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The Lake City reporter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01513
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 3/27/2011
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
System ID: UF00028308:01513
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text






Overtime Misery
Florida, FSU ousted from
NCAA Tournament in OT.


PO BOX 11700' ....Y
205 SMA UNIV OF 1LOIDA
GAINESVILLE FL 611 1943

32 1 -1 4


Sunday, March.27, 201 I


Helping Hand
Group offers aid to
teens through mentoring.

Life, ID


Awy


TODAY'S



S Ma.I ln l2pn.rCF
Si----------------


Reporter


www.lakecityreporter.com


Vol. 137, No. 55 N $ 1.00


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Abigail Williams, 3, of Lake Butler, enjoys her ice cup as she
watches the performances during the 2011 MADDFest event
in downtown Lake City Friday.


MADDFest:

Showcasing local

talent in family

atmosphere


Chance to see
performers on
stage first-hand.
By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
The smells of carnival
foods, the sounds of local
artists singing and sights
,.... offspringg flowers in bloom
overwhelmed the senses
Saturday as hundreds of
people milled "around
Olustee Park during
MADDFest.
MADDFest, a local.
spring arts festival focus-
ing on local talent, was"
held at the park Friday and
Saturday with local artists
displaying their talents in
arts and crafts as well as
song and dance. The festi-
val was designed to focus
on music, art, drama and


dance (MADD).
Festival attendees sat
on park benches and lawn
chairs, purchased food,
took children to bounce
houses or just walked
around the downtown area
throughout the day as local
musicians performed. -
Debra Hasyn, attended
the festival on Saturday
with her daughter, Ashley,
and her 3-year-old grand-
son.
"It seems like there could
be more vendors and stuff
to look at, but other than
that, I enjoyed the music
and everybody has been
real friendly," she said.
Hasyn said they try to do
things as a family and the
MADDFest presented itself
as an event which promised
activities to capture each of
MADDFEST continued on 3A


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake 'City Reporter
Richardson Middle School students perform during the 2011
MADDFest Friday.


THREATENED


Library

budget

cuts could

mean loss
of services

By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com

County Public
Library services
could be at risk
of elimination for
the third year in the row if
needed state funding is not
restored.
The House
Transportation and
Economic .Development
Subcommittee set $17.7
million in its budget for
State Aid to Public Libraries
in 2011-2012, compared to
the $21.2 million from pre-
vious years. Funding is at
$0 in the Senate.
The annualfunding, State
Aid to Public Libraries,
is used to provide basic
public library services to
all Florida counties, and
enhance services at. exist-
ing ones.
"It makes library servic-
es equal, around the state,"
said Deborah Paulson,
Colurrbia County Library
Director.



Lake City residents
Charles Primous
(left) and Edmund
Kirkland utilize
computer terminals
at the main branch
of the Columbia
County Public
Library. 'I use the
Internet to search
for jobs,' Kirkland
said. 'I don't have
a computer, so
what I can't do at
my house I use the
computers here.'


JASON MATTHEW WALKER'
Lake Ci, vep ,o ,


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Program specialist Heather McMillan helps Pinemount Elementary School fpurth-grader
Megan Staten, 9, look for interesting audio books to listen to in the children's section of
the library. 'I think the library is a vital part of the state and people use it not only to just get
books,' McMillan said. 'The economy is so bad that now people use us more and more. If
we are gone, where are all the people going to go?'


State aid has been cut
over time and was reduced
to $21.2 million a couple
of years ago, said Faye
Roberts, the Florida
Library Association execu-
tive director. The money
from state aid is a signifi-
cant portido of the operat-
uig budget for rural coun-
ties, such as Columbia.
The library received
$594,063 for 2010-2011
in state aid. funding.
Columbia would receive


$213,529 if only $17.2 mil-'
lion is appropriated.'
The state aid funds the
West Branch. youth ser-
vices, the adult literacy
program and several staff
members at the main
branch, Paulson said. It
is' unknown %here cuts
would have to be made.
"We'd have to look
very closely at what we're
doing," .she said.
Maintaining that amount
is crucial because it is the


minimum the state must
.contribute to receive fed-
eral funding, Roberts said.
Statewide libraries could
be faced with staff and
hour reduction's or clos-
ings.
The Board of Columbia
County Commissionets
doesn't know how the state
budget will end up but
hopes there are no cuts.
to library funding, said:
LIBRARY continued on 3A


Finalists for Chamber's top business awards named


Winners to be
announced at annual
luncheon Wednesday.
By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter. corn
Businesses and Citizen of the
Year will be named at the Lake
City Columbia County Chamber
of Commerce Awards Luncheon
11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Wednesday
at the Holiday Inn.
In recent years, one award
was presented for business of
the year at the annual Chamber
meeting, said Steve Smith, busi-
ness enhancement committee
chairman. The chamber decided
to host a separate awards lun-
cheon.
The number of awards, were


also expanded by adding Citizen
of the Year and dividing Business
of the Year into large and small
categories, he said. Small busi-
ness finalists include those with
10 employees or less and larger
ones have 10 or more.
There was a call for nomina-
tions among the chamber mem-
bership for businesses, Smith
said. Nominees then received a
set of five questions for a panel of
judges to grade.
Questions. focused on areas
such as how the business has
grown, overcome obstacles or
contributes to the community, he
said.
"We used as objective of a sys-
tem as possible to determine the
winner," Smith said.
The newly established Citizen
of the Year Award was created to


recognize an individual that does
a lot for the business community,
he said.
The top three finalists were
named for each business cate-
gory.
Small business finalists are:
Servpro
"I take it as an honor and
accomplishment to have opened
up a new busi-
ness from
scratch and still
be in business
after five years,"
said Chuck
Nicholson,
owner.
It is a compli- Nicholson
ment to be nominated and then
named one of the finalists, he
said.
"It goes back to a lot of hard


work we've put into (the busi-
ness)," Nicholson said. "It's a
good feeling to just be down to
the final three."
M CMS Professional Staffing
Inc.
"I'm humbled," said Chris
Samson, president and CEO. "It's
* time for me to
take the back
seat and let the
staff, both field
and support, take
the limelight."
The staff at
CMS strives to
be the best, he Samsoh
said. Their hard
work and dedication have, made
such a distinction possible.
"I consider our staff to be top
notch, top of the line," Samson
said.


Lake City Florist and
Design
'We're honored and humbled
by it," said John See, owner.
The business
was pleasantly
surprised to be
one of the three
finalists, he said.
It is exciting to
be put in the
group of other
elite companies. See
'We hope to
win. We'd love to win," See said.
"Even if we don't,. we're very glad
to be a part of the chosen three."
Large business finalists are:
N First Federal Bank of
Florida
"It feels good to be appreci-
FINALISTS continued on 3A


-~ ~ 'rO~' -~O~


1 I ( C 8


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400


85 63
T-Storm Chance
WEATHER, 6A


cO>p


Opinion ... : ............
Life ....................
Obituaries ..............
Advice & Comics.........
Puzzles .................


4A
ID
5A
3D
2B


TODAY IN
BUSINESS
College leaders
work together.


COMING
TUESDAY
Farmer's Market
to open.


y-7








LAKE CITY REPORTER SUNDAY REPORT SUNDAY, MARCH 27, 2011


C ,Hev at-. - ( .-

Friday: Friday: Saturday: Saturday: Wednesday: Wednesday:
6-23-32-36 18 1-4-11-14-36 Afternoon: 8-2-9 Afternoon: 0-6-3-8 7-10-21-33-39-41 5-15-26-28-32
Evening: 0-5-7 Evening: 8-5-2-1


AROUND FLORIDA



House votes to end pay deductions for union dues


TALLAHASSEE
In a blow to public
Employee unions, .
the Republican-
I controlled Florida
House passed a bill
Friday that would ban
payroll deductions of dues
and require labor organi-
zations to get individual
members' OK before using
their payments for political
purposes.
The Florida legisla-
tion, which still needs
Senate approval, is part
of a Republican push in
several states to curtail.
the power of public-sec-
tor unions that generally
support Democratic can-
didates. The efforts follow
GOP election gains in
November. '
Republicans insisted
in floor debate that the
bill's intent is not to harm
unions but to empower
public employees by giv-
ing them more control.
over how their dues are
spent and to separate gov-
ernment from politics.
"We don't need to be
involved in the collections
', of union dues, which then
can be used for partisan
political activity," said
Rep. Chris Dorworih, a
Lake Mary Republican
who sponsored the bill.
"It affords members of
labor unions the right to
determine whether or not
they want to be part of
the political agenda of the
union."
Democrats responded
that the legislation is about
' union-busting, class war-
'.fare and winning elections.
"What's the real reason


COURTESY PHOTO

Trip of a lifetime: Visiting Cape Kennedy

Kennedy Space Center sponsors an overnight adventure once a year for girl scouts, and
on Saturday, March 19, Girl Scout Troop 163 from Lake City took part. They slept under
the largest rocket in the world, the Saturn V. The evening started with a presentation by
astronaut John Blaha. He spoke to the need to study five days a week and play on the
weekend to become an astronaut. He told the girls to get rid of the word impossible from
their vocabulary. And he answered many of the girl's questions. The girls made their own
paper rockets and used an air blaster to blast their rockets into the sky. If a girl's rocket
landed on top of the building, they were forever in the rocket 'hall of fame.' They watched the
Hubble telescope repair in space in an IMAX theater and enjoyed the shuttle simulator. The
girls sold over 4,000 boxes of cookies to the community to help finance the trip. There were
23 girls involved and 14 moms who provided transportation.


for this bill?" asked House
Democratic Leader Ron
Saunders of Key West.
'Two words: political pay-
back."
Union leaders pointed
out that even the House
staff analysis says the bill
likely would make it more
difficult for unions to col-
lect dues for political and
other purposes.


Dry winter fuels
brush fires
WEST PALM BEACH
- Palm Beach County
has had seven times as
many brush fires since
December as it did during
the same period a year
earlier.
And while the county


hasn't seen the 100-acre
brush fires sparked in
Miami-Dade and Martin
counties, forestry and fire-
rescue officials warn that
it is just one cigarette flick
away from disaster.
The South Florida'Water
Management District said
this week that the area is
in the midst of its driest
dry season in about 80


years. That has resulted
in 29 brush fires since
December in Palm Beach
County, mostly in The
Acreage and Loxahatchee,
compared with four dur-
ing the same period a year
ago.
Officials are concerned
that lightning, the usual
suspect, is not to blame
for the increase. They're
focusing their preven-
tion efforts on human
carelessness and asking
that residents pay atten-
tion to warnings from the
National Weather Service
that conditions are ripe for
wildfires.
Ifs not that;we've
changed our activities
since last season, officials
said. The, dry weather
makes it easier for brush
fires to start and spread,
often threatening homes.
The "underbrush" built up
from things such as pine
needles, melaleuca trees
and palmetto plants is
considered fuel for brush
fires.
Underbrush also keeps
the fires burning, as with
the brush fire that was
still smoldering Friday
near Fort Pierce. The fire
started north of Midway
Road late Thursday morn-
ing and spread toward
Indian River Drive, cover-
ing about 50 acres. Winds
up to 25 mph made it even
more difficult to contain.


Emergency
exercise a success
TALLAHASSEE The
Federal Emergency


Management Agency has
given Florida high marks
for a nuclear power plant
emergency exercise.
State officials said
Friday that a FEMA draft
:evaluation showed no defi-
ciencies or need for cor-
rective actions.
The objective was to
assess the level of state
and local preparedness in
responding to a simulated
radiation leak.
The state Division of
Emergency Management
conducted the exercise on
Feb. 23 with.Florida Power
& Light Co. at the utility's
Turkey Point nuclear plant
in Biscayne Bay.

Sting nets 69
guns, 15 arrests
TAMPA Hillsborough
County authorities said
undercover deputies run-
ning a sting operation
bought 69 guns, including
sawed-off shotguns and
an AK47, from felons who
possessed the weapons
illegally.
Sheriff David Gee said
Friday that the initiative
was in response to an
increase of illegal guns on
the street
Fifteen people were
arrested in the operation,
and'the Sheriff's Office
plans to serve 18 other
warrants. Gee is working
with state legislators to
increase prison time for
felons caught in posses-
sion of firearms.

Associated Press,


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS


Taylor estate will earn millions from scents


LOSANGELES
lizabeth Taylor's last
acting job was about a
decade ago, but her lucra-
tive line of fragrances
will likely keep her estate
smelling great long after her pass-
ing.
Her perfume brand, White
Diamonds, remains a best-seller, and
combined with other brands Passion
and Passion for Men, Taylor's scents
brought in an estimated $69 million
at retail worldwide last year, accord-
ing to tracking firm Euromonitor
International.
While thafs down about a fifth
compared to two years earlier, a
wave of recollections anid renewed
interest in her movies could provide
a short-term boost to sales. Experts
said anywhere from 4 to 15 percent
of sales likely flows through to
Taylor's estate in the form of licens-
ing royalties.
Taylor, who died Wednesday
at age 79, actively promoted her
brands.
But White Diamonds, introduced
in 1991 has become so popular, with
an estimated $61 million in sales,
that it is considered to have crossed
over from celebrity status to main-
stream perfume.

Brando Skyhorse getting
PEN/Hemingway Award
BOSTON -t- Brando Skyhorse,
author of "The Madonnas of Echo
Park," is receiving the 2011 PEN/
Hemingway Award for a distin-
guished first book of fiction.
Patrick Hemingway, writer Ernest
Hemingway's sole surviving son, and
writer Marilynne Robinson is pre-
senting California-based, Mexican-
American writer with the award
Saturday at the John E Kennedy
Presidential Library and Museum in
Boston.
The award is given for "a novel or
,book of short stories by'an American
author who has not previously pub-
Slished a book of fiction."
Former PEN Hemingway Award
winners Writers Joshua Ferris, Ha
Jin and Robinson also are talking


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Dec. 1, 2007 file photo, Elizabeth Taylor arrives at Paramount Studios in the
Hollywood section of Los Angeles to give a benefit performance of A.R. Gurney's
play 'Love Letters' for the Elizabeth Taylor HIV/AIDS Foundation. Publicist Sally
Morrison says the actress died Wednesday in Los Angeles of congestive heart
failure at age 79.


about how their first novels affected
their careers.
#
Family, fans turn out
for Nate Dogg funeral
LONG BEACH Throngs of
fans were expected to join the family
and friends of hip-hop singer Nate
Dogg for his funeral in Southern
California.
The family of Nate Dogg whose
real name is Nathaniel Hale decid-
ed that the Saturday services at the


Queen Mary Dome in Long Beach
would not be open to the public as
they had previously wanted.
A public viewing was held Friday
night, and a dinner was planned after
the funeral.
Nate Dogg died at 41 on March
15 of complications from multiple
strokes.
He is known for his contributions
to the hip-hop songs of Snoop Dogg,
Dr. Dre, Warren G and others.

E Associated Press


* Actor Julian Glover is 76.
* Actor Jerry Lacy is 75.
* Actor Michael York is 69.
* Rock musician Tony Banks
(Genesis) is 61.
* Rock musician Andrew
Farriss (INXS) is 52.
* Movie director Quentin
Tarantino is 48.
* Actress Talisa Soto is 44.


Lake City
HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293
Fax number .............752-9400
Circulation ...............755-5445
Online... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Ra. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson .....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
Assistant Editor CJ Risak. .754-0427
After 1:00 p.m.
(crisak@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Ashley Butcher .. .754-0417
(abutcher@lakecityreporter.com)
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440.


N Actress Pauley Perrette is
42.
* Singer Mariah Carey is 41.
* Actress Elizabeth Mitchell
is 41.
* Actor Nathan Fillion is 40.
* Hip-hop singer Fergie
(Black Eyed Peas) is 36. -
* Actress Emily Ann Lloyd
is 27.


Reporter
BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon ....754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7:30
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation ..............755-5445
(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks................ $26.32
24 Weeks ................. $48.79
52 Weeks................... $83.46
Rates indude 7% sales tax.
Mail rates
12Weeks.................. $41.40
24 Weeks............... $82.80
52 Weeks.................. $179.40


CORRECTION


The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion,
please call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifica-
tions will run in this space. And thanks for reading.


Celebrity Birthdays


Daily Scripture



"For it has been granted to you
on behalf of Christ not only to
believe in him, but also to suffer
'for him,"

Philippians 1:29


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427











Spring break: Not just for kids
W.... ,


By LEANNE TYO
ltyo@lakecityreporter. comn

Columbia County School
District students aren't
the only ones who will be
taking off for vacations or
relaxing at home during
the district's spring break,
which officially begins
Monday.
District administration,
teachers and staff will also
be making the most of the
week-long time off.
Susan Griffis, Lake
City Middle School secre-
tary, has plans with her
family to take her grand-
daughter, Kaylee, 7, to visit
Washington D.C.
"She's kind of a history
buff," Griffis said, of her


granddaughter.
Griffis said the fam-
ily plans to tour the
Smithsonian, where her son
is currently interning, and
is looking forward to visit-
ing the Lincoln Memorial
and the Capitol building.
Spring break comes
at a time when schools
are preparing for the
Florida Comprehensive
Assessment Test, which
students will take when
they return, Griffis said.
"So it's (the break) just
a nice little respite," she
said.
Columbia City
Elementary's principal,
Lana Boone, said she and
her family are headed to
Cinnamon Beach at Palm


Coast to enjoy the sand and
sunshine.
The break is needed,
Boone said.
"It's absolutely neces-
sary," she said. "Everybody
needs to relax and just reju-
venate. Everybody needs a
break."
While some district
employees will be travel-
ing, others are spending
the hiatus at home in Lake
City.
Katie Herndon, Columbia
High School history teach-
er, said she is most looking
forward to sleeping in and
spending her week reading
and relaxing in the pool.
"We (teachers) get
burned, out too," Herndon
said. "We get stressed and


burned out and we need
that time to kind of get our-
selves together and finish
out the year, especially with
FCAT being the week after
we come back."
Whether district employ-
ees or students are travel-
ing or staying home, Mike
Millikin, superintendent of
schools, wished them well
and asked that teenage
drivers be safe during the
break.
"We want everybody
to be careful, make good
choices, remember some-
body loves them and cares
for them and come back
rested and ready to go for
the last couple months of
school," he said.


POLICE REPORTS


The following informa-
tion was provided by local
law enforcement agencies.
The following people have
been arrested but not con-
victed. All people are inno-
cent unless proven guilty.

Friday, March 18
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office
Tephanie Patrice
Jones, 40, 10926 County
Road 132, Live Oak, pos-
session of cocaine and pos-


session of drug parapher-
nalia (two counts).

Monday, March 21
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office
James Alan Nash, 47,
9828 State Road 47, driving
while license suspended/
revoked.

Tuesday, March 22
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office
Charles Edward


Davis, 38, 163 SW Naples
Glen, burglary of an unoc-
cupied structure.
Jennifer Nicole
Johnson, 27, 1802 SW Judy
Glen, fleeing from a police
officer.
Michael Dean Reese,
35, 10765 NW 39th St.,
Jasper, warrant: Violation
of probation on original
charges of sell/deliver/
purchase of a controlled
substance and possession
of a controlled substance


with intent to sell or
deliver.
Christopher Michael
Roy, 33, 541 SW Dexter
Circle, third-degree grand
theft.
Florida Highway
Patrol
Erin Marie Brown,
36, 16006 31st.. Drive,
Wellborn, driving while
license suspended/
revoked.

From staff reports.


Doctor arrested in pill mill case


Associated Press

MIAMI A South
Florida doctor has been
arrested on charges involv-
ing illegal distribution of


more than 300,000 painkill-
er pills through two clinics.
Federal prosecutors
in Miami said Friday that
57-year-old Dr. Selwyn
Carrington is charged


with conspiracy to distrib-
ute controlled substances,
which carries a 20-year
maximum prison sentence.
Court document charge
that oxycodone, Percocet


and other pills prone to
abuse were distributed
using prescriptions that
Carrington would sign in
advance without seeing any
patients.


FINALISTS: Chamber of Commerce nominees

Continued From Page 1A


ated and to be rec-
ognized," said Keith
Leibfried, president.
"It definitely is a
positive."
The company has [ .
focused on provid-
ing quality custom- Leibfried
er service beyond
expectations as well as being a good
corporate citizen to the community,
he said.
"I hope we win," Leibfried said.
E Rountree-Moore Automotive
Group
"We've very proud," said Andy
Moore, owner. "It's just a great honor
to be nominated for the award."
Rountree-Moore is a community-


minded business
and one of the larg-
est employers in
town, he said.
"If we don't win,
we certainly will
congratulate who-
ever does," Moore
said.
Columbia Bank


g. -
I


Moore


"We're excited about this opportu-
nity," said Bruce Naylor, president.
"We're pleased and honored some-
one thought enough of us to nomi-
nate us."
The company has a long history
of service to the community and will
celebrate 100 years of business next
year, he said.


"I look forward ....
to the luncheon on :j
Wednesday and f
wish everyone good .
luck," Naylor said.
Tickets are $25
per person for the
luncheon and avail- Naylor
able by calling the
Chamber at (386) 752-3690. A
video 'presentation put together
by Florida Gateway College will
be show about each business.
"What you've got here are some
of the premier businesses based
on nominees from the business
community-at-large, and the judg-
es got the best of the best," Smith
said.


MADDFEST: Celebration of local arts draws crowd

Continued From Page 1A


their interests.
"This was a good family
event for us," she said.
Jeanie Wilks, an event
co-host, said Saturday's
event went very well.
"You can tell there is
some growth from last
year's event, so we're
excited about the festival,"
she said. 'We've had some
really spectacular groups
and live music. We' had a
little bit of art out here
and we've had a little bit
of everything to showcase
the great amount of talent
in Columbia County."
Although the event did
not offer live drama perfor-
mances, Wilks said festival
organizers were selling a
DVD featuring a production
from the Olustee Festival.
She said organizers want
to encourage the school
system to try to keep the
arts in schools, because
research shows the arts
are strongly related to aca-
demic success.
"Where other schools
are cutting the arts, our
schools are working to
keep them and we would
like to see that continue,"
Wilks said.
Cody Gray, an event
co-host, said the event is
important because it gives
local artists an opportu-
nity to showcase their tal-
ents and get themselves
known.


'This gets the students
"out and lets them see the
community that they're
involved in," he said, noting
the event lets the perform-
er show that they are out in
the community doing what
they love to do perform.
Wilks said performing


gives the students a vested
interest in the community.
"So many people in this
generation feel disjointed
- they don't feel that sense
of community," she said.
"When you start involving
them in theater or arts and
take it outside the schools


and into the community,
that's when they feel con-
nected to something out-
side. Once they make that
connection into the com-'
munity, they end tip with
a. vested interest. Once
there is a vested inter-
est, we have hope for the
future."


JASON MATTHEW WALKERILake City Reporter
Columbia County Public Library patron Sarah Kaminski
(left), 23, jokes with librarian assistant Debbie Horner as
she checks out books at the main branch in downtown
Lake City Friday.

LIBRARY: Cuts looming

Continued From Page 1A


Chairman Jody DuPree.
"Columbia County cer-
tainly will not be able to
subsidize the cuts made
by the state," he said. "We
don't have the means to
do it."
Commissioners went
spoke to local legislators at
the capitol and stressed to
each one the important of
libraries, especially when
the economy is down,
Dupree said..
"They all understand it
and know it too," he said.
There has been a lot
of challenges for the state
budget and it's not just
library funding that is
being affected, Roberts
said.
'We know that there's
a lot of goodwill toward
libraries in the house and
senate," she said. "In the
past they have managed to
find a way to fund public
libraries at the minimum
level."
Many libraries partici-
pated in Florida Library
Snapshot Day Jan. 25.
"The whole point of it
was to show the level of
use and how important
libraries are to the com-
munity by documenting
numbers and stories," she
said.
In that one day 1,150 peo-
ple visited the Columbia
County Public library and
checked out 1,262 items.
Public libraries are vital
part of society, Paulson
said. People use library


services to find informa-
tion, apply-of benefits, bor-,
row needed materials and
more.
Dupree said he recom-
mended citizens contact
all the house and senate
representatives to express
their concerns about
library funding.
The library's website,
http://www.ccpl.sirsi.
net, has a link to a drafted
message that users can fill
out and submit with their
name and contact informa-
tion. The message goes
right to key legislators.
County and library offi-
cials are cognizant of pos-
sible funding reductions
but thpy must wait until
a final decision is made,
Dupree said.
Atthe llth hour lastyear
funding was reinstated for
state aid, Paulson said. It is
difficult to know if that will
happen this year.
"So many programs and
institutions need funding
and there is a $3 billion
deficient," she said.
Elected officials will
have to continue to make
choices on how to provide
the greatest benefits to
citizens as long as there is
not enough money to go,
Roberts said.
'"We don't expect this to
be over until the end of
session," she said. "We're
expecting a long process
but think the outcome will
be positive."


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LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE, SUNDAY, MARCH 27, 2011


Page Editor: C.J.Risak, 754-0427












OPINION


Sunday, March 27, 201 I


A N
OPINION



NATO


taking


over


In purely military terms,
the news is good.
Moammar Gadhafi's
forces are still attacking
rebel strongholds, but
there seems little likelihood
that they can stand up to
firepower from NATO, which
is moving to assume control of
the still-murky mission.
On Thursday, the U.S.
military proclaimed the Libyan
air force crippled, and armored
columns that had been
crushing rebellious regions are
under steady attack. Sooner
or later, if the allies remain
aggressive rather than limiting
themselves to the inadequate
no-fly zone, Libyan ground
forces should run out of tanks,
heavy weapons, ammunition,
fuel, willpower, or all five. A
naval blockade and attacks on
airfields, meanwhile, might
cut off the flow of mercenaries
Gadhafi has used to supplement
his army.
But NATO's ability to crush
an inferior military force has
never been in doubt The
question is what will happen
once civilian populations are
no longer under attack, either
because Gadhafi's forces
are destroyed or because
the besieged Libyan leader
recognizes that a strategic
retreat could limit and
potentially split the alliance
attacking him.
Much as the U.S. and its
allies want Gadhafi gone, they
are not fully committed to
evicting him. Therein lies a
quandary. The United Nations
Security Council resolution
authorizing "all necessary
measures" is confined to
protecting civilians, and the,
Arab League, whose support is
critical politically, has already
objected to the ferocity of the
attacks.
As Secretary of State
Hillary Clinton put it Thursday
evening, the U.S. roles
"limited in time and scope."
When-that limit is reached,
it's safe to assume Gadhafi will
no longer control eastern Libya.
* USA Today


LET
PO


TERMS
LICY


Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


www.lakecityreporter.com


Thank You, Vietnam Veterans


"No event in American
history is more misunderstood
than the Vietnam War. It was
misreported then, and it is
misremembered now. Rarely
have so many people been. so
wrong about so much. Never
have the consequences of their
misunderstanding been so
tragic." Richard Nixon from
his book, "No More Vietnams"
Earlier this month the United
States Senate declared March
30, 2011 as "Welcome Home
Vietnam Veterans Day." This
particular date was chosen
because on March 30, 1973,
remaining U. S. troops withdrew
from Vietnam under the terms
of the Treaty of Paris.
In a resolution introduced by
Senator Richard Burr of North
Carolina and co-sponsored by
five other senators, including
Georgia's Johnny Isakson,
the Senate is encouraging
Americans across the country to
recognize Vietnam veterans for
their sacrifice and to make them
feel the gratitude of a country
that sent them to fight. "It's time
they receive the recognition
they have earned and deserve,"
declared Senator Burr.
While Richard Nixon might
have had his faults as President,
the above statement about
the Vietnam War is spot on.
Largely due to intentional
misreporting by anti-war press
members, a number of myths
and falsehoods were generated
and have continued to be
perpetuated about this war and
the men who fought it.
Statistical evidence
contradicts most of these lies.
For one, the majority of Vietnam
veterans declare they are glad
they served (91percent), with74
percent saying they would
serve again, even knowing the
outcome.
In contrast to the popular
notion that a great number of
Vietnam veterans were drug
users, a myth promoted by such
movies as "Apocalypse Now,"
information from the Veterans'
Administration indicates
that there is no difference in
drug usage between Vietnam

LETTERS TO


Carolyn Abell
carbell 1020@mchsi.com

veterans and non-veterans from
the same age group.
The few isolated atrocities.
committed by American
servicemen were blown out
of proportion, causing the
general public to wonder if they
had evolved into savage and
inhumane beasts reminiscent
of the degenerate boys in "Lord
of the Flies." The truth is that
while we had a few incidents,
the North Vietnamese routinely
committed such atrocities
against our side-a fact that
seldom got reported. Former
service members such as
Charles Henderson have
documented some of the
most heinous acts of torture
imaginable inflicted on United
States soldiers and Marines
by a female North Vietnamese
Captain, whose cruel and
deviant brutality earned her the
nickname, "Apache Woman."
Thanks to Carlos Hathcock, one
of the most talented and self-
disciplined Marine snipers of all
time, "Apache Woman" did not
live to make Major.
A 97 percent rate of
honorable discharges among
Vietnam veterans should quell
any myths that they were
largely lawless heathens.
According to a speech by Lt.
Gen. Barry McCaffrey in 1993,
85 percent of Vietnam veterans
made a successful transition to
civilian life. General McCaffrey
further stated that these
veterans' personal income levels
exceeded their non-veteran
counterparts of the same age
group by more than 18 percent
He added that Vietnam veterans
had a lower unemployment rate
.than the non-vet age group.
Another prevailing myth
is that a disprop9ftionate

THE EDITOR


number of blacks were killed
in the Vietnam War. Statistical
evidence shows that 86 percent
of the men who died in Vietnam
were Caucasians. Only 12.5
percent were black, while the
remainder were "other races."
These percentages were in
direct proportion to general
population statistics at that time.
A lot of people think, too, that
the Vietnam War was fought
by the poor and uneducated.
In- actuality, these veterans
were the best educated forces
our country had ever sent into
combat, with 79 percent having
at least a high school diploma
or equivalent Many had taken
some college courses or even
earned a degree.
The survival rate of Vietnam
veterans was also much
-higher than in previous wars,
thanks largely to MEDEVAC
helicopters. Pilots of these birds
flew nearly 500,000 missions,
airlifting over 900,000 patients.
The average time lapse between
wounding to hospitalization
was less than one hour. As a
result less than one percent
of all American wounded who
survived the first 24 hours,
became fatalities.
Perhaps the highest
testimonial to the quality of
our Vietnam veterans, is that
so many former draft-dodgers
and cowards now want to claim
credit for military service they
never gave. And there is no
greater insult to the ones who
actually served. ,
I think the average American
appreciates the sacrifices of -
all veterans. There is nothing
more noble and honorable than
serving one's country in the
armed forces. Vietnam veterans
answered the call to duty, and
they continue to serve today
with acts of national patriotism,
community involvement and
serving in elected offices.
Make it a point this
Wednesday to thank a Vietnam
veteran. Tell him "Welcome
home."
Carolyn Abell can be
contacted at carbell020@
mchsi.com.


Learn to follow Wesley's rule


To the editor:
Several years ago the
invocation for the United Way
of Suwannee Valley Annual
Meeting Was given by one.of
our local United Way's founding
fathers and local attorneys,
Tom Brown, who distributed for
group reading John Wesley's
Rule.
Do all the good you can,
By all the means you can,
In all the ways you can,
In all the places you can,
At all the times you can,
To all the people you can,
As long as ever you can.
John Wesley 1703-1791
This rule agrees with the
United Way "Live United"
theme. To Give. Advocate.
Volunteer. There are many
means to do good.
This rule also agrees with
our United Way of Suwannee
Valley mission 'To advance
the common good through
community impact initiatives
and agency support."
Through our local United
Way affiliated agency programs,
school-age children participated
in after-school programs which
provided safe, supervised
activities and enhanced their
academic success. Victims of
domestic violence and their
children found shelter, comfort
and guidance. Our residents
with developmental disabilities
more fully participated in their
community. Through the 22
community agencies, nearly
22,000 residents not including
their family members who were
also affected received a variety
of services.
Through our local United
Way's 2010 community impact
initiatives 600 residents were
afforded financial assistance
to maintain housing stability
through the American Recovery
Act Homeless Prevention and


Rapid Re-housing Program.
Another 36 households were
afforded the necessary case
management to receive
financial assistance through
other resources. Without
stable housing, these family
members cannot maintain stable
employment. Without stable
housing, the children in these
families cannot succeed at
school.
Above and beyond the
inquiries seeking the basic
needs of rent and utility
support, our United Way
information and referral
specialist assisted almost 2,000
callers. Another 3,150 received
information and referral
guidance through United Ways
2-1-1.
It has been a tough year.
United Way and each of our
partner agencies have felt the
challenge of increased needs
and diminished resources. The
United Way Campaign Cabinet
recognized the challenges to
be faced through this year's
fundraising campaign. The
team refused to decrease its
fundraising goal when the
community needs are so great
With the leadership of General
Campaign Chair Mike McKee,
Suwannee County Campaign
Chair Stephanie McClendon,
Hamilton County Campaign
Chair Danny Johnson and
Columbia County Campaign
Chair George Miller assembled
their respective teams to
attempt the impossible.
As the United Way staff and
volunteers prepare for this
year's annual meeting to be held
April 5, we remain a community
with much to be thankful for.
We are blessed to live and
work in a caring community
with generous donors and with
volunteers who lend their time
and talents to many worthwhile


efforts. While the work of
United Way is best measured
by the lives changed, the
community improved and not
simply the dollars raised, these
dollars represent the means to
the end.
For any of our community
members who have not
personally received an invitation
to LIVE UNITED by giving
their financial support to our
community throughUnited Way,
by volunteering with United
Way or any of bour community
agencies, or by lending their
,voice to advocate on behalf of
those served by community
agencies, please accept this as
your personal invitation. Our
community residents and the
agencies striving to assist them
continue to feel the challenges
of the current economic
environment.
Let us do all the good we can
by all the means we can in all
the ways we can in all the places
we can at all the times we can to
all the people we can as long as
ever we can.
Rita Dopp
Executive Director
United Way of Suwannee
Valley
HIGHLIGHTS
IN HISTORY
Today is Sunday, March
27, the 86th day of 2011. There
are 279 days left in the year.
Today's Highlight in History:
On March 27, 1911, Fort
Lauderdale, Fla., was
incorporated.
On this date:.
In 1513, Spanish explorer
Juan Ponce de Leon (hwahn
pahns duh LEE'-ohn) sighted
present-day Florida.
In 1625, Charles I acceded
to the English throne upon the ,
death of James I.


4A .


An ongoing

Liberal

obsession

I n days when slavery was.:
legal in this country, all
slaves did not willingly
resign to the grim fate
cast upon them.
The human spirit longs to be
free. In some individuals, that
longing beats so strong in their
breast that they will take large
personal risks, against great
odds, to rebel against tyranny
that has transformed their life
into a tool for someone else's
will and whim.
Slaves who had the
temerity to run away from
their plantation "home" paid
dearly if they were caught
and returned. Measures
were taken to make them an
example to others who might
harbor similar thoughts about
freedom.
Among those measures
were brutal public beatings 9f
rebels to which other slaves
were forced to bear witness
and digest with great clarity
the price of rebelliousness.
Such is the fate today of
those uppity souls who choose
to challenge the authority and
legitimacy of our inexorably
growing government
plantation.
*Those with interests for
the care and feeding of this
plantation cannot physically
punish these rebels with the
whip.
Their whip is the
mainstream media and the
means of punishment of this
virtual whip is not beating of a
physical body but assassination
of character.
This perspective helps us
understand the ongoing liberal
obsession with destroying
Supreme Court Justice
Clarence Thomas and former
Alaska governor Sarah Palin.
Thomas and Palin are
particularly threatening to
liberals because their lives
fly in the face of liberal
mythology. According to this
mythology, the essential and
ongoing struggle in our nation
is a power struggle of interests
between "haves" and "have-
nots" rather than an ongoing
struggle for human freedom.
According to this mythology,
there is an elite class of
"haves" who, by virtue of fate
and birth, control power and
wealth. They are conservative
because their only interest is
to keep things as they are.
Fighting against this
conservative elite are noble
"have-nots", struggling, by any
means possible, to get their
fair share and against wealth
distributed by an unjust and
blind fate.
A high profile conservative,
whose very life and personal
history poses an open
challenge and affront to this
mythology, is a liberal's worst .
nightmare.
If being a conservative
means simply protecting the
bounty passed on to you by
your forebears, why would a
man from a poor black family
in the South, or a woman
from a white working
class family in Alaska, be
a conservative? No less
a conservative whose
conservatism plays a role in a
successful professional life?
The liberal answer is that
the only way this could be
possible is that this is an
individual of dubious character,,.
on the take, and being paid off
handsomely by conservative
powers that be.
* Star Parker is president of
CURE, Coalition on Urban
Renewal and Education
(www.urbancure.org) and author
of three books.


Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman







LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, MARCH 27, 2011


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


* To submit your Community
Calendar item, contact Antonia
Robinson at 754-0425 or by
e-mail at arobinson@
lakecityreporter.com.


Today
Meet the Author
The next meet the
author series is 2 p.m.
today at the Columbia
County Main Library. Join
author Donna Meredith
of Tallahassee as she
explores "The Heroine's
Journey in Literature"
during Women's History
Month. Take a look at
a wide variety of female
characters throughout
literature, from Jane
Austen's characters to
modern literature to her
own novel, "The Glass
Madonna." Sponsored by
the Friends of the Library.

Blood drive
The Bloodmobile is
stopping 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
today at Epiphany Catholic
Church. T-shirts for all
donors!

Monday
Spring break activities
Several spring break
activities are available 8:30
a.m. to 5 p.m. March 28
April 1 at Richardson
Community Center.
Activities include: 10 a.m.
Monday game board
madness; 2 p.m. Tuesday
jump rope jamboree; 2
p.m. Wednesday dodge-
ball kickoff; 12:30 p.m.
Thursday movie matinee;
and 10 a.m. Friday volley-
ball voyage. Concession
will be available. Contact
Lynda at 386-754-7905.

Spring Break Camps
The Florida Museum of
Natural Ifistory is offering
fun, educational spring
break day camps March


28-April 1 for students in
grades K-5. Half-day ses-
sions are $117 for museum
members and $130 for
non-members. Full-day
sessions are $225 for mem-
bers and $250 for non-
members. Register today
at www.flmnh.ufl.edu/edu-
cation/childrens_classes.
htm or call 352-273-2061


Department is celebrating
National Women's History
Month with artwork on
display all month 8 a.m.
to 5 p.m. in the PD Lobby
and at City Hall. Featured
artists are Dottie List,
Calendar Wise, and Leslie
Reed-McDaniel. Call
Audre' Washington at 386-
719-5742.


Friend of Music concert Fair/Rodeo Scholarship


The Graffe String
Quartet of the Czech
Republic perform 7:30
p.m. Monday at First
Presbyterian Church of
Lake City. Michiko Otaki,
pianist, will be in concert
with them. The concert
is free to the public and a
reception will follow. For
more information call 386-
365-4932.

Male mentoring
program
Building Strong-Bonds
for middle and high school
boys is meeting 5-8 p.m.
Monday right next to
Totally About You Barber
Shop, 532 Marion Street

Tuesday
United Way awards
banquet
The United Way of
Suwannee Valley Annual
Meeting and Awards
Banquet is 6 7:30 p.m. at
Florida Gateway College
Howard Conference
Center. The cost is $25 per
person. RSVP by Tuesday
to 752-5604.

Wednesday
Art on display
The Lake City Police,


Columbia County
Resources is now accept-
ing applications for the
fair/rodeo scholarship.
Two scholarships for
$1,000 will be awarded to
graduating seniors. Call
386-752-8822 or visit www.
columbiacountyfairorg to
download the criteria and
application. The applica-
tion is also available at
Columbia High School,
Fort White High School or
the fair office. The dead-
line is 5 p.m. April 1.

Feinstein challenge
Christian Service Center
is participating in the $1
million dollar giveaway
Alan Feinstein Challenge
from now until April
30. Every food item or
financial donation counts
toward receiving a per-
centage of the giveaway.
Call 386-755-1770 and
bring donations either to
the center at the corner
of Hilton and Washington
or mail to P.O. Box 2285,
Lake City, FL, 32056.

Thursday
Selling at local Farm
Markets
A workshop to help
vendors get ready to
grow and sell produce


at the new Farm Market
is 6:30 p.m. Thursday
at the Columbia County
Extension office. The
workshop is free and
focuses on how to display
and sell your produce at a
farm market. Learn other
important information
relating to value added
products and food permits.
Space is limited so please
call 752-5384 to register.

Friday
CLE Class
A Continuing Legal
Education class,
Workable Unity: Judicial
Perspectives, is 11 a.m.
- 1:30 p.m. April 14 at
Holiday Inn of Lake City.
Lunch will be served.
Cost is free but seating is
limited. RSVP by Friday,
April 1.

Donors wanted
The bloodmobile is stop-
ping 11 a.m. 7 p.m. Friday
at Pizza Boy Pizza. Receive
a free Large Cheese Pizza
and a T-Shirt.

Antique Tractor &
Engine Show
The Antique Tractor
& Engine Show is April
1 -3 at Stephen Foster


Folk Culture Center
State Park. There will be
seven "Make and Take"
workshops available in the
Craft Square on April 2.
Call the park's Gift Shop
at (386) 397-1920 or visit
www.stephenfosterCSO.
org. To learn more about
the park, visit www.
FloridaStateParks. org/ste-
phenfoster

Saturday
Not Your Mama's
Couponing
A workshop on
Couponing is 10 a.m. 12
p.m. Saturday at Artworks
Studio The event is hosted
by Lindley Rachel from
RO.C.K Solid. The cost is
$5.00 per person, and pre-
registration required, seat-
ing is limited. Call Colleen
at 386-758-9346 or e-mail
mdfinley@juno.com. Learn
how to save 50 -percent
and more on your grocery
bill. The studio is located
at 122 SW Midtown Plaza
suite 103. Visit http://www.
artworksstudio.net/Aboutus.
html for directions.

Pioneer Days
The 35th annual Pioneer
Days is 9 a.m. -5 p.m.
Saturday and 10 a.m.
- 4 p.m. Sunday, April 3 in


downtown High Springs. It
will feature musical enter-
tainment, expanded kids
korral with pony rides,
handmade arts and crafts
vendors, heritage village
with demonstrations of old
time skills and a shoot out
at noon and 2 p.m. each
day. Call 386-454-3120.

Adopt-a-Highway
Cleanup #2
The Filipino American
Cultural Society of Lake
City will meet on April 2 at
8:00 am at the Columbia
Bank Parking lot, corner
of US 90 and Turner road.
We will pickup both sides
of our adopted two-mile
stretch of highway on US
90 west. For more informa-
tion contact Bob Gavette
386-965-5905

Diva Day
Altrusa Diva Day is
10 a.m. 2 p.m. April 2
at the Columbia County
Fairgrounds Banquet Hall.
Admission is $5 which
enters you into a drawing
for a Mariana bracelet or
Suwannee Jam tickets.
Tickets are available at the
Lake City Reporter, Lake
City Advertiser, Mercantile
Bank on Highway 90 or at
the door. Call Jan Smithey
at 386-961-3217.


Mr. Gordon Eugene "Gene"
Pettyjohn
Mr. gordon Eugene "Gene" Pet-
tyjohin, age 73, of Lake City,
Fla., died Friday, March 25, in
the Shands Jacksonville Hospi-
tal, Jacksonville, Fla., following
a brief illness. He was a native
of Summerville, Georgia and
had resided in Lake City, Fla.,
since 1951. He worked for the
Department of Transportation of
Florida for 47 years and retired
as an asphalt engineer in 2003.
He also retired from the Florida
National Guard after 31 years
of service. He was a member
of Berea Baptist Church and a
member of the Old D.O.T. Re-
tirement Liars Club. He was
preceded in death by his par-
ents, Gordon Lee Pettyjohn and
Grethel Walters Pettyjohn and
his late wife, Imogene Walker
Pettyjohn. He is survived by.two
daughters, Brenda (Hal) Johns
of Macclenny, Fla., and Lisa
Turman of Lake City, Fla.; his
son, Don (Nancy) Pettyjohn of
Macclenny, Fla., two brothers,
Dwight Pettyjohn and Bill Pet-
tyjohn, both of Lake City, Fla.;
special friends, Allen and Peggy
Rowe; seven grandchildren and
five great-grandchildren also
survive. Funeral services will
be conducted at 11 am. Tues-
day,,March 29, in the Chapel
of Guerry Funeral Home with
Rev. Larry Sweat officiating. In-
terment.will be in Forest Lawn
Memorial Gardens, Lake City,
Fla. Visitation will be from 6
to 8 p.m. Monday, March 28, at
Guerry Funeral Home, 2659
SW Main Blvd, Lake City, Fla.
www. guerryfunerathome. net.

Robert" Bobby" Allen
Vicenzi
Robert Bobby" Allen'Vicenzi,
45, of Lake City, died March 20,
2011 due to injuries sustained
in an accident. He had lived in
Lake City for the past 33 years.
He was preceded in death by his
father Robert Allen Frank, one
sister Heather Tarashik and a
brother Sean Tarashik. He was
of the Baptist faith, served in the
USMC "Semper Fi"; a member
of the Suwannee County FFA
Alumni; the NPC; an active mem-
ber of Future Fitness, he held the
title of Mr. Lake City in 2007,
enjoyed riding horses and bulls;
and driving around in his Lime
Green Scion. Most of all he en-
joyed and loved life to the fullest.
He is survived by two daughters,
Channah Vicenzi, Mayo, FL; Na-
talia Vicenzi, Lake City, FL.; his
wife Marti Vicenzi, Lake City,
FL.; one grandchild Hayden
Wimberly; mother Anna Lou
Taylor, St. Augustine, FL; one
brother Jeff Tarashik, (Rhonda)
York, PA; one sister Julie Vicen-
zi, Jacksonville, FL; and a host of
nieces and nephews also survive.


OBITUARIES

Funeral services will be con-
ducted at 2 P.M. Tuesday, March
29, 2011 at Gateway-Forest
Lawn Funeral Home, with Pas-
tor Frank Davis officiating.
Visitation with the family will
be Monday, March 28, 2011
from 5 P.M. until 7 P.M.in lieu
of flowers family ask dona-
tions be made to any Columbia
County Bank in Bobby Vicenzi
Memory, for his daughters. In-
terment will follow in Crosby


Lake Cemetery in Starke,
Florida. GATEWAY-FOREST
LAWN FUNERAL HOME,
3596 South U.S. Highway 441,
Lake City, Florida, (386) 752-
1954 in charge of arrangements.
Please sign the guest book at
www. gatewayforestlawn. com.
Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


FRIENDS OF MUSIC
INVITES THE COMMUNITY
to attend FREE
GRArFE STRING QUARTU
with Micluko Otalu, pianist


MARCH 28, 2011 at 7:30 P.M.
at the
FIRST PRESBYERIAN CHURCH, LC
This is a free concert with reception to follow.
First Presbyterian Church WORSHIP
697 SW Baya Dr., Lake City, Fla. Contemporary Worship 9:00am
752-0670 fpcic@bellsouth.net Traditional Worship 11:00am
www.fpclc.org Sunday School 10:00am


Happg Birthday Bcianna
A special girl frorn the very start.
Always know I love ygo with all my heart.


Call today to place an
Invitation ad for your
child, grandchild,
God child or anyone
you think deserves
something extra on
their special day!


call

755.5440 or

755.5441
between 8am & 4pm


S$Deadline:
Ads have to be placed by 4pm, 3-days prior
to appearance in the Lake City Reporter.


S"Soft-Touch" Initial Exam ,, For Only
Panoramic X-Ray, :,2: ,0
.-. :-'" .- i Diagnosis ,...-r 1
.^^ H ~ s.. ...'.' ... f., ., i,,,.,' ,;, ''U,, r.. ,,'rc ,:i i" wIr,: ,l i n i,' ,: ir ( :,,,,
.'h . : ,yh ,: ,...:. with this ad .
i Reg. $136.00 "
-. ........ ...' A Saving of 107.00!
,."*'rll i-pi- li--'JI'r l iIl
** / ,. | .COUPON .008 -" "
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FORI

We can





Find out more by
calling 752-1293.


"Our Lake City Reporter has been
instrumental in sending our
message to everyone in North
Florida. We love to offer low, low
prices on quality mattress sets
to Lake City and
surrounding counties.


BEDS FOR LESS


i deliver your message as well.


Lake City Reporter
lakecityreporter.com CURRENTS Magazine


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


LovPe.Dladl ..


. I












LAKE CITY REPORTER WEATHER SUNDAY, MARCH 27, 2011


THE WEATHER



PARTLY SCT. SCT. SCT. SCT.
CLOUDY STORMS ,-STORMS T-STORMS T-STORMS



HI 85 LO1 H ...I LO HI 80LO HI 80L HI 79
or \\ "


Tallahassee*
84/64
Pensacola S
76/63 ,Pana City
79/66


otVldasta
84/63
Lake City,
85/63
Gainesville *
85/62
Ocala
S7/62


Tampa P
82/68


Ft. Mye
87/65


K


City
* Jacksonville Cape Canaveral
85/63 Daytona Beach
Ft. Lauderdale
Daytona Beach Fort Myers
86J/65 Gainesville
Jacksonville
Key West
Orlando Cape Canaveral Lake City
89/65 85/64 Miami
Naples
West Palm Beach Ocala
89/66 Orlando
* FtL Lauderdale Panama City
rS 88/70 Pensacola
S Naples Tallahassee
83/67 Miami Tampa
89/70 Valdosta
0ey West W. Palm Beach


82 74
a^ /4 ... --...,-..o. r e -


TEMPERATURES
High Saturday
Low Saturday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Saturday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


81
46
77
52
93 in 1907
34 in 2006


0.00"
1.75"
9.02"
3.62"
10.52"


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise tom.
Sunset tom.


7:26 a.m.
7:46 p.m.
7:25 a.m.
7:47 p.m.


MOON
Moonrise today 3:12 a.m.
Moonset today 1:53 p.m.
Moonrise tom. 3:53 a.m.
Moonset tom. 2:50 p.m.



April April April April
3 11 17 24
New First Full Last


10

10 mitestblmrn
Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+.-


Monday
80/66/t
80/63/t
8 '72/t
8:'/68/t
80/61/t
74/60/t
84/75/t
80/60/t
88/72/t
84/69/t
82/62/t
84/64/t
78/64/t
76/63/t
81/61/t
80/68/t
79/58/t
88/69/t


Tuesday
81/68/t
81/66/t
86/73/pc
87/67/sh
81/63/pc
75/63/pc
84/74/pc
80/63/pc
86/71/t
85/69/pc
83/63/pc
86/67/t
74/65/sh
74/63/t
78/63/sh
84/68/sh
76/58/t
85/70/t


,rP A ^ ;!,,; |



.. '..l w,









weather com


>w Forecasts, data and
:."-'- graphics @ 2011 Weather
SCentral, LP, Madison, Wis.
www.weatherpubllsher.com


NATIONAL FORECAST: Showers and thunderstorms will affect portions of the Southeast
today. Some storms along the eastern Gulf Coast could be strong to severe. Elsewhere, scat-
tered thunderstorms are possible along the western Gulf Coast. Rain and snow are expected
across the Pacific Northwest and northern California, with rain and snow also affecting the
Intermountain West.

.- .. '3r.


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YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL EXTREMES ,


Saturday Today
CITY HI/Lo/Pcp. HI/Lo/W
Albany NY 35/18/0 .35/17/s
Albuquerque 54/38/0 68/37/pc
Anchorage 30/28/0 36/24/c
Atlanta 59/53/0 67/45/t
Baltimore 45/28/0 39/27/sh
Billings 40/30/0 40/26/sn
Birmingham 71/57/.07 66/44/t
Bismarck 25/11/0 27/19/c
Boise 48/36/.01 47/34/rs
Boston 39/26/0 39/25/pc
Buffalo 25/12/0 29/14/s
Charleston SC 77/48/0 72/49/t
Charleston WV 44/33/0 40/25/sn
Charlotte 56/44/.22 51/36/sh
Cheyenne 41/22/.03 46/28/rs
Chicago 32/25/0 35/23/pc
Cincinnati 40/31/0 40/24/c
Cleveland 30/21/0 34/20/pc
Columbia SC 62/50/.06 53/40/t
Dallas 84/68/0 62/48/c
Daytona Beach/ 84/50/0 86/65/pc
Denver 50/26/0 55/31/c


CITY
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Fairbanks
Greensboro
Hartford
Honolulu
Houston
Inrdianapolls
Jackson MS
Jacksonville
Kansas City
Las Vegas
Uttle Rock
Los Angeles
Memphis
Miami
Minneapolis
Mobile
New Orleans
New York
Oklahoma City


High: 94, Laredo.Texas Low: -80, Gaylord, Mich.


Saturday Today
HI/Lo/Pcp. HI/Lo/W CITY
37/30/0 38/24/c Omah
33/17/0 33/17/pc Orlani
71/56/0. 79/51/s .Philad
17/3/0 36/11/rs Phoen
47/43/0 43/32/sh Pittsb
40/25/0 39/19/s, Portla
75/71/0 83/70/sh Portia
83/71/0 76/64/c Raleli
38/28/0 40/24/pc Rapid
84/65/0 69/51/t Reno
84/47/0 85/63/pc Richn
36/34/0 38/31/c Sacra
60/48/0 71/53/pc St. Lo
47/44/.05 53/39/c Salt L
57/51/0 E.1 51 pc -San A
52/45/1.00 52/39/c San D
86/67/0 89/70/1'c San F
28/16/0 35/16/pc Seatt
82/64/0 80/63/t Spoke
84/70/0 80/67/t Tampz
39/26/0 41/24/s Tucso
y 57/44/0 54/38/c Wash


Saturday Today


la
do
lelphia
nix
iurgh
nd ME
nd OR
gh
City

nond
imento
ouls
Lake City
mtonio
Diego
Francisco
le
mane
a
in
ington


HI/Lo/Pcp.
35/31/.05
85/54/0
41/27/0
70/53/0
34/19/0
37/19/0
49/43/,27
49/45/0
30/28/.20
48/36/0
48/40/0
50/48/.21
39/32/.10
47/31/0-
79/68/0
62/51/0
55/48/.57
48/38/.01
45/30/0
81/-1/0
70/46/0
46/32/0


HI/Lo/W
38/27/c
89/65/pc
42/25/pc
79/57/pc
35/16/pc
35/19/pc
50/40/r
42/32/sh
35/24/sn
54/33/rs
37/25/sh
59/46/sh
39/27/c
51/34/rs
71/57/pc
60/53/pc
58/48/c
52/41/r
47/34/sh
82/68/pc
77/48/pc
39/29/sh


7p kMonday 6a


On trhis date in
1988., temperatures
rose quickly. then o
dropped jusr as rap-
idl,. in the cenrral
U.S. Eight ces
report tea record higr,
temperatures for the
date as readings
soared into the SOs.
In soutneastern
ColoraOo. the tern.
perature at Lamar
Cplo. reached 91.


H


CITY
Acapulco
Amsterdam
Athens
Auckland
Beijing
Berlin
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Geneva
Havana
Helsinki
Hong Kong
Kingston


Saturday Today
HI/Lo/Pcp. HI/Lo/W
86/73/0 86/68/pc
46/37A02 51/35/pc
65/49/0 65/48/pc
72/64/0 71/63/t
59/34/0 60/37/pc
46/34/0 44/26/pc
73/64/0 70/49/s
72/52/0 75/56/s
64/37/0 60/42/pc
90/59/0 88/68/pc
32/12/0. 33/21/c
68/63/0 64/58/c
84/73/0 86/73/pc


CITY
La Paz
ULima
London
Madrid
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Nairobi
Nassau'
New Delhi.
Oslo
Panama
Paris


Saura Today Saura TodayV


Saturday
HI/Lo/Pcp.
55/37/0
75/64/0
57/45/0
64/46/.02
81/52/0
32/19/0
25/18/0
81/63/0
82/64/0
93/64/0
36/18/0
90/77/0
66/46/0


Today
HI/Lo/W
59/40/sh
80/69/sh
53/38/pc
58/41/sh
79/48/t
29/14/s
33/16/c
82/61/t
80/70/pc
96/67/s
38/22/pc
87/76/t
58/41/c


CITY
Rio
Rome
St. Thomas VI
San Juan PR
Santiago
Seoul
Singapore
Sydney
Tel Aviv
Tokyo
Toronto
Vienna
Warsaw


Saturday
HI/Lo/Pcp.
84/75/0
61/46/0
82/76/0
88/74/.05
75/46/0
48/27/0
91/77/0
68/64/0
68/50/0
52/41/0
25/12/0
55/39/0
37/28/.08


KEY TO CONDITIONS: c-cloudy, dr-drizzle, f-fair, fg-fog, h-hazy, i-ice, pc=partly cloudy, r-rain, s-sunny,
sh-showers, sn-snow, ts-thunderstorms, w-windy.


CAMPUS CMN VISA Platinum Card


BALANCE TRANSFER SPECIAL


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I *:- ~!l s1l ke p


Today
HI/Lo/W
92/76/pc
66/46/pc
83/73/pc
84/73/pc
73/43/s
,50/34/c
89/76/t
71/62/pc
67/48/s
52/37/pc
29/16/s
50/35/sh
41/25/s


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


a










Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@Jakecityreporter.com


Lake City Reporter





SPORTS


Sunday. March 27, 2011


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


BRIEFS

FORT WHITE FOOTBALL
Football camp
offered April 8-9
The Fort White
Quarterback Club, in
conjunction with Pray
then Play Sports, has the
2011 Football Camp on
April 8-9 at First Baptist
Church of High Springs.
The Friday session is
5-8:30 p.m., while the
Saturday session is 9 a.m.
to 3 p.m. and includes
lunch. Cost is $40 per
child, or $35 per child for
siblings.
For details, call Billy,
Stephens at
(352) 317-8053.
T-BALL
Coaches meeting
planned April 7
A T-ball coaches
meeting is 6:30 p.m.
April 7 at the Girls Club
Center. A few player
spots remain.
For details, call
Heyward Christie at
754-3607.

FITNESS
Zumba intro
class offered
The Lake City
Recreation Department is
offering, an Introduction
to Zumba class at 9 a.m.
April 9 at Teen Town
Recreation Center, A
regular Zumba class will
follow at 10 a.m. Cost
is $5 for either or both'
classes. Sarah Sandlin is
the instructor.
For details, call
Heyward Christie at
754-3607.
GOLF
Lions Club
tourney April 9
The Lake City Lions
Club golf tournament is
9 a.m. April 9 at
The Country Club at
Lake City.
For details, call Carl
* Ste-Marie at 752-2266.
CHS FOOTBALL
'Q-back Club
meetings set
The Columbia County
Quarterback Club has
meetings set for 6 p.m.
April 11 and April 25 at
Jones Fieldhouse.
For detail, call Blake
Lundy at 867-0296.
ADULT BASKETBALL
Men's games
at Richardson
Open basketball games
for men 18 and older are
played at Richardson
Community Center from
5-8 p.m. on Sundays. Cost
is $3 per session.
For details, call John
Henry Young Jr. at
623-4817.
From staff reports

GAMES

Monday
Fort White High
baseball vs. Columbia
High, 7 p.m.
Tuesday
Columbia High
baseball vs. Fort White
High, 6 p.m.
Wednesday
Columbia High
weightlifting in sectional
qualifier at St. Augustine
High, 1 p.m.
Friday
Fort White High


weightlifting sectional at
Palatka High, 11 a.m.


Gators falter


in OT against


Butler, 74-71


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Florida's Alex Tyus (23) slam dunks during the second half against Butler Saturday in New
Orleans.


Ratliff signs with
Jacksonville
Dolphins football.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com
For Danny Ratliff, the
dream was to play college
football. The reality came
through academics,
however, as the Columbia
High center earned his
way through a 3.6 GPA to
play on the Jacksonville
University football team.
"I knew that if I kept
my grades and got bright
futures that I could even
'walk on somewhere,"
Ratliff said. "That's where
my future is after football."
Ratliff didn't have to
worry about walking on as
he'll enroll to play under
Kerwin Bell with the
Dolphins. The way he got
there was more gratifying
for his parents, Trina and
Richard Ratliff.
"I'm so proud because
we pushed him so hard
in the classroom," Trina
Ratliff said. "I'm more
proud of this than I was
for football because I know
he did earn it. If he blows
out his knee, they can't
take his brain. He did it the
right way."
Ratliff will see playing
time no matter what next
season. Jacksonville has
both a varsity and junior
varsity team. For now, the
plan is for Ratliff to start
with the junior.yarsity.
"I think they want to ty :
me for five games on the
JV and evaluate whether to
bump me up after," he said.
Ratliff said his dream
toward playing college
football was partly inspired
by one of Columbia's
coaches during the 2009
season.
"I feel that I mostly want
to thank coach (Ed) Stolts,
who came from Ball State,"
Ratliff said. "I was always
scared of college coaches,
but I figured we had a
great relationship so I can
have a great relationship
with college coaches.
Him and my parents
really helped with grades,

RATUFF continued on 2B


Bulldogs make
second-straight
trip to Final Four.
By BRETT MARTEL
Associated Press
NEW ORLEANS Of
course Butler erased a
late deficit. Of course
the Bulldogs hit a clutch
3-pointer late in overtime.
Of course they're going
back to the Final Four.
This is the Butler Way.
Shelvin Mack scored
27 points, including five
in overtime, and Butler
returned to the Final Four
with a 74-71 victory 'over
Florida on Saturday.
Matt Howard scored 14
and Khyle Marshall added
10 for the Bulldogs (27-9),
who showed again they


simply won't give in, climb-
ing out of an 11-point hole
in the second half.
Mack's 3-pointer with
1:21 left in overtime gave
Butler the lead for good at
72-70.
Kenny Boynton missed a
long 3 that could have given
Florida (29-8) the lead with
a little under 20 seconds
left. Alex Tyus appeared to
have the offensive rebound,
but Howard tied him up
and the possession arrow
favored Butler.
Florida had to foul Mack
with 10.6 seconds to go, and
he hit both shots for the
final margin.
Vernon Macklin had a
career-high 25 points for
second-seeded Florida, the
third-straight higher seed
GATORS continued on 2B


Photos by BRANDON FINLEY/
Lake City Reporter

ABOVE: Former Columbia
High center Danny Ratliff
signs a letter of intent to
play football at Jacksonville
University.

LEFT: Ratliff speaks with
Columbia High assistant Ed
Stolts, who coached Ratliff
on the offensive line
during his junior year,
during the signing ceremony
on Thursday.










LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, MARCH 27, 2011


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TV sports
Today
AUTO RACING
12:30 p.m.
ABC IRL, Grand Prix of
St. Petersburg; at St. Petersburg
2:30 p.m.
FOX NASCAR, Sprint Cup, Auto
Club 400, at Fontana, Calif.
CYCLING
5 p.m.
VERSUS Criterium international,
final stage, at Porto-Vecchio, Corsica
(same-day tape)
GOLF
9 a.m.
TGC European PGATour, bpen de
Andalucia, final round, at Malaga, Spain
12:30 p.m.
TGC PGA Tour, Arnold Palmer
Invitational, final round, at Orlando
2:30 p.m.
NBC PGA Tour, Arnold Palmer
Invitational, final round, at Orlando
7 p.m.
TGC LPGA, Kia Classic, final round,
at City of Industry, Calif.
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
4 p.m.
WGN Preseason, Chicago Cubs vs.
Colorado, at Mesa, Ariz.
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
2:10 p.m.
CBS NCAA Division I
tournament, regional finals, double-
header, North Carolina vs. Kentucky,
at Newark, N.J. and Kansas vs: Virginia
Commonwealth, at San Antonio
MOTORSPORTS
3 p.m. -
SPEED FIM World Superbike, at
Derby, England (same-day tape)
NBA BASKETBALL
8 p.m.
ESPN Portland at Oklahoma City
10:30 p.m.
ESPN Dallas at Phoenix
NLL LACROSSE
2 p.m.
VERSUS Buffalo at Minnesota
RODEO
8 p.m.
VERSUS PBR,Ty Murray Invitational,
at Albuquerque, N.M. (same-day tape)
SOCCER.
8:55 a.m.
ESPN2 Men's national teams, exhi-
bition, Scodtland vs. Brazil, at London
WOMEN'S COLLEGE
BASKETBALL
Noon
ESPN NCAA Division I.
tournament, regional semifinal,
Georgetown vs. Connecticut, at,
Philadelphia
2:30 p.m.
ESPN2 NCAA Division I
tournament, regional semifinal, DePaul vs.
Duke, at Philadelphia
4:30 p.m.
ESPN2 NCAA Division I
tournament, regional semifinal, Georgia vs.
Texas A&M, at Dallas
7 p.m.
ESPN2 NCAA Division I
tournament, regional semifinal,Wlsconsin-
Green Bay vs. Baylor, at Dallas
Monday
NHL HOCKEY
7:30 p.m.
VERSUS Chicago at Detroit
PREP BASKETBALL
7:30 p.m.
ESPN2-Exhibition,PoweradeJamfest
slamdunk competition, at Chicago
WOMEN'S COLLEGE
BASKETBALL
7 p.m.
ESPN NCAA Division I
tournament, regional final, at Dayton,
Ohio
9 p.m.
ESPN NCAA Division I
tournament, regional final, at Spokane,
Wash.

BASKETBALL

NBA schedule

Saturday's Games.
Atlanta 98, New Jersey 87
Charlotte 114, NewYork 106
Indiana at Detroit (n) I
Chicago at Milwaukee (n)
Dallas at Utah (n)
Toronto at LA Clippers (n)
Today's Games
Sacramento at Philadelphia, 12 p.m.
San Antonio at Memphis, 6 p.m.
Atlanta at Cleveland, 6 p.m.
Houston at Miami, 6 p.m.
Boston at Minnesota, 7 p.m.
Portland at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m.
Washington at Golden State,9 p.m.
New Orleans at LA Lakers, 9:30 p.m.
Dallas at Phoenix, 10:30 p.m.
Monday's Games'
Milwaukee at Charlotte, 7 p.m.
Boston at Indiana, 7 p.m.
Orlando at NewYork, 7:30 p.m.
Philadelphia at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Portland at San Antonio, 8:30 p.m.


Washington at Utah, 9 p.m.

NCAA tournament
EAST REGIONAL
Regional Semifinals
Friday
North Carolina 81, Marquette 63
Kentucky 62, Ohio State 60
Regional Championship
Today
North Carolina (29-7) vs. Kentucky
(28-8), 5:05 p.m.
SOUTHEAST REGIONAL
Regional Championship
Saturday
Butler 74, Florida 71, OT
SOUTHWEST REGIONAL
Regional Semifinals
Friday
Kansas 77, Richmond 57
Virginia Commonwealth 72,
Florida State 71, OT
Regional Championship
Today
Kansas vs. Virginia Commonwealth
(27-11),2:20 p.m.
WEST REGIONAL
Regional Championship
Saturday
Connecticut vs.Arizona (n)

Women's NCAA

PHILADELPHIA REGIONAL
Regional Semifinals
Today
Connecticut (34-1) vs. Georgetown
(24-10), Noon
DePaul (29-6) vs. Duke (31-3),
2:30 p.m.
DAYTON REGIONAL
Regional Semifinals
Saturday
Tennessee 85, Ohio State 75
Notre Dame 78, Oklahoma 53
Regional Championship
Monday
Tennessee-Ohio State winner vs.
Oklahoma-Notre Dame winner, 7 p.m.
SPOKANE REGIONAL
Regional Semifinals
Saturday
Gonzaga vs. Louisville (n)
Stanford vs. North Carolina (n)
Regional Championship
Monday'
Gonzaga-Louisville winner vs.
Stanford-North Carolina winner, 9 p.m.
DALLAS REGIONAL
Regional Semifinals
Today
Georgia (23-10) vs. Texas A&M (29-5),
4:30 p.m.
Baylor (33-2) vs.Wiscorisin-Green Bay
(34-1), 7 p.m.

Women's NIT

Quarterfinals
Saturday
Charlotte atVirginia (n)
Today
Syracuse (25-9) at Toledo (26-8),
2 p.m.
Arkansas (22-11) at Illinois State
(23-10), Z p.m.
Southern Cal (22-12) at Colorado
(1-.15), 3 p.m.

AUTO RACING

Race week

NASCAR
SPRINT CUP
Auto Club 400
Site: Fontana, Calif.
Schedule: Today, race, 3 p.m. (FOX,
2:30-6:30 p.m.)
Track: Auto Club Speedway (oval. 2.0
miles).
Race distance: 400 miles, 200 laps.
INDYCAR
Grand Prix of St. Petersburg
*Site: St. Petersburg '
Schedule:Today, race, 12:30 p.m. (ABC,
12:30-3 ip.m.).'
Track Streets of St. Petersburg (street
course,-1.8 miles).
Race distance: 181 miles, 100 laps.
FORMULA ONE
Australian Grand Prix
Site: Melbourne,Australia.
Schedule: Today, -race, 2 a.m. (Speed,
1:30-4 a.m.)..
Tradc Albert Park (street course, 3.3.
miles).
Race distance: 191.12 miles, 58 laps.

Auto Club 400 lineup

At Auto Club Speedway
Fontana, Calif.
Friday qualifying; race today
(Car number in parentheses)
I. (42) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet,
184.653 mph. a
2. (I I) Denny Hamlin,Toyota, 184.27.
3. (20) Joey Logano,Toyota, 184.134.
4. (78) Regan Smith, Chevrolet,
184.03.
5. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet,
183.988.
6. (6) David Ragan, Ford, 183.692.
7. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet,


RATLIFF: Signed with Jacksonville

Continued From Page 1B


because that's how parents
are."
One of the determining
factors for Ratliff choosing
to become a Dolphin was
the close proximity to
home.
"I feel that it's not so far
out of reach and it's a better
environment," he said. "It
won't be so far out that I'll
have people there to help
support my college career."
His mother couldn't be
happier to have her son
just down the road.
"It's important for us
to be able to see all of his
games," Trina Ratliff said.


"I've been to all of his
games since he was six or
seven."
Ratliff also received a
ringing endorsement from
athletic director Dennis
Dotson.
"I had an opportunity
to coach him on the staff
for three years and have
seen him not only grow
as a player, but also as a
person," he said. "He's one
of the hardest workers
on the team, doesn't miss
workouts and guys work
harder just because he
works' so hard."
Now the plan is, to work


as hard as possible to
make his way onto the field
and leave with a degree.
Ratliff already has plans
to stay involved in sports
in some capacity after his
college career is over.
"I plan to be a physical
trainer or practice exercise
science," he said. "I'll help
out when players undergo
injuries by helping them
rehab back to full strength
and play again."
And while he works
on the degree, he'll get
to continue his dream of
putting on the shoulder
pads.


183.622.
8. (18) Kyle Busch,Toyota, 183.482.
9. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet,
183.463.
10. (5) Mark Martin, Chevrolet,
183.449.
11. (17) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 183.407.
12. (I) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet,
183.243.
13. (9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford,
183.127.
14. (00) David Reutimann, Toyota,
183.113.
15. (27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet,
182.95.
16. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet,
182.93I.
17. (33) Clint Bowyer, Chevrolet,
182.899.
18. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 182.797.
19. (83) Brian Vickers,Toyota, 182.658.
20. (43) A J Allmendinger, Ford,
182.51.9.
21. (2) Brad Keselowski, Dodge,
182.51.
22. (4) Kasey Kahne,Toyota, 182.366.
23. (22) Kurt Busch, Dodge, 182.039.
24. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet,
181.91.
25.(13) Casey Mears,Toyota, 181.855.
26. (56) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota,
181.809.
27. (21) Trevor Bayne, Ford, 181.804.
28. (09) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet,
181.694.
29. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet,
181.671. ,.
30. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet,
181.534.
31. (36) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet,
180.936.
32. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 180.786.
33. (66) Michael McDowell, Toyota,
180.605.
34. (47) Bobby Labonte, Toyota,
180.338.
35. (7) Robby Gordon, Dodge,
180.279.
36. (38) Travis Kvapil, Ford, 180.014.
37. (34) David Gilliland, Ford, 179.699.
38. (71) Andy Lally, Chevrolet,
178.958.
39. (32) Ken Schrader, Ford, 177.94.
40. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota,
177.659.
41.(60) Todd BodineToyota, 176.557.
42. (37) Tony Raines, Ford, 175.653.
43. (46) J.J.Yeley, Chevrolet.

BASEBALL

Spring training

Today's Games
Boston vs. Baltimore (ss) at Sarasota,
1:05 p.m.
'Baltimore (ss) ys.Toronto at Dunedin,
1:05 p.m.
N.Y. Yankees vs. Minnesota at Fort
Myers, 1:05 p.m.
Philadelphia vs. Atlanta at Kissimmee,
1:05 p.m.
Florida vs. Washington at Viera,
1:05 p.m.
Detroit vs. Houston at Kissimmee,
1:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay vs. Pittsburgh at Bradenton,
1:05 p.m.
N.Y. Mets vs. St. Louis at Jupiter,
1:05 p.m.
Texas vs. Seattle at Peoria, Ariz.,
4:05 p.m.
Monday's Games
Pittsburgh vs. Minnesota at Fort
Myers, 1:05 p.m.
Boston vs. Toronto at Dunedin,
1:05 p.m.
Detroit vs. Baltimore at Sarasota,
.1:05 p.m.
Florida (ss) vs. St. Louis at Jupiter,
1:05 p.m:
Houston vs. Philadelphia at Clearwater,
1:05 p.m.
Florida (ss) vs. N.Y. Mets at Port St.
Lucie, 1:10 p.m.
Texas vs. Arizona at Scottsdale, Ariz.,
4:10.p.m.
Washington vs.Atlanta at Kissimmee,
6:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay vs. N.Y. Yankees at Tampa,
7:05 p.m.,

HOCKEY

NHL schedule

Saturday's Games
N.Y. Rangers I, Boston 0
Los Angeles 4, Colorado I
Buffalo 2, New Jersey 0
Philadelphia 4, N.Y. Islanders I
Washington at Montreal (n)
Tampa Bay at Carolina (n)
Toronto at Detroit (n)
Dallas at Nashville (n)
St. Louis at Minnesota (n)
Anaheim at Chicago (n)
San Jose at Phoenix (n)
Calgary at Edmonton (n)
Today's Games
Florida at Pittsburgh, I. p.m.
Ottawa at Atlanta, 2 p.m.
Vancouver at Columbus, 5 p.m.
Boston at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Monday's Games
Chicago at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Colorado at Anaheim, 10 p.m.


From staff reports

Cheek's Gymnastics of
Lake City competed in its
first meet of the season at
the Alabama Elite Academy
in Dothan, Ala., on Feb. 5.-
Cheek's Level, 3 (begin-
ner) gymnasts swept- the
top four spots.
Morgan Warner, 10,
.placed first all-around with
a score of 33.75. Warner
scored first on balance
beam (8.60) and floor
exercise (9.025), second
on uneven bars (7,90) and
third on vault (8.20).
Brooklyn Altman, 11,
placed second all-around
with 33.20. She was first
on vault (8.95), second
on beam (8.10) and third
on floor (8.75) and bars
(7.40).
Gracee Priest, 8, was
third all-around with 32.90.
She was first on bars
(8.075), second on floor
(8.975) and third on beam


(8.225).
Leigh Wood, 8, of Live
Oak was fourth all-around.
She was second on vault
(8.65) and beam (8.725),
and fourth on bars and
floor.
"The Level 3 gymnasts
had a great first meet,"
Cheek's Gymnastics owner
and coach Tom Cheek said.
"Chris (wife) and I were
more thart pleased with
these girls."
Carson Frier, 7, of Live
Oak competes in Level 4
(beginner/intermediate)
and was the youngest in the
division at the meet Frier
placed seventh all-around
with 33.975. She was fourth
on vault (9.150) and scored
7.85 on bars, 8.55 on beam
,and 8.75 on floor.
Karsen Cembrauch, 9,
competed in Level 5. She
was first on bars (8.6), and
second on vault (8.525),
beam (8.15) and floor
(9.15).


Tessa Ferreira, 12, of
Live Oak is a Level 6 com-
petitor that has been with
Cheek's for nine years.
Ferreira placed first all-
around (37.325) by sweep-
ing all four events 9.765
on vault, 9.125 on bars,
9.275 on beam and 9.175
on floor.
Now in her second year
of Level 6, Ferreira plans to
move up to Level 7 in the
fall. Level 7 requires mak-
ing up routines for optional
skills, where all gymnasts
in Levels 1 through 6 per-
form the same routines.
All in,all the girls did
exceptionally well," Chris
said. 'Tom and I had six
months to get these girls
ready for competition. To
our amazement, they did
fantastic."
Cheek's Gymnastics is
north of Lake City on U.S.
Highway 41. For informa-
tion, call (386) 205-8363 or
(386) 590-2519.


GATORS: Fall to Bulter in overtime

Continued From Page 1B


from a- major conference
to be vanquished by the
Bulldogs.
Boynton finished with 17
points and Tyus had his
second-straight double-
double with 14 points and
10 rebounds.

ACROSS 35 Sta
36 Kis


1 Citrus fruit
5 "- Sera, Sera"
8 Antony the
Roman
12 Baking-powder
ingredient
13 Search
engine find
14 Mishmash
15 Shrill bark
16 Wherever
18 Unisex wear
20 Inched forward
21 kwon do
22 Menacing
sound
23 Put a match to
26 Woodworking
tool
29 Ingrid's
"Notorious"
co-star
30 "The Mammoth
Hunters" writer
31 Fallen tree
33 Spiral molecule
34 Feed the kitty


38 Sin
39 AbN
mu
40 Gui
41 Par
44 We
47 Bo-
49 Lu)
51 Fric
52 Wrn
53 Rel
54 Hire
55 Glo
56 Mo


Butler had to overcome
Florida's size advantage and a
number of its own mistakes.
In regulation, the
Bulldogs made 10 of 20
free throws and shot 39.6
percent (21 of 53), includ-
ing 8 of 30 from 3-point


ge award
ses
k unclogger
sent-minded
rmur,
ided
mphlet
II-behaved
is (hyph.)
(or river
dge stick
ath
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Dve sz.
re than fibs


DOWN

1 Fix the table
2 Dots in "la mer"
3 Ruminate
4 Fellow feeling
5 Movement
along a fault
6 Vases with feet
7 Ron who
played Tarzan
8 Grinding teeth


range. Yet they somehow
found a way to survive to
overtime, when they hit all
seven foul shots and three
of their eight field goals.
Remarkably, Butler also
outrebounded the Gators,
41-34.


Answer to Previous Puzzle

PACS BERG VIC
OMEN O VER EDO
SILO DELUSION
ENER GY FALLS
OBE Y AFR
SMACK AWRY
ROC SCAR HIVE
AHO Y TGOR TSP
YO YO DENIM
K OS LAMB
STOUT HEROES
WORMHOLE TILE
'IRE EBON ERIE

GOO RIBS NEER


Woeful cry
Paddy crop
Woman on cam-
pus
Danger
Popular pet


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com
1 1 3 4 45 6 97 8 1 10 1 i


22 Clarified but-
ter
23 Arith. term
24 Fleming and
Woosnam
25 Lab weight
26 Slices
27 Corsica neigh-
bor
28 Cut of beef
30 Pharaoh's
amulet
32 Prefix for ther-
mal
34 Keen,
35 Type of num-
ber
37 Reaction
to pollen
38 Dover's st.
40 Bounded
along
41 Thunder god
42 Annoy
43 Like good
cheddar
44 Unmixed
45 "Kon- -"
46 Mr. Wiesel
48 Tire support
50 USN rank


3-28 2011 by UFS, Inc.


COURTESY PHOTO
Members of the Cheek's Gymnastics team are Morgan Warner (from left),
Karsen Cembrauch, Carsen Frier, Gracee Priest, Leigh Wood, Brooklyn Altman and
Tessa Ferriera. Warner, Altman, Priest and Wood swept the top four places in Level 3
all-around competition at a meet in Dothan, Ala.


Cheek's Gymnastics team


shines at meet in Alabama


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420,








LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, MARCH 27, 2011 3B


OUTDOORS



Turkey time


By MONTY STEPHENS
Special to the Reporter
Spring turkey
hunting season
for the north
Florida Fish
and Wildlife
Conservation Commission
Zone C opened March 19.
The season runs until
April 24.
During this time frame,
hunters are allowed one
turkey per day with a
season bag limit of two.
This is a shotgun only
hunt and shot size must
be no larger than No. 2
(no buckshot).
Getting started in turkey
hunting is very easy and
requires little equipment.
Since only male turkeys
(gobblers) are legal to
take, it will be necessary
to call in order to locate
the turkey and entice him
within shotgun range. The
easiest call to use is a box
or slate call but expert
hunters prefer diaphragm
calls.
Columbia County Judge
Tom Coleman, one of ,
our local expert hunters,
said, "Although turkeys
are abundant all through
North Florida, the best
hunting is on private lands
because of the light


hunting pressure."
He said hunters would
do well to talk to their
deer hunting buddies that
do not hunt turkeys bfit
have leases, and ask for
permission to hunt the
land.
"The early part of the
season is especially
challenging because the
gobblers readily call back
but are henned up and as
such, don't come in as
easily," Coleman said.
"Later in the season they
typically are much less
vocal, and when they do
come into range are easily
spooked."
So it never easy.
Other advice if you
decide to go is use plenty
of insect repellent and full
camo is needed.
For a public land hunt,
concentrate your efforts
in the Osceola National
Forest by Ocean Pond
(get a WMA permit and a
Turkey Stamp).
Then watch a turkey
hunting show on TV to
learn the clucks,.whines,
yelps, and stick to the
logging trails.
Good hunting.

* Monty Stephens, an avid
hunter and firsheman, lives in
Lake City.


COURTESY PHOTO
Tom Coleman shows a turkey taken in Columbia County.
The gobbler weighed 21 pounds with an 11-inch beard and
1.25-inch spurs. -


Women's Handgun Safety
Day is April 9 at Osceola
Rifle and Pistol Range


From staff reports

The 2011 Women's
Handgun Safety Day is
10 a.m. to 3 p.m. April 9 at
the Osceola Rifle and Pistol
Range.
Participants are urged to
bring their own handgun
with ammunition; handguns
will be provided for those
who do not own one.
Attendees will receive a
certificate of participation,
which can be used to sat-



Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
NBDAL I


isfy the safety class require-
ment to obtain a Florida
concealed weapons permit.
Cost is a $5 donation to
the Friends of the Osceola
and one box of ammunition,
either .38 special or 9mm.
Lunch will be provided.
Call the FWC regional
office (754-1051, Ext. 125)
to register or e-mail Karen.
Little@MyFWC.com.
Registration is limited
to the first 50 women to
sign up.

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek


KCBELU L, .

__ O D WHAT THE COP 5 PIP
WHEN THEY 5POTTEP
TPNTEO THE TWIN -URsGLI-A .
] -- Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.

Ans: A
(Answers tomorrow)
Saturday's Jumbles: PRUNE SPELL FIXING IGUANA
I Answer: The blooming romance was this -
A SPRING FLING


Arizona's scoring

bursts not enough

against UConn


Wifliams,
Wildcats fall
short, 65-63.

By BETH'HARRIS
Associated Press

ANAHEIM, Calif.
- Derrick Williams and
his' Arizona teammates
dunked their way to anoth-
er big second-half run.
This time, it wasn't
enough.
In a matchup of streaky
shooting teams, the
Wildcats, couldn't stay


DISNEY


hot long enough to beat
Connecticut, losing 65-63
in the West Regional final
on Saturday.
It was a crushing end to
fifth-seeded Arizona's run
that came just a year after
the Wildcats' streak of
25 consecutive NCAA .
tournament appearances
ended.
Williams scored 20
points, making 9 of 12
free throws, and Jesse
Perry added 14 points for ASSOCIATED PRESS
the Wildcats (30-8), the Connecticut's Jeremy Lamb goes up for a dunk during the
Pac-10 regular season NCAA West regional college basketball championship game,
champions. Saturday in Anaheim, Calif.


WGRLAY TOfRWH



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Phone Number:
Address:


MARSEE I FLINN
A professonallimited liability company
Attorneys at Law
J. Daniel Marsee
Certified Family Law Mediator

Location
359 N.W. DeSoto Street
Lake City, Florida
Phone: (386) 768-2080












GENERAL AND RESTORATIVE DENTISTRY
(386) 362-6556
PLAYGROUHP

Decs- Parrisfi
Famiyd Fivcid Ho0me




458 Souti Marion Avenue
Lake City, Florida S2025 .
Phone:(386)752-1234 Fax (386)752-7006
www.yarristamifyfmitmerdIomie.com

SWIMMING 0OOL


TACO

386-755-9673

FLORIPA STATE FARKS


ul i:. LIc L UWET 9' WILP
line is Wednesday, March 30th, 2011 at 5:00 p.m. I' -
all 25 of the'Florida Fun'related words hidden in the word search I '
. Words can be found in the banners on the ads shown here. Comr- I illll IlillIPN It.
he puzzle and return it to the Lake City Reporter, 180 E. Duval Street,
City, FL by Wednesday, March 30th 5:00pm, for your chance to winl Specializng n
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Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


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Kentucky outshines expectations


By DAVE SKRETTA
Associated Press

NEWARK, N.J. John
Calipari cringes when peo-
ple bring up the subject
of orie-and-done players,
those freshmen who use
college basketball merely
as a springboard to the
NBA.
He's certainly had his
share of them, four last
year alone.
But every time newcom-
ers Brandon Knight and
Doron Lamb knock down
key baskets, it seems
that senior big man Josh
Harrellson's offensive
rebound made it happen.
Or it was junior DeAndre
Liggins' screen that set up
the open look. Or Darius
Miller providing the assist.
The freshmen have deliv-
ered most of the highlights
this March, with Knight's
second game-winner of the
NCAA tournament lifting
the Wildcats past top-seed-
ed Ohio State on Friday
night and into the regional
finals. But it's been Billy
Gillispie's holdovers that
have been holding every-
thing together, providing
the leadership necessary
this time of year.
One and done? More like
three and won.
"We've been together
for six months," Calipari
said Saturday, fewer than
24 hours before playing
Nprth Carolina for a spot
in the Final Four. "We've
got freshmen playing with
three vets who weren't 'the
guys' a year ago. It's a new
team, so we're trying to
figure it out."
It's nothing new to
Calipari, though. He's fig-
ured it out before.
The NBA declared in
2005 that players must be


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Kentucky's Brandon Knight (12) reacts after making the game winning shot to end an East regional semifinal game against
Ohio State in the NCAA college basketball tournament Friday in Newark, N.J.- Kentucky won the game 62-60.


at least 19 years old or com-
plete one year of college
before entering the draft,
so elite prospects do just
that: spend one year on
campus.
Calipari doesn't like the
rule, but ever since he
returned to college coach-
ing at Memphis, he's cho-
sen to embrace the unique
opportunities that it. pres-
ents.
Derrick Rose truly began
his one-and-done wave,
starring for the Tigers in
2007-08 before jumping to
the Chicago Bulls. Tyreke
Evans came the following
year, and when Calipari


moved on to Kentucky last
season, perhaps the rich-
est crop of freshmen ever
signed on. 'Eric Bledsoe,
DeMarcus Cousins, Daniel
Orton and John Wall all
turned pro after one year.
"I don't agree with one-
and-done, never have, but
it is the rule," Calipari said.
"And I am not holding
kids back. If they have the
chance to go, I will tell them
to go."
Usually he has more in
the pipeline.
It's been Knight and
Lamb this year, providing
scoring punch from beyond
the perimeter with the


same youthful exuberance
of their predecessors. But
for the first time, it seems,
there are some guys who
have been around the block
to help them along.
"Every team needs expe-
rienced players. Coach Cal
does too," Liggins said. "He
kept us around because
we're experienced guys. It
helps the team out a lot if
you have experience."
Liggins acknowledged
that it's sometimes difficult
to watch elite freshmen
come in every autumn, tak-
ing the minutes that the vet-
erans believe they earned.
It's one of the reasons he


was wary of Calipari taking
over.
"I 'knew how good
a recruiter he was, he
recruits one-and-dones, and
he recruits great players.
I just thought he's a win-
ning coach, so whoever he
brings in, we have a chance
to compete," Liggins said.
"When he came in, he talk-
ed to me. He said, "This is
what you need to do, you
need to do this and this in
order to play,' so that's what
I've been doing."
Liggins has blossomed
into one of the premier
defenders in college bas-
ketball, in part because he


spent last season wearing
the white jersey of the sec-
ond team in practice. He
would go up against Bledsoe
and Wall every day, and it
only made him better.
He's now passing that
knowledge on.
"DeAndre does a great
job of leading by example,"
said Miller, also a junior.
"He picks up the intensity
and it rubs off on all of us.
Josh is the same thing."
Yes, Harrellson certainly
has some unique experi-
ences to draw upon.
Two years ago, Gillispie
was so frustrated with him
during a game at Vanderbilt
that he banished him to a
bathroom stall at halftime.
Calipari was so under-
whelmed that he played
him a total of 88 minutes
last season. And when
Harrellson sent out an
unflattering tweet directed
at Calipari, he found him-
self doing extra work before
every practice.
All of it has paid off this
postseason, though. The
senior had 15 points and 10
rebounds in the first round
against Princeton, added 15.
points and eight rebounds
against West Virginia,
then had 17 points and 10
rebounds against super
freshman Jared Sullinger
and Ohio State.
"I never thought I'd be
the player I am today,"
Harrellson said. "I'm just
so thankful for where I am,
for the teammates that have
been there for me. They've
had more confidence thlaff
I've had in myself, and
finally I'm playing like I'm
capable of playing the last
four weeks."
The Wildcats are playing
that way, too. '
Upperclassmnin and new-
comers alike. ?


Florida State ousted by one


of First 4 on quest for Final 4


By JAIME ARON
Associated Press

SAN ANTONIO A few
years ago, George Mason
showed that a No. 11 seed
from an unheralded con-
ference can make it to the
Final Four. Nowleague rival
Virginia Commonwealth is
on the verge of topping
that taking a No. 11 seed
from the First Four to the
Final Four.
The Rams had to win a
play-in game just to secure
their spot in the NCAA
tournament, and have been
unstoppable ever since. A
series of blowouts against
big-name programs from
big-time conferences got
them to the second week-
end, and they showed
Friday night that they can
win the tight games, too.
Bradford Burgess made
a layup off an inbounds
pass with 7.1 seconds
left in overtime, and Rob
Brandenburg blocked
a shot at the buzzer, giv-
ing VCU a 72-71 victory
over Florida State in a
Southwest Region semifi-
nal. If the Rams can knock
off top-seeded Kansas on
Sunday, they will be head-
ed to Houston next week-
end as the biggest surprise
in a tournament that's been
filled with them.
'We're going to have to
play much better than we.
did tonight," VCU coach
Shaka Smart said. "Our
guys know that, and I think
we have it in us."
The Rams (27-11) were
up by nine points with 7:37
left, seemingly headed to
another lopsided win. Then
they nearly blew it. They
scored just three more.
points in regulation, per-
haps getting caught by the
fatigue of being the only
team that advanced by
winning three games last
week.
VCU's final attempt of the
second half was blocked,
giving Florida State one


last shot. A long jumper
didn't get over the front
rim, setting up the extra
period.
The Seminoles were up
by one in the final seconds
of overtime when Rams
guard Joey Rodriguez
stood underneath the bas-
ket ready to throw in the
ball. VCU was going to run
its favorite inbounds play,
but FSU recognized what
was -coming and 'called a
timeout to switch their
defense.'
Smart realized what the
Seminoles,were doing, so
he switched to another
play.
Burgess ended up weav-
ing through several screens
while Rodriguez made
a ball fake to get the big
guy guarding him leaning
the wrong direction. With
the 5-second count close
to expiring, Rodriguez
skipped the ball between
two defenders, right to
Burgess. He bobbled the
pass a bit, then banked it


in before the defense could
recover.
"I had been messing up
- my layups were getting
blocked," said Burgess,
who scored 26 points, mak-
ing 6 of 7 3-pointers. "I
wasn't going to the hole
strong enough, and I said
if I got the chance I wanted
to win the game for the
team."
Florida State's Derwin
Kitchen, who missed the
potential winner in regula-
tion, had the ball in his
hands again on the 'final
possession in overtime. He
drove the baseline, then
passed it outside. The shot
may have been too late to
count, but Brandenburg
avoided any controversy
by swatting it, sending
into the regional finals this
program from the Colonial
Athletic Association that
had never even been to the
regional semifinals.
"Guts just guts and
want-to," Smart said of his
team's recovery after its


second-half pratfall.
The NCAA tournament
selection committee was
widely criticized for letting
VCU into the field after
the Rams lost five of its
last eight games. Smart
used that up-vs.-the-world
schtick for motivation and
half-jokingly said Thursday
that he hoped it continued
even if they beat Florida
State. Well, there's no
doubt they will hear it lead-
ing up to their matchup
against Kansas.
The Jayhawks are com-
ing off a 77-57 route of
Richmond that wasn't even
that close. They also are the
lone No. 1 seed remaining,
making them the favorites
to win it all.
But the Rams might
have as good of a chance
as anyone to knock them
out having already KO'd
high-profile programs from
the Pac-10 (Southern Cal),
Big East (Georgetown),
Big Ten (Purdue) and now
the ACC.'


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Virginia Commonwealth's Rob Brandenberg is blocked by Florida State's Chris Singleton
during the second half of a Southwest regional semifinal game in the NCAA college
basketball tournament Friday in San Antonio.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Ohio State's Jared Sullinger (0) shoots over Kentucky's Josh
Harrellson (55) during the East regional semifinal game in the
NCAA tournament Friday in Newark, N.J.


Buckeyes have


lots coming


back next year


By RUSTY MILLER
Associated Press

COLUMBUS, Ohio In
the doom and gloom of
Ohio State's 62-60 loss to
Kentucky in the regional
semifinals, there was a ray
of sunshine for the top-
seeded Buckeyes.
Three seniors from a
sparkling season would be
leaving, but the center of
a lot of attention provided
some gobd news.
Jared Sullinger, the
national freshman of the
year and a 6-foot-9 building
block inside, said he was
returning next season.
"I'm a man of my word,"
Sullinger said in the
moments after the disap-
pointing loss Friday night.
"I don't change my mind for


anything. I'm happy to be
an Ohio State Buckeye and
play for Coach Matta."
Coach Thad Matta was
almost speechless after the
defeat. But he had to be
encouraged that Sullinger
was coming back instead of
becoming the fourth Ohio
State big man in the last five
years to jump to the NBA
draft after one season.
Sullinger, junior shoot-
ing guard William Buford,
and freshmen Aaron Craft,
Deshaun Thomas and
Jordan Sibert will make
for a blockbuster core for
the 2011-12 season. Add
in another Matta recruit-
ing class, typically ranked
among the top five national-
ly, and the Buckeyes should
be prepared for another big
season.


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, MARCH 27, 2011








Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

Contact
C.J. Risak
Assistant Editor
754-0427
crisak@akecityreporter.com


BUSINESS


Sunday, March 27, 2011


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section C


FGC and St. Leo: A working relationship


By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com
lorida Gateway '
College and Saint Leo
University's Lake City
Center have been in
partnership for the
past 15 years, a partnership that
both schools have nurtured and
plan on continuing.
"Ifs an excellent relationship
and we really do support each
other," said Charles Hall, FGC
president.
That relationship exists legally
on paper through a written artic-
ulation agreement, said Charles
Oden, Saint Leo University's
Lake City Center director, but it
operates mostly on trust.
"It is a legal document," he
said, "but a lot of our thinking
is making sure that we don't go
just by the letter, but also the
intent of the agreement."
'Yeah, there's some stuff in
writing," Oden said, "but I don't
know that we look at it really
that often. We look at what's best
for the community and what's
best for each other."
One way the partnership func-
, tions is by the two schools not
competing with the programs
they offer.
FGC is currently in the pro-
cess of getting the proposals
for its first three baccalaureate
programs approved at the state
level, but the programs will not
conflict with the 10 baccalaure-
ate programs offered at Saint
Leo.
Oden said, for example, that
FGC will be offering a Bachelor
of Science in .Early Childhood
Education from ages birth to
pre-kindergarten, While Saint
Leo offers education degrees


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Charles Oden (left), director of Saint Leo University's Lake City Center, and Florida Gateway College President
Dr. Charles Hall discuss the different programs each campus offers for its students.


for grades kindergarten through
six and grades five through nine.
'"That way, between Florida
Gateway and us, we're cover-
ing everyone as far as creating
teachers to educate students all
the way up from birth to high
school," he said.
While Saint Leo and FGC
share space on the FGC campus,
they also share one of their most
important aspects their stu-


dents.
Oden said the schools' part-
nership began with the idea that
FGC would educate students
through their freshman and
sophomore years of college and
Saint Leo would educate through
the junior and senior years.
Now, more than 60 percent of
Saint Leo University Lake City
Center's students have earned
their associate's degrees from


FGC.
"It's such a seamless program
between the two of us," Hall
said, "that people don't actually
realize in many cases that we're
two completely separate institu-
tions that are working together
by will and by admiration, as
opposed to being forced into it."
Hall and Oden said they ulti-
Smately work together for the
benefit of their students and the


community, basing their deci-
sions for programs off of the
needs of the, workforce to build
economic development. Hall said
they want to keep opportunities
local, which allows students'
money to stay in the community
and frees up time for students to
become a part of the community,
time they might have otherwise
had to spend commuting to
another school.
"We're both about serving
the community and getting the
community what it needs," Oden
said, "and we're good that way.
We really have the same focus
that way."
"What we've done is work-
ing with them," Hall said, "not
against them, not to supplant
them, not to do. anything except
be there to offer this expanded
program for the students in the
community."
The two entities work togeth-
er on other elements such as
advertising and marketing, Hall
and Oden said.
"Honestly, this is the only
place where we have this type of
a partnership," Oden said..
Hall and Oden collaborate
through their business not only
as partners, but as friends.
"I would say that one of the
things that Chuck and I both
believe is that a good working
relationship like we have is like
a good marriage," Hall said. "We
both give 60 percent all the time
so when one of us is down, the
other's picked it up and we've
not lost 100 percent."
"We like each other, which is
kind of nice,' Oden said. "It's a
very good relationship and we're
both about trying to make things
successful."


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LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS & HOME SUNDAY, MARCH 27, 2011


Low Price,
High Volume
Q Some stocks, such as Citigroup
and Alcatel-Lucent, have very
low current values, yet enjoy high
trading volume each day. Who's buy-
ing and selling so many shares of
these "penny" stocks that you folks
recommend staying away from? -
E.M, Walnut Creek, Calif.
A First off, Citigroup and Alca-
tel-Lucent have market values
around $130 billion and $12 bil-
lion, respectively, so they're not
exactly small companies and there-
fore aren't classic penny stocks
(which tend tp trade for less than
$5 per share). And after Citigroup
executes a planned reverse split, its
shares will be above $5, too.
When a stock trades at a very
low price, investors sometimes
think it's a bargain, without realiz-
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overvalued and a $300 stock a
steal. As some investors lose faith
in these firms and sell their shares,
others are attracted by the seem-
ingly low price. Meanwhile, even
some savvy investors might be
buying, if their research suggests
that these firms will turn around.
The stock market thrives because
there are almost always people will-
ing to buy anid sell, at various prices.
Also, remember that the low
prices of the shares contribute to
the high volume. A $1,000 invest-
ment in a $5 stock would create a
volume of 200 shares trading
hands. However, that same invest-
ment in a $50 stock would create
volume of just 20 shares.

Q Ifmy mutual fund closes to
new investors, should I worry?
N.R, Lexington, Ky.
A t's actually a good sign.
A -Funds are often closed
because their managers have
more dollars to invest than great
investments to park them in.
When a fund grows enormous, it
gets harder for managers to earn
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Economy grows at 3.1

percent rate at end of 2010


By MARTIN CRUTSINGER
AP Economics Writer

WASHINGTON The
U.S. economy grew a little
faster at the end of 2010
than the government had
previously estimated,
boosted by more inven-
tory building and business
investment in plants and
equipment.
But rising oil prices will
likely limit growth this
year.
The economy, as mea-
sured by the gross domes-
tic product, grew at an
annual rate of 3.1 percent
in the October-December
quarter, the Commerce
Department reported
Friday. That represents an
upward revision from last
month's 2.8 percent esti-
mate for the same period.
The quarterly expan-
sion was the best since the
start of last year and was
driven by 4 percent growth
in consumer spending,
the strongest gains in four
years. Consumer spending
is closely watched because
it accounts for 70 percent of
economic activity.
But many economists
say a jump in oil prices has
likely cut into that spend-
ing and slowed growth in
the current January-March
quarter.
"Higher oil prices are
going to put a bit of a
squeeze on consumers,"
said Nariman Behravesh,
chief economist at IHS
Global Insight
There is also a concern
that the Japanese crisis will
disrupt factory production
there. That could slow activ-
ity at some U.S. companies
that rely on Japanese man-
ufacturers for parts, espe-
cially in the U.S. auto and
electronics industries.
The new uncertainty has
led many economists to
trim their growth estimates
for the current quarter.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this file photo taken March 11, traders of crude oil and nat-
ural gas react during early trading at the New York Mercantile
Exchange. Oil prices moved up closer to $106 a barrel Friday
as political upheaval in the Middle East and signs of strong
global demand kept crude near two-year highs.


There is a wide range of
estimates, from 2.3 percent
to 3.8 percent.
Economists say growth
needs to average around 5
percent for a year just to
lower the current 8.9 per-
cent unemployment rate by
1 percentage point.
In the final three months,
residential construction
grew at an annual rate of
3.3 percent after plunging
at a 27.3' percent rate in
the July-September quar-
ter. However, there is con-
cern about the prospects
for housing given recent


weakness in home sales
and construction.
Government spending
was shrinking at a rate of
1.7 percent in the final three
months of last year. State
and local governments are
struggling to get budget
deficits under control.
Economic growth of 3.5
percent this year would still
be the best performance
since 2004. Last year, the
economy grew 2.9 percent
following a 2.6 percent drop
in 2006. That had been the
biggest decline in more
than six decades.


State unemployment drops;

US shows uneven job growth


Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE Florida's February
unemployment rate was 11.5 percent, a
drop of 0.4 points from the January job-
less rate.
According to figures the Agency for
Workforce Innovation released Friday,
Florida added 22,700 jobs in February
and now has 32,700 more jobs than it
did in February '2010. Nearly 1.1 million
Floridians remain jobless.
Monroe County has the state's lowest
unemployment rate at 6.9 percent, fol-
lowed by Liberty County at 7.1 percent
and Alachua County at 7.7 percent.
Flagler County had the highest unem-
ployment rate at 14.9 percent, followed
by Hernando County at 13.9 percent and
Hendry County at 13.4 percent.


U.S. companies have added jobs for 12
straight months, but the gains have been
uneven. The latest government data sug-
gest some states are recovering much fast-
er than others from the recession, includ-
ing a few that were hit the hardest
The Labor Department says the unem-
ployment rate dropped in 27 states in
February. It rose in seven states and
stayed the same in 16.
Forty-four states have added, jobs
from February 2010 through last month,
including some that were badly battered
during the downturn. California added
nearly 200,000 net jobs, and Michigan
created a net 71,000 jobs.
Still, six states reported a net loss in
jobs in that time, including a few that
weren't considered trouble spots: New
Jersey, New Mexico, and Kansas.


Oil falls to nearly $105 on

concern about Portugal


By CHRIS KAHN
AP Energy Writer

NEW YORK Oil
prices wavered Friday as
the U.S. said its economy
grew faster than previous-
ly estimated in the fourth
quarter of last year while a
financial crisis in Portugal
raised concerns that
another European country
will need a bailout.
Against the backdrop of
disruptions to oil supplies
from Libya, uncertainty
in Japan and a new eco-
nomic worry for Europe,
traders have been look-
ing for indications of how
strong the U.S. economy
is. Reports out this week
were a mixed bag.
The U.S. said home con-
struction has nearly come
to a halt and that com-
panies trimmed orders
for long-lasting manufac-
tured goods. Yet gaso-
line demand keeps rising
despite higher prices a
gallon of gas costs about
49 cents more than it did


at the start of the year.
On Friday, the Commerce
Department reported that
the economy grew at an
annual rate of 3.1 percent
from October to December,
up from last month's esti-
mate of 2.8 percent At the
same time, some econo-
mists have trimmed their
estimates for growth in the
current quarter, concerned
that high gas prices will
force consumers to cut
spending elsewhere.
"We're waiting to see
the economic recovery
put down roots," Cameron
Hanover analyst Peter
Beutel said. "But you can
find something bullish and
bearish just about every-
where you look."
Benchmark West Texas
Intermediate oil for May
delivery fell 5 cents to
$105.55 per barrel on the
New York Mercantile
Exchange.
Prices dropped just
before trading opened on
the Nymex. Traders said
they were looking for signs


that Portugal's European
neighbors could help its
struggling economy. The
yield on Portugal's 10-year
bond rose to a level that sug-
gests the country may not
be able to finance its debt
The European Union previ-
ously bailed out Greece and
Ireland when debts became
too burdensome.
The U.S. dollar also
gained against foreign cur-
rencies. Oil is priced in the
U.S. currency, So a decline
makes oil more expensive
for investors holding for-
eign currency.
PFGBest analyst Phil
Flynn added that news of
a suspected breach on the
damaged Fukushima Dai-
ichi power plant in Japan
also is weighing down oil
prices. An escalation of the
nuclear crisis could slow
down the country's efforts
to rebuild after the March
11 earthquake and tsunami,
he said. The Japanese prime
minister called the situation
"very grave and serious."


The Motley Fool

To Educate, Amuse & Enrich


1~


^I Ask th


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427














LAKE CITY REPORTER STOCKS SUNDAY, MARCH 27, 2011


THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW *THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW


'i~ 'a~n.~,


The Week in Rev'ew


I NYSE
8,321.78 +205.38


Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
Valhi 24.87 +5.16 +26.2
MediaGen 6.68 +1.38 +26.0
Goldcpwt 3.70 +.72 +24.2
Molycorpn 54.47+10.49 +23.9
Talbots 5.94 +1.07 +22.0
Imax Corp 31.71 +5.51 +21.0
RFotek 8.28 +1.39 +20.2
ChinaDigtl 7.06 +1.18 +20.1
HarmonyG 14.10 +2.23 +18.8
Molycp pfAl04.20+16.45 +18.7

Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
CSVS2xVxS38.89-14.10 -26.6
BarcShtD 17.00 -5.28 -23.7
C-TrCVOL 43.37-10.62 -19.7
iPSER2K 29.22 -6.51 -18.2
BiPLSpxVM16.55 -3.01 -15.4
CSVSVixST65.66-10.91 -14.2
Bar iPVixrs30.37 -4.99 -14.1
ProVixSTF 65.87-10.84 -14.1
MktVEgypt 15.45 -2.50 -13.9
Reddylce 3.04 -.46 -13.1

Most Active ($1 or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
Ciigrp 22486402 4.46 -.04
BkofAm 6899698 13.34 -.70
S&P500ETF6268744131.30+3.54
SprinlNex 5632584 4.68 -.37
iShJapn 4313042 10.33 -.04
FordM 3391773 15.01 +.52
SPDRFnd2892175 16.34 +.07
iShR2K 2551214 82.22+2.93
iShEMkts 2275774 47.34+2.11
GenElec 2253781 19.75 +.50

Diary
Advanced 2,511
Declined 633
New Highs 317
New Lows 39
Total issues 3,199
Unchanged 55
Volume 19,502,161,594


A Amex
2,325.18 +52.84


Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
ChiGengM 2.89 +.93 +47.4
Innovaro 3.03 +.95 +45.7
NewEnSys 5.72 +1.55 +37.2
VimetX 16.04 +3.57 +28.6
ChinaShen 4.36 +.96 +28.2
GoldenMin 22.92 +4.98 +27.8
PemixTh 11.90 +2.47 +26.2
CoreMold 7.68 +1.58 +25.9
MinesMgt 2.92 +.51 +21.2
Compx 16.00 +2.72 +20.5

Losers ($2 or.more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
VoyagerOG 4.23 -.79 -15.7
SBiO 3.06 -.54 -15.0
FstWV 16.96 -2.01 -10.6
EngySvcs 3.50 -.38 -9.8
ChinaNuti 2.82 -.29 -9.3
CagleA 6.60 -.55 -7.7
Hyperdyn 5.19 -.42 -7.5
Arnhythm 5.25 -.40 -7.1
OrientPap 4.82 -.33 -6.4
eMagin 6.96 -.41 -5.6

Most Active ($1si or more
Name Vol(00) Last Chg
Hyperdyn 335879 5.19 -.42
NthnO&G 257503 27.30 -.95
DenisnMg 246824 2.73 +.12
GtPanSilvg221104 4.30 +.20
RareEleg 219950 12.37+1.97
ChinaShen 217494 4.36 +.96
KodiakOg 206787 6.90 +.45
ChiGengM 196130 2.89 +.93
LucasEngy 187782 3.54 +.15
AvalRare n 173750 7.45+1.01

Diary
Advanced 351
Declined 181
New Highs 22
New Lows 14
Total issues 548
Unchanged 16
Volume 827,343,526


1


oNasdaq
A2,743.06 +99.39


Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
drugstore 3.89 +2.12 +119.8
PranaBio 2.86 +1.39 +94.6
Astealntl 5.683 +2.73 +88.1
UghtPath 2.19 +.83 +61.0
PFSweb 4.69 +1.58 +50.8
BiostarPh 2.58 +.74 +40.2
ClearOne 7.10 +1.95 +37.9
BodyCen n 23.20 +6.37 +37.8
SynthEngy 2.22 +.57 +34.2
ChrmSh 3.98 +.98 +32.7

Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
PlumasBc 2.15 -.86 -28.6
DeerConsu 7.89 -3.15 -28.5
XOMArs 3.29 -1.22 -27.1
CoffeeH 5.65 -2.08 -26.9
MedidNova 2.66 -.93 -25.9
CascdeB rs 6.25 -1.92 -23.5
JiangboPh 4.57 -1.31 -22.3
GulfRes 5.54 -1.47 -21.0
Brightpnt 9.99 -2.64 -20.9
Ie, .ucLI 4 16 -81 -204

Most Active 51 or more)
Name Vol 100) Last Chg
P.Sr.; 000298.15h 84 3 .- )1
CAva, 22781760 172 14
M.o7c.nT 2'4.l5.l 11 55 t8I 4
nIr lnl 66L02 20 3 .44
M.:e:Ion 221555.r36)5 .68
SirdusXM 1879906 1.72 +.01
Oracle 1663887 32.64+1.88
Nvidia 1301988 18.63+1.01
Yahoo 1230803 16.96 +.93
Dell Inc 957436 15.06 +.55

Diary
Advanced 2,040
Declined 748
New Highs 241
New Lows 95
Total issues 2,835
Unchanged 47
Volume 9,006,155,199


STOCKS OF LOCAL INTEREST E
wy Wly noYTD Wky wy TD
Name Ex DIv Last Chg%Chg%Chg Name Ex Div Last Chg%Chg%Chg
AT&TInc NY 1.72 28.85 +.91 +3.3 -1.8 Lowes NY .44 27.19 +.99 +3.8 +8.4
AlcatelLucNY ... 5.34 +.27 +5.3 +80.4 McDnlds NY 2.44 75.25 +2.26 +3.1 -2.0
AutoZone NY ... 275.49+12.51 +4.8 +1.1 MicronT Nasd ... 11.55 +1.48 +14.7 +44.0
BkofAm NY .04 13.34 -.70 -5.0 ... Microsoft Nasd .64 2562 +.82 +3.3 -8.2
BariPVixrsNY ... 30.37 -4.99 -14.1 -19.3 NYTimes NY ... 28 +.10 +1.1 -5.3
BobEvans Nasd .80 31.60 +1.05 +3.4 -4.1 NextEraEnNY 2.20 54.10 +1.34 +2.5 +4.1
CNBFnPANasd .66 14.16 +.11 +0.8 -4.4 NobltyH Nasd ... .51 +.03 +0.4 +4.9
CSX NY 1.04 79.16 +2.94 +3.9 +22.5 Nvidia Nasd ... 18.63 +1.01 +5.7 +21.0
CelfrherrshNasd. .38 -.06 -13.6 +4.1 'OcdciPet NY 1.84 100.85 +2.52 +2.6 +2.8
Cemex NY .43 8.81 +.56 +.8 -14.4 Oracle Nasd .24 32.64 +1.88 +6.1 +4.3
Chevron NY 2.88 106.78 +3.98 +3.9 +17.0 Penney NY .80 37.03 +.81 +2.2 +14.6
Chimera NY .66 4.19 -.07 -1.6 +1.9 PepsiCo NY 1.92 63.98 +.74 +1.2 -2.1
Cisco Nasd .24 17.28 +.14 +0.8 -14.6 Pfizer NY .80 20.35 +.17 +0.8 +16.2
Citigrp NY 4.46 -.04 -0.9 -5.7 Potash s NY .28 57.23 +2.71 +5.0 +10.9
CocaCola NY 1.88 65.22 +2.52 +4.0 -.8 PwShs QQQONasd .39 56.84 +2.39 +4.4 +4.4
Delhaize NY 2.02 81.45 +1.31 +1.6 +10.5 PrUShS&PNY ... 21.33 -1.22 -5.4 -10.2
FamilyDIr NY .72 52.02 +.76 +1.5 +4.6 Ryder NY 1.08 49.65 +1.84 +3.8 -5.7
FordM NY ... 15.01 +.52 +3.6 -10.6 S&P500ETFNY 2.34 131.30 +3.54. +2.8 +4.4
GenElec NY .56 19.75 +.50 +2.6 +8.0 SearsHldgsNasd ... 79.83 -1.98 -2.4 +8.2
HomeDp NY 1.00 37.42 +1.42 +3.9 +6.7 SiriusXM Nasd ... 1.72 +.01 +0.6 +5.5
iShJapn NY .14 10.33 -.04 -0.4 -5.3 SoiithnCo NY 1.82 37.58 +.58 +1.6 -1.7
iShSilver NY ... 36.39 +2.12 +6.2 +20.6 SprintNex NY ... 4.68 -.37 -7.3 +10.6
iShEMkts NY .64 47.34 +2.11 +4.7 -.6 SPDRFndNY .16 16.34 +.07 +0.4 +2.4
iShR2K NY .89 82.22 +2.93 +3.7 +5.1 TimeWamrn NY .94 35.30 +.58 +1.7 +9.7
Intel Nasd .72 20.37 +.44 +2.2 -3.1 ValeSA NY .76 32.34 +.20 +0.6 -6.5
JPMorgChNY 1.00 45.86 +.12 +0.3 +8.1 WalMart NY 1.46 52.35 +.83 +1.6 -2.9
Keycorp NY .04 8.72 -.20 -2.2 -1.5 WellsFargoNY .20 31.94 +.18 +0.6 +3.1
LVSands NY ... 42.56 +6.22 +17.1 -7.4 Yahoo Nasd ... 16.96 +.93 .+5.8 +2.0

Stock Footnotes: g = Daioeno dar.1 -am.n. in CarQ3jn doIiai r, = u-vsa roi meal rntibruid-Itng clandarda
li = Ltd m ling with SEC r, = New in pa"fl 2 ea'itE pt = Preian, r = STliir n.as unrd ipr.d 3 riavivrs lxocv plil
oi 5A jeast so ,ct.v,mr nmw r.pra past eaai n Rgn 1o to uv -unr at a spe i fiw" car,: S : Sl, r s rspl, tv at
leau 2) percani a0,n1, trie aIilt ear .d u r, a : =t i l' binkruricyv Or ei.i.ri> dw.i0 = wirn rint-uiled *A. -
Wr.arn rue.a i = Warrani
Mutual Fund Footnotes: t. Fav ruvanng manrvl couLL i. paidl nri lur.Il 3i.ts a Doeirr-Wa 6ais rarge ,:
rednTpf.r, l It e :nl1,.1 IafaICr,.tili m MultiAe e- r. arac4igadt NA- n.',li pal.lii n=rIav1Ouuid6y"
r is 4i vBJuG s = lunad spi11 niar;E during 6 *E s6 = uv'1 pa.,l i dmi nbub.',n ring mta ai.Galne.C aier andi
Losers muel wbe i onn at 1. ia 10 ae isied in ltals iatil. Most Actdess muig D e nn al patl i itVoiluma Ir.
lOu,,ilra, 01 niare,,. Source. The A.vCjied Pi,,eS Sales figuree are uonYIal


Money Rates
Last Pvs Week
Prime Rate 3.25 3.25
Discount Rate 0.75 0.75
Federal Funds Rate .00-25 .00-25
Treasuries
3-month 0.09 0.07
6-month 0.17 0.14
5-year 2.16 1.94
10-year 3.44 3.27
30-year 4.50 4.43


Currencies
Last Pvs Day


Australia
Britain


.9751 .9779
1.6019 1.6111


Canada .9812 .9765
Euro .7106 .7051


lIndnn


81.41 80.95
11.9731 11.9527
.9195 .9073"


Weekly Dow Jones


Dow Jones Industrials


178.01 -17.90 67.39 84.54 50.03


Close: 12,220.59
1-week change: 362.07 (3.1%) MON TUES WED THUR FRI
12 ,500 -r ... .. ..... ... .................. .. ..


12 ,000 .... ..... ..................... ......... -.




S100N0........ ............





MUTUAL FUNDS
Total Assets Total Return/Rank Pct Min Init
Name Obj ($Mlns) NAV 4-wk 12-mo 5-year Load Invt


PIMCO TotRetis Cl
American Funds GrthAmA m LG
Fidelity Contra LG
Vanguard TotStldx LB
American Funds CaplncBuA m IH-
Vanguard Instldxl LB
Amrrn,- ri Fur, d. CpWidGrlA m WS
Varjual 500OOATiTil LB
AjTer.;ar, Funo IrcArrerA m MA
vanrruarad ,lTSnAIOr LB
American. FundL nlrC.)Arr.A m LB
Dodjg C..C:, InrnS' FV
D.dg & C.o 1Sc00 LV
Amrreno n Funad WAWMullrvA m J.V
Vanguard lTorinl d FB
Amrncan Funad EurPac.GrA m FB
Variuara insftlus LB
FrarkTlmp-FranHin Irio:.,A nm CA
Amencan Funds FnlnvA m LB
American Funds NewPerspA m WS
Vanguard 5001nv LB
PIMCO TotRetAdm b Cl
American Funds BalA m MA
Rdelity GrowCo LG
Vanguard WelltnAdm MA
Fidelity LowPrStk d MB
Harbor Intlinsti d FB


136,837
68,135
63,315
59,764
59,201
58,180
56,032
54,664
54,193
50,992
50,354
45,918
45,667
40,241
39,597
39,490
37,376
36,259
35,007
34,131
33,274
33,054
.32,523
29,316
28,884
28,175
28,149


+7.1/B
+13.3/D
+17.9/B
+16.5/A
+10.9/D
+14,9/B
+11.8/D
+14.9/B
+13.9/A
+16.6/A
+11.6/D
+13.4/B
+12.8/C
+15.2/B
+13.6/B
+13.0/C
+15.0/B
+14.7/A
+16.3/A
+14.4/C
+14.8/B
+6.9/B
+13.0/M
+21.1/A
+11.5/C
+17.0/E
+1 6.7/A


NL 1,000,000
5.75 250
NL 2,500
NL 3,000
5.75 250
NL 5,000,000
5.75 250
NL 10,000
5.75 250
NL 10,000
5.75 250
NL 2,500
NL 2,500
5.75 250
NL 3,000
5.75 ,250
NL 200,000,000
4.25 1,000
5.75- 250
5.75 250
NL 3,000
NL 1,000,000
5.75 250
NL 2,500
NL 50,000
NL' 2,500
NL 50,000


CA-ConservativeAll V


ILMe ale, hiiH -WortdAllocatoLB LGrowt hxLG n ,LV -Layg Value, MA 4kdvBAkco M5 .C le,
British pound expressed in U.S. dollars. All oth- MkCap Cuehl, lSH -pedalty-uw, WS -Wldd Sto, Tota Reurn: Chng in I eV wih dividends reivesled. Howfutip vs
ers show dollar in foreign currency. otherswlth same :Aisho 20%, Einhbottlr 20%. Mint IntlnvI:Mim Num $ needed to nvesti o und.t ; c:


New York Stock Exchange


Name Div YId
AESCorp ...
AFLAC 1.20 2.3
AK Steel .20 1.3
AMR
AT&T Inc 1.72 6.0
AbtLab 1.92 4.0
Accenture .90 1.7
AMD
Aetna .60 1.6
Agilent
AirTran
AlcatelLuc ...
Alcoa .12 .7
Alcon ... 3.95 2.4
Allergan .20 .3
Allstate .84 2.7
AlphaNRs ...
Altria 1.52 5.9
AEagleOut .44 2.8
AEP 1.84 5.3
AmExp .72 1.6
AmIntlGrp ...
AmTower ...
Anadarko .36 .4
Annaly 2.62 14.5
Apache .60 .5
ArcelorMit .75 2.1
ArchCoal .40 1.1
ArchDan .64 1.8
ATMOS 1.36 4.0
Avon .92 3.4
BB&TCp .64 2.4
BHP BillLI 1.82 2.0
BakrHu .60 .8
BcoBrades .82 4.2
BcoSantSA .79 6.6
BcoSBrasil .70 5.9
BkofAm .04 .3
BkNYMel .52 1.8
Bar iPVix rs ...
BarrickG .48 .9
Baxter 1.24 2.3
BerkH B ... ...
BestBuy .60 2.1
Blackstone .40 2.1
BlockHR .60 3.6
Boeing 1.68 2.3
BostonSci ...
BrMySq 1.32 4.8
CB REllis ... ...
CBS B .20 .8
CF Inds .40 .3
CSX 1.04 1.3
CVS Care .50 1.5
CablvsnNY .50 1.4
Cameco g .40 ...
Cameron ...
CapOne .20 .4
CapitlSrce .04 .6
Carnival 1.00 2.6
Caterpillar 1.76 1.6
Cemex .43 ...
CenterPnt .79 4.6
CntryUnk 2.90 7.1
ChesEng .30 .9
Chevron 2.88 2.7
Chicos .20 1.4
Chimera .66 15.8
Citigrp
CliffsNRs .56 .6
CocaCola 1.88 2.9
CocaCE .48 1.8
Coeur
ColgPal 2.32 2.9
ConAgra .92 3.9
ConocPhil 2.64 3.3
ConsolEngy.40 .7
ConEd 2.40 4.8
ConstellEn .96 3.1


Wkly YTD Wkly' Wkly YTD Wkly
PE Cha %Cha Last Name Div YId PE Cha %Cha Last


16 +.40 +4.4 12.71
10 +1.98 -6.7, 52.65
... +.36 -4.5 15.63
... -.10 -16.6 6.50
8 +.91 -1.8 28.85
13 +.12 +.3 48.03
20 +4.04 +12.0 54.29
14 +.33 +8.6 8.88
9 +1.68 +20.6. 36.79
21 +1.10 +6.3 44.04
29 +.14 +.7 7.44
... +.27 +80.4 5.34
71 +.98 +11.0 17.09
24 +2.30, +1.8 166.39
... -.40 +1.7 69.85
18 +.31 -1.3 31.46
75 +4.T/ ... 60.05
14 +1.02 +4.9 25.82
22 +.63 +5.9 15.50
14 +.90 -3.5 34.71
14 +1.42 +6.2 45.59
... +1.58 -24.3 36.53
53 -.98 -3.9 49.64
55 +5.61 +8.8 82.88
13 +.27 +1.1 18.12
15 +5.83 +5.6 125.94-
11 +1.16 -6.2 35.75
34 +.82 +.7 35.29
12 +.34 +17.4 35.30
17 +.44 +7.9, 33.67
20 +.84 -5.6 27.43
23 +.06 +3.0 27.07
... +2.11 -2.4 90.67
36 +2.58 +24.3 71.08
... +.50 -4.7 19.33
... +.28 +12.1 11.94
... +.36 -12.8 11.86
20 -.70 ... 13.34
14 +.57 -2.5 29.45
... -4.99 -19.3 30.37
16 +2.11 -3.1 51.51
15 +1.14 +4.5 52.92
18 +1.76 +6.4 85.24
9 -2.31 -14.8 29.22
... +2.11 +32.4 18.74
13 +.49 +39.0 16.56
16 +4.24 +12.4 73.34
... +.01 -4.8 7.21
15 +1.56 +3.1 27.29
42 +.54 +32.8 27.19
26 +1.44 +29.5. 24.67
42 +4.70 -2.3 132.10
19 +2.94 +22.5 79.16
14 +.28 -2.5 33.89
29 -.12 +3.0 34.85
... +1.77 -22.8 31.17
26 -.02 +16.5 -59.08
9 +1.18 +22.7 52.23
... +.18 -.4 7.07
16 -.85 -15.9 .38.78
26 +4.03 +16.5 109.09
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Coming .20
Covidien .80
CrwnCstle ...
DCT Indl .28
DR Horton .15
DTE 2.24
DeanFds ..
Deere 1.40
DeltaAir ...
DenburyR ...
DevonE .68
DrSCBr rs ..
DirFnBrrs ...
DrxFBulls ...
DirxSCBull ...
Discover .24
Disney .40
DomRescs 1.97
DowChm .60
DukeEngy .98
EMC Cp
EOG Res .64
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FMCGs 1.00
FrontierCm .75
GameStop ...
Gannett .16
Gap .45
GenGrPrn ...
GenMarit .04
GenMillss 1.12
GenMot n ...
GenOn En ...
Genwort ...
Gerdau .25
GoldFLtd .19
Goldcrp g .41
GoldmanS 1.40
Goodyear ...
HCA HIdn ...
HCP Inc 1.92
HSBC 1.80
Hiallibrtn .36
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HartfdFn .40
HItMgmt ...
HeclaM
Hertz
Hess .40
HewlettP .32
HomeDp 1.00
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Huntsmn .40
IAMGId g .08
iShGolds ...
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iSh HK .45
iShJapn .14
iSh Kor .44
iShMex' .54
iSTaiwn .29
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10 +.71 +11.1
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... +1.99 +1.3
... +2.11 -.6


LIFE DOESN'T STAND STILL


AND NEITHER SHOULD


YOUR INVESTMENTS.


Time can affect you as much as your investments. While
you can't stop change, you can help make sure your invest-
ments match your current circumstances and goals.

Fortunately, doing that may be as easy as meeting with your
financial advisor. A free Portfolio Review from Edward
Jones can help identify where your investments stand in
relation to your goals. And help put time back on your side.

To schedule a complimentary Portfolio Review, call
your local financial advisor today.

B Steve Jones, CFP
Financial Advisor

2929 West U S Highway 90'
Suite 114
Lake City, FL 32055
386-752-3847
www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last


iShB20 T 3.86
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Name DIv
Lubrizol 1.44
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Masco .30
MasseyEn .24
McMoRn ...
MedcoHilth ...
Medtmic .90
Merck 1.52
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MetroPCS ...
MitsuUFJ ...
MobileTels ...
Molycorpn ...
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Mosaic .20
MotrlaSoln ...
NCR Corp ...


Wkly YTD Wkly
YId *PE Chg %Chg Last


13
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Wkly
Name DIv YId PE Chg


NYSE Eur 1.20
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PG&E Cp 1.82
PMI Grp ...
PPLCorp 1.40
PatriotCoal ...
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Penney .80
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Petrohawk ...
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PlainsEx ..
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PS USDBull...
PrUShS&P ...
ProUltQQQ ...
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SAIC
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SandRdge ...
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Wkly
Last .Name


Wkly YTD Wkly
DIv YId PE Cha %Chg Last


SilvrcpMg .08
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SwstnEngy....
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Teradyn
Tesoro
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UBS AG ...
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US Gold ...
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UtdCont ...
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YingliGm ...


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Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last
AcmePkt ... ... .... +1.54 +28.1 68.12
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ACapAgy 5.60 19.3 4 -.25 +1.0 29.02
AmCapLtd ... ... 3 +.54 +23.8 9.36
Amgen ... ... 11 +.21 -3.2 53.15
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ApldMatt .32 2.1 "15 +.59 +9.8 15.43
AresCap 1.40 8.4 8 +.23 +.5 16.57
ArmHId .09 .3 ... +1.66 +27.8 26.51
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Atmel ... ...' 15 +1.92 +8.0 13.30
Autodesk .. 48 +3.87 +13.3 43.27
AutoData 1.44 2.9 21 +1.06 +8.8 50.37
AvisBudg ... ... 23 +1.82 +15.7 18.00
Baidus ... 90+14.42 +39.8 134.92
BedBath ... ... 17 +1.70 -3.8 47.28
BrigExp ... 93 +1.41 +29.5 35.28
Broadcom .36 .9 21 +1.28 -6.0 40.95
BrcdeCm ... ...30 +.41 +18.1 6.25
CA Inc .16 .7 16 +.88 -2.8 23.75
Cadence ... ... 15 +.29 +19.2 9.85
CpstnTrbh ... ... ... +.11 +103.1 1.95
CeleraGrp ... ... ... -.13 +31.3 8.27
Celgene ... ... 29 +2.26 -6.6 55.24
CellTher rsh... ... ... -.06 +4.1 .38
ChinalntEn ... ... 3 -.09 -48.8' 3.76
CienaCorp ... ...... +.90 +14.0 24.00
Cisco .24 1.4 13 +.14 -14.6 17.28
Clearwire ... ... +.13 +5.2 5.42
CognizTech ... .. 34 +5.84 +9.2 80.03
Comcast .45 1.8 19 +1.16 +14.4 25.02
Comcspcl .45 1.9 19 +1.12 +13.7 23.54
Costco .82 1.1 23 +.80 -1.0 71.46


Name DIv
Cree Inc ...
CypSemi
Dell Inc
DeltaPtr h ..
DirecTVA ...
DishNetwk ...
drugstre
DryShips
ETrade rs
eBay
Ebix Inc ...
ElectArts ...
EntropCom ..
EricsnTel .35
Expedia .28
ExpScrips ..
F5 Netwks...
FifthThird .24
Rnisar
FstNiagara .64
Flextm ...
FuelCell ...
GT Solar ...
Genzyme
GileadSci ..
Google
GreenMtC s...
HercOffsh ...
Hologic
HudsCity .60
HumGen ..
Illumina
Intel .72
Intuit
JA Solar ..
JDS Uniph...
JamesRiv ..
JetBlue


Nasdaq Most Active


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YId PE Chg %Chg Last
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6.1 9 -.02 -22.5 9.87
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... 9 +.14 -5.6 23.90
... 21 +.66 -4.1 6.34


Name Div
LECG
LeapWirss ...
Level3
UbtyMIntA ...
Majesco
MarvellT ...
Mattel .92
Maximlntg .84
MelcoCrwn ...
MicronT ...
Microsoft .64
Motricityn ...
NetApp
Netflix
NewsCpA .15
NewsCpB .15
Novell
Nvidia
Oclaro rs ...
OnSmcnd ...
optXprs 4.50
Oracle .24
PMCSra ...
Paccar .48
PattUTI .20
Paychex 1.24
PeopUtdF .62
Photrn ...
Popular
Power-One...
PwShs QQQ .39
Powrwav
PranaBio ...
QiaoXing
Qualcom .86
RFMicD ...
RschMotn ...
Riverbeds ...


AMEX Most Active


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YId PE Chg %Chg Last


... ... -.02 -85.9 .20
... ... +2.88 +22.5 15.02
+.15 +44.9 1.42
.. 14 +.06 -.8 15.65
... 61 +.67+298.7 3.07
... 18 +.45 -13.4 16.07-
3.7 13 +.56 -;9 25.20
3.3 31 +1.39 +8.3 25.58
... ... +1.02 +23.6 7.86
... 8 +1.48 +44.0 11.55
2.5 6 +.82 -8.2 25.62
... ... +2.99 -17.0 15.41
... 30 -.08 -11.6 48.61
... 78+20.61 +30.9 230.01
.9 16 +.69 +16.9 17.02
.8 17 +.93 +10.1 18.08
... 6 +.16 +.7 5.96
44 +1.01 +21.0 18.63
... 46 +.84 -12.5 11.50
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20 +2.93 +16.5 18.26
.7 22 +1.88 +4.3 32.64
... 21 -.14 -13.2 7.46
1.0 40 +1.40 -13.0 49.86
.7 37 +1.50 +31.5 28.34
4.0 22 -.58 +.4 31.02
4.9 38 +.18 -9.8 12.64
... 13 +.26 +43.3 8.47
... ... -.03 -5.4 2.97
9 +.07 -17.5. 8.42
.7 ... +2.39 +4.4 56.84
... ... +.60 +74.0 4.42
... ... +1.39 +128.8 2.86
... ... +.22 -27.9 2.04
1.6 24 +1.04 +6* 52.75
... 14 +.25 -14.4 6.29
... 9 -4.02 -2.1 56.89
... ... +.55 +8.2 38.07


Wkly YTD Wkly
DIv YId; PE Chg %Chg Last


RoyaleEn ...
SBA Com ...
SanDisk ...
Satcon h ..:
SavientPh ...
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StarScient ...
Starbucks .52
StlDynam .40
SunPowerA...
Symantec ...
SynthEngy ...
TD Ameritr .20
Tellabs .08
TevaPhrm .78
TiVo Inc
TriQuint
UranmRs
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Vodafone 1.33
WetSeal ...
Windstrm 1.00
Wynn 1.00
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Xilinx .76
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44 +.29 +137.5 5.32
... -2.20 -6.2 38.40
8 +1.70 -9.7 45.01
... +.31 -22.7 3.48
... +.85 -9.1 10.13
5 +1.23 -4.1 14.42
12.18
14+15.38 +50.4 103.52
... +.01 +5.5 1.72
36 +2.34 +12.9 32.31
... +.30 +40.1 3.74
16 +.22 -12.1 20.02
... +.28+101.0 3.92
27 +1.94 +14.8 36.90
30 +.94 +4.0 19.04
38 +1.03 +27.8 16.40
24 +.84 +8.2 18.11
... +.57 +89.3 2.22
20 +.35 +9.6 20.81
13 +.14 ,24.3 5.13
15 +2.52 -3.3 50.41
... +.29 +1.3 8.74
11 +.90 +11.1 12.99
... -36.2 2.17
19 -1.19 -16.1 30.06
51 +1.43 +8.9 14.18
... +.01 -.2 27.19
... +.67 +7.5 28.43
29 +.60 +8.4 4.01
18 -.04 -7.5 12.89
99+10.57 +22.3 127.03
... -1.22 -35.9 3.29
14 +1.20 +13.8 32.97
... +.08 -47.3 1.96
19 +.93 +2.0 16.96
... +.40 -4.1 23.23


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... ... +.54 +44.0 1.80
... ... +.76 +8.7 8.90
... ... +1.28 +29.9 34.18
... ... +.06 -28.2 1.17
... ... +.04 -54.2 .14
... ... +.10 -3.0 7.10
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-.02 +32.5 .51
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... ...+1.27 +11.4 23.09
... +1.12 +65.4 9.13
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... -.22 -54.0 1h16
... ... +.01 -49.4 .16
... ... +.04 +26.3 .40
... ... +.12 -20.2 2.73
... ... +.20 +26.6 14.85
... :.. +.03 +37.1 .48
... ... ... -18.8 5.26
... 21 -.03 -35.3 2.97
... ... +.09 -1.7 7.91
... ... -.06 -12.2 2.60
...... +.20 +53.0 4.30
... ... -.42 +4.6 5.19
... ... +.45 +4.5 6.90
... ... +.15 +51.9 3.54
... 10 +.18 +79.4 1.83
... ... +.07 -8.8 1.14
... ... +.04 +109.5 1.76
... ... +.20 -12.1 2.40
... 71 +1.47 +15.5 12.75
... ... +.51 -30.1 2.92
... ... +.44 +82.5 3.76


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+.51 -22.0
... -11.1
+.85 +15.3
+.16 -8.6
+.90 +3.2
-.95 +.3
-.01 -16.3
+.17 -10.9
-.01 +19.5
+.15 +4.1
+.06 -4.8
+.45 +46.8
-.02 -20.1
+.56 -46.6
-.02 -61.4
+1.97 -23.0
+.10 +2.5
+.02 +25.9
+.23 -16.1
+.24 +190.2
-.01 -11.2
-.13 +10.7
+.14 +88.3
+.01 -17.6
-.07 -10.2
-.02 -3.7
+.23 +23.1
+.01 -32.7
+.09 -40.1
+.47 -10.5
-.18 -32.1
-.01 -5.9
+3.57 +8.0
+.63 +61.9
-.79 -21.7
+.01 +2.0
+.09 +13.3


5.87
.04
11.25
6.34
14.75
27.30
2.68
12.72
.50
3.82
3.80
12.93
11:38
6.25
.39
12.37
1.25
1.41
4.79
3.83
.15
5.81
1.19
.98
2.99
.55
8.00
.07
1.79
3.57
4.10
1.91
16.04
3.87
4.23
.26
2.64


Weekly Stock Exchange Highlights


---M---

^ MAKINGSES O IVSTN


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Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427











LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, MARCH 27, 2011

Lake City Reporter





CLASSIFIED


BUY fIT^


SEhLiLlT


Classified Department: 755-5440


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

755-5440


One Item per ad Each addition
4 lines 6 days 5linetS n0
Rate applies to pate individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling $100 or less.
Each Item must Include a price
This is a non-refundable rate.




One Item per ad additional
4 lines 6 daysi$1.10
Rate applies to private Individuals selling
Personal merchandise totalling $S500 or less.
Each item must Include a price.
Thisisa nonrefundablerate.




One Item per ad 16
4 lines 6 days Each additional
Rate applies to private Individuals selling
persona merchandise toting $1,000 orless.





4 lines 6 days Inc e $1.45
Rate applies to private Individuals seling
S personal merchandIse toting $2,500 or les.
Each itam nust include a price.
This Is a non- able rate.




One Item per ad d
4 lines 6 daysE icha ddtina
Rat applIes to prIndividuals selling
personal merchandise tot g 4,000 or less.
Each item must include a price.
This Is a non-refundable rate.





4 lines 6 days Each$a0di 1 |
Rate applies to private Individuals soling
personal merchandise totalling $6,000 or less.
Each Item must ncld a ce.
This is a non-refundable rate.


j77j.


Legal

NOTICE OF INTENT BY THE
SCHOOL BOARD OF COLUMBIA
COUNTY
TO ADOPT RULE AND SET PUB-
LIC HEARING
The School Board of Columbia
County will hold a public hearing on
Tuesday, April 26, 2011, at 7:00
p.m., at the School Board Adminis-
trative Complex, 372 West Duval
Street, Lake City, Florida, on pro-
posed amendments to rules, regula-
tions and procedures for the opera-
tion. of the Columbia County School
System. The public is invited to at-
tend. Action is anticipated at this
meeting..
Persons with disabilities who require
assistance to participate in the public
hearing are requested to notify the
Office of the Superintendent at 755-
8000 at least 48 hours in advance so
that.their needs can be accommodat-
ed.
TITLE: Job Description # 28 -
Information 1Services and Technolo-
gy Manager (Amended)
PURPOSE AND EFFECT: Position
amended to assist the district with all
assigned administrative and/or in-
structional functions in order to meet
the educational needs of students.
SPECIFIC LEGAL AUTHORITY:
1012.22, 1012.23, Florida Statutes
A complete text of the proposed
amended rules, regulations and pro-
cedures can be obtained at the Office
of the Superintendent of Schools,
372 W. Duval St., Lake City, FL, be-
tween the hours of 8:00 a.m. and
4:00 p.m. Monday Friday. Eco-
nomic impact statements, where ap-
plicable, are on file in the Office of
the Superintendent at the above list-
ed address.
DATED THIS -22nd DAY OF
March, 2011.
SCHOOL BOARD OF COLUMBIA
COUNTY
BY: Linard Johnson, Chairman
ATTEST: Michael E Millikin, Su-
perintendent
04544102
March 27, 2011

010 Announcements


4lnes$ T50
3 days $1750
includes 2 Signs ddn ili e 15
020 Lost & Found

Limited to service type'advertis- DidY, ,eo t
ing only.. K.
4 lines, one month....s92.00 U. c
$10.80 each additional line
Includes an additional $2.00 per
ad for each Wednesday insertion.


You can call us at 755-5440,
Monday through Friday from 8:00
a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Some people prefer to place their
classified ads in person, and some
ad categories will require prepay-
ment. Our office is located at 180
East Duval Street.
You can also fax or email your ad
copy to the Reporter.
FAX: 386-752-9400 Please
direct your copy to the Classified
Department.
EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityre-
porter.com





Ad is to Appear Call by: FarlEmail by:
Tuesday Mon., 10:00a.m. Mon.,9:00 a.m.
Wednesday Mon.,10:00a.m. Mon.,9:00a.m.
Thursday Wed., 10:00a.m. Wed.,9:00a.m.
Friday Thurs., 10:00 am. Thurs., 9:00a.m.
Saturday Fri., 10:00a.m. Fri.,9:00 a.m.
Sunday F., 10:00a.m. Fri., 9:00a.m.
These deadlines are subject to change without notice.




Ad Errors- Please read your ad
on the first day of publication.
We accept responsibility for only
the first incorrect insertion, and
only the charge for the ad space
in error. Please call 755-5440
immediately for prompt correc-
tion and billing adjustments.
Cancellations- Normal advertising
deadlines apply for cancellation.
Billing Inquiries- Call 755-5440.
Should further information be
required regarding payments .or
credit limits, your call will be trans-
ferred to the accounting depart-
ment.


Advertising copy is subject to
approval by the Publisher who
reserves the right to edit, reject,
or classify all advertisements under'
appropriate headings. Copy should
be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the first day of pub-
lication. Credit for published errors
will be allowed for the first insertion
for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the
Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nor for any general,
special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply
with Federal, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
nation in employment, housing and
public accommodations. Standard
abbreviations are acceptable; how-
ever, the first word of each ad may
not be abbreviated.

In Print and Online
www.lak'eeityreporter .noni


LOST: Lg 3 yr old white Calico
female cat. Goes by "Hannah".
Lives on 24/Itchetucknee. 9 yr
old daughter brokenhearted: Please
call 386-288-3916 REWARD!!!


060 Services

Adult Family Home, seeking new
residents, 24 hr care, meals, phone,
transportation to Drs. Enjoy our
country living! 386-397-2920

100 Job
Opportunities

04543743
Ladies and Gentleman
if you have A Class A CDL,
we have a Lease/with a lease
purchase plan.
We accept PTD! Certified
students. O/Operators. No
New England States, 100%
fuel surcharge. Carolinas to
the great NW!
Call today to join us!
Buel Inc
866-369-9744

04544095
Part Time Housekeeping
positions available. Experience
required. Must be able to work
flexible hours. Apply in person
at Camp Weed & Cerveny
Conference Center
11057 Camp Weed Place,
Live Oak, FL. 32060


04544096
Part Time position available.
Experience required at basic
maintenance/janitorial duties.
Hours and days will vary each
week. Apply in person at Camp
Weed & Cerveny Conference
Center, 11057 Camp Weed
Place, Live Oak, FL 32060.

04544139




IMMEDIATE OPENING
Breakfast Attendant
Thursday thru Sunday
4:30am- 11:30 am
Industry Standard Benefits
Must Be Self Motivated with
Excellent Customer
Service Skills
Apply In Person
450 SW Florida Gateway Drive
Lake City, FL 32024
NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE

Experienced cook needed,
part time position, weekdays and
weekends, day and/or evening
shift, experience in commercial
kitchen all aspects of meal
preparation and service, apply in
person, pls include resume, apply
at Camp Weed and the Cerveny
Conference Center, Live Oak, Fl


100 Job
Opportunities

04544124




COTTAGE PARENTS
The Florida Sheriffs Boys
Ranch is looking for couples to
be full-time Cottage Parents.
Responsibilities include the
direct care and development of
10 boys, ages 8-18.
Professional skill based training
& support provided. Help
children develop social,
academic, and independent
living skills. Salary $47,000.00
per couple with housing,
utilities, board, and benefits
provided. High school diploma
or GED required. For more
information contact
Linda Mather at (386) 842-5555
lmather@youthranches.org Fax
resume to (386) 842-1029 Em-
ployment application on line at
www.youthranches.org
(EOE/DRUG FREE
WORKPLACE)

04544126
Customer Service Rep. -
Handle inbound customer calls,
schedule appointments,
document actions, place calls to
renew service. Great pay and
benefits, keyboard skills a must.
Send resume to
fjobs@flapest.com, fax to 386-
752-0171 or mail to 536 SE
Baya Drive. Lake City 32625
EOE, M/F, DFWP. H, V.

05525455
United States Cold Storage
seeking .certified warehouse fork
lift drivers, Apply in Person at
211 NE McCloskey Ave, Lake
City, 3/28 and 3/29, 8 to 5pm
or fax resume to 386-438-2080

AVON!!!, EARN up to 50%!!!
Only $10 for Starter Kit,
1-800-275-9945 pii #4206
www.youravon.com/tdavies


Cashiers needed, Experience
Preferred, Drug free workplace,
all applicants will be drug tested
Ellisville Exxon,
Hwy 441, No Phone Calls Please.
CDL A Flatbed/Van Truck
Driver needed for F/T OTR SE
area, 3 years exp or more, Contact
Melissa or Mary @ 386-935-2773
6 Temporary Farm Workers
needed. Employer: Charles Guess
Lyon Co, KY. Tobacco, Row
Crop, Greenhouse/Nursery &
Alternative Work. Employment
Dates: 05/15/11 -01/15/12. Wage
of $9.48/hr. Worker guaranteed
3/4 of contract hours. Tools
provided at no cost. Free housing
provided to non commuting
workers. Transportation &
subsistence reimbursed when
50% of contract is met. Apply for
this job at the nearest One Stop
Center in your area and reference
Job Order # KY0423547.
Hiring Locally This Week
Liberty National Life
Insurance Company
Full Training Provided Potential
of $60K+ Annually. 401K, BCBS
Insurance & Pension for those who
Qualify. Call 1-800-257-5500
to set up an interview.
Drivers: Dedicated Runs!
Top Pay, Weekly Home-Time
for Solo's & Teams!
Consistent Freight with
Werner Enterprises:
1-888-567-4862 *
Experienced Heavy Duty .
Diesel Mechanic needed,
Please call Mary at
386-935-2773
Help Wanted!
Energetic, Dependable, Full Time,
Computer experience required,
Apply in person only!
Smitty's Western Store
Local law office needs
experienced legal secretary.
Workers compensation, personal
injury and general legal matters
experience preferred. Immediate
employment. Apply in person at
116 NW Columbia Ave.,
Lake City, FL 32055.
10 Temporary Farm Workers
needed. Employer: Mark
Robertson dba Robertson Farms -
McLean Co, KY. Tobacco,
Straw/Hay, Row Crop, Row Crop
Produce, & Alternative Work.
Employment Dates: 05/10/11 -
12/31/11. Wage of $?.48/hr.
Worker guaranteed 3/4 of contract
hours. Tools provided at
no cost. Free housing provided
to non commuting workers.
Transportation & subsistence
reimbursed when 50% of contract
is met. Apply for this job at the
nearest One Stop Center in your
area and reference
Job Order # KY0423457.
5 Temporary Farm Workers
needed. Employer: Mernah Farms
Fayette Co, KY. Straw/Hay,
Row Crop Produce, &
Alternative Work. Employment
Dates: 05/10/11 09/10/11. Wage
of $9.48/hr. Worker guaranteed
3/4 of contract hours. Tools
provided at no cost. Free housing
provided to non commuting
workers. Transportation &
subsistence reimbursed when
50% of contract is met. Apply for
this job at the nearest One Stop
Center in your area and reference
Job Order # KY0422809.
Now hiring exp. P/T servers &
cooks. Smiley faces, good team
players and hard workers. IHOP
No Phone Calls, ref's required,
Drug Free Workplace


100 Job0
Opportunities
3 Temporary Farm Workers
needed. Employer: PWM Farm
Properties, Inc Shelby Co, KY.
Tobacco, Straw/Hay, Row Crop,
Row Crop Produce,
Greenhouse/Nursery & Alternative
Work. Employment Dates:
05/15/11 02/01/12. Wage of
$9.48/hr. Worker guaranteed 3/4
of contract hours. Tools provided
at no cost. Free housing provided
to non commuting workers.
Transportation & subsistence
reimbursed when 50% of contract
is met. Apply for this job at the
nearest One Stop Center in your
area and reference
Job Order # KY0423554.


Team Drivers Wanted,
dedicated routes, Target Account,
Out of Lake City, FL
Call AJ 229-630-0021


Wanted Highly motivated
individual for Sales Position.
Rountree -Moore Ford Lincoln
Mercury Great benefits, paid vaca-
tion. Exp. a plus bdt not necessary.
Call Chris. @ 386-755-0630
WANTED LICENSED
Life and Health
Insurance Agent.
Call 386-755-6800

120 Medical
Employment

04543963
CANCER CARE of North
Florida is currently seeking a
MEDICAL ASSISTANT for a
fast paced work environment
Requires HS Diploma and
excellent Phlebotomy skills with
certification
Intergy Experience and
excellent verbal/written
communication skills.
Qualified candidates please
email resume to:
ipapesh(cancercarenorth
florida.com


05524650
LEARN TO DRAW BLOOD
Local Phlebotomy Course
offered in Lake City, FLA
Certificate program.
(904)566-1328

FT Position for Front Offfice
Clerk available for busy
Family Practice Office,
Experience preferred.
Fax resume to (386) 719-9494
Giebeig Family Medicine.


120 Medical
120 Employment


05525486



Meridian Behavioral
Healthcare, Inc.
www.mbhci.org

Please visit our website to view
current open opportunities
and to apply online:

Therapists:
Licensed, or Master's Level
in Outpatient
Bachelor's-Level in
Counselor Support
Case Management
(adult & child)
Outpatient

Medical Services
Psychiatrist
CSU RN Nursing Manager
ARNP (Psych exp, Child Pref)
RN, LPN, C.N.A.
Recovery Specialist
(Direct Care)

Meridian is an active partner
with the National Health
Service Corps

To see our current openings in
Mental Health and to apply
online, please go to:
www.mbhci.org
EOE, DFWP, E-Verify


Apply Online or In Person!
STEL


120 IMedical
120 Employment
Direct Care Staff & Cooks
Lake City Cluster ICF for
Developmentally Disabled
Persons. www.rescare.com
386-755-6104 EEO/M/F/D/V








Home Improvements

Handicap accessible modifications
for veterans. 38 yrs experience.
386-752-4072 DON REED
CONSTRUCTION, INC
Licensed and insured CGC036224


Lawn & Landscape Service


Clean Pine Straw,
You pick it up, $1.85 a bale
Delivery of 100 bales $285
386-688-9156


Services


DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.


ARE YOU OUR MISSING PIECE?


id


1152 SW Business Point Dr
Lake City, FL 32025
386.754.8562
www.sitel.com EOE


j Cimfortabe. .

* enai'irr... nt. nt a ...
i* ,ou r skills
and
S posi te aunh u
. ,Career io
Oppor-nh ie
|Rccogittlon


I


I


SADvantage









LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, MARCH 27, 2011


120 Medical
120 EEmployment




Medical Personnel
RN's & LPN's, local med-surg
hospital shifts, immediate work,
instant pay, $250 sign-on bonus,
Call 1-877-630-6988

170 Business.
17O Opportunities
Pizza & Wing
Franchise Available,
dine-in and/or delivery,
Call 800-310-8848

240 Schools &
240 Education

04544098
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-04/11/10
Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-04/11/11
Continuing education
Fees incl..books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com



310 Pets & Supplies
FREE KITTEN
Litter box trained
386-288-2899
leave message

Loving House Dog, small male,
FREE to good home,
due to relocation
386-288-7358
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they.
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.


361 Farm Equipment
84 Ford 4610 Tractor. Runs good.
Solid 2WD. New front tires,
350hr on 2005 motor. Dependable.
$7500. obo. 386-867-0005

401 Antiques

CASH CASH CASH CASH
Pre 1964 Silver Coins, Sterling,
Flatware, Costume Jewelry,
Unusual Antiques 386-963-2621

402 Appliances
White clothes dryer. Good shape,
works great. $145 obo.
386-292-3927 or
after 6pm call 386-755-5331

408 Furniture

Possibly Antique
Hard Wood Table, w/chairs
$150 obo
386-292-3927 or755-5331


420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.

Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$250 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.
WANTED to Buy
Pea Sheller
Call 8am 8pm
,386-497-2121


430 Garage Sales






ESTATE SALE
March 26-April 2
call for information
727-541-2173 or 386-456-8832
Humongous Sale!! Sat. Crafts, la-
dies shoes, sz 6-7, small to med
apparel. 626 SW Chapel Hill St off
McFarlane From tools to trinkets.
MOVING SALE Fri, Sat.& Sun
8a-2p. 794 E. Duval St.
Household, tools, lawn mowers
(riding & push). & much more!






PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.



440 Miscellaneous


Beige
Loveseat
FREE, you pick it up!
386-292-3927 or 386-755-5331

Full Size Dressing Mirror
on Wooden Stand
$45 OBO
386-292-3927 or 386-755-5331
New Central A/C, still in box,
with full ten year factory warranty
$1,795
Call 386-364-1090
Riding Mower, 14.5 eng,
42" cut, pedal shift,
$450 obo
386-292-3927 or 386-755-5331


440 Miscellaneous
Small A/C
Window Unit
$75 OBO Works Great
386-292-3927 or 386-755-5331
Tow Behind Grill/Smoker
$1,250 OBO.
386-249-3104 or
386-719-4802

463 Building
63O Materials
ROOFING Are you bothered
by a leaking roof?
Call Reed Roofing today for a free
estimate. 386-752-4072
RCC00455399 Insured
ROOFING:Looking to replace
your Roof? Call Reed Roofing
today for a free estimate
386-752-4072 RC0055399
References available

630 Mobile Homes
630 for Rent
2&3 BR MH. $395 $650. mo.
plus deposit. Water & sewer fur-
nished. Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
3BR/2BA Doublewide on
2.5 secluded acres. $750 a mo.
1st month and full security.
Please call 386-965-7534.
A very clean & well maintained
2/2 units in nice park. $599.mo
w/$500. dep. Rent includes Water,
sewer, trash p/u. Close to town
386-984-8448
Ellisville, SWMH on 1+ ac, close
to 441 & 175, recently remodeled,
.$550 mo $500 dep, utilities not
incl, Call Don at 386-365-1885
Mobile Homesfor rent in
White Springs, Lake City &.Ft.
White Contact 386-623-3404
.or 386-365-1919


640 Mobile Homes
640 for Sale


Classified Department: 755-5440


SE Baya Ave Office Furnished
1800 Sq Ft $1125.00
Ideal for Engineers & Professional
Quiet and safe environment
Security, tailable 386-752-4072f


05525136 -) c j u . ^.. v, u -, Iy
Palm Harbor Homes
Has closed 2 Model Centers
Save up to 60K on select models 770 Condos For Rent
Call Today! 800-622-2832


06 Homes of Merit. 3br/2ba. Open
floor plan w/lg kitchen. 3 Rivers
Estate. River access. MLS#75661
Eastside Village Realty. Denise
Milligan-Bose. 386-752-5290 .
Owner Fin, 3/2, S of Lake City,
quiet, wooded, 1.5 ac, sml dn $700
mo, 386-590-0642/386-8671833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com

650 Mobile Home
0 & Land
OWNER FINANCING
3br/2ba DWMH with
acres. 10 additional acres
available. 386-623-6612
Well kept 3/2 moble on 2+ acres.
screened front porch, covered back
porch, shed, MLS77241 $64,000
Call Brittany @ Results Realty
386-397-3473


04544107
Golf Course Condo for rent,
2BR/2BA, 1420 s.f., $1000/mo.
Rent includes all appliances,
basic cable, water/sewer/
garbage, pool & tennis ct.
access. Realtor/owner
call 386-344-0433.


790 Vacation Rentals

Horseshoe Beach Spring Special
Gulf Front 2br home, w/lg water-
front porch, dock, fish sink. .
' Avail wkends. $345. or wk $795.
(352)498-5986/386-235-3633

Rental Condo on Daytona Beach,
All Inclusive, 7 day stay $675,
(Spring Break April 2-9 Avail)
386-590-0642


71 Unfurnished Apt. 805 Lots for Sale
710 For Rent


05524728
SPRING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans;
some with garages.
Call 386-454-1469
or visit our website:
www.springhillvillage.net

U5525315
Move in as low as $325
Call today for details!
386-758-8455
Windsong Apts
1 & 2 Bedroom Homes
Move in for as low as
$199
386-755-2423
2 br/lba country apt. Owner on
property. $800 mo incl electric,
water, phone, cable & pool. Sec
req'd month to month accepted. 8
mi out from city. 386-937-0195
2br Apt. by the lake. Close to
shopping and the VA Medical
Center. $500 mo plus deposit.
386-344-2972
A Landlord You Can Love!
2 br Apts $575. & up + sec. Great
area. CH/A washer/dryer hookups.
' 386-758-9351/352-208-2421
The Lakes Apts. Studios & lBr's
from $135/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $525. + sec.
Call Michelle 386-752-9626

72 Furnished Apts.
720 For Rent

Apartment: Very clean & quiet in
Ft. White, FL 2/1, screen porch,
W/D hook up, $550 mo plus
Security Deposit 386-497-1116


199 3/2 uwDWT on i ac
$55,000
Hallmark Real Estate
386-867-1613
Call Jay Sears


2 ac lot in River Access
community. Suwanne River
1 mile away.. Owner will finance.
$13,500 Hallmark Real. Estate
386-867-1613 Call Jay Sears
Emerald Cove S/D, Lot # 19
Half acre lot, Only $42,000
call Millard Gillen @
386-365-7001 MLS# 75278
westfieldrealtygroup.com
High & Dry buildable, wooded in
Forest Country. MLS#76668
Eastside Village Realty, Inc.
Call Denise Milligan-Bose
386-752-5290
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on.race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.


OPEN HOUSE

Sunday, March 27, 12-3
Beautiful NEW CONSTRUCTION
3B/2B nice master suite with tile show-
er and oversized tub, walk-in closet, all
r" H ; l wood cabinets with glazing. Oversized
garage with plenty of room for storage,
nice back porch, great neighborhood
-i '-" ~ less than 2 miles to 90, convenient to
... schools and shopping. $179,900
Directions: Branford Hwy South 2 miles. Right into Mayfair. Right on
Lucille. House on left.


720 Furnished Apts.
2 For Rent

Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest. Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric.
cable, fridge. microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. I person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

730 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent

3ba/2ba, New carpet & paint: .5
ac 2 mi from d'town. No pets.
Lease req'd: fav. background only.
$850 +dep. 752-8696. 752-5025.

3BR/1.5BA. BLOCK HOME.
Fenced (privacy) bk yard. CH/A
Nice area. $825. mo $825. dep.
Ref's req'd. 386-364-2897
3br/2ba new const.in nice S/D
Lease Opt. to buy. $900/Mo. $700
Dep, + 1st & last Req'd., Credit
Check No Pets (386)755-9476
4/2,on 10 acres, w/lake access, off
of South Marion, $1,000 per
month, $500 security,
Call 386-752-3066
Ft White, 2/1, CH/A, 2010 W2 &
ref's from current landlord req'd,
Access to Rivers $650 mo, .
$600 sec., 386-497-4699

750 Business &
75 Office Rentals

05525390
2,000 sq ft, 1 mile S of 1-75 on
47, includes warehouse & mini
golf,3 bth (incl handicap),
unlimited.possibilities could
convert to Senior Daycare, etc.
386-752-1364 or 965-4340
1800 SQ FT $1100. Office
furniture available and
cubicle dividers.Water,
sewer and garbage fees included.
386-752-4072 Ready to move in!

OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$695. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor


810 Home for Sale
2/1 completely updated. screened
back porch, large utility room,
MLS#77413 $59.888 Call Nancy
@ R.E.O. Realty 386-867-1271
nancytrogers@msn.com
2/2 + Bonus Room, 1749sf, 4 acre
comer lot. board fenced, det
garage/wkshp MLS#74900
$214,900 Call Pam @ Remax
386-303-2505 www.visitpam.com
2/2 -2 story, 9.7 ac. fenced & cross
fenced w/pastures. Oversized LR,
separate dining, Ig den. Workshop,
carport. 386-752-6575 $179,900.
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
2/3 on 5 acres, wrap around porch,
family rm w/fireplace, detached
garage, $179,900 MLS# 77005
call Roger Lovelady @
Westfield, Realty 386-365-7039
2BR/2BA singlewide mfg home
on 1.7-ac comer lot: large yard &
paved drive $44,900 DANIEL
CRAPPS AGENCY, INC. 755-
5110 #75864
3/2 Brick Home in town, fenced
back yard w/12xl2 workshop
$84,888 Call Nancy @ R.E.O.
Realty 386-867-1271MLS# 77414
nancytrogers@msn.com
3/2 Cute Home, Remodeled, on 2
) acres, partially fenced $114,900
MLS# 77396 Call Nancy @R.E.O.
Realty Group 386-867-1271,
nancytrogers@msn.com
3/2 on Country, Woodsy, 5 acres,
Owner Financing Low Down, Low
Qualifying, Quick Estate, Family.
Anxious, Low Taxes and
Insurance Call 727-541-2173
or 386-362-6293
3/3 Brick. Great location, pond.
Custom built w/Florida room &
vaulted ceiling. Workshop. MLS
75222 $179,900 386-867-1613
Jay Sears Hallmark Real Estate
3Bedrm/3bth w/2 Master Suites,
fenced back yard,fireplace
MLS#76779, $115,000
Call Missy Zecher @ 386-623-
0237 www.missyzecher.com
.4/2 on 10.5 acres w/ detached,
garage, patio, above ground pool,
MLS#77410 $189,888 Call-
Nancy Rogers@ R.E.O. Realty
386-867-1271
67.5 Acre Ranch w/MH, fenced
& cross fenced, wkshop, pole barn,
2 ponds, Spacious MLS# 75607
Asking 299K, Call Patti Taylor @
386-623-6896 Access Realty
95 Acre Estate, 4/3 Farm House,
Pond, Oaks, $689,000,
MLS#76149 Call Charlie Sparks
@ Westfield Realty 386-755-0808
westfieldrealtygroup.com
A quiet neighborhood is the
perfect setting for this cute, cozy
home. Lg back yard w/1 car
garage/workshop.'$84,900.
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
Beautiful Home w/custom
cabinets, 10ft ceilings, $199,900
I MLS#77188 Call
Carrie Cason @ 386-623-2806
westfieldrealtygroup.com
Brick Home in Established S/D,
3/2, Open floor plan, MLS#76121
$134,900 Call Missy Zecher @
386-623-0237 Remax
www.missyzecher.com
CBC 3/1 home, inside city limits,
fenced backyard, detached carport
w/office MLS#77411 $84,900
Call R.E.O.Realty,
Nancy Rogers @ 386-867-1271
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Brick, split plan. Woodcrest S/D.
Screened porch, dining, living &
breakfast area.Lg backyard. Elaine
K. Tolar 386-755-6488 $139,900.
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Brick, 10 ac 3/2 split floor plan. Fl
room, Ig utility, scr porch. Gazebo,
carport, fenced. $149,900. Lori
Geibeig Simpson 386-365-5678
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
New home, May Fair. Great area.
Comer lot. 4 bedroom, lots of tile,
covered porch. Split plan$214,900.
Elaine K. Tolar 386-755-6488
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
4br/2ba on 5 ac. Lg family, Florida
room den or office. Covered patio.
23x30 workshop. $229,900. Lori
Geibeig Simpson. 386-365-5678
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
3/2 Hardwood, separate office/liv-

5678 Mary Whitehurst 965-0887
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Brick on 3.23 ac. New roof, win-
dows, paint. Newer AC, remod-
eled interior, fencing, good area.
Elaine K. Tolar. 386-755-6488
Colonial 4/3 + Guest House,
9.95 acres, inground pool, detach-,
ed/garage, gate entry,MLS#77386
$325K Call Pam Beauchamp @
386-303-2505 Remax '
Comer lot in Piccadilly S/D. Huge
living & dining room. New paint
& carpet. 2 car garage, inground
pool. 386-752-6575 $133,500
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.


810 Home for Sale
CUSTOM 4/2 scm porch, 16x24
workshop w/ele & water, gazebo,
fireplace, ceramic tile/wood floors.
386-752-6575 $189,900
Century 2lf/The Darby Rogers. Co
Custom, 3/2.5 built in 2007,
on 10.8 manicured acres,
completely fenced, Owner Fin.
avail., MLS#77382 Call Patti
386-623-6896 Access Realty
EASTSIDE VILLAGE! Owner
motivated! 3BR/2BA has large liv-
ing/dining rm combo $62,000
#77266 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY, INC. 755-5110
Family Home in Subdivision
4 bdrm Lots of space, newer
roof/carpet MLS#76283 Call
Missy Zecher@ 386-623-0237
Remax, www.missyzecher.com
FOR SALE by very motivated
owner. Just reduced $70,000. to
$129,000. Townhouse on Golf
course. 3br/3ba. Wood burning
fireplace. End unit. Remodeled
kitchen, first class appliances,
granite countertops. New Hunter
Douglas wdw treatments.
Cathedral ceiling. Pool, tennis
court. Call for appt. (904)246-6222
GREAT STARTER HOME!
3BR/2BA in Quail Ridge with
back patio, luscious lawn $84,900
#76432 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY, INC. 755-5110
Large Brick, 3/1, 4.43 acres, metal,
roof, MLS# 77415 $109,888
Call Nancy Rogers @ 386-867-
1271 R.E.O. Realty Group, Inc.
nancytrogers@msn.com
Lg home on comer lot w/oversized
garage. Eastside Retirement
Village. Heated Pool & clubhouse.
-MLS# 71901 386-752-5290
Eastside Village Realty, Inc.
LIKE NEW! 3BR/2BA mfg home
near Wellborn on 5+ acres ONLY
$79,900 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY, INC. 755-5110 #76768
Log Home, Cypress Beams,
whole house generator, $269,900
MLS# 76899 Call
Roger Lovelady @386-365-7039
westfieldrealtygroup.com
NEW FLOORING-FRESH
PAINT! 2-story 3br/2ba on 1+ ac,
Ig kitchen, family rm, fenced pond
$99,900 #75951 Daniel Crapps
Agency, Inc. 755-5110
Nice solid brick home on 5 acres,
Country feel but-close to Town,
MLS 76063 $129,888 Call
Brittany Stoeckert Results Realty
386-397-3473
Nice, large 4/2 on 1 acre
w/florida room, granite floors,
wrap around front porch, $148,000
Call Brittany Stoeckert @
Results Realty 386-397-3473
Owners Motivated! Multiple.
dwellings. Main house and 2 mo-
bile homes Pecans, cedar & aza-
leas. $199,900. Century 21/The
Darby Rogers Co. 386-752-6575
Premier Lifestyle Community
The Preserve at Laurel Lake,
4/2, $194,900 MLS# 77257 Call
Scott Stewart @ 386-867-3498
westfieldrealtygroup.com
, QUAINT 1950s home w/lots of
upgrades! Enclosed front porch,
2BR/1BA, screened back porch
$29,900 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY, INC 755-5110 #77505
Qualified General Contractor
doing top Quality work!
386-752-4072 Licensed and
Insured CGC036224
Don Reed Construction, Inc.
Reduced in Rose Creek S/D, 5/4
on 2.2 acres, close to town
MLS#75485 $274,900 Call Pam
@ Remax 386-303-2505
www.visitpam.com
Secluded, however close to town,
3/2 Brick Ranch Home, spacious
$198,900 MLS# 74415 Call
Charlie Sparks @ 386-755-0808
westfieldrealtygroup.com
Solid home, needs updating. Nice
yard & workshop/garage! Country
kitchen w/eat in area as well as
formal. 386-752-6575 $70,000
Century 21/The D4rby Rogers Co.
Totally Refurbished 2/2
w/workshop on 1.25 fenced acres
$94,900 Call Millard Gillen @
Westfield Realty 386-365-7001
MLS#75417
Two story MH, located in
Wellborn on 2.66 acres, porches
and fireplaces, 9 bdrms/3bths
$163,900 Patti Taylor MLS#71594
Access Realty 386-623-6896
Well Maintained 3/2 on 1.5
acres, fenced, porches, wkshp,
$49,900 MLS# 77309 Call Josh
Grecian 386-466-2517
westfieldrealtygroup.com

820 Farms &
A creage
10 ac lots, some w/well, septic, pwr
pole. Lowered prices. Owner finance
w/low dn pmnt Deas Bullard Proper-
ties 386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com


0- o-









Bring the picture in or
we will take it for you!
* Ad runs 10 consecutive days
with a description and photo in the
newspaper and online E-edition.
* Ad runs 10 consecutive days as a
classified line ad online.
* You must include vehicle price.
* All ads are prepaid.
* Private party only.





2006 EF250
c Ford Van
3/4 ton, metal work
shelves/ladder rack,
60K miles, exc. cond.

$10,500
Call
386-555-5555
If you don't sell your vehicle
during the first 10 days, you
can run the same vehicle ad
for 10 additional days for
only $15.00
Terms and conditions remain the
same for the additional run.


To Get You


Lender REO Auctions 100+ FL Properties Mar21- Mar29

M ar 28 @ 3PM Auction Location: The Millennium Center Ste. 204
4340 W Newberry Rd. Gainesville, FL 32635
DG351026 Millennium Ctr Dental Off. Condo Gainesville Preview: 3/17/11 at Noon! 4340 W. Newberry Rd.
DG396929 3,100 SF Meridian Ctr Off. Condo Preview: 3/17/11 at 10:OOAM 2750-A NW 43rd St.
DG361209 Pire Ridge Plantation 240 AC Gilchrist Co Drive by anytime! East Side of SR47
DG457007 100 AC near Live Oak* McAlpin Drive by anytime! 14502 176th St.
DG297875A 5 AC Homesite Newberry Drive by anytime! NW 22nd Road, Lot 1
DG297875B 8 AC Homesite Newberry Drive by anytime! NW 22nd Road, Lot 2
Plus: 3BR/2BA Belmont home and vacant bldg lot call for details!
Homes Horse Farms Homesites Acreage Industrial Bldgs Commercial Bldgs
Condos PUDs Development Sites Waterfront Morel Visit our website for details:


U 888-334-3952 www.tranzon.com

Tranzon Driggers, Walter J. Driggers III, Lic. Real Estate Broker, FL Lic. AU707, AB1237 10% Buyer's Premium


820 Farms &
2f Acreage

05525391
Take Over Pymt's
10 Ac $74,500, 20 Ac $139,500
$6,975 P/A, Fine Neighborhood,
3 miles W of Col. City School,
Owner Fin 5%, Rolling Pasture
386-752-1364 or 965-4340

4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$69,900. $613mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
4 acres, Wellborn, New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down, $39,900, $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
5 WOODED acres.
Suwanee Rancliettes. $200 per mo
for 5 mo. Then $203.85 per mo
thereafter. (352)472-2879
Outdoorsman Special, near
Itchetucknee Springs St Park,
Owner fin. w/20% dn,
$54,900 MLS# 76366
Brodie Alfred 386-487-1484

83O Commercial
Property
Commercial Income Property,
w/national tenants, 17,000+
sq ft, additional fenced space,
Call Scott Stewart 386-867-3488
westfieldrealtygrouo.com

860 Investment
8 Property
Investment Property, 2 MH's on
almost 2acres, well & septic,
fenced $29,900 MLS# 77233
Call Josh Grecian @ Westfield
386-466-2517


940 Trucks









950 Cars for Sale

1997 Bonneville SSEI,
3.8 engine, sun-roof, all power,
$2250 obo
386-292-3927 or 386-755-5331


m





6C LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY. MARCH 27, 2011
________________mi-,**'---"-**-iI _____________________ *f ^-


New Private School Opensb
Enrolling Now for 2011-2012 School Year
Kindergarten thru 12th Grade
S"( -Year Round School,
Accepting Special Needs Children,
Taking McKay and Step Up For Students
Scholarships, Small Classroom Setting.
Enrollment Hours: Mon.-Thurs. 7:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m. Fri. 7:30 a.m.- 12:30 p.m.


Plu Lernig Aadey 80 Fath s dd- Lake Cit
I^BCTMBBMBPMII^BBB386-43875495 Dn~g^


^BgnnfcAdut I Cild*-ggg^
Located Kinr ifMtheLk ity Ma~il (386) 961-818
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F =M Bilb

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___.JF'-Taxe ,and pro.essing aret,:in.lu.de. in the'ti'cket...rices. Cm'i .g .,val.ble
8-01 41 4 W U S H 1 ':, ,. .. "i.." '"......0 ..0 ..:. '. ..








.' ,; ...,_. .-:::'.OEM"'
'- 'i ,.. 4-M 1 I"


PLAY AN ADDITIONAL


, 500 Credits


FREE
I With your purchase of $20 or more in Internet
time. Limit 1 per person per day. May not be
I combined with any other promotional offer.
Expires April 12, 2011
L --------
:.A5^-~~~~~~~~* 1 **'*i^'^ **
^.-*s ; .
1A^-^^ ',
*^ ^ '' *'i. ,' **' ? *-'.' *.;:* ,
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*Our LOCAL Internet Players Have Won Over


, g
I
^-I^H ~l^ IHM BBIB H^
Is.---^9H BIH
I MB H ifi^ S a
*I1 1


WINNERS ARE SELECTED INSTANTLY & PRIZES OF LESS THAN $500 MAY BE REDEEMED INSTANTLY. WINNERS OF PRIZES GREATER THAN $500 MAY REDEEM PRIZES AT NO MORE THAN $500 PER DAY. MUST BE 18 YEARS OR OLDER TO
ENTER MUST BE 21 YEARS OR OLDER TO CONSUME ALCOHOL. PHOTO I.D. REQUIRED. GO TO PANDA-MONI-YUM OF LAKE CITY, LLC TO SEE OFFICIAL RULES & DETAILS, TO PURCHASE INTERNET TIME & TO REDEEM PRIZES.'NO PURCHASE OR
CONTRIBUTION NECESSARY TO PARTICIPATE OR WIN. MAIL-IN ENTRIES AVAILABLE. 2011 Tom Hunt. All rights reserved.


L-1


I










Story ideas?

Contact
C.J. Risak
Assistant editor
754-0427
crisak@lakeatyreportercom


Lake City Reporter





LIFE


Sunday, March 27,2011


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section D


GARDEN TALK


4,




Nichelle Demorest
dndemorest@ufl.edu

Flora will

decide

what birds

will visit

Many people
who spend
a lot of time
on their
landscape
or in their yards are also
avid birdwatchers. But
just hanging a birdfeeder
doesn't mean that you are
going to get every beauti-
ful bird that lives in or flies
through North Florida.
There are many things
you can do in your land-
scape to attract more bird
visitors. The first is to plant
more native species. Use
plants that have berries
and seeds. Catbirds love
the purple morsels from
the beauty berry shrub
(Callicarpa americana).
Flocks of cedar wax wings
strip the berries from the
yaupon hollies (Ilex vomito-
ria) and other native holly
trees.
When you use plants
from the Aster family
like native sunflowers or
Indian blanket, their seeds
become a tasty treat for the
migrating birds heading
south or north, depending
on the time of year.
Try to install different
types of plants from ground
covers all the way up to
trees. Did you know that
the seeds from the large
Southern Magnolia trees
are a favorite food of many
birds? Having different


Demorest continued on 2D


Mentoring programs aim to help youth


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com

County youth an outlet
to receive mentoring
is the goal of one local
community organiza-
tion.
It's About My Efforts Inc. has
implemented two mentoring pro-
grams, Building Strong Bonds,
a program for middle and high
school boys, and Welcome to
Womanhood, which is geared to
reach middle and high school
girls.
"Children need mentoring,"
said Bea Coker, organization
coordinator. It gives them the
opportunity to see another way to
be successful in life and achieve
their goals."
The nonprofit organization was
founded in 2002. Its purpose .is
to help individuals strengthen
and develop their communities
through involvement at all lev-
els with programs such as the
Ambassador Leadership Council.
Both mentoring programs are
the gender divided spin-offs of
the council and will offer aca-
demic planning and monitoring,
community service projects and
more.
The outlook for both programs
is "Where would you be today if
you were mentored as a child?"
Coker said.
The first meeting for BSB,
"Hanging at the Zone," is 5 to
8 p.m. Monday at 532 Marion
Street. The group will meet the
fourth Monday of each month.
Mentors can provide feedback
on past experiences to help the
young men in the program, said
Al Nelson, lead mentor.
"All young men need someone
they can relate to and talk to and
let them know the things going
on in their life," he said.
The program will provide an
outlet for the young men to speak
their minds, Nelson said.
"Sometimes they can't speak at
school or home," he said.
The first Welcome to
Womanhood Meeting is 5 to 8
p.m. April 12.
"I love Welcome to


Photos by JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Above: Lake City Middle School eighth-grader Nakeria Dobson, 14, speaks with mentor Sandra Price Thursday. 'I
like being a mentor. It's good,' Dobson said. Dobson said she is looking to be a better student, how to treat others
and how to become a better person.

Below: John Harris (from left), 13, a seventh-grader at Lake City Middle School, tells mentors Lucious George and
Jeremy Rayford about what he excels at in school and where he would like to improve upon.


Womanhood," said Sandra Price,
lead mentor. "Ifs going to cre-
ate a different outlook for young
women."
The program will focus on
building self-esteem with the
group.
"If young ladies have great
self-esteem they won't fall for any-
thing," she said.
The meeting space for both
groups is donated by Howard
Taylor.
"I've always been in favor of
something to support the youth,"
he said. "I like to do anything I
can to assist"
Both programs will keep stu-
dents occupied and away from
trouble, Taylor said. Offering
meeting space is just a small part
in helping to impact the youth.
"Overall (the program) will be
positive for the community and


help (the students) to grow in a
positive way," he said.
For more information on
Building Strong Bonds call
386-867-1601 or on Welcome to


Womanhood call 386-867-1601.
For more information please e-
mail info@itsaboutmyeffort.org.
We need people to mentor as
well as participants," Coker, said.


Saturday, April 2, 2011 10am 2pm








LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & NATION SUNDAY, MARCH 27, 2011


Dress for success: It's worth the investment


Do the clothes really
make the man?
Well, it depends on
who you ask, but
certainly there is
little question that the profes-
sional image that a man projects
can play a part in his success.
A recent study conducted by
Kelton Research found that well-
dressed men were perceived
as more successful, had higher
incomes and were viewed as
more attractive by women.
According to custom cloth-
ier David Strange, what a man
chooses to wear leaves an indel-
ible impression. "Men under-
stand that their professional
image is as important as the
message they bring. When you
look your best, you feel good
about yourself and are more
likely to succeed in business and
in life," he said.
With conditions creating
such uncertainty throughout
all sectors of the economy, the
stakes of a professional image
may extend beyond feeling
good. Opportunities for employ-
ment and advancement are at a
premium and men are in fero-


Scott A.Sloan
scott.sloan@fgc.edu
cious competition for new jobs
and fighting for position to gain
promotion. For a growing num-
ber of men, these opportunities
will mean donning a suit. As
America has shifted towards a
more service-based economy,
the necessity of a professional
men's wardrobe has never been
greater. Unfortunately, many
men equate shopping for a suit
with a trip to the dentist or the
insurance adjuster.
This phenomenon has gone
largely unnoticed by the world's
leading designers. The fashion
world has never been short on
legendary names. Celebrities
and the designers who outfit
them to look good for the cam-
era are almost synonymous, and,
as more celebrities explore the
lucrative ventures fashion has


to offer, one might say epony-
mous. However, regardless of
who designs them, the majority
of suits that hang on the rack at
the local department store do
little to change their reputation
as stuffy, bland and shapeless
garments. While the designers'
names have become legendary,
the customers are largely viewed
anonymously.
"More men are having their
suits made than ever before. The
recession made people question
the real value of items and to seek
out real quality as opposed to per-
ceived quality," Strange said.
Strange, who is the owner
of Diamond Clothiers based in
Jacksonville, has been in the
custom clothing business for the
past twenty years. 'The longev-
ity and, therefore, the intrinsic
value of clothes made for an indi-
vidual are greater than anything
purchased 'off a rack,'" he said.
One of the most prominent
drawbacks to buying so-called
"off-the-rack" suits is that the
cut is necessarily generic. The
off-the-rack suit is an everyman's
suit patterned with a man's chest
size primarily in mind. In other


words, the lengths of the coat
and sleeves, as well as the width
of the shoulders, are all cut
in approximate relation to the
man's chest measurement. This
means that when the average
man buys a suit off-the-rack, it.
will typically require some altera-
tions in order to fit well. While
a good tailor can work wonders
with your run-of-the-mill 40 regu-
lar, there are limits to what even
they can do in terms of changing
the way the suit fits.
These limitations play a
large part in-why men often
complain about having to wear
suits. When clothing doesn't
fit properly, we create negative
associations with it and won't
want to wear it for fear of appear-
ing awkward or slovenly. "Many
men have come to realize that
the expensive designer suit they
have purchased is made to fit
thousands of other men and
they are paying a premium for a
name, which has nothing to do
with the fit or longevity of the
suit," Strange said.
As Strange is quick to note,
this epiphany has led to a grow-
ing appreciation among men


for garments that are as unique
as they are, often for less or
little more than what they were
paying in the store for a label.
"Custom clothes are designed
by the customer, with assistance
from the tailor, to provide the
best combination of fit, fabric
quality, pricing and useful fea-
tures."
While certainly not the only
way for a man to polish his pro-
fessional image, custom clothing
allows a man to create his ward-
robe on his terms, as opposed
to those of a designer or a suit
salesman at the mall. And with
a variety of entry points into the
custom clothing market, most
men can find a value agreeable
to their means. As designers
grow their legendary status
both in Hollywood and on Main
Street, it may be time for the
customers to lose some of their
anonymity.
Scott A. Sloan is the Title III
academic advisor for Project
EXCEL at Florida Gateway
College and an adjunct professor
of English. He can be reached at
ext. 4494 or via email at scott.
sloan@fgc.edu


Elizabeth Taylor: Classic beauty in every sense


By SAMANTHA CRITCHELL
AP Fashion Writer
Elizabeth Taylor was
the antithesis of today's
Hollywood fashion icon,
who is eager to be seen
as an everywoman. She
was always dressed like
a movie star: hair done,
makeup on and lots of
jewelry. Never would you
see Taylor in jeans and a
T-shirt.
And while she was
famous for her Oscars,
iconic roles and many
husbands, she was most
renowned for her beauty
the violet, almond-
shaped eyes, creamy skin,
pouty lips and raven hair.
She died Wednesday at
79 from congestive heart
failure.
"She was incredibly
beautiful, funny, smart,
charming and super-
glamorous," said designer
Michael Kors. "In today's
world, people who com-
bine all of those attributes
with a big life in the public
eye and a big talent are
few and far between. One
of a kind means just that
there is just one."
The public saw per
mature from a young curly
haired tomboy in "National
Velvet" to the sultry
"Cleopatra." Yet no matter
the time, place or role, her
glamour was consistent,
and that was inspiring to
women, even if they could
never quite replicate it.
"Every quality that we
consider classically beauti-
ful, she had," said Amy
Keller Laird, beauty direc-
tor of Allure. "She was
sexy and girlish at once,
she had both those quali-
ties all through her life."
In 1951, Taylor showed
off her legendary 19-inch
waist in a strapless dress
with a bodice top, full tulle
skirt and delicate flowers
at the neckline designed
by Edith Head. InStyle


This Nov. 15, 1969 file photo siows Richard Burton and Elizabeth Taylor as they arrive at
Hotel Hermitage for the Scorpion-Ball in Monaco. Princess Grace of Monaco invited the
couple along with other guests for the celebration of her 40th birthday. Taylor is wearing the
69-carat diamond which is now known as the Taylor-Burton Diamond. Taylor died Wednesday


at age 79 of congestive heart fa

fashion director Hal
Rubenstein said the outfit
was the "blueprint for
prom dresses of the '50s."
She had the same
influence on lingerie
styles after she wore
a lace-trimmed slip in
"Butterfield 8." And black
kohl eyeliner was all the
rage after "Cleopatra."
Somehow, she even
made caftans stylish in the
'70s, Rubenstein said with
a laugh.
Rubenstein said he
had the pleasure of meet-
ing her a few times. "As
a child, she was eerily
beautiful she never had
a child's face, and as a
woman, she was unmatch-
ably beautiful," he said.
In person, the most
striking thing about her
was her impeccable fea-
tures, but her broader
appeal, the one the world


DEMOREST: Birds

Continued From Page 1D


kinds and sizes of plants to
attract the birds will also
provide what wildlife biolo-
gists refer to as vertical
layering. Here in the dif-
ferent layers they can hide
from predators like the
local hawk or owl as well
as the neighbor's cat.
Install a natural foun-
tain that has a gentle
dripping sound. Birds are
really attracted to running
water. Birds that would
never come to your feeder
because they are not seed
eaters will come to the
bird bath or natural foun-
tain. Choose a bird bath
that has a flat bottom or a
place for the birds to easily
land. Remember to keep,
it clean from algae and
regularly fill the bath with


fresh water. During freez-
ing weather, take the extra
effort to thaw the water
out for our feathered
friends.
To learn more about
attracting more about
attracting wildlife to your
yard, go to the UF/IFAS .
website http://solutions-
foryourlife.com or call
the Master Gardeners
at 752-5384. There will
be two Master Gardener
presentations in April
on Butterfly Gardening.
Check the calendar at
http://columbia.ifas.ufl.edu

* Nichelle Demorest is a
horticulture agent with the
Columbia County Extension
of the University of Florida
Institute of Food and
Agricultural Sciences.


saw in photographs, was
her overall glamour, he
said.
"When she walked into
a room, she just had the
most amazing presence
about her," added designer
Elizabeth Emanuel, who'
is best-known as Princess
Diana's wedding dress
designer but who also
made several looks for


Taylor, including caftans.
"She was just incredible."
The big studios trained
her to always step out
the door as glamourpuss
Elizabeth Taylor: She wore
the role of movie star all
the time, and she didn't
apologize for it.
"She was an incred-
ible beauty and she had
an awareness of her own


'* ",






, fer en-.. .".
" .i' ,- . .' ;. . .
C 4" ' .. "" "
, p ,. ..




*Baileys Mobile
DJ Services.
386-965-4940
C Gamp Weed Cerveny
Conference Center
386:364-5250
:GGes Studio
758-2088
' GrandtRiental Station
752-7368
Holiday Inn
754-14f1f ext 106
Wards Jewelry & Gifts
386-96S .4940
SSweetwater Branchb Inn
80-59,7760- .. .

7 -
,. .* ,' * '


beauty. Even those we
think are great beauties
today play it down and
speak modestly there's
always something they
don't like and they apolo-
gize for it, but she never
did," Rubenstein said. "She
was aware of her gifts and
truly appreciated them."
He also noted that
Taylor made sure any and
all of her suitors, from
boyfriends and husbands
to reporters, knew that
she liked gifts and that she
expected them. After all,
one of the most important
diamonds of all time, a
69-carat stone, was a gift
from husband No. 5 and
6, Richard Burton. It is
now known as the Taylor-
Burton Diamond.
Taylor not only owned
many pieces of statement
jewelry unlike today's
starlets, who borrow them
- but she'd wear them
often instead of storing
them. That goes back to
the movie-star thing.
. At the Oscars in 1970,
she asked costumer Head
to create a gown that
would show off her neck-
lace, ending up in a blue
gown with a very low Y
bustline.
"Elizabeth Taylor was
a style icon who always
followed her own unique
and daring fashion vision,"
said Jamie Cadwell,
director of the Diamond
Information Center,


y, !.,.:: :.t'-
1:'w
4. i


a trade organization.
"Her love of jewelry was
unsurpassed, and women
everywhere continue to be
inspired by her incredible
collection."
In her clothes, Taylor
had a preference for drap-
ing, said Emanuel.
Her longevity as a style
influence is proven by
the longtime success of
her fragrance collections
launched with Elizabeth
Arden. White Diamonds,
which followed 1980s-era
Passion and was one of
the original celebrity per-
fumes, has been a beauty-
counter best-seller for 20
years.
The fragrances will
continue, according to a
company statement. "Our
best tribute to Elizabeth
Taylor'will be to continue
the legacy of the brands
she created and loved so
much," said chairman and
CEO E. Scott Beattie.
"White Diamonds is still
one of our readers' favor-
ite fragrances. The fact
that hers has stood the
test of time, even though
every hot celebrity has a
fragrance, says a lot about
her as a beauty icon," said
Allure's Laird.




RIDAL
REGISTRY
China, Crystal,
Flatware and Gifts
Couples registered:


Jay Swisher
March 26, 2011

Dorrie Sloan
James Albritton, Jr.
April 2, 2011

Joanna Watson
Dustin King
April 15, 2011

Christine Moses
David Moor
,May 21, 2011

Casey McDuffie
Tony de Moya
May 21, 2011

Laurie Little
Robert Evans, Jr.
June 4, 2011
We know exactly what
they want in a wedding or
shower gift. We update their
list as gifts are purchased,
and gift wrap.
SWARD'S
JEWELRY & GIFTS
156 N. Marion Ave.
Lake City
. 752-5470


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


oL .-^










LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & CROSSWORD SUNDAY, MARCH 27, 2011


DEAR ABBY



Unhappy couple can't agree

on best way to break up


DEAR ABBY: My wife of
16 years, "Barb," and I argue
constantly. We can't seem
to agree on anything, have
few common interests and
don't enjoy our time together.
Our love life is nonexistent.
We have gone to three mar-
riage counselors and it hasn't
helped. We now "get along" by
avoiding each other.
I think it's time we faced
the fact that we're never going
to be happy together. When I
bring this up with Barb, she
gets angry and launches into
the same old tirade, saying if I
want a divorce I'll have to get
a lawyer.
Divorce will be difficult and
costly enough without having
to drag lawyers into it. I'd like
us to agree that it's time to split
and use a mediator to work out
the details. It will save us a lot
of money and, hopefully, make
the divorce less acrimonious.
I don't understand why
Barb wants to stay together
when she's so unhappy and
we're unable to make things
better. How can I make her see
that separating in as kind a
way as possible will be best
for us and the kids included?
- "FORMER" HUSBAND
IN LONGMONT, COLO.
DEAR "FORMER" HUS-
BAND: Your wife may prefer
the evils she's living with to
the unknown of being a divor-
cee with children. However,
when a marriage is over it's
over. And when it reaches the


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearobby.com

stage that yours has, what
both parties need to be most
concerned about is preserva-
tion of assets, so they aren't
dissipated in attorney's fees.
I have seen both kinds of di-
vorces one in which the war-
ring spouses spent so much
money in litigation there was
little left for each of them when
it was over; and the other, in
which the couple agreed their
marriage was broken beyond
repair and arranged their di-
vorce with as little cost as pos-
sible. I don't have to tell you
which people are doing well
now. So clip this and share it
with your wife.
DEAR ABBY: If no one
answers the phone when my
mother calls, she shouts on
the answering machine for
my children (ages 18 and 12)
to "pick up!" Then she'll try
my cell phone once or twice in
quick succession before call-
ing back on the house phone
and leaving a cranky message.
It's never an emergency; she
just wants to chat.
I understand that Mom
is frustrated, but sometimes
we are resting, eating dinner


or are otherwise indisposed.
And yes, there are times when
we're not in the mood to talk.
She lectures me constantly
about how my husband and I
are teaching our children to be
disrespectful by ignoring her
calls. (Their teachers and oth-
er adults regularly comment
about how polite they are.)
I see nothing wrong with
letting a call go to voicemail
if I can't or don't want to talk
at that moment, and I always
return Mom's call. I also en-
courage my kids to call her,
but she doesn't make it easy
when slie begins a conversa-
tion with, "Didn't anyone ever
tell you it's rude not to answer
the phone?" Do I owe her an
apology, or does she need to
be more patient? "PLEASE
LEAVE A MESSAGE ..."
DEAR PLEASE LEAVE A
MESSAGE ...: Your mother
apparently feels that her needs
and wishes automatically take
precedence over whatever
else may be happening in your
lives. You do not owe her ahy
apologies, and yes, she does
need to be more patient. But
she won't get that message
until you are able to commu-
nicate it clearly and directly to
her. You are no longer a child,
and you should not be expect-
ed to drop everything anytime
your mother wants to "chat."

* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-April
19): You can try to coast
along on your merits but
someone will step into your
space and ask for more. Be
prepared to go the distance.
Make it perfectly clear that
you are the real deal and you
will be treated that way. **
TAURUS (April 20-May
20): It's time to shake things
up a little in order to stop
stagnating. Be careful not to
neglect to follow the rules
or someone will point out
your mistake. Speak from the
heart truth is the only way
to find out where you stand.

GEMINI (May 21-June
20): You may feel at odds re-
garding what you should do
for others. Don't get mixed up
because you feel obligated or
guilty about what's required.
Give only what you feel com-
fortable with. No one will fault
you for that. ***
CANCER (June 21-July
22): You'll be inclined to ar-
gue or take things the wrong
way. Try putting your needs
aside and focusing on pleas-
ing the people you love. Now
is not the time to be selfish,


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Word
moody or difficult. ***
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):
Give a little, take a little and
plan your day around events
that will give you insight into
what is required to make
life better. Simple financial
changes can ease your stress
and help you move toward a
brighter future. ***
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Do something that
counts. Volunteer your time
to children or seniors who
need a helping hand and you
will feel satisfaction and get
some worthwhile ideas on of-
fering a service that will help
you out financially. Don't limit
the possibilities. *****
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): You'll be drawn to trou-
blemakers and must protect
what you have and want to
keep from those looking to
take-advantage of you. Indul-
gence and uncertainty will
lead to problems with those
who care about your well-be-
ing. Be honest with yourself
and the people you love. **
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: 0 equals C
"IME S S'PYY DP VCM KS SLP J MBYI .
EMS SMIVT. GS' R RXBGEFSG DP...
VEI SLP AGIR VBP SBTGEF SM LGS
SLP OKB Z PCVYY." X PSP LV DG YY
PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "I would imagine that if you could understand Morse
code, a tap dancer would drive you crazy." Mitch Hedberg
(c) 2011 by NEA, Inc. 3-28


Nov. 21): Explain your in-
tentions and what you have
done in the past that will help
you turn an idea you have
into a lucrative endeavor. The
sky is the limit if you follow
through. Networking will pay
off and help you build confi-
dence. ****
SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): Take better
care of your physical well-be-
ing. Too much of anything
can be a bad thing. Create a
space to practice your hob-
bies or to build something
that will help your financial
situation. ***
CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): You won't be
seeing too clearly, especially
when dealing with friends,
relatives and neighbors. Take
a step back and give every-
one else a chance to voice
his or her opinion. Don't let
a last-minute change upset
your plans. ***
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): You'll have more
discipline but will also attract
more .controversy legally,
financially or medically. Do
your research so you can an-
. swer any questions. It's up to
you to put others at ease and
make sure you are on the
right track with your deci-
sions. ***
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): Put personal and physical
power behind whatever you
do to help others but don't
jeopardize your own well-be-
ing. Running out of steam will
cause uncertainty. Make your
contribution worthwhile.


SUNDAY CROSSWORD


Chick Lit By Brendan Emmett Quigley / Edited by Will,Shortz 1 2 3 4 5 6 7- 8 e 10 1 12 13 14 I5 | 16 7 18 19


Across
1 Dinner party
8 Accompanied on a
ticket
15 Works
20 Biofuel option
21 Size of a football
field, roughly
22 "Wyoming
Outlaw," e.g.
23 Chick lit book #1
(1992)'
25 Italy's longest
river
26 Pie Island
(artist commune
on the Thames)
27 Turned right
28 The Browns, on
sports tickers
29 Headline
30 A nut might go
on one
33 Chick lit book
#2, with "The"
(1843)
36 Bear witness
37 Franco
(watch brand)
38 "Downr with
thee!"
39 Chick lit book'#3
(1965)
44 ___ D. Young
'(Time's Man of
the Year in 1929)
48 Two-time N.B.A.
M.V.P. Steve
49 Kerfuffles
50 Emphatic
acceptance
51 Italian city where
pizza was
invented

For any three answers,
call from a touch-tone
hone: 1-900-285-5656,
1.49 each minute; or,
with a credit card, 1-800-
814-5554.


53 Mich. neighbor
54 Clumsy handler
56 P.R. locale
58 Brand introduced
by Philip Morris
in 1975
59' Chick lit book #4
(1974)
64 Iron Man co-
creator
67 Where 76-Across
may be worn
68 Affixes on
69 Chick lit book #5
(1960)
74 "A Dog of
Flanders" writer
75 Pip of "Great
Expectations,"
e.g.
76 67-Across
jewelry
77 Fold member
80 Says
82 Theater with fans
84 Political
commentator
Colmes
85 Nerve cell
projection
86 Opponent of
Napoleon
87 Chick lit book #6
(1930)
92 Start to
production?
93 Tel Aviv's
Park
94 Refer (to)
95 Chick lit book #7
(1985)
101 Group in "Sex
and the City,"
e.g.
103 Some washers
and dryers
104 Wine container
105 Philadelphia's
___ Whitman
Bridge


106 Environmental
pollutant, for
short
108 Snarl
109 Chick lit book
#8 (1967)
114 Bracelet
attachment
115 Christmas or
Yom Kippur
116 Spread, as
rumors
117 Some church
overhead?
118 Bony
119 Game highlights
shower

Down
1 Rose high in some
people's
estimation
2 Besides
3 Gossip fodder
4 Down, with "up"?
5 Mille & Roses
(Lanc6me
perfume)
6 School in the
Patriot League.
7 Stage light
8 Artery
9 True-crime writer
Rule
10 Home of Agate
Fossil Beds Natl.
Monument
11 First horse to
compete in all
three Triple
Crown races
12 With cold feeling
13 Stuck
14 Famous bathrobe
wearer,
informally
15 Folk guitarist
Leo
16 1986 Indy 500
winner


17 Wombs
18 ___ the Short,
early king of the
Franks
19 Power cord
feature
24 Chess opening?
29 "What moves
you" sloganeer
31 Mosquito
protection
32 Reno setting:
Abbr.
33 180s
34 Vitamin and
supplement
chain
35 Night light?
36 ___ time ('never)
37 Old or morning
follower
40 Harsh treatment
41 "If at first, the
is not
absurd, then
there is no hope
for it": Einstein
42 Ulster or Norfolk
43 Friends and
neighbors
44 Broached
45 A quarrel
46 "A Cooking Egg"
poet
47 Dodge S.U.V.
52 Affairs
54 Part of a support
group
55 Skating
maneuver
57 Femur or tibia
59 Rock singer Dee
60 "Just a ___"
61 Bookcase
material
62 When most
movies open:
Abbr.
63 YouTube
selection


64 Bar selection
65 Hypes
66 Dog named after
a Japanese
prefecture
70 Werewolf feature
71 Lakers star:
Lamar
72 Flame, e.g.
73 Impersonate, i'n a
way
77 Clear of charges
78 Carpentry
fastener


79 -ess alternative
81 2005 World
Series team, for
short
83 Classic sandwich
84 End in ___
85 Part of many
ristorante dish
names
88 Shift's end?
89 Book before
Num.
90 Hesitates
91 Locale for many
a gondola


92 Whence the
phrase "I will
both lay me
down in peace,
and sleep"
95 Conifer with
durable wood
96 Home of
ConAgra
97 Seagoing
98 Dia de los Reyes
month
99 Group think?
1.00 Pacers'
contests?
101 [blech!]


102 "Let's
There" (old NBC
slogan)
105 Maze choices
107 Tanning salon
fixtures
109 Doctor from
the planet
Gallifrey
110 Samurai's home
111 8vian, e.g.
112 "Yo!"
113 Hue and cry


Answers to last Sunday's Crossword.


RHO ALONE I SLAM A DMI T
MARRYINGTHEKALE F LITE
0R EOS HOR S Y SPEE D U P
MOSTPAST ORIS STA I RRAMP

SGT ATE BIUS ARYANS
CRACKYOURPATE PIE


ELY MARS INEZ IVE


RA Ac lV O N USEAB W MEN
SR ON 0 EIH E llOHERE






EBOLA CHILLEDWITHFEAR
D EN SE RA I0UR K __ C H S

C 0 K E S HALLE D R AM A E R E
0 X E YE MESS S Y NC'S LSDI


1 8 7


4 8 9


2 6 1 8 7


9 6 1 2


54 37


7 3 1


4 7 5


5_59 3


2 9 6


7 LI 89 9 16 9 L


8 9 Z 6 L 9 L 17






6 9 L 8 8IL 1V 9


Z 7.8 L 9 L 6


L 8 L 9 lZ P9 8 6


S6 9 96 L S8.91,


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Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415







4D LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE SUNDAY. MARCH 27, 2011


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