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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01554
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 5/15/2011
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
System ID: UF00028308:01554
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text





Defense First
CHS offense trails in
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000018 120511 ***3-DIOIT
LIB OF FLOIIDA HISTORY
PO BOX 1177007
205 SMA UNTV OF FLO[RIDA
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-1913


Weather Stop
Lightning keeps Indians
326 m full scrimmage.
Sports, I B


arKe


City


Reporter


iSunday, May 15, 201 I www.lakecityreporter.com Vol. 137, No. 96 E $1.00


NASA clears

shuttle for

Monday launch


Endeavour's last
mission will be
to space station.
By MARCIA DUNN
AP Aerospace Writer
CAPE CANAVERAL
- NASA unanimously
approved a Monday morn-
ing launch attempt for the
space shuttle Endeavour,
after reviewing all the
repairs for an electrical
problem that grounded
the next-to-last shuttle
flight two weeks ago.
The flight to the
International Space
Station will be led by
commander Mark Kelly,


the husband of 'U.S. Rep.
Gabrielle Giffords, who
was critically wounded
during a January shooting
rampage in Tucson, Ariz.
She was present for the
first launch attempt, and
is to be on hand for this
one as well.
Mission management
team chairman Mike
Moses said Saturday he is
confident the repairs took
care of the electrical short
and blown fuse that pre-
vented a string of heaters
from turning on during
the first launch attempt
on April 29. A thermostat
with an exposed wire was
* SHUTTLE continued on 3A


A U.S. Coast
Guard boat patrols
near the space
shuttle Endeavour
at Kennedy Space
Center in Cape
Canaveral Saturday.
Endeavour, and her
crew of six astronauts,
is scheduled to lift off
Monday morning on a
16-day mission to the
international space
station.
ASSOCIATED PRESS


Honey Prairie

fire 30 percent

contained


Official estimate:
Blaze burning in
125,206 acres.
From staff reports
An estimated 30 per-
cent of the Honey Prairie
fire has been contained,
according to official
reports Saturday morn-
ing.
The Honey Prairie fire
is burning in 125,206
acres.
Significant containment
was achieved with the tac-
tical firing operation along
the Swamp Edge Bre'ak
within the South Branch,


according to information
released from Georgia
Forestry Commission
Incident Management.
Line improvement and
tactical firing also gained
containment along the
East Branch.
A spot fire breached
onto Billy's Island with
extreme fire behavior in
the center of the swamp.
Also, a small fire reached
the Suwannee Canal and
was suppressed with air
support.
The fire-fighting plans
for Saturday were to con-
FIRE continued on 3A


FRIEND




IN NEED

Group builds new

home for veterans.


ANTONIA ROBINSON/Lake City Reporter
Jim Davis (bottom) assists Mike Arthur in construction work
on the future home of Teddy 'Bear' Milford Saturday.


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
For several years
Teddy "Bear"
Milford of Lake
City had to live
in a run-down
home.
"It was raggedy," he
said.
Now, thanks to a little
help from some friends, he
will be moving into a bet-
ter house that will benefit
future veterans as well.
A newly formed
Columbia County group,
Vets Helping Vets, is


ANTONIA ROBINSON/Lake City Reporter
Jim Paquette (left) and Teddy 'Bear' Milford talk about the progress on building his new home
Saturday.


building Milford, a Navy
veteran, a new 920 square-
feet house, said Mike
Arthur, one of the project's
organizers. The house will
include two bedrooms and
one 14th.
"I've known Teddy for
years, and no one wanted
to lend him the money to
get a house," he said.
Although not a veteran
himself, the majority of the!
group has served the coun-
try, Arthur said. He began
talking with Jim Martin
and Jerry Gust, and they
decided to do something to
help their friend.
About four months were
spent talking to other *
people for donations. Work
began on the home the
first week in April and is
expected to be completed
in July. A place for Milford
to live has been provided.
"It will be a July 4 p r'es-;
ent, hopefully," he said.
Initially, Milford didn't
want to build a new house.
"When I met (Arthur)
at a restaurant he asked
when I was going to be
ready to move out so they
could tear down the house
and build a new one," he
said. I said, 'No we ain't
either."
Milford said he didn't
want charity, Arthur said.
"I told him, 'This isn't
charity,' he said. "'This is
HOUSE continued on 3A


ANTONIA ROBINSON/Lake City Reporter
Lance Lewis (left) nails on the sheeting of Teddy
'Bear' Milford's future home Saturday. A group of
14 volunteers worked on the house despite rain
showers. Before Milford's new home could be
built, his old one (photo above) had to be torn
down.


ANTONIA ROBINSON/Lake City Reporter
Patty Reeves (from left), Charlene Brown and Gabriel Santiago prepare
to taste a smoothie concoction made by Troy Wimberly at the Columbia
Bank booth at the Spring Fling.


Spring Fling:'Carnival for Charities'


Third annual event
raises money for
CARC, Happy House.
By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
It was an evening for adults to
feel like "kids" again at the annual
Spring Fling, according to orga-
nizers.
The third annual event was
Saturday at the home of Jerry and
Carolyn Castagna in Lake City.
This year's Spring Fling was
themed "Carnival for Charities,"
and proceeds from the event ben-
efited Happy House and CARC


- Advocates for Citizens with
Disabilities Inc.
'The community support has
been tremendous," said Betsy
Pottle, CARC board member. "Ifs
been wonderful."
The money raised from the
event, will help CARC invest in
new revenue-generating programs
for local citizens with disabilities.
Happy House will use proceeds
to go toward educational scholar-
ships for children whose families
do not qualify for any other state
programs.
This is the first year of the car-
nival theme, which was suggested
by Carolyn Castagna.
"It was something different,"


she said. "We wanted to add some
spunk to the fling."
The evening featured carnival
games, such as a wet sponge toss,
fishing' booth and tricycle race.
First Federal Bank of Florida won
the barbecue cook-off with its
"Fenced in barbecue." Other con-
testants were Columbia Bank and
Peoples State Bank.
Participating in the Spring
Fling is a great cause, said Renee
McIntosh of First Federal.
"The CARC and Happy House
are always worthy causes that
need extra support," she said.
Organizing the event was a lot
FUNG continued on 3A


1 .- .. 8


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400


85
Partly cloudy
WEATHER, 2A


O pinion ................
Life .... ................
O bituaries ..............
Advice & Comics.........
Puzzles .................


t VI


TODAY IN
BUSINESS
Shands creating
more jobs.'


COMING
TUESDAY
Endeavour scheduled
for liftoff.


,p


Lald4lt,-fp
MAY 15,2011
- - - - - - - -







LAKE CITY REPORTER SUNDAY REPORT SUNDAY, MAY 15, 2011


FLORIDA
SoC&.


Friday:
4-18-22-29 19


Friday:
9-13-15-19-23


Saturday:
Afternoon: 2-4-2
Evening: 1-4-9


Saturday:
Afternoon: 5-0-2-7
Evening: 7-9-7-8


Wednesday:
1-5-8-29-30-46


Wednesday:
9-17-32-43-45 PB31


AROUND FLORIDA


Coast Guard unit back from Guantanamo Bay


HOMESTEAD
A South Florida
Coast Guard
unit returned
Friday from
ore than
six months of protecting
the U.S. Navy base at
Guantanamo Bay, Cuba,
where dozens of suspected
terrorists are detained.
The 75 men and women
were flown Friday into the
Homestead Air Reserve
Base south of Miami,
where they were met by
flag-waving family mem-
bers, squealing children
and top Coast Guard
brass. They were on duty
at Guantanamo Bay when
President Barack Obama
announced the killing in
Pakistan of Osama bin
Laden, who has many
ardent followers in custody
at the naval base.
Petty Officer Robert
Mundo of Grapevine,
Texas, said he was getting
ready for bed when some-
one burst in with the news.
"It was late. I was get-
ting ready for watch.
Somebody came barging
in and we were all like,
'what?'" Mundo said. "It
was a good thing to hear.
It was just an overwhelm-
ing feeling of satisfaction."
The Miami-based unit is
one of 12 Maritime Safety
and, Security Teams cre-
ated after the 9/11 terror
attacks that can deploy
throughout the world to
protect U.S. ports, bases
and other assets. The
MiaAni group spent 61/2
months providing security
along the waterfront at
Guantanamo and is now
being replaced by another


In this file photo made in 2006
tary guards walk within Camp
Base, Cuba.

unit.
Rear Adm. William
Baumgartner, whose
command stretches from
South Carolina into the
Caribbean, said the teams
are also used for security
for special events such
as presidential visits and
Super Bowls.
"They can deploy just
about anywhere we want
them, anywhere we need
a specialized force,"
Baumgartner said.
The Guantanamo
mission is. doubly sensi-
tive, the admiral added,
because the base is
located in Cuba, where the
communist government
is hostile to the U.S. And,
of course, there are still


ASSOCIATED PRESS


i, reviewed by a U.S. Department of Defense official, U.S. mili
Delta military-run prison, at the Guantanamo Bay U.S. Naval


about 170 suspected ter-
rorist detainees housed
there, many considered
among the most danger-
otus in the world.
"It's always a difficult
situation," Baumgartner
said. "You always have to
be careful there. You have
to make good choices."

Parents of 1-year-
old die in crash
DELAND Authorities
in.central Florida are
investigating a crash that
killed the parents of a 1-
year-old and sent three
others to the hospital.
The Florida Highway
Patrol said the car they.
were riding in flipped


and struck a large power
pole Friday night in Lake
County. Killed were the
driver, 21-year-old Walter
Perkins Jr., and 22-year-old
Danielle Pearson, both of
Paisley. Authorities said
Pearson was 8 months
pregnant. The fetus did
not survive.
The survivors included
the pair's daughter, as well
as a 17-year-old and a 21-
year-old.
Authorities are still try-
ing to determine what
prompted the accident.

Inmate sentenced
for killing cellmate
TAVARES A Central
Florida prison inmate has


been sentenced to another
43 years for killing his
cellmate for whining too
much.
A Lake County judge
sentenced 23-year-old
Phillip Adams last month.
He had previously pleaded
guilty to second-degree
murder in a deal with pros-
ecutors to avoid the death
penalty.
Authorities said Adams
was sharing a cell at Lake
Correctional Institution
with 43-year-old Marc
Rogers in July 2009 when
Adams grew tired of listen-
ing to Rogers complain
about his sentence. He
was serving 25 years for
fatally stabbing a house-
mate in Boynton Beach.
Authorities said Adams
chewed the hem off a bed
sheet and used it to stran-
gle Rogers.
If not for the attack on
Rogers, Adams would have
completed his four-year
sentence for lewd and
lascivious molestation in
October.

Jane Lynch pumps
up rowing team
PALMETTO "Glee"
star Jane Lynch said it
feels good to be cheered
instead of feared.
The actress who plays
maniacal cheerleading
coach Sue Sylvester on
the Fox network's popular
show got a thunderous
cheer when she appeared
Friday at the first-ever pep
rally for the new rowing
team at Palmetto High
School, south of Tampa.
Here's the connec-


tion: the Emmy-winning
actress, and her wife,
former Florida resident
and competitive rower
Lara Embry, are friends
of Palmetto rowing coach
Trish Jackson. Lynch and
Embry already have donat-
ed $15,000 to the new club.
On Saturday, Lynch
will be honored at a fund-
raising brunch at a golf
course, with proceeds
going toward the purchase
of boats, oars and rowing
machines.

Competency
hearing delayed
NAPLES There's
another delay in determin-
ing the competency of a
southwest Florida man
accused of cutting the
throats of his wife and five
children.
On Thursday, a judge
postponed a scheduled
competency hearing for
34-year-old Mesac Damas
because defense attorneys
had just received a thick
stack of documents that
may be relevant to their
case.
The hearing was
rescheduled for June 2.
Afterward, the judge will
determine if the Haitian
national is competent
to stand trial for the
September 2009 slay-
ings. The hearing will not
address Damas' mental
state at the time he is
accused of killing his wife
and five young children in
their Naples town house.

* Associated Press


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS


Duran Duran perform for AIDS awareness


CANNES, France
The Cannes Film Festival
isn't all about movies.
In the wee hours of
Saturday morning, the
focus shifted to music as
Duran Duran stole the spotlight for a
good cause. The band took time out
from touring and promoting their lat-
est album, "All You Need is Now," to
rock onstage at a party partly spon-
sored by the (RED) organization to
bring awareness to the HIV/AIDS
epidemic..
"We feel that we help out .wherev-
er we can," lead singer Simon LeBon
said. '"The (RED) organization is a
very fine organization indeed.... It
seemed like a good thing for us to
do."
The party was held at the exclu-
sive VIP room and was hosted by
Belvedere and (RED), which have
teamed, up and created a special
addition bottle aimed at raising
money to help fight HIV and AIDS.
Duran Duran has an emotional
attachment to Cannes as one of their
earlier records was made in the
region.
"When we came to record our
third album, we rented a big cha-
teau just outside of Cannes in the
mountains and spent all of our time
writing, recording and coming down
here to party in the evening, so great
memories, really great memories
of this town," said drummer Roger
Taylor.

Jon Stewart to rap with
Bill O'Reilly on 'Factor'
NEW YORK Bill O'Reilly wants
to rap with Jon Stewart.
The host of Fox News Channel's
"The O'Reilly Factor" has invited the
host of Comedy Central's "The Daily
Show" as a guest Monday. Fox News
said Friday that O'Reilly and Stewart
will debate the invitation for Grammy
Award-winning rapper Common to
perform at a White House poetry
night this week.
O'Reilly has criticized Common's
presence at Wednesday's event. He
said some of Common's lyrics cel-
ebrlat vi,)r,,,c .


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Members of the band Duran Duran (from left), John Taylor, Simon Le Bon, Nick
Rhodes and Roger Taylor, pose for photographs at the 64th international film festi-
val, in Cannes, southern France, Friday.


Common is known for socially
and politically conscious-rhymes.
He was on his best behavior at the
White House. He took the criticism
in stride and tweeted, "Fox News
doesn't like me." He added on
Facebook, "Peace yall!"
Stewart let loose with an anti-Fox
News Channel rap on his show.
The O'Reilly-Stewart faceoff airs
Monday.

Couric to leave CBS
newscast next week
NEW YORK Katie Couric
will make her exit from the "CBS
Evening News" next Thursday.
The network on Friday announced
her exit date. She'll be leaving short
of five years as CBS' top anchor, and
shy of the June 4 expiration date
of her contract. Scott Pelley will
take over as the new "CBS Evening
News" anchor on June 6.
Couric hasn't announced her next
move, but has been looking at a day-
time talk show and discussing her
future with ABC News.
Couric's executive producer at the
evening news for the past four years,
Rick Kaplan, this week took a new
;,, ,-<, n., ee at


ABC News and producing Christiane
Amanpour's Sunday morning politi-
cal show.

Colbert seeking
'megaphone of cash'
WASHINGTON Comedian
Stephen Colbert wants to grab "a
megaphone made of cash" so he can
shout out the demands of his sup-
porters in next year's elections.
Political talk isn't cheap, so on
Friday he filed paperwork with feder-
al election officials to set up a special
political action committee, known as
a "super PAC," that will let him raise
unlimited amounts of money from
corporations, unions and individuals.
He also asked the Federal Election
Commission for permission to talk
about the PAC on his show, "The
Colbert Report," without violating
campaign finance laws.
"I am sick and tired of the old
boy Democratic and Republican
network toadying to corporate inter-
ests," Colbert said. "What about us?
Where's our money. We're willing to
toady."

Ia Associated Presps


* Playwright Sir Peter Shaf-
fer is 85.
* Actress-singer Anna Maria
Alberghetti is 75.
* Counterculture icon Wavy
Gravy is 75.
* Former Secretary of State
Madeleine Albright is 74.
* Singer Trini Lopez is 74.


Lake City
HOW TO REACH US
Main number ....... (386) 752-1293
Fax number .............752-9400
Circulation ...............755-5445
Online... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of,
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson .....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
Assistant Editor CJ Risak. .754-0427
After 1:00 p.m.
(crisak@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Ashley Butcher .. .754-0417
(abutcher@lakecityreporter.com)
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440.


* Country singer K.T. Oslin
is 69.
* Actor Chazz Palminteri is
59.
* Baseball Hall-of-Famer
George Brett is 58.
* Musician-composer Mike
Oldfield ("Tubular Bells") is


Reporter
BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7:30
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation ..............755-5445
(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks.................. $26.32
24 Weeks..................$48.79
52 Weeks .............. $83.46
Rates include 7% sales tax.
Mall rates
12 Weeks .................. $41.40
24 Weeks ................... $82.80
52 Weeks.................. $179.40


CORRECTION.

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion,
please call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifica-
tions will run in this space. And thanks for reading.


evnatch


Celebrity Birthdays


Daily Scripture


"For you created my inmost
being; you knit me together in
my mother's womb. I praise
you because I am fearfully and
wonderfully made; your works
are wonderful, I know that full
well"'
-Psalm 139:13-14


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


-









Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE SUNDAY, MAY 15, 2011


Broadband education proposed


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter. corn

LIVE OAK A Tallahassee-based
education group made a proposal to
offer classes to familiarize residents
with Internet services as part of a
campaign designed to promote the
broadband initiative.
Mary K Bedford, executive direc-
tor of the Florida Learning Alliance
and president of Emergent Design &
Development, proposed the campaign
during Wednesday's North Florida
Broadband Authority meeting.
The proposed campaign would
be called The Florida Broadband
Education Campaign, and it would be
a joint initiative of Workforce Florida
and the Florida Learning Alliance.


"We're in the process of fulfilling a
grant offered by Workforce Florida
and the purpose of the grant is to pro-
vide broadband education and train-
ing to the underserved and unserved
rural Floridians," she said. "The grant
will focus on providing broadband
(Internet) training to those indi-
viduals who don't currently use the
Internet."
According to statistics from the
2007 National Telecommunications
and Information Administration, pro-
vided by Bedford, about 40 percent of
rural' Floridians currently don't use
the Internet. The data also showed
that 48 percent of those people felt
the content on the Internet was not
relevant to their lives, while 50 per-
cent were not comfortable using the


computer or Internet on their own.
'The plan we're proposing will pro-
vide education and training through-
out rural Florida 33 counties in
Florida that could be classified as
rural," Bedford said.
The proposal calls for the educa-
tion training to be provided through
project Web sites, written materials,
face-to-face training and two channels
on cable television networks.
Bedford said she has three trainers
that are available on a part-time basis
to teach about the Internet, based on
group requests.
She said the curriculum develop-
ment will take place during the sum-
mer months and the training will
begin in the fall, tentatively before
Sept. 15.


of work, said Sarai Moses,
Happy House board mem-
ber.
"It's also been fun to do,"
she said.
Carolyn Castagna said
she loves to host the event
at her home-each year. It's
hard for organizations to
get money for their needs,
and the Spring Fling pro-
vides an outlet for commu-
nity support.
The event is success-
ful just by having so many
people in the community
come together to support
two great causes, said Mike


Belle, CARC executive
director.
"I'm thrilled with the
event and really thankful
for everyone," he said.
The evening is a won-
derful time for everyone to
have fun while both orgma-
nizations reap the benefits,
said Sheryll Walker, Happy
House executive direc-
tor. She appreciates the
Castagnas for opening up
their hearts and home each
year.
"It's so much fun," she
said.


ANTONIA ROBINSON/Lake City Reporter
Mike McKee and Melinda Moses glance over their notes
before the start of'the Spring Fling Saturday. The two were
emcees for the carnival event.


SHUTTLE: Endeavour slated for Monday liftoff

Continued From Page 1A


replaced, as was a switch
box with a blown fuse.
"In our minds, we are
good to go," Moses told
reporters.
Forecasters put the odds
of good weather at 70 per-
cent The main concerns
are stiff crosswind and low
clouds.
"Looks like we r flying
!!!" astronaut Mike Fincke
said in a Twitter update late
Saturday afternoon.
Launch director Mike
Leinbach said an esti-
mated 500,000 spectators
are expected to jam area
roads and communities
in advance of Monday's
scheduled 8:56 a.m. launch:
That's more than the crowd


.for Discovery's final launch
in February, but far short
of what was anticipated for
Endeavour's launch attempt
on April 29.
"They're not quite expect-
ing that big surge ... but still
it will be a heck of a traffic
jam," Leinbach said. Because
of the clogged roads, NASA
may opt for a two-day delay
.rather than the usual one
day, if Monday's try is called
off in the final few hours of
the countdown. Launch con-
trollers need to be able to
get home and rest, he said.
President Barack Obama
and his family were among
those who traveled to
*Kennedy Space Center
last month hoping to see


a launch. He met with the
astronauts and visited with
Giffords, but won't return
Monday.
"I sure would have liked
to have him come back,"
Leinbach said. "We did all
that work for him, and now
he's not going to get to see
a launch." It's possible, he
noted, that the president
may come for the very last
shuttle launch in July.
Leinbach is thrilled that
Giffords will be present for
the launch. As before, the
Arizona congresswoman
will remain off-limits, to
the public and even most
space center employees.
Five other members of
Congress also will attend.


"It will be a terrific time
for her," Leinbach said, "and
Mark just can't wait to see
her back here. That's good
stuff."
The congresswoman has
been undergoing rehabilita-
tion in Houston, her hus-
band's home base, for a gun-
shot wound to the head.
Kelly and five other veter-
an spacemen are assigned
to the 16-day flight. They
will deliver a $2 billion
particle physics detector
- a project led by a Nobel
Prize-winning physicist
- as well as critical space
station spare parts.
Atlahtis will close out the
30-year space shuttle pro-
gram with a July flight.


HOUSE: Group building it for needy veterans

Continued From Page 1A


people who know you and
want to help veterans.'"
The house will be a liv-
ing estate, Arthur said.
Milford will live in the
home until he dies and
then it will be given to
another veteran in need.
"It doesn't matter if its a
man or a woman, as long
as they're a veteran," he
said.


Knowing the house will
help someone else is the
reason he accepted the
gift, Milford said.
"Another disabled vet
will have it and I hope they
appreciate it as much as I
do," he said.
Milford will only have
to pay for insurance, the
upkeep and $50 a month
for escrow in case some-


thing needs to be repaired,
Arthur said.
An account is set up
at Lowe's, No. 7584778,
for material donations,
but labor help in dry wall
and tile work is especially
needed now, Arthur said.
Anyone interested in
volunteering can call 758-
4778.


There is no way to
describe or tell how much
he appreciates the group,
Milford said.
Helping other veterans
is fitting because of their
service to the nation,
Arthur said.
"It's time to give back
to the veterans that do (so
much) for us," he said.


Citizens discuss

concerns with

LCPD chief


'By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter. corn

To Beth Hazen, dog
theft and fighting are
prominent problems in
the area, and she wanted
to make sure the Lake
City Police Department
is proactive in addressing
the issue.
Hazen was among the
citizens attending the third
"Breakfast with the Chief'
Saturday at the LCPD
Public Safety Training
Room.
The event is a forum for
citizens to share concerns
with the department and
hear the resolution of pre-
vious ones.
Her daughter's dog was
stolen last year and other
citizens have experienced
the same situation, Hazen
said. One dog that was
stolen, Buddy, was found
chewed up and emaciated.
These are not dogs on
the street being stolen but
family pets, she said.
People are askedto come
forward to the department
to make a report or even
just talk about their sto-
len dog, said Capt. John
Blanchard.
Signs have been posted
at S&S gas' stations and
in the community about
dog fighting, Gilmore
said. Anyone that knows
of dog fighting is asked
to report it.
The department plans
to work with Hazen and
collaborate with other
agencies, such as animal
control, to deal with the
complain of dog theft and
fighting, she said.
Prior to hearing new
concerns, Gilmore went
over issue identified at the


second "Breakfast with the
Chief' and the actions the
department has taken to
address the problems.
Attendees were also
informed about new and
existing outreach pro-
grams from the LCPD,
including National Night
Out, Citizens Police
Academy and Police
Explorers program.
"Breakfast with the
Chief' helps the communi-
ty get more involved with
the LCPD, said Leonard
Boice of Lake City.
"It eliminates the (dis-
connect) between the
police department and the
community," he said.
Citizens can also find
out what's happening in
other areas of the commu-
nity, said Charlene Boice of
Lake City. She came to the
event to ask for increased
presence in her neigh-
borhood, Northeast Lake
Drive. Students in the area
can be mischievous and
sometimes throw rocks at
each other, or worse.
"If you say something,
their parents get offend-
ed," she said.
The department will
work to address concerns
brought up at the meeting,
Gilmore said. Solutions
won't be created in a day,
but the LCPD will do its
best to work toward reso-
lutions and bring a status
report to citizens.
"I'm pleased with the
issues and concerns that
have been brought to our
attention," she said. "It
keeps us with our finger
on the pulse of the citi-
zens' concerns."


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FIRE: Partly contained

Continued From Page 1A


tinue to improve control
lines along Swamp Edge
Break on the west, south
and east branches. Mop-
up operations will be con-
ducted along tactical firing
operation boundaries.
A total of 321 person-
nel, eight helicopters, 27
engines, 41 bulldozers, 152
fire support staff personnel


one crew and camp crew
are working on contain-
ing the blaze. Additional
resources from private
industry as well as state
agencies are also helping.
For additional details
about the fire;call the Fargo
Community Information
Hotline at (912) 637-5597.


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I


LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE SUNDAY, MAY 15, 2011


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


v


--i


4 ,1 t










OPINION


Sunday, May 15, 201 I


OUR


OUR
OPINION


District

decision

narrow

in vision

People are put into
positions, like
being members of
the St Johns River
Water Management
District Governing Board, to
make sometimes difficult, but
hopefully intelligent, decisions.
That body was faced with a
quandary last Tuesday, when a
crowd of people estimated to be
nearly 200 showed up for the
board's meeting in Palatka.
The reason was the
expected passage of a 20-year
consumptive water use permit,
replacing the 5-year permit the.
board had been using. Such
permits are issued to anyone
who uses large amounts of
water for something deemed
necessary-for the public good.
What most in the crowd
were concerned with was the
apparent hastiness of this
decision. Many firmly believe
drawing more water from the
aquafer in the St. Johns district
can have an adverse affect on
the water supply in Columbia
and Suwannee counties.
With water levels in many of
our lakes and rivers already
dropping, they preached
patience until further studies
could be conducted.
'But the board said no.
The 20-year plan was
overwhelmingly passed.
Understandably, the board
voted as representatives of
their district. They, had their
scientific study which seemed
to refute the study presented
by the Columbia County
contingent.
So people in the crowd asked
for a third, impartial party to be
brought in for more analysis.
But again, the board refused to
listen and pushed the decision
through.
Such urgency was
unnecessary. The board's
narrow vision went no further
than their own district. Which
begs the question: Should the
intelligent decisions we ask
such groups to make for us
include only us, or perhaps
encompass a larger viewpoint?
We certainly know which
side of that question the
St. Johns district board falls.

Lake City Reporter,
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman


LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers .and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,


Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.comi


Creating jobs.
Strengthening
family values.
Improving educa-
tion. Protecting
Social Security. Those are the
leitmotifs that generally mark a
presidential candidate's stump
speech. They're poll-tested to
resonate with the broadest pos-
sible audience, which is why
most stump speeches sound
eerily similar. Not Ron Paul's.
Back in December 2007,
-I took my family to New
Hampshire to listen to the can-
didates speak. Hillary Rodham
Clinton's event was jammed.
Mitt Romney's was, too. So we


www.lakecityreporter.com


U.S. must consider


amnesty for some illegals


Hello, Mr. and Mrs.
Hispanic Voter, the
president loves
you despite that
big fence along the
border and an additional 10,000
federal agents patrolling it as a
sop to anti-immigration forces.
With his campaign apparently
already in full swing, President
Barack Obama finally has.
decided it may be desirable to
do something more about the
problem than just trying to keep
people out.
He went to El Paso, Texas
the other day, looked south
and talked about finding a way
to open citizenship avenues
for the nation's 11 million
undocumented residents,
the huge preponderance of
whom are from Mexico and
Central America. It's about
time. The president won the
overwhelming majority of
Hispanic voters in 2008 by
promising to bring about
a rational and civilized
immigration policy, including
pathways for naturalization. He
has yet to deliver.
He listed a few things the
other day that needed to be
done to bring some rationale to
this growing disaster more
border security funding,
cracking down on employers
who hire the undocumented
because they work cheaper,
opening new pathways to
citizenship and revising the way
we treat illegal immigrants who
just work here. Well, what didn't
he mention? Amnesty, that's
what.
There are 11 million aliens
in this country and if you think
that they all are going to be
deported, you are crazier than
a jumping bean. Who gets rid
of such a horrendous number
of people, many of who are
enormously productive whether
they are tending a garden


or providing vital services?
No one, that's who. From a
logistical standpoint alone it is
impossible in the first place. In
the second place it would knock
the heck out of our economy. So
why not find a way to keep the
deserving? It won't be easy, but
it needs to be addressed.
Obama may or may not have
done a great job in making the
border more secure depending
on whether you're a Democrat
or Republican. He has taken
pride in the huge increases
in the Border Patrol that has
doubled in size to 20,000
since 2004. Deportations have
increased dramatically and
statistics also verify that U.S.
southwest border towns have
among the lowest crime rates
despite the all out drug warfare
in Northern Mexico.
He told the audience in El
Paso that the next thing the
conservatives will want is a
moat with alligators. For some,
that's not terribly far from the
truth.
But the fact is most
thinking Americans have
almost despaired of a rational,
intelligent immigration policy
from a Congress that seems
unwilling to deal with the
situation no matter who is in the
White House. Ask George W.
Bush.
Obama's four principles for
solving the problem are almost
an exact mirror of Bush's
proposals that were rejected by
Democrats and Republicans.
In the Senate, Democrats have


pledged to introduce a new
version of the so-called DREAM
Act that was adopted by the
House in the last Congress.
The act would provide
some students a way to gain
citizenship among other things.
In the midst of all the
immigration turmoil, Maryland
took a bold step that was out
of line with most states. The
legislature adopted, and the
governor signed, a bill that
would allow certain illegal
immigrants under strict
conditions to receive in-state
tuition rates for college. It is a
step toward bringing young,
productive people into a nation
that sorely needs them. But
opponents are already trying to
undo it in another example of
nearsightedness.
Obama has failed to
act aggressively toward
immigration reform despite his
campaign pledges in 2008. It is a
political pattern he has followed
since his inauguration. If there
is any chance of adopting a
policy that is forward thinking
and cohesive, he would have to
go full out.
It simply is not enough
to mouth the words without
putting his reelection on the
table with hard-nosed support.
But even then the chances are
he would fail.
Immigration is a highly
emotional issue that has defied
resolution for decades while
the number of illegal residents
has increased steadily with
no practical way to dissipate
the pressure except the most
expensive law enforcement,
a poor solution at best. Some
form of conditional amnesty is
necessary.

Dan K. Thomasson is former
editor of Scripps Howard News
Service.


ended up in a hotel conference
room listening to Ron Paul (a
longtime Republican congress-
man from Texas) whip up the
crowd with ... references to
ancient Roman emperors who
weakened their currencies.
I've seen grown women
swoon at a Seal concert. But I
never thought I'd see it happen
during a discourse about the
Federal Reserve. The ecstasy of
his devoted followers, however,
never materialized into a broad
following and Mr. Paul's candi-
dacy soon faded.
Now Paul's back in the ring.
He formally announced his
White House run yesterday.


But unlike his efforts in 1988 or
2008, the explosion of US debt
along with the weakening of the
US dollar have turned his fringe
talking points into mainstream
issues. Paul was a one-man tea
party before the tea party move-
ment emerged in 2009, and his
consistency as a fiscal conserva-
tive certainly gives him major
street cred.
Those who back Paul were
certainly buoyed by a shock
poll from CNN last week that
showed Paul running better
against President Obama than
any other GOP candidate.
E Christian Science Monitor


4A


Deroy Murdock
deroy.murdotk@gmail.corn



Just say


no to


Newt


Speaker Newt
Gingrich threw
his hat into the
presidential ring
on Wednesday. Republicans
should toss it back onto
Gingrich's head and kindly
ask him to go away. lie is the
wrong man to lead the GOP to
victory in November 2012.
Gingrich's intellect, tenac-
ity, and perseverance helped
Republicans secure the House
of Representatives in 1994,
ending the Democrats' 40-year
majority. That achievement
notwithstanding, Gingrich's
flaws glowed beneath the glare
of national leadership. And
there they remain.
( "i. rich is no happy war-
ric ,e snarls more than
sm i'- ather than speak,
he 1. s. Gingrich lectures
rather, nan inspires audiences,
as if -e was their father, and
they had misbehaved. His
abrasive tone will chafe voters
long before he ever gets an
opportunity to snap at them
from the Oval Office.
Also grating, Gingrich can-
not say "America." It's pro-
nounced A-MEHR-i-ca, not A-
MORE-i-ca, as Gingrich puts it.
Gingrich's non-stylistic
failings are far graver. After
admirably holding promised
House votes on the Contract
with America's 10 planks,
Gingrich had no Act II.
He waffled on fighting Big
Government. Among other
things, he rescued the notori-
ous sugar program and let
Republicans launch their disas-
trous expansion of earmarks.
Just last January, Gingrich
defended ethanol subsidies
and complained that a pattern
of "big city attacks" on ethanol
"hurts the farmer. It hurts
rural America, and it's funda-
mentally unfair to America's
future." Rather than advocate .
ending ethanol mandates,
Gingrich wants a new one: a
-federal requirement enabling
all cars to consume ethanol or
methane.
Gingrich's man-crush on Bill
Clinton made him falter in leg-
islative negotiations with the
former president.
"I melt when I'm around
him," Gingrich purred in
January 1996. "After I get out, I
need two hours to detoxify. My
people are nervous about me
going in there because of the
way I deal with this."
Gingrich also ensnared him-
self in needless controversies
such as an ill conceived, multi-
million-dollar book deal and
a hissy fit regarding the utter
humiliation of deplaning Air
Force One via a rear door. As
The Wall Street Journal edito-
rialized, "It's time for him to
finish growing up."
Gingrich's biggest vulner-
ability, however, is his uber-col-
orful personal life.
Like him or not, President
Obama has been married for
19 years to Michelle his first
and only wife. By every indica-
tion, he has been faithful to
her.
In jarring contrast, Gingrich
an inexplicable hero to
many social conservatives -
has lived like a guest at the
Playboy Mansion.
New York commentator
Deroy Murdock is a columnist
with the Scripps Howard News
Service and a media fellow with
the Hoover Institution on War,
Revolution and Peace at Stanford
University.


ANOTHER OPINION


Will Paul be embraced as


GOP candidate?









Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, MAY 15, 2011


Today
Meet the author
The next meet the
author program is 2 p.m.
today at the Columbia
County Public Library
main branch featuring
Rachel Hauck. She is an
award-winning, contempo-
rary Christian fiction writ-
er living in Central Florida.
In addition to her solo
works, "Georgia on Her
Mind" and "Dining with
Joy," she also has written
books, such as "Softly and
Tenderly," with country
musician Sara Evans. The
event is sponsored by the
Friends of the Library.

Monday
Mardi Gras
A Mardi Gras Night to
benefit Another Way Inc.
is 7 p.m. -1 a.m., Monday
at The Lions Den. Ten
percent of profits will
benefit the organization.
There will be karaoke,
door prizes and more. Call
Elizabeth Free at 719-2700.

NARFE monthly meeting
The National Active and
Retired Federal Employees
meetings is 1 p.m.
Monday at the LifeStyle
Enrichment Center. The
center is located at 628
SE Allison Court. Contact
Miriam Stanford at 755-
0907 or Jim Purvis at 752-
8570.

Tuesday
Living on a Few Acres
The next Living on a
Few Acres Class -entitled
"Optimize Pasture and
Grazing Management"
is scheduled for 7 p.m.
Tuesday at the Extension
Office.

Donors wanted
The LifeSouth
;'


Mrs. Evelyn Venell May
Mrs. Evelyn Venell May, 84, of
Lake City passed away Wednes-
day, May 11, 2011 at her son's
residence in Margate, Florida
following an extended illness.
A native of Tampa, Florida Mrs.
May had lived in the Lake City
area since 1968 after moving
here from Jacksonville, Florida,
until she moved to. Margate,
Florida in 2007 to be with her
son. Mrs. May will always be
remembered as a talented seam-
stress and quilter. Mrs. May was
preceded in death by her hus-
band of 63 years Hepry Grady
May in 2007. Mrs. May was a
member of the Parkview Bap-
tist Church here in Lake City.
Mrs. May is survived by three
sons Grady May of Palatka,
Florida, Kenny May (Sandra)
of Palm Coast, Florida, and Sam
May (Leslie) of Margate, Flori-
da. Four grandchildren and two
great-grandchildren also survive.
Funeral services for Mrs. May
will be conducted at noon on
Wednesday, May 18, 2011 in
the Parkview Baptist Church
with Pastor Mike Tatum offici-
ating. Interment will follow the
service in Forest Lawn Memo-
rial Gardens. The family will
receive friends at Parkview Bap-
tist Church one hour prior to the
service. Arrangements are under
the direction of the DEES-PAR-
RISH FAMILY FUNERAL
HOME, 458 S. Marion Ave.,
Lake City, FL 32025 (386)752-
1234 please sign our on-line
family guestbook at www.par-
rishfamilyfuneralhome. corn

Irene Watson Kennedy
Funeral services for Irene
Watson Kennedy, 91, of Ash-
burn, Ga. were held Thursday,
May 12, 2011 at 10:00 A.M.
'i at Perry Funeral Chapel with
burial following in Rose Hill
Cemetery in Ashburn. Mrs.
Kennedy died Tuesday at Tift
Regional Medical Center fol-
lowing an extended illness.
Mrs. Kennedy was born in Worth
County, Georgia, the daughter of
the late Alex & Minnie Ethel
Moore Watson. She had lived
in Turner County for over fifty
years. She was a homemaker
and was retired from Manhat-
tan Shirt Company. She was
a member of the Dakota Bap-
tist Church and was the widow
of the late Rome Kennedy.
She is survived by three sons
and daughters in law, Claude


Bloodmobile is seek-
ing donors 12 7 p.m.
Tuesday at Sweepstakes at
Panda-Moni-Yum. Donors
receive 200 credits, a
recognition item and free
lunch or dinner.

Art League
The monthly meeting of
the Art League of North
Florida is 7 p.m. May 17
at the First Presbyterian
Church in Lake City. Guest
speaker is Jane Kopp who
will talk her artist toolbox
experience, which she
has had throughout her
30 years of teaching art.
There will be a business
meeting following the pre-
sentation.

Preschool screening
Free Preschool screen-
ing is 3-5 p.m. May 17 at
Fort White Elementary
School. Screenings are
for ages 3- 4 years, six '
months. Children will be
screening in functional
hearing and vision, motor
development, speech and
language development
and concepts. Parents
will have the opportu-
nity to discuss results
with Florida Diagnostic,
and Learning Resources
System/Gateway or
Columbia County School.
District staff. Details about
Voluntary Pre-K, Headstart
or Subsidized Child Care
will be available. Call
Columbia County Student
Services Office at 755-0849
ext. 122 or Jo Ann Laseter,
FDLRS/Gateway at 1-800-
227-0059.

Legislative breakfast i
The Lake City- Columbia
County Chamber of
Commerce Legislative
Breakfast is 8 a.m.
Tuesday at the Lifestyle
Enrichment Center.
Tickets for members are
$10 and guests $15. The
event is sponsored by Clay
Electric and People's State


OBITUARIES

and Carline Kennedy, Lake City,
FL., George and Patty Kennedy,
Ashburn, Ga. and Wayne & Pam
Kennedy, Leslie, Ga. She is
also survived by four daughters
and sons in law, Ovis & Murray
Mashburn, Opal Newsom and
Mary & Royce Presley all of
Ashburn, Ga. and Janet & Butch
Tomlinson, Moultrie, Ga. Also
surviving are sixteen grandchil-
dren, twenty four great grandchil-
dren and eight great-great grand-
children. Mrs. Kennedy is also
survived by one brother, Charles


Bank. RSVP for this event
to the chamber at 752-
3690.

Wednesday
Donors wanted
LifeSouth Bloodmobile
is seeking donors 3:30, 8
p.m. Wednesday at Fort
White Community Center.
The event will feature
food, fun and prizes. All
donors receive free movie
tickets.

Thursday
Camera Club
The Branford Camera
Club will meet at 7 p.m.
Thursday at the Branford
Public Library. This
month Humberto
Castellanos will review
Picasa basics and begin an
excursion into editing pho-
tos using Picasa. If time
permits, he will also show
us how to use the internet
to share pictures. The dis-
cussion wvill include Q&A
related to Picasa software
(now that we have a cou-
ple months of experience
under our belts), and other
photographic-related sub-
jects. Following the pro-
gram, we'll share our wild-
flower homework pictures
and as many more of your
recent photos as we can
fit in. Bring your cameras,
camera manuals, photos to
share either digitally or in
print, and enjoy an evening
with other photo enthusi-
asts. For mote informa-
tion, please contact one of
the following members:
Carolyn Hogue, Program
Chair, 386-935-2044;
Dick Madden, Technical
Consultant, 386-935-0296;
Skip Weigel, Technical
Consultant, 386-935-1382.

Retired Educators
meeting
The Columbia County
Retired Educators meet-
ing is 1 p.m. Thursday at


Watson, Ashburn, Ga. and one
sister, Izona Alligood,,Ft. Walton
Beach, Fl. Perry Funeral Chapel
Of Ashburn, GA handled all ar-
rangements. Obituary appears
courtesy of the Dees-Parrish
Family Funeral Home, 458 S.
Marion ave., Lake City, FL 32025


Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


Phish Heads, located 1445
SW Main Blvd. Lake City.
All are invited to attend.
Call Glynnell Presley,
Retired Educator, at 752-
4074 or fax to 719-4389.

Master Gardeners
workshop
The "Caring for your
North Florida Lawn"
workshop is 5:45 7 p.m.
Thursday at the Columbia
County Public Library
Fort White branch,
Presented by UF Master
Gardeners, learn about
maintaining healthy south-
ern grasses, fertilizing,
watering and pest control.
The workshop is free.

Ombudsman Program
Florida's Long-Term
Ombudsman Program
is meeting 12:30 p.m.
Thursday at Have Hospice
of North Central Florida in
Gainesville. Anyone inter-
ested in volunteering with
the program or attending.
the meeting can call 352-
955-5015.

Preschool screening
Free Preschool
screening 10 a.m.-6 p.m.
Thursday at Parkview
Baptist Church, 268
NW Lake Jeffrey Road.
Screenings are for ages
3- 4 years, six months.
Children will be screen-
ing in functional hear-
ing and vision, motor
development, speech and
language development
and concepts. Parents
will have the opportu-
nity to discuss results
with Florida Diagnostic
and Learning Resources
System/Gateway or
Columbia County School
District staff. Details about
Voluntary Pre-K, Headstart
or Subsidized Child Care
will be available. Call
Columbia County Student
Services Office at 755-0849
ext. 122 or Jo Ann Laseter,
FDLRS/Gateway at 1-800-
227-0059.

Movies and Masicals
Richardson Middle
School Chorus is having
Movies and Musicals night
7 p.m. Thursday in the
school auditorium. The
program, under the direc-
tion of Christy Robertson,


will include selections
from several musicals such
as "Annie," "Grease" and
"Cinderella." Call 755-8130.

Friday
Blood donors
At Hungry Howie's on
Main Street, each donor
receives a recognition item
and a free personal one-
topping pizza or small sub.

Ladies Lunch and Learn
A Free National
Women's Health Week
Event, Ladies Lunch and
Learn, is noon Friday at
the LifeStyle Enrichment
Center. The event is pre-
sented by Emad Atta, M.D.
and Chandler Mohan,
M.D. Hear about critical
risk factors, symptoms
and treatment options.
Get key tools and valuable
information for a healthier
life. Space is limited. Call
755-0235.

Preschool screening
Free Preschool
screening 10 a.m.-4:30
p.m. Friday at Parkview
Baptist Church, 268
NW Lake Jeffrey Road.
Screenings are for ages
3- 4 years, six months.
Children will be screen-
ing in functional hear-
ing and vision, motor
development, speech and
language development
and concepts. Parents
will have the opportu-
nity to discuss results
with Florida Diagnostic
and Learning Resources
System/Gateway or
Columbia County School
District staff. Details
about Voluntary Pre-K,
Headstart or Subsidized
Child Care will be avail-
able. Call Columbia
County Student Services
Office at 755-0849 ext.
122 or Jo Ann Laseter,
FDLRS/Gateway at 1-800-
227-0059.

Saturday

Armed Forces tribute
Girl Scout Cadette
Troop 525 is hosting a cer-
emony 9:30 a.m. Saturday
at Haven Hospice com-
munity room in honor of
armed forces. The troop
is also planting a tree at


* To submit your Community
Calendar item, contact Antonia
Robinson at 754-0425 or by
e-mail at arobinson@
lakecityreporter.com.


Haven Hospice as a liv-
ing legacy to the Armed
Forces.

Farmers Market
The Lake DeSoto
Farmers Market is 8
a.m. noon Saturday at
Wilson Park, 778 NE Lake
DeSoto Circle. The Lake
City Parks & Recreation
Department is bringing
its summer program to
the market with dancing,
arts and crafts, and more.
Vendor applications and
more information is avail-
able at 386-719-5766 or e-
mail kitej@lcfla.com.

Backyard Composting
The "Backyard
Composting Rot to
Richness" UF Master
Gardener presentation
is 2 p.m. Saturday at the
Columbia County Public
Library main branch.
Learn how to turn your
lawn waste into rich
organic compost for use in
gardening. The workshop
is free.

Bid Whist Tournament
Gold Standard Chapter
#48 is hosting a Bid Whist
Tournament and Fish
Fry 11:30 a.m. 4 p.m.
Saturday at B&S Elks
Lodge #1599, 2510 E
Washington St. The tour-
nament is $20 per team
and fish fry is $5 per plate.
For tournament informa-
tion contact Marva Udell,
386-234-1615 or Carlos
Brown at 386-288-6235 and
Eddie McKenzie for Fish
Fry at 386-623-1714.

Sunday, May 22
Summer Reading Camp
Registration is now open
for Summer Reading Camp
at Miracle Tabernacle.
The first 40 children will
be admitted. Camp is $25
per week. The camp fea-
tures reading, as well as
math, science, hand writ-
ing, black history, exer-
cise and conversational
Spanish in the curriculum.
Camp is 8:30 a.m. 4 p.m.
Monday-Thursday June
6-Aug. 12. Breakfast and
lunch will be provided.
Call Cynthia Robinson at
249-3572 or Pastor Steele
at 758-8452.


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, MAY 15, 2011


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427







LAKE CITY REPORTER


NATION & WORLD


SUNDAY, MAY 15, 2011


Page Editor: C.J.Risak, 754-0427


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Friday photo, Mississippi flood waters creep up the flood walls of downtown Vicksburg, Miss. Army engineers prepared
Saturday to slowly open the gates of an emergency spillway along the rising Mississippi River, diverting floodwaters from
Baton Rouge and New Orleans.


Preparations set: Floodgate to open

for first time in nearly 40 years


By MARY FOSTER
and MELINDA DESLATTE
Associated Press

MORGANZA, Louisiana -
Engineers made final preparations
Saturday afternoon to slowly open a
10-ton, steel emergency floodgate for
the first time in nearly four decades,
purposefully inundating farmlands
and homes in Louisiana's Cajun coun-
try to drain the swelling Mississippi
River and avert flooding in New
Orleans.
Across the countryside, people fled
to higher ground, shored up levees
that held the last time the Morganza
spillway was opened and built new
walls of sand and dirt to hold back
the flood they have known was com-
ing for weeks. Sheriffs and National
Guardsmen were warning people in a
door-to-door sweep, and shelters were
ready to accept up to 4,800 evacuees.
"We're using every flood control tool
we have in the system," Army Corps
of Engineers Maj. Gen. Michael Walsh
said Saturday from the dry side of the
spillway, which was expected to be
under several feet of water Sunday.
It will take about 15 minutes for one
of the 28-feet gates to be raised, then
several hours before any of the water
hits sparsely populated communities.-
The corps plans to open one or two,
more gates Sunday in a painstaking
process that gives residents and ani-
mals a chance to get out of the way.
About 25,000 people and 11,000
structures could be in harm's way
when the Morganza spillway is
unlocked for the first time since 1973,
but diverting the river water will
help take the pressure off levees
downstream. Easing the strain on
the river walls helps make sure the
river doesn't flood more populated
cities like Baton Rouge and New
Orleans, and the numerous oil refin-
eries and chemical plants along the
lower reaches of the Mississippi.
In Krotz Springs, Louisiana, one
of the towns in the Atchafalaya River
basin bracing for floodwaters, Monita
Reed, 56, recalled the last time the
Morganza was opened in 1973.
'We could sit in our yard and hear
the water," she said as workers con-


ASSOCIATED PRESS
A crew of workmen carry drainage hose
along a temporary seawall adjacent
to the Ameristar Casino in Vicksburg,
Miss., as Mississippi River floodwaters
creep up the flood walls Saturday. The
waters from the Mississippi River and
its tributaries are not expected to crest
in Vicksburg until Thursday.
structed a makeshift levee of sand-
bags and soil-filled mesh boxes in
hopes of protecting the 240 homes in
her subdivision.
Some people living in the threat-
ened stretch of countryside an
area known for small farms, fish
camps and a drawling French dialect
- have already started heading out.
Reed's family packed her furniture,
clothing and pictures in a rental truck
and a relative's trailer.
"I'm just going to move and store
my stuff. I'm going to stay here until
they tell us to leave," Reed said.
"Hopefully, we won't see much water
and then I can move back in. "
Opening the spillway will release
water that could submerge about
3,000 square miles (7,770 square kilo-
meters), some places would be under
as, much as 25 feet (7.5 meters) in
some areas.
Engineers feared that weeks of
pressure on the levees could cause
them to fail, swamping New Orleans


under as much as-20 feet (six meters)
of water in a disaster that would have
been much worse than Hurricane
Katrina in 2005.
Instead, the water will flow 20
miles (30 kilometers) south into the
Atchafalaya Basin. From there it will
roll on to Morgan City, an oil-and-
seafood hub and a community of
12,000, and eventually into the Gulf
of Mexico.
The Krotz Springs area was in a
sliver of land about 70 miles (115
kilometers) long and 20 miles (30
kilometers) wide, north of Morgan
City. The finger-shaped strip of land
was expected to be inundated with
10- to 20-feet (three- to six-meters) of
water, according to estimates by the
Army Corps of Engineers.
It will take days for the water to run
south, and it wasn't expected to reach
Morgan City until around Tuesday.
The corps employed a similar cities-
first strategy earlier this month when
it blew up a levee in Missouri inun-
dating an estimated 200 square miles
(520 square kilometers) of farmland
and damaging or destroying about
100 homes to take the pressure
off the levees protecting the town of
Cairo, Illinois, population 2,800.
The disaster was averted in Cairo,
a bottleneck where the Ohio and
Mississippi rivers meet.
This intentional flood is more con-
trolled, however, and residents are
warned by the corps each year in
written letters, reminding them of the
possibility of opening the spillway,
which is 4,000 feet (1,200 meters)
long and has 125 gate bays.
At the site of the spillway, a verti-
cal crane was in position to hoist the
gate panel and let water out one of
the bays. On one side of the spillway,
water was splashing over the gates.
The other side was dry.
Typically, the site of the spillway is
dry on both sides. But when the river
rises to historic levels, like the ones
seen over the past couple of weeks, it
holds the Mississippi in place.
The spillway, built in 1954, is part
of a flood plan largely put into motion
in the 1930s in the aftermath of the
devastating 1927 flood that killed
hundreds.


Kerry: Pakistan

can be better ally

against terror


- 7 ,77"l-^


By RAHIM FAIEZ
Associated Press

KABUL, Afghanistan -
Pakistan could be a better
partner in the fight against
terrorists, U.S. Sen. John
Kerry said Saturday on
the first leg of a visit to
Afghanistan and Pakistan
to patch up relations fol-
lowing the U.S. killing of
Osama bin Laden.
Kerry, chairman of the
powerful Senate Foreign
Relations Committee, said
the United States wants
Pakistan to be, a real ally in
combatting terrorism.
"We believe there are
things that can be done
better," he said in a visit to
Mazar-i-Sharif, a large city
in the north.
Kerry's trip to
Afghanistan and later
Pakistan comes as the
relationship between
Washington and Islamabad
is frayed over the U.S. uni-
lateral raid on Pakistani
soil that killed bin Laden.
Pakistani officials have
denied that they knew that
the world's most-wanted
terrorist was hiding for
years in the northwest gar-
rison city of Abbottabad.
They are angry at U.S. offi-
cials for not alerting them
'to plans for the May 2 raid.
Speaking to reporters,
Kerry was asked if the
United States would be
putting more pressure
on Pakistan because bin
Laden was tracked down
there, and whether the
U.S. would go after the
Taliban's leader, Mullah
Omar, who could be hid-
' ing in Pakistan as well.
Kerry said only: "It's a
legitimate question and it's
certainly a question that's
on the minds of every
American and lots of other
people in the world."
Kerry also said that


ASSOCIATED PRESS
U.S. Senator John Kerry (center left) talks to reporters after
he arrived at Mazar-i-Sharif in Afghanistan, Saturday.


Bin Laden in Pakistan: Potent but past his prime


By CALVIN WOODWARD
Associated Press

WASHINGTON Surrounded
by the din of his multiple families
within walls that were both his
sanctuary and prison, Osama bin
Laden pecked endlessly at a com-
puter, issuing directives to his
scattered and troubled terrorist
empire. It's not clear who really
listened.
Go big,-he told al-Qaida opera-
tives and affiliates.
They mostly went small.
The latest intelligence from the
wealth of material found at bin
Laden's last hideout paints a com-
plicated picture of the fugitive,
both deeply engaged in his life's
violent mission and somewhat
out to pasture.
InsidetheAbbottabad,Pakistan,
compound, he kept busy schem-
ing plots, rehearsed and record-
ed propaganda and dispatched
couriers to distant Internet cafes
to conduct his email traffic, using
computer flash drives to relay
messages he would write and
store from his shabby office. He
dyed his gray beard black to keep
up appearances for the videos.
To U.S. officials, who possess
bin Laden's handwritten personal
journal as well as an enormous
cache of his digital documents,
the still-unfolding discoveries
show he was more involved in


ASSOCIATED PRESS
This image made from television shows Osama bin Laden holding an
AK47 automatic rifle in an undated recruitment video tape for his organi-
zation, viewed by The Associated Press in Kuwait City on June 19, 2001.
There is no dispute that bin Laden spent time in his lair dreaming up
ways to kill Americans in great numbers again, for the terrorist believed
that only mass casualties could move U.S. policy. -


trying to plan al-Qaida's post-911
operations than they had thought
possible for a man in perpetual
hiding.
Even so, he was disconnected
from his organization in real time,
lacking phones or the Internet


at his hideout and with loyalists
hunted at every turn. Essential
elements of a command and con-
trol function from Abbottabad
appear to be missing.
A discovered video shows him
channel surfing with a tiny TV


while wrapped in a wool blanket,
wearing a knit cap and looking
anything but content. Toward its
own propaganda ends, the U.S.
released selective excerpts of
these odd home movies, choos-
ing clips that only show the
Prince of jihad in an unflattering,
even pathetic, light.
For a man working from home,
there seemed to be many distrac-
tions.
The U.S. raiders who killed
him, a grown son and others May
2 encountered 23 children and
nine women on the grounds of the
three-story complex behind walls
stained with mold, including three
of his wives, officials said after-
ward. The U.S. has questioned
those widows, the Pentagon said
Friday without revealing if any-
thing was learned.
U.S. officials also said the raid-
ers found a collection of por-
nography in the materials they
confiscated but it was not clear
who owned it or had seen it.
The compound is hardly the
plush redoubt U.S. officials
described in the immediate after-
math of the Navy SEALs assault.
Yet the Saudi son of privilege,
who long ago renounced wealth
and creature comforts, had lived
in far more Spartan circumstanc-
es even if he was not quite the
cave-dweller of Western lore.
As bizarre as it might be to


know he spent his last months
surrounded by children, any
thought of domestic tranquility is'
probably a stretch.
This was a man who forced his
family to live without air condi-
tioning or a refrigerator in stifling
heat in pre-terrorist days, who
beat them and ket his fighters
experiment on their pets with
poison gas, and made his fam-
ily dig and sleep in ditches on a
desert camping trip, according to
a son and another wife who col-
laborated on the book "Growing
Up Bin Laden."
Such a harsh disposition with
family was disputed by Ahmed
Abdel-Fatah al-Sada, a father-in-law,
who told The Associated Press in
Yemen that bin Laden was a "kind
and noble" man, "easygoing and
modest, giving you the feeling that
he was sincere." Al-Sada's daugh-
ter, Amal, 29, was shot in the leg
during the raid as she rushed the
Navy SEALs, U.S. officials said.
There is no dispute that bin
Laden spent time in his lair dream-
ing up ways to kill Americans
in great numbers again, for the
terrorist believed that only mass
casualties could move U.S. policy.
Communicating both with his core
group and al-Qaida affiliates, he
advised plots against cities spared
on Sept. 11, 2001, such as Los
Angeles, and wanted to explore
attacking trains.


President Barack Obama
and the American people
were committed to work-
ing with Afghans who have
a long history of fighting
for their own indepen-
dence. His visit comes just
two months before Afghan
security forces are to begin
to take the lead for secur-
ing Mazar-i-Sharif and a
handful of other areas of
the nation.
"We're committed to
working with you to say
no to terrorism, no to vio-
lence and yes to economic
possibilities," he said.
Separately, insurgents
attacked a private secu-
rity company in Andar dis-
trict of Ghazni province
in eastern Afghanistan
on Saturday, killing four
guards and setting a vehi-
cle on fire, the Afghan
Ministry of Interior said.
Also in the east, more
than 100 people demon-
strated Saturday to pro-
test the accidental death
of a teenage boy by U.S.-
led coalition forces in
Nangarhar province. The
protesters shouted slogans
against the coalition force
and the Afghan govern-
ment, said Abdul Khaliq
Marouf, chief of Hisarak
district.
Taliban insurgents
who were in the crowd
exchanged gunfire with
Afghan policemen outside
the district office. One pro-
tester died in the shootout,
Marouf said.
NATO said that a 15-
year-old boy was killed
in Hisarak district Friday
when he reached for a
weapon as coalition and
Afghan forces were search-
ing a room. The joint force
was in the area looking for
a Taliban leader suspected
of distributing weapons
and roadside bombs in the
area.


- -.-



.-c A









Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427 LAKE CITY REPORTER NATION & STATE SUNDAY, MAY 15, 2011


Miami imam, 2 sons charged


with supporting the Taliban


By RASHA MADKOUR
Associated Press

MIAMI A Miami imam and two
of his sons were arrested Saturday on
charges they provided some $50,000
to the Pakistani Taliban, designated
by the State Department as a terrorist
organization, officials said.
Hafiz Muhammed Sher Ali Khan,
76, was arrested after morning ser-
vices at the Miami. Mosque, also
known as the Flagler Mosque, where
he is an imam. One of his sons, Izhar
Khan, 24, an imam at the Jamaat
Al-Mu'mineen Mosque in nearby
Margate, Florida., was arrested after
morning services there. Another son,
Irfan' Khan, 37, was detained at his
hotel room in Los Angeles around the
same time. The men are U.S. citizens.
Their mosques are not suspected of
wrongdoing, officials said.
Attempts to reach the men's fami-
lies, attorneys and mosques were
unsuccessful Saturday.
Also named in the indictment are
three others at large in Pakistan -


Hafiz Khan's daughter, grandson and
an unrelated man, all three of whom
are charged with handling the distri-
bution of funds.
The indictment lists about $50,000
in transactions. The funds were used
to buy guns, support militants' fami-
lies and promote the cause of the
Pakistani Taliban, according to the
indictment. It also alleges that Hafiz
Khan owns a madrassa, or religious
school, in his native Swat Valley in
northwest Pakistan that shelters
members of the Pakistani Taliban and
trains children to become militants.
U.S. Attorney Wifredo Ferrer noted
that the investigation was sparked by
suspicious financial activity and was
not based on an undercover sting
operation.
"This is based on the defendant's
words, actions and records," Ferrer
said at a news conference Saturday.
The indictment recounts recorded
conversations in which Hafiz Khan
allegedly voices support for attacks
on the Pakistani government and
American troops in the region.


The Pakistani Taliban is a wing
of the terrorist group that began in
Afghanistan. It claimed responsibility
for a pair of suicide bombings that
killed more than 80 people on Friday
in what it said was vengeance for
the killing of al-Qaida chief Osama
bin Laden. The group has also been
linked to the attempted Times Square
car bombing in New York in May
2010.
If convicted, the South Florida men
face up to 15 years in prison for each
of the four counts listed in the indict-
ment.
It's not the first terror case to come
out of the area. In June 2006, a group
that became known as the "Liberty
City Seven" was arrested in the
Miami neighborhood by that name.
They had been accused in a plot
to destroy Chicago's Sears Tower.
Five men were convicted, while two
were acquitted. The plot never got
past the discussion stage, which led
defense attorneys and national ter-
rorism experts to describe the case
as overblown.


Obama to speed up oil production


By DARLENE SUPERVILLE
and DINA CAPPIELLO
-Associated Press

WASHINGTON Amid
growingpublicunhappiness
over gas prices, President
Barack Obama is directing
his administration to ramp
up U.S. oil production by
extending existing leases
in the Gulf of Mexico and
off Alaska's coast and hold-
ing more frequent lease
sales in a federal petroleum
reserve in Alaska. But the
moves won't calm spiraling
prices at the pump any time
soon.
Obama said Saturday
that the measures "make
good sense" and will help
reduce U.S. consumption
of imported oil in the long
term. But he acknowledged
anew that they won't help
to immediately bring down
gasoline prices topping $4 a
gallon in many parts of the
country, and an oil industry
analyst agreed.
'There is practically
nothing that Washington
can do that would mate-
rially change the price of
fuel in this country," said
Raymond James analyst
,Pavel Molchanov, not-
ing that the United States
produces about 5 percent
of the world's petroleum
while consuming about 20
percent. "Given that imbal-
ance, there is simply no
policy shift that could plau-
sibly come from the fed-
eral government that can
significantly change that
dynamic."
An oil industry group
praised Obama's move as
a first step with a "couple
of positive nuggets" but
contended that more was
needed to boost oil produc-
tion. Erik Milito,, upstream
director for the American
,Petroleum Institute,
called in a statement for
more access to key shale
reserves and construc-
tion of a pipeline that
would import crude from
!Canadian oil sands.
Sen. Robert Menendez,
D-N.J., who is opposed
to diilling .off the Atlantic
coast, expressed concern
about possible dangers to
-the environment "I think
it is disappointing he
.would pursue a strategy
that comes with consider-


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Exxon Mobil Chairman and CEO Rex Tillerson (foregound),
accompanied by fellow oil company executives, gestures
while testifying on Capitol Hill in Washington Thursday before
the Senate Finance Committee.


able risk while offering no
hope of driving down gas
prices," Menendez said in a
statement.
Obama's announce-
ment followed passage in
the Republican-controlled
House of three bills -
including two this week
- that would expand and
speed offshore oil and gas
drilling. Republicans say
the bills are aimed at eas-
ing gasoline costs, but they
too acknowledge that ben-
efits won't come fast.
The White House had
announced its opposition
to all three bills, which
are unlikely to pass the
Democratic-controlled
Senate, saying the mea-


sures would undercut safe-
ty reviews and open envi-
ronmentally sensitive areas
to new drilling.
But Obama is adopting
some of the bills' provi-
sions.
Answering the call- of
Republicans and Democrats
from Gulf Coast states,
Obama said in his weekly
radio and Internet address
that he would extend all
Gulf leases that were affect-
ed by a temporary morato-
rium on drilling imposed
after last year's BP oil spill.
That would give companies
additional time to begin
drilling.
The administration had
been granting extensions


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Why the space


shuttle fleet is

retiring, and

what's next


By SETH BORENSTEIN
AP Science Writer

WASHINGTON As
the space shuttle program
winds down, questions
are flying about what's
happening and why. The
launch countdown began
Friday for the second-to-
last flight. Some answers
about the end of the space
shuttle:

Q: Why are the shuttles
retiring?
A: The shuttles are
aging and expensive, their
key task is nearly com-
pleted and NASA wants
to use the money spent
on them to do something
new. They've been flying
since 1981, hauling up
pieces of the International
Space Station. The panel
that investigated the
2003 Columbia accident
concluded: "It is in the
nation's interest to replace
the Shuttle as soon as pos-
sible."

Q: Who decided to stop
flying shuttles?
A: President George W.
Bush made the decision
in 2004. He wanted astro-
nauts to go back to the
moon, and eventually to
Mars. For NASA to afford
to build a new spaceship to
reach those goals, it had to
stop spending about $4 bil-
lion a year on the shuttle
program.
But President Barack
Obama dropped the moon
mission. His plan has
NASA building a giant
rocket to send astronauts
to an asteroid, and eventu-
ally Mars, while turning
over to private companies
the job of carrying cargo
and astronauts to the
space station.

Q: When does the shut-
tle program end?
A. There are two flights
left. Shuttle Endeavour,
set to launch Monday, is
carrying a $2 billion sci-
ence experiment to the
space station. Atlantis
makes the final shuttle trip
this summer with spare
parts for the station. The
third surviving shuttle
Discovery made its
final voyage earlier this
year. Two other shuttles -
Challenger and Columbia
were destroyed in acci-
dents that killed a total of
.14 astronauts.

Q: What was the shuffle
program all about?
A: It was supposed to
make getting into space
cheap, simple and safe with
a launch virtually every
week. It didn't accomplish
that. But it was the best
way to get big items -
such as satellites and the
Hubble Space Telescope


case by case, but senior
administration officials said
the Interior Department
would institute a blanket
one-year extension.
New safety requirements
put in place since the BP
spill also have delayed drill-
ing in Alaska, so Obama
said he would extend lease
terms there for. a year as
well. An oil lease typically
runs 10 years.
Lease sales in the western
and central Gulf of Mexico
that. were postponed last
year will be held by the
middle of next year, the
same time period required
by the House. A sale off the
Virginia coast still would
not happen until 2017 at the
earliest. But Obama said he
would speed up environ-
mental reviews so that seis-
mic studies to determine
how much oil and gas lies
off the Atlantic Coast can
begin.
To further expedite drill-
ing off the Alaskan coast,
where such plans by Shell
Oil Co. have been delayed
by an air pollution permit,
Obama said he would create
an interagency task force to
coordinate the necessary
approvals. He also will hold
annual lease sales in the
vast National Petroleum
Reserve on Alaska's North
Slope. Officials said the
most recent sale was last
year, but that they had not
been held on any set sched-
ule.
The moves come as
Americans head into the
summer driving season and
gas prices remain high. A
gallon of regular cost $3.97
on average nationwide
Saturday, according to
the AAA, Wright Express
and Oil Price Information
Service. That's up from
$3.81 a month ago and
$2.88 a year ago, but it's
about a penny less than a
week ago.




The I

would




on their May 1(
new loca


Owner Tonya Townsend at 623-1246.
mma lmFW-,


UF. IL I -f *i '"


*
- into orbit and fix them
if needed. For the space
station, it was a combi-
nation moving van and
construction crane. What
made the shuttle unique
was its ability to do all
kinds of things.

Q: What happens to the
space shuttles?
A: They'll be shipped off
to museums. Endeavour
goes to the California
Science Center in Los
Angeles and Atlantis
will stay at Kennedy
Space Center for its visi-
tor complex. Discovery's
new home will be the
Smithsonian Institution's
hangar near Washington
Dulles International
Airport. Enterprise, a
shuttle prototype used for
test flights, goes to New
York City's Intrepid Sea,
Air and Space Museum.
Q: What about the
space station?
A: The life of the space
station has been extended
to at least 2020 and it could
continue on even longer.
It's now big enough for
six people. They conduct
science research, from
astronomy to zoology, and
help scientists understand
what is needed for longer
missions in space, such as
going to Mars.

Q: What about the
astronauts? Do they still
have jobs?
A: Some will; More than
a dozen astronauts will
still go to space and live on
the space station. Others
will wait around for slots
on still-to-be-built space-
ships, including the ride
to an asteroid. Others will
leave the program. The
same thing happened after
the Apollo program ended
nearly 40 years ago.

Q: How will astronauts
get to the space station?
A- NASA will continue
to buy seats on Russian
Soyuz capsules to. ferry
space station residents.
The $56 million price per
head will go up to $63 mil-
lion, which is still cheaper
per person than the space
shuttle.

Q: Is there any other
way to get into space?
A: Not from U.S. soil
once the shuttles retire.
NASA could eventually
use the commercial rock-
ets and capsules, being
developed by private
companies. Two compa-
nies predict they could fly
astronauts to the space
station within three years.
NASA is under orders to
build a giant rocket to go
beyond Earth orbit.


Lake City Reporter

like to congratulate




0, 2011 ribbon cutting ceremony for their
nation at 2744 W Hwy 90, Lake City.


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


LAKE CITY REPORTER NATION & STATE SUNDAY, MAY 15, 2011








LAKE CITY REPORTER WEATHER SUNDAY, MAY 15, 2011


THE WEATHER.



PARTLY -H C OF- PARTLY-., MOSTLY;
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TEMPERATURES
High Saturday
Low Saturday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Saturday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


87
68
86
62
97 in 1967
45 in 1960


1.25"
1.34"
12.82"
1.11"
15.13"


City
Jacksonvlle Cape Canaveral
* 83/64 Daytona Beach
Ft. Lauderdale
vile Daytona Beach Fort Myers
60 87 64 Gainesville
Ocala Jacksonville
86/61 Key West
Orando Cape Canaveral Key West
88/67 85/66 Lake City
Miami
pa,* Naples
/65 West Palm Beach Ocala
84/72 0 Orlando
Ft.L Lauderdale .Panama City
Ft. Myers, 88/73 Pensacola
88/66 Naples Tallahassee
85/69 Miami Tampa
K e 86/74 Valdosta
0eay 1i* W. Palm Beach


7t, I0


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise torn.
Sunset torn.

MOON
Moonrise today
Moonset today
Moonrise torn.
Moonset tom.


6:37 a.m.
8:17 p.m.
6:36 a.m.
8:18 p.m.


6:38 p.m.
4:53 a.m.
7:48 p.m.
5:38 a.m.


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May May June June
17 24 1 8
Full Last New First


10

10 mitesto bin
Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+.


Monday
81/66/pc
81/63/t
87/72/t
. 86/66/t
81/58/pc
79/62/t
86/76/s
82/56/pc
86/73/t
84/68/t
83/57/pc
85/67/t
77/56/t
76/59/pc
77/53/t
84/65/t
80/54/pc
86 74 I1


Tuesday
83/64/t
82/61/t
88/72/t
85/65/t
81/57/pc
79/63/pc
86/75/pc
81/56/pc
86/73/t
85/66/s
82/57/pc
86/64/t
76/57/s
78/60/s
79/53/pc
84/64/t
80/52/pc
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Forecasts, data and
graphics @ 2011 Weather
Central, LP, Madison, Wis.
www.weatherpubllsher.com


NATIONAL FORECAST: Showers and thunderstorms will affect much of the West today as
a storm system slowly makes its way inland. Snow will be likely in the Cascades and Sierra
Nevada. Showers and thunderstorms will also be likely across much of the Northeast as a
slow moving system continues to affect the area. Expect chilly showers from the Great Lakes
to the Ohio Valley.


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YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL EXTREMES High: 94, Blythe, Calr. Low: 210, Angel Fire, N.M.


Saturday Today


CITY HI/Lo/Pcp.
Albany NY 64/59/0
Albuquerque 78/55/0
Anchorage 53/46/0
Atlanta 74/63/0
Baltimore 64/59/0
Billings 49/36/0
Birmingham 67/61/.01
Bismarck 43/39/.19
Boise 84/60/0
Boston 53/45/0
Buffalo 68/63/.21
Charleston SC 82/70/0
Charleston WV 79/63/.21
Charlotte 78/61/.01
Cheyenne 43/36/0
Chicago 53/46/.01
Cincinnati 68/59/.02
Cleveland 73/62/.47
Columbia SC 82/67/.22
Dallas 67/52/0
Daytona Beach 91/66/0
Denver 48/34/0


HI/Lo/W
64/55/r
83/52/s
53/40/c
69/50/pc
76/63/t
65/42/pc
70/48/pc
64/38/s
58/37/t
61/53/sh
54/45/r
81/61/pc
67/51/sh
79/54/t
50/35/pc
48/39/sh
59/47/sh
57/50/r
80/55/pc
72/51/pc
87/64/t
55/42/c


CITY
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Fairbanks
Greensboro
Hartford
Honolulu
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson MS
Jacksonville
Kansas City
Las Vegas
Uttle Rock
Los Angeles
Memphis
Miami
Minneapolis
Mobile
New Orleans
New York
Oklahoma City


Saturday Today
HI/Lo/Pcp. HI/Lo/W CITY
55/47/.01 61/39/c Omah
65/63/.02 56/44/sh Orlani
85/62/0 91/60/s Philad
56/32/0 61/36/pc Phoer
72/62/.03 79/56/t Pittsb
67/56/0 66/58/sh Portla
83/74/.01 87/73/pc Portla
81/60/0 82/60/pc Ralelf
70/62/.01 58/44/sh Rapid
67/57/0, 71/51/pc Reno
85/64/1.00 83/64/pc Richm
54/46/0 60/40/sh Sacra
90/70/0 78/61/w St. Lo
65/57/0 68/48/pc Salt L
66/61/0 63/52/pc San A
63/58/.02 65/50/pc San D
87/73/0 86/74/t San F
48/44/.07 61/38/pc SeattI
80/62/.01 79/56/pc Spoka
75/65/0 80/60/pc Tampa
64/57/0 73/62/sh Tucso
66/47/0 67/45/pc Washi


Saturday Today


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52/44/0
90/66/.21
64/58/.14
92/71/0
72/59/.34
55/43/0
60/51/0
77/63/0
41/33/.01.
69/52/0
77/61/.08
60/49/0
58/54/.50
ty 75/52/0
82/59/0
65/59/0
co 56/50/0
63/49/0
75/61/0
87/70/.12
90/59/0
65/59/.05


HI/Lo/W
63/41/pc
88/67/t
76/62/t
92/67/s
69/52/sh
54/47/r
56/45/sh
82/58/t
54/36/pc
49/32/t
79/58/t
62/44/sh
55/43/sh
78/46/t
77/58/pc
65/56/pc
56/47/sh
56/47/sh
60/40/t
87/65/t
89/62/s
76/60/t


7p Monday


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1991. Becle).
W Va hled a Mav
record within an
afternoon hign
of 85 degrees


I CITY
1 Acapulco
Amsterdam
Athens
Auckland
- BelJing
Berlin
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Geneva
Havana
HelsinkI
Hong Kong
Kingston


Saturday
HI/Lo/Pcp.
* 90/79/0
59/50/0
77/50/0
66/55/0
88/59/0
70/46/.04
64/55/0
77/63/0
70/54/0
90/64/0
57/45/0
86/75/0
82/77/0


Today
HI/Lo/W
'93/78/pc
59/46/sh
82/64/s
64/57/r,
79/58/s
60/45/sh
69/52/s
80/68/s.
57/43/t
91/67/t
55/45/c.
84/78/t
84/76/t


CITY
La Paz
Lima
London
Madrid
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Nairobi
Nassau
New Delhi
Oslo
Panama
Paris


Saturday Today
HI/Lo/Pcp. HI/Lo/W
57/21/0 56/33/sh1
73/68/0 73/63/pc
93/41/0 62/48/t
82/55/.04 70/46/s
84/59/0 82/61/t
55/52/0 56/46/r
50/41/0 68/37/pc
79/61/0 78/60/pc
88/68/0 87/76/t
106/84/0 109/86/s
59/37/0 60/39/sh
90/72/0 88/77/t
,64/48/0 62/46/t


KEYTO CONDIrONS: ,:-LI.oul,.. d-]r,.i' i-iTr i -lot' n-r.:! ,-,ce, pc-partly cloudy, r=rain, s-sunny,
?r .=.:.i .:.,,e.-i *r,-i.:,-,b L-Ir, urcr-,,riTi.W-W ndy.


CAMPUS CMN VISA Platinum Card


BALANCE TRANSFER SPECIAL








APR'


m No annual fee

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OFFER IS FOR A LIMITED TIME ONLY!


7a -' p
Sunday


7 N0"' Fels"telle


CITY
Rio
Rome
St. Thomas VI
San Juan PR
Santiago
Seoul
Singapore
Sydney
Tel Aviv
Tokyo
Toronto
Vienna
Warsaw


Saturday
HI/Lo/Pcp.
73/68/.10
75/54/0
84/77/0
84/71/.89
75/41/0
73/52/0
88/77/0
61/50/0
70/57/.05
75/61/0
61/57/.60
72/52/0
66/43/0


Today
HI/Lo/W
79/70/t
75/53/s
83/73/t
83/77/t
68/42/pc
70/51/pc
91/78/t
66/48/s
72/62/pc
72/60/s
56/47/r
59/50/sh
66/47/sh


,LAKE CITYALMAN~t`,


...... . . . .


l _ IL 1


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


j


i..-r- 4- ( ~-'C- --.m.---- -.....co..di


I


~s~fsp~







Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkitby@~akecityreportercom


Lake City Reporter





SPORTS


Sunday. May 15. 201 I


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


BRIEFS

CHS FOOTBALL
Barbecue meals
for spring game
The Columbia County
Quarterback Club is
selling barbecue
dinners as a fundraiser
for the spring game
against Dunnellon High
on Friday. The meal
includes chicken or ribs,
green beans, chicken
and rice, roll and drink,
and will be available at
11 a.m. at the football
stadium. Orders placed
in advance by businesses
can be delivered by 'club
members during lunch
hours.
For details, call Willie
B. Allen at 397-0917 or
Tony Austin at 623-1890.
FORT WHITE FOOTBALL
Fundraiser for
Q-back Club
The Fort White
Quarterback Club has a
pancake breakfast and
car wash from
8-11 a.m. Saturday at the
Fort White Community
Center. Pancake
breakfast (eat in or take
out) is $5, and donations
will be accepted for the
car wash.
For details, call Kathy
D'Antonio at
(386) 590-9187.
CARDS
Bid whist, fish
fry fundraiser
Gold Standard Chapter
No. 48 has a bid whist
tournament and fish
fry fundraiser from
11:30 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Saturday at B&S Elks
Lodge No. 1599, 2510 E.
Washington Street. Team
entry for the tournament
is $20. The fish fry is $5.
For details, call Marva
Udell at (386) 234-1615
or Carlos Brown at
288-6235 for the
tournament, and Eddie
McKenzie at 623-1714 for
the fish fry.
GOLF
Kiwanis charity
tournament set
The Lake City Kiwanis
Club is hosting a
four-person scramble
golf tournament at 1 p.m.
Friday at The Country
Club of Lake City.
Cost is $60 per
person includes lunch.
For details, call Matt
Greene at 487-1374.
CATORS
International
Gator Day set
International Gator
Day, where gator clubs
unite worldwide to give
back to communities,
is Saturday. The North
Florida Gator Club is
teaming up with Habitat
for Humanity to clean up
a lot for a future home.
Meet at 8 a.m. at KC's
Produce on Baya Avenue
and bring yard tools to
help with the clean-up.
For details, call Diane
at 752-3333.
* From staff reports

GAMES

Friday
Fort White High
football vs. Orange Park
High in spring game,
7 p.m.
Columbia High
football vs. Dunnellon
High in spring game,


7:30 p.m.


Lightning


strikes


K l


Photos by BRANDON FINLEY/Lake City Reporter
TOP LEFT: Fort White High's A.J. Legree (3) scores the game's first touchdown for the Black team with Tavaris Williams (2) in coverage during the Indians'
Red & Black game in Fort White on Saturday.
LEFT: Fort White quarterback Andrew Baker (12) escapes the grip of Wesley Pitts (9) during a scramble on Saturday.
RIGHT: Fort White wide receiver A.J. Legree makes a snag in double coverage against the Red defense on Saturday.


Indians' quarterback Baker connects


with Legree, Williams for two scores


By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter. com
FORT WHITE Fort White
High played its Red & Black foot-
ball game on Saturday morning
and still ran into rain showers.
The Indians got in four series
of offense vs. defense in the intra-
squad scrimmage, but lightning
and rain led to a cancellation.
The game will be completed on
Tuesday. It will follow the middle
school's Red & White scrimmage


that begins at 5 p.m.
Fort White packed some excite-
ment into the short time on the
field. Quarterback Andrew Baker
connected with A.J. Legree on a
40-yard pass on the first play .from
scrimmage.
Baker and Legree also hooked
up for a 54-yard pass play and just
missed on another bomb when a
leaping Legree juggled the ball all
the way to the ground before it
popped loose.
Baker hit Legree on a


13-yard slant play for a touchdown.
Just before the game was post-
poned and with backups on the
field, Baker threw a sideline flair
to Soron Williams and he turned
it into a 74-yard touchdown play.
Nathan Escalante kicked the first
PAT, but there was no time for the
second.
"It is hard to say right now,"
Fort White head coach Demetric
Jackson said after the small sample
of plays. "We wanted to throw it
a little bit. Andrew threw good


passes and AJ. caught them. We
have got to get pur running game
going. The defense is farther along
than the offense and played pretty
physical."
Coach Ken Snider was upset
with the big plays given up by
the defense, but there were bright
spots.
After the long gain on the fist
pass, the defense shut down the
offense aided by a sack on a
INDIANS continued on 2B


Defense shines 4

for Tigers in

Purple & Gold I


Tunsil missed as
Columbia records
seven sacks.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter. corn
As a defensive coach,
BrianAllen had to be pleased
with the Tigers' effort as
the defense recorded seven
sacks in the Purple & Gold
game at Memorial Stadium
Friday.
After starting left tackle
Laremy Tunsil went down
with a knee injury at prac-
tice Thursday, the Tigers
were forced to shuffle the
offensive front. It showed


as five defensive players
recorded sacks.
Quayshon Monismith,
Austin Reiter and Dequan
Ivory each got to the
quarterback twice Friday.
Devontae Levy and Solomon
Bell each sacked the quar-
terback once.
"I thought we saw a bet-
ter effort out of Dequan late
in the game and especially
in the red zone," Allen said
after the game. "Solomon
is a guy we moved outside
this week and he's done it
in practice. That's encour-
aging that we're seeing the
same thing in practice as
CHS continued on 2B


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High's Raheem Battle (1) is pulled down from behind by Blake Kuykendall (43)
during the Purple & Gold game Friday.


--









LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, MAY 15, 2011 Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
AUTO RACING
12:30 p.m.
FOX NASCAR, Sprint CLp, FedEx
400, at Dover, Del.
7 p.m.
ESPN2 NHRA, Southern Nationals,
at Atlanta (same-day tape)
CYCLING
5 p.m.
VERSUS -Tour of California, stage I,
South Lake Tahoe to Truckee, Calif.
GOLF
7:30 a.m.
TGC PGA Tour, The Players
Championship, third round, at Ponte
Vedra Beach
8 a.m.
TGC European PGATour, lberdrola
Open, final round, at Mallorca, Spain
2 p.m. ,
NBC PGA Tour, The Players
Championship, final round, at Ponte Vedra
Beach
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
1:30 p.m.
TBS Philadelphia at Atlanta
2:10 p.m.
WGN San Francisco at Chicago
Cubs
8 p.m.
ESPN Boston at N.Y.Yankees
MEN'S COLLEGE LACROSSE
I p.m.
ESPN NCAA Division I, playoffs,
first round, Maryland at North Carolina
MOTORSPORTS
8 a.m.
SPEED MotoGP World
Championship,'French Grand Prix, at Le
Mans, France
5 p.m.
SPEED MotoGP Moto2, French
Grand Prix, at Le Mans, France (same-
day tape)
12 Midnight
SPEED -AMA Pro Racing, at Sonoma,
Calif. (same-day tape)
NBA BASKETBALL
3:30 p.m.
ABC Playoffs, conference semifinals,
game 7, Memphis at Oklahoma City
8 p.m.
ABC Playoffs, conference finals,
game I, Miami at Chicago
NHL HOCKEY
8 p.m.
VERSUS Playoffs, conference finals,
game I, San Jose at Vancouver
SOCCER
2:55 p.m.
ESPN2 Spanish Primera Division,
La Coruna at Barcelona

Monday
CYCLING
5 p.m.
VERSUS -Tour of California, stage 2,
ScuawValley to Sacramento, Calif.
MAJOR LEAGUE. BASEBALL.
7 p.m.
ESPN Philadelphia at St Louis

BASEBALL

AL standings


East Division
W L
Tampa Bay 23 16
New York 20 16
Toronto 19 20
Baltimore 18 20
Boston 18 20
Central Division
W L
Cleveland 24 13
Detroit 22 18
Kansas City 20 19
Chicago 16 24
Minnesota 12 25
West Division
W L
Los Angeles 2Z 18
Oakland 20 19


Texas 20 19 .513 I',
Seattle 16 23 .410 S'A
Saturday's Games
Seattle at Cleveland, ppd., rain
Oakland 6, Chicago White Sox 2
Baltimore 6,Tampa Bay 0
Detroit 3, Kansas City 0
LA.Angels 3,Texas 2
Toronto 9, Minnesota 3, I I innings
Boston at N.Y.Yankees (n)
Today's Games
Kansas City (Davies 1-5) at Detroit
(Scherzer 6-0), 1:05 p.m.
Seattle (Pineda 4-2) at Cleveland
(Tomlin 4-1), 1:05 p.m.
Baltimore (Arrieta 4-1) at Tampa Bay
(Sonnanstine 0-0), 1:40 p.m.
Toronto (Morrow 1-2) at Minnesota
(Duensing 2-2), 2:10 p.m. .
L.A. Angels (E.Santana 1-4) at Texas
(C.Wilson 4-2), 3:05 p.m.
Chicago White Sox (Buehrle 2-3) at
Oakland (Cahill 6-0), 4:05 p.m.
Boston (Lester 4-1) at N.Y. Yankees
(F.Garcia 2-2), 8:05 p.m.
Monday's Games
N.Y.Yankees at Tampa Bay, 6:40 p.m.
Toronto at Detroit, 7:05 p.m.
Baltimore at Boston, 7:10 p.m.
Cleveland at Kansas City, 8:10 p.m.
Texas at Chicago White Sox, 8:10 p.m.
L.A.Angels at Oakland, 10:05 p.m.
Minnesota at Seattle, 10:10 p.m.

NL standings


East Division
W L
Philadelphia 25 13
Florida 23 15
Atlanta 22 19
New York 18 21
Washington 18 21
Central Division
W L
Cincinnati 22 17
St. Louis 22 18
Milwaukee 18 21
Pittsburgh 18 21
Chicago 17 20
Houston 15 24
West Division
W L
San Francisco 21 17
Colorado 20 17
LosAngeles 19 20
San Diego 16 23
Arizona 15 22


Pct GB
.658 -
.605 2
.537 4'A
.462 7%/
.462 7'


Saturday's Games
Florida I,Washington 0
Atlanta 5, Philadelphia 3
San Diego 9, Colorado 7
Houston 7, N.Y. Mets 3
Milwaukee 8, Pittsburgh 2
Cincinnati 7, St. Louis 3
Arizona at L.A. Dodgers (n)
San Francisco at Chicago Cubs (n)
Today's Games
St. Louis (Carpenter 1-2) at Cincinnati
(T.Wood 2-3), 1:10 p.m.
Florida (Vazquez 2-3) at Washington
(Marquis 4-1),. 1:35 p.m.
Philadelphia (Halladay 5-2) at Atlanta
(T.Hudson 4-3), 1:35 p.m.
N.Y. Mets (Capuano 2-4) at Houston
(An.Rodriguez 0-I), 2:05 p.m. I
Pittsburgh (Correia 5-3) at Milwaukee
(Greinke 1-1), 2:10 p.m.
San Francisco (Lincecum 3-3) at
Chicago Cubs (Zambrano 4-1), 2:20 p.m.
San Diego (Latos 0-5) at Colorado
(Hammel 3-2), 3:10 p.m.
Arizona (I.Kennedy 3-1) at L.A.
Dodgers (Lilly 3-3), 4:10 p.m.
Monday's Games
Philadelphia at St. Louis, 7:05 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Washington, 7:05 p.m.
Chicago Cubs at Cincinnati, 7:10 p.m.
Florida at N.Y. Mets, 7:10 p.m.
Houston at Atlanta, 7:10 p.m.
San Francisco at Colorado, 8:40 p.m.
San Diego atArizona, 9:40 p.m.
Milwaukee at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 p.m.

BASKETBALL

NBA playoffs

CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS
Friday


Memphis 95, Oklahoma City 83
Today
Memphis at Oklahoma City, 3:30 p.m.
CONFERENCE FINALS
Today
Miami at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Wednesday
Miami at Chicago, 8:30 p.m.

AUTO RACING

Race week

NASCAR
SPRINT CUP
FedEx 400
Site: Dover, Del.
Schedule: Today, race, I p.m. (Fox,
12:30-5 p.m.).
Track: Dover International Speedway
(oval, 1.0 miles).
Race distance: 400 miles, 400 laps.
NHRA FULLTHROTTLE
NHRA Southern Nationals
Site: Commerce, Ga.
Schedule: Today final eliminations
(ESPN2, 7-10 p.m.).
Track:Atlanta Dragway.

FedEx 400 lineup

At Dover International Speedway
Dover, Del.
(Lineup based on owner points
unless noted.)
(Car number in parentheses)
I. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet.
2. (43) A J Allmendinger, Ford.
3. (88) Dale Earnharlt Jr., Chevrolet.
4. (4) Kasey Kahne,Toyota.
5. (20) Joey Logano, Toyota.
6. (22) Kurt Busch, Dodge.
7. (18) Kyle Busch,Toyota.
8. (56) Martin Truex Jr.,Toyota.
9. (2) Brad Keselowski, Dodge.
10. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet.
11. (78) Regan Smith, Chevrolet.
12. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford.
13. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford.
14. (6) David Ragan, Ford.
15. (83) Brian Vii:kersToyota.
16. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet.
17. (00) David Reutimann,Toyota.
18. (9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford.
19. (42) Juan Pablo Montoya,
Chevrolet.
20. (27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet.
21. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet.
22. (33) Clint Bowyer, Chevrolet.
23. (47) Bobby LabonteToyota.
24. (17) Matt Kenseth, Ford.
25. (5) Mark Martin, Chevrolet.
26. (I I) Denny Hamlin,Toyota.
27. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet.
28. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet.
29. (34) David Gilliland, Ford.
30. (13) Casey Mears,Toyota.
S3 I1. (I) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet.
32. (09) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet.
33. (32) Mike Bliss, Ford.
34. (7) Scott Wimmer, Dodge.
35. (36) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet.
36. (66) Michael McDowell, Toyota,
Attempts.
37. (71) Andy Lally,Ford,Attempts.
38. (46) J.J.Yeley, Chevrolet,Attempts.
39. (60) Mike Skinner,Toyota.
40. (30) David Stremme, Chevrolet,
Attempts.
41. (38) Travis Kvapil, Ford,Attempts.
42. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota,
Attempts.
43. (37) Tony Raines, Ford,Attempts.
Failed to Qualify
44. (81) Scott Riggs, Chevrolet.

HOCKEY

NHL playoffs

CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS
Thursday
San Jose 3. Detroit 2, San Jose wins
series 4-3
CONFERENCE FINALS
Today
Tampa Bay at Boston, 8 p.m.
Sunday
San Jose atVancouver, 8 p.m.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High quarterback Nigel Atkinson (12) looks for an open man during the
Purple & Gold game Friday.


CHS: Defense shines in 7-7 tie

Continued From Page 1B


the game."
Allen didn't dismiss the
importance of Tunsil being
in the game.
"The good news is that
we'll have him back on
Friday," Allen said. "He's
a guy that can change the
tempo of the game. You put
our stud left tackle back in
the game and it'll open up
holes and make things go in
the passing game as well."
Tunsil should be ready
to go for the Tigers' game


against Dunnellon at 7 p.m.
Friday at Tiger Stadium.
Columbia will use the
next few days to continue
to develop at quarterback
and running back, where
position battles rage on.
"(Barnibus) Madison
was a player that excited
me with his tough running
and cut back ability," Allen
said. "We put the ball on
the ground, but I'm excited
about our vision. Braxton
(Stockton) is another young


guy that made plays and
will be in our program for a
few years. I like what Nigel
(Atkinson) did at receiver
and Jayce (Barber) showed
that he could compete at
quarterback. I'm excited
about these things."
Allen was also excited for
the turnout.
"I liked seeing people
in the crowd and I hope
we have an even bigger
crown next week against
Dunnellon," he said.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Phil Mickelson looks up as rain clouds move in while standing on the seventh green
during the third, round of The Players Championship golf tournament Saturday in
Ponte Vedra Beach.



Rain delay at The Players


Associated Press

PONTE VEDRA BEACH
- David Toms never imag-
ined having to wait 30 hours
for his next shot at The
Players Championship.
The tournament was
suspended for 4k hours
Saturday because of severe


thunderstorms that hov-
ered over the area for much
of the afternoon.
Players finally were sent
out to the range, and play
resumed at 5:30 p.m.
Toms, the 36-hole lead-
er by one .shot over Nick
Watney, finished his sec-
ond round about 1 p.m.


Friday. The delay meant
he would not tee off until
shortly after 7 p.m., and
would only be able to play
about four holes.
Peter Hanson of Sweden
shot a 6-under 66 in the
third round.
The final round will begin
at 7:45 Sunday morning.


Edwards holds on to win Nationwide


Associated Press

DOVER, Del Carl
Edwards held on to win the
Nationwide Series at Dover
International Speedway
on Saturday after a wreck-
filled final lap that knocked
out several contenders.
Edwards battle with Joey
Logano off the final restart


of the race turned danger-
ous in a hurry. Logano
got loose as he tried to
scoot around Edwards and
slammed into the wall,
triggering a pile up that
eliminated Clint Bowyer
from contention. Bowyer's
car slid sideways down the
concrete track. Debris hit
one of Bowyer's crew.


Edwards instantly
thought he hit Logano and
caused the accident But
Edwards never made seri-
ous contact and won on the
second attempt of a green-
white finish.
He refrained from
performing his traditional
winning backflip off his
No. 60 Ford.


INDIANS: Play Orange Park Friday


Continued From Page 1B

blitz by Terry Calloway.
The defeiise registered a
sack on the next series and
forced a fourth-and-20.
Baker had a scramble
for a first down and com-
pleted three passes on the
third series that set up the
touchdown.


ACROSS

1 Influence
5 Knock
politely
8 and downs
11 Freight
hopper
12 Seine
moorages
14 Tree
product
15 With style
17 Play about
Capote
18 Threw with
force
19 Swirled around
21 Tpks.
23 Giza's river
24 Urban
studios
27 Majors and
Remick
29 Yea, to a
matador.
30 Like polyester
(hyph.)
34 Flakes


"I was pleased -with our
run defense, but we have
to shore up our pass rush
and coverage," Snider said.
"There is no substitute for
experience and we have
got a little bit on film to
show the kids their mis-
takes and how to correct


37 Golf term
38 In that case
(2 wds.)
39 Harder to find
41 Confirm
43 Damsel
45 Smokestack
47 Computer
graphics
50 Lemon cooler
51 Periscope site
54 Tayback or
Damone
55 Bring on board
56 Campus sports
org.
57 NASA go-
ahead (hyph.)
58 Grass rolls
59 Fall mo.

DOWN

1 Ewe or sow
2 Pack member
3 Director
Ferrara
4 Healthy snack
5 Faint trace


them. We are young and
have to grow up in a hurry.-
I am confident it will all be
resolved."
Fort White ends practice
with spring game against
Orange Park High at
7 p.m. Friday at Arrowhead
Stadium.


Answer to Previous Puzzle

MAP STMT QUAD
U GH HUME UR GE
G GUIDANCE EBON
SALAMI MOLAR
SPCA ULNA

MACHO BIDMA

SA ASE AIASP


LATS D EG


AVEC CONTRACT
RENE ANIL IRR
MEDS ROSY NUT


Elev.
Volcano goddess
No later than
Blender output
Tire feature
2000 Olympics city


16 Colony
members
20 DVD player
need
22 Downhill race
24 London lav
25 Antique
26 Had over for
dinner
28 Lisper's
problem
30 Metro RRs
31 Loan abbr.
32 Dawn
Chong
33 Drop the ball
35 Good, for
Pedro
36 Once more
39 Costa -
40 Makes pretty
41 Sound
42 Sweater style
(hyph.)
44 Did target
practice
45 Variety of
bean
46 Physicist
Alvarez
48 Friendly
49 Crisp cookie
52 Pal
53 Lunch


2011 by UFS, Inc.


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, MAY 15, 2011


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420











nHeat eager for challenge


of facing Chicago's Rose


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Memphis Grizzlies forward Zach Randolph (50) shoots
against Oklahoma City Thunder forward Nick Collison (4)
during the second half of Game 6 of a second-round NBA
playoff series on Friday in Memphis, Tenn. Randolph led
the Grizzlies with 30 points, as they won 95-83 to even the
series 3-3.


Grizzlies push

Thunder back to

OKC for Game 7


By TERESA M. WALKER
Associated Press

MEMPHIS, Tenn. -
Just keep counting Zach
Randolph and the Memphis
Grizzlies out. They revel in
that underdog status.
Now the team few outside
of Memphis ever noticed
before this postseason has
provided the NBA with
the first Game 7 of these
playoffs.
Randolph had 30 points
and 13 rebounds, and the
Grizzlies avoided elimi-
nation by beating the
Oklahoma City Thunder
95-83 Friday night to push
their Western Conference
semifinal to a deciding
game.
'"We just have to go out
and do it again," Memphis
coach Lionel Hollins said.
"I know all of the pundits
think it's over. They've
been saying we would win
tonight, and Oklahoma City
would win in seven, but it's
not over yet. We have to
go win that game, and I'm
looking forward to it."
The Grizzlies had never
won a game before when
facing elimination, but that
was back in 2004, 2005
and 2006, when they were
swept out of the postsea-
son each of those years.
These Grizzlies are having
not only the best playoff
run in franchise history, but
they now have won more
games this postseason than
any other No. 8 seed from
the West.
Game 7 will be at
3:30 p.m. today in Oklahoma
City, with the winner advanc-
ing to play the well-rested
Dallas Mavericks.
"This is where we want
to be playing, Game 7,
that one. game to get to
the Western Conference
finals," Randolph said. "It's
important. I feel good, but


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
I OPITV I


the job ain't done yet. We
know it's going to be tough
going to Oklahoma try-
ing to win that game. We
believe we can do it, and
we're committed."
O.J. Mayo, who started in
place of Sam Young, scored
16 points for Memphis.
Mike Conley had 11 points
and a franchise playoff-
record 12 assists, and Tony
Allen added 10 points as the
Grizzlies improved to 5-1 on
their home court this post-
season, with a sellout crowd
standing for the entire sec-
ond half cheering to keep
this stunning run going at
least one more game.
"We like people betting
against us," Conley said. "It
motivates us. We know a lot
of people don't believe other
than in the city of Memphis
that we can get this done.
We believe we can. That's
all that matters."
Memphis outscored the
Thunder 51-29 in the sec-
ond half and 46-38 in the
paint overall.:
Russell Westbrook led
the Thunder Mith 27 points,
and James Harden had 14.
Kevin Durant, the NBA's
leading scorer in the regu-
lar season, was held to a
postseason-low 11 points on
3 of 14 shooting. He was 1
of 9 from beyond the arc.
"It's going to be a tough
Game 7 at our place,"
Durant said. "I'm looking
forward to it. I started the
game off like I did ... After
that, it goes downhill. It's
frustrating."
Westbrook refused to call
this a blown opportunity.
'We got one more game,
and we've got to be able to
close it out," he said.
Randolph had been
limited to just 19.8 points
and 31.9 percent shooting
since he scored a career
playoff-best 34 points in
Game 1.

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek


THE MOVIE STAR-
COUPLE PIPNT MINP
WHEN THEIR KIPS
1:PIP THIS.
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


Print answer here: m I
(Answers tomorrow)
Saturday's Jumbles: BLURB CLOAK SUDDEN JUNIOR
Answer: What the landfill artist made when he started
gluing pieces together JUNK BONDS


LADY GIRD JOHNSON








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mrnslayallitate.com


By TIM REYNOLDS
Associated Press

MIAMI LeBron James
will take some turns guard-
ing Derrick Rose in the
Eastern Conference finals.
So will Dwyane Wade. Mike
Bibby, Mario Chalmers and
even Chris Bosh in some
moments, too.
None of them expects to
stop him.
Keeping Rose in check,
however, is the top priority
for the Miami Heat and
is likely a prerequisite for
beating the Chicago Bulls
'and reaching the NBA
finals. Game 1 of the East
title series is Sunday night
in Chicago, the city Rose
has led into its first NBA
Final Four since Michael
Jordan took them there 13
years ago.
"We're not a team to con-
cede anything," James said,
discussing how to defend
the guard who ended his
two-year reign as the NBA's
MVP this season. "That's
not our nature. We don't
play basketball like that.
We have too many guys
that have too much pride
to allow a guy individually
to just go off.
"Like I've said, he's
going to get his. Their
team is going to play
well. But we're up for the
challenge."
It may be their biggest
challenge yet.


Rose has taken 29 per-
cent of Chicago's shots
in the playoffs, his 256
attempts being almost as
many as the total shots
for the Bulls' second and
third options, Luol Deng
(154) and Carlos Boozer
(119) in the postseason.
He's not always a shoot-
first guard, though, prov-
en by his 90 assists in
the playoffs more than
any other three Chicago
players combined.,
"Sometimes he's going
to slither in there and
make some incredible
plays," Bosh said. "It's
going to happen."
Much like James and
Wade, Rose is truly a pick-
your-poison opponent for
teams.
Play him straight up,
run the risk of getting.
beat 1-on-1.
Overplay him, and he
makes you pay with the
sharp pass.
"He's a phenomenal
player," Wade said. "He's
figured out how to be great
in this league fast. We
know he's going to score.
He's going to do amazing
things. It's our job just to
make sure that we make
it tough on him as pos-
sible. He's the MVP for a
reason."
In turn, the Heat have
been one of the NBA's
top defensive teams for a
reason.


Even on Saturday, a
few hours before board-
ing their charter flight to
Chicago, Heat coach Erik


.- - -- - ------------- - - - - -


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Deadline is Wednesday,
i May 18, 2011 at 5:00pm I
I Find all 18 of the WlIdflowe' I
Swords hidden in the word search
above. Words can be found in the
banners on the ads shown here.I
'I Complete the puzzle
j and return it to the Lake City
Reporter, 180 E. Duval Street, I
A Lake City, FL by Wednesday, April
27 5:00pm, for your chance to winlI
Lake CitN Reporter

Y FORM


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LAKE CITY REPORTER NBA SUNDAY, MAY 15, 2011


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this March 6 file photo, Chicago Bulls' Derrick Rose (1)
goes to the basket against the Miami Heat's LeBron James
(6) and Dwyane Wade (3) in the third quarter of an NBA -
game, in Miami. Right from the start, Rose wondered why he
couldn't be MVP. Turns out, nothing was stopping him. Now
the question is: Can he get by LeBron James and
Dwyane Wade?


i . - -


L


~~mr~r


PECTAC
7-T) \ ~






4B LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVERTISEMENT SUNDAY MAY 15, 2011


First Ballot Chosen . . 100

Second Ballot.......... s50
FILL OUT THE BALLOT (Must complete 50% of ballot to be counted)
ENTER YOUR NAME for the RANDOM DRAWING.
ANYONE CAN WIN. . WHY NOT YOU?


SNTER & WIN! 2010 Official Entry Ballot
(Simply Write In Your Choice For Columbia County's Best and Return Ballot by June 6, 2011)

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SI


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SPeople
Attorney
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Doctor
Home Builder _
Insurance Agent
Orthodontist_


Best Plumber_
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Best Veterinarian


Best Auto Body Shop
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Best Credit Union
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Best Gym
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Best Pool/Spa Service and Repair
Best Printer_
Best Real Estate Agency____
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Best Antique Store
Best Appliance Dealer
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Best Consignment/Thrift Store
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Best Pawn Shop_____
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Best Place to Buy Tires
Best Produce______
Best Scrapbook Store
Best Shoe Store
Best Spa/Hot Tub Dealer
Best Sporting Goods Store
Best Truck Dealer
Best Used Auto Dealer


Best Apartment Complex
Best Golf Course
Best Hotel/Motel
Best Place for a Wedding Reception
Best Retirement Community_
Best Campground


l]GINSTRUCT ] ] -' IONS[eAND OF ]F-ICIA =L RU ES:on enryfor pe huseol. Enriesl must be subm itted o offiialetry ba llolt !i. Photocopie'and'carb ,'not!accepte. MusINt
be"18 yersiof age toentr Ba~F'dI llots mus't linc1lude nami, a.ge, ad1ress andteIlephone nuOmbei![;r. Etr Iienomet;ing 1t G;jhese ci: teF3ria wllnotI; tablatednor ete1edin the draw J ing for $150
worth Iof cash p rizes T eLake ityRepoterIesevesthel- r1ightto e r]ify llentr# =iePo"s]an t eim-11 ina,=. te a Iy category for 1any' Leason. Entrl 1ies m Ist bJe pos.tmarke by Jne 6,2I11 nd mi[=z led


City


Phone


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Story ideas?

C.J. Risak
Assistant Editor
754-0427
crisak@okecityreportercom


BUSINESS


Sunday, May 15, 201 I


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section C


Shands increases employment chances

By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter. com


In the midst of a slow
economy, the Shands
LakeShore Regional
Medical Center has
been able to offer
employment opportunities
to fill several newly created
positions.
Since July 1, when Health
Management Associates
and Shands Healthcare
became partners in run-
ning Shands LakeShore,
Shands Live Oak and
Shands Starke hospi-
tals, several new depart-
ments have been created
in the Shands LakeShore
Regional Medical Center.
Some of those depart-
ments serve Shands
LakeShore, while others
serve Shands Live Oak and
Shands Starke.
As a result of the partner-
ship, an accounting depart-
ment,. payroll department,
marketing department and
an information/technology
department were created.
With the new depart-
ments, the Shands
LakeShore Regional
Medical Center has been
able to hire 16 employees
to fill the newly created
positions in the four depart-
ments. The departments
serve all three of the com-
munity -hospitals, but are
based out of the Lake City
facility.
"As our needs grow,
and our hospitals grow, we
will add to those existing
departments," said Rhonda
Sherrod, Shands LakeShore


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Shands LakeShore Regional Medical Center administrators, Jim Burns (from left), market CFO; Zac Bielling, associate
administrator; and Rhonda Sherrod, CEO, discuss the direction the hospital is heading in. 'We are really excited to create
new departments and provide job opportunities for the community,' Sherrod said. 'We feel good about becoming a community
hospital.'


Regional Medical Center
CEO. "We feel good we
can contribute to the local
economy by providing job
opportunities."
Before the partnership
was established between
the two hospital corpora-
tions, the services utilized
in the new positions were


'provided for the local hos-
pitals through Shands offic-
es in Gainesville.
"Shands Healthcare
provided these functions
as a core service out of
Gainesville," Sherrod said.
"When we became 'a Health
Management Associates'
hospital, we created these


departments to support our
three community hospitals."
Sherrod said the depart-
ments are vital to the daily
operations of the hospitals.
. "We're really pleased that
we created these positions
and created jobs," she said.
"At a time when unemploy-
ment rates are going up,


we're creating jobs and we
feel good about that We're
contributing to the economy
in our community in a very
positive way. We're provid-
ing competitive salaries and
benefits and we feel good
about that. We're giving
back to the community in
that way."


Hurricane
speculation
raises OJ
futures

By SANDY SHORE
AP Business Writer

Orange juice futures
rose 3.3 percent Friday
as investors weighed
the possibility that hur-
ricanes could disrupt the
supply of oranges.
The price of frozen
orange juice futures typi-
cally begins to increase
as the hurricane season
gets under way. Orange
juice futures rose 5.8
cents to settle at $1.8285 a
pound, the highest since
late February.
The U.S. Agriculture
Department earlier this
week estimated this
year's crop at 8.82 mil-
lion tons. That was about
1 percent less than the
April forecast but 7 per-
cent more than the 2009-
2010 season.
Transworld Futures
LLC analyst Jimmy Tintle
said a price increase of
nearly 3 percent since the
first of May was "a little
bit unusual."
"I think what every-
body's looking at is one
hurricane, two hurricanes
and we're really having
supply issues," he said.
Other commodi-
ties were mixed largely
because of movements in
the dollar. Commodities
are priced in dollars so
a stronger dollar makes
them more expensive for
JUICE continued on 2C


Rising food and gas costs


push up consumer prices


By CHRISTOPHER S.
RUGABER
AP Economics Writer


the past 12 months. That's
still below the level the
Federal Reserve considers
a healthy pace of inflation.


WASHINGTON -- Economists like to study
'Consumers paid more for costs outside food and ener-
gas and food in April, lifting gy the so-called "core"
inflation to its highest level prices to see long-term
in two and a half years. trends. Food and energy
1~ut inflationary pressures can rise or fall sharply from
have begun to ease this month to month.
month, and ,analysts say The cqst of new and used
some prices could taper off cars, clothing and medical
by summer. care all increased, pushing
The Consumer Price up the core index. Car pric-
Index increased 0.4 per- es likely increased because
cent in April, the Labor of temporary parts short-
Department said. In the ages caused by the March
past 12 months, prices have 11 earthquake and tsunami
risen 3.2 percent. That's in Japan. Most other prices
the biggest year-over-year were subdued.
gain since November 2007 Oil has fallen from $114 a
through October 2008. barrel earlier this month to
Excluding volatile food about $100 Friday. Prices of
and energy, which account corn and other grains have
for about 20 percent of the also declined in recent
CPI, the index increased days
0.2 percent in April and Economists say gas and
has risen 1.3 percent over food prices should fall later



&^ II1


this year. High prices are
likely slowing the economy
this quarter. But growth
should increase in the sec-
ond half of this year, they
say.
"With commodity pric-
es now dropping back,
it looks like inflation is
close to peaking," said
Paul Ashworth, chief U.S.
economist for Capital
Economics. He says year-
over-year inflation should
climb to 3.5 percent before
dropping in the second half
-of the year.
Cary Leahey, an econo-
mistatDecision Economics,
said yearly inflation figures
should start to decline in
the next several months,
although core prices
should continue to rise.
The Federal Reserve won't
need to start raising inter-
est rates until next year to
COSTS continued on 2C


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this April 28 file photo, John Magel pumps gas at a station in Wethersfield, Conn.
Consumers paid more for gas and food in April, lifting inflation to its highest level in two and
a half years. But inflationary pressures have begun-to ease in May, and analysts say some
prices could taper off by summer.


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LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS SUNDAY, MAY 15, 2011


Let's Get Real
About Inflation
Q What's a "real return"? -
L.N., Beverly Hills, Calif
A t reflects an investment's
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Inflation really matters in long-
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Focus on the percentage of your
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In this example; the 1,000 shares
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Don't let any holding grow
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that's not ideal, either. If that /
stock doubles or triples, its
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Most people might aim to
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depending on their confidence. Park
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You want some diversification, but
you needn't overdo it, as you don't
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If that seems like too much work,
consider mutual funds instead, and
look closely at broad-market index
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European crisis drives stocks down


By DAVID K. RANDALL
AP Business Writer

NEW YORK Signs that European
bailouts will be larger than originally
forecast upended financial markets
Friday, sending the dollar up nearly 1
percent and erasing the week's gains
in the stock market.
Stocks in countries that use the
euro fell after the European Union
warned that the debt loads of Greece,
Ireland and Portugal will be larger
than originally thought Officials said
that Greece needs to cut spending
further, which led to concerns that
the assistance the country has already
received won't be enough. The Euro
Stoxx 50, an index of large companies
in countries that use the euro, fell 0.8
percent.
The Dow Jones industrial average
lost 140 points, or 1.1 percent, to
12,555 in early afternoon trading. The
S&P 500 fell 14, or 1 percent, to 1,335.
The Nasdaq composite lost 34, or 1.2
percent, to 2,829. The -slide turned
each index lower for the week.
All 30 stocks that make up the Dow
index fell. JPMorgan Chase & Co. had
the largest loss, 2.2 percent.
Fears of a deepening financial crisis
overshadowed reports that found that
consumers are feeling more confident
in the U.S. economy and that inflation
remains in check. Consumer prices
rose 0.4 percent in April, the Labor
Department said. That was in line with
economist's expectations.
Most of the increases came in vola-
tile food and energy prices. Stripping
those out, prices rose 0.2 percent and


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Thursday photo, specialist Jim Ahrens, left, and trader Michael Urkonis work
on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange. Robust economic growth figures for
the eurozone helped shore up stock markets in Europe Friday and gave the euro
some respite after a savage sell-off over the previous week.


stayed below the rate of inflation that
the Federal Reserve considers normal.
"Inflation doesn't look like the risk
that everyone feared," said Doug
Cote, the chief market strategist at
ING Investment Management.
The prices that consumers pay have
risen 3.2 percent over the last 12
months, the biggest 12-month gain
since October 2008. Companies like
Kimberly-Clark Corp. and Colgate-
Palmolive Co. that sell households
products have raised prices because
of higher commodity costs that have
cut into their profit margins. Costs


for raw materials like oil, coffee, and
cattle have risen more than 10 percent
this year.
Bond prices rose as investors
moved money into assets that are con-
sidered safe. The yield on the 10-year
Treasury bond fell to 3.15 percent
from 3.23 late Thursday. I
No major U.S. companies are
scheduled to report results Friday.
Nordstrom Inc. lost 2.5 percent after
the retailer lowered its full-year earn-
ings forecast late Thursday, due partly
to the acquisition of an online shop-
ping site HauteLook.


Job gains should offset higher gas, food prices


By CHRISTOPHER S.
RUGABER and MARTIN
CRUTSINGER
AP Economics Writers

WASHINGTON The
best hiring market in five
years should limit the dam-
age from inflation and posi-
tion the economy to thrive in
the second half of the year.
Higher food and gas prices
are threatening to slow growth
this spring. But economists
say the drag from inflation


will likely be only temporary.
Commodity prices are easing.
Gas prices could follow in the
weeks ahead.
"We are going to see the
economy picking up steam,"
said Joel Naroff of Naroff
Economic Advisors, who is
among many economists who
think gas prices will taper
off. "Lower energy prices will
give consumers more confi-
dence to spend, and higher'
consumer spending will give
businesses more confidence


to hire and invest"
The nationwide aver-
age for a gallon of gas has
jumped by more than a dol-
lar in the past year, though
it leveled off the past week
slightly below $4 a gallon.
And consumers are paying
more for groceries, after
the biggest monthly spike
in food prices in nearly
three years.
Surging prices for neces-
sities, like gas and food,
were the main reason why


sales at U.S. retailers rose
0.5 percent in April. It was
the 10th straight monthly
gain. But excluding sales
at gas stations, the increase
was a slighter 0.2 percent,
the Commerce Department
said. And grocery store
sales rose at triple the rate
from March.
Economists have
expressed concerns that
those higher prices could
leave consumers with less
money to spend.


COSTS: Prices up

Continued From Page 1C


keep inflation in check,
he said.
The price of gasoline
rose 3.3 percent in April.
That accounted for half
of last month's increase.
Gas has risen more than
33 percent in the past
year because of demand
in fast-growing develop-
ing countries and politi-
cal turmoil in the Middle
East Gasoline is averag-
ing $3.98 a gallon nation-
wide, up $1.09 from last
year.
Food prices increased
0.4 percent last month.
That was half the pre-
vious month's increase,
which was the largest in
nearly three years. The


price of fresh vegetables
fell. Dairy, meat, fish and
eggs all rose,
Federal Reserve
Chairman Ben Bernanke
has said that the impact
of higher food and gas
prices should be tempo-
rary. The central bank
has also said it is watch-
ing closely for any signs
of inflation.
Last October, the core
index had risen only 0.6
percent in a year, and the
Fed was more concerned
about falling prices. That
increase was the small-
est for 12 months since
the core index was cre-
ated in 1957.


JUICE: Futures on rise

Continued From Page 1C


buyers using other cur-
rencies.
, Gold fell and silver
rose as some investors
sold their holdings for a
profit. The metals were
also pressured by global
financial issues such as
Europe's lingering debt
problems, CPM Group
analyst Carlos Sanchez
said.
Gold for June deliv-
ery fell $13.20 to settle
at $1,493.60 an ounce,
which was 5.1 percent
higher than it was at the
start of the year. July
silver rose 21.6 cents
to settle at $35.013.
Although that is off its
high for the year after
days of volatile trading,
the price still was 13.2
percent higher for the
year.
In other metals trad-
,ing, July copper rose 1.3
cents to $3.9835 a pound,
July platinum fell $1.70
to $1,769.30 an ounce
and June palladium fell


$10.40 to at $706.45 an
ounce.
Energy prices settled
higher.
Benchmark crude
for June delivery rose
68 cents to settle at
$99.65 per barrel on the
New York Mercantile
Exchange, ending a vol-
atile week in which the
price ranged from $95
to $104.
In other Nymex con-
tracts for June, heating
oil rose 2j85 cents to
settle at $2.9422 per gal-
lon, gasoline rose 1.05
cents to $3.0744 a gallon
and natural gas rose 5.5
cents to $4.311 per 1,000
cubic feet.
Grains and beans
were mixed.
In contracts for July
delivery, wheat fell 7.75
cents to settle at $7.2775
a bushel, 'corn rose 1.5
cents to $6.82 a bushel
and soybeans fell 13.25
cents to $13.295 a bush-
el.


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427









Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS & HOME SUNDAY, MAY 15, 2011


THE WEEK IN REVIEW oTHE WEEK IN REVIEW *THE WEEK IN REVIEW *THE WEEK IN REVIEW *THE WEEK IN REVIEW




The Week in Review


Weekly Stock Exchanae Hiahliahts


I ----I- J---" 'I


Y NYSE
8,371.67 -54.23


Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
DeanFds 13.41 +2.44 +22.2
Sparton 9.64 +1.70 +21.4
TRC Cos 6.88 +1.16 +20.3
Medifast 24.23 +4.08 +20.2
DollarTh 81.90+12.21 +17.5
SemiMfg 5.50 +.82 +17.5
CrwfdA 4.85 +.69 +16.6
Systemax 14.49 +2.06 +16.6
Dillards 56.00 +7.86 +16.3
Lentuon 3.25 +.45 +16.0

Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
IntraLkson 21.74 -7.37 -25.3
USANA 28.05 -8.62 -23.5
Headwatrs 3.79 -1.08 -22.2
Renrenn 13.16 -3.64 -21.7
Dex One 2.87 -.65 -18.5
Gramnrcy 2.20 -.50 -18.5
Bitauto n 7.79 -1.67 -17.7
Youkun 48.54-10.30 -17.5
AlonUSA 10.97 -2.24 -17.0
ProUSSIvrs19.70 -3.41 -14.8

Most Active ($1 or more)
Name Vol(O0) Last Chg
S&P500ETF6768717134.04 -.16
BkofAm 6118159 11.93 -.38
iShSilver 5643960 34.39 -.09
iShEMkts 3328771 46.92-1.33
SPDR Fncl2983341 15.77 -.34
iShR2K 2963379 83.51 +.24
Citigrp rs 2452335 41.53-3.67
BostonSci 2295536 6.84 -.88
FordM 2156560 15.08 -.03
SprintNex 2061069 5.10 -.10

Diary
Advanced 1,827
Declined 1,350
New Highs 443
New Lows 65
Total issues 3,225
Unchanged 48
Volume 17,487,703,390


Y Amex
2,350.28 -18.53


Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
AdcareH wt 3.33 +.93 +38.8
Solitario 3.18 +.53 +20.0
HeraldNB 2.94 +.46 +18.6
Procerars 11.43 +1.61 +16,4
EngySvcs 3.50 +.49 +16.3
SLInd 23.00 +3.00 +15.0
SunUnk 2.60 +132 +14.0
Ever-Glory 2.20 +.26 +13.6
PHC Inc 2.71 +.32 +13.4
iBio 2.95 +.32 +12.2

Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
NA Pall g 3.90 -1.63 -29.5
LGLGrp 10.43 -2.73 -20.7
NewEnSys. 2.68 -.52 -16.3
Quepasa 6.12 -1.19 -16.3
UnivPwr 3.38 -.62 -15.5
MAGSIvg 9.57 -1.43 -13.0
BioTime 5.53 -.82 -12.9
Innovaro 2.41 -.35 -12.7
CagleA 5.30 -.70 -11.7
GrtBasGg 2.05 -.25 -10.9

Most Active ($1 or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
NAPallg 352627 3.90-1.63
NthnO&G 233245 20.06 -.33
CFCda g 227147 20.70 -.38
NovaGldg 177665 10.34 -.61
GoldStrg 174815 2.61 -.15
NwGold g 159556 9.27 -.46
GtPanSilvg141127 3.11 -.20
TmsatlPet 138669 2.30 -.03
KodiakO g 128681 6.03 -.15
VantageDri 123127 1.80 +.12

Diary
Advanced 278
Declined 243
New Highs 28
New Lows 19
Total issues 542
Unchanged 21
Volume 609,064,326


1 2,828.47 +.91

Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
QuantFu rs 5.13 +2.47 +92.9
Arotech 2.32 +1.03 +79.8
Toplmage 2.05 +.75 +57.7
Vermillion 6.15 +2.18 +54.9
Oxignersh 5.24 +1.68 +47.1
DynaVox 7.91 +2.44 +44.6
Spherix rs 3.90 +1.08 +38.3
Oncothyr 5.91 +1.44 +32.2
ARCA bio 2.51 +.61 +32.1
DiscLabrs 2.50 +.59 +30.9

Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
BioMimetic 8.10 -5.19 -39.0
PensonWw 3.34-2.01 -37.6
SmartHeat 2.15 -.83 -27.9
FFBArkrsh 7.57 -2.91 -27.8
STEC 14,80 -5.44 -26.9
Vertro rs 2.66 -.80 -23.1
Toreador 4.98 -1.42 -22.2
BeasleyB 4.44 -1.26 -22.1
DehaierMd 3.35 -.93 -21.7
BioLase 4.20 -1.13 -21.2

Most Active ($1 or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
Cisco 5488984 16.88 -.68
SiriusXM 5361302 2.24 +.02
Level3 4350716 1.89 +.24
Microsoft 3750689 25.03 -.84
Intel 3406050 23.41 +.16
Yahoo 3211131 16.55-2.10
PwShs QQQ255386358.41 -.06
MicronT 1749529 10.40 -.47
Nvidia 1292306 18.26 -1.06
Dell Inc 1207161 16.37 +.36

Diary
Advanced 1,413
Declined 1,344
New Highs 264
New Lows 117
Total issues 2,815
Unchanged 58
Volume 10,027,520,364


STOCKS OF LOCAL INTEREST


Wkly Wkly YTD
Name Ex Div Last Chg%Chg%Chg


AT&T Inc NY 1.72
AlcatelLuc NY
Alcoa NY .12
AutoZone NY ..
BkofAm NY .04
BobEvans Nasd .80
BostonSci NY
CNBFnPA Nasd .66
CSX NY 1.44
Chevron NY 3.12
Cisco Nasd .24
Citigrp rs NY .04
CocaCola NY 1.88
Delhalze NY 2.02
Dell Inc Nasd
FamilyDIr NY .72
FordM NY
FMCGs NY 1.00
GenElec NY .60
HomeDp NY 1.00
iShJapn NY .14
iShSilver NY
iShEMkts NY .64
iShR2K NY .89
Intel Nasd .84
JPMorgCh NY 1.00
Level3 Nasd
Lowes NY .44


31.41 +.15 +0.5 +6.9
6.10 +.03 +0.5+106.1
17.10 -.02 -0.1 +11.1
286.30 +4.74 +1.7 +5.0
11.93 -.38 -3.1 -10.6
31.51 +.44 +1.4 -4.4
6.84 -.88 -11.4 -9.6
13.27 -.01 -0.1 -10.4
74.75 -3.85 -4.9 +15.7
102.39 -.49 -0.5 +12.2
16.88 -.68 -3.9 -16.6
41.53 -3.67 -8.1 -12.2
68.18 +1.28 +1.9 +3.7
82.44 +.79 +1.0 +11.8
16.37 +.36 +2.2 +20.8
51.94 -1.11 -2.1 +4.5
15.08 -.03 -0.2 -10.2
48:27 -1.40 -2.8 -19.6
19.89 -.12 -0.6 +8.7
37.01 +.02 +0.1 +5.6
10.24 -.28 -2.7 -6.1
34.39 -.09 -0.3 +14.0
46.92 -1.33 -2.8 -1.5
83.51 +.24 +0.3 +6.7
23.41 +.16 +0.7 +11.3
43.15 -1.89 -4.2 +1.7
1.89 +.24 +14.5 +92.9
25.76 +.12 +0.5 +2.7


Money Rates
Last Pvs Week


Prime Rate


3.25 3.25


Discount Rate 0.75 0.75
Federal Funds Rate .00-25 .00-25
Treasuries
3-month 0.02 0.01
6-month 0.07 0.06
5-year 1.84 1.86
10-year 3.18 3.15
30-year 4.32 4.29


Name Ex Div
McDnlds NY 2.44
MicronT Nasd
Microsoft Nasd .64
NY Times NY
NextEraEnNY 2.20
NobltyH Nasd ...
Nvidia Nasd .
OcciPet NY 1.84
Penney NY .80
PepsiCo NY 2.06
Pfizer NY .80
Potash s NY .28
PwShs QQQNasd .39
ProUSSIv rs NY
Ryder NY 1.08
S&P50OETFNY 2.34
SearsHIdgs Nasd
SiriusXM Nasd ...
SouthnCo NY 1.89
SprintNex NY
SPEngy NY 1.05
SPDR FnclNY .16
TimeWam NY .94
US OilFd NY
VangEmg NY .82
WalMart NY 1.46
WellsFargo NY .48
Yahoo Nasd ...


Wkly Wkly VIU
Last Chg %Chg %Chg
80.74 +2.04 +2.6 +5.2
10.40 -.47 -4.3 +29.7
25.03 -.84 -3.2 -10.3
7.49 -.52 -6.5 -23.6
58.64 +1.25 +2.2 +12.8
8.60 -1.7 +0.0
18.26 -1.06 -5.5 +18.6
102.36 -4.06 -3.8 +4.3
38.44 +1.16 +3.1 +19.0
70.56 +1.29 +1.9 +8.0
20.92 +.57 +2.8 +19.5
51.58 -1.87 -3.5 -.1
58.41 -.06 -0.1 +7.3
19.70 -3.41 -14.8 -49.8
55.05 +2.52 +4.8 +4.6
134.04 -.16 -0.1 +6.6
77.03 -1.04 -1.3 +4.4
2.24 +.02 +0.9 +37.4
40.49 +.99 +2.5 +5.9
5.10 -.10 -1.9 +20.6
73.79 -1.01 -1.4 +8.1
15.77 -.34 -2.1 -1.1
35.99 -.26 -0.7 +11.9
39.44 +.57 +1.5 +1.1
47.42 -1.32 -2.7 -1.5
55.72 +1.07 +2.0 +3.3
27.93 -.32 -1.1 -9.9
16.55 -2.10-11.3 -.5


New York Stock Exchange


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last


AES Corp ...
AFLAC 1.20
AK Steel .20
AMR
AT&T Inc 1.72
AbtLab 1.92
AMD
Aetna .60
Agilent
AlcatelLuc ...
Alcoa .12
Allstate .84
AlphaNRs ...
Altria 1.52
AMovilL. .52
AEagleOut .44
AEP 1.84
AmExp .72
AmlntlGrp ...
Anadarko .36
Annaly 2.62
ArcelorMit .75
ArchCoal .44
ArchDan .64
ATMOS .1.36
Avon .92
BB&T'Cp' .64
BHP BilILt 1.82
BakrHu .60
BcoBrades .81
BcoSantSA .79
BcoSBrasil .70
BkofAm .04
BkNYMel .52
.Bar iPVixrs ...
BarnickG .48
Baxter 1.24
BerkH B ...
BestBuy .60
Blackstone .40
BlockHR .60
Boeing 1.68
BostonSci ..
BrMySq 1.32
BrkfldOP rt ...
CB REllis ...
CBS B .40
CSX 1.44
CVS Care .50
Cameco g .40
Cameron
CampSp 1.16
CdnNRs gs .36
CapitlSrce .04
Carnival 1.00
Caterpillar 1.76
Celanese .24
Cemex .43
CenterPnt .79
Cntryink 2.90
ChesEng .30
Chevron 3.12
Chimera .66
Citigrp rs .04
ClifftsNRs .56
Coach .60
CocaCola 1.88
CocaCE .52
Coeur
ConAgra .92
ConocPhil 2.64
ConsolEngy.40
ConEd 2.40
ConstellEn .96
Corning .20
Covidien .80
DR Horton .15
DTE 2.35
DeanFds


15 -.49 +2.1
10 -1.07 -4.3
... -.63 -13.1
... -.18 -18.1
9 +.15 +6.9
14 +.97 +11.6
9 -.02 +8.8
10 +1.99 +43.7
25 +2.85 +26.9
... +.03 +106.1
24 -.02 +11.1
13 -1.05 +1.6
44 -2.77 -19.3
14 +.35 +10.9
16 -.92 -11.4
21 +.11 +.4
15 +1.25 +4.4
14 -.71 +15.3
3 -.28 -37.0
... -1.08 -2.8
7 -.28 -1.4
17 -1.96 -12.3
21 -1.79 -17.0
10 -1,77 +7.0
17 -.15 +9.1
19 41.14 '+3.9
22 -.35 +1.3
... -2.87 -.3
28 ... +21.2
... -.33 -5.6
... -.37 +6.1
.. -.23 -17.7
22 -.38 -10.6
13 -.52. -7.1
... -1.21 -37.2
13 -1.83 -15.4
16 +1.44 +17.0
15 -.56 -.6
10 +1.31 -5.8
... -.41 +23.0
13 -1.42 +32.8
17 +.14 +21.1
20 -.88 -9.6
15 +.17 +8.8
... ... -66.0
36 -.79 +26.7
20 -.63 +36.2
17 -3.85 +15.7
15 +1.11 +9.7
... -2.16 -35.0
22 +1.58 -2.1
15 +1.57 +1.3
... -2.91 -8.4
19 -.09 -12.7
17 +.84 -11.0
19 -4.Q1 +13.5
22 +3.03 +25.4
... +.14 -20.6
17 +.21 +19.1
13 +1.44 -8.1
10 -1.17 +14.9
10 -.49 +12.2
6 -.05 -6.1
14 -3.67 -12.2
9 -4.56 +8.2
21 +.32 +8.5
14 +1.28 +3.7
16 +1.35 +15.7
... -2.45 -7.6
17 +.35 +13.0
10 -1.51 +4.9
23 -1.76 -3.0
15 +1.02 +9.2
16 +.90 +20.4
9 +.43 +7.3
17 +1.26 +22.3
82 -.45 -4.1
15 +1.38 +15.9
30 +2.44 +51.7


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div YId PE C,hg %Chg Last


ASML HId .58
ActivsBliz .17
AdobeSy
AEternag ...
AkamaiT
Alkerm
AllosThera ...
AlteraCp If .24
Amarin
Amazon
AmCapLtd ...
AmerMed
Amgen
A123Sys ...
Apple Inc
ApdMatil .32
AriadP
ArmHId .09
Atmel
Autodesk
AutoData 1.44
AvanirPhm ...
BMC Sft ...
Baidu
BioMimetic ...
BioSante ...
BrigExp
Broadcomr .36
BrcdeCm ...
CA Inc .20
CKX Inc ...
Cadence
Celgene
CellTher rsh...
Cephln
CienaCorp ...
Cirrus
Cisco .24


... -.69 +3.4
27 +.07 -7.5
21 +1.93 .+14.8
... +.04 +33.1
36 -.67 -27.8
... +3.29 +44.6
... -.28 -45.3
18 +.15 +35.8
... +1.40 +107.3
88 +4.96 +12.5
3 -.25 +33.1
27 +.18 +58.5
12 +2.84 +10.1
... +.19 -37.8
16 -6.16 +5.6
15 -.43 +5.3
14 +,11 +75.7
... -.76 +37.4
15 +.10 +21.7
51 +1.26 +19.3
23 +.42 +16.7
... -.21 -5.4
22 +3.45 +15.5
11 -9.98 +36.0
... -5.19 -36.2
+.29 +59.1
96 -1.40 -1.1
17 +.31 -20.9
30 +.17 +19.1
14 -1.47 -6.3
... +1.17 +35.6
15 +.56 +32.2
31 +.64 +1.4
... -.03 -27.4
12 -.01 +29.1
... -.06 +28.3
6 -.08 +2.7
13 -.68 -16.6


39.64
11.51
35.33
2.29
33.95
17.75
2.52
48.30
17.00
202.56
10.06
29.89
60.47
5.93
340.50
14.80
8.96
28.51
14.99
45.57
54.01
3.86
54.47
131.28
8.10
2.61
26.94
34.45
6.30
22.90
5.47
10.92
59.94
.26
79.70
27.00
16.42
16.88


Name Div
Deere 1.40
DeltaAir
DenburyR ...
DevonE .68
DrSCBr rs ...
DirFnBr rs ...
DrxEBear rs...
DrFnBull ...
DirxSCBull ...
DirxEnBull .05
Discover .24
Disney .40
DomRescs 1.97
DowChm 1.00
DukeEngy .98
Dynegyrs ...
EMCCp ...
Eatons 1.36
Edisonint 1.28
ElPasoCp .04
Elan
EldorGIdg .10
EmersonEl 1.38
EnCana g .80
EndvSilv g ..
Exelon 2.10
ExxonMbl 1.88
FNBCpPA .48
FstHorizon .04
FirstEngy 2.20
FordM
ForestLab ...
ForestOil ...
FMCG s 1.00
FrontierCm .75
FrontierOil .24
Gafisa SA .29
GameStop...
Gannett .16
Gap .45
GenGrPr n .40
GenMills s 1.12
GenMot n ...
GenOn En ...
Genworth ...
Gerdau .27
GoldFLtd .19
Goldcrp g .41
GoldmanS 1.40
Goodyear ...
Hallibrtn .36
HartfdFn .40
HeclaM
Hertz
Hess .40
HewlettP .32
HomeDp 1.00
Honwillntl 1.33
HostHotls .08
Huntsmn .40
Hypercom ...
IAMGId g .08
iShGold s ...
iSAstla .82
iShBraz 2.53
iSCan .50
iShGer .29
iSh HK .45
iShJapn .14
iSh Kor .44
iSTaiwn .29
iShSilver ...
iShChina25 .63
iShEMkts .64
iShB20 T 3.99
iSEafe 1.42
iShR2K .89
iShREst 1.98
ITW 1.36




Name Div
Clearwire ...
Comcast .45
Comc spcl .45
Cree Inc
Crocs
Cyclacel ...
Dell Inc
Dndreon
DirecTV A ...
DiscLabrs ...
DonlleyRR 1.04
DryShips ...
ETrade rs ..
eBay
ElectArs ...
Enerl
EntropCom ...
EricsnTel .37
Expedia .28
ExpScrip s ...
FifthThird .24
Finisar
FstNiagara .64
Flextm
FocusMda ...
GSI Cmce h...
GT Solar ...
GileadSci ...
HercOlfsh ...
HudsCity .32
IntgDv
Intel .84
InterMune ...
JA Solar ...
JDS Uniph ...
JamesRiv ...
JetBlue
Kulicke


Wkly YTD Wkly
YId PE Chg %Chg Last
1.6 18 -3.81 +5.6 87.72
.. 17 ,-.56 -15.5 10.65
... 57 -.62 +7.6 20.54
.8 9 -1.60 +4.5 82.02
... ... -.59 -25.0 35.11
... ... +1.90 -8.7 43.15
... ... +.47 -28.6 16.11
... ... -1.44 -.5 27.71'
... +.67 +17.9 85.37
.1 ... -3.04 +20.4 70.36
1.0 11 -.05 +30.8 24.24
1.0 18 -1.54 +10.7 41.52
4.1 15 +1.07 +12.3 47.99
2.6 20 -1.35 +12.4 38.37
5.1 13 +.50 +7.9 19.22
-.79 ... 5.62
... 30 +.48 +20.5 27.60
2.6 17 +.14 +2.3 51.92
3.2 11 +.06 +2.5 39.55
.2 25 -.29 +32.4 18.22
... ... +.59 +47.6 8.46
... 39 -.85 -18.6 15.11
2.6 18 -1.78 -6.4 53.53
2.5 93 +.23 +12.1 32,64
-.34 +22.1 8.96
5.0 14 +1.00 +.2 41.74
2.3 11 -1.35 +10.6 80.87
4.5 16 -.50 +9.5 10.75
.4 ... -.73 -12.9 10.26
5.2 15 +.95 +14.9 42.53
... 7 -.03 -10.2 15.08
... 9 -.03 +7.0 34.23
... 22 +.72 -18.5 30.94
2.1 9 -1.40 -19.6 48.27
8.7 62 +.23 -11.0 8.66
.9 13 +.30 +50.7 27.15
2.7 ... -.38 -26.0 10.75
... 10 +1.26 +16.8 26.72
1.1 6 -.54 -3.2 14.61
2.0 12 +.45 +4.6 23.05
2.5 ... +.20 '+4.1 16.12
2.8 16 +1.05 +11.6 39.72
... 8 -.84 -15.7 31.07
... ... -.12 -4.7 3.63
... 56 -.25 -14.6 11.22
2.6 ... -.35 -25.8 10.38
1.2 3 -.58 -15.4 15.34
.9 15 -1.12 +3.9 47.76
1.0 16 -8.64 -15.9 141.46
... ... +.21 +50.0 17.77
.8 19 -.67 +12.7 46.00
1.5 7 +.09 +4.1 27.57
... 39 +.04 -27.8 8.13
... 27 -.46 +13.1 16.39
.5 10 -1.69 -1.0 75.78
.8 10 -.40 -4.0 40.41
2.7 18 +.02 +5.6 37.01
2.2 20 -.44 +13.8 60.51
.5 ... -.39 -5.0 16.97
2.1 18 -1.54 +22.6 19.14
... ... -.91 +18.9 9.95
... 19 -.96 +5.4 18.76
... ... +.02 +5.0 14.59
3.1 ... -.67 +3.0 26.21
3.5 ...-2.44 -7.5 71.58
1.6 ... -.51 +2.5 31.77
1.1 ... -.68 +11.9 26.79
2.4 ... +.05 +.8 19.08
1.4 ... -.28 -6.1 10.24
.7 ...-2.33 +5.1 64.32
... ... -.23 -.1 15.60
... ... -.09 +14.0 34.39
1.5 ... -.58 +.3 43.20
1.4 ...-1.33 -1.5 46.92
4.2 ... +.01 +1.0 95.08
2.3 ... -.99 +4.1 60.61
1.1 ... +.24 +6.7 83.51
3.3 ... -.17 +8.7 60.81
2.3 16 -.20 +8.5 57.95


YOUR CONTRIBUTION


TO OUR COMMUNITY


HASN'T GONE UNNOTICED.

We understand the difference you make every day.
And we'd like to help make a differences in your life. It you
work for a state or local government, Edward Jones can
explain options for your 457(b) retirement savings plan and
recommend a strategy that's best for you.


And if you change jobs or retire, we can help you roll your
4,57(b) into an Edward Jones IRlA tax free.


'lTo learn why it makes sense to talk with Edward Jones
about your retirement savings, call or visit your local
financial advisor today.


Steve Jones, CFPa
Financial Advisor
2929 West U S Highway 90
Suite 114
Lake City, FL 32055
386-752-3847 www.edwardjones.con) Member SIPC
C ________________________________


.j


Edward^ones
MAKING SENSEOFINVESTING


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last


IBM 3.00
Intl Coal
IntlGame .24
IntPap 1.05
Interpublic .24
IntraLks n
Invesco .49
ItauUnibH .67
JPMorgCh 1.00
Jabil .28
JanusCap .20
JohnJn 2.28
JohnsnCl ..64
JnprNtwk
Keycorp .04
Kimco .72
Kinross g .10
Kohls 1.00
KosmosE n ..
Kraft 1.16
L-1 Ident ...
LDK Solar ...
LSI Corp ...
LVSands
LennarA .16
LillyEli 1.96
Limited .80
LloydBkg ...
LongtopFn ..
LyonBas A .10
MBIA
MEMC


Nasdaq Most Active


Wkly YTD Wkly
YId PE Chg %Chg Last
-.86 -22.3 4.00
1.8 18 -.31 +14.9 25.13
1.9 18 -.29 +14.2 23.66
... 26 +2.52 -36.2 '42.02
... 26 +1.20 +29.6 22.20
... ... +.29 +15.6 1.70
... 12 +.36 +20.8 16.37
... ...-1.11 +8.9 38.03
... 18 +1.16 +24.5 49.73
+.59 -24.9 2.50
5.1 15 +1.07 +16.3 20.32
... 7 -.15 -19.9 4.40
. .. ... +.14 +.4 16.06
24 +.85 +20.6 33.57
... ... +1.95 +44.7 23.70
... ... -.85 -60.0 1.52
... 10 -.55 -26.6 8.87
2.5 ... +.02 +29.1 14.88
1.1 17 -.09 +.3 25.17
... 26 +1.99 +10.9 59.92
1.9 15 -.50 -14.9 12.49
... 23 -.30 -15.6 25.06
4.7 18 -.14 -1.9 13.72
... 14 -.06 -11.3 6.96
... 26 -4.33 +46.9 32.21
... ... ... +25.5 29.15
... 11 +.65 +24.6 11.36
... 13 +.19 +13.7 41.20
... ... -.15 +67.0 5.81
3.5 ... -.18 -27.3 9.26
... 18 +.43 +27.5 8.49
3.6 11 +.16 +11.3 23.41
... 18 -3.72 +7.7 39.20
... 4 ... -11.0 6.16
... 78 -.39 +46.1 21.16
... 12 -1.71 -16.7 21.11
... 18 -.09 -12.0 5.82
... 6 +.20 +69.1 12.18


Name Div YId
LamResrch ...
LawsnSft ...
Leve3 ...
UbtyMlntA ...
MannKd
MarvellT ...
Mattel .92 3.5
MelcoCrwn ...
Microchp 1.38 3.4
MicronT
Microsoft .64 2.6
NetApp
Netflix
.NewsCpA .15 .9
NewsCpB .15 .8
Novlus ... ...
NuanceCm ... ...
Nvidia
OnSmcnd ...
Oracle .24 .7
Oxigne rsh ...
PDL Bio .60 9.4
PacEth h ...
PattUTI .20 .7
PensonWw ...
PeopUtdF .63 4.8
Popular
Power-One...
PwShs QQQ.39 .7
Powrwav
Qualcom .86 1.5
RF MicD ... ...
Rambus
RschMotn ...
Riverbed s ...
Rovi Corp ...
STEC
SanDisk


Wkly YTD Wkly
PE Chg %Chg Last
8 -1.17 -8.3 47.46
40 +.02 +19.9 11.09
... +.24 +92.9 1.89
18 -.41 +13.7 17.93
... -.36 -50.5 3.99
11 -.08 -21.3 14.60
14 -.10 +4.4 26.55
... -.14 +64.9 10.49
19 -.37 +19.5 40.87
7 -.47 +29.7 10.40
6 -.84 -10.3 25.03
33 +.69 -1.8 53.99
83+17.05 +40.3 246.52
15 -.06 +19.8 17.45
15 -.36 +10.2 18.10
11 +1.88 +15.9 37.46
37 +1.87 +20.8 21.96
45 -1.06 +18.6 18.26
15 +.40 +17.8 11.64
23 +.32 +12.4 35.19
... +1.68 +12.0 5.24
10 -.08 +2.2 6.37
1 +.04 -37.7 .45
23 -.52 +28.5 27.69
... -2.01 -31.7 3.34
32 -.35 -6.1 13:16
... -.09 -5.1 2.98
8 +.08 -14.2 8.75
... -.06 +7.3 58.41
58 +.02 +60.2 4.07
25 +.55 +15.4 57.12
14 +.12 -15.0 6.25
... -2.94 -22.7 15.83
7 -2.75 -25.6 43.24
... +3.08 +6.4 37.42
36 +9.63 -6.1 58.23
16 -5.44 -16.1 14.80
9 -.66 -6.8 46.49


Name Div
SavientPh ..
SeagateT .72
Sequenom ...
SifyTech ...
Sina
SinoClnEn ...
SiriusXM
SkywksSol ...
Sohu.cm
Sonus
Staples .40
StarScient ...
Starbucks .52
StlDynam .40
SunPowerA...
Symantec ...
TD Ameritr .20
Tellabs .08
TevaPhrm .83
TibcoSft
TiVo Inc
TriQuint
UnivDisp
UrbanOut
VarianSemi...
Verisign 5.75
Vermillion
VirgnMdah .16
Vodafone 1.33
WarnerCh s8.50
WetSeal
WilshBcp
Windstrm 1.00
Xilinx .76
Yahoo
ZionBco .04


Wkly YTD Wkly
YId PE Chg %Chg Last
S-.44 -24.7 8.39
4.2 6 -.19 +14.0 17.14
... ... +.42 +1.7 8.17
... ... -.56+134.5 5.30
S ... ....-18.31 +55.3 106.88
... 1 +.29 -63.8 2.39
... ... +.02 +37.4 2.24
... 28 -1.27 -1.0 28.34
.. 21-10.66 +31.3 83.36
... -.06 +7.9 2.88
2.0 17 -.64 -11.1 20.25
... ... +.22+110.3 4.10
1.4 25 -.25 +12.5 36.15
2.3 21 +.47 -5.2 17.35
.. 76 -.18 +65.5 21.23
... 26 +.64 +19.8 20.06
1.0 20 -.27 +9.9 20.87
1.7 22 +.05 -30.4 4.72
1.7 15 +2.59 -4.7 49.67
60 +.75 +49.6 29.49
... -.15 +9.0 9.41
12 +.35 +15.6 13.51
-9.15 +47.1 45.08
20 +1.24 -8.9 32.62
18 -.02 +65.5 61.18
8 -.96 +11.8 36.53
... ... +2.18 -18.2 6.15
.5 ... -.21 +16.8 31.81
4.9 ... -.21 +3.4 27.34
... 44 +2.23 +14.1 25.73
35 +.42 +30.8 4.84
-.40 -58.0 3.20
7.5 23 +,44 -4.6 13.30
2.1 15 +.22 +24.1 35.95
19 -2.10 -.5 16.55
.2 ... -.70 -4.6 23.12


Name Div
AbdAsPac .42
AlexcoR g ...
AlIdNevG ..
AlmadnMg ...
AmApparel ...
Anooraq g ...
AntaresP ...
Aurizon g ...
AvalRaren ...
BarcUBS36 ...
BarcGSOil ...
Brigus grs ...
CAMAC En...
CelSci
CFCdag .01
CheniereEn ...
ChinaShen ...
Crystallx g ...
DejourE g
DenisnM g ..
GabGldNR 1.68
GascoEngy ...
Gastar grs ..
GenMoly
GoldResrc .31
GoldStrg
GranTrrag ...
GrtBasG g ..
GtPanSilvg ...
Hyperdyn
ImpOil gs .44
InovioPhm ...
IntTower g ...
KodiakOg ...
LucasEngy ..
MadCatz g ..
Metalico ...
MdwGoldq ...


14 +1.03 +15.8
50 ... +86.7
21 +.64 +3.7
12 -.13 +15.2
24 +.24 +8.9
...-7.37 +16.2
18 +.74 +3.9
..: -.62 -7.2
10 -1.89 +1.7
17 +.66 +7.4
11 -.72 -15.9
15 +1.35 .+7.7
17 -1.00 +1.1
34 +2.49 +7.3
11 -.26 -6.6
... -.09 +5.2
21 -.77 -24.9
15 +2.95 +1.5
-.6
20 +.81 +10.7
... -.43 -9.5
9 -.71 -5.1
... +.10 +27.2
52 -.69 -7.3
26 -1.01 -6.6
8 +1.05 +11.2
17 +.77 +36.2
... +,03 -15.3
...-1.30 -47.7
...-1.40 +15.3
5 -.60 -21.2
65 +.01 -2.2


Name Div YId
MFAFncl .94 11.5
MGIC
MGM Rsts ...
Macys .40 1.4
Manitowoc .08 .4
ManpwrGp .80 1.3
Manulife g .52
MarathonO 1.00 2,0
MktVGold .40 .7
MktVRus .18 .5
MktVJrGtd 2.93 8.4
MktVAgri .33 .6
MarlntA .40 1.1
Masco .30 2.3
McDrmilnts ...
Medtmic .90 2.1
Merck 1.52 4.1
MetUfe .74 1.7
MetroPCS ...
MitsuUFJ ...
MobileTele 1.06 5.2
Molycorpn ...
Monsanto 1.12 1.8
MorgStan .20 .8
Mosaic .20 .3
NCR Corp ...
Nabors
NBkGreece .29 ...
NatGrid 7.04 5.5
NOilVarco .44 .6
NatSemi .40 1.6
NewmtM .80 1.5


Wkly YTD Wkly
PE Chg %Chg Last
9 +.02 ... 8.16
... -41 -22.2 7.93.
... +.27 -.9 14.72
13 +2.38 +12.5 28.46
...-1.32 +38.3 18.13
...-1.37 +.2 62.91
-.12 +3.6 17.79
11 +1.53 +38.6 51.10
...-1.88 -11.8 54.21
...-1.09 -2.6 36.94
...-2.17 -13.0 34.69
-1.48 -1.2 52.88
31 +.21 -12.1 36.50
... -.14 +4.4 13.22
17 -1.38 -1.1 20.47
13 -.66 +13.3 42.03
16 +.69 +2.9 37.08
12 -.42 -.1 44.41
28 +.53 +41.3 17.85
... -.17 -13.5 4.68
35 +.26 -3.2 20.21
... -6.78 +24.5 62.15
26 -1.48 -8.4 63.79
13 -1.11 -11.3 24.13
13 -3.82 -11.8 67.35
15 +.31 +27.2 19.55
81 -.66 +14.0 26.74
... -16.7 1.40
+.12 +13.8 50.51
17 -.58 +1.1 68.02
19 +.14 +77.3 24.40
12 -.94 -14.1 52.78


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last


Nexen g .20
NextEraEn 2.20
NiSource .92
NobleCorp 1.06
NokiaCp .55
Nordstrm .92
NorflkSo 1.60
NStarRIt .40
Novartis 2.53
Nucor 1.45
OcciPet 1.84
OfficeDpt ...
OilSvHT 2.36
PG&E Cp 1.82
PMIGrp ...
PNC 1.40
PPLCorp 1.40
PatriotCoal ...
PeabdyE .34
PennWst g 1.08
Penney .80
PepsiCo 2.06
Petrohawk ...
PetrbrsA 1.34
Petrobras 1.28
Pfizer .80
PhilipMor 2.56
Potash s .28
PwshDB ...
PS Agri
PS USDBull...
PrUShS&P ...
ProUltQQQ ...
PrUShQQQr s...
ProUltSP .39
ProUShL20 ...
ProUSSP500...
ProUSSIvrs...
PrUltCrde rs...
ProSUItSilv...
ProLogis .45
ProUSR2K rs...
Prudentl 1.15
PSEG 1.37
PulteGrp
QksilvRes ..
RadianGrp .01
Raytheon 1.72
RegionsFn .04
Renren n
RioTinto 1.08
RiteAid ..
SLM Cp .40
SpdrDJIA 3.00
SpdrGold ...
S&P500ETF2.34
SpdrKbwBk .15
SpdrRetl .50
SpdrOGEx .49
SpdrMetM .41
Safeway .48
SandRdge ...
Sanofi 1.82
SaraLee .46
Schlmbrg 1.00
Schwab .24
SemiHTr .57
SiderurNac .81
SilvWhtn g .12
SilvrcpM g .08
SmithfF ...
Sothebys .20
SouthnCo 1.89
SwstAiri .02
SwstnEngy ...
SpectraEn 1.04
SprintNex ..
SP Malls 1.23
SP HIthC .61


15 +1.25 +12.8 58.64
19 +.92 +15.6 20.36
13 +.13 +10.7 39.59
+.10 -17.2 8.54
17 +.24 +12.4 47.63
17 -1.38, +13.9 71.57
... -.63 -5.5 4.49
14 +1.00 +3.3 60.89
52 -1.25 -2.0 42.96
17 -4.06 +4.3 102.36
... +.39 -12.6 4.72
... -.09 +5.0 147.49
17 +.26 -3.8 46.02
... -.10 -47.6 1.73
9 -.72 +1.8 61.80
12 +.40 +6.1 27.93
... -1.61 +15.0 22.28
19 -3.68 -8.6 58.45
27 +.99 +8.3 25.90
23 +1.16 +19.0 38.44
19 +1.29 +8.0 70.56
... -.81 +33.3 24.33
...-1.03 -14.6 29.17
-1.05 -12.7 33.04
20 +.57 +19.5 20.92
17 -.29 +16.7 68.31
22 -1.87 -.1 51.58
... +.44 +5.4 29.04
... -28 -.6 32.14
... +.26 -4.5 21.69
... +.03 -14.2 20.39
... -.33 +14.0 92.83
... +.03 -15.8 48.97
... -.14 +13.0 54.32
... +.01 -7.2 34.39
+.01 -21.1 15.31
...-3.41 -49.8 19.70
+.96 -4.3 47.82
...-11.82 +10.2 174.74
... -.18 +7.7 15.55
-.46 -16.6 41.90
9 -.57 +7.5 63.13
11 +1.15 +5.2 33.45
... -.36 +1.1 7.60
7 +.41 -3.1 14.28
... -.39 -35.8 5.18
8 -.25 +7.0 49.19
-.04 +.7 7.05
... -3.64 -26.9 13.16
...-1.26 -7.6 66.23
.... +.06 +37.0 1.21
9 -.67 +26.1 15.87
-.31 +8.9 125.96
+.33 +5.0 145.63
-.16 +6.6 134.04
-.58 -4.9 24.63
... +1.38 +11.9 54.10
-.95 +8.1 57.02
...-2.16 -.2 68.67
16 +.75 +11.2 25.00
-.32 +37.2 10.04
...-1.46 +18.2 38.10
27 -.02 +10.0 19.26
23 +.05 -.9 82.71
31 -.42 +3.1 17.64
... -.05 +12.1 36.48
-.51 -16.4 13.94
33 -1.72 -12.7 34.10
27 -.75 -19.0 10.39
10 -1.35 -.4 20.55
18 -3.78 -6.9 41.90
18 +.99 +5.9 40.49
20 -.04 -7.0 12.07
25 -.71 +10.1 41.20
17 -.53 +9.2 27.28
-.10 +20.6 5.10
-.70 +.6 38.65
... +.58 +14.5 36.08


3.8
4.5


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last


SP CnSt .81
SP Consum .56
SPEngy 1.05
SPDR FncI .16
SP Inds .64
SP Tech .33
SP Util 1.31
StarwdPT 1.68
StateStr .72
StillwtrM
Stryker .72
Suncor gs .44
Sunoco .60
SunTrst .04
Supvalu .35
SwiftTms n .
Synovus .04
Sysco 1.04
TaiwSemi .47
TalismE g .27
Target 1.00
TeckRes g .60
TelefEsp s 1.98
TenetHith ...
Teradyn
Tesoro
Texlnst .52
Textron .08
ThomCrkg...
3M Co 2.20
TimeWarn .94
Total SA 3.16
Transocn .79
Travelers 1.64
Tycolnti 1.00
Tyson .16
US Airwy ...
US Gold ...
UnilevNV 1.17
UtdContl ...
UPS B 2.08
US Bancrp .50
US NGs rs ...
US OilFd ...
USSteel .20
UtdhlthGp .50
Vale SA .90
Vale SA pf .90
ValeantPh .38
ValeroE .20
VangEmg .82
VeriFone
VerizonCm 1.95
ViacomB .60
Visa .60
Vishayint
Vonae
Walgm .70
Weathflntl ...
WellPoint 1.00
WellsFargo .48
WendyArby .08
WstnRefin ...
WstnUnion .28
Weyerh .60
WmsCos .50
WilmTr .04
WT India .15
XL Grp .44
Xerox .17
Yamanag .18
YingliGrn ...
Youku n
YumBmds 1.00


... +.67 +9.6
... +.27 +8.4
... -1.01 +8.1
... -.34 -1.1
... -.39 +8.1
... -.02 +5.0
.. +.62 +8.2
19 -1.16 +.1
15 -1.00 -1.7
26 -1.45 -14.9
19 +3.59 +17.8
21 -1.63 +4.1
36 -.82 -.1
76 -.70 -6.9
... 28 +13.0
... -.53 +7.5
... -.03 -9.1
16 +3.27 +8.1
... -.16 +8.4
... -.98 -5.0
13 +1.01 -14.3
... -3.89 -25.0
.. -.64 +4.6
3 -.19 -5.2
8 +.09 +15.2
13 -1.48 +26.4
13 -.05 +8.2
60 -.38 +4.1
7 -.64 -27.9
16 +.41 +11.3
15 -.26 +11.9
... -1.59 +7.4
23 +.63 -1.6
9 -1.10 +11.9.
17 +2.02 +22.5
8 -.36 +7.6
4 -.28 -6.0
... -.83 -17.2
... 34 +3.6
19 -.07 +7.4
20 +.56 +2.1
13 -.17 -7.2
... -.03 -8.5
... +.57 +1.1
... -.96 -23.6
12 -.17 +38.3
... -1.33 -14.1
... -1.48 -13.0
... +.07 +77.0
31 -.11 +15.4
.. -1.32 -1.5
36 -2.65 +22.3
22 -.02 +4.1
17 -.40 +26.0
19 +.50 +13.5
8 +.68 +19.2
... -.12 +108.0
19 +2.63 +15.4
... -.02 -11.5
11 +2.29 +41.1
11 -.32 -9.9
... +.04 +7.1
... -.50 +48.7
15 -.02 +11.5
... -.03 +15.7
23 -.59 +22.4
+.02 +2.5
... -.39 -11.4
13 -.45 +5.4
21 -.04 -11.4
17 ... -7.8
8 -.79 +7.9
...-10.30 +38.6
21 +1.22' +11.8


AMEX Most Active


Wkly YTD
YId PE Chg %Chg


Wkly
Last Name


Minefnd g ...
Neoprobe ...
Nevsun g ...
NDragon
NwGold g ...
NAPallg ...
NDynMng ...
NthnO&G ...
NthgtMg ...
NovaGldg ...
Oilsandsg ...
OpkoHIth ...
ParaG&S ...
PhrmAth ...
PionDrill ...
Quepasa
RadientPh ...
RareEle g ...
Rentech
RexahnPh ...
Richmnt g ...
Rubicon g ...
SamsO&G
SinoHub ..
TanzRy g ...
Taseko
TmsatlPet
TriValley ...
TriangPet ...
Uluru
Ur-Energy ...
Uranerz
UraniumEn ...
VantageDrl ...
VimetX .50
VistaGold ...
YM Bioq ...


Wkly YTD Wkly
Div YId PE Chq %Chg Last


-.58 +13.8
+.37 +140.8
+.09 -27.9
+.00 +17.8
-.46 -5.0
-1.63 -43.6
+.11 -15.9
-.33 -26.3
+.11 -12.2
-.61 -27.5
-.02 -7.6
-.01 +1.9
-.16 -33.1
+.16 -9.9
-.15 +40.3
-1.19 -47.7
-.09 -70.3
-1.34 -26.4
-.15 -27.0
+.15 +18.8
+.16 +54.2
-.03 -21.2
+.06 +119.7
+.25 -35.2
+.34 -5.6
+.12 -5.7
-.03 -30.9
-.01 +16.7
+.14 +3.8
+.00 -42.7
+.06 -47.5
+.19 -26.6
-.14 -48.8
+.12 -11.3
-.11 +59.1
-.20 +16.7
+.04 +34.8


12.56
4.96
5.43
.05
9.27
3.90
12.02
20.06
2.81
10.34
.39
3.74
2.67
3.81
12.36
6.12
.30
11.82
.89
1.33
7.88
4.50
2.90
1.69
6.89
4.95
2.30
.67
6.75
.06
1.57
2.93
3.09
1.80
23.62
2.79
3.14


Stock Footnotes: g = Dividends and eamings in Canadian dollars. h= Does not meet continued-listing standards.
If = Late filing with SEC. n = New in past 52 weeks. pf.= Preferred. rs = Stock has undergone a reverse stock split
of at least 50 percent within the past year. rt = Right to buy security at a specified price. s = Stock has split by at
least 20 percent within the last year. un = Units. vj = In bankruptcy or receivership, wd = When distributed, wi =
When issued. wt= Warrants.
Mutual Fund Footnotes: b = Fee covering market costs is paid from fund assets,. d = Deferred saledcharge, or
redemption fee. = front load (sales charges), m = Multiple fees are charged. NA= not available. p = previousday's
net asset value, s = fund split shares during the week. x = fund paid a distribution during the week.Galners and
Losers must be worth at least $2 to be listed in tables at left. Most Actives must be worth at least $1. Volume in
hundreds of shares. Source: The Associated Press. Sales figures are unofficial.


Currencies
Last Pvs Day
Australia .9446 .9384


1.6174 1.6286
.9682 .9632


Euro .7087 .7027
Japan 80.84 80.91


11.7298 11.6409


Mexico


Switzerind .8923 .8851
British pound expressed in U.S. dollars. All oth-
ers show dollar in foreign currency.


I


Weekly Dow Jones

Dow Jones Industrials 45.94 75.68 -130.33 65.89 -100.17
Close: 12,595.75 t *- t) l
1-week change: -42.99 (-0.3%) MON TUES WED THUR FRI


12 ,50 0 . . . .... .. ... ...


12,000 .......








MUTUAL FUNDS
Total Assets Total Return/Rank Pct Min Init
Name Obj ($Mlns) NAV 4-wk 12-mo 5-year Load Invt
PIMCOTotRells Cl 140,180 11.03 +1.1 +7.6/B +8.9/A NL 1,000,000
American Funds GrthAmA m LG 68,531 32.02 +0.8 +16.1/D +2.5/D 5.75 250
Fidelity Contra LG 64,782 70.90 +0.6 +18.5/C +4.5/B NL 2,500
Vanguard TotStldx LB 63,493 33.76 +2.0 +18.8/A +3.4/B .NL 3,000
American Funds CaplncBuA m IH 61,219 52.19 +1.4 +16.7/B +3.9/C 5.75 250

American Funds CpWIdGrlA m WS 58,144 37.56 +0.8 +19.4/C +3.6/B 5.75. 250
Vanguard 500Adml LB 56,098 123.49 +1.9 +17.9/B +2.9/B NL 10,000
American Funds IncAmerA m MA 55,798 17.51 +1.6 +17.9/A +4.4/B 5.75 250
Vanguard TotStlAdm LB 53,201 33.77 +2.0 +19.0/A +3.5/A NL 10,000
American Funds InvCoAmA m IB 50,714 29.49 +1.4 +15.3/D +2.3/C 5.75 250
Dodge& Cox IntlStk FV 48,440 36.97 -0.1 +21.2/B +2.2/A NL 2,500
Dodge & Cox Stock LV 48,344 115.93 +2.4 +17.9/B +0.1/0 NL 2,500
American Funds WAMutlnvA m LV 41,374 29.21 +2.4 +18.8/B +2.5/B 5.75 250
American Funds EurPacGrA m FB 40,871 42.93 -1.1 +20.0/D +3.6/A 5.75 250
Vanguard InstPlus LB 38,581 122.64 +1.9 +17.9/B +2.9/B NL 200,000,000
FrarITeT.p-Franrln inc:.meA Am CA 37,027 2.28 +1.8 +16.6/A +6.2/A 4.25 1,000
Arr,,.n,;a.r, Fund.: FilrvA m LB 36,110 38.96 +0.6 +19.4/A +3.5/B 5.75 250
varigu.rdTotlnt d FB 35,783 16.23 -1.2 +21.0/C +1.9/B NL 3,000
American Funds NewPerspA m WS 35,113 29.89 +0.1 +20.2/C +4.8/A 5.75 250
PIMCOTotRetAdmb CI 33,187 11.03 +1.1 +7.3/B +8.6/A NL 1,000,000
American Funds BalA m MA 33,122 18.81 +1.5 +15.1/B +4.4/B 5.75 250
Vanguard 5001nv LB 33,007 123.47 +1.9 +17.7/B +2.8/B NL 3,000
Fidelity GrowCo LG 30,889 91.36 +2.0 +25.0/A +7.1/A NL 2,500
Harbor Intllnstl d FB 30,567 63.64 -0.7 +25.4/A +4.6/A NL 50,000
Vanguard WelltnAdm MA 30,011 56.37 +1.5 +14.3/B +5.9/A NL 50,000
Fidelity LowPriStk d MB 29,083 41.89 +2.3 +21.7/C +5.2/B, NL 2,500
CA-ConservativeAlocation, Cl -Intennedate-Term Bond, ES -Europe Stock, FB -Foreign Large Bend, FG -Foreign LageGrowth, FV -Foreign
Large Value, IH -World allocation, LB -Large Blend, LG -Large rowh, LV -Large Value, MA -Moderate Allocation, MB -Mid-Cap Blend, MV
MidCap Value, SH -Spedaliy-heath, WS -World Slock To Return: Chin NAV wit dividends reinvested. Rankc How fund performed vs.
others with sameobjctve:Aisintop20%, E inbottom20%. Minnit Invt Minimurn $neededtonvestinfund.Source:Momingstar,


Rritain


... ,.. -2.13 -2.2 22.40







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Legal

A public invitation to participate:
Columbia County is in the process of
enhancing the Risk Assessment por-
tion of our Columbia County Local
Mitigation Strategy (LMS) this year.
The risk assessment provides the
foundation for our LMS strategy by
identifying our communities' risks
and vulnerabilities.
Join us for the second meeting on
Thursday, May 19, 2011 at 9 a.m. at
the Columbia County Combined
Communications Center, 263 NW
Lake City Avenue, Lake City, FL
32055. Come be a part of the miti-
gation process and learn about miti-
gation in your community!
http://www.columbiacountyem.com
04544718
May 15, 2011
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 11-95-CA
DMAC OF LAKE CITY, INC.,
a Florida corporation,
Plaintiff,
vs.
YONETTE LEACOCK AND YON-
SON LEACOCK, IF EITHER OF
THEM BE LIVING, AND IF EI-
THER OF THEM BE DEAD,
THEIR RESPECTIVE UNKNOWN.
SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES,
LEGATEES, GRANTEES, AS-
SIGNEES, LIENORS, CRED-
ITORS, OR TRUSTEES; AND THE
UNKNOWN SPOUSE, HEIRS, DE-
VISEES, LEGATEES, GRANTEES,
ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CRED-
ITORS, OR TRUSTEES OF CHER-
YL A. LEACOCK, DECEASED,
Defendants.
AMENDED NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: YONSON LEACOCK
Last known address:
2516 NW 9th Place
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33311
AND to all unknown Defendants
listed in the caption above, whose
identities and whereabouts are un-
known
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action
the foreclose a Mortgage on the fol-
lowing described property:
Lots 3 and 4, Spring Hills West, a
subdivision according -to the plat
thereof recorded in Plat Book 6, pa-
ges 52-52A, public records of Co-
lumbia County, Florida.
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to it on Ed-
die M. Anderson, Plaintiff's attor-
ney, whose address is Post Office
Box 1179, Lake City, Florida 32056-
1179, no later than thirty (30) days
after the first publication of this no-
tice, and file the original with the
Clerk of this Court either before
service on Plaintiff's attorney or im-
mediately thereafter; otherwise, a de-
fault will be entered against you
floor the relief demanded in the com-
plaint. There may be money owed to
you after a foreclosure sale. You
may contact the clerk of the court at
(386)758-1031 for information on
what you need to do to get the mon-
ey. You do not need to hire an attor-
ney or other representative to get this
money.
DATED ON May 11. 2011

P. DEWITT CASON
Clerk of the Court
By:/s/ B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk

04544770
May 15, 22, 2011

100n Job
Opportunities

04544565
Ladies and Gentleman
if you have A Class A CDL,
we have a Lease/with a lease
purchase plan.
We accept PTD! Certified
students. O/Operators. No
New England States, 100%
fuel surcharge. Carolinas to
the great NW!
Call today to join us!
Buel Inc
866-369-9744

Certified Veterinary Technician
needed for small animal practice in
Suwannee Co. Must be willing to
travel to two locations and to do
some reception work. Send reply
to Box 04112, C/O The Lake City
Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake
City, FL, 32056 No phone calls.

Hiring Locally This Week
Liberty National Life
Insurance Company -
Full Training Provided Potential
of $60K+ Annually. 401K, BCBS
Insurance & Pension for those who
qualify. Call 1-800-257-5500 to
set up an interview.







Land Clearing

Back Hoe, Dozer, Chopping, root
raking, bush hog, seeding, sod,
disking, site prep, ponds &
irrigation. Free Est! 386-623-3200

Lawn & Landscape Service

Clean Pine Straw,
You pick it up, $1.85 a bale
Delivery of 100 bales $260
386-688-9156
Landscape Maintenance Company
You can trust for knowledge &
pride, Mention this AD!
Mow Green, LLC 386-288-6532

Services


100 Job
Opportunities

04544659
HERBICIDE APPLICATOR
Local Herbicide Co.
seeking applicators.
Responsibilities:
Apply herbicide with backpacks
& mechanical equipment and
help operator perform daily
tasks. Overnight travel required.
Qualifications:'
Must pass drug screen
Must have valid drivers license
with clean record
Must possess strong work ethic
Other: Bi-Lingual a plus but
not necessary
WE WILL BE HOLDING A
JOB FAIR @ THE HOLIDAY
INN EXPRESS IN LIVE OAK
ON 05/16/11 @ 8 A.M.
Fax resume to: 318.226.6190 or
Call: 386.935.4203

04544754
HR Generalist/Benefits
Administrator
Large Lake City organization
seeking an HR Generalist/
Benefits Administrator. Duties
include recruiting, processing
applications, maintaining
personnel files, representing the
company at personnel-related
hearings, managing the
employee benefits program, etc.
Applicants should have
knowledge of federal and state
employment regulations,
benefits (health, COBRA, 401K,
etc.), workers compensation,
OSHA reporting, EEO and
unemployment claims. Must
also be proficient in Word and
Excel. Please submit your salary
requirements and resume to
wassont@andersoncolumbia.co
m or fax to 386-755-9132.
We are an equal employment
opportunity employer.

05525813
Lead Teacher
(Head Start, 3-5 yr olds)
Lake City
Min 2 yr degree in Early Child-
hood Education (AS ECE) or
#related degree OR age appropri-
ate FCCPC credential; 3 yrs
classroom exp w/young children
required (relevant age prefer-
red).

Teacher
(Early Head Start,
Birth to 3 yrs old) Lake City
Must have FCCPC /CDA,
3 yrs classroom exp w/infants
or toddlers preferred;

Current 1st Aid/CPR preferred.
All applicants must pass physi-
cal/DCF background screening.
Excellent Benefits Paid
Holidays,
Sick, Annual Leave.
Apply in person at 236 SW
Columbia Ave (754-2222) or
mail resume to SV4Cs PO Box
2637, Lake City, FL 32056-
2637, by email:
arobinson@sv4cs.org or
Fax (386) 754-2220. EOE

05525862
Resolutions Health Alliance
has an immediate opening for a
FT Administrative Assistant
in Lake City. The prospective
applicant must have the follow-
ing skills: Proficient in Micro-
soft Word, Excel and Outlook,
able to work independently,
organized, able to multi task,
excellent phone skills, client
friendly, detail oriented, data
entry, file auditing, etc. Salary
range $21K to $23I yearly
based on experience, excellent.
benefits package. Email resume
to: employmentrhapa.net
or fax (386) 754-9017.

Associate Reps
SUMMER WORK/GREAT PAY
Immediate FT/PT openings,
Customer sales/service,
No exp needed, conditions,
Apply Now all ages 17+
(386) 269-0883

CNC Machinist needed.
Metal Machine Shop exp req'd.
CNC exp desired, but not necessa-
ry. Must have strong math skills.
Send resume to: 174 NE Cortez
Terrace, Lake City, FL 32055

AVON!! Only $10 to start!
Earn bonus $ up to $150+
1-800-275-9945 pin #4206
www.youravon.com/tdavies

FLORIDA
GATEWAY
COLLEGE
(Formerly Lake City Community College)
REGISTRAR ASSISTANT I
(Part-Time)
Responsible for evaluating,
processing and verifying transcripts
and other duties associated with the
Registrar's Office and official student
records. Requires a high school
diploma or its equivalent plus two
years clerical experience. Additional
education may substitute on a year
for year basis for required experience
in related area. Special consideration
will be given to applicants with an
Associate Degree or Certificate in a
related area. Must be computer
literate, proficient in MS Word and
Excel. Salary: $9.90 per hour.
Application Deadline: 5/26/11
College employment application
required. Position details and
applications available on web at:
www.fqc.udu
Human Resources


100 Job
Opportunities

05525928
I AM LOOKING FOR
A PARTICULAR
TYPE PERSON
SALES MANAGER
TRAINEE
We will...
Train you...& train you well,
in classroom and field.
Pay you...& pay rou well,
$75,000+ in your first year.
Provide advancement
opportunity limited only by
your own desire and ability.

To schedule a confidential
interview, contact Vicky Harris
at 800-628-6428 X1380 or
vicky.harris@pmausa.net

CDL A Flatbed Truck Driver
needed for F/T OTR SE area, 3
years exp or more, Contact
Melissa or Mary @ 386-935-2773

CDL river 2 yrs exp clean MVR
wanted for local company
Apply 8 AM Noon only deadline.
Fri May 19. 247 NW Hillandale
Glen Lake City No phone calls

Experienced auto Mechanic for
Farm equipment & older vehicles.
Must have own tools.
386-755-6481

HARDEE'S is hiring experienced
people at the Hwy 100 &
Baya location. Apply in
person or call 386-752-0393

Regional OTR Drivers Needed,
must have clean driving record &
min 2 yrs CDL, 5+ yrs exp pref.
Drug test required, Please email:
masonthe3rd@gmail.com,
for application

Sales Position available for moti-
vated individual Rountree -Moore
Toyota, Great benefits, paid train-
ing/vacation. Exp. a plus but not .
necessary. Call Anthony Cosentino
386-623-7442

FLORIDA
GATEWAY

ADJUNCT INSTRUCTORS
FALL 2011
EDUCATION PREPARATION INSTITUTE
Master's Degree in Curriculum and Instruction,
Exceptional Student Education, Reading,
Elementary Education, or a related field
required. Must have a minimum of 18 graduate
hours in teaching and learning courses and
experience teaching in the public school setting.
Requirements include the ability to teach on
campus one night a week and in online learning
environments. Desired qualifications include
c .i.. .... . .i.- .l ., l,
special needs, experience teaching middle or
.high school and/or integrated instruction.
Contact Pamela Carswell atl386-754-4469 or
panrrjacarswell iulqu.gdu for details.
INSTRUMENTATION AND PROCESS
CONTROLS
Must have Master's Degree in electrical
engineering and at least five years of experience
in the installation, maintenance, operation and
troubleshooting of current technology used for
automated process control and associated
systems: including PLC's. variable frequency
drives and instrumentation. A valid Florida
Teacher Certification is also required.
Experience with training both technicians and
operating personnel is a plus. For additional
information contact Bob Deckon at 386-754-4442
or robert.deckoni'?fac.edu.
NURSING CLINICAL
BSN Required. Master's degree in nursing
preferred, At least two years of recent clinical
experience required. Contact Mettile Jones at
386-754-4368 or mate.iionesafoc.edu.
COMMERCIAL DRIVERS LICENSE (CDL)
PROGRAM
CDL instructors needed for growing CDL
program at Florida Gateway College. Qualified
individuals must hold a CDL and have at least
four years of driving experience with a clean
driving record. Prefer individuals with teaching
experience in a truck driving school setting. Email
resumes to Stephanie Glenn at
5s100aeglenrirfyac.enu nor call the Banner
Center for Global Logistics at 386-754-4492 for
more information.
LOGISTICS AND SUPPLY CHAIN
MANAGEMENT
The Banner Center for Global Logistics is
seeking fall adjunct instructors for the Logistics
and Supply Chain Management online courses. A
Master's degree with at least 18 credits in
Operations Management, Logistics, Supply Chain
or related field is required Email resumes
*^ ?Tophni flenn if -1',lt-ni,-1ln as
386-754-4492 for more information.
Collect appltcationi ntd copi" off rantriptr
required Al foreign tri nsc'lts must he suh, tlb'di
wi tirinilutiii aisnd, urluution Applicanon
avnitable ai w".1 r ci.lu


100 Job
Opportunities
Sewing Machine Operator &
Cloth Cutter for cutting patterns
with experience, good hourly rate
Call Hafners 386-755-6481
Stylist Needed
Call
386-752-4614
Southern Exposure
Wanted Highly motivated
individual for Sales Position.
Rountree -Moore Automotive
Group, Great benefits, paid vaca-
tion. Exp. a plus but not necessary.
Call Tony Reese 386-344-7517

120 Medical
120 Employment

05525827
Health Services Manager-LPN
To oversee fast-paced health
services dept
Position involves:
-working w/children (birth 5)
& pregnant women
-case/records management
-supervise small staff
'-work collaboratively w/com-
munity health providers
Must possess: Current LPN
license, records mgmt & super-
visor exp, strong computer &
organizational skills; pediatric
health care exp preferred
Competitive pay & excellent
benefits package
Hrs: Mon-Fri, 8a-4p
Deadline to apply
is May 20, 2011.
Submit resume to:
SV4Cs Head Start/Early
Head Start, HR
P. 0. Box 2637, LC, 32056
By E-mail:
ARobinson@sv4cs.org
By Fax: 754.2220

05525891
Front Desk/Medical Billing
several years experience in
medical office and insurance
billing required. Please email
resume to admin@nfsc.comcast-
biz.net or fax to 386-438-8628

Busy Ambulatory Surgery Center
seeks experienced Medical Biller,
Position is F/T, M-F, 8-5. For
more information call, fax, or
email a resume to 386-487-3930,
386-487-3935, administration
@lcsurgery center.com
Full Time Medical Assistant
needed for very busy paperless
Family Practice. Must be highly
motivated, multi-tasking and
patient centric. Intergy IEHR
experience a plus. Please fax
resume to: 386-961-9541
Part/full Time Medical Assistant
needed in Lake City
physician office. Please fax
CV to 386-719-9662.


We're on target!


Lake City Reporter
lakecityreportercom CURRENTS tungu*in'
Subscribe Today
386-755-5445


120 Medical
Employment

05525930




.Meridian Behavioral
Healthcare, Inc.
www.mbhci.or,

Please visit our website to view
current open opportunities
and to apply online:

Meridian is an active partner
with the National Health
Service Corps

,Therapists:

Licensed, or Master's Level
in Outpatient

Bachelor's-Level in
Counselor Support

Case Management
(adult & child)

Master's Therapist in
Methadone Clinic

Administration

Director of Dietary Svcs
(G'Vile)

Medical Services

RN Nursing Manager (G'Ville)

PRN RN, LPN, C.N.A.

Recovery Specialist
(Direct Care)

LPN (2) for Methadone Clinic
(new)

To see our current openings in
Mental Health and to apply
online, please go to:
www.mbhci.ore

EOE, DFWP, E-Verify



130 Part Time

Nursery Position Available
Southside Baptist Church,
Hours on Wednesdays and
Sunday during regular church
Service. Please call 386-755-5553
for mpre information

240 Schools &
240 Education

04544505
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-05/23/10

Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-07/11/11

Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com



310 Pets & Supplies

CHICHUAHUA MIX.
Moving, FREE to good home.
Good with kids. 2 yrs old.
Found a good home!!!!





1 C, ReSpller



Lake City Reporter


e 4S uwannee


Electric
Cooperative
Suwannee Valley Electric Cooperative, Inc.
Member Assistance Representative

Suwannee Valley Electric Cooperation, Inc. has an immediate opening for
a Member Assistance Representative position. This position reports to
the Member Services Manager and will be responsible for assisting the
Cooperative's members inra pleasant, efficient and productive manner. This
position requires a High School Diploma, an excellent personality and some
computer skills including Microsoft Office.

Applications and job descriptions may be picked up at the Suwannee
Valley Electric administration building, 11340 100th St., Live Oak. The jobs
description can be viewed on www.svec-coop.com. Resumes and applications
can be turned in at the above address with Attn: Vicky Talmadge, or emailed
to vickyt(csvec-coop.com. The deadline for accepting applications is
Wednesday, June 1, 2011.
SVEC is an equal opportunity employer.


DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.


Florida Gateway College
149 S.E. College Place
Lake City, FL 32025-2007
Phone (386) 754-4314
Fax (386) 754-4814
E-Mail: h nWTi..nKr@fgc.t e.u
hFCi is iccrcdiled h lie i ct )nli n i oiin i i'oln.ci u of
,hl So.utlicri .hs..i.cIiiii l('illq e, hi l iii.i.
VI 511. ) I Aocu liioill ege n d i iuni i i ii
i tl i\ c ln ionMi


I I_ _


I I








LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, MAY 15, 2011


310 Pets & Supplies
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.

330 Livestock &
33 Supplies

04544708
Black Angus
Cows & Heifers
Registered & Commercial
Prices Vary
386-719-4802 or 386-623-9427

Pig
For Sale
$35
386-758-2978
Single Lane Farms
(1) 5 yr old registered Angus bull.
Duane Hingson. 386-776-1090
Wayne Parrish Bull.

361 Farm Equipment
84 Ford 4610 Tractor. Runs good.
Solid 2WD. New front tires,
350hr on 2005 motor. Dependable.
$7500. obo. 386-867-0005

407 Computers
Dell Desktop Computer,
$75
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170

10 Lawn & Garden
SEquipment
2-Riding Mowers,
Craftsman, 19.5HP, 42" cut,
MTD 14.5HP, 38" cut
386-965-5744

420 Wanted to Buy


K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$250 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.

430 Garage Sales








Baya Pharmacy
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.


440 Miscellaneous
NEW LOMANCO All aluminum
self rimming, thermostatically con-
trol. Power vent for 2000sqft attic.
Bik, made in USA. $85. 755-6963
NEW SLOAN Regal Flusho Me-
flush. Made in USA. only $95.00.
Easy installation. 386-755-6963
NEW TAPCO C2 Floor Jack
34in-55in. with 16,000 lb
compression at 3ft. Made in USA.
Only $45.00. 386-755-6963
Tow Behind Grill/Smoker
$1,250 OBO.
386-249-3104 or
386-719-4802
Utility Trailer, Enclosed 6 x 12
w/side door and ramp
$800
386-365-5099

6 0 Mobile Homes
630 for Rent
i UNDER NEW MANAGEMENT
Oakview Mobile Home Park.
Clean well maintained 2/2 units in
nice park. 2 miles to downtown
Lake City. 386-984-8448
14x70 MH, 2Br/2Ba Real Clean
Good Location! CH/A $550/Mo.
+ $200 Dep. NO PETS.
(386)755-0064 or (904)771-5924
2&3 BR MH. $395 $650. mo.
plus deposit. Water & sewer fur-
nished. Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422 ,
2/2 Newly remodeled MH New
Floors/counter tops. Lg lot, quiet
area No pets 1st, last & sec. $450
mo $300 sec will work w/payment
plan. Call Jenn 386-454-7724
2/2 Units, clean, well maintained,
nice safe park setting, 2 miles to
downtown Lake City, $550 month
+ $550 sec dep, 386-984-8448
2br /2ba SWMH; also Residential
RV lots for rent between Lake City
& G'ville. Access to 1-75 & 441
(352)317-1326 Call for terms
3/2 S of Lake City, (Branford area)
$400 dep, $600 month
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
3BR/2BA MH
5 ac Country setting.
$625. mo Ist, last & deposit.
386-963-2177
Eastside Village a 55+ Retirement
Community offers 2br/2ba Manu-
factured home fully furnished. No
pets. Leases for $650 + utilities.
1st, last, security. Eastside Village
Realty, Inc. 752-5290 for info.
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White Contact 386-623-3404
or 386-365-1919
X-CLEAN 2/2 SW, 8 mi
NW of VA. Clean acre lot, nice
area. $500. mo + dep No dogs
386-961-9181


640 Mobile Homes
640 for Sale
Access Realty Make Offer! 3/2
MH w/over 1700 SF & move in
ready. Convenient to schools,
shopping & hospitals. MLS 73861
$89,500. Patti Taylor.623-6896
650 Mobile Home
6 & Land
MH on 1 Acre in Live Oak near
Peacock Lake, owner finance
$42,500 MLS#77598 Call Roger
Lovelady 386-365-7039 @
Westfield Realty Group
Owner Finance, Nice 3/2, S of
Lake City, small down/$650 mo
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com

710 Unfurnished Apt.
* For Rent

05525655
SPRING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans;
some with garages. k
Call 386-454-1469
or visit our website:
www.springhillvillage.net







1 & 2 Bedroom Apartments
Move in for as low as
$199
386-755-2423
2BR/2BA w/garage
on the west side of town.
Washer/Dryer hookups -& more.
Call for details. 386-755-6867
A Landlord You Can Love!
2 br Apts $575. & up + sec. Great
area. CH/A washer/dryer hookups.
386-758-9351/352-208-2421
Cute & clean, 2 br Apt. in town
Great area. Close to the VA
Medical Center. $515. mo plus
dep. Must see!!! 386-344-2972
Great location W of 1-75, spacious
deluxe 2BR apts., garage, W/D
hook up. patio. $600 & up, + SD,
386-344-3715 or 386-965-5560


The Lakes Apts. Studios & IBr's
from $135/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $450. + sec'.
Call Michelle 386-752-9626

720 Furnished Apts.
2 For Rent
New furnished bedroom apt in a
home, private entrance & bath,
incl all utilities, trash, cable, frig,
microwave. $450 per month plus
deposit; immediate availability.
386-752-2020 SW Lake City
Retirement Apt: Very clean &
quiet, Ft. White. In town. 2/1,
screen porch, W/D hook up,
$550 mo + dep. 386-497-1116
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. I person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

730 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent

04544776
/ 169 SE James St. 2/1 bunga-
low w/front deck & back yard.
Privacy fence. $575. mo + sec.
/ 390 Wilshire. 3/f newer up-
scale home in Callaway availa-
ble June 1. $1500. mo + sec.
/ 143 Zebra Terrace. 3/2 home
on 1+ acre with fenced back
yard. $875./ mo + security.
1st month rent discounted
50% to qualified tenant.
/ 6206 CR 240. 3/1 CCB home
located in Columbia City
$725. mo + sec.
'204 NW Guerdon Rd. New
Construction! This 3/2 home has
never been lived in, all new ev-
erything. $750. mo + security.
/ 3083 SR 47 S. 3/1.5 brick
home on 1.5 acres. Available
June 1,2011. $895. mo. + sec.
Century 21 The Darby
Rogers Co.
BJ Federico 386-365-5884.
Kayla Carbono 386-623-9650

2007 Home 3/2 1545sf,
352-281-4003, 352-317-2886
$1350 mo, $1000 dep & last,
Pet Neg.,338 SW Wise Drive, LC
3br/1-1/2ba, Block Home W of
town, CH/A, all appliances
included, NO Pets, $650 mo,
Ist/last required 386-752-5786


3BR/1.5BA. Very clean, CH/A
Fenced (privacy) large back yard.
Nice area/location. $800. mo $800.
dep. Ref's req'd. (941)920-4535
Eastside Village a 55+ Retirement
Community offers 2br/lba Duplex,
no pets. Leases for $600 + utilities.
First, last, security. Eastside
Village Realty, Inc. 752-5290
Home for Rent.
3/2 in City Limits. No pets.
$1000. per month. Call Susan,
Realtor. 386-623-6612
Private House for Rent,
Newly Remodeled, S of Lake City
Call The Adams Agency @
386-752-1444

7 0 Business &
75 Office Rentals
For Lease: 1,500 17,000sf
1525 S. Ohio Ave, Live Oak, FL
Call Scott Stewart@ Westfield
Realty Group 386-867-3498
For Lease: E Baya Ave. Two -
1000 sqft office space units or
combined for 2000 sqft. 386-984-
0622 or weekends 386-497-4762
Office Space For Lease
2112sf, 7 rms, Irg conf rm, 4 baths,
private parking MLS#76508
$1760/mo, Call Pam @ Remax
386-303-2505


750 Business &
SOffice Rentals
OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$695. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor


790 Vacation Rentals
Horseshoe Beach Summer Spcl
Gulf Front 2br, w/lg porch, dock,
fish sink. wkend $345./wk $795.
386-235-3633/352-498-5986
alwaysonvacation.com #419-181
"Florida's Last Frontier"


805 Lots for Sale
5 Acre Lot, Secluded & Cleared,
MLS# 67871 $55,000
Call Lisa Waltrip
@ 386-365-5900
westfieldrealtygroup.com
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Fort White, 5 ac. lot. Cleared,
grass, paved street, high and dry.
MLS# 77031
Sherry 386-365-8414 $23,999
Hallmark Real Estate. Cleared
2.57 ac. fenced w/32' Dutchman
camper. In O'Brien. Close to Live
Oak, Lake City, Branford. $25,000
MLS# 74534 386-867-1613
Hallmark Real Estate. Owner
Finance with $5K down with
terms negotiable. Below assessed
value for the county. MLS# 74484
$17,900 Jay Sears 386-867-1613
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

810 Home for Sale

3/2 Brick Home in'town, fenced
back yard w/12x12 workshop
$79,900 Just Reduced!
MLS# 77414 R.E.O.Realty
Group, Inc 386-243-8227
3/2 Brick Home w/1 car garage,
detach carport MLS#77780
$109,900, Call Jo Lytte Remax
386-365-2821
www.jolytte.florida-property-search.corn
3/2 Cute Home, Remodeled, on 2
acres, partially fenced $114,900
MLS# 77396
R.E.O. Realty Group
386-243-8227
3/2 in Lake City Airpark
pool, porch, pond, detach garage
large hangar w/living quarters
MLS#77756 $399,900 Westfield
Call Josh G 386-466-2517
4/2 on 10.5 acres w/ detached
garage, patio, above ground pool,
MLS# 77410 $189,888
R.E.O. Realty Group, Inc
386-243-8227
Brick Home, Screened Porch
$185,900 MLS#77893
Call Charlie Sparks @
Westfield Realty Group
386-755-0808
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
6br/3.5ba brick. Lake views from
back. 39.7 ac., private paved road.
MLS# 76111 Mary Brown White-
hurst. 386-965-0887 $1,200,000


Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Home on the lake in town. 4br/3ba
MLS# 76085 Elaine K. Tolar 386-
755-6488 or Mary Brown White-
hurst. 386-965-0887 $299,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
New home in Mayfair S/D. 4br on
comer lot. Split plan. $214,900
MLS# 76919 Elaine K. Tolar.
386-755-6488
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
4br/3ba 2 story brick on cul-de- *
sac. 1 ac landscaped. Lori Geibeig
or Mary Brown Whitehurst.
386-965-0887 $299,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
4br/1.5ba brick. 1332 sq ft. Great
floor plan, nice yard, close to
town. 1 ac landscaped. Lori
Geibeig MLS# 75713 $84,900
CYPRESS LANDING!
3BR/2BA built in 2005
w/large kitchen $115,000
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #75794


DESIRABLE GWEN LAKE
area! Nice 3BR/2BA home
on comer lot $112,000
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #77307
Eastside Village a 55+ Retirement
Community. 2br/2ba home with
garage, screen porch. Choose wall
color, flooring. MLS# 76483 East-
side Village Realty, Inc. 752-5290
FOR SALE by very motivated
owner. Now reduced $80,000 to
$119,000. Townhouse on Golf
course. 3br/3ba. Wood burning
fireplace. End unit. Remodeled
kitchen, first class appliances,
granite countertops. New Hunter
Douglas wdw treatments.
Cathedral ceiling. Pool, tennis
court. Call for appt. (904)246-6222
Great Family Home in S/D
MLS# 77325, $109,000
Call Missy Zecher @ Remax
Professionals 386-623-0237
www.missyzecher.com
Great Home in Great Neighbor-
hood, Can be 4/2 or 3/2 w/study
MLS#77284 $164,900
Call Carrie Cason @Westfield
386-623-2806
Home on 15 Acres, 2500sf, new
appliances, workshop, MLS 77552
$235,000 Call Brittany @
Results Realty 386-397-3473


810 Home for Sale
GREAT STARTER HOME!
3BR/2BA w/lots of closets
space & nice lawn $79,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #76432
Hallmark Real Estate. 3/2 Brick
home w/large screened porch.
Back yard has wooded privacy.
MLS#69482 Janet Creel 719-0382
or Paula Lawrence 623-1973
Hallmark Real Estate. Bring the
horses. 3/2 HUD, 4 ac. Sold "as is"
$106,000 Bids are being accepted.
www.hudhomestore.com MLS#
72068 Martin Tavener 965-7773
Hallmark Real Estate. DWMH on
5 ac south of town. Back porch,
new metal roof wood burning fire-
place & wired workshop. $82,500
MLS#77185 Janet Creel 719-0382
Hallmark Real Estate. Glassed
porch overlooks wooded backyard
in the Plantations Pool,
sprinkler system. $229,900
MLS#75429 Janet Creel 719-0382
Hallmark Real Estate. Time to go
to the River. Stilt home w/covered
decking. Floating dock,out bldgs
& covered RV parking. $188K.
MLS#72068 Janet Creel 719-0382
HOME OR OFFICE on
Alachua St; remodeled
1,207 SqFt home $82,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #77724


Hallmark Real Estate. 2006
2200SF home. 2br/2ba w/mother-
in-law suite, 4 car garage, endless
hot water heater. MLS# 77547
$309,900 Jay Sears 386-867-1613
Hallmark Real Estate. 3/3 Brick
w/over 2500 SF Great location
with nice one acre pond in back.
Detached workshop MLS# 75222
$179,900 Jay Sears 386-867-1613
Hallmark Real Estate. 4/2 Brick,
3100 SF, Granddaddy Oaks on 5
acres. Double detached carport/ga-
rage w/workshop. MLS# 77877
$119,900. Jay Sears 386-867-1613
Just Reduced 3/2 home, inside city
limits, fenced backyard, detached
carport w/office MLS#77411
$82,900 Call R.E.O.Realty,
@ 386-243-8227 Make Offer!
Just Reduced 4/2 on 1.57 acres,
fireplace. partially fenced, MLS#
77412, Call Nancy Rogers at
R.E.O. Realty Group
386-243-8227 $64,900
Large affordable home in S/D on 2
Acres, fishing rights to Timberlake
Property Owner's Assoc. $64,900
MLS#74862 Call Brittany @
Results Realty386-397-3473
Large Brick, 3/1, 4.43 acres, metal
roof, MLS# 77415 $104,888
R.E.O. Realty Group, Inc.
386-243-8227
Large Home in the Country on
3.66 acres, fireplace, 2 outbldgs,.
MLS#76471, $89,900 Call Jo
Lytte @ Remax 386-365-2821
jolytte@remaxnfl.com
Large Home w/Open Floor Plan,
back yard & porch, Irg oaks, fire-
place, MLS#76122 $115,000
Call Missy Zecher @ Remax 386-
623-0237,mzecher@remax.net
LOTS OF UPGRADES!
Remodeled kitchen in this
2BR/1BA home $29,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY
INC. 755-5110 #77505
Luxury Log Horfie,
Whole House Generator, $269,900
MLS# 76899 Call Roger
Lovelady @386-365-7039
westfieldrealtygroup.com
Nice, large 4/2 on 1. acre
w/florida room, granite floors,
wrap around front porch, $148,000
Call Brittany Stoeckert @
Results Realty 386-397-3473
Norwegian Brick Home, fire-
place/family rm, open floor plan,
screen porch, fenced back yard,
MLS#76796 $179,900
Jo Lytte Remax 386-365-2821
Owner Finance. Custom built 3/2.5
10.8 ac. Granite, fireplace, vaulted
ceilings, surround sound. lanai,
gazebo. MLS 77382 Access Real-
ty. Patti Taylor $249K 623-6896
Priced Reduced! 3/2 w/2346 sf.
.67 ac. Creekside S/D. Shade,
surround sound, vaulted ceilings.
MLS 77385 $169,900. Access
Realty. Patti Taylor. 386-623-6896
Rose Creek S/D, 5/4, 3269sf, on
2.2 acres, bonus rm, many
upgrades Reduced! MLS#75485
Reduced! $234,900, Call Pam @
Remax 386-303-2505
Spacious Brand New Split Floor
Plan Home, Fenced Yard
MLS#77493 $229,900
Call Mike Lienemann @ Westfield
Realty Group 386-867-9053
SPACIOUS home built in
1995 has 2BR/2BA & 1,636
SqFt on 1 acre $89;900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110
Sturdy 3/2 on 4.35 acres, fruit &
pecan trees, Minutes from town
MLS#77878 $105,000
Call Jo Lytte @ Remax
386-365-2821/www.jolytte.com
Totally Remodeled 4 Bd Home
Spacious Must See!
MLS#77782 $135,000
Missy Zecher 386-623-0237
www.missyzecher.com


2005 F-350 Lariat
49,000 miles, many
extras, excellent cond.

$19,500 obo

Call
386-755-0139


Classified Department: 755-5440


810 Home for Sale
Well Maintained 3/2 on dead-end
street, quiet. country, close to
downtown $105.000 MLS#77800
Call Lisa Waltrip @Westfield
Realty Group 386-365-5900

820 Farms &
OU Acreage
4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$69,900. $613mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
4 acres, Wellborn, New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down, $39,900, $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
FARM- 7 stall barn, Apt.
17+ acres cross fenced.
Close in $1000. mo.
386-961-1086
FOR SALE: McAlpin. 10 Acres
W/2006 DW, 12 X 24 Back
addition laundry/office & 12 x 18
covered porch. 20 x 32 polebarn &
8 x 16 Utility shed. 863-634-5283
for details & pictures, $75,000
Leave message w/name, phone
number & email address.
Half to ten acre lots. Some w/
well, septic, pp. We finance; low
dwn pmt. Deas Bullard Properties.
386-752-4339. www.landrrfl.com
Hallmark Real Estate. 40 ac hunt-
ing tract w/camper. Water & septic
already in place. Stands & feeders
in place. MLS# 75532
$84,000 Jay Sears 386-867-1613
Three One Acre. Lots available
@ $14,900 ea & One 1.65 Acre
lot for $19,900 MLS#76050
Call Brodie Alfred 386-623-0906
Westfield Realty Group

830 A Commercial
8O3 Property
Commercial Property For Sale
Currently Leased $495,000
MLS#75953 Call Aaron
Nickelson @ 386-867-3534
Westfield Realty Group
Great Investment/Owner Finance
1400 sq ft building on 2 acres
Creative terms, owner flexible.
Call for details. 386-867'-1190
Hallmark Real Estate. Downtown
Restaurant. Gigantic BBQ Smoker
Clean kitchen w/equip. Handle any
type of food svc. MLS# 77902
$189,900 Vic Lantroop 623-6401
Mini Storage (204 Units),
gated, fenced 5 acres, $1,300,000,
MLS#76048 Call Millard Gillen
@ Westfield Realty Group
386-365-7001

850 Waterfront
850 Property
Upscale River Cabin on
Suwannee River, Shop, Dock
MLS#76336 $349,900
Call Jo Lytte @ Remax.
386-365-2821
Q86 Investment
860 Property
3/2 Renovated Home in town; .
front porch, new appliances, cur-
rently leased MLS#76658 $49,900
Jo Lytte/Remax 386-365-2821
www.jolytte.florida-property-scarch.com
Great Income Opportunity!
Mobile Home Park For Sale
MLS#77228 $195,000
Call Pam Beauchamp @ Remax
386-758-8900


940 Trucks
2006 TOYOTA Tacoma
Pre-Runner SR 5. Perfect
condition. 67,800 miles.
$15,000. 386-397-2972



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Bring the picture in or
we will take it for you!
* Ad runs 10 consecutive days
with a description and photo in the
newspaper and online E-edition.
* Ad runs 10 consecutive days as a
classified line ad online.
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2006 EF250
Ford Van
3/4 ton, metal work
shelves/ladder rack,
60K miles, exc. cond.
$10,500
Call
386-555-5555
If you don't sell your vehicle
during the first 10 days, you
can run the same vehicle ad
for 10 additional days for
only $15.00
Terms and conditions remain the
same for the additional run.

^^^iITo Ge YourB^

Vehicle SoldCal
Marivwy or Bidge






6C LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY MAY 15, 2011


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patient
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Expirei Ma 31, 2011


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FITNESS
nfCENTER


Westfield Square
LAKE CITY, FL
386-752-0749


"Serving the fitness needs of the community since 1986"


Rotate &
Balance
Tires
Most cars & trucks'
Plus tax & supplies
Not valid with any other offer
.,'&expires 5/31/11


S -SPRING IN FOR

kec/aid ONLY $1991
(all for availability, \ ;


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Story ideas?

Contact
C.J. Risak
Assistant Editor
754-0427
crisak@lakecityreporter.com


Lake City Reporter





LIFE


Sunday, May 15, 2011


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section D


GARDEN TALK


Taking their mission to Kenya


Nichelle Demorest
dndemorest@ufl.edu

Mosquitoes
and ticks:
Annoying
summer
pests
T here are a few
things that
really bug me
this time of
year: mosqui-
toes and ticks. Well, I
can't say I enjoy tomato
hornworms or lubber
grasshoppers, but. at least
they want the company
of my plants, not me.
When a pest interrupts
my outdoor enjoyment
and forces me to swat,
flick or pick them off,
that really bugs me.
If you've been out
for an evening walk
lately, you may have had
unwanted company. The,
female mosquito is the
real culprit because she
needs to drink blood
before she lays eggs.
The saliva she releases
into her victim when she
takes a blood meal is
actually what causes us
to itch and swell.
Mosquito eggs are
laid and hatch in water
where the larvae, or
wrigglerss", need to
develop. So the ques-
tion arises, 'When we
,go through long periods
with no rain, why are
we still bugged by mos-
quitoes?' The water in
which that female lays
her eggs are in water-
holding containers such
as discarded tires, cans,
flower pots, tree cavities
and such.
Take a look around
outside and empty con-
tainers that collect water.
Clogged gutters can be
culprits, too. Leaves
and debris can block the
downspouts and turn
the gutters into water
troughs for mosquito
breeding. Water can
even collect on flat roofs
that don't have enough
pitch.
Getting rid of stand-
ing water will help cut
down on the number of
mosquitoes around your
home. Unfortunately,
there is another type of
mosquito that lays her
eggs in dry soil. When
the rains come, there is
an explosion of mosqui-
toes. These 'flood water'
mosquitoes are responsi-
ble for heavy populations
after a hurricane.
As far as the ticks go,
they are just too disgust-
ing to talk about At
least I usually find them
AFTER an enjoyable
trek through the woods.
Find good information
on insect repellants at
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/
IN419
Join us Thursday at
5:45 p.m. at the Fort
White Public Library for
a free class on Caring
for North Florida Lawns.
The 2 pm Saturday pre-
sentation at the Public
Library in downtown
Lake City will be about
Backyard composting.
Bring questions.
Nichelle Demorest is
a horticulture agent with
the Columbia County
Extension of the University
of Florida Institute of Food
and Agricultural Sciences.


By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com

A ndy and Ginny
Thomas of Branford
are quitting their jobs,
selling their home
and vehicles and
saying good-bye to all American
conveniences, like favorite trips to
Target
They're preparing to step out of
their comfort zone and into a com-
pletely different culture in Africa,
a place they've never visited.
Why?
To serve as long-term Christian
missionaries.
The Thomas' will be pack-
ing up with their four children
Hannah, 15, David, 14, Sarah,
13, and Joshua, 6 and taking a
22-hour plane ride to move indefi-
nitely to Nakuru, Kenya, in July
2012.
Their family chose Nakuru
which has a population of
more than 1.6 million, according
to the Kenya National Bureau of
Statistics as its relocation point
because it will offer a central loca-
tion for their mission work, Andy
Thomas said.
That mission work includes
orphan care, a plan to plant a
church in Nakuru for the county's
missionaries and Westerners
who are currently without one,
and theological education for
the area's native pastors in the
hopes those.pastors will use the
education to disciple their own
churches.
"Theological education is a big
word that encompasses every-
thing from the personal relation-
ships, the discipleship aspects, to
the training," Andy Thomas said.
Major preparations for the trip
have already begun, Andy Thomas
said. In April, he stepped from his
pastor's position at Elim Baptist
Church, and the whole family is
learning Swahili, Kenya's national
language.
"Our whole life has already
changed," Andy Thomas said.
"Everything has shifted to prepar-
ing."
All of the changes the family
is making has minimized Ginny
Thomas' perspective of everyday
"stuff."
"What was important to me six
months ago has really been dimin-
ished," she said. "It's stuff that has
become so much less important"
To the Thomas family, that
"stuff' doesn't matter.
"I don't feel like I'm giving.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
ABOVE: Andy and Ginny Thomas listen as their youngest son, Joshua, 6, practices his Swahili, the national language
of Kenya. While a moderate number of Kenyans speaks English, Andy Thomas said his entire family is learning the
language and embracing the vast cultural differences they will face.

Courtesy of Vera L. Knighton
BELOW: Andy and Ginny Thomas and their four children are leaving on a ong-term Christian mission from their home
in Branford to Kenya next year. Pictured are Thomas family members Joshua (front row), 6; Ginny (second row, from
left); Hannah, 15; Sarah, 13; David (third row, from left), 14; and Andy.


anything up," Andy Thomas said.
"I feel like I'm gaining, I'm get-
ting. To be where God wants me
to be is worth all this other stuff,-
because that stuff's just stuff."
While the family has not yet
found an organization to partner
with, they've given their mission
a name R59 Ministries, which
represents Revelation 5:9, Andy
Thomas' favorite Bible verse that
is specifically applicable to mis-
sions.
Both Andy and Ginny, who
currently teaches fourth grade at
Branford Elementary, said their
career and educational back-
grounds have prepared them for
their upcoming mission work. .
"I've felt called to do this sort of
work 20 years ago when I had no
training whatsoever," Andy said.
"And that's why I've gotten all
the training I have over all these
years, is leading to this point I'm
going to be working with pastors,
and quite honestly, it's a whole
lot easier to relate to them, even
when they're in a different cultural


setting, having pastored myself."
- Although the Thomas fam-
ily will have to adjust to cultural
changes like the food preparation
- daily trips to the morning mar-
ket are customary, since stocking
up at a Sam's Club isn't an option
- and the language barrier,


they're convinced they are doing
the work God has called them to
do, and its necessary and impor-
tant.
"It's important to God," Ginny
said. "When you look over and
MISSION continued on 2D


What not to say to a new college grad


By NICHOLAS K. GERANIOS
Associated Press

SPOKANE, Wash. -
The playing of "Pomp and
Circumstance" is over. The
mortar board hats have
been thrown in the air. Your
son or daughter is home
and looking for work in one
of the toughest economic
climates in decades.
How bad is it? In 2010,
college graduates had a 9.4
percent jobless rate. Before
the recession, it was 5.5
percent. Many grads have
moved back home, and
this spring is sure to see
another wave of boomer-
ang kids moving out of the
dorm for the last time and
heading reluctantly back to
their old bedrooms not
necessarily because they
want to, but because they
can't pay rent elsewhere on
their own.
As a parent you want
to help. But what to say?
It's an emotional time, and
nerves may be frayed. You
certainly don't want to start
doing their laundry again,
but you also don't want to
provoke a fight.
With that goal in mind,
here are 10 things NOT to
say to your recent college


graduate:
"I'm sure we all need
a break from stress, but
you need a job before you
know what real stress is."
"Since you are apply-
ing for jobs now, you might
want to remove those beer
pong pictures from your
Facebook page."
"Some time in the
military never hurt the old
resume."
"You may recall that
we were not thrilled with
your choice of a creative
writing degree, but your
contention that we prom-
ised to support you until
you sell your first novel
does reveal a truly creative
mind."
"Remember that I plan
to retire in six years, and
it's important that you be
paying your share of Social
Security by then."
-"I don't care what your
roommate told you, every-
one does NOT have a trust
fund."
-"I'm sure Tiffany's
surgery will help her job
prospects, but we are not
paying for a nose job."
-"It's too bad you
didn't find a nice young
(man/woman) in college,
because you'll never again


ASSOCIATED PRESS
This file photo shows Michigan State University graduates as they sing their school's Alma
Mater at the close of convocation ceremonies in East Lansing, Mich. In 2010, college gradu-
ates had a 9.4 percent jobless rate. Before the recession, it was 5.5 percent. These days
many college grads move home after finishing school, and may have a hard time finding a job
with the economy still weak.


be around so many eligi-
ble people." (On the other
hand, asking, 'You're still
with HIM (her)?' might not
go over well either, depend-


ing on your tone of voice.)
-"We forgot to mention
that we've turned your old
room into our scrapbook-
ing center. How do you


feel about sleeping on the
couch and putting your
stuff in a storage unit?"
-"I hear they're hiring
... in China."


- -- -











Studying the quirks of the English language


By Troy Appling
Associate Professor of English
A couple of weeks ago,
my son and a friend
were playing at a
local park. When his
lk lend came down
the slide and jumped off the end,
she stood up and breathlessly
exclaimed, "Look! I glided!" My
son paused, looked at her, and
said in all seriousness, "No, you
glid."
Although his friend was tech-
nically correct the past tense
of glide is glided you cannot
fault my son's logic. If the past
tense of slide is slid and the past
of hide is hid, then why isn't the
past tense of glide glid?
Such are the vagaries of
English. It is a living language,
meaning that it is constantly
changing; in addition, like other
living things, it has quirks.
We borrow words from other
languages mosquito from
Spanish, tsunami from Japanese,


and Algebra from Arabic
- while at the same time other
existing words shift meanings,
sometimes radically so. (The
word "awful," for instance,
originally meant something that
inspired awe, wonder, or rever-
ence much different from its
current negative connotations.)
Add to this all the idioms and fig-
ures of speech did it literally
rain cats and dogs last week?
- and it's no wonder my son
gets a bit confused every now
and then.
I tell my students that as a
general rule they should fol-
low what is known as Standard
Edited American English when
writing formal essays, and not to
make up new words when a per-
fectly good English word already
exists. But what happens when
a word doesn't exist? William
Shakespeare, J.R.R. Tolkien, and
Lewis Carroll were all famous
for making up words, and we
do it too. My son's nonstandard
"glid" might have earned him a


corrective comment, and I must
confess that I still cannot bring
myself to use "friend" as a verb
when talking about adding some-
one to my online social network,
but how else do you concisely
describe "podcast," "biodiesel"
or "channel surfing"? If you are
interested in new words, techni-
cally called neologisms, then I
would highly recommend Paul
McFedries's blog (another rela-
tively new word) Word Spy, and
the book of the same name.
Of course, I would not be
doing my job as English profes-
sor if I did not recommend some
good (and often funny) books on
the subject of words, language,
and wordplay. One of my favorite
authors on wordplay is the very
funny Richard Lederer, whose
books include "Anguished
English," "Crazy English," and
"Adventures of a Verbivore." He
ponders such questions as "Why
do we park in a driveway and
drive in a parkway?" and why no
one ever talks about getting only


one heebie-jeebie.
On the grammar front, three
of my favorite books that make
learning about grammar fun
and painless are '"Woe is I: The
Grammarphobe's Guide to
Better English in Plain English"
by Patricia T. O'Connor, June
Casagrande's, "Grammar Snobs
are Great Big Meanies" (the title
alone makes it worth the read),
and the very popular "Eats,
Shoots and Leaves" by Lynn
Truss, whose lively discussion of
punctuation explains why "We're
going to eat, Dr. Appling" and
'We're going to eat Dr. Appling"
have two drastically different
meanings. Finally, for those
of you interested in a more in-
depth yet still understandable
examination of how language
develops and changes,,may I rec-
ommend the works of psycholo-
gy professor Steven Pinker, such
as "Words and Rules" or, my
favorite, "The Stuff of Thought"
While I admit that the crazy
rule-breaking nature of English


can be frustrating, as thousands
of Freshman Composition stu-
dents over the years can no
doubt confirm, it is that very
quirkiness that gives the lan-
guage flavor and intrigues lin-
guists such as myself.
Although there often seems to
be no rhyme or reason for some
of English's weirder character-
istics (don't get me started on
spelling), and its grammar can
be confusing for both adults and
children alike, its vibrancy and
liveliness make it a fascinating
and intriguing study. I challenge
you to take a look around you,
listen to the language you use on
a regular basis, and play with it
Maybe you'll find a way to add
some life and vocabulary to the
language and add your own stamp
to the dictionary. Just remember
- glid's already taken.

Dr Appling, who teaches at
Florida Gateway College, may be
contacted at troy.appling@fgc.edu
or at 754-4369.


McDonald
Cora Brashears of
Vanduser, MO and LC.
McDonald of Decatur, Ala.
were united in marriage May
12,1961 in Decatur, Ala.
They celebrated their
50th anniversary with
family and friends with a


celebration given by their
daughter Susan Blackie and
Step Sons Ron Chasteen
and Kenneth Chasteen.
The couple have one
daughter, Susan Blackie and
11 step-children between
them.
The couple has lived in
Lake City for 38 years.


ENGAGEMENTS


Olive-Barrs
Mike and Michelle Eubanks of Lake
City announce engagement and approach-
ing marriage of their daughter, Kristie
Olive of Lake City, to Chase Barrs of Lake
City. He is the son of Mark and Kathy.
Barrs of Lake City.
The bride is also the daughter of
William Olive Cedartown, Ga.
The bride-elect graduated in 2007 from
Columbia High School. She is employed.
at the Pet Spot and is currently attend-'
ing Florida Gateway College pursuing a
degree in animal technology.
The future groom graduated in 2007


,st









from Columbia High School. He is
employed at the State of Florida.
The wedding is planned for 3 p.m.
Saturday, June 11 at Pleasant Grove
United Methodist Church. A reception
will follow at the church.


Little-Evans
Roger Little Sr. and
Sue Little of Lake City
announce the engagement
and approaching marriage
of their daughter, Laurie
L. Little of Lake City, to
Robert E. Evans Jr. of
Lake City. He is the son of
Robbie and Donna Evans
of Lake City.
The bride-elect graduat-
ed in 2005 from Columbia
High School and 2009 from
St. Leo University. She


is employed at Peoples
State Bank and attends
Bethlehem Lutheran
Church.
The future groom
graduated in 2004 from
Columbia High School
and 2010 from St. Leo
University. He is employed
at the Department of
Transportation and a mem-
ber of Bethlehem Lutheran
Church.
The wedding is planned
for June 4.


Solar lighting for the garden


By KIM COOK
For The Associated Press

Few things are prettier
in a night garden than soft
pools of light illuminating
interesting trees, accent
rocks and plants, or path-
ways.
Whether on a small ter-
race or in a sweeping land-
scape, lighting creates a
welcoming and often dra-
matic atmosphere.
But in some cases, bur-
ied-wire electric lighting
can be costly and imprac-
ticable. The answer might
be solar lighting.
The technology of solar
lighting has been refined
in recent years to include
new batteries that take and
hold a charge better -
typically 1,000 nights per
unit. LED bulbs, too, have
become more efficient:
They can stay outside in
any weather, and are avail-
able in various watts and


colors.
Jamie Durie, author
and host of HGTV's The
Outdoor Room, suggests
three ways to use solar
lighting:
"First, light your perim-
eter. It gives some per-
spective, and is a creative
way to show the bound-
aries of your property,"
Durie says. "Next, mark
out your walks and path-
ways. Lastly, feature trees
and other features with up-
lighting, or even by attach-
ing solar lights to walls
and fences."
Durie's not a fan of
"clinical" white LEDs,
preferring those with
amber light. Make sure
when buying solar lights
that they're all the same
tone. And for areas where
you want greater intensity,
look for lights with more
than two and preferably
four LEDs in them.
In his projects, Durie


often combines low-volt-
age electrical lights with
solar.
At mysolarshop.com,
find Mission or Tiffany-
style glass fence-post caps
that fit standard size posts.
There are wall-mount and
lamppost styles here as
well, and solar stepping
stones that would make a
wonderful walkway. You'll
find great utility solar light-
ing as well: motion-sens-
ing security lights, shed
lights, address lights and
even grill lights.
Stake lights are the
quickest to install; Target
and Home Depot carry
mini lights in copper,
stainless or black finishes
that can be placed in the
ground or in any plant
container. Look for coach
and Craftsman-style lamps
sold in multiples at both
retailers. Target's solar
lamppost in a planter box
is an attractive option.


BIRTH ANNOUNCEMENTS


Mason Andrew Carroll
Clint Carroll and Amy L. Carroll of
Lake City announce the birth of their son,
Mason Andrew Carroll, April 12 at North
Florida Regional Hospital in Gainesville.
He weighed 8 pounds, 14 ounces and
measured 20 and 3/4 inches.
He joins sibling Taylor LaRae Carroll,
3.
Grandparents are Pete Vickey Carroll
of Lake City, Michael D. Cox and Velina
Cox of Lake City.
Great-grandparent is Kayron J. Cox of
Lake City.


Asa Braye Jenkins
Michael and Somer Jenkins of Lake
City announce the birth of their son, Asa
Braye Jenkins, March 24 at North Florida
Women's Center in Gainesville.
He weighed 8 pounds, 3 ounces and
measured 19 and 1/2 inches.
He joins siblings Aulden, 3 and Alli, 2.
Grandparents are T.D. and Shirley
Jenkins and Otis and Lorraine Roberts.
Great-grandparents are the late Carlton
and Jane Jenkins, Leon and Dessie Meeks,
the late Otis and Eloise Roberts, Ruth
McDonald and the late James McDonald.


McDuffie deMoya
Dal and Barbara McDuffie of Lake
City announce the engagement and
approaching marriage of their daugh-
ter, Casey Nichole McDuffie of Lake
City, to Anthony Joseph deMoya of.
Wellborn. He is the son of Armando
and Alisa deMoya of Miami.
The bride-elect is employed at
McDuffie Marine Sporting Goods Inc.
The future groom is a sport fishing
captain.
The wedding is planned for sunset
May 21 on the beaches of Regent Palms
Resort in the Turks and Caicos. A
reception will follow at the resort.


. '" *;.* : 3 '." " ; ' ', .'.- ^ "^ ^ '
.' .* ,- . ,4 ? i'. *.,





34. i. -
4, m. .
.-. ._ .. . .. . . . . .


MISSION: Local family going to Kenya

Continued From Page 1D


over again the Scripture,
God cares deeply for the
fatherless. And there's
just something extremely
compelling about a baby
who's literally been left at
two days old because of
extreme poverty. And to
have the opportunity to
redeem that life, it's com-
pelling."
Andy said theological
education is the "essence"
of the Great Commission
in Matthew 28:18-20. He
said he wants to follow
those verses "to go and
make disciples of the
nations," focusing not on
quantities of converts like


in the past, but on disci-
pling.
"In certain parts of
the world, we went for
a quantity of converts
instead of discipline the
ones that we reach, so
we've got large areas of
that where the work is
not done," he said.
The Thomas' said amid
feelings of excitement and
nervousness, their family
is wholeheartedly looking
forward to that work.
Ginny Thomas said she
is most looking forward to
the possibilities of bringing
hope to those who have
none, while Andy Thomas


said he is most anticipating
the work God will do that
surpasses even his family.
"I'm convinced God's
going to do more," Andy
said, "not just with our
family, but with the whole
situation, more that goes
beyond our family. There's
going to be more people
who go, the work's going
to be bigger even than the
things we've described.
We'll do our part, but
God's doing something
bigger, that's what I'm
excited about. I want to
see what it is."
Visit R59Africa.org or e-
mail info@r59africa.org.


1-, '_ ', "': *:"""'" '*'=.-' :,:' .'-^^ <^'


'. . . . ,
. .,* ** '* *., -'' t. : "', .'.. ." *:,


4.'
I. .~.


ANNIVERSARIES


~


LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, MAY 15, 2011


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427










Page EdItor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & CROSSWORD SUNDAY, MAY 15, 2011


DEAR ABBY


High school reunion is tricky


for two friends on the outs


DEAR ABBY: "Lynn" and
I were friends since we. were
teenagers. We are now in our
late 40s. We had a successful
business together, but I de-
cided to leave it to pursue my
dreams. She didn't understand
and our relationship was the
casualty.
We didn't speak for two
years. I attempted a reconcili-
ation, but it failed. We're both
bitter regarding the settlement
of the business, and I'm not
sure it can ever be resolved.
There is a high school re-
union coming up and I'm not
sire how to handle it. Sitting
down and talking with her isn't
an option. She's not reasonable,
and she's prone to sudden out-
bursts of anger. Can you help?
- FORMERLY FRIENDLY
DEAR FORMERLY
FRIENDLY: Yes, when you
attend the reunion, avoid her
as much as possible. But if you
can't, keep any conversation
civil, perfunctory, brief and
move away;
DEARABBY: My wealthy
brother-in-law and his entire
family didn't give my daugh-
ter a graduation gift. And even
though they attended my son's
wedding, none of them gave
him a wedding gift, either.
We have attended the gradu-
ations and weddings of all their
children and have been gener-
ous. We know the right thing is
to say nothing, but it's hard to
understand and remain quiet
What do you think? GIFT-


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearabby.com

LESS FAMILY IN GRAND
RAPIDS
DEAR GIFTLESS FAM-
ILY: If your in-laws attended
both events, they should have
given something. They may
be cheap, stingy or so newly
rich that they haven't learned
the basic rules of etiquette. Or,
they may have had financial
reversals you are unaware of.
You are correct that the "right"
thing to do is to say nothing,
so resist the temptation to call
them on it. And in dealing with
them in the future, expect noth-
ing and you won't be disap-
pointed.
DEAR ABBY: My 17-year-
old daughter, "Kelly," tried to
commit suicide. She was admit-
ted to a hospital and started on
an antidepressant Last night,
when I was walking across the
parking lot to the ward, I. met
her psychiatrist When I asked
how Kelly was doing, he said
she's agitated, not sleeping and
he was starting her on medica-
tion that night
Wheri he mentioned the
dose, I told him my daugh-
ter had been given half that'


amount previously and didn't
wake up for 24 hours. I said I
thought he should give her less
or change the medication. He
said he'd change it, went back
inside and I followed.
I'm glad I ran into him, but
now I wonder what would have
happened if I hadn't. What are
the rules about medication
being given to adolescents?
Aren't the parents supposed to
give consent? What can I do to
prevent this from happening
again? VIGILANT MOM IN
COLORADO
DEAR VIGILANT MOM:
Because your daughter is un-
der 18, your consent is needed
for treatment Good care is both
patient- and family-focused. You
have a right to know what's go-
ing on in your daughter's treat-
ment and to make sure her doc-
tor has enough information to
do an effective job;
It's perfectly all right to ad-
vocate for your child. Should
you become overwhelmed, the
National Alliance on Mental
Illness (NAMI) and the De-
pression and Bipolar Support
Alliance (DBSA) can provide
support and help you navigate
the system. Call NAMI toll-free
at (800) 950-6264 or go to www.
nami.org. The toll-free number
for DBSA is (800) 826-3632 and
the website iswww.dbsalliance.
org.
Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-April
19): Once you have estab-
lished a unique way to present
what you have to offer, move
quickly before someone beats
you at your own game. A love
relationship can be'enhanced.
Let your charm- and humor
capture attention. ***
TAURUS (April 20-May
20): Do what you can with-
out making a fuss and you'll'
impress someone who is con-
sidering you for a job or place-
ment in an event An emotional
matter concerning a peer or
co-worker can be resolved if
you make an effort to put him
or her at ease. ***,
GEMINI (May' 21-June
20): Your changing attitude
and carefree manner will at-
tract people who want to take
advantage of you financially.
Be smart when it comes to
investments. Focus more on
rethinking your professional
strategy. *****-
CANCER (June 21-July
22): Take one step at a time.-
Additional responsibilities may
be dumped in your lap but you
mustn't let this stop you from
going ahead with your plans.
Summon help and you will
fit everything into your.busy


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Word
schedule. **
LEO (July 23-Aug.- 22):
You can improve your status
if you look for better opportu-
nities to get ahead. Staying in
one place doesn't make sense
if there is no room for you to,
advance. Expand your inter-
ests and network with people
who can help you achieve your
goals. ****
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
'22): Take aggressive action
when it comes to activities
that challenge you mentally
or physically. You have the po-
tential to win and to encourage
others to support you in your
efforts. A creative slant to the
way you do something will add
dimension. ****
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): Uncertainty regarding a
money matter can be resolved
quickly if you put a little pres-
sure on anyone holding up the
process. Changes you make to
your home will turn out well
but don't go over budget Al-
tering your spending habits
will help ease the stress you've
been undergoing. ***
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov.


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
S, Each letter in the cipher stands'tor another. .
Today's clue: I equals U
"UMVX. GVO SP YWZP TWWRFNM XMVO
XW XMFOL XMVX VRR XMFN ZV'ZP
TVSZFG WT MPVCPO VOE PVZXM
GWIRE GWYP SA GMVOG P.."
- VOVXWARP TZVOGP
PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "There's an old saying about those who forget history.
I don't remember It, but it's good." Stephen Colbert
(c) 2011 by NEA, Inc. 5-16


21): Emotions will be close to
the surface and will help you
deal with any situation you
face. A relationship you cher-
ish can be enhanced by the
way you approach any prob-
lems. Offer more and you'll
excel. ***
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-
Dec. 21): The alterations you
make to your living arrange-
ments will bring you greater
security and peace of mind.
Getting out with friends late in
the "day will be fun as long as
you don't overindulge and get
into a disagreement. ***
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-
Jan. 19): You now have great-
er opportunities to indulge in
pastimes that interest and ben-
efit you. You can make some
alterations or renovations that
will help you produce more
work-related projects from
home. Make changes for the
right reason. ****
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Make arrange-
ments with old friends or
colleagues to get together
for a reunion. The ideas that
surface and the contributions
you all make can lead to an
interesting sideline business
or ongoing get-together. A
moneymaking opportunity is'
apparent and mustn't be disre-
garded. *****
PISCES (Feb. 19-M1arch
20): Unless you are prepared
to follow through, do not start
something new. You'll send
the wrong message to some-
one who looks up to you. Ac-
tion and greater productivity
are the routes to your success.
Show everyone what you are
capable of doing. ***


SUNDAY CROSSWORD


WORKING IN OPPOSITION By Daniel A. Finan Edited by Will Shortz 1 [12[ = 56 1 78 09,' 11 I 12 13iE4 [15 116 1T17l11


Across
I Rides
5 Nickname for
Joseph Haydn
,9 Part of a girl ,.
, scoutu' ,uniform_
14 Home for 22-
Across
19 Needle case
'20 Tender areas
'21 Fix, as a hem
22 Pitcher Hideki
23 Capris?
.25 Dweller along
the Tigris
26 Ending with sea
.,27 See 66-Across
28 Kind of intake
,30 Domes to let in
London?
32 Southern city
known as the
Horse Capital of
the World
34 It may bring a
tear to your eye
36 Squeezes (out)
37 Verizon
forerunner
38 Pre-2004 .'
S purchase fromin
G.M .? -t i1 .
41 Only Had a.
Brain"
42 Cruise stops ;,.-.
Abbr.
43 Convention .
conclusion'?
44 "Spaceballs" and
the like
47 Sour notes? :
50 "___ Poetica"
53 Accustom. ,

For any three answers,'
call from a touch-tone
phone: 1-900-285-5656;
1.49 each minute, or,
with a credit card; 1-800-
8 4-5554.


54 Toy rocket
company since
1958
55 Verdi aria "__
tu"
56 Fractions of
acres?
59 Boston Tea Party
issue.
60 He wrote "None
but the brave
deserves the
fair"
63 Towers in the
high country?
64 "Flashdance"
actor Michael
66 "King song
premiered on 27-
Across on
4/22/78
67 Month before
Tis'hri
69 Do Is
Dream of You"
70 Shabby wares
sold at an ex.po?
74 Featured singer
on Eminem's
"Stan"
'75 Shipwreck site
- 76 Org. whose
functions follow
forms?
S'77 -__ evil,..."
S78:Lead singer of,
.the fictional
Pussycats
79 Famous answer
giver
81 HBO's __ G
83 What'socialists
campaign for? ,
86 Pokey .
87 Unkem.ipttypes
89 First'play.er'
listed in."Toital
Baseball". -
S90 Shakeslearean"
assents'


91 B and 0, for
presidents #43
and #44?
95 Battlefield
sorting system
97 Spanish pot
98 Crucifix letters
99 Batter's need
101 Career
criminals?
105 Eastern-wrap
106 Actor Robert
who played the
villain in
"Licence to Kill"
107 Rick who sang
"Never Gonna
Give You Up"
110 Overly air-
conditioned
room,
facetiously
111 Material for a
biographer with
a recorder?
114 Monkeys
117 Disco ___
118 _-_ Gay.
119 Church gift
121 Best-looking
rear ends?
123 ___-dink
124 Key key.
125 Sub'-ub-players
1.26 Blind piece
127 Some ends.
128 "Great Scott!"
129 Pianist Myra
130 Numbers game

Down
1 Hold'on a mat
2 Chop-chop.
3 N.R.A. concern
4 Mt., in Milano
5 March Madness
activity
6 Lane marking


7 Millennia-old
Jordanian city
that's a World
Heritage Site
8 St. Clare's home
9 Asian title
10 Walsh with 2004
and 2008 gold
medals in beach
volleyball
11 Golf's Aoki
12 D.J.'s
considerations
13 Like stars at
night
14 Secs
15 Asia's ___ Sea
16 Ideal
17 Covered for,
maybe
18 Baby bottles
20 Doo-wop syllable
' 24 Masked people
wield them
29 latte
31 Courses people
look forward to?
33 Part of L.A.
35 Radial
alternative
39 Through
40 "0 my prophetic
__!": Hamlet
42 Genus of holly
43 One in a harness
45 Palm features
46 ___
circumstances
'48 Actress Hagen .
49 Suffix with audit
50 Union locale
.51 Barbecued bit
52 More clich6d
57 Ambitious track
bet
58 ___ sponte (legal
term)
60 Fizzler
61 Actress Cuthbert
of "24"


62 Reason for a TV-
MA rating
65 Sense of humor
.66 How some
practical jokes
S.go
68 Windblown soil
70 Like House
elections
71 Animal shelter?
72 Pomade
alternative
73 a time ,
78 International
bully


80 Actress _,__ Ling
of "The Crow"
81 Et ___
82 "Long," in
Hawaii
84 Lead-in to -meter
85 Jet's noise
87 Giving it 110%,
so to speak
88 Certain N.C.O.'s
9.1 Targets of
martial law'
92 Modern locale of
ancient Illyria


93 Loafers, e.g.
94 One asked to
R.S.V,P.
96 Heart' meas.
100 Snag .
102 Fdtbol cheer
103 Oklahoma city
104 In order that
one might
106 Pixotal times
107 Incinerated
108 Express shock
or happiness, say


109 "Great Scott!"
112 Sommer in
Southern
California
113 Jazzy.James or
Jones
115 "___ le roi!"
116 Athos, Porthos
or Aramis
120 Signs of
ineloquence
122 Utterance of a
finger wagger


Answers to last Sunday's Crossword.



W 0 R STIN I T M A RE C E TAR
ANTEATER TIMP KN0 TT
TEEI S CAL HN E HELP

ATHESA UTHPL ERRR





SARH0IVASEL DUM
ST EH PES ITSY0A NS


6 8


52 9 6


7 3


9 7 18


3 2 9


5 4 6


2 1 4


7 5 6 4


483 5 2


L J2 I,98 6 J8V 1L 9.
S6 L I E 9 9 8 L



V1 89 9SL L E1 6


-9 19 L 6 8 L -


9 L 6 8 9 LI E 7


8 L E LZ 7 9 9 6 Z


9 618 91L 6 17 L


L I L 9 6 ZE 9 8


6 9 L 8 17 L 9
8LS_ itii99G--8

^AI-^A -Aii


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


v


LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & CROSSWORD SUNDAY, MAY 15, 2011








LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, MAY 15, 2011 Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


Getting dogs and water to mix safely


By SUE MANNING
Associated Press
-LOS ANGELES
-When you think of
four-legged swimmers,
Labrador retrievers might
come to mind. But any
dog can take to the water
if enticed properly.
"I don't think that every
dog has an inherent skill.
They might all have an
idea what to do but some
dogs do it much better
than others. Some are
born to swim. Some are
never meant to put foot in
the water," said veterinar-
ian Karl E. Jandrey, who
works in the emergency
and critical care units at
the Veterinary Medical
Teaching Hospital at the
University of California,'
Davis.
Valentine is a 4-year-old,
42-pound, short-snouted
English bulldog with
stumpy legs who is heavy
on both ends and looks
like she would sink if
placed in water.
For three years,
James MacKinnon of
Los Angeles, an Emmy-
winning TV and movie
makeup artist, went to
great lengths to protect
Valentine from the swim-
ming pool at his home.
Then a year ago, he
started boarding her at
Paradise Ranch Pet Resort
.in Sun Valley, a cage-free,
luxury country club and
water park for dogs about
25 miles northwest of
downtown Los Angeles.
(You can board cats there
too, but the water is off
limits to them.)
It turns out Valentine
loves the water. During
the eight months
MacKinnon traveled
for work last year, with
more time away this
year, Valentine lost seven
pounds, partly due to
swimming. Her health
improved, her endurance
grew and she became fast
friends with a Rottweiler


ASSOCIATED PRESS.
This May 3 photo shows obedience trainer and animal behaviorist Cora Wittekind as she
eases Valentine, a 4-year-old, 42-pound, short-snouted English bulldog, into her swimming
lesson at the Paradise Ranch Pet Resort in the Sun Valley section of Los Angeles.


named Chico who loves to
dive off the dock.
She probably decided
to try it when she saw
how much fun all the
other dogs including
Chico were having,
, said Chico's owner, Cora
Wittekind, an animal
behaviorist who worked
with Valentine.
The best way to turn
your dog into a swimmer
is to introduce water very
early, as a puppy if possible,
making sure the experi-
ence is pleasant, according
to recommendations from
the American Society for
the Prevention of Cruelty to
Animals. Never let dogs get
in water over their heads
until they are accomplished
swimmers, and don't force
or toss them in water.
"Don't push them to do
things they don't want to
do," Jandrey said.
And beware of the risks.
Based on emergency room
visits, one of the most com-
mon backyard pool acci-
dents happens when dogs
walk onto pool covers. If
the cover collapses, the dog
gets trapped, struggles and
inhales water, Jandrey said.


Safety covers made of solid
material can run hundreds
of dollars, but are worth
the investment if there's a
possibility your dog might
jump on a soft pool cover.
Another risk, if you are
at the beach and your dog
drinks salt water all day,
is acute salt intoxication,
Jandrey said. It's easy to
prevent always carry
fresh water for your dog
and offer it often. A few
gulps of salt water won't
harm your dog, but watch
for vomiting and early
neurological signs of salt
poisoning like dullness and
depression. (The chlorine
in pool water, on the other
hand, is not considered a
major problem for dogs.)
In fresh water, dogs can
be infected by a parasite
called giardia, which can
hide in the most pristine
of streams, Jandrey said.
Usually dog and owner will
get it by drinking from the
same water source. Owners
can also be exposed by
cleaning up waste from
infected dogs. Symptoms
include mild diarrhea and
vomiting.
Backyard ponds may


* bloom with mold intoxi-
cants that can cause neu-
rological problems, liver
disease and liver failure in
dogs, Jandrey said.
Owners should also
know when their dogs have
had enough water play.
Dogs don't float, but con-
stantly paddle with all four
legs, so they might tire fast-
er than humans, Jandrey
said. Some dogs, like
Chico, will just keep jump-
ing in the water, retrieving
the ball and returning for
more, Wittekind said.
Panting isn't necessarily
a sign of exertion, Jandrey
said, it's the way dogs
adjust their temperature
after getting hot But if a
dog squeaks, rattles, snores
or makes other unusual
sounds while breathing,
a break is probably war-
ranted, he said.
During a dog's first
few trips into the water,
and for dogs that aren't
as coordinated as Chico,
life preservers or flotation
devices can help, Jandrey
said. Valentine wore a life
vest when she went in deep
water but,was OK without
one otherwise.


Potting benches

make gardening

more efficient


By MELISSA KOSSLER
DUTTON
For The Associated Press

One ofKarenAngelucci's
favorite gardening tools is
the wood potting bench
her father made for her.
The big poplar bench
has shelves for stor-
ing pots, nails on which
to hang utensils, and a
large work area, said
Angelucci, of Lexington,
Ky., an author of garden-
ing books. "I have to have
room to work and create,"
she said. "Potting bench-
es tell the character of a
person. That's, why mine's
large and messy."
Gardeners use the
benches primarily for
potting flowers and small
seedlings.
They can help 'you
become more efficient,
said Robin Pokorski, sec-
retary for the National
Garden Clubs. She likes
having all her tools within
arm's reach when she's
potting plants. "I wouldn't
do without it," said
Pokorski, who lives in Los
Angeles.
Pokorski chose a plas-
tic bench because she felt
it would hold up better
under the Califorpia sun.
Potting benches are avail-
able in many materials
from wood to vinyl.
Building one can be an
easy do-it-yourself project,
said Lou Manfredini, Ace
Hardware's Home Expert,
in Chicago..
Here are some things to
consider before buying or
building a potting bench:

LOCATION
Put the bench in a shady
spot so you're not working
in direct sun, experts rec-
ommend. Consider wheth-
er to incorporate the bench
into the landscape or hide


it behind a garage or shed.
Remember that a potting,
bench can get messy and
cluttered.

SIZE
Think about what size
plants and pots you will be
usiig, and how much work-
space you will need.

HEIGHT
Make sure the work area
is at a comfortable level.
You don't want to have to
bend down or reach up.

STORAGE
Some benches come
with shelves, drawers, or
utensil hooks for storing or
displaying gardening tools.
Consider hanging tools on
hooks so they aren't sit-'
ting in wet drawers after it
rains.

MATERIAL
Pick a material suited to
your climate. Many bench-
es are made from cedar or
redwood, which can with-
stand the elements well.
Plastic and recycled materi-
als also hold up well in sun,
rain and snow.

WHEELS
Some benches have
wheels so they can be
moved around the yard.
If you intend to roll yours
around the lawn, make sure
it isn't too heavy to push.

COST
Prices vary widely. A do-
it-yourself bench could be
constructed for as little as
$30. A number of garden-
ing websites offer plans for
building potting benches.
Store-bought benches start
at around $100.


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Ladies Lunch and Learn

Presented by: Emad Atta, M.D.
Obstetrics and Gynecology
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Obstetrics and Gynecology


Friday, May 20, 2011, Noon

Life Enrichment Center
628 SE Allison Ct.
Lake City, Florida 32025


Space is Limited! Please call 386-755-0235 to reserve your space today.

IN PARTNERSHIP WITH


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national

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Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, MAY 15, 2011