<%BANNER%>

UFPKY NEH LSTA



The Lake City reporter
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS MAP IT! PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01532
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 4/20/2011
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
System ID: UF00028308:01532
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text

EMS contract listed on county's agenda


Giveaway should
result in plenty
Of DOW Seedlings '
By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter. com
Columbia County residents
always lopk forward to the annu-
al tree giveaway, and the City
of Lake City/Columbia County
Beautification Committee doesn't


www.Iakecitryreporter.com


No decision expected
at next county
COHmmiSsiOn meeting.
sy TONY esltin
tbritt~lakecityreporter.com
Columbia County officials con-
tinue to look into the possibility of
privatizing Emergency Medical


"Basically he advised me that
he's not going to be able to do an
in-depth review with the board,"
Williams said. "I think he is going
to say things are moving along
and as soon as he has something,
he'll present it. There will be no
in-depth discussion."
Jason Kimbrell, Lifeguard
IEMS continued on 31A


*County staff is currently nego-
tiating a potential contract wilth
Lifeguard Ambulance Service of
Florida to privatize local EMS.
Lifeguard Ambulance Service of
Florida was voted the top choice
in March to become the county's
EMS provider if privatization of
the service was to occur.
County officials want to save
money by having EMS services


provided by a private company.
The county was supplementing
its' EMS services with close to
$1.2 million annually.
Dale Williams, county man-
ager, said he met with Feagle on
Monday, and Williams said he
doesn't think Feagle will be to
the point where he'll do much of
an in-depth discussion on EMS
privatization at the meeting.


Services for the unincorporated
areas of the county and the Town
of Fort White, and the topic is on
Thursday night's county commnis-
sion agenda. *
The preliminary agenda issued
by the county for the ..7p.n.
Thursday county commission
meeting lists the FMS Contract as
an item slated to b~e discussed by
county attorney Marlin Feag~le.


JASON~ MATTHEW WALK(ERILake City Reporter
Walt McMahon (center), a Jacobsen representative from Golf Ventures Inc., shows Florida Gateway
College students and instructors hsome of the features of a golf course mower at FGC on Tuesday.
Jacobsen dohated seven turf niowers valued at about $120,000 to the college's Go~lf and Landscape_
Operations program. Pictured are Jonathan Morriss (from left), turf equipinent management instructor;
student Greg. Ford, 24; McMahon; turf equipment management instructor- Mark Yarick; and students
Conrad Kassner, 24, and Sa~n McNaughton, 21.


operations, landscape tec nol-
ogy and turf equipment man-
ag3ement will use the donated
equipment for hands-on learn-


mow various golf landsca es,
such as fairways,, greens, thees
and rough.
Students in nolf course


irig, said iohn Piersol, dir2c-
tor of Golf and Landscape.
Operations at FGC.
"They carr take things
apart, instructors can go in
there and do something with
the hydraulics or the electri-
cal systems and the students
then have to diagnose what's
wrong with it and fix it," he
said. "They can practice actual
" "a 'stc ":an i:::::
tive vice' president of Golf
Ventures Inc., a Jacobsen
distributor, said the Jacobsen
donaition was made through
his company's long-standing
relationship with FGC and
to support FGC's Golf and
Landscape Operations pro-
gram, a program that he and
other Golf Ventures employ-
ees and customers graduated
from.
"We owe, a lot of our busi
ness success to the rela
tionship with the school,"
McMahon said. "And John
PierSO1, he taught me when

CAIG'S continued one3A


JASON MATTHEW WALKERILake City Reporter
Turf equipment management instructors Jonathan Morriss (froth left) and Mark Yarick thank Walt
McMahon, Cary Lewis, David Frang and Mike Swinson, all of Golf Ventures Inc.


plan to disappoint this year,
according to officials.
The National Arbor Day Tree
Giveaway is 10 a.m. April .29 at
Memorial Stadium.
"This is a big event in Columbia
County," saidJames Montgomery,
acting beautification committee
chairman. "There's always a long
line of people."
Arbor Day is celebrated across
the nation on the last Friday in
April. The committee commemo-


rates the day with a tree -give-
away.
"WVithout trees we couldn't live,"
Montgomery said. "They create
oxygen for you."
The beautification committee
also celebrates Florida Arbor Day
in January by planting: a tree in
honor of a citizen.
The beautification committee
first held its National Arbor Day
ARBOR continued ont 3A


FILE PHOTO
Gracie Kinney shows
her seedling from the
National Arbor Day
Tree Giveaway.


*


(386) 7 21293
sUBSCRIBETO
THE REPORTER:


Ar.:", Foida...... Z
Calendar. ........ / 3P j
Advice & Comics........ 4B !


Title Shot
~CColumbia HS to play
r- Y *W c;~ir rown
0~~16 120511 "***3-T 1







Lakre c


strong Finish
Fort White girls track
takes second in district.


Sports, IB


State Tr~ip
Lady Tigers outdone at
state tennis tournament.


Sports, IB


it.


Reporter


Vol. I 37, N~o. 74 75 cents


Wednesday, April 20, 20 II


Senate opexti


tank bill

Repeal of inspections
would preserve
'property rights.'

By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lak~ecityreporter.com
Sharon Higgins of Lake City is hopeful
that a Florida` House-passed bill repeal-
ing requirements for septic tank inspec-
tions will move on to be passed by the
Senate.
"In a perfect world, if HB 13 could go
over and the Senate would vote on it and
pass it, thaf~s what we'd want," Higgins
said, Tuesday.
According to the Associated Press, the
bill was passed by a House vote of 110-3
almost a week ago. The bill --- yet to be
passed by the Senate -- repeals required
septic: tank inspections, legislation that
WRS .paSSed last year.
Higgins said the; required inspections,
if they become effective; would go against
her "constitutional standpointt"
"Right from the beginning;. I felt like it
wa my inason of or 8tdo ertymnghs,
that someone could come on our prop-
erty and inspect something that as far as
TANKS continued on 32A



COunty tax



installments

Late fees avoided;
p'nOperty tax
payments by plan.

By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter. com
Residents can avoid late fees for prop-
erty tax payments through the Quarterly
Installment Plan available at the Columbia
County Tax Collector's Office.
MThe deadline to sign-up for the plan is
Property owners can make four pay-
ment installments for their taxes, said
Ronnie Brannon, Columbia County. tax
collector. Bills are sent out in June,
s ntebern uD ce~mb and the final
"In these difficult economic times, it's
a way to budget your tax payments," he
said. "Once you go delinquent, there is
an additional cost involved and penalty
phase."
Delinquent payments are assessed a
three percent penalty in April and addi-
tional costs can be charged,
The plan has about 3,000 people take
advantage of it, Brannon said.
ulf s always hard to put your money
together for one lump sum," he said.
PLAN continued on 3A


CUTTER' SDE~IGHT


Donated
ITIOMerS

will help
teach FGC

students.

By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com
Imost 50 Flonida
Gateway College
students study-
ing Golf and
ALandscape
Operations will have the
chance to tinker with a special
donation worth approximately
$120,000. .
That~ donation cmne
~from Jacobsen, A Textron
Company, in the form of
seven used golf course mow-
ers, which were officially
snaies d oma GoeVentue
Inc. at FGC= Tuesday.
Golf Ventures also delivered
$2,000 worth of scholarships
gv ina0 apco tns toobfour
of the Golf and Landscape-
Operations' students.
The donated mowers can ,


Arbor Day: It's time to plant trees


.: TODAY IN COMING
S COLUMBIA THURSDAY
) nU;t!g a o lsfrC ut


I


90 6 7
Partl cod











Celebrity Birthdays


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



Bon Jovi tours shelter for homeless


62.
Actor Shemar Moore is 41.
Actress Carmen Electra
is 39.
M Reggae singer Stephen

SAtriJe Lawrence is 35.
Country musician Clay
Cook (Zac Brown Band) is
33.


"But ChriSt has indeed been
raised from the dead, the first-
fruits of those who have fallen
aSleep. For since death came
through a man, the resurrection
of the dead comes also through
a man. For as in Adam all die,
SO In Christ all will be made

-- 1Corinthians 15:20-22


CO RRE CTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run
iro~this space. And thanks for reading. ;i:


-Cs----- 1 "' CI-~~ 1111~113lr~l~------~LI~--~--l


---~~T C I


7a 1p 7p la
Wednesday Tht




-rrcsesapae "Fah


I~EIE~


lir:


LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING WEDNESDAY. APRIL 20. 2011


Page Editor: Jason M. Walker, 754-0430


M Retired Supreme Court
C- Justice John Paul Stevens
Monday: is 91.
1-3-15-18-30 W Actor Leslie Phillips is 87.
Sen. Pat Roberts is 75.
Actor GeorgeTakeI i 4
S72.
SActor Ryan O'Neal is 70.

youth Actress Jessica Lange is


Tuesday-
" Afternoon: 8-5-4-5
Evening: 0-8-9-0


~B~I~I


PHILADELPHIA

no longer own a sports
team in Philadelphia, but
he still keeps the city
Sok J B Jv close to his soul.
Bon Jovi returned to Philadelphia
on Tuesday to lend his star power to
the opening of a new homeless shel-
ter for teens and young adults.
The New Jersey native is a long-
time advocate for homeless causes
in Philadelphia, Newark, N.J., New
Orleans and other cities.
Allowing young people to fall
through society's cracks "denies all
tof sthi stalet and lyi ions,o Bon
ing of the Covenant House shelter in
the gritty Kensington neighborhood.
The facility will house 20 people,
ages 18 to 21. Many of them have
aged out of the foster-care system
or formerly lived on the streets. The
shelter will provide a needed bridge
to adulthood and independence,
helping residents set work, educa-
tioixal and life goals.
"They don't have a safety net,"
said Kevin Ryan, president of
Covenant House International.
The Jon Bon Jovi Soul Foundation
contributed to the $3 million facility.
The singer used to be an owner of
the Philadelphia Soul of the Arena
Football League. He was recently
named to President Barack Obama's
White House Council for Communit
Solutions.

Paz de la Huerta in court
over assault charge
NEW YORK Prosecutors said
TV actress Paz de la Huerta derided
a former reality TV figure as a "fake
actress" after attacking her in a posh
New York City hotel bar.
The "Boardwalki Empire" actress
was arraigned Tuesday on assault
and other charges in her March 20
encounter with Samantha Swetra.


CI~I~I~


Get Connded





1CCk~,~rralsim'm


Lakre City
HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293
Fax number .......:.......752-9400
nircula .n . ...... p.7rte. 4
-rhe Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E wdlS. LakedCitFa. CM55
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is propertyof the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709.
Pblael~ d Wison .... .754-0418
(twilson~lakecityreportercom)
NEWS
A~istant Editor CJ Risak..754-0427
After 100 p.m.
(crisak~lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Ashley Butcher ...754-0417
(abutcher~lakechtyreporter.com)
CLASSIFIED
To place classified ad, call 755-5440.


Recording artist Jon Bon Jovi embraces Sister Mary Scullion during an event
marking the opening of Covenant House's new facility Tuesday in Philadelphia:
The Covenant House shelter in the city's Kensington neighborhood plans to house
20 formerly homeless people ages 18 to 21. ,


rReporter
BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon....754-0419
(sbrannon ~lakecityreportercom)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7:30
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers.should
call before 10:30 a.mn. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation........ .......755-5445
(circulation@lakecityreporter.com) .
mTeda tre gh usnday)
12Weeks. ................. $26.32
24 Weeks. .................. $48.79
52 Weeks. .................. $83.46
Ratesindude 7%6sales tax.
12 Weeks. ... ... .. .. .. .. $41.40
24 Weeks......... ..........$82.80
52 Weeks. ................. $179.40


De la Huerta's
lawyer said she's
"asking people not to
rush to judgment."
A court complaint
said de la Huerta
punched Swetra in
the face and threw
a glass that cut


She entered a treatment facility for
three months last year to deal with
what were termed emotional and
physical issues.

HOOver pulling ads from
ABC over soap eras

NEW YORK A Hoover execu-
tive who said his wife and mother
are big fans of two soap operaS
canceled by ABC said he is yanking
the vacuum-makers', ads from the
network in protest.
Hoover's vice president of market-
ing, Brian Kirkendall, announced
on the 'company's Facebook page
that the ads will be lifted Friday, if
not sooner. T~he number of people
:who said they "liked" Hoover on
Facebook lias jtimped from around
7,000 to.more than 11,000 people
since the message was posted.
ABC said it was canceling "All My
Children" an'd "One Life to Live." '


Paz de la Huerta

Swetra's leg.


SAssociated Press


-City
Lakelit 89/64 e Cape Canaveral
8963 90/62 Ft ~ue dl

7116 a m Dah `18eade One vi l
!9/67 Ocl acksonvlle
:0/63 O Ca aavrlKey Whest
90/65 (?8/66 Lake City
Miami
Naples
SWest Palm Ba Ocala
~r 85/72 Orlando
*C~ FtLaudnlal PanamaCity
RIt. yeark 86/74 *1 Pensacola
91/68 9 Naples riTallahassee
`89X67 g j~n Tampa
87/73 Valdosta
85/7 *et W. Palm Beach


Thursday
83 63 pc



87/61/pc
85/76/pc
90/61/pc
86/74/s
88/66/s
90/61/pc
89/65/pc
80/64/pc
81/69/pc
88/62/pc
88/69/pc
87/63/pc
85/72/s


Friday
81,65. pc



86/62/pc
84/75/pc
89/60/pc
85/73/s
87/67/s
88/59/pc
87/64/pc
86/66/pc
82/70/pc
90/62/pc
88/68/s
90/61/pc
83/71/s


Oil still present in water
Shoreline Clean-up Assessment Teams team leader Todd
Farrar of Baton Rouge and other team members use a shovel
to search for oil in the surf in Perdido Key Tuesday. Tar~ballS
continue to wash ashore a year after the Deepwater Horizon
oil spill.


They made the
announcement Tuesday
while in Panama City for a
Cabinet meeting and tour
of the Panhandle to mark
Sthe spill's one-year anni-
versary.
Wednesday is the dead-
1in so i nsg ea leera
in New Orleans. Several
of Flonida's local govern-
ments are participating.

PHYSe snatcher
StuHS VICtim
SARASOTA -
Authorities said a purse
snatcher used a stun gun
to disable his victim.
The Sarasota County
Sheriff's Office said the
incident happened about
7:30 p.m. Monday when a
vehicle stopped next to a
woman who was walking
along ~irads a mn ot

out of the car and used
a ne otu gunlion bh victim
with her. The vehicle,
which was driven by a
woman, fled the scene. .

PoliCO fatally
Shoot suspect
MIAMI GARDENS -
Police officers shot and


killed a man suspected of
shooting an officer last
week. -
Police said Durall Jessie
Miller, 24, refused to leave
the entrance of a Miami
Gardens home Monday
night. When he threatened
to shoot a officers, they

Officers were looking
for Miller in connection
with a shooting last Friday
night during a domestic
violence call in Miami.
Police said Miller fired at
the officers, striking one in
the foot Miller was wanted
on two counts of attempted
murder on a police officer
stemming from the shoot-
ing.

Man Shoots 2

dogs to death
JACKSONVILLE -

tnhal Sew dt 4e6, sh t
his dogs to death outside
his Jacksonville home.
SNeigthbors to1d deputies
with his two dogs and shot
them. Stewart was upset
because the dogs kept
digging holes in the back
yard. He was accused of
cruelty to animals.


An exclusive

brought to
ou eder
by
The Weather
Channel.



weather.com


TEMPERATURES
High Tuesday
Low Tuesday
Normal higli
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Tuesday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


SUN
Swunise today
Sunset today
sunrise tom.
Sunset tom.


91
61
at
55
90 in 1981 .
34 in 2001


0.00"
0.69"
11.00"
1.96"
13.12"


6:58 a~m.
8:01 p.m.
6:57 a.m.
8:02 p.m.


MOON ult
Moontise today 11-16 p.m. raC
fr
Moonset today 8:45 a.m. f
Moonrise tom. a
Moonset tom. 9:43 a.m.


Arfl May May May
24 3 10 17 ~2
LatNew First Fu l




6a On this date in
ursday tih2 Ithkfo lover
ldoto cr sh of
ers, off of Morgan
City, La.




'tiampeur


r l Forecasts, data and
4 graphics @ 2011 Weather
-'~ Cerrrl LP aiowi


MAssociated Press


.*,


ra~tY~4-


'Afternoon: 2-8-9
Fe~l 3 Evening: 7-5-7 usdy


a y crDture


Demi Lovato leaving
'Sonny With a Chaner.
LOS ANGELES Demi Lovato,
18, is leaving "Sonny With a
Chance," the' Disne'y
a Channel TV series .
that m atden a inevefher a s~tar

iT~ with Peolile miga-
l ine, Loyato said she
Didn't "'think going
Lovatoback to 'Sonny'
*would be healthy for
my recovery." Instead, she said she
wants to focus on~ her music career.


;~ ;AROUND FLORIDA


THE WIIEAC~TH-E;R


w ism n f lonnt ana

DELRAY BEACH -
Authorities said a missing
Montana woman has been
found in South Florida.
Delray Beach Police Sgt.
Nicole Guerriero said that
Amanda Lyn Buchanan,
of Whitefish, Mont., was
found early Tuesday in
Briny Breezes.
Guerriero said an off-
duty police officer saw
Buchanan, 34, stand-
cn otieda dsur p. r
to be harmed.
Guerriero said
Buchanan's family told
police that Buchanan had
struggled with depression
and that they did not know
why she was in South
Florida.

~Car T-boned by -
school bus
JACKSONVLLE Five
hildr n hqkonil after a
school bus T-boned a car
that had run a red light.
Jacksonville Fire and
Rescue officials said 23
children were on the bus
when it collided with the
car Tuesday morning.
Officials said that five
children were hospital-
ized within non-life-threat-
ening injuries. The bus
driver injured her leg but
declined to be transported
to a hospital.
It was unclear why the
car's driver ran the red
light. The crash remains
under investigation.

State opts out of
Oil spill lawsuit
PANAMA CITY Gov.
Rick Scott and Attorney
General Pam Bondi said
Florida won't join a lawsuit
against the owner of the
Deepwater Horizon rig
that exploded a year ago,
causing the massive oil
spill in the Gulf of Mexico.


PARTLY OLATED OLATED ~ OLATEDI PARTLY]
.CLOUDY STRM STORMS 1.-~-STORMS ~ CLOUDY


HI SC 62 HI 90 U 6 HI 89 U 6 HI 880 LO60 HI 88 U 61


10m
Toc


illestobu
day's
raviolet
~iation risk
the area on
;cale from 0





CARTS: Teaching tools
SContinued From Page 1A

I was going here. We just industry support."
feel the program's impor-
tant for the golf course
industry in Florida and it
needs to be supported, so RECYCLE
we do whatever we possi-
bly can do for it." YOUR
Piersol said the industry PAPER
support that comes from
that relationship helps to ,
pay for the program. ~sP~~
"The industry sup-
port is a huge part of our
program," he said. "We
wouldn't have the pro-
grams we do have without L -ac.. .


OB YN l~

DA NA GREENE MD
WOME N' HEALTH WITH A WOMAN TOUCH














*Meet with a provider the day you come in
*Same day/next day OB appts.
*Dr. Greene is chief medical officer at Pregnancy
Care Center
*Free pregnancy tests
Call for appt. Mon.-Thurs. 80m-5:30pm
755-0500 449 SE Baya Dr. Lake City
Accepts AI| Insurance


LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL WEDNESDAY. APRIL 20. 2011


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


STo submit your Community
Calendar item, contact Antonia
Robinson at 754-0425 or by
e-mail at arobinson @
lakecityreporter.com.


p.m. Saturday at the Lake
City Mall.

HSCT play
"Moments of Weakness"
runs weekends from


Th ae. Tike~ts a alal
at Ihe Framery, 341 S.
Marion St, corner of Knox
or purchase online at high-
springscommunitytheate7:
com.

Road to Calvar
The "Road to Calvary"
production is 8:159:45
p.m. Friday and Saturday
at Wesley Memorial
United Methodist Church,
1272 SW McFarlane Ave.
Drive-thru time is usually
less than seven minutes.
For further information,
call 752-3513 or visit wrww.
commumityconcerts. info

Good Friday
A High Noon Praise
Service is noon Friday
at Miracle Tabernacle
Church on Sisters
Welcome Road. Dr. G.L.
Hawthorne and Dr. C.J.
Steele will "tag-team" in
the spirit. Call 386-292-
5850 or 386-7588452.


Tenebrae Service
The First Presbyterian
Church is having a Good
Friday Tenebrae Service
8 p.m. Friday. Candles will
be extinguished during





Saturday
Easter Carnival
The Youth Easter
Carnival is 10 a.m. 4 p.m.
April 23 at Alley Ogbrun
Ball Park in White Springs.
The event will feature
powerlifting champion the
Rev.James Henderson,
The carnival will feature
crafts, games, food and
more. Henderson is also
speaking a South Hamilton
Elementary School 7 9
p.m. Also featuring special
guest JA! Ps 1, hip hop
recording artist.

Easter Egg Hunt
Gold Standard Lodge
#167 is having its annual
Easter Egg Hunt 10 a.m.
1 p.m. April 23 at Annie
Mattox Park. The day
will feature games, food
and more. Contact Mike
Kelly 867-6675 or Dennis
Murphy a't 697-3739.


from now until April
30. Every food item or
financial donation counts
toward receiving a per-
ce tae of the yieaw~ay.

bring donations either to


lake City, FL, 32056.

Maundy Thursday
An annual Maundy
Thursday program is 7
p.m. Thursday at Bethel
AME Church. The com-
munity is invited to
enjoy the event of the
Inst Supper. The church
is located on CR 242A.


Honer at 386-697-1395.

Faith in Christ Holy
Week .
Holy week ser-
vices include Maundy
Thursday featuring Holy
Communion 7:15 p.m.
Thursday, walking the Via
Dolorosa or "the Sorrowful
Road" noon Friday and
Resurrection Day 10 a.m.
Sunday at Faith in Christ.
The church is located at
9317 US Hwy. 9~0 East, just
east of the county line and
right next door to the Star
Tech office.


Month. Join the Master
Gardeners and learn all
about attracting these
beauties.IThe program is
free and everyone is wel-


Sc enee Club

Richardson Middle
School EXCEL Science
Club Outstanding Science
Dignitary Program is
honoring all students
who made an A in sci-
ence on their third nine
weeks report card 9 a~m.
Thursday.in the audito-
rium. The speaker is Mark
Hunter, Columbia County
Sheriff. Everyone is' invit-
ed to attend.

Treasure Hunters
meeing
The Gold, Gem &
Treasure Hunters Club of
North Florida is meeting
7 p.m. Thursday at the
Butler Seafood House in
Lake Butler. Contact Club
President John Itshuk
at 904-364-0680 or e-mail
starkepaa@ryahoo.com.

Feinstein challenge
Christian Service Center
is participating in the $1
million dollar giveaway
Alan Feinstein Challenge


WNOOZieS"

fOTr yOUr wine egla ss

-~i9~""C~si


medical services in city limits.
'"The city's position in
regards to EMS services
is that we can not make an
educated decision or take a
direction until we know what
the position of the~county is
going, to,~ be," Johnson said.
'"The county has got a dif-
ficult decision to make and I
know they have been assess-
ing it for several weeks, but
I hope in the end, from my
conversations with officials
from Lifeguard Ambulande
Services, I see them as a qual-
ity firm and they have made a
su enior poosal for quality of
service at no cost. I hope that
in the end the services select-
ed by the county will be for the
people, countywide, to include
all the citizens so that we all
have an equal service with no
cost. Thats what I'm hearing
Lifeguard proposed and cer-
tainly as they go through the
negotiations, I don't see how
they can get much better than
that."


Ambulance Service regional
director of operations, said he
is uncertain when Lifeguard's
proposal will be present-
ed to the Columbia County
Commission. ~
"Right now we're negotiat-
ing with the county to make
sure vie'Are got a very detailed
proposal thats going to pro-
videsthe greatest service to the
.community and thats going to
take a little bit of extra time,
he said. .
Kimbrell said the proposal
may be pushed back to a later
date its contract negotiations
continue.
"Because of the details of
the proposal, it's going to take.
an additional several weeks,"
Kimbrell said. "We're now at
a point where the presenta-
tion is going to be delivered
probably not until at least
May 5. All that's at the discre-
tion of the Board of County
Commissioners."
Mike Anderson, spokesper-
son for the Columbia County
EMSAssociation (International


Association of fie Firefighters
Local 3510), said the union
still has the same points of
consideration it initially voiced
regarding privatizing -there
has been no cost savings evi-
dence presented to support it.
"All that we ask is that they
commissionersrs) allow the citi-
zens to weigh in," Anderson
said. "We're still witing and
watching th~e outcome and
hoping the community will
weigh-in on the direction that
they feel the county should go
in on the privatization issue.
The union plans to have a
press conference following the
county commission meeting if
ai presentation about privatized
EMS services is made during
the meeting.
"We're prepared to address
the county's decision to priva-
tize," Anderson said. "In our
opinion it doesn't appear to be
a good idea."
Wendell Johnson, city man-
ager, said' the city has not
made a decision on a potential
vendor to provide emergency


Elections office will also lie
available to register voters at
the event.
"It'sagreat opportunity to
get trees planted in the com-
munity," Montgomery said.


Celebration at the Old City
Hall building in 2000.
"The first one it was
crazy," Montgomery said.
"Everyone showed up."
Two trees per person
will be available, said Faye
Bowling-Warren, commit-
tee member. Everyone
must show identifica-
tion proving they live in


Columbia County.
Offered trees will include
live oak, dahoon ~holly,
American Elm, sweet gum,
southern magnolia, red
maple, tulip poptilar and dog-
wood. Seedlings will also be
available.
The trees will enhance the
appearance of the commu-
nity, Bowling-Warren said.


"It makes the community
more inviting to people,"
she said.
A brief program will take
place before the giveaway
began. The Supervisor of


"Its easier to pay install-
ments."
There are no additional
costs for signing up for
the plan, and discounts
are also available, he said.
The plan helps avoid late
fees and penalties.
Another option intro-
duced for taxpayers last
year is the Partial Payment
Plan, Brannon said. The
plan begins Nov. 1 and
allows property owners to
make as many payments
needed to payoff taxes
before April 1.
However, no bills are


provided other than the
fist tax bill, he said.
Applications for the
Quarterly Installment Plan
are available at the tax
collector's office or sign-
ups can be made over the
phone, Brannon said. The
tax collector's office is
available at (386) 758-1080
for more information on
either plans or to sign-up
for quarterly installment
"Call the office anytime
you have a question about
anyr kind of property tax
payment," he said. "We're
here to help you."


COMMUNITY CA A


Our Redeemer Holy
Week
Hol Wleek servi es re

nausday s7:3 p.m. F iay
for Good Friday and 7 and

Ba Rdemr s th r
sunrise service Sunday.
The church is located on
State Road 47, 1 mile past
the interstate.


Friday
Steer Competition .
Th eadline t nte
sTher do the Clomb r
s uteer Far 4:30 ia .
F dy. Fhil ren mus te
between the ages of` 8-18
and enrolled in school
or home schooled in
Columbia County. Entries
must be turned into the
fairgrounds office or call
752-8822. Forms are avail-
able online at www.colum-
biacountyf'ailtorg or th?
fair office. The begmmnng
Steer weigh in is 8-10
a.m. May 7.

Easter Bunny Weekend
Schedule
The Easter Bunny vi~ill
be in Bunny Town 3 -- 8
p.m. Friday and 10 a.m. 5


Thurs ay
Redired educators

The Columbia County
Retired Educators


te Scho In ar am. t
Center, located 372 West
Duval Street. The public is
cordially invited to attend.

Camera Club meeting
The Branford Camera
Club is meeting 7 p.m.
Thursday at the Branford
Public Library. The meet-
ing is an "Open Forunk
covering multiple top-
its. Call Caroly Hgue,

935-2044; Dick Bryant,
Technical Consultant, 386-
9351799; Dick Madden,
Technical Consultant, 386-
935-0296; or Skip Weigel,
Technical Consultant, 386-
935-1382.

Master Gardeners
workshop
A Gardening for
Butterflies workshop is
5:45 7 p.m. Thursday
at the Fort White Public
Library on Rt. 47 (located
across from Fort White
High School. April is
Butterfly Gardening


EMS: Lifeguard still under consideration
Continued From Page 1A


TANK(S: Law up for repeal

Continued From Page 1A

we know is working perfectly fine." tion cost (if the repeal is not passed
Higgins said the inspections by the Senate), Barnard said, but
would also incur an "unnecessary the water pollution from septic tanks
expense" for residents, which Lois needs to be dealt with.
Talbert of Lake City agreed with. "I just don't know who ofus would
"I have more bills to pay than I want to suffer from water-bjorne ill-
can think of and to pay Sonriething nesses if we don't start to get this
thats not necessary is ridiculous... pollution under control," she said.
I can't see it and I can't afford;"- "W1ithout M;itkpect for why it
it," Talbert said. "We live on Social (the inspections) is put in place,
Security and as you know with the~ l.it'sigoi~ng- rmt;our.- ach-needed i
gas going up and the food going up water protection back a long way,"
with everything else going up, we Bainar~d said, "and that's something ,
certainly can't withstand an expense, that each of us are going to. have to
like that look at ourselves. How much does
Loye Barnard, vice president of it mean to each one of us? Because
SaveOur uwanee nc.- a on-it affects our families' health and
profit organization concerned with
Suwannee Basin water issues well-being.
said she is "really very concerned" "The sad part is that we're hurting
about the expense of the possible from lack of funds for the financing
inspections, but is also concerned that would help remedy this particu-
about the nitrate pollution septic lar problem," she said, "but sadder
tanks contribute to North Florida still, we'll end up with polluted water
springs and rivers. and springs and that we're expected
"W~e're really between a rock and to drink water that is no longer
a hard place," Barnard said. drinkable."
Perhaps septic tank companies Local septic tank businesses con-
who would perform the possible tacted for comment on this story
inspections could work with low- were unavailable by press time
income areas to offset the inspec- Tuesday.


ARBOR: Itksa day meant to plant a tree
Continued From Page 1A


PLAN: Installments

Continued From Page 1A


)iL





ANOTHER OPINION


Tallahassee's harsh immigration

bills flunk common- sense test


OUR
OPINION


Child ren


1 DrTO


magic

of fight
he annual Young
Ealsevent held
Saturday and
Sunday at Cannon
Creek Airpark
introduced area children to the
magic of flight. The program,
sponsored by local flying enthu-
siasts, offered free airplane
rides to kids ages 8-17.
To some, this sounds trivial.
The planes were small propeller
models of all makes and sizes
and the flightf~' consisted of an
aerial lap around Lake City.
But it's not trivial. Local pilots
and their families who give of
themselves to make this event
happen should be commended.
Most of the children who flew
on Saturday and Sunday had
never been off the ground in
an airplane before. The event
introduced these children to a
very unique experience. Many
of the parents also had never
flown.
Maybe there's one child who
goes on to a career in aviation
or an aviaticn-related ~field.
Giving young children .
the experience of flight is
something they never will.
forget. The symbolic meaning
of the event comes in the
lesson it shares. Some may find
inspiration in the experience
to realize they can step beyond
any limitations and achieve
sonidthin~gthiat off~e ~eedied .
impossible.
The message, the event
and the people behind it all
are positive forces in our
community.

H 1G HLIG HTS
I N HISTORY Y
Today is Wednesday, April
20, the 110th day of 2011.
There are 255 days left in the
year.
Today's Highlight in History:
On April 20, 2010, an
explosion on the Deepwater
Horizon oil platform, leased
by BP, killed 11 workers and
began spewing (by govern-
ment estimates) about 200 mil-
lion gallons of crude into the
Gulf of Mexico for nearly three
months.


Lakre City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Co ebuelieve strn nw ppers build
strong communities --"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
pbish distius hed and prftable
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Sue Brannon,.controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman


LETTERS
POLICE Y
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.


BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 75;2-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


4A


www.Iakecityreporter.com


Dale McFeatters
mcfeottersd@shns.com


for the presidency more than
once as a publicity lark. Leave
it to Cosby to come up with the
appropriate comparison. Maybe
he should run.
Opposing Obama won't be
easy. The presidents ability
on the stump is daunting. In
this era only Bill Clinton could
match his charisma. That may
have diminished some but not
enough to give the current crop
of opponents much hope in the
hurricane that is a presidential
campaign. The task will be to
convince voters that they were
better off before they elected
him and that they will be better
off when he is out of the White '
House. How easy is that in an
economy continuing to show
improvement and given the
power of an incumbent to dic-
tate the news? .
So if this is one of those eleo-
tions without an obvious oppo-
nent why not look at the likes
of "the Donald"? It would be a
hoot. Every few weeks he could
sack his campaign manager
or one of his key advisers just
for show. "You're fied!" could
become the campaign cry. It
would drive the political pun-
dits crazy. He could comp free
nights at the "Taj" or the "Plaza"
in Atlantic City for big donors.
Smaller contributors could be
offered a free meal at the casi-
nos' buffets with those giving
$20 or under receiving coupons
for a discount at the ancient hot-
dog stands along the.boardwalk.
Go for it Trump, baby. We can
hardly wait.

SDan K. Thomasson is former
editor of Scripps Howard News
Service.


inherited a bunch
of money, built
and bought a lot of
D ~ ~b u il d i n g s inclu d-oal T r
ing gambling casinos, married
a beauty or two, provided hun-
dreds of thousands of jobs he
claims and has become even
more' famous for turning the
act of dismissal into one of the
ruder expressions of the awful
era of reality television. All
thatria his.opinion makes him
qualified to be president of the
United 'States.
That's what he told a national
audience tuned into the "'Today
Show" the other morning
without actually saying he was
going to run for the job. A few
minutes later the next guest, the
irrepressible Dr. Bill Cosby, all
but told Today host Meredith
Vieira that Trump should do
something biologically impos-
sible, adding that the only thing
the king of the comb-over is .
running "is his mouth."
Since then, Trump has joined
those demanding that Barack
Obama prove he legally holds
the presidency by releasing
his birth certificate. That has
boosted Trump to the top of
the early polls, of potential GOP
nonunees,
Whether or not the man
whose name is plastered over
a hunk of Atlantic City and is
referred to by the New York
media as "the Donald" decides
to give Republicans the oppor-
tunity to carry their banner is
beside the point. The fact he is
even mentioned shows where
the party is in terms of viable
candidates for next year's elec-
tion. No one has yet actually '
declared to oppose Obama, who


Dan K. Thomas son

has made it cleatlhe is seeking
reelection.
.Some people have signaled
they may be in, and it is to say
the least an eclectic bunch -
Newt Gingrich, Haley Barbour,
Michele Bachmann, Sarah Palin
and Tim Pawlenty (Tim who?).
At this juncture, Mitt Romney
would have to be considered a
frontrunner. Only Palin could be
counted' a household name and
the polls show she has suddenly
developed a case of the "nega-
tives" among Republicans and
independents. Mitch Daniels
is the most sensible possibility
and might even make it a race,
especially one that focuses on
the growing fiscal problems.
But the president's campaign
treasury is way ahead and likely
to stay that way for some time,
giving him a sizable advantage
mna race that is likely to cost the
tidy sum of $2 billion. You read ~
that right. Obama is expected
to spend $1 billion and he won't
have to worry about a primary.
So why shouldn't this
improbable character from the
Manhattan real estate jungles
believe he could do the job.
After all in this country anyone
can run fo'r president, includ-
ing, as Cosby said, "that fellow
from the old Smothers Brothers
Show," referring to comedian
Pat Paulsen who announced


ome lawmakers in
Tallahassee apparently
believe that the way
to appease the state's
Most strident voices
on immigration is to adopt an
Arizona-style bil, opening the
door to a divisive, unneeded and
~emotionally-charged debate. I~s
a huge mistake and a terrible
distraction for lawmakers, who
should focus on fading solutions
for the very real economic
problems facing Florida.
There is no convincing
evidence that the state needs
this legislation or that most
voters want it. As so often
happens with this topic, the
politics of immigration threatens
to overwhelm common sense.


Two versions of the proposed
anti-immigration law are
heading for floor consideration
- harsh and harsher. The latter
is House bill 7089, which would
make being an undocumented
immigrant a state crime. (Not
needed: It~s already a federal
offense.) It also requires police
to check the status of subjects
under criminal investigation
if a "reasonable suspicion"
exists that the person might
by undocumented. Senate bil
2040 would have police check
the status of aninrnate. Both
bills require employers to check
workers' immigration status,
though the Senate version gives
employers more flexibility.
At fist blush, this may


sound reasonable. Don't be
fooled. All such proposals are
deeply flawed on both legal and
practical grounds. For all the
hue and cry in Arizona, and
despite the severe impact of lost
tourism, the law has been in
legal trouble ever since it was
signed by Gov. Jan Brewer one
year ago this month, forcing
the state to spend money
defending a widely derided
proposal that courts have failed
to uphold. First, key provisions
of Arizona's law were enjoined
by a federal district court, and
just last week the 9th Circuit
Court of Appeals extended the
injunction.
SMiami Herald


OINIO


WNednesday,April 20, 20 II


Debt



fight







ince the end of World
War II, the U.S.
dollar has functioned
as the world's
Reserve currency.
International transactions
are~ valued in dollar terms.
Many commodities, like oil,
are priced in dollars. U.S..
Treasury bonds are a safe
haven for other countries'
reserves; China owns $1.15
trillion of them. Dollars are
almost universally accepted,
and more of them circulate
outside the U.S. than inside
the country.
In short, the world has a
high degree of confidence in
the U.S. dollar.
House Republican
backbenchers are threatening
to oppose a necessary increase
ini the federal debt ceiling to
force spending Couts denied
them in this past week's
agreement on the 2011 budget.
With respect to the U.S. dollar,
it is a risky strategy.
Around May 16, the U.S.
government will hit its .
statutory borrowing limit of
$14.3 trillion. The Treasury
can buy some time by juggling
accounts, but unless Congress
raises that ceiling, the U.S.
goes into technical default and
then actual default.
The House fiebrands
might want to take note of
the meeting this week in
China of the BRICS group.
The acronym refers to Brazil,
Russia, India, China and its
newest member, South Africa,
five of the world's fastest-
rising economies that, taken
together, should surpass the
U.S. around 2020.
The BRICS nations are
demanding a restructuring
of the world economy to give
them a greater say, an~d with it,
according to The Washington
Post reporter who covered the
conference, "an eventual end
to the long reign of the U.S.
dollar as the world's reserve
currency."
Calls to dethrone the dollar
are nothing new. Russia does
it regularly, offering, to no
takers, the ruble in its place.
China frequently suggests that
there should be alternatives
to the dollar as the world
standard.
Mostly it's just talk because
all of the alternatives have
drawbacks.
Russia defaulted once, in
1998, and its economic system
:: opqe a., cort Chnat
economy, but its currency, the
renminbi, has convertibility
issues and is widely held to be
artificially undervalued.
The euro is a possibility,
but the debt crises of some of
its members raised questions
about the stability of the
eurozone.
A "market basket" of
currencies as a reserve poses
a host of technical problems.
A default by the U.S.,
however, might be the
incentive these countries need
to stop talking and start acting.
Congress should take great
care that one of the casualties
of a standoff over the debt
ceiling is not the venerable
status of the U.S. dollar.

MDale McFeatters is editorial
writer for Scripps Howard News
Service.


Tru-e *rng gl


to~~~~ bln O il





r


State leaders discuss

Oil Spill recovery


LAKE CITY REPORTER


Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424


rs ih eam is constantly changig, het
said. "There has been a tremendous turn-
over. How many of the elected leadership
are going to participate and not just for
the photo op?"
Speaking to attendees at the National
Hurricane Conference, Fugate said that
governors, mayors and others must
participate in hurricane preparedness
drills to understand the decisions they
could have to make this summer. He also
stressed the need for emergency man-
agement community to take advantage
w': -oa thiato enge te p rlcoand
in the gaps in support when responding
to disasters.
Fugate dismissed the notion that states
and local governments facing budget
woes would be reluctant to respond to
disasters like hurricanes, pointing to the
response to last week's devastating torna-
does across the South,
"Just because the economy's horrible
doesn't mean hurricanes stop," Fugate
said.
National Hurricane Center Director
Bill Read also spoke at the conference.
He recapped~the,2010 seson, wwihic he
s~iid had the highest nubrof hurri-


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Federal Emergency Management Agency
Administrator Craig Fugate gestures while
addressing the audience at the 2011
NainlHurricane Conference in Atlanta,

canes without a U.S. landfall.
Read said that among his priorities this
year is outreach to prepare communities
and empower the public. He said his top
concern for the upcoming season is Haiti,
where 1.5 million people are still living in
tents and are highly vulnerable to a major
hurricane.
"That's going to be mhy biggest gut
check," he said. "I don't know how many
people can be safely dealt-with in a hur-
ricane of that magnitude."
The conference continues through
Saturday.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
its 25th mission at 3:47 p.m. April 29 at Kennedy


The space shuttle Endeavour will embark on
Space Center.


Tucson, Ariz., three months
ago.
Endeavour will fly to the
International Space Station
The crew of .six will deliver
a $2 billion particle physics
experiment.
Liftoff time is 3:47 p.m.
It will be the 134th shuttle
mission overall and the
25th for Endeavour, NASA's
youngest shuttle.


Florida and set April 29
as the launch date for
Endeavour's final voy-
age.
The two-week mission
will be led by Mark Kelly,
the aistronaut husband of
wounded congresswoman
'Gabrielle Giffords. He is
awaiting doctors' permis-
sion for his viife to attend
the launch.
Giffords was shot in


MIAMI A new
national strategy being


combat prescription drug
abuse aims to cut misuse
of powerful pairikillers like
oxycodone by 15 percent
within five years through
education, stepped-up law
enforcement anti pill-track-
ing databases.
The effort will target pill
mills that are dispensing
thousands of painkillers, a
growing drug abuse epi-
demic centered in Florida.
Under one part of the
plan, more than 1 million
doctors would be required
to undergo training on
proper prescription prac-
tices as a condition for
their ability to prescribe
the highly addictive drugs-
known as opioids.
"The key is that every-
one realizes there is no
magicans er to tis" Gle
Barack Obama's national
drug policy director, said
in an interview with The
Associated Press. "It's a
really complex problem."
The first-ever compre-
hensive federal plan focus-
es on four main areas.
education for prescribing
physicians and the public,
including a media cam-
paign about the drugs' dan-
gers; pushing for tracking
databases in all 50 states;
better methods of throw-
ing out unused or expired
prescriptions; and more
intense training and focus
by law enforcement on ille-
gal pill mill clinics.
Florida is the epicenter
of the deadly rise in abuse
of oxycodone and similar
addictive painkillers, with
doctors in the Sunshine
State prescribing far more
of the drugs than all other
states combined, according
to the Drug Enforcement
Administration. And
Florida's pill mills are the
supplier of choice for much
of the eastern U.S., causing
a ripple effect of drug over-
doses and addiction to the
north a phenomenon
dubbed the "Ox;Contin
Express."
A recent report by
Florida medical examin-
ers found that in the first
six months of 2010 the
most recent data available
- 1,268 deaths in the state
were caused by prescrip-
tion drugs, or about seven
fatalities a day during that
span. Kentucky's governor
says 82 people die of over-
doses each month in his
state.
Renee Doyle, a Fort


DEFUNIAK SPRINGS
- A Florida Panhandle
woman who had been fac-
ing a first-degree murder
charge has entered a plea
for a lesser charge:
Teresa McKee entered
a mnanslaughter plea ~
Monday in Walton County
court. She faces up to 30
years in prison at her May
5 sentencing. Her fist-
degree murder trial last
month ended with a hung
jury.
Authorities say. McKee
killed her friend, 45-year-
old Stephanie Lockwood,


in .August 2009. The
woman was found dead
at her home from what
~appeared to be a shotgun
blast to her face.
McKee confessed
details~to.deputies during
the investigation that impli-
cated her in Lockwood's
death, but a defense attor-
ney convinced enough
jurors that McKee's hus-
band, Piper McKee, was a
possible suspect.
A prosecutor said she
had no doubt that Teresa
McKee was the real killer.


-i. i`
J ;171
.. r.:
c~*
`

~~:rE~

-
LI~
sc~
rr. I;r*
.;~j:. *~*r: ~~~, j~-7i Itl


of the Florida Forever
land conservation proj-
ect. Military leaders said
the acreage will ensure
the Navy can continue
its flight-training mission
without disturbing the
growing local population.
Scott and the other state
leaders spent Tuesday in
Panama City visiting local
businesses and discussing
recovering from the mas-
sive rig blowout and that
spill more than 172 million
gallons of crude oil into
the Gulf of Mexico.


PANAMA CITY Gov.
Rick Scott and his cabi-
net have approved a plan
to buffer Whiting Field
Naval Air Station in the
Panhandle by purchasing
172 acres of surrounding
land.
The cabinet approved
the action Tuesday while
meeting in Panama City
as part of events sur-
rounding. the one-year
anniversary of the BP
Deepwater Horizon oil
spill.
The 172 acres are part


. ASSOCIATED PREss
A protester carries a sign protesting against a pain clinic in Fort Lauderdale. Florida is the
epicenter of the deadly rise in abuse of oxycodone and similar addictive painkillers, with doc-
tors in the Sunshine State prescribing far more of the drugs than all other states combined,
according to the Drug Enforcement Administration.


Lauderdale mother whose
son Blayne was in an oxy-
codone haze when he was
struck and killed by a car
in 2009, said he was able
to get` 240 pills on each
monthly visit to a local
pain clinic by doing little
more than asking for them.
More than 850 pain clin-
ics are currently registered
in Florida, where doctors
prescribe 85 percent of all
such pills in the nation.
"I think people were just
not paying attention and
then greed took over," she
said. "They are legal drug
dealers and they should be
outlawed."
Although the DEA
and local police recently
arrested more than 20
people, including five doc-
tors, in a crackdown on
South Florida pill mills,
Kerlikowske said it's not
strictly a law enforcement
issue.
"It's a real collaboration.
It's not just a prosecutor
and DEA. It isn't just the
medical profession. It's
everybody," he said.
Each part of the strat-


egy has several goals. For
example, on physician edu-
cation, the plan calls for
Congress to enact a law
requiring a certain amount
of training on responsible
prescription practices of
the most-abused drugs for
medical practitioners who
seek DEA registration to
prescribe certain controlled
substances. The Food and
Drug Administration pro-
posal would be the largest
of its kind.
'"There has been a flood
of new medicines and many
of the physicians out there
weren't trained in using
them, so there's a big gap
in understanding how to
manage these drugs," said
Dr. Janet Woodcock, who
directs the agency's Center
for Drug Evaluation and
Research.
Another piece would be
a national education cam-
paign featuring ads like the
famous frying-egg "this
is your brain on drugs"
ad used in past antidrug
efforts. Key to that is mak-
ing sure parents keep pre-
scription drugs out of the


hands of their children,
who are now abusing them
more than any illegal drug
except marijuana.
At the state level, the
plan envisions prescription
drug- monitoring programs
in all 50 states. Currently,
35 have such programs
up and running, and they
are authorized but not yet
operational in eight more
states, including Florida.
The databases can help
detect abuses and illegal
diversion of pills by track-
ing physicians' prescrip-
tions and how much phar-
macies are dispensing.
The plan also calls for
continued aggressive law
enforcement efforts and
better training. In Florida,
Miami DEA chief Mark R
Trouville said he expects
a number of physicians
to be indicted based on a
recent undercover probe
involving 340 undercover
pill purchases.
"WIe're trying to make a
statement that if you think
you're sliding by in a gray
area, you're not, and we're
coming," Trouville said.


755 5440 o*

755.5441
between 8am & 4pm


Deadline*
Ads have to be placed by 4pm, 3-days prior
to appearance in the Lake City Reporter.


STATE WEDNESDAY. APRIL 20, 2011


Hurricane Conference


focuses on preparing


newly elected officials

ATLANTA -- Federal Emergency ;L*
Management Agency Director Craig ~~-~OPP1%~
Fugate on Tuesday stressed how impor-
tant it is for newly elected public officials 4i
to learn how to respond during hurri- '.~
canes and other powerful storms.
, ,w e.~-r -i ..,. -.1., "As much as we talk about the public,
,1_"


4 11


Shuttle set for final voyage


Launch wl
be NASA~s
SeCOnd-to -last

CAPE CANAVERAL -
NASA's. next-to-last space
shuttle flight is set to begin
late next week.
Spaceflight manag-
ers gathered Tuesday at
Kennedy Space Center in


Government targets pill mills


Florida woman


charged with

manslaughter


Call today( to lace a
S~trpfS6 88 0fo riO~r .
chld, grndtchild,
God chilid or any~ou
y08 think deserves
something ecxtr on
their speciial day!







6A LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVERTISEMENT WEDNESDAY APRIL 20. 2011

Real People, Real Results.

V1 L.111 III l I


*SPIN CLASSES NOW AVAILABLE *
1191 SW Bascom Norris Dr. Lake City, FL
Mj \ w386-754-17 24
,a* 4 i aag* www.anytimefitness.com


Updated EAGLE onfce
ApartmentS PROPERTIEs Space
with tile floors 752-9626 for lease.
& fresh paint. Oak Hill Plaza.
Excellent 900sqft
location. $675mo/
From1450 1- 695.
+sec sec deposit























AUTO EMPORIUM
2832 SW Main Blvd
Lake City, Florida
* Quality Repair
* Towing


Call today for a quote!'
(386) 755-6444



Full Service Meat Counter
Smo ed Bacon Sausage Hams "Tropler" Amish Products
Jams & Je lies Butter Cheeses Wiatkins Products
Pres est meat in town
cut and wrapped to your specifications
u1S 129 s across From Pizza Hut in Live Oak
386.33o.o4o+


I iaIUWANNEE
NsunA~C
GENC I v


Artists subject to change without notice. Show goes on rain or shine.
Taxes and processing are included in the ticket prices. Camlping available.


I I


11 3322 W. US Hw 90 (386) 755-2502 1


,,- 886-755-5255
~-p-~L~B~DENNIS CONKUN
Electrcal Contractor
Licensed & Insured EC 13003800
Residential & Commercial
Remodels, Power Poles,
Service Changes, Additions, Rewiring,
Generator Hook-Ups, Trenching Available


CALL JUNK JOE
We pay $275 & Up

r . --rZ ~~. .gt c' C-~ .


00ODSTORES i'a~c.o."kn


IPYBP~a(ilUYS1


I
:i~d~L
-J-~
net I
- Sun ~ P !I

r4~5~ ':

Ilc~~l rlrll r I


KM


or i- ~~


..~mPnr ~~;
~ ;,, 64*r
~---~

.~6adR6s


~tc~ ~lgorida ~imz~ -~au~


Lake City
(386) 755-35i58


Live Oak
(386) 364-1~000


visit us online
WWW. 5CONfS.COH










J:: ~ 149per month
.. When you mention this ad.
~. -1NO OFEiRING


386-208-2447 OPEN 24 HOURS


I.H. Crowetz, CLU 323 South Marion Ave.
Reglstered Representative Lake City, FL 32025
(386> 755-3476 Fax (386) 755-3625



Life Mutual Funds
Health Dental
Disability Pensions

Helping Dreams Come True...
One Smile at a Time

M artin
ORTHODONTICS
CELIA MARTIN, D.M.D.
7ss-10ool
701 SW SR 47 Lake City, FL 32025
M tviv. m artinIorthodo n tics.comi


Home Owvners
I HSH rHnc
Gr-eat Rates


Quality Care Phlebotomy Inc.
Community Adult Continuing Education
Learn to Draw Blood~oa lse
~F~n'Financing Available
.1iil 904-566-1 328


Luke Bryan

Kellie Pickler

Phil Vassar

lor rod Niemann

Darryl Worleyl

Lee Bucee

Soa D if f so

lo Cash Cowboys

Blackberry Smoke



DENTFER Tl TJX CK~Dg~E7[ TO "H

~SU WA N d IE IVDE 'D~
ahP~WAB~B~IBT~~~ ':NAME:


SSMCITH &2 SoN's FEED AND SEED

386-755-4328

Mention out* ad and get 25%
off any Realtree prosgluct.
SALE RUNS APRIL 20TH THROUGH APRIL 27TH


PHoNE
ADDnESS:


SURREY PLACE CARE CENTER
A SIGNATURE HEALTH CARE COMMUNITY
QUALITY HEALTHCARE RIGHT HERE AT HOME
110 Lee Ave. SE
Live Oak, FI. 32064

Ask to sp~eakw~it ancy 6.1tin for .
information or come by for a tour


MARY T. SLAY
Agency Owner
(386) 755-6801
a~ *D 677 SW Bascom Norris Dr., #101
Lake City, FL 32025
mslayeallstate.com

AIIstte,
Ban


THE AREA L 1lf)"sSj
LEADER IN Fbrr-Mi-a~li and wedd a photw ~aphf
O SPORTS b evP be3t
PHOTOGRAPHY \~~: SM~D8 t e1
IVIENTION THIS AD -AND
WWW. SHUTTERBUSSONLINE. COM "SUM EO o ouNG

Full Line Feed & Hay Dealer t/~
Shavings Barn Supplies lt \
Pet Food Health Care Supplements
S US Hwy 441 NW UIS Hwy 441 M fl~~
Lake City High Springs
386-752-0770 386-454-1271
www.MvidwestFeeds.co www.(ace boo k.co m/M idwestFeeds liecaurse Ever~y Performn~tc~e ('cunts


LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVE RTISE M ENT WEDNESDAY APRIL 20. 2011


snaerce serve- 386-758-18389

73:8 SIH MaI~ in B/nl* Lakec C~ity. FL


I
I
1
I
1
I
I
I

I


SuSsCRIBER: 0 YPEs


O] No


RBEGIDSTER AnT~ TFHIE THQE ~CsLAK~E CITY RI~EPORTERtB OFFICE
'E~ AT 18 E. DUVAT~L STREET, ]LAEKE CI[TY, FL( 32B55


1~'EN""3~"1TR"IES TS
2011 AT~~g 5:OOl~pM


111~1~1111111111111111111111111~


Ronnie Dunn

(formerly of Brooks and Dunn)


Gary Allan


Df~EAl~~Tgt~DLIEi FOR DL
TrUE~SDAY9, APX~RIL 26,





8A LAKE CITYREPORTER ADVE RTISE M ENT WhEDNESDAY. APRIL 20. 2011


a c

D9 *
~liL~ e e . .


* *L g~~L~ LL 1


Your tota I monthly
prescription bill
wiI~II: cost


you less
at BayaPharmacy.

Regardless of chain store promotions,
Baya Phlarmacy nowpromisjes lower
pIr~ies that. casve you hundreds. k
.Itakes only to minutes to switch to Boya.
Td~'s:~~at~bd.oldmk thalt's never
been done before.
I t's: Bay a's; nevr w

Cription
CO
~IR S








Lak~e City Reporter


, ,


1


September 11 games highlight NFL schedule


Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-042 I
tforby~@lakeatyreportercom


www.Iakecityreporter.com


Fort White has 4
district champS
ill Hile events.

By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com

FORT WHITE Fort
White High brought home
nine individual champi-
onships from the District
3-2A meet at Yulee High


on Friday.
The Lady Indians placed
second in the team compe-
tition, scoring 124 points
to 137 for Santa Fe High.
Suwannee High was third
with 108 points. There are
10 teams in the district.
Suwan~nee won th'e boys'
competition with 142 points,
followed by Santa. Fe with
INDIANS continued on 3B


-- COURTESY PHOTO
Fort White High's girls track and field team show off the District 3-2A runner-up trophy from
the meet at Yulee High on Friday:


~JASON MATTHEW WALKERILake City Reporter
Teammates gather at home plate as Jessica Keene (15) runs in after hitting' a hohne run
against Rdeview Hihon Tues ay.


score Caliegh McCauley to
end the contest.
Columbia will move to
the championship game
where it will face Ed
White High at 7 p.m. on
Thursday.
"They're a formidable
opponent, because they
have a senior pitcher in
Erin Andrews that has
beaten us before on this
samne field," Williams said.
The good news for the
Lady Tigers is that, win or
lose, they are in the.play-
offs. As long as Columbia
wins, it will host every
game.


bat."
Keene continued, her
hot streak in the bottom of
the second, extending the
Columbia lead to 7-0 with
a bases-clearing double to
score Pilktington, Kvistad
and Dohrn. .
Morgan McHenry hit
a solo shot for the Lady
Panthers in the top of the
fourth, but Kvistad's shot in
the bottom gave Columbia
an 8-1 lead.
After an error allowed
three runs to score in the
top half of the fifth, the
Lady Tigers kept firing.
Jordan Williams hit a


shot to the wall to score
Keeley Murray and.Brandy
Morgan sacrificed Williams
in for a 10-4 lead. Michae~la
Burton followed with a sec-
ond sacrifice and Pilkington
scored on a passed ball to
extend the lead to 14-4.
After a scoreless inning
for Ridgeview, the Lady
Tigers reached the run
rule for the second-straight
night in the bottom of the
sixth.
Brittany Morgan, who
was pinch running for
Keene after a triple, scored
on a passed ball. Pilkiington
hit a shot to the fence to


Ryan brothers will
coach int one
allOther in contest.

By DAVE SKREFTTA
Associated Press

NEW YORK The New
York Giants will visit the
Washington Redskins and
the New York Jets will host
the Dallas Cowboys on
Sept. 11, marking the 10th
anniversary of the terrorist
attacks on the World Trade
Center and the Pentagon.
'With the NFL and its
locked-out players mired
in negotiations over a new
labor agreement, the league
on Tuesday announced its
2011-12 schedule assum-
ing the season starts on
time.
The regular season kicks
off Thursday night, Sept. 8,
when the Super Bowi cham-
pion Green Bay Packers
host the New Orleans Saints
at Lambeau Field.
The first Sunday features


several high-profile games,
including Indianapolis at
Houston and Atlanta at
Chicago. But much of the
national focus will be on
Washington and New York,.
the two cities most affected
by the terrorist attacks of
Sept. 11, 2001.
"That stadium is going to
be full of emotion, not only
the people from the area
but in the' entire country,"
said Jets coach Rex Ryan,
who will be matching wits
with his brother, Cowboys
defensive coordinator Rob
Ryan. "The fact that it's the
10th anniversary of 9/11,
that's where the focus
should be, not me playing
against my brother."
The Redskins and Giants
kick off at 4:15 p.m., with
the Jets and Cowboys at
8:20 p.m.
"For nearly 10 years, we
have felt an obligation to
use our platform to make
sure none ofus ever forget
the tragedy and heartbreak
and courage and heroism


of Sept. 11," Giants spokes-
man Pat Hanlon said. "That
responsibility becomes
even greater."
Pittsburgh was the thirId
NFL city most closely affect-
ed by the terrorist attacks
after Flight 93 crashed 80
miles away near Shanksville,
Pa. The Steelers will visit
the Baltimore Ravens on
Sept. 11.
New England travels to
Miami and Oakland visits
Denver for the opening
Monday night
The final Sunday of the
regular season falls on
New Year's Day, when all
16 scheduled games are
between division rivals,
enhancing the potential for
playoff ramifications.
The regular season cov-
ers 17 weeks, with the
opening round of the play-
offs scheduled for Jan. 7-8
and the Super Bowl on Feb.
5 in Indianapolis.
The NFL has expressed
a desire to stretch the sea-
son to 18 games, one of


the sticking points in the
contentious fight between
owners and players over a
new labor agreement.
The two sides resumed
court-ordered mediation on
Tuesday in Minneapolis,
with a federal judge's deci-
sion expected soon on a
request to immediately halt
the lockout
'The two sides spent 16
days immersed in mediated
talks in Washington without
coming to an agreement,
resulting in a class-action
antitrust lawsuit fied by the
players against the NFL and
the league's first work stop-
page since 1987. They've
recently spent about 20
hours over three days meet-
ing in Minneapolis, with
more discussions planned
for Wednesday.
In a statement announc-
ing next season's schedule,
the NFL did not provide
any contingencies should
negotiations on a new col-
lective bargaining agree-
ment stretch into the fall.


"I'm confident we will
have a season," Rex Ryan
said Tuesday night. "We're
going to be ready to play.
Whenever they say, 'OK,
we're going back to work,'
we'll be ready to play."
Among the other high-
lights of the schedule, the
Tampa Bay Buccaneers will
host the Chicago Bears at
Wembley Stadium on Oct.
23, one of two games out-
side the United States and
the fifth consecutive year
the NFL has played a regu-
lar-season game in London.
The Bucs lost to the
New England Patriots
at Wembley Stadium in
2009, while the Bears will
be marking the 25th anni-
versary of their preseason
game against the Cowboys
in London.
The Buffalo Bills will
play a game in Canada
for the fourth consecutive
season when they host the
Redskins at the Rogers
Centre on Oct. 30 in
Toronto.


Today
SColumbia High
baseball at Lincoln High,
5:30 p.m.
Thursday
SFort White High
track in Region 1-2A
meet at Bolles Sch'ool,
1 p.m.
SColumbia High
track in District 4-3A
meet at Wolfson High,
1:30 p.m.
WFort White High
softball vs. Williston
High in District 5-3A
tournament at Santa Fe
High, 5 p.m.
SColumbia High
baseball at Suwannee
High, 7 p.m.
SFort White High
baseball vs. Branford
High, 7 p.m.


Section B


WednesdayApril 20 20 II


Lady Indians

take second at


district track


BRIEFS

YOUTH SOCCER
CYSA sign-up
on Thursday


Soccer Association's
Recreational Summer
Soccer Imague (ages
3-16) is &7:30 p.m.
Thursday and 11 a~m. to
1 p.ln. Saturday at the
CYSA Complex behind
Summers Elementary.
Cost of $65 includes
uniform and season-end
award.
For details, call Scott
Everett at 28&2504.

T-BALL
Rules clinic: set
for Thursday
A T-ball rules clinic for
coaches and officials is
6:30 p.m. Thursday at the
Girls Club.

Heywr Crsti at
754-3607.

BASEBAU.
College tryouts
at St. Johns
St~ Johns River' State
College has baseball
tryouts planned for
May 1 at the on-campus
Tindall Field in Palatka.
The camps are open
to 2011, 2012 and 2013
high school graduate's,
Registration begins at
9:15 a.m. on camp day.
SPitcher-only registration .
is at noon. Cost i~sifo fb
each combine.
For details, call the
St JohnS River baseball
office at (386) 312-4164.
h E t
'Te Edge' event
set for April 30
Rountree-Moore
Automotive Group
Presents "The Edge"
golf tournament at Qu'ail
Heights Country' Club
on April 30. The annual
tournament, hosted by
Shayne Edge, serves as a
fundraiser for school and
recreationaltsports, and
other organizations. Cost
is $100 per player for the
four-person scramble."
Registration is at Quail
Heights (752-3339) and
Brian's Sports
(755-0570).
CHS F00TBAU
Q-back Club
meeting Monday'


me:t t 6 kmm no nd at
the Jones Fieldhouse.
For details, call Blake
Lundy at 867-0296.

SFrom staff reports


GSA ME


Lad




OUSted


Rt Sttie

Columbia makes
Second-straight
trip to finals.

From staff reports

Columbia High's Lady
Tigers tennis team made .a
second-straight trip to the
3A state finals in Kissimmee,
but w~ere unable to make it.
1 0ast~the irst rdund~f b'O~m-
petition.
The Lady Tigers had a
tough draw landing Venice
High in four of their' first
round m tches.icetls
6-0, 6-0 to Venice's Victoria
Traynor as the No. 1 seed.
No. 2 seed Susy Romero
lost to Venice's Michaela
Mignemi 6-4, 6-1. Kelsey
Mercer lost 6-1, 6-2 to Karen
Zafnos of Venice in the No.
3 position.
Jessie Bates lost 6-1,
6-0 to Pinnellas Park High's
Lisa Rickards in the No. 4
position and Heather
Benson lost at No. 5 to
Emily Spears of Martin
County, 61, 6-0.
In doubles, Reichert and
Romero lost to Traynor and
Zefinos 6-3, 6-2 in the No. 1
doubles match.
Taylor Owens and
Mercer fell 6-1, 6-2 against
Grace Dowling and Emily
Wyman of Baron Collier
High.


D


COlumbia' returns

topla offs, pla s
for Thurs ay.

By BRANDON FINLE
btinley@lakecityreporter.com

The bats stayed hot for
Columbia High as the Lady
Tigers defeated Ridgeview
High, 14-4, Tuesday to
.advance to the District 4-
5A championship game
and punch a ticket back to
,the playoffs.
"_TIN for the single-sea.
onvcord in home runs,
freshman Kayli Kvistad
didn't take long to put her
name next to the record as
she connected on atwo-run
bomb in them st innogto
It was her ninth of the year,
but, she wasn't done.
Evistad added a solo
shot in the fourth inning
to move into double digits
with 10 home runs.,
"Thats the modern-day
record as far as I know,"
Columbia head coach
Jimmy ~Williams said.
She wasn't the only hot
bat for the Lady Tigers,
however, as Jessica Keene
added another two-run
homer in the bottom of
the fist to score Hollianne
Dohrn and give Columbia a
4-01lead.Itwas Keene's third
home run in two nights. '
"She's hitting bullets,"
Williams said. "She's hot
at the right time and see-
ing the ball well. Each time
she's up it's a quality at





SCOREBOARD


NF L player s umion resume


COur t-ordered negotiations


Answer to Previous Puzzle

PILUIS GIMCOMC COM
SlUIRIE LIOIO AV OIN
SIGI N'IIITI OIN R IAN I
NUIB E Y IEILET
WOMEN AISSIT
OIRIESEE PSTEP
EIAISIE H IUIM M EM A
SlLAIM ARRI SITA IB
UINWIOIRINN I B
HIALIE AIIS ILE
SlAILAIDIS PVC
EITIAIT P IOSEEIDION
ACIMIE O WIS ENOW
SIHIOD TNTNTAI RAT


Odomn wins Sixth Man Award


Check out the "uttR gt Cr sw d Puzzles" books
at Quill DriverBooks.com


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS WEDNESDAY. APRIL 20. 2011


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421


Serge Ibaka Okla City
Joakim Noah. Chicago
Dwyane Wade, Miami
Tim Duncan San Antonio .

JaVale Mc~ee.Wash.
Keith Bogans. Chicago I
Thabo Sefolosha, Ok.City -
Andrew Bynum. Lakers -
Gnrrod un.a ,Do d
Josh SmithAtlanta


4 L
9 7
8 9
7 9


.5 -
.563 3
.4714 1/2
.438 5


Colorado
San Frncisco
Los Angeles
San Diego


A full field of 43 teams
teed it up for the annual
S & S charity scramble,
The team of Jeff
Chadwick, Rick Perry, Phil
Mac and Brendan Ehlers
1illShed at the top of the
grOss division with a score
Of 54.
The top foursome in the
net division included Jason
Bass, Steve Bass, George
Burnham and Nick Slay
with & SCOre of 55.
Second place in the
grOSS division went to
Steve Peters, Mike McKee,
Jordan Hale and Denis
CrawfOrd, followed by Mike
Milo, Ernie Reiter, Brian
Parent and Pat Womble in
third place.
Second-place finishers
in net division play were
John Moore, Phillip Powell,
Don 'Benton and Brian
BOlella. James Pucci, Josh
Olmstead, Josh Boris and
Kevin Labruno took third
place in the net division.
The COuntry Club at
Lake City ladies champion
Cathy Steen scored her
Sixth career hole-in-one
hole hist week on No. 15 at
Haile Plantation.
Tlie LGA counted putts
only in this week's two-
perSon team match. Faye
Warren and Dotli~e Rogers
took the win. .
Roberta Whitaker and


COUNTRY CLUB
at L AK ECI TY
Ed Goff

Anita West tied Nicole
Ste-Marie and Cathy Steen
for second.
Chad Hunter demolished
the field in Wednesday's
blitz with a barrage of eight
birdies and a +15 score. -
Brian Chang (+8) and
'Jordan Hale (+6) trailed
the leader. Ed Higgs, Lex
McKeithen and Steve
Patterson split fourth-place
money.
Hunter topped off alucra-
tive day with three winning
skins. Mike McCranie,
Charlie Timmons, Chang
and Hale each collected one
.skin. The pot hole began
building with a carryover.
Two teams scored a total
of four wins in the MGA
4-3-2-1 tournament.
Dennis Crawford, Mike
Moses, Greg Lyons and
Ronnie Bennett grabbed
first place in 18-hole com-
petition and had the best
score on the front nine.
Chad Hunter, Jonathan
Allen, Steve Peters and Jim
Carr picked up the other
double win with a second-
place fmish in 18-hole play
and a second-place finish
on the back nine.
Jordan Hale, Alan


Moody, Don Howard and
Mike Carr were second
on the front side. Steve
Thomas, Jonathan Allen,
Steve Peters and Jim Carr
were in fist place on the
back nine.
Skins winners were
Crawford with three, Hale
with two, Terry Hunter
with two and Chad Hunter
with one.
The Good Old Boys put
a load of team points on the
board.
Ed Snow, Joe Persons,
Don Christensen and Dan
Stephens lit it up with a 16-7
win over Marc Risk, Terry
Mick, Bobby Simmons and
Bill Rogers.
Scores in Match 2 were
a bit more normal as Stan
Woolbert, Eli Witt, Jim Bell,
Nick Whitehurst and Terry
Branch won over Monty
Montgomery, Jerry West,
Hoivard Whitaker and Jim
Stevens, 9-7.
Risk led individual
18-hole scoring with
sparkling 3-under-par 69.
Other good scores
came from Woolbert and
Montgomery with 77, Snow
at 78 and Christensen with
79.
Nine-hole winners were
Bell with 38 on the back,
and Rogers, Mick and
Persons tied with 39 on the
front.


Arizona Tusa'6G 8 .429 5

Mihaukee 9, Philadelphia 0
Florida 6, Pittburh 0
Arizona at Cincinnati (n)
Houston at N.Y. Mets (n)
Was Diingto at Ciao, ppd.), rain
San Francisco at Colorado (n)
Adanta at L.A Dodgers (n)
Today's Ga" s

Phldephuiak (I.LeeN2- ), I 5 p.1-) t
San Diego (Moseley 0-3) at Chicago
Cubs (j.Russell l-I), 2:20 p.m., 1st game
san Francisco (cain 2-0) at Colorado
(De La Rosa 2-0).3j:10 p.m- .
CuSan Diego (arang 3-0) atChicago
Arizona (I.Kennedy 1-1) at Cincinnati
(Arroyo 2-1), 7:10 p.m.
Houston (Norris 1-1) at N.Y. Mets
(Dickey 1-2), 7:10 p.m.
NPictsburgh (Morton 2-0) at Florida
Washington (Zimmermann 1-2) at St
Louis (].Garcia 2-0), 8:15 p.m-
Atlanta (D.Lowe 2-2) at I..A Dodger
(Galan On ay' mGames
Arizona at Cincinnati, 12:35 p.mn.
Washington atSt.Louis, I:40 p.m.
Atlanta at L.A. Dodgers, 3:10 Pm.m
Houston na N I Mets, 7:10 p.rn-
Philadelphia at San Diego, 10:05 p.m.

BAS KETBALL

NBA playoffs
FIRST ROUND
Monday
Miami 94, Philadelphia 73, Miami leads
seriehca~go 96, Indiana 90, Chicago leads
series 2-0 .
Tuesday
Boston 96, NewYork 93
'Orlando 88,Atlanta 82
Pbrtland at Dallas (n)
Today

Mmhis atOSa An ono 8:80 P.
New Orleans at LA. Lakers,


10:3Ch o at Indiaa n7 .m. .
Miami at Philadelphia, 8 p.m.
Dallas at Portland, 10:30 p.m.

NBA Sixth. Player
NEW YORK (AP) Voting for the
2010-1 I NBA Sixth Man award as select-
ed by a nationwide panel of I17 spors-
writers and broadcasters. Voting is on a

Paer,bT m i i~st 2nd 3rd Tot
Lamar Qdom,Lakers 96 10 3 513
Jason TerryfDallas 13 '50 '29 244
Thaddeus Young, Phil. 2 I6 18 76
J al Darvis, Bontonat 5 19 1875
Lou Williams, Phil. I 4 9 26
James Harden, Okla-City -- 3' 10 19
George Hill. San Antonio -- 4- 6 18
Marcin GortatPhoenix -- 2 5 II
J nSith, Denver I- 2

Ty Lawson, Denver -- 1 ~-- 3
O.J. Mayo, Memphis -- I -- 3
ToneeyDoug ajNew ork.. --2 2.


NBA Defensive Player

Voting is done by a panel of 120
sportswriters and broadcasters through-
out North America:

eam t~oard, Orl. 114 2n 3rd
Kevin Garned r oson IZ IZ7

TonyAllen, Memphis 12 17 53
Rajon Rondo, Boston 14 3 45
Andrew BogutMilw. 6 14 32
Grant H i, Phonix 1 30

LeBron James, Miami 7 4 25
ILuoleDeng, Chicago 5 9 24


GOL F

Golf week
PGATOUR
he Hvitage
St H iton Hea snd S.

Course- Harbour'Town Golf Links
(6,973 yards, par 71).
Purse: 55.7 million. Winner's share-

3-Televion GofCdne day, :-
3 akm., 3-6 P~m., 8:30-11:30 p.m.; Saturday.
2-5 a.m., 1-2 30 p.m., 9:30-11:30 p.m.;
Sunday, I-2:30 p.m., 9:30-1 1:30 p.m.) and

COn ine rn ll u~p~ou~
CHAMPIONS TOUR
Legends of Golf
Site: Savannah, Ga.
h rs:Te yeti yvannah Harbor
Golf Resort and Spa (7,087 yards, par
72).
Purse: $2.7 million. Winners' shares:
$230,000 each.
20TelevisiSn uGol yhne nitd r, 12 3
CBS (Saturday-Sunday, 1-3 P~m.).
EUROPEAN TOUR
China Open
Site: Chengdu, China.
Schedule:Thursday-Sund y.erainl

Country Club (7,335 yards, par 72).
SPurse: $3 million. Winner's share:
$510 ,000.
Television: Golf Channel (Tursday-
Sunday, 9 a.m.-12:30 p~m.).
Online: http://www.europeantour.com
euGmA Europmean Tour site: http://m .
OneAsia Tour site: httpilwww~oneasia.

asalex Nev ns Nt DGTOriaR Classic,
April 28-May I, Kinderiou Forest Golf
Club,Valdosta, Ga.

Next eve~ns AvneOULRGAClassic
April 28-May I.globert Turnt Jones Gol
Trail, Magnolia Grove, The Crossings,
MobileAla
Online: http-1www.1pgo.com
OTHIERTOURNAMENTs

eGOLF PROFESSIONAL TOUR:
Columbia OpenToday-Saturday, Columbia
Country Club, Cobblestone Park Golf
Club, Blythewood, S.C. Online: http:/www.
ego G OT ROUR:Whitewater
Creek Country Club Open, Thursday-
Sunday, Whitewater Creek Golf Club,
Fayetteville, Ga. Online; http://mn.
ngahooterstour.com

HOCK E Y


N LpFaRSO SOUND

Philadelphia 4, unfl 2
Boston 4, Montreal 2
Pittsburgh 3 Tma aBay 2

Tuesday
Vancouver at Chicago (n)
San Jose at Los Angeles (n)
Washington ta NY Rangers, 7 p.m.

Philadelphia atBuffalo, 7:30 p.m.
Antheim at Nashville, 8:30 p.m.
Detorai at Phoenix, 10:30 p.m.
Thursday .
Boston at Montreal, 7 pm .m. (f

SnecnJose at Los Angeles, 10:30 p.m.


TELEVISION

WV sports

MJOR LEATG BASEEBALL
Aj 7 .
ESPN Minnest at Baltimore
NBA BASKETBALL
a p.m.
T a- 10:30 p~m.
TNT Playoffs, first round, game 2,
New Orleans at LA. Lakers

VERSUS Payoffs, Eastem
Conference quarterfinals, garge 4,
washington at Nv Ranger,
9:30 p.m.

can ernc quarter ja as. gamaser 4
Philadelphia at Buffalo (joined in
progress)
IoJso p.m.
VERSUS Playoffs, Western
Conference quarterfinals,game 4,Detrok
SOCCER
2:30 p~m.
ESPN2 Premier LeagueTottenham
at Arsenal

BASEBALL

AL standings
East Division
W L Pct GB
New York 9 5 .643 -
TamPa Bay 7 9 .438 3
Toronto 6 9 -43 3Il

noreo 5 10 .3334 1/2
Central Division
W L Pt GB
Cleveland 12 4 .750 -
Dana tCity 10 6 .2 2
Chicago 7 9 .438 5
Minnesota 6 10 .375 6
West Division
W L Pct GB
Texas II 5 .688 -
Los Angeles 10 6 .625 I
Oakland 8 8 6 1/2

Tuesday's Games

nap esatM2 Ciaoo )me Sox I

L.A.Angels at Texas (n)
Cleveland at Kansas City (n)
soston at oakland (n)
Deri Todayse Games -
Boston (C.Buchholz 0-2) at Oakland
(G.Gonzalez 2-0), 3:35 p.m.
Detroit (Porcello 0-2) at Seattle
(Bedi'rd 0-3), 3:40 p.m.
Tam ag Wh.t io (Hurnber I-I) at
Minnesota (Blackburn I-2) si.t
Baltimpre (Brktton 2-1), 7:05 P.m. ~
N Y.Yankees (Colon 0- I) at Toronto
(ccLA) Anes7 pImaver 4-0) at Texas
(Harrison 3-0), 8:05 P.m.
Cleveland (Masterson 3-0) at Kansas
City (Hochevar 2-1), 8:10 p.m-
Thursday's Games
S4Chicago White Sox at Tampa Bay*
Minnesota at saltimore. 7:0s P.m. *
Cleveland at Kansas City, 8:10 p.m.
Bsonon natLAeaAn els,0:005 p~m


NL standings


and others, including
Denver owner Pat Bowlen
and Green Bay Packers
CEO Mark Murphy. All
declined comment.
DeMaurice Smith, the
head of the players' trade
association, did .riot attend
due to a ~family emergency.
Linebacker Mike Vrabel
and Hall of Fame defensive
erid Carl Eller were among
the players on hand.
The talks are the latest
step in the contentious fight
over a new collective bar~-
'gaining agreement. Sixteen
days of mediated talks in


Washington fell short,
resulting in a class-action
antitrust lawsuit filed by the
players against the NFL and
the league's first work stop-
page since 1987.
Michael Hausfeld, an
attorney representing
retired players, said both
sides are serious about
reaching a resolution.
"'This is no charade. This
is no illusion. This is going
to come to a resolution
either by the parties com-
promising or agreeing or
by a judgment," Hausfeld
said.


By JON KRAWCZYNSKI
Associated Press -

MINNEAPOLIS The
NFL and its players resumed
COurt-ordered mediation
Tuesday with' a federal
judge's decision expected
Soon on a request to imme-
diately halt a lockout now in
its second month.
Dallas Cowboys owner
JerryJone~joined the NFL's
contingent' in Millneapolis
RS talks resumed following
a three-day break. Jones
walked in with NFL com-
mi~Ssioner Roger Goodell


ACROSS

1 Ste cand sub-
5 Varieties
10 Farm
baby
12 Coolly
13 Walrus hunters
14Pngent

inuy to
16 Kitchen utensil
18 Almost grads
19 Next to
22 Emmy-
25 li g Ed
29 Jeweled
ornament



33 Like a bug bite
34 Humble
37 Unimaginative
38 Shortage
40 Speech stum-
bles


43 Wi nes's vow

44 Playsbjumper-

48 Thin pancake
50 Loves dearly
52 Whole
53 Knight's foe
54 Delicious
55 Pack away

DOWN

1 Arizona
river
2 Disney CEO

3 vb
dormant
4 New Year .

5 Jaha"gn.$:ot.
7 Hussein's
queen
8 Grayish horses
9 Dirty place
10 Oompah- -
11 Sugar amts.


East Division
W L
Philadelphia 10 5
Florida 8 6
Was angton 8 10

Ne okCentral Divison
W L
Cincinnati 9 7
chicago a a
Miwa kee 8

St. Louis 8 8
Hutn West Di isi n


Pct GB
.667 -
.571 I 1/2

.3135 1/2


Turner ex
Mammal's need
Wiped
out a file
Join up
PIN prompter


23 Where Anna
met a king
24 Prefix for sec-
ond
26 Large
trout
27 Cuzco founder
28 Arlene of old
films
31 Reuben bread
35CO fis te

39 Pothole
|OCale
40 Bone below
the elbow
41 Top 10 songs
42 a npar-tiz
45 Jason's ship
46 Feeding time
cry
47 FICA num-
ber
48 Vegas trans-
action
49 Hear a case
51 JAMA
readers


Odom also played for the
U.S. national team in the
2010 world championships.
"It's good recognition of
a player that has reallyfilled
a role for us the last couple
of years," said Lakers coach
Phil Jackson.
THAT SC AMBLE WORD AMeE


By GREG BEACHAM
Associated Press

LOS ANGELES -Lakers
forward Lamar Odom won
the NBA's Sixth Man award
on Tuesday as the league's
top reserve.
Odom averaged 14.4

ihe asts shr n se ti
season while playing in
every game for the IakerS.
Odom was a starter for
long stretches of the sea-
son while center Andrew
Bynum was sidelined with
injuries, but also came off
the bench 47 times.
"I'm very happy for him,"
Kobe Bryant said. "It's
extremely well-deserved."
Odom is the first Iakers
player to win the award,
which began in 1983.
Atlanta's Jamal Crawford
won it last season.
Odom received 96 of 117
fifSt-place votes from the
media panel, easily outdi -
tancmng Dallas guard Jason
Terry.
Odom was a starter dur-
ing 11S flfst nine NBA sea-
sons with the Clippers, Heat
and Lakers, but moved pri-


marily to a reserve role dur-
ing the 2008-09 season. The
Lakers won the NBA cham-
pionship that year and the
next, with Odom coming
off the bench for all but five
of Los Angeles' 46 playoff
games.



Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
tofom ou odiar wrd.


Now arrange the circled letters
t o th bs rriaseoanswer as


(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's ee EinohEdrbNCnd EE
orthodontist into a "DENTIST'


4-20 @ 2011 by UFS, Inc.


GOLF REPORTS



S &~ S features full field


GMLIEN



EDNIRN













ON THE FRINGE



-~~ Luke Donald


poised to reach


r2 4~ new heights


Heat getting defensive




at righ~8tr tieoy


'ASSOCIATED PRESS
Philadlelphia 76ers' Jrue Holiday (center) battles for a loose
ball with Miami Heat's LeBron James (right) and Zydrunas
Ilgauskas (left) during the second half of Game 2 of a
first-round NBA playoff basketball series, Monday in Miami.
The Heat defeated the 76ers 94-73.


I


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


LAKE CITY REPORTER


WEDNESDAY. APRIL 20. 2011


likes of Jonny Wilkinson.
It was Alred who
reminded Donald
that of his 12 holes he
played over par at the
Masters, he bounced back
with a birdie six times.
Such data is now in a
diary that Alred has asked
Donald to keep. And it was
Alred who, in an interview
with the BBC last year,
referred to Donald as
an assassin on the golf
course.
"It's one shot, one .
opportunity and you need
to hit right between the
eyes because you don't get
a second chance," Alred
said.
Put it all together, and
something is going very
right for Donald.
"He has a lot of belief
in what he's doing and
how he's preparing," Goss
said.
Along the way, Donald
has accepted that he will
never be one of the game's
power hitters, and what he
has is ample. It was after
his 2006 season, when he
played in the fmal group at
a major for the first time,
thdat heegan chasing
"I thought to myself that
I had to hit it further,
Donald .said. "My coach
never thought that.. He
thought I had enough in
me. But week in and week
out I was being outdriven,
and all the bombers were
winning, and I convinced
myself I had to get longer.
I think that's part. of the
reason' I got injured. It's
part of the reason my
swing gotin a place I didn't
like." .
Donald finally felt a pop
in his wrist at the 2008
U.S. Open and wound up
missing the second half
of the season, along with
the Ryder Cup at Valhalla.
The upside to that: He still


He was working his way
back into shape when his


British Open produced
harsh criticism of his
work ethic. An American
writer, in a story published
in a British newspaper,
questioned his effort and
motivation and referred
to such players as having
"Luke Donald Disease."
"I can honestly tell you,
it was the first time I saw
the media affect him,"
Goss said. "Most times
with a negative article,
he lets it pass in one ear
and out the other. But this
was a Sunday paper in
London. He's proud of his
English heritage. And that
stung. It was discouraging,
because it couldn't have
been further from the
truth."
Donald has been
working harder than ever,
especially on his short
game. He ranks No. 1 on
the PGA Tour in scoring
and putting, and he is No.
3 in scoring on par 5s,
a testament to his wedge
play.
"I think he's probably
the best in the world
in the short game at
the moment," Martin
Kaymer said after losing
to Donald in the Match
Play final. "I played with
Phil Mickelson a few times
and it is unbelievable. But
what Luke is doing at the
moment is a joke."
If Donald had
access to Twitter in
Shanghai last year, when
he tied for third in a World
Golf Championship, he
might have chuckled over
a tweet from Joe Ogivlie,
who was astonished to
see him in contention so
often.


"'Does anyone know
where I can~ get the 'Luke
Donald' disease?"


By DOUG FERGUSON
Associated Press

JACKSONVILLE -
Luke Donald looks like
a different player these
days.
He even acts like a
different player.
Consider his final hole
at the Masters, where he
was desperate to make
birdie to keep alive his
slim hopes.
Keeping his weight
on the back .1eg to keep
from falling into a fairway
bunker, Donald hit a shot
so perfect that it one-
hopped high against the
pin and ricocheted off the
front of the green.
Then came an
impeccable chip he's
been hitting a lot of those
lately that dropped for
birdie, and the 33-year-old
Englishman unleashed
emotions that seem to
have been bottled up his
whole career.
He raised both arms,
pumped them twice,
roared, slammed hiis right
fist and ripped off his visor
to salute the gallery.

se"\"" Tense" goo'nad I
said Monday. "I got
carried away. It was a fun
moment."
Even' with the birdie,
Donald eventually wound
up four shots behind
Charl Schwartzel in a
tie, for fourth with Tiger
Woods and Geoff Ogilvy,
who played in front of him. '
Even so, it was another
performance that explains
why Donald has risen to
a career-high No. 3 in the
world, aind why''he cian
.go; even. higher:;when. he
returns this week at Hilton
Head:
Donald still doesn't win
as often as he would like
- six official victories,
only two in the last five


chances, and he has done
that as well as anyone
lat ting to the Tour
Championship, where
he was runner-up to Jim
Furyk by one shot, Donald
has finished out of the top
10 only one time in his last
nine starts. The exception
was a missed cut at Riviera,
where he returned after
a three-month break. A
week later, Donald was
so dominant at the Match
Play Championship that
he became the fist player
to never trail in any of his
six matches.
So what has changed?
Pat Goss, his golf coach
at.Northwestern who still
works with him, used to
see two players a world-
beater every two years at
the Ryder Cup (Donald
has an 8-2-1 recordd,
and a player burdened
by expectations just
about everywhere else,
particularly the majors.
Goss noticed something
different at Augusta.
"The Masters was the
fist time I saw the Ryder
Cup Luke," Goss said.
"He looked like a fighter,
ready to go nose-to-nose.
He played fearlessly.
Every time he made a
mistake, he really fought
back."
Donald attributes the
difference to the people
around him.
The toughest change
was deciding toward
the end of 2009 to no
longer have his brother,
Christian, as his caddie.
He now has Jon McLaren,
whom Donald says "keeps
me more lighthearted."
He continues to lean
on Goss as a coach,
mentor and friend. The
other addition was Dave
Alred, a performance guru


bestknown in rugby circles
as a kicking coach for the


COURTESY PHOTO COURTESY PHOTO
Sitia Martinez runs during a regular-season meet. Sydni Jones runs during the district meet at Yulee High.


COURTESY PHOTO COURTESY PHOTO
Matt Waddington (center) runs during a regular-season meet. A.J. Legree clears a hurdle during the district meet at Yulee.


INDIANS: Top 4 advance to region on Thursday
Continued From Pdge 1B


124 points and Bradford
High with 89. Fort White
placed sixth with 51 points.
Sitia Martinez and Sydni
Jones each won three indi-
vidual championships. .
A.J. Legree won two
individual titles and Matt
Waddington won one.
Martinez won the 100
meters (12.4), 200 meters
.(26.4) and 300-meter 'hulr-
dles (48.6). She placed
fourth in the long jump.
.Sydni Jones won the
800 meters (2:42.2), 1600
meters (6:07) and 3200


meters (13:4;0).
Combined with Seaira
Fletcher, Ashley Jones and
Caitlin Congi, Fort White
dominated the distance
events.
Fletcher placed second
in the 800 meters, third in
the 1600 meters and fifth
in the 3200 meters. Ashley
Jones placed fourth-in the
800 meters, fifth in the 1600
meters and sixth in the
3200 meters. Caitlin Congi
was eighth in both the 1600
meters -and 3200 meters.
Brittani Cason was sec-


ond in the high jump and
fourth in the triple jump.
Shania Pelham was sixth
in the 400 meters' and
Danielle Leon was seventh
in the~high jump. .
The Lady Indians' 4x400
relay team placed fourth
and the 4x800 relay team
placed fifth,
The top eight places
earned team points in the
district meet. The top four
in each events advance to
region.
Legree won the high
jump (6-6) and the


300-meter hurdles (43.2).
He ,placed second in the
110-meter hurdles and.
seventh in the long jump.
Waddington won thel1600
meters (4:53.3)' and placed
second in the 800 meters.
Fort White's 4x400 relay
team was seventh and
the 4x800 relay team was
eighth,
. .Martinez,. ,.Jones and
Legree -also were district
champions: in 2010.
The Region 1-2A meet
is 1 p.m. Thursday at The
Bolles School.


Spoelstra said. "And. if the
first game doesn't. grab
your attention, how danger-
ous this team is, then we
wouldn't get it. We kept on
mentioning in the, huddles,
'No exhale.' There's no
opportunity to relax against
that type of speed. Speed
kills in this league."
With the 2-0 lead, Miami
took Tuesday off, although
many players were expect-
ed to get some individual
work or treatment.
Defense is the corner-
stone of the philosophy and
culture that Heat President
Pat Riley installed when
he came to Miami in the
mid-1990s, and they remain
the blocks on which every-
thing is built. The Heat call
it "Five guys on a string,"
their way to say defense
should have all five players
moving in rhythm and mak-
ing offenses react to them
inStead of the other way
around.
So far, it looks playoff-
ready.
"It's not just about one
person," Wade .said. "It's
about all five doing their
jobs. ... It's a whole team
thing and we never look
at someone and say indi-
vidually, 'You got hit for 30
tonight.' It's always what
we need to do better as a
team."
In fairness, that doesn't
happen often.
Of the 550 instanc-
es in the NBA where a
player scored 30 or more
points during the regular
season, the Heat gave up
only 15 of them. By com-
parison, Miami players
scored at least 30 on 55
occasions.


By TIM REYNOLDS
Associated Press

MIAMI It's clearly the
signature highlight so far
in this Miami Heat post-
season. IrBron James tak-
ing off on the fast break,
reaching more than a foot
above the rim, controlling
a perfect lob from Mario
Chalmers and delivering a
powerful one-handed dunk.
Almost forgotten in that
crowd-thiilling moment:
That it started 'with
defense.
Joel Anthrony blocked
a shot by Philadelphia's
Thaddeus Young, and
when Young got the ball
back and tried to shoot
again, Anthony erased that
try as well. Dwyane Wade
controlled the rebound and
quickly passed to Chalmers, .
who in one motion sent the
pinpoint feed to James for
a slain that he punctuated
with a long scream.
"~We've been a confdent
bunch all year," James said.
Perhaps never more so
than right now, having won
17 of 20 games since March
10 and leading the 76ers 2-0
in their Eastern Conference
first-round series, which
resumes in Philadelphia on
Thursday night.
Miami's offense has been
far from perfect. But its
defense over the last seven
quarters has been stifling,
with Philadelphia which
raced to an early 14-point
lead in Game 1 shoot-
ing 34 percent and getting
outscored by 43 points in
the last 83 minutes of the
series.
Since Philadelphia had
that 33-19 lead in the open-


ing moments of the second
quarter of Game 1, Andre
Iguodala has shot 3 of 13,
Elton Brand 4 of 12, Jrue
Holiday 7 of 21, and Jodie
Meeks 3 of 10. Collectively,
outside the paint in this
series, the Sixers have
made 29 of 90 attempts.
"I don't think we've been
getting the good qual-
ity of shots," Iguodala said.
"Youl've got to credit the
defense. I haven't shot an
open shot all series. Every
time I've got the ball, I see
a guy in front of me, and


if you get past him there's
another guy there."
If the Heat could script
what they would want an
opponent to say about their
defense, those would likely
be the exact words.
And if there was any
chance Miami was look-
ing ahead to a potential
East semifinals trip against
Boston or New York,
Philadelphia probably put
that to rest by making the
Heat scurry in Game 1.
'"They have our full
respect," Heat coach Erik


SPORTS









Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS WEDNESDAY, APRIL 20, 2011 4B


DILBERT


BY THE WAY THAT
5 ETI THING WON T


DEAR ABBY: I work
in a dental office. My boss
(the doctor) and his assis-
tant have a problem keep
ing their pants up. Every
time either of them reaches
for something or, God for-
bid, bends over they flash
their backsides. It's just
Sbad, and both of them are
pretty good-sized men.
tiMy boss is the kindest,
most generous person I
know. But frankly, this is
an embarrassment for pa.
tients and co-workers alike.
Something has to be done.
Any suggestions to help us
,with this problem would be
greatly appreciated. EM-
BARRASSED FOR EV-
ERYONE, TOWANDA,
PA.
DEAR EMBAR-
RASSED: The doctor and
-his assistant may be un-
aware of the show to which
They are treating everyone.
You say this is not only em-
barrassing for the employ-
ees but also the patients.
Have any of them com-
plained about it to you? If
so, you have your opening
to transmit that message to
Dr. Derriere.
DEAR ABBY: I have
-been with my boyfriend,
"Gil," for three years. We
bought a house together six
months ago. Prior to that,
we had a.discussion about
the future. Gil told me he


false pretenses. You should
not have children with him
under these circumstanc-
es. Before this goes any
further and you feel even
worse about yourself, I'm
advising you to consult a
lawyer about extricating
yourself from this bad busi-
ness deal. You're not the
failure. He is.
DEAR ABBY: I played
matchmaker for a girlfriend
and introduced her to ab~ud-
dy of mine from work. Two
years later, he was arrested
for molesting her children,
and I just found out he'd
had a record for this! She is
no longer speaking to me.
What do I do? REGRET-
FUL IN OREGON
DEAR REGRETFUL*
All you can do is apologize
_ which l presume you have
already done. Although you
were well-intended when
you made the introduction,
it implied that you were
giving, him your endorse-
ment. However, you should
not have been expected to
have done a background
check on him that was
your friend's responsibility
as the mother of young chil-
dren. And she may be mad-
der at herself for not doing
so than she is at you.
SWrite Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby~com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


BABY BLUES
V DWEN YOU SAy


'THEY MUST CEAR


IF voO TFL ~

90cT To&
MA i




BLONDIE


Abigail Van Buren
wwwr~.deorabby~com
wanted to get married and
have kids.
I expected a marrinige
proposal over the holidays.
When it didn't happen, I
asked him what he was
waiting for. His response
broke my heart. He said he
no longer wants to get mar-
ried. Gil says he loves me,
I'm his "best friend," he is
willing to move forward
and have children but not
get married. *
I'm not sure how I feel
about his arrangement. I am
depressed and don't know
what to do. For me, Gil is
"The One"- the love of my
life. I feel like a failure and
a fool for allowing myself
to get into this situation.
Please help ine. WED-
DING BELL BLUES IN
MASSACIIUSEITS
DEAR WEDDING
BELL BLUES: I don't
blame you for feeling de-
pressed and confused. The
person you thought was
The One led you on and
convinced you to make a
major investment under


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE


ARIES (March 21-
April 19): Joint ventures
will lead to financial gains.
Don't underestimate what
you can accomplish. With
a little ingenuity and team-
work, you will master what
you thought to be impos-
sible in the past. Good for-
tune is heading your way.


MA S0:Notn wH2l b
out in the open but you
can bet that someone will
bt & .Aakin how ao y


young. AA lc smah


GEMINI (May 21-
June 20): The people
around you will recognize
what you have to offer and
how in tune you are with
the times. Getting involved
with someone who complex.
ments your style or your
plans is apparent. Your con-
tributions will lead to other
options. AAA
CANCER (June 21-
July 22): Not everyone
you deal with will be hon-
orable. Go directly to the
source and find out what's
required of you so that you
don't waste time taking on
tasks that will only make
others look good. It's im-
portant to stand out and to
be counted in today's eco-
nomic climate. AAA


tronic equipment wiHl cause
delays and frustrations. Ro-
mance is in the stars. AAA
SAGIlTARIUS (Nov.
S22-Dec. 21): Moneymak-
ing ideas for a business you
can run from home look
good. Get things moving
but don't try to start at the
top and work down. Small,

ba ey eps a th e ests wa

CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): Expectto face

oo t frnm a pu eredf e



and physical activity will
result in mishaps, delays
or a challenging situation.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Rely on your
past experience to help you
ferret ou~t the information
you need to make a profes-
sional decision. As long as
you stick to what you know
and do best, you will find
the path that leads to your
success. AAAA~
PISCES (Feb. 19-
March 20): Travel or at-
tending group or organiza-
tional functions will lead to
meeting new people. Before
you become too friendly,
\question everyone's mo-
tives. Emotional deception
is apparent. Maintain pro-
fessionalism. AA


THE LAST WORD
Eu enia Last

LEO (uy23-Aug
22): Take a: close look at
the possibilities and you
will realize you are sitting
in a better position than
you thought. Social events
or activities will lead to peo-
ple wihso~m gento share

tion or scenery will lead to
an e cunte wNith someone


2 2) DO't fel pesur



when it comes to dealing
with children or other fam-
ily members. Invest in your
home and your profession-
al goals, not entertainment
and luxury items. AA
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): You can make positive
changes within your per-
sonal and professional part-
nerships. Speak up about
how jrou see things unfold-
ing and what you have to
offer. A positive attitude will
bring good results. wAAA
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-
Nov. 21): Deal with ins~ti-
tutions, government agen-
cies or superiors before
you fall behind or are faced
with an overdue situation
that leaves you little wiggle
room. Avoid aggressive
people. Problems with elec-


SNUFFY SMITH .


Z ITS


GARFIELD


B;.C.


MrT


tPEETI~I~S
C~ATUI


of r NE ~H O1 5 ro
A~ssis Us IN pEI us No
OURC Fosst.. FUEL


DEP~IEN~t


by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from Quotations by farnous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: I equals J
"O' NW SWWF J NWUWZJXOJF LYX

BWJXD JFT BWJXD ... O IADZ LWWV

O KJFFYZ WJZ YX MWJX VONOFU

KXWJZAXWD."- TXWM SJXXBRYXW
PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "Democracy and freedom are more than just ideals to
be valued they may be essential to survival." Noam Chomsky
(c) 2011 by NEA, Inc. 4-20


FRANK & ERNEST


FOR BETTER OR WORSE
THE EASTER 80NNMJ GUST BECAUSE -,
Is COMING SooN, TM0T'S WH\/


CLASSIC PEANUTS


DAR AB BY1



Co-workers grit their teeth

seeing dentist's sagging pants


HO ROSCOPES


PI

~i
B
B

~~C~~ 4Zo


wwwJohnHartStudio com


CELEBRITY CIPHER
























Downtown antique shop has plenty to offer


I~ ~, ai


ALrtists subject to change without notice. Show goes on rain or shine.
Taxes and processing are included in the ticket prices. Camping available.


Col/mnh/ia CoulNry


1a

Youtr marketplace sour/Ce for. Lake City~ and


LAKE CITY REPORTER


WEDNESDAY, APRIL 20, 2011


the store and decorating it
to appeal to customers is
the fun part.
"The rest is hard work,"
she said. "I don't own the
business. The business
owns me."
She enjoys interacting
with people coming in,.she
said. The downtown area
is a laid back place.
'%ou meet all kinds of
people and hear great sto-
ries about Lake City and
how it was," she said.
Every day is a new one
at the store, Allum, said.
'%ou don't know what is
coming through the door,"
she said. "I get the most
unusual surprises."
The economy has made
her try to be more inven-
tive in-coming up with
ideas to attract customers,
Allum said.
"I put a lot of work into
the windows," she said. "I
make it fun andl enjoy it."
People seem to enjoy
the window displays she
has at the front of the
business, which enhance
the' overall appearance of
downtown, Allum said.
"It's just a part' of being
downtown," she said.
'%ou want to contribute
to downtown in your own
little atmosphere, The
more you concentrate on
making your little spot
appealing, the more people
will come back."
Advertising in the Lake
City Reporter provides
quite a bit of return for her
money, Allum said.
'%1u have to keep ,
reminding people who you
at~ and where you a-e.
she said. "Yo1u have to let
fPeople know you want


customers can
expect to find
a little of this
and a little of
That at Deco-
Tiqlue in Downtown Lake
City.
The business features
antiques, decorative items
and more, said Elizabeth
Allum, owner. She opened
Deco-Tique 10 years ago.
Allum never wanted
to own a business, but
started one "out of neces-
sity and common sense,"
she said. Previously she
worked for 25 years at
a large corporation in a
physical job.
"I knew I wouldn't be
able to keep up with physi-
cal side eventually," Allum
said.
Thus Deco-Tique was
created and she carved
her own niche in the
downtown. .
"This is my happy
place," Allum said.
The. store received its
name in a name the shop
contest Allum. announced
in the Lake City Reporter,
she said. She picked her
favorite one, and the wiri-
ner received dinner for
two at Red Lobster.
In addition to antiques
and more the store offers
a new baby line.
Allum noticed a lack of
other stores in the down-
town having baby gifts~ and
began to incorporate items
at Deco-Tique.
"It's a fun thing," she
said. "It's slowly conting
into its own. It took a lot of
moving around."
Owvning her ow\~n bus~i-
ness can be challenging,
Allum said. Shopping for .


IPPI~-- IP;E, - IImmwwwm
JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Elizabeth Allum, the proprietor of Deco-Tique located in downtown Lake City, is seen beside some of her, newest merchan-
dise. Deco-Tique sells items including clothing, furniture and affordable antiques.


she said. "Just because a
business isn't a corpora-
tion doesn't mean you
can't find good value and
quality for your moneyy"


them. to come and see
what you have." .
Store hours are 10:30
a.m. 5 p.m. Tuesday .
-- Friday ag~d 10:30 a.m. 3
p~m. Saturday. Customers
can also call ahead of-time
for after hours service.


The number is 386-752-
4009.
"I know how hard it is .
to get some place before it
closes," Allum said. .


Deco-Tique is located at
168 N. Marion Ave., and
the community is invited
"I try to have things dif-
ferent than a corporationn"


nFf~r

.--- -T~ ~


~ S~!t~ ~ ~ r;t~


-rrrr


~iB48lrsaoi~, .. ~ I IC, I i,; (;lrm~ r


s~-i~

;.Z;
~bYj4iY~~ ri
erte aiar~3n cntri ilnloo





I


Legal

criminal background screening re-
quirements-
Date, Time & Place for Pre-Bid Con-
ference: ALL BIDDERS ARE EN~
COURAGED TO ATTEND THE
PRE-BID CONFERENCE AT RI-
CHARDSON MIDDLE SCHOOL,
LAKE CITY, FLORIDA, TO BE
HELD AT 10:00 A.M., WEDNES-
DAY, APRIL 20, 2011
Place forSRece uinhM Ais C ba



Florida 32055, Telephone (386) 755-
8030
Bid Documents Prepared By:
CRAIG SALLEY & ASSOCIATES,
ARCHITECTS, 3911 Newberry
Roa0 S3t 3 G~ainewville,(3FL
377-4945
Bid Documents Available from:
h t://www.csa-
at hitect.com/bid documents.btm
Project Descriphion:
The work includes, but is not limited
to the replacement of the existing
wood playing floor in the Richardson
Middle Sichool ge na imum iae
reoal of the eiting wod pl yn
reomovreplaceemen tor removal ay th
wood sleepers on the slab on grade



removal and installation of the new
gym flooring system.
Dates of Advertisement: April 13,
20RTH COLUMBIA COUNTY
SCHOOL DISTRICT
Mike Millikin, Superintendent
By: R.M. "Mike" Null, Director of
Purchasing
04544346
April 13, 20, 2011
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD
LZ~I IAL CRI N OAR
PROBATE DIVISION
CASE NO. 11-771-CP
IN RE: ESTATE OF
GORDON EUGENE PETITYJOHN,
deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of
GORDON EUGENE PETTYJOHN,
deceased, whose date of death was
March 25, 2011; File Number 11-77-
CP, is pending in the Circuit Court
for Columbia County, Florida, Pro-
bate Divisiori, the address of which
is 173 NE Hernando Avenue, Lake
City, Florida 32055. The names and
addresses of the personal representa-
tive and the personal representative's
atforney are set forth below. *
.All creditors of the decedent and oth-
.er persps having claims or demands
aggns't decedent's estate, on whom a
~copy df this notice is reqliried to be
served, must file their claims with
this court WITHIN THE LATER OF
3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AF-
TER HE DTE OFSERVI E O
THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent
and other persons having claims or
demands against decedent's estate
must file their claims with this court
WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE
DAT OOF THENFIRSCTEPUBLICA-
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITH-
IN THE TIME' PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE


ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
SIS BARRED. --
The date of first publication of this
notice is: April 20, 2011
Personal Representative.
/s/ Donald Eugene Petty john
DONALD EUGENE PETTYJOHN
1009 Christie Court
Macclenny, Florida 32063
Attorney for Personal Representa-
tive:
FEAGLE & FEAGLE, ATTOR"
NEYS, P.A.
By: /s/ Marlin M. Feagle
Marlin M. Feagle
Florida Bar No. 0173248
Attorneys for Personal Representa-
tive
153 NE Madison Street
Post Office Box 1653
Lake City, Florida 32056-1653
386/752-7191

Ap04ril 2,027, 2011

060 s nce


an0 Job
UU Opportunities

EMcPLOYMENT
OPPORTUNITY
COLUMBIA COUNTY
Columbia County is accepting
applications for the position of
Purchasing Director. Position
functions as the chief purchasing
agent & is responsible for
prpm n gbi sp cificatin ,


from an accredited four year
college or university with degree
in a related area and two years
responsible experience in
purchasing work. Experience
ma~y sub tu ~e for education.
reurd. Columbia Co nt
re idec within six alon hs of
date of employment required.
Inumlbent mst fIle a fnda cal
disclosure~~~ fr nul i
accordance with Florida Statute.
IS ear ts39 an 8s lu phe t
must pass drug screening and
pre-employment physical.
Apply: Human Resources,
Board of County Commission-

(rs 53 -E Hrad v

2139. Position open until filled.
Columbia County is an
AA/EEO/AADA/VP employer

04544491
EMPLOYMENT
OPPORTUNITY
COLUMBIA COUNTY
Columbia County is accepting
Mechanic II applications.
Primary responsibility is skilled

h ctnace grwopai on
automotive, draglines, trucks,
tractors, graders, bulldozers,
front-end loaders, fire & rescue
vehicles & other construction &
maintenance equipment.
Includes both gasoline &r diesel
fueled apparatus. Min.
requirements: High School
Diploma/GED, &L 2 years
journeyman level experience in
automotive mechanics, or
graduation from an approved
course in the trade, or equivalent
combination of training &
experience. Valid FL CDL Class
B License required w/in first ,
ninety d ys of initial
epomnt. Must provide own
tools Sary is $i 9per 1 .
plus benefits.: Successfu .
apiatmustpass.pre-employ-
ment physical & drug screening.
Applications: Human Resources
Office, Board of County
Commissioners, 135 NE
Hernando, #203, Lake City, FL
320 5,d (6)9719-2025, TDD

www.columbiacountyfla.com
Deirdline: 05/06/11.
AA/EEO/ADA/VP Employer.


100 Job
Opportunities
AVON!!!, EARN up to 50%'!!!
Only $10 for Stanter Kit,
1-800-275-9945 pin #4206
www.youravon.com/tdavies
Busy office seeking
experienced, energetic person for
receptionist position.
Fax resume to 386-961-8802
7 TEMP Farmworkers needed
4/25/11 12/31/11. Workers will


3/4 of contract hours. Tools
provided at no cost. Free housing
provided for non-commuting
workers. Transportation &
subsistence reimbursed to worker
upon completion of 50% of
contract, or earir $ .8/hr.
Worksites in Muhlenberg Co KY.
Report or send a resume to nearest
local FL Agency of Workforce
Innovation office & reference job
# KY 0421641. Carver Farms -
Greenville, KY
CDL A Flatbed/Van 'I~uck
Driver needed for Fff OTR SE
area, 3 years exp or more, Contact
Melissa or Mary @ 386-935-2773
Crew Leader Small engine

EEO Em Inoer, Bn Ais ofed,

Delivery Driver, must be 21 yrs
old, have 6 pts or less on license
and have NO misdemeanors or fel-

CD pply witino paho cals!
North Florida Sales
467 SW Ring Ct, Lake City
Driver needed for Roll-Off Truck,
CDL, exp. preferred, duites in-
clude delivery & pick up of con-
tainers, transported to varoius
county landfills and PT/FT Exp

Md, soe owd oid reears Of a
based in Lake Butler, Call Greg
Waters @ 386-496-3867
164 Temp Farm Workers needed
5/9/11 11/1/11. Workers wil
Plant, cultivate & harvest sweet
potatoes. Random drug testing at
employer's expense. Guaranteed
3/4 of contract hours. Tools,
supplies, equip. provided at no
cost. Free housing provided for
non-commuting workers.
Transportation & subsistence
reimbursed to worker upon
completion of 50% of contract, or
earlier. $8.97/hr. Worksites in
Chickasaw, Calhoun, Webster,
Tallahatchie, Grenada. Co.'s MS.
Report or serid a resume to nearest,
FL Agency of Wbrkfor~e
SInnovation office & ref.
'Job # MIS 32'194; Edmondson
Farming Partnership
Full time Car Detailer. 8am 7pm
6 days a week. Please apply in
person Rountree-Moore Ford on
Hwy 90, Lake City. Ask for Tim.
SLocal law office needs
experienced legal secretary.
Workers compensation, personal
injury and general legal matters
experience preferred. Immediate
1 loment. Apply i erson at
emp j Coh ba0 Ae.,




m$GATEWAY +*
(Formerly Lake City Community College)
ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR,
ACCOUNTING
Teach accounting classes, general
business classes, and advise students
'in class selections. Prepare and
schedule teaching materials relevant to
thr ens a dtinu u of acutn Ppae,
syllabi and assessments. Meet
scheduled classes and use Scheiduled
classroom time appropriately. Maintain
accurate student record. Recruit
students to business major. Minimum
Qualifications: Master's degree in
businessiaccounting with at least 18
graduate hours in accounting. Qualified
to teach a wide variety of freshman
and sophomore business/ accounting .
clseann Abcltyt teuac nneageenI l
bookkeeping, and online accounting
courses. Desirable Qualifications: CPA
and Sechnd Teaching Field.
Experience with or willingness to
develop distance-leaming classes.
ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR,
.ECONOMICS
Teach undergraduate courses in micro
and macro economics. Prepare and
schedule teaching materials relevani to
instruction; prepare, review, and
update course outlines, syllabi and
tests. Meet scheduled classes and use
scheduled classroom time
studn reod.Rctnsaj entseto
business major. Advise students in
class selections. Minimum
Qualifications: Master's degree* wi
minimum of 18 graduate credit hours in

liera'"; nblt to -. tec orewti
Ability to present information in a
coherent manner and the ability to
fairly evaluate student retention of that
information. Ability to work well with
others. Desirable Qualifications:
College teaching experience. Minimum
of 18 graduate hours in discipline other
thn econanirs epgm is~toey ptica
to teach online courses.
164 Duty Days Tenured Track
to commence Fall 2011
Salary: Based on degree and
experience, plus benefits.
Application Deadine: 5/4/11
Persons interested should proydve College
tasrp loen g ~a no t mus. b
submitted with official translation and
Position details aed a piaions available on
web at wmfgailu
Human Resoum e


Rlonda GaCa eC le
LakeCrtyFl 202207
Phe n on66 neceson
E-bn go made, men,


Legal


LKE SHORE HOSPITAL
AUTHORITY
NOTICE OF ACTION
The Lake Shore Hospital
Authority provides public notice
Of the intent to include the
following director position in the
Florida Retirement System's
Senior Management Service Class
efetv eAprt r52011:.



PO Box 988, Lake City, FL 32056
04544478
April 20, 27, 2011

ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS
THE COLUMBIA COUNTY
SCHOOL DISTRICT
WILL RECEIVE BIDS FOR THE
FOLLOWING:
EASTSIDE ELEMENTARY
SCHOOL
RENOVATE KITCHEN
LARCHITC' PROJECT NO.
1030
CCSD BID FILE NO. 3243
Date & Time for Receiving Bids:
2:00 P.M., WEDNESDAY, MAY



PREQUALFIED. NOTE: All cok-
struction personnel who will be
wr ig on Sheo Bard of I um
project are required by Florida law,
F.S. 1012.32, to meet Level 2 enimi-
nal background screening require-
ments.
Date, Time & Place for Pre-Bid Con-
ference: ALL BIDDERS ARE EN-
COURAGED TO ATTEND THE
PRE-BID CONFERENCE AT EAST
SIDAM IEY FLOMEAPTHOO ,
2L 2T 1:00A.M., TUESDAY,
Place for Receiving Bids: Columbia
County School District, Administra-
tlVe COmplex, Purchasing Office,
Room 233 2nfl Floor, East Wing,
372 West Duval Street, Lake City,
Florida 32055, Telephone (386) 755-
8030
Bid Documents Prepared By:
CRAIG SALLEY & ASSOCIATES,
ARCHITECTS, 3911 Newberry
Road, Suite D, Gainesville, FL
32607, (352) 372-8424, FAX (352)
377-4945
Bid Documents Available from:
http://www.csa-
architect.com/bid documents.htm
Project Description:
The work includes, but is not limited
to, the expansion ~of the existing
kitchen at Eastside Elemerlary
School located in Lake City, Florida.
Sitework involves associated storm-'
water, grease traps, waste water and
potable~ water piping connected to
existing systems on the campus.
Asbestos and Lead Abatement is mn-
cluded mn the Scope of this Project,
bond inthme goect Mnual. Rprs
Building construction consists of
CMU bearing walls with brick ve-
neer; bar joists with metal decking,
tapered nigid roofmisulation and built
up~ roofing; gutters and downspouts-
Materials include vinyl tile; hard tile
alorn in mKitche orandnDis %ash
metal doors and frames; acoustical
tile ceilings; painted block interior
walls; fluorescent lighting. The
HVAC system consists of roof
mountd AFRUds; dea a t~ro

en equipment; DDC controls, and re-
lated mechanical / electrical equip-
ment.
Dates of Advertisement: April 13,
20 and 27, 2011 -
FOR THE COLUMBIA COUNTY
SCHOOL DISTRICT
Mike Millikin, Superintendent
By: R.M. "Mike" Null, Dire~ctor of
Purchasing

04544342
April 13, 20, 27, 2011
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS
THE COLUMBIA COUNTY
SCHOOL DISTRICT
WILL RECEIVE BIDS FOR THE
FOLLOWING.
RICHARDSON MIDDLE SCHOOL
GYM FLOOR REPLACEMENT
LAKE CITY, FLORIDA
ARCHITECT'S PROJECT NO.
1035
C.C.S.D. BID FILE NO. 3252
Date & Time for Receiving Bids:
2:00 P.M., WEDNESDAY, MAY 4,
2011
All construction personnel who will
be working on School Board of Co-
lumbia County property as part of
this project are required by Florida
law, F.S. 1012.32, to meet Level 2


1 Opportunities
Need EXPERIENCED
44r0-Insurance Agent.
Email Resume to
LCinsjob@gmail.com

Optical Assistant & Lab Tech
Needed,Fff exp a plus,but we
will train, Send resume to 763 SW
Main Blvd, Lake City 32025

hirn mFTP Sec rit Offc in


Apply at: www.securitasjobs.com`
Lic#BB2300010 EOE M/F/V/D
Wanted Highly motivated
individual for Sales Position.
Rountree -Moore Automotive
Group, Great benefits, paid vaca-
tion. Exp. a plus but not necessary.
Call Tony Reese 386-344-7517


Emp moment
CNA/home attendant needed in
private home. Will work with oth-
er caregivers. Nights & weekends
req'd. Send resume to: PO Box
3719 Lake City, Florida 32056



stred. No weekends or rights,
competitive salary & benefits
Fax Resume to 386-758-5628
HealthCore Physical Therapy
has an immediate opening for an
energetic, hecensed, Physical
Therapy Assistant for our
outpatient clinics. Excellent pay &
great work environment. Fax re-
sume to: 386-755-6639 or email
to: healthcorelibby@bellsouth.net.
All resumes kept confidential
Licensed, Experienced, FTA
for busy outpatient chmnc
Send resume to P.O. Box 714
Lake City, FL 32056 or
Email to: pta714@hotmadl.com


.230 Tutorinp
Will Tutor Your Student! Certi-
~fied, Masters Degree w/18 yrs exp,
At home or library, After school or
Summer, Call Judy 386-288-6165


240 Ed1108000~

04544098
T Iterested mna Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nlistsing Assistant, $479
next clas -04/11/10

Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-04/11/11

*,Continuiitg education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
exrestannsrieo


310 Pets & Supplies
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks ol a rd have health
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.

361 Farm E upet

84 Ford 4610 Tractor. Runs good.
Solid 2WD. New front tires,
350hr on 2005 motor. Dependable.
$7500. obo. 386-867-0005


404 Baby Items

Crib/Toddler Mattress by Kolcraft
Good Condition $25
I will text picture to you
386-292-4228

407 co pter

HP Computer,
$100.00
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170

IBM Computer,
$65
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170


408 Furniture

King Size Bedroom set, Bed,
Dresser, chest & 2 night stands,
Mattress & box springs included,
$500. Good 3 386-752-3297


416 Sporting Goods

Solid Wood Gun Cabinet,
holds 8, glass sliding doors,
locking drawer
$150 Call 386-961-9171


420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &


Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.

Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.

NOttle n~eeMd !3 687 260p
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.


~Ii~i~


DIIIYY


Lawn & LandscapeService

Clean Pine Straw,
You pick it up, $1.85 a bale
Delivery of 100 bales $260
386-688-9156
Landscape Maintenance Company
You can trust for knowledge &
pnide, Mention this AD!
Mow Green, LLC 386-288-6532

SerVICES

DIVI)RCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.


Land Services

Back Hoe, Dozer, Chopping, root
raking buss tog se Ang s d'
irrigation. Free Est! 386-623-3200


One ietm per ad 2
4 Ilnes 6 days sEa stional
Rate apples toprvtes Ind iduals Hling
Thls is a nonelundable rate.




4 lines *6 days ine 1.10
Rate applies to privrec individual selling
Eam d m Iuea gsoriesew
This is a non-refundable tat.




Ok~tn ite per M ac ddtonl
4 lines 6 days line 51.15 l

Each itemn must Include a price.




O~lne tmper ad "2
4 lines days ,an aPd tional





Each item must include a price. -
This Is a non-refundable rate





4 lnes. days as ti:o nal
Bate applia t private individuals selling
""noal rnhanda taintt IMS ,0 or iesa.
This isa non-nreundablersat.




O ie e di " r
4 liHGS.- das 0 Pd,'O
Ignspple Eto ri at nlvllli alkne li$








Limited to service type advertis-
ing only.
4 lines, one month....f92.00
$10.80 each additional.Iine .
Includes an adilmronal ;~i~'ed er
ad for each Wednesday insertion.



You can call us at 755-5440,
Monday through Friday from 8:00
a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Some people prefer to place their
classified ads in person, and some
ad categories will require prepay-
ment. Oua office is located at 180

You can also fax or email your ad
copy to the Reporter,
FAX: 386-752-9400 Please
direct your copy to the Classified

EM IL el sifieds@lakecityre-
porter.com





Adis to Apear. Call by: Fax/Email by:
Tuesday Mon., 10:0a.m. Mon., 9:0a~m.
Wednesday Mon., 10:00thm Mon., 9:0 a~m.
Thursday Wed., 10:00 a.m. Wed., 9:0 a~m.
Friday This.,10:00a.m. Thurs.,9:00a~m.
Saturday Fri., 10:00a~m. Fli.,9:0a~m.
Sunday Fli., 10:00 am. Fri.,900am.
These deadlines are subject to change without notce




Ad Errors- Please read your ad
on the first day of publication.
We accept responsibility for only
the first incorrect Insertion, and
only the charge for the ad space
in error. Please call 755-5440
immediately for prompt correc-
tion and billing adjustments
Cancellations- Normal advertising
deadlines apply for cancellation-
Billing Inquidies- Call 755-5440.
Should further information' be
required regarding payments or
credit limits, your call will be trans-
ferred to the accounting depart-
ment.


Advertising copy is subject to
approval by the Publisher trho
reserves the right to edit, reject,
or classify all advertisements under
appropriate headings. Copy should
be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the first day of pub-
lIcation. Credit for published errors
will be allowed for the first insertion
for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the
Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nor for any general
special or consequential damages'
Advertising language must comply
with Federal, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
nation in employment, housing and
public accommodations. Standard


abbreviations are acceptable; how-
ever, the first word of each ad may
not be abbreviated.

In Print and online
WW1V7~.lliecityreporter~com


ARE~~~~~~ Y O MSI PE!















Apply Oline or In Person! 1152 SVICBusiness3Poi(5t Dr

386.754.8562
SU~ELwww.sitel.com E0E


Classified Department: 755-5440


HELP FOR YOU!
Resumes, Apps: FAFSA, College,
Jobs; Job Searches, Interview
Tips, Tutoring Call 386-935-4906

REPORTER lassifieds.


www.Iakecityreportebcom


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED WEDNESDAY, APRIL 20. 2011

Lakre City Reporter





CLASSDIIS


Takie ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

755-5440


~ADvantage~


FLO)RIDA
ATEEWAY
COLLEGE'
& At
(Formerly Lake City Community College)
ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR,
194 Duty Days Tenured Track
Conduct the learning experience in
the classroom, laboratory and/or
clinical area. Prepare for instruction -
syllabi, lesson plans, tests; use
assessment strategies to assist the
continuous development of the
le rn ;uuse effective cornmuni nation
Demonstrate knowledge and
understanding of the subject matter,
use appropriate technology in the
teaching' and learning process.
Minimum Qualifications: Master's of
Science in Nursing degree and be
licensed in FL or eligible for licensure
in FL. Three years experience as staff
nurse (acute care preferred). Ability to
present information in a coherent
mannef~and the ability to fairly
evaluate student retention of that
information. Desirable Qualifications:
Computer literate. Teaching
experience.
Salary: Based on degree and
Apl cton I Ieadi 5 411
Persons interested should provide
College application, vita, and
photocopies of transcripts. AII foreign
transcripts must be submitted with
official translation and evaluation.
Position details and applications
available on web at. www.fqc.edu
Human Resources
Florida Gateway College
Lak Citl 32 227

E-Mail: humanr~afqc edu
r(;( ~ ~ "" irlerin )IeCmiino oknc














810 Home for Sale
5 acre Home ws/Horse Barn.
Wood floors. New Kitchen.
Gazebo & Koi Pond MLS#76039
$169,900 Call Aaron @ Westfield
Realty Group 386-867-3534
Beautiful Home For Sale
The Preserve at Laurel Lake
4/2 or 3/2 $194,900 MLS#77257
Call Scott Stew~art 386-867-3498
westfieldrealtygroup.com
CBC 3/1 home, inside city limits,
fenced backyard, detached carport
w/office MLS#77411 $82,900
Cal R.E.O.Reaty,
Nancy Rogers @ 386-867-1271
Charming Remodeled Home

Chali Sare W asd e
Realty Group 386-755-0808

Codlwell Bank~erABso Real y

pla nc yad, cose totwn.
ony $8,0 oiG ibg
Simpson. 386-365-5678

Cb/b Bn 5+c a aae
inground pool/hot tub and more.
MLS #75854 $569,900 Lori
Geibeig Simpson. 386-365-5678
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Superbly maintained home in
Creekside. Oversized garage &
storage. Many extras. Elaine K.
Tolar 386-755-6488 $209,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
New home in Mayfair S/D. 4br on
corner lot. Split plan. $214,900
MLS# 73696195Elamn 8K. Tolar.

ColdweHl Banke /Bishop Realty
Home on the lake in town. 4br/3ba
MLS# 76085 Elaine K. Tolar 386-
755-6488 or Mary Brown White-
hurst. 386-965-0887 $299,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Great home in Woodcrest S/D 3/2
home, covered back porch, nice
yard.MLS# 75198 Elaine K. Tolar
386-755-6488 $129,900
Country Home on 2.5 Acres,
$95,000 MLS#77039
R mlax Pr fessio as, Inc.,
386-365-2821
Custom built home with many
upgrades. Screened back porch,
16x24 workshop.
MLS# 77178 $184,500
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
Custom, 3/2.5 built in 2007,
on 10.8 manicured acres,
completely fenced, Owner Fin.
avail., MLS#77382 Call Patti
386-623-6896 Access Realty
FOR SALE 2br/1ba house.
Bg 3/4 am21 l-
(954)804-48 2 for more info.
Ft White MH on 16.27 Acres,
*near many recre ti nal ac ivitie,
Jo Lytte Remax Professionals
386-365-2821


810 llome for sale

Owner Fianncing: wooded 1/4 ac.
lots in Suw~annee County. close to
River, high & dry. Bring your SW
or DW or RV. S6300
Derington Properties.9654300
Ready for Fun &: Family. 4Ibr/2ba
custom home on 33.84 ac. has
stocked fish pond & huge 54x60
shop. 5325.000. Hallmark Real
Estate 386-719-0382
Rolling Oaks, 3/3 + Bonus Rm.
5 acres, back porch &r more!
MLS#77528 Call Pam Beauchamp
at 386-758-8900 Remax $284.900'
remaxpamb@gmail.com
Solid Brick Home on 5 Acres,
Co t~o ton t $n 2h 8 nty

38C6- 9B 343 Re ts Raty
Spacious, Open Floor Plan Home,
fenced back yard, screen porch,
$179,900 MLS#76796 Call Jo
Lytte@Remax Professionals, Inc-
386-365-2821
Two for the price of one. Updated
mamn home w/a 3/2 guest home. A
lot of living space for the price.
MLS# 77348 $244,900
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
Welcome home. 3br/2ba brick.
Great location on the east side.
Priced to sell.
MLS# 776867 $69,900
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
Well C;ared For 3/2 on 1.4 Acres,
open floor plan, MLS#75702
$199,900, Cal ai Cason

westfieldrealtygroup.com
Well maintianed 3/2 1/2 acre
minutes from town. 20x40
workshop, screened porch.
MLS# 73787 $99,000
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
You can't beat this Pri'ce! 1995
SWMH on 3/4 ac. Paved road'
1216 sf, 2/2 split bedroom plan.
Drn eeds work! $9,9-400


820 Farm"&
10 acres, with'Itavel 'Orailer &
SElectricity, close to Itchetucknee
Springs, $38,000, MLS# 76264
Call MillardGillen at
Westfield Realty 386-365-7001
4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financihng! NO DOWN!
$69,900. $613mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
4 acres, Wellborn, New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down $3,900, $40mon

www.LandOwnerFinancing.com


1836 sf, great value on paved road.
Need repairs. $54,900


430 Garage Sale
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.


440 Miseell&DCOUS
Tow Behind Grill/Smoker
$1,250 OBO-
386-249-3104 or
386-719-4802


520 seats for sale

24' Pontoon Boat Bass Tracker,
115H Marr nw 2cart/ih ts,



630 fto1 HmeS
14x70 MH, 2Br/2Ba Real Clean
Good Location! CH/A $550/Mo.
+ $200 Dep. NO PETS.
(386)755-0064 or (904)771-5924
2&3 BR MH. $395 $650. mo.
plus deposit. Water & sewer fur-
nished. Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
2BR/2BA MH CH/A,
Fenced in back yard and Shed.
$750. mo plus deposit
Pets OK! 386-365-8279
3br/2ba mobile home. Next to
O'Leno State Park. $650 mo. plus
1st, last & sec. Water & lawn
service provided. 386-758-7959
Clean 2 bendrom I ge lot,
Call: 386-752-6269
leave message if no answer.
a UNDER NEW MANAGEMENT
Oakview Mobile Home Park
Clean well maintained 2/2 imits in
nice park. 2 miles to downtown
Lake City. 386-984-8448
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White Contact 386-623-3404
or 386-365-1919

Nice clean 2&3 d m, Five Points'
Westside, 3 bdrm house on
Monroe St 386-961-1482
Quiet, Country Bmfr area
386 86 3d%,r 3868 Sm 0642
www.suwanneevalleyprope ties-.com


640 MObile Homes

05525447
Has come HT odHloCm ters
Save up to 60K on select models
Call Today! 800-622-2832 -



"'s Et 3/ve acs enS 756
Eastside Villag Realty, Inc
Denise Miligaa Bose 752-5290
3/2 DWMH over 1700 sqft. New
Roof & CH/A. Doublesided fire-
place, custom kit w/brialfariit q'eok '
&r Wiet biar. $89,500'ME'fS#y 738161
3A6-42i3-6896 Acc'8sy,~ Rea~ly
Hallmark Real Estate. IRWEMH
4/2 on 5 ac. 24X36 workshop.
Fireplace, kitchen island w/drop
down and more. $114,900. .
MLS# 76188 386-867-1613

TW mF in celoin. 3 l
$89,900! Call Taylor Goes
of Access Realty @ 386-344-7662.

650 Ome '

OWNER FINANCING
3br/2ba DWMH with 5 acres. 10
additional acres available. Daniel
Crapps Agency 386-623-6612


710 Un~furnih ed p t.

aqMove in as low as $325
Call t day for details! -
Windsong Apts

05525655
SPRING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans;
some with garages.
Call 386-454-1469 ,
or visit our website:
iwwwspringh~ivillage~nel

1 80 2 Bedroom Apartments
Mo einf 9asI w as


Bring the picture in or
we will take it for you!
* Ad runs 10 consecutive days
with a description and photo in the
nevispaper and online E-edition.
* Ad runs 10 consecutive days as a
classified line ad online.
* You must include vehicle price.
* All ads are prepaid.
* Private party only.





2006 EF250
Ford Van
Iv tn de Il work
s0K miles, ex.c nd.

$10,500
call
386-555-5555

if you don't sell your vehicle
during thefirst 10 days, you
can run the same vehicle ad
for 10 additional days for
only $15.00
Terms and conditions remain the
same for the additional run.


5\50 cars for sale

Oiw,
2005 Chevrolet Suburban LT -
Leather Loaded! Save Today!!
$12,995
2007 Chevrolet Trailblazer -
34k miles, Sunroof, Power seat,
Alloy wheels only $15, 495
2010 Chevrolet Malibu LT 3
to choose!!! 4Cyl over 33MPG!!
from $15.988
2006 Chrysler 300C SRT8 -
6.1L HEMI!! Leather Loaded
w/Navigation, DVD and all the
toys! $19,990!!
2007 Chey Silverado 2500HD

$29,588

20 Chv 4 lv ro 20H
Diesel Low miles- Loaded
$29,990
2008 Nissan Rogue SL-
Blackffa coth,61oae extra

2002 Nissan Xterra XE Gas
Saver!! Hurry, won't last at
$8,795
2006 Chevrolet Monte Carlo SS
-5.3L V8 Black/Black Leather
Sunroof loaded!! Low miles
only $13,990
2003 Chevrolet Tahoe LT -
Leather Loaded. 3rd Row Seat!
Yours for $10,995
2010 Chevrolet HHR LT-
BIace/elsas PmWtPDL 4 se, -

2010 Chevrolet Camaro 1LT -
Silver/Black Cloth, Auto Trans,
PW, PDL, CD, XM Sat Radio
$22,990
1995 Ch ~let G20Hg To
Converse TVan ghve op e
New!! Captain's Chairs ,TV,
Folding Rear seat... all the toys,
only $6,995



2002 Chevrolet Tahoe LT 4x4-
Only 73k miles! !Black/Black
Leather Loaded!! 11vin Headrest
DVDs, Alloy Wheels Heated
Seats and more only $15,695
2008 Chevrolet Trailblazer -
P/windows, locks, keyless entry
Priced to Move $14,888
2009 Toyota Tacoma Reg Cab
Pickup Auto, AC CD and
more!!! Great gas mileage at a
great Price $13,990
2004 Chevrolet Impala LS -
Sunroof, leather, power seats,

2007 Cevroe il era Reg
Cab 4.3L V6 Gas Saver!!!
SLooks and drives like new!
$12,990
BURK~INS CHEVROLET
,(904)259-5796


Heavily WoodedLand, 10 Acres
MLS#75784 $94,900 5:

Remax Professionals, Inc. S



830 commercial --
Prppe
Great Location with lots of .'tt i1
flexible space & visibility for lease r II
Great Price Too! ji
Call Scott Stewart @ Westfield.
Realty Group 386-867-3498.
Multiple Use 12,000 sq ft i
of Office & Warehouse space,l
Loading dock, Storage yard, ;rh
MLS#77349 $395,000, Charlie "
386-755-0808 Westfield Realty


850 waterrrontIFEAl
Property 386-755-5440
DWMH on Ten Acres w/lakefront,
surrounded by oaks, $115,900
MLS#75571, Call Jo Lytte at "
Remax Professionals 386-365- USRPO
2821, jolytte@remaxnfl.com SBCIi0
River Cabin on Suwannee River, ?:386-755-5445
workshop, patio, deck &r dock,
$349,900 MLS#76336 Call -
Jo Lytte at Remax Pr fessionals

River Front Property 6.45 Acres, A ILA OHIRDPATEI
in White Sprgs close to Big Shoals
Park, Shelter for entertaining, 386-752-1203
$14 O 8 6-S 671 l -Nan~cy


890 Resort Property $%CIORIC ADSSE
Furnished Home on Itchetucknee I
River, Wrap around covered decks
on two levels,MustSEE! $375,000
MLS#77006 Call Jo Lytte
Remax 386-365-2821
River Acc s, Refurbished Rent-

Barn, Pool, Hot Tub $329,900
Call Jo Lytte 386-365-2821
MLS#76734 Remax Professionals


94;0 Trucks

2004 Dodg Ram Quad Cab V8
4 7Lut tran nuisin w/tow

tras $9999/ 386-755-9894




ON WHEELS & WATERCRAFT


81 Home for Sale

1999 Doublewide,
3/2 fenced back yard
on 1 acre.
MLS# 76315 $64,900
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
3/2 Brick Home in town, fenced
back yard w/12xl2 workshop
S$79,900 Call Nancy @ R.E.O.
Realty 386-867-1271MLS# 77414
nancytrogers@msn.com
3/2 Brick home on .59 acre, on the
lake withsbacak sunroom. Garage &

MLS# 76769 $222,900
Century 21/The Darby'Rogers Co.
3/2 Custom Western Cedar Home
on 2 acre lakefront lotMLS#74681
Call Jo Lytte at Remax
Professionals, Inc. 386-565-2821
jolytte@remaxnfl.com
3/2 in Creekside S/D. Fenced back
yard, sprinklers, large
screened rear lanai.
$175,000. MLS# 77385 '
386-623-6896 Access; Realty
S3/ mnton lots o p res

`'$49,900 Call Jo Ljrtte at
Remax pofessi Ias, Inc.


Great Opportunity!,
Currently rented, Seller will
assist w/buyer's closing costs
MLS# 77335, Call Michael at
Westfield 386-867-9053 $99,900
Gweb Lake area. Beautiful up-

flo rs, fi place nw & bhen Ig
den, fenced yard. $125,000, 386-
397-4766 Hallmark Real Estate
Hallmark Real Estate. Brick 3/2.
Many upgrades. Gas fireplace,
Grotto tile. Great location on cul-
de-sac! $149,900.
MLS# 75931 386-867-1613
Historical Home on Lake Isabel-
la. 3/3 w/basement! Great as a pri-
vate residence or a wonderful pro-
fessional office. $240,000 386-
719-0382 Hallmark Real Estate


Home on 15 Acres w/2500 sq ft,
workshop, MLS# 77552 $235,000
Call BRittaln Rtoeckert at
S386-397-3473
- Just Reduced 4/2 on 1.57- acres,
fireplace. partially fenced, MLS#
77412, Call Nancy Rogers at
R.E.O. Realty Group
386-867-1271 $64,900
Large Bnik ,d/1, 4.143 ace, metal
Call Nancy Rogers @ R.E.O.
Realty Group, Inc. 386-867-1271.
nancytrogers@msn.com `

HaRm wa p aon71d f p rch
Call Brittany Stoeckert at
Results Realty386-397-3473
Lg home on corner lot w/garage,
Eastside Village. Clubhouse,
heated pool MLS# 71901 Eastside
Village Realty, Inc. Denise
Milligan-Bose 386-752-5290
Lots of acerage. All brick home.
Screened i or h. Eta big

.MLS# 76765 $115,000
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co*
Luxury 3/2 Log Home, Cypress


Rog~er Loeld @ 3 o63 39
westfieldrealtygroup.com
Make an Offer! 3 br brick, quiet
,om i od "a s'H lm r
Real Estate 386-365-5146


on pae road OVer 9 ous!

Brod e Ws~tfiel Reat Grup
Nice home with eat in kitchen and
a ruce sized living room. Pleanty
of room for entertaining.
MLS# 77584 $89,900
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.

h meG Cfro es,w3 f ep cs,3 et
bar &r big deck. Newly reduced to
$214,9003 HaHlar Real Estate

Open for Bid! 3/2 DW w/corner
stone fireplace, fenced yard & Ig
kit. HUTD property, sold "as is"
MLK77 al1 86- 65-38 sDeb-


G et location Wof I-75 saious

hook up. patio. $600 &r up, + SD
386-344-3715 or 386-965-5560'
The Lakes Apts. Studios & IBr's
from $135/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted,. monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
Call mihle 38-53 9626


720 F(dA"'"h At


3/2 MH on 1.5 acres, fenced,
porches, wkshp,ivell maintained
$49,900 MLS# 77309 Call Josh
wGr can 36 46- clom

3/2 on 4.84 Acres, fireplace, sheds
mRn fruit t6es l Jo Ly 7at
386-365-2821, www~jolytte.
florida-property-search.com
3/2 on 5cres Lre master suite
fenced for horses.

Centr M 1T 8ab 99r Co.

seeral soragl Ildgs, fenced

$1 9 80 ww. i iam cm
3/2 on 9.7 acres. fenced & cross
fenced. Separate pastures. Animals
are negotiable. Owners motivated.
MLS# 77431 $179,900
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.

w/sbrpandt ooff c. BooartipHy
lrindscaped. Private access to Lake

Cetr r1T e hDab Ro rs o.
4/2 with 1000 sq ft workshop,
fenced back yard, 2 car garage,
MLS#77602, Bring Offers!

R.O Ieaty 8Nf6c7y-1 71


Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
coarble o ge, mro pave. Weeley
2 persons $150. weekly
3806 5-5S8ho8d

730 HomeF or en -

497 NW Hamilton St..3/1 home
in established neighborhood.
Short walk to downtown and all
amenities. $550./ mo + ,
$550. security.
143 Zebra Terrace. 3/2 home
"n "los 1 e with fenced

security. 50% discount ort th
first month's rent for approved
applicant.
Century 21 The Darby
Rogers Co.
K 1l dabn 36 8 -950


Classified Department: 755-5440


730 ie ~et
2/2 Home w/lrg dining area, Irg
driveway, appliances included,
$800 mo, Istlast & security in
Lake City, Call 386-623-7494
3/2 Recently Built Custom Home,
1340 sq ft, stainless steel applian.
ces, custom cabinets, $920 mo,
1st. Last & Sec,off I-75 & 47
Call Andrew 386-623-6066
3ba/2ba, New carpet & paint: .5
ac 2 mi from d'town. No pets.
Imase req'd: fav. background only.
$850 +dep. 752-8696, 752-5025.


0750 BU~,SIESS& ~
O FCE SPAC for leas.

$675mo/$695. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor


S790 Vacation Rentals

Horseshoe Beach Spring Special
Gulf Front 2br dw g4 /rch,6 dc,

(352)498-5986/386-235-3633
alwaysolivacation.com #419-181

8g$ .Lots for Sale

5 Acre Lot, Secluded & Cleared
MLS# 67871 $60,000 '
Call Lisa Waltrip -
@ 386-365-5900
westfieldrealtygroup.com
A high & dry buildable wooded
.734 of ac.,Forest Country. MLS#
.76668 Easmtsiede Village Ralty, -

@386-752-5290
Beautiful .92 Acre Lot.
3 Rivers-Ft. White-High & Dry!
Only $11,900.
Call Taylor Goes of Access Realty
@ 386-344-7662.
Forest Country building lot,
scattering of trees, Motivated
Seller $19,999 MLS#75140
Remax Professionals, Inc.
Jo Lytte 386-365-2821
2HallmarknRelal Estate. Cleare
camper. In O'Brien. Close to Live
Oak, Lake City, Branford. $25,000
MLS# 74534 386-867-1613
Nice 4 acre parcel located in
O'Brien. Won't last long at only
$1 ,00e Call Tay81or Ges of2
PUBLISHER'S NOTE-
All real estate advertismng mn this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes itegl
to advertise "any preference
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
'odingiiy eaila bttsoronatiA-
such preference, limitation or

inlde chlrn ud tesag of
18 living with parents or legal
custolchans, pregnant wome and
People securing cu idy o hl
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will notlknowmngly :
,accept any-advertising forirpal es
hatelwhich is ianviolatitbli of the ~
law. olur readers are hereby in- I
formed that all'dwueiKdgs a'dver- '
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis,
To complain of discrimination call
HUD tolt'free at' 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
Ste eph ne numbe to th caring


...to never miss a day's
WOffil Of all the

Lake City Reporter
11RS 10 Offer.

Home delivery.
TO Subscribe call
755-5445





* II 'Iy


Great house in Piccddilly S/D. 2 Derington Properties. 965-4300
car gaaeand inrund pool. aft e celt.Sm
SNewl ya intedm iosde & dit: Half toU s~tenp ace lots. Sme; lw/
-MLS# 76786 $133,500 wel se'"irpmtiLcj pp.Wefance Prprlow
dnthr~y 2fflhe Darby Rogers Co; .dw n pmi1eas Burllard Properties
$8-72-33 ali w w1landn T-c


3/2 in Woodhaven w/Fla Room,
fenced back yard MLS#75499,
$114,900 Call Pam @
Remax 386-303-2505 or
email- remaxpamb@gmail.com


....mmume,m

2004 Dodge Ram
Quad Cab
V8, 4.7L AT w/tow
package. 112,500 mi.
Lots of extras.
$9,999
Call
386-755-9894


Homestead Rancher
Travel Trailer
28ft. One slideout
fiberglass, awning,
sleeps 8.
$1 0,000
Call
850-322-7152


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED WEDNESDAY, APRIL 20, 2011






4C LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED WEDNESDAY. APRIL 20. 2011


-1 www.aspenlakecity.com


open 61)ays A Week Monday-Saturday

..oda o:-esday anod0 .sday

Wednesday 9:00 a.m. -6:00 p.m.
Friday 8:00 a.m. 5:00 p.m.
Saturday- 8:00 a.m. 12:00 p.m.

752-2336


?1~ ___1311~11-LI


c" ';

~d~c~311o


Most cars & trucks
expires 4/30/11


S(ADA-0D110>


Rotate &
Balance
Tires
Most cars & trucks
Plus tax & supplies
Not valid with any other offer
expires 4/30/11


f2s~ l;~t ervkee
:);r ~ rdg H.li 9Q
C') SS55-0631.
: ;-.. ; -,de-,~ 7am-spm


Dr. Robert Harvety Dr. Rameek; Mfc8air


IvUMl th18 a RS 613
A savrr~ssf 517.0I


GoJupon ai008


We are now a Cigna

We are now a
Me uite M~etLife PPO Provider
THE POLICY OF OUR OFFICE IS THAT THE PATIENT AND ANYI OTHER PERSON RESPOrNSIBLE FOR PAYMENT
HASPI RIGHTIO REFUSE TO PAY, CANCEL PAYMENT, OR BE REIMBUrRSED FOR PAYMENT FOR ANY~ SERVICE.
EXAMINdATION, OR TREATMENT IF PERFORMED AS A RESULT OF AND WITHilif2- HOURS OF RESPONDING
TO THE ADVERTISEMENT FOR THE FlifE, DISCOUNTED FEE, EXAM1INATIONj OR TREATMENT


IV hav 100 tohChe,

alli need to see

a dentist right away.

GVe us 3 cl.
We will see you today or tomorrow.


osS @00


* "Soft-Tous~h" Initial Exam
* Panoramit X- Ray (ADAn-00330)


* Diagnosis (H needed)


AS~PENV


I) E1I'


-I
R


"www.aspenlakecity~com


H !


2aED~~





Wednesday, April 20, 20 II www.Iakecityreporter.com


TONY BRITTI~ake City Reporter


Different examples of Fred DeRocco's to~y creations sit on display table.


He said he felt it was important to
make his wooden toys so that children
could have a quality toy at a cheaper price
than the plastic toys sold in stores.
"I see plastic toys in the stores and I
don't like them," he said. "~They break
and they break while you're handling .t
them in the stores. I can make the same :~i
thing out of wood, sell it at cheaper price
than the plastic toys and more kids will
enjoy my toys. The whole thing is about
trying to make things affordable to peo-
ple can buy them."
Sandy and Bob Cole, of Pin~etta, were
looking at some of DeRocco's creations
during the 30th Annual Down Home Days iaEd
Festival in Madison,
"This work is very artistic," Bob Cole
said. "I like the colors and the detailing. I
was attracted to his pieces by the designs.
He said he's going to make a motorcycle
and I would like to see that."


TOYMAKER continued on 3D


Above: Fred DeRocco, owner of Grandpaw's
Workshop, gives customers Sandy and Bob Cole,
of Pinetta, a brief history behind his toys while the
Down Home Days Festival in Madison.






Left: Trace DeRocco, 2, sits with grandfather Fred
DeRocco, at DeRocco's sales booth.







iiE P~otosbyTO~NYBRITTL aCke tyReore


Easter l

Egg time! I D


SucEs


B IL I G


Toymaker

finds joy in

his creations

By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com

ented enough to create
toys and other pieces of
art by using their hands
consider their talents to
be a blessing.
Fred DeRocco didn't realize he was
blessed in that fashion until he lost one of
his legs following an accident, but for the
past 30 years he's utilized those talents as
a toymaker, making wooden toys.
DeRocco's toy and woodworking busi-
ness is called Grandpaw's Workshop,
where he make just wooden toys, chil-
dren's furniture and other wood works.
"I've been doing this 1979," he said,
noting he started his woodworking hobby
after his leg was amputated. "I wasn't,
going to sit around and watch TV all day.
I had to have gonethy. .to ,l~rand I star~-
ed out car-iing lthaerl t pIC ple~t."
DeRocqg, 6;. ofi Jaspe 0 ed his
business in 19;-9 and his gran daughter,
Michelle, named the shop Grandpaw's
Workshop -- a name that has stuck
through the years.
"If it's wood I make it,"' he said, of the :
items he makes in his workshop.
His pieces include children toys such
as wooden cars, trucks, fire trucks, large
semi trucks, helicopters, air planes, trains
and a complete line of a circus set includ-
ing a miniature Ferris wheel, carousel,
a circus wagon with at least a dozen
animals. He also makes wooden cutouts
of college mascots featuring University
of Florida, Florida State University and
the University of Georgia. He also makes
children furniture including cradles and
high chairs.
H-e said it doesn't take too long to make
the items because he doesn't sit down to
make just one thing.
"I'll have about five or six things going
all at the same time so I've always got
something going," he, aid.
DeRocco srtd he noi-mally ci~ts out liat- -
terns for about two dozen pieces, takes
them itheihoiuse and during the; ek-E-
nings wvhbn he godes in after: working .in
the aWorlkshop he sits at hiis desk, paints
the pieces and adds the designS. He esti-
mates thiat he makes hundreds: of pieces
each year.


s. a













Graft is good F


When it's done



in the garden


Pizza-inspired Hawaiian sweet-and-sour chicken


By ALISON LADMAN
For The Associated Press
For quite a while we
couldn't quite put our
finger on what was miss-
ing from sweet-and-sour
chicken.
With all the tangy sweet
goodness from the pineap-
ple, peppers, omions, sugar
and vinegar, it was hard
to identify what it needed.
Then we started think-
ing about Hawaiian-style
pizza and suddenly it hit


ACT2 WEDNESDAY APRlI 20 2011


Page Editor: C.J. Risak. 754-0427


LAKE CITY REPORTER


Before you can topwork
any tree, you have to have
stems, called scions, of the
variety to which you want
to change the plant. You
might get scions from a
neighbor's or friend's tree
that you have admired. I
often get scions for graft-
ing mailed to me from
enthusiasts elsewhere
across our fruited plain, or
from government institu-
tions.
Healthy portions of last
year's growth, each cut
into pieces a foot or so
long, are ideal to become
scions. They can be col-
lected anytime in winter
or early spring, as long
as stems are showing no
signs of growth and tem-
peratures are above freez-
ing. .
Once you have scions
in hand, put them in the
refrigerator. Wrap them
well in plastic, perhaps
with a damp cloth to keep
them plump with moisture.

A FEWV CUTS AND
YOU'RE FINISHED
The ideal time for top-
working is when buds on
the trunk are just begin-
ning to grow; the scions
are still under refrigeration
in their winter sleep. This
way, the scion will have
time to knit to the loppdd-
back trunk and hook up its
plumbing before its buds
expand into thirsty new
shoots.
The actual grafting
operation is simple, and
there are a few ways to go
about it. The method I'Ill
describe is the cleft graft,
practiced by gardeners for
thousands of years and
best done on trunks 1 to 4
inches aci-oss.
Wedge grafting and


bark grafting are among
other methods of topwork-
ing, described in such
books as "The Grafter's
Handbook" by R J. Garner
(Sterling Publishing, 1993)
and "Plant Propagation:
Principles and Practices"
by H. Hartmann, D.
Kester, E Davies and R
Geneve (Prentice-Hall,
2010), and are useful with
trunks even a foot across.
After lopping off the
tree's head and squaring
off the top of the trunk
with a clean saw cut, begin
the cleft graft by hammer-
ing the blade of a heavy
knife right down into the
stub to form a 2- or 3-inch
split. Remove the blade
and let the split close up.
Next, cut two sc~ions
.to fit into the split in the
trunk. Do this by slicing
wood from the bottom 2
to 3 inches on either side
of each scion, making that
bottom portion wedge-
shaped in cross section,
but slightly asymmetrical.
(You "plant"' more than
one scion into the trunk
when topworking as insur-
ance against failure; a
couple of years later you
prune to leave only the
one that made th'e best
growth.)-
Now, force a screw-
driver into the middle of
the slit in the trunk tO
open it up, and-slide each
scion into each of the
outer edges of waiting gap.
The better the alignment
of the line between the
bark and wood on each
scion with this same line
onl the trunk, tile better
the.healing, because the
layer just beneath the bark
is the source of all new
cells at the graft.
Once scions are snug-
gled in place and aligned,:


By LEE REICH
Associated Press
Visitors to my garden
this time of year are often
astonished to see me lop-
ping the tops off some of
my trees,
No, I'm not the Henry
VIII of horticulture, chop-
ping the head off any tree
that no longer meets my
fancy. OK, I am actually
lopping the head off any
tree that doesn't meet my
fancy.
I part ways with Ol'
Henry, though, because
first, lopping the head off
a tree does not kill it, and
second, I graft on a new
head. A few years after
this seemingly brutal
operation, the tree looks
as chipper as ever. And it
has a head that I like bet-
ter or else off it comes
again-
I do this type of grafting,
called topwdrking, mostly
on my apple trees, but it
could be applied to many
Other kinds of fruit or
ornamental trees.
For instance, if you don't
like the growth habit of
your red maple or the leaf
shape of your Japanese
maple, you can just lop
back the head and change
it. Same goes for the flow-
er color of a crab apple or
flowering cherry.
Each time I lopj back one
of my apple trees, I can
make that tree into any
One of the more than 5,000
other varieties of apple.
Mostly, you can only
graft the same kinds of
plants together any vari-
ety of apple on an apple
trunk, cherry on cherry,
maple on maple, etc.

GATHER YOUR STEMWS ;


ASSOCIATED PRESS
This undated photo courtesy lif Lee Reich shows a grafted chestnut tree in New Paltz, N.Y.
Chopping and grafting may look brutal but can result in beautiful fruit trees.


remaining threat to suc-
cess is from the cut ends
drying out. Avoid this by
thoroughly coating all cut
surfaces, including the tips
of the scions, writh some
sort of prunitig'paint or
grafting wax. My Tavorite
is a gooey black stuff
called "~Treekote."


remove the screwdriver to
let the split close up and
fimly hug the two scions.

DRYING IS YOUR
ENEMY
If your timing is right,
and trunk and scions are
in good contact, the only


Check the graft a day
after the operation to make
sure all surfaces are still
thoroughly sealed. Then
stand back, because with
an established root system
it's possible to get 3 feet
SOr idore ofgrowthrromn a
-scion in one season!


aside.
In a large, deep saute
pan over medium-high,
cook the bacon until -
crispy, 6 to 8 minutes.
Using a slotted spoon,
transfer the bacon to a
plate lined with paper
towels to drain, leaving
the drippings in the pan.
Add the chicken to the
pan and saute for 3 to
4 minutes, or until well
browned on all sides.
It does not need to be
cooked through yet. Add
the onion and' the carrot
and cook for another 3
to 4 minutes, or until the
onion is soft and trans-
lucent and beginning to
brown.
Add the bok choy, red
bell pepper, snow peas
and pineapple chunks.


Cook for 2 to 3 minutes,
or until the vegetables
are crisp-tender. Stir in
the reserved sauce.
In a small bowl, stir
together the chicken
broth and cornstarch,
tlhen stir into the pan.
Bring to a boil and cook
until the sauce-is thick-.
ened and coats every-
thing, about 2 minutes.
Serve sprinkled with the
reserved bacon.
Nutrition information
per serving (values are
rounded to the nearest
whole number): 338 calo-
ries; 101 calories from fat
(30 percent of total calo-
ries); 11 g fat (3 g satu-
rated; 0 g trans fats); 89
mg cholesterol; 35 g car-
bohydrate; 25 g protein; 4
g fiber; 631 mg sodium.


us bacon! Like so many
things,, sweet-and sour
chicken could be made
better with bacon.
An'd while we were mak-
mng imp~rovefuents to this
classic dish, we decided
we might as well use fresh
rather than canned pine-
apple, as well as the more
flavorful chicken thigh
rather than the more com-
mon breast. You can still
serve the dish over white
rice, but consider chang-
ing that up too by serving


it as a grinder or tossed
with-soba noodles.

SWEET-AND-SOUR
CHICKEN
Start to finish: 30 min-
utes .
Serves: 6
2 tablespoons ketchup
2 tablespoons .
Worcestershire sauce
1/4 cup brown sugar
1/4 cup cider vinegar
1/4 teasppon red pepper
flakes


4 slices bacon, cut in
1/2-inch pieces
1 pound boneless, skin-
less chicken thighs, cubed
1 red onion, sliced
1 medium carrot, juli-
enned
2 baby~bok choy, sliced
1 red bell pepper, cored
and cut into strips
6-ounce package fresh
snow pea pods
16-ounce container fresh
pineapple chunks
1 cup chicken broth
2 tablespoons corn-
starch
Salt and ground black
pepper, to taste


6'


In a small bowl, whisk
together the ketchup,
Worcestershire sauce,
brown sugar, vinegar and
red pepper flakes. Set



This April 11 p I
photo shows I
sweet and
sour chicken in
Concord, N.H. .
This dish can
be served over
white rice, but ..:
consider trying it
as a grinder or
tossed with soba ~ 7%
noodles. :


ASSOCIATED PRESS













Egg decorating:



Simple tweaks,


fun new looks


www.edwardjones.com M.eme sl-c


ASSOCIATED PREss
This undated image courtesy of Martha Stewart Living Omnimedia, Inc. shows an example of
a glitter egg from Martha Stewart Living's Egg Dyeing 101 app. There are so many ways to
color an egg, and more than one kind of egg to color.


Do you have the right investments in place to help you
meet your financial goals?
A~t Edwardl Jones, our business is to help people: findl
solutions for their long-term financial goals.

If you would like a free review of your retirement or any of your other
investments to see if they are appropriate for your long-term goals,
please call or stop by today.


LAKE CITY REPORTER ACT2! WEDNESDAY APRIL 20. 2011


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


highlight their splendid
shapes. The old standby
- rubber bands also
does the trick.
"I feel there's always
a million things you
can use," says Marcie
McGoldrick, editorial
director of Holiday &
Crafts for Martha Stewart
Living, which offers deco-
rqting ideas in its April
issue. "That's the fun part
with egg dyeing. You've
already got so much stuff
at your house that you
can use."
When working
with younger kids,
McGoldrick suggests
dyeing eggs, then allow-
ing~children to embellish
their creations with stick-
ers and markers'later


for this, promising 101
extraordinary egg-color-
ing ideas. The same ideas
are on the magazine's
website. They primar-
ily involve embellishing
white or colored hard-
boiled or blown-out eggs,
and most of the ideas
use a masking technique:
covering some part of the
egg before or after the -
initial dyeing.
For example, white or
lightly dyed eggs can be
wrapped in pretty lace, '/-
inch masking tape, or tiny
stickers,* such as office-
supply dots or stars. Even
small leaves or herbs,
such as dill or flat-leaf
parsley, can be tempo-
rar-ily applied before
dyeing, then removed to


By JENNIFER FORKER
For The Associated Press
ere are so
many ways to
color an egg,
and more than
Tone kind of egg
to color.
Much depends on the
decorators' ages, time
constraints and motiva-
tion. Do you want to try
something new and dif-
ferent this year, or fall
back 'on standard reliable
egg-dyeing kits?
Even when using an
egg-coloring kit, there
are dozens of ways to
kick the process up a
notch.
Martha Stewart Living
provides a phone app


ASSOCIATED PRESS
This undated image courtesy of Amy Gates shows a basket full of eggs dyed by Gates, of
Longmont, Colo.,. which appears on her blog, Crunchy Domestic Goddess. Gates dyes her
eggs with foods and spices. It's healthier, she maintains, and fun, like a science project.


- like the next day. This
idea works well for family
parties.
Marbleizing isn't
new, but it's an easy
way to tweak an egg.
McGoldrick calls it "fail-
proof." -You start by dye-
ing each hard-boiled egg
a single color. Then pop
up the color concentra-
tion of each dye bath and
add a tablespoon of oil,
such as olive oil, running
a fork through the color
to break up the oil and
create bubbles and swirls.
McGoldrick says.mar-
bleizing works best when
using; food coloring. For
the first dye bath, add 1
teaspoon of white vinegar
and 10 drops of food
coloring to one-half cup
of boiling water. For the
second dye bath the
one with the oil add .
another 10 drops of color
to increase its concentra-
tion. Use two different
colors with each egg.
Egg decorating isn't
only about dye baths
and eggs. Papier-mache
and wooden, craft eggs,
found at craft stores,
can be decorated more
boldly, with fu~ll-on glitter,
decoupage, spray paint,
beads and bling. More
care can be taken to
decorate these eggs, and
they last longer.
H. Camille Smith,
decorating and handmade
editor at HGTV.com, rec-
ommends letting small
children use craft eggs
"so all of their hard work
can be displayed year
after. year.


For adults, she recom-
mends decorating eggs
with self-adhesive gems,
or monogramming them
using contemporary col-
ors. She says turquoise
and violet are two trendy
colors.
(To get those colors in
a dye bath, try this: Use
. four drops of blue food
coloring and one drop of
green to make turquoise;
use equal amounts of
blue and red two drops
of each to get violet.
You may have to play
with these amounts to get
it right.)
Smith still colors eggs
with her mother every
year, but they don't get
too complicated. They dip
hard-boiled eggs in cof-
fee cups filled with dye
baths. *
"We do 'em simple; she
likes it old-school," says
Smith.
How old-school cap you
go? Amy Gates forgoes
the ubiquitous PAAS dye
tablets and store-bought
food coloring, and dyes
her eggs with foods and
spices. It's healthier, she
maintains, and fun, like a
science project.
"It's a time-intensive
thing," says Gates, 35, of
Longmont, Colo. "It takes
a few hours, but I think
it's worth it."
A mother of two, Gates
has written about her
natural egg-dyeing pro-
cess for several years
on her blog, Crunchy
Domestic Goddess. In a
nutshell, beets boiled in
cranberry juice create a


rich red; frozen cherries
go pink; turmeric equals
yellow; chili powder
turns out orange; canned
blueberries go green;
and, chopped red cabbage
conjures up a rich blue.
The best part? Clean
up.
"When you get every-
thing done, you can
throw all your dye mixes
into the compost bin if
you have one," Gates
says.
To show off your gor-
geous, hand-decorated
eggs, Smith, of HG;TV.
com, shares a couple of
show-stopper ideas:
-- On three raised cake
plates, arrange sod. (The
real stuff is available and
cheap at home-improve-
ment stores this time of
year.) Cut around it do
this outside to fit the
circumference of each
plate. Allow the dirt to
show, or cover it by nest-
ing the sod in colorful tis-
sue paper atop the cake
plates. Nestle your deco-
rated eggs in the sod.
You can even pick up a
few floral tubes those
things that hold one or
two stems with water
- and insert diminutive
flowers, such as crocus
or dwarf hyacinth, for dis-
play with the eggs.
Create a display of
nested eggs with Spanish
moss, available at craft
stores, in a low-footed
dish. Simply shape the
moss in the bowl, allow-
ing pieces to escape and
fly free, so it looks natu-
ral.


doing it and seeing that
people appreciated it, it
kind of made me think I
could still do something
to make people happy. I'm
making a difference for


"In cod iue to make
the toys as long as I can
keep going," DeRocco
.said, noting he is fight-
ing to keep one of his
hands after an accident in
November.


is donated to 'the Greater New
Orleans Community Foundation.
Another wine-to-water connection
is being made by Flying Fish, which
makes wines from grapes grown in
Washington state's Columbia Valley.
"WIe thought we'd like` to really
honor the waters that are home to
the fish that are featured on the
label," said Karmen Olson-Stevens,
brand marketing manager.
Since ~Launching in 2004, the
winery has donated a portion of
proceeds to Ocean Conservancy,
for a current total of nearly $70,000.
The money is earmarked for the
organization's annual international
coastal cleanup and last year went
to the Gulf cleanup efforts.
Other wineries are branching out
in different eco-related charitable
directions.
Pine Ridge Vineyards in the Napa
Valley has announced it will donate
$1 to American Forests for every
bottle of the chenin blanc-viognier
wine sold from April through June
to help plant up to 5,000 trees.
And Root 1, produced in Chile,
is a long-standing partner of Global
ReLeaf, a branch of American
Forests. By the end of 2011, winery
officials estimate Root 1 and Global
ReLeaf will have planted more than
40,000 trees in forest restoration
projects around the world.
Hiess Winery in the Napa Valley
takes a back-to the-land approach to


eco sips.
Every year they hold a chardon-
nay month during which 1 percent
of profits on sales of chardonnay
are donated under the 1 Percent for
the Planet environmental advocacy
program. Year-round, the winery
donates 1 percent of profis from
its Hess Small Block Series limited
selection wines.
And Hess, which is in its fourth
year of participating in the project,
recently made grants of $10,000 to
The Land Trust of Napa County and
another $10,000 to the Napa CountY
Student & Landowner Education
and Watershed Stewardship pro-
gram.
The charity-wine connection is a .
natural Mi for an industry that seeks
to connect with consumers on a per-
sonal level, Olson-Steviens notes.
S"First of all, we do it because we
care about the oceans and rivers
and we're committed to making a
change," said Olson-Stevens. "But
it also gives us a story to tell our
consumers." Wine is known for
starting conversations, and having
an environmental tie-in is one more
thing to talk about along with where
the wine came from, how it's made
and how it tastes, she said.
For Selby, raising money for envi-
ronmental causes also is a way to
cut throixgh the slightly intimidating
image that can be associated with
wine.


By MICHELLE LOCKE
For The Associated Press
Sip a pinot, save the planet?
That's the thinking behind a
number of wineries teaming up
with environmental organizations to
raise funds for trees,seas and the
land.
One of the latest releases is
Clean Coast wines, the brainchild of
California winemaker Susie Selby.
The owner of Selby Wmnery m
Healdsburg, Selby created the
wines, available online and in
Mississippi and Louisiana, with the
goal of raising awareness of the
Gulf Coast recovery effort.
"I spend a lot of time in Louisiana.
It's just a place that's near and dear
to my heart," Selby said. After the
2010 oil spil she decided she want-
ed to do something to help the area
on a long-term basis, so she came
up with Clean Coast wines-
"I'm inspired by the way the peo-
ple of New Orleans and Louisiana
choose to handle crisis. They love
each other; they make the most of
it and they frequently do it with a
great meal in front of them and a
glass of wine in their hand," she
said.
The four wines pinot noir, '
chardonnay, cabernet sauvignon
and merlot carry labels decorat-
ed~with marine creatures. Four dol-
lars from every bottle sold online


Steve Jones, CFPQ
Financial Advisor

2929 West U S Highway 90
Suite 114
Lake City, FL 32055
386-752-3847


Eco-conscious vinters



TRise H10 ey fo Y treeS, SeRS


TOYMAKER: Creating

Continued From Page 1D












Rebuilding Resorts casino hard, expensive


aILi~ll~








a a~r~il~il


-r
'r: ~II
i; -- -. -- --
__ __.__


_ I__:_ ~_____


LAKE CITY REPORTER ACT2! WEDNESDAY 20. 2011


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


won't say how many they
have in total; that's infor-
mation that casinos tend to
closely guard for competi-
tive reasons.
Resorts also is remodel-
ing 480 rooms in its Ocean
Tower. That's something
Jake Brown of Alexandria,
Va. feels is badly needed.
"Our room looks kind
of old," he said during a
recent visit. "The bath-
room, especially. Old tiles,
old tub. And the mattress
is kind of hard, too."
But Garth Troescher of
Bethany Beach, Del. liked
his room.
"The price is right and
the room was nice," he
said. "I like when dealers
talk to you a lot, They do
that here."
The promotions are
working, even as they
deplete the casino's
budget. Resorts posted
Atlantic City's biggest
increase in casino revenue
in February, up 16.5 per-
cent from a year earlier,
and March, up 11.6 per-
cent. Of course, some of
that is due to having such
a poor starting point in
2010. And much of the rest
is due to the bargain-hunt-
ing nature of the Atlantic
City casino customer, who
wants the most comps and
the lowest prices, and will
abandon any place that
doesn't deliver.
Many other Atlantic City;
casinos have given up on
this approach, deciding
it's simply too expensive
to shower low-rollers with
free food and drink, hotel
rooms, show tickets or
cash. Bob Griffin, CEO
of Trump Entertainment
Resorts, calls it "over-
incentivizing our custom-
ers."
Gomes is well-aware of
this. He also realizes that
at some point, Resorts will
need to raise its prices to
a level where it can make
a profit. The trick is to do
that without losing the cus-
tomer base it has worked
so hard to regain.
"Acquiring lost business
is a lot more expensive
than just maintaining your
existing customer base,"
he said. "Once you get the
people back, then you look
to see where you're inef-
~ficient. It's a stressful and
~frustrating experience, but
it's something you have
to go through. If people
like what they experience,
they'll keep coming back."


By WAYNE PARRY
Associated Press
ATIANTIC CITY, N.J.
-- In Resorts Casino
Hotel's Superstar Theater,
a rotating disco ball bathed
the crowd of middle-aged
women and senior citizens
in dazzling shards of light
as David Cassidy sang the
Partridge Family hit "I
Think I Imve You."
Around the corner
at the buffet, a simu-
lated flash mob dressed as
casino workers suddenly
appeared, dancing around
-- and sometimes on -
diners' tables while sing-
ing OutKastls "Hey Ya!"
These events marked
two extremes of an effort
aimed at the same goal:
to wKin back business at
the nation's first casino to
open outside Nevada, one
that came within days of
closing last winter.
Rebuilding Resorts is
proving to be a difficult,
expensive proposition,
even as it shows initial
signs of success. The
casino is handing out wadS
of cash to new customers,
its hotel rooms are cheap-
er than discount motels
during the week, and it's
entangled in lawsuits with
the former owners, a util-
ity company who briefly
cut off heat and air condi-
tioning over a half-million-
dollar unpaid bil from, the
old owners, and several
cocktail servers who were
fired after it was deter-
mined they didn't look
sexy enough in revealing
new costumes Resorts is
making them wear.
"It's a great thing to
bring additional business
in, but you can see how
costly it is for us," said
Dennis Gomes, the vet-
eran casino executive who
bought Resorts with New
York real estate magnate
Morris Bailey. "The ben-
efit is for the long term.
Believe me, it's stressful."
Bottom line: the casino
is still losing money, just
not as much as before.
Gomnes predicts Resorts
could turn its fist monthly
profit under his manage-
ment in July, and expects
to break even for the year.
When it opened its
doors on May 26, 1978,
Resorts became the
nation's first casino outside
Nevada. For years, it was
fantastically profitable.
But as more and more
casinos opened in Atlantic
City there are now 11
- Resorts' share of the
market fell. By the time
casinos started opening in
the Philadelphia suburbs
in late 2006, Resorts was
already in a steep decline,
an afterthought for all
but the bus-riding senior
citizen slots player that
remains its typical cus-
tomer.
Gomes has a long career
in the casino industry,
with management jobs at
the Tropicana Casino and
resort (where he famously
made a tic-tac-toe-playing


ASSOCIATED PRESS
The entrance at Resorts Casino Hotel is seen April 13 in Atlantic City, N.J. Efforts are being made to win back business at the
nation's first casino to open outside Nevada, one that came within days of closing last winter. New owners bought it for a song
in December, and now face the daunting task of rebuilding business in a place that had been abandoned by many of its best
customers.


promotional spigots full-
blast. It drove gamblers to
the casino and back from
New York City and Long
Island in luxury mini-
buses for $5. Hotel rooms
went for $29 on weekdays
During the winter: The
casino gave away 150 free
rooms to Philadelphia
Phillies fans at a parking
lot tailgate party before
the team's season opener.
In keeping with the
1920s theme, Resorts
prices its buffet at $19.20
seven days a week, includ-
ing all-you-can-eat king
crab legs and shrimp that ~
still make Gomes cringe
when he sees customers
loading up their plates.
And one of the casino's
restaurants offers a full
steak dinner for $2.99 after
11 p.m. -- a meal that goes
for $20 or more at other '
casinos. .
One of the most suc-
cessful promotions is
also one of the costliest:
Resorts will reimburse
the first $100 of gambling
losses for new club card
members on their first
visit. Gomes says the
casino is adding 1,000 new
card members a day, but


chicken into a top draw),
Trump Taj Mahal Casino
and Resort, the Golden
Nugget in Las Vegas, and
Hilton Nevada's proper-
ties. And his tenure as
Nevada's top casino cor-
ruption investigator was
chronicled in the 1995
Martin Scorsese flm
"Casino."
So when Resorts'
previous owners, the .
Los Angeles hedge fund
Colony Capital LLC
stopped paying their
mortgage and turned the
casino's keys over to their
lenders in 2009, Gomes
saw an opportunity where
others saw a money pit
caught in a death spiral.
He and Bailey, who had
tried to open a casino
in Pennsylvania, bought
Resorts for $31.5 million, a
fraction of the $140 million
Colony paid for it in 2001.
The first thing he did
was slash expenses, most-
ly payroll. The 2,000 work-
ers on the payroll were all
made to re-apply for their
jobs. Ultimately, more
than 200 were laid off, and
nearly 500 others had their
pay slashed by as much as
52 percent,
When Gomes took
over, it soon became clear
just how far things had '
fallen at Resorts. The
casino's revenue from slot
machines and table games
was down 19 percent since
the beginning of the year;
it was taking in less than
$436,000 a day, compared
with $538,000 a day a year
earlier, ranking it 10th out
of Atlantic City's 11 casi-
nos.
Resorts posted a gross
operating loss of $18.5 mil-
lion last year, a worsening
of nearly 41 percent from
2009. .


"It was like a ghost
town," Gomes said. "On
a Friday night, there was
nobody in this place. On
a Saturday, it looked like
what you would see on
a weekday. It was totally
depressing. I thought,
'How the hell am I gonna
fill this place up?"'"
The fist step was
dreaming up a new identi-
ty for Resorts, taking what
was widely considered a
liability the building is
90 years old and smaller
than the most successful
casinos and trying to
turn it into a plus. Gomes
and his staff rebranded
Resorts in a roaring '20s
theme, in part to capitalize
on the success of the hit
H~BO series "Boardwalk
Empire" about Prohibition-
era Atlantic City. Because
the place was built in the
1920s, it didn't need a
makeover to fit in perfectly
with the new theme: the
marble floors and polished
brass fixtures are luxuri-
ous reminders of that
bygone era.
A strolling violinist
was hired to serenade
customers as they walk
through the lobby, and a
stilt-walker in a giant zoot
suit reaches way down to
shake hands and pose for
pictures with bemused
visitors. Blanche Morro,
known as "The Singing
Bartender," mixes drinks
while belting out requests.
But the roaring '20s
theme bought Gomes
trouble when it came to
the revealing flapper cos-
tumes that the cocktail
waitresses soon must
wear.
Fifteen female servers
were fied after a mod-
eling agency hired by
Resorts determined they


did not look sexy enough
in the new outfits, and sev-
eral of them sued, claiming
age and sex discrimina-
tion. One of them claimed
having to strip almost
naked in front of female
co-workers and squeeze
into an ill-fitting costume
for the audition "'was the
most embarrassing thing
I've ever had to do."
Gomes said the cos-
tumes are an indispens-
able part of Resorts' itew
image.
"~We tell the employ-
ees it's like you're actors
and actresses; you're
performers and you've
got to be onstage, help-
ing customers feel like
they've stepped back into
the 1920s," he said. "If you
took a survey, probably
70 percent would say this
was done fairly, and that it
should be the right of any
business to try to maxi-
mize their profits. The fact
that we offered (waitresses
deemed unattractive in the
new costumes) other jobs
shows we were fair."
The next order of busi-
'ness was getting more
bodies through the door,
and Resorts opened the


cO :'; f'l r:
,I


trll ;I


Ib ;tlv iwmr ~iir7 jlUUid~


The services we offer include:
5 lld Nursing~ Phsicallherapy


OMlNI Home Care Was


Lake City
to37 US Highway 90W, Suite r40
Lake City, FL 32055


386-754-6671
License# H HA299991704


i


CHOOSE OMN1 HOME CARE .

OMNI is a leading provider of exceptional care and service in the
privacy & comfort of your own home. 9Ve hire only the very best
licensed or certified professionals. We also conduct t he most
extensive background screenings on all of our staff to ensure
your trust and safety at home.


80891,#9 $18)t