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UFPKY NEH LSTA



The Lake City reporter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01547
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 5/7/2011
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
System ID: UF00028308:01547
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text




'In Command
Miami Heat look for
a 3-0 lead over the
PColtir tonight.
000018 120511 ****3-DIGIT 326
LIB OF FLORIDA HISTORY
PO BOX 117007
205 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-1943




Etke U


Pad Time
Columbia High football
team steps up intensity
in spring practice.
Sports, I B


ity


Record Set
Kahne breaks
qualifying lap record
at Darlington.
Sports, I B


Reporter


Saturday, May 7, 2011 www.lakecityreporter.com Vol. 137, No. 89 E 75 cents



State budget has plenty of pain to go around


$69.7B plan
eliminates nearly
4,500 state jobs.
By BILL KACZOR
Associated Press
TALLAHASSE Special
education teacher Hal


Krantz hasn't had a raise
in two years, but he'll be
among 650,000 public
employees whose pay-
checks will be cut to help
balance an annual state
budget that also slashes
spending by nearly $4 bil-
lion.
The $69.7 billion bud-


get (SB 2000) was set for
final votes in the House
and Senate late Friday to
close out Florida's annual
legislative session. Passage
was virtually assured. Both
chambers have overwhelm-
ing Republican majorities,
and GOP leaders kept their
pledge not to raise taxes.


They found other ways to
/balance the budget that
would go into effect July 1.
It will save more than
$1 billion for .the state
and local governments by
requiring public employees
such as Krantz to contrib-
ute 3 percent of their pay
to the Florida Retirement


System, now, fully funded
by taxpayers.
"Every expense I have
has been going up, except
my salary, so it's going to
be a hardship for me and
every other teacher out
there," said Krantz, who
teaches at Coral Springs
Middle School in Broward


County. "You're going to
have a lot of teachers that
are going to be looking for
second jobs."
That's assuming they
still have their first jobs.
The budget eliminates
nearly 4,500 state positions,
BUDGET continued on 3A


LEANNE TYO/Lake City Reporter
Chloe Paoli (right), 16, Fort White High School junior class
president, and Mary Jo Hancock, a FWHS algebra teacher,
work on a centerpiece for tonight's prom.

Fort White students

put finishing touches

on prom preparation


School's junior/
senior prom gets
going tonight.
By LEANNE TYO ,
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com
FORT WHITE Buying
her prom dress a few
months ago was what got
Rebecca Neil, 17, most


excited for Fort White High
School's junior/senior
prom, which will take place
today.
"I absolutely love my
dress," Neil, student body
historian, said. "I've been
so excited to wear it."
Approximately 200
FHWS students and their
PROM continued on 3A


White Springs'

postmaster under

federal investigation


Employee has.
been with Postal '
Service since 1971.
By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
The Office of Inspector
General of the United
States Postel Service has
launched an investigation
into the activities of White
Springs' postmasterTommy
D. 'TD" Jenkins.
"We have an ongoing


investigation involving Mr.
Jenkins," said Kenny Smith,
special agent with the
Office of Inspector General
of the US Postal Service
and public information offi-
cer for the Southwest and
Southeast (from Texas to
Florida) region.
Smith would not elabo-
rate on the scope of the
investigation.
"Anytime we have an
ongoing investigation, all
FEDERAL continued on 3A


RELAY UNDERWAY


Event raises
money for
cancer research.
By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
name was
called over the
public address
system.
Then came
a different person's voice
telling how long they have
been a cancer survivor.
Then another name was
called and another short
tale of cancer bested.
The list of names con-
tinued for more than
five minutes until each
cancer survivor was rec-
ognized and following
the last name the group
began a lap around Tiger
Stadium to applause from
the crowd.
The scene unfolded
at the Columbia High
School Football stadium
Friday afternoon as hun-
dreds of local residents
and cancer survivors
took part in the 2011
Relay For Life Cancer
Awareness Fundraiser.
For the next 18 hours
the teams will have
members walk around
the track to raise funds
for cancer awareness.
While all team members
don't walk at once, sev-
eral teams were on site
with tents, meals and
sleeping bags hoping to
raise money to fight the
disease that is too often
deadly.
Kimberly Nicholson,
the 2011 Columbia
County Relay For Life
event chair, said this
RELAY continued on 3A


Photos by JASON MATTHEW WALKER
Lake City Reporter

ABOVE: Cancer survivors
of all sizes, colors and
cultural backgrounds took
to the Columbia High
School track Friday toting
a Relay for Life banner
to celebrate their victori-
ous battle with cancer.
Hundreds or survivors,
caregivers and support-
ers came out to the 2011
Relay for Life Cancer
Awareness Fundraiser.

LEFT: Dawn Vargo
(center) a fourth- and
fifth-grade teacher at
Columbia City Elementary
School, dances with a
dragon costume Friday
at .the 2011 Relay for
Life Cancer Awareness.
Fundraiser.,


Florida Gateway College holds two rounds of graduation ceremonies


Photos by JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Jennifer Taylor (left),.19, hugs her mother,
Sonia, after graduating with her Associate of
Arts degree in nursing Friday. Approximately
200 out of 600 students walked in two com-
mencement ceremonies, the first class since
the college was renamed.


Graduate fights
through cancer
to earn degree.
By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com
It required determi-
naton and perseverance,
but Brandi Frazier, 27, of
Live Oak prevailed, trav-
eling a long, tough road
to graduate from Florida
Gateway College Friday.
The ruts in Frazier's
road were two separate
battles with gestational
trophoblastic neoplasm,
a cancer where cells
abnormally grow inside a
woman's uterus, forming


rare tumors, according
to the American Cancer
Society. The second bat-
tle was the worse of the
two, she said.
Aggressive chemo-
therapy treatments kept
Frazier in and out of the
college for nine years.
Now, a wife to her hus-
band, Chris, a mother
to their 8-month-old
son, Leo, and with her
Associate of Arts degree
in hand, Frazier said her
graduation feels "amaz-
ing."
"It's a long time com-
ing," she said, as she was
overcome with tears and
hugged her family.
"I wouldn't change a


moment of how it hap-
pened because it's made
me who I am today,"
Frazier said.
Frazier was just one
student of almost 600 who
donned green robes with
yellow accents as they
graduated with either a
degree or a, certificate
in the 2010-11 academ-
ic school year, the first
class to graduate from
the college after its name
change to FGC.
Approximately 200 of
those students walked in
one of two commence-
ment ceremonies, anoth-
er first for the college so
COLLEGE continued on 3A


Florida Gateway College graduate Brandi
Frazier, 27, of Live Oak, kisses her 8-month-
old son, Leo, after receiving her Associate of
Arts degree Friday. Frazier was hit with two
bouts of gestational trophoblastic neoplasm
cancer, which kept her in and out of FGC for
nine years.


1 8 4264 o0.02 1


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400


86 57
Sunny
WEATHER, 2A


O pinion ................
Around Florida..........
Obituaries ............
Advice & Comics........
Puzzles .................


TODAY IN
FAITH
Police reach out
to Muslim leaders.


COMING
SUNDAY
Elizabeth Porter's
first session.







LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING SATURDAY, MAY 7, 2011


,H 33 Friday:
Afternoon: 6-0-4
Evening: 2-3-0


Friday:
Afternoon: 9-8-4-8
Evening: 5-4-2-6


evnatch-
Thursday:
6-14-20-25-34


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS


Free comics as publishers seek new readers


PHILADELPHIA
t worked with ice cream so
why wouldn't it work with
comics?
A decade after Joe Field
saw people standing in line for
free scoops of ice cream, the effort
to lure new and lapsed readers by
offering up free comic books has
become an annual event embraced
by publishers and comic book retail-
ers eager for new customers.
Field, who owns Flying Colors
Comics in Conford, Calif., said that
the idea for the event, now in its 10th
year, was inspired by an ice cream
shop.
"I noticed a long line of people
outside my store. The line was for
Baskin Robbins 'Free Scoop Night'
- and I thought to myself, 'Comics
are way cooler than ice cream! We
should be able to do something
bigger and better than Free Scoop
Night."'
He wrote about the idea for an
industry magazine and it took off
from there.
"The first Free Comic Book
Day featured just four publishers.
This year, three dozen publishers
are participating," he said, includ-
ing Marvel, DC Comics, Archie,
Zenescope Entertainment, Image,
Dark Horse and IDW.
Geoff Johns, DC's chief creative
officer, called the event a way to cel-
ebrate "an American-born medium
and educating and passing that pas-
sion off to other people."


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Joe Field reads a Green Lantern comic book in his Flying Colors Comics shop
Friday in Concord, Calif. The effort to lure new and lapsed readers by offering up
free comic books has become an annual event embraced by publishers big and
small and comic book store owners eager for new customers:


second wife Heather
Mills.
McCartney pub-
licist Stuart Bell
confirmed recent
media speculation
over a proposal as
McCartney true, but declined to
give further details
on when and how the former Beatle
asked Shevell to marry him, saying
only "we're all thrilled for him."


Will 4th judge for
'
X
McCartney engaged to Factor' be Paula Abdul?
d neirflri Nanc Shevell


LONDON Paul McCartney and
his girlfriend Nancy Shevell, 51, are
engaged, his publicist said Friday,
nearly four years after they were first
spotted together.
McCartney, 68, started dating the
New York socialite and business-
woman following his bitter split from


NEW YORK Taping for the new
Fox singing contest "X Factor" is
scheduled to start Sunday. But only
three of the expected four judges
have been announced.
While the clock is ticking, the
identity of the show's fourth judge,
though widely expected to be Paula
Abdul, remains unconfirmed.


Previously
announced judges
include pop super-
S star Cheryl Cole and
JGrammy-winning
producer Antonio
S "L.A." Reid, as well
Abdul as Abdul's former
"American Idol"
mate, Simon Cowell.

Head of Winfrey's OWN
cable network exits
NEW YORK In the wake of ini-
tial -disappointing ratings for OWN:
The Oprah Winfrey Network,'its
head, Christina Norman, has abrupt-
ly left the 4-month-old channel.
The network announced Friday
that Peter Liguori, the COO for
Discovery Communications, will
take over on an interim basis.

M Associated Press


, Celebrity Birthdays


* Former Sen. Pete
Domenici, R-N.M., is 79.
* Singer Jimmy Ruffin is 72.
* Actress Robin Strasser is
66.
* Singer-songwriter Bill
Danoff is 65.
* Rhythm-and-blues singer
Thelma Houston is 65.
* Rock musician Bill
Kreutzmann (Grateful Dead)
is 65.
* Rock musician Prairie
Prince is 61.
* Actor Robert Hegyes is 60.


* Movie writer-director Amy
Heckerling is 59.
* Actor Michael E. Knight is
52.
* Rock musician Phil
Campbell (Motorhead) is 50.
* Country musician Rick
Schell is 48.
* Rock singer-musician Chris
O'Connor (Primitive Radio
Gods) is 46.
* Actress Traci Lords is 43.
* Singer Eagle-Eye Cherry
is 40.
* Actor Breckin Meyer is 37.


Lake City
HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293
Fax number..............752-9400
Circulation. .............755-5445
Online ... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical pos&age paid at Lake City, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.,
All material herein is propertyof the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson .... .754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
Assistant Editor CJ Risak..754-0427
After 1:00 p.m.
(crisak@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director.Ashley Butcher ...754-0417
(abutcher@lakecityreporter.com)
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440.


Reporter
BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7:30
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
10:30 a.n., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued..
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation ..............755-5445
(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks................ $26.32
24 Weeks..................$48.79
52 Weeks................... $83.46
Rates include 7% sales tax.
Mail rates
12 Weeks........ ......... $41.40
24 Weeks............. z..... $82.80
52 Weeks .................. $179.40


CORRECTION


The Lake City Reporter corrects errors, of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run
in this space. And thanks for reading.


Boy stabbed,,
mother charged
LAKE WORTH A
South Florida woman has
been charged with attempt-
ed first-degree murder after
her son told authorities she
stabbed him.
The Palm Beach County
Sheriff's Office reports
that the 12-year-old boy
called 911 for help Friday
morning. Rescue crews
and deputies responded
and found the boy had
been stabbed several times
in the chest He was air-
lifted to a Delray Beach
hospital, where he was in
serious but stable condi-
tion.
The boy's mother,
Margarita Obando, 45, had
fled from the Lake Worth
home before rescuers
arrived. Palm Beach police
picked her up several
hours later.

Sexual abuse bill
goes to Gov. Scott
TALLAHASSEE Rape
suspects will have to be
tested for hepatitis -as one
provision of a wide-ranging
sexual abuse bill that the
'Legislature is sending to
Gov. Rick Scott.
The Senate passed the
bill unanimously Friday. It
also requires law enforce-
ment to provide or arrange
transportation so rape
victims can get medical
treatment or have forensic
evidence gathered and pro-
vides relocation assistance
to victims.
It also requires schools
to include Internet safety
courses in their health
curriculums and allows
evidence of suspects' past
sex crimes to be used in
court.

Officers respond
to shooting
ORLANDO Orlando
police said there were
investigating an officer-


ASSOCIATED PRESS

Going for the gold
David Boudia competes during the men's platform semi-
final round at the USA Diving Grand Prix Friday in Fort
Lauderdale.


involved shooting that has
left a suspect wounded.
Officials said an officer
was responding to a pos-
sible shooting at an lapart-
ment complex near the
upscale Mall at Millenia
Friday afternoon. The offi-
cer called for a "Signal 43,"
meaning an officer is in
danger and needs help.
Dozens of officers
responded to the area, and
three suspects were taken
into custody.
Police said an officer
fired during the alterca-
tion, hitting a suspect. The
suspect's condition wasn't
immediately available.

Inmate found
Aead at prison
ORLANDO State cor-
rections officials said an
inmate died at the Central
Florida Reception Center
near Orlando.
The Florida Department
of Corrections reports that
Christopher Hughes, 37,
died in his dormitory early
Thursday morning. He
had been serving a
17-month sentence for a
drug conviction.
A DOC spokeswoman
said the death appeared to
be of natural causes. No
foul play was suspected.
A medical examiner is
waiting for a toxicology


report before determining
the official cause of death.

Rescuers tend to
stranded whales
CUDJOE KEY -
Marine mammal rescuers
continued securing and
caring for pilot whales
Friday after a mass strand-
ing the afternoon before,
off the lower Florida Keys.
Responders gathered
eight of the stranded
whales in a temporary sea
pen, where veterinarians
examined them and per-
formed medical tests. The
whales were constantly
supported in the water by
volunteers standing along-
side them.
Marine mammal experts
deemed the whales in the
sea pen are in stable, but
guarded condition.
"These guys are really
weak now," said Robert
Lingenfelser, head of
stranding operations for
the Marine Mammal
Conservancy. "They
haven't eaten in a while,
so one of our jobs is to
get them re-hydrated and
ready for the next step of
eating." The pilot whales
were found stranded in
multiple areas in shallow
Gulf of Mexico waters.

* Associated Press


THE WEATHER



MOSTLY PARTLY MOSTLY MOSTLY MOSTLY
SUNNY CLOUDYoi SUNNY SUNNY SUNNY


HI 'LO HI LO I HI:LO? HI :ILO HI' LO

7- -


Tallahassee *
79 52


Pensacola
77 54


SValdsta
79/53
Lake City.
82 53 "


Gainesville *
Panama City SI 53
76 56 Ocala *
83 56


*


Tampa *
87. 63


FtL Myers
83 65


TEMPERATURES
High Wednesday
L'',.'. Wedne,.da
l:rnrmal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Wednesday
Month total
Year total "
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


81
69
84
59
97 in 2002
44 in 1921


0.00"
0.00"
11.48"
0.30"
14.32"


Jacksonville
77'60

Daytona Beach
77462


Orlan
8 1


City Friday
Cape Canaveral -i'. 65 pr,


Daytona Beach
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Galnesville


Jacksonville
do Cape Canaveral Key West
63 79 68 Lake City
Miami
Naples
West Palm Beach Ocala
A2 71 Orlando
FL Lauderdale Panama City
53 71 0. Pensacola
Nanlac Tallahassee


89 68 Miamr
Key West 84 4
86, 77


SUN
Sunrise toda)
Surinsei .:.ja,
Sunnse 1iom.
Sunset tom.

MOON
Moonrise today
Moonset today
Moonrise tom.
Moonset tornm.


6:44 a.m.
8:11 r. n,
6-43 a.m.
8:11 p.m.


8:13 a.m.
10:39 p.m.
9:06 a.m.
11:30 p.m.


May May May June
10 17 24 1,
First Full Last New


ni Tampa
;2 Valdosta
W. Palm Beach


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Forecastedtempo-Aure Feelshlike"Itemperature


S16.2 p.:
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55 64 .r,
85 ,7 pr
82 62 p.:
86. p.:
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An exclusive
service
[; brought to
' our readers
by
The Weather
S I hannapI


re area on "
ale from 0'
.m
| weather.com

, Forecasts, data and
e, *' graphics 2011 Weather
SI Central, LP, Madison, Wis.
her J www.weatherpublisher.com.





Get Connected



i" M Li',a'.'t.AI [t4K..iasli a d :I t|


Daily Scripture

"Therefore confess your sins
to each other and pray for
each other so that you may be
healed.The prayer of a
righteous person is powerful
and effective."
James 5:16


AROUND FLORIDA


- LL' -aa mas~*,s mie e -


Page Editor: Jason M. Walker, 754-0430


-i - . -








LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE SATURDAY, MAY 7, 2011


FEDERAL: Postmaster investigated

Continued From Page 1A


we can do is confirm that
we have an ongoing inves-
tigation," he said.
The Office of Inspector
General is a federal agency.
It investigates administra-
tive matters and criminal
offenses involving postal
employees in the normal
course of their duties.
Jenkins' present work
status since the inception
of the investigation is list-


ed as "non-duty".
Jenkins was appointed
to the U.S. Postal Service
in 1971 and became White
Springs' postmaster in
August 1988.
Randy Acklin has been
named the acting postmas-
ter in Jenkins' absence.
A postmaster is an oper-
ations manager for a post
office. The postmaster is
responsible for everything


that goes on in their post
office operation. The post-
master has responsibility
for delivery, mail sorting,
window service (retail)
and the post office boxes.
A postmaster also has
general responsibility for
their buildings/facilities
and customer relations. In
smaller offices, postmas-
ters also serve in the retail
window- operations.


PROM: Preparation complete

Continued From Page 1A


guests will suit up in tux-
edos and gowns to attend
the prom at 8 p.m. at the
school's gymnasium.
Sheri Keen,' student
activities director, said
the junior class student
government officers have
worked hard to prepare for
the dance and decorate.
"They transform our
gym," she said. "It looks
like another world. You
wouldn't even know it was
a gym when they're done."
Chloe Paoli, junior class
president, said the junior
class gave the seniors four
prom themes to vote on.
Their pick? A black tie
affair.
After the vote, Paoli said
she and her class officers
planned the entire event.
"Basically, we do it all,"
she said, "the whole thing,
me and my officers."
"Everything has been
going really smooth," Paoli
said. "My class has been
working together really
well, I'm really impressed
with them."
Senior class officers
agreed that prom is a
special tradition that they
anticipate making memo-
ries at.
"It's one night that
everybody can get dress
up and have a good time,"
said Catherine Trisch, 18,


LEANNE TYO/Lake City Reporter
Danielle Leon, 16, a Fort White High School junior, ties a
fabric bow on the back of a chair while decorating for the
prom.


student body president.
"It's not just something
that's an everyday thing,
it's something that you
can look forward to that's
a special night for your
year.",
"It's a _-.oce-in-.alife-
time opportunity to make


memories with our friends
before we graduate," said
Irene Lang, 18, senior
class president. "I just
think it's going io be fun
for us all to let loose and
kind of have fun together
anddance and spend time
together."


COLLEGE: First FGC class graduates

Continued From Page 1A


it wouldn't have to turn
away ceremony attend-
ees. AA degree students
graduated in the morning,
while Associate of Science,
Associate of Applied
Science, Certificate and
Advanced Technology
Diploma students gradu-
ated in the afternoon.
Friday evening, more
than 75 nursing students
were named graduate
nurses at a special pinning
ceremony at Christ Central
Ministries.
Graduating the class of
2011 was an "exciting time"
for the school because it is
the first FGC class, said
Charles Hall, FGC presi-
dent.
"It was also an experi-
ment doing two services,
which seems to have
worked out really well,"
Hall said. "With the way
it's split out, people weren't
as crowded. They could
see more easily, for the
students there was more
room and it just gave a
better feel, a little more
relaxed than the past."
Graduating from the
community college is a
memorable time for stu-
dents because they are
often first-generation col-
lege graduates in their
families, Hall said.
"And as they graduate,
others in their family will
say, 'Well, if Marky can
do it, I can do it,' and then
they come out and try it,"
he said.
Hall encouraged each
graduating student to
stay in touch with FGC
and offered an acronym
of advice RAP, which
stands for reflect, analyze
and project. If people fol-
low that acronym, looking
at where they've been and
where they want to go,
then life is like following a


map, he said.
"But when people just
take off," Hall said, "it's
like when you take off for
California. You know it's
out there, but you just don't
know how to get to it, and if
more people would sit and
think about where they've
been and then analyze it,
then they start to develop
a path to go there."
Students said their FGC
college career readied
them for their futures.


"I think it's just pre-
pared me for college-level
courses and a college-level
experience," said Jordan
Earle, 18 of Fort White,
who graduated with an AA
degree.
"It has really helped
me to prepare to transfer
in my future endeavors,"
said Mikesha Bowden,
20, of Baker County, who
also graduated with an AA
degree.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Chris MtRae embraces his son C.J., now 18, after speaking about being diagnosed with
Hodgkin's lymphoma when he was 13. 'I'm feeling great. I'm happy it's over,' said C.J.
McRae, who is a CHS senior. 'The best advice I can give is to not lose faith in yourself, in
God, or your family. They will help you stay strong through it.'


RELAY: Two-day event gets started

Continued From Page 1A


year's event has close
to double the amount of
teams compared to last
year's event with 45 teams
taking part in this year's
event.
"So far we've raised over
$50,000," she said.
More than 700 walkers
signed-up to participate
in the annual fundraiser,
which is scheduled to end
today at noon.
"It means a lot to me to
see the people participate
in the Cancer Survivor's
Lap because my mother
and father *are out there
walking and they're both
recent cancer survivors,"
Nicholson said. "It means
a lot every time I see all
the purple shirts."
Nicholson said people of
all ages participated in the
event, even an 18-month


toddler who was fighting
cancer. She said her moth-
er explained to her just
how much the event means
to cancer survivors.
"She said it means a lot
that the community comes
out and actually shows
appreciation that they are
still alive," Nicholson said.
"When she gets out here
and sees all these purple
shirts and people not in
purple shirts, she said it
makes her get a felling of
being overwhelmed."
C.J. McRae, 18, is a two-
time cancer survivor, who
' told his story of going
through chemo-therapy,
medicines and radiation
treatment as he fought
cancer as a 13-year-old.
"I never expected that to
occur to me and God gave
me a gift and he blessed


me," he said.
McRae said he was
proud of himself for being
able to tell his story to oth-
ers and proud of the other
cancer survivors for keep-
ing faith and having their
families keep the faith.
He also offered words of
encouragement to people
currently fighting cancer.
"I would tell them to
* stay strong and you have
to believe in yourself and
you have to believe in
God," he said. "You have
to keep yourself busy oth-
erwise you'll just be twid-
dling your thumbs and you
.won't be able to make it
through. You have to stay
busy no matter how sick
you are, just give yourself
company of other people
and give yourself the com-
pany of Christ."


about 2,000 of which are
vacant, while 1,700 jobs
are in prisons slated to be
privatized. School districts
also are anticipating lay-
offs and furloughs due to
state spending cuts.
Some private sector
employees who depend on
state funding, such as road
builders and nursing home
workers, also may get the
ax.
There's fiscal pain as
well ahead for college and
university students who
will be paying higher
tuition, and many will see
their state-funded schol-
arships cut.
Public school class-
rooms will become more
crowded.
Hospitals and nursing
homes will take a reduc-
tion in Medicaid pay-


LAKE CITY-COLUMBIA COUNTY


r CHAMBER ,
Belong Engage Lead Prosper


presents


William J. Rossi

Clinical professor of Entrepreneurship
Center for Entrepreneurship and Innovation
CEI Faculty Fellow
University of Florida
Gainesville, FL


UF


Center for Entrepreneurship
& Innovation
uNIvr.RSrY -O .R..Ad
U-NVE -'-RS ITY -f FIX)RMA


I


Join us for a lunch filled with ideas & encouragement
for Lake City's small businesses.

What: Chamber of Commerce's Bertter Business Series
Lunch catered b Mike's Cafc & Grille
WrhenI: May 25, 2011, I1:-15 ANM 1:00 PM
Where: Christ Central Ministries, 21" Da] Road, [ake Ciy
Cost: $15 for members, $20 for non-members


. so M MI107 MM, M, I nIs I*


ments.
Everglades, .-restoration
spending will be cut and
funding will be eliminated
for the Florida Forever
environmental land buying
program.
"Although this has to be
one of the most difficult
budgets in the history of
Florida, I think'it's one that
most of us can go home
and feel like it's a work-
able budget," said Senate
Budget Chairman JD


Alexander, R-Lake Wales.
.cYet. lawmakers also
found enough money to
cut taxes by $308 million
- mostly at the expense
of water management dis-
tricts and pay for doz-
ens of their, pet projects.
Those include college and
university buildings, a row-
ing facility in Sarasota and
a $400,000 study of House
Speaker Dean Cannon's
proposal to expand the
Florida Supreme Court.


^^B^ Sewing Machines


Starting at:4500












Well, we thought you'd like something productive on
your pad to prove to your spouse that it's really a useful
tool for financial management. Well worth the invest-
ment you made to buy it. And so much more than just
a toy for playing Angry Birds.
See, you.actually can do something useful with this new
technology. You can see if you've got paid yet, balance
your checkbook, pay a few bills, make a loan payment,
transfer funds to your kids away at college, and more!
Or you can just act like you're taking notes at that meet-
ing instead of updating your facebook page.
We also have old-fashioned internet banking for those
who've not yet convinced their spouse that they really
need the newest pad devices or cell phones.
But keep in mind, if you want
to get the red tootsie pops,
You're going to have to come
9.... visit us to get one. Peoples
State Bank. Now that's Bank-
ing!


BUDGET: Cuts hit all areas

Continued From Page 1A


I


I


Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424


A4.












OPINION


Saturday, May 7,2011


www.lakecityreporter.com


AN
OPINION


Making

the skies

friendlier


been very friendly
of late, but maybe
that's about to
change.
The Transportation
Department has finally
announced a new and long-
needed set of passenger-
friendly regulations that should
provide a measure of relief over
some of the most frequent and
frustrating practices of com-
mercial airlines. That includes
endless waits over delayed
flights and lost baggage.
The new regulations, alas,
won't go into effect until Aug.
23 very late into the sum-
mer flying season but at
least airlifies have been put on
notice that they're expected to
do better. This is the first good
news the flying public has had
in months.
First came the December
blizzard that stranded packed
airplanes on the tarmac in New
York City for up to 11 hours
while passengers begged for
relief, to no avail. '
That was followed by the
startling series of reports about
federal air traffic controllers
snoozing in the control tower
while pilots frantically tried to
get clearance for landing.
In another incident, inat-
tentive controllers were blamed
for a near-miss between an
airplane and an official White
House flight carrying First
Lady Michelle Obama and Jill
Biden, wife of the vice presi-
dent
Then the top of a passen-
ger airliner peeled off in midair
like a tin can, frightening pas-
sengers who didn't expect a
high-altitude ride with the top
down.
Granted, some of these situ-
ations are unusual. But pas-
sengers deserve a break, and
they're finally getting it in a
variety of ways.
New federal regulations will
simplify air travel. They require
airlines to hold reservations at
the quoted fare without pay-
ment or cancellation (or pen-
alty) for at least 24 hours if the
reservation is made one week
or more before departure.

* Miami Herald

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman


LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,


Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


Time for conspiracy


theorists to shut up


et me just say this
about the death of
Osama bin Laden.
urray! Thank you
to those who risked
much to see justice done.
Now, attention all people with
tin hats or beanies with little
propellers. Yes, I am speaking
to you moon barkers, conspir-
acy theorists, birthers, truthers
or just plain nutters. Just cut it
out. We are tired of your ridicu-
lous antics. Don't even go there.
Unfortunately, some of
you have already gone there,
haven't you? My colleague
Tony Norman's column about
bin Laden's death appeared
Tuesday. He promptly received
three emails denying the
reports. Two said bin Laden
wasn't dead, one said he had
been dead for a long time.
Apparently the conspiracy theo-
ry is evolving, but they will get
their story straight just as soon
as they bend it
Meanwhile, over at the web-
site of syndicated radio host
Alex Jones styled infowars.


LETTERS


Reg Henry
rhenry@post-gozette.com


com "because there is a war on
for your mind"- a great froth of
conspiracy was brewing. Sample
headline: "Obama Shamefully
Exploits Bin Laden Fairytale In
Transparent PR Stunt." People
who have lost their minds in the
info war will believe this.
It is enough to make us miss
the days when lunatics stayed
on the fringe; today, sadly, they
occupy large reaches of politi-
cal opinion. They have become
almost respectable.
At least the old-fashioned
lunatics came by their addled
state honestly, through no fault
of their own. The current crop
doesn't have the same excuse.


They should know better but
* willfully refuse to believe any-
thing comporting to common
sense. They just want to wish
reality away.
To tell the truth, delusional
impulses are invited by a histo-
ry of official lying. Governments
have lied through their teeth,
lied through their spokesmen,
lied through their news releas-
es. A healthy skepticism toward
all official pronouncements is
thus recommended.
But total disbelief of demo-
cratic governments is equally
unhealthy and not recommend-
ed. Shocking as it may seem,
politicians and governments
also tell the truth on occasion.
Our leaders are not from
another planet it's just that
looks cau be deceiving. They
share the same human traits
we all do and all of us bend
the truth to suit our purposes
well, not me and you exactly,
but the rest of humankind.,

Reg Henry is a columnist for
the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette.


TO THE EDITOR


We have a dog problem


To the editor:
I would like to express my
irritation at.those dog owners
that allow their dogs to be nui-
sances. Not all dog owners are
irresponsible and care for their
pets dearly. However, some
allow their dogs to bark, bark
and bark all the time and many
times do not care for them prop-
erly.
The people who live around
these owners do not want to
hear the dog barking all the
time; day and night. As much
as it is the right of a person to
own a dog, it is just as much of
a right for those living around
the nuisance dog and the owner
to have peace and quiet, at least
some of the time. Many owners
work all day and do not know
the aggravation that the barking
dog they left behind is causing.
The dog is not to blame, the
owner is. Dogs bark, that is a
fact. You should get a dog to
be a companion and in some
cases for protection. But it is
totally irresponsible to allow
the dog to relentlessly bark
and be ignored, causing undue
irritation to those around the
neglected animalss. Nuisance
problems are much more
prevalent in residential neigh-
borhoods due to the close
proximity of residences. A small
neighborhood back yard is not
meant to accommodate multi-
tudes of dogs. Noise and stench
is a continuing problem. Those
that walk dogs should also be
responsible for cleaning up the
poop that is deposited in other
people's yards and in the street.
Take a bag with you and take
the present home. Many cities
have ordinances to require this.
Further, there is a leash law


in this county and evidently
some dog owners ignore this as
their animals run loose through
the neighborhoods. Many dog
owners get animals, place them
in a cage, chain them to a tree
or leave them unattended in a
yard somewhere. The dog may
go for days and weeks at a time
without even being acknowl-
edged by their owners. In some
cases, the dogs become very
aggressive and mean.
This makes them very much
a life-threatening danger to
those around them. If you did
not want the dogs, why did you
acquire them? In some cases,
people acquire numerous dogs
and ignore them also, com-
pounding the nuisance problem.
Dogs are many times placed
in these situations without food,
water and shelter. They are
left out in the blazing sun, rain
and freezing cold. Many times
calls to the Humane Society are
answered, but due to various
rules and regulations, they can-
not do anything. Law enforce-
ment most all the time refers
back to the Humane Society.
What can be done to prevent
a nuisance? Board the dog while
you are gone, obedience train-
ing, hire a dog sitter. Expense
involved? Sure! If you get the
dog this is part of responsibility
of owning the dog. Can't take
responsibility, don't get a dog.
There are other animals that
are a problem also, but dogs
represent majority of animal
complaints. Bottom line, dog
owners should be held directly
responsible for the problems
their dogs may cause to those
that live around them. Take
responsibility for your pet and
try to be a good neighbor and


not a nuisance to your neighbor-
hood.
Richard Poole
Lake City ,

Government spending still a
problem

To the editor:
We as a country just went
through a financial crisis due
to bad loans. Our elected offi-
cials claim they have fixed this
porblem and it will not happen
again. According to those elected
officials, new regulations have
been put into place where banks
no longer make bad loans.
My question is, with our cur-
rent banking regulations, would
we allow a bank to loan money
to the government? Personally,
even if I were able to give the
government a loan, I would not.
They have a credit rating that is
negative and the collateral they
do have is dropping in value due
to the excess printing of money.
Simply put, they are spending
more than they have income.
Is there an easy way to fix
this? The answer is no. However,
if you cut down on spending,
pay your debts and restore your
credit things will start to get
better. Can the government do
it? Yes, they can. But htey must
start with cutting spending and
the size of government itself.
Will the government take
the road of least resistance and
spend, or cut back and save? If
they chose the road of least resis-
tance, our children and grand-
children will only continue the
suffering that we have today, and
that truly would be a shame.
Irv Crowetz
Lake City


Dan K.Thomasson



Look had a

small part

in huge

scandal
A colleague sent
me an obituary
the other day
about the death of
Christopher "Huck"
Look who died several months
ago in Florida not Martha's
Vineyard where he gained
local fame and a small bit of
notoriety in the sensational
death of Mary Jo Kopechne. It
brought back memories.
For a time Huck was a
key figure in the incident at
Chappaquiddick Island that
effectively ended the presiden-
tial chances, if not aspirations,
of Sen. Edward M. Kennedy of
Massachusetts, the remaining
heir of the dynasty that had
seen more than its share of
tragedy.
A deputy sheriff acting as
a special officer for a private
party that fateful night in 1969,
Huck saw a car with a man and
woman stop off the main road.
When he approached, the car
backed up and headed down
a gravel road that led toward
the Dike Bridge over the tidal
pond off which Kennedy's car
plunged carrying Kopechne to
her death. Huck got a partial
license number that matched
those of Kennedy's car.
Without belaboring the
details, the affable young
father and lifelong resident of
the Vineyard remembered the
time of his sighting as being
different from Kennedy's
assertions. Huck's time made
it conclusively doubtful that
the senator and his brother
Robert's pretty former cam-
paign worker had actually been
on the way to the last ferry
that crossed the narrow chan-
nel between Chappaquiddick
and Edgartown on the main
island and had inadvertently
turned off onto the wrong road
as Kennedy was to claim.
The deputy was absolutely
unshakable in his conviction,
leaving Kennedy's team of law-
yers frantic to discredit Huck
because of a potentially drawn
out investigation by the Dukes
County grand jury that had
voted to extend its session for
that purpose despite Kennedy's
plea to a minor charge of leav-
ing the scene of an accident
Although a coroner's inquest
had taken place early in 1970,
the testimony and judge's con-
clusions had not been made
public, and the county grand
jury was dissatisfied with the
disposition of the case. In April
of that year, the grand jury met
to revive the matter to the great
anticipation of the press.
The grand jury met-for
only two days before deciding
against indictment after pres-
sure from the Kennedys and
the then Duke's County pros-
ecutor, Edmund Dinis. Huck
became just a footnote in the
historic tragedy that shook the
nation on the weekend of man's
first landing on the moon. He
ultimately became sheriff and
a successful businessman and
a figure that now and then was
called on to recount his part
in the matter. His obituary,
although quite extensive, car-
ried only one paragraph about
the Kennedy affair.
But I vividly recall one
night standing with a col-
league and him at the bar of
an Edgartown restaurant while
he complained bitterly that the
"Kennedys" had been trying
to attack his character to make
him an unreliable witness.
* Dan K. Thomasson is former
editor of Scripps Howard News
Service.


4A










Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SATURDAY. MAY 7, 2011


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


* To submit your Community
Calendar item, contact Antonia
Robinson at 754-0425 or by
e-mail at arobinson @
lakecityreporter., com.


Today
Bling Queen Pageant
The Miss Bling Queen
Pageant is 5 p.m. today at
Richardson Middle School.
Tickets are $5. Children
under 5 are free. Call 752-
4614.

ALL-Walk outing
Four Rivers Audubon is
hosting a monthly ALLI-
Walk: Bird/Butterfly/
Nature's Garden out-
ing 8-11 a.m. Saturday
at Alligator Lake. Jerry
Krummrich, biologist,
Virlyn Willis, avid birder,
and others will share their
knowledge. Bring a hat,
sunscreen, water, binocu-
lars and a snack. No fee is
charged. All levels of par-
ticipation and knowledge
are welcome. Call Loye
Barnard at 497-3536 for
more information.

Lulu Homecoming Day
The 32nd Annual Lulu
Homecoming Day is 10:30
a.m. today at the Lulu
Community Center. Lunch
is 12:30 p.m. Bring a bas-
ket lunch for everyone
in your party. Bring lawn
chairs and enjoy a day for
food, games, music and
more.

Safety and Health Fair
Home Safety and
Health Fair is 9 a. m.-1
p.m. today in the Home
Depot and Walgreens
parking lots. The event
will'feature a Shands
CAIR Flight Team heli-
copter, Smokey the Bear
and Homer, the Sheriff's
Department with Crime
Stoppers and child and fin-
gerprinting safety, Fire and
Rescue with safe house
and fire engines and the
Division of Forestry, FHP
and FDOT. Decorating and
safety tips will be offered
and a free Home Depot


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter

A moment of prayer
Austin Redd, 8, of Christ Central Ministries bows his'head while praying during Thursday's
National Day of Prayer ceremony at Olustee Park in downtown Lake City. .


Kids workshop is 9 a.m.-
noon.

New farmers market
Launch of the new
Lake DeSoto Farmers
Market is 8 a.m.-noon
today at Wilson Park, 778
NE Lake DeSoto Circle.
Children's activities, ven-
dors, flowers for the first
50 mothers, free canoe
rides, live music and
more will be featured.
Vendor applications and
more information is avail-
able at 719-5766 or e-mail
kitej@lcfla.com.

Annual ChariTEA
The Fourth Annual
ChariTEA is noon today
at the Woman's Club of
Lake City. Doors open
at 11:30 a.m. The event
will feature a silent'auc-
tion and is a fundraiser
for Another Way Inc. Call
719-2700 for ticket infor-
mation.


Wild Florida event
Wild Florida is 10
a.m.-3 p.m. today in the
Craft Square at Stephen
Foster State Park in White
Springs. Nature and wild-.
life experts will talk about
the flora,, the fauna and the
wild animals that make
Florida a unique place to
live. Call 397-1920 or visit
www.floridastateparks.org/
stephenfoster.

Steer competition
The beginning Steer
weigh-in is 8-10 a.m. today
at the Columbia County
Fair.

Living History demo
A Civil War Living
History Demonstration'
is 9 a.m.-4 p.m. today
at Stephen Foster Folk
Culture Center State
Park in White Springs.
Admission to the park
is $5 per vehicle (up to


eight people). Additional
fees may apply for work-
shops offered in the craft
square. Call the park at
397-4331.


Coffee House
The Stephen Foster
Coffee House, hosted
by Cathy DeWitt, is
7 p.m. today in the
Stephen Foster Folk
Culture Center State
Park auditorium. The
Coffee House event
invites folks on stage for
10 minutes to sing, play a
musical instrument, read
some original poetry or
tell a story. The event
offers potluck goodies
and sweets provided by
volunteers, which are
sold at Coffee House. !
Anything on the dessert
table sells for $1. Contact
Park Ranger Larry
Hoover at 397-2733 or for
more information visit
www.floridastateparks.org/


OBITUARIES


Dale Edward Fournier
Dale Edward Fournier, 70, a resi-
dent of Lake City, Florida passed
away May 4, 2011 at his home.
Mr. Fournier was born in Sacco,
Maine and attended and graduat-
ed from the Bristol High School,
Bristol Vermont. He is the son
of the late Henry
and Pauline Fair- s
field Fournier.
He is preceded -
in death by his ""
wife Mickey
Fournier of thirty years. Mr.
Fournier was in the U.S. Army,
was also a Police Officer, bail
bondsman, private investigator
and skilled carpenter. He loved
to entertain his grandchildren
with stories and imaginative
ways after his retirement. He
restored old tools and loved to
golf and fish. He also collect-
ed 17000 old radio programs.
Survivors include five daughters:
Sherri (Jack) Bird, Amy (Jason)
Blondin and Shelly Fournier all
of Vermont, Garnette .(Doug)
Pigott, Mississippi and Deidre
(Mark) Miller, Florida. Ten
Grandchildren, Kayla, Kirst-
en, Zach, Piper, Zoee, Jayme,


Eric, Josh, Austin and Keeley.
One great grandchild: Gracie.
Memorial services for Mr.
Fournier will be conducted
Sunday, May 29, 2011 at 2:00
P.M. in the Chapel of Guerry.
Funeral Home with the Rev.
Mike Norman, officiating.
GUERRY FUNERAL HOME
2659 SW. Main Blvd. Lake City,
Fl. is in charge of all arrange-
ments. Please sign the guest-
book at guerryfuneralhome. com.

Harold E. Martens
Harold E. Martens-was born
in York, Maine on January
15, 1952 to Marvin M. Mar-
tens, Sr. and Lourena Mae
Webber Martens. He died
too soon on April 28, 2011.
Later he moved to New York
State and then to Philadelphia,
PA where he lived for almost
25 years. After that he lived
in LaBelle, FL; Okeechobee,
Fl., Perry, Fl and finally High
Springs, Fl., where he spent the
happiest 3 1/2 years of his life
after marrying his beloved wife.
Nelda Jane on August 11, 2007.
As a youth he enjoyed fishing,


( Miss The
eddie!e



Call
Mary or Bridget
TODAY to place a
Surprise ad for,
wb .. someone you Love!
Ht755-5440 or
755-5441
S0Between 8am & 5pm
di sea u o


Steve.4


horseback riding and playing
cards with his grandparents,
parent and siblings. He still
played cards with his sister,
Donna on every occasion that
they could. as an adult he was
a. truck driver like his father
and three brothers before him.
He loved and followed Jehovah
God for 42 years. being baptized
in July 15, 1969. he was very
happy to have finally found a lov-
ing mate who was his best friend
and partner in their busy service
to Jehovah God together. He oc-
casionally auxiliary pioneered,
including the month of his death.
Sharing the memorial Invitation
campaign. His favorite scripture
was: Psalm 63:3 (what is better
than life?) and Revelation 21:3,4.
Harold is survived by his
wife, Nelda Jane Martens
of High Springs, Fl. His fa-
ther: Marvin M. Martens, Sr.
(Joyce) of Manchester, ME.
He is also survived by five sib-
lings and one adopted brother.
Barbara (Ed) Evenson of Unity,
ME, Marvin Jr., (Sam) (Debra)
Martens of Aurora, AL. Ralph
(Penny) Martens ofLABelle, FL.
Bruce (Bobbie) Martens of Live
Oak, FL., Donina (Bill) Estey of


Perry, FL. and Richard A. (Pat-
ty) Lewis of Okeechobee, FL.
His Extended family includes:
Aunt Orrilla Danforth of Bunn-
level, NC. Uncle Fred (Cathy)
Webber of High Springs, FL.
Uncle Donald (Dru) Web-
ber of LeHigh Acres, FL.
Step children who considered
Harold as a father: Robert An-
thony (Belinda) Conrad of Prov-
idence, FL., Tina Marie (Mat-
thew) Salyers of Lake City, FL,
Wilson W. Conrad, Jr. ofBell, FL.
Five grandchildren who adored
him: Angela, Jesse, Phoebe
Salyers, Isaiah, Carlos Conrad.
Many cousins, nieces,
nephews; spiritual broth-
ers and sisters and friends.
Memorial services will be-held
on May 14, 2011 at 2:00pm at
the Kingdom Hall of Jehovah's
Witness, 310 SE 7th Ave.,
High Springs, FL EVANS
CARTER FUNERAL HOME
is in charge of arrangements.


Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For tails, call the Lake
City Reporters classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


stephenfoster.

Fundraising dinner
The Tough Enough to
Wear Pink fundraising
dinner is 6 p.m. today
at the Columbia County
Fairgrounds Banquet Hall:
The event includes dinner,
casino-style gambling, auc-
/tions and more. Tickets
are $25 per person and are
available at Wilson's, The
Money Man, Chasteens,
Smitty's and the'fair office.
The event raises money
for breast cancer aware-
ness and the Columbia
County Crisis Fund. Call
752-8822.


Monday
Evening With Friends
The 18th Annual
Musical Evening With
Friends featuring the FGC
Gateway City Band is 7:30
p.m. Monday at the Levy
Performing Arts Center.
Conductors include Harry
Wuest and Matt Johnson.
Performances will include
Ben Grier, Miranda
Amaya, Christian Heston
and the Columbia High
School Woodwind Quartet.
Adrmission is free.

Executive meeting
Early Learning Coalition
of Florida's Gateway, Inc.
Executive Committee
Meeting is 3 p.m. Monday
at the Coalition Office,
1104 SW Main Blvd. If any
persons) interested in
attending this meeting has
a disability requiring special
assistance please contact
Stacey Nettles at 752-9770.

Support group
The Women's Cancer
Support Group of Lake
City is hosting an "open ,
to the public" meeting,
5:30-6:30 p.mi. Monday at
the Columbia County Fair
Grounds Entertainment
Building. The speaker will
be Donna Bryce-Wright,
presenting a self-breast
exam program called
Triple Touch. Both women


and men are invited to
attend. Call 752-4198 or
755-0522.

Donors Wanted
LifeSouth Bloodmobile
needs donors 11 a.m.-6
p.m. Monday at Moe's
Southwest Grill. All donors
receive a LifeSouth ball
cap and $5 in Moe Bucks.

Women's meeting
Sheriff Mark Hunter
is the guest speaker at
the Columbia Federated
Republican Women's meet-
ing at 7 p.m. Monday. A
brown bag dinner and
social time is at 6:30 p.m. '
The group meets at the
old Guardian ad Litem
yellow house on Duval
Street just east of the First
Baptist Church and across
from Advanced Auto.
Contact President Gayle
Cannon, 303-2616, gcan-
non@atlantic. net.


Trail Association meeting
The Suwannee Chapter
of the Florida Trail
Association is meeting
7-9 p.m. Monday at the
Suwannee River Water
Management District
Office, 9225 CR 49, Live
Oak. The program will fea-
ture: Megan Wetherington,
senior professional engi-
neer with the Suwannee
River Water Management
District. Contact Sylvia
Dunnam, 362-3256, dun-
nams@windstream. net.

Three-part workshop
Going Native:
Landscaping for Wildlife
with Native Plants begins
6:30 p.m. Monday at
the Columbia County
Extension-office. The
three-part series teaches'
about planting native
plants'in y&tt la~indcape
that will attract more
wildlife. The first ses-
sion focuses on the topic
"Getting Started: Food,
Water, Cover and Place
to raise young." Call 752-
5384.


In Memory of Harold E. Martens
Mr & Ms Harold & Neldajane astens was married on Augult /., 200" I 'ms
my loving husband in death by a drunk driver that shouldn't baow been on the
road
tfa drink driver or anyone that has been drinking gets on a hbghuVy or road
uwbile drinking, tm. should be put ip the room in a comer, and ultbout being able
to leave have to stand the whole time having to see the torture and pain that the
family goes through uwitbtheir lose one
Here is my husband working for his family, not bothering anyone. minding his
own business, and doing his job But on the other band here ts a drink driver mak-
ing a choice to drink and drie where my husband didn I hae a choice in the mat
ler but lost hbi life because of a bad choice the drunk drner made I pray and hope
that anyone drinking "might" think twice before getting into a tvbicle to drive.
because I love people it might saw the life ofanother person
A0y husband and I would have been mamed four wears on August 11, 2011
Harold uws a very suwet and loving husband stepja rer. grandfrter, brother.
son and friend He uas a humble man and us tenr compfisionate and under
standing of other peoples feelings And rus ery sernots about adl lof( hi< nvri wcb
as marriage and his love for his creator and GodJebovtb Harold promised to loe
and tb cbenb bis wiffore faer and etsr and e did ribht to the end
During the short time that Harold spent on the earth he touched lots of peoples
hearts and uas lotw4 by lots and lots of people, and there showed their lotw back for
Harold. He us liked b his boss, and all of his o-workers He u bones and a
bard uwrker
This ha been the bhidest thing as a wufe. and his lore one, to bare to deal u ltb
He ltoed to build. And ai his wife looking around our home at all the things he
made and seeing is smiling fae in our pictures remind me rofthe ternrbe loss that
I must endure forever to my end
Myr gold is to continue on serving our God.lebotab anilto be there to weklcme
him back into myi arms, when Jesus calls the death It hoi John 5 28. 29 Then to
life on a paradise earth u-bere death, pain and soriro will be no more Rer lationl
213.4
Ipray all those uwho already knou and lotJeb&nahm u l remain fathid and close
to him in tis time of end And for al those uwho hae not yet come to knou the God
fall comfort, I hope you will 2 Corinthians 13. 1
At this time as Harold's wife, I would like to thank all four family and fnends
jor all of your phone caels, and what you have did for me as I suffer nmy lois of a
loving husband and best friend Harold uas the love of my lte and now part of me
is gone, because of someone's bad choice to drink and drirv Now as I close this off
I know that Harold woldbe proudto know that even as I'm sittmg here crlng imnd
sfflring the loss qflosing him that I ums willing to take the time that I might sae
someone else Ife and a loeW one. st remember uhoever o o are, please be careful
the next time you get into d ivide Think not only of yourself but of ewryone else
that is on that road It might be yon or.your loed ones that suffer this tragic loss
At 430 am onipri 26, 2011 mv last words spoken on the phone us I lote
you, please be careful. You naer knou', please read Eclesiastli 9 11 because my
husband sure did not expect this Plhase don't wish later you hadn't made a choice
to drink and dried. Just don't do it if your choice is to drink, star off the road
Please.
Written by Harolds IFe, Netda.lane Martens


JqS "Dad's Poem
Sto


Harold

Martens"

You never said "I'm leaving". You never said "Goodbye".
You were gone before I knew it.
There are no words to tell you, Just what I feel inside.
The shock, the hurt, the anger might gradually subside.
A million times I'll need you.-A million times I'll cry.
If love alone could have saved you, You never would have died.
In life I love you dearly. In death I love you still.
In my heart you hold a place that no one could ever fill.
It broke my hear to lose you, but you didn't go alone for part of
me went with you.
Things will never be the same and all though it hurts so bad
I will smile whenever I hear you name and be proud you were my
dad.
And I was proud to call you pops.
And I was proud to have my kids call you grandpa,
Because you loved us so much.
You will be missed so much but never forgotten.
By your daughter, Tina Salyers


LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SATURDAY, MAY 7, 2011


Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424











FAITH


&


VALUES


www.lakecityreporter.com


BIBLICAL MEDITATION


Wash. police reach out to Muslim leaders


Carlton McPeak
cariton_mc@msn.com

Accepting

what you

,can't change

Ever met some-
one that the
more you tried
to get along
with them, the
more difficult it was to
have peace between the
two of you? I know you
have. But what can you
do about it? Sometimes I
think the only solution is
to accept what you cannot
change.
Paul to the Christians at
Rome said, "If possible, so
far as it depends on you,
be at peace with all men"
(Romans 12:18). Paul rec-
ognizes that regardless of
what you might do to have
peace with an individual,
sometimes the other per-
son's actions will not allow
there to be peace.
To try and put forth
the reasons why a person
would not want to resolve
the conflict would almost
be an impossible task.
Because of their percep-
tion of themselves they
are not able to deal with
your personality. If they
are a very sensitive person,
then they might perceive
your confidence as being
arrogance. Because they
perceive you as not being
humble, but very proud,
they are not able to deal
with your personality.
An example might be
that after they have told
you something about their
life, they get offended
when you tell them about
a similar event in your life.
They take what you said as
you thinking that they are
inferior to what you have
done. How could you shar-
ing events in your life make
them inferior?
Another example might
be that you have extended
a compliment to them.
Rather than them kindly
saying, "thank you," they
begin to think, "What is
he really trying to say?"
Because they have not
received a lot of compli-
ments in their life they do
not know how to graciously
receive a compliment so
they take it as you trying
to criticize them by giving
what they perceive as a
"backhanded compliment."
How would you ever deal
with someone like that?
When you do for them
what most people would
consider a good thing to
do, they interpret what you
have done as an act of try-
ing to "put them down."
With this type of thinking,
how would you ever show a
person that you really care
about them?
Sometimes we must
accept what we cannot
change, but we really
do not want to accept it
because we really want
peace with that individual.
Trying to pretend that
everything is okay, only
continues the downward
spiral of a tumultuous rela-
tionship.
How can the relationship
improve? Both parties must
accept what they cannot
change.


Carlton G. McPeak is an
evangelist working with the
Lakeview Church of Christ in
Lake City. All Scriptural
quotations are from the New
American Standard Bible,
Holman Bible Publishers,
unless otherwise stated.


GENE JOHNSON and
MANUEL VALDES
Associated Press

SEATTLE Amid the
talk of possible retaliation
by terrorists for the kill-
ing of Osama bin Laden,
Seattle-area police kept
an eye on local mosques
Monday and reassured
Muslim leaders that they
have somewhere to turn if
they fear anti-Islamic sen-
timent could turn to vio-
lence.
Arsalan Bukhari, the
executive director of the
Washington chapter of
the Council on American-
Islamic Relations, said
Seattle police told him they
were stepping up patrols
around sensitive areas,
including mosques and
government buildings
A Bellevue Police major
urged his officers to
keep a heightened aware-
ness around mosques
and other public spaces.
Across the state, Pullman
Police Sgt. Dan Hargraves
said officers were being
"extra-vigilant" in watch-
ing for threats to the city's
mosque, along a busy
street near the Washington
State University campus.
"We don't have officers
stationed at every mosque,
but if there was any concern
expressed, we'd be there
in a heartbeat," said Seattle


Police Department spokes-
man Sean Whitcomb. "We
are absolutely sensitive to
the significance and enor-
mity of what happened in
Islamabad yesterday, and
we rely on the excellent
relationship we have to
with the Muslim commu-
nity to ensure that people
feel safe."
Officials were monitor-
ing for incidents such as
one in Portland, Maine, on
Monday, when someone
scrawled graffiti reading
"Osama today, Islam tomor-
row" and "go home" on the
city's largest mosque.
The crime echoed one
that occurred in Seattle's
Northgate neighborhood
a day after the Sept. 11
attacks,tvhen a man poured
gasoline outside the Idriss
mosque in an attempt to
set it on fire an incident
that prompted residents of
the area to spend the next
three months standing
round-the-clock volunteer
watches there.
The Seattle Police
Department set up its
Arab-Muslim-Sikh advi-
sory council in 2002 to
improve relations with the
local community.
Adnan Bakkar, a trust-
ee at the Idriss mosque,
said Monday he hadn't yet
spoken with Seattle police,
because he didn't really
need to.
S"They are protecting us


ASSOCIATED PRESS
People cheer and wave flags on the "Freedom Bridge" just outside Joint Base Lewis-
McChord, Sunday, near Tacoma, Wash., after they heard the news that Osama bin Laden
had been killed.


as citizens more than as a
mosque," he said.
News of bin Laden's
death was welcomed in the
state with cautious excite-
ment, as it was elsewhere
in the U.S.
"I thanked the Lord. I'm
thinking it's all over," said
Carroll Fisher, a retired
Air Force member, outside
a popular diner near Joint
Base Lewis-McChord. "But
you know, will Osama's
underlings carry on? They
must have a mission if any-
thing happens to Osama.
That's what we're all fear-
ing if they will come
to U.S. shores one way or
another."
Former Seattle U.S.


Attorney John McKay,
who prosecuted would-be
millennium bomb suspect
Ahmed Ressam and now
teaches a terrorism class
at Seattle University Law
School, said Monday that
there was little chance
of a retaliatory attack in
Washington state. Ressam,
who had trained at al Qaeda
camps in Afghanistan, was
arrested in .December
1999. when he drove off a
ferry in Port Angeles with
a trunk full of explosives.
"Al Qaeda and its affili-
ates are known for careful
planning they're on a
three- to five-year plan," he
said. "They cbuld advance
something that was already


in the works. But if it was
in Seattle, it would more
likely be a lone-wolf, not
something well planned.
But I don't think there's a
network out there that's
that nimble, because the
world's looking for them
and apparently we can get
them."
A Port of Seattle spokes-
woman said Seattle-
Tacoma International
Airport was not under
heightened security
Monday, and all was quiet
at the Washington state
Emergency Operations
Center at Camp Murray,
with no indications of any
new threats, said spokes-
man Marv Nauman.


CHURCH NOTES


Today
Mother's Day
appreciation
A pre-Mother's Day
appreciation and gos-
pel celebration is 6
p.m. today at New Day
Springs Missionary
Baptist Church. The
event is hosted by Angel
Miniseries of Lake City
Inc. and will feature
national and local gos-
pel artists. No ticket
is required, but a love
offering will be collected
during the service. The
church is located at 709
NW Long.Street. Call
Pastor Minnie Williams
Gomes at 758-1886.

Mother/Daughter
Banquet
A Mother & Daughter
Banquet is 6 p.m. today
at Mt. Pleasant United
Methodist Church in
Gainesville. The theme is
"Breaking the Silence,"
and Judge Hubert L.
Grimes of Daytona is the
keynote speaker. Tickets


are $12. Call Delois (Dee)
Watson at 755-2445 or e-
mail deloiswatson@gmail.
com.

Yard sale
A neighborhood yard
sale is 8 a.m. today at
Shiloh Baptist Church in
Fort White. Spaces are
available for $15. Contact
Brother Earl at 454-4978.
The church is located at
173 SW Shiloh Street, US
Hwy. 27.

Sunday
Mother's Day
service
A Mother's Day service
is 11 a.m. Sunday at the
Greater Truevine Baptist
Church. The speaker is
Joyce Herring.

Mother's Day
celebration
A Mother's Day celebra-
tion is 11 a.m. Sunday
at Philadelphia Baptist
Church. The speaker is
Barbary Carter.


Tuesday
Senior Luncheon
A senior luncheon with
a special speaker and
music is 11 a.m. Tuesday at
Wellborn Baptist Church.
Everyone is invited to come
and bring a covered dish.
The church is located on
Highway 90 West between
live Oak and Lake City at
the intersection with Lowe
Lake Road in Wellborn. Call
963-2231 with any questions
or visit www. wellbornbap-
tist. com.

Addiction support
group
Greater Visions Support
Group hosts a faith-based
addictions support group
at 7 p.m. every Tuesday
at Christ Central Church
on Sister's Welcome
Road and 9:30 a.m. every
Thursday at the Suwannee
Coalition office on North
Ohio Avenue in Live Oak.
The group provides spiri-
tual and emotional support
in a non-judgmental set-
ting. Call 208-1345.


Thursday
Bible study
The community is
invited to a weekly Bible
study 10:30- 11:30 a.m.
Thursday at the First
Presbyterian Church in
the Education Building in
Room 106. The study is
on the book of Daniel and
includes records of his
actions, prophecies and
visions of things now, and
things to come. Dr. Roy
Martin teaches the study.
The study is free of charge
and open to the community.
Call the office at 752-0670
for additional information.

English and literacy
classes
Free English speaking
and literacy classes pro-
vided by Columbia County
School District's Career and
Adult Education Program
is from 5:30-8 p.m. every
Thursday at Unity of God
Ministries, Inc. in Wellborn.
Activities for children will
be provided. Call 755-8190.
The church is located at


12270 County Road 137.

Baptist Men's Meeting,
The men of Wellborn
Baptist Church and their
friends join together to
eat and worship together
with a special speaker
and music at 6 p.m.
Thursday. Bring a dessert.
The church is located on
Highway 90 West between
Live Oak and Lake City at
the intersection with Lowe
Lake Road in Wellborn.
Call 963-2231 with any
questions or visit www.
wellbornbaptist. corn

Friday
Spaghetti supper
A fundraiser spaghetti
supper is 4-7 p.m. Friday
at Bethel United Methodist
Church. Eat in or drive-thru
take-out The meal includes
spaghetti with meat sauce,
salad, garlic bread, dessert
and tea. A donation of $7 is
requested. Call in orders
at 755-1353. The church is
located at US Highway. 441
South.


The Bible teaches we must labor for rewards


D o all things
without com-
plaining and
disputing,
that you may
become blameless and
harmless, children of God
without fault in the midst
of a crooked and perverse
generation, among whom
you shine as lights in the
world, holding fast the
word of life, so that I may
rejoice in the day of Christ
that I have not run in vain
or labored in vain" (Phil
2:14-16).
Paul was not afraid to
admit to the Philippians
that he was concerned
about his rewards at the
Judgment Seat of Christ,
which will be the first
event on God's calendar
after the rapture of the
church. He wanted those
Christians to become


pnore fruitful, know that
he would be rewarded
for all their fruit. He
wanted those Christians
to be out shining their
lights, speaking the
words of life to those
souls who were that
crooked and perverse
generation he spoke of.
Many teachers focus
on the love that Paul'
had for those Christians,
that indeed is a major
topic in the letter, for love
is the fuel that drives all
fruitful service. However,
Paul's intention in writ-
ing that letter was to let
the Philippians know that
despite persecution and
loss of earthly goods and
honors, they could have
the attitude that Christ had
when He emptied Himself
of His pre-incarnate glory,
humbling Himself in obedi-


BIBLE STUDIES
.,f-


Hugh Sherrill Jr.
ems-hugh43@comcast.net
ence. But there is another
lesson that runs through-
out the epistle, and that is
the reward that Christians
receive for their labors in
the Lord (Phil. 1:19-27; 3:7-
14; 4:16-17). Throughout all
of his epistles, the reward
we receive at the Judgment
Seat of Christ is a recurring
theme. It was always in
Paul's mind, and it is clear
that it was a larger motiva-
tional part in his thinking.


One of the faults of the
modern church is that
there is hardly any, if any
at all, teaching on the
Judgment Seat of Christ
(I Cor. 3:11-15). Every
Christian today ought to
be aware of their heavenly
account and seek daily
to enlarge it. We must
pray'that God will make
us useful and fruitful if
we expect to be useful
and fruitful (John 15).
Through the pages of the
New Testament, we are
urged to watch for the
imminent return of Christ
for his Bride. If we are
watchful for the return,
we will not be caught
engaged with the world.
Remember the Christian
life either moves upward
or downward, it never
planes off.
The only hope anyone


has in this life is the
resurrection of the body
one day to be with the
Lord. Those who are not
born again Christians
don't have this hope, only
doom.
We who are saved
need to strive daily to
gain rewards. On May
the 15-17 there will
be the "North Florida
Crusade for Christ" at
the Columbia County
Fairground. We who are
Christians ought to sup-
port this crusade every
night and invite and bring
people who need Christ
as their personal savior.
Think of the "crowns" that
can be won.

E Hugh G. Sherrill is a
preacher in Lake City avail-
able for pulpit supply and
revivals.


Saturday, May 7, 2011








LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVERTISEMENT


I.o
-Wh Worry














-.. ., 7'. Phote crfditl: missyas



T he Creator gave the seagull wings to

fly, the most exactly engineered beak with

which to eat, and feet designed for sand or water;

He didn't leave out anything. We are as significant

as the gull; God certainly gives us all we need. But

we humans seem to worry a lot. Why worry?, Why

not let God be in control? He takes care of all His

creatures. Visit your house of worship and learn

more about the Creator who takes care of us.


Scriptures Selected by The American Bible Society
2011, Kelster-Williams Newspaper Services, PO. Box 8187, Charlottesville, VA 22906, www.kwnews.com


North Florida
Pharmacy
7 Locations to Serve You
Lake City, Ft. White, Branford,
Chiefland, Mayo & Keystone Heights

r '..*.











To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440



7 upSecenter
"LOW PRICES EVERYDAY"


GWHunter, Inc.
Chevron Chevron Oil
q0. Jobber





"Quality 4=ork at a reasonable price"
We also do solar hook-ups
(386) 755-5944.


FOOD STORES
Open 7 Days a Week
1036 E. Duval St., Lake City FL.
(386) 752-0067
Fresh Meat, Fresh Produce!
"I can do all things through Chrisl which strcngtheneth me"
Philippians 4:13

To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440

To Advertise in.
this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440


RICK'S CRANE SERVICE
Located at 25A -"'
(Old Valdosta Hwy) 'W"- ,
386-752-5696 or
386-867-2035
after hours

To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440


First Advent Christian
S 1881 SWMcFarlaneAve.
386-752-3900,
.Sunday School: 9:45AMI
Sunday Service:, 11:00AM
Wednesday Service: 7:00PM

GLAD TIDINGS ASSEMBLY OF GOD
993 NWLake Jeffery Road
386-752-0620.
Sunday Worship 10:30AM & 6PM
Wed. Fam. Bible Study 7:00PM
"A church where JESUS is Real"

BERFABAPTIST CHURCH
SR47 S 755-0900
Sunday School 9:30AM
SundayWorship 10:45AM & 6PM.
Wednesday Eve. Service '., 7PM
Interim Pastor Kenneth bEenfield
EASTSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
196 SE James Ave. 386-752-2860
Sun. Bible Study 9:45AM
Sun Worstup It M a 6PM
Wed. Prayer MigtBible Study 6PM
Rev. Brandon G. Win
FIRST BAPTIST CHIJRCH
Sunday Bible Study 9 15AM
Sunday Worship 10 3UJAM & 6 00PM
Wed. 6-00PM Prayer Service, &
Ctildrens Ministry 6:15PM
Downtown Lake City'* 752-5422
-,Rev. Stephen Ahrens, Pastor.
OLIVE MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH
541 NE Davi' Steee
(386) 752-1990
Ronald V.Walters, Pastor
Sunday School 9:45AM
Sunday MorningWorship 11:00AM
Wed. Mid-WeekWorship 6:00PM
"In God's Word, Will & Way"

PINE GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH
1989 N US Hwy 441
386-752-2664
SundayBible Study- 9:45AM
SundayWorship 11AM & 6PM
Wed. Kids &Youth Ministry 6:30PM
Pastor: Ron Thompson
SALEM PRIMITIVE BAPTIST *
Sunday Serice 10:30AM
Pastor: Elder Herman Griffin
.752-4198
SOUTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
388 S.E. Baya Drive* 755-5553
Bible Study 9:15 AM
Morning Worship 10:30AM
Evening Worship 6:15PM
Wednesday:
AWANA 5:45PM
Prayer & Bible Study 6:15 PM
TABERNACLE BAPTIST CHURCH
(Independent Baptist)
144 SE Montrose Ave.* 752-4274
Sunday School 10 AM
Sun. Morn. Worship 11 AM
Sunday Eve. .6PM
Wed. Prayer Meeting 7:30 PM
Pastor: Mike Norman '

EPIPHANY CATHOLIC CHURCH
1905 SW Epiphany Court 752-4470
Saturday Vigil Mass 5:00 PM
Sunday Mass 8:15 AM, 10:30AM,
5:00 PM (SpanishlEnglish)
Sunday School/Religious Education
9:00AM-10:15AM


CHRISTIAN SCIENCE SOCIETY
239 SE Baya Ave.
Sunday Service 11:00AM
Wednesday Evening Service 7:30 PM
LAKE CITY CHRISTIAN CHURCH
Hwy 247 S.* 755-9436


Sunday School
. Sun. Morn. Worship
Wed. Prayer Meeting


9:30 AM
10:30 AM
7PM


.NEWHOMZON
Church of Christ
Directions & Times 386-623-7438
Jack Exum,Jr., Minister

LAKE CITY CHURCH OF GOD
167 Ermine St. *752-5965
Sunday School 9:45AM
Sun. Worship 10:30AM & 6:00PM
Wed. Family Night 7PM
Wed. Youth Service 7PM
Pastor: Carroll Lee

EVANGEL CHURCH OF GOD
370 SW Monitor Glen *755-1939
Sunday School 9:45AM
Sunday Worslip 10:50 & 6:30
'Wed. Spiritual Enrichment 7PM
"ShockYouth Church"
Boys and Girls Clubs
Bible Study
Pastor: John R. Hathaway

ST. JAMES EPISCOPAL CHURCH
2423 SWBascom Noris Dr., Lake
City, Fl 32025- 386-752-2218
Email: stjamesepis330@bellsouth.net
Holy Eucharist
,Sun.8&10AM "*
Wednesday: 5:15pm
Priest: The Rev. Michael Armstrong
Deacon:The Rev. limmie Hunsinger
Director of Music Dr. Alfonso Levy
I 'i ir


OUR REDEEMER LUTHERAN CHURCH
LCMS
S112 miles S. of 1-75 on SR 47
755 4-299


Sunday Serics 9
(Nursery Provided)
Christian Education Hour
Forallages at 10:45AM
Pastor: Rev. Bruce Alkire


:30AM


SPIRIT OF CHRIST LUTHERAN
Hwy 90,1.5 miles West of 1-75 752-3807
Sunday Worship 10:00AM.
Nursery'Avail.
Wed. Pot Luck 6PM Worship 7PM
Vicar John David Bryant


BETHEL UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
4869 US 441 South
Sunday Worship Services,
Traditional Services 8:30 & ll:00AM
386-755-1353
mybethelumc.com
First United Methodist Church
973 S. Marion Ave.
386-752-4488
Sunday School 9:45AM
Sunday Morning Worship
Casual Worship Service 8:50AM
Traditional Service 11:00AM
Program opportunities available in all
areas for all ages.
For a complete schedule
contact church office at
752-4488


WESLEY MEMORIAL UNITED
1272 SW McFarlane 752-3513
(Adjacent to Summers School)
Worship 8:00 & 10:00AM
Sunday School 9:00AM
Nursery provided
Praise & Worship 6:00PM
AWANA Wednqsdays 5:00PM
Pastor: The Rev. I. Louie Mabrey
www.wesleymem.com
WATERTOWN CONGREGATIONAL
METHODIST CHURCH
U.S. 90 E. turn on Cortez (next to Quality
Ind.) right on Okinawa.
Sunday School 9:45 AM
SunWorship 11AM & 6PM
Wed. Night Service ,7PM
Pastor, Randy Ogburn


LAKE CITY CHURCH OFTHE NAZARENE
Services:
- Sunday School 9:45AM
. SundayWofjhip 10:45AM
Wednesday -6:30PM
Adult, Youth Ministry, Children's Ministry
Pastor: Craig Henderson
Nursery Provided
SW SR 47a nd Azalea Park Place

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
629 S'W BaJ Drive 52-0670
Sunday Lonmempcirary' 9 00A
Sunday School 10 OOAM
itadnmonal Service 1100 AM
NURSERY PROWLED
Pasior: Dr. RoyA Mamn
Dreciorr ofl Muic Bill Popln

FIRST FULL GOSPEL CHURCH
NE loneWav & NEWashington Si.
Sunday School 1I0 0 .M
Morning Worship lI:10i ,4M
Eiangeliknc Service 6:00PM
uthdi Srrviie Wednesdav t uOPM
Mtd week Sermie Wedriesday ; 00 PM
For info call 755-3408* Everyone Welcome'
Pastor Rev. Stan Ellis
I I I 'M


, CHRIST CENTRAL MINISTRIES
Leadership Services 9:00AM
Sunday Morning 11:00AM
Wednesday Service 7:00PM
217 Dyal Ave., from Hwy 90 take
Sisters Welcome Rd., go 5 miles, South,
church on left. 755-2525
Lead Pastor: Lonnie Johns
A Church on the Move"
CHRISTIAN HERITAGE CHURCH
Corner SR. 47 & Hudson Circle
Sunday Celebration 10:30 AM
Pastor Chris Jones 752-9119
FALLING CREEK CHAPEL
Falling Creek Road 755-0580
First and Third Sundays 9:30 A.M.
Second and Fourth Sundays 3:00 P.M.
Pastor: Rev. Cheryl R. Pingel
NEW BEGINNING CHURCH
Highway 242 E. of Branford Highway
Sunday School 10:00AM
MorningWorship 11:00AM
Sunday Evening 6:00PM
Wednesday 7:0'0PM
A Full Gospel Church EveryoneWelcomed -
(386) 755-5197
,1:


~w
~


To List

Your


Church

on the

Church


Directory

Call

752-1293!


Toadvertiseign thisChurchDircoyCl75- 5


Tires for every need.
US'90 West across from Wal-Mart
752-0054

Morrell's
Your Complete decorating and
home furnishings store
I s Deputy Jeff Davis Lane (formerly Pinemount Rd.)
752-3910 or 1-800-597-3526
Mon.-Sat. 8:00-5:30 Closed Sunday


ANDERSON COLUMBIA CO., INC.
ASPHALT PAVING
COMMERCIAl .INDUSTRIAl
Sue Preparation Road Building Parking Lots
Grading & Drainage
752-7585
871 NW Guerdon St., Lake City

HARRY'S
a,,, a Heating &Air Condilioning Inc.
Harry Mosley President


PRL 752-2308 1

To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440


Central States
Enterprises
Columbia County's Feed Headquarters
FEED PET SLUPPLIS LA WN & (ARDEN
ANiMAL HEALTH
668 NW Waldo St. 386-755-7445

MIKELLS POWER EQUIPMENT, INC.
Your Lawn & Garden Headquaners
MOWERS CHAIN -SA\\ S TRIMMERS.
115 IiUS 91\EST -LAK.E CITY FL
386-752-8098



LAKE CITY
,o.,_ ''755-7050
I n iMVK Lak OVEy P NLOUMLOATO


To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440

BAYWAYjanioria Services
FIRE & Water Restoration
Floor & Carpet Care
Residential & Commercid
755-6142


To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440


CM lay Electric Cooperative, Inc.
Competitive rates, non-profit,
right here in your community.
Lake City District 386-752-7447
clayelectric.com
To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440


SATURDAY, MAY 7, 2011


I





LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SATURDAY, MAY 7. 2011


FGC students move their tassels to the left to signify that they are college graduates.




FIRST





CLASS

Florida Gateway College celebrated its first
graduation class under its new name Friday.


Philip Mobleyspoke to hundreds of graduates, family members and
friends during the morning commencemencement ceremony Friday. Mobley,
who was the college's firstAfrican-American Student Government
Association president, received the 2011 Distinguished Alumnus
Award.


Dr. Charles Hall, the Florida Gateway College president, congratu-
lates Mary Elizabeth White, who graduated Cum Laude, after receiv-
ing her Associate in Arts degree Friday.


_ullma Matinez (center) and Columbia High School senior Kelsey
Mercer, 18, take pictures of Susy Romero, a CHS student who is
also dual enrolled at FGC.


Charles Carroll announces Savannah Sue Maddox as she prepares
to walk across the stage during the morning commencement cer-
emony.


Brandi Frazier hoists her 8-month-old son, Leo, after receiving her Associate in Arts
degree from Florida Gateway College Friday.


FGC students line up prior to marching into the
Howard Conference Center for graduation Friday.

Photos by JASON MATTHEW WALKER
Lake City Reporter


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427







. Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirbyr@akecityreportercom


SPORTS


Saturday. May 7. 201 I


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


FROM THE SIDELINE


Brandon Finley
Phone: (386) 754-0420
bfinley@Iakecityreporter.com


Best


yet to


come

f you follow the
Lady Tigers'
softball program at
Columbia High, you
already know that
they recently completed
their most successful
season in school history.
Despite falling out just
short of a Final Four
appearance, there's a lot
to look forward to for the
Lady Tigers.
It's always hard to
utter the phrase, wait
until next season, but for
Columbia softball the
saying has never been
more true.
The Lady Tigers will
not only be stronger
next year, but they'll
be, more experienced.
Columbia graduates only
one senior in Jordan
Williams. Despite her
loss, the Lady Tigers
should be better.
Columbia will have a
group of four seniors next'
season who have been
playing varsity softball
since their freshman year.
These girls have all the
experience in the world,
but there's also a group
of freshman this year
who hadn't experienced
playoff softball.
Most of the younger
group bats in the heart
of the order for the Lady
Tigers and many of them
were shut down against
the formidable pitching
offered by Jessa Watts of
Niceville.
The difference in
the two teams is that
Niceville had been in this
situation before. Even as
they were down two runs
entering the bottom of
the fifth, they remained
composed and were able
to rally.
Columbia hadn't been
in a situation where it was
trailing in a playoff game
that late. Next season, the
Lady Tigers will know
what is in store.
That kind of experience
only comes from being
there. For all of the
accolades this was
only the first time that
Columbia has made it past
the second round of the
playoffs. The competition
and pressure wasn't going
to get any easier.
The pressure won't be
any easier next year, but
at least the Lady Tigers
will know what to expect.
They'll know what its
going to take to reach
the pinnacle. Most of all,
they should know -how
to respond next time
around.
For a group of
upcoming seniors who
have shined so bright,
the journey is not over,
but just beginning. The
task may seem like a
daunting one to win a
state championship, but
at least they'll know what
it takes. '


* Brandon Finley covers
sports for the Lake City
Reporter.


Celtics hoping


to hold serve,


return home


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Miami Heat's Dwyane Wade (3) goes to the basket as Boston Celtics' Jermaine O'Neal (7)
defends during the second half of Game 2 of a second-round NBA playoff basketball series,
Tuesday in Miami.


Heat with 2-0.
edge over Boston
entering Game 3.
By JIMMY GOLEN
Associated Press
WALTHAM, Mass.
- Paul Pierce has figured
out how to help the Boston
Celtics play better during
the final minutes of their
next playoff game against
the Miami Heat.
He's going to stick
around.
Pierce was ejected from
the series opener with 7
minutes left in the fourth
quarter; and in Game 2 he
strained his left Achilles'
tendon in the first half and
was still hobbling down
the stretch. He knows that
Boston's chances of avoid-
ing a 3-0 hole depend on
his ability to stick around
at the end, and he plans to
be there.
"Paul Pierce being in the
game in the fourth quarter,
healthy, is always going to


help the Celtics," he said
before practice on Friday.
The Heat took the first
two games of the best-of-
seven Eastern Conference
semifinals in Miami, and
the series resumes with
Game 3 on Saturday night
in Boston. For these Celtics,
who have never fallen
behind 0-2 since the New
Big Three was assembled
in the summer of 2007, it's a
crucial game to avoid what
could be an insurmountable
hole.
"We still feel like it's
going to be a seven-game
series," Pierce said. "I like
our chances, especially with
our backs against the wall."
The Celtics have rea-
son to be optimistic that
they can at least make a
series of it. They are back
at home, where this core
is 29-7 in the playoffs, and
they expect to be healthier
than they have been in a
while, thanks in part to the
three days off since their
NBA continued on 3B


Pads provide difference


Allen pleased
with competition
after first week.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com
.Columbia High coach
Brian Allen finally saw what
he was looking for as the
first week of spring prac-
tice wrapped up for the new
coach. As the pads went on
Thursday, the level of com-
petition went up.
"It was great competi-
tion," Allen said. "That's
the No. 1 word we've been
preaching. The kids are
turning it on. The competi-
tion has been good and I'm
encouraged as new players
emerge."
That's a different tune
than Allen was singing after
the first-three practices.
"Overall, I think we're
working better," he said.
"Our organization is bet-
ter, and that's something
we needed to work on as
- coaches. We have to be as
punctual as possible. We
have to be efficient and that
will show on Friday nights.
The first day, I was upset,
but we get a little better
every day."


Members of the Columbia High offensive line practice their technique as quarterback Nigel Atkinson (center) looks for a
receiver in drills on Wednesday. The Tigers strapped on the pads through the last two days of practice this week.


Pads have helped the
competition level rise as hit-
ting became a focus instead


of fundamentals. Allen's
practices bleed physicality
from the beginning.


"It's important to find hit-
.ters that can keep their hips
low and use their body to


drive a person back with
the proper power," Allen
said.


Kahne sets record

in Darlington

qualifying lap


Driver continues
hot start to
year with pole.
By PETE IACOBELLI
Associated Press
DARLINGTON, S.C. -
Kasey Kahne continued his
strong showing this year
at Darlington Raceway, fol-
lowing a Trucks victory in
March with a record-setting
qualifying lap Friday for the
Southern 500.
Kahne won his fourth
career pole in nine starts
at the track 'Too Tough To


Tame" with a lap of 181.254
mph, surpassing the mark
of 180.370 mph set by Jamie
McMurray a year ago.
Kahne was the marquee
name in the Camping World
Trucks event at Darlington
two months ago while
NASCAR's top two series
had the weekend off. So
how much did taking the
checkered flag then help
Kahne on Friday?
"I don't think that hurt
us that all. We had a great
truck that night, that whole
day," Kahne said. "Anytime
NASCAR continued on 3B


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Kasey Kahne climbs out of his car after winning the pole position for the NASCAR Sprint Cup
Series' Southern 500 auto race, Friday at Darlington Raceway in Darlington, S.C.










LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SATURDAY, MAY 7, 2011


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
AUTO RACING
7 a.m.
SPEED Formula One, qualifying for
Turkish Grand Prix, at Istanbul
7 p.m.
FOX NASCAR, Sprint Cup,
Southern 500, at Darlington, S.C.
COLLEGE BASEBALL
3 p.m.
FSN Kansas at Oklahoma
COLLEGE SOFTBALL
Noon
ESPN -Tennessee at Florida
GOLF
8:30 a.m.
TGC European PGATour, Open de
Espana, third round, at Barcelona, Spain
I p.m.
TGC PGA Tour, Wells ,Fargo
Championship, third round, at Charlotte,
N.C.
3 p.m.
CBS PGA Tour, Wells Fargo
Championship, third round, at Charlotte,
N.C.
TGC Champions Tour, The
Tradition, third round, at Birmingham,Ala.
HORSE RACING
II a.m.
VERSUS NTRA, Kentucky Derby
Undercard, at Louisville, Ky.
4 p.m.
NBC NTRA, Kentucky Derby, at
Louisville, Ky.
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
I p.m.
FOX Regional coverage, Minnesota
at Boston, Cincinnati at Chicago Cubs,.or.
Tampa Bay at Baltimore
8 p.m.
MLB Regional coverage, N.Y.
Yankees at Texas or Arizona at San Diego
(start time 8.30 p.m.)
9 p.m.
WGN Chicago White Sox at
Seattle
MEN'S COLLEGE VOLLEYBALL
7 p.m.
ESPN2 NCAA Division I
tournament, championship match, UC
Santa Barbara vs. Ohio State at University
Park, Pa.
MOTORSPORTS
10 p.m.
SPEED Supercross, at Las Vegas
NBA BASKETBALL
5 p.m.
ESPN Playoffs, conference
semifinals, game 3, Oklahoma City at
Memphis
8 p.m.
ABC Playoffs, conference
semifinals, game 3, Miami at Boston
NHL HOCKEY
8 p.m.
VERSUS Playoffs, conference
semifinals, game 5, Nashville at Vancouver
SOCCER
9:55 a.m.
ESPN2 Premier League,West Hamn
vs. Blackburn, at Londor '
II p.m.
ESPN2 MLS, New York at Los
Angeles


BASEBALL

AL standings

SEast Division
W L Pct GB
NewYork 17 12 .586 -
Tampa Bay 17 14 .548 I
Baltimore 14. 16 .467 3'h
Boston 14 17, .452 4
Toronto 14 17 .452 4
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Cleveland 21 9 .700 -
Kansas City 17 14 .548 4h
Detroit 15 17 .469 7
Minnesota II 18 .379 9
Chicago II 21 .344 II
West Division
W L Pct GB
Los Angeles 18 14 .563 -
Texas 17 15 .531 I
Oakland 16 16 .500 2
Seattle 15 17 .469 3
Friday's Games
Tampa Bay at Baltimore (n)
Detroit at Toronto (n)
Minnesota at Boston (n)
N.Y.Yankees at Texas (n)
Oakland at Kansas City (n)
Cleveland at LA.Angels (n)
Chicago White Sox at Seattle (n)
Today's Games
Minnesota (Duensing 2-1) at Boston
(C.Buchholz 2-3), 1:10 p.m.
Tampa Bay (Hellickson 2-2) at
Baltimore (Guthrie 1-4), 1:10 p.m.
Detroit (Verlander 2-3) at Toronto
(R.Romero 2-3), 4:07 p.m.
Oakland (McCarthy 1-2) at Kansas
City (Hochevar 3-3),7:10 p.m.
N.Y. Yankees (Colon 2-1) at Texas
(Holland 3-1), 8:05 p.m.
Cleveland (White 0-0) at L.A. Angels
(Weaver 6-1), 9:05 p.m.
Chicago White Sox (Floyd 3-2) at
Seattle (Fister 2-3), 9:10 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Detroit at Toronto, 1:07 p.m.
Minnesota at Boston, 1:35 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Baltimore, 1:35 p.m.
N.Y.Yankees at Texas, 2:05 p.m.
Oakland at Kansas City, 2:10 p.m.
Cleveland at L.A.Angels, 3:35 p.m.
Chicago White Sox at Seattle,
4:10 p.m.
Monday's Games
Detroit at Toronto, 7:07 p.m.
Minnesota at Boston, 7:10 p.rti.
Oakland at Texas, 8:05 p.m.
Chicago White Sox at L.A. Angels,
10:05 p.m.


NL standings


East Division
W L
Philadelphia 21 9
Florida 119 I I
Atlanta 18 15
Washington 14 17
NewYork 13 18
Central Division
W L
St. Louis 18 14
Cincinnati 16 15
Pittsburgh 15 16


Chicago 14 16 .467 3
Milwaukee 13 18 .419 41'
Houston 12 19 .387 5S'
West Division
W L Pct GB
Colorado 18 II .621 -
San Francisco 15 16 .484 4
Los Angeles 15 17 .469 4'A
Arizona 14 16 .467 4'h
San Diego 12 19 .387 7
Friday's Games
Cincinnati 5, Chicago Cubs 4
Atlanta at Philadelphia (n)
Houston at Pittsburgh (n)
LA. Dodgers at N.Y. Mets (n)
Washington at Florida (n)
Milwaukee at.St. Louis (n)
Arizona at San Diego (n)
Colorado at San Francisco (n)
Today's Games
Cincinnati (Arroyo 3-3) at Chicago
Cubs (C.Coleman 1-2), 1:10 p.m.
Milwaukee (Gallardo 2-2) at St. Louis
(Lohse 4-l), 4:10 p.m.
Atlanta (|urrjens 3-0) at Philadelphia
(Oswalt 3-1), 7.05 p.m.
Houston (Norris 2-1) at Pittsburgh
(Morton 3-1), 7:05 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers (Garland 1-2) at N.Y.
Mets (C.Young 1-0), 7:10 p.m.
Washington (Gorzelanny 1-2) at
Florida (Volstad 2-1), 7:10 p.m.
Arizona (D.Hudson 2-4) at San Diego
(Moseley I-3), 8:35 p.m.
Colorado (Rogers -3-1) at San
Francisco (Bumgarner 0-5), 9:05 p.m.
Sunday's Games
LA. Dodgers at N.Y. Mets, 1:10 p.m.
Washington at Florida, 1:10 p.m.
Houston at Pittsburgh, 1:35 p.m.
Milwaukee at St. Louis, 2:15 p.m.
Cincinnati at Chicago Cubs, 2:20 p.m.
Arizona at San Diego, 4:05 p.m.
Colorado at San Francisco, 4:05 p.m.
Atlanta at Philadelphia, 8:05 p.m.
Monday's Games
LA. Dodgers at Pittsburgh, 7:05 p.m.
Philadelphia at Florida, 7:10 p.m.
Cincinnati at Houston, 8:05,p.m.
San Diego at Milwaukee, 8:10 p.m.
N.Y. Mets at Colorado, 8:40 p.m.

BASKETBALL

NBA playoffs

CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS
Friday
Chicago at Atlanta (n)
LA. Lakers at Dallas (n)
Today
Oklahoma City at Memphis, 5 p.m.
Miami at Boston, 8 p.m.
Sunday
LA. Lakers at Dallas, 3:30 p.m.
Chicago at Atlanta, 8 p.m.
Monday
Miami at Boston, 7 p.m.
Oklahoma City at Memphis, 9:30 p.m.
Tuesday
Atlanta at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Dallas at LA. Lakers, 10:30 p.m. (if
necessary)

AUTO RACING

Race week

NASCAR
SPRINT CUP
Showtime Southern 500
Site: Darlington, S.C.
Schedule: Today, race, 7:30 p.m. (Fox,
7-11:36 p.m.).'
Trackc Darlington Raceway (oval, 1.366
miles).
Race distance: 501.322 miles, 367 laps.
FORMULA ONE
Turkish Grand Prix
Site: Istanbul.
Schedule: Today,. practice, qualifying
(Speed, 7-8:30 a.m.); Sunday, race, 8 a.m.
(Speed, 7:30-10 a.m., 1:30-4 p.m.).
Track: Istanbul Speed Park (road
course, 3.32 miles).
Race distance: 192.25 miles, 58 laps.
OTHER RACES
WORLD OF OUTLAWS: Late Model,
Today, Swainsboro Raceway, Swainsboro,
Ga.; Sunday, Needmore Speedway,
Norman Park, Ga.

Southern 500 qualifying

(Car number in parentheses)
I. (4) Kasey Kahne, Toyota, 181.254
mph.
2. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet,
180.429.
3.(11) Denny Hamlin,Toyota, 180.132.
4.(99).Carl Edwards, Ford, 179.98.
5. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet,
179.829.
6. (9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 179.671.
7. (43) A J Allmendinger, Ford,
179.448.
8. (83) BrianVickersToyota, 179.259.
9. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet,
179.108.
10, (2) Brad Keselowski, Dodge,
179.082.
I I. (6) David Ragan, Ford, 179.076.



Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form'four ordinary words.

l OTMHU I


12. (1) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet,
178.88.
13. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet,
178.588.
14. (18) Kyle Busch,Toyota, 178.445.
15. (47) Bobby Labonte, Toyota,
178.381.
16. (42) Juan Pablo Montoya,Chevrolet,
178.264.
17. (20) Joey Logano,Toyota, 178.161.
18. (27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet,
178..103.
19. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet,
178.038.
20. (17) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 177.993.
21. (38) Travis Kvapil, Ford, 177.987.
22. (16) Greg Biffle. Ford, 177.955.
23. (78) Regan Smith, Chevrolet,
177.871.
24. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet,
177.826.
25. (22) Kurt Busch, Dodge, 177.755.
26. (33) Clint Bowyer, Chevrolet,
177.723.
27. (09) Landon, Cassill; Chevrolet,
177.672.
28. (5) Mark Martini Chevrolet,
177.614.
29. (56) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota,
177.083'
30. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet,
176.72.
31. (46) J.jYeley, Chevrolet, 176.682.
32.(13) Casey Mears,Toyota, 176.391.
33. (50)T.J. Bell,Toyota, 176.239.
34. (60) Mike Skinner,Toyota, 176.201.
35. (37) Tony Raines, Ford, 176.189.
36. (00) David Reutimann, Toyota,
176.125.
37. (34) David Gilliland, Ford, 175.472.
38. (30) David Stremme; Chevrolet,
175.409.
39. (66) Michael McDowell, Toyota,
175.353.
40. (32) Ken Schrader, Ford, 175.291.
41. (87) Joe Nemechek,Toyota, 174.6.
42. (36) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet,
174.229.
43. (7) Robby Gordon, Dodge, Owner
Points..


HOCKEY

NHL playoffs

CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS-
Thursday
Vancouver 4, Nashville 2, Vancouver
leads series 3-1
Friday
San Jose at Detroit (n)
Philadelphia at Boston (n)
Today
Nashville atVancouver, 8 p.m.

HORSE RACING

Kentucky Derby

Field for Saturday's 137th Kentucky
Derby, with post position, horse's name,
jockey's name and odds:
I.Archarcharch Court 12-1
2. Brilliant Speed Rosario 29-1
3.Twice the Appeal Borel 8-I
4.StayThirsty Dominguez 17-1
5. Decisive Moment Clark 47-1
6. Comma to the Top Valenzuela40-1
7. Pants Op Fire Napravnik 20-I
8. Dialed In Leparoux 9-2
9. Derby Kitten Castellano 28-1
10.Twinspired Smith 25-1
II. Master of Hounds Gomez 20-1
12. Santiva Bridgmohan 18-1
13. Mucho Macho Man Maragh 12-1
14. Shackleford Castanon 21-1
I5. Midnight Interlude Espinoza 13-1
16.Animal Kingdom Albarado 25-1
17. Soldat Garcia 18-1
19.Nehro Nakatani 6-1
20.Watch Me Go Bejarano 35-1
Trainers (by post position): I,William
Fires. 2, Tom Albertrani. 3, Jeff Bonde. 4,
Todd PJetcher. 5, Juan Arias. 6, Peter Miller.
7, Kelly Breen. 8, Nick Zito. 9, Mike Maker.
10, Mike Maker. II, Aidan O'Brien. 12,
Eddie Kenneally. 13, Kathy Ritvo. 14, Dale
Romans. 15, Bob Baffert. 16, H. Graham
Motion. 17, Kiaran McLaughlin. 19, Steve
Asmussen. 20, Kathleen O'Connell.
Owners (by post position): I Robert
and Loval Yagos. 2, Live Oak Plantation.
3, Edward .Brown Jr. and Victor Flores. 4,
Repole Stable. 5, Just For Fun Stable. 6,
Gary Barber, Roger Birnbaum, and Kevin
Tsujihara. 7, George and Lori Hall. 8,
Robert LaPenta. 9, Ken and Sarah Ramsey.
10,Alpha Stables, Skychal Racing LLC and
and Sand Dollar. II, Mrs.John Magnler. 12,
Tom Walters. 13, Reeves Thoroughbred
Racing and Dream Team. 14, Michael
Lauffer and W.D. Cubbedge. 15, Arnold
Zetcher LLC. 16,TeamValor International.
17, Clark, Robertson, Braverman and
Namcook. 19, Zayat Stables LLC. 20,
Gilbert Campbell.
Weights: 126 pounds. Distance: I'A
miles. Purse: $2,171,800 if 19 start. First
place: $1,411,800. Second place: $400,000.
Third place: $200,000. Fourth place:
$100,000. Fifth place: $60,000. Post time:
6:24 p.m.

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek


ENRLTE i.
- 3|t- I r

STHEI HORSE TOOK THE~
LEAP IN THE KENTUCKY

LFNELA PI, 'UT---
/ [ ]/ -Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.

Ans: I"1'1"11" "
(Answers Monday)
Yesterday's Jumbles: LOGIC PLANT DIVERT SANDAL
Answer: His scheme to steal $1,000 was this -
A "GRAND" PLAN


League reports

Results of Lake City Bowl league
play follow.
WATERGUARD
High scratch game: 1. Mary
Lobaugh 233; 2. Joyce Hooper 213;
3. Lori Davis 190. 1. Mark Koppa 276;
2. Zech Strohl 267; 3. Tom Sewejkis
258.
High scratch series: 1. Mary
Lobaugh 666; 2. Lori Davis 541;
2. Gloria Dennis 509. 1. Zech Strohl
728; 2. Mark Koppa 667; 3. Mark
Davis 650.
High handicap game: 1. Joyce
Hooper 259; 2. Gloria Dennis 229;
3. Terry Wayne 225. 1. Mark Koppa
293; 2. Tom Sewejkis 265; 3. Luke
Milton 251.
High handicap series: 1. Mary
Lobaugh 732; 2. Carla Nyssen 662;
3.' bori Davis 652. 1. Zech Strohl 728;
2. Mark Davis 680; 3. Jim Lobaugh
657.
High average: 1. Mary Lobaugh
183. 1. Zech Strohl 212.
(results from April 26)
GOLDEN ROLLERS
Team standings: 1. Golden Niners
(84-52); 2. Gamblers (80-56); 3. Wild
Things (74-62).
High handicap game: 1. Aggie
Mumbauer 250; 2. Elaine Nemeth
237; 3. Joyqe Crandall 234. 1. Bill
Dolly 249; 2. Jerry Ellis 235; 3. (tie)
Lee Evert, Winton Brewer 227.
High handicap series: 1. Bea


BOWLING

Purdy 652; 2. Ellie DeRosa 647;
3. Joyce Hooper 632. 1. Dan Ritter
709; 2. James Burnett 667; 3. Art
Joubert 646.
High average: 1. Shirley Highsmith
156.61; 2. Elaine Nemeth 153.17;
3. Betty Carmichael 150.96. 1. David
Duncan 189.34; 2. Bill Dolly 184.71;
3. George Mulligan 183.21.
(results from April 21)
HIT & MISS
Team standings: 1. The
Sandbaggers -(43-21); 2. Spare Us
(38-26); 3. Lucky Strikers (35-29, 542
average); 4. Alley Oops (35-29, 509
average).
High handicap game: 1. Betty
Carmichael 230; 2. Ruth Helms 222;
3. Cythe Shiver 221.
High handicap series: 1. Joan
Carman 616; 2. Cathy Pelley 589;
3. Betty Schneiders 588.
(results from May 3)
SUNDAY NITE MERCHANTS
Team standings: 1. TAZ (50.5-
17.5); 2. Spare' Us (43.5-24.5);
3. Fantastic Four (37.5-30.5).,
High scratch game: 1. Gloria
Dennis 200; 2. (tie) Norma Yeingst,
Gloria Dennis 195. 1. A.J. Dariano
238; 2. Bill Duncan 237; 3. Robert
Pond 226.
High scratch series: 1. Gloria
Dennis 587; 2. Liz Randall 537;
3. Norma Yeihgst 532. 1. A.J. Dariano
656; 2. Joe Cohrs 621; 2. Bill Duncan
617.
High average: 1. Norma Yeingst
169.86; 2. Liz Randall 159.04;


3. Cheryl Jacks 158.4. 1. Bill Duncan
199.29.1; 2. Joe Cohrs 195.66;
3. Mark Moore 192.97.
(results from May 1)
MONDAY NIGHT MAVERICKS
Team standings: 1. Rountree
Moore Ford (318-162); 2. Team 8
(306.5-173.5); 3. Neil Hoffman's Auto
(295-185).
High scratch game: 1. Bill Duncan
269; 2. (tie) D.J. Suhl Jr., Chris
Napolitono 268.
High scratch series: 1. Chris
Napolitono 717; 2. D.J. Suhl Jr. 715;
3. J.J. Hilbert 685.
High handicap game: 1. D.J. Suhl
Jr. 286; 2. Chris Napolitono 280;
3. Bob Shrum 276.
High handicap series: 1. D.J. Suhl
Jr. 769; 2. Chris Napolitono 753;
3. Donnie Perry 730.
High average: 1. Zech Strohl
222.62; 2. Dale Coleman 213.19;
3. Brian Meek 207.74.
(results from April 18)


Youth leagues

BANTAMS
High handicap game: 1. Biancah
Billingsley 161. 1. Tylor Dudley 178;
2. Mason Cooper 171; 3. Antonio,
Perez 170.
High handicap series: 1. Biancah
Billingsley 468. 1. Tylor Dudley 508;
2. Mason Cooper 502; 3. Eric
Anderson 449.
(results from April 23)


T-ball jamboree today at Girls Softball Complex


From staff reports


The Lake City Parks and' Recreation
Department's T-Ball Jamboree is today
at the Columbia County Girls Softball
Complex.
The game schedule follows.
10.a.m.
Field 1 Tigers vs. Reds;
Field 2 Rays vs. Diamondbacks;


Field 3 Twins vs. Mets;
11 a.m.
Field 1 Giants vs. Yankees;
Field 2 Blue Jays vs. Angels;
Field 3 Red Sox vs. Marlins.
The first team listed on the schedule is
the home team and will occupy the third-
base dugout
The public is invited to join the fun. The
concession stand will be open.


BRIEFS


YOUTH SOCCER

Summer league

sign-up today

Registration for
Columbia Youth Soccer
Association's Recreational
Summer Soccer League
(ages 3-16)'is 11 a.m. to
1 p.m. today at the CYSA
Complex behind Summers
Elementary. The season
will begin the second
week of June. Cost of
$65 includes uniform and
season award. Games and
practice will be on week--
nights.
For details, call Scott or


1 E
5 S
8 c

12 H
13 M
14 I
in
15 T
16 H
18 (
20 P
21 S
r
22 F
"c


Melody Everett at
288-2504 or 288-4481.

YOUTH SWIMMING

CST registration

begins Monday

Columbia Swim Team
registration is 5:30-7
p.m. Monday, Tuesday,
Thursday and Friday at
the Colunibia Aquatic
Complex. Please bring a
copy of the child's birth
certificate.
For details, call Michele
Greene at 623-3403 or
e-mail
cstdolphins@yahoo.com.


ACROSS 39 Martial art
41 Yon maiden
Edible roots 42 May birthstone
Sweet-talk 45 Environmental
Classroom prefix
Bound 48, WhitE vestment
Harmful 49 Weavers'
loon, e.g. frames
Kind of 53 Big apes
insurance 56 High-school
*rait carrier dance
House guardian 57 Service ender
Gratings 58 U2 producer
PC key 59 Beige kin
Stockholm car- 60 Cubicle filler
ier 61 Beads
featured musi- on grass
;ian 62 Yin complement


25 "Rope-a-dope"
boxer
28 Mend a heel
29 Holy cow!
33 Oktoberfest
tunes
35 Path
36 Thresholds
37 Weather sys-
tems
38 Latin I verb


DOWN

1 Safecracker, in


RUNNING

F.EA.M. sponsored

by Haven Hospice

Haven Hospice's second
annual Fitness, Art and
Music Festival is May 14
in downtown Lake City.
Festivities begin with a 5K
run around Lake DeSoto at
9 a.m.' Several sponsorship
levels are available and
include run tickets.
To register for the 5K,
call Stephanie Brod at
(352) 271-4665 or visit
smbrod@havenhospice. org.

* From staff reports


Answer to Previous Puzzle



MOV INFO DUN
SVEN P I LCHARD
DECIDED CAMPUS
AD DE B










PAT RSENDTOE
MTV EYRE CORE
'PAT SEND TOE


olo slang
2 Maintain 8 Baloney!
3 Kind of van 9 Bubble bath
4 Toboggans 10 Ancient colon-
5 Really impress nade
6 Eloquent speaker 11 Clothing
7 Get 17 Truckers' radios


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


5-7


19 Soft drinks
23 Cruces,
N.M.
24 Neophyte
25 Basilica part
26 Superman's
girlfriend
27 Troubles,
to Hamlet
30 Holm and
Woosnam
31 Kind of helmet
32 Ultimatum
word
34 Swiss artist
35 Billy Goats
Gruff foe
37 Rx monitor
39 Congealed
40 Suave
43 "Bien"
opposite
44 Snow White's
friend
45 Victorian oath
46 Show up
47 Taconite and
pitchblende
50 Whale like
Shamu
51 Daybreak, in
verse
52 Gloating
54 Calligraphy
medium
55 Piglet's mom


@ 2011 by UFS, Inc.


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421


I ,













Pacquiao ready to fight Mosley


By TIM DAHLBERG
Associated Press

LASVEGAS-AskShane
Mosley how he can beat
Manny Pacquiao, and the
answer is match his speed
and don't be afraid to trade
punches with a fighter who
loves to trade punches. Ask
trainer Naazim Richardson
how his fighter can beat
the best boxer in the world,
and the answer is slightly
different
"If he can be the best
Sugar Shane Mosley there
is, then Pacquiao has prob-
lems," Richardson said.
Unfortunately, Mosley
hasn't been his best for
quite some time. And that
could make for a rough
night Saturday when
he tries to bounce back
from a bad loss to Floyd
Mayweather Jr. against a
fighter who lately has been
beating up everyone put in
front of him.
The 39-year-old Mosley
will try to resurrect his
career with a signature
win over Pacquiao, who
once again is so confident
of his chances that he has
scheduled a post-fight con-
cert on the Las Vegas Strip


ASSOCIATED PRESS


Manny Pacquiao (left) and Shane Mosley pose for photos after weighing in on Friday in Las Vegas.


for all his loyal followers.
Mosley must not only battle
Pacquiao, who has won 13
straight fights, but the per-
ception that he is a shot
fighter after one last big


payday.
"It's an opportunity to,
show people I'm not washed
up," Mosley said. "You
don't lose your power. They
say you lose your speed,


but I haven't lost my speed
either."
Pacquiao certainly hasn't
lost his, and is coming off
an 8-week training camp
that trainer Freddie Roach


said was his best ever. The
Filipino sensation who trav-
els with an entourage big-
ger than any Muhammad
Ali had in his day, remains
focused on boxing even


while working a side job
as a congressman back
home and singing with his
band.
His real work, though,
comes in the ring in big
pay-per-view fights. And
ever since he sent Oscar
De La Hoya into retirement
by giving him a brutal beat-
ing, Pacquiao has been the
most exciting fighter of his
time.
'This is an important
fight for me and millions
of my fans," Pacquiao said.
"You cannot underestimate
him. He's strong, throws a
lot of punches. and moves
fast."
The Mosley of old cer-
tainly did that. But after los-
ing a lopsided decision to
Mayweather and struggling
in a draw against Sergio
Mora last September, many
in boxing simply consider
Mosley to be old.
Oddsmakers agree, mak-
ing Pacquiao a 6-1 favorite
in a fight that has been
sold out for weeks at the
MGM Grand hotel arena.
The scheduled 12-round
fight is for the WBO version
of the welterweight title
that Pacquiao won against
Miguel Cotto.


Fallout from Richmond

fracas carries to Darlington


By JENNA FRYER
Associated Press

DARLINGTON, S.C.
- Tempers were still rag-
ing Friday between Juan
Pablo Montoya and Ryan
Newman, who had a heat-
ed discussion at Darlington
Raceway about an extend-
ed on-track feud.
It was evident there's a
growing animositybetween
the two drivers, despite
their halfhearted efforts to
downplay their latest flare-
up in their morning media
sessions. A later meeting
moderated by NASCAR
did not go well.
The two were called in
to discuss their actions
last Saturday night at
Richmond, where Newman
wrecked Montoya early in
the race, and Montoya later
retaliated by intentionally
crashing Newman.
"We did have a meeting
with both Ryan and Juan
relative to their incident,
and we made it clear to
them that this is their final
warning. We also made it
clear to them that we will
be watching them very
closely," NASCAR spokes-
man Kerry Tharp said.
"The meeting did not go
as well as we had hoped it
would."
NASCAR told the two
drivers the discussion is


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Ryan Newman speaks to reporters Friday after qualifying in
second place for the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series' Southern
500 auto race at Darlington Raceway in Darlington, S.C.


not finished.
Asked after qualifying if
rumors that Newman had
punched him during the
NASCAR meeting were
true, Montoya would not
say.
"I don't know, ask him,"
Montoya said. "I could tell
you either way, couldn't I? I
could make something up,
Let's leave it at that."
Newman didn't com-
ment, either, when asked
if the discussion turned


physical.
'That's just speculation,"
he said. "It was a private
meeting. That's why we
had it at the hauler. With
conflict there are vary-
ing opinions, that's what
causes the conflict. I'm
past it."
Next up is today's event
at Darlington Raceway,
where the short fuses that
highlighted the Richmond
race could again come into
play.


NASCAR: Newman on front row
Continued From Page 1B


you make laps on this
track, it just builds on your
confidence and builds on
what you're looking for in
your car."
Kahne will be joined
on the front row Saturday
night by Ryan Newman,
who also bettered the pre-
vious record at 180.429.
Defending race champion
Denny Hamlin was third,
Sprint Cup points leader
Carl Edwards fourth and
seven-time Darlington win-
ner Jeff Gordon fifth.
It was the fourth consec-
utive race since Darlington
was repaved after the 2007
event that the qualifying
record was broken. Greg
Biffle did it in 2008 and
Matt Kenseth followed in
2009. The top qualifying
speed has improved by
nearly 8 mph over Ward
Burton's record-setting lap
of 173.797 from 1996 that
stood 12 years.
Kahne's previous quali-
fying success had come
on Darlington's old, abra-
sive, tire-chewing surface
with poles at the track's


2004 spring race the last
year it held two Sprint Cup
weekends and in 2005
and 2006. His best finish
came after his last pole, fin-
ishing third behind Biffle
five years back.
Kahne's had his strug-
gles since the repave, his
best finish in the three
races since a 20th last
year.
"I feel it's take me a little
bit of time," he said. "The
cars handle a little bit dif-
ferent but we just keep
working on it."
Newman's lap ended a
turbulent day at Darlington
when he and driver Juan
Pablo Montoya talked
with NASCAR about their
spat at Richmond a week
ago. NASCAR spokesman
Kerry Tharp acknowl-
edged the meeting didn't
go as well as the governing
body hoped.
Newman had wrecked
Montoya early in the race
and Montoya later retaliated.
"That was a private meet-
ing, that's why we met in
the hauler," Newman said.


"I'm past all that. We'll
work on tomorrow's race
and everything else. That's
behind us."
Hamlin swept the
Nationwide and Sprint Cup
races here in 2010 and
hopes to keep the momen-
tum he gained from a
second-place last week at
Richmond.
Edwards strong lap con-
tinued a stellar week for the
points leader. Wife, Kate,
gave birth to the couple's
second child, Michael, this
past Wednesday night.
Edwards said and mother
and child are healthy and
resting a home.
Gordon is seeking is
eighth Dailington vic-
tory. Only upcoming Hall
of Fame inductee David
Pearson with 10 and the
late Dale Earnhardt Jr.
with nine have won more
often here.
Marcos Ambrose will
start sixth, followed by AJ
Allmendinger and Brian
Vickers. Tony Stewart and
Brad Keselowski round out
the top 10.


SEC could get 10 teams


in NCAA tournament


By DAVID BRANDT
Associated Press

The Southeastern
Conference has been col-
lege baseball's heavyweight
for more than two decades,
winning eight of the past 21
national titles, including the
past two.
This year, the league
could get a record num-
ber of teams in the NCAA
tournament and extend that
dominance.
The SEC has an outside
shot at sending 10 out of 12
teams to the NCAA tourna-
ment, which would be a first
for any conference since
the field expanded to 64
teams in 1999. The SEC has
had nine teams reach the
NCAA tournament three
times.
According to the
NCAA's latest RPI rankings
released on Tuesday, there
are 10 SEC teams in the
top 41, including three in
the top five. Florida is No.
1, Vanderbilt is No. 3 and
defending national champi-
on South Carolina is No. 5.
"I'm obviously prejudiced
here, but I do think the
league is strong enough
to warrant 10 teams,"
said Mississippi State


coach John Cohen, whose
Bulldogs rank No. 29.
Some SEC teams enjoy
lofty rankings even after
struggling. LSU is last in
the SEC's Western Division
with a 7-14 league record
(29-17 overall), but still sits
at No. 27 in RPI, which
would normally be well
within range for an at-large
berth even though the
Tigers are in serious dan-
ger of missing the league's
eight-team conference tour-
nament.
That's led some to say
the RPI ratings skew too
heavily toward teams from
the southeast.
California (27-14) is one
of the six Pac-10 teams in
the RPI's top 40, ranked at
No. 36. The Golden Bears
have an 11-7 record in the
Pac-10.
California coach David
Esquer praised the SEC as
a terrific conference, but
questioned the logic of
sending 10 teams from any
league.
"For some reason, the
RPI hasn't seemed to work
well for the teams out west.
I'm not sure why that is,"
Esquer said. "All I know
is if a team misses its con-
ference tournament, has


a conference record well
below .500 and still gets
in the NCAA tournament,
it leaves a lot of coaches
scratching their heads."
Not all coaches think
there's a regional bias.
Kansas State is one of six
Big 12 programs in the
RPI's top 40, ranked at Noj
28. The Wildcats are 27-18
overall and 8-12 in the Big
12.
"Would 10 teams from
the SEC be a lot? Yeah,
I suppose," Kansas State
coach Brad Hill said. "But
it's hard to argue against
them considering their
recent success. Honestly,
I'm not worried about that.
We've got three weeks left.
If we play well, we'll be in
the NCAA tournament. If
we don't, then our season's
probably over.
"We control our destiny
and that's all you can ask
for."
The NCAA says the RPI,
which is used in several
sports, "never should be
considered anything but an
additional evaluation tool."
But there's little doubt it
has a heavy influence when
the selection committee
puts together its 64-team
field in late May.


NBA: O'Neal expected to play


Continued From Page 1B

Game 2 loss.
That will help Ray Allen,
who has a bruised chest
from being elbowed by
LeBron James, and Rajon
Rondo, who has a stiff back.
Pierce said his Achilles' is
fine, and coach Doc Rivers
said he expects to have
Shaquille O'Neal coming
off the bench for the first
time in the postseason.
O'Neal has played just 5
minutes, 29 seconds since
Feb. 1 because of a leg
injury.
"Other than that, we don't
know what he can give us
on the floor," Rivers said,
adding that O'Neal would
not be limited in practice.
'There's no way we can get
him at 100 percent. That
ship has sailed. That would
be a miracle. But we can get
him to a point where he can
help us."
O'Neal came to Boston
for just this time of year,
but he missed the sweep
of the New York Knicks in
the first round and the first
two games against Miami
because of a calf injury in
his right leg. The Celtics
originally called it a "minor"
injury, and he has been


day-to-day from month-to-
month, but he hasn't gotten
back on the court.
"We don't know what
to expect," Heat guard
Dwyane Wade said. "Shaq
is a champion. He's a guy
who has won four rings.
He's had a lot of big playoff
moments. Having him back
is going to be a boost in
energy to the crowd and to
the team. 'But it's our job to
go in and continue execut-
ing our game plan and not
really worry about who's
coming back, who's in the
lineup and who isn't."
The defending Eastern
Conference champions,
Boston won it all in 2008 and
took the Los Angeles Lakers
to seven games in the NBA
finals last year. The Celtics
cruised through the Knicks
in the first round for their
date with Heat a matchup
that had been anticipated
ever since James and Chris
Bosh joined Wade in Miami
to form the league's newest
superteam.
But to get past them,
Boston will have to do
something its has never
had to do before: Rally from
two games down in the


playoffs.
"The whole thing's a
challenge," forward Kevin
Garnett said. "Our mental-
ity is an all-in mentality for
tomorrow's game. ... This
is it. We've used all our
lifelines. I hate to say it like
that, but it's true. This is
not a cool, kind of, 'Keep
your composure.' No, this
is 'We've got to get the next
game.' It's all-in. This is it,
I've got two pocket kings
and I'm all in."
Miami coach Erik
Spoelstra would expect
nothing less.
"They're a poised, expe-
rienced team that's been
through it all," he said. "And
they've been through this
before, where everybody's
throwing dirt on them, say-
ing that whatever it may be,
that it's near the end of the
line, that their guys have
too many miles on those
wheels.
'We don't believe any of
that," Spoelstra said. "Every
time you count them out, they
come back with a champion-
ship response. That's who
they've been. That's what
they deserve. They deserve
that type of respect."


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SATURDAY, MAY 7, 2011


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420









Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS SATURDAY, MAY 7,2011


DILBERT


BLONDIE


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE


DEAR ABBY


Young widow finds comfort

and guilt in new romance

DEAR ABBY: My hus- With time, the anxieties
band and I were together 11 will ease and what's causing
years since we were 12- them will lessen. If you'll for-
and married for four. He was give the baseball vernacular,
killed in a car accident, and I my advice is to bunt rather
am now a 23-year-old widow. than try to swing for a home
I was in the passenger seat run now. It will improve your
when he died. I sustained Abigail Van Buren odds of not striking out.
multiple injuries, but none as www.deaorbby.com DEAR ABBY: My wife
great as the massive anxiety likes to sunbathe in the nude
I can't seem to shake. love I have for him. We've in our side yard. Anyone
I have had a great deal been there for each other walking by on the sidewalk
of support from friends and through a time of great hard- or riding by on a bike or in
family. However, two months ship. I want to be able to re- a car can easily see her over
after my husband died I lax and enjoy it, not stress out our 3-foot-tall picket fence.
began talking to "Brian," a and destroy it. Can you give She is a beautiful worn
family friend who is going me any advice? YOUNG an and has nothing to be
through a divorce. We'd stay WIDOW IN PAIN ashamed of, but knowing
up for hours talking about DEAR YOUNG WID- strangers can see her in
the things we were going OW: Allow me to offer my the buff makes me uncom
through. I have developed deepest sympathy for the fortable. She says I should
love for Brian that is be- loss of your husband. Af- get over it. Should I? EM
yond anything I have felt be- ter what you have been BARRASSED ON ELI
fore, built on a great deal of through, it's understandable STREET
strength and heartache. that you would experience DEAR EMBAR
We moved fast because the feelings you have been RASSED: Your wife as
of our .mutual need to have having. But if you are going sumes that your neighborE
someone there for us. I feel to move on in the right direct' and passersby are as open
guilty, however, that I have tion, I urge you to discuss minded as she is. Pleas(
this relationship so soon af- your current situation with remind her that if a mothe
ter my husband's death. On a.mental health professional should walk by with a child
top of all this, I have huge preferably one who special- she could be deeply offend
anxiety, the result of 'guilt, izes in post-traumatic stress ed, call the police and you
PTSD and my fear of aban- and anxiety. sun-worshipping wife could
donment. While it's wonderful that, be charged with indecen
I feel isolated because I'm you have met someone so exposure. A tall hedge in th
so much younger than most soon, I urge you to make no front of your side yard would
widows I meet. Also, because permanent decisions for at screen her from public view
I have the complicating fac- least a year. You and Brian Please consider it.
tor of Brian's divorce (with can support each other, but
two kids) going on now, I'm each of you is needy right U Write Dear Abby at
afraid my anxiety will never now, and that's not a basis www. earAbby com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
decrease. I can't reject the for a healthy relationship. Angeles, CA 90069.


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HOROSCOPES


SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS


GARFIELD


B.C.


FRANK & ERNEST


ARIES (March 21-
April 19): It will be diffi-
cult to contain the way you
feel but, before you blurt
out something you'll regret,
consider all sides of the sit-
uation. Don't fret when you
should be putting energy
into sprucing up your sur-
roundings or updating your
image. **
TAURUS (April 20-
May 20): Focus on help-
ing others. A kind word or
gesture of friendliness will
make someone happy and
make you feel good. A part-
nership can be improved
with a little compromise.
Attend an event or function
where you can successfully
network. ****
GEMINI (May21-June
20): Impulse .will be the
culprit Think before you
do or say anything., Don't
make a promise you cannot
possibly keep or spend on
something you don't really
need. Concentrate on your
finances and health issues.

CANCER (June 21-
July 22): Your mood will
fluctuate, causing trouble
or an uncomfortable situ-
ation if you aren't careful
what you reveal. Uncertain-
ty never sits well with you,
but don't force issues with
the potential to spiral out of
control. ***
LEO (July 23-Aug.
22): Concentrate on your
objectives and make a to-


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

do list that is reasonable.
Trying to fit too much into
your day will lead to delays,
upset and minor mishaps.
So slow down and enjoy the
company of the people you
love most ***
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): You may be tempted
to get involved in a joint
money venture or a get-
rich-quick scheme. A loss
is likely to damage your
relationship with whoever
takes part in this money-
making scheme. Weigh the
pros and cons and consider
taking a pass. ****
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): A little confusion in
the love department will
set in. You'll want a com-
mitment but will also want
your freedom. Emotions
will be high and problems
difficult to bypass. Forgo
any serious conversations
that might lead to a misun-
derstanding. **
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-
Nov. 21): Uncertainty re-
garding how you earn your
living or where you are go-
ing to reside will have you
questioning every aspect of
your life. Don't make rash
decisions or think there
is only one route to take.
Time is on your side so
relax and consider your op-
tions. *****


SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): Socializing
will prove to be not only
entertaining but educa-
tional. Love is on the rise
and, whether you are single
or in a relationship, you
should be concentrating on
making someone who in-
terests you happy. Overdo-
ing it will make you appear
frivolous. ***
CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): You'll have
regrets if you let a disagree-
ment ruin your day. Be
careful how you deal with
sticky situations and people
who aren't likely to back
down or give in. Sometimes
it's best to simply avoid any
sort of controversial con-
versations. ***
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Turn those old
ideas into a moneymaking
project Be inventive and
use your imagination. Your
entrepreneurial nature and
inventive mind will save
you in times of economic
strife. A romantic encoun-
ter will encourage you to be
your best ***
PISCES (Feb. 19-
March 20): Update your
home technologically. You
have to keep up if you want
to stay in touch. Don't limit
what you can do because
you aren't equipped to take
part An unusual but inter-
esting proposal is likely.
*** *


CELEBRITY CIPHER

by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: U equals P
"HM TPJ VLIE TPJG KDHZAGXI EP
EJGI PJE VXZZ, WUXIA EVHKX LW
YJKD EHYX VHED EDXY, LIA DLZM


LW YJ KD YPIXT."


AXLG LRRT


PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "To be given a chance to create, is the.meat and
potatoes of life. The money is the gravy." Bette Davis
(c) 2011 by NEA, Inc. 5-7


FOR BETTER OR WORSE
515-TolD ME IN FPCTSHETHOUGrTr
ABOOT YrU F AND IT MIeGHT B5E PooP.
TED. CONNIE- TIMING CMINGTO
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SMIGHTDO A
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SELF.
---^


CLASSIC PEANUTS

5EE THAT
STOMACH?


LAKE CITY REPORTER


Paae Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415


ADVICE & COMICS SATURDAY, MAY 7, 2011









Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SATURDAY, MAY 7, 2011

Lake City Reporter




CLASSIFIED


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds! '

755-5440


BUYI I


SE JJifc


F Tl


On 250
One Item per ad additional
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One Item per ad h23 0
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One Item p2adci/3O
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Personal merhand Ise totalling $6,000 or less.
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* ~l~ BB~


gui-^


3 days
Includes 2 Slgs Ea aditmh iJlirne 65


Limited to service type advertis-
ing only.
4 lines, one month....192.00
$10.80 each additional line
Includes an additional $2.00 per
ad for each Wednesday insertion.



You can call us at 755-5440,
Monday through Friday from 8:00
a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Some people prefer to place their
classified ads in person, and some
ad categories will require prepay-
ment. Our office is located at 180
East Duval Street.
You can also fax or email your ad
copy to the Reporter.
FAX: 386-752-9400 Please
direct your copy to the Classified
Department.
EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityre-
porter.com





AdistoAppyar: Call by: Fax/Emallby:
Tuesday Mon., 10:00a.m Mon., 9:00 a.m.
Wednesday Mon., 10:00a.m. Mon., 9:0ia.m.
Thursday Wed., 10:00 a.m. Wd., 9:0am.
Friday Thiurs., 10:00 a.m. Thurs, 9:00a.m.
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These deadlines are subject to change without notice.




Ad Errors- Please read your ad
on the first day of publication.
We accept responsibility for only
the first incorrect insertion, and
only the charge for the ad space
in error. Please call 755-5440
immediately for prompt correc-
tion and billing adjustments,
Cancellations- Normal advertising
deadlines apply for cancellation.
Billing Inquiries- Call 755-5440.
Should further information be
required regarding payments or
credit limits, your call will be trans-
ferred to the accounting depart-
ment.


Advertising copy is subject to
approval by the Publisher who
reserves the right to edit, reject,
or classify all advertisements under
appropriate headings. Copy should
be. checked for .errors by the
advertiser on the first day of pub-
lication. Credit for published errors
will be allowed for the first insertion
for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the
Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
to be. published, nor for any general,
special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply
with Federal, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
nation in employment, housing and
public accommodations. Standard
abbreviations are acceptable; how-
ever, the first word of each ad may
not be abbreviated.

In Print and Online
www.laiecityreclorter.comn


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR COLUM-
BIA COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO. 2008-000249-CA
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA,
acting through Rural Development,
formerly Farmers Home Administra-
tion (FmHA), United States Depart-
ment of Agriculture (USDA),
Plaintiff,
vs.
LONNA L. RITCHIE; and COLUM-
BIA COUNTY, FLORIDA, Defend-
ants
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given that pursuant
to an Order Rescheduling Foreclo-
sure Sale entered in the above enti-
tled cause in the Circuit Court of Co-
lumbia County, Florida, I will sell
the property located in Columbia
County, Florida, being specifically
described as follows:
Lot 9, Block 5, GOLF MANOR, ac-
cording to the map or plat thereof as
recorded in Plat Book 3, Page 44,
Public Records of Columbia County,
Florida
at public sale to the highest and best
bidder, for cash in a designated
Courtroom, to be determined by the
Clerk, in the Columbia County
Courthouse; 173 N.E. Hemando
Street, Lake City, Florida, at 11:00
a.m. on the 18 day of May, 2011:.
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN IN-
TEREST IN THE SALE, IF ANY,
OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY
OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF,
THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A
CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER
THE SALE.
IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE
AMERICANS WITH DISABILI-
TIES ACT, PERSONS WITH DIS-
ABILITIES NEEDING A SPECIAL
ACCOMMODATION TO PARTIC-
IPATE IN THIS PROCEEDING
SHOULD CONTACT THE OFFICE
OF THE COURT ADMINISTRA-
TOR, 145 N. HERNANDO
STREET, 2ND FLOOR, Lake City,
FL 32055. TELEPHONE (386)758-
2163, WITHIN TWO (2) WORK-
ING DAYS OF YOUR RECEIPT
OF THIS NOTICE. IF HEARING
IMPAIRED, (TDD) 1-800-955-
8771, OR VOICE (V) 1-800-955-
8770, VIA FLORIDA RELAY
SERVICE.
DATED on April 15, 2011.
(sealj
P. DEWITT CASON
Clerk of Circuit Court
Post Office drawer 2069
Lake City, FL 32056-2069
By:/s/ B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
04544545
April 30,.2011
May 07, 2011

PUBLIC AUCTION
Type of Ad Legal
2001 DODGE
VIN#
1999 HONDA
VIN# 1HGCG3273XA010497
1990 FORD
VIN# 1FDKE30G8LHB87269
1994 LINCOLN
VIN# 1LNLM81W4RY695967
1999 FORD
VIN# 1FAFP13P2XW225067
1999 FORD WINDSTAR
VIN# 2SMZA5143XBA01831
To be held 05/30/2011, 8:00am at
Bryant's Tire and Towing
1165 East Duval St. Lake City FL
32055
04544664
May 7, 2011 *


010 Announcements


-



100 Job
Opportunities

05525284 /
EXP. DRIVERS OTR
SERVICE TRUCKING, INC.,
MUST BE 25 YRS OR
OLDER, CLASS A LICENSE
REQUIRED, CLEAN DRIV-
ING RECORD, NO CHARGE
ACC WITHIN THE LAST
YEAR, EXC EQUIPMENT,
GREAT PAY/BENEFITS,
CALL 1-800-899-1300,
EXT 201 MON-FRI, 8-5,
DRUG SCREEN REQUIRED,
EOE
Florida Information Center
in High Springs, 1-75, Exit 404,
Hiring Now, Hrly + Commision,
Benefits & Vacation, We presently
employ 7,000+ nationwide,
advancement potential.
Call 386-418-0650







Lawn & Landscape Service

Clean Pine Straw,
You pick it up, $1.85 a bale
Delivery of 100 bales $260
386-688-9156

Landscape Maintenance Company
You can trust for knowledge &
pride, Mention this AD!
Mow Green, LLC 386-288-6532

Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.


100 'OOpportunities

05525792

/,

Quality Control Lab Tech
World Class Cement Manufac-
turer in need of experienced
Chemical/X-ray Lab Technician
for Quality Control Department
to collect and perform chemical
tests of raw materials, process
materials and finish product for
quality control and quality
assurance. Duties include, but
are not limited to: calibrate, test
and maintain manual and
computer controlled equipment,
spectrometers, and other equip-
ment used in quantitative analy-
sis. Must be able to work in
industrial environment and
collect samples in outside manu-
facturing area. This is a shift
position and must be able to
work rotating shifts, days, nights
and weekends, and accept call-
ins after hours and/or on week-
ends. 2-4 years experience in
cement industry chemical lab
preferred. Must have good com-
puter skills; good communica-
tion skills, both written and
verbal. AS/AA Degree in related
field helpful. Suwannee Ameri-
can Cement, located in Bran-
ford, FL, offers a competitive
salary and an excellent benefits
package. EOE & Drug Free
Workplace. Email resume
and cover letter to:
resumes@suwanneecement.com
or Fax 386-935-5071; or mail:
Suwannee American Cement
HR, PO Box 410,
Branford, FL 32008

05525800
Administrative Assistant
White Springs, Florida

Verifiable job history, strong
computer skills, able to be
trained in our specialty, able to
perform without constant super-
'.vision, must be flexible and
team player, great communica-
tion skills, must want to work
for stable company.
Company has grown significant-
ly in last three years.
POSITION NEEDS TO BE
FILLED IMMEDIATELY
Please email resume to
hr@speced.org
Associate Reps
SUMMER WORK/GREAT PAY
Immediate FT/PT openings,
Customer sales/service,
No exp needed, conditions,
Apply Now all ages 17+
(386) 269-0883
AVON!! Only $10 to start!
Earn bonus $ up to $150+
1-800-275-9945 pin #4206
www.youravon.com/tdavies
CDL Driver 2 yrs exp clean MVR
wanted for local company
Apply 8 AM Noon only deadline
Fri May 13. 247 NW Hillandale
Glen Lake City No phone calls
LEARN TO DRAW BLOOD?
Have a new career in Phlebotomy!
Now Enrolling!! Call for more
info. 386-755-5780 /386-951-6400
Live Oak CPA Firm seeks
full-time Secretary/Receptionist.
Please see Employment
Opportunity at
www.liveoakcpa.com.


Sales Position available for moti-
vated individual Rountree -Moore
Toyota, Great benefits, paid train-
ing/vacation. Exp. a plus.but pot '
necessary. Call Anthony Cosentino
386-623-7442
Sewing Machine Operator
with experience
good hourly rate
Call Hafners 386-755-6481
Wanted Highly motivated
individual for Sales Position.
Rountree -Moore Automotive
Group, Great benefits, paid vaca-
tion. Exp. a plus but not necessary.
Call Tony Reese 386-344-7517

130 Part Time
Nursery Position Available
Southside Baptist Church,
Hours on Wednesdays and
Sunday during regular church
service. Please call 386-755-5553
for more information


130 Part Time

05525793
Busy office needs
Receptionist/Clerk
to answer phones, greet custom-
ers, file and input data. Must
have good interpersonal skills;
be computer literate, and able to
multi-task with minimal
supervi-
sion. This is a part time position.
Monday-Friday as required
(9:00am-6:00pm)and every
other Saturday 10:00am-2:00pm
Fax Resume to 386-438-8103
aL
2 Schools &
240 Education

04544505
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-05/23/10
Phlelotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-05/09/11

Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com


310 Pets & Supplies
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.

n Livestock &
330 Supplies

04544626
Black Angus
Cows & Heifers
Registered & Commercial
Prices Vary
386-719-4802 or 386-623-9427


361 Farm Equipment

84 Ford 46.10Tractor. Runs good.
Solid 2WD. New front tires,
350hr on 2005 motor. Dependable.
$7500. obo. 386-867-0005

407 Computers
Dell Computer,.
$75
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170
HP Computer,
$100.00
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170

408 Furniture
3 piece Living Room Set,
Multi color blues
$500 Good Condition
386-344-2884

420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$250 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.

430 Garage Sales


CLA ITH ITE


McAlpin, 16242 109 Road,
(252 to 129, left, follow signs)
Lots of new & used items, incl.
Prowler 5th wheel trailer & hot tub
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.


430 Garage Sales







Sat 8-12 only, 308 Owens Ave SW
in Branford; bike, lawnmower,
kegerator, baby items, clothing,
guitar, vacuum, military items,
Saturday Only 7a-12p
Household items and much more
221 SW Celine Court
Blaine Estates off 242
Saturday Only-8am to 1 pm
41N on 162 NW Crews Glenn,
Lots of household stuff
and much more!
Yard/Moving Sale-Good Bargains
& wide selection for all! 1048 SW
Yorktown Glen Lake City, May 7
at 7:00 till dusk! 386-466-0929

440 Miscellaneous
Commander II Barber Chair
$1700, 2 Collins Reclining Chairs
w/Mats $325 ea & 2 Roil about
floor dryers $70 ea 386-362-7105
New Central A/C, still in box,
with full ten year factory warranty
$1,795
Call 386-364-1090
Tow Behind Grill/Smoker
$1,250 OBO.
386-249-3104 or
386-719-4802

6 a Mobile Homes
6J3 for Rent
I UNDER NEW MANAGEMENT
Oakview Mobile Home Park.
Clean well maintained 2/2 units in
nice park. 2 miles to downtown
Lake City. 386-984-8448
14x70 MH, 2Br/2Ba Real Clean
Good Location! CH/A $550/Mo.
+ $200 Dep. NO PETS.
(386)755-0064 or (904)771-5924


2&3 BR MH. $395 $650.- mo.
plus deposit. Water & sewer fur-
nished. Cannon CreekMHP
386-752-6422
2/2 Newly remodeled MH New
Floors/counter tops. Lg lot, quiet
area No pets 1st, last & sec. $450
mo $300 sec will work w/payment
plan. Call Jenn 386-454-7724
2/2 Units, clean, well maintained,
nice safe park setting, 2 miles to
downtown Lake City, $550 month
+ $550 spc dep, 386-984-8448
2br /2ba SWMH; also Residential
RV lots for rent between Lake City
& G'ville. Access to 1-75 & 441
(352)317-1326 Call for terms
3/2 DW MH on 1/2 acre @
508 NW Divider Ter.
I No Pets
386-984-0616


3/2 S of Lake City, (Branford area)
$400 dep, $600 month
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
'Furnished 2br/1.5ba Non-smoker
owned. Washer/Dryer, Micro, TV
$570 mo water/garbage /lawn incl.
High school area 386-755-0110
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White. Contact 386-623-3404
or 386-365-1919
New 2br/2ba off Country Club. 1/2
ac. lot Front, back porch & storage
bldg. $600 mo. $600 sec. No Pets!
386-752-5911 or 466-2266


f630 Mobile Homes
6J3 for Rent
Nice clean 2&3 bdrm, Five Points,
NO PETS, also 3 bd on the
Westside, 3 bdrm house on
Monroe St 386-961-1482






X-CLEAN 2/2 SW, 8 mi
NW of VA. Clean acre lot, nice
area. $500. mo + dep No dogs
386-961-9181

6 Mobile Homes
640 for Sale
FOR SALE: McAlpin. 10 Acres
W/2006 DW, 12 X 24 Back
addition laundry/office & 12 x 18
covered porch. 20 x 32 polebam &
8 x 16 Utility shed. 863-634-5283
for details & pictures, $85,000 ,
Leave message w/name, phone
Number & email address.

650 Mobile Home
650 & Land
Owner Finance, Nice 3/2, S of
Lake City, small down/$650 mo
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com-

710 Unfurnished Apt.
7 For Rent

05525655
SPRING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans;
some with garages.
Call 386-454-1469
or visit our website:,
www.springhillvillage.net

02 **3
Windo-A
VoedBst fteBet


1 & 2 Bedroom Apartments
Move in for as low as
$199
386-755-2423
3 bdrm/2 bath,very clean, no lawn
maint, washer/dryer inside,
$650 month, w/$650.sec, also 2/2
for $625 no pets, 386-755-3929
A Landlord You Can Love!
2 br Apts $575.. & up + sec. Great
area:-CH/A washer/dryer lookups-.
386-758-9351/352-208-2421 '


Cute & clean, 2 br Apt. in town
Great area. Close to the VA Medi-
cal Center. $525. mo plus deposit.
Must see!!! 386-344-2972
.Great location W of 1-75, spacious
deluxe 2BR apts., garage, W/D
hook up. patio. $600 & up, + SD,
386-344-3715 or 386-965-5560
Nice Apt. downtown. Remodeled,
kit., 1 bd/ba, LR, dining & extra
room. Ref. req. $450. mo & sec.
386-362-8075 or 386-754-2951.
Quail Heights 2br/lba Duplex.
Secluded, private, safe. W/D
hookup. $700. mo. $500 security.
386-754-1155
The Lakes Apts. Studios & lBr's
from $135/wk. Util. & cable incl.;
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $450. + sec.
Call Michelle 386-752-9626


I1 ,i "" 0l
Il II


4
'4
~


confused?



Call Lake City Reporter Classifieds!


WE CAN HELP 386-755-5440


- ADvantage


h


I


I











720 Furnished Apts.
2^ For Rent
New furnished bedroom apt in a
home, private entrance & bath,
incl all utilities, trash, cable, frig,
microwave. $450 per month plus
deposit: immediate availability.
386-752-2020 SW Lake City

Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

73 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent

04544591




LAKE CITY
2Br/1Ba, Mobile Home $475mo
2Br/lBa, 896SF $695. mo
2Br/lBa, 915SF $595. mo
3Br/3Ba, 3400SF $1750. mo
4Br/2Ba, 1248SF $695. mo
3Br/3Ba, 1050SF $750. mo


4Br/2Ba, 1428SF $750. mo
LIVE OAK
3Br/2Ba, 1976SF $975. mo

MADISON
2Br/IBa, Just Remodeled,
$450. mo (2 Available)
3Br/1.5Ba Remodeled $550. mo
Mitchell Lee 386-867-1155
Mike Foster 386-288-3596
1688 SE Baya Dr., Suite 105
Lake City, FL 32025
www.NorthFloridahomeandiand.coin
Accredited Real Estate
is a Full Service mr
a*, Real Estate Office. J..
We do Rentals---Property
Management---Property Sales.

3/2 Recently Built Custom Home,
1340 sq ft, stainless steel applian-
ces, custom cabinets, $920 mo,
1st. Last & Sec,off 1-75 & 47
Call Andrew 386-623-6066
3bdrm/1-1.2ba, Block Home on
paved rd, den, all appliances in-
cluded, NO Pets, 1st & last req'd
Call 386-752-5786
3BR/1.5BA. BLOCK HOME.
Fenced (privacy) bk yard. CH/A
Nice area. $800. mo $800. dep.
Ref's req'd. (941)920-4535


IMMACULATE 2br/2ba home,
Westside. New carpet/tile;
screened-in porch; 2 car carport.
Water, electric, and lawn mainte-
nance included. $750 mo. No Pets.
1st, & security. Background check.
Call 386-755-9598

750 Business &
5 Office Rentals
For Lease: E Baya Ave. Two -
1000 sqft office space units or
combined for 2000 sqft. 386-984-
0622 or weekends 386-497-4762

OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$695. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor

790 Vacation Rentals
Horseshoe Beach RV Lot.
Nice comer Lot with shade trees.
$295. mo Water/electric included
386-235-3633 or 352-498-5986

Horseshoe Beach Summer Spcl
Gulf Front 2br, w/lg porch, dock,
fish sink. wkend $345./wk $795.
386-235-3633/352-498-5986
alwaysonvacation.com #419-181
"Florida's Last Frontier"

805 Lots for Sale

Forest Country building lot,,
scattering of trees, Motivated
Seller $19,999 MLS#75140
Remax Professionals, Inc.
Jo Lytte 386-365-2821
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act Which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SATURDAY, MAY 7, 2011 Classified Department: 755-5440


810 Home for Sale
2007 VA Approved Home
1500+ sq ft. 3/2 $179,900
386-752-3078 or 325-281-4003
338 SW Wise Drive, Lake City
3/2 Custom WesternCedar Home
on 2 icre lakefront IotMLS#74681
Call Jo Lytte at Remax
Professionals, Inc. 386-365-2821
jolytte@remaxnfl.cornm .
3/2 in town, lots of upgrades,
currently leased, MLS#76658,
$49,900 Call Jo Lytte atr
Remax Professionals, Inc. '
386-365-2821.
3/2 on 4.84 Acres, fireplace, sheds,
many fruit trees, Call Jo Lytte at
Remax $68,900, MLS#72427
386-365-2821, www.jolytte.. V.
florida-property-search.com
Country Home on 2.5 Acres,
$95,000 MLS#77039
Remax Professionals, Inc.,
jo lytte@remaxnfl.com
386-365-2821 1
Ft White MH on 16.27 Acres,
near many recreational activities
MLS#77404 $149,900
Jo Lytte Remax Professionals
386-365-2821
Spacious, Open Floor Plan Home,
fenced back yard, screen porch,
$179,900 MLS#76796 Call Jo
Lytte@Remax Professionals, Inc.
386-365-2821

820 Farms &
Acreage


4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$69,900. $613mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
4 acres, Wellborn, New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down, $39,900, $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
5.82 ac Rolling Oaks off Lake
Jeffrey. High, dry & cleared.
Restricted site built homes only.
Equestrian community.
$65,000.obo. 386-965-5530
for information & pictures
FARM- 7 stall barn, Apt.
17+ acres cross fenced.
Close in $1000. mo.
386-961-1086
Half to ten acre lots. Some w/
well, septic, pp. We finance; low
dwn pmt. Deas Bullard Properties.
386-752-4339. www.landnfl.com
Heavily Wooded Land, 10 Acres
MLS#75784 $94.900
Call Jo Lytte
Remax Professionals, Inc.
386-365-2821


LAND: 40 to 80 ACRES,
Will Divide $2,500 an acre
Suwannee County. Branford
Call 386-365-8522

85n Waterfront
Property
DWMH on Ten Acres w/lakefront,
surrounded by oaks. $115,900
MLS#75571, Call Jo Lytte at
Remax Professionals 386-365-
2821, jolytte@remaxnfl.com
River Cabin on Suwannee River,
workshop, patio, deck & dock,
$349,900 MLS#76336 Call -
Jo Lytte at Remax Professionals
386-365-2821


890 Resort Property
Furnished Home on Itchetucknee
River, Wrap around covered decks
on two levels,MustSEE! $375,000
MLS#77006 Call Jo Lytte
Remax 386-365-2821
River Access, Refurbished Rent-
al Units & Home + Lot,
Barn, Pool, Hot Tub $329,900
Call Jo Lytte 386-3,65-2821
MLS#76734 Remax Professionals

940 Trucks

2005 F-350 Lariat,
49,000 miles, many extras,
excellent condition. $19,500/ obo.
386-755-0139


We're on target!


iH" ON WHEELS & WATERCRAFT


2005 F-350 Lariat
49,000 miles, many
extras, excellent cond.

$19,500 obo

Call
386-755-0139


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