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UFPKY NEH LSTA



The Lake City reporter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01550
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 5/11/2011
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
System ID: UF00028308:01550
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text




Eye on prize Running strong
Tiger Woods Fort White will lean
st;" '- -'- Gr on returning starters
el 000018 12051 i ****3D T '2-1
eM 280%A ****3 -DICG T 3261
LIB OF FLORIDA HISTORY
205 SmA UNIV OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-1943


First Friday
Columbia hopes for
consistency in Friday's
Purple & Gold game.
Sports, I B


Lake


ulny


Report


Wednesday, May I 1,201 I


www.lakecityreporter.com


Vol. 137, No. 92. 75 cents


St. Johns district approves permit


20-year plan attendance at their meet-.
ing Tuesday, but it didn't
could affect water change their thinking.
in Columbia. They ended up passing a
20-year consumptive water
use permit by a 7-1 vote.
By C.J. RISAK Those in attendance
crisak@lakecityreporter.com expressed concerns about
extending the permit from
PALATKA The what had been five years
St. Johns River Water in length to 20 years.
Management District As explained by Walter
Governing Board lis- McKenzie, vice mayor of
tened to the concerns of White Springs, the height
more than 200 people in of the aquafer, or natural


springs, which supplies
this area with its water
supply has been steadi-
ly drawn upon by other
sources including the
Jacksonville area.
By extending the length
of the permit, many fear
water use will increase
with the aquafer draining
until the rivers, lakes and
springs run dry.
"They made some
amendments," said Loye
Barnard of Lake City, one


of those' in attendance.
"They'e were two board
members who did hear
us.
"I think we've got more
science than they do."
What those in atten-
dance were unable to gain,
according to ,McKenzie,
was enough attention for
the board to alter its think-
ing.
"I got the impression the
PERMIT continued on 3A


FOLK FESTIVAL RETURNS


More than 300
artists to perform
on 15 stages.

By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com
A festival com-
memorating
Florida's
land, people
Ad cultural
heritage will be returning
to Stephen Foster Folk
Culture Center State Park
for its 59th year.
Tickets are on sale for
the 59th Annual Florida
Folk. Festival, a weekend-
long festival taking place
May 27 through 29.
Hosted by the
Florida Department
of Environmental
Protection's Florida Park
Service, the festival fea-
tures a large variety of
Florida folk artists bring-
ing their music, dance,
food, crafts and history
for festival-goers to expe-
rience.
"It's an event that cel-
ebrates Florida," said Bob
Giarda, park services spe-
cialist. "It's people, arts,
crafts, cuisine, music and
culture. When we get into
making this festival hap-
pen, we find that there's
such great diversity in
Florida and we're able to
find the people that can
express that through their
cultural heritage, via food
or music or whatever
heritage they have to
showcase."
More than 300 perform-


COURTESY PHOTOS
Jeanie Fitchen (left) and Billy Dean are among the headliners for the 59th Annual Florida
Folk Festival, May 27-29, at the Stephen.Foster Folk Culture Center State Park.


ers will flaunt their talents
on 15 different stages,
with headliners John
Anderson, Billy Dean,
Ben Prestage, The Aaron
O'Rourke Trio, Sam
Pacetti, Tom Shed, Jeanie
Fitchen, Ariana Hall and
more.


Giarda said out of
approximately 50 events
the park hosts each year,
the Flqrida Folk Festival
is the "heart" of the park's
event season.
"It's so widely
embraced by the state of
Florida and it's a Florida
party that people look for-


ward to and don't want to
miss," he said. "It's such a
great opportunity for fam-
ilies to come-out and walk
around the park. There's
so much to see and do
and taste and hear."
Festival gates open

FOLK continued on 6A


Local event benefits Haven Hospice
FAM. Festival blends
fitness, art and music
for a good cause.

I


By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.comrn


Locals can experience physical
activities, browse art booths and
enjoy musical performances all in
one festival Saturday that will ben-
efit Haven Hospice.
The Second Annual EA.M. -
Fitness, Art and Music Festival
is set to take place from 10 a.m. to
5 p.m. in historic downtown Lake
City.
Haven Hospice, whose Suwannee
Valley Care Center in Lake City
will hold the festival, is a non-profit
community-based hospice that has
served North Florida since 1979.


FILE PHOTO
Fun rock band Red Paper Birds entertains the audience at the Second Annual
F.A.M. (Fitness Arts and Music) Festival last year in Olustee Park.
The free, family-friendly event will of North Florida and Glass Creations
feature local artists and vendors, by Barbara Kaste. Street perform-
including Suwannee Song Designs
by Lynne Hutchins, the Art League LOCAL continued on 3A


COURTESY PHOTO
The Honey Prairie wildfire has burnt more than-90,000 acres
and recently crossed the state border into Florida.

Wildfire enters

Florida; nearing

100,000 acres burnt


Fire, smoke
continue to
move south.

From staff reports
The Honey Prairie wild-
fire has burned its way onto
Florida soil and is in the
Baker County area.
According to Florida
Division of Forestry offi-
cials at the Suwannee
Forestry Center, the fire
is in the vicinity of Mims
Island Road. The Honey
Prairie Fire has consumed
more than 90,900 acres.
The fire burned more
than 19,100 acres Monday
night and Tuesday, as it
increased from 71,800
acres burned to more than
90,900 acres at last report
on Tuesday.
Kurt Wisner, Florida
Division of Forestry mitiga-
tion specialist and public
information officer at the
Suwannee Forestry Center
in Lake City, said firefight-
ers are using prescribed
burns to eliminate some of
the fuels in the path of the
fire.
"Florida Division of
Forestry and Osceola
National Forest firefighters


have taken the opportunity
afforded by light winds and
higher humidity to con-
tinue prescribed burning
to remove fuels from the
southeastern area of the
fire," he said, in a prepared
statement Tuesday after-
noon. "This will allow fire-
fighters to better control
the avenues of approach
when northerly winds
blow the fire further into
Florida."
Wisner said motorists
should continue to use
caution if they encounter
smoke on area highways as
well as make preparations
around their homes if the
fire is in their area.
"Residents should clean
their roof and gutter and
clean a 30-foot area around.
their home of any com-
bustibles to protect their
home from potential fire,"
he said.
According to Florida
Division of Forestry
reports, the Honey Prairie
Fire is believed to have
been caused by a lightning
strike in a remote area of
the Okefenokee Swamp
on Thursday, April 28. The
wildfire quickly spread
using extremely dry scrub
vegetation as its fuel.


School district faces

deficit of more than

$8M for school year


Less than 10
jobs expected
to be cut.

By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.comrn
The school district is fac-
ing a state-imposed deficit
of more than $8 million for
the upcoming school year
and less than 10 jobs are
being cut because of it, offi-
cials said Tuesday.
"It's never a good thing,"
said Lex Carswell, district
assistant superintendent.
"It's just something we
have to deal with."
The Columbia County
School Board discussed the
deficit and the personnel
cuts at a general funds bud-
get workshop held prior to


its regular meeting.
As allotted by the state
budget that was approved
May 7 at the end of the
Legislative session, the dis-
trict's budget for the 2011
to 2012 school year is about
$61,390,000, about an 8 per-
cent cut from what the dis-
trict received last year.
Since Carswell said the
district isn't betting on
receiving almost 40 extra
students next year that the
state projects it will, the dis-
trict is estimating its oper-
ating budget to be about
$61,150,00 for the upcom-
ing school year.
"If we grow, great,"
Carswell said, "but we want
to go with the least amount
(of budgeted money) pos-
sible."
SCHOOL continued on 3A


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
1 84264 00020 1 Fax: 752-9400
^BT a > :~~sT^("a a(a*'a;'?B *'* :*?':*.


94
Mostly Sunny
WEATHER, 2A


,1
7


Opinion ...............
Around Florida ...........
Obituaries ..............
Advice & Comics........
Puzzles .................


SA
4B 'q
2B


TODAY IN
COLUMBIA
retre it 'for
p,-IfTFeed pet:


COMING
THURSDAY
Soui.rni lunicheonI
p e I .'-.


It


I __ _ _ I


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LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING WEDNESDAY, MAY 11, 2011


P3 4) 41


Tuesday:
Afternoon: 7-4-8
Evening: 8-1-2


Tuesday:
Afternoon: 2-5-1-0
Evening: 4-4-6-2


evnalch -
Monday:
9-19-30-32-36


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



Shriver, Schwarzenegger drift apart


LOS ANGELES
t times, the marriage of
Arnold Schwarzenegger
and Maria Shriver looked
liked a fairy tale come
true. But the public
record is replete.with problems that
would strain any union, and recent
glimpses into their lives suggested
something amiss with a couple, who
often waxed publicly about their love
for one another.
Since his term as California
governor ended in early January,
Schwarzenegger has hopscotched
around the world, his wife nowhere
in sight. Shriver posted three Twitter
updates on April 26, their 25th wed-
ding anniversary, without mention-
ing the milestone.
On Monday, they announced they
were separating.
"After a great deal of thought,
reflection, discussion, and prayer, we
came to this decision together," they
said in a brief .statement that could
signal a private breakup rather than
a public court battle.

Britney Spears subject
of biographic comic book
PHILADELPHIA Britney
Spears is no stranger to music buy-
ers and concert-goers. Now, her
star power will be on display with
web-slingers, shape
shifters and super-
-heroes.
The pop music
star is the subject
of a new one-shot
comic book cour-
S- tesy of Bluewater
Spears Productions Inc.'s
ongoing "Fame"
series that has seen it profile other
celebrities, including Lady Gaga and
. .actors Robert Pattinson and Kristen
.-* Stewart, among others. The publish-


ASSOCIATED PRESS
This file photo shows Arnold Schwarzenegger and his wife, Maria Shriver ,as they
celebrate his victory in the California gubernatorial recall election in Los Angeles.
The two announced Monday they were separating.


'er has also done comic book bios of
Sarah Palin, Hilary Rodham Clinton
and President Barack Obama, and .
plans one about Donald Trump, too.
The Spears comic will focus on her
rise to stardom, her documented private
life and her efforts to be understood, said
Patrick McCray, who wrote the issue.
"She is far more complicated than
most people realize. No matter what
preconceptions you have about her,
there will always be more layers and.
surprises," he said in a statement
"Beyond the performer, there is a real
human being there, struggling for a
real life, struggling to connect with her
art, and struggling to be understood."


Oprah plans interview
with James Frey
CHICAGO Oprah Winfrey's
interview with author James Frey will
stretch over two episodes during the
final full week of her talk how.
The shows will air May 16 and 17,
more than five years after Winfrey
accused Frey on live television of lying
in one of his books. During a short
promotional clip on Tuesday's episode
of "The Oprah Winfrey Show" an
announcer deemed it "the biggest con-
troversy in Oprah show history."

Associated Press .


Celebrity Birthdays


* Comedian Mort Sahl is 84.
* Rock singer Eric Burdon
(The Animals; War) is 70.
* Actress Frances Fisher
is 59.
* Actor Boyd Gaines is 58.
* Country musician Mark
Herndon (Alabama) is 56.
* Actress Martha Quinn is
52.


* Country singer-musician
Tim Raybon (The Raybon
Brothers) is 48.
M Actor Jeffrey Donovan is
43.
* Actor Coby Bell is 36.
* Actor Jonathan Jackson
is 29.
* Actor Cory Monteith (TV:
"Glee") is 29.


Lake City
HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293
Fax number .............752-9400
Circulation ..............755-5445
Online... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Ra.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the. permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson.....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
Assistant Editor CJ Risak..754-0427
After 1:00 p.m.
(crisak@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Ashley Butcher ...754-0417
(abutcher@lakecityreporter.comn)
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-440.


Reporter
BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter'
should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7.30
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery.,After
10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
' vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation ..............755-5445
(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
.12 Weeks..............:..... $26.32
24 Weeks.............. .$48.79
52 Weeks................. $83.46
Rates include 7% sales tax
Mail rates
12 Weeks................ $41.40
24 Weeks............... $82.80
52 Weeks...................$179.40


CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will
run in this space. And thanks, for reading.


Anthony jury
selection resumes
CLEARWATER Jury
selection for the trial of an
Orlando woman charged
with killing her 2-year-old
daughter hit its first snag
Tuesday afternoon when
the judge dismissed 50
prospective jurors.
Chief Judge Belvin
Perry began Tuesday's
proceedings in Pinellas
County~by calling the
last 40 people from an
original group of about
110 potential jurors origi-
nally brought in Monday.
He and attorneys from
both sides got through
that initial pool before the
lunch break. The plan was
to start narrowing down
a new group of 50 jurors
afterward.
But when Perry asked
the new prospects if they
had discussed the case in
the jury room, more than
a dozen raised their hands.
He promptly excused all of
- them. Perry said a woman
w: ho could be a witness
had happened to receive
a Pinellas County jury
summons and was talking
about the case in the jury
room.
Casey Anthony is
charged with first-degree
murder in the death of 2-
year-old daughter Caylee
in the summer of 2008.
Jury selection is being
held outside Orlando
because of intense media
coverage. Anthony, 25,
has pleaded not guilty
and says a baby-sitter
kidnapped Caylee. The
trial is scheduled to begin
May 17.

Boy killed while
waiting for bus
CLERMONT Officials
said a boy was struck by a
pickup truck as he waited
for a school bus in central
Florida.


THE WEATHER



MOSTLY, PARTLY PARTLY
S SUNNY CLOUDY CLOUDY


S HI- LOH I Hl3.LO HI910L064


niCHANCE
STORMS


p :'m~j


1

*


Pensacola
: 7 ,72


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter

Roadway scenery
Black-eyed Susans are seen in a small field along U.S.
Highway 41. The Black-eyed Susan is known by many names
including Blackiehead, Brown Betty, Brown Daisy, Gloriosa
Daisy, Golden Jerusalem and -Poorland Daisy.


The Florida Highway
Patrol said the accident
happened just before 8
a.m. Tuesday. The child
was taken to a hospital
where he died.
According to the
reports, the driver of the
truck was taken into cus-
tody for driving without a
driver's license. Authorities
said other charges may be
pending.
The name and age of the
child, and the name of the
driver, were not immedi-
ately available.

Boy grazed by
.22-caliber bullet
OCALA Authorities
said a 4-year-old Ocala boy
was grazed in the head by
a bullet that his 10-year-old
brother hit with a hammer.
The incident happened


Sunday evening as the
boys were playing outside.
The child was treated and
released from Munroe
Regional Medical Center.
The older boy told
Marion County Sheriff's
deputies he found the
.22-caliber bullets in the
garage and took them to
the driveway, where he hit
one with a hammer. When
that bullet fell apart, he hit
a second one. The boy told
deputies he heard a loud
bang and the bullet hit his
brother.
The child's father
told authorities he has a
.22-caliber rifle and the
ammunition was stored in
a lockbox. He told authori-
ties the boys may have
found some old rounds in
the garage.
No charges were filed.

Associated Press


SValdosta
96/67
rallahassee Lake Cit
94,/66 94,. 66
Gainesi
Panama City 926E
82.,69


City
Jacksonville Cape Canaveral
92/.' 70 Daytona Beach
Ft. Lauderdale
Aille Daytona Beach Fort Myers
56 89j69 Gainesvllle
Ocala Jacksonville
92/66 *
Orlando Cape Canaveral Key West
92 70 89 71 LakeCity
Miami
na* Naples
4 West Palm Beach Ocala
90, 72 0 Orlando
Ft Lauderdale Panama City
FL Myers 89 741 0 Pensacola
92,' 72 Naples Tallahassee
88, 72 Miami Tampa
90/74 Valdosta
Key West* W. Palm Beach


8 7.,' 5


TEMPERATURES SUN


Hign Tujesda,
LcOU Tue.5,s a,
fIormal highi
Normal low
Record high
Record low


94
65
86
61
96 in 1927
44 in 1923


PRECIPITATION
Tuesday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


0.00"
0.09"
11.57"
0.77"
14.79"


Sunrise today
Surnset today
Sunnse tom.
Sunset tom.


6:40 a m
8:15 p.m.
6:39 a.m.
*8:15 p.m.


MOON
Moonrise today 2:11 p.m.
Moonset today 2:20 a.m.
Moonrise tom. 3:16 p.m.
Moonset tom. 2:57 a.m.


May May June June
17 24 1 8
Full Last New First


On this date in
1966, Chicago,
received their la
measurable sno
on record, when
inches of the wh
stuff fell.


73 Ip 7p la 6a
Wednesday Thursday


S Forecslted Impen e Feels lke" temoeraur


II.

10nitdestolun
Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+.


Thursday
85 69. p.:
86 68. p
91 5,, p,
92 71 p.:
91 65 p.:
89 65 p,:
87 77 pc
93 65 p-:
91. 76 p.:
89.. i I pc
90 66 pc
91. 68 pc
83 71'pc
87 72. pc
93. 66 pc
88 72 pc
94 65. p.-
901 73 p,:


Friday
84 69. p:
86 66,'pc
87 74 pcI
91. 70 pc
91 64 pc
99 68 p.:
86' 77.'
91 64 p.:
89 74 p';
86 71. pC
91 64. p:
91 67, pc
82.62 pc
8372 pc
90 64 pc
7S 71 pc
9 '63. p.:
87 72 pc


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.



weather.com


iifc Forecasts, data and
graphics 2011 Weather
S! Central, LP, Madison, WIs.
weather J www.weatherpubllsher.com




test
wfall
S1.6
hite- .


N61WHIII fi


~13


Daily Scripture


"If your brother or sister sins,
go and point out their fault,
just between the two of you.
If they listen to you, you have
won them over."
Matthew 18:15


AROUND FLORIDA


.-I. +~;~-4c-.nrpl~rar\aaaoRIranrua~~~ aa~~u~i~xr~a rr r~rrrrrmr*


Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424


No


I








LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE WEDNESDAY, MAY 11, 2011


Workshop aims to protect North

Central Florida's regional assets


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter, com

Proposed changes to
the North Central Florida
Strategic Regional Policy
Plan were discussed dur-
ing a public workshop
Tuesday as state plan-
ning officials attempted
to strengthen their plan
to protect North Central
Florida's regional assets.
The workshop, which
lasted just over 25 minutes,
took place at City Council
Chambers in the City Hall
building with regional
planning council officials
giving a PowerPoint pre-
sentation detailing the
proposed amendments to
the current plan.
The North Central
Florida Strategic Regional
Policy Plan is a long-range
guide for the physical, eco-
nomic and social develop-
ment of a planning region
which identifies regional
goals and policies.
The plan contains
regional goals and poli-
cies designed to promote


a coordinated program of
regional actions directed
at resolving problems
identified in the trends
and condition statements
of each strategic regional
subject area.
Scott Koons, North
Central Florida Regional
Planning Council execu-
tive director, said it's
important that they focus
on the regional resourc-
es for the plans because
it's their responsibility
to adopt a strategic pol-
icy plan to identify sig-
nificant regional facilities
and resources that are
essential for five-topic
areas: affordable housing,
economic development,
emergency preparedness,
natural resources of sig-
nificance and regional
transportation.
"The regional plan is the
primary policy document
of the regional planning
council," Koons said. "It's
used in all of our regional
responsibilities when we
review and comment "on
proposed changes cities


and counties want to make
to their local community
comprehensive plans. We
comment on those chang-
es as they relate to and
may impact regional facili-
ties or regional natural
resources.",
The workshop was
the first step to initiate
proposed amendments
to the plan as part of a
five-year evaluation. The
next workshop has been
scheduled for Thursday in
Gainesville.
"Under state law region-
al councils are required
to evaluate their plans
and make any necessary
changes based on the eval-
uations," Koons said.
Following the public
meetings and staff meet-
ings, officials plan to
schedule public hearings
at which they will adver-
tise an adoption plan. They
hope to be able to adopt the
proposed amendments for
the plan by late summer.


PERMIT: Board approves plan

Continued From Page 1A


board had already made
up its mind," he said. "I'm
disappointed but not sur-
prised."
McKenzie and Barnard
both said they were hoping
the board would postpone
any vote and reconsider
the information regarding
th.e aquafer, including any
possible damage such a
long-range decision may
have and not just in the
St. Johns district, which
remained a point of con-
tention.
"They don't believe what


happens in their district
affects our water supply,"
said McKenzie.
McKenzie added both
sides have studies back-
ing up their claims. "So
you get an impartial third
party to study it," he said,
"someone like the National
Academy of Sciences. If
they say (the St. Johns dis-
trict) is not affecting ours,
that's fine. I can live with
that. But get a decision
before going ahead, with
this 20-year plan."
Barnard admitted


there's little else that can
be done now. McKenzie,
however, said the plan
adopted by the St. Johns
district has so many
amendments that people
will be watching for infrac-
tions.
"I think they know the
eyes of North Florida are
on them," he said. 'There
are so many qualifiers
to it, we need to make
sure the safeguards and
safety checks are followed
through."


Carswell presented a
list of almost 20 items to
the board of how staff will
"zero-out" the more than
$8 million deficit.
On that list was 70 jobs
consisting of people who
have retired, resigned,
moved or who will not be
re-hired in the fall of 2011,
Carswell said.
Those jobs will save the
district more than $3 mil-
lion.
Out of the 70 jobs, less
than 10 people were not
re-hired who wanted to
continue employment,
Carswell said.
"Those other 60-some
people chose to leave on
their own," he said, "but
the less- than-10 wanted to
work back in our district
and we were not able to re-
hire them at this time."
Positions cut included
teaching jobs and other
non-instructional posi-
tions, Carswell said, cuts
that were made across
the district after all school
principals were 'inter-
viewed and had a chance
to express their needs.
Carswell encouraged
those not re-hired to "fin-
ish the year strong."
"If you work hard, and
the budget turns around,
then we'll re-hire you if
possible," he said. "And if
they are re-hired, they will
not have broken any ser-
vices, they will maintain
their benefits, they'll main-
tain their years of service,
they'll maintain their pay,
right on through. Nothing
will change."
The state pays the dis-
trict based on how many
students it has, regardless
of the budget, Carswell
said, which may be a
chance for the district to
hire back the cut jobs. -
"Every student over
9,800 (the district's expect-


ed amount) that we have
next year will give us the
opportunity to hire back,"
he said. ,
"Hopefully, when 'we
open schools, we'll be hir-
ing some of them back,"
said Mike Millikin, super-
intendent of schools.
During the board's
regular meeting, Glenn
Hunter, school board
member, asked that all
future personnel employ-
ment hires be moved from
the board's consent agen-
da to the board's action
agenda. He also asked
that, as much as possible,
no personnel items be put
on the board's addendum.
In the workshop,
Carswell also made bud-
get recommendations to
the board to save money,
which included reducing
electricity use, reducing
athletic field lighting out-
side of peak hours and
moving nighttime adult
education to Columbia
High School to generate
Full Time Equivalent sfu-


derit dollars.
Despite all budget cuts,
Carswell noted that the
school district's goal is to
provide its students with a
quality education.

In other discussion and
action:

Fred Gaylord, direc-
tor of maintenance, and
Mike Null, director of
purchasing, gave separate
presentations during the
workshop on cost-saving
suggestions the district
can implement in their
respective departments.

During the regular
meeting, Ray Macatee
of Lake City presented
a donation of more than
$8,700 from his "Scrap to
Music" program, which
will be Used to purchase
more than 10 new drums
for the Columbia High
School Marching Band.


Dwayne Anthony
Bonds
DQOB: 4/19/50
Height: 5'10"
Weight: 180 lbs.
Hair: Brown


Suit accuses disabled program


TALLAHASSEE- A
lawsuit alleges that a state
facility in Chattahoochee
has mistreated mental
patients accused of crimes
by putting them in solitary
confinement and strapping
them into chairs.
Two advocacy
groups sued last week
in U.S. District Court
in Tallahassee, the
Tallahassee Democrat
newspaper reported
Tuesday.
The suit also alleges that
th6 Agency for Persons
with Disabilities offers
little rehabilitation to such
patients.
Charles Ball, super-
intendent of the agen-
cy's Mentally Retarded
Defendant Program, said
restraint and confinement
are used only when some-
one' becomes dangerous.
"At no point do people


get locked down in a room
with no contact unless their
behavior is constantly at a
threat level to other people
in the room" Ball said.
The program can han-
dle up to 130 men and 16
women, including people
charged with serious crimes
up to murder. They are sent
to the Panhandle facility
because they are incompe-
tent to stand trial, Ball said.
Florida International
Legal Services and
Disability Rights Florida
are not seeking monetary
damages. They want, a
court order declaring that
the patients' constitutional
rights are being violated
and directing the program
to change its practices.
The groups sued on
behalf of more than 60
people in the program,
although only three are
listed in the complaint.


They are identified only
by their initials and there's
no mention of what crimi-
nal charges they face.
One man with a history
of bipolar disorder, depres-
sion and self-injury alleg-
edly was placed in solitary
or mechanical restrain
more than 45 times since
last May.
Another with mild retar-
dation and depression
allegedly was secluded
at least 60 times since
January 2010.
Those actions were in
response to such behav-
ior as shouting threats and
fighting, the suit says.
A third man was
restrained and secluded
for behavior that could
have been controlled if he
had received proper treat-
ment, the suit claims.

Associated Press


LOCAL: Event returns for third year

Continued From Page 1A


ers, actors, health informa-
tion booths and more will
be a part of the festival.
Scott Berns of Mix 94:3
will serve as the festival's
emcee and performances
by the Florida Gateway
Band, Lake City Dance
Arts and Fancy Dancer
will be given.
Lake City Zumba will
provide a free zumba les-
son and Healing Caf6 &
Yoga Studio will teach
a complimentary yoga
class.
A 5K fun run around
Lake DeSoto will pre-
cede the festival at 9 a.m.
Registration for the run
begins at 8 a.m.
All festival proceeds
from elements like spon-
sorship or vendor fees
will be put toward Haven
Hospice's unfunded pro-
grams and services in
the Lake City area, said
Stephanie Brod, fund-
raising special events
coordinator.
Thoseprogramsinclude
the Healing Hearts grief
support program, Camp
Safe Haven for children
and teenagers who have
experienced the loss of a
loved one and the Haven
Transitions program, said
Polly Tyler, Suwannee
Valley administrator.
"All of these are
unfunded programs that
we do here in the com-
munity," Tyler said, "so
all of the funding that
comes to us helps us
provide care to patients
and for the community.
Many of these people
will just call us and
they're not patients at
all and they just need
grief support."
Haven Hospice is
bringing the festival
back for a second year
to provide an enjoyable
day for the community
and to give the commu-
nity another opportunity
to.support the hospice,
Tyler said.
"We feel like the com-
munity supports us and
would like to continue
to support us," she said.
"One way they. can sup-


port us is to come out
and have a fun day and in
. doing so, they learn more
about Haven Hospice,
can support the artists
who provide art in our
Care Center year-round,
have a little fun running
around our lake and enjoy
our music."


Run registration cost
$35. For run registration
or festival information, call
Brod at (352) 271-4665 or
visit www.havenhospice.
org.
"Just come out and join
us," Tyler said. "It'll be a
fun day."


New Boys & Girls

Arrivals n Sandals
Assorted styles & colors


New stilesfor men & women


S .. . ,


OB/ YN1

DARNA GREENE, MD
WOMEN'S HEALTH WITH A WOMAN'S TOUCH

; <.


Mixed League Nights
Sunday Tuesday Wednesday Friday
May 25-June 9


Edwin James Case
[H
AKA: Billy K. Willimas,
Brian Shawn Bivins
BOB: 11/28/79
Height: 5' 8"-Weight: 165 lbs.
Hair: Brown Eyes: Blue


E. iyes: Blue-" Wanted For: VOP Burglary of
Wanted For: VOP Grand Theft Conveyance, Grand Theft III; VOP
I I Disorderly Intoxication, Battery
WANTED AS OF 5/9/11
ANYONE WITH INFORMATION ON THE WHEREABOUTS OF THESE INDIVIDUALS IS ASKED TO CALL CRIME STOPPERS OF COLUMBIA COUNTY.
WE DO NOT WANT YOUR NAME, JUST YOUR INFORMATION!
The likeness of suspects is supplied by the Columbia County Sheriff's Office Warrants Division and/or other law enforcement agencies.
The cases are active at the time of publication unless otherwise fhoted. Crime Stoppers of Columbia County, Inc., and their volunteers
are jointly and individually exempt from any and all liability which might arise as a result of the publication of public records.


CALL (386) 754-7099 OR
SUBMIT A WEB TIP AT
F COLUMBIA COUNTY www.columbiacrimestoppers.net
Funded by the Crime Stoppers Trust Fund; Administered by the Office of the Attorney General


SCHOOL: District deals with deficit

Continued From Page 1A


*Meet with a provider the day you come in
*Same day/next day OB appts.
*Dr. Greene is chief medical officer at Pregnancy
Care Center
*Free pregnancy tests
Call for appt. Mon.-Thurs. 8am-5:30pm
755-0500 449 SE Baya Dr. Lake City
Accepts All Insurance


Columbia County's Most Wanted


Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424


-'~











OPINION


Wednesday, May 11,2011


AN LI


AN
OPINION


Passing


.on the


Twitter


trend
n the 21st century, tech-
nology comes and goes
at lightning speed.
Take the flip cam, the
cheap, easy, point-and-
shoot video camera. Its most
popular version, the Flip Ultra,
came out in fall 2007, and took
the market by such storm
that New York Times technol-
ogy writer David Pogue found
himself writing this apologetic
review six months late:
"Well, this is a little embar-
rassing. One of the most signifi-
cant electronics products of the
year slipped into the market,
became a megahit, changed
its industry and I haven't
reviewed it yet."
About a year after his
review, Cisco Systems bought
the Flip's manufacturer for a
reported $590 million in stock.
Earlier this month, less than
two years after Cisco's pur- -
chase, the company announced
it would stop production: Who,
after all, needs a stand-alone
video camera when more and
*rhore smart phones can do the
trick between calls, texting, and
tweeting?
Their message is clear: The
social-media world is flying
past, and you can either leap
'on or get left behind. And so,
on aging knees, since I teach
the rapidly morphing field of
journalism, I am trying to make
that leap. But I can't help but
believe that like my flip cam,
which I bought last spring, this
latest breathless manifestation
of news and information will
have been jilted for the Next
Big Thing about the time I
begin to master it.
It's not that Twitter doesn't
have value, journalistically and
beyond. It forces users to be
succinct, a good thing since
Web content careens around
like subatomic particles in a
supercollider. It provides instan-
taneous alerts to breaking news
around the world. It broadens
the potential for finding and
contacting sources. It allows
nonjournalists to find people
with similar interests.
M Christian Science Monitor


Lake City Reporter
Serving 'Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-orientednewspapers,
This mission will be accomplished
.through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman


L LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,


Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
.. BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


In these trying times,
the best that can be
said about the Florida
Legislature's 60-day
session is that ift's over.
For the average, hardworking
Floridian, there's not much
to celebrate. Attacks on
immigrants, on women's
reproductive rights, and
children in public schools
continued, though an Arizona-
style immigration law wisely
failed as did a gun law that
would have allowed weapons in
schools.
The promise of jobs in the
state budget remains just that,
a promise that bets on gutted
regulations and lower taxes to
court more businesses to the
Sunshine State.
We hope the governor is
right. Gov. Rick Scott maintains,
the session was "all about jobs."
Yet the budget that resulted
from the 60-day session cut too
much from a public education
system that's already struggling
with more demands from
Tallahassee and less money.
By any business executive's
measure, the quality of public
schools. is a key indicator for
relocating. Even under today's


www.lakecityreporter.com


Birds of a feather


is one of them -
when I almost wish
I'd been born a bird.
My mother, rest
her soul, would probably say I
surely had the brains for it.
It strikes me as a bit puzzling
that most of God's creatures live
by instinct knowing what,
when and how to do whatever
it takes to survive while
humans (some of us more than
others) stumble along in our
ignorance, trial and error, hunt
and peck, always guessing
at our next step and second-
guessing our last
Take, for example, pruning.
Somehow we should've known,
my husband and I, to trim the
trees in oqr yard weeks ago.
We talked about doing it, but
kept forgetting until the wind
picked up to tie-down-the-goat
speed, 40 mph, give or take,
as it does in the desert each
spring.
And suddenly the pepper
trees that had slept shivering
and naked all winter long woke
up and started sprouting curly
green shoots and tried their
best to claw the roof off the
house.
That's when I finally called
the tree service. Had I acted
sooner, the job mightfve been
simpler, not to mention less
costly.
But more important, the
mourning dove who'd built a
nest in the tree by the front
walk wouldn't have had the
bejesus scared out of her.
And her nest with two pearly-
white eggs wouldn't have been


Sharon Randall
www.sharonrandoll.com


left in plain view for passing
humans or hungry predators.
By the time the tree trimmer
spotted the nest, it was too late,
the damage was done. When he
lopped off a limb that shielded
the nest, the dove startled and
flew to the ground, acting as if
her wing were broken to try to
lure him away from her eggs.
He left the remaining
branches intact and told me
what had happened. I feared the
dove was gone for good.
Imagine my relief an hour
later, after the last of the trees
had been trimmed, to see her
sitting once again on the nest.
She looked like a fake bird
sitting stock-still in broad
daylight, glaring at me with one
beady eye, as if to say, "If you'd
had half a brain to do this a little
sooner, Bozo, my eggs and I
wouldn't be in this mess."
What does a mother's
instincts tell her when her nest
is exposed and her babies are
at risk? Why. do some flee and
others choose, come what may,
to stay?
Several times a day, morning
and night, I slip out my front
door and, keeping a respectful
distance, peer over the fence to
check that nest. Every time I've


checked, she's been there.
Never in my wildest dreams
did I ever picture being so
proud of, or pulling so hard for,
a bird.
I remember a time years ago
when my first husband was
dying of cancer. Every shelter,
every shield, had been slowly
stripped away, leaving us and
our children bare and exposed
in ways we had never known.
Lucky for us, we had family
and friends who knew how to be
supportive, to stay close and yet
keep a respectful distance.
My survival in those months
had nothing to do with intellect
or experience or even common
sense. It was purely instinctive.
Somehow I knew I just needed
to stay to do what I could,
day by day, and trust for all the
many things beyond my power.
This morning, a week after
her nest was laid bare, the dove
was sitting there, as usual,
stock-still and beady-eyed. But
poking out from beneath her
wings were two perfect, fuzzy,
little heads. '
Sometimes in life, something
can come along and lop off all
your protection, leaving you
feeling naked and vulnerable in
ways you've never known.
I hope that never happens to
you. But if it does, I hope you
will trust your instincts. I hope
that you will stay and trust
As mothers, birds and women-
are not so different.


N Sharon Randall can be con-
tacted at P.O. Box 777394,
Henderson, NV 89077.


funding formula the quality
of Florida's schools remains
a mixed bag. Florida's big on
innovating but small on paying
teachers their due.
Mr. Scott didn't get all the tax
cuts he wanted, which many
legislators in his Republican
Party warned would leave
Florida without a safety net for
the almost 3 million poof, sick
and elderly who reside in the
state. Some tax cuts for small
businesses made sense.
Still, there's no question
that this session was a victory
for the first-year governor and
the majority GOP Legislature.
It will take time to see if his
experiment pumps up the
economy or leaves voters
fuming. Some hits, misses:
Pensions. State workers
will now pay 3 percent of their
salary toward their pension.
That's long overdue. A 5 percent
contribution would have been
difficult for low-wage workers,
particularly as state employees
have not received a raise in
years. Long term, Florida
needs to move toward a defined
contribution plan, and rules
that do not include overtime in
pension calculations.


Courts. The governor's
crazy idea to split the Florida
Supreme Court into two entities
got almost nowhere, except
legislators approved a study
to reconsider this costly and
unnecessary experiment. A
House proposal that wou-d
have robbed South Florida
prosecutors and public
defenders of funding and
handed it to Orlando died in
the Senate, but funding for
the judiciary overall remains
a challenge. One bright
spot: Treatment-based court
programs for drug users will be
tried in eight counties, following
Miami-Dade's successful drug
court model.
Prisons: Placing more
inmates in privately-run prisons
sets up the wrong incentive.
Who wants to fill up prisons for
private contractor? We need to
empty prisons with rehabilitated
people.
Environment and growth.
This session was a disaster for
Florida's Lake Okeechobee, and
all of the protected land, bays,
rivers and streams throughout
the state.
* Miami Herald


4A


Dale McFeatters
mcfeattersd@shns.com



Syrian


reforms


never


came

Trhe United
Nations has
avoided a terrible
embarrassment,
which, if it had
come about, the organization
would have richly deserved.
Kuwait has replaced Syria
on the Asian slate for seats
on the U.N. Human Rights
Council, a welcome break from
the U.N.'s shameful tradition of
naming human-rights abusers
to the council and its disgraced..
predecessor, the Human
Rights Commission. ':
Syria has been a rigid
dictatorship for 40 years, first
under Hafez Assad and for the .
last 10 under his son, Bashar
Assad.
When Bashar Assad
assumed power, he seemed
like a welcome contrast to .
his thuggish father. He was
a British-trained eye doctor, ""
married to a British-born wffe,
widely traveled and widely
expected to be a reformer.
And the younger Assad
did promise reforms, but
except for easing restrictions
on trade, commerce and
foreign investment, those
reforms never materialized.
He was still promising seven
weeks ago when protesters,
demonstrating after Friday
prayers, demanded he make
good o11 those reforms,
particularly repealing the
state of emergency that had
allowed the Assads to govern
by decree.
Instead of negotiations
and accommodations, Assad
reacted with brute force,
sending tanks and troops
into the areas of uprising.
According to a Syrian human-
rights group, by Tuesday the
government had killed more
than 750 of its own people,
and of the many thousands
arrested, 9,000 remain in
custody.
However, unlike with Libya,
where Moammar Gadhafi
reacted similarly, reaction from
the European Union and the
U.S. has been curiously muted.
There have been no calls for .
Assad to step down and no
suggestions whatever that
international force be used to
protect the Syrian people.
The European Union this
week belatedly imposed an
arms embargo and barred
13.top Syrian government
officials, but not Assad, from
traveling to the E.U. The U.S.
has had sanctions on Syria
since 2004 because of its
support for Hezbollah, Hamas
and the Iraqi insurgents, and
those sanctions were recently
tightened. But the West's
diplomats seemingly refuse
to give up on their hopes that
Assad will make good on his :
promises of basic human .
rights for the Syrian people. .
The regime has barred the
foreign press from the country :
and even declared large
areas off-limits to the Syrian :
media. The bar on foreign :
reporters was lifted for a few :
hours so that a top adviser .
and spokeswoman for Assad .
could tell a New York Times "
reporter that the government
had gained the upper hand and *
that the uprising was nearing .
"the end of the story." :
* Dale McFeatters is editorial


writer for Scripps Howard News .
Service.


ANOTHER OPINION


Florida's bargain budget









LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL WEDNESDAY, MAY 11, 2011


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


* U To submit your Community
Calendar item, contact Antonia
Robinson at 754-0425 or by
e-mail at arobinson@
lakecityreporter.com.


Today
Board meeting
Early Learning
Coalition of Florida's
Gateway, Inc. Board
Meeting is 9 a.m. today at
the Coalition Office, 1104
SW Main Blvd. Anyone
interested in attending
this meeting that has a
disability requiring spe-
cial assistance please
contact Stacey Nettles at
752-9770.

Summer program
registration
Girls Club registration
for the summer program
begins at 8 a.m. today.
The cost for the summer
camp is $225. Girls must
be ages 6-13 to attend.
Call Terri Phillips at 719-
5840. ,

Monthly Knights of
Columbus meeting
The Knights of
Columbus Council
#7589 of Lake City's regu-
lar monthly meeting is 8
p.m. today at Epiphapy
Catholic Church in the
Social Hall. For more


Ronald Craig Hall, Sr.
Mr. Ronald Craig Hall, Sr.,
61 of Pascagoula, Mississippi
died Friday, May 6, 2011 at his
home. A native of Lake City,
Florida, Mr. Hall had lived with
his family in Pascagoula since
1983. He was a son to the late
Russell Overy Hall and Edna
Evelyn Smithy Hall. Mr. Hall
enjoyed fishing and spending
time with his family and friends.
He worked -as a pulpwooder
and a carpenter. Mr. Hall was
preceded by a daughter, Ashley
Leigh Hall in 1979 and three
brothers, Franklin Hall, Rus-
sell Hall, Jr. and Raymond Hall.
Mr. Hall is survived by his wife
of 43 years, Louise Bryant Hall,
Pascagoula, one son, Ronald
Hall, Jr., Pascagoula and two
daughters, Shannon Perry (Dan-
iel), Pascagoula and Michelle
Davis (Rodney), Lucedale. One
sister, Myma Loy Marcum, two
sisters in law, Allen Hall and Sue
Hall all of Lake City and seven
grandchildren also survive.
Graveside funeral services for
Mr. Hall will be conducted on
Wednesday, May 11, 2011 at
10:00 AM at the Scott Cem-
etery on US 441 north of Lake
City. Interment will follow.
Visitation with the family was
from 6-8 PM Tuesday evening
at the funeral home.. Arrange-
ments are under the direction of
GUERRY FUNERALHOME,
2659 SW Main Blvd., Lake
City. Please sign the guestbook
at www.guerryfuneralhome.net

Doyle Clark Leslie
Mr. Doyle Clark Leslie, 67 of
Lake City passed away on Mon-
day, May 9, 2011 at Shands at the
University of Florida Hospital in
Gainesville. He
was a native and
life long resident
of Lake City and -
son to the. late
Lloyd Clark and Lola Witt Les-
lie. Mr. Leslie graduated from
Columbia High School class of
1961, served for two years in


information contact Bob
Gavette at 965-5905. All
members please plan to
attend.

Lake City Newcomers
and Friends meeting
The regular meeting of
the Lake City Newcomers
and Friends is 11 a.m.
today at Guangdong
Chinese Restaurant in the
Mall. Luncheon cost is
$10. The guest speaker
is Theresa Morgan-attor-
ney on legacy planning.
All members, guests and
friends along with any
newcomers to the area
are welcome. Call 752-
4552 or 755-4051.

Thursday
DAR meeting
The last Edward
,Rutledge DAR Chapter
monthly meeting is
10:30 a.m. Thursday at
Guang Dong Chinese
Restaurant. Five new
members will be inducted
into the chapter. Elena
.Kennedy, Regent from
Jacksonville's Fort
San Nicholas Chapter
is installing 2011-2013


OBITUARIES

the, United States Army and re-
tired from Florida Power and
Light with 30 years of employ-
ment. He enjoyed fishing and
hunting when able and attended
Christ Central Ministries Church
in Lake City. Mr. Leslie was,
preceded in death by an infant
daughter, Kathy Charlotte Leslie,
his twin grandsons, Cayden and
Cameron Bailey-Croft and his
father in law, Clyde J. Sullivan.
Mr. Leslie is survived by his
wife, Dawn R. Leslie; one son,
David Clark Leslie; two daugh-
ters, Leesa Ronsonet (Mitch) and
Lara Leslie (Courtney Clayton);
three step sons, Billy Joe Brady,
Dustin Brady and Cody Croft;
one brother, Michael M. Leslie
(Billie) and one sister, Charlotte
Carroll all of Lake City. Mother
and father in law, Sidney and
Bunny Williams, Lake City;
brothers and sisters in law, John-
ny and Lee Sullivan, Branford
and Jeffrey and Martha Parker,
Lake City; special friends, Ron
and Tempest Ward, Lake City;
eight grandchildren; one great
grandchild and his Pomeranian
"Sweet Tater" also survive.
Funeral services for Mr. Leslie
will be conducted on Friday,
May 13, 2011 at 11:00 AM in
the Chapel of Guerry Funeral
Home with Pastor Lonnie Johns
of Christ Central Ministries of-
ficiating. Interment will follow
at Bethel Cemetery on US 441
South of Lake City. Visitation
with the family will be from
5-7 PM on Thursday evening
at the funeral home. Arrange-
ments are under the direction of
GUERRY FUNERAL HOME,
2659 SW Main Blvd., Lake City.
Please sign the guestbook at
www.guerryfuneralhome.net.

Anthony J. Zelesky
Mr. Anthony J. "Tony" Zelesky,
of Lake City passed away peace-
fully, on his 87th birthday, Sun-
day May 8, 2011. A native of
Broad Brook, Connecticut, Mr.
Zelesky had been a resident of
Lake City since 1998 having
moved here from Melbourne,


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter

Working out a problem
Columbia City Elementary fourth-grader Jacob Zecher (right) confirms an answer with Cross
Neeley at the 2011 Columbia County Math Bee Monday, held at the Columbia County School
Board Administrative Complex auditorium.


chapter officers. To say
"HATS OFF' to new offi-


Florida. Mr. Zelesky was a vet-
eran of the United States Navy
having served in W.W. II. He
worked for many years as a sheet
metal me-
chanic with
the Schun
Company of
Florida which
was located
in Hialeah,
Florida. He
was a member
of the Epiphany 1 C
Catholic Church
where he was
active with the ,
Knights of Co-
lumbus 4th Degree Assembly
#173 and was a former mem-
ber of #4772 in Hialeah. He
was also a member of the Sheet
Metal, Workers International
Association Miami Local #32,
the V.F.W. and the "Cooties".
Mr. Zelesky is survived by his
wife of sixty-eight years, Marie
Zelesky; two daughters, Cindy
Quiros of Lee, Florida and Joan
Maus of Beaufort, South Caro-
lina; a brother, Francis Zelesky
of Winter Park, Florida and her
half-sister, Sandra Nash. Five
grandchildren and four great
grandchildren also survive.
A funeral mass for Mr. Zelesky
will be conducted at 2:00 P.M.
on Thursday, May 12, 2011 in
the Epiphany Catholic Church
with Father Michael Pendergraft
officiating. The family will re-
ceive friends at the funeral home
from 6:00-8:00 Wednesday eve-
ning. Interment in Jacksonville
National Cemetery will be held
at a later date. Arrangements
are under the direction of the
DEES-PARRISH FAMILY
FUNERAL HOME, 458 S.
Marion Ave., Lake City, FL
32025 (386)752-1234 please sign
our on-line family guestbook at
parrishfamilyfuneralhome. com



Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


cers everyone is encour-
aged to wear crazy,'
fun, whimsical, creative
hats. Dutch treat lunch
immediately following the
meeting. Call 755-5579 or
Live Oak area call 362-
2180.

Retirement planning
A Retirement Planning
Class for ages 50 and
above is 6-9 p.m.
Thursday at the Lifestyle
Enrichment Center.
Course instructors are
Douglas VanAtter and Irv
Crowetz, CLU. Subjects
will include retirement
expenses, retirement mis-
takes, income sources,
investments, estate plan-


ning, taxes and debt man-
agement. Cost is $29.95 a
couple. For more informa-
tion or to RSVP please con-
tact 755-3476 between the
hours.of 9 a.m. and noon.

Cardiovascular forum
Lake City Medical
Center A cardiovas-
cular forum is 11:30
a.m.-1 p.m. Thursday.
at Lake City Medical
Center H2U Building,
334 SW Commerce
Drive. The Cardiology
Associates of Gainesville,
Interventional
Cardiologists of
Gainesville and North
Florida Surgical


Associates will provide
an informational session
about cardiovascular diag-
nosis, care and surgery.
A light lunch will be pro-
vided. Seating is limited.
Please call (800) 525-3248
to reserve a seat

Monthly Landlord's
meeting
.The next Landlord's
meeting is 6 p.m.
Thursday at Lake
City Medical Center
Classroom 1. Sallie Ford,
environmental health
director, is the speaker.
All rental agents and
landlords are welcome.
Call 755-0110.

Friday
Columbia County
summer day camp
Registration for
the Columbia County
Recreation Department'
summer day camp pro-
gram is 8 a.m.-5 p.m. at
Richardson Community
Center. The camp is open
to boys and girls ages 7
-14 and is 7:30 a.m.-5:30
p.m., Monday-Friday, June
13-Aug. 3. The cost for the
eight-week camp is $225
and will include a variety
of daily activities, free
breakfast, lunch and week-
ly field trips. Admission
charges for four of the
weekly field trips are
included in the price
of admission. The camp
will feature five athletic
mini-camps and a two-day
reading camp at no extra
cost to campers. Space
is limited to the first 60
participants Contact Mario
Coppock or Nicole Smith
at 754-7095 or 754-7096.


*1


Free Preschool Screening

Ages 3 years to 4 years and 6 months

Fort White Elementary School

Tuesday, May 17 3:00am-5:00pm

Parkview Baptist Church

(268 NW Lake Jeffery Rd.)

Thursday, May 19 10:00am-6:00pm

Friday, May 20 10:00am-4:30pm
All children will be screened in the following areas:
*Functional Hearing and Vision *Motor Development
*Speech/Language Development *Concepts
These screenings are FREE to parents and are being conducted jointly by the
Columbia County Schools, and Florida Diagnostic and Learning Resources
System (FDLRS/Gateway). Each parent will have an opportunity to dis-
cuss their child's screening results with a member of the FDLRS/Gateway
staff or the Columbia County School District staff. For children under age
3, call FDLRS/Gateway for information or resources.
Parents interested in information about Voluntary PreK, Headstart, or Subsidized
Child Care may get details at this screening.
(Parents should plan approximately two hours time to complete the screening)
FREE Goody Bags
Foro More Information Call: Columbia County Student Services Office at 755-8049 Ext. 122 or
Jo Ann Laseter, FDLRS/Gateway at 1-800-227-0059


Do you have questions about cardiovascular
care in Lake City? Do you know what
treatment options are available?

Please join Lake City Medical Center, Cardiology Associates
of Gainesville, Interventional Cardiologists of Gainesville and
North Florida Surgical Associates for an informational
session about Cardiovascular diagnosis, care and surgery.
A light lunch will be provided.

As seating is limited, please call (800) 525-3248
to reserve your seat today!


THE CARDIOVASCULAR CENTER
AfT LAKE CITY MEDICAL CENTER


Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424








LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE WEDNESDAY, MAY 11, 2011


Gov. Scott calls first


session a success


By BRENDAN FARRINGTON
Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE -
Republican Gov. Rick Scott is
calling his first legislative ses-
sion a success, pointing at tax
cuts, changes to the Medicaid
program, education bills,
a measure requiring state
employees to pay; into their
pensions and more as victories
that will make Florida more
attractive for businesses. '
He by no means got every-
thing he wanted out of the ses-
sion that ended early Saturday
- most notably, corporate
tax cuts weren't as large as
he wanted and he wasn't able
tp follow through on a cam-
paign promise to get tougher
on illegal immigrants but
Scott said he was happy with
the compromises that were
made.
"You look at the positive.
We started phasing out the
business tax, we got property
tax cuts, we reduced the size
of government, the cost of
government, we're modern-
izing the pension plan, we got
a big success in education, we
got lots of reform Medicaid
reform," Scott said.
Scott, who has never before
held elected office, also
learned that being governor
isn't a matter of telling law-
makers what to do, even if the
House and Senate are domi-
nated by Republicans.
"He came in with no experi-
ence in public service and I
think he's learning something
every single day," said former
House Speaker Larry Cretul.
"He came in with a very
strong CEO-type of approach
to his role as the governor and
I think he also now has come
to realize others are elected as
well. You've got the House and
Senate, a total of 160 mem-
bers, that also have some very
strong opinions and ideas."
Scott campaigned on an
agenda of creating jobs by
making Florida more busi-


ASSOCIATED PRESS


Florida Gov. Rick Scott recently said he was happy with the
compromises that were made during his first legislative session.


ness-friendly. He wanted $458
million in corporate income
tax cuts by lowering the tax
rate from 5.5 percent to 3
percent Lawmakers instead
raised the exemption from
$5,000 to $25,000,which would
save each company $1,100 for
a total of $30 million in cuts.
He also wanted state workers
to contribute 5 percent of their
salary toward their pension.
Lawmakers approved a 3 per-
cent contribution.
Scott is also pleased the
Legislature passed a bill that
creates a merit pay system
for'teachers and does away
with tenure for new teach-
ers. A voucher program was
expanded, as was virtual
learning.
"If we just keep doing this,
we will be the model for the
country in education," Scott
said.
And while Scott hasn't pub-
licly made social issues part
of his agenda, he supports
pro-gun laws passed this year
as well as abortion laws that


will require women to get
an ultrasound before having
an abortion and will make it
more difficult for minors to
get an abortion without telling
their parents.
Democrats criticized
Scott's handling of the ses-
sion, saying h'e initially didn't
respect that the Legislature
has an equal say in laws that
are passed. They also ques-
tioned how much of a success
it was for Scott as opposed to
the Republican Legislature
doing what it would have
done anyway.
"He got a lot of what he
wanted but I wouldn't give
him or his administration
credit for it. If Bill McCollum
was governor, they might
have done almost everything
the exact same .way," said
Democratic House Leader
Ron Saunders, referring to
the, former attorney general
who lost the GOP primary to
Scott last year. "He just hap-
pened to be the Republican
governor."


SRWMD adds new real-time

river gage and expands data


Staff reports

LIVE OAK The
Suwannee River Water
Management District
recently added a new
gage to its real-time river
level network.
The .Suwannee River
at Noble's Ferry gage,
located at the County
Road 249 Bridge between
Suwannee and Hamilton
counties, fills a 23-mile
gap between the Ellaville
and Suwannee Springs
gages.
"People in the area
around Noble's Ferry
and the Alapaha River
confluence had abad time,
during the 2009 flood,"
Megan Wetherington,
District senior profes-
sional engineer, said.
"(Their) flooding came
from downstream when


the Withlacoochee and
Alapaha backed up the
Suwannee River.
"If they were looking
at the Suwannee Springs
forecast upstream, the
flooding potential was
minor. But it was a 50-
year event downstream
at Ellaville."
While the new gage
,will not be a flood fore-
cast point, residents can
compare future floods to
the 2009 crest.
"We tracked the crest
using a manual gage, so
at the very least people
can see if future floods
are better or worse than
the bad one two years
ago," Wetherington said.
The gage uses new
radar technology which
allows the water level
to be measured without
any equipment actually


touching the river.
In addition .to the
new gage, the District
expanded its public
access to water data
through its new 'hydro-
logic data portal. The
portal provides infor-
mation on past rainfall,
water levels, and water
quality data collected
from more than 300
monitoring sites within a
15-county region.
The new portal uses
interactive Google-based
maps to display data spa-
tially.
Real-time river levels
and the new data portal
are available at http://
www.srwmd.state.fl. us,
index.aspx?nid=345. F6o
more information contact
Megan Wetherington af
362-1001 or 800-226-1066
(Fla. only).


COURTESY PHOTO
Men of the House will put its musical talents on display at the Florida Folk Festival,.
'May 27-29, at the Stephen Foster Folk Culture Center State Park.

FOLK: Entering 59th year

Continued From Page 1A


daily at 8 4.m.
Advance festival tick-
ets are $20 per day or
$40 for the weekend for
adults and $25 per day
or $50 for the weekend
at the gate.
Tickets for children
ages six to 16 for the
weekend are $4 in


advance or $5 at the gate.
Children under six years
of age will be admitted
free of charge.
Discounted advance
tickets will be on sale
through May 20.
Call (877) 635-3655
to purchase tickets by
credit card.


Giarda said Stephen
Foster Folk Culture
Center State Park is
proud to host the festi-
val for another year.
"In its 59th year, its
become as much apart of
the park as the Carillon
tower (the park's bell
tower)," he said.


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Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424


,?r !










Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@lokeatyreporter.com


Lake City Reporter





SPORTS


Wpdnesdav. Mav I 1.201


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


BRIEFS

GOLF
Kiwanis charity
tourney May 20
The Lake City Kiwanis
Club is hosting a
four-person scramble
golf tournament at 1 p.m.
May 20 at The Country
Club of Lake City. Cost
is $60 per person. Hole
sponsorships are $50.
Lunch and drinks will be
provided. All proceeds go
to youth programs and
building future parks in
Columbia County.
For details, call Matt
Greene at 487-1374.
YOUTH. GOLF -
Junior tour
in Louisiana
The Arrowhead Junior
Golf Tour has a
tournament May 21-22
in Baton Rouge, La. The
36-hole event for ages
12-18 is ranked by the
National Junior Golf
Scoreboard.
To enter, call
(318) 402-2446 or enter
online at
www.arrowheadjgt. com.


International
Gator Day set
International Gator
Day, where gator clubs
unite worldwide to give
back to their
communities, is May 21.
The North Florida Gator
Club is teaming up with
Habitat for Humanity to
clean up a lot for a future
home. Meet at 8 a.m. at
KC's Produce on Baya
Avenue and bring yard
tools for the clean-up.
For details, call Diane
at-752-3333.
YOUTi- SWIMMING
CST registration
ends Friday
Columbia Swim Team
registration is 5:30-7 p.m.
Thursday and Friday at
the Columbia Aquatic
Complex. Bring a copy of
the child's birth
certificate.
For details, call
Michele Greene at
623-3403 or e-mail
cstdolphins@yahoo.com.
SWIMMING
Classes offered at
Aquatic Complex
Youth and adult
swimming lessons will be
offered at the Columbia
County Aquatic Complex,
beginning in June. Six
daily times are offered,
plus there are two daily
mom and tot classes.
Five sessions are offered
- with the first session
June 6-17. Cost is $50.
Registration is at the
pool from 5-7 p.m. June 1
and all day June 2-3.
From staff reports


GAMES

Friday
Columbia High
football Purple & Gold
game at Memorial
Stadium, 6 p.m.
Saturday
Fort White High
football Red & Black
game, 10 a.m.
May 20
Fort White High
football vs. Orange Park .
High in spring game,
7 p.m.
Columbia High
football vs. Dunnellon


High in spring game,
7:30 p.m.


Consistent



effort key



for Tigers


Columbia heads
into Purple &
Gold game Friday.
By BRANDON FINLEY
finley@lakecityreporter.comrn
Columbia High head
coach Brian Allen only had
one word on his mind as the
Tigers prepare for Friday's
Purple & Gold game, and
that was consistency.
Thefirst-year head coach
has been proud of the way


the Tigers have competed,
but he's looking for it on a
more consistent basis.
"We've been good in
spurts, but we haven't been
consistent," Allen said.
The main area of con-
cern throughout the spring
has been at wide receiver,
but Allen's team may make
some moves to improve the
spot.
"We've been doing some
things with (quarterback)
CHS continued on 3B


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High quarterback Nigel Atkinson (right) throws to J.T. Bradley during a practice
Tuesday.


Experience in the backfield


Starters Baker,
Cormier return
for Indians.
By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com
FORT WHITE Fort
White High graduated some
key players on offense,
but head coach Demetric
Jackson has two starters
returning in the backfield.
Drew Baker was quarter-
back in his freshman year
and took all the snaps in
2010. Baker was 52 of 104
passing for 659 yards, with
six touchdown passes and
five interceptions. He car-
ried the ball 78 times for
268 yards and scored two
touchdowns.
Fullback Zach Cormier
paved the way for running
backs Alexis Blake and JR
Dixon, who combined for
1,825 yards on the ground
last year. Cormier had 33
carries for. 107 yards and
scored one touchdown.
Soron Williams is work-
ing as the starting tail-k
back. He is backed up by
Jomar Gainer and Tavaris
Williams. Terry Calloway
and George Fulton are
working behind Cormier.
"Soron and Zach are
starting right now," Jackson
said. "Both guys know the
offense. The others are
starting on defense, but we
are taking a look at them in


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake,City Reporter
Fort White High football players are sprayed with about 3,200 gallons of water from Columbia County Fire Rescue fire trucks.
'We wanted to reward them for their efforts,' said head coach Demetric Jackson. 'This is a way to cool them off and keep up
morale.'


the backfield."
Jackson said the Indians'
started with 65 players and
were down to 55 on varsity
and JV by Monday.
Having an experienced
quarterback is a luxury
after the indecision last


year.
"Drew has really come
on," Jackson said. "The
way he threw the ball on
Monday, some of the coach-
es were saying, 'Is this the
same Drew?' He was throw-
ing great. We were running


'out' routes and there was
* pretty good coverage. He
threw the ball right in there.
All the defensive coaches
were really impressed,"
Five of Baker's touch-
down passes went to A.J.
Legree and the state high


jump champion will again
be a target for the sopho-
more.
"Last year, we made it
kind of simple," Jackson
said. '"This year, we will
INDIANS continued on 3B


A rusty Woods feeling

better heading into TPC


'Players' begir
on Thursday
PonteVedra.
By DOUG FERGUSON
Associated Press
PONTE VEDRA ]
- Tiger Woods h
series of shutters
spectator's camera
stopped his swing
last minute, knees
club shaft parallel
ground, holding hi
until he could reg
balance.
"Oh, no," said th
die for Mark 0O
"You're starting to
like Charles Barkley
Woods doubled
laughter Tuesday
eighth tee on th
Sawgrass, a light r
during his first time
golf since disclosing
knee and Achilles'


ns from the Masters.
in Woods said the left knee
which has gone through
four surgeries and his
left Achilles' are better.
"Good enough to play,"
he -said. "
How much better remains
BEACH to be seen, and Woods still
ieard a has to make it to the first
from a tee Thursday morning for
a and the start of The Players
at the Championship, where he
flexed, hasn't finished better than
to the eighth since winning 10
is pose years ago.
,ain his Woods said he tweaked
his left knee from an awk-
he cad- ward swing in the pine
'Meara. straw on the 17th hole of the
swing Masters in the third round,
T." and he played through
over in the discomfort in the final
on the round when he closed with
e TPC a 67 after making a brief
moment charge.
playing "It didn't feel good on
g minor Sunday. That was tough,"
injuries Woods said. "I played


through it, but ... I was in
the midst of playing and
competing and had to
power through it, so I did
it. I was able to shut it down
for a little bit and was able
to care of it."
Woods said he practiced
Monday for the first time
since the Masters. He
played golf Tuesday the
front nine at Sawgrass -
for the first time since that
last day at Augusta. He is
treating the injuries with
anti-inflammatories, ice,
elevating his legs and some
soft tissue work. Still to be
determined, since he hasn't
spent any time playing, is
whether it swells.
'We'll see how this week
progresses," he said. "If
it flares up like it did at
Augusta, then it flares ups.
But hopefully, it won't."
Woods' swing coach,
TPC continued on 2B


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Tiger Woods flips a golf ball while waiting to tee off on
the first hole during a practice round for The Players
Championship, Tuesday in Ponte Vedra Beach.


---------r, ---r --~---- i,'









LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS WEDNESDAY, MAY 11, 2011


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TV sports
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
8 p.m.
ESPN St Louis at Chicago Cubs
10 p.m.
WGN Chicago White Sox at L.A.
Angels
NBA BASKETBALL
7 p.m.
TNT Playoffs, conference
semifinals, game 5, Boston at Miami
9:30 p.m.
TNT Playoffs, conference semifinals,
game 5, Memphis at Oklahoma City

BASEBALL

AL standings
East Division
W L Pct GB
NewYork 19 13 .594 -
Tampa Bay 20 14 .588 -
Boston 17 18 .4863 1/2
Toronto 15 20 .4295 1/2
Baltimore 14 19 .4245 1/2
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Cleveland 22 II .667 -
Kansas City 18 16 .5294 1/2
Detroit 18 18 .5005 1/2
Chicago 14 22 .3899 1/2
Minnesota 12 21 .364 10
West Division
W L Pct GB
Los Angeles 20 16 .556 -
Oakland 19 17 .528 I
Texas 18 18 .500 2
Seattle 16 19 .4573 1/2
Tuesday's Games
Kansas City at N.Y.Yankees (n)
Seattle at Baltimore (n)
Tampa Bay at Cleveland (n)
Boston at Toronto (n)
Oakland atTexas (n)
Detroit at Minnesota (n)
Chicago White Sox at LA.Angels (n)
Today's Games
Detroit (Coke 1-5) at Minnesota
(S.Baker 2-2), 1:10 p.m.
Oakland (G.Gonzalez 4-2) at Texas
(Harrison 3-4), 2:05 p.m.
Kansas City (Chen 4-) at N.Y.Yankees
(A.J.Burnett 4-2), 7:05 p.m.
Seattle (F.Hernandez 4-2) at Baltimore
(Tillman I-3), 7:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay (Price 4-3) at Cleveland
(C.Carrasco 1-1), 7:05 p.m.
Boston (Lackey 2-4) atToronto (Litsch
- 3-2), 7:07 p.m.
Chicago White Sox (Peavy 0-0) at L.A.
Angels (Chatwood 2-1), 10:05 p.m.
Thursday's Games
Tampa Bay at Cleveland, 12:05 p.m.
Kansas City at N.Y.Yankees, 7:05 p.m.
Seattle at Baltimore, 7:05 p.m.

NL standings
East Division
W L Pct GB
Philadelphia 23 I I .676 -
Florida 20 14 .588 3
Atlanta 20 16 .556 4
Washington 16 18 .471 7
NewYork 15 20 .4298 1/2
Central Division
W L Pct GB
St. Louis 20 IS .571



Blakely


to leave


Florida


football

Associated Press

GAINESVILLE -
Running back Mike Blakely,
considered one of the top
recruits in the country, has
decided to transfer from
Florida.
Coach Will Muschamp
says Blakely wants to play
football elsewhere. Blakely,
who ran for 1,000 yards
and 14 touchdowns as a
senior at Manatee High in
Bradenton last fall, enrolled
in January and missed
spring drills because of a
shoulder injury.
Blakely thanked the
school for his experience,
but did not say where he
intends to transfer.
He is the fourth play-
er to leave Florida since
Muschamp took over in
January. Receivers Chris
Dunkley and Javares
McRoy transferred, and
cornerback Janoris Jenkins
was kicked off the team
following a second arrest
on a marijuana possession
charge.

Charges reduced for
Florida players


ST. AUGUSTINE -.
Suspended Florida players
Erik Murphy ard Cody
Larson are no longer facing
burglary charges.
The State Attorney's
Office reduced one felony
count of third-degree bur-
glary to second-degree mis-
demeanor criminal trespass
Monday.


Cincinnati
Pittsburgh
Chicago
Milwaukee
Houston


19 16
18 17
15 18
15 20
13 22
West Division


W L Pct GB
Colorado 19 14- .576 -
San Francisco 18 16 .5291 1/2
Arizona 15 18 .455 4
Los Angeles 16 20 .4444 1/2
San Diego 14 21 .400 6
Tuesday's Games
LA..Dodgers at Pittsburgh (n)
Philadelphia at Florida (n)
Washington at Atlanta (n)
Cincinnatiat Houston (n)
St. Louis at Chicago Cubs (n)
San Diego at Milwaukee (n)
N.Y. Mets at Colorado (n)
Arizona at San Francisco (n)
Today's Games
San Diego (Stauffer 0-I) at Milwaukee
(Wolf 3-3), 1:10 p.m.
Ciircinnati (Volquez 3-1) at Houston
(W.Rodriguez 2-3), 2:05 p.m.
N.Y. Mets (Niese 1-4) at Colorado
(jimenez 0-2), 3:10 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers (Kuroda 3-3) at
Pittsburgh (Maholm I-4), 7:05 p.m.
Philadelphia (CI.Lee 2-3) at Florida
(Nolasco 3-0), 7:10 p.m.
Washington (Lannan 2-4) at Atlanta
(Hanson 4-3), 7:10 p.m.
St. Louis (Westbrook 2-2) at Chicago
Cubs (Garza 1-4), 8:05 p.m.
Arizona (Galarraga 3-2) at San
Francisco (j.Sanchez 2-2), 10:15 p.m.
Thursday's Games
St. Louis at Chicago Cubs, 2:20 p.m.
Arizona at San Francisco, 3:45 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers at Pittsburgh, 7:05 p.m.
Washington atAtlanta, 7:10 p.m.

BASKETBALL

NBA playoffs
CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS
Monday
Miami 98, Boston 90, OT, Miami leads
series 3-1 *
Oklahoma City 133, Memphis 123,
30T. series tied 2-2
STuesday
Atlanta at Chicago (n)
Today
Boston at Miami, 7 p.m.
Memphis at Oklahoma City, 9:30 p.m.
Thursday
Chicago at Atlanta, 8 p.m.

All-Defensive Team


First Team
Pos. Player Ist
C Dwight Howard 27
G Rajon Rondo 16
F LeBron James 17
G Kobe Bryant 13
F Kevin Garnett 15
Second Team
G Tony Allen 7
G Chris Paul 6
CTyson Chandler 3
F Andre Iguodala 5
F/C Joakim Noah '3
Other players receiving


9 23
6 18
II 17
5 15
9 15
votes, with


point totals (First Team votes in paren-
theses): Derrick Rose, Chicago, 14 (4);
Dwyane Wade, Miami, 13 (3); Russell
Westbrook, Oklahoma City, 13 (4);
Gerald Wallace, Portland, II (I); Grant


Hill, Phoenix I I(4); Luol Deng, Chicago
II (4); Tim Duncan, San Antonio, I
(3); Chuck Hayes, Houston, 10 (2); Al
Horford,Atlanta 7 (3);Josh Smith,Atlanta,
7 (I); Ron Arcest, ,Los Angeles Lakers,
7 (1); Serge Ibaka, Oklahoma City, 6
(I); Shane Battier, Memphis 5 (2);Thabo
Sefolosha, Oklahoma City, 5; Wesley
Matthews, Portland 4 (2), Kendrick
Perkins, Oklahoma City, 3; Nicolas Batum,
Portland, 3; (I); Joe Johnson, Atlanta; 2 (I);
Keith Bogans, Chicago 2 (I); Kyle Lowry,
Houston, 2; Lamar Odom, Los Angeles
Lakers, 2; Luc Mbah a Moute, Milwaukee, 2;
Manu Ginobili, San Antonio, 2 (1);Andrew
Bogut, Milwaukee, I; Andrew Bynum, Los
Angeles Lakers I; Arron Afflalo, Denver, I;
Jrue Holiday, Philadelphia I; Kirk Hinrich,
Atlanta I; Nene, Denver, I; Ronnie Brewer,
Chicago,1 I; Shawn Marion, Dallas, I;
Tayshaun Prince, Detroit, I.
NOTE: The voting panel consisted of
the NBA's 30 head coaches. Each selected
NBAAII-Defensive first and second teams
by position. Coaches were not permitted
to vote for players from their own team.
Two points were awarded for a first-team
vote and one point for second team.

GOLF

Golf week
PGATOUR
Players Championship
Site: Ponte Vedra Beach
Schedule:Thursday-Sunday.
Course:TPC Sawgrass, Players Stadium
Course (7,215 yards, par 72).
Purse: $9.5 million. Winner's share:
$1.71 million.
Television: Golf Channel (Thursday-
Friday, 1-7 p.m., 9 p.m.-midnight; Saturday-
Sunday, 9-11 p.m.) and NBC (Saturday-
Sunday, 2-7 p.m.).
Online: http://www.pgatour.com
EUROPEAN TOUR
Iberdrola Open
Site: Son Servera, Spain.
Schedule:Thursday-Sunday.
Course: Pula Golf Club (6,915 yards,
par 70).
Purse: $1.44 million. Winner's share:
$239,810.
Television: Golf Channel (Thursday-
Friday, 9- 11 a.m.; Saturday-Sunday,
8-1 1:30 a.m.).
Online: http://www.europeantour.com
LPGATOUR
Next event: Sybase Match ,Play
Championship, May 19-22, Hamilton Farm
Golf Club, Gladstone, N.J.
Online: http://www.lpgo.com
CHAMPIONS TOUR
Next event:Senior PGA Championship,
May 26-29,Valhalla GC, Louisville, Ky.
NATIONWIDE TOUR
Next event: BMW Charity Pro-Am,
May 19-22, Thornblade Club, Bright's
Creek Golf Club, The Carolina Country
Club, Greer, S.C.

HOCKEY

NHL playoffs
CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS
Monday
Vancouver 2, Nashville I, Vancouver
wins series 4-2
Tuesday
San Jose at Detroit (n)


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1i I I _


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love vo1 so0


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words. i

CMUPL
< a7" / "\ /
2011 Tribune Media Services, Inc
All Rights Reserved.
ARNBW



GNITHK <
01




FUEIRG _
FUElRI
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Call Mary or Bridget
TODAY to place a
s. surprise ad for
someone you love!


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek


Answer: W D I
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's Jumbles: FRESH HEFTY FRUGAL AFFECT
Yesterday's Answer: The captain entertained passengers with
these "FERRY" TALES


GOLF REPORTS



Randall's eagle leads to win


Lefty Bob Randall's eagle
on the second hole led to
the day's only double-digit
score (+11) and a win in the
Saturday blitz.
Mike McCranie (+8) rode
three birdies to a second-
place finish. Trey Jackson
took third place, another
three shots back.
Randall, Jackson and
McCranie each added
a skin to the their day's
take. Terry Hunter, Bruce
Gibson and Dave Mehl had
the other skins.
Keith Shaw (+10) had
just enough gas in his tank
to outrun four birdies by
Buddy Slay (+9) and a
strong start by Jerry West
(+8) for the top spot in
Wednesday's blitz.
Mike McCranie, Lex
McKeithen and Charlie
Timmons shared fourth
place at +3.
Jonathan Allen had two
of six winners in the skins
game. The others went to
Codi Hudson, McCranie,


COUNTRY CLUB
at LAKE CITY'
Ed Goff

Slay and George Burnham
for an eagle on No. 9.
The LGA "throw out" for-
mat let competitors make a
blind draw to choose which
holes to throw out of their
scores.
Jane McGriff picked the
right numbers for a net
53 and first place. Gloria
Rowley missed out by a
stroke for second. Cathy
Steen and Dottie Rogers
tied for third with 56.
The Good Old Boys
scored plenty of team points
in their featured matches.
Terry Mick, Jim Bell,
Howard Whitaker and
Jerry Snowberger took the
measure of Ed Snow, Dave
Cannon, Tom Kennedy, Jim
Stevens and Dan Stephens,
in Match 1, 8-6.
Marc Risk, Nick
Whitehurst, Tom Elmore,


Bobby Simmons and Jim
McGriff really lit up the
board with an 11-5 win
over Don Christensen,
Eli Witt, Joe Persons, Bill
Rogers and Tony Branch in
Match 2.
Risk led the individ-
ual scoring race with 74.
Whitaker and Christensen
shared second place with
77. Simmons was in solo
fourth with a 78. Snow,
Montgomery and Stephens
all shot 79 to close out the
scores of note.
The Comprehensive
Community Services event
tees off at 8:30 a.m. Friday.
Registration begins at
8 a.m. Proceeds will be used
to support individuals with
intellectual disabilities.
The MGA 33-25 tourna-
ment is Saturday with a
blind draw for teams at
7:30 a.m., followed by a
shotgun start. '
The Kiwanis scramble is
May 20. 'A shotgun start is
scheduled for 1 p.m.


TPC: Woods returns to Jacksonville
Continued From Page 1B


Sean Foley, said he had
been walking in a protec-
tive boot as a precaution.
Woods chose not to play the
Wells Fargo Championship
last week, giving himself a
week to see if the knee and
Achilles' improved. He said
he would have played last
week had it been a major,
smiling as if to remind that
he won a U.S. Open on
a shattered left leg three
years ago.
That was his 14th major,
and the last time he won
the tournaments that mean
the most. And he made it
clear, even at a tournament
debated as the "fifth major,"
that it remains his priority.
"The whole idea is that I
peak four times a year, and
I'm trying to get ready for
Congressional, and I need
some playing time," Woods
said. "I missed playing
last week at a golf course
I truly love playing, but I
really want to get out there


and compete. This is a big
event, and I want to be here
and play."
The TPC Sawgrass is not
among his favorites, and
the record reflects that.
He was runner-up to Hal
Sutton in 2000, then won
The Players Championship
the following year, when he
went on to win the Masters
to hold all four major titles.
Since then, he has only one
top 10 eighth place, after
starting the last round in
the final group, five shots
out of the lead.
Beyond not winning
majors, Woods hasn't won
anything in 18 months,
dating to the Australian
Masters in November 2009.
He is rebuilding his swing,
and taking his share of crit-
icism along the way, similar
to previous swing changes.
Now, even the players
are piling on.
Bubba Watson, who used
to show up early at majors


ACROSS 39 Toward the
edge
Reprimand 40 Summer hrs.
"The Prisoner 41 Gab
of -" 42 Leo mo.
Commotion 44 BLT need
Traffic divider 47 Souvenir buy
Hassle contin- (hyph.)
uously 51 Made of fleece
Grouchy 52 Removed the
Barracks off. pits
Web suffix 53 Basilica parts
Dessert cart 54 Connery and
item Penn


Drifters
Trend
- bind
Cafeteria
amenity
Harmful thing
Address parts
Aileron sites
Male voice
Bit of glitter
Singles
Football cheer
Always, to Poe
Corporate
abbr.


DOWN

1 Dine
2 Klinger's rank
(abbr.)
3. A feast -
famine
4 Records, as
mileage
5 Female
descendant
6 Nulls
7 Red-waxed
cheese


with hopes of playing prac-
tice rounds with Woods,
said last week that Woods
was "going the wrong
way."
"He's so mental right now
with his swing," Watson
said, a two-time winner this
year.
. Watson said he hasn't
spoken to Woods, only his
agent and another person
in Woods' camp to explain
that he "didn't say anything.
wrong" and that the media
blew it out of proportion.
"I just told him, 'Look,
you know me. I'm friends
with you. I've been a sup-
porter of you the whole
time I've been a pro and
have known you. So I'm
here for you, but I didn't do
anything wrong,"' Watson
said. "The camp says I'm
OK, but I haven't talked to
the boss yet."
- Woods said he found
the comments to be
"interesting."


Answer to Previous Puzzle

BUNK OOK OMEN


MAPOAKRA NCOS
THOI-EN


AMA WIG TA D

GP NBA ATMS
E SO PEEL NOSE



A WE -DFU J IYA M A
FL E OFF S 0 C
TSPS POKE SOY


Pen point
Apply makeup
Some
Answer back
"Star Trek"
physician


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


18 Revolver
19 Focused
20 Got, as salary
22 Long-eared
pet
23 Like cobras
24 Sharp
corners
25 Cactus habitat
28 Grain holder
30 Dawn goddess
31 Tusked
animals
34 Kilt features
36 Klondike terri-
tory
39 Joyce Carol -
41 Harvard rival
43 Clarified but-
ter
44 Dundee duo
45 Comic cave-
man
46 Yr. fractions
48 Potato st.
49 Toon
Chihuahua
50 Gridiron stats


5-11 2011 by UFS, Inc.


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421


II


I

(
I
l

(













Miami on cusp of I


landing Boston KO It t &6%


By TIM REYNOLDS
Associated Press

MIAMI Their charter
flight home from Boston
landed around 3 a.m.
Tuesday, and the Miami
Heat were back at work
less than 12 hours later.
Typically, such a late
arrival would merit a day
off.
Not now not when on
the cusp of knocking off
the team that has pained
Dwyane Wade, LeBron
James and the Heat for so
long.
Up 3-1 in their best-of-
seven Eastern Conference
semifinal series, the Heat
will go for the clincher at
home against the Celtics on
Wednesday night.' Miami
grabbed control with a 98-
90 overtime win in Boston
on Monday night, and now
stands one victory away
from reaching the East
finals for the first time
since the 2006 champion-
ship run.
"This is not a team that
you let your guard down
against," Wade said.
"No way," instantly
chimed in James, nodding
as he stood on Wade's left.
It was not a long workout
for the Heat on Tuesday,
Mostly film work and some
light shooting. The Celtics
took the day off, opting
instead to gather around
midday for their flight to
South Florida, though
it was certain that ailing
players like Rajon Rondo
- who remains hampered
mightily by the aftereffects
of dislocating his elbow in
Game 3 would be getting
some treatment
"I'll be fine," Rondo said.
"I'm playing."
The Heat will not make
any changes to the start-
ing lineup either, coach
Erik Spoelstra said, mean-
ing Joel Anthony will
remain at center to open
the game and Zydrunas
Ilgauskas will come off
the bench, as will point
guard Mario Chalmers
behind first-stringer Mike
Bibby.
Minutes after Game 4
ended, Spoelstra began tell-
ing his team that ending
Boston's season would be
its toughest challenge yet.
He did not back down from
that on Tuesday. '
"We can expect their
best," Spoelstra said. "We
know we're getting their
best effort and I'm sure
they'll play well. We'll have
to play better."
Wade and James, who
combined for 63 points in
Game 4, concurred. They
became teammates, in part,
to beat Boston after the
Celtics thwarted James's.
plan to bring a title to
Cleveland and dominated
the Heat since 2007, includ-
ing a five-game ousting of
Miami in the opening round


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Miami Heat's Dwyane Wade (3) guards the basket against
Boston Celtics guard Delonte West (13) during the second
half of Game 4 of a second-round NBA playoff basketball
series in Boston on Monday. The Heat won 98-90 in
overtime, and lead the series 371.


of last season's playoffs.
"This is like an Eastern
Conference finals type-of-
buildup series," Wade said.
"And it's been played out
that way."
Maligned much of the
season for their collec-
tive struggles late in close
games, the Heat got contri-
butions across the board to
pull it out in Game 4. James
made a 3-pointer "A
backbreaker," Celtics guard
Ray Allen said later inch-
es away from the Boston
bench to tie it at 84 with 2
minutes left in regulation.
Wade's long jumper with
2:01 left in overtime was for
a 92-86 lead and rendered
Boston's crowd silent And
Chris Bosh sealed the win
with 24 seconds left, tipping
in James' miss to put Miami
up by five.
"We executed well down
the stretch defensively and
offensively," said Heat for-
ward James Jones,- who
made another key play by
fouling Allen and taking
away a potential Boston fast
break with the game tied at
86 with 19 seconds left in
regulation. "I think it was
just our presence of mind,
our determination. We had
mistakes. We made some
mistakes."
So did Boston.
The Celtics' miscues
were far more noticeable
down the stretch.
Rondo missed a layup
with. 1:11 left in regulation,
misfiring on an easy chance
to give Boston what would
have been a two-point lead.


Paul Pierce had to take a
wild shot at the fourth-quar-
ter buzzer after Allen and
Kevin Garnett collided on
a play that could have won
the game for the Celtics
and instead left them all
shaking their heads.
In overtime, Boston had
as many turnovers four
as points.
"When our back is against
the wall, that's when we
show great resilience,"
Garnett said. "We'll see
what we're made of."
If the Celtics lose, some
sweeping changes may be
on the way.
The core of the team
likely will remain the same
for at least one .more sea-
son. But coach Doc Rivers
who contract is expiring
at season's end has often
said the lure of spending
more time with family is dif-
ficult to ignore.And a loss
may spell the end of the
Shaquille O'Neal era.,
He eclipsed the. 50,000-
minute mark for his career
last month and time has
clearly taken its toll on his
body, so there will surely
be widespread speculation
that whenever Boston's sea-
son ends, the final buzzer
for O'Neal's career may
beckon as well.
But in the Boston lock-
er room late Monday, all
that mattered was winning
Game 5 and extending the
series.
"We've got to get one
win right now," Pierce said.
"That's the focus. ... It's all
.on the line."


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Fort White quarterback Drew Baker prepares to throw during practice on May 5.

INDIANS: Red & Black game Saturday
Continued From Page 1B
open it up more and hope- want to do on offense and the effort."
fully he will excel at it. Drew that makes my job easy. Fort White will play
is real smart and knows the He is naturally competitive, its Red & Black game at
offense. He knows what we wants to do well, and puts in 10 a.m. Saturday.


COURTESY PHOTO
Students from Robert Sepulveda's ATA Black Belt Academy show trophies won at recent
tournaments. Ronald Carver is standing with Alice Geiger (from left), Ashtyn Warner and
Joy Geiger kneeling. .


ATA Black Belt Academy

students excel in events


From staff report

Four students of Robert
Sepulveda from his ATA
Black Belt Academy com-
peted in two tournaments
in April.
The four brought home
16 first-place trophies.
Joy Geiger and Alice
Geiger, both 1st-degree
black belts, participated in
both tournaments.
Ashtyn Warner, a 2nd-
degree black belt, and
Ronald Carver, a red belt,
each competed in one of
the tournaments.
Master Jim Riehards,
a 6th-degree black belt,
hosted a tournament
at Armstrong Atlantic
University in his home-
town of Savannah, Ga., on
April 30.


Joy Geiger won first
place in Traditional
Weapons, Creative Forms
and Creative Weapons. She
took third place in Combat
Weapons Sparring.
Alice Geiger won first
place in Creative Forms
and Creative Weapons.
She placed second in
Traditional Forms,
Traditional Weapons and
Combat Weapons Sparring,
and third in Traditional
Sparring.
Carver won first place
in Traditional Forms,
Traditional Weapons,
Creative Forms and
Creative Weapons. He
was second in Traditional
Sparring.
Master Miguel Nelson
of Boca Raton, also a 6th-
degree black belt, hosted


a tournament at Atlantic
Community High in Delray
Beach on April 16.
Warner won first place
in Traditional forms,
Traditional Weapons
and Combat Weapons
Sparring. She placed third
in Traditional Sparring.
Alice Geiger Won first
place in Traditional
Weapons and Creative
Weapons. She placed sec-
ond in' Creative Forms,
Traditional Forms
and Combat Weapons
Sparring.
Joy Geiger won first
place in Combat Weapons
Sparring and Creative
Forms. She placed sec-
ond in Creative Weapons
and third in Traditional
Sparring and Traditional
Weapons.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High's Braxton Stockton runs through a drill Tuesday.


e & Gold


"The good thing is that
we have two good quarter-
backs," he said. '"We also
have some decent lineback-
ers and defensive line."
The game won't be set up
as offense against defense
and no odd-scoring system
will be involved.
"We'll try to make it as
much like the spring game
as possible," Allen said.
'We won't have live kick-
offs and we'll spot the balls
after the catch on punts,
but we're trying to make it
as close to the real thing as
possible."


tive from spring."
Allen is still making prep-
arations for his first Purple
& Gold game, which is set
to kick off at 6 p.m. Friday
at Memorial Stadium.
Lineups likely won't be
released until before the
game on Friday.
"We'll have a draft with
the players late Thursday,"
Allen said. '"We'll try to set
it up so that the teams are
evenly matched."
Allen is excited to see
quarterbacks Atkinson and
Jayce Barber in competi-
tion.


Continued From Page 11

Nigel (Atkinson) and J.T.
Bradley out in space,"
Allen said. "We're not at all
getting away from Nigel at
quarterback, but it gives
us a fresh look and he's
opened eyes in space."
Allen admits that spring
is too short of a time to
mold all of the pieces
together.
'Three weeks is not
enough to piece everything
together," Allen said. "We'll
hash out things during the
summer and fall. The thing
we're looking for is effort.
We can tell who is competi-


CHS: Headed into Purpl


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS WEDNESDAY, MAY 11, 2011


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420








LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS WEDNESDAY, MAY 11; 2011


DILBERT

WALLY. DID YOU
FINISH CODING THE
PAYWALL FORP, OUR
WEBSITE?


BABY BLUES


BLONDIE
MR. BUMSTEAD, VOUR SIGNATURE
ON THIS WITHDRAWAL SLIP DOESN'T
LOOK LIKE YOUR USUAL ONE

ru ss






BEETLE BAILEY
BEETLE BAILEY


AT BONUS TIME,I
IN MIND THAT YC
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IDEA TO ELIMIN
REVENUE, AND IT'
ONE WHO LOWEF
HOSTING COST
S i K


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE


KEEP
)U'RE
THE
ATE
NTHE
I.ED
-S.


I DID SOMETHING
BETTER. I WROTE A
SCRIPT TO DELETE
ANY NEW CONTENT
AS SOON AS IT'S
POSTED.


" ''


L DEAR ABBY: Your
mother's recipes occasion-
ally have been printed in
your column. However,
mte there is one of the best that I
FO have never seen yet. It's her
S "St. James' Baked Beans."
If you have never tried it be-
fore, then the greatest taste
sensation has been missed.
I am always invited back to
any party- provided I bring
the beans. I have always
given your mom full credit
for the recipe and have nev-
4CK, z- er changed a single ingredi-
uL HAVE. ent. You can't improve upon
urHONT O perfection.
Do your readers a favor
and print it They won't be
sorry. My mom started.
making them when she
bought the first cookbook-
let in 1987, and I have
continued the tradition.
Thanks! SANDRA S.,
PORT ST. LUCIE, FIA.
THE DEAR SANDRA: I'm
ERPAY pleased to print the recipe.
With summer almost here,
( those baked beans will
make a welcome addition to
any barbecue or patio party
and they're high in fiber,
too. Other recipes in the
cookbooklet set are also ter-
rific for entertaining when
the weather is sweltering.
Among them are Summer
Cucumber Salad, Cucum-


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-
April 19): Let your imagi-
nation lead to alternatives
that can help you make the
most of whatever situation
you face. Put your entrepre-
neurial talents to the test
and no one will match what
you have to offer. Don't
worry about what others
say. *****
TAURUS (April 20-
May 20): There is too
much information hidden
for you to make an honest
assessment of your situa-
tion. Don't let your emo-
tions cause you to jump
into something without
sufficient thought. Decide
whether or not your life-
style can sustain the cur-
rent economic climate. **
GEMINI (May 21-
June 20): You- should be
working toward stabilizing
your life, not confusing is-
sues. Emotional uncertain-
ty will leave you question-
ing what you are d6ing in
all aspects of your life. Slow
down, take your time and
consider all your options.

CANCER (June 21-
July 22): You may want
to jump into something
that appears to be helping
a cause you believe in but,
before you make a commit-
ment, consider what's actu-
ally expected. Overspend-
ming or giving too much of
your time or skills could
result. ***


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

LEO (July 23-Aug.
22): A financial or busi-
ness contract or concern
can now be resolved. Don't
waste time talking when
what you need is a written
agreement. Don't let an
emotional debt cause you
to abuse your health or
well-being ***
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Emotions will surface
and impulsive actions will
follow. You will take oth-
ers by surprise with your
no-nonsense way of dealing
with situations. Stand firm
when it comes to matters
that concern your finances.
Don't let anyone get away
with not paying what's
owed you. ***
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): A little tender loving
care given to" your home,
along with some updating
will, make your life easier
and improve your emotion-
al well-being. A relationship
that means a lot to you can
be enhanced. Good fortune
is apparent in real estate
and personal investments.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-
Nov. 21): Make plans for
the future that ensure your
professional status. Take
on clients or offer services
through a freelance busi-
ness. Although your life


may be going through a se-
ries of changes, if you trust
in your intuition, you will be
fine. ****
SAGITrARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): You need a
little excitement in your life.
Sign up for an adventure or
get involved in a challeng-
ing event. You need to put
your skills to use in order to
feel motivated to move for-
ward. Love is in the stars.
**
CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): Don't give
in to persistent nagging or
emotional blackmail. Stop
taking on other people's re-
sponsibilities. Put yourself
first and you will be better
equipped to help others do
for themselves. ***
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): You'll have no
trouble getting your way or
convincing others to help
you. Your charm will help
you reconnect with past
partners who have some-
thing to offer that you want.
Anew approach to your life
will do you good. ***
PISCES (Feb. 19-
March 20): Your intuition
may tell you one thing but,
if you accuse someone
based on what you feel and
not facts, you may be disap-
pointed at .the results. Con-
centrate more on what you
have to offer. Follow your
beliefs and set your own
standards. ***


CELEBRITY CIPHER

by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: L equals G
"OMOHX LHOVF GTRFVUO ZVR V
ZVBWAVX G I G O J F V RSBTF RODIJN
AZOJ TF DVJ YO HODVBBON VJN


SOHZVSR HOGONTON."


S VHB R.


Y P D U
PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "We all have idols. Play like anyone you care about
but try to be yourself while you're doing so." B.B. King
(c) 2011 by NEA, Inc. 5-11


CLASSIC PEANUTS


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearobby.com
ber Soup, Abby's Tomato
Salad, Summer Surprise
Dessert (made with fresh
fruit) and Ritz Pecan Pie. All
of them are simple and easy
to make. The cookbooklet
set can be ordered by send-
ing your name and address,
plus check or money order
for $12 (U.S. funds) to: Dear
Abby Cookbooklet Set,
P.O. Box 447, Mount Mor-
ris, IL 61054-0447. Shipping
and handling are included
in the price. Included with
the recipes are tips for not
only entertaining, but also
how to graciously end a
party without being rude -
- a question I am frequently
asked.
ST. JAMES' BAKED
BEANS
(Serves 8)
6 slices bacon, diced
1/2 cup chopped onion
1 (16-ounce) can pork
and beans, drained
1 (16-ounce) can lima
beans, drained
1 (15-ounce) can kidney


DEAR ABBY


Reader spills the beans

about tasty summer dish


REALLY? HOW DO I KNOW YOU'RE
NOT CHANGING YOUR SIGNATURE
FOR SOME SNEAKY ,
REASON? ---- WHAT SNEAKY
REASON WOULO
I HAV
J SOMETHING
ELIK
F---*TH.A_.


PERFECT COMEBA
MR. BUMSTEAD, ONLY
SNEAKY PERSON WOL
T1O4


"ll "


DANG, MAW--I WISH YA HADN'T TOLD
ME WHAT MIZ PRUNELLY SAID--
NOW I CAN'T SLEEP NEITHER !!


SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS


GARFIELD


B.C.


FRANK & ERNEST


beans, rinsed and drained
1 (10-ounce) package
sharp cheddar cheese,
cubed
1 cup ketchup
3/4 cup firmly packed
dark brown sugar
1 tablespoon Worcester-
shire sauce
Heat oven to 325 de-
grees. Butter a 1 1/2-quart
casserole. In a small skillet,
saute the bacon and onions
until the bacon is crisp and
onions are lightly browned;
drain well. In a large bowl,
combine the remaining in-
gredients. Add bacon-on-
ion mixture; mix well. Pour
bean mixture into prepared
casserole. Bake uncovered
at 325 degrees for 1 1/2
hours. Enjoy!
DEAR ABBY: Why is
it when women get head-
aches or something goes
wrong that depresses them,
they take it out on us men?
- SOMETIMES NOT MY
FAULT IN SIOUX CITY,
IOWA
DEAR SOMETIMES
NOT MY FAULT: For
the same reason that men
do it. It's because you are
THERE.

* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415













olumbia

Your marketplace source for Lake City and


WEDNESDAY, MAY 11, 2011


LAKE CITY REPORTER


Vacation Station provides


pets with ultimate comfort


action Station
Pet Resort in
High Springs
is a pet's ulti-
mate home
away from home.
"I mean, there's no place
like home," said MariLu
Grant, owner, "but we want
to make them as comfort-
able as we can when they're
here."
The small, privately owned
and operated business is a
boarding facility for dogs
and cats of all breeds and
sizes, excluding aggressive
dogs. Pets can stay while
their owners are traveling
for either business or vaca-
tion, or up to any length of
time the customer wishes,
Grant said.
While pets board at
Vacation Station, the staff
caters to their individual
needs, Grant said, includ-
ing the feeding schedule
they're used to at home,
if they can interact with
the other dogs boarding,
how much exercise they
need and specifically what
they're fed and the medi-
cations they're on, if the
owner brings such items in.
Those needs and more are
identified when the owner
drops their pet off.
"We go over everything
we can," Grant said.
Pets stay in clean luxury


accommodations with cots
in their kennels, can under-
go basic training if their
owner chooses and can also
be bathed and groomed.
"They're pampered," she
said. "'They're spoiled rot-
ten. What makes us dif-
ferent is we continue to
spoil them rotten when
they come from Mom and
Dad to us. They're my dogs
whenever they're here and
I treat them like they're
mine and I have the staff
that treats them that way."
Pets will also enjoy a
covered outdoor patio and
multiple safe playing areas,
or go on nature walks.
"Our philosophy is that
they come in, they play
hard and they sleep hard,"
Grant said. "They get more
activity probably than any
other facility."
Grant has been in the
pet-boarding business
for almost 35 years, with
Vacation Station Pet Resort
being the third kennel she's
owned.
It opened in October 2007
when Grant's other kennel
- Archer Road Pet Resort,
located in Archer and still
open for business began
to grow. Plus, Grant saw
a need for a pet-boarding
business in the area.
She chose pet-boarding
because of her love for


dogs.
"Being a dog-lover, I
don't have kids, so I know
how people feel about their
pets and about the anxi-
ety of leaving them," Grant
said. "It's usually harder on
the owner than the pet."
'"They (the pets) are an
extension of their family,"
she said.
Grant said she keeps
Vacation Station small with
a small staff two assis-
tants, kennel technicians
and a groomer to offer
individualized care to the
pets and personalized ser-
vice to her customers.
"We strive to provide the
highest customer service
because we know their
(the customers') anxiety
and their fears," she said.
"We're a small operation.
You're not just a number.
We know everybody by
their name. We know all
the idiosyncrasies about
their pets."
Advertising with the
Lake City Reporter's special
projects and its Currents
magazine has been benefi-
cial for her business, Grant
said.
"It's been very helpful,"
she said. "I love Lake City.
It's a market I really want
to target."
Vacation Station Pet
Resort is located at 578 SE


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
MariLu Grant, owner of Vacation Station Pet Resort in High Springs, poses with Murphy (from
left), a 4-year-old Terrier mix; Mac, a 3-year-old long hair Chihuahua; and Lindsey, a 12-year-
old Spring Spaniel. The best advice Grant offers for a long-lasting relationship with one's dog
is to 'be the leader, and they will follow.' She also said that they should be showered with 'lots


of love.'

Brawley Terrace, off U.S.
Highway 441 North in High
Springs.
The resort is open
Monday through Saturday
from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. and 4
p.m. to 6 p.m. Sunday hours
are 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. and all
hours are by appointment
only. -1


A staff member is always
on the premises 24 hours,
seven days a week.
Call (352) 538-9431,
fax (386) 454-8217, e-mail
VSPetResort@aol.com or
visit www.vacationstation-
petresort.com.
After doing business
with Vacation Station Pet


Resort, both the owners
and their pets will leave
happy, Grant said.
"People go home satis-
fied and the dogs go home
healthy and happy," she
said. "And they like coming
here. That's the reward,
that the dogs enjoy coming
back."


-1 7t


Columbia County


t",mJ1 1'








LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED WEDNESDAY, MAY 11, 2011

Lake City Reporter





CLASSIFIED


Classified Department: 755-5440


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

755-5440


- ADvantage


One Item per ad II
4 lines 6 days Eachadditional
Rate applies to private Individuals selling
personal merhandise totalling $100 or less.
This Is a non-refundable rate.l j




One item per ad ac |
4 lines 6 days Eat additional
Rate applies to private Individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling $S00 or less.







Each item must include a price. j
This is a non-refundable rate.




SOne Item per ad* .LY |
4I lines R r*6 ay Each additional







g ,4 ,o X lines $ a S~p 1.55
Rate applies to private individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling $1p000 or less. .
This isE a non-refundable rate.




|One Item per ad iSX |
14 lines 6 days g$ad 45 tinl
|Lperaonl mrhaondis toallng v2,500 eor lss. J
| Each item must include a price. J





|4 lies dayss a y | na
peRsanal mrhtaondis taling $400 or less, J
| Eahi Ite fnus inldeab pc.


4One item per ad a to
4 1 lines 6 days t^~dd oneg
SRate applies to private ladivduel suellng
personal merchandise tuael nOsO ggpr aess.
S Each item must include a price.
Ths oann-refundabe rata


4 IMes$ i 50
3 days J.
Iocluaes Sign h d l O,)nd 165



Limited to service type advertis-
ing only.
4 lines, one month....s92.00
$10.80 each additional line
Includes an additional $2.00 per
ad for each Wednesday insertion.



You can call us at 755-5440,
Monday through Friday from 8:00
a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Some people prefer to place their
classified ads in person, and some
ad categories will require prepay-
ment. Our office is located at 180
East Duyal Street.
You can also fax or email your ad
copy to the Reporter.
FAX: 386-752-9400 Please
direct your copy to the Classified
Department.
EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityre-
S porter.com :





Ad is to Appear: Call by. Fax/Emall by:
Tuesday Mon., 10:00 a.m'. Min.,9:00a.m.
Wednesday Mor.,10:00a.m. Mon.,9:00a.m.,
Thursday .Wed., 10:00 a.m. Well., 9:00 a.m.
Friday Thurs.,10:00a.m, .Turs., 9:00a.m.
Saturday Fri.,10:0 0a.m. Fi., 9:00a.m.
Sunday F.ri, 10:00 a.m. F., 9:00 a.m.
These deadlines are subject to change without notice.




Ad Errors- Please read your ad
on the first day of publication.
We accept responsibility for only
the first incorrect insertion, and
only the charge for the ad space
in error. Please call 755-5440
immediately for prompt correc-
tion and billing adjustments.
Cancellations- Normal advertising
deadlines apply for cancellation.
Billing Inquiries- Call 755-5440.
Should further information be
required regarding payments or
credit limits, your call will be trans-
ferred to the accounting depart-
ment.


Advertising copy is subject to
approval by the Publisher who
reserves the right to edit, reject,
or classify all advertisements under
appropriate headings. Copy should
be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the first day of pub-
lication. Credit for published errors
will be allowed for the first insertion
for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the
Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nor for any general,
special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply
with Federal, State or. local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
nation in employment, housing and
public accommodations. Standard
abbreviations are acceptable; how-
ever, the first word of each ad may
not be abbreviated.

In Print and Online
WW' .! .".r. pi'.nrlt'r.lE i I


Legal

COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
INVITATION TO BID
BID NO. 2011-N
RESIDENTIAL AND COMMER-
CIAL SOLID WASTE COLLEC-
TION
Please be advised that Columbia
County desires to accept bids on the
above referenced item. Bids will be
accepted through 2:00 P.M. on May
25, 2011.
Specifications and bid forms are
available for download at
http://www.columbiacountyfla.com/
PurchasingBids.asp or may be ob-
tained by contacting the office of the
Board of County Commissioners,
Columbia County, 135 NE Hemando
Ave., Room 203, Post Office Box
1529 Lake City, Florida 32056-1529
or by calling (386)758-1005. Colum-
bia County reserves the right to.re-
ject any and/or all bids and to accept
the bid in the county's best interest.
Dated this 4th day of, May 2011.
Columbia County Board of
County Commissioners
Jody DuPree, Chairman

04544614
May 4, 11, 2011
NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR
TAX DEED
Sec.' 197..241 ES:
Notice is hereby given that the
Mark or.Margaret Sullivan of the fol-
lowing certificate has filed said cer-
tificate for a Tax Deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate number and
year of issuance, the description of
the property and name in which it
was assessed is as follows:
Certificate Number: 2750
Year of Issuance: 2004
Description of Property: SEC 33
TWN 3S RNG 17 PARCEL NUM-
BER 13461-000 S DIV: BEG 420
FT W OF NE COR OF NW 1/4 OF
SW 1/4, RUN S 143 FT, E 105 FT,
N 210 FT TO PUTNAM ST., W 105
FT, S 67 FT TO POB. ORB 961-
1340
Name in which assessed. MICHAEL
D. COX
All of said property being in the
County of Columbia, State of Flori-
da. Unless said certificate shall be re-
deemed according to law, the proper-
ty described in such certificate will
be sold to the highest bidder at the
Courthouse on Monday the 6th day
of June, 2011, at 11:00 A.M.
P. DEWITT' CASON
CLERK OF COURTS
AMERICANS WITH DISABILI-
TIES ACT: If you are a person with
a disability who needs any accom-
modation in order to participate in
this proceeding, you are entitled, at
no cost to you, to the provision of
certain assistance. Persons with a
disability who need any accommoda-
tion to participate should contact the
ADA Coordinator, P.O. Box 1569,
Lake City, FL 32056, 386-719-7428,
within two (2) working days of your
receipt of this notice; if you are hear-
ing impaired call (800) 955-8771; if .
you are voice impaired call (800)
955-8770.
04544616
May 11,2011

ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS
THE DISTRICT BOARD OF
TRUSTEES
OF FLORIDA .GATEWAY COL-
LEGE WILL RECEIVE BIDS FOR
THE FOLLOWING:
FGC BID NO. 11-1-04
ELECTRICAL DISTRIBUTION
OVERHEAD TO UNDER-
GROUND CONVERSION -
PHASE 3
JONES EDMUNDS PROJECT NO.
12040-013-03
PROJECT DESCRIPTION:
The general scope of work is descri-
bed as converting approximately half
of the T3.2-kV distribution system
-from overhead to underground at the
Florida Gateway College (FGC)
Main Campus. This portion of the
system is located primarily along the
South and West side of the main
campus and is approximately 3,500
feet in length. Conduit and man-
holes for future communications will
also be installed as part of this work
along the same corridor.
The demolition work of this project
will include, but not be limited to, re-
moving overhead primary and secon-
dary conductors, concrete poles,
wood poles, a pole-mounted 3-ph
transformer bank, a single-phase
pole-mounted transformer, and sev-
eral riser assemblies.
Construction work of this project
will include, but not be limited to,
the supply, installation, termination,
commissioning, and testing of medi-
um voltage pad-mounted switchgear,.
transformers (both single-phase aind
three-phase), underground distribu-
tion system components, above-
grade junction boxes, and an under-
ground communications duct bank
system complete with manholes for
the College's future use.
The project has been divided into a
base bid and an Additive. Alternate
scope of work to allow the College
the flexibility of executing the con-
struction contract based upon availa-
ble funding for the work. The Base
Bid portion of the project generally


Lawn & Landscape Service

Clean Pine Straw,
You pick it up, $1.85 a bale
Delivery of 100 bales $260
386-688-9156
Landscape Maintenance Company
You can trust for knowledge &
pride, Mention this AD!
Mow Green, LLC 386-288-6532

Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.


Legal

includes the Southern part of the sys-
tem to be upgraded, and the Additive
Alternate potion of the work general-
ly includes the Western part of the
distribution system.
ELIGIBLE BIDDERS:
Only those General Contractors de-
fined in Section 489.105(3)(a), Flori-
da Statutes or Electrical Contractors
defined in Section 489.505(12), Flor-
ida Statutes and who are licensed and
registered to conduct business in
Florida may submit a bid on this
project.
PREQUALIFICATION OF CON-
TRACTORS:
ALL ELIGIBLE BIDDERS WISH-
ING TO BID THIS PROJECT
MUST BE PREQUALIFIED. Con-
tractors who wish to prequalify with
Florida Gateway College must re-
quest a prequalification package
from the College's Director of Pur-
chasing, Bill Brown at (386) 754-
4360 or by email at
Bill.Brown@fgc.edu. COMPLETED
prequalification packages must be re-
turned to the College's Purchasing
office not later than 4:00 P.M. local
time THURSDAY, MAY 12, 2011.
TIME AND DATE .FOR RECEIV-
ING BIDS: ,
2:00 P.M. E.S.T. TUESDAY JUNE
2,2011
PLACE FOR RECEIVING BIDS:
Bids may be mailed as follows:
Florida Gateway College
Purchasing Department
149 S.E. College Place
Lake City, Florida 32025-8703
Hand-delivered bids are to be pre-
sented to:
Florida Gateway College
Purchasing Department
198 S.E. Staff Way
Administration Building 001, Room'
138
Lake City, Florida 32025-8703
All bids must arrive and be date/time
stamped by a Purchasing Department
representative prior to the specified
bid opening date/time. The College
will not be responsible for Postal or
other delivery service delays that
cause a bid to arrive at Room 138,
Building 001 after the designated bid
opening date/time. Bids that are
mailed must be clearly marked on
the outside of the envelope
BID # 11-1-04, ELECTRICAL DIS-
TRIBUTION OVERHEAD TO UN-
DERGROUND
CONVERSION PHASE 3
JONES EDMUNDS PROJECT NO.
12040-013-03
PRE-BID CONFERENCE:
There will be a MANDATORY pre-
bid meeting beginning at 10:00 AM
TUESDAY, MAY 17, 2011 in the
Board Room located in the Adminis-
tration Building (001) on the main
carpus of Florida Gateway College..
BID DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE
FROM:
Carly Roach
Jones Edmunds & Associates, Inc.
730 NE Waldo Rd.
Gainesville, Florida 32641
Telephone (352) 377-5821
E-Mail: \
croach@jonesedmunds.com
COST FOR BID DOCUMENTS:
To ensure that Bidders receive all ad-
denda and/or clarifications to the
Bidding Documents in a timely man-
ner, it is mandatory that all bidders
obtain at least one set of Bidding
Documents from the Engineer to be
eligible to bid on this project. Con-
tractor's failure to purchase plans
and specifications from the Engineer
shall result in the disqualification of
a bid.
Bid documents are available at a cost
of $125.00 per set which includes
shipping. Bid documents may only
be purchased in their entirety and the
cost is non-refundable.
RIGHT TO WAIVE IRREGULARI-
TIES AND TECHNICALITIES:
Florida Gateway College reserves
the right to waive minor irregulari-
ties and/or 'technicalities associated
with this solicitation. The Director of
Purchasing of Florida Gateway Col-
lege shall be the final authority re-
garding waivers of irregularities and
technicalities.

04544569
April 27, 2011
May4, 11, 2011


100 Job
I Opportunities

0454470(1
HR Generalist/Benefits *
Administrator
Large Lake City organization
seeking an HR Generalist/
Benefits Administrator. Duties
include recruiting, processing
applications, maintaining
personnel files, representing the
company at personnel-related
hearings, managing the
.employee benefits program, etc.
Applicants should have
knowledge of federal and state
employment regulations,
benefits (health, COBRA, 401K,
etc.), workers compensation,
OSHA reporting, EEO and
unemployment claims. Must
also be proficient in Word and
Excel. Please submit your salary
requirements and resume to
wassont@andersoncolumbia.co
m or fax to 386-755-9132.
We are an equal employment
opportunity employer.

04544731
Dietary Aide/Server
Experienced preferred. Must be
able to work evenings and
weekends. Please apply Baya
Pointe Nursing & Rehabilitation
Center, 587 SE Ermine
Ave., Lake City, FI 32025
EOE/DFWP

Florida Information Center
in High Springs, 1-75, Exit 404,
Hiring Now, Hrly + Commision,
Benefits & Vacation, We presently
employ 7,000+ nationwide,
advancement potential.
Call 386-418-0650

Bartender needed. Must
have experience & be reliable, &
have your own transportation and
your own phone. 386-752-2412

FLORIDA
GATEWAY
*-m COLLEGE
(Formerly Lake City Community College)
REGISTRAR ASSISTANT I
(Part-Time)
Responsible for evaluating,
processing and verifying transcripts
and other duties associated with the
Registrar's Office and official student
records. Requires a high school
diploma or its equivalent plus two
years clerical experience. Additional
education may substitute on a year
for year basis for required experience
in related area. Special consideration
will be given to applicants with an
Associate Degree or Certificate in a
related area. Must be computer
literate, proficient in MS Word and
Excel. Salary: $9.90 per hour.
Application Deadline: 5/26/11
College employment application
required. Position details and
applications available on web at:
www. qc edu
Human Resources.
Florida Gateway College
149 S.E. College Place
Lake City, FL 32025-2007
Phone (386) 754-4314
Fax (386) 754-4814
E-Mail: humailfoc.e du
IrGC is uccrdiited ihy ie Cvommissmii in College vf

I, ilinl, .',l I


100 Job
1 Opportunities

05525284
EXP. DRIVERS OTR
SERVICE TRUCKING, INC.,
MUST BE 25 YRS OR
OLDER, CLASS A LICENSE
REQUIRED, CLEAN DRIV- .
ING RECORD; NO CHARGE
ACC WITHIN THE LAST
YEAR, EXC EQUIPMENT,
GREAT PAY/BENEFITS,
CALL 1-800-899-1300,
EXT 201 MON-FRI, 8-5,
DRUG SCREEN REQUIRED,
EOE

Associate Reps
SUMMER WORK/GREAT PAY
Immediate FT/PT openings,
Customer sales/service,
No exp needed, conditions,
Apply Now all ages 17+
(386) 269-0883
Sales Position available for moti-
vated individual Rountree -Moore
Toyota, Great benefits, paid train-
ing/vacation. Exp. a plus but not
necessary. Call Anthony Cosentino
386-623-7442
CDL A Flatbed Truck Driver
needed for F/T OTR SE area, 3
years exp or more, Contact
Melissa or Mary @ 386-935-2773

FLORIDA
u.ATEA0,Y
".". E ,
-_ COtLGcEl

ADJUNCT INSTRUCTORS
FALL 2011
EDUCATION PREPARATION INSTITUTE
Master's Degree in Curriculum and Instruction,
Exceptional Student Education, Reading,
Elementary Education, or a related field
required Must have a minimum of 18 graduate
hours in teaching and learning courses and
experience teaching in' the public school seating.
Requirements include the ability to teach on
campus one night a week and in online learning
environments. Desired qualfications include
clinical educator training, reading and/or ESOL
endorsement, experience with students with
special needs, experience teaching middle or
high school and/or integrated instruction.
Contact Pamela Carswell at 386-754-4469 or
pear.ela carswetli@fdc.edu for details. ,
INSTRUMENTATION AND PROCESS
CONTROLS
Must have Master's Degree in electrical
engineering and at least five years of experience
in the installation maintenance, operation and
troubleshooting of current technology used for
automated process control and associated
systems; including PLC's, variable frequency
drives and instrumentation. A valid Florida
Teacher Certification is also required.
Experience with training both technicians and
operating personnel is a plus. For additional
information contact Bob Deckon at 386-754-4442
or robert deckonibifoc edu
NURSING CLINICAL
BSN Required Master's degree in nursing
preferred At least two years of recent clinical
experience required Contact Mattie Jones at
386-754-4368 or ma ijoiJngh'anieclu.
COMMERCIAL DRIVERS LICENSE (CDL)
PROGRAM
CDL instructors needed for growing CDL
program at Florida Gateway College. Qualified.
individuals must hold a CDL and have at least
four years of driving experience with a clean
driving record. Prefer individuals with teaching
experience In a truck driving school setting. Email
resumes to Stephanie Glenn at
s'e ii ohan l ennilfr c edu or call the Banner
Center for Global Logistics at 386-754-4492 for.
more information.
LOGISTICS AND SUPPLY CHAIN
MANAGEMENT
The Banner Center for Global Logistics is
seeking fall adjunct instructors for the Logistics
and Supply Chain Management online courses. A
Master's degree with at least 18 credits in
Operations Management, Logistics, Supply Chain
or related field Is required. Email resumes

386-754-4492 for more information.
Coi/lege cqplitalioiin and ctpic ouj uriaicript.q
itcinrir ith rti/rasttiliii tina i/.vditiiiion. Applicurioer
a.iiiliilhle it wwuJ ..v.cdu .
l'i( .ii ,,Ki5~,lhvhiSi\rcnA.t,~.....U,,t.i~is)l< ,.lsti' \'i, \f>)\\,.,r( *VI'k% n1t-aficnion & Lmpiii~nn


100 Job.
100 Opportunities

AVON!! Only $10 to start!
Earn bonus $ up to $150+
1-800-275-9945 pin #4206
www.youravon.com/tdavies,


S.et your sig~lts


100 Job
SOpportunities

05525813
Lead Teacher
(Head Start, 3-5 yr olds)
Lake City
Min 2 yr degree in Early Child-
hood Education (AS ECE) or
related degree OR age appropri-
ate FCCPC credential; 3 yrs
classrQom exp w/young children
required (relevant age prefer-
red).

Teacher
(Early Head Start, .
Birth to 3 yrs old) Lake City
Must have FCCPC /CDA,
3 yrs classroom exp w/infants
or toddlers preferred;

Current 1st Aid/CPR preferred.
All applicants must pass physi-
cal/DCF background screening.
Excellent Benefits Paid
Holidays,
Sick, Annual Leave.
Apply in person at 236 SW
Columbia Ave (754-2222) or
mail resume to SV4Cs PO Box
2637, Lake City, FL 32056-
2637, by email:
arobinson@sv4cs.org or
Fax (386) 754-2220. EOE

CDL Driver 2 yrs exp clean MVR
wanted for local company
Apply 8 AM Noon only deadline
Fri May 13. 247 NW Hillandale
Glen Lake City No phone calls
Live Oak CPA Firm seeks
full-time Secretary/Receptionist.
Please see Employment
Opportunity at
www.liveoakcpa.com.
Wanted Highly motivated
individual for Sales Position.
Rountree -Moore Automotive
Group, Great benefits, paid vaca- .
tion. Exp. a plus but not necessary.
Call Tony Reese 386-344-7517

120 Medical
1 Employment

05525827
Health Services Manager-LPN
To oversee fast-paced health
services dept
Position involves:
-working w/children (birth 5)
& pregnant women
-case/records management
-supervise small staff
-work collaboratively w/com-
munity health providers
Must possess: Current LPN
license, records mgmt & super-
visor exp, strong computer &
organizational skills; pediatric
health care exp preferred
Competitive pay & excellent
Benefits package
Hrs: Mon-Fri, 8a-4p
Ileadline to apply
is May 20, 2011.
Submit resume to:
SV4Cs Head Start/Early
Head Start, HR
P. O. Box 2637, LC, 32056
By E-mail:
ARobinson@sv4cs.org
By Fax: 754.2220

* Busy Ambulatory Surgery Center
seeks experienced Medical Biller,
Position is F/T, M-F, 8-5. For
more information call, fax, or
email a resume to 386-487-3930,
386-487-3935, administration
@lcsurgery center.com


S130 Part Time

Nursery Position Available
Southside Baptist Church,
Hours on Wednesdays and
Sunday during regular church
service. Please call 386-755-5553
for more information

240 Schools &
2 Education

04544505.
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-05/23/10

Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-07/11/11


* Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com


310 Pets & Supplies

CHICHUAHUAMIX.
S Moving, FREE to good home.
. Good with kids. 2 yrs old. Please
call 386-365-4756. Lv. message


S PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
- weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian .documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.

330 Livestock &
3J3 Supplies

(M4544700
5447 Black Angus
Cows & Heifers
Registered & Commercial
Prices Vary
386-719-4802 or 386-623-9427

Cattle For Sale. 9-16 mos.
Yearlings, bulls & heifers.
Pure bred black angels & cross
breeds. 386-365-1352


^S uwa nnee,


E lectric
Cooperative
Suwannee Valley Electric Cooperative, Inc.
Network Administrator

Suwannee Valley Electric Cooperative, Inc. has an immediate opening for a Network Administrator
position. This position reports to the Manager of Procurement and Information Technology and
will be responsible for managing a majority of the computer systems of the Cooperative along with
maintaining the systems hardware and software while providing system support and training to
employees. A bachelor's degree in computer science, or a closely related field, along with two or
more years of experience in the IT field, is required.
Applications and job descriptions may be picked up at the Suwannee Valley Electric administration
building, 11340 100th St., Live Oak. The job description can be viewed on www.svec-coop.com.
Resumes and applications can be turned in at the above address with Attn: Vicky Talmadge, or
emailed to vickyt@svec-coop.com. The deadline for accepting applications is Friday; May 13, 2011.
SVEC is an equal )opportunity employer.


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LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED WEDNESDAY, MAY 11, 2011


330 Livestock &
SSupplies .
Single Lane Farms
(1) 5 yr old registered Angus bull.
Duane Hingson. 386-776-1090
Wayne Parrish Bull.


361 Farm Equipment
84 Ford 4610 Tractor. Runs good.
Solid 2WD. New front tires,
350hr on 2005 motoi. Dependable.
$7500. obo. 386-867-0005

407 Computers
Dell Computer,
$75
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170
HP Computer,
$100.00
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170

408 Furniture
3 piece Living Room Set,
Multi color blues
$500 Good Condition
386-344-2884

420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.

Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$250 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.

430 Garage Sales
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.


440 Miscellaneops
Commander II Barber Chair
$1700, 2 Collins Recliinng Chairs
w/Mats $325 ea & 2 Roll about
floor dryers $70 ea 386-362-7105
New Central A/C, still in box,
with full ten year factory warranty
$1,795
Call 386-364-1090
New Goulds High Pressure Utility
Pump, 3/4 HP $150; Homelite
Chain Saw 14" 35cc, 1 yr old $70
Phone 386-961-8156
Tow Behind Grill/Smoker
$1,250 OBO.
386-249-3104 or
386-719-4802

Mobile Homes
630 for Rent
i UNDER NEW MANAGEMENT
Oakview Mobile Home Park.
Clean well maintained 2/2 units in
nice park. 2 miles to downtown .

14x70 MH, 2Br/2Ba Real Clean
Good Location! CH/A $550/Mo.
+ $200 Dep. NO PETS.
(386)755-0064 or (904)771-5924
2&3 BR MH. $395 $650. mo.
plus deposit. Water & sewer fur-
nished. Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
2/2 Units, clean, well maintained,
nice safe park setting, 2 miles to
downtown Bake City, $550 month
+ $550 sec dep, 386-984-8448


2br /2ba SWMH; also Residential
RV lots for rent between Lake City.
& G'ville. Access to 1-75 & 441
(352)317-1326 Call for terms
3/2 S of Lake City, (Branford area)
$400 dep, $600 month
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
3BR/2BA MH
5 ac Country setting.
$650. mo 1st, last & deposit.
386-963-2177 .
Eastside Village a 55+ Retirement
Community offers 2br/2ba Manu-
factured home fully furnished. No
pets. Leases for $650 + utilities.
1st, last, security. Eastside Village
Realty, Inc. 752-5290 for info.
Furnished 2br/1.5ba Non-smoker
owned. Washer/Dryer, Micro, TV
$570 mo water/garbage /lawn incl.
High school area 386-755-0110
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White. Contact 386-623-3404
or 386-365-1919
New 2br/2ba off Country Club. 1/2
ac. lot Front, back porch & storage
bldg. 6600 mo. $600 sec. No Pets!
386-752-5911 or 466-2266
X-CLEAN 2/2 SW, 8 mi
NW of VA. Clean acre lot, nice
area. $500. mo + dep No dogs
386-961-9181

'640 Mobile Homes
'64 for Sale
Access Realty Make Offer! 3/2
MH w/over 1700 SF & move in
ready. Convenient to schools,
shopping & hospitals. MLS 73861
$89,500. Patti Taylor.623-6896
FOR SALE: McAlpin. 10 Acres
W/2006 DW, 12 X 24 Back
addition laundry/office & 12 x 18
covered porch. 20 x 32 polebarn &
8 x 16 Utility shed. 863-634-5283
for details & pictures, $75,000
Leave message w/name, phone
number & email address. ".

A650 Mobile Home
650 &Land
MH on 1 Acre in Live Oak near
Peacock Lake, owner finance
$42,500 MLS#77598 Call Roger
Lovelady 386-365-7039 @
Westfield Realty Group
Owner Finance, Nice 3/2, S of
Lake City, small down/$650 mo
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com


710 Unfurnished Apt. 805 Lots for Sale
70For Rent


05525655
SPRING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans;
some with garages.
Call 386-454-1469'
or visit our website:
www.springhillvillage.net







1 & 2 Bedrooin'mApartments
Move in for as low as
$199
386-755-2423
2BR/2BA w/garage
on the west side of town.
Washer/Dryer hookups & more.
Call for details. 386-755-6867
Cute & clean, 2 br Apt. in town
Great area. Close to the VA
Medical Center. $515. mo plus
dep. Must see!!! 386-344-0579
Great location W of I-75, spacious
deluxe 2BR apts., garage, W/D
hook up. patio. $600 & up, + SD,
S386-344-3715 or 386-965-5560
Nice Apt. downtown. Remodeled,
kit., 1 bd/ba, LR, dining & extra
room. Ref. req. $450. mo & sec.
386-362-8075 or 386-754-2951.
Quail Heigjhts 2br/lba Duplex.
Secluded, private, safe. W/D
hookup. $700. mo. $500 security.
386-754-1155 6
The Lakes Apts. Studios & elr's
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $450. + sec.
Call Michelle 386-752-9626

T2 eFurnished Apts.
720 For Rent
New furnished bedroom apt in a
home, private entrance & bath,
incl all utilities, trash, cable, frig,
microwave. $450 per month plus
deposit; immediate availability.
386-752-2020 SW Lake City
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
, cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly

2 persons $150. weekly
386-78386-752-58082W 58

7 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent
3/2 Recently Built Custom Home,
1340 sq ft, stainless steel applian-
ces, custom cabinets, $920 mo,
1st. Last & Sec,off 1-75 & 47
Call Andrew 386-623-6066
3br/1-1/2ba, Block Home W of
town, CH/A, all appliances
included, NO Pets, $650 mo,
lst/last required 386-752-5786
3br/2ba Brick, 2 car carport. Fire-
place, Florida room. Large 4 acre
yard. Country Club Rd.South
$850 month. 386-365-8504
aEastside Village a 55+ Retirement
Community offers 2br/lba Duplex,
no pets. Leases for $600 + utilities.
First, last, security. Eastside
Village Realty, Inc. 752-5290
Suwanee River Frontage. 2/1 in
Columbia Co, ,near 175/White
Spgs Jane S.Usher Lic. Real Estate
Broker 386-755-3500 or 365-1352

750 Business &
7 Office Rentals


For Lease: 1,500 17,000sf
1525 S. Ohio Ave, Live Oak, FL
Call Scott Stewart@ Westfield
Realty Group 386-867-3498
For Lease: E Baya Ave. Two -
1000 sqft office space units or
combined for 2000 sqft. 386-984-
0622 or weekends 386-497-4762.
Office Space For Lease
2112sf, 7 rms, Irg conf rm, 4 baths,
private parking MLS#76508
$1760/mo, Call Pam @ Remax
386-303-2505
OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$695. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor

790 Vacation Rentals
Horseshoe Beach RV Lot.
Nice comer Lot with shade trees.
$295. mo Water/electric included.
386-235-3633 or 352-498-5986
Horseshoe Beach Summer Spcl
Gulf Front 2br, w/lg porch, dock,
fish sink. wkend $345./wk $795.
386-235-3633/352-498-5986
alwaysonvacation.com #419-181
"Florida's Last Frontier"

805 Lots for Sale
5 Acre Lot, Secluded & Cleared,
MLS# 67871 $55,000
Call Lisa Waltrip
@ 386-365-5900
westfieldrealtygroup.com
Hallmark Real Estate. Cleared
2.57 ac. fenced w/32' Dutchman
camper. In O'Brien. Close to Live
Oak, Lake City, Branford. $25,000
MLS# 74534 386-867-1613
Hallmark Real Estate. Owner
Finance with $5K down with
terms negotiable. Below assessed
value for' the county. MLS# 74484
$17,900 Jay Sears 386-867-1613
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
'18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the


law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.


810 Home for Sale
3/2 Brick Home w/1 car garage,
detach carport MLS#77780
$109,900, Call Jo Lytte Remax
386-365-2821
www.jolyte.florida-property-search.com
3/2 in Lake City Airpark
pool, porch, pond, detach garage
large hangar w/living quarters
MLS#77756 $399,900 Westfield
Call Josh G 386-466-2517
Brick Home, Screened Porch
$185,900 MLS#77893
Call Charlie Sparks @
Westfield Realty Group
386-755-0808
CYPRESS LANDING!
3BR/2BA built in 2005
w/large kitchen $115,000
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #75794
DESIRABLE GWEN LAKE
area! Nice 3BR/2BA home
on comer lot $112,000
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #77307
Eastside Village a 55+ Retirement
Community. 2br/2ba home with
garage, screen porch. Choose wall
color, flooring. MLS# 76483 East-
side Village Realty, Inc. 752-5290
Great Family Home in S/D
MLS# 77325, $109,000
Call Missy Zecher @ Remax
Professionals 386-623-0237
www.missyzecher.com
Great Home in Great Neighbor-
hood, Can be 4/2 or 3/2 w/study
MLS#77284 $164,900
Call Carrie Cason @Westfield
386-623-2806
GREAT STARTER HOME!
3BR/2BA w/lots of closets
space & nice lawn $79,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,.
INC. 755-5110 #76432
Hallmark Real Estate. 3/2 Brick
home w/large screened porch.
Back yard has wooded privacy.
MLS#69482 Janet Creel 719-0382
or Paula Lawrence 623-1973
Hallmark Real Estate. Bring the
horses. 3/2 HUD, 4 ac. Sold "as is"
$106,000 Bids are being accepted.
www.hudhomestore.com MLS#
72068 Martin Tavener 965-7773
Hallmark Real Estate. Downtown
Restaurant. Gigantic BBQ Smoker
Clean kitchen w/equip. Handle any
type of food svc. MLS# 77902
$189,900 Vic Lantroop 623-6401
Hallmark Real Estate. DWMH on
5 ac south of town. Back porch,
new metal roof wood burning fire-
place & wired workshop. $82,500
MLS#77185 Janet Creel 719-0382
Hallmark Real Estate. Glassed
porch overlooks wooded backyard
in the Plantations Pool,
sprinkler system. $229,900
MLS#75429 Janet Creel 719-0382
Hallmark Real Estate. Time to go
to the River. Stilt home w/covered
decking. Floating dock,out bldgs
& covered RV parking. $188K.,
MLS#7206.8 Janet Creel 719-0382
HOME OR OFFICE on
Alachua St; remodeled .
1,207 SqFt home $82,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #77724
Hallmark Real Estate..2006
2200SF home. 2br/2ba w/mother-
in-law suite, 4 car garage, endless
hot water heater. MLS# 77547
$309,900'Jay Sears 386-867-1613
Hallmark Real Estate. 3/3 Brick
w/over 2500 SF. Great location
with nice one acre pond in back.
Detached workshop MLS# 75222
$179,900 Jay Sears 386-867-1613
Hallmark Real Estate. 4/2 Brick,
3100 SF, Granddaddy Oaks on 5
acres. Double detached carport/ga-
rage w/workshop. MLS# 77877
$119,900. Jay Sears 386-867-1613
Large Home in the Country on
3.66 acres, fireplace, 2 outbldgs,
MLS#76471, $89,900 Call Jo
Lytte @ Remax 386-365-2821
jolytte@remaxnfl.com
Large Home w/Open Floor Plan,
back yard & porch, Irg oaks, fire-
place, MLS#76122 $115,000
Call Missy Zecher @ Remax 386-
623-0237,mzecher@remax.net
LOTS OF UPGRADES!
Remodeled kitchen in this
2BR/1BA home $29,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY
INC. 755-5110 #77505
Luxury LogHome;
Whole House Generator, $269,900'
MLS# 76899 Call Roger
Lovelady @386-365-7039
westfieldrealtygroup.com
Norwegian Brick Home, fire-
place/family rm, open floor plan,
screen porch, fenced back yard,
MLS#76796 $179,900
Jo Lytte Remax 386-365-2821
Owner Finance. Custom built 3/2.5
10.8 ac. Granite, fireplace, vaulted
ceilings, surround sound, lanai,
gazebo. MLS 77382 Access Real-
ty. Patti Taylor $249K 623-6896
Priced Reduced! 3/2 w/2346 sf.
.67 ac. Creekside S/D. Shade,
. surround sound, vaulted ceilings.
MLS 77385 $169,900. Access


Realty. Patti Taylor. 386-623-6896
Rose Creek S/D, 5/4, 3269sf, on
2.2 acres, bonus rm, many
upgrades Reduced! MLS#75485
Reduced! $234,900, Call Pam @
Remax 386-303-2505
Spacious Brand New Split Floor
Plan Home, Fenced Yard
MLS#77493 $229,900
Call Mike Lienemann @ Westfield
Realty Group 386-867-9053
SPACIOUS home built in
1995 has 2BR/2BA & 1,636
SqFt on 1 acre $89,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110


Three One Acre Lots available
@ $14,900 ea & One 1.65 Acre
lot for $19,900 MLS#76050
Call Brodie Alfred 386-623-0906
Westfield Realty Group

REPORTER Classifieds

In Print and On Line
www.lakecityreporter.com


2005 F-350 Lariat
49,000 miles, many
extras, excellent cond.

$19,500 obo

Call
386-755-0139


S &WATERCRAFVT


*o] I.i





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$4


ToPaeYuAdCl

7.5.-5440.


810 Home for Sale
Sturdy 3/2 on 4.35 acres, fruit &
pecan trees, Minutes from town
MLS#77878 $105,000
Call Jo Lytte @ Remax
386-365-2821/www.jolytte.com
Totally Rembdeled 4 Bd Home
Spacious Must See!
MLS#77782 $135,000
Missy Zecher 386-623-0237
www.missyzecher.com

street, quiet, country, close to
downtown $105,000 MLS#77800
Call Lisa Waltrip @Westfield
Realty Group 386-365-5900

820 Farms &
2( Acreage
4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$69,900. $613mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
4 acres, Wellborn, New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down, $39,900, $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
5.82 ac Rolling Oaks off Lake
Jeffrey. High, dry & cleared.
Restricted site built homes only.
Equestrian community.
$65,000.obo. 386-965-5530
for information & pictures
FARM- 7 stall barn, Apt.
17+ acres cross fenced.
Close in $1000. mo.
386-961-1086 .
Half to ten acre lots. Some w/
well, septic, pp. We finance; low
dwn pmt. Deas Bullard Properties.
386-752-4339. www.landnfl.com
Hallmark Real Estate. 40 ac hunt-
ing tract w/camper. Water & septic
already in place. Stands & feeders
in place. MLS# 75532
$84,000 Jay Sears 386-867-1613


830 Commercial
Property

Commercial Property For Sale
Currently Leased $495,000
MLS#75953 Call Aaron
Nickelson @ 386-867-3534
Westfield Realty Group
Mini Storage (204 Units),
gated, fenced 5 acres, $1,300,000,
MLS#76048 Call Millard Gillen
@ Westfield Realty Group
386-365-7001

850 Waterfront
Property

.Upscale River Cabin, on
Suwannee River, Shop, Dock
MLS#76336 $349,900
Call Jo Lytte @ Remax
386-365-2821

8 0 Investment
860 Property

3/2 Renovated Home in town,
front porch, new appliances,.cur-
rently leased MLS#76658 $49,900
Jo Lytte/Remax 386-365-2821
www.jolylle.florida-property-search.com

Great Income Opportunity!
Mobile Home Park For Sale
MLS#77228 $195,000
Call Pam Beauchamp @ Remax
386-758-8900


940 Trucks

2006 TOYOTA Tacoma
Pre-lRunner SR 5. Perfect
condition. 67,800 miles.
$15,000. 386-397-2972


RECYCLE YOUR
Lake City Reporter


To benefit Hospice of the Nature Coast/Wishes
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UN WHEELS & WATERCRAH l 7"









Bring the picture in or
we will take it for you!
Ad runs 10 consecutive days
with a description and photo in the
newspaper and online E-edition.
Ad runs 10 consecutive days as a
classified line ad online.
You must include vehicle price.
All ads are prepaid.
Private party only.





2006 EF250
Ford Van
3/4 ton, metal work
shelves/ladder rack,'
60K miles, exc. cond.

$10,500
Call '
386-555-5555
If you don't sell your vehicle
during the first 10 days, you
can run the same vehicle ad
for 10 additional days for
only $15.00
Terms and conditions remain the
same for the additional run.


ADVERTISE YOUR

Job Opportunities in the

Lake City Reporter

Classifieds.

Enhance Your Ad with

Your Individual Logo

For just pennies a day.

Call today,

755-5440.


Classified Department: 755-5440


. ***






LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED WEDNESDAY, MAY 11, 2011


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--Cw SPRING IN mFR

RONLY $I,09j
( Cali for availability 1.T, A

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^' w w li-*J4 *-' 'l'*1> riP4AMt


Most cars & trucks
expires 5/31/11
Ib ass K.--< i%^ i w ,


Rotate &
SBalance
Tires
Most cars & trucks
Plus tax & supplies
Not valid with any other offer
expires 5/31/11
I 4. 5m 4ss M54 :1


Rountree
TOYOTA


Parts ( Service
4310 W US Hwy 90
(386) 755-0631
Monday-Friday 7am-5pm


TWO LOCATIONS TO SERVE YOU BETTER


Hwy 90 W
Lake City (Across from


Wal-Mart)


Deputy Jeff Davis Lane
(Old Pinemount Rd) Lake City
386-755-8885


' A -t
0 'yr .;.,.


386-752-3743


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