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UFPKY NEH LSTA



The Lake City reporter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01517
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 4/1/2011
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
System ID: UF00028308:01517
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text


















I


JASON Mi~1l'HTHEWALKER/Lake Cit .Reporter'
A sign advertising a $2,500 reward was installed at
Falling Creek Park T-hursday. Pictured are Landscape
and Parks Director Clint Pittman (from left), Columbia
County Fire Rescue Chief Tres Atkinson, Columbia
County Sheriff Mark Hunter, County C~ommissionel' Ron:
Willianrds andi Pub~lic Works.Director Kevin K~irbjy.


Dowpour:

Countyhit hard

by srigstorm


Inmates receive appreciation awards lbr~ dotion


JASON MATTHEW WALK(ER/Lake City Reporter
Inmates Johnny Eveque (from left), 22, Jeremiah LaRose, 24, and
Emm~anuel Rodriquez, 24, stand around a couple pieces of their work;.


Final Four Road ~Trip
A look at a surprising Youth hoop teams head
000016 1 0sa X" 3 03^ 32, i' Shootoult.
PC BCY 89 mo"5, I B
f205 SMIA UrNIV~ OF FLOr~?IDAi
GAINESVILLE FL 32611- 1943


www.Iakecityreporte r.cpm


Vol. I 37, No. 59 i 715 cents


Friday, April 1, 20 1 1


'Signs go up:
$2,500 offered
Ff rinOTH1QUOn. i
By LEANNE TYo
Itho@lakecityreporter.com
The message for a
chance to receive a 82,500
reward from the- county
,-, exchange for *infor-
mation on the alleged
Fallingi3 Creek tobacco
.barn arsonist' was offi-
cially: posted T~hursday.
The: edbunty ere'ted' a
sign calling for informa-
tion leading to the arrest


and conviction of the-
bllged ar oni or ) hao
1920s tobacco barn at .
Falling Creek Falls Park,
\a crime that` happened
191arch 11, at the scene of
the crime"""" where the barn
once stood.
In return for that infor-
.mation, the; Columbia,
County Board of County
Commissioners will pay a
$2,500 reward, a decision
it unanimously ap~proved
at its 191arch 17 meeting.-
"T he person -that can
SARSON continued on 3A


FILE PHOTO
Kari Hamrick and her brother Jody pet Magic, a miniature horse, at the Haven Hospice
Suwannee Valley Care Center in Lake City.


the British cat known for
his heroic voyage6 down
China's Yangtze River
(her obituary appeared in
TIMEmagazine in 1949),
a heroic dog in Japan,
New Zealand's Moko the
dolphin and the local minia-
ture therapy horse named
Mai."We were very surprised
when Timne/C NN came -'
out wiith their list,": saqid a
Debbie Garcia-Bengechea,
Gentle Carousel Miniature
Therapy Horses Education


Director. "We're honored
and surprised. Alexander
the Greats famous horse
Bucephalus and Magic on
the same list that's nice
company. We know how
much Magic means to the
people she visits but usu- .
ally those visits are private.
U Winless someone has a
child with an illness or a
family mertaber in hospice
Scaitei they miay never meet
Magic. Th~is is a nice way
to siiare Magic's work with
a large audience."


Magic, a four-year-old a
miniature horse,' has been
a therapy horse for three
years. The blue-eyed mare
is smaller than most minia-
ture horses, but Bengochea
said Magic has no pro~blem.
inspiring and motivating
the people she meets.
"Magic always seems tO
fipd just the right person
when she visits a group
: situation Like a nursing
home or a camp for children
MAGIC continued on 3A







'Debbie Garcia-
Bengochea watches
as krvs J~,8,
Magic, of the Gentle
Carousel Miniattir~e
Horses.








FILE PHOTO


MOID ~than all.
inch of rain falls;
some damage.
By TOMY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporte~r.com
High winds and threats
of tornadoes accompa-
nied a spriixg ~thunder-
storri that dumped more
than ~an. inch of rain on
Columbia Couinty and
N'ortihFlorida~Wednesdiy
and Thiirsday.
:Shayne Morgagn,


Columbia. County
Edirnenc dMhanagemennt
no reported tiirnadoes in:
Cohanmbia Counity.
"~We didn't have any~
hail :reorts and ther~e:
was ho damage or any-.
thing like that," he said,
He said local officials
did get notification that'
the storm caused damage
Sin .O'Briep, in Siuivann~ee
SCou~ilt oix Wednesday.
From : 10 a.m.
RAIN continued on 3A


1950s' paningtins O
serve as backdrop for
upcoming banquet.
By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
A show of appreciation from the
'Third Judicial Circuit Guardian



Emmanuel Rodriquez,
24, sits next to a four-
foot by four-foot paint-
ing he created that he
said was his favorite. .

JASON MATTHEW WALKER
Lake City Reporter


ad Litem for his work on a spe-
cial project came as a surprise to
Emmanuel. Rodriquez, an inmate
at corrections corporation' of
America Lake City ~Correctional
Facility..
"I was really grateful," he said.
"I~didn't expect it. I just did it for
the kids."
' The organization pr-esented


appreciation awards to Rodriquez
as well as Jeremiah LaRose: and
Johnny Eveque Thursday for cre-
ating painitings for .its Volunteer
Award Appreciation Banquet April;
'I'he banqliet has a 1950s sock
hop thieme and. the organization
wanted pain~tirigs for decoratiotIs,
said Paul Crawford, Guardiari ad
Litem assistant program. director.:
Warden Jason Medlin had men-
tioned CCA was looking for: com-
munity service projects t&i iinder-
take, said Niki Crawsort, Guardian
ad Litem volunteer recruiter and
trainer. The trio were provided
with a variety of pictures to choose
from for inspiration for the paint-
ings, but the rest was left up tO
them.
INMATE continued on 3A.


\trL~~ /
c iI P


(386 7 i-293
SUBSCRIBETo
THE REPORTER:
Vo e: 554


A:on i lorda...... 2
Obituaries ......,, 5A
Advice &( Cornics ... .. .. 4B
Puzzles ... ............ 2B


TODAY IN
PEOPLE
Carneron's new
atarar Ideas.


-COMING
SATURDAY
Antique Tractor and
Engine Show.


76 5 I
Sunn
WEATHER, 2A


'I.-..- 1~1 liLI Yll -I-i ID,: 1I


~l+;~rll. ~WLU~*lr I:' "1 ~~W'ri''' cnll.'rr~ I ~ rr


Opening Day
Yankees beat Tigers as Major League
baseball season starts.
Sports, I -iSY~


Reporter


Lare


on t


Wanted: County~

offers reward

; fr arSORist


NIAGICAL


ONDER


Helping
people putS
Magic in
the nevs

By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com

miniature
therapy
horse, was .
M ~ ~~n a m e d to agc I c l
th~e TIME/CNN list of his-
tory's 10 most courageous
animals. The announce-
menit was made earlier this
week.
Magic is a member, of
Gentle Carousel Miniature
Therapy Horses, an all vol-
unteer 501(c) (3) nonprofit
Public charity owned by
husband and wife team,
Jorge~ and Debbie Garcia-
Bengbochea of Columbia
County.
The Top 10 Heroic
Animals included
Bucephalus, the famed
steed of Alexander the
Great; Togo the sled dog
who brought serum to
save Nome, ~Alaskai, when
diphtheria broke out in '
1925, Stubby the World
W'~rlha.hoeswarhomwo
bei-ame a lifetime rinember ,
of the American Legiop and
later became Georgetown
University's mascot; Simon


~1 ,.- ..1











, Celebrity Birthdays


"But he was pierced for our
transgressions, he was crushed
for OUr Iniquities; the punish-
ment that brought us peace
was on him, and by his wounds
we are healed."
Isaiah 53:5-6


~P~-~----''"""'--lrY"I~1 -- ---- --


--- C-


~711~


hm~


Page Editor: Jason M. Walker, 754-0430


M Actress Jane Powell is 83.
M Actress Grace Lee Whitney
is 81.
Actress Debbie Reynolds
is 79.
Coutry inger Jim Ed

W Actor Don Hastings is 77.
Blues singer Eddie King
is 73.
Rhythm-and-blues singer
Rudolph Isley is 72.
Reggae singer Jimmy Cliff
is 63.

Daily ScriDture


M Jazz musician Gil
Scott-Heron is 62.
M Supreme Court Justice
Samuel Alito is 61.
Rock musician Billy Currie

Acars r ette O'Toole
is 59.
W Movie director Barry
Sonnenfeld is 58.
M Singer Susan Boyle is 50.
Rapper-actor Method Man
is 40.
M Actor David Oyelowo is 35.


av7 Thursday:
"Afternoon: 4-1-8-0
SEvening: 7-9-1-0


< ISO.l -i CHANCE
STORMS I ~STORMS


HI 86i U 66it rHI 832 ) ?56


It:


I


IAS VEGAS

innovation for his next
"Avatar" installment: shooting
at double or more the film
speed that has been
Hollywood's standard since
, the 1920s, a move he says will great-
ly improve 3-D images.
Cameron, whose 2009 sci-fi block-
,buster raised the bar for digital
imagery and put the 3-D craze on
Sthe fast track, said Thursday that
."Avatar 2" would be shot at 48 or 60
frames a second to reduce an effect
called "strobing" that can blur mov-
mo~ inimages, par60cularly thtose in 3-D.
.has been 24 frames a second.
In a demonstration for theater
owners at their CinemaCon conven-
Stion, Cameron played 3-D footage he
'recently shot at 24, 48 and 60 frameS
a second to show the better quality
~~of high-speed filming. .
The footage of medieval dinner
and fight sequences shot at 48 and
60 frames a second were noticeably
superior.
At 24 frames, blurriness was very
Evident when the camera panned
or dollied along the dinner table
--and when two knights dueled with
swords. The fuzzy, images greatly
diminished at 48 frames and virtually
''vanished at 60 ~frames.
"I was stunned when I saw it, at
how clear and crisp it was," Cameron
said. "If 3-D is like looking at reality
through a window, we've taken the
glass out of the window."

Shields in 'The Addams
Family' on Broadway
NEW YORK Bye, bye Bebe.
Hello there, Brooke.
Producers of "The Addams .
Family" oni Broadway said Thursday
~that Bebe Neuwirth will give her -
final performance as Morticia on
June 26 and her role will be taken


7a 1p 7p la 6a


Ge MAece


Lake City
HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293
Fax number .............752-9400
Circulation .........,......755-5445
Online... www.iakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
e. Dua t.,Lk C t, Fa. 305
Member Audit Burealr of Circulation and
The Associatixi Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
CiyRe hrer deeproductho inwe i
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No: 310-sea.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709.
Pb ihrod Wisn ...75018
(twilson~lakecityreporter.com)

Asitn tE tor CJ Risak..754-0427

(crisak~lakecityreportertcom)
ADVERTISING
Director Ashley Butcher ...754-0417
(abutcher~lakecityreporter.com)
CLASSIFIED
To place classified ad, call 755-5440.


Filmmaker James Cameron discusses the future of digital cinema during a special
program at CinemaCon 2011, Thursday, in Las Vegas.


that would detail the music legendl'S
failed marriages, including his union
with Christie Brinkley, as well as hiS
battles with substance abuse.
But in a statement on Thursday,
Joel said he had changed his mind.
."It took working on writing a book
to make me realize that I'm not all
that interested in talking about the
past, and that the best expression of
my life and its ups and downs haS
been and remains my music," he
said.


over by Brooke
Shields.
.Based on the car-
toons that appeared
for years in The New
'Yorker, the musical
is in its second year
Shieldat the Lunt-Fontanne
sTheatre. The role
of Gomez has already been handed -
over by Nathan Lane to Roger Rees.

The Piano Man Billy


NEW YORK The Piano Ma
is deciding to stay
silent: Billy Joel
is canceling his
planned memoir.
"The Book of
Joel" was sched-
uled for publica-
Joel tion in June. The
HarperCollins book
was billed as an "emotional ride'


degree from Temple
PHITJADELPHIA "Hardball"
host Chris Matthews is getting
an honorary degree from Temple
University. He is also expected
to address graduates at the May
12 commencement ceremony in
Philadelphia.

SAssociated Press


The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run
in this space. And thanks for reading.


.t_" :


Ta laasse

aidi~na Ci
74/58


Saturday
80/62/s

85/60/s
81/52/pc
80/50/s
84/74/s
81/50/pc
86/68/s
82/64/s
82/53/pc
84/59/s
77/59/s
77/58/s
83/50/s
80/61/s
81/49/pc
85/64/s


City
Cape Canaveral


Sunday
78/62/s

86/62/s
84/55/pc
80/5j/pc
84/75/s
84/55/pc
86/71/s
86/67/s
85/58/pc
84/64/s
77/64/s
75/66/s
83/57/s
82/66/s
81/55/s
84/72/s


76/51 i P Luedl
:"`a.~inesvill Daylona Bteah Fort Myprs
y i 76/52 71 57 Gainesville
Ocdala Jacksonville
77/52 Oran Cai avrlKe et

78/57 17/57 Lk iy
SMiami
7 ~Naples
West~akiOcala
8/0* Orlando
$1 F I~udeial Panama City
R$L S 85/65 i Pensacola
83/60 `'eTlaase
.ta 'im ma Tampa ase
S85'/65 Valdosta
Ka~et to W. Palm Beach


Pensacola
74/59


State hit with hard weather

Sun N Fun visitors look over at flipped airplanes after
a severe thunderstorm plowed through the Sun 'n Fun
International Fly-in & Expo at the Lakeland Linder Regional
Airpoit in Lakeland Thursday.


HB 7109) that Republican
sponsors said would help
curtail the escalating cost
of the $20 billion state-fed-
eral program that covers
low-income and disabled
people.
Democrats opposed the

o ts saig n the qal-
ity of such managed care
plans are uncertain.


notice with the state.
Thursday that it intends to
cut 860 jobs from its Boca
Rat~on office and another
363 in Orlando. The layoffs
are to be completed by
May 31.
Teleperformance has
1.20,0005 wrkuens spread

aRos t cut l s


An exch sive




by
The Weather
Channel.

"ete~o


TEMPERATURES
High Thursday
Lowm Tur 4
Normal low
Reodhgh

PRECIPITATION
Thursday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


SUN
Sunrise today
Su et today

Sunset tom.


76


52



0.58"
3.04"
10.31"
4.26"
11.16"


7:20 a.m.


7:50 p.m.


ORIANDO An
Orlando judge has denied
a request from former
astronaut Lisa Nowak to
have her criminal record
sealed.
Judge Marc Lubet
on Thursday dismiissed
Nowak's argument that
leaving the file open would
hinder her ability to find
a job

likely gnyempoe tw Il
have heard about Nowak'S
bizarre airport attack on
a romantic rival, given the
media attention it received.
Nowak was sentenced
in 2009 to a year of proba
tion after pleading guilty to
burglary charges. She had
originally been charged
with attempted kidnapping
and burglary.


!s
In


ror shooting
MIAMI Miami police
have arrested a man
involved with the shooting
of a mother and her
8-year-old son who were
shot while riding in theh-
car.
Police announced P
Thursday the arrest of
Diron Percy Andrew, 19'
on twlo counts of aggra-
vated battr with a de dly
discharging a firearm in
pu lc.

1,200 call center
jobs to be cut
BOCA RATON A
call center operator plans
to lay off more than 1,200
Floridians. .
The French firm
Teleperformance filed


grah ac 21 weather
Central, UP, pYladiaon, Wls.
www.weatherpublisher~com


On this date in
1989, up to six inch-
es of snow blanket-
e theAdirndwacksk
State and the Saint
Lawrence Valley of
VermntsnUp t a
keted the Colorado
Rockies,


Friday


Saturday


T~LAHASSE -
Private companies and
networks of hospitals and
other providers would
deliver Medicaid health
care services in Florida
under legislation passed in
the state House.
The chamber voted
along party lines Thursday
on a pair of bills (HB 7107,


House passe
Medicaid pla
A~Tu c~


11 -Fmcasttee1mpeatra


"'FeeClsh"tpedge


II Associated Press


LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING FRIDAY, APRIL 1, 2011


we,

Wednesday:
S1-5-10-13-19


Ca 3 Thursday:
"Afternoon: 3-2-0
Evening: 5-3-6


PE OPLE IN THE NE WS



Cameron looks to enrich 'Avatar 2' images


Reporter
BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon....754-419
(sbrannon~lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCUI.KnON
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 730
a~m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
vc lo or sm d y re-dlvrya Af
10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery/ or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation ...............755-5445
(circulation~lakecktyreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
Cu~esday through Su day)...$63
24 Weeks. .................. $48.79
52 Weeks. .................. $83.46
Rates indude 7% sales tlx.
12 Weeks. ................. $41.40
24 Weeks. .................. $82.80
52 Weeks. .................$1 79.40


JOel cancels his memoir 'Hard ball' host to ne


COR REACTION


AROUND FLORIDA


THE WEATHER


Appellate court
reverses case .
TALIAHASSEE -
SAn appellate court has
reversed the attemptedl-
murder conviction of a
north Florida man and
ordered a new trial after
finding the lower-court


Stre ju ee pael of
the First District Court of
Appeal ruled on Thursday
that Montez Anderson
should be tried again.
He was convicted of a .
attempted second-degree
murder charge for the
2007 shooting and injuring
of another man in Leon
County
Anderson, 24, had been
sen enced o2 years in
pniSon.

Proposed end of
Sun Pass discount
TALIAHASSEE A

mthe u s twllo dicent
has cleared the Senate
Budget committee.

the reposa eonhrt akr
SunPass is an electronic
toll-paying system and
users typically pay 25 cents
less than drivers who pay
cash on Florida's Turnliike
and other state toll roads.
A fEiscal impact state-
ment` didn't say how
much money the state will
recoup from ending the
discount if it's ultimately
approved.


. SUNNY SNY



HI 76 LO 51 I HI 81 50


uta iolet
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 1~


eques o sea
Suspect arrested records denied


IVoonsisetoday 6:01a.m.
Moonset today 6:24 p.m.
Moonrise tom. 6:30 a.m.
Moonset tom. 7:16 p.m.


A ril A rl Alpdi A~pri
New nirst Funl Ls..t





MAGIC: Local horse with remarkable powers

Continued From Page 1A


bers complete Guardian
ad Litem training, assisted
with fundraising projects,
is paying for the banquets
location and done much
more orhthe or a iain.

very supportive of the
Guardian ad Litem




nMP ARTHU (110) 410 710 930


DAYOF A WIMPY KID: RODRICK
FARUEYS(PG) (120)420720940
RED RIDING HOOD (PG-13) (150) 450 750 1020
RANGO (PG). (100) 400 700 950


LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL FRIDAY, APRIL 1, 2011


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


Constitution, Florida Statutes, the
Columbia County Charter and the
Uniform Accounting System of the
annual budget process.
"~The idea being is when we actu-
ally go to put together next fiscal
year's budget and that is presented to
the board," he said, "they understand
why we are doing this or doing that
without explanation."
The board reviewed specific ele-
ments of the budget process mandat-
ed by law, such as the country operat-
ing on a fiscal year begmmnng Oct. 1
and ending Sept. 30 and that the final
budget approved by the commission
must be balanced.
Commissioners also had the oppor-
tunity to ask questions. Commissioner
Jody DuPree, board chairIman, raised
the issue of internal budget amend-
ments and asked that he be made
aware of why and when they happen
when they do arise.
While the board usually begins
holding its annual budget wor-kshops
in August, DuPree requested the


early workshops at previous county'
meetings.
He said their purpose is to help
the board understand where to best
make cuts in the budget when the
time comes while still accomplish-
ing the county's goals. The needs
of the department heads must to be
known so each department "gets a
fair shake," he said, and so the county
can work together.
"W~e one big team and we all play
different roles," DuPree said.
DuPree noted that he would "'high-
ly s gest"' that the constitutional
officers attend te rest of t bdg t
workshops, where revenue sources
and expenditures will be discussed.
"It's at their disadvantage to not be ~
here," said Commissioner Stephen
Bailey.
The next budget workshop will be
held at 6 p.m. April l4 at the Columbia
County School Board Administrative
Complex auditorium, 372 W Duval
Street.


By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com

The county got a headstart on its
annual budget process with a lesson
on how the budgeting process works
Thursday. .
The Columbia County Board of
County Commissioners discussed
and reviewed the legal requirements
for preparing its annual budget at a
budget workshop, the fist of nine
workshops scheduled through late
July.
All l9 county department directors
were invited to attend the workshop
and approximately 20 county staff
members and county department
directors were in attendance.
With an hour-long PowerPoint
presentation, Dale Williams, county
manager, gave the first portion of
what he called "budgeting 101" for
the commissioners and the depart-
ment heads.
He presented the legal require-
ments those required by the U.S.


receive it can give the
Sheriff's Office the tip,"
said Commissioner Ron
Williams. "If the tip pans
out and an arrest is made
and a conviction is made
~from the tip that led to
the arrest, then that indi-
vidual will be eligible for
the reward.
The sign cost $150,
paid for from the Public
Works Departmenf~s g~en-
eral fund, and was posted
by the Columbia County
Road Department.
Williams said a reward
is being offered because
of the county's concern
for the preservation and
safekeeping of the other
Falling Creek Falls' land-
marks, like the old com-
missary and the chapel.
"They tell when an
arsonist sets something
on fie, they get the plea-
sure of seeing it again,"
Wi""eamns eMd"andewere
ty of our buildings."
Tres Atkinson,
Columbia County Fire/
Rescue chief, agreed.
"As a historical part of
our community, if~s very
important to preserve
these and to understand
our history and this is just
a tragic thing that was .a
senseless act for some-
body to do," he said. "The
county is looking Very
hard into preserving the
rest of them and making
sure this doesn't happen


again."
Sheriff Mark Hunter
said the case is being
treated as arson because
of what the crime scene
indicate's.
"~We're following on any
leads," he said. "We've
beep doing a little bit of'
canvassing of the neigh-
borhood and we ask any
of the citizens that may
have information to come
forward, certainly call
Crime Stoppers and they
can remain anonymous
and get a reward."
Residents with informa-
tion to. the crime, or any
other crimne-related infor-
mation, can anonymously
call Crime Stoppers of
Columbia Coun~ty at (386)
754-7099.
Williams said' if any
individual or business
would like to pledge
tmone tojtard ihe reward
can do so by calling Crime
Stoppers, the Columbia
County Sheriff's Office
at (386) 752-9212 or him-
self at the county office at
(386) 758-1005.
The park suffered a
loss when the tobacco
barn landmark burned,
Williams said, which is
another reason why the
county is offering its
reward.
"The park seein empty
now with this building
gone," he said.


Each office independently owned and operated


with cancer," she said. "She
will visit with everyone
but seems to find certain
people she does not want
to leave. So many times we
have seen her touch some-
one, forehead to forehead
with her eyes closed for
several minutes without
moving. She makes people
feel loved, understood or
like they have a special
friend on their side."
Although Magic has
been included on the
i dnic list, hr hamdlerse
has a busy schedule ahead
other in the upcoming
Weeks.
"Next week National
Geographic is sending ~
Sa photographer from
Washington DC to follow
Magic at work. She is
being lIhotographed for an
Upcoming magazine story,"
Bengochea said.
In addition, Magic and
Geritle Carousel Miniature
Therapy Horses are sched-
uled to receive an award on
April l4 from the Alachua
County Sheriff~s Office.
Magic has also been invited
to attend the University
of Central Florida Book


Wednesday 10 a.m.
Thursday, the National
Weather Service said 1.75
inches of rain fell in the
area.
"For the moilth we
received 4.33 inches of
rain," Morgan said. "Half
of that total came on
Tuesday, Wednesday and
Thursday.,,
High winds accompa-
nied the rainfall during
the past three days, but
officials had no reliable
estimates of wind speeds.
"We didn't get any calls
about debris," Morgan
said, noting there were
Z'epo:'s o ome lapn dhu
the winds.
There was a tornado
watch in the area that
went from 10 a~m. 8 p.m.


Wednesday. A tornado
watch means conditions
may become favorable for
the formation of a tornado
and tornadoes are~ pos-
sible in the area.
The area was also
under a tornado warning
- where weather service
officials saw rotation on
the Doppler Radar indicat-
ing there was rotation in
Sthe system as it moved
across the area.
"Itwasjust weather pat-
tern that moved through
our area," Morgan said
of the inclement weather
con Atins. 'ohenexto

It's supposed to. a sunny
weekend and the chances
of rain will return next
week."


FILE PHOTO
Jorge Garcia-Bengochea (left), the executive director of Gentle Carousel Miniature Horses,
and Magic visit Haven Hospice patient Clarence Michels in 2009.


Festival in April to cham-
pion children's literacy.
Bengochea- also spoke of
the significance and impor-
tance of having Magic on I
the list.
"I think Magic is the
only one living on the
list," she said. "We were
surprised but it's been
great. As an all volunteer
aonprofi charity having


Magic on the list is impor-
tant because the charity
survives month to month.
Transportation is expen-
sive and gas prices have
been a challenge. Our cur-
rent dream is a mini van
for Magic and her mini
friends because it's much
less expensive than pulling
a horse trailer and much
easier to get in and out of


home hospice visits."
Magic was selected
AARP's 2010 Most Heroic
Pet In America and her
story has traveled around
the world in magazines
and newspapers from the
United Kingdom to New
Zealand, Argentina to
Pakistan, the Soviet Union
to Thailand and South
Korea.


She was impressed with
the finished product. .
"I thought, 'Oh, wow,"'"
Crawson said. "It was
amazing, right down to the

dhetal" nine paintings
include icons, such as Betty
Boop, and are able to stand
up alone.
Working on the paintings
was an enjoyable experi-
ence and a way to demon-
strate his budding artistic
talents, LaRose said.
"If~s a form of expressing
myself," he said.
The group worked about
two weeks to .fnish the
paintiligs, Medlin said.


Program, Crawson said.


Their participation in the
project is reflective of CCA's
commitment to service.
"(The inmates) have a
strong desire to give back
to ase c kmunity and
said.
Using their time to give
back sends a strong mes-
sage' to the community.
"Most of us took away
so much from the commu-
nity," Eveque said. "It feelS
good to give back."
Also CCA will receive the
Community Advocate of
the Year award at the ban-
quet, Crawvford said. The
~facility had 14 staff nriem-


has been scheduld for Priday April 15th fromu 9am-4pm
and youl are invited.


The tlrainingt will trakie place at:


12760 Robe'rts Street US HiiWY 4 1.



Allerairring matertairl willine
jhrick~ed oeto prar~ticoa
as wel~l a lunch and anac/ca.


-. -


.The course prepares ,at I r's and your congregation's members and/or health'
.ministry teams to:

1.) Understand community health issues, principles of whole person health, and
health behavior change;

2.) Identify community resources for use in the congregation;

S3.) Implement successful congregational surveys;

4.) Plan and implement successful health awareness and lifestyle programs within
Sthe congregation.

The training will be conducted by Mfr. Jeff May rivt with South Georgia Medical.
3eff has been an RN for over 25 years serving in Emergency Care, Critical Care and
Hospice. Jeff is a volunteer chaplain at South Georgia Medical Center, associate
chaplain at Hospice of South Georgia and currently serves as Coordinator of Faith
Community Health Initiatives for Hospice of South Georgia, an affiliate of South
Georgia Medical Center in Valdosta. This training is being sponsored by Hamilton
and Columbia County Health Departments.

Ero .> !r :er for thep Ptrininglf or addljitional forc inc~format~ion; con~a~ct
T'arolyn, Airc6rd 352-28.1-d29


Residential Industrial New Construction

Acreage/Farms Rental &r Rental Management
IHVCStment PTOpertieS

Call Us For All Your Real Estate Needs 386-752-6575
Blake N. Lu nde/Broker-Owner a nd Debo rah M~yles/ Broker-Ownier


3101 W. Hwy 90 Suite 101
(Located between M~cDonald's 8: Wiendy's)
www.C21 DarbyRogers.com


Workshops to aid department headS


ARSON: $2,500 reward

Continued From Page 1A


RAIN: Heavy storms hit

Continued From Page 1A


-INMIATES: Receive appreciation awards for wTork

SContinued From Page 1A


am....


THE DARBY-ROGERS & Strive to mazinztain
COMPANY


the wlarmz imd friendly

hometown atmosphere

while offering

professional~ service*


--ME |

















I -


OPO N RO N


C of C

WinneTS

honored
getting recognized
by your peers in
the business world
for doing things
G~right is something
worth treasuring, particularly
in an economic atmosphere as
precarious as ours currently
is. Steve Briscoe and those
associated with both CMS
Professional Staffing Inc. and
Rountree-Moore Automotive
Group realize just how gratify-
ing it can be.
At Wednesday's Chamber of
Commerce Awards Luncheon,
Briscoe was recognized as
the Citizen of the Year. CMS
Professional Staffing was the

bquntre-or M a the arge
The reaction by all three
winners was as good an indica-
tion why they were recognized
in the first place. A common

sn dofun humlty. AMd mMw rea
owner of Ru te -oore,
expressed surprise his co"
pany got the award consi ring
the impre sive list of can i
dts, wi Crs Samson,
CMS Professional Staffing's
chief executive officer, credited
his staff for the honor.
A list of nominees for te
business awards was presented.
There were seven candidates
for the newly-created Citizen
of the Year designation and, as
deserving as they all were, no
one could argue with Briscoe's
selection. Owner of ist Street
Music & Sound Co., Money
Man/(;heck Cashing and Pawn,
and the Tax Station, he has
been involved.
Fourteen years in the

Am ri an CacrSoc ty 'he

the Marc Di be sss anda ha
dozen local things make for an
unpressive resume.
The winners, and all those
nominated, were worthylcehoic-
es. But te Cambe' ss ec-
tion process to deternune the
winners, which according
to Steve Smith, the business .
enhancement conimittee chai
man focused on objectivity
deserves accolades as well.
Recognizing those who
deserve it is all the more pleas-
ing when the method used to
arrive at the conclusion is fair.

Lakre City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
lis takhep dt Reoerr d tpuab-
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strn cosmdnintie~s --"Newspapers

pu lih dsing ised aod profitable
commnT -iee dbe speirs d
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
SToe Wilson pu ~ish rr

Dink NeSrnith, president
Torn Wood, chairman



L ET T E RS
POLICEC Y
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MIAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,


Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


4A:


www.Iakecityreporter.com


Deroy Murdock
deroy.murdock@gmoil.com


Nation's

leaders

Should

take notes


newly elected
governor just
persuaded his state
legislature to close
A~multibillion-dollar
deficit, keep taxes in check
and limit annual Medicaid


GOP chief executive, or that
ax-wielding alumnus of the
Gigih Col ress, Gov. John


haNdiwr so ~d w Cuomo,
governor. His performance

caus ofhlie go ednment
on the Hudson far more than
d heis past Dhee Patdcessors
the shirtess Elio Spitzerso,
and the clueless Republican,
Geog Patakri
euoorige .d the
beuomo ingn Ifet-wieg clas
warriors and dman aled

"m x oaire' stoax shoacboosted
the 6.85 percent income-tax
rate to 7.85 percent fr single 8i'
earning as little as $200,000
and 8.97 percent or th00s~e
making at least $0, 0.
'The old way of solving the
pri lemewas conoiruin to

jt an'to that nyn n Post.
'W~e're going to have to reduce,
go ernment spending."
rumodidu His p$el3 billion~
b dgm is $3.4 billion lower
than last year's, an honest 2.5
percent cut.
Cuomo killed the
spending formulae that were
'marbleized throughout Ntew
Thr S aticaw,' as h epdti
Tey autom tially boosted
annual Medicaid and education
expenditures, demanding

pro ram this yarb. In tad'
Cueonmegot D mocrats and
union to accept a 4 percent
yearly~ spending cap on
M ra pin dtheds ao mulae
cut this year's deficit by $10
b llon, next yearili's b $13

bgrot ondasfat tda e tory.
toCuomo secured permission
20 percent, close up to six
prisons, and merge the
state Banking and Finance
departments, among other
age budget lets Cuomo
squeeze $450 million in
concessions from unions. If
they balk, he may sack 10,000
government workers.
C"omo's proposed ceiling
::n: medca ::::::::.e ards
did his wish for a 2 percent
cap on property tax hikes.
Still, he accomplished all of
this without increasing state
borrowing.
The New York Post reacted
with a two-word headline:
"PIGS FLY."
Cuomo's seriousness
jarringly contrasts with
Washington, D.C., where un-
seriousness is a governing
philosophy.
MNew York commentator


Deroy Murdock is a columnist
With the Scripps Howard News
tServic and a m ianfellow with
Revolution and Peace at Stanford
University.


cC onck,rwh himself was
indicted for suppressing
evidence, misstated the law
duririg the current case.
Ginsberg wrote that his tenure
"created a tinderbox in Orleans
Parish in which Brady violations
were nigh inevitable. And when
they did occur, Connick insisted
there was no need to change
anything, and opposed efforts to
hold prosecutors accountable on
the ground that doing so would
make his job more difficult.,,
As with most Supreme Court
decisions, the outcome affects
not just a single man the
innocent John Thompson, who
lost 18 years of his life with no
recompense but our entire
society. The decision will make
it difficult to bring incompetent
or even corrupt prosecutors to

oThe [nnro ensce P oe
Connick's 28 years in office
and concluded he gave the
city a "legacy" of suppressing
evidence. The project said 36
men convicted in Orleans Parish
during Connick's tenure alleged
prosecutorial misconduct
Nineteen have since had
their sentences overturned or
reduced as a result.
John Thompson, stunned by
the Supreme Court's decision,
says he intends to spend his
life working to help wrongly
.convicted inmates. He has
founded Resurrection After
Exoneration. Sadly, he will not
have the financial resources
that the lower courts rightly
Concluded the city of New
Orleans should have paid to
help him pursue his goal.

SScrip Howarhdaco rmnn
the White House and national
politics since 1986.


sumh an e gr-e i
miscarriage of justice
at the highest levels
That your blood boils
and you yield to despair. Such i~s
a new Supreme Court decision.
Imagine being in prison for
18 years 14 of them in solitary
confinement awaiting execution
for a crime you did not
commit. Imagine, after all that
time, that new evidence was
found that exonerated you, and
a new trial found you innocent.
Imagine that it came to light
that for years prosecutors in
thd':district attorney's office
deliberately withheld that .
evidence, and that a federal
appeals court ruled that you
were entitled to $14 million
in damages. Imagine if the
prosecute rs then s~ueud you,

1ue ainst ou, ubyg yu

hadn't proved a pattern of
"deliberate indifference" by the
prosecutors. '
That is exactly what
happened to John Thompson,
who was convicted of an armed
robbery and then a murder,
neither of which he committed.
Prosecutors in the New Orleans
district attorney's office, led by
Harry Connick Sr. (father of the
entertainer), failed for years to
disclose a blood-stained swath
of fabric that~proved Thompson
was innocent
The Supreme Court
acknowledged that prosecutors
misbehaved but ruled 5 to 4
that the city of New Orleans .
(prosecutors may not personally
be sued for misconduct)
was not liable for damages
because Thompson did not
prove Connick's failure to train
1pawyers in evidence law was a
Justice Clarence Thomas,
writing for the majority,


'
Ann McFeatters
amcfeatters@nationalpress.com
concluded that failing to tr-ain
prosecutors against suppressing
evidence does not mean a city
purposefully is violating the
Constitution.
Justice Ruth Ginsberg
wrote the disseriting opinion
for the four justices who said
Thompson deserved the money
She felt so strongly she read
her dissent
She said, "What: happened
here .. wasnnosmo entary

b idnt o one o ier's

evidence demonstrated that
misperception and disregard
of (the definitive case Brady
v. Maryland) disclosure
requirements were pervasive
in Orleans Parish (which)
established persistent
deliberately indifferent conduct
for which the District Attorney's
office bears responsibility....
What the five justices decided
means that a major safeguard .
to hold prosecutors accountable
for misconduct has been
stricken, even if they admit their
misconduct
Ginsberg noted that not all
law schools teach case law that
requires prosecutors to turn
over exculpatory evidence.
Such questions are-rarely asked
on the Inuisiana bar exam.
She wrote that Connick never
trained his lawyers to make

law mennck wwo letoffbe ithe
2003, reportedly gave awards
to prosecutors based on their


LETTERS


To the editor:
I've read and heard that we
don't have inflation. Apparently,
I must not be as informed or
as educated as our elected
officials and their regulators, so
I suppose I'll have to take their
word for it.
But wait a second. Aren't
these the same people from
the '90s through 2007 that
said there were no monetary .
problems like sub-prime
mortgages? Didn't we have
recession, high unemployment
and businesses going under?
It hasn't affected them
Because the working class paiys
their salaries, retirement and


health care. It has affected
me because I am part of
the working class. Gas is up
approximately 50 percent from
a year ago. Food prices are
constantly going up. Electricity
is going up. In order for me to
survive, I have to pay for those
items.
However, my salary keeps
going down.
Mr. President, Mr. and Mrs.
Congress-person, please
explain to me how these
increases are not inflation
and how they don't affect my
(empty) wallet.
Iry Croweiz
Lake City


To the editor:
In response to Carolyn Abell's
report (March 27) about the
U.S. Senate declaring March 30,
2011 wellcome home Vietnam
veterans. It's a little late for the
62,000 veterans who committed
suicide after they came home,
or the 60,000 who are homeless,
wandering the streets because
they don't fi in,
You have to bleed to be
awarded the Purple Heart, but
you don't get one for wounds
to the mind. In my case, I have
been home for 43 years, so I
guess it's a little late for me too.
Robert Musgrave
Fort White


OINIO


Friday, April I, 20 II


Supreme Court makes

horbe de *


TO THE EDITOR


Ele cte d officials say we

don't have in nation? ease





OBTA 4 g


I


BUILD ON WHAT WE KNOW'"
OPEN HOUSE E
Lake City, FL
Tuesday AgwH1 P5, 2011
18,300+total sf facility on 4.25 acres
1824 W. US Highway 90 Lake City, FL 32055
Questions/Comments 724-228-3636 xi349


LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL FRIDAY, APRIL 1, 2011


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


Wi To submit your Community
Calendar item, contact Antonia
Robinson at 754-0425 or by
e-mail at arobinson @
lakecityreporter.com.


1

r


is participating in the $1
million dollar giveaway
Alan Feinstein Challenge
from now until April
30. Every food item or
fmancial donation counts
toward receiving a per-
centage of the giveaway.
Call 386-755-1770 and
bring donations either to
the center at the corner
of Hilton and Washington
or mail to P.O. Box 2285,
Lake City, FL, 32056.

Class get together
The Class of 1959 is hav-
ing its annual get together
5 p.m. April 9 at Camp
Weed. The cost is $1'5 per
person which includes a
buffet meal. Pay at the
door. RSVP to Barbara
Ann Carpenter, Annette
Purvis or Tony Keaton.

IMOSday

Annual Meeting
The United Way of
Suwannee Valley Annual
Meeting and Awards
SBanquet is 6 7:30 p.m. at;
Florida Gateway College
Howard Conference
Center. The cost is $25 per
person. RSVP

Wednesday
Newcomers and
Friends Luncheon
The April Friendship
Luncheon of the Lake
City Newcomers and
Friends is 11:30 a.m. APril
6 at Brooklyn Boys located
at 4196 W US Hwy. 90.
All members, guests and
friends are welcome. For
more information call 386-
438-8100 or 386-754-7227.

Thursday

,Free. Medic~ai4dsworkshop
K C~freeMedictiid work-
shop is'l 10 .rn.April 7 at
the Lifestyle Enrichment
Center, 628 S.E. Allison
Court. The workshop on
Medicaid planning is led
by Teresa Byrd Morgan
ofsMorgan L Cene for
It will discuss the myths
and opportunities avail-
able. Call Shana Miller at
386-755-1977.


Friday, April 8

Tribute to Journey
The Ultimate Tribute to
Journey is 7 p.m. April 8 at
Florida Gateway College.
Ticket nare $10.S Poeds
Children Scholarship. Call
386-754-4340 .


Saturday, April 9

Alligator Lake Spring
Festival
An early bird walk kicks-
off the Second annual
Alligator Lake Spring
Festival 8 to 10 a.m. April
9 at Alligator Lake Park.
The festival is 10 a.m. to
4 p.m. and sponsored by
Four Rivers Audubon and
Gateway Wildlife Habitat


per household is allowed.

Toxic Waste Roundup
The Columbia County
Toxic Waste Roundup is
9 a.m. to 3 p.m. April 9
at the Columbia County
Fairgrounds. Safely dis-
pose of household hazard-
ous wastes such as old
paint, used oil, pesticides,
insecticides and more.
Free for residents and
a small charge for busi-
nesses. Call Bill Lycan at
386-752-6050.

Bowling fundraiser
The 4 Pets Sake bowl-
ing fundraiser is 1:30 p.m.
April 9 at Lake City Bowl.
Registration is 1 p~m.
Prizes are for men and
women; there will be a
door prize and a 50-50. The
cost is $10 per person for
two series. Call 386-935-
0975 or e-mail fourpets-
sakel~windstream.net.

Easter Bunny Arrival &
Belk Kids Fest
The Easter Bunny
arrives at 11 a.m. April
9 at Lake City Mall. The
bunny will have free gifts
for the children. Belki will
beholding kids festival'
throughout the mall. Free:
face painting, duck pond,'
balloons, refreshments
and numerous other activi-
ties for children. Belk Kids
Fashion show at 1 p.m.

Sunday A ril .10
'Weird Florida' author
to speak
Charlie Carlson, author
of "Weir'd Florida," is
speaking at the Columbia
County Library Main
Branch 2 p.m. April 10.
The event is a kick-off for
Natiqual I~braryr We~ek and.,
. poiis~ored by the Friends
of the Library Carlson is
best known for his book,
"Weird Florida," and his
PBS television program
of the same name. Come
hear him talk about some
o lrada's most o d-ba

est oddities.


line is 5 p.m. April 1.

Saturday
Class meeting
Richardson High School
class of 1970 is meeting 1
p.m. April 2 at Richardson
Community Center.
Contact Dennis Murphy at
697-3739 or Macy Wilson
at 752-3471.

Garage sale
The Lake City Alumni
Chapter of Bethute
Cookman University is
hosting its annual Garage
Sale Fundraiser 7:30 a.m.
to 3 p.m. Saturday at 920
NE Joe Coney Terrace
(the home of Dianne
George. This multi-family
event will contain items of
value to the entire family
with more than 20 fami-
lies participating. Contact
Minister Jan Harrison,
President of the BCU Lake
City Alumni Chapter at ,
386-288-2368.

Yard sale

A Spring Community
Yard Sale is 7 a.m. to 2
p.m. April 2 in downtown
Wellborn. The event is
hosted by the Wellborn
Community Association.
Booth spaces are $5 for
12 x 12. A blueberry pan-
cake breakfast is 7:30 to
10 a.m. The cost is $5 for
adults and $3 for children.
Hamburgers, hot dogs and
drinks: will be available for
Lunch. The bloodmobile
will also be at the event.
Call 386-963-1157 or visit
www.wellborncommuni-
tyassociation.com.

Alli Walk
Four Rivers Audubon ~
hosts a monthly ALLI-
W~alk: Bird /Butterfly /
SNature's Garden outing
12s fom 8 o 11 a~. Ap i
Krummrich, biologist,
Virlyn Willis, avid birder,
and others will share
then hkowledge Brin

biNm ulm-shan~d a sn ck.
levels of participation and
knowledge are welcome.
Enter Alligatoi- Lake at the
County Park on Country
Club Road (east side of
lake). Drive in and around
to the parking area in front
of the lake near the new
construction. Call Loye
SBarnard at 497-3536 for
more information.

Spring Health
Professional Seminar
The Gainesville District
Dietetic Association is ~
hosting the "Spring Health
Professionals Seminar
2011" April 2 at Trinity
United Methodist Church
in Gainesville. It is an all
day seminar for registered
dietitians and other health
professionals. Registration
begins at 8 a.m. The cost
is $75 for morning ses-
sion, $25 for afternoon.
session, and $25 for stu-
dents. Education credits
have been approved for


dietitians and other health
professionals. Visit www.
eatrightgainesville.org/
files/ for more information
and to register.

Not Your Mama's
Co uponing
A workshop on
Couponing is 10 a.m. 12
p.m. April 2 at Artworks
Studio The event is hosted
by Lindley Rachel from
RO.C.K. Solid. The cost
is $5 per person, and
pre-registration required,
seating is limited. Call
Colleen at 386-758-9346
or e-mail mdfnley~juno.
com. Learn how to save
50 -percent and more on
your grocery bill. The
studio is located at 122
SW Midtown Plaza suite
103. Visit http://www.art--
worksstudio.net/Aboutus.
html for directions.

Pioneer Days
The 35th annual Pioneer
Days is 9 a.m. -5 p.m. April
2 and 10 a.m. 4 p.m.
April 3 in downtown High
Springs. It will feature
musical entertainment, '
expanded kids korral with
pony rides, handmade arts
and crafts vendors, heri-
tage village with demon-
strations of old time skills
and a shoot out at noon
and 2 p.m. each day. Call
386-454-3120.

Adopt-a-Highway
Cleanup #2
The Filipino American
Cultural Society of Lake
City will meet 8 a~m. April
2 at the Columbia Bank
Parking lot, corner of US
90 & Turner road. We will
pickup both sides of our
adopted 2 mile stretch of
highway on UJS 90 west. For
more information contact
Bob Gavette 386-965-5905 ..

Diva Day
Altrusa Diva Day is
10 a.m. 2 p.m. April 2
at the Columbia County
FA rrundis BaquethHall.

en r a a ana baceet o
Suwannee Jam tickets. ~
Tickets are available at the
Lake City Reporter, Lake
City Advertiser, Mercantile
Bank on Hwy. 90 or at the
door. Call Jan Smithey at
386-961-3217.



Pioneer Days
The 35th annual Piorieer
Days is 10 a.m. 4 p.m.
April 3 in downtown High
Springs. It will feature
musical entertainment,
expanded kids korral wi
pony rides, handmade arts
and crafts vendors, heri-
tage village with demon-
strations of old time skills
and a shoot out at noon
and 2 p.m. each day. Call
386-454-3120.

Mond ay

Feinstein challe nge
Christian Service Center


Organization. The festi-
val is free but people are
asked to RSVP for the
bird walk to Jacqui Sulek
at jsulek~audubon.org
or call (386) 497-4185.
Alligator Lake Park is
located at 420 SE Alligator
Glen.

Paint-out artists wanted
The Art League Of
North Florida is sponsor-
ing a paint-out a9 a.m.
to noon April 9 At the
Alligator Lake Spring
Festival There is an entry
fee of $5 to enter the
judged contest for four
cash prizes to be present-
ed at 12:30 PM. Work must
be produced during the
contest hours in order to
be eligible. There will be
art for exhibit and for sale
by the exhibiting artists. A .
contribution from the art
contest will go to support
the Audubon Society. For
additional information call
697-4622 or 758-7853.

FFA Booster/Alumni
Carwa sh
The FFA Booster/
Alumni will be holding
a car wash 8 a~m. -12
p.m. April 9 at Hardee's
on 90 West in Lake
City to help benefit the
CHS FFA Chapters and
their effort to attend State
and National Convention.
Please come out and sup-
port our efforts. Donations
can be made the day of the
car wash or pre-saile tick-
ets can be purchased by
calling Patricia Starnes at
755-8080.

Drive One 4 UR School
Drive One 4 UR School
is 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. April
9 at Rountree-Moore
Fiord Lincoln. The dealer-
ship is located at:2588 .
US Hwyj. 90 west. For
every test drive in'-a new
Ford/Lincoln automobile
Ford Motor Company
will donate $20 towards
the organization of your
choice at Columbia High
School with a goal of 300

$6,000. Only one test drive


The Columbia County Tobacco Free
Partnership and the Columbia County
Health Department have come together
to form a partnership in order to create a
tobacco free community. This year, the
(00e partnership is focusing on polices that
\Of .0( effect our youth. We are working to.
~rai~a~wards developing 100% tobacco free
schools.o Pleasehcome join us and help
All community members, service
workers, and school aged youth...are in-
vited to attend.




HALTH


Private services will bje held
at a later date. In lieu of flow-
ers donations focueld 37 made
U.S. Highway 90, Lake City,
Florida 32055. GUERRY
FUNERAL HOME, 2659 SW.
Main Blvd. Lake City, Florida
is in charge of arrangements.
Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


Marjorie Jean Bowser

"earjo ie JnCBowleori 87a resi-1
away March 31, 2011 at the Su-
wannee Valley Care Center fol-
lowing an ex-
tended illness.
Ms.a nl3wse
Ligonier,Penn-
sylvania and
had resided in

t pact twe-
ty-one years. She was foi-emost
a homemaker and a LPN for the
St. Mary's Hospital, West Palm
in det yhe hbandp ehadl
B. Bowser and one sister Eleanor
Wood. She was also member of
the Pleasant Grove United Meth-
odist Church, Lake City, Florida.
S arle udwerke Ct, Fs1r
ida One Brother: Lyman Carroll,
Massachusetts. Two Grandchil-
dren, Randal Bryan and Daniel
Bow er an non80 geati cand-


Event: Columbia County Tobacco Free Partnership
Meeting
When: Wednesday, April 6, 2011
Where: Central School Board Office Room 153
409 SW St. Johns ST.
Lake City, FL 32055
Time: 3:30-4:30pm


All partnership meetings are open to the public*
For more information on how to become involved
in you local Tobacco Free Partnership, please
cotact:
""l ..'berts
Columbia County Health Department
386-754-7083 or Kyle Roberts~doh.state.fl.us*


CO~~~DMMUNT CLNA


Today
Poster contest
All 250 poster contest
entries submitted for
the "Water Conservation
Month" in April and
national "Drinking Water
Week" in May are on dis-
play through April l4 at
the Lake City Mall.

Operation Cinderella
Operation Cinderella
is 2 to 6 p.m. April 10
at Lake City Mall in the
former Rex store. Girls in
Columbia and surround-
ing counties can purchase
gently used gowns, shoes
and one accessory for only
$10. Money raised from
the event will. go to The
Ronald McDonald House
of North Central Florida.
Dresses and accessories
donations can be dropped
off at: Doodle's Closet
on U.S. 90 West, next to
Applebee's; Hair Graphics
on Baya Drive near where
Baya and U.S. 90 meet; or
the Lake City Mall Office
8 a.m. to 1 p.Il. Monday
through Friday Donations
must bre received by April
8. Call Doodle's Closet at
386-438-5961 or visit www.
facebook.com/doodles-
closet for more informa-
tion.

CLE Class
A Continuing Legal
Education class,
Workable Unity: Judicial
Perspectives, is 11 a.m.
- 1:30 p.m. April 14 at
Holiday-Inn of Lake City.
Lunch will be served. Cost
is free but seating is lim-
ited. RSVP by April 1.

Donors wanted
The bloodmobile is
~stopping 11 a~m. 7 p.m.. .
April 1 at Pizza Boy Pirzza
R ceive ea re ange

Shirt.

Antiques Tractor &
Engine Show

8< egine ehw as 1 r
1 -3 at Stephen Foster
Folk Culture'Center
State Park. There will be
seven "Make and Take"
workshops available in
the Craft Square on April
2. Call the park's Gift
Shop at (386) 397-1920 or
visitwww.stephenfoster-
CSO.org.To learn more
about the park, visit www.
FloridaStateParks.org/ste-
phenfoster.

Fair/Rodeo Scholarship
Columbia County
Resources is now accept-
ing applications for the
fair/rodeo scholarship.
Two scholarships for
$1,000 will be awarded to
graduating seniors. Call
386-752-8822 or visit www.
columbiacountyfair.org to
download the criteria and
application. The applica-
tion is also available at
Columbia High School,
Fort White High School or
the fair office. The dead-











SC urges GOP to pull


convention from Fla.


over primary debate


No joke: Snow hits Northeast


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


ger say in choosing the nominee and break
the rules by jumping ahead in line can face
penalties, including losing delegates to the
convention.
Some states, including Georgia,
Connecticut, Virginia, Maryland and
California, have or are working to move
contest dates back to no earlier than
March 6.
Florida's top House republican also
wasn't moved"by Floyd's call. The state's
GOP-dominated Legislature hasn't budged
on a state law that sets the state's primary
for Jan. 31, 2012, and top lawmakers have
said they won't move the primary unless
the state is bumped up to fifth in line.
"I look forward to meeting Chairman
Floyd and (Iowa GOP) Chairman (Matt)
Strawn in Tampa next summer," House
Speaker Dean Cannon said.
During 2008's intense campaign, states
scrambled to hold their primaries as soon
as possible to have a say in the nomination
process. That touched off threats to strip
states of delegates and other penalties.
Leaders in both parties agreed to require
later contests in delegate-rich states.
Strawn said Floyd was right to call for the
convention to be moved.
"If Florida refuses to move its primary
date into compliance with RNC rules, that-
consequence should be the re-opening of
the process to select the site of the 2012
RNC Convention," Strawn said.
In June, the RNC chose Tamnpa as the
convention site over Phoenix and Salt Lake
SCity.


JIM DAVENPORT
Associated Press -

COLUMBIA, S.C. South Carolina
Republicans looking to protect the state's
fist-in-the-South primary asked the nation-
al GOP on Thursday to move the 2012
presidential convention from Florida if
officials there hold its contest sooner than
permitted.
"This is about followiing the rules," said
South Carolina GOP chairwoman Karen
Floyd. Her counterpart in Iowa, which
traditionally holds the leadoff caucuses,
agreed.
Floyd suggested moving the political
prize to another state that's fighting unions
or that has close U.S. Senate races. She
suggested even moving it to a key swing
state like North Carolina instead of hold-
ing it in Florida, which she said appeared
bent on breaking Republican National
Committee rules that call for lowa, New
Hampshire, Nevada and South Carolina
to hold contests before any other state in
2012.
H-owaver, it's unlikely the RNC will heed
Floyd's suggestion. RNC spokeswoman
Kirsten Kukowski said Thursday that the
convention would stay in Tampa, where
convention planning already is well under
way.
'The issue is especially sensitive in South
Carolina, where officials brag that no GOP
nominee has been minted without first
winning the state's primary.
Florida and other states that want a big-


Associated Press -

BOSTON -- A no-
joke April Fools' snow-
storm swirled toward the
Northeast on Thursday, a
cruel. prank on a region
that was finally enjoying
a reprieve from its long,
white winter.
The spring snowstorm
was expected to hit late
Thursday and last into
Friday morning April
Fools' Day dropping up
to a foot of snow in some
areas including northwest


Coastal parts of
Massachusetts, Rhode
Island and Connecticut were
expected to get mostly rain,
or wet snow that won't accu-
mulate.
The National Weather
Service said New York City
commuters could encounter
an inch of a slushy mix. Gale
warnings were in effect for
eastern Long Island.
The storm caps a particu-
larly brutal winter for the
region, with many cities set-
ting record or near-record
snowfalls.


New Jersey, eastern New
York and around New
England.
The timing could make
for a messy Friday morning
commute.
Storm warnings were up
around the region, and parts
of New Jersey and New
York's Hudson Valley and
Catskills could see 5 to 12
inches. Up to 8 inches was
possible in Pennsylvania's
Pocono Mountains.
High-altitude areas of cen-
tral Vermont could get up to
a foot of snow.


LAKE CITY REPORTER NATION & STATE FRIDAY, APRIL 1, 2011


1111111







Lakie City Reporter


YOuth teams take show to road


Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@lakeartyreporter~com


Section B


www.Iakecityreporter.com


CHEAP SEATS





.

Tim Kirby
Phone:(386) 754-0421
tkirbylakecityreportercom

ic




teacriers
"I have every respect for
teachers, ma'am. It's a lot
of hard work and not much
pay." -- William Holden to
Rosalind Russell in 'Picnic.'


Pulitzer Prize
winning play
of William
B ~~Inge, th eae d i
movie 'Picnic' was
released in 1955 and
included that line. It is
true today, more than a
half-century later.
Who is more beloved
than a school teacher
- from the school marm
in the one-room prairie
shack to each student's
favorite who influenced
them the most?
I can reel off the
flames of my elementary


Mtzglet, Mrs Jh s.
Mrs. Lindsey and
Mr. Jennings.
I can't name six
legislators, yet every year
the Tallahassee bunch
tells' us what's best for
education.
This year, what's best
is cutting $3.3 billion
from education and
continuing to blame
teachers for the state of
our students.
There will be pressure
to cut programs,
especially in sports.
Coaches have~ always
worked under the new
merit pay plan, which is
based on student
performance.
Teachers won't have
any trouble, but will
education always serve to
score political points?
If education is in a
tailspin, more times than
not you can look at the
students and what they
bring to the table. For all
the goofing off I saw and
did in school, it was on
me and my cohorts. The
teachers put the lessons
out there for those
interested in learning.
In the tenure system,
administrators had three
years to evaluate the
worth of an employee
before approving them as

ap mou lstn to he
bashing from the nation's
:::::dveof goernrs
are to blame for all woes..
One talking-head
genius said teaching was
a part-time job and they
all went home at 2:30.
That might come as a
surprise to those grading
papers on weekends.
Irr'Picnic,' outsider
Holden came to town one
step ahead of the law and
charmed his way into
the good graces of the
people. It took Russell
to read his motives and
bless him out.
"She saw through me
like an X-ray machine "
Holden told love interest
Kim Novak.
Holden ended up with
the girl, but was run out
of town in the process.
Tim Kirby is sports editor


of the Lake City Reporter.


of the 'more memorable
NCAA tournaments in his-
tory. Heck, it already has
been.
So, to get you geared up,
we've pulled together a little
something that's part his-
tory lesson, part rundown
of this year's teams and,
hopefully, an entertaining
look at this are-these-really-
the-teams foursome.

The underdogs *
In honor of underdogs
Butler and VCU getting to
the Final Four, we'd thought
it'd be interesting to look
back at some of the all-time
upset teams in NCAA tour-
nament history:
North Carolina State,
1983. Lorenzo Charles
dunking, Jim Valvano run-
ning, 'Pack beats Phi Slama
Jama. Doesn't get much
better than that.
Indiana State, 1979.
So what if Magic and
Michigan State took down.
the Sycamnores? What
Larry Bird and his batch of
underlings did was incred-
ible stuff.


George Mason, 2006.
The trendsetter for the cur-
rent mid-major runs. The
Patriots took down big
boys Michigan State, North
Carolina and No. 1 overall
seed UConn to get to the
Final Four.
Butler, 2010. The
Bulldogs set their own stan-
dard just last year, coming
within a nearly-banked-in
halfcourt shot by Gordon
Hayward of becoming the
ultimate Cinderella against
Duke.
Villanova, 1985. First
year of the 64-team field
and the Wildcats made it a
memorable one, becoming
the hiighest seed to win a
national championship as a
No. 8.
SLouisiana State, 1986.
First No. 11 seed to reach'
the Final Four.

Numbers

33-5-11 Age in years,
months and days of Butler's
Brad Stevens, making him
the second-youngest coach
FINAL 4 continued on- 3B


Butler, VCU,
UConn, and
Kentuclay surprise.

By JOHN MARSHALL
Associated Press -

HOUSTON -
Connecticut was supposed
to be too young, Kentucky
too immature, Butler too
old news and Virginia
Commonwealth too far off
the radar.
This is some` kinda Final
Four, huh?
After two weeks of games
even the most astute prog-
nosticators couldn't have
predicted, we're finally at
a Final Four unlike any
other.
After all those brackets
around the country hit the
shredder, Kentucky and
Connecticut will play in the
blue blood bracket, while
SButler and VCU face off in
the up-and-comers division.
Winners get a chance at the
really big stagi at really big
Reliant Stadium.
Whatever happens, it's
sure to go down as one


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Kentucky's Brandon Knight (12) shoots over North Carolina's
Dexter Strickland (1) during the second half of the final of the
NCAA men's college basketball tournament East regional,
Sunday in Newark, N.J. Knight scored 22 points as Kentucky
won 76-69.


Local teams travel
to Gainesville
On Saturday.

By EIRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter. com

Two youth teams from
Columbia Countyj will travel
to Gainesville this weekend
for the Stampede Shootout,
a youth basketball tour-
nament for recreational
teams.
"Last year, we only had
one team," Columbia County
Recreation Department
Director Mario Coppock
said. "We had a lot of sup-
port at a very small cost,
and were able to expand.
We hope to add two more
teams in the future."
The Wolves, an eighth
grade division team, and the
Tigers, a team compi-ised of~
sixth and seventh graders,
will represent Columbia
County in the shootout.
"TIhese teams went
through a tryout process
with the help of former
Columbia High coach Trey
Hosford," Coppock said.
"~We're very appreciative of
SHOOTOUT continued on 3B


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
basketball practice for the Wolves'


Roger Cray (from left), Lonnie Underwood and Terrivio Williams prepare to shoot during
youth basketball team.


Braves and Washington
Nationals.. "You just have
to have coffee instead of
beer."
Pretty much the senti-
ment all across the majors.
Get out your mitts and
mittens and let's play
ball.
Chipper Jones was
ready, even though it was
41 degrees and damp in
Washington. The ol' pro
got the first hit of the 2011
season with a double, and
later scored the first run
as Atlanta won 2-0 before a
non-sellout crowd.
At Yainkee Stadium,
there was a box of winter
BASEBALL continued on 2B


ASSOCIATED PRESS
New York Yankees relief pitcher Mariano Rivera delivers in the ninth inning of the Yankees
6-3 opening day victory over the Detroit Tigers at Yankee Stadium on Thursday.


FridayApril 1, 20 II


Runming down an



exciting Final Four


M~itt and mittens:

BRSeball season


Off to chill star t


Opening day
takeS place
around nation.

By BEN WALKER
Associated Press

With a hot beverage
cup in both hands and a
white parka pulled over her
hooded sweat shirt, Marie
Denissen was more than
happy to be at Nationals
Park.
Chilly weather? No wor-
ries. Heck, it was opening
day.
"It's still great," said
Denissen, from Highland,
Md., during Thursday's
game between the Atlanta





eaRnI'ngS to Jap an victims


Answer to Previous Puzzle

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AITIYPI CIAIL BEADA
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EIDI Ts RIOSI N
T(OD MISJG LAMBI S
ClEIAISIE RAIA Y AAH
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L A WJ N S ICIR I IB(B IL E
E(RI I K T(RIU E A YN
F INS S IEILIL BRO
TIAG WlED YIEW


Want rnore puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS FRIDAY, APRIL 1, 2011


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421


3. Liz Randall 156.09. 1. Bill Duncan
198.88; 2. Joe Cohrs 194.34; 3. Mark
Moore 192.45.
(results from March 27)
TGIF
Team standings: 1. The Pacers
(34-10); 2. Strike Zone (33-11);
3. 4 Cryin' Out Howd (27-17, 27,095
pins); 4. Waterbury Builders (27-17,
26,851 pins).
High scratch game: 1. Ida
Hollingsworth 224; 2. Karen Coleman
213; 3. Candace Christie 206. 1. Wally
Howard 262; 2. George Rye Jr. 257;
3. Jay Waterbury 254.
High scratch series: 1. Ida
Hollingsworth 611; 2. Karen Coleman
600; 3. Jeanette Willcox 518. 1. Jay
Waterbury 702; 2. Wally Howard 700;
3. George Rye Jr. 682.
High handicap game: 1. Natalie
Gordon 253; 2. Linda Wells 250;
3. Ida Hollingsworth 249. 1. George
Rye Jr. 278; 2. Keith Blackie 276;
3. Jay Waterbury 272.
High handicap series: 1. Jeanette
Willcox 695; 2. Ida Hollingsworth
686; 3. Karen Coleman 675. 1. Jay
Waterbury 756; 2. George Rye Jr. 745;
3. Wally Howard 715.
(results from March 25)
MONDAY NIGHT MAVERICKS
Team standings: 1. Neil
Hoffman's Auto (221-109); 2. Team 8
(209.5-120.5); 3. Rountree Moore
Ford (201.5-128.5).
High scratch game: 1. Curtis
Gutzmer 267; 2. Tanner Wayne2?59;
3. Al Fooks 258.
High scratch series: 1. Chris
Napolitono 727; 2. Josh Bisque 713;
3. Mike Panza 693.
High handicap game: 1? Al Fooks
289; 2. Tanner Wayne 279; 3. (tie)
Curtis Gutzmer, Ron VanDeVoren,
John Janki 273.
High handicap series: 1. Mike
Panza 780; 2. Chris Napolitona 766;
3. Richard Tompkins 762.
High average: 1. Zech Strohl
219.97; 2. Dale Coleman 214.62;
3. Bobby Smith 205.69.
(results from March 14)


League reports
Results of Lake City Bowl league
play follow.
WATERGUARD
High scratch game: 1. (tie)
Joyce Hooper, Lorie Niquette 190;
3. Amanda Meng 188; 4. Gloria
Dennis 180. 1. Zech Strohl 267;
2. Mark Koppa 248; 3. Luke Milton
246.
High scratch series: 1. Lorie
Niquette 507; 2. Joyce Hooper 500;
3. Lori Davis 478. 1. Zech Strohl 701;
2. Mark Koppa 695; 3. Tom Sewejkis
632.
High handicap game: 1. Amanda
Meng 250; 2. Lidia Strickland 249;
3. Beth Koppa 239. 1. Luke Milton
270; 2. Adam Alford 246; 3. Willie
Frazier 242.
High handicap series: 1. Staci
Greaves 672; 2. Lorie Niquette 654;
3. Joyce Hooper 644. 11. Mark Koppa
752; 2. Zech Strohl 701; 3. Tom
Sewejkis 659.
High average: 1. Mary Lobaugh
182. 1. Zech Strohl 210.
(results from March 22)
SEXY SENIORS
Team standings: 1. Perky Pals
(79.5-44.5); 2. Farmers (76-48); 3. Jo's
Crew (69-55). .
High scratch game:1. (tie) Roberta
Giordano, Betty Brown 185; 3. Joanne
Denton 172. 1. Dan Ritter 218; 2. Earl
Hayward 202; 3. Ross Meyers 196.
High scratch series: 1. Betty
Brown 493; 2. Joanne Denton 466;
3. Roberta Giordano 463. 1. Dan
Ritter 550; 2. Earl Hayward 540;
3. Johnnie Croft 532.
High handicap game: 1. Roberta
Giordano 239; 2. Yvonne Osborn 232;
3. Cookie Reddick 229. 1. Dan Hitter
241; 2. Joe Peterson 234; 3. (tie) Ross
Meyers, Earl Hayward 228.
High handicap series: 1. Betty
Brown 628; 2. Joanne Denton 622;
3. Louise Atwood 604. 1. Wendel
Shay 672; 2. John Quinn 638; 3.
Johnnie Croft 628.
High average: 1. Betty Brown


BOWLING

149.86; 2. Louise Atwood 147.2;
3. Barbara Griner 145.57. 1. Dan
Ritter 175.26; 2. Earl Hayward 171.58;
3. Art Joubert 171.12.
(results from March 22)
GOLDEN ROLLERS
Team standings: 1. Golden Niners
(73-43); 2. Gamblers (69-47); 3. Wild
Things (65-51).
High handicap game: 1. Yvonne
Finley 241; 2. Joyce Hooper 232;
3. (tie) Bea Purdy, Maggie Battle 222.
1. Bill Price 251; 2. (tie) Jerry Ellis,
George Walters 246.
High handicap series: 1. Bertha
Black 640; 2. Joanne Denton 623;
3. Shirley Highsmith 610. 1. Earl
Hayward 703; 2. Lee Evert 691;
3. Ross Meyers 635.
High average: 1. Shirley Highsmith
156.42; 2. Elaine Nemeth 151.88;
3. Betty Carmichael 151.51. 1. David
Duncan 188.3; 2. Bill Dolly 183.83;
3. George Mulligan 181.58.
(results from March 17)
HIT & MISS
Team standings: 1. Alley Oops
(29-15); 2. The Sandbaggers (28-16);
3. Spare Us (28-16).
SHigh handicap game: 1. Ruth
Heims 261; 2. Shirley Highsmith 254;
3. (tie) Karen Gardner, Vicki Baker
243.
High handicap series: 1. Shirley
Highsmith 674; 2. Ruth Heims 664;
3. Vicki Baker 662.
(results from March 22) '
SUNDAY NITEMERCHANTS
Team standings: 1. TAZ
(36.5-11.5); 2. Spare Us (28-20);
3. Train Wreck (25-23).
High scratch game: 1. Gloria
Dennis 224; 2. Norma Yeingst 193,
3. Liz Randall 188. 1. Robert Pond
257; 2. Bill Duncan 247; 3. A.J.
Dariano 237.
High scratch series: 1. Gloria
Dennis 564; 2. Norma Yeingst 539;
3. Cheryl Jacks 516. 1. Robert Pond
663; .2. Bill Duncan 660; 3. A.J.
Dariano 654.
SHigh.average: 1. Norma Yeingst
168.99; 2. Cheryl Jacks 158.43;


Arizona at Colorado, 8:10 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Milwaukee at Cincinnati, 1:10 p.mn.
N.Y. Mets at Florida, 1:10 p.mn.
SAtlanta at Washington, 1:35 p.mn.
Houston at Philadelphia, 1:35 p.m.
San Diego at St. Louis, 2:15 p.mn.
Pittsburgh tt Chicago Cubs, 2:20 p.m.
Arizona at Colorado, 3:IO p.m.
San Francisco at L.A. Dodgers,
8:05 p.m.

Spring training final
AMERICAN LEAGUE


Butler (27-9) vs. Virginia
Commonwealth (28-1 1), 6:09 p.m.
Kentucky (29-8) vs. Connecticut
(30-9), 40 minutes after first game
National Championship
Monday
Semifinal winners, 9 p.m.

NIT championship

Thursday
Wichita State vs.Alabama (n)

VVOmen's Final fur

At at Conseco Fieldhouse
Indianapolis
National Semifinals
Sunday
Stanford (33-2) vs.Texas A&M (3 1-5),
7 p.m.
Connecticut (36-1) vs. Notre Dame
(30-7), 9 p.m.
National Championship
Tuesday
Semifinal winners, 8:30 p.m.

VVOmen's NIT

Semifinals
Wednesday
Toledo 83, Charlotte 60
Southern Cal 63, filinois State 36
'Championship
Saturday
Southern Cal (24-12) at Toledo
(28-8), 3 p.m.

BASEBALL

AL schedule

Thursday's Games
N.Y.Yankees 6, Detroit 3
L.A.Angels 4, Kansas City 2
Today's Games
Chicago White Sox (Buehrle 0-0) at
Cleveland (Carmona 0-0), 3:05 p.m.
Boston (Lester 0-0) at Texas (Wilson
0-0), 4:05 p.m.
Minnesota (Pavano 0-0) at Toronto
(Romero 0-0), 7:07 p.m.
Baltimore (Guthrie 0-0) at Tampa Bay
(Price 0-0), 7:10 p.n.
L.A.Angels (Haren 0-0) at Kansas City
(Francis 0-0), 8:10 p.m.
.Seattle (Hernandez 0-0) at Oakland
(Chll00tu~rdayms Games
Chicago White Sox at Cleveland,
1:05 p.m.
Minnesota at Toronto, 1:07 p.m.
L.A.Angels at Kansas City, 1:10 p.m.
Detroit at N.Y.Yankees, 4:10 p.m.
Baltimore atTampa Bay, 7:IO p.m.
Boston at Texas, 8:05 p.m.
,Seattle aS Oakland,G90 p.m.

Chicago White Sox at Cleveland,
1:05 p.m.
Detroit at N.Y.Yankees, 1:05 p.m.


Boto at 0xs, 2:0 p
L.A.Angels at Kansas City, 2:IO p.m.
Seattle at Oakland, 4:05 p.m.

NL schedule

Atln1hursday' Games
Cincinnati 7, Milws~ukee 6
San Diego 5, St. Louis 3
San Francisco at L.A. Dodgers (n)
Today's Games
Houston (Myers 0-0) at Philadelphia
(Halladay 0-0), 1:05 p.m.
Pittsburgh~ (Correia 0-0) at Chicago

Cum ron (Kneym 0) at Colorado
N.Y. Mets (Pelfrey 0-0) at Florida
(johnson O-0), 7:10 p.m.
San Francisco (Sanchez 0-0) at L.A.
Dodgers (Billingsley 0-0), 10:10 p~m.
Saturday's Games
Atlanta atWashington, I:05 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Chicago Cubs, 1:05 p.m.
San Diego at St. Louis, 4:I[O p.m.
San Francisco at L.A. Dodgers,

40H mston at Philadelphia, 7:05 p.m.

v. et eat Fcora 71 .p.m.


W L Pct
City 20 10 .667
ota 20 12 .625
20 14 .588
geles 18 13 .581
16 13 .552
o16 14 .533
nd 15 14 .517
Bay 15 14 .517
,re 15 15 .500
,rk' 13 15 .464
13 16 .448
14 19 .424
d 12 21 .364
oII 20 .355
NATIONAL LEAGUE
W L Pct
Incisco 23 12 .657
do 20 II .645
kee 19 II .633
lphia 21 14 .600
17 13 .567
lati 17 14 .548
ork 17 15 .531
Igon 1s u4 .sl?
15 15 .500
is 14 16 .467
eso 1 17 -433
o14 19 .424
geles 14 21 .400
rgh 12 21 .364
a 12 25 .324
,n II 24 .314


Kansas
Minnesl
Detroit
Los Anl
Seattle
Toronte
Clevela
Tampa
Baltimo
NewYo
Texas
Boston
Oakian
Chicage


San Fra
Colora
MIwau
Philade
Atlanta
Cincinn
New Y
Washn
Florida
St. Loui
san Dit
Chicag~
Los An;
Pittsbu
Arizon;
Housto


AUTO RACING

Race week

NASCAR
SPRINT CUP
Goody's Fast Relief 500
Site: Martinsville,Va.
Schedule: Today, practice (Speed,

10alfying (ped, n0 -l: 0 p.m.) a;::: ,
race, I p.m. (FOX, 12:30-5 p.m.).
Track: Martinsville Speedway (oval,
0.526 miles).
Race distance: 263 miles, 500 laps.
CAMPING WORLD TRUCKS
Kroger 250
Site: Martinsville,Va.

2-3:3 e e:) Sturd~ady, uaa fing ( 03e0-
I 1:30 a.m.), race, 2 p.m. (Speed, 1:30-
4:30 p.m.)
Track: Martinsville Speedway

Fa e i t L Rc e H3 m l s 5 a p .

NHRA Nationals
Site: LasVegas.
Schedule: Today, qualifying; Saturday,
qaifyn (ESP",2 7 pm); Sun~day, final

Track: The Strip at ILas Vegas Motor
Speedway

H OC KEY

NHL schedule

Today's Games
Phi aelpahia atLNeiwJrsay,7 p.m.


Colorado at Phoenix, 10 p.m.
Saturday's Games
Atlanta at Boston, I p.m.
Tampa Bay at Minnesota, 2 p.m.
Detroit at Nashville, 3 p.m.
Dallas at Los Angeles, 4p.m.
Toronto at Ottawa, 7 p.m.
Montreal at New Jersey, 7 p.m.
Caratina at N.Y Islanders, 7p.m.
Bufl t Wsigo, p m

Edamenn ata a ve, :0 m. n


Ishikawa, who at 19
already has nine wins on
the Japan Golf Tour, wgs
third on Japan's money
list last year with just over
$1.82 million.
He also has pledged
about $1,200 (100,000 yen)

to vybokr las H eled the

341 birdies, which would
amount to over $400,000.
Even in a sport driven by
charity, Ishikawa's gener-
osity caught the attention
of his colleagues.
"It's the most unbeliev-
able gesture ever, isn't it?"
Geoff Ogilvy said Friday.


that devastated his native
Japan, Ishikawa decided to
donate his entire tourna-
ment earnings this year
- plus a bonus for every
birdie he makes.-- toward
relief efforts.
"I dod't view this as pres-

l rein epderbfrem abuto i
vation for me," Ishikawa
said Friday in. an email to
The Associated Press. "I
always believe in myself,
but because I am playing
for the people of Japan,. I
feel like I will be playing
with a greater purpose this
year."


By DOUG FERGUSON
Associated Press

JACKSONVILLE Ryo
IShikawa fist made peo-
ple take notice because of
his golf. He won his ~first
Japan Golf Tour event'as a
m5yar-l mt~eatu ,7 won

laSt year became the first
player to shoot 58 on a
majOr tour.
His latest eye-opening
feat brought attention to
his heart.
Wanting to do his part
to help victims of the
earthquake and tsunami


ACROSS 40 Eyeball
im politely
Dake the sairs 41 Riviera sum-

Holiday song 42 Cousins
Lake near of "um"
Reno 43 Sock part
Dug 46 Tire markings
Henchman 48 Long-eared
Archimedes' hound
Shout 50 Xylophonist's
Maple Syrup need

bDs assers 54 SH dpeds anim
Ms. Thurman 56 Scariett's love
of "Bd: Cool" 57 Prose compo-
Business attire sition


23 Forkful
25 P.O. service
28 Godzilla's
favorite city
3() Mineral find .
31 ves, t~to vvette
32 Sporty truck
33 Caesar's man
35 Traffic no-no
(hyph.)
37 Awful
38 Premed class


11

12

13 1
15 1
16 r

18 1

19 '
21

22 1


Vaccine amts.
Circuit
one of the
Gershwins
Lack olvanity
Roquefort hue
Jazzy James
Chinese
Chairman


the Saturday session is
9. a.m. to 3 p.m. and
includes lunch attendees.
Cost is $40 per child,
or$35 p child if ther
are siblings attending.
Concessions will be
available both days.
For details, call Billy
Stephens at (352) 317-8053.



Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,

to ormfor odinrywors.


T-BAl.L

Coaches meeting

Set for Thursday

A T-ball coaches meeting
is 6:30 p.m. Thursday.
For details, call Heyward
Christie at 754-3607.

MFrom staff reports

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek


15 Enjoy the rink
17 Move abroad
19 Sales rep's
goal
20 Went two-
wheeling
22 Pencil end
24 Grounded bird
25 Scratchy
26 Rolls tightly
27 Sup well
29 Biologist's
OggS
34 Torpid
36 Musses up
39 Gridiron unit
43 Ski lift (hyph.)
44 Vow
45 Salinger hero-
ine
46 Nomad's
dwelling

S9Gr bbed a

51 Deiiunits
52 Historical peri-

53 Sottish river


4
S5
6
7


then Play Sports,
presents the 2011 Football
Camp on April 8-9 at First
Baptist Church of High
Springs. The Friday
session is 5-8:30 p.m., while


to frrtahne utrhpeisrcle letter
suggested by the above cartoon,


(Answers tomorrow)
Yeteda's Jumbles: CLIFF PLUMB GALLON ACROSS
Answer: The architect who designed the skyscraper
had these BIG PLANS


4-1 @ 2011 by UFS, Inc.


SCOREBOARD


TE REVISION

TVSportS
Today
AUTO RACING
I2:30 p.m.
SPEED NASCAR. Sprint Cup,
practice for Goody's Fast Relief 500, at
MartinsvilleVa.
2 p.m-
SPEED NASCARTruck Series, final
practice for Kroger 250, at Martinsville,
Va.
3:30 p.m.
SPEED NASCAR, Sprint Cup,
"Happy Hour Series," final practice for
Goody's Fast Relief 500, at Martinsville,
Va.
BOXING
9 p.m.
ESPN2 Lightweights, Hank Lundy
(19-1-1) vs. Patrick Lopez. (20-3-0), at
Mashantucket, Conn.
GOLF
II am.
TGC Europeaq PGA Tour,Trophee
Hassan II, second round, at Agadir.
Morocco
Noon
TGC LPGA, Kraft Nabisco
Championship, second round, part I, at
Rancho Mirage, Calif
3 p.m.
TGC PGA Tour, Houston Open,
second round, at Humble,Texas
6:30 p.m.
TGC LPGA, Kraft Nabisco
Championship, second round, part II, a
Rancho Mirage, Calif
12:30 a~m.
TGC Champions Tour, Mississippi
Gulf Resort Classic, first round, at Saucier.
Miss. (delayed tape)
MAjOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
I p.m.
ESPN Houston at Philadelphia
2:10 pm.m'
WGN -Pittsburgh at Chicago Cubs
4 p~m.
ESPN Boston at Texas
NBA BASKETBALL
8 p~m.
ESPN Boston at Atlanta*
10:30 p.m.
ESPN L.A. Lakers at Utah
PREP BASKETBALL
3:30 p~m.
boE' NZfni e isl ational Invitational,
5:30 p.m.
ESPN2 Rise National Invitational,
boys' semifinal, at Bethesda, Md.
TENNIS
I p.m.
ESPN2 ATP/WTA Tour, Sony
Ericsson Open, men's semifinal, at Key
Biscayne 7pm.

ESPN2 ATP/WTA Tour, Sony
Ericsson Open, men's semifiibal, at Key
Biscayne

BASKETBALL

NBA schedule


Milwaukee dt IdiaGa pm. I
Charlotte at Orlando, 7 p.m.
New Jersey at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Cleveland atWakhington, 7p.m.
hc~aigo at eoiS 7 30 p.m.
Memphis at New Orleans, 8 p.m.
Boston at Atlanta, 8p.m.
San Antonio at Houston, 8:30 p.m.
L.A Clippers at Phoenrx nd .m.

Devr tSacra en Ipm.

Saturday's Games
Tronto a Chicago,hsm..m.

Philadelphia at Milwaukee, 8:30 p.m.
Dallas at Golden State, 10:30 p.m.
Oklahoma City at L.A. Clippers,
10:30 p.m.

NCAA Final Four

At Reliant Stadium, Houston
National s finals


BRIEFS


DOWN


YOUTH 1BASEBAllU

Lake City 13-15

registration set
Iake City Babe Ruth
Baseball has registration
for ages 13-15 at 7 p.m.
Monday at Southside
Sports Complex.
For details, call Tad
Cervantes at 365-4810.

CHS ~FOOTBAll

Q-back Club
meetings set

The Columbia County
Quarterback Club has ~
meetings set for 6 p.m.
April 11 and April 25 at
Jones Fieldhouse.
For detail, call Blake
Lundy at 867-0296.


8 Electrical units,
once
9 Exercises done
on a mat
10 ;Trickle
14 Beat soundly


FORT WHITE FOOTBALL EFRUES

Football camp ''

offered April 8-9
The Fort White OLNEDO
Quarterback Club, in
conjunction with Prtay












BASEBALL: Cold temperatures a theme for MLB's opening day games
Continued From Page 1B


ASSOCIATED PRESS
COMOeCtiCUt'S Alex Oriakhi speaks before a practice session for a men's NCAA Final Four
semifinal college basketball game Thursday in Houston. UConn plays Kentucky on Saturday.



FINAL 4: Kentucky leads appearances


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS FRIDAY, APRIL 1, 2011


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


No surprise, Dodger
Stadium made for the most
picturesque setting. It was
sunny, with temperatures
in the 80s as Tim Lincecum
and the World Series cham-
pion San Francisco Giants
got ready to play their old
rivals.
Baseball has tried in
the past to avoid inclem-
ent conditions on opening
day, occasionally beginning
with most of the games on
the West Coast and in the
South, along with playing
in places that had domes.
That didn't satisfy every-
one, though.
"You can't every year
open up in Anaheim or IA
or San Diego, or nobody
would ever get the fist
game of the year. You've
got to mix it up. I'm fine
with that," said Padres
,manager Bud Black, whiosEi
~teami started Thursday in
St. Louis.
Quite a change from th~e
sun-baked fields of spring
training in Arizona and
Florida.
"Opening day, you don't
feel the weather because
you're too excited. Opening
d~ay hasn't been cold in the
past," .Royals designated
hitter Billy Butler said. "It's
the next few days after that
when it gets really cold."


hats for players in the New
York clubhouse. It was 42
degrees and misty for the
first-ever March game in
the Bronx.
Rapper Jay-Z bundled up
with his version of a "ball-
parka" hoodie and coat
- and there were pock-
ets of empty seats as the
Detroit Tigers took on the
Yankees. Derek Jeter blew
on his hands in the batter's
box, even though he already
had batting gloves,
The concession Stand
that seemed to be doing the
best business at Kauffman
Stadium in Kansas City was
Sheridan's hot chocolate.
Fans bundled against the
chill, lined up five-deep,
before the Royals hosted
the Los Angeles Angels.
Mark Allred, a retired
electrician from Kansas
City, Mo., sat on the first-
base side about 15 rOWS
from the field. The forecast
called for highs around 50,
with a 50 percent chance of
rain and light winds.
"It's too bad we don't
have a nice day for this.
It's always such an excit-
ing time," Allred said. "Fans
like me have been looking
forward to baseball all the
long winter and now it.still
feels like winter. But I don't
really care. Bring on the


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Atlanta Braves Jason Heyward (right) gets congrats from catcher Brian McCann after his solo home run in the second inning
of their opening day baseball game with the Washington Nationals on Thursday in Washington.


possible.
"It's all mental," Baker
said. "Sometimes it really
is cold. You've got to fool
yourself."
The Brewers didn't seem
to mind. Rickie Weeks
and Carlos Gomez led off
Milwaukee's season with


home runs, -the first time
a team had done that since
1969, when Pete Rose and
Bobby Tolan did it for the
Reds. ,
There were six op~en-
ers Thursday, including
games at St. 10uis and Los
Angles.


fist pitch!"
It was 41 degrees for the
first pitch at GreatAmerican
Ball Park in. Cincinnati
- better than the previous
day, when the Milwaukee
Brewers and Reds worked
out in the snow.
Reds pitcher Edinson


Volquez warmed up' wear-
ing a red-hooded sweat
shirt and players took bat-
ting practice in stocking
caps.
Reds manager Dusty
Baiker said the trick for
players was to ignore the
temperature as much as


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Members of the. Wolves are: Jordan Coppock (front row, from left), Roger Cray,
Tamarick Vanover, Darrell Jones, coach Mordell Jackson (back row, from left), Kelvin Jonas,
Jamarea Frierson, Wayne Broom, Terrivio Williams, Lonnie Underwood, and Columbia
County Recreation Department Director Mario Coppock. Not pictured are Alexis Ortiz,
Dariun Dallas, and Marcus Weston.


Continued From Page 1B

to reach the Final Four
sitice 1972 (Bob Knight, 32-
4-29).
3 Number of.No. 11
seeds to reach the Final
Four: LSU in 1986, George
Mason in 2006, VCU this
year.
5 NCAA tournament
games won by VCU, most
ever to reach the Final
Four.
14 Final Four appear-
ances by Kentucky, eight
more than the other three
teams combined.
19 Games decided by
three points or fewer in this
year's NCAA tournament,
tied for second behind the
24 in 1990 for ~most since
the field expanded to 64
teams.
26 Combined seeds
of Connecticut (three),
Kentucky (four), Butler
(eight) and VCU (11), high-
est in Final Four history.
The previous high was 22

in 000 Games played by
VCU and Connecticut (once
they play Saturday), match-
ing the modern-day (since
1948) record, set seven pre-
vious times.

One-man shows

UConn's Kemba Walker
has put on a virtuoso per-
formance, not just in the
NCAA tournament, but
also in the Big East tourna-
ment. He may be a slender
6 feet 1, but he has carried
the Huskies through nine
straight elimination games.
In honor of his play, here
are afew other impressive
one-man shows through the
years:
Stephen Curry, Davidson,
2008. The king of mid-major
mayhem.
Danny Manning, Kansas,
1988. The Jayhawks were


known as Danny and
the Miracles, but they
might be considered The
Untouchables when if
comes to one leading the
many in NCAA tournament
history.
Larry Bird, Indiana State,
1979. Larry Legend could
have led Moe and Curly to
the title game the way he
was playing.
Bill Bradley, Princeton,
1965. Led the unheralded
Tigers to the Final Four,
set an NCAA tournament
record with 58 points
against Wichita State in the
third-place game.
Bill Walton, UCIA, 1973.
Big Red had some help but
was as dominating as per-
haps anyone in NCAA tour-
nament history, capping it
with 44 points in the title
game.
JerryWest, WestVirginia,
1959. He set an NCAA tour-
nament record while aver-
0gng32 points un nteoe
into the title game against
California.
Lew Alcindor, UCLA,
1967. The man who would
later become Kareem
helped the Bruins set a
tournament record for
average margin of victory
on their way to 10 straight
Final Four wins.
Bill Russell, San
Francisco, 1956. Twenty-six
points, 27' rebounds in the
title game alone.
Austin Carr, Notre Dame.
1970. Just three games,
but went for 61, 52 and 45.
Nice.

Did you know?
Butler is the first Division
I school ~from Indiana to
reach consecutive Final
Fours. Five-time national
champion Indiana, Purdue


and' Notre Dame had neyer
done it.
Kentucky coach John
Calipari joins Rick Pitino
as the only coaches to lead
three different schools to
the Final Four. Calipari also
took Massachusetts and
Memphis, while Pitino did it
with Providence, Kentucky
and Louisville.
The Horizon League
(Butler 2010-11) joins the
Big West (UNLV 1990-91),
Missouri Valley (Cincinnati
1961-62) and West Coast
(San Francisco 1955-56)
conferences as the only
non-BCS conferences to
,send a member to consecu-
tive Final Fours.
All four of UConn's Final
Four appearances (1999,
2004, 2009, 2011) have gone
through the NCAA tourna-
ment's West regional.
Butler is one of nine
teams to reach the Final
Four a year after losing in

ig nio Sat. le9 2)el Noth
Carolitia (1969), North
Carohina (1982), Houston
(1984), Duke (1991),
Michigan (1993), Kentucky
(1998) and Michigan State
(2010).
UConn's men's and wom-
en's teams have reached
the Final Four in the same
season for the third time.
Only six other schools have
done it, none more than
once.
This year's tournament
marks the first time since
1983 that the Final Four
teams have winning streaks
of at least five games.
This year's schools have
streaks of 13 (Butler),
nine (Connecticut), nine
(Kentucky) and five (VCU).
In 1983, Houston had won
25 straight, Louisville 16,
North Carolina State eight
and Georgia seven.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Members of the Tigers are Jordan Smith (front row, from left), D'Angelo Perry,
Dedrick Vanover, Darrion Jones, coaches Der~rick Anders and Demario Merrick,
Derius Anders, Derontae Jordan, Kaylon Jonas, Bobby Fulton and Columbia County
Recreation Department Director Mario Coppock. Not pictured are Derontay Levy, Tray Miller,
Marcel Bell, and Quantrell Levell.


SHOOTOUT: Teams ready-to compete
Continued From Page 1B


him and Mardell Jackson,
who coaches the 8th grad-
ers and Demario Merrick,
who coaches the Tigers."
Coppock is a big propo-
nent of the yduth programs
as a way to mold young
men.
"It's important in the
development of being a
well-rounded young man
emotionally, physically and
spiritually," he said.
Jackson expects his
Wolves to compete in the
tournament, but he will
be without,what he calls
one of his best players as
Kevin Jonas won't be able
to make the trip. He does
believe that he has a team
more than capable of mak-
ing a run, however, as the
Wolves have depth,


"Most of these kids come
from the middle school,"
Jackson said. "I've been
talking to Roger Cray and
told him he'll have to step
up and be more selfish with
the ball. Wayne Broom, as
far as a leader, he's defi-
nitely our leader on the
court. He's very emotional
a verbal, like a coach on the
floor." -
It's more than about just
winning for the Wolves'
coach, however, as Jackson
wants this experience to
help in the development for
the future.
"I hope it's a learn-
ing experience," he said.
"Everyone will lIlay some,
and we'll get to go against
bigger areas. But, I'm pret-
ty sure we can compete


with the best."
Merrick is hoping for the
same from his Tigers and
thinks they have what it
takes to make an impres-
sive showing.
"W~e want to go down,
compete and hope to win,"
he said. "We have big
expectations."
Merrick believes his
team is well-rounded
enough to do just that.
"Deronte Levy is an all-
around player and great
scorer," he said. "Dedrick
Vanover is our backbone
and team captain. Quantrell
Levell is a great inside
score, who gets a lot of
rebounds. Then there's
Deronta JTordan, who's our
leading scorer and aver-
ages a double-double."





BLONDE
ACCORDING TO THIS ARTICLE, THE WHAT?! YOU CALM DOWN, i PLL SET IT' 5 ACTUALLY, IT'S
AVERAGE WIFE HAS THREE SECRETS ACTUALLY HAVE HONEY...I'M MORE LIKE CLOSER TO
HER HUBAND NOWS HRES SECRETS I ONLY TEASING 4 OR 5, 10 OR 12
NOTHING Asour~jc THROATL s NwOUT N o sn




~- a...-
,' '


CELEBRITY CIPHER

by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: Z equals M
"DT UIOJXGPR MA EGJRGN, IDTLR
OGX AMMWR GTX SJRUJNR. TMF
TJUFMNI KNJRDXJTUR OGYJ


LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE &1 COMICS FRIDAY, APRIL 1, 2011


Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415


DILBERT


IFORNIA DREAMIN'
DEAR CALIFORNIA
DREAMIN': What a coinci-
dence! I had that very same
dream last night. Your grand-
mother sure gets around.
DEAR ABBY: I hate
bothering you because I
know you're busy, but I have
been getting the runaround
from my TV provider. I have
asked them repeatedly to
send someone over to ~fix my
set, but they keep saying it
can be fixed by remote con-
trol. I've got a black screen
and it just doesn't work.
Can you come over to fix
it? MISSING JERRY
SPRINGER IN PYITS-
BURGH
DEAR MISSING .TER-'
RY: I help people solve
relationship problems, but
the one you're having with
your TV set does not qualify.
Sorry.
DEAR AlBEY: I prefer to
sleep facing in; my husband
prefers to sleep facing out.
My problem is when he's
gassy which is often it
puts me "in the line of fire."
We've talked about how to
deal with this problem, but
haven't been able to come
up with a solution. Any sug-
gestions? GAS TAXED
IN NEWARK, DEL.
j Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


DEAR READERS: It's
April 1, the day I get to share
some of the occasional let-
ters I receive from folks who
are pulling my leg. Read on:
DEAR ABBY: My wife
of 23 years is threatening to
divorce me on the grounds
that I'm "unreasonable." Is
it unreasonable for me to
attempt to keep my socks
oriented to the proper feet?
When I put my socks on the
wrong feet, I run around in
circles and become disori-
ented. I know women don't
have this. problem because
the wear pantyhose so
it's impossible to put them
on the wrong feet.
I sewed a bit of red yarn
on the tops of my right
socks so I could keep them
straight. My wife says I'm
crazy, but I insist, "Right on
right; left on left."
So tell me, Abby must
I run in stupid circles and
endure moments of disori-
entation and, embarrass-
ment? Or should I forgo the
red yarn and hang in there
with my wife to preserve our
marriage? DISTURBED
KENTUCKY MAN
DEAR DISITJRBED
KENTUCKY MAN: And
a happy April Fools' Day to
you, too. The red yarn is pref-
erable to the yarn you have
spun for me. (Its also pref-
erable to running in circles
like a decapitated chicken.)


BABY BLUES


WUY Do PAeENS WbN TO aw-
BVEeY 6MAE 60Oe\ 6 AND 69511-
n\F(TUNGTWS Bo0d 6 NTo PGAME?



I I


ll~b-

Abigail Van Buren
www.deorabby.com
And you're mistaken about
women's pantyhose. Ask any
woman who has put hers on
backward.
DEAR ABBY: I'm con~
cerned about my youngest
son, "Sammy." From the mo-
ment he gets up each day
until the time he retires at
night, he' spends almost the
entire time playing mn the
sandbox in our backyard.
My wife and I are alarmed
by his bizarre behavior,
and incidentally, .so is his
wife. What should we do?
- WORRIED DAD IN
GEORGIA
DEARWORRIED DAD:
Be sure to brush him off if
he ever runs a marathon to
prevent diaper rash.
DEAR ABBY: Lately I've
been having some strange
dreams. I cannot explain how
I come up with this stuff. The
other night I had a doozy:
whips, chains, whistles, -yo-
yos mircu metes, wo dc
and my grandmother riding
by on a bicycle giving me the
finger. Please advise. CAL-


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGAR THE HORRIBLE


ARIES (March 21-
April 19): Share your ideas
and plans for the future.
You will receive additional
options that will increase
your chance of bemng suc-
cessful. Your attitude will
help create greater interest
and give you a better view
of what you can expect in
the future. AAA
TAURUS (April 20-
May 20): Focus on your
personal life and.your emo-
tional well-being. You will
discover something that
eases your stress and en-
sures you will be at your
best when it counts. Make
changes to your image and
outlook to better suit your
lifestyle. AAAA
GEMINI (May 21-
June 20): Don't let what
other people do bother you.
A last-minute change wiH
work in your favor. You'll
have the discipline to finish
what you start and make
an impression on, someone
who can help you advance,

CANCER (June 21-
July 22): Put more time
and effort into your per-
sonal life and relationships
where you will receive
greater appreciation for the
little thiings you say and do.
You can expect co-workers
to be competitive and un-
derhanded. -kAAAA
LEO (July 23-Aug.
22): Travel, visit friends,


TI-E LAST WORD
Eu enia Last

colleagues or an expert
mn something you want to
find out more about. Get-
ting back to old hobbies or
interests will have an im-
pact on your ability to earn
more cash. A geographi-
cal change will spark your
imagination. -kA
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Put love first..How you
relate to others will have
a lasting effect on the way
you approach people in the
future. Make the first move
and offer something that
means a lot to you to som -
one you love. Use your
charm and honesty. -rt*
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): Don't let indecision
depress you. If you are hv-
ing trouble making up your
mind, rely on your intu-
ition. Much can be resolved
if you open up discussions
with someone you are in
partnership with or would
like to be with. *** .
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-
Nov. 21): Plan to have
some fun. The stress you've
been living with needs an
outlet and, no matter what
else is going on in your life,
spending time with some-
one who makes you laugh
or inspires you should be
your plan. Love is looking
good. AAAAA


SAGYITTARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): You can
make some interesting
changes to your home that
will please anyone who lives
with you. Be careful not to
upset a friend or neighbor
in the process. A problem
will develop in the romance
department if you are eva-
sive. AA
CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): Compensate
for someone who tends to
exaggerate and you can
avoid a potentially costly
problem. Avoid traveling to
locations that have unrest.
You will face unexpected
opposition. If's best to focus
on home, family and love.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Get serious
about your future. Take
what you enjoy doing and
incorporate your skills into
a moneymaking endeavor
that subsidizes a project
you want to pursue. Hook-
ing up with an old business
partner will lead to greater
opportunities. AAA~
PISCES (Feb. 19-
March 20): Follow your
heart and pursue your
dreams, hopes and wishes.
Talk to people behind the
scenes who can offer you
suggyestioris and wisdom
in your pursuit. Don't miss
out on a romantic oppor-
tunity because you are too
busy working. AAA


SNtJFFY SMITH


ZITS


B.C.


GTEOMNZJT."


UJX IMKKJW


PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "Baseball is not unlike war, and when you get right
down to it, we batters are the heavy artillery." Ty Cobb
(c) 2011 by NEA, Inc. 4-1


FOR BETTER ORWORSE

WHP~;IN-T~IS q ~ I BET7FIERE'S
CRSSEROL~MOP~ I MUSHROOMS II~
--\T~OOKSLIKE I ~~ERE-A~~'I~~
MUSHPDOMS
MUSHPOOMS Ir


CLASSIC PEANUTS


DSEAR ABBY


Man fears sock drawer mix-up

will doom him to run in circles


HOROSCOPES


F RAN K & E RN EST





t~i~l~






mi~m~-


Legal


10 Oopbportunities
25 TEMP Farmworkers needed
4/18/11 1/13/12. Workers will
seed, set, cut, house, & strip
tobacco; plant, cultivate & harvest
soybeans, comn & vegetables.
Random drug testing at employer's
expense. Guaranteed 3/4of
contract hours. Tools provided at
no cost. Free housing provided for
non-commuting workers.
Transportation & subsistence
reimbursed to worker upon
completion of 50% of contract, or
earlier. $9.48/hr. Worksites in
Logan & Todd Co KY. Report or
send a resume to nearest local FL
Agency of Workforce Innovation
office & reference job # KY
0421581. Coots Farms
1 Temporary Farm Worker
needed. Employer: Eric Smith -
Christian Co, KY. Row Crop
Production & Altemnative Work.
Employment Dates: 05/15/11~
12/01/11. Wage of $9.48/hr.
Worker guaranteed 3/4 of contract
hours. Tools provided at no
cost. Free housing provided to
non commuting workers
Transportation & subsistence
reimbursed when 50% of contract

ne tst O~np'Sp rCene an e
area and reference
Job Order # KYO423691.
Established 20 y co pany
seeking traveling s les rmpp. Gone
mon. Fi. C p8n 5g 6pa68s
ext 333. www.brechtpacific.com
Exp. Maintenance person needed.
No phone calls. Apply 4-6pm at
.Howard Johnson Inn and Suites.
3072 US Hwy 90
Experienced Breakfast
Grill Cook
Needed
386-867-4242
Experienced Heavy Duty
DieselaMeec dnc needed,

386-935-2773
Janitorial/Custodian. PT down-
town Lake City. Exp & ref 's req'd.
No crumnmal Record. Good Pay.
Nights/weekends 904-259-7700
Leave Message &r phone number
8 Temporary Farm Workers
needed. Employer: Jay Housden
dba Housden Farms Calloway
Co, KY. Tobacco Production &
AIternativ Iok. E nwymnt

guaranteed 3/4 of contract hours.
~Tools provided at, no cost
Free housing provided to
non commuting workers.
Transportation & subsistence
reimbursed when 50% of contract

1nse et O~ne tp hee in e u
riea and reference
Job Order # KYO423175. .
8 Temporary Farm Workers
needed. Employer: JTW Farms,
LLC Calloway Co, KY.
Tobacco Production &r Altemnative
Work. Employment Dates:
05/10/11 12/15/11. Wage of
$9.48/hr. Worker guaranteed 3/4
of contract hours. Tools provided
at no cost. Free housing provided
to non commuting workers.
'Transportation & subsistence
reimbursed when 50% of contract
is met. Apply for this job at the
nearest One Stop Center in your

Job Ore # K 0 237.
Local law office needs
experienced legal secretary.
Workers compensation, personal
injury and general legal matters
experience preferred. Immediate
emplloym n.1 u py ma p~e on at


Production Technician needed
must be over 21I/clean driving
record. On call wkends/after hrs
work. Fax resume 386-754-0263.
7 Temporary Farm Workers
needed. Employer: Rex Hix -
Allen Co, KY. Tobacco Produc-
tion & Alternative Work
E plo ment Dates: 05/16/11 -
m2/31/11. Wage of $9.48/hr
Worker guaranteed 3/4 of contract
hour Tools provided at no
cost. Free housing provided to
non commuting porkers.
.Transportation & subsistence
reimbursed when 50% of contract
is met. Apply for this job at the
nearest One Stop Center in your
area and reference
Job Order # KYO423580.
Sewing Machine Operator
with experience
good hourly rate
Call Hafners 386-755-6481
Wanted Highly motivated
individual for Sales Position.
Rountree -Moore Ford Lincoln
Mercury Great benefits, paid vaca-
tion. Elxp.ha plus b~u~tnot nec ssary.

WANTED LICENSED
Life and Health
Insurance Agent.
Call 386-755-6800

1 II Medica *
.1U Employment

04544185
CANCER CARE of North
Florida is currently seeking a
MEDICAL ASSISTANT for a
fast paced work environment
Requires HS Diploma and
excellent Phlebotomy skills with
certification
Intergy Experience and


excellent verbal/written
communication skills.
Qualified candidates please
email resume to:
jpapesh(al cancercarenorth
florida.com


120 loyment

0.5524650
LEARN TO DRAW BLOOD
Local Phlebotomy Course
offered in Lake City, FLA
Certificate program.
(904)566-1328

0552550




Physical Therapist
Home Health Care Agency
servicmng Lake City and
surrounding counties seeking
Full-time/PRN experienced
Physical Therapist
Please fax resume to
386-758-3313 attention:
Lynn or apply online at
almostfamily.com

05525503


^..i. i

Homecare RNs, LPNs, CNAs
and HHAs needed ASAP.
Full time and part time.
Call 352-291-4888 NOW

Direct Care Staff & Cooks
Lake City Cluster ICF for
Developmentally Disabled
3ess 7 wr sc ecom

Part Time
X-ray Technician,
Please email resume to
hr@toi-health.com


240 Scol&

04544098 .
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express 'Ragining offers
cur es for begi r 9& exp

next class-04/11/10

Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-04/11/11

Continuing education
Fee inl ok, sple, exam

expresstrainineservices.com



310 Pets &Supplies

FREE KITTEN
Litter'bok; trained
1386-e288-2899 A';~-

PUBLISHER'S NOTE

on aten g .odtdebqe t e dt g8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.
Your Male Cavalier, or
Cocker Spaniel to breed our
Cavalier King Charles Spaniel
386-755-6178 Hurry!


361 Farm Equipment

84 Ford 4610 Tractor. Runs good.
Solid 2WD. New front tires,
350hr on 2005 motor. Dependable.
$7500. obo. 386-867-0005


401 Antiques

CASH CASH CASH CASH
Pre 1964 Silver Coins, Sterling,
Flatware, Costume Jewelry,
Unusual Antiques 386-963-2621


402 ApplianceS


420 Wanted to Buy

Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$250 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.


430 Gar geSales

Big Sale! Sat only, 8am til ? Bran-
ford Hwy to Troy to Ascena to 200
SW Fulton Pl. Look for signs. An-
tiques, comics, clothes, & more!






ESTATE SALE
March 26-April 2
call for information
727-541-2173 or 386-456-8832
Fri & Sat, rain or shine, nice
things, no junk, some old some
new, must see to' appreciate. Go 47
S to approx 1 1/2 miles passed
Bingo Station to Broderick Dr,
4th house on right, follow signs.
HUMONGOUS SALE!! FROM
TOOLS TO TRIKETS, crafts,
ladies dress shoes (sz 6-7) apparel
sz small, med & large. 626 SW
Chapel Hill St off McFarlane.
~Multi Family Sale,Sat only,
clothes, kids toys and household

Mo kgir S, tfo1o ts gns







Rain bi Sihine Fri & Sat 7-4,
Household items, Prom dresses,
Nice Men/Women & Children's
clothing & shoes all sizes, elec-

CD's bcig BB ril,d prn Rd to
Bert St, to Nash Rd left on Nash
Rd see signs or Lake Jeffery to
Nash Rd continue on Nash to Carr
Rd see signs 386-755-3682
SAT 8-12, NO EARLY BIRDS
Knick-knacks, videos, deco iten s
472 SE Golf Club Ave, off of
Baya, past Country Club Rd
Sat only 7-2, corner of 90 W &
Sisters Welcome at Sherrod's
Sales, fumn, baby/kids clothes,
varieo s itse,a roese d
8 till ? Name brand clothes,
.shoes, household goods,
806 NW FaihyjDy ),"
440" i. n
ISCO Iielaeous

Large Light Oak Entertainmenit
Center, will hold atleast 40" TV

386-292-3927 or0386-755-5331
Pool Table-Beautiful, claw foot,
mahogany, leather pockets,
maroon cloth, pool sticks, balls,
plastic cover, and hard table top.
3 piece slate. $1295.00 752-1874
Tow Behind Grill/Smoker
$1,250 OBO.
386-249-3104 or
386-719-4802

463 ""imng,

ROOFING Are you bothered
b~y a leaking roof!
Call Reed Roofing today for a free
estimate.386-752-4072
RCC00455399 Insured
ROOFING:Looking to replace
your Roof? Call Reed Roofing
3 6 75 a072 R 05 99
References available


630 M~fobie Hme


AA0 J~b -
UVOpportumitie5
04544139




IMMEDIATE OPENING
Breakfast Attendant
Thursday thru Sunday
4:30am 11:30 am


Excellent Customer
Service Skills

450 SWAFloijdanG t tay Drive.
Lake City, FL 32024
NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE

04544160
NOW HIRING
Cashiers & Baggers for High
Springs fruit & gift stores.
Apply in Person at Florida
Citrus Center (Chevron)
18603 NW CR 236, High
Spig exit 404 & I-75

04544174
Anderson Columbia Co., Inc. is
a cepingC apkl c pon efor a

should include basic knowledge
of Payroll, federal tax deposits,
state withholding, garnishment
remittance and multi-state
filings. Applicants must have a
working knowledge of Word
and Excel. Accounting exp. a
plus You ma fax uour reume

You may also come in and fill
out an application at
871 Guerdon Rd, Lake City, FL.
Equal Employment
Opportunity Employer.

24 TEMP Farmworkers needed
5/2/11 12/24/11. Workers will
plant, cultivate, & harvest sweet
potatoes. Random drug testing at.
employer's expense. Guaranteed
3/4 of contract hours. Tools
provided at no cost. Free housing
prov dd for non-commuting
subsistence reimbursed to worker
upon completion of 50% of
contract, or earlier. $8.97/hr.
Worksites in Chickasaw &
Calhoun Co MS. Report or send a
resume to nearest local FL Agency
of Workforce Innovation office &
reference job # MS 30901.
Cane Creek Farm, Inc.
AVON!!!, EARN up to 50%!!!
Only $10 for Starter Kit,
1-800-275-9945 pin #4206
www.youravon.com/tdavies
6 Tepry Far Wok
neemepo ]%plann Wr: Brs
Forsee Owen Co, KY. Tobacco,
Straw/Hay, Greenhouse/Nursery &
Alternative Work. Employment
Dates: 05/21/11 02/15/12. Wage
of $9.48/h1r. Worker guaranteed
3/4 of contract hours. Tools
provided at no cost. Free housing
provided to non commuting
workers. Transportation &
subsistence reimbursed when
50% of contract is met. Apply for
this job at the nearest One Stop
Center in your area and reference
Job Order # KYO424300.
Cashiers needed, Experience
Preferred, Drug free workplace,
all applicants will be drug tested
Ellisville Exxon,
Hwy 441, No Phone Callls Please.
CDL A Flatbed/Van Truck
Driver needed for Fff OTR SE
area, 3 years exp or more, Contact
Melissa or Mary @ 386-935-2773


14 Wide, 2/2-$475. mo. + dep.
\Clean, Quiet Country Park
Water, septic, garbage incl. NO
PETS! 386-758-2280 References,
2&3 BR MH. $395 -$650. mo.
plus deposit. Water &r sewer fur-
nished. Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
3BR/2BA Doublewide on
2.5 secluded acres. $750 a ino.
1st month and full security.
Please call 386-965-7534.
A very clean & well maintained
2/2 units in nice park. $599.mo
w/$500. dep. Rent includes water,
sewer, trash p/u. Close to town
386-984-8448
Looking for a place to Rent.
Nice reasonable price.
Furnished Mobile Home.
386-623-0925or 386-752-4618
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake Cityi & Ft.
White Contact 386-623-3404
or 386-365-1919








640 Mobile Hoes


Palm Harbor Homes
Has 3 Modular Homes
Available at HUGE Savings
Over 40K Off
Call Toda~y! 800-622-2832

06 Homes of Merit. 3br/2ba. Open
floor plan w/1g kitchen. 3 Rivers
Estate. River access. MLS#75661
Eastside Village Realty. Denise
Milligaln-Bose. 386-752-5290


GE Frost-Free Refrigerator
White, works great
$200 obo ,
386-292-3927 or 386-755-5331

Kenmare0Dr rbapt size'

Runs good, $65
386-292-3927or 386-755-5331
Nice White Gas Tappan Stove
$145 Works Great!
3 6-2 2-3 7 or

White Whirlpool Washer
$150
386-292-3927 or
386-755-5331


407 ComputerS

HP Computer, .
$100.00
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170

,IBM Computer,
$65
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170


408 Furniture

Blue Race car toddler bed made
by little tykes, toddler mattress
included. Gentle used. Asking
$65.00. 386-292-4228


420 Wanted to Buy

K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwoqd &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961-


One Item per ad s5
-4 lines 6 days~: """"
c., . .. .


Gary D. Grunder
23349 Northwest CR 236, Suite 10
High Springs, Florida 32643
(386) 454-1298
Florida Bar I.D. 199486.
Personal Representative:
Js~e h EH A d ro
Ft. White, Florida 32038
04544080
Mrhl? 211

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA.
CIVIL DIVISION N.
12210CA000685XXXXXX
FEDERAL NATIONAL MORT-
GI E ASSOCIATION,
vs.

HEAL ; FLORD CREDIRL U
ION; UNKNOWN TENANT NO 1.
UNKNOWN TENANT NO 2; and
ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES
CLAIMING INTERESTS BY,
THROUGH, UNDER OR
AGAINST A NAMED DEFEND-
ANT TO THIS ACTION, OR HAV-
ING OR CLAIMING TO HAVE
ANY RIGHT, TITLE OR INTER-
EST INr THE PROPERTY HEREIN
DESCRIBED,
DefendantS
NOTICE OF SALE

NTTSUE 10 HRB IEl pur-
suant to an Order or Summary Final
Judgment of Foreclosure dated
March 23, 2011, and entered in Case
NO. 122010CA000685XXXXXX of
tbe Ccuit Courtnin and or Co u
ERAL NATIONAL MORTGAGE
ASSOCIATION is Plaintiff and


UNKNOWN TENANT NO 2; and
ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES
CLAIMING INTERESTS BY,
THROUGH, UNDER OR
AGAINST A NAMED DEFEND-
ANT TO THIS ACTION, OR HAV-
ING OR CLAIMING TO HAVE
ANY RIGHT, TITLE OR INTER-
EST IN THE PROPERTY HEREIN
DESCRIBED,, are Defendants, I will
sell to the highest and best bidder for
cash at on the Columbia County
Courthouse Steps of the Columbia
County Courthouse, 145 N. Hernan-
dto St eetmb LkeCCity Flonida 32055
11:00 a.m. on the 13th day of April,
2011, the following described prop-
erty as set forth in said Order or Fi-
nal Judgment, to-wit:
LOT 2, OF COUNTRY SIDE ES-
MAP ORACLCAOTRTDHREOFOASTRHE
CORDED IN PLAT BOOK 8, PA-
GES 1 AND 2, OF THE PUBLIC



H I 541



Home Improvements

Handicap accessible modifications
for veterans. 38 yrs experiences
386-752-4072 DON REED
CONSTRUCTION, INC
Licensed and insured CGCO36224

Lawn & Landscape Service

Clean Pine Straw,
You pick it up, $1.85 a bale
Delivery of 100 bales $285
386-688-9156

Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.


Classified Department: 755-5440


Legal

OF COLUMBIA
)RIDA.
CLAIMING AN IN-
HE SURPLUS FROM
IF ANY, OTHER
PROPERTYY OWNER
DATE OF THE LIS
UST FILE A CLAIM
DAYS AFTER THE

with the Americans
es Act of 1990, per-
,ecial accommodation
in this proceeding
the Clerk of the Court
ve business days prior
ing at the Columbia
house. Telephone 904-
1-800-955-8770 via
service.
ke City, Florida, on
,SON
cuit Court

,& DIAZ, P.A.
laintiff

:, FL 33339-1438


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR RECORDS
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA COUNTY, FLO
PROBATE DIVISION ANY PERSON
IN RE: ESTATE OF: TEREST IN TI
File Number: 2011-CP-58 THE SALE,
JONA L. ANDERSON a/k/a THAN THE P
JONA CAROLYN ANDERSON, AS OF THE 1
Deceased. PENDENS MI
NOTICE TO CREDITORS WITHIN 60 I
The administration of the estate of SALE.
Jona L. Anderson a/k/a Jona Carolyn In accordance
Anderson, deceased, whose date of with Disabiliti~
death was February 19, 2011, File sons needing sp
Number 2011-CP-58, is pending in to participate
the Circuit Court for Columbia should contact
County, Probate Division, the ad- not later than fi
dress of which is P.O. Box 2069, to the proceed
Lake City, Florida 32056. The County Courth~
names and addresses of the personal 758-1041 :or
representative and the personal rep- Florida Relay S
resentative's attorney are set forth DATED at La
below. March 23, 2011
All creditors of the decedent and oth- P. DEWITT CA
er persons having claims or demands As Clerk of Cirl
against decedent's estate on whom a By:/s/ B. Scippi
copy of this notice has been served As Deputy Cler
must file their claims with this court, SMITH, HIATT
WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE Attorneys for P
(3) MONTHS AFTER THE TIME PO BOX 11438
OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF Fort Lauderdale
THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY (30) 954-564-0071
DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF
SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS 05525490
NOTICE ON THEM. April 1,8, 2011
All other creditors of the decedent -
and other persons having claims or
mumt fe thi clarita ci tehnise ut 00A
WITHIN THREE (3) MONTHS AF-
TER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
P BIAION OF THI NOTIEH

FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE
WE~L BE FOREVER BARRED. a
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, 02 o
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) 02 Lo
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
THE DATE OF FIRST PUBLICA-
TONh 25F1 THIS NOTICE IS
Attorney for Personal Representa-


,One stem per ad 85J
411 lines 6 days |ii:' ~l'oj






One item per ad 7
4 lines 6 days~i'' t'~'
i-'~ ~ ~ ~ ~~~, i il-;i Il;~ii
r':


nouncements .









;t & Found


;4 linOS I 5 1
3 dayS'~ g



limited to service type advertis-
ing only
4 lines, one nionth....s92.00
$~10.80 each additional line
Includes an additional $2.00 per
ad for each Wednesday insertion.



Iou can call us at 755-5440,
~onday through Friday from 8:00
t.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Some people prefer to place their
classified ads in person, and some
~d cate ories will requr pa-
hent. Our offc is lcute dpa a8y0
East Duval Street.
You can also fax or email your ad
copy to the Reporter.
FAX: 386-752-9400 Please
direct your copy to the Classified
Department
EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityre-
porter.com





AdistoAppear: Cali by: Fax/Emallby:
Ted~ay Mn 1: am o. 0 a.
Thursday Wed., 10:00 a.m. Wed., 9:00 a.m.
Friday WThr., 10:00 a.m. Thur., 9:00 a.m.
Satuday F hrs.,10:00a.m. Fhri.,9:00a.m.
Sunday Fri., 10:00 a.m. Fri., 9:00 a.m.
These deadlutes are subject to change without notice




Ad I-rrors- Please read your ad
on the first day of publication.
Wie accept responsibility for only
the first incorrect insertion, and
only the charge for the ad space
in error. Please call 755-5440
immediately for prompt correc-
tion and billing adjustments.
Cancellations- Normal advertising
deadlines apply for cancellation.
BillingInguiries- Call 755-5440.
Should further information be
required regarding payments or
credit limits, your call will be trans-
ferred to the accounting depart-
ment.


Advertising copy is subject to
approval by the Publisher who
reserves the right to edit, reject'
or classify all advertisements under
appropriate headings. Copy should
be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the first day of pub-
lication. Credit for published errors
will be allowed for the first insertion
for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the
Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nor for any general,
speciall or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply
with Federal,, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
hation in employment, housing and
public accommodations. Standard
~bbreviations .are acceptable; how.
gver, the first word of each ad may
not be abbreviated.

PC I I


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED FRIDAY, APRIL 1, 2011

Lakte City Reporter


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

755-5440


ADvantage













750 "otlR"Tetas
1800 SQ FT $1100. Office
furniture available and
cubicle dividers.Water,
sewer and garbage fees included.
386-752-4072 Ready to move in!
OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$695. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor
SE Baya Ave Office Furnished
1800 Sq Ft $1125.00
Ideal for Engineers & Professional
Quiet and safe environment
Security available 386-752-4072

7 Vacation Rentals

Horseshoe Beach Spring Special
uf Front 2kber, dw/l34p50h, to '

(352)498-5986/386-235-3633
alwaysonvacation.com #419-181

805 Lots forSale

1999 3/2 DWMH on 1 ac
$55,000 ,
Hallmark Real Estate
386-867-1613
Call Jay Se ars
2 ac lot in River Access
community. Suwanne ~River
1 mile away. Owner will finance.
$13,500 Hallmark Real Estate
386-867-1613 Call Jay Sears
Emerald Cove S/D, Lot # 19
Half acre lot, Only $42,000
call Millard Gillen @
386-365-7001 MLS# 75278
westfieldrealtygroup.com
High & Dry buildable, wooded in
Forest Country. MLS#76668
Eastside Village Realty, Inc.
Call Denise Milligan-Bose
386-752-5290
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or disonmmiatiorrbased

disabiH ty fmlac rtatrset r axtion-
al origin; or any intention to make
such~preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This

ac et ay adwe n foi rw al s-


tised i ti nesape ar va-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669v9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

8 0 Home for Sale

2/1 completely updated, screened
back porch, large utility room,
MLS#77413 $59,888 Call Nancy
@ R.E.O. Realty 386-867-1271
nancytrogers@msn.com
2/2 + Bonus Room, 1749sf, 4 acre
corner lot, board fenced, det
garage/wkshp MLS#74900
$214,900 Call Pam @ Remax
386-303-2505 www.visitpam.com
2/2 -2 story, 9.7 ac. fenced & cross
fenced w/pastures. Oversized LR,
separate dinmng, 1g den. Workshop,
carport. 386-752-6575 $179,900.
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
2/3 on 5 acres, wrap around porch,
family rm w/fireplace, detached
garage, $179,900 MLS# 77005
call Roger Lovelady @
Westfield Realty 386-365-7039
2BR/2BA singlewide mfg home
on 1.7-ac coern Do; ge adL g

CRAPPS AGENCY, INC. 755-
5110 #75864
3/2 Brick Home in town, fenced
$ac 8 ar xnlc2 wr so
Realty 386-867-1271MLS# 77414
nancytrogers@msn.com
3/2 Cute Home, Remodeled, on 2
acres, partially fenced $114,900
MLS# 77396 Call Nancy @R.E.O.
Realty Group 386-867-1271,
nancytrogers@msn.com
3/2 on Country, Woodsy, 5 acres,
Owner Financing Low Down, Low
Qualifying, Quick Estate, Family
InnxiousC Lw2 -TITesd73
or 386-362-6293
3/3 Brick. Great location, pond.
('ustom built w/Florida room &
vaulted ceiling. Workshop. MLS
75222 $179,900 386-867-1613
Jay Sears Hallmark Real Estate
3Bedrm/3bth w/2 Master Suites,
fenced back yard,fireplace
MLS#76779, $115,000
Call Missy Zecher @ 386-623-
0237 www.missyzecher.com


810 Home for Sale

4/2 on 10.5 acres w/ detached
garage, patio, above ground pool,
MLS# 77410 $189,888 Call -
Nancy Rogers@ R.E.O. Realty
386-867-1271
67.5 Acre Ranch w/MH, fenced
& cross fenced, wkshop, pole barn,
2 ponds, Spacious MLS# 75607
Asking 299K, Call Patti Taylor @
386-623-6896 Access Realty
95 Acre Estate, 4/3 Farm House,
Pond, Oaks, $689,000,
MLS#76149 Call Charlie Sparks
@ Westfield Realty 386-755-0808
westfieldrealtygroup.com
A quiet neighborhood is the
perfect setting for this cute, cozy
home. Lg back yard w/I` car

Cen uryg2~n wDrby p. r0Co.
Beautiful Home w/custom
cabinets, 10ft ceilings, $199,900
MLS# 77188 Call
Carrie Cason @.386-623-2806
westfieldrealtygroup.com
Brick Home in Established S/D,
3/2, Open floor plan, MLS#76121
$134,900 Call Missy Zecher @
386-623-0237 Remax
wwwi.missyzechercom
CBC 3/1 home, inside city limits, -
fenced backyard, detached carport
w/office MLS#77411 $84,900
Call R.E.O.Realty,
Nancy Rogers @ 386-867-1271
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Brick, split plan. Woodcrest S/D.
Screened porch, dining, living &
breakfast area.Lg backyard. Elaine
K. Tolar 386-755-6488 $139,900.
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Brick, 10 ac 3/2 split floor plan. FI
room, Ig utility, scr porch. Gazebo,
carport, fenced. $149,900. Lori
Geibeig Simpson 386-365-5678
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
New home, May Fair. Great area.
Corner lot. 4 bedroom, lots of tile,
covered porch. Split plan$214,900.
Elaine K. Tolar 386-755-6488
Coldvvell Banker/Bishop Realty
4br/2ba on 5 ac. Lg family, Florida
room den or office. Covered patio. .
23x30 workshop. $229,900. Lon
Geibeig Simpson. 386-365-5678 -
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
3/2 Hardwood, separate office/liv-
ing/family rm. Workshop, fenced
Lori Geibeig Simpson 386-365-
5678 Mary Whitehurst 965-0887

Icdkwell B nker/NBishop Reailty



Colonial 4/3 + Guest House,
9.95 acres, inground pool, detach-
ed/garage, gate entry,MLS#77386
$325K Call Pam Beauchamp @
386-303-2505 Remax
.Corner lot in Piccadilly S/D. Huge
oivn tdinng room. 1e pint

Cetur 32816 5e2 7ab54R1 ds Co.
CUSTOM 4/2 scrn porch, 16x24
workshop w/ele & water, gazebo,
fireplace, ceramic tile/wood floors.
386-752-6575 $189,900
Century 21/The Darby Rogers. Co
Custom, 3/2.5 built in 2007,
on 10.8 manicured acres,
completely fenced, Owner Fin.
avail., MLS#77382 Call Patti
386-623-6896 Access Realty
EASTSIDE VILLAGE! Owner
motivated! 3BR/2BA has large liv-
ing/dining.rm combo $62,000
#77266 DANIEL CR APPS
AGENCY, INC. 755-5110
Family Home in Subdivision
4 bdrm Lots of space, newer
roof/c ret MLS#76283 Call
Missy Zecher @ 386-623-0237
Remax, www.missyzecher.com
GREAT STARTER HOME!
3BR/2BA in Quail Ridge with
back patio, luscious lawn $84,900


Large Bnc, 3/1, .1453 ar metal
Caol Nancy Ro ers @ 386-867-
1271 R.E.Oo Reakty Group, Inc.

Lg home on corner lot w/oversized
garage. Eastside Retirement
Village. Heated Pool & clubhouse.
MLS# 71901 386-752-5290
Eastside Village Realty, Inc.
LIKE NEW! 3BR/2BA mfg home
near Wellbr o n + acres ONLY

AGENCY, INC. 755-5110 #76768
Log Home, Cypress Beams,
whole house generator, $269,900
MLS# 76899 Call
Roger Lovelady @386-365-7039
westfieldrealtygroup.com
NEW FLOORING-FRESH
PAINT! 2-story 3br/2ba on 1+ ac,
Ig kitchen, family rm, fenced pond
$99,900 #75951 Daniel Crapps
Agency, Inc. 755-5110


810 Home for Sale
Nice solid brick home on 5 acres,
Country feel but close to Town.
MLS 76063 $129,888 Call
Brittany Stoeckert Results Realty
386-397-3473
Nice, large 4/2 on I acre
w/florida room, granite floors,
wrap around front porch, $148,000
Call Brittany Stoeckert @
Results Realty 386-397-3473
Owners Motivated! Multiple
dwellings. Main house and 2 mo-
bile homes Pecans, cedar & aza-
leas. $199,900. Century 21/The
Darby Rogers Co. 386-752-6575
Premier Lifestyle Community
The Preserve at Laurel Lake,
4/2, $194,900 MLS# 77257 Call
Scott Stewart @ 386-867-3498
westfieldrealtygroup.com

Qup I s 5s rnme lowt oc
2BR/1BA, screened back porch,
$29,900 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY, INC 755-5110 #77505
Qualified General Contractor
doing top Quality work!
386-752-4072 Licensed and.
Insured CGCO36224
Don Reed Construction, Inc.
Reduced in Rose Creek S/D, 5/4
on 2.2 acres, close to town
MLS#75485 $274,900 Call Pam
@ Remax 386-303-2505
www.visitpam.com
Secluded, however close to town,
3/2 Brick Ranch Home, spacious
$198,900 MLS# 74415 Call
Charlie Sparks @ 386-755-0808
westfieldrealtygroup.com
Solid home, needs updating. Nice
yard & workshop/garage! Country
kitchen w/eat in area as well as
formal. 386-752-6575 $70,000
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
Totally Refurbished 2/2
w/workshop on 1.25 fenced acres
$94,900 Call Millard Gillen @
Westfield Realty 386-365-7001
MLS#75417
STwo story MH, located in
Wellborn on 2.66 acres, porches
and fireplaces, 9 bdrms/312ths
$163,900 Pat ITa 18or MLS87916594
Access Raty ?66369
W411Maintained 3/2 on 1.5
acres, fenced, porches, wkshp,
$49,900 MLS# 77309 Call Josh
Grecian 386-466-2517
westfieldrealtygroup.com


820 'Aarasg S


10 Sc 7e,500, ak 0Ace $39n sO
$6,975 P/A, Fine Neighborhood,
3 miles W of Col. City School,
Owner Fin 5%, Rolling Pasture
386-752-1364 or 965-4340

10acd ls, ome w/\tell, seprti pwr


4 1/2Gacre kdt. Lake Jeffedry Road.

Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$69,900. $613mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinaricinrr.com

4ns & ld, Beui 11l woe d
w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down, $39,900, $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
5 WOODED acres.
Suwanee Ranchettes. $200 per mo
for 5 me. Then $203.85 per mo
thereafter. (352)472-2879
Outdoorsman Special, near
Itchetucknee Springs St Park,
Owner fin. w/20% dn,
$54,900 MLS# 76366
Brodie Alfred 386-487-1484

8 Commercial
Property
1525 S OHIO AVE,
LIVE OAK, FL

mn eosi iITies. Gr at eo athon!
1,ea Visi ility Gea PriS w-
art for more info. 386-867-3498

Gre~a Investm ntOwner F nance
Cretv t ers owe bfl xibl


JR IVesiment

Investment Property, 2 MH's on
almost 2acres, well & septic,
fnc d $2,9 M SW 77i d
386-466-2517.

940 Truc~ks


Bring the picture in or
we will take it for you!
* Ad runs 10 consecutive days
with a description and photo in the
newspaper and online E-edition.
* Ad runs 10 consecutive days as a
classified line ad online.
* You must include vehicle price.
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* Private party only.


640 Obtale Hmes
Owner Fin, 3/2, S of Lake City,
quiet, wooded, 1.5 ac, sml dn $700
mo, 386-590-0642/386-867 1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com


0650 MobileHome
OWNER FINANCING
3br/2ba DWMH with 5 acres. 10
additional acres available. Daniel
Crapps Agency 386-623-6612
Well kept 3/2 moble on 2+ acres.
screened front poich, covered back
porch, shed, MLS77241 $64,000
Call Brittany @ Results Realty
386-397-3473

71 Unfurnshed Apt

05524728
SPRING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans;
some with garages.
Call 386-454-1469 .
r visit our website: '
www.sgivinghillvillage.net

Move in as low as $325
Call today for details!
386-758-8455
Windsong Apts
1 & 2 Bedroom Homes
Move in for as low as
$199
386-755-2423
A Landlord You Can Love!
2 br Apts $575. & up + sec. Great
area. CH/A washer/dryer hookups.
386-758-935 1/352-208-2421
Beautiful Apt, Large 1 bdrm,
w/inground pool, CHA, details at
bigfloridahome.com
$650/mo + dep 386-344-3261
Great location W of I-75, spacious
deluxe 2BR apts., garage, W/D
hook up. patio. $600 & up, + SD,
386 965-0276
The Lakes Apts. Studios & IBr's
from $135/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $525. + sec.
Call Michelle 386-752-9626


720 '"rnished Apts.




mi out from city. 386-937-0195
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave, Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808


730 'n"'"i'hedet
3ba/2ba, New carpet &r paint: .5
ac 2 mi from d'town. No pets.
Lease req'd: fav. background only.
$850 +dep. 752-8696, 752-5025.
3bd/2ba 770 Poplar Street
$900.00 mo. Also 3/2 1121 Ashley
St $750.00 mo. 1st and last
required. 386-755-3649
3BR/1.5BA. BLOCK HOME.
Fenced (privacy) bk yard. CH/A
Nice area. $825. mo $825. dep.
Ref's req'd. 386-364-2897 -
3br/2ba Lg LR, w/add'1 family
screen back porch, secluded on 10
acres. Close to &75 on Hwy 47.
$850. mo. + sec. 386-867-1190
3br/2ba new const.in nice S/D

$7L8 Del e 'd.PCr d t0 Cek
No Pets (386)755-9476
4/2,on 10 acres, w/lake access, off
of South Marion, $1,000 per
mC th,3 50s2 ut67'

Ft White, 2/1, CH/A, 2010 W2 &
ref's from current landlord req'd,
SAccess to Rivers $650 mo,
$600 sec., 386-497-4699
Like new site-built home for rent
3/2, on 5 acres, no pets! Non- '
smoking environment. Call for de-
tails, $800mo + dep 386-758-1789
TOWNHOUSE 2br plus
bonus room. w/1.5 bath.
Quail Heights CC. $750. mo plus
$250 damage dep. 386-752-8553


0750 EUfite S

05525390
2,000 sq ft, 1 mile S of I-75 on
47, includes warehouse & mini
golf,3 bth (incl handicap),
unlimited possibilities could
convert to Semior Daycare, etc.
386-752-1364 or 965-4340


$10,500
call


If you don't sell your vehicle


oo rn e sisevhc ea
To 1 addition ths o
Terms and can iions remain ah
same for the additional run.


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has to offer:
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755-5445


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Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED FRIDAY, APRIL 1, 2011


09


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Call Lake City Reporter Classifieds!



WE CAN HELP 386-755-5440