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UFPKY NEH LSTA



The Lake City reporter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01518
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 4/2/2011
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
System ID: UF00028308:01518
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text

INTO-H ETNS


Girl Scouts


give dogs a

place to play

Troop constructs
fenced-in area to
aid Humane Society '

By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com
A Live Oak Girl Scout troop stepped out of
their comfort zone to take on a new construc-
tion project at the Lake City Humane Society
Friday.
The members of Girl Scout Troo'p #280
got -their hands dirty while helping to build a
privacy `fenced
dog socializa-
tion area almost
130 feet long
and nearly 30
feet wide as a
service project.
The scouts
had previously
brainstormed
for project ideas
and~ decided
that helping
animals was
most impoi--
LEANNE TYO/Lake City Reporter tant to them,
Girl' Scouts Taylorsad R ha
Blackmon (from left), 12, ~lvester, op y
Akijhitae McCray, 13, Emily hatched the
Jeansonne, 13, and Leondra idea of the dog
'C~ook, 14, work on a:dog so~ci~aliz~atievr
socialization area at the: Lake .pan after a win-
Cityr Humane Society Friday. ter field trip' to
the Lake City
Humane Society, when they saw the dogs had
no place to run unleashed.
t'They were the ones who recognized there
was a need," Selvester said. "They saw that
need and wanted to jump in and do it."
Lowe's in Live Oak provided the materi-
als for the project and an anonymous donor
SCOUTS continued on 3A


I-7 5's $17 M

f 8 1 #ftB t

Star t Sunday

Interstate to be

resurfaced during
year-long project.
From staff reports

A 12.month, $17 million resurfacing project
on the northbound and southbound lanes of
Interstate 75 in Columbia County is expected
to begin Sunday night. Florida Department
of Transportation officials said the project
will impact the I-75 tr-affic flow patterns in
ColumbiaiCounty.
The resurfacing project calls for 10 miles of
I-75 to be resurfaced, from the Santa Fe River
Bridge (Alachua County line) to three miles
north of U.S. Highivay 41/441 (Exit 414). An
estimated 45,500 vehicles a day travel this seg-
ment of I-75, with approximately 25 percent of
those vehicles classified as large trucks.
V.E. Whitehurst and Soris of Williston have
been hired by the DOT to do the work.
Gina Busscher, DOT District II spokesper-
son, said the first stage of work will begin on
the southbound lanes, with lane closure tak-
ing place Sunday Thursday beginning at 9'
p.m. and ending 6 a.m. on most days. Daytime
lane closures are also expected during the
project.
Work will be suspended during all major
holidays due to increased traffic.
The rpoadway's speed limit will be reduced
1-75 continued on 3A


0000 a6 120s1i i***3-DIGIT 326
BE OF FLORIDIL HISTORY
205 SMAT~ UNIV OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-1943


meet.
:S, IB


www.lakecityreporterncom


Vol. I 37, No. 60 75 cents


Saturday, April 2, 20 II


Alarms~ sound attempts failed. .
Lake City Police
whe e ectrii Department officers spent
is disabled. close to six hours collct
ing evidence from the crime
By TONY BRITT scenes, officials said.
tbritt~lakecityreporter.com "WNe started working on it
around 3 a.m.,"' said Steve
Eight local businesses Shaw, a Lake C~ityI police
were targeted by would-be Department pulblic informa-
thieves, Friday morning, tion officer, noting authiori-
but in each instance their ties cleared the last business


around 9:30 a.m. "It's still an
ongoing investigation."
According to .Lake City
Police Department reports,
the~ suspects disabled the
electricity to the businesses
by removing the utility meter
and theh attempted to force
their way into the business.
"After three alarmi compa-
nies called- and referenced
the activation lof alarms,


patrol officers began a pro-
active approach to ciheck all
businesses in the city,"' Shaw
said.
As a result of their check,
officers found that fpur other-
businesses were targeted
w3ith the ~same method of
attempted entry. Shaw said
one business owner called to
STHIEVES contmuezd on 34


Walt Sherrod
watches his son
Kolby, 7, both of:
Lake City, ~enjoy
sitting ori a John '
Deere antique
tractor at the 23rd
Annual Antique
Tractor and Engine
Show Friday at the
Stephen Foster
Folk Culture Center
( .State Pa'rk.





0CSN ~HTHTWALKER

M~re than: 100 exhibitinrs display antigile ti actors engines


The Felkcnors ~ere one of
many local families taking
part in the Step~hen Foster
Folk Culture Center State
Park 23rd Aninual iAntique
Tractor and Engine Show;,
which takes place af~tthe

continues from 9 a~m 15 p.m.
today an~d fr-om 9 a~m. -3 p.m.
Sunday. Admission is $5,per
vehitdle with up to eight pas-
sengers.
Officials said approxi-
mately 170 exhibitors were
agt the park Fridgy and noted
more exhibitors are expected
Sa ura dar -
Bo Garda,ta p r;ser-
vices specials aStephen
TRACTORS continued onl 3A


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
WHITE SPRINGS
om Felknoiwsn e-ror ws
surrounded by
his family as he
:"icae." ao ga
from the traiiler he towed
behind his trucks. '
::Once unloaded, h caire
fully held his 1-ytear-old
Grandson; Andrew Fellmor,
as 'he drove his tractor to a
resting spot for the we'ek-
eq((p~f~~jkpor's w;ifer, Elouise
snapped pictures of him
with the~ grandbaby with
her 'cellphone camerai and,
hwale gvr~h ,eS ,ah-
ter Audrey. Tom's son iand
Sherris husband, Ryan,
moved the~elo, ta ]ier
dent, said he has ~~articipated
in the annual a~t~ique tractor
and engine show for two
years and his' prized show-
piece for the event is his
19i53 Ford jubilee tractor.
'"We decided to make this a
family event because we just
enjoy it so inuch," he said.
''I like working on the trac-
tors, painting them and fiing
them up. This was my dad's
tractor:"
SFelknor said it took him
close to two years to restore
the tractor to exhibit quality.
"I wanted to put the trac-
tor on display out here at
the park because the people
enjoy it so much and they
like to hear the history of it,"
he said. "Thke tractor was on
a farm in Wauchula where
my dad used to farm. My
dad used it since 1953. It waS
about a year old when he
bought it~"

2T Oplnson .


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
'Wellborn resident Heib Zobel (left) shows Lake City resident
Frank Taylor how gn antique drill press works. Zobel displays
antique farm tools dating back to aticast ~100 years.


JASON MATHTHE WALKERI~ake City Reporter
Lake City resident Debbie Saunders hoists her grandson Bo, 1, onto her shoulders to give him a
bird's-eye view of some antique tractors.


(38 751-1293
SUBSCRIBE To
TE RE51O5 ER:
Fax: 752-9400


...... 1A
2A
....... 5A
........ 4B
B


TODAY IN
STATE
Guilf tourism
h-opes r-ising.


COMING
SUNDAY
County's EMS plans
examined.


Around Florida
Obituaries .
Advice & Comics .
Puzzles ... .....


Double W~in
U~onn tries for both


State Finalists
Indians qualify 5


Top Player
BYU's Fredette is
best college player.
Sports, IB


Reporter


Lare


Cit


Thieves target 8 local businesses


5 k
Partly cloud
WEATHER, 2A


8 I


I.. 6 0 .. 1











,Celebrity Birthdays


7a Saturday unday a


PE OPLE IN THE NE WS



Seeing another side of celebrity Dr. Drew


Thought for Today

"For the director of music. Of
David.The fool says in his heart,
'There is no God.' They are cor-
rupt, their deeds are vile; there
is no one who does good."
Psalm I 4: I


women


~ala~~ei:issl:

r
c
i;

r
c',
~m~mm~
h
..r~p* ;-q~i~LMiI~ II_


Page Editor: Jason M. Walker, 754-0430


SThursday:
10-18-28-29-34


M Actress Rita Gam is 83.
Actress Sharon Acker is
76.
Singer Leon Russell is 69.
M Jazz musician Larry Coryell

-68.tress Linda Hunt is 66.
Singer Emmylou Harris is
64.
Social critic and author
, Amil Paglia 16s 62.
Actress Pamela Reed is
62.
Rock musician Dave
Robinson (The Cars) is 58.


Country singer Buddy
Jewell is 50.
M Actor Christopher Meloni
is 50.
Singer Keren Woodward

o nar mi ge rB Ily Dean
is 49.
Actor Clark Gregg is 49.
Actress Jana Marie Hupp

M R ck musician Greg Camp
is 44.
HActress Roselyn Sanchez
is 38.
W Actor Jeremy Garrett is 35.


1 ~Friday:
Afternoon: 0-4-2-6
Evening: 5-7-2-3


unveiled her star on the Hollywood
Walk of Fame star Friday,*flanked by
lea ing men Javier
Bardem and Johnny

De e event is
timed ahead of next
month's release
of "Pirates of the
Cruz Caribbean: On
Stranger Tides," in
which she stars with Depp.

MarSden's kids don't
like seeing dad on screen
LOS ANGELES One of the rea-
sons James Marsden, 37, took on the
starring role in the family film "Hop"
was so that his two children could
See his work.
But Marsden said that his children
Jack, 10, and Mary, 5, don't really
like seeing their dad on screen.
His son watched "X-Men," but
preferred Wolverine over Marsden'S
Cyclops character. When Marsden'S
daughter saw "Enchanted," she
wanted to "fast-forward past dad's
stuff and watch the dragon."

'NCIS' star makes
mMSic with Navy veteran
LOS ANGELES "NCIS" state
Pauley Perrette met a new music
partner on the show's set, but it took
a church visit for the pair to see their
potential.
The result is "Fire in Your Eyes,"
an R&B-pop duet with Perrette and
B. Taylor, a Navy veteran with a
fledgling recording career. The sin-
gle is set for iTunes release May 3
by Universal Music Group's BungalO
Recodds,FTay' issaiesdawoman,
Perrette and.Taylor were intro-
duced when he paid a visit to GBS'
legal drama.
a Associated Press


NEW YORK
There's more to Dr. Drew
Pinsky's life than sub-
stance-abusing celebri-

tiPinsky and the HLN
network hope to share the other
elements of his life with the debut
Monday of "Dr. Drew," a weekday
prime-time talk show. Airing each
night at 9 p.m. EST, it will focus on
what motivates people in the news.
He is a familiar media presence
with the success of VH1's "Celebrity
Rehab." Yet the VH1 hit has effec-
tively pigeonholed him, and Pinsky
said his favorite TV experiences .
were filing in for Larry King or fel-
low HLN host Joy Behar on more
general interest shows.
"People expect somehow it's going
to be an addiction show or a medical
show," he said. "My point has always
been that certainly these sensibilities
and skill sets are going to come to
bear here, but that's not necessarily
going to be what the show focuses
on." For example, he would have
trauma survivors on the show when
an earthquake hits; or a recovering
drug abuser when a celebrity such
as Charlie Sheen is in the news.
"Dr. Drew can speak to a very
wide ran e of news stories because
at the core of so many stories we like
to talk about are people and the way
people are responding the way
they react when they're under attack
or have done something wonderful,
and the way they react when fame
is thrust upon them," Scot Safon,
HLN's chief executive, said.

Actor John Travolta tO
play Gotti in biopiC
LOS ANGELES John Travolta
will play legendary Gambino crime
family leader "Dapper Don" John
Gotti in an upcoming film about
Gotti's life.
A person with knowledge of the


Reporter
BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon....754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7:30
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 3h86-755-5445 to repr any

InC olmi 0unay customers should
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delively or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation .....:. ,........755-5445
(airculationi@lakecityreporterccom)

(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks............ ....... $26.32
24 Weeks. .................. $48.79

Mail rates
12Weeks..'................ $41.40
24 Weeks. .................. $82.80
52 Weeks............... ...$179.40


L~ake City
HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293
Fa. number ..,.... 752-940
Online... www.Iakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
I hed Tuesday through Sunday at 180
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.
Member A dit Bureau of Circulation and

Cit neoter. Rer payioin a kle o
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-seo-
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056-
Publisher Todd Wilson .....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreportercom)
NEWS
Assistant Editor CJ Risak..754-0427
After 1:00 p.m.
(crisak~lakecityreportercom)
ADVERTISING
Director Ashley Butcher ...754-0417
(abutcher@lakecityreporter.com)
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, cali 755-5440.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
TV personality Dr. Drew Pinksy arrives
at the Blu-ray and DVD release party
for the animated film 'Family Guy: It's
a Trap' in Los Angeles. Pinskyl and the
HLN network will debut his weekday
prime-time talk show, 'Dr Drew,' on
Monday .
project who spoke
on condition of anO-
*nymity because the
project has not been
S-officially announced
'said the film from
independent produc-
Travolta lion company Fiore
Films will be pro-
duced by M~arc Fiore and directed
by Nick Cassavetes. Talent broker
Marty Ingels will be executive pro-
ducer. .
The official announcement will be
made at an April l2 news conference
in New York.

Of uZ getS Hollywood
Walk of Fame star
LOS ANGELES Penelope Cruz
has been enshrined in concrete.
The Oscar-wmnmig actress


CO RREC TIO N

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run
in this space. And thanks for reading.


797~53 .lcsnil


C, Cainesville Daytona Beach
la Panama city 5 '
i6/61 Ocala *
8 3 5 9 0,

Tampa *
:9 62 West Palm B
841 65


i- - -- - -
ASSOCIATED PRESs

DOVe World confirms burning
A member of the Dove World Outreach Center in Gainesville
walks back to the church after collecting the mail Friday.
The church confirmed that it had burned a Quran in March.
Thousands of protesters in northern Afghanistan, angry over
the church's burning of the Quran, stormed a U.N. compound
Friday, killing at least 12 people, including eight foreigners.


FL Lauder
s 85 68
?Naples
'82/65
e West. *


City
Cape Canaveral
Daytona Beach
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Iwyers
sainesvile
Jacksonville
laveral eWet
62Lake City
viami
Naples
leach Ocala
* Orlando
dale Panama city
* Pensacola
STallahassee

8!6 mad sta
W. Palm Beach


Sunday Monday

Qj od a as


835 s 47
53 5.6 8 7 62 p,

84 53 1 87 64 pc
8-3 62 i 8J 65 s
E d 9 E.7 o

;b 08 p.: 8. 0
84/56/s 86/63/pc


82/71/s 82/73/s


Ft Myer
84/63


was entered Thursday on
Bejarano's behalf by the
Miami-Dade Countyr public
defender's office. Bejarano
is being held without bail
on the felony charge of
lew anamilas iius moles-
Police said Bejarano
molested the young son of
a Hialeah couple he visited
last month. Bejarano came
to Miami on March 17 on
a one-month visa to attend
an art fair featuring Latin
American artists.


Tampa's new mayor
takes the helm
TAMPA Tampa has a
new mityor.
Bob Buckhorn, 52, was
sworn in Friday as the
58th mayor of Tampa.
He won a runoff elec-
tion on March 22 against
Rose Ferlita. Buckhorn
garnered 62 percent of
the vote. Ferlita had 37
percent.
Tampa faces what could
be a budget deficit of $20
million or more next year-
At the same time, the city's
economy is struggling to
climb out from under the
wreckage of the housing
crash and recession.


He replaces Mayor Pam
lorio, who couldn't run
again because of term
limits. -

M80 Shot in back,
Said self-inflicted
ORIANDO Police are
investigating a man's claim
that he shot himself in the
back*
Orlando Police were
called to a downtown
location about 9:15 p.m.
Thursday, where they
found a man who told
them he had accidentally
shot himself in the back
with his pistol.
The victim was taken to
an Orlando hospital with
injuries that were not life
threatening

Deputy kills man
Outside bar
ORIANDO -
Authorities said two depu-
ties were confronted by
a man with a gun as they
investigated a stabbing
outside the Laughing
Horse Tavern. Sheriff
Jerry Demings said the
man shot at Deputy Daniel
Shapiro.


An exclusive
SerVICO
brought to
Our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.


TEMPERATURES
High Friday
Low Friday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
'Record low

PRECIPITATION
Friday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date '


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise tom.
Sunset tom.

MOON
Moonrise today
Moonset today
Moonrise tom.
Moonset tom.


74
48
78
52
91 in 2005
33 in 2003


0.00"
0.00"
10.31"
0.12"
11.28"


7:19 a.m.
7:50 p.m.
7:18 a.m.
7:50 p.m.


6:30 a.m.
7:16 p.m.
6:59 a.m.
8:09 p.m.


-- apcssO 2 11a weather
$ Central, LP, Madison, Wis.
~"- www.weatherpubilsher.com


s90,t eiratures
in the north central
U.S. soared from
mrning aows s t
afternoon highs in
the 60s and 70s.
Eight cities reported
record highs for
t~he date including
a reading of 77
degrees.


SAssociated Press


LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING SATURDAY, APRIL 2, 2011


CG$H 3Friday:
'Afternoon: 1-5-7
aEvening: 2-1-9


TH E WEATH ER:\ r +


~AROUND FLORIDA


gl 8aJ~~~ ;
PARTLY MOSTLY MOSTLY CHANCE' MOSTLY
3 CLOUDY~ SUNNY~ SUNNY-STORMS SUNNY


HI L HI LDi HI; E I. HI'r ri.0 .. I 8 LO2
es. .i :(u-- -~


Housekeeper
aCCUSed of theft
NAPLES A house-
keeper accused of steal-
ing $100,000 in jewelry
from her elderly clients
in Southwest Florida will

edu-altd mosee Fmnonaey to

$150,000 for Linda Flemke,
37. She is charged with
felony fraud, theft and
exploitation.
Investigators placed
holds on items she pawned
last May after receiv-
ing complaints. Flemke
met with a Lee Cotmty
Sheriff's detective, but
later told officials she
would have "ran and never
looked back" if she had
known she was going to be
arrested.

Mother testifies tO

HSing freshener

AtOn' DOther Cs ydy,
said she use bairdfresheher
to get ni f sme l

beliec ma haeC h el t
toddler's body
She testified at a pretrial
hearing Friday that she
sprayed the entire car with
Febreeze air freshener and
placed dryer sheets and
fabric softeners through- .
out the car
.The issue of which
chemicals were in the car
is important since a pros-
ecution expert has said
that high levels of chlo-
roform were in the car.
Chloroform can be used
to make a person uncon-
scious.

Cuban artist

pleads not guilty
MIAMI Cuban paint-
er Agustin Bejarano, 46,
maintains he is innocent
of Florida charges that he
.sexually molested a
5-year-old boy.
A written not-guilty plea


10n1iliestallin
Today's
ultraviolet
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+.


April April April April
3 11 17 24
New rarst Full test





1-75: Re surfacing in county to start this weekend
Continued From Page 1A


SCOUTS: Build a fenced-in area for shelter dogs

Continued From Page 1A


Storm officials say

9 tOrnadoes raked

thrOugh Tampa Bay
Associated Press: toppled trucks and small
planes.
_ssi oi. AEsRSBU G Se eNatsonal t'ena es
tornados raked through struck Polk, Hillsborough
the Tampa Bay region. and Pinellas counties
As many as 18,000 Thursday packing winds
residents remained with- from.86 to 110 mph.
out power Friday, a day In Lakeland, a tent col-
after the vicious storms lapsed and injured seven
destroyed dozens of people ~gathered for an
homes, flooded road and aviation festival.

I pLME


BUILD ON WHAT WE KNOW"'
OPEN HOUSE
Lake City, FL
Tuesday April 5, 2011
9,AM until 1 PM
18,300+total sf facility on 4.25 acres
1824Q so Us tihaS 2L~ak 8y 6 L 6 32055





Sewing Machines


s4500
SStarting at:

I 05










Well, we thought you'd like something productive on
your pad to prove to your spouse that it's really a useful
tool for financial management. wVell worth the invest-
ment you made to buy it. And so much more than just
a toy for playing Angry Birds.
See, you actually can do something useful with this new
technology. You can see if you've got paid yet, balance
your checkbook, pay a few bills, make a loan payment,
transfer funds to your kids away at college, and more!
or you can just act like you're taking notes at that meet-
ing instead of updating your facebook page.
We also have old-fashioned internet banking for those
who've not yet convinced their spouse that they really
need the newest pad devices or cell phones.
But keep in mind, if you want
p: to get the red tootsie pops,
you're going to have to come
.. visit us to get one. Peoples
State Bank. Now that's Bank-
ing!




j)Si


THIEVES: Attempt to gain entry into 8 businesses
Continued From Page 1A


NOTICE OF MEETING
ADVISORY AIRPORT COMMITTEE
CITY OF LAKE CITY

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Advisory Airport Committee for the City of
Lake City, Florida will hold a meeting on Monday, April 4, 201 1. The meeting is
scheduled for 6:45 p.m. in the Council Chambers at City Hall, 205 North Manion
Street, Lake City, Flonida.

THE PURPOSE OjF THE MEETING IS TO CONSIDER THE FOLLOWING ITEMS:
*Mandese White Construction Inc. Change Order Number Three
*Mandese White Construction Inc. Pay Application Number Six

All interested persons are invited to attend.


SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS: If you require special aid or services as addressed in the
American Disabilities Act, please contact the City Manager's Office at (386) 719-5768.

AUDREY E SlKES
City Clerk


LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL &( STATE SATURDAY, APRIL 2, 2011


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


and we've got some really
interesting antique trac-
tors here from the 1920s
and 1930s," Giarda said.
'"There's over 50 tractors
on display. There's even a
rooster-crowing contest."
Activities for the second
day of the show, which tra-
ditionally has higher atten-
dance numbers. include


additional exhibitors and
seven craft workshops.
The "make and take"
workshops will take place
from 10 a.m. 1:30 p.m.
"The workshops range
from everything from
bath relaxation to memory
bracelets and basket weav-
ing," Giarda said. "They're
very inexpensive."


Foster Folk Culture Center
State Park, said attendance
numbers for exhibitors
have been wonderful.
"We've already topped
last year's numbers,"
he said. "We're doing
extremely well and we're
looking for places to put
the tractors. Its busy."
Items on display


included: Tractors, steam
engines, outboard motors,
lanterns, glass wares,
tools, other farm equip-
ment and items from the
agricultural industry.
"There are a lot of really
interesting demonstra-
tions, like shingle mill-
ing and wheat thrashing
- thaf~s the old machines


ple expect it," Lycan said.
"W~e typically have it in the
spring time at the end of
March of in April in con-
junction with Earth Week
and other activities."
Organizers try to make
the roundup as simple as
possible, he said. Vehicles
can pull up and workers
will unload the hazardous
"You don't even have to
get out the car," Lycan
said.
It~s best to use hazard-
ous wastes up and not
have any left for disposal,
Lycan said.
"But if you've got some
leftover that's outdated,
we prefer you brmng it to
us and let us dispose of it
properly."
Hosting the event is
Columbia County's part
in protecting the environ-
meh~t, Lycan said.
S"We want -to live here,
and for future generations
we want to leave as good
as an environment as we
can," he said.
The roundup is free
for residents but there is
a small charge for busi-
nesses. Call Lycan at 386-
752-6050 for more infor-
mation.


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter. com

Residents can get rid
of hazardous items with
ease during the annual
Columbia County Toxic
Waste Roundup. .
The event is 9 a.m. to 3,
p.m. next Saturday, April,
9 a the ou mbia County

The roundup is an
annual effort between
the county and the
Florida Department of
Environmental Protection
to -collect unused and
unwanted hazardous
wastes in the area for safe
disposal, said Bill Lycan,
Columbia County solid
waste director. This is the
12th year of the program.
Hazardous wastes items
include pld paints, fertil-
izers, florescent lamps,
insecticides and more.
In Florida most of the
drinking water is from
the ground, Lycan said.
Chemicals can leak into
the sandy soil if hazardous
wastes ai-e not properly
* disposed.
Each year about 300
participants come to the
round up, he said.
"Its gotten where peo-


from 70 to 60 mph during lane clo.
sures and Florida Highway Patrol
troopers will provide extra patrols
in the construction zone during the
project.
Improvements will be made at two
curves along I-75, one just north of
the rest area and the other just
north of the U.S. Highway 41/441
exit. Busscher said additional
asphalt will be placed in the north-
bound lanes to improve the ability
for drivers to maintain the posted
speed limit.
"Because the lanes will be milled,
or the asphalt removed, in two dif.
ferent operations, there will be times
that the lanes will remain milled
and open to traffic," Busscher said.
"Motorists, especially motorcyclists,
are urged to use caution when tray-
eling in the milled lanes because of
the rippled and uneven pavement.
SThe milled condition is necessary in
order to remove more asphalt that is
able to be removed in a single milling
operation."
The Santa Fe River Bridge on the
roadway is slated to get new guard-
rail and bridge joints in the pave-
ment resealed.
When construction requires that
one lane be closed, daytime lane clo-


The resurfac- .
ing of 1-75
in Columbia
County is
expected to
cost 1 million
and to take 12
months-




COURTESY PHOTo


41/441 interchange will be resur-
faced and the, exit ramps will be
realigned to improve the ability of
motorists to see traffic approaching
on U.S. Highway 41/441.
Rest area ramps will also be wid-
ened and resurfaced and the lighting
along the ramps will be relocated and
protected by the installation of a new
guardrail.
This 10-mile stretch of I-75 was last
restirfaced in 1996-1997 when the
road was widened to six lines.


sures will be allowed between 6 a.m.
and 6 p.m.
When two lanes are. required to
be closed, such as repaving the cen-
ter line, nighttime lane closures will
only be allowed between 9 a.ril. 6
a.m. There will be no lane closures
allowed from 6 a.m. Friday until 9
p.m. Sunday due to increased week-
~end traffic.
The project's construction work
will not be limited to I-75. .
Busscher said the U.S. Highway .


it home and once ifs out of .
the kennel it's a totally dif-
ferent animal and they have
- to bring it back.".p !
The new space will serve
as L i exercise area for the
dogs that will help with the
stability of their mental
health, he said, and will
provide a separate place
away from the kennels for
prospective adopters and
the dogs to visit.
"It gives them just a nice,
private area to spend some
time with the dog to see
if its gonna be a right fit
for their family," Marques
said.


Jasmen Garling, 11, Girl
Scout troop member, said
the area is important for
the Humane .Soci~ety so it
has a space for dogs to play
~with possible owners.
'"The dogs have no one to
play with and no owners or
anything and they could be
really lonely," she said.
Karlie Stoe, 16, another
Girl Scout, said she has
enjoyed the project because
of her longtime love for ani-
mals.
"I've always loved ani-
mals and when I heard we
were going to be doing this
I immediately jumped on


helped to cover the cost
of .the fence's sealant,
Selvester said.
On Friday, the Girl
Scouts put up the .fence's
privacy panels and applied
its sealant. They began the
project March 28, digging
the holes, putting in the
posts and filing the holes
with cement. .
The project jives with
the Girl Scout principles
of discovering, connecting
and taking action, Selvester
said. '
"A project like this is
just wonderful because it~s
going to last," she said. -


Terry Marques, society
executive director, said
the socialization space will
compslirent the soiety's
adoption program.
Whieni prospj~ctifve "adopt: t
ers come to -look for a pet
in the kennels, it can be
noisy with all the' dogs
barking for attention and
people may not get to see
the dog's trqle nature or
disposition, he said.
"Because our goal is a
forever home," Marques
said, "the last thing we want
is for them to adopt a dog
in the kennel thinking ifs
a right ft and then they get


report an attempted bur-
glary. .
Reports said officers
were dispatched to mul-,
tiple businesses due to the
attempted burglaries at
various locations.
The.businesses targeted
were:
aDeSoto Drug Store,
297 NE Marion St.;
aGeneral Nutrition
Center, 680 SW Duval St.;
m Subway, 683 NW Duval
St.;


aDollar General, 683
NW Duval St. Suite A'
aSwift Lube, 417 SW
Knox St.; ..
SMoney Man, 1010 SW
Main Blvd.;
aSomewhere in Time,
1034 SW Main Blvd.;
MHong Yip, 905 S. Main
Blvd.

"They (suspects) didn't
get inside any of the busi-
nesses," Shaw said, noting
the one business where the


window was busted out by
the suspects had an audi-
ble alarm, which activated
when the window was bro-
ken,
Authorities have not
been able to identify a
suspect in the attempted
burglaries. However, Shaw
said extra patrols will be
used to patrol the business
community.
"~We're going to be wor~k-
ing extra hard and having
much more focus on the


businesses and with some
more man power," he said.
The Lake City Police
Department is encour'ag-
ing businesses to iricrease
lighting around their
establishments and to trim
shrubbery from around
the utility meters and win-
dqws.
Anyone having informa-
tion about this case is asked
to call the Lake City Police
Department anonymously
on its TIP line at 719-2068.


County will collect

harzardous items in

Toxic Waste Roundup


TRACTORS: Show continues throughout weekend

Continued From Page 1A


















I I


L-.


4A


Saturday,April 2, 20 II


www. Iakecityreporter.com


Betsy~ art
betsysblog corn


s negotiations in
Washington on .
this year's budget
S(already halfway
Into the year that
this budget is for) come to a
head, the rumor mill points to
a Washington-as-usual result.
That is, split the differences
down the middle-
But, as King Solomon taught
us, resolving a dispute by
splitting the difference is not
always a sign of virtue.
Republicans want to cut $61
billion from a budget of almost
$4 trillion with a deficit of $1.6
trillion.
Current interest payments
on the national debt, some $200
billion, dwarf these proposed
cuts that Democrats are labeling
"extremism."
From a purely political
perspective, there are reasons
to expect Republican feet to
start turning to clay
First, Democrats and
Republicans know that in the
1995 showdown that resulted in
shutting down the government,
Democrats and Bill Clinton
came up the political winners.
Although circumstances are
very different today from then,
tha't history certainly looms
large in political minds.
Second, its a good bet that
current polling gives pause to
many Republicans. Polls show
that although in the abstract
Americans are concerned about
the size of government and
runaway spending and debt,
when you get down to specific
programs, there is little positive
sentiment for making significant
cuts in the big areas that would
make a difference.
And third, there is a critical
dife ecne toayI o 1 e


we are in crisis. How much do
they believe that, ultimately,
Things will go on and be just fine
no matter what we do?
The polls that show weakness
in public sentirilent for real
reforms and substantial cuts
in government should not
be taken by politicians as
justification for caving in but as
a message for the need for real
leadership today.
Too many Americans are
just not getting it. And how
could they? Most folks are .
Busy with their work and .
families. How can 1;ey possibly ~.
undekrstagnd what lurkfs behind
the huge budget numbers they
read about,what sprawling
government really means, and
why it is sucking out our vitality,
undermining our freedom, and
destroying our nation. ,
Great political role models
today are two freshman
Republicans from Florida -
Senator Marco Rubio and
Congressman Allen West.
Both have publicly drawn
lines in the sand on the budget
and debt limit debate and
both have had the courage to
speak about entitlement reform
despite representing a geriatric
state. '
Democrats are drawing a
target on the back of West, a
conservative A~frican-American
elected in a liberal white
district. West is a man of real
courage driven not by fear but
by conviction and patriotism.
Freedom is not an
entitlement. Without this kind
of leadership, we will be toast.


SStar Parker is president of
CURE, Coalition
nUrtan Renewal and


Star Parker
parker@urbancure.org
differences pose a much greater
internal problem today to
Republicans than Democrats.
Republicans have today
within their ranks some
individuals that actually stand
for something. Democrats
who have fair party unanimity
in their comfort level to go
on growing government and
aborting our children forever,
relish watching internal
Republican tensions and
potential splits over principle.
So taking things to the brink
is just fine with Democrats
The don't be an bi
proeb em to begmn with and by
the calculations noted above
Republicans would bear all the
political costs
And the a be rgt
Even th mWall Sere journal l
' editors are urging Republicans
to compromise, arguing that

ahev mnent the d ys mand
that they should move on and
gird for the next big battle .
But the key assumption that
always enables putting off until
tthothreorw 11 teea sump ionw.
Or, in the words of Lincoln
"You cannot escape the '
re pnibility of tomorrow by

The real question is how
deeply evdry single politician
rti Ir supoel ersnties o


OUR
OPINION



WVorking .


together

to unprove

education


while conflict draws
attention, accord is


college institutions provide
proof. In a competitive,
capitalistic society such
as ours, it is an accepted
- even expected practice to
outperform each other.
But the administrators at
Florida Gateway College and
St. Leo University have found a
different way. Instead of waging
war in an effort to draw more
students to their particular
institution, they opted to work
together, to better utilize the
available resources.
Their efforts have worked

yeas veryo e :: ha eeitd
and with FGC embarking on its
own baccalaureate programs,
the partnership figures only to
~improve.
It's through this association,
and the tr-ust it's built on, that
the community has profitted.
Example: Wh~ile both schools
will offer Bachelor of Science
degrees in education, FGC's
will focus on ages birth to
pre-kindergarten, while St.
Leo's programs goes from
kindergarten through grade
nine. .
Ultimately, it means there
will be more options available
to the public. Instead of .two ":
schools carrying an identical
curriculum, they discuss
possibilities before deciding'
what course to follow and
whats best not just for
themselves, but for the
community.
Carry that even further and
you'll find how the business
society will expand and grow
stronger through education.
The two schools are striving
to provide more opportunities
for the people of Columbia
County. Their efforts are
working. We get a wider
variety of educational choices
to pursue and, ultimately,
a stronger, more diverse
workforce,
Their collaborative path has
been a boon to all.


Lakie City Reporter
ServingS Clubia County
Sice 17
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pnide for residents of
toubaand es urrnengn unties by
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities --"Newspapers
get things done!"
publs dtryinuse aod profitable
community-oniented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Sue Brannon, controller

Dink NeSmith, resident
Tom Wood, chP irman


LETTERS
POLICE Y
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters ~
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,


Lake City, FL 32056; or drop~off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


should stage Owners
who profit from the tal-
ent appearing on those
stages be obliged to
Spay the talent in some-
thing other than exposure?
Two labor disputes over tal-
ent and compensation, three
decades apart yet eerily similar,
suggest the issue remains as
vexing as ever,
The more recent concerns
whether the Huffington Post
should pay its non-staff writers
and bloggers, who supply most
of the popular website's content
for free. Arianna Huf~fington,
who sold the site she cofounded
to AOL in February for $315
million, has increasingly come
under fire for not paying for
most: of the content she runs.
Last week the Newspaper
Guild called on its 26,000 mem-
bers to boycott the Huffington
Post in support of a "virtual


picket line" until a pay schedule
for writers was established.
The core of Huffington's justi-
fication for not paying is that the
Huffington Post is a showcase
for writers, and that exposure
there leads to paying gigs and
greater visibility. Huffington
merely and generously, by
her estimation provides
the stage. Mario Ruiz, the
Huffi~ngton Post's spokesman,
claims that contributors are
happy to write for free because
they "want to be heard by the
largest possible audience and
understand the value that that
kind of visibility can bring."
This was precisely the argu-
ment put forth 32 years ago by
IVMitzi Shore, the owner of LAL's
Comedy Store, for not paying
the comedians whose perform
mances filled her club night
after night. At the time, accord.
ing to William Knoedelseder's


"I'm Dying Up Here," a history
of the 1970s comedy scene, the
Comedy Store was grossing as
much as $20,000 a week but the
comedians including rising
stars David Letterman, Jay Leno
and Robin Williams were
paid nothing.
Whether the writers striking
the Huffington Post have the
kind of leverage the comedi-
ans had remains to be seen.
Persuading thousands of indi-
viduals with divergent agendas,
most of whom are unknown to
one another, to boycott a popu-
lar platform out of a sense of
solidarity is a formidable task.
Complicating matters is that
many of the unpaid contributors
are not professional writers but
"come ~from all walks of life," as
Ruiz put it, and might be less
inclined to sympathize.

SLos Angeles Tirnes


OINIO


Dealing





a newv





wealthy New York
City bachelor put a
curving, metal tube
slide in his new
A~$3 million duplex
to connect the floors. How
fitting for what even the Yahoo
news item describing the hot
property called the "manchild"
owner.
sKay Hmodizmgtcl
book, "Manning up: How the
Rise of Women has Turned.
Men into Boys" (Basic Books,
2011), speaks to the growing
phenomena of young men in
particular living in what seems
like an extended adolescent
playground.
Hymowitz, a scholar at the
Manhattan Institute in New
York City, is an acute observer
of American cultural trends. In
brutally descriptive terms, she
chronicles what is happening
with young Amenican men:
They are way behind women
in all levels of schooling and
, now a~ttnd college at muchr
Slower ifates; in most major
U.S. cities, young women
today, on average, have higher
employment rates and make
higher incomes than young
men; if men marry at all, it's
much later in life than men of a
few decades ago.
Uh-oh. What do my own
daughters have in store for
them then? When it comes to
fellas, the picture isn't rosy.
Hymowitz says the script
used to be clear: a young man
got a high-school diploma or
more, went on to marry and
have children all typically by
the age of 25 or so. Those
days are long gone. Education
takes longer today. And the
knowledge economy think
multitasking more and
more favors women.
So what's a guy to do?
Without a wife and children
to care for, as I touched on in
another column recently, men
seem far less likely to simply
grow up.
One might argue: So what?
If a fellow wants to put a slide
in his apartment and perhaps
never marry, or marry late
after sleeping with a bevy of
w men, what's wrong with

Well, it's not just that our .
daughters are profoundly
affected, though they are.
While men may not have much
win t:::ayof ioo ial cocks,
And the ppol of marriageable
young men, those who are
Gainfully employed and want to
provide and care for a family, is
dwindling.
On the flip side, few men are
going to find a life of extended
boyhood with or without the
apartment slide ultimately that
rewarding, anyway.
Hymowitz's book focuses on
how we got here. I talked to
her about where we go from
here.
Depictions of bumbling,
even idiotic, boyfriends,
husbands and fathers with
oh-so-capable women coming
to the rescue are common.
She told me that we have
got to become much more self-
conscious about how we treat
men in the popular culture.
SBetsy Hart hosts the "It Takes a
Parent" radio show on WYLL-AM
1160 in Chicago.


resolve on budget w~oes


AN OPINION


VMy Should writers work for no pay?














Sweeping elections-law overhaul clears conunittee


OB-TA IE


LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE SATURDAY, APRIL 2, 2011


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


"It may not be the way you want
to do business," Labasky said. He
also questioned the need for a
personal fine for late reports.
"Accountability always hurts,"
Bailey told reporters later about
the ~fine provision. "If there's no
penalty, things don't get done."
Sancho told the committee
that the bil's proposals disturbed
him. He was in office and became
nationally known during the con-
tested 2000 presidential election
between George W. Bush and Al
Gore.
"Not allowing people to do
, simple address changes at the
polling place is min'dboggling,"
Sancho said. That one change
will increase "by seven-fold" the
use of provisional ballots, tax-
ing already-stressed workers
because all those ballots must be
verified quickly after election day,
he said.
Sancho added that the possibil-
ity of voter fraud is already low
since poll workers check voters
against a statewide database to
ensure they're not trying to vote
more than once.
"~We've got it right," he said.
"Don't destroy the process we


have now."
Ben Wilcox, spokesman for the
League of Women Voters, which
runs voter-registration drives,
said the 48-hour requirement for
handing in completed registra-
tion forms would be onerous for
groups like his.
"In a year when you're looking
to deregulate most areas of state
government, why are you adding
burdensome and costly regula-
tions?" Wilcox asked the panel.
Though the subcommittee
cleared the. bill, some lawmak-
ers asked Baxley for changes
such as shortening early voting
to one week but expanding voting
hours, and clarifying the 100-foot
rule.
Poll i~vorkers, who will have
to, enforce that rule, may favor
one side over another, said state
Rep. Barbara Watson, D-Miami
Gardens.
As the 100-foot limit shifts with
the length of voters' lines, "I think
we're going to find not only harass-
ment, but lights and other disrup-
tions at the polls," she said.
The bill, HB 1355, next will be
taken up.by the House State Affairs
committee.


Supervisor of Elections, said the
changes are meddlesome and
unneeded.
"This is just partisan shenani-
gans raising its head again," said
Sancho, orie of the three Florida
county elections supervisors -
out of 67 who are not party-
affiliated.
The issue of "clean elections"
has been used in recent years as
a political wedge. Conservatives
complained that supposedly left-
leaning voter-registration groups
were jamming the rolls with
ineligible voters. Progressives
responded that conservatives
wanted to discourage registration
and -depress turnout.
Among the more notable pro-
posed changes, the bill:
Requires the Secretary of
State, the state's chief election
officer, to provide "direction and
opinions" to the county elections
supervisors.
Requires voter-registration
groups, such as the League of
Women Voters,- to register with
the state, file regular' reports and
turn in completed voter-registra-
tion forms within 48 hours.
Allows elections officials to


remove deceased voters from the
rolls immediately, instead of wait-
ing seven days.
-- Creates a $50-a-day fine for
elections supervisors, to be paid
out of their own pockets, if they
are late turning in voter history
and other reports to the state.
-- Forces voters to use provi-
sional ballots instead of regular
ballots if they want to update
their name or address in voting
records at the polling place.
Allows groups to run opinion
polls for people who are consider-
ing running for office without
having to later count those polls
as campaign contributions.
Prohibits approaching any
voter waiting in line and giving
voting advice, even if the voter
is more than 100 feet from the
entrance of the polling place.
Ron Labasky, lawyer for the
Florida State Association of
Supervisors of Elections, said
his group was concerned about
the Secretary of State, who is
appointed by the governor, telling
elected county elections supervi-
sors how t~o interpret laws or run
their offices especially if that
governor is on the ballot.


JAMIES L. ROSICA
Associated Press

TALIAHASSEE Over the
objections of county elections
supervisors and public-interest
groups, a bill that would make
numerous changes to Florida's
elections law cleared~ a House
subcommittee on Friday.
The Government Operations
Subcommittee voted up the bill
on Friday by a parly-line tally of
9-4. Its sponsor, state Rep. Dennis
Bailey, R-Ocala, said the changes
will get the state's Elections Code
in "ship-shape" for the next elec-
tion cycle and the redrawing of
congressional and legislative dis-
trict lines.
"'This bill preserves and pro-
tects the political process," Baxley
told the subcommittee. .
The bill started as a 14-page
document and grew to 128 pages
.by Friday.
"It's a massive undertaking,
but this will get us in good posi-
tion to conduct wholesome elec-
tions so we'll know every vote
counts," he said. '
But critics~ such as lon
Sancho, Leon County's six-term


HTo submit your Community
Calendar item, contact Antonia
Robinson at 754-0425 or by
e-mail at arobinson @
lakecityreporter.com.


North Florida is sponsor-
ing a pamnt-out a9 a.m.
to noon April 9 At the
Alligator Lake Spning
Festival There is an entry
fee of $5 to enter the
judged contest for four
cash prizes to be present-
ed at 12:30 PM. Work must
be produced during the
contest hours in order to
be eligible. There will be
art for exhibit and for sale
by the exhibiting artists. A
contribution from the artl
contest will go to support
the Audubon Society. For
additional information call
697-4622 or 758 7853.



The Columbia County
Toxic Waste Roundup is -
9 a.m. to 3 p.m. April 9
at the Columbia County
Fairgrounds. Safely dis-
pose of household hazard-
ous wastes such as old
paint, used oil, pesticides,
insecticides and more.
Free for residents and
a small charge for busi-
nesses. Call Bill Lycan at'
386-752-6050.

Bowling fundraiser
The 4 Pets Sake bowl-
ing fundraiser is 1:30 p.m.
April 9 at Lake City Bowl:
Registration is 1 pS.m.
Prizes are for men and
women; there will be a
door prize and a 50-50. The
cost is $10 per person for
two series. Call 386-935-
0975 or e-mail fourpets-
sakel@winadstream.net.

Ester Bunny Arival
Belk~ Kids Fest
The Easter Bunny
arrives at 11 a.m. April
9 at Lake City Mall. The
bunny will have free gifts
for the children. Belk will
be holding a kids festival
throughout the mall. Free
face painting duck pond,
balloons, re reshmep ts
tx d number n. Il aci
Fashion show at 1 p.m.


begins at 8 a.m. The cost -
is $75 for morning ses-
sion, $25 for afternoon
session, and $25 for stu~-
dents. Education credits
have been approved for ~
dietitians and' other health
professionals. Visit www.
eatrightgainlesville. orgi/iles/
for more information and
to register.

Not Your Mama's
Couponing
A workshop on
Couponing is 10 a.m. 12
p~m. today at Artworks
Studio The event is hosted
by Lindley Ra~chel from
R.O.C;.K Solid. Te cost
is $5 per person, an
pre- egi tration rqu red,

Colleen at 386-758-9346
or e-mdarlmdfn 3yuno.

50 -percent and more on
your grocery bill. The
studio is located at 122
SW Midtown Plaza suite
w003-k Vs o htp/ ww.ar -
html for directions.

Pioneer Days
The 35th annual Pioneer
Days is 9 a.m. -5 p.m.
today and 10 a.m. 4 p.m. '
Sunday in downtown High
Springs. It will feature
musical entertainment,
expanded kids korral with
pony rides, handmade arts
and crafts vendors, heri-
tage village with demon-
strations of old time skills
and a shoot out at noon
and 2 p.m. each day. Call
386-454-3120.

Adopt-a-Highway
Cleanup! #2
The Filipino American
Cultural Society of Lake
City will meet 8 a~m. today
at the Columbia Bank
Parking lot, corner of US
90 & Turner road. We will
pickup both sides of our
adopted 2 mile stretch of
highway on US 90 west. For
more information contact
Bob Gavette 386-965-5905

Diva Day
Altrusa Diva Day is
10 a.m. 2 p.m. today
at the Columbia County
Fairgrounds Banquet Hall.
Admission is $5 which
enters you into drawing
for a Mariana bracelet or
Suwannee Jam tickets.
Tickets are available at the
Lake City Reporter, Lake
City Advertiser, Mercantile
Bank on Hwy. 90 or at the
door. Call Jan Smithey at
386-961-3217 .


Sunday .

Pioneer Days
The 35th annual Pioneer
Days is 10 a.m. 4 p.m.


COURTESY PHOTO

Local girls are Jaguars' photo contest winners

Victoria (8) and Marissa (7) Johnson, from Lake City, entered a contest ~conducted by the
Jacksonville Jgguars, submitting a photo that would be voted on online. The top 10 finish-
ers in the contest would have their photo featured on the 2011-2012 Game Day tickets. The
Johnsons were one of the top 10 and will have their photo featured,


Tickets are $10. Proceeds
to benefit Take Stock in
Children Scholarship. Call
386-754-4340.

Saturday, April 9

Alligator Lake Spring
.Festival
An early bird walk kicks-
off the Second annual
Alligator Lake Spring
Festival 8 to 10 a.m. April
9 at Alligator Lake Park.
The festival is 10 a.m. to
4 p.m. and sponsored by
Four Rivers Audubon and
Gateway Wildlife Habitat
Organization. The festi-
val is free but people are
asked to RSVP for the
bird walk to Jacqui Sulek
at jsulek~audubon.org
or call (386) 497-4185.
Alligator Lake Park is
located at 420 SE Alligator
Glen.

Paint-out artists wanted
The Ar-t League Of


Sunday in downtown High
Springs. It will feature
musical entertainment,
expanded kids korral with
pony rides, handmade arts
and crafts vendors, heri-
tage village with demon-
strations of old time skills
and a shoot out at noon
and 2 p.m. each day. Call
386-454-3120.


Mond 87
Feinstein challenge
Christian Service Center
is participating in the $1
million dollar giveaway
Alan Feinstein Challenge
from now until April
30. Every food item or
-financial donation counts
toward receiving a per- .
centage of the giveaway.
Call 386-755-1770 and
bring donations either to
the center at the corner
of Hilton and Washington
or mail to P.O. Box 2285,
Lake City, FL, 32056 '

Tuesday
Annual Meeting
The United Way of
Suwannee Valley Annual
Meeting and Awards
Banquet is 6 7:30
p.m. Tuesday at Flonida
Gateway College Howard
Conference Center. The
cost is $25 per person.
RSVP


Wednesday
Newcomers and
Friends Luncheon
The Apnil Fniendship
Luncheon of the Lake
City Newcomers and
Friends is 11:30 a.m.
Wednesday at Brooklyn


Boys located at 4196 W
US Hwy. 90. All members,
guests and friends are
welcome. For more infor-
mation call 386-438-8100 or
386-754-7227.

Thursd y

Free Mediclaid workshop
SA free Medicaid work-
shop; is 10 a.m. Thursday
at the Lifestyle Enrichment
Center, 628 S.E. Allison
Court. The workshop on
Medicaid planning is led
by Teresa Byrd Morgan
of Morgan Law Center for
Estate & Legacy Planning.
It will discuss the myths
and opportunities avail-
able. Call Shana Miller at
386-755-1977.

Friday, April 8

Tribute to Journey
The Ultimate Tribute to
Journey is 7 p.m. Friday at
Florida Gateway College.


Dorothy Edna Ward
McMullan
Dorothy Edna Ward McMullan,
91, of WillowBrook in Lake
City, FI passed away Thursday,
March 31, 2011 in the Haven
Hospice Suwannee Valley Care
Center after a short illness. She
was born in Wilkes County,
North Carolina and graduated
from Jones Business College
in High Point, North Carolina.
She moved to Lake City in
1957 with James L. McMullen
(Mac), her husband of 53 years,
who preceded her in death. She
was a loving wife and mother,
who enjoyed bridge, sewing,
needlepoint, and hand crafts.
Being active in the First United
Methodist Church, she regu-
larly participated in the United
Methodist Women's society,
the School of Missions, Church


Women United, and both sup-
ported and volunteered at Happy
House school and the Christian
Service Center from there begin-
nings. She was recognized for
her 50-year membership (actu-
ally 57 years) by the General
Federation of Women's Clubs.
Survivors include one son: James
L. McMullan, Jr.(Beth) of Mel-
bourne, Fl; One daughter: Rhon-
da M. Green (Curt), Flagstaff,
Az; One sister: Elaine Jackson,
Rock Hill, Sc; Two brothers:
Sherrill Ward, Wilkesboro, Nc
and Jim Ward, Roaring River,
Nc; Four grandchildren: Ash-
lyn Butts, Nick Green, James L.
McMullan, HII and Stuart Green;
Seven Precious great-grandchil-
dren: Miranda Butts, Meredith
Butts, James L. McMullen, IV,
Lucas Green Nicole McMullan,
Owen Green and Zoey Green.
Funeral services will be held


3:00 pm Sunday April 10, 2011
in the First United Method-
ist Church, Lake City, FI with
Rev. Jeff Tate officiating. Inter-
ment will follow mn the Memo-
rial Cemetery, Lake City; Fl.
Visitation will be one hour
before service time. In hieu of
flowers, memorials can be made
to the First United Method-
ist Church 973 S. Marion Ave,
Lake City, Fl. Arrangements
are under the direction of the
DEES-PARRISH FAMILY
FUNERAL HOME, 458 S.
Marion Ave., Lake City, FL
32025 752-1234 please sign
Our on-line family guestbook at
parrishfamilyfuneralhome. com
Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


CO~~~REMMUNT CLN


Tod y
Class nteeting
Richardson High School
class of 1970 is meeting 1
p.m. today at Richardson
Community Center.
Contact Dennis Murphy at
697-3739 or Macy Wilson .
at 752-3471-

Garage sale
The Lake City Alumni
Chapter of Bethune
Cookman University is
hosting its annual Garage
Sale Fundraiser 7:30 a.m.
to 3 p.m. today at 920 NE
Joe Coney ~Terrace (the
home of Dianne George.
This multi-family event
will contain items of value
to the entire family with
more than 20 families
participating. Contact
Minister Jan Harrison,
President of the BCU In~ke
City Alumni Chapter at
386288-2368.

Yard sale

A Spring Community
Yard Sale is 7 a.m. to 2
p.m. today in doi~irntown
Wellborn. The event is
hosted by the Wellborn
Community AssociatioI-.
Booth spaces are $5 for
12 x 12. A blueberry pan-
cake breakfast is 7:30 to
10 a.in. The cost is $5 for
adults and $3 for children.
Hamburgers, hot dogs and
drinks will be available for
lunch. The bloodmobile
will also be at the event.
Call 386-963-1157 or visit
www.wellborncommuni-
tyassociation.com.

Alli Walk
Four Rivers Audubon
hosts a monthly Alll-Walkl:
Bird /Butterfly / Nature's
Garden outing is from 8 to
11 a~m. today at Alligator
Lake. Jerry.Krummrich,
biologist, Virlyn Willis, avid
birder, and others will share
their knowledge. Bringe- .
a hat, sunscreen, water,
binoculars and a snack. No
fee is charged. All levels
of participation and knowl-
edge are welcome. Enter
Alligator Lake at the County
Park on Country Club Road
(east side of lake). Drive in
and around to the parking
area in front of the lake near
the new construction. Call
Inve Barnard at 497-3536
for more information.

Spring Health
Professional Seminar
The Gainesville District
Dietetic Association is
hosting the "Spring Health
Professionals Seminar
2011" today at Trinity
United Methodist Church
in Gainesville. It is an all
day seminar for registered
dietitians and other health
professionals. Registration





CHURCH NOTES


According to the Bible, there is a Hell


6A


~ww.Iak:ecityreporter.com


HER M-TR


Some of the pasos from back then
are still carried today.
Female spectators dress in
mourning, wearing black dresses
with a lace Scarf, or mantilla,
held by a comb made of shell.
Some lay Caitholic associations
started allowing women to march
in recent years, but legend has it
that women have always secretly
donned the face-covering habits
with pointed hoods and marched
as penitents, or Nazarenos (the
outfit was appropriated by the
Ku K~lux Klan). This year, the
archbishop of Seville decreed that
women must be allowed to par-
ticipate, including carrying the
massive floats.
Only God is supposed to know
the identifyr of a Nazareno. A jar-
ring sight is to watch the hooded
penitents scurrying around town,
rushing to their parishes before
the marches begin.
Nowadays, many parents
enlist their children in the broth-
erhoods at a very young age
because it takes years to move up
the ranks and earn a prestigious
spot in a procession, such as the
Coveted position of carrying a
great cross at the head. Most
processions are at night, and the
Nazarenos carry long candles
to light the way from their par-
ish church to the cathedral and
back again, an arduous journey
that can take over 12 hours.
SSome walk barefoot or even with
Shackles. In some of the biggest
processions, a group of Roman
soldiers follows.
The Nazarenos are followed
by altar boys, some carrying
incense. Then comes the main
attraction, the pasos, decorated
with flowers and candles. They
are carried by costaleros, named
for the sack-cloth they wear.
Anywhere from two dozen to sev-
eral dozen costaleros will cary
the paso, and will set it down and
raise it back up again periodically
(their toil can draw applause from
appreciative crowds).


RON DePASQUALE
Associated Press
SEVILLE, Spain
s incense and candles
burn, trumpets blare
and drums beat, peni-
tents covered in color-
Aful tunics and conical
hoods march slowly through the
night toward the cathedral. Life-
size statues of Jesus and Mary
are carried by porters hidden
beneath floats, making the sever-
al-ton structures appear to hover
through the air.
The ritual plays out every year
during Holy Week, or Semana
Santa, part of an plaster tradition
celebrated throughout Spain. In
the southern region of Andalusia,
cities spend all year planning for
the spectacle. Seville, the regional
capital, hosts some of the big-
gest processions, dating back to
medieval times and organized by
brotherhoods, or cofradias, each
sporting their own colors.
For tourists here to see the
Easter spectacle, Seville offers
plenty of other thirigs to do as
well with its soaring cathedral,
Real Alcazar fortressss, bullfight-
ing ring, flamenco clubs, tapas
bars and art galleries. Seville is
also a convenient base for exrplor-
ing Andalusia, making it easy to
hop from city to city while see-
ing some of the best parades set
against some of its most beautiful
historic places. Cordoba, with itS
tangled warren of narrow streets
:idi r~ich C.,tholic, Itlamic and
Jewish history, is only about 45
minutes away. Within a two-to-
three hour trip are Cadiz, one of
Europe's oldest cities; Granada,
home of the breathtaking .
Alhambra fortress; and Malaga,
where` the Semana Santa floats
are bigger and are accompanied
by more exuberant music and
applause. Each city could merit
an overnight stay.
Andalusia is flooded with tour-
ists during Holy Week, so hotels


Angie Land
angieland3@windstream.net


Disaiphne.


to help,

not hurt

come to
mind at the
thought of
W hatimagediscipline?
Perhaps you have memo
ries of "meetings" with
your dad behind the wood-
shed, or strict teachers dol-
ing out smacks on the hand
with a ruler, or seenungly
endless weekends with no
car keys.
No doubt our memo-
ries are all different ...
but I wonder if we have


discipline, some from my
childhood, and some I have
experienced as an adult, I
still feel a sense of humil-
ity and even embarrass-
mn I amcnicd th s
i eaus evnneth gh is
Ilth. ie disc hu de Lr
tie, there wa~s no doubt
that I deserved it. If this
rings a bell with you, I have
good news.
In Hebrews 12:5-7, The
:Message Bible has this to
.say:
"So don't feel sorry for
yourselves. Or have you ..
'forgotten how good parents
treat children, ared~ that
God treats you as his chil-
dren? My dear child, don't
shrug off God's discipline,
but don't be crushed by
:::h eihr ts he h e
the child he embraces, he
also corrects. God is edu-
cating you; thats why you
must never drop out. He's
treating you as dear chil-
dren. The trouble you're in
isn't punishment; it's train~-
ing; the normal experience
`of children. Only irrespon-
sible parents leave children
to fend for themselves."
These verses presuppose
that every child requires
discipline, and notice how
clal mear rm n e ,,

parents who discipline their
children; those who refuse
to undertake this responsi-
bility are, in fact, irrespon-
sible. The fact is, when we
are disciplined, it is proof
that we are loved.
So not only can we apply
this easily to our task as
parents, it also should influ-
ence our perspective on
struggles that we face as
adults. "The trouble you're
in isn't punishment; it's

trinn."Prhp instea'dn

Might be: "W7hat am I to
learn from this trouble?"
The payoff from our
training is explained a few
verses later in Hebrews

"At the time discipline
isn't much fun. It always
feels like it's going against
the grain. Later, of course,
it pays off handsomely, for
it's the well-trained who
find themselves mature
in their relationship with
God."
Did you recognize it?
The payoff that comes only
through discipline is matu-
rity: being well-trained to
make good decisions that
will lead to fulfilling rela-
tionships with others, and
with our Father in heaven.

a Heart Matters is written by
Angie Land, Director of the
Family Life Ministries of the
Lafayette Baptist Association.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this April, 2010 photo, penitent women are wearing mantilla scarves over
peinetas during Holy Week in Grariada, Spain. Some women in Andalusla
wear traditional black dress and walk between the floats in the Sema-na
Santa, or Holy Week, parades.


can be expensive and must be
booked in advance of Easter
(April 24 this year). If you can't
make it for Semana Santa, don't
worry, festivals take place here
year-round. If you don't visit
around Easter, the images carried
in the processions, called pasos,
can be viewed in their home
churches.


intersection with Lowe
Lake Road in Wellborn.
Call 386-963-2231 with any
questions or visit www.t
wellbornba~ptist.com .

TlurSday, April 14

Baptds Men's Meetng
The men of Wellborn
Baptist Church and their
friends join togeheer t

with a special speaker
and music at 6 p.m. April
14. You are invited to
come and bring a dessert.
The church is located on
Highway 90 West between
Live Oak and Lake City at
the intersection with Lowe
Lake Road in Wellborn, Fl.
Call 386-963-2231 with any
questions or visit wwwl.
wellbornbaptist. com


Methodist Church pres-
ents The Bad Girl's of the
Bible 6 p.m. today. Dinner
is 5 p.m. Donations are
accepted. Call 386-497-
2935.

Sunday
Musical performance
Hope Street Singing
Goup s foiG sat
Fort White at 11 a.m;
Sunday. The church is
located at 339 SW Bryant
Ave.

Frid y
Revival services
The Rev. Billy Jolley
is in revival 7 p.m. April
8-9 and 10:30 a.m. and


6 p.m. April 10 at Lake.
City Church of God. The
church is located at 173
SE Erminae Ave., the cor-
ner of SE Duval Street.

Sunday, April 10
Men's program
The Sons of Allen
Program is 3 p.m. April 10
a n on AbM.E. ehurchh.

Rev. Charles Young, Mt.
Zion A.M.E. Church pas-
tor. The church is located
at 357 NW Queen Road.

Revival meetings
A week of revival meet-
ings begin 11 a.m. afid 6
p~m. April 10 and 7 p.m.
April 11-15 at Cornerstone
.Baptist Church in Fort


White. The church is
located on the corner of
state road 47 and county
road 138. Guest speak-
ers and special music will
participate in the services
each night. A supper is
served 6 to 6:45 p.m. and
nursery will be available
for birth to ~first grade
children.

Tuesday, April 12
Senior Luncheon
A senior luncheon with
a special speaker and
music is 11 a.m. April
12~ at Wellborn Baptist
Church. Everyone is invit-
ed to come and bring a
covered dish. The church
is located on Highway
90 West between Live
Oak and Lake City at the


few weeks ago a
Methodist pastor in
North Carolina lost
his church because
Ahe agreed with
Rob Bell, author of the book
"Love Wins". Bell, the pastor of
a 10,000-member church, has
determined that the Bible does
not teach that there is a Hell.
It would be great if it was true,
but it is not true according to
the Bible, God's own Word. We
must remember that Satan has
not changed his plan in all the
millenniums since the "Garden
of Eden". In Genesis 2:15-17 God
told Adam he could eat of every
tree in the garden except the
Tree of Knowledge of Good and
Evil, for the day you eat of it you
will die (spiritually).
Then in the 3rd chapter Eve
was in the garden and the serpent
(Satan) raises this question to
Eve: "Has God indeed said you


if not, their blood will be on
our hands. We must preach it
because it is the clear revelation
of Scripture and because the
modern pulpit is almost com-
pletely silent on the subject.
The Bible clearly teaches a
place called by various names
where the wicked and the unre-
pentant and the Christ rejecting
will spend eternity. It is called
"the Lake of Fire", "the Second
Death", "the Place of Outer
Darkness prepared for the Devil
and his Angels", and other high-
ly descriptive names that sum
up the word Hell. There is only
one way to avoid this terrible
place and that is through the
shed blood of the Lord Jesus
Christ.
Accept Him today.
(To be continued next week)
SHugh Sherrill is a preacher in
Lake City available for pulpit supply
and revivals.


word itself appears in the New
Testament about 12 times by
his count." My question is: How
many times does it have to appear
before it is' real?
A preacher of the gospel has
no choice but to preach and
teach that there is a Hell. He is
under constraint to preach the
full council of God's Word. The
dire warning of Ezekiel 3:17-
18 should ring in the ears of
everyone: "Son of man, I have
made you a watchman for the
house of Israel; therefore hear a
word from My mouth, and give
them warning from Me: When
I say to the wicked, 'You shall
surely die,' and you give him no
warning, nor speak to warn the
wicked from his wicked way, to
save his life, that same wicked
man shall die in his iniquity; but
his blood I will require at your
hand."
We must warn the unsaved,


BIBLE STUDY


Hugh Sherrill Jr.
ems-hugh43@comcost.net


shall surely not eat of every tree
of this garden?" All Satan did was
raise the question, causing doubt
to enter in, and that's what he is
doing today. He is causing people
to question the virgin birth, the
death on the cross for our sins,
the resurrection, the security of
Our salvation, the judgments that
are to come, and if there is a Hell.
Bell says, "Hell has assumed an
outsize importance in Christian
teaching. Considering the ,


VALUS


FAI H



Saturday, April 2, 20 II wh


&


Nighttime parades an Easter tradition


_ ~


THE SEMANA SANTA
TRADITION
Each wooden or plaster paso is
a distinct depiction of the $assion
or a gnievmng Mary, and some
are centuries-old artistic master-
pieces. They are tended to by the
cofradias, many of which formed
back in the 1500s and 1600s.


Today
Gospel concert
"Brian Free and
Assurance," a Southern
gospel group, is performing
at 6 p.m. today at Wellborn
Baptist Church. This group
of men have been spread-
ing the message of Jesus
Christ through their music.

Hgh a 9 Wes dtwoenn
Lve Oak a Lake Cit wte
te ine scon wihLw
lake Road in Wellborn. A
love offering for the group
will be received. Visit www.

n8-633 miha oy q es-
tions.

Bible Bad Girls
Tustenuggee United







LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVERTISEMENT SATURDAY, APRIL 2, 2011 7A


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right here in your community.
Lake City District 386-752-7447
clayelectric.com
TO Advertise in
this Directory
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Trers for every need
US 3o Wesr airossa fromr \ral Man
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horme iurn shlng-s rer
hl I r- i o**I ~ -~11~








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po 755-54408


tear through a home or building, threatening hives

and property. In Isaiah 43.20 our Lord promises,

"I provide water in the desert and streams in the
u'dljtddldl. .. ..? God is available to us at all times. Visit

)iOul h(JUSe of worship each~ w\eek, w~herber or not
t-here s an emrgni~lency, make Himt a pennlanle nt fixutule








Scriptures Selected by The American Bible Society


North Florida
'LPharmacy

Lake siy Ft hi e, Bard,
Chiefland, Mayo & Keystone Heights


To Advertise in
this Directory
Ga8 Mary Or Bridget
755-5440



~upercenter
"LOW PRICES EVERYDAY"


GWI~~unter, Inc.
Che" Chevron Oil
IJ Jobber





"Qual e alsork at reasonable price"

(38 6) 755-5944


Open 7 Days a Week
1036 E. Du~val S. a City FL.
Fresh Meat, Fresh Produce!
-I an do all things tbough bhrissl thich trmentheneth me .

To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440

To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440


RI(K'5 (R ANE SER VI(g
Located at 25A -
(Old Valdosta Hwy)
386-752-5696 or
386-867-2035
after hours TL

To Advertise in ,
this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440 ,


gagpg|l Staggg
Enterprises
(olumbia founn's Feed Headquanrte
EflD PET stPlls LN ibhl~Rl)E
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}o~ur Lawrn & Gar~der. Headquirteri
bl10WERS *CHAIN5 j4H5* ~TRi lh1IE R5

386-752-8098



EE',,. 755 7050



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Call Mr or Brid et
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this Directory
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BAY WAY~anioral servime
FIRE & Water Restoration
Floor & Carpet Care
Residential & Commercial
755-6142







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this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440


OUR REDEEMER LUHRNCHURCH
I 12 miles S. of I-75 on SR47
755-4299
Sunday Services 9:30AM
(Nursery Provided)
Christian Education Hour
For all ages at ioussi
Pastor: Rev. BruceAlkire
SPIRIT0F CHRIST LUTHERAN
Hwy o, 1.5 miles west on -75*~752-3807
Sunday Worship 10:00AMI
Nursery Avail.
Wed. Pot Luck 6PM Worship 7PMI
Vicar John David Bryant


BEfHEL U~fED METHOIRST CHURCH
4869 US 441 South
SundayWorshipSenrices,
Traditional Senrices 8:30 & 11:00AM
386-755-.1353
mybethehune.com
First United Methodist Church
973 S. Marion Ave.



Traditional Service 11:00AM
Program opportunities available in aill
areas for all ages.
Fora c mplete shdue

Scnactcurhonane. an
diwrS1E. Star ttlRsV kII eal
em~l~,serimoee hIJ.I 3 l~

Paintl Tht Rev I. Luule Moblleyr
IEstib ile REVilil loill



Sunday 5thol~l 9 15 MI
SEun Woirshlp I L.4M Nb Phl1
Pasor, Randy Ogb~um

LKEGITCHUIRCH OFTHENI~AZARENE .


i\Vednr day 6:30PM
A4dullt Youtih Minute Cruld e~n' Mjinistry
i',is u~r eri~ Hen r on
IIW 5R1 and talea P rk Pldli



\und \ lon ~npon r~ v 90i~~1
Sn) toix I :00 M
Padlun Stl\lr Dr lv,. Ara
Director of Music: Bill Poplin

FIRSTFPULL GOSPEL CHURdi
N:E lones iztay N E Washington jr
Sunday School 10:00 AM
Morning Worship ll:00AM
I'YR~lgell5D enc6:00PM
Yolur'h enitc e -Weninesdj) ;-0PM
hlrd-week senie We~dnesday ? 00 PM
Pastor Rev i an Elli


CHRIST CENTRALMXINISTRIES
no~ f orrm I as oDs ~

sll~istliar e co go n alrr S:lud1.
.aulPastor tnnna Irhnl

C RISTIAN HERflAGF ( 11fH

';undde rde~btdron 10:30 AM
Pastor Chris Jones*~752-9119
FAlllNG CREER CHAPEL
F 'ling Creek Road*~755-0580
First and Third Sundays 9:30 A.M,
Second and Fourth Sundays 3:00 I!M.
Pastor: Rev. Cheryl R. Pingel


Fir Advem~Christin
1881 5W~cFarlane Ave.

SundayScho 86752390 9:45AM
Sunday Servicei 11-:00AM
Wednesday Service: 7:00PM

GLAD TBDINGS 455EMBLY OF GOD

A4 huttil~ Iere I~i)SisRd


Sunday Worship 4 1&6Pi


B ESTRD BAPTIST CHURCH

Sun.Byiblertdy9:4AM
Suedn.Webi IlAM&6lc' PM
ie. rayri Migibiblernh Iltudyl 6PM

SundayFEEe BAPTISTICHUR :5A
SundayI~orship I1:3AM&6:0PM


Wed. 6:00PM Prayer Service, &
childrehs Ministry 6:15PM
Downtown Lake City*r752-5422
Rev. StephenAhrens, Pastor
oUffI 5510ISINAPID BAP~1I CHURCH
il1N E Djii uSteer
(386) 752-1990
RonaldVWalters, Pastor

judr llron g Was~hip 1 00~
W\ed Mtditd Wek Wrrhup 6:00PM
[In God' l0Vrd, Wil & Way"
PAR'VIEW BAPTISTCHURCH
268 NW Lake Jeffejr Rd. 752-0681
Lake City, Florida 32055
www.pbelc.com
Simnday School 8 Sunday Worship 9:45 &I1.1 & 6PM ~
AWANA 5:30 PM
Evening Worship 6:00 PM
Wed. Eve. Schedule
Family Supper (Resenration) 5 PM
Children's Ministry 6 PM
Youth Worship 6:00 pF
Prayer Meeting 6:ooPM
Thursday Evening Schedule St. 8/21/08
ParkviewEdge 8:30PM
Pastor: Michael A. Tatem ~

PINE GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH
398 N USS H2 44
Sunday Bible Study 9:45AM
SuildayWorship 11AMtci&69M
Wed. Kids & Youth Ministry 6:30PM
Pastdr: Ron Thompson


.4 re -n... .

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IABERNiALL BA~PTISE CHURCH
144Stnde ndenil Bapn l
Sundd\ ~ihooll (Usi M
Suln Morn Worship IIi M
juildj) Ele. 6PM
Wed. Prayer Meeting :.30) PM
Pastoar Mike Norman

EPIPHAN CAHOLIC CHURCH
19055W~i Epiphany Corur ;5r 4470
-sanirdd),j'lil hl343 Ilrb
Sunp dq~as d15 Ai, 10:30 ri.
5:01 PMl 1SparuihiEnglishi
Sunday jchol, Rellgiousr Educadon


CHRISTIAN'SCIENESCSOIET

Sunday Set ce II 0ti Mi
tWedinedaiE~vrungieryste 7:30 PM
L4KEcm CHRJIAT1N CURCH

sundg school 9.3, AM
Suln lorn Vlorhlp 10).30 AM
sved Prdoor Mea~ng :Pt

NEW HORION
Church oI Ouist `
Directions & Times 386-623-7438
Jack Exam,Jr.,Minister

IAKE CITY CHURCH OF GOD
Sunda Ermine St.*~752-5969:5AM
Sun, Wnorship 10:30AM &6:00PM
Wed. Family Night 7 PM
Wjed. Youth Service 7 PM
SPastor: Carroll fee
EVANGEL CHURCH OF GOD
370 SW Monitor Glen 755-1939
Suday School 10:5 :45A
Wed.Sp @ouaEk u urch" 7PM
SBoys and~irlsClubs
Bible Study
Pastor: John R. Hathaway

ST. JAMES EPISCOPAL CHURCH
2423 SW Bascom Noris Dr.,Lake
City, FI32025 -386-752-2218 .
Email: stjamesepis330@bellsouth.ndt
Holy Eucharist
Sun. 8&l0AM
Wednesday: 5:15pm
Priest: The Rev. MichaelAraktong:
Deacon:The Rev. mmie Hunsingr
Director ofMusic: Dr. Alfonso Levy
,f 4
--


i~Ti ~Ti~ ~F~T~llli~T~~ i~i~i~i~ ii )~Ti~Ti~ ~c~ilrp~ 11~7~a~ L~ II


SALM PRIMIITIV BAPil5T
Sulnday Sen'stes 10 Sf AM
Pastor: Elder HermanrGriffm
50UT51D752-41985THRH
ji88 j E. Bs a Drlve 755 555'
Sainday:


Bribl Srudy
Mr~rning Walrh p


grAy & Bible Study


L1:15 81
10 3081

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is the objective.

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75-19





8A LAKE CITY REPORTER STATE SATURDAY, APRIL 2, 2011


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


By MITCH STACY
Associated Press

DESTIN Gulf Coast
tourism officials who gath.
ered for a meeting at a
Florida Panhandle resort
this week weren't exactly
jumping for joy over the
prospF.cts for growth in
2011, even with the worst
of the recession and BP
oil spill in their rear-view
mirrors.
Instead, there was mea-
sured optimism that this
would be a year of modest
recovery that vacation-
ers would continue com-
ing back to the beaches
and seafood restaurants in
communities whose imag-
es and economies were
battered by the oil spill
last year. The Deepwater
Horizon explosion and spill
occurred April 20, ruining
the lucrative summer sea
son and the year for tour
ist enclaves that were still
fighting off the malaise of
the recession. The gusher
was finally capped three
months later.
Millions of dollars in
reparations from BP were.
invested into national pro-
motions for the beaches
and gulf seaf ood. Tourism
officials reported good
-- but not great March
spring break crowds this
year, with the more family
oriented Easter break and
typically busy summer sea-.
sons still on the horizon.
But many hotels still are
offering deep discounts
to keep rooms filed. In
Pensacol., BP workers
walk the beaches regularly
to round up stray tar balls,
and tourism bureaus con-
tinue to fight the perception
around the country that
the white-sand beaches in
the Florida Panhandle and
coastal Alabama are awash
with oil. .
"I think we're cautiously
optimistic," said Colette
Boehm, special projects
director for Gulf Shores and
Orange Beach Tourism in
Alabama, where oil and tar
balls stained parts of the 32
miles of coastline last summ-
mer.. "Wiith the (survey)
numbers we're getting, we
can't discount the fact thlat
there is still some percep-
tion of an (oil) issue out
there. But the anecdotal
data~ that we're getting is
that's getting better as time
goes on."


she pointed at a pro-union
demonstration "and
we're going to win again."
That sentiment irritates
veteran state employees
like Kathleen Reese, who
spent 33 years as a child
welfare and elder services
worker.
"State workers are very
hard working and dedi-
cated," said Reese, who
recently retired. "~We're
not sitting around twid-
dling our thumbs."
This year's bills, which
some labor leaders refer
to as "Union Busting 101,"
are in some ways the
legacy of former Florida
Gov. Jeb Bush, a conserva-
tive who fought teachers'
unions as a part of his edu-
cation reform efforts.
In his second inaugural
speech, Bush also talked
about wanting to empty
state office buildings of
all their workers, turning
them into "silent monu-
ments." Two decades
before that, Republican
Gov. Bob Martinez vaguely
alluded to state workers as
"lard bricks," in presenting
a budget that contained no
raises for them.
In one sense, -the
backlash against public
employee unions can be
seen as a chickens-coming-
home-to-roost moment.
Municipalities for years
have felt hamstrung by
union rules governing lay-
offs, overtime and retire-
ment benefits.
"LUnions have won a
considerable amount of fat
for their members, mostly
in benefits," said James
Sherk, the conservative
SHeritage Foundation's
labor policy analyst. That
drives up costs for public
employers and, ultimately,
taxpayers, he said.


By JAMES L. ROSICA
Associated Press

TALIAHASSjEE --
While political assaults on
public employee unions
in Wisconsin and other
States have been grab-
bing the headlines, the
Workers' counterparts in
Florida also have been
under attack from the
Republican-controlled
Legislature.
Lawmakers are prepar-
ing to gut union strength,
curbing their ability to
collect dues through auto-
matic paycheck deduc-
tions, forcing them to get
written permission from
each member before mak-
ing political contributions
and calling for unions
that fall below a certain
level of membership to be
stripped of collective bar-
gaining rights.
One of the bills passed
the House last week and is
awaiting Senate approval.
What's different in
Florida, however, is a
state' constitutional provi-
sion that protects public
Employees' right to col-
lectively bargain. The
term describes negotia-
tions between unions and
employers to agree on pay,
benefits and other work
conditions. The constitu-
tional protection means
Florida lawmakers face
limits on what they can do
to roll back union power.
The Florida efforts are
part of a national trend,
bolstered by Republican
victories last year, to turn
back union might.
As Mabel Ryan, aFlorida
tea party activist, recently
said in Tallahassee, "Last
November was a tremen-
dous boost for all of us.
We won, and they lost" -


420 SE Alligator Glen, Lake City 32025

(on I-- Q" onr lbRd-. ie otho aaDie

*Listen to Experts Talk
about Plants, Birds, Habitat, Water and More

*Learn about the Florida Wildlife. Care Center
and their Birds of Prey

rSee the Fish & Wildlife Commission
I Law Enforcement Helicopter


ASSOCIATED PRESS
This Tuesday photo shows businesses along the coast in Destin. Gulf Coast tourisin officials
who gathered for a meeting at a Florida Panhandle resort this week weren't exactly jumping
for joy over the prospects for growth in 2011, even with the worst of the recession and BP
oil spill in their rear-view mirrors. Instead, there was measured optimism that this would be
a year of modest recovery that vacationers would continue coming back to the beaches '
and seafood restaurants in communities whose images and economies were battered by the


specter of the oil spill last year.

Last year was expected to
be abanneryear for Panama
City, Fla. The Panhandle
beach town saw a record
number of spring break
visitors in March 2010 and
had scheduled the open-
ing of a new international
airport for May amid great
hoopla. The airport went
online as expected, but its
debut was overshadowed
by news of the April oil spill '
and uncertainty over if and
when crude would hit the
shore. Beaches in Panama
City saw only some scat-
tered tar balls, but the
crowds ~still mostly stayed
away despite a visit from
President Barack Obama
and his family designed to
show that the beach was
clean and the seafood was
safe.
"Ecologically, we've fully
recovered. Now we have
an economic recovery,"
said Dan Rowe,~ president
and CEO of the Panama
City Beach Convention &
Visitors Bureau. "But we
can't get back the momen-
tum, we lost with the open-
ing of the airport 2010
was going to be a spring-
board for the future. We'll
do OK in 2011, but it's really
about trying to sustain and
get that momentum back.
If we continue to tell our
story, we may over time
get back to that trajectory
we were on before the oil
spill."


vacation haunts, to the plac-
es they've enjoyed."
John Russell is president
of Sandestin Investments,
owner of the lovely 2,400-
acre Sandestin Gulf and
Beach Resort that hosted
this week's tourism con-
ference. Russell said the
challenges last year taught
him and his promotions
staff that theyL have to work
harder for their business,
offering discounts when
necessary, fostering rela-
tionships with online travel
companies and using email
blasts and social media
often to promote events
and specials.
"There is no longer a'you
build it and they will come'
in this business anymore,"
Russell said. "You have to
be the best marketer in the
business." '


Rowe and other tour-
ism officials said the oil
spill pushed them to uti-
lize Facebook and other
social media more to get
out their message, con-
vince people the beaches
were clean, promote events
and generally connect wiith
visitors on a more personal
level. That online follow-
ing is considered a vital
part of the public-relations
strategy for most tourism
bureaus now.
'"They have done, an
incredible job getting that
message out there," said
~Duane Vinson, whose
Smith Travel Research
analyzes lodging trends for
the industry. He said the
company's research proj-
ects a slight increase in
average daily rates paid by
hotel guests this year, and
that rising gas prices won't
be a huge factor when it
comes to people' deciding
whether or not to travel
this summer. Hoteliers
in the southeast expect a
"strong summer ~season,"
he said.
'"There's a lot of pent-up
demand out there, people
who have held off on those
vacations over the last
couple of years," Vinson
said. "They're going, 'We
haven't been' to the coast
for a couple of years, let's
go to the coast.' We're
going to see those people
heading back to their old


By BILL KACZOR
Associated Press

TALIAHASSEE Pay cuts for teach-
ers and other employees that are part of
appropriations bills in both Florida legisla-
tive chambers could help offset deep pub-
lic school spending reductions, a budget
leader said as the Senate's version cleared
committee Thursday.
Sen. David Simmons, who chairs a
subcom itee oosesoeIn d sochtoe senb

Republican Gov. Rick Scott's budget direc-
tor before the Senate Budget Committee
approved its $69.8 billion appropriations
bill and related legislation.
Pension bills in both GOP-controlled
chambers would require about 655,000
teachers, state workers and local govern-
ment employees to contribute 3 percent
of their salaries to the Florida Retirement
System, now completely supported by.tax-
payers-
The Senate panel approved its proposed
pension bill (SB 7094) on a largely party-line
vote with all but one Republican in favor
and all Democrats against after public
employees and union officials argued that
lawmakers are balancing the budget on the
backs of state workers.
Teachers, police officers, firefighters and
Other public employees said they're already
underpaid compared to other states and
~have gone w~ayrithutpy ie from three to
eight year -
"Enough already," said Andy Ford, presi-
dent of the Florida Education Association,
the statewide teachers union. "This is a tax
on our income. W~e do not get rich while we
work and the changes to our retirement sys-
tem will guarantee that we will be poor until
the day that we die."


The Senate budget bill won commtee
approval on a largely party-line roll call with
only two Democrats joining all Republicans
in voting for the measure.
Simmons, R-Maitland, said Florida school
districts could use money saved from state-
ordered pay cuts for teachers and other
employees, as well as left-over federal stimu-
lus dollars, to offset almost all of the sharp
spending cuts they're facing,
Budget bills mn both chambers would make
deep cuts in education, health care and other
services besides the pension changes to
close a projected $3.75 billion gap between
recession-depressed revenues and high-pri-
ority to critical state needs in the fiscal year
beginning July 1.
The House's budget, which cleared a com-
mittee Wednesday, would cut school spend-
ing by $463.13, or 6.8 percent. The Senate
plan would cut about $40 million less, or 6.2
percent. Scott has proposed a 10 percent cut
in per student spending and a 5 percent pen-
sion contribution from public employees.
Simmons said the 3 percent employee
pension contribution would save school dis-
tricts $678 million. Izwmakers last year also
urged the districts to save $554 million in
unexpected stimulus money they received
from a federal jobs bill for next year, and
Simmons said most of them did.
Tapping those two funding sources would
reduce the spending cut mn the Senate bill to
about 0.5 percent, Simmons said.
"It's essentially level funding," he said.
The state, meanwhile, would save about
$710 million from having employee make
pension contributions.
Contributing 3* percent would cost the
averagC public employee making $39,000
a year nearly $1,200.


Gulf Coast tourism officialS



are 'cRuioulOU optimistic


Political pressure

RISO bearing on

state s umions


State Senate panel will


consider $69.8B budget


\i ponsorea cy


GatewNay Wildlife Habitat Org.









Lakre City Reporter


I
I


Dixon, Norris win sectlonals


Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-042 I
tkirb~akecityreportercorn



Saturday, April 2, 20 1 1


Section B


www.Iakecityreporter.com


FROM THE SIDELINE








Brandon Finley

bf ley0Tkci yeorecom

Critical




foT lOcal


SDOrts
iethe
professional
ranks may

su 6tng up
their baseball season, for
lo al high sch Ils it's all
cmn ts a ood
co~ fuay 0enthink that
so many sports will soon
wrap for the year, because
it seems that many of them

hv u sartd. : Bt h

at local high schools.
Tennis will kick off
the first leg of district
tournaments when the
boys and girls of Columbia
High travel to Jonesville
Tennis Complex in
Gainesville starting on
Wednesday.
The two-day tournament
shouldn't be the end of the
road for the Lady Tigers as
they come in as defending
champions. The boys team
performed a complete
turnaround under first-
year coach Russell Waters,
but they'll have some stiff
competition to contend
with.
Softball has two weeks
remaining in the regular
season before district-
tournament play begins.
Both Columbia and Fort
White are in good shape to
make a push for a district
championship.
The lady Tigers are in
prime position to recapture
the district crown after
falling to Middleburg in last
year's playoff. This time, it
will happen in Columbia's
backyard as Jimmy
Williams' team will host.
Fort White has been in
contention all season, and
the Lady Indians won't
have to travel far either.
Casie Sparks takes her
fist trip to the district
tournament at Santa Fe
High.
It hasn't been a dream

loca baebal temshbeut
the good news is that
Columbia and Fort White


district tournament.
First-year coach J.T.
Clark will lead his Tigers
into familiar territory as
Columbia tries to defend
its title at Middleburg
High, where Columbia won
last year's championship.
Fort White might not
end up on top of the
district at the end of the
regular season, but the
good news for the Indians
is that they'll have home-
field advantage in the
district tournament as
Chad Bonds' team hosts.
Sprinkle in state
weightlifting meets for the
Tigers and Indians, and
the month of April will be
thick for Columbia county
sports. Timmy Jernigan .
has a good chance of
capturing an individual
crown ivrhen the Tigers
travel to Kissimmee on
April 15 for the state
championship.
WBrandon Finley covers


speort for the Lake City


Husldes only
school tO
accomplish feat.

By PAT EATON-ROBB
Associated Press

STORRS, Conn. -
Basketball jerseys with
Kemba Walker's No. 15 and
Maya Moore's No. 23 are
sailing out of the UConn
Co-op campus bookstore as
students prepare to cheer
on their men's and wom-
en's basketball teams in the
Final Fours.
The men playr in their
118110881 Semifinal in
Houston on Saturday night
against Ke~itucky (29-8),


while the women play Notre
Dame (30-7) m 'Indianapolis

oTsuen yonnecticut men
(30-9) are seeking their
third national title and are
back in the Final Four for
the fourth time, and second
time in three years. The
women (36-1) are seeking
an eighth title and third in
a row.
It's the third time in seven
years that both teams have
made it this far. In 2004 the
school became the only one
in Division I history to win
dual titles.
Co-op president Bill
Simpson says the store has
HUSKIES continued on 3B


-


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Connecticut guard Lorin Dixon (30) goes up to the net against Duke in the first half of an
NCAA women's college basketball tournament regional final game, Tuesday in Philadelphia.


"""..
..




. JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake Citl Reporter
Fort White High's JR Dixon competes in the clean and jerk in a match against Columbia High earlier this season. Dixon took
first place in the 183-pound weight class at the t~A sectional meet in Palatka on Friday.


had a 240-pound bench
press and clean and jerked
220 pounds.
The Indians qualified a
second person in the heavy-
weight division as Anthony
Pearce was just 30 pounds


off of Norris' total. Pearce
had a 305-pound bench
.press with 300 pounds on
the clean and jerk.
The 1A state meet
takes place on April 15 in
Kissimmee.


Three other lifters quali- ~finished with a 155-pound
fled for the state meet. clean and jerk for a 360-
Devin; Rorabaugh quali- pound total. .
fi~ed with a third-place fin- Dylan Newman finished
ish in the 129-pound weight in second place for the 239-
class. Rorabaugh had a pound weight class with a
bench of. 205 pounds and 460-pound total. Newman


NOtre Dame'S
Brey selected
COach of the year
Associated Press

HOUSTON Jimmer
Fredette became a one-
name star in his senior sea-
son at BYU. *
Leading the country in
scoring helped as did being
on a team that spent the
second half of the season
ranked in the top ten.
On Friday, Fredette,
excuse me, Jimmer was
selected The Associated
Press' player of the year.
"It's been quite a ride and
it's been a lot of fun and
I wouldn't take anything
back," Fredette: said. "I had '
quite the career at BYU.
There were a lot of ups and
downs, b~ut there were a lot
more ups this year.
The Cougars won the
Mountain West Conference


regular-season title and lost to
San Diego State in the tourna-
ment final. A No. 3 seed in the
NCAA tournament, they lost
to Florida in overtime in the
round of 16 and finished with
a 32-5 record.
"I just knew right from
the beginning we could
have a very good year
with the guys returning,
and it was one of the most
talented teams I've ever
played on," said Fredette,
who averaged 28.5 points.
'"Then we started to plaiy
well and beat Arizona, and
I knew from there we could
be a force. That's what hap-
pened because we stayed
hungry all year, and that's
what separated us from
other teams."
Notre Dame's Mike Brey
was selected the coach
of the year as he led the
'Fighting Irish to a second-
place finish in the Big East
and a No. 5 ranking in the
final poll.


'"The personality of this
group was so stable wheth-
er it was a big win or a
loss, they stayed stable,"
said Brey, who has been
at Notre Dame for 11 sea-
sons. "When they had great
wins it didn't change them.
When they had a tough
loss it didn't change them.
Stable is the word."
Fredette received 48
votes from the 65-member
national media panel that
selects the weekly Top 25.
The voting was done before
the NCAA tournament.
Kemba Walker of
Connecticut was second
with 11 votes. Nolan Smith
of Duke had five and Jared
Sullinger of Ohio State one.
'"To see Jimmer progress
and become a leader of hiS
team, that will be his bas-
ketball legacy," BYU coach
Dave Rose said. "He is driv-
en not just to be the best
player he can, but it was
how he helped his team."


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this March 24 file photo, BYU's Jimmer Fredette (32) goes
up for a shot in front of Florida's Alex Tyus (23) and Kenny
Boynton (1) during the NCAA Southeast regional
semifinal game in New Orleans. Fredette was selected as
The Associated Press' player of the year on Friday.


U onn looks


for mnens and


wvomens titles


Five Indians
GUalify fOr state
Weightlifting meet.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter. com,

Two Fort White High lift-
ers were on top of their
class as the Indians quali-
fied fi~ve members of the
weightlifting team for the
state finals at the 1A sec-
tional meet in Palatka on
Friday.
JR Dixon and ~Curtis
Norris led all Indians with
their first-place finishes.
Dixon led the 183-pound
weight class with a 285-
pound bench press and 285-
pound clean and jerk. He
had a combined weight of
570 pounds.
Norris benched 375
pounds and had a clean and
jerk of 260 pounds for a 635-
pound total.
"Both of those guys had
a very good week working
out and the results showed
that hard work," Fort White
head coach Dan Marsee
said.
Marsee doesn't think that
their luck will run out at the
sectional meet.
"I think both guys have a
chance to compete at state,"
he said.


BYU's Fredette named



AP player of the year





SCOREBOARD


Benland :Z 21 ::
Chicago II 20 .355
NATIONAL LEAGUE

San Francisco 12 I .6P5
Colorado 20 II .645
Milwaukee 19 II .633
Philadelphia 21 14 .600
Atlanta 17 13 .567
Cincinnat 17 14.4
Washington 15 14 .517
Florida 15 15 .500
St. Louis 14 16 .467
San Diego 13 17 .433

Co Agels 14 21. 04
Pittsburgh~ 12 21 .364
Arizona 12 25 .324
Houston 11 24 .314

AUTO RACING


S I I l I I


Check out the JuttR rh Cr sod buzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SATURDAY, APRIL 2, 2011


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


Atat no Hounton, 7n p.m.

Dallas at Portland, 9 p.m.

NCAA Final Four

AtoReliant Stadium
National Semifinals
Saturday
satler (27-9) vs. virginia
Commonwealth (8-l l), 6:09C ectcut

(30-9), 40 minutes after first game
National Championship
Monday
Semifinal winners, 9 p.m.

NIT championship

Wichita State 66,Alaabama 57

Women's Final four

At at Conseco Fieldhouse
IndanN onal Semifinas '
Sunday
Stanford (33-2) vs.Texas A&M (31-5),
7 p.m. -
Connecticut (36-1) vs. Notre Dame
(30-7), 9p.m.
National Championship
Tuesday
seminal winners, a:)o p.m. .

Women's NIT

Ssemiand' s
Toledo 83, Che neala60
Southern Cal 63, Illinois State 36
Championship
Saturday
Southern Cal (24-12) at Toledo
(28-8),3 p.m'

BASEBALL

AL schedule

Friday' Games
Chicago White Sox at Cleveland (n)
Boston at Texas (n)
Minnesota atToronto (n)
Baltmore at Tampa Bay (n)
L.AAngels at Kansas City (n)
Seattle at Oakland (n)
Today's Garnes
Chicago White Sox at Cleveland'
1:05 p.m
Minnesota at Toronto, 1:07 p.m.
LAtr i at YKY me GI ):10 p.m.
Baltimore at Tmpa Bay,7:IO p.m.
Boston at Texas, 8:05 p.m:
Seattle at Oakland, 9:05 p.m-
Samnday's Games
Chicago White Sox at Cleveland,

I:05Dit at N.Y.Yankees. 1:05 p.m.
Minnesota at Toronto, 1:07 P.m.
Batimore at Tampa Bay, 1:40 P.m.
Boston at Texas, 2*05 p.m.
1.AAngels at Kan~sas City, 2:IO p.m.
Seattle at Oakland, 4:05 P.m.

NL schedule

.Foday's Games
.Philadelphia 5, Houston 4
Pittsburgh 6, Chicago Cubs 3
Aizn t lrado (n '
San Francisco at L.A. Dodgers (n)
Today's Games
Atlanta stWashington, 1:05 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Chicago Cubs, 1:05 p.m.
San Diego at St. Louis, 4: IO p.m.
4.10 mFrancisco at L.A. Dodgers,
Houston at Phiiladelphia, 7:05 P.m.
Milwaukee at Cincinnati, 7:IO p.m. .
N.Y. Mets at Florida,7:IO p.m.
Arizona at Colorado, 8:10 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Milwaukee at Cincinnati, 1:10 p.m.
N.Y. Mets at Florida, 1:10 p~m.
Atlanta atWashington, I:35 p.m. .
Houston at Philadelphia, 1:35 p.m.
San Diego at St. Louis, 2:15 p.m.
Pittsburghi at Chicago Cubs, 2:20 p.m.
Arizona at Colorado, 3:10 p.m.
8:Sa mFrancisco at L.A. Dodgers,


Spring training final
AMERICAN LEAGUE


Newton for a pay-to-play
scheme involving his father,
eventually clearing the
Heisman Trophy winner but
not his father. Tennessee
coach Bruce Pearl acknowl-
edged he had lied to inves-
tigators and was later fied
- after the basketball and
football programs already
had been hit with a dozen
violations.
Connecticut coach Jim
Calhoun, whose team is
playing in this weekend's
Final Four, was serve a
three-game suspension next
season for failing to create
an atmosphere of compli-
ance within his program.
And those are just the
highlights. ,Now Emmert
wants the NCAA to talse
a hard look at whether
its penalties are effective
enough to stop more from
happening.
"~We cannot have coach-
es, administrators, parents
or student-athletes sitting
out there deciding' 'Is this-
worth the risk? If I conduct
myself in this fashion and I
get caught; it~s still worth the
risk," Emmert said. "We don't
want those kinds of cost-ben-
efit analyses going on."
The scandal with the
Fiesta Bowl could have
wide-ranging ramifications.
The bowl's board of direc-
tors voted unanimously on
Tuesday to fie president
and CEO Junker "for his
improper and inappropriate
activities documented" in


a scathing report that out-
lined more than $46,000 in
political contribution reim-
bursements that may be in
violation of Arizona state
campaign laws, along with
the charter that allowed the
Fiesta Bowl its nonprofit
status.
An internal report also
showed hundreds of thou-
* sands, perhaps even mil-
lions of dollars, in "exces-
sive compensation, non-
business and inappropriate
expenditures and inappro--
priate gifts."
Criminal charges may be
fied, and BCS officials have
stepped in, telling the Fiesta
Bowl to persuade them that
nothing like this will ever
happen again or the bowl
will lose its place in college
football's lucrative champi-
onship system.
Emmert said he has
scanned the report and is
keeping a close eye on the
situation.
"You can't indict the
entire bowl system because
of whaf~s gone on there,"
he said. "My hope is that
it will also serve as I guess
a warning shot that every
other board in every other
community that runs a
bowl game makes sure
that they're doing the
oversight, compliance and
due diligence to make
'sure their bowl games are
well-run. We have no rea-
son to believe thats not the
~case."


By JOHN MARSHALL
Associated Press

HOUSTON -The
NCAA has had rough run-
up to its premier basketball
event.
The Fiesta Bowl fied its
CEO and will be asked to
justify its inclusion in the
BCS over an alleged politi-
cal reimbursement scheme.
FOur Auburn players told
HBO that they were paid
while playing or being
recruited at the school.
Ohio State coach Jim
Tressel will miss the fist
five games of next season
fOr failing to report that his
playerS Sold memorabilia
and received improper ben-
efits.
And tha~s just the past
month.
On the eve of his first
Final FOur as NCAA presi-
dent, Mark Emmert is
WOrking toward changing
the increasingly-negative
image Of the organization
he leads.
"Like it or not, the things
that are WrOng Oftell wind
up being highlighted,"
Emmert said Thursday.
"Thaf~s riot a shot at the
media, tilats just the way
the world works. We need
tO, therefore, make sure that
people understand if there
are things that are awry, we
will put them right."
A lot has gone awry.
The NCAA investigated
Auburn quarterback Cam


Race week

PNANC p
Goody's Fast Relief 500
'Site: MartinsvilleVa.
Schedule: Today, practice (Spe
12:30-2 p.m., 3:30-5 p.m.); Satur<
qualifying (Speed, noon-I:30 p.m.); Sune
race, I p.m.(FOX, 12:30-5 p.m.).
Track: Martinsville Speedway (o
o.s2s miles).
Race distance: 263 rniles, 500 laps.
CAMPING WORLD TRUCKS

Site: Martinsville,Va.
Schedule: Today, practice (Spe
2-3:30 p.md; Saturday, qualifying (10::
I :0 a.m.), race, 2 p.m. (Speed, 1::

T ac: Martinsville Speedway.
Race distance: 131.5 miles, 250 1aps
NHRA FULL THROTTLE
SummitRacing.com
s Schedule: Today, qualifying; Satur<
qualifying (ESPN2, 7-9 p.m.); Sunday, fi
eliminations (ESPN2, 4:30-7 p.m.).
S Tracle The Strip at 1.as Vegas Mot
Spe ay

HOCKEY

NH L standings

EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W L
x-Philadelphia 77 46 21
x-Pittsburgh 7 2

New Jenerse 76 35 36
N.Y. Islanders 7830 36
Northeast Division
GP W L
x-Boston 77 43 23
Mo real 7 )

Toronto. 78 36 32
Ottawa 78 30 38
Southeast Division
GP W L
xWashingo 7845 22
xTampan ton 77 42 24
carolina n7 37 so
Atlanta 77 33 32
Florida 78 29 37
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division

Detroit W' 442
Nashville 78 42 26
Chicago 76 41 27
St Louis 77 35 32
Columbus 77 34 31
Northwest Division

z-Vancouver I'- 52
Calgary 78 38 29
Minnesota 77 37 32
Colorado 76 28 40
Edmonton 77 23 43
Pacific Division
*GP W L
x-San Jose 77 45 23
Phoenix 78 42 25
Los Angeles 77 44 27
Anaheim 77 44 28
Dallas 74 38 27
Thursday's Games

N..Isan ers 6, N.3, bagers 2
Atlanta I, Philadelphia a
Washington 4, Columbus 3, OT
Tampa Bay 2,Pittsburgh I
Otawa 4, Florida I
Minnesota 4, Edmonton 2
Nashville 3, Colorado 2
Vancouver 3, Los Angeles I
San Jose 6, Dallas 0
Today's Games
Atlanta at Boston, I p.m.
Tampa say at Minnesota, 2 p.m.
EDetrait tNashriele, 34pn.

Toronto at Ottawa, 7 p.m.
Montreal at New Jersey, 7 p.m.
Carolina at N.Y. Islanders, 7 p.m.


Jones Fieldhouse.
For detail, call Blal
Lundy ait 867-0296.

G~OLF
Lions Club tourney
April 9
The Lake City Lior
Club tournament is 9
April 9 at The CountI
Club at Lake City.
For details, call Ca
Marie at 752-2266.

T-BALL
Meing Turs ay
Inke City.Recreatic


Department has a T-ball
ke coaches meeting set for
6:30 p.m. Thursday at the
Girls Club Center.
For details, call Heyward
Christie at 754-3607.

W819ES CHEERLEADING
ns Clinic, tryout dates set
la.m.
ry Richardson Middle
School's cheerleading clinic
rl Ste- is 3:15-5:15 p.m. April 18-20,
and tryouts are 3:30 p.m.
April 21 mn the Richardson
Middle School gym.
For details call cheer
sponsor Shannon Hall at
on 623-4058.


Answer to Previous Puzzle


ACROSS 37 Turned pages
39 Roundup need
Make candles 41 Drum, as f in-
Bus alternative gers
Just for guys 42 Jazz instru-
..00000's Wife ment
Heroic tale 43 Bad or good
Pie crust sign
ingredient 45 Slice
Predicaments 48 Railroad siding
Days before 49 Dark
Harrison's suc- 52 Belgian river
COSsor 53 A woodwind
Show~ 54 Scold
affection 55 Knowing look
=onniving 56 Flour holder
18-wheeler 57 Well-known
Devoted~ pharaoh


24 Take the trou-
ble
27 Spacewalk, to
NASA
28 Gaiter
30 Prepares, as a
dinner table
32 Soft mineral
34 Wily subterfuge
36 Big green par-
FOt


1
4
7

12 t
13 1


16 [
17 I

18 ~

19 (
20 1
21


Pentagon grp.
No future -
Roly- -
Toyota model
Famous Khan
- -relief
Horses pull
them


Kansas City
Minnesota
Detroit
Los Angeles
scattle


Tampa Bay
Baltimore
NewYork


20 Com posts
21 Rent out
22 Almond-
shaped
23 Kind of lock
24 Modem-speed
Unit
25 Cartoon
shrieks
26 66 and I-80
29 Boarding
school
31 Paulo
33 Party provi-
Sloner
35 Lily maid of
Astolat
38 Ceiling
fixtuf6
40 Ice skater's
leap
42 Bill and coo
43 May berry
moppet
44 Think on
46 Dollar fraction
47 Genesis
hunter
48 Our sun
49 Horde
50 Geisha's tie
51 Army off.


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek


I ~ ~ g T | | HAT ONE GETS
| 4 A ( -> WHEN THEY C.AFEPOOL-
WaYITH 50MEONE WVHO
TPIYSG WON'T STOP TALKING
I 17 17Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
L L FLsuggested by the above cartoon.



(Answers Monday)
Yeteda's Jumbles: FLICK PLANK REFUSE NOODLE
IAnswer: After today, Jumble will no longer be featured
in newspapers APRIL FOOLS


4-2 @ 2011 by UFS, Inc.


NCAA going through



TOugh stretch of scandals


TELEVISION

TV sports
Today
AUTO RACING

SPEED -NASCARTruck Series, pole
qualifying for Kroger 250, at Martinsville,
va

SPEED NANCAR, Sprint Cup, pole
qualifying for Goody's Fast Relief 500, at
MartinsvilleVa-
2 p.m-
KS E2DO at MNSCMIe Truck Series,
o 7 p.m.
ESPN2 NHRA, qualifying for
summitRacing.com Nationals,at tLasvegas
(same-day tape)


TGC -European PGA Tour,Trophee
Hassan II, third round, at Agadir, Morocco
I p~m.
thi Cn a PGA To r, Houston Open,
3 p.m.
NBC PGA Tour, Houston Open,
third round, at Humble,Texas
4:30 p.m.
TGC LPGA, Kraft Nabisco
Championship, third round, at Rancho
Mirage, calit
9 p.m-
TGC Champions Tour, Mississippi
GulfiResort lsisic, second round, at
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
I p.m.
WGN Chicago White Sox at
Cleveland 4..

FOX Regional coverage, Detrok
at N.Y. Yankees, San Francisco at LA.
Dodgers, or San Diego at St. Louis
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL

cas NcAA Dvisionl I ourna-
ment, Final Four doubleheader, Butler vs.
Virginia Commonwealth and Kentucky vs.
connecticut at Houston
NBA BASKETBALL..

WGN --Toronto at Chicago
NBA DL BASKETBALL
Il-p.m.
VERSUS Maine at Erie (same-day
tape)
PREP BASKETBALL
Noon
ESPN2 Rise National Invitational,
girls' championship game, teams TBD. at
Bethes~da Md.

ESPN Ris2 Ntonal Invitational,
boys' championship game, teams TBD, at
Bethesda, Md.
RoDEO. *
8 p.m. .
VERSUS PBR, U.S. Bank Invitational,
at Kansas City, CCER

7:30 a~m.
ESPN Premier League, Manchester
United at West Ham
3 p.m.
ESPN2 Women's national teams,
exhibition, England vs. U.S., at London
TENNIS
I2:30 p.m.
CBS` -ATP/WTA Tour, Sony Ericsson
Open, women's championship match, at
Key Biscayne, Fla.

BASKETBALL

NBA stan~dingS

EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic DivisionPcGB

y-Boston 52 22 ,.703 -
Philadelphia 39 36 .520 13%
New Ydrk 37 38 .493 15%
New Jersey 23 5 I .3 II 29
Toronto 20 54 .270 32
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
x-lliami s2 23 .693 -
x-Orlando 47 28 .627 5
x-Atlanta 43 32 .573 9
Charlotte 32 42 .432 191
Washington 18 56 .243 33%
Central DivisionPtGB

y-Chicago 54 20 .730 -
Indiana 34 42 .447 2 I
Milwaukee 30 44 .405 24
Detroit 26 48 .351 28
Cleveland 15 59 .203 39
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
x-San Antonio 57 18 .760 -
x-c~allas sa 22 .707 4
New orleans 43 32 .sn3 14
rnmphis. 42 3 50

Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
x-Oklahoma City 50 24 .676 -
Denver 45 29 .608 5
Portland 43 32 .573 71
utah as 39 .4so 14%
Minnesota 17 58 .227 331
Pacific Division
W L Pct GB
y-L.A. Lakers 54 20 .730 _
Phoenix 36 38 .486 18
Golden State 32 44 .421 23
L.A. Clippers 29 46 .387 25%
Sacramento 2 I 53 .284 33
x-clinched playoff spot
y-clinched division

NBA schedule

Thursday's Games
Boston 107, San Antonio 97
L.A. Lakers I 10, Dallas 82
Today's Games
Toronto at Chicago, 8 p.m.


Minnesota at Memphis, 8 p.m.
Philadelphia at Milwaukee, 8:30 p.m.
Dailasoat Golden State, I MC rsm.

10:30 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Phoenix at San Antonio, I p.m.
Denver at L.A. Lakers, 3:30 p.mn.
Utah at Sacramento, 6 p.m.
Detroit at Boston, 6 p.m.
Washington at Charlotte, 6 p.m.
Miami at New Jersey, 6 p.m.
Cleveland at New York, 6 p.mn.
Orlando at Toronto, 6 p.m.


BRIE FS


YOUTH BASEBALL
Lake City 13-15
rlegistration
Lake City Babe Ruth
BRSeball has registration
for ages 13-15 ait 7 p.m.
Monday at Southside
Sports Complex.
For details, call Tad "
CerVallieS at 365-4810.

CHS FOOTBALL
QB Club meetings set
The Columbia County
Quarterback Club has
IleetingS Set for 6 p.m.
April 11 and April 25 at


DOWN


8 Hebrew letters
9 Greek war god
10 Mdse.
12 Has an odor
15 Movie lioness
18 Baby fox


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.













The shot that still defines Mickelson


HUSKIES* In Final Four
Continued From Page 1B


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SATURDAY, APRIL 2, 2011


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


Iris caddie. It was the pine
Straw.
"I was worried he could
lose his footing," Mackay
said.
Mackay usually brings
the conservative voice to a
risk-reward situation, and
while he knew Mickelson
had already made up his
mind, he pointed out what
happened the day before,
when Mickelson near-
ly holed a wedge on the
15th in his quest for three
straight eagles.
"I knew he was going to
go, but if he wanted to lay
up, he's as good as anyone
from 80 yards," Mackay
said.
After that, it was only a
matter of 5-iron or 6-iron.
Asked whether it was
the defining moment of
the tournament, Westwood
argued for the third round
when Mickelson made
an eagle putt on the 13th,
holed out for eagle on the
14th and came within a few
feet of holing a wedge on
the 15th. "Those kind of
things don't tend to happen
too often," he said.
But even Westwood rec-
ognizes a special shot when
he sees on:
"It was Ijrobably the
shot of the. year last year,
under the circumstances
and taking everything into
account," he said. "I knew
he'd fancy having a go at it,
and that's Phil's personality
and game. He's that kind of
player."
Augusta National asks
each champion to donate
a club to be on display that
was pivotal in his victory.
The 6-iron was an obvious
choice.
Not so obvious is how he
will play as the defending
champion.


By DOUG FERGUSON
Associated Press

The ball was nestled
in loose pine straw to the
right of the 13th fairway
at Augusta National, a pair
of Georgia pines blocking
a daunting view of the flag
tucked behind Rae's Creek,
207 yards away.
What some might con
sider a dilemma, Phil
Mickelson saw as oppor-
tunity.
Jim "Bones" Mackay,
who has caddied for
Mickelson the better part
of two decades, sized -up
the situation quickly and
knew the plan even before
his boss spoke.
"Once I got to the ball, I
knew he was going for it,"
Mackay said. "From past
experience."
With one swing,
Mickelson hit a spectacular-
looking shot through a gap
in the trees, just far enough
to clear the winding creek
and plop down next to the
flag, setting off a ground-
shaking cheer that defines
the back nine Sunday at the
Masters. .
Thitt shot immediately
became part of Masters
lore. It ranks with Jack
Nicklaus hitting 4-iron into
the 15th for eagle in 1986,
the final push toward his
historic sixth green jacket-
with Tiger Woods and the
chip that made a U-turn
down the slope on the 16th
and paused a full second
before dropping for birdie
on the final turn in 2005.
It's right thee with Larry
Mize chipping in from 140
feet in a playoff at No. 11 to
beat Greg Norman; Sandy
Lyle from the fairway bun-
ker on No. 18 for birdie to
win in 1988.


ASSOCIATED PREss
In this April 11, 2010, file photo former Master's champion An~gel Cabrera of Argentina (obscured at rear) helps Phil Mickelson
put on his Masters jacket after his win at the 2010 Masters golf tournament in Augusta, Ga. After a year of turmoil in which his
wife and mother were diagnosed with breast cancer a month apart, Mickelson won another Masters and was excited to finally
turn the corner on and off the golf course.


Mickelsoi'i's shot last
year didn't win the Masters,
though.
What gets lost is that he -
missed the 4-foot eagle putt.
He'wound up with the same
score on that hole as Lee
Westwood, who laid up from
the trees and made birdie.
But that doesn't matter.
For Mickelson, golf
always has been more
about the journey than the
destination.
"Not too many people
could have played that
shot 'probably only Phil,
'to be honest," Ernie Els
said. "He's just kind .of a
magician, the best at times.
And around there, he's just
unbelievable."
This time, Mickelson


arrived ~at.his destination
safely.
The shot was cool, even
by Mickelson's standards.
But the special mieinory for
him last year was walking
off the 18th green and into
the arms of his wife, Amy,
who was at a golf course for
the first time since being
diagnosed with breast can-
cer nearly a year earlier.
The final birdie putt gave
Mickelson a three-shot vic-
toiy, the largest of his three
wins at Augusta National.
It will be hard for anyone
this year at Augusta to walk
past that stand of Georgia
Pines without stopping to
take a look. That's what
U.S. Amateur champion
Peter Uihlein did during a


practice round. Like most
others, he was curious to
see what Mickelson faced,
or even what Mickelson
was thinking.
"It's an aggressive shot,"
Uihlein said with a grin.
"I just looked at it. It's an
unbelievable shot. There's
just no questionn"
After his first Masters
victory in 2004, Mickelson
went back to the spot on the
18th green where he holed
an 18-foot birdie putt for his
first .major championship.
He expects to do the same
on No. 13.
"I very well may go to
that spot because that's an
important spot, an impor-
tant shot for the tournament
last year," he said. "And I


will look at that. However,
I do plan on hitting the fair-
way all four days."
Mickelson has neverbeen
afraid to take on any shot,
no matter the circumstanc-
es.' The television angle
made it look as though he
could touch the trees with-
out moving, although he
had a full swing.
Laying up was never an
option.
"I was going to have to
through. That gap if I laid
up or went for the green,"
MIickelsori said. "That gap
was a little bit wider it
wasn't huge, but it was big
enough, you know, for a
ball to fit through."
The space'`between the
trees wasn't what alarmed


Big 12 Commissioner Dan
Beebe says he is encour-
aged.by the Fiesta Bowl's
response to an investigative
report that led to the fiing
of its longtime president for
alleged misuse of funds.
"I feel good about their
commitment to do the right
thing," .Beebe told The
Associated Press in a phone
interview Friday. '"There
hasn't been a reluctance or
pushback (from Fiesta offi-
cials) at all."
Beebe said he has been
in contact with Fjiesta Bowl
officials often in recent
weeks and they have asked
for help and suggestions for
how to reform the organisa-
tion's leadership structure
to ensure similar mistakes
WOn't be made again.
"I don't feel good about
what, happened," Beebe
said. "I'm saddened by what
occurred.
While he said he is optimis-
: tic about the Fiesta's future,
Beebe stressed it is still too
early to determine whether
his conference and the Bowl
Championship Series will
continue to do business with
the Arizona game.
"Yes I am confident,"
he said, "but I'm not there
yet."
The Big 12 has-a con-
tractual agreement to send
its champion to the Fiesta
Bowl if that team is not play-
ing for the national champi-


'Y-e certainly have the
highest stake on this," he
said.
The BCS issued a stern
statement this week saying
the Fiesta Bowl must prove
it is worthy of remaining
one of the four ~games that
make up the system. BCS
executive director Bill
Hancock has said the BCS
has the authority to revoke
the Fiesta Bowl's BCS sta-
tus even though the event
has three years remaining
on its contract.
The report that resulted
in the firing of Fiesta Bowl
CEO and President John
Junker on Tuesday revealed
lavish expenditures over
the past 10 years.
The report's most signifi-
cant findings involved pos-
sible criminal misconduct
under a system in which
employees were strongly
encouraged to make politi-
cal donations to certain
candidates. At least $46,539
in contributions then were
teimbursed to the employ-
ees by the bowl, an appar-
ent violation of state cam-
paign finance law as well
as IRS rules for non-profit
corporations.
The Arizona attorney
general's office is inves-
tigating the contribution
reimbursements.
The BCS also has appoint-
ed a task force to look into
the improprieties uncov-
ered by the Fiesta Bowl's
internal probe.


Associated Press

HOUSTON When the
coach who recruited him
to VCU suddenly left, Rams
guard Joey Rodriguez
thought it might be time
for him to go home, too.
When Shaka Smart took
over the VCU program for
Alabama-bound Anthony
Grant, Rodriguez decided
he was homesick and want-
ed to go back to Florida.
,He spent a summer there,
then got the itch again. His
father called Smart, asked
if Rodriguez could return
and the point guard was
back. Two years later, he's
in the Final Four.
"'Would we be here today
without him?" Smart said.
"I could make up some
long answer. But no."
Rodriguez's decision to
follow Grant out the door
wasn't all that unexpected
in Smart's eyes.
"He didn't know us;
there vias no relationship,
no trust," the coach said.
Rodriguez decided he
was going to enroll at
Division II Rollins College
near Orlando, play bas-
ketball and get his degree
there.
His teammates kept in
touch with him, though,
and when he decided he
wanted to return, he was
welcomed back.
"My only question to
him was, 'Are you going to
be in the circle'with both
feet?"' Smart said. "He said,
'Coach, I will.' And once he
said that, he was back, as
far as I was concerned."

Holding it together

Butler fans may have
noticed something differ-
ent about Shawn Vanzant
this season.
The Butler guard has
been wearing a brace to


protect his left shoulder,
which is prone to separate
thanks to his days as a
high school football player.
Vanzant clever had surgery
to repair the shoulder,
and the longer he plays
- and more contact he
takes the more.0ften it
separates.
He finally started wear-
ing the brace this year.
"When it comes out
of place, it don't feel too
good," he said. "So I had
to figure out something to
keep it in place."
The brace hasn't limited
his play at all. The senior
is averaging 8.1 points
and 3.2 rebounds for the
Bulldogs, and led Butler
in assists against both
Pittsburgh and Wisconsin
in the NCAA~tournament.

Keeping it clean
Kentucky swingman
DeAndre Liggins will be
charged with doing some-
thing few have been able
to accomplish this season:
stop Connecticut's Kemba
Walker.
Liggins has been say-
ing for weeks he'd like
another chance to slow
down Walker, who torched
Kentucky for 29 points
when the two teams met in
November, one of the few
times this season Liggins
failed to shut down an
opponent,
He's become one of the
country's best defenders,
using his massive wingspan
to swallow smaller players.
The only thing that moves
faster than his feet, how-
ever, may be his mouth.
Liggins is a notorious
trash talker, a ploy he's
used for years to get in
opponent's heads. He went
back and forth with North
Carolina's Harrison Barnes
all game long in Kentucky's


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Virginia Commonwealth's Toby Veal holds up Joey
Rodriguez to help him dunk during a practice for a men's
NCAA Final Four semifinal college basketball game Friday
in Houston. VCU pl ys Butler toda .


fire coming out before he
would even flinch," UConn
coach Jim Calhoun said.
"My point is that he's fear-
less. He's got a heck of
Sa future because he's got
that internal fortitude that
a kid needs."

Rozzell for mayor
Shaka Smart refers to
senior guard Brandon
Rozzell as the mayor.
'Everybody knows him,
or knows of him and every-
body likes him," Smart
explained.
That's all fine with
Rozzell, one of two
Richmond natives on the
VCU roster,
"It's a nickname they've
given me in the city of
Richmond. It's a great one,
and I think it's going to
carry over for a long time,"
said Rozzell, who is averag-
ing 14 points in the NCAA
tournament.


win over the Tar Heels in
the East regional final a
week ago.
Yet Liggins says he's
going to keep to himself on
Saturday night.
"I have the utmost
respect for Kemba Walker,"
Liggins said.
Besides, it might not
help. Walker is used to
defenders jawing at him.
Not that he notices so
much anymore.
"I can hear them, but
that doesn't mean I'm lis-
tening to them," Walker
said, "I'm just playing."

Fearless Napier

Connecticut guard
Shabazz Napier doesn't
play with the timidity of a
freshman. Napier, at times,
plays more like a senior,
afraid of almost nothing,
including his head coach.
"You'd have to line up
one hell of a dragon with


been selling about twice
the normal number of T-
shirts and other souvenirs
since both teams won their
regional finals. The biggest
sellers are the T-shirts that
both teams wore after mak-
ing it to the Final Four. .
"There is quite a bit of
interest in the fact that both


are playing, so I don't know
how much one shir-t is out-
selling the other," Simpson
said. "But this is the third
year in a r-ow for- the women,
and people have come to
expect them to do well, so
there is per-haps a little bit
mor-e excitement about thle
mlen1."


Fiesta Bowl's


r~ne pens laves

encouragement


Smart glad



RodrigueZ



returned





DILBERT
YOUR COMMUNICATION
TISN' SKILLS ARE SO POOR
EHA KN W. T THOAND RAD WANTG
WANTED.YOU WANTED AND
RANO OEN MERS ON
p A SPREADSHEET.
E
8o 1~


WHY APPAREN-
DION'T TLY YOUR
YOU USTLISTENING

CLARIFY? I NEED WORK
STOO.


BLONDIE
THTS OUR B-Z NUMBER ~ ~ITHEN TRv #2 E9OR ".~--,_..- 1 AYS CARUMBA!
fTRrass! PRESS "1o FoR SUPss-ouPEI soFT TWIS outLo as
SUPER-DUPER FIRM EWW AY V CIE
THEE EV



II -


BEETLE BAILEY


_ _____1 _


WHAT'S FUNNY ABouT
CIVING SOME GIRL A
NICE STEAW JOB2 /


CELEBRITY CIPHER

by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created frorn quotations by farnous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: Z equals W
"B' W HNDEBDHXP RLCR XEXMI JNI
BD LBT LXCMR, ZNGAP MCRLXM
TRXCA TXHNDP JCTX RLCD CD


LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS SATURDAY, APRIL 2, 2011


Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415


DEAR ABBY: I have 10-
year-old twin boys. "Frank"
is popular with the boys in
his class, while "Jake" has
only one close friend, "TTom-
my." When Frank is invited
to,parties, sleepovers, mov-
ies, swimming and play
dates, Jake is left out and
never invited. Tommy is a
great kid, but comes from a
family that isn't very social.
We invite Tobmmy to our
home, but Jake isn't invited
back.
I feel terrible when I see
how sad Jake is when his
brother is constantly going
off to do fun things and he's
left at home. We try to keep
Jake busy with enjoyable
activities when this hap-
pens, but it's not the same.
While Frank has a right
to have his own friends,
sometimes I feel I should
say something to the par-
ents about how much their
leaving Jake out is hurting
his feelings and self-confi-
dence. IIEARTBRO-
.KEN MOM IN MIS-
SOURI
DEAR IIEARTBRO-
K~EN MOM: I don't rec-
ommend saying anything
to the parents of Frank's
friends because it could
backfire. Boys that age
pick their own friends, and
if Jake was forced on them,
no one would be happy


done the same thing.
Every time I raise the
subject, he tells me he's
happy with his life and
doesn't want to change.
How do I get through to
him? My husband says
we should let him do
what he wants because
it's his life. But I have
trouble accepting that my
son wants to stay single
the rest of his life. Help!
PROTECTIVE MOM.
IN OHIO
DEAR MOM: Thaf~s
understandable. You come
from a generation in which
marriage was the norm.
However, in the decades
since you were married
there has been a slow (but
steady) erosion in the per-
centage of Americans who i.
think marriage is impor-
tant.
Your son may have much
to offer, but if he isn't inter-
ested in closeness, intimacy
and partnership, he probably
ivouldn't be very good at it.
So trust him, love him, and
don't push him. Marriage,
when it's a good one, is won-
derful. But it is no longer a r
must, and more and more
people are concluding it isn't
for everyone.
HWrite Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O.'Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069~.


BABY BLUES


Abigail Van Buren
www.deorabby.com
about it including Jake.
Instead, continue inviting
Tommy over and explore
activities outside of school
where Jake can shine in
his own right. That will do
more for his self-confidence
than tagging along with his
brother where he really
isn't wanted.
DEAR ABBY: My son
'"Marshall" is 36. He's hand-
some, has a great job, is a
wonderful son and would
be a tremendous "catch."
The problem is Marshall
has no interest in marriage
or even dating. He was in
a relationship six or seven
.years ago that ended badly.
.Since then, he has decided
he doesn't want any woman
getting .close to him. He
hasn't been on a date since.
Marshall spends his time
hunting, fishing and play-
ing/watching sports with
his single and divorced
friends. It' doesn't help that
the divorced friends tell
him he's doing the right
thing by staying single, and
how they wish they had


HAGAR THE HORRIBLE


ARIES (March 21-
April 19): Keep busy.
You'll be overly sensitive to
whats going on around yrou
and must not leave yoursei
too much time to ponder
over what's said or ~jonp.;
:'etar your schedule towiard q~
se f-mprovement, pamper-
ing and enjoyment. ***
TAURUS (April 20-
Ma'"0)T he~re istooomch
to make a good decision or





negatively. AAA
GEMINI (May 21-
June 20): Getting involved
in a cause you believe in will
provide connections to help
you in other areas. Sug-
gestions made will spark
greater enthusiasm in a job
or project that has' poten
tial. You will reap personal
and professional rewards.
-AAAA J
CANCER (June 21-
July 22): Hold off making
any decisions or changes
that can alter the way you
live or the arrangements
you have with a personal
or professional group. The
wrong move will cause a
loss. Contain your feelings
and focus on something
yoti enjoy. AA
LEO (July 23-Aug.
22): The sky's the limit,
so go after whatever you


THE LAST WORD
Eu enia Last

want. Travel, business and
discussing personal and
professional goals will lead
-to a firmwoqmmitment from.
someone.you need in your
Scorner to rnove ahead. A
financial gain' is heading


Y202u Day' geA tr 3-Spe i
someone else's problem


pvce bt eo roe ma f

You may want to make a few
changes to your personal
papers or accumulated as-
sets. AAA
LBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): Its important to make
the most of this opportuni-
ty-filled day. A partnership
can be made or broken,
depending on how you see
it unfolding and whether or
not it's to your advantage.
Do what needs to be done.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-.
Nov. 21): Spruce up your
living quarters to make
someone you love feel more
comfortable. A change in
your routine or starting a
new interest will expand
your friendships and give
you plenty to think about.
Your talents can bring in
extra money. AAA
SAGflTARIUS (Nov.


22-Dec. 21): Don't let
your emotions get the bet-
ter of you. You cannot allow
anyone to manipulate you.
Focus on what you enjoy
doing and on the people
you have the most fun with.
A~ physical or mental chal-
lenge is where you should
put your effort. AAr
CAPRICORN (Dec.
2 -an.el9) Yuawil hav

relative or neighbor if you


wt non e i h hm s uh
bad or who can force you to
confornfto rules you don't
approve of. AAl
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): You can come up
with some brilliant ideas re-'
garding ways to earn more
cash. Connect with people
from your past. Greater op-
portunity will develop out
of necessity and demand.
Time and energy put into
earnings a living will pay off:
and bring you greater ftee-
dom. AAA
SPISCES (Feb. 19-
March 20): Put a halt on
someone trying to push his
or her way into your world.
Speak frankly about what
you expect. If the person
you are dealing with cannot
offer you what you want,
walk away. You'll have plen-
ty of other opportunities.


SNUFFY SMITH
SsoRRY, SNuFFY i! .
SwHA-r cAN I SAy ? _


Z ITS


GARFIELD


B.C.


F RAN K & E RN EST


CGRNWNJBAX."


KGTRBHX RNW


HACMF
PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "In the days of Caesar, kings had fools and jesters.
Now network presidents have anchormenn" Ted Koppel
(c) 2011 by NEA, Inc. 4-2


FOR BETTER OR WORSE


CLASSIC PEANUTS


DEAR ABBY


Twmn boys don t share same


pOpularity among their peers


HOROSCOPES





~mu'-


luluuuu


10 oportunities

WANTED LICENSED
Life and Health
Insurance Agent.
Call 386-755-6800






^CANCER CARE of North
Florida is currently seeking a
MEDICAL ASSISTANT for a
fast paced work environment
Requires HS Diploma and
excellent Phlebotomy skills with
certification
Intergy Experietice and
excellent verbal/written
communication skills.
Qualified candidates please
email resume to:
jpapesh~~cancercarenorth
florida.cotu

05524650
LEARN TO DRAW BLOOD
Local Phlebotomy Course
offered in Lake City, FLA
Certificate program.
(904)566-1328

0552550




Physical Therapist
Home Health Care Agency
servicing Lake City and
surrounding counties seeking
Full-time/PRN experienced~
Physical Therapist
Please fax resume to
386-758-3313 attention:
Lynn or apply online at
almostfamily.com

05525503



Homecare RNs, LPNs, CNAs
and HHAs needed ASAP.
Full time and part time. '
Call 352-291-4888 NOW

Direct Care Staff & Cooks
Lake City Cluster ICF for
Developmentally Disabled
Persons. www~rescare.com
386-755-6104 EEO/M/F/D/V

Licensed, Experienced, PTA
for busy outpatient clinic
SSendlresume to P.O. Box 714
L~ake City, FL 32056 or
Eiiail to: pta714l@hotmait:com
Part Time'
X-ray Technician,
Please email resume to
hr@toi-health.com




04544098
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express'Itaining offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-04/11/10

Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-04/11/11

Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or




310 Pets & Supplies



386-288-2899
leave message

Free to good home!, Male
Jack Russell Terrier/Chihuahua
mix, Great8 3th kids

PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold,to be at least 8
weeks old and have health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
IN RE: ESTATE OF DOROTHY L.
HENLEY, A/K/A DOROTHY LU-
CILLE HENLEY
Deceased -
File No. 11-59-CP
Division PROBATE
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration to the estate of
DOROTHY L. HENLEY, ~A/KA
DOROTHY LUCILLE HENLEY,
deceased, whose date of death was
December 29, 2010, is pending in the
Circuit Court for Columbia County,
Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 173 NE Hemnando
Avenue, Lake City, Florida 32055.
The names and addresses of the per-
sonal representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set forth
below.
All creditors of the decedent and oth-
er persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate on whom a
copy of this notice is required to be
served must file their claims with
this court WITHIN THE LATER OF
3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AF-
TER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF
A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM.
All creditors of the decedent and oth-
er persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate must file
their claims with this court WITHIN
3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITH-
IN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORlpA PROBATE CODE
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DESCENDANTS DATE: OF
DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of the first publication of
this notice is March 26, 2011.
Attorney for Personal Representa-
tive: -
By:/s/ Lindsay L. Carter-Tidwell
Florida Bar Number: 0028866
Brannon, Brown, Haley & Bullock,
PA
P.O. Box 1029 .
Lake City, FL 32056
Telephone: (386)752-3213
Fax: (386)755-4524
E-Mail: Ict@b'battomeys.com
Personal Representative:
By:/s/ Jason Adam Henley
3465 SE Country Club Road
Lake City, FL 32025 .
04544082
March 26, 2011
April 2, 2011
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
FIRST FEDERAL BANK OF
FLORIDA, a Banking corporation
organized under the laws of the Unit-
ed States of America, fkl/a FIRST
FEDERAL BANK OR FLORIDA
Plaintiff,

CHARLES O. ALAKIJA, ET AL.

CASE NO. 09-311-CA
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE
SALE
NOTICE is hereby given that P.
Dewitt Cason, Clerk of the- Circuit
Court of Columbia County, Florida'
will on the 20 day of April, 2011, at
11:00 a.m. at the Columbia County
Courthouse, 173 N.E. 'Hemnando
Avenue, in the City of Lake City
Florida, offer for sale and sell at pub
lic outcry to the highest and best bid-
der for cash, the following described
property situated in Columbia Coun-
Sty, Florida. to-wit:
Lots 8 and 9, Southemn Landings
Aviation Subdivision, according to
the plat thereof recorded at Plat Book
7, pages 205-206, public Records of
I biuant oune Fia Jdgment of
Foreclosure entered mna case pend-
mng mn said Court, the style of which
is as set out above, and the docket
number of which is 09-311-CA. Any
person claiming an interest in the
surplus from the sale, if any, other
tha thethTrspent usherm stof the

claim within sixty (60) days after the

WITNESS my hand and the official
seal of said Court, this 18th say of
March, 2011.
P. DeWitt Cason
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Columbia County, Florida
By:/s/ B. Sc po
Deputy Cler p
04544106
'March 26, 2011
April 2, 2011


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA, IN AND FOR COLOM-
BIA COUNTY
CIVEL DIVISION
FIRST FEDERAL SAVINGS
BANK OF FLORIDA
Plaintiff,
vs.
KATRYNA J. LUMBERT, et al.
Defendants
Case No. 12-2011-000046
Division
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO KATRYNA J. LUMBERT
CURRENT RESIDENCE UN.
KNOWN
LAST KNOW ADDRESS
266 SW DAHLIA LN.
LAKE CITY, FL 32025
You are notified that an action to
foreclose a mortgage on the follow-
ing property in Columbia County,
Florida:
COMMENCE AT THE SOUTH-
EAST CORNER OF THE SOUTH-
WEST 1/4 OF THE NORTHEAST
1/4; SECTION 19, TOWNSHIP 4
SOUTH, RANGE 17 EAST AND
AND RUN THENCE NORTH 0
DEGREES 40 MINUTES WEST,
613.38 FEET; RUN THENCE
NORTH 89 DEGREES 22 MI-
NUTES WEST, 280.00 FEET; RUN
THENCE NORTH 0 DEGREES 40
IVIINUTES WEST, 150.00 FEET TO
THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF
SAID LOT; CONTINUE NORTH 0
DEGREES 40 MINUTES WEST,
125.00 FEET; RUN THENCE
NORTH 89 DEGREES 22 MI-
NUTES WEST, 105.00 FEET; RUN
THENCE SOUTH 0 DEGREES 40
MINUTES EAST 125.00 FEET;
RUN THENCE SOUTH 89 DE-
GREES 22 MINUTES EAST,
105.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF
BEGINNING, COLUMBIA COUN-
TY, FLORIDA. A/K/A LOT 2'
BLOCK C, AZALEA PARK SU3-
DIVISION.
commonly known as 266 SW DAH-
LIA LN, LAKE CITY, FL 32025 has
been filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it on Edward
B. Pritchard of Kass, Shuler, Solo-
mon, Spector, Foyle & Singer, P.A.
plaintiff's attorney, whose address is
P.O. Box 800, Tampa, Florida
33601, (813)229-0900, on or before
April 18, 2011, (or 30 days from the
first date of publication, whichever is
later) and file the original with the
Clerk of this Court either before:
service on the Plaintiff's-attomey or
immediately thereafter, otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the Com-
plaint.
Dated: March 18, 2011. .
CLERK OF THE COURT
Honorable P. DeP~itt Carson
173 NE Hemando Avenue
Lake City, Florida 32056-2069
By:/s/B. Scippio

If you are a person with a disability
who needs any accommodation in
order to participate in this proceed-
ing, you are entitled, at no cost to
you, to the provision of certain assis-
tde CPeatse cdontrtNtanc K. B -

59), LaeCit, F oia 32056-rl 9
days of your receipt of this notice; if
you are hearing or voice unpaired'
call 1-800-955-8771


020 Lost & Found








Lost Two Chihuahua's,
white/male, red & white female,
Reward
850-258-8791
LOST: Lg 3 yr old white Calico .
female cat. Goes by "Hannah".
Lives on 240/Itchetucknee. 9 yr
old daughter brokenhearted. Please
call 386-288-3916 REWARD!!!


100 0 fWb d5

04544139




IMMEDIATE OPENING
Breakfast Attendant
Thursday thru Sunday
4:30am 11:30 am
Industry Standard Benefits
Must Be Self Motivated with
Excellent Customer
Service Skills
Apply In Person
450 SW Florida Gateway Drive
Lake City, FL 32024
NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE

04544160
NOW HIRING
Cashiers & Baggers for High
Springs fruit & gift stores.
Apply in Person at Florida
Citru Center (Chevron)
18603 NW CR 236, Hig
Springs (exit 404 & I- 5)

04544211
First Federal Bank has a
position open for a Mortgage
Loan Booker. Responsible for
assembling files for booking
data input, booking and tracking
pending items. Reviews loans
for accuracy. Reiew and
prepare final documents and
ordering inspections. One year
office experience preferred.
Applications may be obtained
from any First Federal Branch
or email resume to
Turbeville.J@ffsb.com.
Bilingual candidates encouraged
to apply. Equal Employment
Opportunity'. 9=

Cashiers needed, Experience
Preferred, Drug free workplace,
all applicants will be drug tested
Ellisville Exxon,
Hwy 441, No Phone Calls Please.
CDL A Flatbed/Van 'Iuck
Driver needed for F/T OTR SE

Mlssa or Meaxrp m8 3 69 27 3
Exp. Maintenance person needed.
Ho phone cals oA ly d-p mt
3072 US Hwy 90 '
Experienced Breakfast
Grill Cook
Needed
386-867-4242

Experienced Heavy Duty
Diesel Mechanic needed,
Please call Mary at
386-935-2773
Janitorial/Custodian. FI' down-
town Lake City. Exp & ref's req'd.
No criminal Record. Good Pay.
Nights/weekends 904-259-7700
Leave Message & phone number
Local law office needs
W kpe iencep oea ecrt t nd
inuyad geeal legal matt r
experiece trfered. Immedica e
employment. Apply in person at
116 NW Columbia Ave.,
Lake City, FL 32055.


record. On call wkends/after hrs
work. Fax resume 386-754-0263.
Sewing Machine Operator
with experience
good hourly rate
Call Hafners 386-755-6481
Wanted Highly motivated
individual for Sales Position.
Rountree -Moore Ford Lmncoln
Mercury Great benefits, paid vaca-
tion. Exp. a plus but not necessary.
Call Chris. @ 386-755-0630


nnouncementS


Home Improvements

Handicap accessible modifications
for veeris. 3782 Drsexp rience.

CONSTRUCTION, INC
Licensed and insured CGCO36224

Lawn & Landscape Service

Clean Pine Straw,
You pick it up, $1.85 a bale
Delivery, of 100 bales $285
386-688-9156

Services

DIVORCE,SBUANKRUPTCY,

other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.


Classified Department: 755-5440


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
IN RE: ESTATE OF ALAN N. LO-
BECK
Deceased
File NO. 11-57-CP
Division PROBATE
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration to the estate of
ALAN N. LOBECK, deceased,
whose date of death was December
31, 2010, is pending in the Circuit
Court for Columbia County, Florida,
Probate Division, the address of
which is 173 NE Hemnando Avenue,
Lake City, Florida 32055 The names
and addresses of the personal repre-
Sentative and the personal represen-
tative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and oth-
er persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate on whom a
copy of this notice is required to be
served must file their claims with
this court WITHIN THE LATER OF
3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AF-
TER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF
A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM.
All creditors of the decedent and oth-
er persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate must file
their claims with this court WITHIN
3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE.
, ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITH-
IN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DESCENDANTS DATE OF
DEATH IS BARRED. -
The date of the first publication of
this notice is March 26, 2011.
Attorney for Personal Representa-
tive:
By:/s/Lindsiay L. Carter-Tidwell
F Orida Bar Number: 0028866
BT&HROD, BTOwn, Haley & Bullock,
PA
P.O. Box 1029
Lake City, FL 32056
Telephone: (386)752-3213
Fax: (386)755-4524
E-Mail: Ict@bbattomeys.com
Personal Representative:
By:/s/ Sarah Anne Moore
a/k/a Sarah Lobeck Moore
1661 Foust Sledd Road .
Benton, KY 42025
04544081
March 26, 2011
April 2, 2011
114 THIC:CIRCUIT COURT; THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA *
FIRST FEDERAL BANK OF
FLORIDA, a Banking corporation
organized under the laws of the Unit-
-ed States of America, f/k/a FIRST
FEDERAL SAVINGS BANK OF
FLORIDA
Plaintiff,
JAMES RHEA and TAlvMY


CASIE O. O F6-FORECLOSURE
SALE
NOTICE Is hereby given that P.
Dewitt Cason; Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Columbia County, Florida,
will on the 18th day of May, 2011, at
11:00 am at The Columbia County
Courthouse, 173 N.E. Hemnando
Avenue in the City of Lake City,
Florida, offer for sale and sell at pub-
lic outcry to the highest and best bid-
der for cash, the following described
property situated in Columbia Coun-
ty, Florida, to-wit:
The North One-Half of Block 41,
Central division of the City of Lake
City, Florida; Less and except the
Purun tf tthe Final Judgment of
Foreclosure entered in a case pend-
ains nsaiduCoaurt,vthe stdle ofdw ich
number of which is 11-16-CA. Any
person claiming an interest in the
surplus from the sale, if any, other
than the property owner as of the
date of the lis pendens must file a
claim within sixty (60) days after the

WINSS my hand and the official
rlohf sadlCounty, this 17th day of
P. DEWITT~ CASON
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Columbia County, Florida
B. Scippro
By: Deputy Clerk
(seal)

0 rc 2, 2011
April 2, 2011

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WW r, ,, 110: !in'C l


05525530
April 2, 2011


010 A


0 rhO 2, 20
A ril 2, 2011


11


Registration of Fictitious Names
We the undeis~igned, being duly
swomn, do hereby declare under oath
that the names of all persons interest-
ed in the business or profession car-
ried on under the name of Ed's Trac-
tor Service at 892 SW Pathfinder

Gt. nhite FL
32038 t,
Contact Phone Number:
386-497-1968 and the extent of the
i terest o ach, i follows:
Extent of Interest: 100%
by:/s/ Edward C. Wilder
STATE OF FLORIDA
COUNTY OF COLUMBIA
Swomn to and subscribed before me
tbhi 31It a Ef Mrch ,dOD.11.


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SATURDAY, APRIL 2, 2011

Lakie City Reporter





CLADISS FE


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ADvantage


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Call La ke City Reporter Classifieds!


WE CAN HELP 386-755-5440













330 Lie tiock &
Cattle For Sale,
11 yearlings, bulls & heifers,
Pure bred black angus and cross
breeds, 386-365-1352


Mrob~l~i tHomes
14 Wide, 2/2-$475. mo. + dep.
Clean, Quiet Country Park
Water, septic, garbage incl. NO
PETS! 386-758-2280 References,


810 Home forSale
673 Acre Ranch wlMH. fenced
& cross fenced, wkshop, pole bamn,
2 ponds, Spacious MLS# 75607
Asking 299K, Call Patti Taylor @
386-623-6896 Access Realty
95 Acre Estate, 4/3 Farm House,
Pond, Oaks, $689.000,
MLS#76149 Call Charlie Sparks
@ Westfield Realty 386-755-0808
westfieldrealtygroup.com
A quiet neighborhood is the
perfect setting for this cute, cozy
home. Lg back yard w/1 car
garage/workshop. $84,900.
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
Beautiful Home w/custom
cabinets, 10ft ceilings, $199,900
MLS# 77188 Call
Carrie Cason @ 386-623-2806
westfieldrealtygroup.com

3Brc Hom i bE tb ised S
$134,900 Call Missy Zecher @
386-623-0237 Remax
www.missyzecher.com
CBC 3/1 home, inside city limits'
fenced cackSrd, d taclhe c ort

Call R.E.O.Realt ,
Nancy Rogers @ 386-867-1271
Coledwell Banker Bi hopesRealt

b tend poc, ecdvnn li ain e
K. Tolar 386-755-6488 $139,900.
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Brick, 10 ac 3/2 split floor plan. FI
room, Ig utility, scr porch. Gazebo,
carport, fenced. $149,900. Loni.
Geibeig Simpson 386-365-5678
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
New home, May Fair. Great area.
Corner lot. 4 bedroom, lots of tile,
covered porch. Split plan$214,900.
Elaine K. Tolar 386-755-6488
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
4br/2ba-on 5 ac. Lg family, Florida
room den or office. Covered patio.
23x30 workshop. $229,900. L~ori
Geibeig Simpson. 386-365-5678
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
3/2 Hardwood, separate office/liv
mng/family rm. Workshop, fenced
Lori Geibeig Simpson 386-365-
5678 Mary Whitehurst 965-0887
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Brick on 3:23 ac. New roof, win-
dows, paint. Newer AC, remod-
eled interior, fencing, good area.
Elaine K. Tolar. 386-755-6488
Colonial 4/3 + Guest House,
9.95 acres, inground pool, detach- .
ed/garage, gate entry,MLS#77386
$325K Call Pam Beauchamp @
386-303-2505 Remax
Corner lot in Piccadilly S/D. Huge
living & dining room. New paint
& carpet. 2 car garage, inground
pool. 386-752-6575 $133,500
Century 21/T~he Darby Rogers Co.
CUSTOM 4/2 scm porch, 16x24
workshop w/ele 86 water, gazebo,
fireplace, ceramic tile/wood floors.
.386-752-6575 $189,900
Century 21/lhe Darby Rogers. Co
Custom, 3/2.5 built in 2007,
on 10.8 manicured acres,
Completely fenced, Owner Fin.
avail., MLS#77382 Call Patti
386-623-6896 Access Realty
EASTSIDE VILLAGE! Owner
motivated! 3BR/2BA has large liv-
ing/dining rm combo $62,000
#77266 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY, INC. 755-5110
Family Home in Subdivision
4 bdrm Lots of space, newer
roof/carpet MLS38766268233-C7
Remax, www.missyzecher.com
FOR SALE by very motivated
owner. Just reduced $70,000. to
$129,000. Townhouse on Golf
course. 3br/3ba. Wood burning
fireplace. End unit. Remodeled
kitchen, first class appliances,
granite countertops. New Hunter
Douglas wdw treatments.
Cathedral ceiling. Pool, tennis
court. Call for appt. (904)246-6222
GREAT STARTER HOME!
3BR/2BA in Quail Ridge with
back patio, luscious lawn $84,900
#76432 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY, ~INC. 755-5110
Large Brick, 3/1, 4.43 acres, metal
roof, MLS# 77415 $104,888
Call Nancy Rogers @ 386-867-
1271 R.E.O. Realty Group, Inc.
naticytrogers@msn.com
Lg home on comer lot w/oversized
Vill ge. Heated o I leubuse.
MLS# 71901 386-752-5290
Eastside Village Realty, Inc.
LIKE NEW! 3BR/2BA mfg home
near Wellborn on 5+ acres ONLY

AGENY IDA. 75L'5C10 768
Log Home, Cypress Beams,
whole house generator, $269,900
MLS# 76899 Call
Roger Lovelady @386-365-7039
westfieldrealtygroup.com
NEW FLOORING-FRESH
PAINT! 2-story 3br/2ba on 1+ ac,
Ig kitchen, family rm, fenced pond
$99,900 #75951 Daniel Crapps
Agency, Inc. 755-5110
NiC sot d be cbk hme eon 5T ars,
MLS 76063 $129,888 Call '
Brittany Stoeckert Results Realty
386-397-3473
Nice, large 4/2 on 1 acre
w/florida room, granite floors,
wrap around front porch, $148,000
Call Brittany Stoeckert @
Results Realty 386-397-3473


Owners Motivated! Multiple
dwellings. Main house and 2 mo-
bile homes Pecans, cedar & aza-
leas. $199,900. Century 21/fhe
Darby Rogers Co. 386-752-6575
Premier Lifestyle Community
The Preserve at Laurel Lake,
4/2, $194,900 MLS# 77257 Call
Scott Stewart @ 386-867-3498
westfieldrealtygroup.com
QUAINT 1950s home w/lots of
upgrades! Enclosed front porch,
2BR/IBA, screened back porch
$29,900 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY, INC 755-5110 #77505
Qualified General Contractor
doing top Quality work!
386-752-4072 Licensed and
Insured CGCO36224
Don Reed Construction, Inc.


2&3 BR MH. $395 $650. mo.
plus deposit. Water & sewer fur-
nished. Cannon Creek MHP*
386-752-6422


361 Farm E ument '

84 Ford 4610 Tractor. Runs good-
Solid 2WD. New front tires,
350hr on 2005 motor. Dependable.
$7500. obo. 386-867-0005


401 AlltiqleS
CASH CASH CASH CASH
Pre 1964 Silver Coins, Sterling,
Flatware, Costume Jewelry,
Unusual Antiques 386-963-2621


402 Appliances

GE Frost-Free Refrigerator
White, works great
$200 obo
386-292-3927 or 386-755-5331
Kenmore Dryer, apt size,
120 voltage
Runs good, $65
386-292-3927 or 386-755-5331
Nice White Gas Tappan Stove
$145 Works Great!
386-292-3927 or
386-755-5331
White Whir11p ol Washer
386-292-3927 or
386-755-5331


407 ComputerS

HP Computer,
$100.00
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170
IBM Computer,
$65 -
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170


408 Furniture

y it R{ke .artodde bed made
included. Gentle used. Asking
$65.00. 386-292-4228


420 wanted to say
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$250 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648-


430 Garage Sales

Big Sale! Sat only, 8am til ? Bran-
ford Hwy to Troy to Ascena to 200
SW Fulton Pl. Look for signs. An-
tiques, comics, clothes, & more!






ESTATE SALE
March 26-April 2
727-541 213 or 38- -8832
Fri & Sat, rain or shine, nice
things, no junk, some old some
new, must see tolapmreciate. Go47

Bingo Station to Broderick Dr'
4th house on right, follow signs.
HUMONGOUS SALE!! Sat &
Sun from tools to trinkets, crafts,
ladies dress shoes (sz 6-7) apparel
sz small, med & large. 626 SW
Chapel Hill St off McFarlane.

clothes Fkidtoy oshd hoshl

Mo kgir S, tfolo ts gns






Rain or Shine Fri & Sat 7-4,
Household items, Prom dresses,

Nl thin lhoo nall s zhi, ldrt
tronics, various video tapes &
CD's, big BBQ grill, Brown Rd to
Bert St, to Nash Rd left on Nash
Rd see signs or Lake Jeffery to
Nash Rd continue on Nash to Carr
Rd see signs 386-755-3'682
cATk8-2 NO AdL eB RDes
472 SE Golf Club Ave, off of
Baya, past Country Club Rd
Sat only 7-2, comer of 90 W &
Sisters Welcome at Sherrod's
Sales, furn, baby/kids clothes,
variety of items, come see!
Yard Sale Saturday, April 2nd
8 till ? Name brand clothes,
shoes, household goods
806 NW Fairway Dr


440 Miscellaneous

Large Light Oak Entertainment
Center, will h 16d atleast 40" TV r

386-292-3927 or 386-755-5331
Pool Table-Beautiful, claw foot,
mahogany, leather pockets,
maroon cloth, pool sticks, balls,
plastic cover, and hard table top.
3 piece slate. $1295.00 752-1874
Tow Behind Grill/Smoker
$1,250 OBO.
3 6-29-9310 2or


ROOFING Are you bothered
by a leaking roof?
Call Reed Roofing today for a free
estimate. 386-752-4072
RCC00455399 Insured
ROOFING:Looking to replace
your Roof? Call Reed Roofing
today for a free estimate
386-752-4072 RC0055399
References available


3BR/2BA Doublewide on
2.5 secluded acres. $750 a mo.
1st month and full security.
Please call 386-965-7534.
A very clean & well maintained

w 20u0. ep Rnt icude mator,
sewer, trash p/u. Close to town
.386-984-8448
Looking for a place to Rent.
Fic re onbb p ce.
386-623-0925 or 386-752-4618
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White Contact 386-623-3404
or 386-365-1919








640 Mobile Homes

0525alm Harbor Homes
Has 3 Modular Homes
Available at HUGE Savings
Over 40K Off
Call Today! 800-622-2832

06 Homes of Merit. 3br/2ba. Open
floor plan w/lg kitchen. 3 Rivers
Estate. River access. MLS#75661
Eastside Village Realty. Denise
Miligan-Bose. 386-752-5290
Owner Fin, 3/2, S of Lake City,
quiet, wooded, 1.5 ac, sml dn $700
mo, 386-590-0642/386-8671833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com


6560 & Land "
OWNER FINANCING
3br/2ba DWMH with 5 acres. 10
additional acres available. Daniel
Crapps Agency 386-623-6612
SWell kept 3/2 moble on 2+ acres.
screened front porch, covered back
porch, shed, MLS77241 $64,000
Call Brittany @ Results Realty
386-397-3473


710 tFor Rre t

05524728
SPRING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans;
some with garages.
Call 386-454-1469
or visit our website:
www.springhillvillage.net

Move gn as low as $325
Call today for:details!
386-758-8455
Windsong Apts
1 & 2 Bedroom Homes
Move mn for s low as

386-755-2423

Renvtdg ea neeg gedffic ent. Tile
floors, washer/dryer, $475/Mo.
$300 Dep. 386-755-1937
2 A t $ .rdYou Can Loveret
area. CH/A washer/dryer hookups.
386-758-935 1/352-208-2421
Beautiful Apt, Large 1 bdrm,
Sw/inground pool, CHA, details at
bigfloridahome.com
$650/mo + dep 386-344-3261
Great location W of I-75, spacious
deluxe 2BR apts., garage, W/p
hook up. patio. $600 & up, + SD
386 965-0276
The Lakes Apts. Studios & IBr's
from $135/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location,
From $525. + sec.
Call Michelle 386-752-9626


720 Furn he Apts.
2 br/1ba country apt. Owner on
property. $800 mo incl electric,
water, phone, cable & pool. Sec -
req'd roonth to month accepted. 8
mi out from city. 386-937-0195
Room fr Ren 11lcrest IScads,

cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808


730 Hom Fr Rnt
3ba/2ba, New carpet & paint: .5
ac 2 mi from d'town. No pets.
Leas's" re'd: fa. ba ound on y

3bd/2ba 770 Poplar Street
$900.00 mo. Also 3/2 1121 Ashley
St $750.00 mo. 1st and last
required. 386-755-3649
3BR/1.5BA. BLOCK HOME.
Fenced (privacy) bk yard. CH/~A
Nice area. $825. mo $825. dep.
Ref's req'd. 386-364-2897
3br/2ba Lg LR, w/add'1 family,
screen back porch, secluded on 10
acres. Close to &75 on Hwy 47.
$850. mo. + sec. 386-867-1190
3br/2ba new const.in nice S/D
Lease Opt. to buy. $900/Mo.
$700 Dep Reci'd., Credit Check
No Pets (386)755-9476
4/2,on 10 acres, w/lake access, off
of South Marion, $1,000 per
month, $500 security,
Call 386-752-3066


Ft White, 2/1, CH/A, 2010 W2 &
ref's from current landlord req'd,
Access to Rivers $650 mo,
S$600 sec., 386-497-4699
Like new site-built home for rent,
3/2, on 5 acres, no pets!' Non-
smoking environment. Call for de-
tails, $800mo + dep 386-758-1789


Bring the picture in or
we will take it for you!

* Ad runs 10 consecutive days
with a description and photo in the
newspaper and online E-edition.
* Ad runs 10 consecutive days es a
classified line ad online.
ou must include vehicle price.
SA a are prepai .
* Private party only.






2006 EF250
Ford Van
3/4 ton, metal work
shelves/ladder rack,
60K miles, exc. cond.

$10,500
Call
386-555-5555

If you don't sell your vehicle
during the first 10 days, you
can run the same vehicle ad
for 10 additional days for
only $15.00
iTerms and conditions remain the
same for the additional run.


730 ~',"~'dHnefu oheRdent

Suwannee River Frontage,2/1
Cabin in Col. Co./ I75 & W Spgs,
Call Jane S.Usher Lic. Real Estate
r Broker 386-755-3500 or 365-1352
TOWNHOUSE 2br plus
bonus room. w/1.5 bath.
Quail Heights CC. $750. mo plus
$250 damage dep. 386-752-8553


750 ""smess

05525390
2,000 sq ft, 1 mile S of I-75 on
47, includes warehouse & mini
golf,3 bth (incl handicap),
unlimited possibilities could
convert to Senior Daycare, etc.
386-752-1364 or 965-4340

1800 SQ FT $1100. Off c
furni ure available alce
cubicle dividers.Water'
sewer and garbagd fees included.
386-752-4072 Ready to move mn!

OFFIdC SPACE fo lae.
.$675mo/$695. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor
SE Baya Ave Office Furnished
1800 Sq Ft $1125.00
Ideal for Engineers & Professional
Quiet and safe environment
Security available 386-752-4072


760 Wanted to Rent

Retired male w/references looking
for long term rental. Moving to the
Lake City area. Needing 1 bedrm
or small house. (954)205-5501


790 Vacation RentalS

Horseshoe Beach Spring Special
Gulf Front 2br, w/lg porch, dock,
fish sink. wkend $345./wk $795.
(352)498-5986/386-235-3633
alwaysonvacation.com #419-181

805 Lots forsale

1999. 3/2 DWMH on 1 ac
Hallmark 1ea Estate
,* 386-867-1613
Call Jay Sears
2 ac lot in River Access
Community. Suwanne River
1 mile away. Owner will finance.
$13,500 Hallmark Real Estate
386-867-1613 Call Jay Sears
Emerald Cove S/D, Lot # 19
Half acre lot, Only $42,000
386c 65M70(1 d I n7 278
westfieldrealtygroup.com
High & Dry buildable, wooded in
Forest Country. MLS#76668
Eastsid Villag RealtB, Inc.
38 e752-52ga- e
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
new paer is subject to the fair
housing aact which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference
limitation, or discrimination based

clisaob Ity fam lIa aset tu ors tion-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
ppus 1 ians, pegnn no en and
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
acceptw ny advetn for ral ees-

law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
unpaired is 1-800-927-9275.

8 0 Home for Sale

2/1 completely updated, screened
back porch, large utility room,
MLS#77413 $54,888 Call Nancy
@ R.E.O. Realty 386-867-1271
nancytrogers@msn.com
2/2 + Bonus Room, 1749sf, 4 acre
corner lot, board fenced, det
a4a e/0w shp MLS 74900x
386-303-2505 www.visitpam.~com
2/2 -2 story, 9.7 ac. fenced & cross
fenced w/pastures. Oversized LR,
separate dining, Ig den. Workshop,
carport. 386-752-6575 $179,900.'
Century 21ffhe Darby Rogers Co.
2/3 on 5 acres,f 1rpaaro nd wrh,

gaae $179,900 MLS# 77005
gara Roger Lovelady @
Westfield Realty 386-365-7039
2BR/2BA singlewide mfg home
on 1.7-ac comer lot; large yard & .
g'fj'( dieGEM4,9 D NE
5110 #75864
3/2 Brick Home in town, fenced

b 988a dawl Nnc wr REO
Realty 386-867-1271MLS# 77414
nancytrogers@msn.com
3/2 Cute Home, Remodeled, on 2
acres, partially fenced $114,900
1RIS# 77396 Call Nancy @R.E.O.
Realty Group 386-867-1271,
nancytrogers@msn.com


S3/2 on Country, Woodsy, 5 acres,
Owner Financing Low Down, Low
Qualifying, Quick Estate, Family
Anxious, Low Taxes and
Insurance Call 727-541-2173
or 386-36j2-6293
3/3 Brick. Great location, pond.
Custom built w/Florida room &
vaulted ceiling. Workshop. MLS
75222 $179,900 386-867-1613
Jay Sears Hallmark Real Estate
3Bedrm/3bth w/2 Master Suites,
fenced back yard,fireplace
MLS#76779, $115,000
Call Missy Zecher @ 386-623-
0237 www.miss'yzecher.com
4/2 on 10.5 acres w/ detached
garage, patio, above ground pool,
MLS# 77410 $189,888 Call -
Nancy Rogers@ R.E.O. Realty
386-867-1271


810 Home for Sale

Reduced in Rose Creek S/D, 5/4
on 2.2 acres, close to town
MLS#75485 $274,900 Call Pam
@ Remax 386-303-2505
www.visitpam.com
Secluded, however close to town,
3/2 Brick Ranch Home, spacious
$198,900 MLS# 74415 Call
Charlie Sparks @ 386-755-0808
westfieldrealtygroup.com
Solid home, needs updating. Nice
yard & workshop/garage! Country
kitchen w/eat in area as well as
formal. 386-752-6575 $70,000
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
Totally Refurbished 2/2
w/workshop on 1.25 fenced acres
$94,900 Call Millard Gillen @
Westfield Realty 386-365-7001
MLS#75417

TWeo story2M6H, ocatrhes i
and fireplaces, 9 bdrms/3bths
$163,900 Patti Taylor MLS#71594
Access Realty 386-623-6896
ael ndtained 3 ownk 1
*$49,900 MLS# 77309 Call Josh
Grecian 386-466-2517
westfieldrealtygroup.com


820 Farms a
Acreage

ous s See Take Over Pymt's
10 Ac $74,500, 20 Ac $139,500
$6,975 P/A, Fine Neighborhood'
3 miles W of Col. City School'
Owner Fin 5%, Rolling Pasture
386-752-1364 or 965-4340

10 ac lots, some w/well, septic, pwr
po LoweredtpDies B ner fiance
ties 386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com ~
4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$69,900: $613mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancinp.com


w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down, $39,900, $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
5 WOODED acres.
Suwanee Ranchettes. $200 per mo
for 5 mo. Then $203.85 per mo
thereafter. (352)472-2879
Outdoorsman Special, near
Itchetucknee Sprmngs St Park,
Owner fin. w/20% dn,
$54,900 MLS# 76366
Brodie Alfred 386-487-1484


830 commercial
Property

152 O OHIO AVE,
Flexible Sa For Les wth
many possi il~i is. Greetaseo tion!
Great Visibility! Great Price!
1,500sf-17,000sf. Call Scott Stew-
Sart for more info. 386-867-3498
Great Investment/Owner;Finance
1400 sq ft building on '! acres
Creative terms, owner flexible.
Call for details. 386-867-1190

S86 InVeSiment
UU Property
Investment Property, 2 MH's on
almost 2acres, well & septic,
fenced $29,900 MLS# 77233
Call Josh Grecian2@ Westfield


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