
First, last, security. Eastside
Village Realty, Inc. 752-5290
Home for Rent.
3/2 in City Limits. No pets.
$1000. per month. Call Susan,
Realtor. 386-623-6612
Large 2/1 newly remodeled, near
school, $575 mo, + dep, no pets!,
pls Iv mess. 386-365-1920 or 454-
7764 after 6p. 843 SE Putnam St.
Private House for Rent
Newly Remodeled, S of Lake City
Call The Adams Agency @
386-752-1444

750 Business &
Office Rentals
For Lease: 1,500 17,000sf
1525 S. Ohio Ave, Live Oak, FL
Call Scott Stewart@ Westfield
Realty Group 386-867-3498
FOR LEASE: Downtown office
space. Convenient to .
Court house.
Call 386-755-3456
For Lease: E Baya Ave. Two -
1000 sqft office space units or
combined for 2000 sqft. 386-984-
0622 or weekends 386-497-4762
Office Space For Lease
2112sf, 7 rms, Irg conf rm, 4 baths,
private parking MLS#76508
$1760/mo, Call Pam @ Remax
386-303-2505
OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$695. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor


ONI t WH ATECRAFT


Wave Runner 96
Polaris
W/galvanized trailer, only
64 hrs, many extra parts.
$1,500 obo
Call
386-234-1019


Horseshoe Beach Summer Spcl
Gulf Front 2br. w/lg porch, dock.
fish sink. wkend $345./wk $795.
386-235-3633/352-498-5986
alwaysonvacation.com #419-181
"Florida's Last Frontier"


805 Lots for Sale
5 Acre Lot, Secluded & Cleared,
MLS# 67871 $55,000
Call Lisa Waltrip
@ 386-365-5900
westfieldrealtygroup.com
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Fort White. 5 ac. lot. Cleared,
grass, paved street, high and dry.
MLS# 77031
Sherry 386-365-8414 $23,999
Hallmark Real Estate. Cleared
2.57 ac. fenced w/32' Dutchman
camper. In O'Brien. Close to Live
Oak, Lake City, Branford. $25,000
MLS# 74534 386-867-1613
Hallmark Real Estate. Owner
Finance with $5K down with
terms negotiable. Below assessed
value for the county. MLS# 74484
$17,900 Jay Sears 386-867-1613
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.


810 Home for Sale

3/2 Brick Home in town, fenced
back yard w/12x12 workshop
$79,900 Just Reduced!
MLS# 77414 R.E.O.Realty
Group, Inc 386-243-8227
3/2 Brick Home w/1 car garage,
detach carport MLS#77780
$109,900, Call Jo Lytte Remax
386-365-2821
www.jolytte.florida-property-search.conm
3/2 Cute Home, Remodeled, on 2
acres, partially fenced $114,900
MLS# 77396
R.E.O. Realty Group
386-243-8227
3/2 in Lake City Airpark
pool, porch, pond, detach garage
large hangar w/living quarters
MLS#77756 $399,900 Westfield
Call Josh G 386-466-2517
4/2 on 10.5 acres w/ detached
garage, patio, above ground pool,
MLS# 77410 $189,888
R.E.O. Realty Group, Inc
386-243-8227
Brick Home, Screened Porch
$185,900 MLS#77893
Call Charlie Sparks @
Westfield Realty Group
386-755-0808
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
6br/3.5ba brick. Lake views from
back. 39.7 ac., private paved road.
MLS# 76111 Mary Brown White-
hurst. 386-965-0887 $1,200,000
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Home on the lake in town. 4br/3ba
MLS# 76085 Elaine K. Tolar 386-
755-6488 or Mary Brown White-
hurst. 386-965-0887 $299,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
New home in Mayfair S/D. 4br on
comer lot. Split plan. $2J4,900
MLS# 76919 Elaine K. Tolar.
386-755-6488
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
4br/3ba 2 story brick on cul-de-
sac. 1 ac landscaped. Lori Geibeig
or Mary Brown Whitehurst.
386-965-0887 $299,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
4br/1.5ba brick. 1332 sq ft. Great
floor plan, nice yard, close to
town. I ac landscaped. Lori
Geibeig MLS# 75713 $84,900
CYPRESS LANDING!
S3BR/2BA built in 2005
w/large kitchen $115,000
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #75794
DESIRABLE GWEN LAKE
area! Nice 3BR/2BA home
on corner lot $112,000
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #77307
Eastside Village a 55+ Retirement
Community. 2br/2ba home with
garage, screen porch. Choose wall
color, flooring. MLS# 76483 East-
side Village Realty, Inc. 752-5290


950 Cars for Sale
1996 Mercury Sable,
Good Condition, $2000,
White, Power,
386-965-9822


810 Home for Sale
FOR SALE by very motivated
owner. Now reduced $80,000 to
$119,000. Townhouse on Golf
course. 3br/3ba. Wood burning
fireplace. End unit. Remodeled
kitchen, first class appliances,
granite countertops. New Hunter
Douglas wdw treatments.
Cathedral ceiling. Pool, tennis
court. Call for appt. (904)246-6222
Great Family Home in S/D
MLS# 77325, $109,000
Call Missy Zecher @ Remax
Professionals 386-623-0237
www.missyzecher.com
Great Home in Great Neighbor-
hood, Can be 4/2 or 3/2 w/study
MLS#77284 $164,900
Call Carrie Cason @Westfield
386-623-2806
GREAT STARTER HOME!
3BR/2BA w/lots of closets
space & nice lawn $79,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #76432
Hallmark Real Estate. 3/2 Brick
home w/large screened porch.
Back yard has wooded privacy.
MLS#69482 Janet Creel 719-0382
or Paula Lawrence 623-1973
Hallmark Real Estate. Bring the
horses. 3/2 HUD, 4 ac. Sold "as is"
$106,000 Bids are being accepted.
www.hudhomestore.com MLS#
72068 Martin Tavener 965-7773
Hallmark Real Estate. DWMH on
5 ac south of town. Back porch,
new metal roof wood burning fire-
place & wired workshop. $82,500
MLS#77185 Janet Creel 719-0382
Hallmark Real Estate. Glassed
porch overlooks wooded backyard
in the Plantations. Pool,
sprinkler system. $204,900
MLS#75429 Janet Creel 719-0382
Hallmark Real Estate. Time to go
to the River. Stilt home w/covered
decking. Floating dock,out bldgs
& covered RV parking; $188K.
MLS#72068 Janet Creel 719-0382
Home on 15 Acres, 2500sf, new
appliances, workshop, MLS 77552
$235,000 Call Brittany @
Results Realty 386-397-3473
HOME OR OFFICE on
Alachua St; remodeled
1,207 SqFt home $82,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #77724
Hallmark Real Estate. 2006
2200SF home. 2br/2ba w/mother-
in-law suite, 4 car garage, endless
hot water heater. MLS# 77547
$309,900 Jay Sears 386-867-1613
Hallmark Real Estate. 3/3 Brick
w/over 2500 SF. Great location
with nice one acre pond in back.
Detached workshop MLS# 75222
$179,900 Jay Sears 386-867-1613
Hallmark Real Estate. 4/2 Brick,
3100 SF, Granddaddy Oaks on 5
acres. Double detached carport/ga-
rage w/workshop. MLS# 77877
$119,900. Jay Sears 386-867-1613
Just Reduced 3/2 home, inside city
limits, fenced backyard, detached
carport w/office MLS#77411
$82,900 Call R.E.O.Realty,
@ 386-243-8227 Make Offer!
Just Reduced 4/2 on 1.57 acres,
fireplace, partially fenced, MLS#
77412, Call Nancy Rogers at
R.E.O. Realty Group
386-243-8227 $64,900
Large affordable home in S/D on 2
Acres, fishing rights to Timberlake
Property Owner's Assoc. $64,900
MLS#74862 Call Brittany @
Results Realty386-397-3473
Large Brick, 3/1, 4.43 acres, metal
roof, MLS# 77415 $104,888
R.E.O. Realty Group, Inc.
386-243-8227
Large Home in the Country on
3.66 acres, fireplace, 2 outbldgs,
MLS#76471, $89,900 Call Jo
Lytte @ Remax 386-365-2821
jolytte@remaxnfl.com
Large Home w/Open Floor Plan,
back yard & porch, Irg oaks, fire-
place, MLS#76122 $115,000
Call Missy Zecher @ Remax 386-
623-0237,mzecher@remax.net
LOTS OF UPGRADES!
Remodeled kitchen in this
2BR/1BA home $29,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY
INC. 755-5110 #77505
Luxury Log Home,
Whole House Generator, $269,900
MLS# 76899 Call Roger
Lovelady @386-365-7039
westfieldrealtygroup.com
Nice, large 4/2 on I acre
w/florida room, granite floors,
wrap around front porch, $148,000
Call Brittany Stoeckert @
Results Realty 386-397-3473
Norwegian Brick Home, fire-
place/family rm, open floor plan,
screen porch, fenced back yard,
MLS#76796 $179,900
Jo Lytte Remax 386-365-2821
Owner Finance. Custom built 3/2.5
10.8 ac. Granite, fireplace, vaulted
ceilings, surround sound, lanai,
gazebo. MLS 77382 Access Real-
ty. Patti Taylor $249K 623-6896


810 Home for Sale

Priced Reduced! 3/2 w/2346 sf.
.67 ac. Creekside S/D. Shade,
surround sound, vaulted ceilings.
MLS 77385 $169,900. Access
Realty. Patti Taylor. 386-623-6896
Rose Creek S/D, 5/4, 3269sf, on
2.2 acres, bonus rmn, many
upgrades Reduced! MLS#75485
Reduced! $234,900, Call Pam @
Remax 386-303-2505
Spacious Brand New Split Floor
Plan Home, Fenced Yard
MLS#77493 $229,900
Call Mike Lienemann @ Westfield
Realty Group 386-867-9053
SPACIOUS home built in
1995 has 2BR/2BA & 1,636
SqFt on 1 acre $89,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110
Sturdy 3/2 on 4.35 acres, fruit &
pecan trees, Minutes from town
MLS#77878 $105,000
Call Jo Lytte @ Remax
386-365-2821/www.jolytte.com
Totally Remodeled 4 Bd Home
Spacious Must See! -
MLS#77782 $135,000
Missy Zecher 386-623-0237
www.missyzecher.com
Well Maintained 3/2 on dead-end
street, quiet, country, close to
downtown $105,000 MLS#77800
Call Lisa Waltrip @Westfield
Realty Group 386-365-5900

820 Farms &
S Acreage
4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$69,900. $613mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
4 acres, Wellborn, New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down, $39,900, $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
FARM- 7 stall barn, Apt.
17+ acres cross fenced.
Close in $1000. mo.
386-961-1086
FOR SALE: $68,000 CASH FOR
QUICK SALE: In McAlpin.
10 Acres W/2006 DW,
863-634-5283 for details.
FSBO, Ten acres, Mason City off
Catherine Rd, fully fenced,
power accessible
$42,000 386-344-0504
Half to ten acre lots. Some w/
well, septic, pp. We finance; low
dwn pmt. Deas Bullard Properties.
386-752-4339. www.landnfl.com
Hallmark Real Estate. 40 ac hunt-
ing tract w/camper. Water & septic
already in place. Stands & feeders
in place. MLS# 75532
$84,000 Jay Sears 386-867-1613
Three One Acre Lots available
@ $14,900 ea & One 1.65 Acre
lot for $19,900 MLS#76050
Call Brodie Alfred 386-623-0906
Westfield Realty Group

Commercial
O3 Property
Commercial Property For Sale
Currently Leased $495,000
MLS#75953 Call Aaron
Nickelson @ 386-867-3534
Westfield Realty Group
FOR SALE or Lease, Commercial
Bldg, Prime Location, formerly
Church on the Way,
approx 2700sf 386-755-0242
Great Investment/Owner Finance
1400 sq ft building on 2 acres
Creative terms, owner flexible.
CLose to 1-75. 386-867-1190
Hallmark Real Estate. Downtown
Restaurant. Gigantic BBQ Smoker
Clean kitchen w/equip. Handle any
type of food svc. MLS# 77902
$189,900 Vic Lantroop 623-6401
Mini Storage (204 Units),
gated, fenced 5 acres, $1,300,000,
MLS#76048 Call Millard Gillen
@ Westfield Realty Group
386-365-7001

80o uWaterfront
8O5 Property

Upscale River Cabin on
Suwannee River, Shop, Dock
MLS#76336 $349,900
Call Jo Lytte @ Remax
386-365-2821
860f Investment
6OU Property
3/2 Renovated Home in town,
front porch, new appliances, cur-
rently leased MLS#76658 $49,900
Jo Lytte/Remax 386-365-2821
www.jolytte.florida-property-search.com
Great Income Opportunity!
Mobile Home Park For Sale
MLS#77228 $195,000
Call Pam Beauchamp @ Remax
386-758-8900


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