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The Lake City reporter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01528
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 4/14/2011
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
System ID: UF00028308:01528
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text

r-~gg4, _


County: High-


Speed Internet

ke( O grOWth


JASON MATTHEW WALKERI~ake City Reporter
Officers from Lake City Police Department and the Columbia County Sheriff's Office investigate an armed robbery
Tuesday night that took place at the Chevron gas station on Marion Avenue and U.S. Highway 90- -


Extravaganza gives what public wants


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Vol. I 37, No. 69 M 75 cents.


www.Iakecityrepo rter.com


Thursday, April I 4, 20 II


Legi'slature will
have to approve
emergency fundS.
By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinsoh7@lakecityreporter.com
People with disabilities
have the support of the
governor regarding fund-
ing cuts, but they must
wait and see if theyr have
it from the state legislature
as welL ~
Gov. Rick Scditt recent-
ly announced he would
rescind an order to cut pay-
ments to providers of pjeo-
ple with disabilities if the
legislature approved emer-
gency spending to make up
a more than $170 million
shortfall.
The~ State of Florida
Agency for Persons with


Disabilities and the
Agency for Health Care
Administration was ordered
by the governor's office~
to immediately issue a 15
percent cut to provider pay-
.; ment rates
for 90 days
starting
March 31.
Cu t s
affect local
providers.
by causing
Belle such pro-
grams as
companion services to be
eliminated.
Families, agency heads
and clients from across the
state contacted the gover-
nor after the cut was fist'
enacted, said. Mike Belle,
CARC Advocates for
FUNDS continued on 3A


COURTESY PHOTo
A photo of Tuesday's robbery of the Chevron Service Station, taken from the facility's sur-
veillance cameras.


that a. black man wear-
ing a cover over his head
ROBBERY continued on 3A


When ~officers arrived at
the scene they spoke with
tw store e plo eer iia a


store when the robbery
occurred. ~
store ol esks told thte ,


Chiefland area
will bde first tO
8C61V6 SerV1CeS. *
By TONY BRITT
thritt@lakecityreporter.com
LIVE OAK - The
North Florida Broadband
Authority has erected its
first tower and plans to
have broadband services,
for conditional uses, up and
running by July.
Wednesday afternoon
Pat Lien, North Florida
Broadband Authority sys-
tem manager, gave NFBA
board members an update
on the project during the
board's monthly meeting in
the Suwannee River Water
Management District head-
quarters. Lien also spoke
about projected revenue


that will be generated from
the broadband services.
He noted that the current
plan is to start providing
services in the Chiefland
area and add customers as
the core network expands,
when speaking about the
new tower.
"In order for us to be able
to access the huge capacity
of the fiber network of our
partner, we needed to be
able to broadcast to con-
nected radios and provide
micro-data links to the
next towers," Lien said.
"This is essentially the first
core distribution point, in
Chiefland, from that fiber
network."
From the tower there will
be links .in four different
directions which begin four
NFBA continued on 3A


Vendors supply
educational
outlets to explore.
By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@l akecityrepo rter.com
The Educational
Extravaganza had just the
right resource for Leann
Hall of Lake City.
"I'm trying to go back
to school to ge~t my LPN,"
she said.
The inaugural event
was Wednesday at the
Richai-dson Community
Center and was spon-
sored by- Richardson
Community Alliance and
the Columbia County
Board of Commissioners.
Educational vendors
in attendance included
Florida Gateway College,
Florida Crown and the
Columbia County School


ple to connect with educa-
othonalo resoure rght in
Jump, Columbia County
Extension family and con-
sumer science 4H1 agent.
The program. provided
one-stop shopping instead
of people having to go to
each vendor for specific
information.
Education is a vital
part of success, Parker
said. Another educational
extravaganza will tenta-
tively be held in the fall
to coincide with back to
school time.
Information from the
vendors will be available at
the community center for
anyone who was unable
to attend the extravagan-
za. Contact Parker at (386)
754-7095.
"I want to thank all the
vendors that participated in
this first event," she said. .


Plan to start
Selling" SerViCeS
by September.
By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com
Having the neces-
sary infrastructure to
provide wireless high-
speed Internet to a region
Columbia County belongs
to will attract businesses
and provide jobs, officials
said Wednesday.
Jeff Hendry, North
Florida Economic
Development Partnership
executive director, gave
a presentation to the
Columbia County Economic


Development Committee at
its regular meeting on the
North Florida Broadband
Authority's charge of build-
ing fixed wireless infra-
strutcture with more than
$30 million in federal grant
dollars to enable high-
speed Internet connectiv-
ity for those who wouldn't
have it otherwise.
The start time for selling
those Internet services?
Beginning in September,
Hendry said.
Columbia County,
along with 13 other coun-
ties, belongs to the North
Central Rural Area of
Critical Economic Concern,
COUNTY continued on 3A


ANTONIA ROBINSON/ Lake City Reporter
Leann Hall of Lake City talks to Evelyn Koch, Florida
Gateway College financial aid specialist, during the .
Educational Extravaganza Wednesday.


Board.
Th'e exti-avaganza was
organized to meet one
of the areas outlined in a
needs assessmentfrom the
community, said Elishia


Parker of AmeriCorps
VISTTA. Education was
listed as one of the top five
needs.
The event was awon-
derful opportunity for peo-


~h4~~~es~"'
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Opinion... ..... 4A
Around Isonlda . Z
Advice & Comics .. .. 4B '
Puzzles .... ...... 28 .


TODAY IN
HEALTH

I-e ill bu~g ,oI.


COMING
FRIDAY
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THE REPORTER:
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Within Sight
Tigers' girls tennis
shoots for state today.


Sports, IB


,ng Seniors
ers seek titles at
weightlifting meet.

;ports, IB


Reporter


cUlt


cosc nds cuts


10 disabled


ARMED ROBBERY


Thief wth

gun leapt
OVer counter,
took money
From staff reports
authorities are
looking jfor a
gunman that
robbed a local
Agas station
Tuesday night when he
jumped behind the coun-
ter, grabbed money from
the cash register and
escaped with an undeter-
mined ariloutit of cash.
Bob's Chevron, 128 SW
Duval St., was robbed
shortly after 10 p.m. by
the suspect. No o~ne was
injured in the robbei-y and
no arrests have been md
According to -Lake
City Police Department
reports, officers were dis-
;patched to Bob's Chevron
around 10:5 bp m. in refer-


NF BA wYants

beta customers


by summer












- Celebrity Birthdays


SNEEWOTP LE INE T NW



A sisterhood forms on VH1's 'Mob Wives'


k~;~"


Thought for Today

"For all have sinned and fall
Short of the glory of. God, and
all are justified freely by his
graCe through the redemption
that came by Christ Jesus."
Romans 3:23-24


t~ti~


CO RREC TIO N

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items, If you have.a coricern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Correctionis anid clarificatiojris will run
in this space. And thanks for reading. .~~:


1


,


HI 83 LO 57


---I---~---- ----- ~lll~~~ur;rr~Ma~i~i~armd


7a 1p 7p la ga
Thursday Friday







-Foecastaltemlperature ;"Feelk~e~tempealare


An exclusive
SerVICe
10 brought to
VInImItI our readers
10miladestolas
Today's by
ultraviolet IBThe Weather
mediation nisk Cilannel.
a scaee 0ro B
to 10+.

weather~com
; vJi. Forecasts, data and

$;r~i enrean ,sP, Iadson or
`J www.weatherpublisher.com


111 V ,~ed


Page Edlitor: Jason M. Walker, 754-0430


Actor Lloyd Owen is 45.
A Retired MLB All-Star Greg
Maddux is 45.
Actor Anthony Michael Hall
is 43.
M Actor Adrien Brody is 38.
Rapper DaBrat is 37.
W Actor Antwon Tanner is 36.
Actress Sarah Michelle

Atorp34ducer:Rob McEI-
henney is 34.
Actress Vivien Cardone is
18.
Actress Abigail Breslin is
15.


M Actor Bradford Dillman is
81. .
Actor Jay Robinson is 81.
Country singer Loretta
Lynn is 76.
H Actress Julie Christie is 71.
Retired MLB All-Star Pete
Rose is 70.
M Actor-race car driver Brian


W Rock singer-rnusician John
Bell (Widespread Panic) is
49.
Mi Actor Robert Clendenin is
47.


$aayWednesday:
Afternoon: 9-9-4-3
~*tEvening: 5-6-3-5


2-7-11-30-33


NEW YORK

family problems:
Renee
"rz ao'o- ard 0,
who is a high-ranking member of
the mob, Feds said, and is currently
serving time for racketeering. Her
Sex-husband has also had a scrape
with the 1aw on a gambling charge.
Drita D'avanzo is the wife of
Lee~ D'avanzo, the alleged.1eader of a
Bonanno and Colombo crime family
team who has been incarcerated for
bank robbery twice spanning

mos iarla aciamos~aoteger wenit to
prison when she was a girl. Now her
husband, a former broker, is behind
bars for stock fraud. She tells her
twin girls that daddy's away, work-
ing.
Most notable of all, Karen
Gravano is the daughter of Sammy
"The Bull" Gravano, the notorious
mob turncoat who cooperated with
the government ;to help take down
John Gotti and the Gambino crime
family. He, too, is currently in jail.
Now they're bonding at their
Staten Island, N.Y., stomping ground
for a new reality show, "Mob Wives."
A sort of "Growing Up Gotti" multi-
Splied by four, this lively, eywopening
series premieres Sunday at 8 p.m.
EDT on VH1. Keeping it all in the
family, the show's creator and execu-
five producer is Jennifer Graziano,
SRenee's sister.

Mentel Williams' drug
charge dropped
MILWAUKEE A judge dis-
miss~ed a drug paraphernalia posses-
sion charge against former talk show
host Montel Williams, who was brief-
ly detained at a Milwaukee airport m
January after a search of his luggage
turned up the type of pipe commonly
used for smoking marijuana.


]Lakre City
HOW TO REACH US .
'Main number .....;..(386) 752-1293
Fax~nurber ........ ......75240400
olr nation . b.... ..7se 44
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers .Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
Derodua ot age ad at La eCiy 0 a
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
in pati oe ~deepm n o o-th~p r i
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Pulsher~d Wilon .....754-04 8
(twilsori~lakecityreportercoro) .
NEWS
Assistant Editor CJ Risak..754-0427
After 1:00 p.m-
(crisak~lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Ashley Butcher ...75440417
(abutcher~lakecityreporter.com)
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440.


Reporter
BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon....754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter~com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7:30
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
in Columbia County, customers should
calbeforeo1r I a.dr. to myedo a ser-
10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In anl other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation .......... ..755-5445
(circulation@lakecktyreporter~com)
mTieda treuh eusnday)
12 Weeks...u...-............ $26.32
24 Weeks.............. .....$48.79
52 Weeks. .................. $83.46
Rates indedse7%salestax.
12 Weeks. ................. $41.40
24 Weeks...... .............$82.80
52 Weeks. ................ .$179.40


*- ~ ~ ~ ~ - -- 1 '.--
ASSOCIATED ~
In this publicity image released by VH-1, Renee Graziano (from left), Karen
Gravano, Drita D'avanzo and Carla Facciolo, from the new reality series, 'Mob
Wives,' are bhown in New York. The series premieres Sunday on VH-1. .


special double issue.
L~opez is joined on this honor roll
by such.loirelles as Halle Berry,
Jennifer ;Garner and Beyonce
Kn~owles. Lopez said "I feel happy
and proud. Proud that I'm not 25!"

'Idol' accused olf weight
b h d laS; S Ow emies caim
LOS ANGELES Ashley
Kauffman;' of Riverside, Calif., 19,
claimed that she was barred from
an on-camera seat and told it waS
because of her weight. The showr'S
production company denies the alle-
gation.
Kauffman had complained to an
audience coordinator that she was
separated from friends who got front
row seats at last Thursday's show.
,Manfred Westphal, a spokesnian for
producer FremantleMedia North
America, said the allegations are
"simply untrue."

M .Associated Press


Williams, who
said he legally uses
marijuana to treat
chronic pain caused
by multiple sclerosis,
.was scheduled to
Stand trial in May
Wilim on the charge. But a
lams Milwaukee Count
judge dismissed the case Tuesday at
the district attorney's request after
the pipe tested negative for the drug-

Lopez. named People's~.
most~ beautiful woman
NEW YORK People maga-
zine is naming Jennifer Lopez, 41,
the World's Most
Beautiful Woman,
The.singer,
actress and
"American Idol"
judge tops the
magazine's annual
1~list of 'the W~dlld's
Lopez Most Beautiful" in a .


Me city
82/57ona al
Da~~ aatn BedB ot~ers

19~~2::_ JacksonviGanslleB .
liando Capit~Canaveral Key West
5/62 0/67 Lake City
Miami
Naples
West PaintB~adl Ocala
83/71 a, Orlando
FL LauderdalC Panama City
84/73 *i Pensacola
LNaples i tallahassee
\85/67 Miagj iampa


Tallahassee lake City
*84/55 85/56
a'arinvile .
Panaa CS 83/ 56
75/62 O'cala
5~/57


80/68/lpc
li4/73/pc ~
89/68/pc
85/61/pc ~
81/61/pl
85/76/pc
84/61/pc ~
85/74/pc
86/69/pc
86/62/pc
85/67/pc
76/65/pc
79/63/t
83/63/pc
84/69/pc
85/62/pc
84/71/pc


85/62/pc
.86/7i/s
816/68/p/'
84/55/pc
83/54/pc
85/76/pc
83/53/pc
86/72/pc
86/69/pc
84/57/pc
88/66/pc
76/59/pc
76/55/s
82/51/t
85/68/pc
80/53/t
87/71/pc


Pensae,
78/64


Destinations set for shuttles
NASA Administrator Charles Bolden (second from left) ~
speaks to employees and guests prior to announcing the '
final destinations of the three retiring space shuttles at the
Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral Tuesday.


a *
17


Tan/
84 /


A Senate staff analysis
said testing can cost up to
$35.

Teen drove 99
mph before crash
SARASOTA The
Florida Highway Patrol
said a 19-year-old man was
driving an SUJV at almost
100 mph when he crashed
it into a concrete wall last
month, killing himself and
three other teens.
An FHP report released
this week estimates~ that
Sean Leonard was driving
99 mph in a 30 mph zone
when he lost control of
the Chevrolet Trailblazer
and crashed into the wall
March 13 in Sarasota.
Also killed were Andrew
E. Monroe, 19, Jessica
Leonard, 14, and Kelly
Janis, 15.
The crash report also
said neither of the girls
wore seat belts in the back
seat.
The results of a toxi-
cology report that may
indicate whether alcohol
and drugs were a factor
have not been released.
Leonard and Monroe had
been in Tampa celebrating
Leonard's 19th birthday.


conflict of interest forms ,
she filed with the city. .
Prosecutors said .
Poitier voted in favor of
giving a grant to the non-
pro~fit W~estside D~eerfield
Businessmen Association
in March 2009 but alleg-
edly' did not reveal that her
family had a financial inter-
est in the group getting
funds because her brother
hiad loaned the WDBA
money and the debt was
still owed with interest.

Welfare 19Sting
bill aV8HCOS
TALAHASSEE New
applicants for one form of
welfare assistance would
have to get drug tests at
their own expense under
a bill advancilig in the
Florida Legislature.
The Senate version won
approval from a budget
subcommittee Wednesday
on 5-2 party line vote.
Republicans voted in favor
and Democrats against.
Sen. Steve Oelrich
is sponsoring the bill
(SB 556). The Alachua
Republican said it's only
fair for welfare recipients
to get drug tested because
many taxpayers are
screened by their employ-
ers.


FL livers
S89/68 .


n~wet :8 1/72 Valdosta
it .~ W. Palm Beach


TEMPERATURES
-High Wednesda)
Low Wednesday
Normal hign
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Wednesday
Month total
Yiear total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunnse tom.
Sunset tom.

MOON
Moonrise today
Moonset today
Moonfise tom.
Moonset tom.


S81
53
80
54
93 In 1922
34 in 1940


71:05 a.m.
7:57 p.m.
7:04 a.m.
7:58 p.m.


4:24 p.m.
4:23 a.m.
5:32 p.m'
5:00 a.m.


0.00"
0.69
it.oo"
1.41"
12.57"


MAssociated Press


LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING THURSDAY, APRIL 14, 2011


Cb~H 3Wednesday:
"Afternoon: 9-8-3 ,
Evening: 0-0-9


,THE WEATHER


AROU ND F LORI DA


Committee to

pick primary date
TALIAHASSEE -
House Speaker Dean
Cannon is proposing that
a 10-person committee set
the date- for next year's
presidential preference
primary.
Cannon said Wednesday
That Senate President
Mike Haridopolos and
Gov. Rick Scott would
choose three members
each with Secretary of
State Kurt Browning serv-
ing as a non-voting chair
of the panel. They would
be charged with corning
up with a primary date
between the first Tuesday
of January and first
Tuesday in March. It could
be held on any 'day of the
week. The group would
have to make its decision
by. Oct. 1.

.Woman's body
dropped at house
TAMPA Tampa
authorities are investigat-
ing after the body of a
woman was dropped off in
front of a house.
Authorities in
Hillsborough County got
a call Wednesday morning
~from a person who said a
woman, who appeared to
be dead, was dropped off
at her home.
The dead woman didn't
live at the house, but she
was known to the person
who does.

CommiSSIOHnf
faces charges
DEERFIELD BEACH -
Deer~field Beach City
Commissioner Sylvia
Poitier has turned herself
in at Broward County's
main jail to face miscon-
duct charges.
,Poitier, 75, on
Wednesday faces five
counts of falsifying
records, related to voting


MOSTLY MM~~ PRL

SUNNYNI CLOUDY

HIl 851.0 561 HI 84 LO61


April April May May
Ful I st New FIst


On this date in
1933, Franklin, N.H.
ofseo in 2 -us,
to set the state
record.





FUNDS: Governor rescinds order to cut aid

Continued From Page 1A


NFBA: Chiefland to be first; area to get service

Continued From Page 1A


SLAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL THURSDAY, APRIL 14, 2011


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


One of three RA~CEC areas
in the state.
Due to grant obligations,
the grant's dollars must be
spent on the broadband
network in the North
Central RACEC, Hendry
said, and must be targeted
first toward. the region's
"anchor institutions" like
cities, counties and school
districts.
The other two Florida
RACEC sites the eight-
county Northwest RACEC
and the six-county South
Central RACEC -will also
have their own networks.
A combination of the three

".:::: 5 ,mmidas "eog-0
raphy, Hendry said.
"It's gonna be the big-
gest, wireless, middle-mile
network in the country,
literally, in three years,"
he said, adding that it will
be a "very powerful" net-
work.
That network will make
the North Central RACEC
competitive for economic
development, Hendry
said.
"It creates a level, com-
petitive playing f ield," he
said. "It gives us an oppor-
tunity to compete with an
asset that otherwise iwe
wouldn't be able to."
lBusmnses se kngat
about the current commu-
nia;ations infrastructure,
Hendry said.
."Adid I don't have a very
good story to tell them,"
he said, "because if they
can't communicate with
their people nationally or
internationally, much less
within the state, much less
within the region, it's a
non-starter for them. And
so this (the broadband
. network) is gonna change
that game."
Suzanne Norris,
Economic Development
Committee member, noted
that with all three RACEC
network's combined, busi-
nesses within the RACECs
can market not only to
their geographical region,


but to the marketplace of
the entire broadband net-
work.
It will also create jobs,
not only from the system
itself, but from the busi-
nesses and industries that
"spin off' from the network
and from the businesses it
will lure to locate to the
region, Hendry said.
Having th~e infrastruc-
ture and the network will
provide new opportuni-
ties for the region's pub-
hec safety and health care,
he said. It will impact the
opportunities for schools,
like virtual learning.
tWhe -teru olosk at
the next 10 to 15 years,"
Hendry said, "it's bring-
ing our school systems,
our K through 12 systems,
up to a level where they
are recognizing we're not
gonna get businesses and
industry to come to this
region if we don't have
the quality health care, the
quality education, all those
things that people talk a lot
abodt, but we can't reach
that benchmark if we don't
.have this kind of asset."
Norris agreed.
"This provides them
a level playing field with
some of the larger school
d stticts where they 'can
of the more advanced
classes," she said. "ThIey
can take an outstanding
teacher from Tampa who
can teach a class up here
now, and if you don't have
this type of capability, your
*- school systems are suffer-
ing and our kids are suf-
fermng."
Commissioner Rusty
DePratter, committee
Chairman, said his busi-
ness, located on the east
side of Columbia County
across from.the Lake City
Municipal airport, cur-
rently cannot access high-
speed Internet.
"I'm ready for you to
~get this thing rolling," he
said. "I'm looking forward
to it."


came into the store, jumped over
the counter and showed a pistol
to the clerks. The suspect then
took money from the cash regis-
ter, jumped back over the counter
and fled from the store on foot.
The suspect was last seen running
south behind the store and crossing
Nassau Street, reports said.
Lake City Police Department
officers established a perimeter
in the area and requested assis-
tance fr-om the Columbia County
Sheriff's Office K-9 unit as authori-
ties attempted to track the robber.
The K-9 unit arrived at the scene,
but was unable to find the robbery


suspect.
The suspect is described as a
black man, approximately 5'7",
around 220 pounds with a muscular
build, who was wearing a tan/beige
colored long sleeved button-up shirt
and blue jeans that were faded in
the front. He was also wearing black
athleticc shoes with some type of
white markings, black gloves with
some unknown type of black mate-
rial covering his head.
Anyone having information about
this case is asked to contact the
Lake City Police Department anon-
ymously on the department's TIP
line at 719-2068.


and believes the future of the orga-
nization will eventually become one
less reliant on government funding
and more self-sufficient with support
of the community, Belle said.
"The CARC will hope for the best
andl plan for the worst," he said.
Providers have to hold their breath
to see if the legislature will approve to
supply the money, Summers said .
"I'm hoping they will," she saic.1.
"Once they vote on it and approve
it there will be a lot of happy people."


resources of people with disabilities.
"I'm hoping and praying it passes
(the legislature) so everybody gets
what they deserve," she said.
However, Belle is unsure if provid-
ers will receive the funding. Shortfalls
at the agency have been an annual
problem.
"The fact remains the agency has
been underfunded by legislature for
over 5 years," he said "This doesn't
seem to be a good year to get the
legislature to fund the gap."
The CARC is committed to change


Citizens with Disabilities executive
director.
"It's very different to cut the ser-
vices for a group when you're talking
to them," he said. "Thafs painful to
look at people and tell them you're
not going to give them the things
they need to live a normal life."
Persons with disabilities are speak-
ing out to let their thoughts be heard
on the cuts, said Janice Summers,
owner of Open Heart Group Homes.
Money needs to be taken from some
Other category instead of limiting the


beta customers in Chiefland
sometime in May and
the second phase, which
includes the Fort White and
Live Oak areas, is expected
to begin 45 days later.
When Lien addressed the
projected revenue from the
service, he listed conserva-
tive estimates, noting so far
no customers have been
added to the network and
the NFBA is just getting to
the deployment portion of
the project off the ground.
"The most conservative
(revenue) case that we pre-
sented today (Wednesday)
has us beginning to acquire
revenue in November," he


said. "It's a slower acquisi-
tion. rate than we expect.
Over the course of the fist
year we'll get to just ~about
$1 million and it increases.
In the fifth year wie'll get
about $7.4 million, according
to projections."
The NFBA was awarded
$30 million in Feb. 2010
through federid stimulus
money. The broadband proj-
ect~is designed to increase
broadband access to 22
North Florida governments
--14 North Florida coun-
ties and eight North Florida
cities. However, there are
concerns about running out
of stimulus money due to


current budget concerns at
the federal level.
Lien said those concerns
should not hamper funding
for the local project.
"The money, as.we under-
stand it, for this program
has already been obligated
and secured, so our draw-
ing of the funds that have
been awarded there should
be no impediment nor any
drawback," he said. "There
was `money that was not
actually awarded that was
allocated for the Broadband
Technology Opportunities
Program that's the fund-
ing that may be returned to
the general fundd"


different ring configura-
tions in distribution across
the region,
He said the fist custom-
ers to get the broadband
services in Chiefland will be
beta customers custom-
ers who agreed to work with
system providers' as they
test and trouble-shoot the
system.
"We ought to have beta
customers on before the first
ofJuly," Lien said.
Columbia County resi-
dents are ~not expected to
get the services until after
the summer months.
The project's list phase
will provide the service to


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Apply online at campuscu.com or call 754-2219 today!


Clay, Columbia, tarke, Marion and Sumter counties!3


1 Offer does not apply to existing CAMPUS loans. Offer is for new loans only. Credit approval, sufficient income, adequate property valuation (maximum LTV of 70%/), and first mortgage position are
required. Owner-occupied properly only. Offer excludes mobile homes; certain other restrictions apply. Property and flood insurance may be required. Example: a $100.000 loan at 3.99%b for 60 months would require 59 monthly
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Services set

for Fort White

HS student
Frornstaff reports

Memorial services for the Fort White
High School student that died during
the weekend will take place 4 p.m.
Friday in the Fort White High School
Gymnnasium.
Chris McMahon, no age given, died
last weekend of natural causes, school
officials said
Visitation will take place from 7-9 p.m.
today at Evans-Carter Funeral Home in
High Springs.
Burial will take place noon Friday at
the Fort White Cemetery.


ROBBERY: Thief anned with gun

Continued From Page 1A


COUN"TY: Internet

Continued Erom Page 1A

















i I


AN O P INION


Another Flor i- duh moment?


OUR
OPINION


Time


to amO



Libyan

rebels
heLby ginsuretio in
42:ear:scahe
ship of Muammar
Qaddat has turned
into a military: stalemate. The
battle lines have moved back
and forth in Libya's cree-
cent west of Benghazi, the
opposition's de facto capital.
Mr. Qaddaf has consolidated
control of western Libya, and
his forces are laying siege to
the city of Misurata, the last
remaining opposition strong-
hold in the west. A proposal for
negotiations and a ceasefire by,
the African Union was rejected
out of hand by the opposition
leadership on the grounds that
it did not provide for removal of
Qaddaf, his sons, and his inner
circle. With Qaddai showing
no signs of leaving, the options
available-to the United States
nandrits partners have sharply
To let Qaddafi restore hfs
control of Libya would diminish
US credibility. A de facto parti-
tion of Libya Trould generate
co tiued instabiliteand ol 1

mission to enforce ~the no-fly
zone and protect the popula-
tion. An even worse scenario
would be if Libya became a
failed state like Somalia and.
a sanctuary for terrorists in
North Africa. That suggests an
obvious option for the US and
its partners: to engage with 4
an alternative Libyan govern- ~
ment and help it gain control
of the country. At a meeting in
Washington, the representative
of the opposition Provisional
Transitional National Council
said that what the opposition
forces need is arms, amniuni-
tion, and training.
Should the.US and its inter-
national partners decide to
pursue this course of action
the fist step would be to give
the revolutionary government
in Benghazi the military capa-
bility to defend populations in
the liberate'd.areas ki the hope
that they could eventually drive
Qaddaf out and take control of
the entire country.
SChristian Science Monitor

Lak~e City Reporter
Serving Coumi County .

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lished with pride for residents of
Clun ia nde s urro ngn unties by
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strong communities --"Newspapers

pulsh ditnsed nd profitable
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LbE T TER S
POLICE Y
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
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signed and include the writer's name,
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4A


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Dale McFea~tters
mcfeattersd~shns.com



Romney

eases


into the





That is the run-up to a
presidential campaign,
Republican froxit-runner
Mitt Romney fiedth -aui a
papers, this week to create an
exploratory committee that
will allow him to raise money.
A formal announcement of
his run for the White House is
expected this summer.
Like the other
semi-announced GOP
candidate, former Minnesota
Gov. Tim Pawlenty, Romney
disclosed the creation of his
committee in a Web video and

oItF as pr aly not a good
omen for Romney's hopes that
Mark McKinnon, a
political consultant and
strategist for the last two
GP fonat ruG er WoB h
greeted his arrival on the
scene with a post on the
Daily Beast headlined,
"Why Mitt Won't Be
Eresi~dent.'" ~ li-
..,OLn paper, Romney wou 4
sqerknto be just what the
Rejpubilicans are lookiriigor
successful in the private
sector as a venture
capitalist; in the public sector
as the GOP governor of the
blue state of Massachusetts;
and, iti the public-private`
sector, as the leader who
turned the disaster-bound
2002 Salt Lake City Winter
Olympics into a financial
success.
He asserts that he would
provide the economic
leadership that Barack Obama
lacks and, with
Reagan-like optimism, insists
that "America's best days ar~e
still ahead."
Romney, 64, is telegenic,
as is his family, and has a
large personal fortune he
put.over $40 million of his
own money into his 2008 race'
a strong donor base and a
drawer full of political IOUs
from candidates he's helped
Over the past two and a half
As runner-up to McCain for
the 2008 nomination, Romney
can lay plausible claims to the
Republican tradition of being
the next in line.
thaw r ohe ha drawbacks
fatal mn the tumultuous world
of the GOP's internal
politics.
The Tea Party movement
doesn't trust him, suspecting
that he has a barely
concealed streak of political
moderation on issues like
abortion, gay rights and
stem-cell research. Some
fundamentalist Protestants in
the party are skeptical of his
Mormon faith.
And perhaps worst of all,
Romney was the architect five
years ago of a healtli-care plan
in Massachusetts that was a
prototype for Obama's own.
The best part of such an
early semi-announcement
is that Romney has 16
months until the Republican
convention to allay those
suspicions. The betting is that
the Tea Party will make them
16 uncomfortable months for
a man who has been a political
and financial golden boy up
until now.

M Dale McFeatters is editorial
writer for Scripps Howard News
Service.


teach our
children and

o lden, as best
Wwe can, all the
timeless and sacred things we
were taught
Unless we decide that what

a bunc Tof toey ab wc
case, we tend to teach them the
dii-ect opposite. Or some odd
combination thereof
Either way, like it or not, stuff
gets taught.
:`Take Easter traditions.
Growing up, I learned from
, my grandfather a sometime,
if somewhat befuddled, Baptist
preacher that Easter is when
Christians celebrate Jesus
victory over the grave.
SOn Easter, if asked to "say a
few words," he'd preach forever,
singing and dancing, shining
brighter than the sun. Nobody
shined~brighter or preached
longer than my granddad.
From my grandmother a
mischievous woman who loved
her husband, hated hypocrites
and seldom set foot in church
I learned that Easter is a
day, much like any other, when
women are expected to cook
and clean, make everybody
happy and try to smell really
good.
On Easter, when most of her
nine daughters dragged their
husbands and Lord knows how
many children to her table,
she would dust her bosom
in a sweet cloud of talcum

hm otat sldean b nn
pudding you ever put in your


Let me think. OK. I taught
them, more or less, that

to be wikdaejo and nt
made too much of
2. There are two reasons we
celebrate Easter: Jesus' victory
over death, and chocolate.

sh eN wn't sa you w le and
can make you look like a geek.
S4. Miracles happen~ every day;
expect them. Salvation is a gift'
be grateful. The Resurrection
defeated death; be alive.
5. Your mother isn't a great
cook, but she snriell's pretty
good. And if you sleep too late
for church on Easter, she will
eat your Peeps.
What will my' children teach
their children about Easter?
I'm not sure. They've learned '
things I didn't know at their
age. Insing their dad to cancer
taught them that prayer isn't
always answered mn the ways we
hope for. But they are learning
to trust the answers. Like their
mother, they are learning to be
alive.
I would hope they'll teach
their children the same things
I taught thein: To wink at the
Easter Bunny, rejoice in the
Resurrection and be glad for the
gift of grace.
if they don't, I will surely
understand and respect their
role as parents to decide what is
best for their children.
Far be it from me to interfere.
But I can guarantee youi that I
Swill eat all their Peeps.
Sh ronP Rnd IIn be con-
Henderson, NV 89077.


Sharon Randall
www.sharonrandall.com '


mouth..Nobody cooked better
or smelled sweeter than my
grandmother.
From~my mother who was
married at 15, divorced at 25
and forever and always unhappy
- I learned that Easter was -
when I was supposed to make
my daddy buy me brand-new,
shiny white shoes.
To this day, I hate white
shoes,
SFrom my cousin, Bad Linda
-- who was younger by a
year, but, smarter by decades,
and whose mother was even
unhappier than mine I
learned that Easter was when
you got up early to steal all
the Peeps from your cousins'
baskets.
Finally, from my brother .
-- who was born blind and saw
things no one else saw I
learned that miracles happen at
Easter, and every other day of
the year.
Resurrection is not a one-time
offer. With the tap of a blind
child's cane, stones are rolled
away. The breath of life is ours
for the breathing. Miracles .
abound. We just need to orien
our hearts to see them.
ab. sfall thehthting sd learned
teach my children?


decade after the
Sunshine State
earned the moni-
ker Flori~luh for ;
Those indiscernible /
hanging chads used in the old
punch-card ballots during the
2000 presidential election, some
legislators in Tallahassee seem
to want to take us back to that
confusing and divisive time. As
if Florida doesn't have enough
Problems already.
On Thursday, the House State
Affairs Committee will take up
~legislation, HB 1355, drafted
by the office of House Speaker
Dean Cannon and introduced
into committee by Rep. Dennis
Bailey, that's supposed to
strengthen Florida's election
laws. In fact, the 128-page bill
would undo some of the sen-
sible reforms imposed after
the 2000 election debacle and
adds a plethora of requirements
that would tie the hands of
independently elected elections
supervisors, disenfr-anchiise vot-
ers, dissuade volunteers from
engaging in voter registration


and discourage many voters'
participation on Election Day.
Among the bill's onerous
requirements: -
MA newly married woman
wanting'to vote on Election Day
would no longer b3e allowed
to show elections officials at
the polls documentation with
her name change to vote on
that day. Instead, she would be
forced to use a provisional bal-
lot, which likely will mean that
vote won't be counted. In 2008,
half the provisional ballots in
Florida were thrown out, mak-
ing it hard to contest.
MVoter-registration groups
would have to register all
their volunteers and paid staff
with the state's Division of
Supervisors of Elections, which
would create a database. Whats
the purpose? Harassment of
volunteers or particular organi-
zations?
aVolunteers, who now can
help resolve legal issues for
individual voters at the polls,
would be restricted because the
bill lumps "legal advice" into


the definition of solicitation and
prohibits it within 100 feet of a
voting line.
aAny voter who has moved
and shows up at a polling
site with evidence of the new
address would also be forced
to use a provisional ballot
even though county elections
supervisors now have access
to a statewide voter database,
created back in 2003, that can
easily confirm a voter's change '
of name or address. This
would potentially disenfranchise
thousands of college
students.
This bill reeks of partisan-
ship. Why?
One theory: Mt'. Cannon
wants to limit students' par-
ticipation in the voting process
- as volunteers and as voters.
That may be because his dis-
trict includes the University of
Central Florida, and College
Democrats at UCF registered
almost 11,000 voters in 2008
when Barack Obama won
Florida.
WMiami Herald


OINIO


Thursday,April 14, 20 II


Easter le:ssans













Florida one of three


states to get a shuttle


~il~ ~T~SI ~r-~Ti~Cm ~ITC~S15

11111=-11


1 $ | 1 $ | *

20 years of Social Security Disability Experience
www.GBISOnline.com


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


'L,


and visitor centers around
the country put in bids for
the spaceships. NASA is
giving shuttle simulators
and other parts to some
of them.
From the International
Space Station, American
astronaut Catherine
Coleman told space cen-
ter workers at the ceremo-
ny that the retirement of
the space shuttle program
should not be viewed as
an end.
"It represents the next
step in extending human-
ity's reach further into
space," said Coleman, one
of six'people living on the
orbiting outpost.
The shuttle program is
winding down.with only
two more flights left.
Endeavour is set to launch
on April 29 and Atlantis
will close out the shuttle


from the plant where the
shuttle was built; and
Discovery's new home
will be the Smithsonian
Institution's branch in
northern Virginia.
The Smithsonian is
giving up the prototype
Enterprise, which NASA
said.Tuesday will now go
to New York City's Intrepid
museum. Enterprise was
used for test flights in the
1970's.
"For all of them, take
good care of our vehicles,"
said NASA Administrator
Charles Bolden, a former
astronaut, as he choked
up. .
'"They served a nation
well, and we at NASA have
a deep and abiding rela-
tionship and love affair
with them that is hard to
put into words."
STwenty-one museums


By MIKE SCHNEIDER
Associated Press

CAPE CANAVERAL
- NASA's three remain-
ing space shuttles will go
to. Cape Canaveral, Los
Angeles and suburban
Washington when the pro-
gram ends this summer,
the space agency said
Tuesday.
The announcement came
on the 30th anniversary of
the fist space shuttle flight
and the 50th anniversary
of man's ~first journey~ into

SPhu~ttle Atlantis will stay
in Cape Canaveral at the
Kennedy Space Center
Visitor Comple1-, just miles
from the pair of launch
pads where it was. shot
into space. Endeavour is
headed to the California
Science Center,' miles


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Visitors to the Intrepid Sea, Air and Space museum watch as NASA announces that the
museum will receive the retired space shuttle Enterprise on a 40 foot long video wall in New
York. Shuttles will be going to the Smithsonian Institution, the Intrepid Sea, Air and Space
Museum in New York, the Kennedy Space Center in Florida and the California Science


Center in Los Angeles.

program with a summer
liftoff.
Russia, spent Tuesday
celebrating its space
accomplishment in 1961


- the first human space-
flight by cosmonaut Yuri
Gagarin. President Dmitry
Medvedev said Russia
must preserve its pre-emi-


nence in space. But crit-
ics there complained the
government ha~s paid little
attention to the space pro-
gram in recent years.


In laying out his plan,
the president is wading
into a potential political
thicket. Liberals are loath
to making cuts in prized
Democratic programs like
Medicare and Medicaid,
and in Social Securityr.
Moderates worry that his
plan could unravel bipar-
tisan deficit-cutting nego-
tiations. And Republicans
reject any proposal that
includes tax increases.
The proposal calls for cut-
ting $770 billion from non-
defense domestic spending
by 2023. That figure does
not include spending on
major benefit programs like
edcare, Medicaid and
SoilSecurity. The plan
also would reduce defense
spending by $400 billion
duringg th6 same 12 years: i
.'Oblithii envisions spend_
ing `cuts in Medicare .and .
Medicaid of $480 billion
~through 2023.


"Their vision is less about
reducing the deficit than it
is about changing the basic
social compact in America,"
Obama said, as the author
of the Republican plan,
House Budget Committee
Chairman Paul Ryan, sat in
the front row of the univer-
sity auditorium.
Obama previewed his
proposals to congressional
leaders Wednesday morn-
ing. And even before he
delivered his speech, top
Republicans were pushing
back.
"If we're going to resolve
Our differences and do
something meaningful, rais-
ing taxes will not be part of
that," House Speaker John
Boehner declared short-
ly after his White House
meetin~g. ..o
This new..clash~comes
just a ~yveelypafter.the ~presi-
dent announced he would
seek re-election. For the
past two months, Obama
has been arguing for- pro-
tection of his core spending
priorities, including educa-
tion and innovation. His
turn to deficit reduction
reflects the pressures he
faces in a divided Congress
and with poiblic increas-
.ingly anxious about the
nation's debt, now exceed-
ing $14 trillion.
"Any serious plan to tack-
le our deficit will require us
to put everything on the
table, and take on excess
spending wherever it exists
in the budget," the presi-


dent said.
To help; enforce budget
discipline, the president
called for resurrecting a
spending cap that would
be triggered if the nation's
debt did not stabilize and
begin to 'decline by 2014.
The cap would not apply to
Social Security, Idly-income
programs or Medicare ben-
efits.
The president's plan, out-
lined in a seven-page White
House fact sheet, draws
many of its ideas from the
December recommenda-
tions of Obama's biparti-
san fiscal commission,
which proposed $4 trillion
in deficit reduction over 10
years. As in' the commis-
sion's plan, three quarters
of the deficit reduction
.would come -from spending ~
-cuts, inchidingl owei:'ihtetr-
eat payments as the debot
eases. One quarter, or $1
trillion, vcrould come from
additional' tax reveiiue.
For the Aifite House,
the speech comes as
Obama pushes .Congress
to raise the limit on the
national debt, which will
permit the government
to borrow more and thus
meet its financial obliga-
tions. The country will
reach its debt limit of $14.3
trillion by May 16. The
Treasury Department has
warned that failure to raise
the limit byr midsummer
would drive up the cost of
borrowing and destroy the
economic recovery.


By JIM KUHNHENN
Associated Press

WASHINGTON -
Forcefully rejecting
Republican .budget-cutting
plans, President Barack
Obama on Wednesday pro-
posed lowering the nation's
future deficits by $4 tril-
lion over a dozen years arid
vowed he would not allow
benefit cuts for the poor
and the elderly to pay for
tax breaks for the rich.
"That's not right and it's
not going to happen as long
as I'm president," Obama
declared.
While the president rec-
ommendedtrimminghealth
care costs in Medicare and
Medicaid, he also called for
cuts in defense, an over-
haul of the tax syStem to
"eliminate-'ma~ny"lootihd1es
enjoyed by individuals' id
corporations, and an end
to Bush-era tax cuts. for
wealthier Americans.
"WVe have to live with-
in our means, we have to
reduce our deficit, and we
have to get back on a path
that will allow us to pay
down our debt," .Obama
said in a combative speech
at George Washington
University.,
As much a policy speech
as it was a political address,
Obama laid the blame for
the rising debt on the
spending increases and
tax cuts enacted during
the presidency of George
W. Bush and the recession
that struck in late 2007.
"We lost our way," he said.
Ensuring that the nation's
fiscal troubles will be at the
center of the 2012 presi-
dential election, Obama
drew sharp contrasts with
a Republican plan that cuts
about $5.8 trillion in spend-
ing over the next decade
and which the White
House says unfairly singles
out middle-class taxpayers,
older adults and the poor.
He pointedly noted that
the GOP plan has already
been embraced by some
Republican presidential
candidates.
Such cuts, he said, "paint
a vision of our future thats
deeply pessimistic."




Kirk for all them
special times you
brought into our life.
Even the challenges
we have faced just has
made us stronger. You
are really loved.
We miss you so much.
HAPPY BIRTHDAY
Your wife


Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE
Budget negotiations
between the Florida
House and Senate won't
begin for at least 11-more
days.
The two chambers
passed differing versions .
of 'the state budget last
week and the talks had
licen expected to start
.Thursday.
But Senate Budget
Chairman JD .Alexander
said Wednesday that
they're on hold.
The Lake Wales
Republican said lead-
:!ers- haven't~ yet resohred *
; preliminary issites. 'lka"
includes .; deciding how
many dollars to allocate to
each major section of the


budget such as education
and health care.
The House passed -a
$66.5 billion budget bill.
The Senate's version tops
$70 billion.

Religious funding
getting Support
TATLAHASSEE A
proposed state constitu-
tional amendment that
would repeal Florida's ban
on using public dollars for
religious funding such as
s~choolvouchers is advanc-
ing in the Legislature.
The Senate Judiciary
Comm~itteee:ddirojied the
'iiikhidd~ (8JE',1218) on
Tuesday. A sim~ilai- pro-
posal is moving through
the House.


-- No Hassle
Free Consultation


TF A SERIOUS ACCIDENjT OR ILLNESS SHOULD

HAPPEN TO YOU, WHAT HAPPENS NEXT?



Is there someone you trust who can make healthcare or end-of-life
decisions for y~ou? tWhat are your wishes? And who should know?
Join with millions of people across the country ajnd make your
wishes known. April 16 is National Hiealthcare Decisions Day, .the
day to name the person who will speak for you when you can no
longer speak for yourself.

Haven Hospice is here to help with your advance care planning.
To receive your complimentary copy of Five Wishes, go to
havenhospice.org or call 800.727.1889.


At Haven, we believe that every day is a gift.


LAKE CITY REPORTER NATION &1 STATE THURSDAY, APRIL 14, 2011


Obama eyes Medicare changes, tax increases


Lawmakers: delay

budget talks; religious

lunalng getS DOOSt


No Runaround
GBIS Disability, Inc.





LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL THURSDAY, APRIL 14, 2011


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


STo submit your Community
Calendar item, contact Antonia
Robinson at 754-0425 or by
e-mail at arobinson @
lakecityreporter.com.


or e-mail seblingqueen@
gmail. com

SDonors wanted
The LifeSouth
Bloodinobile needs donors
11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday
at Moe's Southwest Grill.
Free Einstein T-Shirts for
all donors.

Master Gardeners
workshop
A Gardening for
Butterflies workshop is 2
3:30 p.m. Saturday at the
Columbia County Public
Library main branch.
The workshop is free and
everyone is welcome.
Bring your questions for
the Master Gardeners.

March of Dimes
sawannee vanley s
March for Babies is 9 a.m.
Saturday at Olustee Park.
Registration begins at 8
a.m. awards at 8:30. Spirit
Stations along the walk
will serve water, gives
away food and goodies

CCRC Jackpot
Columbia County Riding
Club is having a Jackpot
10:30 a.m. Saturday at
the Columbia County
Resource Rodeo Arena.
Gates open at 9 a.m. Sign-
up at 10 a.m. For more
info go to website www.
columbiacountym'dingclub.
com or call 386-961-9422.
Cook Shack on site.
Regular rides for the club
are the second and fourth
Saturday of each month.

Flying Day
Young Eagles Day is 10
a.m. to 12 p.m. Saturday
at Cannon Creek Airpark,
south on County Road
341. The'evrent is hosted
by EAA Chapter 977 and
is an opportunity for ages
8-17 td fly in a private air-
plane with a qualified pilot.
Parent or guardian must
be present t~o sign a per-
Smission form before the
flight. Call Elaine Phillips
at 755-2105. Rain date is 1
p.m. Sunday.

Souls' Harbor Spring
Festival

A Spring Festival is 3 to
7 p.m. Saturday at Souls'
Harbor Church of God
in Christ. The church is
located at 901 Northeast


Ink~e Drive. The event
will feature food, music,
games, an Easter egg
hunt, appearance from
Peter Cottontail and more.

School reunion
The annual Wellborn
1 School Reunion is 11 a~m.
Saturday at Wellborn
Baptist Church. Bring a
covered dish and photos to~
share. Visit www.wellborn-
wildcats, com.

Filipino American
Cultural .Society
The Filipino American
Cultural Society of Lake
City is having its yearly
General fleeting, Flection
Sof Officers/Board, Dinner
and Dancing 6 p.m. April
16 in the Social Hall at
Epip rm a holi C~huch.!

Bob Gavette 965-5905.


Sunday

Class meeting
SThe Class of 1973 is
meeting 5 p.m. Sunday at ,
`Richardson Community
Center. All class members
are invited to attend.


Monday

Team~ Party
The last Relay for Life
Team Party is 6 p.m.
Monday at Christ Central
Ministries.


STuesday

Historical Society
meeting
The Columbia County
Historical Society is meet-
ing 7 p.m. April 19 at the
Columbia C~ounty Public
Librar main branch...,
Outgoing Columbia
SCounty economic develpp-j
ment director, Jim Poole,
isaguest speaker. The
meeting is free and open
to the public. For more
information contact Sean
McMahon at 754-4293: or
sean.mcmahon~fgc. edu.

Academic recognition
Presley Excel and
Scholars Program is hav-
ing its next Academic
Recognition Program
6 p.m. Monday at
Richardson Middle School
auditorium.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter

Big CFOwd for Touch of Home Cooking Show
Visitors follow along as' Michelle Roberts teaches then cooking techniques at Tuesday's show
at Florida Gateway College. A crowd estimated at 500 people came td see Michelle Roberts
create 10 different dishes.


364-3789, Erica Elliot at
386-362-7466 or Sandy Tice
at 386-752-4453.

Donors wanted .
The LifeSouth
Bloodmobile needs donors
12 to 8 p.m. Friday at
Winn Dixie.

~Retirement Reception
A retit-ement reception
for Bill Thomas is 6 p.m.
Friday at the Columbia
County Fairgrounds
Entertainment Building.
Formal presentations
beginning 7 p.m. Send
cards or letters to Cindy
Higgins, 164 SW Mary
Ethel Lane, Lake City,
Florida 32025. Call 386-
758-1168. Columbia .
County Farm Bureau is
sponsoring the food and
Columbia County Fair is
providing the facilities.


play for a silent auction 6
- 9 p.m. Friday Lake City
Mall Center Court. Arm
bands will be for sald' for
a Taste of Lake City. Area
restaurants will have their
signature dishes prepared
for sampling. Proceeds to
go the county schools arts
program and for an art
scholarship.

Art exhibit
'The Art of Change"
Start exhibit and reception
is 5 p.m. Friday at the
Suwannee Valley Hospice
Care Center. It will feature
local artists and talent
from Lake City and sur- .
Sounding areas. All paint-
ings will be hung in the
hallways at the Suwannee
Valley Hospice Care
Center and community
room. The event is open to
the community. Call 386-
752-9191.


Poster contest
All 250 posters subnut-
ted for Florida's "Water
Conservation Month
in April and national
"Drinking Water Week" in
May are on display until
today in the Lake City .
Mall.

Feinstein challenge
Christian Service Center
is participating in the $1
million dollar giveaway
Alan Feinstemn Challenge
from now until April .
30. Every food item or
financial donation counts*
toward receiving a per-
centage of the giveaway.
Call 386-755-1770 and
bring donations either to
the center at the corner
of Hilton and Washington
or mail to P.O. Box 2285,
Lake City, FL, 32056.

Friday
Victim's Assistant
Coalition Brunch
The Suwannee Valley
Victim's Assistance
Coalition is having a
brunch 10 a.m. Friday
at First Baptist Church.
-The Honorable David
W. Fina, Third Judicial
Circuit chief judge is the
speaker. Donations of
$2 are requested to help
victims in the comrmtnity.
Call Missy Norris at 586-


The Easter Bunny will
be in Bunny Town 4 8
p.m, Friday, 11 a.m. 5
p.m. Saturday and 1 5
p.m. Sunday in Lake City
Mall.

4th An~rnual Visual Arts
Gala
Framed art work from
Columbia county art
students will be on dis-


Allamae Alexander

Allamae "Skeeter" Alexander,
84, passed away peacefully on
April 12, 2011. She was born
in Sanderson, .
FL on Febru- ,, s P
ary 27, 1928
to James and
Allie Johnson,
She is prede-
ceased by her
husband, Al
Alexande r;
siblings, Thomas Vasco John-
son, Laverne Mann and James
Perry Johnson and sons James,
Ronnie, Daniel Wayne, Larry
and Charlie Darrell Waters.
She is survived by her best friend
and companion Hank Rotter and
grandchildren Tim Waters, Don-
nie Waters, Wendy Newman,
Brandi Linton, Jeff Waters, Laura
Sauer, Lisa Waters, Sheri Gifford,
cChristy Inks and Shelton Waters
as well as multiple nieces, neph-
ews and great-grandchildren.
Skeeter called herself a good ole
country girl and a river rat. She
loved living and fishing on the
Suwannee River. Above all, she
cherished time with her family
and her beloved dog, 11. She was
an avid fan of bluegrass music
and enjoyed playing her harmon-
ica. She was a member of Mt.
Nebo Baptist Church in Bell, FL.
Visitation will be held at Daniels
Funeral Home in Branford, FL
on Friday, 5:00 pm to 7:00 pm.
Funeral services will be at Mt.
Nebo Baptist Church on Satur-
day, I 1:00 am. A luncheon to cel-
ebrate her life with friends and
family will be held afterward.
H-er place of interment will be at
Townsend Cemetery in Bell, FL.
DANIELS FUNERAL HOME
AND CREMATORY, INC. of
Live Oak and Branford, FI is in
charge of all local arrangements.


David Furman English
Mr. David Furman -English, 64,
of White Sprin~gs passed away
Sunday April 10, 2011 at his
home after
a long battle
with cancer. A
native of Jack-
sonville, FL., -
Mr. English -
has been a res- .
ident of White ,
Springs since
1993. He also
known as "Mon- C
goose"), served -.
in the United *
States Army ,
Special Forces during the Viet-
nam War where he earned many
medals, including two Purple
Heart medals, a Bronz Star and
a Silver Star. He worked for
thirty- seven years as an engi-
neer for CSX Railroad working
from both the High Springs Yard
' and the Baldwin Yard. Follow-
ing his retirement he enjoyed
time fishing, traveling, eating,
and sitting on the front porch.
He was a Master Mason with
the Woodstock Park Lodge
313, a member of the Mo-
rocco Temple of Jacksonville,
the Rollmng Thunder, Chap-
ter 3, and attended the Christ
newrs p ecuer id d tkleby h
father Furman Dewitt English
and his brother, Paul English'
He is survived by his wife, Patsy
Pruitt English, Mother Mamie
Elizabeth Williams English of
Lake City, and his God son Bar.
ty Lhke, Christmas, FL.; He was
also loved by his wife's entire
family including their children
and grandchildren. Memorial
Services will be conducted Sat.
urday, April 16, 2011 at 10:00
A.M. in the chapel of Gateway-
Forest Lawn Funeral Home.
With the Reverend Joseph Ja-
merson officiating. Arrange-
ments are under the direction


of the GATEWAY~FOREST
LAWN FUNERAL -HOME,
3596 South US Hwy 441,
Lake City.. 386-752-1954.
Please sign the guestbook at
www. gatewayfor~es tlawnl.com

Mary Frances Law
Mary Frances Law, 83, Well-
born, FI passed away on Mon-
day, April 11, 2011 after a short
illness. The Olustee, FI native
moved to Wellborn, FI 21 years
ago from Lake City, Fl. She was
a homemaker and a member of
the Mt. Olive Baptist Church.
Mrs. Law is survived by her
daughter: Jewel (Thomas) Ho-
gan, Wellborn Fl; Three sons:
Wayne (Ruth) Law, Eddie (Sha-
ron) Law both of Live Oak, FI and
Steve (Vicki) Law, High Springs,
Fl; Twelve grandchildren, sev-
enteen great-grandchildren and
7 great-great-grandchildren.
Funeral service will be held
11:00 am Thursday April 14,
2011 in the Mt. Olive Baptist
Church with visitation being
held one hour before service
time. Rev. Lewis Gooch and
Rev. Wally Weaver will be of-
faciating. Interment will fol-
low in the church cemetery.
DANIELS FUNERAL
HOMES & CREMATORY,
INC., of Live Oak and Branford,
FL in charge of arrangements.

Denise "Red" Wilson

Miss. Denise I'Red" Wilson age
44, passed away Thursday, April
7, 2011 at Care Partners Hos-
pice Center
in Asheville,
North Caroli-
na after an ex-
tended illness.
Denise was 6
born March n 1
26, 1967 in


Lake City, Florida to Cornelius
Wilson and Juanita Reese Raw-
Is. Mr. Wilson preceded her in
death. She was educated in the
public school system of Colum-
bia County. In her early years,
she attended and was baptized
at Truevine Baptist Church. Af-
ter relocating to St. Augustine,
FL., she furthered her education
at Flagler Community College
and received lier certification as
an Emergency Medical Tech-
nician. After returning home
for a brief time, Denise moved
to Asheville, North Carolina
where she maintained her resi-
dence for eight years. While
in Asheville, she worked as
a home health care aide until
her health began to fail. She
was affiliated with New Vision
Baptist Church in Asheville,
NC. She was affectionately
called "Red": in Lake City. Her
friends in North Carolina gave
her the nickname "Sunshine"
because of her big bright smile.
She was loved by all who knew
her and will be greatly missed.
Left to cherish loving memo-
ries: Parents, Richard and
JuanitaRawls, Lake City, FL.;
three sisters, Lesia (Conrad)
Wallace, Janice (James) Smith,
both of Lake City, FL., Falesia
"Rena" Rawls, Atlanta, GA.;
five nieces, Tyeisha Wallace,
Janice Davis, Trayleshia "Tray"
Shaw, Naya Wallace, Samyria
McMann, all of Lake City, FL.;
two nephews, Conrad "Junior"
Wallace, Lake City, FL., Mi-
kaiah "Busta" Johnson, Atlanta,
GA.; great nephews, Jaiden and
Joshiah Rossin, Lake City, FL.;
aunts, Laura Tyson, Miami, FL.,
Vella (Cecil) Pender, Ola Mae
(Henry) Montgomery, Mary
Jennings, Kathy (Earl) Jen-
nings, all of Lake City, FL.; god-
mother, Annie Ruth Barrington,
Lake City, FL.; god sisters,
Stephanie Barrmngton, Herndon,
VA., Tia and Paula Barrington,


both of Lake City, FL.; very
devoted caregiver and special
friend, Angela Geter, Asheville,
NC.; hosts of cousins, other
relatives and friends, including
Gus Johnson, Asheville, NC.
Funeral services for Denise
"Red" Wilson will be 11:00
A.M. Saturday, April 16, 2011
at New Be~thel Missionary Bap-
tist Church. 550 NE Martin Lu-
ther King Street. Lake City, FL.
The family will receive friends
Friday, April 15, 2011 from 5:00


- 7:00 P.M. at the funeral home..
Arrangements entrusted:
to COMBS FUNERAL)
HOME. 292 NE Washing-i
ton Street. Lake City, FL.~
(386) 752-4366. Marq
Combs-Turner, L.F.D:
"The Caring Professionals"


Obituaries are paid advertise-i
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.







6all


Mar or Bridget
TODAY to place a
SUrprise ad for
SOeo~ne you Love.I

755-5440 or

755-5441
BetWeen 8am & 5pm


CO~~~DRMMUNT CLNA


Tod y
Wanee Festival
Wanee Festival is today
through Saturday at the
Sprit of the Suwannee
Music Park in Live Oak.
The headliner is the .
Allman Brothers Band.
For tickets and more infor-
mation visit waneefestival.
com.

Landlord's meeting
The next Landlord's
meeting is 6 p.m. today
at Lake Shore Hospital
Conference Room. Lake
City Police Department
Chief Argatha Gilmore
is the guest speaker. Call
755-0110.

DAR meeting
The next Edward
Rutledge DAR meeting is
today. The program will
focus on a selection of
Private Washington Ives'
Civil War letters/diary
to be read by dynamic
sister duo team Marthia
Newbern and Mary Jane
Weaver. Dewitt Cason,
Columbia County Clerk
of Court is a maternal
decedent of Private Ives.
The chapter will also elect
new officers for 2011-2013.
Guests are welcome to
attend. Dutch Treat Lunch
immediately following the
meeting. For additional
information please call
386-755-5579 in the Lake
City area or 386-362-2180
in Live Oak '

`Chamber speed .
networking
Speed Networking is 5
to 7 p.m. at the Country
Club of Lake City today.
All Chamber members are
invited. The YEP is spon-
soring the event. Call the
chamber at 752-3690.

Tea Party meeting
The North Central
Florida Tea Party meet-
ing is 7 p.m. today at the
Taylor Building, 128 SW
Birley Ave. The guest
speaker is Frantz Kebreau,
a nationally-known
speaker, member of the
Black Robe Regiment and
author of the book "Stolen
History. Visit www.north-
centralfloridateaparty.org
or call John at 386-935
1705 or Sharon at 386-935-
0821.


Esther unnf~~"y Weekend Saturd y


Pageant registration
deadline
Southern Exposure is
hosting the Miss Bling
Queen Pageant 5 p.m.
May 7 at the Richardso~n
Middle School Auditorium.
The pageant is for girls
ages birth to adults and
boys birth to 5. Entry fee
is $50. The deadline to
register for the pageant is
April 16. Call 386-288-8404


OBITUARIES





A live.Brown Recluse Spider crawls' in a digh at the Smithsonian Institution National Museum of Natural History in
Washington March 30.




Bugs emerge to bug us, and


Some do pose health nsks


HGRI AND REHABILITATION .CENTER
Sve Pain Managernent' o(Nor~th Florida


5eAt cpm nf.com



(W~ayne)Vu ~ PAIN1 CONDITIONS WE TREAT
d-rertified pain specialist *B ~ack pain
Specialist. *Neck pain
~nljr i. Joint pain
i-r rve pain
*Headache
w.:- :*And other pain conditions

Dr. Bohdan WajLycha
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Boar-cerifid phlsicl*(omprehensive Evailuation
medicine and rehabilitation *hscthrp

specialid Medical ma agement

ti~ r" e -; *Ultrasound guided joint
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Dr. Vil~iLhou *Fluoroscopy-guided spine
ltadcertified pain specialist i9 1on
| and neurologist K

W 440 SW Perimeter Glen, take City, FL 32605
~a Phone (3 ) 719-9663, Fax (386) 11l9-9662
Z~p~x")g t (All treatm ent are offered in Lake City.
You do not' have to travel to Gainesville)
.. *


LAKE CITY REPORTER


THURSDAY, APRIL 14, 2011


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


rClclT
IL


DEAR DR. GOIT: I
enjoy your column very
much. I went to a physi-
cian for hives. He did a
host of blood work and
only found low vitamin D
levels. He said there is an
ingredient called carra-
geenan that causes allergic
reactions and inflamma-
tion in the body. He told
me to go home and check
everything I use to see if
it's in there. Sure enough,
the creamer that I have


possibly be the answer; it
was too simple. I stopped
------- th rae nw
and my hives disappeared.
Just to be sure, I used the
creamer again and broke .
out with hives within 30
minutes.
The amazing doctor who
suggested this to me dur-
mng my one visit then~ "ran
off' to Arizona to practice
integrative medicine. I only
knew him as Dr. P, but
I will always be grateful
to him. Please share this
with your readers so that
maybe it can help some of
them, too.

DEAR READER:
Carrageenan is a seaweed
extract used in processed
foods. It is used as an
emulsifier (prevents liq-
uids from separating);
helps stabilize crystals,
such as ice and sugar; and
changes the texture of
foqds (thickens or makes
them chewier).
According to the
National institutes of
Health (NIH), it is known
to cause anaphylaxis in
sensitive individuals during
barium enema (of which
carrageenan is a compo-
nent). It is also thought
that it could accotint for
some of the problems
babies experience using
milk products or certain
baby formulas.
To the best of my knowl-
edge, an allergy to carra- *
geenan is treated as a food
allergy, meaning avoidance
of the product is the best
option. This involves thor-
ough label reading and
diligence.
DEAR DR. GOTT:
Last June, you published a
column about cold sores, '
and I thought you might
be interested in my expe-
rience. I grew up having
cold sorts occasionally,
more often in my child-
bearing years (I assume
because of stress). I


ON HEALTH



: C,


Dr. Peter Gott


"--~~
'?:


began taking garlic pills
for another reason and
two years later when I dis-
continued them, I started
get old spre eein
times a week, daily if I'm
stressed, and seldoni have
the soes IfI eelon
coming on, I take garlic
mboring, noon and nig-ht,
and the sore never fully
develops. I thought this
might be of interest to you
and your readers.

DEAR READER: I had
not heard of garlic pills
being bene-ficial in prevent-
ing cold sores prior to your
letter. To the best of my
knowledge, garlic pills are
most commonly used its an
attempt to lower choles-
terol and blood pressure.
have even liad readers tell
me that they are beneficial
in preventing mosquitoes
~from biting.
Other readers have rec-
ommended taking Llysine
daily. Rub the oil from one
gel cap onto the affected
area of the lip daily until
the ulcer is healed. Yet
another option is to coat
the lesion with a layer of
crystallized or powdered
alum, which can be pur-
chase'd at your local gro-
celly store. Once the lesion
is healed via either or
.other methods, future out-
breaks can be prevented
by the ingestion of one L-
lysine~gel cap -each day:
Thank you for pointing
out yet another use for
garlic.
Readers who would like
additional information for
alternative treatment can
order my Health Reports
"Dr. Gott's Compelling
Home Remedies and "Dr.
Gott's More Compelling'
Home Remedies" by
sending a self-addressed
stamped No. 10 envelope
and a $2 check or money
order for each report to
Newsletter, P.O. Box 167,
Wickliffe, OH 44092-0167.
Be sure to mention the
titles) or print an order
form off my website's
direct link at www.
AskDrGottMD. comz/order_
form.pdf:


By LAURAN NEERGAARD
AP Medical Writer

WASHINGTON It's
that time of year when the
bugs emerge to bug us. ~
Some ~can pose real
threats Lyme disease
from tiny ticks, West Nile
virus from mosquitoes,.
or life-threatening allergic
reactions to bee stings.
But most bug bites in this
country are an itchy nut-
sance.
How itchy or big the
welt depends in part on
your own skin, how much
of the chemical histamine
it harbors. Yes, some peo-
ple really are mosquito
magnets. And no, most of
the bites cople blame on
Spiders aren't from them
at all
In fact, chances are you
won't be able to tell the
culprit unless you catch
it in the act. Yet doctors
and entomologists alike
field calls asking, "What
bit me?"
"People call up really
bummed- out," says' spi-
der expert Jonathan
Coddington of the
Smithsonian Institution's
National Museum of
Natural History, who
points to jitst. two worri-
some types in the U.S.,- the
black willow and -brown
recluse family. Spider pho-
bia, he says, is "out of all
proportion~ to actual risk."
It's ,not uncommon to
have a large skin reac
tion to any bite` or ~sting,
and ~Dr. Reid. Black~we~lder,
a family p Ihysician ~from
East Telinessee State
University,- sees a couple
of them a week in the early
spring and summer. .
"Most of the time, what
people need is reassur-
ance," he says.
Toexploretheniostboth-
ersome biters, Coddington
offered The Associated
Press a behind-the-scenes
look at some of the mil-
lions of specimens in the
Smithsonian's entomology
collections that scientists
use to identify and study
insects and arachnids.
Mosquito bites proba-
bly are the most common.
Sure we've been told to
watch out for them at dusk
and dawn. But the Asian
tiger mosquito a fairly
decent immigrant that has
Spread to 30 states since
arriving hidden in some
tires in Texas bites
a11 day long. It's a more
aggressive, harder-to-swat
version than native spe-
cies, Coddington says.
If it seems every mos-
quito's after you, well,
there are about 3,500 spe-
cies around the world and
Coddington says most
don bithe hua s,i tefer
But those who do can be
attracted by sweat, alco-
hol, perfumes and dark
clothing.
Bedbugs are the latest
headline-maker. Scientists
can't explai~I why they've
suddenly rebounded in
many U.S. cities after all
but vanishing in the 1940s
and '50s. But once they're
:in a building, they're
'famously hard to eradi-
1ae keuwont ,e their
might see a line of red dots
in the morning.


p ,' .. .. E ~ Sl *** ~
~ASSOCIATED PRESS
Dr. Jonathan A. Coddington, Associate Director~ of Research and Collections, examines '
vials of preserved Brown Recluse Spiders at the Smithsonian Institution National Museum
of Natural History in Washington, Wednesday. It's that time of year when the bugs emerge
to bug us. Some cein pose real threats Lyme ~disease from tiny ticks, West Nile virus
from mosquitoes, or life-threatening allergic reactions to bee stings. But most bug bites in
this country are an itchy nuisance.


Not so with horse flies
Sand black flies. They cause .
painful welts, and they'll
chase any blood meal. And
yellow jackets may be a
bane of summer picnics,
but they're most aggres-
sive in the fall, the repro-
ductive mating season,
Coddington notes.
Most people face no risk
other than infection from
scratching, but there are
some important excep-
. tions: .
---Blacklegged tick spe-
cies, commonly, called
deer ticks, that are as
small as poppy seeds. can
transmit Lyme :disease.
The Centers for Diseate
Control and Erevention
Counted more than 35,000
confirmed or *probable
cases of Lyme in 2009, the
latest data available. These
'ticks are most active from
May through July, and
are most common in the
Northeast, mid-Atlantic,
upper Midwest and Paciic
coast.
If a tick's been biting for
less than 24 hours, chanc-
es of infection are small.
So do a daily tick check.
And the CDC recommends
using insect repellent with
DEET.
Antibiotics easily cure
most people of Lyme. But
other than Lyme's hall-
mark.' round,' red rash,
early symptoms are vague
and flu-like. People who
aren't treated can develop
arthritis, meningitis and
some other serious ill-
nesses.
Different tick spe-
cies around the country


can transmit additional
diseases, such as Rocky
SMountain spotted fever,
tickborne relapsing fever,
and STARI -or Southern
tick-asso~ciated rash ill-
ness. '
-W~est Nile virus is the
mamn mosquito concern in
the U.S. Although cases
have~ dropped in the last
decade,' the CDC recorded
45 deaths from West Nile
last 'year. Severe i symp-
toms fortquiately arfe rare
but include ~highi fever, .
neck stiffness, disorienta-
tion, conrit, muscle weak-
ness and paralysis, and the
neurological effects some-
times are permanent.
To avoid mosquitoes,
the CDC advises wearing
insect repellent containing .
DEET, picaridin or oil of
lemon eucalyptus. Empty
standing, water where .
mosquitoes breed.
-At least 40 people a
year die from allergic reac-
tioils to stings from bees
or other insects, according
to the American Academy
of Allergy, Asthma &
Immunology. Potentially
life-threatening reactions .
occur in fewer thari 1 per-
cent of children and 3 per-
cent of adults. -
But seek care quickly
for .signs of an emergen-
cy, Blackwelder stresses:
Swelling on the face or
neck, shortness of breath
or feeling dizzy. People
who know they're allergic
should cal'ry an EpiPihn.
--Bites from a black
widow or brown recluse
can require medical care,
although fatalities are


incredibly' rare. You may
not feel the black widow's
bite, but within about an
hour pain spreads through
the abdomen, with cramp-
ing or rigid abdominal
muscles. Poison centers
stock antivenom, but most
people do fine with mus-
cle relaxants and other
care, says Blackwelder,
a spokesman for the
American Academy of
Family Physicians.
A brown recluse bite
eventually forms an ulcer-
'like lesion that can get
fairly large but usually
requires just good wound
care, he says. But other
infections can be mis
taken for these bites, so
Coddington says bringing ,
in the suspect spider helps
identification.


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WVho fired the first Civil War


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LAKE CITY REPORTER STATE THURSDAY, APRIL 14, 2011


Page Editor: C.J.Risak, 754-0427


Dec. 20 and other states
were about to, including
Florida.
Amid. the turmoil, about
50 federal troops under
the command of Lt. Adam
J. Slemmer encamped at
Fort Barrancas, at what is
now Pensacola Naval Air
Station. The fort of arched
brick passageways and
tunnels overlooks the tur-
quoise waters and white-
sand beaches of Pensacola
Bay.
On the night of Jan. 8,
the men had raised a ~draw-
bridge around the fort,
which dated to when Spain
controlled Florida, because
of growing tensions in the
surrounding Navad yard,
said historian David Ogden,
a ranger at Gulf Islands
National Seashore.
According to Slemme~r's
report, just after midnight,
guards heard footsteps
outside and challenged
the intruders and heard
no response, Ogden said.
Slemmer made no mention
of shots being fired.
SIt wasn't until after the
war ended in*1865 that one
of the would-be intrud-
ers, RL. Sweetman, .wrote
to Slemmer and laterr to
Slemmer's widow and made
reference to the blank shot
fied at Fort Barrancas as
the war's beginning. .
"In his letter, Sweetman
said something like 'Your
husband can claim that
he commanded the post
where the first shot was
fired,'" Ogden said. ,
The letter sparked th~e
local legend that continues
to this day and plays into
Pensacolans `belief that
their city has been~ cheat-
ed by history. They also
claim Pensacola and not St.


Augustine, Fla., is the old-
est city in North America,
based on Pensacola's orig-
inal founding in 1559 by
the Spanish, compared to
1565 for its Atlanitic coast
rival. But Pensacola was
.destroyed by a hurricane
two years after its initial
founding and the Spanish
didn't return until 1698 -
St. Augustine never went
out of existence.
"'We Americans like to
be the first and the big-
gest and the 'tallest, and
Pensacola has this peren-
nially underdog status,"
Ogden said with a laugh.
O~gden and others said
it's a stretch to say what
happened at Fort Barrancas
started the Civil War -
the wvould-be attackers, a
small group of drunken
and rowdy locals, left as
soon as the warning shot
sounded if there ever
was one. The National Park
Service has marked some
anniversaries of the inci-
dent with candlelight tours
of the fort.
"I've gotten in trouble
with locals before who
have wanted to make a big-
ger deal out of this," Ogden
said.
Hours afterthe Pensacola
incident, another pre-war
clash took place in South
Carolina cadets from
The Citadel military acad-
emy mannirig a battery
on Morris Island ~fired on
the steamship Star of the
West as it tried to resupply
200 federal troops at Fort
Sumter. The cadets forced
the steamship to turn back
and others consider that
action the fist shots of the
war, not the larger fight that
happened at For t Sumter
three months later.


"Y1ou can get real far
down in the weeds about
all of this," said Winfred
B. Moore Jr., The Citadel's
dean of humanities and
social studies. "The truth is
thatwhat happened on April
12, 1861, at Fort Sumter had
far, far greater significance
than all of these events that
came before."
On Tuesday, booming
cannons marked the 150th
anniversary of the war's out-
break as hundreds of peo-
ple watched~ a.reenactment
of the Confederate bom-
bardment of Union-held
Fort Sumter in Charleston
harbor the engagement
widely credited wi~ith plung-
ing the young nation into a
war that dragged on four
years and .claimed more
than 600,000 lives. Union
troops surrendered after
about 34 hours of bom-
bardment, Lincoln and the
Confederates issued calls
to arms, and fighting soork
commenced.
Moore said :it was
almost inevitable that the
war would begin in South
Carolina despite effqrts
--.autlined in documents
L- of attempts in Florida
and elsewhere to avert hos-
tilities.
"But there are a lot of
Civil War stories to be told
and a lot that have never
been adequately told and
it's understandable why
people who live close to
the history want to give
it proper recognition," he


By MELISSA NELSON
Associated Press

GULF ISLANDS
NATIONAL SEASHORE
A raid 150 years ago by
Cotifederate sympathizers
on a Union fort at what
is now Pensacola Naval
Air Station was likely little
more than an ill-planned
and drunken misadven-
ture,. perhaps ended by
one soldier's warning shot
and a blank one, at that.
'But don't tell Pensacola
residents that the Jan. 8,
1861, skirmish meant noth-
mng the event is the stuff
of legend in this military
town. Some even claim the
clash was the Civil War's
fist, three months before
the battle on April 12, 1861,
at South Carolina's Fort
Sumter, which is widely
recognized as the start of
the war.
Dale ~Cox, the unofficial
historian for the Florida
Panhandle chapter of the
Sons of the Confederate
Veterans, wrote on his
blog that he considers the
Pensacola shot the first of
the Civil War, saying in an
interview that it marked
the first time federal troops
fied toward Confederate
agitators.
"It is an interesting bit of
history and I'd like to see
Pensacola get more recog-
nition for all of its Civil
War history," he told The
Associated Press.
As 1861 dawned, the
Union was falling apart.
Abraham Lincoln's elec-
tion as president the previ-
ous November had many
Southerners convinced he
would ban slavery after tak-
ing office that March. South
Carolina had seceded on


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Tourists cross a. bridge to, enter Fort Barrancas at Gulf Islands
'National Seashore near Pensacola Beach on ~Wednesday.
Some people claim that the first shot fired in the Civil War
occurred at the fort, about three months before the battle at
Fort Sumter.


added. .
And Civil War history did
happen in Pensacola.
Across the bay from Fort
Barrancab lies Fort Pickens,
where Union troops fended
off Confederate attacks
for four years and kept
Pensacola Bay open to fed-
eral ships' throughout the
war.
On a 'recent after-
noon, Rudy Ynostrosa of


Pensacola and his 12-year-
old son Nicolas made their
way through the, maze
brick tunnels and stair-
ways that comprise Fort
Pickens. Ynostrosa said
he has long heard that the
war's fist shots were Aired
in his home town.
"It always amazestrpe that
this was a Union fort and it
was out here in the heart of
the South," he said.


By~ BILL KACZOR
Associated Press

TALIAHASSEE Newr applicants for
temporary welfare assistance would have
to dig into their own pockets to pay for
drug tests that can cost $35 or more under
bills advancing in the Florida House anid
Senate and backed by Gov. Rick Scott.
The Senate version wolf approval from
a budget subcommttee Wednesday on 5-2
party-line vote~.
All Republicanls voted for the bill (SB
556), saying it,would be only fair to require
drug testing for welfare recipients because
many taxpayers also are screened at work.


They also argued it would encourage drug
abusers to get treatment.
Democrats andt a Florida Catholic
Conference lobbyist, though, said -it would
be unfair to make poor people pay for it
themselves and that the testing require-
ment probably would be unconstitutional.
"It may seeni a little onerous telling
folks they need to get drug tested," con-
ceded Sen. Rene Garcia, R-Hialeah. "But
at the end of the day, I want to help people
who want to help themselves."
Sen. Steve Oelrich, an Alachua
Reptiblican who's sponsoring the bill, said
it~ would be a "an offer of help and a wake-
up call" for drug users.


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I


Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-042 I
tkirby@lokecityreportercom


Section B


www.Iakecityreporter.com


COlumbia meets
familiar o ponent
in Gainesville.

By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter. com
'Columbia High knows its
opponent well. The Lady
Tigers will meet G~ainesville
High with an appearance in
the State 3A championship
on theelmne at.3 p.m..today
The District 4-3A champi-


ons will take on runner'-up
Gainesville for the fourth
time this season (including
districts). Coach Tabatha
McMahon knows the com-
petition and has confdence
in her team to make back-to-
back appearances at state.
Columbia's No. 1 singles'
player, Chrissie Reichert,
will take on district charn-
pion Eve Sampson, who
already has a ticket punched
to the state final in one of
TENNIS continued on 3B


Columbia High's Kelsey Mercer returns a shot during the playoff match against Menedez
High in Lake City Tuesday.


Fort W~hite High
sends three
lifters to state.

By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter. com
FORT WHITE Fort
White High's weightlifting
contingent to .the state meet~
is top heavy in mnore ,waysg
than one.
The FHSAA Firials are at
the Kissimmee Civic Center
on Friday and Saturday, and
Fort White's Class 1A will
lift on day two starting at
10:30 a.m.
Fort White state quali-
fiers Kurtis Norris and
Anthony Pearce are in the
heavyweight division and JR
Dixon lifts in the 183-pibund
division. All are seniors.
"It is really hard for
underclassmen to qualify,"
Fort White head coach Dan
Marsee said. "Experience
and knowing how to handle
that pressure in a big meet
is important, and there are
so many more kids today.
There are only two classil-
cations and we are compet-
ing against. schools three
times our size.'That is~ what
was so impressive about
last year. We almost woil
the whole thing."
Norris and Dixon were
automatic qualifiers for st~te
by winning their weight divi-
sion at the sectional meet in
Palatka.
Norris won with a 375
bench press and 260 clean
'and jerk for a 635 total.
Dixon's winning lifts were
INDIANS continued on 2B


ABOVE: Columbia High's Timmy Jernigan (left) and Barnibus
Weightlifting State Championship in Kissimee on Friday.


TIM KIRBY/Lake City Reporter
BELOW: Fort White High weightlifters Anthony Pearce (from left), JR Dixon and Kurtis Norris
qualified to compete at the Class 1A state meet at the Kissimmee Civic Center on Saturday.


Senior-s shine for
COlumbia in final
home game.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@/akecityreporter. com
Coach J.T. Clark has
been looking for a moment
when the Columbia High
baseball team would gather
some momentum. He may
have just received that on
Senior Night as the Tigers
ktnockedl off previously
unbeaten P.K. Yonge, 6-0, in
Lake City.
Clark sent senior Seth
Thomas to the mound and
he responded with a gem.


Thomas pitched 61 innings,
struck out seven batters
and allowed only four hits.
He was relieved in the final
out by Alan Espenship in a
passing of the torch from
brother to brother as Zach
Espenship caught his final
game.
"It was an amazing job by
Seth tonight," Clark said.
"He's been our hottest guy
out of the bullpen and he
was dominant tonight. We
br-ought Alan in as a pass-
ing of t-he torch from his
brother, who was a four-
year starter. Seth under-
stood that as a team player
and I think it's something
that Zach has earned."


Each senior (Espenship,
Thomas, J.T. Gilliam, Mikeyr
Kirkmian, Dylan Alvey anid
Jake Richardson) reached
base.
Columbia jumped out to a
1-0 lead in the bottom of the
first inning. Kellan Bailey
reached on a walk and was
batted in by Blaine Courson
with a hit up the middle.
The Tigers added four
more in the third inning.
Courson was hit by a pitch
with the bases loaded to
bring in Gilliam. Espenship
delivered with a hit after that
to bring in Michael Craft
and Bailey. The final run of
CHS continued on 38


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Zach Espenship makes his way back to third in a game
played earlier this season-


Lakre City Reporter


SPORTS


ThursdayApril 14, 201 I


State finals


SHOt OH the


*ietoa


BRIEFS

INDIANS CHEERLEADING -
Tryouts planned
for May 2-4
Fort White High
cheerleading tryouts for
varsity, junior varsity and
middle school squads
are 3:30 p.m. May 2-4
in the high school gym.
Tryouts are open to all
fifth- through
11th-graders. Information
packets are available at
the front office.
For details, call Kathy
Harrell, Stephanie Cr use
or Amber Bussey at
497-5952.
YOUTH BASEBALL
Christ Central
Sports sign-up
Christ Central Sports
is offering co-ed T-ball
and coach pitch for ages
3-10. Registration ends
Friday. Cost is $40.
For details, call Ronny

at3 5 1 8 o h church


'The Edge' event
set for April 30
Aou te-Mrooou
Presents "The Edge"
golf tournament at Quail
Heights Country Club
on April 30. The annual .
tournament hosted by
Shayne Edge serves as a
fundraiser for school and
recreational sports, and
other organizations. Cost
is $100 per player for,
the four-person scramble
event.
Registration is at Quail
.Heights (752-3339) and
Brian's Sports
(755-0570).
CHS FOOTBALL
Q-b ck Club
meeting.April 25
The Columbia County
Quarterback Club will
meet at 6 p.m. April 25 at
the Jones Fieldhouse.
For details, call Blake
Lundy at 867-0296.
SFrorn staff reports

GAMES

Today
M Columbia High girls
tennis vs. Gainesville
High in Region 2-3A
tournament, 3:30 p.m.
M Fort White High JV
baseball at Suwannee
High, 7 p.m.
Friday
AFort White High track
in District 3-2A meet at
Yulee High,10 a.m.
AColumbia High
weightlifting in Class 2A
state meet at Kissimmee
Civic Center, noon
SFort White High
Iotl 5t mOak Hall
MColumbia High
ebasjal at Middleburg

MColumbia High
softball vs. Mayo, 7 p.m.
M Fort White High
baseball at Newberry
High, 7 p.m.
Saturday
M Fort White High
weightlifting in Class 1A
state meet at Kissimmee
Civic Center, 10:30 a.m.
Tuesday
M' Fort White High
baseball at Uniion County
High, 7 p.m.
Wednesday, April 20
SColumbia High
baseball at Lincoln High,
5:30 p.m.
Thursday, April 21
SColumbia High
baseball at Suwannee


High, 7 p.m. I


9010 r


Str egt


Ternigan,
IMalliSon look for
individual titles.

By BRANDON FINLEy
bfinley@lakecityreporter. com

Timmy Jernigan and
Barnibus Madison have
one more shot vt win-
ning a state title. The
senior duo will lift in the
2A State Championship in
Kissimmee Friday.
"These guys are phenom-
enal leaders," Columbia
coach Quinton Callum said.
'"Last year, I said that I was
losing a dying breed. These
guys have come in and been
top notch. They've shown
leadership and done a great
job. I'm proud of them.
Now, the two have a
chance to turn their hard
work into state titles.
"I think I have what it
takes," Jernigan said.
"That's the way Callum has
coached us. We're not look-
ing to tie. We're looking
to win. I'm going to do the
best I can do and that's all
I can do."
Madison is returning
from a trip to last year's
final. He feels that the expe-
rience will pay off for him
on his quest.
"I think the chances are
pretty high for me to finish
in the top three," he said.
"I was able to place in the
top six or seven last year,
and now I'm focused on
what I can do. I can't worry
about what someone else is
doing."
UFTERS continued on 3B


,~~~~~. ~ :..,ILz : t

JASON MATTHEW WALKERILake City Reporter
Madison will compete in the 2A


Tigers knock off previously

unbeaten R.K. Yonge, 6-0





don't know if I can win fist
place, butI am not afraid to
compete and I am aiming
for a medal."









ON N E N I



THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek


SCOREBOARD


Answer to Previous Puzzle

GIRAIB BA IRT TI IK I
MIAUI I AIRIF UTES
CIHIEIZ~D SEDIMIENIT




YIEIAIRIN~HACHAT I E
I NIL EARLA B PALEI
DOBBIL~IN LA I .UA LLS
LI I DIB APRLIU LII

BIRAID O ISS I F Y
REITRIEAIDST TIEID
AILEIEIR RIA AN NIO
MIAISIS K E YNS NET


INDIANS: Shooting for medals


Check out the "uttRig t Cr sod Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS THURSDAY, APRIL 14, 2011


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421


5 5
5 6
4 7
3 8
West Division


imaedll egiay, practice (Speed,
2-4:30 p.m.); Saturday, qualifying (Speed,
I1:30-2 a.m.); Sunday, race, I p.m. (FOX,
noon-5 p.m.).
TradckTalladega Superspeedway (oval,
2.66 miles).
Race distance: 500 miles, 188 Iaps.
Next race: Matthew and Daniel Hansen
400, April 30, Richmond International
SRaceway, Richmond,Va.
Online: http://www.nascar.com
NATIONWIDE
Aaron's 312
Site:TalladegaAla.
Schedule: Thursday, practice; Friday,
qualifying (Speed, noon-2 p.m.); Saturday,
race, 3 (ESPN2, 2-6 p.m.).
TraclcTalladega Superspeedway.
Race distance: 31 I.22 miles, I17 laps.
Next race: Nashville 300, April 23,
Nashville Superspeedway, Gladeville,Tenn.
CAMPING WORLD TRUCKS
Next race: Bully Hill Vineyards 200,
Aril 22,TeNashville Superspeedway,

INDYCAR
Grand Prix of Long Beach
Site: Long Beach, Calif.
Schedule: Friday, practice; Saturday,
practice, qualifying (Versus..6-7 p.m.);
Sunday,.race, 4:30 p.m. (Versus, 3:30-
6:30 p.m.).
coTsak 97 I ssof Long Beach (street
Race distance: 167.2 miles, 85 laps.
Next race: Sao Paulo Indy 300. Maiy I,
Streets of Sao Paulo.
Onlinie:http://www.indycar.com
FORMULA.ONE
Chinese Grand Prix
Site: Shanghai.
Schedule: Friday, practice (Speed,
2-3:30 a.m.); Saturday, practice, qualifying
(2-3:30 a.m.); Sunday, race, 3 a.m. (Speed.
2:30-5 a.m.).
Tracle Shanghai International Circuit
(macd stncum 189. nieniles, 56 Iaps.
Next race:Turkish Grand Prix, May 8,
Istanbul Speed Park, Istanbul.
Online: http://www.formulat.com
NHRA FULL THROTTLE
NHRA 4-Wide Nationals
Site: Concord, N.C.
Schedule: Friday, qualifying; Saturday,
qualifying (ESPN2, 6-8 p.m.); Sunday, final
eliminations (ESPN2, 7-IO p.m.).
Ti-ackczMAX Dragway.
Next race: O'ReillyAuto Parts NHRA
Spring Nationals, April 29-May I, Royal
Purple' Raceway, Baytown.Texas.
Online: htp://www.nbra.com
OTHER RACES
ARCA RE/MAX SERIES: 3 Amigos
250, Friday (Speed, S-7 p.m.), Talladega
Superspeedway,Talladega. Ala.
Online: http://www.arcaracing.com

HOCKEY .

NHL playoffs
FIRST ROUND .

Detroit 4,Phoenix 2
Pitesburgh 3,Tampa Bay 0
N.Y. Rangers at Washington (n)
Chicago atVancouver (n)
Nashville at Anaheim (n)
Today
Montreal at Boston, 7 p.m.
Buffalo at Philadelphia, 7:30 p.m.
Los Angeles at San Jose, 10 p.m.
Friday
Tampa Bay at Pittsburgh, 7 p.m.
N.Y. Rangers at Washington, 7:30 p.m.
Chicago atVancouver, 10 p.m.
Nashville at Anaheim, 10:30 p.m.
Saturday
Phoenix at Detroit, I p.m.
Buffalo at Philadelphia, 5p.m.
Monuneaelae Botojo, p.m.
Sunday
Washington at N.Y. Rangers, 3 p.m-
Anaheim at Nashville, 6p.m.


',ndinna i
Pittsburgh
chicago
St. Louis
Houston


W L Pact B
Colorado 7 2 .778 -
Los Angeles 6 5 .545 2
Arizona 5 5 .500 2&
San Francisco 5 6 .455 3
San Diego 4 6 .400 3%
Wednesday's Games
San Diego 3, Cincinnati 2
Milwaukee 6, Pittsburgh 0
Philadelphia 3,Washington 2
Colorado 5, N.Y. Mets 4
Florida 5,Atlanta I
Chicago Cubs at Houston (n)
St Louis at Arizona (n)
LA. Dodgers at San Francisco (n)
SToday's Games
Colorado (De La Rosa 1-0) at N.Y.
Mets(Dickeyl1-G) I2-10dpsm., Ist gam

Mets (Capuano 1-0), 3:40 p.mn., 2nd game
Milwaukee (Wolf 0-2) at Pittsburgh
(Maholm 0-I), 7:05 p.m.
Philadelphia(CI.Lee I-I)atWashington
(Zimmairmann 1-1), 7:05 p.m.
Florida (Nolasco 1-0) at Atlanta
(Beachy 0-1), 7:10 p.m.
St.Louis (j.Garcia 1-0) at L.A. Dodgers
(Kuroda 2-0), 10:10 p.m.
SFriday's Games
Florida at Philadelphia, 7:05 p.m.
Milwaukee atWashington, 7:05 p.mn.
Pittsburgh at Cincinnati, 7:IO p.m.
N.Y. Mets at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m.
San Diego at Houston, 8:05 p.m. .
Chicago Cubs at Colorado, 8:40 p.m:
San Francisco at Arizona, 9:40 p~m.
St. Louis at L.A Dodgers, 10:10 p.m.

BASKETBALL

NBA conference .

EASTERN CONFERENCE
W L Pct GB
z-Chicago 6 I 20 .753 -
y-Mliami 57 24 .704 4
y-Boston 55 26 .679 6
x-Orlando 51 30 .630 10
x-Atlanta 44 37 .543 lI
x-NewYork 42 39 .519 19
x-Philadelphia 41 40 .506 20
x-Indiana 37 44 .457 24
Milwaukee 34 47 .420 27
Charlotte 33 48 .407 28
Detroit 29 52 .358 32
New Jersey 24 57 .296 37
. Washington 23 58 .284 38
Toronto 22 59 .272 39
Cleveland I 8 63 .222 43
WESTERN CONFERENCE

z-San Antonio 6I 20 .753 -
yr-L.A.Lakers 56 25 .691 5
x-Dailas 56 25 .691 5
y-Oklahoma City 552 9 6
x-Pdrtland 48 33 .593 13
x-New Orleans 46 35 .568 15
x-Mlemphis 46 35 .568 15
Houston 42 39 .519 19
Phoenix 39 42 .48 I 22
IUtah 38 43 .469 23
Golden State 35 46 .432 26
L.A. Clippers 3 I 50 .383 30
Sacramento 24 57 .296 37
Minnesota 17 64 .210 44
x-clinched playoff spot
y-clinched division '
z-clinched conference

AUTO RACING


COURTESY PHOTO

'Champions Never Rest'

The 'Champions Never Rest' ATA Taekwondo Tournament was hosted by 5th degree
black belt Scott Murphy at the American Heritage Academy in Canton, Ga., on March 26,
Representing Sepulveda's ATA Black Belt Academy of Lake City were Alice Geiger (left)
and Joy Geiger. Alice placed first in Traditional Weapons, Creative Forms and Creative
Weapons, second in Traditional Forms, and third in Traditional Sparring and Combat
Weapons~ Sparring. Joy placed first in Credative Forms and Creative Weapons, second
in Traditional Weapon~s, and third in Traditional Forms, Traditional Sparring and Combat
Weapons Sparring.


East Division
W L
( 6 3
5 4
S5 6
3 8


Baltimore
New York
Toronto
Tampa Bay


Boston 2 9
Central Division

Cleveland W 1
Chicago 7 4


lnsas City 6 4 .600 Ik
innesota 4 6 .400 31
etroit 4 7 .364 4
West Division
W L -Pct GB
xas 9 2 .818 -
sr Angeles 6 5 .545 3
aklamd 5 6 .455 4
attle 4 7 .364 5
Wednesrday Games
Detroit 3,Texas 2
Kansas City 10, Minnesota 5
Oakiand 7, Chicago White Sax 4, 10


Ka
Mi
Dc


Te
Lo
O;
Se


innings
Toronto 8, Seattle 3 '
N.Y.Yankees 7, Baltimore 4
Cleveland at LA.Angels (n)
Tamnpa Bay at Boston (n)
Today's Games
Mhi esota (Pavano I-1) at Tampa Bay

Baltimore (Amrriet I-1)at N.Y.Yankees
(P.Hughes 0-1), 7:05 p.m.
Seattle (Fister 0-2) at Kansas City
(Cenri 1-),:oOkm. 0-2) at Oakland
(G.Gonzalez 2-0), 10~05 p.m.
Friday's Games
.- Baltimore at Cleveland, 7:05 p.m.
Texas at N.Y.Yankees, 7:05 p.mn.
Minnesota at Tampa Bay,7:10 p.m.
Toronto at Boston, 7:10 p.m.
L.A. Angels at Chicago White Sox,
8:10 p.m.
Seattle at Kansas City, 8:10 p.m.
Detroit at Oakland, 10:05 p.m.

NL standings

East Division .
W L Pct GB
Philadelphia 7 3 .700 _
Florida 5 5 .500 2
Wash ngton 6 2 .0

New York 4 6 .400 3
Central Division
W L Pct GB


COURTESY PHOTO

Epiphany~ soccer
Members of the 2010-1.1 Epiphany Catholic School soccer team at their awards banquet are
(ffont row, form left) Jared Ordinario, Brandon Gaylord, Gilberto Bolailos, Noah Campbell,
Ryan Reynolds, Nick Haines and Sarah Ordinario. Back row (from left) are coach
Rian Rodriguez, Chris Belibasis, Delanie Redmond, Samantha Smith, Kayla Price,
Tajildr Speight, John Norris, Nick Anschultz, Mary Klenk, Principal Rita Klenk and
Michael HaineS.


et onect 1 www~.Iakeoltyreporter~comn


4, M 0Reporter


41 Rum source
43 Falls softly
45 Salver
47 Movie part
49 Reddish tinit
51 Storied sailor
55 Water the
plants
56 Drill
58 Kind of rug
59 Ex lr


S1Whh per
62 Common
~amphibian
63 Tokyori
forme yl

DOWN

1 Supervisor
2 Eve's second
son
3 Casino cubes
4 Movie ad
5 Valet employer
6 Summer in
Cannes


ACROSS

.1 Harmful
4 Sigh orrelief
8 FiOe Or chisel .
12 Geisha's
aCCOSsory
13 FFOm memory
14 Not lack
15 Hidden

18 Shin av e
19 Farme ,

21 Monsieur's son
23 Show

24.of anger
2 ea

27 rnthmbpe abbr
29 Fifi's bo friend
30 Pasta
go-with .
32 Graph paper
pattern
36 Microwaves
38 Uses acalcula-
tor
40 RN employer


Race week

NASCAR
SPRINT CUP
Aaron's 499


Continued From Page 1B


285-285-570.
Pearce placed third at the
sectional with 305-300-605
and had to wait for weight
comparisons among differ-
ent sections before making
the state field.
Fort White had three
other lifters who placed in
the top four at the sectional,
but their totals did not make
state. Dylan Newman (240-
220-460) was second at 238
pounds; Devin Rorabaugh
(205-155-260) and Anthony
Fuller (280-250-530) were
third at 129 pounds and 199 '
pounds, respectively.
Nprris said he hopes to
total 660 to 670 pounds in
Kissimmee.
"(Making state) has been
a goail ever since my junior
year," Norris said. "I was
just a little short last year
and I worked hard to make
sure I made it this year. I
am looking forward to plac-
ing (top six) and getting a
medal.
Marsee said Norris has
a chance at a medal and
Dixon, who goes in ranked
eighth, could finish third or
fourth.
"Kurtis has a legitimate
.shot to score some, points,"
Marsee said. "We kind of
held JR back, since we
knew he had the win at
his body weight. Anthony
could have the third best
clean and jerk in the state
at heavyweight."


Like Norris, Dixon had
his eye on making state
since last year.
"I just got here (Fort
White) last year and
couldn't lift," Dixon said.
'Coach Marsee said I could
have qualified and that was
my goal for this year, so
I had a good work ethic
in the weight room. First
and foremost I give God the
credit because he gave me
the strength to make it. I


c~3~ie
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

SFIRTD f


7 Takes vows
8 Melting
9 Camel halts
10 In plain view
11 Pasture
16 TKO callers


20 Poetic adverb
22 Carpenter's
device
24 La -, Bolivia
25 "Pulp Fiction"
name
26 Back talk
28 Turner or
Koppel
31 JOhn, in
Glasgow
33 Letter before
Sigma
34 Babysitter's
bane
35 Salon styles
37 Tabloid seller
39 Altered genes
42 Novelist Rand
44 Mardi Gras

45 No th er
46 Avoid expira-
tion
48 Port near
Kyoto
50 Dr.'sovisit
52 Linger
ss vinegary
54 Car sales-
man's deal
55 Woolen cap
57 Carioca's
home


WHEN TE BL OKJACK

SCOL-DED BY THE PIT
Boss, HE ---

t~ frrtahne utrhe circled aette s
suggested by the above cartoon.


Jumbles: BLUSH MINUS COYT Ans ers torow
Yesteday's Answer: Saving your pennies coiled be considered
this "CENTSIBLE"


4-14 @ 2011 by UFS, Inc.


TELEVISION

W T sports

Today
AUTO RACING
2 a~m.
SPEED Formula One, practice for
Grand Prix of China, at Shanghai, China.
GOLF
9 am.
TGC European PGA Tour,
Malaysian Open, first round, at Kuala
Lumpur, Malaysia (same-day tape)
3 p~m.
TGC PGA Tour, Texas Open, first
round, at San Antonio
6:30 p~m.
TGC Nationwide Tour. Fresh
Express Classic, first round, at Hayward,
Calif.
NHL HOCKEY
7 p.m.
VERSUS Playoffs, conference
Sqisarterfinals, Montreal at.Boston
10 p~m.
quaSU n sMPlys conference
SOCCER
II pm.
ESPN2 MLS. Chicago at Portland

BASEBALL

AL sadi g


YTETWN












IN THE PITS



More love-bug racing



expected at Talladega


CHS. Seniors shine over E.K. Yonge


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS THURSDAY, APRIL 14, 2011


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


racetrack go right back
into that mode."
Ifs not necessarily a bad
thing. Ifs just different.
For years, Daytona and .
Talladega were known as
the two tracks where fans
could expect the massive
accidents created by pack
racing known as "The Big
One." Daytona still had
crashes there were a
record 16 cautions but
that didn't satisfy many
fans who couldn't get their
heads around the two-car
tandem racing.
NASCAIi officials felt
the same at the start of
Speedweeks, and issued a
series of slight
technical adjustments
designed to prevent the
cars from pushing each
Other for too long. Like
everyone else, NASCAR
was unsure of how the
Daytona 500 would play
out, but was ultimately
pleased with what
officials saw.
"W~e were curious, too. It
was a phenomenon, we'd
never seen anything like
that," said NASCAR
chairman Brian France.
"But 74 lead changes,
dramatic racing all the way
through, although it looked
a little bit different, the
competition le Il went up.
generally speaking, if
competition goes up, the
races are exciting, we're
going to like it."
So aside from a
reduction in the size of
the horsepower-sapping
restrictor plate, NASCAR
has done very little to
force drivers to race any
differently this weekend at
Talladega.
"~We're going to see that
same style draft," said Kurt
Busch, who won two
exhibition races leading
into the Daytona 500.
"The two-car draft is just
so potent. Anytime you can
tell a race car driver he can
go four seconds faster a
lap and give him the recipe
on how to do it, he's going
to go and put it into play.
Thaf-s that two-car draft."
There's an element of
intrigue to it, too, that
forces drivers to place
a huge amount of trust
in some of their biggest


rivals.
The two-car draft forces
the` trailing car, the
"pusher," to race blind
because the driver can't
see what's ahead of the
car he's pushing. Spotters
are forced to be the eyes
for drivers they've never
worked for, and drivers are
tapping into the radio'
frequencies of guys they
don't usually speak to for
in-race strategy sessions.
It made Daytona
interesting, and not all
the drivers enjoyed that
intrigue.
"You can't see where
you're going if you're
'the pusher," said Mark
Martin. "If you're in front,
sometimes you wish you
couldn't see where you
were going. It's pretty
tough on you sometimes
when you're running up
traffic and you have a guy
pushing you that doesn't
really se'e that.
"'We have to trust each
other. We have to. Like
them or not, you hatve to."
Dale Earnhardt Jr. said
he didn't like relying on
Others.
"I'd rather have control
of just what I've got to do,"
he said. "Having to have
responsibility for someone
else ista litebit more than

There is one caveat that
could change the racing
a little: Talladega is wider
Than Daytona, and many
drivers believe the track
Shas enough space for the
cars to go four-wide. It
could lead to more room
for drivers to swap the
lead, and more space for a
fast-closing tandem to get
past a slower two-car pack.
"Talladega is a much
wider race track, there's a
lot more racing lines and
grooves and room to race
on," Jeff Gordon said. "~We
should be able to do the
two-car drafts a lot easier
than we did at Daytona.
Hopefully, we're not
hooking and spinning one
another like we were m
Daytona."
Ifs for sure not going to
be the kind of Talladega
racing people are used
to. That doesn't mean,
however, that it won't be a
thrilling race.


By JENNA FRYER
Associated Press
CHARLOTTE, N.C.

Superspeedway
has long been
celebrated for
T ~~it's 500 miles of ladg
white-knuckle racing, the
kind of bumper-to-bumper
action that keeps fans on
their feet from flag to flag.
Those in attendance
used to fret that the
briefest bathroom break
could cause them to miss
something monumental.
Now, though, the fretting
seems to be focused on
the style of racing and just
what fans will see Sunday
when NASCAR shifts to
one of its most revered
Race tracks.
Two-car tandems took
over the season-opening
Daytona 500, where the
huge pack of cars broke
apart as drivers realized
that the fastest way around
the superspeedway was
with just one partner.
There were very few
Slingshots through
the field, the way I~ale -
SEairnhardt Jr. did in 2010
when he charged from
10th to second over the
final two laps.
STee w~er of comur s
among 22 drivers, and
NASCAR welcomed a
fresh-faced new star in
20-year-old Trevor Bayne,
the youngest winner m
Daytona 500 history.
But the overwhelming
discussion was about the
new style of racing, which
mimicked a game of leap-
frog, in which two drivers
hooked up, took turns
pushing each other to the
front, then swapped the
lead when their engines
got too hot from all that
pushing.
Many fans fear a repeat
of that racing at Talladega,
and by every indication,
that's exactly what they'll
see.
'WYe'll be doing the same
thing we did at Daytona,
said onetime Talladega
winner Tony Stewart.
"I guarantee you right
off the bat, thaf-s exactly
what everybody is going to
do as soon as they hit the


Ilbr~;~nrrra~le~L~-9
COURTESY PHOTOS
TOP: Lake City Middle School's Nicole Morse (far right) and.Samantha Ziegaus (second
from right) start toward their 1-2 finish in the 1500 meters at the Gadsden County Middle
School Invitational on April 9.
ABOVE LEFT: Takemma Stewart won the 200 meters, placed second in the' 50 meters and
placed fourth in the 100 meter at Oakleaf Middle School on April 8.
ABOVE RIGHT:' Emma Tucker left the competition behind in winning the 800 meters in the
Gadsden County meet.


Lake City Middle School

ruHHrOS gear up for qualifier


From staff reports

Lake City Middle School
runners competed in three
recent meets in prepara-
tion for the North Florida
Middle School qualifier at
Bishop Snyder High on
April 23.
In the Gadsden County
Middle School Invitational
on April 9, LCMS winners
were Timothy Pierce in the
S3000 meters, Nicole Morse
in the 1500 meters and
Emma Tucker in the 800
meters. '
Samantha Ziegaus Iwas
second in the 1500 meters


and Bernita Brown was
second in the 800 meters.
The Oakleaf Middle
School Relays on April 8
included individual races
for sixth-graders.
Tucker, Brown, Ziegaus
and Morse won the dis-
tance medley relay. Kelly
Varndell, JTerome Tucker,
Austin Barwick,and Pierce
placed fourth,
Takemma Stewart was
-first in the 200 meters,
second in the 50 meters and
fourth in the 100 meters.
Brown was second in the
800 meters and Barwick
was seventh in the 800


meters.
In the Bradford 191iddle
School Invitational on
April 1, Tucker won the
800 meters and was second
in the 400 meters.
Emily TWintons was
second in the 200 meters
and 6ifth in the 100 meters.
Morse~was fourth in the
800 meters, while Brown
was eighth in the 400
meters and 13th in the 800
meters.
Stewart was 16th in the
100. meters.
Pierce was fifth in the
1600 meters and eighth in
the 800 meters.


could not resolve accused
of Bonds of lying~ to the
grand jury investigating
BAL~CO in 2003 when he,
said he never knowingly
took steroids or RGH, and
when he said he was never
injected by anyone except
his doctors. .
The maximum sen-
tence for the obstruc-
tion of justice count is 10
years in prison, but fed-
eral guidelines called for
15-21 months. For similar
offenses in the BALCO
case, Illston .sentenced
cyclist Tammy Thomas to
six months of home con-
finement and track coach
Trevor Graham to one year
of home confinement.
Bonds walked out of the
courthouse, with his law-
yers, who instructed him
not, to comment because
they said the case isn't
over.
Impeccably dressed in
suit and tie, Bonds flashed
a victory sign to a few
fans.
"Are you celebrating
tonight?" one asked.
"There's nothing to cel-
ebrate," he replied.
Imead defense attorney
Allen Ruby said the pros-
ecution failed to prove the
heart of its case.
The obstruction of jus-
tice count was a compli-
cated charge that asked
jurors to decide if Bonds
was being evasive when
making any one of seven
statements to the grand
jury. He was convicted on
a single statement about
his childhood as the son


of major leaguer Bobby
Bonds and his relation-
ship with personal trainer
Greg Anderson it did
not address performance-
enhancing drugs.
The government "has
determined it's unlawful
for Barry Bonds to tell the
grand jury he's a celeb-
rity child and to talk about
his friendship with Greg
. Anderson," Ruby said.
The foreman of the jury,
who would only give his
first name, Fred, said if
prosecutors want to "pur-
sue this case, they're going
'to have to do more home-
work than they did."
A juror who also gave
Just her fist name, Amber,
said that the final votes
were 8-4 to acquit Bonds
of lying about steroids. and
9-3 to acquit him on lying
about HGH use. The panel
voted 11-1 to convict him
of getting an injection from
someone other than his
doctor, with one woman
holding out, she said.
The so-called needle
count accused Bonds of
lying when he said that
no one other than his doc-
tors injected him with any-
thing. His personal shop-
per, Kathy Hoskins, testi-
fled that she saw Anderson
inject Bonds in the navel
before a rbadtrip in 2002.
Hoskins was not sure what
substance was being inject-
ed.
Amber noted that Bonds'
former mistress, Kimberly
Bell, testified he com-
plained of soreness from
injections.


By PAUL ELIAs
Associated Press

SAN FRANCISCO A
federal jury convicted
Barry Bonds of a single
charge of obstruction of
justice Wednesday but
failed, to reach a verdict
on the three counts at the
.heart of allegations: that he
knowingly used steroids
and human growth hor-
mone and lied to a grand
jury about it. .
Following a 12-day trial
and almost four full days
of deliberation, the jury of
eight women and four men
could reach a unanimous
verdict only on one of the
four counts against Bonds.
U.S. District Judge Susan
Illston declared a mistrial
on the others, a messy end
to a case that put the slug-
ger and baseball itself
under a cloud of suspi-
cion for more than three
years.
Bonds sat stone-faced
through the verdict, dis-
playing no emotion. His
legal team immediately
asked that the guilty ver-
dict be thrown out and
Hlston did not rule on the
request. She set May 20 for
a hearing in the case.
The case also represent-
ed the culmination of the
federal investigation into
the Bay Area Laboratory
Co-Operative steroids ring.
Federal prosecutors and
the' Justice Department
will have to decide wheth-
er to retry Bonds on the
unresolved counts.
The counts that the~jury


Continued From Page 1B
Jernigan has been held
back throughout competi-
tions this year in prepara-
tion for the state final. He
believes that he has a lot
more in him than what he
has shown. '
"I think I could end up
breaking both (school
records)," he said. "Ibelieve
there's alot more in me.Ifs


just right there at my finger
tips. My goal is to leave
with a ring and that's what
I'm pushing myself for. It
would mean everything to
me and my school."
Nerves can play a part in
the contest when lifting at
the highest level. Madison
doesn't believe it will be
a factor for him this time


around. ..
S"Being back again gives
me more confdence," he
said. "Last time I went in
as the underdog. There
was one lift that I wish I
would have got, but this
time I'm shooting for 300
on the bench and 265-275
pounds oil the clean and
jerk."


Continued From PaEge 1B

the days crucial matchups.
"The last time we were
on our court, Chrissie took
her in two sets," McMahon
said. "They went three sets
on clay, and Eve really likes
clay. I'm hoping with the
home-court advantage that
Chrissie can take it."
Susy Romero looks to
remain undefeated against


Callie Lajza in the No. 2
battle. Kelsey Mercer will
take on Breanna Harper at
No. 3, Jessie Bates battles
Sarah Lima at No. 4 and
Heather Benson will take
on Madison Parenti at
No. 5. -
McMahon is confident
that the Lady Tigers can
gain an edge through dou-


bles.
"Eve and Callie are very
good as individuals, but
aren't as cohesive as our
group," McMahon said.
Reichert and Romero .
will pair against Lajza and
Harper.
Mercer will team with
Taylor Owens in the No. 2
doubles' group.


Continued From Page 1B

the inning came off a dou-
ble steal when Espenship
took home after P.K. Yonge
tried to throw out the run-
ner at second base.
For insurance, the Tigers
added another in the bottom
of the fifth when Kirkman
hit a solo shot over the left-
field wall for a 6-0 lead.


"That was a very good
team that came in at 20-0
and ranked No. 1 or No.
2 in 2A," Clark said. "All
of our senior played great.
Mikey hit a home run and it
sounds cliche, but it almost
brought a tear to my eye."
Columbia (12-10, 4-3) has
a chance to clinch the No. 3


position in the district tourna-
mentwith awin atMiddleburg
High at 6 p.m. Friday.
"None of this stuff mat-
ters once we get into the
district tournament," Clark
said. "It's a fresh season
and I still believe we have
the pitching depth to do
some damage."


Obstruction of justice


LIFTERS: Seeking state titles


TENNIS. Doubles will be pivotal





DILBERT ..


THIS SORT
THAT OF INPUT
L UNDS 18 ACT Y
BAD IDEA. TRYING TO
AVOID.n


WHAT'S THAT GOT TO DO
W TH IT, MR. B.?


YOU'RE KCIND OF )(MAYB
EASV TO MESS (~JUS
WITH, vou KNOW GOO
TWA, MR. e..


LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE &1 COMICS THURSDAY, APRIL 14, 2011


Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415


MY GOAL IS TO LEAD
THE COMPANY WITHOUT
KNOWINGUANTNHING


I PLAN TO ADD
SEVEN MORE LAYERS OF
MANAEMEN BETWEEN


DEAR ABBY: We have
been friends with "The Bick-
ersons" for quite some time.
They never have a kind word
to say to each other. Mr. B.
STTo now has a terminal illness,
iE.and you would think they'd be
kinder to each other at a time
like this. On the contrary,
their fights are more ground-
less and vicious than ever. It
~'::~is becoming increasingly dif-
ficult to be around them. This
is when they need friends
more than ever, but they're
driving everyone away! What
can we do? IDVE IS AL
E YOU'RE
T THAT WE NEED -
D, Et.MO/ DEAR LOVE: While you
might imagine that when a
Spouse has a terminal illness
it would bring the couple
closer together, that is not al-
ways the case. Mr. B. may be
frightened, angry, in pain and
taking it out on his wife. Mrs.
B. may be furious at her hus-
band for being sick and de-
pendent, and requiring her to
ANY OF hav gone from being a wife
EA' to a caregiver. Also, they both
may be settling old scores.
Because it's painful to
S watch whats going on but
1 you want to be supportive,
consider socializing with
Them separately. They may
appreciate the time they get
to spend away -from each
other.
DEAR ABBY: When
does dieting become rude? I
have always enjoyed inviting
~E friends and family over for


see some of the other guests
or doesn't want to be left out.
But for a conclusive answer,
you need to query the dieter.
DEAR ABBY: My moth-
er and I are very close, and
I love her very much, but I
have a problem. Mom goes
on every single field trip with
my class. There have even
been times when she was the
only parent in attendance.
The teachers are grateful for
her, but it's becoming em-
barrassing. I'm a freshman
in a private high school, and
I want to start doing things
more independently. What's
the best way to tell Mom be-
fore my next trip that I prefer
she not go without hurting
her feelings? P'M A BIG
GIRL NOW'
DEAR BIG GIRL: Talk
to your mother at a time
when you are both calm. She
needs to understand that her
hovering is making you self-
conscious when you need
some independence. How-
ever, keep in mind that she
may be the only parent who
is volunteering and has the
time to assist in the field trips
which is why the teachers
are grateful. What I'm trying
to convey is how important it
is for you and your mother to
communicate honestly with
each other.
SWrite Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


BABY BLUES


Abi ail Van Buren
www~deorabby~com
dinner. But lately it seems
everyone is on some kind of
diet and "can't eat that." .
I fix healthy meals -free of
fats, sugars and salt. If some-
one has a dietary restriction
or wants to pass on dessert,
I am fine with that, of course.
I don't like it, though, when
my carefully prepared meals
turn into leftovers or get
thrown away off someone s
plate.
Why would anyone ac-
cept a dinner invitation and
then turn into a picky guest?
Would eating 'an average
serving of a good meal once
week blow someone's
diet? LOST THE JOY OF
COOKING
DEAR LOST THE JOY:
I'll answer your questions
in reverse order. Eating an
"average serving- of a good
meal" once a week COULD
blow someone's diet, depend-
ing on the kind of diet the
person is on. And the reason
someone who is on a severely
restricted diet would accept a
dinner invitation on a weekly
basis might be because he or
she wants to see you, wants to


BLONDIE
vOU SUnE LOOK I'M NOT ALL
LIKE YOU COULD iiTRAT HUNGRY
USE A SNACK, RGHT NOW,


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGAR THE HORRIBLE


... tlE 56 EA To LP 7
-r 7 Er RE a O /


AR~IES (March 21-
April 19): Do the best you
can when it comes to earn-
ing your living. Hold your
temper if someone com-
plains or tries to make you
look bad. It's only a matter
of time before your profes-
sionalism is appreciated
and you are rewarded for
your diplomacy and ability
to deal with people. AAA
TAURUS (April 20-
May 20): The choices you
make will determine the
outcome of an encounter
with an organization, gov-
ernment agency or institu~
tion. A power play on your
part will catch whoever is
challeng-ing you off-guard,
allowing you the upper
hand. AAAAA
GEMINI (May 21-June
20): Emotional blackmail
or deceptiveness wit de-
velop at home. Don't give
mn to someone who doesn't
deserve your help. Taking
care of your personal pa-
pers and making changes
that will give you greater
control and power should
be your intent. AA
CANCER (June 21-
July 22): A lack of sincer-
ity can be expected ~from
colleagues who feel you
are the competition. Ask
questions and, if you aren't
happy with the answers you
receive, go higher up until
you have sufficient mnfor-
mation to make a decision.


people around you. Love is
in the stars. AAAA~
SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): You will face
someone who isn't happy
with your recent decisions.
Instead of running for the
hills, face things head-on.
Focus on home and fam-
ily and what you can do to
make your personal life less
stressful. AAt
CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): You'll have
~plenty to consider before
you make a financial, legal
or medical decision. Don't
let anyone pressure you
into doing something you
aren't sure you want to do.
Bide your time until you
feel you have better con-
trol. ItAAt
AQUARI[US (Jan.
20-Feb. 18): Call on old
friends to help you out now,
recalling things you have
done in the past. You can
take on a lot more than you
think and should be volun-
teering or applying for posi-
tions requiring both mental
and physical skills. AAA
PISCES (Feb. 19-
March 20): Your intuition
will help you make the right
decision regarding how to
deal with colleagues and su-
periors. Love is on the rise,
so make plans that will help
you meet someone new, if
you are single, or that will
ensure a romantic evening
with your current partner.


THE LAST WORD
Eucgenia Last

LEO (July 23-Aug.
22): Don't feel an obliga-
tion to spend on anyone
looking for a handout. In-
vest in yourself, not frivo-
lous, luxury items or enter-
tainment. A business trip or
attending a conference will
bring you greater knowl-
edge or help you improve
your skills. AAA
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Speak your mind,
especially concerning af-
fairs of the heart. Listen to
what's being' asked of you
and assess whether or not
you .can offer what's re-
quired. An unexpected cost
will transpire if you promise
to help someone who is in a
fine RAm (ep 23-Oct.
22): Expect someone to be
upset with you if you have
neglected your responsibil-
ities. Problems at home or
when dealing with older or
younger family members
can develop. Overreacting
or overindulgence will lead
to greater uncertainty in

eC RpIOA (t. 23-
Nov. 21); Discuss your
plans and options with
someone who can make a
difference to your status or
career advancement. High
energy and enthusiasm
will help you motivate the


SNUFSY SMITH


GARFIELD


B.C.


by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: P equals J
" KW Y D Bk.Y YK Y DK P S M, K WY B FAR YD K
BSY FD ASJY. BWZK KWY BSIAR
IYZAAM GYYRD FD LSIY ASJY ZGR
AYDD OZOYIBSIX."- OYZIA UZFAYM
PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "When you're born you get a ticket to the freak show.
When you're born in America, you get a front row seat." George Carlin
(c) 2011 by NEA, Inc. 4-14


F RAN K & E RN EST


FOR BETTER OR WORSE


CLASSIC PEANUTS


DEAR AB BY


HuR~relSome couple take


hostility to new heights


HOROSCOPES


CELEBRITY CIPHER





mrri~






mlPIDY~


160 investments

Between Lake City & Ft. White.
6.44 rolling acres. DWMH, 3/2.
1836 sf, great value on paved road.
Need repairs. $54,900
Derington Properties. 965-4300


230 Tutoring

Will Tutor Your Student! Certi-
fidl oM librDe reA c/1 olsxp,'
Summer, Call Judy 386-288-6165


240 Shos&

04544098
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for b gners & ex
SNursing Assistant, $7
next class-04/11/10

Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-04/11/11

Continuing education
Fee inci b ok, spphies, exam

expresstraininerservices.com



310 Pets &Supplies

PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.


411 "ishinery &
Power
Sanding Black
$25
386-758-6886


'420 Wanted to Buy


We BK P ne HM d ood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.

Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$250 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After Spm 386- 752-3648.


430 Garage Sales






Deals you'll never find again!
tq es,lho sewares ,de ibgner
piano, and jewlery. April 15,16
&17th 9am-? Last day make offer
take it all. 695 SE St Johns St.

Employee Garage Sale
Sat. 8-12. Columbia Eye
Associates, 1615 SW Mamn Blvd.
Way too much to list






PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA .
CASE NO.: 09000855CA
SEC.:
CITIFINANCIAL, EQUITY
SERVICES, INC.,
Plaintiff
WLLIE EDWARD GRIFFIS; UN-
KNOWN SPOUSE OF WELIE ED-
WN DALGLRUNNOPWN PAR I
CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UN-
DER AND AGAINST THE HERE-
IN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DE-
FENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT
KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR
ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UN-
KNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM
AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES,
HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES,
OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; VIV-
IAN G. HALL A/K/A VIVIAN
GALE HALL; UNITED ESTATES
OF AMERICA; JOHN DOE AND
JANE DOE AS UNKNOWN TEN-
ANTS IN POSSESSION,
Defendant(s)
N TIE OFO R TE

sure Sale dated April 1, 2011, en-
tered in Civil Case No. 09000855CA
of the Circuit Court of the Third Ju-
dicial Circuit in and for Columbia
County, Florida, wherein their Clerk
of the Circuit Court will sell ,to the
highest bidder for cash on 25th day
of May, 2011, at 11:00 a.m. on the
Third Floor of the Columbia County -
Courthouse, 173 N.E. Hernando
Avenue, Lake City, Florida 32055,
relative to -the following described
Property as set forth in the Final
Judgment, to wit:
LOT 26 PARK WOOD SUBDIVI-
SION, A SUBDIVrISION AS RE-
CORDED INr PLAT BOOK 5,
PAGE 21, COLUMBIA COUNTY
FLORIDA. TOGETHER WITH A
1996 TRIPLE WIDE MOBILE
HHOM0133IN #PHO610133 n
PHO610133CFL.
Any person claiming an interest in
the surplus from the sale, if any, otth-
trteha tte pl spet dsnerr t ofilhea
claim within 60 days after the sale-
This is an attempt to collect a debt
and any information obtained may be

If yo oare pro ith a disability
who needs any accommodation in
order to participate in this proceed-
ing, you are entitled, at no cost to
you, to the provision of certain assis-
tPle e contact:
eAu Coord rato4918PLN Heirnan o
32055
Phone: (386) 719-7428 '
within two(2) ~business days of re-
c ipt of nti e to app ar.1 h iualIs
(800) 955-8701. Individuals who are
voice impaired should call (800)
955-8770.

OA TIS 6TH DAY 0p PRR ,
B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
P. DEWITT CASON
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA

05p525160121 01

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
COUBACOS TY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 11-71-CP
IN RE: ESTATE OF
CYNTHIA ANN JOYE,
deceased.
WIOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of
CYNTHIA ANN JOYE, deceased,
whose date of death was January 30,
2011, is pending in the Circuit Court
for Columbia County, Florida, Pro-
bate Division, File No. 11-71-CP, the
address of which is 173 NE Heman-
do Avenue, Lake City, Florida
3h~e P~ers eal nReresand addre sndt
Personal Representative's attorney
are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and oth-
er persons, who have claims or de-
mands against decedent's estate, in-
cluding unmatured, contingent or ui-
liquidated claims, and who have
musn fiee t iarcla s wth tilis Cor
WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE

TO TM FIC T PULCAIODN O
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE
OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE 014
THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent
and other persons who have claims
or demands against the decedent's








Lawn & Landscape Service


100 'Opbportunities
6 Temporary Farm Workers
needed. Employer: Robert B.
Hayden Graves Co, KY.
Tobacco, Straw/Hay, Row Crop &
Alternative Work. Employment
Dates: 06/01/11- 12/01/11. Wagd
of $9.48/hr. Worker guaranteed
3/4 of contract hours. Tools
provided atdno cost.c Fe moutoing

swb ksteence re use wh n
50% of contract is met. Apply for
this job at the nearest One Stop
Center in your area and reference
Job Order # KYO425201.
mp raryre o Farm Workers
needed. Employer: Rodney Black
-Calloway Co, KY. Tobacco, .
Straw/Hay, Row Crop &
Alternative Work. Employment
Dates: 05/30/11 12/10/11. Wage
of $9.48/hr. Worker guaranteed
S3/4 of contract hours. Tools
provided at no cost. Free housing
provided to non commuting
workers. Transportation &
subsistence reimbursed when
50% s comtr ct smet OApplty for
Center in your area and reference
Job Order # KYO424849.
Securitas Security Services is
hiring FT/PTSecurity Officers in
the Lake City area. Must have a
class D security license and good
computer skills. Great Benefits.
Apply at: www.securitasjobs.com
Lic#BB2300010 EOE M/F/V/D
3 Temporary Farm Workers
needed. Employer: Swift
Farms Calloway Co, KY.
Tobacco, Straw/Hay, Row Crop,
& Alternative Work. Employment
Dates: 05/28/11 12/10/11. Wage
of $9.48/hr. Worker guaranteed
3/4 of contract hours. Tools
provided at no cost. Free housing
provided to non commuting
workers. Transportation &
50(bsistence rtembursedA Ifor
this job at the nearest One Stop
Center in your area and reference
Job Order # KYO424637.
10 Temporary Farm Workers
needed. Employer: Thomas L.
Jenkins Muhlenberg Co, KY.
Tobacco Production & Alternative
Work. Employment Dates.
059 48/1 0//12. arW e o
3/4 of contract hours. Tools
provided at no cost. Free housing
provided to non commuting .
swb kst ene re use wh n
50% of contritct is met. Apply for
this job at the nearest One Stop
Center in your area and reference
Job Order # KYO424645.
Wanted Highly motivated
individual for Sales Position.
Rountree -Moore Automotive

tio~n. Ep lus b t no ne r.
Wanted OTR CLASS A CDL
Driver, must have TWIC card and
passport. Heavy haul exp. req.
Call Jerry Bash 386-965-087r9


120 Mediclmnt
Employen





Physical Therapist
Home Health Care Agency
servicing Lake City and
suudin cutie ski g
sF lo-tmePng ex eice7
Ph sial Ther pist
Please fax resume to
*386 758-3313 att intion:
Lynno apply ni a
almostfamily.com '

HealthCore Physical Therapy
has an immediate opening for an
energetic, hecensed, Physical
Therapy Assistant for our
outpatient clinics: Excellent pay &
great work environment. Fax re-
sume to: 386-755-6639 or email
to: healthcorel ibby@ bellsouth.net.
All resumes kept confidential
Licensed, Experienced, PTA

Send rsum t .3 Bo 14

Email to: pta714@hotmail.com

REPORTER Classifieds

I rnt and On Line

WWW. 8 (ecityreporter~com !


one Item per ad d j
4 lines days S ~adldtional
Rate a plies to private individuals selling
persona rnerchan ise totaln I ga$ or less.
This is a non-refundable rate.


adtinl
One Item per ad il
4 lines *6 days line si ddlon
Rate applies to private individuals selling
persona merchandise to lidngaS5 or less.
This Is a non refundable rate.




One item per add Eah ditonl
4 lines 6 dys line 81.15 '




Rate applies to private individual s selling
personal merchandise totalling$25100 or ess.
Tis is an in-eu dble rae




One item per ad "27
4 lines 6 days 6,~;d~ddtioal
Rate applies to private individuals selling
personal me andis touslln $4 500 or less. .
This is a non refundable rate.




One item pr ad ?
4 lines 6 days h dad ional
persnal erphaons toaellng du60 legss.
Eah ite nau n incld pie




3 dayIs 71 50-eunal ae




Lmied Ito servc tyeadeti-
4 ing s onl dy::,dSO
4 at lin les, on monvth idvuas92.00 n
$1080l meach additional lin S. o e s
Include aadite ional $2.00 pr er



ad for ea Wensa insrtin.


Yo can al s at 75-40 1
Montlday? throgn h Frdidayl from; 8:00

aim.te to 5:00 ic p ym. ade i
Somies pople preerto place their
Inclasifedas in perstonand$.0 soe
ad caeories will requ ireprepay-


You can call so fax or eailyouad
copdy t theog Reprtey r. m 8
FAX: 386-52940 Please
dirctyucoytthClassified ad nproadsm
Dptment. O ofc lct a 8
EMAIL: culassifedslkeiyr-
coyoteRporter.cm


AdsoXpa: Callby*90 Flax/Emib:

Thursdayurcy Wed.,10:00assm ed,90am





Sunday Fri., 10:00 a.m. Edn., 9:00 a.m.


ihese deadlines are subject to change without notice




Ad Errors- Please read your ad
.on the first day of publication.

th fir in precti insrn ad
only the charge for the ad space
in error. Please call 755-5440
immediately foi' prompt correc-
tion and billing adjustments.
Cancellations- Normal advertising
deadlines apply for cancellation.
Billing Inquiries- Call 755-5440.
Should further information be
required regarding payments or
credit limits, your call will be trans-
ferred to the accounting depart-
ment.


Legal

estate, including unmatured, contin-
gent or unliquidated claims, must file
their claims with this court WITHIN
THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIODS AMT FOT ABOOV
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DEBC DNT'S DATE OF DEATII
THE DATE OF FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE IS APRIL
8, 2011.
Personal Representative:
/s/ Cheryl J. Shiver
CHERYL J. SHIVER
4469 NE State Road 47
High Springs, Florida 32643
Attorneys for Personal Representa.
tive:
FEAGLE & FEAGLE, ATTOR-
NEYS, P.A.
By: /s/ Marlin M. Feagle
Marlin M. Feagle
Florida Bar No. 0173248
153 NE Madison Street
eotOffice Blox la65325-63


04544266
April 7, 14, 2011 -


010 AmiouncementS









020 Lost &Found








LOST: Lg 3 yr old white Calico
female cat. Goes by "Hannah".
Lives on 240/Itchetucknee. 9 yr
old daughter brokenhearted. Please
call 386-288-3916 REWARD!!!


10 Jb
1 0 Opportunities
AVON!!!, EARN up to 50%!!!
Only $10 for Starter Kit,
1-8100-275-9945 pin #4206
www.youravon.com/tdavies
Busy office seeking
experienced, energetic person for
receptionist position.
Fax resume to 386-961-8802

CDL A lte dbVa SE
area, 3 years exp or more, Contact
Melissa or Many @ 386-935-2773
Delivery Driver, must be 21 yrs
old, have 6 pts or less on license
and have NO misdemeanors or fel-

CD pply within spahCn ca s!
North Florida Sales
467 SW Ring Ct, Lake City

DUMPhTaRUCK Driver
Drug-free, clean driving record
386-497-3131
7 Temporary Farm Workers
needed. Employer: Joe
O'Donoghue Breckmnridge Co'
KY. Tobacco, Straw/Hay, Row
Crop, Row Crop Produce'
Greenhouse/Nursery & Alternative
Work. Employment Dates:
05/30/11 12/31/11. Wage of
$9.48/hr. Worker guaranteed 3/4
of contract hours. Tools provided
at no cost.cFree hou ingo povided

Transportation & subsistence
reimbursed when 50% of contract
is met. Apply for this job at the
nearest One Stdqp Center in your
Jdba Orne# KYO .593 -

ex eic 1 1a sncretr y.
Workers compensation, personid
injury and gn ra lea mrn I r
employment. Apply in person at
116 NW Columbia Ave.,
Lake City, FL 32055.
WANTED LICENSED
Life and Health
Insurance Agent.
Call 386-755-6800


84 Ford 4610 Tractor. Runs good-
Solid 2WD. New front tires,
350h onO?0050m to. Dep~e~ndable.



402 ApplianceS

Family size upright freezer.
White, very nice. $260. obo
386-397-3269 or
386-292-3927

Kenmore Dryer, apt size,
120 voltage
Runs good, $65
386-397-3269 or 386-292-3927
Nice White Gas Tappan Stove
$165. obo. Ready for LP gas but
will switch for you. 386-397-3269
or 386-292-3927
White clothes dryer. Good shape,
386-397-3269 or
386-292-3927
White Whirlpool Washer
$150
386-397-3269 or
386-292-3927


407 Computers *

HP Computer,
$100.00
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170

IBM Computer,
$65
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170


408 Filmiture

Tan Leather Recliner
Mint C~on~dition

Call 386-754-4094




10" Table Saw

386 77 -886


New Central A/C, still in box,
with full teir year factory warranty

Call 3 636-1090

Tow Behind G~rill/Smoker
$1,250 OBO.
386-249-3104 or
386-719-4802
k

630 fbetor ent
2/2 MH w/screen porch, Irg yard,
quiet/clean/safe 10 unit park,
credit/refs req $475 mo, $475 dep,
NO PETS, 386-965-3003

A very clean & well maintained
2/2 units in nice park. $599.mo
w/$500. dep. Rent includes water,
sewer, trash p/u. Close to town

Clean 23 bdom8 8arge lot,
trees on Turner Road.
Call: 386-752-6269
leave message if no answer.
Mobile Homes for rent in

Whitee 8 Cntc 3623-3404

Nice clean 2&3 bdrm, Five Points,

Nests de 3 bdom hus ne
Monroe St 386-961-1482







Quiet, Country Branford area
38 -867 083 or 3680605m0 42
www suwanneevalleyproperties.com
Room wl/privdate bath. Microwave,
nrde laun rym i tent private
386-965-3477 for information




05254alm Harbor Homes
Call about our
Extreme Makeover Home Sale

800-622-2832

06 MH 3br/2ba open floor plan
w/lg kit w/ island, fireplace. 3 Riv-
ers Est, river access, MLS# 75661
Eastside Village Realty, Inc.
Denise Millgan-Bose 752-5290


Clean Pine Straw,
You pick it up, $1.85 a bale
Delivery of 100 bales $285
386-688-9156
Landscape Maintenance Company






DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
'RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.


Land Services

Back Hoe, Dozer, Chopping, root
raking, bush hog, seeding, sod,
disking, site prep, ponds &
irrigation. Free Est! 386-623-3200


Classified Department: 755-5440


l"x30''
Belt Sander
$25.00
386-758-6886
8" Drill Press
$50
386-758-6886


. f


Advertising copy is subject to
approval by the Publisher who
reserves the right to edit, reject,
or classify all advertisements under
appropriate headings. Copy should
be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the first day of pub-


which was incorrect. Further, the
Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
tso be putlishednor fo nd ge ea
Advertising language must comply ,
with Federal, State or local laws I
regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
nation in employment, housing and
public accommodations. Standard
abbreviations are acceptable; how-
aveb, th ir word of each ad may

I~n Sr;1r 1na Oanl ine
wws.l;t cictityreporter~cons


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED THURSDAY, APRIL 14, 2011

Lak~e City Reporter





CLASI ISS


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

755-5440


ADvantage


361 FarmEquipment 440 mriscenaneous


a





Call La ke City Reporter Classifieds!


WE CAN HE LP 38 6-755-5440











Classified Department: 755-5440


810 Home for Sale

3/2 in Creekside S/D. Fenced back
yard, sprinklers. large
screened rear lanai.
$175,000. MLS# 77385
386-623-6896 Access Realty
3/2 in town, lots of upgrades,
currently leased, MLS#76658,
$49,900 Call Jo Lytte at
Remax Professionals, Inc.
386-365-2821
3/2 in Woodhaven w/Fla Room,
fenced back yard MLS#75499,
$114,900 Call Pam @
Remax 386-303-2505 or
email- remaxpamb@gmail.com
3/2 MH on 1.5 acres, fenced,
porches, wkshp,well maintained
$49,900 MLS# 77309 Call Josh
Grecian 386-466-2517
westfieldrealtygroup.com
3/2 on 4.84 Acres, fireplace, sheds,
many fruit tree: Call Jo Lytte at
Remax $68,90 : MLS#72427
386-365-2821, www~jolytte.
florida-property-search.com
3/2 on 5 acres. Large master suite
and open kitchen. Back 2 ac.
fenced for horses,
.MLS# 75830 $102,900
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
3/2 on 8.7 acres w/Fla room,


@ 386-758-8900 Remax,
$179,000 www.visitpam.com
3/2 on 9.7 acres. fenced & cross
fenced. Separate pastures. Animals
are negotiable. Owners motivated.
MLS# 77431 $179,900
Century i1/The Darby Rogers Co.
3br and Ig open floor plan
w/separate office. Beautifully
landscaped. Private access to Lake
Jeffery. MLS# 76231 $199,000
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
4/2 with 1000 sq ft workshop,
fenced back yard, 2 car garage,
MLS#77602, Bring Offers!
$174,900, Call Nancy @
R.E.O. Realty 386-867-1271
5 acre Home w/Horse Barn,
Wood floors, New Kitchen,
Gazebo & Koi Pond MLS#76039
$169,900 Call Aaron @ Westfield
Realty Group 386-867-3534 ,
Beautiful Home For Sale
The Preserve at Laurel Lake
4/2 or 3/2 $194,900 MLS#77257
Call Scott Stewart 386-867-3498
westfieldrealtygroup.com
CBC 3/1 home, inside city limits,
fericed backyard, detached carport .
w/office MLS#77411 $82,900
Call R.E.O.Realty,
Nancy Rogers @ 386-867-1271
Charming Remodeled Home
in Beautiful Neighborhood
MLS#74765 $142,900 Call
Charlie Sparks @ Westfield
Realty Group 386-755-0808
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
4br 1/5ba. 1332 sqft. Great floor
plan, noce yard, close to town.
Only $84,900 Lori Geiberg
Simpson. 386-365-5678
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
5br/4ba on 5+ac. 3 car garage,
inground pool/hot tub and more.
MLS #75854 $569,900 Lori
Geibeig Simpson. 386-365-.5678
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Superbly maintained home in
Creekside. Oversized garage &
storage. Many extras. Elaine K.
Tolar 386-755-6488 $209,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
New home in Mayfair S/D. 4br on
corner lot. Split plan. $214,900
MLS# 76919 Elaine K. Tolar.
386-755-6488
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Home on the lake in town. 4br/3ba
MLS# 76085 Elaine K. Tolar 386-
755 6838 or9Mar8 Bown lVhhte-

Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Great home in Woodcrest S/D 3/2
home, covered back porch, nice
yard.MLS# 75198 Elaine K. Tolar
386-755-6488 $129,900
Country Home on 2.5 Acres,
$95,000 MLS#77039
Remax Professionals, Inc.,
jo lytte@remaxnfl.com
386-365-2821


810 Home for Sale

Custom built home with many
upgrades. Screened back porch,
16x24 workshop.
MLS# 77178 $184,500
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
Custom, 3/2.5 built in 2007.
on 10.8 manicured acres.
completely fenced, Owner Fin.
avail., MvLS#77382 Call Patti
386-623-6896 Access Realty
Ft White MH on 16.27 Acres,
near many recreational activities
MLS#77404 $149,900
Jo Lytte Remax Professionals
386-365-2821
Great house in Piccadilly S/D. 2
car garage and inground pool.
Newly painted inside & out.
MLS# 76786 $133,500
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
Great Opportunity!'
Currently rented, Seller will
assist w/buyer's closing costs
MLS# 77335, Call Michael at
Westfield 386-867-9053 $99,900
Gwen Lake area. Beautiful up-
grades 4/3 w/tile & laminate
floors, fireplace, new kitchen, Ig
den. fenced yard. $125,000, 386-
397-4766 Hallmark Real Estitte
Hallmark Real Estate. Brick 3/2.
Man out rads e firep c ,
more. Great location on cul-de-
sac! $149,900. 386-755-6600
Historical Home on Lake Isabel-
la. 3/3 w/basement! Great as a pri-
vate residence or a wonderful pro-
fessional office. $240,000 386-
719-0382 Hallmark Real Estate
Home on 15 Acres w/2500 sq ft,
workshop, MLS# 77552 $235,000
Call Brittany Stoeckert at
Results Realty
386-397-3473
Just Reduced 4/2 on 1.57 acres,
fireplace. partially fenced, MLS#
77412, Call Nancy Rogers at
R.E.O. Realty Group
386-867-1271 $64,900
Large Brick, 3/1, 4.43 acres, metal
roof, MLS# 77415 $104,888
Call Nancy Rogers @ R.E.O.
Realty Group, Inc. 386-867-1271
nancytrogers@msn.com
Large Home on 1 acre, 4/2,
Fla Rm, wrap around front porch
MLS#77292 $148,000
Call Brittany Stoeckert at
Results Realty386-397-3473
Lg home on corner lot w/garage'
Eastside Village. Clubhouse,
heated pool MLS# 71901 Eastside
Village Realty, Inc. Denise
Milligan-Bose 386-752-5290
Lots of acerage. All brick home.
Screened in porch. Extra big
closets. Mature pines.
MLS# 76765 $115,000
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
Luxury 3/2 Log Home, Cypress
interior, whole house generator,
$269,900 MLS# 76899 Call
Roger Lovelady @386-365-7039
westfieldrealtygrouIp.com
Make an Offer! 3 br brick, quiet
resid'1 street in Live Oak. HUD
home is sold "as is"` Hallmark
Real Estate 386-365-5146
www.hudhomestore.cornm
Nearly 17 Acres w/House
on paved road, Very Spacious!
MLS#76902 $194,900
Call 386-487-7484 Speak to
Brodie Westfield Realty Group
Nice home with ealt in kitchen and
a nice sized living room. Pleanty
of room for entertaining.
MLS# 77.584 $89,900
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
On Golf Course w/lake view. 3/2
home w/1g rooms, 3 fireplaces, wet
bar & big deck. Newly reduced to
$214,900.3Hallmark Real Estate

Open for Bid! 3/2 DW w/corner
stone fireplace, fenced yard & Ig
kit. HUD property, sold "as is"
MLS 77290- 386-365-3886 Deb-
bie King Hallmark Real Estate
Owner Fianncing! wooded 1/4 ac.
lots in Suwannee County, close to
River, high & dry. Bring your SW
or DW or RV. $6,500
Derington Properties.965 4300


640 eno'aleHomes

3/2 DWMH over 1700 sqft. New
Roof & CH/A. Doublesided fire-
place, custom kit w/breakfast nook
& wet bar. $89,500 MLS# 73861
386-623-6896 Access Realty
Hallmark Real Estate. DWMH
4/2 on 5 ac. High & Dry. 24X36
workshop holds 4 cars. Fireplace
kitchen island w/drop down and
more. $114,900. 386-75_5-6600
Owner Financing-3/2
TWMH in Wellborn. Only
$89.900! Call Taylor Goes
of Access Realty @ 386-344-7662.


650 & L ~bd "

Owner Fin, 3/2, S of Lake City,
quiet, wooded, 1.5 ac, sml dn $700
mo, 386-590-0642/386-8671833
ww w.suwanneeval leyproperties.com
OWNER FINANCING
3br/2ba DWMH with 5 acres. 10
additional acres available. Daniel
Crapps Agency 386-623-6612

Unf u~rnished Apt


MC11e nas low as 35

Windsong Apts
assasess
SPRING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans;
some with garages.
Call 386-454-1469
or visit our website:
www.springhillvillage.net

1 & 2 Bedroom Homes
Move in for as low as

386- 552423 -
Great location W of I-75, spacious
deluxe 2BR apts., garage, W/D
hook up. patio. $600 & up, + SD,
386-344-3715 or 386-965-5560
The Lakes Apts. Studios &t IBr's
from $135/wk. Util. & cable iricl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Updated aartmE tsewt/tile f oors
ERom $525. + sec
Call M~ichelle 386-752-9626


0720 Fu"rniAshe pt
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fric ,e, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808


730 HomeForRent
3ba/2ba, New carpet & paint: .5
ac 2 mi from d'town. No pets.
Lease req'd: Anv. background only.
$850 +dep. 752-8696, 752-5025.
4/2,on 10 acres, w/lake access, off
of South Mari ,s $1u)100 per

Call 386-752-3066
Like new site-built home for rent,
3/2, on 5 acres, no pets! Non-
smoking environment. Call for de-
tails, $800mo + dep 386-758-1789


750 ""siness a

05.525390
2,000 sq ft, 1 mile S of I-75 on
47l, includes warehouse & mini
golf,3 bth (incl handicap),

c ner tt S nir acsae,u ec.
386-752-1364 or 965-4340

Oss.25.50s
GREAT STARTER SPACE
for Salon at Marion Crossing.
Move in ready with
equipment incl., $1600/mo.
Call Scott Stewart
386-867-3498
Westfield Realty Group


830 Coo"""rcial

Great Location with lots of
flexible space & visibility for lease
Great Price Too!
~Call Scott Stewart @ Westfield
Realty Group 386-867-3498

Multiple Use 12,000 sq ft
of Office & Warehouse space,
Loading dock, Storage yard,
MLS#77349 $395,000, Charlie
386-755-0808 Westfield Realty


850 Wtrrn
Property
DWMH on Ten Acres w/lakefront,
surrounded by oaks, $115,900
MLS#75571, Call Jo Lytte at
Remax Professionals 386-365-
2821, jolytte@remaxnfl.com

River k 1 paon Sudwamleed Rver,
$349,900 MLS#76336 Call-
Jo Lytte at Remax Professionals
386-365-2821
River Front Property 6.45 Acres,
in White Sprgs close to Big Shoals
Park, Shelter for entertaining,
$124,888 MLS# 77417 Call Nancy
@ R.E.O. Realty 386-867-1271


890 Resort Property

Furnished Home on Itchetucknee
River, Wrap around covered decks
on two levels,MustSEE! $375,000
MLS#77006 Call Jo Lytte
Remax 386-365-2821

River Access, Refurbished Rent-
al Units & Home + Lot,
Bamn, Pool, Hot Tub $329,900
Call Jo Lytte 386-365-2821
MLS#76734 Remax Professionals


940 Trucks








951 ve`ee inal
Homestead Rancher Travel
Trailer, 28ft, Que slideout, Fiber-
glass, Awning, sleeps 8. $10,000.
(850)322-7152


ADVERTISE YOUR

Job Opportunities in the

Lake City Reporter-
ClRSsifieds.

Enhance Your Ad with

Your Individual Logo

For just pennies a day.
Call today,
755-5440.


810 Home for Sale

Ready for Fun &i Family. 4br/2ba
custom home on 33.84 ac. has
stocked fish pond & huge 54x60
shop. $325,000. Hallmark Real
Estate 386-719-0382
Rolling Oaks, 3/3 + Bonus Rm, (
5 acres, back porch & more!
MLS#77528 Call Pam Beauchamp
a\t 386-758-8900 Remax $284.900
remaxpamb@gmail.com
Solid Brick Home on 5 Acres,
Close to town but in the country!
MLS#76063 Must See!$129,888
SCall Brittany Stoeckert at
386-397-347.3 Results Realty
Spacious, Open Floor Plan Home,
fenced back yard, screen porch,
$179,900 MLS#76796 Call Jo
Lytte@Remax Professionals, Inc.
386-365-2821
Two for the price of one. Updated
main home w/a 3/2 guest home. A
lot of living space for the price.
MLS# 77348 $244,900
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
Welcome home. 3br/2ba brick.
Great location on the east side.

MLS#r 77e6d8to s9,900
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
Well ~e Cae o / n14 A res,


at 386-487-1484
westfieldrealtygroup .com
Well maintianed 3/2 1/2 acre
minutes from town. 20x40
workshop screened porch
MLS# 73787 $99,p000
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
You can't beat this Price! 1995
SWMH on 3/4 ac. Paved road,
1216 sf, 2/2 split bedroom plan.
Needs work! $29,900
Derington Properties. 965-4300

8 FarmS a
Acreage

05 su See Take Over Pymt's
10 Ac-Make offer, 20 Ac-
$139,500 $6,975 P/A, Fine
Area, 3 miles W of Col. City
School, Owner Fin 5%, Rolling
Pasture 386-752- 1364/965-4340

10 acres with Travel Trailer &
Electricity; close to Itchetucknee
Springs, $38,00)0, MLS# 76264
Wetall Mllard3G8 -en6 700

4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$69,900. $613mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancinp.com
4 acres, Wellbomn, New Well
intalled, Beautifully wded
pt/ eared Home Site, o nr fin,
no down, $39,900, $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
Half to ten acre lots. Some w/
well, septic, pp. We finance; low
dwn pmt. Deas Bullard Properties.
386-752-4339. www.1andnfl.com
Heavily Wooded Land, 10 Acres
MLS#7584L t94e900

Remax Professionals, Inc.
386-365-2821


il,
ON WHEELS & WATERCRAFT w .


1


750 "odinfetas

oss25553
OFFICE-RETAIL SPACE
for lease on Branford Hwy.
High Traffic area with 1045sf.-
1398sf. Call Scott Stewart
386-867-3498
Westfield Realty Group

OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$695. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor


790 Vacation RentalS

Horseshoe Beach Spring Special
Gulf Front 2br, w/1g porch, dock,

(524sm4 8 676-3935. 3
alwaysonvacation.com #419-181


805 Lots forSale

5 Acre Lot, Secluded & Cleared,
MLS# 67871 $60,000
Call Lisa Waltrip
@ 386-365-5900
westfieldrealtygroup.com

A high & dry buildable wooded
.734 of ac.,Forest Country. MLS#
76668 Eas sideMVillag Ralty,

@386-752-5290
Beautiful .92 Acre Lot-
3 Rivers-Ft. White-High & Dry!
Only $11,900.
Call Taylor Goes of Access Realty
@ 386-344-7662.
Forest Country building lot,
scattering of trees, Motivated
Seller $19,999 MLS#75140
Remax Professionals, Inc.
Jo Lytte 386-365-2821
Hallmark Real Estate. Cleared
2.57 ac. fenced w/Dutchman
camper 32'. Great area in O'Brien.
Close to Live Oak, Lake City,
Branford. $25,000 386-755-6600
Nice 4 acre parcel located in
O'Brien. Wo 't last long at only
$13,500. Call Taylor Goes of
Access Realty @386-344-7662.
PUBLISHER'S NOTE .
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject teo the fa
housmng act wi mae st ilg l

limitoaidovne oris pi ena en bsed
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowmngly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis-
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telepph nee nmle to the hearing


810 Home for Sale

1999 Doublewide,
3/2 fenced back yard
on 1 acre.
MLS# 76315 $64,900
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
3/2 Brick Home in town, fenced
back yard w/12x12 workshop
$79,900 Call Nancy @ R.E.0
Realty 386-867-1271MLS# 77414
** nancytrogers@msn.com
3/2 Brick home on .59 acre, on the
lake with back sunroom. Garage &
storage building.
MLS# 76769 $222,900
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
3/2 Custom Westemn Cedar Home
on 2 acre lakefront lotMLS#74681
Call Jo Lytte at Remax
Professionals, Inc. 386-365-2821
jolytte@remaxnfl.com


Homestead Rancher
Travel Trailer
28ft. One slideout
fiberglass, awning,
sle ps 8.

$1 0,000
('all
850-322-7152


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LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED THURSDAY, APRIL 14, 2011