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The Lake City reporter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01542
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 5/1/2011
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
System ID: UF00028308:01542
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text




Pink Pride
Fundraiser helps those
facing medical crises


Life


000017 120511
LIB OF I'CHRIJ.
PO BOX 117007
205 SMA UNIV OF'
GAINESVILLE FL-


Gator Granite
Local businessmen help
build Heisman statues.
k4--

'FLOR DA
32 7511 S- 3


First Practice
New CHS football coach
r'.dy to lead team.
Sports, I B


TODATS




M l t. .,i 2o RILjrtur
1MAY 01 A


Latie


UILy


Reporter


Sunday, May 1, 201 I www.lakecityreporter.com Vol. 137, No. 84 E $ 1.00


Authorities collect more than 40 pounds of expired drugs


Take Back Day
a success for
Sheriff's Office.

By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lIkecityreporter.com
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office representa-
tives. collected more than
40 pounds of expired pre-
scription medicines during
National Take Back Day


Saturday.
Sgt. Ed Seifert, Columbia
County Sheriff's Office
public information officer,
said law enforcement offi-
cers collected at least 40
pounds of expired prescrip-
tion drugs in the first two
hours of the event dou-
ble the amount collected
during last year's event.
'"This is an operation
sponsored by the DEA
in conjunction with .local
law enforcement agen-


cies nationwide where we
take in expired, unused
and unwanted prescription
medications," Seifert said.
Saturday's event marked
the second year that the
Columbia County Sheriff's
Office has participated in
the program. Authorities
collected the unwanted
pills at the Park-n-Ride lot
at the intersection of U.S.
Highway 90 and Commerce
Boulevard, where several
residents dropped of 'hun-


dreds of containers with
unwanted pills. Florida
Highway Patrol troopers
Keith Slanker and Bobby
Duncan assisted Seifert as
he collected the pills.
Seifert said last year the
Columbia County Sheriff's
Office collected about 20
pounds of expired prescrip-
tion drugs and noted the
program seems to be gain-
ing popularity.
DRUGS continued on 3A


TONY BRITTLake City Reporter
Florida Highway Patrol trooper Keith Slanker (from left) helps
Columbia County Sheriffs Office Sgt. Ed Seifert separate
prescription containers during National Take Back Day.


WINDING DOWN


Fans enjoy the
final day of the
Suwannee River Jam.

By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.comrn
LIVE OAK
n its 20th year, the Suwannee
River Jam had something to
offer patrons of all taste, as
long as their taste was coun-
try music. From old-school
favorites like Joe Diffie to new sensa-
tions such as Luke Bryan, the four-
night, three-day festival held at the
.Spirit of the Suwannee Music Park in
Live Oak was reflected on wth enthu-
siasm by many fans.
Despite it being the third day of
the festival, spirits were still high as
fans waited to see the festival's clos-
er, Ronnie Dunn, of Brooks & Dunn
fame. But many were still living off
the excitement that the prior days of
the River Jam had provided.
Thousands of people were in
attendance, with everything from
first timers to those who had been
coming for years. Many of those
that attended for the first time have
already made plans to attend next
year's show, such as Kirsten Haley
and Terry Nettes, a Callahan couple
that were making their first trip.
"We came to see Jarrod Niemann,
but ended up seeing Luke Bryan and
that was the best show," Haley said.
"I wasn't a fan until the show, but he
was very energetic and all over the
place. This was my first concert ever
and we're planning on coming back
again for the experience."
It was a spur of the moment deci-
sion for the couple, but one that paid
off.


S JASON MATTHEW WALKER/LakeCity Reporter
Members of Steele Bridge perform during the Suwannee River Jam at the Spirit of
the Suwannee Music Park.

"I just bought the tickets and part," Linda Motolo, of Jacksonville
asked her to go," Nettles said. "It's said. "I'm here to see Ronnie Dunn,
been great." because personally I'm a fan of
The music is jiist half of the fun as Brooks & Dunn, but I think he'll
the social environment draws .much probably play some of his songs and
of the crowd in.
"It's all about the people, park and DOWN continued on 3A


Spending issues fall to budget chairs


Top two leaders
working out final
details of plan.

By BILL KACZOR
Associated Press
TALLAHASSEE The
Legislature's top two bud-
get leaders tried to work
out final details of a com-
promise. spending plan
Saturday after joint confer-
ence committees settled
most issues earlier in the
week.
Those included agree-
ments on college and uni-
versity tuition increases
and scholarship cuts as well
as a requirement for public
employee retirement con-
tributions and cuts to their
benefits.


The committees bumped
issues they couldn't settle
to House Appropriations
Chairwoman ;Denise
Grimsley, R-Sebrifig, and
Senate Budget Chairman
JD Alexander, IR-Lake
Wales. The biggest differ-
ences were in health care
spending.
"It's the only area that
I see any issues that are
really troubling to try and
resolve," Alexander said.
"The Senate feels like we
made some tough deci-
sions about how to reduce
costs and we believe the
House needs to find sav-
ings within the area their
budget is over the cuts that
we took."
For instance, the Senate
has proposed deep cuts for
transplant recipients and
other "medically needy"


patients with catastrophic
illness but who lack suffi-
cient insurance coverage.
Grimsley said sdme of
those issues may get anoth-
er bump to House Speaker
Dean Cannon, R-Winter
Park; and Senate President
Mike Haridopolos, R-Merrit
Island.
They must get a deal on
a budget that's expected to
top $67 billion by Tuesday
in order for lawmakers to
finish the annual 60-day
legislative session on time
Friday.
Both chambers have
cut spending by nearly $4
billion because the reces-
sion-wracked state isn't col-
lecting enough revenue to
keep up with growing costs
and demands for public
services.
Higher education confer-


ees agreed in earlier talks
to raise university as well
as community and state col-
lege tuition by 8 percent
while reducing the popu-
lar Bright Futures scholar-
ships by 20 percent.
State universities, but
not the colleges, have the
authority to boost their
overall tuition increases
to 15 percent and most if
not all are likely to take
that action. It would still
leave Florida with some of
the nation's lowest tuition
rates.
The House also backed
off from its proposal to
accelerate the phase-
in of higher test scores
and community ser-
vice requirements for
the merit-based Bright
BUDGET continued on 3A


Drought conditions

expected to worsen

as July approaches


Region's wildfire
activity highest,
in a decade.
From staff reports

Local Florida Division
of Forestry officials said
the 2011 wildfire season
and wildfire activity in the
region is higher than any
year in the past decade.
According to inf6r-
mation released by .
the Florida .Division of
Forestry Thursday eve-
ning, the Suwannee
Forestry Center, which
is responsible for wildfire
suppression and landown-
er assistance in Baker,
Bradford, Columbia,
Hamilton, Suwannee
and Union counties, has
responded to 237 wild-
fires from January 1 to
April 25. Not only is this
the highest four month
total this decade, it is
higher than the annual
totals of five of those 10


years. For instance, wild-
land firefighters-from the
Center responded to only
183 fires in all of 2010.
Since the fall of 2010,
when a La Nifia weather
pattern was predicted
to dominate the area,
the Florida Division of
Forestry has warned that
the chance of wildfire was
as high this year as in any
year in recent memory.
'"The weather condi-
dtions. which brought us
to this point are not going
away'anytime soon," said
Kurt Wisner, Forestry
spokesman. "We haye
been in a severe drought
for months, and the
National Weather Service
now indicates we will
reach extreme drought
levels by July. Even when
we do get rain, the bene-
fits are only temporary and
now we are beginning the
time of increased lightning
which brings an entirely
new set of problems from a
fire ignition perspective."


TONY BRITT/Lake City Reporter
Rev. Gill Ford, National Director of Unit Capacity Building
Field Operations'and Membership Department of the
NAACP national office, addresses the audience during
Saturday's.29th Annual Freedom Fund Luncheon at the
Winfield Community Center.

Nearly 200 attend

annual NAACP

Freedom Luncheon


Several key
topics discussed
by speakers.

By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com


WINFIELD
history of the
national politics


- The
NAACP,
and the


importance of educa-
tion were key topics dis-
cussed during the 29th
Annual Columbia County
NAACP Freedom Fund
Luncheon.
Close to 200 people
attended Saturday's lun-
cheon at the Winfield
Community Center,
NAACP continued on 3A


I4264 00021 8


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE'REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400


88 :
Mostly Sunny
WEATHER, 8A


Opinion ................ 4A
Business ................ CI
Obituaries .............. 5A
Advice & Comics ......... 8B
Puzzles ................. 2B


TODAY IN
BUSINESS
PetSmart
opening soon.


COMING
TUESDAY
FAM festival preview.


~%-)~2 ~


9













Friday: Friday: Saturday: Saturday: Wednesday: Wednesday:
3-4-19-21 5 5-9-28-29-36 Afternoon: 6-6-3 Afternoon: 2-8-6-7 16-20-26-27-37-53 4-24-40-44-55 5
Evening: 2-8-9 Evening: 8-4-1-2


AROUND FLORIDA


Senate leader balks at deregulating sports agents


TALLAHASSEE
The Florida
Senate's bud-
get chief has
balked at a
House plan to
deregulate sports agents,
gyms and dance studios.
Budget Chairman JD
Alexander on Saturday
cited past scandals that
have tarnished Florida's
universities and bilked
seniors and workout
enthusiasts.
Alexander is negotiating
with the House over a bill
passed there to deregulate
those and several other
businesses. No similar
bill has been filed in the
Senate.
Alexander said he got
a call from University of
Florida Athletics Director
Jeremy Foley urging him
to oppose deregulating
sports agents.
They were regulated in
reaction to a Foot Locker
shopping spree agents had
financed for Florida State
University football players
in 1993.
Alexander also cited
instances of seniors and
other customers cheated
by gyms and dance studios
before they were regu-
lated.

Teen charged with
killing father
INDIAN ROCKS
BEACH An 18-year-old
has been charged with
fatally shooting his dad
during an argument at a
Southwest Florida hotel.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Sen. J.D. Alexander, R-Lake Wales, is negotiating with tho House over a bill to deregulate


sports agents, gyms and dance studios.


Pinellas County sheriff's with se
deputies said James Davis der. It's
and his wife were arguing family
Friday night when their
son, Brandon, intervened. Smol
Authorities said awa
Brandon pulled out a aware
semiautomatic handgun JACKS
and shot his father several Jacksoi
times. James Davis was wife di<
pronounced dead at the disease
Indian Rocks Beach hotel. cigaret
Brandon was charged been aN


econd-degree mur-
s unclear what the
was fighting about.

ker's widower
'ded $40M
ONVILLE A
nville man whose
ed of pulmonary
e after smoking
tes for decades has
warded $40 million


in damages by a'jury.
The award for Andy
Allen was against cigarette
makers RJ, Reynolds and
Philip Morris, both of
whom said Friday they will
appeal.
Allen's lawsuit blamed
the companies were respon-
"sible for the death of his
wife Patty, who died in
2002 at age 54. Testimony
showed she smoked two"


packs of cigarettes a day
and couldn't quit
The award is the third-
largest to date in Florida's
smoking trials. The cases
stem from a 2006 state
Supreme Court ruling
that voided a $145 billion
class-action case, requir-
ing. that each lawsuit be
tried individually. So far,
30 of the 43 verdicts have
favored smokers or their
survivors.

Pedestrian killed
watching launch
TITUSVILLEB- Police
said a spectator waiting for
the space shuttle to launch
was hit by a car and killed.
Police said 70-year-old
John Devoles was walking
across the street Friday
when he was hit The
street was jammed with
cars on both sides of the
four-lane highway as driv-
ers tried to catch a glimpse
of the space shuttle
Endeavour. The launch
was later scrubbed.
The crash is-under
investigation. Charges are
pending against the driver,
who authorities said may
have been speeding.
Devoles died at a h6spi-
tal a few hours after being
hit Authorities said he was
not walking in a crosswalk.

7-year-old
girl drowns
PENSACOLA A 7-
year-old girl has drowned
after being swept away by
'a tidal current in Bayou'


Grande in Pensacola.
Rescuers searched for
her body for nearly three
hours Friday before finally
pulling her to shore. The
girl's name has not been
released.
Escambia Sheriffs
spokesman Deputy Chris
Welborn said the girl and
two friends were swim-
ming when they were
caught in the strong cur-
rent An 18-year-old male
who was watching them
was able to pull one of
the girls to safety. He and
another girl were taken to
the hospital but their con-
dition was not known.

Publix to unveil
new coupon policy
LAKELAND Grocery
store chain Publix is devel-
oping a uniform policy on
coupon use.
A Publix spokeswoman
told the Lakeland Ledger
on Friday that the compa-
nywide policy is scheduled
to be implemented in the
next few weeks.
Spokeswoman Shannon
Patten said customers
have asked for a coupon
policy that is consistent at
each Publix store.
Currently, the Lakeland-
based Publix accepts
coupons from manufac-
turers, competitorsand
some online coupons.
Particularly savvy shop-
pers have been able to
combine coupons for steep
discounts on their grocery
bills.
* Associated Press


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS


The Royals to delay honeymoon


Wi LONDON
rince William and Kate
Middleton have decided'
not to leave for their hon-
eymoon immediately and
the newlyweds will stay'
in Britain this weekend, palace offi-
cials said Saturday.
William, who married Middleton
on Friday in an opulent ceremony at
Westminster Abbey, plans to return
to military duty as a Royal Air Force
helicopter rescue pilot in Wales
at the end of this weekend, which
includes a Monday holiday, officials
said.
They will go on a honeymoon to
an undisclosed overseas location
later, officials said, stating that this
is the couple's "personal prefer-
ence."
A statement posted on the offi-
cial royal wedding website said
the honeymoon destination, and
the location where the newlyweds
are spending this weekend, will be
kept private.
'The couple have asked that
their privacy be respected during
the coming weekend and during
their honeymoon," the statement
said.
William and Middleton, now
known as the Duke and Duchess of
Cambridge, left Buckingham Palace
in a helicopter late Saturday morn-
ing. The casually-dressed couple
walked to the helipad holding
hands, stopping to shake hands with
two staff members.
The palace has not revealed where
in Britain they have gone for the
rest of the weekend. The couple are
thought to be seeking privacy after
the intense media focus ori their wed-
ding.
Earlier, officials said William has
scheduled a two-week leave from
his military duties for the couple's
honeymoon, but no specific dates or
locations have been announced.

Deadline looms for
'Two and a Half Men'
LOS ANGELES There are
2V2 weeks left for Warner Bros.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge walk hand in hand from Buckingham
Palace in London Saturday, the day after their wedding.


Television and CBS
to decide the fate
of 'Two and a Half
Men."
With CBS unveil-
ing its fall schedule
for advertisers in
New York on May Sheen
18, deadline pressure
is on the network,
Warner and "Men" executive pro-
ducer Chuck Lorre to develop a
post-Charlie Sheen version of the
sitcom or kill whafs been a highly
lucrative property for all.


Whether the show is returning,
who's in the cast and whether a
revamped format would be ready
for a fall debut or be delayed until
midseason will be resolved before
the "upfront" sales presentation to
Madison Avenue, according to an
executive close to the situation.
The executive spoke on condi-
tion of anonymity Friday because
Warner and CBS would not autho-
rize public comment on the show's
status.


* Associated Press


" Singer Judy Collins is 72.
" Actor Stephen Macht is 69.
" Singer Rita Coolidge is 66.
" Actor-director Douglas Barr
is 62.
0 Actor Dann Florek is 60.
m Singer-songwriter Ray
Parker Jr. is 57.
- Hall of Fame hockey Steve


Lake' City
HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293
Fax number..............752-9400
Circulation ................755-5445
Online ... www.iakecltyreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, RFa. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.
. Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Ra. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson .....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
Assistant Editor CJ Risak..754-0427
After 1:00 p.m.
(crisak@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Ashley Butcher ...754-0417
(abutcher@lakecityreporter.com)
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440.


Cauthen is 51.
* Actress Maia Morgenstern
is 49.
* Country singer Tim Mc-
Graw is 44.
* Rock musician Johnny Colt
is 43.
* Movie director Wes Ander-
son is 42.


Reporter
BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon. ... .754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7.30
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County customers should
call before 10:30 a.m. .to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation ..............755-5445
(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks.................. $26.32
24 Weeks..................$48.79
52 Weeks...................$83.46
Rates include 7% sales tax
Mail rates
12 Weeks................ $41.40
24 Weeks................... $82.80
52 Weeks.................$179.40


CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion,
please call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifica-
tions will run in this space. And thanks for reading.


Celebrity Birthdays


Daily Scripture

"Instead, speaking the truth in
love, we will grow to become in
every respect the mature body
of him who is the head, that is,
Christ."

Ephesians 4:15


LAKE CITY REPORTER


Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424


SUNDAY REPORT SUNDAY, MAY 1, 2011










Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE SUNDAY, MAY 1, 2011


BUDGET: Spending issues discussed

Continued From Page 1A


Futures scholarships.
Budget negotiators also
agreed on a $540, or 7.9 per-
cent, per student spending
cut for public schools, but
they are expected to make
up for most of that shortfall
through unspent federal
jobs funding, local option
property taxes and what in
effect will be a 3 percent
pay cut for teachers and
other public employees.


Before formal talks
began, legislative leaders
agreed that state, school
district, county and some
local government employ-
ees would be required to
contribute 3 percent of
their pay to the Florida
Retirement System, now
fully funded by taxpayers.
The House also agreed
to accept the Senate's pro-
posal for eliminating annu-


al retirement cost of living
adjustments for employees
who join the pension plan
after July 1.
The panel also voted to
raise retirement ages for
most new public employ-
ees from 62 to 65. For new
police, firefighters and
other special risk employ-
ees it would go from 55 to
60.


NAACP: Luncheon draws big crowd

Continued From Page 1A


where the local National
Association for the
Advancement of Colored
People chapter and its
members were celebrated.
The meeting lasted close
to three hours as several
members were awarded
and recognized for their
service to the chapter. New
Bethel Missionary Baptist
Church was also recognized
as the 2011 Freedom Bell
winner for getting the most
new NAACP memberships
among local churches.
"The Freedom Fund
Luncheon was very mov-
ing," said Cordez King,
who presented a plaque to
NAACP secretary Glynnell
Presley during the ceremo-
ny. "Rev. Ford made some
good points about today's
society that we could go
in and empower our young
people."
Rev. Gill Ford, National
Director of Unit Capacity
Building Field Operations
and Membership
Department of the NAACP
national office, served as
the keynote speaker for the
event
During his address Ford
recalled how the NAACP
was founded and how vital
it was to keep the organiza-
tion alive.
"We understand .that
people come in all colors,"
-he said, speaking of the his-
tory of the 102-year orga-
nization. "From our incep-
tion we've had people of all
colors."
He said there is a grow-


ing divide in the communi-
ty's of this country, because
America was once a coun-
try that valued education,
but now seemed to value
incarceration.
"Most states and the fed-
eral government talk about
balancing their budgets by
cutting education that's
a crime," he said.
As Ford spoke about
issues dealing with
Medicare and Medicaid,
raising children and try-
ing to live the "American
Dream," he said much
work remains for NAACP
members.
"The events of today let
us know there is still work
to do," Ford said. "The
question is who wants to
be a soldier in this army to
fight those kinds of injus-
tices and inequities that are
plaguing our country still."
Afterthe luncheon ended,
Ford said the responsibil-
, ity of the NAACP national
office is to be supportive of
local units and that's how
he came to be the keynote
speaker for Saturday's lun-
cheon.
"I'm humbled that they
would invite me to come
and ask me to be a part of
their Freedom Fund event,"'
he said. "The Freedom
Fund. event is the primary
fundraiser that allows the
NAACP local units to do
their work. So if they have
to mobilize or they need
materials for education,
meetings, or forums, they'll
have those resources avail-


able to them. It also allows
for the young people to be
able to come to training
sessions,, to harness skills
they'll need in problem
solving so they can come
back and make their com-
munity a better place for
everyone."
Glynnell Presley,
Columbia County NAACP
Branch secretary, said the
2011 Freedom Fund lun-
cheon was beautiful, very
successful and one of the
best luncheons in recent
memory.
Presley said members of
the local NAACP branch
met Ford at state meetings
and when they asked him
to be this year's keynote
speaker, he readily agreed.
"He delivered a beautiful
message. It couldn't have
been any better," Presley
said of Ford's keynote
speech. "It's bad that all
of Lake City and Columbia
County couldn't hear that
message."
Presley said it's impor-
tant to have the Freedom
Fund luncheon annually
because it's the organiza-
tion's top fundraiser.
'This is the money that
we raise for the operation
of the unit throughout
the year," he said. "The
Freedom Fund luncheon
also brings together a
diverse group of people,
where we can talk about
issues that are important to
people in the community."


DRUGS: Expired perscriptions collected

Continued From Page 1A


"I think more people
are participating this year
because of the awareness of
the prescription medication
problem in the nation and
especially here in Florida,"
he said, noting new nar-
cotics Task Forces have
been appointed by Gov.
Rick Scott across the state.
"We've done more public
relations efforts to get the


word out that we are taking
the pills in and the people
are responding greatly."
Seifert said no questions
were asked of the people
who brought medicines to
the collection site and he
believes that aided in the
program's attendance.
"Its important to have
a program like this locally
because these pills that are


in the home can fuel an
addiction," he said. "They
can be an incentive in the
home to start a new addic-
tion or fuel an old one. We're
not flushing the medicines
into our Floridan aquifer
-which is very sensitive, but
disposing of them properly
in a way that is environ-
mentally safe."


POLICE REPORTS


The following informa-
tion was provided by local
law enforcement agen-
cies. The following people
have been arrested but not
convicted. All people are
presumed innocent unless
proven guilty.

Monday, April 25
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office
April Lashay Arthur,
35, 119 Maxwell Glen, war-
rant Order revoking bond
on original charges of sell
or delivery of a controlled
substance (two counts)
and possession of a con-
trolled substance with
intent to sell or deliver
(two counts).
Jean Paul Menard,
40, 485 NE Sunnybrook
St., warrant Failure to
appear for arraignment for
charges of unemployment
compensation fraud.
Kristen Jo Linton, 28,
543 SW Brookwood Dr.,
passing worthless bank
checks (two counts).


Lake City
Police Department
U Terrance Antron
Glover, no age given, 667


Saint Claire St, possession
of burglary tools, resisting
officer without violence and .
loitering and prowling.

From staff reports.


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Roadwork underway in county


Staff reports

The following is a list
of roadwork underway in
Columbia County by the
Florida Department of
Transportation that may
impact traffic:
County Road 245
(Price Creek Road):
The road is closed at the
Olustee Creek Bridge
about a mile north of
State Road 238 through
June. Northbound traf-
fic is detoured to State
Road 238 to US 441 to
CR 349 and back to CR
245. Southbound traffic is
detoured to CR 349 to US
441 to SR 238 and back to
CR 245.
Interstate 75:


Nighttime lane closures
beginning at 6 p.m. for
southbound traffic Sunday
and Monday to add asphalt
to the curves just north of
the US 41/441 interchange
(Exit 414). Then, Tuesday
through Thursday nights,
work will resume on
removing the asphalt from
just south of the US 41/441
interchange (Exit 414) to
two miles south, including
the ramps at the south-
bound rest area. One lane
will be closed beginning
at 6 p.m. and two lanes
will be closed between 9
p.m. and 6 a.m. The speed
limit is reduced to 60 mph
during lane closures and
will remain at 60 mph in


the two-mile section that is
being resurfaced because
of the milled condition of
the roadway.
Marion Avenue (US
441): Daytime lane clo-
sures from US 41 to the
Georgia line to repaint the
roadway markings.
US 90 East: Daytime
lane closures between
State Road 100/County
Road 100A and just east of
Florida Gateway College
for work on new cross-
overs in the median at
Hudson Discount Marine,
Macatee Mobile Home
Park and Easy Street Auto
Brokers. Paving work may
begin.


BRANDON FINLEY/Lake City Reporter
Lawrence Dickerson, of Tallahassee, cools off on a hammock during the Suwannee River
Jam Saturday.


DOWN: River Jam comes to a close

Continued From Page 1A


theirs. Plus, Joe Diffie will
put on a good show."
Linda Raimondi, of
Jacksonville, couldn't
recall how long she's
been coming exactly, but
doesn't plan on stopping
anytime soon. .
"I've been coming a lot
of years, at least eight,"
she said. "I just love it, and

BELK.COM


I love the country."
Of course, half of what
has attracted Raimondi to
the River Jam has been
the male entertainers.
"Brad Paisley has been
here and he's good," she
said. "There's Gary Allen
as well who we came to
see this year, but Luke
Bryan was looking pretty


hot"
The country show fe-a-
tured entertainers such
as Kellie Pickler, Gary
Allen, Lee Brice and oth-
ers during the first tvwo
days. Darryl .Worley, Phil
Vassar and Ronnie Dunne
were the closing perform-
ers Saturday.


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Customers 55 and older





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Fragrances, Casio, Coach, Dansko, designer sunglasses, Donna Karan/DKNY, Ed Hardy, Eileen Fisher, Free People, Ice-Watch, Lacoste, Lucky, Ladies
Designer & Contemporary Sportswear & Dresses, St. John, Stuart Weitzman, Citizens of Humanity, Cole Haan, Columbia, Donald J Pliner, Dooney
& Bourke, Ferragamo, Furla, Joe's Jeans, Juicy Couture, Kate Spade, Keen, Vineyard Vines, Joseph Abboud, Hanky Panky, Herend, Hugo Boss, Hickey
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LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE SUNDAY, MAY 1, 2011


Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424


P % lllhl .lV .r% I l.V-.











OPINION


Sunday, May 1, 2011


OUR


OUR
OPINION


Shands

facelift

helps all

of Lake

City

Rhonda Sherrod,
CEO at Shands
LakeShore Regional
Medical Center,
described it suc-
cinctly when she said her hospi-
tal, some of it built in the early
A'70s, was "due for a facelift and
a more contemporary look."
Now ift's getting it, a $1.7 mil-
lion facelift Some of it will be
cosmetic, to be sure, with new
furnishings, flooring and light-
ing on the first floor.
But others are more techni-
cal: renovations in the medical
records department, improved
coding, and upgrades in the
administrative, registration
and admission offices and
outpatient department Among
the technical developments
is the addition of the da Vinci
Surgical Robot System, a device
that brings Shands LakeShore
into the 21st century.
All the improvements are
much needed. And the city can
be thankful for them.
- Long before Shands took
control of the hospital in 1996,
it has been an anchor for the
downtown area. With a pictur-
esque setting overlooking Lake
DeSoto, it is in an ideal loca- '
tion, one that should benefit the
rest of the city.
The rejuvenation of the
downtown area has been an
ongoing project for so many
residents. The renovation of
Shands can only aid in that
process.
The hospital's administration
and board have spent time and
money finding ways to improve
service to the area. An agree-
ment was signed in 2010 with
Health Management Associates
that will continue to help iden-
tify and address areas in need
of updating.
Times have been difficult
and funding isn't always
readily available, but Shands
LakeShore has managed to
improve its product neverthe-
less. And that helps all of Lake
City.


Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman


LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,


Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


www.lakecityreporter.com


Politicization of Fed a


dangerous trend


It might help getting our
minds around what is so
wrong in America today
by thinking about the
local police force.
It's not hard to understand
that the job of the police is to
protect lives and property.
Suppose we decided to
broaden their mandate. Stippose
each municipality decided that
the job of the police was not just
protection but to make every
community more fair and just
and to improve the quality of
life.
To do this, we'd have to let
them decide what is fair and
just and give them authority to
implement their sense of these
things.
They could force families they
thought had too much money,
or who earned their money in
a way they thought not fair, to
turn some of their resources
over to others who the police
concluded more deserving.
Or, if they happened to hear
parents yelling at their child,
they could enter the house and
instruct them how they should
be raising their children.
It seems pretty absurd. But
it's exactly what is going on in
Washington and why things are
such a mess. The very entity
- our government that is
supposedly there to protect us
now has incredibly wide latitude
to invade our lives and property,
Even worse, not only is there
considerable latitude to do
this openly, but it can occur
insidiously in ways where
citizens don't even realize it's
happening to them.
In the former instance, at
least Congress openly votes to


Star Parker
porker@urbancure.org
pay for expanded programs and
spending by raising taxes.
But even with a license
to steal, government power
brokers know they can just
take this so far. Spending may
provide a path to political
popularity for some, but paying
,for it all through taxes is a path
to popularity for few.
Over the last couple years,
we've had a vast expansion of
government spending to bail out
banks, automobile companies,
those with mortgages they can't
afford, expand
unemployment insurance,
create all kinds of projects
under the headline of "economic
stimulus," etc.
If government is spending
a trillion and half dollars more
than it is taking in through
taxes, which is the case with a
deficit of the size that we have
now, where's the money coming
from?
We can turn to Ben
Bernanke, head of the Federal
Reserve, who this past week
held the very first press
conference ever held by a
Federal Reserve chief.
This reflects the fact the
Federal Reserve has been
transformed into a political
entity.
The Fed should, in principle,
be a special kind of police force.


OTHER


Their job should be to protect
one very unique aspect of our
property our money.
But instead, the Fed has,
allegedly within the scope of
the law, assumed a broader
mandate to provide another way
to finance government spending
- printing money.
Like police with a
responsibility for protecting
property but also with a license
to steal, the latter will eclipse
the former. The Fed either is
going to protect the value of our
money or it is going to print it to
pay for spending. Unfortunately,
it has chosen the latter.
Like everything else in our
country, money has become
relative and politicized.
When the dollar was tied to
gold, the official price was $35
per ounce. Since we severed
this link in 1971 and totally
politicized our money, it now
takes over $1500 to buy an
ounce of gold.
Our taxes get raised
indirectly through higher prices
and the eroded value of our
savings.
Politicization of the Federal
Reserve and our money is
a particularly dangerous
development in a trend that is
ruining America the erosion
of law and the distortion of the
role of government.
There is no way around the
fact that freedom and
prosperity only exist-when
government protects
property, and this includes our
money.,

Star Parker is president of
CURE, Coalition
on Urban Renewal and Education


OPINION


Alabama tornado outbreak:


preparedness and response


n the phone with
reporters this
morning, Alabama
Gov. Robert
Bentley responded
to questions about preparedness
for the tornadoes that hit his
state on Wednesday, killing at
least 162 people.
Alabama is used to tornadoes,
he stated. Ift's part of Dixie
Alley. Warnings were broadcast
throughout the day, and many
schools, businesses, and gov-
ernment offices quit early or
remained closed.
"We were very prepared,"
Governor Bentley said. But in
a highly populated area such as
Tuscaloosa, where a maximum
force, mile-wide tornado wiped
out parts of the city, "you cannot
move thousands of people in


five minutes."
With evacuation not possible,
individual preparedness, search
and rescue, and recovery become
that much more important
April is shaping up to be one
of the most violent months
for storms and tornadoes in
America in decades. The unset-
tiled weather is causing floods,
twisters, and deaths in the
Midwest and South. Scientists
say it's due to a lingering La
Nifia system in the Pacific that
has shifted wind patterns across
the United States.
The severe weather system
that plowed through Alabama,
Mississippi, Tennessee, and
other southern states this week
is being compared to the tor-
nado outbreak on April 3-4 in
1974, when 318 people were


killed. This time, dozens of tor-
nadoes have killed at least 248
people, but thafs before all the
searches have been completed.
As this story unfolds, more
will be reported on both pre-
paredness and response. Not all
of it will be positive. But despite
the tragedy, many actions did
show that lessons have been
learned when it comes to disas-
ter readiness.
The early closures of schools
and offices saved lives, says
Tuscaloosa's mayor. Two
thousand National Guard have
been deployed in Alabama.
The University of Alabama sent
buses into town to pick up stu-
dents and bring them back to
campus for safety.
* Christian Science Monitor


4A


Deroy Murdock
deroy.murdock@gmoil.com


Free


press


under


attack


Educational
Scientific
and Cultural
Organization
(UNESCO) has desig-
nated May 3 as World Press
Freedom Day. Latin America's
increasingly heavy-handed
leaders should take that occa-
sion to stop abusing journal-
ists.
Latin heavies generally have
shifted from messy tactics,
such as beating journalists
in the streets or jailing them.
Instead, denunciations, law-
suits, and broadcast-license
rejections accomplish the
same objective without draw-
ing blood.
Even better, from the dicta-
tors' standpoint, teaching a
lesson to one or two journal-
ists might persuade others to
watch their words. Why censor
journalists when they can do
that dirty work for you via self-
censorship?
As Miami's Inter-American
Press Association demon-
strates, media-related hemi-
spheric oppression is on the
grow:
Consider Nicaragua, where
Sandinista Daniel Ortega is
president On February 19,
someone phoned Luis Galeano,
a writer for El Nuevo Diario.
The message was simple.
"You only have 72 hours to
live."
That day, someone sent
Galeano his third threat this
year. He was told to stop-pub-
lishing stories about alleged
fraud in the Supreme Electoral
Council. His physical safety
also was challenged when he
wrote about suspected corrup-
tion at the Finance Ministry.
On March 21, Ecuadoran
President Rafael Correa filed
-a libel lawsuit against the
newspaper El Universo and its
executives. Correa apparently
disliked an opinion piece that
accused him of ordering an
attack on a hospital during a
September 2010 police revolt
Correa wants $80 million in
damages $30 million from
the newspaper and the remain-
ing $50 million to be paid per-,
sonally by executives Carlos,
Cesar, and Nicolas Perez
and by opinion editor Emilio
Palacio. Correa also wants
these four men to spend three
years in prison.
Correa also is campaign-
ing for a May 7 referendum
that would make government
"a regulator and controller of
media content."
Here in Buenos Aires last
March 27, members of the left-
ist General Confederation of
Labor waved pro-government
banners while blockading the
joint printing plant of the anti-
government newspapers Clarin
and La Nacion. On at least
four earlier occasions, these
obstructions have lasted six or
more hours, effectively hold-
ing entire editions beyond the
reach of readers.
In December and January,
Argentine civil court judge
Gaston Polo Olivera held that
the right to demonstrate can-
not hinder freedom of the
press.
New York commentator
Deroy Murdock is a columnist
With the Scripps Howard News
Service and a media fellow with
the Hoover Institution on War,
Revolution and Peace at Stanford
University.








Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, MAY 1, 2011


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


* To submit your Community
Calendar item, contact Antonia
Robinson at 754-0425 or by
e-mail at arobinson@
lakecityreporter., com.


Today
Family Reunion
Descendants of William
Joseph & Harriet Green
Owens are having their
annual family reunion
today at the Mason City
Community Center, US
41 South of Lake City. A
covered dish lunch will be
shared at 1 p.m. All friends
and relatives are invited to
attend. Call Danny Owens
at 752-8497.

Monday
Zumbathon Charity
event
A Tough Enough to Wear
Pink Zumbathon Charity
event is 6-7:30 p.m. Monday
at the Columbia County
Fairgrounds Banquet Hall.
A $10 donation will benefit
the organization's breast
cancer awareness and crisis
fund. Wear pink. Call 758-
0009.

Donors Wanted
LifeSouth Bloodmobile
needs donors 9 a.m.-5 p.m
Monday at the Columbia
County Courthouse. All .
donors receive a LifeSouth
ball cap.

Tuesday
Community Garden
Meeting
A community garden
meeting is 6 p.m. Tuesday
at Richardson Community
Center. Contact Elishia
Parker at 754-7095.

Wednesday
Newcomers and Friends
Luncheon
The May Friendship
Luncheon of the Lake City
Newcomers and Friends
is 11:30 a.m. Wednesday
at Kazbor's in the Publix's


shopping plaza. All mem-
bers, guests and friends
are welcome. Call 438-8100
or 754-7227.

Donors Wanted
LifeSouth Bloodmobile
needs donors 10 a.m.-5
p.m. Wednesday at the
Department of Children &
Families. All donors receive
a LifeSouth ball cap.

Friday
Spring Concert
The Richardson
Middle School annual
Spring Concert is 6:30
p.m. Friday in the RMS
auditorium. Under the
direction of Sherod Keen,.
the following bands will
perform; Beginning Band,
Symphonic Band, Jazz
Band and Drumline, this
will be the final concert of
the school year.

Relay For Life
Relay for Life begins at 6
p.m. Friday and continues
May 7 at Columbia High
Tiger Field. More than 40
team sites will have food,
games and more to ben-
efit the American Cancer
Society. There will be non-
stop entertainment except
during the silent inspiring
Luminary Ceremony hon-
oring cancer victims. Call
288-2871 or 752-4198.

Saturday
Lulu Homecoming Day
The 32nd Annual Lulu
Homecoming Day is 10:30
a.m. Saturday at the Lulu
Community Center..Lunch
is at 12:30 p.m. Bring a
bakest lunch for everyone
in your party. Bring lawn
charis and come enjoy a
day for food, gaines, music
and more.
9


Annual ChariTEA
The Fourth Annual
ChariTEA is noon Saturday
at the Woman's Club of
Lake City. Doors open at
11:30 am. The event will
feature a silent auction and
is a fundraiser for Another
Way Inc. Call 719-2700 for
ticket information.

Wild Florida event
Wild Florida is 10 a.m.
-3 p.m. Saturday in the
Craft Square at Stephen
Foster State Park in White
Springs. Nature and wild-
life experts from around
the state will talk about
the flora, the fauna and the
wild animals that make
Florida a unique place to
live. Call 397-1920 or visit
www.floridastateparks. org/
stephenfoster.

Steer Competition
The beginning Steer
weigh-in is 8-10 a.m.
Saturday at the Columbia
County Fair.

living History demo
A Civil War, Living
History Demonstration
is 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturday
at Stephen Foster Folk
Culture Center State
Park in White Springs.
Admission to the park is
$5 per vehicle ,(up to eight
people). Additional fees
may apply for workshops
offered in the craft square.
Call the park at 397-4331.

Coffee House
The Stephen Foster
Coffee House, hosted by
Cathy DeWitt, is 7 p.m.
Saturday in the Stephen
Foster Folk Culture
Center State Park audito-
rium. The Coffee House
event invites folks on-
stage for 10 minutes to
sing, play a musical instru-
ment, read some original


poetry or tell a story. The
event offers potluck good-
ies and sweets provided
by volunteers, which are
sold at Coffee House, help
to keep this event going.
Anything on the dessert
table sells for $1. Contact
Park Ranger Larry Hoover
at 397-2733 or for more
information visit www.
floridastateparks. org/ste-
phenfoster.

Fundraising dinner
The Tough Enough to
Wear Pink fundraising
-dinner is 6 p.m. Saturday
at the Columbia County
Fairgrounds Banquet Hall.
The event will include din-
ner, casino style gambling,
live and silent auctions
and more. Tickets are $25
per person and available at
Wilson's, The Money Man,
Chasteens, Smitty's and
the fair office. The event
raises money for breast
cancer awareness and the
Columbia County Crisis
Fund. Call 752-8822.

Sunday, May 8
Mother's Day Luncheon
A Mother's Day
Luncheon, "Her Special
Day, Her Cherished
Moments" is 1-3 p.m.
May 8 at the LifeStyle
Enrichment Center.
Tickets must be bought
in advance. The event
will feature music by
Harry Wuest & Company,
dedication of Margaret's
Garden and butterfly
release after lunch. The
meal is $25 fir adults and
includes choice of entree,
prime rib or chicken cor-


don bleu. Children menu
for ages 10 and Under is
chicken strips, mashed
potatoes and green
beans. Call 984-9382 or
752-5655.

Monday, May 9
Cancer Support Group
The Women's Cancer
Support Group of Lake City
is hosting an "open tc the
public" meeting 5:30-6:30
p.m. May 9 at the Columbia
County Fair Grounds
Entertainment BuildingThe
speaker will be Donna
Bryce-Wright, presenting a
self breast exam program
called Triple Touch. Both
women and men are invited
to attend. Call 7524198 or
755-0522.

Donors Wanted
LifeSouth Bloodmobile
needs donors 11
a.m.-6 p.m. May 9 at
Moe's Southwest Grill.
All donors receive a
LifeSouth ball cap and $5
in Moe Bucks.

Women's meeting
Sheriff Mark Hunter
is the guest speaker at
the Columbia Federated
Republican Women's
meeting at 7 p.m. May 9.
A brown bag dinner and
social time is at 6:30 p.m.
The group meets at the
old Guardian ad Litem
yellow house on Duval
Street just east of the First
Baptist Church and across
from Advanced Auto.
Contact President Gayle
Cannon, 303-2616, gcan-


non@atlantic.net.

Florida Trail Association
The Suwannee Chapter
of the Florida Trail
Association is meeting
from 7-9 p.m. May 9
at the Suwannee River
Water Management
District Office, 9225 CR
49, Live Oak. The pro-
gram will feature Megan
Wetherington, senior
professional engineer
with the Suwannee River
Water Management
District. Contact Sylvia
Dunnam, 362-3256, dun-
nams@windstream. net.

Tuesday, May 10
Mentoring program
Calling all middle and
high school girls for
Welcome to Womanhood
mentoring program 5-8
p.m. May 10 at 532 Marion
St Contact Sandra Price at
867-1601. Dinner included.
Transportation can be
provided if contacted one
week in advance.

Wednesday, May
11
Newcomers meeting
The regular meeting of
the Lake City Newcomers
and Friends is 11 a.m. May
11 at Guangdong Chinese
Restaurant in the Mall.
Luncheon cost is $10. The'.
guest speaker is Theresa
Morgan-attorney on legacy
planning. All members,
guests and friends along
with any newcomers to
the area are welcome. Call
752-4552 or 755-4051.


Ronald L. Call
Mr. Ronald L. Call, 71, of Lake
City passed
away late :
Wednesday af-
ternoon April -
27, 2011 in the
Shands @ the University of
Florida Hospital in Gainesville
, Florida following an illness of
several months. A native of East
Chicago Indiana, Mr. Call had
been a resident of Lake City for
the past seventeen years having'
moved here from Indiana Mr.
Call served in both the United
States Army and the United
States Air Force. Following his
service Mr. Call worked for
the Ford Motor Company for
thirty years prior to retiring in
1994. In his spare time he en-
joyed bowling and woodwork-
ing. Mr. Call was a Lutheran.
Mr. Call is survived by his wife
of thirty-two years, Dorothee
Call; his daughters, Rhonda
Warren (Randy); Renae Call
and Rhoda Zasytis (James) all
of Hammond, Inaliana; and his
sisters, Celia Whitehead of Lake
City, Florida and Georgette An-
derson of Hammond, Indiana.
Ten grand children and nine
great grand children also survive.
Private family interment servic-
es with full military honors will
be conducted in the Jacksonville
National Cemetery in Jackson-
ville Florida. Arrangements are
under the direction of the Dees-
Parrish Family Funeral Home,
458 S. Marion Ave. Lake City
, FL 32025 (386) 752-1234
Please sign our guestbook at
parrishfamilyfuneralhome. corn
Allen Jeffery Markey
Mr. Allen Jeffery Markey, 39, of
Wellborn passed away Thursday,
April 28th suddenly in an auto-
mobile accident. Mr. Markey was
born in Bridgeport, Connecticut,
but had lived in the Wellborn
area for the past seven years
after moving here from Day-
tona Beach. Mr. Markey was an
avid Gator Fan, and a NASCAR
and motorcycle enthusiast. Mr.
Markey was preceded in death
by a sister Christine Markey
and attended St Francis Xavier
Catholic Church in Live Oak.
Mr. Markey is survived by
his parents Philip and Theresa
Markey of Wellborn, a son Al-
exander Markey and a daugh-
ter Desiree Allen both of New
York State, three step brothers
Philip Markey, Jr., Ronald Mar-
key, and Michael Markey, and a
step sister Dana Lynn Dowling.


OBITUARIES

Cremation arrangements are un-
der the direction of the DEES-
PARRISH FAMILY FUNER-
AL HOME, 458 S. Marion Ave.,
Lake City, FL 32025 (386)752-
1234 please sign our on-line
family guestbook at par-


rishfam ilyfuneralhome. corn

Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


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LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, MAY 1, 2011


Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424


I





LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, MAY 1, 2011


Left: Lauren Elise (left) and
Cortnie Frazier, both of the
band State of Mind, provide
entertainment Thursday
as dreary weather looms
overhead.






Below: A fan reacts
Thursday as country singer
Tyler Farr takes the stage.


A woman braves the rain on a motorized scooter
Thursday as storm clouds pass over the Spirit of
the Suwannee Music Park.




Photos by -
Jason Matthew Walker
Lake City Reporter


Lacie Burrence (right), of Waycross, Ga., strikes a pose while shopping for a
cowboy hat Thursday. Pictured are Lindsey Hendrix (from left), Tater Huling and
Burrence.


Above: Passengers wave to people Friday while driving through the
Spirit of the Suwannee Music Park during the Golf Cart Parade.
Left: Live'Oak resident Matti Marsee, 7, watches as Tracy Hausler, of -
Cochran, Ga., applies a peace sign glitter tattoo on her arm Friday at the
Suwannee River Jam.


RIVER




JAM'



Sun, fun, music

and some rain


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


4







Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER NATION SUNDAY, MAY 1, 2011


Tornadoes

evoke quake

damages

MATTHEW PENNINGTON
Associated Press
,WASHINGTON Japan's foreign
minister said Friday the tornado
destruction that swiped the U.S. this
week killing more than 300 people
evoked the carnage of the earth-
quake that recently struck his own
country.
Takeaki Matsumoto was speaking
to reporters after holding talks with
Secretary of State Hillary Rodham
Clinton, who paid tribute to Japan's
"courage and conviction" in coping
with its worst natural disaster in
memory.
Matsumoto expressed his sympathy
for all those who died in high winds
that ravaged seven states Wednesday,
America's worst tornado outbreak
since 1932.
He said TV images of the destruction
reminded him of the damage caused by
the magnitude-9.0 quake and tsunami
that hit eastern Japan on March 11.
That disaster is believed to have killed
nearly 26,000 people
He said Japan was "truly grateful" for
U.S. help in the aftermath, including its
help at a crippled nuclear plant which
has been leaking radiation.
Matsumoto, making his first visit to
the U.S. since taking office two days
before the quake, said Japan would
"emerge stronger and continue to fulfill
its responsibilities to the international
'community."
Clinton said Japan's recent announce-
'ment that it would keep its finan-
cial assistance for reconstruction in
Afghanistan at pre-quake levels was "a
remarkable example of both leadership
and generosity."
Japan, a key U.S. ally, faces a mas-
sive recovery bill, estimated as high as
$305 billion equivalent to the size of
.Greece's entire economy.
Clinton said the U.S. government
and private sector will support Japan's
recovery plans.
Matsumoto. urged Americans to
:come to Japan for business and tour-
ism, and to buy more Japanese prod-
ucts to help its economy.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
James Nicholas surveys the damage in Hackleburg, Ala., Friday, following a tornado touchdown Wednesday afternoon that destroyed much of
the small community and caused 27 deaths.


Volunteers assist in storm aftermath


By GREG BLUESTEIN and
MICHAEL KUNZELMAN
Associated Press
PRATF CITY, Ala. Church
groups, students and other vol-
unteers worked aggressively
Saturday to bring food, water
and other necessities to com-
munities ravaged by the sec-
ond-deadliest day of tornadoes
in history.
Across the South, volunteers
have been pitching in as the
death toll from Wednesday's
storms keeps rising. At least 340
people were killed across seven
states, including at least 249 in
Alabama, as the storm system
spawned tornadoes, through
several states. It was the largest
death toll since March 18, 1925,
when 747 people were killed
in storms that raged through
Missouri, Illinois and Indiana.
In Pratt City, a working-class
suburb of Birmingham, police
vehicles and military jeeps
filled the roads surrounded
by leveled and gutted homes
on Saturday. Officers barked
orders to residents wandering
through to clear the roads.
Thomas Brown said volun-
teers had stepped up to bring
supplies a day earlier, a pick-
up truck patrolled neighbor-
hoods with volunteers jumping


out of the back to hand out
water and 'groceries. Dozens
more turned an elementary
school into a community hub,
where people dedicated one
.room to storing bread and
another to sorting donated
clothing. A doctor set up shop
inside, and a grill was set u'p
outside. Students formed an
'assembly line to unload fresh
supplies.
However, he said people
needed more heavy equipment
like trucks to start hauling out
debris. He also said he was
upset police .had put up road-
blocks.
"They let the governor ride
on through but you can't get to
your house," he said. "Why are
they still blocking the streets?"
The Federal Emergency
Management Agency has offi-
cials on the ground in five states,
including Alabama. Tuscaloosa
Mayor Walt Maddox has called
the disaster a "humanitarian
) crisis" for his city of more than
83,000 but he credited vol-
unteers with keeping the situ-
ation there from spiraling out
of control.
The Red Cross had set up a
two shelters in Tuscaloosa, one
of which housed 240 people.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Residents left homeless by tornados look at clothes and find a meal
at a makeshift care center set up in front of a destroyed housing proj-
ect in Tuscaloosa, Ala., Friday.


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LAKE CITY REPORTER NATION SUNDAY, MAY 1, 2011


Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424


pm mom-


I









LAKE CITY REPORTER WEATHER SUNDAY, MAY 1, 2011


THE WEATHER
; ...-, .......* ' '" ^ 1 K . .:.... .


MOMOST MOSTLY ISOLATED.
SUNNY > SUNNY iT-STORMS



HI88LO'.9 HI89HLOI H189L0


ISOLATED
T-STORMS:


HI81LO i


MOSTLY
SUNNY


HI 82 L0


2. i.LL~ ..~.-.- --


Pensacola
83/69


Vd
S. 88/

Taflahassee ake
89/60 88,

Pa82/67a City
82/67


HO City
/62 acksonville Cape Canaveral
e City 83/62 Daytona Beach
/61 Ft. Lauderdale
nesillev Daytona Beach Fort Myers
87/61 83j70 Gainesville
Ocala89/64 Jacksonville
89/64 Key West
Orlaindo Cape Canaveral Lakey ty
89/67 81/72 Mami
Tampa Naples
89/70 West Palm Beach Ocala
86/77 Orlando
Ft Lauderdale Panama City
FL Myers, 86/78 0 Pensacola
91/68 Naples Tallahassee
91/70 Miami Tampa
87/77 Valdosta
Key West W. Palm Beach


8 7 ___ '


ME.hr f


TEMPERATURES
High Saturday
Low Saturday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Saturday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-t0-,date
Normal yearltdate


87
50
83
58
95 in 1906
42 in 2008


0.00"
1.17"
11.48"
2.86"
14.02"


SUN
Sunrise today 6:48 a.m.
Sunset today 8:08 p.m.
Sunrise tom. 6:47 a.m.
Sunset tom. 8:09 p.m.

MOON
Moonrise today 5:33 a.m.
Moonset today 6:58 p.m.
Moonrse tom. 6:06 a.m.
Moonset tom. 7:53 p.m.
.

May May May May
3 10 17 .24
New First Full Last


Monday Tuesday
81/68/s 53, 65, pc:
81/, /s 86/65/Dcl
86/76/s 35 73 -.
92/66/s 89 66.. s
88/62/pc 89, 63, pc
86/62/pc 8r6 63 pc ,
86/77/pc 86, 1',pc.
89/62/pc 89 62 pc
87/75/s 85 73 3
91/70/s 90 68 9
89/61/pc 89 64 p:'
88/65/pc 89 65 p:
82/69/s 80 59 p:
83/70/pc 82 54 p. 4
88/64/pc 89 58 pc'i
89/69/s 86.69 s
89/63/s 88 58 Poc
86 74 s 85 71. 5
a- K ^


10 ffdl ;t blffn
Todays
iuJltra %olet J ".
radaron rsh
for the area onr, "
a scale from O


'.,
-A


is
-Ii


Forecasts, data and
graphics 2011 Weather
Central, LP, Madison, WIs.
www.weatherpubllsher.com


On inis dale in
1963. unseasonabi
cold weather accom
panied a storm
system over re ifli
Eastern Seatoard.
Snowfall was record
ea as far sour, as
Washington. D.C.
1 ______________________


NATIONAL FORECAST: A cold front will bring showers and thunderstorms to the Ohio Valley
today, but the strongest of the storms with this system will be found from northeastern Texas
to the mid-Mississippi Valley. Ahead of this system, high pressure will keep the weather
pleasant with abundant sunshine across much of the East Coast. Sunshine will also be wide-
spread over the West Coast states today.

a-,'=., --


Cold Front
Warm Front

Silrinary
Fagorn
Occl.aedi
From


YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL EXTREMES


Saturday Today


CITY
Albany NY
Albuquerque
Anchorage
Atlanta;
Baltimore'
Billings
Birminghamn
Bismarck
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Charleston SC
Charleston WV
Charlotte ;
Cheyenne ,
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia SC
Dallas
Daytona Beach
Denver


HI/Lo/Pcp.
64/41/0
63/43/0
40/37/0
78/53/0
67/48/0
49/33/0
80/53/0
40/30/.15
56/31/0
61/54/0
62/38/0
83/59/0
73/37/0'
76/45/0
41/26/0
71/48/0
71/44/0
61/35/0
82/50/0
85/68/0
81/51/0
47/31/0%


HI/Lo/W
70/44/s
52/34/sh
,47/33/sh
81/60/pc
72/53/pc
53/36/c
86/66/pc
46/31/pc
60/38/s
55/45/s
64/48/sh
81/62/s
75/59/t
80/58/pc
46/25/pc
60/44/pc
71/50/t
63/47/t
84/58/pc
69/46/t
83/70/s
49/28/c


- Saturday Today
CITY HI/Lo/Pcp. HI/Lo/W
Acapulco 88/70/0 89/73/pc
Amsterdam 70/50/0 65/39/s
SAthens 69/48/0 71/57/t
Auckland 63/48/0 64/57/sh
Beoijng 68/54/0 78/52/s
Berlin 64/46/0 61/37/s
Buenos Aires 68/63/0 58/42/sh
Cairo 79/64/0 87/65/s
Geneva 68/41/0 70/46/sh
Havana 91/70/0 90/68/t
Helsinki 54/36/0 49/31/pc
Hong Kong 82/75/0 82/75/t
Kingston .'-. .82/75/0 84/75/t


CITY
Des Molnes
Detroit
El Paso
Fairbanks
Greensboro
Hartford
Honolulu
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson MS
Jacksonville
Kansas City
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Memphis
Miami
Minneapolis
Mobile
New Orleans
New York
Oklahoma City


CITY
La Paz
Lima
London
Madrid
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Nairobi
Nassau
New Delhi
Oslo
Panama
Paris


High: 99*, Del Rio, Texas Low: '0, Berthoud Pass, Colo.


Saturday Today


HI/Lo/Pcp.
69/57/.08
57/38/0
83/63/0
49/30/0
74/49/0
62/50/0
82/69/0
88/72/0
73/47/0
80/50/0
82/50/0
70/58/0
63/49/0
71/60/0
76/55/0
76/58/0
86/75/0
55/48/.47
82/54/0
84/64/0
66/50/0
73/58/0


Hi/Lo/W
58/35/pc
62/46/sh
79/47/s
50/30/r
77/56/pc
65/47/s
87/72/pc
88/71/pc
68/45/t
87/68/pc
83/62/s
57/40/c
73/52/s
69/54/t
81/58/s
78/56/t -
87/77/s
50/33/pc
86/67/pc
86/71/pc
65/47/s
56/38/r


Saturday Today
HI/Lo/Pcp. HI/Lo/W
57/27/0 57/34/sh
75/64/0 74/63/pc
70/52/0 66/50/pc
61/52/0 70/52/sh
84/57/0 '84/57/t
61/37/0 68/46/s
64/41/0 61/45/sh
79/59/0 79/61/t
91/75/0 86/76/pc
106/84/0 103/78/s
61/41/0 51/31/pc
91/77/0 91/75/t
70/48/0 72/52/pc


CITY
Omaha
Oilando
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland ME
Portland OR
Raleigh
Rapid City
Reno '
Richmond
Sacramento
St. Louis
Salt Lake City
San Antonio
San Diego
San Francisco
Seattle
Spokane
Tampa
Tucson
Washington


CITY
Rio
Rome
St. Thomas VI
San Juan PR
Santiago
Seoul
Singapore
Sydney
Tel Aviv
Tokyo
Toronto
Vienna
Warsaw,


Saturday Today
HI/Lo/Pcp. HI/Lo/W
66/47/.04 61/35/pc
87/54/0 89/67/s
65/49/0 70/52/s
79/65/0 81/55/s
62/35/0 67/53/sh
64/49/0 58/36/s
54/41/.02 72/46/s
76/46/0 78/56/pc
43/34/0 51/31/pc
51/29/0 63/36/s
69/44/0 74/53/s
73/50/0 80/49/s
80/58/0 61/44/r
44/30/.09 49/31/pc
,88/72/0 90/56/pc
73/57/0 77/55/s
67/56/0 72/48/s
50/43/.13 66/46/s
52/34/0 59/38/s
89/61/0 89/70/s
78/59/0 78/47/s
67/51/0 73/54/pc



Saturday Today
HI/Lo/Pcp. HI/Lo/W
84/72/0 88/74/pc
61/55/0 72/54/sh
87/77/0 83/75/t
83/75/0 84/74/t
70/39/0- 64/36/s
59/54/0 65/44/s
90/77/0 89/78/t
70/61/0 70/59/s
72/61/0 73/59/s
73/55/0 .65/58/sh
55/37/0 64/47/pc
68/48/0 65/47/t
66/48/0 56/43/sh


KEY TO CONDITIONS: c-cloudy, dr-drizzle, f-fair, fg-fog, h-hazy, i-ice, pc=partly cloudy, r-rain, s-sunny,
sh-showers, sn-snow, ts-thunderstorms, w-windy.


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Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424


-. - .-. financot .nlt5.C>88g C 4 trj L A R ': 4 8-: A.. j=--..jlfv ^ -l~-I le !w 1.a' i3f3i a..l.-.~lJ c.-. "l '.u-J'f..':r ri dij AcI %.. rl i ,Arn-D: c


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Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-042 I
tkjrby@takeatyreporter.com


Sunday. May 1. 201 I


SPORTS


www.lakecityreporter.com


BRIEFS

DANCE
Zumbathon set
for Monday
Tough Enough
to Wear Pink has a
Zumbathon Charity
Event from 6-7:30 p.m.
Monday at the Columbia
County Fairgrounds
Banquet Hall. Donation
is $10. Proceeds go to
the cancer awareness
and crisis fund.
For details, call
758-0009.
INDIANS CHEERLEADING
Tryouts begin
Monday in gym
Fort White High
cheerleading tryouts for
varsity, junior
varsity and middle school
squads (fifth- through
11th-graders) are
3:30 p.m. Monday
through Wednesday in
the high school gym.
Information packets are
at the front office.
For details, call Kathy
Harrell at 497-5952.
POP WARNER
Registration for
returning players
Lake City Pop Warner
football registration for
returning players begins
Monday at Richardson
Community Center.
Sign-up is 9 a.m. to
5 p.m. weekdays. Regular
registration begins
June 1. Pop Warner also
is looking for girls ages
5-12 interested in
cheerleading.
For details, call Kim
Stephans at 623-2954 or
e-mail kimstephensl972@
yahoo.corn
GATORS
Gator Club
meeting Tuesday
The North Florida
Gator Club will meet at
6 p.m. Tuesday at Beef
0' Brady's on Main
Boulevard. The club is
open to all Gator fans.
The club sponsored 11
UF scholarships in the
five-county area last year.
For details, call Diane
at 752-3333.
GOLF
Kiwanis charity
tourney May 20
The Lake City Kiwanis
Club is hosting a
four-person scramble
golf tournament at 1 p.m.
May 20 at The Country
Club of Lake City. Cost
is $60 per person. Hole
sponsorships are $50.
Lunch and drinks will be
.provided. All proceeds go
to youth programs and
building future parks in

Greene at 487-1374.
* From staff reports

GAMES

Tuesday
Columbia High
softball vs. Niceville High
in Region 1-5A final,
7 p.m.
May 14
Fort White High
football Red & Black
game, 10 a.m.
May 20
Columbia' High
football vs. Dunnellon
High in spring game,
TBA
Fort White High
football vs. Orange Park
High in spring game,


7 p.m.


Granite


for


Gators


Local businessmen collaborate on UF monuments


By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com
Statues are the latest
university fad and that suits
Charlie Charles and Jim
Zuber just fine.
The Lake City business-
men recently collaborated
on the Heisman project at
the University of Florida,
where statues of Steve
Spurrier, Danny Wuerffel
and- Tim Tebow were
unveiled at halftime of the
Orange and Blue spring
game.
Charles of Charles
Custom Memorials and
Zuber of All Seasons
Planning participated in the
project and helped with the
installation.
"We worked from 5:30 to
1 a.m. the day before the
unveiling," Charles said.
'"They wanted to keep it
from the fans, but there
were. probably 100 people
there before we got through
mounting them."
PPI Construction
Management had the
contract on the Heisman
project and the project
manager was Christopher
T. Shepard.
Charles and Zuber were
sub-contractors who had
previously worked on the
Heavener Football Complex
Renovation and Expansion
project at Ben Hill Griffin,,
Stadium. It includes an alli-
gator standing guard over a
granite veneer monument
that lists the Bull Gators.
"An architect is hired'
and a general contractor,
then we get the plans,"
Charles said. "My imput on
it is, will it work right. The
college is looking for some-
one capable of doing the
work. We all collaborate to
get it right."
Charles' employees build
the granite pedestals and
carve the names and nota-
tions on the monuments.
Zuber is a hardscape spe-
cialist and licensed general
contractor in hardscape
construction.
He does specialty mason-
ry and works on the brick
pavers (flat ground momu-
ments) that chronicle all
Florida All-Americans. The
list is updated annually.
Zuber. has done work on
most of the sports complex-
es at Florida and several of
the resident halls.
"We did the memorial


TIM KIRBY/Lake City Reporter
Lake City businessmen Jim Zuber of All Seasons Plannin'g (left) and Charlie Charles of Charles Custom Memorials have
worked together on several construction projects including the Heisman Trophy statues of Steve Spurrier, Danny Wuerffel and
Tim Tebow at the University of Florida.


stone project and rolled on
from there," Zuber said.
"Shands is the biggest deal
we have done together and
that was my own baby."
Zuber refers to the Shands
,at UF Cancer Hospital's
Garden of Hope Memorial
in Gainesville that lists sur-
viving cancer victims and
memorials for others.
"Shands was prob-
ably our biggest project,"
Charles said. "It has a 40-
foot granite wall for people
to buy spaces on the wall
and to buy the pavers. It
was a huge project. We've
done a lot together. I hope
we'll certainly do more with
UF. Everybody is pleased,
including us, on the proj-
ects that have come up."
Charles Custom
Memorials has been in busi-
ness since 1973, and Charles
took it over in 1982.
Charles said the granite
veneer for the statues cov-
ers a concrete block core,
and the carving technique
is the same as he uses on
tombstones.
Charles did the Law
Enforcement Memorial at
Lake DeSoto and the miar-
ble panels at the Columbia
County Courthouse. He
makes monuments for


gravesite memorials, mau-
soleums and granite signs.
"I have a substantial proj-
ect for a prominent govern-
ment official in Tallahassee
in the works," Charles said.
"I am proud to be chosen
to do that What they want
is unique and they looked
all over the state of Florida
for someone to do it. It is
custom built all the way."
Zuber moved to Lake City
from Montana 24 years ago
and has owned All Seasons
Planning for 21 years.
"We have ; done more
than 30 project at UF,"
Zuber said. "We worked
on the Columbia County
Courthouse, First Federal
Savings and the Lake City
Mall. We both worked on
the Meade Ministries Rose
Garden and I have done
construction management
for Meade Ministries."
Zuber did custom mason-
ry for Gianni Versace when
the late fashion designer
was restoring his house in
South Beach.
"My whole thing is pleas-
ing customers one at a time,"
Zuber said. "That is how
you make your reputation.
Ifs the same with Charlie
- keeping customers and
making cultomuers."


BRANDON FINLEYLake City Reporter
Columbia High coach Brian Allen looks through his playbook on April 3. Allen will lead the
Tigers' football team through its first organized practice as head coach on Monday.


Photo courtesy of Christopher T. Shepard
The Heisman Trophy statue and granite memorial of Tim
Tebow stands outside of Ben Hill Griffin Stadium at the
University of Florida in Gainesville.


Allen ready to

lead Tigers in first

practice of spring


First-year coach
wants to restore,
tradition of CHS.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com
New Columbia High
head coach Brian Allen has
talked much throughout his
first few months as Tigers'
football coach about restor-
ing the tradition of the pro-
gram.
Monday will begin the
new era for Allen as the
Tigers take the field for
the first organized practice
of the spring. Columbia
is set to take the field at
3:50 p.m.
On the first day, for Allen,
it's all about knocking off
the cobwebs.


'We expect a little rust
the, first day," he said.
A"We've been talking to
them a couple of weeks
and they know what to
expect though. We've had
a good group go through
conditioning with track and
weightlifting, but expect 30
or so more guys."
Columbia will go through
the motions for the first few
days of spring practice as
it becomes acclimated with
the new coaching regimen.
"We'll begin to teach
on Monday through
Wednesday before issu-
ing the pads for Thursday.
We've already got a good
look at some as far as test-
ing the bench, 40 time and
stuff like that."
CHS continued on 3B


Section B









LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, MAY 1,2011 Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
AUTO RACING
Noon
VERSUS IRL, IndyCar, Sao Paulo
Indy 300, at Sao Paulo, Brazil
7 p.m.
ESPN2 NHRA, Spring Nationals, at
Baytown,Texas (same-day tape)
COLLEGE BASEBALL
3 p.m.
ESPN Auburn at South Carolina
CYCLING
10 p.m.
VERSUS Tour de Romandie, final
stage, Champagne, Switzerland to Geneva
(same-day tape)
EQUESTRIAN
2 p.m.
NBC Rolex Championships, at
Lexington, Ky.
GOLF
9 a.m.
TGC European PGA Tour,
Ballantine's Championship, final round, at
Seoul, South Korea (same-day tape)
3 p.m.
CBS PGA Tour, Zurich Classic, final
round, atAvondale, La.
4 p.m.
TGC LPGA, Avnet Classic, final
round, at Mobile,Ala.
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
I p.m.
TBS -Toronto at N.Y.Yankees
4 p.m.
WGN Chicago Cubs at Arizona
8 p.m.
ESPN N.Y. Mets at Philadelphia
MOTORSPORTS
8 a.m.
SPEED MotoGP World
Championship, at Estoril, Portugal
4 p.m.
SPEED MotoGP Moto2, at Estoril,
Portugal (same-day tape)
NBA BASKETBALL
I p.m.
ABC Playoffs, conference semifinals,
game I, Memphis at Oklahoma City
3:30 p.m.
ABC Playoffs, conference
semifinals, game I, Boston at Miami
NHL HOCKEY
3 p.m.
NBC Playoffs, conference
semifinals, game 2, Detroit at San Jose
7 p.m.
VERSUS Playoffs, conference semi-
finals, game 2,Tampa Bay at Washington

Monday
HOCKEY
10a.m.
VERSUS IlHFWorld Championship,
U.S. vs. Norway, at Kosice, Slovakia
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
7 p.m.
ESPN N.Y.Yankees at Detroit
NBA BASKETBALL
8 p.m.
TNT Playoffs, conference
semifinals, game I,Atlanta at Chicago
10:30 p.m.
TNT Playoffs, conference
semifinals, game I, Dallas at L.A. Lakers
NHL HOCKEY
7:30 p.m.
VERSUS Playoffs, conference
semifinals, game 2, Boston at Philadelphia

BASEBALL

AL standings

East Division
W L Pct GB
NewYork 14 9 .609 -
Tampa Bay 14 12 .538 I'/,
Toronto 13 13 .500 2'
Baltimore II 13 .458 3k'
Boston II 14 .440 4
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Cleveland 17 8 .680 -
Kansas City 13 13 .500 4b'
Detroit 12 14 .462 5S'
Chicago 10 17 .370 8
Minnesota 9 16 .360 8
West Division
W L Pct GB
Los Angeles 15 II .577 -
Texas 15 II .577 -
Oakland 13 13 :.500 2
Seattle 12 15 .444 3%'
Saturday's Games
Tampa Bay 2, L.A.Angels I
Texas I Oakland 2
N.Y.Yankees 5,Toronto 4
Detroit at Cleveland (n)
Baltimore at Chicago White Sox (n)
Minnesota at Kansas City (n)
Seattle at Boston (n)
Today's Games
Detroit (Coke 1-4) at Cleveland
(Masterson 5-0), 1:05 p.m.
Toronto (Litsch 2-1) at N.Y. Yankees
(Nova I-2), 1:05 p.m.
Seattle (F.Hernandez 3-2) at Boston
(C.Buchholz 1-3), 1:35 p.m.
L.A.Angels (Weaver 6-0) atTampa Bay
(Sonnanstine 0-0), 1:40 p.m.
Baltimore (Britton 4-1) at Chicago
White Sox (Floyd 3-1), 2:10 p.m.
Minnesota (Pavano 2-2) at Kansas City
(Hochevar 2-3), 2:10 p.m.
Texas (Harrison 3-2) at Oakland
(G.Gonzalez 2-2), 4:05 p.m.
Monday's Games
Texas at Oakland, 3:35 p.m.
N.Y.Yankees at Detroit, 7:05 p.m.
L.A.Angels at Boston, 7:10 p.m.
Baltimore at Chicago White Sox,
8:10 p.m.

NL standings


East Division
W L
Philadelphia 17 8
Florida 16 8


Atlanta
Washingto
New York


St. Louis
Milwaukee
Cincinnati
Pittsburgh
Chicago
Houston


Colorado


13 14
:n 12 13
II 15
Central Division
W L
15 II
13 12
13 13
12 14
II 14
9 17
West Division
W L
16 8


Pct .GB
.680 -
.667 A
.481 5
.480 5
.423 6%'

Pct GB
.577 -
.520 1I
.500 2
.462 3
.440 3%
.346 6

Pct GB
.667 -


LosAngeles 14 13 .519 3
San Francisco 12 13 .480 4'4
Arizona II 14 .440 5',
San Diego 9 17 .346 8
Saturday's Games
Philadelphia 2, N.Y Mets I
St. Louis 3,Atlanta 2
San Francisco 2,Washington I
Milwaukee at Houston (n)
Florida at Cincinnati (n)
Chicago Cubs at Arizona (n)
Pittsburgh at Colorado (n)
San Diego at L.A. Dodgers (n)
Today's Games
San Francisco (Cain 2-I) atWashington
(Zimmermann 1-4), 1:35 p.m.
St. Louis (j.Garcia 3-0) at Atlanta
(D.Lowe 2-3), 1:35 p.m.
Milwaukee (Narveson 1-1) at Houston
(Norris I-I), 2:05 p.m.
Pittsburgh (Morton 2-1) at Colorado
(jimenez 0-I), 3:10 p.m.
Chicago Cubs (C.Coleman 1-1) at
Arizona (D.Hudson 1-4). 4:10 p.m.
Florida (Nolasco 2-0) at Cincinnati
(Arroyo 3-2), 4:10 p.m.
San Diego (Moseley 0-3) at L.A.
Dodgers (Garland I I), 4:10 p.m.
N.Y. Mets (C.Young 1-0) at Philadelphia
(CI.Lee 2-2), 8:05 p.m.
Monday's Games
San Francisco at Washington, 7;05 p.m.
Houston at Cincinnati, 7:10 p.m.
Milwaukee at Atlanta, 7:10 p.m.
Florida at St. Louis, 8:15 p.m.
Pittsburgh at San Diego, 10:05 p.m.
Chicago Cubs at L.A. 'Dodgers,
10:10 p.m.


BASKETBALL

NBA playoffs

FIRST ROUND
Friday
Memphis 99, SanAntonio 91, Memphis
wins series 4-2
CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS
Today
Memphis at Oklahoma City, I p.m.
Boston at Miami, 3:30 p.m.
Monday
Atlanta at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Dallas at L.A. Lakers, 10:30 p.m.
Tuesday
Boston at Miami, 7 p.m.
Memphis'at Oklahoma City, 9:30 p.m.
Wednesday
Atlanta at Chicago. 8 p.m.
Dallas at L.A. Lakers, 10:30 p.m.
Friday, May 6
Chicago at Atlanta, 7 p.m.
L.A. Lakers at Dallas, 9:30 p.m.

FOOTBALL

NFL Draft

Friday
ROUND TWO
33. New England (from Carolina),
Ras-l Dowling, db,Virginia.
34. Buffalo,Aaron Williams, db,Texas.
35. Cincinnati,Andy Dalton, qb,TCU.
36. Sin Franc;sco fromn De,'Eri.Colin
Kaepemilck. qb. Nevada.
37f-Cleelar.d. Jabaal Sheard, de,
Pittsburgh.
38.Arizona, Ryan Williams, rb,Virginia
Tech.
39.Tennessee,Akeem Ayers, Ib, UCLA.
40. Dallas, Bruce Carter, Ib, North
Carolina.
41. Washington, Jarvis Jenkins, de,
Clemson.
42. Houston, Brooks Reed, Ib,Arizona.
43. Minnesota, Kyle Rudolph, te, Notre
Dame.
44. Detroit, Titus Young, wr, Boise
State.
45. Denver (from San Francisco),
Rahim Moore, db, UCLA.
46. Denver (from Miami), Orlando
Franklin, ot, Miami.
47. St. Louis, Lance Kendricks, te,
Wisconsin.
48. Oakland, Stefen Wisniewski, c,
Penn State.
49. Indianapolis (from Jacksonville
through Washington), Ben Ijalana, ot,
Villanova.
50. San Diego, Marcus Gilchrist, db,
Clemson.
51. Tampa Bay, Da'Quan Bowers, de,
Clemson.
52. N.Y. Giants, Marvin Austin, dt,
North Carolina.
53. Chicago (from Indianapolis through
Washington), Stephen Paea, dt, Oregon
State.
54. Philadelphia, Jaiquawn Jarrett, db,
Temple.
55. Kansas City, Rodney Hudson,
c, Florida State.
56. New England (from New Orleans),
ShaneVereen, rb, California.
57. Detroit (from Seattle), Mikel
Leshoure, rb, Illinois.
58. Baltimore, Torrey Smith, wr,
Maryland.
59. Cleveland (from Atlanta), Greg
Little, wr, North Carolina.
60. Houston (from New England),




Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

NUYGO _


2011 Tribune Media Services, Inc. E
All Rights Reserved.

TULIG !
< ^^^< 1
_ ^-^ ^ ^^:0
______ ___1


NCDEHR|




AFLNELI
Ii. ...

111-111__


Brandon Harris, db, Miami.
61. San Diego (from N.Y. Jets), Jonas
Mouton, lb, Michigan.
62. Miami (from Chicago through
Washington), Daniel Thomas, rb, Kansas
State.
63. Pittsburgh, Marcus Gilbert,
ot, Florida.
64. Green Bay, Randall Cobb, wr,
Kentucky.
ROUND THREE
65. Carolina, Terrell McClain, dt,
South Florida.
66. Cincinnati, Dontay Moch, lb.
Nevada.
67. Denver, Nate Irving, lb1 N.C. State.
68. Buffalo, Kelvin Sheppard, lb, LSU.
69. Arizona, Rob Housler, te,
Florida Atlantic.
70. Kansas City (from Cleveland),
Justin Houston, lb, Georgia.
71. Dallas, DeMarco Murray, rb,
Oklahoma.
72. New Orleans (from Washington),
Martez Wilson, lb, Illinois.
73. New England (from Houston),
Stevan Ridley, rb, LSU.
74. New England (from Minnesota),
Ryan Mallet, qb,Arkansas.
75. Seattle (from Detroit),John Moffitt,
g,Wisconsin.
76. Jacksonville (from San Francisco),
Will Rackley, g, Lehigh.
77. Tennessee, Jurrell Casey, dt,
Southern Cal.
78. St. Louis, Austin Pettis, wr, Boise
State.
79. Washington (from Miami),
Leonard Hankerson, wr, Miami.
80. San Francisco (from Jacksonville),
Chris Culliver, db, South Carolina.
81. Oakland, DeMarcus Van Dyke, db,
Miami.
82. San Diego,Vincent Brown, wr, San
Diego State.
83. N.Y. Giants, Jerrel Jernigan, wr,
Troy.
84. Tampa Bay, Mason Foster, lb,
Washington.
85.Baltimore (from Philadelphia),
Jah Reid, ot, Central Florida.
86. Kansas City, Allen Bailey, de,
Miami.
87. Indianapolis, Drake Nevis, dt, LSU.
88. New Orleans, Johnny Patrick, db,
Louisville.
89. San Diego (from Seattle), Shareece
Wright, db, Southern Cal.
90. Philadelphia (from Baltimore),
Curtis Marsh, db, Utah State.
91 .Atlanta,Akeem Dent, Ib,. Georgia..
92. Oakland (from New England), Joe
Barksdale, ot, LSU.
93. Chicago, Chris Conte, db,
California.
94. N.Y. Jets, Kenrick Ellis, dt,
\Hampton.
95. Pittsburgh, Curtis Brown, db,
Texas.
96. Green BayAlex Green, rb, Hawaii.
97. x-Carolina, Sione Fua, dt, Stanford.
x-compensatory selection

AUTO RACING

Race week

INDYCAR
Sao Paulo Indy 300
Site: Sao Paulo.
Schedule: Today, race, 12:20 p.m.
(Versus, noon-3 p.m.).
Track: Streets of Sao Paulo (street
course, 2.6 miles).
Race distance: 195 miles, 75 laps.
NHRA FULLTHROTTLE
O'Reilly Auto Parts
NHRA Spring Nationals
Site: Baytown, Texas.
Schedule: Today, final eliminations
(ESPN2, 7-10 p.m.).
Track: Royal Purple Raceway.

HOCKEY

NHL playoffs

CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS
Friday
Tampa Bay 4,Washington 2,Tampa Bay
leads series 1-0
San Jose 2, Detroit I, OT, San Jose
leads series 1-0
Saturday
Boston at Philadelphia (n)
Nashville atVancouver (n)
Today
Detroit at San Jose, 3 p.m.
Tampa Bay atWashington, 7 p.m.
Monday
Boston at Philadelphia, 7:30 p.m.
Tuesday
Washington at Tampa Bay, 6:30 p.m.
Vancouver at Nashville, 9 p.m.
Wednesday
Washington at Tampa Bay, 7 p.m.
Philadelphia at Boston, 7 p.m.
San Jose at Detroit, 8 p.m.
Thursday
Vancouver at Nashville, 8:30 p.m;
Friday, May 6
San Jose at Detroit, 7 p.m.
Philadelphia at B}oston; 8 p.m.


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek


HIS VIEW FROM THE
HOT-AIR-
AL.-L-OON L-OOKEr
DEFTER IN THS

Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


A: THE' I"i L

(Answers tomorrow)
Saturday's Jumbles: WHEEL BATCH SHRINK SPRAWL
I Answer: Celebrity battles can sometimes turn into -
STAR WARS


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High's Kayli Kvistad waits to apply the tag at second base against Ed White High's
Alneisha Williams in the Lady Tigers' 7-1 win in the 5A State Playoffs in Lake City Friday.



Lady Tigers set to host



Niceville in 5A playoffs


By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com

Columbia High punched
its ticket to the Elite Eight
with a 7-1 win against
District 4-5A runner-up Ed
White High on Friday and
in doing so moved farther
into the playoffs than any
Lady Tigers' softball team
in history.
With it's 26-3 record, the
Lady Tigers now have their
eyes set upon moving to
the Final Four. To do so,
Columbia must move past
an opponent that has .a lot
of experience in the 5A
State Playoffs.
Niceville High will travel
to Lake City at 7 p.m. on
Tuesday, for the regional
final with a spot in the Final
Four on the line.
"They're a very good
program that was the
state runner up last sea-
son," Columbia head coach
Jimmy Williams said. "The
year before that, they lost
to the state champions."
When looking at
Niceville, Williams believes
that it's good enough in
many areas that Columbia
will have to play its best
game to move on.


ACROSS

1 Lightning-
4 Cough syrup
meas.
8 TGIF part
11 Mock butter
13 Hefner or
Jackman
14 Top
15 Make
preparations
16 Guess
18 Coarse
20 Quiz
21 California fort
22 -vousplit
24 BMW
alternative
27 Clergy member
.30 Laird's accent
31 Certain
undergrad
32 Promise
solemnly
34 Tijuana "Mrs."
35 Coup d'-
36 Mr. Lugosi
37 Half-shell item


'"They have a left-handed
pitcher that's a senior and
she's used to these tough
regional games," he said.
"I've watched her pitch and
she's not up and coming.
She's established."
Niceville can also light
up the scoreboard accord-
ing to the Lady Tigers'
coach..
"We're going to have
to score to beat them,"
Williams said. "Chiles head
coach told me that they're
the best-hitting team he's
ever seen. I think they're
a mirror image of us. They
play good defense, hit the
ball and I think we'll have
to play a little more small
ball to beat them."
Confidence shouldn't be
hard to come by for the
Lady Tigers as Williams
said his team is more than
prepared for the challenge.
"The girls believe they're
destined to go to the Final
Four," he said. "We're tak-
ing one game at a time, but
we believe we're going to
win. We'll play loose."
And the home-field
advantage continues for
the Lady Tigers. Williams
believes it's played a big
factor in Columbia's run.


39 Wavy
40 Border
41 Flirtatious
42 Eight bits
45 Suspects' sto-
ries
49 Easy-going
(hyph.)
53 Signature
54 Potter's bird
55 Tennis stand-
out
56 Pesky bug
57 Diner order
58 Drop sharply
59 Type widths

DOWN

1 Ring boundary
2 Clay pot
3 Much-loved
4 I thought -
never leave!
5 Commuter
vehicle
6 Bilko's rank
7 Frat letter
8 Source of linen,


"It's a big factor, maybe
the most important thing,"
he said. "It keeps our
pregame normal. We can
maintain our routine. For
us, mentally, it's a home
game."
Having alreadysurpassed
all the previous teams in
Columbia history, Williams
is proud of what's already
been accomplished.
"It's been remarkable
for me and the team," he
said. "Starting the year and
getting my 100th win and
now going deeper than
any team before, it's been
remarkable."
Still, the Lady Tigers feel
there's more left to accom-
plish.
"They have a slogan
on our walls for the Final
Four," Williams said. "On
our walls they've written 16
girls, one family, one goal.
As a group, they can do
anything."
In .the, end, it all comes
down to Tuesday to. make
that dream become a reality.
"Our first Final Four
would be special," Williams
said. 'This is a special team
and I wouldn't be surprised
at all, because we're more
than capable."


Answer to Previous Puzzle


RU AHABBET
ARA ABED OMEN
NE C KBA|ND WI





FB E N L TAHAC I
TATA FESS I NS
SEARS CA RD S
R 10 BAG
A AM UNHIP
B L 0 T E NT CLE
MALE ARTY OAT
WILD JRS NYE


9 Hayworth of
"Pal Joey"
10 Footnote word
12 Traveling, as a
band (2 wds.)
17 Liquefy


19 Paycheck
abbr.
22 Equinox mo.
23 Fritz, to him-
self
24 Deli units
25 Dollar rival
26 Dentist's
photo (hyph.)
27 Stadium noise
28 Walkie-talkie
word
29 Hot streak
31 Wine glass
feature
33 "- cool!"
35 Dog days in
Dijon
36 Purchasing
38 Slough off
39 Mountain pass
41 Hardened
42 Splotch
43 Two-masted
sailboat
44 Arcade foul
46 Harmful thing
47 "- Old
Cow Hand"
48 Fixes the
' clock
50 Univ. degrees
51 Grill, maybe
52 T'ai ch'uan


2011 by UFS, Inc.


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, MAY 1, 2011









Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420 LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, MAY 1, 2011


Day 3: Draft keeps moving


By RICHARD ROSENBLATT
Associated Press

NEW YORK The
Carolina Panthers got their
quarterback, then began
rebuilding one of the weak-
er defenses in the NFL.
,Against the backdrop
of a restored lockout, the
Panthers opened the third
and final day of the draft
Saturday by selecting
West Virginia cornerback
Brandon Hogan to begin
the fourth round. Carolina
made Cam Newton the No.
1 overall pick Thursday, and
went for defensive tackles
Terrell McClain and Sione
Fua in the third round
Friday.
In the 5-foot-10, 192-
pound Hogan, Panthers
new coach Ron Rivera is
taking a chance on a player
irith a checkered past who
also is recovering from a
knee injury.
While Hogan led a sec-
: ondary that ranked 11th in
the nation in pass defense,
he served a suspension
following a drunken-driv-
ing arrest among other
legal issues, and missed
the teamni's final two games
with a torn anterior cru-
ciate ligament in his left
knee. He says he won't be
able to begin running until
August
This wild week in the
NFL resumed with play-
ers again locked out after


a brief respite Friday. That
night, however, an appeals
court decision allowed the
league to reinstate the lock-
out that had been lifted ear-
lier in the week.
But the picks keep com-
ing because the draft is pro-
tected under the old collec-
tive bargaining agreement,
which expired March 11.
The Arizona Cardinals
moved to improve their
pass rush by selecting
Texas linebacker Sam
Acho. The 6-1, 257-pounder
was recently honored with
a $25,000 scholarship as the
nation's top scholar athlete.
Acho's parents emigrat-
ed from Nigeria, and each
summer he returns to the
country with his father and
brother on a medical mis-
sion.
Cecil Shorts, a wide
receiver from powerhouse
Mount Union, became the
first Division III player cho-
sen when he went to the
Jacksonville Jaguars with,
the 17th pick in the fourth
round.
Two picks later, another
Matthews joined the NFL
when Oregon lineback-
er Casey Matthews was
picked by the Philadelphia
Eagles. He's the brother of
Packers All-Pro linebacker
Clay Matthews and the first
Oregon player chosen in
this draft.
I The Philadelphia Eagles
made Webraska All-


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Carolina Panthers first-round draft pick Cam Newton smiles..
and holds a jersey with the help of Panthers coach Ron
Rivera as Newton is introduced during a news conference at
Bank of America Stadium in-Charlotte, N.C., Friday. Rivera
and the Panthers turned to defense on Day 3.


American Alex Henery
the first kicker taken with
the 23rd pick of the fourth
round. Henery hit 18-of-19
field goal attempts (10-of-ll
from 40 yards or longer)
and all 54 extra points last
season.
Eagles longtime kicker
David Akers is a free agent,
but the team has placed a
transition tag on him and


would have a chance to
retain him.
The Cleveland Browns,
with a pick from Atlanta,
chose Stanford full-
back Owen Marecic, a
two-way player who also
played linebacker. He
won, the inaugural Paul
Hornung Award that goes
to the nation's most versa-
tile player.


CHS: Ready to roll
Continued From Page 1B


Still, Monday will mark
the first time that Allen has
a live look at the Tigers'
squad.
"For me it will be good,
because I haven't had a
chance to see the guys
in action other than on
tape," Allen said. "I'm
excited with what I've seen,
through conditioning, but
this will help me get a bet-
ter idea from what our core
segment will be."
Allen has a basic sched-'
ule for how Monday's prac-
tice will go, beginning with
a team-stretching period
which he discovered while
at a coaching camp at
Florida State this spring.
"We'll begin with the
stretch, which I developed
from a few clinics," he said.
"One thing we wanted was
an organized period that
we could use before the
game. It'll go for about 20
minutes."
Columbia will then
break into individual drills
to work on fundamentals,-.
which. will expand with
each practice.
The first session of group
work will follow individual
drills, where the focus will
still be fundamentals.
Following the first group
session, Columbia will
break back into individual
.drills to further install the
fundamentals laid out for
the group.
The Tigers will imple-


ment a 7-on-7 period, but
will do so without pads
until Thursday. During the
season, special-teams work
will also be involved.
The practice will end
with conditioning drills as
Allen wants the Tigers to
rival the well-condition,
tough Tiger teams of the
past
Of course, the practices
will have room for vari-
ance, as Allen wants to
keep things fresh for the
Tigers.
"We'll throw in the
Oklahoma drill and other
things, because it's good
for competition," he said.
"It gives us a good chance
to gauge guys. We'll see all
that once the pads go on.
We have to get through
Wednesday to put the pads
on Thursday."
Columbia's reward for
all the spring practices
-comes in the form of two
games. The Purple & Gold
game will take place at
Memorial Stadium begin-
ning at 6 p.tn. 'on May 13.
Columbia host Dunnellon
High at 7:30 p.m. on
May 20 for the spring
game.
"For me, Memorial
Stadium was. where it all
started, so we have a chance
to bring guys back to the
roots," Allen said. "There's
a sentimental value to that
stadium and it' a chance to
honor the old guys."


NFL lockout returns to


players, teams dismay


By JON KRAWCZYNSKI
Associated Press

EDEN PRAIRIE, Minn.
- The wildest week in
- NFL history had one more
twist at the end and it
means football is off limits
.-again.
The NFL locked out its
. players Friday night after
its first legal victory in the
fight with the players over
the future of the $9 billion
business.
The players who showed
up smiling and relieved to
be back at work Friday
morning are now cooling
their heels. The ups and
downs of the day and
Sthe weeks and months of
this labor dispute may
be taking their toll with the
first preseason game little
more than three months
away.
"It's crazy and it's really,
really making it difficult
to plan," Bengals quarter-
back Jordan Palmer said.
"It's just really hectic.
k Everybody I've talked to
i is very thrown off by the
situation."
: Raiders quarterback
Bruce Gradkowski vented
on Twitter: "Gosh I 'just
- wanna get back to work
and play! I feel bad for our
fans having to put up with
this."
The day began with
dozens, if not hundreds,
of players reporting to
team facilities all over the
league. They met with
coaches, picked up play-
books and went through
workouts for the first time
since they were locked out
after talks for a new collec-
tive bargaining agreement
broke down March 11.
"From the players'
standpoint I think every-
body is pleased we're not
locked out anymore, espe-
cially the rookies," Patriots
quarterback Tom Brady
said on CNBC in his first
public comments about the
dispute since he became a
plaintiff in the still-pending
federal antitrust lawsuit
filed against the owners.
Not so fast, Tom.
U.S. District Judge
Susan Richard Nelson's
order lifting the 45-day
lockout on Monday was
temporarily stayed by the
8th U.S. Circuit Court of
Appeals in St. Louis. The
NFL made its decision a
few hours later.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
National Football League commissioner Roger Goodell
(right) greets Deion Sanders at an NFL predraft event in
New York, Wednesday. The league reinstated the player
lockout late Friday evening.


Teams "have been told
that the prior lockout rules
are reinstated effective
immediately," NFL spokes-
man Greg Aiello told The
Associated Press.
Agent Peter Schaffer
said he has advised his cli-
ents to abide by the court's
ruling.
"You can't have conve-
nient justice," Schaffer
said. "Whatever the ruling
of the day is, it must be
followed. So I have told my
players to stay away from
the facilities." "
The appeals court is
expected to rule next week
on the NFL's request for
a more permanent stay
that would last through its
appeal of Nelson's injunc-
tion, a process expected to
take 6-8 weeks.
"Nobody's happy about
any of this," Green Bay
Packers general manager
Ted Thompson said. "But
it is what it is. The lockout
is back into effect"
Teams had announced
plans for organized prac-
tices and camps as early as
next week, but those have
again been put on hold.
"Chaotic," Vikings
receiver Bernard Berrian
wrote on Twitter. "I dunno
where to go."
Coaches and general
managers scrambled to
bring their first-round
picks in on Friday dur-


ing what proved to be a
brief window of time. They,
started to give the young-
sters crash courses in what
they wanted them to work
on in the event that the
lockout does drag on into
the summer.
Dolphins general man-
ager Jeff Ireland said
teams had no choice but to
"go with the flow."
"It was good to see the
players today, great to see
some of those guys, and
wish it would have lasted a
little longer," Ireland said.
The NFL's victory came
in avenue considered more
favorable to businesses
than the federal courts in
Minnesota, though it was a
narrow one. The 2-1 deci-
sion from a panel of the 8th
Circuit included a lengthy
dissent from Judge Kermit
Bye, who suggested tem-
porary stays should be
issued only in emergen-
cies.
"The NFL has not per-
suaded me this is the type
of emergency situation
which justifies the grant
of a temporary stay," Bye
wrote.
Jim Quinn, the lead
attorney for the players,
downplayed Friday's order
and was heartened by the
dissent
"Routine grant of stay
and totally expected," he
said.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Florida center and left guard Mike Pouncey conducts .an interview with members of the media
on Aug. 10, 2010, during the Florid.a Gators Media Day event.


Pouncey expected to


contribute to Dolphins


By STEVEN WINE
Associated Press

DAVIE The sibling
rivalry in the Pouncey fam-
ily could serve the Miami
Dolphins well.
Center Mike Pouncey
, pledged to be drafted .soon-
er than his brother and
was. Now that he's join-
ing the Dolphins as their
first-round pick, Pouncey's
eager to follow his identical
twin Maurkice to the Pro
Bowl at center.
"I know I'm coming in
with big expectations
because of all the success
my brother has had," Mike
said Thursday. "I feel like
we're the same player. I've
got some big shoes to fill,
but I think I can fill those
shoes."
Sounds good to the
Dolphins, who hope to
slide the 6-foot-4, 310-pound
Pouncey into the starting
lineup as a rookie. They
took the former Florida
Gator with the 15th overall
selection.
Maurkice turned pro
after his junior season, went
to the Pittsburgh Steelers
as the 18th pick last year,
started 16 games and made
the Pro Bowl.
"Me and my brother were
fierce competitors," Mike
said. "I told him when he
came out I was going to get
drafted before him."
The Dolphins made it
happen. General manager
Jeff Ireland said he's confi-
dent Pouncey can duplicate
his brother's NFL success.
"They remind me of each


other," Ireland said. "Mike
is very athletic, very smart,
very tough, like his brother.
I didn't feel like I was going
to be getting too much dif-
ferentfrom Maurkice. We're
looking at pretty much the
same type of player."
The Dolphins were eager
to add playmakers but opted
to upgrade their offensive
line rather than draft run-
ning back Mark Ingram of
Alabama or a quarterback.
Ingram went with the 28th
pick to New Orleans, and ho
quarterbacks were selected
in the first, round after the
Dolphins' pick.
The Dolphins extended
their streak of not taking a
QB in the first round since
1983. Finding a franchise
quarterback has been a
problem, but so has the inte-
rior offensive line, one, rea-
son neither Ronnie Brown
nor Ricky Williams had a
100-yard rushing game last
year.
Pouncey anticipated
Miami's decision.
"This was the first team I
had on my radar," he said.
"I think it's the perfect fit
for me, and I'm glad I'm a
Dolphin."
Pouncey can play guard
as well as center, but the
Dolphins project him in the
latter spot They re-signed
Richie Incognito before the
draft to play left guard, and
2010 third-round pick John
Jerry is an option at right
guard.
"Right now we're going to
line Pouncey up at center,"
Ireland said. "That's going
to be up for the coaches,


but that's where I've got
him on-my depth chart."
He'll be flanked by two
former first-round picks
- All-Pro left'tackle Jake
Long (2008) and right tack-
le Vernon Carey (2004).
It's an inviting scenario for
head coach Tony Sparano,
whose background is as an
offensive line coach.
"Offensive linemen end
up playing a lot of years,"
Ireland said. "'It's a good
safe pick. I know exactly
what I'm getting usually
when you take an offensive
lineman. It makes me feel
pretty good that we've solid-
ified the offensive line."
Pouncey started 45 games
for the Gators, including
28 at right guard, but he
replaced his brother at cen-
ter as a senior last year. He
made several bad shotgun
snaps early in the season
but became Florida's best
blocker and a team leader.
Pouncey grew up in
Lakeland, Fla., a fan of the
Tampa Bay Buccaneers.
"But I'm glad I'm a
Dolphin," he said. "I'm glad
I'm going to stay in the
state."
He should help a Miami
offense that ranked next to
last in the NFL in scoring
last season. The Dolphins
went into the draft without
a second-round pick, mag-
nifying the need to choose
well in the opening round.
Because he's joining an
AFC East team, Pouncey
will continue his annual
battles with defensive line-
man Marcell Dareus, of the
Buffalo Bills.


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, MAY 1, 2011


- Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420






LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVERTISEMENT SUNDAY, MAY 1, 2011


First Ballot Chosen .... s100

Second Ballot.......... a50
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ENTER & WIN! 2010 Official Entry Ballot
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Best Pawn Shop
Best Pet Shop____
Best Picture Frame Shop_
Best Place to Buy Tires
Best Produce
Best Scrapbook Store
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Best Sporting Goods Store
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INST RUCTI S ANDOFFI IALRTLE :yf-orm1 e- h o i- i -t bl il bmittd- -on1ficia I .entr y-illt, P ilocop esind sar o11 5 l.6 t ce 'ted.Must
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Phone


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Story ideas?

C.J.Risak
Assistant Editor
754-0427
crisck@lakecityreporter.com

Sunday, May 1, 2011


Lake City Reporter






BUSINESS


www.lakecityreporter.com


PetSmart to open in September


12,000 square-foot
store will feature
dog grooming
and training.

By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
Local pet owners
will soon have
their own super-
store in Lake
City to shop for
supplies and products.
Construction began
March 14 on a new
PetSmart in the area.
PetSmart is slated to
have a grand opening cele-
bration in September, said
Toni Eberhardt, senior
manager of public rela-
tions and special media.
The store will be located in
NW .Commons Loop, next
to Publix.
"We really consider it
a privilege to come into a
new community," she said.
The company is the larg-
est pet specialty retailer
coming into the area,
Eberhardt said.
"It really provides one-
stop shopping for quality,
pet products and solutions
(people) can trust," she
said..
The building will be
approximately 12,000
square feet and will have
dog training and groom-
ing available,' Eberhardt
said.
An additional 3,940
square feet will be avail-
able for retail space for the
company to lease to other
businesses, said Willie


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Construction crews work on the building where a PetSmart store and retail space is being
built near the Publix supermarket in Lake City Commons on West U.S. Highway 90.


Jenkins, Masonry Builders
foreman.
Most of the masonry
work will be up next
week.
"(Construction) .is com-
ing along fine," he said.
The company's, real
estate team regularly
reviews landscapes to
place new stores, she
said. Lake City fit the cri-
teria for a community in
need of a store.
Expanding to include
The PetSmart PetHotel,
Doggy Day Camp and
Banfield Hospital will be
determined in the future,
Eberhardt said.
The store is the next in
a series of maj6r retailers
to expand into the Lake


City market, said Dennille
Folsom, The Lake
City-Columbia County
Chamber of Commerce
executive director. Within
the past year, TJMaxx and
Big Lots also opened new
stores in the area.
"It's a good sign of
what's in store for Lake
City in coming years,"
she said.
The grand opening for
the store will feature give-
aways, dog trick training
and more to make it an
exciting event for the
community, Eberhardt
said.
"It's not all about high-
lighting our products and
services," she said. "We
want to make it a destina--


tion for the community
to come and really cel-
ebrate."
PetSmart will alsowork
with local adoption part-'
ners in the community
to aggressively find fam-
ilies for homeless pets,
Eberhardt said.
The chamber will reach
out to PetSmart to become
an active member once
the management staff is
hired and the building is
up, Folsom said.
"It's great that they've
chosen to come to Lake
-City," she said. "It's going
to open up many new jobs
as well as become anoth-
er resources for people to
shop local and not go to
Gainesville."


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Tuesday photo, Vu To finishes filling his gas tank at
a Shell gas station in the Seattle suburb of Bellevue, Wash.
Americans saw their incomes rise in March and this spurred
higher spending. But much of the extra money went to pay for
more costly gasoline.

Consumer spending

and incomes both

rise in March


By MARTIN CRUTSINGER
AP Economics Writer

WASHINGTON -
Americans earned and
spent more in March, but
much of the extra money
went to pay for gas.
Personal incomes rose
0.5 percent last month
and consumer spending
increased 0.6 percent, the
Commerce Department
reported Friday. But after
adjusting for inflation,
spending rose only 0.2 per-
cent and after-tax incomes
were essentially flat.
Consumer spending had
been expected to post solid
gains this year, helped by
stronger employment
growth and a 2 percent-
age-point cut in Social
Security payroll taxes. But


Americans are paying more
for gas, prompting econo-
mists to scale back their
growth forecasts.
.The national average at
the pump on Friday was
$3.90 a gallon- 31 cents
higher than a month ago
and more than $1 than what
consumers paid a year ago.
Less growth in consumer
spending was a big reason
the overall economy slowed
sharply in the first tree
months of the year. The
1.8 percent growth rate was
weaker than the 3.1 per-
cent growth in the previous
quarter. Consumer. spend-
ing is important because
it accounts for roughly 70
percent of economic activ-
ity.
RISE continued on 2C


Chevron profit rises 36

percent on high oil prices


HOME OF THE WEEK


A Proud Supporter of:




. .. ....... ... ,


ASSOCIATED PRESS

SAN RAMON, Calif. -
Chevron Corp. said Friday
its first-quarter net income
rose 36 percent, the lat-
est strong earnings report
from a major oil company.
. Chevron earned higher
prices for its oil around the
globe. In the U.S., Chevron
sold its oil for an average
price of $89 per barrel
in the last quarter, com-
pared with $71 a year ago.
Internationally, Chevron
sold oil for an average price
of $95 per barrel, compared
with $70 a year earlier.
These higher prices led
to a $1.25 billion increase
in profit from exploring for
and producing oil and gas.
Refining profits more than
doubled, to $622 million.
In all, Chevron's net
income rose to $6.21 bil-
lion, or $3.09 per share,
from $4.55 billion, or $2.27
per share a year ago. The


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Monday photo, a Chevron customer pumps gas in
Mountain View, Calif. Chevron said Friday first-quarter earn-
ings rose 36 percent. The company received higher prices for
the oil it produced, and also made more money from refining


results topped Wall Street
expectations and marked
Chevron's best three
months since it earned $7.9
billion in the third quarter
of 2008.
Analysts say Chevron
was able to cut costs while


enjoying higher oil prices.
The company agreed to sell
a refinery in the United
Kingdom and other assets
in Europe, the Caribbean
and Africa that lowered
CHEVRON continued on 2C


Pump prices jump to $3.91

on tightening supplies


BY SANDY SHORE
AP Business Writer

Gas pump prices across the country
rose to within a dime of $4 a gallon Friday,
as weather-related refinery outages tight-
ened supplies and pushed prices up.
The national average increased 2 cents
to nearly $3.91 a gallon for regular gaso-
line. It's the highest level since July 31,
2008, when pump prices were falling from
a record $4.11 a gallon on July 17 of that
year.
Drivers in nine states and the District of
Columbia already pay $4 a gallon or more
for gas. At the current rate of increase, the
national average could reach $4 by May 8,
Analysts expect it to start falling later in


the month, as refineries return to full pro-
duction and more gas becomes available.
A series of severe storms caused power
outages that temporarily shut down
seven refineries in Texas, Alabama and
Pennsylvania this week. The shutdowns
aren't expected to last more than a few .
days, but 750,000 to 1 million barrels a
day of production a day has been halted
intermittently, according to Tom Kloza,
publisher and chief oil analyst at Oil Price
Information Service.
The affected refineries mostly ship
product to the Southeast, Midwest and
Gulf Coast states, Kloza said. That's where
motorists will probably see the biggest
PRICES continued on 2C


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Section C


I







LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS SUNDAY, MAY 1, 2011


Dollar hits 3-year low on Fed expectations


By TALI ARBEL
AP Business Writer

NEW YORK The dollar
struck its latest three-year low
against a group of six major cur-
rencies Friday on expectations
that the Federal Reserve will
keep interest rates low to nourish
U.S. economicgrowth despite ris-
ing oil and food prices.
Central banks overseas are
increasing interest rates to fend
off inflation. Higher rates tend to
support demand for currencies.
But 'Fed Chairman Ben
Bernanke has said -rising com-
modity prices will have only a
temporary effect on broader
inflation in the U.S. So investors


expect the key U.S. rate to stay
near zero to help fuel domestic
economic growth while millions
are out of work.
The government said Thursday
that economic growth in the first
three months of the year slowed to
an annual pace of 1.8 percent from
3.1 percent at the end of 2010.
In midday trading Friday in
New York, the euro was worth
$1.4825, almost unchanged from
Thursday's rate of $1.4821.
The euro has barreled up more
than 4 percent just in April, and is
up 9.5 percent this year despite
ongoing concerns about high
debt levels and stagnant econo-
mies in some of its member coun-
tries. Expectations that the ECB


will keep lifting rates as prices
rise are boosting the euro.
The EU said Friday that infla-
tion in the 17 euro countries rose
to 2.8 percent in April from 2.7
percent last month.
The euro peaked at $1.4881
late Thursday, its highest level
since December 2009.
The dollar is losing ground
against currencies all over the
world, reflecting worries about
the growing budget deficit in the
U.S., said Bank of America Merrill
Lynch foreign exchange strategist
David Woo in a research note.
The British pound is trad-
ing just shy of its highest lev-
els since November 2009, while
the Canadian dollar hit its stron-


gest point since November 2007
Thursday. The Australian dollar
hit a more than 27-year high and
the Swiss franc notched a fresh
record against the dollar Friday.
Despite the dollar's 8 per-.
cent decline this year against a
group of six currencies, Federal
Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke
and Treasury Secretary Timothy
Geithner have both said this
week that the U.S. supports a
"strong dollar" policy. Bernanke
on Wednesday said that the Fed,
by keeping a watch on inflation
and taking steps to reinvigorate
the economy, was helping sup-
port the dollar.
But the dollar's broad drop
suggests that U.S. consum-


ers will have to pay more for
imported goods from all over the
world, particularly oil. Prices for
crude rose to about $113 a bar-
rel Friday. Analysts say retail gas
prices could reach $4 a gallon by
early May.
The government said Friday that
personal incomes rose 0.5 percent
and consumer spending rose 0.6
percent last month, but most of the
increase was spent on gas.
Many economists say the dol-
lar's decline has also helped con-
tribute to the boom in commodity
prices, which are bought and sold
in dollars. Shoppers will have to
pay more as. consumer goods
companies raise prices, citing
soaring costs of raw materials.


RISE: Spending lp, too

Continued From Page 1C


"The increase in prices
is absorbing pretty much
all of the windfall from
the payroll tax cut," said
Paul Dales, an economist
with Capital Economics.
"If gasoline prices were to
stop rising, real consump-
tion could bounce back in
the second quarter. But
even then, jobs growth
and wage growth are not
strong enough to result in
a significant and sustained
acceleration in consump-
tion growth. This eco-
nomic recovery is going
to continue to disappoint
both this year and next."
The rise in spending
was heavily concentrated
in nondurable goods,'
which includes gasoline.
Spending in this category
jumped 0.9 percent while
spending on longer-last-
ing manufactured goods,


such as autos, was essen-
tially flat. Spending on
services rose 0.5 percent.
The savings rate
remained unchanged
at 5.5 percent of after-
tax incomes in March.
Americans saved just 2.1
percent in 2007 before
the recession. The
bursting of the housing
bubble has made them
more cautious with their
finances.
A key inflation gauge
that is closely watched
by the Federal Reserve
showed prices rising
0.4 percent in March,
the same as February.
Excluding food and ener-
gy, prices were up a more
subdued 0.1 percent in
March and are 1.8 per-
cent higher than a year
ago, well within the Fed's
.comfort zone.


PRICES: Oil increases

Continued From Page 1C


increases in pump prices,
over the next few days.
The Commerce
Department said Friday
that personal incomes rose
0.5 percent and consumer
spending rose'0.6 percent
in March, but higher gas
prices are taking a toll on
consumers' wallets.
"The increase in ...
spending was swallowed
up by higher gasoline
and food prices," said
IHS Global Insight econ-
omist Chris Christopher.
"This report is good
news since it shows that
consumers are plow-
ing ahead despite rising
gasoline and food prices.
The bad news is that con-
sumer spending adjusted
for inflation has lost the
momentum it had in the
last quarter of 2010," he
said.
Some economists think
lower gas prices could
encourage consumer
spending in other areas,
but the high unemploy-
ment rate will keep the
economic recovery in
low gear.
Both oil and gasoline
futures have risen around
35 percent since mid-


February when uprisings
broke out in Libya and
other countries in the
Middle East and North
Africa. 'Traders have
been concerned that the
anti-government clashes
will disrupt oil supplies,
although that hasn't hap-
pened yet.
Prices for oil and other
energy futures got a boost
from a weaker dollar, on
Friday. The dollar his a
three-year low against six
major currencies. Since
commodities are priced
in dollars, they become*
more of a bargain for
traders using other cur-
rencies.
Benchmark crude for
June delivery rose 56
cents to $113.42 a bar-
rel in midday trading on
the New York Mercantile
Exchange.
Heating oil rose 1.36
cents to $3.2595 per gal-
lon, gasoline futures
gained a penny at $3.3809
per gallon and natural gas
rose. 6 cents to $4.689 on
the,Nymex.
'In London, Brent crude
rose 62 cents to $125.64
on the ICE Futures
exchange.


CHEVRON: Big payoff

Continued From Page 1C


profit margins.
Chevron earned $25
in profit for every barrel
of oil it sold, compared
with $20 for ExxonMobil,
according to Phil Weiss of
Argus Research.
"The lower their expens-
es are, the less sensitive
they are to oil prices,"
Weiss said.
Gasoline prices have
topped $4 per gallon in nine
states plus the District of
Columbia. As oil company
profits approach levels of
three years ago, when gas
prices last spiked in the
United States, the industry
is fighting a renewed push
from President Barack
Obama and Democrats to
end its $4 billion a year in
taxpayer subsidies.
On Thursday, Exxon
Mobil reported net


income of almost $11 bil-
lion, its best quarter mak-
ing $14.83 billion in the
July-September period of
2008. That's the record for
a publicly traded company.
Also, Shell's profit rose
60 percent to about $9
billion in the first quarter.
France's Total SA made
about $5.8 billion, up 50
percent. ConocoPhillips'
earnings rose 43 per-
cent.
Chevron's revenue rose
25 percent to $60.34 bil-
lion in the quarter. The
increase in oil prices was
partially offset by lower
prices in the U.S. for
natural gas. International
natural gas prices rose
slightly.
Chevron shares rose 59
cents to $109.40 in after-
noon trading.


World markets sink on slow US growth


By PAMELA SAMPSON
AP Business Writer

BANGKOK A slow-
.down in growth in the U.S.
and mixed corporate earn-
ings dampened stock mar-
ket sentiment around the
world Friday.
Oil prices fell to near
$112 a barrel as the lack-
luster U.S. economic news
blunted crude's 33 per-
cent gain over the past two
months. The slowdown in
the world's No. 1 economy
in the first three months of
the year also proved worri-
some to Asian companies
that count on strong U.S.
consumer demand. The
dollar was down against the
yen and the euro.
In early European trad-
ing, Germany's DAX
was down 0.1 percent to
7,467.04 and France's CAC-
40 slipped 0.5 percent at
4,085.71. Britain's FTSE
100 was closed as the coun-
try celebrated the nuptials
of Prince William and Kate
Middleton. Wall Street
was set for a lower open-
ing, as Dow Jones indus-
trial futures sagged by 14
points to 12,694 and S&P
futures dropped marginally
to 1,353.10.
"Equitymarketsarereact-
ing nervously to weak U.S.
data overnight. Demand
from the U.S. for Asia
exports may actually slow,"
said Dariusz Kowalczuk of
Credit Agricole in Hong
Kong.
Hong Kong's Hang Seng
index closed down 0.4
percent to 23,805.63, with
yuan units of Hui Xian Real
Estate Investment Trust
falling 9.4 percent in their
trading debut. They are
the first equity securities
denominated in China's
currency to trade outside
of mainland China.
. South Korea's Kospi
index slipped 0.7 percent
to 2,192.36, with technol-
ogy shares dragging the
index down.
Samsung Electronics lost
0.8 percent after the com-
pany announced its first
quarter profit fell 30 per-
cent on declines in memo-
ry chip prices and reduced
profitability in liquid crys-


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Traders work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange Wednesday ih New York.


tal displays and flat screen
televisions. Rival Hynix
Semiconductor Inc. slid
1.6 percent. LG Electronics
lost 3.7 percent.
Australia's S&P/ASX 200
shed 1 percent to 4,823.20,,
with mining shares among
the big losers. The world's
biggest mining company,
BHP Billiton Ltd., fell 1 per-
cent. Shares in Rio Tinto
Ltd. lost 1.4 percent.
Japan's Nikkei, 225
was closed for the start
of Golden Week holiday.
Benchmarks in Singapore,
Taiwan, Indonesia, India
and Thailand were also
down.
Mainland Chinese shares
snapped a five-session los-
ing streak as the release of
a survey showing lacklus-
ter growth in manufactur-
ing suggested inflation may
be under better control
than earlier feared, easing
the need for further credit
tightening measures.
The Shanghai Composite
Index gained 0.9 per-
cent to 2,911.51, while
the Shenzhen Composite
Index gained 1.4 percent to
1,200.62. Shares in power
companies, non-ferrous
metals and steels led the
gains while banks fell back
on profit-taking after recent
advances spurred by bet-
ter-than-expected earnings
reports.
"Power companies rose


due to rumors authorities
may raise electricity fees,"
said Peng Yunliang, an ana-
lyst based in Shanghai. But
he said the market's imme-
diate outlook depends on
whether Beijing might opt
for a "surprise" interest
rate hike during the three-
day May Day weekend.
"If there is an interest
rate hike'over the tipcom-
ing long weekend holiday,
as investors fear, the. cor-
rection will resume next
week," Peng said.
Huaneng Power
International, one of sev-
eral big .state-owned elec-
tricity generators, rose 6.3
percent, while Huadian-
Power International Corp.
Ltd rose 9.8 percent
On, Wall Street, stocks
" closed at another 2011 high
Thursday despite modest
U.S. economic growth in
the first quarter. The U.S.
economy grew a 1.8 per-
cent annual rate between
January and March, the
Commerce Department
said. That's the weakest
growth since last spring
and underscores concerns
about the strength of the
U.S. recovery. Higher oil
prices cut into consumer
spending and bad weather
slowed down construction
projects.
The S&P 500 rose 4.82
points, or 0.4 percent, to
1,360.48. The Dow Jones


industrial average rose
72.35, or 0.6 percent, to
12,763.31. The Nasdaq
composite gained 2.65, or
0.1 percent, to 2,872.53.
Corporate earnings were
'mixed. Procter & Gamble
Co. rose nearly 1 percent
after the maker of Tide
detergent and Pampers dia-
pers reported higher earn-
ings but cut its forecast for
the year due to rising costs
for raw materials. Exxon
Mobil Corp. the world's
largest publicly traded com-
pany-fell 0.5 percent even
after the oil giant reported
its best quarterly earnings
since 2008 perhaps due
to high expectations.
More people applied for
unemployment benefits
for the first time last week.
The increase, the second in
three weeks, suggests that
the job market remains
sluggish.
Benchmark crude for
June delivery was down 53
cents at $112.33 a barrel
at late afternoon Singapore
time in electronic trading
on the New York Mercantile
Exchange.
The euro was higher at
$1.4846 from $1.4821 late
Thursday in New York.
It had peaked at $1.4881
Thursday, its highest point
in nearly 17 months before
softening. The dollar was
down to 81.48 yen from
81.57 yen.


Stocks rise despite weaker GDP report


By CHIP CUTTER and
DAVID K. RANDALL
AP Business Writers

NEW YORK Stocks closed at
another 2011 high Thursday despite
modest U.S. economic growth in the
first quarter.
The economy grew at a 1.8 annual
rate between January and March.
That's the weakest rate since last
spring. Higher oil prices cut into
consumer spending and bad weather
slowed down construction projects.
Stocks rose modestly as investors
bet that the economy would grow
at a faster annual rate once gasoline
prices stabilized.
The S&P 500 rose 4.82 points, or
0.4 percent, to 1,360.48. The Dow
Jones industrial average rose 72.35,
or 0.6 percent, to 12,763.31. The
Nasdaq composite gained 2.65, or 0.1
,percent, to 2,872.53.
The Russell 2000 index rose again,
a day after reaching a record high.
The index of small companies rose
3.24, or 0.4 percent, to 861.55.
Corporate earnings were mixed.
Procter & Gamble Co. rose nearly
1 percent after the maker of Tide


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Wednesday photo, Donald
Vaneck of Barclays Capital, works
on the floor of the New York Stock
Exchange, in New York.

detergent and Pampers diapers
reported higher earnings but cut
its forecast for the year due to rising
costs for raw materials.
Sprint Nextel Corp. rose nearly 7
percent. The company added twice
as many wireless subscribers in
the first quarter as analysts had
expected.
Viacom Inc. rose 3.6 percent.
The owner of MTV and Paramount


Pictures reported that its income
grew 53 percent thanks to popular
shows such as "Jersey Shore" and
an improved advertising market.
Exxon Mobil Corp. fell 0.5 percent
even after the oil giant reported its
best quarterly earnings since 2008.
The world's largest publicly traded
company earned $10.65 billion in the
first quarter, uip from $6.3 billion in
the same period'last year.
Steve Quirk, senior vice president
of the trader group at TD Ameritrade,
said investors have -come to expect
strong earnings from Exxon, so even
a solid quarter doesn't necessarily lift
its stock price. '"The anticipation is so
high right now," he said.
More people applied for unemploy-
ment benefits for the first time last
week. The increase, the second in
three weeks, suggests that the job
market remains sluggish.
The weaker economic reports
helped push bond prices higher and
yields lower. The yield on the 10-year
Treasury note fell to 3.32 percent
from 3.35 percent late Wednesday.
Stock indexes hit 2011 highs on
Wednesday after the Federal Reserve
said it would keep interest rates low.


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427











Page Editor: C.J.Risak, 754-0427


LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS & HOME SUNDAY, MAY 1, 2011 3C


THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW *THE WEEK IN REVIEW -THE WEEK IN REVIEW *THE WEEK IN REVIEW




The Week in Review


Weekly Stock Exchange HighlightsI


A NYSE A Amex

8,671.41 +167.05 2,483.05 +30.31


Gainers (2 or more Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg
GATX pf 255.00+106.26 +71.4 Aerosonic 3.27 +.60 +22.4
Boisewt 2.14 +.86 +67.2 DeltaAprl 17.69 +2.88 +19.4
CaptlTr 5.04 +1.35 +36.6 HstnAEn 18.39 +2.87 +18.5
Sequansn 10.26 +2.14 +26.4 TanzRy g 7.26 +.90 +14.2
Heinz pf 919.65+181.47 +24.6 Metalico 6.34 +.73 +13.0
NewpkRes '9.03 +1.75 +24.0 PhrmAth 3.74 +.37 +11.0
PitnBpr 480.94+78.51 +19.5 Inuvors 2.43 +.23 +10.5
UthiaMot 18.19 +2.96 +19.4 Quepasa 8.53 +.81 +10.5
Feijhe Int 10.68 +1.72 +19.2 UnivPwr 4.03 +.38 +10.4
NavigCons 11.65 +1.87 +19.1 Accelr8 3.86 +.36 +10.3

Losers ($2 or more) Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg
BarcShtD 10.01 -4.09 -29.0 ChiMarFd 3.47 -.63 -15.4
SFN Grp 10.53 -3.50 -24.9 SearchMed 2.15 -.35 -14.0
OfficeMax 9.96 -2.93 -22.7 MastechH 3.88 -.57 -12.8
CenPacFrl 5.45 -1.56 -22.3 Tofutti 2.36 -.34 -12,7
HarteHnk 9.29 -2,40 -20.5 ChiMetRur 3.50 -.50 -12.5
C-TrCVOL 29.01 -7.14 -19.8 GoldenMin 20.00 -2.84 -12.4
SkilldHcre 12.12 -2.66 -18.0 ChinaNutri 2.12 -.28 -11.7
iP SER2K 20.65 -4.16 -16.8 SunUnk 2.20 -.29 -11.6
McClatchy 2.86 -.55 -16.1 Solitario 2.69 -.32 -10.6
PilgrimsP 5.88 -1.10 -15.8 NewEnSys 3.67 -.42 -10.3

Most Active (si or more) Most Active (si or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg Name Vol (00) Last Chg
Citgrp 15709139 4.59 +.04 GtPanSilvg298541 3.62 -.30
iShSilver 7353710 46.88+1.35 CFCda g 203577 24.55 -.25
BkofAm 5496914 12.28 -.03 NovaGldg 190416 12.85 -.44
S&P500ETF5044364136.43+2.65 KodiakO g 188403 7.02 -.22
FordM 3786194 15.47 +.04 NwGoldg 186626 11.24 +.52
SprintNex 3111272 5.18 +.37 GoldStrg 155265 3.25 +.15
GenElec 2775779 20.45 +.50 AmApparel 151663 1.45 +.21
iShEMkts 2074582 50.00 -.18 NthnO&G 149298 23.76 -.19
Pfizer 2051534 20.97 +1.18 AvalRare n 148999 9.09 -.23
SPDR Fncl1995835 16.38 +.28 RareEleg 147038 14.45 +.79

Diary Diary
Advanced 2,387 Advanced 305
Declined 803 Declined 222
New Highs 667 New Highs 46
New Lows 44 New Lows 141
Total issues 3,223 Total issues 546
Unchanged 33 Unchanged 19
Volume 18,855,427,919 Volume 657,608,903


R Nasdaq
2,873.54 +53.38


Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
GeneticT h 5.77 +2.56 +79.8
Rdiff.cm 16.43 +5.18 +46.0
Ancestry 45.70+13.47 +41.8
Intelliph 4.34 +1.26 +40.9
Ku6Media 7.44 +2.11 +39.6
Celsion h 3.13 +.85 +37.3
SunPwrB 21.40 +5.77 +36.9
SunPowerA21.69 +5.79 +36.4
LoopNet 18.58 +4.90 +35.8
ReachLocn23.24 +6.05 +35.2

Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
SinoCEnrs 2.88 -1.24 -30.1
GulfRes 3.13 -1.06 -25.3
FsthdTch n 19.89 -6.41 -24.4
WilshBcp 4.00 -1,15 -22.3
3D Sys 41.72-11.03 -20.9
MIPS Tech 8.32 -2.13 -20.4
SkyPFrtJ 3.20 -.80 -20.0
QuantFu rs 2.58 -.63 -19.7
DUSA 4.89 -1.16 -19.2
KVHInd 13.10 -2.98 -18.5

Most Active ($1 or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
Microsoft 4916757 25.92 +.40
Intel 4266124 23.15+1,69
Cisco 3739091 17.52 +.58
SiriusXM 2780868 1.99 +.06
PwShs QQQ213855459.08 +.74
Oracle 1516706 35.96 +1.21
MicronT 1485125 11.32 -.20
Dell lnc 1448103 15.47 +.20
Broadcom 1067375 35.19 -5.21
LawsnSft 1062336 11.06-1.31

Diary
Advanced 1,818
Declined 947
New Highs 389
New Lows 76
Total issues 2,820
Unchanged 55
Volume 10,314,080,6091


STOCKS OF LOCAL INTEREST


Name Ex Div Last
AT&Tlnc NY 1.72 31.12
AlcatelLuc NY ... 6.54
AutoZone NY 282.38
BkofAm NY .04 12.28
BobEvans Nasd .80 31.36
Broadoom Nasd .36 35.19
CNBFnPA Nasd .66 13.87
CSX NY 1.04 78.69
Chevron NY 3.12 109.44
Cisco Nasd .24 17.52
Citigrp NY ... 4.59
CocaCola NY 1.88 67.46
Delhaize NY 2.02 85.86
Dell Inc Nasd ... 15.47
DeltaAir NY ... 10.38
FamilyDIr NY .72 54.21
FordM NY ... 15.47
GenElec NY .60 20.45
HomeDp NY 1.00 37.15
iShJapn NY .14 10.53
iShSilver NY ... .46.88
iShEMkts NY .64 50.00
iShR2K NY .89 86.39
Intel Nasd .72 23.15
JPMorgCh NY 1.00 45.63,
LawsnSft Nasd ... 11.06
Lowes NY .44 26.25
McDnlds NY 2.44 78.31


Wkly Wkly YTD
Chg %Chg 'Chg


+.44
+.40


+1.4 +5.9
+6.5+120.9
-0.9 +3.6
-0.2 -7.9
+0.8 -4.9
-12.9 -19.2
+1.1 -6.3
+5.4 +21.8
+1.2 +19.9
+3.4 -13.4
+0.9 -3.0
-0.6 +2.6
+0.3 +16.5
+1.3 +14.2
+14.7 -17.6
+3.9 +9.1
+0.3 -7.9
+2.5 +11.8
-1.7 +6.0
+3.0 -3.5
+3.0 +55.3
-0.3 +4.9
+2.3 +10.4
+7.9 +10.1
+2.1 +7.6
-10.6 +19.6
-1.6 +4.7
+1.8 +2.0


Wkly Wkly YTD
Name Ex Div Last Chg %Chg %Chg


MicronT Nasd
Microsoft Nasd .64
NY Times NY
NextEraEn NY 2.20
NobltyH Nasd
NokiaCp NY .55
OcciPet NY 1.84
Oracle Nasd .24
Penney NY .80
PepsiCo NY 1.92
Pfizer NY .80
Potash s NY .28
PwShs QQQNasd .39
ProUSSIv rs NY
Ryder NY 1.08
SpdrGold NY I
S&P500ETFNY 2.34
SearsHldgsNasd
SilvWhtn g NY .12
SiriusXM Nasd
SouthnCo NY 1.89
SprintNex NY
SPDR FrclNY .16
TaiwSemi NY .47
TimeWam NY .94
US Bancrp NY .50
WalMart NY 1.46
WellsFargo NY .48


11.32 -.20
25.92 +.40
8.13 -.79
56.57 +1.06
9.01 +.10
9.23 +.60
114.29 +13.76
35.96 +1.21
38.45 +1.06
68.89 +1.48
20,97 +1.18
56.38 -1.58
59.08 +.74
13.64 -1.10
53.50 +2.37
152.37 +5.63
136.43 +2.65
85.97 +3.67
40.62 -1.74
1.99 +.06
39.04 +.96
5.18 +.37
16.38 +.28
13.50 +.94
37.86 +1.35
25,82 +.67
54.98 +1.40
29.11 +.57


-1.7 +41.1
+1.6 -7.1
-8.9 -17.0
+1.9 +8.8
+1.1 +11.1
+7.0 -10.6
+13.7 +16.5
+3.5 +14.9
+2.8 +19.0
+2.2 +5.4
+6.0 +19.8
-2.7 +9.2
+1.3 +8.5
-7.5 -65,3
+4.6 +1.6
+3.8 +9.8
+2.0 +8.5
+4.5 +16.6
-4.1 +4.0
+2.8 +21.8
+2.5 +2.1
+7.7 +22.5
+1.7 +2.7
+7.5 +7.7
+3.7 +17.7
+2.7 -4.3
+2.6 +1.9
+2.0 -6.1


Stock Footnotes: g = Dividends and earnings in Canadian dollars. h = Does not meet continued-listing standards.
If = Late filing with SEC. n = New in past 52 weeks, pf = Preferred, rs= Stock has undergo"t a reverse stock split
of at least 50 percent within the past year. rt = Right to buy security at a specified price. s = Stock has split by at
least 20 percent within the last year. un = Units. vj = In bankruptcy or receivership. wd = When distributed, wi =
When issued. wt = Warrants.
Mutual Fund Footnotes: b = Fee covering market costs is paid from fund assets, d = Deferred sales charge, or
redemption fee, f = front load (sales charges), m = Multiple tees are charged. NA = not available, p = previous day's
net asset value, s = fund split shares during the week. x = fund paid a distribution during the week.Gainers and
Losers must be worth at least $2 to be listed in tables at left. Most Actives must be worth at least $1. Volume in
hundreds of shares. Source: The Associated Press. Sales figures are unofficial.


1I~


|11


'IIV_


Money Rates
Last Pvs Week
Prime Rate 3.25, 3.25
Discount Rate 0.75 0.75
Federal Funds Rate .00-25 .00-25
Treasuries
A nA u~u


3-month
6-month
5-vear


U.U4 0U.U
0.10 0.11
1.97 2.11


10-year 3.29 3.40
30-year 4.40 4.47


' CurrenciesA
Last Pvs Day
Australia .9115 .9168
Britain 1.6711 1.6643


Canada
Euro
Japan
Mexico
Switzerlnd


.9460
.6739


.9512
.6747


. 81.10 81.57
11.5022 11.5555
I .8639 .8732


British pound expressed in U.S. dollars. All oth-
ers show dollar in foreign currency.


Dow Jones Industrials -26.11 115.49 95.59 72.35 47.23
Close: 12,810.54 *- *) *
1-week change: 304.55 (2.4%) MON TUES WED THUR FRI
13,000


12,500


12,000 .T.A .


11,500 ... ..


11,000 "N D ... F M A



MUTUAL FUNDS


Total Assets Total Return/Rank
Obi (SMIns) NAV 4-wk 12-mo 5-year


Name


PIMCO TotRetlls Cl
American Funds GrthAmA m LG
FRdelity Contra LG
Vanguard TotStldx LB
American Funds CaplncBuA m IH
Vanguard Instldxl LB
American Funds CpWIdGrIA m WS
Vanguard 500OAdml LB
American Funds IncAmerA m MA
Vanguard TotStlAdm LB
American Funds InvCoAmA m LB
Dodge & Cox IntlStk FV
Dodge & Cox Stock LV
American Funds WAMutlnvA m LV
American Funds EurPacGrA m FB
Vanguard InstPlus LB
FrankTemp-Franklin Income A m CA
American Funds FnlnvA m LB
Vanguard Totlnfl d FB
American Funds NewPerspA m WS
PIMCO TotRetAdm b Cl
American Funds BalA m MA
Vanguard 5001nv LB
Fidelity GrowCo LG
Vanguard'WelltnAdm MA
Harbor Intlinst! d FB
Fidelity LowPriStk d MB


136,166
67,270
63,411
60,842
59,258
58,419
55,597
54,608
54,296
51,453
49,590
45,650
44,807
40,310
39,416
37,574
36,439
35,114
34,776
33,932
33,332
32,540
32,521
29,883
29,088
28,368
28,359


+7.7/B
+14.3/D
+18.0/B
+16.3/B
+15.1/C
+15.2/B
+17.2/C
+15.2/B
+16.0/A
+16.4/B
+12.8/D
+19.2/B
+13.5/C
+16.6/A
+19.2/C
+15.3/B
+14.9/A
+17.7/A
+19.8/C
+18.8/B
+7.4/B
+13.7/B
+15.1/B
+22.7/A
+13.0/B
+24.8/A
+18.6/C


Pct Min Init
Load Invt
NL 1,000,000
5.75 250
NL 2,500
NL 3,000
5.75 250
NL 5,000,000
5.75 250
NL 10,000
5.75 250
NL 10,000
5.75 250
NL 2,500
NL 2,500
5.75 250
5.75 250
NL 200,000,000
4.25 1,000
5.75 250
NL 3,000
5.75 250
NL 1,000,000
5.75 250
NL 3,000
NL 2,500
NL 50,000
NL 50,000
NL 2,500


CA-Conservaive Aocation, Cl-Intermediate-Term Bond, ES -Europe Stock, FB -Foreign Large Blend, FG -Foreign LargeGrowth, FV -Foeigr
Large Value, IH -World Altocaton, LB -Large Blend, LG -Large Growt, LV -Lae Value, MA -Moderate Alocabon, MB -Mid-Cap Blend, MV
Mid-Cap Value, SH -Specidalty-heath, WS -World Stck, Total Return: Chng in NAV with dividends reinvested. Rank How fund performed vs
others with same ob ecive: A is in top 20%, E in bottom 20%. Min Int Invt: Minimum $ needed to invest in fund. Source: Momingstar.


New York Stock Exchange


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last
ABB Ltd 1.12 4.1 ... +2.15 +22.4 27.49
AES Corp ... ... 17 +.23 +8.7 13.24
AFLAC 1.20 2.1 11 +2.53 -.4 56.19
AK Steel .20 1.2 .. +.18 -.7 16.25
AMR ... ... ... +.38 -24.6 5.87
AT&Tlnc 1.72 5.5 9 +.44 +5.9 31.12
AU Optron ... ... ... -.53 -22.3 8.10
AbtLab 1.92 3.7 13 +.24 +8.6 52.04
Accenture .90 1.6 19 +.32 +17.8 57.13
AMD ... ... 9 +.39 +11.2 9.10
Aetna .60 1.4 9 +2.32 +35.6 41.38
Agilent ... ... 24 +.57 +20.5 49.91
AirTran ... ... 29 +.18 +1.6 7.51
AlcatelLuc ... ...... +.40+120.9 6.54
Alcoa .12 .7 24 +.03 +10.5 17.00
Allstate .84 2.5 14 +2.19 +6.1 33.84
AlphaNRs ... ... 73 +1.09 -3.1 58.17
Altria 1.52 5.7 14 +.78 +9.0 26.84
AmBevs 1.16 3.6 ... +.81 +5.0 32.58
AEagleOut .44 2.8 22 -.45 +6.4 15.56
AEP 1.84 5.0 14 +.99 +1.4 36.48
AmExp .72 1.5 14 +1.97 +14.4 49.08
AmlntlGrp ... ... 3 -1.01 -35.5 31.15
AmeriBrgn .40 1.0 17 +.09 +19.1 40.64
Anadarko .36 .5 52 -.13 +3.7 78.94
Annaly 2.62 14.7 9 +.26 -.4 17.84
Apache .60 .4 14+10.05 +11.9 133.37
ArcelorMit .75 2.0 19 +.57 -2.8 37.07
ArchCoal .44 1.3 25 -.34 -2.2 34.30
ArchDan .64 1.7 12 -+.97 +23.1 37.02
ATMOS 1.36 3.9 18 +1.47 +11.8 34.89
BB&TCp .64 2.4 22 +.94 +2.4 26.92
BakrHu .60 .8 31 +2.93 +35.4 77.41
BcoBrades .81 4.0 ... -.57 -.3 20.23
BcoSantSA .79 6.4 .. +.81 +16.4 12.40
BcoSBrasil .70 6.0 ... -.01 -14.7 11.60
BkofAm .04 .3 22 -.03 -7.9 12.28
BkNYMel .52 1.8 14 +.69 -4.1 28.96
BariPVixrs ... ... ... -1.72 -38.4 23.16
BarrickG .48 .9 14 -4.62 -4.1 51.01
Baxter 1.24 2.2 16 +.31 +12.4 56.90
BerkHB ... ... 16 +.94 +4.0 83.30
BestBuy .60 1.9 10 +1.10 -9.0 31.22
Blackstone .40 2.1 ... -.37 +33.9 18.94
BlockHR .60 3.5 14 -.36 +45.2 17.29
Boeing 1.68 2.1 18 +4.34 +22.2 79.78
Boise Inc .80 ... 13 +1.01 +23.8 9.82
BostonSci ... ... 21 +.33 -1.1 7.49
Brinker .56 2.3 14 -.66 +15.4 24.09
BrMySq 1.32 4.7 15 +.28 +6.1 28.10
Brunswick .05 .2 ... -3.64 +24.7 23.37
CB REIlis ... ... 37 -2.99 +30.4 26.71
CBS B .20 .8 27 +.42 +32.4 25.22
CMS Eng .84 4.2 14 +.37 +6.5 19.80
CSX 1.04 1.3 18 +4.04 +21.8 78.69
CVS Care .50 1.4 14 +.01 +4.2 36.22
Cameron ... ... 23 -1.81 +3.9 52.72
CdnNRs gs .36 ...... +.34 +5.7 46.96
CapOne .20 .4 8 +1.47 +28.6 54.73
CapitlSrce .04 .6 ... -.18 -5.9 6.68
Carnival 1.00 2.6 16 +.46 -17.4 38.07
Caterpillar 1.76 '1.5 28 +5.99 +23.2 115.4"0
Cemex .43 ... ... -.17 -15.7 8.68
CenterPnt .79 4.2 17 +.32 +18.3 18.60
CntryLink 2.90 7.1 12 +1.27 -11.7 40.78
ChesEng .30 .9 11 +.98 +29.9 33.67
Chevron 3.12 2.9 11 +1.31 +19.9 109.44
Chimera .66 16.3 6 +.11 -1.5 4.05
Citigrp ... ... 15 +.04 -3.0 4.59
CliffsNRs .56 .6 13 -3.36 +20.1 93.72
Coach .60 1.0 21 +2.16 +8.1 59.81
CocaCola 1.88 2.8 13 -.42 +2.6 67.46
-Coeur ... ... ... -.34 +16.1 31.71
ColgPal 2.32 2.8 18 +3.70 +5.0 84.35
Comerica .40 1.1 21 +1.62 -10.2 37.93
CmtyHIt ... ... 10 +.04 -17.8 30.73
ConAgra .92 3.8 16 +.56 +8.3 24.45
ConocPhil 2.64 3.3 11 -1.84 +15.8 78.89
ConsolEngy .40 .7 27 +2.83 +11.0 54.09




Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last


ASMLHId .58 1,4
AVI Bio ...
AcadiaPh ...
AcmePkt
ActivsBliz .17 1.4
AdobeSy ...
AEtemag ...
AkamaiT
AlteraCplf .24 .5
Amarin
Amazon
ACapAgy 5.60 19.2
AmCapLtd ...
AmerMed ...
Amgen
Ancestry
A123Sys ...
Apple Inc ...
ApldMatI .32 2.0
ArenaPhm ...
ArmHId .09 .3
Atmel
AvanirPhm ...
Axcelis
Baidu s
BedBath ...
Biogenidc ... ..
Broadcom .36 1.0
BrcdeCm ... ...
CA Inc .16 .7
Cadence ...
CpstnTrb h ...
CeleraGrp ...
Celgene
CellTher rsh...
CentEuro ...
CienaCorp ... ....
Cirrus


...+1.53 +8.9 41.76
+.08 -15.6 1.79
7 +.51 +129.2 2.75"
... +5.58 +55.4 82.61
37 +.06 -8.5 11.38
20 +.07 +9.0 33.55
... +.20 +37.2 2.36
37 -5.55 -26.8 34.43
18 +2.71 +36.9 48.70
-.92 +95.1 16.00
85 +9.92 +8.8 195.81
4 +.33 +1.3 29.11
3 +.24 +35.8 10.27
26 +.05 +56.4 29.50
12 +3.16 +3.6 56.85
54+13.47 +61.4 45.70
... -.01 -36.7 6.04
17 -.57 +8.5 350.13
15 +.44 +11.7 15.69
... +.16 -18.6 1.40
+.52 +51.6 31.46
17 +.45 +24.2 15.30
... +.14 +7.1 4.37
... 60 -46.0 1.87
13 -.13 +53.9 148.52
18 -1.17 +14.2 56.13
23 -2.05 +45.6 97.65
18 -5.21 -19.2 35.19
30 +.29 +18.1 6.25
17 +.43 +.6 24.59
15 +.47 +25.7 10.38
... +.09 +101.0 1.93
... -.09 +25.6 7.91
31 +2.48 -.4 58.88
... -.05 -7.9 .34
... +.78 -48.4 11.82
... +.72 +34.2 28.24
6 +.28 +3.6 16.56


Name Div
ConEd 2.40
ConstellEn .96
Corning .20
Covidien .80
Cummins 1.05
DR Horton .15
DTE 2.24
Danaher s .08
DeanFds ...
Deere 1.40
DeltaAir ..
DenburyR
DrSCBr rs ...
DirFnBr rs
DrxFBull s .
DirxSCBull ...
Discover .24
Disney .40
DomRescs 1.97
DoralFncl ...
DowChm 1.00
DukeEngy .98
ECDang n ...
EMC Cp
Eaton s 1.36
ElPasoCp .04
Elan
EldorGldg .10
EmersonE 1.38
EnCanag .80
EndvSilv g ...
ENSCO 1.40
Exelon 2.10
ExxonMbl 1.88
FstHorizon .04
FirstEngy 2.20
FlagstB rs ...
FordM
FMCGs 1.00
FrontierCm .75
Gafisa SA .29
GameStop ..
Gannett .16
Gap .45
GenGrPr n .40
GenMillss 1.12
GenMot n
GenOn En ...
Genworth
Gerdau .25
GlaxoSKIn 2.11
GoldFLtd .19
Goldcrp g .41
GoldmanS 1.40
Goodyear ...
Hallibrtn .36
HarmonyG .07
HartfdFn .40
HItMgmt
HeclaM
Hertz
Hess .40
HewlettP .32
HomeDp 1.00
HonwlllntI 1.33
HorizLns
HostHotls .08
Huntsmn .40
IAMGId g .08
iShGold s
iSAstla .82
iShBraz 2.53
iSCan .50
iShGer .29
iSh HK .45
iShJapn .14
iSh Kor .44
iSTaiwn .29
iShSilver ...





Name Div
Cisco .24
CitrixSys ...
Clearwire
Coinstar
Comcast .45
Come spcl .45
Costco .96
Cree Inc
Crocs
CypSemi ...
Dell Inc
Dndreon
DirecTV A ...
DryShips
ETrade rs ...
eBay
ElectArts ...
EndoPhrm ...
EntropCom ...
EricsnTel .37
EvrgrSlrrs ...
Expedia .28
ExpScrip s ...
F5 Netwks ...
FifthThird .24
Finisar
FstNiagara .64
Flextrn
GT Solar ..
GileadSci ...
Google
GulfRes
HercOffsh ...
HudsCity .32
Intel .72
Intersil .48
JA Solar ...
JDS Uniph ...


Wkly YTD Wkly
YId PE Chg %Chg Last
4.6 16 +1.44 +5.1 52.12
2.6 12 +3.32 +18.9 36.42
1.0 10 +.55 +8.4 20.94
1.4 17 +.75 +22.0 55.69
.9 19+11.24 +9.2 120.'18
1.2 89 +.45 +4.3 12.44
4.4 15 +1.06 +11.5 50.53
.1 20 +2.06 +17.1 55.24
... 20 +1.01 +26.6 11.19
1.4 20 +2.25 +17.4 97.50
... 16 +1.33 -17.6 10.38
... 31 -.29 +18.2 22.57
... ,.. -2.35 -31.6 32.05
-2.08-16.9 39.25
... ... +1.47 +10Q.2 30.68
... ... +6.14 +30.8 94.73
1.0 11 +.08 +34.1 24.84
.9 19 +.83 +14.9 43.10
4.2 15 +1.67 +8.7 46.42
... ... +.20 +8.7 1.50
2.4 22 +1.51 +20.1 40.99
5.3 13 +.20 +4.7 18.65
... ... -.99 -15.0 23.01
.. 31 -.11 +23.8 28.34
2.5 17 -.33 +5.5 53.56
.2 17 +.11 +40.9 19.39
... ... +.13 +41.4 8.10
49 +.57 +.3 18.63
2.3 22 +1.63 +6.3 60.77
2.4 96 +.97 +15.1 33.53
... ... -.30 +56.5 11.49
2.4 15 +1.30 +11.6 59.57
5.0 14 +1.52 +1.3 42.17
2.1 12 +1.62 +20.3 87.98
.4 ... +.60 -7.0' 10.95
5.5 15 +1.08 +7.9 39.96
... ... +.27 -4.3 1.56
7 +.04 -7.9 15.47
1.8 11 +.18 -8.4 55.02
9.1 36 +.23 -15.0 .8.27
2.3 ... -.61 -14.9 12.36
..: 10 -.86 +12.2 25.68
1.1 6 -.17 -.2 15.06
1.9 12 +1.25 +5.4 23.24
2.4 ... +.77 +7.9 16.70
2.9 15 +.67 +8.4 38.58
... 11 +1.14 -12.9 32.09
... ... +.14 +3.1 3.93
... 53 +.17 -7.2 12.19
2.1 ... -.05 -13.7 12.08
4.8 ... +2.28 +11.3 43.66
1.1 3 -:11 -1.6 17.84
.7 ... +.16 +21.4 55.83
.9 17 -2.50 -10.2 151.01
... ... +2.19 +53.2 18.15
.7 21 ... +23.6 50.48
.4 ... +.15 +24.2 15.57
1.4 10 +1.43 +9.4 28.97
.. 17 +.97 +18.2 11.28
... 72 .-.05 -16.4 9.41
28 +.13 +18.8 17.21
.5 11 +5.28 +12.3 85.96
.8 10 -.62 -4.1 40.37
2.7 18 -.65 +6.0 37.15
2.2 21 +.51 +15.2 61.23
... +.35 -59.5 1.77
.4 ... -.12 -.4 17.79
1.9 29 +.90 +33.6 20.85
27 +.24 +16.6 20.75
+.57 +9.9 15.27
2.9 ... +.23 +11.1 28.27
3.3 ... -.88 +.4 77.72
1.5 ... -.14 +8.7 33.70
.1.0 ... +1.39 +20.2 28.78
2.3 ... -.17 +2.3 19.36
1.3 ... +.31 -3.5 10.53
.6 ... +.61 +12.7 68.97
... +.40 +2.4 16.00
... +1.35 +55.3 46.88


LIFE DOESN'T STAND STILL


AND NEITHER SHOULD


YOUR INVESTMENTS.


Time can allect you as much us your investments. While
you can't stop change, you can help make sure youi invest-
ments match your current circumstances and goals.

Fortunately, doing that may be as easy as meeting with your
financial advisor. A free Portl'olio Review from Edward
Jones can help identlily where your investments stand in
relation to your goals. And help put time back on your side.

To schedule a complimentary Portfolio Review, call
your local financial advisor today.


Steve Jones, CFP
Financial Advisor
2929 West U S Highway 90
Suite 114
Lake City, FL 32055
386-752-3847


www.edwardjones.com Member SIc


** -


Wkly YTD Wkly
Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last


iShChina25 .63
iSSP500 2.46
iShEMkts .64
iShB20 T 3.91
iS Eafe 1.42
iShR2K .89
iShREst 1.98
ITW 1.36
IBM 3.00
Intl Coal
IntlGame .24
IntPap 1.05
Interpublic .24
Invesco .49
ItauUnibH .67
JPMorgCh 1.00
Jabil .28
JanusCap .20
JohnJn 2.28
JohnsnCtl .64
JnprNtwk ..
KB Home .25
KeyEngy ...
Keycorp .04
KimbClk 2.80
Kimco .72
Kinross g .10
Kothls 1.00
Kraft 1.16
L-1 Ident ..
LDK Solar ...
LSI Corp ...


... -1.16
+2.73
-.18
+1.29
+1.39
+1.94
+1.54
16 +4.34
14 +2.30
38 +.16
21 +1.36
12 +.88
24 -.59
18 +.07
... -.51
10 +.95
16 -.07
13 --.46
15 +1.65
18 +.27
33 -1.75
... +.39
22 +2.23
12 +.32
15 +.01
85 +.87
27 +.49
14 +.68
14 +.21
... +.07
11 +.61
... +.47


Nasdaq Most Active


Wkly YTD Wkly
PE Chg %Chg Last
13 +.58 -13.4 17.52
53 +7.97 +23.3 84.34
... -.56 -5.6 4.86
33 +4.24 -4.4 53.98
20 +.87 +19.8 26.21
19 +.81 +18.5 24.55
26 +2.02 +12.0 80.89
25 +1.70 -38.2 40.74
24 -.29 +17.5 20.11
38 +.83 +17.1 21.76
11 +.20 +14.2 15.47
... +2.54 +24.4 43.43
20 +1.59 +21.7 48.59
8 +.02 -14.4 4.70
... -.23 +1.5 16.24
24 +2.44 +23.6 34.39
... -.23 +23.2 20.18
14 +.28 +9.7 39.16
10 +.40 -27.6 8.75
... +2.29 +31.8 15.20
... -.35 -58.5 1.45
17 +1.18 -.3 25.02
24 +.57 +5.0 56.74
42 -5.51 -22.1 101.36
16 +.11 -9.6 13.27
26 +1.34 -5.4 28.09
18 +.51 +3.0 14.40
14 -.32 -11.2 6.97
10 +1.52 +22.5 11.17
12 -.22 +7.2 38.84
20+19.00 -8.4 544.10
2 -1.06 -70.7 3.13
... +.57 +80.3 6.28
... +.07 -25.2 9.53
11 +1.69 +10.1 23.15
... +.29 -3.3 14.77
4 +.49 -1.0 6.85
... +.84 +43.9 20.84


Name Div
JetBlue
KLA Tnc 1.00
LawsnSft ...
Level3
LiblyMlntA ...
UfeTech .,
LinearTch .96
LoopNet
MIPS Tech ...
MarvellT
Mattel .92
Maximlntg .84
MelcoCrwn ...
MicronT
Microsoft .64
NetApp
Netflix
NewsCpA .15
Novius
Nvidia
OCZTech ...
OnSmcnd
Oracle .24
PMC Sra
Paccar .48
PattUTI .20
PeopUtdF .63
Polycom
Popular
Power-One
PwShs QQQ.39
Qualcom .86
RF MicD ...
Rdiff.cm
Regenm
RschMotn ...
Riverbed s ...
SanDisk


Wkly YTD Wkly
YId PE Chg %Chg Last


18 +.27 -14.4
11 +1.30 +13.6
40 -1.31 +19.6
... -.07 +59.2
12 +.99 +10.8
27 +1.65 -.5
15 +.60 +.6
55 +4.90 +67.2
18 -2.13 -45.2
12 -.28 -16.8
14 +.05 +5.1
20 +1.19 +15.7
... +.74 +68.9
8 -.20 +41.1
6 +.40 -7.1
32 +1.09 -5.2
79-19.55 +32.4
15 +.34 +22.4
9 -2.55 -.7
48 +1.48 +29.9
... +.71 +70.1
14 +.55 +6.3
24 +1.21 +14.9
38 +.79 -6.6
33 -.16 -7.4
26 +.27 +44.4
33 +.66 -2.2
55 +7.93 +53.5
... -.01 +.3
9 +.56 -19.1
... +.74 +8.5
25 +.15 +15.4
15 +.57 -9.4
... +5.18 +210.6
... +1.29 +55.5
8 -5.12 -16.3
... -.65
9 +.34 -1.1


5.66
43.90
11.06
1.56
17.48
55.20
34.81
18.58
8.32
15.43
26.72
27.34
10.74
11.32
25.92
52.11
232.67
17.82
32.10
20.00
8.20
10.50
35.96
8.02
53.11
31.12
13.70
59.83
3.15
8.25
59.08
57.09
6.66
16.43
51.04
48.65
35.17
49.33


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last


Satcon h
Savvis
SeagateT .72
SifyTech ...
Silicnlmg
Slcnware .41
Sina
SiriusXM ...
SkywksSol ...
SmartM
Sohu.cm
Sonus
SpectPh ...
Staples .40
StarScient
Starbucks .52
StlDynam .40
SuccessF ...
SunPowerA ..
Symantec ...
TD Ameritr .20
Tellabs .08
TevaPhrm .78
TiVo Inc
TriQuint ...
USA Techh...
UTiWrldwd .06
UrbanOut ...
VertxPh
VirgnMda h .16
Vodafone 1.33
WholeFd .40
Windstrm 1.00
Xilinx .76
Yahoo
Zalicus


. ... -.11 -28.7
... ... +1.68 +54.2
4.1 6 -.35 +17.2
... ... +1.80 +265.0
36 +1.03 +13.2
6.0 23 +.68 +13.9
... .. +1.69 +95.8
... ... +.06 +21.8
... 31 +3.27 +9.9
... 13 +1.13 +58.7
... 27+10.05 +66.5
... ... +.34 +47.6
... ... -.31 +31.0
1.9 17 +.48 -7.2
+.37 +105.6
1.4 25 -.80 +12.7
2.2 22 -.36 -.6
... ... -5.32 +19.6
... 50 +5.79 +69.1
... 26 +.62 +17.4
.9 21 -.80 +13.4
1.6 23 -.57 -27.7
1.7 14 +.72 -12.3
... ... -.55 +10.9
... 12 +1.04 +17.7
... ... +.27 +193.2
.3 39 +.90 +5.7
... 20 -.29 -12.1
... ... +5.68 +57.2
.5 ... +.50 +11.1
4.6 ... +.80 +10.1
.6 39 -3.54 +24.1
7.8 18 +.16 -8.1
2.2 15 +3.09 +20.3
... 21 +.85 +6.4
... ... +.17 +93.7


Name


Div YId


LVSands
LennarA .16 .8
Lexmark
LillyEli 1.96 5.3
Limited .80 1.9
LincNat .20 .6
LizClaib
LongtopFn .
LyonBasA .10 .2
MEMC
MFA Fncl .94 11.8
MGIC
MGM Rsts ...
Macys .20 .8
Manitowoc .08 .4
ManpwrGp .74 1.1
MarathonO1.00 1.9
MktVGold .40 .6
MktVRus .18 .4
MktVJrGId 2.93 7.0
MarlntA .35 1.0
Masco .30 2.2
MedcoHlth ...
Medirnic .90 2.2
Merck 1.52 4.2
MetLife .74 1.6
MetroPCS ...
MitsuUFJ ...
Molycorpn ...
Monsanto 1.12 1.6
MonstrWw ...
Moodys .56 1.4


Wkly YTD Wkly
PE, Chg %Cha Last


94 +1.04
28 +,12
8 -4.67
8 +.75
17 +1.79
11 +1.40
+.13
-3.44
+1.77
79 +.14
9 +.24
+.59
-.73
12 -.25
-.45
... -1.89
15 +.20
-.43
-.26
-.20
30 -.57
... +.02
18 +1.20
13 +.91
17 +1.91
14 +2.41
31 -.06
... +.25
... +5.06
28 +.52
... -1.32
17 +3.31


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last


MorgStan .20
Mosaic .20
MotriaSoln ...
MotriaMon ...
NCR Corp ...
NRG Egy
Nabors
NBkGreece .29
NatGrid 7.04
NOilVarco .44
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SilvrcpM g .08
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Tesoro
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AMEX Most Active


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AdeonaPh ...
Advntrxrs ...
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AldNevG ...
AlmadnMg ...
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AntaresP
Augusta g ...
Aurzong .
AvalRaren ...
BarcGSOil ...
Brigus grs ...
CAMAC En ...
CanoPet ...
CelSci
CFCdag .01
CheniereEn ...
ChinaShen ...
Crossh g rs ...
Crystallxg ...
DejourE g ..
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GenMoly ...
GoldStrg ..
GranTrrag ...
GrtBasGg ...
GtPanSilvg ...
Hemisphrx ...
Hyperdyn
IndiaGC
KodiakOg ...
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MadCatzg ..
Metalico
Metalline
MdwGoldq ...


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NDragon
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NDynMng ...
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Oilsandsg ...
OpkoHIth ...
ParaG&S ..
PhrmAth ..
PionDrill ...
Quepasa
RadientPh...
RareEle g ...
Rentech
RexahnPh ...
Richmntg ...
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SamsO&G
SulphCo
TanzRyg
Taseko
TimberinR
TmsatlPet ...
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Uluru
Ur-Energy ...
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UraniumEn ...
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I Weekly Dow Jones


YId


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I


.l.. ". --m -"tj -.. I


I .







Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, MAY 1, 2011

Lake City Reporter





CLASSIFIED


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

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lication. Credit for published errors
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In Print and Online
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Legal

Local Hazard Mitigation Strategy
Meeting
A Public Invitation to Participate
We are enhancing the Risk Assess-
ment for our Columbia County Local
Mitigation Strategy (LMS) this year.
The risk assessment provides the
foundation for our LMS strategy by
identifying our communities' risks
and vulnerabilities.
Join us for the enhancement kick-off
meeting Wednesday, May 4th, 2011
at 9:00am Columbia County Com-
bined Communications Center 263
NW Lake City Ave. Lake City, FL
32055
Come be part of the process and
learn about mitigation in your com-
munity!
http://www.columbiacountyem.com
04544504
April 24, 2011
May 1,2011


010 Announcements







100 Job
Opportunities

04544565
Ladies and Gentleman
if you have A Class A CDL,
we have a Lease/with a lease
purchase plan.
We accept PTD! Certified
students. 0/Operators. No
New England States, 100%
fuel surcharge. Carolinas to
the great NW!
Call today to join us!
Buel Inc
866-369-9744

05525772
Customer Service Rep
needed for established Insurance
Agency; Health Ins & 401K
. plan available,Send reply to Box
05060, C/O The Lake City
Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL, 32056
Associate Reps
SUMMER WORK/GREAT PAY
Immediate FT/PT openings,
Customer sales/service,
No exp needed, conditions,
Apply Now all ages 17+
(386) 269-0883

Aurora Diagnostics; Part time
Courier Position; Must have a
clean Driving record. Please fax'
resume to 386-758-179'1
*Please no phone calls*

FLORIDA
sh GATEWAY
>COLLEGE
(Formerly Lake City Community College)
MANAGER
NETWORK AND SECURITY
Responsible for managing all
operations of the college data center:
planning, evaluation, purchase,
installation and reliable operation of
all computer hardware, networking
equipment, video conferencing
equipment and system level software.
Responsible for supervising
technology staff. Requires Bachelor's
Degree in Computer Science or a
related field and five years of
increasing responsibility in
supervision, servers, networks, and
pc's or an Associate Degree in
Computer Science or a related field
and seven years of increasing
responsibility in supervision, servers,
networks, and pc's. A minimum of five
years experience in" all aspects of
data center management activities.
Must possess good oral and written
communication skills and knowledge.
and understanding of the principles of
networking, computing,
telecommunications, video
conferencing and data center
management.
Application Deadline: 5116111
College employment application and
photocopies of transcripts required.
Position details and application
available at: www.fqc.edu
Human Resources
Florida Gateway College
149 S.E. College Place
Lake City Fl 32025-2007
Phone.(386) 754-4314
Fax (386) 754-4814
E-Mail: humanr(a)foc.edu
FGC is acr" ediAed, h fth mumo,,,L ,,iot on Collegue o
'PAD/l Ar- O Coll in Edr ti ,







Lawn & Landscape Service

Clean Pine Straw,
You pick it up, $1.85 a bale
Delivery of 100 bales $260
386-688-9156

Landscape Maintenance Company
You can trust for knowledge &
pride, Mention this AD!
Mow Green, LLC 386-288-6532

Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.


100 Job
100 Opportunities
AVON!!!. EARN up to 50%!!!
Only $10 for Starter Kit,
1-800-275-9945 pin #4206
www.youravon.com/tdavies
Barber/Hair Stylist needed.
Experience preferred. No clientele
needed. Great pay, no chair rent,
call 386-984-0101
Busy office seeking
experienced, energetic person for
receptionist position.
Fax resume to 386-961-8802
Hiring Locally This Week
Liberty National Life
Insurance Company
Full Training Provided Potential
of $60K+ Annually. 401K, BCBS
Insurance & Pension for those who
qualify. CalU-800-257-5500 to
set up in interview.
Energetic person w/initiative
needed to teach adult learners.
Eve classes, 40 hrs/mo, $11/hr
To apply go to:
expresstrainingservices.com/jobs
LEARN TO DRAW BLOOD?
Have a new career in Phlebotomy!
Now Enrolling!! Call for more
info. 386-755-5780 /386-951-6400
Licensed Insurance Salesperson,
for non-smoking office, 2-20
P & C Licensed preferred
Contact fmcknight81@cox.net
Live Oak CPA Firm seeks
full-time Secretary/Receptionist.
Please see Employment
Opportunity at
www.liveoakcpa.com.
Sales Position available for moti-
vated individual Rountree -Moore
Toyota, Great benefits, paid train-
ing/vacation. Exp. a plus but not
necessary. Call Anthony Cosentino
386-623-7442
Security Officers
needed Lake City Area, must have
current D Security Lic., Clear
background, Drivers Lic, phone,
Diploma/GED.
Benefits, DFWP EEO Apply at:
www.dsisecurity.com MB 1000084
Sewing Machine Operator
with experience
good hourly rate
Call Hafners 386-755-6481
Wanted Highly motivated
individual for Sales Position.
Rountree -Moore Automotive
Group, Great benefits, paid vaca-
tion. Exp. a plus but not necessary.
Call Tony Reese 386-344-7517

Medical
120 Employment


05525779


Home Health Care
YOU can have it all.
Life balance. Competitive
salary. Bar-setting benefits.
Due to continuous growth,
Amedisys Home Health
Services is hiring! We are
recruiting for.the following
positions in the Lake City area:
Occupational Therapist
PRN
Physical Therapists
Full-time and PRN
Speech Language Pathologist
PRN
Behavioral Nurse
PRN
Please apply online at
careers.amedisys.com.
For additional information,
please contact Kelly Hughes at
(877) 262-3479 or
kelly.hughes@amedisys.com.
EOE/M/F/D/V

Aurora Diagnostics; Medical
Billing Representative needed;
1-2 yrs Medical Billing exp,
preferred but no required. This
position is temporary with the
opportunity to become permanent.
Please fax resume to
386-758-1791
*Please no phone calls*


Experienced LPN wanted to work
in busy medical practice. Knowl-
edge with pediatric & adults de-
sired. No weekends or nights,
competitive salary & benefits
Fax Resume to 386-758-5628
BILLING SPECIALIST
Busy local practice/outpt division,
attention to detail a must, strong
computer skills, $12-$13 per hr,
depending on skills 877-389-6538


ADVERTISE YOUR
Job Opportunities in the
Lake City Reporter
Classifieds.
Enhance Your Ad with
Your Individual Logo
For just pennies a day.
Call today,
755-5440.
1 PM 'ltlT~ lflL~


12 Medical
120 Employment

05525785



Meridian Behavioral
Healthcare, Inc.
www.mbhci.or2
Please visit our website to view
current open opportunities
and to apply online:
Meridian is an active partner
with the National Health
Service Corps

Therapists:

Licensed, or Master's Level
in Outpatient
Bachelor's-Level in
Counselor Support

Case Management
(adult & child)

Master's Therapist in
Methadone Clinic

Medical Services

RN Nprsing Manager (G'Ville)
PRN RN, LPN, C.N.A.

Recovery Specialist
(Direct Care)
LPN (2) for Methadone Clinic
(new)

To see our current openings in
Mental Health and to apply
online, please go to:
www.mbhci.ore

EOE, DFWP, E-Verify


130 Part Time
Nursery Position Available
Southside Baptist Church,
Hours on Wednesdays and
Sunday during regular church
service. Please call 386-755-5553
for more information

240 Schools &
2 Education

04544505
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & e#
* Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-04/25/10
* Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-05/09/11

* Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exanm
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com


310 Pets & Supplies


PUBLISJIER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian dociimenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.

330 Livestock &
33 Supplies


04544561
Black Angus
Cows & Heifers
Registered & Commercial
Prices Vary
386-719-4802 or 386-623-9427


361 Farm Equipment
84 Ford 4.610 Tractor. Runs good.
Solid 2WD. New front tires,
350hr on 2005 motor. Dependable.
$7500. obo. 386-867-0005


407 Computers

HP Computer,
$100.00
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170
IBM Computer,
$65
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170


420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.


420 Wanted to Buy

Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$250 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.


430 Garage Sales






Friday & Sunday only 8 am-3pm,
Lots of Miscellaneous Items!
132 NW Broomsage Ct
(Southern Oaks Country Club)
MOVING SALE. Fri & Sat. 9-?
Branford Hwy to 242, turn R go 4-
5 mi. Signs. 6683 SW CR 242
Too much to List! All must Go!






PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.


440 Miscellaneous

Special Ends Soon!
M & M Fitness
Call Today!
386-752-0749
Tow Behind Grill/Smoker
$1,250 OBO.
386-249-3104 or
386-719-4802
WHAT A STEAL!
Restored 5 ft Cast Iron Claw Foot
Tub, white finish w/gold claw feet
$250 obo, Call Pete 386-344-5764

60n Mobile Homes
63U for Rent
1 UNDER NEW MANAGEMENT
Oakview Mobile Home Park.
Clean well maintained 2/2 units in
nice park. 2 miles to downtown
Lake City. 386-984-8448
14x70 MH, 2Br/2Ba Real Clean
Good Location! CH/A $550/Mo.
+ $200 Dep. NO PETS.
(386)755-0064 or (904)771-5924
2&3 BR MH. $395 $650. mo.
plus deposit. Water & sewer fur-
nished. Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
2/2 MH w/screen porch, Ig yard,
quiet/clean/safe 10 unit park,
$475 mo, $475 dep,
NO PETS, 386-965-3003
2/2 Newly remodeled MH New
Floors/counter tops. Lg lot, quiet
area No pets 1st, last & sec. $450
mo $300 sec will work w/payment
plan. Call Jenn 386-454-7724
2/2 Units, clean, well maintained,
nice safe park setting, 2 miles to
downtown Lake City, $550 month
+ $550 sec dep, 386-984-8448
2br /2ba SWMH; also Residential
RV lots for rent between Lake City
& G'ville. Access to 1-75 & 441
(352)317-1326 Call for terms
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White. Contact 386-623-3404
or 386-365-1919
New 2br/2ba off Country Club. 1/2
ac. lot Front, back porch & storage
bldg. $600 mo. $600 sec: No Pets!
386-752-5911 or 466-2266
Nice clean 2&3 bdrm, Five Points,
NO PETS, also 3 bd on the
Westside, 3 bdrm house on
Monroe St 386-961-1482






Quiet, Country Branford area
3/2 $400 dep, $600 month
386-867-1833 or 386-590-0642
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
X-CLEAN 2/2 SW, 8 mi
NW of VA. Clean acre lot, nice
area. $500. mo + dep No dogs
386-961-9181

640 Mobile Homes
6 for Sale
06 MH 3br/2ba open floor plan
w/lg kit w/ island, fireplace. 3 Riv-
ers Est, river access, MLS# 75661
Eastside Village Realty, Inc.
Denise Millgan-Bose 752-5290
3/2 DWMH over 1700 sqft. New
Roof & CH/A. Doublesided fire-
place, custom kit w/breakfast nook
& wet bar. $89,500 MLS# 73861
386-623-6896 Access Realty
FOR SALE: $85,000 10 Acres
W/2006 DW, McAlpin. 12 X 24
Back addition laundry/office & 12
x 18 covered porch. 20 x 32 pole-
barn & 8 x 16 Utility shed. 863-
634-5283 for details & pictures,
Lv message w/name, phone
number & email address.
Ada .

YOUR


COMMUNITY


Land Services

Back Hoe, Dozer, Chopping, root
raking, bush hog, seeding, sod,
disking, site prep, ponds &
irrigation. Free Est! 386-623-3200


640 fMobile Homes
640 for Sale

Hallmark Real Estate. DWMH
4/2 on 5 ac. 24X36 workshop.
Fireplace, kitchen island w/drop
down and more. $4114,900.
MLS# 76188 386-867-1613
Owner Financing-3/2
TWMH in Wellborn. Only
$89,900! Call Taylor Goes
of Access Realty @ 386-344-7662.


705 Rooms for Rent
Room w/private.bath. Microwave,
fridge, laundry, internet, private
entrance. Convenient.
386-755-9059 for information

Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent
[5525556
Move in as low as $325
Call today for details!
386-758-8455
Windsong Apts

05525655
SPRING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans;
some with garages.
Call 386-454-1469
or visit our website:
www.springhillvillage.net

1 "& 2 Bedroom Apartments
Move in for as low as
$199
386-755-2423
2 br Apt. Close to shopping.
and the VA Medical Center.
$525. mo plus deposit.
386-344-2972
A Landlord You Can Love!
2 br Apts $575. & up + sec. Great
area. CH/A washer/dryer hookups.
386-758-9351/352-208-2421
Great location W of 1-75, spacious
deluxe 2BR apts., garage, W/D
hook up. patio. $600 & up, + SD,
386-344-3715 or 386-965-5560
Large & clean. lbr/lba apt.
CH/A Ig walk in closet. Close to
town. $395. mo and $350. dep.
(904)563-6208
Nice Apt. downtown. Remodeled,
kit., 1 bd/ba, LR, dining & extra
room. Ref. req. $450. mo & sec.
386-362-8075 or 386-754-2951.
The Lakes Apts. Studios & 1Br's
from $135/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $450. + sec.
Call Michelle 386-752-9626

Furnished Apts.
720 For Rent
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808
Small furnished Studio Apt. for
Rent. $450. mo. $50. Deposit.
Utilities included. Non-smoking
environment. 386-438-8000

Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent

04544591





LAKE CITY
2Br/lBa, Mobile Home $495mo
2Br/1Ba, 896SF $695. mo
2Br/1Ba, 915SF $595. mo

3Br/3Ba, 3400SF $1750. mo

4Br/2Ba, 1248SF $695. mo

3Br/3Ba, 1050SF $750. mo

4Br/2Ba, 1428SF $750. mo

LIVE OAK
3Br/2Ba, 1976SF $975. mo

MADISON
2Br/lBa, Just Remodeled,
$450. mo (2 Available)
3Br/1.5Ba Remodeled $550. mo
Mitchell Lee 386-867-1155
Mike Foster 386-288-3596
1688 SE Baya Dr., Suite 105
Lake City, FL 32025
www.NorthFloridahomeandland.com
Accredited Real Estate
0O is a Full Service m
.. .Real Estate Office.
We do Rentals---Property
Management---Property Sales.

3/2 Recently Built Custom Home,
1340 sq ft, stainless steel applian-
ces, custom cabinets, $920 mo,
1st.'Last & Sec,off 1-75 & 47
Call Andrew 386-623-6066
3BR/1.5BA. BLOCK HOME.
Fenced (privacy) bk yard. CH/A
Nice area. $800. mo $800. dep.
Ref's req'd. (941)920-4535
3br/2ba brick, 2 car carport. Fire-
place, Florida room. Large 4 acre
yard. Country Club Rd. South
$950 month. 386-365-8504
BRICK HOME
for rent in nice Subdivision


3br/2ba $1,200 mo. $1,200 dep.
386-344-5065
Ft White, 2/1, CH/A, 2010 W2 &
ref's from current landlord req'd,
Access to Rivers $625 mo,
$600 sec., 386-497-4699


- ADvantage


I








LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, MAY 1, 2011


750 Business &
Office Rentals
For Lease: E Baya Ave. Two -
1000 sqft office space units or
combined for 2000 sqft. 386-984-
0622 or weekends 386-497-4762
OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$695. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor

790 Vacation Rentals
Horseshoe Beach Spring Special
Gulf Front 2br, w/lg porch, dock,
fish sink. wkend $345./wk $795.
(352)498-5986/386-235-3633
alwaysonvacation.com #4159-181

805 Lots for Sale
5 Acre Lot, Secluded & Cleared,
MLS# 67871 $60,000
Call Lisa Waltrip
@ 386-365-5900
westfieldrealtygroup.com
A high & dry buildable wooded
.734 of ac.,Forest Country. MLS#
76668 Eastside Village Realty,
Inc. Denise Milligan-Bose
@386-752-5290
Beautiful .92 Acre Lot-
3 Rivers-Ft. White-High & Dry!
Only $11,900. t
Call Taylor Goes of Access Realty
@ 386-344-7662.
Forest Country building lot,
scattering of trees, Motivated
Seller $19,999 MLS#75140
Remax Professionals, Inc.
to Lytte 386-365-2821
Hallmark Real Estate. Cleared
2.57 ac. fenced w/32' Dutchman
camper. In O'Brien. Close to Live
Oak, Lake City, Branford. $25,000
MLS# 74534 3816-867-1613
Nice 4 acre parcel located in
O'Brien. Won't last long at only
$13,500. Call Taylor Goes of
Access Realty @386-344-7662.
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or .
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly.
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

810 Home for Sale,
3/2 Brick Home in town, fenced
back yard w/12x12 workshop
$79,900 Call Nandy @ R.E.O.
Realty 386-867-1271MLS# 77414
nancytrogers@msn.com
3/2 Custom Western Cedar Home.
on 2 acre lakefront.lotMLS#74681
Call Jo Lytte at Remax
Professionals, Inc. 386-365-2821
jolytte@remaxnfl.com
3/2 in Creekside S/D. Fenced back
yard, sprinklers, large
screened rear lanai.
$175,000. MLS# 77385
386-623-6896 Access Realty
3/2 in town, lots of upgrades,
currently leased, MLS#76658,
$49,900 Call Jo Lytte at
Remax Professionals, Inc.
386-365-2821
3/2 in Woodhaven w/Fla Room,
fenced back yard MLS#75499,
$114,900 Call Pamr @
Remax 386-303-2505 or
email- remaxpamb@gmail.com
3/2 MH on 1.5 acres, fenced,
porches, wkshp,well maintained
$49,900 MLS# 77309 Call Josh
Grecian 386-466-2517
westfieldrealtygroup.com
3/2 on 4.84 Acres; fireplace, sheds,
many fruit trees, Call Jo Lytte at
Remax $68,900, MLS#72427
386-365-2821, www.jolytte.
florida-property-search.com
3/2 on 8.7 acres w/Fla room,
several storage bldgs, fenced,
MLS#75295 Call Pam Beauchamp
@ 386-758-8900 Remax,
$179,000 www.visitpam.com
4/2 with 1000 sq ft workshop,
fenced back yard, 2 car garage,
MLS#77602, Bring Offers!
$174,900, Call Nancy @
R.E.O. Realty 386-867-1271
5 acre Home w/Horse Barn,
Wood floors, New Kitchen,
Gazebo & Koi Pond MLS#76039
$169,900 Call Aaron @ Westfield
Realty Group 386-867-3534
Beautiful Home For Sale
The Preserve at Laurel Lake
4/2 oi 3/2 $194,900 MLS#77257
Call Scott Stewart 386-867-3498
westfieldrealtygroup.com
CBC 3/1 home, inside city limits,
fenced backyard, detached carport
w/office MLS#77411 $82,900
Call R.E.O.Realty,
Nancy Rogers @ 386-867-1271
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.


Nice home with eat in kitchen and
a nice sized living room'. Pleanty
of room for entertaining.
MLS# 77584 $89,900
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
3/2 on 9.7 acres. fenced & cross
fenced. Separate pastures. Animals
are negotiable. Owners motivated.
MLS# 77431 $179,900
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
3/2 on 5 acres. Large master suite
and open kitchen. Back 2 ac.
fenced for horses.
MLS# 75830 $102,900
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
3br and Ig open floor plan
w/separate office. Beautifully
landscaped. Private access to Lake
Jeffery. MLS# 76231 $199,000


810 Home for Sale
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
Lots of acerage. All brick home.
Screened in porch. Extra big
closets. Mature pines.
MLS# 76765 $115,000
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
Welcome home. 3br/2ba brick.
Great location on the east side.
Priced to sell.
MLS# 776867 $69,900
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
Well maintianed 3/2 1/2 acre
minutes from town. 20x40
workshop, screened porch.
MLS# 73787 $99,000
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
3/2 Brick home on .59 acre, on the
lake with back sunroom. Garage &
storage building.
MLS# 76769 $222,900
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
Two for the price of one. Updated
main home w/a 3/2 guest home. A
lot of living space for the price.
MLS# 77348 $244,900
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
1999 Doublewide,
3/2 fenced back yard
on 1 acre.
MLS# 76315 $64,900
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co..
Custom built home with many
upgrades. Screened back porch,
16x24 workshop.
MLS# 77178 $184,500
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
Great house in Piccadilly S/D. 2
car garage and inground pool.
Newly painted inside & out.
MLS# 76786 $133,500
Charming Remodeled Home
in Beautiful Neighborhood
MLS#74765 $142,900 Call
,Charlie Sparks @ Westfield
Realty Group 386-755-0808
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
4br 1/5ba. 1332 sqft. Great floor
plan, noce yard, close to town.
Only $84,900 Lori Geibeig
Simpson. 386-365-5678
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
5br/4ba on 5+ac. 3 car garage,
inground pool/hot tub and more.
MLS #75854 $569,900 Lori
.Geibeig Simpson. 386-365-5678
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
.Superbly maintained home in
Creekside. Oversized garage &
storage. Many extras.: Elaine K.
Tolar 386-755-6488 $209,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
New home in Mayfair S/D. 4br on
comer lot. Split plan. $214,900
MLS# 76919 Elaine K. Tolar..
386-755-6488
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Home on the lake in town. 4br/3ba
MLS# 76085 Elaine K. Tolar 386-
755-6488 or Mary Brown White-
hurst. 386-965-0887 $299,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Great home in Woodcrest S/D 3/2
home, covered back porch, nice
yard.MLS# 75198 Elaine K. Tolar
386-755-6488 $129,900
Country Home on 2.5 Acres,
$9.5,000 MLS#77039
Remax Professionals, Inc.,
jo lytte@remaxnfl.com -
: 386-365-2821.
Custom, 3/2.5 built in 2007, ,
on 10.8 manicured acres,
completely fenced, Owner Fin.
avail., MLS#77382 Call Patti
386-623-6896 Access Realty
Ft White MH on 16.27 Acres,
near many recreational activities
MLS#77404 $149,900
Jo Lytte Remax Professionals
386-365-2821
Great Opportunity!,
Currently rented, Seller will
assist w/buyer's closing costs
MLS# 77335, Call Michael at
Westfield 386-867-9053 $99,900
Gwen Lake area. Beautiful up-
grades 4/3 w/tile & laminate
floors, fireplace, new kitchen, Ig
den, fenced yard. $125,000, 386-
397-4766 Hallmark Real Estate
Hallmark Real Estate. Brick 3/2.
Many upgrades. Gas fireplace,
Grotto tile. Great location on cul-
de-sac! $149,900.
MLS# 75931 386-867-1613
Historical Home on Lake Isabel-
la. 3/3 w/basement! Great as a pri-
vate residence or a wonderful pro-
fessional office. $240,000 386-
719-0382 Hallmark Real Estate
Home on 15 Acres w/2500 sq ft,
workshop, MLS# 77552 $235,000
Call Brittany Stoeckert at
Results Realty
386-397-3473
Just Reduced 4/2 On 1.57 acres,
fireplace, partially fenced, MLS#
77412, Call Nancy Rogers at
R.E.O. Realty Group
386-867-1271 $64,900
Large Brick, 3/1, 4.43 acres, metal
roof, MLS# 77415 $104,888
Call Nancy Rogers @ R.E.O.
Realty Group, Inc. 386-867-1271
nancytrogers@msn.com
Large Home on 1 acre, 4/2,
Fla Rm, wrap around front porch
MLS#77292 $148,000
Call Brittany Stoeckert at
Results Realty386-397-3473
Lg home on corner lot w/garage,
Eastside Village. Clubhouse,
heated pool MLS# 71901 Eastside
Village Realty, Inc. Denise
Milligan-Bose 386-752-5290
Luxury 3/2 Log Home, Cypress
interior, whole house generator,
$269,900 MLS# 76899 Call
,Roger Lovelady @386-365-7039
westfieldrealtygroup.com


Make an Offer! 3 br brick, quiet
resid'l street in Live Oak. HUD
home is sold "as is" Hallmark
Real Estate 386-365-5146
www.hudhomestore.com
Nearly 17 Acres w/House
on paved road, Very Spacious!
MLS#76902 $194,900
Call 386-487-7484 Speak to
Brodie Westfield Realty Group
On Golf Course w/lake view. 3/2
home w/lg rooms, 3 fireplaces, wet
bar & big deck. Newly reduced to
$214,900. Hallmark Real Estate
386-365-2135
Open for Bid! 3/2 DW w/corner
stone fireplace, fenced yard & Ig
kit. HUD property, sold "as is"
MLS 77290- 386-365-3886 Deb-
bie King Hallmark Real Estate


810 Home for Sale
Owner Fianncing! wooded 1/4 ac.
lots in Suwannee County,. close to
River, high & dry. Bring your SW
or DW or RV. $6.500
Derington Properties.965-4300
Ready for Fun & Family. 4br/2ba
custom home on 33.84 ac. has
stocked fish pond & huge 54x60
shop. $325.000. Hallmark Real
Estate 386-719-0382
Rolling Oaks, 3/3 + Bonus Rm.
5 acres, back porch & more!
MLS#77528 Call Pam Beauchamp
at 386-758-8900 Remax $284,900
remaxpamb@gmail.com
Solid Brick Home on 5 Acres,
Close to town but in the country!
MLS#76063 Must See!$129,888
Call Brittany Stoeckert at
386-397-3473 Results Realty
Spacious, Open Floor Plan Home,
fenced back yard, screen porch,
$179,900 MLS#76796 Call Jo
Lytte@Remax Professionals, Inc.
386-365-2821
Well Cared For 3/2 on 1.4 Acres,
open floor plan, MLS#75702
$199,900, Call Carrie Cason
at 386-487-1484
westfieldrealtygroup.com
You can't beat this Price! 1995
SWMH on 3/4 ac. Paved road,
1216 sf, 2/2 split bedroom plan.
Needs work! $29,900
Derington Properties. 965-4300

82O Farms &
Acreage
10 acres, with.Travel Trailer &
Electricity, close to Itchetucknee
Springs, $38,000, MLS# 76264
Call MillardGillen at
Westfield Realty 386-365-7001
41/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$69,900: $613mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
4 acres, Wellborn, New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down, $39,900, $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
5.82 ac Rolling Oaks off Lake
Jeffrey. High, dry & cleared.
Restricted site built hormes.only.
Equestrian community.
$65,000.ob6. 3867965-5530
for information & pictures
'Between Lake City & Ft. White.,
6.44 rolling acres. DWMH, 3/2.
1836 sf, great value on paved road.
Need repairs. $49,900
Derington Properties. 965-4300
Half to ten acre lots. Some w/
well, septic, pp. We finance; low
dwn pmt: Deas Bullard Properties..
386-752-4339. www.landnfl.com'
Heavily.Wooded Land, 10 Acres
..MLS#75784 $94,900
Call Jo Lyt.e
Remax Professionals, Inc.
386-365-2821

830 -,Commercial
O83 Property
Multiple Use 12,000 sq ft.
of Office & Warehouse space,
Loading dock, Storage yaid,
MLS#77349 $395,000, Charlie
386-755-0808 Westfield Realty
850 Waterfront
O850Property
DWMH on Ten Acres w/lakefront'
surrounded by oaks, $115,900
MLS#75571, Call Jo Lytte at
Remax Professionals 386-365-
2821, jolytte@remaxnfl.com
River Cabion Suwannee River,
Workshop, patio, deck. & dock,
$349,900 MLS#76336 Call -
Jo Lytte at Remax Professionals
386-365-2821


2004 Dodge Ram
Quad Cab
V8, 4.7L AT w/tow
package: 112,500 mi.
Lots of extras.
$9,999
Call
386-755-9894


850 rWaterfront
SProperty
River Front Property 6.45 Acres.
in White Sprgs close to Big Shoals
Park. Shelter for entertaining.
S 124,888 MLS# 77417 Call Nancy
@ R.E.O. Realty 386-867-1271


890 Resort Property
Furnished Home on Itchetucknee
River, Wrap around covered decks
on two levels,MustSEE! $375,000
MLS#77006 Call Jo Lytte
Remax 386-365-2821
River Access, Refurbished Rent-
al Units & Home + Lot,
Barn. Pool. Hot Tub $329.900
Call Jo Lytte 386-365-2821
MLS#76734 Remax Professionals


Bring the picture in or
we will take it for you!
Ad runs 10 consecutive days
with a description and.photo in the
newspaper and online E-edition.
Ad runs 10 consecutive days as a
classified line ad online.,
You must include vehicle price.
* All ads are prepaid.
* Private party only.





2006 EF250
Ford Van
3/4 ton, metal work
shelves/ladder rack,
6OK miles, exc. cond.
'$.',,500
allt :
386-555-5555
If you don't sell your vehicle
During the first 10 days, you
can run the same vehicle ad
for 10 additional days for
onli'$15.00
Terms and conditions remain the
same for the additional run.



Mayor Bidg-
(386) SS-544


24' Pontoon Boat
Bass Tracker, 115hp
Mariner, new carpet & .
lights, Biminitop, top, trolling
motor, depth finder.
$4,500
Call
386-752-2863


2 Prime Properties!
Prop #1: The English Place 838+ Ac (Auction Site)
Prop #2: The Ponder Place 100+ Ac
~ Prop #1: 838+ Ac
NWMHawk sAve
Madison Co., FL


O Cm
Pron 1-. inffl+ Ae .


"tellow Pine Forest
* Exc-llerit Interior Rds
* Abundant Wildlife
Beauliful Lodge Sile
P" l Pl ianlorn-T,,pe Prop


F-or F-ree Color tirochure Call 229-2t3-2680 (cell)
Directions, Aerials, GPS locations & other details
www.PropertiesSouthAuctions.com

C'United Stephen Burton Ed Hughes,
ountry- Assoc Bkr/Auctioneer Broker
. GAL 1548 AL 1337AU649 M' a
Auction E.rvics (229) 263-2680 (C) -


and make sonne




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To place your

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Classified Department: 755-5440







LAKE CITY REPORTER


CLASSIFIED


SUNDAY, MAY 1, 2011


Come Celebrate 7VV






6.w L
FAbILV RESTAiURANT
f' 2260 W. U.S. Hwy. 90 Lake City (nevtto Movie gallery) 755-9090


Includes up to 5 quarts Rotate &
of Oil and Fliter Balance

i rb eMost cars & trucks
Plus tax & supplies
Most cars & trucks ? Not valid with any other offer
expires 5/31/11 expires 5/31/11


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Story ideas?


Contact
C.J. Risak
Assistant Editor
754-0427
crisak@lakeatyreportercom

Sunday, May 1, 201 I

GARDEN TALK


Nichelle Demorest
dndemorest@ufl.edu


Containers

can help

vegetable

gardens

ontainer veg-
I etable garden-
ing can be fun,
therapeutic, and
may add some
color to your patio and din-
ner plate. It could be just
the answer for the 'garden-
er at heart' who has little
or no space to garden. You
just need a spot that gets at
least six hours of sunlight
and is big enough for a
bushel basket, a wooden
crate, a flower pot, or an
old milk jug. That spot
could be along a sidewalk,
on a patio, or just outside
the back stoop.
Many containers will
work for growing vegeta-
bles if drainage is provided.
If you opt for terracotta
pots, you will need to water
more often because water
will evaporate quickly from
the porous clay material.
If you are unsure about
wooden or metal-like mate-
rials, line them with heavy
plastic and make sure that
the liner also has drainage
holes. Clear containers
should be painted on the
outside with dark paint
Herbs such as parsley,
chives, and basil will grow
nicely in pots as small as a
6" diameter. Use an 8" pot
to grow a cherry tomato,
leaf lettuce, green onions
or radishes. Half bushel
baskets and larger are ideal
for just about everything
else. For a combination of
several plants, use a bushel
basket and pick your entire
salad from one spot. Keep
in mind that smaller pots
will need to be watered
more often.
Commercial bagged pot-
ting soil is a quick and easy
way to fill your contain-
ers. You can also create
your own special blend by
mixing together several
media such as sand, per-
lite, vermiculite, pine bark,
topsoil, compost and peat.
Different blends can be
found in the UF/IFAS pub-
lication http://edis.ifas.ufl.
edu/VH032
Using sterile bagged
materials in your contain-
ers makes a lot of sense.
Plant diseases, insects,
weed seeds and nematodes
are present in regular
garden soil, so container
gardening is your golden
opportunity to bypass
many problems on your
way to harvesting fresh
vegetables.
There are several
options for fertilizing your
plants, but you should use
complete fertilizers with
added micronutrients.
Water soluble fertilizers
can be mixed with water
Sand applied each time you
irrigate. Dry fertilizer can
be put on the soil so that
it will dissolve when you
water. Always follow the
directions.
Want more container gar-
dening ideas? Need help
figuring out which veg-
etables to plant and when
Sto plant them? Stop by the
S Lake DeSota Farm Market
on Saturday, May 7th. I
will be there with several
UF Master Gardeners with
CONTAINERS continued on 2D


Lake City Reporter





LIFE



www.lakecityreporter.com


Wearing


By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com

best shade of
pink, but only
if you're tough
enough to wear
it
Columbia County
Resources and Shands
LakeShore Regional
Medical Center will be
holding the Sixth Annual
Tough Enough to Wear
Pink Fundraising Dinner
Saturday to raise money
for those in the commu-
nity facing medical crises.
"It is a fun-filled night
of activities to raise
money to help people
who are in medical crisis
situations," said Wanda
Jones, Columbia County
Resources president. "All
the money we raise stays
in our community to help
our friends, neighbors and
family whenever they face
a medical crisis of any
kind."
Held at the Columbia
County Fairgrounds'
newly renovated banquet
hall, the event will fea-
ture a five-course meal,
entertainment, silent and
live auctions, casino-style
gambling and the chance
to win prizes like a 40-inch
Toshiba flat screen TV,
custom-designed jewelry,
golf clubs and resort pack-
ages.
Sponsorships will also
be available, Jones said,
funds that will be put
toward the event's goal of
raising $50,000.
The Tough Enough
to Wear Pink initia-
tive began through
Wrangler jeans and
the Professional Rodeo
Cowboys Association to
raise awareness and funds
for women undergoing
breast cancer treatment,
Jones said. When the cam-
paign was localized, Jones
said Columbia County
Resources realized the
community's need to help
people suffering from all
diseases, not just breast
cancer.


Section D


to raise funds


COURTESY PHOTOS
Above: Last year's Tough Enough to Wear Pink Fundraising Dinner included lots of good food and a big crowd most of it
dressed in pink.
Below: More than just food will be available. Both silent and live auctions, casino-style gambling and prizes like a flat-
screen TV, custom-made jewelry and golf clubs will also be on the menu.


That's when the Tough
Enough to Wear Pink
Crisis Fund was born, she
said.
"We are very mindful
of the many situations
people find themselves in
once they get a diagnosis
of some critical disease,
whether it's cancer, heart,
diabetes, there's always
things that they need that
insurance doesn't cover,"
Jones said. "And we don't
want people in a situa-
tion trying to figure out
whether they buy food
or their prescriptions. If
people come to us and we
can verify their need, we
try to provide the funds
to help them through that
crisis period."
So far, the crisis fund
has assisted or helped
more than 175 community
members and provided
120 women with free
mammograms.
People should attend


the event to support the
fund, Jones said, because
they may eventually need
it
"You never know when
a catastrophic illness or
event is going to occur
in your life or the life of
someone you love or care
about," she said. "And so


ASSOCIATED PRESS
This April 4 photo shows a Mother's Day box of chocolates in Concord,
N.H. Giving mom a box of chocolates on her special day can be a fine
way to show your love. Even more so if you made the chocolates your-
self. Once made, these chocolates can be kept in a cool and dry place
for up to a week.


being a part of this organi-
zation and this event helps
you to have a positive
result from that"
Tickets 'are $25 and are
available at Wilson's Ace
Hardware, The Money
Man, Chasteen's, Smitty's
Western Store or the fair-
grounds office.


Call (386)752-8822.
Attendees are encour-
aged to wear pink, but it is
not required, Jones said.
"The only thing that's
required is to, buy a ticket,
show up and come pre-
pared to have fun and be
a part of this wonderful
event," she said.


Love is like a box


of chocolates -


that you make


By ALISON LADMAN
For The Associated Press
Giving Mom a box of chocolates
on her special day can be a fine
way to show your love. Even more
so if you made the chocolates your-
self.
Relax. It's easier than it sounds
and we've written up a foolproof
plan for making all of the mothers
in yourlife a special box jammed
with a delicious variety of choco-
lates.
To keep it manageable, we
broke the process up into a two-
afternoon project that produces
five 15-piece boxes of mixed filled
and decorated chocolates, such
as chocolate-dipped fruit jellies,
dipped caramels and buttercreams.
The only special equipment you'll
need is a candy thermometer; they
are inexpensive and available at
kitchen and hardware stores.
Craft and baking supply shops
will be your best bet for boxes and
wrappers. Once made, the choco-
late's can be kept in a cool and dry
place for up to a week.
For the fruit jellies, we used pas-
sionfruit nectar and black cherry
juice, but use whichever juice you
like, including grape, pomegranate,
apricot or blueberry. Just be sure
to use 100 percent juice made from


just the fruit named (not a fruit
juice blend).
When making the buttercream
filling, use whichever flavor you
like. Strawberry, raspberry, orange
and lemon are common flavors
used for chocolates. Mint, vanilla,
butter rum, ginger, maple and
anise also are good. If you'd like to
color the filling, gel food coloring
can be stirred in with the extract
To make more than one flavor,
simply divide the unflavored but-
tercream mixture into bowls and
flavor them individually.

DAY ONE
Begin by preparing the fruit
jellies:
Sugar, for dusting
1 1/4 cups fruit juice
3/4 cup unsweetened applesauce
3 cups sugar
Two 3-ounce envelopes liquid
pectin (sold with canning supplies)
1 tablespoon lemon juice
Coat a 9-by-9-inch baking pan
with cooking spray. Dust the pan
with sugar, then tap to coat evenly
and tip out any excess. Open the
packages of pectin to have them
ready to use.

CHOCOLATES continued on 2D


I mw










A time to be proud: Graduation Day at FGC


Florida Gateway
College's Graduation
Ceremonies will be
held Friday in the
Howard Conference
Center on the FGC campus.
While this is a time for celebrat-
ing the accomplishments of our
students, it is also an important
time to reflect on our students
and the path pursued to reach
their goals.
It is also time to celebrate the
name change, from Lake City
Community College to Florida
Gateway College; the first gradu-
ating class of FGC; -the construc-
tion of the new library; and the
preparation to begin offering
baccalaureate degrees.
It is important to point out
that this year the college served
approximately 6,000 students.
These statistics include students
taking credit and noncredit
courses on either a full or part-
time basis. The demographic
characteristics of the students
who attend the college reflect
those of the regional population.
The largest percentage of
students enrolled at FGC pursue
an Associates of Art degree that
is transferable to other colleges


Dr. Charles Hall
President, Florida Gateway College


and universities. A sizeable
percentage of students pursue
an Associate in Science degree
which focuses on college-level
technical and career training."
An equally important seg-
ment of our students choose to
pursue a certificate that equips
them to enter a particular voca-
tion. Though the remainder of
our students may be undecided
about a career path, they do'
see the value in obtaining a col-
lege education. They are also
comforted by the fact that the
college is continually improving
existing instructional programs
and adding programs that pro-
vide new career opportunities.
Research information available
at the Florida Department of
Education website shows upon


graduating from FGC, students
transferring to Florida public
universities attain GPAs amongst
the highest in the 28 community
colleges in the Florida college
system. Latest statistics show
that FGC graduate transfers'
average GPA is 3.04, as com-
pared to a system-wide average
of 2.94.
More specifically, FGC students
transferring to the universities
tend to be very successful. Their
grade point averages at the receiv-
ing institutions compare very
favorably to the existing university
students and typically exceed
those obtained by other commu-
nity college graduates.
There is encouraging news in
challenging economic times for
students preparing themselves
for careers. The average job
placement percentage for recent
occupational graduates exceeds
75 percent, with several associ-
ate in science programs boasting
placement rates of 100 percent.
Graduates of vocational cer-
tificate programs earned aver-
age salaries of approximately
$32,000. The reported average
salary for graduates in associate
in science degrees exceeding


$44,000, with select program
graduates earning a salary of
nearly $50,000. These reported
earnings place our graduates
well above the regional average
income.
The foregoing underscores
the importance of the upcom-
ing graduation ceremony. At
that time, we will be honoring
the students who successfully
completed their degree program
since last year's ceremony. More
specifically, 235 students gradu-
ated during the fall term and 353
students applied for graduation
this spring and summer. Thus,
the number of students who will
graduate from the college this
year will be close to 600.
Needless to say, FGC is very
proud of the superior teaching
and learning environment pro-
vided by its faculty and staff. The
success of our current and past
students provides evidence that
FGC is fulfilling its mission of
providing a high quality educa-
tion at an affordable price.
With all of this in mind, I
encourage you to come to the
graduation ceremonies and
congratulate our graduates.
Because of our growth, FGC will


now have two Commencement
ceremonies. Those students
graduating with an Associate
of Arts degree will have a cer-
emony at 10:00 am. Students
graduating with an Associate of
Science, Associate of Applied
Science or a certificate will enjoy
their ceremony at 1:30 pm, all
on Friday, May 6. Light refresh-
ments will be served at Pine
Square Pavilion following the
ceremonies. The Association of
Florida Colleges (AFC) chapter
will have roses available for
purchase before and after the
ceremonies.-
The sequence of events
should provide plenty of time for
taking pictures and socializing
with fellow students, friends
and families. I hope you will
join me in congratulating these
graduates and their families for
beginning a course of study and
seeing it through to completion.
They are to be commended for
deciding to better themselves,
pursuing a higher standard of
living, and contributing to the
betterment of the community.
Congratulations FGC gradu-
ates and families, we send you
our best wishes.


CHOCOLATES: Making a gift

Continued From Page 1D


In a medium saucepan over medium
heat, combine the juice, applesauce and
sugar. Stirring constantly, heat until
the mixture reaches 238 F on a candy
thermometer. Add the pectin and return
to a boil, stirring constantly. Cook for 1
minute.
Remove from the heat and stir in the
lemon juice. Pour the mixture into the
prepared pan. Sprinkle the top with
a thin layer of sugar. Allow to set, at
room temperature, for at least 2 hours
or overnight. They can be left at room
temperature.
(Jellies recipe adapted from Peter
P. Greweling's "Chocolates and
Confections," Wiley, 2007)

Next, prepare the caramels:
1 cup granulated sugar .
1/2 cup brown sugar ,
1/2 cup (1 stiek)-unsaltt -butter "
1 cup half-and-half
1/2 cup corn syrup
2 teaspoons vanilla bean paste (or
vanilla extract)
1/4 teaspoon sea salt
1/2 teaspoon balsamic vinegar
Line a 9-by-9-inch baking pan with foil.
Lightly spray the foil with cooking spray.
In a medium saucepan over medium
heat, combine the granulated sugar,
brown sugar, butter, half-and-half and
corn syrup. Bring to a simmer cook
until the mixture reaches 244 F on a
candy thermometer, about 15 to 20 min-
utes. Remove the pan from the heat and
stir in the vanilla, salt and vinegar. Pour
into the prepared pan and allow to sit at
room temperature at least 3 hours, or
overnight

DAY TWO
Gather your dipping ingredients:
1 pound chocolate candy melts (avail-
able in the baking section of the grocer)
12-ounce bag milk or dark chocolate
bits (or half of each)
3/4 cup roasted unsalted nuts (single
variety or a mix)
1/4 cup finely chopped dried fruit
(such as apricots, cranberries and cher-
ries)

Begin by preparing tehe butter-
cream filling:
1/2 cup (1 stick) unsalted butter, cool
2 cups powdered sugar, divided
1/4 cup heavy cream
1 to 2 teaspoons flavoring extract
(variety of your choice)
Gel food coloring, if desired
Line a baking sheet or other tray with
waxed paper.
In the bowl of a stand mixer, beat
the butter until creamy and no lumps
remain. Add half of the powdered sugar
and beat on low until incorporated. Add
the cream and the other half of the
powdered sugar and beat again until
smooth. Add the flavorings and color, if
using.
Spoon the mixture into a pastry bag


or a zip-close plastic bag. Snip off the tip
or one lower corner to make a 1/2-inch
opening. Pipe the filling into 3/4-inch
mounds onto the prepared baking sheet.
Place the baking sheet in the freezer to
harden the fillings. Chilling the fillings
will make them easier to handle wheh
covering with chocolate.

Next, assemble the fillings:
Begin with the fruit jellies. Overturn
the pan onto a cutting board. Using a
sharp knife, trim the edges so they are
squared. Cut the block into neat 1-inch
squares. Dust each cube, especially the
cut edges, with more sugar. The fruit
jellies can be added to the box of choco-
lates as is, or dipped in chocolate. If you
plan to dip the fruit jellies in chocolate,
,,.skp the sugar dusting step .... .
,-.To prepare the caramels, using the
Tfoll,'lift the sheet f cai-amel out"of the
pan onto a cutting board. Peel the foil
off the back. Using a sharp knife, cut
the caramel into 1 1/2-inch squares. The
caramel will soften and lose its form, so
do this just before dipping in chocolate.
Alternatively, individual caramels may
be wrapped in squares of waxed paper,
twisting the ends to seal.
Remove the buttercreams from the
freezer.

Dip the chocolates:
Line a 2 baking sheets with waxed
paper.
In a microwave-safe bowl, combine
the candy melts and chocolate bits.
Microwave in 30 second bursts, stir-
ring between each, until melted and
smooth.
Select a filling fruit jelly, caramel
or frozen buttercream and rest it
on a fork. Lower the filling into the
melted chocolate until completely
submerged. Lift the filling out and tap
the handle of the fork on the edge of
the bowl allowing the excess melted
chocolate to drip back into the bowl.
Move the dipped candy onto the pre-
pared baking sheet and gently slide
off, using another fork if necessary.
Repeat to coat all of the fillings. As
desired, top some of the fillings with
huts and/or dried fruit. This must be
done as soon as the fillings are dipped
and the chocolate has not set. Whole
nuts can be pressed onto the surface
of the caramels before dipping, if
desired.
When all of the-fillings have been
covered, dump any remaining chopped
nuts and dried fruit into the bowl of
melted chocolate. Mix to coat, then
use a tablespoon to scoop out and form
fruit-and-nut clusters on the prepared
baking sheets.
Refrigerate the dipped chocolates
on the baking sheets for 10 minutes
to help the chocolate set. Arrange the
chocolates in gift boxes, then store at
room temperature for up to five days.
Do not refrigerate, as this will cause
moisture to form on the chocolate.


ENGAGEMENTS


Harriss Murphy
Kent and Jodi Harriss
of Lake City announce
the engagement and
approaching marriage
of their daughter, Linley
Harriss of Charleston,
S.C. to Mike Murphy of
Charleston, S.C.He is
the son of Joi and Kevin
Murphy of Vermilion,
Ohio.
The bride-elect is a 2000
Columbia High School


graduate and a 2005 Florida
State University graduate.
She is currently employed
by Food For The Southern
Soul of Charleston, S.C.
The future groom is
a 1997 Vermilion High
Schoolgraduate and a 2009
Flagler College graduate.
He is currently employed
by Bibliolabs Publishing.
The wedding is planned
for Thursday, June 9 in St.
Augustine.


ANNIVERSARIES


Maysen Graham
Chris and Christie
Graham of Lulu announce
the birth of their daugh-
ter, Maysen Jewel Graham,
April 7 at North Florida
Regional Hospital in
Gainesville.
She weighed 8 pounds,
12 ounces and measured
21 inches.
She joins sister Natalie
Jo Graham, 1.5 years old.
Grandparents are Glenn
and Delores Brannen, Earl


Graham and Josephine
Pearce.
; Great-grandparents are
the late Cecil and the late
Edith Brannen, the late
Alfred and the late Natalie
Box, the late Gus and the
late, Louise Pearce, and
the late Harry and the late
Queenie Graham.

Samuel, Grady
and Trevor Church

Thomas and Marty


Church of Lake City
announce the birth of
their. three sons, Samuel
Elias, Grady Jordan and
Trevor Luke, March 27 at
UF at Shands Hospital in
Gainesville.
.Samuelweighed4pounds
and 11 ounces. Grady
* weighed 3 pounds and 6
ounces. Trevor weighed 4
pounds and 1 ounce.
Grandparents are Burl
and Bonnie Jenkins and Ed
and Loretta Church.


.; ." rchableCa Ge ., www.lakecityreporter.com
J- "hable edAds Onli^ --*- ,R-EPORTER


CONTAINERS: Vegetable garden

Continued From Page 1D


LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, MAY 1, 2011


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


information on Container
Gardening from 8 a.m.
until noon.,
The Market is held
at Wilson Park on Lake
DeSoto Circle in down-
town Lake City. The Kick


Off event will feature live
music, free canoe rentals,
food and drinks, flowers
for Mom and children's
activities. If you grow
produce and want to sell,
please call Jackie Kite at


(386) 719-5766.


E Nichelle Demorest is a
horticulture agent with the
Columbia County Extension
of the University of Florida
Institute of Food and
Agricultural Sciences.








LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & CROSSWORD SUNDAY, MAY 1, 2011


DEAR ABBY


Twin who bullied as a child


becomes controlling as adult


DEAR ABBY: My fra-
ternal twin, "Marla," was
always difficult. When we
were kids she was physical-
ly and emotionally abusive.
She stopped hitting me only
after I outgrew her in high
school, but she continues to
try to control me.
When I started dating my
wife, "Gloria," Maria would
tell me Gloria wasn't good
enough for me. At first, it
gave me serious doubts
about the woman who is the
love of my life. We're now
expecting our first child a
daughter and Maria has
been offering parenting ad-
vice that goes against what
Gloria and I feel about child-
rearing. When I politely de-
cline her advice, Maria ac-
cuses me of being "selfish"
for not appreciating it
A parenting book was de-
livered anonymously to our
home. It took me a few days
to remember that Maria had
mentioned it Five days later
she sent me an angry email
because I hadn't thanked
her for it
Spats like this usually re-
sult in our not speaking for
months. I harbor no ill will
toward'my sister and often
don't know why we're fight-
ing. She seems to thrive on
the drama she. creates with
these artificial rifts.
I want my daughter ex-
posed to healthy adult rela-


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearobby.com
tionships, not abusive ones.
How do I tell my twin I love
her, but she must stop try-
ing to control me and create
conflict where none exists?
I don't want to have to cut
her out of my life. SOON-
TO-BE-DAD
DEAR. SOON-TO-BE-
DAD: The patterns of a life-
time won't change without
work on both your parts.
Tell your twin that if she
wants to be a part of your
life and your daughter's -
- some radical changes will
be necessary. Offer to join
her in family therapy. If
she agrees, recognize that
change won't be easy for
her. If she refuses, do what
you must to protect your
child from her controlling
and manipulative behavior.
DEAR ABBY: I am a 25-
year-old man. I have been in
a two-year relationship with
the most beautiful woman
I have ever met "Amanda"
is 23, and she has just, told
me she plans .on joining the
Navy.
I respect her decision


and courage to better her
life and future career. How-
ever, my feelings are deeply
hurt. I don't understand
how, after all this time, she
could change course and
put our relationship on the
back burner.
Amanda says she wants
us to stay together and
promises that everything
will be all right. I love her
with all my heart Do you
think after four years in
the Navy our love will be
as strong? At our age, is it
worth keeping ourselves
exclusive to each other?
- IN SHOCK IN CALI-
FORNIA
DEAR IN SHOCK: I
wish you had mentioned
why Amanda has decided
to join the military. Could it
be she's doing it because, in
return for her service, they
will pay for her education? If
that's the case, then respect
her decision and her deter-
mination to better her life.
Whether your romance
can weather the separation
her service in the Navy will
require depends, frankly, on
how much each of you has
invested in it Other couples
have managed. My advice
is to take it day by day and
you'll have your answer.
* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-April
19): Don't be too abrupt.
Physical activity will help de-
fuse any anxiety you feel. En-
ergetic entertainment should
be planned for the evening
hours. You will attract some-
one who will complement your
outgoing and confident atti-
tude. ***
TAURUS (April 20-May
20): Your stress level will be
significant if you are holding
everything in and not express-
ing the way you feel to those
causing you concern. Indulge
in little things that can- make
you feel good like a massage
or physical activity. ***
GEMINI (May 21-June
20): Social events or taking
part in a fundraiser will lead to
interesting new acquaintances.
A new hobby can put your tal-
ent and skills to the test. The
more you do and the more
people you meet, the greater
your chance to prosper finan-
cially, personally 'and profes-
sionally. ****
CANCER (June 21-July
22): Don't count on any-
thing until it's signed, sealed
and delivered. An emotional,
moody and nagging interlude
will develop if you indulge in


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Word
a no-win situation. Spend time
with people who have interests
similar to yours. **
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):
Opportunities to travel must be
taken advantage of, no matter
how short or long the distance.
Mix business with pleasure.
You will learn through the ex-
periences you encounter while
en route. Your persuasive man-
ner will win you all the support
you need. *****
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Uncertainties regarding
your financial, situation will
be unnerving. Get involved in
activities that will ease your
stress and help you feel more
confident. It's time to do more
for yourself. Update your im-
age. ***
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): This is not the best
day to bring up situations that
are bothering you or to try to
change the way someone does
things. Your personal situa-
tion may be unclear and your
household disruptive. Make
personal changes but don't try
to change others. ***


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: X equals P
"WMIXCWOS GIWZSC MH OWGRIS'H
FW L D.T VW J MOU LDR CDDJ CM JS
L DR I X WH H X DIG XNDG D ." WC U D I S
PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "Easter tells us that life is to be interpreted not simply
in terms of things but in terms of ideals." Charles M. Crowe
(c) 2011 by NEA, Inc. 4-25


SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov.
21): Getting together with
colleagues socially will en-
hance your professional repu-
tation. Be ready for adventure
if the opportunity arises but be
aware of delays if you have to
travel. Don't limit opportuni-
ties by staying home alone.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-
Dec. 21): Open your doors
to friends and relatives. Enter-
taining will put you .in a good
position. to get some needed
help. You will meet a prospec-
tive partner while promoting
your ideas or talking about so-
lutions. ******' .
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-
Jan. 19): Focus on yourself.
The busier you are, the less
likely you are to face opposi-
tion. Refrain from erratic be-.
havior. Don't blow situations
out of proportion. Difficulties
while traveling will lead to
problems with. someone in a
position of authority. **
AQUARIUS (Jan.- 20-
Feb. 18): Expect someone to
give you a hard time. You must
stand up for your rights, espe-
cially if this person wasn't fair
to you in the past. Romance
can turn your night into some-
thing memorable. ****
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): Be reasonable when it
comes to entertainment or
self-improvement You will get
taken advantage of by a sales
pitch that claims the impossi-
ble. A partnership with some-
one who thinks the same way
you do will develop if you take
part in an event dealing with
an interest or hobby you have.


SUNDAY CROSSWORD


USE IT OR LOSE IT By Caleb Madison and J.A.S.A: Crossword Class / Edited by Will Shortz 1 3 4610 1112 1 14 1 16 17 18


Across
1 Fix, as a program
6 Water skimmers
10 Nickname for
Baryshnikov
15 Gds.
'19 Steye McQueen's
ex-wife.and co-
star in "The
Getaway"
21 Vogue's Wintour
and others
'22 Kind of torch
23 Electrical paths
in New York
City?
25. They're always
charged
26 Flap
27 Poet's "before"
28 D preceder
29 Divert
31 Deux of these are
better than un
33 Spill a Cuban
drink?
36 Shelter that's
often octagonal
39 Housing for the
homeless: Abbr.
40 Pit crew's supply
41 One who says
"Beg your
pardon" after
stepping on your
toes?
47 Mordant Mort
49 "Exodus" hero
50 Father of Deimos
and Phobos, in
myth
51 Seedcase that
inspired Velcro
For any three answers,
call from a touch-tone
phqne: 1-900-285-5656,
1.49 each minute; or,
with a credit card, 1-800-
814-5554.


52 Scot's "own"
53 Noblewoman


55


Dorm heads, for
short
Mmes., in Iberia
Speak on C-Span,
say
Burn cause


61 Gentleman's
partner
63 Preachers' lies?
68 Get up?
69 Subj. of modern
mapping
7.1 Bust planner, in
brief
72 Sly sort?
73 What a mashed
potato serving
may have?
78 "Sock it to me!"
show
80 Unbar, to the
Bard
81 High-end camera
82 Superior body?
83 Abbr. unlikely to
- start of a
sentence
84 Revolutionary?
88 Continuing plot
in a TV series
89 Did It"
(2007 memoir)
90 Cookie first
baked in
Manhattan's
Chelsea district
91 "Confiteor
omnipotenti"
(Latin prayer
starter) .
92 "Understood,
man"
94 Hairdresser's.
first do?
97 Luggage
attachment


99 Cartoon
exclamation
101 One way to
serve caf6
102 Author Amy's
, family squabble?
107 Our sun's type
111 Baker or Loos
112 Pizza topping
113 FICA fig.
115 Prefix with
metric
116 "It won't hurt

117 The Miracles?
121 Ball boy?
122 Like a bagel
123 Homey's rep
124 Mtn. stats
125 Shakespeare's
"spot"
126 Tofu sources
127 Spine-tingling

Down
1 Blot with gauze,
say
2 Pass over
3 One who sees
everything in
black and white?
4 Actress Thurman'
5 Regards in
wonderment
6 Rubberneck
7 Art, nowadays
8 Rocky of song
9 Tell, e.g.
10 Asian gambling
. meoca
11 Stores after
cremation
12 Long-range
shooters
13 Wor-d after high
ortop.


14 Source of Indian
tea
15 Volcano near
Aokigahara
forest
16 Mass part
17 Bitin' things
18 ___ for elephant
20 Red Cross
course, briefly
24 Line score inits.
30 Group with the
6x platinum
album "Dr.
Feelgood"
32 Backing: Var.
33 Bent beams
34 Some flakes
35 Suffix with
psych-
37 Whistle-blower,
in 'slang
38 Facebook co-
founder Saverin
41 3.26 light-years
42Sibyl, for one
43 Writer Eda
44 Chinese dynasty
during the time
of Confucius
45 Marquess's
subordinate
46 Sow's
counterpart
48 Prefix with port
54 Change the price
on
56 Bedtime
comment
58 Neaten
59 Season idi le.
soleil?
62 First German
emperor of Italy
.63 Runner
64 Mideast nosh
65 Announcement
upon arriving


66 dictum
(incidental
remark)
67 Sarge, e.g.
70 CBS's "The___
Today"
74 Audition (for)
75 100 Iranian
dinars
76 Israeli seaport
77 Cow, in Cidiz
79 Director
Kurosawa


82 Comics character
who said "Big
sisters are the
crab grass in the.
lawn of life"
84 Keatsian, e.g.
85 Johnnie Walker
variety
86 Plant manager?
87 Willingly
90 Chooses
93 Start to boil
over?
95 Met by chance


96 Intaglio seals
98 If nothing
changes
100 Base wear?
103 They have hops
104 Choose
105 Scotland's Firth
of ___
106 Rake in
108 Sash go-with
109 "Rich Man,
Poor Man"
Emmy winner


110 Actor McDowall
113 Jeanne et Julie,
e.g.: Abbr.
114 Any boat
116 ___ Lovelace,
computer
programming
pioneer
118 ___ Szyslak of
"The Simpsons"
119 Dull
120 E-mail add-on


. Answers to last Sunday's Crossword.

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Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427







Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


4D LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, MAY 1, 2011


Si Milk banks seek

SI i t more donor milk

for babies in need


ASSOCIATED PRESS
This product image courtesy of UncommonGoods shows Tyson Weissin's Koi fish ceramic garden ornaments. Fired in
several colors including a wonderful cobalt blue, a school of these placed along a pathway or nestled among some grass-
es would be quite arresting.

Gifts for the garden-loving mom


By KIM COOK
For The Associated Press
For a lot of moms, the urge
to nurture extends to plants and
flowers, outdoors and in. So for
Mother's Day, instead of getting her
a traditional floral arrangement that
lasts just a few days, consider other
options for or from the garden.
If mom spends some of her
happiest hours in her backyard
garden, you might sign her up for
Plantjotter.com's online organizer.
With no special downloads or soft-
ware required, the site allows gar-
deners to create a personalized web
page with info about what they've
planted, to-do schedules, photos
and wish lists. Monthly tips and
ideas are offered specific to your
grow zone.
HGTV.com has started an inter-
active family gardening club: Each
month, there's a new how-to proj-
ect, such as building terrariums,
pizza gardens or topiaries, that par-
ents and lkids can do together. You


can upload video and photos, and
get a biweekly newsletter.
Or add accents to mom's garden.
At Uncommongoods.com, find
Tyson Weissin's charming Koi fish
ceramic garden ornaments. Fired in
several colors including a wonder-
ful cobalt blue, a school of these
placed along a pathway or nestled
among some grasses would be
quite arresting.
This spring, West Elm introduced
Shane Powers' ingenious no-main-
tenance, indoor garden collection,
perfect for a modern mom with
little time or inclination to tend
plants but who enjoys a few touches
of nature in her living space. Sleek,
contemporary, hanging glass
bubble vases, and ceramic and
glass vessels hold plants such as air
ferns, water lilies and succulents.
They introduce some welcome
greenery to rooms, but are easy to
look after.
If mom loves cut flowers, con-
sider PlantationDesign.com's set
of Amaretto vases, formed out of


deliciously liqueur-like glass swirls.
Crate & Barrel has the Evelyn vase,
made of softly folded glass, as well
as Millie, Kiki and Marisol, all hand-
etched with charming designs.
Find here also a quartet of green,
enameled, bird-motif wall tiles, nice
on a patio fence. Pair them with a
couple of Perch pots in the same
crisp green hue, with a flock of little
birds encircling the rim.
Sur la Table has a fresh-looking
Botanical dishware collection out
this spring which features a happy,
modern floral pattern on snowy
white, dishwasher-safe ceramic.
There are linens in the line, too.
Often, retailers have accesso-
ries in their children's furnishings
sections that would work in other
rooms. This season, there are sev-
eral winsome options with a nature-
themed and feminine vibe. Pottery
Barn Kids has a birdcage chande-
lier made of painted iron with facet-
ed glass leaves and flowers. There's
also a crystal dream catcher crafted
of resin beads encircling a pair of
sweet cotton birds.


Associated Press

ATHENS, Ohio With
her baby fast asleep in the
stroller, Valerie Githinji
made her way up to the
nurses' station in O'Bleness
Memorial Hospital's mater-
nity ward.
She came bearing gifts.
Stored in the bottom of the
stroller, in a white plastic


bag, were several containers
totaling 200 ounces more
than a gallon and a half of
frozen breast milk.
GithinIi, who works in
student affairs at Hocking
College, has been donating
her extra breast milk for
about four months.
Some banks are sharing
their supply temporarily to
fulfill requests.


ANNIVERSARIES


Pace
Sharon Lynn Layfield
of Fort White and Steven
Talmnadge Pace of Lake
City were united in mar-
riage May 3,1986 at First
Baptist Church, Lake City.
They will celebrate their
25th anniversary with fam-
ily and friends during a
party in their honor given
by family.
The couple have three
children: Jessica Nicole
Pace, Kristen Amanda
Pace and Sara Bethany
Pace.
The bride is a phar-
macist at North Florida
Pharmacy and a member
of Wesley Memorial United


Methodist Church.
The groom is a proba-
tion and parole officer with
the Florida Department of
Corrections.
The couple has lived in
Lake City for 25 years.


895 Hair
Good at any of our 4 Lo


Branford Hwy.
752-0006
Hwy 90 West
961-8119


Baya
758
Gate W
752


cut
cations
Avenue I
3-3093
lay Plaza
?-0706
= li l l l l


make




i 'Ok


W- Wi- w
YMS/


i-- ----- ----------r1
15% OFF 1NP BOUQUET 4
APP A LITTLE PERSOtALITY .
TO MOTHER'5 P.AY .
S SENP FLOWERS FROM
SUNSHINE FLORIST FOR MOM....
ID 0P PO'T FORGET *
SCGRAPPMOTHER(
I (SHE LOVES YOU TOO)

SSUSHI-E FLORIST.
458 S. MARION AVE
i (36) 755-0833
E ACCT i MAJO W CMmIT CArDS Drf CARDS & CAMN IS APPRnEcIATh
16


I


4
, .'{


Make it.

Bake it.

Grow it.
ORIoW N S MARK.Er


Lake Desoto Wilson Park



Live music
Free canoe rentals
Food and drinks
Flowers for Mom
Children's activities
Bounce house
Storytelling o00am rto 30amr|
Vendor spaces are available ,


Baked Goods
Live Music
Arts
Every Saturday
8 a.m. to 12 p.m.
Additional Information, Call
(386) 719-5766


SMITY S

WESTERN STORE

MOTHER' DAY ,


AUP~is .,


EIttipe babies
Department On Sale!
(Excluding Brighton)


I.H. Crowetz, CLU
Registered Representative
(386) 755-3476


Life
Health
Disability


323 South Marion Ave.
Lake City, FL 32025
Fax (386) 755-3625


Mutual Funds
Dental
Pensions


Come and join us at your
favorite Italian Restaurant for


indmdualand lroip


.l&3-I7713B33333


I


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