<%BANNER%>

UFPKY NEH LSTA



The Lake City reporter
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS MAP IT! PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01531
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 4/17/2011
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
System ID: UF00028308:01531
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text

SWanee Fest sees 30,000 rock the Spirit ... 2A


I


Ill~~i


TOAY8
rM2 ~ l


ANTONIA ROBINSONltake City Reporter
Unleaded gasoline prices in Lake City this weekend ranged
between $3.73 and $3.89 per gallon depending on location in
the city. Five states are reporting average gas prices above
$4 per gallon.


Vol. 136, No..72 $1.00


www.Iakecityreporter.com


Prices creeping
up across the
co~untry.
By CHRIS ~KAHN .
AP Energy Writer
NEW YORK--- The aver-
age price of gasoline is now
above $4 per gallon in five
states, and it could rise
to that level in New York
and Tiashington, D.C., by
today. -


regular cost an average of
$3.979 in New York and
$3.9'99 in Washington.
The rapid increase at.
the pump follows a parallel
rise in oil. Oil, which has
been rising slowly since
2009, gained momentum
- as the Libyan rebellion
effectively shut down its
exports. Crude has jumped
28 percent since the upris-
ing began in the middle of
February.


In portions of Alachua
County, gas was reported
selling at $4.03 this week-
end. In Lake City, gas prices
ranged from $3.73. to $3.89
as of Saturday afternoon
For American drivers, the
$4 mark is a grity~ reminder
of tougher time's, The -last
time gas prices were that
high was in the summer
of 2008, just before the
economy went into a tail-
spin. Retail surveys. sug-


gest motorists are reacting
to higher prices now by
buying less fuel, yet the
government.exrpects pump
prices to keep climbing this
summr.
The national average has
increased for 24 straight
days, hitting $3.82 per gal-
lon on Friday. Motorists
in Connecticut, Illinois,
California, Hawaii and
Alaska nowi pay more than
$4 per gallon. A gallon of


Local kids ~take

aiplne reidoe .
By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson~lakecityreporter.com'
Goingr on her first air-
plane ride'wads a unique
experience for Simne Ells,
9, of Lake City.
Ellis and more than 70
Other students participated
in the Young Eagles Day
Saturday at Cannon Creek
Airpark. The program. con-
tinues from 1-3 p.m. today
for students ages 8-17.
"I liked it," Ellis said. "We
saw lakes that looked really
big ifi the plane." ,
The Experimen~tal
Aircraft Association Chapter
977 has hosted the event
since 1996, said Elaine
Phillips, event organizer.
The Young Eagles Program
was designed to introduce
children to aviation.
"I didn't get to fly in a
plane as a child," she said.
Each year Young Eagles
Day takes children in the
community on a free ~air-
plane ride.
The seven different pilots
took children up for about
EAGLES continued on 3jA


~ANTONIA ROBINSON/Lake City Reporter
Jack Wells (left) and other Experimental Aircraft Association Chapter 977 members from Lake City help Sara Ellis, 16,
and Simone Ellis, 9, off an airplane as Sasha Ellis, (far right} 10, looks on. The three girls went for a free airplane ride
Satun;Iay courtesy of the club as part of the Young Eagles program.


lished a March of Ijimes campaign to
raise money for a cure to polio. People


House


flushes


septic


Sys tem



Bill repealed
by 110-3 vote;
Senate to review.

Associated Press

STALIAHASSEE The
Florida House has voted to
repeal a requirement for
Septic tank inspections that
was passed last year.
The repealer bill (HB 13)
wvas .approved over whelm-
ingly by a vote of 110-3 on
Friday. It now goes to the
Senate for consideration.
State Rep. Marti Coley
is the bill's sponsoP: The
Marianna Republican~. said
the requirement was, intru-
sive anid became a burden
on lower-income homeown-
ers.
DemocraticRep. Michelle
Rehwink~el Vasilinda of
Tallahassee 'was one of
only three lawmakers to
vote against the bill. She
told the chamber that the
requirement protected
underground springs from
lekn tns
Elections overhaul
Another legislative action
wrapping up the week on
Friday, a Senate committee
has approved an elections
law overhaul opposed by
county elections supervi-
sors and public-interest
groups.
The Senate Rules
Committee passed the bil
(SB 2086) on Friday by a
vote of 10-2. The Senate bill
next goes to the Budget
committee.
The measure would
shorten the time for early
voting and require third-
party voter-registration
groups to register with the
state.
It would also prohibit
voters from updating their
address at the polling
place.


ANTONIA ROBINSON/Lake City Reporter
Hundreds of walkers turned out in downtown Lake City
Saturday morning to support the March of Dimes March for
Babies fundraising and awareness event. This year's
fundraising goal was $90,000.


MARCH continuedon 3A


TODAY IN
BUSINESS
'.Aei;stsidje Elern


(3s 7 21293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400


Obituaries ...
Life .......
Sports....... .


COMING
TUESDAY
School ne.15
and e.enltsI


~1.;'I .';r-*I..11~~~3 ~~?~~: -1.' ir~~p;)~'t7L~F~XEi(


Folk Festival
Homecoming
John Anderson,
Billy Dean to headline.
i.OCal NOWS, 5A


-- Second At
state Iviet
CHS weightlifter
,}'~~''76 120511 ****3-DI IT gg-
FLORIDA HISTORY
U~S SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-1943


o;axw IA


lt


Reporter


aday,April 17, 201 I


Gas pains hit as $4 looms


Flying high to help children

Young Eagles prograrn shares magic of flight


March for babies walk

draws hundreds to help
Annual event set out sent in numerous dimes to the White
withgoalto riseHouse during the Great Depression, and
Withgoalto risethe disease was cured.
$90,000 for research. The organization shifted its focus to
premature births and othei* birth defects
By ANTONIA ROBINSON after curing polio. Research shows one
arobinson@lakecityreporter. com out of eight babies are born premature.
The walk's goal was to raise $90,000,
The weather was just right for Terri which it will likely reach, said Betsy
Garrett of Lake City to continue her Trenlt, March of Dimes of Northeast
tradition of participating in the March of Florida executive director.
Dimes walk. "Thls has just been an outstanding
"I started in school and did it ever event," she said.
since," she said. "It's to help save the The purpose of the walk is to raise
babies. It's a good cause." money and awareness to help all babies
Garrett was among the estimated 300 be born healthy and full-term, Trent
people attending the annual Suwannee said. Each year the Lake City community
Valley March of Dimes walk Saturday in supports the walk.
Olustee Park. "They've done a good job this year,"
President Franklin D. Roosevelt estab- she said. -


I~~ ir


9 I 6 4
IO 4St y sunny
WEATHER, 8A
















Friday: Friday: Saturday: Saturday: Saturday: Saturday:
2-5-9-31 4 13-16-18-26-33 Afternoon: 8-8-4 Afternoon: 3-1-4-9 1-8-15-32-40-43 4-23-39-49-50 PB 39
Evening: 4-4-7 Evening: 8-6-1-7


AROUND FLORIDA


Brandon Finley/ Lake City Reporter


: Copsrm sica
Hammer (pahn HAH'-mur) is 63.
Actress Olivia Hussey is 60.
Actor Clarke Peters is 59.
Rock singer-musician Pete Shel-
ley'(Buzzcocks) is 56.
Actor Sean Bean is 52. :
Rock singer Maynard James
Keenan is 47.


Daily Scripture


"Let no debt remain outstand-
ing, except the continuing debt
to love one another, for whoev-
er loves others has fulfilled the


Romans 13:8


COR RE ACTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion,
please call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifica-
tions will run in this space. And thanks for reading.


0419


porter
a.m.
r'7:30
rtany
should
a ser-
After
r ser-
!livery
r ser-

5445


!6.32
48.79
83.46

41.40
82.80
79.40


LAKE CITY REPORTER SU NDAY RE PORT SUNDAY, APRIL 17, 2011


Page Editor: Josh Blackmon, 754-0427


Spirit of the Suwannee
Music Park Marketing
Director Teena Peavey.
"W~e sold tickets in
all 50 states," she said.
"I probably won't have
the official numbers
until after the weekend,
but I'd estimate we had
33,000 people."
The festival has
begun to attract a
larger crowd looking to
beat the summer heat
that accompanies; many
festivals in other parts
of the country.
"It's not as hot, and
it's not in a field,"
Peavey said. "Everyone
loves the venue and
Nature setting. For
those that choose not to
stay, the town is close
and they can stay in a
hotel without having to
drive far."
The atmosphere,
while large, is still
significantly smaller
than some of the
nation's oldest festival,
which attracted one
Tallahassee couple to
make the trip to Live
Oak instead of across
the country.
"I like that it's a
smaller festival,"
Stewart Little said. -
"Everyone's friendly
and like family. It's a
different kind of atti-
tude here."
Wanee also brought .


in dozens of
vendors. Phil
Kutno set up .
shop to sell
original and
duplicated art.
The highlight.
- of Wanee for
him was meet-
ing Robert
Plant, who
walked in his
tent shop to
look at paint-
ings. While
it's a job,
Kutno admitted that
the idea of working to
the background of Led
Zeppelin tunes was one
of the perks that keeps
him going.
"I've been doing this
for over 23 years and
been to all the major
festivals," he said.
In the end, it's all
about the music and
that's what brings peo-
ple together.
"Widespread Panic
probably brought five
thousand people alone,"
Peavey said. "When
people found out that
Robert Plant was
going to be here, they
wanted to hear some
Led Zeppelin and they
got a chance to hear
that Friday. Then the
Steve Miller Band has a
following of its own as
well."


By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityr~eporter.com

LIVE OAK
crowd of
more than
30,000 peo-
ple flocked
Ato the
Wanee Music Festival
at the Spirit of the
Suwannee Music Park
this weekend to hear
Widespread Panic,
the Steve Miller Band,
Led Zeppelin's Robert
Plant and the festival's
mainstay group,
Southern rock legend
The Allman Brothers
Band.
These big name acts
headlined the three-day
event that concluded
early Sunday and fea-
tured about 50 other
bands known only to
jam band and indie
music fans. Music was
performed throughout
the park in locales with
such names as the
Mushroom Stage and
the Peach Stage.
The Allman Brothers
Band closed out the
music sets on both
Friday and Saturday
night with three-hour
performances on the
main stage.
The festival con-
tinued to grow this
year, according to


ctress Lela Rochon (LEE'-lah
rohn-SHAHN') is 47.
Actor William Mapother is 46.
Actress Leslie Bega is 44.
Actress Kimberly Elise is 44.
M Singer Liz Phair is 44.
Rapper-actor Redman is 41.
Actress Jennifer Garner is 39.
Country musician Craig
Anderson (Heartland) is 38.


NEW ORLEANS
ctor Nicolas Cage was
arrested, after he got
drunk mn the city's
French Quarter and
Argued in the street
with his wife over whether a house
they were in front of was theirs,
police said Saturday.
Police said in a press release
Saturday that Cage was' arrested
the previous evening. Police said
the couple was in front of a home
that Cage insisted they were rent-
ing. She said it wasn't theirs, and
Cage then grabbed her arm.
The release said Cage started hit-
ting vehicles and tried to get into
a taxi. A police officer saw that
Cage was drunk and told him
to get out of the cab. Cage then
satedt ellins ba ethe offkr.
on charges of domestic abuse
battery, disturbing the peace
and public drunkenness. He
remained mn the Orleans Parish
Prison on Saturday afternoon.' A
judge set his bond at $11,000.
Representatives for Cage could
not immediately be reached
Saturday.
Cage has been a frequent visitor
to New Orleans, where he has
owned property and shot mov-
ies in the past. He has also had
financial troubles, despite being
one of the highest-paid stars in
Hollywood
He had been behind on taxes and
has said he's had to sell numer-
ous assets because of his financ-
es. He sued his former business
manager in October 2009 for $20
million, claiming the man's advice
led him to financial ruin.
Cage won an Academy Award
for his performance in 1995's
"Leaving Las Vegas."

Martha Stewart touts hard
work at NY commencement

HYDE PARK, N.Y. -
Martha Stewart tells graduates
from a New York culinary school


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Jan. 4, 2011 file photo, actor Nicolas Cage attends the premiere of "Season
Of The Witch" in New York. Authorities say Cage has been arrested in New
Orleans on charges of domestic abuse battery aritl disturbing the peace.


that the keys to success are gen-
erosity, passion and hard work.
The homemaking maven gave
the commencement address
Friday at the Culinary Institute of
America in Hyde Park.
The institute gave the 69-year-old
Stewart an award called Master
of Aesthetics of Gastronomy,
along with an official chef's
jac et.


She told students that many peo-
ple don't know how much hard
work it takes to build a business'
but that any good idea is only aS
good as the effort behind it.
About 80 graduates received
degrees in baking, pastry and
culinary arts. Hyde Park is about
90 miles north of New York City.
aAssociated Press


Allmans, Robert


Plant light up


Wanee M~usic Fest


R
'
i''ifirthda


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS


Actor Nicolas Cage arrested mn New Orleans


Lakee City Reporter
HOW TO REACH US BUSINESS
Main number ........(386)752-1 293 Controller Sue Brannon....754-I
Fax number ............. .752-9400 (srno laeyeptrcm
Circulation .............. .755-5445
online ... www.Iakecityreporterccom CIRCULATION
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of Home delivery of the Lake City Rel
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub- should be completed by 6:30
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180 Tuesday through Saturday, and by
E. Dv st.tagakendCit, .CTa. m on55 ~,, Sunday.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and Please call 386-755-5445 to,repor
The Associated Press. problems with your delivery service
All material herein is property of the Lake In Columbia County, customers s
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or call before 10:30 a.m. to report ~
in part is forbidden without the permis- 'vice error for same day re-delivery
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service 10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery o
No. 310-880. vice related credits will be issued.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes In all other counties where home de
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709; is available, next day re-delivery o
bae Ci r, Fad o 35...7401 vice related credits will be issued.
(twilson@ lakecityreporter.com) Circulation ...............755-
NES( iculation@lakec tyeportercom)
Assistant Editor CJ Risak..754-0427 (Tuesday through Sunday)
After 1:00 p.m. 12 Weeks. ................. $2
(crisak@lakecityreporter.com) 24 Weeks. . ... ... . .. ... .. $4
52 Weeks. ......... ........ $E
ADVERTISING Rates include 7%bsales tax.
Diretor Ashley Bcher ...754-0417 2ai ae $
CLASSIFIED 24 Weeks. ......... $I
To place classified ad, cali 755-5440. 52 Weeks..................$1i





I -


.~t -.-



. -
ANTONIA ROBINSON/Lake City Reporter
More than 70 children ages 8-17 came out for free airplane rides as part of the Young Eagles
Day Saturday at Cannon Creek Airpark. The event was hosted by the. Experimental Aircraft
Association Chapter 977 of Lake City.



EAGLES: Kids get chance to fly
Continued fiom 1A


state's constitution, expands
the Supreme Court from
seven to 10 members and
splits them evenly into sey
arate divisions for criminal
and civil appeals.
Its Republican backers
said the changes will allow
for judicial specialization to
move cases faster and will
promote transparency in
the selection of judges and
justices.
It also requires that the
three more senior justices
--Bar-bara Pariente, R Fred
Lewis and Peggy A. Quince
- go to the criminal bench
to use their expertise on
death-penalty appeals. They
happen to be appointees of
the late Lawton Chiles, a
Democratic governor.


MARCH: Hundreds participate
Continued from 1A


Trump sounds like can-didate


- I ~Sl~l


O B/YN
DAANA GR EENE MD
WOMEN'S HEALTH WITH A WOMAN'S TOUCH


I I - I I I J~aL i


Call IL~a~Ps~ _I I I I IIIIBFIGiPi~





Page Editor: Todd Wilson, 754-0418


Demiocrats havc laini-
basted that p~art oi the~ bill
as "court packilng. s
ing Republican G;ov. Rick:!
Scott will get to fi11 thle civiil
bench with his p~icksi. They(!
fear GOP-friendly juirists
will sway impor-tan~t bus!i-
ness and social-poicy~! causes
ending up in the civlil diivi-
sion, including any~ political
redistricting challenges.
Republicans saidl criti-
cism of the plan, wYhich~
now goes to the SenIate.
was "hyperbole."
Minority Leader Ron
Saunders, a Flor-ida Kecys
Democrat, askedl if the leg-
islature would be pushing
the high-court changes hadl
Democrat Alex; Sinki won
the last governor-'s ra~~c.


By JAMES L. ROSICA
Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE In
a far-reaching exercise of
power by one branch of
government over anoth-
er, the Republican-con-
trolled Florida House of
Representatives passed a
sweeping overhaul of the
state's courts system on
Friday.
House members passed
the main legislation (HJR
7111) by a party-line vote of
79-38 and approved the bill
(HB 7199} that implements
it, 78-37. Related bills also
passed easily, all backed by
Speaker Dean Cannon.
The legislation, which
requires changing the

BELK.COM


vous while her son rode in
the helicopter, but it was
great for him.
"He had a blast," she
said.
"He's daring. I've tiever
been in a plane."
The chapter should host
the event more than once
a year, said Olivia Jackson
of Lake City.
"I think it's wonderful,"
she said. "It's exciting to
me."


25 minutes on Saturday,
Phillips said. -
The children then
received certificate declar-
ing them a Young Eagle
and a log book to fill out.
The event also featured
static displays of aircraft
for students to learn about
the different parts, she
said. -
Cars and houses looked
small to Ethan Parrish, 9,
of Lake City. He rode in


his first helicopter during
the day.
"It was awesome," he
said.
Not only can children
ride in an aircraft, but they
learn about a possible
future in aviation during the
day, said Barbara Benton,
Parrish's mother.
"I think it's really neat
they do this program for
the kids," she said.
Benton was a little ner-


~c I


Eva Sheppard of Lake
City was happy to be a part
of the walk.
"I do it every year to
show support," she said.
'"The babies need help. It's
for the babies."
Groups set up spirit sta-
tions along the six miles of
the walk.
His business, John Kasak
State Farm Insurance, was
the final check point for
walkers as they finished
their journey, said -John
Kasak.
The group has participat-
ed in the walk for 10 years
in Lake City.
The station provided
water, candy, pens and more


ANTONIA ROBINSON/Lake City Reporter
Hundreds turned out to help raise awareness and funds for
the March of Dimes walk in Lake City Saturday morning.
to walkers and cheered Kasak said.
them. "I'm glad to see so many
The walk each year helps people support it," he said.
people recognize some "It was awesome."
children have birth defects,


Fo~llow u1S Gr. TwltTljr j
rlytter corn/BelkFjhash rduZZ


he'd have serve as diplo-
mats and said he was look-
ing forward to releasing his
financial disclosures.
"Most very successful
people, the kind of people
that we need running our
country, don't want to be
scrutinized and abused,"
he said. "T~his is the kind
of person that this country
must have right now."
He derided President
Barack Obama, calling him
the' worst to occupy the
White House in history. He
again questioned whether
the president was born in
the U.S., even though the
fact has been affirmed by
officials in Hawaii, where
Obama was born. And he
maligned China, saying the
U.S. should take control


of Iraqi oil and described
American infrastructure aS
third world.
Trump ticked through a
number of issues seen as
bedrocks for conservative
candidates, saying he is
anti-abortion, against gun
control and wants to repeal
Obama's health care law
as quickly as possible.


S Fired ul .:.n Faeb~ook
-- -.0 13.:@0. .srr., Ik


By MATT SEDENSKY
Associated Press

BO CA RATON -
Sounding increasingly like
a candidate, Donald Trump
repeatedly told a raucous
tea party crowd Saturday
he has the qualities needed
in the White House and the
conservative ideals neces-
sary to seal the Republican
nomination should he
decide to run.
Trump struck familiar
themes and talked about
his own business acumen
in his speech to hundreds
gathered at a park here,
where his name festooned
signs, buttons and T-shirts
of supporters. The real
estate mogul even talked
about the type of people


'ng.. we r- ': '. ''
0 1I f I .L I l l s


if you're 55 or older, take an extra 20% off storewide, or 15% off in our home & shoes departments wit'h your Belk Rewards Card, 15% off sto rye do, 10%I
of In our noee& shooenu epartmertsdwithanye oher oarn paynant, on your sae pudrichases.te Ol ex ludes Reh Dot. I arnce Eri ri I ~tl
Fragrances, Casio, Coach, Dansko, designer sunglasses, Donna Karan/DKNY, Ed Hardy, Eileen Fisher, Free People, Ice-Watch. Lacoste, iLucky Ladite~
Designer & Contemporary Sportswear & Dresses, St. John, Stuart Weitzman, Citizens of Humanity, Cole Haan, Columbia, Oonald J Ph ner. Docrney C;
Bourke, Ferragamo, Furla, JoetB Jeans, Juicy Couture, Kate Spade, Keen, Vineyard Vines, Joseph Abboud, Hanky Panky, Herend. Hugjo Boss, Hickey
Freeman, Hart Schaffner Marx, Austin Reed, Levi's, Dockers, Lilly Pulitzer, Mattel, Merrell, Munro, Nautica, Ralph Lauren/Polo. Seven, For All Malnkindl.
Spanx, Thomas Dean, Tommy Bahama, Ugg, Wacoal; Ladies', Kids' and Men's Designer Shoes, Designer Handbags, Kitchen/novelty electlics!c lfee, Le
creuset, FineJewelrywatches, gifts, trunk shows and service plans; non-merchandisedepts.. lease depts. and Belk gift ca-ds Not vaid onp ir or p in.Hajr
or special orders. Cannot be redeemed for cash, credit or refund, used in combination with any other discount or coupon offer Valid ApirI 19. 2011
RED DOT: 'Limited exclusions In Brighton, designer handbags and Junior denim. Juniors total savings are 60-80% off. Fash on Acc-,,rl
Handbags, Small Leather Goods, Hosiery and Men's Tailored Clothing total savings are 55-70%. COUPONS NOT VAL]D ON RED DOT


_Ti


CITY COUNCIL MEETING


THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF LAKE CITY, FLOOR HtIDA
WILL MEET ON MON\DAY, APRIL 18, 2011 AT 7:00 P.M IN THEF
COUNCIL CHAMBERS LOCATED ON THE SECOND FLOOCR O`~F
CITY HALL AT 205 NORTH MARION AVENUE, LAKE CITY,~
FLORIDA


IB

'.tl

i:
B
1;
i : 1
,,


"~::T
L-it


Pi
I
I


SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS: If you require special aid or services for any of' the mee~ting
identihied above, as addressed mn the American Disabilities Act, please contact the` Chil
~l~i~ll er's Off`ice at (386) 719)-5768.

AUDREY E SlKES
City Clerk


SPECIALIZING IN:
m Non-invasive Laparoscopic
Gynecological Surgery
a Adolescent Gynecology
m High and Low Risk Obstetrics
Contraception
m Delivering at Shands take Shore


LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE SUNDAY. APRIL 17, 2011


Courts to see sweeping change


MODERN. SOUTHERN. STYLE.


jSt in t 171 fO r Ea stern

JSno .


WORKSHOP MEETING
CITY OF LAKE CITY-CITY COUNCIL

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City Council for the City of Lake City, Flonida w-ill
hold a workshop meeting on~ Monday, April 18, 2011. The meeting is schecduled- forl 6:00(
p.m. at City Hall, 205 North Marion Street, Lake City, Florida.

THE PURPOSE OF THE MkEETIN\G IS TO DISCUSS THE FOLLOWING, ITE M-:i%


1. Public Works Infrastructure Project

All interested per-sons are invited to attend. No official action will be taken dur-ing this
meetmg.o


Ne ate t eloe





persPotinasWl aoimen:

386-75 5-0500
449 sE ayo Drive
Lake City. Floricia 32025
www. dainagreenemd. com





De oyMurdock
deroy.murdock@gmail.com

company's $11 billion in
accounting fabrications. Such
graft transformed Bernard
Ebbers from WorldCom's
CEO into federal prisoner No.
56022-054. He is at Oakidale
Penitentiary in Louisiana,
skiingg 25 fve~ars for fraud.
,con'spiracy,-eand~.iling false
statements.
Meanwhile, Democrats
and Republicans maintain
a misallocation-of-funds
conspiracy within a Ponzi
scheme called Social Security
In 2009, Heritage Foundation
analyst David John reports,
Social Security received $689.1
billion in payroll-tax revenues. It
paid beneficiaries $685.8 billion,
leaving a $3.3 billion surplus.
The Treasury took this
$3.3 billion and placed a
non-negotiable Special Issue
Treasury Note of equal nominal
value into the Social Security
Trust Fund. These self-IO~s
(literally stored in a filing
cabinet in Parkersburg, W. Va.),
obligate future congresses to
tax or borrow money to pay
these retiree-benefit bonds
decades hence.
Congress then spent this
$3.3 billion on everything from
ethanol to education to the EPA.
Such chicanery smacks of
embezzlement under Section
664 of the Employee Retirement
Income Security Act (ERISA).
On March 9, a federal appeals
court endorsed the convictions
of executives Sigmund Eriksen
and Raymond Eriksen, as Judge
Milan D. Smith, Jr.'s opinion
states, "stemming from their
misappropriation of employee
401(k contributions to pay their
company's operating expenses."


4A


www.Iakecityreporter.com


Betsy Hart
-esslo~o


Staffers at Lunde Electric
Company, a now-sunk Seattle
maritime electrical-repair firm,
eventually were made whole.
Nonetheless, this father and son
each must endure two years
of probation, a $20,000 fine,
and 240 hours of community
service.
The Securities and Exchange
Commission and Section
448 of the Internal Revenue
Code require that nearly all.
companies with revenues
exceeding $5 million use
accrual accounting to reflect
current finances and long-
term liabilities. Despite being
elephaninfre, the federal
government instead employs
cash-basis accounting as do
dry cleaners and shoe-repair
shops.
"Since cash-basis accounting
ignores government obligations
to spend money in the future, it
gives a disastrously incomplete
and inaccurate picture of
where the government really
stands," wrote CPA and former
Republican Congressman '
Joseph DioGuardi in his book,
"Unaccountable Congress."
Similarly, the Code of
Federal Regulations features
this Securities and Exchange .
Commission rule: "Financial
statements filed with the
Commission which aire not
prepared in accordance with
generally accepted accounting
principles will be presumed to
be misleading or inaccurate."
Thus, if presented by a private
company, Uncle Sam's books
would be considered dodgy, if
not cooked. '
As Washington struggles
to cap a giant geyser of red
ink, it should stop practicing
accounting that, in
business, would be considered
criminal.

SNew York commentator
I) otyhMurd cpksisHa co ns
Service and a media fellow with
the Hoover Institution on War,
Revolution and Peace at Stanford
University.


suddenly morphed into
Samuel Smith, CEO of
Federal Enterprises, Inc.,
a conglomerate with 2.8
million employees in 2009, $2.2
trillion in revenues in 2010,
and a proposed budget of $3.7
trillion for 2012. If this private
company were run the way
Washington works, newspaper
headlines soon would scream:
"MR SMITH GOES TO
ATTICA."
Washington's routine
accounting methods would
trigger indictments against
similarly behaved business
executives. In fact, people have
1)een con~ietedl for operatirg as
Washiingon hiaser decades;a~ ;r
Consider Democrats'
mishandling of $500 billion in
Medicare funds.
Rep. John Shimkus, R RI.,
grilled Health and Human
Services Secretary Kathleen
Sibelius about this at a March 3
Capitol Hill hearing.
"Your law cuts $500 billion in
Medicare," Shimkus reminded
Sebelius.. "Then yoff're also
using the same $500 billion to
say you're funding health care
(reform). Your own actuary says
you can't do both."
"So," Shimkus continued, "are
you using it to save Medicare,
or are you using it to fund
health-care reform? Which
one?"
Secretary Sebelitis confessed:
"Both." -
"So, you're double-counting,"
Shimkus replied.
"The same dollar can't be
used twice," observed Rep. Joe
Pitts, R Pa. "This is the largest
of the many budget gimmicks
Democrats used to claim
ObamaCare would reduce the
deficitt"
As any college business major
knows, such double counting
would earn it big, fat F on an
accounting fixial. Far worse, this
is illegal.
This Medicare flim-flam
parallels WorldCom's double
counting of revenues, among
the defunct telecommunications


OUR
OPINION




Repeal


goo

news to


many


he For spid a Hus

inspection
bil was good news
to many in North Florida
and throughout the state on
Friday.
The Senate still must decide
itstthought on the legislation,
se'cond-thought momentum
will carry down the hall and
int lheother chamber of the
After~ public outcry
throughout election season last
fall, House members rethought
the bblll and realized there were
pr blms.
We're very mindful of
the need for environmental
protection, but the septic tank
inspection bill was badly crafted
legislation.

co re t,mb the leosl tve "fix"
was not the proper one to the
problem of groundwater quality
protection.
As written, the bill seemed
rushed and seemed to create
more bureaucracy on the
inspection side of the issue. It.
also seemed like an extreme
wayder government to -collect
an'o -gaqubbil3~itap-feriem -
a c srsr.The legislatio4-
mos ti9- doulifliavei creale*
a bootleg environment where
more people out of fear of
persecution and fines from the
government would have
been forced to circumvent
the law and possibly do ~more
long-term damage to ~the
environment than is at nisk with
no legislation.
We all have a responsibility
to protect groundwater quality
and nowhere is that more
prevalent than in our own
backyard. We urge everyone
to take responsibility for our
fragile ecosystem. Do the right
thing and have your septic
system serviced on your

oBad le islation is not the
answer.


Lakie City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Clmin ian esu rupne ng counties by
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
puls itn 2 nedandppaofitable
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman


LETTERS
POLICE Y
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of


the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter. com


OTHER OPINION


Obama's Third WTorld Amrerica


resident Obama warns
Republican policies
will turn America into
a Third World country.
PLook who's talking.
On a campaign fundraising
trip to Chicago, Mr. Obama
quipped that under the pro-
posed Republican budget plan,
"we would be a nation of pot-
holes, and our airports would
be worse than places that we
thought that we used to call
the Third World, but who are
now investing in infrastructure."
He failed to elaborate on which
developing countries he thinks
should be models for the United
States, but his policies have
secured America's status as part


of the declining world.
Mr. Obama has approached
the presidency less as a tradi-
tional American chief executive
and more as a developing world
populist. The 2009 stimulus
program was taken directly
from this playbook, using
deficit spending to distribute
favors to his union support-
Sers and cronies in the form of
public-works projects and other
handouts. It was a spectacular
failure at creating the promised
number of jobs but succeeded
in Mr. Obama's core mission to
"spread' the wealth around."
Mr. Obama has accepted
what he sees as the inevitability
of American economic decline.


During the 2008 presidential
campaign, he declared, "we
can't drive our SUVs and eat
as much as we want and keep
our homes on 72 degrees at all
times ... and then just expect
that other countries are going to
say OK~" He has yet to explain
why he thinks the American
people need to ask permission
from other countries to maintain
a high standard of living.
Rising economies in China,
India, Russia, Brazil and else-
where will, he says, "keep
America on its toes." Mr.
Obama is overseeing the end
times for U.S. economic
dominance.
SWashington Times


OINIO


Sunday,April 17, 20 II


Churches

should

defend


marriage

nee again this
week, in a discus-
sion with a friend,
I found that a
O~church had not
::efed d marae oBy
The typical scenario I've
seen more times than I can


church, often official mem-
bers. There's abandonment or
adultery and I mean openly
acknowledged walking out the
door for good against the oth-
er's wishes and/or a publicly
displayed affair and church
leadership does essentially
nothing.
I'm focused on Protestant
and evangelical churches here
since thaf~s what I'm most
familiar with, but I've seen it in
Roman Catholic churches, too.
People in the church divorce
at the same rates as those out-
side of it. Enough already. The
church needs to start defend-
ing marriage. It must say: "If
you join our church, we will
defend your marriage." If it .
won't, how dare it speak to the
breakdown of the family, the
increased sexualization of the
culture, the rise of gay mar-
riage or a host of other issues
it seeks to address?
There is a biblical model
for church discipline and
the specifies in a secular col-
umn are less important than
understanding the purpose, to
win back the straying party -
which in a divorce may include
both partners and to stand
for truth whatever happens.
Of course, when it comes to
marital breakup, perhaps the
one walking out the door had
good reason say, adultery by
the other.- Thaf's what church
leaders are called to find out
when at all possible. Once
thaf~s determined, discipline
includes private attempts to
reach out to the offending
party or parties, and then and
only if that's unsuccessful, pub-
lic admonishment to the con-
gregation. If the sin continues,
the offender (s) is to be put
out of the church. (Matthew
18.)
The hope is always that he
or she will return, and that
such discipline now will save
him or her from much worse
later.
Extreme? I don't think so,
Churches are voluntary orga-
nizations, and they ought to
stand for something far differ-
ent from the current trends
of popular culture. When a
church refuses to deal bibli-
cally with a divorcing couple
who are members of its body,


defend your family, either."
Yet, I know of only a hand-
ful of divorces, including my
own, where church leadership
stepped in and took such bibli-
cal action to defend marriage.
I do know that in these par-
ticular church bodies, divorce
rates are much lower than in
the surrounding communities.
Hopefully, in many church-
es, action is being quietly and
successfully taken before a
marriage is irretrievably
broken,
In fact, true church
discipline should start long
before it gets to even that
stage.
SBetsy Hart hosts the "It Takes
a Parent" radio show on WYLL-
AM 1160 in Chicago.


Feds' accounting scams



WvOul put CE s in jai





The Columbia High School marching band coordinated a yard sale Saturday at the Columbia County School Board
Administrative Building parking lot. Money from the sale will go toward purchasing new instruments for the band. Pictured
folding clothes donated for the sale are (from left) Miranda Hand, 15; Kaelin Holloway, 15; Brittany Milito, 16; Kayla McDade,
15; and Coby Hollingsworth, 15.


Road work may hamper local traffic flow


Variel o~f colors & pa ern~


Me sb er 'Ratings as reported 12 31-2010 by BauerFinancial, Inc, Coral Gables, FL. an independent financial rating
FDIC company. For full report or to check your financial institution s rating, go to www bauerfinanciat~com. "Offer
expires August 1, 2011 If account closes within 90 days of opening, a $250 closure fee will be imposed.


\\umme m\\\m\m\\\mmmmmm\\\ mm\\\\

Ic.


,,, """",,,,,,,, /////,//N///////


SUNDAY, APRIL 17, 2011


LAKE CITY REPORTER


Page Editor: Todd Wilson, 754-

Columnbia

GOP plans

straw poH
From staff reports

The Columbia Republican
Party will offer tickets for
sale to participate in the
Presidency 5 Straw Poll
later this fall.
The Presidency 5 Straw
Poll is set for Sept. 22-24
in Orlando, according to
Terry Rauch, Columbia
County Republican Party
Committee Chairman.
The Presidency 5 Straw
Poll is a critical test of
grassroots support for
Republican presidential
candidates, he said.
Additionally, RPOF is
expanding the Presidency
5 Straw Poll to include a
Republican presidential
debate on Sept. 22. The
debate will give presiden-
tial candidates an oppor-
tunity to speak directly to
Foi di ns
oT parti ipate in the straw
poll, local Republicans in
Columbia County must
be selected via a random
drawing. To be consider in
this drawing a person must
mee ttherfoHlwn t ria
mng Republican with the
Supervisor of ElectionS
before Feb. 1, 2011.
M Be prepared to pur-
chase the ticket on the
spot. Cost of each ticket
is $175.00 (Checks will be
excepted, make payable to:
RPOF)
SBe in attendance when
drawing is to happen to pay
for the ticket.
SHave I.D. available to
prove you are the winner.
MFil out a pre-register
form on the RPOF site. (If
you do not fill out the form
before the drawing you will
not be in the drawing)
Drawing .date has been
set'for July 11.
Ticket owners may even
have a chance to meet the
presidential candidates and
ask them questions.
For mor'e information,'
contact Columbia County
Republican ~Headquarters,
134 N.'Marion Ave., down-
town Lake City.


From staff reports

SSeveral roadwork proj-
ects are under way by the
FDOT that may impact traf-
fic in Columbia County.
MCounty Road 245, Price
Creek Road, is closed at
the 01ustee Creek Bridge
about a mile north of State
Road 238 through June.
Northbound traffic is
detoured to State Road 238
to US 441 to CR 349 and
back to CR 245.
Southbound traffic is


detoured to CR 349 to US
441' to SR 238 and back to
CR 245. "
SInterstate 75 has
nighttime lane closures for
southbound traffic from
Sunday nights to early
Friday mornings to resur-
face ~from north of the US
41/441 interchange, Exit
414, to the Santa Fe River
Bridge at the Alachua
County line.
Up to two lanes will be
closed between 9 p.m. and
6 a.m. The speed limit is


reduced to 60 mph dur-
ing lane closures and will
remain at 60 mph in .the
two-mile section that is
being resurfaced because
of the milled condition of
the roadway.
SState Road 47 has day-
time lane closures from
King Road to US 41 to
repaint the roadway mark-
ings.


SUS 41 North has day-
time laire closures from
8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday
through Thursday fIrom
north of I-10 to the
Hamilton County line at
White Springs for repairs
to the roadway shoulders.
Flaggers will be directing
traffic during the times
when construction work is
taking place.


WE HAVE FULLTIlME SOCIAL. WORKER POSITIONS OPEiN IN A FRIENDLY,
surroRTrVE AN D SERVIICE-DRIVEN WORKPLACE THAT ALLOWS YOU TO HlAVE
A POSITIVE IMPACT ON THE LIVES OF PA4TTENTS AND THEIR FAMILIES.
REQUIREMENTS:
* Master's in Social Work, current license as a Clinical Social Worker or
license eligible and in process
* One to two years experience in tield. Experience working with
interdisciplinary team preferred
- Support and supervision of LCSW provided
- Ability to work non-judg~mentalll wit~h persons of var~ied cultural,


r-ln-,il and socioeconomic backgrounds and lifestyles

if you would enjoy a career that offers a balance
between work and life, submit a cover letter and
resume to employment@havenhospice.org


i~21-: ::- ~e
.,
''~ir ~ v "~'1


B .;.-


B
"' ~
+ :~ ~vr*.:.


Switch your business
accounts to First Federal
and we'll give you $250
plus your~first order of
checks and starnps
(a $150 value) free when
you mention this ad.**


Easter Eggl Hunt!


Saturday, April 28


9 to 1i am


Refreshments!


RSVP (386) 269-0934 by April 21

There will be 3 age categories
1-3 yr olds 4-6 yr olds 7-9 yr olds

Please remember to bring your own basket!


Assisted Living Senior Day Program Short-Term Stays
~7~1327~3~2Assisted Living Facility License #i 11967
201 NE 1st Avenue
High Springs, FL 32643

(386) 243-2022


D ^N K of FL1.ORIDA


Senior Living Riesidence


HighSpringsSeniorL iving. com


LOCAL


Anderson,

IDean lead

lImeup at
Folk event
From staff reports

WHITE SPRINGS The
59th Annual Florida Folk
Festival is May 27-29, at
Stephen Foster Folk Culture
Center State Park.
The festival is the largest
folk event in Flonida and
highlights .the Memorial
Day weekend on the banks
of the Suwannee River.
Headlining this year's
festivities are Florida's own
superstars John Anderson,
and Billy Dean. Additional
featured performers include
Aaron O'Rourke, Bullard
Brothers & Friends and
The Morse Family.
Discounted advance tick-
ets are on sale until May
20. Advance tickets for the
Florida Folk Festival are
$20 per day or $40 for the
entire weekend for adults
and $25 per day or $50 for
the entire weekend at the
gate. Children under 6 years
of age are admitted free of
charge. Ticket prices for
:ht6 andble6M noth eeagde
weekend are $4 in advance
or $5 at the gate.
Credit card purchases can
be made by calling (877)
635-3655, Monday through
Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. To
order by mail, send a check
or money order to: Florida
Folk Festival, Post Office
Drawer G, White Springs,
Florida 32096. Checks
should be made payable to
"Florida Folk Festival."


:'"Il;.i.~i-*~ ! :"j;.
a 1

Ir I L ;;
;'' '':
.,.. 'i
'


HAVEN
H O 5 P C E
HAVEN'HOSPICE.ORG


I~ fr

~Iii~ie~i~


For more information call our Financial Specialists at

(386) 755-0600





. COME AND SEEl "


COMMUNITY CALENDAR 1-


Recycle your
Lak~e City Reporter
.la ~eciyr~porte r om CURRENTS magnane


TAMPA




.See Payer s Club or complete detail Must be atleast 21 yearsold anda Seminole Players Club memberto paricipate.Va ld 10re quire Management reserves all rightsOffe
are non-negotiable, non-transferable and must be redeemed In person at the Seminole Hard Rock Hotel and Casino Tampa. 0ffer Is for the slot and gaming machine of your choice,
not valid for live Poker or Table Games No cash value. Persons who have been trespassed or banned by the Semlnole Tnbe of Flonda or those whoe have opted into the self-exclusion
program are not eligible If you or someone you know has a gambling problem, please call 1-888-ADMli-T IT 2011 Seminate Hard Rock Hotel & Casino. All rights reserved.


LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, APRIL 17, 2011


Page Editor: Antonia Robinson, 754-0425


Darryl Earl Lane
Darryl E. Lane passed away
peacefully on Saturday, April
hs 2r sienc
in Haymar-
ket, Virginia.
He was born
September 18,
1963, the third
child of Bettye
U. Lane and 6
the late Earl Lane. Darryl grew
up in Lake City, Florida, and at-
tended public schools in Colum-
bia County. He was an active par-
ticipant in Little League sports,
especially football, baseball and
basketball. In high school he was
a lettered varsity football and
basketball player. Darryl attend-
ed the University of Florida, hav-
ing obtained several academic
scholarships. He later transferred
to Florida A&M University and
received the Bachelor of Science
degree in Electrical Engineering
from the FAMU/FSU School of
Engineering. He met and married
Madelynn M. Talbert, who was
the love of his life. They moved
to Virginia where Darryl held
several information Technol-
ogy management positions; they
included E-Trade Banking and
BA ys ems wre ewras cn

ington Airports Authority and
the U.S Department of Treasury.
Darryl was baptized at Olivet
Missionary Baptist Church.
Upon moving to Virginia, he and
Madelynn joined Mount Pleas-

on eats hrh whe h

discipleship classes, conduc-
tor of various seminars, includ-
ing Crown Financial Ministry
classes. His love for his Chris-
tian family as deep and tr

edge that his lo ee was be turned
memories: his loving and de-
voted wife, Madelynn M. Lane;
proud and loving mother, Bettye
U. Lane of Lake City, FL; ador-
in sistersL W.dM kki Weston o
fin of Lake City, FL; mentor and
father-in-law, Dr. James T. Tal-
bert, Jr. of Apopka, FL; uncles
Ralph Udell (Rosatlind) and Isa-
dora Udell (Helen); brother-in-
law, Timothy Talbert (firenda);
sisters-in-law, Michelle Tal-
bert, Margarete Talbert-Irving
(Ralph); special families, Willie
& Barbara Foreman, Ricky &
SansdrrKduhnhNat~ha 'iel& Bec c
-.3ss 8r aAos of nicseph .


ews, other relatives and friends.
A Celebration of Love obser-
vance will be held at 12:00 PM,
Tuesday, April 19. 2011, at Oliv-
et Mission ry Bat st Church.
Rev. Isadaore Williams, eulogist.
Arrangements by D.M. Udell
Funeral Services, Live Oak,
Florida. IntermentHighlandMem-
ory Gardens, Apopka, Florida.

Akie Yamaguchi "June" Wil-
liamson

Mrs. Akie Yamaguchi "June'
Williamson, 77, of Lake City,
died Tuesday, April 5, 2011 at
her residence. A native of Tokyo,
Japan, Mrs. Williamson had been
a longtime resident of Lake City.
She had worked as a seamstress in
local apparel factories for many
years. She enjoyed cooking,
sewing, gardening and she dearly
loved animals. Mrs. Williamson
was preceded in death in 1993 by
her husband, Don Williamsoo.
Mrs. Williamson is survived by
two step-sons, David William-
son of Pensacola, Florida and
George Wi iamson Lk iy
Obata of Tokyo, Japan and her
grand-daughter, Heather Wil-
liamson of Perisacola, Florida.
Six grandchildren also survive.
Graveside funeral services for
Micst. Willianison will be coni-
day, April 19, 2011 in Memo-
rial Cemetery with Bishop Jeffro
Thomas offciating. Arrange-



32025 752-1234 please sign our
on-line family guestbook at www.
parrishfamilyfuneralhome. com

Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-


PICK-UP LOCATIONS & TIMES
Service from Valdosta/Lake City/Gainesvilie


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityrepor ter. com

Two new archway signs
now stand at the Garden
of Rest Cemetery entrance
thanks to a collaborative
effort from a local busi-
ness, community members
and the City of Inke City,
The signs were erected
April 11 by the City of
Lake City Public Works
Department, said Mark
Cook of New Millennium.
The company designed,
engineered and fabricated
the signs.
Hanging the signs is
something community
members have wanted to
see happen at the cemetery
for a long time, said Wanda
Sheppard of Lake City.
"I know in my heart God
is still in the blessing busi-
ness," she said.
Initially families handled
the upkeep of the cemetery
because it was abandoned,
Sheppard said. She asked
the city for assistance dur-
ing a June 2010 meeting.
Also the Church of Jesus


For group charter information, please call the Seminole Hard Rock Hotel & Casino 877.529.7653


of the project to complete,
even though it-'s been one
year in the making," he
said.
Community members
will continue to support
the city with the Garden of
Rest Cemetery, Sheppard
said. Upcoming projects
are to establish rules and
regulations for burial, as


Swell as identify some of the
grave sites.
For more information
contact Sheppard at 752
9084.
"It's still an ongoing
task," she said. "A lot of
work has been done and is
still to be done."





:b eumi ec ui

rn. Call 754-0425.

Club Outstanding Science
Dignitary Program is honor-
ing all students who made
an A in science on their third
nine weeks report card 9
a.m. April 21 in the audito-
rium. The speaker is Mark
Hunter, Columbia County
Sheriff.

M0AA meeting
The Suwannee River
Valley Chapter of the Military
Officers' Association of
America is having its month-
ly. dinner meeting 6:30 p.m.
April 21 at the Lake City Elks
Lodge at 259 NE Hernando
Street. Call Suisan Palmer at
697-6828 or Vernon Lloyd at


Christ of Latter Day Saints
of Lake City hosted a day of
service to cleanup the. cem-
etery last year, Cook~ said.
The city now maintains
the cemetery through the
use of an inrrate crew.
The new signs add to
the appearance of the area,
Cook said.
'"This is the last piece


Middle School auditorium.

Team Parity
The last Relay for Life
Team Party is 6 p.m. April 18
at C'hrist Central Ministries.

IIOSda
Historical Society
The Columbia County
Historical Society is meet-
ing 7 p.m. April 19 at the
Columbia County Public
Library main branch.
Columbia County economic
development director, Jim

--.e n IfaP9.rlcahon jr -.-1--1293


Butler Seafood House in
Lake Butler. Contact Club
President John Leshuk at
904-364-0680 or e-mail
starkepaa~yahoo.com.

Camera Club meeting
The Branford Camera
Club is meeting 7 p.m. April
21 at the Branford Public
Library. The meeting is an
"Open Forum," covering
multiple topics. Call Carolyn
Hogue, Program Chair, 386
935-2044.

Butterflies workshop
A Gardening for Butterflies
workshop is 5:45 7 p.m.
SAijril 21 at the:Fart White
Public Library on Rt. 47.
April is Butterfly Gardening
Month. The program is free
and everyone is welcome.

Science recognition
Richardson Middle
School EXCEL Science


SElaine Phillips a~a:-EErrt; ., -i??cm hn-;i d .
. .4
Monday Thursday
.Academic recognition Chab meeting .


Today
Class meeting
The Class of 1973 is
meeting 5 p.m. April 17
at Ri~chardson Community
Center.

Easter Bunny Schedule
The Easter Bunny will be
in Bunny Town 1 5 p.m.
April 17 in Lake City Mall.

Flying Day
Young Eagles Day is 1
a.m. to 3 p.rn. April 17 at
Cannon Creek Airpark, south
on County Road~jl 371 Of


The Presley Excel and
Scholars Program Academic
Recognition Program is 6
p.m. April 18 at Richardson


The Gold, Gem &
Treasure Hunters Club
of North Florida is meet-
ing 7 p.m. April 21 at the


PACKAGE INCLUDES:

$3500 FREE PLAY
Plus ss Meal Voucher &
Roundtrip Transportation


a~


,e ~yan 2drias .uc MIaay


VALDOSTA MALL
VALDOSTA, GA
1700 Norman Drive


LAKE CITY MALL
LAKE CITY
2469 West
US Hwy. 90


OAKS MALL
GAINESVILLE
6419 Newberry Road


~W~P~sp
i3~Mln


I-4 AT NORTH ORIENT ROAD 813.627.ROCK
S EM INOLE HARDROCKTAM PA.COM


OBITUARIe~ES


New archmways at Garden of Rest


ANTONIA ROBINSON/Lake City Reporter
The Richardson Community Center/ Annie Mattox Park North presented a check for $445.90
to the City of Lake City for putting up the new archways at the Garden of Rest Cemetery.


Are you tired olf th~e same old ways, the same tired,

boring and sleepy church services?

1~FIZ$THERE IS AN EXCITING;


NEW MINISTRY IN TOWIN.

Come and visit us at OPEN DOOR MINISTRIES
where miracles are not only possible but probable.
SGod promises in Isaiah 43:19 "Il(will) do a (new thing)
and it shall spring forth and the time is now"
If your desire is for God to do a new
thing in your life then make
plan to ji ad s
nswh tGuosdacansdeoe


YOU PAY: YOU PAY:


*40""* s 35""
From Valdosta From Lake City & Gainesville


For more information call FABULOUS COACH LINES at
1.8 66.352.7295
or visit their website at fabulouscoach.com


/ EIN


(HOTEL & CASINO)









LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVE RTISE M ENT SUNDAY, APRIL 17, 2011 7A


I


lake City Kiddy Club
'1Neire Iorning is fun,"


DEES/PARRISH FAMILY
FUNERAL HOME --







961-9500
752-221 I *752-1234
458 S. MARiON AVE. LAkE CJSY



~iliiiMr llaSSOdiatries,11

Specializing in
Prdinineris and tdoleseon c idit~ille
M~ost Insurance Accepted
Servinrg Coilumbira Cou~nr? Sin~e / 990
On-CaUl Staff 24/7
1847 SA'.l Barne'ttJ~ Wa 5
L'1:ake City,F- PL


~ ~cla










Quality Care Phlebotomy Inc.
Community Adult Continuing Education
Learn to Draw Blood
SLocal Classes
Financing Available
904-566-1 328





IN.






4 94 Taking applications
a"' a for 201 1-2012
PreK-12
O Scholarships
Available
Research based instruction in a
caring atmosphere.

386-758-4710O
WWW.newgenerationschool.org


NOW3C EN ROLLING
Free VPK for
2011-2012 School Year


cow twItoMM c.GIAss l





OffofHwy 247 754-6565


Stel>he~n B. Dernlrni. qMD
386-96 1-9669


CrrplteAuto Services & Towing
(386) 758-9463 Repair
l386) 752-7305 24 hr towing
IVI#11897





~2550 SWill Main Blvd.
Lake.City. FL 32025
I)' Jim Wilkinson owner
Approved ASE Cert. Milaster Tech.
Auto Repair


Helping Dreams Come True...
One Smile at a Time


ORTHODONTICS
CELIA MARTIN, D.M.D.
,ff,,


Name:


Age:


Address:


Town-


State: Zip:.


Phone:
Drop off or mail your entry to Lake Ci y
Repor 5180 E. Duval S Lake City,


ONE WHSfER IN EACM AgE g40tlP:
3-6 YEARS 7-9 YEARS 10-12 YEARS


386-755-0256
Open from
6am-6pm
1290 SE Bayal Or.
Laire City, FL


Al|State .
Bank


MARY T. SLAY
Agency Owner
(386) 755-6801
677 SW Bascom Norris Dr., #101
Lake City FL 32025
mslay@alistate.com


COLORING CONTEST

Contest Rules:
1. The Contest is open to children ages 3 18. Employees and immediate family of
Lake City Reporter are not eligible.
2. Entries will be judged solely on creative value. One winner will be chosen from each age group.
3. Decisions of the judges will be final.
4. Entries must be received by Lake City Reporter, no later than 3 pm on April SO, 2011.
Entry form must accompany the drawing.
6. Winners' photo will be published mn the Lake City Reporter, Sun., April 24, 2011 editioR.
6. All entries must be from Newspaper Print. NO COPIES -


Oreen~ Gables


NEED A DAYCARES





SNATIONAl. FORECAST: Scattered rain and snow showers will be spread across most of the
northern half of the United States today. A frontal boundary in the west will bring scattered
showers and snowfall to portions of the central Plains, Intermountain West, and Northwest.
Meanwhile, a low prssure system north of the Great Lakes will bring scattered rain and


L ~I II 1.1~-


- I --~lb-llllll


I


CAMUS CMN VISA Platinum Card


MOSTLY
SUNNY



HI 81 UD 49


Page Editor: Josh Blackmon, 754-0427


I'


ii~:117~rT~i~r


warm Front

Wr Front

Front


l4 acksonvile Cape Canareral
e76/50 Daytona Beach
/49 Ft. Lauderdale
linesvile Daytona Beach Fort Myers
81/49 76 61 Gainesville
Ocdala *acksonville
1/1Oland C pCanaveralKeWst
Lake City
84/62 78/65
Miami
Tampa ? Naples
81/64 .West Pam Beach Ocala .
85/69 r Orlando
9" Ft. Lauderdale Panama City
Ft.Myers, 86/73 a Pensacola
86/64 e Naples Tallahassee
84/67 Mia Tampa
Wey~et885/ 1 Valdosta
Key Wst *w. Pgim Beach


l
78r

alahassee *
80/49 81,


70/56


Monday
80, i5 pl
79/62/s
86/75/pc
89/68/pc
86/57/pc
81/58/s
85/76/pc
86/57/pc
87/73/pc
88/68/pc
87/57/pc
87/64/s
77/66/pc
81/66/s
87/57/pc
87/68/s
86/56/s
84/73/pc


Tuesday
80l 66 pe
82/64/pc
84/75/pc
89/67/pc
88/63/pc
84/62/pc
84/77/pc
88/63/pc
85/74/pc
89/69/pc
87/62/pc
88/66/pc
80/70/pc
81/72/pc
86/63/pc
88/67/pc
85/61/pc
84/73/pc


T


a


Pelsacola
74/57


Saturday Today


Saturday Today


Saturday Today
CITY HI/Lo/Pcp. HI/Lo/W CITY
Albany NY 47/33/0 57/34/sh Des M
Albuquerque 68/37/0 79/50/pc Derol
Anchorage 41/29/0 46/27/pc El Pa(
Atlanta 65/56/.52 70/51/s Fairba
Ba~ltmore 62/48/.46 64/46/pc Green
BilIIngs 56/38/0 52/31/c Hartfo
Birmnghnam 63/51/0 74/49/s Honol
Bismarck 35/24/0 39/29/rs Houst
Bolse 64/48/0 61/42/sh Indian
Boston 44]/36/0 58/42/sh Jacksl
Buffalo 53/40/.59 45/31/sh Jacksl
Charleston SC 84/69/0 73/51/s Kansa
Charleston WV 66/50/.77~ 65/46/c Las V
Charlotte 70/57/1.22 70l15 JA.Lttle
Cheyenne 55/30/0 64/40/c -LosA
Chicago 49/37/.14 53/39/pc Memp
Cincinnati 57/48/.25- 63/46/c Miaml
Cleveland 62/48/.35, 54/37/pc Minne
Columbla SC '78/62/.15 16/49/s~ Mobil
Dallas 73/50/0 82/65/s New
Daytona Beach 88/69/0 176/61/s New
Denver 66/28/0 71/42/pc Oklah


, HI/Lo/Pap.
48/36/.02
60/46/.39
80/41/0
36/16/0
70/57/1.41
48/35/0 `
78/72/.14
82/48/0
52/46/.14
68/51/0
89/69/0
54/37/.03
81/58/0
64/47/0
81/60/0
53/49/0
88/73/.60 .
38/32/0
74/57/0
75/55/0
98/41'/.02
y *.9~ 41 O


MII/Lo/W
54/38/sh
51/39/pc
90/61/s
46/13/pc
71/48/s
62/40/sh
85/70/r
83/66/s
60/47/c
79/55/s
76/50/s
68/50/pc
90/65/pc
75/56/pc
S68/58/s
76/58/pc
88/71/pc
49/32/pc
76/55/s
76/62/s
62/45/sh.
82/61/s


CITY
Omaha
Orlando
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh .
Portland Mt
Portland OR
Raleigh
Rapid City
Reno
Richmond
Sacramento
St. Louls
Salt Lake City
San Antonio
San Diego
San Francisco
Seattle
Spokane
Tampa
Tucson
Washington


HI/Lo/Pop.
55/33/0
91/68/0
55/43/.39
89/62/0
59/49/.82
43/26/0
54/52/.02
74/59/.12
54/25/0
65/40/0
69/55/.07
71/49/0
49/43/.01
61/48/0
77/53/0
79/61/0
63/53/0
53/46/.03

88/51/0
63/48/.26


HI/Llo/W
58/41/sh
84/62/s
65/47/sh
97/68/pc
55/39/pc
55/39/r
56/39/pc
~72/48/s
54/37/sh
70/47/c
71/49/s
73/51/pc
68/52/pc
67/51/sh
85/69/s
69/59/s
62/52/pc
53/38/pc
50/31/pc
81/64/s
92/61/s
66/49/s


loines
It

Inks
isboro
,rd
ulu
:on
aepolls
on MS
onville
~s City
egas
Rock
ngles


apos
Orleans
York
omaCit


TEMPERATURES
High Saturday
Low Saturday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Red'ord low

PRECIPITATION
Saturday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


SUN
Sunrise today 7:02 a.m.
Sunset today 7:59 p.m.
Sunrise tom. 7:01 a.m-
Sunset tom. 8:00 p.m.

MOON
IMoonrise today 7:51 p.m-
Moonset today 6:19 a.m.
Moonrise tom. 9:02 p.m.
Moonset tom. 7:03 a.m.



April April May May
17~ 24 3 10
Full Last New First


86
66
80
55
90 in 1967
37 in 1962


0.00"
0.69"
11.00"
1.69"
12.85"


SForecasts, data and
"' ./gaphics @ 2011 Weather
www.weatherpublisher~com


CITY
Acapulco .
~Amsterdam
rAthens
:~Aucidand
Beljing
Berlin
.Buenos Aires
Cairo
Geneva
Havana
HelsinkI .
Hong Kong
Ktingston .


Saturday
HI/Lo/Pop
88/73/0
61/39/0
60/46/.07 ~
68/61/0
75/45/0
61/34/0
70/45/0
99/77/0
63/34/0
90/64/0
57. 36,'0
88/73/0
92, 25 0


Today
HI/Lo/W
89/73/pc
63/43/pc
54f48/t
68/59/s
67/48/pe
64/41/pc
64/49/t
100/76/s
68/39/s
90/66/s
50.'37, pi
7pi69;t
86' 741, r1


Saturday
HI/Lo/Pop.
54/34/0
73/64/0
63/48/0
68/50/0
75/52/.19
43/30/.02
.48/28/0
79/61/.03
90/75/0
95/75/0
61/39/0
-88/73/0
63 37 O


Today
HI/Lo/W
57/38/sit
73/63/pc
66/43/sh
73/45/pc
77/56/t
50/3-4/sh '
50/39/sh
79/61/s
87/73/pe
- 94/72/t
59/39/pc
86/74/t
66 46/pc


Saturday Today~
HI/Lo/Pcp. HI/Lo/W"
88/77/0 86/73/s
66/45/0 64/46/s
84/75/.01 -81/74/pc~
84/73/.34 82/70/pc
75/43/0 .74/48/s
63/39/0 64/45/s
86/77/1.88 91/73/pc
66/61/0 69/59/pc
91/57/0' 80/58/s
72/55/0 63/53/pc
43/39/.65 45/36/ph
57/41/0 63/37/s
57/36/0 61/43/pm


CITY
Rlo
Rome
St. Thomas VI
San Juan PR
Santiago
Seoul
Singapore
Sydney
Tel Aviv
Tokyo
Toronto
Vienna
Warsaw i:


CITY
La Pat
1.ma
London
Madrd
Mexico CYit
Montreal
Moscow
Nalrobi
Nassau
New Delhi
Oslo
Panama
Pads


KEYID CONDIT0NS: ie-c~loud. jrn-n le rIanpl rg-11:1g r-n.-nar .=.c pc-partly cloudy, r-rain, s-sunny,
ih-ihoacS ersljr.:r.0w 19handtrstormi L-windy.


No annual fee

No balance transfer fee


BALANCE TTRANSFER SPECIAL


LAKE CITY REPORTER WVEATIHER SUNDAY, APRIL 1 7, 2011


TRH E WHE TE


PARTLY
CLOUDY



HI 91 LO F2


:iI~gly93,H~a~u maz.ow* 12*, Frenchlvlle, Mainec


57/48


p .
.g~rjs. m


OFFER IS FOR A LIMITED TIME ONLY!



















__


Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-042 I
tkirby)@lakecityreporter.com


Section B


www.Iakecityreporter.com


Sunday,April 17, 20 II


Bailey strikes out
10 Broncos in
SiXth Wll1 Of year.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter. com
Columbia High's base-
ball team played its way
into a three-way tie for the
third-seed in the district
tournament with a 3-1 win
at Middleburg H-igh on
Friday. .
Despite the win, coach
J.T. Clark thinks the Tigers
Hmay come out on the short
end of the stick when it
comes to seeding.


"We're tied with
Gainesville and Middleburg,
but I think Gainesville w
end up with the No. 3 seed
he said. "That's fine though,
because everyone in the dis-
trict has at least one good
pitcher. We're going to face
someone pretty good either
way."
Kellan Bailey (6-2) went
to the mound for the Tigers
and pitched what Clark
called his best performance
of the year. Bailey went
seven innings, allowed three
hits, walked one batter and
struck out 10 Broncos. The
CHS continued on 2B


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High's Kellan Bailey (10) watches as a ball falls short of the plate on March 24
during a game against Ed White.


Columbia top
seed for 4-5A
tournament.

By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter. com
With the regular season
over, Columbia High's Lady
Tigers softball team spre-
pares to enter the only sea-
-saon-that matters. Co~lumbia
will host the District 4-3A
softball tournament begin-
ning M~onday.
The Lady Tigers finished
the regular season with an
undefeated district mark,
but bad memories of a-9-
8 loss against Middleb~urg
High iin last year's tour-
nament will motivate the
Tgersd t return to the top
Colunb~ia will look to
regain the form it had two
seasons ago when the Lady
Tigers hosted the district
tournament and came away
with a 5-4 win against Forest
High for the championship.
"All these games usu-
ally end up being one-run
contest," Columbia coach
Jimmy Williams said. "It
only takes one heads-up
play, one extra-effort play
or one time' taking advan-
~tage of a mistake to come
away with a win. We have to
be the dnes to capitalize on
the mistakes." .
Following a loss to


I~~~ I'I
JASON MATTHEW WAL~KER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High's Jessica Keene (15) takes a swing at a pitch during a game against Fleming Island on March 10.


Keystone Heights at home,
Williams thinks the Lady
Tigers (21-3) will be moti-
vated entering the tourna-
men~t.


"I think it got oixr atten-
tion," he said. "We ciin't just
show up and walk on the
field.~ That game came at
the right time." .


Columbia will open
the tournament against
Lee, which beat Wolfson
9-8 in the qualifying game,
at 7 p.m. on Monday.


Fleming Island takes on Ed
White, Middleburg plays
Gainesville DISTRICT continued on 3B


Fort)Nie. openS
aga~ifl~t illiston
On Thursday.
By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter. com
FORT WHITE Fort
White High softball earned
the No. 2 seed for the
District 53A. tournament
and will play Williston High
at 5 p.m. Thursday.
Top seed Santa Fe High
is hosting the tournament.
The Lady Indians were
6-2 in district play, with a
pair of one-run losses to
the Raiders (7-1). Williston
finished 4-4 in district after
starting 0-3.
Suwannee High (3-5) will


play Newberry High (0-8) at
7 p.m. Tuesday, with Santa
Fe facing off against the
winner at 7 p.m. Thursday.
The championship game is
7 p.m. Friday.
Fort White (14-4 over-
all) swept Williston in the
regular season, winning 2-1
in nine innings at home on
Feb. 25 and 6-2 on the road
on April 6. The Lady Red
Devils advanced to the state
final four in 2010.
"There are a lot of years
of rivalry between Williston
and Fort White," Lady
Indians head coach Cassie
Sparks said Friday. "The
girls are really fo~cused.
They haven't let anything
go to their heads. We came
out ready to roll in the sec-


TIM KIRBY/Lake City Reporter
Members of the 2011 Fort White High softball team are (front row, from left) Sarah Conners,
Brett Sealey, Kayla Williams, Alexa Hatcher, Tayler Terry, Caitlin Jones and Ali Wrench.
Back row (from left) are coach Gary Williams, Samantha McCrory, Holly Polhill, Stacle Scott,
Taylor Douglass, Cecile Gomez, Catherine Trisch and head coach Cassie Sparks. Coach
David Sparks is not pictured.

ond game and forced them to happen, it will happen Taylor Douglass and Cecile
into mistakes, this year." Gomez.
"It is hard to beat a team Fort White's strength is
three times but, if it isgoing the 1-2 pitching punch of INDIANS continued on 3B


Lakie Cityv Reporter


SPORTS


Tigers knock

Off Middleburg

in district game


BRIEFS


'Te Edge' event

se~t our Aporole30
Automotive Group
Presents "The Edge"
golf tournament at Quail
Heights Country Club
on April 30. The annual
tournament, hosted by
Shayne Edge, serves as a
fundraiser for school and
recreational sports, and
other organizations. Cost
is $100 per player for the
four-person scramble.
Registration is at Quail
Heights (752-3339) and
Brian's Sports
(755-0570).
WOWtG~EIES NCH
lilHIC, tryOuIS at
RIVIS tis week
The Richardson
Middle School
cheerleading clinic is
3:15-5:15 p.m. Monday



sponsor Shannon Hall
at 623-4058.

INDMNb~S C]IM AIMNG
Tryouts planned
for May2-4
Fort W~hite High
cheerleading tryouts for
varsity, junior varsity and
middle school squads
are 3:30 p.m. May 2-4 :~:-
in the high school gym. .
Tryouts are open to all
fifth- through
11th-graders. Information
packets are available at
the front office.
For details, call Kathy
Harrell, Stephanie Cruse
or Amber Bussey at
497-5952.

SEMI.PRO~( FOOTBQll
L.C. Falcons to -
honor veterans
The Lake City Falcons
semi-pro football team
will honor veterans and
show support for the
troolis at their home
game on April 30. The
festivities begin at
5 p.m. Admission:
aduilt-$7 ($5 with yellow
shirt); seniors-$5
,($3 with yellow shirt);
children 8 and younger
and military with ID-free.
For details on
honoring a veteran, call
Elaineait; .(386) 292-3039.

WFrort staff reports

GAMES

Monday
so tall's a/WNolfs
winner in Distrtict 4-5A
tournament, 7 p.m.
SFor To te High
baseball at Union County
High, 7 p.m.
Wedrie day
MColumbia` High
baseball at:Lincoln High,
5:30 p.m.
Thursday
SFort White High
track in Region 1-2A meet
at Bolles School, 1 p.m.
SColumbia High
track in District 4-3A
meet at Wolfson High,
1:30 p.m.
II Fort White High
softball vs. Williston
High in District 5-3A
tournament at Santa Fe
High, 5 p.m.
WColumbia High
baseball at Suwannee
High, 7 p.m. .
SFort White High
baseball vs. Branford


High, 7 p.m.


f or


Home


d istr icts


Lady Indians

NO. 2 Seed at


5-3A tour ney





poilia A .-- I


Ariswer to Previous Puzzle

HIUISK TEIEMIS
HIORINIEIT LVE VEIT
EINGIAGIE AILILEEGIE
RIEIE F UNUN NAP
UNISHIE LIL
ClOlsuS OEUPSOUF
A IP IO L IL O IT IAIN IG IL E
BAISAILT SITIOL EIS
LIOR~E DU H YAPA
AIDOIRN IEID
YlDlS PIEA AIPIED
VI OlLIEIT MEMEMOR Y
EINIDIO WIS IMMIUNIE
SIT AIGE SIERIE


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


Indians fall to Newberry



High in final district game


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, APRIL 17, 2011


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


ScheduleTodayr.race, 4:30 p.m.(Vrerus,
3:30-6:30 p.m.).
Track: Streets of Long Beach (steet
course, 1.97 miles).
Race distance: 167.2 miles, 85 laps.
FORMULA ONE
Chinese Grand Prix
Site Shanghai.
Schedule: Today, race, 3 a~m. (Speed,
2:30-5 a~m.).
Tracle Shanghai International Circuit
(road course, 3.39 miles).
Race distance: 189.7 miles, 56 Iaps.
NHRA FULLTHROTTLE
NHRA 4-Wide Nationals
Site: Concord, N.C.
Schedule: Today, final eliminations
(ESPN2, 7-10 p.m.).
Track: zMAX Dragway.

Aaron's 499 qualifying

At Talladega Superspeedway
TalladegaAja
Saturday qualifying; race today
(Car number in parentheses)
I.(24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 178.248
mph.
2. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet,
177.844.
3. (5) Mark Martin, Chevrolet,
177.807.
4. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet,
IT/.765.
5. (27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet,
177.702.
6. (09) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet'
177.685.
7. (6) David Ragan, Ford, IT/.438.
8. (22) Kurt Busch, Dodge, 177.379.
.9. (83) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 177.369.
10. (33) Clint Bowyer, Chevrolet,
17.35 I)Trevor Bayne, Ford, I77.353.
12. (IS) Michael Waltrip, Toyota,
177.317.
13.(42)Juan Pablo MontoyaChevrolet,
177.182.
14. (00) David Reutimann, Toyota.
177.143.
15. (47) Bobtiy Labonte, Toyota,
1771. (43) A JAllmendinger, Ford,
177.087.
17. (1 6) Grejg Biffle, Ford, I77.074.
18. (78) Regan Smith, Chevrolet,
177.061.
19. (2) Brad Keselowski, Dodge,
177.032.
20. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 177.006.
21. (1) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet,
176.872.
1726 5(87) Joe Nemechek; Toyota,
23. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet,
176.659. ~
24. (9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford,
176.575.
25.(17) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 176.519.
26. (56) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota,
176.477.
27. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet,
176.46I.

29 !ID yKyHamnillj yo a, 1637.
30. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet,
176.347.
31.(4) Kasey Kahne,Toyota, 176.298.
32. (97) Kevin Conway, Toyota,

1739. (35) Steve Park, Chevrolet,
176.162.
34. (18) Kyle Busch,Toyota, 175.939.
35. (36) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet'

17560 (0) Joey Logano,Toyota, 175.41.
37. (71)Andy Lally, Ford, 175.349.
38. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet,
175.154.
39. (34) David Gilliland, Ford, 175.134.
'40. (13) Casey Mears, Toyota, owner
points.
41. (32) Terry ILabante, Ford, owner
points.
42. (7) Sam Hornish Jr., Dodge, owner
points.
cha i(46) Bill Elliott, Chevrolet, past
Failed to Qualify
44.(60) Mike Skinner,Toyota, 175.09.
45. (37) Tony Raines, Ford, 175.
46. (66) Michael M~cDowell, Toyo .
174.84.

HOCKEY

NHL playoffs
FIRST ROUND
Friday
teTampa Bay 5, Pittsburgh I, series
Washington 2, N.Y. Rangers 0,
Washington leads series 2-0
vancouver 4, chicago 3, vancouver
leads series 2-0
Anaheim 5, Nashville 3, series tied
1-1
Saturday
Detroit 4, Phoenix at
BufFalo at Philadelphia (n)
Montreal at Boston (n)
Los Angeles at San Jose (n)
Today
Washington at N.Y. Rangers, 3 p.m.
Anaheim at Nashville, 6 p.m.
Vancouver at Chicago, 8 p.m.
.Monday
Philadelphia at Buffalo, 7 p.m.
Boston at Montreal, 7:30 p.m-
Pittsburgh at Tampa Bay, 7:30 p.m.
Detroit at Phoenix, 10:30 p.m.


Los Angeles 8 5 .615 2
Oakland 6 8 .429 41
Seattle 4 10 .286 61
Saturday's Games
Cleveland 8, Baltimore 3
N.Y.Yankees 5,Texas 2
Kansas City 7, Seatdle 0
Boston 4,Toronto I
LA.Angels at Chicago White Sox (n)
Minnesota at Tampa Bay (n)
Devoit at Oakland (n)
Today's Games
Baltimore (Bergesen 0-1) at Cleveland
(Carmona 0-2), 1:05 p.m.
Toronto (Litsch 1-0) at Boston (Lester
0- I), 1:35 p.m.
Minnesota (Duensing 0-0) at Tampa
Bay (Hellickson 1-1), 1:40 p.m.
LA. Angels (Haren 3-0) at Chicago
White Sox (Buehrle I-0), 2:10 p.m.
Seattle (Pineda I-I) at Kansas City
(Francis 0-0), 2:IO p.m.
Detroit (Penny 0- I) at Oakland (Cahill
I-0),4:05 p.m.
Texas (Ogando 2-0) at N.Y.Yankees
(Sabathia 0-1), 8:05 p.m.
Monday's Games
Toronto at Boston, I 1:05 a~m.
Chicago White Sox at Tampa Bay'
6:40 p.m
Minnesota at Baltimore, 7:05 p.m.
L.A.Angels at Texas, 8:05 p.m.
Cleveland at Kansas City, 800 p.m.
Detroit at Seattle, 10:10 p.m.

NL standings

East Division
W L Pct GB
Philadelphia 9 4 .692 -
Florida 8 5 .6 I5 I
Washington 6 7 .462 3

ne ork '5 8 40 5
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Cincinnati 8 5 .615 -
Milwaukee 7 6 .538 I
St. Louis 7 7 .500 IR
Chicago 6 7 .462 2
Pittsburgh 6 7 .462 2
Houston 4s Diii0 .286 4%

W L Pct GB
Colorado II 2 .846 -
San Francisco 7 6 .538 4
San Diego 6 7 .462 5
Los Angeles 6 8 .429 5j
Arizona 5 7 .417 51
Saturday's Games
Milwaukee at Washington, ppd., rain
Cincinnati I, Pittsburgh 2
idY aet a elng last game (n)
-San Diego at Houston (ni)
N.Y. Mets at Atlanta, 2nd game (n)
Chicago Cubs at Colorado (n)
SanFrancisc'oatArizona (n)
St. Louis at L.A. Dodgers (n)
Today's Games
Pittsburgh (Karstens 1-0) at Cincinnati
(Voiquez 2-0), !:10 p.m.
Florida (Volstad 0-I) at Philadelphia
(Blanton O-I), 1:35 p.aro -) t

Washington~ (Marqu~is 00), 1.35 p.rf., Ist
game .
N.Y. Mets (C.Young 1-0) at Atlanth
(Hanson 1-2), 1:35 p.m.
(My DI :0(Richard I-0) at Houston
Chicago Cubs (Dempster 1-2) at
Colorado (A~Johnson 0-0), 3:10 p.m.
san Francisco (Bumgarner 0-2) at
ArizLonLis (CretC r -)- at L.A.
Dodgers (Billingsley 1-I),4:10 p.m.
Milwaukee(Estrada I-0) atWashington
(LHernandez I-1). 5:05 p.m., 2nd game
Monday's Games
Milwaukee at Philadelphia, 7:05 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Cincinnati, 7:10 p.m.
San Diego at Chicago Cubs, 8:05 p.m.
San Francisco at Colorado, 8:40 p.m.
SAtlanrta at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 p.m.

BASKETBALL

NBA playoffs
FIRST ROUND : .
Saturday
Chicago l04, Indiana 99
Miami 97, Philadelphia 89

Portland at Dallas (n)
Today
Memphis at San Antonio, I p.m.
New orleans at L.A. Lakers, 3:30 p.m
New York at Boston, 7 p.m.
Denver atOkla dmaaCity, 9:30 p.m.

Philadelphia at Miami, 7p.m-
Indiana at Chicago, 9:30 p.m.

AUTO RACING

Race week

NASCAR
SPRINT CUP
Aaron's 499
Site:TalladegaAla.
Schedule: Today, race, I p.m..(FOX,
noon-5 p.m.).
Track:Talladega Superspeedway (oval,
2.66 miles).
Race distance: 500 miles, 188 Iaps.
INDYCAR .
,Grand Prix of Long Beach
Site: Long Beach, Calif.


JASON MATTHEW WALKERILake City Reporter
Columbia High's Michaela Burton (88) safely slides to home plate against Fleming Island in
a game played earlier this year.


CHS: Dohrn has 7 RBIs in victory


Continued From Page 10


Only Middleburg run was
unearned.
upt WaS 11S best outing
to date by far," Clark said.
'It WRS juSt a great per for-
mance and even the hits
he allowed were just bloop-
OTS "
COlumbia jumped out
to a 1-0 lead in the first
inning when J.T. Gilliam,
who reached on a walk,
Scored off a ground-ball out
by Blaine Courson.
The Tigers added a seo-
Ond run off-a solo home
run by Dylan Alvey in the
Second inning.
"It's a great job of hit-
ting with two strikes on
11im as he got a fastball
away," Clark said. "The
. wind was blowing int but: he
just crushed it and it might
have just landed."
Columbia's third run
came in the third inning as
Michael Craft took advan-
tage- on the bases rounding
111S way ~from second base
to score when Middleburg
tried to turn a double play.


freshman delivered, this
time with a bases-clearing
double.
"She. definitely showed
us what we believed she has
" had all along," Columbia
coach Jimmy Williams
Said. "Her bat is getting hot
at the right time. We've got
her in the No. 4 spot, where
we expect RBIs, and she
gave us seven."
Jessica Keene (21-3)
picked up the wmn with a
complete games work. She
went six innings, walked
two batters and struck out
three.
Freshman Caleigh
McCauley, in a pinch-hit-
ting opportunity, picked
up her fist varsity hit and
an RBI after being called
up fr-om the junior varsity.
Lauren Eaker scored the
Smercy-rule run off a passed
ball in the bottom of the
sixth.
The Lady Tigers head
into the district tourna-
ment, which begins in Lake
City Monday, at 21-3.


"They kind of fell asleep
and he just kept running,
which is something we like
to do," Clark said.
The Tigers improved to
13-10 (5-3, district) with the '
win.


Lady Tigers softball

SColumbia High rebound-
ed from a late-season loss to
Keysttine Heights with an
11-1 win against Lafayette
High to round out the regu-
lar season. The Lady Tigers
mercy-ruled Lafayette in six
innings behind seven RBIs
from Hollianne Dohrn. .
Dohrn went to the place
twice with the bases loaded
and both times cleared the
bases. In her first attempt,
the freshman~ followed
up an intentional walk of
Kayli Kvistad to load the
bases ~with a Grand Slam.
Lafayette didn't learn its
lesson as another inten-
tional walk of Kvistad once
again loaded the bases with
Dohrn up to bat. Again, the


ACROSS 38 Take
On cargo
Chew on 39 Papa
- Paulo 41 Catcall
Sweater 43 Buy and sell
etter 45` Gold
Mystique 47 a ue

Cartoon mice 50 Tall bird
and Meek 51 Look for a
Shone place
Mae West role 54 Sassy talk
PrOCr8Sti- 55 Team of oxen

nattros 5 engt width
Shrill insect maybe
Urn 58 Decimal base
homophone 59 Stitched
Roll down the together


24 Opre
COmposer
27 Country
in Asia
29 Sickly pale
30 retriever
34 Harbors doubt
37 MOuths,
in ZOOlOgy


1.
5
8



14 (

15 i
17 1
18 1


i9 i
21

23 1


16 Garr of
"Tootsie"
20 Juan's home
22 On cloud nine
24 German
"bugs"
25 Perfume
Iabel word
26 MD
assistants
28 Sit-up
targets
30 Arith, term
31 Pentagon grp.
32 California fort
33 MOon beam
35 Entreaty


40 Island

41 welLeoemCurtis
42 Blow, as a vol-
cano
44 Ruhr Valley
city
45 Brown
seaweed
46 Chimney coat-
ing
48 Salt or smoke
49 Realized
52 Small
guitar
53 Beige


East Division
W L
New York 7 5
Toronto .7 6
Baltimore 6 6
Tampa say s a 8
Boston 2 10
Central Division
W L
Cleveland 9 4
Kansas City 9 4
Chicago 7 6
Detroit 7 7
Minnesota 4 9
West Division
W L
Texas 10 3


Pct GB
.583 -
.538 s
.500 I
.,ss 2%
.167 5

Pct GB
.692 -
.692 -
.538 2
.500 2%
.308 5

Pct GB
.769 -


From staff reports -


Fort White High's base-
ball team fell at Newberry
High, 5-4, on Friday in the
final district game of the
regular season for both
teams.


Both teams finished 1-7 in
District 5-3A and will meet
in the opening game of the
tournament, which will be
hosted by Fort White.
Fort White (9-9) plays
Union County High at ? p.m.
Tuesday in Lake Butler.


Robby Howell had
a pair of hits for the
Indians and scored a run.
Brandon Sharpe suffered
the loss.
Blaine Rhea was the
winning pitcher for the
Panthers (12-9).


4-18 @ O2011 by UFS, Inc.


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

WV sports
Today
AUTO RACING
Noon
FOX NASCAR, Sprint Cup,Aaron's
499, atTalladegaAla.
2 p.m.
VERSUS IRI.. Windy Lights, at Long
Beach, Calif.
3:30 P.m.
VERSUS IRL, IndyCar, Grand Prix
of Long Beach, at Long Beach, Calif.
7 p.m.
ESPNZ NHRA, 4Wide Nationals,
at Concord, N.C.(same-day tape)
BOWLING
I P.m.
ESPN PBA, Dick Weber Playoffs,
championship round, at Indianapolis
COLLEGE BASEBALL..
I P.m.
ESPN2 Vanderbilt at South
Carolina
COLLEGE SOFTBALL
t 4 p.m.
ESPN Oklahoma at Missouri
GOLF
9 a~m.
TGC European PGA Tour,
Malaysian Open, final round, at Kuala
Lumpur, Malaysia (same-day tape)
I p.m.
NBC Champions Tour, Outback
Steakhouse Pro-Am, final round, at Lutz
TGC PGA Tour, Texas Open, final
round, at San Antonio
3 p.m.
CBS PGA Tour, Texas Open, final
round, at San Anton m .

TGC Nationwide Tour, Fresh
Express Classic, final round, at Hayward,
Calif.
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
1:30 p.m.
TBS -Toronto at Boston
3 p.m.
WGN Chicago Cubs at Colorado

ESPN -Texas at N.Y.Yankees
MOTORSPORTS
5 p~m.
SPEED RIM World Superbike, at
Assen, Netherlands (satne-day tape)
NBA BASKETBALL
I p.m.
TNT Playoffs, first round, game 1,
Memphis at San Antonio .

ABC Pla 30f, frs round, game I,
New Orleans at L.A. Lakers
7 p.m.
TNT Playoffs, first round, game I,
NewYork at Boston
9:30 p.m.
TNT Playoffs, first round, game I,
Denver at Oklahoma City
NHL HOCKEY
3 p.m.

quaN rfnals, game 3W hincton erence
Rangers
6 p.m.
VERSUS Playoffs, conference
quarterfinals, game 3, Anaheim- at
Nashville 8pm.

VERSUS Playoffs, conference
quarterfinals, game 3, Vancouver at
chicago
......-
MAjOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
7 p.m.
ESPN Milwraukee at Philadelphia
NBA BASKETBALL
7 p.m.
TNT Playoffs, first round, game 2,
Philadelphia at Miami ,
9:30 p.m.
TNT Playoffs, first round, game 2,
Indiana at Chicago
NHL7HOCKEY
VERSUS Playoffs, Eastern
Conference quarterfinals, game 3.
Philadelphia at Buffalo
9:30 p~m.
VERSUS Playoffs, Eastern
Conference quarterfinals, game
3,rPittsburgh at Tampa Bay (joined in
10:30 p.m.
VERSUS Playoffs, Western
Conference quarterfinals, game 3, Detroit
at phoenix

BASEBALL

AL standings


DOWN


Choke or joke
Without
value
Diva's melody
Squandered
Ironfisted
Author Rand


7 Fuel cartel
8 Loaf around
9 Alpine
.moppet
10 Kan. neighbor
13 Tabloid staffer


Get Connected
www.lakecltyreporter.com
Labe City
~ull U~EPII*,OI" ~jT~Reporter





INDIANS: Pumped up


caIt I


pier
When you mention t s ad.







OPEN 24 HOURS








Eledrical Conmrador


Residential 6 Connercial
Remodel, POWef Poles,
service Changes, Additions, Reanang
011eratl Ho0k.Ups, Trenchlng Available


BLACK BELT ACADEMY*

755-1413



ENVIROdMENT




CALL JUNK JOE
We pay $275 & UP


LAKE CITY REPORTER


SUNDAY, APRIL 17, 2011


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


squares off against
Buchholz in other first-
round games,
"We're in a good situ-
ation, because we won't
have to face Middleburg
or Fleming Island until
the championship,"
Williams said. "~We still
have to go out with solid
defensive efforts and can't
let other teams get cheap
runs. Runs are going to
be hard to come by in the
district tournament,
and we have to take
advantage of people on the
bases."
All Williams has to do
to keep the Lady Tigers
focused is mention the
Middlebur defeat ofhl s

that he's been doing
heading into the tourna-
"I started talking about
it a couple of weeks ago,"
Williams said. "Playing a
. team that we've already
beat gives them a moti-
vating factor, just like the
rematch with Keystone.
We can't have a lackluster
effort. This is what mat-


ters. All we've done up to
this point is play 24 prac-
tice games. This is the
real season. Everyone's
even."
Williams noted that
Columbia has seen
the best of both worlds
in the last two district
tournaments, but wants to
be back on the winning
end this time. He believes
being in Lake City will
only help the Lady Tigers'
chances.
"The hometown advan-
tage is huge," he said. "We
have great fans, and you
can't duplicate that. Believe
we have the best fan sup-
port and a lot of times we


does."
it dtheliend, ith ihoes
years ago with the Indy
Tigers celebrating a
championship on their
home field.
"I think the ones that
played two years ago are
going to shine as a group,"
Williams said. "I hope
history repeats itself."


II'II1YI

111


JASON MATTHEW WALKERILake City Reporter
Columbia I-igh's Timmy Jernigan' is cheered on by members of the Tigers' weightlifting team as he attempts the clean and
jerk in a match at Columbia High earlier this season.


JernigRH fiHishes second in 2A


Staie Weightlifting championship


From staff reports

Sometimes in weightlift-
ing, too much weight is not
a good thing.
Columbia High's Tim
Jernigan had to settle for
second place in the FHSAA
state meet because he
outweighed an opponent
during the state weight-
lifting championships in
Kissimmee on Friday and
Saturday.
Both Jernigan and Sam
Jansen of Seminole Ridge
High totaled 760 pounds in
the Class 2A heavyweight
division, but the champion-
ship went to Jansen because
he weighed 278.2 pounds to
Helping Dreams Come True...
one smnle at aTme







ORTHODONTICS
CELIA MARTIN, D.M.D

S701 5W SR 47 Lake City FL 32025

EARTH


300.1' for Jernigan. When
lifters end in a tie, the win-
ner is determined by the
lifter weighing the least.
It was an epic battle
between the twno. Jernigan's
425 bench press was the
best in the state in the divi-
sion, while Jansen's 340 lift
was tops in the clean and
jerk. -
Jernigan's 425-pound
bench press tied the school
record set by Sampson
Genus.
"I'm proud of the great
job he did going in there
and competing,"l Columbia
coach Quinton Callum said.
"He went in there to win it
all and I'm proud of him."


Fort White High's Kurtis
Norris placed seventh, just
out of the money, in the
class 1A heavyweight divi-
sion: Norris lifted. 390-280-
670.
Anthony Descantoli
of Mantanzas High won
the division with 375-355-
730. He was tied with Ray
Mangiafico of Baker County
High and Dalton Wertz of
DeSoto High, but weighed
less than both opponents.
Anthony Pearce benched
310, but scratched out on
the clean and jerk.
JR Dixon also scratched
oil the clean and jerk in the
183-pound division, after
benching 285.


Columbia's Barnabas
Madison had the scale
tiebreaker go his way for
third place in the 154-
pound ?weight division.
Madison lifted 300-245-
545, the' same as Donovan
Mitchell of Seminole High,
but Madison cut him on
weight.
"He was able to obtaiin
his goal of going in and
finishing in the top three,"
Callum said.
Seminole Ridge won
Class 2Awith 28 points, with
Bartow High second with
17 points. Jernigan earned
five points and Madison
earned four, as Columbia
tied for ninth,


Continued From Page 11

Through. 12 games,
Douglass is 7-3 with al.28
ERA and 71 strikeouts in
60 innings. Gomez is 5-1
with an 0.91 ERA and 97
strikeouts in 54 innings.
They each have three
saves.
"Our pitchers have
'thrown great during the
season,"' Sparks said.
Both are also hitting the
ball. Douglass is batting
.429 with four doubles, two
home runs, 17 runs scored
and 19 RBIs.
Gomez is hitting .367
with four doubles, 15
runs scored and 12
RBIs.
Catcher Holly Polhill is
batting .420 with two dou-
bles. Ali Wrench is hitting
.397 with~ eight RBIs and
14 runs scored.
Caitlin Jones is hitting
.300 with six RBIs and


20 runs scored. Kayla
Williams has two doubles
'and eight RBIs.
The Lady Indians can't
help peeking ahead to a
possible championship
showdown with Santa
Fe.
"If we get past Willist~on,
we will see Santa Fe again
and that is` our goal,"
Sparks said. "The seniors
are extremely pumped
up. We didn't get a senior
night and we would like
to have one with that first
playoff game at home. We
are mentally ready and
hopefully we will stay
focused.
"This is what we've been
working for all season."
Fort White won a
playoff game in 2008,
but has missed the
postseason the past two
years.


- - - - - - - -
G HD P E I CI PP







D G H E'` E E Z Y I B B T I
:I


I Y K A R B X P Z C S F
P WV L OE N M I YJ
B A R .O N L D P D I E C
TT IS M ES HAR E I
GE A ZE. CRE C XG D
HRHFNHGGGAEU
W D S ~A T Q N N S H S U I
B. R EE OYU I HU ID
OJRMFIEIZENZE
W L F 11A YA E SS
JIUZSBRDUYEE
O L I) N R II T R U D E W I







RKI F B' D L R, r' Z H L Y







AHRT AY




ENTRY FORM I -


I


ess:
:riber: UI Yes L O No


ine is Wednesday, April 20, 2011 at 5:00 p.rn.
18 of the *Earth Day'wonis hidden in the word search above. I.
Sbe found in the banners on the ads shown here. Complete the
d retum itto the Lake City Reporter, 180 E. Duval Steet, Lake
:L by Wednesday, ApnI 20 5:00pm, for your chance to wini I.

.ake City Reporter t

ecityreporter.corn _l.URRENTS mra az nr-


I.W X
B K
S L
SB P
SY L
I
~I V L .
I R


S E
SI D
T V
C C
I L
I
E N
I
I A. D
N V
UiE
P i.
O M


SL C
I W



G S

IJ E
I I






I Nm




I




SAddrr

SSubsc


IDeadli
IFind all 1
Words can
puzzle an
ICity, F



lakl


SOLAR


I


Someone you Love!.

755-5440 orhnfe b llm&50

75 5-5441


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square'
to form four ordinary words.
DEJDA a



COHCA



D HELUD



RNNUEO


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD SAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek


e Number:


I SHARE


I,


APRIL


GIV l Hrltter, IIc.


Chevron
Oi I
Jobber


r
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


ClLEAN OF llr~-
-' -'


(Answers tomorrow)
Satrdys Jumbles: BRING SMACK PACKET ONWARD
Answer: Getting thrown out of the tavern meant that
he WAS BARRED


FRESH AIR


SPORTS


DISTRICF: begin M/onday
Continued From Page 1B


1 Do You Need to




QUESTION?
CALL Mary or


oIr~ment r v TODAY to place a rde
Y(IlI d0f ,,. surprise ad for


so spedai


anwea


FLOWrERS





LAKE CITY REPORTER


SUNDAY, APRIL 17, 2011


I
C
I

-r
.J _


Soon a year will have passed since the Deepwater Horizon accident in the Gulf.' From
the beginning, we have taken responsibility for the cleartup. Our commitment to the
Gulf remains unchanged, as does our responsibility to keep you informed.

Conalrinf-iitted t the Guiilr
No oil has flowed into the Gulf since July 15th. As our efforts continue, nearly 100%
of the waters are open and the beaches are clean and open-. To ensure its safety, Gulf
seafood~ has been more rigorously tested by.independent ~researchers and experts
than any other seafood in the world. To date, BP has spent more than $13 billion
in clean-up, costs.

ReYstore theB EnvIi~~sjronment:
An additional $282 million has been spent on environmental issues, including wildlife
rescue and restoration of wildlife refuges across the region. We have also committed
$500 million to the Gulf of Mexico Research Institute to fund scientific studies on the
potential impact of the spill.

H;2elp to R~~ebuilcd do 5! .. comll~Yb
$5 billion in claims have already been paid. We've committed $20 billion to an
independent fund to pay for environmental restoration and all legitimate claims,
including lost' incomes. More than $200 million in grants have been made to the
Gulf Coast States to promote tourism and seafood.



This was a tragedy that never should have happened. Our responsibility is to learn
from it anid share with competitors, partners, governments and regulators to help
ensure that it never happens again.

We know we haven't always been perfect but we are working to live up to our
commitments, both now and in the future.

For more information, please visit bpamerica.com.


faceboo k.com/B PAme rica
twitter.com/B P_ merica

youtube.com/bp


-t'
Y


@ 2011 BP, E&P


ADVERTISEMENT






















I I


HE WEEK A Proud Su'pporter of:


STONEHENGE S/D! Very nice 3BR/2BA home
built in 2005 wr/1,956 SqFt has split floor plan,
great room, dining room, screened-in arceh plus Building a Stronger Cojmmunlty for All
great location at end of cul-dnsac #7 688


--:"; . -..- me-, iiCiJLilp' as es esnwa
Artists subject to change without notice. Shown goes on rain or shine.
Taxes and processing are included in the ticket prices. Camping available.


SC.o. Riidaea?
Assistant Editor
754-0427
crisok@lakecityreportercorn

Sudy, April 17, 20 1 1


Section C-


www.Iakecityreporter.com


cation device for W~estside
Elementary," Spradley said.
"W~ith the present funding,
if it were not for Dr. Martin
purchasing these planners,
it's one tool that the teach-
ers and parents would not
have for constant commu=
nication."
Martin said she decided
to give the students plan-
nersc because there were
lots of things that the
schools need, but when
they looked around and
she talked to people that
worked with her, they sort
of all said the planners are
helpful because the chil-
dren bring them home and
the parents can keep in
close communication with
t teachers.
"The children are
required to do so much that
it's helpful to have every-
body on the same page,"!
Martin said. "W7hen it came
to the time of giving them,
we said we would love to
be the ones that sponsored
that."
Martin said she felt mak-
ing the contribution was
important because of the
budget cuts the schools ar~e
facing.
"I think this is the day
and age, and it has been
for a long time, of budget
cuts," shie said. "I really
think that the community
needs to step-up and fill in
the gaps and support our
students because they're
our future. There are lots
of opportunities out there
and I hope we can inspire
all of our business partners
to Jimp in there and help in
- these trying times of bud-
get cuts."


sy TONY BRITT
tbritt~l akec ityre po rter.com

s an orthodon-
tist, Dr. Celia
Martin works
in a business
Where her job
calls for her to improve
the appearance of people's
teeth so they can commu-
nicate effectively.
However, Martin was
recently recognized for
her contributions to a local
school where donations
she made to the school are
.helping teachers, students
and parents communicate
effectively.
Martin Orthodontics and
its owner Dr. Celia Miartin
provided 550 planners to
second-f~tifth grade students
this year and has partnered
with Westside Elementary
for tlge past four years to'
provide these tools of com
munication between school
and home.
As a result of Martin'S
donations, she and her
business were nominated
as a school district level
business award winner,
The Flonida Department
of Education hosts the
Commissioner's Business
Recognition Aw~rd to ree-
ognize outstanding com-
munity businesses, that
have played acriticalriole in
shaping education reform
throughout Flonida.
The school district's
nomination for the
2010 -2011 Florida
Department of Education's
Commigsiozier's Business
Recognition Award recipi-
ent islklartin Orthodontics


JASON MAITTHEW WALK(ER?Lake City Reporter
Westside Elementary School teachers,-students and principal Cherie Hill, along with Dr. Celia Martin, show-off planners Martin


Orthodontics donated to the set

and its partner school
Westside Elemenitary.
"'I am very gratefull"
Martin said of winning the
school district-level a~ward.
"I was honored that they
choose me for that~"
The next step for Martin
is being recognized at a
ceremony in Tampa.
"'Tm impressed and
grateful," she said. "I try
do to a lot of things for the
school and it's just nice that
they appreciate it and it
helps the k~ids out."
D~orothy Spradley school


district volunteer educa-
.tion marketing coordinator
said Martin Orthodontics
will be recognized as the
Columbia School District
winner at the state
level at the 24th Annual
Commissioner's Business
Recognition Awards event
June 9 at the Grand Hyatt
Hotel in Tampa.
"'Through the use of the
planners, Westside parents
receive daily updates on
academics as well as behav-
ior," Sp~radley- said, during
an award presentation for


Martin Orthodontics at
the school board meeting
last week. "Also, teachers
use the planners to share
information .on. upcoming
events happening at school.
Parents know to check
daily in their child's plan-
ners to keep communica-
tion open between school
and home at all times. By
utilizing the students' plan-
ners, Westside students
learn important, .Organi-
za tional- skills and k~now
their .parent~ 'valyUe eLduca-
tion because they' wa~nt to


stay 'informed at all times,
These skills will benefit our
students the rest of their
life."
School district officials
adcept nominations from
the schools and from those
nominations, based on
the business partnership,
a team selects a business
to be the county represen-
tative to go to the state.
Spradley said there was
approximately six nomina-,
Lin7tjion ..giear froim local.
schools.
--This ii a rear communi-


WOWIl This home just about READY TO MOVE INTO! HANDY-MAN SPECIAL.! 3BR/
has it all! 3BR/2BA home 3BR/2BA mfg home built in 2BA mfg home built in 1990
wr/1,680 SqFt, 6.13 fenced' 1981 w/1,300 SqFt on Lake w/1,104 SqFt in Sunnybrook
acres in mostlV pasture, Jeffery Rd has living room S/D an .40-acre lot w/paved
stocked fish pond wr/covered 8 family room plus 24x24 road frontage ONLY $24,900
dock, 2-etary barn, 2-stall detached garage on 2 acres #77927
horse barn plus so much ONLY $45,000 #75210
more! #77884


;,r i-
r i:. ,~

r ~-
:.
-
'5
5

rr -
~-!::;'. ~
~
,.
r::
I: 1


I,.


MANY UPGRADES includ-
ing neu flooring 6 new r
CH&A! 2BR/B0A mfg home
wn/1,216 SqFt on 2.35 acres
between Live Oak b Lake City
ONLY $45,000 477931


4 BEDROOMS plus 2 % baths in
this 1,890 SqFt mfg home built
in 1996 an 1 acre just north
o ape0 7 vI dife is abundant!


SUPER LOCATION for Vaur new EMERALD COVE! % acre 45+ GORGEOUS ACRES! Scat-
sitebuilt home (minimum 1,400 lot on west side of Lake CitV tered live oaks & some planted
Sqrt] convenient to Lake City, for sie-built home@ only? pines for privacy plus pasture &
Gaiesile3 sal reaD CieED on REDUCED TO $11,900 .fish pond! Great homesite within
$24,900 #72762 #73704 5 minutes from Osceola Natl
Forest $149,900 #77871

CALL OFI COlVIE 111 05

FREE
LIST OF FORECLOSURE AND/OR SHORT-SALE PROPERTIES!
ACT FAST... THESE DO NOT LAST!


.~t~


1*4 IB*~~
~i,
t~p~


DANIEL CRAMPS AGENCY, INC.

2806 West US HighwaV 90, Suite 101
Lake City, Florida, 32055
Rw~ (388) 755-5110 wwwn.danielcrapps.com


Lake City Reporter


B SI ESS


Martin Orthodontist recognized as school business partner


V


0g Sun1 rf












I


--- To Educate, Amuse & Enrich


On a Sucker List
I must be on lots of sucker lists.
When I read a stock tip about Ven-
tana Biotech having a way of deliv-
ering an appetite-suppressing drug
in chewing gum, it sounded so
good that I didn't bother to check it
out before buying. Later that same
day I checked my portfolio, and the
stock was down 30 percent. I bailed
- except for 500 shares I kept to
remind me not to buy before doing
the due diligence. -1~G., online
The Fool Responds: We found
a 2009 nwsletter toutmng the stock

$1.7 billion abscash flow!" It
declared that the compn was
plnin to "blow the dors
off o he diet industryy,
with its potentially patented
use of the human hormone
that controls hunger. It sug-
gested that "when big [drug com-
paie 8,t] wmndcokfthis break-
"explode" (in a good way).
It would have been smart to
demand proven performance, niot
just potentiala" patents'and specula-
ti n. If iere real 1so po g,
aW8T00ofit ah'eady.

1)o yms ha~ve ari embarnesing
lesontleame othe han rd w
less) andsendit to Th~e Motley Fool c/o My
Dumbestlnvestment. Got one that wonted?
Submit to My Smartestlavestment. If we
print yours, you'll win a Fool's cap!


Cptal Stru ture

Xp lained


_ I ~ )_^ _


LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS SUNDAY, APRIL 17, 2011


Page Editor: Josh Blackmon, 754-0427


What is This Thing Called
The Motley Fool?
Remember Shakespeare?
Remember "A4s You Like It"?
In Elizabethan days, Fools were the only
people wh~o could get away with telling
Th Mote Fol ell the tt leout
investing, and hopes you'll laugh all



Nike's Still Great

and Growing
If you bet that Nike (NYSE: NKE)
would beat its earnings estimates in
its recently reported quarter, you lost.
However, ifyou're like most Foolish
investors, you're-inrvesting in compa-
nies for the long term, not making
wagers on a single quarter's earnings.
Beyond the headlines, things really
aren't so bad. Sure, Nike took a hit
. fom rising commodity costs, but so
did many companies. The selling and
administrative costs that Nike can
more easily control rose more slowly
than revenue, pulling profits in the
night direction up 5 percent.
Nike's total revenue grew 7
percent over last year. Future orders
which represent footwear
and apparel to be delivered
between March and July -
ivere up 11 percent overall,
jumping 11 percent in North Amer-
ica, 19 percent in China, anid 21
percent mn other emerging markets.
Was it an outstanding quarter?
No. But Nike is still the same great
company, and its business continues
to grovi around the world. The com-
modity issue isn't ideal and will
likely persist, but the value of a
brand such as Nike is that the com-
pany is more able to pass on rising
costs to Oustomers.
Still, Nike's stock doesn't appear
to be a screaming bargain night now.
Consider keeping an eye on it, stay-
ing up-to-date with its develop-
ments, and watching for a more
attractive buy-in price.


On Credit Counseling
Is it OK to use consumer credit
Counseling organizations to help
.me get out of debt? Do they have any

do BecrfulC wth sch outs, as
SA some can rip you off. Worse
still, if they set up a debt repayment
plan with you and a creditor report
to a credit agency that you paid off
some debt through a debt manage-
ment program, that could hurt your
credit score to some degree.
Look elsewhere for help or
advice, too. Discuss your situahton
with a trusted banker or mortgage
officer, and perhaps consult a bank-
ruptcy lawyer, as well, to learn about
your options. Know that many peo-
ple are able to pay off their debts
without outside help. Learn more
about credit card debt and how to .
get out of it at www.fool.'com/how-
to-invest/personal-
finance/credit/index.aspx.
If you want to look into counsel-
ing organizations, seek a non-profit
one. One resource is the National
Foundationl for Credit Counseling
(NFCC), with many member agen- :
cies. Call 800-388-2227 or visit
www.nfec.o g. But first heed these
government warnings:
http://www.fic.gov/bcp/menus/
consumer/credit/debt~shtm. .
***

Q'Ijust read a reference to "liar
loans."! What are they? -1 W;
Maryville, Tenn. '
ALiar loan is a term that
popped up during the recent
financial crisis. It's a loan that's
made based, not on documented nec-
essary information (such as tie bor-
rower's income or assets), but mainly
on the say-so of the borrower. These
low-documentation or no-documen-
tation loans tend to be subprime .
ones, as many borrowers haven't
always been truthful about their
financial conditions, leading to
defaults. While these loans have
helped many good people secure
loans, thev'\te also been abruse~d b
opportunistic-lendeis and borrowers
- thus, the term "liar" loan.

|3 ueto~ r t ol2 Snda n
--see Write to Us . ,'


may sometimes completely wipe

Next, imagine a company that
raises needed funds by issumng more
stock. This is an appealing option
when the market is hopping. If its
shares are trading at steep prices
and buyers are plentiful, cash will
be easily generated. The downside
to equity financing, though, is that
the value of existing shareholders'
stock is diluted every time new
shares are issued. This is OK only
if the money raised creates more
value for the company than the
value eroded by dilution.
Eventually, many great compa-
nies grow so profitable that they
can methodically buy back shares,
driving up value for existing
shareholders:
Finally, a firm can finance its
operations on its own, by fueling its
growth with caSh generated from
operations. The advantage of inter-
nally financed growth is that it
forces a firm to plan and budget
carefully as it creates value for the
company's owners. But it can be a
slow, grueling process. Worse yet'
competitors effectively issumng debt
or stock can fund more rapid
growth than this company,
Many companies use a combina-
tion of these financing methods.


To understand companies you're
studying as possible investments,
you need to understand their "capi-
tal structure." The capital structure
shows you the components of the
company's value and how it
finances its operations.
A firm's capital structure will
typically reflect one or more of the
following: cash, debt financing
(borrowing from a bank or
issuing bonds), and equity 2*-.
financing (selling a chunk
of the company and/or
issuing shares of stock).
Consider some examples. Imag-
ine a company financed with debt.
If it's' paying 6 percent interest on
its debt but growing earnings at
10 percent yearly, its payments
can likely be met, so the financing
is effective. The lower the interest
rate, the-better, and rates are influ-
enced by a company's credit rat-
ing. If a company is carrying a lot
of debt at high interest rates but is
growing sloujly, that's a red flag.
Fluctuating earnings can also be
problematic, as interest payments
~********


., Namze That Company
I WaS f0Uiided in 1975, and in
1981 IBM introduced a PC with my
neW Operating system on it. My
latestt system is installed on more .
than 20 percent of all Internet-


**************************



: 1 connected PCs. I went public in 1986, LAST WEEK'S TRIVIA ANSWER
~~B~ /$and now my market capitalization i was founded in Germany in 1865 by a fellow who was excited by the
''' tops $200 billion. My workplace soft- possible uses of coal tar. I synthesized the first natural dye in 1869, which
''' ware evokes a Steve Carell TV showl, and was mainly used to color cotton. I was socially progressive, providing hous-
ing~ and health insurance for my workers back in the 1800s. I was once the
is~Enl.;,my search engine evokes a Bob Hope side- world's largest sulfuric acid producer, and liquefied chlorine was an early
kick. My gaming system marks the spot, and best-seller. Today I'm the world's top chemical company, with some l09,000
employees and 385 production sites globally. I specialize in plastics, petro-.
I've invested in many companies, such as chemicals, construction chemicals, pigments, agricultural solutions, coat-
Facebook. Have more than $40 billion in cash ings and more. Who am I? (Answer: BASF)
and short-term investments and began paying a
diiedi 03 h mI Write to Us! Send questions -for Ask the Fool, Dumbest (or
Smartest) Investments (up to 100 words), and your Tnivia entries
A ... th anin r *Sen itto s wth oolsh riva o th to an to Fool@fool.com or via regular mail c/o this newspaper, atin: The
I< .11beI h;,wrreJ-, unar a drawing for a myty prize! Motley Fool. Sorry, we can'tprovide individual financial advice.*
*** ****************************************************************,***********#******
O 2011 TilE MOTLEY FO01DlST. BY UNIVERSAL UCLICK (FOR RELEASE 4/I 4/2011)


A uiess Wie
EWYORK .
(AP) Bank
of America
Corp. is still
trying to
Bhake off troubles arisitig -
from mortgages written
during the housing bubble.
Higher fees from battling
lawsuits and costs related
to its mortgage business
led to a 39 percent declidit
in BofA's first-quarter earn-
ings, the bank announced
Friday. It' wasn't what
investors wanted to hear,
since just three months
ago the bank announced
several big charges and
settlements that seemed to
resolve many of its mort-
gage problems.
"It seems like some
of the mortgage-related
issues that they said were
behind them are actually
not behind them yet," said
Paul Miller, a bank analyst
at FBR Capital Mairkets.
The bank is fighting law-
suits from investors and
insurers who say that dur-
ing the housing bubble
they were duped into buy-
ing loans that were- based
on fraudulent documents.
Bank of America set aside
$1 billion to repurchase
those mortgages and also
added $352 million to its
legal expenses' in the first
quarter. The bank had
already taken a $4.1 bil-
lion expense in the previ-
ous quarter for mortgage
repurchase claims and
$1.5 billion for litigation
expenses. -
"The numbers are getting
worse and nobody seems to
have a handle on how bad
this could be," said Miller.
BofA's stock fell 2.4 per-
cent to $12.82. Bank of
America has lost 34 percent
of its value over the past
year, making it the laggard
among major banks.
The Charlotte, N.C.
bank earned $1.7 billion,


Federal Reserve to see if
they were strong enough
to stand up to another eco-
nomic downtitr. Only
banks that passed. the test
were allowed to increase
~dividends. The Fed has
asked the bank to submit a
revised plan.
Brian Moynihan, CEO
of Bank of America, tried
to cast his bank's results
in a positive light. "All
the businesses have moved
back to profitability except
our mortgage business,"
he said in a conference
call with analysts. BofA's
Merrill Lynch division set
records for revenue, asset
management fees and bro-
kerage income.
As the largest U.S. bank
serving about. half of the
nation's households, Bank
of America also provides
a snapshot for the health
of the American consumer
and the overall economy.
. The ~bank said the number
of customers who were late
on their credit card pay-
ments by 30 days or more
fell to near all-time lows
in the first quarter. It was
the sixth straight quarterly
decline.
The bank set aside a total
of $3.8 billion to cover
losses from loans in the
quarter, down sharply
from $9.8 billion in the
same period a year ago.
That reflects an improving
economy and fewer BofA
customers falling behind
on their debts.
The nation's largest bank
by assets also announced
that its chief risk officer,
Bruce Thompson, will
become chieffinancial offi-
cer, replacing Chuck Noski,
who was named vice chair-
man. Noski couldn't relo-
cate to Charlotte to fulfill
his CFO duties because of
an illness of a close family
member, the bank said in a
statement.


gas and crude oil shooting up
the well bore and through the
rig's riser. Mud rained down
on them before the first explo-
sion erupted on the platform,
engulfng the rig.
As workers jumped fr-om
the rig to escape the fire and
pluriged into the Gulf, Landry
gave the orders to disconnect
the Bankston and launch res-
cue boats to pluck workers
from the water, according to'
his award's citation. Bankston's
crew steered the boats around
burning debris to savework-
ers who jumped off the rig,
while others who evacuated in
lifeboats found refuge on the
supply boat. Seventeen work-i
ers with life-threatening inju-
ries were treated on. the vessel
before Coast Guard helicop-
ters flew them to shore.
Coast Guard Lt. Cmdr. Craig
Murray, one of the pilots of the
fist helicopter to arrive, said
he is certain more workers
would have perished that night
if the Bankston's crew hadn't
been there to act.
"They are the true heroes,"
Murray said.
The crowd at Friday's cer-
emony observed a moment of
silence for the 11workers who
died in the blast. Photographs
of each victim adorned a post-
er in front of the stage.
Officials from Bankston
owner Tidewater Inc., rig
owner Transocean Ltd. and
well owner BP attended the
ceremony. Tidewater wouldn't
allow the vessel's crew mem-
bers to be interviewed Friday
about the events of April 20
because of pending litigation
over the disaster. Alwin Landry,
however, said he and his crew
members were humbled by
the awards.
"For a heroic act to occur,
you have to have the right
people in the right place at the
right time, and they have to
do the right thing," Tidewater
CEO Dean Taylor said.


By MICHAEL KUNZELMAN
Associated Press

BELLE CHASSE, La. (AP)
-- Nearly one year after
an explosion aboard the
Deepwater Horizon drilling rig
killed 11 workers and led to
the nation's worst offshore.oil
spill, the Coast Guard honored
a, supply vessel's crew who
helped rescue 115 survivors.
During a, ceremony Friday
at an air station' in Belle
Chasse, Coast Guard Vice
Admiral Sally Brice-O'Hara
presented awards to nine crew
members of the Damon B.
Bankston and about two dozen
helicopter pilots, rescue swim-
mers and other Coast Guard
personnel who responded the
April 20 disaster in the Gulf of
Mexico, about 50 miles off the
Louisiana coast.
The awards include the
Coast Guard's certificate of
valor and distinguished public
service award.
"~We pay tribute to their read-
iness, to their quick thinking,
to their expert ship handling,"
Brice-O'Hara said of the sup-
ply vessel's crew. "Today we
honor you for your willingness
to act. We recognize you for a
job well done."
Alwin Landry, who com-
manded the Bankston on the
night of the explosion, thanked
thle Coast Guard crews that
flew in and tended to injured
workers. ILandry, who received
the Coast Guard's certificate of
valor, recalled the relief he felt
when he spotted the fist flash-
ing light in the sky, signaling
help had arrived.
"They came in low and
strong, one after another, hov-
ering with pinpoint accuracy,"
he said. "I cannot speak highly
enough of their professional-
ism and efficiency."
The Bankston was tethered
to the Deepwater Horizon,
awaiting a load of drilling
mud to be transferred from
the rig, when the crew heard
the jarring sound of methane


In this April 12, 2011 photo, Bank of America CEO Brian Moynihan
speaks during a summit on consumer protection by the National
Association of Attorneys General in Charlotte', N.C. Bank of
America's first-cluarter profit fell 39 percent on higher costs related
to its mortgage business and higher litigation expenses-


in cash to Assured Guaranty
Ltd., an insurer that also
said the bank should repur-
chase its shoddy mortgages.
The bank also entered into
an agreement worth $470
million to share losses on
insuring additional mort-
gages. Assured Guaranty's
stock jumped 24 percent
to $17.60 after the news
came out.
Much of Bank of
America's mortgage-relat-
ed woes stexti from its 2008
acquisition of Countrywide
Financial Corp., once the
largest U.S. mortgage
lender, which was facing
bankruptcy after payment
defaults and foreclosures.
Last month, Bank of
America suffered another
setback when it became the
only one of the four larg-
est U.S. banks that wasn't
allowed by the Federal
Reserve to increase its
dividends. Moynihan had
promised investors that he
would increase dividends
in the second half of the
year.
Along with the 19 largest
banks in the country, Bank
of America was subjected
to a "stress test" by the


or 17 cents per share, com-
pared with $2.8 billion, or
28 cents a share in the
first qitarter of last year.
Revenue fell to $26.9 bil-
lion from $32 billion in the
same period last year.
Most banks will likely
have to pay more fees and
fines in the future for inves-
tigations on other mort-
gage-related issues. Bank
ofAmerica and other banks
are waiting for a decision
from the attorneys general
of all 50 states who are
investigating allegations
that the banks bungled fore-
closure documents, and a
separate decision from the
Securities and Exchange
Commission on its probe
into misleading mortgage-
backed investments.
On Wednesday, Bank of
America was among 16 of
the nation's largest mort-
gage lenders who were
directed by the Federal
Reserve and other federal
banking regulators to reim-
burse homeowners who
were improperly foreclosed
upon. The Fed warned of
more fines in the future.
Separately, Bank of
America paid $1.1 billion


Bank of Anierica :finds it hard to


shake off mortgage troubles


Rescuers honored


for saving Gulf


Oil rig workers














THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW


The Week ;in. Rev~iew~l.:s


STOCKS OF LOCAL INTEREST I Weekly DOW JOneS


Weekly Stock Exchange Highihs


SNYSE
8,400.31 -83.63


Gainers (52 or mr)
Name LastChCg
Grhmk22.98 +6.23 +37.2
NoahEduc 2 75 +.54 +24 4




AtlsnyG ~ 2.95 +3.22 +14.2




Losers (s2 or mr)
Name LastChhg

AC nas 151 -.8 -29.1
myHt 31.90 -8 40 -20.8
KVPhmB 4.15-1.00 -19.4
KVPhmA 4.16 -.87 -17.3
ldisrs 3.26 -.64 -16.4
PIGrp 2.20 -.40 -15.4
Dmdn 19.38 -3.42 -15.0
Cur 31.30 -5.39 -14.7
LITVh 5.06 -.85 -14.4

Most Active (si or mr)
Name Vol (00) Last Cg
Ctgp18521231 4.42 -.14
S&P00EF6761413204-.82
Bkfm 6424176 1782 -.66
FrM 3319645 14.71 -.62
SPRFncl2823168 16.14 -.32
ihlvr2802202 41.84 +1.98
iEks2T/3272 49.14 -.91
Srnex2716554 4.81 +.08
S2K2604116 83.51 -.47
Alcte]uc155505.96 +.23


Advanced1,243
Declined1,913
NwHighs 218
NwLows 54
Totalissues 3,213
Unchanged57
Voue 19,561,8002


I~


MUTUAL FUNDS
Total Assets Total Retum/Rank Pct Min Init
Name Obj ($Mlns) NAV 4-wk 12-mo 5-year Load Invt


__ ___


Stok(Footnotes:*-- --*** ----**--*****- - ** --** *-**- *-..



Mutual Fund Foolnotes:*--***-~-***"~-**-~ --**--*-- -*-- -

Lo *.............. e *-- ---u~dcie ~~-~-* -
.............**Sear~1ce:**el---*-*-----"-*-l-


1,098
1,667
147
113
2,825
60
9,061,366,355


MODn RateS
Last Pvs Week
PieRate 3.25 3.25
DicutRate 0.75 0.75
FdalFunds Rate .00-.25 .00-.25
Treasuries
3-month 0.06 0.04
6-month' 0.12 0.711


CUrfenCIeS
Last Pvs DY

Australia .9463 .9488


Canada .9606 .9605
Euro *.6927 .6901
Japan 83.13 83.54
Mexico 11.6719 11.7253
Switzerind .8929 .8925


.................- -.....-.......- ....------........----.....- -........-----__* -
**1******-----"*__***************** **************** **-*********- **** ***********
I*__ _ 1__ ._._ U.I__........ ............ .....
..... .-............--.- .. ...- -....-.,--***-*****--***- -**-Source:*******-


5-year
10 -year
30-year


2.11 2.30
3.40 3.57
4.46 4.63


New York Stock Exchange





If YOu Aren't~ at YOur Last Job

WhyIs Your ox1k)?


Leaving a 401(k) with a previous employer could mean
leaving it alone with no one to watch over it.

At Edward Jones, we can explain options for your 401(k)
and help you select the one that's best for you. If you'd
like to roll it over to an Edward Jones Individual Retire-
ment Account (IRA), we can help you do it without
paying taxes or penalties. And you can feel confident
that someone is looking out for you and your 401(k).



To Endlt outl wh~y it. makes s-enlse to, talk with Edfward
Jones aboutl your 401(k) options, .= I or vis~it yoar
local hnanic~ial advjsr~c ted~ay


Name Div Yld PE Ch~Y %Chq Last


I I


South~nCo 1.82 4.7
SthnCopperl.83 5.0
SwstAirl .02 .2
SwstriEngy ... ..
SpectraEn 1.04 3.8
SprintNex .. ..
SPMadls 1.23 3.1
SPHithC .61 1.8
SP CnSt .81 2.6
SPConsum .56 1.4
SPEngy 1.05 1.4
SPDR Fncl .16 1.0
SP Minds .64 1.7
SP Tech .33 1.3
SP Util 1.31 4.1
StarwdHil .30 .5
StateStr .72 1.6
Suncorgs .40 ..
Suntech .. ..
SunTrst .04 4
Supvalu .35 3.3
Synovus .04 1.5
Sysco 1.04 3.6
TE Connect .64 1.8
TaiwSemi .47 3.8
Talbots .. ..
TalismEg .25 ..
Target 1.00 2.0
TeckResg .60 ..
TenetHlth .-.
Teradyn .. ..
Tesoro .. ..
Texlnst .52 1.5
Textron .08 .3
3M Co 2.20 2.4
TimeWamn .94 2.6
Transoon .79 1.0
Travelers 1.44 2.4
TrinaSolar .. ..
Tycolntl 1.00' 1.9
Tyson .16 .8
US Airwy .. ..
UnionPac 1.52 1.5
UtdContl .. ..
UPSB 2.08 2.9
USBancrp .50 1.9
US NGs rs .. ..
US OilFd .. ..
USSteel .20 .4
UtdhlthGp .50 1.1
Vale SA .90 2.9
Vale ~pf 90 3 1

VangEmg .82 1.7
VerizonCm1.95i 5.2
ViacomB .60 1.3
Visa .60 .8
VMware .. ..
WMS .. ..
Walgm .70 1.7
WsteMinc 1.36 3.6
Weathfinti ..
WellsFargo .20 *.7
WendyArby .08 1.7
WDigital .. ..
WstnRefin .. ..
WstnUnion .28 1.3
Weyerb .60 2.6
WmsCos .50 1.6
WT India .15 .6
XL Grp .44 1.8
Xerox .17 1.6
Yamanag .12 .9
YumBmds 1.00 2.0


I


__


3.5 14 +1.69 +5.9 33.36
..11 -.50 +10.8 11.21
... .. 04 +10.0 6.59
... 8 -.49 -4.0 44.13
.9 28 +.07 -1.7 18.44
5.4 8 .+.32 +2.8 36.01
2.1 16 +.71 +23.3 37.88
....-.29 -1.7 9.30
40 +9 1. 0488
12.1 8 +.06 -4.5 7.79
....-.35 -14.0 8.76
....+.85 -5.7 14.00
.8 12 -.43 -3.6 24.40
1.2 ... +.86 +1.2 63.51
1.9 15 -1.43 +38.6 51.33
.7 ... -2.51 ... 61.44
.4 ... -1.95 +7.7 40.82
7.2 ... -1.TI +1.7 40.58
1.0 30 -.47 -17,9 34.10
.5 ... -.06 +15.3 7.98
2.3 ... -.23 -14.1 13.18
.4 ... -2.05 +20.4 64.61
2.2 13 +1.38 +10.7 41.05
4.4 17 +.84 -4.2 34.51
1.7 13 -.57 -1.1 43.96
..31 -.16 +30.6 16.50
..+.11 -13.3 4.69
..... +7.03 +48.7 74.22
1.7 28 +1.11 -3.3 67.33
..-.32 -28.9 16.79
.7 11 -.27 -.8 26.98




Wkly YTD Wkly
Yld PE Chq %/Chg Last
1.6 24 -.49 +7.4 53.14
..13 -.33 -20.0 5.88
..8 -1.38 -8.1 53.40
..... +1.42 -3.8 33.85
..9 +.01 -6.2 46.78
. +.31 +11.9 2.63
....+.03 -26.2 3.32
4.1 6+1.80+c17.4 17.64
+1.59 +157.1 5.81
+5.21 +81.0 124.56
.. +.08 +12.6 1.84
..29 -1.23 -8.1 26.32
.. .. ..+33.3 3.56
2.0 16 -.27 -12.3 19.98
....-.28 +92.3 3.75
1.4 27 +.61 +13.2 36.38
2.2 28 -.95 -2.8 17.78
..37 -1.11 +22.7 15.74
..... +1.77 +107.4 9.85
..24 +.31 +10.6 18.52
.9 22 +.84 +16.4 22.11
1.6 13 -.06 -24.3 5.13
1.6 15 -.45 -4.1 50.01
60 +2.68 +49.8 29.52
... .. +01 +.1 8.64
10 -.55 +11 1.2

19 -.27 -14.4 30.64
.6 ... +.36 +2.5 27.91
4.5 ... +.31 +11.2 29.39
7.9 18 +.08 -9.0 1288
2.4 13 -.19 +8.6 31.46
..18 -.15 -.1 16 62
.2 ... -1.03 -4.3 23.19
.. . 3.0 27.16
..4 +.40 -18.8 3.64


Wkly YTD Wkly
Yid PE Chg %Chg Last
3.7 10 -.27 -6.1 19.75
3.4 6T -.10 -7.5 14.12
..33 +1.32 +10.5 54.46
4 -.44 -9.5 6.26
... -.80 +27.8 18.50
..18 -.32 -16.2 5.54
2.3 18 -.90 +10.8 42.80
-.08 -92.8 .10
..10 -.52 +.2 51.90
....+.29 +76.0 1.73
12 -.15 +5.9 16.70
2.9 15 -.24 -4.2 33.14
17 -.65 -25.1 13.90
12 -.42 -13.9 15.97
3.4 14 +1.43 +5.4 26.80
3.4 30 -.57 +5.7 24.97
....+.74 +43.9 9.15
3.7 20 -.27 +10.2 37.69
..7 -.32 +34.0 10.75
2.5 6 -.70 -9.1 25.37
..+.15 +17.0 9.24
..13 -.24 +18.9 28.21
..30 +1.77 -11.6 48.56
80 +.63 +34.0 235.49
.9 15 +.23 +19.5 17.40
..6 +.04 +2.5 6.07
..45 +1.16 +21.5 18.71
... 13 --13 -3.0 9.58
.7 23 +.64 +9 2 34.18
..20 -.01-15.8 7.23
.9 41 +.15 -10.3 51.43
.3 36 -4.58 -7.6 38.07
.7 39 +.60 +38.4 29.83
4.8 39 +.07 -7.6 12.95
.. +.09 6 312
8 -.70 -27.0 7.45
.7 ... -.30 +4.0 56.65
. -.26 +62.6 4.13


AbdAsPac .42
AdeonaPh ..
AlexcoR g ...
AlldNevG ..
AlmadnM g ...
A2mApparel ...
ArcadiaRs ..
Aurizong ..
AvalRare n ...
BarcGS~il ..
Brigusgrs ..
CAMAC En ...
CanoPet ..
CelSci
CFCda g .01
CheniereEn ...
ChiGengM ...
ChinNEPet ...
ChinaShen ...
Crossh g rs ...
Crystallx g ...
DejourE g .
DenisnM g ...
EllieMae n ..
GascoEngy ...
GenMoly ..
GoldStr ...
GranTrrag ...
GrtBasG g ...
GtPanSilv g...
Hyperdyn ..
IndiaGC ..
KodiakOg ...
LongweiPI ...
LucasEngy ...
MadCatzg ...
Metalline ..
MdwGold a ...


6.0 ... +.03 +3.9 7.01
....-.57 -2.4 1.22
.. .14 +17.7 9.64
..... -1.45 +48.7 39.11
.. ..-.16 -4.2 4.53
....+.15 -42.6 .95
.. ..-.01 -51.8 .14
....-.47 -7.4 6.78
.. .17 +51.4 9.45
..... -1.01 +13.1 28.97
....-.08 -24.8 1.58
.. .. .36 -8.0 1.83
.. ..-.08 +33.6 .51
.05 -14.7 .70
+.28 +12.3 23.28
....-.26 +52.0 8.39
..-.0)2 -41.2 3.03
.. 2 -.18 -25.9. 4.27
.. ..+.55 -25.5 6.26
.. ..-.12 -57.1 1.08
....+.01 -55.4 .14
..-.03 +29.7 .42
.. ..-.11 -30.4 2.38
... .. .. .. 6.77
....-.05 +21.1 .42
....-.37 -18.7 5.27
..22 -.08 -34.2 3.02
....-.62 -8.6'7.36
... -.17 -13.9 2.55
....-.22 445.2 4.08
..... -.33 -13.7 4.28
.. .. .. -2.6 .56
.. ..-.14 -1.8 6.48
..3 -.16 -36.7 1.64
..-.60 +48.1 3.45
..12 -.04 +108.8 2.13
....-.10 -10.4 1.12
..-.06 +146.4 2.07


I I


Page Editor: Josh Blackmon, 754-0427


Wkly Wkly YTD
Name Ex Div Last Chq%ChgbChq
AT&T inc NY 1.72 30.65 06 4 2 +4 3

htca l Nu .12 1 .5 -14 -7. +.
AutoZone NY ... 280.08 +3.82 +1 4 +2.7
BkofAm NY .04 12.82 -.66 -4 9 -3.9
BobEvans Nasd .80 31.71 -.29 -0.9 -3.8

CS Y 1.0 7. 26 3+1 .
Chevron NY 2.88 106.24 -3.42 -3 1 +16 4
Niu, Nasd .24 1 03 -.6 3. -1 .



Fo~rdM NY .. 14.71 62 -4.0 -12.4
Geny~le NY 5. 20.904 -8.15-20.7 +9.6
Hoelhpr NY 1.00 38.17 +.71 +1.9 +87.9
iDhlpne NYs .14 10.03 +.05 +2c0.581
iFhmilvelrNY :7 41.84 +1.98 +050 +38.6
FShEMki NY .4 149.14 -.91 -1.8 +3.1
GehR2K. NY .89 83.51 -.47 -0.6 +96.7


Intel Nasd .72 19.75 -.27 -1.3 -6.1
JPMorgChNY 1.00 44.89 -1.95 -4.2 +5.8
Level3 Nasd ... 1.73 +.29 +19.8 +76.0
Lowes NY .44 27.05 +.23 +0.9 .+7.9


1.06 -117.53


MON TUES


7.41 14.16


WED THUR


Name Ex Div
MGM Rsts NY ..

Mo Nsd
Microsoft Nasd .64
NY Tmes NY ..
NextEraEnNY 220


OcciPet NY 1 84
PP ~rpN 1 4



&P50ETF NY 2.34
PeSirisX Nas 1...
Southnr NY 1.82
Spritase NY ...
SP Eng NY 1.05
S8PDR0acNY .16

TenetHIANY 1...


TimeWamNY .94
WalMart NY 1.46
WellsFargoNY .20


Wkly Wkly YTD
Last Chg%Chg%Chq
14 00 + 85 +6.5 -5.7


25.37 70 -2.7 -9.1
8.86 62 -6.5 -9.6
55.12 -.88 -1.6 46.0

1.1 + 6 + 0 21.
98.76 -4 96 -4 8 t7
27.0 +1. t4 + .




378 4 +.27 +0.3 +65.4
1.841 +1.08 +4.3 +12.6
378.3 -2.07 -702 +.3
40.81 +.08 +1.7 +137 2
T/.19 -2.53 -3.2 +13.1
16.14 -.32 -1.9 +1.2
63.66 -.89 -11.8 -.4
36.05 +508 +1.6+12.1
53.55 +1.01 +1.9 -1.7


29.89 -1.73 -5.5 -3.5


Dow Jones industrialS
Close: 12,341.83

121 ek change: -38.22 (-0.3%)
1250


Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
Sunlink 2.55 +.63 +32.8
SearchMed 2 32 +.48 +26.1




Raereni g 1.62 +1 20 +81.3




Losers (s2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg

in OGS 324 -.7 -- 6
ContMatls 16.97 -3.72 -18.0
Inuvors 2.19 -.48 -18.0
VimetX 22.87-~4.62 -18.8
AmLorain 2.01 -.36 -15.2
LucasEngy 3.45 -.60 -14.8
ChiArmM 2.06 -.33 -13.8
Solitario 3.03 -45 -12.9
DocuSec 3.43 -.50 -12.7

Most Active (si or more]
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
RareEleg 387219 15.62+1.20
AvalRare n 316889 9.45 +.17
KodiakO g 206241 6.48 -.14
GtPanSilvg192443 4.08 -.22
NwGold g 1T/190 10.65 -.84
CAMAC En 168049 1.83 +.36
ChinaShen l64190 6.26 +.55
GoldStrg 154432 3.02 -.08
NovaGld g 146857 13.27 -.49
ParaG&S 141584 3.21 -.77

Diar
Advanced 171
Declined 349
New Highs 27
New Lows 18
Totalissues 539
Unchanged 19
Volume 747,693,848


Gainers ($2 or more)
Name' Last Chg %Chg
TastyBak 4.00 +2.39+148.4
GlobCrsg 25 78 +10.98 +74 2




Gden~inun 4.2 .40 +4.0+257

Namle Last Chg0 %Chg
AdA-~Ecd 5 1 +152-1 t3
VmyN wt 2.25 -.75 t325.0
Quick~og 39.72-1.15 -323.6
Chahgdn2t .20-1.521 2.1

Gevoinn 0.34-4+.96 -19.6


Most Ativ ($1 or more)
Name Vol (00) LastChg
CiscoS 3182771 1.03 -4.62
Pw~ldhs QQQ528625. -.30
ntl 2.2911 1.75 -2.27
Mhicrsofl 2.2280 2.5.3 -2.7
SirusXM 1815157 .084 +.08
MwicRon 155487 10.7 -2.32
Dell nc 128736 14.92 +1.35


Nevidi 1079620 18.71 +.16


Yahroo 1024753 16.62 -.15



Diar


12,000 i- -


11,500----i;-- C ..


10,500O D


M A


136,168
67,270
63,411
60,842
59,258
58,419
55,597
54,608
54,296
51,453
49,590
45,650
44,807
40,310
39,416
37,574
36,439
35,114
34,776
33,932
33,332
32,540
32,521
29,883
29,088
28,368
28,359


+7.4/8
+9./D
+13.2/B
+12.4/A
+10.2/C
+11.1/B
+9.2/0
+11.1/B
+12.5/A
+12.5/A
+8.0/D
+10.2/B
+8.8/C
+12.8/A
+10.5/B
+11.1/B
+12.91A
+12.2/A
+10.1/C
+11.5/C
+7.1/8
+10.9/A
+10.9/B
+17.4/A
+9.3/C
+14.1/A
+14.7/D


+8.7/A
+2.5/C
c4.6/A
43.2/B
+4.3/C
+2.7/B
+4.4/8
+2.6/8
+4.6/B
+3.31B
+2.4/C
t 3.5/A
+0.2/D
+2.5/B
+4.91A
+2.7/B
46.3/A
44.0/A
+3.3/A
+5.6/A
+8.5/A
+4.3/B
+2.5/8
+6.2/A
+6.0/A
+8.0/A
+5.3/9


NL 1,000,000
5.75 250
NL 2,500
NL 3,000
5.75 250
NL 5,000,000
5.75 250
NL 10,000
5.75 250
NL 10,000
5.75 250
NL 2,500
NL 2,500
5.75 250
5.75 250
NL 200,000,000
4.25. 1,000
5.75 250
NL 3,000
5.75 250
NL 1,000,000
5.75 250
NL 3,000
NL (2,500
NL 50,000
NL 50,000
NL 2,500


PIMCOTotRetis CI
AmericanFundsGrthAmA m LG
FidelityContra LG
Vanguard TotStidx LB
AmericanFundsCaplnc&uA m IH
Vangualulantaldxl LB
PamesicanFundsCpWidGriA m WS
Vanguard500OAdml LB
American Funds IncAmerA m MA
Vanguard TolStlAdm LB
American Funds InvCoAmA m LB
Dodge&CoxintlStk FV
Dodge &Cox Stock LV
American Funds WAMutinvA m LV
AmericanFundsEurPacGrA m FB
VLyou rJ nItPlub LB
Flrn Temi-Frank.n Inrncome Am CA
Amentan Funds Fninv4 m LB
Vanguad ~TOllr.II FB
American Funds NewPerspA m WS
PIMCOTotRetAlfm b Cl
American Funds BalA m MA
Vanguard 5001ny LB
Fidelity GrowCo I LG
Vanguard WelltnAdm MA
Harbor Intllnsil d FB
Fidelity LowPriStk d MB


n iatirB


9 0361 1 8353


Advanced
Declined
New Highs
New Lows
Total issues
Unchanged
Volume


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div Yld PE Cha %6Cha Last


.Wkly YTD Wikly
Div Yld PE Chg %bChg Last


Name


16 -.07 +.3
.20 -3.38 -25.2
19 -.05 -10.4
23 -.59 +6.8
17 +.32 +10.0
..+.08 +13.7
..-.84 +2.5
+.60 +7.7
... .59 +5.2
+.19 +4.9
... -2.53 +13.1
..-.32 +1.2
..-.29 46.5
..-.19 +2.2
..+.12 +2.4
23 +1.05 -5.4
14 -.65 -2.0
33 -2.86 +14.4
6 -.39 +12.7
... -1.51 -4.6
... +1.20 +10.3
..+.01 +2.3
15 +.60 -2.5
13 +1.69 +.6
-... 44 -2.6
20 -.59 -30.6
... -1.36 +5.0
13 +.71 -16.4
... -5.41 -16.0
3 -.89 -.4
9 -.83 +21.9
13 +.75 +43.1
13 -.18 +7.7
88 -.91 +11.1
16 -.40 +7.6
15 +.58 +12.1
25 -4.02 +8.7
9 +.22 +7.3
7 +.19 +24.0
17 t4.55 +24.8
8 +.32 +14.0
4 +.15 -19.2
18 +2.61 +6.1
14 +1.23 -11.8
20 -.54 +.2
15 -.25 -3.9
..+.44 -8.1
... -1.44 +12.1
... -2.28 -13.5
11 +.80 +24.6
.. .76 -5.2
-.80 -3.

..-.82 +2.9
29 +.13 +5.8
16 +.28+20.3
18 -.25 +8.7
88 +3.22 -3.3
17 -4.86 -30.5
18 +.86 +7.5
19 -.07 +2.7
..-.78 -7.8
14 -1.73 -3.5
-11 +4.8
8 -06 +14.3
+.65 +71.8
15 +.29 +13.4
6 -.92 +19.9
23 +.22 +25.6
..-.20 -5.6
14 -.72 +12.1
25 +.03 -6.9
21 -.50
20 +1.79 +4.2


ACE Ltd 1.32 2.0
AESCorp .. ..
,AFLAC 1.20 2.3
iAKSteel .20 1.3
AMR .....
~AT&T Inc 1.72 5.6
fbtLab 1.92 3.7
JAccenture .90 1.6
AM .. ..
A~etna .60 1.6
Agilent ..
AirTran .. ..
AlcatelLuc .
Alcoa .12 .7
Allstate .84 2.7
AlphaNRs ... ..
Altria 1.52 5.6
AEagle~ut .44 2.7
AEP 1.84 5.2
'AmExp .72 1.6
'AmTower .. ..
'Anadarko .36 .4
AInalogDev.88 2.3
'Annaly 2.62 15.0
'Apache ..60 .5
'ArcelorMit .75 2.1
'ArchCoal .40 1.2
'ArchDan .64 1.8
'ArcosDorn ... ..
'AssuredG .18 1.0
'ATMOS 1.36 4.1
'BB&TCp .64 2.4
BHP BillLt 1.82 1.8
IBHPgilplc 1.82 2.2
BgakrHu .60 .9
BgcoBrades .82 4.1
IgcoSantSA .79 6.7
IgcoSBrasil .70 6.0
IBkofAm .04 .3
18kireind. 1.04 ..
IBkNYMel .52 1.7
Igar iPVix rs ... ..
I8arrickG .48 .9
IBaxter 1.24 2.3
SIBerkH B .. ..
IBestBuy .60 2.1
IBlackstone .40 2.2
IBlockHR .60 3.4
IBoeing 1.68 2.3
IBostonSci .. ..
IBrMySq 1.32 4.7
KBE REllis .. ..
T~SGe .0 .
CMS Eng .84 4.4
CSX ..' 1.
Cameco g 40 ..
Cameron .
IdnNRsgs 36 ..
,CapOne .20 .4
CardnlHlth .78 1.9
,Camnival 1.00 2.6
,Caterpillar 1.76 1.6
,Cemex .43 ..
,CenterPnt .79 4.4
ICntryLink 2.90 7.2
,ChesEng .30 .9
,hevron 2.88 2.7
Fhimbra .68 16.8
Filigrp .. ..
CliffsNRs .56 .6
oah .80 1.1

'CocaCola 1.88 2.8
Coeur .. ..
'ColgPal 2.32 2.8
'Comerica .40 1.1
:CmlyHIt ..


7 +.09 +5.8
16 -.43 +5.3
10 -1.41 -7.4
..-.43 -6.2
..-.12 -27.5
9 -.06 +4.3
14 +1.89 +8.3
19 1.02 +12.7
13 -.20 +1.1
9 +.83 +22.7
23 +2.61 +14.7
28 +.05 -.3
.23+c101.4
23 -1.40 +7.3
18 +.01 -1.5
89 -1.97 -8.2
14 +.T/ +9.7
23 +.12 +9.6
14 +.15 -1.4
14 -.03 ~+7.8
54 +.30 -2.1
5) -4.29 +5.6
14 -.90 +1.3
9 +.18 -2.8
14 -7.76 +2.7
18 -1.90 -8.3
32' -.79 -3.8
11 -.44 +15.8

6 +2.67 -.6
17 -.26 +7.5
23 -.70 +.9
... -1.52 +7.4
... -2.32 +2.1
35 -1.09 +23.3
-.71 -.3
-.55 +11.5
..-.21 -14.6
19 -.66 -3.9
..-.28 -23.4
14 -.50 -1.6
... -1.37 -26.7
16 -1.04 +.3
15 +1.23 +8.6
15 -.91 +1.0
, 9 -.70 -15.9
.. .09 +31.3
14 +.24 +48.3
16 -.87+11.2
..-.27 -6.5
16 +.37 +5.3
44 +1.44 +41.2


15 +.02 +3.7


... -1.39 -29.5
23 -2.14 +5.2
...-4.02 +2.2
8 -1.62 +17.6
15 -1.21 +6.9
16 +.58 -17.6
26 -2.61 +14.5
..+.02 -14.0
16 +.38 +13.7
12 -.43 -13.3
11 -1.29 +26.3
11 -3.42 +16.4
6 ... -4.6
13 -.14 -6.6
13 -4.35 +20.9
20 +3.70 -1.5
... -1.37 +14.8
13 +.74 +3.4
... -5.39 +14.6
17 +.53 +1.8
48 +.11 -10.2
11 -8.40 -14.6


ConAgra .92
ConocPhil 2.64
ConsolEngy .40
ConEd 2.40
ConstellEn .96
Coming .20
Covklien .80
DR Horton .15
DTE 2.24
DeanFds ..
Deere 1.40
DeltaAir ..
DenburyR ..
DevonE .68
DrSCBr rs ..
DirFnBr rs ..
DrxFBull s .
DirxSCBull ...
Discover .2`4
Disney .40
DomRescs 1.97
DowChm 1.00
DrPepSnap1.00
DukeEngy .98
EMC Cp ...
Edisonlnt 1.28
EIPasoCp .04
Elan ..
EldorGldg .10
EmersonEl l.38
EnCanag .80
EndvSilvg ...
Exelon' 2.10
ExxonMbt 1.76
FairchidS ..
FMajilv g ...
FirstEngy 2.20
FlagstB rs ...
FordM ..
FMCG s 1.00
FrontierCm .75
Galisa SA .14
GameStop ...
Gannett' .16
Gap .45
GenGrPr n .40
GenMills s 1.12
GenMot n .
Gen~nEn ...
Genworth ..
Gerdau .25
GoldFtd~ .19

GodanS 1.440
Goodyear ..

Gahkgk
GpTelevisa ...
HCA HId n ..
Hallibrtn .36
HarleyD .40
HarmonyG .07
HarltdFn .40
HltMgmt
HeclaM
Hertz
Hess .40
HewlettP .32
HomeDp 1.00
Honwlilnti 1.33
HorizLns ..
HostHotls .08
Huntsmn .40
IAMGld g .08
iShGold s ..
iSAstia .82
iSh~raz 2.53
iSCan .50
iShGer .29


17 +1.04 +9.3 24.89
12 -1.67 +16.2 79.12
30 -1.68 +4.3 50.84
15 -.19 +2.3 50.71
11 +.47 +9.6 33.56
9 +.19 +2.3 19.77
17 +1.38 +17.8 53.80
82 -.08 -3.4 11.53
13 +.13 +8.9 49.34
18 -.42 +12.0 9.90
19 -2.17 +12.9 93.76
13 +.21 -26.6 9.25
31 -2.16 +17.2 22.38
8 -3.58 +11.9 87.82
.. .59 -23.6 35.80
... +1.88 -12.4 41.37
... -1.34 +5.2 29.28
... -1.79 +18.4 85.78
11 +.43 +31.0 24.28
18 -.24 +10.7 41.52
14 -.35 +4.1 44.47
21 -.74 +10.7 37.78
16 +.85 +9.0 38.31
13 -.04 +3.1 18.37
31 .+.78 +17.5 26.91
10 +1.45 +.3 38.72
16 +.56 +32.8 18.28
.. .01 +37.5 7.88.
48 +.01 -2.7 18.06
21 -.20 +.7 57.55
18 -1.44 +13.2 32.95
..-.39 +163.2 11.98
13 +.21 -2.4 40.65
14 -1.66 +15.3 84.29
13 -.63 +17.8 18.39
..-.85 +63.2 23.69
15 +1.27 +3.7 38.40
..-.12 -18.4 1.33
7 -.62 -12.4 14.71
11 -5.81 -'14.8 51.17
35 +.08 -17.1 8.07
... -1.48 -12.0 12.78
10 +2.59 +15.4 26.40
6 -.02 -1.9 14.80
12 +.22 +2.0 22.47
.. .53 -.3 15.44
15 +1.14 +4.9 37.35
10 -1.28 -18.0 30.24
..-.28 -3.9 3.66
53 -.73 -6.7 12.26
..-.59 -12.8 12.20
3 -.67 -1.4 17.88

9 -58 -.15 .1
.. .15 +27.8 15.15


..-.57 -13.3 22.47
... -1.19 +3.1 31.98
23 -1.31+t14.7 46.82
61 +.99 +17.0 40.55
..-.75 +18.1 14.81
9 -.37 +1.2 26.80
16 -.28 +8.8 10.38
74 -.15 -14.7 9.61
32 +.83 +16.3 16.85
12 -5.36 +3.1 78.88
10 -.44 -4.4 40.26
19 +.71 +8.9 38.17
22 -.55 48.6 57.75
..-.02 -60.4 1.73
+.32 -4.8 17.02
27 +.56 +26.1 19.69
26 -3.03 +12.8 20.07
..+.14 +4.5 14.53
..-.33 +7.0 27.23
... -2.50 -.4 77.11
... -1.18 +6.8 33.11
..-.15 +11.6 26.72


Mosaic .20
MotriaSoln ...
NCR~orp ...
NYSE fur t.20
Nabors ..
NBkGreece .29
Natjrki 7.04
NOilVarco .4
NatSemi .40
NewAlliBc .28
NewmtM 1.9
NextEraEn 2.20
NiSource .92
NikeB 1.24
NobleCorp .98
NokiaCp .55
NorflkSo 1.60
Novartis 2.53
Nucor 1.45
OcciPet 1.84
OfficeDpt ..
OilSvHT 2.42
PG&ECp l.82
PMI Grp ..
PNC 1.40
PPLCorp 1.40
PatriotCoal ...
PeabdyE .34
Penney .80
PepsiCo 1.92
Petrobawke ...
PetrbtsA 1.41
Petrobras 1.41
Prizer .ao
PhilipMor 2.56
Potash s .28
PrUShS&P ...
PrOUltQQQ ...
PrUShQQQrs... -
ProUltSP .39
ProUShl20 ...
ProUSSP500...
ProUSSlv rs...
Pronavin 1.40
ProLogis .45
ProUSR2K rs...
Prudently 1.15
PSEG 1.37
PulteGrp ..
Qihoo360 n ...
QntmDSS ..
QksilvRes ..
Rainrp .0

RangeRs .16


ReneSola ..
RioTinto s 1.08
RiteAid ..
RylCarli .
SpdrDJIA 3.00
SpdrGold ..
S&P500ETF2.34
SpdrKbwBk .15
SpdrRetl .50
SpdrOGDx .49
SpdrMetM .41
Safeway .48
St~ude .84
SandRdge ...
Sanoli 1.63
SaraLee .46
Schlmbrg 1.00
Schwab .24
SemiHTr .55
SiderurNac .58
SilvWhtng .12
SilvropM g .08


15 -4.56 -3.3
23 -.05 +15.1
15 -.27 +22.2
19' +.31 +30.1
95 -.22 +33.6
..-.12
... +.95 +11.4
19 -3.13 +13.8
19 +.08 +75.3
S25 +.15 -1.3
13 -.24 -6.0
14 -.88 +6.0
18 +.19 +8.8
19 +1.34 -7.8
14 -2.83 +19.6
..-.38 -16.1
17 +.05 +7.8
13 +.66 -5.1
... -1.19 +3.2
18 -4.96 +.7
-... 09 -23.9
... -5.80 +11.3
18 +.12 -6.2
...-.40 -33.3
11 -.98 +1.9
13 +1.13 +2.6
... -1.40 +28.2
22 -2.54 +2.5
22 +.06 +15.3
17 +1.38 +2.7
61 +2.07 +44.2
... -2.36 -.9
... -2.83 -.1
20 +.07 +17.2
.17 +.73 +13:7
28 -2,29 +7.9
+... 26 -11.2
..-.99 +7.4
.. .54 -10.0
..-.63 +10.0
... -2.26 -.9
..+.28 -17.1
... -2.00 -55.1
12 +.17 +7.9
..+.48 +12.1
+.48 -15.7
9 -1.28 +3.9
10 -,02 -1.9
.. +4.0
... +3.94 -13.5
..+.28 -17.2
6 +.56 -3.1
-.2 2 .

... -4.08. +18.4


5 -.58 +5.4
.. -3.02 -1.0
-.01 +17.8
15 -.45 -18.9
..-.34 +6.5
... +1.39 +4.6
..-.82 +5.0
-.68 -2.0
.. .18 +7.8
... -2.46 +16.6
... -2.57 +5.4
16 +.97 +10.4
18 +.70 +23.9
15 -1.04 +62.6
... +1.06 +16.4
36 +.18 +5.8
25 -4.19 t3.8
49 +.26 44.8
..-.52 +5.6
... -1.17 -6.1
51 -4.30 +9.1
38 -1.79 +10.7


www.edwardlones.com Member SIPC ,


Wkly YTD Wkly
PE Cha %6Chg Last


PE Chg%ChgLas 1~


maN e Div YId


Name Div
Kraft 1.16
LDK Solar ..
LSICorp ..
LVSands ..
LennarA .16
UillyEli 1.96
Limited .80
LaPac ..

NEC
MFA Fnl .94
MGIC ..
MGM Rsts ...
Macys .20
Manpwl .74
Marathon01.00
MkIVGold .40
MlktVRus .18
MktVJrGld 2.93
MarlntA .35
Marshals .04
Masco .30
MasseyEn .24
Medimic .90
Merck 1.52
MetLife .74
MetroPCS ..
MitsuUFJ ..
Molycorp n ...
Monsanto 1.12
MonstrWw.
MorgStan .20





Name Div
Quaicom .86
RF MicD ..
RschMotn ..
Riverbed s ..
SanDisk ..
Sanofi rt ..
Satcon h ..
SeagateT .72
SifyTech
Sina
SiriusXM ..
SkywksSol ...
Sonus ..
Staples .40
StarScient ..
Starbucks .52
StiDynam .40
SunPowerA ...
SwisherH n ...
Symantec ..
TDAmerlr .20
Tellabs .08
TevaPhrm .78
TibcoSft ..
TiVoloc ..

Vrnm~s
UrbanOut ..
VirgnMda h.16
Vodafone 1.33
Windstrm i.00
Xilinx .76
Yahoo ..
ZionBcp .04
Zipcar n .
ZoomTech ..


Yld


iSh HK .45
IShJapn .14
iSh KOr 44
IShSing .43
iSTaiwn .29
iShSilver ..
iShChina25 .63
iSSP500 2.46

iB0T 3 9
iS Eafe 1 42
IShR2K 869
iShREst 1.98
IBM 2.60
Intl Coal ..
Intllame .24
IntPap 1.05
Interpublic .24
Invesco .44
Ironhrln .75
ItauUnibH- .67
JPMorgCh 1.00
Jabil .28
JohnJn 2.16
JohnsnCti .64
JnprNtwk ...
KB Home .25
KKR n .52
Keycorp .04
Kimco .72
Kinrossg .10
Kohls 1.00


-.03 +3.4
+.05 -8.1
+.65 +7.2
+.11' +1.8
-.37 -3.5
+1.98 +38.6
-.23 +6.3
-.74 +5.0

+27 -.5
-.33 +4.7
-.47 +6.7
+1.19 +6.6
+2.16 +13.3
+.02 +42.1
-.28 -10.9
+.05 +9.9
-.22 +11.9
-.95 +3.8
+1.16 +38.1
-.66 -1.5
-1.95 +5.8
-.61 -4.5
+1.10 -2.1
-1.14 +2.5
+.06 +4.0
-.22 -15.6
+.83 +28.3
-.05 -.3
+.51 +.1
-.93 -17.4
-.93 -2.0


Name Div
Clearwire h ...
CognizTech ..
Comcast .45
Come spel .45
Compuwre ...
CorinthC ..
Cree Inc ..
CypSemi ..
Dell Inc ..
Dndreon ..
DirecTV A .
dnrgstre ..
DryShips ..
e~ay ..
Erth~nk .20
ElectArts .
EndoPhrm ..
EntropCom ...
EricsnTel .35
Expedia .28
ExpScrip s ...
F5Netwks.
FifthThird .24
Finisar ..
FstNiagara .64
Flextrn ..
FocusMda ..
GSI Cmce h...
GT Solar ..
GileadSci ..
GlobCrsg ..
Google ..
GreenMIC s...
HercOffsh ..
HudsCity .60
HumGen ..
Identive ..
InfosysT .90


Wkly YTD Wkly
Yld PE Chg %bChg Last
..-.03 +15.5 5.95
33 -1.54 +7,4 78.72
1.8 19 -.19 +12.0 24.49
2.0 18 -.18 +11.4 23.07
..23 -.08 -5.1 11.07
....-.70 -17.3 4.31
..22 -2.59 -37.4 41.27
..36 -.73 -1.1 18.37
..11 +.35 +10.1 14.92
..... +3.13 +21.4 412.40
..19 +.41 +17.4 46.89
....-.07 +71.0 3.78
.. -.30 -13.8 4.73
..23 +.47 +13.6 31.61
2.5 11 +.16 -5.3 8.14
....+.27 +22.9 20.13
13 -.64 +12.6 40.21
..10 -.07 -34.9 7.86
2.8 ... -.62 +7.5 12.39
1.2 16 -1.64 -5.7 23.66
25 -.71 +2.6 55.44
..44 -.49 -27.3 94.69
1.7 22 +.10 -6.0 13.80
23 -.80 -15.9 24.96
4.6 19 +.37 +.1 14.00
14 -.21 -9.9 7.07
..27 +2.94 +56.3 34.27
t. .06. +26.8 29.45
..9 -.31 +6.3 9.69
..13 +.45+15.1 41.70
.....+10.98 +99.5 25.78
..19-47.46 -10.7 530.70
... ... .8 +99.7 65.63
....+.09+65.2 5.75
6.2 9 -.19 -24.0 9.68
.. .16 +21.0 28.90
... +.68 +33.3 3.36
.4 25 -8.84 -16.9 63.21


Name Div
Intel .72
Intersil .48
Intuit ..
JA Solar ..
JDS Uniph ...
JetBlue ..
KLA Tnc 1.00
LECG h
LamResrch ...
Level ..
LibtyMlntA ...
LinearTch .96
Logitech
MarvellT
Mattel .92
Maximlntg .84
MelcoCrwn ...
Microchp 1.38
MicronT ...
Microsoft .64
NPS Phm ..
Nasd0MX ..
NetApp ..
Nelfix ..
NewsCpA .15
Novell ..
Nvidia ..
OnSmend ...
Oracle .24
PMC Sra ..
Paccar .48
PanASly .10
PattUTI .20
Peop~tdF .62
Popular ..
Power-One ..
.PwShs 0QQ.39
Powrway ..


Wkly YTD Wkly
Chq %Chg Last


Wkly YTD Wkly
Chq %Cho Last


Name Div Yld PE


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div Yld PE Cha %Cha Last


Name


Div Yld PE


ASML Hld .54 '1.3
AcordaTh .. ..
ActivsBliz .17 1.5
'AdobeSy ... ..
'Adtran .36 .9
'AdvBattery ... ..
'AkamaiT .. ..
~AllscriplH ... ..
'AlteraCp if .24 .6
Amazon .. ..
ACapAgy 5.60 19.6
,AmCapLtd ... ..
~AmerMed .. ..
~AmSupt ..
Amgen .. ..
Amylin .. ..
A123 Sys ... ..
~Apple Inc .. ..
.ApidMatl .32 2.2
ArenaPhm ... ..
,ArmHld .09 .3
ArubaNet .
Almel .. ..
AvanirPhm ... ..
,Baidu s
,Bed~ath
,Biogenldc ... ..
IBrig Exp .. ..
IBroadcom .36 .9
IBrcdeCm .. ..
ICAlnc .16 .7
ICpstnTrbh ... ..
Ieelgene .. ..
,CellTher rsh... ..
pChkPoint .. ..
pCienaCorp ... ..
pCirrus .. ..
,Cisco .24 1.4


+4.4 40.04
+6.9 29.15
-9.7 11.23
+12.1 34.51
+12.8 40.83
-45.7 2.09
-19.0 38.09
+8.4 20.88
+21.3 43.17
... 180.01
-.7 28.53
+28.8 9.74
+56.3 29.48
-55.2 12.81
+1.1 55.51
-11.0 13.09
-42.2 5.51
+1.5 327.46
+4.8 14.72
-25.0 1.29
+41.1 29.28
+53.1 31.97
+8.4 13.35
-5.4 3.86
+52.1 146.81
+13.6 ~55.84
+23.7 82.96
+23.3 33.58
-12.2 38.23
+10.8 5.86
-1.1 24.18
+88.5 1.81
-3.7 56.98
+.3 .37
+17.0 54.11
+25.5 28.41
+5.4 16.84
-15.8 17.03


MincoG g .. ..
Minefnd g .. ..
NeoStem .. ..
Nevsun g .. .
NwGold g .. ..
NA Pall g .. ..
NDynMn g ... ..
NthnO&G .. ..
NlhgtM g .. ..
NovaGld g ... ..
Oilsan~dsg ... ..
OpkoHith
ParaG&S .. ..
PionDrillI ..
RadientPh
RareEle g
Rentech ..
RexahnPh
Rubicon g
Sams0&G
Solitario
SulphCo .. ..
Taseko .. ..
Tengsco .. ..
TmsatlPet .. ..
TriValley .. ..
Uluru .. ..
Ur-Energy ... ..
Uranerz .. ..
UraniumEn ...
VantageDri ... ..
VirnetX .50 ..
VistaGold .. ..
VoyagerOG ... ..
Walterlny 2.00 11.2
WizzardSit ...
YM Bio q


.. .01 -5.9
87 +.29 +41.3
..+.21 +42.6
..-.35 -15.9
..-.84 +9.1
-.76 -15.4
... -1.17 +2.0
69 -2.56 -14.1
36 +.13 -10.0
.. .49 -7.0
-.02 +9.5
-.01 +1.9
14 -.77 -19.5
..+.28 +69.7
-.05 -62.4
..+1.20 -2.7
.-.05 -3.3
-.03 +6.3
-.52 -8.4
-43 +159.1
.45 -16.5
..-.02 -35.9
..-.43 +5.1
..-.12 +63.)
..-.13 -11.
..-.11 +21.6
..-.00 -36.4
..-.09 -44.8
..-.16 -21.6
-.10 -32,3
.. .10 -6.4
16 -4.62 +54.0
..-.43 +41.4
-.54 -28.7


LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS &( HOME SUNDAY, APRIL 17, 2011


Amex Nasdaq


Wkly YTD Wkly
Div Yld PE Chg %/Ch Ls


Steve Jones, CFP*
Financial Advisor


2929 West U S Highway 90
Suite 114
Lake City, FL 32055
386-752-3847


Nasdaq Most Active


AMEX Most Activle





















I


C~T~I~~-


~J~r--


IYIUDY"


I


10 Oopbportunities
Hiring Locally This Week
Liberty National Life
Insurance Company
Full Training Provided Potential
of $60K+ Annually. 401K, BCBS
Insurance & Pension for those who
qualify. Call l-800-257-5500
to set up an interview.

Delivery Driver, must be 21 yrs
old, have 6 pts or less on license
and have NO misdemeanors or fel-
onies. Must possess a Class A
CDL,apply within/no phone calls!
North Florida Sales
467 SW Ring Ct, Lake City

Driver needed for Roll-Off Truck,
CDL, exp. preferred, duites in-
clizde delivery & pick up of con-
tainers, transported to varoius
county landfills and PT/FT Exp
Mechanic, w/knowledge of Heavy
Eq seodm r de s de reepa~irs.l gie
Waters @ 386-496-3867

Local law office needs
experienced legal secretary-
Workers compensation, personal
injury and general legal matters
experience preferred. Immediate
employment. Apply in person at
116 NW ColumbiaAve.,
Lake City, FL 32055.
Need EXPERIENCED
440-Insurance Agent*
Email Resizme to
LCinsjob@gmail.com

Optical Assistant & Lab Tech
Needed,F/T exp a plus,but we
will train, Send resume to 763 SW
Main Blvd, Lake City 32025

Securitas Security Services is
hiring FT/PT Security Officers in
the Lake City area. Must have a
class D security hecense and good
computer skills. Great Benefits.
Apply at: www.secunitasjobs.com
Lic#BB23000TO0 EOE M/~F//D

Wanted Highly motivated
individual for Sales Position.
Rountree -Moore Au~tomotive
Group, Great benefits, paid vaca-
tion. Exp. a plus but not necessary.
Call Tony Reese 386-344-7517

FLORIDA
t, )G~AOLEWGAE

(Formerly Lake City Com uniy Co lege)
ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR,
ACCOUNTING *
Teach accounting classes, general
business classes, and advise students
in class selections. Prepare and
she ue te ohnfg material seevn t
review, and update course outlines
syllabi and assessments. Meet
scheduled classes and use scheduled
cla srooam time aep ropriately. Maintain j
students to business major. Minimum I
Qualifications: Master's degree in
busmnesslaccounting with at least 18 1
graduate hours in accounting. Qualified
to teach a wide variety of freshman
and sophomore business/ accounting i
chisses. Ability to teach managerial
b dk epng aand onln acung
courses iDees iaeTQucalifica ins CPA :

develop distance-learning classes.
ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR, '
ECONOMics
Teach undergraduate courses in micro
and macro economics. Prepare and
schedule teaching materials relevant to I
instruction; prepare, review, and
update course outlines, syllabi and
tests. Meet scheduled classes and use I
scheduled classroom time
stadn a crd. Reci stns nt to
business major. Advise students in
Qual fiatosn ater' duemre with
minimum of 18 graduate credit hours in i
economics prefix courses. Computer
literate Aiity o teach ourse within
technology in the te iga clre.
coherent manner and the ability to
fairly evaluate student retention of that
info nation. Abil ty to work wel wth
College teaching experience. Minimum
of 18 graduate hours in discipline other
than economics (e.g. history, political I
science gotrpy nm 0 retc.). Abilit

164 Duty Days Tenured Track
Sato CoB ece Fall e0 nd
epryee plus b fits. *
A ppiection ,Deadline 514111
Persons interested should provide College
application, vita. and photocopies of
transcripts. All foreign transcripts must be
submitted with official translation and
evaluation.
Position details and applications available on
web at: ww~g~d
Human Resources
FoI da Geay eo le e
Lake City FI 32025 2007

me on (3. -41
E j- ;-?i~i .*_


402 Appliances

Family size upright freezer.
White, very nice. $260. obo
386-397-3269 or
386-292-3927
Kenmore Dryer, apt size,
120 voltage
386-397R3u89 or 38 292-3927
Nice White Gas Tappan Stove
$165. obo. Ready for LP gas but
will switch for you. 386-397-3269
or 386-292-3927
White clothes dryer. Good shape,
works great. $145 obo.
386-397-3269 or
386-292-3927
White Whirlpool Washer
$150
386-397-3269 or
386-292-3927


4 ComputerS

HP Computer,
$100100
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170
IBM Computer,
$65
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170 .



10" Table Saw
$75.00
386-758-6886


Belt Sander
$25.00
386-758-6886
8" Drill Press
$50
386-758-6886

Power
Sanding Black
$25
386-758-6886


640 2,o Hi~eeHomes

Palm Harbor Homes
Call about our
Extreme Makeover Home Sale
As Seen On TV!!i
800-622-2832

06 MH 3br/2ba.open floor plan
w/lg kit w'/l island, fireplace. 3 Riv-
ers Est, river access, MLS# 75661
Eastside Village Realty, Inc.
SDenise Millgan-Bose 752-5290
3/2 DWMH over 1700 sqft. New
Roof & CH/A. Doublesided fire-
place, custom kit w/breakfast nook
& wet bar. $89,500 MLS# 73861
386-623-6896 Access Realty
Hallmark Real Estate. DWMH
4/2 on 5 ac. 24X36 workshop.
Fireplace, kitchen island w/drop
down and more. $114,900.
MLS# 76188 386-867-1613
Oner Financi g-3 ly

$89,900! Call Taylor Goes
of Access Realty @ 386-344-7662.


650 Moble Home

Owner Fin, 3/2, S of Lake City,
quiet, wooded, 1.5 ac, sml dn $700
mo, 386-590-0642/386-8671833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
OWNER FINANCING
3br/2ba DWMH with 5 acres. 10
additional acres available. Daniel
Crapps Agency 386-623-6612

S705 Roomnsfor Rent;


010 Announcements









020 Lost &Found








LOST: Lg 3 yrold white Calico
female cat. Goes by "Hannah".
Lives on 240/Itchetucknee. 9 yr
old daughter brokenhearted. Please
call 386-288-3916 REWARD!!!


100 Job
OpportunitieS

04544161
Ladies and Gentleman
if you have A Class A CDL,
we have a Lease/with a lease
purchase plan*
We accept PTD! Certified
students. O/Operators. No '
New England States, 100%
fuel surcharge. Carolinas to
the great NW!
Call today to jomn us!
Buel Inc .
866-369-9744

05.525663
Teacher Positions


Lake City-FCCPC /CDA; 3 yrs
of classroom experience
preferred (individuals w/ HS
dip/GED and DCF 40 hrs. may
also apply). Excellent bienefits-
paid holidays, sick/annual leave,
health insurance, retirement +
add'1 benefits; Apply in person
at 236 SW Columbia Ave
(754-2222) or mail resume to
SV4Cs PO Box 2637,
Lake City, FL 32056-2637, by
email: arobinson@sv4cs.org
or Fax (386) 754-2220. EOE

AVON!!!, EAR up to 50%!!!

1-800-275-9945 pin #4a206
www.youravon.com/t aies

Busy office seeking
experienced, energetic person for
receptionist position.
Fax resume to 386-961-8802
CDL A Flatbed/Van 'luck
Driver needed for F/T OTR SE
area, 3 years exp or more, Contact
Melissa or Mary @ 386-935-2773


FLIORIDA

COLLGE
* * a*+
(Formerly Lake City Comrhunity College)
ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR,
194 Duty Nay R Nn rad Track
Conduatsthe learng r perienc in
clinical area. Prepare for instruction -
syllabi, lesson plans, tests; use
assessment strategies to assist the
continuous development of the
leamer; use effective Fommunication
techniques with students and others.
Demonstrate knowledge and ~
understanding of the subject matter,
use appropriate techriology in the
teaching an learning asre% of
Sienc in Nursir ode ree and be
licensed in FL or eligible for licensure
nnurse Tahote caep errd). A ilits t
present information in a coherent
mnev t an rh alit t fairat
information. Desirable Qualifications:
Computer literate. Teaching
experience
Salapri: Bsed on d re and
Application Deadline: 5/4/11
Persons interested should provide
College application, vita, and
p otaco ies of traisesiupts. All foreign
official translation and evaluation,
Position details and applications
available on web~at: wwwv.fqc.edu
Human Resources
Florida Gateway College
149 S.E. College Plae `
Lake City FI 32025-2007
Phone (386) 754-4314
Fax (386) 754-4814
E-Mail: flumanrfceu
r0i0 is accredited by) th COmlmissiOn on Colleges of
the~soutrhcm Alsociatil onorcolleges and chool,.
VP/iADAAA:EU College inlEducation and
lmp melnt







Lawn & Landscape Service

Landscape Maintenance Company
You can trust for knowledge &
pride, Mention this AD!
Mow Green, LLC 386-288-6532


Se CViceS

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY'
RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.


Land Services'

Back Hoe, Dozer, Chopping, root
raking, bush hog, seeding, sod
disking, site prep, ponds &
irri ation. Free Est! 386-623-3200


10 Oopbportunities
Wanted OTR CLASS A CDL
Driver, must have TWIC card and
passport. Heavy haul exp. req.
Call Jerry Bash 386-965-0879.



.LUEmnploylnent

oss256so




Meridian Behavioral
Healthcare, Inc.
Swww~mbhei~ory

Please visit our website to view
current open opportunities
and to apply online:

LicensedT o psers Level
in Outpatient
Bachelor's-Level in
Counselor Support
Case Management
(adult & child)
Outpatient
Medical Services
Psychiatrist
CSU RN Nursing Manager
.(G'Ville)
ARNP (Psych exp, Child Pref)
RN, LPN, C.N.A.
Recovery Specialist
(Direct Care)

Meridian is an active partner
with the National Health
Service Corps

To see our current openings in
Mental Health and to apply
online, please go to:
www~mbhci~orP
EOE, DFWP, E-Verify
CNA/home attendant needed in.
private home. Will Work with oth-
er caregivers. Nights & weekends
req'd. Send resume to: PO Box
3719 Lake City, Florida 32056

Experienced LPN wanted to work
in busy medical practice. Knowl-
edge with pediatric & adults de-
stred. No weekends or nights,
competitive salary & benefits
Fax Resume to 386-758-5628
HeallhCore Physical Therapy
has an immediate pdenin forlan

Therapy Assistant for our
outpatient clinics. Excellent pay &
great work environment. Fax re-
sume to: 386-755-6639 or email
to: healthcorelibby@bellsouth.net,
All resumes kept confidential
Licensed, Experienced, PTA
for busy outpatient clinic
Send reueto P.O. Bo 714
Lak Cte, FL 32056 or
Equail to: pta714@hotmail.com


20 Tutori 88

Will Tritor Your Student! Certi-
fied, Masters Degree w/18 yrs exp,
Atumome or 2irrAtrs ho Ir


240 ~RjSchos&

04544098 .
Interested mna Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-04/11/10

Phlebotomy national certifica- -
tion, $800 next class-04/11/11

Continuing education

Fee eincl ab ok,- 52pls ean
expresstralningservices.com


310 Pets &Supplies

PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.


361 Farm Equipment

84 Ford 4610 Tractor. Runs good.
Solid 2WD. New front tires,
350hr on 2005 motor. Dependable.
$7500. obo. 386-867-0005


~1C~6~7~~


Room w/private bath. Microwave,
fridge, laundry, internet, private
entrance. Convenient.
386-965-3477 for information

7 6fUnfurnised Apt


Move in as low as $325
Call today for details!
386-758-8455
Windsong Apts

05525655
SPRING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floot-plans;
Cale3 38-54-16
"or vsi nu 1 v s ..et

S1 & 2 Bedroom Apartments
Move in for as low as
$199
38'6-755-2423
A Landlord You Can Love!
'2 br Apts $575. & up + sec. Great
area. CH/A washer/dryer hookups.
386-758-9351/352-208-2421


Moving sale sat. a sun. 8-
SPlantation S/D off 90W 4354
Caden Glenn follow signs, Fridge
furniture, baby items, shelves, art



zbled, p mno,9md jewlset .Aprike
offer take it all. 695 SE St Johns






PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.



440 Miscenlaneous .

New Central A/C, still in box,
with full ten year factory warranty

Call 3 9-64-1090
Tow Behind Grill/Smoker
$1',250 OBO.
386-249-3104 or
386-719-4802


630 M~~tobie Hms

2&3 BR MH. $395 $650. mo.
plus deposit. Water & sewer fur-
nished. Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
2/2 MH w/screen porch, Irg yard,
quliet/clean/safe 10 unit park,
credit/refs req $475.mo, $475 dep,
NO PETS, 386-965-3003
3br/2ba mobile home. Next to
O'Leno State Park. $650 mo. plus
1st, last & sec. Water & lawn
service provided. 386-758-7959
SA very clean & well maintained
2/2 units in nice park. $599.mo
w/$500. dep. Rent includes water,
sewer, trash p/u. Close to town
386-984-8448
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White Contact 386-623-3404
or 386-365-1919
Nice clean 2&3 bdrm, Five Points,
NO PETS, also 3 bd on the
Westside, 3 bdrm house on
Monroe St 386-961-1482







Quiet, Country Branford area
3/2 $400 dep. $600 month
386-867-1833 or 386-590-0642
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com


Great location W of I-75, spacious
deluxe 2BR apts., garage, W/D
hook up. patio. $600 & up, + SD,
386-344-3715 or 386-965-5560
The Lakes Apts. Studios & IBr's
from $135/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Updatsehdapmartment ew/tile floors

Cal Mi he 1 3086 7 3-626

72R ThI~he Apt

Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808


730 HomeFor Rent

3/24 ecenl ult Cuseto i om e
ces, custom cabinets, $920 mo,
1st. Last & Sec,off I-75 & 47
Call Andrew 386-623-6066
3ba/2ba, New carpet & paint: .5
ac 2 mi from d'town. No pets.
Lease req'd: fav. background only.
$850 +dep. 752-8696, 752-5025.
3BR/1.5BA. BLOCK HOME.
Fenced (privacy) bk yard. CH/A
Nice area. $800. mo $800. dep
Ref's req'd. (941)920-4535
5/3, eat in kit, new carpets/paint, 2
car garage, fenced back yard, on
Gwen Lake in Lake City
$1,100 mo 386-438-5884
FSBO w/Option to Buy, 3br/2ba
LgLR, w/add'I family sre
back porch. Aprox 4 ac. Close to
&75 on Hwy 87. $8150.0mo. + sec.

Ft White, 2/1, CH/A, 2010 W2 &
ref's from current landlord req'd,
Access to Rivers $650 mo,
$600 sec., 386-497-4699


750 Offie Rntl
OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$695. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor


790 Vacation Rentals

Horseshoe Beach Spring Special
Gulf Front 2br, w/1g porch, dock,
fish sink. wkend $345./wk $795.
(352)498-5986/386-235-3633
alwaysonvacation.com #419-181

805 Lots forSale

5 Acre Lot, Secluded & Cleared,
MLS# 67871 $60,000
Call Lisa Waltrip
@ 386-365-5900
westfieldrealtygeroup.com


1152 SW Business Point Dr
Lake City, FL 32025
386.754.8562
www.sitel.com EOE


Classified Department: 755-5440


4 lin5 8 ~50
3 IIayS ~
Inlot dies 1 sIgnr El..dlllld Iln a 4



Limited to service type advertis-
ing only.
4 lines, one month....s92.00
$10.80 each additional line
Includes an additional $2.00 per
ad for each Wednesday insertion.



You can call us at 755-5440,
Monday through Friday from 8:00
a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Some people prefer to place their
classified ads in person, and some
ad categories will require prepay-
ment. Our office is located at 180

co ca tlso or email your ad
FAX: 386-752-9400 Please
direct your copy to the Classified
Department.
EMAIL: classified@ lakecityre-
porter.com





Ad islo Appear: Call by: Fax/Email by:
Tuesday Mon., 10:00 a.m. Mon., 9:00 a.m.
Wednesday Mon.,10:00a.m. Mol.,9:00a.m.
Thursday Wed., 10:00 a.m. Wed., 9:00 a~m.

auarday Fr : 1 :00a.m. i., :00a.m. .
Sunday Fni. 10:00 am. Fr. 9:00 a.m.
These deadlines are subject to change w ihout notice.




Ad Errors- Please read your ad
on the first day of publication.
We accept responsibility for only
the first incorrect insertion, and
only the charge for the ad space
in error. Please call 755-5440
immediately for prompt correc-
tion and billing adjustments
Cancellations- Normal advertising
deadlines apply for cancellation.
Billing I airies- Call 755-5440
Should further information be
required regarding payments or
credit limits, your call will be tranS-
fer red to the accounting depart-
ment.


Advertising copy is subject to
approval by the Publisher who
reserves the right to edit, reject, .
or classify all advertisements under
appropriate headings. Copy should
be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the first day of pub-
lication. Credit for published errors
wl te allowed for teafirst iseertion
which was incorrect. Further, the
Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nor for any general,
special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply
with Federal, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
nation in employment, housing and
public accommodations. Standard
abbreviations are acceptable; how-
ever, the first word of each ad may
nlot be abbreviated.

9&i l :;: :i li\ Qb 1110


AR


C i nfortal-...:

ej u v m eYo u r s1
Sand
." :. pos mhe a

.44Opportunities 's .
... .- O RS1 ~


kills

ttitud e


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, APRIL 17, 2011

Lake City Reporter





CLAIS S FE


Take ADvantage of the


ADvantage


4 W noted to uy

K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress.11L3ge or sm~a611tracts'

Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$250 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648


430 Garage Sales


PI E


Apply Online or in Person!

fa.)















830 Coo""" eial

Multiple Use 12,000 sq ft
of Office &: Warehouse space.
Loading dock. Storage yard.
MLLSg77349 $395.000. Charhie
386-755-0808 Westfield Realty

OF0 Waterfront
OOProperty
DWMH on Ten Acres w/lakefront.
surrounded by oaks. $115.900
MLS#75571. Call Jo Lytte at
Remax Professionals 386-365-
2821. jolytte@remaxnfl.com
Rive kCai pan SudwamueedRier.
$349,900 MLS#76336 Call -
Jo Lytte at Remax Professionals
386-365-2821
River Front Pr perty 6.45 Acres.
in White Sprgs colse to Big Shoals
Park, Shelter for entertaining.
$124,888 MLS# 77117 Call Nancy
@ R.E.O. Realty 386-867-1271


890 Resort Property

Furnished Home on Itchetucknee
River, Wrap around covered decks
on two levels,MustSEE! $375,000
MLS#77006 Call Jo Lytte
Remax 386-365-2821
River Access, Refurbished Rent-
al Units & Home + Lot,
Bamn, Pool, Hot Tub $329,900
Call Jo Lytte 386-365-2821
MLS#76734 Remax Professionals


940 Trucks .








950 ca sfor sale

04544447
2L0 %eroe ra ura bT d
$12,995
2007 Chevrolet Trailblazer -
34k miles, Sunroof, Power seat,
Alloy wheels only $15, 495
2010 Chevrolet Malibu LT 3
to choose!!! 4Cyl over 33MPG!!
from $15,988
2006 Chrysler 300C SRT8 -
a.1 HEI eather odoed
toys! $19,990!!
-2007 Chevy Silverado 2500HD
Crew Cab 4x;4 LT Duramax
Diesel Power! Lather loaded!

2005 Chevy Silverado 2500HD
Crew Cab 4x4 LT Duramax
Diesel, Low miles- Loaded
$29,990
2008 Nissan Rogue' SL -
Black/Tan cloth, loaded extra
clean $16,888
2002 Nissan Xterra XE Gas
Saver!! Hurry, won't last at
$8,795
2006 Chevrolet Monte Carlo SS
.-5.3L V8 Black/Black Leather
Sunroof loaded!! Low miles
only $13,990
2003 Chevrolet Tahoe LT -
Leather Loaded. 3rd Row Seat!
Yours for $10,995
2010 Chevrolet HHR LT -
Black/Black PW, PDC,.Cruise,
Keyless Remote $14,990
2010 Chevrolet Camaro 1LT -
Sil r/BaI kC lothM AutoRTras
$22,990
19~95 Chevrolet G20 High Top
Conversion Van Drives like
New!! Captain's Chairs TV,
Folding Rear seat... all the toys,
only $6,995
.2001 Chevrolet Blazer LS 2dr'
4x4 only 65k miles, looks and
drives like new $7,995
2002 Chevrolet Tahoe LT 4x4 -
Only 73k miles!!Black/Black
Le thers Lad! d win Headrest

Seats and more only $15,695
2008 Chevrolet Trailblazer -
P/windows, locks, keyless entry
Priced to Move $14,888
2009 Toyota Tacoma Reg Cab
Pickup Auto, AC CD and
more!!! Great gas mileage at a
great Price $13,990
2004 Chevrolet Impala LS -
Sunroof, leather, poe seats,

2007 Chevrolet Silverado Reg
Cab 4.3L V6 Gas Saver!!!
Looks and drives like new!
S$12,990

SBURKINS CHEVROLET
(904)259-5796



951 Recreoatina
Homestead Rancher Travel
Trailer, 28ft, One slideout, Fiber-
glass, Awning, sleeps 8. $10,000.
(850)322-7152


ADVERTISE YOUR

J0b Opportunities in the

Lake City Reporter

Cl8Ssifieds.

Enhance Your Ad with

Your Individual Logo

For just pennies a day.

Call t0day,

755-5440.


805 Lots fr Sale

A high & dry buildable wooded
.734 of ac.,Forest Country. MLS#
76668 Eastside Village Realty.
Inc. Denise Milligan-Bose
@386-752-5290
Beautiful .92 Acre Lot-
3 Rivers-Ft. White-High & Dry!
Only $11,900.
Call Taylor Goes of Access Realty
@ 386-344-7662
Forest Country building lot,
scattering of trees, Motivated
Seller $19,999 MLS#75140
ReomaxProfeinas, Ic.

Hallmark Real Estate. Cleared
2.57 ac. fenced w/32' Dutchman
camper. In O'Brien. Close to Live
Oak, Lake City, Branford. $25,000
MLS# 74534 386-867-1613
Nice 4 acre parcel located in
O'Brien. Won't last long at only
$13,500. Call Taylor Goes of
Access Realty @386-344-7662'
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and

pre 1ne thne acuestoodl8. Ts

accp tsy ad lrts g fr rea 1s-
tate which is mn violation of the
lw Our eaad na are heey m -

tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
'To complain of disenmmiation call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free *
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

810 Home for Sale

1999 Doublewide'
3/2 fenced back yard
on 1 acre .
IVLS# 76315 $64,900
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
3/2 Brick Home in town, fenced
back yard w/12x12 workshop
$79,900 Call Nancy @ R.E.O.
Realty 386-867-1271MLS# 77414
nancytrogers@msn.com
3/2 Brick home on .59 acre, on the
lake with back sunroom. Garage & .
storage building.
MLS# 76769 $222,900
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
3/2 Custoin Western Cedar Home
on 2 acre lakefront lotMLS#74681
Call Jo Lytte at Remax
Professionals, Inc. 386-365-2821
jolytte@remaxnfl.com
3/2 in CreeksideS/D. Fenced back
yard, sprinklers, large
screened rear lanai.
$175,000. ML;S# 77385
386-623-6896 Access Realty
3/2 in town, lots of upgrades,
currently leased, MLS#76658,
$49,900 Call Jo Lytte at
Remax Profe sioas, Inc. .

3/2 in Woodhaven w/Fla Room,
fence back yard MLS#75499,

Remax 386-303-2505 or
email- remaxpamb@gmail.com
3/2 MH on 1.5 acres, fenced,
porches, wkshp,well maintained
$49,900 MLS# 77309 Call Josh
.Grecian 386-466-2517
westfieldrealtygroup.com

3/n2 fri tA e s, Cael J y te
Remax $68,900, ML;S#72427
386-365-2821, www~jolytte.
florida-p roperty-search.com


810 Home for Sale -

Charming Remodeled Home
in Beautiful Neighborhood
M/LS#74765 5142.900 Call
Charlie Sparks @ Westfield
Realty Group 386-755-0808
Cold well Banker/Bishop Realty
4br 1/5ba. 1332 sqft. Great floor
plan, noce yard, close to town.
Only $84,900 Lori Geibeig
-Simpson. 386-365-5678
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
5br/4ba on 5+ac. 3 car garage,
inground pool/hot tub and more.
Ge S 78p5s4 $56,0 5 78

Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Superbly maintained home in
Creekside. Oversized garage &
storage. Many extras. Elaine K.
Tolar 386-755-6488 $209,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
New home in Mayfair S/D. 4br on
comer lot. Split plan. $214,900
MLS# 76919 Elaine K. Tolar.
386-755-6488
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Home on the lake in town. 4br/3ba
MLS# 76085 Elamne K. Tolar 386-
755-6488 or Mary Brown White
hurst. 386-965-0887 $299,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Great home in Woodcrest S/D 3/2
home, covered back porch, nice
yard.MLS# 75198 Elaine K. Tolar
386-755-6488 $129,900
Country Home on 2.5 Acres,

Re$a OPr0 eSo als, 19c.,
.jo lytt ~rema~xnfll.com

Custom built home with many
upgrades. Screened back porch,
16x24 workshop.
MLS# 77178 $184,500
Century 21/The Darby Rogers CO.
Custom, 3/2.5 built in 2007,
on 10.8 manicured acres,
completely fenced, Owner Fin.
avail., MLS#77382 Call Patti
386-623-6896 Access Realty
FtWhite MH on 16 27 Ars

MLS#77404 $149,900
Jo Lytte -Remax Professionals
386-365-2821
Great house in Piccadilly S/D. 2
: car garage and in ground pool.
Newly painted inside & out.
MLS# 76786 $133,500
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
Great Opportunity!
Currently rented, Seller will
assist w/buyer's closing costs
MLS# 77335, Call Michael at
Westfield 386-867-9053 $99,900
Gwen Lake area. Beautiful up-
grades 4/3 w/tile & laminate
Floors, fireplace, new kitchen, Ig
den, fenced yard. $125,000, 386-
397-4766 Hallmark Real Estate
Hallmark Real Estate. Brick 3/2.
Many' upgnides. Gas fireplace,
Grotto tile. Great location on cul-
de-sac! $149,900-
MLS# 75931 386-867-1613

Hsoia Heomm tn nLae teass -_
vate residence or a wonderful pro-
fessional office. $240,000 386-
719-0382 Hallmark Real Estate
Home on 15 Acres w/2500 sq ft,
workshop, MLS# 77552 $235,000
Call Brittany Stoeckert at
Results Realty
386-397-3473
Just Reduced 4/2 on 1.51 acres,
fkreplace.partially fenced, MLS#
7741Rb OallRNeancyGRogers at
386-867-1271 $64,u0p0

Large Brick, 3/1, 4.43 acres, metal
81b Nacy R77r 5 OR E. .
SRealty Group, Inc. 386-867-1271
nancytrogers@msn.com
large Home on 1 acre, 4/2,
.Fla Rm, wrap around front porch
MLS#77292 $148,000
Call Brittany Stoeckert at
Results Realty386-397-3473
Lg home on corner lot w/garage,
Eastside Village. Clubhouse,
heated pool MLS# 71901 Eastside
Village Realty, Inc. Denise
Milligan-Bose 386-752-5290
Lots of acerage. All brick home.
Screened in porch. Extra big
closets. Mature pines.
MLS# 76765 $115,000
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
Luxury 3/2 Log Home, Cypress
interior, whole'house generator,
$269,900 MLS# 76899 Call
Roger Lovelady @386-365-7039
westfieldrealtygroup.com
Make an Offer! 3 br brick, quiet
resuId' streetdin L~is OHk HUD

Real Estate 386-365-5146
www.hudhomestore.com
Nearly 17 Acres w/House
on paved road, Very Spacious!
MLS#76902 $194,900
Call 386-487-7484 Speak to
Brodie Westfield Realty Group
Nice home with eat in kitchen and
a nice sized living room. Pleanty
of room for entertaining.
SMLS# 775841 $89,900
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
On Golf Course w/lake view. 3/2
home w/lg rooms, 3 fireplaces, wet
bar &r big deck. Newly reduced to
S$214,900. Hallmark Real Bstate
386-365-2135


810 Home for Sale

Open for Bid! 3/2 DW w/comer
stone fireplace, fenced yard & Ig
kit. HUD property. sold "as is
MLS 77290- 386-365-3886 Deb-
bie Kingl Hallmark Real Estate
Owner Fianncing! wooded 1/4 ac.
lots in Suwannee County,. close to
River, high &r dry. Bring your Sw
or DW or RV. $6.500
Derington Properties.965-4300
Ready for Fun & Family. 4Ibr/2ba
custom home on 33.84 ac. has
stocked fish pond & huge 54x60
shop. S25e030806 Hallmark Real

Rolling Oaks, 3/3 + Bonus Rm,
5 acres, back porch & more!
MLS#77528 Call Pam Beauchamp
at 386-758-8900 Remax $284,900
remaxpamb@gmail.com
Solid Brick Home on 5 Acres,
Close to town but in the country!
MLS#76063 Must See!$129.888
Call Brittany Stoeckert at
386-397-3473 Results Realty
Spacious, Open Floor Plan Home,
fenced back yard, screen porch,
$179,900 MLS#76796 Call Jo
Lytte@Remax Professionals, Inc.
386-365-2821
Two for the price of one. Updated
ranau home /lad 3/ st hore A

MLS# 77348 $244,900
Century 21/The Darby Rogr Co
Welcome home. 3br/2ba brick.
Great location on the east side.
MLPrice to s 9,900
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
Well Cared For 3/2 on 1.4 Acres,
open floor plan, MLS#75702
$199,900, Call Carrie Cason
at 386-487-1484
*westfieldrealtygroup.com
Well maintianed 3/2 -1/2 acre
minutes from town. 20x40 -
workshop, ~screened porch.
MLS# 73787 $99,000
Century 21IThe Darby Rogers Co.
You can't beat this Price! 1995
1S2T on 3 a. aed laadn.
Needs work! $29,900
Derington Properties. 965-4300


820 Farms &
Acreage
10 acres, with Travel'llI-ailer &
Electricity, close to Itchetucknee
Springs, $38,000, MLS# 76264
Call MillardGillen at
Westfield Realty 386-365-7001
4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorg~eous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWNj!
$69,900. $613mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancina.com
4 acres, Wellbomn, New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down, $39,900, $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
Between Lake City & Ft. White.
6.44 rolling acres:-DWMH, 3/2.
1836 sf, great value on paved road.
Need repairs. $54,900 .
Derington Properties. 965-4300
Half to ten acre lots. Some w/
Swell, septic, pp. We finance; low
dwn pmt. Deas Bullard Properties.
386-752-4339. www.1andnfl.com
Heavily Wooded Land, 10 Acres
MLS#75784 $94,900

RemaxC lo coss ioas, Inc.
386-365-2821


830 commercial .
Property
Great Location with lots of
Hlexible space & visibility for lease

Call Scott Stewart @ Westfield
Realty Group 386-867-3498


3/2 on 8.7 acres w/Fla room,
several storage bldgs, fenced,
MLS#75295 Call Pam Beauchamp
@ 386-758-8900 Remax,
$179,000 www.visitpam.com
3/2 on 9.7 'acies. fenced & cross
fenced. Separate pastures. Animals
are negotiable. Owners motivated.
MLS# 77431 $179,900
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
3br and Ig operi floor plan
w/separate office. Beautifully
landscaped. Private access to Lake
Jeffery. MLS# 76231 $199,000
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
4/2 with 1000 sq ft workshop,
fence 0akyad, car garage,
$174,900, Call Nancy @
R.E.O. Realty 386-867-1271
5 acre Home w/Horse Barn,
Wood floors, New Kitchen,
Gazebo & Koi Pond MLS#76039
$169,900 Call Aaron @ Westfield
t Realty Group 386-867-3534
Beautiful Home For Sale
The Preserve at Laurel Lake
4/2 or 3/2 $194,900 MLS#77257
Call Scott Stewart 386-867-3498
westfieldrealtygroup.com
CBC 3/1 home, inside city limits,
fenced backyard, detached carport
w/office MLS#77411 $82,900
Call R.E.O.Realty,
Nancy Rogers @ 386-867-1271


-N WHEELS & WATER CRAFT ~~


11 S quick and easy.


1.) Go to www.Iakecityreporter.com

2.) Click the"Share Photos"icon






.I .
.,, .

o manage


Share Pho~tos Submit Ever ts Cowmment ate
of your family, to be posted on connect writh
friencs are our onlinae other local
c~ommunlty cEalendar online users on
our guest book


renoto carr*rv ome


Send in your favorite photos

and share them with everyone!



a~ a


SClassified Department: 755-5440


Bring the picture in or
we will take it for you!

* Ad runs 10 consecutive days
with a description and photo in the
newspaper and online E-edition.
* Ad runs 10 consecutive days as a
classified line ad online,
* You must include vehicle nrce
* AII ads are prepaid.
* Private party only






2006 EF250
Ford Van
3/4 ton, metal work


$10,500
Call
386-555-5555

if you don't sell your vehicle
during the first 10 days, you
ca rr1th diana whicle ad
only $15.oo
Terms and conditions remain the
same for the additional run.


..
~_CL-'






. .



. .~


Iri~~


3*) Click:


Subinn rnato D


4.) Attach your Ijhoto (Choose File)

5.) Select the best album for your photo

6.) Complete theform and Submit
Albums will change during the year.
Most photos will remain online for at least one month.

PhoIlC G 11ir r > ubmit a Phare


SCagos Tit no !ie IctcS
Pet P402; Oarts


The title is the name of your photo.


0,


The caption is the description of your photo
that will be seen by viewers.


3/2 on 5 acres. Large master suite
and open kitchen. Back 2 ac.
fenced for horses.
MLS# 75830 $102,90g
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.


Homestead Rancher
Travel Trailer
28ft. One slideout
fiberglass, awning'
sleeps 8.
$10,000

850-322-7152


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, APRIL 17, 2011








































r r:Bi i Full Synthetic=

Set ; 1ril- i Oil ar 3Chqnge
Badesmrt Deluxe luour Fing or
I fP- oTE IN RetaIsloly lanr
P 8i'ef 8 S8I0 0 0 8 Finnr IFuslrwe :lucludes up to 5 qua t
...n..........r tUeaFrm YOUR CHO.ICli or on...and-lk

BSt IBIONUS C~OUPON FREE SET OIF PILLOWS .
S Most cars & t ucksm


~ue;


~arrs~L~I~~rvi [


~-" I "~


CLASSIFIED


SUNDAY, APRIL 17, 2011


LAKE CITY REPORTER


I--~z~I
1 ~c~";~i""


SRotate Be
Balance're
I Most cars & trucks .
Plus tax & supplies
SNeot valid wth an other offe r


;.rr;;- .,~;~.. '1 .~;;i ~ www.aspenlakec:ity.com


:r '''~' '
.*
~
~:""
~fT~S~` I: 1-"""~
: P-.:''
~ ;;s~~
_.., .. ..;
; ..
~;y tY: .r.
;
''I
'"' 'i r,. r- -:K:P.~.,.-~
~
Y :.
rrlacrr~lltsnietplpvIlsHilavPS~
ri-
"~ :6i'b-~
,1; ::~~TSiBi
:rl; ~2.
$'
'4; 'Fyl
r -t I ;I-
1:; . ~

I- .: .. j.


r~, i
.- -si~;
;: -'


rm ~c3 ~s~i~I rU D ;1
? ~ i;


"; ~g~: ,a_
p_.
: i. Y~s I
v ,: ~i5~;9~~d~:;Y: A1


I


With your purchase of $20 or more in Internet
time. Limit 1 per person per day. May not be
combined with any o hr pr motional offer.


~xpi Ma 3,21


WINNERS AREl SELECTED INSTANTLY & PRIZES OF LESS THAN S500 MAY BE REDEEMED INSTANTLY WINNERS OF PRIZES GREATER THAN $500 MAY REDEEM PRIZES AT NO MORE THAN $500 PERT DAY. MUST BE 18 YEARS OR' OLDER TO
ENTER. MUST BE 21 YEARS OR OLDER TO CONSUME ALCOHOL PHOTO L.D REQUIRED GO TO PANDA-MONI-YUM OF LAKE CITY. LLC TO SEE OFFICIAL RULES & DETAILS, TO PURCHASE INTERNET TIME & TO REDEEM PRIZES. NO PURC~LASE OR ~
CONTRIBUTION NECESSARY TO PARTICIPATE OR WIN MAIL-IN ENTRIES AVAILABLE C 201 1 Tom Hunt AII rights reserveo








Lake City Reporter


;Cloth or disposable?

Half-century debate

Still COntilROS


Story ideas?

Contact
C.J. Risak
Assistant Editor
754-0427
crisak@lakecityreporter~com


Section D


www.Iakecityreporter.com


JASON MATTHEW WALKERILake City Reporter
William Thomas, an extension agent at the University of Florida IFAS Extension Office in Lake City, is congratulated
by Patty Twadowski (from left), Linda Brown and Deanna Cox on his retirement. Thomas will be retiring after 34 *
years.


the challenges they take on ~eac~h
and every day." .
Neal Dukes was the extension
Soffice director when Thomas
started. Two years later Dukes
retired and Thomas moved up to
the position, for which he held for
more than 20 years.
However, he didn't wvant to stay
just on the administrative -end of '
the office and decided to spend
his remaining years in agriculture
research and demonstrations,.
"That's what I really enjoy,"
Thomas said. "I got out of admin- '
istr'ation and started doing the
.agriculture side."
University specialists, as well


"I was ready to go to work,"
Thomas. said about completing
his rnaster's.
.Some of his professors were
extension specialists, and a posi-
tion opened up at Columbia
,County Extension.
"I aliplie'd and went through
the -interview processs" he said.
"Fortunately I got hired."
His start date' was Jan. 7, 1977
as an assistant agent. .
"I got here just in time for the
1977 drought," Thomas said.
"It (almost) put everyone out of
the business. 3ut agriculture is
a resilient industry. I have the .
utmost respect for gro vers and


as local growers, were a source
of inspiration and motivation over
the years for Thomas.
"A lot. of people I owe thanks
to for being my mentor," he said.
"Local gro~wers, you learn fr-om
therm as much as th~ey learn froni
you.",
There are many nriemorable
moments' for Thomas.
Working with the growers
was the most enjoyable part of
his time at the extension office,.
he said. Seeing people prosper
was part of the rewards from his
career' in extension~ services.

MORMISON continued on 2D


box stores.and discount houses.
Stashes ~are sometimes passed on
to friends. They're still roughly
5 percent or less of thie diaper
market, but it was the other way
around in 1956 when disposables
accounted for about 1 percent.
Thats ivhett P&G chemical engi-
neer Vic Mills went in search of a
better alternative to cloth for his
newborn grandchild.
Disposables have been around
since at least 1935, primarily as
a niche item for trips away fr-om
home, but they never broke
through to overtake cloth until
Pampers hit, tapping into the
postwar fervor for all things
new,convenient and timesaving
- espiecid~ly among wontien set-
ting up house in suburbia.
"Empowermerit of women was
a big piece of what was ~behind
that," said Jodi Allen, general
manager for Pampers. "Offering
conveniences, offering more
options, was clearly part of the
culture at that time."
Today, saving the environment
- and keeping anything that isn't
"green!" away from baby is
driving interest in reusables. The
green question is especially vex-
ing as both sides bandy scientific
studies involving so many vari-
ables that the Natural Resources
Defense Council considers the
issue a wrash when it comes to
disposables in a landfill versus
reusables in the laundry. .
"W~e don't recommend one over
another," said Allen Hershkowitz,
a senior scientist at the environ-
mental action group and director
of its solid waste project.
"A compelling argument for
getting rid of disposable diapers
absolutely does not exist. It's
a personal choice, but it really
can't be made on environmental
grounds. There are costs both
ways," he said.
Cloth advocates are scrappy.
They have a public education
arm, the Real Diaper Association,
which is not to be confused with
a trade group, the Real Diaper


By LEANNE ITALIE .
Associated Press
NEW YORK Disposables,
cloth. Cloth, disposables. Fifty
years after Procter & Gamble
introduced affordable throwaway
diapers, dubbing them Pampers,
the battle over baby's bottom
rages on-
The brand brought on a revo-
lution in baby care, obliterating
safety pins, soaking pails and
diaper delivery; trucks. But reus-
"diles; have been slowly inching
back into the mainstream, with
the predictable faceoff among
parents choosing one lor the other
- though some families use
both.
.In 1958, with other disposables
already out, P&G's version was a
"fortunate failure" during a sumi-
mer test run in Dallas, according
to a company history. Consisting
of pads and plastic pants, it made
babies uncomfortable in the heat.
The Cincinnati-based company
tweaked the invention into a on>
piece and went calling on parents
again in 1961. They played in
Peoria, hIl., one of the markets
chosen, but customers said the
cost of 10 cents each was too
high. More tweaks followed and
' the price went down to 6 cents.
By 1979, Pampers was a billion-
dollar brand.
The disposable diaper industry,
now worth more than $25 billion,
crushed the cloth market. But ~
wait. After the save-the-planet
zeitgeist of two decades ago failed
to produce a blockbuster come
back, reusables have become de
rigueur in ces tain circles, and to .
some parents who lack money for
disposables-
The new cloth diapers are
hardly a threat to the big guys
in throwaways, but in crunchy
enclaves like Portland, Ore., and
Northampton, Mass., it's a rare
parent worth his yoga'mat who
would dare consider disposables,
Sat least out loud.
Reusables can be had in big


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Daniela Laboy, 3, and brother Alejandro, 1, center,. play with other children
at a 50th Birthday celebration for the disposable diaper Pampers Monday in
Cincinnati, Ohio. Disposables, cloth. Cloth, disposables. The diaper battle
rages on 50 years after diaper latecomer Procter & Gamble rolled over old
fashioned reusables to mass market an affordable throwaway for the first .
tirne.


Industry Association,
Reusable diapers come in cot-
ton, hemp, bamboo, wool and less
organic forms. The flat cloths of
old have been reinvented in pre-
folded, litted, pocketed and all in
one "systems" that offer breath-
ability, expandability, leak control,
Velcro, snaps and a three-armed
fastener called a Snappi. There's
also a cuteness factor in brightly
decorated covers, many from
mom-grown businesses fueled by
Internet interest.
"Even if there really are no
indications that future genera-


tions of humans will be able to
survive our mistakes, I can wash
load after load of dirty diapers
with some trite optimism," said
cloth-user Thomas Chang, the
stay-at-home dad to year-old Olive
in Northampton.
Shhhh: He and his wife use dis-
posables at night.
In Portland, 20-month-old
Alexander's mom, Kris Vockler,
went for disposables all day long
after she worked out a metric
carefully weighing the pros and

DIAPERS continued on 2D


Sunday, April 17, 201 II


Growmng career comes to a c ose


GARDEN TALK







Nichelle Demorest
dndemorest@ufl.edu


Keeping

pests away
without

chemicals


plants are grow-
inig and the
insects are hun-
T he ~gadnry. What are
you going to do?
There are many pest
management practices
that you can use instead of
reaching for the pesticides.
Try some of the following
practices in your garden
this year and feel good
knowing that you have
been 'Florida Friendly' to
the environment.
First, choose varieties of
plants that are resistant to
nematodes and diseases .
The plant tag or seed pack
will have that information
Plants should be clean an I
free of problems when you
purchase them. Vegetables
in the same plant family
shouldn't be planted in the
same location two years in
a row.
~Alternating where they
gow in the garden helps
tokeep soil pests such ~as
nematodes from building
up. ~


are found in the soil of any
gardn Some fee oneroots

below the ground. They

water and nutrients.
Unfortunately, there are` I
no chemical controls for
nematodes in home gar-
dens, but there are it few
things you can do to keep
the numbers down.
Adding organic mat-
ter, or compost,-to the
soil will reduce nematode
populations. Organic
matter also helps the .
soil retain moisture and
nutrients for better plarit
growth. Healthy plants
show a better resistance to
pests. Organic matter also
attracts beneficial insects
that prey on nematodes.
Many of the insects in ,
the garden are 'beneficial
insects. We don't want to
harm them because they
destroy the 'bad bugs'.
Learn to identify these
good bugs and welcome.
Plant some flowers in the '
garden to provide good
bugs with nectar and pol-
len.
Harvest vegetables
as soon as they are ripe
because over-ripe veg-
gies will just attract
more unwanted insects.
Compost or discard plants
as soon as they stop pro-
ducing. Sanitation practic-
es like these will cut down
on the number of insects
that will even find your
garden.
Can't tell a good bug
from a bad one? Bring in
a sample to the Extension
office for identification.
Visit this siteifor more envi- ,
ronmentally friendly and
effective practices. ht@://
ipm. ifas~ufl. edu/

II Niche )~ Demores is a
Columbi eC ent Exte son
of the University of Florida
Institute of Food and


Agricultural Sciences.


After more

than 34 years,

IVOrriSOn

leaves IFAS

By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter. com

hel opportunity toe
hUnivres Mth' Flda/
IFAS Columbia
T e ppruntytCounty Fxtension
office is something William D.
Thomas has taken seriously for
more than 30 years.
"Overall, if I had it to do all
over again I would do the same
thing," Thomaps said. "I loved
every bit of it"..
Thomas retired March 31 aS

eafte3 year ud ohe months
with the office.
Thomas gr~ew up in Avon Park
and his family had a cattle and cit-
rus operations mn the area.
"I decided the last thing~ I want-
ed to do was spend 365 days lo.ok-
inig at the same trees," he said. .
He started college but was
drafted into the Navy and served
four years. .
"It gave me time to think about
what I wanted to do," Thomas
said. "I d~cided. I wanted to go .
back and get a degree in agricul-
ture." .
He went on to receive a
Bachelor's degree in agronomy
and i~master's in agronomy and
agriculture management from the
University of Florida.












Robotics Camp will combine fun and learning


extension services.
"I just appreciate the
opportunity to be here
and to get to know all the
people I dealt with and
hopefully served over the
years," Thomas said.







t z





China, Crystal,
Flatware and Gifts
Couples registered:

Dorrie Sloan
Jaes Albritoln1 r


Toanna War son
Dustin King
April l5, 2011

Christine Moses
David Moor
May 21, 2011

Casey McDuffle
Tony de Moya
May. 21, 2011

Laurie Little
Robert Evans, Jr.
June 4, 2011

We know exactly what
they want in a wedding
or shower gift. We update
their list as gifts are
purchased, and gift wrap.

SWIARD'S
JEWJCELRY &~ GIFTS
156 N. Marion Ave.
Lake City
752-5470


LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, APRIL 17, 2011


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


to calculate the mathematical
relationship between wheel size
and distance with a set number
of motor rotations,
aRight Face how to pro-
gram a robot to navigate a series
of 90 degree turns
aFrequency and Amplitude
- the difference between them
and the units in which to mea-
sure them
aFollow the Guidelines -
how to program a robot to track
a line and learning that complex
robot behavior is just the sum of
simple behaviors.
SFaster Line Tracking how
to alter programs to optimize the
robot's performance.
aObstacle Detection how
to program the robot to use
Touch and Ultrasomec Sensors to
provide feedback about its envi-
ronment. .
Using the robotic platform,
the activities sharpen teamwork,
prowess in technical design,
presentation skills and reinforce
STEM principles.
Each camp will run for four .
full days and will be held at
the 01ustee Campus of Florida
Gateway College. The 01ustee
facility provides a large class-
room with internet access and
laptop computers for each team,
as well as another room with


enough space for building, test-
ing and for setting up challenges
Three identical camps will be
held the following weeks: June
20 23, June 27 30, July 25 28.
The camps are free and avail-
able to all high school students
in the FGC service area; how-
ever, each session is limited to
12 students and positions will
be competitive. The camps are
sponsored by FGC and made
possible through a Community
Based Jobs Training Grant
through the US Department of
Labor.
The Summer Robotics Camps
provide a rich learning environ-
ment for students. Fundamental
concepts in science, engineer-
ing, computing and robotics are
explored, with a focus on the
,practical nature on each sub-
~ject. Camps concentrate on real
world application of the subject.
Students learn teamwork and
responsibility through participa-
tion in group projects presented to
their peers, friends and families.
For more information, contact
your high school guidance coun-
selor or check out our website
at: http:/www. engineeringtech-
program. com
You may contact Bob Deckon
at robert.deckon~,fgc.edu or at
(386) 754-4442.


DC battery and charger
a 3 servo motors
a 1 each: color sensor, ultra-
sonic sensor
a 2 touch sensors
a 3 rotation sensors built into
the motors
hundreds of Technic build-
ing elements
The general format for the
program includes an opening
lesson on the basics, review in
building, followed by a challenge
that utilizes the building and
engineering aspects of robotics
and then move ort to a program-
ming lesson and a challenge
in programming. The series of
lessons~and challenges contin-
ues each day, using lessons on
sensors, programming loops
and more advanced.commands,
as well gearing and advanced
designs.
An iaverview of the curricu-
lum:
aRobotics: What' Do You '
Know? .
m History of Robotics
aIntroduction to Robotics
and the Lego Mindstorms NXT
Systern
aFull Speed Ahead how
to set up the programming soft-
tvare and use it to program the
robot.
aWheels and Distance how


learning cannot
happen togeth-
er>
W hosay funanThis summer,
the two will be combined when
the Engineering Technology pro-
gram at Florida Gateway College
hosts three individual Summer
Robotics Camps for high school-
aged students. The curriculum
is a mixture of IrgoTM edu-
cational materials and STEM-
focused subjects (science, tech-
nology, engineering and math)
used in modern manufacturing.
All camp activities are condu~ed
in an environment of fun, team
work and competitive problem
solving. The camps provide
opportunities for students to:
a Iarn technology and engi-
neering skills
aGain experience working
effectively in project teams
aExpress their creativity and
hav fun
eBe inspired to explore
future technology careers
Participants attending ou
camps work in teams of two. A
qualified instructor introduces
the teams to equipment, mateni-
als and concepts through inter-
active demonstrations, hands-on
tutorials, team activities and
challenges. The teams complete


Bob Deckon
robertdeckon@fgc.edu


activities and problem-solv_
ing challenges using LegoTM
MINDSTORMSTM robot con-
struction kits, lap-top computers
and software. The LegoTM
MINDSTORMSTM NXT 2.0
Education kit combines the
unlimited versatility of the Lego
building system with an intel-
ligent microcomputer brick and
intuitive drag-and-drop program-
ming software. The educational
kit features everything you need
to create your first robot in 30
mnunumu and then abcoucninesesn
tions. The intelligent NXT LEGO
brick features a 32-bit micropro-
cessor, a large matrix display,
four inut and three output
portinp
Also included. -
a NXT Intelligent Brick
a New rechargeable lithium


in the United States, and municipal -
waste makes up about 2 percent of
all waste from all sources. As some-
one who cares, he's been looking for
answers to the diaper dilemma for
decades, "and there's just no clear
position to take. I wish it was that
easy, but it's not." .
P&G's Allen, a believer in "giving
babies the best, most comfortable
experience," is no cloth-basher. "I
certainly don't want to downplay the
cloth diapering options and the fact
that parents are looking for options
that are also good for the environ-
ment," she said.
In his enlightened western
Massachusetts town, Chang notes
that few day care centers support


cloth, though that's changing.
Most states allow child care provid-
ers to decide for themselves whether
to accept reusable diapers. Generally,
day care centers are not terribly
receptive, said Heather McNamara,
mom of two in San Diego, Calif., and
executive director of the Real Diaper
Association.
The group maintains a searchable
database of cloth-~friendly day cares
and massive amounts of other infor-
mation at Realdiaperindustry.org.
McNamara sees a steady stream of
cloth converts there.
"'Ihere's a large silent population of
cloth dkper users," she said. "People
coine to us almost daily and say I can't
believe I didn't know about this before."


cons the big pro being she travels
a lot and decided they were hassle-
free when lier son was along for the
ride. He's mostly potty-trained now
but Vockler's memories are fresh.
"We live outside Portland, where,
if you know the place, picking dis-
.posables and saying so would give us
funny looks," she said. .
There are a lot of "what about" in
the cloth versus disposable debate.
There's the cotton, pulp, petrol and
industrial agricultural complexes
to contend with on both sides. And
what about the landfls, a subject that
comes up a lot,
Disposable diapers, according to
Hershkowitz, comprise about 1.5 per-
cent of all municipal waste generated


is employed
Correctional
shif cpan


at Lake City
Facility as a


T wding is planned
for 4 p.m. April 21 at Olivet
Miss Mnay Iaptist Curc

tion will follow at Winfeld
Community~ Recreation
Center.


other business," Thomas
said. "It's a very competi-
tive and challenging busi-
ness in order to be profit-
able."
The mission of exten-
sion services is to provide
information and technol-
ogy as a resource to the
local community, he said.
'And I believe in that
mission," he said. "I
wouldn't have worked
here otherwise."
Retirement for Thomas


won't be; sperit just relax-
ing, he said. Instead he
will work on several proj-
ects at his 40 acres: of land
and a farm in Avon Park.
"My wife asked if I had
a plan to keep myself busy
and I started listing over
20 things," Thomas said.
"She said, 'It sounds like
you are going to be a busy
boy.'"
He will also continue to
work on some research
and development with


"It is really difficult
to come up with one
memory," Thomas said. "I
would say just the friend-
ships with so many over
the years is probably the
thing I will remember
forever."
Extension services help
bring research and tech-
niques to people so they
can increase their efficien-
cy, he said. Efficiency in
turn improves profitability.
"Farming is like any


The wedding is planned
for sunset May 21 on the
beaches of Regent Palms
Resort in the Turks and
Caicos. A reception will
follow at the resort.


ter, Blayre Reagan Bush,
Feb. 19 at North Florida
Regional in Gainesville.
She weighed 8 pounds,
12 ounces and measured
21.5 inches.
She joins siblings Bryson,
4, and Brennyn, 2.
Grandparents are Rodney
and Teresa Tompkins and
Bob and Lydia Bush.

J8XOn Daniel
Overlook

Ashlyn Finnemore and
Zak Overlock of Maine
announce the birth of their
son, Jaxon Daniel Overlook,
Apnil 1 in Miles Memorial
H~o ital in Damaniscotta,
He weighed 8 pounds
and 4.5 ounces.
His grandmother is
Amber Finnemore Thomas
of Lake City.


a ;
"'
A ~ *
.. '; r
- :I
..
r J
- ,-
"'C:i.J)."~
L
~t~ se.I ,~
i
f:~
c
r
.F,-.
Y '.
i!lg
-F;,
.. -II;di-.~; r-,
:Ik' - r, ~I
L~ .... -'-
iii
..~.
. 1 s. ~r
: -
,~14~!'~r~; li- J;
~-?' '" :? '$
; ~~Li~--.~ I;
~x 'C ; ~


DIAPERS: Cloth or disposable, the debate goes on

Continued From Page 1D


EN~UGAG EM CENTS


Piortee-Jones

Rub Thers Portee of
Lake City announces ache
engagement andh ugpah
mgr LaKaiae LaFa Portee

of VLake ait sto Tenraan e
City. He is the son of Mr.
and Mrs. Willie Jones of
Ro noke Rpds, N.C
The bri e-lect is a 1994
gaduate of Columbia High
School and a- graduate
of Lake City Community
College practial nusn
pro m a he his emplr g
at Richardson Middle
Schoolas a sh ol nus
an is aas ocal sonurne fo
CMS Professional Staffing.
The future groom is a
19' gxraduat of soothwes
a graduate of Lake City
Community College basic
corrections program.~ He


MORRISON: Retiring after 34 years.

Continued From Page 1D


McDuHi -
deMoya
Dal and Barbara
McDuffie of Lake City
announce the engage-
ment and approach-
ing marriage of their
daughter, Casey Nichole
McDuffie of Lake City,
to Anthony Joseph
deMoya of Wellborn. He
is the son of Armando
and Alisa deMoya of
Miami.
The bride-elect is
employed at McDuffie
Marine Sporting Goods
Inc.
The future groom is a
sport fishing captain.


BIR TH

ANNO UN CEMENTS


Samantha Jane
Perry

Keith and Shelley Perry
of Tifton, Ga., announce
the bir th of their daugh-
ter, Samantha Jane Perry,
Jan 20. in Tifton Regional
Medical Center,
She weighed 7 pounds
and 2 ounces and measured
20 inches.
Grandparents are George
and Emma Perry of Lake
City, Diane Perry of Lake
City, Barbara Eskorwitz of
Fort White and Eddie and
Beth Spears of Oak Ridge
North Carolina.

Blayf6 Re8gan
BUSh

Bo and Kimmey Bush
of Lake City announce
the birth of their daugh-





DEAR ABBY



Nebr Oal HWISWhile H10H1


CELE BR ITY C IPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations ss farnu people, past and present.
Today's clue: K equals Y
" WPU UAX KS NRH R X U JTX K IX RD T CU
az c .. c GTK CUPT YUNS :T WWTCH
Bz Tx y, C GTK CUPT YUNS R X ZCC XT
I Z. TD T UB FT ." Y LAT HS ZY TP
PREVIOUS SOLUTIC)N: "I alone cannot change the world, but I can cast a
stone across the waters to create many ripples." Mother Teresa
(c) 2011 by NTA, Inc. 4-18


I SUN DAY CROSSWORD


ALL-PRO By PaulaGamache / Edited by Will ShortZ1234 5 6- 7 18 .9 110 11 12 13 14 15 116 117 18 119


9 96II 9 8 L 86







P6ELL 98 67 9




8 9 8 79 E6 L


PZ ~E 99 8L


6 88 LL 9 9 E


LL 9 P 8 8E 6 9


4 9 I


2 6 9


1 8 9 56 2


9 :2 5 3


2 7' 1


4 9


'1 3 8 4 6


5 6 8


2 3 -1


Answers to' last Sunday's Crossword.


REIPILIANAN'M LA EISA BIONJJOV I-
GRIEIEN'TIEAPPIAIRITIY ENDEMEI IC



ojwcUTcLASS HEAIRTE

NAIILIF ILE A IRCAINIAIDIA DRY
ASISS S IREIN YIOYY OSP PAAR
ETIHIA'N ONON I PAIN C AL LS
DI RITIY BIL 0 NDE JOK EK
LIAID LE LIAP OIRAARIA ARY N
T ILIEIR PRIOIR CRAAZY AIWIE
HEIAIDC IOLDCAIA SIE S IZECHWAIIN

KI URS A IG H NEYP PI I II

CIOILA HOIAIGY

Avi IAITIOR BLUESII TIAITIEB RID
MEIST IZO IIAIGR IEE TA PIAIN
SCIH S IEMMSWII SWO DIS OIDESSA


LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & CROSSWORD SUNDAY, APRIL 17, 2011


Page Editor: Xxx, 754-xxxx


SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov.
21): A romantic evening
should be planned whether
you are single or in a relation-
ship. Socialize with friends
or network with people who
work in the same field. It will
help you personally and pro-
fessionally. SrAA
SAGTITTARIUS (NTov.
22-Dec. 21): Honesty can
get you off the hook with a re-
lationship that you don't want
to spend time nurturing any-
more. Once you clear the air,
you can move on freely. There
appears to be a great deal of
activity going on at your place.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-
Jan. 19): If someone is ask-
ing too much of you, back
away. This is not the time to
argue but rather to protect
your image, ~reputation and
family from anyone who is
too pushy or argumentative.
Travel will not go according
to plan. 2 stars AAArAQUAR-
IUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): It
is apparent that work-related
issues can be resolved if you
combine a host of different
skills you have. An old friend
will help you realize your full
potential and encourage you
to make changes that will im-
prove you; liee.. ..~~
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): Spend some money to
update your look or to make
yOu feel good about yourself.
Make new friends. Get in-
VOlved in an event or activity
that interests you and it will
lead you to someone with
whom you can work in the
future. Love is in the stars.


ARIES (March 21-April
19): Youtl be in a good posi-
tion when dealing with per-
sonal and domestic situations
requiring mental and physical
skill. Your energy and ability
to pull things together and get
everyone on the same page
will make you a hero. Wit
TAURUS (April 20-May
20): Work on a project that
can help you improve 4iour
efficiency at work and home"
You can learn a lot by watch-
ing what others do wrong and
not making the same mis-
takes. Keep anyone who is
too domineering at a distance.
SrAA
GEMINI (May 21-June
20): Getting involved in your
community or fundraiser wil
lead to a worthwhile introduc-
tion. You are heading in the
right direction with regard
to friendships and potential
partnerships. Be prudent
and responsible financially.
***** ~
.CANCER (June 21-July
22): Don't push your plans,
ideas or projects on someone
who isn't interested. You are
better off going it alone. Add-
ed responsibilities are likely
to be dumped i~n your lap by


THE LAST WORD

E ugen ia W~ord
those depended onyour kind-

LEO (July 23-Ahug. 22):
You've got what it takes to
be in control and to lead the
pack. Your strength, cour-
age, determination and high
energy will be impossible to
beat. This can turn into an in-
vigorating and successful day
if you put your best foot for-
ward. WAAA ~
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Not everyone will see
things your way but, if you
follow your own path, you will
accomplish your goals and re-
ceive the recognition and the
praise you deserve. Investing
in your home, family or a proj-
ect can help you raise your
income. AAA r
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct
22): You'll feel torn between
what you want to do an~d what
smo else iskin y t
d Smtim s asu hv ton
selfish in order to boost your
confidence and attitude. Offer
suggestions and solutions but
let others fend for themselves.


works up
DEAR ABBY: A member
of my gym brings her newborn
in with her every morning.
She sets the carrier dowri next
to her treadmill, puts in her
earplugs and runs. 'lle baby
usually cries on and off, but
today he cried nonstop during
my entire 20-minute workout
It drove me crazy.
I'm a mom, too. A crying
baby, especially a newborn, is
heartbreaking. This woman
never stops to see why her lit-
tle one is crying or to console
him. This situation doesn't
seem to bother the other gym
members. Should I talk to her
and risk a hostile response, or
speak to the gym manager?
- HEAVY-HEARTED GYM
BITNNY IN RIVERVIEW,

DEAR GYM BUNNY: Talk
to the manager. The crying in-
fant may not bother the other
gym members, but it bothers
you. The woman isn't stopping
her workout to see what may
be wrong because with her
earbuds in she can't hear the
child, which doesn't make her
a candidate for mother of the
year. She's' causing a distrac-
tion and an inconvenience to
you, so speak up.
DEAR ABBY: Ihave been
married to my high school
sweetheart, "Don," for 10
years. I love him dearly. We
were very young when we mar-
ried, and at the time he said he
didn't want kids. I didn't give


racing against your biological
clock.
DEAR ABBY: My part-
ner has been diagnosed with
Alzheimer's. As time goes on,
I know I will lose him more
and more. How do I do this
and allow him to keep his dig-
nity? Life comes full circle, and
I understand that. I keep try-
.ing to dwell in the present and
not think too far ahead. I don't
know ~where to turn. How do
you start the long goodbye?-
IDSI' IN PHOENIX -
DEAR IDST: The first
thing you need to do is contact
the Alzheimer's Association.
The Alzheimer's Association
can guide you on the journey
ahead of you and provide a
source of emotional support if
you join one of its caregiver's
groups. The toll-free phone
number is (800) 272-3900 and
the website is alz.0rg.
You and your partner
should also make certain
NOW that his wishes for end-
of-life care are clearly stated in
writing, so that when the time
comes, they will be respect-
ed. Then take each day as it
comes, thank God for the good
ones, have patience when they
are less so, and take good care
of yourself because that will be
key to ensuring your partner
gets the best care possible.
SWrite Dear Abby at
mwwDearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, LOS
Angeles, CA 90069. '


Abigail Van Buren
www.deorabby.com
it much thought because back
then we weren't ready to start
a family. Now, Don still doesn't
want kids but I do.
He says if children are
that important to me, I should
leave him and find someone
who does want to be a parent.
Of course, I don't want just any
man's baby. I want his baby.
Don has warned me that if
I become pregnant, he'll prob-
ably leave. He's planning to
liave a vasectomy even though
I'm against it. Don't knowivhat
to do. This is the only problem
we have.. He won't agree to
counseling I've already sug-
gested it. I can't picture myself
starting over with another man
or going my whole life without
being a mother. Please help.
- UNFULTFILLED IN LOU-
ISVIILE
DEAR UNFUL;FILLED:
Your husband has given you
fair warning. Your now have an
important choice to make. B -
cause having a child is so im-
portant to you, my advice is to
start "picturing" yourself wth
another.hu band, and oi in
'enough time that you won't be


55 Not
56 Crested __,.
Colo.
58 Chairlift
alternative
60 Shake
62 Blot with a paper
towel, maybe
63 Like food that's
acceptable to
cattle?
67 Inuit relatives
69 Checked, say
70 Italiln
sportswear name
73 They come with
turndown service
74 Soviet
75 Burial site of
early Scottish
kings
77 Rents
78 Pihp material, for

79 Memo Mbe

performance?
83 Shell, e.g.
86 Warning from a
driver
87 Extremely, in
1970s slang
88 Joyce's land
89 Bottom-line
bigwigs, in brief
91 Head-turning
sound
93 Abstain happily.

12F Seen who co-
vvrote
"Freakonomics
103 New Guinea
port
104 Life-threatening
107 Blow away


108 Is well- .
endowed?
111 One giving an
order
112 Declared
113 Dammed river
in North
Carolina
114 Maurice of
Nixon's cabinet
115 Region
conquerdd by ,
Philip II of
Macedon
116 Mounts

Down
1 "Back to the
Future" family
name
2 "Get !"
3 California
missions founder
Junipero ___
4 Scottish poet
James known as
"The Ettric
Shepherd"
5 Southern
university that
shares its name
with a biblical
judge
6 Form a splinter
group
7 Sled dog with a
sttu enNerwl
Park
8 Elizabeth in the

dparmr nt
9 Abbr. following
op. and loc.
10 The Wi~dcats of
the Big 12 Conf.
11 Attack from the
air


12 2010 chart-
topper for Ke$ha
13 Like in the
headlights
14 Old Ottoman
governor
15 Rurd) setting, in
poetry
16 Green gemstone
17 Place iri a Carlo
Levi memoir
18 Scout's mission
19 David's weapon
24 Western tribe
28 Preposterous
31 Once, a long time
ago
32 "Fam~ily Guy"
creator
MacFarlane
33 Ignore,
imperatively
34 Barely beat
35 Oahu offering
38 In ___ (confused)
39 Mr. Burns's
teddy bear on
"The Simpsons"
40 Typical cemetery
enclosure
41 Driver's target
42 Balloonhead
43 Seller of space or
time, for short
44 Showy craft?
45 'acte
46 ___ -deucy
48 Tennis's 1977
U.S. Open champ
49 Slon,e.g.,

50 Accustom
51 _-masochism.
'56 False deity
57 Baloney and then
some
59 Dinner scraps .


Across
1 Reduces to pulp
7 Betray, in a way
15 They're
unoriginal
20 Haitian
21 Haiti's first
democratically
elected president
22 Iconoclast

2STklinksgiving
leftovers?
25 Early spring '
bloomers
26 Operagoer's
accessory
27 Broke bread
28 Longfellow's
words before "O
Ship of State!"
29 Singer Sumac
30 Saye"No, ad

"Uh-uh"?
34 Mrs. Robert _
(Mary Custis)
36 Make a big stink
37 Chacon of the
1960s Mets
38 Put up with
41 One may be
original
43 Hopelessly lost
47 Plea for


52 Abbr. on a cover
letter
53.Wind ien front of

54 Kin of fairies
Fo nym ut-r asers
phone: 1-900-285-5656,
w14 9aec imin ,1700-
814-5554.


60 Memorable time
61 Vintage platters
62 Kebab go-with
64 Bravura
65 Cry to a mate
66 Cterreat eof the
67 Concert stack
68 Unexploded
71 Made haste
72 "__ dignus"
(Latin motto)
74 Sans pizazz


75 Chapel line
76 Giant of old
79 Gist
80 Basic first step
81 Mateus
82 Chant syllables
84 Bear vis-h-vis
the woods, e.g.
85 Fails miserably
89 Like a hair shirt
90 Bordeaux
brothers


91 La M~me __
(The Little
Sparrow)
92 Sharpening
devices
93 Sword lilies, for

94 Send, as a check
95 Trump who wrote
"The Best Is Yet
to Come"
96 Instant .
97 Lensman Adams


98 Good to go
99 Dexterity
exercise

1001 state
101 Jumps bail, say
105dSoay "What tot
do?," e.g.
106 To
(precisely)
108 Siamese, e.g.
109 Filing org.
110 H


oTIOIOLEEANI ANT EM


HO ROSCO PES


a sweat at the gyni


IlClIIESIEW





Your total monthly
prescription bill

w i11 cost



at Baya Pharmacy.

Regardless of chain store promotions,
Baya Pharmacy nowpromises lower
prices that can save y u hundreds. It
takes only 10 mid utes to swritch to Baya.
It's a bold mayethat's never
beenl do~ne before.::;
1lt's Baya's new

scriptioni

cel~


ADVERTISEMENT


SUNDAY, APRIL 17, 2011


'd
t
: