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The Lake City reporter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01536
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 4/24/2011
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
System ID: UF00028308:01536
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text

Wi2illiams to file incident report against Lemley


It s onficial: Count

RCCeptS NOTTIS'

EDD re si nation


TODAY'S
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APHIL:4.2011


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intention of filing the report at
the Columbia County Board of
County .'Commissioners regular
meeting Thursday. The meet-
ing had already been adjourned,
but Commissioner Jody DuPree,
board chairman, called it back
to order per W~illiams' request to
comment.
During a phone interview
Friday, Williams said Lemley
was seen.by Ben Scott, county


'She has no business
plundering around
my private vehicle.'
By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com
Commissioner Ron Williams
said he will be filing an inci-
dent report Monday with the
Columbia County Sheriff'sOffice


purchasing director, after the
April 7 county commssion meet-
ing taking pictures of Williams'
truck. Scott had~stepped outside
to retrieve papers from his own
truck, Williams said.
' "While he was there, Barbara
Lemley vvas hanging around my
truck taking pictures of it all the
way around it, looking on the back
of my truck and looking through
the windshield," Williams said.


"That's my private vehicle and
she has no business plundering
.around my private vehicle."
When asked why Immley was
taking pictures, Wiilliams said he
did not know.
"That board meeting night I
said to her, 'The next time you
want truck, I'll wash it first,' he said,
INCIDENT continued on 3A


againstBarbara ;
Lemley of Lake '
city for "plun-
dering" around
his personal
truck.
"I .Want & .
reIjort, so if- williams
anything hap-
pens, I'm on record," Williams
said Friday.
-Williams first announced his


S12,500 square-
foot building may
cost $500,000.
By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com
Cost estimates for the
possible construction
of a Columbia County
Sheriff's Office crime
scene and vehicle main-
tenance building --' cur-
rently estimated to cost
almost $500,000 will
doon be drawn up, county
officials said. Friday.
"WIhat we're trying to
do is firm up -the cost,
said Dale Williams, coun-
ty manager.
,At the' Columbia
County Board of County
Commissioners regu-
lar meeting Thursday,
the board unanimously
approved staff to acquire
separate cost estimates
for various stages of the


project, such as how much
cot ie oplbtl fiishe
and how much the build-
ing will cost with only the
crime lab finishedf.
Williains' said the esti-
mates will be done in-
house.
"WVhat .we're going to
do, we're going to do
totally in-house up to this
point," he said.
The- building ~will be
almost .12,500 square feet
on the site of the CCSO
administrative building.
. Constritcting it~ is
expected to resolve two
issues, W~illiams said.
First, the~ Sheriff's
Office currently does not
have a designated lab
area for processing crime
scene evidence, specifical-
ly lacking an appropriate
place to process automo-
bile crime scenes in
CRIME continued onr 3A


LEANNE TYOiljake iOry Pieporter
K'La Marshall (from left), 6, J'Liyn Smith, 3,:Anthony Smith', 6, and Au'Vontaie Smith, 4, smile
for a photograph with their Easter baskets and buckets stuffed with eggs after the 15th Annual
EastelrEgg Hunt hosted by the Gold Standard Lqdge #1 67 at Annie Mattox. Parkc Saturday.


Rescue and the Lake City
Police Department were
i available for safety demon-
strations.
The event also featured
a bounce house and games
like tug of war.
Hosting the Easter Egg
Hunt was a way to support
the community, Kelly said,
and it also gave parents a
canc tordiipt in et
children who may not be
able to otherwise.
"With the crisis that we
fae in everyday life, espe-
ciallyr with the economy," '
Kelly sajid, "wve want to
.give back to the communi-
ty for the parents that are
less fortunate to be able to
TREASURE continued on 3A


Photos by LEANNE TYO/1ake City Repoffer
Above: Amaiya Callum, 7, of Lake City bends down as she
prepares to place an Easter egg in her bucket and scoop up
another' egg. Callum was one of( approximately 20 children
w~ho found eggs with prize tickets~ inside that won them an
Easter basket i
Below: Children and their parents race toward 3,000: plastic,
candy-filled Easter eggs in an attempt to pick up as many
eggs as possible at the 15th Annual Eastel' Egg Hunt hosted .
by the Gold Standard Lodge #167 at Annie Mattox Park.


Search fOr
replacement to
be 'i soon
By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com
The county will' soon
begin advertising to
replace Suzanne Norris'
seat on Columbia County's
economic development
boards.
Norris, Economic
Development Department.
board member and
Industrial Development
Authority board chiair-
woman, became officially
resigned from her posts
effective June 30 when the
Columbia County Board
of County Commissioners
unanimously approved its
consent agenda at a regu-
lar meeting Thursday.
In a letter dated April l2


that: w sbmitted to the
wastyNu ris tendered
her resignation and also
asked that she step down
from the boards sooner
than June 30 if a replace-
ment was found.
Norris is Mercantile
Bank N~orth Central
Florida Market presi-
dent. She
served
as the
former
Columbia
County
ID A
board
ch~a ir Norris
woman
when 'the
IDA was still an autono-
mous entity before it was
taken under county' con-
trol in January and named
,the Columbia County
Economic Development
Department.


;j;;53~i~Li~?;Ln't~B~i~:~:~l~~riiQ~~ I~e~L~E~SP~*iClr~~LSPYd7d~sB*ls~


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Vol. I 37, Nd. 78 $1.00


Sunday, April 24, 20 II


pl is f cisis

SCene building


TREA SURE SEARCH


Kids score

at annual

e gg hunt.

By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com

into the community
and collecting: Easter
'eggs together were
reasons why Kyala
Wilson-Rolle of Lake City
took- her son and nephews
to the annual Easter Egg
SHaunt at Annie Mattox Park
Sat r ay.
for~ ea aeygod ev n
ge om be dpa o th ceorm-
eggs, play and enjoy themn-
selves for a Saturday," ~
Wilsort-Rolle said.
Hundreds of c e -
drn and thi~ii s
attended the 15th annual
event, hosted by the Gold
Standard lodge #167. -
(It's a community-wide
event," said Mike K~elly,
the lodge's senior warden
and even~it organizer.
~At the blow of Kelly's
whistle, the children
race't-'anzi3 0eplastic,
that speckled the park's
lawn, trying to collect as
many as they could.
Approximately 20 eggs
Held prize tickets and the
children that found those
eggs each won an Easter
basket.
Free lunch was pro-
vided for the children and
Columbia County Fire/


.I ~ii


90 6 3
Pardl cloudy
WEATHER, 8A


BEST


Voting begins Sunnday:, May 1st















Friday- Friday: Saturday: Saturday: Wednesday: Wednesday:
5-24-39-42 21 5-7-1 2-22-34 Afternoon: 0-7-8 Afternoon: 0-5-5-7 4-20-40-43-46-53 9-24-34-36-43 27
Evening: 4-7-5 Evening: 2-7-5-8


AROUND FLORIDA



Southwest Florida soldier killed in Afghanistan


CO RREC TIO N

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion,
please call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifica-
tions will run in this space. And thanks for reading.


LAKE CITY REPORTER SUNDAY REPORT SUNDAY, APRIL 24, 2011


Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424


told the court she often
didn't know where the boy
stayed.
The hearing lasted three
minutes and the teen was
released later that day.
Sometime around 3
a.n1. the next day, April 16,
police said the teen shot
the British tourists in the
city's high-crime Newtown
neighborhood.

Four injured in
club shooting
WEST PALM BEACH
- Authorities are investi-
gating a shooting at a West
Palm Beach club that sent
four people to the hospital.
The sheriff's office said
ab tailePllup to el
Lounge shortly after 3 a.m.
Satra and shot se eral

Three people suffered
gunshot wounds. A fourth
victim cut her foot while
fleeing frontthe scene. All
were treated at a local hos-
pital for non-life threaten-
ing injuries;

Mifce manager
charged with theft
FORT IAUDERDALE
- The former office man-
ager for a Fort Lauderdale
veterinarian has been sen-
tenced to. more than three
years in prison for stealing
hundreds of thousands of .
dollars from the business.
A federal judge Friday
imposed the sentence ....
pn 46-year-old Kelly
Lisa Duncan. She'll be "


on probation for three
years when she gets out
and must pay restitution.
- Duncan pleaded guilty in
February to mail fraud.
Prosecutors said
Duncan stole more than
$647,000 from the veter-
mnarian's office between
2004 and 2010. She admit-
ted creating payroll checks
for fake employees and
bogus second checks for
real employees, then cash-
ing the checks for her per-
sonal benefit.

Navarre Beach

property taxed
TALIAHASSEE An
appellate court has decid-
ed owners of homes and

sec sreli ble for op-
erty tax on land beneath
the building that they
lease rather than own.
The 1st District Court of
Appeal, though, asked the
Florida S~upreme Court to
have a final say.
A three-Judge panel
Thursday issued the latest
in a series of tax rulings
affecting leased property
on Santa Rosa Island. Prior
decisions approved the
.taxation of the buildings.
The federal government
gaethe island poerty to
Esc i County in 14
with a reverter clause that
prohibits it from being
sold.

-. M Associated PredS


IMMOKALEE
southwest
Florida family
is mourning a
soldier killed in
AAfghanistan.
Sgt. Linda Pierre of
Immokalee was one of
five U.S. soldiers killed
last weekend in a suicide
attack. U.S. officials said
an Afghan solider working
as a Taliban sleeper agent
set off multiple grenades.
Pierre was assigned to
Fort Campbell, Ky. The 28-
year-old was deployed late
last year for her fist tour

ov res father, a Haitian
immigrant, said he stiU
loves the Army despite his
daughter's death. She's
not the only soldier in her
family. One of Pierre's

bedpoyd eit t ed Amy
after serving five tours
overseas with the Marines.
About 60 friends and
gstraansd waed A e re
on a busy Immokalee
street corner to pay their
respects Thursday.


TOUriSt Slayings
suspe c held
SARASOTA The
Florida teenager charged
with fatally shooting
two British tourists was
ordered held without
bond Friday on five felony
counts of aggravated
assault with a deadly weap- .
on in connection with a.
separate crime.
Shawn Tyson, 16, had a


COlOring contest winners
Winners of the Lake City Reporter's 2011 Easter Coloring Contest pose for a photograph
Thursday at the Lake City Reporter office with their winning coloring pages and Skate Station
Fun Works certificates. Pictured are Kyrsten Giebeig fromn left), 12, ages 10 to 12 winner; :
Hailey Jones, 9, ages 7 to 9 winner; and Preston Jossi, 6, ages 3 to 6 winner. Winners
received four Skate Station Funworks unlimited admission passes as their pnize.


According to the ne~ws-
paper, the Sarasota Police
Department said it never
received the order, and the
detective did not attend
the April 15 hearing.
During that hearing, which
was before Juvenile Judge
Deno Economou, prosecu-
tors did not mention the -
previous judge's concerns.
Records also show pros-
ecutors did not object to
a Department of Juvenile
Justice recommendation
that the teen be released
to home detention even
though his mother had


first court appearance at
the Sarasota County jail on
charges that he fired into
an occupied car during an
unrelated dispute earlier
this month. '
The Sarasota Herald
Tribune reported that
missteps in the case's
handling allowed Tyson to
be released April 16. Early
the next day, authorities
said he fatally shot James
Cooper, 25, and James
~Kouzaris, 24. .
A public defender i'
appeared for Tyson at the
Friday hearing. TIyson will


appear on chargels.related
to the British tourists' slay-
ing at a later date and he is
expected to be charged as
an adult.
In the previous shoot-
ing, Tyson was arrested
and had a first court
appearance hearing on
April 8. At the hearing, .
Chief Judge Lee Haworth
raised questions about
whether the teen posed a
danger to the community.
He also ordered a detec-
tive familiar with the case
to present more informa-
tion at the next hearing.


Actor-comedian Cedlric the
Entertainer is 47.
Latin pop singer Alejandro

d corEic Baour is 34.
M Singer Kelly Clarkson is 29.
M Rock singer-musician Ty-
son Ritter (T~he All-American
Rejects) is 27.


Actress Shirly MacLaine
is 77. ..
Author Sue Grafton is 71.
: .::es-::::::::::etor
A Chicago Mayor Richard M.
Daley is 69.
Actor Michael O'Keefe is
56.



Daily Scrioture


ally ~replace record albums,
skeptics scoffed. Herbert
von Karajan, Stevie Wonder
and Herbie Hancock spoke
up in defense of Sony's digi-
tal sound.
Sony sold the world's
first CD in 1982 and CDs
overtook LP record sales
en apanc~v ya s@ lt
used today and fostered the ~
devices developed since.


Sheen's police
OSCOMt inVOStigated
WASHINGTON
- Charlie Sheen is fond
of boasting about his
"winning" ways, but D.C.
authorities are now inveS-
tigating how he won a
high-speed police escort
on his way to a show in
downtown Washinigton thiS
week '
Sheen posted a photO
on his Twitter account
Tuesday night showing
a police car ahead of him
with eme genc lightS
flashing as he was escort-
ed at least part of the way
from Dulles International
Airport to his stage shOW'
"Violent Torpedo of Truth:
Defeat is Not. an Option."
Sheen included a picture
of a speedometer reach-
ing about 80 mph and a
message that read: "In
car with Police escort in
front and rear! Driving like
someone's about to deliver
a baby! Cop car lights
(hash) Spinning!"
It was not clear exactly
where along the route the
photo was taken.

is Associated Press


LOS ANGELES


all too familiar-
ly for Lindsay
Lohan: a court
T h dy ufodehearing, jail
sentence, a quick release.
The starletappeared
b fof ua jde erda f
a year and was sentenced


designer necklace.
Los Angeles Superior
Court Judge Stephanie
Sautner said she thought
Sthe actress had inten-
*t2ionally taken the $2,500
necklace from an upscale
SVenice store and shown
poot- judgment in not try-
ing to return it until police
Became involved-
The judge reduced the
Actress' charge from felony
Grand theft to a misde-
meanor and imposed the
120-day sentence.
Ho an' attorney fawn
11oley ~lda notice
Appeal right before court
closed, clearing the way for
the actress' release on bail.
She was freed at 9:21
p.m. after posting $75,000
Bail, according to the sher-
iff department's website-
Deputy District Attorney
Danette Meyers said her
office would consider
appealing the ruling as
well.
Sautner agreed with
Meyers that Lohan showed
intent to keep the neclilace,
and said that she thought
Lohan's conduct probably
warranted a felony.
"I see the intent here,"
Sautner said. "I see a level
of brazenness with, 'Let
me see what I can get
away with here."'


Lakre City
HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293
Fax number ..............752-9400
Circulation .............. .755-5445
Online... www.Iakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055-
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Pbe ,hr Td isn .... .754-0418
(twilson~lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
Assistant Editor CJ Risak..754-0427
After 1:00 p.m.
(crisak~~lakecityreporterscom)
ADVERTISING
Director Ashley Butcher ...754-0417
(abutcher~lakecityreporter.com)
CL.AaSlaFe a ossified ad, cali 755-5440.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Actress Lindsay Lohan, center, arrives at the LAX Airport
Courthouse in Los An eles, Frida .


and chairman from 1982 to
1995, Ohga died Saturday
in Tokyo of multiple organ
failure, Sony said. He was
81.
The flamboyant music
comf~oisseur steered his
work through his love of
music. A former opera
singer, Ohga insisted the
CD be designed at 12
centimeters (4.8 inches)
in diameter or 75 min-
utes worth of music to
store Beethoven's Ninth
Symphony in its entirety.
From the start, Ohga rec-
ognized the potential of the
CD's superior sound quality.
In the 1970s, when Ohga
insisted CDs would eventI-


Celebrity Birthdays


PSNEO THE INP PLE NW



Lohan quickly released from jad


"It is written:'As surely as I
live,' Says the Lord,'every knee
will bow before me; every
tOngUe Will aCknowledge God."'

-- Romans I 4: II


Reporter
'BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon....754-0419
(sbrannon ~lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7i00
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers shouki
call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivi~ry
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation ..............755-5445
(circulation@lakecityreporterccom)
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12 Weeks. ... .. .. .. .. . ... $26.32
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Mail rates
12 Weeks ....... .......... $41.40
24Wees .........$2


FOrmer Sony
president dies
TOKYO Opera singer
Norio Ohga complained
about the quality of Sony
tape recorders before he
was hired by the company,
developed the compact
disc and championed its
superior sound. Love of
music steered the former
Sony chairman's career
and in turn, he trans-
formed the Japanese elec-
tronics maker into a global
software and entertain-
ment empire.
The company president





t~MYY~~rumr~7~1~R~Y~u~


CRIME: New facility could help process evidence

Continued F~rom Page 1A


O B/ YN

DA NT\A cREENEl MD
WOMEN'S HEALTH WITH A WOMAN'S TOUCH


8 st~ern Store
7015 W. US Hwy 90 Lake City
,~20386-755-BOOT



~EARS O y ou
Purchase any Brighton necklace and bracelet and you can
choose any pair of Brighton earrings* FREE!
*Uimitedi to srocke on hand. Charm iewel~ury minlded Necklace it Bracelet
mulst be purchased inl the sornei to : I,, ' :;:( IIi~ . :. a


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


for rising gas costs.
Obama's focus on the
issue came as a New York
Times/CBS News poll
published Thursday found
that 70 percent of the pub-
lic believes the country is
headed in the wrong direc-
tion. That followed a March
AP-GrfK survey reflecting
widespread discontent over
the economy, with just 15
percent seeing an econom-
ic improvement the previ-
ous month. Through the
spring, Obama's approval
numbers in several polls
have slipped.
"Gas prices are a major
factor in his slide ... along
with unemployment and
his talk about cuts and
tax increases to deal with
deficits and debt," Thurber
said.
The national average
price for a gallon of regular
gasoline is currently $3.84,
almost a dollar higher than
a year ago. In many places,
it's well ovei- $4.
The gas .price debate
has a sense of dji8 vu to
it, Obama notes. Vows to
end dependence on expep-
sive oil imports go back
'to Richard Nixon's "Project
Independence", a 1973
response to the Arab oil
embargo, and this has been
a popular refrain by presi-
dents of both parties over
the last 40 years.
"Whenever gas prices
shoot up, like clockwork,
you see politicians racing
to the cameras, waving
three-point plans for two
dollar gas," Obama said
in Saturday's address. But
when prices subside, those
plans are quietly shelved.
Even calls to target price
gouging have a~ familiar
ring. When, gas hit $3 a
gallon in 2006, George W.
Bush launched a probe,
declaring Americans "don't
vciant and will not accept ...
manipulation of the market.
And neither will I."


By MARK S. SMITH
Associated Press

WASHINGTON Wies
gas prices climbing and lit-
tle relief in sight, President
Barack Obama is scram-
bling to get ahead of the
latest potential obstacle to
his re-election bid, even as
Republicans are making
plans to exploit the issue.
No one seems more
aware of the electoral peril
than Obama himself.
"My poll numbers go up
and down depending on the
latest crisis, and right now
gas prices are weighing
heavily on people," he told
Democratic donors in Los
Angeles this past week.
In fact, Obama raised
the issue unsolicited in a
series of town meetingS
in Virginia, California and
Nevada that were ostens~i-
bly about his deficit-reduc-
tion plan. And he made the
gas spike the subject of his
weekly radio and Internet
address Saturday.
"It's just another burden
when things were already
pretty tough," he said.
As Obama well knows,
Americans love their cars
and remain heavily depen-
dent on them, and they
don't hesitate to punish
politicians when the cost
of filing their tanks goes
through the roof. Indeed,
for presidents, responding
to sudden surges is a recur-
ring frustration.
"These gas prices are
killing you right now,"
Obama said at Facebook
headquarters in Palo Alto,
acknowledging that many
Americans can't afford new
fuel-efficient cars and must
drive, ilder models.. For
some, he said, the cost of
a fill-up has all but erased
the benefit of the payroll
tax holiday that he and
congressional Republicans
agreed on last December.
On Saturday, Obama


have long raised the spec-
ter of a massive spill, the
accident in the Gulf last
April highlighted short-
comings in spill prepared-
ness. In the aftermath,
experts such as Thad
Allen the government's
point person on the Gulf
spill and the presiden-
tial .oil spill commission
have questioned whether
companies and the gov-
ernment are adequately
prepared to overcome the
challenges of responding
to an Arctic spill.
"We ought to be
extremely careful about
the Arctic, because we
know that spill response
and the Coast Guard can-
not get to the Arctic very
well," Cherry Murray, a
member of the presiden-
tial oil spill panel, told
a committee on ocean
energy safety this week.
"And cleanup is going to
. be considerably more dif-
ficult."
Despite lessons learned
from the massive response
to the Macondo well blow-
out on April 20 a year ago,
some of the techniques
deployed --.skimming,
burning and the applica-
tion of chemical disper-
sants either wouldn't
wor-k in the frigid seas and
stormy skies off Alaska or
would be less effective.
Booms, depending on
the degree of ice cover,
can freeze. Ice can also
clog the suction devices
used to mop up the spill,
reducing how much oil can
be collected. Depending
on the time of year a spill
Occurred, even daylight
can be scarce.
"The problem is on what
order of magnitude are
you, prepared~to respond,
and;L, don't >eally: i think
we know that," said Allen,
hov Bseonior fteHlow~ t
"That doesn't mean that
we shouldn't proceed, but
everyone needs to know
that's a very, very difficult
place to operate."


By DINA CAPPIELLO
Associated Press

WASHINGTON A
year after the largest off-
shore oil spill in U.S. histo-
ry, some experts are pon-
dering the next doomsday
scenario a massive oil
well blowout in the icy
waters off Alaska's north-
ern coast.
Like the deepest waters
of the Gulf, the shallow
but frigid seas off Alaska
are a new frontier for oil
and gas exploration. The
reserves are large but
come with risks.
With no roads connect-
ing remote coastal towns,
storms and fog that can
ground aircraft, no deep-
water ports for ships and
the ~nearest Coast Guard
station about 1,000 miles
away it would be nearly
impossible to respond on
the scale that was needed
last year to stop a run-
away oil well and clean up
the mess. That means the
burden to respond would
rest to an even greater
degree on the company
doing the drilling.
Like a backcountry
camper, an' oil company
drilling off Alaska would
have to bring all the
equipment needed to the
isolated drilling site. And
the federal government,
at least in the early stages,
would be far away ~from
the scene.
. .Unlike the Gulf, where
tens of thousands of oil
wells and runoff have taint-
ed the waters for decades,
a spill in the Arctic risks
tainting a pristine and sen-
sitive landscape, one that
has not been as well stud-
ied and where drilling in
federal waters is limited.-
That makes it harder to
determine what toll a spill
wouldd h n~oi~h de n a

ing whales and other wild-
life that make use of the
oil-rich seas.
While critics of off-
- shore drilling in Alaska


Woozies*
f0( <@I~-L-REEf
FUP FLOPS

Wi ne tevis tumbler'" I
~_~~, SICIS "' kn~~


ASSOCIATED PRESS
President Barack Obama walks from the White House in
Washington Saturday to his limo, for an afternoon of golf at


wedge issue," said James
Thurber, who directs the
Center for Gongressional
and Presidential Studies at
Ariterican University.
Legislative aides report
House Republicans are
considering a series of
hearings and floor votes on
measures to boost domes-
tic -oil and gas production
when Congress returns
from its Easter break.
Meantime, Obama
has ordered his Justice
Department to form a task
force to look for fraud or
manipulation in the oil
markets. It will "root out"
any abuses, he told a town
meeting in Reno, Nev. The
president is among those'
who've said the surging
price for crude is caused
by worries about political
upheaval in the Arab world
and increasing demand
from China and elsewhere.
Still, Am~ericans have
a tradition of holding the
party in~power responsible


Andrews Air Force Base, Md '

insisted in his radio and
Internet address that the
best answer is a long-term
drive to develop alterlia-
tivres to fossil fuel. He also
renewed calls to end $4 bil-
lion in subsidies for oil and
gas companies. "Instead
of subsidizing yesterday's
energy sources, he said,
"we need to invest in
tomorrow's,"
Republicans contend
that high gas prices are
the inevitable result of an
: administration they accuse
of stifling' domestic drill-
ing, and which placed new
curbs on offshore explo-
ration after last spring's
disastrous BP oil spill.
"The administration has
declared what can only
be described as a war on
American energy," said
Senate Minority Leader
Mitch McConnell.
"Obama 'is vulner-
able on gas prices dnd
the Republicans have
and .will.exploit ~this: as a


"That's all I can think it stems
from," he said, "but I don't know.
You'll have to ask her."
Lemley did not return numerous
phone calls to comment on the situa-
tion by press time Saturday.
Williams said he is concerned
about what Lemley may do after she
previously approached DuPree's ex-
wife "asking for dirt on him and want-
ing to bring him down or, something


else," a situation that DuPree publicly
commented on at the commission's
March 17 meeting.
"I'm just concerned that she might
plant an explosive device on my truck
or some illegal drugs," Williams said.*
Williams also said it is legal for the
commission to re-convene a meeting
after it is adjourned.
"It's just carrying on from the meet-
ing that we had," he said.


"because I don't think she knew any-
one saw her."
~Williams said he thinks the incident
may have occurred because some-
body "buried" Lemley, Stew Lilker
and Craig Wormer through mock
graves on the country courthouse
steps when Lilker was knocked out
of the~ county commission District
Two race after the primary election
in August 2010.


attend an Easter egg hunt
on Sunday. Some parents
have to work."
Deandra Kelly of Lake
City said the event gave
her a chance to spend
time with her 4-year-old
son, Kaden, and was ben-
eficial for the community.
"There's always neg~a-
tivity around, but this is
something positive for the
community and I would
always support this," she
said.
Leondra Fleming of


Lake City and the Gold
Standard Chapter 48
Order of the Eastern Star,
said she and her family
attend the Easter Egg
Hunt each year.
(It's an annual event;
we look forward to every
year coming out to help
the community and sup-
.port our sister lodge," she
said.
"~We love giving back to
the community and watch-
ing the kids play and pick
up all the eggs."


controlled conditions,
Williams said.
"Trhere's really no place
for the Sheriff's Office to
do those things and to do
them safely," he said.
Second, the Sheriff's
Office currently performs
its vehicle maintenance
in-hjouse at the county's
Watertown Maintenance
Facility, Williams. said, a
decision the county made
to see if the in-house main-
tenance program was a
cost-effective project before
constructing a separate
building for it.
"So we allowed them to
use part of our building in
order to do this, well that
was several years ago," he
said, "And of course the
program has grown and
expanded. The Sheriff'4
vehicle maintenance peo-
ple need more space now
and we need the space in
county maintenance that
we've given up to them."
At the commission's
Thursday meeting,
Williams requested permis-


:sion to prepare bid specifi-
cations for the project and
to bid it out.
Commissioner Stepheri
Bailey said while he under-
stands the Sheriff's need,
he was concerned about
how the project would be
paid for.
"The issue that I have
is we don't have it funded
yet," he said.
~Williams said the build-
ing's funding would most
likely come from the coun-
ty's year-end fund balances,
since the~project does not
have an established line
item in the county's bud-
get.
Bailey said the county
already has a "mile-long"
list of items to use year-
end funds on.. He asked
Williams to re-submit that
list to the board with all its
projects' cost estimates so
the board can determine
the new Sheriff's Office
building priority against
the list's other items.
Commissioner Ron
Williams said if the county


can't afford the whole proj-
ect at once, it can complete
it in phase$ as the funding
becomes available.
"But we definitely need
to have a place where they
process crimes," He said.
Dale Williams said
Tommy Matthews, county
projects superintendent,
will prepare the cost es~ti-
mates in stages to be pre-
sented to the board.
Sheriff Mark Hunter
said Friday that the build-
ing will help his employees


respond more efficiently
to Coluni~bia C~ounty resi-
dents.
"The building gives us a
chance to better and more
efficiently process the evi-
dence gathered, which
hopefully gives us a better
opportunity to catch the bad
guy and hopefully a convic-
tion will follow," Hunter said.
"I think the commissioners
understand the- need for
the building and that's why
they're looking at it and are
moving forward with it."


Y




Ih-.


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LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & NATION SUNDAY, APRIL 24, 2011


Costly gas clouds Obama's re-election


Gulf disaster

Y8HOWS debate

Over Arctic oil spill


INCIDENT: Wiliants'u msurer ;-Whhi~t"'elenly was doing

Continued From Page 1A


TREASURE* Eg hunt

Continued From Page 1A


















I I


night


City's investment of
building a
state-of-the-art water
T ~~treatment plant toh Ct Lk
upgrade the quality and ta-ste of
tapwater provided to
Custom rs paid off in a big way
Lake City's water won first
place as the best tasting water
in Region XI of the Florida
Section of the American Water
Works Association.
If~s a well-deserved honor
and represents the hard work
and dedication of dozens of city
employees.
It also supports the vision
of top city management and
the city council who 'several
years ago pledged to improve
the quality of drinking water in

leaderhip made the
ozonation process happen
at the Price Creek Water
Treatment Plant.
The process of ozonation is
cleaner and replaces the old
way' of chlorinating water to
purify it. Gone are the days
of city water tasting like pool
water when it comes out of the
water fountain. --.
Without a~ doubt, city
water tds'tes better now than it
did in 2007 when the
process of building the new
water treatment facility
began. .
Older water lines and the
proximity to the plant are a .
few of the factors that still may
determine the absolute best.
water quality, but without a .
doubt, city water tastes better
than it did and customers are
seeing the benefit.
If~s a great accomplishment
to be recognized for a statewide
honor and it's great notoriety
for the City of Lake City.
With this, we raise a glass of
crystal clear, great tasting Lake
City tapwater and propose a
toast to the City of Lake City's
water department: Job well .
done.



Lakre City Reporter
Serving Columbia C ut
Since 1874 onY
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
CmIs han dseufroneng cofties by
Community Newspapeis Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
str ng communities --"Newspapers
Four piary 0al is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
ded cated to truth, integrity and hard

Todd Wilson, publisher
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman





.Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter


BY MAIL: Letters, P.O.,Box 1709,
Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BYFAX (6) 752-9400.
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4A


~~s 1C L-




//~ DCI CCsv5 1
~~~~~;~ i5cr S~

""""""""""""""""* ~J
Worldmust now A enca

undestans fredom


welfare state lie. We now have a
black president who is leading
us all into the abyss.
A black president more
interested in protecting
abortionists than babies,
burying the nation hopelessly
into debt, piling on more
and more spending with
increasingly worthless dollars,
to pay for government p 'ograms
that never have and never will
work.
This is happening at a time
in a world increasingly in -
chaos. Millions in nations in
the Middle East suddenly are
aspiring toward freedom and
mobilizing to-achieve it as
blacks did here in the 1960's.
But they are faced with the
Same dilemma. What does it
mean to be free? If~s easier to
know what you don't want than
what you do.
Unfortunately, the spreading
chaos in the Middle East is
exacerbated by the! absence of
leadership from an America,
once the world's beacon for
freedom.
.How can those in the Middle
East look to us when the
American president's message
Sis that the poor are poor
Because the rich are rich and
that eternal inoral truths are .
irrelevant to political freedom?
All the world is waiting for
a new America to come forth
that again understands that .
freedom isn't about politics but
about moral truths and personal
responsibility.

SStar Parker is president of
CURE, Coalition .
on Urban Renewal and Education
(www.urbancure.org) and author
of three books.


t this time when
Christians and Jews
celebrate Easter
and Passover, a near
Record number of
Americans feel religion is losing
its influence on American life.
According to Gallup's latest
survey, 69 percent now feel that
religion is losing its influence
on life in our country. This
percentage has been trending
upwards over receipt years. .
But a far sharper similar
trend occurred mn the 1960's.
In 1962, 32 percent felt that
religion was losing'its influence
on American life but by 1970
this increased to 75 percent.
It's interesting that such a
large increase in the sense that
religion was losing its influence
occurred during the 1960's,
the period of the civil rights
movement. It seems counter"
intuitive.
You'd think that the civil
rights movement, fueled by
moral passion and a driving
conviction about the need to fix
grave injustices in the country,
would have occurred when,
there was a sense that religion
was becoming more not less
influential in American public
life.
How might we think about
this?
One way would be to consider
that it's a lot easier to see what's
wrong, to know what you don't
want, than to see what's right
and what you do want.
Getting rid of barriers to
freedom is a different problem
rom living as a fEree person
once those barriers are gone.
Blacks didn't want to live
in an America defined by Jim
Crow and discrimination. But
what kind America did they


. Star Parker
porker~urbancure.0rg
want,
The America in which Dr.
King founded the Southern
Christian Leadership
Conference was an America that
increasingly saw religion as an
obstacle to freedom rather thian
as a framework to enhance and
enable it
The American public
square where King and other
black pastors marched was
an American public square
increasingly sanitized from the
presence of God and religion.
In 1962, pryr in
public school s found
unconstitutional
By 1973, abortion on demand
was 1 galized
In 160, less than 5 percent
of American babies were born
to unwed mothers. Today, more
than 40 percent are.
Pastors in the 1960's held
up the Bible as the authority
to fight the immorality of
discrimination and make the
case for equal rights under the
law. B~ut they made their case

sw rdmpto in r 1 tics and
materialism.
The morality of freedom
transformed into the politics of
race. The antidote of personal
responsibility transformed into
entitlements and victimization.
W'e now gone beyond
blacks just buying into the great


LETTERS


T O


THE ED IT-O R


To the edtior:
I've read with interest that
American companies have over
$500 billion in cash held outside
the U.S. The reason for this is so
they do not have to pay a 30 per-
cent-phirs tax on their monies.
If we let them bring the
money in at a 5 percent tax the
government gets $25 billion.
The companies would keep $475
billion to spend here. Some will
go to stockholders as dividends
(money to be spent). The rest
should be used for research and
development of products, jobs
formed and hiring of people,


This way the government gets
tax dollars and companies
spend money. Wouldn't this be
better than TARP money where
the government uses our tax
dollars?
If I'm right, people could
go back to work. Workers pay
taxes that help the budget.
The state and federal govern-
ments don't pay unemployment
and that helps everyone it's
called a win-win situation.
Could it be this simple solu-
tion might be too simple for
the people running our coun-
try to figure out? It seems so.


They don't have to work like
the rest of us do just to pay for
the necessities, let alone those
extras that each bread winner
would love to provide for their
family: health insurance, college
funds and possibly a vacation
now and then. They just show
up for work, have health and
retirement benefits and get
paid. They've proven they can't
manage the federal and state
budgets and I dare to say that
they probably couldn't manage
their household budgets either.
Iry Crowetz
Lake City


OINIO


Sunday,April 24, 20 II


b tsy H


EaHO nW,

Obama

was born

18 State s

nce again, mainly
in response to
The Donald's

O :::id &ia
politics, my email box has
been filled with Barack Obama
conspiracy theories. The most
front and center, of course,
is that the president is not a
natural-born citizen. Thereby,
I~ suppose, nullifying his
presidency.
Now in this space I'm not
offering a political treatise
as much as I am a call for
responsible citizenship. I've
been talking about this with
my children a good deal lately,


caught up in this sp~ecious
quest.
Yes, specious.
Thankfully, several
conservatives and others
have answered well the facts
of the matter here i.e.,
even if it could be somehow
shown, despite all evidence
to the contrary, including a
tralid certificate of live birth,
that he \irasn't born in ifawaii'
or anywhere else in the U.S.,
Obama's birth to an American
mother made him a citizen
the moment he was born. A
"natural-born" citizen if ever
there was one. And thaf~s
regardless of his father's or
Stepfather's citizenship, a later
adoption or anything else.
Just looking at case law and
legal precedent, it~s clear that
a court battle on this issue
would get nowhere at best, and
so then to what end pursue it?
To cynically tear down the
legitimacy of a duly elected
president. And that inakes it a
wholly irresponsible course.
Here's why I know these
attacks are for the most part
cynical: because if~s clear
that so many of the folks
demanding more "proof of
citizenship" for Obama would
be profoundly disappointed
if an original Hawaii birth
certificate were produced.
Actually, I fear many would
determine it to be a fraud, no
matter the facts otherwise.
Instead, conservatives and
Republicans across the board
should be the fist to want to
establish and encourage the
legitimacy of our government
when it is, in fact, legitimate.
Obama was freely and fairly
elected president of the United
States. We must respect that,
and call on others to honor it,
no matter how much we would
like the election to have gone
differently.
Can anyone imagine Ronald
Reagan getting hung up
on demonstrably baseless
arguments about a political
opponents citizenship?

wh ch muchalegeOea
Look, I agree that Obama is
far more left-wing than I had
guessed he could be; I find
his policy agenda, and even
his view of America's place in
the world, to be destructive;
I'm angry that during the
presidential contest of 2008
John McCain refused to make
Obama's associations with
terrorist Bill Ayers and race
baiter Jeremiah Wright an
issue. And yes, I very much
want to see him leave office in
2013.
Satisfied?
SBetsy Hart hosts the "It Takes a
Parent" radio show on WYLL-AM
1160 in Chicago.


An alt1rative to TARP





JOin RS

,* Saturday,



el *i,~ 10 am 4 pm


e~r A~~k ~ I effeShmentS!
TOUrs! PrizeS!

- we. .Open to the Public

I -Come & Bring a Friend


Enjey a carefree lifestyle for one all inclusive monthly rate!

Beautiful studio apartments Medication supervision
Furnished apartments available Nurse on staff
Gracious lounges Library Emergency Call System
Chef-]prepared meals served On site Home Health Care
restaurant-style Housekeeping and
Art, music and pet therapy laundry services
Beauty/Barber salon Social events
Patio and gardens Cultural outings
Activity and exercise programs And much, much more!


Assisted Livinlg Senior Day Programr Shiort-Term Stays

201 NE 1st Avenue
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(386) 243-2022
Senior Living Residen~ce HighSpringsSeniorL iving. comn


~1111(~~11~


LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, APRIL 24, 2011


Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424


STo submit your Community
Calendar item, contact Antonia
Robinson at 754-0425 or by
e-mail at arobinson @
lakecityreporter.com.


charities and non-profits 9
a~m.-5 p.m. Saturday.

Cemetary association
meeting
The Mt. Tabor
Cemetary Association is
hmaen is annual bu iess
at Bethlehem Lutheran
Church. Cookbooks will
be sold for $20 as a fund-,
raiser. The money is put
toward the cemetary fund.
Contact 752-1219. The
church is on Emma Burns
Lane off of US 441 South
near Ellisville.

Show and sale
Arts.and crafts show
and sale is 8 a.m.-5 p.m.
Saturday at the F~ort White
Depot on Hwy. 27. Items
will include paintings,
jewelry, fused glass, soaps
and more. Call 965-6113.


Friday, May 6

Spring Concert
The Richardson Middle

Cocrt Hil e hed at
6:30 p.m. May 6 in the
RMS Auditorium, under
the direction of Mr.
Sherod Keen. The begin-
ning band, symphomec
band, jazz band and drum-
line will all perform. This
will be the fmal concert of
the school year.


Stadium. Two trees per
person will be available.
Everyone must show
identification proving they
live in Columbia Coupty.
Offered trees will meclude
live oak, dahoon holly,
American Elm, sweet gum,
suher h agnon a, redd
dogwood. Seedlings will
also be available.


Saturday
Freedom Fund Luncheon
NAACP 29th Antiual
Freedom Fund Luncheon
is noon Saturday at
Winfield Recreation Center.
The theme is "NAACP:
Affiming America's
Promise." Tickets are $35 .
and must be purchased in
advance. Call 752-4070.

CHS Quarterback Club
100th Anniversary
Meet and greet the
new head football coach
and the players 2-4 p.m.
Saturday at Lake City Mall.
Eteer ament bd th CHS
Team. CHS Fashion show.

Fill The Banks Day
Donations of clothing; -
money, food and blood will
be collected for Christian
Service Center, Suwannee
Valley Food Bank, LifeSouth
Blood Bank and other area


JASON MAITTHEW WALKERIlake City Reporter

Egg drop experiment .
Dede Koon, a Summers Elementary School third-grade teacher, presents an egg that is left
intact after falling about 10 feet during an egg-dropping experiment at the school Thursday.


Ronnie Dunn, Kellie
Pickler and.more. Tickets
are available at S&S Food
Stores. Contact the park at
364-1683. Order online at
SuwanzneeRiverfam. com.

Guild meeting
The Lady of the Lake
Quilting Guild is meet-
ing 9:30 a.m. Wednesday
at Teen Town, 533 NW
Desoto St. The program
will feature quilting tech-
nique demonstrations.
'Contact President~ Loretta
Kissner at 754-9330 or '
vice-president Sunny
Nadort at 658-1555.


Thursday
Video Presentation
A video pres'enta-
tion of "The South An
Interpretation" is 5 p.m.
Thursday at the Lake City
Police Department The
video is by local historian
Henry Sheldon. Call Audre'
Washington at 7195742.

M0AA meeting
The Suwannee River
Valley Chapter of the
Military Officers'


Association of America is
having its monthly din-
ner meeting 6:30 p.m.
Thursday at the Lake
.City Elks Lodge at 259
'NE Hernando Street. For
more information or to
RSVP call Susan Palmer at
697-6828 or Vernon Lloyd
at 752-4885.

School festival
Shakespeare IV begins
6 p.m. Thursday at Fort
White High School.
Activities include school
registration, re-enact-
ment camps, historical
musetim tales and a the
Theater Under The Stars
performance at 8 p.m.
Bring a lawn chair or
blanket.

Kindergarten
Orientation
Kindergarten
Orientation for students
and parents is 6:30 p.m.
Thursday at each ele-
mentary school. Parents
or guardians of children
who will be 5 years of
age on or before Sept. 1
should attend the school
for which their child is
zoned.


rg a



Our Redeemrer
Lutheran Church
Saturday, April 30th
10:00 am to ztoo pm
FREE Fun & Gasnes Day
for the whole fasnily!
Featuring r
THE MERCY
.~ I
MOUNTAIN BOYS \

Bring a blae 1Or 100n chair and ;
enjoy the music Ce fenowship.
Car &~ Motorcycle Show!
AII day with prizes at 2:oo pan


Chicken & Rice plates! 11:00-I:oo '
Sc. carnival style Gasnes & Bounce Houses J
Bake Sale ro:oo-2:oo
S R 47 1 mile passed I-75, just pass the Dollar General 1t

., I


O


CO~~~RMMUNT CLNA


Today
Easter Sunrise Service
The 44th annual Easter
Sunrise Service is 7 p.m.
today on the greenway
at Stephen Foster Folk
Culture Center State
Park in White Springs.
The service will meclude
participants from area
churches. Donations will
be requested following the
service. Call 397-4331 or
visit www.]loridastatefarkes. .
org/stephenfoster

Sunrise service
An Easter Sunrise
Service is 7 a.m. today
at First Advent Christian
Church. The church
is located at 1881 SW '
McFarlane Ave.

Easter service and hunt
Sunrise Service is 6 a.m.
today at Union A.M.E.
Church. Sunday School
is 10 a.m. Church service
begins at 11 a.m. followed
by the Easter program and
the Extravagant Easter

Eashuterfsio hw

AnEaster Fashion Show

is 11 a.m. today at Falling
Creek M.B. Church. The
por is hosted in con-
ju c omnwith Deep Creek
M.B. Church. An Easter
Egg Hunt is after the pro-
gram. Call 961-8277.

Old Providence Easter
services
Easter Sunrise Service
is 7 a.m. today fol-
lowed by breaktfast at
Old Providence Baptist .
Church. Sunday School is
10 a.m. and morning wor-
ship is 11 a.m.

New Bethel Sunrise
Service
Sunrise Service is 5:30
a.m. today at New Bethel
Missionary Baptist Church
Sunday. Deacon Narvell
Kelly is the speaker. The
church is located at 550 .
NE Martin Luther King St.

Philadelphia Easter
services
Philadelphia Baptist
Church is having sun-
rise service and Holy
Communion 8 a.m. today,
followed by Sunday School
and breakfast at 9:45 a.m.
arid an Easter pageant.
at 11 a.m. The church is
located on Hwy. 242.

Greater Truevine Easter
Service
Easter Sunrise Service
is 6 a.m. today at Greater
Truevine Baptist Church.
Sunday School is 9:45 a.m.
and morning worship is
11 a.m.

Easter Chapel
An Easter Chapel
Sunrise Service is 6:30
a.m. today at Falling
PC eek. Co7 at Cherly


Tuesday
Meet the Author

CB ch SHarriseonn, Florida
is speaking at 7 p.m.
Tuesday at the Main
Library. Come hear him
shpar store pabou the
Florida of the past


Wednesday
River Jam

ASuwan ea RiverSJa tiS
ofSuwannece Msct ark.


Frid y
Tree Giveaway
The National Arbor
Day Tree Giveaway is 10
a.m. Friday at Memorial













Thousands mark




holy f ir erit e in 4 r


Jerusalem church





Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


SUNDAY, APRIL 24, 2011


Armenian monks in black
robes and pointed hoods to
Russian Orthodox women
wearing turquoise heads-
carves.
People crammed against
each other in the dimly
lit, cavernous church, and
police broke up scuffles.
One middle-aged American
woman f ainted, but she
remained standing because
people were pressed up'
against her mn the densely
packed crowd.
Despite the suffocating
Crowds, the throngs waited
in anticipation for the cer-
emony to begin, clutching
bundles of 33 slim candles
signifying the years of
Jesus' life.
Adorned with a. golden
crown encrusted with jew-
els and religious icons, the
Greek Orthodox Patriarch
of Jerusalem, Theofilos III,
entered the Edicule, the


Jesus was crucified, bur-
ied and resurrected. In the
ceremony, a flame believed
to be miraculously lit ema-
nates from the tomb.
"I'm all vibrating," said
Romanian pilgrim Ivan
Kurnia. "It's really, really
impressive."
Hours before the cer-
emony, local Christians
and pilgrims from around
the world snaked through
the narrow alleyways of
Jerusalem's old city and
filled the small courtyard
outside the church. About
a thousand Israeli police
officers .processed the
crowds through police
barricades that filtered
access to the church's
only entrance.
Inside gathered a color-
ful mix of clergymen and
worshippers representing
the different Orthodox
Christian sects from


By DANIEL ESTRIN
Associated Press

JERIUSALEM

way to the tra-
ditional site of
Jesus' tomb
T h smlldocrcacked open
to reveal a bright flame and
tens of thousands of wor-
shippers cheered ecstati-
cally, marking the pinnacle
of Easter Week's holy fie
ceremony in the Church of
the Holy Sepulcher.
The annual ritual has
been practiced for at least
the last 1,200 years on the
day before Easter, which
celebrates Jesus' resurrec-
tion
Worshippers of various
Orthodox Christian sects
packed into the Jerusalem
church Christianity's
most sacred shrine and
revered as the site where


ASSOCIATED PRESS
A cross is seen in front of the the Church of the Nativity, believed by many to be the birthplace
of Jesus Christ, during the Holy Fire ceremony in the West Bank town of Bethlehem Saturday.
The Holy Fire ceremony is part of Orthodox Easter rituals and the flame symbolizes the resur-
rection of Christ.


lit and interpreted as a
message to the faithful
from the heavens. The
Precise details of the
flame's source are a close-
ly guarded secret.
The flame was quickly
passed on from one bunch
of candles to another, and
soon the dark church was
filled with worshippers
holding flickering -torches
and waving it around their
faces. Bells rang and peo-
ple cheered.
"Christos has risen.
I feel amazing," said a
Russian Orthodox pilgrim
from San Fr-ancisco who
identified himself only as
Igor. "It came from God,
from the sky." .
Police spokesman
Shmuel Ben Rubi said
around a' thousand police
officers were deployed
to direct foot traffic and
keep the peace. He esti-
mated tens of thousands
of worshippers were in
the church.
Asaf Abras, spokesman
for Jerusalem's firefight-
ing services, said about
10 firefighters with mobile
.unitsi, were stationedrid
around the church in case
of emergency.
Israeli officials have
been worried since the
late 1990s that a fire could
erupt from .the church
during the ritual. In 1834,
pilgrims in the church


panicked, a stampede
ensued, and several hun-
dred people were crushed
or suffocated to death,
But the, six Christian
sects that stake claim to
different sections of the
church have been reluc-
tant to bui d an emergen-
cy exit or a fire escape.
The sects zealously guard
their portions of the
church and brawls have
erupted in recent years
when clergymen of one
sect.encroach on another
section, even' when only
sweeping the floor. None
of the sects wants to give
up an inch of precious real
estate in the church to
construct a second exit.
After the holy fire cer-
emony, the flame was
immediately taken from
the church and past an
Israeli military bar-
rier into the Palestinian
Authori~ty-controlled city
of Bethlehem where it was
received at the Church of
the Nativity,.the traditional
site of Jesus' birthplace.
Palestinian Prime
.Minister Salaam Fayyad
.atterided_ another holy
fire, ceremony in a ceritral
square -in Ramallah, the
seat of his government in
the West Bank.
In the Gaza Strip, about
fifty Christian worshippers
attended a mass in one of
Gaza's two churches.


small chamber atthe core of
the church marking the site
of Jesus' tomb. Armenian
clergymen entered as well,
and the door was sealed,
guarded by clergymen and
an Israeli policeman.
Then, the door was
opened to reveal candles
lit with the holy fire -
said to be miraculously


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Christian pilgrims, during the Holy Fire ceremony, ir) front of the Church of the Nativity, believed by.many to be the birthplace
of Jesus Christ, in the West Bank town of Bethlehem Saturday. The Holy Fire ceremony is part of Orthodox Easter rituals and
the flame symbolizes the resurrection of Christ.


native, tenls The Forum

onewesh an choe ing owkhid
completing his doctorate
.at Texas A&M. He says
the dye doesn't harm
the chickens, but says it
shouldn't be attempted by
people who. don't know
what they're doing.

PrOma ure baby.
home for Easter

BERLIN German
doctors say a baby girl
who was born at 21 weeks
and five days is spending
.Easter at home after ~five
months in neonatal care.
She is believed to be the


Eotorsm ert te Iud a
Children's Clinic say
Frieda was born on Nov.
7 weighing just 16 ounc-
es (460 grams). She was
released from the hospital
on Wednesday weighing
7 pounds, 11 ounces (3.5
kilograms) .
The clinic's chief doctor,
Reinald Repp, said he saw
"no indication that she will
not be healthy."

cal ree rodsspo it former
tion that Frieda is most
premature baby known to
have survived in Europe.
The Associated Press
could not independently
confirm that.
laAs 4 ealls pregnancy
The hospital cited one
other baby born at 2
weeks and five days, in
Ottawa, Canada that is
known to have survived.
Repp called Frieda's sur-
vival "a medical miracle."

aAssociated Press


By ALESSANDRA RIZZO
Associated Press

ROME Some 150 Gypsies
whose camp was dismantled have
taken refuge in one of Rome's most
ancient basilicas, creating a standoff
Saturday with city officials trying to
get them out.
Italy is struggling to deal with hun-
dre'ds of Gypsies who live in illegal
trailer settlements on the city's out.
skirts. Weeks ago, four children died
in their sleep as a blaze tore through
a shack in an illegal camp in Rome -
prompting Pope Benedict XVI to call
for more solidarity with the Roma.
The Gypsies entered St. Paul's
Outside the Walls, one of Christianity's
most ancient churches, on Friday to
protest city plans to send the women
and children, but not m~en, to shelters,
tem oraril break u families.ad

women walking along the church's
aisles, some carrying plastic bags,
and children playing and running
around, or resting against the basili-
ca's imposing columns.Many left the
basilica Friday night to allow Good
Friday ceremonies marking cruci-
fixion of Jesus to go ahead; others
stayed inside to watch.
The 150-strong group, including
children and babies, were allowed
to spend the night in two rooms
adjacent to the basilica's cloister, the
ANS cew agncy said On aturdayk
full of crackers, biscuits and water.
It wasn't clear if they would be
allowed to spend another night inside
the~ basilica complex. Some people
who had gone ohuatsidebfor work od
toacprcuirde fod hd' een alowe
Law enforcement officials were
patrolling the main entrance to the
basilica to allow the faithful and pil-
grims' to enter and exit, ANSA said.
Rome's city hall offered 500 ($730)
to individual Gypsies, many of whom
are Romanian nationals, who agreed
to be repatriated. But only about a
dozen Roma had accepted, according
to Italian news reports.
City hall promised that families


ASSOCIATED PREss
This photo shows gypsy women sitting inside St. Paul Outside the Walls Basilica,
in Rome. Some 150 gypsies whose camp was dismantled have taken' refuge in
one of Rome's most ancient basilicas, engaging in a standoff with city officials
trying to get them out. Only about 10 Roma had accepted an offer Saturday by
Rome's city hall of 500 euro (730 US dollars) to families accepting to be repatriat-
ed, according to Italian news reports. Many of the gypsies are Romanian nationals.


would be reunited in a Gypsy camp
in a few weeks. But the Roma asked
that entire families, including men, be
sent to the shelter,
Rome Mayor Gianni Alemanno
insisted that "the solution cannot
be, as is demanded by many Gypsy
families and various association, that
we offer an accommodation to these


families."
Alemanno said this would send a
signal of "indiscriminate acceptance"
that might result in a further increase
in the number of homeless people in
the Italian capital. Currently, there
are 22,000 homeless people between
refugees, Gypsies, asylum-seekers
and others, Alemanno said.


6A LAKE CITY REPORTER WORLD & NATION


Gypsies take refuge in Rome church


BRIEFS


Church gives gas
aWay for Easter

KNOXVILLE, Tenn.
- A Knoxville church is
giving away $10,000 worth
of gas in celebration of
Easter.
Overcoming Behievers
Church spokeswoman
Deborah Spencer said
drivers began lining up
outside an East Knoxville
Exxron station since about
6:30 a.m. for the 10 a.m.
event on Saturday. The
'Gas and Glory".event was
also taking place at a Pilot
station across town begin-
ning at 2 p.m.
Church members were
at the station washing

oht chuc lteatre a d
offering prayers for those
who wanted it.
Arnold said it is the sec.
ond year for the event,
which the church offers as
a community service.
She said several people
joined the church after
getting free gas at last
year's event.

Professor hatches
Easter tradition

JAMESTOWN, N.D.
A Jamestown College
biology professor is tak-,
ing Easter eggs to a new

lev1chael Kjelland says
he has perfected the pro-
cess of injecting chicken
embryos with food color-
ing during incubation. The
result is usually brightly
colored Easter chicks.
his year he wound up
with four chicks: one
green, one pink, one yel-
low and one that wasn't
dyed.
Kjelland, aNorth Dakota














On Easter, church leaders


lament losses in union fights ~"


0811 10885 10 L1888 8
surprise6 ad 10[ 0Hr
chlid, grandchild,
God child or anyone
50u think desenres
SOmething extra on
tneir $ ecia $ ( g


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


aid.
The Roman Catholic
Church has a long history
of backing the rights of
workers to join unions, and
many mainline denomina-
tions were deeply involved
in supporting the U.S. civil
rights movement.
The collective bargain-
ing debate has emerged
in other states including
Indiana, Iowa, Michigan,
New Hampshire, Nevada,
Oklahoma and Tennessee.
Alexander Lamis, politi-
cal science professor 'at
Case Western Reserve
University in Cleveland,
said a lot of factors will
determine how the col-
lective bargaining debate
plays out in other states,
but church backing helps
the unions.
"Y1ou almost have to take
each legislative battle by
-itself, the configuration of
power, but overall I think
its a great benefit to unions
to be supported by orga-
nized religion," he said.*
Church backing raises
the' collective bargaining
issue to a moral level and
"gives legitimacy to orga-
nized labor and that cer-
tainly helps," Lamis said.
John Russo, a
Youngstown State
University professor who
researches labor issues,
agreed. "It moves the issue
away from raw economics
to one of social, moral and
ethical values," he~ said.
The budget-cutting col-
lective bargaining fight
energized religious leaders
concerned about threats
to programs for the poor,
"the people who are most
vulnerable in our soci-
ety," said Roman Catholic
Bishop Richard Lennon of
Cleveland. .
Lennon, a Boston native
whose father, uncle, and
cousins worked in the
police-firefighter ranks,
said bishops tried to cast
the debate in terms of
social justice, particularly
for the poor who might suf-
fer in budget-cutting. "We
do need to be focused on
those things," he said."
The Inter faith
Association `of Central
Ohio, an interreligious
organization that promotes
social justice, agreed, tell-
ing Ohio lawmakers they
"should not advance Senate
Bill 5 as a means to address
budget deficits."
However, group of evan-
gelical pastors in Mount
Vernon north of Columbus
cited Scripture to endorse
"the biblical principle offis-
cal responsibility"! and su?-
port Gov. John Kasich and
others trying to close an $8
billion budget gap. .
"Their job is to restore
financial responsibility and
stability to our great state,
and it is ours to back them
up with prayer," they said
in a statement after the col-
lective bargaining bill was
signed.
In Wisconsin, ~the


Muslim community spoke
out against union restric-
tions, with the Chicago
office of the Council on
American-Islamic Relations
taking an active role, said
Julia Shearson, executive
director of the Cleveland
chapter of CAIR-Ohio. She
said Muslims are gener-
ally socially conservative
but have religious values
that support the right to
bargain and fair pay for
teachers and other public
servants.
She said her group will
try to energize members of
its community to work on
the ballot issue to overturn
the Ohio law.
"~We think there are other
ways to solve the budget
issues, not on the backs of
the. average working peo-
ple," she said.
The conservative-lean-
ing Ohio Christian Alliance
took a neutral position on
the collective bargaining
bill and devoted its lobby-
ing attention to anti-abor-
tion measures, according
to president Chris Long.
He said many like-mind-
ed congregations did the
same.
In Richmond, Va., Rabbi
Ben R~omer told a rally that
anti-labor bills, cuts to pro-
grams that aid the poor and
predatory corporate prac-
tices were an affront to
Judeo-Christian teachings.
"I wonder what Jesus
Christ would cut?" he
asked.
Russo, the labor
researcher, said the high-
profile involvement of
church leaders was more
visible, in part, because
of the intensity of feelings
over the collective bargain-
ing issue.
Such church-related
legislative lobbying, while
common, ,"often doesn't
get a lot of attention," he
said.
Russo testified against
the bill for the Ohio
Education Association. He
said religious leaders sup-
porting unions probably
recognized the proposals
"are going to affect the
flock, the parishioners."
And sometimes the flock
can be politically divided:
Lennon got calls and let-
ters questioning church
involvement in a political
debate.
Lee, whose mother was
involved in the garment
workers' union in clothing
factories in Philadelphia
and Cleveland, said most
of those who contacted
her appreciated herwover-
ture in Wisconsin. Others
felt it was an inappropri-
ate church involvement in
politics.
Christopher Wolfe,
professor emeritus at
Marquette University and
co-director of the Thomas
International Center, a
Catholic intellectual cen-
ter, didn't detect intense
lobbying involvement in
Wisconsin by church lead-


By THOMAS J. SHEERAN
Associated Press

CLEVEIAND Public-
employee unions battling
a spreading challenge to
collective bargaining rights
may no longer be able to
count on the clout of a long-
time ally the nation's
mainline' churches.
In Ohio and Wisconsin,
the collective bargaining
debate energized lobbying
by sympathetic bishops
and pastors, but unions
lost those fights. Church
leaders now fret that the
volatile debate over bud-
get-cutting may expand to
target programs aiding the
needy.
The involvement of reli-
gious leaders highlighted
the intersection between
faith and the marketplace
as policymakers debated
union and spending issues
woven into the fabric of
American society.
As thousands of teach-
ers, firefighters and other
workers chanted and
waved signs during state-
house protests, some pas-
tors and bishops lobbied
lawmakers, spoke' at rallies
and wrote letters in favor of
public-employee rights to
collective bargaining.
"Is there not another
way to accomplish what is
needed?"! Methodist Bishop
Linda Lee asked Wisconsin
Gov. Scott Walker in a let-
ter asking him to recon-
sider his collective bargain-
ing bml.
Reflecting on the mes-
sage of Holy Week, Lee
said she was reminded of
the need for mutual con-
cern.
"What I would hope for
is that people would be will-
ing to stay at the table with
each other until there's a
way to agree on what is
really best for all involved,"
she said. "We are all cre-
ated in the image of God."
Under Ohio's law, 350,000
public workers can negoti-
ate wages and certain work -
conditions but not health
care, sick time or pension
benefits. Opponents now
hope to ask voters whether
to keep or overturn the
measure. Wisconsin's law
covers 175,000 workers,
exempting police and fie-
fighters, but is temporarily
blocked by a court order.
Backers see the laws as
necessary steps toward
balancing state budgets,
but some religious leaders,
including Christian and
Jewish clergy, spoke up
against it. Some thought it
was the opening round of
budget-cutting that could
trim state programs for the
needy, including food, pre-
scriptions and child-care


House



tobloc

EPA rules
Associated Press

TALIAHASSEE The
Florida House has passed
legislation to prohibit state,
regional and local govern-
ment agencies from imple-
menting federal water pollu-
tion regulations.
The bill (HB 239) won
approval 90-27 after the House
placated environmentalists
by removing provisions that
would have weakened cur-
rent state regulations.
The U.S. Environmental
Protection Agency has pro-
posed nutrient limits for
Florida to settle a lawsuit by
environmental groups.
The EPA rules are

dleoos gethatoa re atoin rv
ers, lakes and other water


bodies in the state.
Agriculture and business
interests as well as many
I cal governments op ose

would cost billions to imple-
ment.


ers.
He said that may be due,
in part, to split opinions
within congregations.
Ohio state Rep. Todd
McKenney, an Akron-area
Republican and former
pastor at The Chapel, a
non denominational con-
gregation, felt wrenching
tension over the state's
GOP-led effort to limit
workers' union rights.
He wanted to be respon-
sible with taxpayer money
but was hearing from upset
teachers and police. He
prayed about it and backed
the bill.
On balance, he said, "I
have a strong biblical ethic
that we have to be account-
able with people's money
and we cannot continue to
tax people who have less
money available than they
did before."
The nuanced intersec-
tion between faith and
policy was underscored by
John E Kennedy when he
told ministers in 1960 that
he was "not the Catholic
candidate for president. I
am the Democratic Party's
candidate for president
who happens also to be a
Catholic." *
Dan Barker, co-presi-
dent of the Freedom from
Religion Foundation,


:i '


,r


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Tuesday photo, Roman Catholic Bishop Richard
Lennon participates in a Chrism mass in Cleveland. A fight
over union rights of public workers in Ohio and Wisconsin
energized mainline churches alarmed that the volatile debate
would expand to target programs aiding the needy.


watched rallies on thq col-
lective-bargaining issue in
Madison, Wis. He said reli-
gious leaders had a right to
speak but felt it might be a
. waste of time.
"Some of us even think
it's counterproductive


to invoke a deity to solve
these problems," he said.
Even among believers,
it's sometimes hard to
resolve a divisive issue.
"It's hard for us to know
for sure where God is,"
McKenney said.~


LAKE CITY REPORTER NATION & STATE SUNDAY. APRIL 24. 2011


Ca**

755.5440 or

755.5441
between 8am &( 4pm


C~Deadline*
Ads have to be placed by 4pm, 3-days prior
to appearance in the Lake City Reporter.





w--' l sler~~n- carmrcrwme~res....r-.=npwneswle..s ......
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL EXTREMESHigh: 97", Laredo, Texas Low: -4", Yellowstone National Park. Wyo.'


Saturday .Today Saturday Today Saturday Today


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I88 10 6


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


SNATIONAL FORECAST: Heavy rain and thunderstorms will continue to affect the middle
SMississippi Valley today. Some thunderstorms could be strong to severe in this region, as
well. Rain and storms will also develop along a long frontal boundary, stretching from the
Northeast into the Ohio Valley towards the southern Plains and central Rockies.



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r/67 1/69Lake City
Miami
Naples
West Palm Beach Ocala
82/74 Orlando
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84/75 a;Pensacola
Fla pes Tallahassee
88/68s Mgm Tampa
8 /75 Valdosta
West. *~~ W. Palm Beach


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indianappils
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Jacksonville
Kansas City
Las.Veogas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Memphis
Mlaml
Minneapolls
Moble
New Orleans
New York
Oklahoma City


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57/46/c Orlando
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86/63/pc Pittsbur
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87/72/pc Portlane
88/74/pc .Raleigh
64/54/sh RapidC
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86/67/pc Richmol
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62/54/pc San Ant
84/68/pc San Die
85/75/pc San Frai
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CITY HI/Lo/Pop.
Albany NY 52/35/.62
Albuquerque 69/51/Q
Anchorage 39/35/0
Atlanta 75/55/0
Baltimore 71/447.07
Billings 51/31/0
Birmingham 84/66/0
Bismarck 58/34/0
Bolse, 54/33/0
Boston 49/39/.39
Buffalo 66/44/.58
Charleston SC 84/63/0
Charleston WV 78/56/.35
Charlotte 78/49/.02
Cheyenne 40/24/0
Chicago 64/45/0
Cincinnati 69/62/1.17
Cleveland 74/54/.25
Columb~a SC 84/56/0
Dallas 86/73/0
Daytona Beach 84/61/0 ,
Denver 46/32/0


Iphia

d ME


Ity
nd
ento
s
re City
:onlo
go
ncisco




gton


TEMPERATURES
High Saturday
Low Saturday
Normal high '
Normal low
Record high
Record low

F;PRECIPITATION
Saturday
~:Month total
SYear total ~'
Normal month-tc~iate
Normal year-to-date


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise tom.
Sunset tom.

MOON
Moonrise today
Moonset today
Moonrise tom.
Moonset tom.


90
61
.82
56
92 in 1970
41 in 1993


0.00"
0.69"
2 1.00"
2.30"
13.46"


6:54 a.m.
8:04 p.m.
6:53 a.m.
8:04 p.m.


1:50 a.m.
12:42 p.m.
2:28 a.m.
1:39 p.m.


April May May May
S24 310 17
'Last New First Full


Forecasts, data and
raphics Q2011 Weather
SCentral, LP, Madison, Wis.
wef e /o www.weatherpublsher~com


Saturday
HI/Lo/Pop.
63/30/0
75/64/0
79/50/0
63/48/0
81/57/0
48/37/0
61/39/0
81/61/0
~-86/73/0
97/72/0
66/37/0
91/73/0
79/50/0


Today
HI/Lo/W
59/38/sh
73/63/pc
75/50/pc
66/48/sh
82/56/t
54/38/pc
57/36/s
77/64/t
.87/75/pc
100/73/s
61/39/s
95/73/t
73/54/c


Saturday
HI/Lo/Pcp.
93/77/0
64/57/0
87/77/0
85/75/0
68/45/0
57/41/0
90/79/0
66/55/0
70/57/0
66/59/0
70l 39 0
75, -1? i
S68'/46/0 :


Today
HI/Lo/W"
92/73/pc
70/50/c
85/73/pc
86/73/pc
74/47/s
58/43/pc
89/i6/t
71/62/pc
73/56/s
S66/53/s
50/39/c
72/43/s
61/48/pc


CITY
Acapulco
'Amsterdam
Athens
Auckland
Being
Berlin
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Geneva .
Havana
HelsinkI
Hong Kong
Kingston


Saturday
HI/Lo/Pcp.
88/73/0
77/54/0
60/48/0
70/55/0
68/46/0
.73/54/0
66/43/0
77/57/0
73/50/0
88/68/0
64/30/0
73/68/0
84/75/0


Today
HI/Lo/W
89/73/pc
75/48/pc
63/52/s
70/63/sh
.73/49/s
70/46/s
71/49/s
84/65/s
68/48/t
91/67/pc
61/39/s
80/71/s
85/75/pc


CITY
La Paz
I.ma
London
Madrd
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Nalrobi
Nassau
Niew Delhi
Oslo
Panama
Parts


CITY
RI@
Rome
St. Thomas VI
San Juan PR
Santiago
Seoul
Singapore
Sydney
Tel Aviv
Tokyo
Toronto
Vienna
Warsaw


On mnis date ir.
1989, record heat
continued over the
Great Plains. 20
Cities experienced
record high tempera
lures. Russell, Kan*
Was the nation's
warmest city, with a
temperature of 101
degrees.


KEYTO CONDm0NS: c**cloudy, dr-drizzle, f-fair, fg-fog, h-hazy, i-ice,.pc-partly cloudy, r=rain, s sunny,
sh-showers, sn-snow, ts-thunderstorms; w-wrindy.


Apply online at campuscu.com or call 754-2219 today! C M U


Membership is open to everyone in Alachua, U S
Clay, Columbia, Lake, Marion and Sumter counties!3a


1 Offer does nor ply to existing CAMPUS loans. Offer is for new loans only. Credit approval, sufficient income, ade uate property valuation (maximum L1V of 70%), and first mortgage position are
required. Owneroccupied property onhl. Offer excludes mobile homes; certain other restrictions apply. Property and flood insurance may be require Example: a $100,000 loan at 3.99% for 60 months would require 59 monthly ~ J?7P
payments of $1842.04 and one final paymen, of $1787.83, total finance charge of $10,468.19; for a total of payments of $110,468.19. The amount financed is $99.n?? 00 the bPP i d n70'? APPlbnnera Perrcenlae Pate NUA
2 If eite insurance (or lons over $125,000) or an appraisal is required, it will be at an additional expense ro the borrower. 3 Credit approval and initial deposit of $5 .:1,..ed re-se.~.r.- ~ ~. as a j~.41 ,; IIj..e I.4 t I: .. cmbmer fee. **


LENDER


LAKE CITY REPORTER WEATHERq SUNDAY, APRIL 24, 2011


THE RWHET HE


' SCT. T-




I82 LO 5


'67


Key
85/


Today's
ultraviolet
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+


Iii.L~i




















1


j


Indians set to
host 5-3A field
starting Monday.

By TIM KIRI$Y
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com
FORT WHITE Fort
White -High is hosting the
District 5-3A baseball tour-
nament and the Indians will.
need plenty of home-field
advantage to return, to the
pa ffthe No. ~4 and
No. 5 seeds, Fort White and
Newberry High square off
in a play-in game at 7 p.m.
sondy lB h were 1-7 in
Waiting for the winner at
7 p.m. Tuesday is top-seed
Santa Fe High, which went
7-1 in district play. No. 2
Suwannee. High (6-2) and
No. 3 Williston High (5-3)
meet in the 4 p.m. semifinal
game on Triesday.
The championship gam~e
is 7 p.m. .Thursday.
Monday's game should
be an excellent matchup.
Fort White and Newberry
split one-run games dur-
ing the season, with both
teams winning at home.
The Indians won, 1-0, in 10
innings on March 8, while
the Panthers prevailed, 5-4,
on April 15.
Fort White was district
runner-up last year, when
Suwannee made the three-
~gam'erun from play-in team
Sto district champion,
"This is the time of year
where anything can hap-
~''eii," Fort White head
coach Chad: Bonds said.
"Our team is talented and
we need to put a few games
together."
FortWhite closed the reg-
ular season with a2-1 Senior
Night win over Branford
High on Thursday.
"It was a good night for
Our seniors," Bonds said. "'I
would rather have a close,
clean game before going
into a mus -win situart s,.

Cody Spin and~ Josh
Faulkner played well in the
INDIANS continued on 4B


I .'= u


Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-042 I
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com


Section B


Sunday,April 24, 20 II


www.Iakecityreporter.com


Pro-Bowl wide'out
Sa1d to be m
TOCOVery by agent.
Associated Press

MIASMI Authorities
said the wife of Brandon
Marshall stabbed the
Miami Dolphins wide
receiver with a kitchen
knife, and his agent said
Saturday that the player was
recovering.
Michi Nogami-Marshall,
26, was arrested Friday
~even~ing and charged with
aggravated battery with a
deadly weapon. .
According to the
Broward Couilty Sheriff's
Office arrest report,
Nogami-Marshall told offi-
cers she was defending
herself. ..
Marshall had earlier told
officers he slipped and fell
onto a broken glass vase,
but the officers noted that


evidence at the couple's the Dolphins' complex in
home didn't substantiate Davie.


that claim.
Nogami-Marshall was
released from jail Saturday
on $7,500 bail. It was unclear
if she had an attorney.
"This is a very dif-
ficult time for Brandon
and family, thankfully he
will make a full recovery,"
Marshall's agent, Kennard
McGuire, said in a
'statement.
The NFL lockout restricts
team contact with players.
However, a 'team doctor
for the Dolphins can see
IMarshall and consillt with
Marshall's other doctors,
and the team can express
appropriate well wishes,
said NFL spokesman.Greg
Aiello. .
Marshall married Michi
Nogami in Miami last July,
They met while both were
students at Central Florida.
They. live in Southwest
Ranches, which is near


A year ago last week,
Marshall, 2L7, was traded
to the Dolphins by the
Denver Broncos for twzo
second-round draft picks.
In Denver, he caught at
least 100 passes three con-
secutive years and twice
made the Pro Bowl. Yet he
wore out his welcome,-,in
part because of a long legal
record.
In March 2009, Marshall
was arrested in Atlanta
on misdemeanor battery
charges stemming from a
fightwith Nogami-Marshall,
who was his fiancie at the
time.
The charges were
dropped when both refused
to testify.
Marshall was also
involved in a New Year's
Eve fight that led to the
2007 drive-by slaying of
Broncos teammate Darrent
Williams. .


'I -I =.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Dec. 19,.2010, file photo Miami Dolphins wide receiver
Brandon Marshall (19) talks with teammate Anthony Fasano
(80) during a game against the Buffalo Bills, in Miami.
Marshall's wife is accused of stabbing receiver and has been
arrested on a domestic violence charge, according to a police
report. The report, which was posted on The South Fldrida
Sun Sentinel's website, says Michi Nogami-Marshall stabbed
her husband with a' kitchen knife late Friday.


Tigers enter as
NO. 3 Seed against
Middleburg High.
SBy BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley~lakecityreporter.com

('olumbia High won't
enter the Distrct 4-5A tour-
nament as the top-ranked
seed, but coach~ J.T. Clark
still has faith that the Tigers
have what it takes to make

ar e Tigers finished the
regular season at 14-11
(5-3, district) 'in a tie for
third .in the district with
hG iessil oasd Mdlees I
won the tiebreaker due tO
its number of district road
wins. .
As it stands, the Tigers
prepare to open the first
game of the tournament
at 11 a.m. Monday in
Middleburg against the
hosting Broncos.
Columbia is one of three
teams to beat Middleburg
starter D.J. Robinson who
Clark believed has a 7-3
record entering Monday's
matchup. Buchholz and
Fleming Island also beat the
pitcher, but Clark doesn't
lack any respect for the
Broncos' ace.
"I think he's the best
pitchef- in our district, but
we've already beat him
once," Clark said. "I think
we have what it takes to beat
him again. We're going to
have to run the bases well,
bunt and steal. We'll have to
play a little small ball, but I
think we can win."
The Tigers were set to
send K~ellan Bailey to the
mound, but a broken hand
in the final game of the
year left Columbia without
its starter. Without him, the
Tigers will turn to a stable
that Clark doesn't mind
dealing with.
"It's tough to lose Bailey,
-but I think our pitching

1 nd batshe eaud. We feel f r
him, but we can't worry
about it."
CHS continued on 4B


Photo courtesy of ShutterBugs Photography
Members of the 2011 Fort White High baseball team are (front row, from left) Jake Philman
Brandon Sharpe, Brandon Brooks, Cody Spin and Taylor Morgan. Back row (from left) are '
coach Bubba Fillyaw, Bryce Beach, Anthony Gonzalez, Justin Kortessis, Kevin Dupree,
Robby Howell, Josh Faulkner, Jonathan Dupree and head coach Chad Bonds.


......'. ..

. JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbla High's Blaine Courson (14) waits for a pitch in a game on March 24 against Ed
White.


Lakre City Reporter


SPORTS


NlRYShall victimn



Of knife attack


Quateback Club wl

meet at 6 p.m. Monday at
the Jones Fie,1dhouse.
For details, call Blake
Lundy at 867-0296.
801F
'The Edge' event
set for Saturday
Rountree-Moore
Automotive Group,,
Presents "The Edge
golf tournament at Quail
Heights Country Club on
Saturday. '
The annual
tournament, hosted by
nhadyn Ee,sehve as a
recreational sports, and
other og ntions.
player for the four-person
scramble event.
Registration is at
Quail Heights (752-3339)
and Brian's Sports
(755-0570).
SEMI-PRO FOOTBAWl
Falcons to honor
vets Saturday

The ake ity aldns


game Saturday.
Fans are encouraged
to w~ryello fo the fe -

The Falcons will play
the Savannah Venom at
7 p~.m.
Admission: adult-$?
($5 with yellow shirt);
seniors-$5 ($3 with
yellow shirt); children
8 and younger-free.
There is no charge for
military wi th ID.
For details on
honoring a veteran, call
Elaine at (386) 292-3039.


College tryoutS
at St. Johns
St. Johns River State
011eg phas ba all
May 1, May 14, May 28
and June ll at the
on- aps Tndall Fie'ld

mare o en to 20e1 ca0 -
and 2p l3 hig school
graduates.
Registration begins at
9:15 a.m. on camp day.
Pitcher-only registration
is at noon. Cost is $50 for
each combine.
For details, call the
SSt. Johns River baseball
office at (386) 312-4164.

a From staff reports

GAMES

Monday
SColumbia High
baseball at Middleburg
High in District 4-5A
tournament, 11 a.m.
MFort White High
.baseball vs. Newberry
High in District 5-3A
tournament, 7 p.m.
Tuesday
MColumbia High
softball vs. Chiles High in
Region 1-5A quarterfinal,
7 p.m.
Thursday
AColumbia High track
in Region 1-3A meet at.
Pensacola Washington
High, 1 p.m. (CDT)
WFort ht High's
Sitia Martinez, A.J. Legree
in Class 2A state track


meet at Showalter Field
in Winter Park, 1 p.m.


0 UR NEY


TIM E:


CHS, Fo~t~hit prepared for districs





SCOREBOARD


Kobe 'like Mike'?


Answer to Previous Puzzle

UlNI T AIG HIA GEM
N ONIO M IAI~ID~ IDIA
T: ILT I ITEM I IZ EID
OIRIAITIE D INuANI E
E WIER LTID
RIAIBB I E IGIOS
OlHIO SAA B. X EINIA
TIUBIA DRIEG IEIO'S
TIRI G D IEILA Y
AIMY BAIL K
C Y NIIC OISIMIOND
HIAUINCIHIEISM MOOR
AILI OIAITH IESTAT
NIEIT Y MICIAR RET


Florida cornerback



Jenlans ar rested ag ain


LAKE CITY REPORTER .S PO RTS SUNDAY, APRIL 24, 2011


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


Aan Dego 8 IZ.40 5
Saturday's Games
Chicago Cubs 10, L.A Dodgers 8
YdaMg 5 A Fro is42 Z
Cincinnati at St. Louis (n)
Washington at Pittsburgh (n)
Colorado at Florida (n)
Houston at Milwaukee (n)
Philadelphia at San Diego (n)
Today's Games
Arizona (Galarraga 3-0) at N.Y. Mets
(Niese 0-3), 1:10 p.m.
Colorado (jimenez 0-1) at Florida (Jo.
Johnson 3-0), I:I0p.m.
Pittsbr ( orreia 3-1) ,:3s5 p.1-) t
Houston (W.Rodriguez 1-2) at
Milwaukee (Wolf 2-2), 2:10 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers (Kuroda 2-2) at Chicago
Cu ata (b ahy -I a n Francisco
(I.Sanchez 2-1), 4:05 p.m.
Philadelphia (Halladay 2-1) at San
Diego (LeBlanc 0-0), 4:05 p.m .
Cincinnati (LeCure 0-1) at St. Louis
(WestbrookMI-2),8:05 p.m. s
Mnay' Games
Washington at Pittburgh, 7:05 p.m.
L4.ADodgers at Florida, 7:IO p.m-
C lrado at Chicago C bs, 8:05 p.m.
Philadelphia at Aizona, 940P pm.
Atataa SnDego, 00 p.

B AS KETBALL

N BA plyffs
FIRST ROUND
Friday
Boston I 13, New York 96, Boston
Alena 8, ,0rlando 84, Atlanta leads
series 2-1
LA. Lakers 100, New Oricans 86, Los
Angeles leads series2-1
saturday
Indiana 89, Chiacago 84
San Antonio at Memphis (n)
Oklahoma City at Denver (n)
Today
M naonat Ne~ ,31:30 pm.
Orlando at Atlanta, 7 p.m.
L.A. Lakers at New Orleans, 9:30 p.m.
Monday
San Antonio at Memphis, 8mp.m.
Oklahoma City at Denver, 10:30 p.m.

HOCKEY

NH L playoffs
FIRST ROUND
SFriday
Buffalo 4, Philadelphia 3, Buffalo leads
Nsehsa ille 4, Anaheim 3, OT, Nashville
leads series 3-2
Saturday
Tampa Bay 8, Pittburgh 2
Washington 3, N.Y. Rangers I
Mog An I Bs t Ja joe (n)
Today
Philadelphia at Buffalo,3)p.m.
Anaheim at Nashville, 6 p.m.
Vancouver at Chicago, 7:30 p.m.


VERSUS -9:Iaofs, conference first
round, teams TBA
SOCCER

ESPN2 -Pr mer LegueManchester
City at Blackburn

BASE BALL

AL standings
East Division
W L Pct GB
NewYork 10 6 .625 -
TorontB 9 10 A47 2
Bati~more 8 10 .444 3
Boston -8 II .42 I 34
Central Division

Cleveland 136 .6P84 GB
Kansas City 12 8 .600 Ig
Detroit 10 10 .500 3%
Chicago 8 12 .400 5%
Minnesota 7 12 .368 6
SWest Division
W L Pct GB
Texas 12 7 .632 -
Los Angeles 12 8 .600 4
Oakland 9 II .40 31

Saturday's Games
Mneoa 1 Ce oland 3
Chicago White Sox at Detroit (n)
N.Y.Yankees at Baltimore (n) ~
Kansas City at Texas (n)
Bostandaa LA.Angels (n)

Today's Games
Chicago White Sox (Danks 0-2) at
Detroit (Scherzer 3-0), I:05 p.m.
(R.Rmp oa ),ied m-I) at Toronto
N.Y.Yankees (F.Garcia I -0) at Baltimore
(Arrieta 2-I), 1:35 p.m.
Cleveland (C.Carrasco I-l) at
Minnesoia (Pavano 1-2). 2:10 p.m.
(C.nsaso 2Ci)y 3:Cp 3-0) at Texas
Boston (Laclkey I-2) at L.A. Angels
(Palmer I-0),3:55 p.m.
Oakland (Anderson 1-1) at Seattle
(Fister 1-3))4:1 d Gmes
Chicago White Sox at N.Y. Yankees,
7:05 p.m.
Toronto at Texas, 8:05 p.m.
Oakland at L.A.Angels, 10:05 p.m.

NLStan ings


By RUSTY MILLER
Associated Press

COLUMBUS, Ohio
- iCamO-clad Jim Tressel
declared Ohio State's
spring game a success
while 44,276 scratched
their heads trying to figure
Out the scoring system.
"We had certain things
we wanted to get done this
spring and we got a lot of
tilOSe done," Tressel said.
Each of the four quar-
terback candidates-
JOe Bauserman, -Taylor
Graham, Kenny Guiton
a Ba hdnMillerp -
RS the Buckeyes offense
beat the defense 59-27 in a.
scrimmage that concluded,
spring practice.
Ohio State is looking for
someone to take over foir
three-year starter Terrelle
Pryor, who must sit out
file firSt five games along
with four other top players
the NCAA determined took
improper benefits. Tressel,
t00, iS suspended for the
first five games while the
NCAA investigates his
admission that he knew
about but didn't report play-
eTS trading autographed
Uniforms and champion-
Ship rings for cash and free
tattoos from a Columbus
tattOO parlor owner,
The game, Which fea-
tured a quirky scoring sys-
tem that overwhelmingly
favored the offense, ended
early because of a risk of
tOrnadoes in the area.
The offense didn't
Score a touchdown until
its ninth possession its
fourth series beginning at
the defense's 25-yard line.
Guiton's 17-yard scoring
Pass went to Verlon Reed.
Graham flipped a 68-yard
touchdown throw to T.Y.
Williams in stride streak-
ing down thie right sideline.
COrey Brown caught a 15-
yard pass from Miller,. a
prized incoming freshman.
.And Bauserman, a Senior-
to-be with the most exp~ri-


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Ohio State quarterback Joe Bauserman (14) breaks a tackle
by defensive lineman Nathan Williams (43) during an NCAA
college football Spring Game Saturday in Columbus, Ohio.


Yellow Jackets' depth chart
at quarterback, played with
a brace on his left knee and
endured a long afternoon
leading the White team
with three interceptions,
three sacks and couple of
lost fumbles.
Days combined with B.J.
Bostic for an 11-yard scor-
ing pass early in the first,
and Richard Watson made
it 14-0 with a 15-yard run on
the next possession.
Washingtoil ran for a
15-yard TD in the second.
quarter. Days' 1-yard TD
run came in the third.

Wisconsin defense
dominates

MADISON, W~is.
Quarterback Jon Budmayr
and the rest of the Badgers'
offense were held without a
touchdown as the defense
dominated Wisconsmn's
spring football game at
Camp Ranldall Stadium on
Saturday afternoon.
Budmayr, a redshirt
sophomore, is vying -to
replace departing starter
Scott Tolzien. Freshman
Joel Stave looked slight-
ly sharper, but none of
Wisconsin's offensive play-
ers truly stood out as the
Badgers' offense failed to
produce a touchdown.


ence,' found Ryan Ross on
a 16-yard score on. the final
play of the scrimmage.
He completed 4 of 11
passes ~for 42 yards. Guiton
was 5 of 11 for 43 yards,
Graham 4 of 9 for 91 yards
and Miller 7 of 12 for 73
yards. Graham was sacked
five times and Bauserman
twice. The offense did not
have a turnover,
Asked- to rate the four
quarterbacks, Tressel said,
"I thought Braxton probably
played little bitmore relaxed
and had a little bit more fun
than he has, in part because
we really limited what we
were doing todayr Joe and
Kenny showed that they've
been around and they are
able to manage our offense
and know what's going on.
Taylor had the big home-run
throw but took a couple too
many minus-yard plays."

Yellow Jackets freshman
shines .
ATLANTA Freshman
quarterback Synjyn Days
ran for 122 yards and one
touchdown and passed for
a TD 'in the Gold team's
21-7 victory Saturday over
the White squad in Georgia
Tech's spring game. .
JuniorTpyinWashington,
who.'s listed No. 1 on the


East Division
W L
ia 13 6
12 6
on 9 9
7 13
Central Division
VV L
10 9
10 10
9 10
8 II
7 13
West Division
I3 6


Pct GB
.684 -
.667 s
.5W 3
.350 61


Philadelph
Florida
Washingte
New York

St. Louis

Chicago
Pittsburgh
Houston

Colorado


San Francisco 10 9 .526
Los Angeles II 10O .524


Pet
.684


ACROSS

1 Ration out
5 Prior to yr. 1
8 Verdi's
princess
12 forest grazers
13 Journal
14 Dorm unit
15 Be grouchy
16 Severely
18 Decelerated
20 Water-filled
trenches
21 Cousins of .
"~um"
22Gs ump qt .

26 Damsel
29 Not into the '
.wind
30 Icy precip
31 Sailor's word
33 Hawai'SIVaunla-
34 Not-so-funny
IMarx .
35 Opulent
36 Planet next to
Saturn


38 tazinstru-
39 Alamos
40 Very, in teen.
Ss jak
41 Porcupine fea-
ture
44 Geritlest
47 Bland
49 Stole
51 Full of grease
52 Copper source
53 Ballad
54. Currier
and -
55 Fmnale
56 1.amb's pen


DOWN

.1 Rx givers
2 Gedolojealperiods
3 Wild duck
4 Adopt, as a
cause
5 Rhythm and -
6 Firewood quan-
tity


hard to argue otherwise,
assuming championships
are the ultimate measuring
stick of a great player. They
are, and the truly great play-
ers find ways to win as the
supporting cast changes.
Jordan 'did' it with only
Scottie Pippen along for the
entire ride. Bryant is trying
to do it with only Derek
Fisher as the constant in
the backcourt.
Jordan fans will argue their
man's statistics are, for the
most part, more impressive,
and that Jordan would have
won even more titles had he
not taken off nearly two years
this peak togo play baseball.
That may be true, but statis-
tics aren't everything and you
can't assume championships
you didn't win.
The one thing Jordan had
and Bryant has, though, is
the one thing all great play-
ers have: The ability to do
whatever is necessary to rally
teammates and win games
when games must be won.
There was no better
example of that than in
Game 2 against the Hornets,
when Bryant abandoned


his glitzy superstar role and
made it his night's work to
staglk Chris Paul the length
of the basketball court. The
box score shows Bryant
only scored 11 points, but
his gritty play seemed to
wake up 'teammates who
played the opener like they
never expected the Hornets
to put up a fight.
Bryant was back to his
old ways Friday night in
New Orleans, hitting tw~o
big 3s to start the sec-
ond half and leading the
Lakers to another win with
30 points. His lame-duck
coach was happy to see his
star scoring again, though
he didn't exactly shower
him in praise.
"Kobe can play better
than that," Phil Jackson
said.
Jackson should know. The
Zen Master has been court-
side for all five of Bryant's
championship runs, just as
he was in Chicago for all six
of Jordan's titles. He under.
stands better than anybody
what it takes to motivate
a superstar when it's most
crucial.


By TIM DAHLBERG
Associated Press

Kobe Bryant hasn't called
anybody anything so far in
the NBA playoffs, though
it's easy to imagine what
kind -of names he had in
mind for his teammates fol-
lowing a shocking Game
1 loss to the New Orleans
Hornets.
Meandering their way
through an erratic regu-
lar season was one thing.
Getting in the way of what
may be Bryant's most
important ring of them all
is quite another.
The comparisons won't
begin for real until the
Lakers make the finals,
something that isn't quite
the lock this year that it
wias in the past. Come June,
though, the debate will like-
ly be in full bloom.
Is Kobe just like Mike?
Will winning a sixth title
and matching Jordan's total
put Bryiant on the same
level as the player many
consider the greatest in
NBA history?
It will be increasingly


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name
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Devers
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ly name
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Associated Press

GAINESVILLE Florida
cornerback Janoris Jenkins
has been charged with mar-
ijuana possession for the
second time this year.
A Gainesville police
report says an officer spot-
ted the 22-year-old sitting in
a parked car, smoking what


the officer later found to be
a marijuana cigar.
He was charged early
Saturday with possession
of marijuana less than 20
grams, a misdemeanor. He
was released after signing
a notice to appear in court
May 12.
Jenkins was arrested on
the same charge in January,


for which he accepted a
plea deal and paid $316. He
was also arrested in May 41
2009 during a downtown
fight. He signed a deferred 147
prosecution agreement,
agreeing to probation and 51
community service.
University officials could 5
not be immediately reached
on Saturday for comment. 4-25


@ 2011 by UFS, Inc.


SPRING ROUNDUP




Buckeyes look to fill


P Of 'S five-game volid


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LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, APRIL 24, 2011


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


with 17.9 seconds left to
make it 85-81.
Noah made a layup
with 15.3 seconds remain-
ing, and Jeff Foster fouled
him while trying to take
a charge. Noah made the
free throw to cut Indiana's
lead to 85-84.
The' Pacers barely got
the ball inbounds, but~
Granger was fouled with
14.1 seconds left. Through
a booing crowd on his
home court, Granger made
both free throws to make
it 87-84.
Boozer's 3-point try from
the left corner was short,
and Granger rebounded.
Granger made two free
throws with a second
remaining to close the
deal.
.The Bulls shot just 38
percent.
Rose came up hobbling
after going for a layup
against Darren Collison.
Rose went to the locker
room briefly before return-
ing to the bench. He came
back into the game with
10:29 left in the second
quarter.
Indiana closed the first
half on a 17-3 run to take a
49-331lead at the break. Ten
different Pacers scored
before halftime.'
Early in the third quar-
ter, Hiibbert blocked Rose
on a layup attempt.


By CLIFF BRUNT
Associated Press


INDIANAPOLIS -.
Chicago's fans traveled to "bC'bPB6~j:ar
Indiana by the thousands,
planning to celebrate a
fist-round playoff victory
at Conseco Fieldhouse.
The Pacers sent them
home disappointed, hold-
ing off a furious rally to
beat the Bulls 89-84 on .
Saturday afternoon- for
their first playoff wiix
since 2006. Chicago's
Carlos Boozer missed a 8
3-point attempt that could
have tied the game with a
second remaining.
The Bulls still lead the
series 3-1 and will have a 1 -
chance to close it out at ~i~~7s~l~B ~ I
home Tuesday.
Danny Granger scored
24 points for Indiana,
which never trailed and
finally broke through
after losing the first three ASSOCIATED PRESs
games by a combined 15 Indiana Pacers' Tyler Hansbrough dunks against Chicago
points. Bulls' Carlos Boozer (5) and Joakim Noah (13) during the
SBulls guard, Derrick first half of Geitne~ 4 of a first-round NBA basketball series in
Rose, who averaged 32.7
points in the fist three Indianapolis on Saturday.
games, finished with 15
points and 10 assists. He rebounds. Roy Hibbert on a shot by
sprained his left ankle late Chicago trailed 84-71 Boozer sliced t~he deficit
in the first quarter and with 2:17 remaining before to 84-79 with 46.5.secorids


ASSOCIATED PREss
O~rlando Magic shooting guard Jason Richardson (front)
is restrained by teammate Dwight Howard as after being
involved in an altercation with Atlanta Hawks center Zaza
Pachulia (27) in the fourth quarter Game 3 of a first-round
playoff NBA basketball game in Atlanta on Friday:


NO lOVE lOSt





Hawks head g

gnt Gm


making a final rally.
A three-point play by Luol
Deng cut Indiana's lead to
84-77 with 1:36 to go. A
goaltending call against


remaining, and a steal and
dunk by Rose pulled the
Bulls within 84-81.
Mike Dunleavy hit the
second of two free throws


scored eight points on
3-for-16 shooting the rest of
the way.
Joakim Noah led the
Bulls with 21 points and 14


cal. The Hawks won 88-84
to take a .2-1 lead in the
series.
The NBA didn't punish
Howard.
"I'm not trying to bedirty.
But I never back down from
anybody," Pachulia said.
"It's just my .character.
When I feel like I'm disre-
spected, I'm there. I'm not
backing down. That's what
happened. It might be a
bad thing, but everybody
has their own personality.
That's my personality."
Richardson said he has
no regrets either, except for
having to sit out a poten-
tially pivotal game. He plans
to watch the game on televi-
sion at the team hotel.
"I'm not sorry for what
I did," he said. "But I kind
of feel bad because I'm not
there for my teammates."
The best-of-seven series
has taken on a nasty tone.
The Hawks accuse Howard
of freely swinging elbows
when he gets in the larke,
while Orlando's coach said
Atlanta's big men tend to
fall down anytime someone
gets near them.
Specifically, Van Gundy
mocked 7-footer Jason
Collins for going down in
Game 3 on a charge by
Orlando's 6-foot point
guard, Jameer Nelson.
"'One thing that frustrates
me is all the flopping," the
outspoken coach said. "It's
amazing to me how many
times guys as big Jason
Collins and Zaza Pachulia
get knocked down. You'd
think they'd be able to stand
up a little bit better."
Collins hasn't been
too pleased with some of
Howard's tactics, either.
"WIhen the whistle blows,
it doesn't end for him,"
Collins said. "You've got
to protect yourself at all *
times."

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek


By PAUL NEWBERRY
Associated Press

ATIANTA Stan Van
Gundy says he's getting
tired of all the flopping
by Atlanta's big men. Thie
Hawkis accuse Orlando
star Dwight Howard of
being a little too loose
with his elbows. And Jason
Richardson sums up his
feelings about Zaza Pachulia
this way: "I don't like him."
Yep, this Eastern
Conference playoff series is
getting downright testy.
The NBA tried to tone
things down a bit Saturday
by handing one-game sus-
pensions to Richardson,
one of Orlando's top out-
side shooters, and Pachulia,
the Hawks' burly backup
center, after their alterca-
tion in the 'closing minutes
of Game 3.
The league's discipli-
narian, vice president Stu
Jackson, was on hand for
the contest at Philips Arena
and needed less than 24
hours to announce his deci-
sion Saturday.
Pachulia will sit out
Sunday night's game for
head-butting Richardson.
The Magic player was sus-
pended for shoving Pachulia
in the face. Both also will
forfeit one game's pay.
With about 21/2 minutes
to go Friday night, Pachulia
took exception when
Howard swung his elbow
after a hard foul, respond-
ing with an elbow of his
own. Richardson jumped in
and was head-butted sev-
eral times by Pachulia as
they jawed with each other.
Richardson responded with
a slap to Pachulia's face
before Howard pulled away
his teammate.
Pachulia and Richardson
were both ejected, and
Howard received a techni-



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INDIANS: Dupree leads Fort White with .451 batting average during season
Continued From Page 1B


Fort WNhite JV baseball
Members of the 2011 Fort White High junior varsity baseball team are (front row, from left) Stephen Giardina, Jason Brock,
Brady Wilkinson, Kody Moniz, K~ody Owe~ns, Brent Beach and Willie Carter. Back row (from left) are coach Mike Rizzi,
Dominique Carter, Zach Gaskins, Lane Pendergrast, Tyler Parker, Dalton Sweat, Nick Butler, Thomas Hatch, and head coach
Pete Blanchard.


-f


We pay 2.50%"on c he k n
F ~~PerforrnanceFlus Checking~-The Cherryg On Top


of complete games dowri
the stretch. Kevin Dupree
(2-2), Brandon Sharpe (2-
4) and Robby Howell (2-
0) also have two wins, and
Kortessis is 1-3.
Bonds juggled his roster?
during the season, bring,
ing up Brady Wilkinson!
Zach Gaskins and Willie
Carter from the junior var~
si~ty. Five other JV players~
have come on board for thej
tournament.


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, APRIL 24, 2011


win and Kortessis hopes his
words to the team will carry
over into the tournament.
"I told them to play as hard
as they could and let it out on
the field," Kortessis said fol-
lowing'Ihursday's game. "Do
it for the seniors, because
you will want people to do it
for them. How it happened
last year with Suwannee,
anything is possible in the
district tournament."
Kortessis leads the
Indians with three home
runs, seven doubles and
16 runs scored through 18
games. He is hitting .353.
Kevin Dupree leads with
a .451 average that includes
23 hits and 20. RBIs. He is
second with 12 runs scored'.
Jonathan Dupree is hitting
.341 with four doubles and
11 RBIs. Bryce Beach is hit-
ting .328 with 11 runs and
five stolen bases.
Spin has pitched a couple


.


Photo courtesy of ShutterBugs Photography


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High's Jason Plyn (22) swings at a pitch against Ed White on March 24.


CHS: Could play Fleming Island next


Continued From Page 11
Who will get the stitrt in
Bailey's absence?
"Right now, I'm leaning
towards J.T. Gilliam," Clark
said. "He's been our next
guy all 'season. Everyone's
ready though, because we
have to win Monday. If we
don't .win Monday, then
Tuesday doesn't matter."
Seth Thomas, Blaine
Courson, Alan Espenship,
Ryan Thomas and Andrew
Nettles will be available if
needed.
"IJ'm confdent in all six of
them," Clark said.
Top-seeded Fleming
Island will open with the win-
ner of Lee and Ridgeview.
Gainesville, the third seed,


will take on Ed White. ,
Columbia would look
toward a matchup' with
Fleming Island unless
there's an upset in the
second round for a shot at
going to the playoffs. Th~e
game would take place on
Tuesday. ,
The Eagles were unde-
feated at 8-0 in district play.
"Theyr are a solid team
, that doesn't make many
mistakes, but even though
They are 8-0, they're beat-
able," Clark said. ,"Don
Soriano, their coach, has
over 550 career wins and
his team reflects that. They
make all the routine plays.
We've been close, but we


have to hit the stride at the
right time."
Columbia was .leading
their only matchup earlier
this season, 4-1, before one
bad innitig left the Tigers
with a 6-4 loss.
"W1e have to learn froin
our mistakes if we get
there," Clark said. "It's
n6t going to be easy, but
there aren't any easyr games
in the district. Everyone
has at least one goo~d
pitcher."
Clark's key to winning
the district tournament is
simple.
"We have to win every
inning and stay away from
the big one," he said.


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Renovations on tap at Shands LakeShore


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S or idaekas?

Assistant Editor
754-0427
crisak@lakecityreporter~com

Sunday,April 24, 201 II


www.Iakecityreporter.com


Section C


By TONY BRITT
tbritt~lakecityreporter.com

the Shands LakeShore
Hospital has pro-
vided health care to
Columbia County resi-
dents in a facility that contin-
ued to age while getting minimal
upgrades through the years.
Last week construction crews
began a $1.i- million renovation
project at the facility, now called
Shands LakeShore Regional
Medical Center, which is expect-
ed to improve the hospital's inte-
rior looks as well as improve
first floor efficiency. The renova-
tion work began April 19 and is
expected to take 20 weeks for
completion.
The first floor renovation will
take place in majority of the facil-
ity, including the medical records
department, coding, physician's
lounge, administrative offices,~
the outpatient department, reg-'
istration. and admissions offices,
nine first floor restrooms and the
cafeteria.
"The whole first floor will have
a beautiful new look," said Rhonda
Sherrod, Chief Executive Officer
of Shands LakeShore Regional
Medical Center, noting the
hospital's front lobby will get a
newly created reception area for
patients and visitors. "W~e'll also
create a new outpatient regis-
tration department that provides
privacy for our patients."
The hospital's medical records
department will be redesigned
and all of the first floor restrooms
will be upgraded and modernized
with the installation of "touch-
'less" ixtures.
Upgrades~t~o the cafeteria will
induded making changes so that
it has a "restaurant-styled"' look.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Rhonda Sherrod, CEO of Shands LakeShore Regional Medical Center, goes over blueprints with Dan Sanborn, a Deangelis Diarnond Construction
superintendent. Partof the new construction is for the hospital's new executive suites and medical records section.


The entire first floor will get
new furnishings, flooring and
lighting.
"Ceiling to floor will be renovat-'
ed and updated," Sherrod said.
The renovation project has
been in the planning stages for a
few months.
Architects and engineers were
brought in to evaluate the project


and the Agency for Health Care
Administration had to approve
the plans before the project could
begin.
"All of our plans had to be
approved to ensure they met
hospital code requirementss"
Sherrod -said. "Part of the liosipi- :
tal was built in the early 19701's, so
it's certainly due for a facelift and


a more contemporary look." are long over due," Sher-rod said.
Sherrod,' who noted she was ."We want to provide a beautiful
born in the hospital and feels it environment in, which patients
serves as a pillar of the commu- can come forh~ealth care services
nity, said she's looking forward and we also want a great envi-
to the renovation, project being conment for our associates and
completed. m: :: .. .,~~ medical Staffe:to work in. We're
'cWW're really "excited' about' ai.comlmunity hospital and it's an
being apar tolHealth Al~anagem~ent
Associates and the renovations aSIpADS continued on 2C


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Columbia Bank Hires Retail Lend~ing

& Deposit Sales Manager


Sampson Joins Team at Columbia Bank
Todd Sampson recently jqined Columbia
Irl Bank as Branch Manager of the downtown
branch (173 Hillsboro Street) and of the
sot brnc (514 S.W State Road 47).,,
"We consider our customers to be one
of our greatest assets," said Bruce Naylor,
president .of Columbia Bank. "Todd
understands the value of excellent customer
service and knows how to lead by example,
insuring that our customers will receive the very best banking
experience."
Sampson, an experienced banker of twelve years, is also involved
in numerous community activities, including the United Way
and currently serves as president of the Rotary Club of Lake City
Downtown. He is a board member of the Lake City/Columbia County
Humane Society and a board member of Florida Crown.
Sampson was born in Lake City and graduated from Branford High
School. He received his associate's degree from Lake City Community
College (nka Florida Gateway College) and his bachelor's degree
in business management from the University of Florida. He and his
family reside in Lake City.




Member COlumbia Bank
F IC Banking on a first name basis. p


____


LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS SUNDAY, APRIL 24, 2011


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


B.y JULIE PACE
SAssociated Press

LOS ANGELES President
Barack Obama headed west to sell his
:ig picture deficit-reduction plan. But
inany people are waiting for a quick
fi~x to their own economic problems
;caused chiefly by persistent unenv.
;ployment and the crippled housing
. market.
Audiences in California and Nevada
:understood why it's important to get
a handle on the deficit over the long
term. Yet they made clear that the
economic recovery hasn't fully taken
h~old in ways that are meaningful to
Them.
As Obama shifts into re-election
rnode, he .will need to show that he
hasn't lost his focus on jobs even
as the conversation in Washington
swings-.to paying down what the
:nation owes.
An audience member at Obama's
town hall meeting Wednesday at
Facebook headquarters in Palo Alto,
Calif., summarized how the increased
attention on red ink looks to the
public.
"At the beginning of your term you
~spent a lot of time talking about job
creation and the road to economic
recovery," the questioner told the
president. "Since then, we've seen
the conversation shift from that of
job creation and economic recovery
to that of spending cuts and the defi-
cit." .
"I would love to know your thoughts
on how you're going to balance these
two going forward, or even poten-
tially shift the conversation back,"
she added.
SOb;ama said that unless lawmakers
get the country's long-term finances
under control, more immediate eco-
nomic gains could prove difficult.
"If we don't have a serious plan to
tackle the debt. and the deficit, that
could actually end up being a bigger
drag on the economy than anything
else," Obama said.
'The economy has rebounded since
the early days of Obama's presidency.
But the unemployment rate is 8.8
percent and-millions of jobs cut dur-
mng the recession haven't returned.
A questioner at Obama's town hall
inecting in Reno, Nev., on Thursday
said.both he and his ~wife were out


By ALAN SAYRE
AP Business Writer

NEW ORLEANS -
With all of the ups and
downs of the stock mar-
kets over the past decade,
the average investor might
wonder who's watching
Over his mutual funds.
In the case of the
Burkenroad Fund, it's a
.group of students atTulane
University's Freeman
School of Business who
spend hours combing
through the financial
reports of companies that
a lot of retail investors
haven't heard of and ana-
lysts don't follow and
eventually find many of
the stocks the fund buys.
SThe results over a
decade of student involve-
ment aren't anything to
sneeze at. According to
Burkenroad's prospectus,
the no-load version of the
fund, which started Dec.
'31, 2001, had returned
1i19 percent since incep-
tion through March 31,
2011. The fund, managed
by Biloxi, Miss.-based
banker Hancock Holding
Co., has current assets
of about $70 milliodi. The
fund licenses its name
from the university, but
is managed independently
from the Achoo~l.
The Russell 2000 index,
a benchmark barometer of
small- and. mid-cdp -compa-
nies, returned an overall
7.5 percent over the same
time. .
In the recessionary year
of 2008, when many 401 (k)
plans lost inuch of their
value, the Burkenroad
fund suffered a loss of just
under 25 percent com
pared to 33.8 percent for
the Russell 2000 index.
But both rebounded the
following year. And for the
three years ending March
31, the Burkenroad fund
returned 10.72 percent
compared to 8.6 per-
cent for the Russell 2000
index. .
Peter Ricchiuti, wvho
teaches the stock analysis
course, said he picks most
of the companies, and stu-
dents come upwith others.
He said the Burkenroad
fund's reliance on stu-
dent reports is unique,
although other business
schools put their students
to the task of researching
investments for university
endowments.
About 200 students
over the current school
year have been evaluat-
ing 40 companies' across
the South. Considering
the region, i~t's.not surpris-
ing that 15 of the compa-
nies have some sort of
involvement in the petro-
leum industry. The others
include regional banks,
as well as insurance, con-
sumer goods, chicken-
and egg- processing and
retail companies.
All of their final analyses


- known as Burkenroad
Reports are available to
the public.
"At the Freeman school,
we do our due diligence
and take a more long-
term look at investing,"
said Anthony Elia, a 25-
year-old graduate student
in finance from Pasadena,
Calif.
The companies are gen-
erally in the $100 million
to $LS5 billion market cap
range andlocated inTexas,
Louisiana, Mississippi,
Alabama, Georgia, or
Florida.
The group looks for
profitable companies -
and those that don't have
many financial analysts
following them.
"One of the things is that
we cail clearly understand
what they do," Ricchiuti
said. "No wild high-tech
companies. Just meat-and-
potato companies."
Elia fist reported on oil-
field services company Key
Energy Inc. and now heads
a team of students studying
Carbo Ceramics Inc., an oil-
field services company, and
consumer services special-
ist Rollins Inc.
Alexandra Thurber, a
graduate student from'
Bethesda, Md., fEirst report-
ed oni oillield service com-
pany Willbros Group Inc.
and now is team leader
of a group analyzing egg
producer Cal-Maine Foods
Inc. and Pool Corp., which
provides swimming pool
products. She's not sure yet
whether she'll be doing the
same task for a living.
"My background is in
math and this is an exten-
sion of that," Thiur-ber, 25,
said. "The dynamic nature
of the 'markets is inter-
esting. I think I will wind
up working in a financial
career, but not necessarily
investing."
Inkeepingwith standard
investment house rules,
the students are forbidden
from investing personally
in companies they have
researched. They can buy
the Burkenroad Fund.
These staglents, from
their perspective in life,
have grown up around
a lot of cynicismi con-
cerning investing the
dot-com bust, the scan-
dals of Euron and Tyco
International and, last but
not least, the collapse of
Ishman Brothers and the
ensuing retirement say-
ingS wipeout of the 2008
~financial collapse.
"There's always been
some cynicism," said
Arnaba Dasqupta, a 29-
year-old graduate student
with a previous job at a
New York hedge firm and
who is now hoping for a
banking career. "It doesn't
have to come from a cor-
porate scandal. It can be
. management being too
optimistic. It's not lying,
but it's miisleading to
investors."


. ASSOCIATED PRESs
President Barack Obama speaks at a fundraiser at Sony Plctures Studios in Culver
City, Calif:, Thursday.


of work. -
The faltering housing market has
'left many homeowners owing more
on their loans than their homes are
worth. Prospective homeowners are
struggling to find the money to buy.
A question submitted for Obama
online during the Facebook town
hall put the public's frustration sim-
ply: "The housing crisis will not go
away."
Obama didn't reject that assessment.
He said the housing market was the
"biggest drag" on the economy. .
Factor in rising gasoline prices and
it's no surprise that many people are
feeling squeezed from all sides. In
an Associated Press-GfK poll from
March, 90 percent of those ques-
tionjed said the economy was a top


priority.
The poll found that 76 percent see
budget and deficit issues as extremely
important or very important. The poll
was conducted before Obama and
Rep. Paul Ryan,' R-Wis., announced
competing plans for bringing down
the deficit.
Obama's plan would cut spend-
ing by $4 trillion over 12 years and
raise taxes on the wealthy. House
Republicans have passed a plan that
would cut nearly $6 trillion' from
the deficit, in part by overhauling
Medicare and Medicaid. '
Obama and Republicans have
accused each other by turn of pitch-
ing "radical" plans, and there are few
indications of where they'll find room
for compromise.


and -resources to try to
rebuild it and bring it back
to glory." `
Bratz have been in legal
limbo -since 2004, when
.Mattel first. sued MGA,
alleging that the creator
of Bratz was working at
Mattel when he came up
with initial concept sketch-
es for Bratz. On Thursday
a jury rejected ~Mattel's
claims and awarded MQA
more than $88 million in a
surprise verdict.
Mattel attorneys say
they ivwill file a motion for
a retrial within. two weeks
and reserved the right to
appeal, so it is not certain
that the legal battle is over.
But the verdict will
encourage MGA to put
more dollars behind the
brand and make retail-
ers feel more comfortable
restocking Bratz on store
shelves,
SMGA never stopped sell-
,ing Bratz. It launched 10th
anniversary dolls, made
over with less makeup and ~


ampler clothing, last year.
This year, the company cre- .
ated two new lines: $19.99
Bratz All Glammed Up with
styleable hair and $14.99 -
Bratz Rock dolls that come
with their own musical .
instruments. .
MGA said Friday that
it will introduce Bratz
Masquerade this fall, with
four dolls that come with
masks for both the doll and
Sthle doll's owner.
.But the legal fight took a
big toll on Bratz, which have
been hard to find in stores.
S"They have four feet (of
shelf space) at Toys R Us
where they used to have
40 feet," said BMO Capital
Markets analyst Gerrick
Johnson who estimates
worldwide sales are under
$50 million, down fr-om
$800 million at their peak.
Meanwhile, doll sales


have been rising. U.S.
sales totaled $2.77 bil-
lion in 2010, up 6 percent
from 2009, according to
research firm NPD Group.
And what made Bratz so
unique when they debuted
- a saucy, irreverent look
- has been incorporated in
newer arrivals.
MGA itself has, moved
on from Bratz. It launched
Moxie Girlz, a nice-girl
version of Bratz, in 2009,
the same year Canadian
toy company Spin Master
launched similar Liv Dolls.
Mattel, based in El
Segundo, Calif., mean-
while, created a new line of
dolls called Monster High,
which each have a famous
monster foi a parent. They
have Bratz-like insouciance
along with dyed hair, gothic
makeup and platform boots
and have been a smash hit.


By MAE ANDERSON
associatedd Pre~ss-

:- NEW YORK MGA
Entertainment will face, a
trimnsformed doll aisle as
lit: attempts to rebuild its
Bratz brand following its
:ytictory Thursday against
Mattel in their- long-run-
nRing legal battle.
1 ~A decade ago the saucy
:dolls, with their pouty lips
and skimpy attire, caused
-a sensation when they gave
:the classic Barbie doll a
~run for her money.
: These days, Barbie is
selling briskly, and new
X-ompetitors and imitators
have become hit toys.
MGA CEO Isaac Larian
"is unfazed by the prolif-
eration of dolls that have
Sprung up over the past
fe'w years.
"'There is a lot more com-
petition now, but competi-
'tion is good. Bratz has its
own niche," he told The
Associated Press. 'We're
going to put a lot of effort


Blake Cannon recently joined Colum-
bia Bank asiReti u e sdmg & epyos a

range of product mix to the business fld
professional mark~et.
"We are pleased Blake has joined our
team of bankers and look forward to his


honor to serve the people
of this community and we
want them to have a beauti-
ful hospital to receive care.
We're really excited about
the things that are going
on in our hospital the
growth, new physicians,
new services and expan-
sion of existing services.
We're really excited about
what's going on in our hos-
pital and we want to share it
with our community."
SThe renovations are, in
part, a result of the part-
nership formed by Health
Management Associates,
Shands and the Lake Shore
Hospital Authuo ty that was

"Health Management


committed to this and
they're doing exactly what
they said they would do,"
Sherrod said. "They said
they want to invest in ou
hospitals and we would
grow' and expand it so that
it would meet the needs of
th'e people in this communi-
ty and Health Management
is doing exactly what they
told us they would do.
We feel really good to be
a part of such a wonder-
ful organization. We're in
an older facility that needs
to be updated and we're
really excited that Health
Management Associates is
inv sting n otur hnspia 1

our community."


) -a~ valuable contribution to our success in
I raa meeting the needs of the community," said
President Bruce Naylor. "I believe local businesses and individuals
will find Blake responsive, eagei, and an important resource in as-
sisting them in growing their businesses."
Cannon comes to Columbia Bank from VyStar Credit Union, having
served our community as a residential \ consunrier lender for four
years. He is also a member of the Chamber of Commerce's Young
Emerging Professional Committee.
Cannon is a native of Baker County and a graduate of Baker County
High School. He received his associate's degree from Florida Gateway
College and is working on a bachelor's degree in business from the
University of Florida. He is a resident of Lake City.


w,


Tulane~ students;

research stocks

for mutual fund


Obama's deficit plans run
. .

1HtO eCOHOH110 realltV


7,
,... .


.SHANDS: Renovation

Continued From Page 1C


Nicmber COlumbia Banak
FDIC Banking on a first name basis.















THE WEEK IN REVIEW'* THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW


STOCKS OF LOCAL INTEREST


WekyDow Jones


Weekly Stock Exchiange Highlights I


New York Stock Exchange





If YOu Aren't at Your Last job

Why Is. Your 4oi(k)


Leaving a 401(k) with a previous employer could mean
leaving it alone with no one to watch over it.

At Edward Jones, we can explain options for your 401(k)
and help you select the one that's best for you. If you'd
like to roll it over to an Edward Jones Individ'ual Retire-
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paying taxes or penalties. And you can feel confident
that someone is looking out for you and your 401(k)



10 find- out -why it mnakes sense to talk wit~h Edward
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SSteV9 JOnOS, CFP
: Financial Advisor

S2929 West U S Highway 90
Suite 114
Lake City, FL 32055
386-752-3847


www.edwardjones.com MemberqSIPc


Wkly Wkly YTD
Name Ex Div Last Chg%Chg%Chg


12,500


12,000


1,500

11,000 NDJ FM A




MUTUAL FUNDS
Total Assets Total Return/Rank Pct Mmn Inn
Name Obj ($Mins) NAV 4-wk 12-mo 5-year Load Invt
PICTotRetls Cl 136,166 10.98 +1.1 +7.3/A +8.6/A NL 1,000,000
AecaFundsGrthAmAm LG 67,270 32.38 43.6 +12.1/D +2.4/D 5.75 250
RdltContra LG 63,411 71.79 44.2 +16.3/B +4.5/B NL 2,500
VgadTotStidx LB 60,842 33.74 +3.4 +14.3/B 48.1/B NL 3,000
AmrcnFunds CaplncBuA m IH 59,258 52.10 +3.9 +11.9/C +4.010 5.75 250
VagadInstldxl LB 58,419 122.43 +3.1 +13.1/B +2.6/B NL 5,000,000
AmrcnFunds CpWldGrlA m WS 55,597 37.86 +4.6 +12.7/D +4.1/B 5.75 250
Vagad500Admi LB 54,608 123.29 +3.1 +13.1/B +2.6/B NL 10,000
AmrcnFunds IncAmerA m MA 54,296 17.44 +2.8 +13.7/A +4.4/B 5.75 250
VagadTotStlAdm LB 51,453 33.75 +3.4 +14.5/A +3.2/B NL 10,000
AmrcnFunds invCoAmA m LB 49,590 29.46 +2.6 +9.8/D~ +2.2/C 5.75 250
Doge&Cox Intldtk FV 45,650 37.70 +5.7 +14.0/B +3.1/A NL 2,5(00
Dog Cox Stock LV 44,807 114.61 +2.5 +10.7/C -0.1/D NL 2,500
AecnFunds WAMuthvA m LV '40,310 29.04 +3.3 +14.1/A +2.3/B 5.75 250
AmrcnFunds EurPacGrA m FB 39,416 44.22 +5.8 +15.1/B +4.5/A 5.75 250
VgadInstPlus LB 37,574 122.44 +3.1 +13.1/B +2.6/B NL200,000,000
Fakemp-Franklin income Am CA 36,439 2.27 +2.3 +14.0/A t6.01A 4.25 1,000
AecaFunds FninvA m LB 35,114 39.40 +3.3 +15.0/A +3.7/A 5.75 '250
VagadTotind d FB 34,T/6 16.74 +5.3 +14.8/C +2.9/B NL 3,000
AmrcnFunds NewPerspA m WS 33,932 30.49 +5.0 +15.7/B +5.3/A 5.75 250
PICTotRetAdm b Cl 33,332 10.98 +1.1 +7.0/B +8.4/A NL 1,000,000
AmrcnFunds BalA m MA 32,540 18.75 +2.0 +11.9/B +4.2/B 5.75 250
Vagad5001ny LB 32,521 123.28 +3.1 +13.0/B +2.5/B NL 3,000
dliyGrowCo LG 29,883 92.19 +6.8 +21.7/A +6.6/A NL 2,500
VagadWelitnAdm MA 29,088 56.10 +2.1 +10.6/C +5.7/A NL 50,000
HabrIntilnst] d FB 28,368 65.74 +6.5 +19.8/A +5.6/A NL 50,000
FieiyLowPriStk d MB 28,359 41.83 *+5.4 +16.2/D +5.1/B NL 2,500
CACosevaie~kradnCI Intermedat~e-TenBond, ES -Euope Stock F8 -Foreign Lne Bend, FG -ForekinLargeGrowth,FV-Fore gn
Vae uIII -orid AUocaon L sge B end, -T L~ger m~i~LV -Lag VV u,d iAMder ee ocbnM kl pe e~d, Mvs
oerwihsame obj isin tp 20, E inbto20,nInnytap inimum neededt nvet n ud Suce oin


Stock Footnotes: g = Dividends and eamings in Canadian dollars, h = Does not meet continued-listing standards.
If = Late filing with SEC. n = New in past 52 weeks. pt = Preferred. rs = Stock has undergone a reverse stock split
of at least 50 percent within the past year. rt = Right to buy security at a specified price. s = Stock has split by at
least 20 percent wihin the last year. un = Units. vj = In bankruptcy or receivership, wd = When distributed. wi=
when issued. wt Warrants-
Mutual Fund Footnotes: b=- Fee covering market costs is paid from fund assets d Deferred sales charge, or
net pion vlee =fs iod (@Mshaes diur thin uek. xe a nde padadstriuinNM durng te. p usrs en
Losers must be worth at res$2 to be listed in tables at left. Most Actives must be worth at least $1. Volume in
hundreds of shares. Source: The Associated Press. Sales figures are unofficial.


Money Rates
Last Pvs Week

Prime Rate 3.25 3.25
Discount Rate 0.75 0.75
Federal Funds Rate .00-.25 .00-.25
Treasuries
3-month 0.05 0.06
6-month 0.11 0.13
5-year 2.11 2.20
10-year 3.40 3.48
30-year 4.47 4.54


Currencies

Last Pvs Day
Australia .9308 .9370
Britain 1.6517 1.6407
Canada .9536 .9546
Euro .6876 .6890
Japan 81.90 82.37
Mexico 11.6069 11.6089
Switzerlnd .8854 .8890
British~pound expressed in U.S. dollars. All oth-
ers show dollar in foreign currency.


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


Wkly Wkly YTD
Name Ex Div Last Chg%Chlg%Chg


S2,820.16 ada+55.51

GainerS ($2 or mr)
Name Last Chg %Chg
Amrn 16.92 +8.15 +93.0
ImmuCell 4.86 +1.69 +53.3
BnpI 44.32+13.38 +43.2




Siolbl2.35 +.49 +26.3
Oselnn3.38 +.70 +26.1

LoserS ($2 or mr)
Nae Last ChgCg
ZTDigtl 2.68 -2.08 -43.7


Oikrsh 2.47 -.92 -27.1
TennCmce 3.32 -1.12 -25.2
OCTech 7.49-2.48 -24.9
Knhg 8.28 -2.50 -23.2
Cla~Irs 4.40 -1.23 -21.8
Ge~nun 3.55 -.85 -19.3
Hatae69.79 -14.12 -16.8

Most Active (si or mr)
Nae ol(00) Last Chg
ntl 3604041 21.46 +1.71
Cso 3019579 16.94 -.09
Mcoft2028910 25.52 +.15
P hsQQQ1202399458.34+1.69
SiisM1822235 1.93 +.10
McoT 1385790 11.52 +.TI
Lee3 1052566 1,63 -.lo
Yho 1002386 16.85 +.23
ApeInc 860110350.70+23.24
Orce 854201 34.75 +.57



Advanced 1,532
Declined .1,202
New Highs 227
New Lows 86
Total issues 2,80g
Unchanged 75
Volume 7,420,460,812


Dow Jones IndustrialS
Close: 12,505.99
1-week change: 164.16 (1.3%)
13,00--


-140.24 65.16 186.79 52.45 CLOSED


MON TUES WED THUR FRI


AmT&inc NY 1.72 30.68 +.03
Alcatel~ucNY .. .4+

Apple Inc Nasd ... 350.70 +23.24
AutoZone NY ... 284.85 +4.77
BkofAm NY .04 12.31 -.51
BariPVixrsNY ... 24.88 -2.67
BobEvans Nasd .80 31.12 -.59
CNBFnPANasd .66 13.72 +.28
CSX NY 1.04 74.65 -2.01




Delhalze NY 2.02 85.63 -.77


FordM NY ... 15.43 +.72
FMCG s NY 1.00 54.84 43.67
GenElec NY .60 19.95 -.09
HomeDp NY 1.00 37.80 -.37
i~hlapn NY .14 10.22 +.19
i~hSilver NY ... 45.54 43.70
iShEMkts NY .64 50.18 +1.04
iShR2K NY .89 84.45 +.94
Intel Nasd .72 21.46 +1.71
JPMorgChNY 1.00 44.68 -.ti
JohnJn NY 2.16 64.07 +3.51


+0.1 +4.4
+2. + 0.
+7 1 +8.7
+1.7 +4.5
-4.0 -7.7
-9.7 -33.8
-1.9 -5.6
+2.1 -7.4
-2.6 +15.5


-0.9 +16.2
+. + .


+4.9 -8.1
+7.2 -8.7
-0.4 +9.1
-1.0 +7.8
+1.9 -6.3
+8.8 +50.9
+2.1 +5.3
+1.1 +7.9
+8.7 +2.0
-0.5 +5.3
+5.8 +3.6


Level3 Nasd ... 1.63

sGRstsN .. 33
McDnlds NY 2.44 76.91
MicronT Nasd .. 11.52
Microsoft Nasd .64 25.52
NYT~mes NY ... 8.92
NextEraEn NY 2.20 55.51
NobbtyH Nasd 8.91
NokiaCp NY .55 8.63




Pfizer NY .80 19.79
Ptashs NY .2 5 .9

Ryder NY 1.08 51.13
S&P500ETNY 234 133.78
SearsHldgsNasd ... 82.30
SiriusXM Nasd ... 1.93
SouthnCo NY 1.89 38.56
Sprint~ex NY ... 4.81
SPORFnclNY .16 16.10
TimeWam NY .94 36.51
Wa]Mart NY 1.46 53.58
WellsFargoNY .48 28.54
Yahoo Nasd ... 16.85


-5.5 +66.3


-0.6 +.2
+7.2 c43.6
c0.6 -8.6
+0.7 -9.0
+0.7 +6.8
+1.7 +9.9
-0.3 -16.4


-3.6 +13.0
0.3 +1 .


+0.3 -2.9
+1.3 +6.4
+4.9 +11.6
+5.2 +18.4
+0.6 +.9
... +13.7
-0.2 +.9
+1.3 +13.5
40.1 -.6
-4.5 -7.9
+1.4 +1.3


Gain9YS ($2 or mr)
Nae est Chg %Chg
Qeaa 7.72 +2.24 +40.9
Barg 3.73 +.90 +31.8
Exore 9.46 +2.17 +29.8





ChiArmM 2.32 +.26 +12.6
Neoprobe 4.53 +.50 +12.4

LoserS ($2 or mr)
Name Last Chg %Chg
ChinaShen 4.45 -1.81 -28.9
RaeEle g 11.66 -1.9 -1

HallwdGp 20.75 -1.80 -8.0
BovieMed 2.96 -.25 -7.8
SagaComm35.76-2.97 -7.7
FieldPnt 4.01 -.32 -7.4
EngySves 3.34 -.26 -7.2
SwGA Fn 12.50 -.95 -7.1
IncOpR 2.91 -.21 -6.7

Most Active (st or mr)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
KodiakO g 305779 7.24 +.76
AvalRare n 174880 9.32 -.13
NwGold g 173281 10.72 +.07
RareEle g 145750 13.66 -1.96
MadCatzg 132611 1.90 -.23
Gta 9iyg127316 3.92 -.16
NAPallg 126963 6.37 +.50
ChinaShen 118515 4.45 -1.81
NovaGld g 116876 13.29 +.02
Goldltg 105333 3.10 +.08


I 8inefS (S2 or more)
Nae Last ChgCg
Chn~cr5.55 +1.23 +28.5
E agn 24.00 +4.59 +23.6
PSltiv49651.89 +18 0


Bai +nv 2.5 +.02 +15.6


WABCO 69.16 48.50 +14.0

LoserS ($2 or mr)
Name Last Chg %Chg
Grammcy 2.84 -1.12 -28.3
Lee nta n 100 56 1.
CSVS2xVxS25.71 -5.99 -18.9
Pro S~l14.74-2.91 -16.5
Gnoip8.17-1.51 -15.6
HNCorp 26.42-4.54 -14.7
Leton 3.25 -.55 -14.5
CPI 18.54 -3.05 -14.1
BarcShtD 14.10 -2.12 -13.1

Most Active 1a orme

Name Vol (00) Last Chg /
Citigr 18468851 4.55 +.13
BkofA~m 7155162 12.31 -.51
S&P500ETF52585721 33.78+1.74
GenElec 3003942 19.95 -.09
iShSilver 2933732 45.54+3.70
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Pfizer '2824841 19.79 -.74
SPDR Fncl2444546 16.10 -.04
iShEMkts 2159639 50.18 +1.04
FordM 2052462 15.43 +.72



Advanced2,219
Declined941
NwHighs 316
NwLows 51
Total issues 3,211
Unchanged 51
Voue 16,257,0108


Advanced
Declined
New Highs
New Lows
Total issues
Unchanged
Volume


296
217
35
13
537
24
533,542,307


Name Div
Coming .20
Covidien .80
DCT Indl .28
DPL 1.33
DR Horlon .15
DTE 2.24
Danahers .08
DeanFds ..
Deere 1.40
DeltaAir ..
DenburyR ..
DrSCBr rs ..
DirFnBr rs ..
DrxFBull s .
DirxSCBull ...
Dicvr .24
Disney .40
DomRescs 1.97
DowChm 1.00
DukeEngy .98
DukeRlty .68
ECDang n ...
EMCCp ..
Eaton s 1.36
EIPasoCp~ .04

EldorGldg .10
EmersonE1 1.38
EnCanag .80
EndvSily g ...
ENSCO 1.40
ExcoRes .16
Exelon 2.10
ExxonMbl 1.76
FstHorizon .04
FirstEngy 2.20
FordM ..
ForeptLab ...
FMCGs 1.00
FrontierCm .75
GameStop ...
Gannett .16
Gap .45
GenGrPr n .40
GenMills s 1.12
GenMot n .
Gen~n En ..
Genworth ..
Gerdau .25
GoldFLtd .19
Golderp g .41
GoldmanS 1.40
Goodyear ..
HCA Hid n ..
Hallibrtn .36
HarleyD .40
HarmonyG .07
HarffdFn .40
HItMgmt ..
HeclaM ..
Hertz ..
HewlettP .32
HomeDp 1.00
Honwillntl 1.33
HostHotis .08
Huntsmn .40
IAMGld g .08
iShGold s .
iSAstla .82
iShBraz 2.53
iSCan .50
iShGer .29
iSh HK .45
iShJapn .14
iShSing .43
iSTaiwn .29
iShSilver ..
iShChina25 .63
iShEMkis .64


Wkly YTD Wkly
Yid PE Chg %ChgLat


Wkly YTD Wkly
Div Yld PE Chg %Cha Last


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div Yld PE Chg %Chg Last


Name Div Y~d PE
NatSemi .40 1.7 19
NY OmlyB 1.00 6.2 13
NewmtM .80 1.4 13
Nexen g .20 ....
NextEraEn 2.20 4.0 14
NiSource .92 4.8 18
NikeB 1.24 1.5 19
NobleCorp .98 2.3 14
NokiaCp .55 6.4 ..
NorilkSo 1.60 2.4 17
Novartis 2.53 4.4 13
Nucor 1.45 3.1 ..
OcciPet 1.84 1.8 18
OfficeDpt .
OllSvHT 2.36 1.1 .
Omnicom 1.00 2.1 17
PG&E Cp 1.82 4.0 16
PMIGrp .. .. ..
PNC 1.40 2.3 11
PPLCorp 1.40 5.2 13
PatriotCoal ... .. ..
PeabdyE .34 .5 21
Penney -.80 2.1 22
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Petrohawk ... ... 63
PetrbtsA 1.41 4.1 ..
Petrobras 1.41 3.7 ..


Potash s .28 .5 29
PS USDBull... .. ..
PrUShS&P ... ....
ProUItQQQ ... ....
Prushooo rs... ....
ProUltSP .39 .7 ..
ProUShL20 ... ....
ProUSSP500... ....
ProUSSly rs... .. ..
ProgsvCp 1.40 1.9 12
ProLogis .45 2.8 ..
ProUSR2K rs... ....
Prudentl 1.15 1.9 9
PulteGrp .. .. ..
Qihoo360 n ... ....
QntmDSS .. ....
RadianGrp .01 .2 ..
RadioShk .25 1.6 9
Raytheon 1.72 3.5 8
RegionsFn .04 .6 ..
ReneSola ... ... 5
RioTinto 8 1.08 1.5 ..
RiteAid .. .. ..
RylCarb ... ... 15
SLM Cp .40 2.5 9
SpdrDJIA 3.00 2.4 ..
SpdrGold .. ....
SP Mid 1.55 .9 ..
S&P500ETF2.34 1.7 ...
SpdrHome .Q1 1.6 ..
Spdr~bwBk .5 .8
SpdrRetl .50 .9 *
SpdrOGEx .4 .8 ..
SpdrMetM .41 .6 ..
Safeway .48 1.9 16
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Salesforce .. ;. ..
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Sanofi 1.63 4.3 ..
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Schlmbrg 1.00 1.1 26
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SemiHTr .57 1.6 ..
SiderurNac .58 3.6 ..
SilvWhtn g .2 .3 51
SilvrcpM g .08 ... 38
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SthnCopperi.83 5.0 20
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-.04 +75.0 24.08
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-.32 -12.9 11.31


AES Corp ..
AFLAC 1.20
AK Steel .20
AMR ..
AT&T Inc 1.72
AU Optron ...
AbtLab 1.92
Accenture .90
AMD ..
Aetna .60
Agilent ..
AirLease n ..
AirTran ..
AlcateiLuc ..
Alcoa .12
Allstate .84
AlphaNRs ...
Altria 1.52
AMovilL .52
AEP 1.84
AmExp .72
AmlntlGrp ..
AmTower ..
Anadarko .36
AnalogDev .88
Annaly 2.82
ArcelorMit .75
ArchCoal .40
ArchDan .64
ArcosDor n ...
AssuredG .18
ATMOS 1.36
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BkofAm .04
Bklrelnd 1.04
BkNYMel .52
Bar iPVix rs ...
BarrickG .48
Baxter 1.24
BerkH B ..
BestBuy .60
Blackstone .40
BlockHR .60
Boeing 1.68
BostonSci ..
BrMySq 1.32
CB REllis ..
CBS B .20
CIT Grp ..
CSX 1.04
CVS Care .50
Cameron ..
CdnNRs gs .36
CapOne .20
Carnival 1.00
Caterpillar 1.76
Cemex .43
CenterPnt .79
CntryLink 2.90
ChesEng .30
Chevron 2.88
Chimera .66
Citigrp ..
CocaCola 1.88
Coeur ..
Comerica .40
CmtyHlt ..
CompPrdS ...
ConAgra .92
ConocPhil 2.64
ConsolEngy .40
ConEd 2.40
ConstellEn .96


17 +.18 +6.8
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20.39
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45.54
46.37
50.18


SwstnEngy ...
SpectraEn 1.04
SprintNex ..
SP Matls 1.23
SP HlthC .61
SP CnSt .81
SP Consumn.56
SP Engy 1.05
SPDRFncl .16
SP Inds .64
SP Tech .33
SPUtil 1.31
StarwdHtl .30
StateStr .72
StillwtrM ..
Stryker .72
Suncorgs .40
Suntech ..
SunTrst .04
Supyalu .35
Synovus .04
Sysco 1.04
TE Connect .64
'TaiwSemi .47
Talbots ..
Target 1.00
TeckResg .60
TenetHith ..
Teradyn ..
Terex ..
Tesoto ..
Texinst .52
Textron .08
3M Co 2.20
TimeWam .94
TotalSA 3.16
Transoon .79
Travelers 1.44
TrioaSolar ..
Tycolnti 1.00
UBS AG ..
US Airwy ..
UnionPac 1.52
UtdContl ..
UtdMicro .08
UP~S B 2.08
UtdRentals ...
US Bancrp .50
US NGs rs ..
US OilFd ..
USSteel .20
UtdhithGp .50
Vale SA .90
Vale SA pf .90
ValeroE .20
VangEmg .82
VerizonCm i.95
ViacomB .60
Visa .60
VMware ..
Walgm .70
Weathflntl ..
WellsFargo .48
WendyArby .08
WDigital ..
WstnRefin ..
WstnUnion .28
Weyerb .60
WmsCos .50
XL Grp .44
Xerox .17
Yamanag .12
Youku n .
YumBmds.1.00


23 +.58 +8.3
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Wkly YTD
Chg %Chg


WlLast IName Div Yid PE WlChg


YTD Wkly
%~Chg Last


Name Div Yld PE
iShB20 T 3.91 4.2
iS Eafe 1.42 2.3 ..
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iShREst 1.98 3.3 ..
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IBM 2.60 1.5 14
Inti Coal 72
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IntPa 1.05 3.5 20
Interpublic .24 1.9 28
Invesco .44 1.8 18
IronMtn .75 2.4 ..
Itau~nibH '.67 2.8 ..
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KB Home .25 2.2 ..
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Kimco .72 3.9 81
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Kraff 1.16 3.5 14
LDK Solar ... ... 11
LSI Corp .. .. ..
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MGIC
MGM Rsts..
Macys .20
Manitowoc .08
ManpwrGp .74
Marathon01.00
MktVGold .40
MktVRus .18
MarlntA .35
Marshlls .04
Masco .30
McDrmlnt s ...
Mechel
IdedcoHlth ..
Medtmic .90
Merck 1.52
MetLife .74
MetroPCS -
MitsuUFJ
Molycorp n ...
Monsanto 1.12
MonstrWw.
MorgStan .20
Mosaic .20
MotrlaSol n ...
NCR Corp ...
NRG Egy ..
NYSE Eur 1.20
Nabors ..
NBkGreece .29
NatGrid 7.04
NOilVarco .44





Name Div
SanDisk ..
Sanofi ft ..
Satcon h .
SeagateT .72
SelCmfrt ..
SifyTech
Sina
SiriusXM ..
SkywksSol ..
Sohu.cm .

Stpen .40

Starbucks .52
StlDynam .40
SunPowerA ...
SwisherH n ...
Symantec ..
SynthEngy ...
TD Ameritr .20
Tellabs .08
TevaPhtm .78
TibcoSft ..
TiVo Inc ..
TradeStatn ...
Tri~uint
21Vianet n ..
UrbanOut ..
VirgnMda h .16
Vivus ..
Vodafone 1.33
Windstrm 1.00
Wynn 2.00
Xilinx .76
Yahoo ..
Zalicus ..
ZionBco .04


Wkly YTD
Chg %Chg


Last 1 Name


Name Div Yld PE


Wkly YTD Wkly
Div Yld PE Chg %Chg Last


Name Div
KLA Tnc 1.00
LECG h .
LamResrch ...
Level3 ..
LibGlobA
LibtyMlntA ..
LimelghtN ..
LinearTch .96
lululemn g ..
MarvellT ..
Mattel .92
Maximlntg .84
MelcoCrwn ...
MicronT ..
Microsoft .64
NetApp ..
Netflix ..
NewsCpA .15
NorTrst 1.12
Novell ..
Nvidia ..
OCZTech ..
OnSmend ..
Oracle .24
PDL Bio .60
PMC Sra
Paccar .48
PanASiv .10
PattUTI .20
PeopUtdF .63
Popular ..
Power-One ...
PwShs QQQ .39
Qualcom .86
RF MicD ..
Rdiff.cm ..
RschMotn ..
Rivert~ed s ..


Wkly YTD Wkly
Yld PE Chg %Chg Last
2.3 18 -.20 +10.2 42.60
....-.01 -93.8 .09
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..12 -.27 -15.4 15.70
3.4 14 -.13 +4.9 26.67
3.2 32 +1.18 +10.7 26.15
.. .85 +57.2 10.00
..8 +.77 +43.6 11.52
2.5 6 +.15 -8.6 25.52
..31 +2.48 -7.2 51.02
..85+16.73 +43.6 252.22
.9 15 +.08 +20.1 17.48
2.3 18 -2.40 -10.9 49.38
..6 +.01 +2.7 6.08
..44 -.19 +20.3 18.52
..... -2.48 +55.4 7.49
13 +.37 +.7 9.95
.7 23 +.57 +11.0 34.75
9.6 12 +.03 +.8 6.28
20 ... -15.8 7.23
.9 34 +1.84 -7.1 53.27
.3 36 -.65 -9.2 37.42
.6 41 +1.02 +43.2 30.85
4.8 32 +.25 -5.8 13.20
....+.04 +.6 3.16
.. +.24 -24.6 7.69
.7 ... +1.69 +7.1 58.34
1.5 25 +3.80 +15.1 56.94
..13 +.21 -17.1 6.09
..... +2.11 +112.7 11.25
..8 +.37 -7.5 53.77
..... +1.97 +1.8 35.82


Name Div
AbdAsPac .42
AdeonaPh ..
AlexcoR g .
AlldNevG ..
AlmadnM g ...
AmApparel ...
ArcadiaRs ..
Aurizon g .
AvalRare n ...
Banro g ..
BarcGS~il ..
Brigus grs ..
CAMAC En ...
CanoPet
CelSci
CFCda g .01
CheniereEn ...
ChiGengM ...
ChinNEPet ...
ChinaShen ...
Crossh g rs ...
Crystallxg ...
DejourE g .
DenisnM g ...
EntGaming ...
ExtorreG g ...
GascoEngy ...
GenMoly ..
GoldStr g ..
GranTra g ...
GrtBasG g ...
GtPanSily g ...
Hyperdyn ..
KodiakO g ...
LucasEngy ...
MadCatz g ...
Metalico ..
Metalline ..


Wkly YT Wly
Yld PE Chg %ChgLat
5.9 ... +.13 +5.8 7.14
.. .17 -16.0 1.05
....+.53 +24.2 10.17
..... +1.01 +52.5 40.12
....-.02 -4.7 4.51
....+.29 -25.3 1.24
..-.01 -56.8 .13
....-.02 -7.7 6.76
.. .13 +49.4 9.32
....+.90 -7.2 3.73
....+.59 +15.4 29.56
....-.01 -25.2 1.57
....-.10 -13.1 1.73
+.01 +36.0 .52
-.01 -16.1 .69
..+1.52 +19.6 24.80
....+.42 +59.6 8.81
....-.19 -44.9 2.84
..2 -.07 -27.1 4.20
..... -1.81 -47.0 4.45
....-.09 -60.5 .00
....-.01 -58.6 .13
....-.02 +22.2 .39
....+.02 -29.8 2.40
.. ..-.01 -22.5 .28
..... +2.17 +39.9 9.46
....-.02 +14.3 .40
... -.03 -19.1 5.24
..22 +.08 -32.5 3.10
....+.02 -8.3 7.38
... +.04 -12.5 2.59
....-.16 +39.5 3.92
..+.13 -11.1 4.41
.. .76 +9.7 7.24
....+.06 +50.6 3.51
..11 -.23 +86.3 1.90
..16 +.02 -4.6 5.81
.. ..-.08 -16.8 1.04


Name Div
MdwGold g ...
Minefnd g ..
Neoprobe ..
Nevsun g .
NDragon ..
NwGold g .
NA Pall g ..
NthnO&G ..
NlhgtM g ..
NovaGld g ...
Oilsands ..
OpkoHith ..
OrsusXel h ..
ParaG&S
PionDrill
Quepasa
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RareEle g .
Rentech ..
RexahnPh
Richmnt g .
Rubicon g ..
Sams0&G ..
SulphCo ..
Taseko ..
Tengsco ..
TmsatlPet ..
TriValley ..
Uluru ..
Ur-Energy ...
UraniumEn ...
VantageDrf ..
VantDri wt ..
VimetX .50
VoyagerOG ...
WTDrfChn .15
YM Bio q ..


Wkly YTD Wkly
Yld PE Chg %Chg Last
....-.04 +141.7 2.03
..93 +1.16 +51.8 16.76
....+.50 +119.9 4.53
....+.12 -14.3 6.45
....+.02 +42.2 .06
....+.07 +9.8 10.72
....+.50 -8.2 6.37
..70 +.59 -12.0 23.95
..36 +.02 -9.4 2.90
....+.02 -6.9 13.29
+9.5 .46
....+.01 +2.2 3.75
-04 -41.2 .10
14 -04 -20.6 3.17
+1.22 +83.5 16.17
+2.24 -34.0 7.72
+.02 -60.1 .40
..... -1.96 -14.9 13.66
....-.04 -6.6 1.14
-.02 +4.5 1.17
..+.69 +76.3 9.01
....-.07 -9.6 5.16
....+.07 +164.4 3.49
....-.03 -51.8 .08
....-.06 +4.0 5.46
.. .. ..+63.0 1.03
.. ..-.09 -14.4 2.85
....+.06 +31.6 .75
.. ..+.00 -35.5 -.07
....+.01 -44.5 1.66
....-.24 -36.3 3.85
-.05 -8.9 1.85
..+.01 +133.3 .01
..18 +2.29 +69.4 25.16
....+.35 -22.2 4.20
.. ..+.22 +1.3 25.69
....+.30 +30.5 3.04


ASML Hid .54
AcadiaPh ..
AcmePkt..
ActivsBliz .17
AdobeSy ..
A~temag ..
AkamaiT ..
AlteraCp If .24
Amarin ..
Amazon ..
AmCapLtd ...
AmerMed ..
AmSupr ..
Amgen ..
Amylin ..
A123 Sys ..
Apple Inc ..
ApldMatl .32
ArenaPhm' ...
ArmHld .09
Atmel ..
Autodesk ..
AvanirPhm ...
Baidu s ..
BedBath ..
Biogenldc ..
Blkboard ..
Broadcom .36
BrcdeCm ..
CA lnc .16
CpstnTrb h ...
Celgene ..
CellTher rsh ..
CienaCorp ...
Cirrus .
Cisco .24
Clearwire ..
Comcast .45


..+.73 +6.3 40.77
6 +.47 +86.7 2.24
... +4.53 ~+44.9 77.03
37 +.09 -9.0 11.32
20 -1.03 +8.8 33.48
.:+.23+25.6 2.16
44 +1.89 -15.0 39.98
18 +2.82 +29.3 45.99
... +8.15 +106.3 16.92
73 +5.88 +3.3 185.89
3 +.29 +32.7 10.03
26 -.03 +56.2 29.45
14 -1.07 -58.9 11.74
11 -1.82 -2.2 53.69
..-.21 -12.4 12.88
..+.54 -36.6 6.05
17+23.24 +8.7 350.70
15 +.53 +8.5 15.25
..-.05 -27.9 1.24
... +1.75 +49.5 31.03
17 +1.50 +20.5 14.85
50 +1.79 +17.5 44.88
..+.37 +3.7 4.23
99 +1.84 +54.0 148.65
19 +1.46 +16.6 57.30
25+16.74 +48.7 99.70
...+10.87 +18.2 48.80
20 +2.17 -7.2 40.40
28 +.10 +12.7 5.96
17 -.02 -1.1 24.16
..+.03 +91.7 1.84
30 -.58 -4.6 56.40
... +.02 +6.6 .39
... +1.11 +30.7 27.52
12 -.56 +1.9 16.28
13 -.09 -16.3 16.94
..-.53 +5.2 5.42
19 +.85 +15.9 25.34


Come spel .45
CorinthC ..
Cree Inc ..
Ctrip.com
CypSemi
DelllInc ..
Dndreon ..
DirecTV A ..
DishNetwk ...
DryShips ..
ETrade rs ..
eBay ..
ErthLink .20
ElectArts ..
EntropComn ...
EricsnTel .35
Expedia .28
ExpScrips ...
F5 Netwvks .
FifthThird .24
Finisar ..
FstNiagara .64
Flextm ..
FocusMda ..
Garmin 1.50
GileadSci ..
Googie ..
HanmiFncl ..
HercOffsh ..
HudsCity .32
HumGen ..
Identive ..
InfosysT .90
Intel .72
Intuit ..
JA Solar ..
JDS Uniph ...
JetBlue ..


18 +.67
..-.08
24 -2.23
49 +4.73
41 +2.56
11 +.35
... -1.51
19 +.11
11 +1.17
8 -.05
..+.66
23 +.34
11 +.03
..+.28
11 +.49
..+.52
16 +.18
26 +.73
44+12.18
21 -.64
25 +1.79
19 -.11
15 +.22
28 +.53
11 +.25
12 -2.64
19 -5.60
.. +.01
..-.04
..-.22
..+.08
.. +.12
26 +1.83
10 +1.71
34 +.89
4 +.10
... +1.50
18 -.15


+14.6 23.74
-18.8 4.23
-40.7 39.04
+24.4 50.33
+12.6 20.93
+12.7 15.27
+17.1 40.89
+17.7 47.00
+24.0 24.37
-14.8 4.68
+2.9 16.47
+14.8 31.95
-5.0 8.17
+24.6 20.41
-30.9 8.35
+12.0 12.91
-5.0 23.84
+3.9 56.17
-17.9 106.87
-10.4 13.16
-9.9 28.75
-.6 13.89
-7.1 7.29
+58.7 34.80
+10.2 34.15
+7.8 39.06
-11.6 525.10
+15.7 1.33
+64.1 5.71
-25.7 9.46
+21.3 28.98
+38.1 3.48
-14.5 65.04
+2.0 21.46
+12.3 55.35
-8.1 6.36
+38.1 20.00
-18.5 5.39


9 +2.21 -1.7 48.99
.. .17 +4.7 2.46
.. ..-26.2 3.32
6 +.51 +20.8 18.15
24 +4.66 +89.4 17.29
.+.64+185.5 6.45
... +8.50 +93.3 133.06
..+.10 +18.4 1.93
31 +1.87 -1.5 28.19
26 +.31 +50.7 95.69
17 +.68 -932 .

27 +.62 +15.2 37.00
22 +.T/ +1.4 18.55
37 +.16 +23.9 15.90
... -1.00 +86.3 8.85
25 +.51 +13.7 19.03
..+.43+232.5 3.89
21 +.28 +17.9 22.39
14 +.34 -19.3 5.47
13 -5.00 -13.7 45.01
61 +.25 +51.0 29.77
... +1.48 +17.3 10.12
37 +2.16 +43.6 9.69
11 +.90 +8.8 12.72
.. .. .. 18.80
20 +1.12 -11.3 31.76
... +1.85 +9.3 29.76
+.67 -19.3 7.56
... -1.07 +7.1 28.32
18 -.03 -9.3 12.65
60 +9.25 +42.2 147.71
14 +.31 +9.6 31.77
20 +.23 +1.3 16.85
..+.41 +82.9 2.89
..+.47 -2.4 23.66


LAKE CITY REPORTER STOCKS SUNDAY, APRIL 24, 2011


TThe Week inr Review


NYSE Amex

8404.36- +14.5 ,42.4 4406


Cho %Ch WLas I Name


Nasdaq Most Active


AMEX Most Active


Wkly YTD Wkly
Yld PE Chg %Chg Last


...





















I I


i~i~i~


C~l~anvi-


Ipnu~v-~


I


630 r~r, e ome

3br/2ba mobile home. Next to
O'Leno State Park. $650 mo. plus
1st, & sec. Water & lawn
service provided. 386-758-7959

Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White ..Contact 386-623-3404
or386-365-1919

New 2br/2ba off Country Club. 1/2
acd lot Fr00ntmbac Oporch &Nstorage
386-752-5911 or 466-2266

Nice clean 2&3 bdrm, Five Points,
NO PETS, also 3 Ed on the
Westside, 3 bdrm house on
Monroe St 386-961-1482






Quiet, Country Bra'nford area
3/2 $400 dep, $600 month
386-867-1833 or 386-590-0642
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com


640 f SlMobile Homes
for Sale

Palm Harbor Homes
Has closed 2 Model Centers
Save up to 60K on select models
Call Today! 800-622-2832

06 MH 3br/2ba open floor plan
w/lg kit w/ island, fireplace. 3 Riv-
ers Est, river access, MLS# 75661
DEastside illg oely 5 n90

3/2 DWMH over 1700 sqft. New
Roof & CH/A. Doublesided fire-
place, custom kit w/breakfast nook
& wet bar. $89,500 MLS# 73861
386-623-6896 Access Realty

Hallmark Real Estate. DWMH
4/2 on 5 ac. 24X36 workshop.
.Fireplace, kitchen island w/drop
down and more. $114,900.
MLS# 76188 3.86-867-1613

Owner Financing-3/2
TWMH in Wellborn. Only
$89,900! Call Taylor Goes
of Access Realty @ 386-344-7662.


710 fu~lrnis Apt.t

Move in as low as $325
Call today for details!
386-758-8455
Windson Apt


Ec 1 eNGi HLLr ngLLoAGtn
1, 2 & ero lo-lans;

or visit our website:
www.spring ilvlage.nef

1 & 2 Bedroom Apartments
Move mnfo as low as

386-755-2423

2 br Apt. Close to shopping
and the VA Medical Center.
$525. mo plus deposit.
386-344-2972

A Landlord You Can Love!
2 br Apts $575. & up + sec. Great
area. CH/A washer/dryer hookups.
386-758-9151/352-208-2421

Great location W of I-75, spacious
deluxe 2BR apts., garage, W/D
hook up. patio. $600 & up, + SD,
386-344-3715 or 386-965-5560


Legal

Local Hazard Mitigation Strategy
Meeting
A Public hnivitation to Participate
We are enhancing the Risk Assess-
ment for our Columbia County Local
Mitigation Strategy (LMS) this year'
The nisk assessment provides the
,foundation for our LMS strategy by
I edntiuymgabouriecommunities' nisks
Jint us for te enanc mnt kick of

bne Cmmm nimabin nCeon r% 2
NW Lake City Ave. Lake City, FL
320'55
Come be part of the process and
learn about mitigation in your com-
munity!
http ://www.columbiacountyem.com

5pri254042011
May 1, 2011

010 Announcements


10 opportunities .
055241936
Professional and Courteous
Class A Ct)L Drvrneeded

United States Cold Storage
Lake City
Immediate o enm gs due to
fleet e mansion
Florida rego deliveries

Qualified Class A
CDL Drivers must:

*Have a valid Class A CDL
with an acceptable driving
safety record
*Be 23 years of age
*Have 2 years verifiable
tractor trailer experience
We offer our Class A
*BL yrers
*Benefits

Apply in person or
send resume to
USCS
211 NE McCloskey Ave
Lake City, FL 32055

05525729
Teacher Positions .

Lake City-FCCPC /CDA; 3 yrs
of classroom experience
preferred (individuals w/ HS
dip/GED and DCF 40 hrs. may
also apply). Excellent benefits-
paid holidays, sick/annual leave,
health insurance, retirement +
add'1 benefits; Apply in person

(754-22 rmi Asmveeto

Lake City, FL 32056-2637, by



05525730
Lead Teacher-Head Start
3-5 yrs old, Lake City
Minimum of 2 year degree in
early childhood education
(AS ECE) or child
development or related
Degree OR age appropriate
FCCPC credential; 3 yrs of
classroom experience working
rit rung chiddene
preferred). Excellent benefits-
paid holi ay, sick/annual leave,
add'1 benefits; Apply in person
at 236 SW Columbia Ave
(754-2222) or mail resume to
SV4CsPO Box 2637,
Lake City, FL 32056-2637,or
by email: arobinson@sv4cs.org
or Fax (386) 754-2220.


MVON"'! EAERONE to 50%!! '

108 0 -5- 94 pner#4K ,6
ww,w.youravon.com/tdavies
Busy office seeking
experienced, energetic person for
receptionist position.
Fax resume to 386-961-8802
Caregiver needed 28 flexible hours
per week, for young adult,
Email resume and references to
PCAposition@ yahoo.com
Hiring Locally This Week
Liberty National Life
Insurance Company
Full Training Provided Potential
of $60K+ Annually. 401K, BCBS
Insurance & Pension for those who
Qualify. Call 1-800-257-5500
to set up an interview.
Experienced General Auto
IVechanic with own tools needed
for small private company. .
386-755-6481
Full time Car Detailer. 8am 7pm
6 days a week. Please apply in
person Rountree-Moore Ford on
Hwy 90, Lake City. Ask for Tim.
Licensed Insurance Salesperson,
for non-smoking office, 2-20
P & C Licensed preferred
Contact fmcknight81@cox.net
Optical Assistant & Lab Tech
Needed,F/T; exp a plus,but we
wil traimdvSend re rne to 325SW

OTR Driver: Must have clean
MVR, 7 yrs Reefer/Driver exp,
LTL, Physical, Great work ethics,
Ref. req'd. Call 386-963-3153
Preschool Teachers Wanted.
Must have 40 hr certs & 5 hr
literacy cert. No phone calls.
Please apply in person at:
LPOP2 Childcare Center
416 SE Ermine Ave.
Sales Position available for moti-
vated individual Rountree -Moore
Toyota, Great benefits, paid train-
ing/vacation. Exp. a plus but not
necessary. Call Anthony Cosentino
386-623-7442

in ii udal for Saem Pos n.
GRo nre eMoe As pa a- e

tion IE a pR s 3dt'n6 3n csl r


120 M'dlclnnt

oss2574 6




Meridian Behavioral
Healthcare, Inc.
www.mbhci.orf
Pleas vst ou ebsite to ve
c erevn open opportunity ew
and o apply on ine.

Meridian is an active partner
witlpthe National Health
Service Corps
Ther pists.

Licensed, or Master's L~evel
in Outpatient
Bachelor's-Level in
counseror Support

Case Management
S(adult &child)
Ou patient

Medical Services

CSU RN Nursing Manager
(G'Ville)

RN~, LPN, C.N.A-

Recovery Specialist
(Direct Care)

To see our current openings in
Mental Health and to apply
online, please go to:
.www.mbhci.ory

EOE, DFWP, E-Verify

Experienced LPN wanted to wor)
in busy medical practice. Knowl-
edge with pediatric & adults de-
sired. No weekends or nights,
competitive salary & benefits
Fax Resume to 386-758-5618 ,


404 Baby Items

Cribff~oddler Mattress by Kolcraft
Good Condition $25
I will text picture to you
386-292-4228


408 Furniture

DKingeSiz Btedroom set, Bd,
Mattress & box springs included.
$500. Good 3 386-752-3297


416 Sporting Goods

Solid Wood Gun Cabinet,
holds 8, glass sliding doors,
locking drawer
$150 Call 386-961-9171


420 Wanted to Buy

K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$250 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.


430 Garage Sales













PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.


020 Lost & Found

LOST: Lg 3 yr old white Calico
female cat. Goes by "Hannah".
Lives on 240/Itchetucknee. 9 yr
old daughter brokenhearted. Please
call 386-288-3916 REWARD!!!


Opportunities


04.544161
Ladies and Gentleman
if you have A Class A CDL,
we have a Lease/with a lease
purchase plan.
We accept PTD! Certified
Students. O/Operators. No
New England States, 100%
fuel surcharge. Carolinas to
the great NW!
Call today to join us!
Buel Inc
866-369-9744

045s 3tFederal Bank of Florida
has a position open for a
Fin ncial Sp calis in Lake

services to both existing and
new bank customers. Strong
background in financial
institution operating policies an
procedures. Knowledge of
banking regulations and
communication skills
re~qbied dA piton day be


22H Lak Cty 25B6 or
email Turbeville.J@ffsb.com.
Equal Employment
Opportldnity Employer.

04544541
HERE WE GROW AGAIN
Field Service Technician
Customer service and satisfac-
tion a priority. Work outdoors.
Clean driving record. Desire to
learn, grow and succeed. Great
pay and benefits. Send resume
to fjobs@flapest.com, fax to
386-752-0171 or mail to 536 SE
Baya Drive. Lake City, FL
32025 EOE, M/F, DFWP. H, V.

05525726
Customer Service Rep
needed for established Insurance
Agency; Health Ins & 401K
plan available,Send reply to Box
05060, C/O The Lake City
Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL, 32056




7855-5440


Lawn & Landscape Service

Clean Pine Straw,
You pick it up, $1.85 a bale
Delivery of 100 bales $260
386-688-9156
Landscape Maintenance Company
You can trust for knowledge &
pride, Mention this AD!
Mow Green, LLC 386-288-6532

ServiceS

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.


Land Services

Bacle Hoe, Dozer, Chopping, root
r nbnbg, s thog,eseedinds sod,
irrigation. Free Est! 386-623-3200


LcneExperience~d, PTA
for busy outpatient clinic
Send resume to P.O. Box 714
Lake City, FL 32056 or
Email to: pta7 14@hotmail.com


130 Prat Time


Looknoeg foaer snreic sernq
w/excellent communication skills
Apply at M & M Fitness Center.

Nursery Position Available
Southside Baptist Church,
Hours on Wednesdays and

se~r icd 1 ese all 3 67 53


PartaTime Caregiveer for p rially
night w/schedule flexibility, exp a
must, Ellisville, call 386-752-5152




04544505
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-04/25/10

Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-05/09/11

Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or



310 Pets &SupplieS

PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild- .
life must be I ensed byFlorida

unsure, contact the local
office for information.


361 Farm Equipment

84 Ford 4610 Tractor. Runs good.
Solid 2WD. New front tires, '
350hr on 2005 motor. Dependable.
$7500. obo. 386-867-0005


402 Appliances

Family size upright freezer.
White, very nice. $260 obo
386-292-3927 or
386-755-5331


Refri erto Wited wokreat

386-292-3927 or 386-755-5331


9 g `SCO Re0HaoS

New CentralA/C, still in box,
with full ten year factory warranty
$1,795
Call 386-364-1090
Tow Behind Grill/Smoker

3861 01BOO04or
386-719-4802


520 Sasdles

24' Pontoon Boat Bass Tracker,
115 HP Mariner, new carpet/lights,
bimini to, 3tr80Hin52mot r, dep



obR tr0~omeS e
I UNDER NEW MANAGEMENT
Oakview Mobile Home Park. -
Clean well maintained 2/2 units in
nice park. 2 miles to downtown
Lake City. 386-984-8448
14x70 MH, 2Br/2Ba Real Clean
Good Location! CH/A $550/Mo.
+ $200 Dep. NO PETS.
(386)755-0064 or (904)771-5924
2&3 BR MH. $395 $650. mo.
plus deposit. Water & sewer fur-
nished. Cannon G!reek MHP
386-752-6422
2/2 MH w/screen porch, Irg yard,
quiet/clean/safe 10 unit park,
credit/refs req $475 mo, $475 dep,
NO PETS, 386-965-3003
2br /2ba SWMH; also Residential
RV lots for rent between Lake City
& G'ville. Access to 1-75 & 441
513( 2)17-1326 Call for terms


A W E "f ""


For Free Color Brochure Call 229-263-2680 (cell)
Directions, Aerials, GPS locations & other details
www. Prop ertiesSo uthA uctions. com

Stephen Burton ; Ed Hughes,
1~:; Assoc Bkr/Auctioneer pa Broker
-e (229) 263-2680 (C) I aPCF PJ


: Illt


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SiEL
Apply in person or online k


2BR/2BA MH CH/A,
Fenced in back yard and Shed.
$750. mo plus deposit.
Pets OK! 386-365-8279


Large & clean. lbr/1ba apt.
CH/A Ig walk in closet. Close to
town. $395. mo and $350. dep.
(904)563-6208


The Lakes Apts. Studios & IBr's
from $135/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741

Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $450. + see.
Call Michelle 386-752-9626


3/2 DoubleWide Mobile Home'
CH/A, Washer dryer hook up.
$450. mo $200. dep.
~386-752-2254
3/2 SWMH on lacre. CH/A. New
carpet/tile. Great location, very
nice home. No pets-smoke free.
$500 dep/$650 mo. 386-288/6786


2 Prime P~roperties!
Prop #1: The English Place 838.+ Ac (Auction Site)
Prop #2: The Ponder Place 100+ Ac
Prop #1: 838+ Ac
MNWHawk s Pve
Madison Co., FL


*Yellow Pine Forest
* Excellent Interior Rds
* Abundant Wildlife
Beautiful Lodge Site
S* Plantation-Type Prop


LAKE C~lY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, APRIL 24, 2011

Lakie City Reporter





CLAIS S FE


Take ADvantage of the


ADvantage


One item per ad r 5
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Rate applies to private individuals selling
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One Item per ad 24
4 lines 6 days B5 addtional
Rate applieshtao private Individuals selling
personada"l erhn o' t~otallni $6 00 or less.
This is a non-refundable rate-












810 Home for Sale

Welcome home. 3br/2ba brick.
Great location on the east side.
Priced to sell.
MLS# 776867 $69.900
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
Well Cared For 3/2 on 1.4 Acres,
o en floor plan, MLS#75702
$199.900. pCall Carrie Cason
at 386-487-1484
westfieldrealtygroup.com
Well maintianed 3/2 1/2 acre
minutes from town. 20x40
workshop, screened porch.
MLS# 73787 $99,000
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
You can't beat this Price! 1995
SWMH on 3/4 ac. Paved rgad,
1216 sf, 2/2 split bedroom plan.
N~eds work! $29,900
Derington Properties. 965-4300

8 FarmS &
80Acre g
10 acres, with Travel Trailer &
Electricity, close to Itchetucknee
Springs, $3&,000, MLS# 76264
Call MillardGillen at
Westfield Realty 386-365-7001
4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$69w90L $d603mo n2 2cl 018.

4 acres, Wellborn, New Well
i saHdBoeautif t|1 nodedi,

no l downd -215-1018 mo
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com

Iewen L ake sitD / t Wie
1836 sf, great value on paved road.
Need repairs. $49,900
Derington Properties. 965-4300
Half to ten acre lots. Some w/
dwell, septic, pp. We fdmance; ltow
386-752-4339. www.1andnfl.com
Heavily Wooded Land, 10 Acres
MLS#75784 $94,900
Call Jo Lytte
Remax Professionals, Inc.
386-365-2821

8 Commercial
30 Property
Multiple Use 12,000 sq ft
of Office & Warehouse space,
Loading dock, Storage yard,
MLS#77349 $395,000, Charlie
386-755-0808 Westfield Realty

85 Wterffnt
50 reoisert on
DW1VH on Ten Ac es w/lakefront,

MLS#75571, Call Jo Lytte at
Remax Professionals 386-365-
2821, jolytte@remaxnfl.com
River Cabin on Suwannee River,
workshop, patio, deck & dock,
$349,900 MLS#76336 Call -
Jo Lytte at Remax Professionals
386-365-2821
River Front Propei-ty 6.45 Acres,
in White Sprgs close to Big Shoals
Park, Shelter for entertammig,
$124,888 MLS# 77417 Call Nancy
@ R.E.O. Realty 386-867-1271


805 Lots for Sale

PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper iS subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation) or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
d uch ref rence,F lmtiosna s
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowmngly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver"
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-92;7-9275.


810 Home for Sale .

1999 Doublewide,
3/2 fenced back yard

MLS# 76315 $64,900
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co*
3/2 Brick Home in town, fenced
bak Nd/2axn1 wor Eho
Realty 386-867-1271lMLS# 77414
nancytrogers@msn.com
3/2 Brick home on .59 acre, on the
lake withsbacak ub oom. Garage &

MLS# 76769 $222,900
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
3/2 Custom Western Cedar Home
on 2 acre lakefront iotMLS#74681

'Professoas dI c. 38 3652821
jolytte@remaxnfl.com
3/2 in Greekside S/D. Fenced back
jrard, sprinklers, large
screened rear lanai.
$175,000. MLS# 77385
386-623-6896 Access Realty
3/2 in town, lots of upgrades'
currently leased, MLS#76658,
R4,0 rCal s i Itste at
386-365-2821
3/2 in Woodhae w/Fla Roo ,
fenced back eadnMLS#75499m'
R$114,930806C3l 3P2Tea or
email- remaxpamb@gmail.com

p/ hhMsH on 1.5 acrs, fnc dd
S$49,9000 MS3743669 ZCall7Josh

westfieldrealtygroup.com
3/2 on 4.84 Acres, fireplace, sheds,
many fruit trees, Call Jo Lytte at
Remax $68,900, MLS#72427
386-365-2821, w jolytte "''*1 *
'florida-property-search.com
3/2 on 5 acres. Large master suite
and open kitchen. Back 2 ac.
fenced for horses
MLS# 75830 $102,900
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
3/2 on 8.7 acres w/Fla room'
MI8 ra st5 oragbd gs, fecdp
@ 386-758-8900 Remax,
$179,000 www.visitpam.com


810 Home for Sale

Large Brick. 3/1. 4.43 acres. metal
roof. MLS# 77415 $104.8S88
Call Nancy Rogers @ R.E.O.
Realty Group, Inc. 386-867-1271
nancytrogers@msn.com
Large Home on 1 acre, 41/2,
Fla Rm, wrap around front porch
MLS#77292. $148.000
Call Brittany Stoeckert at
Results Realty386-397-3473
Lg home on corner lot w/garage,
Eastside Village. Clubhouse
heated pool MLS# 71901 Eastside
Village Realty, Inc. Denise
Milligan-Bose 386-752-5290
Lots of acerage. All brick home.
Screened mn porch. Extra big
closets. Mature pines-
MLS# 76765 $115,000
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co-
Luxury 3/2 Log Home, Cypress
in erwr, whole house generator.

Roger LoeLtfi 1@386-365-7039

Make an Offer! 3 br brick, quiet
resid'1 street in ~Live Oak. HUD
home is sold "as is" Hallmark
Real Estate 386-365-5146
www. hudhomestore.com
Nearly 17 Acres w/House
on pa ed r la, y S acous!
Call 386-487-7484 Speak to
Brodie Westfield Realty Group

Nic os dwlith e in kit b n and
of room for entertaining.
MLS# 77584 $89,900
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
On Golf Course w/lake view. 3/2
home w/g roomsN 3 f rplces, wet
$214,900. Hallmark Real Estate
386-365-2135
Ope for Bid! 3/2 DW w/c me
stn Ffireplace, fene yad&
MLS 77290p- 98-365-3886 Deb-
bie King Hallmark Real Estate
Owner' Fianncing! wooded 1/4 ac.
lots mn Suwannee County, close to
River, high & dry. Bring your SW
or DW or RV. $6,500
Derington Properties.965-4300

Read >for Fun 8: Famil~y. 4br/2ba
stocked fish pond & huge 54x60
shop. $325,000. Hallmark Real
Estate 386-719-0382
Rolling Oaks, 3/3 + Bonus Rm, .
5 acres, back porch & more!
MLS#77528 Call Pam Beauchamp
at 386e 58-p8900 Remax $284,900


CSI sedto konHb in te c un I
MLS#76063 Must See!$129,888
Call Brittany Stoeckert at
386-397-3473 Results Realty
Spacious, Open Floor Plan Home,
fenced back yard, screen porch,
$179,900 MLS#76796 Call Jo
Lytte@Remax Professionals, Inc.
386-365-2821
Two for the price of one: Updated
main home w/a 3/2 guest home. A
lot of living space for the price.
MLS# 77348 $244,900
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.


720 "~Sd~psh pt
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808


730 Ullfuf~Rdhed
Home Fr Rent
49 WHamilton St..3/1 home
in established neighborhood.
Short walk to downtown and all
amenities. $550./ mo +
$550. security.
143 Zebra Terrace. 3/2 home
on almost I acre with fenced
back yard. $875./ mo + $875.
security. 50% discount on the
first month's rent for approved
applicant.
Century 21 The Darby
Rogers Co.
BJ Federico 386-365-5884
Kayla Carbono 386-623-9650
2/2 Home w/lrg dining area, Irg
driveway, appliances included,
$800 mo, 1st,1ast & security in
Lake City, Call 386-623-7494
3/2 Recently Built Custom Home,
1340 sq ft, stainless steel applian-
ces custom c~aebin ts $2 o

Call Andrew 386-623-6066
5/3, eat in kit, new carpets/ ont,2

"'1en Lmde i mk C ty4

Ft White, 2/1, CH/A, 2010 W2 80
ref's from cu rnt an lod req'd,

$600 sec., 386-497-4699


750 BUSinESS

100 sf fie Sasy venit o -
combined for 2000 sqft. 386-984-
0622 or weekends 386-497-4762

OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$695. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor


790 Vacation RentalS

Horseshoe Beach Spring Special
Gulf Front 2br, w/lg porch, dock,
fish sink. wkend $345./wk $795.
(352)498-5986/386-235-3633
alwaysonvacation.com #419-181

805 Lots for Sale

5 Acre Lot, Secluded & Cleared,
MLS# 67871 $60,000 <
Call Lisa Waltrip
@ 386-365-5900
westfieldrealtygroup.com

A high & dry buildable wooded
.734 of ac.,Forest Country. MLS#
76668 Eastside Village Realty,
Inc. Denise Milligan-Bose
@386-752-5290

3 RiveesFt Wh91teA ih Dry.
Only $11,900.
Call Tay or Goes o c es Realty


3br and Ig open floor plan
w/separate office. Beautifully
landscaped. Private access to Lake
Jeffery. MLS# 76231 $199,000
Century 21/The Dar y Rogers Co.
4/2 with 1000 sq ft workshop,
fenced back yard, 2 car garage,
MLS#776j02, Bring Offers!
$174,900, Call Nancy @
R.E.O. Realty 386-86;7-1271
5 acre Home w/Horse Barn,
Wood floors, New Kitchen,
Gazebo & Koi Pond MLS#76039
$169,900 Call Aaron @ Westfield
Realty Group 386-867-3534


890 Resort Property

Furnished Home on Itchetucknee
River, Wrap around covered decks
on two levels,91ustSEE! $375,000
MLS#77006 Call Jo Lytte
Remax 386-365-2821
River Access, Refurbished Rent-
al Units & Home + Lot,
Barn, Pool, Hot Tub $329,900
Call Jo Lytte 386-365-2821
MLS#76734 Remax Professionals


940 Trucks

2004 Dodge Ram Quad Cab V8
4.7L Auto transmission w/tow
package. 112,500 mi. Lots of ex-
tras $9999 / 386-755-9894



ADVERTISE YOUR

Job Opportunities in the

Lake City Reporter

ClRSSifieds.

Enhance Your Ad with

YOilr Individual Logo

f0r just pennies a day.

Cal (0 Ry,

755-5440.


1;- -









Bring the picture in or
Swe wel take i or you!

* Ad runs 10 consecutive days
with a description and photo in the
-newspaper and.online E-edition.
* Ad runs 10 consecutive days as a
classified line ad online.
* You must include vehicle price.
* All ads are prepaid.
* Private party only.

gP -



2006 EF250
/4o~rd Vanor
shelves/ladder rack,
60K miles, exc. cond.

$10,500
Call
386-555-5555

If you don't sell your vehicle
during the first 10 days, you
can run the same vehicle ad
for 10 additional days for
only $15.00
Terms andi conditions remain the
same for the additional run.


Classified Department: 755-5440


810 Home for Sale

Beautiful Home For Sale
.The Preserve at Laurel Lake
4/2 or 3/2 $194,900 MLS#77257
Call Scott Stewart 386-867-3498
westfieldrealtygroup.com
CBC 3/1 home, inside city limits,
fenced backyard, detached carport
w/office MLS#77411 $82,900
Call R.E.O.Realty,
Nancy Rogers @ 386-867-1271
Charming Remodeled Home
mn Beautiful Neighborhood
MLS#74765 $142,900 Call
Charlie Sparks @ Westfield
Realty Group 386-755-0808
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
4br 1/5ba. 1332 sqft. Great floor
plan, noce yard, close to town.
Only $84,900 Lori Geibeig
Sipson. 386-365-5678
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
5br/4ba on 5+ac. 3 car garage,
inground pool/hot tub and more.
MLS #75854 $569,900 Loni
Geibeig Simpson. 386-365-5678
Coldwell .Banker/Bishop Realty
Superbly maintained home in
Creekside. Oversized garage &
storage. Many extras. Elaine K.
Tolar 386-755-6488 $209,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
New home in Mayfair S/D. 4br on
corner lot. Sp91it ln $14,1900
386-755-6488
Coldwell Banker/Bisho Realty
H me ond IhEakemin town 4br/3ba

755-6488 or Mary Brown White-
hurst. 386-965-0887 $299,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realt
Great home in Woodcrest S/D 3/
home cve~re b~ac orch, nice

386-755-6488 $129,900
Country Home on 2.5 Acres,
$95,000 MLS#77039
R mlax Pr fssio as, nc.,
386-365-2821
Custom built home with many
Upgrades. Screened back porch,
16x24 workshop
MLS# 77178 $184,500
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
Custom, 3/2.5 briilt in 2007,

comltl ecd we mi.

386-623-6896 Access Realty
FOR SALE 2br/1ba house.
Big 3/4 acre lot.
Asking $15,200.
(954)8'04-4842 for more info.
FWite MH o 627 Ars

MLS#77404 $149,900
Jo Lytte Rem~ax Poessionals

Great house in Piccadilly S/D. 2
car garage and inground pool.
Newly painted inside & out.
MLS# 76786 $133,500
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
Great Opportunity"
Currently rented, Seller will
assist iv/buyer's closing costs
MLS# 77335, Call Michael at
Westfield 386-867-9053 $99,900
Gwen Lake area. Beautiful up-
grades 4/3 w/tile & 1 miat
floors, fireplace, new kiceneIg
den, fenced yard. $125,000, 386-
397-4766 Hallmark Real Estate
Hallmark Real Estate. Brick 3/2.

Groto ot 1pPGrdea tl atio 1u-
de-sac! $149,900.
MLS# 75931 386-867-1613
Historical Home on Lake Isabel-
la. 3/3 w/basement! Gieat as a pri-
vate residence or a wonderful pro-
fessional office. $240,000 386-
719-0382 Hallmark Real Estate
Home on 15 Acres w/2500 sq ft,
workshop, MLS# 77552 $235,000
Call Brittany Stoeckert at '
SResults Realty
386-397-3473
Just Reduced 4/2 on 1.57 acres,
fireplace. partially fenced, MLS#
77412, Call Nancy Rogers at
R.E.O. Realty Group
386-867-1271 $64,900


EELS & WalERCRAFT ,






24' Pontoon Boat
Bass Tracker, 115hp
Mariner, new carpet &
lights, Bimini top, trolling
motor, depth finder.

$4,500

386-752-2863


Forest Country building lot'
scattering of trees, Motivated
Seller $19,999 MLS#75140
Remax Professionals, Inc.
Jo Lytte 386-365-2821
Hallmark Real Estate. Cleared
2.57 ac. fenced w/32' Dutchman
camper. In O'Brien. Close to Live
Oak, Lake City, Branford. $25,000
MLS# 74534 386-867-1613
Nice 4 acre parcel located in
O'Brien. Won't last long at only

0ces R aly@810r3G e76 2 *

To pla ce your
classified ad call

755-5440


3/2 on 9.7 acres. fenced & cross
fenced. Separate pastures. Animals
are negotiable. Owners motivated.
MLS# 77431 $179,900
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.


2004 Dodge Ram
Quad Cab
V8, 4.7L AT wt/tow
package'. 112,500 mi.
Lots of extras.

$9,999
Call
386-755-9894


I





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LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, APRIL 24, 2011






6C LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY APRIL 24,2011


I '


WINNERS ARE SELE6fED INSTANTLY & P fZES OE LESS THAN $500, MAY BE.REdEEMED INSTANTLY. WINNERS OF PRIZES GREATER THAN $500 MAY REDEEM PRIZES AT NO MORE THAN S500 PER DAY. MUST BE 18 YEARS OR OLDER TO
ENTER. MUST SE 21 Y~IR 6 d.nR@ R0 G MEi~bi~ ALCOHOL.' PHOTO I.D. REQdUIRED. 00 TO PANDA-MONI-YUM OF LAKE CITY LLC TO SEE OFFICIAL RULES & DETAILS. TO PURCHASE INTERNET TIME & TO REDEEM PRIZES. NO PURCHASE OR
CONTRIBUTION NECESSA TOi PARTICIPATE 0 WIN. MAIL-IN ENTRIES AVAILABLE. 62011 Tomn Hunt. AII righis reserved.


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expires 4/30/11


I.........../ SPRJ: -.cINGI~rN6.' FOR

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C.J. Risak
Assistant Editor
754-0427
crisak2lakecityreportercom

Sunday,April 24, 20 II

GARDEN TALK


r I


NeW book takes critical look at internships


Section D


Nichell Demorest




April is

1101 tOO .






pril is a great
month to be
outside work-
ing around
Athe house and
in the garden. There are
always things to do, and
the following are some <
suggestions to add to that
overflowing April 'honey .
do' list.
You still have time to
divide and replant clumps
of bulbs or perennial flow-
ers before the stress of
summer heat arrives. Use
these divisions to increase
your garden display, start
new planting beds, or share
with friends as 'pass-along'
plaixts. But make sure you
aren't passing along any
invasive plants, unwanted
weeds or insects.
Many warm season
vegetable plants will still '
produce, if planted~ in April.
Some that you may want to
get into the ground soon
include tomatoes, peppers,
corn, squash, green beans,
and melons. A few have
longer planting seasons
and can be planted into late
spring or early summer.
These include eggplant,
southern peas, lima beans,
and sweet potatoes. For a
complete list of vegetable
planting dates in North
Florida, check out the
UF/IFAS Florida Vegetable
Gardening Guide at http://
edis. ifas. ufl. edu/VHO21. *
This is also a good time
to apply a new layer of
mulch to the landscape
and garden. A fresh coat
of mulch does wonders
for the landsciaIitig



protects the soil and plant ,
roots from the flucturations
of temperatures and relent-
less summer sun.- Less pre-
cious water is lost through
evaporation if there is a two

so tre onh lyr it mulch

vegetable garden. Organic
mulch will conserve
moisture in dry weather
minimize weed seed germi-
nation, and will eventually
add to the organic content
of your soil. When applying
mlulch, don't let the mulch
rest up against the base of
plants.
Start checking your
shrubs and flowers for
aphids. These small insects
are about 1/8 inch long
and are usually green or
dark in color. They feed on
many shrubs, perennials,
and annuals by piercing
the plant tissue and suck-
ing out the plant juices.
They love to feed on the
new flush of plant growth
that is abundant in the
early spring. Some signs of
feeding aphids are curled
leaves or distorted flowers.
You may also notice
a black 'sooty mold' on
leaves. The mold is caused
by honeydew which is
the sticky excretion of
a hdssas welas sev r l

DEMOREST continued on 2D


ciate those guys giving me the
opportunity to do this."
The Suwannee River Jam, April
27-30, will feature four days of
music with more than 20 coun-
try music artists playing on two
stages. The event will take place
at the Suwannee Music Park in
Live Oak and is expected to draw
more than 25,000 attendees this
year.
Freeman said he's hasn't
received all the details about
his upcoming performance, but
event organizers.have told him
he'll most likely be performing
a 25-30 minute set. Freeman
expects to perform about seven
songs during his allotted stage
time.
"I'll be performing the songs
off my riew album, 'Another
Stupid Love Song'," he said.
His song "Love Songs For
Sally", which is getting local radio
.play, is on the list of songs he's
scheduled to perform.
"I miglg even throw in some
cover tunes from my favorite
artists," he said. "It's definitely a .
major stepping stone being able
Sto perform at this event. It's just
getting more people to hear my .


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
Wh~~~~en the lightsngt a ra
go up at the
Suwannee River
Jam Wednesday

for one local musician will
become reality.
Justin Freeman, a Sanderson
resident who went to school
in Union County at Lake
Butler, has dreamt about but
nev~r played on stage at the
Suwannee River Jam.
In a few days he'll see his
dream materialize and he'll
have the opportunity to further
his country music career as an
opening act for some of the big- .
gernames in the country music
industry.
Freeman, 28, is scheduled to
perform at 7 p.m. Wednesday as
the opening act for Blackberry
Smoke. He said he is doing an
acoustic show.
"It's an honor really to be able
to perform at the Suwannee
River Jam. and get the chance to
let people see me and hear my
music," he said. "I really appre-


COURTESY PHOTO
.Justin Freeman will be the preliminary act before Blackberry Smoke on
Wednesday's opening day of the Suwannee River Jam festival. He'll per-
form about seven songs in his 25-30 minute set.


voice, hear my songs and wrho .
knows what kinds of doors this
opportunity may open for me. It's
defmitely a great opportunity to
be able to be up there and have
my name up there with some of.


the biggest names in country
music. I definitely feel hoixored to
be able torbe a part of it and help
open it up.
"My music has a little touch of
everything in it, I think.
Freeman, who said he consid-
ers his style to be country-pop
music, has led worship iri churth-
es over the years as a perfornier
and tried his hand at writing his
own music. hri December 2009
he released an EP album with six
songs. The album was available
on Amazonz~com and Itunes.
After releasing that digital
download album, he decided that
he wanted to release a full-length
album, recorded with a full band.
''I recorded and produced
everything myself," he said of
the album. "I then had CDs
made and I got the album out in.
February."
"Another Stupid Love Song"
has 13 tracks. It was released
Feb. 14.
Following the introduction
track, Freeman said the remain-
ing 12 songs are love songs,



a feW Shows, but three years ago
he started taking his music a lit-

FREEMAN continued ont 2D


COURTESY PHOTO
Justin Freeman, a Sanderson resident who went to high school at Lake Butler, considers his style to be country-
pop. He started performing at church worships.


that roughly 1 to 2 million people take
the resume-burnishing gigs every year
in the United States, with more around
the globe.
Three-quarters of about 10 million
students at four-year colleges and uni-
versities in the U.S. take at least one
internship before graduating, according
to the College Employment Research
Institute.
Interns permeate most every corner
of th~e economy, from Disney World
to Capitol Hill, the Fortune 500 to the
nonprofit sector, Main Street to Silicon
Valley. They fetch coffee, clean toilets
and staple, but they also do more sub-
stantive work for little or no pay, Perlin
said.
Perlin estimates that a third to a
half of all interns go unpaid. "It's the
only major category of work that I
know of that is not tracked at all by the
Bureau of Labor Statistics," Perlin said.
"Nobody's paying attention." .
The number of internships that are
"school-like, full-time dedicated train-
ing programs is vanishingly few," he
wrote in the book, noting the clamor for
the opportunities has sprouted its own
industry in on-campus career centers,
online middlemen and employers look-
BOOK continued on 2D


By LEANNE ITALIE
Associated Press
NEW YORK -- Charlie Sheen's paid
tweet for an intern with tiger blood summ-
monedd 82,148 people hoping to serve
the warlock.
As internships go, at least it's a paid
gig with a real jdb description: eight
weeks helping the actor with social
media at $10 an hour.
That's more than many interns get,
said Ross Perlin, who leaps into the fray
over internships in a new book, "Intern
Nation: How to Earn Nothing and Learn
Little in the Brave New Economy"
(Perso Books).
"The Charlie Sheen thing, it's the
most competitive internship ever,"
Perlin told The Associated Press in an
interview. "The most sought after, and it
sort of beautifully sums up the absurdity
of what's going on with this incredible
explosion of internships."
Perlin views the competition for
internships among college kids and
even jobless grads and high schoolers,
as not only absurd, but even legally
questionable when measured against
labor laws governing internships.
Perlin, himself a paycheckless but sat-
isfied intern a few years ago, estimates


'A fascinating and overdue expose.' Benjamin Kunke






-NER

NATION










HOW TO EARN NOTHING ANlD LEARN ITTLE
IN THE BRAVE NEW ECONOMY
ROSS PERLIN
ASSOCIATED PRESS
This book cover image courtesy of Verso Books shows the
cover of 'Intern Nation,' by Ross Perlin. Perlin estimates that
roughly 1 to 2 million people take internships every year in
the United States and many times that around the globe.


Local musician



opens


Suwannee


River Jamn














What is the Association of Florida Colleges?


.


FREEMAN: Suwannee performer

Continued From Page 1D


has also said "academic
credit alone does not guar-
antee that the employer is
in compliance."
SDespite Perlin's con-
cerns, many interns and
ex-interns have no
complaints and consider
the experience worfhvlhile.
An Intern Bridge survey of
27,335 U.S. undergraduates
showed seven out of 10
would accept less money in
exchange for greater work
experience.
Andrew Riedy, 28, soon
to get his master's degree
from George Washington
University in Washington,
D.C., has had both paid
and unpaid internships.
A veteran of the U.S.
Marines, he relied in part
on military benefits to
support himself while
interning at the nonprofit
Centr o Arm aC rol





'w .
-! -







China, Crystal,
Flatware and Gifts
Couples registered:

Joanna Watson
Dustin King
April 15, 2011

Christinle Moses
David Moor
May 21, 2011

Casey McDuffle
Tony de Moya
May 21, 2011

Laurie Little
Robert Evans, Jr:
Julne 4, 2011

Jessica Clark
Tommy McAllister
fune 24, 2011

Ashley Cloninger
Justin Brimmer
September 24, 201 1

We know exactly what
they want in a wedding
or shower gift. We update
their list as gifts are
purchased, and gift wrap.


JEWELRY &r GIFTS
156 N. Marion Ave.
Lake City
752-5470


DEMO REST: Plant in April

Continued From Page 1D


LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, APRIL 24, 2011


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


ities, fundraisers, community
support, and networking that I
have been able to do since join-
ing the organization. I've been
able to attend conferences and
conventions that provided me
with leadership and enabled me
to network with professionals
who work in the college setting.
Some of our community
service projects this year have
included a school supply drive
for Five Points Elementary
School, the Peanut Butter and
Jelly drive for Catholic Charities
as well as our Christmas Project
for children in the Guardian Ad
Litem program.
The FGC Chapter also par-
ticipates in fundraising for orga-
nizations in the community and
this year includes MDA where
One our own, Myrtle Kerce, was
actually taken into custocky and
we raised enough money for
MDA to be able to bail her out
The money was raised by selling
and delivering "Cupid Grams"
on Valentine's Day. The Florida
Gateway Chapter of AFC recent-
ly received a plaque honoring
our chapter for their support of
The United Way.
April and May, our chapter is
involved with sponsoring a team
to participate in the American


Cancer Society's Relay for Life
on May 6. In addition to the
Relay for Life, we will be having
an on-line cake and desert auc-
tion April 21st and a raffle for a
spa facial all to raise money for
the Cancer Society. In the sum-
mer, we are planning a "build a
dog" luncheon to raise money
for our scholarship fund which
assists members or their depen-
dents with textbook costs.
AFC honors its faculty and
staff by having events such as
the Ice Cream Social held in
August when school begins.
Faculty and staff can enjoy all
flavors of ice cream with lots
of toppings while they mix and
mingle to talk about the summer
and get prepa ed for stt'de ds
returning in alhe fld.n ah ton

faa ty an tafiscan pat-take of
hot cocoa or coffee, cookies and
other snacks.
One of the most important
parts of the Association of
Florida Colleges is their active
and effective involvement in
legislature. AFC is in force in the
legislature at this time of year, .
lobbying for bills that are being
brought forth in Tallahassee.
Some of the issues that AFC is
advocating ~for include the State
Retirement System, Tenure, and


College Budget Changes. AFC
actively opposes bills that would
reflect negatively for our schools
and educators.
From education to chapter
activities to community involve-
ment as well as networking, AFC
is the home for college profes-
sionals in the state. Membership
is open to all Florida Gateway
College employees includ-
ing staff, full-time faculty, and
adjunct faculty, as weil as FOd
retirees. Our current mem-
bership comprises 78% of our
employees. Our goal this year is
85%. Membership also includes
our Board of Trustees and
retirees. Our Executive Board
is comprised of Dr. Toni Briley,
President; Becky Van Hoek,
President-Elect; Myrtle Kerce,
Treasurer; Debra Harrison,
Secretary, and Frances Ash,
Past-President
'If you are an empoye or
retiree of Florida Gateway
College and are interested in
joining the Florida Gateway
Chapter of the Association of
Florida Colleges, please con-
tact Dr. Toni Briley, President,
Florida Gateway Chapter,
Association of Florida Colleges,
at 386-754-4334 or e-mail at toni.
briley~fgc. edu.


Florida Colleges
(AFC) was orga-
nized in 1949 as the
Florida Association
of Public Junior Colleges and
became the Florida Association
of Community Colleges (FACC)
in 1971. In 2010, the organiza-
tion officially changed its name
to the Association of Florida
Colleges. AFC was started as a
means of uniting the colleges
for the purpose of helping the
Florida Legislature understand
the jumior college and to advo-
cate for Flonida's public commu-
nity colleges in the development
of the state's long-range plan for
higher education. .
The Association of Florida
Colleges exists to actively pr -
mote, represent, support, and

winter 1ndea sssto pmoevidees
students and citizens of Florida
the best possible college educa-
tional system. The Association
also provides an opportunity to
network with those who have
similar interests and job respon-
sibilities throughout the state of
Florida. We are facultyj, career
staff, administrators, retirees,
part-time employees, trustees,
and presidents of28 colleges in
Florida.


Toni Briley
toni.briley@fgc.edu
Academic and Career Advisor

Some of the goals of the orga-
nization include promoting legis-
lation that is beneficial to institu-
tions and their members; recog-
nize and showcase exemplary
programs and practices; provide
membership development; and
to advocate and provide profes-
sion'al training, education, and
development opportunities for
the Association members.
Florida Gateway College
supports the passion of the
Association of Flonida Colleges
in the development and advance-
ment of Flonida public state and
community college education.
Florida- Gateway Chapter is
active in civic affairs and fund-
raising for local organizations as
well as social events for faculty
and staff.
SI joined AFC in 2004 and have
been very pleased with the activ-


Continued From Page

ing for free entry-level
bodies.
Struggling interns,
meanwhile, include a
growing number without
wealthy parents, conneo-
tions or other safety nets.
According to research .
from Intern Bridge, a
Boston-based consultancy
to colleges and businesses,
three-quarters of students
have to work paying jobs
on the side in order to sup-
port unpaid internships.
"An overwhelming
majpritj' of colleges
and universities, as well
as some high schools,
endorse and promote
unpaid internships without
a second thought, provide
the lucrative academic
credits that employers *


wishfully hope will indem-
nify their fims, and jus-
tify it all with high-minded
rhetoric about 'situated
learning' and 'experiential
education,"' Perlin wrote.
He also fmds it outra-
geous that some employers
now "require not only that
their charges work for free,
but that they also obtain
(academic) credit, which
usually means paying
(tuition fees) to work."
Richard Bottner, founder
and president of Intern
Bridge, said government
labor agencies may not
routinely "audit"' intern
ship hardships, but they
do "invite and investigate"
complaints.
"I think the quality of
internships is improving,,


said Botiner, a survivor
of a bad internship at a
Boston advertising fim.
"There's so much attention
on internships right now.
Companies can't afford not
to put some effort into it "
The U.S. Labor
SDepartment does have
some standards, saying
that interns may work
without pay only when
the program is similar to
that offered in a vocational
school; benefits the stu-
dent; doesn't displace a reg-
ular employee; and doesn't
entitle the student to a
job. The employer must
also derive "no immediate
advantage" from the work,
and both sides must agree
that the intern isn't entitled
to wages. The department


of North Florida with a
Bachelor of Science degree
in finance. He is employed
at Columbia Grain and
Ingredients Inc. in Lake
City.
The wedding is planned
for May 2011 at Epiphany
Catholic Church.


stuart.


Smith
Stephen and Tia ~Smithy
of Lake City anutounce the
birth of their daughter,
Langsley Saige Smithy,
March 30 at Shands Lake
Shore Hospital.
She weighed 6 pounds,
14 ounces and measured
19 i ch s
Sme j ins siblings
Zachary, 12, Kaydence, 6
and Katie, 5.
Grandparents are Linda
Smithy and the Lake Glenn
Smithy arid Curt and
Sheila Lang.


tie more serious' when he
recorded his EP album.
He 'said he is looking
forward to performiing
at a local event in ~front
of family and friends, as
well as new fans, near his
home.
"It will be really cool to
be in that kind of venue


.- ~that's right around
the corner," Freeman
said. "Just being able to
perform in front of people
that I have never met
before~ and having a ton
of family and friends that
will be out there eqming
out to support~me ... it's
definitely a cool oppor-


tunity. This is one of the
biggest events in the
Southeast and it's really
cool to be able to be a
part of that. I'm definitely
elicited about it."-
For rndre information
about Freeman, go-to
wwwu~justintfreemanmusic.
comn.


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insects. Ants also feed on
honeydew, so if you see
any ant activity on a plant,
check under leaves and
along new shoots for feed-
ing aphids. To learn more
about aphids, go to http://
edis. zyas. ufl. edu/MG002
Many homeowners
prefer to remove aphids
and suppress populations
by simply spraying the
insects off with the gar-
den hose. Once they are
Washed off, they won't
be able to make their
way back to the plants.
Another environmentally
friendly way to control
aphids is with the use of
insecticid'al soaps. These
soaps can safely be applied
at weekly intervals, if
needed. Horticultural oil
and neem oil are two more
environmentally ~friendly
pest control products.
Always follow the label
directions on any pesticide
product.


Before you reach for
any product, scout your
plants to determine if the
intruder is a 'good' bug or
a 'bad' bug. We all know
that ladybugs are good
guys and have voracious
appetites for bad insects
like aphids. But the young
ladybug larva looks rather
creepy. Identify what is
crawling around the leaves
before you spray, or you
may be killing off your
'good' guys in the garden.
Master Gardeners are
available to help identify
your insect problems on
Tuesday, Thursday and
Friday mornings from
9am noon at the UF
Extension Office. You can
also reach them by calling
752-5384.

oNi I ele tmres th ae
Columbia County Extension
of the University of Florida
Institute of Food and
Agricultural Sciences.


.; -


-. .n' . --.' '~


E NGAG EM CENTS


BOOK: Takes critical look at internships


MOe ossMoor '
Jim and SallyMoses
of Lake City announce
the engagement' and
approaching marriage of
their daughter, Christine
Michelle Moses of Lake
City, to David Christopher
Moor of Lake City. He is
the son of Laura Moor
and the late Bruce Moor
of Norfolki, Va.
The bride-elect is
a 2005 graduate of
Columbia High School.
She graduated in 2009
from theUniversity of
,Florida with a Bachelor
of Science in finance.
She is employed at
Suwannee Valley Electric
Cooperative in Live Oak.
~The future groom is a
2001 graduate of Columbia
High School. He graduated
in 2006 from the University


BIRTH ANNOUNCEMENTS


Kornegay '
Keith and Mis y
Kornegay of White Springs
announce the birth of their
daughter, Brie Anastasia
Noel Kornegay, April 9
at Shands Lake Shore
Hospital.
She weighed 8 pounds'
3 o~uncces and measured 18

She joins siblings
DNmi ,n 12, Ariel, 11 and
Grandparents are Paul
and Jo Pittman, Howell
Stuart and Howard and
Vickie Kornegay. Great-
grandparents are Betty
Parks and the late Eva





SU NDAY CROSSWORD



END OF THE LINE By Matt Ginsberg / Edited by Will ShortZ 1" 2" 3 4 5 6 7 8 1 0 1'1" 12"I' 13 1415 1617 1


5 76 8


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3. 9


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8 E 9 8 9I 6 9 L:




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Answers to last Sunday's Crossword.


CIRIEIOLE AR I ST DIDE RE IBEEL

LIORIGNNETETTE ATIE S IA LOIN

YIMIA ELDIOIO~INSFIORBI DIDIIN IG

AIB I DIE CIAIST ALLALT LAT EIA
FIOIRIG IVEIUISITIH ISIDIA Y EINIC
OIBIOEE IMIPIS NARYYIU B TTIE





MINTS BILOCYHII IDTONA RI PS EI

PVC PLAYHARDTOFORGETT

GIR INAINID FIO R BEAR ITI EIL F
LE~V( IITIT LIAE EAER N A FIATIAIL
AIMIAIZ E IARR CAR IESIAIFO RTUNE
D INEIR A ISSIETERTED PIEE EDEE
SITIAINISTHS TH S AILY STEEDSIDI


LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & CROSSWORD SUNDAY, APRIL 24, 2011


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


ARIES (March 21-Apri
19>: Contributeyourthoughts
to a group decision. Equality
and sharing will make a differ-
ence to the outcome of a ven-
ture. Uncertainty with regard
to a personal relationship must
be confronted before you get
in over your head. AA
.TAURUS (April 20-May
20): Taking a look at where
you stand emotionally, men-
tally and financially will help
you get an idea of what's re-
quired in order to move in a
direction that suits you better.
The only limitation you have
is the one you put on yourself.
SrAAAA
GEMINI (May 21-June
20): You need to experi-
ence new people, places and
activities. Getting involved in
different cultural groups or an
organization that you've never
been involved with in the past
will open your eyes to new
possibilities. Romance is high-
lighted. The right moves will
enhance your love life. AAA
CANCER (June 21-Juhly
22): Moodiness can ruin
your day. Impulsive action
will lead to loss. Pull yourself
together and avoid self-pity.
Now is the time to make per-


SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov.
21): Emotional issues will
arise in conversation. Address
whatever is bothering you in-
stead of wasting valuable time
that should be used to make
your home and family life bet-
ter.' Use your imagination to
find a potentially profitable
venture. AAA
SAGIITARIUS (Njov. 22-
Dec. 21): Take time to help
those less fortunate. Abide by
any rules set by authorities or
you will face the cons'equenc-
es. Investing in yotir home or
your future will not be a waste
of time or money. AAAr
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-
Jan. 19): You'll have a diffi-
cult time dealing with friends,
relatives and neighbors. For
now, remain the friendly ob-
server until you are better
positioned to win any war you
want to wage. Stick close to
home. -kAA
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Stop, look arid
listen before you make any fi-
nancial decision. Collect facts
and figures so you have a
better uriderstandling of your
options. Take the initiative to
further your education in an
area of interest~ and you can
raise your mecome. raise your
income. 3 sta
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): Your greatest rewards
Will come from the satisfaction
*of helping others. New friend-
ships will begin if you take
pat in an unusual event. Your
insi Ittwill be right on and the
choices you make will lead to
a brighter future. Jr A


THE LAST WORD

Eugenia WNord

anal dem aosr, not ance pla
negativity or an overindulgent
disposition. At
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):
Everything you do will be-
tome the hot topic or the
thing everyone wants to join
in. Have fun and enjoy the mo-
ment but beware of someone
whose jealous tendency is out
to do you harm. Protect your
reputation. AAA
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): There is no quick fix.
When it comes to diet, health
and getting into shape, it takes
hard work and discipline. Fast
cash and joint ventures aren't
likely to bring you a wind-
fall. Use your creativity to
work toward your objectives.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct
22): Uncertainty regarding
your personal life and future
will arise. If you aren't happy
with the way things -are go-
ing, discuss your options. Ro-
,mance is in the stars. Enhance
your current relationship or
move on to someone new.


DEAR ABBY: I am a nice,
charming, likable young man
in my mid-20s. I have almost
no friends. I rarely see the
ones I do have because they
don't live in my province. I can
count the number of people I
consider friends on one hand.
I am close with my family,
though none of them live close
enough to see regularly. I work
from home, so there's no one I
come in contact with daily ex
cept my husband, whom I love
dearly.
I know there are things I
could do to meet more people
and make friends, but I don't
really want to. Maintaining
friendships feels like more
work than it's worth to me. I
don't dislike people and I'rn
certainly not a snob. But when
I have a conversation, it feels
like I'm trying to be interest-
ing for their sake and I don't
really care about them, and I
wonder why they seem to care
about me
I'm not bitter or lonely,,but
I don't think this is normal.
Should I accept that this is
who I am, or should I worry?
- LONER IN TORONTO
DEAR IDNER: Excuse
me, but there are contradio.
tions in your letter. If you
weren't concerned that there
was something to worry about,
yoth wouldn't have written to
me. Now it's time for you to
talk to a counselor and take
a deeper look at what's really


hadn't had an attack in years,
until I found myself having
one recently at the gym. I ran
to the dressing room in tears
to battle it out, and was prac-
ticing breathing deeply when I
spotted something shiny in the
far corner of the room. I imme-
. diately flashed on the "pennies
from heaven" letters I have
read in your column and, still
crying, went to see what it
was. As soon as I saw it was a
penny, I felt calmer.
Abby, I haven't lost anyone
close who might have sent me
a penny, but when I picked it
up it had the year of my birth
on it. I understood then it was
intended for me, and my anxi-
ety dissipated.
I'm confused, though. Is
this something our guardian
angels share amongst them-
selves, or did an unknown
angel take pity on me? JEN-
NIFER IN ONTARIO, CAN-
ADA
DEAR JENNIFER: The
subject of guardian angels is
a spiritual one and very per-
sonal. I believe that some of
us have guardian angels right
here on Earth watching over
us as well as those from above.
And if one of them had a spare
moment, it wouldn't be atypi-
cal to help out someone~ in a
(penny) pinch.
SWrite Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, LOS
Angeles, CA 90069.


--



Abigad Van Buren
www~deaorbby~com '
going on. My intuition tells me
there may be issues you need
to address.
DEAR ABBY: I was in a
long-term relationship with a
man who died recently. After
his death I found out he had
other girlfriends while he was
with me. It turns out he was a
con man who used women. I
am stunned, sad, hurt, angry
and feel like a fool.
When people who knew
us as a couple see me, they
ask about him. When I say he
died, they respond by offering
condolences over "my loss.
Should I thank them for their
kindness and leave it at that,
or should I tell them the truth
about him so they won't waste
time feeling bad about his d -
mise? TRICKED IN RICH-
MOND, VA.
DEAR TRICKED: If it wil
make you feel better to vent,
do it. However, if rehashing
the unhappy details would
make you feel worse, keep
them to yourself.
DEAR ABBY: I have been
dealing with an anxiety disor-
der I thought I had beaten. I


CELE BR ITY C IPHER

bytluis Campos
Celebnty Cipher cryptogram are reat~ed rom geuro aino yrm people, past and present.
Today s clue: X equals P
" WMIX CWOS GI W ZSC M H O W GR IS H
F WL D T VW JMOU ,LDR CDDJ -CM JS
L D RI X W H H X D IG X N DG D. W C UD I S
PREVIIOUS SOLUTION: "Easter tells us that life is to be interpreted not silitply
in terms of things but in terms of ideals." Charles M. Crowe
(c) 2011 by NEA, Inc. 4-25


112 Saint's place
116 Essentials
119 Con Ed, e.g.: .
Abbr.
120 "I have the
heart of a small
boy. It ": .
Stephen King
124 Classic role-
playing game,
for short
125 Dairy mascot
126 Slate, for one
127 Fooled
128 Out-line?
129 Perform it la
.Shakespeare
130 Place for
military supplies
131 Mayo
container?

Down .
1 Feature of many a.
.Jet Li film
2."Already?"
3 Stanza successor .
4 Get fixed?
5 19-Across has a
much-used one
6 The Beatles during
Beatlernania,
e.g.
7 Heaps
8 Totally fail .
9 Diving duds
10 J.F.K.'s
successor
11 Forbidding
12 1960s doo-wop
goup w th an

name, with "the,,
13 Escorts to a

at et, stay
14 First Congolese
P.M. Lumumba


15 Czech neighbors
16 Liza Minnelli,
for one
17 First pope to be
called "the
Great"
18 "Love leave

24 Like Inspqctor
Clouseau
25 Superlative
prefix
26 Inside look?
31 Roger of
"Cheers"
32 Pi'erbre is there:

34 Scottish
psychiatrist R.
D.
37 Squirt, e.g.
38 '13 grad in 'll,
* e.g.
39 Biblical patriarch
"righteous in
this generation"
40 Decorative kit
41 Become a traitor
45 Glutton
46 Wet lowland
47 __Minor
48 Wettish
50 Crocus or
freesia,
botanically
51 Chinese gang
53 Eugene O'Neill'st
__ Christie
54 Palindromic time
57 Battle of the
A 9tlanti cvf ss l
motto
60 Spot
61 Fruit that grows
in a cluster
62 Cries of pain
64 Bugs Bunny's
girlfriend


Across
1 Screen grp.?
4 Solzhenitsyn
subject
9 Dives (into)
14 Song
accompanied by
a harp
19 Huffington Post
buyer in 2011
20 Lyric muse
21 Wear down
22 Tree-lined path
in une fort
23 "I used to do

itc H berg
27 Intvent
28 Ignores
29 Dam result, often
30 Sends one out of
,the park
33 Alone, in Patils
35 Lady of
Lamm'ermoor
36 "The car stopped
on a dime.
Unfortunately,
the dime was

Anonymous
42 Mexican
Valentine's
greeting
43 Madre's hermano
44 Recuperate
46 Kind of diet
49 "Never mind',
52 Asian flatbread
55 Mystifying
Geller .
For any three answers,
call from atouch-tone
k o~n e: 19025656'
with credit card, 1-80-
814-5554.


56 Biblical name
meaning "hairy"
58 "I don't want to
achieve
immortality
through my
work. I want to
achieve it ":
Woody Allen
63 Like Jack, it's
said
66 Some doors
67 Exploding stars
68 "Whoever named
it necking was
Ma": Groucho
75 Sci-fi film with a
hatching egg on
its poster
76 Cork's place:
Abbr. ,
77 More moist
79 "Y~ou know what
I hate? Indian
givers. ___":
Emo Philips -
86 Affix carelessly,
with "on" -
87 Crush, sportswise
88 Whisked mixture
89 Send
continuously, as
video
9? Physicist Georg
93 Cut off
97 Dinner table
command, with
"up
99 Above
101s" on' nlitrean to
cold or cruel, but
I am ": Bill
Hicks
109 Fool's deck
110 Fashionable
'70s dress
111 Breastbones


65 The Phantom of
the Opera
69 Taunt
70 A law itself
71 Venus and others
72 Grand slam, e.g.
73 Whence Venus?
74 When said three
times, "Of
course,
obviously!"
78 Record stat
79 Sleep precursor


80 Gets charged up? 98 F-15, e.g.


108 Admonish, as a
child
112 Aspect
113 Org. for part-
time soldiers
14 Colanda fu er

117 What you might
do after retiring
118 Fabric scrap,
say
121 Family girl
122 6 letters
123 Thus far


81 Really liking
82 "Quit your
crying"
83 It's assumed
84 Nile menace'
informally
85 Vegas attraction
90 Cashpoints
91 Vintner Claude
94 Doesn't cut
95 Empty pretense.
96 Garage opener?


100 Ann Landers or
Ayn Rand: Abbr.
102 Drove (along)
103 French walled

Engih Channel
104 Something that
can't be patented
105 Like stadium
seating
106Daniel of
Nicaragua
107 Simultaneity


HO ROSCOP ES


'DEAR ABBY


YOily Imall With few frends


SeellS 1101 10 WRIt any Inore






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