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The Lake City reporter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01535
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 4/23/2011
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
System ID: UF00028308:01535
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text

I


Ag ric ul tur e

commissioner to

visit local 'school


~B -- "Florida pastor jailed prior to protest


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GAINESVILLE FL 32611-1943


www.Iakecityre


Saturday, April 23, 20 II


Daveyon Brown (fr~om
left), 9; Khairya Robinson,
1.1; Khamya M~cQuay,
10; Takyian Acosta, 7; ri1
Jazymrfe McQuay, 16; and &?(~~ Z zL ~ i'CtEa
Theodosia Brown enjoy
lunch at Lake Isabe~lla Park
Friday in celebration of (~~~alPi~ ~ ---
Earth. Day. jiB_



JASON MATTHEC WLKER e= eE~ 'IeL1





KEEPING EARTH DAY


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
William Hamilton (left) and Cody Price wash one of a 12
dogs taken from Skunkie Acres on April 7. The~ dog was
said to be infested with fleas.' Skunkie Acres reclaimed all-
12 dogs from the humane society on Thursday.


Skunkie Acres


day in court

set for May 24


gbaobrosuto
lulSallCe iSSUe.

By C.J. RISAK .
crisak@lakecityreporter.com
The new date set for
the Skunkie Acres nui-
sance hearing could fmnal-
ly provide an answer to
the problem. And that jus-
tification is something the
people on opiioilite sides
of the issde feel they looth
deserve.
Which means someone
won't be happy.
The new court date is
set for May 24. At least
four neighbors of Skunkie
Acres, the riding stable
and exotic zoo located in


t co'sig e a ffd d amo ts
regarding. the numerous
complaints filed against it.
The nuisance complaints
were for noise, or eXCes-
sive barking b~y the dogs,
as well as the dogs wan-
dering untended through
the neighborhood.
'"The witnesses-neigh-
bors will all be in the
courtroom to give testimo-
ny," said Terry Marques,
director of the Humane
Societyj/Lake City Animal
Shelter who served the
complaint April 7, leading
to the dogs being taken
from Skunkie A9cres.
"They are actually neigh-
SK(UNKIE 'continued on3~jA


said. "W~e have to take care
of it so that kids like him
(Kaiden) can have fun mn
the future."
Earth Day held
annually on April 22 for
more than 40 years is
~designed to inspire and
mobilize individuals and
organizations worldwide to
act on theii conimitinent
to environmental protec-
tion and sustainability,
according to the Earth Day
,Network website'
EARTH continued on 34


By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com

together outside
at Lake Isabella
viras how Kay
Osedigthedyseen of Lake
City and, her 5-year-old .
grandson, K~aiden, com-
memorated Earth BaJ
2011 Friday. .
"I think it's important
that we keep as much nat-
ural beauty as we can and
remember that we have
to take care of it," Osteen


JASON MATTHEW WALKERILeab Call Repeal.
A few Coreopsis flowers are seen among unopened- buds in
an itight-acre field off of Branford. Highway. The Coreopsis,
which are often mistaken as Black-eyed Susans, was named
Florida's wildflower in 1991.


SPutnam to read
to students at
City Elemeritalf.
From staff reports
Florida Agriculture
Commissioner Adam
Putnam is scheduled to
read with local 'elemen-
tary school students dur-
ing Florida Agriculture
Literacy Day on Monday.
Putnark is slated to be
in Lake City and read with
ColumbiaCityElementary
School students at 11 a.m.
Monday. He is expected
to read "Florida Farms at
Work" during his visit at
the local school.


The visit to Columbia
county is part of the
Florida Agriculture
Literacy Day.
He is also scheduled
to read with students
in Ocala at Shady Hill
Elementary School from
8:30-9:30 a.mn.
Florida Agriculture
Literacy Day is a partner-
ship between the Florida
DepartmentofAgriculture
and Consumer Services
and Florida Agriculture
in the classroom, a non-
profit organization tasked
with educating Florida
students and teacherS
about the importance of
agriculture.


JASON MATTHEW WALKERILake City Reporter
Fort White High School students Chelsea Gore, 16, and Cody Howard, 16, embrace Friday afternoon while overlooking Lake
Isabella. Friday was the international celebration of Earth Day.


Demonstration wvas
set for M~iddle Eastem
neighborhood.
By COREY WILLIAMS
Associated Press
DEARBORN, Mich. -- A Florida
pastor's planned demonstration out-
side a Michigan mosque was scuttled
Friday after a jury determined the
protest would constitute a breach of
the peace and he was briefly jailed


for refusing to pay what authorities
called a "peace bond."
The Rev. Terry Jones, whose
past rhetoric against Muslims has
inflamed anti-Western sentiment in
Afghanistan, said he refused to pay
the $1 bond because to do so would
violate his freedom of speech. He
later paid it and was released.
SJones had planned a demonstration
Friday evening outside the Islamic
Center of America in Dearborn, a
suburb of Detroit that is home to one
of the largest: Muslim communities


in the nation. An estimated 30,000
people in Dearborn, about a third of
the city's population, trace their roots
to the Middle East.'
Prosecutors worried the protest
*would lead' to violence and asked
Dearborn District Judge Mark
Somers to intervene. Somers con-
ducted a one-day jury trial to deter-
mine whether Jones would pose a
threat to peace. They did, and Somers
then ordered Jones and an associate
PASTOR continued on 3jA


~ASSOCIATED PRESS
Pastor Terry Jones (right) of Gainesville and Wayne Sapp
react to the jury's verdict, that both of them are likely to cause
a breach of the peace with their proposed protest against at
the Islamic Center of America Friday in Dearborn, Mich.


(386 75-@293
SUBSCRIBETo
THE REPORTER:
Vie: 7545


Opii. n.... .. d ...
C eunndar.0ri a...........
Advice & Comics .. ...
Puzzles ............. ..


COMING
SUNDAY
Easter has arrived
in many forms.


Region Next state Bound
14 CHS athletes advance Fort W~hite runners
from 4-3A track. heading to 1-2A meet.


Columrbia Falls
Tigers tumble in slugfest
to Suwannee, 18- I .


Sports, IB


l~e por ter

pborter.com Vol. I 37, No. 77 1 75 cents


am,


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Serves as reminder to

prOtect environment.


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90 6 3

WVEATHER, 2A


TODAY IN
FAITH
Po~pe answers
On~ video.











, Celebrity Birthdays


SN OEWP LE IN T HE IPE



Giffords makes Time s 'most influential' hst


AROUND FLORIDA


THE WEATHEI~R :


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Page Editor:- Jason M. Walker, 754-0430


M Actress-turned-diplomat
Shirley Temple Black is 83.
M Actor Alan Oppenheimer
is 81.
Actor David Birney is 72.
Actor Lee Majors is 72.
Irish nationalist Bernadette
Devlin McAliskey is 64.
Actress Blair Brown is 63.
H Writer-director Paul
Brickman is 62.
M Actress Joyce DeWitt is 62.
Actor James Russo is 58.

Daily Scrio~ture


a Filmmaker-author Michael
Moore is 57.
Actress Judy Davis is 56.
Actor George Lopez is 50.
Actor Kal Penn is 34.
Actress Jaime King is 32.
Actor Aaron Hill is 28.
Actress Rachel Skarsten
is 26.
Termis player Nicole
Vaidisova is 22.
M Actor Dev Patel ("Slumdog
Millionaire") is 21.


Friday:
Afternoon: 8-2-1
Evening: 1-2-9


l/)Forecasts, data and
S.graphics @ 2011 Weather
V etal P Madsn r s.



atherVV Vw~~'epuhl~


PHOENIX

U.S. Rep. Gabrielle
Giffords as one of the 100
most influential people in
T t~~~he world.i mgzn a me
President Barack Obama wrote
the tribute to Arizona congress-
woman in the magazine's May.issue,
saying Giffords may not have been a
household name before she was shot
in the head in a Jan. 8 mass shooting
in Tucsozi, but now "she's got the
prayers of a nation rooting for her."
Obama wrote Giffords is a "model
of civility and courage and unity a
needed voice that cannot return

Those ivho also made the list of
leaders, thinkers, artists and heroes
include comedienne Amy Poehlet,
Oscar winner Colin Firth, Facebook
founder Mark Zuckerberg, singer
Justin Bieber, WikiLeaks fodnder
Julian Assange, fist lady Michelle
Obama and author Jonathan
Franzen.
Also on Time's list was Wael
Ghonim, the Google Inc. execu-
tive who anonymously launched a
Facebook page that helped orga-
nize protests that led to the oust of
former Egyptian President Hosni
Mubarak.
Mohamed ElBaradei, a Nobel
Peace laureate and former head of
the U.N. nuclear watchdog agency,
wrote Ghonim's tribute, said that the
Egyptian worked "outside the box
to make his peers understand that
only their unstoppable people power
could effect real change."

Actor James Firanco
seeks Ph.D. in HoustOD
HOUSTON James Franco, 33,
has worr a spot in a University of
Houston creative writing program.
The university confirms that .
the actor nominated for the 2010
Academy Awar~d for best' actor in


"FOr Since the creation of the
world God's invisible qualities
- his eternal power and divine
nature have been clearly
seen, being understood from
what has been made, so that

people are without excuse."
Romans' 1:20


Lakee City
HOW ~TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293
Fax number ............. .752-9400
Circi stion ..1.... ec r e 5
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
Ee iodia pSt UkepaidC la Lk Ciy l.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
Ciny Re drer. Rdep ewcio in wo r
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Senrice
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Pbe ,hrod Wisn .....754-0418
(twilson~lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
Asstant Editor CJ Risak. 754-0427

(crisak~~lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Ashley Butcher ...754-0417
(abutcher~lakecityreporter.com)
CLASSIFIED
To place classified ad, call 755-5440.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Rep. Gabrielle Giffords, D-Ariz., takes part in a reenacfmnent of her swearing-in, on
Capitol Hill in Washington on Jan. 5. Time magazine has named Giffords one of
the 100 most influential people in the world.


rReporter
BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon.,..754-0419
(sbrannon~lakecitreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7:30
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should

10:30 a.m., next day re-delively or ser-
vice related credits will be issued,
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation .............. .755-5445
(circulation~lakecityreporterscom)
Home delivery rates
p-2uesday through Sunday) $63
24 Weeks. ......... $48.79
52 Weeks. .................. $83.46
Rate indueds7%salestax
12 Weeks. ........ $41.40
24 Weeks. ......... $82.80
52 Weeks. .................$1 79.40


been accepted for
the school's doctoral
program in literature
-. and creative writ- .
ing. Creative writing
program director
Franco James Kastely said
that Franco plans tO ~
enroll in September 2012.

Pharrell struggles tO
be eco-conscious
NEW YORK Pharrell Williams
may be involved with the textile

Textiles -which
creates clothes from
recycled bottles
but he said his
intention isn't to be
'eco-friendly.
The rapper-pro-
Williams ducer said that he


wasn't eco-conscious growing up and
still isn't.
And while the company is an eco-
friendly one, Pharrell said its main
goal is to make quality productS.

Madelyn Pugh~ Davis,
'Luc~y' writer dies at 90
LOS ANGELES Madelyn Pugh
Davis, a screenwriter who co-created
the lines and slapstick that L~ucille
Ball brought to life in TV's classic
comedy "I Love Lucy," has died.
Davis died Wednesday after a
brief illness, hier son, Michael Quinn
Martin, said Thursday.
Davis and her longtime writing
partner, Bob Carroll Jr., crafted all
episodes for the hit CBS TV sitcom's
fist four years before they were
joined by two other writers, said
Lucie Arnaz, Ball's daughter.

SAssociated Press


The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run
in this pae.rd ndthqn'kS for reading.


acksonville


189/63 .' *l1
Lake City
90/63
'`\ Cainestile e
\89/63
Ocala *
89/63 O

880~


._ .
Tallahassaee
88/62 ..~

81/66:


City Sunday
('ape Canavea I126p


Monday


86/76/pc
89/65/pc
88/63/pc
84/64/pc
85/78/pc
88/63/pc
86/75/pc


87/67/pc
79/68/pc
83/70/s
87/64/pc
86/70/pc
90/62/pc
85/75/pc


i~f4 6/7oaBec
\ Ft. Lauderdale
Da~fga Beacil Fort Myers
8 67 Gainesville
Jacksonville
iando Ca Ceanaveral KeY West .
/66 82/68 Lake City
Miami

West Paki Biach cl
84/72 Orlando
it Lauderdale Panama City
85/74 iPensacola
SNaples Tallahassee
'90/69 Ma Tampa
Wes /~74 Valdosta
78B~ :::C W. Palm Beach


84/75/s
89/64/pc
88/62/pc
85/63/pc
85/78/pc
89/62/pc
85/75/s


87/66/pc
87/67/pc
83/69/s
89/63/pc
87/68/pc
89/61/pc
83/71/s


A life saver's tale

Helen Beard of Worksop, England, answers questions at a
news conference describing her ordeal. She was recognized
for saving the life of a 1-year-old child in Orlando with a
IMedal of Merit by Orange County Sheriiff Jerry Demmings
Friday in Orlando. On April 21, Beard ran from the swimming
pool of the hotel she was visiting after she noticed a child
hanging from a fourth floor balcony and arrived in time to
catch the little girl as she fell.


\ *0
Ft. myrerst
90/68


90-year-old mother.
It took less than an hour
for the six jurors to return
the verdict Thursday
against Richard Cassin, 53.
He faces a maximum of 30
years in prison when he is
sentenced in June,
Florence Cassin died
last June, a few weeks after
she was removed from
what officials described
as a filthy house. First
responders testified that
the elderly woman com_
municated through groans
and moans.


Maa yag tjgg?
eXpecting cubs
WEST PALM BEACH

Cout loom sai e of
its rare Malayan tigers is
expecting cubs.
The tiger, named Berapi,
has been at the zoo since
November. Officials said
she could deliver up to
four cubs in May.
The Malayan tiger is
one of the smafilest of the
tiger species, and some
estimates suggest there
could be as few as 500


remaining in the wild. It
is found in the Malayan
peninsula in Thailand and
Malaysia.

Truck hits stroller
and kills girl
PENSACOIA A
Florida baby was killed
after the stroller she was
being pushed in was .
struck by a pickup truck in
Pensacola.
Police said Shakuriyah
Jenkins rode inoa double

young child when they
were hit by a 1993 Nissan
picku tr i driven
Thursday evening.


been pushing the stroller,
while the mother, Shiesha
Knight, 17, walked along-
side them. Police said they
were crossing a street and
standing in a yellow safety
area in the center of the
roadway when Williams'
vehicle merged into the
striped area and hit them.


Key
86/


An exclusive

brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.


- *'
weather.com


I


TEMPERATURES
High Friday
Low Friday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high .
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Friday
Month total

Nrma Imnonth-to-date
Normal year-to-date


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise tom.
Sunset tom.

M00Ill
Mooprise today
Moonset today
Moonrise tom.
Moonset tom.


90
S62
'82
56
94 in 1968
42 in 1962


0.00"
0.69"


13.38"


6:55 a.m.
8:03 p.m.
6!54 a.m.
8:04 p.m.


1:05 a.m.
11:43 a.m.
1:50 a.m.
12:42 p.m.


A2 3 10 1
Lat New ait nul 3l




6a oi~n rnl 5jl deIn
nday 1 MOj, a heat wa~.ve

centraj U5S sainn.
aSn. Set the tat 5[~!

a reajlng of los
aegprees. It wcas one
or 19 recora mnl~
lapaue p rature~s to be;


SAssociated Press


LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING SATURDAY, APRIL 23, 2011


Thursday:
1-4-8-28-31


SFriday:
SAfternoon: 3-4-3-9
.. Evening: 8-4-3-3


EH 3*


CO RREC TIO N


o~u de fie house
PORT ST. LUCIE A
caller alerted St. Lucie
County Fire District offi-
cials that a newborn baby
was inside a bag left in
front of the building.
The call came in as
firefighter Stephen Beane
arrived at work Thursday
morning.
Beane found the baby
girl, wrapped in towels
and ~plastic bags, along~
with a note indicating
she was born at 7:15 a.m.
Thursday.
The baby was taken
to L~awnwood Regional
Medical Center in Fort
Pierce where Beane said
she appeared to be in
'pretty good health."
The Department of
Families and Children said
the infant will be ~turned
over to the Children's
SHome Society for adoption.

Family doubts that
toddler killed mom
FORT IAUDERDALE
A toddler whose father
said he accidentally shot
his mother to death has
been temporarily removed}
from his father's custody.
The father of the boy,
2, called 911 Wednesday
saying the child had some-
how accessed the gun and
accidentally fired the 9 mm
semiautomatic weapon.
SOn Friday, a judge
Ordered the child into the
care of his mother's rela-
tives.
SThe child's great ahuent,

boy doesn't understand
what happened and keeps
asking for his mother Julia
Bennett, 33.

Man convicted

of elderly abuse
SVIERA A jury found a
Brevard County man guilty
of aggravated manslaugh-
ter in the death of his


101aiutestolm
Today's
ultraviolet
radiation risk
for the area on
Ssle from 0





SKUNKIE* Court data

Continued From Page LA


r








\\






1301 NW 76th Blvd 352 332-2695 bowlsplitz.com


,Well, we thought you'd like something productive on
your pad to prove to your spouse that it's really a useful
tool for financial management. Well worth the invest-
ment you made to buy it. And so much more than just
a toy for playing Angry Birds.
See, you actually can do something useful with this new
technology. You can see if you've got paid yet, balance
your checkbook, pay a few bills, make a loan payment
transfer funds to your kids away at college, and more!
Oar you can just act like you're taking notes at that meet-
ing instead of updating your facebook< page.
We also have old-fashioned internet banking for those
who've not yet convinced their spouse that they really
need the newest pad devices or cell phones.

,, n.But keep in mind, if you want
P ;;. to get the red tootsie pops,
you're going to have to come
visit us to get one. Peoples
State Bank. Now that's Bank-
mng!



a


LAKE CITY RE ORTER LOCAL & STATE SATURDAY, APRIL 23, 2011


Page Editor.: Todd Taylor, 754-0427


Jhooe eby s teople as
of Columbia County."
He died Feb. 16, 1925,
and businesses in the coun-
ty were closed in honor of
his funeral. He was laid
to rest in the Oaklawn
Cemetery in Lake City. '
DeWitt Cason, Clerk of
Court of Columbia County
is a descendant of Ives.
Other relatives in the com
munity include: Thomas
W. Ives, Bruce Ives, Alexis
Ives, Mary Virginia Ives
McRae, Mike McRae,
Norman Ives McRae,
Wanda Nichole Hicks
Lee, Daniel Hicks, Owen
Norman Lee, Christopher
P. McRae, Christopher
James McRae, Barney E.
McRae III, Bryan Cason
and Matt Cason.


From staff reports

Mary Jane Dykes Weaver
and Martha Jean Dykes
Newbern, members of the
Edward Rutledge Chapter
Daughters of the American
Revolution, presented a
program on Wtashington
Mackey Ives, Jr., April l4.
Ives was one of the most
i~nfuential people in the hi?-
tory of Columbia County.
He was born 1843 in St.
Augustine and moved with
his family to Columbia
County in 1844.
In 1860, he began writ-
ing a diary about life in
the county leading up to
the Civil War. Ives did
not believe in secession
but enlisted in 1862 in
Company C, then Company
K, Florida .Regiment


Du ewrocewa any letters
home during the war and
his diary and Civil War
letters are now in the hold-
ings of the Florida State
Archives.
Ives taught himself law
without going to college,
and was admitted to prac-
tice in 1866. He was also
involved in mercantile
businesses and saw-mill
and shipping interests.
He married Arabelle
Elizabeth Parshley, whose
family was instrumental in
establishing the town of
Live Oak.
In 1875, he was elected
mayor of Lake City, and
in 1876 he was elected
citjr clerk and treasurer.
He held that office, with-
out opposition, until he


re dwas elected county
judge in 1877 and held that
office for 40 years.
He was a member of
the Florida Constitutional
Convention in 1885, and,
along with his wife, he was
an organizer of the Advent
Christian Church.
The biography of
Washington Mackey Ives,
Jr., was included in the
prestigious Biographical
Souvenir of the States of
Georgia and Florida, pub-
lished in 1889 because of
his notoriety.
His life of usefulness to
the community was noted
in the June 6, 1902 issue of
The Florida Index, which
stated, "Perhaps there is -
not a single man in the
state who is loved and


From staff reports

The Lifestyle Enrichment
Center's Crochet Class
donated handmade baby
items to the Pregnancy
Care Center of Lake City
Friday.
Crafting the items have
become an annual proj-
ect for the group, and the
senior volunteers love the
opportunity to bless others
in the community
"I prayed over every
blanket fo~r the babies that
would receive them," said
Leah Goff, one of the vol-


unteers.
The donation included
several baby caps, afghans,
baby blankets, and bibs.
Donna Sandage,
Pregnancy Care Center,
was thrilled with the gifts,
she said. Each item meant
so much because many of
the women coming to the
Care Center have nothing.
Sandage plans to take pic-
tures of some of the moth-
ers who receive the items
to send back to the seniors
and show their reaction to
the gifts.


Osteen said she and
her grandson planned
on planting new plants at
home for their Earth Day
demonstration.
Eating outside at Lake
Isabella with her five
children was Theodosia
Brown's commemoration
of Earth Day.
Brown, of Lake City,
said people need to sus-
tain the planet because it
is their home. .
"God created it, so it's
important that we take
care of it," she said.
Pat Stevens of Lake City
Said she and her grand-
son, Chip, planted new
plants at her home like


knockout roses, tomato
plants, daylilies and
hydrangeas prior to Earth
Day and are taking care
of them with water and
fertilizer.
When asked why caring
for the Earth is important,
Stevens said for its beauty,
people's enjoyment and
health reasons.
"We just couldn't live
without trees and flowers,"
she said. "~They just add
so much for our beauty
and .out' health."
"Just the beauty of
it and the enjoyment,"
Stevens said. "I can't
imagine not having it (the
Earth's beauty).


because "Scott is thumb- '
ing his nose at clean water
on Earth Day."
The standards, the first
the agency has adopted
for a state, are designed
to prevent toxic algae
blooms that have choked
Florida waters, killing
fish and sickening people.
Thte are cra ed by nu r-
and animal wastes.
"Florida is one of the
few states that has a com-
prehensive program in
place to address excess
nutrients, and we continue
to lead the nation in devel-
epnginnovathrlehtoolsoto
state's waterways," Scott
said in a statement
~Environmenta~lists,,
though,' say the state's
regulations are too~ weak
because 'they ~dorr't have
specific limits on the
amount of nutrients in
Florida's waters.


By BILL KACZOR
Associated Press

TALAHASSEE Gov.
Rick Scott authorized state
officials Friday to ask the
federal Environmental
Protection Agency to
back off on water pollu-
tion rules that Florida
bm nes an giulture
local government officials
say will be too costly to
implement
Scott's directive drew
a sharp response from a
lawyer for environmental
groulis that obtained a
federal court settlement

wui er uotriesnt his foe
Florida.
"The idea there isn't a
problem is absolutelyridic-
ulous," said David Guest,
a lawyer for Earthjustice,
Guest said the governor's
action "is political postur-
ing in its purest form"
and particularly galling


JASON MATTHEW WALKERILake City Reporter
A duck quickly gets out of the way of Takyian Acosta, 7, as he
runs through' Lake Isabella Park Friday.


tor from Amarillo, Texas,
who came to Detroit to
"'tike"'liarn't int' demonstra-
tion with Jones.
Jones acted as his own
attorney and told the jury
in his closing argument
that the mosque, one of
the largest in the country,
was chosen because his
protest is against "a radical
element of Islam."
"All we want to do is
walk, demonstrate, protest
on an area that already
belongs to you, to the city,"
Jones said. 'We are not
accusing this mosque. We
aire not accusing the people
of Dearborn. We are not
accusing all Muslims."


to post the bond to ostensi-
bly cover the costs of police
--prrtectliotn'.
While largely symbolic,
Sthe bond also came with
conditions that included a
prohibition on Jones from
going to the mosque or the
adjacent property for three
years. ,
Somers said he spoke to
the jury after they reached
their verdict and they told
him they were concerned
with the "time, place and
manner and not the con-
tent of the speech."
But Robert Sedler, a con-
stitutional law professor at
Wayne State University,
called the entire proceed-
ings unconstitutional. He
said the U.S. Supreme
Court has found that it's
the job of the police to
protect speakers at such
events and said it is uncon-
stitutional to require pro-
testers to post a bond for
police protection.


"What basis did the state
have for arguing that they
would breach the peace?"
Sedler said. "It's a matter of
First Amendment require-
ment: The government
can't stop a speaker from
speaking because of dan-
ger from a hostile crowd."
A burning of the Quran
in March at Jones' church
in Gainesville, Fla., led to
a series of violent protests
in Afghanistan that killed
more than a dozen people.
Wayne County Prosecutor
Kym Worthy said fears that
Jones could incite violent
counter-protests led them
to court.
"These proceedings
were solely about public
safety. This was never about
prohibiting free speech or
fearing rioting but about
a situation that could
potentially place the pub-
lic in danger in Dearborn,"
Worthy said.
But Dawud Walid, the


executive director of the
Michigan, chapter of the
Counlcil~ on Anierican ~
Islamic Relations, said
Jones and Sapp should have
been allowed to demon-
strate outside the mosque
to show that Muslims in
Dearborn would not have
rioted in response.
"Mr. Jones has been
made as a martyr for free
speech," Walid said.
Dearborn had denied
Jones a permit to protest
outside the mosque and
offered alternative sites, but
Jones wouldn't move the
location., He refused to pay
the bond to make a point
about freedom of speech,
said David Grisham, a pas-


bors who filled out the
affidavits."
Marques said his inter-
est in this situation is
what it should be: "We're
concerned about the wel-
fare of the' animals," he
explained, adding that
some of the dogs taken
from Skunkie Acres "had
not been well cared for.
The animals had not
received the proper mnedi-
cal attention."
In the two weeks the
Humane Society has had
them, the dogs "all got
examined, we got their
diagnosis, we got their.
report, and we gave them
treatments for .various
issues," Marques said.
That, he added, puts thd
pressure on Skunkie
Acres; when the Haake
family picked up the
dogs Thursday after get-
ting Judge Tom Coleman
to reverse his decision,
Humane Society person-
nel gave them "recom-
mendations" from their
veterinarians for their
care. The plan will have to
be adhered to or it could
lead to the animals being
reclaimed.
That won't be an issue,
according to Bernard
Haake, manager and co-
owner of Skunkie Acres.
"We'll be ready for them,"
he said. "'Two of them
tested positive for heart~
worm but they were
already being treated.
Another had a sore paw
and one had a shoulder
injury. We were already
treating them for prob-
lems they had.
"(The recommenda-
tions) were just what we
were already doing."
Haake added his fam-


ily, which runs Skunkie
Acres with him, was jubi-
lant when they got the
dogs back.
"The kids are still play-
ing with them," he said
"vryone is happy o
now.
"(The dogs) have
already had their baths.
When we picked 'em up,
they were loaded with
fleas.
Although Marques
would not go into detail
about the animals' medi-
cal problems, he did
say they were in better
shape when the Haakes
reclaimed them. And he
added they'd better still
be in good shape come
the May 24 hearing, which
was rescheduled because
the Haskes insisted they
missed the first hearing
because they were not
informed of a change in
date
"Who really knows
what (the Haakes) might
say?" Marques said. "But
the burden of proof falls
on the witnesses, to prove
they're making too much
noise."
Although the May 24
hearing could put many
issues to rest regarding
Skunkie Acres, it is just
as likely that nothing will
be resolved. As Marques
said, the Haakes could
insist improvements to
their facility have been
made and another inspec-
tion is necessary.
Marques, said once
again his only concern
was for the care of the
animals. That sentiment
was echoed by Haake.


Crochet class


RSSIStS Pregnancy

Careg Ce p


DAR honors historical county figure


EARTH: Environamenit

Continued From Page 1A


Scott asking EPA

to back off on

Fla. water rules


PASTOR: Protest blocked by courts
Continued From Page 1A

















C I I


DAA II/ es- rewwIcom


ANOTHER OPINION


Legislature should hold the

l1He On property insurance


4A


www.Iakecityreporter.com


AN
OPINION



Earth



Day has

failed

:srticp i
in Earth Day

back in 1970. We've manned
booths that teach people about
water pollution, we've orga-
nized environmental clean ups
in the Santa Monica Bay and
judged Earth Day posters at
schools in Pakistan. But regard-
-less of what we have done or

whe:9:whkav dneesm~ee' e

40 years of orgamnzed Earth
Day events, and the heightened
awareness of environmental
issues that they create, human-
ity collectively continues to
degrade the Earth,
Since Earth Day began, we
humans have fished down the
seas, scoured the Earth for
fossil fuels and rare earth ele-
ments, pumped more and more
CO2 into the atmosphere, and
created dead zones atid Texas-
sized garbage patches in our
oceans and bays. How can this
be? We're more environmen-
tally aware than ever before.
The problem is' that environ-
mental education has failed to
translate awareness into action.
To be effective, it must go
beyond creating awareness to
creating measurable changes
in our bg)1avior. Our future and
our children's future depend
upon it. Fortunat ly, there are
easy ways. to cut Iack odur con-
sumption,. .. .
Everyone learns about pollu-
ton uihrmK- sch or fom T.
children about the environment
- and how to respect it. Some
schools even take kids outside
tolearn about nature first hand,
But somehow, environmental
education has uniformly failed
to teach s hw to c ange our

Traditional environmental
education assumes that envi-
ronmental awareness will some-
hw taslt t o atin at i
action. Whatever action this
education has produced has
proven grossly insufficient to
keep pace with ch~vironmental
degradation '
SChristian Science Moriitor

Lak~e City Reporter
Serving Columbia Coun y
Smece 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
ClmIa tand Srus dn countries by
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities --"Newspapers
get things done!"
pu lihp dsign sei ond profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
ded cated to truth, integrity and hard



Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman .


Z-. .

Duke of Earl were marrying
Lady Gaga. That would be
something to get excited about. .
Instead of a stately anthem
featuring trumpets, all the
distinguished guests: could
chant "Duke, duke, duke, duke
of Earl!" As for Lady Gaga's
dress, that would be a sight!
There wouldn't be much of it, -
for starters, which would liven
*up the abbey no end.
This isn't far-fetched. If I
remember the lyric correctly,
nothing can stop the Duke of
Earl. .
Instead, nothing can stop
the Prince William and Kate
frenzy. The other morning I
was watching the "Today" show
and they described this as the
Wedding of the Centurry.
Wait a second! Even in
Queensland, the wedding of the -
century is always the one where
one of the participants is a close
relative. My own nomination
for wedding of the century was
when my daughter Allison.was
wed on a beach in Costa Rica,
as howler monkeys and other
relatives looked on. -
Who would want to have a
royal wedding anyway? How
frightfully stiff and boring. Will
they perform the chicken dance
afterward? Will they have a
.cookie table? And how about
all those ladies in waiting. I'd
be tempted to say, "Hey, ladies,
what are you waiting for? Get
out there and do the chicken
dance.
Worse yet, Kate and her
prince will be married by the
Archbishop of ,Canterbury, who
rejoices in the title "Primate
of All England." I say keep
the monkey business for the
honeymoon. -
If you see the Four Horsemen
gallop by in fright, give them a
passing mimosa toast for me. I
will be royally asleep.

MReg Henry is a columnist for
Sthe Pittsburgh Post-Gazette.


e ?


s soap opera
producers
understand, nothing
cheers up people
More than a good
wedding.
Economic depression lifts the
moment a bride walks down
the aisle, except, of course, for
the father stuck with the bill.
Why, the Four Horsemen of the
Apocalypse would gallop away
at the first sight of the floral
decorations.
And here's the jolly thing.
In less than two weeks,
Britain's royal family will
marry off Prince William to
Kate Middleton, thus cheering
millions of people around the
world, most of them women.
As for men, it is a fair guess
the~y will keep their; enthusiasm
under control. That's because
they know that this may be like
the Super Bowl of weddings,
but it's not actually the Super
Bowl.
My own wife will get up early
the morning of the wedding
to attend a breakfast timed to
coincide with the TV broadcast
from Westminster Abbey. No
doubt she will sip mimosas and
eat crumpets and have a grand
time.
As for me, although I like
to wash down a crumpet with
champagne and orange juice as
much as the next person first
thing in the morning, I will be
wearing my pajamas for the
occasion.
To paraphrase Henry V's
speech on the eve of Agincourt
ini William Shakespeare's
famous play, "And gentlemen in
America now a-b'ed, Shall think
themselves happy they were not
here."
I nriust now declare an old
prejudice. The truth is that I
have never had much fondness
for royals This is not my fault.
I grew up in the Australian
state of Queensland consider
that fateful name where
royal cousins and uncles of


Reg H-enry
rhenr)post gazette~com


great antiquity regularly came
on tours from England for no
better reason, I think, than the
Place was called Queensland.
To provide a spontaneous
welcome, thousands of us
school kids were rounded up
by menacing teachers and
marched down to the state
fairgrounds, where we stood
under the harsh tropical sun
wtillinothing to drink. After
many hours, the geriatric
aristocrat would arrive and
pretend to be the queen, even
making the little waving hand
movement.
We kids assumed that the
hand was really a stuffed glove
on a stick, probably operated
by a special butler maybe a
handman, much like a footman,
only employed for waving.
The one redeeming feature
was that when the royal visitor
finally appeared, he or she
would say in an accent so rich
and fruity that cake crumbs
surely fell on kids near the
podium, that we all had the
rest of the day off from school.
Hurray! Hurrah! That was the
one cheer we meant. Then we
went home to recover from the
thirst and dehydration.
But don't let me spoil the
royal wedding for you.
Just one quibble: How come
the nation that kicked King
George out should become
so excited about a marriage
involving his descendants? I
suppose this is just another
example of the distorting effects
of the cult of celebrity that holds
America in thrall.
I could understand it if the


is bad enough. A further boost
would be an unbearable burden .
for most South Florida resi-
dents, who rely on the state's
insurer of last resort because
private industry has redlined
large sections of this part of the
state. Many consumers already
have trouble making ends meet
and staying in their homes. This
could drive them over the edge.
We are all in favor of
increased competition and
offering incentives to lure more
insurance companies to do
business in Florida, but forcing
consumers to shoulder unac-
ceptably high costs is not the
solution.

aMiami Herald


reform bill, which opened the
door to a rollback of premium
discounts based on horte
improvements made by hom-
eowners a bad idea. This
year, the impact on businesses
and homeowners could be even
worse, particularly for those
covered by Citizens Property
Insurance most of South
Florida. There seems little rea- .
son to believe that Gov. Rick
Scott will be similarly inclined to
protect consumers.
Policyholder premiums could
shoot up by 15 percent or 25
percent a year, according to the
different versions in the House
and Senate (HB 1243 and SB
1714). Current law caps annual
increases at 10 percent, which


ERS
C Y


ost windstorm
insurance
consumers in
Florida would
Surely say
they already pay too inuch for
premiums, but lawmakers in
Tallahassee don't seem to care.
They're considering at least
three major insurance bills that
would either raise rates, reduce
homeowner protections, reduce
regulation or all three.
If the legislation follows the
pattern of previous years, a deal
will almost certainly be struck
in the final days of the session,
and as things now stand, hom-
eowners would be the losers,
Last year, Gov. Charlie Crist
vetoed the major insurance


Letters to the Editor should be
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spaced. Letters should not exceed
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length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
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BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


OINIO


Saturclay, April 23, 20 1 1


JyA bo se


Unions


hurting

economy



Company, all
innovator of some
moment irr the
T heBoeng rebuilding of a
recession-ravaged America,


Carolina with 1,000 employees
already hired and .. oh,
noe! There's a mugger! He's
Slobbering Boeing! Who is this
vHllain?
.Why, it's the National Labor
Relations Board deciding that
fair play and an improved
economy must never, ever
get in the way of union
wishes. The independent
agency, nowadays in the grip
of pro-labor Democrat~s, has
filed a complaint to make
Boeing desert South Carolina
and build the planned 787
Dreamliner passenger planes
in the state of Washington.
Do this, and union workers
, will carry out the job, and
every now and then, they may
well strike. That's something
they have been doing
repeatedly to Boeing, leading
to billion-dollar-plus losses that
ultimately help no one. But, as
a Watll Street~ Journal editorial
observes, it has ordinarily
been possible and a good thing
for the country and prosperity
that companies can move
operations around to where
conditions are most favorable.
Nothing doing', says the
complaint, which will be heard
in June. It contends Boeing
is undermining the right of
unions to strike by moving
away from striking unions,
a fresh-faced argument that
seeins to have more to do with
ideology than law. But labor
has a special friend pushing
things its way. That would be
Craig Becker, a former lawyer
for the Seirvice Employees
International Union who could
not get the nod of the Senate
for his job on the board and
~~got something else instead:
a recess appointment by the
president. He is reported to
be someone whose union
enthusiasm are virtually
unbounded.
Boeing's lawyers are
outraged, one of them telling
The New York Times this
move is absolute nonsense,
but absolute nonsense has
been getting its way quite a
bit in this country lately. If
it does this time around, it's
thought it could be a bad sign
for South Carolina and the'
other right-to-work states that
think individual rights should
:":,:1:de o lchis kwer
states, unions can have closed


companies if you do not join an
organization you may not want
to join. Never mind, join or go
elsewhere, and by the way,
don't suppose you can neglect
to pay your dues. They will be
subtracted from your paycheck
before you get it.
Let's all agree that there was
a time when unions helped
us get to justice in this land.
But let's understand, too,
that that the opposite can be
more nearly true today. It's
not an accident that union .
membership has dropped to
little more than 7 percent.
Jay Ambrose, formerly
Washington director of editorial
papr nd th ed tr ofr die sin
El Paso, Texas, and Denver, is a
columnist living in Colorado.


This royal w~e adding is


SO~~ ma


LETT
P.O LI





1~~~ 7 / a1%u 6 0) r






Newr and Moder~nl Furnl~ishings,:; Jewe~lry &~ G`ift~s


LAKE CITY REPORTER L OCAL &( STATE SATURDAY, APRIL 23, 2011


Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424


STo submit your Community
Calendar item, contact Antonia
Robinson at 754-0425 or by
e-mail at arobinson @
lakecityreporter.com.


U all ~



Mary or Bridget
/ 1 TODAY to place a
' surprise ad for
. ..someone you Love!
~755-5440 or

.. . .755-5441
. -Between 8am & Spm

*~


- * * Vt~


lowed by Sunday School
and breakfast at 9:45 a.m.
and an Easter pageant
at 11 a.m. Sunday. The
church is located on Hwy.
242.

Greater Truevine Easter
Service
Easter Sunrise Service
is 6 a.m. Sunday at Greater
Truevine Baptist- Church.
Sunday School is 9:45 a.m.
and morning worship is
11 a.m. -

Easter Chapel
An Easter Chapel
Sunrise Service is 6:30
a.m. Sunday at Falling
Creek. Contact Cherly
Pingel at '755-0580. '



Meet the Author
Butch Harrison, Florida
Cracker Storyteller,
is speaking at 7 p.m.
Tuesday at the Main
Library. Come hear him
share stories about the
rapidly disappearing
Florida of the past.


Wednesday

River Jam

Suwannee River Jam is
April 27-30 at the Spirit
of Suwannee Music Park.
Performances' include
Ronnie Dunn, Kellie
Pickler and more. Tickets
are available at S&S Food
Stores. Contact the park at
364-1683. Order online at
SuwanneeRiverfam. com.


COURTESY PHOTO

Shands hosts Relay for Life fundraiser
Shands at Lake Shore Regional Medical Center held a fundraiser April 15 to support their
Relay for Life team. The event raised more than $500. Relay for Life will be held at the
.Columbia High School track from 6 p.m. May 6 until noon May 7. Money raised for the
Ameriban Cancer Society event will benefit cancer research, ROCK Kids Camp, the Winn
Dixie Hope Lodge in Ganesville and the Road to Recovery program.


Church. The church
is located at 1881 SW
McFarlane Ave.

Easter service and hunt
Sunrise Service is 6 a.m.
Sunday at Union A.LM.E.
Church. Sunday School
is 10 a.m. Church service
begins at11 a.m. followed
by th atrp gram an
the Extravagant Easter
Egg hunt.


Old Providence Easter
services ,
Easter Sunrise Service
is 7 a.m. Sunday fol- -
lowed by breakfast at


Old Providence Baptist
Church. Sunday School is
10 a.m. and morning wor-
ship is 11 a.m.

New B~ethel Synrise
Service
Sunrise Service is
5:30 a.m. at New Bethel
MisslionaryeBaptist Chn ch
Kelly is the speaker. The
church is located at 550
NE Martin Luther King St

Philadelphia Easter
services
Philadelphia Baptist
Church is having sun-
rise service and Holy
Communion 8 a.m., fol- *


be requested following the
service. Call 397-4331 or
visitwww,~floridastateparks.
org/stephenfoster

East fashion sh w

An Easter Fashion
Show is 11 a.m. Sunday
at Falling Creek M.B.
Church. The program is
hosted in conjunction with
Deep Creek M.B. Church.
An Easter Egg Hunt is
after the program. Call
961-8277

Sunrise service
An Easter Sunrise
Service is ?7 a.m. Sunday
at First Advent Christian


clerks' offices in the state
budget while the House
does not.
Both cut nearly $4 billion
in spending because the
state's income from taxes
and fees hasn't kept up with
the growing demand for
and cost of services.
Also, both chambers
plan on raising revenue by
increasing college and/or
university tuition as well as
whatamountstopaycutsfor
teachers and state employ-
ees. They'd be required to
begin contributing to the
Florida Retirement System
that's now fully supported
by taxpayers.
Once leaders agree on
a bottom line and alloca-
tions for different sections
of the budget, conference
committees can begin
meeting to resolve differ-
ences within each of those
categories, including edu-
cation, transportation and
health care.


By BILL KACZOR
Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE -
Florida's two legislative
chambers have made little
progress toward resolving
their budgetary differenc-
es, leading House Speaker
Dean Cannon to say he
can't guarantee an on-time
finish with just two weeks
left in the annual session.
Gov. Rick Scott, mean-
while, reiterated Friday
that he's confdent the
Legislature will begin cutting
Florida's corporate income
tax although that's in neither
chamber's budget bill.
Cannon, R-Winter
Park, said he's optimistic
lawmakers won't need a
special session to finish
the budget but that "any-
thing's possible." ~
The Legislature could
extend the session beyond
its scheduled May 6 con-
clusion or Cannon and


Senate President Mike
Haridopolos, R-Merritt
Island, could jointly call a
special session.
"It's more important
that we do. it right than get
hung up on a 60-day time
limit," Cannon said after
the House finished an
abbreviated two-day holi-
day work week Thursday.
The Senate took
the entire week off for
Passover and Easter, but
budget leaders ~from both
chambers spoke behind
the scenes without agree-
ing on preliminary issues.
"It's progress, but we're
not there yet,"l Cannon
said.
The House's $66.5 bil-
lion budget is about $4 bil-
lion less than the Senate's,
but much of that gap is due
to accounting differences.
The Senate, for instance,
includes the five regional
water management dis-
tricts and 67 county court


From staff reports
LIVE OAK -
Landowners, developers
and others in need of an
environmental resource
permit (ERP) from the
Suwannee River Water
Management District
(District) can now obtain
it more quickly for certain
projects.
The District is offer-
ing an accelerated permit
review (APR) process,
which r-educes the time a
permit is reviewed from
30 to two business days.
Factoring in the time the
application is received, an
applicant may have a per-
mit in hand within 3-7 busi-
ness days. This is provided
the permitted follows all
guidelines required for the
accelerated process,
Non-APR permits are
issued within 60 days and
longer if the application is
incomplete. This process
is still available to all appli-
cants. Applicants who wish
to receive a permit on an
accelerated basis can take
advantage of the APR pro-
cess.
ERP projects that qualify
for an APR must meet cer-
tain criteria, including, but
not limited to the following:
they must not have wetland
impacts and/or require
mitigation; they must not
require a variance; and
they must not require com-
ments or review from the
District's attorneys.
foTh eR is a $1O0 charge
administrative costs. This
is in addition to the actual

Applicants must still meet
tl ir enquoeds ruecse an d icoend
in Chapter 40B-4 and 40B-
400, Florida Administrative
Code.
"TeAPR program
is designed to give pre-
mium service for certain
projects," Leroy Marshall,


District professional engi-
neer, said in a release.
'Marshall said the pro-
gram was implemented
in response to applicants'
requests for an expedited
permitting process. It 'also
allows applicants to schedule
their permits in advance.
"Knowing when a permit
may be issued is partic-
ularly helpful to contrac-
tors who must meet other
development requirements,
such as obtaining a zoning
change or county build-
ing permit," he said. "This
service is designed to help
commercial ventures get in
and out the door."
Those requesting an APR
schedule a receiving period
- a time frame of up to five
days when the application
and related documents will
be submitted. The two-day
review process begins after


the five-day period.
Marshall said small-to-
medium sized commercial
projects, such as the devel-
opment of a department
store, convenience store
or fast food restaurant, are
the type of projects that
will most benefit from the
program.
Currently, the program
is only offered to ERP
applicants, btit the District
may look to expand the
program in the future to
provide APRs for other
permits. Some of the proj-
ects that require an ERP
include: the development
of ponds, boat ramps, and
dams? the construction of
buildings, subdivisions,
and roads; and wetland or
streaml encroachment.
Call Leroy Marshall at
362-1001 or 800-226-1066
for more information.


CO~~~DRMMUNT CLNA


Guild meeting
The ~I ady of the Lake
Quilting Guild is meeting
9:30 a.m. April 27 at Teen
Town, 533 NW Desoto
St. The program will fea-
ture quilting technique
demonstrations. Contact
President Loretta Kissner
at 754-9330 or vice-presi-
dent Sunny Nadort at 658-
1555.


Thursday

M0AA meeting
The Suwannee River
Valley Chapter of the
Military Officers' Associatior
of America is having its
monthly dinner meeting 6:30
p.m. Thursday at the Iake
City Elks Indge at 259 NE
Rernando Street. For more
information or to Rsve canl
Susan Palmer at 697-6828 or
Vernon Lloyd at 752A885.

School festival
Shakespeare IV begins
6 p.m. Thursday at Fort
White High School.
Activities include school
registration, reenactment
camps, historical museum
tales and a the Theater
Under The Stars perfor-
mance at 8 p.m. Bring a
lawn chair or blanket.


Video Presentation

A video presentation
of "The South An
Interpretation" is 5 p.m.
Thursday at the Lake City
Police Department The
video is by local histo-
rian Henry Sheldon. Call
Audre' Washington at 719-
5742.


Today
Easter Carnival
The Youth Easter
Carnival is 10 a.m.-4 p.m.
today at Ailey Ogbrun Ball
Park in White Springs.
The event will feature
powerlifting champion the
Rev. James Henderson.
The carnival will feature
crafts, games, food and
more. Henderson is also
speaking a South Hamilton
Elementary School 7-9
p.m. Also featuring s ecial
guest JA! Plus 1, hip hop
recording artist.

Easter Egg Hunt
Gold Standard Lodge
#167 is having its annual
Easter Egg Hunt 10 a.m.-1
p.m. today at Annie Mattox
Park.sTh day llmfeature
Contact Mike Kelly at 867-
6675 or Dennis Murphy at
697-3739.

Egg Hunt
A community-wide
Easter Egg Hunt is
2-5 p.m. today at Old
Providence Baptist
Church. The event will
feature hotdogs, bounce
houses, an egg hunt and
more.


Sunday

Easter Sunrise Service
The 44th annual Easter
Sunrise Service is 7 p.m.
Sunday on the greenway
at Stephen Foster Folk
Ctilture Center State '
Park in White Springs.
The service will include
participants from area
churches. Donations will


New S~RWMD program


speeds up. environmental

resource permitting process


Budget issues still loom





BIBLICAL MEDITATION


CH URCH NOTES


JeSUS and the two disciples on the road to Emmaus


6A


www.Iakecityreporter.com


Saturday,April 23, 201 II


he fielded the questions,
which all dealt with suffer-
ing and Jesus' death, which
Christians recall on Good
Friday, and his, resurrec-
tion, celebrated on Easter
Sunday.
The fist question came
from young Elena, who
asked the pope why she
felt so afraid after Japan's
earthquake shook her
house and killed so n~any
children.
"WIhy do children have to .
be so sad?" the girl asked.
"I'm asking the pope, who
speaks with God, to explain
it to me."
Speaking simply as if
Elena were right there,
Benedict responded that
he too .wondered why SO
manybinnohcatntspeopl0su
take heart in knowing that
Jesus had suffered too.
"You can be sure that in
the world, in the universe,
there are many people
who are with you, thinking
of you, doing what they
can for y'ou to help you,"
Benedict said.
"'Be assured, we are with
you, with all the Japanese
children who are suffer-
ing."
He then turned to a ques-
tion from an Italian mother,
Maria Teresa, who worried
about her son, Francesco,
who has been in a vegeta-


:-- '
Carton McPeak
carlton mc@msn.com




Should




recently at a fast
food restaurant
I saw something
Which I believeain lu
spoke to the moral fiber
of our culture. It made me
think about the integrity of
our citizens.
Three young people, pos-
sibly high school seniors
or college freshmen, had
a clear cup filled with soda
and ice. It seemed strange
that cola would be served
in a clear cup, but I thought
"times are hard" maybe
this was something new.
But then the store's gen-
eral manager came to the
booth where these young
people were sitting and
asked them if they enjoyed
T~heii- "cup of water." He
kindly, but very sternly,
told them that people could
not come into the rest~au-
rant, request a "courtesy
cup of water" and then
get a soda. Immediately,
the yuntgmdanpulled out

his "water," as well as the
beverage his two female
friends were drinking.
There seemed to be no
remorse, only the unpleas-
'ant feeling of being caught
Sand the assumption their
money wuld cover their
Reflecting upon the
Action of the general man-
ager, I was impressed with
how gracious and merci-
ful he was to these young
people.
What are our young -
people being taught about
integrity? These three had
blatantly taken advantage
of a courtesy the restaurant
was providing in that they
got a soda instead of water.
It appears that they had not
told the truth about their
intentions as to the type of
drink they were going to.
consume. In my opinion
this was bordering on lying
as well as stealing. I was
appalled.
It seems that their word
means nothing. If they
.would falsify their inten-
tions about a beverage,
what else would they falsi-
fy? If they would try to get
away with not paying for
a small cup of soda, what
else woukl they try to take
without paying? Where

o dli g th truth is the
very basis of society. If I
cannot trust what you say
to be what you mean, then
what is the basis for our
dealing with each other?
The Psalmist said that in
order for us to dwell in the
tent of the Lord a person
must "walk in~integrity, and
wore2 rghtetouisneh aen
(Psalms 15:2) '
thIt tohuld be nice told
ti tis was an iso ated
incident, but is it? Young
people practice what they
are taught. Where did they
learn to ask for a "courtesy
cup"? Are we older ones
really teaching them integ-


ACarlton G. McPeak is an
evangelist working in the
Lake City, Florida area. All
Scriptural quotations are
from the New American
Standard Bible, Holman Bible
Publishers, unless otherwise
stated.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Faithful Francesca Maio follows a question and answer session between Pope Benedict XVI
and viewers displayed at a restaurant in Romne, Friday.


interview. "It's launching
something new for us."
In the past, Benedict has
taken preselected ques-
tions from carefully cho-
sen Catholics, responding
live in St. Peter's Square,
such as when he meets
annually with university
students. He also regularly
answers questions submit-
ted beforehand by journal-
ists when flying to foreign
countries and has fielded

SPOPE continued on 10A


tive state since Easter 2009.
She asked if Francesco's
soul still remained.
"He feels the presence
of love," Benedict told her,
praising her for keeping
her vigil as a "true act of
love."
"I encourage you, there-
fore, to carry on, to know
that you ~are giving a great
service to humanity with
this sign of faith, with this
sign of respect for life, with
this love for a wounded
body and a suffering soul,"


he said.
Monsignor Paul Tighe,
the No. 2 in the Vatican's
social communications
office, said the decision
to have the pope engage
in the televised event
stemmed fr-om the realiza-
tion that Benedict~ must
engage more with the pub-
lic to ensure his message
is received.
"'This is a very simple
beginning of what you
could call interactiv-
ity," Tighe said in a recent


east of the county line and
right next door to the Star
Tech office.

Our Redeemer Service
Holy Week services
conclude 7 and 10 a.m.
Sunday Easter Sunday at
Our Redeemer Lutheran
Church. Breakfast is
after sunrise service. The
church is located on State
Road 47, 1 mile past the
interstate.

Easter Sunrise Service
The 44th annual Easter
Sunrise Service is 7 a.m.
Sunday on the greenway
at Stephen Foster Folk
Culture Center State Park
in White Springs. The ser-
vice will include partici-
pants from area churches.
Donations will be request-
ed following the service.
Call 397-4331 or visit www.
floridastateparks. org/ste-
phenfoster. ..

Eser service and unt
Sunrise Service is 6 a.m.
Sunday at Union A.M.E.
Church. Sunday School at


is 10 a.m. Church service
begins 11 a.m. followed by
the Easter program and
the Extravagant Easter
Egg hunt.

Easter fashion show
An Easter Fashion
Show is 11 a.m. Sunday
at Falling Creek M.B.
Church. The program is
hosted in conjunction with
Deep Creek M.B. Church.
An Easter Egg Hunt is
after the program. Call
961-8277.


church is located at 550
NE Martin Luther King
St.

Philadelphia Easter .
services
Philadelphia Baptist
Church is~ having sun-
rise service and Holy
Communion 8 a.m., fol-
lowed by Sunday School
and breakfast at 9:45 a.m.
and an Easter pageant 11
a.m. Sunday. The church
is located on Hwy. 242.


Memorial United
Methodist Church, 1272
SW McFarlane Ave. Drive-
through time is usually
less than seven minutes.

cal 7 5 -53 orm ,iiww.
communityconcerts.info.

Sunday .
Miracle Tabernaicle
Sunrise Service
Sunrise Service is 6
a.m. Sunday at Miracle
Tabernacle. Resurrection
Sunday service is 11 a.m.
The speaker is Church
Mother Geneva Stewart.
Call 386-758-8452.

Sunrise Service
An Easter Sunrise
Service is 7 a.m. at First
Advent Christian Church.
The church is located at
1881 SW McFarlane Ave.

Faith in Christ Service
Holy week ends
Resurrection Day 10 a.m.
Sunday at Faith in Christ.
The church is located at
9317 US Hwy. 90 East, just


Old Providence Easter
servicesGreater Truevine Easter


Easter Sunrise Service
is 7 a.m. Sunday fol-
lowed by breakfast at
Old Providence Baptist
Church. Sunday School is
10 a.rn. and morning wor"
ship is 11 a.m.

New Bethel Sunrise
Service
Sunrise Service is
5:30 a.m. Sunday at New
SBethel lVissionary Baptist
Church. Deacon Narvell
Kelly is the speaker. The


Passover); how He saw
the Red Sea part; how
even though the people
failed,God along the way
God still blessed them;
how God provided food
and water every day,
how their shoes never
wore out. He might also
have told them of all
that died along the way
because of unbelief; how
He saw Go give th
Ten Commandments to
Moses (to show us the
need of a Savior); and
how the Israelites went
to the Promise Land.
He may have told .
about the Three Hebrew
Children, Shadrach,
Meshack and Abed-nego
recorded in Daniel 3
and He was in that fiery
furnace with them and
the only thing that was


burned was the cords
that bound them; how
He was with Daniel in
the lions den and God
stopped the mouths of
the lions. He may have
shared how He was in
the belly of the fish with
Jonah for three days and
three rights.
I love what verse 32
says after they recog-
nized Jesus: "Did not our
hearts burn within us
while He talked with us
and opened the Scriptures'
to us". What a story, and
the Scriptures opened by
the Holy Spirit will do the
same for you.
Know today that Jesus
died and was resurrected
because He loved us.

SHugh G. Sherrill is a
preacher in Lake City avail-
able for pulpit supply and
revivals.


any things
transpired
on resur-
rection
MSunday,
too many to write about
One event recorded by
Luke in Cha ter 24 stands

tined inewords and smnen-
I feel we overlook a great
truth here. *
In Luke 24:13-32 is
the record of the two
disciples on the road to
Emmaus. Emmaus was a
village about seven miles
from Jerusalem. It was
late in the day when they
were walking and talking
about the events of the
day. It is apparent these
two were very disappoint-
ed about all the things
that had happened that
day. As they walked and
talked, Jesus drew near
and walked with them.
They did not recognize


BIBLE STUDIES


"We hoped He was the
Redeemer." Verses 22-24
tells of the events around
the empty tomb. They
had heard He was alive
but did riot see Him.
~Verses 25- 26 Jesus said:
"Don't you know what
the Scriptures say would
happen to Me?
Then in verse 27
He preached to them,
maybe the most powerful
sermon ever preached.
"And beginning at Moses
and all the prophets, He
ex wounded to them in all
the S ritu the tlx g
concern ngr Hmself.'igs
He went back to Moses
and perhaps He told
them how His people,
Israel were in bond-
age in Egypt and how
He saw the Father call
Moses to lead them out
of Egypt (after the first


Hugh Sherrill Jr.
ems-hugh43@comcost~net

Jesus because their eyes
were restrained. Jesus
asked them what they
were talking about. The
two thought it strange
that Jesus did not know
the things that had hap-
pened that day.
In verse 19 He asked:
what things, so they
said to Him "The things
concerning Jesus of
Nazareth, who was a
prophet, and how He
was put to death on
the cross." They said


VALUS


FAIT H&


POpe fields questions on TV show


Benedict talks

of suffering on
Good Friday.

By NICOLE WINFIELD '
Associated Press

VATICAN CITY Pope
Benedict XVI consoled a
7-year-old Japanese girl,
reassured a mother about
her ailing son's soul and
advised a Muslim woman
that dialogue was the way
to peace in Ivory Coast.
The pontiff's words
came during an unusual
Good Friday question and
answer session on Italian
state TV part of a new
Vatican push to engage
mith the world ous e ind

and other social media.
It was hardly a casual or
spontaneous chat: Seven
questions were selected
from thousands thatpoured
in via RAI television's web-
site, and Benedict record-
ed his answers last week.
He seemed a bit stiff,
sitting all alone in a big
white chair behind his
desk inside the Apostolic
Palace as an unseen inter-
.viewer read out the letters
to him.
But the teacher and
pastor in..the 84-year-old
Benedict came through as


Today
Easter Carnival

Carme al i 0 a~.4p.m.
today at Ailey Ogbrun Ball
Park mn White Sprmngs.
The event will feature
powerlifting champion the
Rev.James Henderson.
The carnival will feature -
crafts, games, food and
more. Henderson is also
speaking a South Hamilton
Elementary School 7 9
p.m. Also featuring special
guest JA! Plus 1, hip hop
recording artist

Old Providence Baptist
Church
Community Wide
Easter Egg Hunt! will be
held from 2-5 p.m. today
Free hotdogs, bounce
houses, egg hunt and
community wide fellow-
ship. Fun for all ages.

Road to Calvary
production
SThe "Road to Calvary"
production is 8:15-9:45
p.m. today at Wesley


Service
Easter Sunrise Service .
is 6 a.m. Sunday at
Greater Truevine Baptist
Church. Sunday School-
is 9:45 a.m. and morning
worship is 11 a.m.
East Ch pel

An Easter Chapel
Sunrise Service is 6:30
a.m. at Falling Creek.
Contact Cherly Pingel at
755-0580.





~lYay ElecrcCoeaie, 1c .
Competitive rates, non-profit,
right here in your community.
Lake City District 386-752-7447
clayelectric.com
To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440











US 90 Wet aros fro al-Mart
752-0054

Morrell's
Your Complete decorating and
SW Depuho ref luons Ln f rmed eount Rd.)
752-3910 or 1-800-597-3526
Mon.-Sat. 8:00-5:30*~Closed Sunday


WESLEY MEMORIAL UNITED
1272 SW McFarlane 752-3513
(Adjacent to Summers School)
Worship 8:00 &10:00A
Sunday School 9:00AM
Nursery provided
Praise &Worship 6:00PM
AWANA-Wednesdays 5:00PM
Pastor: The Rev. J. Louie Mabrey
www~wesleymem.com
warERtTOWN CONGREGATIONAL
MiETHODIST CHURCH
U.S. 90 E. turil on Cortez (next to Quality
S IndaySlhdrght on Olnawa.9:5A
Sun.Worship 11AiM&6PM
Wed. Night ServiceasondOu 7PM


LAE CHY CWRCH OF THE NZRE
Services:
Snda choo I:5

Aut o'""i sinistr, Chiren's ini r
Pastor:Craig Henderson
Nursery Provided
SW SR47 and Azalea Park Place

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
eL~SbV Bllorl 71 .r ;2U70
Sunday Contemporary 9:00AM
Sunday Scholol lIIil.UlM
Traditiunal serate II 00.141
Pastor: Dr Roy A. l artn


FIRST FUllG05~PEL CHURCH
NrE lones Way & NIE Wa~hrngton 51



Mid-Wueek Service Wedneidal 7 (0 PM
F'rdnc il~l ?5-1H vri Slne WEb ni




~Sunday Morning~ 1 5:0AM
Wednesday Service 7:00PM
Sist r Wlcom R. g m ie s, south,
chitrch on left.* 7 55-2525
Ikad Pastor: Lonnie Iohns
XChurch on the Move"
CHfRIST IANHRITAPGE CHURCH
-Comer SR. 47 & Hudson Circle
Sunday Celebration 10:30 AM
Pastor Chris Jones( 52-9119
FALLING CREEK CHAPEL
Falling Creek Road *755-0580
First and Third Sundays 9:30 A.M.
Second d Fo rth S days 3:0 P.M.

:!, .NEWBBGCINNING CHURCH
Highway 242 E. of Branford Highway
Sunday School 10:00AM
MomingtWeo hip ll0A
Wednesday 7:00PM
A Full Gospel Church Everyone Welcomed
(386)755-5197


Aa.iEso oNo CLMBIeo....N

Site Preparation Road Building Parking Lots
Grading & Drainage




Hanry Mosley, President

Puromn 752-2308 W1I

To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440


E611 1,08e l l





muscles oburn" we

Know we are improving
physical fitness. Building

spirituall fitness is simiilar.
There are times we feel

Q'; emotional and spiritual

Spain, but often through
these painful challenges wre

exercise our faith in God's

wisdom and increase our spiritual strength. Increase

your spiritual energy each week as you worship

the One who strengthens you. Welcome challenges

with an attitude of acceptance for you'll know it's

working when you feel the "burn".







Scriptures Selected by Thte American Bible Society
@2011, Keister-Williams Newspaper Services, P.O. Box 8187, ( harlottesville, VA 22906, www.kwnews.com


BtNorth Florida
Pharmacy
7 locations to serve`You
Lake City, Ft. White, Branford,
Chiefland, Mayo & Keystone Heights














To Advertise in
this Directory .
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440



Supercenter
"LOWPRICES EVERYDAY" .
IS 90 WEST 755-2421 .

GW Hunter, Inc.
sevron Chevron Oil
I1 J'obber




O ~ac.
"Quality or reasonable price"
We also do solar hook-ups
(386) 755-5944


FOOD 8TOREs
Open 7 Days a Week
1036 E. Duval St., Lake City FL.
Fresh Met reh Pr7duce!
"Ica~n do all thingu through Christ which strengthencth me"
Phllppians 1:13

To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440

To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440


RK(K'5 (RAI( 55RVI(5
Located at 25A
3 6-7a259 g
386-867-2035
after hours

To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440


Central States
Enterp~riseas
CoumbiaCounty' Fed Hqu art

658 NW Waldo St. 386-755-7445

MIIIELf'S POWER EQUIPMIlEM INC.
Your Lawn & Garden Headquarters
MOWERS CHAIN SAWS TRIMMERS
1l52 US 90WEST*LAKE CITY, FL.
386-752-8098




ES' 1 755 7050


To Advertise in
this Directory

Cal ay or Bridget


S7A


BirstfdventChdisda
18e SWucarlammeAve

Sunday School 6-5-99 45 M
Sunday Service: 11 :00AM
Wednesday Service: 7:00PMX

GIAD TIDINGS ASSEMBLY OF GOD
993 NW Lake Jeffery Road
SlundayR~orship. 1 80OAMi:& PM
:Wed.fam:Bible~Study r;.-r 7OPM
.. churg w erdPUS is Real"

BERMABAPElSTCHURCH
Sunday School 9:30AM
Sunday Worship 10:45AM &6PM
WednesdayEve.Service 7PM
Interim Pastor: Kenneth Ededield
M~STSUIDEBAPTIST CHRea
196 8E ames he.*r386-752-2860
Sun Bible Study 9:45AM
StnWorship 11AM&6PM
Wed.Praye tA$ B les~ tud 6PM

FIRSTBAPTISTCHURC
`SundayBibleStudy 9:15AM
Sunday Worship 10:30AM & 6:00PM
.Wed. 6:00PM Prayer Service, &
ChildrensMinistry 6:15PM
D ntownhid LaeA ni r 7252

OUIVET MISSIONARY BAPHlST CHURCH
541N.E.Davis Street
(386) 752-1990
Ron ldV.W at rs,Pastor

Wed.Mid-WeekWorship 6:00PM
"In God's Word, Will & Way"

PINE GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH
198y9g NU 9 441
386-752-2664
SundayBibleStudy 9:45AM
Sunday Worship 11AM & PM
Wed.IKid r~o a pinson 6:30PM

SALEM PRIMITIVE BAPTIS
Sunday Services I10: AM
P83tot:Elder Herman Griflin '
752-4198
SOUTHSIDEBAPTISTCHURCH
388 S.E. Baya Drive* 7555553,
Bible Study 9:15 AM
Morning Worship 10:30AM
Evening Worship 6:15PM

Pryr& Bible Study 6:155 P
TABERNACLE BAPTIST CHURCH
(Independent Baptist)
144 SE Montrose Ave. *752-4274
Sunday School 10 AM
Sun.Mom.Worship 11AM
Sunday Eve. 6PM
Wed. Prayer Meeting 7:30 PM
Pastor: Mike Norman

EPIPHANY CATHOLIC CHURCH
1905 SW Epiphany Court 752-4470
Saturday Vigil Mass 5:00 PM
Sunday Mass 8:15 AM, 10.30 AM,
5:00 PM (SpanishlEnglish)
Sunday School/Religious Education
9:Oh usiorSAg


CHRISTIANSCIENCE SOCtITY
SundaySe ie9 av 1:00AM
~Wednesday Evening Senrice 7:30 PM
LAlall GIY CHCRISTIAN HUCHCH
Hwy 2478.*i$ 15-9436
. Sunday School. 9:30 AM
SSun. Miom. Worship 10:30 AM
Wed. Prayer Meeting 7 PM


Church of Christ
Directions & Times 386-623-7438
Jack rxam,)r., Ministei

IAee CITY CHURCH OF GOD
167 Ermine St.*(752-5965
Sunday School '9:45 AM
Sun.Worship 10:30AM &6:00PM

Pastor Carroll Le
EVANGEL CHURCH OF GOD
Su0 5W Ionitor Glen *?55-19 AM
Sunday Worship 10:50 & 6:30
We.Spmraual Ennrihment 7PM
''Shock youth Church"
Boys and Girls Clubs
Bible Study
Pastor lohn R Hathaway


243SW acE oi CDr. Lak
City 9132025- 386-752-2218 z
Email: stjamesepis330@3belsouth~net
Holy Euehdebst y m

Priest: The Rev.Michael Armstrong!
Deacon:The Rev. Timmie Hunsinger
Director ofMusic: Dr. Alfonso Levy

OUR REDEEMER LUTHRAN CHURCH
IDMS
1 1/2 miles S. of 1-75 on SR 47

Sunday Services 55-4299 9:30AM
Christian Education Hour
For all ages at 10:45AM
SPastor: Rev, Bruce Alkire
SPIRIT OF CHRIST LUTHERAN
Hwy 90, 1.5 milesWest ofl-75*7 52-3807
ISunday Worship 10:0AM
NurseryAva~.
Wed. Pot Luck 6PM Worship 7PM
Vicar John David Bryant


BERIHELUNITED METHODIST CHllRCH
4869 US441 sout
Sunday Worship Services'
Traditional Services 8:30 &ll:00AM
386-755-1353
mybethelume.com
First United Methodis hurch
973 S.MarionAve.
386-752-4488

Snda Mmng Worship 94A
Casual Wiorship Service 8:50AM
Traditional Service 11:00AMI
Program opportunities available in all
Areas for all ages.
For a complete schedule
contact church office at
7s2-448


To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440

BAYWAYwaiorlal services
FIRE &c Water RestOration
Floor &r C ret Care
acsirli Cena/0nercidu
755-6142


To Advertise in
thiS Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVE RTISE M ENT SATURDAY, APRIL 23, 2011


Church


On the




Director


1 l

75 -12








LAKE CITY R-EPORTER LOCAL & STATE SATURDAY, APRIL 23, 2011

Real People, Real Results.

...~ Hil TI Ill ,


*SPIN CLASSES NOW AVAILABLE -
1191 SW Bascom Norris Dr. Lake City, FL 7i
386-754-17 24 .e
www.a nytimefitness.com


CATERING FOR ALL OCCASIONS
WEDDINGS, SH WERS, GRADUATIONS
I Ih B BIRTH DAY PARTI ES
I ROMANTIC DINNERS


F.f~ tr aceyhickscatering.com
-'386-7i58-8195. oR 386-623-2926


Updated EAG LE onice
ApartmentS PROPERTIES Space
with tile floors 752-9626 for lease.
& fresh paint. Oak Hill Plaza.
Excellent / 900sqft
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LAKE CITY REPORTER


Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424


SATURDAY, APRIL 23, 2011


Lindseyl Barnhart, 5, hoists her Easter egg hasket up in triumph after col- Kindergartners race off of the sidewalk in order to find 10 Easter eggs to stuff
lecting 10 blue eggs. their baskets with.




LET THE HUNTING BEGIN


Summers Elementary School' kin-
dergartner Caleb Pope (center),
6, searches for a specific-colored
egg during an Easter egg hunt at
Summers Elementary Thursday
afternoon. More than 100 students
participated in the event.

Photos by
]arson Matthew Walker


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POPE

Continued From 6A

questions from groups of
priests.
But the Good Friday
session was the first time
he had taken questions
from the general public -
and not necessarily even
the Catholic public.
"The advantage of this
is it opens up the possibil-
ity to people who couldn't
hope ror aspire to having
a direct meeting with the
pope, but -through the
Internet can put their
questions there," Tighe


caefr Bit;aMsli
pope in Arabic and asked
him in French for his
advice on bringing peace
to Ivory Cohst, which has
been wracked by political
violence.
"How many innocents
have lost their lives!" she
said. "How many mothers
and how many children
traumatized!"
Benedict told her he
was grieved that he could
do so little, saying he
had tasked the head of
the- Vatican's justice and
peace office, Cardinal
Peter Kodwo Turkson, to
try to mediate between
the country's opposing
factions.
"The only path is to .
renounce violence, to
begin anew with dialogue,
with the attempt to find
peace together, with a new
concern for one another,
a new willingness to be
open to one another," the
pontiff said.
The broadcast spliced'
the pope's responses with
commentary from Italian
religious affairs experts,
as well as video footage
of the people asking their
questions.
It was a very feminine-
focused event, with three
of the questions coming
from women and a fourth
about Mary.
Benedict continued that
theme with the more tra-
ditional Good Friday event
- the nighttime Way of
the Cross procession at
Rome's Colosseum, in
which the faithful re-enact
the final hours of Christ's
life. The meditations for
each station of the cross
were composed by an
Italian nun, Sister Maria
Rita Piccione, and the art-
work accompanying them
were designed by another
trun.
Piccione said she didn't
know why she had been
selected. The only com-
munication she ever had
with the pope, she said,
was when she sent him
a letter last year offering
her support for the "perse-
cution" he and the church
were going through in the
midst of the clerical abuse
scandal.
While the Q&A ses-
sion departed from. the
Vatican's Good Friday
routine, elsewhere in the
world ancient Christian
practices marked the sol-
emn day.
In Jerusalem, Christian
pilgrims filled the cobble-
stone alleyways of the
walled Old City to com-
memorate~ Jesus' cruci-
fixion there two millen-
nia ago. Thousands of
international visitors and
local Christians retraced
thrist's last steps down
the Via Dolorosa, Latin
for the "Way of Suffering."
The route ends at the
ancient Church of the Holy
Sepulcher, revered as the
site. of Jesus' crucifixion,
burial and his resurrec-
to on Ea st Sudy


- I've been wishing for
one day to come here in
Jerusalem to worship. I
wanted to step where my
lord stepped," said Roshan
Futsom, a pilgrim from
Toronto.
II Associated Press
writer Matti Friedman in
Jerusalem contributed to
this report.


LOCAL. & WORLD


~L~~s~b gk:!











LakCtyReoter


I


Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
'754-042 I
tkirbg@okecityreporter:com


SaturdayApril 23, 201 I


www.Iakecityreporter.com


FROM THE SIDELINE







Brandon Finley
Phone:(386) 754-0420
bfinley;@lakecityreporter~com


La y






110tic e
olumbia
High's Lady
Tigers
tennis team
Should be
commended for its effort
over the'last two
seasons.
It's not the most
popular sport mn town,
so often it gets lost
in the fold, but its
accomplishments are not
to go unnoticed.
With a return trip to
the state tournament last
week, the Lady TigerS
made their mark as the
most successful team
over the last few years in

Coe bl d Tig rs
outperformed more
fpoootbl aH d bass th l
but often doesn't get t e
headlines. Sure, the Lady
Tigers were eventually
eliminated once reaching
the state final, but how
many teams can say
they made back-to-
back trips to the state
championship?
The Indy Tigers
softball team, another
dominant program over
the last three years, had

last season. Columbia,
has won two out of the
last three' District 4-5A
championships, but it has
yet to make a trip to the
Final Four. This year, the
Columbia softball team
may finally do it, needing
only three more wins
to qualify, but t~he Lady
Tigers' tennis team has
done it twice.
Despite the results at
the, state tournament,
these girls should be
recognized for their
excellent play over the
last two seasons, and
teams should pray for
the success they've
achieved.
While there are surely
other talented teams in
the area, including the

gea a te Ti 1 .
weightlifting team, which
has sent six lifters to
state as indiiriduals over
the last two seasons, the
accomplishments of the
Lady Tigers' tennis team
are to be commended.
Just as Butler made
an improvable run to the
Final Four in basketball
this season, the Lady
Tigers played the role of
underdog to perfection.
While private schools
generally dominate prep
sports, Columbia proved
that it can be done on the
public level.
Years from now when
these girls look back on
their days on the tennis
courts in Lake City, they
won't remember exactly
how the season ended.
They'll look back on the
ride and enjoy how they
got there.
MBrandon Finley covers
sports for the Lake City


Reporter.


COlleCtiVe
bargaining
COntinueS.

By RACHEL COHEN
Associated Press

NEW YORK The
NFL hasn't set a deadline
for when games would be
canceled without a col-
lective bargaining agree-
ment. .
W~e .don't have a date
by which the season is
lost, or a date by which
we have to move rom
16 games to some other
(number)," Eric. Grubman,
the league's executive vice
president for business
operations, said Friday at
a meeting with Associated
Press Sports Editors. "Our
intentions are to play a
full season, and we will
pull every lever that we
cad' within the flexibility
we have or can identify to
make that happen."
Even during the lock-
out, Grubman said, the
NFL and teams are work-
ing so they will be ready
.tonEd sa t ssonhqeu ky
"We have to be able to
figure out: When you thrn
the key, is the gas going to
flow?" he said. "Is every-
thing going to work?"
The .2011 schedule
released Tuesday has
games beginning Sept. 8,
but includes some room to
maneuver. The NFL could
still squeeze in 16 games
with a delayed start by
eliminating bye weeks and


the week between the con-
ference championships
and the Super Bowl. The
league also has a deal with
host Indianapolis to poten-
tially hold the Super Bowl
a week later, stemming
from the earlier possibil-
ity of playing an 18-game
regular season.
But a delayed opening
would renlove a meaning-
ful date from the schedule.
For now,~ the fist Sunday
of the season falls on the
10-year anniversary of the
Sept. 11 attacks, and part
of the NFL's business-as-
usual ~planning includes
deciding how to comnmem-
orate that moment.
"fIts national significance
is profound," Grubman
said. "And the significance
of competitive sports in
America is also very pro-
found."
Predicting a deadline
for when the schedule
would .have to be revised
is difficult because it's
impossible to know how
negotiations will play out.
If at some point it becomes
clear a deal is near, the
pNFaLs an bgincsoet ig
season. If an agreement
is reached unexpectedly
and rapidly, ~there might
be more lag time before
the games 'start;
The league and teams
have mostlyr turned to pay
cuts to reduce expenses
during the lockout. It costs
about $40 million a week
to run the business of the
NFL continued on 2B


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High's J.T. Gilliam (23) strolls past a catcher on the way to home plate to score a
point against Ed White High on March 24.


Suwannee downs CHS, 18-11


provided the difference.
"You never like to lose,
but in the grand scheme
of things we have to takd
the positives and stay
away from the negatives,"
Columbia coach J.T. Clark
said. "We stayed hot with
the bat, but we didn't pitch
well as a group."
Columbia's Blaine
Courson had the hottest bat


on the night with a 4-for-
4 appearance at the plate
including .a home run, two
doubles and a single. Mikey
Kirkman also homered in
the contest and had two
hits. Levi Hollingswlirth
was the Tigers' only other
multiple hitter.
Columbia finishes the
regular season at 14-10 with
a 5-3 mark in the district.


By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter. com
Columbia High wrapped
up its regular-season run
on Thursday in a hard-
fought road loss, 18-11, to
Suwannee High.
The Tigers were riding a
three-game winning streak
heading into the Ishow-
down, but Suwannee's bats


in the 10-team field.
For the boys, Shaquille
Johnson placed second mn
the 400 meters, fifth in the
triple jump and sixth in the
200 meters.
Seth Peterson placed
second in the 800 meters.
Dalvin Kelly placed third
in the 110-meter hurdles
and seventh in the 300-
meter hurdles. J.T. Bradley
placed fourth in the high
jump.
Columbia's 4x800 meter
relay team of Kiva Bunkley,
Wyatt Snook, Peterson
and Nick Jones placed
third. The 4x1(i0 relay,
team 'of Trey Marshall,
Rakeem Battle, Cornelius
Montgomery and John
Fulton placed fourth.
Peterson, Johnson,
Bunkley and Fulton
earned team points with
a fifth-place finish in the
4x400 relay.
Nigel Atkinson was fifth
in the high jump. Darius
Williams was sixth in the
long jump and triple jump.
DeQuan Ivery was sixth in
the shot put. Montgomery
was seventh in the 100
meters. Jones was eighth
in the 1600 meters.
Lee won the boys' side
with 155 points. Stanton
Prep was second with 113
and Wolfson was third with
98 points. Columbia's 77
points was fourth among
the nine teams.


By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter. com

Columbia High's track
team produced a pair of dis-
trict ~champs and 14 region
qualifiers at the District
4-3A meet at Wolfson High
on Thursday.
Michaelle Charlotin won
the 1600 meters in a time
of 5:46.29.
Marcus Amerson won'
the high jump at 6-foot-2.
Kaicie Chasteim placed
third in the discus and
qualified for region (top
four) for the second year.
Also in the discus,
Harley Phillips was fifth
and Jessica Land was
eighth to earn team points
(top eight).
Charlie Watson was sev-
enth in 100-meter hurdles
and 300-meter hurdles.
Abby Williams was sev-
enth in the 800 meters and
eighth in the 400 meters.
Shayla Tucker was sev-
enth in the shot put. Alyssa
Barwick was eighth in the
300 hurdles' j
Columbia's 4x400 relay
team of Ashlyn Martin,
Alexis Marcus, Williams
and Charlotin placed sixth.
Stanton Prep dominated
the girls' district with 238
points. Atlantic Coast High
was second with 113 points
and Wolfson was third with
85 points. Columbia scored
34 points and finished fifth


COURTESY PH
ABOVE: Fort White High's A.J. Legree relaxes during a tr;
rneet during the season.

BELOW: Fort White's Sitia Martinez hits full stride during ;
meet this season.


Section B


INO deadline


for NFL games

to be canceled


Tigers


.n sh


fall


Tigers send 14




ulStf lot Hleet

Charlohin, ~Amerson

are district championS


pMartinez,





for state

Second ~trip for
Legree; Martinez
Will go in 2 events.
From staff reports

Fort White High's Sitia
Martinez and A.J. Legree
qualified for state at the
Region 1-2A meet at The
Bolles School on Thursday.
Legree placed second in
the high jump to earn his
second trip to state compe-
OTOS tuition. He was fourth in the
ack region high jump last year.
Legree placed eighth in
the 300-meter hurdles to
a earn all nine team points
for the Indians.
Martinez placed second
mn the 300-meter hurdles
and fourth in the 100 meters
to qualify for state in both
events.
Also earning team points
for Fort White were Brittani
SCarson, fifth in the high
jump, and Sydni Jones,
seventh in the 1600 meters.
Bolles won the girls'
region with 103 points,
iFirfollowed by Raines High
withh 81 points. Fort White's
18 points was good for
Tr 13th place out of 24 teams
a represented.
Go dby High won the boys'
competition with 128 points.
Episcopal High was second
il with 88 points. Legree's
"work for Fort White was
good for 19th place out of
26 teams.
The Class 2A state meet
is April 30 at Showalter
3 Field in Winter Park.


i





series 3-0
Miami 100, Philadelphia 94, Miami
leads series 3-0
Portland 97, Dallas 92, Dallas leads
series 2-1
Friday
Boston at NewYork (n)
Orlando at Atlanta (n)
L.A. Lakers at New Orleans (n)
Today
Chicago at Indiana, 2:30 p.m.
Dallas at Portland, 5 p.m.
San Antonio at Memphis, 7:30 p.m.
Oklahoma City at Denver, 10 p.m.
Sunday
Miami at Philadelphia, I p.m.
Boston at NewYork, 3:30 p.m.
Orlando at Atlanta,7 Pm.
LA. Lakers at New Orleans, 9:30 p.m.
Monday
San Antonio at Memphis, 8 p.m.
Portland at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Oklahoma City at Denver, 10:30 p.m.

NBA Mvost I proved

(Selected by a national panel of I 16
Nas ortswriters and broadcasters)
Kevin Love, Minnesota 66 21 7 400
L.Aldrldge, Portiand II 29 15 157
DorellWright, G.S. 16 10 14 124
De ik Ro eChicg II 3 5 69
Krisr umpl les,N~ icg 13 19 63
Kyle Lowry, Houston 3 7 12 48
R.WestbrookOkla.City 3 6 13 46
W. Matthews, Portland 2 7 I 2
Jrue Holiday, Philadelphia I 2 4 15
Michael Conid~y, Memphis 3 5 14
Arran Afrialo, Denver 4 I13
Roy Hibbert, Indiana I I I 9
DeMar DeRozan~,Torontol I1 6
Tyler Hansbrough, Indiana- I 2 5
NickYoung,Washington I 2 5
Eric Gordon, L.A. Clippers- I 2 5
Darrell Arthur, Memphis I I 4
Sergelbaka,0kia.City I I1 4
D.jordan, L.A.Clippers '- I I 4
Thaddeus Young, Phil. 1I 4
DJ Augustin, Charlotte 1 3
Luol Deng, Chicago I 3
A.Stoudemire,NewYork I -3
TonyAllen, Memphis -- I I
Michael Beasiey, Minn. -- I I
Elton Brand, Philadelphia -- I I
Tyson Chandler, Dallas -- I I
Jared Dudley, Phoenix -- I I
Marcin Gortat, Phoenix -- I I
James Harden, Okla. City I I
Jodie Meeks, Philadelphia I I

AUTO RACING

Race week


NATIN DE
Nashville 3oo
Site: Gladeville,Tenn.
Schedule: Today, qualifying (ESPN,
noon-1 ~p.m.), race 3 p.m. (ESPN,
2-6 p~.).
Tr k: Nashville Su eseedway (oval
I.333 miles). prp,
Race distance: 300 miles, 225 laps.

HOCKEY

NlHL playoffs
FIRST dOUND
Thursday
Boston 5, Montreal 4, OT, series tied


Answer to Previous Puzzle

TIAIMP AIMP AIK C
AILIOUID IOIO~ S R
OlPIEIRIANA1 MA A EIE
EIMIMIY D IR IVIE
HIORISIE MSGS
EION E ILI HI ORIZ O
SlTIE LIOIATAN TAIL
SIEIAIL DRUB CPI L
EILILE l ITEIR E IP A
A!RIC TIOAD Y
SlPIORIE AIKS K
NUIAINICIEISA AH AID
A IP R U IT A IW E IDIG E
GAIS RAIN NlOEIL


.BRIE SF


honor veterans and show
" port fr the trooons at

April 30. Festivities begin
at 5 p.m. Admission: adult-
$7 ($5 with yellow shirt);
seniors-$5 ($3 with
yellow shirt); children
8 and younger and military
with ID-free.
For details on honoring
a veteran, call Elaine at
(386) 292-3039. -




Unscramble these four Jumbles,
to om folrenu asy uar s.

I RTClK I


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SATURDAY, APRIL 23, 2011


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421


,sigh ;****C ", hie hHighs2 th
3. Betty Carmichael 151.34. 1. David
Duncan 189.43; 2. Bill Dolly 184.32;
3. George Mulligan 182.52.
(results from April 7)
HIT & MISS
Team standings: 1. The
Sandbaggers (36-20); 2. Spare Us
(34-22); 3. Alley Oops (33-23).
High handicap game: 1. Susan
Mears 241; 2. Karen Clampett 227;
3. Shirley Highsmith 225.
High handicap series: 1. Susan
Newbern 622; 2. Cythe Shiver 616;
3. Iva "Jean" Dukes 610.
(results from April 19)
SUNDAY NITE MERCHANTS
Team standings: 1. TAZ
(43.5-16.5); 2. Spare Us (35.5-24.5);
3. Train Wreck (33 27).
High scratch game: 1. Norma
Yeingst 216; 2, Liz Randall 212;
3. Norma Yeingst 206. 1. Leonard
Randall 267; 2. (tie) Joe Cohrs, Bill
Duncan 237.
.High scratch series: 1. Norma
Yengt s3 ei sLit 9Randal o5 d
Randall 679; 2. A.J. Dariano 627;
3. Bill Duncan 605.
High average: 1. Norma Yeingst
169.62; 2. Cheryl Jacks 158.56;
3. Liz Randall 157.99. 1. Bill Duncan
199.22; 2. Joe Cohrs 195.09; 3. Mark
Moore 192.96.
(results from April 17)
MONDAY NIGHT MAVERICKS
Team standings: 1. Rountree
Moore Ford (273-147); 2. Team 8
(266.5-153.5); 3. Neil Hoffman's Auto
(246-174).
High scratch game: 1. Zech Strohl
300; 2. Ted Wooley 297; 3. John
Janki 279.
High scratch series: 1. Zech Strohi
788; 2. Ted Wooley 714; 3. John
Janki 694.
High handicap game: 1. Ted
Wooley 302; 2. Zech Strohl 300;
3. John Janki 294.
High handicap series: 1. Zech
Strohl 788; 2. Jim Grimsley 751;
3. Roger Snipes 745.
High average: 1. Zech Strohi
222.15; 2. Dale Coleman 214.43;
3. Brian Meek 206.85.
(results from April 4)


Friday's Games
Chicago White Sox at Detroit (n)
N.Y.Yankees at Baltimore (n)
Tampa Bay at Toronto (n)
Kansas City at Texas (n)
Cleveland at Minnesota (n)
Boston at L.A.Angels (n)
Oakland at Seattle (n) ~
Today's Games
Tamnpa Bay (Price 2-2) at Toronto
(Morrow 0-0), 1:07 p.m. .
Cleveland (C.Carrasco I-I) at
Minnesota(Liriano 1-3), I:10 p.m.
Chicago White Sox (E.Jackson, 2- I) at
Detroit (Penny 0-2), 4:10 p.m.
N.Y.Yankees (F~arcia 1 -0) at Baltimore
(Tiliman 0-2), 7:05 p.m.
Kansas City (Davies 1-1) at Texas
(Ogando 2-0), 8:05 p.m.
Boston (Matsuzaka 1-2) at L.A.Angels
(E.Santana 0-2), 9:05 p.m.
Oakland (Cahill 2-0) at Seattle (Vargas
0-1), 9:10 p.m.
Sunday's Gam s
Chicago White Sax eat, Detroit,
1:05 p.mn.
Tampa Bay at Toronto, 1:07 p.m

NI eann at Mi msoa 2:10 p.m.
Kansas City atTexas, 3:05 p.m
Boston at L.A.Angels, 3:35 p.m
Oakiand at Seattle, 4:IO p.m.

NL standings

East Division
W L Pt GB
Philadelphia 12` 6 .667 -
Florida II 6 .647 1
Washington 9 9 .500 3
Atlanta 8 12 .400 5
NewYork 6 13 .316` 6%
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Cincinnati 10 9 .526 -
St. Louis 10 9 .526 -
Chicago 9 9 .500 h
MIlwaukee 9 9 .500 1
Pittsburgh 8 II .421 2
Houston 7 12 .368 3
West Division
W L Pet GB
Colorado 13 5 .722 -
San Francisco 10 8 .556 3
Los Angeles 10 10 .500 4
Arizona 8 9 .471 4%
San Diego 8 II .421 51
Friday's Games
L.A Dodgers 12, Chicago Cubs 2
Washington at Pitsburgh (n)

Aiona tNY Ma n)

Cincinnati at St. Louis (n)
Philadelphia at San Diego (n)
Atlanta at San Francisco (n)
Tod y's Gamie
L.A. Dodgers (Lilly I-e)s at Chicago
Cubs (Dempster I-2), 1:05 p.m-
Arizona (Enright 0-1) at N.Y. Mets
(Gee I-0), 1:10 p.m.
'Atlanta (T.Hudson 2-2) at San
Francisco (Lincecum 2-I), 4:10 p~m.
Cincinnati (T.W~ood 1-2) at St. Louis
(Carpenter 0-2), 4: 10 pm.m-
Washington (Marquis 1-0) at
Pittsburgh (Correla 3-I), 7:05 p~m.
,C lorad (amel 1-1) at Florida
.Houston (Myers 1-0) at Milwaukee
(Marcum 2-1), 7: 10 p.m.
Philadelphia (Blanton 0-1) at San
Diego (Stauffer 0-I) 8:5P

Arizona at N.Y Mets,1:I0 P.m.
Colorado at Florida, 1:10 p.m.
Washington at Pittsburgh, 1:35 p.m.
Houston at Milwaukee, 2:IO p.m.
L.A. Dodgers at Chicago Cubs,
2:20 p.m.
Atlanta at San Francisco, 4:05 p.m.
Philadelphia at San Diego, 4:05 p.m.
Cincinnati at St. Louis, 8:05 p.mn.

BASKE TBAL L

.NBA playoffs.
FIRST 'ROUND
Thursday
chicago 88, Indiana 84, Chicago leads .


COURTESY PHOTO

Super series

Brigette Harrelson, 23,
Of High Springs recently
bowled a 300 game at
Lake City Bowl and set th@
Women's house record with
an 802 series. Harrelson's
hometown is Homestead
and she bowled four years
for UCF, where she was a
four-tifie COile late
all-American and a CBUSA
Nationals MVP. Harrelson
bowled for Junior Team USA
in 2007. She has one
pf9VIOus 300-game and
bowled an 824 series at
Alley Gatorz Bowling Center
in Gainesville. .

Team standings: 1. Golden Niners
(78-50); 2. Gamblers (75-53); 3. Wild
Things (72-56).
High handicap game: 1. Yvonne
Finley 243; 2. Louise Atwood 225;
3. Pat Hale 224. 1. George Walters
246; 2. Vernon Black 237; 3. Jerry
Ellis 232*
High handicap series: 1. Elaine
Nemeth 646; 2. Joyce Hooper 620;
3. Roberta Giordano 610. 1. David
Duncan 674; 2. James Burnett 672;
3. Bill Dolly 636.


Continued From Page 11


NFL, Grubman said.
Commissioner Roger
Goodell, whose salary was .
SlRShed to $1 during the
lockout, recently received
a pay stub for 4 cents.
'"TereS nO possible
Way We COuld have a state
Of readiness and achieve
the season quickly if we
cut staff and the clubs cut
staff," Grubman said.
Executive vice president
f00 football operations Ray
Anderson said it was fea-
sible to play fewer than
.the normal four preseason


games, but general man-
agers and coaches would
prefer at least two.
The two sides took a
break from mediation ear-
lier this week after four ses-
sions and aren't scheduled
to reconvene until May 16.
Before then, U.S. District
Judge Susan Richard Nelson
is expected to decide on the
players' request to immedi-
ately lift the lockout.
Goodell said he didn't
believe the labor impasse
would be resolved through
the courts.


"I recognize people try to
get leverage in negotiations,
but at the end of the day it's
going to come down to the
negotiations," said Goodell,
who unexpectedly attended
the final 10 minutes of the
. 90-minute meeting. '"The
sooner we get to that nego-
tiation, the better. I think
the litigation has delayed
those negotiations."
The NFL has also filed an
unfair labor practice charge
against the union with the
National Labor Relations
Board.


East Division

NewYork 10' 6
Tampa Bay 9 10
Baltimore 8 10
Toronto 8 10
Boston 7 II
Central Division
W L
Cleveland 13 6
Kansas City 12 7

chicago a 1
Minnesota 7 12
West Division
W L
Ls Angeles 2Z 7

S tdend 9 1


Chicago 5, Vancouver 0, Vancouver
leads series 3-2
San Jose 6, Los Angeles 3, San Jose
leads series 3-1Frdy

Buffalo at Philadelphia (n)
Nashville at Anaheim (n)
Today .
Tampa Bay at Pittsburgh, Noon
N.Y. Rangers at Washington, 3p.m.
oonuAn It tos onjo, :3 p.m.
Sunday
Philadelphia at BufFalo, 3 p.m.
Anaheim at Nashville, 6p.m.
Vancouver at Chicago, 7:30 p.m.


ACROSS 39 Aurora, to
Socrates
Apartment 40 M~ath course
- Khan 41 Stall -
Vlaluable stone 43 A Carter
Parents warn- 45 Refuse
ng (hyph.) to go on
MrlnSion staffer 48 Skeptical one
Boise's st. 51 Donny
Cause or Marie
olean 53 Hindqurarters
Went into detail 56 Where heather

Gn a dress 57 Ca sus Clay
Shallow 58 Four-letter
Big pitcher word
joho co. 59 This, in
rorah Barcelona
eciter 60 New Jersey
Theyhoften (11 wrmn ol
Discoverer's loc.
;hout 62 Take a break


iwedish
mport
awlesss role
~and
instrument
~emnant


- 1 I
5
9
12 ~
.in
14 E
15 (
t
16 ~
18 (

20 Z
21 E
23 T
r
26 T

30 0

33 S
i
34 L
35 BE
ii
37 R


8 Concede
9 Sphinx site
10 Firstorchartl?
11 Whipped up
17 Directory
19 Important
decades
22 Lawsuit cause
24 Villain
25 Naked
27 Ri ht~t t
mule .
28 Name in
Beaties histo-

29 Eur, airline
30 Slugger Mel
31 "Ben- -"
32 Teahouse
attire
36 Once more
38 Chitchats
42 Complain
44 Hatfield foe
46 Not tight
47 Granny and
square
48 "Rush Hour"
star
49 Harvard foe
50 Nimes night
51- Job-sa ety
org.
52 Darn!
54 Eggs compan-
lon
55 1-1 dy bbr


ADULT BASKETBALL.

Men's games at
RichardsOH

Open basketball games
for men 18 and older are
played at Richardson
Community Center from
5-8 p.m. on Sundays.
Cost is $3 per session.

WFrom staff reports

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek


EKDDEC I I
TglHE FARMEP'5 PHOTO
:IOF INS COR FI-TO

LEPLTE I IrNIt He P19 THIS.
0 1 Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.



(Answers Monday)
Yesterday'sI Jumbles: PERCH IMPEL CANNON ADRIFT
Answer: The poker players were able to remodel their poker
room because they all did this CHIPPED IN


4-23 @ 2011 by UFS, Inc.


SCOREBOARD


BOWLING


League reports
Results of Lake City Bowi league
play follow.
WATERGUARD
*High scratch game: 1. Susie Flick
218; 2. (tie) Mary Lobaugh, Joyce
Hooper 213. 1. Bill Dolly 289; 2. Mark
Koppa 237; 3. Mark Davis 234.
High scratch series: 1. Mary
Lobaugh 592; 2. Joyce Hooper 575;
3. Susie Flick 566. 1. Bill Dolly 747;
2. Mark Koppa 653; 3. Mark Davis
537.
High handicap game: 1. Susie
Flick 263; 2. Dianne Petit 241;
3. Cathey Creel 237. 1. Rudy Nyssen
285; 2. Steve Greaves 261; 3. Willie
Frazier 252.
High handicap series: 1. Joyce
Hooper 716; 2. Mary Lobaugh 658;
3. Pat Frazier 648. 1. Bill Dolly 792;
2. Mark Koppa 707; 3. George Wailters
706
High average: 1. Mary Lobaugh
182. 1. Zech Strohi 210.
(results from April 12)
Tem iEY SENIORSekPas
(85.5-50.5); 2. Farmers (83-53); 3. Jo's
Crew (78-58).
High scratch game: 1. (tie) Louise
Atwood, Joanne Denton 178; 3. Bea
Purdy 176. 1. Ross Meyers 213;
2. John 6uinn 209; 3. Earl Hayward
202.
High scratch series: 1. Louise
Atwood 486; 2. Joanne Denton 461;
3. Roberta Giordano 441. 1. John
Quinn 564; 2. Ross Meyers 548;
3. Dan Ritter 539.
High handicap game: 1. Sabrina
Herbster 232; 2. Aggie Mumbauer
230; 3. Joanne Denton 228. 1. John
Quinn 250; 2. Ross Vleyers 245;
3. Earl Hayward 228.
High handicap series: 1. Cookie
Reddick 649; 2. Louise Atwood 627;
3. Roberta Giordano 600. 1. Wendel
Shay 645; 2. Rick Yates 620; 3. Dan
Ritter 608.
Highl average: 1. Betty Brown
148.93; 2. Louise Atwood 148.22;
3. Joanne Denton 144.75. 1. Dan
Ritter 175.04; 2. Earl Hayward 171.85;
3. Art Joubert 169.69.
(results from April 12)
GOLDEN ROLLERS


TELEVISION

WV sports

Today
AUTO RACING
Noon
ESPN NASCAR, Nationwide
Series, pole qualifying for Nashville 300,
at Lebanon,Tenn.
3 p.m.
ESPN NASCAR, Nationwide Series,
Nashville 300, at Lebanon,Tenn.
BOXING
10 p.m.
FSN -- Featherweights, Roberto
- Marroquin (19-0-0) vs. Frankie Leal
(15-5-3), at Thackerville, Okla. .
COLLEGE BASEBALL
6 p.m.
ESPN2 --Alabama at Florida
COLLEGE SOFTBALL

ESPN Alabaa a tFlorida
GOLF
9:30 a~m.

Ope~nG third rnd, at Chengu Ch
(same-day tape) -
I p.m.
CBS Champions Tour. Legends of
Golf, second round, at Savannah, Ga.
TGC -PGATour,The Heritage, third
round, at Hilton Head.Island, S.C.
3 p.m.
CBS PGA Tour,The Heritage, third
round, at Hilton Head Island, S.C.
M~jOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
4 p.m.
FOX Regional coverage,Atlanta at
San Francisco, Cincinnati at St. Louis, or
Chicago White Sox at Detroit
NBA BASKETBALL
2:30 p.m.
TNT Playoffs, first round, game 4,
Chicago at indiana
5 p.m*
TNT Playoffs, first round, game 4,
Dallas at Portland
7:30 p.m.
ESPN -Playoffs, first round, game 3*
San Antonio at Memphis
10 p.m.
ESPN Playoffs, first round, game 3,
Oklahoma City at Denver
NNHLHOCKEY
Noon
VERSUS Playoffs, Eastern
Conference first round, game 5, Tampa

NBa y a t Pi t t b u 0f fs mEa s t e r n C o n f e r e n c e

Warshiround, game 5, N.Y. Rangers at
Wahngton
7 p.m.
VERSUS-Playoffs,Eastern Conference
first round, game 5, Montreal at Boston
10:30 p.m.
VERSUS Playoffs, Western
Confere ce frst round, game 5, Los

J eCCER
7:30 a~m.
ESPN2 Premier League, Everton at
Manchester United '

BASEBALL

AL standings


Nnl. Goodell receives 4 cent pay stub


YOUTH SOCCER

CYSA league

F~giStration today


Coumbi oth Soccer
ASsociation's Recreational
Summer Soccer Imague
(ages 3-16) is 11 a.m. to

Copme 1 hid SuC ers
Elementary. The season
will begin the second
week of June. Cost of $65
includes uniform and
season-end award. Games
and practice will be
weekday evenings.
For details, call Scott
Ever'ett at 288-2504 or
Melody Everett at
288-4481.

CHS FOOTBALL .

Q-back Club
meeting Monday

The Columbia County
Quarterback Club will
meet at 6 p.m. Monday at
the Jones Fieldhouse.
For details, call Blake
Lundy at 867-0296.

SEMI-PRO FOOTBALL

FalCONS to honor

veterans April 30

The I.alke City FalconS
semi-pro football team will


3 Wife's mom
(hyph.)
4 Move unsteadily
5 Among
6 Hood's weapon
7 Rush off .


DOWN

1 Golden Rule
word
2 Bete -





LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SATURDAY, APRIL 23, 2011


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


By STEVEN WINE
Associated Press

CORAL GABLES Jim
Larranaga has taken the
Miami Hurricanes' basket-
ball job after 14 years at
George Mason, including
an improbable run to the
Final Four,in 2006.
Larranaga called George
Mason athletic director
Tom O'Connor on Friday
morning to say he accept..
ed Miami's offer. The
Hurricanes scheduled an
evening news conference to
introduced their new coach,
who replaces Frank Haith.
"Coach Larranaga is the
real deal," Miami president
Donna Shalala said in a
statement. "He's a winner,
an inspirational leader, and
he cares deeply about his
players and staff."
Larranaga .61, led the
Patriots to fivie NCAA tour-
nament berths and went
273-164, setting a school
seor folr isct res. w i
27-7 and reached the third
round of the tournament
before losing to overall
No. seed Ohio State.
Larranaga helped the
Patriots win three titles
in` the Colonial Athletic
Association. Now he
moves to the Atlantic Coast
Conference, where the
Hurricanes were 43-69 the
past seven seasons under
Haith,
"Jim can coach at any
level," O'Connor said. "He
could probably coach the
Los Angeles Lakers if he
wanted to."
Miami officials declined
to comment. The hiring was
made by Shawn Eichorst
only nine days after he
became the Hurricanes'
athletic director.
Haith left for Missouri
after going 129-101 at
Miamli, including 21-15 this
past season.
Larranaga's contract at


ie season and finished with
three sacks in 13 games.
Second-round selection
Brian Price played spar-
ingly in five games before
spending the second half
of the season on injured
reserve.
The Bucs have not draft-
ed a' defensive end that's
developed into a dominant
player since taking Hall
of Famer Lee Roy Selmon
with the franchise's first
ever pick in 1976.
The pass rush has been
in decline since free agent
acquisition Simeon Rice had
14 sacks in 2005, ending a
stretch of five consecutive
seasons in which he had at
least 11.
Morris serves as his own
defensive coordinator, how-
ever he's already shown
he understands the team
has' multiple needs on draft

daymen we had pick No.
20 before, the whole town
wanted a defensive player
and we took Josh Freeman,"
Morris said, referring
to Tampa Bay moving
up to select the Kansas
State quarterback two years
ago.
"It was an unpopular
choice and now people
get it. It's hard to question
what our guys have done
the last couple of years in
the draft, plus bringing in
guys from practice squads
off other teams. You fol-
low your board. We have a
belief in each other to get
a successful player that can
help you."
With the team's best
defensive player, Aqib
Talib, facing legal prob-
lems and a potential league
suspension stemming
from' a shootil:ngc.idfntidgti
Texas this offseason, cor-
nerback could be a priority,
too.


By FRED GOODALL
Associated Press

TAMPA Tampa Bay
needs a pass rusher.
Statistics suggest it, NFL
draft analysts believe it, and
even Buccaneers general
manager Mark Dominik
concedes it.
Yes, a defensive end with
the ability to put heat on
quarterbacks is the most
pressing need for .a team
That won 10 games and nar-
rowly missed making the
playoffs last season.
"I would say I don't dis-
agree with that, but again
it doesn't mean thats what
our fist pick is going to
be," Dominik said, careful
to not provide the slight-
eSt hint of what the Bucs
feel they could or should
do with the 20th selec-
tion of the first round. "If
ounn-lrsdop ch is't de ensive
'can't get to the quarterback
ever again."
But playing in the NFC
South,, where the .New
Orleans Saints have Drew
Brees, the Atlanta Falcons
feature Matt Ryan and the
Carolina Panthers may be
considering draftingAuburn
quarterback Cam Newton
first overall, its seems
imperative that Dominik
and coach Raheem Morris
address the weakness soon-
er rather than later.
Tampa Bay ranked 30th
among 32 teams in sacks
with 26 a year ago, despite
using their first two picks
in the 2010 draft on a pair
of defensive tackles who
arrived with strong pass
rushing resumes from col-
lege.
Gerald McCoy, the third
overall pick behind Sam
Bradford and Ndamukong
Suh, got off to a slow start
in an injury-shortened rook-


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this March 20 file photo, George Mason coach Jim Larranaga yells to his players in the
first half of an East regional NCAA college basketball tournament third-round game against
Ohio State, in Cleveland. George Mason's athletic director~says Larranaga is leaving to
become the men's basketball coach at the University of Miami. Tom O'Connor tells The
Associated Press that Larranaga called Friday morning to say that he has accepted the job
at the Atlantic Coast Conference school.


at Bowling Green for 11
seasons and Division II
American International~for
two seasons.
The improbable NCAA
tournament run by George
Mason in 2006 was a tri-
umph for all mid-major
programs. The .Patriots
beat Michigan State,
North. CaroDlina and sec-
ond-seeded Connecticut
before losing to Florida in
the national semifinals at
Indianapolis.
Larranaga also led the
Patriots to the tournament
in 1999, 2001 and 2008.
Miami made the tourna-
ment once under Haith,
losing in the second round
in 2008.
Small crowds have been
a chronic problem for the
Hurricanes, who compete
in a market that includes


George Mason, which ran
until 2016, had a base sal-
ary of $525,000. The school
offered him a package
including incentive bonus-
es would that have put
him in the top five among
mid-major coaches in com-
pensation, O'Connor said,
but even that deal couldn't
compete with Miami's
resources.
Unlike the Hurricanes,
George Mason does not
have a football program.
"In all honesty, the univer-
sity can only go so far with
finances," O'Connor said.
"~We think we put together
a very, very attractive finan-
cial compensation package.
We couldn't compete with
an ACC school, a big foot-
ball school with its budget."
A native New Yorker,
Larranaga also coached


all four major professional
sports. Average attendance
at George Mason was 3,192
the season before Larranaga .
arrived but climbed to 6,834
the year after the Final Four
appearance, anid was 5,896
this past year. *
O'Connor said George .
Mason's search for a
replacement would start
immediately.
"I'm confident we can
attract a very strong bas-
ketball coach," O'Connor
said.
Miami's hiring of
Larranaga completes a
revamping of the athletic
department. Al Golden
.replaced Randy Shannon
in December as foot-
ball coach, and Eichorst .
replaced Kirby Hocutt, who
became athletic director at
Texas Tech.


By STEVEN WINE
Associated Press


By PETE IACOBELLI
Associated Press

HILTON HEAD ISLAND,
S.C. Luke Donald moved
a step closer to the No. 1
Ranking Friday, shooting a
6-under 65 on Friday to take
'the lead halfway through
The Heritage.
Donald is ranked third
now, behind No. 1 Martin
Kaymer and No. 2 Lee
Westwood. However,
Donald would jump
to the top with a win at
Harbour Town, no matter
how Westwood fares this
weekend at the Indonesian
Master's.
Westwood was tied for
the lead in Jakarta, where
the second round was sus-
pended by rain. Kaymer
isn't playing this week.
The 33-year-old Donald
hasn't let talk of No. 1
distract him through two
rounds, finishing at 10-
under 132,for a one-shot
edge over first-round leader
Garrett Willis (69).
Masters runner-up
Jason Day (65), defending
champion Jim Furyk (66),
Camilo Villegas (68) and
Chad Campbell (69) were 8
under. Ben Crane (66) and
lan Poulter (66) were three
strokes behind Donald.
Donald was the highest
ranked of seven players in.
the world's top 20 compet-
ing at what could be the last
Heritage. The PGA Tour fix-
ture is seeking a title spon-
sor, something tour and
event officials say is essen-
tial to maintaining its place
on the schedule for 2012.
Donald could give the
Heritage the boost it needs
if he can claim No. 1.
"I guess it's always in
the back of your mind,"
the Englishman said. "It's
hard to get away from


DAVIE When it
comes to running the
Miami Dolphins' draft,
general manager Jeff
Ireland concedes he can't
match Bill Parcells' expe-
rience or gift for gab.
Next week's draft will
be the ~first for Miami since
Parcells stepped down last
September after 2'&~ years
as head of football opera-
tions. That means more
authority for Ireland, a
Parcells protege who is
going into his fourth draft
with t~he Dolphins.
"Bill had an aura and
he always made it fun, but.
everybody knew when it
was time to get down to
business," Ireland said
Thursday. "That really
hasn't changed. I'm not ii
naive in the fact that I
don't have that aura, but
really the mechanics have In this Feb
not changed. Pouncey r
"As a matter of fact," in Indianay
Ireland added with a smile, NLDat
"we're probably more
focused on just work~.most
of the time, because there cant du
was usually some storytell- pick Jare
ing involved in the draft almost t
room." because
In Parcells' absence, 2009 gre
Ireland will rely more and-roun
heavily on Brian Gaine, but also
whose promotion to direc- became
tor of player personnel pick Jake
was announced Thur-sday. into an
Gaine had worked primar- but the
ily on the evaluation of pro second-r
player-s anld nlow assesses Henne at
college talent too. tion at ql
"He's going to be my The D
right-hand man since Bill 15th pick
has left," Ireland said. next Th~
Ireland, Gaine and the needs,
rest of the Parcells regime choice a
have a respectable track first 110
record in the draft. The lovetotr~
2010 class produced five round for
players who saw signifi- And I


ASSOCIATED PRESS
. 26 file photo, Florida offensive lineman Mike
uns a drill during the NFL football scouting combine
,olis. Pouncey is a top prospect in the upcoming


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Luke Donald flips his ball to his caddie after making a birdie
on the 11th green during the second round of The Heritage
golf tournament in Hilton Head Island, S.C., Friday.


ty, although top
ed Odrick missed
~he entire season
of injuries. The
oup included sec-
Id bust Pat White
four players who
starters. Top 2008
e Ldng blossomed
All-Pro tackle,
jury's still out on
ound pick Chad
s a long-term solu-
uar-terback.
dolphinss have the
Sin the fist round
ursday. With many
no second-round
nid only two of the
picks, they would
ade down in thelirst
multiple picks.
reland didn't rule


out trading up.
"I'm game for anything,"
he said. "I think there will
be quite a bit of move-
ment."
After finishing next to
last in the AF;C in scor--
ing in 2010, the biggest
needs ane on offense. That
includes a running back,
quarterback, tight end and
guard.
While thle NFL labor dis-
pute has delayed address-
ing roster deficiencies in
fr-ee agency, Ireklad said
he won't reach in the draft:
to fill a position.
"Free agency will open
up again," Irelandt sa~id.
"Brian GainehIas reminded
me of that abo~t- a thlou-
sand times."


knowing that with Twitter
and Facebook and the
media and everything, you
obviously know what's at
stake."
Donald, who won the
Match. Play Championship
in February, thinks he can
focus on what got him to
this point steady, unflap-
pable golf.
"I can control where I hit
the golf ball, and hopefully,
I'll give myself a good shot
at it come Sunda~y," he said.
Donald has gradually
found his game the past
few seasons on Pete Dye's
treacherous layout. Donald
finished second two years
ago, then was third behind


Ftiryk in 2010.
Donald began the round
three shots behind Willis
and quickly moved in front
with five birdies on the front
nine. After a bogey on the
10th hole, Donald moved in
front again a hole later with
a 20-foot birdie putt from
the fringe. An 8-footer on
the par-5 15th brought his
final birdie and he parredl in
to break 70 for eighth time
in his last nine rounds in
the event.
'"The last couple of years,
I've come here playing rea-
sonably well, where I've
had control of the golf ball,
which is very key at this
place," Donald said.


Bucs hope to


build on recent


draft success


Coach Jim Larranaga leaving


George Mason for Miami


Dolphins prep for draft

without Parcells''aura'


Donald closes in on



No. 1 with Heritage lead





TO BE PERFECTLY
HONEST, IT WAS A
o=E NRDAL DDN'
DO OUR BEST WORK
TOWARD THE END.


DILBERT
THE COMMITTEE
DECIDED THAT THE FILE

DATE, IN THE ORDER OF
MONTH, YEAR, DAY..


THEN A SPACE, -
THEN THE TEMPERATURE

NEAREST SQUIRREL.


CELEBRITY CIPHER

by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: R equals H
"~P E IZ PN ZP C CI AlI Z R EZ C JX P J I Z B
GP JMZPNKNPZPY MBZ IJLKCU JM
ZPNLI BX ZRJMWI GAZ JM ZPNLI BX
JYPECI ." FRENCPI L. FNBTP
PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "I still believe in the nonviolent Jesus and the basic
human goodness present in all of us." Martin Sheen
(c) 2011 by NEA, Inc. 4-23


P01.AX --- IT'S 0H~Y

)TM$~ POST
) OFFICE TMIAT'T -IJ(II

SOF JTOPPINIG P
SATURDAY
---~~~ D~I~


HA/ 4_,


Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415


DEAR ABBY: I have a
huge problem. I am 13, and
my mom makes me buy
clothes a size larger than
what I need or want. I wear
a size 0 pant and my closet
is filled with 2's. Mom likes
her clothing loose, but I don't
like mine to fit that way. She
claims she buys iny clothes
big so I can "grow into them."
But how much am I going to
grow at this age?
I don't like the way these
clothes fit, and it seems like
a waste of money because I
like expensive things. Mom
bought.me tops a year ago
that are just beginning to
fit me now. She doesn't like
shopping very much, and
this disagreement makes it
harder for both .of us. I've
tried talking to her. Please
help, Abby.--- LOOSE AND
BAGGY IN SAN FRAN-
CISCO
DEAR LOOSE AND
BAGGY: At age 13 it's en-
tirely within the realm of pos
sibility: that you haven't yet
achieved full growth. If the
tops your mother' bought a
year ago are just' beginning
to fit you now, it's because
although you may not have
grown taller, you are begin-
ning to fill out. That may
very i~vell continue to happen
with the rest of your figure
over the next couple of years
- or sooner.
While you and your moth-
er may never have the same
fashion taste, please trust her


dent enough to plan (and
pay) for it with her fiance. It
will be good practice for what
lies ahead after her trip to the
altar.
DEAR ABBY:' I volun-
teer with a support group
and have fallen for one of the
merixbers. I'm certain she
doesn't know my feelings.
I have respected lier right.
to pursue the support she'
sought without the complica-,j
tion of romance.
I have been resigned to'~
the fact that an extraordinary
woman has simply crossed
my path under the wrong;
circumstances. However, a~;
trusted friend has suggested :
that special people come only
rarely into our lives and that
I should consider leaving my
role as facilitator to pursue
her. I'm now struggling over
what to do. I find great satis-
faction in my volunteer work~
but am drawn to this woman.
- TORN BETWEEN TWO
DESIRES
DEAR TORN: If you ap-
proach the woman while
she's a member of your.
group, it could be considered':.
a breach of ethics. Therefore
it might be better if you wait
until she is strong enough~to
leave the group before you
approach her for a personal,.
relationship.

SWrite Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


Abigadl Van -Burven
www.dearobby~com
judgment for now. She has
your best interests at heart.
DEAR ABBY: I don't like
my 25-year-old daughter's
fiance.* He never went to
college, works a low-paying
job and doesn't know how
to manage money. He floats
through life and doesn't ap-
pear to have any goals. I have
Raised these issues with my
daughter in the past, but she
didn't want to hear it.
I know I gan't choose her
husband, and she's free to
. make her own choices. My
problem is, I don't want to
plan the wedding. Every time
I think about planning it, my
heart aches and my stomach
sinks. There is no excite
ment for my daughter. What
should I do? Fake it, or Jevel
with her about not wanting
to be a part of this? ANX-
IOUS AND WORRIED IN
THE SOUTII
DEAR ANXIOUS: Your
daughter already-knows how
you feel about her fiance.
When parents plan and/or
pay for a wedding it is a gift,
not a requirement. At 25,
your daughter is old enough
and should be indepen-


BABY BLUES


BLONDIE


BEETLE BAILEY


ARIES (March 21-
April 19): Don't take oth-
ers for granted or make
promises you cannot keep'
*Feeling sorry or drown-
ing your sorrows will not
reverse negativity. Taking
hold of your life and work-
ing toward a goal will help
avert damage to your repu-
tation. **
TAURUS (April 20-
May 20): You will pick up-
some valuable information
at a conference or trade-
show. Short trips or educa-
tional events will be helpful
in establishing ideas and
concepts you can apply
to one of your projects.

GEMINI (May 21-
June 20): Don't take on a
task that will cause some-
One to question your mo-
tives. Volunteer your time
to a cause you truly believe
you can help. Romance is
highlighted and time spent
with someone you think is
special will bring interest-
ing results and a greater
commitment. ***
CANCER ~(June 21-
July 22): Your peers .or
your partners aren't likely
to share your sentiments
regarding a move. Honesty
will be necessary if yo~tt
plan to come to terms with
a pending problem. Listen
to what others are telling
you but don't question or


will help others understand"
your concerns and choices.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): You will be
emotional about money
matters if you let someone
take advantage of your gen-
erous nature. Focus more
on putting your money into
projects that benefit yout
home, family and emiotion-:
al well-being. A personal
investment is your best bet,

CAPRICORN (Dec.,
22-Jan. 19): Relationships
are likely to ruri smoothly'
with friends, neighbors
or relatives. Avoid anyone
who is overindulgent -
emotionally, physically or-
financially. It may be time:
to question your lifestyle.-
***"
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20;:
Feb. 18): Question anyone
offering too much or being"
overly generous with com
pliments. Ulterior motives:
are likely and may lead to
an emotional or financial:
loss. Consider a career or
lifestyle change. AAAr
PISCES- (Feb. 19-
March 20): Your intuition
won't let you down but
someone you thought you
could count on will. Part-
nership problems will cause
stress if you let them fester.
Face whatever- is causing
the rift head-on. -AAAAl


THE LAST WORD
Eugen~ia Last

retaliate. AAA
LEO (July 23-Aug.
22): You can make sub
stantial alterations to your
lifestyle by changing your
location or picking up skills
that will enhance yoth re-
sume. Getting along with
people you have to deal
with will be a necessity. Ro-
mance and travel are in the
stars. Sc4
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Septs
22): Your finances .should
be evaluated and a budget
set into place. A couple of
changes to your spending
habits should make your
life less stressful. Network
or socialize with people
who can provide you .with
insight into future trends.
AAAAA -
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): Emotional decep-
tion and disillusionment at
home and with family will
leave you in a quandary
difficult to fix. You may not
relish change but it will be
necessary if you want to
avert a situation ready to
explode. AA
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-
Nov. 21): Someone who
tries to take over must be
stopped. You have to be
the one making decisions
that affect your life and
your future. Being' honest


ZITS


GARFIELD


B.C.


F RAN K & E RN EST


FOR BETTER OR WORSE


CLASSIC PEANUTS


LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS SATURDAY, APRIL 23, 2011


DEAR ABBY


Teenager is having a smit

Over howN her clothes fit


HOROSCO PES


SNUFFY SM1ITH





I


Legal

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
CONCERNING A SPECIAL EX-
CEPTION AS PROVIDED FOR IN
THE
CITY OF LAKE CITY LAND-DE-
VELOPMENT REGULATIONS
BY THE BOARD OF ADJUST-
MENTS OF THE CITY OF LAKE
CITY, FLORIDA, NOTICE IS
HEREBY GIVEN that, pursuant to
the City of Lake City Land Develop-
ment Regulations, as amended, here-
inafter referred to as the Land Devel-
opment Regulations, objections, ree-
ommendations, and comments con-
cerning a special exception, as de-

scu ded beowl ehadb h

or as soon thereafter as the matter
can be heard, in the City Council
room on the second floor ~of City
Hall located at 205 North Marion
Avenue, LakP City, Florida.
.Pursuant to a petition, SE 11-03, by
Anthony Thomas, requesting a spe-
Cial eXceptio be granted as provided
v or nS t Rm 45.5a8 nof the Lnd
Home Occupation located in a Resi- .
dential Single Family-2 (RSF-2)
zoning district, located at 1364 NW
Labonte Lane, Lake City, Florida.
The public hearing Clay be continued
OHrstdorpmoreshall be d visAd th t
the date, time, and place of any con-
tinuation of the public hearing shall
be announced during the public hear-
ing and that no further notice con-
cerning the matter will be published,
,unless said continuation exceeds six
(6) calendar weeks from the date of
the above referenced public hearing-
At the aforementioned public hear
ing, all interested parties may appeal
to be heard with respect to the
amendment.
Copies of the special eqception- are
available for public inspection at the
H fIcelooaGrlownthManaeanmet oo t
205 North Marion Avenue, Lake
City, Florida, during regular business
hours.
All persons are advised that if they
decide to appeal any decision made
at the above referenced public hear-
ing, they will need record of the pro-
ceedings, and that, for such purpose,
they may need to ensure that a verba-
tim record of the proceedings is
made, which record includes the tes-
timony and evidence upon- which the
appeal is to be based.
04544499
April 23, 2011


10 Oopbportunities

05525726
Customer Service Rep
needed for established Insurance
Agency; Healthrlns & 401K
plan available,Send reply to Box
05060, C/O The Lake City
Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL, 32056

05525729 .
Teacher Positions .


Lake City-FCCPC /CDA; 3 yrs
of classroom experience
prferred (indivi ualsbw/e .


paid holidays, sick/annual leave,
health mnsirance, retirement +
add'1 benefits; Apply in person
at 236 SW Columbia Ave
(754-2222) or mail resume to
SV4Cs PO Box 2637,
Lake City, FL 32056-2637, by
email: arobinson@sv4cs.org
or Fax (386) 754-2220. EOE

05525730
Lead Teacher-Head Start
3-5 yrs old, Lake City


(AS ECE) or child
development or related
Degree OR age appropriate
FCCPC credential; 3 yrs of
classroom experience working
with young children
required (relevant age
preferred). Excellent benefits.
paid holidays, sick/annual leave,
health insurance,retirement +
add'1 benefits; Apply in person
at 236 SW Columbia Ave
(754-2222) or mail resume to
SV4Cs PO Box 2637,
Lake City, FL 32056-2637,or
by email: arobmnson@svlcs.org
or Fax (386) 754-2220.
EOE

AVON!!!, EARN up to 50%!!!
Only $10 for Starter Kit,
1-800-275-9945 pmn #4206
www.youravon.com/tdavies
Busy office seeking
experienced, energetic person for
receptionist position.
Fax resume to 386-961-8802
Caregiver needed 28 flexible hours
per week, for young adult,
Email resume and references to
PCAposition@ yahoo.com


100 'Oobpruies

Need EXPERIENCED
440-Insurance Agent.
Email Resume to
LCinsjob@gmail.com

Optical Assistant & Lab Tech
Needed,Fff, exp a plus,but we
will tramn, Send resume to 763 SW
Main Blvd, Lake City 32025
OTR Driver: Must have clean
MVR, 7 yrs Reefer/Driver exp,
LTL, Physical, Great work ethics,
Ref. req'd. Call 386-963-3153
Sales Position available for moti-

vted idvduale Runtre dMoore

necessary. Call Anthony Cosentino
386-623-7442

Wanted Highly motivated
individual for Sales Position.
Rountree -Moore Automotive
SGroup, Great benefits, paid vaca-
tion. Exp. a plus but not necessary.
Call Tony Reese 386-344-7517


120 Md"
Employment
05525717

needd for 1 d care Hom e a
Agency. Great pay and Flexible
Schedules. Please call Suwannee
Homecare (386) 755-1544

05525720
Nursing Staff (LPN/RN)
needed for Suwannee Medical
Personnel's staffing division.
Great pay and flexibility. We
staff nursing homes, behavioral
facilities, hospitals and prisons
in Union, Columbia and
Alachua Counties.
Please call (352) 336-0964

Licensed, Experienced, PTA
for busy outpatient cliic
.Send resume to P.O. Box 714
Lake City, FL 32056 or
Email to: pta714@hotmail.com


130 Prft Time

Front Desk/Sales Associate Pff
Looking for energetic person
w/excellent communication skills
SApply at M & M Fitness Center

Nursery Position Available
Southside Baptist Church,

Su y dring e ular scudch
service. Please call 386-755-5553
for more information

Part Time Caregiver for partially
paralyzed woman, evenings/over
night w/schedule flexibility, exp a
must, Elhisville, call 386-752-5152


240 Schools & :


Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-04/25/10

Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-05/09/11

Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or




31 .Pets &Supplies

PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats b ig Iod to be atleast 8

certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information '


361 Farm Equipment

84 Fod46 Tractor. Runs good.
350hr bn2005 mot r. De edble
$7500. obo. 386-867-0005


401 Antiques

125 Dated
Currier & Ives
Prints with history
Call 386-755-0217


402 Apphiances

Family size upright freezer.
White, very nice. $260 obo
386-292-3927 or
386-755-5331

Fridgedaire Side-by-Side
Refrigerator White, works great

386-292-3927 or 386-755-5331


404 Baby Items

Cribffoddler Mattress by Kolcraft
Good Condition $25
I will tex 2pic %eet8 you


408 Filmittfe

King Size Bedroom set, Bed,
Dresser, chest & 2 night stands,
Mattress & box springs included.
$500. Good 3 386-752-3297


640 iro geomes
3/2 DWMH over 1700 sqft. New
Roof & CH/A. Doublesided fire-
place, custoin kit w/breakfast nook
& wet bar. $89,500 MLS# 73861
386-623-6896 Access Realty
Hallmark RealEstate. DWMH
4/2 on 5 ac. 24X36 workshop.
Firep ace, kicen isln wdop
down and more. $114,900.
MLS# 76188 -386-867-1613
Owner Financing-3/2
TWMH in Wellborn. Only
$89,900! Call Taylor Goes
of Access Realty @ 386-344-7662.


Fn tfuRrnshed Apt.

Move in as low as $325
Call today for details!
386-758-8455
Windsong Apts


oSP ING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans;
some with garages.
Call 386-454-1469
or visit our website:
www.springhillvillage.net

1 & 2 Bedroom Apartments
Move in for as low as
$199
a 386-755-2423
A Landlord You Can Love!
2 br Apts $575. & up + sec. Great
area. CH/A washer/dryer hookups.
386-758-935 1/352-208-2421
Great location W ofI1-75, spacious
deluxe 2BR apts., garage, W/D
hook up. patio. $600 & up, + SD,
386-344-3715 or 386-965-5560
Large & clean. lbr/1ba apt.
CH/A Ig walk in closet. Close to
town. $395. mo and $350. dep.
(904)563-6208
The Lakes Apts. Studios & IBr's
from $135/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location,
From $450. + sec.
Call Michelle 386-752-9626


720 Furnishd Apts

.Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
SColumbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable frihdger nmncoae sn kl

2 pers s $5150 w'eekly



730 Unfurnishe

045441486
497 NW Hamilton St..3/1 home
in established neighborhood.
SShort walk to downtown and all
amenities. $550 / mo +
$550. security.
143 Zebra Terrace. 3/2 home
on almost 1 acre with fenced
back yard. $875./ mo + $875.
security. 50% discount on the
first month's rent for approved
applicant.
Century 21 The Darby
Ro ers Co.
BJ Federico 386-365-5884
Kayla Carbono 386-623-9650

22 vH m wplr 1 ne nl aea
$800 mo, 1st,1ast & security mn
Lake City! Call 386-623-7494
3/2 DWMH,on 1 acre lot, partially
fenced, $550 month, $400 sec.,
near N entrance of Itchetuckn~ee
Park, 386-961-8063/965-5093

3/32 Recenl I uit Customa Home,
ces, custom cabinets, $920 mo,
Ist. Last & Sec,off I-75 & 47
Call Andrew 386-623-6066
5/3, eat in kit, new carpets/paint, 2
car garage, fenced back yard, on
Gwen Lake in Lake City
$1,100 mo 386-438-5884
Ft White, 2/1, CH/A. 2010 W2 &
ref's from current landlord req'd,
Ac~ces toR rs4 $62 9




For Lease: E Baya Ave. Two -
1000 sqft office space units or
combined for 2000 sqft. 386-984-
0622 or weekends .386-497-4762
OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$695. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor


790 Vacation Rentals

Horseshoe Beach Spring Special
Gulf Front 2br, w/lg porch, dock,
fish sink. wkend $345./wk $795.
(352)498-5986/386-235-3633
allwaysonvacation.com #419-181

805 Lots forSale

5 Acre Lot, Secluded &t Cleared,
MLS# 67871 $60,000
call Lisa waltrip
@ 386-365-5900
westfieldrealtygroup.com
A high & dry buildable wooded
.734 of ac.,Forest Country. MLS#


76668 Eastside Village Realty.
Inc. Denise Milligan-Bose
@3786-752-5290
Bea\utifull .92 Acre Lot-
3 Rivers-Ft. White-High &Y Dr.y!
Only $11,900.
CallI Talylor Goes of Access Rea~lty
@ 386-344-7662.


416 Sporting Goods

Solid Wood Gun Cabinet,
holds 8, glass sliding doors,
locking drawer
$150 Call 386-961-9171


420 Wanted to B }

K&rH TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts..
Call 386-961-1961.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$250 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.


430 Garage Sales






Household items, clothes, child-
rens toys, appliances & some high-
end stuff for the sportsman. 196
SW Huntsview Way in Woodcrest.
Fri 22nd & Sat 23rd 8:30 to 2:00
Movn Sale Fri & Sat,8 a
Ever ting Imaginable! 245aSmW
Parker Lane, off Pinemount &
Barwick 386-755-1791
Multi Family! Fri/Sat 8-3 In Roll-
ing Meadows off Branford Hwy at
252N. Follow signs. Mowers, Pa-
tio furn, shoes, purses, clothes (0-
2x),collectables, dishes, & more






PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.



440 MiSCell800llS

New Central A/C, still in box,
with full ten year factory warranty
$1,795
SCall 386-364-1090
Tow Behind Grill/Smoker
$1,250 OBO.
386-249-3104 or
386-719-4802


520 Boats for sale

24' Pontoon Boat Bass Tracker,
15 HP Marinerlinew carpet ig s,
finder Call 386-752-2863 $4500


UJV for Rei~nt ~e
I UNDER NEW MANAGEMENT
Oakview Mobile Home Park.
Clean well maintained 2/2 units in
nice park. 2 miles to downtown
Lake City. 386-984-8448
14x70 MH, 2Br/2Ba Real Clean
Good Location! CH/A $550/Mo.
+ $200 Dep. NO PETS.
(386)755-0064 or (904)771-5924
2&3 BR MH. $395 -$650. mo.
plus deposit. Water & sewer fur-
nished. Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
2/2 MH w/screen porch, Irg yard,

creqd t/rf re 5 m 4p75 ep,
NO PETS, 386-965-3003
2br /2ba SWMH; also Residential
RV lots for rent between Lake City
& G'ville. Access to I-75 & 441
(352)317-1326 Call for terms
2BR/2BA MH CH/A,
Fen e~d n back yard and Shed.

Pets OK! 386-365-8279
3/2 DoubleWide Mobile Home,
CH/A, Washer dryer hook up.
$450, mo $200. dep.
386-75 -2254
3/2 SWMH on lacre. CH/A. New
carpet/tile. Great location, very
nice home. No pets-smoke free.
$500 dep/$650 mo. 386-288/6786
3br/2bal mobile home. Next to
O'Leno State Palrk. $650 mo. plus
1st, & sec. Water & lawn
service provided. 3786-758-7959
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White Contact 386-623-3404
or 386-365-1919
New 2br/2ba off Country Club. 1/2
ac. lot Front, back porch & storage
bldg. $600 mo. $600 sec. No Pets!
386-752-5911 or 466-2266
Nice clean 2&3 bdrm, Five Points,
NO PETS, also 3 bd on the
Westside, 3 bdrm house on
Monroe St 386-961-1482







Quiet, Country Branford area
38-674 83 r 16850060.O42
www.suwanneevallecyproperties. com


640 MobileHomes


Palmt Harbor Homes
Hals closed 2 Model Centr~s
Save up to 60K on select models
Call Today! 80()-622-2832


06 MH 3br/2ba~ open floor plan
w/1g kit w/ island, fireplaces. 3 Riv-
ers Est, river access, MLS# 75661
Eastside Village Realt~y, Inc.
Denise Millgan-Bose 752-5290


010 Announcements









100 0 1it
Opport 118 MS

MFrS~t6Federal Bank of Florida
has a position open for a
Financial Specialist in Lake
City. Provides financial
services to both existing and
new bank customers. Strong
background in financial
institution operating pohicies and
procedures. Knowledge of
banking regulations and
communication skills
required. Applications may be
obBane at anyoFirstdFedderal
Human Resources, P.O. Box
2029, Lake City, Fl. 32056 or
email Turbeville.J@ffsb.com.
Equal Employment
Opportunity Employer.

0 4 E WE GROW AGAIN

Custime de ve ands ti ac-
tion a priority. Work outdoors
Clean driving record. Desire to
learn, grow and succeed. Great
pay and benefits. Send resume
to fjobs@flapest.com, fax to
386-752-0171 or mail to 536 SE
Baya Drive. Lake City, FL
32025 EOE, M/F, DFWP. H, V.

Mr scool 0ea stsWante .

litPseraycaept INiophone c ls.
LPOP2 Childcare Center
416 SE Ermine Ave


n dTempor oFarmCWorke rsF.
Henning Breckinridge Co, KY.
Tobacco, Stray/Hay, & Alternative
0ok 1Emplloylment Da esof
$9.48/hr. Worlter guaranteed 3/4
of contract hours. Tools provided
at no cost. Free housing provided
to non commuting workers.
Transportation &r subsistence
reimbursed when 50% of contract
is met. Apply for this job at the
nearest KY Office of Employment
&, Training Division of Workforce
& Employment Services Office
referenemng the job order
#KYO425633.
8 Temporary Farm Workers
needed. Employer: Daniel
Richard Poore Logan Co, KY.
Tobacco, Stray/Hay, Row Crop,
Row Crop Produce,
Greenhouse/Nursery & Alternative
Work. Employment Dates:
06/13/11 01/06/12. Wage of
$9 48Tac Wo rkes ToMI td 3/4d
at no cost. Free housing provided
to non commuting workers.
Transportation & subsistence
reimbursed when 50% of contract '
is met. Apply for this job at the
nearest KY Office of Employment
& Trammig Divisto o Workforce
referencing th b order

Experienced General Auto
Mechanic with own tools needed
for small private company.
386-755-6481
Full time Car Detailer. 8am 7pm
6 days a week. Please apply in
person Rountree-Moore Ford on
Hwy 90, Lake City. Ask for Tim-
6 Temporary Farm Workers
needed. Employer: Hugh Bittel
dba Bittel Farms Daviess Co,
KY. Tobacco, Row Crop -
Produce, & Alternative Work.
Employment Dates: 06/07/11 -
12/20/11. Wage of $9.48/hr.
Worker guaranteed 3/4 of contract
hours. Tools provided at no cost.

com uhionu gorpkere .i Tsosa-
tion & subsistence reimbursed.
when 50% of contract is met. Ap-
ply for this job at the nearest KY
Office of Employment & Training
Division of Workforce &
Employment Services Office
referencing the job order
#KYO425677.
12 Temporary Farm Workers
needed. Employer: KAD Farms -
Daviess~~~ C K Tbco
Stray/Hay, Row Crop, Row Crop -
Produe, Gree housEm urery &

Dates: 06/01/11 12/20/11. Wage
of $9.48/hr. Worker guaranteed
3/4 of contract hours. Tools
provided at no cost. Free housing
provided to non commuting
Workers. Transportatiop &
subsistence reimbursed when
50% of contract is met. Apply for
this job at the nearest KY Office of
Employment & Training Division
'of Workforce & Employment
Services Office referencing the job
order #KYO424873.
Licensed Insurance' Salesperson,
for non-smoking office, 2-20
P & C Licensed preferred
Contact fmcknight81@cox.net


Lawn & Landsca e Service

Clean Pine Straw,
You pick it up, $1.85 a biale
Delivery of 100 bales $260
386-688-9156 ~

Landscape M~aintenance Company
You can trust for knowledge &
pride, Mention this AD!
.Mow Green, LLC 386-288-6532




DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms.
386-961-5896.


Land ServiceS

Back Hoe, Dozer, Chopping, root
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LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SATURDAY, APRIL 23, 2011

Lake City Reporter





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LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIC FIED SATURDAY, APRIL 23, 2011


810 nome for sale

Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
4br 1/5ba. 1332 sqft. Great floor
plan, noce yard, close to town.
Only $84,900 Lori Geibeig
Simpson. 386-365-5678
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
5br/4ba on 5+ac. 3 car garage,
inground pool/hot tub and more.
MLS #75854 $569,900 Lori
Geibeig Simpson. 386-365-5678
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Superbly maintained home in
Creekside. Oversized garage &
storage. Many extras. Elaine K.
Tolar 386-755-6488 $209,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty

owrnheomot. Sl plan 1 .Sq44b9n
MLS# 76919 Elaine K. Tolar,
386-755-6488
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Home on the lake in town. 4br/3ba
MLS# 76085 Elaine 10 Tolar 386-
755-6488 or Mary Brown White-
hurst. 386-965-0887 $299,900 .
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Great home mn Woodcrest S/D 3/2
home, covered back porch, nice
yard.MLS 75 9888Elaine K.0Tolar

Country Home on 2.5 Acres,
$95,000 MLS#77039
Remax Professionals, Inc ,
jo lytte@remaxnfl.com"
386-365-2821
Custbm built home with many
upgrades. Screened back porch,
16x24 workshop.
MLS# 77178 $184,500
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
Custom, 3/2.5 built in 2007,
on 10.8 manicured acres,
completely fenced, Owner Fin,
Sa~val., ML6S 7638 Cal P

FOR SALE 2br/1ba house.
Big 3/4 acre lot.
Asking $15,200.
(954)804-4842 for more info.
Ft White MH on 16.27 Acres,
near many recreational activities
MLS#77404 $149,900
Jo Lytte Remax Professionals
386-365-2821
Great house in Piccadilly S/D. 2
car garage and inground pool.
Newly painted inside & out.
MLS# 76786 $133,500
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
Great Opportunity!,
Currently rented, Seller will
assist w/buyer's closing costs
MLS# 77335, Call Michael at
Westfield 386-867-9053 $99,900
Gwen Lake area. Beautiful up-
grades 4/3 wv/ile & laminate
floors, fireplace, new kitchen, Ig

d %c6edH lma k Ra stat e
Hallmark Real Estate. Brick 3/2.
Many upgrades. Gas fireplace,
Grotto tile. Great location on cul~
de-sac! $149,900.
MLS# 75931 386-867-1613
Historical Home on Lake Isabel-
la. 3/3 w/basement! Great as a pri-
Svate residence or a wonderful pro-
fs~sio Il oH ie. $240,e000 386e

Home on 15 Acres w/2500 sq ft,
workshop, MLS# 77552 $235,000
Call Brittany Stoeckert at


Just Reduced 4/2 on 1.57 acres,
fireplace. partially fenced, MLS#
77412, Call Nancy Rogers at
R.E.O. Realty Group
386-867-1271 $64,900
Large Brick, 3/1, 4.43 acres, metal
roof, MLS# 77415 $104,888
Call Nancy Rogers @ R.E.O.
Realty Group, Inc. 386-867-1271
nancytrogers@msn.com
Large Home on 1 acre, 4/2,
Fla Rm, wrap around front porch
MLS#77292 $148,000
Call Brittany; Stoeckert at
Results Realty386-397-3473
Lg home on corner lot w/garage,
Eastside Village. Clubhouse,
heated pool MLS# 71901 Eastside
Village Realty, Inc..Denise
Milligan-Bose 386-752-5290
Lots of acerage. All brick home.
Screened in porch. Extrai big
closets. Mature pines.
MLS# 76765 $115,000
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
Luxury 3/2 Log Home, Cypress
interior, whole house generator,
$269,900 MLS# 76899 Call
RogereLto ayl @386-p365-7039

Make an Offer! 3 br brick, quiet
resid'1 street in Live Oak. HUD
home is sold "as is" Hallmark
Real Estate 386-365-5146
'www.hudhomestore.com
Nearly 17 Acres w/House
on paved road, Very Spacious!
MLS#76902 $194,900
Call 386-487-7484 Speak to
Brodie Westfield Realty Group
Nice home with eat in kitchen and
a nice sized living room. Pleanty
of room for entertaining.
MLS# 77584 $89,900
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
On Golf Course w/lake view. 3/2
home w/lg rooms, 3 fireplaces, wet
bar & big deck. Newly reduced to
$214,900. Hallmark Real Estate
386-365-2135


, f




i ''








-..


810 Home Mr Sale

Open for Bid! 3/2 DW w/corner
stone fireplace, fenced yard & Ig
kit. HUD property, sold "as is'
MLS 77290- 386-365-3886 Deb-
bie King ~Hallmark Real Estate
Owner Fianncing! wooded 1/4 ac.
lots in Suwannee County, close to
River, high & dry. Brmng your SW
or DW or RV $6,500
Derington Properties.965-4300
Readyr for Fun & Family. 4br/2ba
custom home on 33.84 ac. has
stocked fish pond & huge 54x60
shop. $325,000. Hallmark Real
Estate 386-719-0382
Rolling Oaks, 3/3 + Bonus Rm,

MLS 15 8 1a PamhBea hmp
at 386-758-8900 Remax $284,900
remaxpamb@gmail.com
Solid Brick Home on 5 Acres,
Close to town but in the country!
MLS#76063 Must See!$129,888
Call Brittany Stoeckert at
386-397-3473 Results Realty

Speaci usb Open Flool Plan Home,
$179,900 MLS#76796 Call Jo
Lytte@Rem~ax Profe sionals, Inc.

Tw.0 for the price of one. Updated
main home w/a 3/2 guest home. A
lot of living space for the price.
MLS# 77348 $244,900
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
Welcome home. 3br/2ba brick.
Great locat nd on the east side.


CentuML2S1/The6 Daby 9Ors Co.
Well Cared For 3/2 on 1.4 Acres,
open floor plan, MLS#75702
$199,900, Call Carrie Cason
at 386-487-1484
westfieldrealtygroup.com
Well maintianed 3/2 1/2 acre
minutes from town. 20x40
workshop, screened porch.
MLS# 73787 $99,000
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
You can't beat this Price! 1995
SWMH on 3/4 ac. Paved road,
1216 sf, 2/2 split bedroom plan.
.Needs work! $29,900
Derington Properties. 965-4300


820 Farms a
OAcreage
10 acres, with Travel Trailer &
Electridity, close to Itchetucknee
Springs, $38,000, MLS# 76264
Call MillardGillen at
Westfield Realty 386-365-7001
4 1/2 acre lot. Lakce Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$69,900. $613mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancine.com
4 acres, Wellborn, New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down, $39,900, $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com

B tw IniL~ae Ct r D t.WoHi /
1836 sf, great value on paved road.
Need repairs. $49,900
Derington Properties. 965-4300
Half to ten acre lots. Some w/
well, septic, pp. We finance; low
dwn pmt. Deas Bullard Properties.
386-752-4339. www.1andnfl.com
Heavily Wooded Land, 10 Acres
MLS#75784 $94,900
Call Jo Lytte
Remax Professionals, Inc.
386-365-2821

80 A 00m~lerial
OUProperty
Multiple Use 12,000 sq ft
of Office & Warehouse space,
Loadmng dock, Storage yard,
MLS#77349 $395,000, Charhie
386-755-0808 Westfield Realty

OMA Waterfront
O U Property
DWMH on Ten Acres w/lakefront,
surrounded by oaks, $115,900
MLS#75571, Call Jo Lytte at
Remax Professionals 386-365-
2821, jolytte@remaxnfl.com
River C bin odn Sudwamleedmiver,

$349,900 MLS#76336 Call -
Jo Lytte at Remax Professionals
386-365-2821

in Wite Srg colC to Scol

$12 ,r8 89 M r# 74 Cl acy
@ R.E:O. Realty 386-867-127 1


890 Resort Property

Furnished Home on Itchetucknee
River, Wrap around covered decks
on two levels,MustSEE! $375,000
MLS#7700 C 15 Jo Ly~tte
Remax 563522
River Access, Refurbished Rent-
al Units & Home + Lot,
Barn, Pool, Hot Tub $329,900
Call Jo Lytte 386-365-2821
MLS#76734 Remax Professionals


940 Trucks

2004 Dodge Ram Quad Cab V8
4.7L Auto transmission w/tow
package. 112,500 mi. Lots of ex-
tras $9999 / 386-755-9894


805 Lots for Sale

Forest Country building lot,
scattering of trees, Motivated
Seller $19,999 MLS#75140
Remax Professionals, Inc.
Jo Lytte 386-365-2821
Hallmark Real Estate. Cleared
2.57 ac. fenced w/32' Dutchman
camper. In O'Brien. Close to Live
Oak, Lake City, Branford. $25,000
MLS# 74534 386-867-1613
Nice 4 acre parcel located in
O'Brien. Won't last long at only
$13,500. Call Taylor Goes of
Access Realty @386-344-7662.
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this

h usisg apct hbc m s i ile al
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation~
al origin; or any intention to make
Such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes.children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
de sun er the ag tof lo8wm
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is mn violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-

ocompli Aofdi ciitobn cl
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
unpaired is 1-800-927-9275.


810 Home for Sale

1999 Doublewide,
3/2 fenced back yard
on 1 acre..
MLS# 76315 $64,900
Century 21/The Darby Rqgers Co.
3/2 Brick Home in town, fenced
back yard w/12xl2 workshop
$79,900 Call Nancy @ R.E.O.
Realty 386-867-1271MLS# 77414
nancytrogers@msn.com
3/2 Brick home on .59 acre, on the
lake with back sunroom..Garage &
storage building. .
MLS# 76769 $222,900
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
3/2 Custom Western Cedar Home
on 2 acre lakefront lotMLS#74681
Call Jo Lytte at Remax
Professionals, Inc. 386-365-2821
jo lytte@remaxnfl.com
3/2 in Creekside S/D. Fenced back
yard, sprinklers,1large
screened rear lanai.
$175,000. MLS# 77385
386-623-6896 Access Realty
3/2 in town, lots of upgrades,
currently leased, MLS#76658,
$49,900 Call Jo Lytte at
Remax Professionals, Inc.
386-365-2821

3/ en kohaven 7/laR 9m'
$114,900 Call Pam @
Remax 386-303-2505 or
email- remaxpamb@ginail.com
3/2 MH on 1.5 acres, fenced
prh s, ws~hp,we3 9ma nam e
Grecian 386-466-2517
westfieldrealtygroup.com
3/2 on 4.84 Acres, fireplace, sheds,
many fruit trees, Call Jo Lytte at
Remax $68,900, MLS#72427
386-365-2821, www~jolytte.
florida-property-search.com
3/2 on 5 acres. Large master suite
and open kitchen. Bitck 2 tic.
fenced for horses. .
MLS# 75830 $102,900
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
3/2 on 8.7 acres wlFla room,
several storage bldgs, fenced,
MLS#75295 Call Pam Beauchamp
@ 386-758-8900 Remax,
$179,000 www.visitpam.com
3/2 on 9.7 acres. fenced & cross
fenced. Separate pastu es. Animals
are negotiable. OwnerS motivated.
MLS# 77431 $179,900
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
3br and Ig open floor plan
w/separate office. Beautifully
landscaped. Private access to Lake
Jeffery. MLS# 76231 $199,000
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co*
4/2 with 1000 sq ft workshop,
fenced back yard, 2 car garage,
MLS#77602, Bring Offers!

R.ElO lty 8Na8n67y-1 71
5 acre Home wlHorse Barn,
Wood floors, New Kitchen, -
Gazebo & Koi Pond MLS#76039
$169,900 Call Aaron @ Westfield
Realty Group 386-867-3534
Beautiful Home For Sale
The Preserve at Laurel Lake
4/2 or 3/2 $194,900 MLS#77257
Call Scott Stewart 386-867-3498
westfieldrealtygroup.com
CBC 3/1 home, inside city limits,
fenced backyard, detached carport
w/office MLS#77411 $82,900
Call R.E.O.Realty,
Nancy Rogers @ 386-867-1271
Charming Remodeled Home
in Beautiful Neighborhood
MLS#74765 $142,900 Call
Charlie Sparks @ Westfield
Realty Group 386-755-0808


Classified Department: 755-5440


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