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The Lake City reporter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01537
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 2/26/2011
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01537
System ID: UF00028308:01537
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text







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Fort White edges
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LIB OF FLORIDA HISTORY
Sp PO BOX 117007
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Scalped
Indians surrender 5
home runs in baseball rout.

Sports, I B





Reporter


Saturday, February 26, 201 I


Wlakecityreporter.conm


Vol. 137, No. 30 75 cents


BEST OF THE BEST


Stephen Brown (left)
accepts a certificate,
clock and a check
for $300 from Mayor
Stephen Witt after
being awarded the
2010 Employee
of the Year Award
during the City of
Lake City Annual
Awards Banquet
Friday night. Brown,
Lake City's only
cathodic protection
specialist, has been
employed with the
city for three years.




JASON MATTHEW WALKER
Lake City Reporter


Brown collects

title as city's

top employee


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
Hearing his
name called as
Employee of
the Year came
as a surprise
to Steve Brown.
"I've never won any-
thing," he said. "It's an
honor to be nominated by
my peers for this award."
Brown received the
honor during the City of
Lake City Annual Awards
Banquet Friday at The
County Club of Lake City.
He is the cathodic pro-
tection specialist and has
been employed with the
city for three years.
The city couldn't have
picked a better employee
for the award, said Joe '
Sheldon, gas department
superintendent. He said he
can depend on Brown for
a job that is crucial to the
entire city.
"He's an outstanding
employee," Sheldon said.
Winning the award is a



Marcia Bullard (center),
a Lake City Utilities
Department employee,
congratulates Stephen
Brown on being named
the Employee of the Year.
'He's wonderful and has
a fantastic personality,'
Bullard said. 'He's funny
and tries to keep everyone
up. He's an all-around
good man.'
Brown's wife, Mandy, who
works for the Lake City
Reporter, listens to the
'conversation.
JASON MATTHEW WALKER
Lake City Reporter


humbling experience for
him and a honor for the
entire gas department,
Brown said.
"I didn't do it by myself,"
he said. "It was a team
effort."
Also receiving top
honors at the banquet
were: Keith Hampton for *.
the Achievement Award;
Robert Thon Sr. for the
Dedication Award; and
Linda Andrews for the
Supervisor of the. Year
Award.
Each of the top four
award winners are
nominated by their fel-
low employees, said Gene
Bullard, banquet commit-
tee chairman. The com-
mittee then evaluates and
ranks the nominees to
determine the winners.
Employees also received
awards for five, 10, 15, 20,
25, 30 and 35 years of ser-
vice. Councilman Eugene
Jefferson was recognized
for 12 years of service.

AWARDS continued on 3A


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Keith Hampton shows off his Service Award for five years
of service and a 2010 Achievement Award. Other winners
included Robert Thon Sr., who won the Dedication Award;
Linda Andrews, who was named the Supervisor of the
Year; and about 40 other city employees who won years
of service award.


"All of the employees are award
winners.This is your night."

Wendell Johnson
City Manager


LC man arrested

for vehicular

manslaughter


Also charged with
leaving scene of
crash that killed 2.
By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
A Lake City man is
being held in the Columbia
County Detention Facility
on $175,000 bond after state
patrol troopers arrested
him from an October wreck
that killed two people.
Jerry James Jackson, 33,
of 453 NW McCall Terrace,
was arrested on a six-
count warrant by Florida
Highway Patrol investiga-
tors Thursday night at his
home. Authorities charged
him with two counts of
vehicular manslaughter,
two counts of leaving the


scene of a crash with death,
leaving the scene of a crash
with injuries and driving
while his license has been
suspended or revoked.
The warrantwas obtained
from Third Judicial Circuit
Judge Paul Bryan as a
result of a traffic homicide
investigation conducted by
the state patrol's Lake City
District Traffic Homicide
Investigation section.
FHP said Jackson was
driving a 1998 Jeep SUV
northbound on U.S.
Highway 441 at a high rate
of speed at around 7:54 p.m.
on Oct. 10 when he struck
a 2003 Dodge pickup truck,
which was turning left into
the Chevron Service station
on U.S. 441 at Interstate
CHARGED continued on 3A


Sheriff: 'Appears

that she took

her own life'

No reason given Cameron said. "From what
what drove girl to we got from the medical
examiner, the preliminary
commit suicide. report from them tells us
that's how she died."
By TONY BRITT Cameron said Garcia's
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com brother found her
Wednesday night in' her
Authorities confirmed on bedroom on 129th Road.
Friday that a sixth-grade Deputies arrived at the
Suwannee County Middle home around 7:55 p.m.
School student killed her- The Medical Examiner's
self by hanging. Office in Jacksonville gave
Two days after 12-year- Suwannee authorities an
old Lizbeth Garcia's death, oral report of its prelimi-
officials .are still trying nary findings Thursday,
to solve the puzzle: Why Cameron said.
would a young girl take her "The report said they see
own life? nothing inconsistent with
Suwannee County Sheriff her taking her own life,"
Tony Cameron said Garcia he said. "There's no other
died of asphyxiation due to form of trauma or anything
hanging, that. occurred with the
"It appears that she child. It was asphyxiation
took her own life and it
appears to be self-inflicted," SUICIDE continued on 3A


CDC to host Sixth

Annual Black Tie

Fundraiser


Aim is to help
educate and
build community.
By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.comrn
Local support is what
helps the Greater Lake City
Community Development
Corporation provide oppor-
tunities and resources for
the community.
The organization is hav-
ing its Sixth Annual Black
Tie Fundraising Banquet at
6 p.m. today atthe Columbia
County Fairgrounds
Exhibition Hall.
The banquet is an oppor-
tunity to raise money for
the nonprofit agency, which


works to increase the qual-
ity of life for the commu-
nity, said Lester McKellum,
CDC executive director.
It helps people create and
build wealth, which in turn
is a positive contribution for
the community as a whole.
The CDC offers several
programs that focus on
areas such as financial lit-
eracy, GED and computer
classes, and helping low- to
moderate-income families
and individuals become
homeowners.
* "We make it possible for
people to accomplish the,
American dream of home
ownership," he said.
Educating people
FUNDRAISER continued on 3A


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400


7 7 5 4 Opinion ................4A
7 5 f -"T Faith................... 6A -
Partly cloudy People ................. 2A
Advice & Comics ......... 4B
W EATHER, 2A C. .- Puzzles................. 2B
~~~ .


TODAY IN
FLORIDA
Discovery on
way to station.


COMING
SUNDAY
County narrows
EMS choices.


1 '.L


e c(l










LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2011


PIay


Friday:
Afternoon: 5-4-2
Evening: 5-2-4


Friday:
Afternoon: 9-2-4-5
Evening: 2-0-4-7


' Thursday:
1-5-13-33-35


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



Nominees agree: Making it real not easy


LOS ANGELES

Playing real-life people on
film is one of the trickier
acting challenges, a feat
that the Academy Awards
has recognized more
than 15 times over the past decade.
They're expected to do it again at
Sunday's ceremony, with the real-
world tales "The King's Speech,"
"The Social Network," "The Fighter"
and "127 Hours" all up for multiple
Oscars.
Portraying a nonfictional char-
acter isn't a surefire way to win an
Oscar, but it sure seems to help an
actor's chances. James Franco, who
is serving double duty as the show's
co-host anda best actor nominee for
"127 Hours," felt just as much pres-
sure to portray real-life mountain
climber Aron Ralston as he did to
once play a fictional heroin addict
named Joey.
"You feel a different kind of
responsibility, but you can also feel
that for a fictional character," said
Franco, one of eight nominees this
year who portrayed a real person. "I
played a heroin addict once opposite
Robert De Niro (in 2002's "City by
the Sea"). There are lots of people
with heroin addictions, so you feel a
big responsibility to get that right."
Some of this year's nominees
shaped their performances after
meeting their real-world counter-
parts. The cast and crew of "The
Fighter" had access to the actual
Ward boxing brood from Lowell,
Mass.


Eric Church, The Band
Perry win ACM Awards
NASHVILLE, Tenn. Eric
Church and The Band Perry are
this year's first Academy of Country
Music Awards winners.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Actors James Franco (left) and Anne Hathaway talk to the media at the Kodak
Theatre in the Hollywood section of Los Angeles Thursday. Franco and Hathaway
are hosting 83rd Academy Awards, which airs Sunday.


Organizers announced Church
won top new solo vocalist and The
Band Perry won top new vocal group
or duo in a news release Friday. Both
categories were determined by fans
and member voters.
They now move on to compete for
the top new artist award. The winner
will be announced during the show,
which will be broadcast live April 3
from the MGM Grand in Las Vegas.


Court won't free pair in
Stamos case on appeal
MARQUETTE, Mich. A court
has denied a request by a Michigan
couple convicted of trying to extort
$680,000 out of "Glee" actor John
Stamos to be released from prison
while their case is on appeal.


The Mining Journal of Marquette
reported the Sixth Circuit U.S.
Court of Appeals this week issued
the decision in the case involving
Allison Coss and Scott Sippola. They
were each sentenced to four years in
prison.
Attorney Sarah Henderson, who is
representing them on appeal, argued
that they should be freed in part
because the convictions were for
nonviolent offenses.
Coss and Sippola were convicted
in July of conspiracy and using e-
mail to threaten a person's reputa-
tion. They threatened to sell old
photos of Stamos with strippers and
cocaine.
The FBI said such photos didn't
exist.

* Associated Press


Celebrity Birthdays


* Singer Fats Domino is 83.
* Country-rock musician
Paul Cotton (Poco) is 68.
* Actor-director Bill Duke is
68.
* Singer Mitch Ryder is 66.
* Rock musician Jonathan
Cain (Journey) is 61.
* Singer Michael Bolton is
58.
* Bandleader John McDaniel

Daily Scripture


is 50.
* Actress Jennifer Grant is
45.
* Singer Rico Wade (Society
of Soul) is 39.
* Olympic gold medal swim-
mer Jenny Thompson is 38.
* Rhythm-and-blues singer
Corinne Bailey Rae is 32.
* Country singer Rodney
Hayden is 31.


"Jesus replied: 'Love the Lord
your God with all your heart
and with all your soul and with
all your mind.' This is the first
and greatest commandment.
And the second is like it:'Love
your neighbor as yourself.'"
Matthew 22:37-39


Lake City
HOW TO REACH US
*Main number ........(386) 752-1293
Fax number .............752-9400
Circulation ..............755-5445
Online... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St, Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, RFla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson .....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
Assistant Editor CJ Risak..754-0427
After 1:00 p.m.
(crisak@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Kathryn Peterson. .754-0417
(kpeterson@lakecityreporter.com)
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440.


Reporter.
BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by- 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7:30
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be Issued.
Circulation .............755-5445
(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks................ $26.32
24 Weeks...................$48.79
52 Weeks..................$83.46
Rates indude 7% sales tax.
Mail rates
12 Weeks.................. $41.40
24 Weeks...................$82.80
52 Weeks..................$179.40


CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run
in this space. And thanks for reading.


Special day
for veteran crew
CAPE CANAVERAL
Still on a high from
their dramatic liftoff with
just two seconds to go,
Discovery's astronauts
spent their first full day in
orbit operating a 100-foot,
laser-tipped rod to take a
close look at the shuttle
wings and nose.
At least four pieces of
insulating foam peeled
away from the exter-
nal fuel tank during
Discovery's farewell
launch, and some of them
apparently struck the
shuttle. Officials said the
impacts were gentle and
occurred late enough in
the launch to pose no
safety concern.
All the same,
Discovery's commander,
Steven Lindsey and his
crew followed standard
day-after-launch procedure
in checking the wings
and nose of NASA's most
traveled spaceship. The
inspections became man-
datory following the 2003
Columbia disaster.
Discovery and its all-
veteran crew along
with Robonaut 2, the first
humanoid robot in space
- are due at the space
station on Saturday after-
noon. Robonaut 2, or R2,
will stay behind when the
-shuttle leaves.
. "Look who is coming
to dinner!" space sta-
tion astronaut Catherine
Coleman enthused in a
tweet.
On its last voyage before
'being retired and shipped
to a museum, Discovery is
delivering a compartment
full of space station sup-
. plies as well as Robonaut
2. The chamber will be
attached to the orbiting lab
next week and function as
a closet.
Storage space is limited
at the 220-mile-high com-
plex and will become even
tighter once NASA retires


THE WEATHER


PARTLY
CLOUDY


HI177 LO0 -


ASSOCIATED PRESS
STS-133 mission specialist Nicole Stott waves to employees
as fellow mission specialist Michael Barratt looks on after
leaving the Operations and Checkout Building at Kennedy
Space Center in Cape Canaveral Thursday.


the shuttles this year.
Shuttles double as garbage
trucks, hauling away trash
and old equipment.
- Two more shuttle launch-
es remain, Endeavour in
April and Atlantis in June.
It was a special day in
space for Michael Barratt,
who like crewmate Nicole
Stott and Timothy Kopra
- bumped from space shut-
tle Discovery's final flight
following a bicycle crash
- lived aboard the space
station in 2009. Thursday
marked his 200th day in
orbit, cumulatively, as the
shuttle zoomed after his for-
mer home.

Man cited after
crash with trooper
JACKSONVILLE A
north Florida man was
cited for running a red
light after authorities said
he crashed into a state
trooper.
Florida Highway Patrol
reported that 38-year-old
David Thomas was driving
in Jacksonville Thursday
morning when he collided
with an unmarked patrol
car.


The trooper was taken
td a nearby hospital with
minor injuries.

T-shirt leads
officials to robber
ALTAMONTE SPRINGS
- A T-shirt with a distinc-
tive black and white pat-
tern helped lead authori-
ties to a suspected bank
robber.
The shirt was in the
back seat Thursday when
Orange County Sheriff's
deputies stopped a car
driven by 49-year-old Lee
Anthony Aiello. Aiello is
suspected in two bank rob-
beries one in Altamonte
Springs, the other in near-
by Polk County.
Video surveillance cap-
tured a picture of a man
who made no effort to dis-
guise himself, wearing the
T-shirt when he robbed
a SunTrust Bank in
Altamonte Springs Feb. 18.
Authorities said the same
man, wearing the same
shirt, robbed a Trustco
Bank in Davenport
Tuesday.


Tallahassee *
75/55
Pensacola *
70/60 Panama City
71/57


MOSTLY I PARTLY PARTLY PARTLY
SUNNY CLOUDY CLOUDY CLOUDY


HI82LO is HI81LOS5 HI76LD45 HI73LO 44


* Valdosta
76/56 acksonville
Lake City "73/54
77/54
Gainesville Daytona Be
76/54 78/58
Ocala
101T ICCU


Tampa,
70/ ;


TEMPERATURES
High Friday
Low Friday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Friday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


82
64
71
46
85 in 1962
23 in 1989


0.00"
3.59"
7.27"
3.00"
6.51"


"7a lp 7p la 6a
.... saturday Sunday







F- eca stgd.terus i, *F Be'fa. ,n


ach


city
Cape Canaveral
Daytona Beach
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Jacksonville


S Key West
Oiando Cape Canaveral. Lake City
82/59 78/60 MiamI
Naples


S West Palm Beach Ocala
82/66 Orlando .
Ft Lauderdale Panama City
Ft Myers., 82/70 Pensacola
83/61 Naples Tallahassee
82/61 Mfami Tampa
West 82/69 Valdosta
KeyWes* W. Palm Beach
70/71


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise torn.
Sunset tom.


7:00 a.m.
6:27 p.m.
6:59 a.m.
6:28 p.m.


MOON
Moonrise today 2:40 a.m.
Moonset today 1:03 p.m.
Moonrise tom. 3:30 a.m.
Moonset tom. 2:00 p.m.


March March March March
4 12 19 26
New First Full. Last


On this date in
1910, parts of
Washington State
were in the mids
a storm which pr
duced 129 inche
snow at Laconia,
.single storm reco
for the state.*


Sunday
80/65/pc
79/61/s
81/71/s
84/63/s
82/55/pc
80/56/s
77/69/s
82/54/pc
82/70/s
83/65/s
83/57/pc
84/61/s
74/60/pc
73/63/c
80/55/s
80/62/s
81/53/pc
82/69/s


Monday
80/63/pc
83/62/pc
82/67/pc
82/63/pc
81/59/pc
80/59/pc
76/68/s
81/59/pc
'82/68/s
84/65/pc
82/60/pc
84/62/pc
73/57/pc
73/52/t
79/58/pc
79/63/pc
80/59/pc
83/66/s


An exclusive
service
6 brought to
llat our readers
30 nies to bu
.Today's by
ultra-violet The Weather
radiation risk Channel,
for the area on
a scale from 0 "
to 10+.

weather.com

[ Forecasts, data and
="2 graphics 2011 Weather
."* Central, LP, Madison, Wis.
www.weatherpublisher.com





e (e0 Connected
it of
o-,
s of
a
ord

,' i A I'l igl ,,^


* Associated Press


C%GH3


AROUND FLORIDA


.. -...- ...... __r I*717 ..9 .... ... .


............. .... - --------- -


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


,. Of/


78/










LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2011


DOT gives plaque of appreciation f WrA


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter. corn

A local business was
recently recognized by
an area law enforcement
agency for aiding authori-
ties with drug and evi-
dence destruction.
Department of
Transportation Office of
Motor Carrier Compliance
Lt. Jerry Bullard on
Wednesday presented
Tampa Armature Works'
representatives with a
plaque of appreciation.
TAW has assisted the
Motor Carrier Compliance
office and other law
enforcement agencies by
burning seized narcotics,
drug paraphernalia and
other former- evidence in
the company's incinera-


TONY BRITT/Lake City Reporter
Department of Transportation Office of Motor Carrier
Compliance Lt. Jerry Bullard (from left) presents Preston
Ellis, Tampa.Armature Works plant manger in Lake City, with
a plaque on Wednesday.


tor.
"They really help us
out and other local law


enforcement agencies
that aren't able to have
the cost of having their


own incinerator," Bullard
said.
The materials are taken
to TAW after they've been
processed through the
court system and State
Attorney's Office signs off
a destruction order. The
items are then placed in
an incinerator, with law
enforcement and media
present and destroyed in
the oven where the tem-
perature reaches 1,200-
degrees.
"It means a lot to us to
get the plaque from the
DOT," said Preston Ellis,
Tampa Armature Works
plant manger in Lake City.
"We try to help them out
as much as we can. We'll
be here whenever they
need us."


Porter supports sales tax free holiday bill


From staff reports

TALLAHASSEE State represen-
tative Elizabeth Porter (R Dist 11)
has joined Senator Ellyn Bogdanoff
(R Dist. 25) in introducing a house
bill to bring back the Sales Tax Free
Holiday.
House Bill 733 was introduced by
Bogdanoff and Porter in cooperation
with the Florida Retail Federation,
according to information released
from Porter's office Thursday.
The bill proposes that a Sales Tax


Holiday be held on ISi
the, third weekend jI
of August, just in .
time for parents to ~' "
purchase items for .41-
children before the
beginning of school.
"This short, Porter
three-day sales tax
holiday has a long distance impact
on Florida's economy and that is why
Sen. Bogdanoff and I are leading a
legislative effort to make sure it hap-
pens again this year," Porter said in a


prepared statement. "This Sales Tax
Free Holiday will help strengthen the
retail sector for our state because it is
an industry that contributes 75 per-
cent to our gross domestic product
It provides one out of every five jobs
in our state and generates $20 billion
in sales and retail-related taxes for
Florida's Government each year."
Porter noted that the legislation is
worth fighting for because Florida's
families work hard and they deserve
a break at the cash register, especially
when it actually pays Florida back.


AWARDS: City's top employee announced

Continued From 'Page 1A


Recognition Awards
were presented to Verna
Ingram, Jerome Love and
Donna Reese. The award-
ees all do an outstanding
. job in their roles and work
behind the scenes, Bullard
said.
There are 230 employees
with the city.
As a team the employees
work together to make the
city a better place, said
Mayor Stephen Witt
"We do these awards
because you deserve
them," he said.
All of the employees are
award winners, said City
Manager Wendell Johnson.
"This is your night," he
said.
The awarding this year
was tough because of the
economy, but it was also a
positive one because of the
work of all the employees,
Johnson said.
"I appreciate what you
do. I couldn't do it without
you," he said. "You are
what makes the city work."


High-speed
rail plan
gets reprieve

TALLAHASSEE Hours
after the Obama administra-
tion gave Florida Gov. Rick
Scott a week to reconsider
his opposition to a revised
proposal for high-speed
trains between Tampa and
Orlando, the Republican kept
up his harsh criticism of the
project
U.S. Transportation
SecretaryRayLaHoodoffered.
the reprieve after meeting
with Scott in Washington. At
stake is $2.4 billion the fed-
eral government would take
back if Scott doesn't approve
the project.
"He asked me for addi-
tional information about
the state's role in this proj-
ect, the responsibilities of
the Florida Department of
Transportation, as well' as
how the state would be pro-
tected from liability," LaHood
said in a statement. "He has
committed to make a final
decision by the end of next
week."
If Scott balks, the money
would be reallocated to one
or more other states seek-
ing high-speed rail funding,
including California, New
York and Rhode Island.
"I believe high speed rail
is a federal boondoggle, as I
said more than a week ago,"
Scott said.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Mandy Brown kisses her husband Stephen on the cheek after he won the 2010 Employee of
the Year for the City of Lake City on Friday. 'I'm very proud that he won,' she said. 'This was
chosen by his peers. He's very honored to have it. I couldn't be any more proud.'


SUICIDE: No reason given why

Continued From Page 1A


that occurred with the
child. It was asphyxiation
where she held pressure on
herself until she passed out
and then her body weight
would have continued. ...."
Cameron said there are
rumors as to why the child
would have taken her life,
but nothing has been sub-
stantiated.
'We'veinterviewed alotof
people and kids," Cameron
said, "but we don't have
anything that tells us why
at this point. We certainly
wish to get to the bottom
of it, so that whatever the
reason is, maybe we can
prevent anything like that


ever happening again."
Cameron said investiga-
tors from his office con-
tinue to interview people
who knew the child, her
parents and her friends to
see whether she spoke to
someone and told them
why she was upset.
"Was she bullied? I don't
know if she was or not,"
Cameron said. "I think
school officials are trying
to find out if that could be
a cause."
According to the Centers
for Disease Control and
Prevention, 12 percent of
all deaths among youth
and young adults in the


U.S. result from suicides.
Nearly 20 percent of high
school students surveyed
by the CDC reported being
bullied on school proper-
ty .during the previous 12
months. Bullying involves
emotional, verbal or physi-
cal abuse.
Cameron said investi-
gators have interviewed
Garcia's classmates to figure
out what led to her suicide.
"Nobody has said any-
one in particular would
have been bullying her,"
Cameron said. "We don't
have anything concrete at
all as to why she would
have chosen to do this."


LEANNE TYO/Lake City Reporter

Quality Assurance Review team
Mike Millikin (left), superintendent of schools, poses for
a picture with the AdvancEd Quality Assurance Review
team at the Columbia County School Board Administrative
Complex auditorium Wednesday. The team spent three
days evaluating the district and its schools for accreditation
through AdvancEd and presented its findings to the school
board, which included recommending the district for accred-
itation. Also pictured are team members Dody Sapp (from
left), Dorothy Blackwell, Lucille Wolfrey, Randall Cook, Toni
Stivender, Tonya Bradburn and Clete Lipetzy.



Art Fest to

display themes

of friendship


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com

Young artists will have
their artwork on display
for the community in
honor of Black History
Month.
The Annual Art Fest
is 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. today
at Southside Recreation
Center.
The exhibit will feature
artwork from several
elementary schools in
the district, said Wayne
Jernigan, recreation
supervisor.
"We have children who
come to the center and
take part in art-related
activities," he said. "We
thought it was a good
idea to partner with the
schools and showcase
students' works."
Each piece in the show
will reflect a theme of
friendship, said Laura
Hunter-Null, district art
coordinator and art teach-


er at Eastside Elementary
School. Artwork will
include murals, paintings,
Amish quilts and more.
"We've got some beau-
tiful artwork," she said..
A community center
is about meeting your
neighbors and getting to
know each other, Hunter-
Null said. Students will
be able to see the works
of others at the event.
The show also brings
people out to the cen-
ter that have never been
there before, Jernigan
said. Southside is about
community involvement.
"We hope to have a good
turnout for the event," he
said. "It's going to be a
nice little program."
Hunter-Null's future
goal is to eventually dis-
play art work for the
whole month of February
at the center, she said.
The theme for each show
will continue to be a word
that unifies the artwork.


FUNDRAISER: CDC event

Continued From Page 1A


through programs, such as
financial literacy training,
helps them know the nec-
essary steps to obtaining
a home, McKellum said.
The organization partners
with the City of Lake City
in providing affordable
housing.
Banquet tickets are
$30 apiece or two for $55.
The evening will feature a


social mixer, dinner and
silent auction, along with
music and dancing.
Dr. Kurt B. Young from
the Institute for Research
Evaluation and Policy
Analysis is the keynote
speaker.
"We'd like for every-
body to come out and help
us with out fundraising
activity," he said.


CHARGED: Manslaughter

Continued From Page 1A


10. '
Christopher James
Ratliff, Jackson's right
front passenger, died from
injuries he suffered in the
wreck.
The driver of the 2003
Dodge pickup truck, Ricky
J. Groover, was also killed.
Groover's wife, Rhonda R.


Groover, was a passenger
in the right, front seat of
Groover's truck and suf-
fered serious injuries in
the wreck.
Reports said Jackson
fled the scene of the dead-
ly crash and was not found
until the next day by FHP
investigators.


Public.


*NGH O* *
* :Tl


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427













OPINION


Saturday. February 26, 201 I


www.lakecityreporter.com


O
0 P


THEIR
INION


Scott's


political


tunnel


vision

W hy would Gov.
Rick Scott just
say no to $2 bil-
lion in federal
funding for a
bullet train already approved by
the GOP-led Legislature a
project that would create thou-
sands of jobs for Florida? Many
people are asking that question
after the governor canceled
plans for a high-speed train line
between Tampa and Orlando,
which eventually would extend
to Miami's inter-modal center
near the airport. Many of those
caught by surprise, in fact, are
from the governor's own party.
U.S. Rep. John Mica, who
chairs the U.S. House and
Infrastructure Committee, said:
"I have urged the governor
to reconsider going forward
and allow the private sector to
assume the risk and any future
costs for the project"
State Sen. Paula Dockery, an
early supporter of Scott's "Let's
get to work" campaign, noted,
"It would be more prudent" for
him to allow private companies
to bid for the project and show
how they would pay operating
costs and, any cost overruns
before turning down the deal.
Dockery is right. It was
imprudent for the governor to
unilaterally turn down an initial
$300 million in federal stimulus
dollars already appropriated by
the Legislature in fact, he
has no constitutional author-
ity to do so.. Florida Senate
Budget Committee Chair
J.D. Alexander and Senate
Transportation Committee
Chair Jack Latvala wondered as
much, too.
This is a case of the gover-
nor putting his ideology before
common sense even if it
means turning down 14,000
jobs and eventually as many as
25,000 by the time the Miami
leg would be completed.
How unfortunate that one
mpn's political tunnel vision
has sought to bury a project
that just a few months ago won
bipartisan support and would
get Floridians to work.
The Miami Herald

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman


LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.


BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


Adherence to rules proves fatal


WASHINGTON
ust when one believes
we are living in a society
based on common sense
that protects our children
from inequities, which
can ruin their lives in an
instant, an incident comes
along to dispel that, something
so unfair as to shake the very
foundations of our faith in the
system.
That may seem a bit hysteri-
cal, but in the case in question
blind adherence to a rule pro-
duced action so draconian that
it was a contributing factor to a
chilling tragedy. It is just one of
a growing number of examples
where the misguided applica-
tion of such policies has had
horrendous results.
Nick Stuban at 15 was a bet-
ter than average student at an
elite high school in Fairfax
County, Va., one that has been
cited in the top 50 secondary
institutions in the United States.
There are more than a few of
these in what overall may be
the best public school system in
the nation. Nick was a popular
linebacker in football with plans
for greater things, including
the possibility down the road of
playing in college.
But as is often the case in
adolescence, he made a mis-
take. He bought a single pill
from a fellow student that mim-
icked the effect of marijuana.
It was a legal substance that
he researched on the Internet.
This pill, labeled JWH-018, was
only half full and had no lasting
properties. The minute he com-
pleted the transaction, he knew
it was foolish. There is zero
tolerance in the county for any
drug, even the over-the-counter
kind. The spice oregano brings
swift action if it is packaged to


Dan K.Thomasson
look like marijuana.
Nick's action triggered a pro-
cess so unfair as to resemble
the worst star chambers of a
totalitarian government. Little
did it seem to matter to those
in the system that Nick's world
was turned upside down by the
impending death of his mother
from Lou Gehrig's disease that
had finally robbed her of most
'normal functions. He often had
to jump to her aid when his
father wasn't available because
of work. He was an only child
and the pressures clearly were
enormous.
School officials suspended
him and recommended his
expulsion. He was out of school
and away from his friends for
two months as his parents
appealed the severity of the
punishment to the county's
highest school authority. During
that time, his father noticed
that Nick was becoming less
responsive. Finally, he was not
expelled from the system but
was forced to attend another
school away from his team-
mates and friends who had
become his substitute family
as his mother's disease pro-
gressed. Enforced transfer is
the county's way of punish-
ing those who have violated
the letter of their policy but
might deserve some leniency.
Nick became despondent and
reportedly began having dark
thoughts.


Before his father could
respond, his only son, with so
much promise, ended his own
life.
His story was told in detail in
The Washington Post.
Throughout the process of
trying to reach an accommoda-
tion with the school officials,
Nick apologized over and over
again. He even wept some-
thing he had learned not to do
in front of his ailing mother. His
father was told by authorities
that it would be bad for him to
hire a lawyer because it might
harden resolve and be seen
as an adversarial action. The
father acquiesced only to watch
helplessly, according to observ-
ers, as those hearing the case
turned the meetings into just
that. Warning that "lawyering
up" makes one look guilty is an
old police trick to keep suspects
from getting a jump on their
defense.
Almost as mind bending as
this story is the failure of the
county's school superintendent
and his colleagues to concede
that their punitive treatment
may have contributed to Nick's
suicide. They made no com-
mitment to revise a policy that
obviously fails to weigh each
case. This seeming lack of com-
passion sounds like advice from
school district lawyers worried
about a lawsuit.
Unfortunately, as in any num-
ber of cases, it is too late to rec-
tify the damage. As hundreds
joined his grieving parents at
his funeral, one could only hope
that common sense might ulti-
mately prevail. I'm not betting
on it
* Dan K. Thomasson is former
editor of Scripps Howard News
Service.


OTHER OPINION.


Clarify oil-spill claims process


the claims process
for the BP oil spill
to go smoothly,
least of all Kenneth
Feinberg, the man hired to
oversee it. He surely knew that
when you have 500,000 requests
for compensation for numerous
and dissimilar economic activi-
ties across several states, deter-
mining legitimate claims from
the leeches is like trying to seg-
regate needles from haystacks.
But the public has every right
to expect a transparent process.
That has not materialized, and
it has fueled much of the anger
and frustration toward Feinberg
and the Gulf Coast Claims
Facility.
Feinberg recently spent two
days meeting with Florida offi-
cials to discuss ways to improve


the claims process. He received
an earful, with legislators com-
plaining that their constituents
aren't being paid and can't get
answers from the GCCE Some
wondered why claims with simi-
lar circumstances have been
treated differently.
On the surface it appeared
to be a productive trip, with
both sides clearing the air and
Feinberg pledging to make
substantial changes. Attorney
General Pam Bondi met with
the claims czar and proposed
these sensible reforms:
Allow claims adjusters to
resolve claims onsite in their
offices.
Appoint an independent
auditor to review past and future
decisions of the GCCE.
Make claims procedures
public.


Provide clear explanation
to each claimant as to why pay-
ments were reduced or denied.
Feinberg appeared receptive
to these ideas and agreed with
lawmakers that the current pro-
cess has not been up to snuff.
He admitted that a lack of trans-
parency about why claims are
being denied and delayed has
been his "Achilles heel."
Saying it is one thing. Fixing
it is another.
Claimants should expect to
see results.
GCCF's opaqueness has
eroded public trust in the pro-
cess. Claimants can't be sure
they're getting a fair shake or a
raw deal. Feinberg must clarify
the rules, explain decisions and
make for better appeals.
N News Herald (Panama City)


Dale McFeatters
mcfeattersd@shns.com


Somalian-

pirates

display

brutality

he piracy that has
bedeviled the Horn :-
of Africa has taken a.
dark and ugly turn.
Pirates murdered
two American couples aboard
a yacht on a round-the-world
cruise. Why the pirates did so
is still a mystery.
They were in negotiations
with two U.S. Navy destroyers
standing by. But for whatever
the reason overcrowding
among the 19 pirates aboard
the 58-foot yacht, dwindling
supplies of food and water, a
falling-out over the hostages
the pirates killed two of
their own number and the four
Americans.
On hearing the shots and
having a rocket-propelled gre-
nade fired at them, the destroy-
ers dispatched special-opera-
tions troops who killed two
more of the pirates and took
the rest captive.
When this piracy began
in earnest, as Somalia's few
remaining national institutions .
collapsed, the motives were
purely mercenary, unclouded
by religion, ideology or xeno-
phobia. They wanted money. It
was a straightforward business
proposition pay a ransom,
and get the crew and ship
back.
The Associated Press inter-
viewed by phone a pirate
named Hassan who said
that the kidnappers became
angry because the U.S. ships
were blocking their return to
Somalia with the hostages.
And, he said, pirates will now
kill hostages before being
taken captive and sent for trial
to the United States, where a
Somali pirate recently received
a 33-year prison sentence.
The AP says the pirates now
hold some 30 ships and 660
hostages.
The pirates are said to have
upped the number of guards
watching the ships and hos-
tages for fear of a rescue opera-
tion. "We will respond to any
future attacks aggressively,"
promised one.
Meantime, the piracy busi-
ness, once the province of
underemployed fishermen
operating close to shore, has
changed. The pirates are
increasingly drawn from crimi-
nal gangs, and by using mother
ships are able to operate far
out in the Indian Ocean. They
are said to be bankrolled by
wealthy Somalis who take a cut
of the ransoms.
The sea-lanes are patrolled
by warships from the world's
maritime nations, including the
United States, but the area is
immense larger, it is said,
than the U.S. East Coast. The
most logical course rooting
the pirates out of their onshore
bases likely wouldn't work
because there is no functioning
Somali government to keep the
pirates from returning.
The navies can step up
patrols, convince ship owners
to make their vessels harder to
storm and urge yachts, fishing
craft and other smaller ships to
steer clear of the area.
But the immediate outlook,
given the potential profits, is
for the pirates to become more
aggressive and more violent.
Dale McFeatters is editorial
writer for Scripps Howard News
Service.


4A


- - - -17 - - -- I - 7 - I -._













FAITH


Saturday, February 26, 201 I v


&


VALUES


www.lakecityreporter.com


5A


IIL Suit claims FBI violates Muslims' rights


Carlton McPeak
carltonjmc@msn.com


Blessings

for being

kind like

Jesus

oming from
all Judea and
Jerusalem and
the coastal
region of Tyre
and Sidon (Luke 6:17)
people had assembled to
hear what Jesus had to say
(Luke 6:18).
To this crowd, which
included the 12 men who
had been selected as
apostles, Jesus describes
the benefits of being a fol-
lower of Jesus as well as
the consequences of reject-
ing Him. He also describes
an attitude of a follower
of Jesus and gives several
parables trying to motivate
the people to follow what
He said.
The benefit to the poor
is that they will receive
the kingdom of God, the
hungry will be fed, those
who weep will laugh. When
they stand up for God they
will be persecuted, but this
should bring joy because
they are like the prophets
of yesteryear.
For those who reject
Jesus there will be con-
sequences. The rich will
be comforted only in this
world. The "fed" will not
enjoy the spiritual food that
God has given. Those who
are seeking laughter in this
world will not give attention
to the things which they
need to change in order to
have enjoyment after this
life is over. Jesus wants us
to follow Him regardless
of the price we must pay,
rather than seeking the
approval of those who are
around us.
Because of the benefits
a Christian will receive
from. God, Jesus gives us
instructions as to how we
should treat two'groups of
people; our enemies and
those who are not able to
repay us for our kindness.
Jesus says that we are not
to retaliate to our enemies
but to love them. We are
to do good to those who
hate us. We are to bless
those who curse us. He
concludes by saying, "just
as you want people to treat
you, treat them in the same
way" (Luke 6:31).
Recognizing the fact that
we all need motivating to
do hard things, Jesus tells
several parables to His
audience. He speaks about
not following a blind man, a
pupil being like his teacher,
the speck and beam in a
person's eye, fruit that a
tree will bear as well as two
builders building a house
on different types of foun-
dations.
Every action in life will
receive either a reward
or a consequence. Being
a follower of Jesus is no
exception. Jesus requires
some hard things from His
followers. However, they
are no different that what
He has done for us.
Is being the Christian
Jesus described worth the
blessings He promised?

* Carlton G. McPeak is an
evangelist working in the
Lake City area. All Scriptural
quotations are from the New
American Standard Bible,
Holman Bible Publishers,
unless otherwise stated.


By THOMAS WATKINS
Associated Press
LOS ANGELES
Plaintiffs in a lawsuit
against the FBI said
Wednesday that the
agency's use of a paid
informant to infiltrate
California mosques has left them
and others Muslims with an
enduring fear that their phones
and e-mails are being screened
and their physical whereabouts
monitored.
The claims came at a news
conference announcing the law-
suit, filed by the American Civil
Liberties Union of Southern
California and the Los Angeles
office of the Council on American-
Islamic Relations.
The civil rights groups allege
that former FBI informant Craig
Monteilh violated Muslims'
freedom of religion by conduct-
ing indiscriminate surveillance
because of their faith.
The former fitness instruc-
tor with a criminal past spied on
Orange County mosques for the
FBI for more than a year from
2006 to 2007, recording conversa-
tions and meetings with a device
concealed on his key ring and a
camera hidden in a shirt button.
'To know that he was target-
ing me simply because I was a
Muslim, it's sad," said Ali Malik,
one of three plaintiffs named in
the suit. "I live in paranoia. ... I
just wish the FBI didn't do this."
Malik, a Pakistani-American,
added that his wife had night-
mares about him being snatched
by agents.
FBI spokeswoman Laura
Eimiller said she could not com-
ment on pending litigation but
emphasized that the FBI does not
target religious groups or indi-
viduals based on their religion.
"Any investigation would be
based on allegations of criminal


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Ameena Mirza Qazi, staff attorney of the Council of American-Islamic Relations, (middle) takes questions on a law-
suit against the FBI in Los Angeles Wednesday. The council joined-the class-action lawsuit against the FBI after an
informant said he was ordered to target Muslims for surveillance when he infiltrated California mosques. Also shown
are plaintiff All Malik (left) and CAIR executive director Hussam Ayloush.


activity," she said.
Another plaintiff, Yassir Fazaga,
who is a religious leader and a
therapist, says he no longer feels
he can guarantee his clients full
confidentiality because he thinks
the FBI is listening in.
Monteilh's use as an informant
his caused little but headaches
for the FBI. '
The one-time machine operator
has a lengthy rap sheet dating to
the 1980s and a history of evic-


tions and bad debts for every-
thing from car payments to rent
to credit cards.
After several months of gath-
ering cell phone numbers and
e-mail addresses for his handlers,
agents asked Monteilh to talk
more openly about jihad and his
willingness to engage in violence,
according to the lawsuit.
Instead of responding approv-
ingly to Monteilh's violent rheto-.


ric, several mosque-goers called
the FBI to say they were worried
about his statements.
Monteilh himself is suing the
FBI over his treatment by the
handlers.
He says the FBI failed to pro-
tect him from grand theft charges
he claims were related to his
work for the agency on a drug
ring investigation. He eventually
served eight months in prison on.
the felony-counts ,-....


CHURCH NOTES


Today
Church revival
The 21 Days of Ablaze is 7:30
p.m. today through Monday and
March 1-15 at Miracle Tabernacle
Church. The church is located at
1190 S.W. Sister Welcome Road.

Sunday
BHM celebration
Shiloh Missionary Baptist
Church is celebrating its Annual
Black History Celebration 11:30
a.m. Sunday. The church is locat-
ed at 948 NE Aberdeen Ave.

Voice of Deliverance
Buddy and Jeanne Steele will
be at the Voice of Deliverance
Church 2 p.m. Sunday. The
church is located on E.
Washington Street. Call 386-344-


3874.


2483,


Black History Program
A Black History Program is
4 p.m. Sunday at Sweet Home
Baptist Church. The speaker is'
Minister Charles Lee of High
Springs. The church is located at
CR 25A in White Springs.'

Regional Camp Meeting
The Live Oak Church of God
regional camp meeting is 6. p.m.
Sunday and 7:15 p.m. Monday
through Thursday. Special music
and area choirs each night.
Speakers include: Dr. Raymond
Culpepper, general overseer;
Bishop Dusty Wilson, state youth
coordinator; Bishop Kent Rogers,
Highlands C.O.G. pastor; and
Bishop J. David Stephens, state
overseer Florida. The church
is located at 9828 US Hwy. 129
South in Live Oak. Call 386-362-


Monday
The monthly meeting of the
Lake City Aglow Lighthouse is 7
p.m. Monday at New Generation
School. Dr. Ellamas Dennard is
the keynote speaker. She is an
educator, evangelist, administra-
tor and author from Jacksonville.
Dennard is the prayer coordinator
for the State of 'Florida Aglow.

Wednesday
Revival services featuring the
Rev. Dr. Mark Crutcher from
Orlando are 6:30 p.m. Wednesday
through Friday at New Mt. Pisgah
A. M. E. Church. The church is
located at 345 NE Washington St.
Call 386-752-1830.

Thursday
A gospel tent meeting is 7 p.m.


Thursday through Saturday at
Mercy Baptist Church of Lake
City. Contact the Rev. Chris Hall,
pastor, at (386) 466-4542. The
church is located at 441 South
across from Racetrack Road.

Saturday, March 5
Yard Sale
Lake City Church of God is
having a Kids Club Yard Sale
7 a.m. to 1 p.m. March 5 in the
Family Life Center. The church
is located at 173 SE Ermine Ave.,
the corner of SE Duval Street.

Submit Church Notes items
in writing no later than 5 p.m.
Monday the week prior to an event
by e-mail to arobinson@lakecityre-
porter.com, fax to (386) 752-9400
or drop-off at 180 E. Duval St.,
Lake City. Call (386) 754-0425
with questions.


Bible explains why worship on Sunday


Christ arose on
Sunday (John20:1-9).
Sunday worship
commemorates
new life through
forgiveness from
sins through
Christ, who died and
rose again. Every Sunday
worship service is a
remembering-resurrection
Sunday. The old Sabbath
order of remembering sins
and forbearance of penalty
through anticipatory sacri-
fices is now replaced with
Christ's once-for-all-time
sacrifice for sin and His
bodily resurrection, which
evidences God's satisfac-
tion with Christ's sacrifice.
The disciples met on
Sunday (John 20:19-21).
Two gatherings of the
disciples on Sunday are
recorded in this passage.
In these services they
saw the living Lord Jesus
Christ, were empowered
with the Holy Spirit, and
were sent to minister to


BIBLE STUDY


Hugh Sherrill Jr.
ems-hugh43@comcostnet
sinners. Through God's
Word, your worship expe-
rience should have the
same impact. Note that
the Sunday gathering in
verse 19 was in the eve-
ning. Are you an advocate
of and participant in the
Sunday evening church
service?
The church was born
on Sunday (Acts 2:1-13).
Pentecost was 50 days
after the resurrection of
Christ, or the seventh
Sunday after the resur-
rection. Through bap-
tism of the Holy Spirit


the Body of Christ was
formed of believers in the
risen Christ, who were
subsequently filled with
the Holy Spirit to serve
Him. Sunday worship is
to renew our commitment
and spiritual energy to be
"witnesses."
The believers
observed the Lord's
Table on Sunday (Acts
20:7).
While the record of the
Last Supper notes singing
at the service; this text
speaks of preaching until
midnight. This gathering
to "break bread" wasn't
a quick 10 or 15 minutes
tacked onto an unrelated
church service. I hope
your church builds the
entire communion service
around the communion
table with a unifying
theme. It can be life-
changing.
Paul preached on
Sunday (Acts 20:7).
Sunday church services


are primarily for preach-
ing. While preaching is
foolishness to the perish-
ing,.it is still the Lord's
foremost method to com-
municate His message
(Col. 1:28; 2 Tim. 4:2).
The New Testament prec-
edent for the church is
Sunday preaching.
The people gave their
offerings on Sunday (1
Cor. 16:2).
"On the first day of
the week ..." again shows
the pattern of the New
Testament following the
resurrection of Christ
to gather the church on
Sunday for worship. This
included heart-purposed
giving as an act of worship
for participation by "every
one of you." Sunday wor-
ship was the continuing
practice of the churches
as congregations were
multiplied through com-
missioned witnessing.
John was given the
Revelation on Sunday


(Rev. 1:9,10).
It was the Lord's Day -
the day remembering His
resurrection when John
received the Revelation of
Jesus Christ. This Sunday
message from our Lord
Jesus Christ to us through
John and the inspiration of
the Holy Spirit challenged
the church to faithfulness,
informed the church of
the coming judgments,
and encouraged the
church with the message
of His coming quickly.
Yes, all the evidence
concerning the day of
church worship following
the resurrection of Christ
is Sunday worship.
Don't lose sight of the
primary significance of
this day for worship and
service.
Let's all worship this
Sunday.

* Hugh Sherrill is a retired
preacher in Lake City.










6A LAKE C




HAVING THE


-4 m-


;ITY REPORTER ADVERTISEMENT SATURDAY. FEBRUARY 26. 2011


OUR REDEEMER LUTHEIIAN CHURCH

112 miles S. of -75 on SR47
755-4299


.1-,


M an dreamed of flying long before the

Wright brothers finally achieved success.

After innumerable attempts, they succeeded where

others had failed. What faith they must have had

to believe that they could do what no man had

done! We all have the potential to do great things.

We must use the gifts God has given us and have

faith in His Word. Worship this week and meet

others who will encourage and counsel you...

you will find the faith to fly toward your dream.,






Scriptures Selected by The American Bible Society
2011, Keister-Williams Newspaper Services, P.O. Box 8187, Charlottesville, VA 22906, www.kwnews.com


North Florida
Pharmacy
7 Locations to Serve You
Lake City, Ft. White, Branford,
Chiefland, Mayo & Keystone Heights









AI."., rox 15-



- 1 ,.


To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget'
755-5440



Supercenter
"LOWPRICES EVERYDAY"


GWHunter, Inc.
Cieon Chevron Oil
0 Jobber




Holly/f/Eectnc, Inc.
Quality work at a reasonable price"
We also do solar hook-ups
(386) 755-5944


FOOD STORES
Open 7 DaNs a Week
I036 E. Dxa! St.. Lake Cit) FL.
(386) 752-0067
fresh Meat. Fresh Produce!
I an do al hinga through Chins hil ch istrentheneth m "
Phlppans 4 13

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755-5440

To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440


RICK'S RANGEE SR VICE
Located at 25A ".
(Old Valdosta Hwy)
386-752-5696 or Ni ,t
386-867-2035
after hours

To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440


Fir ,-dveni Chr.iari
l I I, ,' i i 'i
','; 7 '* I'il iin


Su n.i ji f ,'I'
\Si ,iid. i, Fri l,' I


'-I b~l


AGLD IDIN Y 9,SSEMBi\ OF GOD
'yiv i\, i.ii- Hi Ml j.ld
n-li X \ i .-ip I. lia i
'.r,'1 1 diI ;i ti'r% ud.t X I'Ia'.ld
l, I l.h ,tl-rt r S.i lI, i-' h i,"


BER[EA BAP'i CHURCH
Sunri, 3.N h"'il '1
1udda .i.,rl.ip II '.1'


7PM


L\S[ISIE BA.PTiM1 HIIRLH
96SE lames Ave.' 186.75'2-'.l86
Uiii Bibletit-i, 9:45AM
,u1. i\,,rl'llp 11AMI&6PM
, ed li i.3, i,.Ir'Bii'ctru'l, 6PM
lit- B rlanl i-', Witt

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Suirid BiA b Sle ud, 1', 1
''ur la i i,'r.hnp In ,i3.M , Sr i' ]
\u J id ln 't. 'l -o i r i- .'.r ;.
C i rItr ,\tiUri- '!-r-'.
Li'h' iiL[.l n : .,Ii I'," 752-5422


OLIVET MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH
541 N.E. Davis Street
39i7 73399n

Sunday School 9:45AM
Sunday Morning Worship 11:00AM
Wed. Mid-Week Worship 6:00PM
"In God's Word, Will & Way"

PARKVIEW BAPTIST CHURCH
268 NW Lake Jeffery Rd. *752-0681
Lake City, Florida 32055
www.pbclc.com
Sunday School 8:30, 9:45 & 11AM
Sunday Worship 9:45 & 11AM & 6PM
AWANA 5:30 PM
Evening Worship 6:00 PM
Wed. Eve. Schedule
Family Supper (Reservation) 5 PM
Children's Ministry 6 PM
Youth Worship 6:00 PM
Prayer Meeting 6:00PM
Thursday EveningSchedule St. 8/21/08
Parkview Edge 8:30PM
Pastor: Michael A. Tatem

PINE GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH
1989 N-US Hwy 441
386-752-2664
Sunday Bible Study 9:45AM
Sunday Worship 1 AM & 6PM
Wed. Kids &Youth Ministry 6:30PM
Pastor: Ron Thompson


SLEM PRIMIfl F BAPliST
Iurrld i S-n ji .V.. "U .d11 I'
rl,,, l,,.i He c riT,.. i brLtin

SOUTHSIDEBAPlSI (HURCH
... S E [..j u L -,, t ' ,'
t, odaJ_


'I '. 1 .1I
[i ,I| M


Bit&Yitl-'.ni
N..irrioni, Wnh,rhip
L .cr1Iin:iX'ri' l\.t|p
l1ednefday.
AWANA
['mtJ', r t:il-.I. l ,1


TABE R1NACLE BAPTIS l CHI
I i!b 'lI'[ I F I ": 2


'. !,l,'M




,4,274


' Rur|]i .i.- i l li ,i
: iJn MII, In \\,,[,hip
'%IJ r~ii p, E\I-
'd i' Mr ['.- r rnr
i "''lIII, r Mi ]ll, ~iI.i nihu-I


EPIPHANYN 'CAl HOLIC C(UR-H i H
E'pi; a -.i Ep iphJil iu l lf .' 4 711


.- u -i l:.i|M i ir
S.undllh.ln Ma n iI 4 x I u r M
S ili i ..i, l i lEr ii'. h i

S L I II A'

(HRISiAN S[ErtE SOlIET
sun l 5,wi E iP,] I n
', llrd t it ti-tioe tr l l i111 'I.

LMK (EmCHlS LAN CHURCH

suiJi[la, c, .1 l 9:30 AM
Sun' M,iin '.iirhip 10:301AM
\\'dj Pr,., M"r..ie g 7PM


EWHORIZON
Church of Christ
Directions & Times 386-623-7438
Jack Exumr., Minister

LAKE CITY CHURCH OF GOD
167 Ermine St.* 752-5965
Sunday School 9:45 AM
Sun. Worship 10:30AM & 6:00PM
Wed, Family Night 7 PM
Wed. Youth Service 7PM
Pastor: Carroll Lee

EVANGEL CHURCH OF GOD
S ,i] l.iii. r Glen 755-1939
Sunday School 9:45.AM
Sunday Worship 10:50 & 6:30
Wed. Spiritual Enrichment 7PM
"Shock Youth Church"
Boys and Girls Clubs
Bible Study .
Pastor: John R Hathaway
EPISC OPA


ST. JAMES EPISCOPAL CHURCH
2423 SW Bascom Norris Dr., Lake
(ir FI 1-'ii.1.-386-752-2218
Email: stjamesepis330@bellsouth.net
Holy Eucharist
Sun. 8 & 10AM
Wednesday: 5:15pm
Priest: The Rev. Michael Armstrong
Deacon: The Rev. Jimmie Hunsinger
Director qf Music Dr. Alfonso Levy
7.
,' .\ .


~ Ku,


(Nurserv Provided)
Christian Education Hour
For all ages at 10:45AM
Pastor: Rev. Bruce Akire


9:30AM


SPIRIT OF CHRIST LUTHERAN
Hwy 90,1.5 miles West of 1-75* 752-3807
Sunday Worship 10:00AMI
'u r\ i.- j,
Wed. Pot Luck 6PM Worship 7PM
Vicar John David Bryant


BETHEL UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
4869 US 441 South
Sunday Worship Services,
Traditional Services 8:30 & 11:00AM
386-755-1353
miibI, rlirhJnii.t, ,rr

First iJruLtd NMthoidis[ Church
977 S. Marion Ave.
38h-752-4488
'.iijJdr. S', _.II", I l 1
nurij.' ;,.lrnu i ,:,rstup,
,,u-ujW ifihip .r.i:e -,,M

l'[iii,niji ,ppirurirn jilutlt in Iil
tj t': i .i[ll age'
FoI[ i i ,ripltii: 4 ,h, ulI
r'lad[c l ithuifh Jljf)i it
44V*:

WEsLE) MIMORLI UNITED
I ?-. ,1 M r ,Farl.inrl ,71,.2"3:., L[






I_ jIi'j l SIIIRnI b M
r i ,; l i. W e ~ia.ip 5 uill M







.orer- piu-. .'l--
F',stli Ihi R,- I u L'I uie 1 dbira y
\v-' ive Iyrr eiri, ,:.:.i

WI-ERTOW l:I( 'GRL:,,AJONL
MEUHODiSI CHURCH
I sE 9 ifl in il t lu f ; O .1 i l'l i jilrln

a1., [ I,,.,iI, 45 -Im ,

Pa t r, Rand Oghuin


LKI C1T\ (FHIIIRH OF T-it IAZaREN


dull ll lhl-n r h, .,l 'J 415P\
i\ -n a ri'dn is PM
A.juli 'iiulh r'irii -r., C iildrrd i'i- '.t.jrii.rr-






ti i 'i l [:I ["arSn L\ ',2 l
S iJI|j.d i llII"' 'I[ L \ lllJ-l

TridriiJr,, i. t J 0ll V \M

D i -IiIUr iit l M lu ii '.l'il r


FlIST FULL GOSPEL CHURCH
t;'. I,. U qV 'f IJ.l t\'a'liv j inr 'in Xi





'und Ceiilebrationp 11:3ill,


CHRiST LENTeR.. *72INISTRIES
Siiiind,, rl'Rnii o d '10 1 in NI
0 1i0i i In'r, 6.hi p l iI iil

F ,i ln d U "Tird ti;r .rr Hu iii 0A .:






Lead Pastor: Lonnie Johns
'; iliut fch rli 16re"

CHRISTIAN HEINISTTAGE CHURCH

Sunday Celebration '10:ll0AM
Lead Pastor: isonnie Jo752-9119
CHFSTIAN HERITAGEEEK CHURCHAPEL
Sunday Celebration 10:30 AM
Pastor Chris Jones,752-91!9
FAlING CREEK CHAPEL
Falling Creek Road 755-0580
First and Third Sundays 9:30 A.M.
Second and Fourth Sundays 3:00 P.M.
Pastor: Rev. Cheryl R. Pingel
NEW BEGINNING CHURCH
Highway 242 E. of Branford Highway
Sunday School 10:00AM
'%Iir 1Ilngl i i' rip 11:00AM
Sunday Evening 6:00PM
Wednesday 7:00PM
A Full Gospel Church Everyone Welcomed
(386) 755-5197


-4 __JI L


I ` '4 ./ I


Toadetienthshrcire


:...1 o


Central States
Enterprises
Columbia County's Feed Headquarters
FEED PET SUPPLIES LAWN & GARDEN
ANIMAL HEALTH
668 NW Waldo St. 386-755-7445

MIKELL'S POWER EQUIPMENT, INC.
Your Lawn & Garden Headquarters
MOWERS CHAIN SAWS TRIMMERS
1152 US 90 WEST* LAKE CITY, FL.







smet 755-7050


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this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440















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this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440

BAYWAYjanitorial Services
FIRE & Water Restoration
Floor & Carpet Care
Residential & Comniercial
755-6142




2" 4:..



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this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440


MIlay Electric Cooperative, Inc.
Competitive rates, non-profit,
right here in your community.
Lake City District 386-752-7447
clayelectric.com

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this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440








CWYtON


Tires for every need.
US 90 West across from Wal-Mart
752-0054

Morrell's
Your Complete decorating and
home furnishings store
SW Deputy Jeff Davis Line (formerly Pinemount Rd.)
752-3910 or 1-800-597-3526
Mon.-Sat. 8:00-5:30 Closed Sunday


/"





/ M\NDEslON COLUMBIA CO., INC.
1 ASPHALT PAVING
(O ~UIRCIAL *INDUSTRIAL
Site Preparation Road Building Parking Lots
Grading & Drainage
752-7585
871 NW Guerdon St., Lake City

HARRY'S
K 1i-ii3-i Air Conditioning Inc.
Harry Mosley, President


iP on- 752-2308 -

To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440


1"i RI


. d\' i," j, i hF '. S rin % I.


P i n Ln E ':*. il1









Lake City Reporter
Story ideas?


Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkjrb/y okeit/reporTer com


SPORTS


Saturday, February 26, 201 I


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


FROM THE SIDELINE


Brandon Finley
Phone: (386) 754-0420
bfinley@ckecityreportercom


Each


coach


brings


hope

have the upmost
faith in the
committee to select
the next head
coach at Columbia
High. Though their
names were not released
to the public, I know
many of the participants.
Each of them have
long ties to not only
Columbia High, but to
the football program
in general. Each of
them wouldn't dream of
missing a game.
No matter who they
decide on, I'm sure it will
be in the best interest
of the Tiger football
program. If Phad my
choice, I'd love to get a
dream team of Dennis
Dotson, Brian Allen and
Frankie Carroll working
collectively on one staff.
We all dream of seeing
the Tigers in the state
championship. More so,
we dream of seeing them
win one. All of these
candidates are proven.
Since the coaching
position came open, I
have talked to countless
numbers of people
with their opinion on
the vacancy. Everyone
has their feel for who
deserves the shot, but
one thing has remained
consistent I have
heard nothing but
good things about the
candidates.
Each is more than
qualified. Dotson has
proven it with the
countless hours he's put
in studying game film,
helping develop players
and being there on a
daily basis.
Allen may not
have head-coaching
experience, but he's
learned from one of
the best of all time in
Bobby Bowden at Florida
State. He's got NFL
knowledge and he's got
a fire that the youth of
the program will greet
enthusiastically.
Carroll, he's a proven
winner. From looking at
what he was able to do
at Madison County, it's
hard not to imagine what
he could do at a school
the size of Columbia
with the athletes they
produce.
I know it's probably
an impossible scenario
to have all three hang
around, but a man can
have his dream.
Columbia is lucky
- to have that quality
of a coaching circle
interested in the job. It
says volumes for what
the Tiger program is
perceived to be around
the state.
Sure, it's slipped in the
past few years, but it only
takes dedication to get
it back. They've got the
candidates to do it.
* Brandon Finley covers
sports for the Lake City
Reporter.


Ingram has

much to prove

at NFL combine


Running back
went from
Heisman to injury.
By CLIFF BRUNT
Associated Press
INDIANAPOLIS In
a year, Mark Ingram went
from a Heisman Trophy
winner to a man with much
to prove.
Ingram rushed for a
school-record 1,658 yards
and 17 touchdowns dur-
ing his Heisman campaign
at Alabama in 2009, then
struggled a bit this past sea-
son.
He missed the first two
games with a knee injury,
thrust himself back into
the Heisman conversation
with two big games, then
split carries with Trent


Richardson the rest of
the season and never had
another 100-yard game.
Now, he's ready to show
he's fully healthy and ready
for the NFL.
Ingram said he will com-
plete all phases of evalua-
tion at the NFL scouting
combine.
"I just want to go out
here and compete," he said.
"I have nothing to hide."
Ingram said he's con-
stantly questioned about
his knee.
"It feels great, or I
wouldn't be out here get-
ting ready to run and work
out," he said.
Ingram said he didn't
mind sharing the load with
Richardson.
"We had another great-
running back," he said.
'Trent, he needed his


HOME


FUN


FOR


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Alabama running back Mark Ingram responds to a question during a news conference for the
NFL football scouting combine in Indianapolis on Friday.


touches as well, so I just
tried to do what was best
for the team. Trent was
deserving of all his carries.
He was so explosive and
such a playmaker that you


RUNS


have to share carries with
him."
Ingram said the team that
drafts him will get a special
player.
"A focused ,and deter-


NO


INDIANS


BRANDON FINLEY/Lake City Reporter
Fort White High's Jonathari Dupree attempts to tag out a Suwannee High runner on a pick-off play during the Indians' 16-0
loss against the Bulldogs on Friday.


Suwannee beats Fort White, 16-0


By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com
LIVE OAK It was
almost a no-hitter for
Suwannee High pitcher
Matt Pennington as the
Bulldogs did all the hitting
in a 16-0 win against Fort
White High.
If not for Cody Spin's


double in the top of the
fifth, Pennington would
have added a no-hitter to
go along with two home
runs in the Bulldogs' win.
Pennington hit one of
five home runs for the
Bulldogs as they jumped
on top of Fort White, 6-0, in
the first inning and never
looked back. He was 4-for-4


at the plate, had three RBIs
and scored four runs.
Pennington threw five
innings, struck out five bat-
ters and allowed one hit.
Suwannee's Stuart
Brown hit a lead-off home
run to start the game.
Ryan DaSilva, Blake
Swann and Trevor Lister
also had home runs in the


contest.
The Bulldogs had a
home run in each of the
first three innings as they
opened up a 15-0 lead.
DaSilva added the final
blow in the bottom of the
fourth with a sacrifice fly
just short of becoming the,
Bulldogs' sixth home run
to bring in Pennington.


mined person, really com-
petitive and really driven,"
he said. "I'm going to try
to be the best person I can
be and the best player I can
be."


Assistants

tabbed

to make

$3M at UF
Salaries exceed
that of coach
Muschamp.
By MARK LONG
Associated Press
GAINESVILLE -
Florida is spending more
on assistants than it is on
first-year head coach Will
Muschamp.
The Gators have com-
mitted $2.93 million to
Muschamp's nine-man
coaching staff in 2011,
according to contracts
released Friday.
Offensive coordinator
Charlie Weis signed a three-
year deal worth $2.495 mil-
lion. He will earn $765,000
in 2011, then $865,000 the
next two years. Defensive
coordinator Dan Quinn
signed a two-year deal
worth $1 million. He will
get $490,000 in 2011, then
$510,000 the following year.
Muschamp agreed to a
five-year deal worth $13.5
million, or $2.7 million
annually. He assembled a
staff with lots of NFL expe-
rience. He also paid them
accordingly.
The staff will make about
$300,000 more than last
year's assistants.


Extra-innings win


Fort White picks
up 2-1 victory -
against Williston.
By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.comrn
FORT WHITE Fort
White High softball won
a 2-1 thriller over defend-
ing district champion
Williston High at home on
Friday.
It took the Lady Indians
nine innings to get a hit
off Williston pitcher Tori
Stamper. Then, they got
two hits to win the game.
Caitlin Jones walked
with one out in the ninth
and Cecile Gomez dou-
bled to left field. Taylor
Douglass followed with a
single to send in the win-
ning run.
Fort White scored its
other run in the first inning.


Ali Wrench walked and was
forced at second base by
Gomez. Douglass' fly ball to
left field was dropped for a
three-base error.
Following that, Stamper
pitched to the minimum
amount of batters for the
next six inning and got
out of a jam in the eighth
inning. She ended up with
seven strikeouts to go with
her two-hitter.
Gomez started for Fort
White and pitched four
innings. She gave up two
hits, no runs and struck
out four.
Douglass finished on
the mound with four
hits, one walk and four
strikeouts. The run in
the sixth inning was
unearned.
Dayna Hunn doubled to
drive in Chrissy Rauls for
the Lady Red Devils. Kate
Bannon had three hits for


Williston (3-3, 0-3 District
5-3A).
Fort White demolished
Taylor County High,
14-0, on Thursday,
as Douglass fired a
five-inning no-hitter. She
struck out 10 and walked
two.
The Lady Indians had 10
hits and scored in every
inning.
Douglass was 2-for-3
with two RBIs, including a
squeeze bunt. Holly Polhill
was 2-for-4 with two RBIs.
Ali Wrench was 2-for-5 with
two RBIs.
Brett Sealey (two RBIs),
Cecile Gomez (RBI), Sarah
Conners (RBI) and Caitlin
Jones (RBI) had hits. Kayla
Williams drew four walks
and Sam McCrory had an
RBI.
Fort White (5-0, 2-0)
hosts Newberry High at
6 p.m. Tuesday.


FILE ART
Fort White High's Taylor Douglass squares up for a bunt in a
game played last season in Fort White. Douglass fired a
five-inning no-hitter against Taylor County High on Thursday.
She struck out 10 batters and walked two. Douglass was also
2-for-3 with two RBIs at the plate.


I


Section B












LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2011


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
AUTO RACING
2 p.m.
SPEED NASCAR, Nationwide
Series, pole qualifying for Bashas'
Supermarkets 200, at Avondale, Ariz.
3:30 p.m.
SPEED NASCAR, Sprint Cup, pole
qualifying for Subway Fresh Fit 500, at
Avondale,Ariz.
5:30 p.m.
ESPN2 NASCAR, Nationwide
Series, Bashas' Supermarkets 200, at
Avondale,Ariz.
II p.m.
ESPN2 -- NHRA, qualifying for
Winternationals, at Pomona, Calif. (same-
day tape)
BOWLING
10 p.m.
ESPN2 PBA, U.S. Open, at North
Brunswick, N.J.
GOLF
9 am.
TGC PGA Tour/WGC, Accentuire
Match Play Championship, quarterfinals,
at MaranaAriz.
2 p.m.
TGC LPGA, HSBC Women's
Champions, third 'round, at Singapore
(same-day tape)
2 p.m.
NBC PGA Tour/WGC, Accenture
Match Play Championship, sertfinis, at
Marana,Ariz.
6:30 p.m.
TGC PGA Tour, Mayakoba Classic,
third round, at Riviera Maya, Mexico
(same-day tape)
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
Noon
CBS Syracuse at Georgetown
ESPN Missouri at Kansas St.
I p.m.
ESPN2 -Wichita St.at Missouri St.
2 p.m.
CBS BYU at San Diego St.
ESPN St.John's atVillanova
3 p.m.
ESPN2 Memphis at UTEP
4 p.m.
CBS Florida at Kentucky
ESPN Kansas at Oklahoma
FSN -Arizona at UCLA
6 p.m.
ESPN Mississippi St. at Tennessee
8 p.m.
ESPN2 UC Santa Barbara at Long
Beach St.
9 p.m.
ESPN Duke atVirginiaTech,
MOTORSPORTS
7:30 p.m.
SPEED AMA Supercross, at Atlanta
NBA BASKETBALL
8:30 p.m.
WGN Chicago at Milwaukee
NBADL BASKETBALL
II p.m.
VERSUS Bakersfield at Idaho
RODEO
8 p.m.
VERSUS PBR; St. Louis Invitational
WOMEN'S COLLEGE
BASKETBALL
6 p.m.
FSN Oklahoma St. at Texas Tech
10:30 p.m.
FSN UCLA at Arizona St.

BASKETBALL

NBA schedule

Friday's Games
Sacramento at Charlotte
Utah at Indiana
Detroit at Philadelphia
Phoenix at Toronto
New York at Cleveland
Washington at Miami
New Orleans at Minnesota (n)
Oklahoma City at Orlando (n)
New Jersey at San Antonio (n)
Atlanta at Golden State (n)
L.A. Clippers at LA. Lakers (n)
Denver at Portland (n)
Today's Games
Utah at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Sacramento at Memphis, 8 p.m.
Dallas at Washington, 8 p.m.
New Jersey at Houston, 8:30 p.m.
Chicago at Milwaukee, 8:30 p.m.


Boston at LA. Clippers, 10:30 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Phoenix at Indiana, 12 p.m.
LA. Lakers at Oklahoma City,
2:30 p.m.
Golden State at Minnesota, 5 p.m.
Philadelphia at Cleveland, 5 p.m.
Charlotte at Orlando, 6 p.m.
Dallas at Toronto, 6 p.m.
Houston at New Orleans, 7 p.m.
Memphis at San Antonio, 7 p.m.
New York at Miami, 8 p.m.
Atlanta at Portland, 10:30 p.m.

AP Top 25 schedule

Today's Games
No. I Duke at Virginia Tech, 9 p.m.
No. 3 Kansas at Oklahoma, 4 p.m.
No. 5 Texas at Colorado, 4 p.m.
No. 6 San Diego State vs. No. 7 BYU,
2 p.m.
No. 9 Notre Dame vs. Seton Hall,
7 p.m.
No. 10 Arizona at UCLA, 4 p.m.
No. II Georgetown vs. No. 17
Syracuse, Noon
No. 13 Florida at No.22 Kentucky,
4 p.m.
No. 15 Villanova vs. No. 23 St. John's,
2 p.m.
No. 18Vanderbilt at LSU, 1:30 p.m.
No. 20 Missouri at Kansas State,
Noon
No. 21 Texas A&M at Baylor, 9 p.m.
No. 24 Temple at George Washington,
2 p.m.
Sunday's Games
No. 2 Ohio State vs. Indiana, 4 p.m.
No. 4 Pittsburgh at No. 16 Louisville.
2 p.m.
No. 8 Purdue at Michigan State, I p.m.
No. 12 Wisconsin vs. Northwestern,
6 p.m.
No. 14 Connecticut at Cincinnati,
Noon
No. 19 North Carolina vs. Maryland,
7:45 p.m.
No. 25 Xavier at Dayton, I p.m.

BASEBALL

Spring training

Today's Games
Philadelphia vs N.Y.Yankees at Tampa,
1:05 p.m.
Detroit vs Toronto at Dunedin,
1:05 p.m.
Pittsburgh vs Tampa Bay at Port
Charlotte, 1:05 p.m.
Atlanta vs N.Y. Mets at Port St. Lucie,
1:10 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Toronto vs Detroit at Lakeland,
1:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay vs Pittsburgh at Bradenton,
1:05 p.m.
N.Y. Yankees vs Philadelphia at
Clearwater, 1:05 p.m.
N.Y. Mets vs Atlanta at Kissimmee,
1:05 p.m.
Kansas City vs Texas at Surprise,Ariz.,
3:05 p.m.
Boston vs Minnesota at Fort Myers,
7:05 p.m.

GOLF

Match Play

World Golf Championships
At The Ritz-Carlton Golf Club at
Dove Mountain
Purse: $8.5 million
Yardage: 7,791; Par 72
Friday
(Seeds in parentheses)
Matt Kuchar (13), United States, def.
Rickie Fowler (29), United States, 2 and

Y.E. Yang (44), South Korea, def.
Graeme McDowell (5), Northern Ireland,
3 and 2.
Bubba Watson (19),.United States, def.
Geoff Ogilvy (30),Australia, 6 and 4.
J.B. Holmes (22), def. Jason Day (38),
Australia, I up.
Ryan Moore (48), United States, def.
Nick Watney (32), United States, 19
holes.
Luke Donald (9), England, def. Matteo
Manassero (57), Italy, 3 and 2.
Martin Kaymer (2), Germany, def.
Hunter Mahan (18), United States, 2
and I.


Miguel Angel Jimenez (23), Spain, def.
Ben Crane (39), United States. 7 and 6.
Thursday
Second Round
Graeme McDowell (5), Northern
Ireland, def. Ross Fisher (37). England,
4 and 2.
Y.E.Yang (44), South Korea, def. Stewart
Cink (53), United States, 4 and 3.
Jason Day (38), Australia, def. Paul
Casey (6), England, 4 and 2.
J.B. Holmes (22), United States, def.
Ernie Bs (11), South Africa, I up.
Matteo Manassero (57), ltaly,.def:Charl
Swartzel (25), South Africa. I up.
Luke Donald (9), England, def. Edoardo
Molinari (24), Italy. 2 and I.
Ben Crane (39), United States, def.
Rory Mcllroy (7), Northern Ireland,
8 and 7.
Miguel Angel Jimenez (23), Spain, def.
Ryan Palmer (55). United States, 4 and 2.
Rickie Fowler (29), United States, def.
Phil Mickelson (4), United States, 6 and 5.
Matt Kuchar (13), United States, def.
Bo Van Pelt (45), United States, 3 and 2.
Geoff Ogilvy (30), Australia, def.
Thomas, Bjorn (62), Denmark, I up.
BubbaWatson (19), United States, def.
Mark Wilson (51 ), United States, 6 and 5.
Nick Watney (32), United States, def.
LeeWestwood (I), England, I up.
Ryan Moore (48), United States, def.
K.J. Choi (49), South Korea, 5 and 4.
Martin Kaymer (2), Germany, def.
Justin Rose (34), England, 20 holes.
Hunter Mahan (18), United States, def.
Robert Karlsson (15), Sweden, 2 up.

AUTO RACING

Race week

NASCAR
SPRINT CUP
Subway Fresh. Fit 500
Site:Avondale,Ariz.
Schedule: Today, qualifying (Speed,
3:30-5 p.m.); Sunday, race, 3 p.m. (2:30-
6:30 p.m.).
Track: Phoenix International Raceway
(oval, I mile).
Race distance: 312 miles, 312 laps.
Next race: Kobalt Tools 400, March 6,
Las Vegas Motor Speedway, Las Vegas.
Online: httpJ/www.noscar.com
NATIONWIDE
Bashas' Supermarkets 200
Site:Avondale,Ariz.
Schedule: Today, qualifying (Speed,
2:30 p.m.), race, 5:30 p.m. (ESPN2,
5-8 p.m.).
Track: Phoenix International Raceway.
Race distance: 200 mires, 200 laps.
NHRA FULL THROTTLE
NHRAWinternationals
Site: Pomona, Calif.
Schedule: Today, qualifying (ESPN2,
Today, II p.m.-I a.m.); Sunday, final
eliniinations (ESPN2,7-10 p.m.):
TracIcAuto Club Raceway at Pomona.
Next race: NHRA Gatornationals,
March 10-13, Gainesville Raceway,
Gainesville.
Online: http://www.nhra.com

HOCKEY

NHL schedule
Friday's Games.
N.Y. Rangers at Washington
Pittsburgh at Carolina
Phoenix at Columbus
Ottawa at Buffalo
Florida at Atlanta
New Jersey atTampa Bay
San Jose at Calgary (n)
St. Louis at Edmonton (n)
Minnesota atAnaheim (n)
Today's Games
Nishville at Dallas, 2 p.m.
Colorado at Los Angeles, 4 p.m;
Detroit at Buffalo, 7 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Toronto, 7 p.m.
Carolina at Montreal, 7 p.m.
Philadelphia at Ottawa, 7 p.m.
Washington at N.Y. Islanders, 7 p.m.
Boston at Vancouver, 10 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Tampa Bay at N.Y. Rangers, I p.m.
Columbus at Nashville, 3 p.m.
Toronto at Atlanta, 5 p.m.
New Jersey at Florida, 5 p.m.
Phoenix at Chicago, 7 p.m.
St. Louis at Calgary, 8 p.m.
Boston at Edmonton, 8 p.m.
Colorado at Anaheim, 8 p.m.


BRIEFS


YOUTH SOFTBALL

Fort White final

registration today

Final registration for
Fort White Girls Softball
Association's spring season
(ages 6-16) is 10 am. to
2 p.m. today at the South
Columbia Sports Complex
concession stand.
For details, call Lynn
Harvey at 365-2797.

CHS FOOTBALL

&Quarterback Club

meeting Monday

The Columbia County
Quarterback Club will
meet at 6 p.m. Monday at
the Jones Fieldhouse to
discuss fundraisers and the
100-year anniversary activi-
ties. Members are encour-
aged to attend.
For details, call Blake
Lunde at 867-0296.

T-BALL

City registration

on March 12, 19

The Lake City
Recreation Department


has T-ball registration set
for March 12 (returning
players) and March 19.
(new players). Registration
is 8:30 to 5 p.m. at Teen
Town Recreation Center.
'Age divisions offered are
4-5 and 6-7.
Cost is $40 and a birth
certificate is required at
registration.
For details, call Heyward
Christie at 754-3609.

FORT WHITE BASEBALL

Team at Publix for

donations today

Fort White High
baseball players will be
seeking donations at Publix
in Lake City from 8 a.m. to
4 p.m. today.
For details, call coach
Chad Bonds at 590-7362.

ADULT SOFTBALL

League sign-up

begins Monday

The Lake City
Recreation Department has
church, commercial and
women's adult
softball league registration.
is Monday through March


18. Registration is 8:30 to
5 p.m. weekdays at Teen
Town Recreation Center.
Fees are $350 for a
minimum of 10 games.
For details, call Heyward
Christie at 754-3609.

FISHING

Brody Stevens

Open March 5

The Brody Stevens
Open Bass Tournament is
March 5 at Clay Landing
in Chiefland. Entry fee is
$70 plus a $10 optional big
bass pot.
For details, call Chris
Starling at (386) 984-5639.


League reports
Results of Lake City Bowl league
play follow.
WATERGUARD
High scratch game: 1. Susie Flick
185; 2. Terry Wayne 183; 3. Mary
Lobaugh 182. 1. Adam Alford 279; 2.
Dess Fennell 256; 3. Mark Davis 255.
High scratch series: 1. Mary
Lobaugh 518; 2. Lori Davis 487;
3. Lorie Niquette 480. 1. Adam Alford
656; 2. Tom Sewejkis 609; 3. Dess
Fennell 595.
High handicap game: 1. Terry
Wayne 235; 2. Susie Flick 230; 3. (tie)
Lori Davis, Bertha Black, Linda Oliver
219. 1. Dess Fennell 280; 2..Mark
Davis 268; 3. Jack Stanfield 263.
High handicap series: 1. Cathey
Creel 647; 2. Debbie Walters 634;
3. Lorie Niquette 633. 1. Adam Alford
701; 2. Bill Price 666; 3. Tom Sewejkis
645.
High average: 1. Mary Lobaugh
180. 1. Zech Strohl 206.
(results from Feb. 15)
SEXY SENIORS
Team standings: 1. Perky Pals
(67-37); 2. Farmers. (65-39); 3. Pin
Droppers (58.5-45.5).
High scratch game: 1. Janet Nash
198; 2. Janet Nash 185; 3. Sandra
Johns 183. 1. Eari Hayward 199;
2. Art Joubert 193; 3. Dan Ritter 189.
High scratch series: 1. Janet Nash
512; 2. Yvonne Finley 473; 3. Louise
Atwood 472. 1, Dan Ritter 550; 2. Earl
Hayward 547; 3. Art Joubert 487.
High handicap game: 1. Janet
Nash 260; 2. Sandra Johns 237;
3. (tie) Ruth Lott, Bea Purdy 232.
1. Keith Herbster 234; 2. Earl Hayward
225; 3. Bill Nash 220.
High handicap series: 1. Vy
Ritter 652; 2. Sabrina Herbster 638;
3. Yvonne Finley 623. 1. Jim Belgard
637; 2. Dan Ritter 622; 3. Morrell
Atwood 605.
High average: 1. Betty Brown


SCOREBOARD


BOWLING

147.06; 2. Louise Atwood 145.55;
3. Yvonne Finley 145.38. 1. Dan Ritter
173.88; 2. Earl Hayward 171.49; 3. Art
Joubert 170.68.
(results from Feb. 15)
MONDAY NIGHT MAVERICKS
Team standings: 1. Neil Hoffman's
Auto (137-43); 2. Instagators (112.5-
67.5); 3. Team 8 (109-71).
High scratch game: 1. Zech Strohl
279; 2. David Adel 246; 3. Dess
Fennell 245.
High scratch series: 1. David Adel
695; 2. Zech Strohl 693; 3. Daniel
Adel 673.
High handicap game: 1. Zech
Strohl 279; 2. Dess Fennell 273;
3. Ron VanDeVoren 265.
High handicap series: 1. David
Adel 713; 2. (tie) Daniel Adel, Chris
Hamrick 694; 4. Zech Strohl 693.
High average: 1. Zech Strohl
217.67; 2. Dale Coleman 215.92;
3. J.J. Hilbert 206.26.
(results from Feb. 7)
GOLDEN ROLLERS
Team standings: 1. Golden Niners
(56-40, 56,118 pins); 2. Gamblers
(56-40, 55,833 pins); 3. Knock 'em
Down (53-43).
High handicap game: 1. Bertha
Black 243; 2. Dee Dee Young 233;
3. Betty Carmichael 232. 1. Lee Evert
252; 2. Ray Denton 233; 3. Vernon
Black 231.
High handicap series: 1. Janie
Posey 649; 2. Joyce Crandall 637;
3. Roberta Giordano 626. 1. Jack
Stanfield 645; 2. James Bumett 625;
3. George Walters 624.
High average: 1. Shirley Highsmith
154.75; 2. Elaine .Nemeth 151.47;
3. Betty Carmichael 150.9. 1. David
Duncan 188.26; 2. Bill Dolly 183.69;
3. George Mulligan 182.33.
(results from Feb. 10)
HIT & MISS
Team standings: 1. Alley Oops
(19-5); 2. The Sandbaggers (17-7);
3. Spare Us (16-8).


Fort White junior varsity


baseball starts season 3-1


From staff reports

Fort White HIigh's junior
varsity baseball team is 3-1
for the February portion of
its season.
The Indians ventured
to Gainesville High on
Thursday for their first
road game and defeated
the Hurricanes, 10-6, in
what coach Pete Blanchard
said was "otir best game
so far."
Fort White pounded
out 19 hits, led by Willie
Carter's 5-for-5 and Dalton
Sweat's 4-for-5: Sweat's


double in the top of the
seventh inning was the big
hit Kody Moniz also had
four hits and Nick Butler
. had two hits to back up his
"solid defense at third."
Steven Giardina pitched
three innings and improved
to 3-0.
Other Fort White wins
came against Melody
Christian Academy, 16-6 on
Feb. 14,.and.Union County,,
High, 11-4 on Tuesday. The
loss was to Bradford High,
8-6, on Feb. 18.
Zach Gaskins, Kodey
Owens and Moniz each had


three hits in the Melody
Christian game.
Fort White trailed 8-1
against Bradford in the fifth
inning and rallied to make
it a game with the tying
runs on base.
The Indians scored six
runs in the sixth inning to
- move past Union County.
Both Brady Wilkinson
and Sweat had two hits.
,.Lane, Peq4ergrast started
and got relief help from
Giardina and Gaskins.
Fort White opens for the
varsity at 4:30 p.m. Friday
against Williston High.


"jr'"4 3 earchable dak ,c- ,,rep

Lake City Reporter


ACROSS 41
43


1 -dish pie
5 Writes quickly
9 Boxing stat
12 Dairy-case buy
13 Sleep--
14 Checkers side
15 "Breathless"
actor
16 Kept from
falling
18 Tattle
20 Freeway
accesses
21 Space lead-in
22 Belief
23 Wobbled, as a
rocket
26 Lamb's alias
30 Sports "zebra"
33 Add some
brandy
34 Cushiony
35 Moffo solo
37 Trawler's haul
39 Mach 2 flier,
once
40 Where Cuzco is


Of the Arctic
Location tech-
nique (abbr.)
Boor
Volcanic out-
put
Acid in lemons
Mexican sandal
Culture dish
goo
It's south of
Eur.
Placed
Trillion, in com-
bos
Offer
Consumer gds.
Holland export

DOWN


1 Musher's team
2 "Maria -"
3 Like a seance
4 Verse
5 Kid around
with
6 Sudbury's
prov.


Answer to Previous Puzzle

FEE H UR T WIA
RASE OROE HAH
AUNTS WEA ENS







PUPR IL YE T
HEN ESAU AT R
ARC SODA K L
GID RO0L-E VIAN
SEW AI-AN IICI
A YNF R OC K
AF RE YNA
S U RFACE E TUD
T RI S IL REFI
I SS TAT ROP


7 Bind
8 Galaxy units
9 Neaten a beard
10 Hold onto
11 Chances
17 Slangy ladies


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


RUNNING

Tortoise 5K at 35 36

O'Leno State Park 40

The third annual Race 43
the Tortoise 5K/walk is
8 a.m. March 5 at O'Leno 48 49 50
State Park. Entry fee is $14
for age 14 and younger and 53
$25 for others.
To register, go to www. 57
floridastateparks.org/oleno/ --
Events. cfan.

* From staff reports 2-26


19 Fossil fuel
22 Best possible
24 Yellow jackets
25 Repeat
27 Gatos,
Calif.
28 Conditions
29 Bar mem.
30 Kind of sheet
31 Before
32. Fragrant tree
36 Ice-fishing
tool
38 Limp-watch
painter
42 Spin around
44 Church read-
ing
46 Egged on
47 Coronet
48 Melville cap-
tain
49 Muslim mystic
50 Strict
51 Relinquish
52 Overstuff
54 Two-timer
55 That guy's


2011 by UFS, Inc.


High handicap game: 1. (tie) Karen
Clampett, Betty Carmichael, Betty
Schneiders 231.
High handicap series: 1. Karen
Clampett 656; 2. Shirtey Highsmith
636; 3. Joyce Crandall 631..
(results from Feb. 15)
SUNDAY NITE MERCHANTS
Team standings: 1. TAZ (19-5);
2. McGhghy's Navy (14-10, 56,822
pins); 3. Average Joe's (14-10, 56,510
pins).
High scratch game: 1. Cheryl
Jacks 189; 2. Donna Duncan 188;
3. Linda Sutton 181. 1. Joe Cohrs
248; 2. Robert Pond 243; 3. Tim
Carberry 224.
High scratch series: 1. Cheryl
Jacks. 513; 2. Linda Sutton 501;
3. Gloria Dennis 491. 1. Robert
Pond 649; 2. Joe Cohrs 609; 3. Tim
Carberry 571.
(results from Feb. 13)
TGIF
Team standings: 1. The Pacers
(21-3); 2. Strike Zone (16-8); 3. Alvin
& The Chickmonks (15.5-8.5, 14,909
pins); 4. Couple of Pairs (15.5-8.5,
17,767 pins).
High scratch game: 1. Brigette
Harrelson 267; 2. Pat Gallegos 230;
3. Shannon Brown 226. 1. Zech Strohl
254; 2. Jason Howell 245; 3. Curtis
Gutzmer 237.
High scratch series: 1. Brigette
Harrelson 726; 2. Pat Gallegos 604;
3. Candace Christie 581. 1. Zech
Strohl 716; 2. Jason Howell 691;
3. Jay Waterbury 675.
High handicap game: 1. Brigette
Harrelson 278; 2. Kristy Lambert 273;
3. Pat Gallegos 267. 1. Jason Howell
273; 2. (tie) John Stem, Zech Strohl
254.
High handicap series: 1. Brigette
Harrelson 759; 2. Pat Gallegos 715;
3. (tie) Chi Snipes, Kristy Lambert
671. 1. Jason Howell 775; 2. Jay
Waterbury 729; 3. Zech Strohl 716.
(results from Feb. 18)


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421









LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS


NFL, union have 'strong

differences' in CBA talks


By HOWARD FENDRICH
Associated Press
WASHINGTON NFL
Commissioner Roger
Goodell and union head
DeMaurice Smith refuse
to reveal anything publicly
about where things stand in
their labor talks.
Everyone will know
something substantive soon
enough less than a week
from now, if not sooner.
That's because the cur-
rent collective bargaining
agreement is set to expire
at the end of the day next
Thursday, and federal medi-
ation between the sides will
resume less than 72 hours
before that. After a full
week overseeing face-to-
face meetings more than
40 hours spread over seven
consecutive days media-
tor George Cohen said
"very strong differences
remain on the all-important
core issues that separate


the parties."
He also said: "At bottom,
some progress was made."
Cohen, director of the
Federal Mediation and
Conciliation Service, did
not explain in his written
statement Thursday where
the progress came or where
the differences stand. The
biggest sticking point all
along has been how to
divide about $9 billion in
annual revenues, including
what cut the 32 team own-
ers should get up front to
help cover certain costs,
such as stadium construc-
tion.
Among the other signifi-
cant topics in negotiations:
a rookie wage scale; the
owners' push to expand
the regular season from 16
games to 18 while reduc-
ing the preseason by two
games; and benefits for
retired players.
If there's no new deal in
place a week from now, the


union thinks owners will
move to lock out players,
threatening the 2011 sea-
son. And owners think the
union will decertify, allow-
ing for an antitrust lawsuit
The NFL has said, how-
ever, that the deadline could
be extended.
"If you're making prog-
ress, you can stop the
clock," the league's lead
labor negotiator, Jeff Pash,
said three weeks ago. "It's
not a 'Thelma & Louise'-
type situation, where you
just go over the cliff."
Cohen's public comments
Thursday were his first
since he began working with
Goodell, Smith and their
negotiating teams last week.
No NFL team own-
ers attended the talks in
Washington. Ten active play-
ers did at sorie point, includ-
ing the four NFLPA executive
committee members present
Wednesday and Thursday:
Indianapolis Colts center Jeff


ASSOCIATED PRESS
NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell (center) and Peter Ruocco, NFL senior vice president for
Labor Relations (right) arrive for football labor negotiations with the NFL Players Association
involving a federal mediator Thursday in Washington.


Saturday, Denver Broncos
safety Brian Dawkins, and
Kansas City Chiefs lineback-
er Mike Vrabel and guard
Brian Waters.
"Just continue talking,


man that's what we're
doing," Saturday said. "I
think ownership every-
body needs to know that
we're all committed to it
and committed to getting


something done."
Members of both groups
now head to Indianapolis
for the NFL's annual scout-
ing combine for draft
prospects.


Selig toname

Torre major

league executive


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Chicago Bears head coach Lovie Smith talks with reporters
following a news conference during the NFL football scouting
combine in Indianapolis on Friday. The Bears have extended
coach Smith's contract by two years through the 2013
season.



.,Bears sign


coach Smith


to extension


By CLIFF BRUNT
Associated Press

INDIANAPOLIS The
Chicago Bears gave coach
Lovie Smith a two-year
contract extension Friday,
keeping him through the
2013 season after a year
in which his team won the
NFC North and made it to
the conference champion-
ship game.
Smith, who led the Bears
to the Super Bowl after the
2006 season, is 66-52 over
seven seasons. His team
came within one win of mak-
ing it to the Super Bowl, los-
ing at home to Green Bay
last month.
"Every day I've been on
the job, the goal has been
to do the best possible job
that I could, and I could
live with the results," Smith
said. "With three years on
my contract, I feel pretty
good about that."
General manager Jerry
Angelo had said last month
that the Bears planned to
sign Smith to an extension.
Smith said Friday at the
NFL Combine that he .was
happy to get the deal done.
He gave his coaching staff
credit for helping him get
the new deal.
"I'm in position to be
here and get that extension
based on what the players
and our staff has done," he
said. "They all did a great
job."
Smith said he expects
quarterback Jay Cutler to
lead the way. Cutler was
criticized for sitting out
most of the second half of
the playoff loss to Green
Bay, but doctors later found
he had a medial collateral
ligament strain in his left
knee.


"Just to kind of hit Jay
one last time, no, there's no
question about Jay's tough-
ness or anything like that,"
Smith said. "For guys to
even challenge that or ques-
tion that don't know what
they're talking about, don't
know him. He's as tough
as any quarterback in the
league."
The Bears hired Mike
Martz as the team's offen-
sive coordinator last sea-
son, and Smith said it was
a success, even though the
team ranked 21st in scor-
ing and 30th in yards per
game.
"Mike is a great offen-
sive coach," he said. "We
did some good things this
year offensively. We won
12 games. We ended up in
the (NFC) championship
game. But Mike, and the
rest of our staff, all of us
would say we can take
another step."
Smith said Cutler and
Martz likely will improve in
their second year together.
"I think the core is in
place, starting with Jay
Cutler, our quarterback,
leading us," he said. "I
wouldn't ask for any other
quarterback. I'm excited
about him going into that
second year with Mike and
seeing those improvements
on the offensive side."'
Smith said the Super Bowl
champion Packers have set
the bar for his team.
"We realize we have the
Super Bowl champs in our
division, and we're looking
up to them," he said. "We're
looking forward to this next
year of trying to get our-
selves in position where we
can hold up the Lombardi
trophy."


By JANIE McCAULEY
Associated Press

SCOTISDALE, Ariz. -
Joe Torre has been hired
as Major League Baseball's
executive vice president of
baseball operations, a per-
son with knowledge of the
appointment said.
The person spoke to The
Associated Press on condi-
tion of anonymity Friday
because commissioner
Bud Selig wasn't expect-
ed to formally introduce
Torre until Saturday. .
MLB said Selig would
make a major announce-
ment at the new Salt River
Fields ballpark, the spring
facility for the Arizona
Diamondbacks and
Colorado Rockies.
The 70-year-pold Torre
won four World Series


titles for the New York
Yankees in a 29-year
career as a manager, retir-
ing after last season follow-
ing three years with the
Los Angeles Dodgers. He
played parts of 18 seasons
in the majors.
Even when Torre
stepped away from the dug-
out, he insisted he would
always stay involved in the
game to some extent -
though many figured that
might be in television, or
that he would take another
managerial job elsewhere
unable to truly call it quits
as a skipper.
He likely will help
Selig in a variety of roles.
MLB lost chief operating
officer Bob DuPuy last fall
after he spent 8b years as
the commissioner's top
aide.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Oct. 27, 2010 file photo, show former Major League
Baseball manager Joe Torre speaking before President
SBarack Obama arrives at an event marking Domestic
Violence Awareness Month in the East Room of the White
House in Washington. A person with knowledge of the
appointment says Torre has been hired as Major League
Baseball's executive vice president of baseball operations.
The person spoke to The Associated Press on condition
of anonymity Friday because commissioner Bud Selig isn't
expected to formally introduce Torre until Saturday.


Hocutt leaves Miami
e e


10 J01n Texas Tech as AD
By TIM REYNOLDs ed," Shalala said. Tech President Dr. (1uy he was "not a candidate" at
Associated Press Texas Tech later said Bailey said in a release Texas Tech either


CORAL 'GABLES -
Kirby Hocutt has resigned
as Miami's athletic direc-
tor to take the same job
at Texas Tech, barely two
months after hiring a new
football coach and speaking
about his desire to see the
Hurricanes chase national
prominence in all sports.
Hocutt told Miami offi-
cials of the decision Friday.
University President Donna
Shalala announced the
move in a one-paragraph
statement, doing so even
before Texas Tech officials
or Hocutt himself chose to
make the decision public.
"I am deeply disappoint-


shortly after Shalala
released her statement
that it has an "agreement in
principle" with Hocutt, not-
ing that some small details
still need to be worked out
At Texas Tech, he'll replace
the retiring Gerald Myers.
Hocutt, 38, was at Miami
for 2/2 years, and has been
considered one of the ris-
ing administrators in col-
lege athletics, even get-
ting selected last year as
part of the "40 Under 40"
top sports executives by
SportsBusiness Journal.
'We are excited about
the future of our athletics
program and look forward
to his leadership," Texas


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
r~JV2 iby Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles, We're going Wow, look at
one letter to each square, We're going Wow, look at
one letter to each square, o t miss you. all the pasta dishes.
to form four ordinary words., to s you d ties
OMBOL -


ITHAPC



LAURIB
WHAT THE ITALIAN
'_ C-OUPLE 5ERVE AT
z THE GOING
CHEWEN AAY PARTy
S-Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
Answer here:
(Answers Monday)
Yesterday's Jumbles: CLUCK PHONY CALMLY SHREWD
Answer: Often said when the cost is questioned -
HOW MUCH?


"This is a great day for
Texas Tech athletics."
For Hocutt, it's a chance
to return to his roots.
He's a Texas native, still
has family there and played
college football at Kansas
State a conference rival
of the Red Raiders. He was
approached by officials
from Kansas to discuss
their athletic director open-
ing several weeks ago, turn-
ing down those overtures.
And on Feb. 12, Hocutt told
The Associated Press that


4


The Red Raiders persist-
ed, and eventually, things
changed.
Texas Tech formally pre-
sented Hocutt an offer ear-
lier this week. Hocutt flew
back to South Florida on
Thursday, and told some
staff of his decision-which
he said to have anguished
over on Friday.
"We did everything we
could to convince him to
stay, but in the end it was
an intensely personal deci-
sion," Shalala said.


-i



"- Do You Need to

POP TlHE
QUESTION?
CALL Mary or
Sre nber ,Bridget
remember n
v TODAY to place a
each dal V surprise ad for
so special someone you Lovel
(indsieet 755-5440 or
m11.( more 755-5441
between 8:00am & 5:00pm
mwlw O( Illif


A Marr Ae!
----~ - l i^ -*' ^ I


(I


iDi m ut Lak Reporter.


SATURDAY. FEBRUARY 26, 2011


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


I I


II It ll I lll











46 LAKECITYREPORTER ADVICE & COMICS SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2011 Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415


DILBERT


THE CONTRACT THAT
YOU IGNORANTLY
SIGNED GIVES THEM
THE RIGHT TO
HARVEST YOUR
ORGANS.


BABY BLUES


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE


SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS


GARFIELD


B.C.


FRANK & ERNEST


YOUR BEST LEGAL
STRATEGY IS TO GET
SLWORN AFFIDAVITS
FROM ATTRACTIVE
WOMEN SAYING YOU
HAVE COOTIES.


DEAR ABBY


High school junior suffers

loss that has yet to occur


HECK I JAS
t YES, ILL HOPING
SIGN IT. THIS
WOULD BE
S | HARDER-
E ^


DEAR ABBY: I am a
junior in high school and
will graduate next year.
I attend a private school
where I have made many
good friends teachers
included and have creat-
ed many happy memories.
I have just been hit with
the realization that my
time in high school is run-
ning out Once I leave for
college, I may never see
or talk to my friends here
again. I can't process the
thought of having such
great friends and mentors
and losing them. I'm afraid
for the future and how I
will miss everything I've
experienced at my school.
Do you have any sug-
gestions on how to deal
with all this? I can barely
sleep because I feel like it's
only going to get worse.
- LEAVING IT ALL BE-
HIND IN LOUISIANA
DEAR LEAVING IT
ALL BEHIND: You have
the rest of your junior year
and senior year of high
school to enjoy. Please
don't cloud them by worry-
ing that you will lose touch
with your friends and men-
tors. Once you graduate,
you will have the Internet


My son will be 3 soon.
Yesterday we were talk-
ing about families and he-
asked, "You don't have a.
mommy?" I replied, "Yes,-
I do. Her name is Cindy.",.'
Thankfully, he left it at that.
But it started me thinking
about what I should say
when he asks me questions
about his grandmother. I,
had planned on talking to''
him when he was older be--
cause addictions can run in'
families, and I want him to
be aware of it when mak-
ing choices in his teen and'
later years. What do you'll.
tell a 3-year-old who won-:
ders who his grandma is?
- OUT OF ANSWERS
IN WISCONSIN
DEAR OUT OF AN-
SWERS: You have al-'"
ready started the dialogue."
When your son wants to
know why Grandma Cindy
doesn't visit, that will be,'
the time you tell him she
can't be around because,'
she's sick and isn't able to;,
be. As your son grows old-',
er, continue to answer his
questions honestly and in
an age-appropriate way.


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearabby.com
and social networking sites
to keep you in touch, and
you can see each other
during vacations.
You have great adven-
tures ahead of you and
so do they. True friend-
ships don't have to end
because of distance. While
some of them may, others
last a lifetime. And those
are the ones that count.
DEAR ABBY: I have no
contact with my mother for
many reasons. It was dif-
ficult to sever the relation-
ship, but after my son was
born for his safety and
well-being I felt I had no
choice.
My mother has seen my
son once, when he was 6
months old. She had just
been released from jail and
arrived at my home stoned
and out of it. I made sure
she found a safe way home
and haven't spoken to her
since.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-
April 19): Don't let im-
pulse be your downfall.
There are too many vari-
ables today to take a risk
that could set you back or
cause a rift between you
and someone you respect
and/or love. Think before
you act *****
TAURUS (April 20-
May 20): The more you
interact with others, the
more you will accomplish.
Understanding what oth-
ers want and need will help
you make decisions that
will benefit everyone. Be
the driving force instead of
the one being pulled along.

GEMINI (May 21-
June 20): Stop before you
do or say something that
will label you. You'll be ex-
pected to fulfill a promise
you make, so be realistic
about what you can or can-
not do. A change within a
close personal relationship
will be emotional. ***
CANCER (June 21-
July 22): If something ap-
pears to be impossible, it
probably is. However, if you
can see a way to unmask
your fear of failure, you
may be able to use your
knowledge, experience and
sound memory to navigate
your way to the finish line.
***


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

LEO (July 23-Aug.
22): An opportunity is ap-
parent but will only work
out favorably if it is within
your means. Decide what
you can live without and set
your sights on what you can
acquire. Building assets will
ease your stress and secure
your future. ***
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): You can find love or
make your current relation-
ship better by being atten-
tive and compromising.
Don'tbe afraid to showyour
aggressive side, especially
when it comes to physical
activities and challenges
that test your strength and
endurance. *****,
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): You may have your
pulse on something that is
truly creative but trying to
get others to see your vision
won't be that easy. Remove
your emotions from the
equation and find a practi-
cal way to incorporate what
you want to do. **
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-
Nov. 21): Doors are open-
ing. You can accomplish
plenty if you work from
home or you arrange your
residence to suit your goal-
oriented needs. A change
will bring with it inspiration


and motivation. ****
SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): You will be
up against opposition and
can easily disrupt plans
unintentionally. A sudden
change of heart on your
part or that of someone you
are close to will mean you
must protect your assets
and your reputation. ***
CAPRICORN (Dec. ,
22-Jan. 19): Don't take
on someone's responsibili-
ties. It's vital that you put,
your strengths to work for
yourself, so you don't fall
behind. Getting together or
the memories of someone-,
from your past will help you
make a decision about your,
future. ***
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Join a group that,
will help you to help your-, ,
self. With added discipline,"'
you can reach goals you fell"'
short on in the past Walk
away from any poor influ-
ence and you will send a
signal that confirms you are
on the right track. **** -
PISCES (Feb. 19-
March 20): You must
proceed with caution, espe-
cially when your personal
well-being is at risk. Some-
times it's best to keep a se-.
cret and -spare someone's'
feelings, especially if you
are uncertain of what has
actually transpired. **


CELEBRITY CIPHER


by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: J equals L
"Z CKAB VBDTBNRBS RCB KDR FT
VPRRZMO HI TBBR FM HI CPLWKMS'L
JKV SPDZMO KUKDSL NBDBHFMZBL


LF CB NKM DPW RCBH."


- K M M B R R B


W B M Z M O
PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "Most people work just hard enough not to get fired
and get paid just enough money not to quit." George Carlin
(c) 2011 by NEA, Inc. 2-26


FOR BETTER OR WORSE


* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or'
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


YS, TH MC.K HAHL INz .RIT THE
/ EARTH, ,AUT I
DIPN'T AY YOU
SHOULDt TART

DI ON
,, 7 THN6A Ai


10 1 ,. -


SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2011


Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415


CLASSIC PEANUTS


4B LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS












LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SATURDAY. FEBRUARY 26, 2011


Lake City Reporter





CLASSIFIED


SADvantage


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

755-5440


[Prsna Mrcanise


Rate applies to private Individualssellin
personal hdse totaling 100 or less.
Each Item must Include a price.
This Is a non-refundable rate.




One Iam per ad I 7
4 lines 6 days chdditioal
Rate applies to private Individuals selling
personal erchandisetotaling $500 o less.
Each tm s.., Include a pri,
This is a non-refundable rate.




|Onetem perad $ I
4 lines 6 days Each additional
Ratappliestoprivate Individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling $1,000 or less.
Each em must inClude a price.
This Is a non-refundable rate.



One Item per ad $237
4 lines 6 d Each additional







yS line $1.45
SRate applies to prvte Individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling $2,500 or less.
Each Item ust Include a price, s
ThIsa non-refundablerate.




One Item per ad
4 lines 6 days Each additional







Inches an o line $1.65
hate applies to pri ate Individuals selling
personal mrchandto lim totalling 4,000 or less.
Eah item m clude a price
This Is o-refundable rate.




One ham per ad in |
4 lines 6 days Eire a
Rate applies to pive Intivdals selling..
This Is a non-refundable rate.







3days 750
eluces 2 s5gns Ea iir ailulne n 65



Limited to service type advertis-
ing only.
4 lines, one month....$92.00
$10.80 each additional line
Includes an additional $2.00 per
ad for each Wednesday insertion.



You can call us at 755-5440,
Monday through Friday from 8:00
a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Some people prefer to place their
classified ads in person, and some
ad categories will require prepay-
otent. Our office is located at 180
East Duval Street.
You can also fax or e-mail your ad
copy to the Reporter.
FAX: 386-752-9400 Please
direct your copy to the Classified
Department.
EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityre-
porter.com





AditloAppear. Callby: Fax/Eanallby:
Tuesday Mon., 1100am. Mon.,t9:00a.m.
Wednesday Mon.,10:00a.m. Mon., 9:00 a.m.
Thursday Wed.,10:00a.m. Wed.,9:00 a.m.
Friday Thurs., 10:00 am. Thurs., 9:00 a.m.
Saturday Fri., 10:00 a.m. Fri.,9:00 a.m.
Sunday Fri.,10:00am. Fri., 9:00a.m.
These deadlines are subject to change without notice.




Ad Errors- Please read your ad
on the first day of publication.
We accept responsibility for only
the first Incorrect insertion, and
only the charge for the ad space
in error. Please call 755-5440
immediately for prompt correc-
tion and billing adjustments.
Cancellations- Normal advertising
deadlines apply for cancellation.
Billing Inquiries- Call 755-5440.
Should further information be
required regarding payments or
credit limits, your call will be trans-
ferred to the accounting depart-
ment


Advertising copy is subject to
approval by the Publisher who
reserves the right to edit, reject,
or classify all advertisements under
appropriate headings. Copy should
be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the first day of pub-
lication. Credit for published errors
will be allowed for the first insertion
for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the
Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nor for any general,
special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply
with Federal, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
nation in employment, housing and
public accommodations. Standard
abbreviations are acceptable; how-
ever, the first word of each ad may
not be abbreviated.


In Print and Online
www.laiiecihIrcporter.coin


Legal


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR COLUM-
BIA COUNTY
CASE NO. 10000328CA
JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NA-
TIONAL ASSOCIATION SUC-
CESSOR IN INTEREST TO
WASHINGTON MUTUAL BANK
F/K/A WASHINGTON MUTUAL
BANK EA.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
EDWARD M. BECKER, et. al.
Defendants
TO: EDWARD M. BECKER
Whose residence is: 260 NE JACK-
SONVILLE LOOP, LAKE CITY,
FL 32055 & 3505 US HWY 90 E,
DEFUNIAK SPRINGS, FL 32433 &
1147 OAKWOOD LAKES BLVD,
DEFUNIAK SPRINGS, FL 32433
TO: UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF ED-
WARD M. BECKER
Whose residence is: 260 NE JACK-
SONVILLE LOOP, LAKE CITY,
FL 32055 & 3505 US HWY 90 E,
DEFUNIAK SPRINGS, FL 32433 &
1147 OAKWOOD LAKES BLVD,
DEFUNIAK SPRINGS, FL 32433
If alive, and if dead, all parties
claiming an interest by, through, un-
der or against EDWARD M. BECK-
ER; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF ED-
WARD M. BECKER and all parties
having or claiming to have any right,
title or interest in the property descri-
bed herein.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action
for Foreclosure of Mortgage on the
following described property:
SE 1/4' OF BLOCK 9 AS LIES
SOUTH OF THE PUBLIC ROAD
LEADING FROM LAKE CITY TO
WATERTOWN, FLORIDA, IN A
SUBDIVISION OF THE NW 1/4
OF NE 1/4 OF SECTION 33,
TOWNSHIP 3 SOUTH, RANGE 17
EAST, AS SURVEYED AND
MAPPED BY A. B. BROWN FEB-
RUARY 5, 1913, LYING IN CO-
LUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA,
CONTAINING ONE ACRE, MORE
OR LESS. a/k/a 260 NE JACKSON-
VILLE LOOP, LAKE CITY, FL
322055
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of your
written defenses; if any, to it, on Di-
ana Chung, Attorney for Plaintiff,
whdse address is 2901 Stirling Road,
suite 300, Fort Lauderdale, Florida
33312 within 30 days after the first
publication of this notice, and file the
original with the Clerk of this Court
either before service on Plaintiff's at-
torney or immediately thereafter;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demanded
in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
,this Court this 11 day of February,,
- 2011.
P. DEWITT CASON
As Clerk of the Court
By:/s/B. Scippio
As Deputy Clerk
A copy of this Notice of Action,
Complaint, and Lis Pendens were
sent to the defendants and address
named above.
In accordance with the Americans
with Disabilities Act, persons need-
ing a reasonable accommodation to
participate in this proceeding should,
no later than seven (7) days prior,
contact the Clerk of the Court's disa-
bility coordinator at 9049582163. PO
BOX 1569, LAKE CITY, FL.
32056. If hearing impaired, contact
(TSS) 8009558771 via Florida relay
System.
This is an attempt to collect a debt.
Any information obtained will be
used for hat purpose.
04543557
February 19, 26, 2011


010 Announcements









020 Lost & Found








Male Rottweiller lost evening of
02/21, County Road 138/Rum
Island area. REWARD.
Please call 386-454-2925
if no answer leave message


Home Improvements

Carpentry, remodeling, paint,
repairs, additions, Lie. & Ins.
Since 1978 FREE estimates
386-497-3219 or 954-649-1037

Handicap accessible modifications
for veterans. 38 yrs experience.
386-752-4072 DON REED
CONSTRUCTION, INC
Licensed and insured CQC036224


Lawn &-Landscape Service

Clean Pine Straw,
You pick it up, $1.85 a bale,
delivery 100 bales, $285,
386-688-9156


Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.


020 Lost & Found

FOUND DOG,
She is a gorgeous Chocolite
brown with some white markings.
Found on CR 137 between
Hwy 240 & Hwy 242.
Please call to identify. She wants
to go home. 396-963-4120

LOST Black Male, Toy Poodle,
on Tues 2/15, in the 252 & Coun-
try Club area.Reward being
offered Please call 386-752-9300
LOST Purse (Navy Blue) in ,
Winn-Dixie Parking Lot
on February 14th
386-755-4791
Lost Femate Dog on 2/12 Sat.,
near Richardson Middle School.
Medium sized brown/black, looks
like a fox, Reward, 386-752-8920

Prescription bi-focals LOST @
Columbia Courthouse parking lot
on Wed 2/16, black & white
Please call 386-752-1893

100 Job
100 Opportunities
10 Temporary Farm Workers
needed. Employer: Courtney
Farms, LLC Shelby Co, KY.
Tobacco, Row Crop, Row-
Crop Produce & Fruit,
Greenhouse/Nursery & Alternative
Work. Employment Dates:
04/15/11 02/01/12. Wage of
$9.71/hr. Worker guaranteed 3/4
of contract hours. Tools provided
at no cost. Free housing provided
to non commuting workers.
Transportation & subsistence
reimbursed when 50% of contract
is met. Apply for this job at the
nearest One Stop Center in your
area and reference
Job Order # KY0420857.
04543713
FANTASTIC
OPPORTUNITY
Guest Services
Housekeeping
Part/full time. MUST be a people
person with great customer service
skills, strong work ethic, good
communication, computer skills,
and willingness to learn. MUST be
a team player and be able to work
a flexible schedule including
weekends and holidays.
Experience preferred but not
required. Only those seeking long
term employment need apply in
person at Comfort Suites located
3690 W US Hwy 90,
Lake City. Please do not call
regarding application.
i .. .


05525172



Now accepting applications for
servers and cashiers
Apply in person at
3177 W Hwy 90 Lake City
DFW/EOE

05525200
Field Service Technician,
Service medical equipment in
North Florida,
established company, will train,
knowledge of electricity a plus,
Send resume to
PO Box 494273.
Port Charlotte, FL 33949

05525206
Painters Needed
The Health Center of Lake City
has openings for Temporary
Full-Time Painters
EOE/ADA
Drug Free Workplace
Apply in person at
The Health Center of Lake City
560 W McFarlane Ave
Lake City, FL 32025

05525215
Administrative Assistant H
(Health Services Lake City)
HS Dip/GED, 5 yrs data entry
exp., 5 yrs computer exp., 2 yrs
exp. in records and/or case
management, valid Fl driver's
license, safe driving record and
valid personal auto Insurance
Teacher (Early Head Start Lake
City, Birth to 3 yrs old) HS
Dip/GED, Must have FCCPC
/CDA; 3 yrs of classroom; exp,
working with infants/toddlers
pref., or min. of 2 yr degree in
early childhood ed. or child
development; individuals who
have completed the DCF 40 hrs
and 5 hr Lit may also apply.
ALL positions must pass
physical/DCF background
requirements, Bilingual
(Span/Eng) pref., current 1st
Aid/CPR pref. Excellent
benefits-paid holidays, sick/
annual Leave, health insurance,
retirement +. add'l benefits ;
Apply in person at
236 SW Columbia Ave
(754-2222) or mail resume to
SV4Cs PO Box 2637,
Lake City, FL 32056-2637,
by email: arobinson(S)sv4cs.org
or Fax (386) 754-2220. EOE

05525221
PRODUCT ADVISOR
Travel Country RV is accepting
applications for product advisors
in our Lake City, FL location.
No experience necessary. We're
looking for personality, charac-
ter, and energy. Applicants must
be outgoing and have the ability
to interact and communicate
with our loyal customers.
This is an excellent opportunity
to learn a new career in a
thriving industry. Salary plus
bonuses with an excellent
employee benefit plan. Call Jeff
at 888-664-4268 or email to
jeff@travelcountryrv.com
for further information


100 Job
0 Opportunities

A/C SERVICE Tech
Min 5 yrs experience
F/T with benefits
Please call 386-454-4767
AVON!!!, EARN up to 50%!!!
Only $10 for Starter Kit,
1-800-275-9945 pin #4206
www.youravon.com/tdavies
CDL A Drivers needed for Target
dedicated acct, good pay,
great home time, Call Shawn
904-517-4620/Fred 404-671-6362
Cloth Cutter in small
Sewing Plant
Call Hafner's
386-755-6481
Cosmetologist wanted. Cut N Up
Family Hair Salon has stations
available for rent. Call Sharon
386-365-8402 or 752-1777
6 Temporary Farm Workers
needed. Employer: Eddie Hill -
Marion Co, KY. Tobacco,
Straw/Hay, Row Crop, Row-Crop
Produce, & Alternative Work.
Employment Dates: 04/11/11 -
12/31/11. Wage of $9.71/hr.
Worker guaranteed 3/4 of contract
hours. Tools provided at no cost.
Free l housing provided to
non commuting workers.
Transportation & subsistence
reimbursed when 50% of contract
is met. Apply for this job at the
nearest One Stop Center in your
area and reference
Job Order # KY0420731.
Hair Stylist,
Full service, exp pref,
great pay, no chair rent,
call 386-984-0101
Jr & High school Math teacher
needed. Also, daycare teacher,
must have CDA. Please fax
resumes to: 386-758-3018
SECURITY OFFICERS
FT/PT, Great Pay and Benefits.
Lake City/Alachua Area.
Must have Sec. Lic., clean
background, pass drug screen.
Call: 866-458-9523 EOE
Security Officers
needed Lake City Area, must have
current D Security Lic., Clear
background, Drivers Lic, phone,
Diploma/GED.
Benefits, DFWP EEO Apply at:
www.dsisecurity.com MB 1000084
Subway is now hiring.
Management Experience.a plus..
Send resumes to:
lakeciitmanager@yahoo.com
Wanted Highly motivated
individual for Sales Position.
Rountree -Moore Ford Lincoln
Mercury Great benefits, paid vaca-
tion. Exp. a plus but not necessary.
Call Chris. @ 386-755-0630


A120 Medical
SEmployment
AMIkids Family Services Program
seeks Case Managers for
community based program work-
ing w/ at risk youth &
families. Bachelor's degree req'd.
Req's travel to 7 counties.
Fax resume to 386.362.0932.
PT CNA needed.
Send resume to
826 SW Main Blvd Ste 102.
Lake City, FL. 32025.


130 Part Time

Bartender/Waitress, must be neat
in appearance, friendly personali-
ty, great smile and able to multi
task, Apply between lla-lp @
Pockets 301 NW Cole Terrace

141 Babysitters

Will babysit in our home,,any time
day or night, clean atmosphere,
in Branford in town
Please Call 386-935-4226

240 Schools &
Education

04543680
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-03/28/10

Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-04/11/11

Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com



310 Pets & Supplies

CKC Toy Poodle
8 wks, Hlth Cert/Shots, $400,
386-719-4900 or
386-288-7403
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.


361 Farm Equipment

84 Ford 4610 Tractor. Runs good.
Solid 2WD. New front tires,
350hr on 2005 motor. Dependable.
$7500. obo. 386-867-0005


401 Antiques

CASH CASH CASH CASH
Pre 1964 Silver Coins, Sterling,
Flatware, Costume Jewelry,
Unusual Antiques. 386-963-2621


407 Computers

DELL COMPUTER
$100.
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170


416 Sporting Goods

Columbia White Dot Bowling
Ball 13 lbs,caramel, silver & black
in color, used twice, need to sell
$40 386-362-7441


420 Wanted to Buy

I BUY WORKING AND
NON WORKING
APPLIANCES!
CALL 386-365-1915
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$250 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3.648.


430 Garage Sales






Fri & Sat, 7:30- ?
Tools and Household items,
125 SW Whitetail Cir,
of off 252B, follow signs







All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.



440 Miscellaneous
King Comforter Set. Shams,
bedskirt, 3 designer pillows. Floral
design w/blue background. Excel-
lent condition. $75. 386-454-4947
Tow Behind Grill/Smoker

386-249-3104 or
386-719-4802

463 Building

ROOFING Are you bothered
by a leaking roof?
Call Reed Roofing today for a free
estimate. 386-752-4072
RCC00455399 Insured
ROOFING:Looking to replace
your Roof? Call Reed Roofing
today for a free estimate
386-752-4072 RC0055399
References available


520 Boats for Sale

Bass Tender Boat 2 Seater
10'2",can fit in back of truck
$500 386-965-2215
Great for pond or lake!

630 Mobile Homes






2&3 BR MH. $395 $650. mo.
plus deposit. Water & sewer fur-
nished. Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
2/1 1/2,SWMH, water,sewage,gar-
bage pick up included, screened
deck, $450 mo, $200 dep, NO pets
386-292-0050
2/1 w/screen porch. Lg yard in
quiet, clean, safe, well maintained
10 unit park. Water, garbage incl.
$475.mo $475.dep. 386-965-3003
3/2 MH 1064 sq ft,remodeled in
small/quiet park, near FGC, Small
pets ok, $500 dep $575 mo
386-752-1971 or 352-281-2450
3BR/2BA Doublewide on 1 ac.

1st month and full security.
Please call 386-965-7534.
CLEAN SOLID REDONE
2/2 SW, private, quiet acre.
8 mi to VA. $450. mo + dep
No dogs 386-961-9181
Country setting. DWMH 3br/2ba
with washer/dryer on 1 ac.
$700. mo plus $500. security.
Avail March 1st. 386-719-4957
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White Contact 386-623-2465
or 386-623-3404






Rent/Sale. Owner Finance.


3br/2ba. Lg DWMH. remodeled,.
new AC, 2 ac. 10 mi SW Branford
Hwy. No pets 1st + sec. 984-7478.
Small Mobile Home at Wilson
Springs in Ft. White. $400. mo or
$100. per week. $200. Deposit
386-623-9026 or 497-1315


630 Mobile Homes
630 ffor Rent __

SWMH 2 BR/1BA. Washer/
Dryer. In country on 2 acres. Off
of SR 47. $450. mo + deposit.
386-961-9990 before 9pm.
Very clean & well maintained 2/2
units in nice park. $599.mo -
w/$500. dep. Rent incl water,
sewer, trash p/u. Close to town
386-984-8448 or 623-7547

/640 Mobile Homes
640 for Sale"

$216 a month remodeled,
like new, 2Bd/2Ba S Wide
Delivered & blocked, appliances,
A/C $2500 down, 8 year fin.
Possible owner financing. Ready
now. Call Gary 386 758-9824
*Lot Model Sale*
Save 1,000's @ Royals Homes
Call Charles @ 386-754-6737
For Model Info and Details
05524942
Palm Harbor Homes
Factory Liquidation Sale
2009 Model Homes MUST GO!
Call for FREE color brochures
800-622-2832

12 X 56, 2/1 SWMH,
axles avail, tongue attached
$2,500 OBO
386-965-1882
Come in and see the
Future in Manufactured Homes.
Royals Homes making
people smile
386-754-6737
Come See all New Lot Models
Royals Homes. Honesty! Integrity!
Customer Satisfaction
386-754-6737
Looking for a Modular?
Come see the Specialists
at Royals Homes and ask for Bo
386-754-6737
New 2011 Homes are Here
3BR/4BR at Royals Homes
Call (harles @ 386-754-6737
Homes Built Your Way!
New,2010 MH,never been
occupied, front & back deck,
$99,900 MLS#76635 Call
Roger Lovelady 386-365-7039
@ Westfield Realty
Royals Homes is Quality!
We treat you like Family.
Stop in or Call Catherine
386-754-6737

710 Unfurnished Apt.
For Rent

05524728
SPRING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans;
some with garages.
Call 386-454-1469
or visit our website:
www.springhillvillage.net

U5524833--
No Application Fee +
$200 OFF!!
BEST PRICES IN TOWN!
Windsong Apts.
386-758-8455
1, 2 & 3 Bedroom Apartments
& Mobile Homes
starting at $350 per month
386-755-2423
2 br Apt. Close to shopping
and the VA Medical Center.
$525. mo plus deposit.
386-344-0579
3BR/2BA DUPLEX
Gatorwood on the Westside
Rent $650. per month.
Call 386-867-1212 for details.
A Landlord You Can Love!
2 br Apts $575. & up + sec. Great
area. CH/A washer/dryer hookups.
386-758-9351/352-208-2421
Great location W of 1-75, spacious
deluxe 2BR apts., garage, W/D
hook up. patio. $600 & up, + SD,
386 965-0276
Nice Apt. downtown. Remodeled,
kit., 1/bd, ba, LR,'dining & extra
room. Ref. req. $450. mo & sec.
386-362-8075 or 386-754-2951.
Quail Heights 2br/lba Duplex.
Secluded, private, safe. W/D .
hookup. $700. mo. $500 security.
386-754-1155
The Lakes Apts. Studios & lBr's
from $135/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $525. + sec.
Call Michelle 386-752-9626

720 Furnished Apts.
0For Rent
New furnished studio apt in a
home, private entrance & bath,
incl all utilities, trash, cable, frig
and pest control. $450 mo + dep;
immediate avail. 386-752-2020
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

730 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent
3/2, family rm w/fireplace, 2 car
garage, Irg fenced yard,
near park & schopls
Call 386-365-3953
3/2 on 2.1 acres, 2 car garage,
ceramic tile, front & rear porches,
$995 mo, plus 2 mo sec.
Lease with the option to buy
386-758-9996 or 386-365-5434


Eastside Village Realty
386-752-5290
A 55+Retirement Living,
Site built home
2br/2bth For Lease


li--'q
BUYIfT jfc


hSELL I.J


Classified Department: 755-5440











Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SATURDAY. FEBRUARY 26. 2011


7 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent

LANDLORDS. let our gold
standard work for \ou'
Call today for additional
information on managing your
residential rentals.
16884 53rd Wellborn
3/2 well kept DWMH with great
floor plan and 2 car garage
5850./mo. + $800 security
642 Chris Terrace Lake City
Nice upscale 3/2 with 1623 sf.
Close to Town but far enough
out for privacy. $1150./mo
$1150./security.
143 Zebra Terrace Lake City
3/2 well maintained brick home
on I acre +. Bonus room. could
be 4th bedroom or nice family
room. $900./mo. +
$900. security.
B.J. Federico 386-365-5884
Kayla Carbono 386-623-9650
(habla espaiol)
Century 21
The Darby Rogers Co.

3BR/1.5BA. BLOCK HOME.
Fenced (privacy) back yard.
$825. mo $825. dep. References
req'd. 386-364-2897
Attractive 3br/2ba Brick home.
Excellent location View of
Lake Montgomery. No Pets.
$950. mo. 386-965-0763
Ft White, 2/1, CH/A, 2010 W2 &
ref's from current landlord req'd,
Access to Rivers $675 mo,
$600 sec., 386-497-4699
House for rent. Everything new.
4br/2ba plus study. Carport. Great
neighborhood. $1000 mo last plus
security. 386-867-2283

750 Business &
Office Rentals
1800 SQ FT $1100. Office
furniture available and
cubicle dividers.Water,
sewer and garbage fees included.
386-752-4072 Ready to move in!
OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$695. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor
SE Baya Ave Office Furnished
1800 Sq Ft $1125.00
Ideal for Engineers & Professional
Quiet and safe environment
Security available 386-752-4072

770 Condos For Rent

04543682
Golf Course Condo for rent,
2BR/2BA, 1420 s.f., $1200/mo.
Rent includes all appliances,
basic cable, water/sewer/
garbage, pool & tennis ct.
access. Realtor/owner
call 386-344-0433.


780 Condos for Sale
3 bdrm Condo Nit, back patio,
HOA fees include ext maintenance
of home, lawn & pool MLS#76797
$110,000, Call Missy Zecher@
Remax 386-623-0237

805 Lots for Sale
1 acre lot outside the city limits.
Homes only subdivision. Priced
blow the assessed value with the
county, $16,900 Hallmark Real
Estate 386-867-1613 Call Jay S
2 ac lot in River Access
community. Suwanne River
1 mile away. Owner will finance.
$13,500 Hallmark Real Estate
386-867-1613 Call Jay Sears
Beautiful 5+ acre lot, partially
cleared w/large oaks, Homes only,
$38,000, MLS 75038 Call Roger
Lovelady @ Westfield Realty
386-365-7039


Charming Turn of the Century,
property, close to
downtown,MLS# 74814
$94,900 386-755-0808
Charlie Sparks @ Westfield


Nice 4.5 acre parcel w/S/P/W
older SWMH $39.900
MLS# 76182 Call
Roger Lovelady 386-365-7039
Westfield Realty

To place your
classified ad call

755-5440


805 Lots for Sale
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference.
limitation, or discrimination based
on race. color, religion, sex.
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin: or any intention to make
such preference. limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.


810 Home for Sale
2/1,on nearly an acre, living/dining
rm, kitchen nook, util rm, fenced,
back porch,2 car carport close to
town, $60,000 386-754-5818
2/3 on 5 acres, wrap around porch,
family rm w/fireplace, detached
garage, $179,900 MLS# 77005
call Roger Lovelady @
Westfield Realty 386-365-7039
3/2 home w/1758 sq ft, Storage
bldg, enclosed patio & deck,
$168,000 Call Carrie Cason @
Westfield Realty 386-623-2806
MLS# 73410
3/2 w/over 1700 sq ft, fireplaces,
modem kitchen, fenced yard, 2
sheds, convenient location
$89,500 MLS#73861 Call Patti
@Access Realty 386-623-6896
4 bdrm + office, 2 living & dining
areas, front & back porch
$279,900 MLS# 72831
Call Charlie Sparks @ Westfield
Realty 386-755-0808
4/2 2300 plus sq ft,Palm Harbor
Home on 2 lots, Good Condition
$69,888 Call Nancy Rogers @
386-867-1271 Results Realty,
4/2 1,800 sq ft on 10.5 acres,
newly remodeled inside, detached
garage, above ground pool
$189,888, Call Nancy,
Results Realty 386-867-1271
5 bedroom Home on 5 acres south
of Lake City, Big Rooms
lots of space $229,500
Charlie Sparks 386-755-0808
MLS# 72928 Westfield Realty
5/2, 1800sf, 24 acres, family rm,
screened back porch, RV
parking,newly painted close to VA
& DOT, Call Pam @ Remax
386-303-2505
5/3 Triplewide MH .(2200) sq ft,
w/2 master bdrms, on 10 fenced
acres, fireplace. MLS# 76226
$75,000 Call Patti Taylor
386-623-6896 Access Realty
AFFORDABLE 3BR/2BA mfg
home in Woodgate Village only
$27,000 #76741
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 386-755-5110
Beautifully Landscaped 3/1 on'
1.11 ac, 16x24 detached garage,
screen perched bldg, water
purification system, Call Pam @
Remax 386-303-2505
Brick home with 2,700 sqft under
roof. Large master w/bath on .5
acres completely fenced. $167,500
Hallmark Real Estate
386-867-1613,Call Jay Sears
Brick, .59 ac. 3br/2ba w/large
spacious rooms. Split floor plan.
2 car garage & storage $222,900.
Century 21/The Darby
Rogers Co. 386-752-6575
Close to town, 2 story home
w/stone, fireplace, downstairs
master bdrm, $144,900
MLS# 77050 Call Carrie Cason
386-623-2806 Westfield Realty.
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Brick, Woodcrest. Great area, split
plan. Screened back porch. Elaine
K. Tolar. 386-755-6488 $139,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
6br/3.5ba. 3 Fireplaces. 39.7 acres
included. Mary Brown Whitehurst.
386-965-0887 $1,200,000
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Reduced, brick w/over 2,000 sqft,
5 ac. 3br/2ba.Lots of extras. Elaine
K. Tolar 755-6488 $149,900


810 Home for Sale
Coldwell Banker Bishop Realty
Lakeviesw home in town. Old
charm w/many upgrades Elaine K.
Tolar. 386-755-6488 S189.900.
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
2 Stors. 4br/2.5ba-2160 sqft. Spa-
cious plan ss/garage Lori Geibeig-
Simpson 365-5678 S149.900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
3br/2ba close to town. 1620 sqft
w/covered patio& more. Lori Gei-
beig Simpson 365-5678 5 117.900
Coral Shores Realty 200-
Custom built home. 23 fenced ac.
1700 ft paved frontage. Lg
kitchen/pantry. master/bath.
386-965-5905 Bob Gavette
Comer lot in Piccadilly Park.
Newly painted in/out. New carpet
/vinyl. 2 car garage. Inground
pool. $133.500. Century 21/The
Darby Rogers Co. 386-752-6575
Custom 4/2, Screened back porch.
16x20 workshop w/elec. & water.
Ceramic/wood floors & more
$189,900. Century 21/The Darby
Rogers Co. 386-752-6575
Custom 4/2, Screened back porch.
16x20 workshop w/elec. & water.
Ceramic/wood floors & more
$189,900. Century 21/The Darby
Rogers Co. 386-752-6575
CUSTOM-BUILT 4BR mfg
home w/screen porch, front deck,
shed $87,500
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 386-755-5110 #73893
Cute 3/2 nicely remodeled home,
2 acres, partially fenced
$115,888
Call Brittany @ eults Res alty
386-397-3473
Derington Properties, LLC
3/2 MH, large deck and
screened.porch, 5 ac.
$46,500 B86-965-4300
Derington Properties, LLC
DWMH, 5 ac. Screened front/back
porches. 20x40 shop fully equip-
ped w/bath. $74,900. 965-4300
Eastside Village Realty
386-752-5290
A 55+ Retirement Living
Fully furnished 2br/2ba @
$83,000
Eastside Village Realty
386-752-5290
A 55+ Retirement Living
3BR/2BA
$99,999
Family home in Subdivision
4 bdrm Lots of space, newer
roof/carpet MLS#76283 Call
Missy Zecher @ Remax 386-
623-0237 www.missyzecher.com
Great Investment Property!
House needs lots of TLC, close to
shopping and schools, $35,000,
Bring all offers, Results Realty
Call Brittany 386-397-3473
LIKE NEW! 3BR/2BA mfg
home near Wellborn on
5+ acres ONLY $79,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 386-755-5110 #76768
Log Cabin home, located on
5 acres, wrap around porch
$199,000 MLS#75550
Call Missy Zecher @
386-623-0237 Remax Realty
Lrg Brick Home, well-established
neighborhood, in town,
$129,900 MLS#77016
Call Carrie Cason
Westfield Realty 386-623-2806
Must See!.4/2 2368SF Home,
island kitchen, den, fire place,
storage, auto gate entry,
Call Pam @ Remax
386-303-2505
Owners Motivated! Multiple
dwellings. Main house and 2 mo-
bile homes Pecans, cedar & aza-
leas. $199,900. Century 21/The
Darby Rogers Co. 386-752-6575
Perfect starter home. Quiet area.
Wood laminate floors, Ig dining,
French doors. 1 car garage/work-
shop $84,900. Century 21/The
Darby Rogers Co. 386-752-6575
Qualified General Contractor
doing top Quality work!
386-752-4072 Licensed and
Insured CGC036224
Don Reed Construction, Inc.
READY TO MOVE IN!
Living rm, dining rm, family rm,
lots of space ONLY $55,000
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #75210
REDUCED TO $61,500 in
Eastside Vlg! Immaculate
2BR/2BA w/lg rooms
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 386-755-5110 #76753


810 Home for Sale
Solid Home' Needs updating.
Country eat in kitchen & formal
dining.Some N% indow s replaced.
5 0.000 Century 21,The Darby
Rogers Co. 386-752-6575
SPACIOUS 2BR/2BA home on 1
ac w/attached garage &
2-ston shed 589.900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 386-755-5110 #76887
Totally refurbished 2/2 w/
workshop on 1.25 fenced acres
S94.900 Call Millard Gillen @
Westfield Realty 386-365-7001
MLS#75417
Two story MH. located in
Wellborn on 2.66 acres, porches
and fireplaces. 9 bdrms/3bths
$163.900 Patti Taylor
Access Realty 386-623-6896
Very Nice 4/2 on 4 acres w/open
floor plan. 2 living rooms, eat in
kitchen, dining rm and rec rm
w/wet bar $89,900 Call Brittany
Results Realty 386-397-3473
Well maintained 3/2 DWMH,
1568 sq ft, acres. new roof,
$65,000, MLS#76187
Call Millard Gillen @
Westfield Realty 386-365-7001

820 Farms&
Acreage
10 ac lots, some w/well, septic, pwr
pole. Lowered prices. Owner finance
w/low dn pmnt Deas Bullard Proper-
ties 386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com
4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$69,900. $613mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
4 acres, Wellborn, New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down, $39,900, $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com

830 Commercial
8 Property
Coral Shores Realty. Prime
commercial, located on Hwy 41 &
Gibson Ln. 26X54 concrete block.
$76,000 386-965-5905
Call Bob Gavette
Downtown & borders 3 streets.
Aprox. 10,000 sqft fenced parking.
"as is" Bob Gavette. $73,000. 386-
965-5905 Coral Shores Realty
Prime Commercial Property
across from plaza, frontage on
Baya 3.27 acres, room for building
$398,888 386-867-1271
Call Nancy @ Results Realty

940 Trucks








950 Cars for Sale

GET CASH TODAY!!
For your car, truck, van or SUV.
(Running or not). Call anytime.
(352)653-5691

951 Recreational
951 Vehicles
2009 FREEDOM Spirit
18 ft. Tag along travel trailer.
Excellent condition $8,300.
386-438-5560


REPORTER Classifieds

In Print and On Line
www.lakecityreporter.com


un uanflEIa Wii ifnunn r,









Bring the picture in or
we will take it for you!
* Ad runs 10 consecutive days
with a description and photo in the
newspaper and online E-edition.
* Ad runs 10 consecutive days as a
classified line ad online.
* You must include vehicle price.
* All ads are prepaid.
* Private party only.





2006 EF250
Ford Van
3/4 ton, metal work
shelves/ladder rack,
60K miles, exc. cond.
$10,500
Call
386-555-5555
If you don't sell your vehicle
during the first 10 days, you
can run the same vehicle ad
for 10 additional days for
only $15.00
Terms and conditions remain the
same for the additional run.


951 Recreational
5 Vehicles







04 Rialta Motor home 58k mi.
Self contain. generator. Like new.
Too many goodies to list. Open for
offers. S19.800. 386-758-7683


2010 Puma Travel Trailer 32 ft, 2
slide outs, air awning, King Island
bed, Many Extras $18,900
Call 863-660-8539 will deliver


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Reporter's
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week at a price
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