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The Lake City reporter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01551
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 5/12/2011
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
System ID: UF00028308:01551
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text










000


Purple & Gold Record Setter
All eyes on quarterback Local teen
position for Friday's weightlifter holds
annrinI c.fimmr"n. AD c *"'Irld record.
017 12051 ****3-DIGIT 326 .-


LIB OF FLORIDA HISTORY
PO BOX 117007
205 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-1943


,rts, I B


Jaiie inyiy


Heat prevail
Heat defeat Celtics
97-87 to win
series 4- I.
Sports, I B


Reporter


Thursday, May 12, 2011


www.lakecityreporter.com


Vol. 137, No. 93 75 cents


COURTESY PHOTO
The above graphic shows the Honey Prairie Fire's path as it
moves farther into Florida.


Wildfire presses on into Florida


Motorists and
residents urged
to take caution.

From staff reports

The Honey Prairie Fire,
which crossed the Florida
border earlier in the week,
has burned more than
96,000 acres, according to
Florida Division of Forestry
officials.
Kurt Wisner, Florida
Division of Forestry miti-


gation specialist and public
information officer at the
Suwannee Forestry Center
in Lake City, said the fire
crossed the Florida State
Line in the vicinity of Mims
Island Road and burned a
half acre of property. The
fire has burned a total of
96,400 acres.
"A fire south of Mims
Island Road caused by a
drifting ember burned
about one-half acre before
being contained by bull-
dozer/plow crews and a
helicopter water drop," he


said, in a prepared state-
ment released Wednesday
afternoon.
Florida Division of
Forestry and Osceola
National Forest firefighters
have continued to solidify.
and assess defensive posi-
tions, Wisner said, with
emphasis on the area north-
east of Moccasin Creek
Circle in Baker County.
Wisner said motorists
should continue to exercise
caution if they encounter
smoke on the highway.
He also noted that .resi-


dents should clean their
roof and gutter and clean
a 30-foot area around their
home of any combustibles
to protect their home from
potential fire.
The Honey Prairie Fire
is believed to have been
caused by a lightning strike
in a remote area of the
Okefenokee Swamp on
Thursday, April 28. Since
then the wildfire spread and
made its way onto Florida
soil earlier this week.


More than 100

to attend Chamber's

Legislative Breakfast


Attendees can
ask legislators
questions.

By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City- Columbia
County Chamber of
Commerce Legislative
Breakfast is 8 a.m. Tuesday
at the Lifestyle Enrichment
Center.
The annual event is spon-
sored by Clay Electric and
People's State Bank.


"The legislative break-
fast is an opportunity for
all of our local legislators to
come and inform the cham-
ber about what they accom-
plished in the legislature
during the session," said
Dennille Folsom, executive
director.
Legislators or their rep-
resentatives attend the
event. Confirmed attendees
include: Adele Griffin with
Senator Marco Rubio's
office; Lynn Bannister
with Senator Bill Nelson's

CHAMBER continued on 3A


Tourism excellence

to be honored at

awards luncheon


First-year
event set for
Wednesday.

By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.co
Excellence in tourism
the Suwannee River Val
area will be recognize
with special awards at
upcoming event.
The Suwannee Ri'
Valley Marketing Group
hosting the 2011 Touri
Awards Luncheon fr
12-2 p.m. Wednesday


at the Columbia County
Fairgrounds Banquet Hall.
The awards honor people
in the industry for doing a
good job, said Paulette Lord,
Columbia County Tourist
Development Council mar-
m keting director.
"We do outstanding in
for hospitality in the area," she
ley said.
zed This is the first year
an, of the group having the
awards luncheon, Lord
ver said. Previously the TDC
is hosted the event.
sm "This year we decided
om
lay TOURISM continued on 3A


FRESHLY PAVED


Lane closures on
U.S. Highway
90 East expected.

By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com

along U.S.
Highway 90
Ea st, across
from the Lake
City Gateway Airport, will
be altered for the next few
weeks as the roadway gets
more than $1.4 million
worth of construction and
resurfacing work.
Florida Department of
Transportation District
II spokeswoman Gina
Busscher, said the proj-
ect began March 9 and
construction crews have
90 days to complete the
project, depending on
the weather. The project
includes resurfacing work
as well as new median
openings along the road-
way.
"The project was need-
ed because of the condi-
tion of the pavement and
whenever we resurface
we always make safety
improvements," she said.
"We also made some
minor drainage improve-
ments near. Baya Drive."
The total length of the
construction project is 2.7
miles and the cost of the
project has been listed as
$1,458,385. The work will
take place between State
Road 100 by the Spires
IGA store and ends east
of the Florida Gateway
College entrance.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Two steam rollers work on part of a freshly paved lane along U.S. Highway 90 East
Tuesday. Traffic going both east and west was reduced to one lane for 2.7 miles from
State Road 100 to the Florida Gateway College entrance.


"Also as part of this proj-
ect was the relocation of
two median openings and
the new median locations
will be directly across from
Hudson Discount Marine
and Macatee's Mobile
Home Park," Busscher


said.
An additional median
opening was added to
Easy Street Auto Brokers.
Construction crews
from Anderson Columbia,
based in Lake City, was
the lowest bidder for the


contract and is completing
the construction project.
Busscher said only six
percent of the project's
work has been complet-
ed,. but 25 percent of the

PAVED continued on 3A


Bank extends line of credit to Broadband Authority


Agency gets 12-
month extension
from Merchantile.
By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com

LIVE OAK -The
North Florida Broadband
Authority is continuing to
make moves to provide
broadband Internet access
to rural areas of North
Florida by equipping tow-
ers and deploying radios
and other equipment.
Wednesday afternoon



CALL US:
(386) 752-12'
SUBSCRIBE
THE REPORT
Voice: 755-54
1 426400020 1 Fax: 752-94


the agency received a finan-
cial boost when Mercantile
Bank agreed to extend the
agency's line of credit for
another 12 months.
Last year Mercantile
Bank gave the North
Florida Broadband
Authority a $750,000 line of
credit as the agency began
implementing a $30 mil-
lion federal stimulus grant
aimed at providing rural
areas of North Florida with
broadband Internet access.
"We made the commit-
ment a year ago when we
saw the opportunity for



93 95
TO. Partly Cloudy
TWER:
145
t00 WEATHER, 2A


the broadband and the
type of services it would
provide to the communi-
ty," said Suzanne Norris,
Mercantile Bank of North
Central Florida president.
'We have seen the progress
that has been made and we
felt at this point in time the
progress has been substan-
tial and that we were able
to look towards extending
it another year to allow
the broadband authority to
continue to complete the
project and bring it to the
communities."
Pat Lien, NFBA system



i-'P" Opinion .....
Around Florida
Obituaries ....
Advice & Comic
Puzzles ......


cs


manager, said the line of
credit extension will give
the agency more flexibility
in customer acquisition and
in developing sales process-
es, where they may be able
to create earlier incentives
for adding customers.
"Over the next 30 days
were going to have crews
all over the service area
preparing the sites, sell-
ing radios and moving for-
ward," he said. "When it
comes to acquiring custom-
ers, we're about 30 days
behind that."
The new extension



......... 4A
..........2A
......... 6A
......... 4B
......... 2B


is to the North Florida
Broadband Authority's line
of credit, where the agency
can borrow against it as
necessary.
"The line of credit exten-
sion covers operational
costs the grant does not
cover," Norris said. "For
example, some of the soft
costs in personnel and
things that the grant did
not cover, they'll get repaid
as revenue starts.to be gen-
erated from the broadband
authority. Right now the
grant doesn't cover those
types of costs."



TODAY IN
HEALTH
| TDealing with
disabilities.


The initial line of credit
matured a few weeks ago,
but during Wednesday's
meeting Norris gave broad-
band authority officials a
commitment letter listing
the bank's intention to pro-
vide a 12-month extension
to the line of credit.
Norris said at the end
of the 12-month period,
Mercantile representatives
will meet with North Florida
Broadband Authority board
members and review the
revenue stream.



I COMING
FRIDAY
Robotic surgical
system preview.


I -


rI ,.








LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING THURSDAY, MAY 12, 2011


Wednesday:
Afternoon: 0-3-5
Evening: 3-3-4


S, / Wednesday:
Afternoon: 7-7-2-4
Evening: 5-9-8-2


Tuesday:
2-7-15-28-31


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



Mayor names street after Winfrey


CHICAGO
What do you get the
woman who has
everything and has
given away just
about everything?
On Wednesday, outgoing Chicago
Mayor Richard Daley gave another
departing Chicago institution, Oprah
Winfrey, a civic version of a parting
gift: Her own street.
Daley, who will leave office next
week after more than 22 years,
honored Winfrey by naming a block
in front of Harpo Studios "Oprah
Winfrey Way." Winfrey is ending her
own two-decade-plus run as host of
her Chicago-based television show.
"Your presence in Chicago has
been a gift ..." Daley said, moments
before the cover was pulled off the
sign that stands in front of the stu-
dio's main entrance, calling Winfrey
"a great ambassador for our city."
Winfrey was equally effusive about
Daley and her adopted hometown.
"I just want to say thank you to the
mayor and also to the city of Chicago
for embracing me and allowing me
to take a stand and make a stand
here in this city," said Winfrey.
Winfrey is the latest of well over
1,200 celebrities, religious lead-
ers, activists and others who have
been honored with street signs in
Chicago. The list includes Michael
Jordan, Siskel and Ebert, Frank
Sinatra who has two and the
geniuses behind Chicago-style hot
dogs and pizza.
More than 100 people crowded
onto the block and dozens more .
stood behind police barricades that
blocked both ends of the street in
one of the best attended ceremonies
since the city started honoring peo-
ple with the signs in the early 1980s.
Winfrey, who is taking her talk
show off the air later this month after
,25 years, recently launched her own
Los Angeles-based television network.


'ASSOCIATED PRESS
Chicago Mayor Richard M. Daley presents TV talk-show host Oprah Winfrey with
a sign after a street was named in her honor outside her Harpo Studios in.Chicago
Wednesday. Winfrey will end her 25 year-run on daytime television in Chicago on
May 25.


Norma Zimmer, TV's Patrick Kennedy cancels
'Champagne Lady,' dies his writing memoir


* LOS ANGELES The
"Champagne Lady" of television's
"The Lawrence Welk Show" has died.
Norma Zimmer was 87.
Welk's son, Larry, said that Zimmer
died peacefully Tuesday at her Brea,
Calif., home. Larry WVelk didn't know
the cause of death.
Zimmer performed on Lawrence
Welk's music show from 1960 to 1982
as the "Champagne Lady," the title
Welk traditionally had given his lead
female singer. Zimmer sang with
Welk's orchestra and waltzed with him
to the strains of his effervescent dance
tunes tagged as "champagne music."
She also appeared on the orches-
tra's public TV specials that have aired
since 1987. Lawrence Welk died in
1992.
Funeral arrangements for Zimmer
were pending.


WOONSOCKET Former
Rhode Island Congressman Patrick
Kennedy said he's no longer writing
a memoir that had been scheduled
for release in November.
The son of the late U.S. Sen.
Edward Kennedy told The Associated
Press this week he's
S busy with other
projects, such as his
initiative to improve
brain research,
A S .. which will hold
a conference in
Boston this month.
He said he can't do
Kennedy both effectively.
Kennedy also
starts a visiting fellowship this sum-
mer at Brown University.

Associated Press


Celebrity Birthdays


* Baseball Hall-of-Famer
Yogi Berra is 86.
* Singer-musician Steve
Winwood is 63.
* Rock musician Eric Singer
(KISS) is 53.
* Actress Kim Greist is 53.
* Actor Ving Rhames is 52.
* Actress April Grace is 49.
* Actor Emilio Estevez is 49.
* Actress Vanessa A. Wil-


Daily ScriDture


liams ("Melrose Place") is 48.
* Actor Stephen Baldwin is
45.
M Actress Kim Fields is 42.
* Actor Jason Biggs is 33.
* Actress Emily VanCamp
is 25.
* Actor Malcolm David Kel-
ley is 19.
* Actors Sawyer and Sul-
livan Sweeten are 16.


"Be kind and compassionate
to one another, forgiving each
other, just as in Christ God for-
gave you."


- Ephesians 4:32


Lake City
HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293
Fax number .............752-9400
Circulation ..............755-5445
Online... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of'
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson.....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
Assistant Editor CJ Risak. .754-0427
After 1:00 p.m.
(crisak@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Ashley Butcher ...754-0417
(abutcher@lakecityreporter.com)
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440.


Reporter
BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by,6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7:30
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation ..............755-5445
(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks .................. $26.32
24 Weeks..... .............$48.79
52 Weeks..................$83.46
Rates include 7% sales tax.
Mail rates
12 Weeks..... . . . . ..... $41.40
24 Weeks..................$82.80
52 Weeks..................$179.40


CORRECTION


The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will
run in this space. And thanks for reading.


AROUND FLORIDA THE WEATHER


Plane passenger arrested B
PARTLY PARTLY CHANCE
BOSTON A CLOUDY CLOUDY RMS
Massachusetts man who
allegedly tried to open an II
emergency door on a flight HI -LO HI LO I 81164
to Boston has pleaded not -


guilty to interfering with the
operation on an aircraft
Robert Hersey of
Arlington on Wednesday
was ordered held on $1,000
bail after an incident his
attorney called a "non-
event."
Prosecutors said the 43-
year-old Hersey tampered
with the plane's emergency
exit door during the Delta
flight from Orlando, Fla. A
Delta spokeswoman said an
off-duty police officer sub-
dued Hersey.
Passengers said he'd
been drinking and appeared
upset when the flight was
late.
His attorney, Ron
Wayland, said Hersey acci-
dentally touched the cover
for the door, the cover
fell off and he replaced it.
Wayland said that caused a
light to go off and the pilot
to order Hersey moved to
another seat

Woman hit by
tractor-trailer
OCAIA-A woman
was hit by a tractor-trailer
after she stepped out of her
vehicle parked alongside
Interstate 75 near Ocala.
The Florida Highway
Patrol said the accident
happened about 10:15
a.m. Wednesday on the
northbound side of the
interstate.
All lanes of traffic were
stopped briefly so a heli-
copter could land on the
roadway. Officials said
the woman was flown to a
Gainesville Hospital in criti-
cal condition.
No further details about
the accident were immedi-
ately available.


* Pensacola
88,' 70


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Robert J. Hersey, 43, of Arlington, Mass., is arraigned at
the East Boston Division of the Boston Municipal Court
Department Wednesday. Hersey allegedly tried to open one
of the emergency exits of Delta Flight 1102 during a flight
from Orlando to Boston on Tuesday night.


Teens accused of
attacking driver
LAKELAND -
Authorities said two teen-
agers pushed and repeat-
edly punched a school bus
driver who had pulled over
after they refused to close
their windows because the
air-conditioner was on.
Polk County Sheriff's
officials said the attack
happened Monday after 62-
year-old Charles Faulkner
walked to the back of the
bus to talk to students.
As he was returning to
the driver's seat, officials
said two 15-year-old boys
knocked him down and hit
him until he started bleed-
ing from the head.
The driver got up,
returned to his seat
and called authorities.
According to reports,
the driver received three
stitches.
Deputies said the teens
were arrested Tuesday,


charged with aggravated
battery on an education
employee and booked into
the Juvenile Assessment
Center.

Gator eats cat
in Palm Bay
PALM BAY A Palm
Bay neighborhood is on
high alert after a large alli-
gator ate a cat.
Seventy-year-old Robert
Geraci was browsing the
Internet and sipping coffee
Tuesday morning when
he heard loud splashing
in the canal behind his
mobile home park. Geraci
looked out and saw the cat
in the gator's mouth.
Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission
officials went to the scene
Tuesday and agreed to
send a trapper to catch the
alligator.


"""t LO 2


-%lCHANCE |
STORMSS


I' LO
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


.. ..C -.,...:. # ~' '


Tallahassee *
94 65.

Panama City
89.69


yedosta
95/65
Lake City,,
95 6E.
Gainesville *
93 65
Ocala
9 6 4:


* Jacksonville
91 ,66

Daytona Beach
89 68
S


City
Cape Canaveral
Daytond Beach
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Jacksonville


Orlando Cape Canaveral Key West
93,'6. 89 69 Lake City
Miami
Tampa Naples
90/75 West Palm Beach Ocala
92, 73 Orlando
S FL Lauderdale Panama City
FL Myers 92 75 Pensacola
92 71 Naples Tallahassee
87' 73 Miami Tampa
93 75 Valdosta
Key West W. Palm Beach


TEMPERATURES
High Wednesday
Low Wednesday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low


PRECIPITATION
Wednesday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date





7a lp 7p
Thursday







Foreca4d liwerperatuie


* Associated Press


95
69
86
61
98 in 1955
45 in 1923


0.00"
0.09"
11.57"
0.85"
14.87"


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise torn.
Sunset torn.


6:39 a.m.
8:15 p.m.
6:38 a.m.
8:16 p.m.


TC, cl
i ~ht


MOON ,; ult~r,
Moonrise today 3:16 p.m. .f oarh
Moonset today 2:57 a.m. .
Moonrise tom. 4:22 p.m. r 1,.i
Moonset tom. 3:34 a.m. ;


May May June June 4iV&
17 24 1 8 3
Full Last New Rrst 1ArM


"we I
weather


t
s to bin


Sarea ori


Friday
86 6.8 i
S7 69 p.:
87 76 rl:
92 71 p.:
Q1 67 pr
90 67 p:
i7 ;6 p,:
92 E, p.:
87 71 pc
91 6e. PC
92 69 p,

90 66 pr
90 71 p:
91 65 p,:
861- 74 p.:


Saturday
84 68 t;
87 67 pc !
pc 75. r"
Ss 69 p.: ,
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87 65 pC:
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An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.



weather.com


SForecasts, data and
y graphics 2011 Weather
Vy Central, LP, Madison, Wis.
r J www.weatherpubllsher.com


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Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424


87. 71


.. . ... ..









Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE THURSDAY, MAY 12, 2011


Judge weighs evidence

release in girl's death


By KELLI KENNEDY
Associated Press
MIAMI A Miami
judge said Wednesday she
will review what evidence
has been collected in the
case of a man and woman
charged with fatally beat-
ing their 10-year-old adop-
tive daughter and then
decide whether to release
it to the public.
Attorneys for Jorge and
Carmen Barahona asked
Judge Sarah Zabel to
seal all pretrial evidence
from the public, arguing
the intense media cover-


age would prevent the
Barahonas from finding an
impartial jury and receiv-
ing a fair trial. Defense
attorneys gave the judge
a computer disc filled with
national and local media
coverage.
"You are in a position to
recognize the breadth of
the penetration of people's
thoughts by the Internet and
there's no stopping that,"
attorney Edith Georgie
argued. "It will saturate. It
will be front page again and
again. It will be all over
Facebook and Twitter."
Even readers' comments


beneath the Miami Herald's
online stories about the
Barahona case "are sicken-
ing," Georgie said.
She implored the judge
to treat this case different-
ly than other high-publicity.
cases because it involves
the death of a child.
The Barahonas were
charged with first-degree
murder and multiple
child-abuse and neglect
charges after their daugh-
ter Nubia's body was
found partially decom-
posed in the back of Jorge
Barahona's truck along a
busy highway on Feb 14.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
A dump truck feeds materials into a paver while working on a part of U.S. Highway 90
East Tuesday.

PAVED: Roadwork underway
Continued From Page 1A


project's elapsed time has
been used.
"The work percentage
will go up dramatically
when they start paving,"
she said. '"They are sup-
posed to be finished by
June. The paving is their
main thrust of work. When
they start paving they will
have completed a large


portion of their work."
Lane closures are
expected as the project
progresses.
Busscher said the proj-
ect could have daytime
lane 'closures after 8:30
a.m. weekdays, and if they
deem it necessary to work
on weekends, construc-
tion crews can close the


lanes at anytime.
"We're only going to
pave one layer of asphalt
between State Road 100
and Baya Drive," she said.
'The other section of the
roadway, between Baya
Drive and Florida Gateway
College will have two lay-
ers of asphalt paved."


Shands LakeShore

hosts open house today


From staff reports
Shands LakeShore
Regional Medical Center
will host an open house
event today where resi-
dents will have an opportu-
nity to see the facility's da
Vinci Surgical System.
The da Vinci Surgical


Robotic System improves
minimal invasive surgery
and is used primarily for
outpatient surgery. It can
be used for gynecology,
general surgery and some-
times used for cardiac sur-
gery.
The unit was delivered at


the hospital March 29 and
installed April 1. Five gen-
eral surgeons and four OB/
GYN surgeons will train on
the unit.
The open host will take
place from 4-6 p.m. at the
hospital, 368 NE Franklin
St.


TOURISM: First awards luncheon
Continued From Page 1A


to expand to the tri-county
area," she said. "We're mar-
keting ourselves now as the
Suwannee River Valley and
we thought it was impor-
tant to include all of our
partners."
The group covers
Columbia, Hamilton and
Suwannee counties.
Awards will be given
in several categories:


Outstanding Hotel
Employee, Outstanding
Campground Employee,
Outstanding Management
Employee, Outstanding
Attractions Employee,
Outstanding Agri-tourism
Partner,The"AlwaysThere"
Award, Best Strategic
Partner, The Director's
Award for Excellence in
Tourism and Community


Service Award.
Tourism is a big employ-
er in the area and very
important to the economy,
Lord said.
"We've been real fortu-
nate- to make a rebound in
tourism," she said. "We're
up from last year."
The deadline to RSVP for
the event is Friday by call-
ing the TDC at 758-1312.


CHAMBER: Legislative breakfast
Continued From Page 1A


office; Nathan Riska with
Congressman Ander
Crenshaw's office; Senator
Steve Olerich and office
staffer Tonya Shays; Rep.
Leonard Bembry; and Rep.
Elizabeth Porter and office
staffers Koby Adams and
Rob Summerall.
The event will include
a question and answer
segment for attendees to
express their comments
and concerns, she said.
One of the main roles of
the chamber is to not only
inform members of what's
happening on a business
level, but everyday life as
well, Folsom said.
"We're supposed to keep
people informed," she said.
'We feel like it's an impor-


tant thing for us to continue
to put on every year."
More than 100- people
have already made reser-
vations for the event, and
there is space for more,
Folsom said.
Tickets are $10 for mem-
bers and $15 for guests.


The RSVP deadline is
Friday. Call the chamber at
752-3690.
"It's one of the most pop-
ular events we host at the
chamber," she said. "You
can't really go anywhere
else and get all your local
legislators in one room."


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LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE THURSDAY, MAY 12, 2011


Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424


* "t


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I I .










OPINION


Thursday, May 12, 2011


ANI


AN
OPINION


Royals

have won

our hearts

Years ago, Britain's
King George VI -
now immortalized
in an award-winning
movie for mastering
his nervous stammer was on
a royal visit to South Africa with
his family. The royal railway
carriage, with its widescreen
windows for better viewing, was
parked for the night
By accident, the accompany-
ing railway car carrying the
press drew alongside it To
the amazement and delight
of reporters, they beheld the
king reenacting for his wife and
daughters, Princesses Elizabeth
and Margaret, the Zulu war
dance he had witnessed earlier
in the day.
It was a rare and delicious
lapse of regal decorum, the
images of which served only to
enhance the popularity of the
king with his public. He had
already endeared himself to the
British people by steadfastly
refusing to leave Buckingham
Palace during World War II,
remaining in London and shar-
ing the dangers of the German
bombing.
Princess Elizabeth succeeded
her father as queen upon his
death and remains a poised and
dignified monarch, as close to
British hearts as was her father.
The behavior of some of
the new generation of British
royals has clearly caused the
queen and British public some
angst As John Burns put it ,
in The New York Times, there
have been serial divorces, sun-
dry indiscretions (including
the publication of the "Camilla-
gate" phone call of Prince
Charles to his then-lover), and
revelations of dubious finan-
cial deals involving Charles's
younger brother Andrew.
But all this is mere specula-
tion and indications are that
Britain's royals are for now
- here to stay. Their role is
largely symbolic and they have
little political heft. But what
they attract in foreign tourist
money alone is significant It
is difficult to imagine London
without Buckingham Palace,
Trooping the Colours, the
uniformed sentries, and all the
pageantry that attends the royal
family.
* Christian Science Monitor

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman


LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.


BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


Has Florida lost
its will to clean
up and protect
the Everglades?
A federal judge
seems to think so.
In a strongly worded decision,
U.S. District Judge Alan Gold
vented his deep frustration
over continued delays and
"disingenuous" legal
maneuvers by state lawmakers
and agencies that have
weakened rules meant to
reduce phosphorus in the
Everglades. In a decision that
basically said that, if the state
won't clean up the Everglades,
let the federal government
do it, Judge Gold ordered the
Environmental Protection
Agency to take over the


www.lakecityreporter.com


Troubling aspect of


Egyptian democracy push


recent events in
Egypt make one
wonder whether
that country is
capable of building
and maintaining a sustained,
peaceful democratic system
of governance, or if ongoing
internecine and sectarian strife
make that goal impossible.
I was not one of those
who lauded Egypt's peaceful
revolution, not because I am a
fan of Hosni Mubarak's thievery
and despotism. I am not. But
I do fear the consequences of
trying to foist democracy on a
populace not ready to practice
it
East weekend, in Cairo's
Maspiro neighborhood, ancient
tensions between Coptic
Christians and Muslims flared
into violence. Before it was
over at least a dozen people
were dead and a Christian
apartment building and one
of the oldest Churches in
Cairo were destroyed by fire.
The violence erupted as the
latest clash between Egypt's
Coptic Christian minority and
its Muslim majority. Copts are
the most ancient widespread
sect of Christianity, formed in
Egypt within a hundred years
of Christ's birth and in fact
some half a millennium before
Mohammed's recitation of the
Koran.
CNN reported protests
in response to the violence
continued into early this week
in Cairo as demonstrators
gathered by the thousands in
Cairo streets and," threw bricks
from rooftops on predominantly
Christian protesters ... Chants
could be heard of 'with our
souls and blood we will sacrifice
ourselves for the cross.' Military
riot police with red helmets and
clubs separated mutually hostile
crowds."
The inability of the Islamic
majority and Coptic minority
to live side-by-side in peace


..-74..


Bonnie Erbe
bonnieerbe@compuserve.com


is beyond troubling. Both
parties may be equally at
fault. But since there are
many examples of Christian
democracies and few if any
examples of functioning Islamic
democracies, one gives greater
pause when considering
whether an Islamic democracy
is possible at this point in
history.
Prof. Mark Tessler is
Samuel J. Eldersveld Collegiate
Professor and Vice Provost
for International Affairs at
the University of Michigan.
He has studied in the Middle -
East extensively and written
profusely on the topic of
Islamic nations' potential for
democratic. In one article he
wrote:
"Islamic law includes
numerous codes governing
societal relations and
organization. It guides that
which is societal as well as
personal, corporate as well as
individual...Some observers,
particularly some Western
observers, assert that
democracy and Islam are not
compatible. Whereas democracy-
requires openness, competition,
pluralism, and tolerance of
diversity, Islam, they argue,
encourages intellectual
conformity and an uncritical
acceptance of authority...Equally
important, Islam is said to be
anti-democratic because it vests
sovereignty in God, who is the
sole source of political authority
and from whose divine law must


come all regulations governing
the community of believers."
But Prof. Tessler also
writes, "many knowledgeable
analysts reject the suggestion
that Islam is an enemy in
the struggle to establish
accountable government
They point out that Islam has
many facets and tendencies,
making unidimensional (sic)
characterizations of the religion
highly suspect."
Of course it is true that
Islam, like Christianity and
every other large-scale religion
encompasses a variety of forms,
some politically oppressive
and others not. But I fear that
more Islamic countries in the
Middle East fall into the former
category than the latter, and
that may be all too true of Egypt
as well.
Yet another factor working
against democratic success in
Egypt and other Middle Eastern
countries is that a relatively
educated populace is the
sine qua non of a democratic
society. When potential voters
lack education and live in dire
poverty, democracy is similarly
less likely to succeed.
Coptic Christians are
ethnically indistinguishable
from their Islamic countrymen.
They make up roughly 10
percent of Egypt's 80 million
citizens. They have been
sidelined by prior governments.
Perhaps the Egyptian people
will hold a vote and install
. a democratically-elected
government and I will be proven
wrong. I hope so
But full integration into
Egyptian society of the Coptic
Christians must be attained
before we can declare Egypt's
attempt at democracy fully
realized.

Bonnie Erbe is a TV host and
writes this column for Scripps
Howard News Service.


cleanup.
. This is a stunning turn in
what has become the longest-
running legal saga since
Charles Dickens wrote Bleak
House. It should be a wake-up
call for Gov. Rick Scott and
the state agencies responsible
- primarily the Department
of Environmental Protection
(DEP) and the South
Florida Water Management
District (SFWMD). Is
Florida still willing to do its
share to preserve the River of
Grass?
So far the only answer is that
the state swiftly appealed the
ruling. That's not going to solve
the problems the judge outlined
in his decision. "Protection of
the Everglades requires a major


commitment which cannot be
simply pushed aside in the
face of financial hardships,
political opposition, or other
excuses. These obstacles will
always exist, but the Everglades
will not especially if the
protracted pace of preservation
efforts continues at the
current pace," Judge Gold
admonished.
Judge Gold is spot-on.
There is urgency here. The
original lawsuit United
States vs. South Florida Water
Management District -
charging the state with allowing
pollution to threaten the
Everglades was filed in 1988.

* Miami Herald


4A


Dan K.Thomasson



Couric


fails


for CBS

C BS has only itself
to blame. In a
star system that
rivals anything
Hollywood had in
the old days, it decided five
years ago to hire personable
Katie Couric to the prestigious
post of nightly news anchor at
the prodigious salary of $15
million annually.
The result was predictable
- continued third place rat-
ings in a business where even
"rip and readers" on TV, unlike
their old radio counterparts,
not only have to sound authori-
tative but also must look the
part Television is an enter-
tainment medium pure and
simple and appearance often
means more than the words
the anchor stars are being
fed through their earpieces.
Obviously, viewers didn't take
the former Today Show co-
host seriously enough with
her mop-headed, girl-next-door
look. Decking her out in a
black dress and pearls didn't
do the trick.
She also suffers in compari-
son to ABC's Diane Sawyer, a
mature beauty with a boatload
of political experience and an
air of quiet, friendly, cool com-
petence who looks and sounds
like she knows what she is
talking about.
What's more, it has been
reported that other CBS
evening news staffers from
the very start resented the
humongous contract Couric
had signed'with very little past
news experience at that level.
All this has culminated with
Couric recently stepping down
as CBS Evening News anchor
to be replaced by Scott Pelley
starting June 6.,.tarting in
September, Couric will instead'
do a one-hour daily talk show
on ABC for a reported $20 mil-
lion. That should make viewers
across the nation deliriously
happy considering there aren't
enough of those around. Right
Broadcast news at the net-
work and big market level is
a dicey business these days
with affiliates of the main nets
struggling to keep up the
revenues needed to pay the
bills and make the owners
and stockholders happy in the
years between elections when
the huge amounts from the
sale of political advertising fill
their coffers. Simply put it is
an every-two-years business.
Most local stations have a
tough time paying the freight
the nets demand to meet their
obligations to their superstars
like Couric. Cutbacks at CBS,
NBC and ABC have been sub-
stantial.
The days when owning a
television station was a license
to print money are long gone,
and the outsized salaries that
even local anchors make and
national correspondents have
been paid are unsustainable.
Moreover they have very
little to do with experience.
Print reporters with years of
expertise long have smarted
over the discrepancy in pay
between them and television
correspondents at the national
level who make far more
for a few seconds of air time
daily and often are treated
like movie stars by those they
cover.

* Dan K. Thomasson is former
editor of Scripps Howard News
Service.


ANOTHER OPINION


The solution or the problem?








LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL THURSDAY, MAY 12, 2011


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


* To submit your Community
Calendar item, contact Antonia
Robinson at 754-0425 or by
e-mail at arobinson@
lakecityreporter.com.


Today
Garden Club meeting
The Lake City Garden
Club will hold its regular
meeting at 10 a.m. today
at the Woman's Club.
The program will be
"Magical Hydrangeas" by
Chris Carter from Nobles
Nursery. The meeting will
be followed by a potluck
luncheon. Visitors are wel-
come.

Summer program
registration
Girls Club registration
for the summer program
is now open. The cost
for the sununmmer camp is
$225. Girls must be 6-13 to
attend. Call Terri Phillips
at 719-5840.

Retirement planning
A Retirement Planning
Class for ages 50 and
above is 6-9 p.m.
today at the Lifestyle
Enrichment Center.
Course instructors are
Douglas VanAtter and Irv
Crowetz, CLU. Subjects
will include retirement
expenses, retirement mis-
takes, income sources,
investments, estate plan-
ning, taxes and debt man-
agement. Cost is $29.95
a couple. For more infor-
mation or to RSVP please
contact 755-3476 between
the hours of 9 a.m. and
noon.

Cardiovascular forum
Lake City Medical
Center A cardiovas-
cular forum is 11:30
a.m.-1 p.m. today at
Lake City Medical
Center H2U Building,
334 SW Commerce
Drive. The Cardiology
Associates of Gainesville,
Interventional
Cardiologists of
Gainesville and North
Florida Surgical
Associates will provide
an informational session
about cardiovascular diag-
nosis, care and surgery.
A light lunch will be pro-
vided. Seating is limited.
Please call (800) 525-3248
to reserve a seat

Monthly Landlord's
meeting
The next Landlord's
meeting is 6 p.tn. today at
Lake City Medical Center
Classroom 1. Sallie Ford,
environmental health
director, is the speaker.
All rental agents and
landlords are welcome.
Call 755-0110.

DAR meeting
The last Edward
Rutledge DAR, Chapter
monthly meeting is 10:30
a.m. today at Guang Dong
Chinese Restaurant. Five
new members will be
inducted into the chapter.
Elena Kennedy, Regent
from Jacksonville's Fort
San Nicholas Chapter
is installing 2011-2013
chapter officers. To say
"HATS OFF' to new offi-
cers everyone is encour-
aged to wear crazy,
fun, whimsical, creative
hats. Dutch treat lunch
immediately following the
meeting. Call 755-5579 or
Live Oak area call 362-
2180.

Friday
Columbia County
summer day camp
Registration for
the Columbia County
Recreation Department
summer day camp pro-
gram is 8 a.m.-5 p.m. at
Richardson Community
Center. The camp is open
to boys and girls ages 7


-14 and is 7:30 a.m.-5:30
p.m., Monday-Friday, June
13-Aug. 3. The cost for the
eight-week camp is $225
and will include a variety
of daily activities, free
breakfast, lunch and week-


COURTESY PHOTO

Home Safety and Health Fair
The Home Safety and Health Fair was Saturday in the Home Depot and Walgreens parking
lots. The event was to feature a Shands CAIR Flight Team helicopter, Smokey the Bear and
Homer, the Sheriff's Department with Crime Stoppers and child and fingerprinting safety, Fire
and Rescue with safe house and fire engines and the Division of Forestry, FHP and FDOT.
Decorating and safety were offered and there was a free Home Depot Kids workshop.


ly field trips. Admission
charges for four of the
weeldy field trips are
included in the price
of admission. The camp
will feature five athletic
mini-camps and a two-day
reading camp at no extra
cost to campers. Space is
limited to the first 60 par-
ticipants. Contact Mario
Coppock or Nicole Smith
at 754-7095 or 754-7096.

Summer Reading Camp
Registration is now open
for Summer Reading Camp
at Miracle Tabernaole. The
first 40 children will be
admitted. Camp is $25 per
week. The camp features
reading, math, science,
handwriting, black history,
exercise and conversation-
al Spanish in the curricu-
lum. Camp is 8:30 a.m.-4
p.m. Monday-Thursday,.
June 6-Aug. 12. Breakfast
and lunch will be provided.
Call Cynthia Robinson at
249-3572 or Pastor Steele
at 758-8452.

Saturday
CHS reunion
A class reunion for the
Columbia High School
classes of 1949-1953
is 11:30 a.m. May 14 at
Mason City Community
Center. Anyone who
attended CHS is welcome.
There will be a covered
dish lunch. Call Julia
Osburn at 752-7544 or
Morris Williams at 752-
4710. -

RHS alumni meeting
There will be a RHS
alumni meeting at
noon Saturday at the
Richardson Center. For
additional information con-
tact CJ at 752-0815.

Farmers Market
The Lake DeSoto
Farmers Market is 8 a.m.
-noon Saturday at Wilson
Park, 778 NE Lake
DeSoto Circle. Vendors,
live music and more will
take place at the event.
The market is joining in
with-the FAMFest Vendor
applications and more
information is available at
719-5766 or e-mail kitej@
lcfla.com.

FAM Fest
Haven Hospice's Second
Annual Fitness, Art and
Music Festival is 10 a.in.
-5 p.m. in historic down-


town Lake City. The day
will begin with a 5K fun
run around Lake de Soto
starting at 9 a.m. and reg-
istration starts at 8 a.m.
The festival will feature
local artists and vendors,
performances, infor'ma-
tion booths and more.
Registration for the 5K
is $35. Visit www.haven-
hospice.org and click on
"Haven Events," or contact
Stephanie Brod at 352-271-
4665.

Plant sale
Master Gardener Plant
Sale is 9 a.m.-1 p.m.
Saturday at the Columbia
County Extension Office
by the fairgrounds. A vari-
ety of annuals, perennials,
shrubs, houseplants and
more will be available at
reasonable prices. Master
Gardeners will also be able
to answer questions.

Tea and fashion show
The Columbia County
Women's Club is hosting
its Annual Tea and Fashion
Show 7 p.m. Saturday. The
event is at 655 NE Martin
Luther King St. Tickets
are $3 at the door. Each
church department or aux-
iliary is asked to sponsor a
table for $25. Call Deanna
George at 288-2368 or 755-
6044

Cake walk
FFA Booster/Alumni
is having a Cake Walk 11
a.m.-2 p.m. Sautrday at
the Lake City Mall center
court. Tickets are $1 for
each walk and space for
a chance to win a home-
made cake.

Breakfast with the
Chief
The Lake City Police
Department presents
"Breakfast with the
Chief' from 10-11:30 a.m.
Saturday in the Public'
Safety Training Room. The
purpose of this meeting is
to address citizens' ques-
tions and concerns. Call
Audre' J. Washington,
Community Relations
Unit, at 719-5742.

Herbs workshop
Using Herbs Workshop
is 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Saturday
at Stephen Foster Folk
Culture Center State
Park Craft Square, White
Springs. Participants will
taste and discuss the
uses of various vinegar,


Publix Is


and make their own tea
bags. Participants should
bring a lunch. The cost of
the workshop is $25 and
includes park admission.
Call the park Gift Shop at.
386 397-1920 or visit www.
stephenfosterCSO. org.

Spring Fling
The third annual Spring
Fling is 6 p.m. Saturday
at the home of Jerry and
Carolyn Castagna. CARC
- Advocates for Citizens
with Disabilities, Inc.
- and Happy House will
benefit from the event.
The Columbia County
Sheriff's Office will have
finger printing for kids
from 3-5 p.m. prior to the
event. Facepaintnig, cook-
ies and balloons will be
available. Tickets for the
fling can be purchased
for $50. For more infor-
mation or to purchase a
ticket call 752-1880, ext.
103.

Sunday
Meet the author
The next meet the
author program is 2 p.m.
Sunday at the Columbia
County Public Library
main branch featur-
ing Rachel Hauck. She
is an award-winning,
contemporary Christian
fiction writer living
in Central Florida. In
addition to her solo
works, "Georgia on
Her Mind'" and "Dining
with Joy," she also has
written books, such as
"Softly and Tenderly,"
with country musician
Sara Evans. The event
is sponsored by the
Friends of the Library.

Monday
Mardi Gras Night
A Mardi Gras Night to
benefit Another Way Inc.
is 7 p.m. -1 a.m. Monday
at The Lions Den. A total


of 10 percent of profits
will benefit the orga-
nization. There will be
karaoke, door prizes and
more. Call Elizabeth Free
at 719-2700.

Tuesday
Donors wanted
The LifeSouth
Bloodmobile is seek-
ing donors 12 7 p.m.
Tuesday at Sweepstakes at
Panda-Moni-Yum. Donors
receive 200 credits, a
recognition item and free
lunch or dinner.

Art League meeting
The monthly meeting of
the Art League of North
Florida is 7 p.m. Tuesday
at the First Presbyterian
Church in Lake City. Guest
speaker is Jane Kopp who
will talk her artist toolbox
experience, which she
has had throughout her
30 years of teaching art.
There will be a business
meeting following the pre-
sentation.

Preschool screening
Free Preschool
screening is 3-5 p.m.
Tuesday at Fort White
Elementary School.
Screenings are for ages
3--4 1/2 years. Children
will be screened in
functional hearing and
vision, motor develop-
ment, speech and lan-
guage development and
concepts. Parents will
have the opportunity
to discuss results with
Florida Diagnostic and
Learning Resources
System/Gateway or
Columbia County School
District staff. Details
about Voluntary Pre-K,
Headstart or Subsidized
Child Care will be avail-
able. Call Columbia
County Student Services
Office at 755-0849 ext.
122 or Jo Ann Laseter,
FDLRS/Gateway at 1-
800-227-0059..

Legislative breakfast
The Lake City- Columbia
County Chamber of
Commerce Legislative
Breakfast is 8 am. Tuesday
at the Lifestyle Enrichment
Center. Tickets for mem-
bers are $10 and guests $15.
The event is sponsored by
Clay Electric and People's
State Bank. RSVP for this
event to the chamber at 752-
3690.

Wednesday
Donors wanted,
LifeSouth Bloodmobile
is seeking donors 3:30-8
p.m. Wednesday at Fort
White Community Center.
The event will feature
food, fun and prizes. All
donors receive free movie
tickets.

Thursday, May 19
NARFE monthly meeting
The National Active and


Retired Federal Employees
meetings is 1 p.m.
May 19 at the LifeStyle
Enrichment Center. The
guest speaker is Deborah
Freeman, LEC director.
The center is located
at 628 SE Allison Court.
Contact Miriam Stanford
at 755-0907 or Jim Purvis
at 752-8570.

Master Gardeners
workshop
The "Caring for your
North Florida Lawn" work-
shop is 5:45 7 p.m. May
19 at the Columbia County"*
Public Library Fort White
branch, Presented by UF
Master Gardeners, learn
about maintaining healthy .
southern grasses, fertil-
izing, watering and pest
control. The workshop is
free.

Ombudsman meeting
Florida's Long-Term
Ombudsman Program is
meeting at 12:30 p.m. May
19 at Haven Hospice of
North Central Florida in
Gainesville. Anyone inter-
ested in volunteering with
the program or attending
the meeting can call 352-
955-5015.

Preschool screening
Free Preschool screen-
ing 10 a.m.-6 p.m. May 19
at Parkview Baptist Church,
268 NW Lake Jeffrey Road.
Screenings are for ages
3- 4 1/2 years. Children will
be screened in functional
hearing and vision, motor
development, speech and
language development
and concepts. Parents will
have the opportunity to
discuss results with Florida
Diagnostic and Learning
Resources System/Gateway
or Columbia County School
District staff. Details about
Voluntary Pre-K, Headstart
or Subsidized Child Care
will be available. Call
Columbia County Student
Services Office at 755-0849
ext. 122 or Jo Ann Laseter,
FDLRS/Gateway at 1-800-
227-0059.

Movies and Musicals
night
Richardson Middle
School Chorus is having
Movies and Musicals night
at 7 p.m. May 19 in the
school auditorium. The
program, under the direc-
tion of Christy Robertson,
will include selections
from several musicals,
such as "Annie," "Grease"
and "Cinderella." Call 755-
8130.


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LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & WORLD THURSDAY, MAY 12, 2011


Diary: Bin Laden eyed new targets, big body count


By KIMBERLY DOZIER
AP Intelligence Writer

WASHINGTON Deep in hid-
ing, his terror organization becom-
ing battered and fragmented,
Osama bin Laden kept pressing
followers to find new ways to hit
the U.S., officials say, citing his pri-
vate journal and other documents
recovered in last week's raid.
Strike smaller cities, bin Laden
suggested. Target trains as well
as planes. Above all, kill as many
Americans as possible in a single
attack.
Though he was out of the pub-
lic eye and al-Qaida seemed, to
be weakening, bin Laden never
yielded control of his worldwide
organization, U.S. officials said
Wednesday. His personal, hand-
written journal and his massive
collection of computer files reveal
his hand at work in every recent


major al-Qaida threat, including
plots in Europe last year that had
travelers and embassies on high
alert, two officials said.
They described the intelligence
to The Associated Press only on
condition of anonymity because
they were not authorized to talk
publicly about what was found in
bin LaderNs hideout Analysts are
continuing to review the docu-
ments.
The information shatters the
government's conventional think-
ing about bin Laden, who had been
regarded for years as mostly an
inspirational figurehead whose
years in hiding made him too mar-
ginalized to maintain operational
control of the organization he
founded.
Instead, bin Laden was com-
municating from his walled com-
pound in Pakistan with al-Qaida's
offshoots, including the Yemen


branch that has emerged as the
leading threat to the United States,
the documents indicate. Though
there is no evidence yet that he
was directly behind the attempt-
ed Christmas, Day 2009 bombing
of a Detroit-bound airliner or the
nearly successful attack on cargo
planes heading for Chicago and
Philadelphia, it's now clear that
they bear some of bin Laden's
hallmarks.
He was well aware of U.S. coun-
terterrorist efforts and schooled
his followers in working around
them, the messages to his follow-
ers show. Don't limit attacks to
New York City, he said in his writ-
ings. Consider other areas such
as Los Angeles or smaller cities.
Spread out the targets.
In one particularly macabre bit
of mathematics, bin Laden's writ-
ings show him musing over just
how many Americans he must kill


to force the U.S. to withdraw from
the Arab world. He concludes that
the smaller, scattered attacks since
9/11 had not been enough. He tells
his disciples that only a body count
of thousands, something on the
scale of the Sept 11, 2001, attacks,
would shift U.S. policy.
He also schemed about ways to
sow political dissent in Washington
and play political figures against
one another, officials said.
The communications were in
missives sent via plug-in com-
puter storage devices called flash
drives. The devices were ferried
to bin Laden's compound by cou-
riers, a process that is slow but
exceptionally difficult to track.
Intelligence officials have
not identified any new planned
targets or plots in their initial
analysis of the 100 or so flash
drives and five computers that
Navy SEALs hauled away after


killing bin Laden. Last week,
the FBI and Homeland Security
.Department warned law enforce-
ment officials nationwide to be on
alert for possible attacks against
trains, though officials said there
was no specific plot.
Officials have not yet seen
any indication that bin Laden
had the ability to coordinate tim-
ing of attacks across the various
al-Qaida affiliates in Pakistan,
Yemen, Algeria, Iraq and Somalia,
and it is also. unclear from bin
Laden's documents how much
the affiliate groups relied on his
guidance.
Al-Qaida has not named bin
Laden's successor, but all indica-
tions point to his No. 2, Ayman al-
Zawahri. The question is whether
al-Zawahri, or anyone, has the
ability to keep so many disparate
groups under the al-Qaida ban-
ner.


OBITUARIES


Ola Duncan
Ola Duncan, age 96 resident
of Lake City, Florida, departed
this life on Wednesday, May 4,
2011 at Avalon Healthcare and
Rehabilita-
tion Center,
Lake City, FL.
Born. in Co-
lumbia Coun-
ty, Florida,
she was the i
daughter of
the late Mr.
Jim and Liza. Brown.
She joined Galilee Missionary
Baptist Church and later moved
her membership to Pleasant
Hill Missionary Baptist Church
where she served faithfully as the
Assistant Mother of the church,
until her health began to fail.
She was preceded in death by her
latehusband, DeaconJoeDuncan.
She leaves to cherish her mem-
ories many nieces, nephews,
cousins and sorrowing friends.
Funeral services for the late
Ola Duncan will be 11:00 AM,
Saturday, May 14, 2011@ Coo-
per Funeral Home Chapel.
The family will receive friends
in Friday, May 13, 2011 @ Coo-
per Funeral Home from 6-7 PM.
Arrangements entrusted
to COOPER FUNERAL
HOME, 251 N.E. Washing-
ton Street, Lake City, Florida
32055. Willis 0. Cooper, L.F.D.

Clyde James Harris Sr.,
Clyde James Harris Sr, age 84
of Lake City, FL, passed away
on Tuesday, May 10, 2011, at
the Lake City V.A. Hospital. He
was a native of
Plant City, FL
and moved to
the Lake City
area in 1986.
He is survived
by his wife;
Bernice Mc-
Collum Harris;
sons: Clyde Har-
ris, Jr. (Mary)
Plant City; Craig
Harris, Jackson-
ville, FL; grand-
daughter, Cheryl Harris Abbey
(James) of Plant City, FL; step-
children; William McCollum of
Lake City, FL., Linda Creamer
(Calvin) of Lake City, Gary
McCollum (Susan) of Jackson-
ville, FL, and grandchildren:
Abby Stalvey (Mike), Amy
Brown (David), Angie Anschul-
tz (Paul), Bradley McCollum,
Brian McCollum: Also surviv-
ing are nine great grandchildren.
Clyde was a retired school ad-
ministrator of Live Oak, FL He
also graduated from Stetson
University with honors in 1954,
served as Pastor of Mango Bap-
tist Church, and as a science
teacher in Live Oak FL., was a
member of the American Legion
Post #57; The Veteran of for-
eign Wars Post # 2206; and the
Lake City Moose Lodge # 624.
His church membership was at
the Southside Baptist Church
of Lake City. He was an avid
sportsman of hunting and fishing.
Visitation with family and
friends will be 6 to 8 pm Fri-
day, May 13, 2011 at WELLS
MEMORIAL FUNER-
AL HOME in Plant' City
with a funeral service 2pm
on Saturday at Wells. Inter-
ment will follow at Mt. Enon
Cemetery in Plant City, FL.
There will be a Memo-
rial Service at 2 PM Tuesday
May 17th at the First Bap-
tist Church in Lake City, FL.

Alice Teretha Kent
Alice TerethaKent, 85,residentof
Lake City, FL, died Tuesday, May
10, 2011 at St. Vincent's Medi-
cal Center in Jacksonville, FL.
She was a native of Columbia
County, FL, daughter of the late
Carl and Rosa Harper Markham
and had made her home here her
entire life. She was employed
by Avalon Nursing Home for
many years until her retirement.
She was a member of Elim
Baptist Church and was bet-
ter known as "Aunt Bill". She
loved to read, watch QVC on
T.V. and being with her family.
She was preceded in death by
her husband, Victor J. Kent and a


daughter in law, Linda Kent. She
is survived by one son, Victor
"Roy" Kent of Jacksonville, FL.
One brother, Tommy Markham,
of Jacksonville, FL. Four
Grandchildren, Tammy Was-
din (Andy), Pam Fry (Robert),
Vicky Henderson, (Dean), and
Lori Ebanks (Paul), all of Jack-
sonville, FL. Five Great Grand-
children and four Great-Great
Grandchildren also survive.
Funeral Services will be con-
ducted at 2 P.M. Thursday,
May 12, 2011 at Elim Baptist
Church near Ft. White, FL with
Rev. Charles Knight officiat-
ing. Visitation with the fam-
ily will be held one hour prior.
to Funeral Service (1 P.M.) at
the church. Interment will fol-
low in Bethel United Methodist
Church Cemetery on U.S. High-
way 441 South of Lake City.
GATEWAY-FOREST LAWN
FUNERAL HOME, 3596 South
U.S. Highway 441 is in charge
of arrangements (752-1954).
Please-sign the Guest Book at
www.gatewayforestlawn. corm.

Monica D. Lee
Ms. Monica D. Lee
God never hurts His children, He
shields them from pain. I could
not stay longer for the pain would
remain. I was a
gift from.God,
sent to shine
blessings with
all my might.
Now God
has called
me home and
everything
is alright. Monica Denice Lee,
32 of Tallahassee, Florida re-
ceived a call from God on May
4, 2011, following an extended
illness. She was a well rounded
and loved person known to all.
Monica was born in Lake City,
Florida. She was a graduate of
Columbia High School, class
of 1997 and went on to also be-
come an alumnus of Tallahassee
Community College and Florida
State University. Her passion for
helping others led her to a job
at Department of Children and
Families (South wood). She was
a faithful member ofA.L.A.R.M.
International Church of Tallahas-
see FL. She will forever remain
in the hearts of her loving moth-
er Lula Fead (J.C) of Greenville,
FL; father Ernest Lee of Orlando,
FL; sister Charonda Lee, brother
Eric Lee; niece A'nessa Fluellen;-
nephew A'terian Clark; great
nephew A'monte Fluellen; un-
cles Odell Jones (Barbara); An-
drew Jones (Pearl) of Lake City,
FL; Randolph Jones (Barbara)
of Killeen, TX; Roy Weaver of
.Syracuse, NY; aunts Cora Boul-
ware (Willie) of Warner Robins,


GA; Corrine Ross of Columbus,
OH; Special Cousins; Crystal
Bradley (Wilbur); Brett Jones
(Shalanda); Marie Jones-Stewart
(Hugh); Andrew Jones Jr.; co-
workers, friends and loved ones.
In lieu of floral arrange-
ments, the family is request-
ing that donations be made to
the American Cancer Society.
Funeral services for Ms. Monica
D. Lee will be held on Satur-
day, May 14, 2011, at 11:00 AM
at Shiloh Missionary Baptist
Church in Greenville, Florida,
Moderator J.B. Duval, Pastor.
Public visitation will be held
at the church on Friday May.
13, 2011 from 6-8:00 PM. Fu-
neral arrangements entrusted to
TRINITY FUNERAL HOME,
Inc. 1159 W US Highway 98,
Perry, Florida, (850) 584-9620,
Anthony White, Licensed Fu-
neral Director/Embalmer.

Oscar F. "Nick"
Nicholson
Mr. Oscar F. "Nick" Nicholson,
90, of Lake City passed away
in the Health Center of Lake
City on April 22, 2011 follow-
ing an extended
illness. A na-
tive of Boston,
Massachusetts, &
Mr. Nicholson "..
had been a resident of Lake
City since 1978 having moved
here from Orlando, Florida. He
retired from the United States
Navy having served in the Corp
of Civil Engineers. Mr. Nichol-
son was a very educated man
holding his Masters Degree in
Civil Engineering. He was a
member of St. James Episco-
pal Church. Mr. Nicholson had
been an avid golfer especially
enjoying the greens at the Lake
City Country Club. Mr. Nichol-
son was preceded in death by
his wife, Bettye Nicholson and
his daughter, Danith Harkness.
He is survived by his grand-
children, Christopher Hark-
ness (Anne Ehresman) of San
Jose, California and Katrina
Harkness (Andrea Jones) .
His sister Betty Muller of Elk-
ton, Maryland also survives.
Memorial services for Mr. Nich-
olson will be conducted at 11:00
A.M. on Saturday, May 14,
2011 in the St. James Episcopal
Church with Mother Michael
Armstrong officiating. Crema-
tion arrangements were han-
dled by the DEES-PARRISH
FAMILY FUNERAL HOME,
458 S. Marion Ave., Lake
City, FL 32025 (386)752-
1234 please sign our on-line
family guestbook at par-
rishfamilyfuneralhome. com


Rena Mae Watkins
Rena Mae Watkins, 61, departed
this life to eternal peace on May
3, 2011. She was born February
26, 1950 in Madison, Florida.
Her parents, Predy Lee Watkins
and Addie
Mae Watkins-
Ryan preceded
her in death.
She attended
Richardson
High School
and was a
graduate with
the class of 1968. At an early age
she joined Grand Chapel A.M.E.
Church, and later as an adult,
she attended New Bethel Bap-
tist Church, Lake -City, Florida.
Before her health failed, she was
employed by Richardson Day
Care, Lake Shore Hospital and
the Medical Center. Rena loved
her family dearly and her pet
"Sheba". She was very proud
of her grandchildren and would
support them in all of their en-
deavors when she could. Her
hobbies included cooking, gar-
dening, knitting, and crossword
puzzles. Rena is also preceded
by one sister, Arlene Green.
She leaves to cherish her memo-
ries, a loving and devoted part-
ner for thirty-one years, Robert
Nelson; four children, Latonia
Griffin (John), Alkesha Gray,
Ymekkico "Shawn" Gibson


(Anthony), Al Nelson (Trishe-
ka), all of Lake City, FL; twelve
grandchildren, Albert Coker,
Jr., Marqueze Coker, Octavi-
ous Buiey, Jr., Albneisha Coker,
Vincent Gray, Malik Gray, Da-
vid Watkins, Willie Swophire,
Anna Gibson, Anthony Gibson,
Jr., Avery Nelson, Alan Nelson,
all of Lake City, FL; three great-
grandchildren, Synniah Watkins,
Cha'matria Coker, Gaige Wil-
liamson, all of Lake City, FL;
seven sisters, Barbara Graham,
Winter Haven, FL., Cynthia
"Pumpkin" Carwise (George),
Bartow, FL, Vickey Coffer
(Freddie), all of Winter Haven,
FL, Darlene Ham, Tampa, FL,
Anna "Candi" Davis (Henry),
Lukaraen "Me Mamma" Ham,
all of Winter Haven, FL, La-
tonia Chamberlain (Bernard)
Albany, GA; two brothers,
Gregory Ham (Verneka), Ter-
rance Ryan (Sabrina), both of
Winter Haven, FL; one aunt,
Johnnie Mae Kamma (Lavell),
Gainesville, FL; seven special
cousins, Macy Wilson (Joe),
May Nell Bailey (Timothy), Joe
Frazier (Susan), Margeret Don-
aldson, Frankie Jean McCoy,
all of Lake City, FL, Clarence
Douglas, Jr., Johnny "Yogi"
Douglas (Therasa), Vanessa
Kelsey, all of Gainesville, FL;
one special friend, Wayne Rob-
inson; hosts of nieces, nephews,
cousins and sonrrowing friends.


A Free National Women's

Health Week Event


Ladies Lunch and Learn Friday

Presented by: Emad Atta, M.D. Life Er
Obstetrics and Gynecology 628 SI
Chandler Mohan, M.D. Lake C
Obstetrics and Gynecology


A celebration of Rena Mae's
life will be held 4:00 P.M. Sat-
urday, May 14, 2011 at New
Bethel Missionary Baptist
Church. 550 NE Martin Lu-
ther King Street. Lake City, FL.
Visitation with the family will
be from 5:00 7:00 P.M. Friday,
May 13,2011 atthe funeralhome.
Arrangements entrusted to
COMBS FUNERAL HOME.
292 NE Washington Street.
Lake City, FL. (386) 752-4366.
Marq Combs-Turner, L.F.D.
"The Caring Professionals"

Lyric Bailey Williams
Lyric Bailey Williams, infant
daughter of Kevin Williams and
Candyce Arline, departed this
life Saturday, May 7, 2011 at
Baptist Medical Center South,
Jacksonville, FL terminating
a sudden illness. Funeral ser-
vices will be Friday, May 13,
2011 at Arline Family Cem-
etery in Olustee, FL with Rev.
LaVerne Donaldson officiating.
Arrangements entrusted to
COOPER FUNERAL
HOME, 251 N.E. Washing-
ton Street Lake City, FL
, Willis 0. Cooper, L.F.D.

Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lak6
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


national

il, l n ck


, May 20, 2011, Noon

enrichment Center
E Allison Ct.
City, Florida 32025


Space is Limited! Please call 386-755-0235
to reserve your space today.


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Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427,








LAKE CITY REPORTER HEALTH THURSDAY, MAY 12, 2011


ON HEALTH






Dr. Peter Gott


Drug trial

doesn't help

Alzheimer's

patient

DEAR DR. GOT: My
wife was diagnosed with
Alzheimer's dementia about
five years ago. The current
drugs being prescribed
are galantamine, Namenda
and citalopram. Other than
Alzheimer's, her overall
health is good.
Shortly after being diag-
nosed, she placed in her age
class at the Bloomsday road
race. We were both runners.
Anyway, her height is 5 feet
5 inches, her weight is 115
pounds, and her blood pres-
sure is normal.
Is there any other pos-
sible course of treatment?
We have been to specialists
and more. We did participate
in the failed dimebon trial.

DEAR READER: The
dimebon trial you refer
to did fail. An old Russian
antihistamine remedy
developed for hay fever
and known as dimebon was
one of the world's most
promising hopes for the
treatment of Alzheimer's.
While originally providing
good results in a small trial,
a newer one involving a
greater number of patients
with mild to moderate
symptoms failed to show
progress after six months
*for the treatment of cogni-
tive decline, nor did it help
the behavioral problems
associated with the disease
when compared with a
placebo. As you can well
imagine, the outcome was
unexpected and tragic for
individuals such as yourself
and your wife, as well as
for Pfizer, who had been
paying for 60 percent of the
development costs.
Alzheimer's is an irre-
versible and progressive
brain disease that destroys
memory and thinking. It is
estimated that more than
5 million Americans may
have the disease, so you can
understand why so much
hope was placed in the dime-
bon.
Brain damage for this
disorder can begin 10 to 20
years before any symptoms
are present Tangles develop'
and plaque forms in certain
areas of the brain. As this
occurs, healthy neurons
work less efficiently before
*they lose their ability to func-
tion properly. By the time
Alzheimer's reaches its final
stage, damage is widespread
:and brain tissue has signifi-
cantly atrophied.
There are four FDA medi-
cations approved for the
treatment of Alzheimer's. In
no particular order and for
a mild to moderate disorder
are rivastigmine (Exelon),
galantamine (Razadyne) and
donepezil (Aricept). The
heavy hitter for advanced
cases is memaritine
(Namenda). All four regulate
the chemicals that transmit
messages between neurons
within the brain. Their
purpose is to help memory
and speech and assist with
behavioral problems. The
big issue is that they don't
modify the underlying dis-
ease process, nor do results
last more than a few years.
SWhile ifs not what you
really want to hear and I
wish I could be more help-
ful, research has been


phenomenal over the past
few years and important
advances have been made.
Scientists and physicians
are working together for a
better understanding of the
disease. Every effort brings
us a step closer to the time
when we will be able to bet-
ter manage this horrible
condition. While the last trial
was a failure, perhaps anoth-
er one is on the horizon that
might make all the differ-
ence in the world for you.


Disabilities add challenge to pregnancy


By LAURAN NEERGAARD
AP Medical Writer

WASHINGTON Her
first pregnancy brought
Dianna Fiore Radoslovich
a break from the weakness
and pain of her multiple
sclerosis.
She put away her cane
and her meds and gave
birth to a healthy son.
Pregnancy No. 2 hasn't
brought the same reprieve.
This time, Radoslovich jug-
gles the cane with a tod-
dler, a growing baby bump
and a bit of anxiety.
"Every pregnancy's dif-
ferent, and MS is different
every day for everybody,"
says Radoslovich, of New'
York City, who has been
learning along with her
obstetrician how to make
adjustments.
Physical disabilities add
a whole new challenge to
pregnancy. And while the
vast majority of women
with disabling conditions
appear to have healthy
babies, specialists say far
too little is known about
moms' risks of complica-
tions, their special needs
and barriers to good care.
More than 1 million
women of childbearing age
have a physical disability-
meaning they report need-
ing some sort of assistance
with daily living because
of such conditions as MS,
rheumatoid arthritis, spinal
cord injuries or cerebral
palsy, says a recent report
in the journal Obstetrics
& Gynecology. Yet when
the National Institutes of
Health convened experts
to examine the issue, they
couldn't even find a good
estimate of how many of'
those women give birth
each year.
It's "a real invisible popu-
lation," NIH researcher Dr.
Caroline Signore said at a
meeting of the American
College of Obstetricians
and Gynecologists last
week.
But it's one that is
increasing: "There will
be a growing number of
women with disabilities
who will desire pregnancy
and come to you for care,"
Signore told the group.
The NIH workshop rec-
ommended a comprehen-


ASSOCIATED PRESS
This March 2 handout photo provided by the family shows Dianna Fiore Radoslovich of New York, with her husband Steve
and son Steven Andrew, celebrating his first birthday. Radoslovich's multiple sclerosis symptoms including difficulty walking
- temporarily disappeared with her first pregnancy, but her second pregnancy hasn't brought the same reprieve. Pregnancy
adds a new challenge for women with physical disabilities, and specialists say too little is known about their needs.


sive registry to track preg-
nancy in women with phys-
ical disabilities and answer
some key questions.
Among the priorities
are following up on small
studies that found preterm
birth, low birth weights and
C-sections may be more
common among women
with certain disabling con-
ditions.
-Why? .That's not clear.
But women with spinal
cord injuries or MS seem
to experience more urinary
tract infections, a risk factor
for preterm labor and thus
smaller babies', Signore
says. Also, some women
with spinal cord injuries
may not feel the pain of
early contractions and seek
care soon enough.
As for C-sections, many
women with spinal cord
injuries still are capable of
a vaginal birth but may not
get a chance because of
nervous doctors, Signore
says.
Other questions: How
might pregnancy's weight
gain and fatigue affect bal-


ance and contribute to falls,
in turn decreasing mobility
and independence? What
role do higher levels of
day-to-day stress play? Is
postpartum depression a
greater risk?
But Signore who
uses a wheelchair herself
because of a spinal cord
injury challenged her
fellow ob/gyns to consider
more than medical issues.
Few doctors own scales
that can weigh women in
a wheelchair, for example.
They should have at least
one exam table that low-
ers to the floor for women
with impaired mobility, she
says.
In fact, a completely rou-
tine pregnancy requires 15
visits over eight months,
and just getting there can
be exhausting for women
with mobility problems.
Signore says the chal-
lenges start at the front
door, and showed photos
of herself stuck outside a
physician's office, unable
to heave open a heavy door
even though its lever han-


dle complied with acces-
sibility laws.
"Accessibility is in the eye
of the beholder," she says.
The issue may be best
studied so far in mul-
tiple sclerosis, perhaps
because of some good
news. Symptoms of MS,
an autoimmune disease
that can wax and wane,
tend to improve temporar-
ily during pregnancy, prob-
ably because of hormonal
changes. The National
Multiple Sclerosis Society
notes that research has
begun to test whether add-
ing a type of estrogen to
regular treatment when
women aren't pregnant
might mimic some of that
benefit.
Radoslovich was one
of those lucky ones while
pregnant with her first child,
Steven Andrew, now 1.
But about 30 percent of
MS patients have a flare-up
of symptoms a few months
after giving birth that can
be severe. Breastfeeding
sometimes staves off the
episodes, but didn't for


Radoslovich, who had to
quit when a flare-up sud-
denly left her unable to
walk or use her right side
until intravenous steroids
kicked in.
The toddler is her morale
booster: "When I'm having
a bad day in terms of not
feeling well, all I need is to
see that smile on his face
and him reach out to me
and it's pure medicine."
Radoslovich was thrilled
to learn she was pregnant
again a second son is
due in August. But this
time, the weakness, mus-
cle stiffness and her other
usual symptoms didn't
abate. She's learned to ask
for help on tough days.
Still, her doctor says
she can try a vaginal birth
despite having a C-section
the last time -that was unre-
lated to MS. Radoslovich
hopes she'll have the ener-
gy to make that happen.
She craves hearing how
other women with MS han-
dle pregnancy's hurdles: "I
feel like, if you can do it, so
can I."


Study in South Korea finds higher rate of autism


By CARLA K. JOHNSON
AP Medical Writer

CHICAGO A study in
South Korea suggests about
1 in 38 children have traits
of autism, higher than a pre-
vious U.S. estimate of 1 in
100.
By casting a wider net
and looking closely at
mainstream children, the
researchers expected to find
a higher rate of autism char-
acteristics. But they were
surprised at how high the
rate was. They don't think
South Korea has more chil-
dren with autism than the
United States, but instead
that autism often goes undi-
agnosed in many nations.
U.S. estimates are based
on education and medical
records, not the more time-
consuming survey conduct-
ed in South Korea.
Two-thirds of the chil-
dren with autism traits in
the study were in the main-
stream school population,
hadn't been, diagnosed
before and weren't getting
any special services. Many


of those undiagnosed chil-
dren likely have mild social
impairments, rather than
more severe autism.
"It doesn't mean all of
a sudden there are more
new- children with- (autism
spectrum disorders)," said
co-author Dr. Young-Shin
Kim of the Yale Child
Study Center. "They have
been there, all along, but
were not counted in previ-
ous prevalence studies."
It's not clear whether
the children need spe-
cial services or not, other
experts said.
"I'm sure some of these
children probably could
benefit from interven-
tion, but I don't think we
could make a statement
that all would benefit
from intervention," said
Dr. Marshalyn Yeargin-
Allsopp, chief of the Centers
for Disease Control and
Prevention's developmental
disabilities branch.
TheCDCwasn'tinvolved
in the new study, although
another federal agency,
the National Institute of


Mental Health, provided
some funding. The group,
Autism Speaks, which
advocates for more aggres-
sive autism screening, also
helped pay for the study.
Autism Speaks had no role
in the study's design.


The research, published
Monday in the American
Journal of Psychiatry,
attempted to screen all 55,000
schoolchildren, ages 7 to 12,
in a district of Goyang City,
near Seoul. '
However,, only about two-


thirds of mainstream chil-
dren participated. About 63
percent of their parents filled'
out a survey. The researchers
acknowledged that parents of
affected 'children might be
more likely to fill out the sur-
vey.


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LAKE CITY REPORTER NATION THURSDAY, MAY 12, 2011


Despite improving economy, budget

deficit on track to exceed $1 trillion


By MARTIN CRUTSINGER
AP Economics Writer
WASHINGTON The govern-
ment is taking in more tax revenue
as the economy improves, but not
nearly enough to keep the federal
budget deficit from exceeding $1 tril-
lion for a third straight year.
The deficit for April dropped to
$40.5 billion, half the imbalance
from the same month last year,
the Treasury Department said
Wednesday. Tax receipts were up 45
percent last month compared to the
same month one year ago.
Still, the deficit is on pace to grow
to $1.4 trillion in this budget year,
according to the Congressional
Budget Office. That would be greater
than last year's $1.29 trillion deficit
and nearly match the record $1.41
trillion deficit hit in 2009.
Through the first seven months of'
the budget year, the deficit has totaled
$869.9 billion a figure that just
three years ago would have ranked as
the highest ever for a full year.
Soaring deficits are putting pres-
sure on Congress and President
Barack Obama to agree on a long-
term plan to trim federal spending.
The White House and Democrats
want to trim the deficit through
spending cuts and also by ending tax
cuts for the wealthy, which were first
passed when President George W.
Bush was in office and later extended
by Obama.
Republicans reject that approach,
saying it amounts to a tax increase.
Their plan would focus exclusively
on cutting spending. They have also
proposed further tax cuts for the
wealthiest Americans.
A decade ago, it seemed the federal
budget was heading in the opposite
direction. The government had a sur-
plus of $127 billion in 2001 when
President George W. Bush took office
and was projected to run surpluses
totaling $5.6 trillion over the next
decade.
But by 2002, the country was back
in the red. The deficits grew after
Bush won approval for the broad tax
cuts, pushed a major drug benefit
program for seniors which wasn't


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this April 8 photo, President Obama poses for photographers in the Blue Room
at the White House in Washington after he spoke regarding the budget and averted
government shutdown after a deal was made between Republican and Democrat
lawmakers.


offset with revenue to pay for it and
entered the country into wars in Iraq
and Afghanistan.
In 2008, Bush's last full year in office,
the deficit had grown to $454.8 billion,
a record at the time. And when the
economy soured, it jumped into the $1,
trillion-plus range.
The Bush administration pushed a
.$700 billion bailout program in 2008
Sto rescue the nation's banks, financial
firms and automakers. The following
year, the Obama administration con-
tinued the bailouts and also backed a
$787 billion stimulus program to boost
the economy.
Higher spending for unemployment
insurance and food stamps, and the
sharp contraction in tax revenues, also
widened the deficit And it grew even
more this year after Obama and con-
gressional Republicans signed off on
a deal that extended the Bush tax cuts
for two years and also reduced Social
Security payroll taxes for one year.
The monthly reports this year have
shown that the revenue losses are turn-
ing around. Unemployment, while still
high, has been declining. More people
working means more tax revenue for
the government.


Through April, government rev-
enues totaled $1.31 trillion, up 9.2 per-
cent from the seven months through
April of 2010. The increase included
the big jump in income tax payments
received by the government from indi-
viduals filing in April and also a gain in
corporate tax payments.
Government spending totaled $2.18
trillion through April, a 9 percent
increase over the same period a year
ago. One of the fastest-rising categories
was interest on the government's debt
held by the public, which rose'13.1 per-
cent to $139.3 billion .through the first
seven months of this budget year.
Last month, Standard & Poor's low-
ered its long-term outlook for the fed-
eral debt from "stable" to "negative."
The credit rating agency said there
could be serious consequences if law-
makers failed to reach a deal to control
the ballooning deficits.
The issue is expected to come to
a head over the next few months as
Congress debates legislation to raise
the government's $14.3 trillion borrow-
ing limit Treasury Secretary Timothy
Geithner has said by Aug. 2 he will run
out of maneuvering room to avoid a
default on the national debt


House GOP: $30B more in spending cuts


By ANDREW TAYLOR
Associated Press

WASHINGTON -
Republicans controlling the
House announced plans
Wednesday to cut $30 bil-
lion from the day-to-day
budgets of Cabinet agen-
cies, doubling down on
cuts to domestic programs
just weeks after a split-the-
differences bargain with
President Barack Obama.
The moves by the pow-
erful lawmakers atop the


House Appropriations
Committee are the first
concrete steps to try to
implement a tight-fisted
2012 budget plan approved
by Republicans' last month.
It would build on $38 bil-
lion in savings enacted in
a hard-fought agreement
with O.bama over the cur-
rent year's budget.
The $30 billion in sav-
ings from agency operat-
ing budgets, that have to
be annually approved by
Congress seems small


compared to deficits that
could top $1.6 trillion this
year. But they're actually a
key building block in even-
tually wrestling the deficit
under control, ,assuming
Congress can make the
cuts now and stick with
them year after year in the
face of inflation.
That's a big "if.'"
Obama and his
Democratic allies control-
ling the Senate are sure
to battle against the cuts.
And since the Pentagon


- which accounts for
more than half of the bud-
get that passes through the
Appropriations panel each
year actually receives
a $17 billion, 3 percent
boost, the cuts to domes-
tic programs like educa-
tion, housing subsidies and
infrastructure projects will
feel much more severe.
Domestic agencies and
foreign aid accounts would
have to absorb $47 billion
in cuts, averaging about 9
percent.


Poll: Obama's

approval rating

hits 60 percent


By JENNIFER AGIESTA and
LIZ SIDOTI
Associated Press

WASHINGTON -
President Barack Obama's
approval rating has hit its
highest point in two years
- 60 percent and more
than half of Americans
now say he deserves to
be re-elected, according to
an Associated Press-GfK
poll taken after U.S. forc-
es killed al-Qaida leader
Osama bin Laden.
In worrisome signs for
Republicans, the presi-
dent's standing improved
not just on foreign policy
but also on the economy,
and independents a
key voting bloc in the
November 2012 presiden-
tial election caused the
overall uptick in support
by sliding back to Obama
after fleeing for much of
the past two years.
Comfortable majori-
ties of the public now call
Obama a strong leader
who will keep America
safe. Nearly three-fourths
- 73 percent also now
say they are confident that
Obama can effectively
handle terrorist threats.
And he improved his
standing on Afghanistan,
Iraq and the United States'
relationships with other
countries.
Despite a sluggish
recovery from the Great
Recession, 52 percent of
Americans now approve
of Obama's stewardship
of the economy, giving
him his best rating on that
issue since the early days
of his presidency; 52 per-
cent also now like how
he's handling the nation's
stubbornly high 9 percent
unemployment.
The economy remains
Americans' top issue.
Impressions of the,
nation's economic health
have improved following
last Friday's positive jobs
report, which showed
American companies are
on a hiring spree. More
people now say the econ-
omy got better in the past
month and that it's likely
to continue doing so in the
coming year.
Also, more Americans
- 45 percent, up from 35
percent in March say
the country is headed in
the right direction. Still,
about half 52 percent -


say it's on the wrong track,
meaning Obama still has
work to do to convince a
restive public to stay with
the status quo.
Some have seen enough
to know they'll stick with
him.
"I was happy about
bin Laden," says
Brenda Veckov, 42, of
Hollidaysburg, Pa. "I put
my fists in the air. To me,
it was just a little bit of
closure for the United
States."
"The president made
the right decisions on this
one. And I will vote for him
again."
Not everyone has such an
optimistic view of Obama.
"I'm very concerned"
about. the country,
says Susan Demarest
in Snellville, Ga., 56,
who didn't support the
Democrat last time and
won't this time. "I'm in
my 50s and I worry that
I'm not going to be able to
retire at a reasonable age
and enjoy the end of my
life because of Medicare
and Social Security and the
debt of the country." Still,
she says Obama doesn't
carry all of the blame.
Obama's overall politi-
cal boost comes at an ,
important time. He is
embarking on his re-elec-
tion campaign and is in
the early days of a debate
with Republicans who con-
trol the House over raising
the country's debt limit
But it's unclear how long
Obama's strengthened
standing will last in the
aftermath of bin Laden's
death.
Americans say they
overwhelmingly approve
of the military's handling
of the risky nighttime
mission in Abbottabad,
Pakistan. But it hasn't
changed public opinion:
on the war in Afghanistan;
most still are opposed to it,
and a big majority favors
Obama's plan to withdraw
all combat troops by 2014.
Overall, Obama'sapprov-
al rating is up slightly from
53 percent in March and a
47 percent low point fol-
lowing last fall's midterm
congressional elections,
in which Republicans won
control of the House and
gained seats in the Senate.
It was 64 percent in May
2009, just months after he
was sworn into office.


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Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@lakecityreportercom


SPORTS


Thursday, May 12, 2011


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


BRIEFS

YOUTH SWIMMING
CST registration
today, Friday
Columbia Swim Team
registration is
5:30-7 p.m. today and
Friday at the Columbia
Aquatic Complex. Bring
a copy of the child's birth
certificate.
For details, call
Michele Greene at
623-3403 or e-mail
cstdolphins@yahoo.com.
RUNNING
F.A.M. sponsored
by Haven Hospice
Haven Hospice's
second annual Fitness,
Art and Music Festival
is Saturday in downtown
Lake City. Festivities
begin with a 5K run
around Lake DeSoto at
9 a.m. Race fee is $35.
To register for the 5K,
call Stephanie Brod at
(352) 271-4665 or visit
smbrod@havenhospice.
org.
GOLF
Kiwanis charity
tournament set
The Lake City Kiwanis
Club is hosting a
four-person scramble
golf tournament at 1 p.m.
May 20 at The Country
Club of Lake City. Cost
is $60 per person. Hole
sponsorships are $50.
Lunch and drinks will be
provided. All proceeds go
to youth programs and
building future parks in
Columbia County.
For details, call Matt
Greene at 487-1374.
FORT WHITE FOOTBALL
Fundraiser for
Q-back Club
The Fort White
Quarterback Club has a
pancake breakfast and
car wash from 8-11 a.m.
May 21 at the Fort White
Community Center.
Pancake breakfast (eat in
or take out) is $5, and
car wash donations will
be accepted.
For details, call Kathy
D'Antonio at
(386) 590-9187.
GATORS
International
Gator Day
International Gator
Day, where gator clubs
unite worldwide to give
back to communities,
is May 21. The North
Florida Gator Club is
teaming.up with Habitat
for Humanity to clean up
a lot for a future home.
Meet at 8 a.m. at KC's
Produce on Baya Avenue
and bring yard tools to
help with the clean-up.
For details, call Diane
at 752-3333.
* From staff reports


GAMES

Friday
Columbia High
football Purple & Gold
game at Memorial
Stadium, 6 p.m.
Saturday
Fort White High
football Red & Black
game, 10 a.m.
May 20
Fort White 'High
football vs. Orange Park
High in spring game,
7 p.m.
Columbia High
football vs. Dunnellon


High in spring game,
7:30 p.m.


All eyes on quarterback

position in Purple & Gold


Memorial
Stadium to host
Columbia game.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com
The old saying in football
is that if you have two quar-
terbacks, you don't have'
any. Columbia High doesn't
see it that way.
The Tigers are spending
the spring trying to iden-
tify who will take the snaps
in the fall. With return-
ing quarterbacks Nigel
Atkinson and Jayce Barber,
the Tigers have options in
the area.
"They both bring they're
own strength with differ-
ent styles," Columbia coach
Brian Allen said. "We'd like
to see one emerge from the
competition. We want one
guy to emerge as the guy."


Even if he loses the
starting quarterback job,
Atkinson is quickly earn-
ing playing time at another
position.
"The good thing with
Nigel is that he's a guy we
can put at wide receiver and
have him bring something
different," Allen said. "We
have the same thing with
freshman quarterback J.T.
Bradley in that we can put
those guys out there and
make the wide receiving
core better quickly."
The two quarterbacks
have only practiced at wide
receiver for two practices,
but Allen is already singing
their praises.
"I'm excited about them,
and what I've seen the last
couple of days," he said.
'They help that much
more."
Despite working at wide
receiver, Atkinson is still


running with the first-team
-offense.
"He's still the guy," Allen
said. "He'll continue to
grow throughout the sum-
mer and improve on some
things that we didn't see on
day one."
Atkinson and Barber
each bring different quali-
ties to the position accord-
ing to Allen.
"Nigel's strong point is
his escapability," he said.
"He was able to do that in
the spread and you see the
same thing in our offense.
When he pulls it down, you
see excitement."
Barber plays the role of
the more traditional quar-
terback.
"They both have strong
arms, but Jayce is a little
taller," Allen said. 'That
helps-him to see over the
CHS continued on 2B


ecor


Masters has
become master
of powerlifting.
By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com
At the age of 14,
Dalton Masters
is breaking
powerlifting
records his
own.
Masters broke four
records at the American
Powerlifting Federation
RAW and Single Ply
Nationals in Orlando on
April 30.
He had previously set
the marks in bench press,
deadlift, squat and total
power at the state meet on
Feb. 19.
Competing in the Men's
13-145 age group and
90-kilometer Division,
Masters currently holds
eight Florida state records,
four national records and
four world records.
His record lifts
(converted from metric)
were 375 pounds in the
squat, 259 pounds in the
bench press, 468 pounds
in the deadlift and 1,103 in
total power.
"I have been lifting 11'/
years," Masters said. "I
first went to the gym with
my dad (Allen) just for
working out."
Masters caught the eye
of Bobby Vicenzi at Future
Fitness.


COURTESY PHOTqO
Lake City's Dalton Masters lifts in the squat at the American Powerlifting Federation National Championships on April 30 in
Orlando. Masters is the current APF record'holder for his age group and size in the squat, bench press, deadlift and overall
power. He currently holds eight state, four national and four world records.


"He was training a kid
about my age and he
wanted me and him to
work with each other since
we lifted about the same,"
Masters said.
Masters now trains with
Toby Irby, and his usual
workout schedule is three
times a week.
Masters is taking


three weeks off for
spring football practice
at Columbia High. The
eighth-grader played for
Lake City Middle School
the last two years. He is
working at center and is a
long-snapper.
"Powerlifting builds
muscle for football and
it is a great hobby, too,"


Masters said.
The'World Powerlifting
Congress is the umbrella
organization that
includes the American
Powerlifting Federation
and the Amateur American
Powerlifting Federation.
The amateur APF is a
drug-testing organization.
RAW requires that


athletes compete without
the aid of any lifting
equipment other than
a lifting belt. Single Ply
refers to special body
suits that are worn for the
various power lifts.
The bench press
requirements are the same"

MASTERS continued on 2B


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High quarterback Jayce Barber throws a pass
"during Tuesday's practice.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Boston Celtics players Nenad Krstic (4) and Delonte West (14) try
to defend the Miami Heat's LeBron James (6) during the first half of
Game 5 of a second-round NBA playoff basketball series in Miami.


Wade, James lead Heat
in final minutes to
eliminate Celtics, 97-87.
By TIM REYNOLDS
Associated Press
MIAMI Behind Boston much of
the season. Behind Boston much of the
game. No more.
Not only has the Miami Heat caught
the Celtics they have officially
gone past them, and into the Eastern
Conference finals.
Vanquishing the team they couldn't
beat for so long with a 16-0 run to end
the' game, Dwyane Wade scored 34
points, LeBron James put the Heat up


for good with a 3-pointer with 2:10 left'
on the way to a 33-point effort, and
Miami topped Boston 97-87 to win their
East semifinal series Wednesday night
in five games.
James added a game-sealing more
aptly, a series-sealing 3-pointer with
40.4 seconds left, then turned and
posed for some fans who screamed in
delight.
A steal and two-handed slam 6 sec-
onds later for good measure, followed
by a Celtics turnover, got the party
started. It was over, the Heat and Celtics
knew it, and Boston coach Doc Rivers
stood silently near the bench, his arms;
folded across his chest as James ran
down the clock on Miami's final offen-
sive possession of the series.


sette


East finals bound:

Miami bounces Boston


- I I --









LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS THURSDAY, MAY 12, 2011


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
COLLEGE SOFTBALL
7:30 p.m.
ESPN2 Southeastern Conference,
quarterfinal, Mississippi St. vs. Alabama, at
Oxford, Miss.
GOLF
9 a.m.
TGC European PGATour, Iberdrola
Open, first round, at Mallorca, Spain
I p.m.
TGC PGA Tour, The Players
Championship, first round, at Ponte Vedra
Beach
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
Noon
MLB -Tampa Bay at Cleveland
7 p.m.
MLB-Regional coverage,Kansas City
at N.Y.Yankees or Seattle at Baltimore
NBA BASKETBALL
8 p.m.
ESPN" Playoffs, conference
semifinals, game 6, Chicago at Atlanta
NHL HOCKEY
9 p.m.
VERSUS Playoffs, conference
semifinals, game 7, Detroit at San Jose

BASEBALL

AL standings *

East Division
W L Pct GB
NewYork 20 13 .606 -
Tampa Bay 20 15 .571 I
Boston 17 19 .472 4'A
Toronto 16 20 .444 S'A
Baltimore 15 19 .441 5'/
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Cleveland 23 I I .676 -
Kansas City 18 17 .514 5A'
Detroit 19 18 .514 5A
Chicago 14 23 .378 1 0'h
Minnesota 12 22 .353 II
West Division
W L Pct GB
Los Angeles 21 16 .568 -
Oakland 19 18 .514 2
Texas 19 18 .514 2
Seattle 16 20 .444 4'h
Wednesday's Games
Detroit 9, Minnesota 7
Oakland atTexas (n)
Kansas City at N.Y.Yankees (n)
Seattle at Baltimore (n)
Tampa Bay at Cleveland (n)
Boston at Toronto (n)
Chicago White Sox at L.A.Angels (n)
Today's Games
Tampa Bay (Shields 3-1) at Cleveland
(Masterson 5-0), 12:05 p.m.
Kansas City (O'Sullivan 1-2) at N.Y.
Yankees (Nova 3-2), 7:05 p.m.
Seattle (Vargas 2-2) at Baltimore
(Britton 5-2), 7:05 p.m.
Friday's Games
Boston at N.Y.Yankees, 7:05 p.m.
Kansas City at Detroit, 7:05 p.m.
Seattle at Cleveland, 7:05 p.m.
Baltimore atTampa Bay, 7:10 p.m.
LA.Angels at Texas, 8:05 p.m.
Toronto at Minnesota, 8:10 p.m.
Chicago White Sox at Oakland,
10:05 p.m.


NL standings


Philadelph
Florida
Atlanta
Washingto
New York

St. Louis
Cincinnfati
Pittsburgh
Milwaukee
Chicago
Houston


East Division
W L
ia 23 12
21 14
20 17
in 17 18
16 20
Central Division
W L
21 15
20 16
18 18
e 16 20
15 19
13 23
West Division


Pct GB
.657 -
.600 2
.541 4
.486 6
.444 7'.


W L Pct GB
Colorado 19 15 .559 -
San Francisco 19 16 .543 h'
Los Angeles 17 20 .459 3h'
Arizona 15 19 .441 4
San Diego 14 22 .389 6
Wednesday's Games
San Diego 13, Milwaukee 6
Houston 4, Cincinnati 3
N.Y. Mets at Colorado ppd.
L.A. Dodgers at Pittsburgh (n)
Philadelphia at Florida (n)
Washington at Atlanta (n)
St. Louis at Chicago Cubs (n)
Arizona at San Francisco (n)
Today's Games
St. Louis (j.Garcia 4-0) at Chicago
Cubs (C.Coleman 1-2), 2:20 p.m.
Arizona (D.Hudson 3-4) at San
Francisco (Cain 2-2), 3:45 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers (Garland 1-2) at
Pittsburgh (Morton 4-1), 7:05 p.m.
Washington (Zimmermann 2-4) at
Atlanta (D.Lowe 3-3), 7:10 p.m.
Friday's games
San Francisco at Chicago Cubs,
2:20 p.m.
Florida at Washington, 7:05 p.m.
St. Louis at Cincinnati, 7:10 p.m.
Philadelphia at Atlanta, 7:35 p.m.
N.Y. Mets at Houston, 8:05 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Milwaukee, 8:10 p.m.
San Diego at Colorado, 8:40 p.m.
Arizona at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 p.m.

BASKETBALL

NBA playoffs

CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS
Tuesday
Chicago 95, Atlanta 83, Chicago leads
series 3-2
Wednesday
Miami 97, Boston 87
Memphis at Oklahoma City (n)
Today
Chicago at Atlanta, 8 p.m.
Friday
Miami at Boston, 7 or 8 p.m. (if
necessary)
Oklahoma City at Memphis, 9 or
9:30 p.m.

GOLF

Golf week

PGATOUR
Players Championship
Site: PonteVedra Beach
Schedule: Today-Sunday.


Course:TPC Sawgrass, Players Stadium
Course (7,215 yards, par 72).
Purse: $9.5 million. Winner's share:
$1.71 million.
Television: Golf Channel (Today-Friday,
1-7 p.m., 9 p.m.-midnight; Saturday-Sunday,
9-11 p.m.) and NBC (Saturday-Sunday,
2-7 p.m.).

AUTO RACING

Race week

NASCAR
SPRINT CUP
FedEx 400
Site: Dover, Del.
Schedule: Friday, practice (Speed, 2:30-
4:30 p.m.), Saturday, qualifying (Speed,
noon-l:30 p.m.), Sunday, race, I p.m. (Fox,
12:30-5 p.m.).
Track: Dover International Speedway
(oval, 1.0 miles).
Race distance: 400 miles, 400 laps.
Next race: All-Star Race, May 21,
Charlotte Motor Speedway, Concord, N.C.
Online: http://www.noscar.com
NATIONWIDE
5-Hour Energy 200
Site: Dover, Del.
Schedule: Friday, practice (Speed,
12:30-2:30 p.m.); Saturday, qualifying
(ESPN2, 10:30-1 1:30 a.m.), race, 2 p.m.
(ESPN, 1:30-4:30 p.m.).
Track: Dover International Speedway.
Race distance: 200 miles, 200 laps.
Next race: John Deere Dealers 250,
May 22, Iowa Speedway, Newton, Iowa.
CAMPING WORLD TRUCKS
Lucas Oil 200
Site: Dover, Del.
Schedule: Today, practice; Friday,
qualifying (Speed, 6-7 p.m.), race, 4:45 p.m.
(Speed, 8-11 p.m.).
Track: Dover International Speedway.
Race distance: 200 miles, 200 laps.
Next race: N.C. Education Lottery
200, May 20, Charlotte Motor Speedway,
Concord, N.C.
NHRA FULL THROTTLE
NHRA Southern Nationals
Site: Commerce, Ga.
Schedule: Friday, qualifying; Saturday,
qualifying (ESPN2, 7-9:30 p.m.); Sunday,
final eliminations (ESPN2, 7-10 p.m.).
Track:Atlanta Dragway.
Next event: NHRA Summer Nationals,
May 20-22, Heartland ParkTopeka (Kan.)
Online: http://www.nhra.com
INDYCAR
Next race: Indianapolis 500, May 29,
Indianapolis Motor Speedway.
Online: http://www.indycar.com
FORMULA ONE
Next race: Spanish Grand Prix, May 22,
Circuit de Catalunya, Barcelona.
Online: http://www.formulal.com

HOCKEY

NHL playoffs

CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS
Tuesday
Detroit 3, San Jose I, series tied 3-3
Today
Detroit at San Jose, 9 p.m.
CONFERENCE FINALS
(Best-of-7)
Saturday
Tampa Bay at Boston, 8 p.m.


TIM KIRBY/Lake City Reporter
Dalton Masters shows medals and award certificates for his powerlifting records.


MASTERS

From Page 1B
as high school competition.
The squat requires that
the lifter's hips go below
the knees for a successful
lift. The deadlift uses the
reverse hand grip.
"The deadlift is my
favorite," Masters said.
"I'm stout, so it's easier for
me to do and I can do a lot
more weight than a lot of
kids my age. You have to
set you feet right, get your
hands even and hips down,
then pull toward you and
not out."
Masters has qualified
for the WPC World
Championships in Latvia,
but the competition falls
during football season.
The APF national meet
will be televised under
Xtreme Power Sports in
June on Sun Sports.


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

I ERCKE I


Answer:
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's Jumbles: CLUMP BRAWN KNIGHT FIGURE
Answer: When he brought home cucumbers instead of
zucchini, he was this IN A PICKLE


COURTESY PHOTO

Stinging Kicks champions

The Columbia Youth Soccer Association's under-12 Stingers won first place in CYSA's
second annual Stinging Kicks Soccer Tournament in April. Team members are (front row,
from left) Brandon Gaylord, Caleb Strickland, Trent Morrison, Tyler Pierce, Jesus Gary,
Grey Thompson, Will Vickers and Joshua Lewis. Back row (from left) are coach
Rian Rodriguez, Lloyd 'Tate' Lee, Hunter Houston, Gilberto Bolanos, DeAndre Jones,
Moises Gary and coach Danny Bell.



Fiesta Bowl fined, stays in BCS


By FREDERIC J.. FROMMER
Associated Press

WASHINGTON The
Fiesta Bowl will be allowed
to remain part of the Bowl
Championship Series,
though it must pay a $1 mil-
lion fine for apparent illegal
campaign contributions and
inappropriate spending.
The BCS presiden-
tial oversight committee,
which made the decision
Wednesday, also attached


several other conditions as
it let the Fiesta Bowl remain
part of the system for
deciding -college football's
national champion. They
included steps to strength-
en the Fiesta Bowl's board
along with greater supervi-
sion of executives to make
sure the problems are not
repeated, according to
materials obtained by The
Associated Press.
"The message is they
had cleaned house and


addressed their problems,
but our group doesn't
believe they went far
enough," said Bill Hancock,
executive director of the
BCS, in a telephone inter-
view with the AP. He
added that the $1 million
fine was meant to reflect
the "serious nature of the
matter."
The BCS called for the
$1 million to be donated to
charities serving Arizona
youth.


CHS: Looking at all options for QBs


Continued From Page 1B

line and his mechanics are
good. Nobody is going to
outwork him and he's a
leader. When he's in there
we don't lose anything at
quarterback and we have
our best talent on the field."
As far as Bradley, the
freshman quarterback, he
has a choice to make.
"He's earned a varsity
spot," Allen said. "I told
him that he could play on
Friday or watch. It's what
he wants to do. You don't

ACROSS 45 Gar
46 Fam
1 Muscle quivers 50 Coc
5 Horrible boss- 53 Hire
es 55 Go
10 Stick together 56 Lool
12 Voluntarily 57 Shai
13 Long-winded 58 Sub


14 Secure
15 Hawser
16 Beetle, e.g.
18 Sandra or
Ruby
19 Irish port
23 911
responder
26 Protrude
27 Part of NWT'
30 Rowed or
sailed
32 In a row
34 Dress part
35 Thing
36 Pub throw
37 Co. hbnchos
38 Born as
39 Adopt, as a
cause
42 Cargo unit


see a lot of college quarter-
backs with his height, but
playing at wide receiver,
he's all of a sudden open-
ing another door."
Allen said he made one
of the eye-popping plays of
spring during Tuesday's
practice.
"He took a jet sweep,
popped it outside, cut back
and then made it to the end
zone," he said. "That's all
after two days of work."
Allen said it's, a matter


ment edge
niliar auth.
hise's tribe

over again
ked like
rk domain
arctic tribe


DOWN

1 Corrida sight
2 Flapjack chain
3 "People"
person
4 Delhi address
5 Moon or sun
6 Receive,
as a gift
7 Frequent the
library
8 Mr. Wiesel
9 "Auld Lang
-" I
10 Paramedic's
skill
11 Keep out
12 - song
(cheaply)


of getting the quarterbacks
into playing another posi-
tion. It's something he
hasn't had a hard time con-
vicing Atkinson or Bradley
of yet.
"They believe what we're
telling them," he said.
"They realize it's just as
fun to score a touchdown
at wide receiver as it is
to throw one as, a quar-
terback. It's opening doors
for them. They understand
that and are buying in."


Answer to Previous Puzzle

SCOLD ZtENDA


P L U E CRABB Y


PIE HOBOS FAD
I N T R Y BAN E
S T R.EE S WINGS
TENOR SPA G[LE
T El OR* ^AINIQtL E

0ONES YELL EE R
0 EIEDE NU


T OMA'TOTS"H I R T
WOOLEN E D ED
APSESE S E A NS
EJi Ni


Near the stern
Bounces
Tours of duty
Camping gear
Wane
Frame of mind


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


25 Hooray for
me! (hyph.)
28 Harness piece
29 Give four
stars, e.g.
31 Spare, maybe
32 Cover crops
33 Deli loaf
37 One of the
Three Stooges
40 Relieved mur-
mur
41 Gung-ho
42 South Seas
edible root
43 Well-known
cartel
44 Pew locale
47 Repute
48 Ess molding
49 Beatty of films
.51 Undercover
org.
52 Domestic fowl
54 Toshiba rival


5-12 2011 by UFS, Inc.


ItisKAI HUTul l PMORALWL'L


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


1













An island unto itself at TPC


By DOUG FERGUSON
Associated Press

PONTE VEDRA
BEACH The Players
Championship has all the
ingredients of the fifth big-
gest tournament in golf.
It has the largest purse
of any tournament at $9.5
million, with the winner
getting nearly as much as
Arnold Palmer earned in
his PGA Tour career. From
top to bottom, it has the
strongest field of the year.
The list of winners in 30
years at the TPC Sawgrass
includes Jack Nicklaus and
Greg Norman, Tiger Woods
and Phil Mickelson.
But to all fans, and most
players, mention the tour-
nament and the first thing
that comes to mind is an
island.
The Players
Championship begins
Thursday, and there will
be a steady stream of traf-
fic through the gates and
toward the 17th hole, with'
an island green that makes'
it one of the most infamous
holes in the world.
By the weekend, it turns
into the Jacksonville's big-
,gest sideshow this side
of the World's Largest
Outdoor Cocktail Party
when Florida and Georgia
play football.
"I think our pension is
funded by beers sold on
17," Paul Goydos said.
The signature hole on the
TPC Sawgrass measures
only 137 yards on the score-
card and is surrounded by
water, an idea that Alice
Dye drew up on the back of
a cocktail napkin.
"It's do-or-die, and I think
spectators love that," Luke
Donald said. "Most of the
other holes are pretty regu-
lar holes that you see week


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Tiger Woods hits from the 17th green during a practice round at The Players Championship golf tournament, Wednesday in
Ponte Vedra Beach.


in and week out, but 17 is
unique."
The PGA Tour .will offer
live streaming on its website
at the 17th, and asked sev-
eral players their strategy
on the hole. Lucas Glover
spoke for most when he
said, "Hit it where I can hit
it again."
The island green is so
much a part of the tour-
nament that NBC Sports
is devoting 11 cameras to
the hole, which includes
two periscope cams out of
the water that can turn 360
degrees.
The 17th green rarely
decides who wins, rather
who loses.
The PGA Tour decided
to make the 17th the sud-
den-death playoff hole in
2008. Sergio Garcia hit the
green, fGoydos did not.
Sean O'Hair was two shots
behind Phil Mickelson in


2007 when his 9-iron car-
ried just enough over the
green all it takes is an
inch and went into the
water. He went from second
place to 11th place, a differ-
ence of $747,000.
Tiger Woods holed a
60-footer that broke to the
right, to the left and back to
the right in the third round
when he won The Players
Championship, still one of
the most famous moments.
Fred Couples has twice
knocked it in from the tee
box once for an ace,
once for a par after his first
shot went into the water.
"I think 17, any other
day, wouldn't be too dif-
ficult because of the short
iron," Masters champions
Charl Schwartzel said. "But
there's such a big hype
about it, and you get so
many people sifting around
it that I think that starts'


becoming the big, big fac-
tor around there."
Too big?
The hype is so strong
about the 17th that the rest
of the course often gets,
ignored. And while the PGA
Tour touts so much about
its championship event, it is
largely defined by a single
'hole.
For most of the fans, the
splash is as entertaining as
any good shot.
"It's an infamous type of
vibe about the hole, which
is good because it raises
the tournament profile,"
Geoff Ogilvy said. "But it's
probably bad because it's
a little bit of a lottery for
the second-to-last hole of
maybe the fifth most impor-
tant tournament.
"Sergio hit one of the most
quality iron shots anyone
has seen to win a playoff.
Sean O'Hair hit a shot only


4 yards further in the air
and went from second place
to 11th. For 70 holes, he
was the second-best player
and he finishes 11th. Is that
right?" he added. "They're
lucky someone hasn't been
winning and did that."
Goydos said the hole is
short enough that it can
get away with being a bit
different.
"It would be in an awk-
ward spot if it were a 3-
iron," he said. "We're ask-
ing guys to be the players'
champion, and were asking
him to hit a short iron into
a green."
The island green again
will be a big part of the
story when The Players
Championship gets under
way, along with several sub-
plots.
Woods, who has only one
finish in the top 10 since his
win 10 years ago, returns


with as many questions
about his health as the lon-
gest winning drought in his
career, now on 18 months.
He missed last week
because of minor injuries to
his left knee and Achilles.
After playing another
nine-hole practice round
Wednesday, he reported
only "minimal" swelling.
The defending champion
is Tim Clark, who has only
played two tournaments this
year as he tries to recover
from an elbow injury.
The Players
Championship offers the
most world ranking points
outside the majors, even
without the No. 1 player in
the. world. Lee Westwood
decided not to compete this
year, at first over a dispute
with the PGA Tour's mem-
bership policies, later saying
it didn't fit into his sched-
ule. Also skipping is Rory
Mcllroy, who said he wasn't
comfortable on the course.
Westwood could lose
the ever-changing No. 1
ranking to Martin Kaymer,
Donald or Phil Mickelson .
if they weie to win. Kaymer
also could return to No. 1 if
he is the runner-up.
Asked if missing the
No. 1 player was a detrac-
tion from the tournament,
Goydos said, "I think it's a
detraction to him, not us."
Yes, the show will go on,
and the 17th hole figures to
be a big part of the story.
Several players were
asked where they would go
to watch if they were specta-
tors. All of them mentioned
the 17th not just for the
par 3, but to see the second
shot on the par-5 16th, and
the tee shot on the 18th.
"On 16 you can make a
3 or a 6," Dustin Johnson
said. "On 17, you can make
a 2 or an 8."


Hitters beware! It's the



Year of the Pitcher II


By BEN WALKER
Associated Press

Yovani Gallardo kept
putting up zeros, setting
off no-hitter alerts all over.
So when he glanced at
the Busch Stadium score-
board, the Milwaukee
pitcher clearly saw what
was happening.
In Toronto, that is.
Because that's where
Justin Verlander was doing
even better, working. on a
perfect game.
"Obviously, you see
during the game different
scores around MLB and,
for some reason, the pitch-
ers always notice that,"
Gallardo said.
Minutes after Gallardo
gave up his first hit against
St. Louis, Verlander walked
a Toronto batter. That's all
the Detroit ace yielded,
though, while throwing the
majors' second no-hitter of
the week.
By the time Verlander
and his 100 mph heat
finished what Francisco
Liriano and his spinners
started four days earlier,
the stamp on this season
was unmistakable.
This is the Year of the
Pitcher II. King Felix and his
fellow kings of the hill are
ruling, with a vengeance.
'The days of slow-pitch
softball are over," Tigers
manager Jim Leyland said.
Homers, runs and hits,
all down more than 7 per-
cent from last May, reports
STATS LLC. And remem-
ber: The overall 2010 totals
were their lowest since the
early 1990s.
"Last year they said it
was the year of the pitcher
because of all the no-hit-
ters, and this year they're
doing the same thing,"
Florida first baseman Gaby
Sanchez noted.
All-Stars Felix
Hernandez, Tim Lincecum,
Josh Johnson and Trevor
hilll are in control, joined


by emerging talents Jaime
Garcia, Max Scherzer and
JustinMasterson.Together,
they've put Albert Pujols,
Magglio Ordonez, Adam
Dunn and top 'sluggers in
prolonged slumps.
Hitters, any sugges-
tions?
"Maybe they should
move the mound back,"
Florida catcher John Buck
quipped.
"It's just baseball evolv-
ing; maybe going back to
more traditional baseball.
It always seems to balance
itself out, whatever era it
goes through steroids or
whatever. Baseball seems
to balance itself out. So I
think it's the natural course
of things," he said.
A season after Roy
Halladay pitched two of
the year's six no-hitters, it
seems as if every other day
brings a close call.
Already there have been
13 instances of a no-hit
bid going into the seventh
inning, STATS LLC said.
In 2006, when the season
started at almost the same
time, it had occurred only
three times by now.
Tim Hudson and Dan
Haren also chipped in with
one-hitters, and Cliff Lee
struck out 16 but lost
because Atlanta's Derek
Lowe took a no-hitter into
the seventh.
"It's not like all the teams
conspire and decide they're
not going to hit," Colorado
closer Huston Street said.
"Everything has its trends.
I think that we live in this
information age where it's
so easy to compare every-
thing and put some sort
of ratio or say, 'This is
the week of the no-hitter.'
Before all this, people just
sloughed it off."
Theories abound on the
reasons for the growing
shift, on and off the field.
They include:
The rise of the cut fast-
ball, boring in on hitters


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Detroit Tigers pitcher Justin Verlander (right) and catcher
Alex Avila celebrate Verlander's no-hitter against the
Toronto Blue Jays in a baseball game in Toronto on
Saturday.


and breaking their bats.
A premium on picking
lots of nearly-ready-for-the-
show hard throwers in the
draft.
An emphasis on put-
ting more athletic defen-
sive players on the field.
Advances in video
scouting, plus better train-
ing and treatment tech-
niques.-
Some point directly
at the drug programs
designed to root out ste-
roids and amphetamines.
Others aren't so sure that's
the main reason.
"They test pitchers,
too," Oakland manager
Bob Geren said, "so you
can't necessarily make that
argument." .
A week after the White
Sox were zipped by Liriano,


Chicago first baseman Paul
Konerko offered a simpler
explanation for the rash of
no-hitter and near no-nos.
"I think a lot of it is coin-
cidence," he said.
Makes sense to Kevin
Correia. He struggled last
season with San Diego, but
is off to a terrific start for
Pittsburgh he took a no-
hit bid into the sixth inning
against Milwaukee before
losing.
"You know, last year was
the year of the pitcher but
I had a bad year, or not as
good of a year," he said.
"With the weather being
pretty bad at the beginning
of the year, I think it's eas-
ier to pitch in bad weather
than it is to hit. I'm sure it
will turn around at some
point," he said.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
A musician plays the bagpipes as Seve Ballesteros'
oldest son, Javier, carries the urn holding the Spanish
golfer's ashes, flanked by his sister, Carmen (left) holding
flowers anid their brother, Miguel (right) in honor of Spanish
professional golfer Seve Ballesteros, during his funeral
service in Pedrena, Spain, Wednesday. Ballesteros, 54, a
five-time major tournament winner, died last Saturday of from
complications of a cancerous brain tumor.


Golfers, family

gather for Seve

Ballesteros funeral


By PAUL LOGOTHETIS
Associated Press

PEDRENA, Spain To
the mournful wail of a lone
bagpipe, some of Europe's
greatest golfers joined fam-
ily, friends and local resi-
dents Wednesday at the
funeral of Seve Ballesteros,
paying an emotional final
tribute to the dynamic
Spaniard who revived, the
European game.
Ryder Cup captains Nick
Faldo, Colin Montgomerie,
Ian Woosnam, Sam
Torrance and Jose Maria
Olazabal and players
including Miguel Angel
Jimenez marched together
in silence as part of the pro-
cession from Ballesteros'
family home to the
church of San Pedro de
Pedrena.
Young boys and girls
wore replicas of the navy
blue outfit that Ballesteros
wore for his first British
Open win in 1979. They each
held a 3-iron, the only club
Ballesteros owned when he
learned to play golf.
About 400 people packed
the church to provide


Ballesteros with one final
send-off before his ashes
were spread under a mag-
nolia tree at the family home
in this tiny fishing village in
northern Spain.
Ballesteros, a five-time
major winner and Ryder
Cup stalwart, died Saturday
at age 54 from complica-
tions of a cancerous brain
tumor.
"He was so young and
such a great man. A great
champion the best
Europe ever had," Torrance
said.
Ballesteros' oldest son,
Javier, carried the urn hold-
ing the Spanish golf great's
ashes at the front of the
procession, with the som-
ber notes of a single bag-
pipe punctuating the occa-
sion on an overcast day in
the village off the Bay of
Santander.
The crowd of up to
1,000 gathered outside
the church burst into
applause as Ballesteros'
ashes reached the church.
Locals, friends and others
watched from one of the
three giant screens set up
outside.


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS THURSDAY, MAY 12, 2011


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


Z .







LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS THURSDAY, MAY 12, 2011


DILBERT


BABY BLUES


BLONDIE


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE


SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS '


GARFIELD


B.C.


FRANK & ERNEST


DEAR ABBY


Wife, daughter gang up on dad

over sleeping arrangements


DEAR ABBY: Our
daughter, "Julie," came
home for the weekend so
we could meet her new
boyfriend, "Scott." He's a
delightful young man, and
my daughter is clearly smit-
ten.
When I suggested Scott
sleep in the guest room, Ju-
lie and my wife gave me this
perplexed look as though
I'm from a different planet.
In the end, I was deeply dis-
appointed that they shared
a bedroom. After 30 years
of marriage, this created
the first disagreement be-
tween my wife and me in a
long time.
I'm no prude. My wife
and I had our share of pre-
marital mambo, but we
always slept in separate
rooms while visiting our
families before we were
married. It was about re-
spect for our parents' feel-
ings.
Julie spends a lot of time
with Scott's family where
they share a room. My wife
is afraid if we don't provide
common accommodations
in our home, our daughter
will be less inclined to visit.
I welcome your
'thoughts, Abby. Is expect-
ing some sense of propriety
being a curmudgeonly fa-
ther? STUMPED AND
TRUMPED IN OHIO
DEAR STUMPED
AND TRUMPED: You
didn't mention how long Ju-


.
Abigail Van Buren
www.deorabby.com
lie and Scott have been in-
volved, or whether they're
living together which
might have had some bear-
ing on this. However, I keep
coming back to the fact that
under your roof, guests
should abide by your rules.
If you prefer that unmar-
ried couples sleep apart in
your home, then your feel-
ings should have been re-
spected. And for your wife
to wimp out for the reason
you stated is just sad.
DEAR ABBY: I work
for a company that process-
es orders from a store at a
local mall. I handle these
orders and have run into
an embarrassing problem.
Our customers come from
every imaginable ethnic
background. When I take a
look at some of the names
on the work orders, I can't
even begin to pronounce
them.
It's my job to call these
customers back to verify
details and schedule instal-
lations, so what should I
do? Is it more polite to try
to sound out the name and
wait to be corrected, or to


apologize right off the bat
and ask the proper pronun-
ciation?-TONGUE-TIED
IN ST. PAUL, MINN.
DEARTONGUE-TIED;
To lead off the conversation
by stating that you don't
know how to pronounce:
someone's name could be'
extremely off-putting. It
would be better to sound
it out, syllable by syllable,
and try to pronounce it -
- adding, "If I have mispro-
nounced your name, please
correct me." (It probably
won't be the first time the:
person has heard it.)
DEAR ABBY: I have
several old Bibles that are
literally falling apart. What's
the proper way of disposing;
of Bibles? It seems wrong to
just throw them in the trash'
or burn them. ROBERT
IN COLUMBUS, OHIO
DEAR ROBERT: The
answer to your questioqg
depends upon the religion:
to which you belong. Ac-
cording to my experts,!
Protestants can dispose of
an old Bible by giving it to
someone or by throwing
it away if they're comfort
able doing that the paper
and ink are not "holy." Old
Bibles can also be given to;
a Bible bookstore or Bible
book society for refurbish-
ing or disposal.
* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069:,


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-
April 19):, Greater preci-
sion and more attention to
detail will help you attract
interest in what you say and
do. You can outmaneuver
the competition by follow-
ing through and leaving no
room for error. Don't let an
unpredictable person lead
you astray. ***-
TAURUS (April 20-
May 20): The people you
meet and what you learn
from having open discus-
sions will help you make
important decisions. People
from different backgrounds
will enhance your knowl-
edge, your experience
and your ability to expand
your business interests.

GEMINI (May 21-
June 20): Pay off debts or
collect money that's owed
you. A quiet but strategic
approach to where or how
you live will allow you great-
er freedom to make benefi-
cial life changes. Love is in
the stars. **
CANCER (June 21-
July 22): Broaden your
horizons. A small side busi-
ness will help you bridge
the financial gap. A proac-
tive approach will help you
take care of your financial
situation as well as any con-
cern you have within your
community. ****
LEO (July 23-Aug.
22): A sudden change'will


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

highlight your day. Good
fortune is within reach.
Recognize that you are a
worthy match for anyone
who wants to challenge
you. Your knowledge and
experience will lead to vic-
tory. ***
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Get your thoughts and
feelings out in the open.
You cannot fix something
if you don't address the is-
sues head-on. Talks will
lead to decisions and the
changes you need in order
to do your best. Network all
you can. ***
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): Stop procrastinating
and start dealing with any
pending problem so that
you are free and clear to
move forward personally,
professionally, financially
or emotionally. An unex-
pected proposition will help
you get a handle on your fi-
nancial situation. ***
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-
Nov. 21): Expand an idea
from the past to include a
sought-after service. Find-
ing ways to make your ser-
vices more affordable in an
industry that is highly com-
petitive will be your ticket
to success. Be a pioneer
and embrace new concepts
and methods. ****


SAGrITARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): You have
to deal with any emotional
problem before it takes over
and affects the way you per-
form at work. Accept any
unexpected changes that
come about at home. Your
free spirit will take you on a
personal, social adventure,
Be careful not to mix busi-
ness with pleasure. **
CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): Listen but
wait until you have more in-
formation before you take
on a challenge or confront
someone trying to meddle
in' your affairs. Focus on
home, family and protect-
ing what's yours rather than
dealing with someone who
may not share your ethics.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Before you make
promises that are legally
binding, review what's ex-
pected of you. A change in
the way you do things will
affect your life and your
status. Your attitude and ex-
pertise will help you make
your plans work. ***
PISCES (Feb. 19-
March 20): Relationships
will be difficult emotionally.
A change of heart or plans
will leave you dealing with
matters you aren't prepared
for. Remain open to sugges-
tions but don't agree to a
plan or solution that is not
fair to you. ***


CELEBRITY CIPHER


by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: L equals V
"JYGE RSUN ME ZGEEUP YSJ SAU
OSZUN VK EYU EPDEY NS BSAI GN
SAU CSDAOUN DCSA ME GAR B,MLUN


VK ME?"


YUAPK ZMBBUP


PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "Every great mistake has a halfway moment, a split
second when it can be recalled and perhaps remedied." Pearl S. Buck


(c) 2011 by NEA, Inc. 5-12


FOR BETTER OR WORSE


S._ -r-dj __.r'.--,
5?-O r=DTeD
k-A I- I
', -
LCU


LDOK- THFrFIT- HI NG-
BE 1M-EEN COM 1& R-AD
ME IS INl-THIE.fISrT-
2RE YOU ST1L-1
G^ ORF r S^S-%


;RN f '


CLASSIC PEANUTS


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427







Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED THURSDAY, MAY 12, 2011

Lake City Reporter





CLASSIFIED


BUY IT



,` 5i^>,
N ~ s ITsi^


aFIlND T


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

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a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Some people prefer to place their
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ad categories vill require prepay-
ment. Our office is located at 180
East Duval Street.
You can also fax or email your ad
copy to the Reporter.
FAX: 386-752-9400 Please
direct your copy to the Classified
Department.
EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityre-
porter.com





Ad Is to Appear: Call by: Fax/Email by:
Tuesday Mon.,10:00a.m. Mon., 9:00a.m.
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on the first day of publication.
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reserves the right to edit, reject,
or classify all advertisements under
appropriate headings. Copy should
be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the first day of pub-
lication. Credit for published errors
will be allowed for the first insertion
for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the
Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nor for any general,
special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply
with Federal, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
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In Print and Online
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Legal

STATE OF FLORIDA, CRIMINAL
JUSTICE STANDARDS & TRAIN-
ING COMMISSION,
Petitioner
vs.
JONATHAN C. ARNOLD, Case
#27277
Respondent
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: JONATHAN C. ARNOLD,
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an Ad-
ministrative Complaint has been
filed against you seeking to revoke
your CORRECTIONAL Certificate
in accordance with Section
943.1395, F.S., and any rules pro-
mulgated thereunder.
You are required to serve a written
copy of your intent to request a hear-
-ing pursuant to Section 120.57, F.S.
upon Michael Crews, PROGRAM
DIRECTOR, Criminal Justice Pro-
fessionalism Program, Florida De-
partment of Law Enforcement, P. 0.
Box 1489, Tallahassee, Florida
32302-1489, on or before June 18,
2011 [2 months from the date legal
ad sent to the newspaper]. Failure to
do so will result in a default being
entered against you to Revoke said
certification pursuant to Section
120.60, F.S., and Rule 11B-27,
F.A.C.
Dated: April 18, 2011 [date legal ad
sent to the newspaper]
Ernest W. George
CHAIRMAN CRIMINAL JUS-
TICE STANDARDS
AND TRAINING COMMISSION
By: -s- Ashley Hegler, Division Rep-
resentative

04544422
April, 21, 28, 2011
May, 05, 12, 2011
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No.: 11-99-CP
Division: PROBATE
IN RE: ESTATE OF
JAMES WALTER KEATON
Deceased,
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of
JAMES WALTER KEATON, de-
ceased, whose date of death was
February 19, 2011, is pending in the
Circuit Court for Columbia County,
Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 173 NE Hernando
Avenue, Lake City, Florida 32055.
The names and addresses of the per-
sonal representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set forth
below.
All creditors of the decedent and oth-
er persons having claims or demands
against the decedent's estate on
whom a copy of this notice is re-
quired to be served must file their
claims with this court WITHIN THE
LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER
THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLI-
CATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30
DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF
SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent
and other persons having claims or
demands against the decedent's es-
tate must file their claims with this
court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER
THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUB-
LICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITH-
IN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED. "
The date of first publication of this
notice is May 5 ,2011.
Attorney for Personal Representa-
tive:
By /s/: LINDSAY L. CARTER-TID-
WELL
Attorney for James A. Keaton
Florida Bar Number: 0028866
Brannon, Brown Haley & Bullock,
PA.
P.O. Box 1029
Lake City, FL 32056
Telephone: (386)752-3213
Fax: (386)755-4524
E-Mail: lct@bbattorneys.com
Personal representative:
By /s/: JAMES A. KEATON
503 SE Anastasia Street
Lake City) Florida 32025
04544632
May 5, 12, 2011
Public Auction
2000 Ford 4 Dr.
VIN#1 FAFP55SOYG.196687
at Auto Emporium of Lake City Inc.
2832 SE Main Blvd
Lake City FL. 32025
in Columbia Co. at 10:00 AM on'
May 30, 2011
04544733
May 12, 2011

To place your
classified ad call

755-5440









Lawn & Landscape Service

Clean Pine Straw,
You pick it up, $1.85 a bale
Delivery of 100 bales $260
386-688-9156
Landscape Maintenance Company
You can trust for knowledge &
pride, Mention this AD!
Mow Green, LLC 386-288-6532

Services


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE 3rd JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO: 10-246-CA
REGIONS BANK, an Alabama
banking corp.
Plaintiff,
vs.
SALVADOR A. PUIG, et al.
Defendants.
NOTICE OF JUDICIAL SALE BY
CLERK
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
pursuant to Plaintiff's Summary Fi-
nal Judgment of Mortgage Foreclo-
sure entered in the above styled
cause now pending in said court, that
I will sell to the highest bidder for
cash at the 173 Hemando Ave. Lake
City, FL 32055 on the 25th day of
May, 2011, at 11:00 a.m., in accord-
ance with Sec. 45.031 of the Florida
Statutes, the following property:
LEGAL DESCRIPTION: SEE EX-
HIBIT "A" ATTACHED.
A parcel of land lying in Section 16,
Township 5 South, Range 17 East,
Columbia County, Florida, being
more particularly described as fol-
lows: COMMENCE at the North-
west comer of the North 1/2 of the
Southwest 1/4 of Section 16, Town-
ship 5 South, Range 17 East, Colum-
bia County, Florida, and run South
01'08'06" West along the
Exhibit "A"
West line of said Section 16 a dis-
tance of 1154.83 feet; thence South
89'48'00" East a distance of 11.32
feet to the Easterly maintained right-
of-way of Mixon Road (a county
maintained road), also being the
POINT OF BEGINNING; thence
continue South 89'48'00" East along
a line, being parallel with the North
line of the North 1/2 of the South-
west 1/4 of said Section 16 a dis-
tance of 1311.00 feet to the West line
of the Northeast 1/4 of the Southwest
1/4 of said Section 16; thence contin-
ue South 89*48'00" East still along
said parallel line 175.85 feet the
Westerly limited access right-of-way
line of Interstate Highway No. 75;
thence South 17'47'19" East along
said Westerly limited access right-of-
way line 179.97 feet to the North line
of the North 1/2 of the Southeast 1/4
of the Southwest 1/4 of said Section
16; thence continue South 17'47'19"
East still along said Westerly limited
access right-of-way line 697.73 feet
to. the South line of the N 1/2 of the
Southeast 1/4 of the Southwest 1/4 of
said Section 16; thence North
8940'45" West along said South
line 461.06 feet to the Southwest
comer of the North 1/2 of the South-
east 1/4 of the Southwest 1/4 of said
Section 16; thence North 011 10'21"
East along the West line of said
North 1/2 of the Southeast 1/4 of the
Southwest 1/4 a distance of 663.05
feet to the Northwest comer of said
North 1/2 of the Southeast 1/4 of the
Southwest 1/4; thence* North 891
43'28" West along the South line of
the North 1/2 of the Southwest 1/4;
of said Section 16 a distance of
1310.93 feet to the Easterly main-
tained right-of-way line of Mixon
Road; thence Northerly along said
Easterly maintained right-of-way
line 169.2 feet, more or less, to the
POINT OF BEGINNING.
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN IN-
TEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM
THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER
AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS
PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE
SALE.
DATED APRIL 18, 2011.
P. DeWitt Cason
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By:/s/ B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
04544604
May 5, 12, 2011
PUBLIC AVAILABILITY OF
HAZARDOUS MATERIAL
INFORMATION
Pursuant to Section 324 of the Emer-
gency Planning and Community
Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA), the
following information is available to
the public upon request during nor-
mal working hours by the North
Central Florida Local Emergency
Planning Committee, 2009 NW 67tht
Place, Gainesville FL 32653-1603:
* Hazardous Chemical Inventory
(Tier Two) Forms
* Shelter In Place Training Assis-
tance
* Material Safety Data Sheets
(MSDSs)
* Emergency Release Follow-up Re-
ports
* Hazards Analyses for Section 302
facilities
* LEPC Hazardous'Materials Emer-
gency Response Plan
* How-to-Comply Information for
Hazardous Materials Users
* Free Hazardous Materials Re-
sponse Training for First Responders
* Your Telephone Book may contain
Hazardous Materials Emergency in-
formation that you could be asked to
follow in an actual emergency.

The North Florida Local Emergency
Planning Committee (Florida District
3 LEPC) serves Alachua, Bradford,
Columbia, Dixie, Gilchrist, Hamil-
ton, Lafayette, Madison, Suwannee,
Taylor, and Union Counties. To ob-
tain information on the above items,
please contact Dwayne Mundy at
(352)955-2200 x 108, email mun-
dy(5ncfrpc.org or visit
www.ncflepc.org
05525847
May 12, 2011
Registration of Fictitious Names
We the undersigned, being duly
sworn, do hereby declare under oath
that the names of all persons interest-
ed in the business or profession car-
ried on under the name of LEES UP-
HOLSTERY at 776 E. DUVAL ST.,
LAKE CITY, FL., 32025

Contact Phone Number: 386-752-


5785
and the extent of the interest of each,
is as follows:
Name: CANDY JULSETH
Extent of Interest: 100%
by:/s/ Candy Julseth


Legal


STATE OF FLORIDA
COUNTY OF COLUMBIA
Sworn to and subscribed before me
this 9th day of May, A.D. 2011.
by:/s/J. Chase Moses
04544716
May 12, 2011

100 Job
100 Opportunities

04544731
Dietary Aide/Server
Experienced preferred. Must be
able to work evenings and
weekends. Please apply Baya
Pointe Nursing & Rehabilitation
Center, 587 SE Ermine
Ave., Lake City, FI 32025
EOE/DFWP

05525284
EXP. DRIVERS OTR
SERVICE TRUCKING, INC.,
MUST BE 25 YRS OR
OLDER, CLASS A LICENSE
REQUIRED, CLEAN DRIV-
ING RECORD, NO CHARGE
ACC WITHIN THE LAST
YEAR, EXC EQUIPMENT,
GREAT PAY/BENEFITS,
CALL 1-800-899-1300,
EXT 201 MON-FRI, 8-5,
DRUG SCREEN REQUIRED,
EOE

05525813
Lead Teacher
(Head Start, 3-5 yr olds)
Lake City
Min 2 yr degree in Early Child-
hood Education (AS ECE) or
related degree OR age appropri-
ate FCCPC credential; 3 yrs
classroom exp w/young children
required (relevant age prefer-
red).

Teacher
(Early Head Start,
Birth to 3 yrs old) Lake City
Must have FCCPC /CDA,
3 yrs classroom exp w/infants
or toddlers preferred;

Current 1st Aid/CPR preferred.
All applicants must pass physi-
cal/DCF background screening.
Excellent Benefits Paid
Holidays,
Sick, Annual Leave.
Apply in person at 236 SW
Columbia Ave (754-2222) or
mail resume to SV4Cs PO Box
2637, Lake City. FL 32056-
2637, by email:
arobinson@sv4cs.org or
Fax (386) 754-2220. EOE
Associate Reps
SUMMER WORK/GREAT PAY
Immediate FT/PT openings,
Customer sales/service,
No exp needed, conditions.
Apply Now all ages 17+
(386) 269-0883
AVON!! Only $10 to start!
Earn bonus $ up to $150+
1-800-275-9945 pin #4206
www.youravon.com/tdavies
Bartender needed. Must
have experience & be reliable, &
have your own transportation and
your own phone. 386-752-2412
CDL A Flatbed Truck Driver
needed for F/T OTR SE area, 3
years exp or more, Contact
Melissa or Mary @ 386-935-2773
CDL Driver 2 yrs exp clean MVR
wanted for local company
Apply 8 AM Noon only deadline
Fri May 1.3. 247 NW.Hillandale
Glen Lake City No phone calls
Live Oak CPA Firm seeks
full-time Secretary/Receptionist.
Please see Employment
Opportunity at
tvww.liveoakcpa.com.
Sales Position available for moti-
vated individual Rountree -Moore
Toyota, Great benefits, paid train-
ing/vacation. Exp. a plus but not
necessary. Call Anthony Cosentino
386-623-7442
Sewing Machine Operator &
Cloth Cutter for cutting patterns
with experience, good hourly rate
Call Hafners 386-755-6481
Stylist Needed
Call
386-752-4614
Southern Exposure
Wanted Highly motivated
individual for Sales Position.
Rountree -Moore Automotive
Group, Great benefits, paid vaca-
tion. Exp. a plus but not necessary.
Call Tony Reese 386-344-7517


120 dEmployment

1552581
Front Desk/Medical Billing
several years experience in
medical office and insurance
billing required. Please email
resume to admin@nfsc.comcast-
biz.net or fax to 386-438-8628

Busy Ambulatory Surgery Center
seeks experienced Medical Biller,
Position is F/T, M-F, 8-5. For
more information call, fax. or
e-mail a resume to 386-487-3930.
386-487-3935, administration
@lcsurgery center.com


130 Part Time


Nursery Position Available
Southside Baptist Church,
Hours on Wednesdays and
Sunday during regular church
service. Please call 386-755-5553
for more information


240 SSchools &
240 Education

04544505
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
* Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-05/23/10

* Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-07/11/11

* Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com



310 Pets & Supplies

CHICHUAHUA MIX.
Moving, FREE to good home.
Good with kids. 2 yrs old. Please
call 386-365-4756. Lv. message

PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.

330 Livestock &
330 Supplies


04544708
Black Angus
Cows & Heifers
Registered & Commercial
Prices Vary
386-719-4802 or 386-623-9427


Cattle For Sale. 9-16 mos.
Yearlings, bulls & heifers.
Pure bred black angus & cross
breeds. 386-365-1352
Pig
For Sale
$35
386-758-2976
Single Lane Farms
(1) 5 yr old registered Angus bull.
Duane Hingson. 386-776-1090
Wayne Parrish Bull.


361 Farm Equipment

84 Ford 4610 Tractor. Runs good.
Solid 2WD. New front tires,
350hr on 2005 motor. Dependable.
$7500. obo. 386-867-0005


407 Computers

Dell Computer,
$75
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170

HP Computer,
$100.00
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170


408 Furniture

3 piece Living Room Set,
Multi color blues
$500 Good Condition
386-344-2884


416 Sporting Goods

GUN SHOW/STARKE
Bradford County Fairgrounds
May 14, Sat, 9-5, May 15. Sun 9-4
GunTraders is now buying GOLD
Bring your GUNS &
GOLD to sell or trade.
Concealed Weapons Classes Daily
GunTraderGunShows.com
352-339-4780


420 Wanted to Buy

K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.

Wanted Junk Cars. Trucks, Vans.
$250 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.


430 Garage Sales






Fri & Sat, 8 am ?,
Household, knick-knacks,
chairs, TV's, computer parts
Eastwood S/D on Apache Way


430 Garage Sales

Fri & Sat. 8-1. 3455 NW Moore
Rd. Off Lake Jeffery. Look for
signs. Plus size, baby items, yards
of material, movies, music, games.
Ki4tK Ministry Rummage Sale
Fri & Sat May 13-14 8:00 AM
Comer of US 90 & Baya
Furniture Tools 100's of items
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.

Sat only, 7am-noon.
880 NW Savannah Cr.
In the Plantation S/D off Hwy
90W. Wide variety of items.
SAT. 8-? 531 SW San Juan PI,
McFarlane to Grandview. Look for
signs. Furn., tools, TV's, Mowers,
saws, china, appliances & more.
Saturday only, 8am-2pm, many
miscellaneous items, Jeep Wran-
gler rag top, scuba equip., SR 247
& 63 Place (1 mi W of Beachville)


440 Miscellaneous

New Central A/C, still in box,
with full ten year factory warranty
$1,795
Ca11 386-364-1090
New Goulds High Pressure Utility
Pump, 3/4 HP $150; Homelite
Chain Saw 14" 35cc, 1 yr old $70
Phone 386-961-8156
NEW LOMANCO All aluminum
self rimming, thermostatically con-
trol. Power vent for 2000sqft attic.
Blk, made in USA. $85. 755-6963


NEW SLOAN Regal Flusho Me-
ter. Chrome finish, gold tankless
flush. Made in USA. only $95.00.
Easy installation. 386-755-6963


NEW TAPCO C2 Floor Jack
34in-55in. with 16,000 lb
compression at 3ft. Made in USA.
Only $45.00. 386-755-6963
Tow Behind Grill/Smoker
$1,250 OBO.
386-249-3104 or
386-719-4802.

630 Mobile Homes
6 for Rent

1 UNDER NEW MANAGEMENT
Oakview Mobile Home Park.
Clean well maintained 2/2 units in
nice park. 2 miles to downtown
Lake City. 386-984-8448
14x70 MH, 2Br/2Ba Real Clean -
Good Location! CH/A $550/Mo.
+ $200 Dep. NO PETS.
(386)755-0064 or (904)771-5924
2&3 BR MH. $395 $650. mo.
plus deposit. Water & sewer fur-
nished. Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
2/2 Newly remodeled MH New
Floors/counter tops. Lg lot, quiet
area No pets 1st, last & sec. $450
mo $300 sec will work w/payment
plan. Call Jenn 386-454-7724
2/2 Units, clean, well maintained,
nice safe park setting, 2 milesito
downtown Lake City, $550 month
+ $550 sec dep, 386-984-8448
2br /2ba SWMH; also Residential
RV lots for rent between Lake City,
& G'ville. Access to 1-75 & 441
(352)317-1326 Call for terms
3/2 S of Lake City, (Branford area)
$400 dep, $600 month
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
Eastside Village a 55+ Retirement'
Community offers 2br/2ba Manu-
factured home fully furnished. No
pets. Leases for $650 + utilities.
1st, last, security. Eastside Village
Realty, Inc. 752-5290 for info.
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White. Contact 386-623-3404
or 386-365-1919
X-CLEAN 2/2 SW, 8 mi
NW of VA. Clean acre lot, nice
area. $500. mo + dep No dogs
386-961-9181

64A iMobile Homes
640 for Sale

Access Realty Make Offer! 3/2
MH w/over 1700 SF & move in
ready. Convenient to schools,
shopping & hospitals. MLS 73861
$89,500. Patti Taylor.623-6896_

Mobile Home
650 & Land

MH on 1 Acre in Live Oak near
Peacock Lake, owner finance-
$42,500 MLS#77598 Call Roger
Lovelady 386-365-7039 @
Westfield Realty Group
Owner Finance. Nice 3/2, S of
Lake City, small down/$650 mo
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com


I p~t,, p
Meica Assistnith


DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.


I -I I C1


* ADvantage


I- I U -


L-


^^_ ^^_ __ __^___j


I








LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED THURSDAY, MAY 12, 2011


Classified Department: 755-5440


705 Rooms for Rent
Clean, with W/D. Kitchen.
TVw/cable, A/C, owner is non-
smoker, $100 week. high school
area, fishing near by 386-755-0110

710 Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent

o05525655
SPRING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans;
some with garages.
Call 386-454-1469
or visit our website:
www.springhillvillage.net







1 & 2 Bedroom Apartments
Move in for as low as
$199
386-755-2423
2BR/2BA w/garage
on the west side of town.
Washer/Dryer hookups & more.
Call for details. 386-755-6867
Cute & clean, 2 br Apt. in town
Great eat. Close to the VA
Medical Center. $515. mo plus
dep. Must see!!! 386-344-2972
Great location W of 1-75, spacious
deluxe 2BR apts., garage, W/D
hook up. patio. $600 & up, + SD,
386-344-3715 or 386-965-5560
Quail Heights 2br/lba Duplex.
Secluded, private, safe. W/D
hookup. $700. mo. $500 security.
386-754-1155
The Lakes Apts. Studios & IBr's
from $135/wk. Util. & cable incl..
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $450. + sec.
Call Michelle 386-752-9626

720 Furnished Apts.
2v For Rent
New furnished bedroom apt in a
home, private entrance & bath,
incl all utilities, trash, cable, frig,
microwave. $450 per month plus
deposit; immediate availability.
386-752-2020 SW Lake City

307 Unfurnished
7u3 Home For Rent
2007 Home 3/2 1545sf,
352-281-4003, 352-317-2886
$1350 mo, $1000 dep & last,
Pet Neg.,338 SW Wise Drive, LC
3/2 Recently Built Custom Home,
1340 sq ft, stainless steel applian-
ces, custom cabinets, $920 mo,
1st. Last & Sec,off 1-75 & 47
Call Andrew 386-623-6066
3br/1-1/2ba, Block Home W of
town, CH/A, all appliances
included, NO Pets, $650 mo,
Ist/last required 386-752-5786
3br/2ba Brick, 2 car carport. Fire-
place, Florida room. Large 4 acre
yard. Country Club Rd.South
$850 month. 386-365-8504
Eastside Village a 55+ Retirement
Community offers 2br/lba Duplex,
no pets. Leases for $600 + utilities.
First, last, security. Eastside
Village Realty, Inc. 752-5290
Suwanee River Frontage. 2/1 in
Columbia Co. ,near 175/White
Spgs Jane S.Usher Lic. Real Estate
Broker 386-755-3500 or 365-1352

750 Business&
5 Office Rentals
For Lease: 1,500 17,000sf
1525 S. Ohio Ave, Live Oak, FL
Call Scott Stewart@ Westfield
Realty Group 386-867-3498
For Lease: E Baya Ave. Two -
1000 sqft office space units or
combined for 2000 sqft. 386-984-
0622 or weekends 386-497-4762
Office Space For Lease
2112sf, 7 rms, Irg conf rm, 4 baths,
private parking MLS#76508
$1760/mo, Call Pam @ Remax
386-303-2505
OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$695. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor

790 Vacation Rentals
Horseshoe Beach RV Lot.
Nice corner Lot with shade trees.
$295. mo Water/electric included
386-235-3633 or 352-498-5986
Horseshoe Beach Summer Spcl
Gulf Front 2br, w/lg porch, dock,
fish sink. wkend $345./wk $795.
386-235-3633/352-498-5986
alwaysonvacation.com #419-181
"Florida's Last Frontier"

805 Lots for Sale
5 Acre Lot, Secluded & Cleared,
MLS# 67871 $55,000
Call Lisa Waltrip
@ 386-365-5900
westfieldrealtygroup.com
Hallmark Real Estate. Cleared
2.57 ac. fenced w/32' Dutchman
camper. In O'Brien. Close to Live
Oak, Lake City, Branford. $25,000
MLS# 74534 386-867-1613


805 Lots for Sale
Hallmark Real Estate. Owner
Finance with $5K down with
terms negotiable. Below assessed
value for the county. MLS# 74484
$17.900 Jay Sears 386-867-1613
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

810 Home for Sale
3/2 Brick Home w/1 car garage,
detach carport MLS#77780
$109,900, Call Jo Lytte Remax
386-365-2821
www.jolytte.florida-property-search.com
3/2 in Lake City Airpark
pool, porch, pond, detach garage
large hangar w/living quarters
MLS#77756 $399,900 Westfield
Call Josh G 386-466-2517
Brick Home, Screened Porch
$185,900 MLS#77893
Call Charlie Sparks @
Westfield Realty Group
386-755-0808
CYPRESS LANDING!
3BR/2BA built in 2005
w/large kitchen $115,000
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #75794
DESIRABLE GWEN LAKE
area! Nice 3BR/2BA home
on comer lot $112,000
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #77307
Eastside Village a 55+ Retirement
Community. 2br/2ba home with
garage, screen porch. Choose wall
color, flooring. MLS# 76483 East-
side Village Realty. Inc. 752-5290
FOR SALE by very motivated
owner. Now reduced $80,000 to
$119,000. Townhouse on Golf
course. 3br/3ba. Wood burning
fireplace. End unit. Remodeled
kitchen, first class appliances,
granite countertops. New Hunter
Pouglas wdw treatments.
Cathedral ceiling. Pool, tennis
court. Call for appt. (904)246-6222
Great Family Home in S/D
MLS# 77325, $109,000
Call Missy Zecher @ Remax
Professionals 386-623-0237
www.missyzecher.com
Great Home in Great Neighbor-
hood, Can be 4/2 or 3/2 w/study
MLS#77284 $164,900
Call Carrie Cason @Westfield
386-623-2806
GREAT STARTER HOME!
3BR/2BA w/lots of closets
space & nice lawn $79,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #76432
Hallmark Real Estate. 3/2 Brick
home w/large screened porch.
Back yard has wooded privacy.
MLS#69482 Janet Creel 719-0382
or Paula Lawrence 623-1973
Hallmark Real Estate. Bring the
horses. 3/2 HUD, 4 ac. Sold "as is"
$106,000 Bids are being accepted.
www.hudhomestore.com MLS#
72068 Martin Tavener 965-7773
Hallmark Real Estate. Downtown
Restaurant. Gigantic BBQ Smoker
Clean kitchen w/equip. Handle any
type of food svc. MLS# 77902
$189,900 Vic Lantroop 623-6401
Hallmark Real Estate. DWMH on
5 ac south of town. Back porch,
new metal roof wood burning fire-
place & wired workshop. $82,500
MLS#77185 Janet Creel 719-0382
Hallmark Real Estate. Glassed
porch overlooks wooded backyard
in the Plantations Pool,
sprinkler system. $229,900
MLS#75429 Janet Creel 719-0382
Hallmark Real Estate. Time to go
to the River. Stilt home w/covered
decking. Floating dock,out bldgs
& covered RV parking. $188K.
MLS#72068 Janet Creel 719-0382
HOME OR OFFICE on
Alachua St; remodeled
1,207 SqFt home $82,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #77724
Hallmark Real Estate. 2006
2200SF home. 2br/2ba w/mother-
in-law suite, 4 car garage, endless
hot water heater. MLS# 77547
$309,900 Jay Sears 386-867-1613
Hallmark Real Estate. 3/3 Brick
w/over 2500 SF. Great location
with nice one acre pond in back.
Detached workshop MLS# 75222
$179,900 Jay Sears 386-867-1613


IEnNEtil c _C-
-ONWHEELS & WATERCRAFT A


2005 F-350 Lariat
49,000 miles, many
extras, excellent cond.

$19,500 obo
Call
386-755-0139


10[ DI


ONLY"0




$4 .1
To PaceYourAdCal

755-55440


810 Home for Sale
Hallmark Real Estate. 4/2 Brick.
3100 SF. Granddaddy Oaks on 5
acres. Double detached carport/ga-
rage w/workshop. MLS# 77877
$119.900. Jay Sears 386-867-1613
Large Home in the Country on
3.66 acres, fireplace. 2 outbldgs,
MLS#76471. $89,900 Call Jo
Lytte @ Remax 386-365-2821
jolytte@remaxnfl.com
Large Home w/Open Floor Plan,
back yard & porch,. rg oaks, fire-
place. MLS#76122 $115,000
Call Missy Zecher @ Remax 386-
623-0237.mzecher@remax.net
LOTS OF UPGRADES!
Remodeled kitchen in this
2BR/IBA home $29.900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY
INC. 755-5110 #77505
Luxury Log Home,
Whole House Generator, $269,900
MLS# 76899 Call Roger
Lovelady @386-365-7039
westfieldrealtygroup.com
Norwegian Brick Home, fire-
place/family nn, open floor plan,
screen porch, fenced back yard,
MLS#76796 $179,900
Jo Lytte Remax 386-365-2821
Owner Finance. Custom built 3/2.5
10.8 ac. Granite, fireplace, vaulted
ceilings, surround sound, lanai,
gazebo. MLS 77382 Access Real-
ty. Patti Taylor $249K 623-6896
Priced Reduced! 3/2 w/2346 sf.
.67 ac. Creekside S/D. Shade,
surround sound, vaulted ceilings.
MLS 77385 $169,900. Access
Realty. Patti Taylor. 386-623-6896
Rose Creek S/D, 5/4, 3269sf, on
2.2 acres, bonus rm, many
upgrades Reduced! MLS#75485
Reduced! $234,900, Call Pam @
Remax 386-303-2505
Spacious Brand New Split Floor
Plan Home, Fenced Yard
MLS#77493 $229,900
Call Mike Lienemann @ Westfield
.Realty .Group 386-867-9053
SPACIOUS home built in
1995 has 2BR/2BA & 1,636
SqFt on 1 acre $89,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110
Sturdy 3/2 on 4.35 acres, fruit &
pecan trees, Minutes from town
MLS#77878 $105,000
Call Jo Lytte @ Remax
386-365-2821/www.jolytte.com
Totally Remodeled 4 Bd Home
Spacious Must See!
MLS#77782 $135,000
Missy Zecher 386-623-0237
www.missyzecher.com
Well Maintained 3/2 on dead-end
street, quiet, country, close to
downtown $105,000 MLS#77800
Call Lisa Waltrip @Westfield
Realty Group 386-365-5900

82 0 Farms &
2O Acreage
4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$69,900. $613mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
4 acres, Wellborn, New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down, $39,900, $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
5.82 ac Rolling Oaks off Lake
Jeffrey. High, dry & cleared.
Restricted site built homes only.
Equestrian community.
$65,000.obo. 386-965-5530
for information & pictures
FARM- 7 stall barn. Apt.
17+ acres cross fenced.
Close in $1000. mo.
386-961-1086


ON WHEEIS & WiTERCRAFT '









Bring the picture in or*
we will take it for you!
Ad runs 10 consecutive days
with a description and photo in the
newspaper and online E-edition.
Ad runs 10 consecutive days as a
classified line ad online.
You must include vehicle price.
All ads are prepaid.
Private party only.


l -A


2006 EF250
Ford Van
3/4 ton, metal work
shelves/ladder rack,
60K miles, exc. cond.
$10,500
Call
386-555-5555
If you don't sell your vehicle
during the first 10 days, you
can run the same vehicle ad
for 10 additional days for
only $15.00
Terms and conditions remain the
same for the additional run.



To~et~o'u


820 Farms &
82 Acreage
FOR SALE: McAlpin. 10 Acres
W/2006 DW. 12 X 24 Back
addition laundry/office & 12 x 18
covered porch. 20 x 32 polebam &
8 x 16 Utility shed. 863-634-5283
for details & pictures, $75,000
Leave message w/name, phone
number & email address.
Half to ten acre lots. Some w/
well, septic. pp. We finance; low
dwn pmt. Deas Bullard Properties.
386-752-4339. www.landnfl.com
Hallmark Real Estate. 40 ac hunt-
ing tract w/camper. Water & septic
already in place. Stands & feeders
in place. MLS# 75532
$84,000 Jay Sears 386-867-1613
Three One Acre Lots available
@ $14,900 ea & One 1.65 Acrg
lot for $19,900 MLS#76050
Call Brodie Alfred 386-623-0906
Westfield Realty Group

83O Commercial
830 Property
Commercial Property For Sale
Currently Leased $495,000
MLS#75953 Call Aaron
Nickelson @ 386-867-3534
Westfield Realty Group
Mini Storage (204 Units),
gated, fenced 5 acres, $1,300,000,
MLS#76048 Call Millard Gillen
@ Westfield Realty Group
386-365-7001

8Q50 Waterfront
850 Property
Upscale River Cabin on
Suwannee River, Shop, Dock
MLS#76336 $349,900
Call Jo Lytte @ Remax
386-365-2821
6 Investment
860 Property
3/2 Renovated Home in town,
front porch, new appliances, cur-
rently leased MLS#76658 $49,900
Jo Lytte/Remax 386-365-2821
www.jolytte.florida-property-search.com
Great Income Opportunity!
Mobile Home Park For Sale
MLS#77228 $195,000
Call Pam Beauchamp @ Remax
386-758-8900

940 Trucks
2006 TOYOTA Tacoma
Pre-Runner SR 5. Perfect
condition. 67,800 miles.
$15,000. 386-397-2972



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