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UFPKY NEH LSTA



The Lake City reporter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01525
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 4/10/2011
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
System ID: UF00028308:01525
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text

TO DAY'S


;Ilr ;a


i:


326


Vol. 1 37, No. 66 $1.00


www.Iakecityrveporter.com


A grant from the state
helps fund the collection,
said Kurt Seaburg, haz-
ardous waste coordina-
tor for Alachua County
Environmental Protection.
The event is a partner-
ship between .Columbia
County, the Department of
Environmental Protection
and Alachua County
Environmental Protection.
More than 400 people
ivere estimated in atten-
dance at this year's event,
said Pam Davis, Winfield
Solid Waste Facility office


manager.
Columbia County's
round-up is one of the
most heavily attended,
Seaburg said. The collec-
tion is hopefully a positive
influence for the commu-
nity.'
Residents are so appre-
ciative of being able to
get rid of toxic materials,
Davis said. Many save.
items throughout the year
to bring to the Avent.
"It's no cost here," she
WASTE continued on 3A


event was Saturday at
the Columbia County
Fairgrounds.
"I think it's great," she
said. "I'm glad they have
it."
The round-up is, an
opportunity for Cblumnbia
County residents to prop-
erly dispose of household
hazardous wastes.


By ANTONIA, ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter~com
There was only one
place Margaret Pettigrew
of Lake City wanted to
bring hazardous wastes
found while cleaning out
her barns -- the Toxic
Round-up.
The 12th annual


ANTONIA ROBINSON/Lake City Reporter
Van Turner sorts through pesticides for disposal at the toxic
round-up Saturday.


Author of 'Weird
Florida' scheduled
for an appearance.
By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter. com
National Library Week
begins today and Columbia
County residents are
encouraged to join the
nation to celebrate local
libraries.
Several activities are
planned during the week
at the Columbia County
pB ah: a Leet the Aumain
program is 2 p.m. today
with the author of "WTeird
Florida," Charlie Carlson; a
bilingual story time is 3:30
p.m. Monday with a DVD
screening of "Florida: A
Sense of Place,'" by Florida
Author Patrick Smith at 7
p.nri.; and there's a scaven-
ger hunt for ages 10-17 at 4
p.m. Tuesday.
National Library Week,
sponsored by the American


Library Association, began
in 1958, said Debbie
Paulson, library director.
The event celebrates librar-
ies throughout the nation.
"It's just a nice way to
bring attention to the library
and have people stop by
and see it," she said.
John Grisham, a nation-
ally-kiown best-selling
author, is the honorary
chair for National Library.
Week. This year's theme is
"Create Your Own Story At
Your Library."
Legislators like to hear
pe sonal sto is from con-
instead of ~just receiving
data from officials, Paulson
said. The week falls at a
good time because legisla-
tors are in session right
now.
The library offers
resources daily to the com-
munity, such as meeting
space for non-profit organi-
zations, research'
UBRARY continued on 3A


ANTONIA ROBiNSONILake City Reporter
Joe Lauermnan, and his daughter, Gwen, 4, look at a nature book during the A ligator Lake
Spring Festival Saturday.
7, to learn about nature
and conserving resources.
"I'm trying to learn and ..4-. -
teach her about it," she
said. B I a
Jessie Taylor came to
last year's festival with
her father and enjoyed the
return trip this year. -
"I love it," she said. "I
like the birds, flowers and

e ig tr Lake is
FESTIVAL continued on 3A


Above: Birds of
prey expert Leslie
Staub with a hawk,
on display at thie
Alligator Lake
Spring Festival.


Left: Emmra Glover '
14, works on a
painting during
the Alligator Lake
Spring Festival
Saturday.


WToman in
serious condition. '
2 charges filed.
From staff reports
A Live Oak man was
arrested after a hit-and-run
accident Friday night.
Antwanna D. Roundtr-ee,
25, of Live Oak, was travel-
ing west in a 1997 Infinity
four door sedan at 8:20
p.m. on 60th Street at 147th
Road in Suwannee County.
Kimberly Burnett was walk.
ing west on 60th Str~eet on
the south side of the road
in (FrOnt of Roundtree.
FOT TreSORS unknown,


Roundtree failed to see
Burnett walking in the
roadway. He struck Burnett
with the front of his car.
Roundtree left the scene
after hitting Burnett. He
was later located at his
residence in Live Oak and
arrested .d
Roundtree was charged
with failure to render aid
and leaving the scene of a
traffic crash. He was tranS-
ported to Suwannee County
Jail.
Burnett was serious-
ly injured and taken to
Shands at the University of
Florida.


Photos by Antonia Robinson
Lake City Reporter


3 71 23 90Opinion .......
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IEake


B~


Sports, I




T~t


Reporter


un day, April 10, 20 1 1


Toxic Round-Up draws crowd IIII


More than 400 people show
up at Fairground to get nid
of hazardous materials.


Library Week


ATURE


ENJOYING


Alligator
Lake- Festival
COmnbines
Run wlm
education *

By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@iakecityreporter.com

day for the com-
munity to enjoy
the Second Annual
SA llig a to r Lake a e u i u
Spring Festival, said Lauri
Shubert, Gateway Wildlife
Habia Organization

The event, sponsored
by Four Rivers Audubon
and GWHO,.served as a
celebration of nature and
the natural resources pro-
vided ~by the park.
More than 400 people
were estimated in atten-
dance at the event, she
said. The day featured
educational speakers, a
paint-out, organizations
sharing information on
protecting the environ-
ment and much more. ~
Ciliane Taylothef e 1
with her daughter, Jessie,


. *Live Oak man

arreSted after

hitting pedestrian


I


TODAY IN
NATION
G ol~t 3 1 .rl n m e nt ~

















Friday: Friday: Saturday: Saturday: Wednesday: Wednesday:
11-24-36-37 9 1-6-28-30-34 Afternoon: 6-1-9 Afternoon: 3-2-8-3 2-15-21-22-24-45 10-18-41-55-56 PB15
Evening: 4-8-1 Evening: 3-7-5-3


AROUND FLORIDA




Disputed pill-tracking system gets go-ahead


Celebrity Birthdays


PTO LE INE PLP N p p



Eliminated 'Idol" singer needed medic


Daily Scripture

"The Son is the radilance of
God's alory and the exact rep~-
rOSentation of his being.After
he had provided purification for
SIns, he sat down at the right
hand of the Majesty in heaven."

-Hebrews. 1:3



Lakre City Reporter
HOW TO REACH US BUSINESS
Main number ........(386)752-1 293 Controller Sue Brannon....754-0419
Fax number .. . . ... .752-9400 (sbrannon~lakecityreporter.com)
Circulation ... .. . ... .. .755-5445
Online... www.Iakecityreporter.com CIRCULATION
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of Home delivejyof the Lake City Reporter
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub- should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180 Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7 30
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055. am. on Sunday.
Me"e Adt Buee doatC rackueat and Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
The Associated Press. problems with your delivery service.
Ali material herein is property of the Lake In Columbia County, customers should
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser-
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POSTMASTER: Send address changes in all other counties where home delivery
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NEWS Home delivery rates
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CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern,, question or suggestion,
please call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifica-
11008 WIll run in this space. And thanks for reading.


LAKE CITY REPORTER SUN DAY REPORT SUNDAY, APRIL 10, 2011


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


less and making more use
of electronic conferencmng.
But the report said the
state could do even more.
Its recommendations
include contracting with
travel agents instead of let-
ting~ employees make their
own arrangements, getting
better deals on travel and
conferencing services and
capping reimbursements
for hotel expenses.

Man charged for
kicking dog
PORT ST. LUCIE A
Port St. Lucie man is facing
an animal cruelty charge
after authorities said he
kicked a Chihuahua with a
pointed toe cowboy boot.
The Chihuahua report-
edly urinated blood follow-
i the incident.
mAntonio Rodriguez-
Sac ez dem dd indeton-

ing he tripped over it while
he argued with his wife.
But Rodriguez-Sanchez's
wife, son and daughter
told investigators he pum-
meledbthe p because

couple fought. That argu-
met Iast onth resulted
arrest on an aggravated
battery charge for domes-
tic violence. He bailed out
after paying $35,000.
Rodriguez-Sanchez then
surrendered to authorities
this week on the animal
cruelty warrant. He was
,release .Thursday on $500
bd~il.

SAssociated Press


valuable jewelry in what
authorities are calling a lot-
tery scam.
The Broward Sheriff's
Office is looking for two
suspects who ripped off
70-year-old Guillermina
DeLaCruz ill Pompano
Beach. The woman lost
$7,200 in cash and jewelry
worth about $75,000.
DeLaCruz was
approached in a Wal-Mart
by a man and a woman,
The woman claimed to
have a $3 million wmmnng
lottery ticket but could not
cash it because she was in
the country illegally. The
woman said two people
were needed to cash her
ticket for a $50,000 fee.
After withdrawing
the money and jewelry'
DeLaCruz asked the cou-
ple to stop so she could
get something to drink.
When she came out of a
store, the pair was gone,

Officials cut
travel 48 pret
TALIAHASSEE
- 11 lgsl tve ieot said
their travel expenses by
48 pe ceat oer a fouu year

year ending last June.
The report released
Friday by the Office
of Program Policy
Analysis & Government
Accountabilityr said ,
travel spending in 2009-10
dropped to $55 million.
State employees are .
adding mtilliple taskt;oi1 .
each trip, driving instead
of flying, simply traveling '


TALIAHASSEE

Department
of Health
on Friday
T h Flridannounced it
is going ahead with a dis-
putell prescription drug
tracking system to help
close down "pill mills" that
sell painkillers and other
medications to drug deal-
ers and addicts.
Gov. Rick Scott wanted
Sthe database scrapped,
questioning its effective-
ness and arguing it would
infringe on patient pri-
vacy, but Surgeon General
Frank Farmer Jr., a Scott
appointee, cleared the way
for implementation by .
rejecting a contract chal-
lenge that has held it up
for the last four months.
Farmer cited a state law.
passed two years ago to
create the monitoring sys-
tem.
Law enforcement offi~
cials said the lack of a .
database has made Florida
the nation's epicenter of
prescription drug abuse'

acs thebcouer hinm
what's been dubbed the
."Flamingo Express."

Pam o di nd Sate
President Mike
Haridopolos, both strong
'supporters of the elec-
tronic monitoring system,
hailed Farmer's order.
'The database will pro-
vide 'shock and awe' in
Flonida's efforts to end
the criminal abuse of
legal prescription drugs "
Haridpolos said in a state-
ment.


JASON MATTHEW WALKERILake City Reporter


Florida Gateway College student Charles Jenkins, 21, swings during a softball game against
the Bandits on Wednesday at the Columbia Countyr Softball Fields.


only as a white man in his
late 40s to early 50s.
Neighbors reported see
i t eeast one person run
The State Fire Marshal also
is investigating.


Elderly woman
victimized in scam
POMPANO BEACH
- An elderly Broward
SCounty woman is out
thousands of dollars and


The Merritt Island -
Republican, who's also
running for the GOP U.s.
Seb teS 8)mia don, din
the Florida Senate would
strengthen the monitoring
system and increase pni-
vacy protections.
Izgislation, though,
has been introduced in
the Hoilse to repeal the
monitoring system. It has
support there from House
Sljeaker Djean Cannon'
R-Winter' Park, as well as
Scott.


Reggae. artist Bunny Waller
is 64.
- Actor Steven Seagal is 60.
SAco cSte M~cl is 57.
Gustafson (10,000 M~aniacs)
is 54.
Rock singer-musician Brian
Setzer is 52.


Actor Harry Morgan is 96.
M Actor Max von Sydow is
82. -
: Aco sm Sheri en 7
is 75.
Rhythm-and-blues singer
Bobbie Smith (The Spinners)
is 75.


LOS.ANGELES

expected to land in
the bottom three on
"American Idol" but felt so
overwhelmed when she
was eliminated that she needed a
little medical assistance..
The 22-year-old singer from New
York City said Friday she had a
medic walk her offstage at the end
of Thursday's show in Los Angeles.
She said she needed help because
she had a "little bit of a moment."
Toscano didn't offer details, but
said she's fine after receiving aid
- and the support of the show's
judges.
Judges Randy Jackson, Steven
Tyler and Jennifer Lopez expressed
shock on the air that the audience
vote faie to keep Toscano in the

The songbird said the "American
Idol" panel offered her love and sup-
port later.

Lu met, '12 Angry Men,'
'Network' director, dies
NEW YORK Sidney Lumet,
the award-winning director of such
acclaimed films as "Network,"
"Serpico," "Dog Day Afternoon" and
"12 Angry Men," has died. He was
86.
Lumet's death was confirmed
Saturday by Marc Kusnetz, who is
the husband of Lumet's stepdaugh-
ter, Leslie Gimbel. He said Lumet
died during the night and had suf-
fered from lymphoma.
~A Philadelphia native, Lumet
moved to New York City as a
child, and it became the location of
thoice fr mor tan 3 h fls
long love affair rw th the city, he often

sSweh d ramsm ce of the

rahttn ad "erico s1ked at
the hard lives and corruptibility of
New York police officers. "Dog Day
Afternoon" told the true-life story of
two social misfis who set in motion
a chain of disastrous events when


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Wednesday, March 30 photo released by Fox, Pia Toscano performs
in front of the judges on the singing competition series, 'American Idol,' in Los
AngeleS.


they tried to rob a New York City
bank on an oppressively hot summer
afternoon.
He was nominated four times for
directing Academy Awards, and
although he never won, Lumet did
receive an honorary Oscar in 2005 for
lifetime achievement. He also received
the Directors Guild ofAmerica's pres-
tigious D.W. Griffith Award for lifetime
achievement mn 1993.

Tyler Perry gives Georgia
family new home
NEWNAN, Georgia M/ovie
mogul Tyler Perry delivered on a
Chnistmas promise when he handed
the keys of a new four-bedroom
house to anl 88-year-old woman who


lost her rural Georgia home to a fEire.
Rosa Lee Ransby and her seven
grand- and great-grandchildren lost
their home a week before Christmas.
Perry saw the story on a local
television newscast and decided to
rebuild the house. He also fully fur-
nished it.
More than 20 family members
attended the ceremony in rural
Coweta County on Friday.
Perry said he wanted to do some-
thing for Ransby when he found out

rebid edsisd dh maeve t gtowas
getting her enough space for the
children and for them to have room
to pay.

SAssociated Press


Taking a swing with softball.


House fire hides
murder victim
ZELLWOOD -
Firefighters responding to
a house fie in a small town
northwest of Orlando found
a murder victims inside aftdr
dousing the blaze.
The Orange County
Sheriffs Office reported
that the unidentified man
found in Thursday's fire
liad been the victim of foul
aiy. His boywas fund m
a ekdr'oom. He' is described





.Q ag p





ANTONIA ROBINSON/Lake City Reporter

Easter Bunny arrives at Lake City Mall

Elizabeth Depasqu'ale, 7, of Lake City gives the Easter Bunny a big kiss Saturday at the Lake
City Mail. The Bunny arrived Saturday and began seeing children, handing out free gifts.
There was also face painting, a duck pond, balloons, refreshments and various other activities
for the children, including the Belk Kids Fashion Show.


LIBRARY: Snecial events

Continued Fromn Page 1A


--------- ------------


I


OB/ YN

DA NA GREEN\E MD
WOMEN'S HEALTH WITH A WOMAN'S TOUCH


LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & WORLD


SUNDAY, APRIL 10, 2011


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


burglary tools and dealing
in stolen property.

Thursday, April 7
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office
SJohn Allen Turner,
42, 4080 Driskell Road,
Milton, warrant: Violation
of probation on original
charges of robbery and
grand theft.
From staff reports.


The following informa-
tionz was provided by local
law enforcement agencies.
The following people have
been arrested but not con-
victed. All people are inno-
cent unless proven guilty.

Wednesday, April 6
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office
aCanesha Corbin, 30,
7770 SW Symphony Loop,


warrant.
aFrank Troy Kerce,
38, 1842 SW Nautilus
Road, warrant: Violation
of probation on' original
charge of organized
scheme to defraud.
aRuby Mershon
Waldron, 48, 198 NE
Lavern St., warrant
Violation of probation
on original charges of
burglary, possession of


.( -- I


.r ,


"~We're here to solve
a complex problem if
called upon," said mission
commander Maj. Mike
Johnson. .
The noncombat unit
will be based indefinitely
at Yokota U.S. Air Force
base, just west of Tokyo.
"We're here to assist
and advise the Japanese
.military and to be a quick
reaction force if something
really, really bad does hap-
pen. All indicators say it's
not going to, but it's better
to have us and not need
Sus than to need us aird
So hlaek ms, sid 10as er
most senior enlisted man
in the outfit
The unit arrived with 32
vehicles and piles of high-
tecli equipment carried on
seven planes. One vehicle
is a mobile laboratory
where staff can quickly
analyze substances, said
Dumdie, who comes from
Copperas Cove, Texas.
In a demonstration to
journalists, Marines and
sailors rescued mock vic-
tims who may be exposed
to chemicals or radiation,
extracting then? from an


overturned car and the top
of a three-story building
and whisking them to a
makeshift decontamina-
tion tent. There Marines
in full body suits cut off the
outer clothing of the vic-
tims and sprayed some off
with water and scrubbed
others down with soap and
water.
Other victims who pre-
tended to be injured were
rushed to a medical tent
where doctors and medics
attended to them.


By MALCOLM FOSTER
Associated Press

TOKYO Wearing gas
masks and baggy gray body
suits, a special U.S. Marine
Corps unit trained to rescue
people in chemical, biologi-
cal or nuclear emergencies
held drills Saturday with
Japanese counterparts,
standing ready to help out if
needed around the crippled
Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear
plant
The 145-member
Chemical Biological
Incident Response Force,
in ed fa ila naval a p

Head, Maryland, near
Washington, D.C., flew to
Japan on April 2 to offer its
assistance, officials said.
It is the unit's first over-
seas deployment, but it
does not signal height-
ened alarm in Washington
about the troubled nuclear
plant, members said. It has
no immediate plans to go
north, closer to the plant,
where operators are try-
ing to bring reactors under
control after their cooling
systems were knocked out
by last month's tsunami.


the headwaters for the
Ichetucknee River and
the park is a designated
site on the Great Florida
Birding Trail and a
Certified Wildlife Habitat
with the National Wildlife
Federation-
Park attractions include
walking trails, a play-
ground and picnic.
"It's just a great
resource for the entire
community to come spend
quality time with their
family at no cost," Shubert
said.
Many people in the com-
munity still don't know the
park exists, said James -
Montgomery, GWHO
member. >
"Wi~e have a jewel out


here in Alligator Lake
Park," he saiid.
The number of people
attending the festival help
bring more exposure to
the lake and park.
"I'm always excited to
see this many people come
out to it," Montgomery
said.
Shubert said she hoped
the citizens learned a lot
and come back next year.
The festival is a part of
trying to get Columbia
County as a whole certi-
fied as a wildlife habitat.
'We want to continue
to grow every year and
turn it into a huge festi-
val, as big as the Olustee
Festival," she said. "The
possibilities are endless."


SANTONIA ROBINSON/Lake City Reporter
Loye Barnard shows off the Alligator Lake Spring Festival
T-shirt.


assistance, public comput-
ers, wireless service, mate-
rials for checkout and more,
Paulson said. For more
information on National
Library Week activities in
Columbia County call 758
2101 or visit www.ccpl.sirsi.


net.
"~We always try to empha-
size the public library is
fok- anyone and everyone's
use," Paulson said. "~The
public library is free, which
is important.


BELK(.COM

help us make this year
even bigger!
over *9.5 million
raised for local charities, schools &
nonprof:s:"-rig ur two 2010



4 HOURS ON LY!
Saturday, April 16
6a m-1Oam


said. "To take them to the
landfill they would have to
pay."
Properly disposing of
hazardous wastes keep
them from going into the
ground and affecting water
supplies, Davis said. It helps


protect the environment for
future generations. .
Each item brought to the
round-up is one less to go in
the trash, Pettigrew said.
"I'm glad to be able to
bring it," she said.


Amon fo ~ special shavings to he-n We're gratefuI Il fohe support our communities give us. So wevc give it right back


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for a list of charities. Ail ticket proceeds beneht your favorite p~articlpatlng local charities. All unclaimed money from the sale of Charity Sale tickets will be denow1~~~ as haililty of Bollks~ a.licw
910 days. Limit one $5 discount per customer. Cannot be used with any other coupon offer
'"'100 Belk gift cards per store valued anywhere from $5 to $1000 wlil be given away. One lucky person per Belk Division (for a total of 3 winners) will walk away with a gift card worth $1000.
No purchase necessary. One per adult customer, while supplies last. Not valid by phone or on Belk.com. See a sales associate for details
RED DOT: Limited exclusions In Brighton, designer handbags and ]unior denim Juniors total savings are 55-75% off. Fashion Accessories, Handbags. Small Leather Goods, Hoslery and Men ~s
Tailored Clothing total savings are 4565% COUPONS NOT VA~LID ON RED DOT
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PO LIC E R EPO RTS


Marine nuclear rescue team


Stands ready to help in Japan


FESTIVAL: Alligator Lake teaches and entertains

Continued From Page 1A


`WASTE: Large collections

Continued From Page 1A


MODERN. SOUTH ERN. STY LE.


Saturday, April 16, 6-10am
when you present your
Charity Sale ticket to
your sales associa eyoibrhefst e
No cash back.


storewide, including secial savin s on
RARELY DIS COUNTED BRANDS



















I I


A N
OPINION


Time

running

out for


peace talks


Palestinian peace
process, it has worked
to Israeli Prime Minister
Benjamin Netanyahu's
advantage to play for time. It
has kept him in power and
his conservative coalition
government together.
But time is no longer on
Mr. Netanyahu's side. A wave
of change is coming in the
Middle East and at the United
Nations, where the Palestinians
are building support for a
September bid to win UN
recognition of a Palestinian
state. Far better for the Israel
prime minister to ride this
wave, than to be battered by it
Palestinians have been
buoyed by statehood
endorsements from countries
that aren't automatic
sympathizers, such as Brazil
and Argentina. This week, the
Palestinians received a big .
boost from the International
Monetary Fund. The fund
released a report saying that
the Palestinian Authority
which governs the occupied
~West Bank is "now able to
;Conduct the sound economic
:policies expected of a future
:well-functioning Palestinian
state.
: It must be remembered that
g resolution on statehood would
:be brought before the General
Assemb';l-j ;wh;iier majority rtiles
with no big-power vetoes. It's
not as if the United States could
come to the rescue with a veto
-- though it could certainly
.twist arms.
SNetanyahu and Ihrael
President Shimon Peres
traveled abroad this week
to lobby against a possible
statehood resolution, wi~th Mr.
Pieres visiting President Obama
and the UN, and Netanyahu
calling on German Chancellor
Angela Merkel in Berlin.
Both the US and Germany
are Israel's longtime allies.
Yet the Western leaders
urged Israel to get back to the
negotiating table. Reviving the
talks is now "more urgent than
ever," said each leader, using
the exact same phrase. .

M Christian Science Monitor

Lak~e City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities --"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
tdruh htdheteamw rk of prof s indals
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman


LETTERS
POLICE Y
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
Verification. Writers can have two
Letters per month published. Letters
Sand guest columns are the opinion of
;the writers and not necessarily that of
:the Lake City Reporter.


BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
:Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
:news@lakecityreporter.com


4A


www.Iakecityreporter.com


who somehow is
polling second in
the Republican
D ~ ~~fi e l d o f p o s s ib l eoal T u p
presidential candidates, believes
"birther" is a disparaging term
but nonetheless he's decided to
become one.
The birthers are those who
believe that Barack Obama is a
Kenyan, an Indonesian, a Brit,
anything but a natural-born
American citizen. Because then
he couldrft be president of the
United States, could he? They
are not dissuaded in this belief
by the total lack of proof or their
complete inability to find any.
Not that they've given up
trying. Just this week, a Hawaii
appeals court rejected a sitit by
one Robert Justice to "inspect
and copy" Obama's birth certifi-
cate. Hawaii has a strict privacy
law that bans access to birth
certificates except by some- ,
one with a "tangible interest,"
meaning a family member, or
for "compelling circumstances
affecting the h alth ad safe y
of a idividueal "an
oh ny dges formd less than


THE 112'" CONGRESS

THE EARLY YEARS




.. r



)' 'e


Abercrombie, a friend of
Obama's parents who says he
remembers the birth, tried to
get his hands on the certificate
to dispel the rumors, but the
state attorney general told him
the privacy law applied to him,
too.
The birthiers see a conspiracy,
but Abercrombie's predeces-
sor, Linda Lingle, is a staunch
Republican and a big booster of
Sarah Palin and even spoke on
the Alaskan's behalf at the 2008
GOP convention;
But to true conspiracy
theorists, any evidence that
disproves. their theory isionly
further proof of how diabolically
clever the conspiracy is.
Trump has a reputation for
wildly over-the-top rhetoric and
maybe this birther nonsense is
just further mischief. And if his
"people" discovered anything
in Hawaii, it's likely the plea-
sure of icy Long Board lagers
on the beach at Waikiki at The
Donald's expense.

SDale McFeatters is~editorial
wrteir for Scripps Howard News


Dale McFeatter~s
mcfeattersd@shns.com
compelling Justice's argument
that the health and safety of 300
million Americans was at stake
if he didn't get to see Obama's
birth certificate.
Trump announced, during a
tour of TV shows, that he shares
these doubts about Obama's
place of birth. Moreover, he
claims to have dispatched
teams of private investigators
to Hawaii. "And they cannot
believe what they're finding."
Obama's campaign has
provided a "certification of
live birth," a legal document
in Hawaii that will get you,
for example, a passport. But
that's not good enough for the
birthers, who are holding out
for the actual' birth certificate.
Hawaii Gov. Neil


TO. THE EDITOR


To the ~editor:
I am greatly concerned about
Gov. Scott's proposed budget
cuts to education for three rea-
sons.
First, the education budget
has been severely cut for the
past five years. when I came to
Columbia County in 1993 to be
principal at the Kindergarten
Center, we had a strong budget.
When I helped open Westside
Elementary School in 2000, we
had a strong budget. Recently,
our country moved into a
recession and state budgets
quickly lost money. In the past
~five years, the district budget
has been cut repeatedly. Many
discussions have taken place
to determine how to make the
required cuts in the district and
school budgets while protect-
ing~ classroom needs and still
provide a strong educational
program for our students. We
are very blessed in Columbia
County to have a base of strong


teachers and administrators.
District staff, the superintendent
and school board members
have worked together to make
good decisions for our students.
More budget cuts, however,
may put our educational pro-
grams at risk. *
Next, when staff salaries
make up almost 80 percent of
the district budget, there aren't
many ways to continue to cut
the budget without cutting staff.
This not onlyr affects the educa-
tional programs but calls into
question safety issues for our
students. There is no easy way
to cut staff and maintain strong
educational programs.
Last, I believe it is short-
sighted to harm the educa-
tional system any further than
it has already been harmed.
As a country, we rely oni the
educational system to prepare
students for the workforce.
Some students go to work when
they finish high school, some


go to training programs then
into the workforce, and some
go to college before finding a
career. The basis of the work-
force is tne way we "grow our
society." A strong educational
program prepares students to
help develop a stronger society.
If the legislators really do cut
the proposed $3.3 billion from
the education budget for the
upcoming year, this will affect
the educational programs in our
state and the outcome will be a
weakened educational system.
In conclusion, I am greatly
concerned with the budget
cuts to education proposed by
Gov. Scott. I urge our leaders in
Columbia County to work within
their organizations to halt these
proposed cuts. I urge our leg
islators to be very careful with
the education budget, as the
impact will be felt by our chil-
dren for many years to come.
Marty Cox
Iake City


OINIO


Sunday, April I 0, 201 II


Return


to Main




though my
organization's
home office is in
Washington, D.C.,
AIlog some 150,000
miles a year flying around the
country.
Traveling back and forth
from the nation's capital pro-
vides good perspective on the
bold contrast between the
realities there and the rest of
America.
Washington~ is boom-
ing today while working
Americans in cities across the
rest of our nation sti-uggle to
.see' the economic light of day.
Washington Business Journal
reports that, based orrtheir
latest annual job growth
data ~from February 2010
to February 2011, D.C. is
the No. 1 job market mn the
nation. Compared to a national
unemployment rate that just
dropped below 9 percent, the
Journal reports unemployment
in the D.C. area at 5.9 percent.
According to the S&P/Case-
Schiller Index, the leading index
of home prices in the U.S., the
latest composite of home prices
from 20 cities around the coun-
try shows an annual decline of
3.1 pjercerit. Of the 20 cities in
the composite, only two showed
annual home price increases.
San Diego barely at 0.1
percent, and Washington, D.C.,
with a solid increase of 3.6
(percent.~
Yes, Washington is booming,
its malls are filled and the wine
flows in our capital's fancy,
expensive restaurants. The
Democratic regime has been
good to Washington.
Although our president
famously campaigned about
purging Washin~gton of "special
interests," I wrote then that this
was ridiculous. The business of
Washington is special interests.
So anyone with an agenda to
grow the federal government
by definition grows these many
special interests. And the data
bears this out.
Combined lobbying expen-
ditures in our nation's calsital
for 2009 and 2010, the fist two
years of the current adminis-
tration, were at an all-time high
of $7 billion.
Over the course of eight
years under the George W.
Bush administration, when fed-
eral spending increased at the
highest rate since the Johnson
administration in the 1960s, a
little over $1 trillion was added
to annual federal spending.
The Obama administration has


Yes, friends, the great suck-
ing sound we hear today is the
liberal regime in Washington
sucking the living daylights
out of this nation.
Almost 80 percent of
Americans feel today that
the country is on the wrong
track. Last November, voters
fired oile-quarter of the sitting
Democrats in Congress mn the
name of change.
Now Republicans in
Congress, in response to this
voter mandate, have tried, in
their fist shot at the federal
budget, to cut $100 billion out of
$4 trillion in 2011 expenditures,
and Democrats have cried foul.
One hundred billion dol-
lars is wasted in Washington
on any given day by the time
President Barack Obama,
Harry Reid and Nancy Pelosi
have finished breakfast.
SStar Parker is president of
CURE, Coalition
on Urban Renewal and Education
(www.urbancure.org) and author
of three books.


TruIT1 ji1ns the bir their s


LETTERS


COnCeTHS Over budget cuts





a alr~



,


LAKE CITY REPORTER NATION SUNDAY, APRIL 10, 2011


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


tors and it's going to bring
a lot of attention and pub-
licity," said Reece Sexton,
publisher of the Civil War
Courier newspaper and two
companion magazines con-
sidered bibles by enthusi-
asts.
"The hobby is not going
to die. It does need some
new blood."
There is no nationwide
association for re-enactors,
but Sexton estimates as
many as 50,000 take part at
least occasionally. An esti-
mated 1,000 re-enactors will
be in Charleston, S.C., for
the festivities surrounding
the April 12, 1861 attack on
Fort Sumter, the fist shots
of the war. Organizers will
explode a starburst shell
over the fort, signaling re-
enactors manning some 30
cannons ringing the harbor
to begin a 30-minute bar-
rage.
Sexton expects up
to 12,000 re-enactors in
Virginia for the 150th anni-
versary of Bull Run, the
first major battle of the war,
in July.
But the capstone will,
come in 2013, when the
Gettysburg anniversary
could draw as many as
25,000 re-enactors and
four times that many
spectators to the fields of
Pennsylvania.


By BRUCE SMITH .
Associated Press

FORT SUMTER
NATIONAL MONUMENT,
S.C. For thousands of
Civil W~ar re-enactors, the
next four years are a chance
to capitalize on the public's
curiosity about a century-
old hobby that demands
such attention to detail that
the fights seem-almost real.
The die-hards converg-
ing soon at the site where
the War Between the States
began 150 years ago with a
Confederate artillery bar-
rage on Union-held Fort
Sumter can't wait to help
others understand why they
spend weekends tramping
through the rain; sleeping in
tents in snow-covered fields,
cooking on open campfies
and enduring mock battles
in wool coats under the hot
Southern sun.
They're expecting a
surge of interest in a pas-
time that has roots at the
50th anniversary of the
Battle of Gettysburg in
1913, when Confederate
veterans retraced Pickett's
Charge. Re-enacting took
hold for good five decades
ago during the Civil War's
centennial.
"The 150th cycle is' going
to be great. It's going to
bring us some new reenac-


By JIM KUHNHENN
Associated Press

WASHINGTON -A last
minute budget deal forged
amid bluster and tough bar-
gaining averted an embar
rassing federal shutdown
cut billions in spending and
provided the fist major test
of the divided government
that voters ushered in five
months ago.
Working late into Friday
night, congressional and
White House negotiators
finally agreed on a plan to
pay for government opera-
tions through the end of
September while trimming
$38.5 billion in spending.
Lawmakers then
approved a measure to
keep the government run
ning through next Friday
while the details of the new
spending plan are written
mnto legislation.
Obama signed the
short-term measure with-
out fanfare Saturday.
Congressional approval of
the actual deal is expected
in the middle of next week.
"Americans of differ-
ent beliefs came together
again," President Barack
Obama said from the White
House Blue Room, a set-
ting chosen to offer a clear
view of the Washington
Monument over his right
shoulder.
The agreementwas nego-
tiated by Obama, House
Speaker John Boehner, R-
Ohio, and Senate Majority
Leader Harry Reid1, D-Nev.
The administraton was
poised to shutter federal
services, from national
parks to tax-season help
centers, and to send fur-
lough notices to hundreds
of thousands of federal
workers.
All sides insisted they
wanted to avoid that out-
come, which at times
seemed inevitable.
Shortly after midnight,
White House budget direc-
tor Jacob Lew issued a
memo instructing depart-
ments and agencies to con-
tinue normal operations.
Boehner said the deal
came after "a lot of dis-
cussion and a long fight."
He won an ovation from
his rank and file, including
the new tea party adher-
ents whose victories last
November shifted control
of the House to the GOE
Reid declared the deal
"historic."
The deal marked the
end of a three-way clash of
wills. It also set the tone for
coming confrontations over
raising the government's
borrowing limit, the spend-
ing plan for the budget year
that begins Oct. 1 and long-
term deficit reduction.
In the end, all sides
claimed victory.
For Republicans, it was
the sheer size of the spend-
ing cuts. For Obama and
Reid, it was ~casting aside
GOP policy initiatives
that would have blocked


'

:
~c.:


ASSOCIATED PRESS
President Obama speaks to reporters in the Blue Room at the Wlhite House in-Washington,
He spoke regarding the budget and the averted government shutdown after a deal was made
between Republican and Democrat lawmakers Friday.


environmental rules and
changed a program that
provides family planning
services. .
Not all policy provisions
were struck.
One in the final deal
would ban the use of federal
or local government funds
to pay for abortions in the
District of Columbia. A pro-
gram dear to Boehner that
lets District of Columbia
students use federally fund-
ed vouchers to attend pri-
vate schools also survived.
Republicans had includ-
ed language to deny fed-
eral money to put in
place Obama's year-old
health care law. The deal
only requires such a pro-
posal to be voted on by
the Democratic-controlled
Senate, where it is certain
to fall short of the neces-
sary 60 votes.
The deal came together
after six grueling weeks as
negotiators virtually dared
each other to shut down
the government. .
Boehner faced pressure
from his GOP colleagues
to stick as closely possible
to the $61 billion in cuts
and the conservative policy
positions that the House
had passed.
At one point, Democrats
announced negotiators
had locked into a spend-
ing cut ~figure $33 bil-
lion. Boehner pushed
back and said there was
no deal. During a meeting
at the White House this
past week, Boehner said
he wanted $40 billion. The
final number fell just short
of that.
In one dramatic moment,
Obama called Boehner on
Friday morning after learn-
ing that the outline of a deal
they had reached with Reid
in the Oval Office the Itight
before was not reflected in
the pre-dawn staff negotia-
tions. The whole package
was in peril.
According to a senior
administration official,
Obama told Boehner that
they were the two most


consequential leaders and
if they had any hope of
keeping the government
open, their bargain had to
be honored and could not
be altered by staff. The offi-
cial described the scene on
condition of anonymity to
reveal behind-the-scenes
negotiations.
The accomplishment set
the stage for even tougher
confrontations.
House Republicans
intend to pass a 2012 bud-
get in the coming week
that calls for sweeping
changes in the Medicare
and Medicaid health pro-
grams and even deeper
cuts in domestic programs
to gain control over soar-
ing deficits.
In the Republican radio
address, House Budget
Committee Chairman Paul
Ryan, R-Wis., warned of a'
coming crisis.
"Unless we act soon,
government spending
on health and retirement
programs will crowd out
spending on everything
else, including national
security. It will literally
take every cent of every
federal tax dollar just to


pay for these programs,"
Ryan said Saturday.
That debate could come
soon. .
The Treasury has told
Congress it must vote to
raise the debt limit by sum-
mer.- Republicans hope
to use this issue to force
Obama to accept long-term
deficit-reduction measures.


civil t2ats 150th

anniversary a lifetune

event for re-enactors


Federal shutdown avoided '



2012 budget fight looms





C811 lOday 10 place a **BI

surprise ad for your 755.5440 or
child, grandchild,
God child or anyone 755.5441
70u' think desenres between 8am &( 4pm
SOmething 8Itra on .gIbadie

their special dlay! ,,, emine.,,,,,~,,,,,
to appearance in the Lake Ct eotr


I


6A LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, APRIL 10, 2011


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


STo submit your Community
Calendar item, contact Antonia
Robinson at 754-0425 or by
e-mail at arobinson @
/&kecityreporter. comn.


Meeting of the Lake City
Newcomers and Friends is
11 a.m. Wednesday at the
club house in East Side
Village. Directions are
Sgo east on Baya Avenue
(10A) until you come to
East Side Village, enter on
li-,g Pearl Terrace-go to end
:eand turn left on Willow
drive, then to Claudia
way club house on right
Luncheon cost is $10. The
program is the annual
FILE PHOTO Fashion Show featuring
clothes from Belks, J.C.
ow Penney, Bond Worth and
TJ MAXX. All members,
11 Taste guests and friends along
oking with any newcomers to
tips the area are welcome. Call
lain for 386-752-4552 or 386-755-
porter 4051.
esday in
p.m. Thursday
K-12 Wanee Festival
reeks
han Wanee Festival is
sday. Thursday through
ust be Saturday at the Sprit of the
Ition Suwannee Music Park in
d by Live Oak. The headliner~is
~infor- the Allman Brothers Band.
rnice D. For tickets and more infor-
02, Lake mation visit waneefestival.
i46 S.E. com.
ake City
4389 or Landlord's meeting
EL~aol.
~The next Landlo~rd's
meeting is 6 p.m.
Thursday at Lake Shore
Hospital Conference
Room. Lake City Police
s ~Department Chief Argatha
cil Gilmore is the guest
rglr speaker. Call 755-0110.
3s 8p.m.
Social DAR meeting
atholicThe next Edward
inom-Rutledge DAR meet-
;avetteing is Thursday. Te
program will focus on
a selection of Private
mers Washington Ives' Civil
ting War letters/diary to be
nthly read by tdyn ri c si -


Newbern and Mary Jane
Weaver. Dewitt Cason,
Columbia County Clerk
of Court is a maternal
decedent of Private Ives,
The chapter will also
elect new officers for
2011-2013. Guests are
welcome to attend. Dutch
Treat Lunch immediately
following the meeting.
For additional informa-
tion please call 386-755-
5579 in the Lake City
area or 386-362-2180 in
Live Oak.

Chamber speed
networking

SSpeed Networking
is 5 to 7 p.m. at the
Country Club of Lake City

ear ars are antdb Te

eet.s 1al th rc amber at
752-3690.

Tea Party meeting
The North Central
Florida Tea Party meet-
ing is 7 p.m. Thursday
at the Taylor Building,
128 SW Birley Ave. The
guest speaker is Frantz
Kebreau, a nationally-
known speaker, member of
the Black Robe Regiment
anti author of the book
"Stolen History. Visit www.
northcentralfloridateaf~arty.
org or call John at 386-935-
1705 or Sharon at 386-935-
0821.


Friday
Easter Bunny weekend
schedule
--The Easter Bunn will
be in Bunny Town 4
- 8 p.m. April l5, 11 a.m.
- 5 p.m. Aprdl 16 and 1- 5
Cim. Apri 17 mn the Lake


755-0522.

Photography workshops
Workshops in Beginning
Digital Photography are 10
a.m. 12:30 p.m. Monday
and Advanced Digital
Photography are 2 4:30
p.m. at Stephen Foster
Folk Culture Center State
Park Craft Square, White
Springs. A hands-on out-
door photography session
is planned. ParticipantS
should bring their own
camera, film or digital.
The cost of the workshop
is $25 and includes park
admission. Call the park
Gift Shop at (386) 397-1920
or visit www.stephenfoster-
CSO.org.

Special viewing
A DVD screening of
Patrick Smith's "Florida:
A Sense of Place: is 7
p.m. Monday. Smith is an
award-winning Florida
author and wrote "A Land
Remembered," "Forever
Island" and "The River
Is Home." He personally
narrates a tour of the old
Florida of his youth and of
his books.


Tuesday

Photoshop Workshop
Photoshop workshops
are 6:30 8:30 p.m
Tuesday at Stephen Foster
Folk Culture Center
State Park Craft Square,
White Springs. A laptop
computer with Photoshop
Creative Suit Phot-oshop
Elements or some editing
software is recommended,
but not required. The soft-
ware used in class will be
Photoshop Elements. Cost
of the workshop is $25 and
includes park admission.
3C~a7 lth Opo kGiftwS ptat
phenfosterCSO. org.


TaSte of Home Cookinrg Shl
The Lake City Reporter and FGC will present the 20'
of Home Cooking School, a two-hour professional co
show featuring Michelle Roberts (above) that shares
and recipes with audience members. Tickets still rem
the event and can be purchased at the Lake City Rel
office for $12 each. The show begins at 6:30 p.m. Tu
FGC's Howard Conference Center. Doors open at 5 1


students in grades
whose third nine w
has no grade less t
a B or S is Wedne~
Contact number m
included. Confirma
call will be received
Friday. Please send
mation to: Mrs. Be
Presley P.O. Box 4(
City FL 32055, or 6
Pennsylvania St., L
FL, 32025, fax 719-~
e-mail berniceEXC2
comn. Call 752-4074.

Monthly regular
meeting
The next Knight
of Columbus Coun
#7589 of Lake City
monthly meeting i~
Wednesday in the I
Hall at Epiphany C
Church. For more
tiohn, contact Bob G
965-5905.

Lake City Newco
and Friends meel
The regular mor


Cancer treatment yesterday.

Gardening today.





COMMUNITY

CANCER CENTER
OF NORTH FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE LAKE CITY


(386) 755-0601 ccenf.com

Follo~w us on .


CO~~~RMMUNT CLNA


Toda
Poster contest
All 250 posters submit-
ted for Florida's "~Water
Conservation Month"
in April and national
"Drinking Water Week" in
May are on display until
Thursday in the Lake City
Mall.

Operation Cinderella
Operation Cinderella
is 2 to 6 p.m. today at
Lake City Mall in the
former Rex store. Girls in
Columbia and surround-
ing counties can purchase
gently used gowns, shoes
and one accessory for
only $10. Money raised
from the eent will glodto

House of North Central
Florida.

Meet the Author
Charlie Carlson, author
of "Weird Florida," is
speaking at the Columbia
County Library Main
Branch 2 p.m. today. The
event is a kick-off for .
National Idbrary Week and
sponsored by the Frienls
of the Library Carlson is
best known for his book,
"W~eird Florida," and his
PBS television program
of the same name. Come
hear him talk about some
of Florida's most off-beat
tourist attractions and odd-
est oddities.


IVonday

Support group meeting
The Women's Cancer
Support Group of Lake is
meeting 5:30 6:30 p.m.
Monday at Baya Pharmacy
East, 780 SE Baya Drive.
Call 386-752-4198 or 386-

OBITUARIES

Dee Calhoun Tucker
Dee Calhoun Tucker, 78,
longtime resident of Jackson-
ville, passed away April 7,
2011. She was born in Colum-
bus, GA, daughter of the late
Clinton Blondie Calhoun and
Dottie (Aldridge) Calhoun.
Surviving are two daugh- .
ters, Dorie (John) Sparkman,
Margete T. (Richard) Griffin,
a grandson, Ben Griffin, hon-
orary son, *Steve Takach, her
two beloved dogs, her cat, and
many dear relatives and friends.
A graveside service will be
held on Wednesday, April 13,
2011 at 2:00 pm in Riverdale
Cemetery, Columbus, GA.
Local arrangements byaardage-
Giddens Funeral home, 4115
HendricksAve., Jacksonville, FL.
The family requests in lieu
of flowers, donations to be
sent to Akita Rescue Soci-
ety of Florida, www.ars~forg
or your local Hospice pro-
vider, www~hospicenet~org.
Mr. Oedis Walter Blanks
Mr. Oedis Walter Blanks, age 69,
of Lake City, Florida died Friday'
March 18, from injuries received
in an automobile accident north
of Live Oak, Fla. He was a na-
tive of Homerville, GA and had
resided in Lake City since 1958.
He was the son of the late Robert
Earnest Blanks and Mary Jordan
Blanks, was preceded in death
by one son, Sammy Blanks and
a brother, Vernon Blanks. Mr.
Blanks -owned and operated
Blanks Saw Mill in Lake City
for over 39 years. He was of the
Baptist faith and enjoyed hunt-
ing.and fishing with his family.
Survivors include his wife, Polly
Blanks of Lake City, Fla.; His
daughter, Ruby (Frank) Col-
lins, Jacksonville, Fla.; His
son, Terry "Cooper" (Kitty)
Blanks, Taylor, Fla.; Three sis-
ters, Versie Dancy and Virginia
Merker both of Lake City, Fla.
and Vivian Jones, Whigham,
GA; Two brother, Marion
"Butch" Blanks, Lake City and
Robert "R.J." Jordan, O'Brien,
Fla.; Five grandchildren and one
great-grandchild also survive.
Funeral services will be conduct-
ed llA.M. Tuesday, Aprill12, in
the Chapel of Guerry Funeral
Honw.P ista~tion wil pr lf on


the funeral home. Final dispo-
sition will be by cremation with
GUERRY Fulneral Home, 26i59
SW Main Blvd., Lake City, Fla. in
charge of arrangements. Please
vie vn desti8; ter / 72 tbkeat


Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


Wednesday
Educational Fair .
An Educational
Extravaganza is 10 a.m.
- 2 p.m. Wednesday at
Richardson Community
Center. Organizations
in Attendance include:
Florida Gateway College,
Florida Crown, Columbia
Co. School Board, a
Suwannee Vo Tech,
Military, AmeriCorps
and mord. Refreshmeh~ts
will be served. Pre-regis-
ter by April 11. Contact
Elishin Parkier at (38,)
754-7095. The event is
sponsored by Richardson
Community Alliance and
Columbia County Board of
Commissione-s.

Academic Recognition
Presley Excel and
Scholars Program is hav-
ing its next Academic
Recognition Program 6
p.m. April 18 at Richardson
Middle Schdo Iudito-

submit report cards for

















































Tuesday, AprHl 12, 2011


SUNDAY, APRIL 10, 2011 7A


LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVE RTISE M ENT


Do you remember?
The sign out front of G&.H Foods
on the corner of Duval and 7th Street...


... and the colorful display~
inside the the store.


11 It was so
Exciting!


The Excritemnent Conttinues
This Coming ITuesday!'
Limited
Tickets
Available



$1200J


~


1
'A'


Florida Gateway College Gymnasium


"'7W~


"t. '


L


irr`


Purchase tickets at the
Lak~e City Reporter
180 E. Duval St., Lake City, FL 32055


;\nay zs~ 1Y81


Guess what, it still is.





NATIONAL FORECAST: A significant outbreak of severe thunderstorms is expected to produce
tornadoes, very large hail and destructive winds across portions of the Midwest and Upper
Mississippi Valley today. Showers and thunderstorms will also affect the`Northeast, while rain
-and snow persist across the Rockies. Rain will return to the Pacific Northwest today, as well.






t@ / .,.,' 'eangar
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0 ) Cold Fronl

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OF
T- STORMS

HI 83 58


6L~m~43[imR;~T~ ~~--'-C-CI~)


1515




Today's
ultra-violet
radiation nisk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+.


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


rs rr. su- .......


Get~~~ Conc


]'7,37'Membership is open to everyone in~ Alachua, Clay and Columbia coluntiesP
OFFE dG Car~. P iL ?5O E 0 d .L:s lOA ?1 I 1.8FEC .`fa a1T-iB=s R I .J1pooa eurd orraem yb ihrbse nceiw rhnss eil n emo
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90 6

.91/ 4
1Ocala


City
Cape Canaveral
Daytona Beach
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Jacksonville


Monday
83/67/pc
85/66/pc
87/'?/pc
91/bij/pc
90/65/pc
90/66/pc
84/76/s
90/65/pc
88/72/pc
88/69/pc
90/65/pc
90/67/pc
79/66/t
82/61/pc
86/64/pc
88/71/pc
89/62/pc -
86/72/pc


Tuesday
82/66/pc
84/64/pc
85/72/pc
89/69/pc
83/59/pc
81/58/pc
84/76/s
83/56/pc
86/71/pc
87/69/pc
81. 59 pr:
86/66/pc
78/63/pc
79/58/s
83/54/pc
85/68/pe
84/57/pc
84/72/pc


* JICISOHville
90/65

Da tna6Beach
6ss


Tallahassee *
90/61 .


80/70


B0/65* Key West
92/68 4/6Lake City
Miami
'Cama\Naples
89/71 West PalinBach Ocala
88/70 Orlando
` t [agg gol Panama City
FL Myert, 86/73 Pensacola
92/68 fnaples Tallahassee
`89/\69 MiiTampa .
89/72 Valdosta
*ews W. Palm Beach


YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL EXTREgS


HIgh51001, oredoTexas Low: 7*, Stanley, Idaho


Saturday Today
HI/1.a/Pop. HI/Lo/W CITY


. Saturday Today
SHI/Lo/Pep. HI/LofrW CITY


Saturday Today


Alichorage
Atlanta
Baltimnore
Billings
Birmingham
Bismarck
Bolse
Boston
Buffalo
Charleston SC
Charleston WV
Charlotte
Cheyenne
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columba SC
Dallas
Daytona Beach
Denver


HI/Im/Pop.
84/ 2/
58/41/0
58/45/.22
55/42/0
55/25/0
52/42/0
57/48/.12
44/37/0
45/30/0
~56/45/0
60/34/0
86/59/.55
36/33/.12
.90/66/0
60/47/.14
56/45/0
51/42/O
49/31/0
86/69/0
58/43/.11
49/42/.01


HI/Lo/W

64/58/c
69/51/s.
82/68/pe
51/46/pc
57/42/sh
81/63/pc
49/36/c~
61/39/pc.
76/64/pc:
66/45/pc
85/58/t
47/39/pci
94/63/pc
65/52/s
61/48/pc
53/45/sh
53/40/c~
89/71/s.
64/41/s
71/63/c


gggjggjyg
SGSVics
U~s~$i t









wreathericorn


Fd 42 5 Phladelphia
' 37/12/c Phoenix
e4 62p.. Pittsburgh
SE 51.sn Portland ME
oi. 7ir Portland OR
85/68/pc Raleigh
e2 6? pc Rapid City
86/67/pc Reno
90/65/s Richmond
81/49/t Sacramento
68/49/s St. Lauls
84/60/c Salt Lake City
65/54/s San Antonio
86/63/pc San Diego
89/72/s SanFrancisco
72/44/t Seattle
85/69/pc Spokane
84/71/pc Tampa
56/54/sh Tucson
83/46/pc Washington


36/30/0
85/66/0
52/42/0
37/30/0
ET = -9.0
45/37/0
49/37/0
60/35/0
65/36/0
90/65/0
72/55/.15
74/57/0
55/38/0
64/44/0
61/50/.42
52/44/0
88/65/0
86/69/0
87/65/0
68/37/0


S40/26/c
~87/61/s
;69/60/c
58/36/pc
88/61/pc ~
48/34/sh
59/42/pc
57/49/c
71/59/t
83/66/pc
89/66/pc
86/61/pc
46/30/rs
83/57/t
85/67/pc
80/64/t
90/65/pc
87/54/t
86/68/s
53/32/sh


roeMolnep '750'
ElPaso r;8261/b ~
Fairbanks: )30/23/0
Greensboro . 5 147.10
Hartford 30
Honolulu 9SO 72 0
Houston 87/71/0
Indianapolls 65/53/.31
Jackson MS 87/69/0
Jacksonville 90/64/0
Kansas City 86/57/0
Las Vegas 52/41/0
I..ttle Rock 87/69/0
Los Angeles 58/44/0
Memphis 87/72/0
Miami .89/73/0
Minneapolls 58/48/0
Mobile 85/71/0
New Orleans 85/73/0
New York 58/40/0
Oklahoma City 91/67/0


TEMPERATURES
High Saturday
L~ow Saturday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high .
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Saturday
Month total
Year totab
Normal month-to-date
Normnalyear-to-daate


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunriise tom.
Sunset tom.

MOON .
Mo0nrise today
Moonset today
Moonrise tom.
Moonset tom.


88
60
79
53
90 in 1978
39 in 2000


7:10 a.m.
7:55 p.m.
7:08 a.m.
7:55 p.m.


12:08 p.,m.
1:33 a.m.
1:09 p.m.
2:20 a.m.


0.00"
0.64
10.95"
1.01"
12.17.


;s Forecasts, data and
.grayihics @ 2011 Weather
- as Central, LP, Mbdison, Wis.
wwwwatherpubllishrcom


Saturday
HI/Lo/Pcp.
S55/37/9
79/64/0
66/46/0
84/48/0
84/57/0
57/37/0
36/32/.90
81/61/0
88/70/0
93/68/0
57/37/0
88/75/0
`72/45/0


Today
HI/Lo~W
60/38/c
73/63/pe
70/45/s
79/48/s
85/61/pc
57/52/sh
43/37/sh
81/61/s
86/73/pc
94/71/pc
57/37/pc
84/73/t
72/52/pc


Saturday
HI/Lo/Pcp.
91/77/0
64/52/0
85/71/0
85/71/0
70/50/0
57/36/0
90/75/1.49
81/59/0
70/55/0
64/54/0
55/32/0
63/50/0
46/39/.15


Today
HI/LoW
82/72/t
72/50/sh
85/72/t
85/74/t
'77/60/s
61/41/s
S86/75/t
75/60/s
67/57/s
64/57/pc
66/57/t
61/43/s
52/30/sh


CITY
Acapulco
Amsterdam
SAthens
Auckland
Be~jing
Berlin
Buenos Alres
Cairo
Geneva
Havana
Helsinki
Hong Kolig
Kicngston

. e .


Saturday
HI/Lo/Pop.
88/75/0 '
61/41/0
72/59/0
68/55/0
79/43/0
59/43/0
73/43/0
75/61/0
77/48/0
90/70/0
46/34/0
81/70/0
82/73/0


Today
HI/Lo/W
87/71/pc
64/48/s
.64/50/s
67/62/c
66/41/pc
63/41/s
77/60/s
85/67/s
73/45/pc
90/63/pc
41/28/pc
75/64/pc
86/74/pc


CITY
La Paz
Uma
London
Madrd
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Nairobi
Nassau
.New Delhi
Oslo
Panama
Paris .


CITY
Rlo
Rome
St. Thomas VI
San Juan PR
Santiago
Seoul
Singapore .
Sydney
Tel Aviv
Tokyo
Toronto
Vienna
Warsaw


K(EY10CONDm0NS: c-cidudy, dr-drizzle, f-fair, fg-fog, h-hazy, i ice, pc= partly cloudy, r- jpr. :.ar..,
t~h-showers, sn-snow, ts-thunderstorms, w-windy.


AS LOWV AS









.rr APR


Receive this low rate when you

buy, or refinance your auto loan
from another financial institution!







CAMPUS








Apply online for fast approval!

wwwVVVcamwrpuscu Icom~

or call 754-9088 and press 4


LAKE CITY REPORTER WEATHER SUNDAY, APRIL 10, 2011


TH W V E RHE R


PARTLY




HI 840 U 2


-iPARTLY
CLOUDY



HI 90 U)65


MOSTLY
SUNNY



HI 85M Ui


MOSTLY
SUNNY



HI 901.063


April April April May
11 17 24 3
First Full Last New


FAST


ca r.


FASTE a ppr ova 1.








Lake City Reporter


, r


_1_. ." *~ -- ;,
,, M


Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-042 I
tkirby,~@lakecityreporter~com


Section B


www.Iakecityreporter.com


SundayApril I 0, 20 II


H~eisman winners
reCOgniZO d at
halftime of game.
By MARK LONG
Associated Press

GAINESVILLE Steve
Spurrier is passing, Danny
Wuerffel is getting ready
to throw and Tim Tebow .
is, well, doing what he does
best.
He's running with the
ball.
Florida honored its three
Heisman Trophy win-
ners with life-sized statues
outside the stadium. The
Gators ~unveiled bronze
statues of Spurrier (1966),
TODD WILSON/Lake City Reporter Wuerffel (1996) and Trebow
Former Florida quarterback Tim Tebow looks at his statue after halftime of the Orange and (2007) during halftime of
Blue Debut on Saturday. Florida unveiled statues of its three Heisman Trophy winners. Str ays spring game.


The thing that' stood out
was Tebowv's depiction.
"Thaf~s fine," Tebow said.
"You have to change it up.
We can't all be throwing."
Tebow and Wuerffel were
on hand for the unveiling.
Spurrier thanked his alma
mater in a videotaped mes-
sage. He was in Columbia,
S.C., for South Carolina's
spring gamne. One of his
daughters, Amy Moody,
attended the ceremony in
his place.
"If~s kind of hard to put
in words," Moody said.
"Its not often in life people
dedicate a statue to you. It
means a great deal."
The statues, which weigh
between 1,700 and 2,000
pounds, were placed on the
STATUES continued on 3B


Brantley struggles
ill Forida's spring
game Saturday.
By MARK LONG
Associated Press

GAINESVILLE -- The
loudest ovation of Florida's
spring game came when
former Heisman Trophy
winner T'im Tebow exitered
the Swamp.
As Tebow walked through
the end zone, quarterback
John Brantley inadvertently
skipped a pass at his prede-
cessor's feet. Tebow picked
up the ball and effortlessly
threw it 40 yards back.
It was the best pass of
the day.
Brantley completed 4 of
14 passes for 45 yards as
the Gators opened coach
Will Muschamp's era with a
resounding thud Saturday
Brantley, who struggled
most of last season as
Tebow's replacement, was
paired with new offensive
coordinator Charlie Weis
and a more passer-friend-
ly system. But Brantley's
debut looked about the
same as his first' year as
Florida's starter. He had
two passes batted down at
the line of scrimmage and
several overthrows.
"Not at all (disappoint-
ed)," Brantley said. "If~s just
another one of our prac-
tices. We're just trying to
go out there and get better,
We had a really good spring
and that just added on to
it and we're going to keep
building from here going
into the offseason, the sum-
mer and camp."
Brantley missed his first
six passes, leading his
Blue team to just 79 yards
and a field goal in the fist
half. Walk-on quarterback
Chris Provancha, thanks to
Sa 39-yard touchdown pass
to Robert Clazrk with 45
seconds remaining, rallied
Brantley's squad to a 13-10
victory over the Orange.
Nonetheless, most of the
talk afterward was about
Brantley's lackluster per-
formance.
Muschamp blamed it on
long list of missing starters,
including three offensive
linemen,~ and a defensive
line that dominated the
trenches.
.Muschamp also made
it clear that Brantley's job
is safe, even with backup
Tyler Murphy (7 of 11 for
GATORS continued on 2B


;i Branfog pley~le
Pho,,ne:(386) 754-0420
bli,pey@ickecityreportecom




Nty





Gathat

waa to provide
Florida fans a
look of what~ is
F ragmhtto come, many
might have left the game
remembering what once
was.
The Orange and Blue
debut under new coach
Will Muschamp came and
went without much fizzle
as the Blue came away
with a 13-10 wvin in a game
that was without much
offense.
The biggest cheers of
the day came at halftirie.
Former Heisman Tr'ophy
winners IDanny Wuerfell
and Tun Teb'ow were on
hand for a ceremony that
involved the unveiling of
their statues m~i front of
Ben Hill Griffin Stadium.
~Foriner coach Steve
Spurrier, who won a
IHeisman in 1966, also had
'a statue erected mn his
honor, but was unable to
attend. He greeted fans
with a vided message.
Flonida may have to
wait a minute for its next
Heisman quarterback
as John Brantley looked
largely ineffective,
although the Gators were
missing many of their
weapons. Brantley only
played the first half, and
was unable to guide his
squad into the end zone.
.The fist half ended 3-3,
leaving a crowd of 53,000
wanting more as Caleb
Sturgis kicked field goals
for both squads.
Following Sturgis' third
field goal with 3:09 left in
the third quarter, Tyler
Murphy led the Orange
DEBUT continued on 2B


Photos by JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake tity Reporter
ABOVE: Florida head coach Will Muschamp watches quarterback John Brantley (12) being
chased during a play.
BELOW: Tight end A.C. Leonard (81) jumps over Tim Clark to retrieve a pass during the
Orange and Blue Spring game. The Blue beat the Orange 13-10.


Spurrier, wuerffel,
Tebow honored in

StatHOS at Swamp


B RIE FS

CHS FOOTBA


m;,bteskMC nday
The Columbia County
Quarterback Club has
meetings set for 6 p.m.
Monday and April 25 at
Jones Fieldhouse.
For details, call Blake
Lundy at 867-0296.
GOLF
'The Edge' event
set for April 30
Rountree-Moore
Automotive Group
presents "The Edge"
golf tournament at Quail
Heights Country Club
on April 30. The annual
tournament, hosted by
Shayne Edge, serves as a
fundraiser for school and
recreational sports, and
other organizations. Cost
is $100 per player for,
the four-person scramble
event.
Registration is at Quail
Heights (752-3339) and




L~C. Falcons to
honor veterans
The Lake City Falcons
semi-pro football team
will honor veterans and
show support for the
troops at their home
gamne at Memorial
Stadium onApril 30.
Fans are encouraged to
wear yellow for the :
festivities that begin at
5 p.m. The Falcons will
play the Savannah Venom
at 7 p.m. Admission:
adult-$7 ($5 with yellow
shirt); seniors-$5 -
($3 with yellow shirt);
free-children 8 and
young~er. There is no
charge for military
personnel with ID.
There is a home game
at 5:30 p.m. April 16.
For details on
honoring a veteran, call
Elaine at (386) 292-3039.

SFrom staff reports

GAME

Tuesday .
SColumbia High grs
tennis vs. Menendez
High in Region 2-3A
tournament, 3:30 p.m.
MCblumbia High
baseball vs. Chiles High,
6 p.m. .
aColumbia High
softball at Keystone
Heights High, 7 p.m.
(JV-5)
Thursday
. Columbia High
baseball vs. Gainesville,
6 p.m.
MFort White High
softball vs. Hamilton
County High, 6 p.m.
II Fort White High JV
baseball at Suwannee
High, 7 p.m.
Friday
SFort White High track
in District 3-2A meet at
Yulee High, 10 a.m.
SColumbia High
weightlifting in Class 2A
state meet at Kissimmee
Civic Center, noon
MFort White High
softball at Oak Hall
School, 5 p.m.
SColumbia High
baseball at Middleburg
High, 6 p.m.
SColumbia High
softball vs. Lafayette
High, 7 p.m.
SFort White High
baseball at~ Newberry
High, 7 p.m. .
Saturday
SFort White High
weightlifting in Class 1A
state meet at Kissimmee


Civic Center, 10:30 a.m.


debut


uschamp s


FROM THE SIDELINE





SCOREBOARD


GATORS: Brantley's job secure


DEBUT: Gators don't show much
Continued From Page 1B


Answer to Previous Puzzle

ROO10K LIDTDEI TEL
AIRI A OIRR EDDIIE
CIEINITI P IOINE IEIR S
Y O K E IS P OI E NIY E
SITIOIOPED
I RIE INID Y E IA RIL
IEl IG NS RIADI I
SIAIRIEK CIARIAIFE
O IM IE N S ICIO W~ MIT IN
EIQ UAILILY
AIDIE BIBS ~SAV WED
J U M P IS IU I T C O T IE
AILMIA RTEEHII HOE
R YIAIN BIAIDT TSR


Check out the "ut R gt Cr sod Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


SPORTS SUNDAY, APRIL 10, 2011


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


LAKE CITY REPORTER


sprin.


to the field without start-
mn quarterback Stephen
Garcia and four backups
got a chance to vie to be the
suspended senior's replace-
ment.
Last year's backup
Connor Shaw finished the
day 17-of-27 for 176 yards
and a touchdown, but his
Black team lost. Dylan
Thomas was lead quarter-


Orl onoat Phi ael hia77 p.m

Cleveland at Detroit,7:30 p.m.
Toronto at Milwaukee, 8 p.m.
utah at New orleans, 8 p.m.
Dallas at Houston, 8:30 p.m.
Golden State at Denver, 9 p.m.
Minnesota at Phoenix, 10 p.m.
Oklahoma City at Sacramento, 10 p.m.

GOLF

MaSters tee times

10:30 a.m.: Kyung-Tae Kim
10:40 a.m.: Nick Watney, Ernie Els
Badl50 a.m.: Paul Casey, Aaron
II a.m.: Bill Haas,Alex Cejka
11:10 a.m.: steve Marino. camilo
Vile:20 a.m.: Giry Woodland, Jeff
Overton
I I:30 a.m.: Rickie Fowler, Rober
Karisson
I I:40 a.m.: Trevor Immelman, Sergio
Garcia
I 1:50 a.m.: Ryo Ishikawa, Dustin
Johso p~m.: Ryan Moore, Charley
Hoffman
12:10 p.m.: Ricky Barnes, Justin Rose
12:20 p.m.: Brandt Snedeker, Jim
Furyk
1: p.rn.: lanAPoirlter,Q s Mid el

Angel Jimenez
I p.m.: Steve Stricker, Lee Westwood
1:10 p.m.: Edoardo Molinari, Phil
Mickelson
1:0pm.Y.E.Yang,1-41deki Matsuyama

1:40 p.m.:Tiger Woods, Martin Laird
1:50 p.m.: Fred Couples, Geoff Ogilvy
2 p.m.: Bubba Watson, Ross Fisher
2:0p -. Luke Donaldd Bo an Pelt

2:30 p.m.: Charl Schwartzel, K.J. Choi
2:40 p.m.: Rory Mcilroy, Angel
Cabrera '

AUTO RACING

Race week

INDYCAR
Grand Prix ofAlabama

m.edle To rc,3 p.m. (Versus.
3-6 p.m.).
Track: Barber Motorsports Park (road
course, 2.38 miiles).
Race distance: 18.5 milesE 75 laps.

Malaysian Grand Prix
Site: Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.
Schedule: Today, race, 4 a.m. (Speed,
3:0-acm. S pag Inm national Circuit
(road course, 3.44 miles).
Race distance: 192.88 miles, 56 laps.

IHOC K EY

'NHL schedule

saSatualay's Gams '
Boston 3, Ottawa I
Montreal at Toronto (n)
N.Y. Islanders at Philadelphia (n)
Tampa Bay at Carolina (n)
,Washington at Florida (n)
Buffalo at Columbus (n)
Nashville at St. Louis (n)
Vancouver at.Calgary (n)
Anaheim at Los Angeles (n)
Phoenix at San Jose (n)
Today's Games
.Detroit at Chicago, 12:30 p.m.
Boston at New Jersey,3 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Atlanta, 3 p.m.
Edmonton at Colorado, 3 p.m.
Dallas at Minnesota, 6 p.m.
End of regular season


<,,2," (ollandP I0) at Baltimore
Oakland (McCarthy 0-0) at Minnesota
(S.Baker 0-1), 2: 10 p.m.
Tampa say (Niemann onI) at chicago
White Sox (Floyd 0-0), 2:10 p.m.
Toronto (jo-.Reyes 0-0) at L.A.Angels
(Weaver 2-0), 3:35 p.m.
Cleveland (Tomlin 1-0) at Seattle
(Bedard 0-I), 4: 10 p.m.
N.Y.Yankees (Sabathia 0-0) at Boston
(Bcet0 o day'smGames
Texas at Detroit. 1:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Boston, 7:10 p.m-
Oakland at Chicago White Sox'

8IC8m00adm Lnlr O0 m
To evelantaSeatLe An0 1 p.m.

NL standings


back for the Garnet and
was 6-of-13 for 168 yards
and a touchdown, but he
also had two interceptions.
Andrew Clifford hit on
7-of-8 passes for 65 yards
with one interception for
the Garnet while. Seth
Strickland finished 6-
of-8 for 80 yards with a
-touchdown and an
interception.


TELEVISION

/ sports
Today
AUTO RACIN G

VERSUS I Inlandy Lights, at
BirminghamAla.
3 P.m.
VERSUS IRL, IndyCar, Grand Prix
of Alabama, at Birmin Ga, Ala.

7 p.m.
VERSUS -Paris-Roubaix, Compiegne
to Roubaix, France (same-day tape)

CBS Masters Tournament., final
round, at Augusta,GCa
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
TBS Philadelphia at Atlanta
2 p.m.
WGN Chicago Cubs at Milwaukee
8 p.m.
ESPN N.Y.Yankees~at Boston
NBA BASKETBALL

ABC Chicag am Orlando
3:30 p.m.
ABC Boston at Miami
NHL HOCKEY
12:3o p.m.
NBC DetroitDEtChicago

3 p.m.
NBC PBR, Built Ford Tough
Invitational, atTampa (same-day tape)
TENNIS

ESPN2L W Tur, Family Circle
Cup, championship match, at Charleston,
S.C.
da
MAjOR LE GE BASEBALL
7 p.m.
ESPN --Tampa Bay at Boston
NBA DL BASKETBALL

VERSUS Pi8ys .first round, game
2, Utab atlowa
SOCCER
2:55 p.m.
ESPN Premier League, Manchester
City at LiverpoAIASEBAL

a p.m.
ESPN -Draft at Bristol, Conn.

BASEBALL

AL standings


East Division
W L
Philadelphia 5 2
Florida 4 3
Atlanta 4 4
New York 3 4
Washington 3 4
Central Division

cincinnati s 2
Pittsburgh 5 3
Chicago 4 3
Milwaukee 3 5


COntinued From Page 115

68 yards and a touchdown)
and freshman Jeff Driskel
(3 Of 8 f01 29 yards) press-
ing him for playing time.
"'He's ahead," Muschamp
Said. "You look at the whole
body of work, he's done a
nice job. ... The quarter-
back position is no differ-
ent than ally other position.
We'll have great competi-
tion in the fall for that job.
Right now Johnny Brantley
is the starter."
Brantley started every
galne lRSt season, throwing
for 2,061 yards with nine
touchdowns and 10 inter-
ceptions in former coach
Urban Meyer's spread sys-
tem. The Gators struggled
to score most of the year
and finished 8-5, their worst
season since 2004.
Brantley became the fist
quarterback to lead Florida
in paSSing and have more
INTs than TDs since Kyle
MOrris in 1988.
TiCis Wants considerably
more from the laid-back kid
Ifrm nearby Ocala.
"He's always been telling


me to be more of a leader
in the huddle, to be more
vocal, to be more of a rah-
rah guy, just to be able to
lead the team, to do what
my actions are," Brantley
said. "He antss me to bre
able to run this teath~. Je's
helped me' out a lot with
that this sprin~g."
No matter what Brantley
does in the huddle, on, the
sideline or irr t~he locker
room, he will be judged on
what happens in the pocket
and on the scoreboard. And
Brantley insisted he feels
comfortable in the new
scheme even though it
didn't show in the spring
game. .
"W~e're going to keep
building off it and we're
going to work together over
the summer and get in sync
with. everything and be
ready for camp," Brantley
said. "~We're going to be
fine. We just need to keep
getting better. I feel pretty
comfortable. There's a lot
more to learn and coach
Weis and all the coaches


are getting ready for all
that. What we learned in
the spring is a good basis
of what we're going to be
doing in the fall."
The Gators played with-
out offensive tackles Matt
Patchan, Xavier Nixon
and Nick Alajajian, run-
ning backs Jeff Demps,
Mack Brown, Mike
Gillislee and Mike Blakely,
and receivers Trey Burton,
Andre Debose and Chris
Dunkley.
Without them, 'the
defense controlled the line
and kept steady pressure
on Brantley.
"I wouldn't call John
Brantley's play today a
struggle," defensive tackle
, Sharrif Floyd said. "I would
call it not enough room.
Me and Dominique Easley,
we collapsed the pocket.
That's one of our main
goals. We forced offensive
linemen into his face and
he has to roll out. That's
just how our defensive line
plays. We play physical and
fast."


2 5

West Division
W L
4 2
3 2
3 3


St. Louin


Colorado
San Diego
L A geles


San Francisco 3 4 .429 I'b
Saturday's Games
Philadelphia 10,Atlanta 2
iann Dg c, o L.A. Dodgers 2; tie, 9
Colorado at Pittsburgh (n)
Florida at Houston (n)
Chicago Cubs at Milwaukee (n)
W hn to tat N.Y. Mets (n)
L.A. Dodgers at San Diego (n)
St. Louis at San Francisco (n)
Today's Games
Washington (Marquis 0-0) at N.Y.

Meo. uao (hai I -O) at Pittsburgh
(Ja.McDoniald 0-0) 1:35 p.m.
Philadelphia (Hamels 0-1) at Atlanta
(D.Lowe 1-1), 1:35 p.m.
(Harcnk (Ani.an hez 0-0) at Houston
chicago cubs (Coleman 0-0) at
Milwauikee (Gallardo 1-0), 2:10 p.m.
LA. Dodgers (Ely 0-0) at San Diego
(Haan oI- )( oe 0 1) at San Francisco
(Zito 0-0), 4:05 p.m.
.S Cin tI (aeP 1-0) at Arizona
Monday's Games
Colorado P N.Y. Mets, 7:IO p.m.
~'Chicago Cubs at Houston, 8:05 p.m.
St. i.ouis at Arizona. 9:40 p.m.
Cincinnati at San Diego, 10:05 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers .at San Francisco,
10:15 p.m.

BASKETBALL

NBA schedule

Today's Games
Chicago at Orlando, I p.m.
Boston at Miami, 3:30 p.m.
SNew Orleans at Memphis, 6 p.m.
Detroit at Chariotte, 6 p~m.
New Jersey at Toronto, 6 p.m.
NewYork at Indiana, 7 p.m.
Phoenix at Dallas, 7:30 p.m.
Sacramento at Golden State, 9 p.m.
Oklahoma City at L.A. Lakers,
9:30 p.m.
Monday's Games
Miami at Atlanta, 7 p.m.
charlotte at New jersey, 7 p.m.


East DivisionL
5 I
5 2
I 6

Central Division


Baltimore

Ner Y rk
Boston
Tampa Ba)


W L Pct GB
Cleveland 5 2 .714 -
Chicago 4 3 .571 1
Kansas City 4 .3 .571 I
Detroit 3 4 .429 2
Minnesota ms i 4so .429 2
W L Pct GB
Texas 6 0 1.000 -
Los Angeles 3 4 .429 31
Oakland 2 5 .286 4%
Seattle 2 5 .286 43
Saturday's Games
N.Y.Yankees 9, Boston 4
Kansas City 3, Detroit I -
Chicago White Sox 4,Tampa Bay 2
Baltimore 5,Texas 0, Ist game
Oakland at Minnesota (n)
Texas at Baltimore, 2nd game (n)
Toronto at L.A.Angels (n)
cleveland at Seattle (n)
Today's Games ~
Kansas City (Hochevar 0-1) at Detroit
(Porcello 0-I), 1:0s p.m.


defensive coach, so a
low-scoring game could
be a positive, but he also
brought in offensive
guru Charlie Weis. After
a spring working with
the Gators, last year's
unproductive offense
hasn't changed much.


team on one of the most
impressive drives of the
afternoon. After 10 plays,
the Orange converted on
a 10-yard passing play to
walk-on Ben Sams to take
the lead.
It appeared that would be
file ~final Score, but another


unheralded player came
away with the difference.
Quarterback Christian
Provancha tossed a
39-yard touchdown pass to
freshman receiver Robert
Clark to give the Blue the
13-10 win.
Muschamp is a


ACROSS 38 Non-comn nick-
name
Make a mis- 39 Tijuana "Mrs."
take 40 Checkers piece
Trucker, often 41 Played over
ChipS 44 Traveler's need
go-with 48 Pampiona yell
200 fins 49 Mascara tar et
Throng 51 Tumult .
I, to Caesar 52 Elite divers
Drivel 53 Gore and
Brown the Capone
bandleader 54 Long-faced
Catching 55 Reproving
Go fly --! clucks
Ben & Jerry 56 Mao --tung


21 N opposite
22 Lama
25 Inconvenient
29 Test
30 Paul Anka's
"- Beso"
31 Oaxaca gold
32 Stately tree
33 Rookie
socialite
34 Excursion
35 Climb down


1

4
8

11
12
13 1
14 1
16 1

17 (
18 (
20 1


series is also in Miami.
The No. 1 seed mn the East
'has' been locked up by the
Chicago Bulls, and in some
order, seeds 2 and 3 will go
to Miami and Boston. So
that means thie Heat and
Celtics will be slotted to
meet in the East semifinals
- where Games 1, 2, 5 and
7 would be hosted by the
:higher seed.
"This is a big game for
us," Boston forward Paul
Pierce said in a story pub-
lished on the team's web-
site, Celtics.com. '"That's
what we are playing for, for
the home. court advantage.
'Not only for the first round,
but hopefully we will see
then in the second round.
This is a big game for us
when you are talking about
seeds and trying to advance
in the playoffs. It's huge."
For the Heat, there's
more at stake than just
home-court.
This season began with
great hubbub in Boston,
the team that not only oust-
ed Miami from the play-
offs a year ago, but also
knocked out Cleveland
and LeBron James -
in the second round last
spring. Simply put, the Heat
just want to prove to them-
selves that they can beat
the Celtics,


'We're going against a
team that we haven't beaten
this year, that we kind of
looked at before the season
as needing to get to that
point as far as chemistry,
as far as what they do as a
team," James said. "There
is not one guy on their team
that you have to pay atten-
tion to it's every last one
of them. We're looking for-
ward to t~he challenge."
The games this year have
not necessarily brought the
best out of either club.
'1he season-opener got
off to an ugly start, Boston
leading 16-9 after the fist
quarter and eventually pre-
vailing 88-80 after holding
Miami to 36 percent shoot-
ing. They met again two
weeks later, Boston taking
as much as a 20-point lead
that the Heat whittled down
to three in the final half-
minute before falling 112-
107.
Then came an absolute
second-half debacle for
Miami on Feb. 13, when
the Heat got outscored by
17 in the third quarter and
lost again, 85-82.
"It's about the team-that's
going to make the plays
down the stretch, who's
going to execute the best
down the stretch," Heat
guard Dwyane Wade said.


By TIM REYNOLDs
Associated Press

MIAMI Somehow,
after 79 games, nothing
between the Boston Celtics
and Miami Heat has been
decided.
Boston, 55-24.
Miami, 55-24.
Tied for the No. 2 spot
in the Eastern Conference,
one team will take a stran-
glehold on the race for
home-court through at least
the first two playoff rounds
on Sunday when the Celtics
and Heat meet in Miami.
Boston is 3-0 in the season-
series between the clubs,
and has won 18 of its last
20 games against the Heat
since April 2007.
But if Miami finds a way
on Sunday, that Celtic domi-
nance may be temporarily
forgotten.
"Let's toss the ball up
and play," Heat coach Erik
Spoelstra said Saturday."'We
think we're a different team
than the last three times
we've played them, but until
we prove it in between the
lines, it doesn't matter."
The Heat are understand-
ably thrilled that Game 4 of
the regular-season series is
in Miami. That won't be the
case if Game 4 of a poten-
tial Heat-Celtics postseason


1 Quiche ingredi-
ents
2 Horse's brake
3 "Fancy" singer
4 Trite
5 Admiral's jail
6 Sullivan and
Murrow
7 Go over old
ground


8 Salami seller
9 - the pic-
ture!
10 Work as a
model
12 Swiss miss


15 Minnow kin
19 Green parrot
21 Uppity one
22 Heroic exploit
23 Grease gun
target
24 Takes a pow-
der
25 Exploited
26 Jordan's
queen
27 Penicillin, e.g.
28 Kmights
of -
30 Ferber or
Wilay
34 Lmony

36 Dixie, once
37 Ppap
Hemingway
38 Epics
40 Ruminates
41 Towel
holders
42 Charles Lamb
43 Tear
44 Pipe problem
45 At the drop of

46 Thickens
47 Latin I verb
50 Survey choice


4-11 @ 2011 by UFS, Inc.


Gamecocks try out 4


QBs .
Associated Press

COLUMBIA, S.C. -
DeAngelo Smith caught
four passes for 118 yards
and three touchdowns to
lead the Garnet squad to
a 21-17 win over the Black
team in South Carolina's
RI1RuRI Spring game
Saturday.
The Gamecocks took


SHeat, Celtics face off with


NO. 2 Seed likely at stake


DOWN '












rra~t~ OUTDOORS


THESE ARE NOT CHEAP SEATS!
.. West Side, Row 30, Approx..
20yd line. North End Zone.
Price Includes Owner's
Booster Membership.
g . r


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, APRIL 10, 2011


Page Editor: ~Brandon Finley, 754-0420


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Rory Mcllroy (second right) of Northern Ireland and Jason Day of Australia walks across the Byron Nelson Bridge with their
caddies during the third round of the Masters golf tournament Saturday in Augusta, Ga.




McIlroy leads Masters,



Styn CH OO O ot da


Kindergarten catch COREYHT
Zane Starling, 5, of Lake City caught this 8-pound bass at
a private pond in Columbia County during spring break.
Zane, who is in kindergarten at Columbia City Elementary,
was fishing with his dad, Chris Starling.


McIlroy plodded through -
the ~first 12 holes at 1. over
but closed with a flourish.
He. came to the 13th tied
with Day, but left with a
two-stroke lead after mak-
ing the expected birdie. He
made another at the par-5
15th, hooking his second
shot over the pond and
skipping it safely to a stop
on the green.
SThen, a big boost at the
end of the day 'the putt at
17 that brought out a furi-
oxis fstpump.
"I've been saying it all
week, I feel comfortable,"
he said. "I feel comfortable
with my game, feel comfort-
able with the way I've pre-
pared and all of a sudden
I'm feelitig comfortable on
this golf coursee"
K.J. Choi, who played
with Woods in the next-to-
last group, struggled with
the putter and settled for
a 71.
The biggest shakers
on moving day were the
guys who started farther
back, sweating their way
through rounds in the 60s
even as the heat firmed up
the already slick greens. It
was expected to, be even
steamier Sunday, with the
mercury pushing into the
90s.


a 5-footer to save par at the good round."
final hole. ':'Day, another o'f golf's
Whiile there were sorne: young stars, played in the
wild shots with his big ,final group with McIlroy.
clubs -- he had to: crouch The '23-year-old Aussie
down at No. 17 after driving .briefly surged to the top of
under a pine tree but his the board with three birdies
biggest woes ~cam' ~on t~he .on the first ~five holes.
greens he knows so well.: '' But he cooled off as the
The miss at No.. 18 was temperature soared, climb-
bad enough, but hardly his. .ing into the mid-80s with
worst. There was a 2-footer .humidity that made it feel
that lipped out at the 11th. like a summer day.
And a 3-footer that skidded Day was shaky with his
wide at the 15th, ruining- short stick, -making a cou-
a birdie after he struck a ple ofthree-putt bogeys. He
brilliant hook around the made another bogey at the
towering pine trees. par-5 13th a hole that-'s
"I just made nothing," expected to be at least a
Woods moaned. "I hit so birdie by rubbing a chip
many putts early that looked that rolled right back to his
like they were going to go feet.
in and they didn't go in." But at least he's still in
Mired in the longest win- the mix. Day fnished with a
less streak of his career, 72 and is inthe group at208
he went from three shots with Angel Cabrera, Charl
behind at the start of the Schwartzel and Choi.
round to a daunting seven- Woods looked like the
shot deficit heading to Tigerof old Friday, but any
Sunday. momentum ciuickly faded
"I'm going to have to when he drove into a fair-
put together a good front way divot at the fist hole, a
nine and see what hap- tough break that led to the
pens," he said. "I hit the first of four bogeys. He also
ball well all day. That wasn't made a mess of the fourth
the problem. I just inade hole, dropping his club as
nothing. Take away the two though it was on fire after
three-putts there, a couple whizzing his tee shot far
of unforced errors and it right of the green on the
should have been a pretty par 3.


By PAUL NEWBERRY
Associated Press

AU~TGUSTA, Ga. The
kid stayed cool on a swelter-
ing day at Augusta National,
anid now Rory McIlroy has
a comfortable lead heading
into the final round of the
Masters.
The 21-year-olet from
'Northern Ireland shot a 2-
under 70 Saturday, punctu-
ated by a 33-foot putt at
the 17th holle that suddenly
gave him plenty of breath-
mng room.
He was at 12-under 204
through three rounds, hav-
ing held at least a~ share of
the lead in all three rounds.
He'll have his biggest
advantage yet going into
Sunday, four strokes clear
of the field as challengers
like Tiger Woods, Jason
Day and KJ. Choi failed to
put on the pressure.
"Its a great position to be
in," McIlroy said. "I stayed
,really patient out there
today. I'm really happy with
way I stuck to my game
plan and it paid off."
Woods was dropping
expletives and screaming
at himself. He followed up a
brilliant 66 on Friday with a
sloppy 74, staggeringto the
scoring shed after missing


COURTESY PHOTO

White Springs whopper'
Keith Smith shows a 13111-pound bass he caught in White
Springs on April 3.


ATV riding allowed at Mlallory Swamp


From staff reports

The Suuwannee River
Water Management
District will allow ATV
riding at Mallory Swamp


in Lafayette County from
today until Sept. 11.
A daily special-use
auth-orization is required.
For details, call (386)- 362-
1001 or 1-800-266-1066.


Continued From Page 1B

west side of Ben Hill Griffin
Stadium near .the skybox
entrance. They were paid
for by private donations.
"When do you ever think
growing up that you'll have
a statue somewhere where
people will look at itand have
great memories?" Wuerffel
said. "It's even more special
being next to two guys that
I love and admire in my
coach, Steve Spurrier, and
my friend, Tim Tebow. That
even makes it more special
for me."
,Spurrier threw for more
than 4,800 yards and 37
touchdowns as a three-year
starter in Gainesville. His
most notable play might not
have even been at his posi-
tion. He kicked a 40-yard
field goal to beat Auburn
30-27 during his senior sea-
son. *
Spurrier returned to
coach his alma mater in
1990. He led the Gators
to six Southeastern
Conference championships
and the 1996 national title
with Wuerffel at the helm.
Under Spurrier's guidance,
Florida won 122 games in
12 seasons and went 68-5 in
Gainesville.. He helped cre-
ate one of the best home-
field advantages in college
football and even nick-
named the stadium "The
Swamp."
Spurrier welcomed the
process of posing for the
statue, but made his pri-


Uns ramble tehaecshe rumbles,
to form four ordinary words.
TWCAH

02>o1 Tribtine Media Services, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
NRAKC I -



DDEPEL g



EKRAMT


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Former Florida quarterback Tim Tebow addresses the crowd at midfield after statues of
himself and fellow Heisman Trophy winners Danny Wuerffel and Steve Spurrijer were unveiled
outside the stadium at halftime of the Orange and Blue Debut Saturday. .


teammates at Florida Field.
One of college football's
greatest players, Tebow
had 32 touchdown passes in
2007 and ran for 23 more.
He became the first
player to score at least 20
touchdowns rushing and
passing, then became the
first sophomore to win the
Heisman.
"I feel like I'm not just a
player, but I'm part of it,"
Tebow said. "I grew up a
Gator and that just makes it
that: much more special."


orities clear by filming his
message in a black South
Carolina shirt and sitting in
a Gamecocks team meeting
room.
'"This is one of the best
honors I've ever had in my
life," Spurrier said.
Wuerffel, who threw for
more than 3,600 yards and 39
touchdowns in 1996, echoed
Spurrier's sentiments. But
he stopped short of calling
it one of his best moments
at Florida Field.
'"There have been so


many wonderful memo-
ries, from hugging a team-
mate after a touchdown to
being picked up after a sack
from one of my buddies,"
Wuerffel said. "This is one
of those that is kind of hard
to grasp at the moment. I'm
sure as the years go by it'll
become more clear what
this means."
Tebow, not surprisingly,
had the largest contingent
on hand for the ceremony.
He had friends, family mem-
bers and a bunch of former


n a
WVHEN THE SHIP
CARRYING TIRES
STAR TED SINKING,
lr--
Now arrange the circled letters
ts oum ete srris oanswero as


Jumbles: FETCH TOXIC CH(Answer tomorrow
Saturay's Answer: Before he completely unpacked, he worked
out of his HOME BOX OFFICE


he feels part of tradition


STATUES: Tebowv says










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Soon a year will have passed since the Deepwater Horizon accident in the Gulf. From
the beginning, we have taken responsibility for. the cleanup. Our commitment to the
Gulf remains unchanged, as does our responyibiity to keep you informed.

Commi~tted-to the Gulf
No oil has flowed into the Gulf since July 1~thi4s: og!r efforts continue, nearly 100%/
of the waters are open and the beaches 'are 'cleaR andi~ open. To ensure its safety, Gulf
seafood~has been mrt0e rigorously tested by independent researchers and experts
than any other seafood in the world. To date,: BP has spent more than $1.3 billion
in clean-up costs.


Restore the Environment
An additional $282 million has been spent on environmental issues, including wildlife
rescue and restoration of wildlife refuges across the region. We have also committed
$500 million to the Gulf 'of Mexico Research Institute to fund scientific studies on the
potential impact of the spill.


Help to Rebuild the Econom'y
$5 billion in claims have already been paid. We've committed $20 billion to an
independent fund to pay for Eypvironmehtal restoration and all legitimate claims,
including lost incomes. More than $200 million in grants have been made to the
Gulf Coast States to promote tourism and seafood.

Learn and Share the Lessons
This was a tragedy that never should have happened. Our responsibility is to learn
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Deadline approaching for filing taxes


- reat time to start a



BUSINESS S...


I i~__ _:


~___


2806 West US HighwaV 90, Suite 101.
Lake City, Florida, 32055
;m.s [386) 755-5110 wwwnn.danielcrapps.com G


Storiidaekas?

Assistant Editor
754-0427
crisak@lakecityreportercom

Sunday,April 10, 20I I


www.Iakecityreporter.com


Section C


others just procrastinate.'
"I think everybody
procrastinates a little bit
in some shape, form or
fashion," he said. "And
let's face it, it's (filing a tax
return) one of those dfead~-
ed responsibilities that we
have that nobody likes."
..Jf someone does' not file
tiy the: d~alikdl:iethycould
suffer labi; penalties and
inte-e~st' could- accumulate
Sif they have, a balaride due,
room said. --
The peltfrnotigtyfrntfln
on time is a perc'en'fage of
what.the taxpayer owes,
Broom said. If the taxpay-
er does not owe anything,
they could still be subject
to a late filing penalty if
they miss the deadline,
she said.
Filing ain extension
gives taxpayers another
six months to actually
file their return, Broom
Said, but if they don't
send in the balance they
mw wihteir exen don,

interest accrued on that
balance will not be waived.
Taxpayers will still have
to pay those penalties and
interests until they pay
their balance dues, she
said, even with an exten-
sion.
Filing on time wNill keep
a taxpayer safe from those
penalties, Broom said.
"To do it on time, it
avoids those penalties and
fines," she said.
Briscoe encouraged tax-
payers to file on time. "'


By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com

That's what
Steve Briscoe,
owner of The
H ~ ~Tax Stationur u .
Inc. in Lake City, said
laughingly when asked
what people can do to file
their taxes on time-
"Basically, they have a
week left," he said.
Only eight days remain
for taxpayers to ille their
income taxes by the 2011
fiing deadline, which is set
at Monday, April l8.
According to the -
Internal Revenue Service
website, the 2011 tax due
date was switched ~from
the usual April 15 deadline
because of a District of
Columbia holiday, granting
taxpayers an extra week-
end to file.
Who needs to file?
SAnybody with any type of

is Brom ma er ofd
the Lake City H&R Block
office.
"Basically anybody
that has received taxable
income throughout the
year by law is to file a tax
return," Briscoe said.
Thus far, Briscoe said
his Tax Station has pr -
pared about 92 percent of
the anticipated tax returns
his business will do.this
yeair, with the remammig
8 percent left to go within
the last week before the fil-
ing deadline.*
In the last 10 days or
so, there's a pretty good
influx of people last-min-


JASOIY MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Joyce Demarco (left), a tax preparer at the Tax Station, helps Kerstin Morris, 21, with her income fax forms. The deadline to
file taxes has been moved back from April 15 to April 18, due to a District of Columbia holiday.


Broom said.
In addition to using a
preparer, people can also
electronically file for their
tax returns through vari-
ous means made available
onlinb: by the IRS, Briscoe
said.
Unless someone is
capable and comfortable
with filing their tax return
On~line, Briscob said he
recommends having a
professional handle the
tax return preparation and
answer any questions so
the return is being pre-
pared correctly.
'"The IRS is not gonna


ute," he said, "just like
Christmas with the last-,
minute shopper." -
W~hile Broom could not
release hard numbers, she
said business at the Lake
City H&R Block should be
about the same she's seen
.so far this tax season. -
"We've been pretty
steady, so I'm preparing to
stay steady," she said.
Options for people filing their
t'ax returns include taking it
to a professional preparer,
using the H&R Block online
software or filling it out
by hand and mailing it in,


accept the excuse of,'Oh,
I didn't know, sorry I did
it wrong,"' he said. "IRS is
gonna say, 'Sorry, you still
owe the interest and the
penalties.
'"So I always urge people
when they do it online,
if you're not 100 percent
comfortable, don't do
it," Briscoe said. "I know
everybody wants to save
money and I'm nordif-
ferent, but don't second-
guess yourself if you're not
sure."


Some customers~ do~ wait
until thie last week to file,
Broom saiid.
"Normally they have bal-
ance dues, is one thing,"
she said, "or they're not
sure how to actually pay
their balance dues so they
wait until the last minute
or they're preparing all the
paperwork` to, bring into
us."
Last-minute customers
The Tax Station sees are
usually ones that owe an
amount, Briscoe said, bu


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I purchased a company at $0.75
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market via an IPO (initial public
oan I sen rwcmmednd tos to
buy it. Is it a good idea to purchase
additional shares now to correct my
original entry into this stock? I feel
stupid for having bought into this.
Help! R.D., online
The Fool Responds: First off'
stocks trading for less than $5 or
so per share are "penny stocks,"
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that they're bargains due .
to their seemingly; low ,.I
trc; rut een at e10ma a
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Jt' a common instinct to want


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Defining Terms
Seasoned and beginning investors
alike can be confused by financial
jargon. Hone your financial literacy
Ageseime g awh fumd: A
mutual fund that seeks long-term
capital growth by investing primarily
in stocks of fast-growing smaller
companies or narrow market seg-
ments, such as the technology sector
or Internet stocks.
Asset classes: The three
mi n a cs ascalled cash reserves, money
market instruments, or
moolah), bonds and stocks.
*Basis point: most often used
relating to changes in interest rates.
One basis point is 1/100 of a per-,
Cenpia gin/lpss: The differ-
ence between the price at which an
asset is sold and-its original pur-
chase price (or "basis"').
Commodities: Goods, with lit-
de dlfferennanon berlicen prodiuc-


amounts on an exchange.
*Cost basis: The ongmnal p~nce


r


r.-


" _- .


What Is This Thing Called
The Motley Fool?
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In Elizabethan dlays,-Fools were the only
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The Motley Fool tells the truth about
investing, and hopes you 11 laugh all
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Cisco Gives Birth
Cisco Systems (Nasdaq: CSCO)
has announced its first-ever cash
dividend: $0.06 to be paid quarterly.
CiCt tnsaes tsot n annual divi-
dend yield of about 1.4 percent at
the recent share price. With roughly
5.5 billion shares outstanding, it
will cost Cisco about $1.3 billion
per year, just under 15 percent of its
free ash flowi 2010.
Cocusiderin wdat Cisco already
sent s e$9 bill oe the last
12mots eto buy bakisown
shares, it seems quite committed to
returning ~value to shareholders. And
thfoe you start comp ainmng aout'
thecompany' stoA -ased compde -
of ths subas l no gthateCisco
issued only $3 billion mn new shares
over t same period Tu, h oa
shatecn has een fallmg laig
Other major technology companies
are following a similar model, spend-

conipany's stock is actually underval-
oh~e i as eu.0 gh m l alo
offers flexibility in times of need .
diied isfond uo denn
in ~buybacks is not such a red flag.
Cisco's current yield isn't big
enough to make it an income-gener-
ating powerhouse today, but that
could change with steady raises
over the years, or a blow to the
Underlying stock price.
*************************


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


Paper Profits

QWhat are "unrealized gains"?
L.H., Shenanldoah, Iowa
AWhen you sell an investment,
you usually realize abgamstoork
loss. If, for example, you buy stc
in Roadrunner Industries (ticker:
BEEEP) at $25 per share and then
sell it a few years later at $36, you'll '
have a realized gain of $11 per share
'(less commission costs).
Meanwhile, perhaps you bought -
shares of Acme Explosives Co.
(ticker: KBOOM) at $F45 apiece and
they're now at $55. If you haven't ,
sold any shares, you've got an unre..
alized gain (or "paper profit") of $10
per share. It's your profit in theory .
only: Since you haven't actually sold
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was
What do chief financial officers
do? G.S., Keene, N.H.
AAcompany's chief-financial
officer (CFO), such as
Hewlett-Packard i Catherine Lesjak,
Morgam Stanle_ 1 Ruth Parat and
U.S. Steel's Gretchen Ha~ggrty, is
responsible for all thmgs financial at


be, de~cidmg~ howe best to f nance

st khlr r n\ cors crd tors,
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The CFO Is also0 focused on
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mix of internal lash. debt f~inanc-
ing and jtoc\ finanang for the
company) (ttus Is known as a firm s
''"Capual1 structure"). The CFO plans
and or ersees the fo~recasting and
budgeting process. monitors aU
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with funding sources such as com-
mercial and invecstment bankls, and
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and commmucating the quarterly
and annual financial statements
Finally,. the CFO: bas ulltimate
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ensulrmg that the company ~s asts
aire protected
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paid for an investment (including
commissions).
*Derivative: A financial contract
whose value is determined by (or
"derived" from) the value of
another security, such as stocks,
bonds, commodities or a market
motxco o ot peS Pde03vahvs
are options, futures and mortgage-
backed securities.
*Free cash flow: The cash that's
left over after everything bills
from suppliers, salaries, expenses
for the annual holiday bash, new
equipment to expand the business
- is accounted for. Theoretically,
free cash flow is the amount of cash
a business could issue to sharehold-
ers in the form of a dividend check.
*Gross Domestic Product
(GDP): The value of all goods and
services provided within the borders
laPnas d tekrme dqm reSIy bthe
Department of Commerce.
*No-load fund: A mutual
fund that does not charge a sales .

* ecrtis:Afailanaefor


wiki.fool.c m/Foolsalarus agnd : .: .
www.investopiedia.comn/dictionary


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v. Today I'm the world's top chemical company,
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ica~s second-largest magazine' seller, offering about 5,500 magazines and
almost 1,000 newspapers. Each year, my cafes serve 60 million drinks.
Altogether, I sell roughly 300 million books annually, less than 5 percent
of them best-sellers. I host close to 100,000 community events each*
year. I've won awards for my customer service and my commitment to
.equality. Who am I? (Answer: Barnes & Noble)
Write to Us! Send questions for Ask the Fool, Dumbest (or
Smartest) Investments (up to 100 words), and your Tinvia entries*
to .Fool@,fool.com or via regular mail c/o this newspaper, attn: The


:..:(t. ~~T~ Ll~~n i, C~.~I!DYT I' I II
~d.Z..t .: ffB
.r- a 1, ;


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~Ls~


2VZDC K,; I ~LUlb~r;.~wr.~l .U.,~. ~r~L r~.l


express our apprecia-
tion to the Lake City
Holiday Inn & Suites,
Days Inn Motel (U.S.
90 West), Cabot Lodge and.Oaks
'n Pines Campground for hosting
our staff and personnel from Touch
Poll Flonida during the weekend of
March 18-19 as we conducted polling
tci gauge a variety of issues pertain-
ing to marketing issues rfor our area.
A total of 227ivisitors completed
the 20-question survey which was
administered on touch screen com-
puters at each location. The results
will allow us to better focus market-
ing efforts in the future and better
identify: markets and media in which
to spend our:dollars. .
The polling showed that 2/3 of
each party consisted of two people
with 52 percent spending just
one night in our area, 32 percent
spending two or three nights in
Sthe Suwannee River Valley. Of the
respondents, 31 percent indicated
their reason for staying was pass-
ing through to another destination
in Florida, while 37 percent were in
our area to attend an event. Of that
group, 12 percent said they were
here to play golf, 17 percent we-e
here for a recreational activity.
Asked to provide an impression of
our area, 45 percent said they had an
excellent opinion of our area and 48
percent cited a good impression of
the Suwannee River Valley. A total of
S95 percent of visitors said they would
recommend a stay and/or visit to
our area to family and friendls. In
terms of age, 49 percent of those
polled were in the age bracket of 35-
54 and 24 percent were ages 55-64.
According to the polling, approxi-
mately 35 percent of visitors were .
walk-in guests with the majority :
having made reservations on-line or
by telephone. Visitors said that bill-
boards made ain infuei~ce on 57 leie"
110o istrst sty iu ae lia le
by mailing faulette_10rd~columbia- .
countyfla. com
We will'be partnering with Spirit
of the Suwannee Music Park to poll
visitors at Wanee Festivral, ~April 14-,
16, as an additional opportunity to


May 18th, beginning at 13 Noon.
Awards will be presented in each
of nine categories. The awards piro-
gram will identify outstanding tour-
ism marketing, customer service
and industry support efforts for
anyone employed in the industry in
Columbia, Hamilton and Su1wannee ~
Counties.
Award winners will be recog-
nized in the following categone~s:
Outstanding Hotel/Motel Employe;
Outstanding Management : i
Employee/Owner; Outstanchng
Campground Employee/Owner;
Outstanding Attraction Employee;
Outstanding Agri-Tourism
Employee/Owner; the "Always
There" Award for excellence in
tourism marketing and promo-
tilonal efforts; Best Strategic Partner
Award; the Director's Award for
Excellence; Community Service
Award to either an individual or
lodging property.
TDC staff will be filling brochure
racks in the upcoming week and
will leave nomination forms at all
tri-county lodging facilities. You can
also obtain forms by calling the TDC
office at 758-1312 or on our web site
at: www.springsrus.com

A big month for sports
tournaments in April
A busy month for sports tourna-
ment action got ixnderway during
the weekend of April 2-4 ivith a
USSSA event at the Southside Sports
Complex. Five additional tourna-
ments are scheduled for this month,
Listed below are the dates, event and
contact information for each of the
events. All of the following are at the
Southside Sports Complex:
April 9-10 ASA Girls Softball,
Greg Kennon, 386-288-8783; April'
15-17 Florida Travel Baseball,
Randall Plyn, 386-961-1782; April 16-
17 NSA Softball, Greg Kennon,
386-28783 Aprl22 244 1 USSSA
S1412; April 23 ASA Softball, Roy
Hattaway, 478-518-3926; April 30
-May 1 USSSA Softball, Greg
Kennon, 386-288-8783; May 6-8
- USSSA Softball, Tak Walden, 407-
518-1412.


the tota crop.
But the increase didn't
alter the agency's overall
estimate, mostly because
livestock producers are
expected' to scale back
their corn purchases.
.The Agriculture
Department estimated
that demand from live-
stock producers fell 1 per-
cent to 5.15 billion bush-
els.
Crops prices rose about
1 percent~ to $7.67 dur-
in mormig trading
ohrtly at he report
was released. The price
of soybean rose 1 percent
to $13.80 a bushel. Wheat
.was virtually unchanged
at $7.76 a bushel.
Corn prices affect most
products in supermarkets.
Corn is used to feed the
cattle, hogs and chickens
that fill the meat case, and
it is the main ingredient in
cereals and soft drinks.


Associated Press

ST.~ LOUIS .Rising
demand for corn from
ethanol producers is push-
,ing( U.S. reserves to the
lowest point in 15 years,
a trend that could lead
to higher grain and food
prices this year.
The Agriculture
Department on Friday
left its estimate for corn
reserves unchanged from
the previous month. The
reserves are projected to
fall to 675 million bushels
in late August, when the
harvest begins, or rough-
ly 5 percent of all corn
consumed in the United
States. That would be the
lowest surplus level since
1996.
The limited supply is
chiefly because of increase.
ing demand from ethanol
makers, which rose 1 per-
cent to 5 billion bushels.
That's about 40 percent of


Harvie Campbell
Columbia uointy Tourism
Development


research our marketing.effortsj and
to help establish strategies and- mar-
kets in which to focus promotional
efforts in the future.
We are already making plans to
do a research project in conjunction
with the 2612 Olustee Battle Festival
in February of next year.

Educational seminar upcoming
this month .
The Columbia. County Tourist
Development Council will be part-
nering with VISIT F'LORIDA and
the Florida Festival and Events
Association to host a free educational
seminar entitled "Promoting Special
Events" on Wednesday, April 20th, ~
9:00 a.m. 2:00 p.m., at the Columbia
County Combined Communications
Center, 263 NW Lake City Avenue.
The seminar will include three com-
ponents of promoting your event
with one element identifying how to
create and involve partnerships; a
second aspect will identify methods
of using the internet to your benefit;
and the third component will deal
with successfully utilizing consumer
trade shows to market your property
and special event.
Registration for th-e seminar is free
of charge, but you must register in
Advance. For additional information
or to register for the seminar, please
call386-758-1312.

. Sixth Annual Tourist Awards
Luncheon planned for mid-May
Tourism Week will be celebrated
in the Suwannee River Valley during '
the week of May 16-22, highlighted
by our annual awards luncheon
which will be, hosted at the Columbia
County; Fairgrpunds on Wednesday,


In this April 16, 2010 file photo, Gary Niemeyer finishes
planting 1,550 acres of corn on his farm in Auburn, Ill.
Rising demand for corn from ethanol producers is pushing
U.S. reserves to the lowest point in 15 years.


LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS SUNDAY, APRIL 10, 2011


US corn reserves


expected to fall

5tO 1 -yearlow


Survey shows majority of visitors


have a good impression of area











Government shutdown tex~;~ v9si~if~


has stocks wavering Jr .i :j


Registration 8:00 AM C)1ustee Park
Awards Party 8:30 AM 169 N.. Marion Ave

Marc~h forBa~bis~K~ickf 9:00 AM Lake iyFord


Artists subject to change without notice. Show goes on rain or shine.
TRxeS Ran procOsaing are included in the ticket prices. Camping available.


LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS SUNDAY, APRIL 10, 2011


Page Editor: C.J.Risak, 754-0427


~la rr Ir~l rir rl rle ~%I QI Ir=s~r~l n9
elc)
T~e~


in oil prices as investors worried that
higher transportation costs would cut
into company margins and consumer
spending.
Energy companies rose, leading the
10 industry groups within the S&P 500.
Occidental Petroleum Corp. rose 2.1
percent, and H~alliburton Co. rose 0.5
percent.
Todd Salamone, director of research
at Schaeffer's Investment Research, said
stocks tend to rise along with oil prices
over the long ter-m. "The recent break-
down in the pattern has largely been
due to fears of supply shocks," he said.
"But the oil rally could also be attrib-
uted to a stronger world economy."
World markets rose broadly. The
Euro Stoxx 50, an index of European
blue chips, gained 0.7 percent. Japan's
benchmark Nikkei index rose 1.9 per-
cent.
SExpedia Inc. rose 11 percent, the
most mn the S&P 500 index, after it said
it would split off its TripAdvisor.com
division.


By DAVID K. RANDALL s
AP Business Writer
NEW YORK The stock market
bounced between small gains and
losses Friday, a day after another
big earthquake in Japan sent indexes
lower.
Investors are watching Washington,
where Republicans and Democrats are
in the final day of talks to reach a
budget agreement that would prevent
a government shutdown. A shutdown
would close government services
that aren't considered essential. That
means the government will stop pub-
lishing most economic reports.
The Dow Jones industrial average
dropped 7 points, or 0.1 percent, to
12,402 in midday trading. The Standard
& Po~or's 500 index was essentially
unchanged at 1,334. The Nasdaq com-
posite fell 2, or 0.1 percent, to 2,793.
Oil prices were up 1.2 percent to near-
ly $112. Over the past two months,'most
stocks have fallen following large jumps


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Trader Richard Newman, center, works on the floor of~the New York Stock Exchange Friday.


T


harks ta oup Giocal Spons~ors: T hanks to our Natina~sl Sponsorsn

dll ~ ~~FA RMERS if amu
Shanldsc Shnd sanolpau Ranyer Fed


Lakre City Rteporter
A\ COP'Y OF` THE OFFICIAL REGRIST~RATION AND FINANCALh
'-neosouk arne *'N 01 RMSADON MS YBO OB SIGNED FRM THH DIYSO F@ FM-
TH`IE STAT~lE. REGISTRATION DOES NOT IMPLY ENDORSEMENT,
'"~~"'~~''~~"'"p "" u b ix APPR'lOVAL, OR RIECOMMEINDh~flONBY~ THE STATE. Our Florida
legistratlion number is. C11569)


0.1~0% ;e-


Si


2.50% :i
01 [i dl, s, I 1.1 1


.51% on -
r c'll XIllie I )


Free Nationw\ide ATRIl Fees + Onlinie Banking


Requirements include: e-Statements, Direct Deposit or Automatic Debit and
12 Check Card Transactions per statement t cycle.


WALKING TOGETHER
FOR9 STRONGER,

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march for babies. 6 Y~~


march


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We pay 2.50% on checking.
Performance Plus Checking-The Cherry On Top


Hertag~a*
















THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW *THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW




The Week in Review



SWeekly Stock Exchange Highlights I STocKS OF LOCAL INTEREST j Weekly Dow jones


I I


LIFE DOESN'T STANID STILL









'I'imne canl affect you as mnuc~h as your inlvestmnents. While

you can't stop, change, you c~an help make surll your invesit-
.rnenlts match your current circumrstances and goals.

l'ortulnately, doing that mray b~e as easy as meeting with your
finlancial advisor. Ai free P'ortfolio Review fr~om' Edlward

Jone~s can hel > identifyv where youlr inlvestmnents stanrd in
r~elat~ion to you~r goals. And -help p~ut time back on yo~ur side.

To adhedule a complimentary Portfolio Review, call
your local financial advisor today.

Steve Jones, CFP@
zF~inancial Advisor

2929 West U S Highway 90
Suite 114 ..
Lake City, FL 32055
386-752-3847
wwwledwardjones.com Memler slp


MUTUAL FUNDS
Total Assets Total Return/Rank Pct Min init
Name Ob) ($Mins) NAV 4-wk 12-mo 5-year Load Invt


Stock Foototes: g= Dividends and eamings in Canadian dollars, h= Does not meet continued-listing standards
If = Late fuling with SEC. n = New in past 52 weeks. pl= Preferred. rs = Stock has undergone a reverse stock spilt
of at least 50 percent within the past year. rt = Right to buy security at a specified price, s = Stock has split by a
least 20 percent within the last year. un = Units. vj = In bankruptcy or receivership. wd = When distributed, wi=
When issued. wt= Warrants.


Lovers must be worth at least $2 to be listed in tables at let. Most Actives must be worth at least $1. Volume in
hundreds of shares. Source: The Associated Press. Sales figures are unofficial.


Currencies

Last Pvs Day
Australia .9503 .9570
Britain 1.eas2 1.esis
Canada .9577 .9590


Money Rates
Last Pvs Week


PIMCO TotRels
American Funds GrthAmA m
Ridelity Contra
Vanguard TotStldx
American Funds CaplncBuA m
Vanguard Insildxl
American Funds CpWldGrlA m
Vanguard 500Adml
American Funds IncAmerA m
Vanguard TotStlAdm
American Funds InvCoAmA m
Doe Co Inttl tkk
Amenican Funds WAMutlnvA m
Amenican Funds EurPacGrA m
Vanguard InstPlus
FrankTemp-Franklin lncme A m
American Funds FninvA m
Vanguard Totindi d
American Funds NewPerspA m


,, _


FdrlFunds Rate .00-.25 .00-?5
Treasuries
3-month 0.04 0.06


Euro
Japan


.96.95
84.96


Switzerind .9098 .9163 A-Conservatve Alocalion,CI -Intermediate-Term BowlES -Europe Slack,FB -Foeg Lrge Be~knd, FG ~Fr~l LreMW'o. ., -Fro,.,
British pound expressed in U.S. dollars. All oth- Vaue S Ipdahe WS -Wo~Sard Ta Reatum: Ch~n inNV iddivindse need. Rank: How fudperfone Vs.
ers show dollar in foreign currency. Others Wh same ob e~:As n op 20, E in balm 20%. Min Ini In t inimum $ needed t neti ud oure oings


10-Vear 3.57 3.45
30-year 4.63 4.49


NYSEAmex Nasdaq

,483.94+14.60 2,447.88 +51.06 2,780.42 -9.18


G8in9TS ($2or more) GainefS ($2or more) GainefS ($2or mr)
Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg
Goldcp wt 6.80 +3.22 +90.0 ExtorreG g 7.66 +1.86 +32.1 OptiBk rsh 3.24 +1 14 +54.3
NatSemi 24.04+9.81 +68.9 VimetX 27.49+6.24 +29.4 XenoPort 9.31+3.26 +53.9
Aldrsr m .9 c101 3 IG lopg +.4~93 t2. Or GiCell 1 +.7 +3



onditSilvg 263 +26+ Id6 ima g 1.5 +1T- 21. 0cgc 9.522 3.




Losers ($2or more)_l LoserS ($2or more) l Losers ($2or mr)
Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg
DuoyGWat 3.22 -2.27 -41.3 PudaCoal 6.00-6.19 -50.8 IAmSupr 13.77-10.76 -43.9
boXTM -.9 -22 SeardhGMpun2 -6 .4 6.1 SNoetin 1.228 _
CSdlobWm 9.40 -2.00 -17.5 Cieur4.64 -.56 -10.8 Natur~lA 4.29 -1.23 -22.3
GNlron 104.20-20.84 -16.7 HelixBiog 3.08 -.37 -10.7Q~uantFurs 3.31 -.89 -21.2
ProUSSlyrsl9.65-3.55 -15.3 IncOpR 2.96 -.34 -10.3 SemiLedsnil.98- 3.08 -20.5
Feihe Intl 6.93 -1.13 -14.0 B8acterin n 3.40 -.38 -10.11 Y~ongye 4.88 -1.23 -20.1
UtdContl 19.79-3.15 -13.7 NewConcEn 3.48 -.39 -10.1 Hydrognc 5.59 -1.37 -19.7
Qihoo360 n25.48 -4.02 -13.6 A lerocntry 12.41 -1.27 -9.3 Radvisn 9.61 -2.35 -19.6
DirDGldBr 34.80 -5.34 -13.3 1 CoastD 4.00 -.40 -9.1 Osseninno n .T/ -.67 -19.5

Most Active sir or more, IMost Active (si or more)l Most Active ($1 or mr)
Name Vol (00) Last C~g Name Vol (00) Last Chg Name Vol (00) Last Chg

Sg oME"F55733 80061 2 6 -.2 PuaRa In 09 60-61 SuX MD 38 16 1 6 tl
BkofAm 4601653 13.48 +.11 RareEle g 356994 14.42 +1.40 Intel 2833867 20.02 +.30
FordM 3296512 15.33 +.17 Vimet). 236068 27.49 +6.24 Microsoft 2559799 26.07 +.59
iShEMkts 2751850 50.04 + 59 NovaGld g 230581 13.76 +.78 PwShs QQQ243234556.95 -.51
Ihan2688920 9.98 -.32 1 GtPanSibeg213565 4.30 +.03 MicronT 1407820 11.07 -23
iShR2K 2449275 83.98 -.56 1ChinaShen 210391 5.71 +.90 O~racle 1197303 33.54 -.48
GenElec 2316299 20.19 15 1 GoldStr g 207526 3.10 +.20 Nvidia 1087128 17.55 -.65
SPDR Fncl2294143 16.46 -.07 ICapGold 206122 6.56 +.25 Dell Inc 961543 14.57 +.23
NatSemi 2166371 24.04 +9.81 NwGold g 183138 11.49 -.16 MarvellT 875790 16.39 +.46


Adaned1,377 1 Advanced 2691 Aldvanced 1,174
Dedned1,775 I Declined 2541 Dleclined 1,581
NwHighs 575 New Highs 57NwHighs 396
NwLaws 35 New Lows 161 New Laws 94
Total issues 3,210 1 Totalissues 5431 Totalissues 2,832
Unchnged58 Unchanged 201 Ulnchanged 77
Voue 18,464,642,2021 V~olume 868,033,2501 Volume 9,029,298,10


Wkly YTD Wkly
Yld PE Chg %Chg Iat


Name Div
ConstellEn .96
Coming .20
Cosan Ltd ..
Covidien .80
CypSharp 2.40
DCT Indl .28
DR Horton .15
DTE 2.24
DeanFds ..
Deere 1.40
DeltaAir
DenburyR .
DrSCBr rs ..
DirFnBr rs ..
DrxFBull s.
DiorSCBull ...
Discover .24
Disney -.40
DomRescs 1.97
DowChm .60
DukeEngy .98
DuoyGWat ....
EMCCp ..
EIPasoCp .04
Elan ..
E~ldorGld g .10
EmersonEl l.38
EnCanag .80
EndvSilvg ...
Exelon 2.10
Express n .
ExxonMbl 1.76
FMajSily g ...
FirstEngy 2.20
FlagstB rs ..
FordM ..
FMCG s 1.00
FrontierCm .75
FrontierOil .24
Gafisa SA .14
GameStop ...
GamGld g ...
Gannett .16
Gap .45
GenDynami.88
GenGrPr n .40
GenMari .04
GenMills s 1.12
GenMot n ..
Gen~n En ..
Genworth ..
Gerdau .25
GoldFLtd .19
Goldcrpg .41


GpTelevisa ...
HCA Hid n ..
HSBC 1.80
Hallibrtn .36
HartfdFn .40
HltMgmt ..
HeclaM ..
Hertz ..
HewlettP .32
HomeDp 1.00
Honwlllntl 1.33
HorizLns
HostHotls .08
Huntsmn .40
iShGold s ..
iSAstla .82
iSh~raz 2.53
iSCan .50
iShGer .29
iSh HK .45
iShJapn .14
iSh Kor .44
iSTaiwn .29


6.0 ... +.01 +3.4 6.98
....-.07 t43.2 1.79
..... +1.01 +19.4 9.78
..... +3.50 +54.2 40.56
.. .81 -.8 4.69
....-.10 -51.6 .80
....+.01 -50.2 .15
....+.56 -1.0 7.25
....+.33 +48.7 9.28
..... +1.39 +17.1 29.98
....+.15 -21.0 1.66
.. ..+.08 +54.9 .59
21 +.25 +29.4 6.56
....+.03 -20.5 .65
+.77 +11.0 23.00
-.67 +56.7 8.65
..+.13 -40.8 3.05
....+.90 32.0 5.71
..+.15 +17.8 2.58
....+.09 -52.4 1.20
.. ..-.03 -57.0 .14
....+.01 +38.8 .44
... ..-27.2 2.49
....-.01 +34.0 .47
..-..+.34 -13.0 5.64
..22 +.20 -32.5 3.10
.. .19 -.9 7.98
.. +.11 -8.1 2.72
....+.03 +53.0 4.30
.. .10 -7.1 4.61
.. ..-.09 +.3 6.62
..17 +1.55 +20.8 18.98
.. 3 +.03 -30.5 1.80
.. .. ..+73.8 4.05
..12 +.07 +112.7 2.17
....+.14 -2.4 1.22
....+.31 +153.6 2.13
....+.26 -6.2 2.56


Minefnd g ..'
Nevsun g .
NewEnSys ...
NwGold g ..
NA Pall g .
NthnO&G ..
NthgtM g ..
NovaGld g ...
Oilsandsg ...
OpkoHlth ..
ParaG&S ..
PionDrill ..
PlatGpMet ...
PudaCoal ..
RadientPh ..
RareEle g
Rentech
RexahnPh
Rubicon g
Sams0&G
SinoHub .
SulphCo ...
Taseko ..
Tengsco ..
TimberinR ..
TmsatlPet ..
TriValley ..
Uluru ..
Ur-Energy ...
Uranerz ..
UraniumEn ...
VantageDrl ...
VimetX .50
VistaGold ..
Walteriny 2.00 1
WizzardSit ...
YM Bio q ..


..85 +2.36 +38.7 15.31
....+.88 -11.3 6.68
.. 4 -.43 -43.3 4.38
.. .16 +17.7 11.49
....+.15 -4.5 6.63
..76 -.08 -4.7 25.92
..34 +.07 -14.1 2.75
....+.78 -3.6 13.76
....-.01 +14.8 ..48
... -.01 +2.2 3.75
..17 +.18 -.3 3.98
....+.91 +66.5 14.67
....+.22 -14.7 2.27
.. 5-6.19-57.9 6.00
....-.09 -57.9 .43
+1.40 -102 14.42
-.02 +.8 1.23
+.03 +8.9 1.22
+.55 +.7 5.75
+.03 +191.7 3.85
..2 -.10 -36.4 1.66
....-.01 -23.5 .13
.. ..-.01 +13.3 5.95
... -.01 +82.0 1.15
....+.08 -12.6 1.04
... -.08 -7.8 3.07
.. +25 +40.9 .80
.. ..+.00 -34.5 .07
... -.02 -41.8 1.74
.. +.07 -17.5 3.29
... +.14 -30.6 4.19
....+.11 -1.5 2.00
..20 +6.24 +85.1 27.49
.. ..-.08 +59.4 3.81
1.1 13 +1.00 +.3 18.00
..-.01 -5.6 .24
... .09 +9.9 2.56


Page Editor: Xxx, 754-xxxx


Wkly Wkly YTD
Chg%Chg%6Chg
+.52 +1.7 +4.5


+.45+~2.6+~16.4
+1.59 +0.6 +1 3
+.11 +0.8 +1.0
-.68 -2.1 -2.9
+.05 +0.7 -2.9
-.54 -3.8 -68
-2473. + 9.




+220.4 -. 4.1
+.17 +1.1 -8.7
-.15 -0.7 +10.4
-4.03 -50.3+65.
-.32 -3.1 -8.5

-.56-+0.7 +7.3
+.30 +1.5 -4.8


+.74 +1.6 +1.04

+.08 +0.3 48.9


ly kW Wkly YTD
Name Ex Div Last ChgChgChg


Dow Jones IndustrialS
Close: 12,380.05
1-week change: 3.33 (flat)


23.31 -6.13 32.85 -17.26 -29.44


MON TUES WED THUR FRI


Name Ex Div Last
AT&T Inc NY 1.72 30 71

DlctelLuc NY .. 57
Alcoa NY .12 17.92
AutoZone NY ... 276 26
BkofAm NY .04 13.48
BobEvans Nasd .80 32.00
BostonSci NY ... 7.35
DNBFnPA Nasd .66 13.81

whvon NY 281 96
Camera sd .6 1 9

Dso a a sd .2 76



FamilyDlr NY .72 51.75
FordM NY ... 15.33
GenElece NY .56 20.19
ElomeDp NY 1.00 37.46
iShJapn NY .14 9.98

v rMs N 6 04
ShR2K NY .89 83.98
Intel Nasd .72 20.02
JPMorgCh NY 1.00 46.84
Lowes `NY .44 26.82


McDnlds NY 2.44

Mirsft Nad.6
NatSemi NY .40
NY Times NY ..
NextEraEnNY 2.20
NobltyH Nasd ..
NokiaCp NY .55
Nvidia Nasd ..

eetcl N sd 1

PesCo NY 1 9




S&P500ETFNY 2.34
SearsHldgs Nasd ..
SiriusXM Nasd ..
SouthnCo NY 1.82
SprintNex NY ..
m WRFnrclN .
ValeSA NY .90
VangEmgNY .82
WaiMart NY 1.46
WellsFargo NY .20


76.04 +.05 +0.1 -.9


24.04 +9.81 +68.9 +74.7
9.48 -.02 -0.2 -3.3
56.00 +.07 +0.1 +7.7
8.97 +.88 +10.9 +10.6
9.02 +.47 +5.5 -12.6
17.55 -.65 -3.6+14.0




103.28 -.29 -0.2 +5.7
78 22 -3.39 -142 +4.1
15.76 +.11 +6.7 +8.0
38.40 +.09 +0.2 +1.4
48.73 +.17 +3.7+11.8

33.3+-.949+1.5-15.9

50.37 +.62 +1.2 +4.6
2.540 +.41 +0.8 -2.6
316.6 -.44 -1.4 +32.0


2 1 0


10,500


N D J F M A


NL 1,000,000
5.75 250
NL 2,500
NL 3,000
5.75 250
NL 5,000,000
5.75 250
NL 10,000
5.75 250
NL 10,000
5.75 250


5.75 250
5.75 250
NL 200,000,000
4.25 1,000
5.75 250
NL 3,000
5.75 250
NL 1,000,000
5.75 250
NL 3,000
NL 2,500
NL 50,000
NL 50,000
NL 2,500


Adm b Cl
s BalA m MA
ny LB
o LG
InAdm MA
d FB
Stk d MB


Cl
LG
LG
LB
IH
LB
WS
LB
MA
LB
LB

LV
FB
LB
CA
LB
FB
WS


136,166
67,270
63,411
60,842
59,258
58,419
55,597
54,608
54,296
51,453
49,590


40,310
39,416
37,574
36,439
35,114
34,TI6
33,932
33,332
32,540
32,521
29,883
29,088
28,368
28,359


+7.3/B
+12.3/D
+16.7/B
+15.7/A
+12.0/C
+14.2/8
+13.0/D
+14.2/B
+14.3/A
+15.8/A
+11.3/D


+15.5/A
+13.9/C
+14.2/B
+15.0/A
+16.0/A
+14.0/C
+14.9/C
+7.0/9
+12.8/A
+14.0/8
+20.8/A
+11.5/C
+18.6/A
+16.8/D


PIMCO TotRet
American Fund
Van uard 5001
Fide bty GrowCe
Vanguard Welli
Harbor Intilnstl
Ridelity LowPri!


3.25 3.25


mirP e Rate


7.0 5 0.75


t nuocsiD Rate


6-month
5-vear


0.11 0.14
2.30 2.24


Mexico


11.7398 11.7784


Wkly YTD Wkly
Chg %6Chg Last


MotrlaMon ...
NCRCorp ...
NYSE Eur 1.20
Nabors ..
NBkGreece .29
NatGrid 7.04
NOilVarco .44
NatSemi .40
NewmtM .60
Nexen g .20
NextEraEn 2.20
NiSource .92
NikeB 1.24
NobleCorp .98
NokiaCp .55
NorfkSo 1.60
Novartis 2.53
Nucor 1.45
OcciPet 1.84
OfficeDpt ..
OilSvHT 2.42
PG&.ECp 1.82
PMIGrp ..
PNC 1.40
PPLCorp 1.40
PatriotCoal ...
PeabdyE .34
Penney .80
PepsiCo 1.92
Petrohawk ...
PetrbrsA 1.41
Petrobras 1.41
Pfizer .80
Philipuor 2.se
Pier 1 .
Potashs .28
PrUShS&P ...
ProUltQQQ ...
PrUShQQQ rs...
ProUltSP .39
ProUSht20 ...
ProUSSP500...
ProgsvCp 1.40
ProLogis .45
ProUSR2K rs...
Pnrdentl 1.15
PSEG 1.37
PulteGrp ..
Qihoo360 n ...
QntmDSS ...
RadioShk .25
Raytheon 1.72
RegionsFn .04
ReneSola .


RubyTues ...
SpdrDJIA 2.98
SpdrGold ..
SP Mid 1.55
S&P500ETF2.34
SpdrHome .31
SpdrKbwBk .15
SpdrLehHY4.44 '
SpdrRetl .50
Spdr~etM .41
Safeway .48
StJude .84
Saks ..
SandRdge ...
Sanofi 1.63
SaraLee .46
Schlmbrg 1.00
Schwab .24
SemiHTr .55
SiderurNac .58
SilvWhtng .12
SilvrepMg .08
SmithfF ..


89 -.47
16 +.22
18 -.90
96 +1.18
.. .02
.. .23
20 -1.05
19 '+9.81
13 +3.62
.. -.19
14 +.07
18 -.39
18 +.86
15 +.31
.+.47
17 -1.63
13 +1.06
..+.22
19 .58
.. -.01
... -2.23
16 +.24
..-.08
11 -.49
12 +.17
.. -.63
23 -4.60
22 +1.40
17 +.51
56 -.25
.. +.12
..-.77
20 +.08
17 +.eo
13 +1.20
29 -2.21
.. .08
... -1.57
.. .88
..-.23

.. +.09
13 +.05
:.-.32
.+.44
9 -.24
10 -.28
.. .34
... -4.02
.. +.28
9 +1.03
8 +.01
..-.02
5 -.27

15 -2 2
13 -2.56
.. +.19
... +4.46
... -1.58
.. -.29
.. +.14
..+.04
.. +.30
.. +.91
+.57
15 +.38
18 +.07
39 +.37
16 -.02
..+.78
36 +.45
26 -2.85
48 -.16
..+.80

57 +4.08
43 +1.22
11 -.71


-17.4 24.03
+23.9 19.05
+29.1 38.70
+34.5 31.56
+7.1 1.80
+9.3 48.49
+18.4 79.63
+74.7 24.04
-5.6 57.99
+8.9 24.94
+7.7 56.00
+7.7 18.98
-9.4 77.39.
+27.5 45.60
-12.6 9.02
+7.8 67.69
-6.2 55.30
+5.9 46.42
+5.7 103.72
-22.2 4.20
+15.4 162.24
-6.5 44.74
-21.2 2.60
+4.1 63.23
-1.7 25.87
+35.4 26.23
+6.5 68.11
+15.1 37.20
+.6 65.73
+32.8 24.24
+6.0 36.22
+7.4 40.64
+16.8 20.46
+12.5 es.83
+9.2 11.47
+12.5 58.06
-12.3 20.83
+8.6 88.47
-10.9 51.82
+11.3 53.47
+5.2 38.95
-18.5 15.82
+7.0 21.26
+8.8 15.71
-16.7 41.86
+6.1 62.28
-1.9 31.22
+4.0 7.82
-25.1 25.48
-24.7 2.80
-14.0 15.91
+10.5 50.79
+3.9 7.27
+19.0 9.79


-18.6 10.63
+6.9 123.65
+3.6 143.66
+8.8 179.23
+5.7 132.86
+6.3 18.49
+.7 26.08
+2.0 40.51
+7.5 51.97
+9.1 75.07
+6.1 23.87
+22.2 52.28
+10.2 11.79
+76.il 12.94
+13.1 36.46
+4.8 18.35
+8.8 90.85
+7.2 18.35
+7.2 34.88
+1.0 16.83
+20.2 46.91
+24.6 15.99
+13.4 23.40


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div Yld PE Chg %Chg Last
AESCorp ... ... 17 +.17 +8.9 13.26
AFLAC 1.20 2.2 11 +.16 -4.9 53.66
AK Steel .20 1.3 ... -.10 -3.6 15.78
AMR ... ... ... -..62 -25.9 5.77
AT&T inc 1.72 5.6 9 +.52 +4.5 30.71
AbtLab 1.92 3.8 13 +1.12 +5.4 50.49
AberFitc .70 1.0 33 +8.16 +17.1 67.46
Accenture .90 1.6 19 +.23 +13.6 55.10
AMD ... ... 13 +.11 +3.5 8.47
Aetna :60 1.6 9 -.93 +20.5 36.75
Agnicog .64 1.0 33 +2.22 -13.1 66.64
Alcate]Lue ... ... '... -.09 +93.6 5.73
Alcoa .12 .7 75 +.45 +16.4 17.92
Alcon 3.95 2.4 23 +2.53 +2.8 167.99
Aldirishrs ... -... ...+1.01-11.4 3.90
Allstate .84 2.7 18 -.05 -1.5 31.40
AlphaNRs ... ... 71-3.16 -4.9 57.10
Altria 1.52 5.8 14 +.26 +6.6 26.24
AMovilL .52 .9 18 -.41 +2.0 58.47
AEagleOut .44 2.8 23 +.07 +8.7 15.91
AEP 1.84 5.2 14 -.21 -1.9 35.31
AmExp .72 1.6 14 +1.10 +7.8 46.28
AmlntlGrp ... ... 3 -.51 -28.5 34.49
AmTower ... ... 54 -2.05 -2.6 50.28
Anadarko .36 .4 56 +1.83 +11.2 84.71
AnalogDev .88 2.3 15 -.10 +3.7 39.06
Annaly .2.62 15.2 8 -.19 3.9 17.23
Anworth 1.00 14.4 8 -.03 -.6 6.96
ArchCoI .4() i.2~ 33f-1.02 -:5 34~.53
ArchDan .64 1.8 12 -1.21 +17.3 35.27
ArmourRsd1.44 20.1 -.51 -8.3 7.16
ATMOS 1.36 4.0 17 '-.78 +8.3 33.80
Avon .92 3.3 20 +.52 -3.7 27.98
BB&TCp .64 2.4 23 -.24 +3.6 27.23
BHPBillLt1.82 1.8 ...+4.44) +9.0101.32
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BcoSBrasil .70 5.9 ... -.53 -13.1 11.82
BkofAm .04 .3 20 +.11 +1.0 13.48
Bklrelnd 1.04 ... ... +.17 -12.8 2.31
BkNYMel .52 1.7 15 -.05 +.1 30.22
Bar iPVix rs ... ... ... -.17 -23.1 28.92
BarrickG .48 .9 17 +3.10 +2.2 54.37
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BerkH B ...~ ... 15 -1.88 +2.1 81.80
BestBuy .60 .2.0 10 +1.06 -13.4 29.70
Blackstone .40 2.2 ... +.31 +30.7 18.49
BlockHR .60 3.4 14 -.02 +46.3 17.42
Boeing 1.68 2.3 17 -.54 +12.6 73.47
BostonSci ..... .... +.05 -2.9 7.35
BrMySq 1.32 4.8 15 +1.05 +3.9 27.51
BrkidPrp .56 3.0 7 +.50 +5.8 18.54
CBSB .20 .8 26 -.52 +27.4 24.27
CS Eng 4 1 -2.4 +1. 769
CVR Ptrs n ... ... ... ... ... 17.55
CVS Care .50 1.4 14 +1.27 +4.2 36.23
Camecog .40 ... ... -.69 -26.1 29.85
Cameron ... ... 24 -1.15 +9.4 55.49
CdnNRsgs .36 ... ... +.38 +11.3 49.43
Camival 1.00 2.7 15 -.85 -18.9 37.40
Caterpillar 1.76 1.6 27 -3.30 +17.3 109.82
Cemex .43 ... ... -.34 -14.2 8.84
CenterPnt .79 4.5 16 -.25 +11.3 17.50
CntryLink 2.90 7.2 12 -.57 -12.4 40.46
ChesEng .30 .9 11 +.52 +31.3 34.02
Chevron 2.88 2.6 11 +1.34 +20.2 109.66
Chicos .20 1.3 24 +.20 +25.6 15.11
Chimera .66 16.8 6 -.04 -4.6 3.92
Citigrp ... ... 13 +.11 -3.6 4.56
CliffsNRs .56 .6 13 +.68 +26.5 98.70
CocaCola 1.88 2.8 13 +.05 +2.3 67.27
Coeur ... ... ... +2.47 +34.3 36.69
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ConocPhil 2.64 3.3 12 +1.11 +18.6 80.79
Con~solEngy.40 .8 31 -.61 +7.8 52.52
ConEd 2.40 4.7 15 -.15 +2.7 50.90
ConstellA ... ... 8 +1.03 -2.8 21.53




Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div Yld PE Cha %Cha Last


11 +1.TI
9 -1.03
16 -1.18
16 -.04
16 -.13
.. -.13
83 -.13
13 -.15
19 +.50
19 -2.67
13 -.78
34 +.13
..+.58
... .22
..-.34
... -1.66
10 -.24
18 -1.09
14 +.12
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13 -.01
2 -2.27
30 -.42
15 -.44
.. +.95
48 +2.16
21' -1.28
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... +2.62
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14 +1.54
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... +2.96
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.. -.05
8 +.17
13 +2.15
35 -.11
81 -.57
.. +.81
9 +.89
..+.40
6 -.58
12 -.26
11 -2.44
..-.46
.. .38
14 +.10
11 -.89
.. .04
56 -.55
.. +.19
4 +1.01
... +5.21


... -2.04
.. -.57
... +1.81
24 -1.21
9 -.58
16 -.66
75 +.76
31 +.11
10 -.28
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+.42
..-.72
27 +1.75
.. +.44
.. +.63
.. +.39
.. +.36
.. +.49
.. +.51
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~27.1 2.37
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-14.5 31.52
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-1.1 12.99
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-11.1 23,04
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t4.5 54.35
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-13.3 9.76
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-3.3 40.70
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-60.0 1.75
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-8.5 9.98
+6.2 64.97
-1.2 15.44


SouthnCol1.82
Sthn~oppedl.83
SwstAirl .02
SwstnEngy ...
SpectraEn 1.04
SprintNex ..
SP Matls 1.23
SP HlthC .61
SP CnSt .81
SP Consum .56
SPEng 1.05
SPDR Fndl .16
SPinds .64
SPTech .33
SP Util 1.31
StateStr .72
Suncor gs .40
Suntech ..
SunTrst .04
Supvalu .35
Synovus .04
Sysco 1.04
TJX .76
TaiwSemi .47
Talbots ..
Target 1.00
TeckResg .60
TenetHith ..
Teradyn ..
Tesoro ..
Texlnst .52
Textron .08
ThermoFis .
TimeWam .94
Transoon .79
TrinaSolar ..
Tycolnti 1.00
Tson .16
Usf AG ..
US Airwy ..
US Gold ..
UtdConti ..
UPS B 2.08
US Bancrp .50
US NGs rs ..
US OilFd ..
USSteel .20
UtdhithGp .50
Vale SA .90
ValeSApf .90
ValeantPh .38
ValeroE .20
VangEmg .82
VeriFone ..
VerizonCm i,95
ViacomB .60
Visa .60
VMware ..
Vonage ..
Walgm .70
Weathflnt! ..
WellsFargo .20
WendyArby .08
WDigital ..
WstnRefin
WstnUnion 28
Weyerb .60
WmsCos .50
WT India .15
XLGrp .44
Xerox .17
Yamanag .12
YingliGm ..
YumBmds 1.00


16 +.09 +.4
22 -.02 -18.3
19 -.99 -10.0
23 -2.32 +8.3
17 -.23 +8.7
..+.17 +11.8
.. .03 +4.7
+.04 +5.8
+.18 +3.2
-..-24 +4.4
-.. 27 +16.8
.. -.07 +3.2
-.56 +7.3
..-.08 +2.9
.. .14 +2.0
15 +.59 -.6
35 +1.37 +21.8
7 +.05 +17.6
..+.45 +.5
..+.38 -2.2
..+.17 +1.9
14 +.19 -4.5
15 +1.20 +14.2
..+.44 +.9
22 +.52 -23.7
12 -.83 -17.6
... +4.19 -7.2
'4 -.08 +12.9
10 +.11 +27.8
12 -1.25 +39.1
13 +.94 +8.2
91 -.23 +14.9
22 -.17 +.8
15 -.06 +10.3
27 +.78 +14.5
7 -.44 +23.2
16 +1.90 +13.8
8 -.01 +12.1
..+.51 +12.7
4 -.84 -20.7
.. +.83 +18.7
13 -3.15 -16.9
20 -1.23 +.9
15 -.50 -2.9
..-.75 -11.7
... +1.98 +15.8
... -1.32 -9.6
11 -1.23 +22.9
..+.49 -1.9
..+.88 +.6
..+.80 +91.1
49 -1.83 +21.9
..+.62 +4.6
40 -2.39 +35.3
29 -.26 +5.4
16 +.21 +19.6
18 +2.50 +9.0
,84 +1.52 -6.9
..-.06 +104.9
17 +.07 +5.3
... -1.25 -4.4
14 -.44 +2.0
-.. -14 +7.1
8 +.62 +14.5
-45 +65.7
15 -01 +11.8
6 -1.53 +24.7
23 -.45 +24.7
..+.08 -4.9
15 +.41 +15.4
25 -.18 -7.1
22 +.82 +3.9
9 -.70 +24.0
20 -1.82 +1.1


Name


Name Div
LSI Corp ..
LVSands ..
LennarA .16
LillyEli 1.96
Limited .80
LaPac
LyonBasA ..
MEMC
MFA Fncl .94
MGM Rsts ...
Macys .20
Manitowoc .08
Manpwl .74
Marathon01.00
MktVGold .40
MktVRus .18
MktVJrGld 2.93
MarlntA .35
MarshM .84
Marshlls .04
Masco .30
MasseyEn .24
MedcoHith ..
Medtmic .90
Merck 1.52
MetLife .74
MetroPCS ..
MobileTels ...
Molycorp n ...
Monsantal1.12
MorgStan .20
Mosaic .20


iSh UK .43
iShSilver ..
iShChina25 .63
iSSP500 2.46
iShEMkts .64
iShB20 T 3.91
iSEafe ,1.42
iShR2K .89
iShREst 1.98
IBM 2.60
Intl Coal ..
IntlGame .24
IntPap 1.05
Interpublic .24
Invesco .44
IronMin .75
ItauUnibH .67
JPMorgCh 1.00
Jabil .28
JohnJn 2.16
JohnsnCtl .64
JnprNtwk ..
KB Home .25
KV PhmA ..
Keycorp .04
KimbClk 2.80
Kimco .72
Kinrossg .10
Kohls 1.00
Kraft 1.16
L-11Ident ..
LDK Solar ..


+6.7 18.54
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+6.8 46.02
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-4.5 89.88
+5.3- 61.28
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-9.3 16.05
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-1.5 19.79
-3.9 59.46
+5.5 40.30
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-13.9 11.61
+97.3 5.03
+.2 8.87
+3.8 65.43
-2.8 17.54
-12.4 16.60
-.3 54.20
+.5 31.67
-1.8 11.70
+15.7 11.71


Yd PE Ch %Chg Last
....-.03 +10.7 6.63
..89 +.97 -2.9 44.62
.9 27 +.06 -2.0 18.37
5.5 8 +.70 +1.9 35.69
2.2 15 +4.18 +21.0. 37.17
..-1.07 +1.4 9.59
... +2.31+23.8 42.58
82 -.44 +9.3 12.31
12.2 8 -.23 -5.3 *7.73
.. .. -.11 -11.4 13.15
.8 13 +.48 -1.9 24.83
.4 ... -.02 +64.8 21.60
1.2 ... -.07 -,2 62.65
1.9 15 -.79 +42.5 52.76
.6 ... +4.18 +4.0 63.95
.4 ... +.24 +12.8 42.77
6.9 ... +3.35 +6.2 42.35
1.0 30 -.84 -16.8 34.57
2.8 19 +.28 +10.0 30.07
.5 ... -.1D +16.2 8.04
2.2 ... -.63 +5.9 13.41
.4 ... -2.60 +24.2 66.66
..17 -.92 -8.9 55.82
2.3 12 +.40 +7.0 39.67
4.5 16 +.60 -6.6 33.67
1.7 14 -.73 +.2 44.53
..31 +.17 +31.9 16.66
..37 -.20 +2.3 21.34
..... +7.94 +34.6 67.19
1.7 27 -6.67 -4.9 66.22
.7 11 -.01 +.1 27.25
.3 15 -1.96 +2.7 78.41


Wkly YTD
Cha %Cha


Div Yld PE Cha %Cho Last


Name Div
AbdAsPac .42
AdeonaPh ..
AlexcoR g ..
AlldNevG ..
AlmadnMg ...
AmApparel ...
ArcadiaRs ..
Aurizon g .
AvalRaren ...
BarcGS~il ..
Brigusgrs ..
CanoPet ..
CapGold ..
CelSci ..
CFCdag .01
CheniereEn ...
ChiGengM ...
ChinaShen ...
ClaudeR g ...
Crossh grs ...
Crystallxg ...
DejourE g .
DenisnM g ...
GascoEngy ...
GenMoly ..
GoldStr g ..
GranTrrag ...
GrtBasG g ...
GIPanSily g ...
Hyperdyn ..
KodiakO g ...
LaBarg ..
LongweiPI ...
LucasEngy ...
MadCatzg ...
Metalline ..
MdwGold g ...
MincoG g ..


Wkly


Wkly YTD
Chg %Chg


Last I Name


Wkly YTD Wkly
Div Yld PE Chg %Ch Last


Name


Name Div
LevelS ..
LiblyMintA ...
LifeTech ..
LinearTch .96
Logitech ..
lululemn g ..
MIPS Tech ...
MarvellT ..
Mattel .92
MelcoCrwn ...
MicronT ..
Microsoft .64
NIl Hldg
NXP Sem n...
NasdOMX ..
NetApp ..
Neilix ..
NewsCpA .15
Novell ..
Nvidia ..
OCZ Tech ..
Oclaro rs ..
OmniVisn h ...
OnSmend ..
Oracle .24
OrchidCell ...
Orexigen ..
PDL Bio .60
PMC Sra ..
Paccar .48
PacEth h ..
PanASly .10
Paychex 1.24
PeopUtdF .62
Popular ..
Power-One ...
PwShs OQQQ .39
ProspctCapl.21


Name Div
QiaoXing ..
Qualcom .86
Questcor ..
RF MicD ..
RschMotn ..
Riverbed s ..
RoyaleEn
SanDisk ..
Sanofi rt .
Satcon h .
SeagateT .72
Sina ..
SiriutXM ..
SkywksSol ...
Staples .40
StarScient ..
Starbucks .52
StlDynam .40
SunPowerA ...
Symantec ..
TD Ameritr .20
Tellabs .08
TeslaMotn .
TevaPh rm 8
TriQuint ..
UrtianOut ..
VirgnMda b .16
Vivus ..
Vodafone 1.33
Wstptinn g ...
WetSeal ..
Windstrm 1.00
XenoPort ..
Xilinx .76
Yahoo ..
ZionBcp .04


Yld PE


Ynd PE


AcmePkt..
ActivsBliz .17
AdobeSy ..
AdvBattery ...
AkamaiT ..
AliscriptH ..
AlteraCp if .24
Amazon ..
ACapAgy 5.60
AmCapLtd ...
AmSupr ..
Amgen ..
Ai23 Sys ..
ApplelInc ..
ApidMatl .32
ArenaPhm ..
AriadP ..
ArmHld .09
ArubaNet ..
Atmel ..
AvanirPhm ...
Baidu s ..
BedBath ..
Broadcom .36
BrodeCm ..
CA inc .16
Cadence ..
CpstnTrb h ...
Celgene ..
CellTher rsh ...
Cephln ..
CienaCorp ...
Cisco .24
CleanEngy ...
Clearwire h ...
Comcast .45
Comc spel .45
CorinthC ..


... +4.59
36 +.13
20 -.01
4 +.23
42 -.25
... -1.29
17 +.14
73 +4.58
4 .-.71
3 -.23
16-10.76
11 +.82
.. -.57
19 -9.50
15 -.22
.. -.02
11 +.26
.. +.60
... -2.51
15 +.45
+.07
94 +3.05
17 +5.11
20 +1.54
28 -.04
17 -.08
15 -.14
-.01
30 -1.38
+.01
15 +.66
+.79
13 +.61
... +1.05
+.40
19 -.41
18 -.22
.. +.47


+36.2 72.38
-10.5 11.14
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-40.3 2.30
-20.6 37.35
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+20.3 42.81
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-1.5 28.31
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-51.8 13.T/
-1.8 53.90
-41.8 5.55
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-20.9 1.36
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-3.2 3.95
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-8.4 39.90
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-1.6 24.05
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-5.4 55.92
+6.6 .39
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-12.8 17.65
+25.5 17.37
+16.1 5.98
+12.8 24.68
+12.3 23.25
-3.8 5.01


Costco .82
Cree Inc ..
Ctrip.com ..
CubistPh ..
Deli nc ..
DeltaPtr h ..
Dndreon ..
DirepTV A ..
DryShips ..
eBay ..
ElectArts ..
EntropCom ...
EpicorSft..
EricsnTel .35
Expedia .28
ExpScrip s ...
F5 Netwks ..
FifthThird .24
Finisar ..
FstNiagara .64
Flextm ..
FuelCell ..
GSI Cmmrc ...
GT Solar ..
Genzyme
GileadSci
Google ..
HercOffsh ..
HudsCity .60
HumGen ..
InspPhar ..
Intel .72
Intersil .48
JA Solar ..
JDS Uniph ...
JetBlue ..
KLA Tnc 1.00
LECG h .


24 +2.16
23 -1.66
44 +4.05
20 +4.85
10 +.23
+.01
... +1.86
19 -.55
8 +.25
23 -.22
.. +.13
10 -.16
... +1.29
.. .53
17 +3.04
26 -.02
44 +1.62
22 -.29
24 +2.12
19 -.21
15 +.03
.. -.29
.. +.05
9 -.41
+.24
13 -1.41
22 -13.64
... -1.12
9 +.15
... +1.45
... +1.04
10 +.30
68 +1.87
4 -.07
..+.19
20 -.38
19 -3.10


+5.8 76.41
-33.4 43.86
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+7.5 14.57
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-6.7 13.70
-13.2 25.76
-2.5 13.63
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-19.5 1.86
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-2.7 578.16
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-22.5 9.87
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-40.7 4.98
-4.8 20.02
-6.9 14.22
-3.2 6.70
+33.3 19.30
-11.3 5.86
+13.1 43.70
-87.2 .18


Wkly YTD Wkly
Yid PE Chg %Chg Last
....-.04 +46.9 1.44
..12 +.57 +6.8 16.85
..22 -.56 -5.0 52.73
2.9 15 -.06 -3.5 33.38
..18 -.16 -21.6 14.55
..53 +1.15 +31.9 90.28
..22 -.36 -33.4 10.11
..12 +.46 -11.6 16.39
3.6 14 +.11 -.2 25.37
....+.41 +32.4 8.42
..8 -.23 +38.0 11.07
2.5 7 +.59 -6.6 26.07
.19 -1.81 -10.6 39.91
.. +2.03 +55.9 32.62
..13 +.22 +19.9 28.45
..29 -1.41 -14.9 46.79
..79 -7.23 +33.7 234.86
.9 16 -.79 +17.9 17.17
6 +.06 +1.9 6.03
42 -.65 +14.0 17.55
... +1.82+105.8 9.92
..45 +.24 -15.3 11.14
..20 -3.66 +9.9 32.53
..13 -.05 -1.7 9.71
.7 22 -.48 +7.2 33.54
..+.72 +39.4 2.76
....+.12 -62.9 3.00
9.7 12 .+.24 -1.1 6.16
..20 +.02 -15.7 7.24
.9 41 -2.16 -10.6 51.28
..1 -.10 -28.0 .52
.2 41 +5.72 +3.5 42.65
3.9 23 +.13 +3.4 31.96
4.8 39 +.19 -8.1 12.88
....+.09 -3.5 3.03
.. -.48 -20.1 8.15
.7 ... -.51 +4.6 56.95
10.4 ... -.57 +7.5 11.61


+.12 -25.4
25 -.84 +8.4
34 +4.04 +26.3
14 -.18 -15.5
9-1.30 -5.8
... -2.15 -7.8
46 +.32 +146.4
9 +1.26 -6.2
.. .. -1.3
-.. 55 -26.9
5 +.90 +.4
... +7.90 +7.4
..+.11 +8.0
30 4.90 -3.8
17 +.19 -11.1
..-.80 +106.7
26 -1.48 +11.3
29 -.12 +2.3
39 -.34 +31.3
24 -.25 +8.8
211 -.12 +12.0
13 +.01 -23.5
-17 -5
15-08 32
11 -.19 +5.8
19 +.56 -13.7
.. -.20 +1.1
.. +.15 -31.1
.. +10.0
... +2.74 +44.4
32 +.22 +20.3
18 -.14 -9.6
... +3.26 +9.3
13 -.50 +9.2
19 -.07 +.8
.. +.70 ..


LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSIN ESS & HOM E SUNDAY, APRIL 10, 2011


, 0 lV


12,000 -


11,500 --


11,000 -i -


New York Stock.Exchange


Wkly YTD Wkly
Div Yld PE Chg %Cha Last


Name Dlv Ynd PE


Div Yld PE Cha %Ch 1.st


Nasdaq Most Active


AMEX Most Active





IRS awards $4.5M

to whistleblower

accountant


I


ASSOCIATED PRESS
A Southwest Airlines plane sits in a remote area of the Yuma International Airport, after the plane had a section of fuse-
lage tear from the plane during a flight on Friday, seen here April 4 in Yuma, Ariz. Three more Southwest Airlines jetliners
have small, subsurface cracks that are similar to the ones suspected in the fuselage tear on the plane shown.


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


The WhistleblowerOffice
received nearly 1,000 tips
involving more than 3,000
taxpayers in fiscal years
2008 and 2009, accord-
ing to its annual reports
to Congress. Hundreds of
them alleged tax underpay-
ments of more than $10
million, and dozens more
underpayments of $100 mil-
lion or more.
The accountant-s case is
the fist in the program to
reach fruition.
"Quite frankly, I'm
shocked that they finally
got around to using it," said
Grassley. He has been dis-
couraged by the program's
slow start, which some
blame on ambivalence
about whether tipsters
should receive potentially
huge windfalls. The IRS
may also fear embarrass-
ment; the senator said.
'When you got a whistle-
blower thaf~s saying some-
body didn't pay $20 mil-
lion in taxes, that thaf~s an
embarrassment to the full-
time employees of the IRS,"
he said.
Neither Stephen
Whitlock, director of the
Whistleblower Office, nor
the agency's public affairs.
office returned messages
about the program late
Thursday.
However, the annual
reports note a new policy of
waiting to pay awards until
the two-year window for tax-
payers to appeal~their pay-
ments has expired. Young's
case might therefore be the
first in a series of awards
that are ripe for payment.
The office has about 17
employees, who refer com-
plaints to IRS agents and
investigators around the
country to pursue. Before
2006, the IRS could choose
to reward tipsters, but were
under no obligation to pay
them a share of the taxes
recovered. Many of the
tips involved mom-and-pop


gram only promises awards
for returns of $2 million or

mo is law is not designed
to snag the guppies, but to
harpoon the whales," said
Patrick Burns, a spokes-
man for Taxpayers Against
Fraud, a Washington, D.C.-
based nonprofit whose
members include many
lawyers for whistleblowers.
"Whistleblower pro-
grams have been iincred-
ibly successful in the arena
of health care and defense
spending, and now they are
being tried as a weapon
against tax cheats and Wall
Street scoundrels," Burns
said.


By MARYCLAIRE DALE
Associated Press .

PHILADELPHIA An
accountant who tipped off
the IRS that his employer
was skimping on taxes has
received $4.5 million in
the first IRS whistleblower
award.
The accountants tip net-
ted the IRS $20 million in
taxes and interest from the
errant financial-services

The award represents a
22 percent cut of the taxes
recovered. The program,
designed to encourage
tips in large-scale cases,
mandates awards of 15 to
30 percent of the amount
recouped.
"It ought to encourage a
lot of other people to squeal'
Sen. Charles Grassley told
The Associated Press. The
lowa Republican helped
get the IRS Whistleblower
Office authorized in 2006.
The IRS mailed the
accountants lawyer a $3.24
million check that arrived
in suburban Philadelphia
byfirst-cJass mail Thursday.
The suin represents the
award minus a 28 percent
'tax hit.
The lawyer, Eric L. Young
of Blue Bell, won't release
the name of his client or
the fim because his cli-
ent remains a small-town
accountant, and hopes to
continue to work in his
field.
"If~s a win-win for both
the government and tax-
payers. These are dollars
that are being returned to
the Treasury that other-
wise wouldn't be," Young
said.
"If~s veryr difficult to be a
whistleblower," said Young,
who has represented more
than a dozen such tipsters,
including one in a $2 billion
Pfizer case involving off-
label drug marketing.
"Most people would be
inclined to turn a blind ey?

toi: Te :oeEbdane b

personal and professional



in 2007, just as the IRS
Whistleblower Office
opened, but heard nothing
for two years. Frustrated,
he hired Young to help
push the issue.
"We were able to help
him get it back on track,"
Young said.
In the accountant's case,
the IRS did not deem the
issues he raised complex.
But the agency said the
information he shared
pointed out new questions
Sfor a routine IRS audit that
was already under way.


By cHRIS KAHN
AP Energy Writer

NEW YORK Oil
surged above $112 per bar-
rel Friday following a drop
in the dollar and continued
jitters about shipments
from the world's major oil
suppliers.
Benchmark West Te~xas
Intermediate for May
delivery jumped $2.49,
or 2.3 percent, to settle
at $112.79 per barrel on
the New York Mercantile
Exchange. Crude oil set
new30-month highs almost
every day this week.
Oil moved higher as
the dollar plunged against
other major currencies.
Oil is traded in dollarS
and tends to rise when
the greenback falls and
makes crude cheaper for
investors holding foreign
currency. The looming
shutdown of the federal
government threatened to
weaken the dollar further
and encouraged more buy-
ing, according to analysts.
Oil also climbed on fears
that violence ih Nigeria
ahead of .the country's
national election this
weekend could lead to
supply -interruptions. And
in Venezuela a massive
blackout appears to have
affected some refineries,
analysts said. The two
countries supply a com-
bined 2 million barrels of
oil per day to the U.S.
If crude prices keep ris-
ing, experts say, gasoline
prices could hit $4 a gallon
across the U.S. this sum-
mer.
Pump prices have
jumped from $3.07 to
$3.74 per gallon since the
beginning of the year. The
swift rise forced the Oil
Price Information Service
to boost its retail gasoline
price forecast to a range of
$3.75 to $4 per gallon t~i~s


ASSOCIATED PREss
David Castro-Diephouse returns the nozzle to the pump after filling his car's tank with gas
in Philadelphia. Oil prices rose above $104 per barrel March 22 as traders continued to
focus on a series of international crises that will drive world supply and demand this year.


year. OPIS chief oil analyst
Tom Kloza said it may not
be long before the national
average tests the all-time
record of $4.11 per gallon
set in July 2008.
Further price hikes
could do serious damage
to the U.S. economy, he
said. For consumers, "gas
prices have more relevance
on an emotional level than
a lot of other things that
they pay for," Kloza' said.
"People pay more atten-
tion to gasoline than phone
service, cable TV or other
services," Kloza said.
The national average
for a gallon of gas is now
88.3 cents higher than
the same time last year,
according to OPIS, AAA,
and Wright Express. It's
already above $4 per gal-
lon in California, Alaska
and Hawaii, and it's almost
there in Connecticut,
Washington, D.C., Illinois
and New York.
Oil and gasoline prices
began a steady rise in


February, as the Libyan
rebellion shut down the
country's daily exports of
1.5 million barrels of oil.
Libya ~produces about 2
percerit of world demand,
and analysts say making
up for those losses will
severely reduce the abil-
ity of other oil-produc-
ing countries to increase
production in the future.
Saudi Arabia and other
OPEC countries are cover-
ing some of the shortfall
in Libyan crude, which
went mainly to refineries
in Europe.
Barclays Capital has said
that Libya's oil exports
probably will be offline for
several~ months. As ilght-
ing continues more trad-
ers are going along with
that prediction.
'"The market is being
forced to consider a pos-
sible major loss of Libyan
barrels probably through
the rest of this year and
into next," analyst Jim
Ritterbusch said Friday.


Experts point to other
factors that have pushed
oil and gasoline to record
.levels. The U.S. economy
added hundreds of thou-
sands of jobs this year. That
means gasoline demand
could increase this year
as more workers join
the daily commute. And
last month's devastating
earthquake and tsunami
in Japan put further pres-
sure on oil prices. Japan is
expected to boost oil and
natural gas imports while
some of its nuclear power
plants are offline.
In other Nymex trading
for May contracts, heating
oil added 11.37 cents to
settle at $3.3197 per gal-
lon and gasoline futures
gained 7.42 cents to set-
tle at $3.2607 per gallon.
Natural gas lost 1.6 cents
to settle at $4.041 per 1,000
cubic feet.
In London, Brent crude
rose $3.86 to .settle at
.$126.12 on the ICE Futures
exchange.


By JOAN LOWY
Associated Press

WASHINGTONj The Federal
Aviation Administration is reviewing
its safety regulations aimed at spot-
ting metal fatigue in aging aircraft
in response to the 5-foot hole that
ripped open in a Southwest Airlines
plane last week, the agency's chief
told a House panel on Wednesday.
FAA Administrator Randy Babbitt
said he has ordered a review of
regulations that became effective in
January. Those regulations lay out
actions that aircraft manufacturers
and operators must take to ensure
they catch metal fatigue in planes
before it becomes a safety problem. ~
The new rules give aircraft manu-
facturers as many as five years to
develop inspection plans for about
4,000 older airliners. Airlines would
have as many as six years to imple-


ment the inspections. *
If~s unclear why a section of the
Southwest Boeing 737's fuselage
came apart in flight despite an air-
craft testing and maintenance regime
already in place that is designed
to prevent such problems, Babbitt
told the House Appropriations
Committee's transportation subcom-
mittee.
The sudden opening of the hole
at 34,400 feet caused an explosive
decompression of the 15-year-old
plane with 95 people on board. The
plane was heading from Phoenix to
Sacramento, Calif., but pilots made
an emergency landing at a military
base in Yuma, Ariz.
On Tuesday, FAA issued an emer-
gency order requiring inspections
on similar older-model Boeing 737-
300s, 737-400s and 747-500s that
have had at least 30,000 pressuriza-
tion cycles, basically takeoffs and


landings. Cracks can develop from
the constant cycle of pressurizing
the cabin for flight, and releasing it.
The planes were built between 1993
and 2000.
Boeing said 579 airplanes will
eventually have to be checked, but
just 175 have that many cycles and
need immediate inspections. Boeing
issued a service bulletin detailing
Sthe' required inspections earlier this
week.
Aircraft manufacturers like Boeing
have special equipment they use to
simulate the effects on tens of thou-
sands of takeoffs and landings on an
airplane, Babbitt said.
'"That's on the test stand. Are we
getting a different performance out
in the field? We do-'t know," Babbitt
said.
"~We don't know what happened
with this plane. We have some sus-
picions," he said.


By TOM KRISHER
AP Auto Writer

DETROIT With gas
prices rising and instabil-
ity in the Middle East, the
thought of an electric car in
the garage might be getting
more appealing.
Before you jump for the
new technology, though,
make sure your garage is
ready to be a refueling sta-
tion.
Depending on which car
you buy and how old your
home is, it could cost a cou-
ple thousand dollars to prep
the garage so you can charge
a car quickly enough to take
off for work in the morning
with a full battery.
Start with the age of the
home. Older houses may
not have enough juice to
handle an electric car. Fifty
yeafS ago, who would have
thought we'd be plugging in
cars at night?
So the garage may have


to be rewired. According to
experts, you need at least a
12-amp circuit to charge a
car in a reasonable amount of
time. You also need a circuit
in the garage with little or
ixothing else on it. Anything
else drawing power from the
same circuit can slow the
charging.
Even if you have a dedi-
cated circuit in the garage,
it still may not work for you.
Most garages in the U.S.
have standard 120-volt out-
lets. But a dedicated 240-volt
outlet, similar to the kind t-he
powers an electric dryer, can
cut the charging time in half.
That's important depending
on the electric car you buy.
Two mass-market elec-
tric cars, the Chevrolet
Volt and the Nissan Leaf,
have different power sys-
tems and different charg-
ing needs. The Leaf is all
electric and can go up to
100 miles (160 kilometers)
on a single charge.


LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS SUNDAY, APRIL 10, 2011


Oil settles above $112



per barrel as dollar falls


FAA chief orders review



of agmng aircraft program


Thinlang of an

elctic *aP


yOur garage ready





630 M~obileHomes

A very clean & well maintained
2/2 units in nice park. $599.mo
w/$500. dep. Rent includes water,
sewer, trash p/u. Close to town
386-984-8448







Quiet, Country Branford area
3/2 $400 dep, $600 month
386-867-1833 or 386-590-0642
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
Room w/private bath. Micro,
C ndgee, leautdr prif e tanc .i
references needed 386-965-3477

4 Mobile Homesfr~l

05525445
Palm Harbor Homes
Repo s/sed Hommes)/Shlr iSalses

CWon'tdLast!8030-560202-4208K2

06 MH 3br/2ba open floor plan
w/1g kit w/ island, fireplace. 3 Riv-
ers Est, river access, MLS# 75661
Eastside Village Realty, Inc.
Denise Millgan-Bose 752-5290
3/2 DWMH over 1700 sqft. New
Roof & CH/A. Doublesided fire-
place, custom kit w/breakf~st nook
& wet bar. $89,500 MLS# 73861
386-623-6896 Access Realty~
Hallmark Real Estate. DWMH
4/2 on 5 ac. High & Dry. 24X36
workshop holds 4 cars. Fireplace,
kitchen island w/drop down and
more. $114,900. 386-755-6600
Owner Fin, 3/2, S of Lake City,
quiet, wooded, 1.5 ac, sml dn $700
mo, 386-590-0642/386-8671833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
Owner Financing-3/2
TMH in Wellborn.r Only

of Access Realty @ 386-344-7662.


100 Job -
Opportumities
041544.347
COOK
Must have experience and
able to works evenings
and weekends.
PT with possible FT.
Please apply at Baya Pointe
Nursing & Rehabilitation
Center, 587 E Ermine
Ave., L~akeEC:. FlP 32025



WAREHOUSE SHIPPING
OUTBOUND

SUPERVALl.) LOGISTICS
Flr da hsa perishable fr zen

City. We are currently seeking
qualified candidates for our
shipping outbound position (2nd
shift). These positions will
involve repetitive lifting and the
candidates should have the abili-
ty to work overtime as required.

pr gesso i cras and aege
differentials for second shift.
More detailed information will
be available at time of interview.
Previous warehouse xp rence
equipment experience preferred.
We prOvide an excellent
compensation and benefits
program medical, dental, lik
insurance, Short Term Disabill-
ty, 401(k), employee stock
Purchase, vision, a drug free
workplace and great opportuni-
ties for advancement. Please

8Hpihway 900r Wstr Sell97809
Lake City, FL 32025.
Drug Free
EOE/M//D/V
"Thank you for your interest"

AVON!!!, EARN up to 50%!!!
Only $10 for Starter Kit,
1-800-275-9945 pin #4206
WWW.yOUraVOn.com/tdavies
Busy medical office seeking
experienced, energetic person for
receptionist position.
Fax resume to 386-961-8802
CDL A Flatbed/Van 'Iuck
Driver needed for Fff OTR SE
area, 3 years exp or more, Contact
Melissa or Mary @ 386-935-2773

Hiring Locally ThisLWeek

Full T aisni Preoomdd -a Ptential
of $60K+ Annually. 401K, BCBS
Insurance & Pension for those who
qualify. Call 1-800-257-5500
to set up an interview. .
Delivery Driver, must be 'll yrs
old, have 6 pts or less on hecense
and ave snu msdememnor sn el-

CDL,apply within/no phone calls!
46North FloridaLSalesit

DUMP TRUCK Driver
w/Asphalt experience
Drug-free, lean drivmg record

Local law office needs
experienced legal secretary.
Workers compensation, personal
injury and general legal matters
experience preferred. Immediate
emplloyment.C bplin person ~at
Lake City, FL 32055.
Person needed fol; cutting cloth
and other duties in local sewing
plant. Experience preferred-
Call Hafners 386-755-6481
Medical Delivery Technician
needed. Experience a plus. Send
reply to Box 04110, C/O The Lake
City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL, 32056
SWanted Highly motivated
individual for Sales Position.
Rountree -Moore Automotive
Group, Great benefits, paid vaca-
tion. Exp. a plus but not necessary.
Call Tony Reese 386-344-7517
WANTED LICENSED
Life.and Health
Insurance Agent.
CaSI 386-755-6800

1 8 Medical
-19 Employment
Licensed, Experienced, PTA
for busy outpatient chinic
Send resume to P.O. Box 714
Isake City, FL 32056 or
Email to: pta714@hotmail.com


2;40 Schools &


Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-04/11/10

Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-04/11/11

Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstramningservices .com



310 Pets &Supplies

PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinal-ian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinaleandsexterna
parsts M y spei o ld
life must be licensed byFlorida

unsure, contact the local
office for information.

330 Livestock &
Supplies
SBarn Kept Hay for Sale
Bermuda
$15 Roll, Lee, FL
850-971-4344


361 Farm Equipment

84 Ford 4610 Tractor. Runs good.
Solid 2WD. New front tires, '
35Qhr on 2005 motor. Dependable.
$7500. obo. 386-867-0005


4 Computers .

HP Computer,
$100.00
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170


Leg l

PUBLIC NOTICE
ON
INVITATION TO BID
ITB-019-2011 .
Sealed bids will be accepted by the
City of Lake City, Florida, 205i N
Marion Avenue, Lake City, Florida
32055 until May 12, 2011 at 11:00
A.M. at which time all bids will be

upne a~nd Ia alud inthe Ci
Avenue, Lake City, Florida.
DEMOLITION AND REMOVAL
OF FOUR CITY OWNED STRUC-
TURES -
MANDATORY PRE-BID: TUES-
DAY, APRIL 26, 2011 AT 10:00
CHAMERTLCEO E NUNCHE

LOCATED AT 205 N. MARION
AVENUE, LAKE CITY, FL 32055
Bid specifications may be viewed on
the City website
http://www.1cfla:com/purchasing.ht
m; by contacting
purchasing@lcfla.com. or by phone
(386) 719-5818 or 386) 719-5816.
04544341
April 10, 2011


01 HilouRcemeH S









020 Lost &Found










100 ,
Opportumities

o4544mi .
Ladies and Gentleman
if you have A Class A CDL,
we hav a L D /iteh ta ease



New 1 ad Sae, ON %
fuel surcharge. Carolinas to
the great NW!
Call today to join us!
Buel Inc
866-369-9744


FLORIDA
GATEWAY
COLLEGE
+ t l
(Formerly Lake CIty Commtunity College)
BURSAR
(Revised and Re-advertised)
Manage the activities of Student
Financial Services, including the
student billing system, loan
collections, student financial records
and cash handling. Provide timely
and accurate billings to students and
a e e a use rs of t e C o l g

applied to each student's account in a
Quaif ctios:n BchMIr' megree
from a regionally accredited institution
of higher education in business,
finance, or accounting. Experience
with an integrated database such.as
Sungard SCT Banner software
E perie inn s preiin D r unI
Qualifications: Successful completion
of SCT Banner Accounts Receivable

Sar: $37.500 tr Ialy, plus benefits
Application Deadline: 4/25/11
Persons interested should provide
College application, vita, and
photocopies of transcripts. All foreign
transcripts must be submitted with
official translation and evaluation
Position details and applications
available on web at: www.fqic.edu
I-uman Resources
Fllor da Gate y C legee
Lake City, FL 32025-2007
Phone (386) 75414314
Fax (386) 754-4814
E-Mail: humanrdfalc edu
Fj('i rrciad h i on'amn~i i ,no n ( *~l~c o
Ib VP/ADh~mArotE A lE~ hginl oC lluaon' mid Sca,~








Lawn & Landscape Service


~4?F"


~Y~_'jn~r]U,


WIPI~Z~


One item per ad Eah ditonl
4 lines 6 days line $.25 ""







4 lnes da additional
Rate ra les o piate in i iual00melln s





One item per ad 6
4 lines *6 days ~s iddtional
Rate plies to private individuals selling
personalamerhandis totallni SI00 or less.
This Is a noil-refundable rate




One Item per ad "2 '
4 lines *6 days 2 (ti:~onal
persnal e.Y cehaondiet~l eng d20 eriness.
Echs Item must include a pc.




One item per ad $24
4 lines.*6 day Each additinal
Rate~ ~ ~y aple lpiaeine 51uals seln
Rsac n e l mu t icu pcen.
This is a non-refundable rate.




One item per ad 431
4 lines 6 days g'B;tional
peroa aar chtaonds talln du6 803 Ir ess.
Eah it em as incude pr c.


120 Medical
Employment
04.544213
Avalon Healthcare Center is
currently accepting applications
for the following positions:
*Full time RN/LPN
3-11 shift and 11-7 shift ,
2 PRN Positions available
for variable shifts & holidays-
Full Time CNA 3-11 Shift
ECoem etitive Sal ak e.
Please apply at Avalon
Healthcar'e and Rehabilitation
Center. 1270 S.W. Main Blvd.
Lake City, Florida 32025 or
Fax resume to 386-752-8556
386-752-7900 EOE

04544236
Avalon Healthcare Center is
currently accepting applications
for the following positions:
* Admissions/
Marketing Director
RN/LPN Preferred

ECompetitive Sialaryc an
Please apply at Avalon
Healthcare and Rehabilitation
Center. -1270 S.W. Main Blvd.

FLx rsme ton38 -585556
386-752-7900 EOE


055 RN TO DRAW BLOOD
Local Phlebotomy Course
offered in Lake City, FLA
Certificate program.
(904)566-1328


0552550




Physical Therapi t
Home Health Care Agency
servicmng Lake City and
surrounding counties seeking
Full-tthme/R experienced

Plea e fax resume to
386-758-3313 attention:
Lynn or apply online at
almostfamily.com

05.525549
SENIOR CERTIFIED
NURSING ASSISTANT
The Florida D apartment of


DNA cdus h eat neasat ya
working experience as a CNA.
All applicants must hold a
Florida C.N.A. license and be
currently dettified in C.P.R.

386C- 8Am60 xT3lmp fo more
information or apply online at
www.peopllefirst.myflorida.com/

Req #50000429
Closing Date is 04/14/2011
EEO/AAE

05525592




Meridian Behavioral
Healthcare, Inc.
wwwmbhdi.ore

Please visit our website to view
current open opportunities
and to apply online:

Therapists:
Licensed, or Master's Level
in Outpatient .
Bachelor's-Level m
Counselor Support
Case Mana eent

Outpatient
Medical Services
Psychiatrist
CSU RN Nursing Manager
ARNP (Psych exp, Child pref)
RN, LPN, C.N.A.
Recovery Specialist
(Direct Care)

Meridian is an active partner
with the National Health
Service Corps

To see our current openings in
SMental Health and to apply
online, please go to:
www.mbhci.ory
EOE, DFWP, E-Verify


OWNER FINANCING
3br/2ba fWMH with 5 acres. 10
ad~diti fisal acre availabk. Damiel


710 UnqfurenishedApt.


SPR~I4~NG HEL VILLAGE
Excellent H gh Spri ss lo aon.

some with garages.

or vst 5u ebie
www.springhillvillage.net

Move in as low as $325
CaHl t dayb fo ails!
Windsong Apts
1 & 2 Bedroom Homes
Move in for as low as
$199
386-755-2423
A Landlord You Can Love'
2b ps$55 h /udp + eh Geast
386-758-9351/352-208-2421
Great location W of I-75, spacious
deluxe 2BR apts., garage, W/D
hook up. patio. $600 & up, + SD,
386 965-5560 or 961-9490
The Lakes Apts. Studios & IBr's
from $135/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 votichers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $525. + sec.
Call Michelle 386-752-9626


I 0 For Rent'"
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

7'fQ UnflrimShed
I U.Home For Rent

3ba/2ba, New carpet & paint: .5
ac 2 mi from d'town. No pets.
Lease req'd: fav. background only.
$850 +dep. 752-8696, 752-5025.
3bd/2ba 770 Po lar Street
$900.00 mo. Also 3 2 1121 Ashley
St $750.00 mo. 1st and last
required., 386-755-3649
3BR/1.5BA. BLOCK HOME.
Fnced (pivcy okyr.C
Ref 's req'd. (941)920-4535
3br/2ba new const.in nice S/D
Lease Opt. to buy. $900/Mo.
$700 Dep Req'd., Credit Check
No Pets (386)755-9476
4/2,on 10 acres, w/lake access, off
of South Marion, $1,000 per
month, $500 security,
Call 386-752-3066
Ft White, 2/1, CH/A, 2010 W2 &(
ref's frorricurrent landlord req'd,
Access to Rivers $650 mo,
$600 sec., 386-497-4699
Like new site-built home for rent,
3/2, on 5 acres, no pets! Non-
smoking environment. Call for de-
tails, $800mo + dep 386-758-1789



OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$695. sec dep.
Tom 3786-961-1086 DCA Realtor


SLLUT~IZI .

Medical Personnel

RN's & LPN's, local med-surg
hospital shifts, immediate work,
instant pay, $250 sign-on bonus
Call 1-877-630-6988


Clean Pine Straw '
You pick it up, $1.85 a bale
Dehivery of 100 bales $285
386-688-9156

Landscape Maintenance Company
You can trust for knowledge &
pride, Mention this AD!
Mow Green, LLC 386-288-6532


Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.



Land Services

Back Hoe, Dozer, Chopping, root
'"'link, bust tlog ,ewedulds s d'
irrigation. Free Est! 386-623-3200


1152 SW Business Point Dr
Lake City, FL 32025
386.754.8562
www.sitel.com EOE


Classified Department: 755-5440


Limited to service type advertis-
ing only.
4 lines, one month.... 92.00
$10.80 each additional line
Includes an additional $2.00 per .
ad for each Wednesday insertion.



You can call us at 755-5440,
Monday through Friday from 8:00
a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Some people prefer to place their
classified ads in person, and some
ad categories will'require prepay-
ment. Our office is located at 180
Esist Duval Street.
You can also fax or email your ad
copy to the Reporter,
FAX: 386-752-9400 Please
direct y or copy to the Classified

EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityre-
porter com -





AdlstoAppear: Call by: Fax/Emali by:
Tuesday Mon. 10:00 a.m. Mon., 9:00 a.m.
Wednesday Mon., 10:00 a.mn. Mon., 9:00 a.m.
Thursday Wed., 10:00 a.m. Wed., 9:00 a.m
Friday Thurs.,10:00a.m. Thurs.,9:008.m
Saturday Fr., 10:00 a.m. Ri., 9:00 a.m.
Sunday Fri.; 10:00 a.m. Fri., 9:00 a.mn.
These deadlines are subject to change without notice




Ad Errors- Please read your ad
on the first day of publication.
We accept responsibility for only
the first incorrect insertion, and
only the charge for the ad space
in error. Please call 751i-5440
immediately for prompt correc.
tion and billing adjustments,
Cancellations- Normal advertising
deadlines apply for cancellation.
Billing Inquiries- Call 755-5440.
Should further information be
required regarding payments or
credit limits, your call will be trans-
ferred to the accounting depart-
ment.


IBM Computer,
$65
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170


408 Farniture

Tan Leather Recliner
Mint Condition .
..0Q ..
Call 386-734-4094 .


416 Sporting GoodS


eq ip.m12m ch tes w/s s cd's
to change stations. Used in good
.cond. $4,000 obo 386-965-6622


420 Wanted toBuy

K&H TIMBER
SWe Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$250 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NOt tile need !8-28 89260


S430 Garage SaleS


Ap i2 & 10, 8am-5pm Applian-
ces, hshold, in & outdoor furni-
ture', tools, electronics, lawn
equip., pool table & much more.
6761 NW Lake Jeffery Rd. .













PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads -
Must be Pre-Paid.


Sat only, 8-1 Two Family Sale

hou 13old, d c~lch 1%wt I aby
items,,new CD's- Rain or Shine
Sat only, 8a-12p, Women's, &
kids clothing, baby stuff
Great Deals! Mill Creek Sub
division (behind High School)
Sat/Sun,Huge Moving Sale
8am-?, air comp, drill press, shelv-
ing, din nn set, ride lawn mower'
249 SW Bedrock St (SR47)


440 Miscellaneous

Chicago Man's Roller Skates
Black size 10, Med
Like New $30
386-754-3922
Tow Behind Grill/Smoker
$1,250 OBO.
386-249-3104 or
386-719-4802

63n Mobile HomeS

3br/2ba mobile home. Next to
O'Leno State Park. $650 mo. plus
Ist, last a sec. walter a lawn
service provided. 386-758-7959
Mobile Homes for rent in
Whute Spaings Ltk it Ot3 Ft.
or 386-365-1919


H~ealthCore Physical Therapy
has an immediate opening for an
energetic, licensed, Physical
Therapy Assistant for ouf
outpatient clinics. Excellent pay &
great work environment. Fax re-
sume to: 386-755-6639 or email
to: healtlicorelibby@bellsouth.net.
All resumes kept confidential


Advertising copy is subject to
approval by the Publisher who
reserves the right to edit, reject,
or classify all advertisements under
appropriate headings. Copy should
be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the first day of pub-
lication. Credit for published errors
will be a lowed for the first insertion
itchthat prion of the advuertisemeteh
Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nlor for any general,
special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply
with Federal, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
nation in employment, housing and
public accommodations. Standard
abbreviations are acceptable; how-
ever, the first word of each ad may
not be abbreviated

In Print and Online
WlWW.slilecityreporter.com .


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, APRIL 10, 2011

Lake City Reporter


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

755-5440


ADvantage


.j __. and

I C Te r lrb-

~' Opp~ionlrtuiie .,..
08 ;*" skl
".. -- a -


Apply Online or In Persont

441)





940 Trucks














Oil WHE~ELS a WITEllCRAFT~








Bring the picture in or
we will tarke it for youl
Ad runs 10 consecutive days
with a description and photo in the
newspaper and online E-edition.
Ad runs 10 consecutive days as a
classified line ad online.
You must include vehicle price.
AII ads are prepaid.
Private party only.




2006 EF250
Ford Van
3/4 ton, metal work
shelves/ladder rack,
60K miles, exc. cond.
$10,500
386-555-5555
If you don't sell your vehicle
during thefirst to days, you
can run t soon ve Icl ad

only $1s.oo
Tnnas and or e iods renm n the


Classified Department: 755-5440


4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$69,900. $613mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
4 acres, Wellborn, New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down, $39,900, $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
Heavily Wooded Land, 10 Acres
MLS#75784 $94,900
Call Jo Lytte
Remax Professionals, Inc.
386-365-2821

Ota Commercial
O ?Pro erty

flexil spac vs bil ty fo lease
Call Scott Stwar @ estfield
Realty Group 386-867-3498
Multiple Use 12,000 sqi ft
of Office & Warehouse space,
Loading dock, Storage yard,
MLS#77349 $395,000, Charlie
386-755-08088 Westfield Realty

8 Waterfrold
PrOperty
DWMH on Ten Acres w/lakefront,
surrounded by oaks, $115,900
MLS#75571, Call Jo Lytte at
Remax Professionals 386-365-
2821, jolytte@remaxnfl.com

RiverkCpabnioSuwanneedRiver,
$349,900 MLS#76336 Call -
Jo Lytte at Remax ProfessionalS
386-365-2821
River Front Property 6.45 Acres,
in White Sprgs close to Big Shoals
Park, Shelter for entertaining'
$124,888 MIdS# 77417 Call Nancy
@ R.E.O. Realty 386-867-1271

890 Resort Property ,
Furnished Home on Itchetucknee
r Rnvr o 1s ar und Sc~o e d7 k
MLS#77006 Call Jo Lytte
Remax 386-365-2821
,River Aes, Refo eishe Retu

Call Jo Lytte 386-365-2821
MLS#76734 Remax Professionals


os,00 sq ft, 1 mile S of I-75 on
47, includes warehouse & mini
golf,3 bth (incl handicap),
unlimited possibilities could
convert to Senior Daycare, etc.
386-752-1364 or 965-4340


osssjAT STARTER SPACE
for Salon at Marion Crossing.
Move in ready with
equipment incl., $1600/mo.
Call Scott Stewart
386-867-3498
Westfield Realty Group

05525553
OFFICE-RETAIL SPACE
for lease on Branford Hwy


.Westfield Realty Group


790 Vacation Rentals

Horseshoe Beach Spring Special
Gulf Front 2br, w/lg porch, dock,
fish sink. wkend $345./wk $795.
(352)498-5986/386-235-3633
alwaysonvacation.com #419-181

805 Lots forSale
5 Acre Lot,*Secluded & Cleared,
MLS# 67871 $60,000
Call Lisa Waltrip
@ 386-365-5900
westfieldrealtygroup.com
A high & dry buildable wooded
.734 of ac.,Forest Country. MLS#
76668 Eastside Village Realty,
Inc. Denise Milligan-Bose
@386-752-5290
Beautiful .92 Acre Lot
3 Rivers-Ft. White-High & Dry!
SOnly $11,900.
Call Taylor Goes of Access Realty
@ 386-344-7662.

Fs et ri~n onf tes, Mt vtlo(
S ell $1 ,99 eMssS 0 00

Jo Lytte 386-365-2821
Hallmark Real Estate. Cleared

caper 3'. repeat umeanO'Brien.
Branford. $25,000 386-755-6600
Nice 4 acre parcel located in
o'Bien. on'tlas" lonGoatso l
Access Realty @386-344-7662.
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All reat estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to' advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
cus I ans,u pgnanstowome anId
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa~
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To cmpli of 1isc8iiato ncan

telephone nu inr eothe hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

810 Home for Sale

3/2 Brick Home in town, fenced
back yard w/12x12 workshop
$79,900 Call Nancy @ R.E.O.
Realty 386-867-1271MLS# 77414
nancytrogers@msn~cont
3/2 Custom Western Cedar Home
on 2 acre lakefront lotMLS#74681
Call Jo Lytte at Remax
Professionals, Inc. 386-365-2821
jolytte@remaxnfl.com
3/2 in Creekside S/D. Fenced back
yard, sprinklers,1large
screened rear lanal.
$175,000. MLS# 77385
386-623-6896 Access Realty
3/2 in town, lots of upgrades,
currently leased, MLS#76658,
$49,900 Call Jo Lytte at
Remax Professionals, Inc.
386-365-2821
3/2 in Woodhaven w/Fla Room,
fenced back yqrd MLS#75499,
$114,900 Call Pam @
Remax 386-303-2505 or
email- remaxpamb@gmail.com
3/2 MH~on 1.5 acres, fenced,
porches, wkshp,well maintained
$49,900 MLS# 77309 Call Josh
Grecian 386-466-2517
westfieldrealtygroup.com
3/2 on 4.84 Acres, fireplace, sheds,
many fruit trees, Call Jo Lytte at
Remax $68,900, MLS#72427
386-365-2821, www~jolytte.
florida-property-search.com
3/2 on 8.7 acres w/Fla room,
several storage bldgs, fenced,
MLS#75295 Call Pam Beauchamp
@ 386-758-8900 Remax,
$179,000 ivww.visitpam.com
4/2 with 1000 sq ft workshop,
fenced back yard, 2 car garage,
MLS#77602, Bring Offers!
$174,900, Call Nancy @
R.E.O. Realty 386-867-1271
5 acre Home wlHorse Barn,
Wood floors, New Kitchen,
Gazebo & Koi Pond MLS#76039
$169,900 Call Aaron @ Westfield


Realty Group 386-867-3534
Beautiful Home For Sale
The Preserve at Laurel Lake
4/2 or 3/2 $194,900 MLS#77257
Call Scott Stewart 386-867-3498
westfieldrealtygroup.com
CBC 3/1 home, inside city limits,
fenced backyard, detached carport
w/office MLS#77411 $82,900
Call R.E.O.Realty,
Nancy Rogers @ 386-867-1271
Charming Remodeled Home
in Beautiful Neighborhood
MLS#74765 $142,900 Call
Charlie Sparks @ Westfield '
Realty Group 386-755-0808


Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
4br 1/5ba. 1332 sqft. Great floor
plan, noce yard, close to town.
Only $84,900 Lori Geibeig
Simpson. 386-365-5678
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
5br/4ba on 5+ac. 3 car garage,
inground pool/hot tub and more-
MLS #75854 $569,900 Lori
Geibeig Simpson. 386-365-5678
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Superbly maintained home in
Creekside. Oversized garage &
storage. Many extras. Elaide K.
Tolar 386-755-6488 $209,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
New home in Mayfair S/D. 4br on
corner lot. Split plan. $214,900
MLS# 76919 Elaine K. Tolar.
386-755-6488
Coldwell Banealndit np Rb a t

5P64 786080 EneBK Toa 8e6-
hurst. 386-965-0887 $299,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Great home in Woodcrest S/D 3/2
home, covered back porch, nice
yard.MLS# 75198 Elaine K. Tolar
386-755-6488 $129,900
Country Home on 2.5 Acres,
$95,000 MLS#77039
Remax Professionals, Inc.,
jo lytte@remaxnfl.com
386-365-2821
Custom, 3/2.5 built in 2007,
on 10.8 manicured acres,
completely fenced, Owner Fin.
avail., MLS#77382 Call Patti
386-623-6896 Atcess Realty
Ft White MH on 16.27 Acres'
near many recreational activities
MLS#77404 $149,900
Jo Lytte Remax Professionals
386-365-2821
Great Opportunity!,
Currently rented, Seller will
assist w/buyer's closing costs
MLS# 77335, Call Michael at
.Westfield 386-867-9053 $99,900
Gwen Lake area. Beautiful up-
flo as, fxr p31ac ne& lkithn In g
de* fn 6edH yar$1k ,0a0 Od8 -

Hallmark Real Estate. Brick 3/2.
Many upgrades. Gas fireplace,
ertt til 009 nh -ah m &

Historical Home on L~ake Isabel-
la. 3/3 w/basement! Great as a pri~
vae r sidec o a wo rul p~ro-
719-0382 Hallmark Real Estate
Home on 15 Acres w/2500 sq ft,
works oprMLS# S 552k$23i,t000
CalBitny Soce a
Results Realty
386-397-3473
Just Reduced 4/2 on 1.57 acres,
fireplace. partially fenced, MLS#
77412, Call Nancy Rogers at
R.E.O. Realty Group
386-867-1271 $64,900
Large Bric, /1,4.1453 ae,8metal
Call Nancy Rogers @ R.E.O.
Realty Group, Inc. 386-867-1271
nancytrogers@msn.com
Large Home on 1 acre, 4/2,
Fla Rm, wrap around front porch
MLS#77292 $148,000
Call Brittany Stoeckert at
Results Realty386-397-3473
Lg home on corner lot w/garage,
Eastside Village. Clubhouse,
heated IRolMLS# 7190D E stside
Milligan-Bose 386-752-5290
Luxury 3/2 Log Home, Cypress
intribwhole huse g~eneratr,

Roger Lovelady @386-365-7039
19estfieldrealtygroup.com
Make an Offer! 3 br brick, quiet
resid'1 street in Live Oak. HUD
home is sold "as is" Hallmark
Real Estate 386-365-5146
www.hudhomestore.com
Nearly 17 Acres w/House
on paved road, Very Spacious!
MLS#i76902 $194,900
Call 386-487-7484 Speak to
Brodie -Westfield Realty Group
On Golf Course w/lake view. 3/2
home w/1g rooms, 3 fireplaces, wet
bar & big deck. Newly reduced to
$214,900. Hallmark Real Estate
386-365-2135
Open for Bid! 3/2 DW w/corner
stone fireplace, fenced yard & Ig
kit. HUD property, sold "as is"
MLS 77290- 386-365-3886 Deb-
bie King Hallmark Real Estate
Ready for Fun & Family. 4br/2ba
custom home on 33.84 ac. has
stocked fish pond & huge 54x60
shop. $325,000. Hallmark Real
Estate 386-719-0382
Rolling Oaks, 3/3 + Bonus Rm,
5 acres, back porch & more!
MLS#77528 Call Pam Beauchamp
at 386-758-8900 Remax $284,900
remaxpamb@gmail.com
Solid Brick Home on 5 Acres, ,
Close to town but in the country!
MLS#76063 Must See!$129,888
Call Brittany Stoeckert at
386-397-3473 Results Realty
Spacious, Open Floor Plan Home,
fenced back yard, screen porch,
$179,900 MLS#76796 Call Jo
Lytte@Remax Professionals, Inc.'
386-365-2821
Well Cared For 3/2 on 1.4 Acres,
open floor plan, MLS#75702
$199,900, Call Carrie Cason
at 386-487-1484
westfieldr-ealtygroup.com

820 Farms
SAcreage


05525391
Must See Take Over Pymt's
10 Ac-Make offer, 20 Ac-
$139,500 $6,975 P/A, Fine
Area, 3 miles W of Col. City
School, Owner Fin 5%, Rolling
Pasture 386-752-1364/965-4340

10 acres, with Travel 'Itailer &
Electricity, close to Itchetucknee
Springs, $38,000, MLS# 76264
Call MillardGillen at
Westfield Realty 386-365-7001
Half to ten acre lots. Some w/
well, septic, pp. We finance; low
dwn pmt. Deas Bullard Properties.
386-752-4339. www.1andnfl.com


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Phone Number.

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Subscriber: 0 IYes O~ No I

Deadline is Wednesday, April 13, 2011 at 5:00 p.m. I
Find all 22 of the 'Volunteer' words hidden in the word search above. I
Words can be found in the banners on the ads shown here. Complete the
puzzle and retum it to the Lake City Reporter, 180 E. Duval Steet Lake
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I'. 9 60


m ale CitO Re orter
;u ea:.elleporl r com CCo 0.i NTj m.a.rl.
-mn.m1m. 1 .u. -m ..m 4


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, APRIL 10, 2011


750 "ostie"Y ls 810 Home for Sale 820 ':SeAcrseag


and 'WJP)om
('tS


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E J OR P

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EAID ST\PI Nationl




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SC LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, APRIL 10, 2011


a as
,: "


Your total monthly
prescription bill

wil Icost a



at Baya Pharmacy.

Regardless of chain store promotions,
Baya Pharmacy nowpromises lower
Spri'ces thiat can save you hundreds. It
takes only 10 minutes to switch to Baya. r:~
SIt's ai bo~ld miove ;that's ni~Cev
been done before.
I t's Bay a's ne w

scription






















='


Story ideas?

Contact
C.J. Risak
Assistant Editor
754-0427
tmayer@lakcityreporter.com


Section D


www.Iakecityreporter.com


GARDEN TALK







Nichelle Demorest
dndemorest@ufl.edu


NeW


IleallS


mIIgration


throated hu"
mingbirds
have returned
T ~~from their ruy
winter homes in Central
and South America. A few
stay in southern Flon-da
through the winter, but
most migrate further
south. The males return
to Florida in March and
the females follow about a
vicek later.
Black-chinned and
rufous hummingbirds are
the two other species that.
are often seen in Florida,
but the ruby-throated
hummingbird is the most
common. The name refers
to the bright red-toned
feathers on the male's
throat. The male and
female are both tiny; they
are about three inches long
and weigh as much as a


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter. com
A visit to the doctor
provided a wake-up call to
Stan Bragdon, 42, about
his weight. At the time the
Lake City resident was 420
pounds and needed to go
on medication for his cho-
lesterol.
He didn't see me living
into my 50s," he said. "I
""$d etehh nake a change
Stan Bragdon chose to
make a change and has
since lost 200 pounds in
two years. His wife, Wendy,
35, lost 100 pounds.
Wendy Bragdon said her
desire to lose weight was
sparked by a Christmas
Party the couple attended.
She wanted to shed the
pounds for the party.
"I was 34 years old and
tired of being fat," she said.
To aid the couples
weight loss, they joined
Anytime Fitness and modi-
fled their eating.
Jackie Irwis, Anytime
Fitness personal trainer .
manager, began working
with Stan Bragdon at the
'end of December 2009. She
started hiin out very slowly
on the treadmill.
"I am so proud of him,"
she said. "There was so
much he couldn't do at
420 pounds. We started
out really slowly, and I'm
impressed he stuck with
it."
Coming to the gym was


initially terrifying because
of the image of everyone
else working out being
smaller, Wendy Bragdon
said. Lewis had her come
into an exercise class, and
she headed to the back.
"Going in the class was
the hardest thing," she
said.
Now Wendy Bragdon
is one of the people in the
fr-ont.
He knew losing the
weight would be a long
process and take time, Stan


Above: Stan Bragdon
pulls himself forward dur-
ing a rowing exercise on a
TRX Suspension Training
mchine.


Left: Jackie Lewis (center)
assists Wendy Bragdon as
she holds the plank posi-
tion ~on an TRX Suspension
Training machine,

Photos by JASON MATTHEW WALKER
Lake City Reporter


LOSS continued on 2D


BIRDS continued on 2D


Lakie City Reporter


Sunday, April I 0, 20 II


DrOp 200 pounds, turn life around





LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, APRIL 10, 2011


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


LEANNE ITALIE
Associated Press

NEW YORK Barry
Lenson's daughter was
thrilled to get into her cozy,
exclusive first choice col
lege, happily signing u?
for an "admitted students
overnight stay on the small
town campus to make sure
it was the place for her.
It was a miserable, mind
changing visit. Students
mocked each other and a
professor. She got a cold
shoulder in the dorm.
"WThen tIly wife arrived
to pick her up the next day,
my daughter walked up to
her and said, 'Get me out of
here,'" recalled Lenson, in
Milburn, N,.J*
So goes Decision HeH ,
as opposed to Adnussions
Hell, which was supposed
to be the hard part.
For tens of thousands
of high schoolers who
sweated over college appli-
cations, then nervously
checked email and mailbox-
es for admission letters this
spring, the next few weeks
may be equally stressful as
they decide where to spend
~freshman year.
Many schools require
students to make a decision
by May 1. There are cam-
pus visits to schedule, wait
lists to navigate, financial
aid packages to leverage
and deferment to consider,
all at a time when many
Sof the nation's 7,000 insti-
tutions of higher educa-
tion including the most
coveted report swelled
ranks of applicants looking
to be Class -of 2015.
All turned out fine for
Lenson's daughter, Olivia,
who was grateful for the
chance to re-evaluate. Now
21, she landed at an equally
prestigious yetlarger, urban
private school, where she's
a junior majoring in politi- -
cal science.
"I thought it was going
to be very open and accept-
ing," she said of her aban-
doned fist choice, request-
ing that its name not be
used. "It is in a lot of ways
but it seemed too cutthroat.
I'm so glad I didn't go."
Admissions consultant
Pairicia Aviezer says swift
action may be required
if teens are going after
wait-list spots or trying
to improve financial aid
offers.
Make sure to heed all


t 7 p.m.
Thursday
evening,
the Flonida
AGateway
College Choir will pres-
ent their Spning Choral
Concert in the Irvy
Performing Arts Center.
The concert program
will feature choral music,
solos and ensemble
pieces from the Broadway
musicals "Cabaref~' and
E hicago" by Kander and
Plus, they will sing
several A~frican-American
spirituals, classical and
folk music. A special
added feature before
the concert will be the
Visual and Graphic Arts
Departments Art Show in
the PAC Gallery, featuring
a variety of student art_
work at 5 p.m. There will
be refreshments served
and you will be able to
browse the gallery at your
leisure until the concert,
which promises to be a
colorful and entertaining
evening for all.
Curtain is 7 p.m. and
it's free.
The opening set of
the concert is the music
from "Chicago." Some
of the pieces are All that
Jazz, When you're good
to Mama, Roxie, My
own best Fniend, Funny
Honey; All I Care about
is Love, Razzle Dazzle
and I move On. The
musical is about a young
women's desire to become
a nightclub star during
the Great Depression in
Chicago. She hopes to
gain notoriety and grab
headlines after she mur-
ders her lover. Her rise
to fame is helped by her
attorney, a slick-woman-
izer. Also included will be
Wilkommen and Cabaret, .
from' another Kander ~
and Ebb musical hit,
'Cabaret
There will be an inter-
mezzo following the
opening of two songs
sung by T.J. Washburn'
Left Behind from
the musical "Spring
Awakening" by Sheik
and Sater. A second
piece -in this Intermezzo
section, A heart full of
love from the musical
Les Miserables" will be
performed by Michelle
Johnson and Callihan
Helms. Both students are
from Baker County.
The second choral
portion of the concert
contains three sacred


Owen WNingate


pieces: Exsultate Deo by
Alessandro Scarlatti; The
Battle ofJericho by Moses
Hogan; and Ain't got time
to die by Hall Johnson.
This will be followed
by another intermezzo
section, consisting of a
duet and an ensemble.
As Long as You're Mine
from "Wicked" will be
performed by Shannon
Mckain (Lake City) and
Frankie Machart (Dixie
County). The Facebook
Song will be sung by
an ensemble of Alexa
Johns(Lake City), Ashley
Jones (Inke City), Sarai
Torres (Lake City),
Frankie Machart (Dixie
County), Matt Friedman
(Lake City) and Washburn
(Baker County).
In the closing choral
set, the choir will begin
with a colorful arrange-
ment of the folk song,
Hermandad, which trans-
lated means brotherhood.
This piece is performed
in Spanish and English
with a trumpet solo by
Christian Heston ~(Lake
City). Then the choir with
soloist Mary Weatherholt
(Lake City) sing The
House of the Rising Sun.
Last they will sing an a
cappella setting of Billy
Joel's And, so it Goes.
Remember, this con-
cert is free. No ticket is
required and the public is
invited to attend.
The College Choir is
a student club organiza-
tion and a membserof `
the Student Gov~ernment
Organization of Florida
Gateway College. The
choral director is pro-
fessor of music Owven
Wingate and the choir's
accompanist is Timothy
Redding. For more
information about this
concert accommodation
or information regarding
enrolling in spring music
classes at FGC, please call
386-754-4255.


MOwen Wingate is a
Florida Gateway College
professor of Music and
Choral director.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
This undated photo courtesy of Sarah Lawrence College shows students on the campus of
Sarah Lawrence in Bronxville, N.Y. Tens of thousands of high schoolers sweated over their
college applications, huddled at mailboxes for acceptance and ~face the final push toward the
rest of their lives over the next few weeks.


deadlines for notifying
admissions offices of the
desire to remain on a wait
list. The process may not
be automatic. Politely ask
the following questions
of -the school: In the past
three years, have you gone
to your wait list to admit? If
so, how deep?
You may have to put a
deposit down to reserve a
spot at one school while
waiting to find out whether
you make it off the wait list
at another.
"Depending on the selec-
tivity of the college, there
are years when some col-
leges do not go to their wait
lists," Aviezer said. "Last
year, however, there was a
sudden climate change in
the number and size of wait
lists across the country.
Attributed to the increase
in applications received by
colleges and the jockeying
for students that ensued
As a result, more students
received a wait-listed let- <
ter."
The same seems to
be true this year as well,
though data remains scat-
tered.
In fall 2009, 39 percent of
schools went to wait lists,
which was slightly higher
than most recent years
except fall 2007, when the
percentage reached 41 per-
cent, according to the "State
of College Admission"
report released last year
by the National Association
for College Admission


Counseling. The group
represents 11,000 counsel-
ing and enrollment officials
from arourid the country.
A student's likelihood of
admission off a wait list
was about l in 3 in fall 2009,
when schools accepted an
average of 34 percent of
students from wait lists, the
report said. The number
was up from 30 percent in
fall 2008 and fall 2007, and
from 29 percent in 2006,
according to the annual
report, the most recent
available fErom the associa-
tion.
Ist the admissions office
kniow of your continued
interest, or.1et your high
school guidance counselor
take the lead, emphasizing
gains in grades and any
accolades since the appli-
cation first landed..Ask if
there's anything else that
would strengthen the appli-
cation. ,.
But sending too ~ni~uch
information to get off a wait
list could backfire, said Rod
Bugarin, a consultant who
worked in the admissions
and financial aid offices of
Columbia, Wesleyan and
Brown. "Colleges already
know about the student, so
additional letters of recom-
mendation or daily emails
sometimes leave a negative
impression," he said.
Bugarin added that he
believes the lists "favor
wealthy applicants as many
colleges do pay attention
to a student's financial aid


eligibility if they do go to
the wait list."
Parents,' he said, should
carefully consider whether
to withdraw an applica-
tion for need-based aid to
increase a studenf~s chanc-
es of wait list admission.
Heather McDonnell,
associate dean of financial
aid arid admissions at the
nation's most expensive
college, Sarah Lawrence
in -Bronxville, N.Y., said
withdrawing financial aid
requests won't help or hin-
der chances there.
About 60 percent of Sarah
Lawrence's incoming fresh-
man receive need-based
aid from a pool of about
$14 million. Top grants to
"perfect fit"' students can
reach $62,000. The school
received 2,000 applications
for admission and plans a
freshman class. of about
360.
Finances are a big part
of the final decision for
many families. There may
be wiggle room when
evaluating aid offers from
schools of equal stature.
Presenting one school's
offer to a school you pre-
fer might result in a bit
more money.
Michael Steidel, director
of undergraduate admis-
sions at Carnegie Mellon
University in Pittsburgh,
said his school sets aside
just under $1 million a year
of a freshman'aid allocation
of roughly $18.5 million to
re-negotiate.


LOSS: Dropping wei h, getting fit

Continued From Page 1A


Wendy and Stan
Bragdon can eas-
ily fit into their old
pants with inches of
room to spare. They
both went down in
pants sizes from size
24 to 10, and 54
to 38, respectively.
'You've got to make
a decision yourself
to change,' Stan
Bragdon said.


JASON MATTHEW WALKERI
Lake City Reporter


bird. Use only recom-
mended sugar water, and
never honey or artificial
sweeteners.
The feeders should
be cleaned weekly with
hot water and white
vinegar, not with soap
or bleach. Use fresh
solution each time the
feeder is cleaned and if
the water ever appears
cloudy. Bacteria grow
quickly in hot weather,
so clean the feeder more
often when temperatures
are high. Hanging the
feeder in the shade will
help keep the solution
cooler.
Visit httP:/solu-
tionsforyo urlife. co m
for lots of articles
about attracting wild-
life, or call the Master
Gardeners at 752-5384.
Plan to attend the work-
shop "Gardening for
Butterflies" on April
16th or April 19th. Find
more information on
our calendar at http:/
columba. ifas. utl. edu

SNichelle Demorest is a
horticulture agent with the
Col rbia Couinty E tesion
Institute of Food.and
Agricultural Sciences.


penny.
Attracting these beau-
ties to your garden is so
rewarding. The enjoy-
ment of a colorful gar-
den is enhanced by add-
ing other factors such
as movement, sound,
and fragrance. And hum-
.mingbirds certainly add
movement. You'll be
charmed by the antics of
these stunt flyers as they
dart among the flowers
that you have planted for
them.
Hummingbird feeders
can be placed strategi-
cally in your yard so
you can get a better
view of these visitors as
they eat. Feeders are
made so that humming-
birds can withdraw the
sugar water in the same
way they withdraw nec-
tar from tubular flow-
ers.
Recently, a reader of
this column requested
that I write about the
proper care of the
feeder. There is a
responsibility that goes
along with attracting
hummingbirds for our
enjdoyment.almp oper use
be very dangerous to the
health of the humming-


Bragdon said. The couple motivated
each other during the process.
Lewis said Stan Bragdon is an
inspiration to her. Even when he hit
plateaus he continued to work on his
goal. .
"Ifs an honor to work with him
and a wonderful blessing to me," she
said.
In turn his wife was an inspiration
to him while reaching multiple pla-
teaus, Stan Bragdon.
"She kept going at it and would
lose larger amounts of weight," he
said.
Faith was also an important aspect
in losing weight, Wendy Bragdon
said. A lot of praying has taken place
during the process.
"I praise God for what he has
helped us accomplish," she said.
The weight loss has brought a


complete lifestyle change for the
couple.
His doctor didn't even recognize
him on his last visit, Stan Bragdon
said. Working out at the gym has
become a regular routine for them.
They ran a 5K together and can now
enjoy other activities.
The couple are both within 20
pounds of their desired goals, Lewis
said. Stan Bragdon wants to reach
199 and Wendy 150.
He works out with, Lewis weekly
and Wendy Bragdon comes to the
gym twice a week.
People often ask the couples'
secret to weight loss but don't want
to hear how they achieved their goal,
Wendy Bragdon said.
"They say, 'Don't tell me diet and
exercise. I don't want to do that,"'"
she said.


Stan Bragdon said they tried other
methods of losing iteight before with-
out the same results.
. "We went with what we felt we
could do the rest of our lives," he said.
Trying one fad diet after the
other wasn't working for her, Wendy
Bragdon said. Diet and exercise has
made a difference.
'"This is how I want to lose
weight," she said.
A lot of people get overwhelmed
trying to lose weight, Lewis said.
Their desired goal seems impossible
and they want to use quick fixes.
"There is no easy fix," she said.
The couples weight loss show diet
and exercise are the best way to lose
the pounds and keep them off, Lewis
said.
"It shows people it can be done,"
she said.


FGC's Spring

Choral Concert


set for Thursday


It'S college decision season


for high school semiorS


BIRDS: Migrating back'

Continued From Page 1D





TRIPLE BONDS By Oliver Hill and Eliza Bagg / Edited by Will ShortZ 11 2 13 14 5,6 8 1 17 12 19'4' 132 14516 117 118


31 16 1 1 7











8l I 9 5


2' 91 8 71 1 I


6 181 2 4


7 12 19 31 1 6 '1


4 1 2 1 3


9 8 6 9 Z L 8 L P


L1 9 8 1 P 6 9 L


1I EL 8 L 9 9 E 6


9 LS 9 L 8 9 6 2:


IL 96 9 E 89


8 6 E9 8 EL9


E 8EL 6 1 9 L9


6 P 9 L 9 I L L. 8


L 9 L E 8 9 6 9 8


Answers to last Sunday's Crossword.
BUSY REPASTS S
A L PIN E S TA R SP 0 T PIN '
G1A DS US S EN A TE N,
S N 0 0 PIN G Y S E R PIN IBALLI EI
CREAMWARE TAR.
AIT A RCA IL M O OD
T R OM P IINT R OS S C
UN R EP AMAM SI BAAL



CHEWEARUP NEOE

R A GAl L EIC H A Y
TIG G ER T H OU A T
NOTABADIDEABAL
F 0N A Ai LERRO B BBG
AV G LIMEC 0RDIAL
T~E ST T AMI R E S0


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


ARIES (March 21-April
19): Emotional problems will
broadside you, causing upset

give whpouver yu ap n o
with a chance to explain and to
have an equal share in finding
a reasonable solution. Not ev-
eryone will do things the same
~way.* ~
TAURUiS (April 20-May
20): Don't let restlessness
lead to divulging information
that you are supposed to keep
a secret. Get involved in com-
munity events that allow you-
to make new friends. Don't
mess with authority figures or
institutions. AAAA
GEIMINI (May 21-June
20): Don't rely on people ~from
your past to come through for
you now. An old debt will leave
you in an awkward position.
Focus ~on important partner-
ships and what's required to
make them work better. Don't
let an old flame leave y;ou con-
fused. AAA
CANCER (June 21-July
22): Your emotions will be
difficult to control but, if you
respolid to them with displays
of affection, you might bypass
a verbal explosion. A negative
attitude will bring a poor re-


SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov.
21): Social events, network-
ing or. spending quality time
wit loed one ail ,alll
and insight mnto your future.
Change heading your way will
play an important role in your
attitude and the goals you set.

SAGFITARIUS (Nov. 22-
Dec. 21): Put a little time, ef-
fort and money into your well-
being and overall appearance
and attitude. A little pamper-
ing will go a long way. Enjoy
the comfort of your home and
the company of the ones you
love. JrAAr
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-
Jan. 19): Before you criticize
others, remember your past
mistakes. Giving positive ad-
vice will enable you to have
greater input and control over
a situation with the potential
to escalate quickly. Now is not
the time to disagree just for
the sake of being right. AAr
AQUARIUS' (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Making extra cash
should be on your mind. Use
your imagination and don't be
afraid to offer a skill, talent or
service you feel others can
benefit from. Get advice from
someone with experience and
you'll be able to stabilize your
financial situation. AAAr
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): Put your hear-t on the
line and let the people you
care about know how you feel.
Don't let an old partner or en-
emy Stifle your plans or cause
you to stiay away fErom an event
or reunion you want to attend.


TI-E LAST WORD

Eugenia WNord

sons.Lo an utdoe psiive


LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):
Keep your true feelings to
yourself and concentrate on
accomplishment. A challenge
will be beneficial. A physical
activity, educational event or
interaction with someone with
inore experience will get you
pumped up and ready to take

on GOroje AA23-Sept
22): Attend social events.
Your strong opinions and your
intellect will capture interest
Don't contribute financially to
a deal, but certainly listen to
what's being offered. Avoid
taking on someone else's bur-
d n; concentrate on your own

LBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): Emotional matters will
escalate if you don't control
the situation early. Take your
time if you are put in a position
that requires you to make a
personal decision that will af-
fect your emotional well-being-
and current residence. AA'


DEAR ABBY: I am cur-
Srently deployed in Afghani-
stan. My best friend's little
sister, "Brittany," has had
a crush on me for years.
She has been straightfor-
ward about what she wants
- marriage, kids, white
picket fence, etc. She has
always been like a little sis-
ter, so it has been awkward.
I thought it was weird for a
15-year-old (at the time) to
say that to an older soldier
on R&R.
SDuring my deployment
Brittany has sent me care
packages loaded with cook-
ies. Maybe I should have
kept my mouth shut about
my weakness for home-
made cookies, but hind-
sight is 20/20. Brittany has
now called in the bribe by
inviting me to her senior
prom. Not wanting to mess
with the steady supply of
baked goodsj.I said yes. I
figure it's an appropriate
way to say thanks for the
cookies.
I intend to make sure
Brittany enjoys her prom
with her medal-covere~d
arm candy, but I need to let
her know that while I'in flat-
tered she thinks so highly
of me, I'm not interested in
dating her. I love her like a


you. Stranger things have
happened.
DEAR ABBY: Spring is
here, and with it comes the
wedding season. Would
you please -inform your
readers about the impor-
tance of answering wed-
ding RSVPs? A lot of people
appear to need reminding
about the need to respond.
Thanks! MOTHER OF
A BRIDE AND GROOM
DEAR MOTHER: I'm
glad to oblige and con-
gratulations on the double
blessing thats coming
your way in gaining both a
daughter ~and a son! .
Readers: When a formal
invitation is received, you
should immediately re-
turn the RSVP card that%
enclosed with it. RSVP is
the abbreviation. for the
French phrase "Repon..
dez s'il yous plait," which
means "Please reply." It'
important for the people
planning the affair to know
how many guests will at-
tend so they can be prop-
erly provided for -for obvi-
ous reasons. So please be
polite and don't keep them
wondering.
SMWrite Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, LOS ~
~Angeles, CA 90069.


Abigail Van Buren
www~dearobby.com

sister. I don't want to break
her heart
Any suggestions -for a
guy who's about as subtle
as a tank rolling down a
cobble stone road on a
Sunday? MEDAL-COV-
ERED EYE CANDY
DEAR EYE CANDY:
How long has it been since
you've seen Brittany? When
yu return for that prom,
she will no longer be that
precocious 15-year-old you
remember. By all means
show her a mece evening.
But don't say anything you
might regret or you may
aved to ea your word

you're not romantically in-
terested, .youll1date other
women and.Brittany wil
catch on soon enough. And
you may did that after her
glamorous eve~mg with
her medal-covered war
hero, she sets -her sights
on someone other than -


CELE BRITY C IPHER

by Luis Campos ..
Celebrity Cipher cryptogram ore reted from hqurtton a famous people, past and present.
Today'sclue:lIequals S
" C G J D LP .. M Pl L AZ J Z Z J PL G Y TV
SE JLSG P Z N K IZ T G IAKMEZ XAD
BP ZE JD YAD J LY Y PCPMGLSG ,"-
JTP M.JPc JvaNs
PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "I get the Freatest feeling when I'm singihlg. It' other-
worldly ... you're holding hands with the angels!' Cyndi Lauper
(c) 2011by NEA, Inc. 4-11


Across
1 Henry IIplayer in
"Becket"
7 Something that
might get a rise
out of people?
13 Clinch
16 Clinch, with "Lup"
19 Aurangeoa ai
Die o
21 "ay r"oband
23 C tna eant

offering /
Wonderland
a fan / Group -o@

25 Indigenous
26 Neo, for one
27 Ble m re
Effortless task /
Move on all
fours with the
belly up
29 Admit '
31 Skins, e.g.
32 Ancient city NW .
of Carthage
36 Most red, maybe
39 Firmly fixed
43 Plunging / Play
hooky / Vulgar
47 Scrunchies
51 Tip reducer?
52 Northern flier /
Mixer maker /
Put on the line
55Buffoon


For any three'answers;
call from atouch-tone '
pone: c 0025 5656,
with credit card, 1-800-
814-5554.


58 Idiots -
59 "Up to ___,"
1952 game show
60 ___ Hunt, Tom
Cruise's
character in
"Mission:
Impossible"

6 ond of eepherds
65 Dials
67 Yel owishdbro n

humor / Many a
forwarded e-mail
72 Hot cider server
74 Seat for toddlers
75 Time, in Torino

80Iem for a mason
81 Previous
84 Idiotic
86 Wonderment
8.7 Cause of
congestion /
Detective's
challenge /
Loony
90 Style of chicken
93 "Naturally!
94 Winnie-the-Pooll
sakee e tnee /
Sweetie
96 Grow together
97 Best to follow, as
advice
100 Attention
getters

2 he nio' flt
10 ero
106p tacyFeast
Cafeteria
outburst / "Mean
Girls" event
114 Hooded jackets .


118 ___ sunglasses
119 democratic
territory /
SCardinal, e.g. /
"Over the .
Rainbow" flier
122 Biracial Latin
Americ n

12 t96 best seller
set, in Hong '
Kong
125 See 126-Across
126 Half a 125-
SAc oss year:
br
127 They might be

128c "Te Battleship
Po emkin"


Down .
1 Alternative to gov
2 Trillion: Prefix
3 Word Hith French
or U.S.
4 Olive genus
5 Cross-country
skiing
6 deux Ages
(middle-aged:

7 Joh Wayne
western, with
"The"
8 Toddler's need
9 Nickname for a
seven-time
N.B.A. All-Star
10 Frau's partner
11 B pinai e s

12 Halfhearted
R. R .SV. P.' s
13 Lettei--shaped
support
14 Bean
15 German finale


16 "Brave New
World" drug
17 ___ eye
18 Lit part
22 Ashkenazi, for
one
24 Take in.
28 Polo locale
30 New Deal inits.
32 They turn on
hinges
33 A goner
34 "If only!"
35 Third-century
year
37 "This

38 R Iprca
Fitanacci

39 Bomb
40 Suffix' with drunk
41 Desk item
42 Kind of wave
44 the season

45 Black in a
cowboy hat
46 "Sleigh Ride"
composer
Anderson
48 Enero starts it
S49 Times to
remember
50 Med. land
53 Cornelius who
wrote "A Bridge
Too Far"
54 Creature
wrorashiped by the
57 As one
61 Appended
62 Zip
64 101-Across, e.g.
66 Alias initials.
68 Bit of homework


69 Actress __
Flynn Boyle
70 Rub out
71 Stimulating
72 Gladly
73 Omdcr of
77 Barks
78 Anticipate
79 Yucatin youth
80 Howe'er
82 "Treasure Island"
inits.


83 Words before any
month's name
84 Fortune
profitlees, for


U8__ bhoun (for
whose benefit?:

89 "__ Bangs"
(Ricky Martin
hit)
91 Check, as text
92 Bklyn. __


95 Kind of power, in
math
98 Outs
99 Speech~blocker
101 One going into

103aHdarll partner
104 Santa _

B0 ghe tke vids
107 1_ plii
108 "Oh,pp '
109 Butcher's
trimmings


110 Soulful Redding
1 11 Slime
112 Venezuela's
SChlvez
113ACbo nial land:
115 Rose's beau'
116 M _B vt
(ahtan area)
117 Sp. titles
120 But: Lat.
121 Some evidence


LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & CROSSWOBRD SUNDAY, APRIL 10, 2011


DEAR ABBY


HO ROSCOPES


'Soldier gomng to senior prom


practices 'back off boogaloo'


SUN DAY CROSSWORD





Most cars & trucks
anexpir s 4/ 01


Enrolling Now for 2011-2012 School Year
Kindergartha thnr l2th Grade
\ Year Round School,
Accepting Special Needs Children,
Taking McKay and Step Up ~For Students
Scholarships, Small Classroonii Setting.
Enrollment Hours: Mon.-Thurs. 7:30 a.m.-2:30 p~m. ~ Fr/. 7:30 ae.m.-j12.'O$0 pm.


1 ,~v~ltY~ru~' ~r~m~s~b~

r ~~1ILIII ~ r ~-B O i ~-1 61.1.1 ~j l~d B i d~ I I B [ ~cPd3 I C I BQ'I ~


*


LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVERTISEMENT SUNDAY, APRIL 10, 2011


Page Editor: Xxx, 754-xxxx


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time. Limit 1 per person per day. May not be
I combined with any opt a prom tional offer. I


WINNERS ARE SELECTED INSTANTLY & PRIZES OF LESS THAN $500 MAY BE REDEEMED INSTANTLY WINNERS OF PRIZES GREATER THAN $500 MAY REDEEM PRIZES AT NO MORE THAN $500 PER DAY. MUST BE 18 YEAltB OR OLDER 10
ENTER MUST BE 21 YEARS OR OLDER TO CONSUME ALCOHOL. PHOTO L.D REQUIRED GO TO PANDA-MONI YUM OF LAK(E CITY LLC TO SEE OFFICIAL RULES & DETAILS, TO PURCHASE INTERNET TIME & TO REDEEM PRIZES. NO PURCHASE OR
CONTRIBUTION NECESSARY TO PARTICIPATE OR WIN MAIL-IN ENTRIES AVAILABLE 4 201 1 Tom Hunt AII rignis reserved.


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