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The Lake City reporter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01530
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 4/16/2011
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
System ID: UF00028308:01530
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text

Art Achievemet ccso:woman

lying on tracks

Illr 4Ckilled by tr ain


FlOrida jobless rate

dips to 11.1 percent


Walgreens suspect nabbed in St. Johns


Derby Bout '102 Years
ACR Hunnies NAACP will celebrate
take on SFRG with annual luncheon
en-se~ In Local, 3A
000016 120511 ****3-DIGIT 326
LIB OF FLORIDA HISTORY
PO BOX 117007
205 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE F'L 32611-1943


www.Iakecityreporter.com


She apparently
placed~ herself in
train's path.
From staff reports

A Lake City woman was
killed Thursday night when
shk was run over by a CSX
14'comotive, according to
sheriff's office officials.
Carol Ann Ande, 23, 283
NE Jem St., was killed in
the Incident.
The incident occurred
after 8 p.m. on Northeast
Washington Street~ near
the intersection of Buddy
Avenue.
Accoi~ding to Columbia
County Sheriff's Office
reports, deputies who
responded to the scene
reported faitding the east-
bound CSX freight train
stopped on the tracks and
a dead woman under the
train. '


Sgt. EXI Seifert, Columbia
County Sheriff's Office pub-
lic information officer, said
detectives and crime scene
technicians were on the'
scene throughout the night
and conducted interviews
with the train engineer and
witnesses near the scene..
Seifert said it appears the
train's engineer followed
appropriate procedures
and, implemented 'emer-
gency braking protocols
when he saw the victim oni
the tracks, however, the
~train could not be stopped
in a,short distance due to
weight momentum. '
"Detechies believe that
the victim purposely placed'
herself in a position to be
struck by the train,'" Seifert
said.' "Detectives believe
that she placed herself in
the path of the train as the
train approached."
No charges are pending
against the train operator.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Lake City residents Aimee Steedley (from left), Billy Steedley and Sharon Steedley look at pieces of student-created artwork
displayed inside' the Lake City Mall Friday.


Show honors students' creations


Hundreds of
students' workS
on display. :
By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com

eeing her son's>
artwork displayed
for the fist time
was why Renee
SBrinkley' of Lake
City attended the Fourth
Annual Columbia Arts
Gala ait the~ Lake City Mall
Friday.


suing higher education in
the arts. '
Julie` Wald, Summers
Elementary art teacher and
evdnt orgariizer, said the
gala's purpose was to cel-
ebrate the students' artistic
excellence, raise money for
the scholarship fund and
promote awareness for the
district's arts programs.
Wald noted that the
teachers are grateful to the
district's administration.
"We want to make sure
we acknowledge our grati-
ART SHOW continued on 3A


"It's a big achievement
'for him," Brinkley said,
since her son, Loimnie, 6,
was the only Pinemoult
Elementary kindergartner
to display a mask drawing.
The gala showcased hiun-
dreds of district students'
artwork that they created
in school art classes, rang-
ing from ceramics, paint-
ings and drawings made by
children grades kindergar-
ten through 12 across the
district. -
Approxilvately 50 student
art pieces were donated for
a silent auction that people


in the community could bid
on and a variety of hands-on
stations were available for
childreri to make crafts like
puppets- or origami. A kin-
dergarten through grade
12 honors show was also
on display and will show
through April 30.
Local restaurants donat-
ed food.for the event and
also gave items fo~r the
silent auction.
Money raised by the gala
will be put toward other dis-
trict-wide special art events
and a scholarship fund for
high school students pur-


rate also remains well above
the 8.8 percent national rate
;for. March.
,On the positive side,
Florida added 22,600 jobs
in March and job growth
is up by 51,500 over the
same month in 2010. That's
the strongest over-the-year
increase in nearly four
years.
The Mat-ch unemploy-
ment rate also is a shade
lower than the 11.3 percent
recorded a year ago, mnark-
ing the fist over-the-year
6Hclne since November
"WT~e're seeing an encour-
aging trend since Florida's
unemployment rate has
declined for three straight
months," Scott said. "We're
clearly heading in the right
direction, but we still have a
long way to go because we
still have more than a mil-
lion people out of work."
Scott also noted the job-
less rate has dropped by 0.9
percentage, point since he
took office in January.


Sa drop getS
paSe frm


By BILL KACZOR
Associated Press .
TALLAHASSEjE
Florida *Gov. Rick Scott
called it "great news" that
the state's unemployment
rate dropped by '0.4 per-
centage point~to 11.1. per-
~cent in March, brit he left it
to a state economist Friday

rosy pronouncement.
Agency for Workforce
Innovation economist
Rebecca Rust said one
factor in the decline was
Florida's shrinking labor
pool: 14,000 people gave up.
looking for jobs in March.
so they're no longer Count-
ed in labor statistics. She
also noted job creation
hasn'thbeen quite as robust
as expected.
Florida's unemployment


He's accused of -
a p armacy
robbery there.
By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
A man accused of rob-
bing the Wa7lgreens in Lake
City earlier in the week
was' arrested in St. Johns
County Thursday, with two


accomplices, after
a Walgreens there,
o f f i c i a l s s a i d .algdyr b i g i
.Sergey Anthony
Kozlov, 25, 1363 ,
E. Elk; Glen Drive, .
Draper, Utah; Kozlol
Trevor Carlos
LeFranc, 20, 118 S. 3600
W., Salt Lake, Utah; and
Kimberly Lynn Kozlov, 23,
1363 E. Elkr Glen Dirve,


Draper, Utah; were
arrested in -con-
nection with the
St. John's county
crime. .
Sergey'Kozlov is
Believed to 'be the
prime suspect in the
LakeCityWalgre'ens
pharmacy robbery, 2094
SW U.S. Highway 90.
According to Lake City
Police Department reports,


on Thursday LCPD inves-
tigator Paul Kash received
information that the St.
Johns Coun~ty Sheriff's
Office was involved in a
pursuit of a robbery sus-
pect and had captured three
people related to Walgreen
robberies in their area.
"Overnight we were able
to confirm with the St. Johns
CAUGHT continued on 3A


Roush earnrs top
service 'award
during event.
By TONY BRITT
Stbritt@lakecityreporter.com
Frank Roush has volun-
teered at the Lake City VA
Medical Center, on and off,
for more than 27 years.
Friday afternoon, Roush,
92, received a standing
ovation when Lake City
VA Medical Center repre-
sentatives gave him a pin
and an Exceptional Honor
Medallion honoring the
15,000 hours of service he
has volunteered to the local
facility.
Roush was one of several


hundred VA Medical Center
volunteers honored at the
facility s annual volunteer
Awards Ceremony and
Luncheon. The event was
held at the Florida Gateway
College gymnasium with
more than 150 people in
attendance.
"It's important to be avol-
unteer because I love our
veterans," Roush said, not-
ing that he is a World War
II Army veteran. "I choose
to work as an escort at the
VA because of the exercise
that I get plus the fact that
I have access to the whole
hospital."
SRoush said he volunteers
because he loves working
LUNCHEON continued on lA


TONY BRITT/Lake City Reporter
Frank Roush (sitting) chuckles as shows off with the
Exceptional Honor Medallion he earned for volunteering 15,000
hours to the local VA Medical Center, while flanked by VA offi-
cials Nicky Adams (from left) and Maureen M. W~ilkes.


JASON MATTHEWWALK Mike Summons follows through on a swing on hole No. 12 Friday after-
noon at the S&S Charities Golf Tournament held at the Country Club at
Lake City. One hundred and forty four golfers participated in the event.


(386 75 '293
sUBSCRIBETo
THE REPORTER:
V ? e:0 7545


Obituaries. ... 3A
Advice &Comics. .. .. B
Puzzles .... .. . 2B


COMING
SUNDAY
You~l~ng Eagle~S
take. flight


victims Rememered
Solemn ceremony
held Friday
Local, 3A


Reporter


cUlt


1 aKO


Vol. I 36, No. 71 I 75 cents


Saturday, April I 6, 20 II


VA says 'thank you' to

facility volunteers


86
T-Storm Chance
WEATHER, 2A


TODAY IN
LOCAL
,' nv rntim: ~













. Celebrity Birthdays


PO N EH PPLE I TNE NE



Turner gets 'Hig as a nun on Broada


TH E WEATH ER

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FEW MOSTLY MOSTLY PARTLY ARTLY
T-STORMWS ,SUNNY SUNNY CLOUDYq ~_ CLOUDYp



~-~..._~..HI M. HI8 LO4t HI4L 58 ~ HIH~i LO HI 7 i .


CO RREC TIO N

.The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run
in this space. And thanks for reading.


Ta lhsee*
.j I
;b 55Panama City
75 56


1


Get V Vonce


Page Editor: Jason M. Walker, 754-0430


Pope Benedict XVI is 84.
Actor Peter Mark Richman
is 84. -
Singer Bobby Vinton is 76.
M Denmark's Queen
Margrethe 11 is 71.
Basketball Hall-of-Famer
Kareem Abdul-Jabbar is 64.
NFL coach Bill Belichick
is 59.


Rock singer-turned-politi-
cian Peter Garrett is 58.
Actress Ellen Barkin is 57.
M Rock musician Jason
Scheff (Chicago) is 49.
Singer Jimmy Osmond is
48.
M Actor-comedian Martin
Lawrence is 46.
M Actor Jon Cryer is 46..


Friday:
Afternoon: 2-7-2-1
Evening: 8-6-1-7


Thursday:
12-23-29-32-33


NEW YORK

confused as anyone
about the heavenly
detour her roles have
K ~~~taken lately.atle T r e a
She's making her first appearance
as a Roman Catholic nun when the
play "High" opens this month on
Broadway. And, in a divine bit of
coincidence, the actress best known
for "Body Heat"' and "Romancing
the Stone" also stars as a suburban
mom striving to be named Catholic
Woman of the Year in a new film
opening at the same tinie at the

'Fo aso r assn this year it's my
year of Catholicism. Who knew?"
says the 56-year-old actress in her
rose-filed dressing room at the
Booth Theater where she's putting
the finishing touches on Matthew
Lombardo's play.
"I must confess that I don't believe
in any organized religion," she said.
"I happen to think that they're all
men putting words in God's mouth.
That doesn't work for me, but I cer-
tainly believe in belief and faith."
The fist of back-to-back' devout
Catholic roles has Turner playing
Sister Jamison Connelly, a foul-
mouthed recovering alcoholic who
is asked to treat a 19-year-old crystal
meth addict and prostitute. ..
The three-character play explores
the battle between addiction and
faith as the nun tries: to help a young
man perhaps beyond forgiveness
or redemption. It requires her to be
devoid of glamour in shapeless cloth-
.ing and a ponytail. Lombardo, the
playwright, had someone mn mmnd.

Singer Janet Jackson
to play state fair
INDIANAPOLIS Indiana native
Janet Jackson is set to perform at
the state fair this summer.
The Indianapolis Star reports -


"This is also why you pay taxes,
for the authorities are God's
servants, who give their full
time to. governing. Give to
everyone what you owe them: If
you owe taxes, pay taxes; if rev-
enue, then revenue; if respect,
then respect; if honor, then
[honog a
Romans I 3:6-7


0419


~orter
7:30

t any
lould
Afe
ser-

ivery
'ser-

i4S


6.32
8.79
3.46

1.40
2.80
9.40


Actress Kathleen Turner poses for a portrait at the Booth Theatre in New York-
Turner portrays Sister Jamison Coribelly in the Broadway production 'High.'


Friday that Jackson
last performed in
Indianapolis in 2001.
The resident of
Gary until age 5 will
play at the Indiana
State Fair on Aug. -
17.


at $100,000 for Nicholas Tracy, 21, of
Beachwood,
Tracy was arrested Wednesday
after police, responding to a tripped
burglar alarm at a Middletown
Township home, foumd him hiding in
a bathroom. ,

AMC expanding into
uHScripted series
NEW YORK AM;C h'as flour-
ished with its lineup of feature filmS
and original dramas like ''Mad Men" -
and "The Walking Dead." Now, the
network is expanding into unscripted
series with a.show that tells the
inside story of the U.S. Department
of Homeland Security.
Filming for "Inside the DHS" is
set to begin this summer. The eight-
episode series will premiiere in late
2011, Joel Stillerman, head of origi-
nql programming, said Friday.

WAssociated Press


n oskcaJ


Tickets for the
nighttime performance are priced at
$88, $68 and $48 and go on sale May
14.

Burglar stole $100K
ffom Bon Jovi's hone
MIDDLETOWN Authorities
said they've nabbed
a burglar who stole
$100,000 in jewelry
from Jon Bon Jovi's
New Jersey home
and also robbed
three, of the rocker's
neighbors.
.Bon Jovi Bail has been set


MondayY 6'


61 55 ps.

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35 58. .~

;3 64 pi"
85/56/s
87/68/s
83/56/si


Valilosta
'82/-52
Lake City
actss
Cainesil .
Si E
Ocala
so so


City
Cape Canaveral
Daytopa Beach
Rt. Lauderdale

Gainesville
Jacksonville


Sunday



52 51 0.:
1; 52 5

61 59 pe
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82/47/s
84/64/pc
79/50/s
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*lackcsonville


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Pi6


i


Student is best documentarian

Ricky Nelles, 16, a Higley High School junior, poses with a
camera in Gilbert, Ariz. Nelles has won Best Documentary
from the Student Television 'Network in Orlando. He shot and
edited 'Prison of Clay,' which follows a 6-year-old boy with a
rare form of cerebral palsy as he travels with his parents to
Dusseldorf, Germany to undergo an experimental stem cell
procedure.


hey west
Orando Cap ~a aeral Lk iy
Miame

West Palm Beach Ocl
so.7 *ll Orlando
SFL Lauderdale Panama city
s 86 73 Pensacola
MapNles Tallahassee
'87/70 giagg Tampa
West 8873 Valdosta
,,, W. Palm Beach


Tamp *
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FL RMyer!
89/69


ror plot, but still deemed a
national security threat.
Immigration and
Customs Enforcement said
all 19 Haitians deported
Friday hadolmen cnvic~ted
felonjr offense.

Man getS life Of r
attempted murder
JACKSONVILLE A
Jacksonville man has been
sentenced to life in prison
for nearly killing his girl-
friend by running her
down with a car.
sAtDua Cout judge
Martin, 34, on Friday. He
was convicted in February
of attempted murder.
Authorities said Martin
pushed his girlfriend,
Mary Wilkie, out of the car
last July and ran her over
three times. He then drove
off, leaving the woman for
dead.
SWilkie survived the
attack but remains in a
wheelchair.

Teen gets 40
y98tS fOr murder
BRADENTON -A


Manatee County teen has
been sentenced to 40 years
in prison for fatally shoot-
ing another teen armed
with a bat.

Byro Gal y 11 ,n don
Wednesday. He was con-
victed in September of
second-degree murder and
assault with a firearm.
Galloway shot her broth-
er Dejuan Williams, 18,
who later came home.

E.T. Yobrk, former
chancellor, dies

Forme tte LU versity
System Chancellor E.T.
York has died.
York also was a vice
president and interim
president at the University
of Florida.
University of Florida
officials said York died
Friday in Gainesville. He
was 88.
Current University
System Chancellor Frank
Brogan issued a statement
praising York's role in
advancing Florida's univer-
sities.

SAssociated Press


An exclusive
ServiCO
brought to
Our readers
by
The Weather
isk IIChannel.
!amon

-m -


Forecasts, data and
era hi s O 01Wethe
www.weatherpublisher~com


TEMPERATURES
High Friday
Low Friday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Friday
Month total

Noma mnth-toadate


SUN
.Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise tom.
Suriset tom,

MOON
Moonrise today
Moonset today
Moonrise tom.
Moonset tom.


84
58
80
54
92 in 1936
38 in 1950


0.00"
0.69"

11.0


7:03 a.m.
7:58 p.m.
7:02 a.m.
7:59 p.m.


6:41 p,.m.
5:39 a.m.
7:51 p.m.
6:19 a.m.


O
April
F1u


--


LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING SATURDAY, APRIL 16, 2011


*6 Evening: 4-4-7


:11 -


Thought for Today


Lakee City Reporter
HOW TO REACH US BUSINESS
.Main number ........(386) 752-1293 Controller Sue Brannon....754-(
Fax number .............752-9400 (sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
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Comuniy Nwsalirsln., s pb- h~M b copltedby :p
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180 Tuesday through Saturday, and by
ri Dodvall stag paea Ciya 3205 a.m. on Sunday.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulbtiori and Please call 386-755-5445 to report
ni~e Associated PreA. problems with your delivery service.
All material hereinstis property of~the Lake .InColumbia County, customers sh
CiyRe crer. deeprouto~n hh or ne e I for d03 m o repory
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'(circulation~lakecityrepodtercom)
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CLASSIFIED 24 Weeks. .................. $8:
To place classified ad, call 755-5440. 52 Weeks. ................ .$171


ARO U ND F LORI DA


Tea Party cheers.
Gov. Rick Scott
JACKSONVILLE -
Gov. Rick Scott is urging
tea party supporters to
keep putting pressure on
lawmakers to reduce taxes
and remove government

bct apeared before
Jacksonville tax day tea
party rally and told them
to stay politically active.
To wild cheers, he said,
"Stop raising our taxes!
Stop regulating our lives.
So, what do we have to do?
We have to vote."

Woman punches
DCF: caseworker
MIAMI Authorities
said a mother of five
punched a Department
of Children and Families
caseworker who had come
to take away her children.
SMiami police said they
120catibd hCaneem Atkins,
Friday, two days after they
were reported illissing by
DCE
According to reports,
two caseworkers arrived
at Atkins' home April 8 to
take custody of the chil-
dren. Police said Atkins
lunged at Lovern Alleyne-
Babb, punched her in the
face and stomped on her

e ferae ea n he noe.

Convicted criminalS

deported to Haiti
MIAMI-- Immigration
authorities have repatri-
ated 19 Haitia'ns previously
convicted of crimes in the
U.S.
I~t's the second such
group of deportees since
the devastating January
2010 earthquake in Haiti.
The U.S. resumed deporta-
tions to Haiti on Jan. 20,
Sending back 26 Haitians
convicted of a crime and
one acquitted in a 2007 ter-


10millisestolu
Today's
ultra-violet
radiation r

to 10+.


G O
April May May
Lat New Fist




a On this date in
1998, severe
t ogh pat df
SKentucky. Golf bal
to baseball sized
hail fell over Bowling
Go ninag rehaes. A
Least one tornado
passed just to the
s ath of eB Unga
Jr F3 intensity.





NAACP to celebrate 102 years


I'cl Like To Te([ Everyone









8 birthday

An niVe TS Oy



Ca H 755-5440
L~ake City RiCeporter








Well, we thought you'd like something productive on
your pad to prove to your spouse that it's really a useful
tool for financial management. Well worth the invest-
me'nt you made to buy it. And so much more than just
a toy for playing Angry Birds.
See, you actually ca n do someth ing useful with th is new
technology. You can see if you've got paid yet, balance
your checkbook, pay a few bills, make a loan payment,
transfer funds to your kids away at college, and mor-e!
Or you can just act like you're taking notes at that meet~-
ing instead of updating your facebook< page.
We also have old-fashioned internet banking for those
who've not-yet convinced their spouse that they really
need the newest pad devices or cell phones.


LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SATURDAY, APRIL 16, 2011


Page Editor: Josh Blackmon, 754-0427


Continued from 1A
wt he veteras.
"I just love all of them and
I have more fun interacting
with them, than anybody,"
he said. "It just makes my
life. The medallion that
I was given is not really
important, the interaction
that I can have with our
veterans is what is impor-
tant."
Apparently a lot of other
volunteers feel the same
way.
Heather C. Frebe, North
Florida/South Georgia
Veterans Health System
public affairs officer, said in
2010, the 350 volunteers at
the Lake City VAMC donat-
ed 48,656 hours of service
worth an estimated $1.04
million dollars. .
"Many of our volunteers
have donated hundreds,
even thousands of hours
and numerous years, to
serve our Veterans," she
said.
Nicky Adams, North
Florida/South Georgia
Veterans Health System
assistant chief of volun-
tary services, said Friday's


observation.
"This is the week that the
VA utilizes to specially r-ec-
ognize all the contributions
from the volunteers for the
veterans," she said.
Adams estimated that.
130 volunteers attended
the luncheon.
During the ceremony vol-
unteers were given pins for
donating various amounts
of service hours to the VA
medical center. In addition
to Roush getting his award,
Ken' Graulich was recog-
nized for donating 10,000
volunteer hours to the
facility. Graulich was given
Silver Bowl.Award as well
as a pin for his services.
"Our volunteers do little
bit of everything," Adams
said. "ThIey touch almost
every` patient that comes
through those doors, either
directly or indirectly. They
support over 29 different
departments in the medical
center and our outpatient
clinics."


Martin Lee were honored
as the Friends of the Circuit
for their roles in saving the
life of Clyde Sperring in
November. Sperring was
shot twice by his wife while
he slept and left for dead,
as she then set the home
on fire and killed herself.
The deputies working on
shift were able to run into
the burning house and pull
Sperring to safety. Missy
Norris, victim advocate
for the Suwannee County
Sheriff's Office accepted
the award on their behalf.
Third Judicial Circuit
Chief Judge David W.
Fina served as the key-
note~ speaker for the event
and noted he was there to
honor the victims of crimes
that survived, as well as the
ones that didn't survive.
Bass said it was impor-
tant to continue to honor-
the memories of the vic-
tims. .
"As day in and day out
goes by, a lot of times mem-
ories fade and it's so imme-
diately impressed on people
when the crime occurs,"
she said.- "I think a lot of
victims just fade from the
picture, so by doing some-
thing like this it reminds
people that while the crime
is over and people have
gone on or died, their fami-
lies still wYalk that path day
in and day out. This pro-
gram sheds some recogni-
tion, respect and honor for
victims' families."


TONY BRITT/Lake City Reporter
Missy Norris (from left), victim advocate for the Suwannee County Sheriff's Office; Tina Walker,
an advocate at Vivid Visions and Michelle Johnson, an advocate and liaison with the Attorney
General's office, were given advocate awards by Paul Crawford, Guardian Ad Litem assistant
program director, during Friday's Suwannee Valley Victim Assistance Coalition brunch.


Tangles, a community out-
reach program for women
in Live Oak, said the coali-
tion has been in existence
for 10 years and has held
the recognition ceremony
for 10 years. '
Bass said the local
event falls in conjunc-
tion with National Crime
Victims' Rights Week and
there were -events held in
Tallahassee earlier in the
week where local coalition
members participated.
"W1~e hosted this event to
bring honor and recogni-


tion to victims and victims'
families," she said. "Wre also
honored people who have
gone above and beyond the
call of duty."
During the program,
Tina Walker, an advocate at
Vivid Visions and Michelle
Johnson, an advocate and
liaison with the Attorney
General's office, were rec-
ognized as the 2011 Victim
Advocates of the Year. .
Suwannee County dep-
uties Cory Horne, Sgt.
Sam St. John, Cpl. Domiie
Brown, Wayne Kelly and


sy ToNY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com

Local victims of violent
crimes were remembered
during a solemn ceremony
Friday morning when the
Suwannee Valley Victim
Assistance Coalition held
its annual observation cer-
emony.
The brunch took place
at the First Baptist Church
with more than 30 people
in attendance and lasted
more than an hour. '
Vrickie Bass, co-leader of


Chief Argatha Gilmore
said in a prepared state-
ment. "I would like to thank
the investigators from the
St. Johns County Sheriff's
Office and investigator
Kash for sharing their infor-
mation so quickly. Their
information allows us to let
our local community know
that the armed robber has
been captured and is no

nF adath "pi8, a pistol-
toting gunman robbed the
Lake City Walgreens of an
undetermined amount of
pills and fled from the store
before he could be appre-
hended.
The incident occurred
around 11:40 a.m. No one
was injured in the incident.
Store employees told
authorities that a white man
walked up to the pharmacy
counter, handed the clerk a
note that said turn over the
drugs to him as he showed
her a pistol.


Continued from page 1A

County Sheriff's Office
that the three individuals
were linked to the Lake
City Walgreens robbery,"
said Capt. John Blanchard,
LCPD public information
officer. "Kash will be travel-
ing to St. Augustine to con-
fer with the lead investiga-
tor to r viw the eo d ne
'by investigators from the
St. Johns County Sheriff's
Office that all three indi-
viduals were involved in
the Lake City Walgreens
robbery. Sergey Kozlov
has been identified as the
person in the surveillance
picture from the Lake City
Walgreen's robbery."
Blanchard said Kash is
filing charges on all three
people for robbery and
related charges.
"I am so glad that no
citizens were hurt dur-
ing the robberies," LCPD


Continzued from page lA

tude to our leadership for
understanding the impor-
tance of the creative pro-
cess and ~for making the
arts a part of our children's
education," she said.
The gala was a way for
parents and the commu-
nityr to see the students'
artwork, Wald said, and a
chance for students to dis-
play their pieces and be
proud of them.
"It just is a. wonderful
opportunity to 1muild their
self-esteem and to ackn-owl-
edge. their efforts and their
persistence and their knowl-
edge in the arts," she said,
"and know that it is a valu-
able skill, the practicing
and knowing that there's
more than one solution to
a fluestion, all those kinds
of things."
Dawn Odum of Lake City
said she came to the gala
with her family to see her
6-year-old daughter Mary's
piece, which was in the
silent auction.
"Tonight's the first time
we've ever seen it," she said.


JASON MATTHEW WALKERILake City Reporter
Columbia County elementary and middle school students parade through the Lake City Mall on
Friday as they showcase their artwork during the Columbia Arts Gala.


Odum said the event
encourages appreciation of
the arts for the students and
the community.


"And I love to see art in
the school systems," she
said, "because there are
Some students that don't


excel academically, but can
excel artistically, so I think
it's (the gala) a great posi-
tive experience ~for them."


From staff reports
John E Mayo, NAACP president
and CEO, said the NAACP was born
about 102 years ago in a small room
in Harlem, N.Y.
A local celebration of the NAACP's
102nd anniversary~will be held April
30.
The Columbia County Branch
NAACP will hold its 29th Annual
Freedom Fund Luncheon at noon at


the Winfield Recreation Center.
The event's theme will be "NAACP:
Affirming America's Promise" and
Reverend Gill Ford, national director
NAACP Unit Building, will be the
event's keynote speaker.
NAACP Life members will be rec-
ognized. .
Formed in 1982, the annual lun-
cheon has grown from almost 120
individuals to more than 250 people '


including Third Circuit Judges, the
Supervisor of Elections, the Sheriff,
the Superintendent of Schools, the
Tax Collector, Chief of Police, clergy
and others.
The luncheon is the branch's annu-
al fundraiser,
Tickets are $35 and must be pur-
chased in advance. Call Glynnell
Presley at (386) 752-4070.


Jerry Stephan 'Pops"
Creamer

Jerry Stephan "Pops" Creamer,
57 of Silverhill, AL passed away
suddenly on April 7, 2011. Jerry
was a native of
Lake City, FL.
Jerry was pre- FI
ceded in death .
by his parents
Calvin & Ola
Mae Row- L- :
land Creamer ,. .A
and sis-
ter, Claudette Creamer.
Jerry was a family man. He
enjoyed flea markets, fish-
ing, collecting hats, pho-
tography and anytime spent
with his beloved family,
Survivors include his soul mate


& wife of 39 years, Mary Phil-
lips Creamer; children, Stepha-
nie (Clyde) Johnson, Sarah (Ben
Willis) Creamer. Grandchildren. '
Joshua Creamer, Lizzy Johnson'
Nathan Johnson, Katy Johnson
and Noah Willis. All of Silver-
hill, AL; sister; Vickey (Pete)
Carroll & Voncile Creamer, both
of Lake City, FL; brothers; Billy
(Lillian) Creamer of Hazelhurst,
GA, Calvin (Linda) Creamer,
Donnie Creamer, Roger (Caro-
lyn) Creamer, Bo (Brenda)
Creamer, all of Lake City, FL
and numerous nieces & nephews.
In keeping with Jerry's vvish,
a Sunday dinner & celebra-
tion of Jerry's life was held
at his childhood home-


ers of Blythewood; a brother,
Harvey Wise of Okeechobee,
FL; two grandchildren, Pres-
ton and Brandon Stuckey; and
numerous nieces and nephews.
A graveside service will be
held at 1:00 p.m. on Mon-
day, April 18, 2011 in Sum-
merton Evergreen Cemetery.
Visitation will be 3:00-5:00 p.m.
SundayatStephensFuneral Home.
STEPHENS FUNERAL
HOME & CREMATORY,
304 N. Church St., Man-
ning, is in charge of arrange-
ments, (803) 435-2179.
wwwlc. steph~ensfunera~lhomne.or~g

Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments e de aisf dalte Lae
ment at 752- 1293.


Sarah Elizabeth Wise Stuckey
Huffman
Sarah Elizabeth Wise Stuckey
Huffman, 69, widow of Pres-
ton Stuckey and Jim Huffman,
died Friday, April 15, 2011 at
Palmetto Baptist Hospital. Born
April 19, 1941, in Orangeburg,
she was a daughter of the late
Harvey Carson Wise and the
late Pauline Davis Beckham.
She was a homemaker, mem-
ber of the Eastern Star, busi-
ness owner, loving mother and
founding member of the Cel-
ebration Community Churlch.
She is survived by her only
child, Alex Stuckey of Jackson-
ville, FL; three sisters, Anne Ly-
brand of Columbia, Louise Wise
of Kentucky and Carol Sand-


B kep inmin if you want
to get the red tootsie pops,
you're going to have to come
visit us to get one. Peoples
State Bank. Now that's Bank-
ing!


ii -


Victims remembered



dur mg annual ceremony


LUNCHEON: Volunteers honored


CAUG HT: Three involved


AR~T SHOW: Gala boosts students' self-esteem


O BIT UARIE S


,e~ .



Ad 1 ... -,o..o or

















I I -


AN OPINION


StrkeFloid'scourt-packing plan


4A


www.Iakecityreporter.com


Star Parker
..parker@urbancure.0rg


im at
ear Friends o
Education:
By the time
you are reading
This, most likely
the House and Senate budgets
will have been adopted, and a
joint committee from the two
houses will be in the process of
negotiating a unified spending
bill to send to the Governor for.
approval. As everyone is now
aware, Florida continues in the
midst of a struggling economy
that is having an impact on all
of us in Columbia County every
day, including our hard-working
school employees.
This is a serious situation as
the state budget has been cut
again and again in the last four
years. Since 2007, our school
system has absorbed nearly $15
million in cuts from the legis-
lature, even after adding in the
school districts' federal stimulus
money, which is set to run out
this June.
The easy and necessary
cuts have already been made
by restricting travel, field trips
and non-essential purchases. In
addition, we have:
Asked our teachers
to substitute on their planning
periods,
Postponed purchases
of computers and new school
buses,
Delayed long-over-
due maintenance at our older
schools,
not replaced teachers
and support staff as they retire
or move, and
Transferred staff from
the county office to jobs at
schools.
What comes next?
Unfortunately, the outlook
isn't much brighter. Columbia
County Schools depend heavily
on state dollars to survive: We


with potential savings to con-
sider in order to balance the
budget. Unfortunately, some
of these will include reducing
personnel even more through
resignations and retirement,
not filling vacant positions and
shifting even more of our main-
tenance and repair money to fill
a need in our operating budget.
Obviously, the bulk of any say-
ings by a service organization
such as a school district will be
by "real" people in "real" jobs,
like teachers, bus drivers, lunch,
room and maintenance work-
ers, custodians, secretaries and
administrators. Most import
tantly, these people affect the
quality of education given to our
children.
As we move forward in these
tough economic times, please
be assured the Board and I
will do our best to balance the
impact of all options with stay-
ing committed to protecting
the quality of instruction in the
classroom and the jobs of our
valued employees. I ask every
one to remember that a school
system is the foundation of any
community an investment in
the future.
What can you do? Be under-
standing and patient with us
as we continue to change and
alter what you, may be used to at
your child's school or bus stops
or athletic events and extracur-
ricular activities. We pledge to
continue to look for ways to
save and do our part in helping
balance the state budget.
Lastly, please show your inter
est and concern for preserving
the budget and protecting our
children's future by contacting
the Governor and our state leg-
islative leaders.

SuM itednt I if Columbia
County Schools.


receive more than three times
as much money from the state
as we generate with our local
taxes for our "operational" or
general fund. State cuts affect
us significantly more than prop-
erty-ricli counties with a high
tax ~base, such as those located
along the coast.
Additionally, superintendents
are being told to prepare for a
six to seven percent cut on top
of the budget we are operating
under presently. That equates
to approximately $4 million
less for next year, which would
continue the steady decline to
.an estimated $11 million less for
the 2011-2012 school year than
we received just a few years ago
'in our annual budget.
All the while, our expenses
have gone up for utilities, insur-
ance, fuel and the requirement ~
to hire more teachers to meet
the class size reduction law. We
all should try to live within our
means during tough times, but
proportionately this is like a
family with a household income
of $30,000 suddenly trying to
live on $25,000 with an addi-
tional baby on the way.
The School Board and
County Office staff have had
and will continue to hold work-
shops and meetings to further
develop a working list of items


A N
OPIN ION


Better

tech is


not magic

T~e British writer and
scientist Arthur C.
Clarke proposed three
laws of the future, the
most memorable of
which is that "Any sufficiently
advanced technology is indistin-
guishable from magic."
I felt that way the fist time
I rode in a car with power
windows..In the mid-1960s,
the crank-down was the norm.
Pushing a button to open a
window seenied like something
only James Bond could do. But
the technology goes back to
before World War II. Lincolns
and Cadillacs had had power -
windows since the '50s. .
What was commonplace m
some circles was magic to me.

se em bymakn cuare eid ws
go up and down these days. *
Nor did I, after a few weeks of
annoyed admonitions from my

Once out of its package,
a gotta-hav-~it technology
becomes routine. It may be
useful. Its no longer novel.
This is not meant as a slight
to engineering or marketing.
Without the new and improved,
we'd still be scratching seeds
into the ~ground with sharp
sticks and sending messages
by smoke signal (though those
were improvements, too, in
their day).
Tech that makes one part of
Sthe world yawn can still be a
wonder in another. Cell phones,
for instance, are just now hav-
ing a profound effect inl areas
that never had decent phone
service.
You may use your cell phone
to check e-mail, take pictures,
text a friend, play solitaire
and even occasionally make
a call. In the African natiori of
Niger, where phone service
was always spotty, cellular tech-
nology has let rural farmers
leapfrog the land-line phase and
go directly to the 21st century.
Now, instead of carting produce
from market to market, settling
for the best price they can get
before their harvest spoils, they
call around, agree on a price,
and make one trip. Because
their fingers do the walking,
food stays fresh and prices stay
steady.
SChristian Science Monitor

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia Gounty
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Coembueliev strn nw ppers build
strong communities --"Newspapers
get things done!"
pu0ihp dsting ise ond profitable
comrnunity-oriented newspapers.
throg the ta rek o rmf sioals '
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.

s'".d WIsn publish r

Dink NeSmithi, president
Tom Wood, chairman


LETTERS
POLICE Y
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of


the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


be named by Republican Gov.
Rick Scott. Then it would go
one step past Roosevelt by
dividing the court in two. The
three most senior justices all,
coincidentally, appointed by a
Democratic governor would
be consigned to a new criminal
division.
This would ensure a con-
servative-leaning majority on a
new civil division, where pivotal
cases involving the drawing of
new voting districts will land
next year.
Republicans cite all sorts of
reasons for expansion, such as
needing to cut the court's heavy
caseload.
They ignore the fact that the
court's caseload is now the low-
est in a decade.

MUSA Today


judges and the courts they
sit on are, above all else,
supposed to be indepen-
dent. The judges are the
umpires, as U.S. Chief
tieJohn Roberts famously
referred to them, calling balls
and strikes i-egardless of the
consequences. Unlike politi-
cians, who react to every twitch
of public opinion, judges aren't
supposed to consider whether
a decision will be popular, just
whether it is fair and true to the
law. Their job is to protect prin-
ciple against the mob.
All of which explains why
frustrated politicians periodi-
cally seized on public emotions
to undo that two-century-old
principle. Take, for instance,
Florida Republicans, who seem
to have forgotten the lesson that
President Franklin D. Roosevelt


was taught in 1937, when he
tried to expand the Supreme
Court and pack it with several
new justices sympathetic to
his New Deal. The Democrat's
attempt proved so unpopular
that even many in his own party
didn't support him. No presi-
dent has tried such a maneuver
since.
Not so the GOP majority in
Florida's state House, which
moved one step closer Thursday
to passage of a constitutional
amendment that would pack the
state Supreme Court.
The Florida plan, champi-
oned by House Speaker Dean
Cannon, sounds an awful lot like
Roosevelt's proving that such
machinations are not confned
to either party. The measure
would add three new justices
to the court, all of whom would


OINIO


Saturday, April I 6, 201 II


Out




ne of the reasons
we study history
is that there is
something to learn
O~from it.
We're now noting that trau-
matic landmark in American
history the beginning, 150
yeas ao, f the Civil War
.As eo realwa hp ned
its relevance to what is hap-

we went to war with ourselves
and 600,000 plus had to die at
the hands of their brothers?
What parallels if ay iht we
draw from tha tragic ti that
will help us understand the
troubled and deeply divided
America in which we live
today?
On Wednesday, President
Obm spoonla Ges rg
share his vision on how to deal
with the nation's fiscal crisis.
In opening his remarks, the
president quite correctly noted
.that the debate about our
national budget is about "more
tan just num erd cna pa e...


wealth w rds, the bud et
debate is most fundamentally a
debate about values.
The president should be
commended for his clarity on
thB centa and cruci pomnt

the President and his
Democrat colleagues used this
very point that the budget
is about values as an excuse
to attack conservatives and
Republicans.
When Republicans wanted
to cut $350 million dollars
extracted annually from tax-
payers and directed to Planned
Parenthood, the nation's
number one provider of abor-
tions, Democrats accused
Republicans of introducing
"ideology" into budget discus-
sions.
In negotiations with
Republicans that could have
led to a government shut-
down, the President pretended
thatathe budget is exactly what
several days later he claimed
it is not 'just numbers on a
page."

clear tha he agrreesswi th n-
servatives that the budget is
about values, what are the val-
ues in question?
Let's go back to the Civil
War.
Several years bce re th wsr
dent, he and Stephen Douglas
engaged in their famous
debates in the campaign for
the Illinois Senate seat.
IM gls Icrhmpine ch
allowed new states entering
the union to decide by popular
vote whether slavery would
be permitted in their state.
Lincoln opposed expansion of
slavery into new states.
Douglas argued that in a
free country, choice was the
most important thing.
What could be more
American than citizens in
States deciding themselves
whet er slavery would be per-
mitted

SStar Parker is president of
CURE, Coalition
on Urbjan Renewal and Education
(www.urbancure.org) and author
of three books.


Economy leaves


on education


Mike Millikin
millikin m@fitn.edu





LAKE CITY REPORTER


SATURDAY, APRIL 16, 2011


Page Editor: Antonia Robinson, 754-0425


STo submit Community
Calendar items fax 752-9400,
drop-off at the Reporter or e-
mail at arobinson @
lakecityreporter.com. Call 754-
0425 for more information.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Retired Marine Corps 1st Sgt. (right) presents to Milton Smith on Thursday, on behalf of the Robert H. Jenkins, Jr. Veterans'
Domiciliary Home of Florida, a Congressional Medal of Honor awarded to Jenkins, posthumously. The medal was donated
to the domiciliary by Jenkins' family during the Marine Corps Flag Ceremony, which was organized by retired Sgt. Maj. Earl
Salmons, of the Gen. Roy S. Geiger Detachment Marine Corps League #1047.


Phillips at 755-2105. Rain
date is 1 p.m. April 17-

School reunion
The annual Wellborn
School Reunion is 11 a.m.
April 16 at Wellborn Baptist
.Church. Bring a covered
dish and photos to share.
Visit www.wellbornwildcats.
com.


Filipino American
Cultural Society
The Filipino American
Cultural Society of Lake City
is having its yearly General
Meeting, Election of Officers/
Board, Dinner and Dancing
6 p.m. April 16 in the Social
Hall at Epiphany Catholic
Church. For information con-
tact Bob Gavette 965-5905.

Sunday

Class meeting
The Class of 1973 is

mt gihrdso FCA mity
Center l class members


Monday

Team Party
The last Relay for Life ,
Team Party is 6 p.m. April 18
at Christ Central Ministries.

THOSday

Historical Society
meeting
The Columbia County
Historical Society is meet-
ing 7 p.m. April 19 at the
Colurnbia County Public
Library main branch.
Outgoing Columbia County
economic development
director, Jim Poole, is guest
speaker. The meeting is free
and open to the public. For
more information contact
Sean McMahon at 754-4293
or sean.mcmahon@fgc.edu.

Academic recognition
Presley Excel and
Scholars Program is hav-
ing its next Academic
Recognition Pro ram 6
p.m. April 18 at Richardson
Middle School auditorium.

Thursday

Club meeting
The Gold, Gem &
freasure Hunters Club of
North Flonida, a chapter
of the Gold Prospecting
Association of America is
meeting 7 p.m. April 21 at
the Butler Seafood House
in Lake Butler. Contact Club
President John Leshuk at
904-364-0680 or e-mail
starkepaa~yahoo.com.


Camera Club meeting
The Branford Camera
Club is meeting 7 p.m. April
21 at the Branford Public
Library. The meeting is an
. "Open Forum," covering
multiple topics. Call Carolyn
Hogue, Program Chair,
386-935-2044; Dick Bryant,
Technical Consultant, 386-
935-1799; Dick' Madden,
Technical Consultant, 386-
935-0296; or Skip Weigel,
Technical Consultant, 386-
935-1382.

Master Gardeners
workshop
A Gardening for
Butterflies workshop is 5:45
7 p.m. April 21 at the Fort
White Public Library on Rt.
47 (located across from Fort
White High School). April is
Butterfly Gardening Month.
Join the Master Gardeners
and learn all about attracting
these beauties. The program
is free and everyone is wel-
come.

Science Club
recognition
Richardson Middle
School EXCEL Science
Club Outstanding Science
Dignitary Prqgram is honor-
ing all students who made
an A in science on their third
nine wek report carddi9

ru T~he spe kereisauMar
Hunter, Columbia County
Sheriff. Everyone is invited to
attend.

M0IAA meeting
The Suwannee River
Valley Chapter of the
Military Officers' Association
of America is having its
monthly dinner meeting 6:30
p.m. April 21 at the Lake
City Elks Lodge at 259 NE
Hernando Street. For more
information or to RSVP call
Susan Palmer at 697-6828 or
Vernon Lloyd at 752-4885.

Friday

Steer Competition
The deadline to enter
steers for the Columbia
County Fair is 4:30 p.m.
April 22. Children must be
between the ages of 8-18
and enrolled in school or
home schooled in Columbia
County. Entries must be
turned into the fairgrounds
office or call 752-8822.
Forms are available online at
www. columbiacountyf air.org
or the fair office. The begin-
ning Steer weigh in is 8
-10 a.m. May 7.

Easter Bunny Weekend
Schedule
The Easter Bunny will be
in Bunny Town 3 8 p.m
April 22 and 10 a.m. 5
p.m. April 23 at the Lake


City Mall.

Easter carnival
The Youth Easter Carnival
is 10 a.m. 4 p.m. April 23
at Ailey Ogbrun Ball Park
in White Springs. The event
will feature powerlifting
champion the Rev. James
Henderson. The carnival will
feature crafts, games, food
and more. Henderson is also
speaking a South Hamilton
Elementary School 7 9

must sA! Pl s 1 isp ho l
recording artist.

Easter Egg Hunt
Gold Standard Lodge
#167 is having its annual
Easter egg hunt activi-
ties 10 a.m. 1 p~m. April
23 at Annie Maddox Park.
The event will feature fun'
games, food and more..
Contact Mike Kelly at 867-
6675 or Dennis Murphy at
697-3739.

Sunday
Easter Sunrise Service
The 44th annual Easter
Sunrise Service is 7 p.m.
April 24 on the greenway at
Stephen Foster Folk Culture
Center State Park in White
Springs. The service will
include participants from
area churches. Donations
will be requested follow-
ing the service. Call (386)
397-4331 or visit www.flori-
dastateparks.org/stephen-
foster.

Wednesday, April 27
River Jam
Suwannee River Jam is
April 27 30 at the Spirit
of Suwannee Music Park.
Performances include
Ronnie Dunn, Kellie Pickler
and more. Tickets are avail-
able at S&S Food Stores.
Contact the park at 386-
364-1683. Order online at
SuwanneeRiverJam.com.

Thursday, April 28
School festival
Shakespeare IV begins 6
p.m. April 28 at Fort White
High School. Activities
include school registration,
re-enactment camps, histori-
cal museum tales and a the
Theater Under The Stars
performance at 8 p.m. Bring
a lawn chair or blanket.

Video Presentation
A Video presenta-
tion of "The South An
Interpretation" is 5 p.m.
April 28 at the Lake City
Police Department The
video is by local historian
Henry Sheldon. Call Audre'
Washington at (386) 719-
5742.


Bingo games at the
Moose Lodge, 624 NE
Williams, are open to every-
one. Games are at 3 p.m.,
6:45 and 7 p.m. on every
Wednesday and Friday.
There is free ice tea and
coffee. Food is available for
purchase. Call (386) 755-
3730.


The Rotary Club of Lake

TC rsmdeae, sat OEnks lub,

Vs tiNE membr adsa guests
are welcome. Call Steve
Smith at (386) 758-9990 for
more information.

American Legion bingo
American Legion Post 57
and Auxiliary Unit 57 bingo
begins at 3 p.m. and 6:45
p.m. every Sunday, Monday
and Thursday. Call (386)
288-2755 for more informa-
tion.

UF Master Gardeners
The University of Florida
Master Gardeners are at the
Columbia County Extension
Office from 9 a.m. to noon
every Tuesday, Thursday
and Friday. They answer
gardening questions and
conduct soil pH tests
free of charge. Call (386)
752-5384, or stop at the
UF/1FAS Extension Office at
the Co umbia Courtyfair-

tion.

Magic: The Gathering
A Magic: The Gathering
league Play occurs from
noon to 6 p.m. Saturday,
at American Legion Post 57
on U.S. Highway 41 South.
Everyone is invited. Call
(386) 365-8743 for more
information.

English and literacy
classes
Free English speaking
and literacy classes pro-

dch o DisrCo msb arCe ynd
Adult Education Program is
froms5 30 t8 rn.m.everd

CMiitis inc. in es bor
Call (386) 755-8190.


Celebration
Meet and greet the new
theeapl roball onc mand
April 30 at Lake City Mall.
Entertainment by the CHS
Cheerleaders and Dance
Team. CHS Fashion show.

Cemetery Association
meeting
'The Mt. Tabor Cemetery
Association is having its
annual business meeting 10
a.m. April 30 at Bethlehem
Lutheran Church Education
Builing oook~b0k oar
money for the cemetery
fund. Officers are to be
elected and other concerns
will be discussed. Donations
are tax deducible. Make
gut checks to Mt. Tabor
Cemetery Association Inc.,
991 SE Cline FeagleRoad,
Lake City, FL 32025. Contact
Janice Feagle at 752-1219.
The church is on Emma
Burns Lane off of US 441
South near Ellisville.

Fill The Banks Day
Donations of clothing
money, food and blood will
be collected for Christian
Sevc Center S wne
Valel Food Bnk, i eoth
Blood Bank and other area
charities and non-profits 8
a.m. 4 p.m. April 30.

ONGOING


Mall Walkers
Rain or shine, the Lake
City Mall is open at 7 a.m.
Monday Saturday and 10
a.m. Sunday for those who
want to walk for exercise.


LOCAL


CO~~~RMMUNT CLNA


Civil Air Patrol meeting
Suwannee Valley
Composite Squadron Civil
Air Patrol meets 6:30 to 9
p.m. Monday. For more
information, please call Maj.
Gat Meadows, (386) 365-


Geri Actors
The Geri Actors at the
LifeStyle' Enrichment Center
are looking for members.
Meetings are 12:45-2 p.m.
Tuesday and Thursdays.
Anyone retired and interest-
ed in becoming an actor or
actress is invited. Call Frank
at 752-8861 -

Lake City Lions
The Lake City Lions meet
at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, at the
County Club at Lake City.
Call Gary Laxton at 386-
623-1884 or George Revoir
386-288-5288 for more infor-
mation.

Square Dancing
The Dixie Dancers weekly
dance is held at 6:30 p.m.
every Tuesday at Teen Town
Community Center. The
group does square and
round dancing. Couples 12
and older are welcome. Call
(386)497-2834.

Domestic violence
support group
A support group for sur-
Svivors of domestic violence.
meets at 5:30 p.m. every
Tuesday. The location is for
them alone. Child care is
provided. Call Another Way
at (386) 719-2700 for more
information.

Rotary Club Downtown
The Rotary Club of Lake
City Downtown meets at
7:15 a.m. each Wednesday,
in the Lifestyle Enrichment
Center, 628 SE Allison Court.
Call (386) 755-7969 for more
information.


Today -
Roller Derby
The ACR Hunnies take
on the South Florida Roller
Girls 7 p.m. April 16 at the
Skating Palace. Tickets are
$8 at the door. Children 12
and under free. Skating
Palace is located at 357 NW
Hall of Fame Drive.

Haunted Museum Tour
A haunted museum tour
hosted by the North Florida
Mystery Trackers is April 16
at the Lake City/Columbia
County Historical Museum.
Tickets are $5 for adults,
$3 for ages 6-12 and free
for children under 3. For
dates, times and tickets call
352-240-2885 or visit www.
nf myste rytrackers .com .

Wanee Festival
Wanee Festival is April 16
at the Spirit of the Suwannee
Music Park in Live Oak.
The headliner is the Allman
Brothers Band. For tickets
and more information visit
waneefestival.com.

Feinstein challenge
Christian Service Center
is participating in the $1
million~ dollar giveaway Alan
Feinstein Challenge from
now until April 30. Every
food item or financial dona-
tion cout toward ere 11ing

away. Call 386-755-1 770
and bring donations either
to the center at the corner
of Hilton and Washington or
mail to P.O. Box 2285, Lake
City, FL, 32056.

Easter Bunny Weekend
Schedule
The Easter Bunny/ will be
in BunnyllTown d1 a.m. 5
p.m.1 Apri 1L6 a Ci -M5 .m.
Apr 1 in LaeCty Ml.

Pageant registration
deadline
Southern Exposure is
hosting the Miss Bling
Queen Pageant 5 p.m. May
7 at theu RcardsonTMiddle
Scool Auorium. Te
pageant is for girls ages
birth to adults and boys
birth to 5. Entry fee is $50.
The deadline to register
for the pageant is April 16.
Call 386-288-8404 or e-mail
seblingqueen~gmail.com.

Donors wanted

Blo demL ile neds donors

1at Mes Sou wst Gill6
Free Einstein T-shirts for all
donors.

Master Gardeners
workshop
A Gardening for Butterflies
workshop is 2 3:30 p.m.
April 16 at the Columbia
County Public Library main
branch. The workshop is
free and everyone is wel-
come. Bring your questions
for the Master Gardeners.

March of Dimes
Suwannee Valley's March
for Babies is 9 a.m. April 16
at Olustee Park. Registration
begins at 8 a.m. awards at
8:30. Spirit Stations along
the walk will serve water,
gives away food and good- '
les.

CCRC Jackpot

Club mb hvngo d ng po
10:30 a.m. April 16 at the
Columbia County Resource
Rodeo Arena. Gates open
at 9 a.m. Sign-up' at 10 a.m.
For more info go to website
www.columbiacountyriding~
club.com or call 386-961-
9422. Cook Shack on site.
Regular rides for the club
are the second and fourth
Saturday of each month.

Flying Day
Young Eagles Da .is 10
a.m. to 12 p.m. April 16
at Cannon Creek Airpark
south on County Road 341.
The event is hosted by


EAA Chapter 977 and is an
opportunity for ages 8-17 to
fly in a private airplane with
a qualified pilot. Parent or
guardian must be present
to sign a permission form
before the flight. Call Elaine


Kindergarten
Orientation
Kindergarten Orientation
for students and parents is
6:30 p.m. at each elemen-
tary school April 28. Parents
or guardians of children who
will be 5 years of age on or
before Sept. 1 should attend
the school for which their
child is zoned. .


Saturday, April 30 Moose Lodge Bingo


Freedom Fund Luncheon
NAACP 29th Annual
Freedom Fund Luncheon
is noon A ril 30 at Winfield
Recreation Center. The
theme is "NAACP: Affirming
A ierc's P oie" Tickets
nier c35an drmst bepr
e ~sed in adm nce.eCalr-
386-752-4070


CHS Quarterback Club RoayCumetn
100th Anniversary





CHURCH NOTES


Three days and nights, according to the Bible


6A


vww.1akecityreporter.com


HEAR MATR


From staff reports

The annual Road to
Calvary production opens
8:15 to9Q:45 p.m. April22 and
23 at Wesley Memorial
United Methodist Church.
The drive-thru event
attracts hundreds of visi.
tors from the North Florida
area.
Road to Calvary consists
of a living tableaux of eight
scenes depicting Christ's
last week on earth, along
with a new final scene enti-
tled "Today."
The presentation fea-
tures a cast of more than
40 costumed actors, at least
one animal, special lighting
and surround sound. Drive-
thru time is usually leSS
than seven minutes.
A staff of two dozen pro-
vides sets, costumes, make-
up,1lighting, sound and food
for the actors. .
The living drama con-
sists of nine stations: The
Triumphal Entry; The Last
Supper; The Arrest; The
Trial; The Road of Sorrow;
The Crucifixion; The
Resurrection the empty
tomb; The Ascension; and
Today.


Angie Land
ongieland3@windstream.net


toughest thing in
the world to do ...
is nothing. Is it
just me, or do you
agree that toddlers aren't
the only ones who have a
difficult time being still?
Recently, I came across a
verse that quickly became
a favorite...and a challenge:
'"The Lord will fight for you;
you need only to be still,"
Exodus 14:14. .
A little background will
help us understand the con-
text: The story of Exodus,
the second book of the
Bible, begins with the chil-
dren of Israel in bondage
more than 400 years and
crying out to God to deliver
them. By way of a burning
bush, God sends Moses -to
lead the way, and after a
string of unpleasant plagues,
Pharaoh relents and sends
them on their way. Only
hater, when Pharaoh looked
around and realized that all
his free labor was gone, did
he recall his decision and
'st ob wih hs entir am
to Egypt.
By this time, the Israelites
had traveled to. the edge
of the Red Sea. Exodus
;14:10 says, "As Pharaoh
approached, the Israelites
looked up, and there were
the Egyptians, marching
after them. They wereterri-
fied..." Understandably,this
was a stressful situation and
Moses was in charge...and
his instructions were to "BE
STILL!"
As a parent, can't you
relate? How many times
have you yelled, "Everybody
just be still a minute and let
me think!" Several of my
aunts were telling family
stories recently and shared
with me that my grandma
was terrified of thunder
and lightening, so anytime
a storm blew in, she made
everyone in the house
go lie down on their bed.
Perhaps this is hereditary
because when my kids were
small, if we were driving'
in the car in badi weather,
I required them to be still!
One of my boys even told
his friend riding with us
one day that, "You have to
be .still, because mymom
can't drive in bad weather "
Nothing like a little fear to
bring about compliance!
Being still doesn't seem
to come natural for most
of us...we are doers. I like
to solve problems and get
answers and check off my
to-do list. Don't you? Yet
there are times that being
still is much more produc-
tive. Psalm 46:10 tells us
to "Be still, and know that
I am GodP T will he exalted
among the nations, I will
te ealeedsin the earh"
of being still is to contem-
plate the power and might
of God. These words will
serve us well in our daily
life of difficult decisions, dif-.
ficult responsibilities, and
difficult relationships.
When everything you try
seems to make the problem
messier and bigger, Be
still, and know that He is
God." It is interesting that
in Exodus 14:15, God imme_
diately said to Moses "...tell
the Israelites to move on."
Once we get still, He will let
us know when to move for-
~ward..~.because every heart
matters!

. a Heart Matters is a
weekly column written by
Angie Land, Director of
Ithe Family Life Ministries
of the Lafayette Baptist
Association.


~COURTESY PHOTo
Actors portray the Triumphal Entry of Jesus'approach to Jerusalem as crowds shout
"Hosanna" and spread palm branches in his path.


tion while visiting her par-
ents in Mississippi.
The production is a labor
of love for the many work-
ers and actors from kinder-
garten to adult.
SThe church aims to
awe, inspire and renew the
faith of hundreds of North
Floridians as they trace the


journey of Jesus Christ on
the Road to Calvary.
Call 752-35130orvisitwww
communityconcerts.info
forl more information. The
church is located at 1272
SW McE'arlane Avenue,
adjacent to Summers
Elementary School.


A different actor portrays
Jesus in each of the nine
scenes. Wesley Memorial
United Methodist Church
has committed to present-
ing "Road to Calvary"
almost every year since
1991. Dede Darby brought
the idea to Lake City after
viewing a similar produc-


games, an Easter egg
hunt, appearance from
Peter Cottontai'l and more.

Sunday
Egg hunt
A Palm Sunday Egg
Hunt is 1:30 p.rn. April 17
at the Live Oak Church
of God activity center.
paei iptee: 25, 6- annd
9-12. Some prizes will
be awarded at the hunt
and on Easter Sunday.
Children will receive a
Passion Week booklet
to work in, color and
complete daily activities.
Prizes will be awarded for
best work. A hamburger,
hot dog grill is after morn-
ing service at 12:30 p.m.
Pastor's anniversary
The Eighth Pastoral
Anniversary for the
Rev. Wyndell Wallace
and Minister Almeda
Wallace is 11 a.m.
and 3 p.m. April 17 at
Fellowship Missionary
Baptist Church. The Rev.
Henry Ortiz of Magnolia
Missionary Baptist Church
in Raiford is the Friday
speaker. Bishop Vernon
Paige of Sanderson is
the Sunday morning
speaker. The Rev. Ronald
V. Walters of Olivet
Missionary Baptist Church
is the evening speaker.
The church is located at
1015 SW Birley Ave.


Dr. CJ.nSttheelep il "ta -
.386-292-5850 or 386-758-
8452.
Tenebrae service
The Good Friday
Tenebrae Service is 8
p.m. April 22 at First
Presbyterian Church.
It is a dramatic service
to remember the death
of Jesus Christ. The lit-
e tintwr Tnnbrhaee is
shadows. Candles will
be extinguished during
the service as a sign of
the passage from light to
darkness.

April 24
Easter service
An Easter Sunrise .
Service is 7 a.m. at First
Advent Christian Church-
The church is located at
1881 SW McFariane Av'e.
Sunrise service
A Sunrise Service
is 6 a.m. April 24 at
Union A.M.E. Church.
Sunday School is 10 a.m.
Church service begins
11 a.m. followed by the
Easter program and the
Eggtravagant Easter Egg
hunt.
Fashion show
An Easter Fashion
Show is 11 a.m. April
24 at Falling Creek M.B.
Church. The program is
hosted in conjunction with
Deep Creek M.B. Church.
An Easter Egg Hunt is
after the program. Call
386-961-8277.


he Bible clearly
defines for us
the meaning of
the words "day"
and "might."
Wherever the words are
used to apply to a day of
the week or month, they
always indicate exactly
what is meant. The word
day is also used to express
indefinite periods of time,
In every instance where
a 24-hour-day is referred
to, the meaning is clear
from the context that it has
referred to the light part
and the dark part of that
particular day. The Bible
gives God's own defini-
tion of "day and night" in
Genesis 1: "And God saw
the light, that it was good:
and God divided the light
from the darkness. And


BIBLICAL STUDY


the belly of the great fish,
so must the Son of Man be
three days and three nights
in the heart of the earth."
The Jewish day began at
sundown and ended at sun-
down. Some say the Jews
believed that any part of
a day was called a whole
day. That tradition came
from the "Talmud," which
has nothing to do with the
Bible.
Jesus said he would be
in the tomb three days'
time and three nights'
times. How could that
be if He was crucified on
Good Friday? The prob-
lem comes when one hears
the word "Sabbath." It is
assumed it means weekly
Sabbath. It is the Passover
Sabbath. John 19:31 reads
"Therefore, because it


was the Preparation Day,
that the bodies should not
remain on the cross on the
Sabbath (for that Sabbath
was a high day), the Jews
asked Pilate that their legs
might be broken, and that
they might be taken away."
Leviticus 23 records the
Sabbath and dates. The
Passover Sabbath day: 14th
day of the first month, the
Unleaven Bread Sabbath:
next day, the 15th' day of
the fist month, then the
Weekly Sabbath. Matthew
28:1: "After the Sabbath
(the Greekword is Sabbaton
which is plural) as the ~first
day of the week began to
dawn, Mary Magdalene
and the other Mary came
to see the tomb." John 20;1
says it was still dark.
If Jesus was in the tomb


three days and three nights,
it must mean that he was
crucified on Wednesday,
died about 3pm and was bur-
ied just before dark (6pm),
was already resurrected
before daylight Sunday
Morning. So he would
have been in the tomb from
dusk Wednesday night til
duskThursday night (Feast
of the Passover); dusk
Thursday night to dusk
Friday (Feast of Unleaven
Bread); dusk Friday to
dusk Saturday (Weekly
Sabbath); thus being three
days and three nights, like
He said.

. Hugh G. Sherrill is a
preacher in Lake City avi-
able for pulpit supply and
revivals.


Hugh Sherrill Jr.
ems-hugh43@comcostnet
God called the light day,
and the darkness He called
night. And the evening and
the morning was the first
day (Genesis 1:4-5).
God's definition of day
consists of a light period
and a dark period, accord-
ing to the Bible. Another
example is Exodus 13:21.
In Matthew 12:40 we read,
"For as Jonah was three
days and three nights in


VALUS


FITH



Saturday, April I 6, 201 1w


&


Road to Calvary opens Easter


From staff reports
Team Impact, some of
the strongest men on the
planet, are making public
appearances 7 p.m. April
25 to 27 at Hopeful Baptist
Churdh.
The group will demon-
strate feats of strength,
such as shattering five feet
of concrete with one blow
from their arms or snapping
baseball bats in half with
bare hands.
Team Impact is a group of
world-class athletes, includ-
ing power-lifters, previous
WWE wrestlers and former
NFL players. They travel'
the globe motivating and
inspiring people of all ages
and bring a inessage about
the dangers of drugs and'
alcohol and the importance
of academic excellence.
The group appears regu-
larly on TV and has a week-
ly show to also demonstrate
their feats and provide an
inspirng message.
Call Hopeful Baptist
Church for more informa-
tion at 752-4135.
Visit www.team-impact.
com to learn more.


Today
Evangelist outreach
The annual~evangelistic
outreach and giveaway is
.10 a.m. 2 p.m. April 16
at BethefAME Church on
CR242 A.' The event will
feature lots of fun, games,
food and clothing items.
ContactlSarnuel Honer at
386-697-1395 or Patricia
Brady at 697-7720.
Gospel sing
A gospel sing featuring
Don and Sylyia Lemiey
is 7 p.m. April 16 at
Watertown Congregation
Methodist Church. There
will be refreshments. Call
752-1329 or 965-4706.
Canrwash
A youth-sponsored
carwash is 9 a.m. 2
p.m. April 16 at Lake City
Church of God. The
church is located at 173
SE Ermine Ave., the cor-
ner of Duval Street.
Auction and dinner
A silent auction, cake
auction and BBQ pork ~
sandwich dinner is 9
a.m.-1 p.m. April 16 at
Gateway Baptist Church.
The auction closes at
noon and food is served
until 1 p.m. The church
.is located at 3252 SW
SR 247. Call 755-4447 to
reserve dinner.
`Srn Fet a
SSpring Festival is3t
7 p.m. Apnil 16 at Souis'
Harbor Church of God
in Christ. The church is
located at 901 Northeast


Thursday
Maundy Thursday
An annual Maundy
Thursday program is 7
p.m. April 21 at Bethel
AME Church. The com-
munity is invited to enjoy
the event of the Last
Supper. The church is ,
Located on CR 242A.
Contact Terry Harrell.at
386-752-7259 or Samuel
Honer at 386-697-1395.

Holy Week services
Services for Holy.Week
are 7:30 April 21 for
Maundy Thursday,.7:30
p.m. April 22 for Good
Friday and 7 and 10 a.m.
Apnil 24 Easte~r Sunday at
Our Redeemer Lutheran
Church. Breakfast is after
sunrise service Sunday.
The church is located
on State Road 47, 1 mile
past the interstate.

Friday
Road to Calvary
The "Road to Calvary"
production is 8:15-
9:45 April 22-23 at
Wesley Memorial United
Methodist Church, 1272
SW McFariane Ave. Drive-
thru time is usually less
than seven minutes. For
further information, call
752-3513 or visit www.
communityconcerts.info
Praise service
A High Noon Praise
Service is noon April 22
at Miracle Tabernacle
Church, Sisters Welcome
Road. The Dynamic Duo
of Dr. G.L. Hawthorne and


pIl 25
Strength team
Team Impact is per-
forming 7 p.m. April
25-27 at Hopeful Baptist
Church. The group dem-
onstrates feats of strength
with an inspirational mes-
sage. Call the church
office 752-4135.

April 30
Spring Festival
A Spring Festival is 10
a.m. 2 p.m. April 30 at
Our Redeemer Lutheran
Church. The event will
feature a bake sale, free
fun and games, a concert
by the Mercy Mountain
Boys 11:30 a.m. 1:30
p.m. Bring a blanket or
lawn chair. Chicken and
rice plates are sold 11
a.m. -1 p.m. Car and
motorcycle show all day
with prizes at 2 p.m. The
church is located on SR
47, 1 mile past 1-75 just
pass the Dollar General.
Car wash and sale
A youth car wash and.
indoor yard sale is 7
a.m. 12 p.m. April 30 at
Gateway Baptist Church.
The church is located at
3252 SW SR 247.
aSubmit Church Notes
by e-mail to arobinson@8
lakecityreporter. comn,
fax to (386) 752-9400 or
drop-off at 180 E. Duval
St.. Call (386) 754-0425
with questions. Church
Notes run as space is
available each Saturday.










LAKE CITY REPORTER ADV E RTISE M E NT SATURDAY, APRIL 16, 2011 7A


__


lay Electpra~ribc privIc
Competitive rates, non-profit,
right here in your community.
Lake City District 386-752-7447
clayelectric.com
To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440


Tires for every need
UlS 0 wes acjs rmwa~rl-Man


1Morrell's
1lour Compler e deoraung and
ho.mi-$ irnlhnjw


WESLEY MIEMORIR UNfTED
1272 SW McFailane 152-3513
(Adjacent to Summers School)
Worship 8:0 & 10:00AM
Sunday School 9:00AM
Nursery providedd
Praise &Worship 6:00PM
AWANA-Wednesdars 5:00PM
Pastor: The Rev.J. Louie Mabrey
ww~wvestevaem.com
warERTOWN CONGREGATIONA
MET~HODIST CHURCH
U.S. 90 E. turn on C5rtez (next to Quality
Ind.) right Jn Okinawa.
Sunday School 9:45 AMA
,Sun.Worship 11AM &6 PM
Weda Night Service 7 PM
PastorRdy Ogburn


IK crrcITYCURcIi OF THE NAZARENE
Services:

Wednesday 6:30P~I
Adult, Youtho Mitr,HChilddren'snMinist"

Nurs ry Provided


FIRST PRESt\rTERIAN CHURCH '
6295SWBap Dilve* 752-0670

Tradit'ional UTri~ PRDD:00AI

Pjstor. )r. RIev A Maramn
Duenlo d lujlc: Bil Poplin

FIRST F ULG05OPEL.CHIJRCH
N~E lones\M ) NE Wasihinglon SL


);]l"l e'iC, Wrdnes~day :.IP
Mldid-eek Secrvie ht-dnesdy :00 PM
Fo rr aorl Rc35 09 Er n eloe



Lerader hp jSerei 9.00MI
Sunday Blorning 11:0.lh1
bllcc J@ R 0 :uth.

slrr2Pcm i. g ml, uh


MIERO1LMORECO.. 1NC.

Sne r paFr~uce. Roj Bllldtng Pabui Llo




n.752-2308 i
To1 AdvGerto isL~e Cin

thise Diretry'
Call Melaryb or Biodloingetn

Puo.755-54408 r


alvation is ours because of Christ's

Crucifixion upon the cross. He died so that we

could be forgiven. Salvation is God's gift to us; in

return we can grow in wisdorn and in the Spirit

and spread God's love to others. In 1 John 4.16-

17, we read, "God is love. Whoever lives in love

lives in God, and God in him. In this way love

is made complete among us." This Easter, accept

God's gift of love and share~it within joy!







Scriptures Selected by The American Bible Society
@2011, Keister-Williams N~ewspaper Services, P.O. Bdx 8187, Charlottesville, VA 22906. www.kwnews.com


BtNorth Florida hrmc
n locations to serve vo"
Lake City, Ft. White, Branford,
Chiefland, Mayo & Keystone Heights


To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440



Supercenter
"LOW PRICES EVERYDAY"
IIS90 WEST 755-2421


Central States
Enterprises
Columbia (uount's Feed Headquarter
FLEED- PET SPPtt\LA~ 1 9&GAXc;RDEN
668 NW Waldo St. 386-755-744

MIKELIS POWER EquIPMENT, INC.
Yo~ur Lawrn &i Gardecn Headqujiner?
blOHER5*Cl-L41N 3~5.41TRiMMlE R5
li.' tis T T ikih ilITY. FL
386-752-8098




LAKE CITY
no w '. 755 70 50


To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440


"Quality /Cork at a reasonable price"
We ~also do solar hook-ups
(386) 755-5944


Open 7 Days a Week
1036 E. Duval St., Lake City FL.
Fresh Mea, Frs Producer
'I can do all things Ihrough Chri st which strengthe~ned me

To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440

To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440


RIK' (RN JER ILE
(l ad s HyLocated at 25A *
3 6-7 2596 ort
386-867-2035
after hours "

To Advertise in
th is Directory
Call Ma~r5-or Bridget


18813W McFarlaneAve.

SundayScho8-72-90 9:45AM
Whnd y evce: 1 oo


G~LAD TIDING5 A55EBLYOF GOD
993 NW Lake Jeffery Road
Sunday Wors ipr 75 -06 A&6M
Wed.F kBilSid E5UM 7:00PM


BERFA47APTI CHURCH .

Sunday School 9:30AM
SundayWorship 10:45AM&6PM
\nrde e< Eve. Srneth Edndli

EA~TlDI HAPH 1EflURCH
196; 5E lames Avle. 386-752-286n
Sun. Bible~rudy94pt
Suin norrse, Ita~l& w bh
wetd. P~ra PlgBbrs esud a as

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Sunday Bible Study 9:15AM
Sunday Worship 10:30AM &6:00PM '
Werd 6j.nlllPM PRayer S'vcE~. &
Children, tin st 6.SP 1Fk
Downtown Lake Chty* 7 5422

O~IV~ MII510NAR BAR15T CHURCH
54 INE Daus stleer
(386) 752-1990
SudaSnalidV Walters, Pastor9:5M
Sunday Morning Worship ll:00AM
Wed. Mid-Week Worship '~6:00PM
"In God's Word, Will & Why"


.386-752 2664 a
SundayBibleStudy 9:45AM
SundayWorship I ih (#1 PM
Wed. Kidsp&Yout ~iistr 6:30PM

SALEM PRIMII'VBAPTIST
Sunday Services 10:30 AM
PaSIor: Elder Herman; Griffin
752-4198
SOUTHsIDEBAPTPISTCHURCH .
388 S.E. Baya Drive 755-5553
$lun~day:
BibleStudy :19:15~AM
Morning Worship .10:30AM
Evening Worship 6:15PM ;

Pry&~Bible Study 6:1~ P`
TABERNACLE BAPTIST CHURCH :
(Independent Baptist)
144 SE Montrose Ave.*752-4274 ;
Sunday School 10 A
Sun.Morn.Worship 11AM
Sunday Eve. (IPM ~
Wed. Prayer Meeting 7:30 PM
Pastor: Mike Norman

EPIPHANY CATHOLIC CHURCH
1905 SW Epiphany Court 752-4410
Saturday Vigil Mass 5:00 PM
Sunday Mass 8:15Af,10:30 AM,
5:00 PM (SpanishlEnglish)
Sunday SchoollReligious Education


CHRISTIAN SCIENCE SOCIETY
Sundday Srrvice 11:00 AM
Wedllrneday Evenlng Sm-il:ei 7:30PM
iAKE CITY ICHRISTIAN CHUjRCH
Hwy 247 8.*i755-9436
Sunday School 9:30 AM
suln Mtolrn iznr~hlp 10I:30AM
Ved. P'raver Mleetig 7 PM



Directions & Tmes 386623-7438
JackExum,lr.,Minister

IAKE CITY CHURCHOF GOD
167 Entine St.*(752-5965

'W 1 Fi 10-3081& 1 ~

Pasrror Cairroll Lee
EVANGEL CHURCH OF GOOD

sund3~cal 5 }.nr le is A
Sunrday Wa~r hrp 10:50 F6:30
Wed. Spiritual Enrichment~ 7PMl
"Shock Youth Church"
Boys and Girls Clubs
Bible Study
Pastor: John R. Hathayay

$T.IAM ES PISCOPA CHURCH
242?3 5W Bniiilrn Norit.Dr. Late.
City, Fl132025 384752-2218
Email: stjamesepis33i0bellsouth~net
Sun. 8 i0AM
.Wedriesdiy: 5:15pm
Priest: The Aew~MichaelArmstrong:
Deacon: Thle Rev. limmie Hunsinger
Directorof~jtusic: Dr. Alfonso Levy

OUR REDEEMER LUTHERAN CHURCH
IDMS
1. milesS.ofI-75onbR47
0755-4299

(11ri~ran Eduiallon Hour
Folr all ager a l 1015M~I
/ Paairr Rev Br w~e Allare

SPIRIT OE CHRIST LITHERAN
Hwy 90,1.5 milesWest of 1-75*7152-3801
Sunday Worshiip 10:00AM
NurseryAyall.
Wed.PotLuck6PM Worship7lPM
Vicar John David Bryant


B~FfEL UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
486 US 441 south
Sunday Worship Services,
Traditional Services 8:30 & 1:00AM
386-755-1353
mybethelume.com
First United Methodist Church
973 S. Marion Ave.
386-752-4488

Snaorig Worship 94A
Casual Worship Service 8:50AM
Traditional Service 11:00AM
Program opportunities available in all
areas for all ages.
For a complete schedule
contact church office at


"AChurch on the Move"
GIRISTIAlN HERITAGE CHURCH
Corner SR. 47 & Hudson Circle
SurdayCelebration .10:30M1
`Pastor Chris Jones 752-9119
FAILING CREEK CHAPEL
Falling Creek Road*7155-0580
SFirst and Third Sundays 9:30 A.M.~
Second and Forth Sundayps 300 EM.

NEWJBEGINNINGCHURCH
Highway 242 E. of Branford Highway
SundaySchool 10:00MI
MorningWo ship 1 00h
Wednesday ~6 5-17 7:00Phi
A Full Gopel Church -EveryoneWelcomet


To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary or Brid et
755-5440

BAYWAY>.ulorl Servies
FIRE & Water Restoration
Floor & Carpet Care

755-6142


To Advertise in
this Di rector y
Call Ma~r5-or Bridget


O Li t


YOUT


Church

ono -





Directory




752-1293!









8A LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVERTISEMENT SATURDAY,APRlIL16, 2011


Name: Age:

Address:

Town: State: Zip:
Phone- ONE WINNER IN EACHl A5E gAOUP:
Drop off or mail your entry to Lake City 3-6 YEARS 7-9 YiEARS 10-12 YEARS
Report'r,80 E. Duval St. Lake City,


DEES PARRISH FAMILY
,FUNE RAL OME







961-9500
752-2211 *752-1234
458 S. MARioN` AVE. LAkE CITy


',Mb Pethatries
an 111(1 suffillcl, 110.
Specializinig 'in

Mlost Insurance Aiccepted

On-Call St a T'2 -t/7
1847 S.H'. Barnett Was
Lake Cit, F`L


Oreen Galales


NEED A DAYCARES


3863-96, 1-9669~i


Quality Care Phlebotomy Inc.
Community Adult Contjinuing Education
Learn to Draw Blood
Local Classes
Financing Available
904-566-1328











aking applicat ons
for 2011 -2012
PreK 12
Scholarships
Available
Research based instruction in a
caring atmosphere.

386-758-4710
www.newgenerationschool.org


NOWS EN ROLLING
Free VPK for
2011-2012 School Year


NOW ENROLl/HG AGES 9f--1




Off of Hwyi 247 -754-6565


Cs~r~ompt~ t 8to Iown
(880)peZ 78utr 7805r~c 24 htowing



2 ~ o~5~ ~ies

f~~f~~4t)~ PP u t tetnj


A11state-.

rrr Bank

MARY T. SLAY.
Agency Owner
67n SW Bacm Nr s Dr., #101
Lake City FL 32025
mslay@allIstate.com


Helping Dreams Come Thue,...
One Smile at a Time;


at "'E-; # ;L'*'
ASH LEY'S PET
PAL~AC E
1445 SW MAIN BLVD LAKE CITY
386-755-8668


'










2 e a


386-755-0256
Open from
6am-6pm
1290 SE Baya Br.
Lo0ce City, FL


ORTHODONTICS
CELIA MARTIN, D.M.D.

7ol sw sR 47 Lake City, R. 32025


COLORING CONTEST

COntest RuleS:
1. The Contest is open to children ages 3 12. Employees and immediate fairly of
Lake City Reporter are not eligible.
2. Entries will be judged solely on creative value. One winner will be chosen from each age group.
3. Decisions of the judges will be final.
4. Entries must be received by Lake City Reporter, no later than 3 pm on Aprl 20, 2011.
Entry form must accompany the drawing.
5. Winners' photo will be published in the Lake City Reporter, Sun., April 24, %011 edition'
6. All entries must be from Newspaper Print. NO COPIES


lake City Kiddy Club
"Where lourning ri fun.."


































































Indians beat Oak;
Hall in final game
OffegUl8T SeaSOn.
By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter. com
GAINESVILLE-
HamiltoTn County High was
a no-show for Thursday's
Senior Night, so Fort White
High and its seniors took
their show on the road.
The Indians beat Oak Hall
School, 9-0, in Gainesville
on Friday in the final game
of the regular season.
Most of Fort White's
seniors started and all
played, except the injured
Samantha McCrory.
Leading the seniors,
Holly Polhill was 2-for-
4 with a double and run
scored. Caitlin~ Jones was
1-for-2 with an RBI and
scored two runs.
Brett Sealey (RBI, run
scored) and Stacie Scott
(run scored) had hits.
Catherine Trisch scored
a run and Sarah Conners
ended the~ game and an
Oak Hall threat with a run-
ning catch in left field.
Starting pitcher Cecile
Gomez was 3-for-4 at the
plate with a double, RBI
and two runs scored. She
was good on the mound,
too, going four innings with


Second day of

mediation begins

~jfor NFL, players

Talks to resume The two groups spent more


,--~ ,-I I


Story ideas?

Contact
Tim (irby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@lakecityreportercom


Section B


www.Iakecityreporter.com


FROM THE SIDELINE


Brandon Finley
Phone:(386) 754-0420
afiniey@ickecityreportercom



task for

RL d

Tig er s

part, tennis is
an individual .
game. But the
SL a d y Tigers t m s
of Columbia High have
collectively pulled~ off one
of the most remarkable
feats throughout the last
couple of years in high
school sports.
With a 4-3 win against
Gainesville High on
Thursday, the Lady
Tigers punched their
ticket to a second
consecutive state
championship. What
makes the run the most
impressive is that this
team is all home-grown.
When talking about
prep sports, most of the
time the private school
sector dominates. They
have the ability to pick
up athletes which are
able to attend the finest
tennis camps offered.
Columbia is doing it with
their own-
After the graduation
of Leandra Neail last
season, the Lady Tigers
didn't get to recruit her
replacement. Instead,
they plugged in the next
player-
Chrissie Reichert
moved into the No. 1
position flawlessly. She
reached the District 4-3A
iinal before falling to Eve
Sampson. The rest of the
Lady Tigers have been
equally impressive behind
her, especially at the No. 2
singles' position.
Senior Susy Romero
has an undefeated
record for the season
heading into the state
tournament. While she
may not end the season
that way, just getting
there unblemished is'
something to be proud of.
Kelsey Mercer moved
into the No. 3 position
this season~and, for the
most part, has been -
dominant. tYhen her
team had its state hopes
riding on Mercer's
shoulders, she provided '
them with a return ticket.
The No. 4 position has
been a revolving door
of sorts this season due
to injury and trying out
new players, but Heather
" "ehtnta sb oe uld
hope at No. 5.
do bleent gamet ere
Tabatha McMahon's
players have also shined.
Reichert and Romero
qualified for state at
the district tournament
by winning the 4 3A
championship. Taylor
Owens has teamed
with Mercer in the No.
2 group, and they've
been a formidable pair
throughout the season.
However the season
ends for Columbia, it is
to be commended for
what its accomplished
so far. Just getting back
to state was enough of a
battle.
WBrandon Finley covers
sports for the Lake City
Reporter,


Local team set
for rematch with
South Florida.
From staff reports

The South Florida Roller
Girls are back for a rematch
against the Alachua County
SRollers in Lake City.
The' ACR Hunnies Flat-
Track Roller Derbyi Team
will take on SFRG at 7 p.m.
today at Skating Palace.
Roller derby is a fast-
paced, hard-hitting women's
sport played on skates, said
Jenni Davids, ACR captain.
Play runs counterclockwise
on the track.
Points are scored by
jammers from each team
lapping around four block-


ers on the opposing side
as many times as possible.
Blockers try to assist their
jammer through the laps
and stop the opposing one
from SCOring.
"Roller derby is an
incredibly unique and
fun sport that I think
changes the way some
people look at women ath-
letes," Davids said. "Some
people don't think women
are capable' of contact
sports."
ACR last played SFRG
Oct. 10 in Lake City and
won' 185-45.
:SFRG has a. very hard-
hitting team it a good speed
skating coach, Davids said.
"Based on the scores
ROICRS continued onz 3B


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Alachua County Rollers' Jenni Davids blocks the jammer for the South Florida Reller Girls on
Oct. 10 in Lake City. The Rollers will be in action' at 7 p.m. today at Skating Palace.


mal


m


TIM KIRBY/Lake City Reporter
Seniors on the 2011 Fort White High softball team are Samantha McCrory (from left), Stacie Scott, Caitlin Jones,
Sarah Conners, Catherine Trisch, Brett Sealey and Holly Polhill.


three hits, two walks and
eight strikeouts.
Taylor Douglass pitched
the final three innings with
four hits, one walk and
two strikeouts. She stole a
base and scored a run on
offense. .


Alexa Hatchet; walked
* three times and stole a
base. .
Scott gunned down a
runner at third base from
center field to ~squelch an
Oak Hall rally in the third
inning.


Haley Birkle and Taylor
King each had two hits for
the Eagles (16-6).
Birkle pitched four
innings and gave up all the
runs. Four were unearned.
Jaymi Bautista-Geiger
relieved in the fifth inning


and struck out seven down
the stretch.
Fort White improved to
14-4 and will play Williston
High in the District
5-3A tournament at 5 p.m.
Thursday. Santa Fe High is
hosting the tournament.


On; Tuesaay alter
Friday session.

By DAVE CAMPBELL
Associated Press

MINNEAPOLIS The
NFL and its locked-out
players opened their sec-
and day of court-ordered
talks Friday amid hopes for
progress in their fight over
how to divide $9 billion in
revenue.
U.S. Magistrate Judge
Arthur Boylan is oversee-
ing the talks at the federal
courthouse in Minneapolis.


than nine hours together in
his chambers on Thursday
and returned Friday morn-
ing. Talks Ywill resume on
Tuesday.
Commissioner Roger
Goodell, several league
officials, attorneys and four
team owners are on hand
for the NFL, with players'
association officials, attor-
neys and a couple of players
present on the other side.
The closed-door sessions
are confdential, but both
sides called the first day
constructive. The talks are
NFL continued on 3B


New England Patriots owner Robert Kraft (left) and NFL commissioner Roger Goodell
(center) are escorted by NFL security official Dag Sohlberg (right) as they arrive at the federal
courthouse Friday in Minneapolis for the second day of court-ordered mediation.


Lakre City Reporter


SPORTS


SaturdayApril I 6 20 1 1


Roller Girls in


action today at


Skating Palace





SCOREBOARD


San :'""', (""i's -o' at os2ston
(Figueroa 0-2), 7:05 p.m.
chicago Cubs (Coleman 0-0) at
Colorado (Hammel 1-0), 8:10 p.m.
San Francisco (Zito 0-I) at Arizona
(].Saunders 0-1), 8:10 p.m.
St. Louis (McClellan 1-0) at L.A.
Dodgers (Kershaw 2-1), 10:10 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Pittburgh at Cincinnati, 1:10 p.m.
Florida at Philadelphia, li35 p.m.
Milwaukee atWashington, 1:35 p.m.
N.Y. Mets atAtlanta, 1:35 p.m.
San Diego at Houston, 2:05 p.m.
Chicago Cubs at Colorado, 3:IO p.m.
San Francisco at Arizona, 4: IO p.m.
St. Louis at LA. Dodgers, 4: IO p.m.

BASKETBALL

NBA playoffs
FIRST ROUND
Today
Indiana at Chicago, I p.m.
Philadelphia at Miami, 3:30 p.m.
Atlanta at'Orlando, 7 p.m.
Portland at Dailas,9:30 p.m.

AUTO RACING

Race week

NASCAR
SPRINT CUP
Aaronls 499
Site:TliladegaAla.
Schedule: Today,, qualifying (Speed,
I1:30-2 a.m.); Sunday, race, I p.m. (FOX,
noon-5 p.m.) .
Track: Talladega Superspeedway (oval,
2.66 miles).
Race distance:500 miles, 188 laps.
NATIONWIDE

Site:Talladega,Ala.
Schedule: Today, race, 3 (ESPN2,


2-6 e d sace 3S 1.2 mi I 1 aps.
INDYCAR
Grand Prix of Long Beach
Site: Long Beach, Calif.
Wescubedule:p moda ,u pmaic qu~ai yng
(Versus, 3:30-s:30 p.m.).
Track: Streets of Long Beach (street
course, 1.97 miles). r
Race distance: 167.2 miles, 85 laps.

C inese Grn Eix
*Site:Shanghai.
Schedule:'Today, practice, qualifying
(2-3:30 a.m.); Sunday, race, 3 a.m. (Speed,

2:30Trachanghai International Circuit
(road course, 3.39-miles).
SRace distance: 189.7 miles, 56 laps.
NHRA FULLTHROTTLE
NHRA 4-Wide Nationals
Sitdue: Co or Cqualifying (ESPN2,
6-8 p.m.); Sunday, final eliminations
(ESPN2, 7-IO p.m.). .
Track: zMAX Dragway

HOCKEY

NH L playoffs

FIRST ROUND
Thursday
Montreal 2, Boston a
Buffalo I, Philadelphia 0
San Jose 3, Los Angeles 2, OT
Friday
Tampa Bay 5, Pittsburgh I
Wjashington 2, N.Y. Rangers 0
Chicago atVancouver (n)
Nashville at Anaheim (n)
Today
Phoenix at Detroit, I p.m.
Buffalo at Philadelphia, 5 p.m.
Montreal at Boston, 7 p.m.
Los Angeles at San jose, 10p.m.


NCAA anoroves rules



changes for football


Answer to Previous Puzzle

PIOIPIPY HIAV OIC
TIAI LlOR M1OILIINIE
ARICIAIDIEl AVIATIE
NEIT VEIT
AIBIS LIABYABE YAK
MIAIPl IRON MIORNI
OIR LIANDDOIA SAWTIO
E KI I NIG BIUICIOL IC
BEITIA DIO GE EE IK
AIDIS GIRIOAN I DRS
OIRIE NTH
MEISSIEISD DIETEID
AIPIPILEIS NAN NALS
RIA YION GSIUIT


Want more puzzles?
check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SATURDAY, APRIL 16, 2011


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421


Shiver 653; 2. Betty Carrkichael 617;
3.eElsie Huddleston 606.
SUNDAY NITE MERCHANTS
Team standings: 1. TAZ
(39.5-16.5); 2. Spare Us (31.5-24.5);
3. Average Joe's (31-25).
High scratch game: 1. Liz Randall
202; 2. Donna Duncan 195; 3. Liz
Randall 193. 1. Joe Cohrs 235;
2. Boaty Boatwright 222; 3. Bobby
Trunnell 213.
High scratch series: 1. Liz Randall
528; 2. Norma Yeingst 480; 3. Kim
Schneiders 472. 1. Joe Cohrs 637;
2. Boaty Boatwright 617; 3. Bobby
Trunnell 615.
High average: 1. Norma Yeingst
168.5; 2. Cheryl Jacks 158.56;
3. Liz Randall 157.08. 1. Bill Duncan
199.15; 2. Joe Cohrs 195; 3. Mark
Moore 192.96.
(results from April 10)
MONDAY NIGHT MAVERICKS
Team standings: 1. Rountree
Moore Ford (255-135); 2. Team 8
(246.5-143.5); 3. Neil Hoffman's Auto
(241-139).
High scratch game: 1. David Adel
266; 2. (tie) Zech Strohl, Ted Wooley
258.
High scratch series: 1. Zech Strohl
699; 2. Wally Howard 698; 3. Ted
Wooley 696.
High handicap game: 1. John
Smith 286; 2. Carl McGhghy 280;
3. David Adel 270.
High handicap series: 1. John
Smith 764; 2. Cameron Wise 737;
3. Wally Howard 722.
High average: 1. Zech Strohl
220.65; 2. Dale Coleman 213.95;
3. Brian Meek 206.21.
(results from March 28)


BOWLING

Herbster 233. 1. John Quinn 263;
2 im Belgard 247; 3. Morrell Atwood
245
High handicap series: 1. (tie)
Joanne Denton, Barbara Croft 450;
3. Bea Purdy 641. 1. Lee Evert 694;
2. Ross Meyers 626; 3. Joe Peterson
623.
High average: 1. Betty Brown
148.93; 2. Louise Atwood 147.76;
3. Yvonne Finley 145.28. 1. Dan Ritter
174.9; 2. Earl Hayward 171.7; 3. Art
Joubert 170.14.
(results from April 5)
GOLDEN ROLLERS
Team standings: 1. Golden Niners
(77-47); 2, Gamblers (72-52); 3. Wild
Things (69-55).
High handicap game: 1. Bertha
Black 236; 2. Debbie Walters 235;
3. (tie) Louise Atwood, Shirley
Highsmith 223. 1. Chuck Pressler
240; 2. Jim Hawkins 236; 3. Bill Price
227.
High handicap series: 1. (tie) Jane
Sommerfeld, Vy Ritter 639; 3. Judy
Sanders 630. 1. George Mulligan 677;
2. Ross Meyers 637; 3. Vernon Black
623.
High average: 1. Shiriey Highsmith
156.94; 2. Elaine Nemeth 151.73;
3. Eletty Carmichael 151.54. 1. David
Duncan 188.59; 2. Bill Dolly 183.91;
3. George Mulligan 182.64.
(results from March 31)
HIT & MISS
Team standings: 1. The
Sandbaggers (33-19, 565 average);
2. Alley Oops (33-19, 511 average);
3. Spare Us (30-22).
High handicap game: 1. Cythe
Shiver 228; 2. Betty Carmichael 225;
3. Susan Newbern 224.
High handicap series: 1. Cythe


East Division
W L
7 5
6 6
6 6
5 8
2 9
Central Division
W L
9 4
y8 4
7 5
6 7
4 9
West Division
W L
10 3
is 7 5
6 7
4 9


Pct GB
.583 -
.500 I
.500 I
.385 2'h
.182 4'


New York
Baltimore
Toronto
Tampa Bay
Boston


Cleveland
Kansas Cit
Chicago
Detroit
Minnesota


Texas
Los Angele
Oakland
Seattle


Pet
.692
.667
.583
.462
.308

Pct
.769
.583
.462
.308


Friday's Games
Cleveland 8, Baltimore 2
Texa 5, N.Y.Yankees 3
Tampa Bay 5, Minnesota 2
Toronto at Boston (n)
LA.Angels at Chicago Wliite Sox (n)
Seattle at Kansas City (n)
Detroit at Oakland (n)
Today's Games
Baltimore (Guthrie 1-1) at Cleveland
(Tomlin 2-0), 1:05 p.m.
Texas (Holland 2-0) at N.Y.Yankees
(F.Garcia 0-0), 1:05 p.m-
Seattle (F.Hernandez 1-1)'at Kaplsas
City (O'Sullivan -I), 1:10 p.m-
Toronto (Jo-.Reyes 0-1) at Boston
(Beckett 1-1), 1:10 p.m.
L.A.Angels (Chatwood 0- I)at Chicago
White Sox (Floyd I-0), 4:10 p.m.
Minnesota (S.Baker 0-2) at Tampa Bay
(Niemann 0-2), 4:10 p.m-
(Btr -t (Verlander I-l) at Oakland
Sunday's Games
Baltimore at Cleveland, 1:05 p.m.


oA Agl sat T aicg Ohite Sox,
2:10 p.m-
Seattle at Kansas City, 2:10 p.m.
Detroit at Oakland, 4:05*p.m-
Texas at N.Y.Yankees, 8:05 p.m.

NL standings

East Division
W L` Pct GB
Phldlphia 9 4.9 -

Washington 5 7 .417 31
Atlanta 5 8 .385 4
New York 4 9 .308 5
Central Division PtGB

cincinnati a s .sis -
Milwaukee 7 5 .583 I
Chicago 6 6 .500 11
Pittsburgh '6 7 .462 2
St. Louin 6 7 4 2 Z

west Division
W L Pct' GB
Colorado 10 ~2 .833 -
San Francisco 6 6 .500 4
Lo 'ngeles .6 '

San Diego 5 7 .417 5
Friday's Games
Florida 4, Philadelphia 3
Pittsburgh 6, Cincinnati I
N.Y. Mets at Atlanta, ppd., rain
Milwaukee at Washington (n)
Sari Diego at Houston (n)
Chicago Cubs at Colorado (n)
San Francisco atArizona (n)
St. Louis at L.A. Dodgers (n)
Today's Games
Milwaukee (Gallardo I-0) at
Washington (Marquis 0-0), 1:05 p.ns.
Pittsburgh (Ja.McDonald 0-0) at
Cincinnati (Volquez 2-0), 1:10 p.m.
N.Y. Mets (Pelfrey 0-1) at Atlanta
(Jurrjens 0-0), 4: 10 p.mn.
Florida (Ani.Sanchez 0-I) at


Associated Press


IND.IANAPOLIS -
COllege football will have
a few rule changes in place
this fall, including one that
will give teams the option
Of shaving 10 seconds off
(110 ClOck in penalty situa-
tions.
The most notable change
apprOved Thursday by
(110 NCAA S Playing Rules
OVeTSight Panel is the
10-second run-off that can
occur if a~team commits a
penalty in the final minute
of a half.
Opponents will have the
option of taking the yard-
age and the time, the yard-
age Onlf Or declining tie
penalty.
}}le COmmittee also
apprOVed a rule that allows
video monitors in the coach-


ACROSS 42 NFL
45 Leg
1 COrn shuck 46 Mim
5 Crawls with 50 Mea
10 Charlotte 53 Rec
hoopster 55 Pro
12 Soft fabric 56 Exe
13 Hire 57 Put
14 Claim without 58 Drie


es' booths. The televisions
will have access only to any
live broadcast of the game
- no video recorders to
help coaches decide if they
should challenge a call. If
the monitors are available
to the home team, they
must also be available to
the visitor.
Those changes coincide
with perhaps the biggest
change of the season a
taunting rule that could
cost teams points.
Last April, the playing
rules panel approved a
decision to nullify touch-
downs if a player is called
for taunting before he
crosses the goal line.
~Examples include play-
ers finishing touchdown
runs by high-stepping into
the end zone or pointing
the ball toward an oppo-


nent.
The panel decided then
to wait one year before
implementing the change.
Previously, the 15-yard
penalty was assessed on
the extra point attempt, 2-
point conversion attempt
or the ensuing kickoff.
Penalties called after the
player crosses the goal
line still will be assessed
on those plays, but live-ball
fouls will be assessed at the
spot of the foul and elimi-
nate the score.
The playing rules panel
also approved two changes
they hope will make the
game safer.
Players lined up within
seven yards of the center
on scrimmage plays will
still be permitted to block
below the waist anywhere
on the field.


15 pCro forma-
tion
16 Habit wearer
18 Forty,winks
19 Prepare nuts
23 Romaine *
26 Increases
27 Monsieur's egg
30 Moonshot mis-

32 Kont
34 Volcanic rock
35 Mink items
36 Handed-down-
stories
37 "That's obvi-
ous!"
38 Talk foolishly
39 Made lovelier


Automotive Group
Presents "The Edge,,
golf tournament at Quail
Heights Country Club on
Aoprln3a. Te teantuddby

Shayne Edge, serves as
a fundraiser for school
and recreational sports,
and other organizations.
Cost is $100 per player for
the four-person scramble
event.
Registration is at Quail
Heights (752-3339) and
Brian's Sports (755-0570).




Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

SRN BIG


20 Canceled .
21 Dislike intensely
22 Jay of late-night
TV
23 Trucker's com-
partment


24 Outback min-
eral
25 Fair (hyph.)
28 Like some
.crowds
29 Kind of collar
31 Zhivago's
be oved
32 Tidal wave
33 Mind reading
37 Rapper Dr.
40 Casts a vote
41 Kickboxer
Jean-Claude
SVan
42 Montand of
the movies
43 Force
44 Vending
machine buy
47 Preside at tea
48 Sea eagle
49 Batik need
51 Cut timber
52 Flock member
54 911 responder


B GETTING THROWN
I K ~ KAi I OUT OF THE
TAVERN MEANT
WRODAN
s ,Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
1 / L71 / suggested by the above cartoon.


Answerr here:y

Yeteda's Jumbles: GRIND MUSTY FROSTY JOCKEY
Answer: The accountants excelled at tennis because
of their GOOD RETURNS


FORITP WHITE BQASEBALL

C8? WaSh,

bake sale today

Th~e Fort White High
Baseball Dugout Cl'ub has
a car wash and bake sale
from 8:30 a.m. to 3 .p.m.
today at Walgreens drug
store in Lake City.
For details, call Chad
Bonds at (386) 590-7362.

SEMIs-PROa FOOTBAl..

Falcons to honor

veterans April 30

The Lake City Falcons
semi-pro football team will
honor veterans and show
support for the troops at
their home game on
April 30. Fans are
encouraged to wear yellow
for the festivities that begin
at 5 p.m. The Falcons will
play the Savannah Venom
at 7 p.m. Admission:
adult-$7 ($5 with yellow
shirt); seniors-$5 ($3 with
yellow shirt); children
8 and younger-free. There
is no charge for military
with ID.
For details on honoring
a veteran, call Elaine at
(386) 292-3039.

GOLF

'The Edge' event

set for April 30
Rountree-M/oore


@ 2011 by UFS, Inc.


League report
Results of Lake City Bowl league
play follow
WATERGUARD
High scratch game: 1. Maggie
Battle 201; 2. Gloria Dennis 197;
3. Terry Wayne 189. 1. Tom Sewejkis
267; 2. Zech Strohi 221; 3. Bill Price
220.
High scratch series: 1. Goi
Dennis 501; 2. Maggie Battle 492;
3. Lori Davis 481. 1. Tom Sewejkis
646; 2. Zech Strohl 636; 3. (tie) Mar
Davis, Bill Price 603
High handicap game: 1. Maggie
Battle 245; 2. Gloria Dennis 240;
3. Lorie Niquette 233. 1. Tom Sewejkis
275; 2. Steve Greaves 246; 3. Frank
Miller 235.
High handicap series: 1. Lidia
Strickland 645; 2. Terry Wayne 635;
3. Dianne Petit 626. 1. Bill Price 693;
2. Vernon Black 679; 3. Mike Mclnally
653.
High average: 1. Mary Lobaugh
182. 1. Zech Strohl 211.
(results from April 5)
SEXY SENIORS
Team standings: 1. Perky Pals
(83.5-48.5); 2. Farmers (81-51); 3. Jo's
Crew (75-57)-
High scratch game: 1. Vy Ritter
198; 2. Joanne Denton 188; 3. Louise
Atwood 179. 1. Lee Evert 226; 2. John
Quinn 221; 3. Lee Evert 216.
High scratch series: 1. Joanne
Denton 497; 2. Bea Purdy 488;
3. Roberta Giordano 471. 1. Lee Evert
613; 2. John Quinn 558; 3. Ross
Meyers 527.
High handicap game: 1. Vy Ritter
264; 2. (tie) Cookie Reddick, Sabrina


BAS BALL

AL standings


TELEVISION

W sports

Today
AUTO RACING
I 1:30 a~m.
SPEED NASCAR, print Cup, pole
qualifying for Aaron's 499, at Tailadega,
AI .
a.3 p.m
ESPN2 NASCAR, Nationwide
Series,Aarons 312, atTalladegaAla.
6 p.m.
ESPN2 NHRA, qualifying for
4-Wide Nationals, at Concord, N.C.
(same-day tape)
VERSUS IRL, IndyCar, pole
qualifying for Crand Prix of Long Beach,at
Long Beach, Calif.
2:30 a~m.
SPEED Formula One, Grand Prix of
China, at Shanghai, China
BOXING
9:45 p.m.
HBO SAME-DAY TAPE: Champion
Amir Khan (24-1-0) vs. Paul McCloskey
(22-0-0), for WBA junior welterweight
title, at Manchester, England; LIVE:
champion Andre Berto (27-0-0) vs.Victor
Ortiz (28-2-2), for WBC welterweight
title, at Mashantucket, Conn.
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
2 p.m.
VERSUS Intrasquad, Notre Dame
Blue-Gold Game, at South Bend, Ind.
COLLEGE SOFTBALL
Noon
E5PN2 -Tennessee at LSU
4:30 p.m.
FSN Oklahoma at Missouri
GOLF
9 a~m.
TGC European PGATour, Malaysian
Open, third round, at Kuala Lumpur,
Malaysia (same-day ta

TGC PGA Tour,Texas; Open, third
round, at San Antonio

.oCBS -nPGA Tor Texas Open, third
4 p.m. &
NBC Champions Tour, Outback
Steakhouse Pro-Am, second round, at

L 6:30 p.m.
TGC Nationwide Tour, Fresh
Express Classic, third round, at Hayward,
calit .
MAjOR LEAGUE BASEBALL

Fox Regiona coverage. N.Y. Mers
at Atlanta, L.A. Angels at Chicago White
Sox,or Minnesota atTampa Bay
8 p.m.
WGN -- Cing PCubR aS Colorado

10o3op.m.
.SPEED -AMA Supercross, at Seattle
NBA BASKETBALL
I p.m.
Indi t-- Payoffs, first round, game I,
):)o p.m. .
ABC Playoffs, first round, game I.
Philadelphia at Miami
7 p.m.
AlESn t OPlayoffs, first round, game I.
9:30 p.m.
ESPN Playoffs, first round, game 1.
Portland at Dailai
NHL HOCKEY
I p.m.
NBC Playoffs, conference
quarterfinals, game 2, Phoenix at Detroit
7 p.m.
VERSUS Playoffs, conference
qualrtedinals, game 2, Montreal at Boston
10 p.m.
VERSUS Playoffs, conference
quarterfinals, game 2, Los Angeles at San
Jose
PREP BASKETBALL
8 p.m.
ESPN2 Jordan Brand Classic, at
charlotte, N.C. *


DOWN

1 Whetstone
2 Natural
impulIse
3 Foul-up
4 Gunpowder
holder
5 Util. bill
6 Pluam igs b

8 MHz part
9 Short
distance
10 Boating pro-
noun
11 Sawbuck (hyph.)
12 Wind indicator
17 Cousins of "um"


.gains
lume
licked
adow flower
collectionn
vides funds
!m t
on a play
id-up


BRIEF


YOUTH GOLF

Junior tour

in Alabama

The Arrowhead Junior
Golf Tour has a *
tournament May 14-15 m
Point Clear, Ala. The
36-hole event for ages 12-18
is ranked by the National
Junior Golf Scoreboard.
To enter online, go to
www. arrowheadfgt. com.

IIFrom staff reports

THAT SCRAMBLED Vt(ORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek





ROLLERS: Derby today


NFL: Boylan overseeing this round of mediation


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SATURDAY, APRIL 16, 2011


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


pulled away in the final
three minutes of a 96-86
victory on March 21, the
only one Carmelo Anthony
played in.
Storyline: Like last
season, the Celtics hope
to prove their late-season
struggles were meaning-
less and start another run
to the NBA finals against
the Knicks, who are back
in the playoffs for the fist
time since 2004 and believe
they are a dangerous under-
dog in the 14th postseason
matchup between the long-
time rivals.
Key matchup: Paul
Pierce vs. Anthony. The
Celtics have long had one
of the NBA's best losers
in Pierce,. who made the
tiebreaking jumper with 0.4
seconds left in their 118-
116 victory at New York on
Dec. 15. Nowi the Knicks
have an answer in Anthony,
who has an NBA-high 16
go-ahead field goals in the
last 10 seconds since 2003.
Prediction: Celtics in 6.


3-0. Miami's Big Three
earned its first victory
together with a 97-87 win
at Philadelphia on Oct. 27,
then beat the 76ers twice at
home. Dwyane Wade aver-
aged 30.7 paints and the
Heat held the 76ers to 92
per game.
Storyline: The Heat,
who closed the regular sea
son playing at the level that
was expected of them when
LeBron James and Chris
Bosh joined Wade in Miami,
open with a Philadelphia
team that exceeded expec-
tations in Doug Collins' fist
season as coach, but strug-
gled down the stretch.
Key matchup: James vs.
Andre Iguodala. Iguadala's
defensive skills earned him
a starting spot on the U.S.
world championship team
last summer. He'll have
to be at his best against
James, who scored only 16
and 20 points in the fist
two games before going foi-
32 in Miami's 111-99 victory
on March 25.
Prediction: Heat in 4.


By BRIAN MAHONEY
Associated Press

A look at the eight first-
round series in the NBA
playoffs, which start. this
weekend:

EASTERN CONFERENCE
No. 1 CHICAGO BULLS
(62-20) vs. No. 8
INDIANA PACERS
(37-45)
Season series: Bulls,
3-1. .
Storyline: With the best
record in the NBA and
their best since Michael
Jordan's final season the
Bulls begin the quest for
their first championship
since Jordan left after win-
ning his sixth in 1998.
Key Matchup: Luol
Deng vs. Danny Granger.
Deng, whose fine season
was overshadowed by
Rose's brilliance, scored at
least 15 points ill all four
meetings. Granger had a
pair of 19-point outings and
scored .22 in another, but
the Pacers showed how
much they need their lead-
ing scorer when they shot
just 36' percent without him
in the Dec. 13 loss.
Prediction: Bulls in 5.


No. 2 MIAMI HEAT
(58-24) vs. No. 7
PHILADELPHIA 76ERS
(41-41)

Season series: Heat,


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Los Angles Lakers guard Kobe Bryant (right) drives to the basket past Sacramento Kings
forward Francisco Garcia during-the first quarter of an NBA basketball game in Sacramento,
Calif., Wednesday.


100 points and Chris Paul
admitted "this is not a team
we match up with good this
year."~ After the final and
most lopsided meeting, the
Lakers' 102-84 victory on
March 27. Kobe Bryant had
a pair of 30-point games and
averaged 26.8.
Storyline: Seeking a
third straight NBA title,
the Lakers open against the
Hornets, whose surprising-
ly strong season was ruined
when power forward David
West was lost with a torn
knee ligament.
Key matchup: Pau
Gasol vs. Carl Landry.
Landry's solid play helped
the Hornets hild on to A
playoff spot after West went
down and he scored 24
points against the Lakers
in the most recent meeting.
But Gasol was dominant
this season against New
Orleans, averaging 22.3
points and 12.8 rebounds,
and shooting 70.5 percent
from the field.
Prediction: Lakers in 4.


No. 3 DALLAS
MAVERICKS (57-25) vs.
No. 6 PORTLAND TRAIL
BLAZERS (48-34)
Season series: Tied,
2-2. Dallas won the first two
meetings and Portland took
the last two at home later
in the season after acquir-
ing Gerald Wallace. Dallas
guard Jason Kidd had a
combined~ one point in the
Mavericks' losses, missing
all six shots in a scoreless
outing on April 3.
Storyline: Following two
straight first-round elimina-
tions, the Blazers seem to
be considered the trendy
underdog pick this year,
even though Dallas won its


final four games to tie. for
the second-best record in
the Western Conference.
Key matchup: Dirk
Nowitzki vs. LaMarcus
Aldridge. The M~avs won
on Jan. 4 at home against
Portland without their All-
Star forward, who faces
an opponent who also
enjoys popularity in Dallas.
Aldridge is a native of the
.city who played at Texas
and had a pair of 30-point
outings against his home-
town team.
Prediction: Trail Blazers
in 6.

No. 4 OKLAHOMA
CITY THI)NDER (55-
27) vs. No. 5 DENVER
NUGGETS (50-32)

Season series: Thunder,
3-1. Oklahoma City won the
season series with a pair of
victories in April, including
a 101-94 win on April 5 that
was Kevin Durant's first in
Denver. The NBA's leading
scorer averaged 31.5 points
in the series.
Storyline: The Thunder
are considered one of the
top challengers to the
Lakers in the Western
Conference, but draw a dan-
gerous first-round opponent
in the Nuggets,*who went
18-7 after trading Carmelo
Anthony to the Knicks in
February.
Key Matchup: Russell
Westbrook vs. Ty Lawson
and Raymond Felton. The
Nuggets have a solid duo
to play against Oklahoma's
All-Star point guard, but
Lawson, perhaps a better
option because of his speed,
sprained his left ankle in
the season finale.
Prediction: Thunder
in 7.


No. 1 SAN ANTONIO
SPURS (61-21) vs. No.
8 MEMPHIS GRIZZLIES
(46-36)
Season series: Tied,
2-2. San Antonio won the
first two at home, and the
Grizzlies won a pair in
Memphis in March, averag-
ing 110 points and shooting
better than 52 percent in
both. Tini Duncan missed
one of those losses .and
was largely outplayed by
Zadh Randolph in the other
three.
Storyline: Back in the
postseason for the first time
since 2006 and still seeking
their first victory in a play-
off game after 12 losses,
the Grizzlies start against
a Spurs team that could
open without All-Star Manu
Ginobili, wh6 spi-ained his
right elbow in the regular-
season finale anid is doubt-
ful for the opener.
Key matchup: Duncan
vs. Randolph. Randolph had
four 20-point, 10-rebound
games, including a 24-21
game in the Spurs' Dec. 18
victory. Duncan's stats have
been down in recent years
and he didn't score more
than 13 against Memphis,
but remains one of the top
defenders at his position
and should be more of a
factor offensively playing
more minutes in the post-
seas'on.
Prediction: Spurs in 6.


No. 2 LOS ANGELES
(57-25) vs. No. 7 NEW
ORLEANS HORNETS
(46-36) -
SSeason series: Lakers,
4-0. Los Angeles posted
three double-digit victories,
the Hornets never cracked


Season series: Celtics,
4-0. Boston completed the
sweep on the final night of
the season, when Amare
Stoudemire was the only
one of the combined six
All-stars on the teams who
played. The Celtics won by
four and then two in the
first two meetings, then


Season series: Hawks,
3-1. Atlanta won the last
three meetings, doing .a
solijl job on Dwight Howard
and limiting the Magic to 79
points per game in its wins.
Howard averaged 19.3
points and 14.3 rebounds,
but his 43.1 percent shoot-
ing against the Hawks was
his worst against any oppo-
nent. Joe Johnson, who had
a nightmare series when
these teams met in last
year's Eastern Conference
semifinals, bounced back
with 19.3 points per game
against Orlando this sea-
son. .
Storyline: Rematch `of
last season's secorid-round
series, the most lopsided
four-game sweep in NBA
history. Orlando won by an
-average of 25.3 points and
the Hawks would go on to
change coaches, replacing
Mike Woodson with Larry
Drew. .
Key matchup: Howard
vs. Al Horford. After shoot-
ing 10 of 20 for 27 points in
Orlando's Nov.- 8 victory,
Howard was held below 50
percent in the last three
games, including a 4-for-13
showing in the Atlanta's 85-
82 victory on March 30.
Horford had only 11 points
in that game, but had a
pair of 16-point games and
scored 24 in another match-
up.
Prediction: Magic in 6.

WESTERN CONFERENCE


ASSOCIATED PREss
Chicago Bulls' Derrick Rose goes in for a dunk during the
second half of the Bulls' NBA basketball ~game against the
'New York Knicks Tuesday in New York.


Continued From Page 11

the first since negotiations
toward a new collective
bargaining agreement fell
apart last month.
So how long might this
go? .
''The court has indicated
it wants to continue with
everyone talking as long
as it makes sense," said
Michael Hausfeld, an attor-
ney for the players.
What about the fans, who
are frustrated by the back-
and-forth rhetoric with
no promise of an accord
before training camps are
to begin in late July?
"Well, I'm a fan too," said
Hall of Famer Carl Eller,
among those on the play-
ers' side of the talks. "We
would like to ease their
minds. We can't tell them
the outcome, but we are
very interested in having
a football season. A lot


Continued From. Page 1B

we've seen, they have got-
ten better this season," she
said. "T~hey've figured out
new strategies and studied
how we play."
ACR plans to play aggres-
sively by knocking down
the SFRG blockers and
letting its jammers pass
through the pack, Davids
said. The team has amazing
team chemistry. .
"~That leads us to be very
aware of where are team-
mates are on the floor and
what they're doing," she
said. "A blocker can antici-
pate where the jammer is
going to be."
The team bas also worked
on new strategies the
SFRG haven't seen before
and knows how to break
apart older ones, Davids
said.
Practices have incorpo-
rated strength training to


of things depend on it, of
course. But, I'm with the
fans. We want them to be
happy. That's what's impor-
tant to us."
It was the fist time the
sides have sat down to talk
since March 11,, when the
collective bargaining agree-
ment expired, the union
was dissolved to clear the
way for a court fight and the
NFL wound up with its first
work stoppage since the
monthlong strike in 1987.
With the 2011 season in
peril, Boylan is overseeing
this round of talks after
16 days of mediated ses-
sions in Washington failed
to secure a new labor pact.
Goodell stepped away
from the session to join a
teleconference with 5,300
Cleveland Browns season-
ticket holders for 20 min-
utes Thursday. He would


not characterize the negoti-
ations, which are supposed
to remain confidential, but
did reiterate the impor-
tance of the sides getting
together.
"I can tell you that it;'s a
positive step when the par-
ties are talking," he said.
"We saw the March 11
proposal as responsive to
issues raised by the players
and there are many attrac-
tive elements in it. ... Our
entire focus is on getting a
deal done."
Goodell said the league
hopes to release its sched-
ule for next season within
the next 10 days and plans
to play "a full season."
Goodell also said there are
no plans to use replacement
players as the league did in
1987 'and that the Super
Bowl in Indianapolis could
be pushed back one week,


or the two-week gap after
the conference champion-
ships could be shortened
to one if necessary.
Goodell's main message
was to assure fans they
would see thle Browns play
next season,
"W7e're going to make
sure we have football, and
more of it," he said.
Goodell held a similar
session Wednesday with
Dolphins season-ticket
holders. During that call, he
stressed the league's goal of
keeping player costs under
control and, in response
to a question about finan-
cial transparency, said the
NFL's disclosure has been
"extraordinary." He insisted
the players know "the rev-
enue down to the penny,"
a reference to the union's
push for the league to open
the books.


help players withstand hits
without falling.
Tickets are $8 at the door,
Children 12 and under are
free.
Skating Palace is located
at 357 NW Hall of Fame
Drive.
"You get to see the girls
next door play in an aggres-
sive sport," she said.
ACR includes team
members from Lake City,
Alachua County 'and
Valdosta, Ga.
The team is always look-
ing for new skaters, refer-
ees and non-skating offi-
cials, Davids said.
Open recruitment is
8 p.m. Monday at Skating
Palace. E-mail join@
acrderby.org.
"No experience is neces-
sary," she said. "We take
you from lacing up to laying
out."


Bulls, Spurs lead among





NBA pla off contenders


No. 4 ORLANDO MAGIC
No. 3 BOSTON CELTICS (52-30) vs. No. 5
(56-26) vs. No. 6 NEW ATLANTA HAWKS
YORK HNICKS (42-40) (44-38)





BLONDIE
WHAT'S TAT THAT YOUNG L
ALL ASOUT? C! ELEBRIfV HAD A
M.ELDOW DO 1.1 E
CARRIED
oF A E


WOW! JUST WHEN HER CAREER WAS
NEARLY OFF THE RADAR, TOO




\,' .


HELLO, PUBLIC APOLOGY
AND COMEBAtCK TRAIL!!


\ `/
'~4 ~= I


HO ROSCOP ES


F RAN K & E RN EST





@ W


TWY


LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS SATURDAY, APRIL 16, 2011


Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415


DILBERT


IF YOU'D LIKE A LE55
HONEST ANSWER, I CAN
RECON EN .OMONE

I MIGHT TRY
C~~THAT. ^


DEAR ABBY: My wife
and I recently returned
from a vacation where we
had a disagreement regard-
ing hotel service and tow-
els.
Regarding the towels,
my wife thinks we should
hang them to dry daily for
reuse later. I say the cost
of washing the towels is
included in the price of the
room, and I want a fresh
towel daily.
The other issue is my
wife feels obligated to tip
the housekeeping staff. I
have never felt that obliga-
tion. Not a single house-
keeper has been exception-
al, regardless of the hotel
we stayed in.
We're hoping you could
shed some light on hotel
etiquette. WEST VIR-
GINIA TRAVELER
DEAR TIRkVELER:
Your wife appears to be a
conservationist. Although
you prefer fresh towels
daily, many travelers volun-
tarily forgo this service to
help hotels conserve water
and save energy. If you pre-
fer to do otherwise, that's
your privilege and it's not
worth arguing over,
As to tipping the ~house-
keeping staff, has it oc-


son. We have another rela-
tive in mind.
My mother-in-law is a
nice enough person and
would not be cruel or abu-
sive to Ethan, but she was
not a good mother to Park-
er and his siblings. She's
extremely selfish and self-
absorbed. We know she'll
be extremely offended if
we don't name her as our
child's guardian,
I would like to hire an-
other attorney, but she will
take offense to that as well.
She hasn't stopped hound-
ing us about this issue.
Please tell us how to handle
this. TRAPPED IN THE
GOLDEN STATE
DEAR TRAPPED:
Hire an attorney and have
the document drawn up.
And when your mother-
in-law raises the subject
again, you and Parker
should thank her and tell
her it has already been
done, so she doesn't have
to worry about it anymore.
The woman may be selfish
and self-absorbed, but she
is absolutely right that you
should have your wishes
put in writing.
HWrite Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


BABY BLUES


Abigad Van Buren
www.dearobby.com
curred to you that you have
never received exceptional
service because you never
offered a tip? Some hotel
guests talk to the house-
keeper at the time they ar-
rive to re uest extra han -
ers, soap, washcloths, etc.
- and offer a gratuity at that
time. And when they do,
the staff usually goes out of
their way to be accommo-
dating. Try it they need
the extra money, and they'll
spoil you if you let them.
DEAR ABBY: My hus-
band, "Parker," and I have
a 4-year-old son, "Ethan."
Recently, my mother-in-law
suggested wie have a will
drawn up, stating who will
take care of Ethan if some-
thing happens to us. She's.
an attorney and has offered
to do it for us.
Parker and I agree that it
is a good idea and appreci-
ate her offer to do the pa-
perwork. The problem? We
don't want her raising oir


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGAR THE HORRIBLE







jj so e ,


ARIES (March 21-
April 19): You may feel at
odds about your future, es-
pecially at where your part-
nerships and responsibili-
ties appear to be heading.
Put your heart and soul into
everything you do. An un-
expected change will turn
out favorably. It**
TAURUS (April 20-
May 20): Dealing with
personal paperwork and
large groups, institutions
or agencies may be stress~
ful but, once you clear up
any pressing matters, you
can relax and get back to
enjoying your day. Use your
imagination to come up
with an entertaining plan
that will enhance your love
life. AAAA t
GEMINI (May 21-
June 20): Good things will
happen if you get involved
in a worthy cause. Your
high energy and ingenious
ideas and solutions will put
you in a key position. The
sky is the limit. AAAAA jr
CANCER (June 21-
July 22): Proceed with
caution. Nothing will run
smoothly, especially if you
are opposing someone who
doesn't think the same way
as you. You must find com
mon ground so that you can
work harmoniously with ev~
eryone. It's the end results
that count. **
LEO (July 23-Aug.


tive. www
SAGYITARIUS (NTov.
22-Dec. 21): Don'thelieve
everything you are told. Go
directly to the source. You
carr make changes at home
that lead to a more fun and
entertaining environment.
A commitment to someone
special will be well received.

CA~PRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): Judge what-
ever situation you face ob-
jectively. Take a wait and
see attitude if someone
comes on too strong. Avoid
conversations with people
who are threatening or
pushy. Added responsibili-
ties will lead to exhaustion.
Be upfront about what you.
can and cannot do. ItA
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): You can get
serious about something.
you've wanted to do for a
long time. Success is within
reach if you are quick to
act. A financial opportunity
or gain is apparent. Budget
wisely. Start a self-ituprove-
nient regime that ensures
better health. WAAAA~
PISCES (Feb. 19-
March 20): You'll have a
keen sense of what others
are doing and thinking. Use
your insight to get what you
want. Talking to someone
in an influential position
will ensure your advance-
ment. AAA


THE LAST WORD
SEu enia Last

22): You'll be hard to beat
no matter what game you
are playing. Your ability: to
face any challenge head-on
will bring you greater popu-
larity and .higher .status.
Physical activity, coupled
with expressing yourself
effectively, will lead to suc-
cess. ItAAA
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): The liast will help you
put things in perspective.
Remember your experience
with joint ventures and you
will know how to address
issues that concern you..A
lack of moderation should
be a warning that perhaps
you shouldn't take. part
AAbr
LIBRIA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): You'll be emotional
about matters that concern
love, friendship and tak-
ing care of responsibilities.
Avoid overindulgence and
overspending. Indecisive-
ness will cause friction.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-
Nov. 21): You may have
to answer to someone in an
authoritative .position if you
haven't stuck to rules and
regulations. Don't keep se-
crets that can get you into
trouble. Focus on home,
family and all thats posi-


SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS


GARFIELD


B.C.


by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: G equals B
"X ZRIVH YZVVIE YPZVMH EPH
OIDRC, GJE X YZV YZAE Z AEIVH
Z Y D IAA E PH O'Z E HDA E I Y DH ZE H


LZVB DXNNRHA."


- LIEPHD EHDHAZ


PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "The difference between tax avoidance and tax
evasion is the thickness of a prison wall." Denis Leary
(c) 2011 by NEA, Inc. 4-16


DEAR ABBY



Tips on hotel etiquette turn

couple mnto pampered guests


CELEBRITY CIPHER























s


1 0 EMdpl Iment
CNA/home attendant needed in
private home. Will work with oth-
er caregivers. Nights & weekends
req'd. Send resume to: PO Box
3719 Lake City, Florida 32056

Experienced LPN wanted to work
in busy medical practice. Knowl-
edge with pediatric & adults de-
sired. No weekends or nights,
competitive salary & benefits
Fax Resume to 386-758-5628
HealthCore Physical Therapy
has an immediate opening for an
enertc, lche sed,t rysical
outpatient clinics. Excellent pay &
great work environment. Fax re-
to:uh ltt c3rlby h ls utne t.
All resumes kept confidential
Li ensed, Expear ncted,m PA

Send resume to P.O. Box 714
Lake City, FL 32056 or
Email to: pta714@hotmail.com


`230 Tutorin

Will Tutor Your Student! Certi-
fied, Masters Degree w/18 yrs exp,
At home or library, After school or
Summer, Call Judy 386-288-6165


240 Schoos &


Ine sted in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
corur es fr begir 9& exp
next class-04/11/10

Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-04/11/ll

Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or



310 Pets &Supplies

PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.


361 Farm Equipment

84 Frd 4 10 Tmector. Runs god.

350hr on 2005 motor. Dependable.
$7500. obo. 386-867-0005


402 Appliances

Family size upright freezer.
White, very nice. $260. obo
386-397-3269 or
386-292-3927


402 Appliances

Kenmore Dryer, apt size,
120 voltage
Runs good, $65
386-397-3269 or 386-292-3927

.Nice White Gas Tappan Stove
3.165. obo. Ready for LP gas but
will switch for you. 386-397-3269
or 386-292-3927
White clothes dryer. Good shape,
works great. $145 obo.
386-397-3269 or
S386-292-3927
White Whirlpool Washer
386-37-530269 or
386-292-3927


403 Anctions

Court Ordered Absolute Auction
Saturday, April 16th 10 A.M.
Hooter's h 34th Street, G'.Ville,
mL Fracie eauctionzip.com,.
10% B. P.Charles "Red" Willian s
AU437 386-454-4991


407 cO pUterS

HP Computer,
$100.00
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170
IBM Computer,.

386-755 9984 or
386-292-2170


411 If0015 'y
10" Table Saw
$75.00
386-758-6886

l"x30"
Belt Sander
$25.00
386-758-6886
8" Drill Press
$50
386-758-6886

Power
Sanding Black
$25
386-758-6886


420 Wanted to Buy

K&H TIMBER
We liuy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
Wanted ITunk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$250 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NOttl need !8-88-49260


430 Garage Sales
BIG YARD SALE:. Furniture,
baby and women clothes. Lots of
misc. And Church Pews. Sat. 8-?
334 E. Duval Street.


430 Garage Sales

Employee Garage Sale
Sat. 8-12. Columbia Eye
Associates, 1615 SW Main Blvd.
Way too much to list

Moving Sale Sat. & Sun. 8-?
Plantation S/D off 90W 4354
Caden Glenn follow signs, Fridge,
furniture, baby items, shelves, art
Moving Sale! Deals you'll never
find agamn! Antiques, housewares,
designer clothes, dsk,eelect. king

15,16 &17th 9am-? Last day make
offer take it all. 695 SE St Johns






PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.

Sat. 7-1. 464 SW Emerald St. off
247 near 252B. Name brands baby
clothes (0-9 mo.) Baby items,
maternity clothes, household items


440 Miscenlaneous

New Central A/C, still in box,
with full ten year factory warranty

Call 386-364-1090

Tow Behind Grill/Smoker
$1,250 OBO.
3 6-2 9-30 or


63a MobileHomes

2&3 BR MH. $395 -$650. mo.
plus deposit. Water & sewer fur-
nished. Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422

2/2 MH w/screen porch, Irg yard,
quiet/clean/safe 10 unit park,
credit/refs req $475 mo, $475 dep,
NO PETS, 386-965-3003
3br/2ba mobile home. Next to
O'Leno State Park. $650 mo. plus
1st, last & sec. Water & lawn
service provided. 386-758-7959
A very clean & well maintained
2/2 units in nice park. $599.mo
w/$500. dep. Rent includes water,
sewer, trash p/u. Close to town
386-984-8448

Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White Contact 386-623-3404
or 386-365-1919

Nice clean 8c3abdrm, Five Points,

MoreSt 86 9 1-ul82n







Quiet, Country Branford area
3/2 $400 dep, $600 month
386-867-1833 or 386-590-0642
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com


'Legal


w~s


ml~lDY'i'


; III(


One Itein per ad Eac adiioal
4 lines 6 days Ime $.a25 iioa

Each itern must Include a price.
This Is a non-refundable rate.




One item per ad ln $.0 1
4 lines *6 das mes tional
pRa n apmle to pat o I dviua selin s.
Eah ite rnrnust Incuc e pi




One Item per ad $1
4 lines *6 days ts~~ ional
penoatil mercadse tonialln at se lne'ss.
Eah It rn must inold a ce

phi isannrfnal a


One Item per ad "7
4 lines 6 days ~~Sa 6 tional
Rate applies to private individuals selling
personal e candise to IIin S2 00 or less,
This is a non-refundable rate.




One Item per ad 62 4
4 lines *6 days Sa addtional
pae a no er ht piate n ds viul s0ellrin ag
Eah ite rnrust Inuc e 0- pi




O Item per ad 3 l
4 lines *6 days (tid~onal
Rate ap lies to private Individuals selling
personal Erac n lue totaln g I cooriess.
This Is a non-refundable rate.






4 lnes 3d 50 ~ s

Includle 2 Signs Eih dMArlnJ Ilt4 0



Limited to service type advertis-
ing only.
4 lines, one month....s92.00
$10.80 each additional line
Includes an additional $2.00 per
ad for each Wednesday insertion,




Moun n tch oh Fria 5fr 8:00
a.rn. to 5:00 p.m.
Some people prefer to place their
classified ads in person, and some
ad categories will require prepay-
ment. Our office is located at 180
East Duval Street.
YIou can also fax or email your ad
copy to the Reporter.
FAX: 386-752-9400 Please
direct your copy to the Classified
Department.
EMAIL: classified@ lakecityre-
porter.com





Ad is toAppear: Call by: Fax/Email by:
Tuesday Mon., 10:00 a.m. Mon., 9:00 a.m.
Wednesday Mon., 10:00 a.m. Mon., 9:00 a.m.
Thursday Wed., 10:00 a.m. Well., 9:00 a.m.
Friday hurs.,10:00a.m. Thurs.,9:00a.m.
Saturday Fri., 10:00 am. Fi, 9:00 a.m.
Sunday Fri., 10:00a~m. Fri.,9:00 a.m.





Ad Errors- Please read your ad
on the first day of publication.
We accept responsibility for only
the first incorrect insertion, and
only the charge for the ad space
In error. Please call 755-5440
immediately for prompt correc-
tion and billing adjustments,
Cancellations- Normal advertising
deadline apply for cancellation.
Billing Inquiries- Call 755-5440.
Should further information be
required regarding payments or
credit limits, your call will be trans-
ferred to the accounting depart-
ment.


Advertising copy is subject to
approval by the Publisher who
reserves the right to edit, reject,
or classify all advertisements under
apr priate healinge} Copy sotu
advertiser on the first day of pub-
li ail'. redit f rr pblirshe ser os
for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the
Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nor for any general,
special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply
with Federal, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
nation in employment, housing and
public accommodations. Standard
abbreviations are acceptable;' how-.
ever, the first word of each ad may
not be abbreviated.


In Printa and On~line
HTV~W.saiicaelotereportrcon


1 0 Opbportunities
05525?6r>3
.Teacher Positions

SEarly Head Start,
Lake City-FCCPC /CDA; 3 yrs
of classroom experience
preferred (individuals w/ HS
dip/GED and DCF 40 hrs. may
also apply). Excellent benefits
paid holidays, sick/annual leave,
health insurance, retirement +
add'1 benefits; Apply in person
at 236 SW Columbia Ave
(754S-2C2s) or mail r sume to
Lake City, FL 32056-2637, by
omail a 1)insnn sE~sOrE

Busy office seeking
experienced, energetic person for
receptionist position. i
Fax resume to 386-961-8802

CDLA Flatbed/Van Truck
Driver needed for FR OTR SE
isa,3ayears e p or m re, Cnact

Delivery Driver, must be 21 yrs
old, have 6 pts or less on license
and have NO misdemeanors or fel-
onies. Must possess a Class A
CDL,apply within/no phone calls!
North Florida Sales
467 SW Ring Ct, Lake City

ne7dTempnrar Farn t kes

& Altemnatv sW 1.KEmploam n
Dates: 05/28/11 12/15/11. Wage
of $9.48/br. Worker guaranteed
pr34eodf contract hous ee ing
provided to non commuting
workers. Transportation &
50 sistence rte mbursed pphleor
this job at the nearest One Stop
Center in your area and reference
Job Order # KYO424792.

Local law office needs

Worxkper copn tlon .1sal
injury and general legal matters
experience preferred. Immediate
employment. Apply in person at
116 NW Columbia Ave.'
Lake City, FL 32055.
Need EXPERIENCED
440-Insurance Agent.
Email Resume to
LCinsjob@gmail.com

Optical As~sistanta& ILsb ewh
Swill train, Send resume to 7637 SW
Main Blvd, Lake City 32025
Securitas Security Services is
hiring FT/PT Security Officers in
the Lake City area. Must haye a
cls se .itli ense andefod
Apply at: www.securitasjobs .com
Lic#BB2300010 EOE M/F/V/D

Wanted Highly motivated
individual for Sales Position.
Rountree -Moore Automotive
Group, Great benefits, paid vaca-
fion. Exp. a plus but not necessary.
Call Tony Reese 386-344-7517
Wanted OTR CLASS A CDL,
Driver, must have TWIC card and
passport. Heavy haul exp. req.
Call Jerry Bash,386-965-0879.


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR POLK COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CIVEL DIVISION
Case No.: 53-2010-C3A-1916-07
WELLS FARGO, N.A., individually
and as successor in interest by merg-
er to WACHOVIA BANK, N.A '
Plamntiff'
T STUCCO COMPANY OF
IDAHO, INC., a Florida corporation,
THE STUCCO COMPANY, INC.,

anLC, a d hol olomt liablt m
pany, ANDREW DUMMAR JEN-
RIFGER DO FIAIGINET E LNa
Florida limited liability company,
aned CIYOF LAKELAND,
NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
pursuant to the "Partial Summary
a amet of Foealosr, ened rn
Judicial Circuit Court, in and for

Pol Cuny ills Ite pkoe t
situated in Polk County, Florida, as
described in the attached Composite
Exhibit "A", to the highest and best
bidder, for cash, online at
www.polk.realforeclose.com, on
May 2nd, 2011, beginning at 10:00
a.m.
Any person claiming an interest in
the surplus from the sale, if any, oth-
dtehaon ttheelspeppdewsn mus filee

y // JON A. ANHNY 1S-
F lord Bar Number: 0731013
LYNN A. BRAUER, ESQUIRE
Flonida Bar Nuber: LO46C7420

201 North Franklin Street, Suite
2800

Te ehoe: (83 6P35616
Telecopier: (813)273-5615
Attorneys for Wells Fargo, N.A. in-
dividually and as successor in inter-
CSt by merger to Wachovia Bank,
N.A ,,
Blc H, Cx and Weeks Addition
to Lakeland, according to the map or
plat thereof as reedrded in Plat Book
2, tag 5, public eesoadso ph k
South 220.50 feet thereof; Also Less
and except the North 105 feet of the
South 325.5 feet thereof; and the
North 1.0 foot of the East 67.0 feet
of the North 105.0 feet of the South
325.5 feet thereof.
Lots 2, 3 and 4, Block 30, Turman's
East Ybor Subdivision, according to
teP mp orkplat thereof, as rco de
lic Records. of Hillsbaoro County.
Florida.
Lot 8,' Columbia South, according to
the map or plat thereof, as recorded
ih Plat Book 5, Page'55, of the Pub-
lic Records of Columbia County,

04d4300
April, 16, 2011


S010 AnnouncementS









020' LoBt & Found








LOST: Lg 3 yr old white Calico
female cat. Goes by "Hannah".
Lives on 240/Itchetucknee. 9 yr
old daughter brokenhearted. Please
call 386-288-3916 REWARD!!!



10 Oopbportunities

AVON!!!, EARN up to 50%!!!
Only $10 for Starter Kit,
1-800-275-9945 pin #4206
www.youravon.com/tdavies

Driver needed for Roll-Off Truck,
CDL, exp. preferred, duites in-
clude delivery & pick up of con-
tainers, transported to varoius
county landfills and PT/FT Exp
Mechamec, w/knowledge of Heavy
Eq, some road side repairs. Office
based in Lake Butler, Call Greg
Waters @ 386-496-3867


1


Lawn & Landscape Service

Landscape Maintenance Company
You can trust for knowledge &

Mow Gr een L I3t8 2AD!6532


Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.


Land Services

Back Hoe, Dozer, Chopping, root
rankingbuss thog seedulds sod,
irrigation. Free Est! 386-623-3200


Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SATURDAY, APRIL 16, 2011

Lake City Reporter





CLAIS S FE


Take ADvantage of the


~ADvantage














810 Home for Sale

CBC 3/1 home. inside city limits,
fenced backyard. detached carport
wfoffice MLS#77411 582.900
Call R.E.O.Realty.
Nancy Rogers @ 386-867-1271
Charming Remodeled Home
in Beautiful Neighborhood
MLS#74765 $142.900 Call
Charlie Sparks @ Westfield
Realty Group 386-755-0808

Coldwel a a~n~ker/Btishopa Ralty
plan, noce yard, close to town.
Only $84.900 Lori Geibeig
Simpson. 386-365-5678
Cold well Banker/Bishop Realty
5br/4ba on 5+ac. 3 car garage
inground pool/hot tub and more.
GMLS #S7 8p5s4$56,0 5 78

Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Superbly maintained liome in
Creekside. Oversized garage &
st lage. Many ex rs. 10ain~e K.

Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
New home in Mayfair S/D. 4br on
corner lot. Split plan. $214,900
MLS# 73689619 Elain 8K. Tolar

Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Home on the lake in town. 4br/3ba
MLS# 76085 Elaine K. Tolar 386-
755-6488 or Mary Brown White-
hurst. 386-965-0887 $299,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Great home in Woodcrest S/D 3/2
home, covered back porch, nice
yard.MLS# 56149888Elain K.0Tolar

Country Home on 2.5 Acres,
$95,000 MLS#77039
Remax Professionals, Inc.,
jo lytte@remaxnfl.com
386-365-2821
Custom built home with many
upgrades. Screened back porch'
16x24 workshop.
MLS# 77178 $184,500
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
Custom, 3/2.5 built in 2007
on 10.8 manicured acres, '
com ltel fenced820wnler i.

386-623-6896 Access Realty
Ft White MH on 16.27 Acres,
near many recreational activities
MLS#77404 $149,900
Jo Lytte: R67ax Poessionals

Great house in Piccadilly S/D. 2
car garage and ingrounclpool.
Newly painted inside & out-
MLS# 76786 $133,500
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
Great Opportunity!,
Currently rented, Seller will -
assist w/buyer's closing costs
MLS# 77335, Call Michael at
Westfield 386-867-9053 $99,900
Gwen Lake area. Beautiful up-
grades 4/3 w/tile & laminate
floors, fireplace, new kitchen, Ig
den, fenced yard. $125,000, 386
397-4766 Hallmark Real Estate
Hallmark Real Estate. Brick 3/2.
Many upgrades. Gas fireplace.,
Grotto tile. Great location on cul-
de-sac! $149,900.
MLS# 75931 386-867-1613
Historical Home on Lake Isabel-


fessional office. $240,000 386-
719-0382 Hallmark Real Estate
Home on 15 Acres w/2500 sq ft,
workshop, MLS# 77552 $235,000
Call Brittany Stoeckert at
Results Realty
386-397-3473
Just Reduced 4/2 on 1.57 acres,
fireplace. partially fenced, MLIS#
77412, Call Nancy Rogers at
3..O -R 71 G Oup0


810 Home for Sale

Large Brick. 3/1, 4.43 acres. metal
roof, MLS# 77415 $104,888
Call Nancy Rogers @ R.E.O.
Realty Group, Inc. 386-867-1271
nancytrogers@msn.com
Large Home on 1 acre, 4/2,
Fla Rm. wrap around front porch
MLS#77292 $148,000
Call Brittany Stoeckert at
Results Realty386-397-3473 -

Lg hom on corner ltu garage'
heated pool MLS# 71901 Eastside
Village Realty, Inc. Denise
Milligan-Bose 386-752-5290
Lots of acerage. All brick home.
Screened in porch. Extra big
closets. Mature pines..

Century 231 T~h~e7a by ROrs Co.
Luxury 3/2 Log Home, Cypress
interior, whole house generator,
$269,900 MLS# 76899 Call
Roger Lovelady @386-365-7039
westfieldrealtygroup.com
Make an Offer! 3 br brick, quiet
resid'1 street in Live Oak. HUD
home is sold "as is" Hallmark
Real Estate 386-365-5146
www.hudhomestore.com
Nearly 17 Acres wlHouse
on paved road, Very Spacious!
MLS#76902 $194,900
Call 386-487-7484 Speak to
Brd~die Westfield Realty Group
Nice home with eat in kitchen and
a nice sized living room. Pleauty
of room for entertaining.
MLS# 77584 $89,900
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
On Golf Course w/lake view. 3/2
home w/1g rooms, 3 fireplaces, wet
bar & big deck. Newly reduced to
$214,900. Hallmark Real Estate
386-365-2135
Open for Bid! 3/2 DW w/corner
s one fireplace, fenced yard slIg
MLS 77290- 386-365-3886 Deb-
bie King Hallmark Real Estate
Owner Fianncing! wooded 1/4 ac.
lots mn Suwannee County, close to
River, high & dry. Bring your SW

Derin ton PopeR e956050-4300
Ready for Fun & Family. 4br/2ba
custom home on 33.84 ac. Isas
stocked fish pond & huge 54x60
shop. $325,000. Hallmark Real
Estate 386-719-0382
Rolling Oaks, 3/3 + Bonus Rm,
5 acres, back porch & more!
MLS#77528 Call Pam Beauchamp
at 386-758-8900 Remax $284,900
remaxpamb@gmail.com
Solid Brick Home on 5 Acres,
C1 s~e t70 t006 st inte $ 8tr
Call Brittany Stoeckert at
386-397-3473 Results Realty

Speaci usb Oken F oor Plan Home,
$179,900 MLS#76796 Call Jo
Lytte@Remax Professionals, Inc.
386-365-2821 -
Two for the price of one. Updated
main home w/a 3/2 guest home. A
lot of living space for the price.
MLS# 77348 $244,900
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
Welcome home. 3br/2ba brick.
Great location on the east side.

MLS 76d8607 $6,900
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
Well Cared For 3/2 on 1.4 Acres,
open floor plan, MLS#75702
$199,900, Call Carrie Cason
at 386-487-1484
westfieldrealtygroup.com
Well maintianed 3/2 -1/2 acre
minutes from town. 20x40
workshop, screened porch.
MLS# 73787 $99,000
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
You can't beat this Price! 1995
12 H 2/n 3/4 a. aed rom I
Needs work! $29,900
Derington Properties. 965-4300

8 Farms &
80Acre ge

e0acres wihav l~Icher
Sprmngs, $38,000, MLS# 76264'
Call MillardGillen at
Westfield Realty 386-365-7001
4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Fmnancmng! NO DOWN!
$69,900. $613mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancinp.com
4 acres, Wellborn, New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down, $39,900, $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
Between Lake City & Ft. White.
S6.44 rolling acres. DWMH, 3/2.
1836 sf, great value on paved road.
Need repairs. $54,900
Derington Properties. 965-4300
Half to ten acre lots. Some w/
well, septic, pp. We finance; low
dwn pmt. Deas Bullard Properties.
386-752-4339. www.1andnfl.com
Heavily Wooded Land, 10 Acres
MLS#75784 $94,900
Call Jo Lytte
Remax Profe si Ias, Inc.


8 Commercial
Prperty
Great Location with lots of
flexible space & visibility for lease
Great Price Too!
Call Scott Stewart @ Westfield


Realty Group 386-867-3498

oMumtpl Us r2,00u0 sr ae
Loading dock, Storage yard,
MLS#77349 $395,000, Charlie
386-755-0808 Westfield Realty


850 7,ateer ront
Pop ry
DWMH on Ten Acte w lkefont,

MLS#75571, Call Jo Lytte at
Remax Professionals 386-365-
2821, jolytteeremaxnfl.com
River Cabin on Suwannee River,
workshop, patio, deck & dock,
$349,900 MLS#76336 Call-
Jo Lytte at Rem;T2P~rofessionals


.640 Obtall Homes

os2--Palm Harbor Homes
Call about our
Extreme Makeover Home Sale
As Seen On TV!!
800-622-2832

06 MH 3br/2ba open floor plan
w/1g kit w/ island, fireplace. 3 Riv-
ers Est, river access, MLS# 75661
Eastside Village Realty, Inc.
Denise Millgan-Bose 752-5290
3/2 DWMH over 1700 sqft. New
Roof & CH/A. Doublesided fire-
place, custom kit w/breakfast nook
& 3wet b $6 88950A0cMLS# 73861

Hallmark Real Estate. DWMH
F4/ on acit24X(3i61 drkhp
down and more. $114,900.
MLS# 76188 386-867-1613
Oner F nancing-3 1

$89,900! Call Taolor Goe
of Access Realty @ 386-344-7662.


0650 Mo"bile Home
Owner Fin, 3/2, S of Lake City,
quiet, wooded, 1.5 ac, sml dn $700
mo, 386-590-0642/386-8671833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
OWNER FINANCING
3br/2ba DWMH with 5 acres. 10
additional acres available. Daniel
Crapps Agency 386-623-6612

705 Rooms for Rent

Room w/private bath. Microwave,
fridge, laundry, internet, private
entrance. Convenient.
386-965-3477 for information


710 2'"RrnshdApt.

Move in as low as $325
Call today for details!
386-758-8455
Windsong Apts .

05525655
SPRING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans;
some with garages.
Call 386-454-1469
or visit our website:
www.springhillvillage.net

1 & 2 Bedroom Apartments
Move in for as low as
$199
386-755-2423
A Landlord You Can Love!
2 br Apts $575. & up + sec. Great
area. CH/A washer/dryer hookups.
386-758-9351/352-208-2421
Great location W of I-75, spacious
deluxe 2BR apts., garage, W/D
hook up. patio. $600 & up, + SD,
386-344-3715 or 386-965-5560
The Lakes Apts. Studios & IBr's
from $135/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $450. + sec.
Call Michelle 386-752-9626


0720 FurishdAts.
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia: All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808




3/32 Recenl 1 ul Cu'o Hm,
ces, custom cabinets, $920 mo, .
1st. Last & Sec,off I-75 & 47
Call Andrew 386-623-6066
3ba/2ba, New carpet & paint: .5
ac 2 mi from d'town. No pets.

$8a50 +de -8 k6, 72-d50 5
3BR/1.5BA. BLOCK HOME-
Fenced (privacy) bk yard. CH/A
Nice area. $800. mo $800. dep.
Ref's req'd. (941)920-4535
5/3, eat in kit, new carpets/paint, 2
car garage, fenced back yard, on
Gwen Lake in Lake City -
$1,100 mo 386-438-5884
FSBO w/Option to Buy, 3br/2ba
Lg LR, w/add'1 family, screen
back porch. Aprox 4 ac. Close to
&75 on Hwy 47. $850. mo. + sec.
386-867-1190
Ft White, 2/1, CH/A, 2010 W2 &
ref's from current landlord req'd
Access to Rivers $650 mo, '
$600 sec., 386-497-4699


0750 BISI 1S &
OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$695. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor


790 vacation Rentals

Horseshoe Beach Spring Special
Gulf Front 2br, \v/1g porch, dock,
fish sink. wkend $345./wk $795.
(352)498-5986/386-235-3633
alwaysonvacation.com #419-181


805 Lots forSale

5 Acre Lot, Secluded & Cleared,
MLS# 67871 $60,000
Call Lisa Waltrip
@ 386-365-5900
westfieldrealtygroup.com
A high & dry buildable wooded
.734 of ac.,Forest Country. MLS#
76668 Eastside Village Realty,
Inc. Denise Milligan-Bose
@386-752-5290

3 Riv~ert White HghL& Dry!
Only $11,900.
Call Taylor Goes of Access Realty
@ 386-344-7662-
Forest Country building lot,
scattering of trees, Motivated
Seller $19,999 MLS#75140
R ni vtProf sioas, 1Inc.

Hallmark Real Estate. Cleared
2.57 ac. fenced w/32' Dutchman
camper. In O'Brien. Close to Live
Oak, Lake City, Branford. $25,000
MLS# 74534 386-867-1613
Nice 4 acre parcel located in
O'Brien. Won't last long at only
$13,500. Call Taylor Goes of
Access Realty @386-344-7662.
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or

i 2luem chln une thes ugof
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
It e which isdinrviolation oft
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telmpph ned Inuber to th~e-91eariig


810 Home for Sale

1999 Doublewide,
3/2 fenced back yard
on 1 acre
MLS# 76315 $64,900
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
3/2 Brick Home in town, fenced
back yard w/12x12 workshop
$79,900 Call Nancy @ R.E.O.
Realty 386-867-1271MLS# 77414
nancytrogers@msn.com
3/2 Brick home on .59 acre, on the
lake with back sunroom. Garage &

MLs# g6e69 $2 900
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
3/2 Custom Western Cedar Home
on 2 acre lakefront lotMLS#74681

Professoas ITI 38 362821
jolytte@remaxnfl.com
3/2 in Creekside S/. Fenced back
yard, sprinl rs1, large
$15,e0q0 L#a 785
386-623-6896 Access Realty
3/2 in town, lots of upgrades,
cu rntly leas d, MLS 76658'
$49,90 Cal JoLytt a
Remax Professionals, Inc.
386-365-2821
3/2 in Woodhaven w/Fla Room,
fenced black yard MLS#75499,
$114,900 Call Pam @
Remax 386-303-2505 or
email- remaxpamb@gmail.com
3/2 MH on 1.5 acres, fenced,
porches, wkshp,well maintained
$49,9000 MS3877436069 C~all Josh

westfieldrealtygroup.com
3/2 on 4.84 Acres, fireplace, sheds,
many fruit trees, Call Jo Lytte at
Remax $68,900, MLS#72427
386-365-2821, www~jolytte.
florida-property-search.com
3/2 onSacres.t I ge master suite
fenced for horses.
MLS# 75830 $102,900
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
3/2 on 8.7 acres w/Fla room,
several storage bldgs, fenced,
MLS#75295 Call Pam Beauchamp
@ 386-758-8900 Remax,
$179,000 www.visitpium.com
3/2 on 9.7 acres. fenced & cross
fenced. Separate pastures. Animals
are negotiable. Owners motivated.
MLS# 77431 $179,900
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
3br and Ig open floor plan
w/separate office. Beautifully
landscaped. Private access to Lake
Jeffery. MLS# 76231 $199,000
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
4/2 with 1000 sq ft workshop,
fenced back yard, 2 car garage,
MLS#77602, Bring Offers!
$174,900, Call Nancy @
R.E.O. Realty 386-867-1271
5 acre Home w/Horse Barn,
Wood floors, New Kitchen,
Gazebo & Koi Pond MLS#76039
$16R,90 CaH Aaro 67V Wseld
Beautiful Home For Sale
The Preserve at Laurel Lake
4/2 or 3/2 $194,900 MLS#77257
Call Scott Stewart 386-867-3498
westfieldrealtygroup.com


850 Warpe'r'ront
River Front Property 6.45 Acres.
in White Sprgs close to Big Shoals
Park. Shelter for eptertainmng
$124.888 MLS# 77417 Call Nancy
@ R.E.O. Realty 386-867-12-71


89 esort ropert

Furnished Home on Itchetucknee
River, Wrap around covered decks
on tw I velsMustSEE $L17 000

Remax 386,365-2821
River Access, Refurbished Rent-
Bal Unt & HoH +3 ,o00
Call Jo Lytte 386-365-2821
ML.S#76734 Remax Professionals


940 Trucks








951 Recreaional
Homestead Rancher Travel
Trailer, 28ft, One slideout, Fiber-
glass, Awning, sleeps 8. $10,000.
(850)322-7152


Classified Department: 755-5440


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2006 EF250
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3/4 ton, metal work
shelves/ladder rack,
60K miles, exc. cond.


386 50505 5 5

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fiberglass, awning,
sleeps 8.
$10,000
Call
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LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SATURDAY, APRIL 16, 2011