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UFPKY NEH LSTA



The Lake City reporter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01552
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 5/13/2011
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
System ID: UF00028308:01552
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text




Injury Issues Purple & Gold
Tiger Woods CHS football team to
withdraws from kick off 100th season
-,1 - -:---L...:- ';"" '--nual game.
00017 120511 **-*3-DTGIT 326
LIB OF FLORIDA HISTORY tS, I B
PO BOX 117007
205 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-1943


Red & Black


Spring
White


staff has Fort
football team


ready for Saturday.
Sports, IB


alKCe


'uly


Reporter


Friday, May 13, 201


www.lakecityreporter.com


Vol. 137, No. 94 M 75 cents


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake tity Reporter
Rob Kade (background), a clinical representative for Intuitive Surgical Inc., explains how to control the da Vinci Surgical
System to Blake Cannon during a demonstration Thursday at the Shands LakeShore Regional Medical Center. The robot-
ic surgical system is used to treat various conditions, including different types of cancers, mitral valve prolapse, endome-
triosis and coronary artery disease. 'It's insane. It's crazy. It makes me want to go to medical school now,' Cannon joked.



ROBOTIC DEMO


Shands Lakeshore
test drives $1.7M
surgical device.

By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com,
The administrative
and medical staff at
Shands LakeShore
Regional Medical
Center re-empha-
sized its commitment to the com-
munity by allowing residents to
"test drive" a new $1.7 million
piece of surgical equipment dur-
ing an open house Thursday.
The da Vinci Surgical System,
a surgical systerh which. utilizes
three robotic arms, foot pedals,
a camera and high-definition
television screen for minimally
invasive surgery was showcased
during the afternoon event. The
machine uses arms that are con-
trolled remotely by a physician.
Using the robotic system may
result in quicker operation times
for doctors and shorter recovery
times for patients.
'These arms are able to do
just about the same thing that
a physician's hands can do,
but because they are so much
smaller you don't need to have
as big of an incision," said Dr.
DEMO continued on 3A


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Rob Kade adjusts the camera fixed to one of the robotic arms of the da Vinci'
Surgical System. The other three arms can hold a different surgical instrument.
Eight of about 40 instruments are used on a regular basis.


Florida Gateway

College receives

$100,000 bequest


Gift establishes
scholarship
endowment.

From staff reports
The Foundation for
Florida Gateway College
received a $100,000 bequest
from the estate of Francis
Kayo Bowman Thursday.
The gift establishes the
Francis Kayo Bowman
Scholarship endowment at
Florida Gateway College to
benefit golf course opera-
tions and turf equipment
management students in
perpetuity.
Bowman died April 6 at
the age of 92 and was well
respected in the golf and
turf industry.
He founded Wekiva Golf


Club in Longwood in 1976.
Bowman became one of the
few men to hold the distinc-
tion of Lifetime Member
of the Professional Golfers
Association anrd a Lifetime
Member of the Golf
Course Superintendent's
Association of America.
Bowman was honored by,
the PGA as Merchandiser
of the Year for Semi-Private
Golf Courses and was also
listed in Who's Who in
America in the early 1990's.
He sold Wekiva Golf Club
and retired in 1998.
His love -for the game
of golf and turfgrass man-
agement was evidenced,
by everyone whose life h6
touched.
Bowmanwas predeceased
GATEWAY continued on 3A


Woman injured,

boat damaged in

sturgeon strike


Airborne fish
crashes through
windshield.

By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
A Safety Harbor woman
was' injured last month
when the boat she was
traveling in struck a Gulf
sturgeon, causing $2,300
worth of damage, as it
jumped from the waters
of the Suwannee River,
Florida Fish and Wildlife
ConservAtion Commission
officials said in an inves-
tigative report issued
Thursday. The incident
marked the first reported
sturgeon strike since 2009.
Erica Stevens, 27, of
Safety Harbor, received
minor injuries in the inci-
dent.
According to FWC


reports, on April 27,
Stevens and her husband,
Scott Stevens, were on the
Suwannee River north of
the U.S. Highway 19 Bridge
in Gilchrist County, travel-
ing about 15 mph. Scott
Stevens was operating the
boat when about 5 p.m., a 5-
foot sturgeon jumped up in
front of the Stevens' vessel
and crashed through the
boat's windshield.
"We did confirm that
it was a sturgeon strike,"
said Karen Parker, public
information coordinator
for the FWC North Central
Region, who. noted the
FWC investigation was
finalized Wednesday night.
"The woman received
minor injuries."
Erica Stevens was sitting
behind the passenger wind-
shield and was hit by flying
glass, suffering cuts on her
BOAT continued on 6A


Number of FCAT retakes

down approximately 100


More students
passing exam
on first attempt.

By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com
FCAT Reading and Math
Petake scores were offi-
cially released Thursday,
showing that district stu-
dents taking the retakes
this year was about 100
less than those taking
them in 2010.
"Less people are hav-
ing to take it," said Kitty
McElhaney, director of


Curriculum Assessment
and Accountability for the
Columbia County School
District, "so therefore, you
may see a drop in scores
because fewer people are
taking it."
The Florida Department
of Education dispensed
all state districts'
Florida Comprehensive
Assessment Test retake
scores, gathered from
exams taken by students
in grades 11 and 12 across
the state in April.
Students who took the
retakes were 11th and 12th-
graders who did not pass
either the FCAT Reading


or Math exams when
they initially took them
in grade 10, McElhaney
said. Students continue to
retake the test(s) they did
not pass each fall or spring
until they pass or receive
a concordant score .- a
score DOE deems compa-
rable to a passing FCAT
score on the SAT or
ACT, she said.
A passing FCAT retake
score is 300 points or
above out of 500 points,
McElhaney said.
Columbia County
School District students
FCAT continued on 3A


Farmers Market, FAM Fest

team up for fundraiser


Haven Hospice
to benefit from
annual event.

From staff reports
The Lake DeSoto
Farmers Market returns
8 a.m.-noon Saturday at
Wilson Park. The market
kicked-off Saturday with'
hundreds in attendance.
The market is joining
with EA.M. Fest, Haven
Hospice's annual fund-
raiser, this week. EA.M.
Fest will run all day in
FARMERS continued on 3A


COURTESY PHOTO
John and Raven Smith of High Springs, members of
Quartermoon, will perform from 9 a.m. to noon.


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400


94
Partly Cloudy
WEATHER, 2A


(Ii.-,


O pinion ................ 4A
Around Florida ........... 2A
W orld.................. 6A .
Advice & Comics......... 4B
Puzzles ................. 2B


..-


TODAY IN
PEOPLE
,2-bib :.,l int ,
r~ rU~ i'li


COMING
SATURDAY
'.t L-eo U ,ni.er ..i,t
2 a,'r du 3t.:-ii .:,:-'. ,r.t'e


_






LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING FRIDAY, MAY 13, 2011


Play4)


C $H3 Thursday:
Afternoon: 6-4-8
Evening: 8-9-4


Thursday:
Afternoon: 6-5-7-2
Evening: 2-3-2-7


eznatch -
Wednesday:
2-9-22-28-31


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



Gibson's rants may not be used as evidence


LOS ANGELES
A series of Mel
Gibson's rac-
ist and sexist
rants might
not be used
as evidence during an
ongoing child custody
dispute, an attorney for his
ex-girlfriend told a judge
Thursday.
The disclosure comes
a week after Oksana
Grigorieva's attorney,
Daniel Horowitz, told the
court that his client was
dropping her claims that
Gibson physically abused
her for the purposes of a
case over the custody and,
, care of their infant daughter.
_ Horowitz's comments
came after Gibson attorney
Stephen Kolodny com-
plained that he had been
trying to get access to the
'Russian musician's laptop
for nearly a year to find out
more about the recordings.
Horowitz noted that
Grigorieva is no longer
seeking a domestic violence
restraining order against
Gibson and the rants were
more important to those
allegations than any other
aspects of the case.
The recordings,
which were leaked to
the celebrity website
RadarOnline.com, included
misogynistic statements
about Grigorieva by the
Oscar-winner and also
several racial slurs. The
tapes were reviewed by
authorities who eventu-
ally charged Gibson with
misdemeanor domestic
violence battery, but have


never been played in open
court.
The "Braveheart" star
pleaded no contest to the
battery charge and was
placed on probation and
ordered to undergo coun-
seling.

Mary Tyler Moore
to undergo surgery
NEW YORK A
representative for Mary
Tyler Moore said the
veteran sitcom star will
have surgery to remove a
brain tumor.
Spokeswoman Alla
Plotkin said Moore's doc-
tors recommended the
elective procedure after
monitoring the tumor for
some time. Plotkin did
not say when the surgery
would take place.
It would remove a
meningioma, a slow-grow-
ing tumor in the mem-
branes that cover the
brain. Meningiomas usu-
ally occur in older adults


If


and are
mostly
benign.
The 74-


4 year-old
Moore
gained
stardom
Moore as a mod-
ern sub-
urban housewife on the
1960s comedy "The Dick
Van Dyke Show," then
went on to headline her
own successful series as a
single woman pursuing a
career.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this file photo, Mel Gibson and Oksana Grigorieva arrive
at the "Edge Of Darkness" Premiere in Paris. An attorney for
Grigorieva said Thursday that he may not introduce a series
of racist and sexist rants by the actor-director in a child
custody case because the Russian musician is dropping her
domestic violence claims.


Jim Lehrer to
retire as anchor
NEW YORK Jim
Lehrer has been delivering
the news each weeknight
to PBS viewers since the
Gerald Ford administra-
tion. Now he says it's time
to step away.
He announced Thursday
that he's leaving the
"NewsHour" as a regular
anchor effective the week


of June 6,
the final
step in a
carefully
planned
retire-
ment that
included
Lehrer the intro-
duction of
a rotating anchor team in
December 2009.

Associated Press


Celebrity Birthdays


* Actor Harvey Keitel is 72.
* Singer Stevie Wonder is
61.
* Former NBA All-Star Den-
nis Rodman is 50.
* Actor-comedian Stephen


Colbert is 47.
* Singer Darius Rucker
(Hootie and the Blowfish) is
45.
* Rock musician Mickey
Madden (Maroon 5) is 32.


Daily Scripture


"[Epilogue:The Wife of Noble
Character] A wife of noble char-
acter who can find? She is worth
far more than rubies. She watch-
es over the affairs of her house-
hold and does not eat the bread
of idleness. Her children arise
and call her blessed; her hus-
band also, and hepraises her."
Proverbs :31:10,. 27-28


HO0
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Lake City Reporter
W TO REACH US BUSINESS
number ........(386) 752-1293 Conltroller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
number ...;..........752-9400 (sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
ulation............... 755-5445
e,... www.lakecityreporter.com CIRCULATION
Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
unity Newspapers Inc., is pub- should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
I Tuesday through Sunday at 180 Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7:30
uval St.; Lake City, Fla. 32055., a.m. on Sunday.
dical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.
ber Audit Bureau of Circulation and Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
Associated Press. problems with your delivery service.
material herein is property of the Lake In Columbia County, customers should
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stant Editor CJ Risak. .754-0427 (Tuesday through Sunday)
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CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or.suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will
run in this space. And thanks for reading.


Art teacher
punches student
BROOKSVILLE
Authorities said a high
school art teacher was
arrested after punching a
student who called her vul-
gar names.
According to a'Hernando
County Sheriffs Office
arrest report, 64-year-old
Sandra Hadsock was arrest-
- ed Wednesday after taking
two or three swings at a
student in the hallway. The
student received a minor
injury on his lip.
-. Officials said other stu-
dents pulled the teen away
from the teacher.
Joe Vitalo, president of
Ahe Hernando Classroom
'Teachers Association said
-the Hadscok maintains
'he acted in self-defense.
Vitalo said the incident
was captured by a cell
phone camera.
Hadsock will be sus-
pended with pay pending a
school district investigation.
Hadsock was arrested
on a charge of child abuse
without causing great bodi-
ly harm. The arrest report
states she refused to coop-
erate with a deputy.

Teens charged
with laptop theft
LAKELAND Police
have recovered more
than half of the 55 laptops
stolen from Lake High
School, and they've arrest-
ed two teen suspects.
A 16-year-old and a 17-.
year-old were arrested late
Tuesday on multiple felony
charges. Police are continu-
ing-their search for the
third suspect in the April 30
robbery at the high school.
Authorities said they
aren't sure if the teens were
students at Lakeland High.
Police said a tip led
them to a home in
Mulberry on Monday,
where they found one
computer and a coopera-
tive witness. They eventu-


JASON MATTHEW WALKERILake City Reporter

Traffic directors
Anderson Columbia employees Alfonso Ramirez (left) and
Dusty Browning control traffic while U.S Highway 90 is
repaved.


ally learned of the 17-year-
old's involvement and went
to his home. There, they
found 13 computers.
So far, police have recov-
ered 37 computers.
The teens were
booked into the Juvenile
Assessment Center in
Bartow.

Wanted man
jumps into ocean
COCOA BEACH --A
man running from authori-
ties jumped into the Atlantic
Ocean, where a sheriffs
helicopter used a spotlight
to hunt him down.
Deputies arrested 30-
year-old Ryan Prebor
Wednesday night after
searching the Atlantic
Ocean along Cocoa Beach
for 40 minutes.
The chase began after
investigators confronted
Prebor while he was
working at a beachside
restaurant. He was wanted
on charges of dealing in
stolen property and pro-
viding false verification of
ownership.
Prebor ran from authori-
ties, who chased him sev-
eral blocks before he "ran
straight into the water."
It wasn't his first police


chase. In 2005, records
show he led police on a car
chase that ended with 17
charges against him.
This time, Prebor was
charged with resisting
arrest without violence.
He's also been linked to an
armed robbery.

Alligator bites
trapper in leg
TAMPA A six-foot-long
alligator bit a trapper on the
leg as the trapper tried to
capture the creature.
The Hillsborough
County Sheriff's Office
reports that the trapper
- whose name was not
released was trying to
catch the alligator along a
roadside Wednesday night.
As he tried to ensnare
the reptile, it bit his leg
and wouldn't let go. A dep-
uty shot the gator, which
then released its grip from
the man's leg.
The trapper was taken to
an area hospital. Deputies
said his wound does not
appear life-threatening.
The Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation
Commission is investigat-


THE WEATHER


PARTLY CHANCE CHANCE
CLOUDY OFT- OFT-
SRMS STORMS

HI LOHI 88 LO 64 HI85LO62


Wdes
90/66 0
Tallahassee* Lake City,
90 68 94.66
0 Gainesville *
iPanama City a3/65
86/71 O -\ cala *
93/65
9 9
Tamlae.
93/68'


City
Jacksonville Cape Canaveral
90/69 Daytona Beach
Ft. Lauderdale
Daytona Beach Fort Myers
88J68 Gainesville
-. Jacksonville


Ft. Lauderdale Panama City
Ft. Myers 86/73 Pensacola
93/70 Naples Tallahassee
88/71 Miami Tampa
Key West 87/74 Valdosta
Key Wet* W. Palm Beach
87/77


TEMPERATURES
High Thursday
Low Thursday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Thursday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


MOON
Moonrise today 4:22 p.m.
Moonset today 3:34 a.m.
Moonrise tom. 5:29 p.m.
Moonset tom. 4:12 a.m.


May May June June
17 24 1 8
Full Last New First


7a Ip 7p la 6a
Friday Saturday







Foreitedlemimesahjre Feekls he" temperatre


On this date in
1981, a large t(
do destroys 90
cent of Emberso
Texas. A man in
bathtub was blo
a quarter of a rr
and a 1500 pou
recreational veh
was blown 500
yards.


4 to Forecasts, data and
. graphics 2011 Weather .
% | I I Central, LP, Madison, Wis.
weatherJI www.weatherpubllsher.com


N Associated Press


AROUND FLORIDA


*^,-U-.'. : : -,'.,,
.-.


Pensacola
82/72


4
drando Caph Canaveral.Key West
01/70n 84/70 ,Lake.City


West Palm Beach
86/73 0


Miami
Maples
Ocala
Orlando


Saturday
85 70 1
89. 67 i
89.61 1
86 73 1
90, 6 L
88/65/t
86/67/t
87/77/pc
88/64/t
86/75/t
87/72/t
89/65/t
90/70/t
83/68/t
82/64/t
85/64/t
88/66/t
86/63/t
83/74/t


Sunday
83 67-1
85,65 1
89 72 i
88, 68,
86/64/t
85/66/t
86/76/sh
85/62/t
89/73/t
85/70/sh
86/64/t
88/68/t
79/66/t
80/63/pc
84/62/t
87/66/t
83/60/t
88/72/t


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise tom.
Sunset tom.


6:38 a.m.
8:16 p.m.
6:38 a.m.
8:17 p.m.


97
64
86
61
97 in 1955
48 in 1924

0.00"
0.09"
11.57"
0.93"
14.95"


10

0lmisutstolnm
Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+.


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.



weather.com


per-
on,
a
wn
nile
ind
icle


uei ~nneoa
",o1e


~-


Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424


.ISOLATED

,''STORMS


I x






LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL FRIDAY, MAY 13, 2011


Breakfast with Chief Saturday


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com

The Lake City Police
Department will listen to
new public concerns and
give updates on old ones at
Saturday's Breakfast with
the Chief.
The quarterly meeting is
10-11:30 a.m. Saturday in
the Public Safety Training
Room.
Breakfast with the Chief
aims to provide a relaxed
atmosphere for citizens
to express both their con-
cerns and expectations
of the police department,
said Capt John Blanchard,
LCPD public information
officer. Status reports of
problems identified at
previous meetings will be


shared, and the floor will
open up to hearing new
ones.
The meetings were
instituted to gain citizens'
concerns and problems in
the community, he said.
Law enforcement officials
might think issues, such
as noisy cars and drug
dealers, are the main con-
cerns.
"Sometimes that may
not be the problems at the
heart of concerns for citi-
zens," Blanchard said. "It
may be more quality-of-life
issues."
The police department
doesn't just arrest people,
he said. Phone calls come
in from people who have
a "hiccup" and want some-
one to vent to. or don't


know who they can call
for help.
"We're a one-stop shop,"
Blanchard said. "If people
call and have problems,
we try to guide them to
the service we hope can
best help take care of their
problems."
Command staff and rep-
resentatives from other
City of Lake City depart-
ments will be on hand at
the event for questions and
comments, he said. Call
* 719-5742 for more informa-
tion.
"This is about the com-
munity and working with
other departments even
though it's called Breakfast
with the Chief," Blanchard
said.


GATEWAY: Receives bequest


Continued From Page 1A
by his wife of 63 years, Leola,
and survived by his daugh-
ter, Tammy, and son-in-law,
Chris Wilmot.
Bowman never visited
Florida Gateway College,
but was impressed by the
quality of the Golf and


Landscape Program gradu-
ates and subsequently
named the college in his
will.
Anyone wishing to con-
tribute to the Francis Kayo
Bowman Scholarship in his
memory, please contact


or send your gift to The
Foundation for Florida
Gateway College, 149 SE
College Place, Lake City,
Florida 32025. E-mail mike.
lee@fgc.edu or call 754-4201
for more information.


DEMO: Equipment on display

Continued From Page 1A


Joseph Charles, an OB-
GYN at Shands LakeShore
Regional Medical Center,
who answered audience
questions during the event
During the two-hour
open house event, more
than 100 people came in
to look at the equipment
and see what it feels like to
operate it.
The system is complete-
ly intuitive and operates
with an electrical power
supply. It can be used to
treat a range of conditions
through minimal invasion
surgery such as: bladder
cancer, coronary artery
disease, gynecological can-
cer, kidney disorders, lung
cancer, obesity, throat can-
cer, uterine fibroids and a
variety of other cancers.
The unit was delivered at
the hospital March 29 and
installed April 1.
"We decided to have the
open house because we're
really excited about the cut-
ting edge technology that
the da Vinci brings to our
hospital and we wanted to
share that with our commu-
nity," said Rhonda Sherrod,.
Shands LakeShore Regional
Medical Center CEO. 'We
hope this allows people to
stay local for their health-
care."
Mark Fitzgerald isn't a
physician, but was one, of
the first people to sit at the


da Vinci Surgical System
and test the equipment.
He said he was impressed
with the piece of medical
equipment.
"The da Vinci was remark-
ably intuitive," he said. "Ifs
amazing. You get the hang
of it right away. The instru-
ments do what your fingers
are asking them to do right
away. I would have thought
it would have taken a lot lon-
ger to be able to operate it"
Charles has performed
surgery twice utilizing the
da Vinci device.
"This machine makes a
very big difference to the
patient," he said. "Patients
experience a lot less pain,
shorter hospital stays and
less complications when
this instrument is used on
them."
Charles stressed that
using the da Vinci Surgery
System allows physicians
to eliminate the large inci-
sions traditionally used
for surgery and noted the
machine's camera gives
physicians a three dimen-
siopal view as they per-
form operations.
"By not having a big
incision, that's were you
get most of the relief in the
amount of pain that major
surgery usually causes," he
said. "It's one of the new-
est technologies and it's
going to greatly change, at


least from a gynecological
standpoint, how surgery is
done."
Charles had about 12
hours of training before
using the device during an
actual operation.
"I think this will make
a big difference for the
hospital," he said, noting
patients that often traveled
to hospitals outside, the
area, will now be able to
get their treatment closer
to home.
Sherrod said extensive
training is required for
doctors to use the machine
and noted that in addition
to Dr. Charles, two more
OB-GYN physicians will
go in for training.
"A total of five physi-
cians will be trained on it
when we get finished," she
said. "Our goal is to keep
people here in Lake City
and meet their health care
needs here so they don't
have to travel out of town
for these types of medical
procedures."


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Budget workshops continue


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter. corn

Columbia County offi-
cials continue to review
the county's 2010-2011 fis-
cal budget with a fine-tooth
comb looking for areas
where additional cuts can
be made for the upcoming
fiscal year if necessary.
During a county bud-
get workshop Thursday
evening, which lasted an
hour, department heads
from the county's facilities
management, safety and
emergency management
departments detailed
their current year budgets
and explained their job
responsibilities.


"Columbia County com-
missioners have already
reviewed all revenue
sources available to the
county and now we're in
the process of reviewing
expenditures," said Dale
Williams, county manager,
noting at least three more
workshops have been
scheduled. "Ultimately,
this will provide knowl-
edge to the board that
commissioners can use
when they begin to delib-
erate the fiscal year 2011-
2012 budget." "
During Thursday's
workshop department
heads addressing their
budgets also included pro-
posed budgets for next


year with reductions of 5
percent and 10 percent.
The department heads
then explained where the
money would be com-
ing from and noted if any
personnel would need to
be cut to meet the 5 and
10 percent budget reduc-
tions.
"Commissioners wanted
each department to pro-
vide for them a 5 and 10
percent budget reduction
scenario," Williams said.,
Thursday night's
workshop marked the
fourth Columbia County
Commission budget work-
shop as officials look to
begin work on the county's
2011-2012 fiscal budget.


FCAT: Number of retakes down

Continued From Page 1A


that took the re-takes
were from Columbia High
School, Fort White High
School and the Challenge
Learning Center.
Across the district, 22
percent of more than 115
grade 11 students passed
the Reading re-take;


15 percent of almost 65
grade 12 students passed
the Reading re-take; 27
percent of more than 40
grade 11 students passed
the Math re-take; and 13
percent of almost 15 grade
12 students passed the
Math re-take.


McElhaney said FCAT
re-take scores are the
only factor used to calcu-
late bonus points for the
Florida School Grades,
points that are added to
the school's 'total score
and impact a school's final
grade.


FARMERS: Music from 9 a.m. to noon

Continued From Page 1A


downtown Lake City, and
activities will include a
morning 5K run around
Lake DeSoto right past
the farmers market.
The market will feature
live music 9 a.m. to noon
from Quartermoon.
The group includes
the High Springs based
husband and wife team
of John and Raven Smith.
John Smith is on bass,
vocals and composer, and
Raven Smith is on rhythm
guitar and vocals.
The couple is joined by
Jon Alexander on pedal,
steel and acoustic and
electric guitars and Mike


Mullis on drums..
Quartermoon has par-
ticipated in events such
as Magnoliafest and
Springfest at the Spirit
of the Suwannee Music
Park for 14 years, Farm to
FamilyMusicConcerts,the
Hickoryfest in Wellsboro,
Pa., the Gram Parsons
Tribute in Waycross, Ga.
and Gainesville's "Let's
Go Downtown Concert
Series."
The Lake City Parks &
Recreation Department is
bringing its Summer pro-
gram to the market with.
dancing, arts and crafts
and other activities May


21 at the Market
Vendor applications for
the Lake DeSoto Farmers
Market are available and
the City of Lake City is also
looking for a permanent
market manager. Contact
Jackie Kite, City of Lake
City community redevel-
opment administrator, by
calling 719-5766 or e-mail
kitej@lcfla.com.
Wilson Park is located
between Shands Hospital
and the Columbia County
.. Courthouse in downtown
Lake City at 778 NE Lake
DeSoto Circle.


$:-- ,J


.7
1-


iasin store


Summer Movie Preview
PARADE's Summer Movie Preview provides
a synopsis of the 18 hottest "must-see" films
of the season, including an in-depth look at
the upcoming Pirates of the Caribbean: On
Stranger Tides.

Intelligence Report: Sunday
With Amy Poehler
With late nights a thing of the past, the
comedian discusses the delights of avocados,
organizing, and Lisa Minnelli.


They've Got Game
A basketball powerhouse from California tops PARADE's 35th Annual Girls
Basketball Team. Find out why the press has already heralded her as the next
Lisa Leslie, and meet the rest of the team.


SUNDAY, May 15, 2011
Lake City Reporter


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Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424


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OPINION


Friday, May 13, 2011


AN I -I


AN
OPINION


Welcome

to the

Newt

show

Newt Gingrich is
a very intelligent
man, if he says so
himself.
I first
encountered the newly de
cared presidential candidate in
1985, as he was breaking out as
an insurgent Republican in the
House.
What I remember most
about the interview in his office
(which, he proudly noted, had
no desk with the unfortunate
consequence that there were
ungodly piles of paper all
over the floor and coffee
table) was that Gingrich kept
telling me he was an
educator, a historian, that he
had a PhD.
I had never before met an
educated person who was so
determined to make reference
to how educated he was.
Then, Gingrich said
something unusual for a self-
proclaimed educator-historian-
PhD. The thinker who meant
the most to him, he declared,
was Alvin Toffler, author of the
1970 pop bestseller "Future
Shock."
Not Aristotle; not Plato; not
Edward Gibbon, the greatest
historians in the English
language; not Shakespeare or
Tolstoy or John Locke. Alvin
Toffler.
Newt Gingrich has a'restless
and outsized intelligence that
is tragically unleavened by any
kind of critical sensibility.
Without question, he is able
to see interesting things others
can't. For example, at a meeting
here at The New York Post a
dozen years ago, he offered
the brilliant observation that
something significant had
changed when people
began to trust bank machines
with their paychecks rather
than handing them to actual
people and that we should
expect the commercial use of
the Internet to explode as a
S result.
-'When he's seized by an idea,
he believes in it wholeheartedly
and makes a very good case
for it
* New York Post

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
'We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman


LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters ,
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,


Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


o paraphrase .
America Online's
famous phrase, I've
got mail. What this
mail teaches me is
that technology is a wonderful
thing but it is changing people's
lives in ways not always great.
Consider how people used to
communicate before iPhones,
BlackBerrys and laptops. Why,
back in the olden days, they
wrote letters with pen and ink.
Letter writers would first have
to find a suitable quill, which
sometimes involved going
into the backyard in search
of a goose willing to donate a
feather. At times, they were
unsuccessful, giving rise to
the expression "a wild goose
chase." (Note to copy desk:
check this before putting in
paper).
With quill in hand, they would
start their letter "My Dear Mr.
Somebodyorother," and after a
flourish of pretty phrases, would
sign themselves, "Your Most
Sincere and Obedient Servant,
John Q. Citizen Esq."
In signing this way, the social
understanding was that the let-
ter writer might not be sincere,
was probably not obedient and
was almost certainly not a ser-
vant
These quaint manners were
a formal hypocrisy meant to
make all personal communica-
tion civilized. A man or woman
might make all sorts of slanders
against whole classes of people
but would conduct personal
communications on a higher
plane of sincere insincerity.
By and large, the formality
worked and everybody was
happy, except the goose. It took
the invention of the fountain
pen, the ballpoint pen and later
the typewriter to please the
poultry community. With these
new tools, the dignified formal-
ity of letter writing became less
stylized, yet something of the
old manners survived.
Even today, if you receive a


www.lakecityreporter.com


Reg Henry
rhenry@post-gazette.com


typed letter in the mail from a
mortgage company concerned
about your lack of payments, it
will be addressed to "Dear ..."
and it will probably be signed
"Sincerely" although you
are not really dear to the letter
writer, who is sincere only about
wanting your money.
But with the advent of elec-
tronic communication, all nice-
ties have pretty much vanished.
As I've got mail, let me go
through my email letter box
from last week to give you a
sense of this bravt new world of
communications.
Forget "Dear Mr. Henry."
In the body of the text, I
was addressed in the follow-
ing terms: Foe of the First
Amendment; child with a
crayon; quaint 1950s throwback;
thumb sucker; intellectually
bankrupt disgrace to all that
is American; lapdog; complete
disgrace to fellow humanity;
discredit to the profession of
journalism; shill for the New
World Order; dinosaur; crack-
pot old fool; peon; pawn; dumb
uninformed sheep; sycophan-
tic elitist; Mr. Pravda; swine;
knuckle dragger; sad old man
who believes what the govern-
ment tells him; sheeple; dim-
witted ignoramus; close-minded
sociopath; sad, pathetic pile; Mr.
Nobody; and .dear little zio-poo-
dle. Well, OK, I guess someone
did call me "dear."
This did not count those
who have the literary formf of
Tourette syndrome and whose
messages consisted merely of
expletives undeleted.
Of course, I asked for it, so


no' complaints from me. I rudely
called out the lunatic commu-
nity who persist in believing
conspiracy theories that send
common sense fleeing into the
night, weeping inconsolably.
Members of the lunatic commu-
nity sent rpie these messages to
prove how sane and reasonable
they are, as is their right.
And I replied to every single
message and signed most "Very
best wishes" because I am
old school when it comes to
personal correspondence. And
while my sincerity did not quite
extend to (ital) very (endital)
best wishes, my wishes were
good enough: I hope that when
they fall off the turnip truck
they don't hurt themselves.
But, seriously, we have gone
from the absurd formality of
scratching quills to the casual
abuse of the text message
- and lost something in the
technology-driven journey.
I have no doubt that most of
the people who wrote to me are
good souls who would not be so
rude to my face. That's because
I assume they still have inher-
ent good manners in personal
dealings or else they fear my
ridiculing them with satirical
hand puppets.
What the world needs is a set
of manners for email correspon-
dence that incorporates the art
employed by previous genera-
tions, who mastered the trick of
delivering their abuse in strictly
polite terms.
We also need a new form of
introduction to emails people
texting can't be expected to type
Dear Whoever, because evolu-
tion already threatens to turn
the human race into a species of
land lobsters with giant, overde-
veloped thumbs. I suggest "Yo"
as the accepted formal greeting.
Very best wishes from your
obedient servant (not).

* Reg Henry is a columnist for the
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette.


ANOTHER OPINION

Bin Laden's death brings debate on torture


O sama bin Laden's
welcome death
has ignited debate
over whether the
so-called enhanced
interrogation techniques used
on enemy prisoners were instru-
mental in locating bin Laden, and
whether they are a justifiable
means for gathering intelligence.
Much of this debate is a defi-
nitional one: whether any or all
of these methods constitute tor-
ture. I believe some of them do,
especially waterboarding, which
is a mock execution and thus
an exquisite form of torture.
As such, they are prohibited by
American laws and values, and I
oppose them.


I know those who approved
and employed these practices
were dedicated to protecting
Americans. I know they were
determined to keep faith with
the victims of terrorism and to
prove to our enemies that the
United States would pursue jus-
tice relentlessly no matter how
long it took.
I don't believe anyone should
be prosecuted for having used
these techniques, and I agree
that the administration should
state definitively that they won't
be. I am one of the authors of
the Military Commnissions Act,
and we wrote into the legisla-
tion that no one who used or
approved the use of these inter-


rogation techniques before its
enactment should be prosecut-
ed. I don't think it is helpful or
wise to revisit that policy.
But this must be an informed,
debate. Former attorney gen-
eral Michael Mukasey recently
claimed that "the intelligence
that led to bin Laden ... began
with a disclosure from Khalid
Sheik Mohammed, who broke
like a dam under the pressure of
harsh interrogation techniques
that included waterboarding. He
loosed a torrent of information
- including eventually the nick-
name of a trusted courier of bin
Laden." That is false.
* Washington Post


4A


Dale McFeatters
mcfeattersd@shns.com


Home


prices


stumble


badly

Unemployment
is typically the
last economic
indicator to
recover from
a recession, but even at 9
percent the jobless rate is
positively brisk compared to
another badly lagging
sector of the economy -
housing.
The rate of decline in home
prices had been improving
since it seemed to have
bottomed out in 2009. But that.,
upswing has come to an abrupt.;
end.
The real estate research
firm Zillow says home prices
dropped 3 percent in the first
quarter of this year and fell
8.2 percent year-over-year.
Prices have not fallen for 57
straight months, according
to Zillow, and 28.4 percent of
homeowners are underwater
on their mortgages, meaning
they owe more than their
house is worth.
Economists who had
forecast the housing market
would bottom out this year are
now saying it will be sometime
in 2012.
Acting as a drag on any
recover is the vast number
of foreclosed homes selling
when they sell at huge
discounts. Fannie Mae and -:
Freddie Mac sold 94,000
foreclosed homes in the first
quarter but the mortgages
giants have an inventory of
218,000 homes, up 33 percent
from a year ago.
And all of this is getting
expensive.
* Bailing out Fannie Mae and
Freddie Mac from defaulted
mortgages has cost $259
billion and Fannie Mae has just',
asked the government another"
$8.5 billion.
There is not much the
government can do except
wince and write the checks
until the market stabilized
and lenders recover their
confidence.
Mortgage rates are really
low if you can get one.
Lenders who were burned by
their overconfidence during
the boom are now, according
to anecdotal evidence, too
cautious about making loans,
even to buyers who meet all
the usual standards of credit
worthiness.
What the government
should not do is act to
artificially re-inflate the
housing bubble. The $9,000
homebuyer's tax credit that
expired last year bought
a reprieve in the slide in
home prices but it was both
temporary and expensive.
It's hard to disagree with
the assessment of Wall Street ,
Journal columnist Brent
Arends:
"What a foolish boondoggle
those tax breaks for home*
buyers have turned out to
be. The government spent an
estimated $22 billion between
2008 and 2010 on tax breaks to
prop up the housing market.
All it achieved was a brief
suckers' rally that ended last
summer."
We can only hoped that
once the unemployed find jobs
they'll want to buy a house.
There are plenty available.

Dale McFeatters is editorial
writer for Scripps Howard News *
Service.


Sad lapdog swine calls


for e-mail cleanup






LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL FRIDAY, MAY 13, 2011


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


* To submit your Community
Calendar item, contact Antonia
Robinson at 754-0425 or by
e-mail at arobinson@
lakecityreporter.com.


Today
Columbia County
summer day camp
Registration for
the Columbia County
Recreation Department
summer day camp pro-
gram is 8 a.m.-5 p.m. at
Richardson Community
Center. The camp is open
to boys and girls ages 7
-14 and is 7:30 a.m.-5:30
p.m., Monday-Friday,
June 13-Aug. 3. The cost
for the eight-week camp
is $225'and will include
a variety of daily activi-
ties, free breakfast, lunch
and weekly field trips.
Admission charges for
four of the weekly field
trips are included in the
price of admission. The
camp will feature five
athletic mini-camps and
a two-day reading camp
at no extra cost to camp-
ers. Space is limited to
the first 60 participants.
Contact Mario Coppock
or Nicole Smith at 754-
7095 or 754-7096.

Summer Reading Camp Time for celebration


Registration is now open
for Summer Reading Camp
at Miracle Tabernacle. The
first 40 children will be
admitted. Camp is $25 per
week. The camp features
reading, math, science,
handwriting, black history,
exercise and conversation-
al Spanish in the curricu-
lum. Camp is 8:30 a.m.-4
p.m. Monday-Thursday,
June 6-Aug. 12. Breakfast
and lunch will be provided.
Call Cynthia Robinson at
249-3572 or Pastor Steele
at 758-8452.

Saturday
CHS reunion
A class reunion for the
Columbia High School0
classes of 1949-1953 is
11:30 a.m. Saturday at
Mason City Community
Center. Anyone who
attended CHS is welcome.
There will. be a covered
dish lunch. Call Julia
Osburn at 752-7544 or
Morris Williams at 752-
4710.

RHS alumni meeting
There will be a RHS
alumni meeting at
noon Saturday at the
Richardson Center. For
additional information con-
tact CJ at 752-0815.

Lake DeSoto
Farmers Market
The Lake DeSoto
. Farmers Market is 8 a.m.
-noon Saturday at Wilson
Park, 778 NE Lake
DeSoto Circle. Vendors,
live music and more will
take place at the event.
The market is joining in
with the FAMFest Vendor
applications and more
information is available at
719-5766 or e-mail kitej@.
Icfla.com.

FAM Fest
Haven Hospice's Second
Annual Fitness, Art and
Music Festival is 10 a.m.
-5 p.m. Saturday in his-
toric downtown Lake City.
The day will begin with a
5K fun run around Lake
de Soto starting at 9 a.m.
and registration starts at
8 a.m. The festival will
feature local artists and
vendors, performances,
information booths and
more. Registration for
the 5K is $35. Visit www.
havenhospice.org and click
on "Haven Events," or
contact Stephanie Brod at
352-271-4665.

Plant sale
Master Gardener Plant
Sale is 9 a.m.-1 p.m.
Saturday at the Columbia
County Extension Office
by the fairgrounds. A
variety of annuals, peren-


Dr. Robin Hall (far right), assistant director of the St. Leo University Lake City Center,
and congratulates Donna Goodson-King, an elementary education major who was aw
the Summa Cum Laude distinction. This year's commencement ceremony will take pl
today at 5 p.m. at the Howard Conference Center at Florida Gateway College.


nials, shrubs, houseplants
and more will be avail-
able at reasonable prices.
Master Gardeners will
also be able to answer
questions.


available. Tickets for the
fling can be purchased
for $50. For more infor-
mation or to purchase a
ticket call 752-1880, ext.
103.


Tea and fashion show Sunday


The Columbia County
Women's Club is hosting
its Annual Tea and Fashion
Show 7 p.m. Saturday. The
event is at 655 NE Martin
Luther King St. Tickets
are $3 at the door Each
church department or aux-
iliary is asked to sponsor a
table for $25. Call Deanna
George at 288-2368 or 755-
6044.

Cake walk
FFA Booste&/Alumni
is having a Cake Walk 11
a.m.-2 p.m. Sautrday at
the Lake City Mall center
court. Tickets are $1 for
each walk and space for
a chance to win a home-
made cake.

Breakfast with the
Chief
The Lake City Police
Department presents
"Breakfast with the
Chief' from 10-11:30 a.m.
Saturday in the Public *
Safety Training Room. The
purpose of this meeting is
to address citizens' ques-
tions and concerns. Call
Audre' J. Washington, -
Community Relations Unit,
at 719-5742.

Herbs workshop
Using Herbs Workshop
is 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Saturday
at Stephen Foster Folk
Culture Center State
Park Craft Square, White
Springs. Participants will
taste and discuss the
uses of various vinegar,
and make their own tea
bags Participants should
brink a lunch. The cost of
the workshop is $25 and
includes park admission.
Call the park Gift Shop at
386 397-1920 or visit www.
stephenfosterCSO. org.

Spring Fling
The third annual Spring
Fling is 6 p.m. Saturday
at the home of Jerry and
Carolyn Castagna. CARC.
- Advocates for Citizens
with Disabilities, Inc.
- and Happy House will
benefit from the event.
The Columbia County
Sheriff's Office will have
finger printing for kids
from 3-5 p.m. prior to the
event. Facepaintnig, cook-
ies and balloons will be


Meet the author
The next meet the
author program is 2 p.m.
Sunday at the Columbia
County Public Library
.main branch featuring
Rachel Hauck. She is an
award-winning, contem-
porary Christian fiction
writer living in Central
Florida. In addition to her
solo works, "Georgia on
Her Mind" and "Dining
with Joy," she also has
written books, such as
"Softly and Tenderly,"
with country musician
Sara Evans. The event is
sponsored by the Friends
of the Library.

Monday
Mardi Gras Night
A Mardi Gras Night to
benefit Another Way Inc.
is 7 p.m. -1 a.m. Monday
at The Lions Den. A total
of 10 percent of profits
will benefit the orga-
nization. There will be
karaoke, door prizes and
more. Call Elizabeth Free
at 719-2700.

Tuesday
Donors wanted
The LifeSouth:
Bloodmobile is seek-
ing donors 12 7 p.m.
Tuesday at Sweepstakes at
Panda-Moni-Yum. Donors
receive 200 credits, a
recognition item and free
lunch or dinner.

Art league of North
Florida meeting
The monthly meeting of
the Art League of North
Florida is 7 p.m. Tuesday
at the First Presbyterian
Church in Lake City. Guest
speaker is Jane Kopp who
will talk her artist toolbox
experience, which she
has had throughout her
30 years of teaching art.
There will be a business
meeting following the pre-
sentation.

Preschool screening
Free Preschool
screening is 3-5 p.m.
Tuesday at Fort White
Elementary School.
Screenings are for ages
3- 4 1/2 years. Children


ern grasses, fertilizing,
watering and pest control.
The workshop is free.


8130 for more information.

Friday, May 20


Ombudsman Program Ladies Lunch and Learn


FILE PHOTO


hugs
larded
lace


will be screened in
functional hearing and
vision, motor develop-
ment, speech and lan-
guage development and
concepts. Parents will
have the opportunity
to discuss results with
Florida Diagnostic and
Learning Resources
System/Gateway or
Columbia County School
District staff. Details
about Voluntary Pre-K,
Headstart or Subsidized
Child Care will be avail-
able. Call Columbia
County Student Services
Office at 755-0849 ext.
122 or Jo Ann Laseter,
FDLRS/Gateway at 1-
800-227-0059.

Legislative breakfast
The Lake City- Columbia
County Chamber of
Commerce Legislative
Breakfast is 8 am. Tuesday
at the Lifestyle Enrichment
Center. Tickets for mem-
bers are $10 and guests
$15. The event is spon-
sored by Clay Electric and
People's State Bank. RSVP
for this event to the cham-
ber at 752-3690.

Wednesday
Donors wanted
LifeSouth Bloodmobile
is seeking donors 3:30-8
p.m. Wednesday at Fort
White Community Center.
The event will feature
food, fun '-nd prizes. All
donors receive free movie
tickets,.

Thursday
NARFE monthly
meeting
The National Active
and Retired Federal
Employees meetings is
1 p.m. Thursday at the
LifeStyle Enrichment
Center. The guest speak-
er is Deborah Freeman,
LEC director. The center
is located at 628 SE
Allison Court. Contact
Miriam Stanford at 755-
0907 or Jim Purvis at
752-8570.

Master Gardeners
workshop
The "Caring for your
North Florida Lawn"
workshop is 5:45 7 p.m.
Thursday at the Columbia
County Public Library
Fort White branch,
Presented by UF Master
Gardeners, learn about
maintaining healthy south-


meeting


Florida's Long-Term
Ombudsman Program
is meeting at 12:30 p.m.
Thursday at Haven
Hospice of North Central
Florida in Gainesville.
Anyone interested in
volunteering with the
. program or attending the
meeting can call 352-955-
5015.

Free preschool
screening
Free Preschool
screening 10 a.m.-6 p.m.
Thursday at Parkview
Baptist Church, 268
NW Lake Jeffrey Road.
Screenings are for ages 3-
4 1/2 years. Children will
be screened in functional
hearing and vision, motor
development, speech and
language development
and concepts. Parents
will have the opportu-
nity to discuss results
with Florida Diagnostic
and Learning Resources
System/Gateway or
Columbia County School
District staff. Details aboul
Voluntary Pre-K, Headstar
or Subsidized Child Care
will be available. Call
Columbia County Student
Services Office at 755-084.
ext. 122 or Jo Ann Laseter,
FDLRS/Gateway at 1-800-
227-0059.

Movies and Musicals
night
Richardson Middle
School Chorus is having
Movies and Musicals
night at 7 p.m. Thursday
..in the school audito-
rium. The program,
under the direction of
Christy Robertson, will
include selections from
several musicals, such
as "Annie," "Grease" and
"Cinderella." Call 755-


A Free National
Women's Health Week
Event, Ladies Lunch and
Learn, is noon May 20 at
the LifeStyle Enrichment
Center. The event is pre- ,
sented by Emad Atta, M.D.-
and Chandler Mohan,
M.D. Hear about critical
risk factors, symptoms and,
treatment options. Get key
tools and valuable informa-'.
tion for a healthier life.
Space is limited. Call 386-
755-0235.

Free preschool
screening
Free Preschool screen-
ing 10 a.m.-4:30 p.m. May
20 at Parkview Baptist
Church, 268 NW Lake
Jeffrey Road. Screenings
are for ages 3- 4 years, six
months. Children will be
screening in functional
hearing and vision, motor
development, speech and ,
language development
and concepts. Parents
will have the opportu-
nity to discuss results
with Florida Diagnostic
and Learning Resources
System/Gateway or
Columbia County School
District staff. Details about,
Voluntary Pre-K, Headstarf
or Subsidized Child Care
will be available. Call
Columbia County Student
Services Office at 755-0849
ext. 122 or Jo Ann Laseter,
FDLRS/Gateway at 1-800-
227-0059.


Hang Op
a minute e .

Dur custorersreceive :
a Complimentary
copy of the'
Lake City Reporter
r uwhen they drop off&
pickup their cleaning


IHickin T -4 iThe Kgi

'u a Sal e:

Frji. & Sat.May 13-1

**ff''jyTjSAM T

Corneriil *F U~S 9 &Bjaya--,


Call today to place a surprise ad for your child,
grandchild, God child or anyone you think
deserves something extra on their special day!


SDeadline:
Ads have to be placed by 4pm, 3-days
L prior to appearance in the Lake City Reporter.

Call 755.5440 or 755.5441
between 8am & 4pm


Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424






LAKE CITY REPORTER STATE AND WORLD FRIDAY, MAY 13, 2011


ACLU, union, others may


challenge new state laws


By BILL KACZOR
Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE The American
Civil Liberties Union of Florida has
hired two more lawyers and is plan-
ning to add another to help handle an
expected workload increase resulting
from the Republican-led Legislature's
recently ended session.
The ACLU, unions and some liber-
al and non-partisan groups are gear-
ing up for potential legal challenges
to legislation ,as well as at least one
of Gov. Rick Scott's executive orders.
They are reviewing measures that
they say violate privacy, free speech,
voting, due process, collective bar-
gaining and other constitutional
rights and requirements.
"I didn't realize at the time of the
election that when Gov. Scott said
'Let's get to work,' he was referring
to the lawyers in the state, but that
seems to be the way it's working
out," Tallahassee attorney Ron Meyer
said. His clients include the Florida
Education Association, the statewide
teachers union, which is considering
challenges to several measures.
"This legislative session- has been
maybe the biggest disaster for personal
freedoms and human rights, and the
list is long," said Howard Simon, ACLU
of Florida's executive director.
Some of the same measures that
Simon and other critics say would cur-
tail various rights do just the opposite
in the eyes of their Republican sup-
porters.
"The Legislature passed mul-
tiple measures which stand up for
Floridians' freedoms," Senate Majority
Leader Andy Gardiner, R-Orlando, said
in a statement Thursday. "Anyone who
files suit following the passage of laws
has every right to do so. At the end of
the day, we can only do what we know
in.good conscience is best to ensure
our children have a bright future."
The ACLU is targeting several
changes to the state's election law
that it believes would suppress minor-
ity voting and a measure that requires
welfare applicants to get drug tests,
saying it would violate privacy rights.
The ACLU also may challenge a state
constitutional amendment that would
repeal Florida's ban on using public


funds to aid churches and other reli-
gious organizations.
Simon said the passage of legally
questionable legislation was no sur-
prise. He said the ACLU began plan-
ning to beef up its legal staff shortly
after the election in November of Scott,
a Republican, and overwhelming GOP
majorities in the House and Senate.
No final decisions have been made,
but Meyer said "it's a relative cer-
tainty" the teachers union will sue
over a new law linking teacher pay to
student test scores and eliminating
tenure for new hires.
"It expressly, in some instances,
prohibits collective bargaining,"
Meyer said.
That includes limiting consider-
ation of advanced degrees in setting
salaries and requiring that half of
teachers' performance evaluations be
based on how much each of. their
students improves on standardized
tests. Those evaluations will be used
to decide which teachers get merit
raises. The law also says seniority
cannot be a factor in deciding which
teachers will be laid off if cuts are
made.
Meyer said those are issues for col-
Jective bargaining, a right the Florida
Constitution says "shall not be denied
or abridged."
One- of the bill's sponsors, Rep.
Eric Fresen, R-Miami, said it simply
modifies factors already in state law
and won't prevent bargaining over
the final details.
"The fundamental principles of col-
lective bargaining weren't touched,"
Fresen said.
The League of Women Voters and
ACLU may challenge an election bill
sponsors say would prevent fraud.
Critics say the real intent is to dis-
courage minorities and others who
tend to vote Democratic from casting
ballots.
The league has decided to dis-
continue voter registration drives in
Florida if the bill goes into effect.
Members of groups such as the
league and Boy Scouts would be
required to register with election offi-
cials before conducting such drives.
They also would have to file regular
reports and turn in completed regis-
tration forms within 48 hours or else


face a $50 fine for each late form.
"It's almost as if they expect that
every volunteer will have a secretary
to keep track of every form," said
Deirdre Macnab, the league's Florida
president.
Other provisions would cut early
voting hours and require provisional
ballots for voters who make address
changes at polling places on Election
Day. They later would have to prove
their identity before their ballots
could be counted.
"There is clear evidence that it has
a racially retrogressive impact by
requiring more minority voters, who
move at a greater rate than major-
ity voters, to use provisional ballots,
which are counted less," the ACLU's
Simon said.
A lawsuit may unnecessary. The
ACLU and others plan to ask the U.S.
Justice Department to determine
under the federal Voting Rights Act if
the bill discriminates against minori-
ties. If so, it cannot be enforced.
The election bill's sponsor, Rep.
Dennis Baxley, R-Ocala, said oppo-
nents are overreacting to the new
registration requirements because
penalties would apply only to will-
ful violations. He said the fact some
provisional ballots go uncounted
proves they are effective in prevent-
ing fraud.
The welfare drug screening bill
would require applicants for federally
funded temporary assistance to pay
for the tests themselves although
those who pass would get reim-
bursed.
Simon said ACLU may challenge
the bill and Scott's order to screen new
hires while randomly testing existing
state employees. Such screening vio-
lates their privacy rights, he said.
The U.S. Supreme Court has
allowed blanket suspicion-less drug
testing only if "the risk to public
safety is substantial and real."
The bill's sponsor, Rep. Jimmie
Smith, R-Inverness, prefaced his
comments by acknowledging "I'm
not a lawyer," a frequent refrain in
the Legislature, before saying studies
show a greater percentage of welfare
recipients abuse drugs than the gen-
eral population. Opponents dispute
that claim.


BOAT: Sturgeon causes damage to boat

Continued From Page 1A


arms and legs when the
jumping sturgeon crashed
into the boat. Investigators
were unable to determine
whether the .turgeon ever
made contact with her dur-
ing the incident.
Reports indicate the
sturgeon also struck the
bimini-top support and the
motor cowling before com-
ing to rest inside the vessel.
The Stevens' 1973, 15-foot
Lightning boat sustained
approximately $2,300 in
damages.
Scott Stevens, who was
not injured in the incident,
took his wife to Shands
Hospital in Gainesville


and reported the sturgeon
strike to FWC officials on
April 28. An investigation
was immediately launched.
"The Stevens live in
Pinellas County, outside
of our region, so we had to
coordinate with the FWC
Southwest Region, out
of Lakeland, to conduct
our investigation," Parker
said.
Scott Stevens told inves-
tigators he threw the stur-
geon back into the river
but thought it was dead.
"The investigators
received photos from Mr.
Stevens that shbw the stur-
geon in the boat," Parker


said. "It appeared dead."
Parker said there has
been reported sturgeon
strikes in the Fanning
Springs area before and
warned boaters and per-
sonal water craft operators
to go slow on the.Suwannee
River, especially when they
see fish jumping.
"Always wear a life jacket
and keep everyone off the
bow of the boat," she said.
Parker said during the
summer months the FWC
also has additional person-
nel on the water conduct-
ing boating safety checks
and educating the public
about the sturgeon.


The only fatality believed
to be sturgeon-strike
related on the Suwannee
occurred in 2007,' when
two anglers were switch-
ing fishing locations and
a large fish, believed to
be a sturgeon, jumped in
front of their boat. The ves-
sel operator attempted to
avoid the fish, took evasive
actions and over-corrected,
throwing both men into the
water. The vessel operator
was able to swim to the
shore, but the passenger,
who was not wearing a life
jacket, drowned in the inci-
dent.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
This image taken from video released by Qatar's AI-Jazeera
television broadcast on Oct. 5, 2001, is said to show Osama
bin Laden. Despite having no Intemet access in his hideout,
Osama bin Laden was a prolific email writer who built a
painstaking system that kept him one step ahead of the U.S.
government's best eavesdroppers.


How bin Laden

mailed without


US detecting


By ADAM GOLDMAN
and MATT APUZZO
Associated Press

WASHINGTON -
Despite having no Internet
access in his hideout,
Osama bin Laden was a
prolific email writer who
built a painstaking system
that kept him one step
ahead of the U.S. govern-
ment's best eavesdrop-
pers.
His methods, described
in new detail to The
Associated Press by a
counterterrorism offi-
cial and a second person
briefed on the U.S. inves-
tigation, served him well
for years and frustrated
Western efforts to trace
him through cyberspace.
The arrangement allowed
bin Laden to stay in touch
worldwide without leav-
ing any digital fingerprints
behind.
The people spoke to the
AP on condition of ano-
nymity to discuss the sen-
sitive intelligence analy-
sis.
Bin Laden's system was
built on discipline and
trust. But it also left behind
an extensive archive of
email exchanges for the
U.S. to scour. The trove of
electronic records pulled
out of his compound after
he was killed last week
is revealing thousands
of messages and poten-
tially hundreds of email
addresses, the AP, has
learned.
Holed up in his walled
compound in northeast
Pakistan with no phone
or Internet capabilities,
bin 'Laden would type a
message on his computer


without an Internet con-
nection, then save it using
a thumb-sized flash drive.
He then passed the flash
drive to a trusted courier,
who would head for a dis-
tant Internet caf6.
At that location, the cou-
rier would plug the memo-
ry drive into a computer,
copy bin Laden's message
into an email and send
it. Reversing the process,
the courier would copy
any incoming email to the
flash drive and return to
the compound, where bin
Laden would read his mes-
sages offline.
It was a slow, toilsome
process. And it was so
meticulous that even vet-
eran intelligence officials
have marveled at bin
Laden's ability to main-
tain it for so long. The
U.S. always suspected bin
Laden was communicating
through couriers but did
not anticipate the breadth
of his communications as
revealed by the materials
he left behind.
Navy SEALs hauled
away roughly 100 flash
memory drives after they
killed bin Laden, and offi-
cials said they appear tp
archive the back-and-forth
communication between
bin Laden and his associ-
ates around the world.
Al-Qaida operatives are
known to change email
addresses, so it's unclear
how many are still active
since bin Laden's death,.
Butthe long list of electron-
ic addresses and phone
numbers in the emails is
expected to touch off a
flurry of national security
letters and subpoenas to
Internet service providers:


Obama asks FBI chief to stay, seeks Congress OK


By BEN FELLER
AP White House Correspondent

WASHINGTON -
Reluctant to see another
shake-up in his national secu-
rity team, President Barack
Obama said Thursday he
wants to stick with FBI
Director Robert Mueller, the
sturdy face of the bureau
whose term has spanned
from the Sept 11 attacks
on America to the killing of
terrorist leader Osama bin
Laden. Key lawmakers indi-
cated support for Obama's
surprise decision.
Keeping Mueller on
the job would require an
act of Congress since the
law allows an FBI direc-
tor to serve only for 10
years, and Mueller's term
is up on Sept. 4.Obama
said he wants Mueller to
remain for two more years,
which would keep him in
place well after the next
presidential election, into
September 2013.
Mueller is the longest-
serving FBI chief since
J. Edgar Hoover, whose
checkered 48-year term
ended with his death in


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this March 30 file photo, FBI Director Robert Mueller testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington.
President Barack Obama will ask Congress to allow Mueller to remain in his job an extra
two years, a rare exemption that would give the government continuity in a time of change
atop the national security team, senior administration officials told The Associated Press on
Thursday.


1972 and led Congress to
put the term limit in place.
Obama said the rare
exemption for Mueller was
needed for continuity and
"for the sake of our nation's
safety and security."


Obama already is in
the midst of a reshuffling
of his national security
leadership, shifting CIA
Director Leon Panetta to
be Pentagon chief and Gen.
David Petraeus to head up


the spy agency. The chang-
es await Senate confirma-
tion at a time of renewed
worldwide attention to the
threat of terrorism.
In a sign of Mueller's
respected standing in both


parties, lawmakers seem
poised to allow him to stay
atop the FBI.
Mueller is known for
transforming a crime-fight-
ing agency into the front
line of defense against
terrorism., Mueller was
appointed by Republican
President George W. Bush
and began just a week
before the Sept. 11, 2001,
terrorist attacks. Obama
said he has turned the FBI
into a "pre-eminent coun-
terterrorism agency."
It wasn't that way when
he began. The carnage a
decade ago at the World
Trade Center and the
Pentagon exposed vul-
nerabilities, and the FBI
missed a number of clues
that might have averted the
attacks. Before 9/11, the
FBI also came under fire
for other messes, including
one of its own, FBI agent
Robert Hanssen, spying for
Moscow for two decades.
The plan to keep Mueller
on isn't tied to the U.S. raid
in Pakistan that led to the
killing of bin Laden, the
al-Qaida leader behind the
Sept. 11 attacks, or to any


threat of retaliation against
the United States as a result
of that mission, administra-
tion officials said.
Obama had been look-
ing for successors for
Mueller since the start of
the year and, indeed, the
attention on the top FBI
position centered on who
would succeed him. Other
likely names surfaced.
White House spokesman
Jay Carney declined to say
whether the president had
met with candidates.
Mueller was offered the
two-year extension a couple
of days ago, said an admin-
istration official, speaking
on condition of anonym-
ity about the internal pro-
cess. The official said that
Mueller was not expect-
ing the overture from the
White House nor had he
been looking to stay on.
Another potential factor
in the mix: Any replace-
ment for Mueller would
have to be confirmed by
an expanded Republican
minority in the Senate, one
with the votes to potentially
complicate the prospects of
an Obama nominee.


C.J. Risak, 754-0427








Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@Jakecityreporter:com


Lake City Reporter





SPORTS


Friday, May 13, 2011


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


CHEAP SEATS






Tim Kirby
Phone: (386) 754-0421
tkirby@lakecityreportercom


When

Seve

came

calling

olfing legend
Severiano
Ballesteros
was laid
to rest on
Wednesday.
His ashes were
spread under a
magnolia tree at his
family home in Pedrena,
Spain. Ballesteros, 54,
finally succumbed to a
cancerous brain tumor
discovered a couple of
years earlier.
Ballesteros
swashbuckled into Lake
City for a tournament in
February 1986.
It was the third stop
on the new Tournament
Players Association tour,
and came to be called
the Barnett Bank Florida
Cup Classic after bank
president J.C. Bell signed
on as primary sponsor.
The Ste-Marie family
owned Quail Heights
Country Club at that
time and patriarch
Claude was contacted
about the possibility of a
tournament
"They called me out of
the blue," Ste-Marie said.
"Somebody from the
TPA said they wanted
a place in Florida they
could come and play."
It was the height of
the tourist season for
Ste-Marie, so he agreed
to the tournament if it
was held on Monday,
Tuesday and Wednesday.
The upstart tour
had been in touch with
Ballesteros. Ballesteros
was feuding with PGA
Tour Commissioner
Deane Beman, who had
stripped him of his
playing card after he
failed to play in the
required 15 PGA events
in 1985.
Ballesteros missed
the first two TPA events,
including one in Myrtle
Beach, S.C., because of
his father's illness, and
was looking to get in
some competitive golf
in the lead-up to the
Masters. He played on
the European Tour, but
there was no spring golf
"Seve was looking for a
place to play," Ste-Marie
said. "He had won in
New Orleans the year
before and could play
there, but that
tournament was in
March. He had no card
to play on the tour."
There were 120 golfers
expected for the event.
When the word about
Ballesteros got out,
the entries more than
doubled. With the entry
fee and sponsorship, the
purse was $129,000 with
$18,000 to the winner.
Ste-Marie enlisted the
aid of what was then
Lake City Country Club
and pro Chris Pottle.
The field was split and


SEVE continued on 2B


Watney torches


Sawgrass with 64


Leads by.one over
Glover; O'Meara,
Toms two back.
By DOUG FERGUSON
Associated Press
PONTE VEDRA BEACH
- Coming off his worst per-
formance in nearly a year,
Nick Watney looked better
than ever Thursday in The
Players Championship with
an 8-under 64 that put him
atop the leaderboard.
Coming off what he
described as a "minor inju-
ry," Tiger Woods looked to
be in big trouble.
Nine holes into his first
tournament since the
Masters, the former No. 1


player in the world said he
couldn't go on. Woods with-
drew after his highest nine-
hole score at this event a
42 and had no idea when
he might return.
Watney opened with
three straight birdies, didn't
let a double bogey slow his
momentum, and finished
with his best score ever on
the TPC Sawgrass his
previous best was a 68 to
take a one-shot lead over
Lucas Glover, who won last
week at Quail Hollow.
The surprise came from
54-year-old Mark O'Meara,
who qualified by win-
ning the Seniors Player
Championship and who
played nine holes of prac-
tice rounds with Woods the


last two days.
He finished with a long
birdie on the 18th for a 66 in
his first round at Sawgrass
in eight years.
"Even when I went to din-
ner with Tiger last night, my
wife Meredith said, 'How's
Mark hitting it?' He says,
'Short.' OK, yeah, I'm not 32
and strong," O'Meara said.
"But I hit it far enough."
Davis Toms also had a
66, and he managed to do
that without a single bogey
on his card.
Watney had not missed
the cut since last June when
he had rounds of 76-75 for
an early departure last week
at Quail Hollow. Instead of


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Nick Watney chips to the eighth green during the first round
of The Players Championship golf tournament Thursday in


TPC continued on 2B Ponte Vedra Beach.


ai


JASON MATTEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High running backs coach Quinton Callum shows Barnibus Madison the correct technique used for securing the
ball during practice on Tuesday.


Purple & Gold square off tonight


By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.comrn
In its 100th season,
Columbia High will play
its Purple & Gold game
tonight at the tradition rich
Memorial Stadium. It's


part of what head coach
Brian Allen believes is pay-
ing respect to the prede-
cessors of Tiger football.
"They are the reason we
have these nice amenities,"
Allen said. "None of this
would be possible without


what the guys before did for
them. They need to under-
stand what it means."
For Allen, it's back to
the roots of where his
Columbia career began.
"It brings a smile to my
face, because this is where


it all began for me," he
said. "I remember being
in ninth grade and being
pulled up after the spring.
For me, it's almost another
chance to come home like
CHS continued on 2B


Woods

out at

Players


Tiger's knee forces
him to withdraw
from The Players.
By DOUG FERGUSON
Associated Press
PONTE VEDRA BEACH
- Tiger Woods. withdrew
after his worst nine holes at
The Players Championship
on Thursday because of leg
injuries that sent him limp-
ing off the course toward a
future that is murkier than
ever.
Woods shot a 42 on the
front nine, including a triple
bogey on No. 4 when he
didn't clear a water hazard
30 yards in front of him.
He constantly walked some
20 yards behind his playing
partners, holding his club
for support, limping more
noticeable with each hole.
After taking a bogey on
the par-5 ninth, he handed
his scorecard to PGA cham-
pion Martin Kaymer, then
walked back to inform Matt
Kuchar that he was leav-
ing early from The Players
Championship for the sec-
ond straight year.
"I'm having a hard time
walking," Woods said.
It was his first compe-
tition since the Masters,
where Woods said he hurt
his left knee and Achilles'
WOODS continued on 3B


Fort White High


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
assistant coach Dan Marsee talks to A.J. Legree during practice on May 5.


Indians gear up
for Saturday's Red
& Black game.
By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter. corn
FORT WHITE With
Fort White High gearing
up for its Red & Black game
on Saturday, head coach
Demetric Jackson has
assembled a spring staff to
get the players prepared.
Jackson has most of his
regular staff returning.
Ken Snider is back as
assistant head coach to
watch over the defense.
Rick Bicknell returns to


coach the defensive line.
Dan Marsee returns as a
defensive backs coach, and
will be joined for the DBs by
Shea Showers who returns
to Fort White after a head
coaching stint at Santa Fe.
Chris Martinez returns
to work with the inside line-
backers and Kendyll Pope
is back after a couple of
years away from the pro-
gram to work with the out-
side linebackers.
Returning on the offen-
sive side is John Wilson,
who works with the running
backs, receivers coach Isiah
Phillips and John Woodley
INDIANS continued on 2B


Fort White blends

youth, experience

on coaching staff


,, I I







LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS FRIDAY, MAY 13, 2011


TELEVISION

TV sports
Today
AUTO RACING
10 a.m.
SPEED NASCAR,Truck Series, pole
qualifying for Lucas Oil 200, at Dover,
Del.
II am.
SPEED NASCAR, Sprint Cup,
practice for FedEx 400, at Dover, Del.
12:30 p.m.
SPEED NASCAR, Nationwide
Series, final practice for 5-Hour Energy
200, at Dover, Del.
2:30 p.m.
SPEED NASCAR, Sprint Cup,
"Happy Hour Series," final practice for
FedEx 400, at Dover, Del.
8:30 p.m.
SPEED NASCAR, Truck Series,
Lucas Oil 200, at Dover, Del. (same-day
tape)
BOXING
9 p.m.
ESPN2 Junior welterweights,
Kendall Holt (26-4-0) vs. Julio Diaz
(38-6-0), at Santa Ynez, Calif.
GOLF
9 a.m.
TGC European PGATour, Iberdrola
Open, second round, at Mallorca, Spain
I p.m.
TGC PGA Tour, The Players
Championship, second round, at Ponte
Vedra Beach
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
7 p.m.
MLB Regional coverage, Boston at
N.Y.Yankees or St. Louis at Cincinnati
10 p.m.
WGN Chicago White. Sox at
Oakland
NBA BASKETBALL
9 p.m.
ESPN Playoffs, conference
semifinals, game 6, Oklahoma City at
Memphis

BASKETBALL

NBA playoffs .

CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS
Wednesday
Miami 97, Boston 87, Miami wins
series 4-.1
Oklahoma City 99, Memphis 72,
Oklahoma City leads series 3-2
Thursday
Chicago at Atlanta (n)
SToday
Oklahoma City at Memphis, 9 p.m.

NBA All-Rookie team

(Voted by the 30 head coaches)
First Team
Player, Ist 2nd Tot
Blake Griffin 29 58
John Wall 28 I 57
Landry Fields 28 56
DeMarcus Cousins 26 2 54
Gary Neal 18 8 44
Second Team
Player Ist 2nd Tot
Greg Monroe 13 16 42


WesleyJohnson ... 4 18 26
Eric Bledsoe 19 19
Derrick Favors I 16 18
Paul George I 12 12
Other players receiving votes:
Ed DavisToronto, 10 ( first place);Evan
Turner, Philadelphia, 12; Jordan Crawford,
Washington, 12; Gordon Hayward, Utah,
7; Omer Asik, Chicago, 6 (I); Patrick
Patterson, Houston, 5; AI-Farouq Aminu,
Los Angeles Clippers, 3;Tiago Splitter, San
Antonio, 3;Trevor Booker, Washington, I;
Christian Eyenga, Cleveland, I; Ekpe Udoh,
Golden State, I.

BASEBALL

AL standings


Tampa Bay
New York
Boston
Toronto
Baltimore

Cleveland
Kansas Cit
Detroit
Chicago
Minnesota.

Los Angele
Oakland
Texas
Seattle


East Division
W. L
22 15
20 14
17 20
17 20
16 19
Central Division
W L
23 13
ty 19 17
20 18
15 23
12 23
West Division
W L
es 21 17
19 18
19 18


16 21


Pct
.553
.514
.514
.432


Thursday's Games
Tampa Bay 7, Cleveland 4
Kansas City at N.Y.Yankees (n)
Seattle at Baltimore (n)
Today's Games
.Boston (C.Buchholz 3-3) at N.Y.
Yankees (Colon 2-I), 7:05 p.m.
Kansas City (Hochevar 3-3) at Detroit
(Verlander 3-3), 7:05 p.m.
Seattle (Fister 2-4) at Cleveland
(Carmona 3-3), 7:05 p.m.
Baltimore (Guthrie 1-5) at Tampa Bay
(Hellickson 3-2), 7:10p.m.
L.A. Angels (Weaver 6-2) at Texas
(Ogando 3-0), 8:05 p.m.
Toronto (R.Romero 2-4) at Minnesota
(Pavano 2-4),8:10 p.m.
Chicago White Sox (Humber 2-3) at
Oakland (McCarthy 1-3), 10:05 p.m.
Saturday's Games
Seattle at Cleveland, 1:05 p.m.
Chicago White Sox at Oakland,
4:05 p.m.
Baltimore at Tampa Bay,4:10 p.m.
Kansas City at Detroit, 4:10 p.m.
LA.Angels at Texas, 4:10 p.m.
Toronto at Minnesota, 4:10 p.m.
Boston at N.Y.Yankees, 7:10 p.m.

NL standings


Philadelph
Florida
Atlanta
Washingto
New York

St. Louis


ia


East Division
W L
24 12


21 15 .583 3
20 18 .526 5
on 18 18 .500 6
17 20 .459 7'A
Central Division
W L Pct GB
22 16 .579 -


Cincinnati 20 17 .541 I'
Pittsburgh 18 19 .486 3'h
Chicago 16 20 .444 5
Milwaukee 16 21 .432 5h
Houston 14 23 .378 7'A
West Division
W L Pet GB
San Francisco 21 16 .568 -
Colorado 19 16 .543 I
Los Angeles 18 20 .474 3'A
Arizona 15 21 .417 5'A
San Diego 15 22 .405 6
Thursday's Games
St. Louis 9, Chicago Cubs I
N.Y. Mets 9, Colorado 5
San Francisco 3,Arizona 2
L.A. Dodgers at Pittsburgh (n)
Washington atAtlanta (n)
Today's Games
San Francisco (Bumgarner 0-5) at
Chicago Cubs (Dempster 1-4), 2:20 p.m.
Florida (Volstad 2-2) at Washington
(Gorzelanny 2-2), 7:05 p.m.
St. Louis (Lohse 4-2) at Cincinnati
(Arroyo 3-3), 7:10 p.m.
Philadelphia (Hamels 4-2) at Atlanta
(Beachy I-I), 7:35 p.m.
N.Y. Mets (Gee 2-0) at Houston
(Norris 2-2), 8:05 p.m.
Pittsburgh (Ja.McDonald 2-2) at
Milwaukee (Gallardo 3-2),,?:10 p.m.
San Diego (Moseley 1-4) at Colorado
(De La Rosa 4-1), 8:40 p.m.
Arizona ([Saunders 0-4) at L.A.
Dodgers (Kershaw 4-3), 10:10 p.m.
Saturday's Games
Florida atWashington, 1:05 p.m.
Philadelphia at Atlanta, 1:10 p.m.
San Diego at Colorado, 3:10 p.m.
N.Y. Mets at Houston, 4:05 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Milwaukee, 4:10 p.m.
St. Louis at Cincinnati, 4:10 p.m.
Arizona at L.A. Dodgers, 7:10 p.m.
San Francisco at Chicago Cubs
7:10 p.m.

AUTO RACING

Race week
NASCAR
SPRINT CUP
FedEx 400
Site: Dover, Del.
Schedule:Today, practice (Speed, 2:30-
4:30 p.m.), Saturday, qualifying (Speed,
noon- 1:30 p.m.), Sunday, race, I p.m. (fox,
12:30-5 p.m.).
Track: Dover International Speedway
(oval, 1.0 miles).
Race distance: 400 miles, 400 laps.
NATIONWIDE
5-Hour Energy 200
Site: Dover, Del.
Schedule:Today, practice (Speed, 12:30-
2:30 p.m.); Saturday, qualifying (ESPN2,
10:30-11:30 a.m.), race, 2 p.m. (ESPN,
1:30-4:30 p.m.).
Race distance: 200 miles, 200 laps.
CAMPING WORLD TRUCKS
Lucas Oil 200
Site: Dover, Del.
Schedule: Today, qualifying (Speed 6-7
p.m.), race, 4:45 p.m. (Speed 8-I I p.m.).
Race distance: 200 miles, 200 laps.
NHRA FULL THROTTLE
NHRA Southern Nationals
Site: Commerce, Ga.
Schedule: Today, qualifying; Saturcay,
qualifying (ESPN2, 7-9:30 p.m.); Sunday,
"final eliminations (ESPN2,7-10 p.m.).


SEVE: Gracious with fans, players


CHS: Debuts from Memorial tonight


Continued From Page 1I


coaching my Alma mater."
Allen has used faces
familiar with the program
to speak to this year's crop
of Tigers about the impor-
tance of tradition.
"I was excited to bring
back the guys to share our
roots," Allen said. "A lot of
the guys don't know the sig-
nificance, so we brought in
Donnie Harrison, Tre Ore
and Billy Hale to talk to the
guys. It helps them under-
stand what it means to wear
the Purple and Gold."
The game, which begins
at 6 p.m. tonight, will mark
the first chance for many
eyes to catch what Allen
and his staff have installed
in the program.
"It's the first opportunity
to see what the staff has put
together under the lights,"
he said. "I'm happy with


what we have, who we have
and how we've worked our
butts off. We don't only
have athletes, but we're
preparing students of the
game."
One position that Allen is
particularly excited about
seeing is the running back
spot. With depth going four
deep, Allen has a lot to
choose from.
"We have a real good
group with four backs capa-
ble," Allen said. "Rakeem
Battle leads the group,
but we also have Braxton
Stockton, Ronald Timmons
and Barnibus Madison."
Each of the backs bring
their own strengths accord-
ing to the first-year coach.
"Ronald has shown him-
self this spring," Allen said.
"I expect exciting things
out of him. Barnibus is a


thumper and has shown he
can take it 50 yards."
Battle is the unques-
tioned leader of the group
according to Allen and
much of that is due to work
ethic.
"He's unparalleled," he
said. "He's never satisfied
with being second. He'll out-
work everyone. It doesn't
matter if we're pushing the
sled, jumping rope of play-
ing football, he's going to
bring it everyday."
Of course, he also has
speed in his corner.
"He's fast and quick, and
that's a combo you don't
hear all the time," Allen
said. "He's hard-to bring
down with the first tackle
and even if they do, he's
falling forward. The best
thing is, he's only in ninth
grade."


INDIANS: Red & Black on Saturday


Continued From Page 1f

on the offensive line. Blaine
Crews has signed on as
a volunteer coach to help
with the O-line.
Joey O'Neal and Chad
Bonds are not on the staff.
Wayne Exum Sr., Gator
Exum and Gary Williams are
back with the junior varsity.
Charles Moore returns to
coaching and will help with


the JV. Elvin Shepard, who
Jackson said was "one of my
favorite players" is helping
with the JV receivers.
"Our volunteers are
enthusiastic about the
opportunity," Jackson said.
"Anybody who wants 'to
learn and put the work into
it, we need them."
Jackson said the combi-


nation makes for a good
mix.
"When I first got the job,
I wanted to have veteran
coaches and keep' young
guys around," Jackson
said. "You bring, in youth'
and they have good ideas.
It makes a good staff."
The Indians' Red & Black
game is 10 a.m. Saturday.


TPC: Kaymer bids to take over No. 1


Continued From Page 1I
letting it get him down, he
came to Florida to practice
and then came out firing.
"Last week in Charlotte,
I got off to a bad start and
I never really righted the
ship," Watney said. "So
today to have a bad hole
like that and still play a
good round is a reward-
ing feeling, just because I
didn't let it affect the rest of
my day."
PGA champion Martin
Kaymer, who can return to
No. -1 in the world by win-
ning or finishing alone in
second this week, opened
with a 67 and became- part
of the biggest news of the


day.
He was in the group with
Matt Kuchar and Woods,
although it became a two-
some on the back nine
when Woods left.
Also at 67 was Rory
Sabbatini, U.S. Open cham-
pion Graeme McDowell and
Alvaro Quiros of Spain.
Ryder Cup captain Davis
Love III, a two-time winner
of this prestigious event,
had a 68, along with Ben
Crane.
Crane is significant for
the bogey he made.
, On the infamous island-
green 17th, Crane caught a
gust of wind as the ball was


in flight and it took over the
green. But the ball landed
on the back of the wooden
frame and bounced so far
that it cleared the water
and landed among the
spectators. He then faced
a scary pitch back to the
island and hit the bulkhead
in about the same spot, the
ball rolling to the front, of
the green.
He two-putted from 50
feet for his bogey, which
could have been much
worse.
"A crazy day, a crazy
game," Crane said.
Only 23 players broke


Continued From Page 11
the first two round were
played at both courses.
The final was at Quail
Heights, which played with
the nines flipped. What is
now the Creeks was the
front side and the Ponds
was the back.
John Horne, now the
head pro at Plainview
Country Club in his Texas
hometown, led wire to
wire. He opened with a
66 at Lake City, then shot
69 at Quail Heights and
closed with a 71 to win by
a stroke.
Horne broke a four-way
logjam with a birdie on the
final hole. He got up and
down and made a 3-foot
putt.
"I knew a birdie would
win but knocked it over the
green in two," Horne said.
"The wind was pretty good
in my face and I waited for
a gust to come up and hit
the chip."
Horne said he
introduced himself to
Ballesteros, but didn't see
him much.
Ballesteros shot
70-70-73 and took his
check for $1,350.
Mark Calcavecchia,
Jerry Haas and Keith
Clearwater were in the
field and others also
remember Tom Lehman,
Steve Jones, Kenny Perry
and Lance Ten Broeck
among the players.
But it was Ballesteros,
already a four-time major
winner at the time, who
was the draw. By all
accounts, he was very
gracious.
Ste-Marie talked him
into playing nine holes and
sent for his son, Carl, to
caddie. It didn't take
much prodding to enlist
the 12-year-old.
"Growing up he was my
favorite golfer of all time,"


Carl said. "Imagine Tiger
playing in a tournament in
Lake City and Seve was the
Tiger Woods of Europe."
,Dad shocked Ballesteros
with a proposed wager in
front of about 300 fans in
the gallery.
"I told him I would give
him three shots and we
would play for caddies,"
Ste-Marie said. "He said,
'What!' I played nine holes
with him and he was
flawless. His swing was
perfect."
Pottle said Ballesteros
would not use the locker
room, but changed shoes
in his office.
"He was practicing in
the sand trap behind the
golf shop," Pottle said. "He
lined up several balls and
hit a couple in normal
fashion. Then he
starting swinging between
his knees and got the balls
out as pretty as you please.
He was very polite and



Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

FILTN


2011 Tribune Media Services, Inc. -'
All Rights Reserved. _
HSRHA



DPAEDL



LYJUFO
---?
^ _


helpful to other players."
Robb Burns of Lake City
played in the tournament
as a amateur.
"I remember watching
him play a few holes of a
practice round at Quail
Heights," Burns said.
"Seve was very cordial
with all the fans that were
present there."
Ballesteros was
presented the key to the
city by then mayor Gerald
Witt, but it was later that
Lake City got dissed.
"One of the golf
magazines had a title on
the front page, 'Seve in the
Boondocks,"' Ste-Marie
said. "They called it a
cinderblock clubhouse and
were very pejorative about
where he was playing."
Still, Lake City made the
golf map, and in a couple of
years the Ben Hogan Tour
would come calling.
E Tim Kirby is sports editor of
the Lake City Reporter.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek


Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


Ans:
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's Jumbles: CREEK BLOCK RODENT ANYONE
Answer: The new laundromat in the Sahara turned out
to be a DRY CLEANER


1
5
8

12 F
a
13
r
14
15
f
16
18
20
21 -

22 E
23 C
26 F


ACROSS 35 Libertine
36 Wedding-party
Misplaced members
Long sigh 38 Reheats
Result of 39 Noted cathe-
damming dral town
Pharaoh's 40 John,
imulet in Glasgow
Swelling 41 Rural
educer necessity
Unit of area 43 Kind of switch
Sierra Club 46 "Jeopardy!" for
under one (2 wds.)
Harem 48 "Fatha" Hines
Gets moldy 50 Related
Debtors' notes 51 Ms. Hagen
- you 52 Hoarfrost
kidding? 53 Prefix for "tril-
El Dorado loot lion"
Ceases 54 Movie rat
Fixes a manu- 55 Doe's mate


script
29 WWW address-
es
30 Hawk
31 Mouse catcher
33 Pindar forte
34 Island near
Java


DOWN


Go on the -
Unpleasant
necessity
Overlook
Gullets


Answer to Previous Puzzle

T IICIS OIGIREIS
CROHE E F R E ELY
P L I OX 0 B|TM AI N
E CAR





B XCHEL FAS AT |
B EsL
EMT J UT TER
BOA ED LI NEA

DARTNIT INEE
EIE






TION H M ANOIN
APAC HE ENGAGE
RE VI EW SEEMED
OCEAN C RIEE


5 Supermarket
area
6 Makes a hole in
one
7 That ship
8 Pool


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


9 Freedom org.
10 Mr. Kristoff-
erson
11 Fair-hiring let-
ters
17 Made public
19 CPA employer
22 All, in combos
23 "- Vadis?"
24 Language of
Pakistan
25 Dots in the
Seine
26 Lampreys
27 Kind of prize
28 Had done laps
30 Fluctuate
32 Brown of
renown
34 Carillon
35 Wildlife pro-
tectors
37 Montana's
capital
38 Droll one
40 Waterloo resi-
dent
41 Vigil
42 Kuwaiti VIP
43 Big bag
44 Cafe au -
45 Ms. Bombeck
46 Mobster's
piece
47 Center
49 Trouser part


2011 by UFS, Inc.


SCOREBOARD


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420








LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS FRIDAY, MAY 13, 2011


Donovan 'starting over'


with revamped staff


By MARK LONG
Associated Press

GAINESVILLE Florida
coach Billy Donovan is
treating his revamped staff
like an overhauled roster.
He's trying to build bonds,
develop chemistry and cre-
ate teamwork.
If it works, the Gators
could stay atop the
Southeastern Conference
and make another deep run
in the NCAA tournament
next season.
"When you have three
people leave at one time,
you're really starting over,"
Donovan. said Tuesday as
he introduced his new, yet
somewhat familiar, staff.
Donovan lost associate
head coach Larry Shyatt to
Wyoming in March, then
had Richard Pitino leave
to become associate coach
under his father, Rick, at
Louisville and had Rob
Lanier take a similar posi-
tion at Texas.
Donovan filled the spots
with close friend and for-
mer Arkansas coach John
Pelphrey, respected col-
league and former St. John's
coach Norm Roberts, and
former Florida assistant
Matt McCall.
"I've had different coach-
es leave throughout the
course of my time here at


Florida, but when you have
three people leave on one
staff at one time, that's cer-
tainly unique and very, very
different," Donovan said.
There certainly have
been challenges, start-
ing with Pelphrey and
Roberts still having their
families living out of state.
And with the summer
recruiting season about
two months away, there
has been little time for the
new staff to get acquainted
with recruits, their families,
high school staffs and
those all-important AAU
coaches.
"It's no different than
a team," Donovan said.
"You try to create a level
of chemistry inside your
staff. When John was
here and (Alabama coach)
Anthony (Grant) was here
and (Central Florida coach)
Donnie Jones was here, it
was not by mistake that
we had really, really good
teams. Our staff reflected
what a team was all about."
Donovan said he
expects similar results
with Pelphrey, Roberts and
McCall.
"As a coaching staff
you're always looking to
make your players better,
but a lot of times inside your
staff, you can display a lot of
chemistry and teamwork,"


Donovan said. "That's what
we've talked about a lot."
Pelphrey, who served
six years (1996-2002) as an
assistant under Donovan,
is returning to Florida after
spending the past nine
seasons at South Alabama
(2002-07) and Arkansas
(2007-11). He was fired
last month after posting
a 69-59 record with the
Razorbacks.
Pelphrey said he has a
lot more knowledge now
than he did when he left
Gainesville in 2002.
"I have a different under-
standing," he said. "I see
things completely different
than I did the first time
around, not that the way
that I saw it the first time
around was wrong because
there was a level of success.
But as you get older you
gain experiences and have
a chance to be exposed to
the good and to the bad.
Those are valuable things.
Those are weapons in your
arsenal."
Roberts, a 1987 graduate
of' Queens College in New
York City, spent six seasons
at St. John's before he was
fired in 2010. He was 81-101
and never made the NCAA
tournament. He spent last
season working as a televi-
sion commentator for the
Big East Network.


Smr B :ww

"BBIm u"W i~r JF'^w ^ PSIIil' w 'Jle" w". ""*


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Florida coach Billy Donovan watches from the sideline as the Gators take on Florida State in
Gainesville during the 2009 season.


Roberts also served as
an assistant under Kansas
coach Bill Self at four differ-
ent schools. He was associ-
ate head coach at Kansas
(2003-04) and an assistant
at Illinois (2000-03), Tulsa
(1997-2000) and Oral


Roberts (1995-97).
Like Pelphrey, he
believes his head-coach-
ing experience will serve
Florida well.
"Coming as head coaches,
you understand the urgency,
you understand the impor-


tance, you understand the
little things and how impor-
tant those things are,"
Roberts said. 'The same
things coach Donovan's
going to be preaching to us
we've already preached to
our assistants."


Wade, James embrace


winning together


By TIM REYNOLDS
Associated Press

MIAMI With two
words, LeBron James
captured Dwyane Wade's
attention.
"I apologize," James
said.
He said it late Wednesday
night, roughly an hour after
the Miami Heat finished
off the Boston Celtics in
their Eastern Conference
semifinal series. Wade was
seated to James' left, look-
ing down at .the table, when
that one phrase immedi-
ately had him lift his eyes
toward his teammate's.
face.
The topic was how
James and Cleveland lost to
Boston in the 2010 playoffs
- and the infamous whirl-
wind that followed his deci-
sion to leave the Cavaliers
and join the Heat.
In that moment, as the
Heat were moving forward,
James was looking back.
"I went through a lot, you
know, with deciding to be
here and the way it panned
out, with all the friends
and the family and the fans
back home," James said.
"I apologize for the way it
happened."
No specifics were
offered. James has said
many times in recent
months that he wishes cer-
tain aspects of last summer
went differently. All those
references being clear
nods to "The Decision," the
hourlong televised special
on July 8, 2010 in which he
announced he was joining
the Heat.
He may be sorry for
that, but he's surely not
sorry about the results so
far in Miami.
The Heat are 8-2 in the
postseason, 23-5 since
March 10, and will be one
of four teams left standing
in the chase for an NBA
title.
That's not hardly good
enough for Miami.
"We knew that in order
to get to our goal we had to
go through Boston," Heat
guard Mario Chalmers
said. "And we got through
them."
Thursday was a quiet
day for the Heat, with
players taking the day off
while coaches and other
staff found plenty to do in
anticipation of Miami's first
trip to the East finals since


ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Miami Heat's LeBron James, facing camera, hugs
Dwyane Wade after Miami defeated Boston 97-87 in the
fifth game of their NBA playoff series at American Airlines
Arena Wednesday.


2006. The earliest they
will play again is Sunday,
depending on the outcome
of the Chicago-Atlanta
matchup.
The Bulls held a 3-2
lead in that series entering
Game 6 Thursday night.
It was a championship-
type scene as the final buzz-
er sounded Wednesday
in Miami's 97-87 victory,
sealing the 4-1 series win
over the now-dethroned
East champs. The Celtics
ended both Miami's sea-
son and James' tenure with
Cleveland in the 2010 play-
offs.
James knelt in prayer.
Wade dove into the court-
side seats to try and
retrieve the final rebound,
needing help to slowly get
to his feet. Juwan Howard
- the 38-year-old veteran
who's headed to the NBA's
final four for the first time
- wrapped his arms
around James' and Wade's
necks, before they hugged
one another. Boston's Ray
Allen grabbed Chalmers,
barking wisdom for several
seconds into his ear as the
younger guard nodded.
And how's this for a
twist?
After his players were
done trying to play defense
against the Heat in Game
5,'Celtics coach Doc Rivers
took a turn defending
them.


Literally.
"You know, I've never
seen a team more criti-
cized in my life, and a guy
in LeBron more criticized
for doing what was legal,"
Rivers said. "He didn't
break a law. He didn't do
anything wrong. You know,
the preseason parade might
have been a little bit much,
but other than that ... I just
told him 'Good luck and
keep going' out there. He
was very emotional. Good
for him."
Wade scored 34 points
in Game 5, James added 33
- including the final 10 of
the game.
He at least dampened
the he-can't-finish notion.
"Big players make big
plays," said Heat center
Joel Anthony. "When he
was in the moment, the
moment was there. He def-
initely played huge for us.
That's part of playoff bas-
ketball. There are going to
be times like that when you
need someone like Bron to
come in and just take over
like that."
But it wasn't the points,
or the two late 3-point-
ers that swung the tide
Miami's way, or the steal
and dunk that sealed the
victory, or even his kneel-
ing in prayer after the final
buzzer that will go down as
the compelling meniory of
Game 5.


Green Bay will retire


Favre's jersey eventually


Associated Press

ASHLAND, Wis. -
Green Bay Packers presi-
dent Mark Murphy said the
team will eventually retire
Brett Favre's No. 4, but that
they want to make sure he's
really retired.
"He deserves that for
what he did as a Packer,"
Murphy told fans in
Ashland Wednesday during
the Tailgate Tour. "There
are very few players in our
history that had their num-
ber retired. He deserves it


though. But it's a very, very
meaningful honor and we
want to do it at a time when
it's meaningful for both him
and the organization."
The Green Bay Press-
Gazette quoted Murphy
as saying it would likely
be a few years before the
ceremony. He said when
Favre retired after the 2007
season they planned a cer-
emony at the opening game
against the Vikings but
then Favre went to play for
the Jets.
Earlier this week Favre


said he has no intention of
coming out of retirement.
Former receiver Antonio
Freeman made an appear-
ance on the tour Wednesday.
He said the league and the
world are about second
chances.
- "So, I think at one point in
time we'll have to give Brett
Favre a second chance to
come back home," Freeman
said. "He did have a very
meaningful career here. I'm
personally biased because
he and I shared so many
magical moments."


-4


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Tiger Woods speaks to the media after withdrawing during the first round of The Players
Championship golf tournament Thursday in Ponte Vedra Beach.


WOODS: Withdraws due to knee
Continued From Page 1B


tendon while hitting from
pine straw in the third
round. He described it as a
"minor injury" and skipped
the tournament last week to
give his leg time to heal.
Woods had said his leg
felt better. But from the
opening tee shot at the TPC
Sawgrass, he looked as bad
as he ever has.
"The knee acted up and
then the Achilles followed
after that, and then the
calf started cramping up,"
Woods said. "Everything
started getting tight, so
it's just a whole chain reac-
tion."
The first hole could not
have gone any worse.
He pulled his opening
tee shot into the pine trees,
leaving him a stance in the


pine straw. Then he came
up short of the green, his
ball perched at the bottom
of a steep bank that force
another awkward stance.
'The pine straw didn'thelp
because my foot slipped,
my left foot slipped," Woods
said. "It obviously would
have probably felt better if
it would have held."
The rest of his nine holes
was not much better, espe-
cially at No. 4. He said his
knee "grabbed me" on a
tee shot that sailed well left
into the mounds, and he put
his approach into the water.
Then came a shocker of a
shot after taking a drop,
his short pitch to a back pin
hit the bulk head and went
back into the water. He had
to make a 20-foot putt for


triple bogey.
Even more remarkable
- Woods didn't hit a single
green from his five tee shots
that found the fairway.
The 42 was three shots
higher than his previ-
ous worst 9-hole score
at the TPC Sawgrass. His
worst 9-hole score on the
PGA Tour was a 43 on four
occasions, the most recent
on the back nine at Quail
Hollow last year when he
missed the cut.
This is the second
straight year Woods has
withdrawn in the middle of
the round at The Players
Championship. He stopped
on the seventh hole of the
final round last year with
what turned out to be a
neck injury.


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420









Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS FRIDAY, MAY 13, 2011


DILBERT
I ESTIMATED THE
PROJECT TIMELINE BY
ASSUMING THAT EVERY-
ONE INVOLVED WILL
WASTE ONE WEEK.


BABY BLUES


BLONDIE


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE


SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS


GARFIELD


B.C.


FRANK & ERNEST


DEAR ABBY


Wife loses sight of her future

after husband admits he's gay


DEAR ABBY: I recently
learned that my husband of 35
years is gay. I never suspected
and I am stunned. I have loved
him since we met. I still do. I
have never been interested in
anyone else. We have three
children and eight grandchil-
dren who all adore him.
I learned his secret from an
email he left on the computer
screen. It took a few days, but
I confronted him and he told
me everything. He has been
with men since before our
marriage. He assured me he
has never done anything that
could have caused me to get a
disease. I went for an examina-
tion and I'm fine.
I'm lost about what my next
step should be. I'm in my late
50s. Starting over isn't some-
thing I ever -considered. I'm
seeing a therapist who sug-
gested it might be simpler
to consider myself a widow. I
have no interest in having sex
with my husband again, but
being apart from him terrifies
me. I feel like I'm in prison.
Have you any suggestions?
HELPLESS IN MIAMI
DEAR HELPLESS: You
are not "in prison" and you're
not "helpless." You're prob-
ably in shock, knowing your
husband deceived you from
the time you met him. That's
understandable. My advice is
to do NOTHING until you re-
'gain some sense of balance.
Finding that email was no
accident. Consciously or un-
consciously, your husband
wanted you to see it. That


21


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearabby.com
you no longer want to have
sex with him isn't surprising.
Some things to consider: Does
he still want to have sex with
you? How do you feel about
having sex with anyone? Is
your husband involved with
more than one person or just
one? And does HE want to stay
married?
Some women (and men) re-
main married to their bisexual
spouse. Others marry people
they know are gay. I do not
agree with your therapist that
you should "consider yourself
a widow," unless you want to
be married to the living dead.
Before making any decision
about your future, you should
contact the Straight Spouse
Network. It's a confidential
support network of current or
former heterosexual spouses
or partners of gay, lesbian, bi-
sexual or transgender mates.
It helps straight spouses or
partners cope constructively
with the coming-out crisis and
assists mixed-orientation cou-
ples and their children to build
bridges of understanding. The
phone number is (201) 825-
7763 and the website is www.
StraightSpouse.org. I wish you


luck on your journey.
DEAR ABBY: I'm a 19-
year-old woman. When I was
4, my mom went to prison for
eight years. It turned her life
around. At 38, she now has a
college degree, a loving hus-
band, a good job and a new
home. .
My two younger sisters say
they don't want to be part of
Mom's life, but they never fail
to call her at holiday and birth-
day time to pick up the gifts
they know she has bought
them. Afterward, they don't
contact her or answer her calls
and texts until the next holi-
day. It leaves Mom depressed
and feeling used. I have tried
telling them they're wrong,
but they don't listen. They
say I'm wrong for getting in
their business. Is it wrong to
want my mother to be happy?
DAUGHTER ON THE
OUTSIDE
DEAR DAUGHTER: I
don't blame your mother for
feeling depressed and used.
Your two younger sisters
are manipulative, selfish and
self-centered. However, your
mother is enabling them to be-
have that way. Talk to her and
suggest family counseling.
She may be giving and giving
out of guilt, they may be taking
and taking in order to punish
her, and that's not healthy for
any of them.

Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-
April 19): Get out, mingle,
network and let people
knowwhatyou can do. Offer
your services or make help-
ful suggestions and you will
soon be known as the go-to
person among your friends,
peers and colleagues.. A
change of plans will play in
your favor. ***
TAURUS (April 20-
May 20): Do your best to
get everyone all revved up
about your plans and take
advantage of the opportu-
nity to get the backing you
need to move forward. Your
strong work ethic and abil-
ity to get things done will
help you advance. ***-
GEMINI (May21-June
20): Spend time working
toward something you en-
joy doing and you will get
a better sense of how you
can turn your interest into
a profitable venture. Talk to
people with experience. A
serious decision will affect
your personal and profes-
sional life. **
CANCER (June 21-
July 22): Don't procrasti-
nate when it's obvious you
have to act quickly if you
don't want to lose some-
thing that means a lot to
you. You may need to com-
promise a little in order to
keep the peace. Put your ef-
forts into home, family and
making your surroundings
pleasant. ****


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

LEO (July 23-Aug.
22): Bend over backwards
if it will ease someone else's
stress. Your generosity and
kindness will be appreciat-
ed. A job with the potential
to go either way will favor
you if you are ready to work
alongside those familiar
with the project. ***
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Everything you do
to enhance your chance
to advance will bring you
that much closer to getting
what you want. Plan to so-
cialize late in the day. Your
confidence, experience and
willingness to share infor-
mation will win you allies.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): Don't hold back your
thoughts to spare some-
one's feelings. Honesty will
be necessary. Speaking
from the heart will have
a huge impact and will
encourage others to see
things from your perspec-
tive. ***
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-
Nov. 21): Now is the
perfect time to make the
changes at home that will
put your mind at ease and
make your life more com-
fortable. Updating equip-
ment, appliances or any-
thing else that will make
your life easier should be


done without hesitation.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): Getting out
and doing things that you
find challenging will lead
to interesting new connec-
tions and bring about a nice
ending to your day, with
someone you love. Don't
be afraid to share your feel-
ings. ****
CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): Don't over-
react You will get the most
for the least if you take ac-
tion and live up to your
promises without hesita-
tion. You must set the stan-
dard if you want others to
.follow through. Don't let
someone's change of plans
disrupt your day. **
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Don't get angry,
get moving. You have plen-
ty to offer. Concentrate on
the things you enjoy doing
most and you'll find a way
to incorporate your skills,
your passion and your ex-
perience into extra cash.

PISCES (Feb. 19-
March 20): Avoid criticiz-
ing others or leaving your-
self open for disapproval.
Be responsible for your
actions and think before
you act. You will find a way
through any obstacles put
in your way. An, interview
or job offer will be favor-
able. ***


CELEBRITY CIPHER


by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: P equals X
" R M J T K H Y'T I H N T X I B H V G R
B H J YTT M H I H B H V G
S U H CY R D S i G H J C I U YY ZT X
U P H B I Y Z K S R B S K H Z R I G
B T O R J D ." O R I B S S U C N U V D

PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "What does it matter how one comes by the truth so
long as one pounces upon it and lives by it?" Henry Miller
(c) 2011 by NEA, Inc. 5-13


FOR BETTER OR WORSE


-THAT'S A STUPID WAY
TO DO A TIMELINE.
SET UP A MEETING
AND I'LL SHOW YOU
HOW IT'S SUPPOSED
TO BE DONE.


HE'S
AVAILABLE
IN A WEEK.


I HAD TO 60 THROUGH THE
- ~;5CURITY PAT DOWN THRWE
r TiM6S---THfY HAD
0 TROUFLf V F. 4ieViNo
THIS I JUST MY
j-- ODY ANP X'M NOT
i. IDING ANYTHING.


LAKE CITY REPORTER


Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415


CLASSIC PEANUTS


ADVICE & COMICS FRIDAY, MAY 13,2011








Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED FRIDAY, MAY 13, 2011

Lake City Reporter





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only the charge for the ad space
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approval by the Publisher who
reserves the right to edit, reject,
or classify all advertisements under
appropriate headings. Copy should
be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the first day of pub-
lication. Credit for published errors
will be allowed for the first insertion
for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the
Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nor for any general,
special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply
with Federal, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
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In Pri ; Onliac
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IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
FILE NO. 11-105-CP
PROBATE DIVISION:
IN RE: ESTATE OF
JERRY E. CARSWELL
Deceased
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate ol
Jerry E. Carswell, deceased, whose
date of death was April 2, 2011 and
whose social security number is 263-
52-9944, is pending in the Circuit
Court for Columbia County, Florida.
Probate Division, the address ol
which is 173 NE Hemando Ave
P.O. Box 2069, Lake City, Florida
32056. The names and addresses ol
the Personal Representative and the
Personal Representative's attomey
are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and oth-
er persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate on whom a
copy of this notice is required to be
served must file their claims with
this court WITHIN THE LATER OF
3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AF-
TER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF
A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent
and other persons having claims oi
demands against decedent's estate
must file their claims with this court
WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE. .
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITH.
IN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS Ol MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATE
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of thin
notice is May 13, 2011.
Attomey for Personal Representa-
tive:
/s/ John E. Norris
John E Norris
Attorney for Personal Representative
Florida Bar No. 058998
Norris & Norris, P.A.
253 NW Main Blvd.
Post Office Drawer 2349 .
Lake City, Florida 32056-2349
Telephone: (386) 752-7240
Fax: (386) 752-1577
E-Mail: jnorris@norrisattomeys.com

Personal Representative:
/s/ Patricia 0. Carswell
Patricia 0. Carswell
1795 SW McFarlane Ave.
Lake City, Florida 32025

05525865
May, 13, 20, 2011


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRE
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 2010-CA-000783,
COLUMBIA BANK,
Plaintiff,
vs.
SHERMAN A. STANLEY, JR.,
Defendant.
CLERK'S NOTICE OF SALE UN-
DER F.S. CHAPTER 45
NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accord-
ance with the Summary Final Judg-
ment of Foreclosure dated May 3,
2011, in the above-styled cause. I
will sell to the highest and best bid-
der for cash at the Columbia County
Courthouse, courtroom 1, 173 North-
east Hemando Avenue, Lake City,
Florida 32055 at 11:00 a.m. on June
8, 2011, the following described
property:
Lot 8 of SUZANNE SUBDIVI.
SION, UNIT 4, according to the plat
thereof as recorded in Plat Book 4
Page 99, of the Public Records of
Columbia County, Florida.
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN IN-
TEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM
THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER
AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS
PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE
SALE.
Dated May 4, 2011
P. DeWitt Cason
Clerk of Court
By:/s/ B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk

0454470'1
May 13, 20, 2011



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Lawn & Landscape Service

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Delivery of 100 bales $260
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You can trust for knowledge &
pride, Mention this AD!
Mow Green, LLC 386-288-6532

Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.


Legal


NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
CONCERNING A SPECIAL EX-
CEPTION AS PROVIDED FOR IN
THE COLUMBIA COUNTY LAND
DEVELOPMENT REGULATIONS
BY THE BOARD OF ADJUST-
MENT OF COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA, NOTICE IS HEREBY
f GIVEN that, pursuant to the Colum-
bia County Land Development Reg-
1 ulations as amended, hereinafter .re-
- ferred to as the Land Development
t Regulations, comments, objections
, and recommendations concerning the
f special exception as described be-
. low, will be heard by the Board of
a Adjustment of Columbia County,
f Florida, at a public hearing on May
e 26, 2011 at 7:00 p.m., or as soon
y thereafter as the matter can be heard,
in the County School Board Admin-
istrative Complex, located at 372
West Duval Street, Lake City, Flori-
a da.
e SE 0516, a petition by Christopher J.
Newsom, to request a special excep-
* tion be granted as provided for in
F Section 4.5.7 of the Land Develop-
* ment Regulations to allow for a
building contractor and yard within
F an AGRICULTURE-3 (A-3) zoning
I district and in accordance with a site
plan submitted as part of a petition
t dated April 25, 2011, to be located
r on property described, as follows:
o A parcel of land lying in Section 15,
t Township 7 South, Range 17 East,
Columbia County, Florida. Being
more particularly described, as fol-
lows: Commence at the Southwest
- comer of the Northwest 1/4 of the
r Southwest 1/4 of said Section 15;
F thence North 88034J)8" East, along
the South line of the Northwest 1/4
. of the Southwest 1/4 of said Section
15, a distance of 100.03 feet to the
, East right-of-way line of U.S. High-
) way 41/441 (State Road 25) and the
3 Point of Beginning; thence North
I 0152'52" West, along the East right-
of-way line of said U.S. Highway
s 41/441 (State Road 25) a distance of
371.35 feet; thence North 88034'08"
- East 180.00 feet; thence South
01052'52" East 20.00 feet; thence
North 88034'08" East 302.82 feet;
thence South 01052'52" East 351.35
feet to the South line of the North-
west 1/4 of the Southwest 1/4 of said
Section 15; thence South 88034'08"
West, along the South line of the
Northwest 1/4 of the Southwest 1/4
of said Section 15, a distance of
482.82 feet to the Point of Begin-
ning.
Containing 4.00 acres, more or less.
The public hearing may be continued
to one or more future dates. Any in-
terested party shall be advised that
the date, time and place of any con-
tinuation of the public hearing shall
be announced during the public hear-
ing and that no further notice con-
cerning the matter will be published.
At the aforementioned public hear-
ing, all interested parties may appear
to be heard with' respect to the spe-
cial exception.
Copies of the special exception are
available for public inspection at the
Office of the County Planner, Coun-
ty Administrative Offices, 135
Northeast Hemando Avenue, Lake
City, Florida, during regular business
hours.
All persons are advised that if they
decide to appeal any decision made
at the above referenced public hear-
ing, they will need a record of the
proceedings, and that, for such pur-
pose, they may need to ensure that a
verbatim record of the proceedings is
made, which record includes the tes-
timony and evidence upon which the
appeal is to be based.
In accordance with the Americans
with Disabilities Act, persons need-
ing a special accommodation or an
interpreter to participate in the pro-
ceeding should contact Lisa K. B.
S.Roberts, at least seven (7) days prior
to the date of the hearing. Ms. Rob-
erts may be contacted by telephone
at (386)758-1005 or by Telecommu-
nication Device for Deaf at
(386)758-2139.
04544649
May 13, 2011


Registration of Fictitious Names
We the undersigned, being duly
sworn, do hereby declare under oath
that the names of all persons interest-
ed in the business or profession car-
ried on under the name of Radiant
Skin Solutions at
125 SW Midtown Place
Lake City, Florida
32025
Contact Phone Number:
386-719-9227 and the extent of the
interest of each, is as follows:
Name: Three Rivers Medical, Inc.
Extent of Interest: 100%
by:/s/ Rodney Scyphers
by:/s/ Margaret Maloney

STATE OF FLORIDA
COUNTY OF COLUMBIA
Sworn to and subscribed before me
this 10th day of May, A.D. 2011.
by:/s/ Jennifer W. Thompson

05525890
May 13, 2011


NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARINGS
CONCERNING AMENDMENTS
TO THE COLUMBIA COUNTY
LAND DEVELOPMENT REGU-
LATIONS BY THE PLANNING
AND ZONING BOARD OF CO-
LUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA,
SERVING ALSO AS THE LOCAL
PLANNING AGENCY OF CO-
LUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA,-
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that,
*pursuant to Sections 163.3161
through 163.3215, Florida Statutes,
as amended, and the Columbia
County Land Development Regula-
tions, as amended, hereinafter refer-
red to as the Land Development Reg-
ulations, objections, recommenda-
tions and comments concerning the
amendments, as described below,
will be heard by the Planning and
Zoning Board of Columbia County,
Florida, serving also as the Local
Planning Agency of Columbia Coun-
ty, Florida, at public hearings on
May 26, 2011, at 7:15 p.m., or as
soon thereafter as the matters can be
heard, in the School Board Adminis-
trative Complex located at 372 West
Duval Street, Lake City, Florida.
(1) LDR 11-01, an application by


REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL
Day-Labor Projects
Bid File #3254
Bid File #3255
May 10, 2011
The Columbia County School Dis-
trict is interested in receiving propos-
als for Day-Labor Contracts for con-
structions, renovation, remodeling,
and maintenance of existing facilities
as provided in Chapter 1013.45 Flor-
ida Statutes. All such contracts shall
be for projects estimated at $200,000
or less. The School District may use
its own forces in addition to subcon-
tractors for portions of day-labor
projects. All day-labor projects shall
include contract documents (plans
and specifications) and are subject to
the same laws, rules, and codes as
for new construction and shall be
subject to inspection by the UBCI
following issuance of appropriate
permits from the School District
Maintenance Department. Subcon-
tractors contracted under the day-la-
bor contracts shall be stated licensed
as required by Chapter 489, F.S., or
locally registered, and shall carry re-
quired insurance.
The School District shall furnish all
required necessary materials. Cir-
cumstances requiring the subcontrac-
tor to furnish material will be only
upon authorization of the Director of
Maintenance whereby material cost
plus 7.5 percent mark up shall be re-
imbursed upon receipt of invoice(s).
Any subcontractor contracted shall
perform work only within the trade
licensed to do so; the subcontractor
will not be permitted to further sub-
contract said work. All invoicing
from the subcontractor will identify
the hours and the approved rates; no
additional charges outside the scope
of this contract will be allowed. All
work under the terms of this con-
tract, shall be at the direction of the
Director of Maintenance. All work
under the terms of this contract shall
be done in the most efficient manner.
All trash and debris generated by the
subcontractor shall be recovered by
the subcontractor and disposed per
direction of Director of Maintenance
or his designated supervisor. All
work perform under the terms of this
contract will be performed during
hours mutually agreed with the Di-
rector of Maintenance and may vary
depending upon the specific project.
All work shall be paid at an hourly
rate for:
a. Subcontractor hourly rate
b. Technician hourly rate
c. Laborer or helper hourly rate
Proposals will be accepted for the
following grades:
Bid File #3254 Day Labor Con-
tracts
Carpentry (metal stud framing)
Electrical
Plumbing
Painting
Masonry
Concrete Finislhing
Bid File #3255 Day Labor-
Site Work
BID INFORMATION: Call (386)
755-8030 or visit


Legal

the Board of County Commissioners,
-to amend the text of the Land Devel-
opment Regulations by amending
Section 5.7 entitled Maintenance, to
require that any road, street, utilities,
public parking or other public area or
drainage facility accepted for mainte-
nance by the County be designed and
built in accordance with the Board of
County Commissioners require-
ments; by amending Section 5.20 en-
titled Maintenance and Repair of Re-
quired Improvements, to require sub-
dividers to maintain and repair the-
improvements they are required to
construct until it has achieved no less
than 50 percent build out with certifi-
cates of occupancy within the re-
corded subdivision; to increase the
maintenance surety from 10 to 15
percent for required subdivision im-
provements; to provide the proce-
dures for the Board of County Com-
missioners to accept the maintenance
of subdivision improvements.
(2) LDR 11.-02, an application by the
Board of County Commissioners, to.
amend the text of the Land Develop-
ment Regulations by amending Sec-
tion 4.2.3.2 entitled Width of Curb
Break, to change the maximum
width of curb breaks within residen-
tial areas from 24 feet to 40 feet, to
change the minimum width of curb
breaks within planned shopping cen-
ters, industrial developments multi-
family developments with parking
for 300 or more vehicles from 24
feet to 40 feet, and to revise the reso-
lution number referenced in said sec-
tion.
The public hearings may be contin-
ued to one or more future dates. Any
interested party shall be advised that
the date, time and place of any con-.
tinuation of the public hearings shall
be announced during the public hear-
ings and that no further notice con-
cerning the matters will be publish-
ed, unless said continuation exceeds
six calendar weeks from the date of
the above referenced public hearings.
At the aforementioned public hear-
ing, all interested parties may appear
to be heard with respect to the
amendments.
Copies of the amendments are avail-
able for public inspection at the Of-
fice of the County Planner, County
Administrative Offices located at
135 Northeast Hemando Avenue,
Lake City, Florida, during regular
business hours.
All persons are advised that if they
decide to appeal any decision made
at the above referenced public hear-
ings, they will need a record of the
proceedings, and that, for such pur-
pose, they may need to ensure that a
verbatim record of the proceedings is
made, which record includes the tes-
timony and evidence upon which the
appeal is to be based.
In accordance with the Americans.
with Disabilities Act, persons need-
ing a special accommodation or an
interpreter to participate in the pro-
ceeding should contact Lisa K. B.
Roberts, at least seven (7) days prior
to the date of the hearing. Ms. Rob-
erts may be contacted by telephone
at (386)758-1005 or by Telecommu-
nication Device for Deaf at
(386)758-2139.

04544648
May 13,2011


04544754
HR Generalist/Benefits
Administrator
Large Lake City organization
seeking an HR Generalist/
Benefits Administrator. Duties
include recruiting, processing
applications, maintaining
personnel files, representing the
company at personnel-related
hearings, managing the
employee benefits program, etc.
Applicants should have
knowledge of federal and state
employment regulations,
benefits (health, COBRA, 401K,
etc.), workers compensation,
OSHA reporting, EEO and
unemployment claims. Must
also be proficient in Word and
Excel. Please submit your salary
requirements and resume to
wassont@andersoncolumbia.co
m or fax to 386-755-9132.
We are an equal employment
opportunity employer.

05525284
EXP. DRIVERS OTR
SERVICE TRUCKING, INC.,
MUST BE 25 YRS OR
OLDER, CLASS A LICENSE
REQUIRED, CLEAN DRIV-
ING RECORD, NO CHARGE
ACC WITHIN THE LAST
YEAR, EXC EQUIPMENT,
GREAT PAY/BENEFITS,
CALL 1-800-899-1300,
EXT 201 MON-FRI, 8-5,
DRUG SCREEN REQUIRED,
EOE

05525862
Resolutions Health Alliance
has an immediate opening for a
FT Administrative Assistant
in Lake City. The prospective
applicant must have the follow-
ing skills: Proficient in Micro-
soft Word, Excel and Outlook,
able to work independently,
organized, able to multi task,
excellent phone skills, client
Friendly, detail oriented, data
entry, file auditing, etc. Salary
range $21K to $23K yearly
based on experience, excellent
benefits package. Email resume
to: employment(arhapa.net
or fax (386) 754-9017.
Associate Reps
SUMMER WORK/GREAT PAY
Immediate FT/PT openings,
Customer sales/service,
No exp needed, conditions,
Apply Now all ages 17+
(386) 269-0883

AVON!! Only $10 to start!
Earn bonus $ up to $150+
1-800-275-9945 pin #4206
www.youravon.com/tdavies

Bartender needed. Must
have experience & be reliable, &
have your own transportation and
your own phone. 386-752-2412

CDL A Flatbed Truck Driver
needed for F/T OTR SE area, 3
years exp or more, Contact
Melissa or Mary @ 386-935-2773

Experienced auto Mechanic for
Farm equipment & older vehicles.
Must have own tools.
386-755-6481


Legal

www.columbia.kl2.fl.us/purchasing
to obtain a copy of the Proposal
documents. Licensed contractors in-
terested in performing work as a sub-
contractor for one of the identified
trades must complete and submit the
Bid Form no later than 2:00 PM.
June 2, 2011 and submit the proposal
in a sealed envelope identified as
DAY-LABOR CONTRACTS Bid
File #3254 or DAY LABOR- SITE
WORK Bid File #3255 addressed
or delivered to:
Columbia County School District
Mr. R. M. "Mike" Null, Director of
Purchasing
372 West Duval Street
Lake City, FL 32055
Any proposal received after the des-
ignated time shall not be considered.
Questions pertaining to the submis-
sion of this bid shall be directed to
Mike Null at (386) 755-8034; ques-
tions related to the scope of work
shall be directed to Fred Gaylard at
(386) 755-8065.
The Columbia County School Dis-
trict reserves the right to reject any
and all proposals and to award to the
lowest most responsive bidder.

04544717
May 13, 18, 2011

100 Job

Opportunities

04544659
HERBICIDE APPLICATOR
Local Herbicide Co.
seeking applicators.
Responsibilities:
Apply herbicide with backpacks
& mechanical equipment and
help operator perform daily
tasks. Overnight travel required.
Qualifications:
Must pass drug screen
Must have valid drivers license
with clean record
Must possess strong work ethic
Other: Bi-Lingual a plus but
not necessary
WE WILL BE HOLDING A
JOB FAIR @ THE HOLIDAY"
INN EXPRESS IN LIVE OAK
ON 05/16/11 @ 8 A.M.
Fax resume to: 318.226.6190 or
Call: 386.935.4203

04544731
Dietary Aide/Server
Experienced preferred. Must be
able to work evenings and
weekends. Please apply Baya
Pointe Nursing & Rehabilitation
Center, 587 SE Ermine
Ave., Lake City, Fl 32025
EOE/DFWP


Nursery Position Available
Southside Baptist Church,
Hours on Wednesdays and
Sunday during regular church
service. Please call 386-755-5553
for more information

240 Schools &
2 0u Education

04544505
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-05/23/10

Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-07/11/11

Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com



310 Pets & Supplies

CHICHUAHUA MIX.
Moving, FREE to good home.
Good with kids. 2 yrs old.
Found a good home!!!!

PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intesinesnal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.

330 Livestock &
Supplies

04544708
Black Angus
Cows & Heifers
Registered & Commercial
Prices Vary
386-719-4802 or 386-623-9427

Cattle For Sale. 9-16 mos.
Yearlings, bulls & heifers.
Pure bred black angus & cross
breeds. 386-365-1352
Pig
For Sale
$35
386-758-2976
Single Lane Farms
(1) 5 yr old registered Angus bull.
Duane Hingson. 386-776-1090
Wayne Parrish Bull.


361 Farm Equipment

84 Ford 4610 Tractor. Runs good.
Solid 2WD. New front tires,
350hr on 2005 motor. Dependable.
$7500. obo. 386-867-0005


407 Computers

Dell Computer,
$75
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170


I -


- ADvantage


II' I


100o Job
100 'Opportunities

Live Oak CPA Firm seeks
full-time Secretary/Receptionist.
Please see Employment
Opportunity at
www.liveoakcpa.com.
Sales Position available for moti-
vated individual Rountree -Moore
Toyota, Great benefits, paid train-
ing/vacation. Exp. a plus but not
necessary. Call Anthony Cosentino
386-623-7442
Sewing Machine Operator &
Cloth Cutter for cutting patterns
with experience, good hourly rate
Call Hafners 386-755-6481
Stylist Needed
Call
386-752-4614
Southern Exposure
Wanted Highly motivated
individual for Sales Position.
Rountree -Moore Automotive
Group, Great benefits, paid vaca-
tion. Exp. a plus but not necessary.
Call Tony Reese 386-344-7517

120 Medical
120 Employment

05525891
Front Desk/Medical Billing
several years experience in
medical office and insurance
billing required. Please email
resume to admin@nfsc.comcast-
biz.net or fax to 386-438-8628

Busy Ambulatory Surgery Center
seeks experienced Medical Biller,
Position is F/T, M-F, 8-5. For
more information call, fax, or
email a resume to 386-487-3930,
386-487-3935, administration
@lcsurgery center.com
Full Time Medical Assistant
needed for very busy paperless
Family Practice. Must be highly
motivated, multi-tasking and
patient centric. Intergy IEHR
experience a plus. Please fax
resume to: 386-961-9541
Part/full Time Medical Assistant
needed in Lake City
physician office. Please fax
CV to 386-719-9662.


130 Part Time

Need someone to load/unload
furniture & House-keeper to shop,
cook & drive
Call 207-215-0929


4







Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED FRIDAY, MAY 13, 2011


407 Computers
HP Computer.
$100.00
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170


408 Furniture
3 piece Living Room Set,
Multi color blues
$500 Good Condition
386-344-2884

410 Lawn & Garden
Equipment
2-Riding Mowers,
Craftsman, 19.5HP, 42" cut,
MTD 14.5HP. 38" cut
386-965-5744

416 Sporting Goods
GUN SHOW/STARKE
Bradford County Fairgrounds
May 14, Sat, 9-5, May 15, Sun 9-4
GunTraders is now buying GOLD
Bring your GUNS &
CyGOLD to sell or trade.
Concealed Weapons Classes Daily
GunTraderGunShows.com
352-339-4780

420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &


Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$250 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.

430 Garage Sales







Household, knick-knacks,
chairs, TV's, computer parts
Eastwood S/D on Apache Way
Fri & Sat. 8-1. 3455 NW Moore
Rd. Off Lake Jeffery. Look for
signs. Plus size, baby items, yards
of material, movies, music, games.
Ki4tK Ministry Rummage Sale
Fri & Sat May 13-14 8:00 AM
Comer of US 90 & Baya
Furniture Tools 100's of items
Multi-family, Sat 7 am,
654 SE Baya Dr
between Fla Pest Control &
Baya Pharmacy
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.

Sat only, 7am-noon.
880 NW Savannah Cr.
In the Plantation S/D off Hwy
90W. Wide variety of items.
SAT. 8-? 531 SW San Juan PI,
McFarlane to Grandview. Look for
signs. Fum., tools, TV's, Mowers,
saws, china, appliances & more.
Saturday only, 8am-2pm, many
miscellaneous items, Jeep Wran-
gler rag top, scuba equip., SR 247
& 63 Place (1 mi W of Beachville)

440 Miscellaneous
NEW LOMANCO All aluminum
self rimming, thermostatically con-
trol. Power vent for 2000sqft attic.
Blk, made in USA. $85. 755-6963
NEW SLOAN Regal Flusho Me-
ter. Chrome finish, gold tankless
flush. Made in USA. only $95.00.
Easy installation. 386-755-6963
NEW TAPCO C2 Floor Jack
34in-55in. with 16,000 lb
compression at 3ft. Made in USA.
Only $45.00. 386-755-6963
Tow Behind Grill/Smoker
$1,250 OBO.
386-249-3104 orj
386-719-4802
Utility Trailer, Enclosed 6 x 12
w/side door and ramp
$800
386-365-5099

630 Mobile Homes
630 for Rent
i UNDER NEW MANAGEMENT
Oakview Mobile Home Park.
Clean well maintained 2/2 units in
nice park. 2 miles to downtown
SLake City. 386-984-8448
14x70 MH, 2Br/2Ba Real Clean
Good Location! CH/A $550/Mo.
+ $200 Dep. NO PETS.
(386)755-0064 or (904)771-5924
2&3 BR MH. $395 $650. io.
plus deposit. Water & sewer fur-
nished. Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
2/2 Newly remodeled MH New
Floors/counter tops. Lg lot, quiet
area No pets 1st, last & sec. $450
mo $300 sec will work w/payment
plan. Call Jenn 386-454-7724
2/2 Units, clean, well maintained,
nice safe park setting, 2 miles to
downtown Lake City, $550 month
+ $550 sec dep, 386-984-8448
2br/2ba SWMH; also Residential
RV lots for rent between Lake City
& G'ville. Access to 1-75 & 441
(352)317-1326 Call for terms
3/2 S of Lake City, (Branford area)
$400 dep, $600 month
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833


www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
3BR/2BA MH
5 ac Country setting.
$625. mo 1st, last & deposit.
386-963-2177
Eastside Village a 55+ Retirement
Community offers 2br/2ba Manu-
factured home fully furnished. No
pets. Leases for $650 + utilities.
1st, last, security. Eastside Village
Realty, Inc. 752-5290 for info.
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White Contact 386-623-3404
or 386-365-1919
X-CLEAN 2/2 SW, 8 mi
NW of VA. Clean acre lot, nice
area. $500. mo + dep No dogs
386-961-9181


640 Mobile Homes
6 for Sale
Access Realty Make Offer! 3/2
MH w/over 1700 SF & move in
ready. Convenient to schools,
shopping & hospitals. MLS 73861
$89,500. Patti Taylor.623-6896f

650 Mobile Home
650 & Land
MH on 1 Acre in Live Oak near
Peacock Lake, owner finance
$42,500 MLS#77598 Call Roger
Lovelady 386-365-7039 @
Westfield Realty Group
Owner Finance, Nice 3/2. S of
Lake City, small down/$650 mo
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com

710 Unfurnished Apt.
7/10 For Rent

05525655
SPRING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans;
some with garages.
Call 386-454-1469
or visit our website:
www.springhillvillage.net







1 & 2 Bedroom Apartments
Move in for as low as
$199
386-755-2423
2BR/2BA w/garage
on the west side of town.
Washer/Dryer hookups & more.
Call for details. 386-755-6867
A Landlord You Can Love!
2 brApts $575. & up + sec. Great
area. CH/A washer/dryer hookups.
386-758-935/3532-208-2421
Cute & clean, 2 brApt. in town
Great area. Close to the VA
Medical Center. $515. mo plus
dep. Must see!!! 386-344-2972
Great location W'of 1-75, spacious




Secluded, private, safe. W/D
hookup. $700. mo. $500 security.
386-754-1155
The Lakes Apts. Studios & IBr's
from $135/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $450. + sec.
Call Michelle 386-752-9626

720 Furnished Apts.
72 For Rent
New furnished bedroom apt in a
home, private entrance & bath,
incl al utilities, trash, cable, frig,
microwave. $450 per month plus
deposit: immediate availability.
386-752-2020 SW Lake City
Retirement Apt: Very clean &
quiet, Ft. White. In town. 2/1,
screen porch, W/D hook up,
$550 mo + dep. 386-497-1116
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135.
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

730 Unfurnished
Home For Rent
2007 Home 3/2 1545sf,
352-281-4003, 352-317-2886
$1350 mo. $1000 dep & last,
Pet Neg.,338 SW Wise Drive, LC
3/2 Recently Built Custom Home,
1340 sq ft, stainless steel applian-
ces, custom cabinets, $920 mo,
1st. Last & Sec,off 1-75 & 47
Call Andrew 386-623-6066
3br/l-1/2ba, Block Home W of
town, CH/A, all appliances
included, NO Pets, $650 mo,
1st/last required 386-752-5786
3BR/1.5BA. Very clean, CH/A
Fenced (privacy) large back yard.
Nice area/location. $800. mo $800.
dep. Ref's req'd. (941)920-4535
Eastside Village a 55+ Retirement
Community offers 2br/lba Duplex,
no pets. Leases for $600 + utilities.
First, last, security. Eastside
Village Realty, Inc. 752-5290
Home for Rent.
3/2 in City Limits. No pets.
$1000. per month. Call Susan,
Realtor. 386-623-6612
Suwanee River Frontage. 2/1 in
Columbia Co. ,near 175/White
Spgs Jane S.Usher Lic. Real Estate
Broker 386-755-3500 or 365-1352

750 Business &
U Office Rentals

For Lease: 1,500 17,000sf
1525 S. Ohio Ave, Live Oak, FL
Call Scott Stewart@ Westfield
Realty Group 386-867-3498
For Lease: E Baya Ave. Two -
1000 sqft office space units or
combined for 2000 sqft. 386-984-
0622 or weekends 386-497-4762
Office Space For Lease
2112sf, 7 rms. Irg conf rm, 4 baths,


private parking MLS#76508
$1760/mo, Call Pam @ Remax
386-303-2505
OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$695. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor

790 Vacation Rentals
Horseshoe Beach RV Lot.
Nice corner Lot with shade trees.
$295. mo Water/electric included
386-235-3633 or 352-498-5986
Horseshoe Beach Summer Spel
Gulf Front 2br, w/lg porch, dock,
fish sink. wkend $345./wk $795.
386-235-3633/352-498-5986
alwaysonvacation.com #419-181
"Florida's Last Frontier"


805 Lots for Sale
5 Acre Lot, Secluded & Cleared,
MLS# 67871 $55,000
Call Lisa Waltrip
@ 386-365-5900
westfieldrealtygroup.com
Hallmark Real Estate. Cleared
2.57 ac. fenced w/32' Dutchman
camper. In O'Brien. Close to Live
Oak, Lake City, Branford. $25,000
MLS# 74534 386-867-1613
Hallmark Real Estate. Owner
Finance with $5K down with
terms negotiable. Below assessed
value for the county. MLS# 74484
$17,900 Jay Sears 386-867-1613
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

810 Home for Sale
3/2 Brick Home in town, fenced
back yard w/12xl2 workshop
$79,900 Just Reduced!
MLS# 77414 R.E.O.Realty
Group, Inc 386-243-8227
3/2 Brick Home w/1 car garage,
detach carport MLS#77780
$109,900, Call Jo Lytte Remax
386-365-2821
ww.jolytte.florida-roperty-search.com
3/2 Cute Home, Remodeled, on 2
acres, partially fenced $114,900
MLS# 77396
R.E.O. Realty Group
386-243-8227
3/2 in Lake City Airpark
pool, porch, pond, detach garage
large hangar w/living quarters
MLS#77756 $399,900 Westfield
Call Josh G 386-466-2517
4/2 on 10.5 acres w/ detached
garage, patio, above ground pool,
MLS# 77410 $189,888
R.E.O. Realty Group, Inc
386-243-8227
Brick Home, Screened Porch
$185,900 MLS#77893
Call Charlie Sparks @
Westfield Realty Group
386-755-0808
CYPRESS LANDING!
3BR/2BA built in 2005
w/large kitchen $115,000
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #75794
DESIRABLE GWEN LAKE
area! Nice 3BR/2BA home
on comer lot $112,000
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #77307
Eastside Village a 55+ Retirement
Community. 2br/2ba home with
garage, screen porch. Choose wall
color, flooring. MLS# 76483 East-
side Village Realty, Inc. 752-5290
FOR SALE by avery motivated
owner. Now reduced $80,000 to
$119,000. Townhouse on Golf
course. 3br/3ba. Wood burning
fireplace. End unit. Remodeled
kitchen, first class appliances,
granite countertops. New Hunter
Douglas wdw treatments.
Cathedral ceiling. Pool, tennis
court. Call for appt. (904)246-6222
Great Family Home in S/D
MLS# 77325, $109,000
Call Missy Zecher @ Remax
Professionals 386-623-0237
www.missyzecher.com
Great Home in Great Neighbor-
hood, Can be 4/2 or 3/2 w/study
MLS#77284 $164,900
Call Carrie Cason @Westfield
386-623-2806
GREAT STARTER HOME!
3BR/2BA w/lots of closets
space & nice lawn $79,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #76432
Hallmark Real Estate. 3/2 Brick
home w/large screened porch.
Back yard has wooded privacy.
MLS#69482 Janet Creel 719-0382
or Paula Lawrence 623-1973
Hallmark Real Estate. Bring the
horses. 3/2 HUD, 4 ac. Sold "as is"
$106,000 Bids are being accepted.
www.hudhomestore.com MLS#
72068 Martin Tavener 965-7773
Hallmark Real Estate. DWMH on
5 ac south of town. Back porch,
new metal roof wood burning fire-
. place & wired workshop. $82,500
MLS#77185 Janet Creel 719-0382
Hallmark Real Estate. Glassed
porch overlooks wooded backyard
in the Plantations Pool,
sprinkler system. $229,900
MLS#75429 Janet Creel 719-0382
Hallmark Real Estate. Time to go
to the River. Stilt home w/covered
decking. Floating dock,out bldgs
& covered RV parking. $188K.
MLS#72068 Janet Creel 719-0382


Home on 15 Acres, 2500sf, new
appliances, workshop, MLS 77552
$235,000 Call Brittany @
Results Realty 386-397-3473
HOME OR OFFICE on
Alachua St; remodeled
1,207 SqFt home $82,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #77724
Hallmark Real Estate. 2006
2200SF home. 2br/2ba w/mother-
in-law suite, 4 car garage, endless
hot water heater. MLS# 77547
$309,900 Jay Sears 386-867-1613
Hallmark Real Estate. 3/3 Brick
w/over 2500 SF. Great location
with nice one acre pond in back.
Detached workshop MLS# 75222
$179,900 Jay Sears 386-867-1613


810 Home for Sale
Hallmark Real Estate. 4/2 Brick,
3100 SF, Granddaddy Oaks on 5
acres. Double detached carport/ga-
rage w/workshop. MLS# 77877
$119,900. Jay Sears 386-867-1613
Just Reduced 3/2 home, inside city
limits, fenced backyard, detached
carport w/office MLS#77411
$82,900 Call R.E.O.Realty,
@ 386-243-8227 Make Offer!
Just Reduced 4/2 on 1.57 acres,
fireplace. partially fenced, MLS#
77412, Call Nancy Rogers at
R.E.O. Realty Group
386-243-8227 $64,900
Large affordable home in S/D on 2
Acres, fishing rights to Timberlake
Property Owner's Assoc. $64,900
MLS#74862 Call Brittany @
Results Realty386-397-3473
Large Brick, 3/1, 4.43 acres, metal
roof, MLS# 77415 $104,888
R.E.O. Realty Group, Inc.
386-243-8227
Large Home in the Country on
3.66 acres, fireplace, 2 outbldgs,

Lytte @ Remax 386-365-2821
jolytte@remaxnfl.com
Large Home w/Open Floor Plan,
back yard & porch, Irg oaks, fire-
place, MLS#76122 $115,000
Call Missy Zecher @ Remax 386-
623-0237,mzecher@remax.ftet
LOTS OF UPGRADES!
Remodeled kitchen in this
2BR/1BA home $29,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY
INC. 755-5110 #77505
Luxury Log Home,
Whole House Generator, $269,900
MLS# 76899 Call Roger
Lovelady @386-365-7039
westfieldrealtygroup.com
Nice, large 4/2 on 1 acre
w/florida room, granite floors,
wrap around front porch, $148,000
Call Brittany Stoeckert @
Results Realty 386-397-3473
Norwegian Brick Home, fire-
place/family rrh, open floor plan,
screen porch, fenced back yard,
MLS#76796 $179,900
Jo Lytte Remax 386-365-2821
Owner Finance. Custom built 3/2.5
10.8 ac. Granite, fireplace, vaulted
ceilings, surround sound. lanai,
gazebo. MLS 77382 Access Real-
ty. Patti Taylor $249K 623-6896
Priced Reduced! 3/2 w/2346 sf.
.67 ac. Creekside S/D. Shade,
surround sound, vaulted ceilings.
MLS 77385 $169,900. Access
Realty. Patti Taylor. 386-623-6896
Rose Creek S/D, 5/4, 3269sf, on
2.2 acres, bonus rm, many
upgrades Reduced! MLS#75485
Reduced! $234,900, Call Pam @
Remax 386-303-2505
Spacious Brand New Split Floor
Plan Home, Fenced Yard
MLS#77493 $229,900
Call Mike Lienemann @ Westfield
Realty Group 386-867-9053
SPACIOUS home built in
1995 has 2BR/2BA & 1,636
SqFt on 1 acre $89,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110
Sturdy 3/2 on 4.35 acres, fruit &
pecan trees, Minutes from town
MLS#77878 $105,000
Call Jo Lytte @ Remax
386-365-2821/www.jolytte.com
Totally Remodeled 4 Bd Home
Spacious Must See!
MLS#77782 $135,000
Missy Zecher 386-623-0237
www.missyzecher.com


Well Maintained 3/2 on dead-end
street, quiet, country, close to
downtown $105,000 MLS#77800
Call Lisa Waltrip @Westfield
Realty Group 386-365-5900


820 Farms &
V Acreage
4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$69,900. $613mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
4 acres, Wellborn, New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down, $39,900, $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
5.82 ac Rolling Oaks off Lake
Jeffrey. High, dry & cleared.
Restricted site built homes only.
Equestrian community.
$65,000.obo. 386-965-5530
for information & pictures
FARM- 7 stall barn, Apt.
17+ acres cross fenced.
Close in $1000. mo.
S 386-961-1086
FOR SALE: McAlpin. 10 Acres
W/2006 DW, 12 X 24 Back
addition laundry/office & 12 x 18
covered porch. 20 x 32 polebarn &
8 x 16 Utility shed. 863-634-5283
for details & pictures, $75,000
Leave message w/name, phone
number & email address.
Half to ten acre lots. Some w/
well, septic, pp. We finance; low
dwn pmt. Deas Bullard Properties.
386-752-4339. www.landnfl.com
Hallmark Real Estate. 40 ac hunt-
ing tract w/camper. Water & septic
already in place. Stands & feeders
in place. MLS# 75532
$84,000 Jay Sears 386-867-1613
Three One Acre Lots available
@ $14,900 ea & One 1.65 Acre
lot for $19,900 MLS#76050
Call Brodie Alfred 386-623-0906
Westfield Realty Group

830 Commercial
8 Property
Commercial Property For Sale
Currently Leased $495,000
MLS#75953 Call Aaron
Nickelson @ 386-867-3534
Westfield Realty Group
Hallmark Real Estate. Downtown
Restaurant. Gigantic BBQ Smoker
Clean kitchen w/equip. Handle any
type of food svc. MLS# 77902
$189,900 Vic Lantroop 623-6401
Mini Storage (204 Units),
gated, fenced 5 acres, $1,300,000,
MLS#76048 Call Millard Gillen
@ Westfield Realty Group
386-365-7001


850 Waterfront
50 Property
Upscale River Cabin on
Suwannee River. Shop, Dock
MLS#76336 $349,900
Call Jo Lytte @ Remax
386-365-2821

860 Investment
860 Property
3/2 Renovated Home in town,
front porch, new appliances, cur-
rently leased MLS#76658 $49,900
Jo Lytte/Remax 386-365-2821
www.jolytte.florida-property-search.com
Great Income Opportunity!
Mobile Home Park For Sale
MLS#77228 $195,000
Call Pam Beauchamp @ Remax
386-758-8900


940 Trucks
2006 TOYOTA Tacoma
Pre-Runner SR 5. Perfect
condition. 67,800 miles.
$15,000. 386-397-2972


Contact us


at the paper.


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