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The Lake City reporter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01545
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 5/5/2011
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
System ID: UF00028308:01545
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text




Spring Begins
Columbia football
team begins workouts
Sports, I B

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OF FLORIDA HISTORY
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Help Wanted 1 .
Fort White football
team looks to fill holes. TODAY'S
Sports, IB


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ity Reporter


Thursday, May 5, 201 I


www.lakecityreporter.com


Vol. 137, No. 87 0 75 cents


Columbia FCAT Writing scores increase by more than 10 percent


Proficiency
score rises
to 79 percent.

By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter. corn

The FCAT Writing
results are in and the
Columbia County School
District improved its dis-
trict-wide proficiency score
by more than' 10 percent
this year.


The Florida Department
of Education released
all state districts' scores
Wednesday for the
Florida Comprehensive
Assessment Test Writing
exam, which students in
grades four, eight and 10
took across the state in
March.
In the 2009 to 2010
school year, Columbia
County's proficient score
was at more than 67 per-
cent, but increased this
year to almost 79 percent.


"We are very pleased,"
said Mike Millikin, super-
intendent of schools, "and
we want to
thank .all
the teach-
er from
the vari-
ous grade
levels
who have
worked Millikint
with the
students so hard in increas-
ing the number of students
passing the state test by


over 10 percent 'in one
year. "
While the state considers
a 3.5 test score to be profi-
cient, the district measured
its proficiency by students
Who scored at or above a
four, Millikin said, in antici-
pation of the State Board of
Education voting May 17
to raise the proficient score
to a four.
The FCAT Writing exam
is scored on a zero to six
point scale, with six being
a perfect score.


On average, the dis-
trict's fourth and eighth
grade essay exam scores
increased, but 10th grade
scores decreased. Fourth-
graders increased their
average from a four in 2009
to a 4.1 in 2011, eighth-
graders increased from
a 3.9 in 2010 to a 4.1 in
2011 and grade 10 students
decreased from a 4.1 in
2009 to a four in 2011.
According to a DOE
news release, the, average
essay score increased to a


four for grade 10 students
and fourth-graders and a
4.2 for eighth-graders.
Students across the state
scoring at or above a four
for the 2010 to 2011 school
year were at 81 percent for
grade four, 82 percent for
grade eight and 75 percent
for grade 10.
Individual student score
reports for FCAT Writing
are expected to be mailed
to districts for receipt by
May 12, according to the
news release.


ToP HUMANITARIANS


Lake City Medical Center volunteer Linda
Butler (above) and anesthesiologist Dr. Luis
Cajina (below) react after receiving Frist
Humanitarian awards Tuesday.


Three LCMC
workers get
top award.

By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreportercom
Three peo-
ple who
work at the
Lake City
Medical
Center were honored
for their dedication,
work ethic; commu-
nity involvement and
selflessness as award
recipients for the facil-
ity's top humanitarian
award Tuesday.
Dr. Louis H. Cajina
was honored as
the hospital's 2010
Frist Humanitarian
Physician Award win-
ner; Linda Butler was
honored as the 2010
Frist Humanitarian
Volunteer Award
winner and Quinetta
Williams was honored
as the hospital's 2010
Frist Humanitarian
Employee Award win-
ner. ,
The trio was recog-
nized for their accom-
plishments during
a brief ceremony in
the hospital cafeteria
Tuesday, where many
of their friends and
family members were
present
"This is the most
special day we have
here at Lake City
Medical Center," said
Charles Briscoe, Lake
City Medical Center
CEO.'The FristAward


Photos by JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Gwendolyn Williams accepts the Frist
Humanitarian Award Tuesday, on behalf of her
daughter Quinetta-Williams, who is a clinical coor-
dinator at LCMC.


is the highest award in
the company.",
Butler, a volunteer,
is the manager/buyer
at the Lighthouse Gift
Shop, which serves
'as the hospital's gift
shop.
"I'm very humbled
to get this award," she
said. "I couldn't have
done it by myself, I
had a lot of help. I
thank mry husband
for putting up with
me because I do a
lot of work when I
go home. It's a lot


of hard work, but I
enjoy it and love it
This means a lot It's
the first award I ever
received and I really
don't know what to
say."
Cajina, an anesthe-.
siologist at the hospi-
tal, said he was proud
to get the award in
front of his family and
friends.
'The Frist Award is
a very reputable award
in this corporation

TOP continued on 3A


Poole outlines

'next natural

steps' for EDD


Demographic
study maybe
conducted.

By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lbkecityreporter.com

Economic Development
director Jim Poole gave
direction to the Columbia
County Economic
Development Department
board Wednesday on the
"next natural steps" it,can
take for economic develop-
ment
Those steps con-
ducting an independent
area demographic study,
handling legal services,
expanding its plan to bud-
get for targeted industry
sites, working on retail
policy and identifying
the layers of economic
development were rec-
ommended by Poole at
the committee's regular
meeting.
Authorizing an inde-
pendent demographic
study for Lake City and
Columbia County would
help the area show its
"true strengths" to busi-
nesses seeking reloca-
tion, Poole said, like the
labor force the area has
within 30 miles in addi-
tion to the local labor
force.
"We are a regional
employer and so we try
to recruit based on our
individual demograph-
ics, when actually we've


got a much larger mar-
ket that what we show,"
he said.
The board previ-
ously discussed how it
would handle legal ser-
vices to avoid conflict
with County Attorney
Marlin Feagle, as he
represents the Columbia
-County Board of County
Commissioners. Poole
said Feagle will delegate
the committee's legal
work, to someone else
with appropriated money
rather than hiring some-
one new on staff.
. In the board's Go-
To-Market Columbia
County economic devel-
opment plan 'previous-
ly formulated by the
Rudder Team, the team
identified seven target
locations in the county
for economic develop-
-ment. Poole asked the
board to identify budget
estimates for each. site's
development..
He also asked the
board to begin identify-
ing the layers of eco-
nomic development, like
education and recre-
ation, noting that it also
needs to discuss how to
deal with confidentiality
when working with cli-
ents.
"The more people you
talk to the greater the
chances that the word
gets out," Poole said.
Dale Williams, county-

POOLE continued on 6A


Annual event benefits two charities


Spring Fling
returns for
third year.

By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com

A carnival-themed event
May 14 will benefit two
long-time, local charities
and offers adults a chance
to compete in a friendly
tricycle race or have their
fortunes told.
Dubbed a "Carnival for
Charities," Happy House
and CARC-Advocates for
Citizens with Disabilities
Inc. will again be part-
nering to hold their third


annual Spring Fling at the
home of Jerry and Carolyn
Castagna in Lake City.
The adult, carnival
event will feature a vari-
ety of booths and games
including a fishing booth, a
kissing wench and a pluck-
a-duck game, for people
to play and make 'cash
donations, said Alice Leis,
CARC office assistant.
- Three different banks -
Peoples State Bank, First
Federal Bank of Florida
and Columbia Bank -
will provide dinner at the
event, pitted against each
other in a judged barbecue
cook-off. Cocktails will also
be served throughout the
evening.


Proceeds from the event
will go toward both CARC
and Happy House. Funds
raised will help CARC
invest in new revenue-gen-
erating programs for local
citizens with disabilities,
while Happy House will put
its portion of the proceeds
toward educational schol-
arships for children whose
families do not qualify for
any other state programs.
Sheryll Walker, Happy
House executive director,
said the event will inform
the public about the ser-
vices both organizations
offer and also gives the
community a chance to
EVENT continued on 6A


Farmers Market gets makeover


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com

The Lake DeSoto
Farmers Market could be
the start of a new Saturday
morning habit for the com-
munity, according to orga-
nizers.
The kick-off celebration
for the newly reorganized
and renamed Farmers
Market is 8 a.m. to noon
Saturday at Wilson Park.
Previously, it was known
as the Downtown Farmers
Market and was Fridays in
Olustee Park. Later it was
held at the old city hall.
The new market will fea-
ture a variety of local ven-
dors with products rang-


ing from seasonal produce,
jams and jellies and hand-
made crafts, said Jackie
Kite, community redevel-
opment administrator.
The setup will include
50 percent homegrown
produce, 23 percent home-
made products and 25 per-
cent arts and crafts.


"It's so exciting," said
Sharon Yeago, market con-
sultant. "It's going to be
a great development for
Columbia County and the
entire region. I predict
it's going to become the
regional farmers market
for the area."
Several organizations
will participate in the kick-
off. Live music will feature
Matt Johns & Friends.
United Way of Suwannee
Valley and the Columbia
County Public Library will
provide children's activi-
ties including storytell-
ing 8:30 to 10 a.m. in the
gazebo. Beulah Baptist

FARMERS continued on 3A


4- '~4~


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
1 Fax: 752-9400


82 !.
Mostly Sunny
WEATHER, 2A


',' ."x~ia!"i?~vliyV' IY~~~.I~ B~~h~i3~Y~~ -:l~niD


O pinion ................ 4A
Around Florida ........... 2A
Obituaries .............. 6A
Advice & Comics ......... 4B
Puzzles ................. 2B


I


TODAY IN
HEALTH
New diabetes
pill approved.


COMING
FRIDAY
Folk Festival
preview.


LIB
PO C
205
GAIN


8 21 I1r8 24" i
B~i)Wf


i:








LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING THURSDAY, MAY 5, 2011


, Celebrity Birthdays


SIy4)


CA$H 3Wednesday:
S Afternoon: 7-3-3
S Evening: 7-1-2


Wednesday:
Afternoon: 8-8-6-1
Evening: 7-2-1-6


Tuesday:
4-10-12-17-27


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS


Hemsworth takes Hollywood as god of thunder


LOS ANGELES
H e's about.to introduce
himself to the world as
a cinematic superhero,
but right now, Chris
Hemsworth's biggest
worry is a giant bowl of almonds.
Since taking on the title role in
"Thor," the Australian actor has
packed on more than 20 pounds of
muscle to become the rippled Norse
god of thunder and the new body
requires constant protein to maintain
it I
"I needed to make an effort to get
into the gym and force feed myself
buckets of chicken and steak and
vegetables and brown rice. It was
rather sickening'," said the affable
actor, who looks like a young Brad
Pitt with a sculpted physique that
wows men and women alike. "But as
far as jobs go, I don't want to com-
plain. Ift's still one of the best."
Hemsworth had only a handful of
American movie roles before land-
ing that of the otherworldly Marvel
superhero, which he introduces in
"Thqr" and will reprise next year in
"The Avengers."
'Thor," which is directed by
Kenneth Branagh and also stars
Anthony Hopkins and Natalie
Portman, opens Friday.
Hemsworth admits it was "sort of
intimidating" to face his Oscar-win-
ning costars, "but they couldn't have
been more supportive."

Marie Osmond remarries
1st husband in Vegas
LAS VEGAS Marie Osmond,
51, has remarried
her first husband in
a private ceremony
at a Mormon temple
in Las Vegas.
Osmond said in a
statement that the
singer and Stephen
Osmond Craig, 54, a former


* Actress Pat Carroll is 84.
* Former AFL-CIO president
John J. Sweeney is 77.
* Saxophonist Ace Cannon
is 77.
* Actor John Rhys-Davies
is 67.
* Actor Roger Rees is 67.
* Rock correspondent Kurt
Loder is 66.
* Rock musician Bill Ward
(Black Sabbath) is 63.
* NBC News anchor Brian
Williams is 52.


* Rock musician Shawn
Drover (Megadeth) is 45.
* TV personality Kyan
Douglas is 41.
" Actress Tina Yothers is 38.
" Actor Vincent Kartheiser
is 32.
" Singer Craig David is 30.
" Actress Danielle Fishel is
30.
" Actor Henry Cavill is 28.
" Soul singer Adele is 23.
" Rhythm-and-blues singer
Chris Brown is 22.


Daily Scripture
"If my people, who are called
by my name, will humble them-
selves and pray and seek my
face and turn from their wick-
ed ways, then I will hear from
heaven, and I will forgive their
sin and will heal their land."
2 Chronicles 7:14


In this film publicity image released by Paramount Pictures, Chris Hemsworth (left).
and Anthony Hopkins are shown in a scene from the film, 'Thor.'


professional basketball player, wed
on Wednesday. She said the day is
special because it marks the birth-
days of both her late mother and her
late son, Michael Bryan.
Osmond said it was important for
both relatives to be with her and her
husband on their special day.

Poetry night at the
White House next week
WASHINGTON President
Barack Obama and his wife,
Michelle, will cel,
ebrate American
poetry and prose
with a gathering of
poets, musicians
and artists at the
White House next
Obama Wednesday night.
Obama, Professionals
Elizabeth Alexander, Billy Collins, .
Common, Rita Dove, Kenneth
Goldsmith, Alison Knowles, Aimee
Mann and Jill Scott will read, sing:
and highlight poetry's influence on


American culture.
The White House said the first
lady.will also hold an afternoon
workshop for students from across.
the country so they can learn from
some of the night's performers.

Charlie Sheen starts Ala.
donations website
TUSCALOOSA, Ala. Two days
after he walked through tornado
rubble in Alabama, actor Charlie
Sheen has begun an online campaign
to raise money for storm victims.
The website named 'Torpedos
against Tornados" said that dona-
tions will be tax-deductible and will
go to Alabama victims of the April
27 twisters that ripped through the
South. The name of the relief cam-
paign is derived from Sheen's tour-
ing stage show "My Viblent Torpedo
of Truth." Sheen visited tornado-
damaged Tuscaloosa this week and
pledged to organize a benefit event.

* Associated Press


Lake City
HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293
Fax number .............752-9400
Circulation ................755-5445
Online... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson. ;...754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
Assistant Editor CJ Risak..754-0427
After 1:00 p.m.
(crisak@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Ashley Butcher ...754-0417
(abutcher@lakecityreporter.com)
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440.


Reporter
BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7:30
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation ...............755-5445
(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
SHome delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks................ $26.32
24 Weeks................. $48.79
52 Weeks .................$83.46
Rates indude 7% sales tax'
Mail rates .
12 Weeks.................. $41.40
24 Weeks..................$82.80
52 Weeks..................$179.40


CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items'. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run
in this space. And thanks for reading. .


Man wrongfully
jailed to get paid
TALLAHASSEE -
The Florida Senate has
approved an $810,000 pay-
ment for a Brevard County
man wrongfully convicted
of a 1981 homicide.
The Senate voted 39-0
Wednesday to approve
the payment on behalf
of William Dillon, who
spent 27 years in prison
before DNA evidence
cast doubt on his case in
the bludgeoning death
of James Dvorak. Dillon
was released from prison
in 2008 and prosecu-
tors dropped the murder
charge after a judge then
ordered a new trial.
The bill still requires
House approval.

Law proposesto
shorten voting
TALLAHASSEE A
massive bill now in the
Florida Senate that pro-
poses to overhaul the
state's elections code has
been amended to shorten
the time available for early
voting.
Sen. Don Gaetz'on
Wednesday said his
amendment was a com-
promise. It shortens the
time for early voting from
the current two weeks to
one week but allows local
elections officials to keep
polling places open for up
to 12 hours per day.
Senators voted to accept
the Niceville Republican's
amendment after debate.
Proponents said it is a
money-saving move.

Spooner selected
for US Marshal
TALLAHASSEE -
President Barack Obama
has nominated Ed Spooner
to serve as U.S. Marshal
for the Northern District
of Florida.
The nomination was
announced Wednesday.


THE WEATHER


MOSTLY
SUNNY


I H82LO53


Officers remembered
Members of the Honor Guard watch the proceedings
Wednesday during a tribute for fallen police officers in Tampa.
Tampa police honored the 31 officers who have lost their lives
in the line of duty during the department's history.


Spooner currently
serves as an assistant spe-
cial agent in charge for the
Florida Department of Law
Enforcement. Before that, .
he was interim sheriff of
Okaloosa County. He was
appointed to that position
in 2009, after the previous
sheriff was charged with
multiple counts of corrup-
tion and removed from
office. Praised by many
for restoring credibility to
the agency, he left when a
new sheriff was elected in
November.

Senate passes
sexual abuse bill
TALLAHASSEE Rape
suspects would have to
be tested for hepatitis as
ohe provision of a wide-
ranging sexual abuse bill
unanimously passed by the
Senate.
The bill passed
Wednesday also requires
law enforcement to provide
or arrange transportation
so rape victims can get
medical treatment or have
forensic evidence gathered
and provides relocation
assistance to victims.
The bill also requires
schools to include Internet
safety courses in their


health curriculums and
allows evidence of sus-
pects' past sex crimes to
be used in court.

Student stabbed.
outside school
PORT ST. LUCIE -
Authorities said a student
was stabbed outside a cen-
tral Florida high school.
.The St. Lucie County
Fire District reports
that a male student was
stabbed in the parking lot
of Treasure Coast High
School Wednesday after-
noon. School officials said
the stabbing occurred
shortly after dismissal.

5 charged with
teen's murder
OCALA Five of the
six people accused of par-
ticipating in the killing of
a North Florida teen have
been formally charged
with first-degree murder.
A Marion County grand
jury indicted Michael
Bargo, 19; Justin E.
Soto, 20; Kyle Hooper,
16; Charlie Ely, 18; and
Amber Wright, 15, on
Wednesday.


MOSTLY MOSTLY MOSTLY
, SUNNY SUNNY SUNNY


H188L058 HI893LO62 HI990L064


;' 111 1 ... I,.11.

I ds"ta .City Friday Saturday
79/53 Jasoville Cape Canaveral 80, 65,'pc 83 6i
Tallahassee Lke City, 77/ 60 Daytona Beach 81/62/ pc 84/63/s
79/52 82/3 t. Lauderdale 85/72/sh 84/76/s
Pensacola ".* Pam Gainesvile DaytonaBeach Fort Myers. 88/64/sh 90/66/s
77/54 Pa a City 81/53 762Ganesvlle 85/57/pc 87/60/s
76/56 Ocala Jacksonville 82/62/pc 83/64/s
Oand Cap Canaveral Key West 86/76/pc 85/77/pc
S 84/63 Miami 85/72/sh 84/74/pc
Tamla Naples 85/70/sh 88/71/s
87/63 West Palm Beach Ocala 85/58/pc 88/62/s
F 82/71 Orlando 87/66/pc 87/67/s
-, FtLLauderdalK Panama City 77/59/s 79/64/s
FtL Myers.! 83/71 Pensacola 80/63/s 81/66/s
88/65 ? Naples Tallahassee 83/53/s 87/58/s
89/68 Miami Tampa 83/67/pc 86/67/s
.e 84/72 Valdosta 82/54/pc 87/58/s
1.6/77 ^0 W. Palm Beach 84/70/sh 85/70/pc
^..,,,,nuuuu .,..,~u,,..lllll,,l.. .ri..i--


TEMPERATURES
High Wednesday 81
Low Wednesday 69
Normal high 84
Normal low 59
Record high 97 in 2002
Record low 44 in 1921

PRECIPITATION
Wednesday 0.00"
Month total 0.00"
Year total 11.48"
Normal month-to-date 0.30"
Normal year-to-date 14.32"


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise tom.
Sunset tom.

MOON
Moonrise today
Moonset today
Moonrise torn.
Moonset tom.


6:44 a.m.
8:11 p.m.
6:43 a.m.
8:11 p.m.

8:13 a.m.
10:39 p.m.
9:06 a.m.
11:30 p.m.


@000
May May May
10 17 24
First Full Last


7a Ip 7p la 63
Thursday Friday





For tpraee
-"" Fareustedlteiiptnti "Feelslie" tempeaan


* Associated Press


3


10 sites tobun
Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+.


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.



weather.com
!-a ,n--l


June Il fc Forecasts, data and
1 graphics 2011 Weather
New l i' Central, LP, Madison, Wis.
weather www.weatherpubllsher.com


On this date in
1930, a heat wave
began across the
mid-Atlantic. An
afternoon high of
93 was recorded
at College Park, Va.
after a morning low
of 43.


AROUND FLORIDA


fli^BB
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ESATU21


SUNDAY


Page Editor: Jason M. Walker, 754-0430


NO~dl


Get CRnnected

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Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL THURSDAY, MAY 5, 2011


Land purchase vote nears


By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com

The county is set to vote
on a $1.6 million transac-
tion that if approved, will
buy it the first of three final
land parcels needed for the
Bascom Norris Road con-
nector.
The Columbia
County Board of County
Commissioners will dis-
cuss the land purchase,
which pertains to the Giles
property, and the media-
tion summary surrounding
that purchase at its regular
meeting today.
Greg Stewart, an attor-
ney from Nabors, Giblin
& Nickerson PA and spe-
cial counsel to the board,
will present all of the pur-
chase's financial scenarios
to the board, like the prop-
erty's appraisals, said Dale
Williams, county manager.
The mediation for the


property's purchase, which
was discussed in an execu-
tive session April 28, will
also be presented to the
board and is subject to
board approval.
Williams said the media-
tion includes the county
giving an easement to the
Giles in addition to paying
$1.6 million. The easement
will run along the prop-
erty's north side and will
allow the Giles access from
the east side of the prop-
erty to the west side, since
the connector will split the
property.
Another part of the
agreement is that the Giles
will have to vacate their
home within a year of the
county signing the pur-
chase documents, if the
board approves the pur-
chase, Williams said.
If the board rejects the
purchase price and media-
tion agreements, the next


step would be imminent
domain, Williams said.
"If the board turns this
down, then of course
it would go through the-
imminent domain process,
which is really a court pro-
ceeding," he said.
The other two parcels left
for the county to acquire
land rights to are Lowe's
Inc. and Overflow Land
Trust.
The Bascom Norris Road
connector, when finished,
will run between Lowe's on
NW Bascom Norris Drive
and New Millenium on
Lake Jeffrey Road.
The Columbia
County Board of County
Commissioners will meet
at 7 p,m. at the Columbia
County School Board
Administrative Complex
auditorium, 372 W Duval
Street.


TOP. Award recipients honored

Continued From Page 1A


and therefore it's a great
honor to have it," he said.
"I would tell my friends I'm
extremely honored to have
it. Winning the award was a
surprise, but I'm extremely
happy to be surprised. I'm
honored and very happy to
have this award bestowed
on me. I didn't expect this,
I was just trying to do my
job. Ift's one of the highest
honors I've ever received."
Williams, the Lake City
Medical Center clinical
coordinator, was ill and
unable to attend the award
ceremony, but her moth-
er, Gwendolyn Williams,
accepted the award on her
behalf.
"I really feel honored
to accept this award for
her," Gwendolyn Williams
said. "She's well deserving
of this honor and I really
appreciate whoever played
a part in selecting her for


this award."
Gwendolyn Williams said
it was a special occasion to
have friends and family at
the ceremony.
"We raised Quinetta
to love God, love herself,
love others and to love her
patients and it shows in her
work," she said. "It means
all the world to us to be at
the award ceremony."
Briscoe said the Frist
Humanitarian Award is the
HCA Corporation's oppor-
tunity to bestow honors on
a physician, employee and
volunteer and the award
is modeled after the attri-
butes of Tommy Frist Sr.,
who started HCA back in
1968.
There are 168 facilities
in HCA and each has a sim-
ilar award ceremony annu-
ally, where local winners
have the opportunity to
get a corporate level Frist


Humanitarian Award.
"It's special to have this,
award ceremony,"' Briscoe
said. "Some days we get
locked into the trenches of
what we do here, but it's
nice anytime you can take
the time and celebrate and
honor the people that allow
you to be successful as an
organization. The three
people we honored today
all contribute to our facility
in different ways."


ChariTEA fundraiser Saturday


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com

Women across the
community can celebrate
Mother's Day and support
a good cause this week-
end at the Fourth Annual
ChariTEA, according to
organizers.
Doors open at 11:30 a.m.
Saturday at the Woman's
Club of Lake City for the
event.
The ChariTEA is the.
"big" fundraiser for
Another Way Inc., said
Sherri Cole, the board's
vice president


"Ifs a fun way for women
and their mothers or daugh-
ters to come to a a program
and enjoy three different
types of tea, crumpets and
scones," she said.
The event also features
a silent auction with items
ranging from Versace sun-
glasses and jewelry to tea
sets and a beauty package
to GeGee's Studio.
Another Way provide
services to survivors of
domestic violence and sex-
ual assault in Columbia,
Dixie, Gilchrist, Hamilton,
Lafayette, Levy and
Suwannee Counties.


"We help women that
need a new start," Cole
said. "We help them find
housing and a job. It's
more than just come stay
(at our center). We help
them get to the next level
to be productive in society
and leave a bad situation."
Tickets are $30 for the
ChariTEA and can be pur-
chased by calling 719-2700
Call Another Way at 719-
2700 or Cole at 623-0514
for ticket information.
"It's a wonderful way to
support .a local organiza-
tion,' she said. "It really is
a fun event."


FARMERS: Kickoff celebration


Continued From Page 1A
Association will sponsor a
bounce house and slide.
Flowers, will be avail-
able for 50 mothers at the
market. American Canoe
Adventures will, have
free canoe rides on Lake
DeSoto.
An educational
booth from the UF/
IFAS Columbia County
Extension Service horti-
culture program will be
set-up. Also Ruppert's
Bakery and Cafe on the
Way will provide baked
goods and prepared
foods and drinks.
Community participa-
tion is what will make
the market successful,
Yeargo said.
'The previous market
didn't get the community
support it needed," she
said. "Thafs the differ-
ence with this market."


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Wilson Park is located
at 778 NE Lake DeSoto
Circle in downtown Lake
City. Interested vendors
can receive applications
for the market by contact-
ing Kite at (386) 719-5766
or kitej@lcfla.com.


The Lake DeSoto
Farmers Market will con-
tinue 8 a.m. to 12 p.m.
every Saturday until July
2 with special events each
week. The market will also
feature monthly festivals
July-September.


John W Burns III, Agent See wry State Farm' insures
234 SW Main Boulevard
Lake City, FL 32056 more drivers than Geico and
Bus: 386-752-5866 Progressive combined. Great
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siVies plus discounts oUl
up to 40 percent.*
Like a good neighbor,
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1001174 .F -'.IB ''"'l ",",,r l .......... I. ,


LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL THURSDAY, MAY 5, 2011


Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424











OPINION


Thursday, May 5,201 I


AN
OPINION



Obama


needs


special


guest


First, the royal
wedding. Then,
the good news that
US Navy SEALs
had pulled off
a spectacularly successful
mission that took out the
world's most wanted terrorist,
Osama bin Laden.
The two events hardly go
together, except that they both
united a weary world and
left people feeling hopeful
again.
This week President Obama
has an opportunity to prolong
the unity. Whatif, when he
visits ground zero on
Thursday, he invites President
Bush?
It took the work of both.
administrations to finally catch
up with the terrorist who took
responsibility for 9/11. The
intel tip that led to the
courier that led to the house
that bin Laden built goes back
to 2005.
President Obama called
President Bush to personally
deliver the news of the
successful mission. Obama
people have shared the credit
with the Bush people, and vice
versa.
Last night, at a bipartisan
dinner with leaders of
Congress, Mr. Obania
talked about bin Laden and
the unity that followed his
death.
"It is my fervent hope that
we can harness some of that
unity and some of that pride to
confront the many
challenges that we still face,"
he said.
Having President Bush by
his side just might help him do
that
Can you imagine Obama
and Bush joining hands over
something like this? Not a
royal wedding, exactly, but an
unforgettable image of what's
possible with persistence and
cooperation. /
N Christian Science Monitor


Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman


LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,


Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


www.lakecityreporter.com


AN MLB '"CROWIP'oqa"TiAEV:WE 7:2011 1 l Po


Bloomberg's ban on sodas


part of bigger issue


ew York
Mayor Michael
Bloomberg has
bestirred a dustup
over what one
might think is a minor yet
symbolic policy change. He
wants to ban people on food
stamps (a.k.a. the federal SNAP
program) from using them to
buy sugar-sweetened beverages
in New York City.
The Mayor's goal is clear:
government-funded programs
should not underwrite people's
self-destructive eating habits.
It doesn't mean people on food
stamps can't buy sugar-based
sodas and drinks. It just means
they cannot use food stamps to
do so.
Yet the move has energized
a brigade of food -industry
lobbyists and advocates for poor
Americans claiming the Mayor's
policy change is tantamount
to denying a constitutional
right (to government-funded
bad behavior?) or something
thereunto approximating.
According to the New York
Times, "Food and beverage
lobbyists see the mayor's
plan as a well-intentioned but
misguided and paternalistic
effort They say it would
create a logistical bottleneck
at checkout counters and
stigmatize poor people using
food stamps. They also fear
that restrictions on soft drinks
would set a precedent for the
government to distinguish
between good and bad foods
and to ban the use of food
stamps for other products an
issue sure to come up next year
in the Congressional debate on
a new farm bill."
Buying sugar-sweetened
sodas and pop drinks is not
that big a deal, as far as I'm
concerned. That, despite


Bonnie Erbe
bonnieerbe@compuserve.com


the Mayor's claim that those
drinks are the single largest
contributor to the obesity
epidemic. To me the argument
develops in the chasm between
people who would answer the
following question with a yes or
a no: Do Americans have a right
(whether constitutional or not)
to money from the government
to engage in self-destructive
behavior? Further, when they
engage in such behavior, is'it
the duty of the taxpayers to
subsidize the huge inedical
costs they bring on themselves?
As a proponent of the war on
poverty, I believe the nation's
poor are entitled to a wide array
of taxpayer-funded benefits that
help them pull themselves out
of poverty: Headstart, a quality
public school education and
government-supported colleges
and graduate schools program,
is foremost among those
benefits. But between 1963
(when Congress and President
Johnson launched the Great
Society anti-poverty programs)
and 2004, the conservative
Heritage Foundation reports
the federal government spent 11
trillion dollars fighting poverty.
And the poverty rate is now
rising perilously close to what
it was when the Great Society
programs began. That, even
though in the 1970s, it had
dropped to about half was it was


ANOTHER


in the early 1960s.
What has happened in
between? Several major events
have occurred, of course, the
most recent being the Great
Recession from which we are
just now recovering. But prior to
that, we had a huge expansion
in the percentage of births to
unwed mothers. Never-married
moms and their children are the
most likely of all demographic
groups to be living in poverty.
Our public school system
also deteriorated greatly in
the five decades between the
Great Society programs' launch,
and now. We saw immigration
patterns change so thaf a
huge increase in impoverished
persons entered the U.S. legally
and illegally, filling more slots in
those public schools.
And, sadly, we saw a change
in the ethic of the American
poor from believing that it was
up to each person or family to
pull themselves out of poverty,
to a sense of entitlement as if
the government owed each
family food, housing and free
quality schooling..
I do not blame the poor for
'this change in ethic. I blame
nonprofit groups that, at least in
part, have found they can make
a living lobbying Congress and
the public for more benefits
for poor people. At first this
was a great idea. Now it has
snowballed into a non-stop
battle over subsidies for bad
behavior.
So is Mayor Bloomberg's
policy change demonic and
hard-hearted? Or are people
owed government subsidies
for bad behavior? I think the
answer is clear.

* Bonnie Erbe is a TV host and
writes this column for Scripps
Howard News Service.


OPINION


Was capture an option?


A merica might have
raised its moral
standing in the
Muslim world if
it had been able
to capture Osama bin Laden
instead of killing him or
even made more of an effort to,
capture him.
But in that split-second choice
by a Navy SEAL to shoot the
unarmed Al Qaeda leader, the
moment was lost.
This trigger-quick killing
of the man behind 9/11 is
probably easy to justify in those
difficult circumstances. In 2001,
Congress had authorized such
force. Mr. bin Laden is said to
have resisted capture in his
Pakistan hideout. And there was
a chance he could have set off
an explosive, such as a suicide
belt, killing the SEALs.


It was a tough call, riot one
easily second-guessed. The
world may never know if, given
a bit more time or a different
encounter, bin Laden might
have put up his hands, revealed
his body as harmless, and
surrendered. 'To be frank,"
CIA Director Leon Panetta said
in a PBS interview, "I don't
think he had a lot of time to say
anything."
For President Obama, the
outright elimination of terrorists
does seem to be his preferred
tactic. US drone attacks on
suspected terrorist targets in
Pakistan have escalated since he
took office. He has authorized
the killing of Anwar al-Awlaki,
an American and influential
Islamist cleric in Yemen who
promotes violence. And when
given a choice in 2009 between


capturing or killing Saleh Ali
Saleh Nabhan, the leader of an
Al Qaeda affiliate in Somalia,
the administration chose to kill.
Such tactics may strike fear
in extremists, perhaps deterring
them from violence against
civilians. And they certainly
reduce the constitutional
struggles in the United States
over what to do with them as
detainees.
But the method also stands in
stark contrast to the surprising
embrace of nonviolence by
young Muslims in the Arab
Spring.
Since December, hundreds of
unarmed demonstrators have
been killed in Tunisia, Egypt,
Syria, Libya, Bahrain, and
Yemen.
* Christian Science Monitor


4A


Jose De La Isla
joseisal3@yahoo.com


Superman

and the

American

way of life


resident of this city,
was reported by
The Associated Press
on April 29 to have
renounced his United States
citizenship.
It was not known at press
time whether birther-mania or
other factors were responsible
other than those reported in
Action Comics No. 900.
In that issue, Superman
chronicler David S. Goyer
and illustrator Miguel
Sepulveda quote Superman as
renouncing his United States
loyalty after a trip to Iran to
support nonviolent protests.
Iranian President Mahmoud
Ahmadinejad presumed the
caped man of steel was acting
as an agent of the United
States and provoking war
against Tehran.
The dispatch quotes
Superman as saying, 'Truth,
justice and the American way...
it's not enough anymore," in
declaring his independence.
The question about
Superman's citizenship has
lingered for.decades. The 73-
year-old, who arrived from the
planet-Krypton in 1938, has"
no known birth certificatarid
informed sources say he is
actually an illegal alien.
If he never took out
citizenship and cannot show
proof of birth, how could he
have ever represented "truth,
justice and the American
way" in the first place?
Some speculate that this
contradiction is actually behind
the sudden renunciation of
allegiance.
The same week that
Superman renounced his
U.S. citizenship, President
Barack Obama produced
new verification of his
Hawaii birthplace. This came
after alleged Republican
presidential hopeful Donald
Trump exploited an old wing-
nut conspiracy theory about
Obama's place of birth.
Obama had earlier
tried to show chauvinistic
citizen identity by having
his administration promote
unethical and immoral
deportations of hard-working
families (fathers, mothers and
children) from their homes
during these hard times, a type
of dislodging only mortgage
lenders are known to do.
Obama has refused to use
other administrative remedies
to maintain family values and
unity, such as parole, executive
orders and commutations
intended to keep hard-
working, law-abiding families,
possibly guilty of misdemeanor
offenses, intact
A statement from the
Comics Alliance points out
that Superman has always
represented immigrant culture,
the ability to literally "make it
in America."
One source, who chose
not to disclose his name, said
that just as America has lost
faith in what Superman stands
for (truth, justice and the
American way), Superman has
lost faith in America.
By having comically pursued
the Obama birthplace issue,
Donald Trump is more
responsible than anyone for
outing Superman and making


the man of steel eligible for
deportation by Obama's goons.
* Jos6 de la Isla, author of "The
Rise of Hispanic Political Power"
writes a weekly commentary for
Hispanic Link News Service.


-- I I g I I







Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL THURSDAY, MAY 5, 2011


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


* To submit your Community
Calendar item, contact Antonia
Robinson at 754-0425 or by
e-mail at arobinson @
lakecityreporter.com.


Today
National Day of Prayer
National Day of Prayer
is 12 p.m. today at Olustee
Park. Local citizens and
clergy will pray on vari-
ous themes concerning
the city, schools, law
enforcement, military,
government, nation and
more. Call Mike Hohman
at 965-3031 or Audre'
Washington at. 344-9915.

Friday
Relay For Life
Relay for Life begins at
6 p.m. Friday and contin-
ues Saturday at Columbia
High Tiger Field. More
than 40 team sites will
have food, games and
more to benefit the
American Cancer Society.
There will be non-stop
entertainment except dur-
ing the silent inspiring
Luminary Ceremony hon-
oring cancer victims. Call
288-2871 or 752-4198.

Spring Concert
The Richardson
Middle School annual
Spring Concert is 6:30
p.m. Friday in-the RMS
auditorium. Under the
direction of Sherod Keen,
the following bands will
perform; Beginning Band,
Symphonic Band, Jazz
Band and Drumline. This
will be the final concert of
the school year.
Kids Music Camp
Suwannee Spirit Kids
Music Camp is May 6-8
at Spirit of the Suwannee
Music Park for all inter-
ested kids. The camp is
run by volunteers who
teach children ages 4-
17 how to play guitars,


017^


ANTONIA ROBINSON/Lake City Reporter
Students sign anti-bullying pledge

Epiphany Catholic School students signed pledges to show support of President Barak
Obama's anti-bullying campaign Wednesday. Students listened to Guidance Counselor Judy
Williams and watched puppet demonstrations about bullying before signing the pledges.
Justin Torres, middle, is first signing the pledges as Taylor Speight (from left) Hannah Collins,
John Norris and Delanie Redmond look on. Copies of the pledges will go to the president and
Debbie Johnson, who worked to have the "Jeffrey Johnson Stand Up for All Students Act"
passed in 2008 in Florida in memory of her son, who committed suicide due to bullying.


mandolins, fiddles, ban-
jos, drums and to sing,
and it's free. A parent
or guardian must be on
site while the kids attend
music camp. If your child
doesn't have an instru-
ment, instructors likely
will have one available
to loan them during the
camp. Call 364-1683,
email spirit@musi-
cliveshere.com or visit
www. musicliveshere. corn
for more information.
HSCT play
"Moments of
Weakness" runs week-
ends through May 8
at the High Springs
Community Theater.
Tickets available at The
Framery, 341 S. Marion
St., corner of Knox or
purchase online at high-
springscommunitytheater.
com.


Saturday,
Lulu Homecoming Day
The 32nd Annual Lulu
Homecoming Day is 10:30
a.m. Saturday at the Lulu
Community Center. Lunch
is 12:30 p.m. Bring a basket
lunch for everyone in your
party. Bring lawn chairs and
enjoy a day for food, games,
music and more.

Safety and Health Fair
Home Safety and Health
Fair is 9 a. m.- 1 p.m.
Saturday in the Home
Depot and Walgreens park-
ing lots. The event will fea-
ture a Shands CAIR Flight
Team helicopter, Smokey
the Bear and Homer, the
Sheriff's Department with
Crime Stoppers and child
and fingerprinting safety,
Fire and Rescue with safe
house and fire engines and


the Division of Forestry,
FHP and FDOT. Decorating
and safety tips will be
offered and a free Home
Depot Kids workshop is 9
a.m. to noon.
New farmers market
Launch of the new Lake
DeSoto Farmers Market
is 8 a.m. to noon Saturday
at Wilson Park, 778 NE
Lake DeSoto Circle.
Children's activities, ven-
dors, flowers for the first
50 mothers, free canoe
rides, live music and more
will be featured. Vendor
applications and more
information is available at
719-5766 or e-mail kitej@
lcfla.com.
Annual ChariTEA
The Fourth Annual
ChariTEA is noon Saturday
at the Woman's Club of
. Lake City. Doors open at


11:30 am. The event will
feature a silent auction and
is a fundraiser for Another
Way Inc. Call 719-2700 for
ticket information.

Wild Florida event
Wild Florida is 10 a.m.
-3 p.m. Saturday in the
Craft Square at Stephen
Foster State Park in White
Springs. Nature and wild-
life experts will talk about
the flora, the fauna and the
wild animals that make
Florida a unique place to
live. Call 397-1920 or visit
www.floridastateparks.org/
stephenfoster.
Steer competition
The beginning Steer
weigh-in is 8-10 a.m..
Saturday at the Columbia
County Fair.
Living History demo
A Civil War Living
History Demonstration
is 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturday
at Stephen Foster Folk
Culture Center State
Park in White Springs.
Admission to the park is
$5 per vehicle (up to eight
people). Additional fees
may apply for workshops
offered in the craft square.
.Call the park at 397-4331.


Coffee House
The Stephen Foster
Coffee House, hosted by
Cathy DeWitt, is 7 p.m.
Saturday in the Stephen
Foster Folk Culture Center
State Park auditorium.. The
Coffee House event invites
folks on stage for 10 min-
utes to sing, play a musical
instrument, read some
original poetry or tell a
story. The event offers pot-
luck goodies and sweets
provided by volunteers,
which are sold at Coffee
House. Anything on the
dessert table sells for
$1. Contact Park Ranger
Larry Hoover at 397-2733
or for more information
visit www.floridastateparks.
org/stephenfoster
Fundraising dinner
The Tough Enough to
Wear Pink fundraising
dinner is 6 p.m. Saturday
at the Columbia County
Fairgrounds Banquet Hall.
The event includes dinner,
casino-style gambling, auc-
tions and more. Tickets
are $25 per person and are
available at Wilson's, The
Money Man, Chasteens,
Smitty's and the fair office.
The event raises money for
breast cancer awareness
and the Columbia Coulty
Crisis Fund. Call 752-8822.


Open House Early Registration
Monday, May 9th & Thursday, May 12th 5:00 p.m.
For more information call Pat Dolingo
S (386) 752-424. , .,


sqows


.1 wv^


^ ?'x'


Live Remote

,TM AY


MAY


6TH


Whole Short Loins (T-Bones)
$479LB


Whole Bone-In Strips
$399LB


Whole Bone-In Ribeyes
$469LB

Whole Boneless Strips
$499LB

Whole Boneless Top Sirloins
$349LB

80/20 Ground Chuck 10lb Tubes
$269LB


Plantation Quail Box of 12
$1450
Bar-S Corn Dogs 31b Box
21/'800
Sea Best IQF Tilapia Fillets
51b Bag
s$1 599


Chicken Tenders or Nuggets
51b Bag
$1000


Carriage House
Chicken Breast Bites
21b Bag
21 $300
Cooked Crawfish


51b Bag
$1000


Fryer Leg Quarters


101b Bag
$499


401b Box
$1950


Boneless-Skinless Fryer Breast


lOIb Bag
$1 590


401b Box
$6350


Fryer Wings


101b Bag
$990


401b Box
$3950


Boston Butt Pork Roast (2 pack)
$1 591b

Pork Riblets
1lOIb Box
$1150 *
Pine Ridge Farms 1/2 Boneless
Pork Loins
$1991b

Medium Pork Spare Ribs (2 Pack)
$.2191b
Nettle's Assorted Pork Chops
61b Box
$1200
Nettle's Sugar Cured Smoked
Picnics
$1591b

Clifty Farms Country Ham
21b
2/$10oo


Crinkle Cut French Fries
51b Bag
2/$800
Fresh Frozen Vegetables
4/$100oo
Baby Limas
Butter Peas
California Mix
Corn on the Cob
Cut Corn
Cut Okra
Cut Squash
Field Peas
Italian Green Beans
.Mixed Vegetables
Speckled Butter Beans
Stew Mix
Stir Fry Veggies
White Acre Peas

FREE Nettle's
Sausage dogs
Friday ONLY


IL6


&


LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL THURSDAY, MAY 5, 2011


Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424


FB


5TH









LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE THURSDAY, MAY 5, 2011


Lawmakers limit lawsuits against auto makers


JAMES L. ROSICA
Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE In a
win for Big Business, the
Florida House approved
a bill on Wednesday that
makes it more difficult for
injured plaintiffs to win
product liability damages
from auto makers and
other manufacturers.
The measure (SB 142)


was approved by a vote of
80-35 and will be sent to
Republican Gov. Rick Scott.
It had previously cleared
the Senate.
The bill, which the pro-
business Scott is expected
to sign, neutralizes a 2001
Florida Supreme Court
decision against Ford that
said evidence of the prima-
ry cause of a crash, such
as driver error or drunken-


ness, cannot be introduced
in product liability cases.
According to the new
law, juries would have to
"consider the fault of all
persons who contributed to
an accident when appor-
tioning damages in a prod-
ucts liability action.'"
"Not giving the jury all
the details,- including a
critical piece of information
about the driver's condi-


tion, is unfair and absurd,"
said Barney Bishop III,
president of Associated
Industries of Florida, the
state's lobby for big busi-
ness.
"Correcting this inequity
will now open the doors to
automotive manufacturing
companies that previously
had not considered Florida
as a base of operation,"
Bishop added.


The legislation on the
"crashworthiness doctrine"
was the focus of a lobbying
duel between trial lawyers
who represent injured par-
ties and business interests
led by Ford Motor Co.
Under that doctrine, if,
for example, "an airbag
fails to deploy during an
initial collision and the
driver subsequently col-
lides with the windshield,


the manufacturer may be
liable for damages attribut-
able to the second collision
caused by the defective air-
. bag," according to a staff
analysis.
Democrats have argued
the bill would shift medical
costs for seriously-injured
crash victims to taxpayers
and that manufacturers
should be held accountable
for their mistakes.


EVENT: Charities to reap benefits

Continued From Page 1A -- :.


come together.
"These were the only
two charities in town at one
time, so I think it brings
the families back together
in support of the commu-
nity," Walker said. "I think
the businesses and families
that have been in Lake City
for a long time have always
supported us and it's just


followed generation after
generation."
The Spring Fling will begin
at 6 p.m. and tickets are on
sale for $50 each at the CARC
and Happy House. Tickets
will also be available at the
door.
Call (386) 752-1880, ext.
103.
Leis said the Spring Fling's


guests will enjoy the eve-
ning.
"I believe it's going to
reach across the community
and people will have a chance
to mingle with each other
and just have a fun, fantastic
evening with no pressure,"
Leis said. "It'll be just a good
night out and something dif-
ferent to do."


manager, also' noted that
the Economic Development
department has been work-
ing from an industry stand-
point, but now has three dif-
ferent retail projects it's deal-
ing with. Those businesses
are seeking incentives, he
said, which the board will
need to recommend policy
for to the commission.
"No job is toosmall to
warrant attention," Williams
said, "but it's certainly going
to require an awful lot of
policy on the part of the
county, which is going to


begin with you."

In other discussion:
Suzanne Norris,
Economic Development
board member and Industrial
Development Authority
Board chairwoman who
recently tendered her resig-
nation, said the IDA board
will make a recommenda-
tion at the June 1 meeting
to donate $100,000 to the
construction of Columbia
High School's 'Logistics and
Distribution Academy build-
ing. Jeff Simmons, another


Economic Development
board member, requested
that a portion of those funds
be put toward the academy's
operating expenses for the
next two years. *
The members discussed
adding a seat on its board for
a City of Lake City official to
occupy. Commissioner Ron
Williams, who attended the
meeting, said adding a City
seat is necessary, since it is
the "lifeline" of water, sewer
and utilities.


ANTONIA ROBINSON/ Lake City Reported

Young hero honored by fire department
Gilshard Newkirk, 10, a fourth-grade student at Melrose Park Elementary, was hon-
-ored for performing the Heimlich Maneuver on a classmate by the Columbia County,
Fire Department Tuesday. Division Chief David Boozer, left, presents Newkirk a
certificate for his heroism.


OBITUARIES


Yulonda Souter-Dortly
Yulonda "Heckle" Souter-Dortly
departed this life April 29, 2011
at Haven Hospice, Lake City,
Florida fol-
lowing an ex-
tended illness.
Yulonda was
born October
2,1969 inLake
City, Florida to
Betty Stroder
and James Sim-
mons. She was the granddaugh-
ter of Mother Evangelist Beatrice
Souter- Cooley. Mother' Cooley
preceded her in death. Yulonda
"Heckle" received Christ at an
early age under the leadership
of Pastor Zane Cray, Sr. in Lake
City, FL. She was educated in
the public school system of Co-'
lumbia County, graduating from
Columbia High School in 1987.
Yulonda was employed at North
Florida Reception Center, Lake
Butler, FL. as a Correctional
Officer and worked there until
her health failed. Yulonda was
full of life and will be greatly
missed by her loved ones and
friends. Others preceding her in
death; her sister, Chiquita "Nana"
Stroder and uncle, Cato Souter, Jr.
Left to cherish her memories:
Husband, Walter Dortly; lov-
ing mother Betty Stroder; father,
James Simmons (Gerald); loving
and devoted son, Ja'Ques Dun-
more, all of Lake City, FL.; sis-
ters, KadriaPertee (Troy), Rhonda
Timmons, both of Lake City, FL.;
Dequita Simmons, Jacksonville,
FL; brothers, Derrick Simmons,
Lake City, FL., DeWayne Sim-
mons, Seattle, WA; aunts, Elaine
McCallum (Naura), Rachael J.
Merrick, Brenda Jefferson, all
of Lake City, FL., Sara Doris
Brown, Orlando, FL; uncles Ron-
nie Souter (Stacy), Tampa, FL,
Trigger Wooldridge (Thomasi-
na), Savannah, GA; one god-sis-
ter, Danielle Gartin, Jacksonville,
FL; devoted friend, Ellis "Bubba"
Dunmore; hosts of sister-in-law;
brothers-in-law, nieces, nephews,
cousins and sorrowing friends.
Funeral services for Yulo-
nda "Heckle" Dortly will be
11:00 A.M. Saturday, May
7, 2011 at New Day Springs
Missionary Baptist Church.
Visitation with the family will
be Friday, May 6, 2011 from 6-
8:00 P.M. at the funeral home.
Arrangements entrusted to
COMBS FUNERAL HOME.
292 NE Washington Street.
Lake City, FL. (386) 752-4366.
Marq Combs-Turner, L.F.D.
"The Caring Professionals"

Susan Camille Fowler
Mrs. Susan Camille "Susie"
Fowler, 53 of Lake City passed
away on Wednesday, May 4,
2011 at Shands at the University
of Florida Hospital in Gaines-
ville. A native and life long resi-
dent of Lake City, Mrs. Fowler
was a daughter to the late Buck


and Ora Lee Simmons Waldron.
She was a devoted wife, loving
mother and grandmother and
was of the Baptist faith. She
was preceded in death by two
brothers, Buddy Waldron and
J.B. Waldron and two sisters,
Faye James and Annette Boone.
Mrs. Fowler is survived by her
husband of 30 years, Mr. Bill
Fowler, Lake City, two sons,
James Waldron (Cindy), Lake
City and Billy Fowler, Jr. (Car-
ry), Salisbury, North Carolina,
four daughters, Bobbie Jo Fowl-
er, Valdosta, Georgia, Lisa Brett
(Quenton), Kacey Jo Fowler
(Dewayne) and Fay Fowler all
of Lake City. Four brothers, Ed-
gar Waldron (Carol), Lake City,
Claude Waldron (Nelda), Lulu,
Gregory Waldron (Shirley) and
Donnie Waldron both of Lake
City, two sisters, Teresa Polbos
(Tammy), Kansas and Kathy Bea-
vers (Kenneth), Lake City, twen-
ty one grandchildren and many
nieces and nephews also survive.
Funeral services for Mrs. Fowler
will be conducted on Satur-
day, May 7, 2011 at 1:00 PM in
the Chapel of Guerry Funeral
Home. Interment will follow at
Forest Lawn Memorial Gardens
Cemetery. Visitation with the
family will be Friday evening
from 6-8:00 PM.at the funeral
home. Arrangements are un-
der the direction of GUERRY
FUNERAL HOME, Lake City.
Please sign the guestbook at
www.guerryfuneralhome. net.


Curtiss Johnson Sr.
A celebration of life for Curtiss
Johnson Sr. 75, who died Sunday
(May 1,2011) will be held Fri-
day at 1 p.m. from Fluker Funer-
al Home Chapel
in Waycross -
Ga. with Rev.
Walter Scott Jr. ,
bringing words
of comfort.
He was born in Waycross, Ga. to
the late William R. Johnson Sr.
and Alberta Staten Johnson. He
received his formal education
from the public school system
of Waycross. He was also pre-
ceded in death by three brothers,
Albert, Clinton Jr. and Otis. He
was a veteran of the U.S. Air
Force and a member of Masonic
Composite Lodge # 40. He was
retired from Scapa Dryer Inc.
Those left to cherish his memo-
ries include his wife Thelma
R. Johnson: children, Curtiss
Johnson Jr., Rodney Johnson,
Denise Johnson, Gendnise John-
son-Lewis and Dontina Johnson
Riley; step children, Gregory
Stockton, Jenifer Stockton, Jan-
ice Stockton, Nichole Stockton
and brother, William John-
son Jr. (Berta). Three sisters,
Velma J. Goettie (Ben Jr.),
Sylvia J. Hill and Joan J. Hill
(Curtis): numerous grandchil-
dren; great grandchildren and
other relatives also survive.


Friends are being received
at the Johnson resident 1602
Kentucky Ave., Waycross, Ga.
Public visitation will be. Thurs-
day from 5 to 8 p.m. at Fluker
Funeral Home. Interment will
be in Barnar Memorial Cem-
etery. Funeral arrangements
are entrusted to Fluker Fu-
neral Home. Wayoross, Ga.
Announcement courtesy of
COOPER FUNERAL HOME,
251 N. E. Washington Street.
Lake City, Fl. Phone: (386)752-
3S66 Willis 0. Cooper, L.F.D.

Almetha Williams
Almetha Williams, age 85 resi-
dent of Lake Butler, Fl. departed
this life on Saturday, April 30,
2011 at her residence. Born in
Lake Butler,
Fl., she was
the daugh-
ter of the late
Robert and
Nettle Foster.
Almetha
her educa-
tion in the public schools of
Union County. She was a
member of "House of Prayer
In Love One With the Other".
Missionary Williams will con-
tinue to live in the hearts of
her children; Eight sons; James
Williams (Crecy), Jeroy Wil-
liams (Darlene), Buck Edell
Williams (Emory), Macclenny,


Fl.; Jubble Williams (Effie) of
Cleveland, 04., Ruben Williams
III (Geraldine), Angdo Williams
(Pattie), 'Joe Nathan William s of
Lake Butler and Samuel L. Wil-
liams (Emory) of Macclenny.
Five daughters; Annie J Col-
vin of Hephziba, Ga., Freedia
White (Edward) Lake City, Fl.,
Mae Watson, Patricia Hampton
(Jimmy) Lake Butler, Fl., and
Loria Hines, Gainesville, Fl.;
One step-daughter; Annie Lee
Mitchell, of Tampa, Fl. Sister-
in-laws; Sarah J. Holmes and
Ella Mae Merricks of Lake But-
ler, Fl., Addie Mae Williams of
Orlando, Fl., her pastor and his
wife Bishop Borie and Florine
Hudson, whom she called her
son and daughter, and a host
of grands, great grands, many
other relatives and 'friends. A
special relative and friend Elder
Elousie Stephenson. Mission-
ary Williams is also preceded
in death by her husband Elder
Ruben B. Williams, two sons,
Billy and Leon Williams and
her sister Evangeline Jackson.
Funeral services for the late
Almetha Williams will be
11:00am Saturday, May 7, 2011
at Victory Christian Center,
705 Southwest 6th Street, Lake


Honoring

Those We Love!

CALL Mary or Bridget
TODAY to place an
In Memory Ad for
someone you miss!

755-5440 or
755-544 I
between 8:00am & 5:00pm
Soeoe oumis!

. 5554 0 r
755-544 I


Butler, Fl. 32054. The family
will receive friends on Friday,
May 6, 2011 at the "House of
Prayer In Love One With the
Other" from 6 to 8 pm. Inter-
ment will follow in the St. Johns
Cemetery in Providence, FL
Arrangements entrusted to
COOPER FUNERAL
HOME 251 NE Washington
Street Lake City, FL32055
Willis 0. Cooper, L.F.D

Rena Mae Williams
Rena Mae Williams of Lake
City, Florida passed away May,
3, 2011 in Shands at the Uni-
versity of Florida Hospital. Ar-
rangements are incomplete and
will be published at a later date.
Arrangements entrusted
to COMBS FUNERAL
HOME. 292 NE Washing-
ton Street. (386) 752-4366.
"The Caring Professionals"


Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


In Loving Memory
You served with
honor, love & pride.
You gave your all
from deep inside.
Now we go on
without you here.
But know our child
we miss you dear.

Your Family


POOLE: Economic steps laid out

Continued From Page 1A


fu. .




PUblix.


AdH~rP M s hae lbS'bepae b 0,
I !-days1 fpntf ijr-to apafrff n In
I a dh e. he, Lak City Rep 0^TW 1 y* t3eIrT-',


Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424







LAKE CITY REPORTER HEALTH THURSDAY, MAY 5, 2011 7A


ON HEALTH






Dr. Peter Gott


Sundowner's

linked to

Alzheimer's
DEAR DR. GOTTA:
Please write something on
sundowner's syndrome.
It seems as though this is
fairly common. Thank you
for all the great information
I have read.

DEAR READER:
Sundowner's, or sundown-
ing, is confusion that gen-
erally occurs late in the
day, although it has been
known to occur during
early-morning hours as
well. The cause appears
elusive and is often misun-
derstood.
The disorder is com-
monly seen in hospital
or nursing-home settings
where an older individual
may be forced to adjust
to a different setting.
Or, in some cases, it can
manifest following illness
or surgery. Sundowner's
may be temporary for
some but prolonged in
other instances. It is seen
primarily in Alzheimer's
patients, in those with
Parkinson's and with
other forms of demen-
tia. As a matter of fact,
up to 25 percent of all
diagnosed Alzheimer's
patients have been found
to exhibit sundowner's as
well.
t As the day progress-
es, a patient becomes
fatigued and less able to
deal with stress. In the
case of hospital or nurs-
ing-home placement,
it is likely all visitors
have gone home for the
day and there is less to
occupy a person's mind.
Perhaps medications have
been administered prior
to sleep. The patient who-
was stimulated earlier in
the day has nothing to
occupy his or her mind
and appears increas-
ingly forgetful and agi-
tated. Memory loss seems
greater. Blood-pressure
readings may be lower.
Patients may see things
that aren't there or per-
ceive things to be other
than what they actually
are. These visions can be
extremely frightening.
Treatment might include
establishing a repetitive

GOTT continued on 8A


FDA approves new diabetes pill


I


Tradjenta-
r [linaqctr; Tablets

3 r |


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Boehringer Ingelheim
Pharmaceuticals, Inc. and Eli Lilly
and Company announced Monday
that the U.S. Food and Drug
Administration, FDA, has approved
TradjentaTM (linagliptin) tablets.

tions.
Tradjenta works by blocking
the DPP-4 enzyme, which releas-


es insulin-boosting hormones that
help control blood sugar levels.
Merck & Co. Inc. and Bristol-
Myers Squibb already market
similar drugs in the U.S.
Merck's Januvia pill had sales
of $954 million last year. Diabetes
drugs accounted for $16.9 billion
in U.S. sales last year, accord-
ing to health care data firm IMS
Health. The drugs made up the
fourth largest prescription drug
class by spending, behind choles-
terol drugs.
The FDA approved the new
medication as a stand-alone treat-
ment or in combination with older
diabetes drugs like metformin.
Many diabetes patients have to
combine drugs to manage their
blood sugar levels.
Boehringer and Lilly submit-
ted eight studies of the drug that
enrolled more than 3,800 patients.
The drug consistently improved


blood sugar control when com-
pared to placebo..
The most common side effects
of the drug were respiratory infec-
tion, sore throat, muscle pain and
headache.
Tradjenta, known by the gener-
ic name linagliptin, will be dis-
tributed with a medication guide
explaining the drug's risks to
patients.
The FDA issued new testing
guidelines for diabetes treat-
ments in 2008 after data sug-
gested that GlaxoSmithKline's
diabetes pill increases the risk
of heart attack. That drug, once
a blockbuster medication for the
company, is currently only avail-
able through a limited prescrib-
ing program.
Boehringer is headquartered
in Germany, with U.S. offices in
Danbury, Conn. Eli Lilly & Co.
Inc. is based in Indianapolis.


Group checkups for diabetes, Parkinson's explored


By LAURAN NEERGAARD
AP Medical Writer

WASHINGTON Wait
a minute, Doc. You wantme
to share my appointment
with 10 other patients?
Group appointments
aren't just for psychothera-
py anymore. Put diabetes,
high blood pressure and
maybe even Parkinson's
disease on the list.
Shared checkups aim
to help patients who are
battling certain chronic
diseases, and they're far
from the typical 15-min-
ute office visit. They're
stretched over 90 minutes
or even two hours, offering
more time to quiz the doc-
tor about concerns, learn
about managing the dis-
ease and get tips from
fellow patients.
What's in it for the doc-
tor? A neurologist found he
learned more about how
his Parkinson's patients
were faring by watching
them interact with others


than when he had them
one-on-one.
"I can see if you're get-
ting worse over the course
of the visit, your ability to
eat, to walk, to converse
and to think," says Drn Ray
Dorsey, who led a pilot
study of group checkups
for Parkinson's patients at
the University of Rochester
Medical Center.
"This is a new way of
delivering health care,"
*adds Dorsey, now at
Johns Hopkins University.
"People are thirsting for
better ways."
It's a small but slowly
growing trend that prom-
ises to get more attention
with the tight supply of pri-
mary care physicians, who
find it hard to squeeze in
time to teach their patients
how to deal with complex
chronic illnesses like diabe-
tes. An American Academy
of Family Physicians sur-
vey found more doctors
trying the group approach
about 10 percent of its


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FLORIDA PAIN AND REHABILITATION CENTER
' Formerly Comprehensive Pain Management of North Florida
S www.cpmnf.com
(ALL INTERVENTIONAL TREATMENTS ARE OFFERED IN
LAKE CITY OFFICE)


Dr. Hoang (Wayne)Vu
Board-certified pain specialist
and PMR specialist


Dr. Bohdan Warycha
Board-certified physical
medicine and rehabilitation
specialist


Dr. YiLi Zhou


PAIN CONDITIONS WE TREAT
*Back pain
*Neck pain
*Joint pain
*Nerve pain
e*Headache
*And other pain conditions

SERVICES WE OFFER,
*Comprehensive Evaluation ,
.*Physical therapy
*Medical management
*EMG/NCV test
eUltrasound guided joint
injections
4Fluoroscopy-guided spine
injections


Medical Director
Harvard-Trained Pain Specialist
Board certified pain specliast and neurologist
Former Director ofJMH Pain Clinic University of Miami
Winner of Physician Recognition Award -
American Medical Association 2003
Distinguished Physician Award -
Florida Medical Association 2004,2006


GAINESVILLE OFFICE
6830 NW 11th Place
Gainesville, FL 32605
Phone: 352-331-0909
Fax: 352-331-0970,


LAKE CITY OFFICE
440 SW Perimeter Glen
Lake City, FL 32605
Phone (386) 719-9663
Fax (386) 719-9662


LIVE OAK OFFICE
1441 Ohio Ave North
Live Oak, FL 32064
Phone: 386-330-0163
Fax: 386-330-0270


active members in 2009,
up from fewer than 6 per-
cent in 2005.
Peer pressure among
patients helps, says fam-
ily physician Dr. George
Whiddon of Quincy, Fla.
He has about 40 diabetic
patients divided into groups
for shared checkups at
Tallahassee Memorial
Family Medicine Quincy,;
and he wants to add more.
One woman with
uncontrolled diabetes for
years confessed to fellow
patients that she'd ignored
Whiddon's "eat better,
take your meds" advice for
too long.
"Now I only have one
toe left. I should have lis-
tened," Whiddon recalls
her saying. 'That had
more impact than anything
I said all day."
Group appointments
don't replace the patient's
annual in-depth physical.
But many people with
chronic illnesses, espe-
cially if they're not well-


controlled, are supposed
to have additional follow-
up visits about every three
months an opportunity
for shared checkups that
stress patient education.
; But how well do
these group visits work?
Evidence is mixed. An
Italian study published
last year found that diabet-
ics who took part in them
lowered their blood sugar,
blood pressure and cho-
lesterol more than similar
patients who got regular
individual office visits.
A separate study at two
Veterans Affairs Medical
Centers, in North Carolina
and Virginia, tracked peo-
ple with poorly controlled
diabetes and blood pres-
sure and also concluded
shared appointments can
improve care. for some
people. Those in group vis-
its significantly improved
their blood pressure and
needed less emergency
care, but there was no
difference in diabetes


improvement between
patients who had shared
checkups or regular ones.
Parkinson's marks the,
newest attempt. Dorsey
recruited 30 Parkinson's
patients and assigned
half of them to 90-minute
group checkups, and the
rest to regular private vis-
its that lasted a generous
half-hour. During group
visits, everyone got a few
minutes for private discus-
sion with the doctor. Then
Dorsey gave an education-
al talk about a Parkinson's
topic the patients had pre-
viously requested from
the newest research, to
why symptoms vary so
widely, to how patients
cope at work and took
group questions.
'Medically, both sets
of patients fared equally
well during the year-long
study, showing that group
visits are a feasible to offer,
Dorsey reported last week

GROUP continued on 84


HOW STORY TIME PROVED THAT MAKING
HOUSE CALLS AREN'T FABLES AFTER ALL.

Bill always had a fondness for reading bedtime stories to his daughter.
As a Haven Hospice patient, he wanted to be home with his family.
So when' it became too difficult to visit his doctor, our doctors made
house calls to Bill -just not during story time so Bill could stay
right where he wanted to be, home.


Not what you'd expect from hospice care? Haven is different. At Haven,
we believe that Hospice is about living, riot dying. We're Haven Hospice.
The stories of life live here. To learn more, visit havenstories.com.

We're here to help, 24-hours a day, 7-days a week.
Haven Hospice has been honored with the Circle Of Life Award
for its high level of hospice care and innovative programs.



HAVEN
H 0 S P I C E
IHAVENSTORIES.COM
8oo.727.1889


Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424


By MATTHEW PERRONE
AP Health Writer

WASHINGTON The Food
and Drug Administration has
approved a new diabetes pill
from Boehringer Ingelheim and
Eli Lilly for patients who can't
control their blood sugar with
older medicines.
The agency said Monday it
approved Tradjenta tablets for
adults with type 2 diabetes. Type
2 is the most common form of dia-
betes, affecting up to 95 percent
of the 24 million people in the U.S.
with diabetes.
People who suffer from diabe-
tes have trouble breaking down
carbohydrates, because their
bodies have become resistant
to the protein insulin. They are
at higher risk for heart attacks,
kidney problems, blindness and
several other serious complica-









LAKE CITY REPORTER HEALTH & NATION THURSDAY, MAY 5,2011 Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424


GOTT

From Page 7A
routine that a patient
can rely on. Continuity
is good. Noise from the
radio and television dur-
ing evening hours may
exacerbate agitation in
some but help others.
Allow the patient's sleep-
ing area to remain lit
during the night such as
with a nightlight. Review
all medications to be
assured they don't have
insomnia or disrupted
sleep patterns as a side
effect. Ask the doctor
about the use of over-
the-counter melatonin
or St. John's wort as a
possible sleep aid. Avoid
giving food items later
in the day that contain
caffeine, such- as coffee
and chocolate. Monitor
the patient's diet to
determine whether any
specific foods trigger agi-
tation.
While not always possi-
ble to accomplish, family
members or caregivers
who can spend nighttime
hours with a patient in
a nursing home or hos-
pital setting will provide
a comforting sense of
familiarity that may avoid
symptoms. Keep in mind
that with those patients
able to ultimately return
home to familiar sur- -
roundings, sundowner's
can disappear completely,
making the process of
providing appropriate
care easier. The fact that
the condition may appear
out of the blue is no
reflection on the quality
or capabilities of a facil-
ity where a patient may
be placed. Family mem-
bers need not be overly
concerned by perceived
wrongdoing after hours
but should express their
thoughts regarding the
possibility of a misun-
derstood disorder that
affects their loved ones.
Most of all, remember
that anyone with sund-
owner's is unaware of the
havoc that he or she may
impose on family mem-
bers and caregivers. The
condition is not fatal but
can be extremely difficult
to deal with.

Dr Peter H. Gottis a
retired physician and the
author of several books,
including "Live Longer,
Live Better," "Dr Gott's No
Flour, No Sugar Diet" and
"Dr Gott's No Flour, No
Sugar Cookbook," which
are available at most book-
stores or online. His web-
site is www.AskDrGottMD.
com.


Bin Laden photos won't be released


By KIMBERLY DOZIER and
ERICA WERNER
Associated Press

WASHINGTON -
President Barack Obama
said Wednesday he's decid-
ed not to release death
photos of terrorist Osama
bin Laden because their
graphic nature could incite
violence and create national
security risks for the United
States. Separately, officials
told The Associated Press
that the Navy SEALs who
stormed bin Laden's com-
pound shot and killed him
after they saw him appear
to lunge for a weapon.
The officials, who were
briefed on the operation,
said several weapons were
found in the room where
the terror chief died, includ-
ing AK47s and side arms.
The officials, who were not
authorized to speak pub-


ASSOCIATED PRESS
White House Press Secretary Jay Carney tells reporters
Wednesday that President Barack Obama will not release
photos of Osama bin Laden's body.


licly, commented only on
condition of anonymity.
Obama, in an interview
with CBS News, said bin
Laden's death had been well
established and people who
didn't believe it wouldn't
be convinced by gruesome


photos, either. "It would be
of no benefit to gloat, he
added. r"There's no need to
spike the football."
'There are going to be
some folks who deny it
The fact of the matter is
you won't see bin Laden


walking on this earth
again," said Obama.
The new. word about
the reason bin Laden was
shot and killed rather than
taken into custody came
after changing White
House accounts first
that bin Laden was armed,
then that he wasn't that
raised questions about the
rationale.
The officials who gave the
latest details on Thursday
also said that a U.S. com-
mando grabbed a woman
who charged toward the
SEALs. The raiders were
concerned, the officials said,
that she might be wearing a
suicide vest
Photos taken by the
SEAL raiders show bin
Laden shot in the head,
numerous officials have
said. CIA Director Leon
Panetta said Tuesday he
expected at least one photo


to be released. Asked about
that, White House spokes-
man Jay Carney said the
decision had not been
made at that time.
But Carney also said the
president never doubted his
position on not releasing
the photos. Obama said in
the interview, "It is impor-
tant for .us to make sure
that very graphic photos
of somebody who was shot
in the head are not floating
around as an incitement to
additional violence."
The president made his
comments in an interview
Wednesday with CBS' "60
Minutes"; Carney read
the president's quotes to
reporters in the White
House briefing room, ahead
of the program's airing.
Carney said there would
not be images released of
bin Laden's burial at sea,
either.


Senate puts property tax relief on ballot


By BILL KACZOR
Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE The
Florida Senate narrowly
approved tax breaks for
a wide range of property
owners, but some who
voted for the ballot pro-
posal Wednesday said
they'd try to replace it with
a more equitable version
before voters get their say
next year.
The House, meanwhile,
put a narrower tax-cutting
state constitutional amend-
ment on the November
2012 ballot It would expand
a property tax break for
combat-disabled veterans.
Unless lawmakers
replace the comprehensive
tax proposal (SJR 381), it
also will go on the ballot
next year as a result of
the Republican-controlled
Senate's vote.
It passed 25-12 one
more vote than the mini-
mum needed on a large-
ly partisan roll call. All but
three Republicans voted
for it All but one Democrat
opposed it The House, also
with a GOP majority, previ-
ously passed the proposal.
Sen. David Simmons, R-
Maitland, said he voted for
it despite "grave reserva-
tions."
"We are compounding the
inequity that exists in our
tax laws," Simmons said.
"And the first rule of taxa-
tion is that you must have a,
rational and equitable basis
for doing the taxation, and
. we don't have that"


The Senat&sponsor, Sen.
Mike Fasano, had so such
qualms. The New Port
Richey Republican argued
the tax breaks would stim-
ulate Florida's moribund
economy.
, The amendment has ele-
ments benefiting primary,
homeowners, also known
as homesteaders, as well as
businesses and other non-
homestead properties.
Besides lower taxes for
most property owners, it
aims to fix inequities caused
by the Save Our Homes
Amendment, which went
into effect in the 1990s,
but Simmons and others
said those cures would just
cause more disparities.
Save Our Homes caps
annual assessment increas-
es for homesteads at 3 per-
cent no matter how much
property values go up.
That has meant a more
recently purchased home
is taxed more than one val-
ued the same but with many
years of Save Our Homes
benefits. The homestead
cap also has resulted in
higher taxes for non-home-
stead properties including
second homes.
In an attempt to remedy,
voters adopted another
amendment in 2008 that
gaves non-homestead
properties a 10 percent
annual assessment cap. It
has seldom come into play
because most property val-
ues have fallen since then.
The amendment spon-
sored by Fasano and Rep.
Chris Dorworth, R-Lake


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Mary, would make the cap
more effective by reducing
it to 5 percent
Simmons argued that
would create more inequi-
ties between new and old
businesses, just like those
Save Our Homes caused
for hbmesteads.
The Dorworth-Fasano
amendment would give a
bigger exemption to first-
time home buyers. It actu-
ally would apply to anyone
who hasn't owned a home
for at least three years.
Simmons said next year


he will push for a replace-
ment amendment with
a 7 percent cap for non-
homestead properties
while replacing .the first-
time homeowner provision
with bigger exemptions for
all homesteads valued up
to $400,000. He said that
alternative is supported
by the Florida Association
of Counties and Florida
League of Cities. -
Another provision of the
Dorworth-Fasano proposal
would allow the Legislature
to repeal a quirk in the Save


Our Homes Amendment
known as the "recapture
clause." It allows a home's
assessment to rise up to 3
percent annual if its value
declines.
Sen. Don Gaetz, R-
Niceville, called the recap-
ture rule "unjust, inane,
inappropriate, unexplain-
able, unjustifiable."
The veterans amendment
(SJR 592) passed unani-
mously. Currently, only com-
bat-disabled veterans who
lived in Florida before enlist-
ing can get the exemption.


GROUP: Shared appointments

Continued From Page 7A


in the journal Neurology.
What the study couldn't
measure, Dorsey says, was
how he watched patients'
interactions for subtle
signs that they needed pre-
scriptions adjusted, things
like cognitive problems or
if medications wore off too
quickly. One meeting even
devoted 45 minutes to the
pros and cons of implanted
brain stimulators to curb
tremors.
"Many heads are bet-
ter than one. They think
of questions you wouldn't
normally think of by your-
self," says Jim Euken,
a retired judge and


Parkinson's patient from
Belmont, NY. He began
exercising on a bicycle
after one of Dorsey's group
visits discussed research
showing some patients still
can bike when they can
barely walk, for unknown
reasons.
Euken joined some fel-
low study participants who
petitioned the hospital,
unsuccessfully, to contin-
ue group visits when the
study ended: "It's not that
I don't get good care. I do.
But I still think I learned
more and I think the pro-
cess was better doing it in
a group format."


More research is need-
ed to determine which
patients fare better with
group visits, plus they take
a lot of doctor preparation,
cautions study co-author
Dr. Kevin Biglan of the
University of Rochester.
Medicare will reim-
burse the doctor for
each patient in a shared
checkup with proper doc-
umentation that the visit
includes certain elements,
says Florida's Whiddon.
For his office, that means
breaking even, as long as
at least six people show up
for his two-hour diabetes
groups.


Celebrating
50 years of
. service to


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Page Editor: Todd Taylor,,754-0424


LAKE CITY REPORTER


HEALTH & NATION THURSDAY, MAY 5, 2011






Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com


SPORTS


Thursday, May 5,201 I


www.lakecityrleporter.com


Section B


BRIEFS
YOUTH SWIMMING
CST registration
begins Monday
Columbia Swim
Team registration at
the Columbia Aquatic
Complex is 5:30-7 p.m.
Monday and Tuesday,
and May 12-13. Please
bring a copy of the
child's birth certificate.
For details, call
Michele Greene at
623-3403 or e-mail
cstdolphins@yahoo. corn
FORT WHITE FOOTBALL
Fundraiser for
Q-back Club '
The Fort White
Quarterback Club has a
pancakebreakfast and
car wash from 8-11 a.m.
May 21 at the Fort White
Community Center.
Pancake breakfast (eat
in or take out) is $5, and
donations will be
accepted for the car
wash.
For details, call
Kathy D'Antonio at
(386) 590-9187.
YOUTH SOCCER
CYSA sign-up
today, Saturday
Registration for
Columbia Youth
Soccer Association's
Recreational Summer
Soccer League (ages
3-16) is 6-7:30 p.m.
today and 11 a.m. to
1 p.m. Saturday at the
CYSA Complex behind
Summers Elementary.
Cost of $65 includes
uniform and awards.
For details, call Scott
Everett at 288-2504 or
Melody Everett at
288-4481.
SWIMMING
Classes set at
Aquatic Complex
Youth and adult
swimming lessons will be
offered at the Columbia
County Aquatic Complex,
beginning in June.
Classes meet for two
weeks and six daily times
are offered, plus there
are two daily mom and
tot classes. Five sessions
are offered with the first
June 6-17. Cost is $50
per person.
Registration is at the
pool (755-8195) from
5-7 p.m. June 1.and all
day June 2-3.
POP WARNER FOOTBALL
Cheerleading
interest sought
Lake City Pop Warner
is looking for girls ages
5-12 interested in
cheerleading.
For details, call Kim
Stephans at 623-2954 or
e-mail kimstephensl972@
yahoo.corn
From staff reports

GAMES

May 13
Columbia High
football Purple & Gold
game at Memorial
g Stadium, 6 p.m..
May 14
Fort White High
football Red & Black
game, 10 a.m.
May 20
Fort White High
football vs. Orange Park
High in spring game,
7 p.m.
Columbia High
football vs. Dunnellon


High in spring game,
7:30 p.m.


Tigers ready to

turn up heat as

spring continues


Allen not pleased
with conditioning
of some players.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter. com
New Columbia High head
coach Brian Allen preaches
punctuality. That's why he's
still a little upset with some
of the younger Tigers pre-
paredness when it cbmes to
spring football.
"We only had about 25
or 26 guys show up from
two feeder programs," he
said. 'That's nowhere near
what my expectations were.
I'm a little disappointed. I
don't want players to think
they can show up during


the summer when these
other guys have been work-
ing their butts off and think
they'll jump in. They've got
to put in the work."
Allen was particularly dis-
appointed due to the school
offering free physical and
some players missing prac-
tice for not having the prop-
er paperwork in.
"I like punctuality," he
said. 'That's why you hear
me blowing the horn in
practice. We need tempo
and we're going to push
100 miles per hour. We just
need everyone pushing in
the same direction."
As for the players at prac-
tice, Allen is pleased with
CHS continued on 2B


Bodybuilders
make contract
with their body.
By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com
Bodybuilding is a con-
tract with one's self and
three Lake City athletes
have signed on the dotted
line.
The 2011 Gateway Classic
is Saturday at the Alfonso
Levy Performing Arts
Center at Florida Gateway
College. It is the seventh
year Future Fitness owner
Tony Curtis has promoted
the event.
Cheryl Mattimore,
Svetlana Zhavoronkova and
Shawn Lee plan to compete
in the classic. It will be the
first show for Mattimore
and Zhavoronkova, while
Lee is a veteran performer.
Mattimore, 44, will com-
pete in the Over 40 Figure
and Lake City Figure
events.
"I have never been to
one," Mattimore said about
CLASSIC continued on 2B


Fl ~ 4*. ~' "~ o'~i

~


BRANDON FINLEY/Lake Cty Reporter
Columbia High's Dequan Ivory (right) works through a drill with assistant coach Tim Jernigan
during Wednesday's practice.


TIM KIRBY/Lake City Reporter
Shawn Lee (from left), Svetlana Zhavoronkova and Cheryl Mattimore will compete in the seventh annual 2011 Gateway
Classic Championships at Florida Gateway College on Saturday.


Jackson looking

for help at

multiple spots


n7 qIndians must
replace Dixon,
Blake this year.
By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.corn
FORT WHITE The
pads go on at Fort White
High's spring training
,. today, and coach Demetric
Jackson will have his eye on
a couple of positions.
"One of our pressing
S. .. issues is running back,"
.. Jackson said. "We were for-
S;. tunate the last couple of
S years to have good running
.. -a backs. We have got to find
- ,,q.. ., one."
Y. . ., '.. Fort White had the 1-
2 punch of seniors Alexis
FILE PHOTO Blake and JR Dixon last
Fort White High's A.J. Legree (3) and Trey Phillips (5) converge on a Madison County High year, who combined for
running back in a Sept. 3 game at Arrowhead Stadium. 1,825 yards.


Quarterback Andrew
Baker had 78 .carries and
fullback Zach Cormier had
33 carries, and both are
back. Other, returning play-
ers combiniH for 30 cares,
and Jackson is looking for
someone to step into the
spot.
The other pressing issue
is a line for the backs to run
behind.
"We have to shore up
our offensive line," Jackson
said. "We lost two, two-year
starters (Zack Bentley,
Dylan Newman) on the
line and tight end Donnell
(Sanders) was just like an
offensive lineman. We have
a couple of young kids we
hope will pan out and come
through for us."
Jackson said Baker, who
INDIANS continued on 2B


/


str


I r - -'








LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS THURSDAY, MAY 5, 2011


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TV sports-
Today
GOLF
9 a.m.
TGIC- European PGATour, Open de
Espana, first round, at Barcelona, Spain
I p.m.
TGC Champions Tour, The
Tradition, first round, at Birmingham,Ala.
3 p.m.
TGC PGA Tour, Wells Fargo
Championship, first round, at Charlotte,
N.C.
HORSE RACING
5 p.m.
VERSUS NTRA, Racing from
Churchill Downs, at Lexington, Ky.
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
I p.m.
MLB Regional coverage, San
Francisco at N.Y. Mets or LA. Angels at
Bostorr(start time 1:30 p.m.)
7 p.m.
MLB Regional coverage, Milwaukee
at Atlanta or Washington at Philadelphia
MEN'S COLLEGE VOLLEYBALL
7 p.m.
ESPN2 NCAA Division I
tournament, semifinal, at University Park,
Pa.
NHL HOCKEY
9 p.m.
VERSUS Playoffs, conference
semifinals, game 4, Vancouver at Nashville

BASEBALL

AL standings

East Division
W L Pct GB
NewYork 17 10 .630 -
Tampa Bay 16 13 .552 2
Boston 14 15 .483, 4
Baltimore 13 IS .464 4h
Toronto 13 16 .448 5
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Cleveland 20 8 .714 -
Kansas City 16 13 .552 4'A
Detroit 13 17 .433 8
Minnesota 10 18 .357 10
Chicago II 20 .355 10'k
West Division
W L Pct GB
LosAngelbs 16 14 .533 -
Texas 16 14 .533 -
Oakland 15 15 .500 I
Seattle 14 16 .467 2
Wednesday's Games
Minnesota 3, Chicago White Sox 2
Toronto at Tampa Bay (n)
N.Y.Yankees at Detroit.(n)
LA.Angels at Bqston (n)
Baltimore at Kansas City (n)
Cleveland at Oakland (n)
Texas at Seattle (n) *
Today's Games
N.Y. Yankees (A.J.Burnett 4-1) at
Detroit (Po"rcello I-2), 1:05 p.m.
Toronto (R.Romero 2-3) atTampa Bay
(Price 3-3), 1:10 p.m.
L.A. Angels (Pineiro 0-0) at Boston
(Lackey 2-3), 1:35 p.m.
I Baltimore (Tillman 1-2) at Kansas City
(Chen 3-1),2:10 p.m. -
Cleveland (j.Gomez 0-1) at Oakland
(Anderson 2-2), 3:35 p.m.
Texas (Lewis 2-3), at Seattle (Vargas
1-2), 10:10 p.m.
Friday's Games
Tampa Bay at Baltimore, 7:05 p.m.
'Detroit atToronto, 7:07 p.m.
Minnesota at Boston, 7:10 p.m.
N.Y.Yankees atTexas, 8:05 p.m.
Oakland at Kansas City, 8:10 p.m.
Cleveland at LA.Angels, 10:05 p.m.
Chicago White Sox at Seattle,
10:10 p.m.


NL standings


East Division
W L
Philadelphia 19 9
Florida 18 10
Atlanta 15 15


Washingtor
NewYork

St. Louis
Cincinnati
Pittsburgh
Milwaukee


Chicago
Houston


n

Central


14 15
12 17
Division
W L
17 13
14 15


14 16
13 15
13 16
12 17
West Division-


W L Pct GB
Colorado 17 10 .630 -
Los Angeles 15 16 .484 4
San Francisco 14 15 .483 4
Arizona 13 15 .464 4h
San Diego 12- 18 .400 6k
Wednesday's Games
Cincinnati 3, Houston 2
Chicago Cubs 5, L.A. Dodgers I
Atlanta 8, Milwaukee 3, Ist game
Pittsburgh at San Diego (n)
Washington at Philadelphia (n)
San Francisco at N.Y. Mets (n)
Milwaukee atAtlanta, 2nd game (n)
Florida at St. Louis (n)
Colprado at Arizona (n)
Today's Games
Houston (Myers 1-1) at Cincinnati
(Bailey 0-0), 12:35 p.m.
San Francisco (j.Sanchez 2-1) at N.Y.
* Mets (Pelfrey 1-3), 1:10 p.m. !
Florida. (o.Johnson 3-0) at St. Louis
(Westbrook 2-2), 1:40 p.m.
Washington (Lannan 2-3) at
Philadelphia (Halladay 4-), 7:05 p.m.
Milwaukee (Marcum 3-1) at Atlanta
(Beachy I-I), 7:10 p.m.
Colorado (Hammel 3-1) at Arizona
(I.Kennedy 3-I),9:40 p.m.
Friday's Games
Cincinnati at Chicago Cubs, 2:20 p.m.
Atlanta at Philadelphia, 7:05 p.m.
Houston at Pittsburgh, 7:05 p.m.
LA. Dodgers at N.Y. Mets, 7:10 p.m.
Washington at Florida,'7: 10 p.m.
Milwaukee at St. Louis, 8:15 p.m.
Arizona at San Diego, 10:05 p.m.
Colorado at San Francisco, 10:15 p.m.

Twins no-hitters

Minnesota
May 3, 2011, Francisco Liriano at
Chicago White Sox, 1-0
Sept. 11, 1999, Eric Milton vs.Anaheim;
7-0
April 27, 1994, Scott Erickson vs.
Milwaukee, 6-0
Aug. 25, 1967, Dean Chance at
Cleveland, 2-I '
Aug. 26,. 1962, Jack Kralick vs. Kansas
City Athletics, 1-0
Washington Senators
Aug. 8, 1931, Bob Burke vs. Boston,
5-0-
July I, 1920,Walter Johnson at Boston,
1-0

BASKETBALL

NBA playoffs
CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS
Tuesday
Mianmi'102, Boston 91, Miami leads
series 2-0
Oklahoma City II1, 'Memphis 102,
series tied I-1I
Wednesday
Atlanta at Chicago (n)
Dallas at L.A. Lakers (n)
Friday
Chicago at Atlanta, 7 p.m.
LA. Lakers at Dallas, 9:30 p.m.
Saturday
Oklahoma City at Memphis, 5 p.m.
Miami at Boston, 8 p.m.
Sunday .
LA. Lakers at Dallas, 3:30 p.m.
Chicago at Atlanta, 8 p.m.
Monday
Miami at Boston, 7 p.m.
Oklahoma City at Memphis, 9:30 p.m.

NBA MVP voting

(Voting is on a 10-7Z5-3-1 basis)
Player,Team 1st 2nd 3rd 4th5thTotal
Rose,Chicago 113 6 2 - 1182
Howard,Orl. 3 57 31 16 II 643


James, Miami
Bryant, Lakers
Durant, Ok..City
Nowitki, Dallas
Wade, Miami
Ginobili, SA
Stoudemire, N Y
Griffin, Clippers
Rondo, Boston
Parker, SA
Paul, NO


4 26 39 31
I 18 32 40
- 6 10 20
- 5 3 I1

- I -
- I -
- I -


12 522
12428
38 190
30 113
6 24
6 20
4 9
- 5
- 5
- 3
2 2


AUTO RACING

Race week

NASCAR
SPRINT CUP
Showtime Southern 500
Site: Darlington, S.C.
Schedule: Friday, practice (Speed,
11:30-3 p.m.), qualifying (Speed,
5-6:30 p.m.); Saturday, race, 7:30 p.m. (Fox,
7-11:30 p.m.).
Track: Darlington Raceway (oval, 1.366
miles).
Race distance: 501.322 miles, 367 laps.
Next race: FedEx 400, May 15, Dover
International Speedway, Dover, Del.
Online: http://www.nascar.com
NATIONWIDE
Royal Purple 200
Site: Darlington, S.C.
Schedule: Friday, practice, qualifying
(ESPN2, 3:30-4:30 p.m.), race, 7:30 p.m.
(ESPN2,7-10 p.m.).
Track: Darlington Raceway.
Race distance:200.8 miles, 147 laps.
Next race: 5-Hour Energy 200, May
14, Dover International Speedway, Dover,
Del.
CAMPING WORLD TRUCKS
Next race: Lucas Oil 200, May 13,
Dover International Speedway, Dover,
Del.
FORMULA ONE
Turkish Grand Prix
Site: Istanbul.
Schedule: Friday, practice (Speed,
7-8:30 a.m.); Saturday, practice, qualifying
(Speed, 7-8:30 a.m.); Sunday, race, 8 a.m.
(Speed, 7:30-10 a.m., 1:30-4 p.m.).
Track: Istanbul Speed Park (road
course, 3.32 miles).
Race distance: 192.25 miles, 58 laps.
Next race: Spanish Grand Prix, May 22,
Circuit de Catalunya, Barcelona.
Online: http://www.formula .com'
INDYCAR
Next race: Indianapolis 500, May
29, Indianapolis Motor Speedway,
Indianapolis.
Online: http://www.indyc6r.com
NHRA FULL THROTTLE
Next event: Summit Racing'Equipment
NHRA Southern Nationals, May 13-15,
Atlanta Dragway, Commerce, Ga.
Online: http://www.nhra.com
OTHER RACES
WORLD OF OUTLAWS: Sprint
Car, Outlaw Thunder Weekend, Friday-
Saturday, Eldora Speedway, Rossburg,
Ohio. Late Model, Saturday, Swainsboro
Raceway, Swalnsboro, Ga.; Sunday,
Needmore Speedway, Norman Park, Ga.
Online: http://www.worldofoutlaws.com

HOCKEY

NHL playoffs

CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS
Tuesday
Tampa Bay 4,Washington 3,Tampa Bay
leads series 3-0
Vancouver 3, Nashville 2, OT,
Vancouver leads series 2-I
Wednesday
Washington at Tampa Bay (n)
Philadelphia at Boston (n)
San Jose at Detroit (n)
Today
Vancouver at Nashville, 8:30 p.m.
Friday
San Jose at Detroit, 7 p.m.
Philadelphia at Boston, 8 p.m.
Saturday
Tampa Bay at Washington, 12:30 p.m.
(if necessary) t
Nashville atVancouver, 8 p.m.


CHS: Geared up to put on pads


Continued From Page 1B
the work ethic they have
shown through the first
three days.
'We're throwing a lot
at them and their mind is
going to-be fried," Allen
said. "Everyone looks good
in shorts, but we're ready to
see what it's like when they
go through the Oklahoma
or board drill. It's kind of



INDIANS

From Page 1B

was battling with Wesley
Pitts for the job last year,
would be the quarterback.
Pitts was injured before the
season started.
"Andrew played the
whole year and set himself
up," Jackson said. "He will
be a sophomore who took
every single rep last year
and we will let him stay
there. Anything can happen,
but Wesley will work mostly
on defense and might be a,
backup at quarterback."
Jackson has a scrimmage
planned for Friday, and
again on Tuesday.
The Red & Black game
is 10 a.m. May 14, and
the spring game against
Orange Park High is 7 p.m.
May 20.


like riding a bull. We want
to see who has that nasti-
ness for six seconds."
Two players in particu-
lar that Allen is excited to
see are Dequan Ivory and
Laremy Tunsil.
"I want to see if. they
come out of their shell and
unleash their full potential,"
Allen said. "Laremy has the



Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words. .

MCICO I


I kA I

NKCAYR -




CUEBNO .
7^~S 7~~^ ""^ 0
^-^ __ ^ __ a-


tools to be the greatest line-
man to ever play at this
school, but the potential is
unproven."
The pads go on today at
3:50 p.m. when the Tigers
continue their first week of
practice.
The Purple & Gold game
takes place at Memorial
Stadium at 6 p.m. May 13.

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

SI knew this I
would work.


WHEN SHE =PIPNT HAVE
THE R-IGHT EQUIPMENT
TO CHANGE HER FLAT
TIRE, sHE FOUNP A---
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


Answer:
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday Jumbles: POUND YOUTH PILLOW REVERT
I Answer: The day care center was quickly turning into
a "WHINERY"


CLASSIC: To be held this Saturday


Continued From Page 11

bodybuilding competitions.
A secretary at the
Veterans Administration
Medical Center, Mattimore
is sold on working out and
saw performing as the next
step. An off-hand comment
got her started at the gym.
"My husband (Scott)
* made a comment about me
having 'old lady' knees,"
Mattimore said. "I have lost
51 pounds and gone from
a size 15 to a size 5 in 1'/2
years. I started watching
muscles grow and the tone
come out and I thought, 'I
am getting to be 45 and I
might as well try this for
the first time.' It is more of
a competition for myself."
Mattimore said she has
no problem with the diet-
ing requirements to pre-
pare for a show.
"The call me a 'happy
dieter' here," Mattimore
said. "Drinking plain water
'is the hardest part for me."
Mattimore does have'
two cravings when the
show ends on Saturday -
chocolate and a "Chicken
Critter" salad with honey
mustard dressing from
Texas Roadhouse.
"I will continuesto work
out, but whether I do anoth-
er competition remains to
be seen," Mattimore said.
"I have great respect for'
people who do this for a liv-
ing. It is not an easy thing.
It is physically and mentally
challenging."
Zhavoronkova, 39, began
working out at the urging of
her fianc6, Carlos Pizzino.
"He was working out
at the time and always
told me I needed to come
to the gym with him,"
Zhavoronkova said. "I
thought that meant I was
getting fat I finally came
with him and got interested
in lifting weights."
Zhavoronkova is the


finance manager at CARC-
Advocates for Citizens with
Disabilities. She has lived
in Lake City for 9,k years
and became an American
citizen "close to July 4" in
2010. Growing up in Russia,
Zhavoronkova participated
in ballet and folk dances
and, as such, was familiar
with competition.
"I always had legs, but my
muscles were not so devel-
oped," Zhavoronkova said.,
"They were long. When
' I worked out I got round
shoulders and biceps."
Pizzino took
Zhavoronkova to see her
first bodybuilding competi-
tion last year, and both saw
the possibilities.
"He said, 'Baby, you can
do that,' and I said, 'Yes I
can,'" Zhavoronkova said.
"I am going to try every-
thing. This is my first time
and I am open to all chal-
lenges."
Zhavoronkova said the
dieting was not too bad for
her and she plans to con-
tinue competing .
"It doesn't matter the
outcome with this competi-
tion, I will do a competition
in Gainesville in. August,"
Zhavoronkova said, "I enjoy
the challenge."
Lee, 50, is a.vocational
instructor at Suwannee
Correctional Institute. He
is a defending champion
of sorts in the Gateway
Classic.
"I was the Mr. Lake
City winner in 2009, but
you have to wait two years
before winning again,'" Lee
said. "I won first place in
heavyweight that year."
Lee was looking for-
ward to the new Lake
City Masters division and
planned to compete with
his friend Bobby Vicenzi.
Vicenzi died in a kayak
accident this year and there


Boise State imposes sanctions


By TODD DVORAK
Associated Press

BOISE, Idaho Boise
State football coach Chris
Petersen, in the wake of a
series of NCAA violations,
will have fewer scholar-
ships to hand out in the

ACROSS 40 Par
42 Bur
1 Less cramped 43 Cer
6 Egg portion 45 Sec
10 Van Gogh 47 "Oh
painting 50 Car
12 Claws 52 Saf
14 Bahamas' cap- 54 Go
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16 Missing link
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18 Fleecy animal
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23 Revenuer
24 Cleaning cloth
26 MOMA artist
29 Oahu
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33, Glove filler
35 Helm position
36 Kiwi's extinct
cousin
37 Pet lovers' gp.
38 Ride a wave


bale
Mal
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next two years and less
time on the practice field to
prepare for tough season
openers against Georgia
this fall and Michigan State
in 2012.
The sanctions already
imposed on the Bronco
football team are part of


t of UCLA
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3 Bad-mouth
4 Composition
5 Farm machine
6 Gaped open
7 Bullring shout
8 Rich source
9 Understood -
11 Haul into court
12. Autocrat of yore


a broader penalty package
put in place by universi-
ty officials this week for
,men's and'women's tennis
and track and field after
an NCAA -inquiry iden-
tified nearly two dozen
violations by coaches in
those sports.


Answer to Previous Puzzle

SJUP ER WIVE
ACTIVE LACIER
GOUGED ALKALI
APRES Z ITI
RENO RAT EWER
NOON KRAZY
FE W KNIFE ERA
ALE ASNER TAN
SHADY EAR L
TIRE MST ENYA
ADOS SNEER
GUIDES TATAMI
ARDENT WAITED
BEANS ORLON


13 Compass dir.
17 Huge blossom
19 Knows some-
how
20 Parting word
22 Sighs of relief


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.comn
12 13 14- 1 I5 6 17 1 In 1


23 Marlins' st.
25 Rocker part
27 Not get
renewed
28 Cuzco
builders
30 Feudal worker
32 Paulo,
Brazil
34 "Ghost -"
(1990 Cosby
film)
39 Come next
41 Plays for time
44 Big family
46 Asimov or
Hayes ,
47 Checkout ID
48 Uniform
49 Try a case
51 Ms. Whitman of
eBay
53 Strong soap
55 Golf instructor
56 Use a Singer
57 MS polishers


5-5 2011 by UFS, Inc.


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


will be a memorial trophy
presented at the classic in
his name.
Lee began working out
in the early '80s and gravi-
tated to bodybuilding com-
petition.
"It is a challenge being
able to do something other
people don't do," Lee said.
"You see changes in your
body, putting on muscle
with more definition and
cuts."
Lee said the biggest chal-
lenge is dieting down, then
coming out of the regimen
the proper way.
"Everybody can work
out, but it is all about the
food," Lee said. "You have
to eat every 2-2h hours to
keep your body with a con-
stant supply of nutrients. It
takes me an hour and a half
every day to get my food
ready. Coming out of it, you
have to hydrate right away
to prevent cramps. You
can't jump right back into
your routine or you could
wind up in the hospital."
Lee said he had ben look-
ing forward to going "head
to head" with Vicenzi, who
won Mr. Lake City in 2007.
"It is all a mental thing,"
Lee said. "You put your
body through all of it, then
get up on the stage and
win."
The Gateway Classic
competition is divided into
two sessions. The pre-
judging is 10 a.m. and the
evening show is 7 p.m.
Admission is $10 and $20,
respectively.
Following the first ses-
sion, there is the annual
Lake City Hot Body Contest
at Moe's Southwest Grill
on U.S. Highway 90 west
Contests include best abs,
best bikini and bench
press., There is no admis-
sion for the Hot Body
Contest


1

1
1

1












Clippers' Blake Griffin



voted top NBA rookie


By GREG BEACHAM
Associated Press

LOS ANGELES Los
Angeles Clippers forward
Blake Griffin was named
the Rookie of the Year on
Wednesday after a landslide
vote, becoming the NBA's
first unanimous choice for
the award in 21 years.
Griffin received every
first-place vote from a
panel of 118 media mem-
bers, easily outdistancing
Washington's John Wall.
The Clippers' electrifying
dunker is the first to win
it unanimously since San
Antonio's David Robinson
in 1990, and just the third
unanimous choice in NBA
history after Ralph Sampson
in 1984.
The No. 1 overall draft
pick out of Oklahoma in
2009 missed all of the 2009-
10 season after breaking
his kneecap in the Clippers'
final preseason game, but


Griffin returned with one of
the most impressive debut
campaigns in a generation.
'To miss my entire first
year and then be able to be
up here today is definite-
ly satisfying," Griffin said
while accepting the award
onstage at the Clippers'
training .complex. "My
teammates, every single
one, did such an amazing
job helping me in a year
that was filled with ups and
downs, when I was learning
a lot about the game."
Griffin led all rookies in
scoring and rebounding
while playing in all 82 games
for the Clippers, finishing
12th in the entire NBA in
scoring (22.5 points) and
fourth in rebounds (12.1)
while ranking second
among rookies in assists
(3.8).
The 6-foot-10 power for-
ward was the NBA's first
rookie All-Star since Yao
Ming ih 2003, and he won the


dunk contest at All-Star week-
end in Staples Center with an
iconic leap over a car.
Although Griffin's aeri-
al acrobatics made him a
staple of nightly highlight
reels with more than 200
dunks of varying vicious-
ness, he's already at work
in the offseason rounding
into an even more complete
player.
"He's a highlight at any
second of the game, but
he's also smart enough to
know that the fundamen-
tals are the part that will
make him better and help
.this team," Clippers coach
Vinny Del Negro said. "He
handles it very well. He has
great humility and great
character."
Griffin received a maxi-
mum 590 points in the vot-
ing, while Wall had 91 of
the 118 second-place votes
to finish with 295 points.
New York's Landry Fields
received 12 second-place


votes and 62 points, but fin-
ished fourth in the overall
voting behind Sacramento's
DeMarcus Cousins, who
got 11 second-place votes
and 81 points.
San Antonio's Gary Neal
and Detroit's Greg Monroe
were the only other rookies
receiving votes.
Wall, the No. 1 pick
last summer, tweeted his
approval of Griffin's victo-
ry, saying: "Congrats to the
home ... well deserved!"
Cousins' teammate,
Tyreke Evans, won the
award with the Kings last
season.
Griffin was named the
Western Conference's
Rookie of the Month six
times, becoming the first
player to sweep that award
since Chris Paul did it
with New Orleans in 2005-
06. He's the first rookie to
average 20 points and 10
rebounds since Elton Brand
in 1999-00.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this March 26 file photo, Los Angeles Clippers' Blake
Griffin (left) goes to the hoop past Toronto Raptors' Ed Davis
(right) during the second half of an NBA basketball game in
Los Angeles. Griffin will be named the NBA's Rookie of the
Year on Wednesday a person familiar with the news told The
Associated Press.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Miami Heat's LeBron James (left) prepares to drive against Boston Celtics' Ray Allen
during the first half of Game 2 of a second-round NBA playoff basketball series, Tuesday in
Miami.


Boston ailing, Miami


soars in East semifinals


By TIM REYNOLDS
i Associated Press

MIAMI Coach Doc
Rivers had very specific
instructions for the Boston
Celtics on Wednesday.
Go golfing. Avoid hang-
ing out with each other.
Most importantly, try to
stay away from the game
of basketball.
Think of it as a Doc's
prescription for mental
health.
Physical health may be
of greater concern for the
Celtics, who are limping
into big trouble against the
Miami Heat. And if there's
an upside, to being down
2-0 to the Heat in these
Eastern Conference semi-
finals, it's that the schedule
allows Boston some time
to heal.
Game 3 isn't until
Saturday in Boston.
"We'll be ready," Rivers
said. "I can tell you that.
Guarantee you that.
In this case, the rest is
good. It's very good for us,
because we are a little
banged-up."
Or a lot banged-up, more
specifically.
Paul Pierce (foot), Rajon
Rondo (back) and Ray
Allen (chest) are dealing
with various maladies for
Boston, and the 'Celtics
are still without center
Shaquille O'Neal, who
has played in one game
briefly at that since
Feb. 1 because of calf prob-
lems.
"Rest is always good, but
I don't think we really want
four days off," Heat guard
Dwyane Wade said. "I think
it probably helps Boston
more than it helps us, for
them guys to really get a


lot of rest We'll have one
day off and then (get) back
at it again. We're going
to take it. We're going to
learn from the things we
did well and also the things
we didn't do so well."
At this rate, there isn't
much to complain about
from the Heat perspective.
Miami used a 14-0 run in
the fourth quarter to fuel
a 101-92 victory in Game 2
on Tuesday night behind
35 points from LeBron
James and 28 more from
Wade. So far in the series,
they've combined to,
score 123 points nine
more than the collec-
tive total from Ray Allen,
Pierce, Rondo and Kevin
Garnett
The Celtics are getting
beat up and banged up at
about the same rate.
Pierce began noticeably
limping midway through
the first quarter of Game
2. Rondo did not warm up
at halftime, keeping a heat-
ing pad on his aching back
instead until play resumed,
then needed some fourth-
quarter stretching on the
Celtics' sideline.
And when Rondo and
Allen tried challenging
James in the open floor,
they paid big prices.
James spun around
Rondo for a two-hand-
ed dunk Rondo was
knocked into a backward
somersault on the play.
And minutes later, James
and Allen collided on
another Heat breakout.
James caught a forearm
from Allen in the face and
was briefly shaken up, but
got the worst of it, having
to leave the game briefly
with a bruised chest.'
"Something you deal


with," Allen shrugged.
Say this much for the
Celtics: They may be
bruised, but far from beat-
en.
O'Neal insists that he
will play in Game 3, and in
a crestfallen Boston post-
game locker room, both
Garnett and Glen Davis
used the same phrase to
emphasize the importance
of the next game.
"Do or die," they said in
separate interviews.
If the Heat had their
way, Game 3 probably
would have been played
already. A franchise that
couldn't beat the Celtics
for the better part of the
last four years Miami
dropped 18 of 20 games
to Boston has now won
three straight in the series,
including the April 10 reg-
ular-season matchup.
Find a way to win two.
more, 'and the Heat are
heading to the Eastern
Conference finals.
'We did what we want-
ed to do, protect home-
court," James said. "Now
the series starts in a very,
very hostile environment
on Saturday. Looking for-
ward to the challenge."
Like Rivers, Miami
coach Erik Spoelstra gave
his team Wednesday off.
Rest is good, Spoelstra
said, and he doesn't expect
the Heat to lose their edge
over the layoff.
"The series doesn't
start until somebody wins
on an opposing teams'
court,", Spoelstra said. "So
we understand what the
challenge will be going up
there."
For Miami forward
Chris Bosh, the rest might
be worthwhile.


Long road for Twins'


Liriano to no-hitter


By RICK GANO
Associated Press

CHICAGO, Francisco
Liriano showed his potential
five years ago as a rookie
All-Star and 12-game winner
for the Minnesota Twins.
Then came the down time,
elbow surgery, a missed
season and a struggle to
regain his form and his con-
fidence.
A year ago he appeared
to have found his way back,
winning 14 games and
the AL Comeback Player
award. But when 2011 start-
ed, he was having problems.
again with control and was
1-4 with a 9.13 ERA. His
spot in the rotation was in
jeopardy.
Then the left-hander
took the mound on a cold
Tuesday night against the
Chicago White Sox and
pitched the game of his life,
a no-hitter. Now the ques-
tion: Can he carry that type
of effective pitching into the
rest of the season?
"You know what? It's just
been a struggle and obvi-
ously in the game when
you struggle, you put a lot
of pressure on yourself,"
Twins pitching coach Rick
Anderson said Wednesday.
"He's been doing that,
out in games, overthrow-
ing and trying to do a little
much to get it going. Last
night by no means did he
have his greatest stuff, but
I think he had great results
with it and with that hope-
'fully will build some confi-
dence with him."
Liriano walked six and
got some strong defense
behind him, including one
nice play by third base-
man Danny Valencia, who
went into foul territory in
the seventh to grab Carlos
Quentin's hard hopper and
throw him out. Denard
Span made a nice running
catch of Quentin's drive to
left center in the fourth.
And then in the ninth, with
the tension building, first
baseman Justin Morneau
made a beautiful scoop of
a low throw from shortstop
Matt Tolbert to retire Brent
Morel.
Tolbert then snagged
Adam Dunn's liner to end
the game.
Liriano showed up at U.S.
Cellular Field onWednesday
morning, a little more than
12 hours after completing
his 2-hour, 9-minute master-
piece the first complete
game and shutout of his
pro career that began back
in 2001.
He was weary. And he was
the talk of the Dominican
Republic.
"Yeah, I got like 55 text
messages and a lot of phone
calls from family back


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Minnesota Twins starting pitcher Francisco Liriano (right)
celebrates with catcher Drew Butera after his no-hitter and
1-0 win over Chicago White Sox in a baseball game Tuesday
in Chicago.


home. They were pretty
happy back home," Liriano
said. "My brothers and sis-
ters and all my friends and
cousins. They called until
about four in the morning.
"I didn't sleep at all. Too
many phone calls," he said.
"Thinking a lot of stuff, you
know. How the game went
and everything. Thinking
about a lot of stuff."
Liriano was acquired
in a 2003 trade with the
San Francisco Giants that
also brought Joe Nathan
to Minnesota in exchange
for A.J. Pierzynski, now the
White Sox catcher.
He burst onto the scene
in 2006, going 12-3 with a
2.16 ERA and dominating
overmatched hitters with
an untouchable slider. But
the violent delivery caused
him to develop arm prob-
lems toward the end of
the season and resulted in
Tommy John surgery that
November.
His road back has been
long and difficult. Liriano
missed all of 2007, spent a
good portion of the follow-
ing season in the minors
and then struggled to regain
his form over the next two
years, leading some to won-
der if the power lefty would
ever make it all the way
back.
He went just 5-13 with a
5.80 ERA in 2009.
Liriano started last sea-
son as the Twins' fifth
starter, but a strong sea-
son of winter ball in the
Dominican Republic
buoyed his confidence, and
he steadily worked his way


to the top of the rotation
as the season wore on. He
won 14 games and fanned
201 batters, fifth best in the
American League, while
pitching a career-high 191
2-3 innings.
The Twins did not pursue
any frontline starters over
the offseason, hoping that
Liriano could finally be the
stopper they have lacked
since trading Johan Santana
to the New York Mets.
Liriano irked manag-
er Ron Gardenhire and
Anderson in February when
he showed up to spring
training a little out of shape
- and told the Twins brass
he had not been doing the
exercises they instructed
him to do to keep his arm
strong through the winter.
He was limited in spring
because of the soreness as
he worked his way back'
into shape, and then got off
to a terrible start in 2011.
Now, all is forgiven.
"It was a big pick-ts-
up that everyone gets to:
enjoy in this clubhouse. I'm
really happy for the young
man," Gardenhire said.
"He's worked so hard and
takes the game so personal.:
He feels terrible when he
doesn't get the job done
out there on the mound, so
it's good to see him with a
big smile on his face and.
the guys slapping him on
the back and beating him
around after a win.
It's exciting for us all, we
needed a win," Gardenhire
said. "We'd lost six in a row.
To get a no-hitter on top is
a big bonus."


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS THURSDAY, MAY 5, 2011


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420








LAKE CITY REPORTER. ADVICE & COMICS THURSDAY, MAY 5, 2011


DILBERT

CONGRATULATIONS
ON SOLVING EVERY
IMPORTANT PROBLEM
IN THE WORLD.


BABY BLUES


BLONDIE
BOSS, EVEN THOUGH IT'S CINCO DE
MAYO, THERE WON'T BE ANY
FRIVOLITY TODAY!.




-
I 1 Ly^^ -


YOU HAVE MV WORD! IT'LL
BE BUSINESS AS USUAL





III"' \
IT^^^ ^ < W


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE


SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS


GARFIELD


FRANK & ERNEST


DEAR ABBY


Husband's lack of trust may

mean he wants more control


HIGH
FIVE?


DEAR ABBY: I am a mar-
riage counselor writing in re-
sponse to the March 22 letter
from the man who objected to
his wife having dinner with a
mutual (male) friend while the
writer was on a business trip.
I found his signature, "Feeling
Cheated On in Illinois," exces-
sive, perhaps even a signal he
has an "ownership" attitude
toward his spouse, which is
associated with controlling be-
havior. In the absence of any
reason to distrust her, why is
he so upset?
My husband of 20 years
was going to Japan for a week
to visit our foster daughter.
I was unable to go, so one of
my female friends went with
him instead. My husband is at-
tractive, and no doubt has had
many opportunities to cheat.
I realize many spouses are
unfaithful, but you don't keep
them faithful by keeping them
on a short leash. All that does
is make a potential cheater
sneakier.
Because spouses who cheat
sometimes claim their lovers-
in-waiting are "just friends"
doesn't mean men and women
can't be "just friends." "Illinois"
is insecure at best, controlling
at worst. I think he should
have a one-time appointment
with a therapist and discuss
his expectations of his wife.
BARBARA IN MAINE
DEAR BARBARA: I heard
from readers who have first-
hand experience in this sub-
ject And many of them agreed
I with you. Read on:


Ita*


HOROSCOPES'


ARIES (March 21-
April 19): You will have to
work hard and do your best
to bypass someone who is
giving you a hard time. In
the end, the rewards will be
worth your time and effort
Welcome change and new
beginnings with open arms.

TAURUS (April 20-
May 20): Take care of
pending problems con-
cerning institutions, gov-
ernment agencies or large
corporations. Go directly to
the source and make career
changes if necessary. You
will be able to get the help
you need from colleagues
with whom you have
worked in the past ***
GEMINI (May 21-
June 20): Your emotions
are running wild. Making
a decision is almost impos-
sible. You are torn in many
directions and need to take
three steps back so you
can assess your situation
objectively. Do whatever re-
search is required. ***
CANCER (June 21-
July 22): Avoid taking on
responsibilities that don't
belong to you. Don't make
donations or in any way
jeopardize your financial
position to help someone
else. With imagination, you
will come up with solutions
that aren't costly. ***
LEO (July 23-Aug.


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

22): Status, position and
recognition can all be yours
if you follow through with
your promises. You can
dazzle and mesmerize the
people you want to impress,
making it easy for you to
move into a leadership po-
sition. Make sure your mo-
tives are ethical. ****
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
. 22): Impulse will be the
enemy, especially regard-
ing spending or financial
matters. Uncertainty about
a contract or deal you've
been working on should
be a warning not to do any-
thing until you have a firm
commitment in hand. **
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
*22): Stick to your objec-
tives and complete what's
required of you. Make
positive changes that will
enhance your relationship
with someone who can
make a difference to your
life personally and finan-
cially. Love is highlighted.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-
Nov. 21): Moneymaking
deals are apparent but you
will have to move quickly.
A change in the way you do
things will lead to new con-
nections. Unusual activities
at home will spark greater
enthusiasm and new possi-


abilities for personal growth.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): Personal op-
portunities will develop that
allow you to expand your
interests, your friendships
and your business relation-
ships. Networking will be
the key to getting ahead.
Welcome any challenges
that come your way. ***
CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): Trying to
accomplish will be difficult
as the obstacles mount and
the 'frustration builds. For-
get about work and take a
mental health day. A little
time off will help you get
a fresh look at an old situa-
tion. ***
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Open your doors
to friends, colleagues and
relatives. Sharing what you
have with others will en-
hance your reputation and
ensure you get the help
needed. Welcome change
and challenges that allow
you to show how versatile
you are. *****
PISCES (Feb. 19-
March 20): Don't expect
anyone to understand what
you're going through or
how you feel. You need a
timeout to reassess your
life and your plaps for the
future. Don't let someone
dictate what you should or
shouldn't do. **


CELEBRITY CIPHER


by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: K equals P
"FMNI? D TJYJN FMNIJX G XGP DT
ZP WDAJ. D GWFGPR WMYJX FOGU D
FGR XMDTL, OGX G KGRRDMT AMN
DU." JNTDJ VGTIR
PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "For myself I hold no preferences among flowers, so
long as they are wild, free, spontaneous." Edward Abbey
(c) 2011 by NEA, Inc. 5-5


FOR BETTER OR WORSE
FH, MON PETIT CHOU.....
o'fIou'- LOOKING- .
MUNCJ-eL-F U
I E

I


CLASSIC PEANUTS


I ASSUME THAT'S WHAT
HAPPENED. OTHERWISE,
YOU WOULDN'T HAVE
TIME TO CREATE DESK
STANDARDIZATION
POLICIES.


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearabby.com
DEAR ABBY:' I'm an at-
home wife of a husband who
travels frequently. He has
logged more than 3 million
frequent flyer miles in the last
20 years. I'll bet the "Illinois"
man dines out often with fe-
male colleagues. It's a fact of
business life these days. And
I'll bet a lot of the women are
married, too. So, really, what's
the difference?
He needs to look inward at
his own actions and ability to
trust. While travel may be part
of his job, why must his wife
be denied adult companion-
ship when he's away? A man
and woman eating out togeth-
er doesn't automatically equal
"date." I do it often when my
husband travels. I pay my own
way and meet my friends) at
the restaurant. It's a "get-to-
gether" and the only way I can
stay sane. BEEN THERE
AND WILL CONTINUE
DEAR ABBY: I'm a mar-
ried woman with single and
married male friends. I go out
for lunches and dinners with
all of them. Some live out of
state and we email often. I also
have outings with female pals,
some of whom are lesbians. "II-


THAT'S WHAT
WORRIES ME




-


1 1zI


H : -1 1 --- 1 1.1 .11 --s I1


l


lul


Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415


linois" needs to figure out why
he doesn't trust his wife and
his good friend. My husband
socializes without me as well.
He even goes to lunch some-
times with an old girlfriend.
Either you trust your partner
or you don't. SECURE AND
HAPPY IN CALIFORNIA
DEARABBY: I travel often
and enjoy dinners with lots of
people, both male and female.
I've dined with my neighbor's
husband while we were strand-
ed at an airport trying to get
home. Should we have sat at
different tables? Implying that
this behavior is "questionable"
is outrageous. My husband-is.
sometimes invited to dinner by
neighbors when I'm away and I
thank them for their kindness.
JULIA IN GAINESVILLE,
FLA.
DEAR ABBY: Something
similar happened to me. It
started with the remark that'
there's nothing wrong with a
married woman having a man
as her best friend. Three years
later she filed for divorce,, say-
ing she didn't love me any-
more. They worked together in
the same office, started going
out to lunch, then having after-
work drinks and golf dates on
the weekends I worked over-
time. I understand what "Illi-
nois" is-going through. I hope
his situation works out better
than mine did. LARRY IN
OHIO
Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.










Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED THURSDAY, MAY 5, 2011

Lake City Reporter





CLASSIFIED


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

755.5440


BUY IT

S Thl

ELL',,g


neitem prad $ 250ditonl
4 lines 6 days one |
Rateapplies toprivateIndividualssellg
persona merchand noting 100 or less.
Each Item must Include a price.


WT


One Item per ad ditonal
4 lines 6 dayslin $ |-
Rate applies to private Individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling $500 or less.
Each item must Include a price.
This is a onrefundabletat...




One Item per ad d
4 lines 6 days Each additional
Rate applies to private Individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling $1,000 or less.
Each item must include a price.



This Is a non-refundable rate.




One ftem per ad $2
4 lines 6 days Each additional
line $1.45
Rate applies to private individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling $2,500 or less.
Ea em mt Includ a price.







000 0tno a ran
One Item per ad
4 lines 6 days Each additional
Rate applies to private individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling $4,000 or less.
SEach item must include pdce
Ths Is a son-refundabl rate.





4 linudes 6 daysEach additional














Limited to service type advert s-
4 nes ona e s tmonthe n as 92 0

$10.80 each add tonal e
EaInclud h tem must Include al $200 price.
ad for each Wednesday nsert ion
You can call uines at 7555440







Monday through Frday from 8i00
CludSome people preferSgn tn o place thei 5







classimited ato service tyn person and somertis-
$10.80 each additional line
Includes an additional $2.m00 per








ad categor es wi requday insertioepay
meant. Our office is located at 180
You can all us at 755-5440x or emai your ad



copday through Friday from 8ter :00
a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

classified ads in person, and some
ad categories will e read prepay-
ment. Our office is located at 180

You can also fax or e-mail your ad
copy to the Reporter.
FAX: 386-752-9400 Please
direct your copy to the Classified
Department'.
EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityre-
porter.corn





Ad Is to Appear: Call by: Fax/Emall by:
Tuesday Mon., 10:00 am. Mon., 9:0 a.m.
Wednesday Mon., 10:00 a.m. Mon, 9:00a.m.
Thursday Wed., 10:00 a.m. Wed.,9:00a.m.
Friday Thnurs., I00a.m. Th rs., 9:00 am.
Saturday F.,10:00a.m. Fri.,9:00a.m.
Sunday Fri., 10:00 a.m. Fri., 9:00 a.m.
These deadlines are subject to change without notice.




Ad Errors- Please read your ad
on the first day of publication.
We accept responsibility for only
the first incorrect insertion, and
only the charge for the ad space
in error. Please call 755-5440
immediately for prompt correc-
tion and billing adjustments.
Cancellations- Normal advertising
deadlines apply for cancellation.
Billing Inquiries- Call 755-5440.
Should further information be
required regarding payments or
credit limits, your call will be trans-
ferred to the accounting depart-
ment.


Advertising copy is subject to
approval by the Publisher who
reserves the right to edit, reject,
or classify all advertisements under
appropriate headings. Copy should
be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the first day of pub-
Hcation. Credit for published errors
will be allowed for the first insertion
for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the
Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nor for any general,
special or consequential damages.
Advertising language ,must comply
with Federal, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
nation in employment, housing and
public accommodations. Standard
abbreviations are acceptable; how-
ever, the first word of each ad may
not be abbreviated.

In Print and Online
www.lalhcdityrcpor ter.com


mBf


Legal

NOTICE OF BOARD MEETING
TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN
The District Board of Trustees, Flori-
da Gateway College, will hold a pub-
lic meeting at 4:00 p.m. on Tuesday,
May 17, 2011, in the Board Room of
the Union County School Board Of-
fice, 55 SW 6th St., Lake Butler, FL
32054.
Topics of consideration will be rou-
tine college business. Any person
wishing to be heard on any agenda
matter will be provided an opportu-
nity to do so by appearing before the
Board in the Board Room of the Un-
ion County School Board Office.
All objections to this notice and pro-
priety of the scheduled meeting
should be filed with Florida Gateway
College prior to noon, Thursday,
May 12, 2011. All legal issues
should be brought to the Trustees' at-
tention and an attempt made to re-
solve them prior to the meeting.
Please notify the President's Office
immediately if you require accom-
modation for participation in the
meeting.
04544642
May 5, 2011


STATE OF FLORIDA, CRIMINAL
JUSTICE STANDARDS & TRAIN-
ING COMMISSION,
Petitioner
vs.
JONATHAN C. ARNOLD, Case
#27277
Respondent
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: JONATHAN C. ARNOLD,
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an Ad-
ministrative Complaint has been
filed against you seeking to revoke
your CORRECTIONAL Certificate
in accordance with Section
943.1395, ES., and any rules pro-
mulgated thereunder.
You are required to serve a written
copy of your intent to request a hear-
ing pursuant to Section 120.57, F.S.
upon Michael Crews, PROGRAM
DIRECTOR, Criminal Justice Pro-
fessionalism Program, Florida De-
partment of Law Enforcement, P. 0.
Box 1489, Tallahassee, Florida
32302-1489, on or before June 18,
2011 [2 months from the date legal
ad sent to the newspaper]. Failure to
do so will result in a default being
entered against you to Revoke said
certification pursuant to Section
120.60, F.S., and Rule 11B-27,
F.A.C.
Dated: April 18, 2011 [date legal ad
sent to the newspaper]
Ernest W. George
CHAIRMAN CRIMINAL JUS-
TICE STANDARDS
AND TRAINING COMMISSION
By: -s- Ashley Hegler, Division Rep-
resentative
04544422
April, 21, 28, 2011
'May, 05, 12, 2011
NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETING
The North Florida Broadband Au-
thority ("NFBA") announces a public
meeting to which all interested per-
sons are invited. The NFBA is a le-
gal entity and public body created
pursuant to the provisions of Section
163.01, Florida Statutes, and an Inter
local Agreement among: Baker,
Bradford, Columbia, Gilchrist, Harh-
'ilton, Jefferson, Lafayette, Levy,
Madison, Putnam, Suwannee, Tay-
lor, Wakulla and Union Counties and
municipalities of Cedar Key, Cross
City, Lake City, Live Oak, Monticel-
lo, Perry, White Springs and Wor-
thington Springs, Florida. The regu-
lar meeting will be held at 2:00 p.m.
E.T. on Wednesday, May 11, 2011 at
the Suwannee River Water Manage-
ment District,. Suwannee Room,
9225 County Road 49, Live Oak,
Florida 32060. The NFBA Board
will address general business of the
NFBA and an amendment of the by-
laws of the NFBA Operations Com-
mittee providing for the appointment
of alternates to serve on the commit-
tee. If a person decides to appeal any
decision made by the NFBA with re-
spect to any matter considered at the
meeting, such person will need a re-
cord of the proceedings and may
need to ensure that a verbatim record
is made, including the testimony and
evidence upon which the appeal is to
be made. In accordance with the
Americans with Disabilities Act, per-
sons needing special accommoda-
tions or an interpreter to participate
in this proceeding, or if you have any
questions regarding this meeting,
please contact the Clerk to the NFBA
Board at (877) 552-3482, at least two
business days prior to the date of the
meeting.
05525791
May 5, 2011







Lawn & Landscape Service

Clean Pine Straw,
You pick it up, $1.85 a bale
Delivery of 100 bales $260
386-688-9156

Landscape Maintenance Company
You can trust for knowledge &
pride, Mention this AD!
Mow Green, LLC 386-288-6532


Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.


Land Services


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No.: 11-99-CP
Division: PROBATE
IN RE: ESTATE OF
JAMES WALTER KEATON
Deceased,
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of
JAMES WALTER KEATON, de-
ceased, whose date of death was
February 19, 2011, is pending in the
Circuit Court for Columbia County,
Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 173 NE Hemando
Avenue, Lake City, Florida 32055.
The names and addresses of the per-
sonal representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set forth
below.
All creditors of the decedent and oth-
er persons having claims or demands
against the decedent's estate on
whom a copy of this notice is re-
quired to be served must file their
claims with this court WITHIN THE
LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER
THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLI-
CATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30
DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF
SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent
and other persons having claims or
demands against the decedent's es-
tate must file their claims with this
court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER
THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUB-
LICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITH-
IN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this
notice is May 5 ,2011.
Attorney for Personal Representa-
tive:
By /s/: LINDSAY L. CARTER-TID-
WELL
Attorney for James A. Keaton
Florida Bar Number: 0028866
Brannon, Brown Haley & Bullock,
P.A.
P.O. Box 1029
Lake City, FL 32056
Telephone: (386)752-3213
Fax: (386)755-4524
E-Mail: lct@bbattorneys.com
Personal representative:
By /s/: JAMES A. KEATON
503 SE Anastasia Street
Lake City, Florida 32025
04544632
May 5, 12, 2011
Notice is hereby given per Florida
Statue 98.075(2):
Last known address of:
Ronald A. Byrd
187 SE Brandon Dr.
Lake City, F1032025
James Elliot
1900 SW Brim St.
Lake City, Florida 32024
John K. Byrd
496 SE Montrose Ave.
Lake City, FL 32025
James T. Morgan Sr.
751 SE Sycamore Ter
Lake City, Florida 32025
is potentially ineligible to be regis-
tered to vote. Please respond within
30 days of publication of this notice
by contacting the Supervisor of Elec-
tions Office at the address or phone
number below. If no response is re-
ceived within 30 days of this publi-
cation, it may result in determination
of ineligibility by the supervisor and
removal of the registered voter's
name from the statewide voter regis-
tration system.
Published one time in the Lake City
Reporter
Elizabeth "Liz" P. Home
Columbia County Supervisor .of
Elections
971 W. Duval Street, Suite 102
Lake City, FL 32055
(386) 758-1026
04544613
May 5, 20(llI




Get Connected




SWWWt.ktWt r.pot om
il'Bf~-M----


010 Announcements











AVON!! Only $10 to start!
Earn bonus $ up to $150+
1-800-275-9945 pin #4206
www.youravon.com/tdavies
Associate Reps
SUMMER WORK/GREAT PAY
Immediate FT/PT openings,
Customer sales/service,,
No exp needed, conditions,
Apply Now all ages 17+
(386) 269-0883


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE 3rd JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO: 10-246-CA
REGIONS BANK, an Alabama
banking corp.
Plaintiff,
vs.
SALVADOR A. PUIG, et al.
Defendants.
NOTICE OF JUDICIAL SALE BY
CLERK
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
pursuant to Plaintiff's Summary Fi-
nal Judgment of Mortgage Foreclo-
sure entered in the above styled
cause now pending in said court, that
I will sell to the highest bidder for
cash at the 173 Hemando Ave. Lake
City, FL 32055 on the 25th dayof
May, 2011, at 11:00 a.m., in accord-
ance with Sec. 45.031 of the Florida
Statutes, the following property:
LEGAL DESCRIPTION: SEE EX-
HIBIT "A" ATTACHED.
A parcel of land lying in Section 16,
Township 5 South, Range 17 East,
Columbia County, Florida, being
more particularly described as fol-
lows: COMMENCE at the North-
west comer of the North 1/2 of the
Southwest 1/4 of Section 16, Town-
ship 5 South, Range 17 East, Colum-
bia County, Florida, and run South
01'08'06" West along the
Exhibit "A"
West line of said Section 16 a dis-
tance of 1154.83 feet; thence South
89"48'00" East a distance of 11.32
feet to the Easterly maintained right-
of-way of Mixon Road (a county
maintained road), also 6eing the
POINT OF BEGINNING; thence
continue South 89'48'00" East along
a line being parallel with the North
line of the North 1/2 of the South-
west 1/4 of' said Section 16 a dis-
tance of 1311.00 feet to the West line
of the Northeast 1/4 of the Southwest
1/4 of said Section 16; thence contin-
ue South 89"48'00" East still along
said parallel line 175.85 feet, the
Westerly limited access right-of-way
line of Interstate Highway No. 75;
thence South 17"47'19" East along
said Westerly limited access right-of-
way line 179.97 feet to the North line
of the North 1/2 of the Southeast 1/4
of the Southwest 1/4 of said Section
16; thence continue South 17"47'19"
East still along said Westerly limited
access right-of-way line 697.73 feet
to the South line of the N 1/2 of the
Southeast 1/4 of the Southwest 1/4 of
said Section 16; thence North
89"40'45" West along said South
line 461.06 feet to the Southwest
comer of the North 1/2 of the South-
east 1/4 of the Southwest 1/4 of said
Section 16; thence North 011'10'21"
East. along the West line of said
North 1/2 of the Southeast 1/4 of the
Southwest 1/4 a distance of 663.05
feet to the Northwest comer of said
North 1/2 of the Southeast 1/4 of the
Southwest 1/4; thence North 891
43'28" West along the South line of
the North 1/2 of the Southwest 1/4;
of said Section 16 a distance of
1310.93 feet to the Easterly main-
tained right-of-way line of Mixon
Road; thence Northerly along said
Easterly maintained right-of-way
line 169.2 feet, more or less, to the
POINT OF BEGINNING.
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN IN-
TEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM
THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER
AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS
PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE
SALE.
DATED APRIL 18, 2011.
P. DeWitt Cason
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By:/s/ B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
04544604
May 5, 12, 2011


100 Job
100 'Opportunities

10 Temporary Farm Workers
needed. Employer; Tommy
Litchfield Trigg Co, KY.
Tobacco, Straw/Hay, Row Crop,
& Alternative Work. Employment
Dates: 06/19/11 11/15/11. Wage
of $9.48/hr. Wage of $9.48/hr.
Worker guaranteed 3/4 of contract
hours. Tools provided at no
cost. Free housing provided to
non commuting workers.
Transportation & subsistence
reimbursed when 50% of contract
is met. Apply for this job at the
nearest KY Office of Employment
& Training Division of Workforce
& Employment Services Office
referencing the job order
#KY0426195.
05525772
Customer Service Rep
needed for established Insurance
Agency; Health Ins.& 401K
plan available,Send reply to Box
05060, C/O The Lake City
Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL, 32056

05525792



Quality Control Lab Tech
World Class Cement Manufac-
turer in need of experienced
Chemical/X-ray Lab Technician
for Quality Control Department
to collect and perform chemical
tests of raw materials, process
materials and finish product for
quality control and quality
assurance. Duties include, but
are not limited to: calibrate, test
and maintain manual and
computer controlled equipment,
spectrometers, and other equip-
ment used in quantitative analy-
sis. Must be able to work in
industrial environment and
collect samples in outside manu-
facturing area. This is a shift
position and must be able to
work rotating shifts, days, nights
and weekends, and accept call-
ins after hours and/or on week-
ends. 2-4 years experience in
cement industry chemical lab
preferred. Must have good com-
puter skills; good communica-
tiori skills, both written and
verbal. AS/AA Degree in related
field helpful. Suwannee Ameri-
can Cement, located in Bran-
ford, FL, offers a competitive
salary and an excellent benefits
package. EOE & Drug Free
Workplace. Email resume
and cover letter to:
resumes@suwanneecement.com
or Fax 386-935-5071; or mail:
Suwannee American Cement
HR, PO Box 410,
Branford, FL 32008

Bartender needed. Must
have experience & be reliable, &
have your own transportation and
your own phone. 386-752-2412
LEARN TO DRAW BLOOD?
Have a new career in Phlebotomy!
Now Enrolling!! Call for more
info. 386-755-5780/386-951-6400
Live Oak CPA Firm seeks
full-time Secretary/Receptionist.
Please see Employment
Opportunity at
www.liveoakcpa.com.
Sales Position available for moti-
vated individual Rountree -Moore
Toyota, Great benefits, paid train-
ing/vacation. Exp. a plus but not
necessary. Call Anthony Cosentino
386-623-7442
Security Officers
needed Lake City Area, must have
current D Security Lie., Clear
background, Drivers Lie, phone,
Diploma/GED.
Benefits, DFWP EEO Apply at:
www.dsisecurity.com MB 1000084
Sewing Machine Operator
with experience
good hourly rate
Call Hafners 386-755-6481


130 Part Time

Nursery Position Available
Southside Baptist Church,
Hours on Wednesdays and
Sunday during regular church
service. Please call 386-755-5553
for more information

REPORTER Classifieds

In Print and On Line
www.lakecityreporter.com


confused?



Call Lake City Reporter Classifieds!


WE CAN HELP 386-755-5440


Back Hoe, Dozer, Chopping, root
raking, bush hog, seeding, sod,
disking, site prep, ponds &
irrigation. Free Est! 386-623-3200


- ADvantage


I


II


130 Part Time

05525793
Busy office needs
Receptionist/Clerk
to answer phones, greet custom-
ers, file and input data. Must
have good interpersonal skills;
be compulit literate, and able to
multi-task with minimal
supervi-
sion. This is a part time position.
Monday-Friday as required
(9:00am-6:00pm)and every
other Saturday 10:00am-2:00pm
Fax Resume to 386-438-8103


240 Schools &
2 0 Education

04544505
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-05/23/10

Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-05/09/11

Continuing education
Feesincl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
e'xpresstrainingservices.com



310 Pets & Supplies

PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs '
and cats being sold to be at least 8 :
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.

330 Livestock &
Supplies

04544626
Black Angus
Cows & Heifers
Registered & Commercial
Prices Vary
386-719-4802 or 386-623-9427



361 Farm Equipment
84.Ford46l4ATractor. Runs good.
Solid 2WD. New front tires,
350hr on 2005 motor. Dependable.
$7500. obo. 386-867-0005


420 Wanted to Buy

K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$250 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.
WANTED
Mayhaw Berries
Call Pat at
386-454-3584


430 Garaige Sales













PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.

Sat 8-12 only, 308 Owens Ave SW
in Branford; bike. lawnmower,
kegerator, baby items, clothing,
guitar, vacuum, military items
Saturday Only 7a-12p
Household items and much more
221 SW Celine Court
Blaine Estates off 242
Saturday Only-8am to 1 pm
41N on. 162 NW Crews Glenn,
Lots of household stuff
and much more!








Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED THURSDAY, MAY 5, 2011


430 Garage Sales
Yard/Moving Sale-Good Bargains
& wide selection for all! 1048 SW
Yorktown Glen Lake City, May 7
at 7:00 till dusk! 386-466-0929


440 Miscellaneous
Commander II Barber Chair
$1700, 2 Collins Reclining Chairs
w/Mats $325 ea & 2 Roll about
floor dryers $70 ea 386-362-7105
Tow Behind Grill/Smoker
$1,250 OBO.
386-249-3104 or
386-719-4802

f630 Mobile Homes
630 for Rent.
I UNDER NEW MANAGEMENT
Oakview Mobile Home Park.
Clean well maintained 2/2 units in
nice park. 2 miles to downtown
Lake City. 386-984-8448
14x70 MH, 2Br/2Ba Real Clean
Good Location! CH/A $550/Mo.
+ $200 Dep. NO PETS.
(386)755-0064 or (904)771-5924
2&3 BR MH. $395 $650. mo.
plus deposit. Water & sewer fur-
nished. Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
2/1 S/W, front kitchen, CH/A
$375. mo. plus
$200. dep
386-752-2254
2/2 MH w/screen porch, Irg yard,
quiet/clean/safe 10 unit park,
$475 mo, $475 dep,
NO PETS, 386-965-3003
2/2 Newly remodeled MH New
Floors/counter tops. Lg lot, quiet
area No pets 1st, last & sec. $450
mo $300 sec will work w/payment
plan. Call Jenn 386-454-7724
2/2 Units, clean, well maintained,
nice safe park setting, 2 miles to
downtown Lake City, $550 month
+ $550 sec dep, 386-984-8448
*2br /2ba SWMH; also Residential
RV lots for rent between Lake City
& G'ville. Access to 1-75 & 441
(352)317-1326 Call for terms
3/2 S of Lake City, (Branford area)
$400 dep, $600 month
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
Furnished 2br/1.5ba Non-smoker
owned. Washer/Dryer, Micro, TV
$570 mo water/garbage /lawn incl.
High school area 386-755-0110
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White. Contact 386-623-3404
or 386-365-1919
New 2br/2ba off Country Club. 1/2
ac. lot Front, back porch & storage
bldg. $600 mo. $600 sec. No Pets!
386-752-5911 or 466-2266
Nice clean 2&3 bdrm, Five Points,
NO PETS, also 3 bd on the
Westside, 3 bdrm house on
Monroe St 386-961-1482






X-CLEAN 2/2 SW, 8 mi
NW of VA. Clean acre lot, nice
area. $500. mo + dep No dogs
386-961-9181

640 Mobile Homes
640 for Sale
06 MH 3br/2ba open floor plan
w/lg kit w/ island, fireplace. 3 Riv-
ers Est, river access, MLS# 75661
Eastside Village Realty, Inc.
Denise Millgan-Bose 752-5290
FOR SALE: $85,000 10 Acres
W/2006 DW, McAlpin. 12 X 24
Back addition laundry/office & 12
x 18 covered porch. 20 x 32 pole-
bam & 8 x 16 Utility shed. 863-
634-5283 for details & pictures,
Lv message w/name, phone
number & email address.
Hallmark Real Estate. DWMH
4/2 on 5 ac. 24X36 workshop.
Fireplace, kitchen island w/drop
down and more. $114,900.
MLS# 76188 386-867-1613
Owner Financing-3/2
TWMH in Wellborn. Only
$89,900! Call Taylor Goes
of Access Realty @ 386-344-7662.

650 Mobile Home
6-5 &Land -

Owner Finance, Nice 3/2, S of
Lake City, small down/$650 mo
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com


710 Unfurnished Apt.
7 For Rent

05525655
SPRING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans;
some with garages.
Call 386-454-1469
or visit our website:
www.springhillvillage.net

U.5250803
Move in as low as $325
Call today for details!
386-758-8455
Windsong Apts
1 & 2 Bedroom Apartments
Move in for as low as
$199
386-755-2423


710 Unfurnished Apt. 805 Lots for Sale


3 bdrm/2 bath,very clean, no lawn
maint, washer/dryer inside,
$650 month, w/$650 sec, also 2/2
for $625 no pets, 386-755-3929
Cute & clean, 2 br Apt. in town
Great area. Close to the VA Medi-
cal Center. $525. mo plus deposit.
Must see!!! 386-344-2972
Great location W of 1-75, spacious
deluxe 2BR apts., garage, W/D
hook up. patio. $600 & up, + SD,
386-344-3715 or 386-965-5560
Nice Apt. downtown. Remodeled,
kit., 1 bd/ba, LR, dining & extra
room. Ref. req. $450. mo & sec.
386-362-8075 or 386-754-2951.
The Lakes Apts. Studios & lBr's
from $135/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $450. + sec.
Call Michelle 386-752-9626

720 Furnished Apts.
2f For Rent
Apartment: Very clean & quiet in
Ft. White, FL 2/1, screen porch,
W/D hook up, $550 mo plus
Security Deposit 386-497-1116
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

730 'Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent

04544591





LAKE CITY
2Br/lBa, Mobile Home $475mo
2Br/lBa, 896SF $695. mo
2Br/lBa, 915SF $595. mo

3Br/3Ba, 3400SF $1750. mo

4Br/2Ba, 1248SF $695. mo

3Br/3Ba, 1050SF $750. mo

4Br/2Ba, 1428SF $750. mo

LIVE OAK
3Br/2Ba, 1976SF $975. mo

MADISON
2Br/lBa, Just Remodeled,
$450. mo (2 Available)
3Br/1.5Ba Remodeled $550. mo
Mitchell Lee 386-867-1155
Mike Foster 386-288-3596
1688 SE Baya Dr., Suite 105
Lake City, FL 32025
www.NorthFloridahomeandland.com
Accredited Real Estate
12 is a Full Service
N7 Real Estate Office. ,.
We do Rentals---Property
Management---Property Sales.

2 or3 Bedroom/1 Bath
Starting at $500. mo
on Nassau Street,
386-697-9950
3/2 Recently Built Custom Home,
1340 sq ft, stainless steel applian-
ces, custom cabinets, $920 mo,
1st. Last & Sec,off 1-75 & 47
Call Andrew 386-623-6066
3bdrm/l-1.2ba, Block Home on
paved rd, den, all appliances in-
cluded, NO Pets, 1st & last req'd
Call 386-752-5786
BRICK HOME
for rent in nice Subdivision
3br/2ba $1,200 mo. $1,200 dep.
386-344-5065.
IMMACULATE 2br/2ba home,
Westside. New carpet/tile;
screened-in porch; 2 car carport.
Water, electric, and lawn mainte-
nance included. $750 mo. No Pets.
1st, & security. Background check.
Call 386-755-9598

750 Business &
5 Office Rentals
For Lease: E Baya Ave. Two -
1000 sqft office space units or
combined for 2000 sqft. 386-984-
0622 or weekends 386-497-4762
OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$695. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor

790 Vacation Rentals
Horseshoe Beach RV Lot.
Nice corner Lot with shade trees.
$295. mo Water/electric included
386-235-3633 or 352-498-5986
Horseshoe Beach Summer Spcl
Gulf Front 2br, w/lg porch, dock,
fish sink. wkend $345./wk $795.
386-235-3633/352-498-5986
alwaysonvacation.com #419-181
"Florida's Last Frontier"


805 Lots for Sale
5 Acre Lot, Secluded & Cleared,
MLS# 67871 $60,000
Call Lisa Waltrip
@ 386-365-5900
westfieldrealtygroup.com


A high & dry buildable wooded
.734 of ac.,Forest Country. MLS#
76668 Eastside Village Realty,
Inc. Denise Milligan-Bose
@386-752-5290
Beautiful .92 Acre Lot-
3 Rivers-Ft. White-High & Dry!
Only $11,900.
Call Taylor Goes of Access Realty
@ 386-344-7662.
Forest Country building lot,
scattering of trees, Motivated
Seller $19.999 MLS#75140
Remax Professionals, Inc.
Jo Lytte 386-365-2821
Hallmark Real Estate. Cleared
2.57 ac. fenced w/32' Dutchman
camper. In O'Brien. Close to Live
Oak, Lake City, Branford. $25,000
MLS# 74534 386-867-1613
Nice 4 acre parcel located in
O'Brien. Won't last long at only
$13,500. Call Taylor Goes of
Access Realty @386-344-7662.
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subjectto the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.


810 Home for Sale
3/2 Brick Home in town, fenced
back yard w/12x12 workshop
$79,900 Call Nancy @ R.E.O.
Realty 386-867-1271MLS# 77414
nancytrogers@msn.com
3/2 Custom Western Cedar Home
on 2 acre lakefront lotMLS#74681
Call Jo Lytte at Remax
Professionals, Inc. 386-365-2821
jolytte@remaxnfl.com
3/2 in town, lots of upgrades,
currently leased, MLS#76658,
$49,900 Call Jo Lytte at
Remax Professionals, Inc.
386-365-2821
3/2 in Woodhaven w/Fla Room,
fenced back yard MLS#75499,
$114,900 Call Pam @
Remax 386-303-2505 or
email- remaxpamb@gmail.com
3/2 MH on 1.5 acres, fenced,
porches, wkshp,well maintained
$49,900 MLS# 77309 Call Josh
Grecian 386-466-2517
westfieldrealtygroup.com
3/2 on 4.84 Acres, fireplace, sheds,
many fruit trees, Call Jo Lytte at
Remax $68,900, MLS#72427
386-365-2821, www.jolytte.
florida-property-search.com
3/2 on 8.7 acres w/Fla room.
several storage bldgs, fenced,
MLS#75295 Call Pam Beauchamp
@ 386-758-8900 Remax,
$179,000 www.visitpam.com
4/2 with 1000 sq ft workshop,
fenced back yard, 2 car garage,
MLS#77602, Bring Offers!
$174,900, Call Nancy @
R.E.O. Realty 386-867-1271
5 acre Home w/Horse Barn,
Wood floors, New Kitchen,
Gazebo & Koi Pond MLS#76039
$169,900 Call Aaron @ Westfield
Realty Group 386-867-3534
CBC 3/1 home, inside city limits,
fenced backyard, detached carport
w/office MLS#77411 $82,900
Call R.E.O.Realty,
Nancy Rogers @ 386-867-1271
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
Nice home with eat in kitchen and
a nice sized living room. Plenty
of room for entertaining.
MLS# 77584 $89,900
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
3/2 on 9.7 acres, fenced & cross
fenced. Separate pastures. Animals
are negotiable. Owners motivated.
MLS# 77431 $179,900
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
3/2 on 5 acres. Large master suite
and open kitchen. Back 2 ac.
fenced for horses.
MLS# 75830 $102,900
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
3br and Ig open floor plan
w/separate office. Beautifully
landscaped. Private access to Lake
Jeffery. MLS# 76231 $199,000
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
Lots of acerage. All brick home.
Screened in porch. Extra big
closets. Mature pines.
MLS# 76765 $115,000
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
Welcome home. 3br/2ba brick.
Great location on the east side.
Priced to sell.
MLS# 776867 $69,900
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
Well maintianed 3/2 1/2 acre
minutes from town. 20x40
workshop, screened porch.
MLS# 73787 $99,000


Ft White MH on 16.27 Acres,
near many recreational activities
MLS#77404 $149,900
Jo Lytte Remax Professionals
386-365-2821
Great Opportunity!,
Currently rented, Seller will
assist w/buyer's#closing costs
MLS# 77335, Call Michael at
Westfield 386-867-9053 $99,900
Gwen Lake area. Beautiful up-
grades 4/3 w/tile & laminate
floors, fireplace, new kitchen, Ig
den, fenced yard. $125,000, 386-
397-4766 Hallmark Real Estate
Hallmark Real Estate. Brick 3/2.
Many upgrades. Gas'fireplace,
Grotto tile. Great location on cul-
de-sac! $149,900.
MLS# 75931 386-867-1613
Historical Home on Lake Isabel-
la. 3/3 w/basement! Great as a pri-
vate residence or a wonderful pro-
fessional office. $240,000 386-
719-0382 Hallmark Real Estate
Home For Sale
in the Preserve at Laurel Lakes,
4/2 or 3/2 split plan $189,900
Call Scott Stewart 386-867-3498
Westfield Realty Group
Home on 15 Acres w/2500 sq ft,
workshop, MLS# 77552 $235,000
Call Brittany Stoeckert at
Results Realty
386-397-3473
Just Reduced 4/2 on 1.57 acres,
fireplace. partially fenced, MLS#
77412, Call Nancy Rogers at
R.E.O. Realty Group
386-867-1271 $64,900
Large Brick, 3/1, 4.43 acres, metal
roof, MLS# 77415 $104,888
Call Nancy Rogers @ R.E.O.
Realty Group, Inc. 386-867-1271
nancytrogers@msn.com
Large Home on 1 acre, 4/2,
Fla Rm, wrap around frdnt porch
MLS#77292 $148,000
Call Brittany Stoeckert at
Results Realty386-397-3473
Lg home on comer lot w/garage,
Eastside Village. Clubhouse,
heated pool MLS# 71901 Eastside
Village Realty, Inc. Denise
Milligan-Bose 386-752-5290
Luxury 3/2 Log Home, Cypress
interior, whole house generator,
$269,900 MLS# 76899 Call
Roger Lovelady @386-365-7039
westfieldrealtygroup.com
Make an Offer! 3 br brick, quiet
resid'l street in Live Oak. HUD
home is sold "as is" Hallmark
Real Estate 386-365-5146
www.hudhomestore.com
Nearly 17 Acres w/House
on paved road, Very Spacious!
MLS#76902 $194,900
Call 386-487-7484 Speak to
Brodie Westfield Realty Grourn


2005 F-350 Lariat,
49,000 miles, many extras,
excellent condition. $19,500/ obo.
386-755-0139


810 Home for Sale
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
3/2 Brick home on .59 acre, on the
lake with back sunroom. Garage &
storage building.
MLS# 76769 $222,900
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
Two for the price of one. Updated
main home w/a 3/2 guest home. A
lot of living space for the price.
MLS# 77348 $244,900
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
1999 Doublewide,
3/2 fenced back yard
on 1 acre.
MLS# 76315 $64,900
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
Custom built home with many
upgrades. Screened back porch,
16x24 workshop.
MLS# 77178 $184,500
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
Great house in Piccadilly S/D. 2
car garage and inground pool.
Newly painted inside & out.
MLS# 76786 $133,500
Charming Remodeled Home
in Beautiful Neighborhood
MLS#74765 $142,900 Call
Charlie Sparks @ Westfield
Realty Group 386-755-0808
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
4br 1/5ba. 1332 sqft. Great floor
plan, noce yard, close to town.
Only $84,900 Lori Geibeig
Simpson. 386-365-5678
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
5br/4ba on 5+ac. 3 car garage,
inground pool/hot tub and more.
MLS #75854 $569,900 Lori
Geibeig Simpson. 386-365-5678
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Superbly maintained home in
Creekside. Oversized garage &
storage. Many extras. Elaine K.
Tolar 386-755-6488 $209,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
New home in Mayfair S/D. 4br on
comer lot. Split plan. $214,900
MLS# 76919 Elaine K. Tolar.
386-755-6488
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Home on the lake in town. 4br/3ba
MLS# 76085 Elaine K. Tolar 386-
755-6488 or Mary Brown White-
hurst. 386-965-0887 $299,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Great home in Woodcrest S/D 3/2
home, covered back porch, nice
yard.MLS# 75198 Elaine K. Tolar
386-755-6488 $129,900
Country Home on 2.5 Acres,
$95,000 MLS#77039
Remax Professionals, Inc.,
jo lytte@remaxnfl.com
386-365-2821


Have you read the newspaper today

6 days a week you'll find it here...,
Lake City Reporter
lakecityreporter.com CURRENTS m ine
386-7521293


ON WHEELS &WATERCRAFT






2005 F-350 Lariat
49,000 miles, many ~

extras, excellent cond. A

$19,500 obo -

all386-7 5-0139
386-755-0139


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810 Home for Sale
On Golf Course w/lake view. 3/2
home w/lg rooms, 3 fireplaces, wet
bar & big deck. Newly reduced to
$214,900. Hallmark Real Estate
386-365-2135
Open for Bid! 3/2 DW w/comer
stone fireplace, fenced yard & Ig
kit. HUD property, sold "as is"
MLS 77290- 386-365-3886 Deb-
bie King Hallmark Real Estate
Owner Fianncing! wooded 1/4 ac.
lots in Suwannee County, close to
River, high & dry. Bring your SW
or DW or RV. $6,500
Derington Properties.965-4300
Ready for Fun & Family. 4br/2ba
custom home on 33.84 ac. has
stocked fish pond & huge 54x60
shop. $325,000. Hallmark Real
Estate 386-719-0382
Rolling Oaks, 3/3 + Bonus Rm,
5 acres, back porch & more!
MLS#77528 Call Pam Beauchamp
at 386-758-8900 Remax $284,900
remaxpamb@gmail.com
Solid Brick Home on 5 Acres,
Close to town but in the country!
MLS#76063 Must See!$129,888
Call Brittany Stoeckert at
386-397-3473 Results Realty
Spacious, Open Floor Plan Home,
fenced back yard, screen porch,
$179,900 MLS#76796 Call Jo
Lytte@Remax Professionals, Inc.
386-365-2821
Well Cared For 3/2 on 1.4 Acres,
open floor plan, MLS#75702
$199,900, Call Carrie Cason
at 386-487-1484
westfieldrealtygroup.com
You can't beat this Price! 1995
'SWMH on 3/4 ac. Paved road,
1216 sf, 2/2 split bedroom plan.
Needs work! $29,900
Derington Properties. 965-4300

820 Farms &
SAcreage

10 acres, with Travel Trailer &
Electricity, close to Itchetucknee
Springs, $38,000, MLS# 76264
Call MillardGillen at,
Westfield Realty 386-365-7001
4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$69,900. $613mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
4 acres, Wellborn, New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down, $39,900, $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
5.82 ac Rolling Oaks off Lake
Jeffrey. High, dry & cleared.
Restricted site built homes only.
Equestrian community.
$65,000.obo. 386-965-5530
for information & pictures
Between Lake City & Ft. White.
6.44 rolling acres. DWMH, 3/2.
1836 sf, great value on paved road.
Need repairs. $49,900
Derington Properties. 965-4300
FARM- 7 stall barn; Apt.
17+ acres cross fenced.
Close in $1000. mo.
386-961-1086
Half to ten acre lots. Some w/
well, septic, pp. We finance; low
dwn pmt. Deas Bullard Properties.
386-752-4339. www.landnfl.com
Heavily Wooded Land, 10 Acres
MLS#75784 $94,900
Call Jo Lytte
Remax Professionals, Inc.
386-365-2821

\830 Commercial
8 Property
Multiple Use 12,000 sq ft
of Office & Warehouse space,
Loading dock, Storage yard,
MLS#77349 $395,000, Charlie
386-755-0808 Westfield Realty

850 Waterfront
0 Property
DWMH on Ten Acres w/lakefront,
surrounded by oaks, $115,900
MLS#75571, Call Jo Lytte at
Remax Professionals 386-365-
2821, jolytte@remaxnfl.com
River Cabin on Suwannee River,
workshop, patio, deck & dock,
$349,900 MLS#76336 Call -
Jo Lytte at Remax Professionals
386-365-2821
River Front Property 6.45 Acres,
in White Sprgs close to Big Shoals
Park, Shelter for entertaining,
$124,888 MLS# 77417 Call Nancy
@ R.E.O. Realty 386-867-1271

890 "Resort Property
Furnished Home on Itchetucknee
River, Wrap around covered decks
on two levels,MustSEE! $375,000
MLS#77006 Call Jo Lytte
Remax 386-365-2821
RiVer Access, Refurbished Rent-
al Units & Home + Lot,
Bamrn, Pool, Hot Tub $329,900
Call Jo Lytte 386-365-2821
MLS#76734 Remax Professionals


940 Trucks


Bring the picture in or
we will take it for youl

* Ad runs 10 consecutive days
with a description and photo in the
newspaper and online E-edition.
* Ad runs 10 consecutive days as a
classified line ad online.
* You must include vehicle price.
* All ads are prepaid.
* Private party only.





2006 EF250
Ford Van
3/4 ton, metal work
shelves/ladder rack,
60K miles, exc. cond.

$10,500
Call
386-555-5555
If you don't sell your vehicle
during the first 10 days, you
can run the same vehicle ad
for 10 additional days for
I only $15.00
Terms and conditions remain the
same for the additional run.


I


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