<%BANNER%>

UFPKY NEH LSTA



The Lake City reporter
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS MAP IT! PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01515
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 3/30/2011
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
System ID: UF00028308:01515
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text



Split Decision
Fort White, CHS divide
baseball doubleheader.

00016 0LO -

B_ OFh
pa B


Minor Setback
Kirkman starts season
in Class AAA.

Sports, I B


4nIy


Repeat Hopes
Rangers aim for return
to World Series.

,Sports, IB


Reporter


Wednesday, March 30, 201 I


www.lakecityreporter.com


Vol. 137, No. 57 E 75 cents


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Elishia Parker (center right), the AmeriCorps VISTA/program manager,
joins in to jump with.Tamia Vanover, 9. Pictured are Kamiya Bowden,
Vanover, Parker and Briana Parker.


Spring break fun:

Kids gather to jump

rope, shoot hoops


Richardson Center
offers lots of choices
during time off.
By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
Participating in a jump rope
jamboree not only provided
exercise for Tamia Vanover, 9, of
Lake City, but gave her an oppor-
tunity to show off cool tricks.
"I like jumping rope," she
said.
Vanover joined other students
in the. events at Richardson
Community Center. The center
is hosting several spring break
activities this week.
Activities continue at 2 p.m.
today with a dodgeball kickoff;
at 12:30 p.m. Thursday with a


movie matinee; and at 10 a.m.
Friday with volleyball. The cen-
ter is open from 8:30 a.m.-5 p,m.
Many students just come to
the community center to play
basketball, said Lynda Caldwell,
recreation aide. The center want-
ed to implement other activities
for students to participate in dur-
ing the break.
"Kids can enjoy the center
aside from playing basketball,"
she said. "I love basketball but
wanted other kids to have some-
thing to do."
Hosting activities for the com-
munity is important to the center,
especially during spring break.
"We want them to have fun
instead of staying inside sitting in
front of the TV," Caldwell said.
JUMP continued on 3A


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Kamiya Brown, 8, laughs after getting tangled while jumping rope
Tuesday. Pictured are Bowden (from left), Mikhiya Hendon, 6, and
Briana Parker, 14.


INDUSTRIAL


GE


Erin Starling (left)- '
shows her grand-
mother Sandra
Starling that she
knows how to c-e .
steer a tractor
while sitting on
Claude Starling's
antique John
Deere tractor.







FILE ART

Antique tractors on display this weekend


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
WHITE SPRINGS
.Machinery from
yesteryear that
took America
from the indus-
trial age to the
technological age will be on
display this weekend, as a snap-
shot into history. ,
The Stephen Foster Folk
Culture Center State Park will
host the event, highlighting
antique tractors and farming
equipment reflecting 200 years
of rural American history dur-
ing the 23rd Annual Stephen
Foster Antique Tractor and
Engine Show.'
The annual event will be
from 9 a.m. -5 p.m. Friday and
Saturday and from 9 a.m. 3
p.m. Sunday at the Stephen
Foster Folk Culture Center
State Park. Admission is $5 per
vehicle with up to eight pas-
sengers.
The show will feature antique
tractor pulls, children's tractor
races, barrel races, antique cars
and children's games. In addi-
tion, there will be demonstra-
tions with some of the equip-
ment, such as wheat thrashing,
shingle milling and corn grind-
ing.
'"There are really some
unusual engines still out there
for everyday purposes," said
Bob Giarla, a park services
specialist at the Stephen Foster
Folk Culture Center State Park.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Gary Erixton (from right), a park ranger at the Stephen Foster Folk
Culture Center State Park, describes to a group of visitors the different
features of a 1936 Minneapolis-Moline Twin City tractor that belongs to
his father, Lee. Pictured are Pat Phillips, of Carver, Mass., Geziena and
Sidney Roorda, both of Bridport, Vt., and Gary Phillips.


He said event exhibitors
started arriving earlier in the
week and park officials are
anticipating a good turnout.
"I would expect upwards
of at least 50 tractors to be at
the event," Giarda said; noting
exhibitors from all across the
state as well as Georgia have
signed on to participate. "After
23 years, people are very loyal
to this event and they've known
its reputation for being a good
event that they can take their
whole family to."
Giarda said the Stephen
Foster Folk Culture State Park
is about embracing the history
of farming and a show like this


gives residents an opportunity
to experience machinery and
tools used years before.
"It's about being able to
showcase the history of farm-
.ing so people can have a better*
understanding that this is the
machinery people used in the
past to work farms," he said.
'"This'is things that you would
never be able to see ordinarily.
It's really a good event. I was
pretty amazed the first time I
saw it."
This year's event will also fea-
ture a series of "make-and-take"
workshops in Craft Square.
TRACTOR continued on 3A


Paulson featured speaker at conference


County library director
will share her thoughts on
participatory management.
By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
Participatory management is a practice
Columbia County Public Library Director
Deborah Paulson knows a thing or two
about.
"Ift's something I've done since I've been
here the last six years," she said.
Paulson will share her knowledge on the
subject as a featured workshop present-
er for the Library Management Institute
annual two-day conference July 11-12 at
Arcadia University in Pennsylvania.
"I'm really very honored," she said.
This is the fourth year of the conference,
which focuses on issues in library manage-
PAULSON continued on 3A


JASON MATTHEW WALKER / Lake City Reporter
Deborah Paulson will attend and speak at the Library Management
Institute's annual two-day conference July 11-12.


Diffie added to

impressive River

Jam lineup


Grammy, CMA
winner joins
Dunn, Pickler.
Staff reports
Grammy and Country
Music Awards-winner Joe
Diffie has been added to
the already impressive
lineup for the upcoming
20th anniversary edition of
the Suwannee River Jam.
Diffie joins Ronnie Dunn
(formerly of Brooks and
Dunn), Gary Allan, Luke


COURTESY PHOTO
Joe Diffie has been added to
play at Suwannee River Jam.
Bryan, Kellie Pickler, Phil
Vassar, Jerrod Niemann,
DIFFIE continued on 3A


I l84264 102 1


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400


76
Thunderstorm
WEATHER,


O pinion ................
Around Florida...........
Obituaries ..............
Advice & Comics.........
Puzzles .................


2A /


TODAY IN
COLUMBIA
Classes that help
inr n-,r, ways.


COMING
THURSDAY
Chamber of
Commerce awards.








LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING WEDNESDAY, MARCH 30, 2011


CA$HS 3 Tuesday:
Afternoon: 0-7-0
Evening: 3-7-5


P bay4 Tuesday:
S Afternoon: 2-1.-8-2
S Evening: 7-7-9-1


1 Monday:
1-3-4-23-25


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS


'Trek' captain Abrams revisits youth in 'Super 8'


LAS VEGAS
J. Abrams is making good use
of his boyhood apprentice-
ship shooting super-8 movies.
The director of 2009's "Star
Trek" and creator of
TV's "Lost" revisits his child-
hood with this summer's "Super 8,"
about a band of kids shooting a mon-
ster movie who end up documenting
a train wreck that unleashes an alien
force.
The movie is the most autobio-
graphical he has worked on, Abrams
said in an interview at CinemaCon,
a Las Vegas convention for theater
owners where he showed off footage
Monday night.
The youths in "Super 8" are doing
exactly what the 44-year-old Abrams
was doing three decades ago, when
he was obsessed with making his
own horror films and monster flicks:.
"It was sort of an uncanny thing
shooting it, because it felt like I had
gone back to my childhood in a way
that was just incredibly surreal and
oddly disturbing," Abrams said.
"There are moments where I was
like, 'My God, this is exactly what it
was like.' The set dressing, the cos-
tumes. Certainly, some of the subject
matter was just very transportive."
Due in theaters June 10, amid
Hollywood's onslaught of visual-
effects and action tales, "Super 8"
began as a quiet drama about teen
filmmakers in a small town.


J.J. Abrams, director of the upcoming film 'Super 8,' introduces clips of the film to
the audience during the opening night of CinemaCon 2011, the official convention
of the National Association of Theater Owners on Monday in Las Vegas.


be produced at Harpo Studios on
Chicago's West Side.
Executives at Harpo announced
the move on Tuesday. O'Donnell is
slated to return to daytime TV with
the one-hour show on OWN: Oprah
Winfrey Network in the fall.
In a statement Tuesday, Winfrey
said she's delighted to welcome
O'Donnell to the studio that's been
her home for years.


O'Donnell to move into Rob Lowe dishes on
Winfrey's Chicago studio early years with Sheen


CHICAGO "The Oprah Winfrey
Show" is shutting
down at the end of
4, the season, but the
lights won't be going
out at Winfrey's stu-
dio in Chicago.
That's because
O'DRosie O'Donnels
O'Donnell new talk show will


NEW YORK Rob Lowe gives
fellow Brat Packer
Charlie Sheen a'
slight edge when it
qav comes to partying.
Lowe tells Vanity
Fair that in past
days, he and Sheen
Lowe "competed to see
Lowe who could play hard-


er, then show up for work."
Lowe recently finished his auto-
biography and shared excerpts with
the magazine. He calls Sheen "a
wonderful mix of nerd and rebel"
and speaks of days when the two
were relatively unknown actors who
plotted their careers in Sheen's pool.

Hemsworth hammers
Hollywood's door as Thor
LAS VEGAS Chris Hemsworth
is turning the mighty Thor's fall
from grace into his own personal
rise to Hollywood stardom.
.Hemsworth stars in the title role
of 'Thor," the Marvel Comics super-
hero adaptation that opens May 6 to
lead off what is expected to be a sea-
son of summer blockbusters.
After six months of casting, he
said he felt he had won the lottery.

* Associated Press


Celebrity Birthdays


* Game show host Peter
Marshall is 85.
* Actor Richard Dysart is 82.
* Actor John Astin is 81.
* Entertainer Rolf Harris
(song: "Tie Me Kangaroo
Down, Sport") is 81.
* Actor-director Warren
Beatty is 74.
* Rock musician Graeme
Edge (The Moody Blues) is
70.
* Rock musician Eric Clapton
is 66.
* Actor Justin Deas (TV:
"Guiding Light") is 63.
* Actor Robbie Coltrane is

Daily Scripture


61.
* Actor Paul Reiser is 54.
* Rap artist MC Hammer is
48.
* Singer Tracy Chapman is
47.
* Actor lan Ziering is 47.
* Singer Celine Dion is 43.
* Actor Mark Consuelos is
40.
* Actress Bahar Soomekh
is 36.
* Actress Jessica Cauffiel
is 35.
* Singer Norah Jones is 32.
* Country singer Justin
Moore is 27.


"God made him who had no sin
to be sin for us, so that in him
we might become the
righteousness of God."
2 Corinthians 5:21


Lake City
HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293
Fax number..............752-9400
Circulation ................755-5445
Online... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., Is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, RFla. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson .....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
Assistant Editor CJ Risak..754-0427
After 1 00 p.m.
(crisak@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Ashley Butcher ...754-0417
(abutcher@lakecityreporter.com)
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440.


Reporter
BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon ... .754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 730
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 1030 a.m. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation ..............755-5445
(drculation@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
fTuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks.................. $26.32
24 Weeks..................$48.79
52 Weeks................. $83.46
Rates mindude 7% sales tax.
Mall rates
12 Weeks................ $41.40
24 Weeks..................$82.80
52 Weeks......... ..... $179.40


CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run
in this space. And thanks for reading.


AROUND FLORIDA


THE WEATHER


Man carrying
: knife fatally shot
LAUDERHILL-
Lauderhill police are
investigating the shooting
of a 21-year-old man who
was fatally shot by officers
while holding a knife.
S* A police spokesman said
officers were responding
to a disturbance call that
came from a cell phone
Sely Tuesday morning
When they found Cedric
Telasco in the front lawn of
his home.
At least three officers
were at the scene during
the shooting. Police have
not said what forced the
officers to shoot Telasco.
The officers are on paid
administrative leave.

Students. treated
for taking meds
HIALEAH Four
middle school students
are in stable condition in
a Hialeah hospital after
ingesting a prescription
Medication.
Hialeah Fire Rescue said
the students from Palm
Springs Middle School
swallowed a medication
Tuesday called Seroquilin,
which is used to treat
psychotic disorders. A fire
rescue spokesman said
the students were not seri-
ously injured.

Officials find man
dead in jail cell
HOMESTEAD Jail
officials said a South
Florida father charged in
his toddler son's death has
been found dead in his
cell.
Lee Willie Dejesus, of
Homestead, was found
dead at the Miami-Dade
jail Saturday night. A jail
official said that Dejesus
was being held in the
ninth-floor psychiatric
ward of the jail but had
riot been placed on a sui-
cide watch. Police said he


! STORMS



I 76 LO E3


ASSOCIATED PRESS

A game played by gentlemen
Mardy Fish (left) greets Juan Martin del Potro, of Argentina,
at the net after winning 7-5, 7-6 (5) in their match at the Sony
Ericsson Open tennis tournament in Key Biscayne Tuesday.


apparently killed himself,
but the death is being
investigated.
DeJesus, 24, was
charged last August with
second-degree murder
after police said he fatally
struck his 2-year-old son.

Puppy thrown off
balcony, euthanized
LEHIGH ACRES Lee
County Sheriff's deputies
have arrested a woman for
allegedly throwing a puppy
off a second-floor balcony.
Cathy Sue Garrison was
charged Monday with fel-
ony animal cruelty. Bond
was set at $1,500.
According to a police
report, the puppy had an
open fracture to its left
femur. The puppy was later
euthanized.
An investigation said
Garrison was angry with
the dog and was punish-
ing it by throwing it from
a second-floor balcony on
Sunday.

Court asked to
overturn Scott
TALLAHASSEE A
disabled food stamp appli-
cant has asked the Florida
Supreme Court to over-
turn Gov. Rick Scott's
executive order suspend-


ing agency rulemaking
powers..
Lawyers for Rosalie
Whiley filed the petition
Monday. It alleges Scott
overstepped his authority
by transferring rulemaking
from agencies under the
governor to his office.
That halted rules to
simplify the reapplication
process for food stamps.
Whiley, who is blind, said
the new rules would have
made it easier for her
to apply for food stamps
online.
Her lawyers said
the order halts actions
urgently needed to protect
vulnerable low-income citi-
zens and that the governor
doesn't have the.power to
suspend state laws.

House: Debate on
Medicaid begins
TALLAHASSEE The
Florida House has begun
floor action on legislation
that would shift delivery of
Medicaid services largely
to private companies.
The chamber started
that discussion on
Tuesday. Florida currently
has five counties in an
experimental managed
care program.


Pensacola
77/60


PARTLY MOSTLY MOSTLY
' CLOUDY SUNNY SUNNY
., 7 L ,.4 SI

HI 78L 50 HI 76L 49 HI 82 LO 56


VWiASM
**v/" "imynIo .lo


b.


_.76/6"-:., oiad.^nve
rallahassee Lake Ci 76/61
77/63 76/63


Panma cty
75/66


TEMPERATURES
High Tuesday
Low Tuesday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Tuesday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


69
57
77
52'
94 In 1907
33 in 1955


0.00",
1.89"
9.16"
4.01"
10.91"


City Thursday
Cape Canaveral 82, 70,-


Daytona Beach
Ft. Lauderdale


inesvile Daytona Beadc Fort Myers
78/65 79 68 Gainesville
Ocala Jacksonville
8067 6
80/67 Key West
Orlando Cap Caaeral Key West
/ 83/68 80/68 Lake Cy .
S8, Miami
Tana* \ Naples
81/70 West Pain Bei Ocala
86/72 *, Orlando
FL Lauderdalo Panama City
FLt. years 87/74 6 Pensacola
87/69 Naples Tallahassee
\86/69 MiW Tampa
K.e .. 88/74 Valdosta
Key West* W. Palm Beach
84/76


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise tom.
Sunset tom.

MOON
Moonrise today
Moonset today
Moonrise ton.
Moonset tom.


7:23 a.m.
7:48 p.m.
7:21 a.m.
7:49 p.m.


5:01 a.m.
4:39 p.m.
5:31 am.
5:32 p.m.


0003
April April April April
3 :11 17 24
New First Full Last


7a Ip 7p la 6a
Wednesday Thursday







..a.Fon"astalte erabre "-Feesie'tinpWea


* Associated Press


82/62/t
87/71/pc
86/65/pc
77/57/t
74/56/t
85/75/pc
75/55/t
87/72/pc
84/68/pc
80/59/t
83/64/t
75/56/t
74/54/c
75/48/t
79/63/t
73/45/t
87/67/pc


Friday
79/ 60/t
80/59/pc
84/70/pc
83/63/pc
78/52/pc
77/52/pc
83/73/pc
78/50/pc
82/68/t
81/66/pc
81/53/pc
81/60/pc
75/53/s
75/55/pc
77/48/s
79/62/pc
77/47/pc
84/68/t


An exclusive
service
brought to
WIWIft our readers
15bilesbiibu by
Today's
ultra-violet The Weather
radiation risk Channel
for the area on Can
a scale from 0
to 10



Forecasts, data and
graphics 2011 Weather
S Central, LP, ,Madison, Wis.
www.weatherpubllsher.com


lr SATUi


ESUNDAY


Page Editor: Jason M. Walker, 754-0430


Y','"",A, 'M-ANAC:^B~t~8B


mISMaESSOREB










Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL WEDNESDAY, MARCH 30, 2011


Final River Jam auditions Saturday


Local talent vies
for spot on stage
at Suwannee Fest
Staff reports
The Suwannee River
Jam Final Talent Audition
is scheduled for Saturday
at the Spirit of the
Suwannee Music Park
(SOSMP).
Contestants include
Steffanie Renae, Katie
Gillard and Jessy "
Reynolds (Rockin Rodz);
Michale Cooper, Justin
Freeman and Jimmy
Coleman (Whiskey River);


Robin Kinsey, Jordan
Bush and Tommy Earl
and Randy Neubert (duet)
(Fiddler Crab Festival);
Chelsea Dierickx, Heather
Dockery and Crystal
Black (Columbia County
Fair); Maci McDuffie,
Colby Craig and Jaelyn
Jackson (Smokin Pig)
and wildcard contestants
Meagan Stedman, Lindsey
Lane and Clay Boatwright.
Well-known area radio
DJ Stevie D will be the
emcee for the evening.
This event features
winners from months of
auditions all over North
Florida. Three country


artists will be chosen from
among nearly two dozen
during the final audition in
the SOSMP's Music Hall.
The winning artists will
perform sets from the 1st
Street Music and Sound
Co. Stage during the
Suwannee River Jam April
27-30, together with other
artists.
Up and coming bands
already chosen from
earlier events to perform
at the Jam are Steele
Bridge (Steinhatchee
Crab Festival) and State of
Mind (Rockin Rodz).
Music Hall doors for
the final talent audition


open at 5 p.m. Saturday,
with free admission. The
audition begins at 6:30
p.m.
Go to www.musi-
cliveshere.com, email at
spirit@musicliveshere.com
or call at 386-364-1683 for
more information. The
Spirit of the Suwannee
Music Park is located
at 3076 95th Drive, 4.5
miles north of Live Oak,
off US 129 at the famous
Suwannee River. The
park is 4.5 miles south of
Interstate 75 and 4.5 miles
north of Interstate 10 off
US 129.


PAULSON: Will speak at conference in July

Continued From Page 1A


ment and administration,
Paulson said. It is attended
by library managers across
the United States.
Interested workshop
leaders had to submit
proposals for a 75-minuite
session on topics related
to library administration
and management, she
said. The proposal includ-
ed a brief description of
the topic.
Employees help, take
part in decision-making
processes for participato-
ry management, Paulson
said. She has the final say
as director but incorpo-
rates their ideas.
"They're an important
part of the staff and con-
tribute wonderful ideas,"
she said. "Sometimes
directors don't realize it."
Paulson has spoke at
other events in the past,
such as the National
Academic Library
Conference in 2004, and
felt she wanted to continue
to share her knowledge.
"I've done public speak-


JASON MATTHEW WALKER / Lake City Reporter
Deborah Paulson (center) shares a laugh with staff members at the library.


ing before and thought it
was a good professional
activity," she said.
Paulson was initially
interested in submitting a
proposal last year for the
institute but noticed the
status of past presenters.
"Some were nationally
known, and .I thought I
didn't stand a chance,"


she said.
This year she didn't let
the opportunity slip past
again.
Her presentation is cre-
ated for the institute, but
Paulson still looks back
over it every few days.
"It's a work in progress
until I go," she said.
Attending the confer-.


ence will not only allow
her to share her knowl-
edge, but she'll learn a
few things too, Paulson
said.
"Being recognized as a
speaker gives important
to what I'm trying to do
here as the director," she
said. "I encourage partici-
patory management."


DIFFIE: Added to Suwannee River Jam package

Continued From Page LA ". ^' .


Darryl Worley, Lee Brice,
LoCash Cowboys and
Blackberry Smoke for the
River Jam, scheduled for
April 27-30.
A Grand Ole Opry mem-
ber since 1993, Diffie's
hit songs include "John
Deere Green," "Bigger
Than The Beetles," "Prop
Me Up," "Pickup Man,"
"Third Rock From The
Sun," and "Leroy The
Redneck Reindeer." His
most recent album is
"Homecoming." He has
produced 12 singles that
reached the top of the
charts adn was awarded a
Grammy for Best Country
Collaboration with Vocals
in 1998.
Diffie has had 12 No. 1


songs of his own and has
written top hits for Tim
McGraw, Tracy Lawrence
and Joe Dee Messina.
His latest album,
"Homecoming," was co-
produced by Diffie and
Luke Wooten and features
a who's who of bluegrass,
including fiddler/mandolin
player Aubrey Haynie, one
of Live Oak's owp favorite
sons who has played at the
SOSMP on several occa-
sions.
The Jam will also
include a second stage
for up-and-coming artists,
including the winners of
the SRJ Talent Contest.
Additionally, the new
Ms. Suwannee River Jam
Daisy Dukes Style will be


crowned for the next year
and will receive more than
$3,000 in prizes.
Tickets are now on sale
for the 20th Suwannee
River Jam. Regular admis-
sion for adults for weekend
$130; children 6-12 are
$45; VIP Gold is $400 for
adults; VIP Silver is $200
adults. Single day tickets
are $75 for adults, $45
for children, and $75 for
students (which includes
primitive camping) who
must have school ID.
To purchase tickets,
call the SOSMP at 386-
364-1683, email them at
spirit@musicliveshere. corn,
go to www.musicliveshere.
corn to events and click
on Suwannee River Jam


JUMP: Fun time during Spring Break

Continued From Page 1A


Each day's events at the
center promote being active
and different things to do,
said Briana Parker, 14, of
Lake City.
Students only get two days
during a normal school week
to have fun and relax, she


said. Spring break changes
the schedule for a week.
"There's more you get to
do," Parker said. "There's
fun everyday."
The community center is
open to every one on days
aside from holidays, Caldwell


said. Call 386-754-7905 for
more information.
'We are here for the
kids," she said. 'We like to
have fun and want the kids
to enjoy spring break."


April 27-30 for complete-
information, or go to www.
suwanneeriverfam. com.
S & S Food Stores, one
of the Jam's long-time spon-
sors, has the lowest Jam
ticket prices at their many
stores in North Florida.
The Spirit of the
Suwannee Music Park is
located at 3076 95th Drive,
4.5 miles north of Live Oak
off US 129 on the Suwannee
River. The park is 4.5 miles
south of Interstate 75 and
4.5 miles north of Interstate
10 off US 129.





Unlimited Hours, No Contracts!


* FREE Technical Support
* Instant essaging keep your buddy list!
* 10 e-ma:l addresses w'th Webmai!
* Custom Star Page- rews, weather & more!
Surf up to fOx faster! )
just 3 nior --
Sign Up Online! www.LocalNet.com
752-0774
LocalNet 1-888-488-7265


The following informa-
tion was provided by local
law enforcement agencies.
The following people have
been arrested but not con-
victed. All people are inno-
cent unless proven guilty.

Monday, March 28
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office
Randy Merryman
Acosta, 56, 340 SE Doretha
Terrace, warrant: Violation
of probation on original
charge of possession of
less than 20 grams of mari-
juana.
Jamie Lockhart
Goodwin, 38, 278 SE
Gillian Terrace, Lulu, war-
rant: Violation of probation
on original charge of credit
card fraud; stolen car.
Christopher Quentin
Green, 33, 4450 Lambert
Cemetery Road, warrant:
Violation of probation on
original charge of uttering
a forgery (three counts)
and grand theft.
Rainford Glenroy
Smith, 29, 1274 NW
79th St., Miami, warrant:
Violation of probation on
original of burglary of an


The workshops will take
place from 10 a.m. 1:30
p.m.
"They'll range from
everything from a rag doll
workshop, memory brace-
lets to an herbal vinegar
workshop," Giarda said.
"We're taking one step
beyond the usual trac-


unoccupied structure and
third-degree grand theft
Randy Allen Sommers,
48, 195 SE Opal Way, war-
rant: Violation of probation
on original charge of third-
degree grand theft.
Johnny James Taylor,
31, Post Office Box 21,
White Springs, driving
while license suspended/
revoked (habitual offend-
er).
James Oliver Weeks
Jr., 33; 684 SE Nassau St.,
warrant Violation of proba-
tion on original charge of
battery.
Emmery Ryan
Williams, 20, 1557 SE
Alfred Markham St., war-
rant: Third-degree grand
theft

Tuesday, March 29
Lake City
Police Department.
Christopher Scott
Childers, no age given,
11453, Brandon Field Road,
attempted burglary, loi-
tering and prowling and
resisting without violence.

From staff reports.


tor show with the farm
machinery and expanding
it into the kitchen with
the herbal vinegar work-
shop and healing and pain
reduction and quilting
- different folk arts that
would have been much a
part of the time these old
tractors were in use."


V LUMBER
BUILD ON WHAT WE KNOW"
OPEN HOUSE
Lake City, FL
Tuesday April 5, 2011
9 AM until 1 PM
18,300+total sf facility on 4.25 acres
1824 W. US Highway 90 Lake City, FL 32055
Questions/Comments 724-228-3636 x1349

OB/G YN

DAINA GREENE, MD
WOMEN'S HEALTH WITH A WOMAN'S TOUCH














*Meet with a provider the day you come in
*Same day/next day OB appts.
*Dr. Greene is chief medical officer at Pregnancy.
Care Center
*Free pregnancy tests
Call for appt. Mon.-Thurs. 8am-5:30pm
755-0500 449 SE Baya Dr. Lake City
Accepts All Insurance


Columbia County

^^Tobacco Free Partnership


The Columbia County Tobacco Free
Partnership and the Columbia County
Health Department have come together
to form a partnership in order to create a
" ee tobacco free community. This year, the
OcCO partnership is focusing on polices that
Oi' effect our youth. We are working to-
wards developing 100% tobacco free
schools. Please come join us and help
protect our youth.
All community members, service
workers, and school aged youth...are in-
vited to attend.


FLORIDA DEPARTMENT .F


Event: Columbia County Tobacco Free Partnership
Meeting
When: Wednesday, April 6, 2011
Where: Central School Board Office Room 153
409 SW St. Johns ST.
Lake City, FL 32055
Time: 3:30-4:30pm


All partnership meetings are open to the public.
For more information on how to become involved
in you local Tobacco Free Partnership, please
contact:
Kyle Roberts
Columbia County Health Department
386-754-7083 or Kyle Roberts@doh.state.fl.us.


POLICE REPORTS


TRACTORS: On display

Continued From Page 1A


LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL WEDNESDAY, MARCH 30, 2011


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427











OPINION


Wednesday, March 30, 201 I


Ou


SOU
OPIN


Lake


R
ION


City's

Bugaboo

f you lived in or near
Lake City in May 2007,
you remember the
carnage and the fear that
engulfed our community
as the Bugaboo Wildfire raged
in the northern portion of
Columbia County.
A creeping wildfire slowly
scorching more than 100,000
acres of timber prefaces itself
with an eery calm. Things
were agonizingly quiet in the
downtown area. We all smelled
the smoke and saw the plume
on the horizon.
Day turned to night at 3 p.m.
one afternoon. At daylight the
following morning, ashes fell
from the sky like snowflakes.
All we could do was sit and
wait for forestry officials to do
their job, establish a fire line
and hope for the best
As we face another spring
that has been labeled dryer
than 2007, we must take every
precaution to make sure any
of our actions are the cause
of another forest fire disaster.
Careless humans cause more
forest fires each year than any
natural occurrence.
We all must pay attention to
the dry conditions we face and
make sure we prevent any type
of grass fire from spreading.
The current conditions are
worse than 2007. Let'fs make a
conscious effort to prevent a
repeat of the Bugaboo situation.

HIGHLIGHTS
IN HISTORY
On March 30, 1981,
President Ronald Reagan was
shot and seriously injured out-
side a Washington, D.C., hotel
by John W. Hinckley Jr. Also
wounded were White House
press secretary James Brady;
Secret Service agent Timothy
McCarthy and District of
Columbia police officer
Thomas Delahanty.
On this date:
In 1867, U.S. Secretary
of State William H. Seward
reached agreement with Russia
to purchase the territory of
Alaska for $7.2 million.
In 1945, the Soviet Union
invaded Austria during World
War II.


Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Tom Mayer, editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman


LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown,
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


www.lakecityreporter.com


Time is now for America


to exit Afganistan


The war in
Afghanistan is losing
its support at home
according to recent
polls that show
two-thirds of Americans don't
believe it is worth fighting. That
seems hardly surprising given
the fact the decade-long conflict
is based on reasons that no lon-
ger seem relevant.
This primitive nation poses no
real threat to national security
and as a haven for terrorists
now it would have to take a
back seat to half a dozen other
places. The current govern-
ment is mired in corruption
and the minute U.S. troops
leave, it is likely to try to make
some accommodation with the
Taliban in an effort to survive.
It is doubtful that Osama bin
Laden, if he is still alive and
kicking, is somewhere else
having thwarted the main jus-
tification -for our being there in
the first place. How long U.S.-
trained Afghan troops will,con-
trol things is problematic.
So why continue to put U.S.
soldiers in harm's way and at
a cost that continues to strain
an economy still struggling to
rebound while being hamstrung
by an astronomical indebted-
ness? Maybe President Barack
Obama can answer.that as he
decides how many troops to
withdraw beginning this sum-
mer. He might also ponder the
heed to send any fresh troops
other than those needed to
facilitate withdrawal.
To the average citizen this
is not a complicated situation,
* particularly' since the president
promised voters two years ago
that he would move quickly to
remove us from this drain on


LETTERS


-- ,.
/1 ,

Dan K.Thomasson

manpower and money. Well,
easier said than done is about
the only explanation, especially
when you're trying to sell your-
self as the be all and end all
answer to good foreign policy.
As unsophisticated in worldly
politics as most of us are, Mr.-
President, it didn't take us long
to figure out that this expedition
was a really bad deal. Turning
this storied mountain mess of
tribal warfare into a working
democracy was a dumb idea
- shades of the Khyber Pass,
the British and the goofy Soviet
.Union that broke its own back
trying to install its silly system
on people who are the most
independent in the world.
Once upon a time there could
have been a potentially success-
ful, limited engagement there.
U.S. troops had the Taliban on
the run and there was reason
to believe that bin Laden was
close to being in our grasp.
What went wrong? The invasion
of Iraq, of course. Resources
were pulled from Afghanistan
to support the George W. Bush
administration's half-cocked
notion that Saddam Hussein
was a major threat-to world
peace and was ready to launch
weapons of mass destruction
in cahoots with al Qaeda, both
patently false assumptions. He
had no such weapons and was
no friend of al Qaeda. Was he


a bad dude? You bet he was,
mainly to his own people, but
we have done business with lots
who fit that image.
Well, the Taliban are bad
dudes, too, religious nuts who
brook no disagreement when
it comes to their radical view
of the Islamic faith. Women
are particularly vulnerable to
these 11th century throwbacks.
But we blew our chance, slim
as it was, of eradicating them
and now all they have to do is
outwait us while picking off
Americans now and then just
to see if they can't hurry our
departure.
What a lot of tragic nonsense.
Get us the heck out of there
Obama or hang up your politi-
cal credentials and let someone
else try. Is this all emotional?
You know that it is and itfs
born of the frustration of see-
ing brave young men spent so
unwisely. One of the architects
of Vietnam, Robert McNamara,
said years after our efforts
there had concluded that he
had known during his reign
as Defense secretary for John
Kennedy and Lyndon Johnson
that it was futile under the cir-
cumstances. Then why did he
allow 58,000 young Americans
to perish in that insanity? The
same question might be asked
of you and your predecessor,
Mr. President.
From all indications the surge
you designed on a blueprint
from Bush's in Iraq has had
negligible impact on changing
things. Now Americans over-
whelmingly want out
E Dan K. Thomasson is former
.editor of Scripps Howard News
.Service.


TO THE EDITOR


All I'm asking for is fairness


To the editor:
What I ask for is fairness
when it comes to government,
and that means no unions
controlling the elections, which
is exactly what the unions do.
Unionized employees pay into
unions and the unions use that
money to get their guy/girl


elected to office so that the
unions will have a say so and
control.
Unions have outlived their
usefullness in this country in
the guise they are in now. If you
want to really research what
union workers make (especially
retired UAW), put it all together


and you will come up with a
total of about $70 per hour -
that's with all the great benefits.
If your hubby didn't make that
cut, then he was really used by
the UAW.
Manuel Enos
Lake City
Scripps Howard News Service


4A


Dale McFeatters
mcfeattersd@shns.com

Obama's

rationale

misses

point
p resident Barack
Obama on Monday
belatedly explained
why the U.S. had
intervened in Libya
nine days earlier and what our
continued role would be in the
no-fly operation.
Beset by spreading oppo-
sition to his 41-year rule,
Moammar Gadhafi had threat-
ened to wipe out Benghazi, the
center of the rebellion.
Given Gadhafi's murderous
record, it was a threat that had
to be taken seriously. Further,
the mass flight of refugees had
the potential to destabilize the
fragile new governments that
have just replaced dictators in
Egypt and Tunisia.
The president's reasons for
intervention were consistent
with his cautious, deliberative
style and likely to be the tem-
plate for future and very selec-
tive humanitarian missions:
"We had a unique ability to
stop that violence: an inter-
national mandate for action,
a broad coalition prepared to
join us, the support of Arab
countries and a plea for help
from the Libyan people them-
selves."
Thanks to allied airpower,
Gadhafi's advancing forces were
stopped outside Benghazi and
forced to retreat. They're now
battling to defend the dictator's
hometown of Sirte, one of the
few remaining obstacles on the
road to Tripoli, the capital.
The president made much,
perhaps too much, of our
handing over command and
control of the no-fly operation
to NATO. Since the U.S. is the
largest force and the biggest
source of funds to the alliance,
ifs hardly as if we're bowing
out of the operation.
We will now play a "support-
ing role," the president said,
reducing the risk and cost
to ourselves. We may have a
more restrained role in enforc-
ing the no-fly zone, not much
of a task now that Gadhafi's air
force has been destroyed, but
the dispatch of AC-130 gun-
ships and A-10s weapons of
close-in air support suggests
we intend to cover the rebels'
ground operations.
While Obama did a mas-
terful job of explaining the
why and what of the Libyan
operation he conspicuously
refused to call it a war the
end game of getting Gadhafi
and his rapacious sons to
depart quickly and peacefully
seems largely wishful thinking.
While the rebels chip away
at Gadhafi's forces, Obama
and the allies are pushing him
to step down by denying him
arms, cutting off his cash,
supporting the opposition and
applying diplomatic pressure..
Obama has ruled out ground
troops because it would tear
apart the coalition and cost
U.S. and Libyan lives. 'To be
blunt, we went down that road
in Iraq," he added gratuitously. -
But if Gadhafi digs in, the
coalition will have to arm and
train the rebels. That would
almost certainly mean fudg-
ing on the "no ground troops"
pledge, at least to the point of .
sending in U.S. advisers.
As Obama himself point-
ed out, because Gadhafi
destroyed or corrupted Libya's
civil institutions, the transition :
to a legitimate government will
be difficult and lengthy
* Dale McFeatters is editorial
writer for Scripps Howard News
Service.












Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL WEDNESDAY. MARCH 30, 2011


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


Wednesday
Fair/Rodeo Scholarship
Columbia County
Resources is now accept-
ing applications for the
fair/rodeo scholarship.
Two scholarships for
$1,000 will be awarded
to graduating seniors.
Call 386-752-8822 or visit
www.columbiacountyfair.
org to download the cri-
teria and application. The
application is also avail-
able at Columbia High
School, Fort White High
School or the fair office..
The deadline is 5 p.m.
April 1.

Feinstein challenge
Christian Service Center
is participating in the $1
million dollar giveaway
Alan Feinstein Challenge
from now until April
30. Every food item or
financial donation counts
toward receiving a per-
centage of the giveaway.
Call 386-755-1770 and
bring donations either to
the center at the corner
of Hilton and Washington
or mail to P.O. Box 2285,
Lake City, FL, 32056.


Art on display
The Lake City Police
Department is celebrating
National Women's History
Month with artwork on
display all month 8 a.m.
to 5 p.m. in the PD Lobby
and at City Hall. Featured
artists are Dottie List,
Calendar Wise and Leslie
Reed-McDaniel. Call
Audre' Washington at 386-
719-5742.

Thursday


Perspectives, is 11 a.m.
- 1:30 p.m. April 14 at
Holiday Inn of Lake City.
Lunch will be served.
Cost is free but seating is
limited. RSVP by Friday,
April 1.

Donors wanted
The bloodmobile is stop-
ping 11 a.m. 7 p.m. Friday
at Pizza Boy Pizza. Receive
a free Large Cheese Pizza
and a T-Shirt.
An. .... T.IA.A 0L


The Antique Tractor
& Engine Show is April 1
-3 at Stephen Foster Folk
Culture Center State Park.
There will be seven "Make
and Take" workshops avail-
able in the Craft Square
on April 2. Call the park's
Gift Shop at (386) 397-1920
or visit www.stephenfoster-
CSO.org. To learn more
about the park, visit www.
FloridaStateParks. org/ste-
phenfoster.

Saturday
Garage sale
The Lake City Alumni


Chapter of Bethune
Cookman University will
host its annual Garage Sale
Fundraiser on Saturday.
This multi-family event
will contain items of value
to the entire family with
over 20 families participat-
ing. The event will be
Saturday, from 7:30 a.m.
until 3 p.m. at 920 NE Joe
Coney Terrace (the home
'of Dianne George). For
more information, contact
Minister Jan Harrison,
president of the BCU Lake
City Alumni Chapter, at
386-288-2368.

Yard sale
A spring community
yard sale is 7 a.m. to 2
p.m. Saturday in down-
town Wellborn. The event
is hosted by the Wellborn
Community Association.
Booth spaces are $5 for
12 x 12. A blueberry pan-
cake breakfast is 7:30-10
a.m. The cost is $5 for
adults and $3 for children.
Hamburgers, hot dogs and
drinks will be available for
lunch. The bloodmobile
will also be at the event
Call 386-963-1157 or visit
www. wellborncommunityas-
sociation.com.


Alli Walk
Four Rivers Audubon
hosts a monthly ALLI-
Walk: Bird /Butterfly /
Nature's Garden outing is
from 8-11 a.m. Saturday
at Alligator Lake. Jerry
Krummrich, biologist,
Virlyn Willis, avid birder,
and others will share
their knowledge. Bring
a hat, sunscreen, water,
binoculars and a snack.
No fee is charged. All
levels of participation and
knowledge are welcome.
Enter Alligator Lake at the
County Park on Country
Club Road (east side of
lake). Drive in and around
to the parking area in front
of the lake near the new
construction. Call Loye
Barnard at 497-3536 for
more information.

Spring Health
Professional Seminar
The Gainesville District
Dietetic Association is
hosting the "Spring Health'
Professionals Seminar *
2011" Saturday at Trinity
United Methodist Church
in Gainesville. It is an all
day seminar for registered
dietitians and other health


A workshop to help ven-
dors get ready to grow and
sell produce at the new
Farm Market is 6:30 p.m.
Thursday at the Columbia
County Extension office.
The workshop is free and
focuses on how to display
and sell your produce at a
farm market. Space is lim-
ited so please call 752-5384
to register.

Friday'
CLE Class
A Continuing Legal
Education class,
Workable Unity: Judicial


* To submit your Community
Calendar item, contact Antonia
Robinson at 754-0425 or by
e-mail at arobinson@
lakecityreporter., corn.


professionals. Registration
begins at 8 a.m. The cost
is $75 for morning session,
$25 for afternoon ses-
sion, and $25 for students.
Education credits have been
approved for dietitians and
other health professionals.
Visit www.eatrightgaines-
ville.org/files/ for more
information and to register.

Pioneer Days
The 35th annual Pioneer
Days is 9 a.m. -5 p.m.
Saturday and 10 a.m. 4
p.m. Sunday in downtown
High Springs. It will feature-
musical entertainment,
expanded kids korral with
pony rides and a shootout
at noon and 2 p.m. each day.
Call 386454-3120.

Adopt-a-Highway Cleanup
#2
The Filipino American
Cultural Society of Lake
City will meet on April 2 at
8:00 am at the Columbia
Bank Parking lot, corner of
US 90 and Turner road. We
will pickup both sides of our
adopted two-mile stretch
of highway on US 90 West
Contact Bob Gavette 386-
965-5905


OBITUARIES


Ada Virginia Blodgett
Ada Virginia Blodgett, 73, of
Lake City, Fl passed away Satur-
day March 26, 2011 in the Lake
City Medical Center after a long
illness. The McKees Rock, Pa
native moved to Lake City, FIl in
1971 from Tallahassee, Fl. Mrs.
Blodgett was a C.N.A. for the
V.A. Medical Center, Lake City,
Fl where she retired after 18 years.
She also was of Methodist Faith.
Mrs. Blodgett is survived by
her husband of 57 years: Emer-
son E. Blodgett, Lake City, Fl;
Two sons: Emerson (Lisa Lord)
Blodgett, Huntsville, Al and Ed-
ward (Julie Brasher) Blodgett,
Valdosta, Ga; One sister: Em-
majean Smith; Three brothers:
Ted Henry, Jim Henry and Rob--
ert Henry; Four grandchildren:
Emily Blodgett, Erica Blodgett
both of Huntsville, Al, Ashley
Blodgett and Coleman Pollack
both of Valdosta, Ga. She was
preceded in death by her parents:
John Kroft Henry II and Altha
Bell Nixon Henry; Two brothers:
Lou Henry and John Henry; One
sister: Susan Henry Hoffman.
Funeral services will be held
10:00 A.M. Wednesday March
30, 2011 in the Chapel of Dees-
Parrish Family Funeral Home
with Rev. Charles Peck offici-


ating. The family will receive
friends one hour before service
time. Interment will follow in
the Florida National Cemetery,
Bushnell, Fl. Arrangements
are under the direction of the
DEES-PARRISH FAMILY
FUNERAL HOME, 458 S.
Marion Ave., Lake City, FL
32025 752-1234 please sign
our on-line family guestbook at
www.parrishfamilyfimeralhome. corn

Grace Hunter Goodwin
Grace Hunter Goodwin passed
away on March 27th, 2011.
She was born in Bushnell, FL,
but lived in Lake City 'aver
f'roy years. She was a member
of the First United Method-
ist Church, in Lake City. She
graduated from the University
of Florida before becoming a
hospital/homebound teacher for
20 years in Columbia County.
Grace was married to the late Pat
Hunter and then to the late Rog-
er Goodwin. She is survived by
her 3 children; Charlotte Hunter
of Ocala, Patrick Hunter, M.D.
of Windermere, and Deb-Rose
Brown of Live Oak,.her 5 grand-
sons; Patrick Hunter III, Michael
Hunter, Garrett Brown, Stuart
Brown and Jackson Brown.


A grave side service is planned
for Sunday, April 3rd at 2:00pm
at Forest Lawn Memorial Gar-
dens in Lake City. The arrange-
ments have been entrusted to
DANIELS FUNERAL
HOMES&CREMATORY,INC.
of Live Oak.

Rickie "Big Daddy"
Harkness
Rickie "Big Daddy" Harkness,
56, of Lake City, Fl passed away
Monday March 28, 2011 in his
residence after a short illness.
The Covington, Tn native lived
most of his life in Lake City,
Fl. Mr. Harkness was a'heavy
equipment operator member .
of the Lake City, Moose Lodge
and attended the First Full
Gospel Church, Lake City, Fl.
He is survived by his partner:
Allie Raulerson, Lake City,
Fl; Four Step-daughters: Jack-
ie Fulford (Gary), Michelle
Charles (Jason Howell), Renee
Charles and Angie Davis all of
Lake City,. Fl; Two sisters: Joyce
Garrett and Jannie Harper; both
of Tn; One.brother: Gene Hark-
ness, Tn; Nine grandchildren; He
was preceded in death by his two
sons: Rickie W. Harkness, Jr. and
Daniel Harper.Funeral services


will be held 2:00 pm Thursday
March 31, 2011 in the First Full
Gospel Church with Rev. Cag-
ney Tanner and Rev. Stan Ellis
officiating. Interment will follow
in the Forest Lawn Cemetery.


Arrangements are under the di-
rection of the DEES-PARRISH
FAMILY FUNERAL HOME,
458 S. Marion Ave., Lake City,
FL 32025 752-1234 please sign
our on-line family guestbook at


parrishfamilyfuneralhome. com

Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


Columbia County's Most Wanted


Albert Richard
Allen, Jr.
AKA: Burt
DOB: 12/21/83
Height: 6' 3"
Weight: 215 lbs.
Hair: Brown Eyes: Blue
Wanted For: VOCC Possession of
Controlled Substance x2


Michael Antonia
Harris
DOB: 4/21/81
Height: 6' 2" Weight: 200 Ibs.
Hair: Black Eyes: Brown
Wanted For: 2 Counts Sell/Deliver/
Purchase of Cocaine, '2 Counts
Possession of Cocaine SUbstance
With Intent To Sell or Deliver, 1
Count Possession of Druo


.I '- f .- B=.J I -- L Paraphernalia
WANTED AS OF 3128/11
ANYONE WITH INFORMATION ON THE WHEREABOUTS OF THESE INDIVIDUALS IS ASKED TO CALL CRIME STOPPERS OF COLUMBIA COUNTY.
WE DO NOT WANT YOUR NAME, JUST YOUR INFORMATION!
The likeness of suspects is supplied by the Columbia County Sheriff's Office Warrants Division and/or other law enforcement agencies.
The cases are active at the time of publication unless otherwise noted. Crime Stoppers of Columbia County, Inc., and their volunteers
are jointly and individually exempt from any and all liability which might arise as a result of the publication of public records.


CALL (386) 754-7099 OR
SUBMIT A WEB TIP AT

IF COLUMBIA COwww.columbiacrimestoppers.net
Funded by the Crime Stoppers Trust Fund; Administered by the Office of the Attorney General


"We have been advertising in the Lake City
Reporter throughout the years with great
success, but we wanted to try a different
marketing approach. We found the Reporter
offers front page post-it-notes and decided to
give it a try.
We can honestly tell you, it works! The
response from our note was tremendous.
Thank you Lake City Reporter for
bringing us many new customers
and this great marketing strategy."


Dr. Debbie Griffin
Cindy Thomas
Hearing Solutions


FOR HEARING SOLUTIONS


Front page post-it-notes are
just one of the many
marketing options available
when advertising in the
Lake City Reporter.

Find out more by
calling 752-1293.










^O1


TO TEST-.DRIVE
A HEARING DEVICE LIKE ANOTHER

I: (See reverse side for details)

S THE EAR EXPERTS
\ ( Hearing Solutions
:: .: (386)758-3222
Eligible participants will be given hearing
instruments to wear for a period of 7 days and
askedto provide feedback about the dpiqn
comfort, sound quality an d
L_^ of the technology, j,



Lake City Reporter
lakecityreporter.com CURRENTS Magazine


Antique irdactor a
Selling at local markets Engine Show


LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL WEDNESDAY. MARCH 30, 2011


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427








6A LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVERTISEMENT WEDNESDAY, MARCH 30, 2011


: .


'*uA'


C
"p


-A I


LAKE CITY


MEDICAL CENTER


,2., /;. -. ,




We thank all the physicians that work tirelessly to earn the trust of
the patients and families in their care. Their dedication, expertise and
compassionate care enables us to always put our patients first.


A .71 0 i.

; ' ':-. ." ,, ., .* '*, ^ '.':.'- "r. '^ i, ":- *' '''' '.*'.** -*'* '" '-'. ,
, ,.. :, ._,;, -., ; ., . ;^ .r L :; *' ..;-. *
^ .': ,,.*' v. '- , ,, * ''" ' l. r.. . . .. "


% -,^ ".- .-..-*,. ** *. ^ /: ,,',; .:. ,,Y.'" I. -' '. -^
:,," "; Z L' .... .
', 1 '
re. .4,4 -


:-!'S..- "*'"' "
t'-. ,
-. ,
. ." ":" " :'" .. .. "i' '" "-"-7

'; ' " "'{i .. ..: v - . .

'k "" '-'- ." , .' --" -:,,t. c . . .' '


1%


* a s '; .4,-'.


-"5
- .2.5


'. . ', " -" *
-"- '* r


.








Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@lakecityreportercom


Lake City Reporter





SPORTS


Wednesday, March 30, 201 I


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


BRIEFS

T-BALL
Coaches meeting
set for April 7
Lake City Recreation
Department has a T-ball
coaches meeting at
6:30 p.m. April 7 at the
Girls Club Center. A few
team spots remain and
registration will continue
through Friday.
For details, call
Heyward Christie at
754-3607.

GOLF
Uons Club
tourney April 9
The Lake City Lions
Club tournament is
April 9 at The Country
Club at Lake City.
For details, call Carl
Ste-Marie at 752-2266.

YOUTH GOLF
Junior tour event
in Louisiana
The Arrowhead Junior
Golf Tour has a
tournament April 16-17 in
Alexandria, La. The
36-hole event for ages
12-18 is ranked by the
National Junior Golf
Scoreboard.
To enter, call (318)
402-2446 or online at
www.arrowheadjgt. com.

* From staff reports

GAMES

Today
Columbia High
weightlifting in sectional
qualifier at St. Augustine
High, 1 p.m.
Friday
Fort White High
weightlifting sectional at
Palatka High, 11 a.m.
Fort White High
track at Florida Relays in
Gainesville, TBA
Monday
Columbia High
softball vs. Ridgeview.
High, 6 p.m.
Tuesday
Columbia High
baseball at Wolfson High,
6:30 p.m.
-* Fort White High JV
softball vs. Columbia
High, 6:30 p.m.
Fort White High
baseball at Branford
High, 7 p.m. (JV-7 vs.
Suwannee High)
Wednesday, April 6
Columbia High
tennis in District 4-3A
tournament at Jonesville
Tennis Center, TBA
'M Fort White High
weightlifting strongman
contest, 3:45 p.m.
Columbia High
weightlifting vs.
Suwannee High, Union
County High, 4 p.m.
Fort White High
softball at Williston High,
7 p.m. (JV-5)
Thursday, April 7
Columbia High
tennis in District 4-3A
tournament at Jonesville
Tennis Center, TBA
Fort White High track
at Suwannee High, TBA
Columbia High JV
baseball vs. Suwannee
High, 6 p.m.
Columbia High
softball at Bell High,
7 p.m. (JV-5)
Friday, April 8
Columbia High
baseball vs. Fleming
Island High, 6 p.m.
Fort White High
baseball at Williston High,
7 p.m. (JV-4:30)
Columbia High
softball vs. Suwannee
High, 7 p.m. (JV-5)
- Fort White High


softball vs. Taylor County
High, 7 p.m. (JV-5)


El


Indians take
opening game of
double-header.
By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com
Fort White High played
as the home team in the first
game of a Tuesday double-
header at Tiger Stadium.
The Indians made Columbia
High look like nervous visi-
tors in a 7-1 victory.
Fort White starter Kevin
Dupree was hit by a pitch in
the third inning. He rubbed
a little dirt on it, then made
the Tigers pay. Dupree
pitched to the minimum
number of batters in the
last four innings, retiring
the final 11 in a row.
Dupree finished with a
three-hitter. Columbia's
only run scored when the
outfielder missed the cutoff
man. Dupree walked two
and struck out three.
Fort White added to its
2-1 first-inning lead with a
run in the third inning, and
two runs in both the fifth
and sixth innings.
In the first inning Bryce
Beach walked with one out
and Kevin Dupree followed
with a ground-rule double
to left field. Beach scored
on aground out by Jonathan
Dupree and Kevin Dupree
scored when Cody Spin's
infield popup was allowed
to drop.
Justin Kortessis led off
the third inning and hit the
first pitch over the fence
down the left-field line.
Anthony Gonzalez start-
ed the fifth inning with a
bunt single and moved to
second on a throwing error.
Kortessis walked and Beach
was hit to load the bases.
The runners advanced
on a wild pitch and Kevin
Dupree walked to cap off
a 1-for-1 day at the plate,
and chase Columbia starter
Blaine Courson.
Seth Thomas relieved
and Jonathan Dupree laced
a ground ball to short that
turned into a double play
when J.T. Gilliam tagged
Beach and threw to nab
the runner off first base.
Kortessis scored on the
play.
In the sixth inning, Josh
Faulkner hit a hard shot
through the shortstop and
stole second and third.
INDIANS continued on 3B


Kirkman

back in

minors

Lake City native
will play for Round
Rock Express.
By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com
Lake City's Michael
Kirkman will have to use
the same approach as last
year to get back to the
major leagues.
After spending spring
training with the Texas
Rangers in Arizona,
Kirkman was sent to the
Round Rock Express, the
Rangers Triple A minor
league team in Austin,
KIRKMAN continued on 2B


Photos by JASON MATTHEW.WALKER/Lake City Reporter


ABOVE: Columbia High's J.T. Gilliam (23) waits for Fort White's Robby Howell (10) to reach
second base for an out on Tuesday.

BELOW: Fort White's Cody Spin (9) celebrates after tagging Columbia's Dylan Alvey (1) out
at third.


TIM KIRBY/Lake City Reporter
Michael and Lode Kirkman spend time with nephew Caden Kirkman before leaving Lake City
for 2011 spring training in Arizona.


Columbia bats
come alive in 5-1
win in Game 2.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com
Needing a win to split
a doubleheader with Fort
White High, Columbia High
sent ace pitcher Kellan
Bailey to the mound, and
he delivered for the Tigers
in a 5-1 win.
Bailey was dominant from
the beginning. He allowed
one run off a solo home run
in the second inning to pick
up his fifth win of the sea-
son. Bailey (5-1) struck out
five batters, gave up four
hits and hit three batters.
Brandon Sharpe suffered
the loss for the Indians as
he went 4A innings, allow-
ing seven hits, four runs
and two walks, striking out
one batter.
Columbia never trailed in
the contest. Zach-Espenship
scored the Tigers' first run
off a wild pitch in the first
inning. He reached on a
bunt single and took sec-
ond off a throwing error to
first J.T. Gilliam's ground
out advanced Espenship to
third before he stole home.
Fort White tied the game
in the second inning as
freshman Zacl4 Gaskins,
who was pulled up from the
junior varsity for the game,
hit a solo home run over
the left field wall.
Columbia went back on
top in the bottom of the
fourth inning as Michael
Craft hit a blooper into
left field to score Blaine
Courson after he reached
on a double earlier in the
inning.
The Tigers added three
runs to their lead in the next
inning. This time, Courson
was driving in runs. He hit
a single to score Jimmy
White and Espenship to
give Columbia a 4-1 lead.
Bailey helped out his own
cause with a ground out
that scored Gilliam for a 5-1
cushion.
"Kevin Dupree had his
pitching going in the first
game, giving up only three
hits, but in the second game
Bailey was able to keep us
off balance," Fort White
head coach Chad Bonds
said. "We struck out a lot
more and just needed to
CHS continued on 3B


Rangers

face


hurdles

AL champions
must overcome
to repeat bid.
By STEPHEN HAWKINS
Associated Press
ARLINGTON, Texas
- The shiny championship
rings for Texas players are
still in boxes. There have
been a lot of spiffy improve-
ments to Rangers Ballpark,
too, since their first World
Series.
Yet, there is already plen-
ty to tarnish the expecta-
tions for the Rangers less
RANGERS continued on 3B










LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS WEDNESDAY, MARCH 30, 2011


TELEVISION

TV sports
Today
NBA BASKETBALL
7:30 p.m.
ESPN New Jersey at New York
NHL HOCKEY
7 p.m.
VERSUS N.Y. Rangers at Buffalo
PREP BASKETBALL
10 p.m.
ESPN All-American Game, East vs.
West, at Chicago
TENNIS
I p.m.
ESPN2 ATP/WTA Tour, Sony
Ericsson Open, quarterfinals, at Key
Biscayne
7 p.m.
ESPN2 ATP/WTA Tour, Sony
Ericsson Open, quarterfinals, at Key
Biscayne

BASKETBALL

NBA schedule

Tuesday's Games
Houston 112, New Jersey 87
Miami at Cleveland (n)
Golden State at Oklahoma City (n)
Phoenix at Sacramento (n)
Today's Games
Orlando at Atlanta, 7 p.m.
Cleveland at Charlotte, 7 p.m.
Detroit at Indiana, 7 p.m.
Milwaukee at Toronto, 7 p.m.
Houston at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Miami at Washington, 7 p.m.
New Jersey at NewYork, 7:30 p.m.
Golden State at Memphis, 8 p.m.
Chicago at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Portland at New Orleans, 8 p.m.
Sacramento at Denver, 9 p.m.
Oklahoma City at Phoenix, 10 p.m.
Dallas at LA. Clippers, 10:30 p.m.
Thursday's Games
Boston at San Antonio, 8 p.m.
Dallas at L.A. Lakers, 10:30 p.m.

NCAA Final Four

National Semifinals
Saturday
Butler (27-9) vs. Virginia
Commonwealth (28-1 I), 6:09 p.m.
Kentucky (29-8) vs. Connecticut
(30-9), 40 minutes after first game

NIT

Semifinals
Tuesday
Wichita St. vs.Washington St. (n)
Colorado vs.Alabama (n)
Championship
Thursday
Semifinals winners, 7 p.m.

AP All-American team
First Team
Jimmer Fredette, BYU, 6-2,195, senior,
Glens Falls, N.Y., 28.5 ppg, 4.2 apg, 40.4 3-
pi fg pct, 89.1 ft pct. (64 first-place votes,
323 points).
Nolan Smith, Duke, 6-2, 185, senior,
Upper Marlboro, Md., 21.3 ppg, 4.6 rpg,
5.2 apg, 81.6 ft pct. (61, 315).
Jared Sullinger, Ohio State, 6-9, 280,
freshman, Columbus, Ohio, 17.2 ppg, 10.1
rpg, 53.6 fg pct. (58, 31 I1).
Kemba Walker, Connecticut, 6-1, 172,
junior, Bronx, N.Y., 23.5 ppg, 5.3 rpg, 4.3
apg, 1.9 steals, 37.5 minutes (51,297).
JaJuan Johnson, Purdue, 6-10, 221,
senior, Indianapolis, 20.5 ppg, 8.2 rpg, 81.5
ft pct, 2.3 blocks (44,277).
Second Team
Marcus Morris, Kansas, 6-9,235 junior,
Philadelphia, 17.3 ppg, 7.2 rpg, 58.7 fg pct.
(14,208).
Derrick Williams, Arizona, 6-8, 241,
sophomore, La Mirada, Calif., 19.1 ppg,
8.1 rpg, 61.5 pg pct, 60.3 3-pt fg pct.
(16,205).
Ben Hansbrough, Notre Dame, 6-3,
203, senior, Poplar Bluff, Kan., 18.5 ppg,
3.9 rpg, 4.3 apg, 44.1 3-pt fg pct, 81.4 ft
pct. (7, 184).
Jordan Taylor, Wisconsin, 6-1, 195,
junior, Bloomington, Minn., 18.1 ppg, 4.1
rpg, 4.7 apg, 43.3 3-pt fg pct, 84.9 ft pct,
4.2 a/to ratio (2, 122).


Kawhi Leonard, San Diego State, 6-7,
225, sophomore. Riverside, Calif., 15.4
ppg, 10.7 rpg.(2, 107).
Third Team
Jordan Hamilton,Texas, 6-7,220, soph-
omore, Compton, Calif., 18.6 ppg, 7.6 rpg,
2.1 apg.(1,84).
Kenneth Faried, Morehead State, 6-8,
228. senior, Newark, N.J., 17.6 ppg, 14.5
rpg, 64.4 fg pct, 2.4 blocks, 2.0 steals
(2,72).
Jacob Pullen, Kansas State, 6-0, 200,
senior, Maywood, III., 19.5 ppg, 3.7 apg, 1.7
steals. (1,68).
Tu Holloway, Xavier, 6-0, 185, junior,
Hempstead, N.Y., 20.2 ppg, 5.1 rpg, 5.5
apg, 38.4 minutes, 86.9 ft, pct, 1.5 steals
(0,45).
Marshon Brooks, Providence, 6-5, 200,
senior, Stone Mountain, Ga., 24.6 ppg, 7.0
rpg, 1.5 steals (1, 32).
Honorable Mention
Harrison Barnes, North Carolina;
Talor Battle, Penn State; Devon Beitzel,
Northern Colorado; Keith Benson,
Oakland; Solomon Bozeman, UALR.
I Alec Burks, Colorado; Gilberto
Clavell, Sam Houston State; Norris Cole,
Cleveland State; Malcolm Delaney,Virginia
Tech;Austin Freeman, Georgetown.
Ashton Gibbs; Pittsburgh; Andrew
Goudelock, College of Charleston; Justin
Greene, Kent State; Dwight Hardy, St.
John's;John Holland, Boston U.
Ken Horton, Central Connecticut
State; Reggie Jackson, Boston College;
Rick Jackson, Syracuse; Charles Jenkins,
Hofstra;John Jenkins,Vanderbilt.
Aaron Johnson, UAB; Terrence Jones,
Kentucky; Trevele Jones, Texas Southern;
Brandon Knight, Kentucky; Jon Leuer,
Wisconsin.
Mickey McConnell, Saint Mary's;
ETwaun Moore, Purdue; Markieff Morris,
Kansas; Mike Muscala, Bucknell; Chandler
Parsons, Florida.
C.J. Reed, Bethune-Cookman; Ryan
Rossiter, Siena;Jesse Sanders, Liberty; Kyle
Singler, Duke; Mike Smith, East Tennessee
State.
Isaiah Thomas, Washington; Tristan
Thompson,Texas; NikolaVucevic, Southern
California; Brad Wanamaker, Pittsburgh;
Casper Ware, Long Beach State.
Kyle Weems, Missouri State;Taj Wesley,
Utah State; Jordan Williams, Maryland;
Isiah Williams, Utah Valley; Keith Wright,
Harvard.

Women's NCAA

PHILADELPHIA REGIONAL
Regional Championship
Tuesday
Connecticut vs. Duke (n)
DAYTON REGIONAL
Regional Championship
Notre Dame 73,Tennessee 59
SPOKANE REGIONAL
Regional Championship
Stanford 83, Gonzaga 60
DALLAS REGIONAL
Regional Championship
Tuesday
' Texas A&M vs. Baylor (n)

Women's NIT

Semifinals
Today
Charlotte (27-9) at Toledo (27-8),
8 p.m.
I Southern Cal (23-12) at Illinois State
(24-10), 8:05 p.m.

BASEBALL

Spring training

Today's Games
Minnesota atAtlanta, 12:05 p.m.
Florida vs. N.Y. Mets at Port St. Lucie,
12:10 p.m.
Toronto at Tampa Bay, 4:10 p.m.
Seattle at LA. Dodgers, 10:10 p.m.

AL schedule

Thursday's Games
Detroit at N.Y.Ynkees, 1:05 p.m.
LA.Angels at Kansas City, 4:10 p.m.

NL schedule

Thursday's Games
Atlanta atWashington, 1:05 p.m.
Milwaukee at Cincinnati, 2:10 p.m.


San Diego at St. Louis, 4:15 p.m.
San Francisco at LA. Dodgers,
8:05 p.m.

GOLF

Golf week

LPGATOUR
Kraft Nabisco Championship
Site: Rancho Mirage, Calif.
Schedule: Thursday-Sunday.
Course: Mission Hills Country Club,
Dinah Shore Tournament Course (6,738
yards, par 72).
Purse: $2 million. Winner's share:
$300,000.
Television: Golf Channel (Thursday,
noon-3 p.m., 6:30-9:30 p.m.; Friday,
1-4 a.m., noon-3 p.m., 6:30-9:30 p.m.;
Saturday, 6-9 a.m., 4:30-8:30 p.m.,
II p.m.-3 a.m.; Sunday, 4:30-8.30 p.m.,
II p.m.-3 a.m.).
Online: http://www.ipgo.com
PGATOUR
Houston Open
Site: Humble. Texas.
Schedule:Thursday-Sunday.
Course: Redstone Golf Club,
Tournament Course. (7,457 yards, par
72).
Purse: $5.9 million. Winner's share:
$1,062,000.
Television: Golf Channel (Thursday-
Friday, 3-6 p.m., 9:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m.;
Saturday-Sunday, 1-3 p.m.) and NBC'
(Saturday-Sunday, 3-6 p.m.).
Online: http://www.pgatour.com
CHAMPIONS TOUR
Mississippi Gulf Resort Classic
Site: Saucier, Miss.
Schedule: Friday-Sunday.
Course: Fallen Oak Country Club
(7,054 yards, par 72).
Purse: $1.6 million. Winner's share:
$240,000.
Television: Golf Channel (Saturday,
1'2:30-2':30 a.m., 3-5 a.m., 9-11 a.m.,
9-11 p.m.; 'Sunday, 3:30-5:30 a.m.,
9-11 p.m.; Monday, 3:30-5:30 a.m.).
PGA EUROPEAN TOUR
Hassan II Trophy
Site:Agadir, Morocco.
Schedule:Thursday-Sundayo
Courses: Golf du Palais Royal (6,844
yards, par 72) and Golf de L'Ocean (6,798
yards, par 71).
Purse: $2.11 million. Winner's share:
$351,400.
Television: Golf Channel (Thursday-
Friday, II a.m.-noon; Saturday, II a.m.-
I p.m.; Sunday,9 a.m.-I p.m.).
Online: http://www.europeantour.com
NATIONWIDE TOUR
Next event. Fresh Express Classic,
April 14-17, TPC Stonebrae, Hayward,
Calif.
OTHER TOURNAMENTS
Women
DURAMED FUTURES TOUR:
Daytona Beach Invitational, Friday-Sunday,
LPGA International, Champions Course,
Daytona Beach. Online: http://www.
duromedfuturestour.com

HOCKEY

NHL schedule

Tuesday's Games
Toronto 4, Buffalo 3
Philadelphia 5, Pittsburgh 2
Carolina atWashington (n)
Florida at Columbus (n)
Chicago at, Boston (n)
Atlanta at Montreal (n)
Ottawa atTampa Bay (n)
Minnesota at St. Louis (n)
Vancouver at Nashville (n)
Los Angeles at Edmonton (n) .
Dallas at Phoenix (n)
Today's Games
N.Y. Rangers at Buffalo, 7 p.m.
N.Y. Islanders at New Jersey, 7 p.m.
Montreal at Carolina, 7 p.m.
St. Louis at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Anaheim at Calgary, 9:30 p.m.
Thursday's Games
Toronto at Boston, 7 p.m.
N.Y. Rangers at N.Y. Islanders, 7 p.m.
Atlanta at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Columbus atWashington, 7 p.m.
Pittsburgh atTampa Bay, 7:30 p.m.
Ottawa at Florida, 7:30 p.m.
Edmonton at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Nashville at Colorado, 9 p.m.
Los Angeles at Vancouver, 10 p.m.
Dallas at San Jose, 10:30 p.m.


KIRKMAN: Looks to make it back


Continued From Page 1B
Texas.
"I was optioned to Round
Rock and will leave for there
(Tuesday)," Kirkman said
Monday night "Nobody is
ever happy about getting
sent down, but I hope to be
back up soon."
Kirkman will be in the
starting rotation at Round
Rock, a job he held last
year for the Rangers'
Triple A Oklahoma City
affiliate. He was Pacific
Coast League pitcher of
the year in 2010 with a 13-
3 record and 3.09 ERA for
the Redhawks.
Kirkman was called up
by the Rangers in August
and eventually pitched
in the Afnerican League
Championship Series and
the World Series.
"They (Rangers) are
planning on carrying 13
pitchers and they told me
I would be one of the first
guys considered if any-
thing happens to the staff,"
Kirkman said.
Kirkman played in four
games in the spring. He
gave up 15 hits and seven
earned runs in 11'6 innings


for a 5.56 ERA. He was 0-1
in his one start when the
defense collapsed behind
him and he "made some
bad pitches."
"I didn't have a bad




Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

CIBKR


02011 Tribune Media Services, Inc. '
All Rights Reserved.

FTINA
o3


spring at all," Kirkman said.
"One game got out of hand.
All I have to do is go out
and pitch with good stuff
and things will fall into
place."


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek


RNCIGY ,___

c ^ WHAT THE MA&ICJANK
HAP ON THE
LSIFOS cou-sE.
SNow arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.

A: A
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's Jumbles: PROUD SHOWN SAVAGE DIFFER
I Answer: The computer repairman had one -
A HARD DRIVE


GOLF REPORTS



Charity event for Lightning


The 1st Annual Lake
City Lightning Charity Golf
Tournament was Saturday.
There were 14 four-
person teams playing a
scramble format
The team of Snuffy
Smith, and Frank, Dean
and Luke Soucinek won
gross with a 57.
The net team winners
were Oscar Saadverda,
Mike Koon, Mike Smith
and Eric Williams with a
57.
There was a multi-
hole on the par-3 Creeks
No. 8, which had six holes
to choose from if you hit
the green. Also on the hole,
the Lake City Lightning
10-and-under. girls softball
team was there to cheer on


QUAIL HEIGHTS
COUNTRY CLUB
Tammy Gainey

the participants with clap-
ping and giggles.
There also was a $5,000
'putting contest. Dennis
Reynolds got the chance
and gave it a great roll,
but just missed. After play
there was lunch, awards
and prizes for the winners.
Thank you to everyone
that played and to all the
sponsors for the successful
tournament.
Jack Tuggle won the Top
of the Hill with +6. Ronnie
Ash was second with +4.
VonCile Kahlich won the
Ladies Blitz with +5. Carole


McGraw was second with
+2.
Wednesday Blitz
winners:
A Division Don Horn
+1, first; Frog Niewisch -2,
second; Tom Harl -4, third;
B Division Mike
Kahlich +8, first; Emerson
Darst +7, second; Gary
Croxton +4, third; .
C Division Tim
Tortorice +9, first; Gary
Dampier +1, second; Terry
Shay even, third;
D Division Jimmy
Dempsey +10, first; Keith
Denmark +9, second;
Richard Skipper +3, third.
Chet Carter, Pete
Skantzos, Randy Heavrin,
Todd Carter and Dempsey
won skins.


Canadian Open contested


Ten teams took to
the course for the
annual Canadian Open.
Competition was fierce
with every team finishing
under par.
The team of Brian Chang,
Gilles Drolet, Vachon
Huguette and Jocelyne
Motard eked out the win,
finishing a shot ahead of
Ghislain Gagnon, Alain
Meunier, Sylvie Dufour and
Nicole Ste-Marie.
The annual Appreciation
Award went to the four-
some of Pierre Provencher,
Jacques Lacroix, Yvette
Hall and Marcia Martel.
The LGA drew 20
players for a net score
match using full handicaps.
Dottie Rogers displayed her
best game to pick up first
place. Nicole Ste-Marie was
a close second, followed by
Katrina Counts in third.
Chad Hunter (+6) used
his only birdie of the day
to capture the Wednesday
Blitz A division, one shot
ahead of Dwight Rhodes.
Yves Pelletier and John
Raulerson posted stellar


1;
1

1



1


2
2

2'


COUNTRY CLUB
at LAKE CITY
Ed Goff

scores of + 12 to tie for first
place in the B division.
Mike McCranie and
Pelletier each had two of
the five skins and Alan
Moody took the other.
In Saturday action, Scott
Kishton and Steve Thomas
both finished at +8 to split
the top prize.
Jordan Hale was in solo
third place with +7, fol-
lowed by Jonathan Allen,
Jim Carr, Mike Carr and
Richard Francis in a four-
way tie for fourth.
In the skins game Greg
Lyons, Hale and, .Thomas
picked up two winners
apiece. Kishton, had the
other keeper.
Only the first match of
Good Old Boys play was
competitive. That con-
test- ent to Eli Witt, Don
Christensen, Mike Spencer
and Jim Stevens by a lone
team point over Monty
Montgomery, Jim McGriff,


ACROSS 38 Confused fight
39 911 responder
1 Like some 40 Moray
tablets 41 Rainbow band
6 Vitamin B comrn- 42 Tooth-puller's
ponent org.
2 Hockey player 43 Rx writers
4 White 44 Travel
rabbit, maybe stopover
5 Lure 46 Where chimps
6 Beseeches groom
7 "The", to 48 Resounded
Wolfgang 51 Wholly
8 Exaggerator's absorbed
suffix 55 Household
9 Apple goody member
1 Capone foe 56 Regarded as
3 Water- 57 Cockatoo fea-
power org. tures
6 Debate side 58 Plows through


27 Grassy field
28 Fishing gear
30 Authorizes
31 Joule fraction
32 Astaire sister
33 Wild distur-
bances
35 Herd of whales
37 Estuary


.DOWN

1 Not sm. or
med.
2 Charged parti-
cle
3 Natalie's father
4 Omit, in speech


Tom Elmore and Howard
Whitaker.
Match 2 produced an
easy 10-6 win for Marc Risk,
Jim Bell, Carl Wilson, Ed
Snow and Dan Stephens,
over Stan Woolbert, Bobby
Simmons, Bill Wheeler,
Merle Hibbard and Joe
Persons.
Good individual scores
continued to abound. Snow
was in the medalist spot
this week after holing out
six birdies en route to an
even par 35-37-72. Woolbert
(75), Montgomery (75),
Whitaker (77), Christensen
(77), Risk (78), Bell (79)
and Witt (79) rounded out
the 18-hole leaders list.
Hibbard's 37 on the front
and Spencer's 38 on the
back were 9-hole winners.
Upcoming events:
Thursday, ER.E.E.
tournament (9 a.m.
shotgun start);
April 9, Lions Club
scramble .(9 a.m. shotgun
start);
April 15, S & S
scramble (12:30 p.m.
shotgun start).


Get www.lakecityreporter.com
i "~ pLake City
0(ir1 -- Reporter


Answer to Previous Puzzle

B IBEVILE CPA
APO IDEA HIIIL
ITS CLOT ICE
TISSUE SOC K
CAAN ROAFN
FACADE XI
GENE ABE P ECK
HOLES GUM ISEE
PAW VEGOUT



PUMA EVEN ST
ITER LIEU CE


5 Casino cubes
6 Scruffs
7 Misfortunes
8 Helped a burglar
9 Spy org.
10 Midwest st.


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


11 Refusals
13 More spooky
19 Less speedy
20 Foot support
22 Tattered
24 Swerved
25 Joins forces
26 Crocus "bulb"
27 majeste
28 Woolly ani-
mals
29 Make airtight
34 Repetitive and
boring
36 Caused aston-
ishment
42 Cuzco site
43 Gourmet
mushroom
45 Wildlife shel-
ter
47 Dollar bills
48 PC button
49 Paramedic's
skill
50 Tend the gar-
den
52 1 love (Lat.)
53 Violin knob
54 Six-pointers


2011 by UFS, Inc.


SCOREBOARD


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421











Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420 LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS WEDNESDAY, MARCH 30, 2011


Tiger still toast of PGA tour


By DOUG FERGUSON
Associated Press

ORLANDO So many
people surrounded the first
tee that it was hard to see
who was playing. The gal-
lery stretched down the
entire length of the 461-
yard opening hole and
wrapped around the back
of the green on a sun-baked
Sunday at Bay Hill.
Now on the tee, Tiger
Woods.
He was in a tie for 29th.
He was 10 shots out of the
lead, no serious threat to
win.
About four hours later,
the final group of Martin
Laird and Spencer Levin
approached the fifth green
with under 100 fans tagging
along.
This is nothing new.
A few weeks earlier
at Doral, the PGA Tour
decided to group players
based on their world rank-
ing. Someone estimated
the gallery at 85 people for
the "Big Three" of Martin
Kaymer, Lee Westwood
and Luke Donald. On the
other side.of the course,
there were too many fans to
count in the group of play-
ers ranked 4-5-6- Graeme
McDowell, Woods and Phil
Mickelson.
During .the FedEx
Cup playoffs last year at
Ridgewood, thousands
of fans crammed behind,
the ropes on both sides. of
the .fairway at Ridgewood
Country Club to ,; watch
Woods, ..who was in 20th
place and going nowhere.
One reporter was think-
ing tob hard as he searched
for the meaning of it all.
"T get it ... but I don't
get it," he said as his eyes
scanned the size of the
crowd. "The guy is in 20th
place. Why wouldn't you go
watch someone who is'actu-
ally playing well?"


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Tiger Woods hits out of a bunker onto the 17th green during the final round of the Arnold Palmer
Invitational at Bay Hill golf tournament in Orlando Sunday.


The answer: They
were- there to see Babe
Ruth.
Even at his worst and
there are plenty of numbers
and statistics to back that
up Woods remains the
most .compelling figure in
golf. It was like that at Bay
Hill. It will be that way next
week at the Masters, even
as Mickelson tries to join
him with four green jack-
ets, or Kaymer goes after
a second straight major, or
Westwood tries to regain
the No. 1 ranking, this time
without having to explain
why.
Never mind that Woods
is meandering through
mediocrity at the moment.
Wednesday.will mark 500


days since his last victory
at the Australian Masters,
.his last tournament before
the. car crash outside his
Florida home and the rev-
elations of affairs that fol-
lowed and broke up his
marriage.
He has played 20 tour-
naments since, not includ-
ing the Ryder Cup. In his
.only chance to win, at the
Chevron World Challenge,
Woods coughed up a
four-shot lead in the final
round to McDowell, the
first time in his career that
Woods was leading by more
than three shots going
into the last day and didn't
win.
Woods has earned
$265,465 in five tourna-


ments this year. He earned
more in his first five tourna-
ments as a 20-year-old pro.
In 16 starts on the PGA
Tour since he returned last
year, Woods has three top
10s.
One longtime British
golf journalists might have
summeditupbestlastyearat
The Players Championship.
He wandered onto the TPC
Sawgrass to watch Woods
for a couple of holes, then
walked back in. "It's noth-
ing special," he said.
So why the special treat-
ment?
Because Woods is
approaching an important
anniversary.
Ifts not the one-year anni-
versary of his return to,


competition at the Masters,
where he played off mem-
, ory and somehow tied for.
fourth at Augusta National
with a performance that
raised false hopes.
It's the 10-year anniver-
sary of his greatest feat.
Woods won the Masters
in 2001 to become the only
player to hold all four major
championships at the same
time. It took him 294 days
to achieve something that
might never be done again.
There was no one close to
him in the game back then.
There remains no one
close to him in interest level.
now.
That's why lie draws the
biggest crowds. That's why
television can't resist show-,


ing him.
A few years ago, Sean
O'Hair was in rough on
the 14th hole of the North
Course at Torrey Pines, and
Woods was on the adjacent
hole. Spotting a reporter,
O'Hair playfully asked why
he was always watching
Woods. Then came a ques-
tion to O'Hair: "If you had
this job, who would you be
watching ori Thursday?"
'Tiger," O'Hair said with
a laugh.
Woods was more inter-
esting to watch when he
was winning 40 percent, of
his tournaments, when he
looked like a special play-
er. Now he is interesting
in a nostaglic sense. They
remember how he once
performed and wonder if
he'will ever play that way
again.
Will be reach, let alone
surpass, the benchmark of
18 professional majors won
by Jack Nicklaus?
Can he be golf's best
player again?
Not even Woods knows
the answer.
All anyone has at the
moment are memories of
how he once played, and
they are strong enough to
hold the interest.
In times of parity -which
is what Woods' demise has
brought come remind-
ers how hard it is to win,
and how often Woods won,
Consider this: Before turn-
ing 30, Woods already had
46 wins on the PGA Tour
and 10 majors.
Until someone else comes
along and it probably
won't be in Woods' lifetime
everyone will want to
know about Woods, good or
bad. Some watch because
they are eager to see him
dominate again. Some
watch because they delight
in his failure. Others are
just curious.
But they're watching.


INDIANS: Dupree picks up victory


Continued From Page 11

Willie Carter walked.
Faulkner scored on a
grounder to deep short by
Kortessis and Carter came
home on a throwing error.
Courson worked four
innings for Columbia with
three hits, five runs (four
earned), three walks and
a strikeout. Seth Thomas
went two innings with one


hit, two unearned runs, one
walk and one strikeout
Columbia's run in the
first inning came with two
outs. Gilliam singled and
scored on a double by
Courson.
Ryan Thomas singled
to lead off the third, but
three ground balls got the
Indians out of the inning.


Fort White had one
throwing error, but made
up for it by picking a run-
ner off third base. The
Indians also turned a
64-3 double play (Kortessis
to Brady Wilkinson to
Jonathan Dupree) to
get Dupree started on his
run of outs to close out the
game.


-~ -1 -
.. .-
-3-,


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Fort White's Brady Wilkins (6) covers second base a few seconds after Columbia's Mikey
Kirkman (18) tags the base.



CHS: Looking for consistency


Continued From Page 11t

put the ball in play. Gaskins
did put a good swing on
one though and he has a
bright future in front of
him. He'll definitely be
pulled up by the end of the
season."
Columbia coach


J.T. Clark wants the
Tigers to produce more
like they did in the second
game for the rest of the
season.
"Bailey threw very well
and has really solidified
the No. 1 job," he said. "If


we need a win, he's the
guy that's going to go do
it and do a good job. We
swung the bats a lot better
in the second game, but
we've got to get consis-
tent. That's what is missing
right now."


ASSOCIATED PRESS
.Texas Rangers left fielder Josh Hamilton goes sliding for a line drive during a spring training
game at Salt River Fields in Scottsdale, Ariz., Monday.

RANGERS: Looking for Series return


Continued From Page 1B
than six months after win-
ning their first American
League pennant.
Just like the days when
the Rangers were still also-
rans in the AL West, there
seem to be growing con-
cerns about pitching despite
plenty of big bats.
All-Star third baseman
Adrian Beltre has been
added to a lineup so stacked
that Rangers career hits
leader Michael Young has
been pushed into the role
of the primary designated
hitter and dropped to sixth
in the batting order. Josh
Hamilton is coming off an
AL MVP season when he
led the majors hitting .359,
along with 32 home runs
and 100 RBIs.
But ace left-hander Cliff
Lee decided not to stay
despite a $138 million,
six-year offer and instead
returned to Philadelphia,
another team he has pitched
for in the World Series.
And soon after settling
on their Lee-less rotation,
and deciding to keep hard-
throwing Neftali Feliz in
the bullpen, Tommy Hunter
strained his right groin,
Derek Holland had a hor-
rible outing and C.J. Wilson
went only two innings his


final Arizona start because
of tightness in his left ham-
string.
Wilson, the crafty left-
hander who won 15 games
last season after making
the transition from the
bullpen to the rotation, did
throw some more pitches
on the side after coming
out Saturday and still plans
to start the season open-
er at home Friday against
Boston.
, But while the weekend
will include the debut of
the ballpark upgrades and
handing out those rings
to fifth-year manager Ron
Washington and his play-
ers, it marks the beginning
of the Rangers' bid to return
to the World Series.
"We know what it takes
to get there now, and we
need to win three more
games, that's it," said, Lewis
3-0 with a 1.71 ERA in four
postseason starts after 12
regular-season wins in his
return from Japan. "That
was the big deal, we know
what it takes, we know what
type of grind it is."
The Rangers had never
won a postseason series, or
even a home playoff game,
before last season the
50th in the history of the


franchise that started as
the expansion Washington
Senators in 1961.
"It's a confidence builder.
We've always felt like we
could do it," Hamilton said.
"We just got to the point
where the 'pitching stepped
up, and our defense and our
hitting kind of all worked
together at the same time."
Ian Kinsler has returned
to the leadoff spot after a
career-best .382 on-pace
percentage last year while
hitting in five different spots
in the order. Elvis Andrus is
hitting second, setting up
Hamilton, Beltre, Nelson
Cruz and Young, the lon-
gest-tenured Ranger who
had requested a trade but
seems content now to begin
his 11th season in Texas.
"I think because we lost
the World Series, it motivat-
ed everybody to be better,"
said Cruz, who hit .318 with
22 homers last season even
while missing 51 games
with hamstring problems.
While Lee was the big
midseason acquisition. last
season, the Rangers already
had a 5'/-game lead in the
AL West that was the larg-
est in any of baseball's six
divisions when he arrived
from Seattle.


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS WEDNESDAY, MARCH 30, 2011


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


w








4B LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVERTISEMENT WEDNESDAY, MARCH 30, 2011
































































Soon a year will have passed since the Deepwater Horizon accident in the Gulf. From
the beginning, we have taken responsibility for the cleanup. Our commitment to the
Gulf remains unchanged, as does our responsibility to keep you informed.


No oil has flowed into the Gulf since July 15th. As our efforts continue, nearly 100%
of the waters are open and the beaches are clean and open. To ensure its safety, Gulf
seafood has been more rigorously tested by independent researchers and experts
than any other seafood in the world. To date, BP has spent more than $13 billion
in clean-up costs.


An additional $282 million has been spent on environmental issues, including wildlife
rescue and restoration of wildlife refuges across the region. We have also committed
$500 million to the Gulf of Mexico Research Institute to fund scientific studies on the
potential impact of the spill.


$5 billion in claims have already been paid. We've committed $20 billion to an
independent fund to pay for environmental restoration and all legitimate claims,
including lost incomes. More than $200 million in grants have been made to the
Gulf. Coast States to promote tourism and seafood.


This was a tragedy that never should have happened. Our responsibility is to learn
from it and share with competitors, partners, governments and regulators to help
ensure that it never happens again.

We know we haven't always been perfect but we are working to live up to our
conrnitments both now and in the future.

For more information, please visit bpamerica.com.


'~ATIteT c~orn,.1B'KAmenca
)
LlJvL~be ~c'n~ihp













oColumia County

Your marketplace source for Lake City and Columbia County


WEDNESDAY, MARCH 30, 2011 1i



Program offers classes covering various topics


Meeting
the com-
munity's
needs by
providing
knowledge on a particular
subject and making infor-
mation accessible is a goal
of the Columbia County
Cooperative Extension
Service.
The office is a partner-
ship of the University of
Florida/IFAS, the United
States Department of
Agriculture and Columbia
County, said Derek Barber,
livestock and natural
resources /4H Agent II.
Educational programs in
areas such as agriculture,
horticulture, family and
consumer sciences, and
4-H youth development are
offered.
"It's not just cows and
plows," he said. 'There are
a whole lot of other things
to help an individual."
A new program being
offered is Living on a Few
Acres, which introduces
basic production tech-
niques on a wide variety of
topics to participants, he
said.
Census statistics from
2007 pertaining to agri-
culture in the county
indicated an increase in
the number of farms but
a decrease in acreage,
Barber said. The class "
helps participants know
how to maximize their
amount of acreage.
"It's based on the ques-
tion, 'What can I do with
my acreage?'" he said.
Barber is the main
instructor but also has.
additional speakers.',


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Derek Barber, a livestock and natural resources agent with the University of Florida Columbia County IFAS Extension office, is seen next to a floating hydro-
ponics garden growing various types of lettuce.


The class is 7-8:30 p.m.
at the extension office
and remaining dates
and prpgrants are: April
19 Backyard Flock:
Growing Poultry; May 17
- Optimize Pasture and
Grazing Management;
June 21 Beef and Small
Ruminant Production;.July
19 Pond Management;
Aug. 16 -'Equine
Management; Sept 20
- Organic Production;
Oct. 18 Fruits and Nuts
for North Florida: Nov. 15


- Wildlife Habitat; and
. Dec. 20 Marketing and
Value Added Products.
Eac n month the num-
bers increase for par-
ticipation in the program,
Barber said. The program
is $10 per person or $15
per couple, which includes.
a notebook with informa-
tion on each topic.,
Another program
offered through the
office is Going Native:
Landscaping for Wildlife


with Native Plants. The
three-part series focuses
on learning about native
plants to attract birds and
butterflies.
"We're trying to provide
more programs that deal ,
with natural resources and
habitats," Barber said.
The class meets,at 6:30
p.m. on the following
dates with these topics:
May 9 Getting Started:


Food, Water, Cover, and
Place to raise young; June
6 Attiacting Birds'to
your Backyard; and July 11
- Attracting Butterflies to
your Backyard. The pro-
gram is free.
Publicity in the Lake
City Reporter helps
increase awareness about
programs offered at the
extension office, Barber
said.


"I think it helps tremen-
dously," he said. "When
people call for more infof-
mation they say they. read
about it in the paper."
University of Florida /
IFAS Columbia County
Extension office is located
at 164 SW Mary Ethel
Lane. The number is 386-
752-5384, fax is 386-758-
2173 and website is http://
columbia., ifas. ufl. edu.


We're proud to be part of the TD Bank family. Not just Building
The Better Bank we're building stronger communities.
Mercantile Bank has always i
been a great supporter of local
community programs and initiatives
and that will continue as TD Bank,
where they believe in Making a
Difference Together
In the last year through the o"i
TD Charitable Foundation, TD Bank
awarded 1,500 donations from
Florida to Maine, contributing
$13 million to non-profits serving- r
local communities.
This June, Mercantile Bank
will become TD Bank, America's Most
Convenient Bank, and we look
forward to delivering you the best
possible banking experience.






MERCANTILE BANK

800,38,8681 www,6 1h, t 4 ilt,.com

mem,,,,, FDIC Mercantile Bank is a trade name ofTD Bank, N.A.TD Bank Group is a trade name for The Toronto-Dominion Bank. Used with permission. Fbr detailed
credit ratings for The Toronto-Dominion Bank and TD Bank, N.A. visit https://www.td.comlinvestor/credit.jsp, Credit Ratings are not recommendations to purchase,
sell, or hold a financial obligation inasmuch as they do not comment on market price or suitability for a particular investor. Ratings are subject to revision or
withdrawal at any time by the rating organization.


More
1-.3ossibilifics.




Same

I lonictowil Clonimittlicti.t.


..0b^L
F"ItB^









Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED WEDNESDAY, MARCH 30, 2011


Lake City Reporter





CLASSIFIED


ADvantage


~L~W


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

755-5440


One item per ad $
4 lines 6 days sa1 tonal
Rate applies to private individuals sailing
personal merchandise totalling S00 or less.
Each item must include a price
I This i a non-refundable rate.



One Item per ad addition
lines 6 days le$ 0" |
Rate applies to private Individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling $00 or less.
Each Item must include a prie.






Rate applies to private individuals selling
Personal merchandise totalling $1,000 or less.
Each item must Ilclude a price
Th. sis anon-refundable rate.




9 iach additional
it $ 2 3ts7a0rkhai lling$2SO~or 913





One Item per ad
4 lines 6 days Each additional
lines 6 Qy s.line$ l.55 :,
Rate applies topdvaa Indivldual sewlng
personal mercandie totaling $4000 or less.
Each Item must Incluae a price.
This Is a non-refundable rate; ,


One item per ad ad veis
$ 10.80oe e ach ad ditional l
4 lines 6 days line $1.65 a
Rate applies to private Individuals selling
f personal merchandise totalling $6,000 or less.
Each item must Include a price,
S gThis Is a non-refundablre ra.






m4linest. O 50
3 days
ICules 2 Sgn' e dd t onal lne 165



Limited to service type advertis-
ing only.
4 lines, one month....s92.0.4
$10.80 each additional line
Includes an additional $2.00 per
ad for each Wednesday insertion.



You can call us at 755-5440,
Monday through Friday from 8:00
a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Some people prefer to place their
classified ads in person, and some
ad categories will require prepay-
ment. Our office is located at 180
East Duval Street.
S- You can also fax or email your ad
copy to the Reporter.
FAX: 386-752-9400 Please
direct your copy to the Classified
Department.
EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityre-
S porter.com


[edines


Ad is to Appear:
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Fnday
Saturday
Sunday


Call by:
Mon., 10:00 am.
Mon., 10:00a.m.
Wed., 10:00 a.m.
Thurs., 10:00 a.m.
Fri., 10:00a.m.
Fri., 10:00 a.m.


Fax/Email by:
Mon., 9:00 a.m.
Mon., 9:00 a.m.
Wed., 9:00 a.m.
Thurs., 9:00 a.m.
Fri.,9:00a.m.
Fr., 9:00 a.m.


These deadlines are subject to change without notice




Ad Errors- Please read your ad
on the first day of publication.
We accept responsibility for only
the first incorrect insertion, and
only the charge for the ad space
in error. Please call 755-5440
immediately for prompt correc-
tion and billing adjustments.
Cancellations- Normal advertising
deadlines apply for cancellation.
Billing Inquiries- Call 755-5440.
Should further information be
required regarding payments or
credit limits, your call will be trans-
. ferred to the accounting depart-
ment.


Advertising copy is subject to
approval by the Publisher who
reserves the right to edit, reject,
or classify all advertisements under
appropriate headings. Copy should
be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the first day of pub-
lication. Credit for published errors
will be allowed for the first insertion
for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the
Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nor for any general,
special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply
with Federal, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
nation in employment, housing and
public accommodations. Standard
abbreviations are acceptable; how-
ever, the first.word of each ad may
not be abbreviated.

'.... .i$hd Online1
lwvw.ilevimtyreporter.eomi


Legal

BOARD OF COUNTY COMMIS-
SIONERS, COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
INVITATION TO BID
TRAFFIC SIGNAL MAINTE-
NANCE AND EMERGENCY RE-
PAIR
BID NO. 2011-D
This is to advise that Columbia
County is accepting bids to provide
traffic signal maintenance and emer-
gency repair services. Bids will be
accepted through 2:00 PM on April
20, 2011. Information and instruc-
tions may be obtained by contacting
the office of the Board of County
Commissioners, Columbia County,
135 NE Hemando Ave. Suite 203,
Lake City, Florida or P. 0. Box
1529, Lake City,.Florida 32056-1529
or by calling (386)719-2028.
Bid packages may also be download-
ed from the County's website:
http://www.columbiacountyfla.com/
PurchasingBids.asp
All bidders must attend a pre bid
meeting to be. held at the Commis-
sioners office located at 135 NE Her-
nando Avenue Room 203, Lake City,
FLonApril 13, 2011 at 2:00 P.M.
Colurbia Count Board of'
Count\ Cdmmistioner.,
Jody DuPree, Ch.urmtr ir
(0454st-14
NMarch 30. 2011
Aprut6. 2o1 i
NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR
TAX DEED t'
ec. 197.241 F.S
Notf&is-iberob' gnn'lhrfethe *
Ma1k Sulliv.an CF Thomras Sulinan
of the following certificate has filed
said certificate for a Tax Deed to be
Issued thereop. The ertificate nuim-
ber and year if ksuiance, the descrp-
tion of lthejlprop'5rn and name mi
which it aissiesased is as tollok :
Certificate Number 1165
Year of Issuance: 2005
Description of Property: SEC 01
TWN 2S RNG 17 PARCEL NUM-
BER 04659-010 COMM SW COR
OF NW 1/4 OF NE 1/4, RUN N
432.75 FT, E 158.88 FT FOR POB,
RUN N 218.23 FT, E 223.69 FT, S
217.80 FT, W 220 FT TO POB.
(AKA LOT 34 FRANK THOMAS
S/D UNREC) ORB 353-472, 761-
1961 i
Name in which assessed: DICK
JOHNSON
All of said property being in the
County of Columbia, State of Flori-
da. Unless said certificate shall be re-
deemed according to law, the proper-
ty described in such certificate will
be sold to the highest bidder at the
Courthouse on Monday the 18th day
of April, 2011, at 11:00 A.M.
P. DEWITT CASON
CLERK OF COURTS
AMERICANS WITH DISABILI-
TIES ACT: If you are a person with
a disability Who needs any accom-
modation in order to participate in
this proceeding, you are entitled, at
no cost to you, to the provision of
certain assistance. Persons with a
disability who need any accommoda-
tion to participate should contact the
ADA Coordinator, P.O. Box 1569,
Lake City, FL 32056, 386-719-7428,
within two (2) working days of your
receipt of this notice; if you are hear-
ing impaired call (800) 955-8771; if
you are voice impaired call (800)
955-8770.
04543580
March 30, 2011


PUBLIC AUCTION
2001 CHEVY
VIN# 2GlWF55K919250207
CREAMER'S WRECKER SERV-
ICE 290 NE SUNNYBROOK ST.
LAKE CITY, FL 32055
COLUMBIA COUNTY
386-752-2861
SALE DATE: April 18, 2011
8:00AM
04544189
March 30, 2011
NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR
TAX DEED
Sec. 197.241 F.S.
.Notice is hereby given that the
Mark or Margaret Sullivan of the fol-
lowing certificate has filed said cer-
tificate, for a Tax Deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate number and
year of issuance, the description of
the property and name in which it
was assessed is as follows:
Certificate Number: 2750
Year of Issuance: 2004
Description of Property: SEC 33
TWN 3S RNG 17 PARCEL NUM-
BER 13461-000 S DIV: BEG 420
FT W OF NE COR OF NW 1/4 OF
SW 1/4, RUN S 143 FT, E 105 FT,
N 210 FT TO PUTNAM ST, W 105
FT, S 67 FT TO POB. ORB 961-
1340
Name in which assessed: MICHAEL
D. COX
All of said property being in the
County of Columbia, State of Flori-
da. Unless said certificate shall be re-
deemed according to law, the proper-


Home Improvements

Handicap accessible modifications
for veterans. 38 yrs experience.
386-752-4072 DON REED
CONSTRUCTION, INC
Licensed and insured CGC036224

Lawn & Landscape Service

Clean Pine Straw,
You pick it up, $1.85 a bale
Delivery of 100 bales $285
386-688-9156

Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,-
h co a RESIdfES: '.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.


Legal

ty described in such certificate will
be sold to the highest bidder at the
Courthouse on Monday the 18th day
of April, 2011, at 11:00 A.M.
P. DEWITT CASON
CLERK OF COURTS
AMERICANS WITH DISABILI-
TIES ACT: If you are a person with
a disability who needs any accom-
modation in order to participate in
this proceeding, you-are entitled, at
no cost to you, to the provision of
certain assistance. Persons with a
disability who need any accommoda-
tion to participate should contact the
ADA Coordinator, P.O. Box 1569,
Lake City; FL 32056, 386-719-7428,
within two (2) working days of your
receipt of this notice; if you are hear-
ing impaired call (800) 955-8771; if
you are voice impaired call (800)
955-8770.
04544047
MArch 30, 2011

NOTICE OF BOARD MEETING
TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN
The District Board of Trustees, Flori-
da Gateway College, will hold a pub-
lic meeting ,t 4:00 p.m. 'on Tuesday,
April 12, 2011, in the Board Room
of the Administration Building,
(Building 001) of Florida, Gateway.
College.
Topics of consideration will be rou-
tine college business, .In addition to
routine college business the follow-
ing items will be considered:
Board Polic\ 6AFH. 12 6.10. Grievan-
Board Policy lHix.12:6-23, Disciimi-
nation and Harassmenit
Board Policy 6Hx 12:9-09, Student
Grievances Regarding, Discrimina-
tion
Any person wishing to be heard on
any agenda matter will be provided
an opportunity to do so by appearing
before the Board in the Board Room
of the Administration Building of
Florida Gateway College.',
All objections to this notice and pro-
priety of the scheduled meeting
should be filed with Florida Gateway
,College prior to nooq," Friday, April
8, 2011. All legal issues should be
brought to-- the Trustees' attention
and an attempt made to resolve them
prior to the meeting.
Please notify the President's Office
immediately if you require accom-
modation for participation in the
meeting.
Before the Board Meeting a Board
Retreat will be held in the Med-
Tech. Auditorium in Building 103
from 12:00 p.m. until 3:30 p.m. A
reception will be held at 3:30 p.m. in
the lobby of the Administration
Building prior to the regular Board
meeting.
04544136
March 30, 2011

020 Lost & Found

LOST: Lg 3 yr old white Calico
female cat. Goes by "Hannah".
Lives on 240/Itchetucknee. 9 yr
old daughter brokenhearted. Please
call 386-288-3916 REWARD!!!

060 Services

Adult Family Home, seeking new
residents, 24 hr care, meals, phone,
transportation to Drs. Enjoy our
country living! 386-397-2920

100 Job
S Opportunities
04544063
EMPLOYMENT
OPPORTUNITY
COLUMBIA COUNTY
Columbia County is accepting
applications for an Equipment
Operator II. The primary
responsibility is skilled manual
work in the operation of several
types of automotive vehicles &
mobile motorized heavy
equipment in the daily
operations of the Landfill. High
School diploma/G.E.D.
preferred & 2 years experience
in vehicle and/or equipment
operation, or an equivalent
combination of training &
experience. Valid Florida CDL
Class B Drivers License re-
quired. Salary is $10.02 per hr.
plus benefits. Successful
applicant must pass a pre-em-
ployment physical, drug
screening, and criminal history
check. Applications may be
obtained at the Human
Resources Office, Board of
County Commissioners, 135 NE
Hemando, #203, Lake City, FL
32055, or online at
www.columbiacountyfla.com
(386)719-2025, TDD (386)758-
2139. Deadline: April 8, 2011.
AA/EEO/ADA/VP Employer.

04544064
EMPLOYMENT
OPPORTUNITY
COLUMBIA COUNTY
Columbia County is accepting
applications for General
Laborer, Public Works. Min.
Experience: Completion of the
eighth grade & one-year
experience performing manual
labor; or combination of training
& experience. Valid FL driver's
license required. Salary: $8.67
per hr. plus benefits,.
Successful applicants must pass
pre-employment physical and
drug screening. Applications
may be obtained online at


100 Job
100 J Opportunities

04544071
EMPLOYMENT
OPPORTUNITY
COLUMBIA COUNTY
Columbia County is accepting
applications for the position of
Purchasing Director.' Position
functions as the chief purchasing
agent & is responsible for
preparing bid specifications,
reviewing bids, & awarding
purchasing contracts.,Minimum
requirements include graduation
from an accredited four year
college or university with degree
in a related area and two years
responsible experience in
purchasing work. .Experience
may.substitute for education.
Valid FL drive's license
required. Columbia County
residency within six months of
date of employment required.
Incumbent must file a financial
disclosure form annually in
accordance with Florida Statute.
Salary $43,098 annually plus
benefits. Successful applicant
must pass drug screening and
pre-employment physical.
Apply: Human Resources,
Board of County Commission-
ers, 135 NE Hemando Ave.,'
Lake City, FL, or at
www.columbiacountyfla.com.
(386)719-2025, TDD
.(386)758-2139 Applications
must be received onr or before
04/08/11. Columbia County is
an AA/EEO/ADA/VP employer

04544095
SPart Time Housekeeping
positions available. Experience
required. Must be able to work
flexible hours. Apply in person
at Camp Weed & Cerveny'.
Conference Center
11057 Camp Weed Place, *
Live Oak, FL. 32060

04544096
Part Time position available.
Experience required at basic
maintenance/janitorial duties.
Hours and days will vary each
week. Apply in person at Camp
Weed & Cerveny Conference
Center, 11057 Camp Weed
Place, Live Oak, FL 32060.

04544139




IMMEDIATE OPENING
.. Breakfast Attendant
Thursday thru Sunday
4:30am- 11:30 am
Industry Standard Benefits
Must Be Self Motivated with
Excellent Customer
Service Skills
Apply In Person
450 SW Florida Gateway Drive
Lake City, FL 32024
NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE

04544160
NOW HIRING
Cashiers & Baggers for High
Springs fruit & gift stores.
Apply in Person at Florida
Citrus Center (Chevron)
18603 NW CR 236, High
Springs (exit 404 & 1-75)

04544174
Anderson Columbia Co., Inc. is
accepting applications for a
Payroll Clerk. Experience
should include basic knowledge
of Payroll, federal tax deposits,
state withholding, garnishment
remittance and multi-state
filings. Applicants must have a
working knowledge of Word
and Excel. Accounting exp. a
plus. You may fax your resume
to 386-755-9132 or email to
wassont(d)andersoncolumbia.com
You may also come in and fill
out an application at
871 Guerdon Rd, Lake City, FL.
Equal Employment
Opportunity Employer.

AVON!!!, EARN up to 50%!!!
Only $10 for Starter Kit,
1-800-275-9945 pin #4206
www.youravon.com/tdavies
Cashiers needed, Experience
Preferred, Drug free workplace,
all applicants will be drug tested
Ellisville Exxon,
Hwy 441, No Phone Calls Please.
CDL A Flatbed/Van Truck
Driver needed for F/T OTR SE
area, 3 years exp or more, Contact
Melissa or Mary @ 386-935-2773
Drivers: Dedicated Runs!
Top Pay, Weekly Home-Time
for Solo's & Teams!
Consistent Freight with
Werner Enterprises:
1-888-567-4862


Established 20 yr. company
seeking traveling sales rep. Gone
mon. Fri. Company avg. pays
$910/wk. Call 1-800-225-6368,
ext 333. www.brechtpacific.com
Experienced cook needed,
part time position, weekdays and
weekends, day and/or evening
shift, experience in commercial
kitchen all aspects of meal
preparation and service. apply in
person, pls include resume. apply
at Camp Weed and the Cerveny
Conference Center, Live Oak, Fl
Experienced Heavy Duty
Diesel Mechanic needed,
Please call Mary at
386-935-2773
Help Wanted!
Energetic, Dependable, Full Time.
Computer experience required,
Apply in person only!
Smitty's Western Store


100 Job
too Opportunities
Local law office needs
experienced legal secretary.
Workers compensation, personal
-injury and general legal matters
experience preferred. Immediate
employment. Apply in person at
116 NW Columbia Ave.,
Lake City, FL 32055.
Wanted Highly motivated
individual for Sales Position.
Rountree -Moore Ford Lincoln
Mercury Great benefits, paid vaca-
tion. Exp. a plus but not necessary.
Call Chris. @ 386-755-0630
WANTED LICENSED
Life and Health
Insurance Agent.
Call 386-755-6800

1-2A Medical
120 Employment

04544185
CANCER CARFpfNNoJ .
Florida is currently g a
MEDICAL ASSISTANT for a
fast paced work environment
Requires HS Diploma and
-excellent Phlebotomy skills with
certification
Intergy Experience and
excellent verbal/written
communication skills .
Qualified candidates please
email resume to:
jpapesh(flcancercarenonh
florida.com

05524650
LEARN TO DRAW BLOOD
Local Phlebotomy Course
offered in Lake City, FLA,
Certificate program.
t (904l566-14328

0552550
* M e er


Physical Therapist
Home Health Care Agency
servicing Lake City and
surrounding counties seeking
Full-time/PRN experienced
Physical Therapist
S Please fax resume to
386-758-3313 attention:
Lynn or apply online at
almostfamily.com

Direct;Care Staff & Cooks
Lake City Cluster ICF for
Developmentally Disabled
Persons. www.rescare.com
386-755-6104 EEO/M/F/D/V
FT Position for Front Offfice
Clerk available for busy
Family Practice Office,
Experience preferred.
Fax resume to (386) 719-9494
Giebeig Family Medicine.
Part Time
X-ray Technician,
Please email resume to
hr@toi-health.com


Smawann&
Medical Personnel

RN's & LPN's, local med-surg
hospital shifts, immediate work,
instant pay, $250 sign-on bonus,
Call 1-877-630-6988

.240 Schools &
S Education

04544098
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-04/11/10
Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-04/11/11

Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com



310 Pets & Supplies

FREE KITTEN
Litter box trained
386-288-2899
leave message
Loving House Dog, small male,
FREE to good home,
due to relocation
386-288-7358
Your Male Cavalier, or
Cocker Spaniel to breed our
Cavalier King Charles Spaniel
386-755-6178 Hurry!

REPORTER Classifieds

In Print and On Line
ww.Iakecityreporter.com


310 Pets & Supplies

PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.


361 Farm Equipment

84 Ford 4610 Tractor. Runs good.
Solid 2WD. New front tires,
350hr on 2005 motor. Dependable.
$7500. obo. 386-867-0005


401 Antiques

CASH CASH CASH CASH
Pre 1964 Silver Coins, Sterling,
Flatware, Costume Jewelry,
Unusual Antiques 386-963-2621

402 Appliances

GE Frost-Free Refrigerator
White, works great
$200 obo
.386-292-3927 or 386-755-5331

Kenmore Dryer, apt size,
120 voltage
Runs good, $65
386-292-3927 or 386-755-5331
Nice White Gas Tappan Stove
$145 Works Great!
386-292-3927 or
386-755-5331
White Whirlpool Washer
1$150
386-292-3927 or
386-755-5331


408 Furniture

Blue Race car toddler bed made
by little tykes, toddler mattress
included. Gentle used. Asking
$65.00. 386-292-4228


420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
We.Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.

Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$250 &-up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.


430 Garage Sales
ESTATE SALE
March 26-April 2
call for information
727-541-2173 or 386-456-8832


440 Miscellaneous.

Large Light Oak Entertainment
Center, will hold atleast 40" TV
$60
386-292-3927 or 386-755-5331

Pool Table-Beautiful, claw foot,
mahogany, leather pockets,
maroon cloth, pool sticks, balls,
plastic cover, and hard table top.
3 piece slate. $1295.00 752-1874
Tow Behind Grill/Smoker
$1,250 OBO.
386-249-3104 or
386-719-4802

A463 Building
r63 Materials

ROOFING Are you bothered -
by a leaking roof?
Call Reed Roofing today for a free
estimate. 386-752-4072
RCC00455399 Insured
ROOFING:Looking to replace
your Roof? Call Reed Roofing
today for a free estimate
386-752-4072 RC0055399
References available

630 Mobile Homes
630 for Rent

14 Wide, 2/2-$475. mo. + dep.
Clean, Quiet Country Park
Water, septic, garbage incl. NO
PETS! 386-758-2280 References,

2&3 BR MH. $395 $650. mo.
plus deposit. Water & sewer fur-
nished. Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
3BR/2BA Doublewide on
2.5 secluded acres. $750 a mo.
1st month and full security.
Please call 386-965-7534.


www.columbiacountyfla.com
or the Human Resources Office,
Board of County
Commissioners, 135 NE
Hemando, #203, Lake City, FL
32055, (386)719-2025, TDD
758-2139. Deadline for
applications: April 8,2011.
AA/EEO/ADA/VP Employer


ARE YOU OUR MISSING PIECE?








Spoie attitude






Apply Online or In Person! 1152 SW Business Point Dr
SLake City, FL 32025
s m- E 386.754.8562
SiTE -L www.sitel.com EDE


1, Fl, D17






Classified Department: 755-5440


;I. f~.~ ~3 586-688-1025
Located next to Lee's Nursery
Wtttt8Y* .A mcA ~ ^ "^.^.8..4.l*<-*-* *( 1^4. 1,*S l'-


Gum~as AMws DRUMS PNos
SOUND SYSTEMS -REmrALs REPAIRS
KEYBOARDs SHEET MusIC l
BAND INSTRUMENTS LESSONS
SOUND PRODUCTION


WITH TH PURCHASE OF A
FENDER ELECTRIC GUITAR
IBANEZ ELECTRIC GurTAR
K&,"usLAWmi Mo a E Id N W uiu


~;ii-rz'


Artists subject to change without notice. Show goes on rain or shine.
Taxes and processing are included in the ticket prices. Camping available.


s-,l-


p1,,


wro,-rV'ICE MUsic ,
v 'jTj Lake. C t FL
I 386-755-2060
950 SW MAIN BLVD
WWWVJMSIREEMW]C M_


11 ci~('


*I ,


your


-, ff: . ... . ...
? *? l *' ** '.J"**l*i ,'.>--; -.A


r-)


I;

El .'~
,. a


Customized Choices from Broyhill make one-of-a kind easy.


S 7 -


: : M -: ,...... -. .
!'. N,

,--,, .-' A


~Liii~'


$100


'OFF?
I Any Broyhill
I Choice Custom
I I
I Sofa

Expires 4-15-11
L n am go am n JoM


2.


I~A
1' '~
I, -

V


5.


I..


*1


RNITURE


1052 SW Main vd. 752-2752
Fae FwartareAeessorid sd Destvforewr 47yewrs


0 &lin flS Q I
>*<&'~r~r -nMj Z i-Wte; --- -- .f a mW ^


,1 If//, l/,.-, I -
Backuest Deluxe Ly raxnn or
TOP-OF-THE-LINE Pmadagc Vsn mF -
Perfect Sleeper Fi7iR I -
Sf l how BUp PoORr*SupwEE. ETYOURCHOCE P$5 L5
-W IJ BONUS COUPON a FREE SET OF PILLOWS_


I.


3.


Kffiger^-'^j


CLASSIFIED


WEDNESDAY, MARCH 30, 2011


LAKE CITY REPORTER


K OM
* L nc l^.IMS llim


r


. ...,-..".', :


'f cm ,


...... .,- .-. 1
^ -,. ,: ... <', ; ,,, ,:. :
te."", --v_,. is_ ,'.,.,-,^^









Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED WEDNESDAY, MARCH 30, 2011


630 Mobile Homes
630 for Rent
A very clean & well maintained
2/2 units in nice park. $599.mo
w/$500. dep. Rent includes water,
sewer, trash p/u. Close to town
386-984-8448
Ellisville, SWMH on 1+ ac, close
to 441 & 175, recently remodeled,
$550 mo $500 dep, utilities not
incl, Call Don at 386-365-1885
Looking for a place to Rent.
Nice reasonable price.
Furnished Mobile Home.
386-623-0925 or 386-752-4618
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White Contact 386-623-3404
or 386-365-1919

(640 Mobile Homes
for Sale

05525444
Palm Harbor Homes
Has 3 Modular Homes
Available at HUGE Savings
Over 40K Off
Call Today! 800-622-2832


06 Homes of Merit. 3br/2b
floor plan w/lg kitchen. 3
Estate. River access. MLS
Eastside Village Realty.
Milligan-Bose. 386-752
Owner Fin, 3/2, S of Lal
quiet, wooded, 1.5 ac, sml
mo, 386-590-0642/386-8
www.suwanneevalleyproper

650 Mobile Home
650 &Land,
OWNER FINANCE
3br/2ba DWMH wi
acres. 10 additional a
available. 386-623-66

Well kept 3/2 moble on
screened .front porch, cove
porch, shed, MLS77241
Call Brittany @ Results
386-397-3473

710 Unfurnished t
1 For Rent


05524728
SPRING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans;
some with garages.
Call 386-454-1469
or visit our website:
www.springhillvillage.net

5525315
Move in as low as $325
Call today for details!
386-758-8455
Windsong Apts
1 & 2 Bedroom Homes
Move in for as low as.
$199
386-755-2423
2br Apt by the lake. Close to
shopping and the VA Medical
Center. $500 mo plus deposit.
386-344-2972
Great location W of 1-75, spacious
deluxe 2BR apts., garage, W/D
hook up. patio. $600 & up, + SD,
386 965-0276
The Lakes Apts. Studios & 1Br's
from $135/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $525. + sec.
Call Michelle 386-752-9626

S 720 Furnished Apts.
SFor Rent
2 br/lba country apt. Owner on
property. $800 mo incl electric,
water, phone, cable & pool. Sec
req'd month to month accepted. 8
mi out from city. 386-937-0195
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent
3ba/2ba, New carpet & paint: .5
ac 2 mi from d'town. No pets.
Lease req'd: fav.wbackground only.
$850 +dep. 752-8696, 752-5025.

3br/2ba new const.in nice S/D
Lease Opt. to buy. $900/Mo. $700
Dep, + 1st & last Req'd., Credit
Check No Pets (386)755-9476
4/2,on .10 acres, w/lake access, off
of South Marion, $1,000 per
month, $500 security,
Call 386-752-3066

750 Business &
7 Office Rentals

05525390
2,000 sq ft, 1 mile S of 1-75 on
47, includes warehouse & mini
golf,3 bth (incl handicap),
unlimited possibilities could
convert to Senior Daycare, etc.
386-752-1364 or 965-4340

1800 SQ FT $1100. Office
furniture available and
cubicle dividers.Water,
sewer and garbage fees included.
386-752-4072 Ready to move in!

OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$695. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor
SE Baya Ave Office Furnished
1800 Sq Ft $1125.00
Ideal for Engineers & Professional
Quiet and safe environment
Security available 386-752-4072

770 Condos For Rent


04544107
Golf Course Condo for rent,
2BR/2BA, 1420 s.f., $1000/mo.
Rent includes all appliances,
basic cable, water/sewer/
garbage, pool & tennis ct.
access. Realtor/owner
call 386-344-0433.


790 Vacation Rentals
Horseshoe Beach Spring Special
Gulf Front 2br home, w/lg water-
front porch, dock, fish sink.
Avail wkends. $345. or wk $795.
(352)498-5986/386-235-3633

805 Lots for Sale
19993/2 DWMH on 1 ac
$55,000
Hallmark Real Estate
386-867-1613
Call Jay Sears
2 ac lot in River Access
community. Suwanne River
1 mile away. Owner will finance.
$13,500 Hallmark Real Estate
386-867-1613 Call Jay Sears
Emerald Cove S/D, Lot # 19
Half acre lot, Only $42,000
call Millard Gillen @
386-365-7001 MLS# 75278
westfieldrealtygroup.com
High & Dry buildable, wooded in
Forest Country. MLS#76668
Eastside Village Realty, Inc.
Call Denise Milligan-Bose
386-752-5290


ba. Open PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Rivers All real estate advertising in this
i#75661 newspaper is subject to the fair
Denise housing act which makes it illegal
-5290 to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
ke City, on race, color, religion, sex,
dn $700 disability, familial status or nation-
671833 al origin; oi any intention to make
rties.com such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
: .18 living with parents or. legal
custodians, pregnant women and
NG people securing'custody of chil-
th dren under the age of 18. This
icres newspaper.will not knowingly
612 accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is'in violation of the
V' *. law. Our readers are hereby in-
+res. k formea'thaitall dwellings adver-.
e4' back tised in thin-newspaper are availa-
$64,00t ble on an equal opportunity basis.
Realty To complain of discrimination call
SHUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free-," ,,.
Apt. telephone number to the hearing
impairedis. L-800-927-9275.


810 Home for Sale
2/1 completely updated, screened
back porch, large utility room,
MLS#77413 $59,888 Call Nancy
@ R.E.O. Realty 386-867-1271
nancytrogers@msn.com
2/2 + Bonus Room, 1749sf, 4 acre
comer lot, board fenced, det
garage/wkshp MLS#74900
$214,900 Call Pam @ Remax
386-303-2505 www.visitpam.com
2/2 -2 story, 9.7 ac. fenced & cross
fenced w/pastures. Oversized LR,
separate dining, lg den. Workshop,
carport. 386-752-6575 $179,900.
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
2/3 on 5 acres, wrap around porch,
family rm w/fireplace, detached
garage, $179,900 MLS# 77005
call Roger Lovelady @
Westfield Realty 386-365-7039
2BR/2BA singlewide mfg home
on 1.7-ac comer lot; large yard &
paved drive $44,900 DANIEL
CRAPPS AGENCY, INC. 755-
5110 #75864
3/2 Brick Home in town, fenced
back yard w/12x12 workshop
$84,888 Call Nancy @ R.E.O.
Realty 386-867-1271MLS# 77414
nancytrogers@msn.com
3/2 Cute Home, Remodeled, on 2
acres, partially fenced $114,900
MLS# 77396 Call Nancy @R.9.0O.
Realty Group 386-867-1271,
nancytrogers@msn.com
3/2 on Country, Woodsy, 5 acres,
Owner Financing Low Down, Low
Qualifying, Quick Estate, Family
Anxious, Low Taxes and
Insurance Call 727-541-2173
or 386-362-6293
3/3 Brick. Great location, pond.
Custom built w/Florida room &
vaulted ceiling. Workshop. MLS
75222 $179,900 386-867-1613
Jay Sears Hallmark Real Estate
3Bedrm/3bth w/2 Master Suites,
fenced back yard,fireplace
MLS#76779, $115,000
Call Missy Zecher @ 386-623-
0237 www.missyzecher.com
4/2 on. 10.5 acres w/ detached
garage, patio, above ground pool,
MLS# 77410 $189,888 Call -
Nancy Rogers@ R.E.O. Realty
386-867-1271
67.5 Acre Ranch w/MH, fenced
& cross fenced, wkshop, pole barn,
2 ponds, Spacious MLS# 75607
Asking 299K, Call Patti Taylor @
386-623-6896 Access Realty
95 Acre Estate, 4/3 Farm House,
Pond, Oaks, $689,000,
MLS#76149 Call Charlie Sparks
@ Westfield Realty 386-755-0808
westfieldrealtygroup.com
A quiet neighborhood is the
perfect setting for this cute, cozy
home. Lg back yard w/1 car
garage/workshop. $84,900.
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
Beautiful Home w/custom
cabinets, 10ft ceilings, $199,900
MLS# 77188 Call
Carrie Cason @ 386-623-2806
westfieldrealtygroup.com
Brick Home in Established S/D,
3/2, Open floor plan, MLS#76121
$134,900 Call Missy Zecher @
386-623-0237 Remax
www.missyzecher.com
CBC 3/1 home, inside city limits,
fenced backyard, detached carport
w/office MLS#77411 $84,900
Call R.E.O.Realty,
Nancy Rogers @ 386-867-1271
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Brick, split plan. Woodcrest S/D.
Screened porch, dining, living &
breakfast area.Lg backyard. Elaine
K. Tolar 386-755-6488 $139,900.
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Brick, 10 ac 3/2 split floor plan. Fl
room, Ig utility, scr porch. Gazebo, .
carport, fenced. $149,900. Lori
Geibeig Simpson 386-365-5678
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
New home, May Fair. Great area.
Comer lot. 4 bedroom,' lots of tile,
covered porch. Split plan$214,900.
Elaine K. Tolar 386-755-6488


810 Home for Sale
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
4br/2ba on 5 ac. Lg family. Florida
room den or office. Covered patio.
23x30 workshop. $229,900. Lori
Geibeig Simpson. 386-365-5678
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
3/2 Hardwood, separate office/liv-
ing/family rm. Workshop, fenced
Lori Geibeig Simpson 386-365-
5678 Mary Whitehurst 965-0887
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Brick on 3.23 ac. New roof, win-
dows, paint. Newer AC, remod-
eled interior, fencing, good area.
Elaine K. Tolar. 386-755-6488
Colonial 4/3 + Guest House,
9.95 acres, inground pool, detach-
ed/garage, gate entry,MIS#77386
$325K Call Pam Beauchamp @
386-303-2505 Remax
Comer lot in, Piccadilly S/D. Huge
living & dining room; New paint
& carpet. 2 car garage, inground
pool. 386-752-6575 $133,500
Century 21f/The Darby Rogers Co.
CUSTOM 4/2 scm porch, 16x24
workshop w/ele & water, gazebo,
fireplace, ceramic tile/wood floors.
386-752-6575 $189,900
Century 21/The Darby Rogers. Co
Custom, 3/2.5 built in 2007,
on 10.8 manicured acres,
completely fenced, Owner Fin.
avail., MLS#77382 Call Patti
386-623-6896 Access Realty
EASTSIDE VILLAGE! Owner
motivated! 3BR/2BA has large liv-
ing/dining rm combo $62,000
#77266 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY, INC. 755-5110
Family Home in Subdivision
4 bdrm Lots of space, newer
roof/carpet MLS#76283 Call
Missy Zecher @ 386-623-0237
Remax, www.missyzecher.com
FOR SALE by very motivated
owner. Just reduced $70,000. to
$129,000. Townhouse on Golf
course. 3br/3ba. Wood burning
fireplace. End unit. Remodeled
kitchen, first class appliances,
granite countertops. New Hunter
SDouglas wdw treatments.
"Cathedial ceiling. Pool, tennis
court. Call for appt. (904)246-6222
GREAT STARTER HOME!
3BR/2BA in Quail Ridge with
back patio, luscious lawn $84,900
#76432 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY, INC. 7.55-5110
Large Brick, 3/1, 4.43 acres, metal
roof, MLS# 77415 $109,888
Call Nancy Rogers @ 386-867-
i271 R.E.O. Realty Group, Inc.
nancytrogers@msn.com
Lg home on comer lot w/oversized
garage. Eastside Retirement
Village. Heated Pool & clubhouse.
MLS# 71901 386-752-5290
Eastside Village Realty, Inc.
LIKE NEW! 3BR/2BA mfg home
near Wellborn on 5+ acres ONLY
$79,900 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY, INC. 755-5110 #76768
Log Home, Cypress Beams,
whole house generator, $269,900
SMLS# 76899 Call
Roger Lovelady @386-365-7.039
westfieldreaitygroup.com
NEW FLOORING-FRESH
PAINT! 2-story 3br/2ba on 1+ ac,
lg kitchen, family rnm, fenced pond
$99,900 #75951 Daniel Crapps
Agency, Inc. 755-5110
Nice solid brick home on 5 acres,
Country feel but close to Town,
MLS 76063 $129,888 Call
Brittany Stoeckert Results Realty
386-397-3473
Nice, large 4/2 on 1 acre
w/florida room, granite floors,
wrap around front porch, $148,000
Call Brittany Stoeckert @
Results Realty 386-397-3473


Bring the picture in or
we will take it for youl
* Ad runs 10 consecutive days
with a description and photo in the -
newspaper and online E-edition.
* Ad runs 10 consecutive days as a
classified line ad online.
* You must include vehicle price.
* All ads are prepaid.
* Private party only.





2006 EF250
Ford Van
3/4 ton, metal work
shelves/ladder rack,
60K miles, exc. cond.

$10,500
Call
386-555-5555
If you don't sell your vehicle
during the first 10 days, you
can run the same vehicle ad
for 10 additional days for
only $15.00
Terms and conditions remain the
same for the additional run.

To et ou
VehcleSol, a l
M ary o Brdge
(38 ) 55-44


810 Home for Sale
Owners Motivated! Multiple
dwellings. Main house and 2 mo-
bile homes. Pecans. cedar & aza-
leas. $199.900. Century 21/The
Darby Rogers Co. 386-752-6575
Premier Lifestyle Community
The Preserve at Laurel Lake,
4/2, $194,900 MLS# 77257 Call
Scott Stewart @ 386-867-3498
westfieldrealtygroup.com
QUAINT 1950s home w/lots of
upgrades! Enclosed front porch,
2BR/1BA, screened back porch
$29,900 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY, INC 755-5110 #77505
Qualified General Contractor
doing top Quality work!
386-752-4072 Licensed and
Insured CGC036224
Don Reed Construction, Inc.
Reduced in Rose Creek S/D, 5/4 .
on 2.2 acres, close to town
MLS#75485 $274,900 Call Pam
@ Remax 386-303-2505
www.visitpam.com
Secluded, however close to town,
3/2 Brick Ranch Home, spacious
$198,900 MLS# 74415 Call
Charlie Sparks @ 386-755-0808
westfieldrealtygroup.com
Solid home, needs updating.. Nice
yard & workshop/garage! Country
kitchen w/eat in area as well as
formal. 386-752-6575 $70,000
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
Totally Refurbished 2/2
w/workshop on 1.25 fenced acres
$94,900 Call Millard Gillen @
Westfield Realty 386-365-7001
MLS#75417
Two story MH, located in
Wellborn on 2.66 acres, porches
and fireplaces, 9 bdrms/3bths
$163,900 Patti Taylor MLS#71594
Access Realty 386-623-6896
Well Maintained 3/2 on 1.5
acres, fenced, porches; wkshp,
$49,900 MLS# 77309 Call Josh
Grecian 386-466-2517
westfieldrealtygroup.com

820 FarmsA&
8 Acreage

0552539i
SMust See Take Over Pymt's
10 Ac $74,500, 20 Ac $139,500
$6,975 P/A, Fine Neighborhood,
3 miles W of Col. City School,
Owner Fin 5%, Rolling Pasture
386-752-1364 or 965-4340

10 ac lots, some w/well, septic, pwr
pole. Lowered prices. Ownet finance
w/low dn pmnt Deas Bullard Proper-
ties 386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com
4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$69,900. $613mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
4 acres, Wellborn, New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down, $39,900, $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
1 5 WOODED acres.
Suwanee 'Ranchettes. $200 per mo
for 5 mo.'Then $203.85.per mo
thereafter. (352)472-2879


MONDAY
Karaoke
w/TO e 'M
Doors Open 5pm

All You Can Eat
Whole Catfish


820 Farms &
2,V Acreage
Outdoorsman Special. near
Itchetucknee Springs St Park,
Owner fin. w/20% dn,
$54.900 MLS# 76366
Brodie Alfred 386-487-1484

830 Commercial
oJv Property
Commercial Income Property,
w/national tenants. 17.000+
sq ft, additional fenced space.
Call Scott Stewart 386-867-3498
westfieldrealtygroup.com
860 Investment
Property
Investment Property, 2 MH's on
almost 2acres, well & septic,
fenced $29,900 MLS# 77233
Call Josh Grecian @ Westfield
386-466-2517


N

SG

C

0

.U

B

E.

U

' V

H





(N

X

0
U


THURSDAY
Karaoke
w/Te ,
Doors Open 5pmn

All You Can Eat
Spaghetti & Meat
Sauce


FRIDAY

Variety Show
8pm
Doors Open 5pmr

All You Can Eat
Sirloin Steak


Ask About Our Cabin Rentals
or Stay the Night In Our Famous Tree House!

Hk A-X %- 44j1 *1A'


Lake City Reporter


B C:' S,,I' U V B I A

.R E Q a '- N I.1

A P K ..G, 'U, X I L Y

F- 0 H. F M 0 E, G L


A+ EyeCare

Em .

*.. E j 'nitarll s,

Sunglanti






555-5555


B I G

Lake Cit
Reporter
popular we
word search
a great wa
get atten'
with a fun
puzzle ev
week at a
any bus in
can afford


R

L E

G M

A 0

W T

H S

Q U

H C

L W

S E.

V Ii

ty
"' s
'ekly
'I- is
ly to
tion
i ne
'ery
price
less
r-d.


SATURDAY


8pm
lDoors Open Spm

Prime Rib

.. .. ... ....... ..


0303


.~,


Saturday, April 2 at 6:30

Come out & Support Your Favorite Local Talent!


-01 --








Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS WEDNESDAY, MARCH 30, 2011 5C


BABY BLUES


BLONDIE


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE


SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS


GARFIELD


B.C.


FRANK & ERNEST


DEAR ABBY


Lonely man ready to make

music with bluegrass fan


DEAR ABBY: I have
been married for 21 years,
and the past eight or 10 of
them haven't been good. I
have tried to get my wife to
go camping, out to dinner
or to bluegrass concerts we
both love. I can't convince
her to do any of these things
with me. But when her sister
calls wanting her to go some-
where, she's gone and stays
out all day.
About two years ago I
started going out alone to
clubs that feature bluegrass
music on Fridays and Satur-
days.'I met a wonderful lady
at one of them and we have
gotten close. I have told her
-I love her. We have. a lot in
common, and she cares for
me, too. I have not been un-
faithful to my wife (yet), but
I don't know how much more
I can handle. I am lonely and
miserable.
Abby, I don't know what to
do. Please advise before I do
something stupid. I'm an avid
reader of your column and I
trust your advice. TEMPT-
ED DOWN SOUTH
DEAR TEMPTED: Mar-
riage is like a garden. If it isn't
tended and fertilized occa-
sionally, it withers. It appears
you and your wife stopped
communicating not long after
your 10th anniversary.
Sneaking around is not
the answer to your problem.
It's unfair to your wife and to
the woman.you say you .love.
So man up and offer your wife


Abigail Van Buren
www.deorabby.com
the option of intensive mar-
riage counseling if you want
to save your marriage and
your assets, that is. But do
not pursue the extramarital
relationship until and unless
you are free to do so.
DEAR ABBY: I have
been married to a wonderful
guy for four years, and I'm
fortunate to have nice and
caring in-laws. My only is-
sue with them is the personal
questions they ask like how
much money people make.
Abby, they know exactly
how much their children
make, as well as the amount
of their son-in-law's salary.
Once I'm out of graduate
school and settled into my ca-
reer, I know they will ask me.
I feel my finances are my
personal business and no
one else's especially if my
husband and I are living com-
fortably. How do I handle the
situation when my in-laws
ask me about my income? I
don't want to be rude, but I
think it's intrusive and too
personal. NOT QUOTING
FIGURES
DEAR NOT QUOTING:
Start now and tell your hus-


band if you haven't already
- how you feel about ques-
tions about how much people
earn. That way he'll be less
inclined to "spill" when his
parents start pumping him
for the information. When
they ask you, say that you
are not comfortable with that
question because you feel it
is too personal. Smile when
you say it, and remember you
are not obligated to answer
every question someone asks
of you.
DEAR ABBY: I have
been estranged from our
grandchildren for nine years.
-One of them is now 18 and we
would like to reach out and
contact her, but have no idea
how to do it. We don't know
what caused the estrange-
ment with her parents, but we
have never stopped loving our
grandchildren. How do you
contact someone who isn't in
the phone book, is of age and
across the country? BON-
NEY JEAN IN HAWAII
DEAR BONNEY: You
have written to me for so
many years, I feel like I know
you. My heart goes out to you
in this I'm sorry to say not
uncommon predicament. A
way to locate your grand-
daughter would be to do it via
a Google search. I wish you
luck.

* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-
April 19): Grab hold of
whatever situation is ap-
pealing and shows promise
and you will excel. Con-
nect with people who have
similar interests. It's a time
of give and take as well as
added discipline to see mat-
ters through to completion..

TAURUS (April 20-
May 20): Steer clear of
anyone trying to convert
or push you in a direction
that's not right for you.
Doubt is likely to arise
when dealing with institu-
tions, large corporations or
government agencies. Do
your own research. **
GEMINI (May 21-
June 20): You've got ev-
erything going for you, so
don't look back, slow down
or let anyone else take over.
The connections you make
now will lead to a long-last-
ing relationship. Use your
imagination and you can
improve your financial situ-
ation. *****,
CANCER (June 21-
July 22): Keep your
thoughts to yourself. Focus
on getting your work done
and avoiding a run-in that
will lead to loss. Your em-
phasis should be on learn-
ing, patience and spending
quality time with someone
you love. ***
LEO (July 23-Aug.


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

22): You've got the capabil-
ity to achieve your goals, so
don't allow your emotions
to lead you astray. You don't
have to buy your way into a
group or pay for someone
you want to impress. Use
your head, your good ideas
and your charm. ***
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Someone will take ad-
vantage of you financially if
you don't protect your as-
sets and your ideas. A love
interest may not be what
you think. Back away from
anyone who is overindul-
gent physically, emotionally
or financially. ***
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): Present, promote and
push whatever you have
to offer. You will grab the
interest of someone who
wants to collaborate with
you personally or profes-
sionally. Don't let self-doubt
cause you to offer too much
for too little. ***
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-
Nov. 21): Don't let emo-
tions get the better of you
when you can turn what
may appear to be a setback
into an opportunity. Use
your creativity to come
up with an idea for a proj-
ect that has the potential
to bring in huge profits.
S**-**


SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): Don't get
all worked up over noth-
ing. If someone doesn't see
, things your way or want to
take part in something you
are doing, don't let it stop
you from moving forward.
Changes, at home, may .ap-
pear to be negative but will
ultimately benefit you. **
CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): Refrain from
letting others see what you
are planning. Opposition
can be expected. Move for-
ward on your own to avoid
obstacles. Avoid travel, se-
rious talks and dealing with
anyone in a position to influ-
ence your future. ***
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Take on a new
project or integrate some-
thing you are working on
now with something you've
done in the past. You can
come up with a way to stabi-
lize your financial situation.
Take care of any pending
settlement, legal or health
matters. ***
PISCES (Feb. 19-
March 20): Good fortune
can be yours if you are ac-
tive in your pursuits. Don't
leave anything to chance
or depend on others to get
things done for you. You
have plenty to gain if you
direct your energy wisely.
Love is in the stars. ***


CELEBRITY CIPHER

by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: I equals V
"GBGZKF MZZ K UZKTZZG NAYZ
WVXKZ XGC MBDJK UXJZ YXF UZ KNZ
L V A JZJK YXG NXJ ZIZD LAYZ KA
WZDMZLKBAG." JWAD KJTDBKZD
DZC JYBKN
PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "Baseball creates the magnetic, addictive illusion that
it can almost be understood." Sportswriter Thomas Boswell
(c) 2011 by NEA, Inc. 3-30


FOR BETTER OR WORSE


CLASSIC PEANUTS


THA4T WA6
600D ADVIce!
M. t,-

(eoDAz o.-





Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED WEDNESDAY, MARCH 30, 2011


aS4 aPE New Patient
iE N T A.- Exam and Necessar' X-rays


X' F tHw-" mewi
patient
S Reg. -]36 5 INGS OF $IO7




Adl t O i C l ld



LctdinteL ake C ity Mal I(36).1 81 81

We havelhem Jme o rtyu


'8Psychic Readings JenniferMiller
" Helps in A Problems. Pyh i


....~~ ~ ~ ~~ --...":: +"' --- -
IMonday.Friday $59.95 $59 95
7am :3 pm Most Cars i Most Cars
Saturday '7ianl-1pI i Includes Anti-Freeze ii Fluid Change-Gasket i
Io p I P t ,m , r ia . i La b or e xtra 1
----------J -_-------J


New Private School Opening
Enrolling Now for 2011-2012 School Year
Kindergarten thru 12th Grade
Year Round School,
Accepting Special Needs Children,
taking McKay and Step Up"For Students,
Scholarships, Small Classroom Setting.
Enrollment Hours: Mon.-Thurs. 7:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m. Fri. 7:30 a.m.- 12:30 pn.\
My 386-4859


iafslgas or


-^ BileoxI*


PLAY AN ADDITIONAL


500 Credits


* With your purchase of $20 or more in Internet
time. Limit 1 per person per day. May not be
I combined with any other promotional offer.
Expires April 12, 2011


-------


- J


*Our LOCAL Internet Players Have Won Oter


$


J -


I


. I- -1- 1 ; - R-01 -,


"" t ?i*^: i' .... ....'"
.-,-- *' *X-** '^ ^ -,? ..
". '.-." .'r:4. ,. ,.':,1_ C ,.- *.
"* "; :,' *; 1 :' .:^ ". ;. "
.- ,. ;',' -,',,r.1^ *.v : ,, "-'.
-:.'. "* "'?,' s .= ': J -" "' "
' .' .- ,*? -; -


WINNERS ARE SELECTED INSTANTLY & PRIZES OF LESS THAN $500 MAY BE REDEEMED INSTANTLY. WINNERS OF PRIZES GREATER THAN $500 MAY REDEEM PRIZES AT NO MORE THAN $500 PER DAY MUST BE 18 YEARS OR OLDER TO
ENTER MUST, BE 21 YEARS OR OLDER TO CONSUME ALCOHOL. PHOTO I.D. REQUIRED. GO TO PANDA-MONI-YUM OF LAKE CITY, LLC TO SEE OFFICIAL RULES & DETAILS TO PURCHASE INTERNET TIME & TO REDEEM PRIZES NO PURCHASE OR
CONTRIBUTION NECESSARf TO PARTICIPATE OR WIN. MAIL-IN ENTRIES AVAILABLE. 2011 Tom Hunt. All rights reserved.


',- -t i ,
"'.* ;,- ,,r ^.
, '7. .:- ..,