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The Lake City reporter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01553
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 5/14/2011
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
System ID: UF00028308:01553
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text





Thorns leads Ready to go All Tied Up
GoV-- -' s to the top Fort White football's Annual Purple & Gold
LC 00 os 1205-1 R Black game today. game finishes 7-7.
sox S, B 117007-S,1 GT 2 Sports, IB
ae UNIV OF PLODI,
A -NEVILNE FL 32601-943




Lake city Reporte


Saturday, May 14, 201 I www.lakecityreporter.com Vol. 137, No. 95 75 cents


Controlled burns

planned to slow

Honey Prairie fire


Officials call fire
'zero percent
controlled.'
By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
The Honey Prairie fire,
which has consumed more
than 100,000 acres of prop-
erty, was reportedly most
active on its north side
because of southerly winds
and low relative humidity
Friday, according to official
reports.
According to information
released from the Georgia
Forestry Commission
Incident Management Team
Friday afternoon, the Honey


Prairie fire is burning in
109,469 acres of peat-laden
soils.
Officials have noted the
fire is "zero percent" con-
tained and Friday's firefight-
ing plan called for increased
personnel presence on the
East Branch of the fire to
protect the Swamp Edge
Break.
Late Friday afternoon air
resources were working
to contain a spot fire north
of the Suwannee Canal in
Georgia.
There are five helicop-
ters; 21 engines; 30 bull-
dozers and plows; 129 fire
support staff personnel;
FIRE continued on 3A


Sheriff's office warns

public about fake

solicitation calls


Several citizens
received false
donation requests.

From staff reports

The Columbia County
Sheriff's Office has issued
a warning to local residents
advising of fake solicitation
phone calls seeking dona-
tions for local law enforce-
ment agencies.
According to informa-
tion from Sgt. Ed Seifert,
Columbia County Sheriff's
Office public informa-
tion officer, several con-
cerned citizens have called


the sheriff's office about
phone calls they have been
receiving requesting dona-
tions for the local sheriff's
office and Lake City Police
Department. ,
"Your state, county and
local law enforcement agen-
cies are publicly funded
and will never solicit dona-
tions from the community,"
Seifert said. "A fraternal
law enfoArement organi-
zation may state that any
donations they receive will
benefit the agencies; how-
ever, none of this money
is returned to our local law
CALLS continued on 3A


Saint Leo University
students celebrate.
commencement.
By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
Receiving a Bachelor of
Arts degree in human
services administration
was a huge milestone
for Gerald Clayton.
"It feels good to accomplish this,"
he said. "All my hard work paid off."
Clayton and 90 others graduated
from St Leo University Friday at the
Howard Conference Center.
The 91 graduates represent
Baker, Columbia, Gilchrist, Dixie
and Union counties.
Mike Millikin, Columbia County
Superintendent of Schools, was the
commencement speaker, and Alina
DeWein gave the Class of 2011
Farewell.
DeWein graduated Summa Cum
Laude with a 4.0 grade-point aver-
age and BA in elementary educa-
tion.
"It was a lot of hard work and
dedication," she said.
Students had a lot of people sup-
port them during their time at St
Leo, DeWein said. The graduation
is a significant event for the entire
class.
"It took a while for me realize
how big this is," she said. "It hit me
this was four years of our life."
The class worked very hard to
earn its degrees, said Dr. Robin
Hall, Lake City Center assistant
director. Students juggled work and
families in addition to school.
"This is a great class," she said. "I
wish all the best for all of them and
hope they are able to find a job."
One of the advantages of the
campus is the ability to provide per-
sonalized and one-on-one attention
to students, Hall said. Many of them
will continue their education beyond
St Leo University.
Christy Barker said it was excit-
ing to receive a BA in business
administration: accounting. Her next


PHOTOS BY JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
ABOVE: Health care management graduate Deanna Castell (left) adjusts
Alina DeWein's tassle Friday before the Saint Leo University Commencement.
Ceremony held at Florida Gateway College's Howard Conference Center.

BELOW: Charles Oden, director of the Saint Leo University Lake City Center,
congratulates graduates as they make their way across the stage Friday.


step is securing a better paying job
and even attending grad school.
"I enjoyed it a lot," she said. "I
thought it was a very good school."
Barker encouraged her class-


mates to prepare for life post-gradu-
ation.
"You made it this far. Don't give
up," she said. "Continue to seek
additional education."


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Brad Sutherland (from left), Jason D'Souza and Joe Shaara, team members from Lake City's
Target Distribution Center, work to plant a dwarf yaupon holly Friday in the front yard of the
CARC Advocates for Citizens with Disabilities Group Home. 'It's satisfying to know that the
work done today will have a long-lasting effect on the lives of others,' D'Souza said.


CARC receives a helping hand


Corporate
volunteers help
landscape yard.

By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter. com
The front yard of the
CARC Advocates for


Citizens with Disabilities
- Group Home received
a makeover thanks to the
support of corporate vol-
unteers.
Team members from
Lake City's Target
Distribution Center land-
scaped the yard Friday
afternoon.
Target gave the CARC


a call, saying it wanted
to collaberate on a proj-
ect with the organization,
said Mike Belle, executive
director.
"We felt like the home
could use a lot of TLC," he
siad.
From there the project
HAND continued on 3A


LCPD eyes new equipment


License plate
readers might
be purchased.
By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Police
Department could
receive some new equip-
ment to enhance its ser-
vices.
The Public Safety
Committee voted to sub-
mit to the City of Lake
City Council for approv-
al the purchase of two
portable and two inter-
state license plate read-
ers during a meeting
Thursday at the Public
Safety Building.
If approved by coun-
cil, the equipment
would cost $68,700, said
Chief of Police Argatha
Gilmore. Of that amount,
$18,559 of the funding
would come from a 2010
grant available, and the
remaining $50,141 from
the refinancing of the
sales tax bond.
The readers scan
license plates on vehicles
to pull up information on


the owner. Information
such as if the vehicle has
been reported stolen or
if the driver has a sus-
pended license would
be instantly conveyed
to officers through the
scan.
The readers would be
used inside city limits as
well as on the interstate
that runs through the
area, she said.
Council members had
the opportunity to go on
a ride with one of the
scanners several weeks
ago.
Committee Chairman
and Councilman Eugene
Jefferson said he was
impressed with the
amount of information
the readers captured so
fast.
Councilwoman
Melinda Moses learned
how the scanners
quickly found a vehicle
identified in an Amber
Alert.
'That sold me right
there," she said
The Alachua County
Sheriff's Office and
Gainesville Police
Department already


use the system and are
willing to share infor-
mation, said Capt John
Blanchard, public infor-
mation officer.
Interstate readers use
a faster processor to
scan plates on the high-
way, he said. Portables
will be used primarily in
city limits.
Readings of license
plates will only identify
information about the
vehicle owner, not the
car driver, Blanchard
said.
Officers will still com-
pare visual information
with written research. -
"There's nothing in
law enforcement that
takes the human fac-
tor out of what we do,"
Gilmore said. "Different
systems help us out."
In other business:
The committee is
recommending to coun-
cil for approval purchas-
ing automatic vehicle
locators for $30,425.
The equipment will

LCPD continued on 3A


CALLUS: 8 6
(386) 752-1293 86 64 f/
SUBSCRIBE TO T-Storm Chance
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400 WEATHER, 2A


Op inion
Pound Ficlrda
Ob tu-itres
Adice & Cornmcs
Puzzles


*4A
..... 2.4
... 5A
. 4B
.. .. 2B


TODAY IN
FAITH
Dalai Lama
leads summit.


COMING
SUNDAY
Helping a veteran
find a home.


RADIATION DAY


L~7~~~""nnr;r.~i~"~~nrhvrri+rr~~:)2~I~'


,IIIU.








LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING SATURDAY, MAY 14, 2011


Friday:
Afternoon: 2-8-9
Evening: 5-7-7


. .Friday:
Afternoon: 1-0-1-9
Evening: 2-6-4-9


ewzatci
Thursday:
3-11-19-23-25


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



Take 2: Retooled 'Spider-Man' unveiled


NEW YORK
OK, left's try this again!
After close to 150
previews and a three-
week hiatus, Broadway's
troubled "Spider-Man:
Turn Off the Dark" unveiled its new,
heavily retooled version Thursday
- a show that harks back to a more
familiar story line, transforms a
major character, adds new songs and
seriously lightens its mood with a
bunch of one-liners.
Talk about turning off the dark
- the comic touches even extended
to a joke about the show's own bloat-
ed price tag, the largest in Broadway
history by far. "I'm a $65 million cir-
cus tragedy," quipped the villainous
Green Goblin. "Well, more like $75
million."
Producers were blunt about the
extent of changes to the show as
they took the stage for what they
joked was not the 146th preview, but
the "second first preview." (Opening
night is scheduled for June 14.)
"This is almost a brand-new show,"
said producer Michael Cohl.

Ashton Kutcher lands on
'Two and a Half Men'
NEW YORK Ashton Kutcher
will replace troubled star Charlie
Sheen in the hit CBS comedy 'Two
and a Half Men"
next season, the
network and produc-
ers Warner Bros.
Television said on
Friday.
The deal appar-
ently came together
Kutcher quickly, following
reports earlier this
week that negotiations with film actor
Hugh Grant to join the show had


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Patrick Page, right, Jennifer Damiano, second from right, Reeve Carney, second from
left, and T.V. Carpio, left, react to audience applause during the curtain call for 'Spider-
Man: Turn Off The Dark' following the first preview performance of the revamped show
at the Foxwoods Theatre in New York Thursday. The musical returned after a three-
week hiatus to fix problems with the show and is scheduled to open June 14th.


fallen through. Kutcher is familiar to
television audiences through his role
on Fox's "That 70s Show," film roles
like the romantic comedy "No Strings
Attached" and for producing and host-.
ing the prank show "Punk'd."
Kutcher said he believes that "we
can fill the stage with laughter that
will echo in viewers' homes.
"I can't replace Charlie Sheen but
I'm going to work my ass off to enter-
tain the hell out of people," he said.

Cartoonist Bill Gallo
remembered at funeral
NEW YORK Longtime New
York Daily News cartoonist and col-
umnist Bill Gallo was remembered
at his funeral Mass Friday as the
soul of the newspaper and a legend


whose easy manner was admired by
those he so famously lampooned -
sports greats like Joe DiMaggio and
Larry Holmes and Yankees owner
George Steinbrenner.
Among the 400 New Yorkers
- sports figures, colleagues, city
officials and fans who paid tribute
to Gallo at St. Patrick's Cathedral
was Police Commissioner Raymond
Kelly, a longtime friend and former
Marine, like Gallo.
Gallo died Tuesday of complica-
tions from pneumonia at age 88. For
seven decades, he profiled the great
sports figures of the past century,
going back to Jack Dempsey, Man
O' War, Jesse Owens, Babe Ruth, Joe
Namath, Reggie Jackson and scores
of others.

Associated Press


AROUND FLORIDA


Celebrity Birthdays


* Rock singer-musician Jack
Bruce (Cream) is 68.
* Movie producer George
Lucas is 67.
* Actress Meg Foster is 63.
* Rock singer David Byrne
is 59.
* Actor Tim Roth is 50.
* Rock singer lan Astbury
(The Cult) is 49.
* Rock musician C.C. DeV-
ille is 49.



Daily Scripture


* Rock musician Mike Inez
(Alice In Chains) is 45.
* Fabrice Morvan (ex-Milli
Vanilli) is 45.
* Actress Cate Blanchett is
42.
* Singer Danny Wood (New
Kids on the Block) is 42.
* Movie writer-director Sofia
Coppola is 40.
* Actress Amber Tamblyn
is 28.


"Charm is deceptive, and
beauty is fleeting; but a woman
who fears the Lord is to be
praised."
Proverbs 31:30



Lake City Reporter
HOW TO REACH US BUSINESS
Main number ........(386) 752-1293 Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
Faxnumberl..............752-9400 (sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
Circulation ............... 755-5445
Online... www.lakecityreporter.com CIRCULATION
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub- should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
listed Tuesday through Sunday at 180 Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7.30
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055. a.m. on Sunday.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and Please call.386-755-5445 to report any
The Associated Press. problems with your delivery service.
All material herein is property of the Lake In Columbia County, customers should
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser-
in part is forbidden without the permis- vice error for same day re-delivery. After
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POSTMASTER: Send address changes In all other counties where home delivery
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CORRECTION


The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will
run in this space. And thanks for reading.


Woman killed
in shooting
DUNEDIN -
Authorities said 42-year-old
William Foster came home
from a meeting to find his
wife fatally shot and a child
injured inside his Dunedin
apartment
A Pinellas County
Sheriff's spokeswoman
Cecilia Barreda said
39-year-old Tina Marie
Foster was already dead
when deputies arrived
at the scene about 10:40
p.m. Thursday. Foster
would have turned 40 on
Friday.
The child was taken to a
hospital with what officials
described as life-threaten-
ing injuries.
Barreda said the child
was related to Tina Foster,
but she did not explain the
relationship.
Detectives were still
investigating early Friday,
but said the shooting was
not a random act of vio-
lence. No other details were
immediately available.


Juror dismissed
in Anthony trial
CLEARWATER
- Defense attorneys for a
mother charged with kill-
ing her 2-year-old daughter
on Friday dismissed a man
from a pool of potential
jurors after they claimed
he misled them about a
prior arrest.
Casey Anthony's
defense attorneys exer-
cised their right to a
peremptory challenge of a
potential juror for the first
time since jury selection
began five days ago.
Their target was Juror
No. 1011, a rock 'n roll
memorabilia collector who
had worked as a grounds-
keeper for local colleges.
The potential juror was
arrested for a DUI in 2006
but had failed to mention
the arrest on a jury form
that asked about his crimi-


Folk Festival performers
The Bullard Brothers & Friends will perform at the 59th
Annual Florida Folk Festival on May 29. The event runs May
27-29 at Stephen Foster Folk Culture Center State Park.


nal history.
"I didn't know if that
made me a criminal or
not," the potential juror
said. "Am I criminal under
that?"
Defense attorney Jose
Baez said the oversight
suggested a lack of truth-
fulness by the potential
juror. Circuit Judge Belvin
Perry refused defense
attorneys' request to dis-
miss the juror for cause,
saying that could only
be done because of bias,
prejudice, not understand-
ing English or because of
a previous experience that
made it difficult to render
an impartial decision.
The defense then opted
to use one of their limited
number of peremptory
challenges to dismiss the
man, anyway.

20-month-old
hit by truck
TEQUESTA A grand-
father backed his pickup
truck over a 20-month-old
boy who police believe
followed him out of a
Tequesta home.
Police said the man
was backing out of the
driveway about 6:30 p.m.
Thursday when he hit
something. When he real-
ized he had hit the boy, he
yelled for family members


to call 911.
Officials said the child
was breathing and con-
scious when Tequesta Fire
Rescue paramedics took
him to the hospital.
Tequesta Fire Rescue
spokesman Dan Tilles said
the child was in stable con-
dition Thursday evening.

Murder for hire
sentence coming
CLEARWATER- A
Pinellas County judge is
scheduled to sentence a
man who pleaded no con-
test to a charge of solicita-
tion to commit murder.
Edward Graziano will be
sentenced Friday.
Prosecutors said he
tried to arrange for a hit
man to kill his wife, Debra.
Officials said Graziano
offered the man $2,100
and a pizza gift card.
Graziano is the father of
John Graziano, left perma-
nently brain damaged after
a 2007 crash where he
was a passenger of Nick
Bollea, son of wrestler
Hulk Hogan. Graziano's
lawyer said his client has
not, and won't, admit guilt.


THE WEATHER


CHANCE PARTLY -", PARTLY PARTLY i. MOSTLY
-STORMS CLOUDY CLOUDY. CLOUDY SUNNY


HI 86 LO 64- HI 3L HI4HLO62 4 HILO-?I HI LO


TEMPERATURES
High Friday
Low Friday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Friday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


*lA" ''% Daytona Beach
86/64 .' Ft. Lauderdale
Gainesville Daytona Beach Fort Myers
).88/66 89/68 Gainesville
: Ocala Jacksonville
i Orlando Cape Canaveral Key West
91/67 86/71 LakeCity
Miami
Tampa \ Naples
87/12/ 7West Palm Beach Ocala
90/72 Orlando
\*' FL Lauderdale Panama City
Ft. Myers 89/74 Pensacola
89/70 Naples Tallahassee
'85/70 Miami Tampa
KeyWest \ 9/74 Valdosta
86/76"y W. Palm Beach
6,.b''


Sunset today 8:17 p.m.
Sunrise tom. 6:37 a.m.
Sunset tom. 8:17 p.m.

MOON
Moonrise today 5:29 p.m.
Moonset today 4:12 a.m.
Moonrise tom. 6:38 p.m.
Moonset tom. 4:53 a.m.

030
May May June June
17 24 1 8
Full Last New First


On this date in
1923, a tornado cut
a path of destruc-
tion through Howard
and Mitchell
Counties in Texas.
The tornado at
times was 1.5 miles
in diameter.


* Associated Press


CA$H3


SValdosta
85/62 Jacksonville
Ik L Pitu C7/6j


861Pensacola
*83/61


Tallahassee .
86/62 ,...
Patmha City
84/65


City Sunday
Cape Canaveral 84 66,


86/64/Lt
87/74/t
87/68/pc
86/63/pc
86/63/pc
86/76/s
86/62/pc
87/73/t
86/69/pc
87/63/pc
88/65/t
78/61/s
81/63/s
83/57/s
86/69/pc
84/67/pc
87/69/t


Monday
82 66 p,:
84/63/pc
87/73/pc
87/67/pc
83/58/pc
83/58/pc
86/76/pc
84/56/pc
87/73/pc
85/67/pc
85/57/pc
86/64/pc
78/56/pc
82/56/pc
82/53/pc
84/68/pc
81/54/pc
86/70/pc


SUN
Sunrise today


6:38 a.m.


96
67
86
61
97 in 1967
48 in 1989

0.00"
0.09"
11.57"
1.02"
15.04"


10
VERY HIGM
10 iutes tob m
Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+.


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.



weather.com


j- Forecasts, data and
I V e ,graphics P 2011 Weather
w I I IV Central, LP, Madison, WIs.
weather www.weatherpubllsher.com


7a Ip 7p la 6a
Saturday Sunday







fas tenpernature "Fee like" temperature


Get RoMectel


-- ---- -----p~ III~ICCI--~gII CC.. .-~I IIP- IIIIIIP----~---lll~~


Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424


Ld
8'










Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE SATURDAY, MAY 14, 2011


Ethics Commission


OKs Scott's investments


Company being
sold by family not
covered in ruling.


By BILL KACZOR
Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE The
Florida Ethics Commission
ruled Gov. Rick Scott's
investments and his blind
trust present no prohibited
coAflicts of interest in an
advisory opinion Friday,
but it doesn't cover a com-
pany his family is in the
process of selling.
The opinion was the
first of its kind sought by a
Florida governor, said the
commission's executive
. director, Phil Claypool. It
was approved without dis-
cussion or debate.
"I'm trying to make sure
I do everything the right
way and organizing my
business investments that
way," Scott said shortly after
the panel acted. "I believe I
was doing the right thing,
but it's nice when they do
that"
The Republican gover-
nor "made his fortune in
the hospital and health care
business. Scott reported
a $218 million net worth
before last year's election
and then spent some $73
million of his own money
on his campaign.
The commission found
no conflict of interest from
Scott's holdings in four
companies and a New York-
based investment fund that
have Florida-based or regu-
lated entities. Three com-
panies are in the energy
business and one is in
waste hauling. The invest-
ment fund owns stock in
a Florida-based company
that operates cancer radia-
tion facilities.


"The governor's passive
investments in these large
national corporations and
investment fund do not cre-
ate a continuing, frequently
recurring conflict with his
public duties," Claypool
said.
The opinion drafted by
Claypool says Scott has
no control over the busi-
nesses, nor does he have
knowledge of or control
over future investments
that might be made by
advisers who manage his
trust.
Claypool said Scott's
interest in Jacksonville-
based Solantic, which
operates urgent care clin-
ics in Florida and other
states, is the governor's
most controversial hold-
ing, but it wasn't included
because of the impending
sale.
Scott gave the company
to his wife after being elect-
ed, but now they've got a
contract to sell it to minor-
ity investors.
"We're just waiting for
regulatory approval," Scott
said.
State health care agen-
cies must approve the
transfer of several licens-
es before the deal can be
closed. Scott said he hoped
that happens in the next
30 days but would not ask
Florida agencies under his
control to speed up the pro-
cess.
"I have no involvement in
these things," he said.
Also not covered is Scott's
holding through a family
investment in Illinois-based
Drives LLC, an industrial
equipment manufacturer
with less than $100,900 in
inventory and less than
$350,000 in annual sales
in Florida but none to the
state.
Companies covered


by the opinion include
Energy Transfer Equity
LP of Dallas. Scott owns
stock valued at about
$593,000 in the company
that transports and stores
natural gas. It's also one
of the nation's largest pro-
pane marketers, including
35 service locations oper-
ated in Florida by a sub-
sidiary.
Scott owns about
$130,000 worth of Houston-
based Enterprise Products
Partners LP. The company
transports natural gas and
other products through
pipelines and provides
services related to termi-
nals, offshore drilling and
other energy activities. Its
only apparent business in
Florida, though, is a tow-
boat and barge operation.
The governor's holdings
in Inery LP are valued at
$88,000.. The Kansas City,
Mo.-based company's busi-
ness includes natural gas
storage facilities and pro-
pane supply and marketing,
including 19 customer ser-
vice centers in Florida.
Scott has about $250,000
invested in Republic
Services, Inc., of Phoenix.
It's the nation's second-larg-
est provider of domestic,
non-hazardous solid waste
services. Republic oper-
ates in 40 states, including
Florida.
The governor has a 1
percent or less limited part-
nership interest in Vespar
Capital Partners V. The
fund has about $43 mil-
lion in equity capital and a
controlling interest in Fort
Myers-based Radiation
Therapy Services.


CALLS: Residents receive fake calls

Continued From Page 1A


enforcement agencies."
Seifert noted that the
Florida Sheriff's Youth
Ranches is a charity
endorsed by the Columbia
County Sheriff's Office,


and may send a packet
via mail, but would never
solicit funds during a,
phone call.
Columbia County Sheriff
Mark Hunter asks that if


anyone receives these
soliciting phone calls,.
please report it by calling
the Florida Department of
Agriculture at (800) 435-
7352.


FIRE: Continues to move south

Continued From Page 1A


one crew and a total of
243 personnel working on
containing the blaze.
Annaleasa Winter, Florida
Division of Forestry wild-
fire mitigation specialist,
said forestry workers plan
to have a prescribed burn
north of Florida Highway 2
and on Florida state lands


in the northern portion of
John Bethea State Forest to
eliminate some of the fuels
that are causing the fire to
grow.!
Motorists are urged to
be aware of the possibility
of dense smoke on all roads
near the southern part of
the swamp.


The Honey Prairie wild-
fire has continued to 'grow
since it was first ignited by
a lighting strike on April
28.
For additiofial details
about the fire, call the Fargo
Community Information
Hotline at (912) 637-5597.


wasformed.
'Target takes pride in
being a good neighbor in
the Lake City community,"
said Scott Owens, senior
manager of operations.
"Our team members are
excited to volunteer at the
CARC Group Home and
look forward to making a
positive impact."
The front yard really
needed some help, said
Martha Ann Ronsonet,
CARC founder.
"It looked overgrown
and unkempt," she siad.
"It wasn't suitible for an
entrance. Without these
wonderful young men it
wouldn't get done."
Residents came out to
observe the work and were
excited about the project,
Ronsonet siad. The yard
now includes plants, such
as Loropetalum, dwarf


yaupon and periwinkles,
and residents will tend to
them.
'They're all easy to care
for plants once they're
established," she said.
Corbitt Manufacturing
donated bags of mulch
and Ronsonet in partner-
ship with G & K Nursery,
provided flowers and
plants.
Target provided the
wood, topsoil and man-
power for the project,
Belle said.
"Our local citizens with
disabilities are finding
it harder and harder to
enjoy a rich, diverse life
as traditional funding dis-
appears," he said. "Target
is giving their time and
labor to create something
beautiful, something that
our group home residents
can enjoy everyday. We


are grateful for them."


Honoring

Those We Love!

CALL Mary or Bridget
TODAY to place an
In Memory Ad for
someone you miss!

755-5440 or
755-5441
between 8:00am & 5:00pm


Pensacola Beach returning to

normal 1 year after oil spill


By MELISSA NELSON
Associated Press

PENSACOLA BEACH
- Pensacola Beach's
famously white sands
- coated in thick crude
last year after the nation's
worst offshore oil spill
- are back to their origi-
nal color, and tourist arriv-
als outnumber what they
were before BP's blown-
out well spewed 172 mil-
lion gallons of oil into the
Gulf of Mexico.
Hotels and restaurants
that sat largely abandoned
at the height of the spill
are reporting a 50 percent
increase this spring com-
pared to the same time
last year before the disas-
ter.
"We've had visitors
from 48 states this spring.
They know our beaches'
are clean and they aren't
asking about the oil," said
W.A. "Buck" Lee, execu-
tive director of the Santa
Rosa Island Authority,
which oversees Pensacola
Beach.
Yet reminders of the
spill are everywhere in
TV ads from attorneys-
seeking to represent spill
victims, in pamphlets for
the mental health distress
hotline distributed at the
Island Authority's office,
in, the early morning
beach walks by BP crews
that scour the sand each
day and remove tar balls
that washed ashore.
Lee, who has overseen
the beach's cleanup since
the spill started, said he
wants to make sure BP
cleaning crews stay on
scene in case storms mov-
ing through the Gulf push
undersea oil or tar mats
onto the beach.
"It's not over," Lee said.
But the lifelong beach
resident said the situation
looks much better than
he thought it would last
June.
"We were covered in
oil 50 feet up all along
the shoreline. Then the
oil was covered up by
three high tides and bur-
ied before we could start
cleaning it I felt depressed
and exasperated because I


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In a March 23 photo, Pensacola Beach is seen. Pensacola
Beach's famously white sands coated in thick crude just
months ago from the nation's worst offshore oil spill are
back to their original color, and tourist arrivals outnumber
what they were before BP's blown-out well spewed 172
million gallons of oil into the Gulf of Mexico.


was staying so busy fight-
ing with BP and the politi-
cians. I knew what had
to be done, but I wasn't
sure how we would get it
done," Lee said.
Lee pushed for heavy
sand-cleaning machinery
and for permission to dig 3
feet down to ensure all the.
buried oil was thoroughly
removed before the 2011
tourism season. It seems
to have worked.
Ed Schroeder, director
of the Pensacola Bay Area
Convention and Visitors
Bureau, said hotel tax rev-
enues for the region are
up 15 percent this year.
"We did some really
effective marketing cam-
paigns and we were really
able to move the needle
on tourism. We did every-
thing we could to ... show
the day-by-day truth of the
beaches and the cleanup
and the vacation experi-
ence," he said.
Tourist Charleene"
Wilson headed out to the
white sand with her beach
chair and towel last week
for her first day of vaca-
tion. She didn't know she
was visiting Pensacola
Beach on the anniversary
of the massive spill.


"I am' expecting it to be
just as beautiful as I want
it to be. They have been
talking on the news about
it being cleaned of all the
oil."
The Grand Marlin
restaurant on Pensacola
Beach opened weeks
before the spill and strug-
gled to make it through
the summer.
"Because we are a
seafood restaurant and
because of the lost tour-
ism, we did not get close
to what our budgeted
numbers were," said Lisa
Jacobi, the banquet coor-
dinator.
But the business is doing
much better this spring.
On the menu one recent
day: Local crab claws and
fresh Florida oysters from
nearby waters.
The beach is largely the
same as it was before the
spill, Jacobi said.
"People think the oil spill
-is behind us. You cannot
really see oil unless you go
out on the beach and dig
and look for it Tourism is
up and I think business is
good except for maybe a
couple of businesses that
didn't make through the
spill," she said.


LCPD: Plate readers considered

Continued From Page 1A


assist dispatchers in
deployment of officers
or to verify citizens com-
plaints of an officer speed-
ing, Gilmore said.

The LCPD wants to
renovate its check-off room
and armory for expansion.
The current check-off
room, which is used for
roll calls and briefings
with officers, has a lot
of things happening in a
small space, she said.
'To make it a true
check-off room we ask
to expand it right behind
the armory," Gilmore
said. .
The armory would be
moved to space available
in the evidence room,


Is havi 8 baa
l3 Uay spp
thLkeCt Rpre


she said. Cost estimates
begin at $15,000 but .could
increase slightly more.

Server system.
upgrades are needed for
$77,000.
The upgrades will
enhance the efficiency and
speed of existing equip-


ment, Gilmore said.

The committee is
also seeking approval to
apply for a COPS Grant
and Secure Our Schools
Program grant for use
in areas such as funding
new positions or train-
ing.


Well, we thought you'd like something productive on
your pad to prove to your spouse that it's really a useful
tool for financial management. Well worth the invest-
ment you made to buy it. And so much more than just
a toy for playing Angry Birds.
See, you actually can do something useful with this new
technology. You can see if you've got paid yet, balance
your checkbook, pay a few bills, make a loan payment,
transfer funds to your kids away at college, and more!
Or you can just act like you're taking notes at that meet-
ing instead of updating your facebook page.
We also have old-fashioned internet banking for those
who've not yet convinced their spouse that they really
need the newest pad devices or cell phones.
.But keep in mind, if you warit
to get the red tootsie pops,
you're going to have to come
F "B visit us to get one. Peoples
State Bank. Now that's Bank-
-9 |ing!


HAND: Volunteers beautify CARC lawn

Continued From Page 1A


In Loving Memory
You served with
honor, love & pride.
You gave your all
from deep inside.
Now we go on
without you here.
But know our child
we miss you dear.
Your Family


LAKE CITY REPORTER


Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424


LOCAL & STATE SATURDAY, MAY 14,2011


:~at~











OPINION


Saturday, May 14, 201 I


AN I


AN
OPINION


Egypt's

rumors on

interfaith

marriage

Once again, rumors
of an interfaith
marriage between
a Christian (a
former one) and
a Muslim have sparked riots
in Egypt Thirteen people
were killed and two churches
set ablaze in street fight-
ing between Muslims and
Christians called Copts in
Egypt- over the weekend.
Hundreds were injured.
A human-rights expert I
'talked to said the rumors are
a pretext for Muslim funda-
mentalists to incite sectarian
strife. Interfaith marriage is
not the root cause of religious
violence, explained Dwight
Bashir, at the US Commission
on International Religious
Freedom in Washington.
Indeed, both the Coptic and
Muslim religious organizations-
in Egypt forbid interfaith mar-
riage.
Understood. But I can't stop
thinking about this bloodshed
and its connection to marriages
of mixed faiths, especially given
the trend toward interfaith
unions in the United States.
According to the 2008 US
Religious Landscape Survey
'by the Pew Forum on Religion
& Public Life, 37 percent of
American marriages mix faiths.
"American Grace," a 2010 book
by co-authors Robert Putnam.
(of "Bowling Alone" fame) and
'David Campbell puts the percent-
age at more than half. Whatever
the exact proportion, the rate of
interfaith unions in the US has
grown rapidly in the last two
decades, from about 25 percent
Many reasons figure into
this trend. The religious divide
that came as a reaction to the
free-love '60s has been replaced
by a political divide. America is
still a religious country, but it's
getting more secular, with 16
percent declaring themselves
"unaffiliated," according to Pew.
And then there's just the basic
makeup of America as a diverse
and open society: People of
different religious beliefs work
together, sit side-by-side in
school, live next door to each
other.
0 Christian Science Monitor

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman


LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,


Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
' BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


president Obama's
speech on Tuesday
signals yet another
push for desper-
ately needed reforms
of America's dysfunctional
immigration system. Yes, the
odds are long and many will
pronounce this effort dead on
arrival. Many folks also told us
that an anti-immigrant bill was
certain to pass in Florida this
year, but none passed.
Never underestimate the
power of people who believe in
the American Dream and know
immigrants enrich our country.
Arizona-style bills were intro-
duced by Florida legislators,
though these bills would have
eviscerated our tourism, agri-
cultural and international busi-
nesses. These measures, like in
other states, reflect the frustra-
tion with the lack of immigra-
tion fixes at the federal level.
While waiting for Congress to
act, it has been another brutal
year for immigrants. As our


www.lakecityreporter.com


Are we coming apart



at the seams?


n the final analysis,
Charles Murray is not
a pessimist, destitute of
hope, sad and defeated,
even though some
research he's still working on
points to a development that
could mean the end of what
"made America America."
With facts and figures
enough to make lesser men
dissolve in their trepidation, this
social scientist at the American
Enterprise Institute shows how
a sizeable bunch of us have
given up on some of the most
precious norms that got us
where we are, portending the
"unraveling", of a civic culture
in which we came "together
voluntarily to solve problems."
What we could get instead is
society divided on class lines in
basic attitudes.
His study, he explained in an
AEI talk available by video on
the Internet, focuses on non-
Hispanic whites in the prime
of life ages 30 to 49. He pays
special attention to the working
class, seen as the bottom 30
percent as determined by social
and economic criteria, and to
the upper middle class, the top
20 percent by the same criteria.
By examining whites, observers
note, he eliminates racial
discrimination as an explanatory
issue for what he finds.
Here is about a half minute's
worth of his carefully qualified,
incisive, scarily awakening
hour-and-a-half discussion that
covered the years 1960 to 2010:
We have been just about
the hardest working people
in the world, but that's fading.
The upper middle class is still


up and at 'em, with very low
unemployment, but increasing
numbers of working class men
are trying to avoid work, often
relying on girlfriends to see
them through. Even in good
economic years, when hardduck
is less a factor, the .outsof-work..
rate more than doubled after
the 1960s;.reachihn 12 percent;-
while those working part-time
also shot up dramatically.
Something like 83 percent
of the upper middle class is
getting married, almost as high
as decades back, whereas the
working class has dropped from
83 percent in 1960 to 48 percent
today. So what? Well, marriage
makes citizens of men, Murray
says; it domesticates them,
it gets them involved in their
communities more than singles,
just for starters..
A related issue is that births
by unwed mothers in the
working class was something
like 6 percent in 1960, compared
to almost half now, and as
Murray says, neither left nor
right social scientists deny how
much less a chance' children
have in life on average when
coming from a single-parent
home instead of a married-
couple, two-parent home.
There's more, such as ,


ANOTHER


the decline in working class
religious faith, and what you
fear is that a portion of the
working class is headed toward
becoming a helpless class,
alienated from the rest of
us and left out of the bounty
except through handouts,
while an upper middle class
thrives. But listen, says Murray,
who is writing a book on all
of this called "Coming Apart
at the Seams," a lot of people
have "gone broke" out of
faithlessness in "the resilience
of the American project."
Many people think the
, government is what made us
..what we are, he said, comparing
them to the rooster that
thinks it's crowing produced
the sunrise. Don't heed that
cock-a-doodle-do, for the thing
that made us exceptional and
great was the "fostering (of)
a new way for free people to
live together" so that these
people could then fix their
shortcomings, as was done
in ridding us of the great
contradiction of slavery.
This way of life, now being
abandoned by some, is "still
precious to many Americans
"determined" that it will "endure
and prevail," he said.
I think he is absolutely
right, but I think more of us
had better be as concerned as
he is.

Jay Ambrose, formerly
Washington director of editorial
policy for Scripps Howard
newspapers and the editor of
dailies in El Paso, Texas, and
Denver, is a columnist living in
Colorado.


OPINION


weak economy has encouraged
Americans to search for scape-
goats, hardworking, taxpaying
immigrants with American
spouses and U.S. born chil-
dren are being forced under-
ground. Our work at the Florida
Immigrant Advocacy Center
(FIAC) provides ample evidence
that the barrage of anti-immi-
grant practices and policies is
an assault on the fundamental
civil liberties of us all.
We must break away from
Immigration and Customs
Enforcement's (ICE) over-
whelming reliance on law
enforcement as the only solu-
tion. Secure Communities, an
ICE program launched in 2008
to target the "most dangerous
criminal aliens" has instead net-
ted a flood of non-U.S. citizens
arrested for minor offenses like
driving with an expired license.
Florida's rates of non-criminal
deportations are among the
nation's worst. In several coun-
ties, including Miami-Dade,


Broward, Palm Beach and
Orange, the percentages of
Secure Communities non-crimi-
nal deportees are double the
percent of such deportees from
Arizona's Maricopa County,
which is notorious for Sherriff
Joe Arpaio's tough-on-immi-
grants practices.
ICE's increased reliance on
local law enforcement to do immi-
gration work also damages rela-
tions between local cops and the
communities they are sworn to
protect When the bonds of trust
with police are broken, all of us,
not just immigrants, are at risk.
That's why most police chiefs,
including former Miami Chief
John Timoney, say that anti-immi-
grant laws threaten public safety.
Yet tens of thousands of
immigrants who pay taxes, have
U.S. citizen relatives, contribute
to their communities and have
lived here for years are being
detained and deported.
* Miami Herald


4A


Betsy Hart
betsysbiog.com


The village

needs to

cut down

on eating


pointing to the
fact that hav-
ing fat friends
can be, well,
contagious.
According to Arizona State
University research just pub-
lished in the American Journal
of Public Health online, the
more overweight a woman's
social circle is, the more likely
she is to be obese herself.
Interestingly, researchers
found that this may have
less to do with shared values
such as "Ifs OK to be fat"
than it does shared behav-
iors.
If this is also true for chil-
dren and young adults, and
there is no reason to think it
isn't, it's especially dangerous.
Fully one-third of American
youth are overweight or even
obese. That rate is increasing,
and these kids are likely to
grow into overweight or obese
adults, with all the attendant
health and emotional problems.
I've written before about
what I know I'm going to see
at the pool in the summer:
overweight kids scarfing their
second-and third hot dogs, or
chips or candy or all of the
abbvel '.- while their parents
don't say "no" or even "slow
down."
But I also admit that while I
used to put the blame squarely
on parents, I'm increasingly
discontented with much of our
food-focused culture. It seems
one can't go.to any youth-relat-
ed event without somebody
being asked to bring treats.
Meanwhile, the portion sizes in
restaurants are nothing short
of nuts. And the idea of vending
machines in schools deliver-
ing candy and sodas to kids is
beyond gruesome to me.
There are times when it
actually does take a village to
help raise a child. Now it may
be time for the village to help
raise awareness about weight
control.
I appreciate first lady
Michelle Obama's emphasis on
combating childhood obesity.
While I don't want the govern-
ment involved in monitoring
eating habits, I'm glad that
attention is being drawn to
this national problem. And
I'm all for getting kids outside
and exercising, which she
promotes. Sustained physical
activity is incredibly beneficial
to one's overall health, mental
well-being and so on. Feeling
good about your exercise rou-
tine may make you want to eat
better, for instance.
But studies also show that
exercise itself doesn't physical-
ly do much when it comes to
weight loss. Not only because
the calorie expenditure isn't
very high, but because you can
actually get hungrier from the
exercise.
The focus here needs to
start with consumption. For
my own kids, that begins with
simple principles like no soda
in the house ever, and when
we do go out for a meal, if we
have dessert at all, splitting
one or two at the most for all
five of us.
There's more on that list,
but my focus here is the vil-
lage. So, how about knocking
off much of the eating that
village does together? Believe
it or not, not every gathering
of two or more requires food.
* Betsy Hart hosts the "It Takes a
Parent" radio show on WYLL-AM
1160 in Chicago.


Still waiting for Congress


to act on immigration











Page EdItor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SATURDAY, MAY 14, 2011


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


* To submit your Community
Calendar item, contact Antonia
Robinson at 754-0425 or by
e-mail at arobinson@
lakecityreporter. com.


Today

CHS reunion

A class reunion for the
Columbia High School
classes of 1949-1953 is
11:30 a.m. today at Mason
City Community Center.
Anyone who attended CHS
is welcome. There will be
a covered dish lunch. Call
Julia Osburn at 752-7544
or Morris Williams at 752-
4710.

RHS alumni meeting

An RHS alumni meet-
ing is at noon today at
the Richardson Center.
Contact CJ at 752-0815.

FAM Fest

Haven Hospice's Second
Annual Fitness, Art and
Music Festival is 10 a.m.
-5 p.m. today in historic
downtown Lake City. The
day will begin with a 5K fun
run around Lake de Soto
starting at 9 a.m. and regis-
tration starts at 8 a.m. The
festival will feature local art-
ists, vendors, performances,
information booths and
more. Registration for the
5K is $35. Visit www.haven-
hospice.org and click on
"Haven Events," or contact


57


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter

Showcasing technology

Dr. Joseph Charles, an OB-GYN at the Shands LakeShore Regional Medical Center, explains
how the da Vinci Surgical System can reduce a patient's exposure during an operation com-
pared to traditional surgeries. Charles was the first doctor in Columbia County to use the
robot in two separate procedures on Monday.


Stephanie Brod at 352-271-
4665.

Riding Club meeting

The Columbia County
Riding Club meets the sec-
ond and fourth Saturday of
each month at the Columbia
County Resource Rodeo
Arena. Admission is free
for spectators. Bring your
families for a night of fun.
Fee charged for game par-
ticipation with horses. Cook
shack on sight For more
information go to www.


columbiacountyridingclub.
com. Gates open at 4:30 pm.



Farmers Market

The Lake DeSoto
Farmers Market is 8 a.m.
-noon today at Wilson
Park, 778 NE Lake DeSoto
Circle. Vendors, live music
and more will take place
at the event The mar-
ket is joining in with the
FAMFest Vendor applica-
tions and more informa-


tion is available at 719-5766
or e-mail kitej@lcfla.com.


Plant sale

Master Gardener Plant
Sale is 9 a.m.-1 p.m. today
at the Columbia County
Extension Office by the
fairgrounds. A variety
of annuals, perennials,
shrubs, houseplants and
more will be available at
reasonable prices. Master
Gardeners will also be able
to answer questions.


Tea and fashion show

The Columbia County
Women's Club is hosting
its Annual Tea and Fashion
Show 7 p.m. today. The
event is at 655 NE Martin
Luther King St Tickets are
$3 at the door. Each church
department or auxiliary is
asked to sponsor a table for
$25. Call Deanna George at
288-2368 or 755-6044.

Cake walk

FFA Booster/Alumni
is having a Cake Walk
11 a.m.-2 p.m. today at
the Lake City Mall center
court. Tickets are $1 for
each walk and space for
a chance to win a home-
made cake.


Herbs workshop

Using Herbs Workshop
is 10 a.m.-2 p.m. today
at Stephen Foster Folk
Culture Center State
Park Craft Square, White
Springs. Participants will
taste and discuss the
uses of various vinegar,
and make their own tea
bags. Participants should
bring a lunch. The cost of
the workshop is $25 and
includes park admission.


Call the park Gift Shop at
386 397-1920 or visit www.
stephenfosterCSO. org.

Spring Fling

The third annual Spring
Fling is 6 p.m. today at
the home of Jerry and
Carolyn Castagna. CARC
- Advocates for Citizens
with Disabilities, Inc.
- and Happy House will
benefit from the event
The Columbia County
Sheriffs Office will have
finger printing for kids from
3-5 p.m. prior to the event
Facepaintnig, cookies and
balloons will be available.
Tickets for the fling can
be purchased for $50. For
more information or to pur-
chase a ticket call 752-1880,
ext. 103.

Breakfast with Chief

The Lake City Police'
Department presents
"Breakfast with the
Chief' from 10-11:30 a.m.
today in the Public Safety
Training Room. The pur-
pose of this meeting is '
to address citizens' ques-
tions and concerns. Call
Audre' J. Washington,
Community Relations
Unit, at 719-5742.


OBITUARIES


Rose A Key

Rose A Key passed away on April
11. 2011. Her family would like
to invite friends to Rose's Cel-
ebration of Life
Service that will
be held on Mon-
day May .16, ,
2011 at 9 AM -.=
at American Legion, Post 57,
Lake City, Florida. Her intern-
ment will be at the Jacksonville
Veteran's Cemetery the same
day at 1:00pm with full mili-
tary honor. The Patriot Guard
will ..be present ,for. her service -
Rose was born in 1934 in Ten-
nessee and went into the United,
States Air Force after her gradu-
ation in 1952-1954. While in
the military she met and mar-
ried Kenneth A. Key of Key
West Florida. They had four
children Donna Gail (passed),
Deborah Ann, Virginia Eliza-
beth and Kenneth Key Jr. She
also had six grandchildren.
Rose travelled all over the world
during her lifetime with her fam-
ily; Newfoundland, Maine, Kan-
sas, Florida, Hawaii, Copenha-
gen, Kuwait, Iran and Italy. She
also did a lot of charity work for
the veterans and child welfare
programs through the American
Legion. She held the follow-
ing offices in the American Le-
gion Post 200, Ft Walton Beach


and Post 57, Lake City Florida.
President of Auxiliary Post 200
Started Junior Auxiliary and
Son's of the Legion at Post 200
The Junior Auxiliary and
Son's were in many pa-
rades and veterans programs.
Rose was the Legion
Historian for Post 57
She was Auxiliary Chaplain,
Americanism Chairman and
Children and Youth Post 57
Rose was the American Legion
Auxiliary's Department Ameri-
canism Chairman one year.


Monica D. Lee

Ms. Monica D. Lee
God never hurts His children,
He shields them from pain. I
could not stay
longer for the
pain would re-
main. I was a
gift from God,
sent to shine
blessings with
all my might.
Now God has
called me home and everything
is alright. Monica Denice Lee,
32 of Tallahassee, Florida re-
ceived a call from God on May
4, 2011, following an extended
illness. She was a well rounded
and loved person known to all.
Monica was born in Lake City,


Florida. She was a graduate of
Columbia High School, class
of 1997 and went on to also be-
come an alumnus of Tallahassee
Community College and Florida
State University. Her passion for
helping others led her to ,a job
at Department of Children and
Families (South wood). She was
a faithful member ofA.L.A.R.M.
International Church ofTallahas-
see FL. She will forever remain
in the hearts of her loving moth-
er Lula Fead (J.C) of Greenville,
FL; father Ernest Lee of Orlando,
FL; sister Charonda Lee, brother
Eric Lee; niece A'nessa Fluellen;
nephew A'terian Clark; great
nephew A'monte Fluellen; un-
cles Odell Jones (Barbara); An-
drew Jones (Pearl) of Lake City,
FL; Randolph Jones (Barbara)
of Killeen, TX; Roy Weaver of
Syracuse, NY; aunts Cora Boul-
ware (Willie) of Warner Robins,
GA; Corrine Ross of Columbus,
OH; Special Cousins; Crystal
Bradley (Wilbur); Brett Jones
(Shalanda); Marie Jones-Stewart
(Hugh); Andrew Jones Jr.; co-
workers, friends and loved ones.
In lieu of floral arrange-
ments, the family is request-
ing that donations be made to
the American Cancer Society.
Funeral services for Ms. Monica
D. Lee will be held on Satur-
day, May 14, 2011, at 11:00 AM
at Shiloh Missionary Baptist


Church in Greenville, Florida,
Moderator J.B. Duval, Pastor.
Public visitation will be held
at the church on Friday May
13, 2011 from 6-8:00 PM. Fu-
neral arrangements entrusted to
TRINITY FUNERAL HOME,
Inc. 1159 W US Highway 98,
Perry, Florida, (850) 584-9620,
Anthony White, Licensed Fu-
neral Director/Embalmer.


Rory M. Swearengin

Mrs. Rory M. Swearengin, 60,
of Lake City passed away peace-
fully on Friday, May 13, 2011 in
the Avalon Nursing and Rehab
Center following an extended
illness. A native of Olney, Illi-
nois, Mrs. Swearengin had been
a resident of Lake City most
of her life. She was a member
of the 1968 graduating class of
Columbia High School. Prior
to Multiple Sclerosis stealing
her health, Mrs. Swearengin
was a homemaker, a waitress
and she loved to crochet. She
was preceded in death by her
son, Walter Travis Swearengin
and her mother Daisy Myers.
Mrs. Swearengin is survived
by her father, Morris Myers
of Lake City; her sisters, Gin-
ger McClain of Lake City and
Cherry Butler of McComb,
Mississippi and her brother,


Wayne Myers of Lake City.
Graveside funeral services
for Mrs. Swearengin will be
conducted at 10:00 A.M. on
Wednesday, May 18, 2011 in
* the Falling Creek Cemetery with
Rev. Cagney Tanner officiating.
Interment will follow. There
will be no visitation. Arrange-
ments are under the direction
of the DEES-PARRISH FAM-
ILY FUNERAL HOME, 458
S. Marion Ave., Lake City, FL
32025 (386)752-1234 please sign
our on-line family guestbook at
w w w. p a r r i s hf a m i -
lyfuneralhomee. co m


Edna A. Yoder

Mrs. Edna A. Yoder, 89, of Lake
City, passed away peacefully
late Thursday evening, May -12,
2011 in the Haven Hospice of
the Suwannee Valley Care Cen-
ter. A native of Randolph Coun-
ty, Indiana, Mrs. Yoder moved to
Lake City in 1973 with her fam-
ily from Richardson, Indiana.
She was a cosmetologist and
homemaker. In her spare time
she enjoyed quilting, crafts and
flower gardening but her favor-
ite time was that spent with her
grandchildren. Mrs. Yoder was a
member of the Tabernacle Bap-
tist Church. She was preceded
in death in 2001 by her husband


of sixty years, Ronald Yoder.'
Mrs. Yoder is survived by her
three daughters, Nancy Bran-
don and Bonnie Yoder both of
Lake City and Debbie Reck-
ers of Richmond, Indiana; and
her five grandchildren; Matt
Brandon, Scott Brandon, and
Kelly Lanpier all of Lake City;
Amanda Corwin of Richmood,
Virginia and Kim Drook of
Richmond, Indiana. Eight great-
grandchildren, numerous nieces,
nephews and other family mem-
bers and friends also survive.
Funeral services for Mrs. Yoder
, will- .be conducted abl4400 AM.
on Monday, May 16, 2011.in the
-Tabernacle.Baptist Church with
Pastor Mike Norman officiating.
Interment will follow in Forest
Lawn Memorial Gardens. The
family will receive friends for
one hour prior to the service
at the church. Arrangements
are under the direction of the
DEES-PARRISH FAMILY
FUNERAL HOME, 458 S.
Marion Ave., Lake City, FL
.32025 (386)752-1234 please sign
our on-line family guestbook at
www. parrishfami-
1 y funeralhome com

Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


RONNIE BRANNON
TAX COLLECTOR
Pursuant to Florida Statute 197.402(2)all unpaid 2010
Personal Property taxes became delinquent on April
1,2011. These unpaid taxes are accruing interest
at a rate of 18 percent per year. If the amounts set
opposite of same are not paid before May 31,2011
warrants will be issued thereon and the Tax Collector
will apply to the Circuit Court for an Order directing
levy upon and seizure of the personal property of
the taxpayer for the unpaid taxes. The list of unpaid
personal property for Columbia County is as follows

1 P00064-000 304.74
SUNPLEX REALTY CORP
RE/MAX PROFESSIONALS
605 CRESCENT EXECUTIVE CT
STE 336
LAKE MARY FL 32746
2 P00094-000 163.45
OAKS N PINES INC
C/O JAMES T & CHERRI CRAMER
3864 NORTH US HWY 441
LAKE CITY FL 32055
3 P00096-150 14.33
AARON SIMQUE HOMES INC
C/O AARON SIMQUE
313 SW NIGHTSHADE DRIVE
LAKE CITY FL 32024
4 P00173-600 281.13
A HAIR DUET
363 SW BAYA DR STE 105
LAKE CITY FL 32025
5 P00208-602 1,411.55
S B A TOWERS II LLC
5900 BROKEN SOUND PARKWAY NW
ATTN TAX DEPT
BOCA RATON FL 33487
6 P00214-002 562.49
LEAF FINANCIAL CORP
2005 MARKET STREET
15TH FLOOR
PHILADELPHIA PA 19103

7 P00670-000 497.94
BAILEY, BISHOP & LANE INC
C/O ROBERT BISHOP JR
POST OFFICE BOX 3717
LAKE CITY FL 32025

8 P01385-350 1,324.06
BORDEAUX CABINETS INC
C/O STEVE BORDEAUX
2698 S MARION AVE
LAKE CITY FL 32025

9 P01436-100 243.11
LAKE CITY INDUSTRIAL TOOL
RENTAL INC
POST OFFICE BOX 3357
LAKE CITY FL 32056


10 P01580-050
SAHARA INN
14113 S US HWY 441
C/O KUSH PAHAK
LAKE CITY FL 32024


708.17


11 P01901-000 120.53
CABLEVIEW COMMUNICATIONS
OF JACKSON
12058 SAN JOSE BLVD STE 804
JACKSONVILLE FL 32223
12 P02131-002 1,703.48
AT @ T MOBILITY LLC
ATTENTION PROPERTY TAX DEPT
POST OFFICE BOX 97061
REDMOND WA 98073
13 P02200-000 116.49
CHARLES PEELER LAND CLEARING
2054 SW DAIRY STREET
LAKE CITY FL 32024
14 P02880-000 62.91
COMBS FUNERAL HOME
POST OFFICE BOX 218
LAKE CITY FL 32056
15 P03500-000 1,995.39
CYPRESS INN
C/O B J NAGAR
2987 US HIGHWAY 90 WEST
LAKE CITY FL 32055
16 P03791-001 120.53
DENNARD MASONRY LLC
C/O JOSHUA DENNARD
130 SE RACHEL WAY #102
LAKE CITY FL 32025
17 P04080-100 63.83
DIXON MICHAEL R
676 SW HOMESTEAD CIRCLE
FT WHITE FL 32038
18 P04425-000 98.32
EAST COAST CONSTRUCTION LLC
1357 SE BAYADR
LAKE CITY FL 32025
19 P04645-000 221.94
ELITE AUTO REPAIR &
TIRE CENTER LLC
1357 SE BAYA DR
LAKE CITY FL 32025
20 P04793-100 65.10
EVERY REALTORS FRIEND
C/O GLENNA SMITH
218 SW DANA GLN
LAKE CITY FL 32038
21 P05965-010 675.06
JASMINE GARDEN INN
C/O JOHN PAULSON
352 NW KNIGHTS AVE
LAKE CITY FL 32055
22 P06330-050 1,287.54
R H LAKE CITY INC
133 SW WEBBS GLEN
LAKE CITY FL 32055


23 P06435-000 65.10
HALF BAKED T'S
C/O DWAYNE WOODRUFF
215 SW SKINNER GLN
LAKE CITY FL 32024
24 P06770-500 1,288.52
LAKE CITY MGT LLC
240 EAGLE ESTATES DR
DEBARY FL 32713
25 P06820-000 119.26
HENRY SAPP SALVAGE
1917 E DUVAL ST
LAKE CITY FL 32055
26 P07132-000 89.16
HOPKINS MCFARLANE RENTALS
C/O EVELYN WILLIS
1339 SW INGLEWOOD AVE
LAKE CITY FL 32025
27 P07615-205 1,586.26
COLUMBIA CYCLES
580 SW FLORIDA GATEWAY BLVD
LAKE CITY FL 32024
28 P07942-000 216.53
SHIRLEY'S RESTAURANT
C/O TRAMEL WASDEN
746 E DUVAL STREET
LAKE CITY FL 32025
29 P08530-000 1,499.77
SEAN EXPRESS
10202 NW 136 DRIVE
ALACHUA FL 32615
30P09120-000 65.10
LEARY FLOOR COVERING
INSTALLATION LLC
219 SW CHURCHILL WAY
LAKE CITY FL 32025
31 P09320-600 381.27
LEWIS TREE SERVICE INC
2397 SW TUSTENUGGEE AVE
LAKE CITY FL 32025
32 P09500-000 31.53
LOLLIPOP NURSERY
369 NE FRONIE ST
LAKE CITY FL 32055
33 P09850-000 90.17
MARION ST CAFE
279 N MARION AVE
LAKE CITY FL 32055

34 P10134-000 8,546.58
MCALISTER'S #1314
HORNED FROG DELI
2847 S INGRAM MILL RD STE C101
SPRINGFIELD MO 65804

35 P10485-000 6,822.59
PANDA-MONI-YUM
OF LAKE CITY LLC
PO BOX 719
FORT WHITE FL 32038


36 P10536-700
MICKLER TRUCKING
C/O MAURICE MICKLER
434 SE WALDRON TER
LAKE CITY FL 32025


31.79


37 P10830-000 120.53
MORGAN'S TREE TRIMMING &
LAWN MAINTANCE
342 NW PATRIOT CT
LAKE CITY FL 32055
38 P11050-500 281.17
NATIONAL DREDGING SERVICE INC
C/O MICHAEL ROBERTS SR
POST OFFICE BOX 609
LAKE CITY FL 32056
39 P11384-000 77.83
NORTH FLORIDA DIVORCE &
MEDIATION SERVICES
972 SW BAYA DR
LAKE CITY FL 32025
40 P12153-003 2,122.02
PHISH-HEADS INC
C/O TONI S CRENSHAW
1445 SW MAIN BLVD
SUITE# 170
LAKE CITY FL 32025
41 P12156-000 46,908.15
PHYSICIANS IMAGING
LAKE CITY LLC
PO BOX 2908
KEY WEST FL 33045
42 P12625-000 162.81
QUALITY REPAIR OF LC INC
C/O POLO SOTRES
736 S MARION AVE
LAKE CITY FL 32025
43 P12661-125 204.99
R & H FARMS INC
C/O FORD BREWER
POST OFFICE BOX 393
LAKE CITY FL 32056
44 P13190-000 2,229.53
KNIGHTS INN
RKG LLC
117 NW KNIGHTS AVE
LAKE CITY FL 32055
45 P13223-000 32.07
RON E BIAS WELL DRILLING
1114 SW TROY ST
LAKE CITY FL 32024
46 P13663-135 22.56
SEQUENCE MANAGEMENT INC
C/O MIKE LINEMAN
POST OFFICE BOX 2881
LAKE CITY FL 32056

47 P13791-000 120.53
SHONE'S LAWN SERVICE
C/O SHONE NASH
201 SW EMERALD WAY
LAKE CITY FL 32024


48 P13791-500
SHOW-N-TELL SIGNS INC
C/O ROBERT JAMMER
POST OFFICE BOX 961
FORT WHITE FL 32038


23.73


49 P13810-100 7,557.09
SPEEDY SIGNS.COM
C/O LAURA & SHANE WILLEMS
162 SW SPENCER COURT
LAKE CITY FL 32024
50 P14722-100 234.58
HENDRIX SMITH & KIRBY LLC
152 SE DEFENDER DRIVE
LAKE CITY FL 32025
51 P14892-000 136.21
SYMOGRAPHY INC
5623 US 19 STE 110
NEW PORT RICHEY FL 34652
52 P15117-100 35.62
THE ALABASTER BOX
341 N MARION AVE
LAKE CITY FL 32055
_--_-_--- -_------_
53 P15118-001 144.75
EARTH TURF & WOOD LANDSCAPING
PO BOX 7421
LAKE CITY FL 32056
--- ---------------- -----
54 P15310-100 39.83
PERRY ST RENTALS
C/O LOWER LOWNDES INC
PO BOX 3243
VALDOSTAGA 31604
55 P15707-100 16,415.84
UNITED OUTDOOR MEDIA LLC
C/O SCOTT STEWART
POST OFFICE BOX 3566
LAKE CITY FL 32056
56 P16020-000 92.73
WATERS LOGGING &
TREE SERVICE LLC
538 SE DEER ST
LAKE CITY FL 32025
57 P16225-000 31.79
WEDDLE CONSTRUCTION CO
C/O THOMAS EUGENE WEDDLE
503 SW TRENTON TERACE
FORT WHITE FL 32038
58 P16500-000 1,648.63
WILLBOW ENTERPRISES LLC
4114 WEST US HIGHWAY 90
LAKE CITY FL 32024




Tax Roll

Available Online
www.lakecityreporter.com


-


Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424


*-.
. .


LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SATURDAY, MAY 14, 2011


lot










FAITH


Saturday, May 14, 201 I v


&


VALUES


vww.lakecityreporter.com


HEART MATTERS


Angie Land
angielond3@windstream.net

Shine the

light in

your home
n the last few years,
Mother's Day has
become one of those
emotional, cry-at-the-
drop-of-the-hat holidays
for me. I have heard that
the older we get, the more
tenderhearted we become. I
think it's because the more
we live, the more our hearts
get tenderized. That said, I'm
thinking of volunteering this
year for the poster child of
that concept.
I sat on my front porch early
on Mother's Day morning
thinking of what motherhood
has brought into my life this
year ... one son moving away
to college, my daughter turn-
ing 16 and getting a job and a
driver's license, my oldest son
preparing to marry, and add-
ing a new daughter to our fam-
ily through adoption. I think I
need a nap just thinking about
it all at once. Or maybe just a
good cry. Because while each
of these things are worthy of
celebration, they also repre-
sent some mighty big changes
for our family... and change is
hard on the heart
As I was thinking on all
these things, the Lord directed
me to a familiar scripture in
Matthew 5:14-15:
"You are the light of the
world. A city on a hill cannot
be hidden. Neither do people
light a lamp-and put it under
a bowl. Instead they put it on
its stand, and it gives light to
everyone in the house."
I memorized this portion of
Jesus', Sermon on the Mount
years ago, but I noticed two
things for the very first time.
One, the fact that He started
the explanation about an
entire city and ended it with
only those in the house, and
two, the light He specifically
refers to is a lamp. I think
that we can often get so
overwhelmed with all that
is wrong in the world and
wonder how we can impact
our "city" and our commu-
nity; while all the time we
are called first to shine our
light in our own house to
everyone in the house: our
parents, our spouse, our
children and their friends,
extended family, friends and
guests. We should consider
that our community is made
up of these very people. As
a mom, I asked God to help
me put my light on its stand
in my home and not grow
complacent in my treatment
of those closest to me ... no
matter what changes we face.
Now for the lamps. Our
culture is so different than that
of Jesus' day. Obviously, they
didn't have the convenience of
electricity, so perhaps we pic-
ture their lamps like we might
light a candle. The difference
is that candles are self-suf-
ficient and they burn up ...
and burn out. These lamps, on
the other hand, relied on oil to
burn and had to be continually
refilled. Throughout scripture,
oil represents the working of
the Holy Spirit to fuel (and
refuel) us. It is good news that
we were never intended to be
self-sufficient, but to depend
on God to supply the energy
and resources we need to be
light in a dark world, and in
our own house.
* Heart Matters is a weekly
column written by Angie Land,
director of the Family Life
Ministries of the Lafayette
Baptist Association, where she
teaches bible studies, leads
marriage and family conferenc-
es, and offers biblical counsel-
ing to individuals, couples and
families.


Dalai Lama headlines peace summit


By SAMANTHA HENRY
Associated Press
NEWARK The Dalai Lama
brought his message of peace
Thursday to a U.S. city wracked
by violence; saying one tool
Americans can use toward social
well-being is addressing the gap
between rich and poor.
The Tibetan Buddhist spiritual
leader made the remarks on a
visit to New Jersey's largest city
to kick off a three-day event pro-
moting nonviolence.
"I always say: it's not only moral-
ly wrong, but practically," the Dalai
Lama said, referring to economic
disparities between rich and poor
in America and throughout the
world. "You cannot say: 'Oh, God
created this' or 'its due to karma.'
We must make an effort"
The Dalai Lama will be key-
note speaker at the Newark
Peace Education Summit, which
runs Friday through Sunday in
the city's downtown. The summit
will feature panel discussions by
international peace activists, and
local community leaders.
Now 75, the Dalai Lama fled
into exile in 1959 into northern
India, where he is still' based.
China has occupied Tibet since
1950, and claims the region has
been part of its territory for cen-
turies, although many Tibetans,
who are linguistically and ethni-
cally distinct, say they were effec-
tively independent
The Dalai Lama reiterated
Thursday that he's pushing for
a high degree of autonomy for
Tibetans under Chinese rule, not
a total separation from China.
He's set to turn over his politi-
cal leadership to a newly elected
prime minister of Tibet's gov-
ernment-in-exile by the end of
May. He said a group of Tibetan
leaders has yet to name his spiri-
tual successor, but added with a


ASSOCIATED PRESS


The Dalai Lama, right, and Robert Thurman, founder of Tibet House in New York City, are seen during a news confer-
ence that kicked off a three-day peace and education summit, Thursday in Newark, N.J. The summit will feature Nobel
Peace Prize winners Shirin Ebadi and Jody Williams, among other speakers who focus on peacemaking practices.


laugh: "If you look at my face, do
you think succession is urgent?"
The Dalai Lama has been on
a multi-state tour of the United
States, but organizers of the
Newark peace summit said it was
important to him to include a
place like Newark on his tour,
a city of 280,000 residents- that
has been struggling to reverse-
decades of violence.
When asked how the mes-
sages of the summit which
will include panel discussions by
Nobel laureates and celebrities
including Goldie Hawn will
reach young people in Newark
struggling to find their way in
violence-plagued neighborhoods,
the Dalai Lama said that violence
- especially among the young
- is an acting out of extreme
frustration.
"At age 16, I lost my freedom..


At age 24, I lost my own country,
there's a lot of difficulties there,
there are sufficient causes to be
angry," he said. "But (it's) no use.
Too much anger spoils, destroys
(one's) own life, and anger won't
solve the problem."
The Dalai Lama said young
people must learn a new, non-
violent way of expressing their
frustrations, one that involves
improving their own physical,
environmental, emotional and
spiritual well;being, regardless of
their religion or background.
The conference was organized
by Robert Thurman, U.S. co-
founder of the Tibet House in
New York, and billboard com-
pany owner Drew Katz, a philan-
thropist who has made significant
contributions to Newark's anti-
crime efforts.
Thurman said they didn't


expect the conference to trans-
form Newark overnight, but
hoped it would give community
leaders, young people, educa-
tors and other participants tools
to take back to their commutii-
ties and help young people learn
more effective ways of "control-
ling the gut reactions that lead to
violence."
He said naysayers may think the
conference won't reach many in
Newark but they should note that
the Tibetan struggle has continued
for more than 50 years amid simi-
larly dismissive comments.
"People do say: 'Oh gee, what
good has it done the Tibetans?"'
he said, referring to the Dalai
Lama's commitment to nonvio-
lence. "But the answer to that
is: What good has it done any of
the people who have been doing
violence for 50 years?"


CHURCH NOTES


Today
Tent revival
The North Florida Crusade
for Christ Tent Revival begins 7
p.m. May 14 -17 at the Columbia
County Fairgrounds. A youth
revival is Saturday. Call 904-338-
4786 for information and direc-
tions.

Sunday
Recognition Day
Law Enforcement and
Government Recognition Day is
11 a.m. Sunday at Bethel AME
Church. The church is located at
CR 242 A. The speaker Wendell
Johnson, city manager. Call Sam
Honer at 697-1395.

Hat Day
A Hat Day service is 3 p.m.
Sunday at Union A.M.E. Church.


LaKisha Mills of New Day
Springs Missionary Baptist
Church is the speaker. Come
wearing a hat.

Tuesday
Support group
Greater Visions Support
Group hosts a faith-based
addictions support group
at 7 p.m. every Tuesday at
Christ Central Church on
Sister's Welcome Road and
9:30 a.m. every Thursday at
the Suwannee Coalition office
on North Ohio Avenue in Live
Oak. The group provides spiri-
tual and emotional support in
a non-judgmental setting. Call
208-1345.

Thursday
Conference and concert
Judah III Believe in God


Conference and Concert is 7:30
p.m. May 19-20 and 6 p.m.
May 21 at Miracle Tabernacle
Church. Guest speakers are
Prophet Gregory Hawthorne
Sr. of Lake Wales and Dr. Eric
Mason of Savannah, Ga. The
church is located at 1190 SW
Sister's Welcome Road.

Revival service
An Old Time Revival ser-
vice is 7:30 p.m. May 19-21
at The Church of Faith and
Deliverance Through Christ
Inc. Prophetess Jennifer
Long of Conquering Gospel
Ministries in Jacksonville is the
speaker. The church is located
at 379 NW Long St. Contact
Pastor Minnie Williams Gomes
at 466-1070 or 758-1886.

Bible Study
The community is invited to
a weekly Bible study 10:30-


11:30 a.m. Thursday at the
First Presbyterian Church in
the Education Building in room
106. The study is on the book
of Daniel and includes records
of his actions, prophecies and
visions of things now, and
things to come. Dr. Roy Martin:
teaches the study. The study is!
free of charge and open to the
community. Call the office at
752-0670 for additional informa-
tion.

English and literacy classes
Free English speaking
and literacy classes provided
by Columbia County School
District's Career and Adult
Education Program is from
5:30-8 p.m. every Thursday
at Unity of God Ministries,
Inc. in Wellborn. Activities
for children will be provided.
Call 755-8190. The church is
located at 12270 County Road
137.


Revelation, The Revealing of Jesus Christ


Blessed is he who
reads and those who
hear the words of this
prophecy, and keep
those things which are
written in it; for the time is near
(Rev. 1:3 NKJ).
"Behold, I am coming quickly!
Blessed is he who keeps the
words of the prophecy of this
book (Rev. 22:7 NKJ)."
These days we live in are full
of confusion about the Bible. It's
no wonder with all the different
denomination and religions out
there, but those who prayerfully
seek the knowledge and study (II
Tim 2:15), The Holy Spirit, the
only true teacher will open the
eyes of their understanding and
show them what they need to
know.
Much talk these days is about
the end times and judgment day
and many are looking into the
Book of Revelation. Many are
saying "it's too hard," that "it's not


BIBLE STUDIES


Hugh Sherrill Jr.
ems-hugh43@comcast.net
meant to be understood," that "it's
too depressing," and that "its all
signs and symbols". The truth
is that it is one of the most easily
understood books in the Bible;
after all it is The Revelation of
Jesus Christ (Rev 1:1-A). It is the
revealing or unveiling of our Lord
and Savior.
The author of the book is none
other than Jesus (Rev. 22:16),
although John penned it. God
intended that the book should be
studied by His people and prom-
ised a blessing for those who do


(Rev. 1:3). It is not a sealed book
but one which is open and easy to
understand (Rev. 22:10).
A simple outline to be used
when studying the Book of
Revelation is as follows: I An
introduction to the Author and
object of the book, Jesus Christ
Hihiself (Rev. 1); II- The History
of the professing church (Rev. 2 &
3); the seven churches represent-
ing the course of Christendom's
history from Pentecost to the
Rapture; III The Translation of
the Body of Christ (Rev. 4:1-3), the
true Church within the profess-
ing Church; IV The Church
in Heaven (Rev 4:3-11); V The
Seven Sealed Book (Rev. 5), the
key to Revelation; VI The first
half of the Tribulation Period (Rev.
6-10), corresponds to the first half
of Daniel's Seventieth Week; VII
- Paienthetical Portion (Rev.
11,12,13), an introduction to the
chief participants in the last half of
the Tribulation period; VIII The


Great Tribulation (Rev 14-19:22),
last half of Daniel's Seventieth
Week; IX The Second Coming
of Christ (Rev 19:11-12); X The
Millennium (Rev 20), the binding
of Satan and the first resurrection;
XI The Final Judgment (Rev
20:11-15); XII Eternity (Rev
21-22).
I believe we are the Laodicea
Church (Rev 3:14-22); it presents a
perfect picture of today's church;
a church that sees itself as in good
standing (rich) with God, yet
does not realize that according to
God's own word, it is not It is the
church that literally makes our
Savior sick. More than any other
time in the history of the church
revival is needed. The Tent
Crusade May 15-17 could be a
step in the right direction. Hope
to see you there.
* Hugh G. Sherrill is a preacher in
Lake City available for pulpit supply
and revivals.


6A


- I g I








LAKE CITY REPORTER


ADVERTISEMENT


SATURDAY, MAY 14, 2011


North Florida
Pharmacy
i" 7 Locations to Serve You
' Lake City, Ft. White, Branford,
Chiefland, Mayo & Keystone Heights

- .
F\ a ,


"W oe tovibi^ on _Jir.- t ond J ntz. -y-.l


e To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440



Supercenter
"LOWPRICESEVERYDAY"


GW


Hunter, Inc.
Chevron Oil
Jobber


H llyI ectric, O Inc.
,"Quality ork at a reasonable price"
We also do solar hook-ups
(386) 755-5944


FOOD STORES
Open 7 Days a Week
1036 E. Duval St., Lake City FL.
(386) 752-0067
Fresh Meat, Fresh Produce!
"I can do all things through Chrisi which strengtlhcnclh me"
l. 1ilippi- 4-1"3

To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440

To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440


RISK'S CRANE SERVICE
Located at 25A .*-
(Old Valdosta Hwy) jI.
386-752-5696 or
386-867-2035
after hours

To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440


First Advent Christian
1881iSW McFarlane Ave.
386-752-3900
Sunday School: 9:45AM
Sunday Service: 11:00AM
Wednesday Service: 7:00PM

GLAD TIDINGS ASSEMBLY OF GOD
993 NW Lake Jeffery Road
386-752-0620
Sunday Worship 10:30AM & 6PM
Wed. Fam. Bible Study 7:00PM
"A church where JESUS is Real"

BEREA BAPTIST CHURCH
SR47 S* 755-0900
Sunday School 9:30AM
Sunday Worship 10:45AM & 6PM
Wednesday Eve. Service 7PM
Interim Pastor: Kenneth Edenfield
I EASTSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
196 SE James Ave. 386-752-2860
Sun. Bible Study 9:45AM
Sun. Worship 11AM & 6PM.
Wed. Prayer Mtg/Bible Study 6PM
Rev. Brandon G. Witt

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Sunday Bible Study 9:15AM
Sunday Worship 10:30AM & 6:00PM
Wed. 6:00PM Prayer Service, &
Children Ministry 6:15PM
Downtown Lake City 752-5422
Rev. Stephen Ahrens, Pastor
OLIVETMISSIONARYBAPTIST CHURCH
541 N.E. DavisStreet
(386) 752-1990
RonaldV.Walters, Pastor
Sunday School 9:45AM
Sunday Morning Worship 11:00AM
Wed. Mid-Week Worship 6:00PM
"In God's Word, Will & Way",

PINE GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH
1989 N US HIwy 441
386-752-2664
Sunday Bible Study 9:45AM
Sunday Worship 11AM & 6PM
Wed. Kids &Youth Ministry 6:30PM
Pastor: Ron Thompson

SALEM PRIMITIVE BAPTIST
Sunday Services 10:30 AM
Pastor: Elder Herman Griffin
752-4198
SOUTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
388 S.E.Baya Drive* 755-5553
Sunday:
Bible Study 9:15AM
Morning Worship 10:30AM
EveningWorship 6:15PM
Wednesday:
AWANA 5:45PM
Prayer & Bible Study 6:15 PM
TABERNACLE BAPTIST CHURCH
(Independent Baptist)
144 SE MontroseAve. 752-4274
Sunday School 10 AM
Sun. Morn. Worship 11 AM
Sunday Eve. 6PM
Wed. Prayer Meeting 7:30 PM
Pastor: Mike Norman

EPIPHANY CATHOLIC CHURCH
1905 SW Epiphany Court 752-4470
Saturday Vigil Mass 5:00 PM
Sunday Mass 8:15 AM, 10:30 AM,
5:00 PM (Spanish/English)
Sunday School/Religious Education
9:00 AM-10:15 AM


is-i


B est friends
share their

innermost secrets

and feelings, their

wishes and dreams

for the future. They

can also share their


CHRISTIAN SCIENCE SOCIETY
239 SE Baya Ave.
SundayService 11:00AM
Wednesday Evqning Service 7:30 PM
LAKE CITY CHRISTIAN CHURCH
Hwy 247 S.. *755-9436


Sunday School
Sun. Morn. Worship
Wed. Prayer Meeting


9:30 AM
10:30AM
7PM


NEW HORIZON
Church of Christ
Directions & Times 386-623-7438
Jack Exum,Jr., Minister

LAKE CITY CHURCH OF GOD
167 Ermine St. *752-5965
Sunday School 9:45AM
Sun, Worship 10:30AM & 6:00PM
Wed. Family Night 7PM
Wed. Youth Service 7PM
Pastor: Carroll Lee
EVANGEL CHURCH OF GOD
370 SW Monitor Glen 755-1939
Sunday School 9:45 AM
SundayWorship 10:50 & 6:30
Wed. Spiritual Enrichment 7PM
"Shock Youth Church"
Boys and Girls Clubs
Bible Study
Pastor: John R. Hathaway

ST. JAMES EPISCOPAL CHURCH
2423 SW Bascom Norris Dr., Lake
City, Fl32025- 386-752-2218
Email: stamesepis330@bellseuth,net
Holy Eucharist
Sun. 8 & 10AM
Wednesday: 5:15pm
Priest: The Rev. Michael Armstrong
Deacon: The Rev. limmie Hunsinger
Director of Music Dr. Alfonso Levy "

OUR REDEEMER LUTHERAN CHURCH
LCMS
11/2 miles S. of 1-75 on SR 47
S755-4299
Sunday Services 9:30AM
(Nursery Provided)
Christian Education Hour
For all ages at 10:45AM
Pastor: Rev. Bruce Alkire
SPIRIT OF CHRIST LUTHERAN
Hwy 90,1.5 miles West of 1-75 752-3807
Sunday Worship 10:00AM
Nursery Avail.
Wed. Pot Luck 6PM Worship 7PM
Vicar John David Bryant


BETHEL UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
4869 US 441 South
Sunday Worship Services,
Traditional Services 8:30 & 11:00AM
386-755-1353
mybethelumc.com
First United Methodist Church
973 S, Marion Ave.
386-752-4488
.Sunday School 9:45AM
Sunday Morning Worship
Casual Worship Service 8:50AM
Traditional Service 11:00AM
Program opportunities available in all
areas for all ages.
For a complete.schedule
contact church office at
752-4488


ar-' .





odI


WESLEY MEMORIAL UNITED
1272 SW McFarlane 752-3513
(Adjacent to Summers School)
Worship 8:00 & 10:00AM
Sunday School 9:00AM
Nursery provided
Praise & Worship 6:00PM
AWANA-Wednesdays 5:00PM
Pastor: The Rev. 1. Louie Mabrey
www.wesleymem.com
WATERTOWN CONGREGATIONAL
METHODIST CHURCH
U.S. 90 E. turn on Cortez (next to Quality
Ind.) right on Okinawa.
Sunday School 9:45 AM
Sun. Worship 11AM&6PM
Wed. Night Service 7PM
Pastor, Randy Ogbum


LAKE CITY CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE
Services:
Sunday School 9:45AM
SundayWorship Ifl:45AM
Wednesday 6 30PM
Adult, Youth Ministry, Children's Mimstry
Pastor: Craig Henderson
Nursery Provided
SWSR47 and.Azalea Paik Place

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
629 SW Baya Drive 752.0671)
Sunday Contemporary 9:00AM
Sunday School 10.00AM
Traditional Service 11 00 AM
NURSERYPROINVED
Paiior. Dr Ro0 A. Marmn
Director of Muiic: Bill Pophn

FIRST FULL GOSPEL CHURCH
NE ones Way & NE Washingion SLt.
Sunday School 10.00 AM
Morning Worship 11:00 AM
Emngelislic Seice 6 U0 PM
Youth Service Wednesday 7:00PM
Mid-week Service Wednesday 7.00 PM
For info call 755 3408* Everyone Welcome
Pastor. Rev. StanEtFis


CHRIST CENTRAL MINISTRIES
Leadership Servicea 9.UOAM
Sunday Morning 11:00AM
Wednesday Service 7:00PM
217 Dyal Ave., from Hwy 90 take
SistersWelcome Rd., go 5 miles, South,
church on left. 755-2525.
Lead Pastor: Lonnie Johns
"A Church on the Move"
CHRISTIAN HERITAGE CHURCH
Comer SR. 47 & Hudson Circle
Sunday Celebration 10:30 AM
Pastor Chris Jones* 752-9119
FALLING CREEK CHAPEL
Falling Creek Road *755-0580
First and Third Sundays 9:30 A.M.
Second and Fourth Sundays 3:00 PM.
Pastor: Rev. Cheryl B. Pingel
NEW BEGINNING CHURCH
Highway 242 E. of Branford Highway
Sunday School 10:00AM
MomingWorship 11:00AM
Sunday Evening 6:00PM
Wednesday 7:00PM
A Full Gospel Church- Everyone Welcomed
(386) 755-5197


t


ToS.. -i nthsCurh iretoy al 75-44


ANDERSON COLUMBIA CO., INC.
ASP JATf PAVING
COMMERCIAL INDUSTRIAL
Site Preparation Road Building Parking Lots
Grading & Drainage
752-7585
871 NW Guerdon St., Lake City

HARRY'S
Heating &Air Conditioning Inc.
Harry Mosley, President


EPl 752-2308 w-

To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440


Central States
Enterprises
Columbia County's Feed Headquarters
FEED PET SUPPLIES LAWN & GARDEN
ANIMAL-HEALTH
668 NW Waldo St. 386-755-7445

MIKELL'S POWER EQUIPMENT, INC.
Your Lawn & Garden Headquarters
MOWERS CHAIN SAWS TRIMMERS
1152 US 90 WEST LAKE CITY, FL.
386-752-8098





4s: 755-7050


To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440


'A .


1-, '


To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440

BAYWAYja.itoria services
FIRE & Water Restoration
Floor & Carpet Care
Resilenuli; & Coinllercild
755-6142




'0.



To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440


thoughts about God. The world leaves no room

for doubt that our youth need a firm foundation

in order to face inevitable moral issues. Let God

make a lasting imprint on their souls.. .share Him

with a best friend this week at your house of

worship.







:. i Scriptures Selected by The American Bible Society
02011, Keister-Williams Newspaper Services, RO. Box 8187, Charlottesville, VA 22906, www.kwnews.com


Lway Electric Cooperative, Inc.
Competitive rates, non-profit,
right here in your community.
Lake City District 386-752-7447
clayelectric.com
To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440

r "-',








Tires for every need.
US 90 West across from Wal-Mart
752-0054

Morrell's
Your Complete decorating and
home furnishings store
SW Deputy Jeff Davis Lane (formerly Pinemo6nt Rd.)
752-3910 or 1-800-597-3526
Mon.-Sat. 8:00-5:30 Closed Sunday


To List

Your


Church

on the


Church


Directory.


Call,

752-1293!









LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & NATION SATURDAY, MAY 14, 2011 Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


MOMENTS To





REMEMBER



Saint Leo's University

celebrates its graduation.


Elementary education graduate Kendra Crews waits for Dr. Robin Hall, the assistant of the
Saint Leo University Lake City Center, to call her name Friday during the commencement
ceremony.


Elise Fraze (right), 22, is hugged by her aunt Teresa Cheatham after the
commencement ceremony Friday. 'It feels good. I'm excited and nervous,'
said Fraze, who studied elementary education.





Messages adorn the
tops of caps worn by
Saint Leo University
graduates Friday.


Saint Leo University
graduates move their
tassels from the right
to the left side, which
signifies that they are
no longer students.


Photos by Jason Matthew Walker /Lake City Reporter


Spillway to open, flooding Cajun country


By HOLBROOK MOHR
'and MARY FOSTER
Associated Press

LAKE PROVIDENCE,
La. In an agonizing
trade-off, Army engineers
said they will open a key
spillway along the bulging
Mississippi River as early
as Saturday and inundate
thousands of homes and
farms in Louisiana's Cajun
country to avert a potential-
ly bigger disaster in Baton
Rouge and New Orleans.
About 25,000 people and
11,000 structures could be
in harm's way when the
gates on the Morganza
spillway are unlocked for
the first time in 38 years.
Opening the spillway
will release a torrent that
could submerge about
3,000 square miles under
as much as 25 feet of water
but take the pressure off
the downstream levees pro-
tecting New Orleans, Baton
Rouge and the numerous
oil refineries and chemi-
cal plants along the lower
reaches of the Mississippi.
Engineers feared that
weeks of pressure on the
levees could cause them
to fail; swamping New
Orleans under as much
as 20 feet 'of water in a
disaster that would have
been much worse than
Hurricane Katrina in 2005.
Instead, the water will
flow 20 miles south into the
Atchafalaya River. From
there it will roll on to the
Gulf of Mexico, flooding
swamps and croplands.
Morgan City, an oil-and-
seafood hub and a commu-
nity of 12,000, shored up
levees as a precaution.
The corps said it will
open the gates when the
river's flow rate reaches
a certain point, expected
Saturday. But some people
living in the threatened
stretch of countryside -
an area known for small
farms, fish camps and a
drawling French dialect -
have already started flee-
ing for higher ground.
Sheriffs and National
Guardsmen will warn peo-
ple in a door-to-door sweep
through the area, Gov.
Bobby Jindal said. Shelters
are ready to accept up to
4,800 evacuees, the gover-
nor said.
"Now's the time to evac-
uate," Jindal said. "Now's
the time for our people to


execute their plans. That
water's coming."
The Army Corps of
Engineers employed a
similar cities-first strat-
egy earlier this month
when it blew up a levee in
Missouri inundating an
estimated 200 square miles
of farmland and damaging
or destroying about 100
homes to take the pres-
sure off the levees protect-
ing the town of Cairo, Ill.,
population 2,800.
With crop prices soar-
ing, .farmers along the
lower Mississippi had been
expecting a big year. But
now many are facing ruin,
with floodwaters swallow-
ing up corn, cotton, rice
and soybean fields.
In far northeastern
Louisiana, where Tap
Parker and about 50 other
farmers filled and stacked
massive sandbags along
an old levee to no avail.
The Mississippi flowed
over the top Thursday, and
nearly 19 square miles of


soybeans and corn, known
in the industry as "green
gold," was lost.
"This was supposed to
be our good year. We had
a chance to really catch up.
Now we're scrambling to
break even," said Parker,
who has been farming
since 1985.
Cotton prices are up 86
percent from a year ago,
and corn which is feed
for livestock, a major ingre-
dient in cereals and soft
drinks, and the raw material
used to produce ethanol -
is up 80 percent. Soybeans
have risen 39 percent. The
increase is attributed, in
part, to worldwide demand,
crop-damaging weather
elsewhere and rising pro-
duction of ethanol.
While the Mississippi
River flooding has not had
any immediate impact on
prices in the supermarket,
the long-term effects are
still unknown. A full dam-
age assessment can't be
made until the water has


receded in many places.
Some of the estimates
have been dire, though.
More than 1,500 square
miles of farmland in
Arkansas, which produces
about half of the nation's
rice, have been swamped
over the past few weeks.
In Missouri, where a levee
was intentionally blown
open to ease the flood
threat in the town of Cairo,
Ill., more than 200 square
miles of croplands were
submerged, damage that
will probably exceed $100
million. More than 2,100
square miles could flood in
Mississippi.
When the water level
goes down and that
could take many weeks in
some places farmers
can expect to find the soil
washed away or their fields
covered with sand. Some
will probably replant on the
soggy soil, but they will be
behind their normal grow-
ing schedule, which could
hurt yields.


Si "Dad's Poem

to

Harold

SMartens"
You never said "I'm leaving". You never said "Goodbye".
You were gone before I knew it.
There are no words to tell you, Just what I feel inside.
The shock, the hurt, the anger might gradually subside.
A million times I'll need you. A million times I'll cry.
If love alone could have saved you, You never would have died.
In life I love you dearly. In death I love you still.
In my heart you hold a place thai no one could ever fill.
It broke my heart to lose you, but you didn't go alone for part of
me went with you.
Things will never be the same and all though it hurts so.bad
I will smile whenever I hear your name and be proud you were
my dad.
And I was proud to call you pops.
And I was proud to have my kids call you grandpa,
Because you loved us so much.
You will be missed so much but never forgotten.
By your daughter, Tina Salyers



In Memory of Harold E. Martens
Mr & Mrs. Harold & Nelda Jane Martens was married on August 11, 2007. I lost
my loving husband in death by a drunk driver that shouldn't have been on the
road.
If a drink driver or anyone that has been drinking gets on a highway or road
while drinking, .they should be put in the room in a corner, and without being able
to leave, have to stand the whole time having to see the torture and pain that the
family goes through with their love one.
Here is my husband working for his family, not bothering anyone, minding his
own business, and doing his job. But on the other hand here is a drunk driver
making a choice to drink and drive where my husband didn't have a choice in
the matter, but lost his life because of a bad choice the drunk driver made. I pray
and hope that anyone drinking "might" think twice before getting into a vehicle to
drive, because I love people it might save the life of another person.
My husband and I would have been married four years on August 11, 2011.
Harold was a very sweet and loving husband, stepfather, grandfather brother, son
and friend. He was a humble man and was very compassionate and understanding
of other peoples feelings. And was very serious about all of his vows such as marriage
and his love for his creator and GodJehovah, Haroldpromised to love and to cherish
his wife forever and ever and he did right to the end.
During the short time that Harold spent on the earth he touched lots of peoples
hearts and was loved by lots and lots ofpeople, and they showed their love back for
Harold. He was liked by his boss, and all of his co-workers. He was honest and a
hard worker.
This has been the hardest thing as a wife, and his love ones to have to deal with.
He loved to build. And as his wife looking around our home at all the things he
made and seeing his smiling face in our pictures remind me of the terrible loss that
I must endure forever to my end.
My goal is to continue on serving our God Jehovah and to be there to welcome
him back into my arms, when Jesus calls the death to life. John 5:28, 29. Then to
life on a paradise earth where death, pain and sorrow will be no more Revelation
21.3, 4
I pray all those who already know and love Jehovah will remain faithful and close
to him in this time of end. And for all those who have not yet come to know the God
of all comfort, I hope you will. 2 Corinthians 1:3, 4
At this time as Harold's wife, I would like to thank all of our family and friends
for all of your phone calls, and what you have did for me as I suffer my loss of a
loving husband and best friend. Harold was the love of my life and now part of me
is gone, because of someone's bad choice to drink and drive. Now as I close this off
I know that Harold would be proud to know that even as I'm sitting here crying and
suffering the loss of losing him that I was willing to take the time that I might save
someone else life and a love one. Just remember whoever you are, please be careful
the next time you get into a vehicle. iO it '..-u .*ii, ofyourselfbut ofeveryone else
that is on that road. It might be you or your loved ones that suffer this tragic loss.
At 4:30 a.m. on April 26, 2011 my last words spoken on the phone was I love
you, please be carefuld You never know, please read Ecclesiastes 9:11 because my
husband sure did not expect this. Please don't wish later you hadn 't made a choice
to drink and drive. Just don't do it. If your choice is to drink, stay off the road
Please
Written by Harold's Wife, NeldaJane Martens


LAKE CITY-COLUMBIA COUNTY

SCHAMBER-

Belong Engage Lead Prosper

presents


-* William J. Rossi

SI Clinical Professor of Entrepreneurship
SICenter for Entrepreneurship and Innovation
CEI Faculty Fellow
University of Florida
Gainesville, FL


I Center for Entrepreneurship
U &cInnovation
UNtvrRsIry of FiLORIDA


Join us for a lunch filled with ideas & encouragement
for Lake City's small businesses.

What: Chamber of Commerce's Better Business Series
Lunch catered by Mike's Caf6 & Grille
When: May 25, 2011, 11:45 AM 1:00 PM
Where: Christ Central Ministries, 217 Dyal Road, Lake City
Cost: $15 for members, 520 for non-members



'~ g


SATURDAY, MAY 14, 2011


Page Editor: C.J: Risak, 754-0427


LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & NATION









Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirbyc@akecityreportercom


Lake City Reporter





SPORTS


Saturday, May 14, 201 I


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


FROM THE SIDELINE


Brandon Finley
Phone: (386) 754-0420
bfinley@lakecityrepoitercom


Finally,

it was

real...

kind of

Allen era of
Columbia
High football
finally saw
its beginnings on
Friday as the Tigers
took part in the annual
Purple & Gold game at
Memorial Stadium.
In many ways, it
answered a lot of
questions about what an
Allen-led football team
will look like. In many
ways, a lot of questions
are still unanswered.
From the beginning
it was evident that the
offense would look
different from the Craig
Howard era at Columbia
as there were many more
formations ran from
under center. That didn't
necessarily mean that
the Tigers wouldn't be
exciting to watch.
Allen's offensive
coordinator Ed Stolts
made sure of that early
on as the first play from
scrimmage was a wide
receiver sweep to Nigel
Atkinson, who also
doubled as one of the
teams' quarterbacks.
Still, it was refreshing
to see the Tigers lining
up with two men behind
the quarterback in the
backfield and trying to win
with a straight forward
running approach.
For three quarters, the
game was dominated by
the defense, however,
but how much can one
take away from a divided
squad scrimmaging?
The positives carfie in
effort seen throughout
the fourth quarter,
especially on a stand to
end the game tied 7-7 by
the first-team defense.
With a running clock
throughout the contest,
the first-team defense
caught a bit of bad luck
as the clock stopped with
the offense on the five
and less than 30 seconds
to play. Had the clock
continued to roll, the
offense may have had
time for two plays. As it
stood, the defense had
to answer the bell four
times. The result a
stand by the first-team
unit and a physical one
at that.
The defensive front
forced quarterback Jayce
Barber into making quick
decisions three times
and recorded a sack.
For a defensive coach
like Allen, these are the
type of things you would
expect from his team.
The good news is
that even with the
offensive line getting
beat throughout, the
Tigers will get left tackle
Laremy Tunsil back for
the Dunnellion game
on Friday, a welcoming
sight for the Tigers'
quarterbacks.
* Brandon Finley covers
sports for the Lake City
Reporter.


JASON MATTHE I W WALIKER/Lake Ulty Reporter
Columbia High football players huddle up before taking to the field in the Purple & Gold game Friday at Memorial Stadium. The game ended in a 7-7 tie.





Tigers tied at end


Purple & Gold
finishes 7-7 at,
Memorial Stadium.

By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter. comr
It was the first-team
offense .against the first-
team defense and at the end
of four quarters the units
were tied at 7-7 in Columbia
High's version of the Purple
& Gold game.
Brian Allen made his
debut as Columbia coach
and was pleased with what
he saw in his first outing.
"I think we were slow
from the beginning, but we
picked it up in the second
half as far as competition,"
he said. "I don't think we
changed anything other
than effort."
Columbia came into the
game without starting left
tackle Laremy Tunsil and
may have lost wide receiver
John Fulton during the con-
test.
After a stagnant begin-
ning to the game, the first-
team defense made a play
on the ball to get the Purple


team on the board first.
Rakeem Battle turned a run
up field but lost control of
the ball, resulting in a fum-
ble. Trey Marshall made
the most out of the opportu-
nity. with a scoop and score
for a 60-yard fumble return.
Hayden Lunde added the
extra point.
With 3:23 remaining in
the second quarter on a
running clock, neither team
had managed a first down.
Jayce Barber changed that
with a seven-yard comple-
tion to Nigel Atkinson on
fourth-and-5.
Atkinson took a sweep
14 yards on the next play,
before the team stalled on
the 21-yard line. Lunde
attempted a 38-yard field
goal, but missed to the left.
A49-yard pass from Barber
to Fulton set up another field
goal drive, but Fulton was
lost on the play. Brandon
Roberts' 37-yard attempt at
the field goal was short
Needing an offensive
score, Braxton Stockton
gave the Tigers just that on
one play. The running back
took the ball inside, broke a
tackle and cut out to the left
sideline on his way to a 65-


Fort White


ready for


Red & Black


Indians football
game begins at
10 a.m. today
By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter. corn
FORT WHITE Fort
White High's Red & Black
game begins at 10 a.m.
today, and fans will want to
be on time.
"We will probably go first
offense vs. first defense for
the first couple of series,
about 45 minutes," Indians
head coach Demetric
Jackson said. "We will take
a break and go with some


younger guys."
Jackson said the intra-
squad scrimmage will
approximate the four quar-
ters of a game. There will
be officials to call the action.
Jackson expects the young-
er guys to play much of the
second and third, quarters,
then he will mix it up in the
fourth quarter.
"They will play their pri-
mary positions in the first
quarter and secondary posi-
tions in the fourth quarter,"
Jackson said.
There is no admission
charge for the Red & Black
INDIANS continued on 2B


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High quarterback Jayce Barber (5) is tripped up by Solomon Bell (42) during the
Purple & Gold game Friday.


yard score. Roberts added
the extra point.
Following exchanged
possessions, Barber gave
the first-team offense a
chance to win on the final
possession of the game.
A 14-yard pass to Shaq
Johnson and 10-yard run by
Barnibus Madison gave the
first-team offense the ball
at the five-yard line with 30
seconds remaining.


After using a running
clock throughout the rest of
the game, the clock stopped
after each of the final-four
plays of the contest. Barber
was pressured into scram-
bling on first down, threw
an incompletion when
the receiver failed to turn
around on second down
and was sacked by Dequan
Ivory for a five-yard loss on
third down.


The game's final play
resulted in Austin Reiter
breaking through to force
Barber into throwing an
incomplete pass and leave
the Tigers in a 7-7 tie.
"We ride Reiter so hard
in practice to stay outside,
get his contain and when he
does that only good things
happen," Allen said. "We
saw that tonight with two or
three sacks from him."


F


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Fort White High head coach Demetric Jackson speaks with players at practice on May 5.


'








LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SATURDAY, MAY 14, 2011


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
AUTO RACING
10:30 a.m.
ESPN2 NASCAR, Nationwide
Series, pole qualifying for 5-Hour Energy
200, at Dover, Del.
Noon
SPEED NASCAR, Sprint Cup, pole
qualifying for FedEx 400, at Dover, Del.
2 p.m.
ESPN NASCAR, Nationwide Series,
5-Hour Energy 200, at Dover, Del.
5 p.m.
SPEED Rolex Sports Car Series,
Bosch Engineering 250, at Danville, Va.
(same-day tape)
7 p.m.
ESPN2 NHRA, qualifying for
Southern Nationals, at Atlanta (same-day
tape)
COLLEGE BASEBALL
7:30 p.m.
FSN Baylor at Oklahoma St.
COLLEGE SOFTBALL
5 p.m.
ESPN2 -- Big East Conference,
championship game, Syracuse vs. Notre
Dame-Louisville winner, at Louisville, Ky.
8 p.m.
ESPN Southeastern Conference,
championship game, Tennessee vs.
Georgia-Alabama winner, at Oxford, Miss.
GOLF
8 a.m.
TGC European PGATour, Iberdrola
Open, third round, at Mallorca, Spain
2 p.m.
NBC PGA Tour, The Players
Championship, third round, at Ponte
Vedra Beach
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
4 p.m.
MLB Regional coverage, St. Louis at
Cincinnati or Kansas City at Detroit
7 p.m.
FOX Regional coverage, Boston
at N.Y.Yankees, San Francisco at Chicago
Cubs, or Arizona at LA. Dodgers
MEN'S COLLEGE LACROSSE
Noon
ESPN2 NCAA Division I, playoffs,
first round, Hofstra vs.Johns Hopkins
MOTORSPORTS
10 p.m.
SPEED -AMA Pro Racing, at Sonoma,
Calif. (same-day tape)
NHL HOCKEY
8 p.m.
VERSUS Playoffs, conference finals,
game I,Tampa Bay at Boston
SOCCER
7:30 a.m.
ESPN2- Premier League, Manchester
United at Blackburn
11 p.m.
ESPN2 MLS, Portland at Seattle

BASEBALL

AL standings


East Division
W L
mpa Bay 22 15
ewYork 20. 15
Itimore 17 19
3ston 17 20
ronto 17 20
Central Division
W L
eveland 23 J 3
ansas City 20 17
etroit 20 18
hicago I5 23
nnesota 12 23"
West Division
W L
s Angeles 21 17
akland 19 18
xas 19 18
battle 16 22
Friday's Games
Boston at N.Y.Yahkees (n)
Kansas City at Detroit (n)
Seattle at Cleveland (n)
Baltimore atTampa Bay (n)


Pct GB
.639 -
.5413 1/2
.526 4
.395 9
.343101/2


L.A.Angels at Texas (n)
Toronto at Minnesota (n)
Chicago White Sox at Oakland (n)
Today's Games
Seattle (Bedard 1-4) at Cleveland
(White 1-0), 05 p.m.
Chicago White Sox (Floyd 4-2) at
Oakland (T.Ross 2-2), 4:05 p.m.
Baltimore (Bergesen 0-4) at Tampa
Bay (W.Davis 4-2),4:10 p.m.
Kansas City (Francis 0-4) at Detroit
(Penny 3-3), 4:10 p.m.
L.A. Angels (Haren 4-2) at Texas
(Holland 3-1), 4:10 p.m.
Toronto (jo-.Reyes 0-3) at.Minnesota
(Blackburn 2-4), 4:10 p.m.
Boston (Beckett 2-1) at N.Y.Yankees
(Sabathia 3-2), 7:10 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Kansas City at Detroit, 1:05 p.m.
Seattle at Cleveland, 1:05 p.m.
Baltimore at Tampa Bay, 1:40 p.m.
Toronto at Minnesota, 2:10 p.m.
L.A.Angels atTexas, 3:05 p.m.
Chicago White Sox at Oakland,
4:05 p.m.
Boston at N.Y.Yankees, 8:05 p.m.

NL standings


East Division
W L
Philadelphia 24 12
Florida 21 15
Atlanta 21 18
Washington 18 19
New York 17 20
Central Division


St. Louis
Cincinnati
Pittsburgh
Chicago
Milwaukee
Houston


W L
22 16
20 17
18 19
II 20
16 21
14 23
West Division


Pct GB
.667 -
.583 3
.5384 1/2
.4866 1/2
.4597 1/2

Pct GB
.579 -
.5411 1/2
.4863 1/2
.4594 1/2
.4325 1/2
.3787 1/2


W L Pct GB
San Francisco 21 17 .553 -
Colorado 19 16 .543 1/2
Los Angeles 18 20 .474 3
Arizona 15 21 .417 5
San Diego 15 22 .4055 1/2
Friday's Games
Chicago Cubs I I, San Francisco 4
Florida atWashington (n)
St. Louis at Cincinnati (n)
Philadelphia at Atlanta (n)
N.Y. Mets at Houston (n)
Pittsburgh at Milwaukee (n)
San Diego at Colorado (n)
Arizona at L.A. Dodgers (n)
Today's Games
Florida (Ani.Sanchez 2-I) at
Washington (LHernandez 3-4), 1:05 p.m.
Philadelphia (Blanton 1-1) at Atlanta
(jurrjens 4-0), 1:10 p.m.
San Diego (Harang 5-2) at Colorado
(Chacin 4-2), 3:10 p.m.
N.Y. Mets (Dickey 1-4) at Houston
(Happ 2-4), 4:05 p.m.
Pittsburgh (Karstens 2-1) at Milwaukee
(Narveson 1-3), 4:10 p.m.
St. Louis (McClellan 5-0) at Cincinnati
(Cueto 1-0), 4:10 p.m.
Arizona (Collmenter 1-0) at LA.
Dodgers (Billingsley 2-2), 7:10 p.m.
San Francisco (Vogelsong 2-0) at
Chicago Cubs (D.Davis 0-0), 7:10 p.m.
Sunday's Games
St. Louis at Cincinnati, 1:10 p.m.
Florida atWashington, 1:35 p.m.
Philadelphia atAtlanta, 1:35 p.m.
N.Y. Mets at Houston, 2:05 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Milwaukee, 2:10 p.m.
San Francisco at Chicago Cubs,
2:20 p.m.
San Diego at Colorado, 3:10 p.m.
Arizona at L.A. Dodgers, 4:10 p.m.

BASKETBALL

NBA playoffs

CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS
Thursday
Chicago 93, Atlanta 73, Chicago wins
series 4-2
Friday
Oklahoma City at Memphis (n)
Sunday
Memphis at Oklahoma City, 3:30 p.m.


(if necessary)
CONFERENCE FINALS
Sunday
Miami at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Wednesday
Miami at Chicago, 8:30 p.m.

All-NBA

(Voting on a 5-3-1 basis;
first-place votes in parentheses)
First Team
F LeBron James, Miami (I 19) 595
F Kevin Durant, Ok. City (69) 492
C Dwight Howard, Orl.(118) 593
G Kobe Bryant, Lakers (98) 551
G Derrick Rose, Chi. (118) 593
Second Team
F Pau Gasol, LA. Lakers (2) 259
F Dirk Nowitzki, Dallas (47) 437
C Amar'e Stoudemire, N.Y. (2) 258
G Dwyane Wade, Miami (24) 392
G Russell Westbrook, Ok. City 184
Third Team
F LaMarcus Aldridge, Portland 135
F Zach Randolph, Memphis 67
C -Al Horford,Atlanta 62
G Manu Ginobili, San Antonio 106
G Chris Paul, New Orleans 157
Other players receiving votes, with
point totals: Rajon Rondo, Boston,
68; Paul Pierce, Boston, 55; Carmelo
Anthony, Denver-New York, 53; Kevin
Love, Minnesota, 48; Tim Duncan, San
Antonio, 43; Blake Griffin, L.A. Clippers,
36; Tony Parker, San Antonio, 27; Kevin
Garnett, Boston, 22; Deron Williams,
Utah-New Jersey 19; Steve Nash, Phoenix,
17; Andrew Bogut, Milwaukee, 13; Monta
Ellis, Golden State, II; Nene, Denver,
I I; Andrew Bynum, LA. Lakers, 9; Kevin
Martin, Houston, 7;Tyson Chandler, Dallas,
7; Joakim Noah, Chicago, 5; Marc Gasol,
Memphis, 3;AI Jefferson, Utah, 3; Kendrick
Perkins, Boston-Oklahoma City, 3;Andrea
Bargnani, Toronto, 2; Chris Bosh, Miami,
2; Andre Iguodala, Philadelphia, I; Emeka
Okafor, New Orleans, I; Eric Gordon, LA.
Clippers, I; Gerald Wallace, Charlotte-
Portland, I; Jason Kidd, Dallas, I; Luis
Scola, Houston, I; Luol Deng, Chicago, I;
Ray Allen, Boston, 1.

AUTO RACING

Race week

NASCAR
SPRINT CUP
FedEx 400
Site: Dover, Del.
Schedule: Today, qualifying (Speed,
noon- 1:30 p.m.), Sunday, race, I p.m. (Fox,
12:30-5 p.m.).
Track: Dover International Speedway
(oval, 1.0 miles).
Race distance: 400 miles, 400 laps.
NATIONWIDE
S-Hour Energy 200
Site: Dover, Del.
Schedule: Today, qualifying (ESPN2,
10:30-11:30 a.m.), race, 2 p.m. (ESPN,
1:30-4:30 p.m.).
Track: Dover International Speedway.
Race distance: 200 miles, 200 laps.
NHRA FULLTHROTTLE
NHRA Southern Nationals
Site: Commerce, Ga.
Schedule: Today, qualifying (ESPN2,
7-9:30 p.m.); Sunday, final eliminations
.(ESPN2,7-10 p.m.). '
Track: Atlanta Dragway.

HOCKEY

NHL playoffs

CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS
Thursday
San Jose 3, Detroit 2, San Jose wins
series 4-3
CONFERENCE FINALS
Today
Tampa Bay at Boston, 8 p.m.
Sunday
San Jose atVancouver, 8 p.m.
Tuesday
Tampa Bay at Boston, 8 p.m.
Wednesday
San Jose atVancouver, 9 p.m.


BRIEFS


GOLF at 752-3333.

Kiwanis charity CHS FOOTBALL

tournament Friday Barbecue dinners


The Lake City Kiwanis
Club is hosting a
four-person scramble
golf tournament at 1 p.m.
Friday at The Country
Club of Lake City.
Cost is $60 per person.
Hole sponsorships are $50.
Lunch and drinks will be
provided.
All proceeds go to youth
programs and building
future parks in Columbia
County.
For details, call Matt
Greene at 487-1374.

GATORS

International

Gator Day

International Gator Day,
where gator clubs unite
worldwide to give back to
their communities, is
May 21.
The North Florida Gator
Club is teaming up with
Habitat for Humanity to
clean up a lot for a future
home.
Meet at 8 a.m. at
KC's Produce on Baya
Avenue and bring yard
tools to help with the
clean-up for a worthy cause.
For details, call Diane


for spring game


The Columbia County
Quarterback Club is
selling barbecue dinners as
a fundraiser for the spring
game against Dunnellon
High on Friday. The meal
includes chicken or ribs,



Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words. *.

LBBRU I-


2011 Tribune Media Services, Inc. "'
All Rights Reserved.
AKCLO
0




DSNEUD|
JZ5



JRUOIN
'^~ 7^ ^
L / L __ __


green beans, chicken and
rice, roll and drink, and
will be available at 11 a.m.
at the football stadium.
Orders placed in advance
by businesses can be
delivered by Quarterback
Club members during
lunch hours.
For details, call Willie B.
Austin at 397-0917 or Tony
Austin at 623-1890.

From staff reports
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek


Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


Answer here: LII( 1 .
(Answers Monday)
Yesterday's Jumbles: FLINT HARSH PADDLE JOYFUL
I Answer: All the new highway construction was turning
Hawaii into "ROAD ISLAND"


League reports

Results of Lake City Bowl league
play follow.
WATERGUARD
High scratch game: 1. Mary
Lobaugh 224; 2. Lori Davis 210;
3. Joyce Hooper 197. 1. Mark Davis
277; 2. (tie) Tom Sewejkis, Michael
Mclnally 244.
High scratch series: 1. Mary
.Lobaugh 669; 2. Lori Davis 558;
3. Joyce Hooper 543. 1. Mark Davis
698; 2. Michael Mclnally 623; 3. Mark
Koppa 613.
High handicap game: 1. Lidia
Strickland 265; 2. Lori Davis 247;
3. Brandy Watson 244. 1. Dave Ward
260; 2. Tom Sewejkis 253; 3. George
Mulligan 243.
High handicap series: 1. Mary
Lobaugh 732; 2. Joyce Hooper 678;
3. Maggie Battle 642. 1. (tie) Mark
Davis, Michael Mclnally 728; 3. Luke
Milton 675; 4. Mark Koppa 661.
High average: 1. Mary Lobaugh
185. 1. Zech Strohl 212.
(results from May 3)
GOLDEN ROLLERS
Team standings: 1. Golden Niners
(88-52); 2. Gamblers (80-60); 3. Wild
Things (75-65).
High handicap game: 1. Joanne


BOWLING

Denton 254; 2. Elaine Nemeth 228;
3. Debbie Walters 227. 1. Dan Ritter
239; 2. (tie) Winton Brewer, George
Mulligan 227.
High handicap series:. 1. Sandra
Johns 709; 2. Pat Hale 618; 3. Shirley
Highsmith 616. 1. Jack Stanfield 695;
2. Lee Evert 625; 3. Lee McKinney
619.
High average: 1. Shirley Highsmith
156.89; 2. Elaine Nemeth 153.43;
3. Betty Carmichael 150.41. 1. David
Duncan 189.3; 2. Bill Dolly 184;
3. George Mulligan 183.39.
(results from April 28)
HIT & MISS
Team standings: 1. The
Sandbaggers (43,25); 2. Spare Us
(42-26); 3. Lucky Strikers (39-29).
High handicap game: 1. Karen
Clampett 252; 2. Shirley Highsmith
219; 3. Susan Newbern 215.
High handicap series: 1. Elsie
Huddleston 624; 2. Betty Carmichael
621; 3. Joanne Knutsen 612.
(results from May 10)
SUNDAY NITE MERCHANTS
Team standings: 1. TAZ
(54.5-17.5); 2. Spare Us (43.5-28.5);
3. Train Wreck (39-33).
High scratch game: 1. Gloria
Dennis 183; 2. Liz Randall 179;
3. Liz Randall 178. 1. Bill Duncan 256;
2. Carl McGhghy 237; 3. A.J. Dariano


236.
High scratch series: 1. Liz Randall
529; 2. Gloria Dennis 526; 3. Norma
Yeingst 448. 1. A.J. Dariano 655;
2. Bill Duncan 648; 3. Mark Moore
644.
High average: 1. Norma Yeingst
169.22; 2. Liz Randall 159.59;
3. Gloria Dennis 158.42. 1. Bill Duncan
199.75; 2. Joe Cohrs 194.6; 3. Mark
Moore 193.65.
(results from May 8)
MONDAY NIGHT MAVERICKS
Team standings: 1. Rountree
Moore Ford (339-171); 2. Team 8
(327.5-182.5); 3. Neil Hoffman's Auto
t305-205).
High scratch game: 1. Donnie
Perry 279; 2. (tie) Zech Strohl, Robert
Stone, Brian Meek 266.
High scratch series: 1. Robert
Stone 768; 2. Donnie Perry 745;
3. Zech Strohl 715.
High handicap game: 1. Donnie
Perry 297; 2. Steve Fancy 285;
3. Robert Stone 274.
High handicap series: 1. Donnie
Perry 799; 2. Robert Stone 792;
3. George Rye 753.
High average: 1. Zech Strohl
223.12; 2. Dale Coleman 213.35;
3. Brian Meek 208.51.
(results from April 25)


Forcier decides not to enroll at UM


By TIM REYNOLDS
Associated Press

CORAL GABLES- Tate
Forcier's career at Miami is
over before it started.
A person familiar with his
decision told The Associated
Press on Friday that the
former Michigan quar-
terback broke off contact
with the Hurricanes about
six weeks ago because
undisclosed personal mat-
ters were overshadowing
football. The person spoke
on condition of anonymity
because Forcier has not


publicly revealed the deci-
sion.
ESPN.com first reported
Forcier would not attend
Miami. A message left for
Forcier's father by the
AP was not immediately
returned Friday.
Miami added another
transfer quarterback ear-
lier this spring, when
South Florida native Ryan
Williams left Memphis
after one season to join the
Hurricanes.
Returning quarter-
, backs Jacory Harris and
Stephen Morris will vie for


Miami's starting job for
2011 in training camp, and
Williams would have to sit
out until 2012 unless the
NCAA grants a waiver say-
ing otherwise.
Forcier's college career
has been turbulent. He was
dogged by transfer rumors
last season at Michigan,
despite his insistence
that he would remain a
Wolverine throughout his
career.
He was declared aca-
demically ineligible for
Michigan's trip to the Gator
Bowl.


INDIANS: Host Orange park next week


Continued From Page 1B


game, but donations will
be welcome at the gate.
The concession stand will
be in full force with food
and drinks.
Playing with officials
will allow Jackson and
his staff to add a level of
evaluation.
"There are a couple of
things," Jackson said. "We
want to shore up some spots
with our young guys, and
we want to get some guys
to play at a high level."


ACROSS


Atlas page
Mo. bill
Campus area
Snort of dis-
gust
Actor Cronyn
Yen
Direction
Poet's black
Deli staple
Tooth type
Pet-adoption org.
Humerus
neighbor
Like Rambo?
Wait awhile
RN forte
Poet Khayyam
Kind of race
Clamping
device
Bewildered
Venomous
snake
WXY, on phone
Tough-talking
coach


Jackson is in the midst of
replacing a running back
and filling in spots on the
line.
"From an offensive
standpoint, we are going to
see how we can open it up
a little bit," Jackson said.
'"We don't have a dominant
running back at this time,
so we will throw in some
spins."
On defense, the Indians
have returning players who
need to develop into sea-


45 Back muscles
47 Remnant
49 Gives off light
51 Opposite of
perigee
55 With, to Henri
56 Binding agree-
ment
58 Mathematician
Descartes
59 Indigo plant
60 S&L offering
61 Docs prescribe
them
62 Blushing
63 Pecan or hicko-
ry

DOWN

1 Coffee holders
2 Water, in Baja
3 Noted ground-
hog
4 Do one's hair
5 Long blouse
6 XXI times C
7 Abound (with)
8 Crushed


soned veterans.
"We have some young
guys on the line and at
linebacker," Jackson said.
"We want to see how they
respond with a big crowd
watching them and we hope
to have a big crowd. They
have played some, but have
not necessarily been 'the
man' on the field."
Fort White will host
Class 6A Orange Park High
in the spring game at 7 p.m.
Friday.


Answer to Previous Puzzle


LOST AAH LAKE
ANKH ICIE ACRE
MUIR SERAGLIO
SPOILS IOUS
ARE ORO


UR LS VE DO W L


USH R ARMS


WEL TO GGL
GAMESHOW EARL
AK IN UTA RIME
TERA BEN STAG


Kind of sprawl
Socrates' hang-
out
Cub Scout
group
Run 100 meters


20 Belly dance
instrument
22 Degraded
24 V.J. employer
25 Rope-a-dope
boxer
26 ICU units
28 Umbrage
31 Provide staff
33 Ship deserter
34 Try to find out
35 College stat
37 Leads on
39 Capably
42 Adherent
44 1939 Lugosi
role
45 Flood barrier
46 Improve upon
48 Rajahs'
spouses
50 Dueler's pride
52 Advance
53 Brownish tint
54 Coup d'-
55 Sofa end
57 Mrs. Lennon


9
10

11

16


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


5-14 2011 byUFS, Inc.


Tai
Ne
Ba
Bo
To


Cl
Ka
De

Mi


Lo
Oa
Te:
Se:


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421












Toms shoots 68 to take lead at Players


By DOUG FERGUSON
Associated Press

PONTE VEDRA BEACH
- David Toms has gone
five years without win-
ning, and 10 years since
his lone major at the PGA
Championship. Now he has
to fend off a host of players
who have won big events a
lot more recently.
Toms went 25 holes
before making a bogey
Friday and countered with
enough good shots for a 4-
under 68, giving him a one-
shot lead over Nick Watney
going into what figures to
be another wild weekend
on the TPC Sawgrass.
Watney won a World Golf
Championship two months
ago at Doral, punctuated by
a birdie on the tough clos-
ing hole. Despite missing
four birdie putts inside 12
feet on his last seven holes,
he got into the final group.
Luke Donald, the World
Golf Championship win-
ner at Arizona in February,
became the first play-
er since 2004 to. make it
around Sawgrass without a
bogey for the first 36 holes.
He birdied the island-green
17th and shot 67 to finish
two shots behind.
Also two shots behind:
U.S. Open champion
and Ryder Cup star Graeme
McDowell, who is back on
track after a dismal April.
Former U.S. Open
champion Lucas Glover,
riding high after his win last
week at Quail Hollow.
Steve Stricker, who has
won two FedEx Cup playoff
events and has become a
regular among the top 10 in
the world.
The favorite?


ASSOCIATED PRESS
David Toms hits from the sand on the 15th hole during the second round of The Players Championship golf tournament,
Friday in Ponte Vedra Beach. Toms finished with a two-round score of 10-under-par.


"Whoever plays the best
on the weekend," Glover
said, as good of an answer
as anyone can provide.
Toms quite trying to be
perfect on a course that
looks like it demands no
less. It led to nearly perfect
play over two days at The
Players, and pole position
going into the weekend.
Toms doesn't have a great
record at TPC Sawgrass.
In 18 previous attempts,
he has missed the cut 10
times and only once has
finished in the top 10. He
just couldn't figure out the


right angle into the greens,
and always believed it had
to be just right.
"It seemed early in my
career around here I was
always trying to play .the
perfect shot," he said. "I
think the last few years,
I've just learned to try to
play my game, my shot ..
rather than trying to hit
the perfect shot on the golf
course."
Watney did his best to
catch him.
He started the back nine
with back-to-back birdies,
then gave himself a chance


on every hole. Watney
missed four birdie putts
inside 12 feet over his last
seven holes, settling for 71
after opening with a 64. His
emotions showed what this
place can do for you.
"I'm not exactly happy,"
Watney said, before end-
ing his remarks with, "I'm
excited where I am."
Toms was at 10-under
134, leading a quality list of
contenders at the biggest
event of golf's strongest
tour.
Looming particular-
ly large was Donald, the


Englishman who can go to
No. 1 in the world with a
victory. He has only been
out of the top 10 once since
last September. Perhaps
even more impressive this
week is that Donald hasn't
made a bogey all week.
"I think it's an accom-
plishment anywhere,"
Donald said. "This is a tough
course. There is a lot of
danger lurking. It is pretty
easy to slip up around this
course. So it's pretty satisfy-
ing to go without making a
bogey 36 holes.
Four major champi-


ons are among the top 10
- one of them is Ryder
Cup captain Davis Love III,
a two-time winner of The
Players who was three back
going into the weekend. All
but Toms among the top six
have won tournaments in
the last year.
Even with Tiger Woods
long departed after with-
drawing Thursday, there
was no shortage of drama.
. A fan offered to be lift-
ed down into the lake off
the 18th tee to retrieve
Michael Bradley's driver
when it came out of his
hands. Mark Wilson called
a two-shot penalty on him-
self for a double-hit even
though video evidence
was inconclusive which
caused him to miss the cut.
Jonathan Byrd challenged
a bad time he received, and
had Rory Sabbatini argue
on his behalf.
The cut came at even-par
144, and even that featured
some tough moments.
Ernie Els, inducted into the
World Golf Hall of Fame
on Monday, was in front
of the par-5 ninth in two,
flubbed a chip and missed
a 4-foot putt to make'
bogey and miss the cut by
one.
Then there was the score-
card of Phil Mickelson a
31 on the front to get within
two shots of the lead, a 40
on the back to settle for a 71
and linger eight shots out of
the lead.
For' all the putts he
missed, Watney got a pair
of good breaks. On the par-
5 11th, his ball was headed'
into deep rough short of
the green when he noticed
it slightly plugged and cov-
ered with mud.


SiRivers gets five-year

aA f-t. extension as Celtics' coach


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Driver Kyle Busch (right) looks on as crew members work on his car during a practice session
for Sunday's NASCAR Sprint Cup series FedEx 400 auto race, Friday in Dover, Del.


Drivers Busch, Harvick


continue feud at Dover


By DAN GELSTON
Associated Press

DOVER, Del. Kevin
Harvick and Kyle Busch
may have to play nice on
the track now that they're
on probation.
Off the track?
Well, boys, have at it.
"It's kind of one lie after
the other," Harvick said of
Busch.
"He'll talk to you to your
face like you're best friends,
but then behind closed
doors ....he has the utmost
disrespectful thoughts,"
Busch said of Harvick.
The verbal smackdown
that's been ignited between
the NASCAR stars since
their dustup last weekend
at Darlington Raceway has
turned Harvick-Busch into
the feud of the week.
Harvick and Busch dis-
agree about the incident
that forced NASCAR to
penalize them. And, they
differ on NASCAR's inter-
pretation of "Boys, have at
it."
They did agree Friday
at Dover International
Speedway that they don't
like each other.
"I've never gotten along
with the guy," Busch said.
Harvick and Busch were
fined $25,000 apiece and put
on probation this week by


NASCAR for their actions
on pit road at Darlington.
On Thursday, the drivers
were summoned separately
to the NASCAR hauler for a
meeting with top officials.
NASCAR issued a brief
ultimatum about what it
means to compete while
on probation and that
Harvick's No. 29 Chevrolet
and Busch's No. 18 Toyota
shouldn't tangle too closely
on the track.
The probation for all
NASCAR-sanctioned events
runs through June 15, a
span that includes, four
Sprint Cup Series champi-
onship races and the non-
points $1 million All-Star
event.
The drivers got an early
chance to prove they'll be
on their best behavior in
Friday night's Truck Series
race at Dover. Harvick
qualified second .and Busch
third.
Their already contentious
relationship took another
blow late in the race at
Darlington after Busch
made contact with Harvick.
Harvick said officials.
stressed he was penalized
because of the postrace
blow up on pit road. Last
weekend at Darlington,
Harvick climbed from his
car and threw a punch into
Busch's window just as


Busch pulled away, using
his car to bump Harvick's
car out of the way.
The empty car turned
and hit the inside wall. No
one was hurt, but Harvick's
crew members were run-
ning down pit road when
the car hit the wall.
"I think they would back
me whether I was right or
wrong, they are going to
back me up and I will do the
same for them. That's the
great part about our team,"
Harvick said.
'"The No. 18 team is not
backing him up, I mean
'when you don't have a
backbone how do you back
someone up?"
One-liners aside, safety
issues were at the heart
of' the penalty. Pit road is
no place for payback, espe-
cially once crew members
and other personnel are out
there.
NASCAR adopted a
"Boys, have at it" policy at
the start of last year that
gave the drivers more leni-
ency to police each other on
the track.
For some, the penal-
ties levied against the pair
seemed to go against that
easygoing stance.
"It's definitely to the point
where it's a little bit confus-
ing with how it all works,"
Harvick said.


By JIMMY GOLEN
Associated Press

WALTHAM, Mass.
- Boston Celtics general
manager Danny Ainge
was approaching his post-
season news conference
when his cell phone rang.
He smiled and told
reporters it was from his
new coach, then ducked
into the nearby workout
room to take the call. But
he was only half-joking:
It was Doc Rivers calling,
and he had just agreed to
a five-year contract exten-
sion that would not only
give him another run at
a title with the current
roster but keep him in
Boston to help rebuild
the franchise when the Big
Three era is done.
"I think Doc is the best
coach in the league. So
it's great for us," Ainge
said Friday at the team's
practice facility. "There's
nobody I'd rather have as
my coach than Doc."
Rivers contract was set to
expire he had an option
for next season -- and he
said after the Celtics were
eliminated by the Miami


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Boston Celtics' coach Doc Rivers watches the final minutes
of the second half of Game 5 of a secondround NBA playoff
basketball series in Miami, Wednesday. The Heat won 97-87
to advance to the Eastern Conference finals.


Heat on Wednesday night
that he was "leaning heav-
ily" toward coming back.
But he was expected to
return on a short-term deal
to make one more run at a
title with the Big Three of
Kevin Garnett, Paul Pierce
and Ray Allen.
Instead, the five-year
contract worth a reported
$35 million would give him
the chance to lead the fran-
chise with a rebuilt roster


that probably won't include
any of the thirtysomething
stars-who led Boston to
its 18th NBA title and
Rivers' first in 2008.
"Doc wants to be here.
It's not all because he
thinks that over the next
five years we will have the
best team in the NBA,"
Ainge said. "He's part of
this franchise. He wants to
do what it takes for us to be
successful."


Kidd making most of what

could be last title chance


By JAIME ARON
Associated Press

DALLAS Jason Kidd
walked off the court slow-
ly, his blue long-sleeved
T-shirt, white jersey and
gray warmup pants soaked
in sweat. As if an intense
scrimmage wasn't enough,
he'd also just pushed him-
self through a series of 3-
pointers and free throws
- two series, actually,
going through his around-
the-arc, to-the-stripe routine
on each end of the court.
By the time Kidd fin-
ished, he was the last play-
er headed to the locker
room.
As much as the 38-year-
old needs to rest up for the
Western Conference finals,
Kidd also knows this could


be his last chance to finally
win an NBA title and he's
determined to make the
most of it.
"That's what you play the
game for, to be a champi-
on," Kidd said. "It's a hard
climb and you're never
promised to get there. If
you do, you've got to trea-
sure it and do everything
you can to win."
Kidd reached the NBA
finals in 2002 and '03 with
the New Jersey Nets. They
were swept by the Lakers,
then turned away by the
Spurs. He was in the prime
of his career and figured
he'd have another chance.
Instead, this is his first
time to even make the con-
ference finals since then,
and it comes in what could
be his last season. Kidd


has said he'll walk away
from the final year of his
contract if a lockout wipes
out much or all of next
season.
But that's a conversa-
tion for another day. Right
now, all he's thinking about
it is winning eight more
games to fill the only void
on his Hall of Fame-worthy
resume. He'd do it in his-
torical fashion, too, becom-
ing the oldest starting
point guard on a title team,
according to research by
STATS LLC.
"When you come into the
league, you think you're
going to be able to win
a championship, but there
are so many talented play-
ers and the big thing is that
there are so many talented
teamss" Kidd said.


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SATURDAY, MAY 14, 2011


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420









Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS SATURDAY, MAY 14, 2011


DILBERT
1.1


I TOOK THE LIBERTY
OF UPDATING YOUR
ESTATE PLAN.


BLONDIE


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE


THIS GIVES YOU A
POWERFUL INCENTIVE
TO KILL ME SO YOU
CAN INHERIT MY
STUFF.
n7


DEAR ABBY


Table-hopping friend deserts

dinner companions to hobnob


IF IT MAKES YOU
FEEL ANY BETTER.
THAT OPTION HAS
ALWAYS BEEN ON
THE TABLE.
/

ji'L5s~


DEAR ABBY: From
time to time, my husband
and I are asked by some
friends to dine out with
them. However, the wife
does some things that
make us very uncomfort-
able. She prides herself
on being friendly and out-
going. When we're in a
restaurant, she'll go from
table to table and engage in
conversations with people
she doesn't know. She'll
ask where they're from,
what they've ordered, etc.
Once, she eavesdropped
while the people at the next
table discussed what they
were ordering and gave
them her opinion on what
they should "really" order.
It progressed to her join-
ing them for a short time at
their table for further con-
versation.
While I appreciate that
she's trying to impress us,
it embarrasses my husband
and me. How do we handle
the situation without telling
her, making her feel bad
'and putting a strain on our
friendship? We don't enjoy
dining out with them like
we used to. Are we overre-
acting, or is this bad man-
ners? MORTIFIED IN
SALT LAKE CITY
DEAR MORTIFIED:


should be working, tak-
ing care of an infant and
an older child, paying for
day care, half the bills and
mortgage. Abby, this man
has an income in the lower
six figures!
We suggested therapy,
but it was ignored. He
blames everything on her.
There is so much more
to this story, but it would
take up 10 of your columns.
Please help. DESPER-
ATE DAD IN CALIFOR-
NIA"
DEAR DESPERATE:
A lawyer could point out
to your daughter that she
lives in a community prop-
erty state, and half of what
her husband has accumu-
lated during the marriage is
hers. A social worker could
warn her that abuse doesn't
remain static, that it can es-
calate to violence if it hasn't
already. Statistics could
illustrate that men who
abuse their wives often go
on to abuse their children.
There is much that could
be done, but not until or un-
less your daughter is will-
ing to admit to herself that
she is the victim of spousal
abuse and take action.
* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS


GARFIELD


B.C.


FRANK & ERNEST


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-
April 19): Don't limit what
you can do because some-
one is putting additional
stipulations on you. Rise
above any interference
you face and you will sur-
pass the obstacles put in
your way. You may require
patience but do not let any-
one take advantage of you.

TAURUS (April 20-
May 20): Make the most
of what you have to work
with and you will get ahead.
Finishing off projects or
taking care of odds and
ends that give a job that pol-
ished look will bring you all
sorts of compliments. Push
for perfection. ***
GEMINI (May 21-
June 20): Getting together
with friends or colleagues
will lead to beneficial dis-
cussions. A lover, child or
friend will make a differ-
ence to the choices you
make regarding who you
associate with in business
and in activities. *****
CANCER (June 21-
July 22): You have to par-
ticipate but you don't have
to agree with everyone.
Good fortune is on your
side, so don't be afraid to
stand alone in order to
make your point heard. A
journey will clear your vi-
sion and help you make a
decision. 2 stars
LEO (July 23-Aug.
22): Remembering the past


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

and the experiences you
encountered will help you
alter your current lifestyle
to work more efficiently.
Making a snap decision will
turn out well. Your gener-
ous nature will be quite im-
pressive. ****
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Taking it upon your-
self to do the groundwork
will show others how you
operate when you 'want
results. Don't cave under
pressure to spend more
than you can afford. Collect
an old debt or pay off what
you owe and you can move
on. ***
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): Put a little more effort
into your personal relation-
ships. Whether it's a friend,
lover or family member, do
what you can to make life
better by engaging in activi-
ties you enjoy. Your desire
to please others will bring
you rewards. ***
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-
Nov. 21): Let your intu-
ition guide you in affairs
of the heart and the home.
Preparing for the future by
finishing projects that need
tweaking will help build
confidence and motivate
you to be more determined
and successful. ***
SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): Engage in a


little adventure and you will
feel exhilarated. Challeng-
ing activities will allow you
to meet new people or re-
unite with those from your
past. Love is in the stars.

CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): You've been
fighting a losing battle but
the chance to make a stra-
tegic move is present Keep
a close eye on what others
are doing but make the per-
sonal and physical changes
that will make you feel good
abput where you are head-
ing. Life altering changes
are upon you. **
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Concentrate on
your attributes and sched-
ule a meeting with some-
one you feel can help or di-
rect you. Money is heading
your way through a rebate,
surrender, gift or an old
investment A past partner
will give you the go-ahead
or blessing to use some-
thing that was developed
by both of you. *****
PISCES (Feb. 19-
March 20): Lean on
your intuition but do the
research to back the way
you feel. Without sufficient
proof, you will have a diffi-
cult time getting others to
join in your pursuit A sud-
den and unexpected change
regarding an emotional re-
lationship will catch you off
guard. ***


CELEBRITY CIPHER

by Luis Cdmpos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: P equals W
"KZYBY'I NW XCH INOMWU NSXFK
K ZXIY PZX DXBUYK ZMIKXBO. M
HXW' K BYJYJSYB M K, SFK MK' I
UXXIH." IKYGZYW VXCSYBK
PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "I know a lot about cars. I can look at a car's
headlights and tell you exactly which way it's coming." Mitch Hedberg
(c) 2011 by NEA, Inc. 5-14

CLASSIC PEANUTS


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearabby.com
If you and your husband
are dinner guests, the lady
should be devoting her at-
tention to you and not the
other diners in the res-
taurant. To leave you and
go table-hopping is, rude.
However, to call her on it
would be equally rude. So,
because you don't enjoy
dining out with them the
way, you used to, do it less
often and it will be less up-
setting.
DEAR ABBY: How can
we convince our married
daughter with children to
seek a separation or di-
vorce from her husband,
who is physically, mentally
and economically abusive
to her and the kids? We be-
lieve she's suffering from
low self-esteem, depression
and other issues she can't
resolve with him.
She has had to borrow
what little money we can
spare to buy food, school
clothing and other basics.
Her husband believes she


LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS SATURDAY, MAY 14, 2011


Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415








Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SATURDAY, MAY 14, 2011

Lake City Reporter




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Advertising language must comply
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ever, the first word of each ad may
not be abbreviated.

In Print and Online
www.la~ecityreporter.com


1A00 Job
1 10 Opportunities

04544659
HERBICIDE APPLICATOR
Local Herbicide Co.
seeking applicators.
Responsibilities:
Apply herbicide with backpacks
& mechanical equipment and
help operator perform daily
tasks. Overnight travel required.
Qualifications:
Must pass drug screen
Must have valid drivers license
with clean record
Must possess strong work ethic
Other: Bi-Lingual a plus but
not necessary
WE WILL BE HOLDING A
JOB FAIR @ THE HOLIDAY
INN EXPRESS IN LIVE OAK
ON 05/16/11 @ 8 A.M.
Fax resume to: 318.226.6190 or
Call: 386.935.4203

04544754
HR Generalist/Benefits
Administrator
Large Lake City organization
seeking an HR Generalist/
Benefits Administrator. Duties
include recruiting, processing
applications, maintaining
personnel files, representing the
company at personnel-related
hearings, managing the
employee benefits program, etc.
Applicants should have
knowledge of federal and state
employment regulations,
benefits (health, COBRA, 401K,
etc.), workers compensation,
OSHA reporting, EEO and
unemployment claims. Must
also be proficient in Word and
Excel. Please submit your salary
requirements and resume to
wassont@andersoncolumbia.co
m or fax to 386-755-9132.
We are an equal employment
opportunity employer.

05525862
Resolutions Health Alliance
has an immediate opening for a
FT Administrative Assistant
in Lake City. The prospective
applicant must have the follow-
ing skills: Proficient in Micro-
soft Word, Excel and Outlook,
able to work independently,
organized, able to multi task,
excellent phone skills, client
friendly, detail oriented, data
entry, file auditing, etc. Salary
range $21K to $23K yearly
based on experience, excellent
benefits package. Email resume
to: employment(&rhapa.net
or fax (386) 754-9017.


S4 Temporary Farm Workers
needed. Employer: Andrew
Tobacco, Straw/Hay, Row Crop,
Row Crop Produce,
Greenhouse/Nursery & Alternative
Work. Employment Dates:
07/01/11 12/30/11. Wage of
$9.48/hr. Worker guaranteed 3/4
of contract hours. Tools provided
at no cost. Free housing provided
to non commuting workers.
Transportation & subsistence
reimbursed when 50% of contract
is met. Apply for this job at the
nearest KY Office of Employment
& Training Division of Workforce
& Employment Services Office
referencing the job order
#KY0426865.
Associate Reps
SUMMER WORK/GREAT PAY
Immediate FT/PT openings,
Customer sales/service,
No exp needed, conditions,
Apply Now all ages 17+
(386) 269-0883

AVON!! Only $10 to start!
Earn bonus $ up to $150+
1-800-275-9945 pin #4206
www.youravon.com/tdavies
CDL A Flatbed Truck Driver
needed for F/T OTR SE area, 3
years exp or more, Contact
Melissa or Mary @ 386-935-2773
CDL Driver 2 yrs exp clean MVR"
wanted for local company
Apply 8 AM Noon only deadline
Fri May 19. 247 NW Hillandale
Glen Lake City No phone calls

Certified Veterinary Technician
needed for small animal practice in
Suwannee Co. Must be willing to
travel to two locations and to do
some reception work. Send reply
to Box 04112, C/O The Lake City
Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake
City, FL, 32056 No phone calls.







Land Clearing

Back Hoe, Dozer, Chopping, root
raking, bush hog, seeding, sod,
disking, site prep, ponds &
irrigation. Free Est! 386-623-3200

Lawn & Landscape Service

Clean Pine Straw,
You pick it up, $1.85 a bale
Delivery of 100 bales $260
386-688-9156
Landscape Maintenance Company
You can trust for knowledge &
pride, Mention this AD!
Mow Green, LLC 386-288-6532

Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.c
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.


100 Job
100 'Opportunities
Experienced auto Mechanic for
Farm equipment & older vehicles.
Must have own tools.
386-755-6481

6 Temporary Farm Workers
needed. Employer: G A Smith
Farms LLC Graves Co, KY.
Tobacco, Straw/Hay, Row Crop,
& Alternative Work. Employment
Dates: 07/01/11 12/31/11. Wage
of $9.48/hr. Worker guaranteed
3/4 of contract hours. Tools
provided at no cost. Free housing
provided to non commuting work-
ers. Transportation & subsistence
reimbursed when 50% of contract
is met. Apply for this job at the
nearest KY Office of Employment
& Training Division of Workforce
& Employment Services Office
referencing the job order
#KY0427185.

HARDEE'S is hiring experienced
people at the Hwy 100 &
Baya location. Apply in
person or call 386-752-0393

9 Temporary Farm Workers
needed. Employer: Jude
Buckman Farming LLC Marion
Co, KY. Tobacco, Straw/Hay, &
Alternative Work. Employment
Dates: 07/01/11 12/10/11. Wage
of $9.48/hr. Worker guaranteed
3/4 of contract hours. Tools
provided at no cost. Free housing
provided to non commuting
workers. Transportation &
subsistence reimbursed when 50%
of contract is met. Apply for this
job at the nearest KY Office of
Employment & Training Division
of Workforce & Employment
Services Office referencing the job
order #KY0426667.


112 TEMP Farmworkers needed
5/23/11 10/15/11. Applicant
must have 1 month verifiable
experience hand harvesting a
perishable crop. Workers will
work alone & in teams to harvest
gladiolus & sunflowers. Workers
will also process bouquets.
Workers may be required to hand
weed gladiolus & sunflower fields.
Random drug testing at employer's
expense. Guaranteed 3/4 of
contract hours. Tools provided at
no cost. Free housing provided for
non-commuting workers.
Transportation & subsistence
reimbursed to worker upon
completion of 50% of contract, or
earlier. $10.62/hr. Worksites in
Branch & St Joseph Co's MI. Re-
port or send a resume to nearest lo-
cal FL Agency of Workforce Inno-
vation office & reference Job # MI
067073. Lynn Mayer's Great
Lakes Glads Bronson, MI

4 Temporary Farm Workers
needed. Employer: Nicholas
Hardesty Meade Co, KY.
Tobacco, Straw/Hay, Row Crop.
Greenhouse/Nursery & Alternative
Work. Employment Dates:
07/03/11 -01/15/12. Wage of
$9.48/hr. Worker guaranteed 3/4
of contract hours. Tools provided
at no cost. Free housing provided
to non commuting workers.
Transportation & subsistence
reimbursed when 50% of contract
is met. Apply for this job at the
nearest KY Office of Employment
& Training Division of Workforce
& Employment Services Office
referencing the job order
#KY0426538.

Regional OTR Drivers Needed,
must have clean driving record &
min 2 yrs CDL, 5+ yrs exp pref.
Drug test required, Please email:
masonthe3rd@gmail.com
for application

Sales Position available for moti-
vated individual Rountree -Moore
Toyota, Great benefits, paid train-
ing/vacation. Exp. a plus but not
necessary. Call Anthony Cosentino
386-623-7442

Sewing Machine Operator &
Cloth Cutter for cutting patterns
with experience, good hourly rate
Call Hafners 386-755-6481

Stylist Needed
Call
386-752-4614
Southern Exposure

Wanted Highly motivated
individual for Sales Position.
Rountree -Moore Automotive
Group, Great benefits, paid vaca-
tion. Exp. a plus but not necessary.
Call Tony Reese 386-344-7517


12 ^nMedical
120 Employment

05525891
Front Desk/Medical Billing
several years experience in
medical office and insurance
billing required. Please email
resume to admin@nfsc.comcast-
biz.net or fax to 386-438-8628

Busy Ambulatory Surgery Center
seeks experienced Medical Biller,
Position is F/T, M-F, 8-5. For
more information call, fax, or
email a resume to 386-487-3930,
386-487-3935, administration
@lcsurgery center.com
Full Time Medical Assistant
needed for very busy paperless
Family Practice. Must be highly
motivated, multi-tasking and
patient centric. Intergy IEHR
experience a plus. Please fax
resume to: 386-961-9541
Part/full Time Medical Assistant
needed in Lake City
physician office. Please fax
CV to 386-719-9662.


130 Part Time
Nursery Position Available
Southside Baptist Church,
Hours on Wednesdays and
Sunday during regular church
service. Please call 386-755-5553
for more information

240 Schools
24 0 Education

04544505
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-05/23/10

Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-07/11/11

Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
-fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com


310 Pets & Supplies

CHICHUAHUA MIX.
Moving, FREE to good.home.
Good with kids. 2 yrs did.
Found a good home!!!!
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats'being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.

330 Livestock &
SSupplies

04544708
Black Angus
Cows & Heifers
Registered & Commercial
Prices Vary
386-719-4802 or 386-623-9427


Pig
For Sale
$35
386-758-2978
Single Lane Farms
(1) 5 yr old registered Angusbull.
Duane Hingson. 386-776-1090
Wayne Parrish Bull.


361 Farm Equipment
84 Ford 4610 Tractor. Runs good.
Solid 2WD. New front tires,
350hr on 2005 motor. Dependable.
$7500. obo. 386-867-0005

407 Computers
Dell Desktop Computer,
$75
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170


410 Lawn & Garden
Equipment

2-Riding Mowers,
Craftsman, 19.5HP, 42" cut,
MTD 14.5HP, 38" cut
386-965-5744


416 Sporting Goods
GUN SHOW/STARKE
Bradford County Fairgrounds
May 14, Sat, 9-5, May 15, Sun 9-4
GunTraders is now buying GOLD
Bring your GUNS &
GOLD to sell or trade.
Concealed Weapons Classes Daily
GunTraderGunShows.com
352-339-4780

420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$250 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.


430 Garage Sales






Fri & Sat, 8 am ?,
Household, knick-knacks,
chairs, TV's, computer parts
Eastwood S/D on Apache Way
Fri & Sat. 8-1. 3455 NW Moore
Rd. Off Lake Jeffery. Look for
signs. Plus size, baby items, yards
of material, movies, music, games.
Ki4tK Ministry Rummage Sale
Fri & Sat May 13-14 8:00 AM
Comer of US 90 & Baya
Furniture Tools 100's of items
Multi-family, Sat 7 am,
654 SE Baya Dr
between Fla Pest Control &
Baya Pharmacy
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.


Sat only, 7am-noon.
880 NW Savannah Cr.
In the Plantation S/D off Hwy
90W. Wide variety of items.
SAT. 8-? 531 SW San Juan PI,
McFarlane to Grandview. Look for
signs. Fum., tools, TV's, Mowers,
saws, china, appliances & more.
Saturday only, 8am-2pm, many
miscellaneous items, Jeep Wran-
gler rag top, scuba equip., SR 247
& 63 Place (1 mi W of Beachville)

440 Miscellaneous

NEW LOMANCO All aluminum
self rimming, thermostatically con-
trol. Power vent for 2000sqft attic.
Blk, made in USA. $85. 755-6963
NEW SLOAN Regal Flusho Me-
ter. Chrome finish, gold tankless
flush. Made in USA. only $95.00.
Easy installation. 386-755-6963
NEW TAPCO C2 Floor Jack
34in-55in. with 16,000 lb
compression at 3ft. Made in USA.
Only $45.00. 386-755-6963
Tow Behind Grill/Smoker
$1,250 OBO.
386-249-3104 or
386-719-4802
Utility Trailer, Enclosed 6 x 12
w/side door and ramp
$800
386-365-5099

60A Mobile Homes
630 for Rent
t UNDER NEW MANAGEMENT
Oakview Mobile Home Park.
Clean well maintained 2/2 units in
nice park. 2 miles to downtown
Lake City. 386-984-8448
14x70 MH, 2Br/2Ba Real Cleian
Good Location! CH/A $550/Mo.
+ $200 Dep. NO PETS.
(386)755-0064 or (904)771-5924
2&3 BR MH. $395 $650. mo.
plus deposit. Water & sewer fur-
nished. Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422.
2/2 Newly remodeled MH New
Floors/counter tops. Lg lot, quiet
area No pets 1st, last & sec. $450
mo $300 sec will work w/payment
plan. Call Jenn 386-454-7724


2/2 Units, clean, well maintained,
nice safe park setting, 2 miles to
downtown Lake City, $550 month
+ $550 sec dep, 386-984-8448
2br /2ba SWMH; also Residential
RV lots for rent between Lake City
& G'ville. Access to 1-75 & 441
(352)317-1326 Call for terms


630 Mobile Homes
630 for Rent
3/2 S of Lake City, (Branford area)
$400 dep, $600 month
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
3BR/2BA MH
5 ac Country setting.
$625. mo 1st, last & deposit.
386-963-2177
Eastside Village a 55+ Retirement
Community offers 2br/2ba Manu-
factured home fully furnished. No
pets. Leases for $650 + utilities.
1st, last, security. Eastside Village
Realty, Inc. 752-5290 for info.
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White Contact 386-623-3404
or 386-365-1919
X-CLEAN 2/2 SW, 8 mi
NW of VA. Clean acre lot, nice
area. $500. mo + dep No dogs
386-961-9181

640 Mobile Homes
V640 for Sale
Access Realty Make Offer! 3/2
MH w/over 1700 SF & move in
ready. Convenient to schools,
shopping & hospitals. MLS 73861
$89,500. Patti Taylor.623-6896

60n Mobile Home
U65 & Land
MH on 1 Acre in Live Oak near
Peacock Lake, owner finance
$42,500 MLS#77598 Call Roger
Lovelady 386-365-7039 @
Westfield Realty Group
Owner Finance, Nice 3/2, S of
Lake City, small down/$650 mo
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com

710 Unfurnished Apt.
710V For Rent

05525655
SPRING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans;
some with garages.
Call 386-454-1469
or visit our website:
www.springhjllvillage.net







1 & 2 Bedroom Apartments
Move in for as low as

386-755-2423

2BR/2BA w/garage
on the west side of town.
Washer/Dryer hookups & more.
Call for details. 386-755-6867
A Landlord You Can Love!
2 brApts $575. & up + sec. Great
area. CH/A washer/dryer hookups.
386-758-9351/352-208-2421
Cute & clean, 2 br Apt. in town
Great area. Close to the VA
Medical Center. $515. mo plus
dep. Must see!!! 386-344-2972
Great location W of 1-75, spacious
deluxe 2BR apts., garage, W/D
hook up. patio. $600 & up, + SD,
386-344-3715 or 386-965-5560
The Lakes Apts. Studios & lBr's
from $135/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $450. + sec.
Call Michelle 386-752-9626

72 ,F o Furnished Apts.

New furnished bedroom apt in a
home, private entrance & bath,
incl all utilities, trash, cable, frig,
microwave. $450 per month plus
deposit; immediate availability.
386-752-2020 SW Lake City

Retirement Apt: Very clean &
quiet, Ft. White. In town. 2/1,
screen porch, W/D hook up,
$550 mo + dep. 386-497-1116
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808


confused?



Call Lake City Reporter Classifieds!


WE CAN HELP 386-755-5440


~ I


I - -


- ADvantage


I








6B

7 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent
2007 Home 3/2 1545sf,
352-281-4003, 352-317-2886
$1350 mo, $1000 dep & last,
Pet Neg.,338 SW Wise Drive, LC
3br/l-1/2ba, Block Home W of
town, CH/A, all appliances
included, NO Pets, $650 mo,
Ist/last required 386-752-5786
3BR/1.5BA. Very clean, CH/A
Fenced (privacy) large back yard.
Nice area/location. $800. mo $800.
dep. Ref's req'd. (941)920-4535
Eastside Village a 55+ Retirement
Community offers 2br/lba Duplex,
no pets. Leases for $600 + utilities.
First, last, security. Eastside
Village Realty, Inc. 752-5290
Home for Rent.
3/2 in City Limits. No pets.
$1000. per month. Call Susan,
Realtor. 386-623-6612

750 Business &
Office Rentals
For Lease: 1,500 17,000sf
1525 S. Ohio Ave, Live Oak, FL
Call Scott Stewart@ Westfield
Realty Group 386-867-3498
For Lease: E Baya Ave. Two -
1000 sqft office space units or
combined for 2000 sqft. 386-984-
0622 or weekends 386-497-4762
Office Space For Lease
2112sf, 7 rms, kg conf rm, 4 baths,
private parking MLS#76508
$1760/mo, Call Pam @ Remax
386-303-2505


OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$695. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor

790 Vacation Rentals
Horseshoe Beach RV Lot.
Nice comer Lot with shade, trees.
$295. mo Water/electric included
386-235-3633 or 352-498-5986
Horseshoe Beach Summer Spcl
Gulf Front 2br, w/lg porch, dock,
fish sink. wkend $345./wk $795.
386-235-3633/352-498-5986
alwaysonvacation.com #419-181
"Florida's Last Frontier"

805 Lots for Sale
5 Acre Lot, Secluded & Cleared,
MLS# 67871 $55,000
Call Lisa Waltrip
@ 386-365-5900
westfieldrealtygroup.com
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Fort White, 5 ac. lot. Cleared,
grass, paved street, high and dry.
MLS# 77031
Sherry 386-365-8414 $23,999
Hallmark Real Estate. Cleared
2.57 ac. fenced w/32' Dutchman
'camper. In O'Brien. Close to Live
Oak, Lake City, Branford. $25,000
MLS# 74534 386-867-1613
Hallmark Real Estate. Owner
Finance with $5K down with
terms negotiable. Below assessed
value for the county. MLS# 74484
$17,900 Jay Sears 386-867-1613
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275:

810 Home for Sale
3/2 Brick Home in town, fenced
back yard w/12xl2 workshop
$79,900 Just Reduced!
MLS# 77414 R.E.O.Realty
Group, Inc 386-243-8227
3/2 Brick Home w/1 car garage,
detach carport MLS#77780
$109,900, Call Jo Lytte Remax
386-365-2821
www.jolytte.florida-property-search.com
3/2 Cute Home, Remodeled, on 2
acres, partially fenced $114,900
MLS# 77396
R.E.O. Realty Group
386-243-8227
3/2 in Lake City Airpark
pool, porch, pond, detach garage
large hangar w/living quarters
MLS#77756 $399,900 Westfield
Call Josh G 386-466-2517
4/2 on 10.5 acres w/ detached
garage, patio, above ground pool,
MLS# 77410 $189,888
R.E.O. Realty Group, Inc
386-243-8227
Brick Home, Screened Porch
$185,900 MLS#77893
Call Charlie Sparks @
Westfield Realty Group
386-755-0808


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SATURDAY, MAY 14, 2011


810 Home for Sale
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
6br/3.5ba brick. Lake views from
back. 39.7 ac., private paved road.
MLS# 76111 Mary Brown White-
hurst. 386-965-0887 $1,200,000
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Home on the lake in town. 4br/3ba
MLS# 76085 Elaine K. Tolar 386-
755-6488 or Mary Brown White-
hurst. 386-965-0887 $299,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
New home in Mayfair S/D. 4br on
corner lot. Split plan. $214,900
MLS# 76919 Elaine K. Tolar.
386-755-6488


Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
4br/3ba 2 story brick on cul-de-
sac. 1 ac landscaped. Lori Geibeig
or Mary Brown Whitehurst.
386-965-0887 $299,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
4br/1.5ba brick. 1332 sq ft. Great
floor plan, nice yard, close to
town. 1 ac landscaped. Lori
Geibeig MLS# 75713 $84.900
CYPRESS LANDING!
3BR/2BA built in 2005
w/large kitchen $115,000
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #75794
DESIRABLE GWEN LAKE
area! Nice 3BR/2BA home
on comer lot $112,000
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #77307
Eastside Village a 55+ Retirement
Community. 2br/2ba home with
garage, screen porch. Choose wall
color, flooring. MLS# 76483 East-
side Village Realty, Inc. 752-5290
FOR SALE by very motivated
owner. Now reduced $80,000 to
$119,000. Townhouse on Golf
course. 3br/3ba. Wood burning
fireplace. End unit. Remodeled
kitchen, first class appliances,
granite countertops. New Hunter
Douglas wdw treatments.
Cathedral ceiling. Pool, tennis
court. Call for appt. (904)246-6222
Great Family Home in S/D
MLS# 77325, $109,000
Call Missy Zecher @ Remax
Professionals 386-623-0237
www.missyzecher.com
Great Home in Great Neighbor-
hood, Can be 4/2 or 3/2 w/study
MLS#77284 $164,900
Call Carrie Cason @Westfield
386-623-2806
GREAT STARTER HOME!
3BR/2BA w/lots of closets
space & nice lawn $79,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #76432
Hallmark Real Estate. 3/2 Brick
home w/large screened porch.
Back yard has wooded privacy.
MLS#69482 Janet Creel 719-0382
or Paula Lawrence 623-1973
,Hallmark Real Estate. Bring the
horses. 3/2 HUD, 4 ac. Sold "as is"
$106,000 Bids are being accepted.
www.hudhomestore.com MLS#
72068 Martin Tavener 965-7773
Hallmark Real Estate. DWMH on
5 ac south of town. Back porch,
new metal roof wood burning fire-
place & wired workshop. $82,500
MLS#77185 Janet Creel 719-0382
Hallmark Real Estate. Glassed
porch overlooks wooded backyard
in the Plantations Pool,
sprinkler system. $229,900
MLS#75429 Janet Creel 719-0382
Hallmark Real Estate. Time to go
to the River. Stilt home w/covered
decking. Floating dock,out bldgs
& covered RV parking. $188K.
MLS#72068 Janet Creel 719-0382
Home on 15 Acres, 2500sf, new
appliances, workshop, MLS 77552
$235,000 Call Brittany @
Results Realty 386-397-3473.
HOME OR OFFICE on
Alachua St; remodeled
1,207 SqFt home $82,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #77724
Hallmark Real Estate. 2006
2200SF home. 2br/2ba w/mother-
.in-law suite, 4 car garage, endless
hot water heater. MLS# 77547
$309,900 Jay Sears 386-867-1613
Hallmark Real Estate. 3/3 Brick
w/over 2500 SF. Great location
with nice one acre pond in back.
Detached workshop MLS# 75222
$179,900 Jay Sears 386-867-1613
Hallmark Real Estate. 4/2 Brick,
3100 SF, Granddaddy Oaks on 5
acres. Double detached carport/ga-
rage w/workshop. MLS# 77877
$119,900. Jay Sears 386-867-1613
Just Reduced 3/2 home, inside city
limits, fenced backyard, detached
carport w/office MLS#77411
$82,900 Call R.E.O.Realty,
@ 386-243-8227 Make Offer!
Just Reduced 4/2 on 1.57 acres,
fireplace. partially fenced, MLS#
77412, Call Nancy Rogers at
R.E.O. Realty Group
386-243-8227 $64,900
Large affordable home in S/D on 2
Acres, fishing rights to Timberlake
Property Owner's Assoc. $64,900
MLS#74862 Call Brittany @
Results Realty386-397-3473
Large Brick, 3/1, 4.43 acres, metal
roof, MLS# 77415 $104,888
R.E.O. Realty Group, Inc.
386-243-8227
Large Home in the Country on
3.66 acres, fireplace, 2 outbldgs,
MLS#76471, $89,900 Call Jo
Lytte @ Remax 386-365-2821
jolytte@remaxnfl.com


ON WHEELS & WATERCRAFT R,


2005 F-350 Lariat
49,000 miles, many
extras, excellent cond.

$19,500 obo

Call
386-755-0139


To Pace Your Ad, Cailll

755-5440


810 Home for Sale
Large Home w/Open Floor Plan,
back yard & porch, Irg oaks, fire-
place. MLS#76122 $115,000
Call Missy Zecher @ Remax 386-
623-0237.mzecher@remax.net
LOTS OF UPGRADES!
Remodeled kitchen in this
2BR/1BA home $29.900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY
INC. 755-5110 #77505
Luxury Log Home,
Whole House Generator, $269,900
MLS# 76899 Call Roger
Lovelady @386-365-7039
westfieldrealtygroup.com
Nice, large 4/2 on 1 acre
w/florida room, granite floors,
wrap around front porch, $148,000
Call Brittany Stoeckert @
Results Realty 386-397-3473
Norwegian Brick Home, fire-
place/family rm, open floor plan,
screen porch, fenced back yard,
MLS#76796 $179,900
Jo Lytte Remax 386-365-2821
Owner Finance. Custom built 3/2.5
10.8 ac. Granite, fireplace, vaulted
ceilings, surround sound. lanai,
gazebo. MLS 77382 Access Real
ty. Patti Taylor $249K 623-6896
Priced Reduced! 3/2 w/2346 sf.
.67 ac. Creekside S/D. Shade,
surround sound, vaulted ceilings.
MLS 77385 $169,900. Access
Realty. Patti Taylor. 386-623-6896
Rose Creek S/D, 5/4, 3269sf, on
2.2 acres, bonus rm, many
upgrades Reduced! MLS#75485
Reduced! $234,900, Call Pam @
Remax 386-303-2505
Spacious Brand New Split Floor
Plan Home, Fenced Yard
MLS#77493 $229,900
Call Mike Lienemann @ Westfield
Realty Group 386-867-9053
SPACIOUS home built in
1995 has 2BR/2BA& 1,636
SqFt on 1 acre $89,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110
Sturdy 3/2 on 4.35 acres, fruit &
pecan trees, Minutes from town
MLS#77878 $105,000
Call Jo Lytte @ Remax
386-365-2821/www.jolytte.com
Totally Remodeled 4 Bd Home
Spacious Must See!
MLS#77782 $135,000
Missy Zecher 386-623-0237
www.missyzecher.com
Well Maintained 3/2 on dead-end
street, quiet, country, close to
downtown $105,000 MLS#77800
Call Lisa Waltrip @Westfield
Realty Group 386-365-5900

820 Farms &
O Acreage
4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$69,900. $613mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
4 acres, Wellborn, New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down, $39,900, $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
FARM- 7 stall barn, Apt.
17+ acres cross fenced.
Close in $1000. mo.
386-961-1086
FOR SALE: McAlpin. 10 Acres
W/2006 DW, 12 X 24 Back
addition laundry/office & 12 x 18
covered porch. 20 x 32 polebarn &
8 x 16 Utility shed. 863-634-5283
for details & pictures, $75,000
Leave message w/name, phone
number & email address.
Half to ten acre lots. Some w/
well, septic, pp. We finance; low
dwn pmt. Deas Bullard Properties.
386-752-4339. www.landnfl.com
Hallmark Real Estate. 40 ac hunt-
ing tract w/camper. Water & septic
already in place. Stands & feeders
in place. MLS# 75532
$84,000 Jay Sears 386-867-1613
Three One Acre Lots available
@ $14,900 ea & One 1.65 Acre
lot for $19,900 MLS#76050
Call Brodie Alfred 386-623-0906
Westfield Realty Group

830 Commercial
830 Property
Commercial Property For Sale
Currently Leased $495,000
MLS#75953 Call Aaron
Nickelson @ 386-867-3534
Westfield Realty Group
Great Investment/Owner Finance
1400 sq ft building on 2 acres
Creative terms, owner flexible.
Call for details. 386-867-1190
Hallmark Real Estate. Downtown
Restaurant. Gigantic BBQ Smoker
Clean kitchen w/equip. Handle any
type of food svc. MLS# 77902
$189,900 Vic Lantroop 623-6401
Mini Storage (204 Units).
gated, fenced 5 acres, $1,300,000,
MLS#76048 Call Millard Gillen
@ Westfield Realty Group
386-365-7001

85OC Waterfront
O Property
Upscale River Cabin on
Suwannee River, Shop, Dock
MLS#76336 $349,900
Call Jo Lytte @ Remax
386-365-2821


860 Investment
O0U Property
3/2 Renovated Home in town,
front porch, new appliances, cur-
rently leased MLS#76658 $49,900
Jo Lytte/Remax 386-365-2821
www.jolytie.florida;property-scalich.comi
Great Income Opportunity!
Mobile Home Park For Sale
MLS#77228 $195,000
Call Pam Beauchamp @ Remax
386-758-8900


940 Trucks
2006 TOYOTA Tacoma
Pre-Runner SR 5. Perfect
condition. 67,800 miles.
$15,000. 386-397-2972


Classified Department: 755-5440


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