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The Lake City reporter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01519
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 4/3/2011
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
System ID: UF00028308:01519
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text

















Reporter


DIV UAY DD CES SCE


Mike Belle, execu- ^
tive director of -
CARC Advocates yf
for Citizens with
Disabilities, speaks
about Gov. Scott's

funding in front of
CARC Housing.





Ongoing process:

EDD director

Search continues


Pioneer Days draw big crowa


Right Fit
Finding an affordable
eCMm T-brove


www. Iakecityreporter.com


provider if privatiza-
tion of the service
was to occur.

spkekseper onfrh
Columbia County
EMS AssociationB
(International Anderson
Association of fire
Firefighters Local 3510), said they
are affiliated with IAFF because
there is a limited number of estab.
lished unions that represent para-

EMS continued on 3A


tizing Emergency
Medical Servicesfor
the unincorporated
ane thet Tocnonf
Fort White. A L
County staff is :
currently negoti- Hill
ating a potential
contract with Lifeguard Service of
Florida and the staff is expected to
make a presentation to the board of
county commissioners some time
this month. Lifeguard Ambulance
Service of Florida was voted the top
choice to become the county's EMS


H-ave concerns over
jobs, benefits if county
Opts to privatize service.
By TONY BRITT
tbritt~lakecityreporter.com
Columbia County EMS union
members are worried that county
officials may choose to privatize the
local EMS service, which may result
in union members losing jobs and
benefits,
Columbia County officials contin-
ue to look into the possibility of priva-


State to reduce
prOVider payrnent
rates 15 percent.
By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter. com

Companion Services
offered through the CARC
- Advocates for Citizens
with Disabilities helped
her participate in several ~
activities outside of her
group home, sitid Judy
Cashmere of Lake City.
Now that service is coming
to an end, at least tempo-
rarily.
"I don't like it," she said.
"I don't like it period."
The State of F~lorida
Agency for Persons with
Disabilities Handh Cta


Administration submit-
ted an emergency plan
to reduce provider pay-
ment rates by 15 percent
for the next three months
Thursday, according to a
release.
Several CARC services
will be affected as a result
of the reduction, said Mike
Belle, executive director.
Companion services will no
longer be offered.
The CARC also provides
Adult Day Training. five
days a week. One day will
have to be eliminated from
the program.
"WIith the current rate
of reductions there is no
way we can provide those
services," he said.
The emergency action is
CARC continued on 3A


COmmlfliSSOH 10
USe an agency to
aid the quest.
By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakec~ityreporter:com -
The recruitment ~pro-
cess for Columbia Cournty's
new economic develop-
ment director continues to
move forward, officials said
Friday.
Dale Williams, county
manager, said the hunt for a
person to lead the county's
newly formed Economic
Development Department
is ~in the advertising pro-
cess and
proposals .
have been
requested
from three
outside =
emplo y -
ment con- .
su 1ting williams
firms to
aid in the selection.
At its Feb. 15 regular
meeting, the Columbia
County Board of County
Commissioners unani-
mously approved starting
the search by hiring an
employment agency spe-
cializing in finding select
individuals for critical posi-
tions.
The position's job
deseniption was unanimous-
ly approved in the con-
sent agenda at the board's
March 17 meeting.
According to a March


15 county memo, employ-
ment agencies being con-
sidered have beep nar-
rowed to three -- Colin
Baenziger & Associates in
Wellington, Fairfield Index
Inc. in Tampa and Sanford
Holshouser Economic
Development Consulting in
Raleigh, N.C.
Williams said Michele
Crumnmitt, county Human
Resources director, asked
the fims last week to sub-
mit proposals for the coun-
ty's review with "all the
particulars," like how much
they will charge for their
services and how they will
advertise the position.
"Assuming that we like
these proposals," Williams
said, "we'll recommend one
to the board and we'll see
where that carries us."
The recruitment process
is also in the advertising
stages with advertisements
being put out in "the normal
local channels," Williams
said, such as the Lake City
Reporter and public service
channels. The county will
also advertise with other
associations that support
economic development
Depending on whether
significant leads result
from general advertising,
Williams said, he will ask
the board to approve an
agreement to use one of
the ~firms.
The firms' proposals will
most likely be presented to
EDD conttnued on 3A

COMING
TUESDAY
I-: Hi drar r i r di5s


TONY BRITTI~ake Cifty;Rep~orter
Laura Paphides (from left) and Michele Cuadras, of Merle Norman Cosmretics,
take part in a make-up demonstration during Saturday's Diva Day.


High SpringS
f OStlVal payS
homage to history.
By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter. com
HIGH SPRINGS The
Reverend "Wicked" Willie,
a newly elected sheriff for
High Springs, was fed up
with the antics of Cypress
Copeland and his ranch
hands because they con-
tinually wreaked havoc in
the small town in Southern
Alachua County.
Shots rang out Saturday
as the two men and
members of their gangs
engaged in a shootout in
the middle of town during
the town's annual festival.
The staged gunfight was
part of the 35th Annual
Pioneer Days event, where


the staged guni~ght. "'We
haven't had any: prob-
lems and everybody, has
remembered their lines.
We had a lot of fun an~d we
think the audience had a
lot of fun."
Thomas Weller, High
Springs Chamber of
Commerce immediate
past president, said event
organizers were expecting
5,000 10,000 people to
attend this year's two-day
festival.
iT~he crowds are good
and the weather has been
absolutely gorgeous,"
diellrSaid.
The shootout in front of
the town's old school drew
a crowd of people who sat
on lawn chairs, bleachers
or the ground and attenta-
tivley watched the action,
DAYS continued on 3A


TONY BRITT~~ e00Repear l
The Reverend 'Wicked' Willie, portrayed by William Peele.
shoots Cypress Copeland and his ranch hands during a
staged gunfight at the 35th Annual Pioneer Days Saturday.


the town of High Springs
paid homage to its history
and the pioneers of High
Springs.


"We've had twNo excel-
lent showss' said William
Peele. who portrayed
Sheriff W~icked Wlillie in


CALL US: 8
(386) 752-1293 o
SUBSCRIBE TO Sunn
THE REPORTER:
Vie 5-544 WEA-THER, 10A


-HE =_r ar t
c.: 3.-. and


Advice & Comics......... 7D
---J-'Puzzles ................. 2B


~tl~f~


0 DAY'S


-. i


Championship Set
UConn to rneet Butler
for NCAA title.


S orts, IB


cUlt


La~e



unday, April 3, 20 II


Vol. I 37, No. 6 I 5$1.00


Funding for


CARC to be

*rme


EMS plan worries union


Altrusa Club s

event should

help charities

By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityrepor ter. com

.came to the Lake City
Fairgrounds Saturday
hoping to find an event
where they would be
pampered, treated like royalty and
allowed to gnd items that catered to
their shopping needs and wants.
Their wishes were granted by the
Altrusa Club of Lake City, whose
Diva Day event, which started out

charities.
Jan Smithey, Altrusa Club of Lake
City president, said the event was
wonderful and noted it drew a huge
crowd of women.
The Diva Day event was held at
the Columbia County Fairgrounds
banquet facilities, featured 40 ven-
dors and most of the day the build-
ing clients and customers. Diva Day
decorations inside the banquet hall
were provided by Francis Event
Design.
"It started at 10 a.m. and it'S
been packed since then," Smithey
said. "We sold over 500 tickets and
people are still coming in."
Personal fitness trainers, food

DIVA continued on 3A


Opinion ......... 4A 'ir~ TODAY IN
Buins ......--...
...,-eg usiess.............BUSINES!
Obituaries . .. .. .. .. ... 6A


1 4264 it Jl





AROUND FLORIDA



Rubio speaks out after low profile early in Senate.


`Daily Scripture


"jeSUS took the Twelve aside
and said to them, The Son of
Man will be delivered over to
the chief priests and they will
condemn him to death. On the
third day he will be raised to
|jfgf'"'
Matthew 20: 17- I9


L~ake City Renorter
HOW TO REACH US BUSINESS
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Periodical postage paid at L~ake City, Fla. amon dy
Membe Aui Bureau of Cinrclation and Pleas call386-7554 to report any

All material herein is property of the L~ake In Columbia County, customers shoddy
City Reporter. Reproduction inwhole or call before 10 30 am. to report aser-
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CO RREC TION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion,
please call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifica-
tions will run in this space. And thanks for reading.


LAKE CITYr REPORTER SU NDAY REPORT SUN~DAY APRIL 3. 2011


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


Friday:
7-8-14 22-27


Friday:
7-23-32-36 17


Saturday:
E~eingr 7-3-4-9


Saturday:
Afterncon: 8-4-9
Evening: 4-1-9


the bar parking lot when
they arrived early Saturday
morning. Detectives
believe two men were
fighting when the shots
were fired. One of the
victims may have been
shot accidentall trying to
break up the fight.
The victims were taken
to a local hospital by
friends and are listed in
stable condition.'llieir
names have not been
released.
Deputies found three
9mm casings and blood in
the parking lot.

Man charged with
endangering train
JACKSONVILLE -
Jacksonville authorities say
a 27-year-old man illegally
opened a bridge, forcing a
train to make an emergency
stop to prevent it from

Adrw Hast at
booked into Duval County
jIl eadler tis we n
with railr ad track, bur

gl lic sads ssty was on
his boat March 26 when
he came upon a closed
drawbridge. He alleg-
edly broke into the bridge
tender's building and
activated controls to open
the bridge. Police said he
jumped back in his boat,
leaving the bridge open.
A passing CSX train was
forced to stop to prevent
going into the Trout River,
causing a significant traffic
delay.

SAssociated Press


WASHINGTON

Marco Rubio,
a breakout star
of the 2010
Selection and a lrd S n
tea party favorite, kept a
low profile early on in the
Se~nate. That's begun to
change.
In a matter of days,
Rubio made his opposi-
tion clear in a Wall Street
Journal article to raising
the federal debt ceiling
and he has called on law-
makers to authorize force
to capture Libyan leader
Moammar Gadhaf.
Rubio, the son of Cuban
exiles, drew attention last
year when he took on for-
mer .o Charleo nrsn e

GOP primary and stayed
off Crist's independent bid.
The 39-year-old former
Florida House speaker had
followed a path forged by
Prels dt BarackSObama
Hillary Rodham Clinton
both former senatos k ep

reach the Senate, learn the
ropeus dn's makeR i It
compelled to speak out as
the Senate moved closer to
considering a plan to raise
the federal debt ceiling, a
move most conservatives
oppose.
"When he first got to the
Senate, there was a lot to
absorb very quickly," said
Todd Harris, a campaign
strategist for Rubio. "At
the same time, there was
no way he was going to
allow the ~ight over the
debt limit to come and
go without playing a key


ing community is hard
to infiltrate, but they had
information that the ani-
mals were being trucked
to other counties for big
fights.
Authorities said the
dogs had scars and other
signs they had been in
fights.

Jury COHVICIS man
fOr murder
SANFORD A central
Florida jury has convicted
a man of premeditated
attempted first-degree
murder in a 2008 attack on
a woman who gave him a
ride home.
James Hataway was also
found guilty of robbery,
false imprisonment and
burglary with a battery
FnidayinC kheattack on

Haataway ad itted
attacking Clarke when he
took the stand, but said he
did not intend to kill her.

is Aaluo t on Isa a ay
suspect mn the disappear-
ance ofTracy Ocasio. She
was last seen leaving a bar
with him in 2009. He has
not been charged with her
disappearance .

Two shot in fight
OutSide bar
PORT CHARLOTITE
- A man and woman are
recoveritig from gunshot
wounds after a fight out-
side a southwest Florida
bar.
Char-lotte County
Sheriff's deputies said
about 200 people were in


ASSOCIATED PRESs
In this photo taken Nov. 2, Republican Marco Rubio speaks after winning his U.S. Senate
bid in Coral Gables. Rubio, 39, a breakout star of the 2010 election and a favorite of the tea
party, has taken on Senate leaders over Libya and voiced concerns over the national debt in
a high-profile editorial.


role."
The Treasury
Department estimates the
government will reach the
$14.3 trillion debt ceiling
sometime between Apn1
15 and May 3L. The White
House has warned that it
could lead to a default on
the national debt and harm
the economy.
In his Wall Street
Journal article, Rubio said
he would vote against
an increase in the debt
limit unless "it is the last
one we ever authorize"
and it includes significant
sliending8icuts, a balanced-
budget amendment and


reforms to Social Securi y
Medicare and Medicaid.
He also turned his
attention to Libya, asking
Senate leaders to advance
a resolution authonziing
Obama's move to join in *
military action in Libya.
"As long as Gadhafi
remains in power, he will
be in a position to terror-
ize his own people and '
potentially the rest of the
world," Rubio said.
When a spokesman for
Senate Majority Leader
Harry Reid, D-Nev., criti-
cized the proposal, Rubio .
sent a letter to Reid asking
him to reconsider.


Actress-singer Doris Day
is 88.
W Conservationist Dame
Jane Goodall is 77.
Actress Marsha Mason is
69.
Singer Wayne Newton is
69.
Singer Tony Orlando is 67.


Country musician Curtis
Stone (Highway 101) is 61.
Blues singer-guitarist John
Mooney is 56.
A Rock musician Mick Mars
(Motley Crue) is 55.
H Actor Alec Baldwin is 53.
M Actor David Hyde Pierce
is 52.


DETROIT
harlie Sheen has been
pretty well everywhere
the past few months, pop-
ping up i11 over national
CTV, the Internet and in
other forms of mass media, blather-
ing on about the "tiger blood" cours-
ing through his veins and decrying
the "trolls" who derailed his lucrative
ac nmucu as been said by and
about the unemployed actor, it's
almost as if there's nothing left to
learn about him.
Sheen's banking on the "almost"

Promising "the REAL story," the
45-year-old ex-"Two and a Half Men"
star is hitting the road for a month-
long, 20-city tour that got its start
Saturday night in Detroit
Why Detroit?
"Why not," asked publicist Larry
Solters, who, like his boss, hasn't
said a lot about the show, other than
it will last an hour and a half and fea-
ture guests, music and a multimedia
presentation. Ra per Snoop D g
wi11 be there as 11l guitarit R b
Patterson
What remains to be seen is wheth-
er Sheen a talented comic actor,
but not a stand-up comedian can
sufficiently entertain a live audience
for that I ngth of tina
Sh en deeen appeared in a string o
memorable 1980s films ranging from
the Oliver Stone-directed dramas "~Wall
Street"' and "Platoon" to the timeless
comedies "Ferris Bueller's Day Off,
and "Major League." Later in his
career, he found small-screen success
as the star of the hit sitcoms "Spin
City" and "Two and a Half Men,,
But in recent years, the actor has
increasingly made headlines for his
drug use, failed marriages, custody
disputes and run-ins with the police

Academics to dissect
Bob Dylan at conference
NEW YORK More than three
decades have passed since Bob
Dylan brought the plight of boxer
Rubin "Hurricane" Carter into the


who also happen to like Dylan's
music, 'iind a way to put them
together; tell us how Dylan relates to
your academic work or your think-
ing,"' said Fordham professor Bruce
Green, one of the organizers.
An academic session on Tuesday
follows a Monday night public panel
discussion at Fordham in Manhattan.

Lohan, rehab worker
. heard yelling on 911 call
RIVERSIDE, California A rehab
worhketrs tdoan em rgec ayd tc~h-
to pack her bags and leave the Betty
Ford Center after the actress hit
her during a December argument,
according to a recording of the call
released Friday. .
The six-minute call started with
a chaotic exchange between Lohan
and the worker, Dawn Holland, argu-
ing over control of the phone at the
facility in Palm Desert.
Later, Holland told the dispatcher
she wanted to press chargeS.
Lohan was nearing the end of a
three-month court-ordered rehab
stint at the center after authoritieS
said she had failed a drug screening.
The Dec. 12 call resulted in an
investigation by Riverside County
sheriff's detectives into Holland'S
accusations. Prosecutors said
Tuesday they found insufficient evi-
dence to file any chargeS.
Holland told Lohan she wanted
to be treated with respect. By that
point, the two women were yelling
and the audio became garbled.
The call was lost and a dispatcher
had to call the facility back. Holland
returned to the line and said Lohan
was among three girls caught leav-
ing the property without permission.
The two other girls reeked of alco-
hol, Holland said.
The dispatcher asked if Lohan
was involved in sneaking out of the
facility.
"Oh yes," Holland replied. "She
got busted trying to hop back over
the fence."

SAssociated Press


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this 2009 file photo, actor Charlie
Sheen is interviewed at an event in
Los Angeles. The 45-year-old unem-
ployed actor's 20-city road show started
Saturday in Detroit.
public consciousness: "Criminals in
their coats and their ties are free to
drink mar tinis and watch the sun
rise while Rubin sits like Buddha in
a 10-foot cell, an innocent man in a
flying hell.
Dylan championed the case of
Carter, a former nuddleweight boxer
convicted twice of a 1966 triple mur-
der. And mn the end, Carter was freed
after 19 years in prison; a federal
judge found that the conviction was
tainted by racial bias and that Carter
and his co-defendant were denied
their civil rights.
Now, academics from around the
country will examine the implica-
tions of that song and others dur-
ing "Bob Dylan and the Law," a
conference presented by Fordham
University's law and ethics center
and Touro Law School.
"We basically said to people who
write and think about the law ant


Wednesday:
19-20-42-56-58
PB37


Wednesday:
3-9-10-20-31-52


Man charged for
dog-fighting
GAINESVILLE A cen-
tral Florida man has been
charged after police seized
24 dogs and 100 roosters
they say were used in ani-
inal fights.
Union County Sheriff
Major Garry Seay said
additional felony animal
cruelty charges will be
filed against Eric Cox. The
44-year-old was arrested at
his home Friday.
Authorities said they .
had been getting com-
plaints from neighbors.
. Seay said the dog-fight-


Celebrity Birthdays


O H PE PLE IN TH NE V



Sheen lacks off Torpedo of Tru~th tour.






























































EMS* Union members concerned

Continued From Page 1A


DA INA GREEN\E MD
WOMEN'S HEALTH WITH A WOMAN'S TOUCH


ESTEE LAUDER


LAKE SIT/ t' EPO-E~ LOCAL sox-; -= s ss


Page Editor: C.J. Risak. 754-0)427


success


DIVA: Altrusa event a big

Continued~c From~ Page lA


Con1tinuled From2 Page 1A

which had a newl theme
this year.
TIhe staged shootout
production chronicled the
story of a new sheriff in
town who battled with a
local cattle baroln. The per-
fo~rmancej was done at noon
and 2 p.m.
Other event attendees
took their children to an
area where the children
could entertain themselves
by playing games, jumping
around in bounce houses


samples. health screen-
ings. make-up advice.
we-re just a small exam~ple
of some of the vendor
booth ideas at the event.
Donna Hy-de. a vendor
showing-off unique soaps
for sale at her vendor's
booth, said she like the
concept behind Diva Day.
"I have a business.
Soaps Byi Design, and
we're doing really good
here." she said. "This
gives you a lot of new
customers and good expo-
sure for your business."

even nl sd as dna-
tions to local charities.
"'Because of the hard
times right now we are
doing the best we can,"
Smithey said. "If we
can raise $10,000 with
this event, we'll be very
pleased. The money goes
right back into the local
community for non-profit
charities. Well let the
charities know how they
can apply for the funds at


a later date."
She estimated that at
least 300 people attended
the event.
"The attendance has
exceeded our expecta-
tions." Smlithey- said.
"We're very pleased. The
community has been
very: responsive and the
vendors that we have are
local vendors and they are
loving this because it's
advertising for them. This
is a wmn-wmn for every-
body."
Linda Waldron, a Imke
Chty sd ent tsted fod

metic vendor booths and
visited with people dur-
ing the Altrusa Diva Day
fundraiser.
."Diva Day is wonder-
ful it's very nice," she
said. "I'm impressed with
all the exhibits and all the
people that are here for
the function. They have
some wonderful ideas,
gifts and different things
for women of all ages. It's


a wonderful day out for
the ladies. It s just some-
thing for the women and
it's not that many things
to do here in Imke City
most of the time that's
geared just for women. I
think this is a lovely- idea."
Waldron, who is a
board of directors mem-
ber with The March of
Dimes said it's wonderful
that Altrusa has decided
to'give proceeds to com-
munity charities.
"People should partici-
pate more for our chari-
ties," she said. "Proceeds
from all these events go
to the people that need
it --people here in Lake
City and the people
should support it,"
SThe door prize win-
ners from Diva Day were
Eadie Geiger who won a
pair of Suwannee River
Jam tickets, while Barbara
Jernigan won the Mariana
bracelet donated by
Wards Jewelers.


or take part in other child-
re~ns' activities.
Traci Richardson and
Rowen Richardson, 3, Fort
White residents, were tak-
ing part in the activities in
the children's area.
"Pionee~rs Days is great,"
she said. "I used to come
here when I was 10) years
old and it was nice to be able
to come back and let Rowen
see some of the things l used
to see."
Groups of people also


w~alke-d through towrn prr-
chasing antiques. ilower, r~
western werars and other
goods from vendors. Event
organizers estimated 3190 ]
vendors participated in this
year s event.
Heritage Village in the cen-
ter of down1 featured people
dressed in period constumes
showing and detailing life in
the pioneer era.
Pioneer D~ays activities
will continue in High Spaings
today from 10J a~m. 4l p.m.


the board at its April 21 meeting, he said.
Because of contacts through Jim Poole,
the current Economic Development direc-
tor who is retiring June 30, and from word-
of-mouth advertising, Williams said the
county has gotten some bites at the apple,
one of which has been local. *
"WVe're already, without the benefit of
much advertising at all, getting some
decent interest," he said.
He noted that Poole told him there
are currently four other similar econom-
ocdedadcopume positions open in other
"So we do have some competition, obvi-
ously," Williams said.
Any advertising done for the position
will show the job's salary as negotiable,
he said.


While the county would like to begin
interviewing for the position by June and
have someone hired by Poole's retirement,
Williams stressed that finding the best
possible candidate is the county's highest
priority.
"The objective here is to find the most
qualified person that we can that best fits
our needs," he said.
"Whlat I don't want to do here, and I
don't think my board wants to do this, is
say, 'Okay, applications are due by April 15'

p cdk t bst of thl 'or, Willanms said
"For a lot of positions that's fine, but here,
if none of those three meet a certain stan-
dard, I think we're better off to continue to
push forward until we find the right fit."


to address APD's more than $170 mil-
lion deficit in the Medicaid waiver pro-
gram, according to a release. Florida law
requires the agencies to take action when
it is determined that APD received $805
million for waiver services but is spend-
ing more money than was allocated by
the legislature.
"These actions are necessary to com-
ply with statutory obligations so that we
are not forced to eliminate services to
this vulnerable population," stated APD
Chief of Staff Bryan Vaughan in a release.
"APD is committed to protecting the
health and safety of Floridians with devel-
opmental disabilities while living within
our budget."
ADP has not had an increase in funding
since 2005 but its services have extended
to 5,000 more people, Belle said. A reduc-
tion wasn't completely unexpected, but
a 15 percent cut doesn't consider what
services people with disabilities need.
Also the announcement was made
without giving organizations enough time
to come up with other funding options.


"~We were literally given 24 hours to
make up 15 percent of funding services
for our clients," he said.
The reduction not only affects the
CARC but organizations that serve peo-
ple with disabilities across the state, Belle
said.
"It's worse for some other agencies
than just for us," he said.
The CARC has already reduced its
budget and cut thousands of dollars in
annual expenses.
' "We're as tight as it gets," he said.
The CARC must have certain number
of caregivers for its clients, Belle said.
The staff requirement is set by APD and
will not change under the reduced rate.
The emergency rule will be in effect
until the end of the fiscal year which is
June 30, according to the release.
The sudden announcement is taking a
toll on the CARC, but it will continue to
try and serve clients an efficiently as pos-
sible, Belle said.
"Going out of business is not an option,"
he said.


medics and EMS workers.
The Columbia County EMS
workers became unionized
in 1999-2000.
Anderson said the ofi-
cial position of the union
was shock when the county
announced it was consider-
ing the EMS privatization
route in February.
"It basically took us by
surprise -the union and
the employees of the coun-
ty EMS Department," he
said. "We really were not
expec-ting it. The county
has suggested looking at
privatizing a few times in
the past so it really wasn't
totally out of the clear blue,
but when they had it on
the agenda there was not
enough detailed informa-
tion that was the direction
the county was going to
go in."
Lance Hill, the local
EMS union president, said
EMS contract negotiations
reached a stalemate and
the last meeting was in
October,
"WIe tried to set up multi-
ple dates with the county for
November and December
and every date we proposed
never happened," he said.
"Then Feb. 3, they came
along and said they were
going to look at privatiz-
ing because of stalemated
negotiations. I don't knpw
where the stalemate came
in because we presented at
least five different dates."
Hill said another letter
wag sent to the county fol-
lowin8 the announcement
about potential privatiza-
tion,
"I sent them a letter
saying that we as a union
wished to continue to nego-
tiate and have no intentions
of letting this be a stalemate
and sent them a letter with
at least 35 dates," he said,
noting he only received a
response Monday.
During the Feb.
SComC mbia nCeut g
Anderson said the coun-
ty's labor attorney, Mike
er"gn tideththeb ug-
unanimously accepted his
recommendation, moving
forward with the idea to
privatize.
County officials want
to save money by having
EMS services provided
by a private company. The
county was supplementing
its EMS services with close
to $1.2 million annually.
"The conclusion that we
can draw based on the pre-
sentation from the labor
attorney, is that this was
a la or issue," Anderson
said. "WIe have been in


the process of negotiating
with the county and was
not aware the county had
reached a turning point in
how they viewed the prog-
ress of negotiations and
they felt their next best step
was to immediately look at
privatizing."
Anderson said when
county officials began ask-
ing for requests for qualifi-
cations from potential EMS
service vendors, it showed
they ;were more serious
about privatizing. .
"Our chief concern with
privatization of the service
is that well potentially be
unemployed," .Anderson
said.
There are 28 full-time
EMS employees who will
be impacted by the coun-
ty's privatization decision.
He added the possibility of
being employed by a private
ambulance service could
mean a loss of income and
benefits.
Anderson said there are
additional concerns that
the concerns of the citizens
of the county should be
weighed into the fin~al deci-
sion.
"Wie don't feel like all the
answers to some of the ques-
tions have been provided
yet," he said. "The county
hasn't validated how they are
going to reduce the costs."
He said if the county
increases the workload
of the fie department, as
proposed, there could be
greater costs. Anderson
noted that private compa-
nies are looking to increase
their profit margins and the
plan does not adequately
address where their profits


would be.
"~They can come in and
discount-up front, but even-
tually they are going to
have to make a profit to
stay," he said. "Eventually
if they are not making the
money through the county
subsidizing their operation
or them passing the costs
to those that use the ser-
vice, some how their profit
is going to have to be added
to the-service and that's an
additional cost."
Hill said the current
EMS contract expired in
2010, but' noted that until
it is negotiated out, it's still
an active contract. The con-
tract ran from 2006-2009
and there was a one-year
extension granted byr the
county because of the
merger.
In April 2009, the coun-
ty merged EMS and the
Columbia County Fire
Department, and the union
extended the negotiation
process and agreed with
the county to move into
negotiations after the ele-
ments of the merger were
established.
"~We're in the fifth year of
the current contract," Hill
said.
'"The merger has become i
murky and it's also one of
the unanswered issues,"
Anderson said. "If we were
moving forward in a merg-
er process, why all of a sud-
den are we abandoning the
plan and going to privatize?
It doesn't make sense. We
have a willingness to work
with the county, but it is
unclear as to where, how
and when we can work with
them."


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DAYS: Pioneers remembered


EDD: Search for new director ongoing

Continued From Page 1A


CARC: Facing some loss of funding

Continued From Page 1A


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www.Iakecityrepo rter.com


4A


Sunday,April 3, 201 I


OUR
OPINION


Don't cut

funds for

libraries


hi bry jut opened,
improving that
town's services
immensely and giv-
ing the people of Fort Whiite
something both needed and
deserved.
The Library of Congre'ss
Gateway to Knowledge
Traveling Exhibit paid Imke
City a visit, bringing a treasure
trove of historical items with it,
things kids from a small city in
North Florida may never have
gotten a chance to see, or may
never have known existed.
Deborah Paulson, director
of Columbia County's Public
Library system, has recently
been asked to share her
management expertise at the
annual Library Management
Institute Conference at Arcadia
University. It's a rare oppor-
tumity to both give and gain
information on how best to run
a program.
We've been fortunate. Our
public libraries have been
accessible when needed most
when a sagging economy has'
forced fande;Fs to cut back in so
many areas. Our libraries have
been there to fil the gap.
By definition, a library is a
collection of books, or' at least
that was its original purpose.
Now it's an information high-
way. There is computer access
available, something many
people would not have without
a library.
Programs are plentiful as
well, inspiring young new read-
ers with stories both entertain-
ing and informative and helping
older readers understand why
things happen.
All this is readily attainable,
there for the asking. But unfor-
tunately, that extravagance has
put us in a precarious position.
We've taken public libraries and ,
what they provide for granted.
Now the state tax money that .
pays for this institution must be
trimmed. Considerably.
That could lead to branches
closed, hours cut, programs
lost.
Seems when money is need-
ed, the things we need most
are fist to suffer. Libraries help
everyone. Closing them would
be a travesty.

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub- .
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities --"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
puls itn usd and prfitable
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
workr.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Sue Brannon, controller

Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman



L EOT LT- ERYS


type or nan wrte a dubble
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.


BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


jay Ambrose
Speo~aojoyi~oo.com


to have bottomed out in state
government.
But hiring in other sectors
was more than healthy enough
to offset that shrinkage plus the
15,000 layoffs by local govern-

me e than anything the
Republicans do, the economy
will be the significant factor in
whether Barack Obama is re-
elected president. The jobs fig-
ures "signs of real strength"
- left the president almost
giddy.
At a visit to a UPS facility
in the Washington suburbs,
Obama said that making sure
good jobs were available to any
American who wants one "is the
first thing I think abput when I
wake up every morning. Its the
last thing I think about when I
.go to bed each night.',
Hold that thought, Mr.
President. The March numbers
show we're getting there, but
we're not there yet

SDale McFeatters is editorial
wr terdfor Scripps Howard News


technically, the reces-
sion has been over
for nearly two years,
since June 2009, but
Tthe job market has
been agonizingly slow to recov-
sir Nsow there ae enc urgmng
The March unemployment
rate fell to 8.8 percent, its lowest
in two years, and the economy
added 216,000 jobs, along
with the 200,000-plus added in
February, making those the
strongest two months of hiring
.since the recession began in
December 2007.
The unemployment rate has
dropped a full percentage point
over the past four months, mak-
ing it the sharpest drop since
1983, when we were coming out
of another bad recession.
"' The Associated Press notes
that if hiring continues at this
rate through the end of the year,
the economy will have gener.
ated 2.5 million new jobs. While
thats good, it's still not enough
to make upfor the 7.5 milli n
mosls duprn ~the reeon
or empoy uhe 1.5emlo ot


Dale McFeatters
mcfeattersd@shns.con
of work.
The underemployment rate
- the percentage of people
who are so discouraged that
they have quit looking for work
altogether and those who work
part-time but want full-time jobs
- fell to 15.7 percent
The unemployment rate may
rise again, but for a good rea-
son. As the job picture bright-
ens, discouraged workers, who
are not counted in the regular
unemployment rate, may come
flooding back into the job mar-
ket, swelling the size of the
workforce.
Employment, shrank in con-
struction, transportation and
telecommunications; and after
four months of layoffs, appears


TO THE EDITOR


To the editor:
Today I read in the Lake
City Reporter about the State
Legislature passing a law which
prohibits local governments
from putting fees on agricultural
property.
If any of these legislators have
property which is exempted
under this law, these legislators
are not allowed to vote on this
legislation. It is a conflict of inter-
est. I am fairly sure this is true
for the Federal Legislature and
I believe that by lawsuit the citi-


zens of this state can force this
on the State Legislature.
Only land which is truly pre
during food for humanity should
be exempt from property taxes.
I would propose that both the
State Agricultural Department
and the USDA have to rule a
piece of property to be truly agri-
cultural land before any exemp-
tion is granted. The rich like
to exempt their property from
taxes but in order to do that,
they have to corrupt our state
gover-nment


There are no state rights when
it comes to corruption in govern-
ment Corruption in government
is organized crime. The RICO
Iaws apply. When legislators try
to exempt themselves or their
friends from paying property
taxes, they are criminals. Period!
The Federal government should
take these properties under the
RICO laws and use the money
from the sales to pay down the
Federal debt
Michael Harris
lake City


OINIO


Lawyers

Want profit

in Walmart

here is a case
beoe the Supreme
Court now th~at, if
decided on behalf of
the plaintiffs, would
make some lawyers very, very
wealthy, even though it would
damage consumers, workers
and one of the best companies
in America while violating prin-
ciples of fair play and 'sound
law. But what the heck? That's
the American way, right?
Yes, of course it is, at least
if you look at much of what's
been happening in our courts
over the years, with average
Americans out a pile of money
owing to outcomes that in
many instances are question-
able, to say the least.
But please, please, kind jus-
dices, just say no this time out,
telling the lawyers that they
will not be allowed to pursue
a class-action, self-enriching
bamboozlement in which
Walmart could be forced to
pay something like a million
and a half women' recompense
based on the claims of seven
people.
The case goes like this.
The seven women, who have
gotten the nod to proceed in
lower courts, say they were
not treated equally with men
in promotions and pay, and the
lawyers say the same is true of
every woman who has worked
for Walmart since 1998.
They would like to sue on
behalf of the whole crowd,
potentially getting payments
for one and all and a percent-
age of the haul for themselves,
on the ground that research
shows women don't fare as
well as men at the fabled retail
firm. They agree there was no
companywide rule dictating
anything nasty at the 3,400
outlets, but say loose controls
and a culture of male privilege
amount to the same thing.
Observers cite a number
of problems. Justice is only
justice when defendants can
answer specific accusations
with evidence of their own. In
this suit, many women who
faced no workplace impedi-
ments would be on the victims'
list. The store has stats refut-
ing the drift of plaintiff stats
and it has anti-discriminatory
policies, to boot.
What's more, it's said, if this
suit is allowed to go forward, it
will mean other big companies
in America can be similarly
sued via class action and
they all will be, leading to set-
tlements to avoid the possibil-
ity of runaway, wholly ruinous
jury verdicts. The billions from
Walmart would be just step
one down the golden road.
Walmart would be a good
place: to start because it is so
hated, or is it? By the left, yes,
but not by the 100 million who
shop in the outlets every week,
mostly folks of limited means
who thereby save what's been
es::mated ato1r0d bilo n
standard boon they appreciate
ev:n if it makes the hoity-toity
The nation's largest private
employer, the company also
hires 1.4 million people who
are often supplementing family
incomes and sometimes living
in situations in which extra
benefits come from spouses or
parents, according to one com-
mentary.

SJay Ambrose, formerly
Washington director of editorial
policy for Scripps Howard news-
papers and the editor of dailies in
El Paso, Texas, and Denver, is a
columnist living in Colorado.


Re cover fmnall star ts

to reach* j mre


LETTERS


COrr up tron in g over nment:


Or ganiz ed cr ime































































































NOTICE OF SPECIAL CALLED MEETING OF THE
LAKE CITY COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY TO

BE HELD ON MONDAY, APRIL 4, 2011 AT 6:1.5 PM, IN THE
COUNCIL CHAMBERS LOCATED ON THE SECOND FLOOR

OF CITY HALL AT 205 NORTH MARION AVENUE, LAKE

CITY, FLORIDA.


THE PURPOSE OF THE MEETING IS TO;
*Develop sustainable Farmers Market operation within the CRA District

In aCCOrdance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if any accommodations are needed for
persons with disabilities, please contact Joyce Bruner, Office of City Manager, 386-719-5768.

AUDREY E SIKES
Cit Clerk


Tucson shooting

victim remembered

with 9-11 statue


LAKE CITY REPORTED WORLD & STATE SUNDAY APRIL 3 2011


Page Editor: C.J. Risak. 754-0427


nme Caurnhia County Toaco Fr"
Health Department have come together
to form a partnership in order to create a
Fretobacco free community. This year, the
OCCO Fpartnership is focusing on polices that
F\0idO .CO effect our youth. We are wo king to.
wanis deeleoapi -0eotobacc fam

protect our youth.
All community members, service
workers, and school aged youth,..are in-
vited to attend.


SFLOR!D I DEPIRTMIENT OF
'~ HE L
11 E- -


MCistura, said the organiza-
tion had no plans to, evacu-
ate. It would, however,
temporarily redeploy 11
staff members from Mlaraz-
i-Sharif to Kabul
"This is not an evacuation,
it is a temporary redeploy-
ment because the office is
not functioning. We will be
ready to go back as soon as
we can establish an office
that is secure enough," he


same church where the
Rev. Te~rry Jones had threat-
ened to destroy a copy of
the holy book last year but
initially backed dowvn
On Saturday, thousands
of Afghans carrying long
sticks and holding copies
of the Quran over their
heads marched through
Kandahar, the largest city in
southern Afghanistan and
the cradle of the insurgen-
cy. The crackle of gunfire
could be heard throughout
the city, which was blanket-
ed by thick black smoke.
Security forces shot
in the air to disperse the
crowd, said Zalmai Ayubi, a
spokesman for the provin-
cial governor. It's unclear
how the protesters were
slain, he said.
The governor's office
in Kandahar province
issued a statement saying
that nine protesters were
killed and 81 others were
injured in the demonstra-
tion that turned into a riot
Seventeen people, includ-
ing seven armed men, have
been arrested, the state-
ment said.
The governor's office
claims demonstrators were


incited by extremists who
joined the group and set
property ablaze.
"The enemies of the
people and country also
burned down the furni-
ture and a bus at a ladies'
high school in K~andahar
and destroyed some other
properties," the governor's
office said.
Shops and restaurants
throughout the city were
shuttered and routes lead-
ing into the city were
blocked by security forces.
An Associatfed Press pho-
tographer estimated the
crowd at a few thousand
and said demonstrators had
smashed his camera and
roughed up other journal-
ists.
Karzai's office said the
president spoke on the tele-
phone Saturday morning
with U.N. Secretary-General
Ban Ki-moon. Karzai asked
the secretary-general to
extend his condolences
to the families of the U.N.
workers slain Friday.
He also called on the U.N.
to help promote religious tol-
erance throughout the world
to ease friction between peo-
ple of different faiths. Karzai


By AMIR SHAH
Associated Press

KABUL, Afghanistan
- Anger over the burning
of the Muslim holy book at
a Florida church fueled a
second day of deadly vio-
lence half a world away in
Afghanistan, where demon-
strators se~t cars and shops
ablaze SatgCrday in a riot
that killed nine protesters,


officials said. told reporters.
The church's desecration In an unrelated attack
of the Quran nearly two that nonetheless demon-
weeks ago has outraged strated the kind of violence
millions of Muslims and plaguing Afghanistan near-
others worldwide, fueling ly a decade after the U.S.
anti-American sentiment invaded to oust the Taliban
that is further straining ties and hunt al-Qaida, two sui-
between the Afghan gov- cide attackers disguised
ernment and the West. as women in blue burgas
The uproar even brought blew themselves up and a
violence to the normally third was gunned down at
peaceful northern city of a NATO base on the out-
Mazar-i-Sharif on Friday, skirts of Kabul, police said.
when a crowd of protest- The Quran was burned
ers apparently infiltrated March 20, but many
by insurgents stormed Afghans only found out
a U.N. compound in an about it when Afghan
outpouring that left four President Hamid Karzai
Afghan protesters and condemned the desecra-
seven foreign U.N. employ- tion four days later. The
ees dead. burning took place at the
The top U.N. envoy in Dove Outreach Center in
Afghanistan, Staffan de Gainesville, Florida, the


ASSOCIATED PRESS
A dead body, believed to be an attacker, lies on the ground
after an attack on a NATO base in Kabul, Afghanistan on
Saturday. Three insurgents attacked the NATO base on the
outskirts of Afghanistan's capital but were killed by coalition
forces before they could enter the compound, NATO and
Afghan police said.


said Afghan officials were
investigating the U.N. attack
and would bring the perpe-
trators to justice.
De Mistura said four
Nepalese guards were killed
protecting the U.N. staff and
did not fie their guns.
The other three victims
were identified by officials
in their home countries as:
Joakim Dungel, a 33-year-old
Swede; LL. Col. Siri Skare, a
53-year-old female pilot from
Norway; and Filaret Motco,
a 43-year-old Romanian who
worked in the political sec-
tion of the U.N.
The U.N. envoy said the
Russian mission chief, who
spoke Dari, was beaten but
let go after he told the attack-
ers he was Muslim.
According to de Mistura,
a group of seven to 15 insur-
gents had infitrated the
protest, which numbered
around 3,000 people, and
said some have been arrest-
ed.
"I am profoundly sad and
I am also shocked by what I
saw, but we do continue our
work, we are not going to be
deterred," De Mistura said,
describing the Quran burn-
ing as "an insane gesture."
In Florida, Wayne Sapp, a
pastor at the church, called
the events "tragic," but said
he did not regret the actions
Of 111S church.
"I in no way feel like our
church is responsible for
what happened," Sapp said
in a telephone interview on


Friday. Afghan authorities
suspect insurgents melded
into the mob outside the
U.N. compound and they
announced the arrest of
more than 20 people, includ-
ing a militant they suspect
was the ringleader of the
assault. The suspect was an
insurgent from Kapisa prov-
ince, a hotbed of militancy
about 250 miles (400 kilome-
ters) southeast of the city,
said Rawof Taj, deputy pro-
vincial police chief.
Taliban spokesman
Zabiullah Mujahid sent a text
message to Tlhe Associated
Press on Saturday denying
that the insurgency was
responsible for killing the
U.N. workers.
Demonstrators have
alleged that the four protest-
ers were killed by Afghan
security forces.
Interior Ministry spokes-
man Zemeri Bashary
gave reporters details of
Saturday's attack on NATO's
Camp Phoenix.
He said three armed insur-
gents wearing suicide bomb
vests arrived at a main gate
at the base around 6:45 a~m.
Two of the attackers opened
fire and then detonated their
vests of explosives, Bashary
said. The third opened fie
and was killed by NATO
forces. The body of a fourth
person, an Afghan man at
the scene, has not been iden-
tified. Three NATO service
members were injured, the
coalition said.


n -I- -~ BlslB~g uy~p~g~~:;- -=IyweL~ fP~::; WP. ':; J- : as -t;.-*~iPg~~ ' :I
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Afghan protesters walk with sticks, as they carry a wounded colleague during a demonstration to condemn the burning of a
copy of the Muslim holy book by a Florida pastor, in Kandahar, southern Afghanistan, on Saturday. The governor's office in
Kandahar has raised the death toll to nine in a Quran burning protest that turned violent.


By AMANDA LEE MYERS
Associated Press

ORO VALLEY, Ariz. -
The silver angel lies just
beyond the outfield fence,
overlooking the field where
Christina-Taylor Green
once scooped up ground-
ers.
The 9-foot, 11-inch-tall
statue was unveiled Friday
evening before the Canyon
del Oro Little League sea-
son opener Friday evening
in honor of the youngest
victim of the Tucson shoot-


e f ter a d brr ve


the glistening figure.
"It's going to serve as a
daily reminder to us that we
,had the privilege of know-
ing Christina," said John
Ward, who coached her for
two years
The angel's hand extends
out, its robes appearing
to blow in the wind a
symbol of peace after the
Jan. 8 shooting that killed
five others and wounded
13, including Rep. Gabrielle
Giffords.
The statue's he ght holds
added significance because
the numbers 9 and 11 are
prominent in Christina-
Taylor's life. She was born
on Sept. 11, 2001 the


day of the terrorist attacks
- aiid was featured in a
book about other children
born that day:
Besides a 5 V2-foot long
fragment of an I-beam from
ground zero, the Freedom's
Steadfast Angel of Love
also incorporates a 3 V2-fO~t-
long piece of steel from the
Pentagon and a large rock
from the Flight 93 crash
site, sculptor Lei Hennessy
Owen said.
"It's beautiful," said
shooting victim Susan
Hileman, 59, who was hold-




market. Hileman had taken
her to the event because
the little girl said she was
interested in politics.
Hileman and other sur-
vivors also were planning
to attend the ceremony
at James D. Kriegh Park,
where Christina-Taylor
donned a forest green and
bright yellow baseball uni-
form to play for the Pirates.
On Friday, her father, John
Green, spoke of how being
born on 9/11 shaped who
his daughter was, sayin
she was touched that on
her birthday, the country
waives its flags highest
and remembers those who
were lost.


Event: Columbia County Tobacco Free Partnership
Meeting
When: Wednesday, April 6, 2011
Where: Central School Board Office Room 153
409 SW St. Johns ST.
Lake City, FL 32055
Time: 3:30-4:30pm


All partnership meetings are open to the public.
For more information on how to become involved
in you local Tobacco Free Partnership, please
cotact:
Kyle Roberts
Columbia County Health Department
386-754-7083 or Kyle_Roberts~doh~state.fl.us.


Quran burning at Florida


church brings a 2nd day of


violent protests in Afghanistan


























































































































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LAKE C;T / REPORTER LOCAL SUDAY APRli 3 200 r


Page Editor: C.J. Risak. 754-0427

MTo submit your Community
Calendar item. contact Antonia
Robinson at 754-0425 or by
e-mail at arobinson @
lake cityr reporter. com.


(I


COURTESY PHOTo

Catholic Charities gets Families Up Front Award

Members of the Catholic Charities Lake City Regional Office accept the Families Up Front
Award. Pictured are Ester Tibbs (from left), Catholic Charities COO Suzanne Edwards, Lynda
Wood, Lindsay Patton, Sherry Hardin, Margot Abernathy and Jesenia Soto.


6 2tin~aloN5[omataon call


Toxic Waste Roundup
The Columbia County
Toxic Waste Roundup is
9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday
at the Columbia County
Fairgrounds. Safely dis
pose of household hazard-
ous wastes such as old
paint, used oil, pesticides,
insecticides and more.
Free for residents and
a sunl-l charge for busi-
nesses. Call Bill Lycan at
386-752-6050.

Bowling fundraiser
The 4 Pets Sake bowl-
ing fundraiser is 1:30 p.m.
Saturday at Lake City
Bowl. Registration is 1
p.m. Prizes are for men
and women; there will be
a door p ze and a 50-50.
The cost is $10 per person
for two series. Call 386-
935-0975 or e-mail fourfeis-
sakel~windstream.nIet.

East Bun Ar ival &

Belk Kids Fest

The Easter Bun y
arrives at 11 a.m. Sturdy
at Lake City Mall. The
bunny will have free gifts
for the children. Belk will
be holding a kids festival
throughout the mall. Free
face painting, duck pond
balloons, refreshments
and numerous other activi-
ties for children.


Class get together
The Class of 1959 is hav-
ing its annual get together
5 p.m. Saturday at Camp
Weed. The cost is $15 per
person which includes a
buffet meal. Pay at the
door. RSVP to Barbara
Ann Carpenter, Annette
Purvis or Tony Keaton-


Sunday A ril 10
'Weird Floridla' author
to seak

Charlie Carlson, author
of "W~eird Florida," is
speaking at the Columbia
County Library Main
Branch 2 p.m. April 10.
The event is a kick-off for
National Library Week and
sponsored by the Friends
of the Library Carlson is
best known for his book,
"Weird Florida," and his
PBS television program
of the same name. Come
hear him talk about some
of Florida's most off-beat
tourist attractions.


Monday, April 11

SPhotography workshops
Workshops in Beginning
Digital Photography are


nda~. 2:30 pm. Aril
Photography are 2 4:30
p.m. at Stephen F~oster
Folk Culture Center State
Park Craft Square, White
Springs. A hands-on out-
door photography session
is planned. Participants
should bring their own
camera, film or digital.
The cost of the workshop
is $25 and includes park
admission. Call the park
Gift Shop at (386) 397-1920
or visit www stephenfoster-
CSO. org.

Photoshop Workshop
Photoshop workshops
are 6:30 8:30 p.m. Apn1
12 at Stephen Foster
Folk Culture Center State
Park Craft Square, White,
Springs. A laptop computer
with Photoshop Creative
Suite, Photoshop Elements
or some editing software
is recommended, but not
required. The software
demonstrated in class will
be Photoshop Elements.
The cost of the workshop
is $25 and includes park
admission. Call the park
Gift Shop at (386) 397-1920
or visit www.stephenfoster-
CSO. org.


Pioneer Days
The 35th annual Pioneer
Days is 10 a~m. 4 p.m.
today in downtown High
Springs. It will feature
musical entertainment,
expanded kids korral with
pony rides, handmade arts
and crafts vendors, heri-
tage village with demon-
strations of old time skills
and a shoot out at noon
and 2 p.m. each day. Call
386-454-3120.


Monday

Uinen and Gift Sale
'lle Auxiliary is hav-
ing a one day Linen and
Gift Sale. There will
be 30 to 70 percent off
regular retail store prices
on home linens. Also'
books and items for men,
women and kids, includ-
ing Melissa and Doug
toys, will be discounted.
Selections are huge, from
h a.m ni 43 epCm -at
Regional Medical Center
Conference room.


F istei challeeninnge
Christian Service Center
is participating in the $1
million dollar giveaway
Alan Feinstein Challenge
from now until April
30. Every food item or
financial donation counts
toward receiving a per-
centage of the giveaway.
Call 386-755-1770 and
bring donations either to
the center at the corner
of Hilton and Washington
or mail to P.O. Box 2285
Lake City, FL, 32056 '


Tuesday

Annual Meeting
The United Way of
Suwannee Valley Annual
Meeting and Awards
Banquet is 6 7:30 .
p.m. Tuesday at Flonida
Gateway College Howard
Conference Center. The
cost is $25 per person.
RSVP.


Wednesday.
.Newcomers and
Friends Luncheon
.The Apnil Fniendship
; uncheon of the lake -
C iity Newcomers and
: Friends is 11:30 a.m.
WSednesday at Brooklyn




Glen R. Doan
Glen R. Doan, 74, of Lake City
Florida, passed into god's care
on March 30, 2011. He was born
in Montezuma, IN, on March 1,
1937. His sons Dirk Alan Doan
(23) and Lenny Duane Doan (37)
Preceded his death. He is survived
by his wife; Gloria Ann Doan;
brother; Robert Doan; daugh-
ters; Ann Lucille Kollasch and
Jacquelyn Gloria Soto; son Glenn
Keith Doan; grandchildren; Ben,.
Dustin, Cassandra, Isaac, Han-
nah and Noah Doan and Antino
Soto. Glen Ray was a graduate
of Montezuma High School, IN.
He was a member of the Athens
Baptist Church in Lake City, FL.
He was a good husband, father
and person who will be greatly
missed. In Lieu of memorial
services, we ask that any dona-
tions be sent to curepsp.org

JearrywEdward "Bo Jack"

Jerry Edward "Bo Jack" Car-


15th. 1936. in Ozark. Alabama,
the son of late Louise and Julian
SCarswell. He was the youngest
of three siblings. He graduated
from Clay County High School


and attended South Georgia
College. He moved to Lake
City from Green Cove Springs
als 191. berwas co-ownerg o
53 years. He enjoyed camping
and spending time with family
and friends. He was a member of
New Life Christian Fellowship
and served as an elder for many
years. He is survived by his wife
of 54 years. Patnicia Owens Car-


Boys located at 4196 W
US Hwy. 90). All members,
guests and friends are
welcome. For more infor-
mation call 386438-8100 or
386-754-7227.


Thursday

Free Medicaid iworkcshop
A free Medicaid work-
shop is 10 a.m. Thursday
at the Lifestyle Enrichment
Center, 628 S.E. Allison
Court. The workshop on
Medicaid planning is led
by Teresa Byrd Morgan
of Morgan inw center for
Estate & Legacy Planning.
It will discuss the myths
and opportunities avail-
able. Call Shana Miller at
386755-1977.


Friday, April 8
Tribute to Journey
The Ultimate Tribute to
Journey is 7 p.m. Friday at
Florida Gateway College.
Tickets are $10. Proceeds
to b nefitSTk So k. all

386-754-4340.


Saturday

Alligator Lake Spring
Festival

An early bird walk
kicks-off the Second .
annual Alligator Lake
Spring Festival 8 to 10
a.m. Saturday at Alligator
Lake Park. Thie festi-
val.is 10 a.nl. to 4 p.m.
and sponsored by Four
Rivers Audubon and '
Gateway Wildlife Habitat
Organization. The festi-
val is free but people are
asked to RSVP for the bird
walk to Jacqui Sulek at
isulek~audubon. org or call
(386) 497-4185. Alligator
Lake Park is located at 420
SE Allig;~tor Glen.

Pa nt- ut artists wnted

The Art League Of
North Florida is spon-
soring a paint-out at 9
a.m.-noon Saturday at
the Alligator Lake Spring
Festival There is a $5 fee
to enter the judged con-
test for four cash prizes
to be presented at 12:30
p.m. Work must be pro-
duced during the contest
hours in order to be eli-
gible. There'will be art
for exhibit and for sale by
the exhibiting artists. A
contribution from the art
contest will go to support
the Audubon Society. For


OBITUARIES

swell; daughters, Terran (Billy)
Hale, Tona (Mike) Crews; son,
Ty (Pam) Carswell; grandchil-
dren, Lindsay Hale, Jordan Hale,
Stephanie (Rob) Price, Aaron
Cain, Sarah (Chris) Bullard, Amy
Cain, Koty (Kellina) Crews, Jo-
sey Crews, Tucker Crews, Haley
(David) Beckner, Seth Carswell;
great-grandchildren, Juliahna
and Olivia Price, Eden and Bella
Crews; brother, Alex (Joyce)
Carswell; sister, Jane Crawley.
Jerry was preceded in death by
his parents, an infant son, and
brother-in-law, James Crawley.


Services will be held at New
Life Christian Fellowship. Con-
tact Gateway Forest Lawn
Funeral Home for day and
time. In lieu of flowers, dona-
tions may be made to New Life
Christian Fellowship Missions
Fund at 422 South West Baya
Drive, Lake City, FL 32025.


Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752- 1293.


CO~~MMUNT . DA


April 13
Newcomers and Friends
Rgulyar Meeting
The regular monthly
meeting of th~e Lake City
Newcomers anld F~riends
is 11 a~m. April 13 at the
club house in East Side
Village. Directions are go
east on Baya Avenlue (10A)
until you come to East
Side Village, enter on Pearl
Terrace-go to end and turn
left on Willow drive, then
to Claudia way club house
on right. Luncheon cost is
sl0.'IThe program is the
annual Fashion Show featur-
ing clothes from Belks, J.C.
Penney, Bond Worth and
TJ1 MAXX. All members,
guests anld friends along
with any newcomers to the
area are welcome. Call 386-
7524552 or 38j-'755-4051.


Thursday, Apnil 14

DAR meeting
The next Edward


will focus on a selection of
Private Washington Ives'
Civil War letters/diary to be
read by dynamic sister duo
team Martha Newbern and
Mary Jane Weaver. Dewitt
Cason, Columbia County
Clerk of Court is a maternal
decedent of Private Ives.
The chapter will also elect
new officers for 2011-2013.
Guests are welcome to
attend.

Chamber speed
networking
Speed Networking is 5
to 7 p.m. at the Country
Club of Lake City. All
Chamber members are
invited. The YEP is spon-
soring the event. Call the
chamber at 752-3690.

Tea Party meeting
The North Central
Florida Tea Party meet-
ing is 7 p.m. April l4 at
the Taylor Building, 128
SW Birley Ave. The guest
speaker is Frantz Kebreau,
author of the book "Stolen
History. Visit www.north-
centralfiloridateaparty. org
or call John at 386-935-
1705 or Sharon~at 386-935-
. 0821.




























































































































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Page Editor: C J. Rlsak. 754-0427


T~~r-


By WALE sEsRRY and


PHOENIX--A"gunshot-
like sound" woke Bre~nda
Reese as her Southwest
Airlines flight cruised at
36,000, feet. Looking up, she
could se~e the sky through a
hole: torn in the cabin roof.
The Boeing 73:710st cabin
pressure after the hole
developed Friday, prompt-
ing frightened passengers
to grope for oxygen masks
as the plane made a terrify-
ing but controlled descent.
One passenger called it
"pandemonium." Another
watched as a flight atten-
dant and another passen-
ger passed out, apparently
for lack of oxygen, their
heads striking seats in front
of them. ,
Officials said Flight 812
lost pressure because of a
fuselage rupture. Federal
Aviation Administration
spokesman lan Gregor said
the pilot made a "controlled
descent from 36,000 feet to
11,000 feet altitude."
His safe emergency
landing at a military base
in Yuma, about 150 miles
southwest of Phoenix, drew
applause from relieved pas-
sengers,
No serious injuries were
reported among the 118 peo-
ple aboard although a flight
attendant was slightly hurt,
according to Southwest offi-
cials.'llie cause of the hole
was not immediately known.
The FBI called it a "mechani-
cal failure," not an act of ter-
ror or other foul play.
The plane is a 15-year-old
Boeing 737-300. Southwest
officials said they would pull
about 80 similar planes out
of service for inspections of
the fuselage, forcing the air-
line to plan to cancel roughly
300 flights Saturday.
Southwest operates about
170 of the 737-300s in its
fleet of about 540 planes, but
it replaced the aluminum
skin on many of the 300s in
recent years, spokeswoman
Linda Rutherford said. The
roughly 80 planes being
grounded have not had their
skin replaced, she said. .


any-body ever having one.
It turned a lot of heads.
and it was kind of fun
weirding out my friends
all these years. Everybody
dug it, but at the same
time they were kind of
creeped out to come into
my house."
He brought the chair
to a "Treasure Hunters
Roadshow"' in Sarasota a
couple' of months ago and
got an offer for it, but he
held off. The show came
to Tampa this past week-
end, and Clawson loaded
his chair into a truck and
brought it up here to sell.
He got a good amount
of cash for it, though he
declined to say how much,
he said, and much of it
will go to catch up on his
mortgage payments.
"Treasure Hunters
Roadshow" antique
experts say the electric
chair, circa 1896, is genu-
ine, though exactly where
it came from or who may
have breathed their last
breaths in it, remains a
mystery.
The first execution by
electricity was in 1890 in
New York State. The chair
purchased by the road
show wasn't that one and
it's not one from Florida.
It could be among the first
generation of chairs built
for executions, perhaps in
Ohio, said David Morgan,
advertising director
with Treasure Hunters
Roadshow.
"W1e did buy it," he said
on Monday morning.
Morgan said he's not
sure what will happen
to the chair. It likely will
be bought by 'a collector.
Probably, it won't end up
in a family room in front of
a television, though. "It's
not made for comfort," he
said.


By KEITH MORELUi
-rE Tampa 7n~bune

TAML~PA The cen-
tury-old oak chair that
Eddlie C~lawson bought a
decade ago had an eerie
feel to it. He took it to his
home in Sarasota. where
his friends initially were
impressed but eventually
got uneasy around it
It wasn't comfortable.
There was no cushy uphol-
stery, no footrest,
Back in the chair's hey-
day, people who sat in it
tended not to get up.
It was the economy
that forced Clawson,
46, Sarasota, to sell his
antique electric chair. His
swimming pool construc-
tion business was slowed
by the economy and he
was having trouble mak-
ing mortgage payments.
So the chair had to go.
"I didn't think I would
want to be living in the
woods," he said, "sitting in
my electric chair."
He sold the chair this
past weekend to televi-
sion's "Treasure Hunters
Roadshow," which held an
event in Tampa. The show
buys collectibles and
antiques from people who
bring stuff to the shows.
Clawson said he got
the electric chair from a
buddy in North Florida
who's into the "antiques-
swapping-getting-all-the-
cool-stuff business up
there." His buddy was
inspecting a shed filled
with other antiques when
he spotted the chair and
made an offer.
"He doesn't hold on to
stuff," Clawson said of his
buddy, "so the first thing
he does is call me and I
headed up there.
"It's just kind of rare," he
said. "I've never heard of


ASSOCIATED PRESs
In this photo provided by passenger Brenda Reese, unidentified passengers take photos with
cell phones of an~ apparent hole in the cabin on a Southwest Airlines aircraft Friday in Yuma,
Ariz. Authorities say the flight from Phoenix to Sacramento, Calif., was diverted to Yuma
due to rapid decompression in the plane. FAA spokesman lan Gregor says the cause of the
decompression isn't immediately known. But passengers aboard the plane say there was a
hole in the cabin and that forced an emergency landing.


"Obviously we're dealing
with a skin issue, and we
believe that these 80 air-
planes are covered by a set
of (federal safety rules) that
make them candidates to
do this additional inspection
that Boeing is devising for
us," Rutherford said.
Southwest officials said
the Arizona plane had under-
gone all inspections required
by the FAA, but they did
not immediately provide the
date of the last inspection.
The 737-300 is the oldest
plane in Southwest's fleet,
and the company is retir-
ing 300s as it take deliver-
ies of new Boeing 737-700s
and, beginning next year,
737-800s. But the process of
replacing all the 300s could
take years.
Reese said the plane had
just left Phoenix Sky Harbor
International Airport for
Sacramento, Calif., when
the "gunshot-like sound"
woke her up. Oxygen masks
dropped as the plane dove.
Seated one row from the
rupture, Don Nelson said it
took about four noisy min-


rupture" led to the drop in
cabin pressure aboard the
plane.
A similar incident hap
opened in July 2009 when a
football-sized hole opened
up in flight in the fuselage
of another Southwest 737,
depressurizing the cabin.
Thle plane made an emer-
gency landing in Charleston,>
W.Pa. Itwas later determined
that the hole was caused by
metal fatigue.
Afterward, Southwest and
the FAA reached an agree-
ment specifying actions the
airline would take to prevent
another episode, said John
Goglia, a former National
Transportation Safety Board
member and an expert on
airline maintenance. The
details of that agreement are
considered proprietary and
haven't been made public,
he said.
The latest incident "cer-


utes for the plane to dip to
less than 10,000 feet. "Y'ou
could tell there was an oxy-
gen deficiency," he said.
"People were dropping,"
said Christine Ziegler, a
44-year-old project man-
ager from Sacramento
who watched as the crew
member and a passenger
nearby fainted. Nelson and
Ziegler spoke after a substi-
tute flight took them on to
Sacramento.
Reese described the hole
as "at the top of the plane,
right up above where you
store your luggage."
"1The panel's not complete-
ly off,"she told TheAssociated
Press. "It's like ripped down,
but you can see completely
outside... When you look up
through the panel, you can
see the sky."
Cellphone photographs
provided by Reese showed
a panel hanging open in a
section above the plane's
middle aisle, with a hole of
about six feet long.
The National
Transportation Safety Board
said an "in-flight fuselage


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Page Editor: C.J. Risak. 754-0427


8A LAKE CITYI REPORTER WORLD SC'C-"`-I f'.PL 3 200 1


By BEN HUBBARD and
R:Ao LUAS

BENGHAZI, Libya A
NATO airstrike intend.
ed to thwart MCoammar
Gadhafi's forces killed 13
rebel fighters in eastern
Libya instead, the opposi-
tion said Saturday, but they
described it as an "unfortu-
nate accident" and stre~ss-d
it did not diminish their
support for the internation-
al air campaign.
ITe rebels' response to
the attack blaming it
on a mistake within their
ranks highlighted their
thav dpendec amn th
as they face the superior
military power of the long
time Libyan leader. The
misfire also showed the
challenges the coalition
faces in identifying targets
without coordination with
forces on the ground.
"As regrettable as it may
be, we understand that we
might have to give up lives
for the greater good. We
have to look at the bigger
picture," opposition spokes-
man Mustafa Gheriani said.
"This is a war and the lines
are so fluid going back and
forth, so it's natural that
mistakes will happen."
The slain fighters were
hit Friday night as they
moved forward, attempting
to take back the oil city
of Brega, while airstrikes
were in progress. Seven
fighters were injured.
Another opposition spokes-
man, Abdel-Hafidh Ghoga,
said it was an example of
the lack of coordination in


B ~d


By EUGENE HOSHIKO and
JAY ALABASTER
-Asso;:ared Press

RIKE~ZEN TAKA.LTA.
Japan As Japan's prime
mnurster visited tsunami-
ravaged coastal areas for
the first time Saturday,
frustrated evacuees com-
plained that the govern-
ment has been too focused
on the nuclear crisis that
followed the massive
WaVe.
Nearly every day
Sso e new p oblemaat the

Ichi nuclear plant com-
mands officials' atten-
tion Saturday it was a
newly discovered crack in
a maintenance pit that is
leaking highly radioactive
water into the sea.
"~The government has
been too focused on the
Fukushima power plant
rather than the tsunami
victims. Both deserve
attention," said 35-year-
old Megumi Shimanuki,
who was visiting her fam-
ily at a community center
converted into a shelter in
hard-hit Natori, about 100
miles (160 kilometers)
from Rikuzentakata, where
Prime Minister Naoto Kan
stopped Saturday. More
than 165,000 people are
still living in shelters.
Kan's government has
been frantically working
with Tokyo Electric Power
Co. to solve the crisis at
the nuclear complex,
which has been~ spewing


-
0


ASSOCIATED PRESS
A Libyan rebel stands guard on the middle of the road at the front line near Brega, Libya,
Saturday. NATO said it was investigating Libyan rebel reports that a coalition warplane had
struck a rebel position near the eastern front line of the battle with Gadhafi's forces.


Associated Press
A Japanese woman reacts
beneath a car hanging
on a fence at the March
11 earthquake anid tsu-
nami-destroyed area in
Kesennuma, Miyagi prefec-
ture, Japan, Saturday.


radioactivity since cooling
systems were disabled by
the 9.0-magnitude earth-
quake that preceded the
tsunami on March 11.
On Saturday, nuclear
safety officials announced
that they had found water
with levels of radioactive
iodine far above the legal
limit leaking from an 8-
inch (20-centimeter) crack
in the maintenance pit into
the Pacific Ocean.
They said the crack was
likely caused by the quake
and may be the source of
radioactive iodine that start-
ed showing up in the ocean
more than a week ago.


Idris Kadiki, a 38-year-old
mechanical engineer, said
he had seen an ambulance
and three cars burning after
an airstrike.
Rebels told TheAssociated
Press that the fighters were
hit about 12 miles (20 kilo-
meters) east of Brega,
which has gone back and
forth between rebel and
government hands in
recent weeks.
NATO, which on
Thursday took over what
had been a U.S.-led mili-
tary campaign to stop
Gadhaf from attacking his
own people, also is inves-
tigating whether other air-
strikes have killed civilians
in western Libya, as the
Libyan government claims.
The United States, mean-
while, was ending its role in
combat missions Saturday,
leaving that work for other
nations.


the ranks that has proven a
key obstacle to victory over
the more organized Libyan
military.
Rebels without training
- sometimes even without
weapons have rushed
in and out of fighting in a
free-for-all for more than
six weeks, repeatedly get-
ting trounced by Gadhafi's
more heavily armed forces.
But ex-military officers who
have joined the rebel side
have stepped up training
efforts and taken a greater
role in the fight.
"LTlhis unfortunate acci-
dent was a mistake that
was caused by the rebels'
advance during the coali-
tion's attack," Ghoga said.
"Now the military leader-
ship that has been orga-
nized more effectively
recently is working on pre-
venting the recurrence of
these accidents."


Rebels in the field had
-previously said some of
their comrades were killed
by an airstrike Friday but
Ghoga's comments provid-
ed the fist confirmation.
NATO spokeswoman
Oana Lungescu said the
alliance was investigating
the reports, and appeared
to suggest that its aircraft
on patrol had encountered
ground fire and retaliated.
'"The exact details are
hard to verify because we
have no reliable source
on the ground," Lungescu
said. "Clearly, if someone
fires at one of our aircraft
they have the right to
defend themselves."
Mohammad Bedrise, a
doctor in a nearby hospital,
said three burned bodies
had been brought in by men
who said they had been hit
after fiing a heavy machine
gun in the air in celebration.


Ireland police force. Building Catholic sup-
port for the previously Protestant-domi-
nated police force is a central goal of
Northern Ireland's peace process.
But reflecting the exceptional political
solidarity in Northern Ireland today, lead-
ers from both the British Protestant and
Irish Catholic sides of the community con-
demned the bombers and vowed to bring
them to justice.
In Dublin, newly elected Irish Prime
Minister Enda Kenny called the killing "a
heinous and pointless act of terror.
"Those who carried it out want to drag
us back to the misery and pain of the past.
They are acting in defiance of the Irish
people. They must know that they can
never succeed in defeating the democratic
will of the people," Kenny said.
Neighbors of the victim' said he had
just entered his car when it exploded.
The car was turned into a blazing wreck.


By SHAWN POGATCHNIK
Associated Press -

DUBLIN A 25-year-old Catholic
policeman who had just joined Northern
Ireland's police force was killed Saturday
when a booby-trap bomb exploded as he
got into his car in the town of Omaiph,
police and neighbors said.
No group claimed responsibility. But
police and politicians universallyr blamed
Irish Republican Army dissidents who have
repeatedly planted bombs underneath the
private cars of off-duty police officers. .
Until Saturday, such booby-trap attacks
had badly maimed two other officers but
killed nobody. It was the first lethal attack
on Northern Ireland security forces in
more than two years.
In previous statements, the dissidents
have stressed their determination to target
any Irish Catholics who join the Northern


The trainingwi'll take place at:


12'760 Roberts Street US HWVY 41.


Ailrrainng~ materials wil~lbe

~;rnjitmithed to panlricans









"n I:. ( ,:l To ~.: .., . and you
ministry teams to:


ir congregation's members and/or health


1.) Understand community health issues, principles of whole person health, and
health behavior change;

2.) Identify community resources for use in the congregation;

3.) Implement successful congregational surveys;

4.) Plan and implement successful health awareness and lifestyle programs within
the congregation.

The training will be conducted by with South Georgia Medical.
3eff has been an RN for over 25 years serving in Emergency Care, Critical Care and
Hospice. 3eff is a volunteer chaplain at south Georgia Medical Center, associate
chaplain at Hospice of South Georgia and currently serves as Coordinator of Faith
Community Health Initiatives for Hospice of South Georgia, an affiliate of South
Georgia Medical Center in Valdosta. This training is being sponsored by Hamilton
and Columbia County Health Departments.


TI,.~~~ gSl ~ r~7~-t~


I
J -
~-- MUSTe
--..-


Rebels: Air strike killed 13 of theirs Gov't focus on


nuke crisis angers

tSHHaml VICt1ms


has been scheduled for Friday April 15trh froml 9ai~m4p
and you are invited.


-- ~ 8


,S~c. I






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Page Editor: C.J. Risak. 754-0427


N ATIONAL FORECAST: '. 3Zierfuli Storm system taking shape o\;er the Plains will produce
.~-( za .-- :-c-: r;s am the Southiwest into the M~iawest today. Strong to severe
-nr-- n* f,c: aead of :nis 3syse~m :ate in th~e dal. Expect rain. snow and a few
s ;..E" rr e RD:es and Northern P ains. High pressure will bring quiet condi-


I ~- -- -- -C-- I -I -Y


llC--1111 1- I C1 -I -p-----~ ----L~


~r~~4~~11ii~n I I I I I


SSUNNY PARTLY CHC OF MO STLYj MOSTLY
CLOUDY -.STORIMS SUNNY SUNNY


~T~Trl~n~~~c I


llr~7~1~31


I I Wp :
-


I


5L13' ="' -_3. 2011


5ZU ,dil~
Y*6
~-~Fsa.. 30s

-JC;t~ InlClndllClr~l
M ~Lst' M1 r'-4Ba---.
~t5r4h 'L '~Ct~LP
Y1YSb~SOs 605
~. Ln ,, q/g


I oi




warm Front



Front

Fot


lackonfleap Canaveral
*etr 79/60 Daytona Beach
Ft. Lauderdale
inSii a Dayrtona B&edd Fort Myers
14/59 76 Gainesville
Ocdala lackssonville
85/60 *Key West
Orlando Cape CanaveralLkeC
84/62 77/64
Miami
EimaaNaples
84/65 West Pain Beads ocala
83/70 Orlando
t 1.alklerdale Panama City
Ft.Myers 84/72 Pensacola
86/63 Naples a Tallahassee
88/67 Miamj Tampa
85/71 Valdosta
*~!wet W. Palm Beach


Tallahssee *
bbarc LdE


76/66


jcT :





;5 3 :

;3 68 :


so, 5-1,
80/57/i
64 49 pc




85/67/ti~


NMonaa





BE 5



al 7'o


89 66 Go


83 60 pi:
86 69 pc
87 65 pc
83 75 pc


80/68


Hig: 95", Junction, Teaes hor:170, Alamosa, Colo


37/48


Saturday Today
CITY HI/Lo/Pcp. HI/Lo/W
Albany NY 50/37/0 52/35/s
Albuquerque 76/47/0 77/38/pc
Anchorage 34/26/0 45/27/c
Atlanta 68/43/0 74/57/s
Baltimore 51/32/.04 58/43/pc
Billings 70/37/0 39/24/sa
Birmingham 72/44/0 83/61/pc
Bismarck 46/30/0 40/25/rs
Bolse 59/41/.05 49/31/pc
Boston 53/38/0 51/37/s
Buffalo 42/28/0 48/41/c
Charleston SC 72/47/0 74/58/s
Charleston WV 48/41/0 69/56/pc
charlotte 66/35/0 71/49/s
Cheyenne 72/34/0 47/22/sh
Chicago 49/36/0 63/50/t
Cincinnati 54/36/.01 68/57/pc
Cleveland 48/34/0 50/46/sh
Columbia SC 71/41/0 74/53/s
Dallas 83/55/0 88/63/pc
Daytona Beach 79/55/0 79/62/s
Denver 79/40/0 59/25/t


Saturday Today


Saturday Today


HI/Lo/W
69/43/pc
44 43 sh
87/57/pc
41/17/pc
69/49/pe
53/37/s
86/69/s
83/71/pc
68/58/pc
85/67/pc
79/60/s
85/50/t
79/54/pc
82/65/pc
63/53/c
83/67~/pc
85/71/pc
54/37/sh
80/68/pc
81/70/pc
56/43/s
88/50/pc


HI/Lo/Pcp.
62/32/0
81 55 0
51/35/0
91 67 0
47/33/.09
46j34 0
48/42/.11
64/37/0
58/34/0
S68/56/0
59/36/0
66/56/0
66/38/0
69/51/0
76/63/0
67/61/0
59/53/0
46/40/.15
45/37/.11
80/60/0
91/63/0
52/36/.04


HI/Lo/W
67/40/pe
84 62 s
58/46/s
85 58/pc
49/48/'sh
45 30/pc
53/41/c
69 48 pc
45/24/as
56/34/pc
63/46/pc
69/46;s
80/56/pc
42/31;sn
87/72/pc
63/54/c
65/49/s
52/43/c
48/35/pc
84/65/s
86/52/pc
59/47/lpc


CITY
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Fairbanks
Greensboro
Hartford
Honolulu
Houston
Indianapol~s
Jackson MS
Jacksonville
Kansas City
Las Vegas
Uittle Rock
Los Angeles
Memphis
Miami
Minneapolls
Moble
New Orleans
New York
Oklahoma City


HI/Lo/Pcp.
62/35/0
49/31'0
87/54/0
18/0/0
62/38/0
53/34/0
79/71/0
82/66/0
55/36/0
76/52/0
76/50/0
68/36/0
84/71/0
74/44/0
65/60/0
72/42/0
84/69/0
50/31/0
82/57/0
80/61/0
54/38/0
81/49/0


CITY
Omaha
Orlando
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland ME
Portland OR
Raleigh
Rapid City
Reno
Richmond
Sacramento
St. Louis
Salt Lake City
San Antonio
San Diego
San Francisco
Seattle
Spokane
Tampa
Tucson
Washington


An eXdluS V6


brought to
Our readers
by
The W~eather





weather.com


TEMPERATURES
High Saturday
Low Saturday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Saturday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise tom.
Sunset tom.


80
S51
78
52
91 in 1974
32 in 1919


00
0.00'
10.31"
0.24"
11.40'


7:18 a.m.
7:50 p.m.
7:17 a.m.
7:51 p.m.


MOON
Moonrise today 6:59 a.m.
Moonset today 8:09 p.m.
Moonfise tom. 7:31 a.m.
Moonset tom. 9:04 p.m.



April April April April
3 11 17 24
New First Full Last


SF rcsts, data and
gaphcs @ 2011 Weather
SCentral, LPMadisonWis.
www.weatherpublisher.com


Saturday
HI/Lo/Pop.
86/66/0
73/50/0
58/51/0
70/54/0
57/37/0
68/54/0
81/59/0
75/64/0
72/41/0
91/70/0
37/32/0
79/66/0
82/75/0


Today
HI/Lo/W CITY '
88/70/pc La Paz
54/39/sh 1.Jma,
61/50/sh London
70/65/s MadrId
65/40/s Mexico City
73/46/pc Montreal
79/53/t Moscow
78/64/s Nafrobi
70/45/pc Nassau
84/64/t New Delhi
39/34/r Oslo
73/66/pc Panama
83/75/t' Paris


Saturday
HI/Lo/Pcp.
57/37/0
73/64/0
63/54/0
70/48/0
79/55/0
52/32/.04
41/32/.03
79/61/0
86/75/0
91/72/0
41/34/.03
90/77/.55
75/45/0


Today
HI/Lo/W
57/40/sh
75/63/pc
61/45/sh
64/48/sh
80/51/pc
45/28/sf
50/28/c
82/62/pc
85/72/pc
90/62/s
48/28/c
94/75/t
59/45/r


Saturday
HI/Lo/Pcp.
88/75/0
73/46/0
83/75/0
85/76/0
84/48/0
55/36/0
90/73/.03
70/63/0
77/63/0
61/50/0
54/32/0
66/46/0
59/41/0


Today
85/74/t
70/57/1
82/75/s
86/73/s
81/51/s
57/38/s
89/77/t
74/61/s
74/58/s'
54/44/sh
52/34/s
70/54/s
64/41/s


CITY
Acapulco
Amsterdam
Athens
Auckland
Being
Berlin ,
Buenos Aires
Calro
Geneva
Havana
HelsinkI .
Hong Kong
Kingston


CITY
Rio
Rome
St. Thomas VI
San Juan PR
Santiago
Seoul
Singapore
Sydney
Tel Ayviv
Tokyo
Toronto
Vienna
Warsaw


On this date in
1990, rain and
snow prevailed in
the northeastern
U.S. Boston, Mass.
was soaked with
2.91 inches of rain.
Up to half a foot
of snow blanketed
the hills of Steuben
County, N.Y. that
Tuesday night.


KEY TO CONDm0INS: c-cloudy, dr-drizzle, f-fair, fg-fog, h-hazy, i-ice, pc-partly cloudy, r-rain, s-sunny,
sh--showers, sn-snow, ts=thunderstorms, w-windy.


iiC


`j


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10A -'*'E, = ;= =-= WEATHER


YESTERIMY'S NYATONAl. EREMUES


15Endrestolarn
Today s
ultra-violet
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+.
rm :
8, I


FAST


ca r.


FASTER a pprova l.




















I_ _


MIack leads Butler back

to nto a tl gm


Story ideas?

Contact
Tim K~irby
Sports Editor
754-0421


Section B


www.Ilakecityreporter.com


SundayApril 3, 201 I


Conunec~ticut holdS
On to reach final in
nailbiter over Cats.

By EDDIE PEU.S
Associated Press

HOUSTTON -- Kemba Walker
scored 18 points Saturday night to
help Connecticut keep its remark-
able postseason run going wiith a
56-55 victory over Kentucky that
placed the Huskies one win away
from their third, and most improb-
able, NCAA title.
UConn won despite not making
a field goal over the final 2:29.
Trailing by two with the clock
ticking down, DeAndre Liggins
had a chance to win it for Kentucky,
but his 3-pointer came up short
-- the end of a 34-percent shoot-


ing night for the fourth-seeded
" I reral ) had seven assists,
as UConn (31-9) won its 10th game
in a row -- a string that began with
a five-win-in-five-night leg-dramner
at the Big East tournament and
now includes five straight in the
tournament that really matters.
The Huskies haven't lost since
they fell to Notre Dame on Feb. 5
and finish their Big East regular
season at 9-9.
They locked up this game
with good defense and a remark-
able cold spell by fourth-seeded
Kentucky (29-9), which went 5:39
down the stretch without a point.
That turned a 48-48 tie into a 54-
48 UConn lead and the HuskieS
barely hung on.
Brandon Knight led Kentucky
with 17 points.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Kentucky's Brandon Knight tries to control the ball as Connecticut's K~emba
Walker defends during the first half of a men's NCAA Final Four semifinal
college basketball game Saturday in Houston,


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Photos by BRANDON FINLEYI
Lake City Reporter -

ABOVE: Columbia House
head football coach Brian
Allen looks through the
playbook in his office at
the Jones Field House on
Saturday.

LEFT: Allen goes through
a play during a meeting
Saturday at Jones Field
House.


Bulldogs defeat
VCU, 70-62, in
Final 4 Saturday.

By NANCY ARMOUR
Associated Press

HOUSTON M~iaybe
this time that final, riveting
shot will go in.
Maybe this time Butler
won't need it.
The Bulldogs are back in
the national title game, not
as lovable underdogs but as
a team intent on making up
for last year's heartbreak.
"We've just got to be one
shot better than last year."
coach Brad Stevens said


As the players walked
down the hall to the lock-
er room, one shouted
out: "We're not done yet!
Unfinished business,
baby!"
"Izst year we didn't get it
done, so that's in the back
of my mind," said Mack,
who earlier this week said
national runners-up was just
another way of saying "first
losers." "My teammates did
a great job of getting me
the ball in position to have
success."
Hahn scored all eight
points of his points during
a 90-second span in the sec
BUTLER continued on 2B


after Butler's 70-62 victory
over VCU on Saturday night
that put the Bulldogs back
in the national title game
and ended the warm-and-
fuzzy story of this year's
tournament.
Shelvin Mack scored 24
points, Zach Hahn came
up big off the bench and
the Bulldogs shut VCU
down wiith their trademark
unforgiving defense. The
eighth-seeded Bulldogs
(28-9) wiill face the winner
of Kentucky-Connecticut on
MLonday night, the first time
since K~entucky in 1998 that
the runner-up has returned
to play for the champion.
ship.


B 'L 'A.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Butler's Matt Howard is defended by Virginia
Commonwealth's Jamie Skeen (21) and Joey Rodriguez (12)
during the second half of a men's NCAA Final Four
basketball game Saturday in Houston.


Lakie City Reporter


SPORTS


UConn beats Kentucky,

56-55, in Final Four


BRIEFS

YOUTH BASEBAU.
Lake City 13-15
registration set
Lake City Babe Ruth
Baseball has registration
for ages 13-15 at 7 p.m.
Monday at Southside
Sports Complex.
For details, call Tad
Cervantes at 3654810.


Coaches meeting
planned gril 7
Lake City Recreation
Department has a T-bal
coaches meeting set for
6:30 p.m. April 7 at the
Girls Club Center. A few
team spots remain and
registration will continue
through Friday.
For details, call
Heyward Christie at
754-3607.


Inroto Zumba
class offered
Imke City Recreation
Department is offering
an Introduction to Zmba

Teen Town Recreation
Center. A regular Zumba
class will follow at
10 a.m. Cost is $5 for
either or both classes.
For details, call
754-3607.

Wi From staff reports


G A ME

Monday
MColumbia High
softball vs. Ridgeview
High, 6 p.m.
Tuesday
SColumbia High
baseball at Wolfson High,

6:r White High JV
softball vs. Columbia
High, 6:30 p.m.
SFort White High
baseball at Branford
High, 7 p.m. (JV-7 vs.
Suwannee High)
Wednesday, April 6
SColumbia High
tennis in District 4-3A
tournament at Jonesville
Tennis Center, TBA
a Fort White High
weightlifting strongman
contest, 3:45 p.m.
SColumbia High
weightlifting vs.
Suwannee High, Union
Co ntF HighW 4p.em.Hgh

softball at Williston High,
7 p.m. (JV-5)
Thursday, April 7
II Columbia High
tennis in District 4-3A
tournament at Jonesville
Tennis Center, TBA
atFort White Hig htrck
SColumbia High JV
baseball vs. Suwannee
Hih Colmbia High
softball at Bell High,
7 p.m. (JV-5)
Friday, April 8
a Columbia High
baseball vs. Fleming
Island High, 6 p.m.
a Fort White High
baseball at Williston High,
7 p.m. (JV-4:30)
M Columbia High
softball vs. Suwannee
High, 7 p.m. (JV-5)
a Fort White High
softball vs. Taylor County
High, 7 p.m. (JV-5)
Saturday, April 9
SColumbia High
baseball at Chiles High,
4 p.m.
W Fort White High
baseball at Melody


Christian Academy,
4 p.m. (JV-1)


hard


at WOrk


Alien


COlumbia coach
putting pieces of
staff to gether.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter. corn

High head
football coach
Brian Allen
N ~~has barely.ewCl m i
had time to breathe since
arriving in Lake City
three weeks ago. The
former Tiger, -Florida State
Seminole` and NFL player
is used to moving, but he's
ready to make Columbia a
permanent home.
Allen is. still making
trips back to Orlando as he
continues to move into his
new house. He's getting
things in order at his new
Jones Field H-ouse office.
And then, he's putting the
pieces together on his first
staff.
The new Tigers' coach
.believes its important to
keep as many of those
pieces together as possible.
In doing so, he's kept some
familiar names. DenniS
Dotson will remain with
the Tigers as defensive
coordinator. Andy Giddens,
*Doug Peeler and Vernon
Amerson will remain as

bac an faml.a nae
Ed Stolts, who coached
the offensive line for the
Tigers during the 2009
district championship
season. Stolts will serve
as Allen's offensive

ALLN continued on 2B





BUTLER: Dominates on boards

Continued From Page 1B


Answer to Previous Puzzle

DI P CIAIB STAGA
OlNIO SIIGAGLA LAD
DIILIEIMIMIAIS E VE
TIY LIER KIISIS
SlLYIR RIG
LIO Y IAIL BIOTHE R
E VIA SIPIAITT SES
TIAILC RUSSI~E K A
LIE AIFEID LASSOS
TAIP SAIX
OIMEIN PI ECIE
SIPUIR M IOIONLE SIS
OI SIE OBBOIE NAG
LIEIEIRI BIN TUIT


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAYu APRIIL 3 2011


Page Editor: Brandon Finley. 754-0420


Race week

NASCAR

Cood~ Fas Rdif SW
SI-e Marse e.W


T-ad Mart-Me Speedry (ca.
0526ce a yce 263 rr:es.50 acs 3l
NHRA FUU.THROTTLE
SummitRacing.com
NHRA Nationals
snr L~asv" Vgs
Schedule: Today fi-al ellmlnacons
(ESPN2.4:30-7 p.m.).
Track The Strip at Las Vegas Motor


NASCAR lineuP

Goody's Fast Pain Relief 500
At Martinsille Speedway

Lap I ngth:.26 miles
(Car number in parentheses)

1. (1) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet,
96.509.
62. (39) Ryan Newman. Chevrolet,
3. (4) Kasey Kahne.Toyota, 96.293.
4. (20) Joey Logana,Tayota,96.22.
5.( I ) Denny HamlinToyota, 95.995.
Bob (4)A~ledn For 9 .950 .
8. (00) David Reutimann, Toyota.
95.854.
9. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet'
95.825.
10. (78) Regan Smith, Chevrolet,
9s.791.
I I.(18) Kyle BuschToyota,95.786.
12. (5) Mark Martin, Chevrolet,
95.714.
13. (83) Brian Vickers,Toyota,95.694.

15 ( 3) lint Bowyr Cvrolet
95.65 I.
16. (27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet.
95.554.
17. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet,
9s.s4.
9547. (56) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota,
19. (9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 95.468.
20. (22) Kurt Busch, Dodge, 95.463.
21. (24) Jeff Cordon, Chevrolet,
95.429.
95.32 (2) Brad Keselowski, Dodge'
23. (99) carl Edwards, Ford, 95.275.
24. (17) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 95.256.
25. (21) Trevor Bayne, Ford, 95.256
9526. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet,
27. (42) Juan Pablo Montoya,Chevrolet,
95.118.
28. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet,
95.089.
s.274. (36) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet,
30. (13) Cas~ey Mears,Toyota, 95.003.
31. (38) Travis Kvapil, Ford, 94.955.
96372. (31) Jeff Burtan, Chevrole'
33.(16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 94.661.
34. (7) Robby Gordon, Dodge, 94.548.
35. (66) Michael McDowell, Toyota.
94.472.
36. (34) David Gillitand, Ford, 94.369.
37. (87) Joe Nemechek. Toyota.

38. (09) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet,
94.045.
39. (60) Mike Skinner,Toyota, 93.877.
40. (32) Ken Schrader, Ford, 93.613.
41. (37) Tony Raines, Ford, 93.253.
42. (46) J.J.Yeley, Chevrolet,93.253.
43. (71) Hermie Sadler, Chevrolet,
91.744.

HOCKEY

NHL schedule

Friday's Gamnes
Chicago 4, Columbus 3, SO
eood e4, PhP Ie io2 ),
Caigary 3, St. Louis 2
Saturday's Games
Boston 3,Atlanta 2
Tampa Bay 3, Minnesota I
Detroit 4, Nashville 3, O
Los Angeles 3, Dallas I

trneal atON wle ey (n)
Carolina at N.Y. Islanders (n)
Buffalo at Washington (n)
Pittsburgh at Florida (n)
Edmonton atVancouver (n)
Anaheim atdSansjoGe (nu

N.Y. Rangers at Philadelphia, 12:30
p~m.
Buffalo at Carolina, 5 p.m.
Minnesota at Detroit,5 p.m.
St.Louis at Columbus, 5 p.m.

Camgry a oCoboao p .
Datlas at Anaheimn, 8 p.m.


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAMe


NmYor
washingron
Rone
St L ~l

Chicago
Los Angeles
Pittburgh
Ararzoa
Houton


of teams don't emphasize
special teamsj. but we've
got to have ourselves in a
position to score anytime
we cross the 40."
The Tigers didn't leave
the cupboard bare in his
fist season. Allen believes
that the Tigers have a lot
of talent coming back and
will never struggle to find
players.
"I ve been astonished
with what I've seen all the
way down to the middle
schools," he said.
The emphasis isn't on
talent, however, it's on
hard work.
"Spring will be about
conditioning and letting
them know how we're
going to do things," Allen
said. "They're going to see
my passion for weights.
We'll work on plyometrics
(jump training). It teaches
top programs to be more
explosive. How we build
our bodies will effect how
we are as players."
And Allen expects the
physical nature to be back
in the Jungle on Friday
nights.
"Wie want to be the


best-conditioned team an
opponent will face and be
physical," he said. "We
want a mean, physical
group and we're going to
teach that every day so
that it will be natural come
Friday."
He's already off to a
good start as far as firing
up the players.
''The kids are hungry,"
he said. "I don't know
how many times I've been
around where you drive
tip and there's players out
in the rain running drills
on spring break. Nigel
(Atkinson) has been out
here working on his own
on routes all week. As a
coach, how much more can
you want?"
It's that hard-working
attitude that Allen hopes
all Tigers take on after the
head coach.
"It's our home, and we've
got to take pride in what
is ours," he said. "Pride is
contagious. We're going to
take pride in our home. We
don't want to lose at home
and that started on the first
day here. That's what it's
all about."


coordinator.
'I'm excited about
the situation with my
assistants." Allen said.
-We TO also gOing to have
Reinard W~ilson as our
defensive line coach.
He's got a tremendous
knowledge of football. 11e
big thing is having guys
that I can trust, because
that's what I believe it
takes to be successful."
Allen plans on the
ilgerS' defense to be a
tough one to gauge in the
upcoming season. Dotson
has traditionally run a
3-4 defense, while Allen
COmes in with a wealth of
knowledge using the 4-3.
e'll WOrk together
and I think we'll be that
much better combined," he
said. "We're going to blend
the 4-3 and 3-4 to confuse
teams. We'll be pretty
salty."
Allen is still looking for
SOmeone to coach special
teams, because he believes
that will be a big emphasis
fOr the Tigers this season.
'W'eV gOt to find a way
to get those unaccounted-
fOr points," he said. "A lot


BASKETBAtLL

NBA standings

EASTERN CONFERENCE
Adlantic Diviion
W L Pct GB
y-Boston 52 22 .703 -
Philadelphia )9 36 .21'

New Jersey 23 51 .3I I 29
Toronto 20 54 .270 32
Southeast Division

x-Miami 5232 .6P93
x-Orlando 47 28 .627 5
x-Atlanta 43 32 .573 9
Charlotte 32 42 .432 191
Washington 18 56 .24)3333
Cen dDivisi Pt B

y-Chicago 54 20 .730 -
Indiana 34 42 .447 21
Milwaukee 30 44 .405 24
Deeo I6 nd .312
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
x-San Antonio 57 18 .760 -
x-Dallas 53 22 .707 4
New orleans 43 32 .573 14
Memphis 42 33 .560 15
Houston 39 36 .520 18
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
x-OklahomaCity '90 2 6 -

Portland 43 32 .573 71
Utah 36 39 .480 141
Minnesota 1'7 58 .227 331
Pacific Division
w 1. Pet CB
y-hLoA.itakers 542 7 0 -
Golden State 32 44 .42 I 23
L.A. Clippers 29 46 .387 25%
Sacramento 21 53 .284 33
x-clinched playoff spot
y-clinched division

NBA schedule


ndnaFriday's Games
Orlando 89, Charlotte 77
Philadelphia I IS, New Jersey 90
Washington II15, Cleveland 107
Chicago 141I,Detroit 96

aepi oo, Ne 2ens al
Atlanta 88, Boston 83
'Houston I 19, San Antonio I 14, OT
PHoeni i11,c I I ;LA lpers9 I

Denver 99, Sacramento 90 .
LA. Lakers 96, Utah 85
Sunday's Games
Phoenix at San Antonio, I p.m. .
Denver at L.A Lakers. 3:30 p.m.
Utah at Sacramento, 6 p.m-

Wasihingtan at Charlotte, 6 p.m.
Miami at New Jersey, 6 p.m.
Cleveland at NewYorl 6 p.m.
Orlando at Toronto, 6 p.m-
Atlanta at Houston, 7 p.m.
Indiana at New Orleans, 7 p.m.
Dallas at Portland, 9 p.m.

NCAA Final Four

AtReliant Stadium
Houston
National Semifinals
Saturday
Butler 70,Virginia Commonwealth 62
Kentucky vs. Connecticut (n)

National ChamPIonship
.Monday
Butler vs. Kentucky/Uconn winner,
9 p.m. .

Women's Final four

At at Conseco Fieldhouse
indanN onal Semifinals
Sunday
Stanforrd (33-2) vs.Texas A&M (3 1-5),
7 p.m. &
Connecticut (36-1) vs. Notre Dame
(30-7), 9 p.m.
National Championship
Tuesday
Semifinal winners, 8:30 p.m.


AUTO RACING





Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to bach square,
to form four ordinary words.

BCICU


@2011 Tribune Media Services. Inc.
All Rights Reserved.

FSITH




ORTDAW I




WHRNTO


The defense and the
big night by Mack made
up for a lackluster show-
ing by leading scorer and
rebounder Matt Howard.
The senior had 17 points,
but shot just 3-of-10 and
picked up his fourth foul
with 9:22 left.
The Bulldogs came with-
in a bounce of winning it all
last year only to see Gordon
Hayward's last-ditch,' half-
court heave carom off the
rim and watch Duke cel-
ebrate the title with a 61-59
win. That the Bulldogs are
playing for the title again is
maybe even more impres-
sive than the first trip, hav-
ing lost Hayward, their lead-
ing scorer and rebounder,
to the NBA lottery. Butler
also lost two other players
who made significant con-
tributions, Willie Yeasley
and Avery Jukes.


ond half that gave Butler
COntrol of the game for
good.
VCU (28-12) sure didn't
l00k like a team critics
dismissed as "unworthy"I
- and a whole lot worse
- after it skidded into the
NCAA tournament with
lVe l0SSeS in its last eight
games.' But Butler's unfor-
giving defense was too
much for the Rams, only
the third No. 11 seed to
reach the Final Four.
"Butler was the aggres-
Sor for the majority of the
game," VCU coach Shaka
Smart said. "We had our
ruins."
But not enough of them.
Jamie Skeen scored 27
and Bradford Burgess had
15, including three 3-point-
ers before the game was
even four minutes old. But
Stevens is known for his


AC ROSS 41 Ro
42 Ste
1 Chop down 45 Pri
4 Omigosh! 49 For


tactical acumen, and this
game was no different. He
tweaked Butler's defense,
and Burgess had just one
more three the rest of the
night. -
VCU had always managed
to find a shot when it need-
ed it in its first three games,
but Butler simply wouldn't
allow it. VCU was just 8 of
22 from long range, though
that was still enough to set
the NCAA record for most
3s in a tournament with 61.
But Brandon Rozzell, who
tied his career high with six
treys against Georgetown,
was 0 for 3. Slippery point
guard Joey Rodriguez didn't
make a shot until 8:30 left
in the game, finishing with
only three points on 1-of-7
shooting.
Butler also dominated


the boards,
VCU 48-32.


man 54
!reo (hyph.)
nciples
rks and


outr~bounding


knives
53 Radiate
54 Place to~sleep
55 Ship's position
56 Prudent
57 AARP mem-
bers
58 Decade part
59 Cat or turkey

DOWN

1 Take cover
2 Gouda cousin
3 As it -
4. Gulf nation
5 Here, to Henri
6 Univ. degree
7 Many millennia
8 Long narrative
9 Grades 1-12
10 Light-bulb unit
1'2 More spooky
17 Varieties
19 Lion's quarry


8 Replace a but-
ton
11 fiXO
13 Mike problem
14 Huntsville loc.
15 Be bold
enOugh
16 Cinderella's
CUrfeW
18 Surface
20 Cafe au -
21 Rustic hotel
22 Hearty laugh
24 Farewell
27 Miniature
maple, e.g.
30 Tusked animal
31 Rubbish
32 Ave. crossers
34 Common ID
35 Roulette color
36 Tout's hangout
37 Flee
39 Mr. Loggins
40 Yo!


27 Crusty cheese
28 Hot - oven
29 Don't rub
-1
31 Xerox
33 Devious

t do~o a lir
test
38 Goatee site
39 HIC s' cereal
maker
42 Major airports
43 Route for
Ben-Hur

44Gvt, a ents
47 Japanese
Soup
48 Goblet part
'50 Make a com-

51 Percent end-

52 Madow


Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer. as
suggested by the above cartoon.


(Answers tomorrow)
Satrdys Jurnbles: POUCH ALONG CRUNCH PIGSTY
IAnswer: What one gets when they carpool with someone
who won t stop talking NO "YOU" TURNS


4-4 @ 2011 by UFS, Inc.


SCOREBOARD


ALLEN: Believes Tigers are hungry

Continuecd From~ Page~ 1B


TELEVISION

TV sports
Today
AUTO RACING
12*30 p~m.
FOX -NASCAR Cpr:m: up.Goodys
Fax Rebef 500. at Manaw'eVa.

ESPN2 NHRA Su5A~c ng~c
retonals at LVeveas(wm-day tape)
CYCLING
4 p.m.
VERSUS Tour of Ftanders. Brges
to Meerbeke, BlI~um (same-dy tape)
GOLF
9 a~m.
TGC European PGA TourTrophee
Hassan II, final round, a Agadlr. Morocco

TGC PGA Tour. Houston Open.
final round~at Humble.Texas
3 p.m.
timc -- PGA Tour Houston Open,
4:30 p.m.
TGC LPGA, Kraft Nabisco
Championship, final round, at Rancho
Mirage, Calif.

TGC Cha9 pion Tour. Mississippi
Gulf Resort Classic final round, at Saucier,
Miss.(same-day tape)
MAjOR LEAGUE BASEBALL

TBS Bosto2 mte as
2:10 p.m.
WGN Piatsburgh at Chicago Cubs
8 p.m.
ESPN2 San Francisco at L.A.
Dodgers
MOTRosPRoTs
8 a~m.
SPEED MotoGP World
Championship. Spanish Grand Prix, at
Jerez de la Frontera, Spain
NBA BASKETBALL

ABC Phoenix at San Antonio
3:30 p.m:
ABC Denver at LA. Lakers
NHL HOCKEY
12:3e p.m.
NBC N.Y. Ran ers at Philadelphia

8 p.m.
VERSUS -PBR, U.S. Bank Invitational,
at Kansas City, Mo. (same-day tape)
TENNIS

CBS -ATPNT Tur, Sony Ericsson
Open, men's championship match, at Key
Biscayne, Fla.
WOMEN'S COLLEGE
BASKETBALL

ESPN NCAA Division I tourna-
ment, semifinal, Texas A&M vs. Stanford,
at indianapolis
9 p.m.

men2 Psmifinalconn cct vs.o No
Dame, at Indianapolis

BASEBALL

AL schedule

Friday's Games
Chicago White Sox IS, Cleveland 10
Texas 9, Boston 5
Trontoo 1, Minnesota 3
Kansas City 2, L.A.Angels I
Seattle 6, Oakland 2
Saturday's Games
Chicago White Sox 8, Cleveland 3
Toronto 6, Minnesota I
Kansas City 5, LA.Angels 4
N.Y.Yankees 10. Detroit 6
saltimore atrampa Bay (n)

Betl att Oakl (n)
Today's Games
chicago White Sox at Cleveland,
1:05 p.m.
Detroit at N.Y.Yankees, 1:05 p.m.
Minnesota at Toronto, I:07 p.m.
Bal nmrea aTar a0 Bay, 40 p.m.

L.A.Angels at Kansas City, 2: 10 p.m.
Seattle at Oakland, 4:05 p.m.

NL schedule

Friday's Games
Philadelphia 5, Houston 4

Ar bna 7, C oro 6, 1 innings
Florida 6, N.Y. Mets 2
L.A. Dodgers 4, San Francisco 3
Saturday's Games
Washington 6,Atlanta 3
Chicago Cubs 5. Pittburgh 3
San Diego 11.,St Louis 3
San Francisco 10, L.A. Dodgers 0
Houston at Philadelphia (n)
Milwaukee at Cincinnati (n)
N.Y. Mets at Florida (n)
AzoaToda s Goam s
Milwaukee at Cincinnati. 1:10 p~m.
N.Y. Mets at Florida, 1:10 p.m.



Pittsburgh at Chicago Cubs, 2:20 p.m-
Arizona at Colorado, 3:IO p.m.
San Francisco at L.A. Dodgers)
8:05 p.m.

Spring training final
AMERICAN LEAGUE
W L Pe
Kansas City 20 10 .667
Minnesota 20 12 .625
Detroit 20 14 .588
Los Angeles I8 13.



Tamnpa Bay 15 14 .517


Baltimore IS 15 .500
NewYork I3 I5 .464
Texas 13 16 .448
Boston 14 19 .424
Oakland 12 21 .364
Chicago II 20 .355
NATIONAL LEAGUE
W L Pet
San Francisco 23 12 .657
Colorado 20 li .645
Milwaukee 19 11 .633
Philadelphia 21 14 .600
Atlanta 17 13 .567
Cincinnati 17 14 .548


Not mine
Sturm Drang
Tummy muscles
Give medicine
McKellen and
Holm





BLACK BELT ACADEIVY

755-1413








CALL JUNK JOE




7 ~S~nQ


111


'" L


~pp .


1Phdoee Numbe

S~Subscriber:

p, Deadline is Wi





SILLY


I


I


LAKE CiT. sEPORTE= SPORTS suse'`r v;il 3 2011


Page Editor: Brandon Finley. 754-0420


"What I'm working on is
what I did best today, which
was really seeing the shot
and executing and holding
that picture throughout the
swing." Mlickelson said. "1
probably did that better
today than I have in a long
time."
Mlickelson switched
between two drivers w\ith
different lengths and lofts
- on the practice range
before his round. He's lean-
ing toward having both in
his bag at Augusta nextt
week.
"There's a good chance
I'll have that," Mickelson
said.
Mickelson birdied three
of his first four holes on
Saturday, under cloudy
skies with virtually no
wind.
Paired with Lee
Westwood, he lost his tee
shot left on No. 6j, a dogleg
left. Mickelson took a drop
out of a native area, but
then saved par by holing a
50-yard pitch from behind
the green,
When the ball disap-
peared, Westwood's caddie,
Billy Foster, kneeled and
bowed to Mickelson in jok-
ing homage as the huge
gallery exploded into a loud
roar.
"It could've really been
bad," Mickelson said. "I'm
just fighting not to have it
be a double (bogey), and
be a momentum killer.
When that chip went in,
it really~ propelled me to
play the last 12 .holes
good."


By CHRIS DUNCAN
Associated Pre-ss

HUMBLEI~ Texas Phil
IMickelson shot his lo~w-
est round in two ye-ars on
Saturday, tying the course
record with a 9-under 63 to
share the lead with Scott
Ve~rplank after three rounds
at the Houston Open.
Verplank shot his sec-
and straight 65 to catch
Mickelson at 13-unde~r par.
Aaron Itaddeley (66)
and second-round leader
Chris Kirk (69) were one
stroke back, and defend-
ing champion Anthony Kim
and David Hearn (66) were
two behind.
Mickelson, the defending
champion at next week's
Masters, equaled the
record score set by Johnson
Wagner and Adam Scott in
2008 and matched by Jimmy
Walker on Thursday. It was
Lefty's best score since a
62 in the third round at the
2009 Northern Trust Open,
which he won.
"To get a good round like
this means a lot," Mickelson
said. "Also, to have the chal-
lenge to be in contention,
to be in the final group,
have an opportunity to win,
I really enjoy that opportu-
nity. I think it's good for me
to be in that position head-.
ing into next week, too."
Mickelson has won the
last four events during
which had a round of 64 or
better, dating to the 2006
BellSouth Classic. That
year, he ear-ned his second
green Jacket the following


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Phil Mickelson tees off the third hole during the third round of the Houston Open PGA Tour golf tournament on Saturday in


Hurnble, Texas.


week and is the last play-
er to win the event before
Augusta and the Masters in
the same year.
The Houston Open
became the run-up tourna-
nient to the Masters in 2007,
and Mickelson is here for
the fourth straight year. He
practiced at Augusta earlier
this week, and only arrived
in Houston on Wednesday,


bypassing the chance to
play warmup rounds at
Redstone.
He said winning the week
before the '06 Masters gave
him a valuable boost, and
.he sees no disadvantage
in trying to duplicate that
feat .
"People have talked about
winning the week before a
major as not necessarily the


. greatest thing, because it
takes away energy, or what
have you," Mickelson said.
"I felt like in '06, it was .
really a benefit to gain the
momentum and confdence
of winning a golf tourna-
ment right before, especial-
ly the Masters."
Organizers have tried to
groom the Redstone course
to simulate the conditions

I SE UF'W JS P


players will see next week,
and Mickelson said that
creates a smooth transition
to.Augusta.
But Mickelson is more
concerned this week-
end with improving his
shot visualization than
practicing shots he'll see at
the Masters. He had shot
only four sub-70 rounds in
his previous four events.


ZCRAPRILZIK
KUYUFWCSLNL
D D 0 J X Q J T H C VI
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ENTRY FORM



er:


0 Yes O No

wednesday, April 6, 2011 at 5:00 p.m.


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ASSOCIATED PRESS
Jamie McMurray gets out of his car after qualifying for
Sunday's NASCAR Sprint Cup race at the Martinsville
Speedway in Martinsville, Va., Saturday. McMurray won the
pole for the race.







WinS pole at


Martinsville


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F P G ZR X Y A
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Generator Hooll-ths, Trenciling Availal0 is Z C T R N J D B B N. B N T


By JENNA FRYER .
Associated Press

MARTINSVILLE, Va.
- Jamie McMurray took
a step toward jump-starting
his season Saturday by win-
ning the pole at Martinsville
Speedway.
Mc Murray turned a lap of
96.509 mph in his Chevrolet
to earn the top starting spot
for Sunday's race. He came
to Martinsville ranked 28th
in the Sprint Cup Series
standings and with a sea-
son-best finish of 18th in
the opener at Daytona.
'This is really big for
our team," said McMurray.
"We've had some really
good cars, and for the most
part, the short tracks is
where we've run the best.
But we got caught up in
that wreck at Phoenix and
at Bristol ... got caught up
in a wreck. It just seems
like we've had really bad
luck. But I hope this turns
around for us."
McMurray said he was
pacing through his team
hauler during the qualifying
session, and his Earnhardt
Ganassi Racing crew was
making fun of him for being
so nervous about potential-
ly winning the pole.
Told them, 'M artinsville,
the pole, if you get the No.
1 pit stall here, it's huge. I
think that can win the race
for you,' McMurray said


of the stall he'll use Sunday
at the exit of pit road.
Ryan Newman qualified
second with a lap of 96.342
in a Chevrolet. Kasey Kahne
qualified third in a Toyota
and was followed by Joe
Gibbs Racing teammates
Joey Logano and three-
time defending race winner
Denny Hamlin.
AJ Allmendinger was
sixth in a Ford, and was fol-
lowed by Bobby Labonte,
David Reutimann and Kevin
Harvick. Regan Smith
rounded out the top 10.
Five-time Martinsville
winner Jimmie Johnson
qualified 17th.
But qualifying resultS
were overshadowed by tire
troubles for the second time
in three races.
The tires Goodyear
brought to Martinsville are
leaving marbles made of
rubber all over the track.
It's a different tire than the
one used last year because
Goodyear wanted to pre-
vent grating on the left-side
tires that often occurs when
cars slide from the asphalt
racing surface into the con-
crete corners.
Because of the marbles
and the lack of rubber accu-
mulating on the track sur-
face, drivers spent much of
Saturday complaining about
a lack of grip.
"~The tire is really crappy "
said Dale Earnhardt Jr.


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S..\DAY APRIL 3. 2011


4B LAKE CITY RE "ER ADVERTISEMENT


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the beginning, we have taken responsibility for the cleanup. Our comm~jitment to the
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Catholic Charities now an award-winner


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Sunday,April 3, 20 II


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By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@llal-eciF,trepoter. corn

the commu-
nity, Catholic
Charities of Lake
So t o wtCity received
a special honor from the
Florida Department of
Children and Famlies.
The "Familes Up Front"
Award was presented to
the organization at DCF's
15th Annual Families Up
Front Awards Ceremony
March 22.
"It was a nice honor to
have a state agency that
helps the community honor
us," said Lyndsay Patton,
Catholic Charities database
coordinator and IT special-
ist.
The organization was
invited to the ceremony
but didn't know it was up
for an award, said Suzanne
Edwards, Catholic Charities
chief operating officer.
Awards were presented
to DCF staff members for
their work through the
year and then to an agency
that excelled in service to
the community.
'"Nie were the agericy,"
she said.
Catholic Charities pro-
vides assistance programs
to people in Suwannee,
Hamilton, Lafayette and
Columbia counties.
"This group of commu-
nity advocates at Catholic
Charities, led by Suzanne
Edwards, have been work-
ing to assist families in
need for many years in
important ways with
emergency food, help with


Suzanne Edwards, chief
operating officer of the
Catholic Charities Lake City
Regional Office, poses for a
photograph. The non-profit
organization was recently
awarded the Families Up
Front Award.











JASON MATTHEW WALKER
Lake City Reporter

situation.
It supports DCF staff
members who come out to
do application assistance
and makes sure every fam-
ily leaves with enough food
until they can be evaluated
for state programs, accord-
ing to the release.
"I~t's just nice knowing that
we're appreciated for the
hard work we do," Patton
said.


three years novi," Edwards
said. "We're going on the
third year of the economic
downturn and more fami-
lies need services that
didn't need them before."
Department staff mem
bers attend SNAP Outreach
events each year and
approve applications right
on the spot.
"Whetherthe events held
on a Saturday or during the
week, Suzanne Edward's
team is out bright and
early setting up," accord-


ing to the release. "Seeing
the kindness with which
these advocates work with
those coming out for these
events demonstrates they
are living their motto of
'Putting Compassion into
Action."'"
The special recognition
from a state agency helps
restore the energy of Catholic
Charities to continue to work
in the community, Edwards


said. Also, the distinction is
beneficial in displaying liest
practices, policies and pro-
cedures to the Council on
Accreditation.
"Certainly to be recog-
nized is an attribute to con-
tinued accreditation," she
said. .
Catholic Charities' mis-
sion is to help anyone in
need, and the organization
will not judge people or their


family budgeting, utility
and rental assistance, and
supportive services to the
homeless," according to a
release from DCE
One important initiative
of the organization is the
Supplemental Nutrition
Assistance Program
Outreach. The program is a
collaboration with DCF and
provides an opportunity for
people to apply for food
stamps and other services
at Catholic Charities,
"WNe've been doing it for


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BUSINESS





To EducLare, .4mulse & Enlrich


A Bad Swap
My\ dumbest investments decision
w-as xiling m\ sharrs of Coca-Co~la
in order to buy shares of Fannie
Mlae. Fredidie Mlac and Lehman
Bmrohers. Sigh. H C:. onl~ine
The Fool Responds: That wIs
certainly a rerettable move. All
investors. including the best, make
occaional mistakes. Still.
you miaht have avoided this
one hadlyou considered a
-ew- things. For starters, if
you were parking much of
your money in those three stocks,
you were putting a lot of faith in just
one sector, financial services. That's
not v~ery diversified. Some well-
regarded mutual fund managers got
whacked by that mistake, too.
Next, you might have looked at
what was going on in the U.S. with
mortgages. It was no secret that
many people were buying homes
they could barely afford, and that
lenders were making it extra-easy to
get a mortgage. While many people
jupd onthe wg t fit fro
ttuT, as uig thtuin opricesm
would keep rising, others correctly


PTObate 101
.Most of us have heard the word
'probate,"' but many people don't
understand what it really is. It s
important for you to understand it.
though, to help in your estate
planning.
Probate is the legal process of
administering an estate once some-
one dies. The process includes sev-
eral parts. First, it must be
detennined that the will is
valid. If you don't have a
will, the probate court will
have the remaining assets distributed
according to the rules of the state.
Assuming that there's a valid will,
the probate process will include
making an inventory of the
deceased's property and appraising
its value. It will see that debts are
repaid and taxes paid. What's left
will be distributed to inheritors,
according to the terms of the will,
with title and ownership being for-
mally transferred.
If this sounds like a complicated
hassle, it often is. It can be costly,
too, involving lots of paperwork
and fees to lawyers, accountants,


What Is This ThingJ Called
The Motley Fool?
Remember Shakepeare?
Remember `:4s Ibm Like It"?
InEi- iurivrn~ Jms. roots w~ere ,;e on;,
people wh~o could get away with telling
the tnah to the King or gueen.
The .tforle Fo~o! rells the truth ab~our
investing. and hopes yourl laugh all(
........... ,Mr o th tnng



Enter EnerNOC
\feet EnerNOC (Nasdaq: ENOC).
AL ma~lrke leader in the demand
response industry, it uses technology
to monitor. coordinate and reduce its
customers` el-ctricity usag~e. (Cus-
tomers include large factories, depart-
ment stores. warehouses, malls, etc.)
When electricity demand is high,
EnerN\OC can reduce its customers'
usage. saving utilities from having to
power up ektra plants at high costs.
For that, EnerNOC is paid by utilities
and gnid operators, passing along a
portion of that cash to its customers.
Over the past three years, Ener-
NOC s revenue has averaged 66 per-
cent annual growth, and 2010 was its
first profitable year. As more utilities
deregulate and EnerNOC expands,
expect further growth.
EnerNOC has a solid balance
sheet, with more than $100 million
to mv\est mn its own operations as
well as to buy competitors and
increase market share.
Better still, its stock has fallen
recently, partly due to a rate dispute,
the departure of its chief operating
officer and an earnings disappoint-
ment This has ;iven lnon-term


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We feel the magazine is a fabulous
Marketing sourcefor our restaurant. We
also use other advertising products offered
by the Reporter and the combination of all
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would otherwise have eone to

Probate can eat up 5 percent to 10
percent of the value of the esjtate. So
writh an e-sat worth 5200.000. pro-
bate might take 510.000 to 520.000.
a sizable chunk. Also. property
remains in a kind of limbo wttile in
probate and that can last months
or ev~en years. A~nd finally, the pro-
bate process is public, so anyone
w-ho wants to know your business
will likely be able to find out
That said, probate does have some
advantages. For example, it tends to
be a methodical and unbiased sy;s-
tem, since a judge oversees it. Still,
for most people, its downside over-
shadow~s the upside, so it's best
avoided. And, it can be avoided
(such as via a living trust, for exam-
ple), if you learn more about it and
take some action,
Learn more about estate planning
issues at www~aarp.org/money/
estate-planning and www~nolo.com.
And if you'd like an actual person (a
financial pro, no less) to talk to about
your tax concerns and your financial
planning needs, seek one at
www~napfa~com.


* * * * * * * * * suspected thatf it would end badly ""'" "b"'" "
SThe beauty of Coca-Cola is its investors an opportunity to buy at
SName That Company .dependability. People will always a good price.
be thirsty, and most can afford a EnerNOC's business model seems
:Based in New York City, I'm : simple drink. a win-win for utilities and large con-
the world's largest bookseller, : oyuhv nebrsig a rvn, I cung oneye ll and
L.withi 705 stores in 50 states and a lesson learned the han/ way? Constellation Energy. Both have
b sit. Ials636Boil it down to 100 wontsr (or deep pockets and could change the
< usy webie I lo manage 63 q less) and send it to The Motley Fool c/o My competitive landscape.
college bookstores. List more Du~rbest hvestment. Got one that worked? Take a closer look at EnerNOC. (It's
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largest magazine seller, offering ."" "" "" "
LAST WEEK'S TRIVIA ANSWER*
abou 5,50 maazies ad alostTracing my roots back to a packing plant in Virginia in l936, today I'm the
)00 newspapers. Each year, my cafes world's largest pork processor and hog producer, with annual sales topping $11*
rvre 60 million drinks. Altogether, I sell billion. In 2007, I bought ConAgra's branded meats business as well as 49 per-
cent of Butterball, the nation's top turkey producer. I'm vertically integrated,
Highly 300 million books annually, less taking hogs from conception to processing to produce. I boast more than 50
5 pecen ofthembes-selers I ost brands of pork products and more than 200 different foods. My livestock pro-
to 100,000 community events each duction subsidiary is named Murphy-Brown LLC, and I've received a bunch of
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ve won awards for my customer service.
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ed into a drawing for a myfty prize! Motley Fool. Sorry, we cant Yprovide individual financial advice.*
7(1711 THFManrvFal/Dir avilvivmal lnrsrK (FOR evIved/11/701l)


la



1,0
'I sei
Srou
,9~ than
Mrclose
year. I'~
and my c

Anrow rlth ans7
you 'll be enter


are looking for one is sur-
prisingly low for this stage
of the recovery.
People who stopped
looking for work during the
downturn are not counted
as unemployed. If many
out-of-work people star t
looking for work again,
they will be counted and
the unemployment rate
could go up. That could
happen even'if the econo-
my is adding jobs.
Local governments,
wrestling with budget
shortfalls, cut ~15,000~ work-
ers last month and are
expected to keep shedding
Jobs. Home prices are fall-
ing amid weak sales and a
record number of foreclo-
sures. Construction spend-
ing dropped in February to
a 12-year' low. Higher food


and gas prices are leaving
Consumers with less dis-
posable income to spend
on other goods and ser-
vices.
Worker's' paychecks
wereflat inMarch. Average
hourly earnings held steady
at $22.87, unchanged from
February, Over the past 12
-months, wages have lagged
behind inflation. Workers
have little bargaining power
to demand big pay raises
because the job market is
still healing slowly.
Another report out
Friday showed that manu-
facturing activity cooled
off a bit last month after
expanding in February at
the fastest pace in nearly
seven~years. Still, the sector
grew for the 20th' straight
month, another positive


sign for the economy.
The number of unem-
ployed people dipped to
13.5 million in March, still
almost double since before
the recession began in
December 2007.
Including par t-time
workers who would rather
be working full time, plus
people who have given
up looking altogether, the
percentage of "underem-


JEANNIINE AVERSA
AP Economics Writer

WASHINGTON The
unemployment rate fell
to a two-year low of 8.8
percent in March, capping
the strongest two months
of hiring since before the
'recession began,
The economy added
216,000 jobs last month,
the Labor Department said
Friday. Factories, retailers,
the education and health
care sectors and profession-
al and financial services all
expanded payrolls. Those
job gains offset layoffs by
local governments.
Another month of brisk
hiring provided the latest
sign that the economy is
strengthening nearly two
years after the recession
ended. Still, a surprisingly
lar ge number of people
who stopped looking for
work during the downturn
have yet to start looking
agamn.
Private employers, the
backbone of the economy,
are driving the gains. They
added more than 200,000
jobs for a second straight
month. It was the fist time
that's happened since 2006
- more than a year before

'eU.S nao market is
finally making some serious
progress," said Sal Guatieri,
economist at BMO Capital
Markets Economics.
The unemployment rate
dipped from 8.9 percent in
February. The rate has fall-
en a full percentage point
over the past four months.
That's the sharpest drop
since 1983.
Economists predict
employers will add jobs at
roughly the same pace for
the rest of this year. That
would generate about 2.5
million new positions. Still,
that would make up for
only a small portion of the
7.5 million jobs wiped out
during the recession.
A big factor in the lower
unemployment rate is that
the proportion of people
who either have a job or


played" people dropped
to 15.7 percent in March,
the smallest share in two
years.
.Professional and busi-
ness services, including
accountants, bookkeepers,
engineers and computer
designers, added 78,000
positions, the most since
November. Of those, 29,000
were temporary positions.
Factories added 17,000


jobs in March, the fifth
straight month of gains.
Retailers added nearly
18,000 jobs, after cut-
ting them in February.
Financial services expand-
ed payrolls by 6,000, fol-
lowing two straight months
of cutbacks. Education and
health services expanded
employment by 45,000, lei-
sure and hospitality added
37,000 jobs.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this March 23 photo, Meghan Clark (right), a recruiter from
Royal United Mortgage, talks with a job seeker at a job fair
in Indianapolis. The unemployment rate fell to a two-year low
of 8.8 percent in March and companies added workers at the
fastest two-month pace since before the recession began.


LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS &L HOME SUNDAY APRIL 3. 2011


Indexes Galore

What are the other major stock
indexes, besides the Standard &
Poor's 5007 --.M0, Flagiraraf n>


("the P 1, w which includes 30
Amencan giants, such as ExxonMo-
bil, General Electric, Home Depot
and Verizon. The S&P 500 also
focuses on large companies, includ-
ing 500 of America's leading capo~-
rations. Its components account for
75 percent of the total market value'
of the U.S. stock market These two
indexes are often viewed as proxies
for the overall U:.S. economy.
Then there's the Russell 3000
Index which inludes 3,000 of the
largest U.S. companies based on
market capitalization (current share
price multiplied by number of shares
outstanding). lliese 3,000 constitute
about 98 percent of the U.S. market's
value. For a measure of small-cap
companies, look to the Russell 2000.
It's composed of the 2,000 smallest
companies in the Russell 3000.
The Dow Jones Wilshire 5000 is
just about the broadest index ofAmer..
ican companies, including almost

brod iteratinalcoverage, h
Vanguard Total Intemnational Stock
index represents about 98 percent of
the non-U.S. world stock market.
There are indexes for lots of
broad or narrow international /
regions. Other indexes address sec-
tors such as utilities, semiconduc-
tors, pharmaceuticals, the Internet,
and shoe horns. (Just kidding about
shoe horns.) Learn more at
www.fooLcom/mutualfunds/
mutualfunds.htm.


SWhat are "convertibles"! in
investing? C.G., Grand
Ra ids, Mich

AConvertibles are bonds, promis-
sory notes or preferred stock
that can be converted (according to
specified terms) into regular com-
mon stock by their owner. Th y've
been described as investments with
built-in stock options. They're best
suited only for advanced investors.
Got a question for the Fool? Send it in
- see WVrite to Us


Unemployment rate falls to 8.8 percent, two-year low








1


I C


eL ~r~








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, g ,,, at..,,

in hot tis, s., m,
















THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW


Weekly Dow Jones


STOCKS OF LOCK INTEREST


Name Ex Dry Last Chg1Chp1Che


Total Assets Total Return/Rank Pct Min init
Name Obj ($Mins) NAV &wk 12-mo 5-year Load invt


New York Stock Exchange




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Time can affect you as much as your investments. While
you can't stop change, you can help make sure your invest-
ments match your current circumstances and goals.

Fortunately, doing that may be as easy as meeting with your
financial advisor. A free Portfolio Review from Edward
.,
Jones can help identify where your investments stand m
relation to your goals. And help put time back on your side.

To schedule a complimentary Portfolio Review, call
your local financial advisor today.

Steve Jones, CFPs

.: Financial Advisor

2929 West US Highway 90
Suite 114
Lake City, FL 32055
386-752-3847
yrwar.edwardjones.com Member siPc


and eemings in Cmadian dolars, h = Does not meet
in past 52 weeks. pl= Preferred. rs= Stock has undergone a tweerse shack spa
past yes it = Right to buy security at a spedlied price. s = Stods has split by at
ear un= unk Vi= b bankmpicy or receivwsh wd = When ee covering market costs is paid from fund assets d = Deferred sales charge, or
A & =
2 to be Estodin tables at left. Most Actives must be worth at least $1. Volume in
e Assadated Press. Sales figures are unofocial.


,
Rates Currencies
Last Pvs Week Last Pvs Day
3.25 3.25 Australia .9631 .9648
0.75 0.75 Britain 1.6121 1.6065
.00-.25 .00-.25 Canada .9647 .9688
Euro .7025 .7042
0.06 0.09 Japan 84.09 83.07
0.14 0.17 Mexico 11.8368 11.8902
2.24 2.16 Switzertnd .9237 4 .9163
3.45 3.44
British pound expressed in U.S. dollars. All oth-
4.49 4.50 ers show dollar in foreign currency.


CA Alanravalrve Alocalion, CI -htermediale-Term Sorst ES -Earape Sild, FB -Foreip Large Blend. FG -Foreip liergeGroA. FV
Yalue, lH -World Alocation, LB -Large Blend, LG -Large Gro4, LV Large Value, MA Moderate Alocallon, MB -Mdi sp Stand,
Value, SH -Specialyhoolh, WS -worn Slock, Total Relum: in NAV ath dividends reinvested. Rank How lund performed vs
others wilh seme abledive: A ls in icp 20%, E ka boliDrn 20% Mrt inl invt. $ needed an invest in iund Sourts: Marnhgsler


AES Corp ... ...
AFLAC 1.20 2.2
AK Steel .20 1.3
AMR ... ...
AT&T Inc 1.72 5.6
AU Option ... ...
AbtLab 1.92 3.9
Accenture .90 1.6
AMD ... ...
Aetna .60 1.6
AlcataelLuc .12 1

Allstate .84 2.7

AlnpNhaaNRs 192 SS
AmBev s 1.16 4.0
AMovilL .52 .9
AEagleOut .44 2.8
AEP 1.84 5.2
AmExp .72 1.6
AmlntlGrp ... ...
AmTower ... ...
Anadarko .36 .4
Annaly 2.62 15.0
Apache .60 .5
ApolloGMn... ...
ArcelorMR .75 2.1
ArchCoal .40 1.1
ArchDan .64 1.8
ATMOS 1.36 3.9
Avon .92 3.4
BB&TCp .64 2.3
BHP BillLt 1.82 1.9
BakrHu .60 .8
BcoBrades .82 3.9.
BcoSantSA .79 6.6
BcoSBrasil .70 5.7
BkofAm .04 .3
Bkireind 1.04 ...
BkNYMel .52 1.7
Bar iPVix rs ... ...
BarrickG .48 .9
Baxter 1.24 2.3
BerkHB ... ...
BestBuy .60 2.1
BlackRock5.50 2.7
Blackstone .40 2.2
BlockHR .60 3.4
Boeing 1.68 2.3
BostonSci ... ...
BrMySq 1.32 5.0
CB REllis ... .
CBS B .2 .8
CSX 1.04 1.3
CVSCare .50 1.4




Camival 1.00 2.6
Caterpillar 1.76 1.6
Cemex .43 ...
CenterPnt .79 4.5
CntryLink 2.90 7.1
ChesEng .30 .9
Chevron 2.88 21
Chicos .20 1.3
Chimera .66 16.7
Citigrp .
CliffsNRs .56 .6
CocaCola 1.88 2.8
Comerica .40 1.1
ConAgra .92 3.9
ConocPhil 2.64 3.3
Con$olEngy .40 .8
ConEd 2.40 4.7
ConstellEn.96 3.1
Coming .20 1.0
Covidien .80 1.5


Wkly YTD Wkly -
YId PE Chg %Chg Last
5.6 8 +.51 -.1 34.99
2.4 14 +.71 +7.4 32.99
... ... +.07 -5.6 3.88
... ... -.09 +17.1 40.27
... 85 -.16 +13.2 12.75
... ... +.66 +5.7 8.84
11.5 9 -.02 +.5 8.20
... ... +.60 -8.2 9.35
... ... +.04-10.7 13.26



.7 ... +.25 -2,8 59.77
.4 ... +.89 +12.2 42.53
1.0 31 -2.25 -14.8 35.41
.5 ... +.38 +17.6 8.14
2.1 ... -.05 +11.5 14.12
2.6 15 +.66 +7.6 39.19
... 18 +3.02 -7.4 56.74
2.3 12 +1.14 +6.5 39.50
4.6 16 +50 -8.2 33.07
-2.70 -19.5 16.52
1.6 14 +.21 +1.8 45.26
... 31 +.95 +30.6 16.49
... ... -.22 -14.4 4.63
... 37 +.08 +3.2 21.54
... ... +4.78 +18.7 59.25
1.5 32 +2.41 +5.1 73.17
... ... +.80 -30.7 16.38
1.3 16+1.54+30.3 34.57
.7 11 +.13 +.2 27.26
.2 16 +1.55 +5.3 80.37


Why YTD WMy
Name Div YId PE Chy %Chy last


WMy YTD WMy
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last


AVI Bio ... ...
ActivsBliz .17 1.5
Acxiom ... ...
AdobeSy ... ...
AdvBattery ... ...
AEtema g ... ...
AkamaiT ... ...
AliscriptH ... ...
AlteraCp If .24 .6
Amazon ... ...
ACapAgy 5.60 19.3
AmCapLtd ... ...
Amgen ... ...
A123Sys ... ...
ApolioGrp ... ...
Apple lnc ... ...
ApidMatt 32 21
AriadP ..
ArmHId 09 3
ArubaNet .
Atmel .
AvanirPhm .
Baidus .
BrigExp
Broadcom 36 9
BrcdeCm ..
CA Inc .16 7
CpstnTrth. .
Ceigene .
CellTherrsh.
Cephin
ChinalntEn.
CienaCorp .
Cisco .24 1 4
CleanEngy ... ..
Clearwire h ... ..
Comcast .45 1 8
Comc soci .45 1 9


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


Amex Nasdaq Name Ez Div Ust

2,396.82 +71.64 2,789.60 +46.54 AT&Tac 2 -62
NadeO.c :32
4ma 2 ~ 4'
GainerS ($2 or more) GainerS ($2 or more) BkctV- 35

IrnetX 2125 +521 +315 Ambasint rs 180 +1 85 +194 7 CSX 04 ??39
AnangPh 2 17 + 48 +28.4 inhbilex 413 +1 67 +54 6 Chevrm NY 2 88 106 32
CHAletRur 5 20 +1 10 +26 8 Hydogr 6.96 +141 +53 0 Cha) Nasd 24 17 :
kralRare n 8 95 +1 50 +20 1 GSI Centrc 2934 +9 96 +51 4 Edigp NY 4 45
SL Ina 21 60 +3 45 +19 0 TranSwict) 4 57 +132 +40 6 o~





GenElec NY 56 20 34
LoserS ($2 or more) LoserS ($2 or more) Home0p NY 1 00 37%

NednSys 4.81 91 -15 9 AdvBattery 2 07 -1.59 -43 4 iShEMds NY 64 49 45
Ambrain 2.30 -.38 -14 2 ChinalntEn 2 28 -1 48 -39 3 ISHR2K NY .89 84 54


Walteriny 17 00 -2.28 W un Lowes NY .44 26.74

HQ SustM 2.78 -.35 -11 2 Subaye 11 2.34 67 -22.3 McOnids NY 2.44 75.99
B&HO 4.02 -.47 -105 SmartHeat 2.68 -75 -0.5
ASpecRit s 18.00 -2.00 -10.0 A123 Sys 6.12 -1.64 -21.1 Stock Footnotes* g = Dividends
Ir= Leae sing wilh SEC.n= New
MOst Active $1 of at least 50 percent wthin the
Most Active (si or more) ( or more) sust 20 pere.n wanin one last
y
Name Vol (00) Last Chg Name Vol (00) Last Chg When issued. wt = Wilrrarils-
Mutual Fund Foolnoles*b= F
A 3 2 m 3 7 r in.}s1
KodiakO g 217762 6.71 -.19 Microsoft 2561291 25.48 -.14 Losers must be waith at least $
RareEle g 211695 13.02 +.65 PwShs QQQ228169857.46 + 62 hundreds of shares. Source: Th


Chg10sgbChg
-- -- -e- 42
.4 -90 4.5
*Je 42 **3 5

**:3 *Cl el

v23 *03 22 9
+1 st -' 4 v' 5
- 8 -' 0 -' 5 5
- C' -Cl -6 9
v22




+ 59 3 0 +112
+ 14 +0.4 +7 1


+2.11 44.5 +3 8
+2.32 +2.8 +8 1


-.45 -1.7 +6.6
+.74 +1.0 -1.0


NYSE

8,469.34 +147.56


GainerS (52 or more)

Oxkrdirds 34.03+10.17 +42 6
Danaos 8 99 +1.62 +302
NeoPhoto n 11 60 +237 +25 7
CSGlobWm11 40 +2.18 +23 4
hexBks 54 47+10 13 +223








KY Phrra 537 -3 62 -40 2
KV PhmA 539 -3 58 -39 9


5

IP 24.92 -4 30 -14 7
Feheing 8.06 -134 -143
Mentor 16.52 -2.70 -14 0

Most Active (si or more
Name Vol (00) Last Chg

0 661 SS-.%
BkofAm 4876369 13 37 +.03
AT&T Inc 3715060 30.62 +1.77
iShEMkts 3037360 49.45 +2.11
SprinlNex 2917363 4.5 -.12
FordM 2697116 15.16 +.15
SPDR Fnd2362474 16.53 +.19
GenElec 2052913 20.34 +.59
iSAlapn 1926144 10.30 -.03

Diary
Advanced 2,409
Declined 755
New Highs 525
New Lows 42
Total issues 3,207
Unchanged 43
Volume 18,524,366,297


DowJonesIndustrialS
Close:12,376.72
1-week change: 156.13 (1.3*0)
21 500


-22.E 81.13 1.60 -30.88 56.99


MON TUES WED THUR FRI


th-orT base
Alicasit base 9
V rres NY

-0-.9 Nasc

koPct NY St
Orame base 24
Perre NY K
Pass(O NY 92
Pizer NY )90




SrmsXM Nasd
SouthnCo NY 1 82

TrneWam NY 94
Vale SA NY 76


Weathfint NY
WelisFargo NY 20


30 -j -s:0
4 - 1
5' -22 -2, -: '

5 09 -42 -5 3 3

0: SC *3 4 *3 4 -4 3
34 02 +1 38 *-4 2 -E'
36 00 -' 03 -23 ," 4
6622 24 ,* 0 9
20 38 C3 -0 v'6 4




65 07 -4 +11
38 31 73 +1 9 + 2

35 53 +23 +0 7 +10 4
33 44 +1 10 3 4 -3 3


23 05 +2 18 +10 4 +1.1
32 06 + 12 0 4 +3.5


DenisnM g 205313 2.49 -.24
RexahnPh 197216 1.19 -.22
YrnetX 172534 21.25 +5.21
Hyperdyn 167010 4.71 -.48
NovaGid g 145647 12.98 +.26
NwGoldg 141551 11.65 +.40

: Diary
Advanced 305
Declined 221
New Higlis 38
New Lows 10
Total issues 550
Unchanged 24
Volume 763,778,149


vanguard ToISudx LB
American Funds CapincBuA m 1H
sangualulliedhi LB
American Funds CpWidGrtA m WS
Vanguard 500Admi LB
American Funds IncAmerA m MA
Vanguard ToIStlAdm LB
American Funds invCoAmA m LB
Dodge & Cox lnilStk FY
Dodge&CoxStock LV
American Funds WAMutinvA m LV
Vanguard Totinti d FB
American Funds EurPacGrA m FB
Vanguard inslPlus LB
FrankT6mp-Franklin Income Ax CA
American Funds FnlnvA m LB
American Funds NewPerspA m WS
PIMCOdo mb

American Funds BalA m MA
FidelityGrowCo LG
Vanguard WelitnAdm MA
Fidelity LowPriStk d MB
Harbor Intlinsti d FB


59,764
59,201
58,180
5,032
54,664
54,193
50,992 .
50,354
45,918
45,667
40,241
39,597
39,490
37,376
36,259
35,007
34.131

32.523
29.316
28,884
28,175
28,149


+17.2/A
+10.8/D
+15.3/B
+11.3/D
+15.3/B
+14.0/A
+17.3/A
+11.6/D
+12.3/B
+12.7/D
+151/B
+12.0/C
+12.1/C
+15.4/B
+15.1/A
+16.3/A
+14.4/C

+13.4/B
+22.6/A
+11.5/C
+17.7/E
+152/A


NL 3,000 ,
5.75 250
NL 5,000,000
5.75 250
NL 10,000
5.75 250
NL 10.000
5.75 250
NL 2.500
NL 2,500
5.75
NL 3,000
515 250
NL 200,000,000
4.25 1,000
5.75 250
5.75 250
1,000000
5.75 250
NL 2,500
NL 50,000
NL 2,500
NL 50,000


SiriusXM 2235654 1.65 -.07
MicronT 1679759 11.30 -25
Oracle 1674649 34.02 +1.38
Nvidia 1142380 18.20 -.43
Dell Inc 939773 14.34 -.72
JOSUniph 816776 19.11 -.68

DIarY
Advanced 1,828
Declined 944
New Highs 372
New tows
Total issues 2,83
Unchanged 67
Volume 9,167,735,674


| Wkly
I Name Div YId PE Cho


WMy YTD Wkly
Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last


Wkly |
Last I Name


WMy YTD Wkly
Chg %Chg last


Name Div YId PE


MotriaSol n ... ...
MotriaMo n ... ...
NCR Corp ... ...
NYSE Eur 1.20 3.0
Nabors ... ...
NatGrid 7.04 5.8
NOilVarco .44 .5
NatSemi .40 2.8
NY CmtyB 1.00 5.8
NewmtM .60 1.1

xenr En 2 3.9
rce

NobleCorp .98 2.2
NokiaCp .55 6.4
NorilkSo 1.60 2.3
Novartis 2.53 4.7
Nucor 1.45 3.1
OcciPet 1.84 1.8
OfficeDpt ... ...
OilSvHT 2.42 1.0
PG&ECp 1.82 4.1
PMI Grp .... ...
PNC .40 .6
PPLCorp 1.40 5.4
ParkDri ... ...
PatriotCoal ... ...
PeabdyE .34 .5
Penney .80 2.2
PepsiCo 1.92 2.9
Petrohawk ... ...
PetrbrsA 1.41 3.9
Petrobras 1.41 3.4
Pfizer .80 3.9
PhilipMor 2.56 3.9
Potash s .28 .5
PrUShS&P ... ...
PrUShQQQrs... ...
ProUltSP .39 .7
ProUShl20 ... ...
ProUSSP500... ...
ProLogis .45 2.8
PmilSR2Km ...
PulteGrp
Qiltoo360n...
OntmDSS ... ...
QksilvRes ... ...
RAIT Fin .03 1.2
RadianGrp .01 .1
RadioShk .25 1.7
Raytheon 1.72 3.4
RegionsFn .04 .5
ReneSola ... ...
RioTintos1.08 1.5




SpdrDJIA 2.98 2.4
SpdrGold ... ...
S&P500ETF2.34 1.8
SpdrHome .31 1.7
SpdrKbwBk .15 .6
SpdrLehHY4.44 10.3
SpdrRett .50 1.0
SpdrOGEx .49 .8
SpdrMetM .41 .6
Safeway .48 2.0
StJude .84 1.6
Salesforce ... ...
SandRdge ... ...
SaraLee .46 2.6
Schimbrg 1.00 1.1
Schwab .24 1.3
SemiRTr .55 1.6
SiderNacs.58 3.4
SilvWhtn g .12 .3
SouthnCo 1.82 4.8


24 +.45 +16.7 44.40
91 -1.30 -15.8 24.50
15 -.10 +22.5 18.83
19 +5.12 +32.1 39.60
92 +.81 +29.5 30.38
... +.72 48.7 48.26
20 +.03 +20.0 80.68
11 -.12 +3.4 14.23
14 +.12 -7.9 17.37
12 +.41 -11.5 54.37

14 +
+. g

10 15 +26.6 45.29
... +.20 -17.2 8.55
17 +.64 +10.3 69.32
12 -1.19 -8.0 54.24
... +.01 +5.4 46.20
19 +3.45 +6.3 104.30
... -.63 -22.0 4.21
... +5.11 +17.0 164.47,
16 +1.06 -7.0 44.50
... -.17 -18.8 2.68
11 +1.95 +4.9 63.72
12 +1.13 -2,4 25.70
... +.96 +51.0 6.9
... +1.46 +38.7 26.86
25 +.08 +13.6 72.71
22 -1.03 +11.4 36.00
17 +1.24 -.2 65.22
57 +1.24 +34.2 24.49
... +.86 +5.6 36.10
... +.79 +9.4 41.41
20 +.03 +16.4 20.38
17 -.19 +10.9 64.93
30 +3.04 +16.8 60.27
... -.58 -12.7 20.75
... -1.10 -12.4 50.94
... +1.43 +11.8 53.70
... -.31 +.2 37.11
... -.70 -19.0 15.73
... +.54 +11.0 16.03
... -2.40 -17.6 41.42
-.09 -.5 7.48
-13.2 29.50
... +.05 -32.3 2.52
6 +.22 -4.5 14.08
2 +.05 +12.3 2.46
... +.08 -15.5 6.82
9 +.58 -19.5 14.88
8 +.41 +11.4 51.21
... +.11 +4.1 7.29
5 +1.06 +15.1 10.06
...+3.43 +.1 71.70




... +1.50 +6.8 123.46
... -.06 +.3 139.20
... +1.85 +5.9 133.15
... +.10 +5.5 18.35
... +.33 +.5 26.04
... +.07 +1.3 40.21
... +1.13 +5.6 51.06
... +1.61 +22.7 64.74
... +1.47 +8.3 74.50
15 +.80 +4.4 23.49
18 +1.60 +22.1 52.19
... +6.67 +1.6 134.12
16 +.83 +77.0 12.96
35 +.06 +2.2 17.90
27 +6.81 +12.2 93.70
44 +.42 +8.2 18.51
... -.49 +4.8 34.08
... +.56 +1.0 16.83
52 -.97 +9.7 42.83
16 +.73 +.2 38.31


17 +.38 +7.5 13.09
11 +.85 -5.2 53.50
... +.25 -3.0 15.88
... -.11 -18.0 6.39
9 +1.77 +4.2 30.62
... +.16 -16.8 8.67
13 +1.34 +3.0 49.37
21 +.58 +13.2 54.87
13 -.52 +2.2 8.36
9 +.89 +23.5 37.68

6 1
18 -01 -1.3 3145

+
... +1.82 -6.2 29.12
18 +2.68 +27 58.88
23 +.34 +8.3 15.84
14 +.81 -1.3 35.52
14 -.23 +5.7 45.36
3 -1.53 -27.5 35.00
56 +2.69 +1.3 52.33
55 ... 48.8 82.88
13 -.08 -2.8 17.42
15 +4.04 +9.0 129.98
... ... -1.1 18.00
11 +.53 -4.9 36.28
34 +.26 +1.4 35.55
12 +1.18 +21.3 .36.48
17 +.91 +10.8 34.58
20 +.03 -5.5 27.46
24 +.55 +5.1 27.62
... +6.17 +4.2 96.84
36 +1.33 +26.7 72.41
... +1.7(5 +3.6 21.03
... +.01 +12.2 11.95
... +.59 -9.2 12.35
20 +.03 +.2 13.37
... +.27 -19.2 2.14
15 +.82 +.2 30.27
... -1.28 -22.7 29.09
16 -.24 -3.6 51.27
15 +.99 +6.5 53.91
17-1.56 +4.5 83.68
9 -.58 -16.5 28.64
18+14.19 +6.2202.43
... -.56 +28.5 18.18
14 +.88+46.4 17.44
17 +.67 +13.4 74.01
... +.09 -3.6 7.30
15 -.50 --.1 .26.46
43 +.47 +35.1 27.66
26 +.12 +30.1 24.79
20 +.23 +22.9 79.39
14+1.07 +.5 34.96




16 -.53 -17.0 3825
27 +4.03 +20.8 113.12
... +.37 -10.9 9.18
16 +.62 +12.9 17.75
12 +.06 -11.1 41.03
11 -.66 +29.3 33.50
11 +1.54 +18.7 108.32
23 +.82 +23.9 14.91
6 -.09 -3.6 3.96
13 -.01 -5.9 4.45
13 +3.61 +25.7 98.02
13 +2.00 +2.2 67.22
47 +.16 -12.5 36.95-
16 +.01 +5.6 23.84
12 -.58 +17.0 79.68
31 -2.35 +9.0 53.13
15 +1.04 +3.0 51.05
11 +.29 +2.3 31.32
9 -.85 +6.7 20.61
... +.71 +15.3 52.66


CreXus .74 6.4
ClwnCstle ... ...
CypSharp 2,40 18.8
DCT Indl .28 5.0
DR Horton .15 1.3
DTE 2.24 4.5
DeanFds ... ...
Deere 1.40 1.4
DeltaAir ... ...
DenburyR ... ...

rs
DirFnBrrs ... ...

rx us
Discover .24 1.0
Disney .40 .9
DomRescs1.97 4,4
DowChm .60 1.6
DukeEngy .98 5.3
Dynegy rs ... ...
ECDang n ... ...
EMCCp ... ...
EOG Res .64 .5
EdwLIScis ... ...
ElPasoCp .04 .2
EldorGld g .10 ...
EmersonEl l.38 2.3
EnCanag .80 2.3
EngyTsfr 3.58 6.8
ENSCO 14.40 2.4
Exelon 2.10 5.1
ExxonMbi 1.76 2.1
FelCor ... ...
FirstEngy 2.20 5.9
FordM ... ...
ForestLab ... ...
FMCG s 1.00 1.8
FrontierCm .75 9.3
GI IX Rs ... ...
GNC n ... ...
GameStop ... ...
GamGld g ... ...
Gannett .16 1.0
Gap .45 2.0
GenGrPrn.40 2.6
GenMarit .04 2.0
GenMilIss1.12 3.1
GenMot n ... ...
GenOn En ... ...
Genworth ... ...
Gerdau .25 2.0
GoldFLtd .19 1.1
Golderp g .41 .8
GoldmanS1.40 .9




HarmonyG .07 .5
HartfdFn .40 1.4
HItMgmt ... ...
HeclaM ... ...
Hertz ... ...
HewlettP .32 .8
-HomeDp 1.00 2.7
Honwillntl 1.33 2.2
Horizl.ns ... ...
HostHotls .08 .5
Hunting n .
Huntsman .40 2.3
iShGold s ... ...
iSAstla .82 3.0
iShBraz 2.53 3.2
iSCan .50 1.5
iSh HK .45 2.4
iShdapn .14 1.4
iSh Kor .44 .7
iShSing .43 3.1


18 -.39 -11.7 11.57
... +2.82 -1.7 43.10
17 -.10 -1.1 12.77
... +.28 +4.7 5.56
84 -.30 -1.6 11.74
13 +1.58 +8.9 49.36
18 -.68 +11.1 9.82
20 +4.71 +18.7 98.60
14 +.02 -22.1 9.82
34 +.24 +27.9 24.41

.
... -1.82 -16.9 39.27

+ 2
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4C L.AKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS & HOME SUNDAY APRIL 3. 2011


. The Week in Review


WeeMy Stock Exchange HI 8 ts


.





11,500


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Name Div YId PE Cha %Chg Last


Wkly YTD Wkly
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AMEX Most Active


Nasdaq Most Active





i~li~i~


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Ilk~lDY"


S010 ,nnouncements


1 0 Oopbortunidies
CDL A\ Flathed.10n Truck
Drive er needed for FT OTR SE
area. S pealrs exp or more. Contact
Merlissa or .Mars (a 386-935-2 73

Hiriin Locall~ This1 'rk
Insurance Company
Iul Trane Po~ de-d potent aS
Insurance & Pe~nsion for those who
qualify. Call 1-800-257-5500
to set up an mtervie.
Local law office needs
W kerene dpegla io al n
injury and general legal matters
experience preferred. Immediate
employ Nent.C bpl inprson at
Lake City. FL 32055.
Drivers: Dedicated Runs!
Top Pay, Weekly Home-Time
for Solo's & Teams!
Consistent Freight with
Werner Enterprises:
1-888-567-4862
Wanted Highly motivated
individual for Sales Position.
Rountree -Moore Ford Lincoln
Mercury Great benefits, paid vaca-
tion Elxp. a pus b~ut not ne ess~ary.

Janitorial/Custodian. PT down-
town Lake City. Exp & ref's req'd.
No criminal Record. Good Pay.
Nights/weekends 904-259-7700
Leave Message & phone number

Experienced Breakfast
Grill Cook
Needed
386-867-4242

SExperienced Heavy Duty
Diesel Mechanic needed'
Please call Mary at
386-935-2773
Production Technician needed

rrnustibOn Ial wed/ fermhrs
Work. Fax resume 386-754-0263.
Sewing Machine Operator
with experience
good hourly rate
Call Hafners 386 755-6481

FLORIDA
GATEWAY
COLLEGE
t k A W
(Formtery Lake City Commumtly College)
ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR
ACCOUNTING '
Teach accounting classes, general
business classes, and advise students
in class selections. Prepare and
schedule teaching materials relevant to
the instruationu o ceantig Peae,

scheud cadss asndsdm scMtuled
classroom time appropriately. Maintain
accurate student records. Recruit
students to business major. Minimum
Qualifications: Master s degree in
business/accounting with at least 18
g aduae hho s i n a tcutig Qaed

classes. Ability to teach managerial
and financial accounting, general
bookkeeping, and online accounting
courses De~s rle aucalifica ens CPA

Experience with or willingness to
develop distance-learning classes.
ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR,
ECONOMICS
T ach undergraduate courrseesain micro
schedule teaching materials relevant to

tests. Meet scheduled classes and use
scheduled classroom time
appropriately. Maintain accurate
student records. Recruit students tP
busi asss Iar tdis s. iudents in
Qualifications: Master's degree with
minimum of 18 graduate credit hours in
economics prefix courses. Computer
literate. Ability to teach course within
economics. Proven ability to use
technology in the teaching of courses.
Ability to present information in a
coherent manner and the ability to
fairly evaluate student retention of that
information. Ability to work well with
others. Desirable Qualifications:
College teaching experience. Minimum i
of 18 graduate hours in discipline other I
than economics (e.g. history, political
science, geography, math, etc.). Ability /
to teach online courses.
164 Duty Days Tenured Track
to Commence Fall 2011
Salary: Based on degree and
experience, plus benefits.
Application Deadline: 5/4/111
Persons interested should provide College
application, vlta, and photocopies of
transcripts. All foreign transcripts must be
submitted with official translation and
evaluation
Position details and applications available on
w mn Rure
Flonda Gateway College
149 S E College Place
L-PM oit FI3 5- 07

KrCI It acredited b ihe C.unm soo~n or Co~llege of the
somehn, \ritlas sonr(~lcne, alla waeou
yr vlnn, I IlInCouILn I3 i.iinour mr r,lm


10000portunidies





pLRFla


College of Public Helhand

Department of Speech Language
and Hearing Sciences
Position V'acancy
Clinical Audiologist

The Deparmnent of Speech
Language and Hearing Sciences
has initiated a search for a clinical
fault m ber mn u olog~ nhe
al/resac umst witi tth College
Professions at the University of
Florida Health Science Center.
This is a 12-month non-tenure
clinical faculty position. Prefer-
ence will be given to applicants
with clinical experience in a medi-
cal setting, having expertise in
cochlear implant evaluations,
cochlear implant programming,
and demonstrating a wide array of
diagnostic services. Applicants
mus h ve anAuDbe elig ble for

CCC-A. Interested applicants
should submit a letter of interest
referencing position title Clinical
Assistant Professor and
PeopleSoft position number
00006182, curriculum vitae, and
three letters of recommendation
to: Katherine Gray-Lingis,Au.D.,
Chair Search Committee.
Department of Speech Language
and HainnGaS inc9es B x31 1010

0174aUSAdp (oe 3 2-273- 318
katie@phhp.ufl.edu. Deadlie for
applications is April 30, 2011.
If an accominodation due to a
disability is needed to apply for
this position, please cal:
352-392-1251 or
TDD 352-392-7056.
Equal Opportunity Institution

WANTED LICENSED
Life and Health




'10Medical
Emp 0yme t

04544185 .
.CANCER CARE of North
Florida is currently seeking a
MEDICAL ASSISTANT for a
fast paced work environment
Requires HS DiIjloma and
excellent Phle oomynskills with

Intergy Experience and
excellent verbal/written
communication skills.
Qualified candidates please
email resume to:
jpapesh@cancercarenorth
florida.com

05524650
LEARN TO DRAW BLOOD
Local Phlebotomy Course
offered in Lake City, FLA
Certificate program.
(904)566-1328

0552550




Physical Therapist
Home Health Care Agency
servicing Lake City and
surrounding counties seeking
Full-time/PRN experienced
Physical Therapist
Please fax resume to
386-758-3313 attention:
Lynn or apply online at
almostfamily.com

05525503



Homecare RNs, LPNs, CNAs
and HHAs needed ASAR
Full time and part time.
Call 352-291-4888 NOW

Direct Care Staff & Cooks
Lake City Cluster ICF for
Developmentally Disabled
PCTSOIns. www.rescare.com
386-755-6104 EEO/M/F/D/V

Licensed, Experienced, PTA
for busy outpatient clinic
Send resume to P.O. Box 714
Lake City, FL 32056 or
Email to: pta714@hotmail.com

Part Tim?
X-ray Techmician,
Please email resume to
hr@toi-health.com


120 m" n'1vent






11eridian Behavioral
Healthcare, Inc.
warw~mbhci~org

Please visit our w~ebsite to view
current open opportunities
and to apply online:

Therapists:
Licensed. oru str's -Level

Bachelor's-Level in


(adu tp tzchild)

Medical Services
Psychiatrist
CSU RN Nursing Manager
ARNP (Psych exp, Child Pref)
RN, LPN, C.N.A.
Recovery Specialist
(Direct Care)

Meridian is an active partner
with the National Health
Service Corps

To see our current openings in
Mental Health and to apply
online, please go to:
www.mbhci.org
EOE, DFWP, E-Verify





04544098
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners &r exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-04/11/10

Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-04/11/11

Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 38 -5-41 or



310 Pets & SpplieS

FREE KITTEN
Litter box trained
386-288-2899
leave message

Free to good home!, Male
Jack Russell Terrier/Chihuahua
mix GreatS 3th kids

PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
vterinarian tdo umentingdth y

free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wi d if. If nauare

office for information.


3 Livestock &
Supp ie5
Cattle For Sale,
P1 e b ingas bulls & heifers,
Pr b eds 386can us and cross
bree s, 363512


361 Farm Equipment

84 Ford 4610 Tractor. Runs good.
Solid 2WD. New front tires,
350hr on 2005 motor. Dependable.
$7500. obo. 386-867-0005


401 Antiques

CASH CASH CASH CASH
Pre 1964 Silver Coins, Sterling
Flatware, Costume Jewtelry
Unusual Antiques 386-963-2621


402 Appliances

GE Frost-Free Refrigerator
White, works great
$200 obo
386-292-3927 or 386-755-5331

Kenmore Dryer, apt size,
120 voltage
Runs good, $65
386-292-3927 or 386-755-5331
Nice White Gas Tappan Stove
$145 Works Great!
386-292-3927 or
386-755-5331
White Whirlpool Washer

38 -5232 lor



407 Computers

HP Computer'
5100.
S386-755-99)84 or
386-292-2170

IBM Computer'
$65
386-755-9984 or
386-292-21 70


4 FUTrlitUre

Blue Race car toddler bed made
by little tykes. toddler mattress
included. Gentle used. Asking
565.00. 386-292-4228


420 Wanted to Buy

K&~H TIMBER
Wer Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tcracs.
Call 386-961-1961.

Sat5T Jun FasTrucs !m
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3@18.


430 Garage Sales







HUMONGOUS SALE!! Sat &
Sune srmtools to tria e cp 1ts
sz small, med &: la ge. 626 SW
Chapel Hill St off McFarlanes.









440 Miscenlaneous

Large Light Oak Entertainment
Center, will hold atleast 40" TV
$60
386-292-3927 or 386-755-5331

Pool Table-Beautiful, claw foot,
mahogany, leather pockets,
maroon cloth, pool sticks, balls,
plastic cover, and hard table top.
3 piece slate. $1295.00 752-1i874
Tow Behind Grill/Smoker
S$1,250 OBO.
386-249-3104 or
386-719-4802


463 Buildin

ROOFING Are you bothered
by a leaking roof!
Call Reed Roofing today for a free
estimate. 386-752-4072
RCC00455399 Insured
ROOFING:Looking to replace
your Roof? Call Reed Roofing
today for a free estimate
386-752-4072 RC0055399
References available




14 Wide, 2/2-$475. mo. + dep.
Clean, Quiet Country Park
Water, septic, garbage incl. NO
PETS! 386-758-2280 References,

2&3 BR MH.. $395 $650. mo.
plus deposit. Water & sewer fur-
nished. Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
3BR/2BA Doublewide on
2.15 ssmndt a res s75 htrno.
Please call 386-965-7534.
A very clean & well maintained
2/2 units in nice park. $599.mo
w/$500. dep. Rent includes water,
Sewer, trash p/u. Close to town
386-984-8448
Looking for a place to Rent.
Nice reasonable price.
Furnished Mobile Home:
386-623-0925 or 386-752-4618
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White Contact 386-623-3404
or 386-365-1919








6AA MObile Homesfr~l

05525444
Palm Harbor Homes
Has 3 Modular Homes
Available at HUGE Savings
Over 40K Off
Call Today! 800-622-2832

06 Homes of Merit. 3br/2ba. Open
floor plan w/lg kitchen. 3 Rivers
Estate. River access. MLS#75661
Eastside Village Realty. Denise
Milligan-Bose. 386-752-5290
Owner Fin, 3/2, S of Lake City.
quiet, wooded, 1.5 ac, sml dn $700
mo, 386-590-0642/386-867 1833
www. suwanneevalleyproperties.com


650 MobileHome
OWNER FINANCING
3br/2ba DWMH with 5 acres. 10
ad itional acres aai ale. Damiel


Wel ret32 o n n v adre k
porch, shed, MLS77241 $64,000
Call Brittn R~esults Realty


U1 ~nfurnshed Apt.


sS RING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans;
some with garages.
Call 386-454-1469
or visit our website:
wwwfspringhillvillage.net


Move in as low as $325
Call today for details!
386-758-8455
Windsong Apts


020 Lost& Found .








Lost Two Chihuahua's,
white/male, Red & white female,

850-258-8791

LOST: Lg 3 yr old white Calico
female cat. Goes by "Hannah".
Lives on 240/Itchetucknee. 9 yr .-
old daughter brokenhearted. Please
call 386-288-3916 REWARD!!!


1010 Job
OpportunitieS

04544160
NOW HIRING
Cashiers & Baggers for High
Sprmngs fruit & gift stores.
Apply in Person at Florida
Citrus Center (Chevron)
18603 NW CR 236, High
Springs (exit 404 & I-75)

04544161
Ladies and Gentleman
if you have A Class A CDL,
we have a Lease/with a lease
purchase plan.
We accept PTD! Certified
students. O/Operators. No
New England States, 100%
fuel surcharge. Carolinas to
the great NW!
Call today to join us!
Buel Inc
866-369-9744

0444i st Federal Bank has a
position open for a Mortgage
Loan Booker. Responsible for
assembling files for booking,
data input, booking and tracking
pending items. Reviews loans
for accuracy. Review and
prepare final documents and
ordering inspections. One year
office- experience preferred.
Applications may be obtained
from any First Federal Branch :
or email resume to
BiiTurbey leJ@ffsbn raged
to apply. Equal Employment
Opportunity



GATEWAY WA
COLLEGE
(Formerly Lake City Community College)
ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR,
NuRsING
194 Duty Days Tenured Track
Conduct the learning experience in
the classroom, laboratory andlor
clinical ara Prepa~re for instru ton -
assessment strategies to assist the
continuous development of the
learner; use effective communication
techniques with tundoents aned others.
understanding of the subject matter,
use appropriate technology in the
teaching and learning process.
Minimum Qualifications: Master's of
licesdi FL rr eigi le f li esre
in FL. Three years experience as staff
nurse (acute care preferred). Ability to
present information in a coherent
manner and the ability to fairly
evaluate student retention of that
information. Desirable Qualifications:
Computer literate. Teaching
experience.
Salary: Based on degree and
experience, plus benefits.
Application Deadline: 514/11
Persons interested should provide
College application, vita, and
photocopies of transcripts. All foreign
transcripts must be submitted with
official translation and evaluation,
Position details and applications
available on web at: www.fqc.edu
Human Resources
Florida Gateway College
149 S.E. College Place
Lake City FI 32025-2007
Phone (386) 754-4314
Fax (386) 754-4814
E-Mail: hlumnacr~r8c.edu
Ior` i s ctredilred b the Comme~inlrln on Co.llluege of
LIIe southemw r\usnionl ortonieess d bchools








Home Improvements

Handicap accessible modifications
fr veea2s 072yrs experience.
CONSTRUCTION. INC
Licensed and insured CGCO36224


Lawn & Landscape Service

Clean Pine Straw.
You pick it up, $1.85 a bale
Dehivery of 100 bales S283
386-688-9156


ServiceS

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESU;MES-


other court approved forms-
386-961-5896


p V


LAKE CITY REPORTER C LASSIF IED SUNDAYv. APRIL 3. 2011

Lake City Reporter





CLASSI IS


Classified Department: -755-5440


isolrada2 Sgign Eahd~~alnY



Limited to service type advertis-
ing only
4 lines, one month....s92.00
$10.80 each additional line
Includes an additional $2.00 per
ad for each Wednesday insertion.



You can call us at 755-5440,
Monday through Friday frorti 8:00
a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Som people pefer to plac shoe

ad categories will require prepay-
ment. Our office is located at 180
East Duval Street
You can also fax or email your ad
copy to the Reporter.
FAX: 386-752-9400 Please
direct your copy to the Classified
Department.
EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityre- .
porter.com





Ad a o Appear: Call by: FaxlEmail by:
Tuesday Mon., 10.00a.m. Mon., 9:00 a.m.
Wednesday Mon., 10:00 a.m. Mon., 9:00 a.m.
Thursday Wed., 10:00 a.m. Wed., 900 3.m.
Friday Thuns.,10:00.m. Timis.,9:008.m
Saturday Fri., 10:00 am. hi., 9.03 .m.
Sunday Fri.,1000 a.m. Fri.,99: a~m.
These deadhines are subject to change without notee


:n nr
Ad Errors- Please read your ad
on the first day of publication,
We accept responsibility for only
the first incorrect insertion, and
only the charge for the ad space
in error. Please call 755-5440
immediately for prompt correc-
tion and billing adjustments.
Cancellations- Normal advertising
deadlines apply for cancellation.
Billing I alies Call 755-5440
Should further information be
required regarding payments or
credit limits, your call will be tranS-
ferred to the accounting depart-
ment.



approval theo Pulsh w o

pee r e te e n g h t o e i r j c t

be checked for errors by the



for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the
Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nor for any general.
special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply
with Federal, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
nation in employment. housing and
public accommodations. Standard
abbreviations are acceptable; how-
ever, the first word of each ad may
not be abbreviated.

11 Piint ilnte Online
WWW-\\, Ihlietit ronotlrc~cterC u


Tak~e AIUvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

755-5440


ADvantage


ARE YOU OUR MISSING PIECE?










Career' 1 .CR, ~
ortuides d..a




Apply Online or In Person! 1152 SW Business Point D'r
44 Lake City, FL 32025

g~E www.sitel.com367482 EOE





6C LAKEr --' rE"3= ERi CLASSIFIED s~ .-\\ 1 3 200:


%3 75% 3 .................................48 MONTHS
g g~ .................................s 6 M 0NTS












810 Hlome for Sae

A\ quiet neig-hborbood is rthe
penrfet wouxg fr duis cute. cozy
home Lg back yadu w1 car
garage~w rkShop. 584.900.
Centur 'llThe Darby- Roers Co.

Beautiful Home w/lcustom
cabints. 10ft cilin-s. 5199.900
bfLS= "7188 Call
Carre Cason @ 386-621 2806
w estfieldrealtvgroup.com

Bricki Home in Established S/D.
3P3. Open floor plan. MISn'76121
5134.900 Call Miissy Zecher g
386-623-0237 Remax
w w-w.milsszecher.com

CBC 3/1 home, inside city limits.
fenced backyard, detached carpon
w/office MLS#77411 $82,900
Call R.E.O.Realty'
Nancy Rogers @ 386-867-1271
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Brick, split plan. Woodcrest S/D.
Screened porch, dining, living &
breakfast area.Lg backyard. Elaine
K. Tolar 386-755-6488 $139,900.

Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Brick, 10 ac 3/2 split floor plan. Fl
room, Ig utility, scr porch. Gazebo,
carport, fenced. $149,900. Lori
Geibeig Simpson 386-365-5678

Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
New home, May Fair. Great ar
Corner lot. 4 bedroom, lots of tile,
covered porch. Split plan$214,900.
Elaine K. Tolar 386-755-6488

Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
4br/2ba on 5 ac. Lg family, Florida
room den or office. Covered patio.
23x30 workshop. $229,900. Lori
Geibeig Simpsonl. 386-365-5678


810 nlome for sae

Codwnell Bankier!Bishop Realty
Brcic on 3.23 ac. New roof, win-
do s. paint. Newer AC. remod-
eled interior. fencing, good area.
Elaine K. Tolar. 386-755-688
Colonial 4 3 + Guest House.
9.95 acres. ineround pool. detach-
ed, garae. gate entry.MELSP77386
535K ICall Pam Beauchamp @
386-303-2505 Rema~x
Comer lot in Piccadilly S/D. Huge
livulge & dining room. Newa paint
&: carpet. 2 car garage, inground
Pool. 386-752-6575 $133.500
Century 21/IThe Darby Rogers Co-
CCSTOI 4/2 scrn porch. 16x24

f rcpaeop p ac ti e/Ho oos.
386-752-6575 $189,900
Century 21/Ihue Darby Rogers. Co
Custom, 3/2.5 built in 2007
on 10.8 manicured acres '
com ltel fecd er Fn.
av86-62L#736896 A Rall Pu
386-623-68% access Raty
EASTSIDE VILLAGE! Owner
motivated! 3BR/2BA has large hv-
ing/dining rm combo $62,000
#77266 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY, INC. 755-5110
Family Home in Subdivision
4 bdrm Lot of sae wr
roof/carpetan ,gT728 Cl
Missy Zecher @ 386- 23-0237
Remax, www.nussy ecer com
FOR SALE by very motivated
owner. Just reduced $70,000. to
$129,000. Townhouse on Golf
course. 3br/3ba. Wood burning
fireplace. End unit. Remodeled
kitchen, first class appliances,
granite countertops. New Hunter
Douglas wdw treatments.
Cathedral ceiling. Pool, tennis
court. Call for appt. (904)246-6222
GREAT STARTER HOME!
3BR/2BA in Quail Ridge with
back patio, luscious lawn $84,900
#76432 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY, INC. 755-5110


810 Home for Sale

Large Brick. 3/1. 4.43 acre>. mear~l
roof. MLLS-; 77415 Sittt.SS(
Call Nancy Rogers~ @ 6So -~
1271 R.E.O. Realty Group. Inc.
nancytrogersmsn.com~

Lg home on comer lot w/ol ersuedr~
garage. Eastside Retiremrnen

Eastside village e Realt Inc

Log Home. Cypress Beamrnz
wrhole house g~nert;Lor. $260 olks)1
MILS# 76899 Call1
Roger Lovelady~ @386-365 030:'
wezstfieldrealtygroup.comrl

NE' FLOORINGC-FRESH
PAINT! 2-story 3br/2ba on 1+ ac~.
I~g kitchen, family rm. fenced ponld
599.900 #75951 Damesl Cra~pps
Agency. Inc. 755-5 110
Nice solid brick; home on 5 alcrets.
Country feel but close to Tow nI.
MLS 76063 $129.888 Call
Brittany Stoeckert Results Realt!
386-397-34731

Nice, large 4/2 on I acre
w/florida room, granite floors.
wrap around front porch, $148,000K
Call Brittany Stoeckert @
Results Realty 386-397-347.;

Owners Motivated! Multip~le
dwellings. Main house and mou-
bile homes Pecans, cetdar & ava;-
leas. $199,900. Century 2 Ifflic.
Darby Rogers Co. 386-752-6575

Premier Lifestyle Community
The Preserve at Laurel Lake,
4/2, $194,900 MLS# 77257 CallI
Scott Stewart @ 386-867-34198
westfieldrealtygroup.comn

QUAINT 1950s home w/lots of
upgrades! Enclosed front porch,
2BR/IBA, screened balck porch
$29,900 DANIEL CR APPS
AGENCY, INC 755-5110 #77.505


805 Lots for Sle

PUBLISHER'S NVOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which make, nI illegal
to advertise "any preference.
limitation. or discrimination based
on race, color. religion. ex.
disability, familial status or natrion-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not know ingly
accept an adetsn n o rea es-
law. Our readers are hereby in
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.


8 0 Home Tor sale

2/1 completely updated, screened

@ R.E.O. Realty 386-867-1271
nancytrogers~msn.com
2/2 + Bonus Room, 1749sf, 4 acre
corner lot, board fenced, det
garage/wkshp MLS#74900
$214,900 Call Pam @ Remax
386-303-2505 www.visitpam.com
2/2 -2 story 9,7 ac. kened & cross
fenced w pastures. Oversized LR
s karate dinig Ig den. Worksho '
crort. 386 752-6575 $179,900.'
Ce tury 2lffhe Darby Rogers Co.
REPORTER Classifieds
in Print and On Line
WWW.Iakecityreporter~com


810 Home for Sae

2/3 on 5 acres. wrap Iround e-ch.

osrewJ. 51-r.900 MLLS=- --TOB
CaLll Roger L3\elady ai
West~ileld Realn 78~6~-36-!1.: 9
'8R2?BA- jinuiewide mIg home
on 1.7-ac comer loc larze 1.ard &
pved drive 4-?.900 DANIEL
CRA\PPS AGENLCY. CIC. -55-
~110 ;864
:7 Brick Home in tow a. fenced
back pard !l2xl2u orkshop
579.888 Call Nancy Ca R.E.O.
Realty 386-867-1271MLUS= 77414
nanc\ trogers~ msn.com
312 Cute Home, Remodeled. on 2

.MLrSe 77 C e Mancv aREO.
Realt) Group 386-867-1271
nancytrogpers~ msn.com '
3/3 Brick. Great location, pond
Custom built w/Forida room &
vaulted ceiling. Workshop. MLS
75222 5179.900 386-867-1613
Jay Sears Hallmark Real Estate
3Bedrm/3bth vl2 .Master Suites,
fenced back yard.fireplace

Cany #7 7s ZehrS 538 -623
0237 www missyzecher.com
4/2 on 10.5 acres w/ detached
ga ag~e, 7aio 0 ve9 g nda pol,
Nancy Rogers@, R.E.O. Realty
386-867-1271
675 Acre Ranch wlMH, fenced
& cross fenced, wkshop, pole bam ,
2 p)onds, Spacious MLS# 75607 '
Asking 299K, Call Patti Taylor @
386 623-6896 Access Realty
-95 Acre Estate, 4/3 Farm House,
Pond, Oaks, $689,000,
MLS#76149 Call Charlie Sparks
@ii Ws~tfielld Reltr 386L~~I


e_ yr~llu\'J .Y'-V V
westfieldrealtygroup.com Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
LIKE NEW! 3BR/2BA mfg home 312 Hardwood, separate office/liv-
near Wellbomn on 5+ acres ONtY ing/family rm. Workshop, fenced
$79,900 DANIEL CRAPPS Lori Geibeig Simpson 386-365-
AGENCY, INC. 755,5110 #76768 5678 Mary Whitehurst 965-0887


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY. APRIL 3. 2011


Clalssified Department: 755-5440


710 ~b'lef"Rhed Apt
1 & 2 Bedroom Homes
Move in for as low as
51Y99
386-755-2423

2br/Iba duplex, avail May Ist
Renovated & energy efficient. Tile
floors, wasber/dryer, $475/Mo.
$300 Dep. 386-755-1937
A Landlord You Can Iove!
2 br Apts $575. & up + sec. Great
area. CH/A washer/dryer hookups.
386-758-9351 /352-208-2421
Beauntiful Apt, Large I bdrm'
wfmgron pool CH~air
$650/mo + dep 386-344-3261
Great location W of I-75, spacious
deluxe 2BR apts., garage, W/D
hook up. patio. $600 & up, + SD,
386 965-0276
The Lakes Apts. Studios & IBr's
from $135/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
Canl Mcel875%-926


720 ("'"M d pg
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electic*
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135, .
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808


730 Unfrnihed

3ba/2ba, New carpet &r aint:.5
ac 2 nn from d'town. No pets.
Lease req'd: fav. background only.
$85p +dep. 752-8696, 752-5025.

4 b 2ba 770 P~o 1 S Athley
St $750.00 mo. 1st and last
required. 386-755-3649
3br/2ba Lg LR, w/add'1 family,
screen back poich, secluded on 10
acres. Close to &i75. on Hwy 47.
$850. mo. + sec. 386-867-1190
3tir/2ba new const.in nice S/D
Imase Opt. to buy. $900/NIo.
$700 Dep Req'd., Credit Check
No Pets (386)755-9476
4/2,on 10 acres, w/lake access, off
of South Marion, $1,000 per
month, $500 security,
Call 386-752-3066
Ft White, 2/1, CH/A, 2010 W2 &
ref's from current landlord req'd,
Access to Rivers $650 mo,
S$600 sec., 386-497-4699
Likre new site-built home for rent,
3/2, on 5 acres, no pets! Non-
smoking environment. Call for de-
tails, $800mo + dep 386-758-1789
Suwannee River Frontage,2/1
Cabin in Col. Co./ I75 &r W Spgs,
Call Jane S.Usher Lic. Real Estate~
Broker 386-755-3500 or 365-1352
TOWNHOUSE 2br plus
bonus room. w/1.5 bath.
Quail Heights CC. $750. mo plus
$250 damage dep. 386-7-52-8553


750 Business &Ofc etl

05525390
2,000 sq ft, 1 mile S of I-75 on
47, includes warehouse &r mini
golf,3 bth (incl handicap),
unlimited possibilities could
convert to Senior Daycare, etc.
386-752-1364 or 965-4340

1800 SQ FT $1100. Office
furniture available and
cubicle dividers.Wlater,
sewer and garbage fees included.
386-752-4072 Ready to move in!
OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$695. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor
SE Baya Ave Office Furnished
1800 Sq Ft $1125.00
Ideal for Engineers &r Professional
Quiet and safe environment
Security available 386-752-4072


760 Wante to Rent

Retired male w/references looking
for long term rental. Moving to the
Lake City area. Needing 1 bedrm-
or small house. (954)205-5501


770 Condos For Rent

04544218
Golf Course Condo for rent,
2BR/2BA, 1420 s.f., $950/mo.
Rent includes all appliances,
basic cable, water/sewer/
garbage, pool &r tennis ct.
access. Realtorlowner
call 386-344-0433



790 Vacation Rentals

Horseshoe Beach Spring Special
Gulf Front 2br, w/lg porch, dock,
fish sink. wkend $345./wk $795.
(352)498-5986/386-235-3633
alwaysonvacation.com #419-181

805 Lots forSale


1999 3/2 DWMH on 1 ac
$55,000
Hallmark Real Estate
386-867-1613
SCall Jay Sears
2 ac lot in River Access
community. Suwanne River
1 mile away. Owner will finance.
$13,500 Hallmark Real Estate
386-867-1613 Call Jay Sears
Emerald Cove S/D, Lot # 19
Half acre lot, Only $42,000
call Millard Gillen @
386-365-7001 MLS# 75278
westfieldrealtygroup.com
High &r Dry buildable, wooded in
Forest Country. MLS#76668
Eastside Village Realty, Inc.
Call Denise Milligan-Bose
386-752-5290










LAKE CiY P~E OR ER CLASSIFIED s--i~ -31-; z


940 Trucks







To place your
classified ad call


810 Ho~me for Sale




Don Reed Construc-tion. Inc.
Reduced in ROSe (Treek 5 D.5 4
iin 2 ;i- : ai- to rn

fri R anir~i i-!:-2505

Srcluded. hoiL J. r- tclow to towhn.
3 2 Brick Ranch Home. ~pacious




Soard & orkc inccf ilray:'p SCotry
kulchen keat In srra ;I, well as
foirml. i86-7i2-6,5; 5 5701.IfX)
Cerntur, 2Ulh: Dart? Roerrs Co.

Totally ReTurbishe~d 2/2
w/w~orksihop onr 1.25 fenced acres
5914.900) Call Mlillad Gaillen (s
Westfrild Really 186-365-7001I
MLSn75417
TPwo story MH. located in
Wellborn on 2.66h acres, porches
and fireplaces, 9 bdrms/3bths
5163,900 Patti Taylor MLS#71594
Access Realty 386-623-6896
Well Maintained 3/2 on 1.5
acres, fenced. porches, wkshp,
549.900 MLS# 77309 Call Josh
Grecian386-466-251 7
westfieldrealtygroup.com


820 Farmasg


Must See Take Over Pymt's
10 Ac $74,500, 20 Ac $139,500
$6,975 P/A, Fine Neighborhood,
3 miles W of Col. City School,
Owner Fin 5%. Rolling Pasture
386-752- I364 or 965-4340

10 ac lots, some w/well, septic, pwr
pole. Lowered prices. Owner finance
w/low dn pmnt Deas Bullard Proper-
ties 386-7.52-4339 www.landefl.con)
4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$69,900. $613mo 352-215-1018.
ww w.LandOwnerFinancing.com
4 acres, Wellborn, New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down, $39,900, $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
ww w. LandOwnerFinancing.c~m
5 WOODED acres.
Suwanee Ranchettes. $200 per mo
for 5 mo. Then $203.85 per mo
,thereafter. (352)472-2879
Outdoorsman Special, near
Itchetucknee Springs St Park,
Owner fin. w/20% dn,
$54,900 MLS# 76366
Brodie Alfred 386-487-1484


8 03 Commercial
Property
1525 S OHIO AVE,
LIVE OAK, FL
Flexible space For Lease with
many possibilities. Great Location!
Great Visibility! Great Price!
1,500sf-17,000sf. Call Scott Stew-
art for more info. 386-867-3498


Great Investment/Owner Finance
1400 sq ft building on 2 acres
Creative terms, owner flexible.
Call for details. 386-867-1190


$08 Investment
Property
Investment Property, 2 MH's on
almost 2acres, well & septic,
fenced $29.900 MLS# 77233
Call Josh Grecian @ Westfield
386-466-2517









05 WHE1S a WATRB ~CAT










Bring the picture in or
we will take it for youl
Ad runs 10 consecutive days
with a description and photo in the
newspaper and online E-edition.
Ad runs 10 consecutive days as a
classified line ad online.
You must include vehicle price.
All ads are prepaid.
Private party only.


Classified Department: 755-5440


g
r
~~~
.-i,
?rl: .ui
'h
i'



i










I




















"iiYir~ L








r

=~ClrlC


$10,500
Call
386-555-5555

If you don't sell your vehicle
during the first 10 days you
can run the same vehide ad
for 10 additional days for
only $15.00
Terms and conditions remain the
same for the additional run.


~ Contact us



at the paper~


~ 5J .



386-755-5440



SSUBSCRIPTION

386-7~5-5448


nWOTE D PRE ENTS

386-752-1 293



:. ECTRONIIC MDS SEND T&~:
M6-A >/- -.!:





Operation Cinderella: An affordable prom


Story ideas?

Contact
C.J. Risak

7541-042t7


Section D


Sunday, April 3, 20 II


www.Ilakecityreporte r.com


GARDEN T-ALK


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
aroblnson~~iakecityreporter.corn

Afton Browvn of
Lake City from
several activi-
Wt i ~ ~ ~ te s d u r i n g high brigot n k p
school, but she didn't miss out
on one of the biggest events
- prom.
"To me, prom was huge," she
said. "It was the one night I could
be a princess. Every girl wants to
be a princess for a night."
Brown wants other girls to
have a special prom night and
also help a community orga-
nization through Operation
Cinderella, which is 2-6 p.m. April
10 at Lake City Mall in the for-

ro endn c utie can pr hse

one accessory for only $10,
she said. Money raised from
the vent willogo to Th~e Ronald

aCcesre ar to be deosnaed
from the community.
Brown, Doodle's Closet owner,
found an article online about a
Northern group organizing a
similar project for its community,
she said. People donated dresses,
and girls in need were able to
pick one out for free.
"I thought it was a really cool
idea," she said.
Implementing Operation
Cinderella in Lake City could
serve several purposes by charg-
ing a minimal fee for the dresses,
'Brown said. Girls could find
Ssuital prom dress, money
would be raised for the Ronald
McDonald House and any


Photos by JASON MATTHEW WALKERILake City Reporter
Above: Afton Markham Brown, owner of Doodle's Closet, looks at different dresses donated for Operation
Cinderella, which will take place on April 10 from 2 p.m. to 6 p.m.

Below: Although most of the donations have been prom-related, any formal c nothing -- including men's wear -- and
even costume jewelry and accessories are welcome.

dresses not purchased would be L ~
donated to the Hospice Attic.
She approached Janice
Dorminey, Lake City Mall
operations/marketing manager,
about partnering for Operation .
Cinderella. ,
"I was all for it," Dormiey r*
said. "I klmew what it was and was
excited'somebody wanted to do -..
that event."
Prom is a turning point, from --b
youth to adulthood. ~-t
"Everyone wants to look theiri'


Her s

fo OT Our





H er~~bs haeo mlie


purposes including healing,
dying linens, and cooking.
dHrebas can twhfound fresh,

Iomanm sers are asl,
and oregano. H-erbs are
often used in cooking to
increase the flavor of the
food without adding extra
fat, sugar, and sodium.
It is best to buy or pick
fresh herbs close to the
time you will be using
them, to insure their best
flavor. When buying herbs,
some things to notice
are the smell, color, and
texture. If you are unsure
about their quality, remove
a few stems from the
bunch. If the stem remains

HERBS continued on 2D


DRESSES continued on 2D


Lakie City Reporter


jenny Jumrp














Re-enacting a weekend as an Olustee re-enactor


LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL &( STATE \D AIL3201


Page Editor: C.J. Risak. 754-0427


as Confederates to meet the
adv-ancing Federal force. harass-
ing their adv-ance to the battle
field.
This is scripted so we arrive
on the field at the start time of
the 'spectator battle'. This battle
simulates early success of Union
forces. with infantry engaging in
front of the crowd, the artillery
static on each end of the field,
and cavalry- attacking exposed
flanks. *
Some deviations from reality
are made. Because it is a specta-
tor battle, distances are greatly
compressed, explaining why
there is an unbelievable amount
of shooting for few casualties.
With limited numbers, we can't
take too many hits initially.
While blood and guts could
be simulated, we keep gore to
a minimum. Third, we have a
limited period to 'perform' so the
rate of powder burned is much
higher than originally. We carry
more ammunition than our fore-
fathers would have in a full day
of combat.
After the battle we retire to
our camps and soon horses


are groomed. guns cleaned,
and there may be a beer or
two. The campfire is a gather-
ing for music, stories and good
fellowship. The music is good,
creative. and not always bland
versions. By 1 a.m., things die
down and reveille comes later
on Sunday.
Sunday is more relaxed, with
most attending church. After
services, we prepare for the
battle. All cavalry ride Feder-al
to simulate part of the original
events Federal cavalry attacks
Confederate infantry, who form
a square, bayonets outward. The
square then dissolves under
cannon fie and a general melee
follows. Federal do their best
to stem rebel forces, who sweep
across the field to victory.
All that remains is cooling
down the mounts, striking camp
and the drive home. An evening
of cleaning and storing weapons
for the next event wraps up the
weekend.

aGeorge Scott is Director of
College Facilities. His phone
number is 754-4325.


Ain hour later I led a small
Confederate patrol out. carefully
scouting ahead and expecting a
loud boom around every turn.
Fortunately our woods runner
Southern boys spotted the gun
in ambush. By cowpaths e
reached their rear unseen and
crept to within 50 yards.
Our first volley would have
devastated them. They ow-ned
themselves 'done in' and good
Yiankees! After a break for water
and lunch, we separated.
Wte crept about for hours
without achieving an advantage,
a truce was declared and we
proceeded back to camp to rest,
and water and feed the horses.
Inter that night the perfidious
Yankees slipped off, cannon and
all. The bold Rebs followed, but
were betrayed by a full moon,
One for the Yankee gunners.
Saturday dawned early. Most
cavalry units trailered to Inke
City for the parade. It stepped
off on time and proceeded well.
A high point is saluting the vets
at the VA hospital.. I'm honored
to do this. We trucked back to
the battlefield in time to go out


recently celebrated
the Olustee Festival.
For spectators, this
is a once a year treat
to see recreation of a historic
event For re-enactors, this is a
rewarding hobby and way of life
for same.
Who are they, why do they
do it, and how does it happen?
Some common themes are a
deep interest in history and a
desire to 'do it right'. For some,
every stitch worn and every
word spoken is consistent with
how people lived then. For oth-
ers, it is sufficient if it looks
'right' from 10) feet
'Hard corps' often stay in char-
acter. The most prevalent por-
trayal is the Civil War, but eras
from ancient Rome to Vietnam
have adherents.
How does it happen?
Contacting a person involved in
the hobby isn't difficult and they
are anxious to assist you in get-
ting involved. For cavalryr, being
a competent horseman and hav-
ing a good mount is prerequisite.
Inantry means marching,


George Scott


although usually done in mod-
eration. Most artillery units are
static; in place for the entire
event. Units have extra equip
ment, weapons, and gear to get a
new member started.
How does the typical event
go? Being sure my horse is up
for it is the first priority. I also
check my weapons, tack and
equipment in advance. I arrived
at Olustee Thursday and met
with the cavalry commander. W~e
marked campsites and enjoyed a
quiet fie before the fun started.
Friday the fist cavalry units
arrived for a campaign into the
Osceola Forest
The Alabama mounted artil-
lery a horse-drawn gun and
escort donned Union uniforms
and vanished into the woods.


Ella Mae Weaver
of Miami and Jack
H. Luffman of
Miami were united
in marriage April 4,
1946 in Miami. They
will celebrate their
65th anniversary.
The couple have
two children, Jan
and Alan, and three
grandchildren.
Both are retired.
The couple has
lived in Lake City
for 23 years.


Carl and Cindy Dempsey of Lake
City announce the engagement and
approaching arrriage of their daugh-
:tbi-,Chtfstine'yr Dempse~ of Igke
City to Caleb Matthew Douglas of Lake
City.~ He is the son of Zach and Cindy
Douglas of Inke City.
The bride-elect is a 2007 graduate
of Columbia High School and a 2009
graduate of the Florida Gateway College
cosmetology department. She is owner
of Floyd's Barber Shop.
The future groom is a 1999 graduate
of Columbia High School and served
six years in the United States Air Force.
He is a graduate of the Iake City
Police Academy arid has been with the
Columbia County Sheriff's Office for
three years.
A August wedding is planed at Wesley
Memorial United Methodist Church in
Lake City. A reception will follow at the
church.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Afton Markham Brown, owner of Doodle's Closet, located at 2941 W. U.S. Highway 90, picks
out a donated prom dress that will be featured in Operation Cinderalla, which is a program in
association with the Lake City Mall that will offer formal wear for $10. All proceeds will go to
The Ronald McDonald House of North Central Florida.


DRESSES: Getting ready for prom

Continued From Page 1D


best for the night of the prom," she said.
Donations are needed from the commu-
nity to make Operation Cinderella a suc-
cess, Brown said. Formal dresses in good
condition of any shape, size or color, as
well as shoes and other prom accessories,
are accepted.
Any interested businesses can have
vendor booths at the event for $30, she
said. Booth proceeds also go to the
Ronald McDonald House.
Many people in the community have
already brought in items or committed to
donating to Operation Cinderella, Brown
said.
As the mother of three daughters,
Audre' Washington of Lake City said she
can remember spending hundreds of dol-
lars on prom dresses and accessories.
She is coordinating with friends to gather
up dresses, shoes and accessories for the
project.
"It's just an awesome way to gather
funding for such a worthy cause as the
Ronald McDonald House," Washington
said. "So many families, not only in Lake
City, use it for various reasons."
Most prom dresses hang in the closet
never to be worn again, she said. The


project is an opportunity to be a blessing
to others.
"Donating is just as easy as going
to your closet and going through your
after-five attire," Washington said. "We're
fortunate to have a young lady like Afton
have this in her heai-t. Whatever we can
do to help her, we ought to join together.
Community is about joining together and
making things better for everyone."
Dressing rooms will be fashioned in
the store for customers, Dorminey said.
. Donating to Operation Cin~derella is a win-
win situation for everyone involved.
"I think it is a wonderful event," she
said. "I think it's a nice thing to do."
Donations can be dropped off at:
Doodle's Closet on U.S. 90 West, next to
Applebee's; Hair Graphics on Baya Drive,
near the Baya and U.S. 90 intersection; or
the Lake City Mall Office 8 a~m. to 1 p.m.
Monday through Friday Donations must
be received by April 8.
Call Doodle's Closet at 386-438-5961 or
visit www.facebook.com/doodlescloset for
more information.
"It's a great case to help Ronald
McDonald House and clean out your
closet," Brown said.


upright on its own then
the herb is still fresh.
However. if the stem wilts,
it is best to choose another
bunch.
Herbs need to be prop
erly washed in order to
clean off any contami-
nants. The best method
of cleaning is to rinse
the water downwards. A
colander helps with this
so that you are washing
the soil and possible con-
taminants away from the
herbs. Dunking foods does
not allow all of the con-
taminants to be cleaned
off because the water then


becomes cont-aminated and
re-contaminates the food.
Properly storing fresh
herbs helps retain their fla-
vor. After removing parts
that are discolored or wilt-
ed, cut the stems diagonal-
ly. Then, place the herbs
in a container with 1-2
inches of water, cover with
a plastic bag to allow room
for air circulation. 'You can
also place the herbs into
a half opened bag being
careful not to crush them.
Placing herbs in the warm-
est part of the refrigerator
helps prevent freezing.
If you are unable to use


all of the herbs quickly,
think about freezing what
is leftover. One way to
preserve fresh herbs is to
crush them, place in an ice
cube tray, fill with water,
and freeze. Once frozen,
you can transfer into a
sealable bag labeled with
the name of herb and date
preserved.
So go ahead add some
spice to your life!
For more information
on healthy eating tips and
food safety, contact Jenny
Jump at 386-752-5382
Learn more at hftt:/
edis. ifas. ufl. edu/fy209


ANNIVERSARY


E N AG EM ENT


HERBS: Keeping them fresh

Continued From Page 1D





LAKE CITY REPOTER ADVE RTISEMh~ENT Si'CAY APRIL 3. 2011


Page Editor: C.J Risak. 754-0427


Your total monthly
prescription bill

will cost



at Baya Pharmacy.

Regardless of chain store promotions,
Baya Pharmacy now promises lower
prices that can save you hundreds. It
takes only 10 minutes to switch to Baya.
It's a bold move that'snever
been done before.
It3s Baya's new

scrzptlon
COd
ornirsO





Photo courtesy of Getty Images


LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE sUNDAY APRIL 3 2011


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


Photo courtesy of Getty Images


Creative messy cooking is good for kids


get their
kids to clean up or, better yet, to not make a
mess in the first place. But guess what? Getting
messy can actually be good for kids.
Clinical research shows that creative, messy
activities like cooking and baking engage all of a
child's senses, helping them explore new ideas and
teaching them how to solve problems. It
also provides valuable time together, as well as an
opportunity to teach basic math skills, cleaning habits
and nutrition.
"To unlock a child's fullest potential, cooking
activities, even as simple as pouring and mixing, are
recommended at least three to four times a week,"
said Karen Deerwester, child development expert and
founder of Family Time, Inc.
According to Deerwester, children shape their own
learning
by transforming unpredictable, messy experiences into
creative, purposeful action. "These mess-to-morsel
experiences teach children a critical life skill called
executive function," she said, "which is a child's
ability to self-manage behavior and negotiate age-
appropriate challenges and obstacles. Furthermore,
these types of activities teach kids to take risks, learn
from mistakes and create out-of-the-box solutions."
Children learn through play, so Deerwester
encourages parents
to cook up a mess with their children on a regular
basis. These tips and ideas will help you create a
powerful and fun learning experience for your
child. .
For more information and ideas for messy play
activities, visit www.facebook.com/clorox.


d








4


f,, t


.r


Get started on some creative kitchen play with these homemade play doughs and fun toast art.


Best Play Dough Ever
2 cups flour
1 cup salt
1 teaspoon cream of tartar
2 tablespoons oil
1 teaspoon food coloring
2 cups water
Mix ingredients mn saucepan.
Cook over medium heat, stirring
constantly until dough leaves
sides of the pan. Remove from
pan. When cool to the touch,
knead for a few minutes. Play
dough can be stored
in the refrigerator Tor weeks in
an airtight container.


Edible Peanut Butter
Play Dough*
I cup peanut butter
1 cup powdered milk
1/4 cup honey
Optional texture items: raisins,
coconut, crushed graham
crackers
Mix the first three ingredients
in a large bowl until smooth.
Add optional texture items.
*Not for children with
peanut allergies.


Chocolate Play Dough
1 1/4 cup flour
1/2 cup cocoa powder
1/2 cup salt
1/2 teaspoon cream of tartar
1 1/2 tablespoons cooking oil
1 cup boiling water
Combine flour, cocoa powder, salt,
and cream of tartar. Add cooking
oil and boiling water. Stir quickly
and mix well. Cook over low heat
until dough forms a lyil. When
cool, knead with hands. Refrigerate
and store in an airtight container.
Smells great, but is not really sweet
enough to eat.


How to cook up a mess with
kidS

a Baking and basic food assembly is the easiest way
to branch into messy culinary play. Cut up fruits
and vegetables to make fun faces, or simply mix
together homemade dough to play with and shape.
(See recipes.)
a Age is just a number! Allow even the youngest
chef to help by pouring ingredients like flour,
sugar and eggs into a bowl.
. Start simple. No-bake cookies, smoothies and sand-
wiches are a great start. If using a cookbook, start
w-ith one that has pictures for each instruction.
Pour on the praise! No matter the outcome, always
encourage their effort. Remember, practice makes
perfect.
a Spills happen. Take it in stride and simply use the
opportunity to teach clean-up. Clean applicable
surfaces with Clorox Clean-Up Cleaner with
Bleach. especially after using eggs or raw meat.


Love Toast
ftoast is for more than just eating. White bread is an excellent canvas for making meal-
time extra special. Simply; paint bread with milk mixed with food coloring and then
toast. For some extra fun. cut toast into a special shape using a seasonal cookie cutter.
For a fruity flavor twist, create paint out of water and flavored powdered gelatin mix.


ir~L


Show me the dough!










LAK(E Si1 ' 3 E;=E LIFE SUNDAY APRIL 3 2011


Page Editor: C.J. Risak. 754-0427


needed to not only adapt
our home but ourselves,"
says Laila Ali, professional
athlete and mother to
toddler son and soon-to-be-
born baby number two.
Huggiest teamed up
with Laila to help parents
conquer the chaos of parent-


Laila Ali


hood by offering exclusive
tips for the everyday mom. According to Laila, and
other modern moms struggling to keep up, little
bundles of joy can often have parents wishing for
more hours in the day.
"With only a few lifestyle changes, your baby's
exciting milestones don't have to be accompanied
by crazy days, puffy eyes and fast food dinners,"
explains Laila. "From squeezing in daily fitness
routines to finding little ways to reward yourself
- it's possible to maximize your energy as you
chase after your running, dancing and playing
little mover."
Check out these tips, and don't forget to enjoy
this special time in your active baby's life.
To learn more about parenting rewards from
Huggies and obtain other tips on how to enjoy the
amazing ride of parenting, visit www.Huggies.com.





1. Get moving.
Finding time to hit the gyEm
isn't always easy with a baby
at home, so find ways to
incorporate aerobic activity itito
your day. Walk to the library or
supermarket whenever possible,
and be sure to get your toddler
out of her stroller so she can
walk some of the way, too. If
walking toyour destination-isn't
an option, park the car far from
entrances and enjoy those extra
steps of exercise.

2. Surround yourself
with support.
From sharing parenting advice
to all those special firsts ill
your baby's life, connecting
with other parents is a great
way to surround yourself with
needed support. Huggies"
Brand is helping moms all over
the country come together
by teaming up with Meetup,
the world's ~largest online net-
work of local groups, to host
60 "Keep-Up Meetups" from
January to March. "Keep-Up
Kits" will be given away to help
Meetup Momns keep up with
their little mover.

3. Laugh.
From the spit-up to the spilled
milk, don't be afraid to laugh
off the silly situations. Laughter
really is the best medicine
relieving stress and burning
extra calories. Remember,
parenting is never perfect, so the
next time you find yourself in
the middle of that messy diaper
change don't let yourself stress
laugh it out instead.

4. Accept ~a helping hand.
For a first-time mother, it's hard
to realize you really can't do it
all. Keeping up with your little
speedster all day can be exhaust-
ing. When feeling overwhelmed
and ready to pull out your hair,
it is ok to admit that you really
could use that extra helping
hand. Accept your family or
friend's offer to come over and
keep your little one entertained
for a couple of hours. Don't
second guess this decision; be
grateful and accept the favor
because you deserve it (and
Others relish the time with your
Bundle of joy).

5. Don't forget to sleep.
Between the late night feedings
and round the clock diaper duty,
it may seem impossible to get
more than a couple hours of
shut-eye. To keep from feeling
like you are going to fall asleep
while at the stroller wheel, try


Photo courtesy of Getty Imags'


Parents deserve rewards for all that they do on days other
than Mother's Day and Father's Day. What's even better
is getting rewards on items they already purchase like
diapers. This season, enjoy a winning code in every pack
of Huggies' Little Movsrs diapers to cash in for prizes like
Starbucks gift cards and iPods. Submit each on-pack code
online and see details at www.Huggies.com to win.

9. Take a break.
Take regular breaks away from your children. It's easy
to brush off the importance of "me time" but it's a must
to keep you at your best whether it's taking a walk.
reading a book or going for a drive, "me time"' cannot be
underestimated.

10.Remember to treasure those
"aww-inspired" moments.
Last but certainly not least, remember to sit back and enjoy
the ride of a lifetime -- parenthood. From sharing photos
of your toddler on wwwh.facebook.com/hug~gies to connect-
ing with other parents via wwwu.twitter.com/huggies.
remember to treasure each and every moment.


to fit in a inidday nap while your baby snoozes. For the
working mom. head to bed as soon as possible once the
little ones are tucked snuggly in their beds. Teaming up
with your partner and switching off middle-of-the-night
feedings and diaper changes can also save you from -
exhaustion.

6. Take up a hobbyi.
Setting aside time to wrork on something you enjoy can
help clear your mind and leave you feeling refreshed and
rejuvenated. Don't be afraid to try out different hobbies
until you find the one that fits your schedule and interests.
If possible. incorporate y-our little one into y~our new hobby
as this can make for some very- special bonding time.

7. Stay organized.
Organization is key to keeping stress to a minimum.
From making sures the diaper bag is prepared prior to a
long car ride or da\ at the playground. staying organized
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and collected


8. Reward yourself.


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THE LAST WORD

E ugen ia WNord

toole so eone put dman s
Take care of your own inter-
ests. At
IO (July 23-Aug. 22):
There are opportunities ga-
lore. but choose what suits you
best without bragging. You
don't want to send the wrong
impression or make someone
less fortunate feel bad. It's
about sharing the glory with
the people who are important
to y (Aug 23-Se 0
22): There is much that can
be accomplished if you focus
on how you can adapt what
yonuc ne dy h~av t w rk more
place so that everyone has
what they require will ensure
a household that is productive
and positive. -kAA
.LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): Indecision and confusion
can be expected. Being pulled
in different directions will
cause anxiety and a need to
withdraw. Expect to be pres-
sured if you don't make up
your mind. You require peace
and quiet to think. AAA




q ~o a~g~~o~n y muBsrBP. peolpst and present
Sersanals raohe


GET READY TO ROLL By Kevin G. Der'/ Edited by Will Shortz


i9 8 3 4


3 2 1


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3 6 9 7


S7 '19 5 1


4 1 5


2 8 4


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Answers to last Sunday's Crossword.
PIOT ILUCKIIRI RA WI TH KIRU

TIHE P ELIIC ANNBIRIIE F T H E
EIEL GIEIED -C LE SITAIR

AITT ESIT GIINIO FIE
TH E ST ER ILEICUICKKOIO OW
NIAISH AIDIOS DOI IN IAPP O
OINIT PAWEIR AITL ME R
SII X DIA Y S IO IFTHECONDII
SITAIN LEE EIAR G LU EIS
TIOIK IL LIAM!O ICIK II NGB RD
OIU I DIA L IA D HIOIOPS El'
UTITEIRIS NIOHH ALAN AIX
TISIAR TH EMIA LTEISE FA LIC

LONESOED VIEI GALPALI

AIMAINAISI TUN WIA LT P
R A V E LWH ER E EAGLE SDA
CIHIAIRIMOLD HO Y AIYIR B UI IT
HIA LOS O0S S EIOUS ES PN E '


LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE &L CROSSWORD SUNDAY. APRIL 3. 2011


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


-lRIES (MLarch 21-April
19): Set your mind on what
you need to accomplish and
forge ahead. You have plenty
of; energy- to get things done
as long as you don t let y-our


scORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov.
21): You'll be drawn to a job
that alows y-ou to use y-our tal-
ents to the fullest. Being able
to relate to people who are
as creative as you will open
doors. Networking functions
will lead to interesting con-
nections and a proposal that
ecsAG T~RUS (Nov. 22-
Dec. 21): Make changes that
will enhance your surround-
ings. Invest in and promote
what you have to offer. Yrou
will attract people who will
encourage and contribute to
your plan. Open your doors
to friends, family and people
interested in what you are do-
ing. WAAAAlr
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-
Jan. 19): Tread carefully
when dealing with others. You
will be misinterpreted or led
.astray by someone who wants
something from you. Stick
close to home as travel delays,
mishaps and minor injury are
all likely Irl
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Rely on your past
and the present to help you
ascertain how to use your

nh potpoe yeo findmisirn
to lend you a helping hand or
to jump in and get involved
wholeheartedly. AAAA
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): Determine if you are
happy and fulfilled in both
your personal and profession-
81 liVeS. Irok for areas where
you can make improvements.
Take advantage of a social
eVent or activity with the po-
tential to enhance your love


DOWNSIZING IN SOLTTI emotions interfere. Your dedi-
JERSEY' cation, loyalty and abilitieswuill
DEAR DOWNSIZ. earn you points with someone
ING: I'm glad you asked. are trymg to unpress.
Offer them to your county TARU Apil2-My
or state historical society: 20): U Goo frtun can be
'I~rse ictues f yor rla-yours if you use today to check
tives could provide interest- otivsmnso rpry
ing snapshots of the time in wt h oeta ogo n
which they were taken. Your value. Take on a project that
local library might also want will allow you to use your skills
them.and talents to the fullest. Trust
DEAR ABBY: My sister in your own judgment AAA
and I want a dog, but our GEMINI (May 21-June
mother won't let us have 20): You've got everyone's at-
one. When we asked her why tention, so put your best foot
not, she said, "Because dogs forward and relay your mes-
poop, pee, 'get things dirty Isage passionately. An equal
and bark." share in something you want
We told her, "We will train to do should be considered
it, feed it, clean up after it. withsomeonewhrocanbringa
We'll even pay for it." We re- lot to the table. WAAA
ally would, but she still says, CANCER (June 21-July
"NO!" 22): Don't make a move that
What should wedo tocon- might incriminate you be-
vince our mom to let us get a cause someone is being pushy
dog? SON AND DAUGH- or pointing an accusing finger
TER IN ALBUQUERQUE mn your sbetn docus on .
DEAR SON AND ote osblte n eue
DAUGHTER: I can't claim IV
this advice as my own. It was CE g g Y
penned by Jeff and Bil Ke- I
ane, the noted cartoonists. Ceebit Ciphe crporm r tt
They said, "The best way to E hclenerlnlheiph
get a hamster is to first ask SJMHJN'OD AE
for a pony." That logic mightYWBNHUWB DM H
also apply to a puppy. vw N w o M
X ZK HONJ YA X FZ NY
SWrite Dear Abby at IZ H M H X Y Y B Z H M H X
www.DearAbby.com or PEVIOU sSO)L.ObON "Ihm c nv ne

An eesox C 69AM (c) 2011 by NI


SUNDAY CROSSWORD


DEAR ABBY* My eldest
daughter, "Judy," who was
previously loving, kind and
considerate, has for the last
year distanced herself from
me. I have left messages on
her answering machine be.
cause she won't answer the
phone. I have sent her cards
and letters, only to receive
no response. We live a short
distance of each other, but I
haven't seen her in a year.
I am bewildered by this
abrupt change in our mother-
daughter relationship. I have
pleaded for an explanation;
there's never any response.
Judy is a well-educated
individual, with several de-
grees and on her way to a
master's degree. I know, too,
that there has been consider-
able stress in her life but
that shouldn't cause her to
cut her own mother out of
her life. I have had many
sleepless nights over this.
I am at my wit's end. I
feel she possibly needs help
in some way. Judy seems to
be angry at the whole world
- me, her siblings, her grand-
mother, and oftimes her
friends are her "enemies."
Help! SLEEPLESS IN
UTAH
DEAR SLEEPLESS: If
your daughter had distanced
herself .only from you, I
would guess that she was


Abi il Van Buren
Nw~vweor bby~com

punishing you nursing a
grievance she wasn't ready
to air. However, because she
has suddenly cut herself off
from everyone, declaring
that they are her enemies,
there is indeed cause for con-
cern. She could be suffering
from depression or paranoia.
Please don't wait. Go to
your daughter so you can
see for yourself what is going
on with her. She may need
medical or psychological in-
tervention.
DEAR ABBY: I have a
question that affects just
about every household in
America sooner or later.
What do you do to dispose
of unwanted family photo-
graphs?
I have albums filled with
pictures of parents, siblings,
aunts and uncles. I can un-
derstand saving a few but
when you are at the "end of
the line," so to speak, and
there is no one to pass them
along to, what's an appropri-
ate method for disposal? -


F BUF B FSA Y B
O ), SB NH HF ZD(
DoR (SH MOBR
Y ." X FX JN F J F
teatevery by. n his her, would
EA, Inc. 4-4


OH


61 Shankar piece
62 acid
63 Hoedown seating
64 Pooh's pal
66 What you used to

68 Bickering
72 "I like your
thinking"
76 "Cat __," 1965
Film
77 Red-haired film
princess
79 Olds sedan
80 Shot source
82 Exchange fig.
83.Citrusy cocktail
mixer
86 Focus of a class
action?
88 Novelist Hoag
89 Canedn, e.g.
92 Flap
94 Drink with
tempura, maybe
97 "rHoewards End"
98 Centipede maker
101 Singular '
102 Balancing acts?
103 Kaplan course,
briefly
105 Waited longer

107t 11imaster's
call
108 Called
110 Rhodes of the
Rhodes
scholarships
114 M.P.G. watcher
'115 "make.believe"
sloganeer
116p ___ gix v ,
117 Kind of gun
119 Continue
123 Twin Cities sch.


124 Waikiki wear
126 Yellow pool
items
128 That, in Toledo
129 Sophocles title

131 Station line
134 ___ del Carmen,
Mexico
135 Told stories
136 Norwegian king
called "the 77-
Down"
139 Clear
140 Station
identification,
143 Tie uP
144 Pixar robot with
a female voice
145 London daily
146 Rot
147 Letter in 145-

148Act s
149 Ch eers

Down
1 Luggage
2 Asian capital name
starter
3 P.R. people
4 no
5 Some N.F.L.'ers

6 Muak wr dy for a
winter storm, as
a highway .
8 Ed heard in "Up"
9 Bit of free time
10 Onesie wearer
11 Enter
12 Game piece
13 "Go" square in
Monopoly, e.g.
14 Cinderella's
wear, at home
16 Darling


22 Hawaiian pizza
.topping .
25 Minstrel songs
27 Month before

29 Swift's "A Tale
of __"
30 Soap opera
creator Phillips
33 Mio"
35 Ambulance,
slangily
37 One in a maze
39 Schemed together
40 For
~(cheaply)
41 Alexander, to
Aristot e
44 Sardegna, e.g.
47 Asia's Se'a
48 What writer's
block may block
49 5-4 ruling, e.g.
5'2 Assembly area

54 S~panish food
bran
55 Old PC part
56 O.K., in Osaka
57 Ones with the
Christmas spirit?
59 Mariner of note
63 Steel or bronze
65 Card catalog
abbr.
67 Tracker's aid
69 Child-sized mitt
70 Promise to pay
71 Large cask
73 The Crimson
Tide, for short
.74 Bass lover?
75 Irish Rose's beau
77 See 136-Across
78 had it!"


81 Nine
84 Skater Midori
85 Exsiccates
87 Campsite sight
90 Slowing, in mus.
91 French
possessive
93 Highilands
daggers
95 Water color
96 "Survivor"
homes
98 More than.pale
99 Hosiery color
100 How some
shares are sold
101 Suited to a
person's
strengths
104 Edible
mushroom
106 Charge
109 Fork
111 Said "No fair!"
112 They have rates

113 Jay who jests
118 Tongue-lash
120 Engage in a
1920s fad
121 One way to turn
122 Cornhusker St.
125 Draws out
127 Clowns' toys
129 Still in the
game
130 Spent
132 Merry-go-round
Music
133 Sly type?
134 W. or Bam
137 Actress Skye
13 8 Nettles
141 Sound at a spa
142 Neth. neighbor


Across
1 Ornate
5 Spreads
12 Old pol. entity
15Like some skiing

distant sun
17 Nifia
accompanied
18 Roams
19 Century in Amer.
politics
20 Pony
21 Yenta's habit
23 River to the
North Sea
24 Bally enthusiasts
26 Off-white pottery
28 Sharp-tongued
29 Land in a stream
31 Thin as
32 Temper
34 Galumph
36 They may get
people talking
38Jazz style

Assembly figure,
for short
43 Mine, to Marie
45 Sun Devils' sch.
46 Underlying
47 Dutch brews
50 Ticket presenter
51 Shred
53 Period of the
Cenozoic Era
55 Meditate (on)
58 Like much of
NewcOr eans'esr
60 Beaver's bome
F aydihree anwers,
phone: 1-900-285-5656,
wit 9a ced c hd, ,00-
814-5554.


HOROSCOPES


DEAR ABBY


Dau hter abruptly abandons


RMl 1iner &CtlOR With f ml







Page Editor: ,' R:eai --5-04127


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