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UFPKY NEH LSTA



The Lake City reporter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01507
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 3/20/2011
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
System ID: UF00028308:01507
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text





State's Top

Volunteer
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LIB OP F1iOR DA 'l'I,
PO BOX I1.700 /
205 SMA UNI[V OF 1LOF I
CAINESV LI,L,E FL, 326 1 1 3




Lae


Sunday, March 20, 2011


JASON MATTHEW WALKERItake City Reporter
Bob Loosenort, of Martin, Tenn., attempts to overpower a steer during the steer wrestling competition at the 17th Annual
Florida Gateway Pro Rodeo. Loosenort won the event with a time of 6.7 seconds.




MEMORAB LE


Rodeo's

annual visit

something

to cherish.

By Ar*TONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter. corn
Each year Jean Fudge of
Lake City waits for the
rodeo to come to town
"I live my whole year
to come to the rodeo,"
she said. "I'm a rodeo type of per-
son."
Fudge was among the crowd at
the 17th Annual Florida Gateway
Pro Rodeo Saturday. The rodeo con-
tinues today at 1:30 p.m. Gates open
at noon.
Festivities for today will include
a big salute to the military, said
Wanda Jones, rodeo chairman.
Attendance has been fanstasic on
Friday and Saturday.
Prior to the start of the rodeo,
attendees could visit vendors with
food, activities and more.
At each rodeo she gets a root
beer float and walks around the
arena, Fudge said. Then she waits
to see all the events.
Her favorite event is the barrel
racing.
"I used to barrel race when I was
younger," Fudge said.


This was the first rodeo for
Mason Bielinski, 11, of Fort White.
He enjoyed playing on the rock-
climbing wall and hunger jumping.
"I came here to have fun," he
said.
The last time Edward Riopelle,
12, of Fort White carie to a rodeo
he was too young to remember. he
said. He planned to spend the eve-
ning walking around the arena and
seeing all ihe vendors.
"I thought it would be fun," he
said. "And it is."
The weather has been beautiful


Rodeo clown Rudy Bums
pretends to throw a live
skunk into the audience
during one of his acts.







JASON MATTHEW WALKER
Lake Ciy Repolre

during the weekend and will con-
tinue on today, Jones said.
"It's been all-around fantastic,"
she said.
The community doesn't want to
miss out on rodeo entertainment for
Sunday.
Tickets are $5 for children 6-12
and $10 in advance for adults 13 and
up, $13 at the gate. Veterans can get
free ticket coupons for today.
"1 thank evwriyh dy for coming
out and being a part of the rodeo,"
Jones said. "I hope they all have a
good time."


Lake City man
killed when truck,
SUV collide.
From staff reports
One Lake City man and
two others died when two
vehicles collided at an
intersection in Suwannee
County Friday.
Oedis Walter Blanks,
69, of Lake City, Dorothy
Lee Sherman, 53, of Harris
Township, Mich. and a pas-
senger riding with Sherman


whose identity was not
released by officials died
according to a Florida
Highway Patrol report
Polly Jones Blanks, 64,
of Lake City, a passenger
in Oedis Blanks' vehicle,
was listed in serious condi-
tion at Shands Live Oak
Hospital.
According to the FHP
report, the accident
occurred at approximately
10:48 a.m. Friday. Sherman,
ACCIDENT continued on 3A


ANTONIA ROBINSONILae .Car Reporter
Florida's legendary Highwaymen artist Robert L. Lewis shows
off several of the paintings in his exhibit at the Wild Azaleas
Festival Saturday.

Crowds gather

to celebrate Wild

Azalea Festival.


11th annual affair
attracts more
than 1,000 visitors.
By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecltyreporter.com
WHITE SPRINGS
- More than 1,000 people
attended the 11th Annual
White Springs Wild Azalea
Festival Saturday at The
Nature and Heritage
Tourism Center, according
to event officials.
The event featured eight
food vendors and 11 craft-
ers, said Dennis Price,
White Springs event com-
mittee president.
A highlight of the fes-


tival was a birds of prey
demonstration by Kitty
Carroll, using free-flying
falcons, owls and hawks at
the Stephen Foster Folk
Culture Center State Park,
he said.
Florida's legendary
Highwaymen artist, R.L
Lewis. had an exhibit set
up to showcase paintings
featuring Florida's natural
beauty'.
Other festival activi-
ties included a guided
hike along the Suwannee
River Friday, .musical per-
formances throughout the
day, arts and crafts vendors
and the Suwannee River
AZALEA continuedon 3A


Taking flight on your b'day


Avid aviator gets
surprise 80th
birthday celebration.
By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
Avid aviatrix Virginia Hollins
thought she was only going on a
plane ride for her 80th birthday
but got something more instead
- a surprise birthday party.
"It was great," she said. "I had
no idea it was going on."
Friends and family gatlhered to
celebrate Hollins birthday, along
with Pat Redding,' at Cannon
Creek Airpark Friday.


S- Cannon Creek
',A Airpark resident
Virginia Hollins
hugs Lt. Col.
John Barber
(U.S. Army
SRetired) at her
surprise 80th
birthday party.
JASON MATTHEW
WALKER
Lake City Reporter


Ilollini, first learned to fly
planes after her childriti were
all grown with her new husband,
she said. lie would often push
her to go out fl iing the planes..


"He said, "I think you fly better
than me,'" she said.
These days slihe doesn't fly
BIRTHDAY continued on 3/1


Butcher named Reporters
new advertising director


Experience includes
three years in
management.
From staff reports

Ashley Butcher has been
named advertising director of
the Lake City Reporter
Butcher, of ligh Springs,
comes to the Reporter after
working the past three years as
a sales andI marketing manager
at The Gainesville Sun. At the
Sun she worked closely with
clients to build their businesses
through successful advertising


Campaigns in print, digital and
matziine product platforms.
She also worked closely with
special proj- -
ects and was
the coordinator
of the North
Central Florida
Home Show in
(,mlisville,.
"I am very
excited tor this Butcher
oppo r tun ity
to join the Lake City Reporter
advertising and marketing team
and help it grow during these
DIRECTOR continued on 3.1


11 .. .. 1


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400


82-
Partly cloudy
WEATHER, 6A


Opinion ...........
Around Florida.....
Obituaries ........
Advice & Comics:..
Puzzles ...........


TODAY IN
BUSINESS
I l i1 Ill I .' I I


COMING
TUESDAY
I, I'l t '.'v,. 1, '1 ll t
I'. 1, i i t I i,.. itn l.' i


Sweet 16
Gators beat UCLA TODAY'S
in NCAA Tournament.
Sports, I B ^32,5 T
*.'Mitiini nil ',




Reporter


,porter.com Vol. 137, No. 49 N $ 1.00


SThree die in

collision at

intersection









LAKE CITY REPORTER SUNDAY REPORT SUNDAY, MARCH 20, 2011


Friday:
11-15-23-32 13


eiirtch.

Friday:
1-12-18-30-34


(1A$1I

Saturday:
Afternoon: 3-8-6
Evening: 5-6-9


Saturday:
Afternoon: 2-0-5-3
Evening: 8-2-1-6


FLORIDA


Wednesday:
1-2-5-41-49-50


Wednesday:
28-39-40-48-53


AROUND FLORIDA



Panel recommends campaign fund override


TALLAHASSEE
A House panel
recommended
Friday that
lawmakers
override for-
mer Gov. Charlie Crist's
veto last year of a bill
that would create special
committees that legisla-
tive leaders could use to
raise campaign funds and
decide which candidates
get the cash.
The State Affairs
Committee voted 11-4 in
favor of overriding after
leaders of both Republican-
controlled chambers asked
for override suggestions
during the regular legisla-
tive session.
The Legislature already
has overridden eight
vetoes by Crist, who quit
the Republican Party and
became an independent,
during a special session in
November.
The session was called
after the GOP won veto-
proof majorities in both
chambers. They were the
first veto overrides in 12
years.
League of Women
Voters lobbyist Ben Wilcox
urged lawmakers to sus-
tain the veto. He said what
the bill calls "affiliated
party committees" are sim-
ply another name for lead-
ership committees, which
the Legislature abolished
two decades ago.
Under the proposal, leg-
islative leaders could dole
out the pools of money
to preferred candidates,
including favored primary
candidates. That is essen-
tially how the leadership


committees worked before
they were abolished.
"Who in this process
would turn down a solicita-
tion by a legislative leader
who has the power to
decide if your bill will even
be heard?" Wilcox asked.
'The league believes that
legitimizing leadership
funds encourages the 'pay
to play' nature of this pro-
cess."
The bill would mirror
similar committees formed
by the Democratic and
Republican leaders of the
U.S. House and Senate to
help elect their respective
candidates.
Crist was still in the
GOP when he vetoed the
bill, angering Republicans
but pleasing Democrats.
He cited the abolished
leadership funds in his
veto message.

State economists
reviewing forecast
TALLAHASSEE State
economists said they now
expect an estimated $3.6
billion shortfall in the next
Florida budget to widen by
about $135 million.
That's a net figure they
arrived at Friday after
reducing recurring gen-
eral revenue expected in
the budget year beginning
July 1. by $215.8 million.
That loss will be partly
offset due to a $31.2 mil-
lion increase in the current
year estimate and other
unspent money that will
carry over into 2011-12.
Legislative economist
Amy Baker said next


Targeting the Special Olympics

Target employees present a check for $1,000 to Columbia
County Special Olympics before the start of the 2011 -
Columbia County Special Olympics Summer Games Friday at
Columbia High School.


year's increase is relatively
small but still will be pain-
ful.
Leaders of the
Republican-controlled
Legislature have taken tax
and fee increases off the
table.
So the only way to close
the budget gap is to cut
spending and public ser-
vices, including education,
health care, social servic-
es, prisons and courts.

Teens charged
with arson
JACKSONVILLE Six
teens have been arrested
after a rash of iarsoins at ai
Jacksonville high school.
including one thi at dat l-
aged the football stadliuni.
Two tel"ns were charged
in the Marchi 3 stadium
fire. Authorities said they


were smoking pot and one
dared the other to throw
lit matches on a cushion
and spray it with cologne.
Authorities said the teens
tried to extinguish the fire
and then fled. Their book
bags were found at the
scene.
Fire Marshal's Office
detective Andy Redding
said four teens also
lit some patper on fire
Wednesday andt threw
it near exposed bush.
1lie boys, ages 15 to 17.
are charged with willful
and intentional arson to
woodlands. About .1 acres
of land near the school
burned in that fire.

Arrest made in
old cartel case
MIAMI A Colombian
man is jailed in Miami 17


years after he and three
brothers were indicted
on charges of working for
the now-defunct Medellin
cocaine cartel.
Sigifredo Maya made
his first court appear-
ance Friday and was
ordered held without
bail. Authorities said the
48-year-old Maya was
detained a week earlier in
Panama while attempting
to travel to Mexico and
flown to Miami, where he
was arrested.
An indictment that
had been sealed since
1994 charges Maya and
his brothers will helping
supervise the notorious
cartel's cocaine trafficking
operations in the U.S. in
the 1980s. Much of their
work allegedly involved
large cocaine loads flown
to Miami International
Airport
The indictment said
they also transported cash,
including $3 million packed
into six cardboard boxes.

Man pleads guilty
to shining laser
TAMPA A central
Florida man has pleaded
guilty in Tampa federal
court to shining a laser
into the cockpit of a sher-
iff's helicopter and tempo-
rarily blinding the pilot.
Court records show 59-
year-old Mark Clay Hazlitt
pleaded guilty Friday to
one count of interfering
with the operation of an
aircraft. With no plea deal
in Nace. the Lakeland man
could ix)tentially face up


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS


American Idol' sends another home


LOS ANGELES
American Idol" viewers
said adios to Karen
Rodriguez.
The bubbly, bilingual
21-year-old wannabe diva
from New York, who crooned Taylor
Dayne's "Love Will Lead You Back"
in English and Spanish on the Fox
talent competition Wednesday, was
revealed Thursday to have received
the fewest viewer votes. The judges
decided against saving her following
a last-chance performance of Mariah
Carey's "Hero."
"It just felt great to at least have
that one chance," Rodriguez said
after her swan song.
Haley Reinhart, the 20-year-old
college student from Wheeling, Ill.,
who belted out Whitney Houston's
"I'm Your Baby Tonight" while
smudging her lipstick, and Naima
Adedapo, the 26-year-old dance
instructor from Milwaukee who
delivered a pitchy rendition of Tina
Turner's "What's Love Got to Do
with It," joined Rodriguez as the bot-
tom three vote-getters.
Before the elimination, the top 12
finalists plowed through a mash-up
of Steppenwolf's "Born to Be Wild"
and Lady Gaga's "Born This Way."
The other remaining finalists are
Casey Abrams, 20, of Idyllwild, Calif.;
Lauren Alaina, 16, of Rossville, Ga.;
James Durbin, 22, of Santa Cruz,
Calif.; Stefano Langone, 21, of Kent,
Wash.; Jacob Lusk, 23, of Compton,
Calif.; Scotty McCreery, 17, of
Garner, N.C.; Paul McDonald, 26,
of Nashville, Tenn.; Thia Megia, 16,
of Mountain House, Calif.; and Pia
Toscano, 22, of Howard Beach, N.Y.

Country entertainer
Ferlin Husky dies at 85
NASHVILLE, Tenn. Ferlin
Husky, a pioneering country music
entertainer in the 1950s and early
'60s known for hits like "Wings of a
Dove" and "Gone," died Thursday.
He was 85.
The 2010 Country Music Hall of
Fame inductee died at his home, hall
spokeswoman Tina Wright said. lHe


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this publicity image released by Fox,
'American Idol' host Ryan Seacrest
(left) stands with contestant Karen
Rodriguez after she was eliminated
from the singing competition series
Thursday in Los Angeles.

had a history of heart problems and
related ailments.
With his resonant voice and good
looks, Husky was one of the most
versatile entertainers to emerge
from country music. He was a sing-
er, songwriter, guitarist, actor, andl
even a comedian whose in'person-
ations ranged from Bing Crosby to
Johnny Cash.
He was one of tlie first country
musicians to bring lthe genre lo t(le-
vision and helped spread( its Ipopular-
ity in booming post-World War II
California, an important step illn coun-
try's quest for a national audience.
He said in a 2010 interview with
The Associated Press that he was
buoyed by his Hall of Fame induc-
tion because he worried he'd been
forgotten as his health failed over
the years.


Report: Plame Wilson to
pen suspense books
NEW YORK Former CIA opera-
tive Valerie Plame Wilson is turning
to fiction writing more than three
years after publishing a memoir
about her career.
'The New }brk Times reports
that Wilson has a book deal with
Penguin Group USA for a series of
international suspense novels. The
newspaper said she will team up with
mystery writer Sarah Iovett on the
books, which will feature a fictional
operative.
Wilson tells the Times she's
frustrated by portrayals of female
C'IA agents in popular culture that
emphasize their looks rather than
their brains.
Wilson's 2007 memoir, "Fair
(ane," told the story of her CIA
career and her 200:1 outing that led
to thlie indictment of Vice President
Dick Chieney's top aide, I. Iewis
Libby. Her first fiction book is due
out next year.

Dr. Dre wins appeal in
dispute over video
DI OIT- 111he Michigan
Supreme Court said Detroit city offi-
cials had no right to privacy when they
were videotaped backstage at a 2(XX)
concert involving hip-hop stars liDr.
Dre and ull mine.
In a decision released Saturday,
the court overturned a ruling by the
Michigan aplx'als court and( reinstatedl
dismissal of a lawsuit filed by D)etroit
councilman(; ary Brown and others.
In 2000, Brown was a high-ranking
police official. Ihe warned concert
organizers that power at Joe Louis
Arena would be turned olf if they
showed a sexually-explicit video.
The confrontation was taped and
later included in a I)VI) of the' "1Up In
Smoke" tour.
Dr. Dre's lawyer, llerschel Fink,
said there's no privacy when pIolice
are doing their job.

* Associated Press


Celebrity Birthdays


* British songstress Dame
Vori Lynn is 94
* Producer-director-come-
dian Carl Reiner is 89
* Actor Hal Linden is 80.
* Country singer Don
Edwards is 72.
* Country singer-musician
Ranger Doug (Riders in the
Sky) is 65.


* Hockey Hall-of-Famer
Bobby Orr is 63.
* Actor William Hurt is 61.
* Rock musician Carl Palmer
(Emerson. Lake and Palmer)
is 61.
* Actress Amy Aquino is 54.
* Movie director Spike Lee
is 54.
* Actress Holly Hunter is 53.


Daily Scripture


"But the fruit of the Spirit is
love, joy, peace, forbearance,
kindness, goodness, faithfulness,
gentleness and self-control.
Against such things there is no
law."


- Galatians 5:22-23


Lake City
HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293
Fax number ..............752-9400
Circulation ...............755-5445
Onlineo... www.lakoctyreporter.com
The Lake City Roporlor. an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., Is pub-
Ilshod Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fin. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City. Fla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press,
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part Is forbidden without the pemlis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City. Fla. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson .....754-0418
(twilson@lakocltyreporter.com)
NEWS
Assistant Editor CJ Risak..754-0427
After 1:00 p.m.
(crisaks@lakecltyrepolor,.oom)
ADVERTISING
Director Ashley Butcher .. .754-0417
(ariutchonlrtr unkrrltyroportor'.,)
CLASSIFIED
To placo a classlfkx) nd, call 755-5440,


Reporter
BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon ....754-0419
(sbrannoni@lakecilyreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7:30
a m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be Issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
Is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be Issued.
Circulation ...............755-5445
(ctriilatlon@ilakecityrporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks ................... $26.32
24 W weeks ...................$48.79
52 Weeks . ................$83.46
Rakes intle 7% sales tax.
Mail mrtes
12 Weeks .. .......... $41.40
24 Weeks ...................$82.80
52 Weeks........ .........$179.40


CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion,
please call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifica-
tions will run in this space. And thanks for reading.


to 20 years in prison at his
June 2 sentencing.
Hazlitt'was first arrested
in November by Polk
County deputies after a
sheriff's helicopter pilot
identified Hazlitt's home as
the source of a laser light
He was later indicted by a
federal grand jury.

Class size cap
bill advances
TALLAHASSEE A
new proposal to loosen
Florida's class size caps
sailed through a Senate
committee on a unani-
mous vote without debate
or objection Thursday,
although the statewide
teachers union later said it
opposes the legislation.
The bill (SB 1466) filed
by Sen. David Simmons
would allow schools to
exceed the limits by three
to five students per class
for core subjects to accom-
modate those who enroll
after an annual count is
taken each October. It
also would redefine core
classes to sharply reduce
the number of courses cov-
ered by the limits.
As a representative, the
Maitland Republican had
introduced a similar bill
that unanimously passed
the House in 2008. The
Senate had refused to
consider his 2008 bill,
insisting the limits adopted
through a constitutional
amendment in 2002 could
only be altered by another
amendment.

Associated Press


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427







LAKE Ci1 Y REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, MARCH 20, 2011


At 92, man decides time to retire


By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@tlatecityreportet: corn

Robert Molosso of Lake City said a bit-
tersweet goodbye Friday.
Molosso, 92, finished his last day of
almost 18 years of working as a gro-
cery bagger at the Lake City Publix
Supermarket.
"We're just gonna miss him," said Kinm
Shay, customer service manager. "It's
been great working with him. I know all
the customers and associates are gonna
miss seeing him every day. But it's time
for him to retire."
Molosso was the Lake City Publix's
oldest employee. To honor his retirement
and show their appreciation, his cowork-
ers threw him a surprise party with cake
in the store's break room.
"I thought I got around this somehow,"
Molosso said, joking and laughing. "I
did."
He said he felt like it was time to stop


working and spend more time at home
with his wife, Gloria, helping to care for
their home and even making coffee in the
morning so she won't have to.
"When you get my age, you've gotta
think of how many years you've got left,"
Molosso said.
"You're not living by the year, you're
living by the day," he said. 'That's what 1I
want to do with my wife."
Shay said Molosso has always been
willing to do anything the store needs,
from cleaning to car duty.
"He does everythingjust like everybody
else does," she said. '"The age doesn't stop
him."
Molosso has only once stopped work-
ing briefly since he was 17 years old when
he took his first job cleaning his father's
diner in New Jersey, his home state.
But now, it's time, he said.
Molosso said he will be leaving a lot of
friends behind at Publix, both coworkers
and customers alike.


"These people have been great," hle
said. "'There's a lot of them I'm going to
miss."
"They've shown me the deepest
respect," Molosso said, as he was over-
come with tears. "And I appreciate it."
The feelings and the tears were
mutual.
Rhonda Bundy, assistant customer
service manager who has worked with
Molosso since he started at Publix, said
losing him is like losing a family mem-
ber.
"I will miss his friendly personality,"
she said.
"He's a good guy to work with," said
Enondrus Phillips, front service clerk.
"He's always been very helpful and stuff.
We'll miss him when he goes."
Molosso reassured his co-workers that
he'll still be living in Lake City and will
still visit Publix for his weekly grocery-
shopping regimen every Thursday.


DIRECTOR: Joins Reporter

Continued From Page LA


challenging economic times,"
Butcher said. "I am confident
that our experienced adver-
tising team will answer the
challenge to grow our market
and expand our presence in
Columbia County."
Prior to working in newspaper
advertising, she worked for two
years as an advertising account
manager in outside sales with
Trader magazines, including
Cycle Trader, Boat Trader, Truck
Trader and RV Trader.
"I look forward to getting out
and meeting everyone; prior-
ity No. 1 is to build a connec-
tion and relationship within this
community," she said.
At the Lake City Reporter.
Butcher will oversee all aspects
of advertising, including outside
sales, classified, magazine and
niche product advertising, as
well as online sales on lakccity-
reporterconm.
"Ashley understands the
needs of small businesses and
she has the expertise and a
proven track record of creat-


ing marketing plans that help
businesses grow their custom-
er base in these challenging
times," said Lake City Reporter
Publisher Todd Wilson. "She
is a dedicated professional who
understands the values that make
living and operating a business in
rural North Florida the unique
experience we all enjoy."
A native of the small town
of Belleview, Butcher attended
Johnson and Wales University
in Miami.
In her free time, Butcher
enjoys spending time with her
husband and their two young
sons, ages 4 years old and 3
months. She is a T-ball momn
and also is an avid college and
professional sports fan.
"I am very excited to wel-
come Ashley to our team at
the Ixke City Reporter." Wilson
said. "She brings a great energy
and enthusiasm to our staff. We
welcome her to lake City and
look forward to her becoming
an active part of our conmmu-
nity."


alone, Hollins said.
"I hoped they would let me
fly (on my birthday)," she
said.
Lt Col. John Barber (U.S.
Army Retired) decided to go
flying with Collins to cele-
brate her milestone, he said.
'Two weeks ago I got to
thinking about it," Barber
said.
Once in the air Hollins was
at ease with the controls.
"Not too many fly in their
80s," he said.
She obtained a stu-
dent and private Federal
Aviation Administration
license and is also involved
with Experimental Aircraft


Association Chapter #977
according to Barber. Hollins
has given more than 240
aircraft rides to the "Young
Eagles" EAA Program.
One trip up with a group
of three girls was memorable
for Hollins.
One of them looked down
and was scared to death see-
ing the houses getting small-
er, she said.
"She thought something
was going to happen to her
house," Hollins said.
Redding is Hollins neigh-
bor, and her birthday was
Thursday, she said. The party
also came as a surprise to
her.


AZALEA: Annual festival

Continued From Page 1A


Duck Race.
Kristi Mitchell of
Gainesville enjoyed festi-
val activities, especially the
birds of prey.
"It was great," she said.
"I loved out here."
She spent the day seeing
the arts and crafts, eating
oysters and even bought
hot sauce from a vendor.
The festival brought a
basic appreciation of natu-
ral Florida and native plants
such as azaleas, Mitchell
said.
"I have a whole yard cov-
ered in them," she said.
Price said everyone


OBITUARIES

Edith Hunter Sistrunk
Edith Hunter Sistrunk passed
away Sunday, March 13, 2011,
in Jacksonville, FL at the age of
96. The daughter of the late Jes-
sie Peeler Hunter and Blooma
0. Hunter, she was born in Co-
lumbia County near Lake City.
She attended public schools in
Jacksonville, Lake City, and
Fort White, and Massey Busi-
ness School in Jacksonville.
She was a longtime member
of Spring Glen United Meth-
odist Church of Jacksonville.
She was preceded in death by
her husband of 37 years Law-
rence A. Sistrunk, her daughter
Laurie Ann Sistrunk, and her
siblings Mary H. Howard, Alice
H. Zelenka, Blanche H. Collins,
William M. Hunter, and Jose-
phus P. Hunter. She is survived
by her son Calvin H. Sistrunk
of Jacksonville; her sisters,
Shirley H. Sievers of Jackson-
ville and Helen H. Hamilton
of Panama City; and numerous
nieces and nephews as well as
her devoted friend and long
time caregiver, Vickie Amos.
A graveside service will he held
at 11:00 am on Tuesday, March
22, at Greenlawn Cemetery,
4300 Beach Blvd, Jacksonville,
Florida, with the Rev. David D.
Spaulding of Spring Glen Unit-
ed Methodist Church officiating.
In lieu of flowers, the fam-
ily request that donations he
made to Spring Glen United
methodist Church, 6007 Beach
Blvd., Jacksonville, FL 32216.
GEORGE H.' HEWELL
AND SON FUNERAL
HOME of Jacksonville are
in charge of the arrangements

Donald Bryant
Donald Bryant, 73, of Lake City
died March 18, 2011
G a t e w a y F o r -
Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.,


participating in the festival
made it a success. Visitors
hopefully left appreciating
the beauty of the outdoors.


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LAKE CITY
2469 West
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i . t .. .. '. ,
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~1


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Molosso reacts as he makes an emotional
farewell speech. He plans on spending more
time taking care of his wife, Gloria.


ACCIDENT:

Continued From Page 1A

driving a 2008 Kia SUV, was driving
north on County Road 795 (also known
as Boys Ranch Road) and Oedis Blanks
was traveling west on County Road 132
(also known as Stagecoach Road). Her
vehicle was required to stop at the
intersection of the two roads but did
not, going directly into the path of
Blanks' 2008 Chevy truck.
As a result of the collision, Sherman's
Kia began overturning on its left side,
traveling 55 feet from the original point
of impact until running into a fence on
the property of the Florida Sheriffs
Boys Ranch and coming to a rest on its
left side facing west on the westbound
shoulder of CR 132.
Blanks' truck started rotating clock-
wise after the collision, traveling 75
feet from the Ipoint of impact, stopping
while facing east on the westbound
shoulder of CR 132. The boat trailer
that was being towed by Blanks' truck
separated from the vehicle, the boat
coming off the trailer and coming to
a rest on the westbound shoulder of
CR 132 and the trailer overturning
and also coming to a stop on the west-
bound shoulder of CR 132.


Lo ok 'F? 111/ 0in
'Kenneth Otto Dicks, Jr. "'Kenn"
woutd like to express o. u sincere ii: raiti'ru antd
apprrciation to r the ovenvh t U in aII lol4I1t of
1'i.its, prayers, cards, flowers, and food during
our ilei ot0 sorrow. 'tBe assi.red tlihat iour 71a1ni/
acts of frfizdliSip, s'pp,-ort, kiinness, and love
did not Io 410 n4notiCe ofr u inappreciated. 'It was
evident that l liall pIetpl loved' Keill, a(id
that hei toclied the hearts andil lives of others,
1ist as al f io. t hn /Ive rouchied o.rs. WeV rIjoice
in kowi l .at rK,.enIII/, nloI suffterinLq
hdid is ill the presence If oir 10'iniiOi father in
/ihavenl. 'Thildlls to 1 0 dli, l7od 'Tless.
j'Alt t well.

love i i C'll iist,
0111 'The'K n \i 'Ft ? \f -




OB/ YN

DAINA REENE MD.
WOMEN'S HEALTH WITH A WOMAN'S TOUCH


* o;


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BIRTHDAY: Surprise party

Continued From Page 1A


VALDOSTA MALL
VALDOSTA, GA
1700 Norman Drive


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


Am~V











OPINION


Sunday, March 20, 2011


OUR


OUR
OPINION


Do it right,

but do it

quickly

The switch from
Columbia County's
previous industrial
incentives of tax
rebates to the
more proper tax abatements
has been a tedious process.
The procedural switch has
been viewed and reviewed
by legal and governmental
minds and the documents are
not completely ready for final
approval.
Making the switch to tax
abatement incentives is, as
we've said in past opinion
writings, certainly the proper
move for the county. While the
process of switching requires
meticulous oversight, it also
is a process that demands a
steadfast, quick approach.
It's been several months
since the county's self-audit
of the Industrial Development
Authority revealed
overpayment problems with
the old system. There's
been plenty of time of work
out the details of the new
tax abatement system and
implement it
We support the county's
endeavors to make the
procedural switch. We just
want government to move
quickly in its efforts to make
sure all the paperwork and
ordinances are in place to get
the new plan into action.
The longer this drags
on, the worse we look to
prospective industries
interested in utilizing tax
abatement incentives to
possibly expand or locate in
Columbia County.


HIGHLIGHTS
IN HISTORY
On March 20, 1815,
Napoleon Bonaparte returned
to Paris after escaping his
exile on Elba, beginning his
"Hundred Days" rule.

In 1995, in Tokyo, 12
people were killed, more than
5,500 others sickened when
packages containing the poi-
sonous gas sarin were leaked
on five separate subway trains
by Aum Shinrikyo cult mem-
bers.


Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -'Newspapers
get things done!'"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman


LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters.
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter,
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,


Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


www.lakecityreporter.com


Pfc. Bradley Manning


deserves decent treatment


WASHINGTON
f Army Pfc. Bradley
Manning is convicted of
handing over thousands
of classified U.S. docu-
ments to WikiLeaks, and
it appears that is more than a
good possibility, he deserves
the severe punishment he will
surely receive perhaps even
the rest of his life behind bars.
While it is easy to blame his
faulty) judgment on misguided
youthful zeal, the fact is he was
old enough to know better and
certainly to realize his actions
could bring dire consequences.
There is really little defense
for what he did if lie did it.
But that hasn't yet been (deter-
mined in a court of law and
until it is, lie is under the U.S.
Constitution, an innocent man.
So why then does the
Pentagon insist that being
forced to sleep naked, to being
deprived of clothes except
shorts and allowed one hour of
exercise a day and other indig-
nities physical and psycho-
logical during his pretrial incar-
ceration is fair treatment when
he is not on suicide watch? And
why does President Barack
Obama accept that assurance
when he has to know better?
There are several possible
answers to those questions
including an effort to appease
government authorities furious
and embarrassed over the bla-
tant breach of security caused
by a new policy of sharing that
went awry; to head off poten-
tial allegations by the admin-
istration's 2012 opponents of
mollycoddling those accused
of treason or of being enemy


LETTERS


Dan K.Thomasson
combatants; to send a message
to others who might feel so
inclined, or all the above.
Whatever, the recent indict-
ment of Manning's brig experi-
ence as "ridiculous, counterpro-
ductive and stupid" by former
State D)epartment spokesman
Phillip Crowley is absolutely
correct even if it may have cost
lini his job. (rowley resigned
shortly after making the state-
nment.
Military jails are notoriously
unsympathetic not only to con-
victed miscreants but to those
only accused of violations.
Repudiated to be among the
toughest of brigs are those run
by Marines. Manning is being
held at the Quantico Marine
Base in Virginia just outside
of Washington where the brig
commander has put him on
"prevention of injury" status
apparently to justify the abusive
treatment He is not on suicide
watch and a psychiatrist has
said he is not suicidal. His law-
yer and others have decried
the treatment and his father,
who had been silent about his
son's alleged involvement in
the scandal, has complained.
Manning reportedly trig-
gered the severe restrictions -
- that included being given only
a blanket to sleep under and


standing naked part of the time
- by making a sarcastic remark
about suicide. At least that was
the explanation.
During the tumultuous days
of the Nixon Administration,
a yeoman assigned to the
National Security Council in
the White House was discov-
ered to have rifled the brief-
case of NSC Chairman Henry
Kissinger and transferred clas-
sified cables and other infor-
mation about administration
dealings with China to those
within the military not autho-
rized to have the information.
including the chairman of the
Joint Chiefs of Staff. He also
leaked classified information to
;i Washington columnist.
In this famous "Pentagon
spying case," the yeoman
was removed and sent to the
West Coast where lie was
"baby sat" by authorities. The
careers of several top officers
including the joint chief were
ended. There obviously was no
thought of prosecution because
of the political volatility of the
entire affair kept secret until
Watergate, which it helped trig-
ger.
While Manning has been
charged with crimes against
the state that could bring the
death penalty, the government
wisely said it would not ask for
that when his trial begins. In
the meantime, as a man "pre-
sumed innocent" he should not
be subjected to obviously abu-
sive, punitive.treatment by his
jailers, acting with suspicious

* Dan K. Thomasson is former
editor of Scripps Howard News
Service.


TO THE EDITOR


Country's weath has been spent


To the editor:
America's wealth has been
spent. Citizens have lost their
homes, jobs, self esteem and
hope. American exceptionalism
is at stake. America must have
new leadership.
The world watches as thou-
sands of bodies wash ashore
in Japan as a result of natural
disasters.
The Middle East is on fire
with revolt against ruthless
leaderships, many are (lying for
their beliefs.
The cost of living is going up,
wiht the cost of fuel leading the
way.
However, one of our beloved
citizens is complaining about
people burnign their yard
debris and the smelll was
offensive, preventing him from
opening his windows. I must
admit, I am the person with the
yard fire. My story goes like
this. I live lost my job, my son
has recently returned from Iraq,
one of my grandchildren is facing
a very serious operation. We got
together and burned my leaves
and limbs with the intention
of cooking with th remaining


coals. This was intended to be
a family get-together, to some-
what forget our problems for a
while. Sorry.
Great citizens of Columbia
County, please get your priori-
ties in order. We must all pull
together to save America from
the liberal assault now under-
way. Our children and grand-
children deserve the America
we were handed so they can
hand it to the next generation.
Please step up.
God Bless America.
Bill Glover
Lake City

Smelling trouble

To the editor:
My letter is in response to
Mr. James Snowberger's letter
and to the people of Lake City.
I totally agree with Mr.
Snowberger. I live in thlie city
limits and when you have neigh-
bors and people in the neighbor-
hood burning leaves and copper
wire, etc., the smell will kill you.
I have complained many times
to the Fire Department about
the smoke, especially about


those folks who burn copper
wire to get money for it. I'm
sure that's what they do com-
monI sense here.
These people who burn their
leaves (God's natural waste)
must understand flower beds
love the leaves, mowing your
leaves into your grass is a natu-
ral fertilizer and earthworms
just love it. Yards become
greener, healthier and mostly
beautiful, the sign of a proud
homeowner.
Those who burn copper wire
are only contributing to an
unhealthy environment. They
are ruining their lungs and oth-
ers too. The chemicals used in
making the wire's insulation
are very hazardous to breathe,
the smell is like no other. You
feel like, when you smell it,
you have been placed in a gas
chamber, your eyes water, your
throat burns, your sinuses get
iunflanned and irritated.
So please, (do not hurn your
leaves and other debris. lHave
some respect for others and
Mother Nature too.
Rebecca Musgrove
Lake City


4A.


Star Parker
parker@urbancureorg


No surprise

on planned

parenthood

funding

T he facedown in
Congress on the
federal budget
must be about
principles as well as
absolute spending. No drunk
will sober up if he only thinks
about how much he drinks and,
not about why.
There is nothing more
repugnant and flagrantly mis-
placed in the federal budget
than the $360 million taxpay-
ers annually send to Planned
Parenthood. If we can't elimi-
nate this, it means either that
the nation is hopelessly lost or
that Republicans are weak.
Planned Parenthood funding
must become the poster child
for what is wrong with the fed-
eral budget Why?
We can sum up noting that
funding Planned Parenthood
forces taxpayers to subsidize
three sins. Lies, theft, and
murder.
Lies. Planned Parenthood
is on red alert because the
House budget passed in
February included an amend-
ment by Rep. Mike Pence.
R-Ind., that eliminates their
funding.
As result, they're now in a
full court press lobbying and
PR campaign. Perhaps you've
seen an ad they are running on
TV? It shows a doctor explain-
ing that Planned Parenthood
screens for cervical and breast,
cancer and that the "House has
voted to take away this care."
Sad there is a doctor who
would be party to this kind of lie..
We're led to believe that cancer
screening is the only or main
thing that the nation's largest
abortion provider does. Their
annual report notes that cancer
screening accounts for 17 per-
cent of Planned Parenthood's
services. Federal funding
amounts to one third of their $1.2
billion budget My little grandson
can figure out that cutting one
third of a budget leaves plenty of
money to pay for what amounts
to 17 percent of it.
You'd also think that tax-
payers are the only place that
Planned Parenthood can turn
to for funds. Non-profits raise
hundreds of billions in con-
tributions soliciting private
citizens. Planned Parenthood's
annual report shows they get
28 percent of their budget
from contributions, less than
they get from taxpayers. This
is an organization that suppos-
edly believes in choice. They
can appeal to private citizens
to choose to contribute rather
than turning to government to
force taxpayers.
Theft. Planned Parenthood
insists that, by law, they don't
use government money to fund
abortion services. Those funds
go for the rest of their work
that they call "family planning."
But the one-third of their
budget that does come from
government simply frees up
the rest, part of which does
fund abortion. You also have to
ask how far you can sort this
out. Which dollars go to plan,
locate, and construct facilities
planned strategically to give
easy access to low income,
largely black women that
provide all their services,
including abortion?
Just think about the familyy
planning part. Where does
our constitution put the federal
government in the familyy

* Star Parker is president of
CURE, Coalition
on Urban Renewal and Education
(www.urbancure.orq) and author
of three books.








LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, MARCH 20, 2011


Today
Rodeo
The 17th Annual Florida
Gateway Pro Rodeo is 2
p.m. today at the Columbia
County Resources Arena.
Gates open at noon.
Tickets are $5 for children
6-12; $10 in advance for 13
and up and $13 at the gate.

Art on display
The Lake City Police
Department is celebrating
National Women's History
Month with artwork on
display all month 8 a.m.
to 5 p.m. in the PD Lobby
and at City Hall. Featured
artists are Dottie List,
Calandra Wise, and Leslie
Reed-McDaniel. Call
Audre' Washington at 386-
719-5742.

Fair/Rodeo Scholarship
Columbia County
Resources is now accept-
ing applications for the
fair/rodeo scholarship.
Two scholarships for
$1,000 will be awarded to
graduating seniors. Call
386-752-8822 or visit www.
columbiacountyfairorg to
download the criteria and
application. The applica-
tion is also available at
Columbia High School,
Fort White High School or
the fair office. The dead-
line is 5 p.m. April 1.


Spring Break Camps
The Florida Museum of
Natural History is offering
fun, educational spring
break day camps March
28-April 1 for students in
grades K-5. Half-day ses-
sions are $117 for museum
members and $130 for
non-members. Full-day
sessions are $225 for mem-
bers and $250 for non-
members. Register today
at www.flmnh.ufl. edu/edu-
cation/childrens_classes.
htm or call 352-273-2061.

Feinstein challenge
Christian Service Center
is participating in the $1
million dollar giveaway
Alan Feinstein Challenge
from now until April
30. Every food item or
financial donation .counts
toward receiving a per-
centage of the giveaway.
Call 386-755-1770 and
bring donations either to
the center at the corner
of Hilton and Washington
or mail to PO. Box 2285,
Lake City, FL, 32056.

Monday
SAR Meeting
The Sons of the
American Revolution is
meeting 6 p.m. Monday
at Guangdong Chinese
Restaurant. Contact Jim
Craig at 752-0015.


Relay For Ufe party
Columbia Teanm
Captains' Party is 6 p.m.
Monday at Christ Central
Church, 217 SW Dyal Ave.
Visit www.relayforlife.org/
ColumbiaFL, call Event
Chair Kim Nicholson at
386-288-2871, or Team
Development Chair Lorrie
Woods at 386-984-5992.

FFA booster/alumni
meeting
The Columbia High
School FFA Boosters are
meeting 6:30 p.m. Monday
at the school land lab. ALLI
FFA members, parents,
conununity leaders, andt
past alumni are encour-
aged to attend. Please
bring a covered dish for
dinner before the meeting.

Class get together
The RSVP deadline for
the Class of 1959 annual
get together is Monday.
The event is 5 p.m. April
9 and the cost is $15 per
person.

Tuesday
Gold, silver exchange
Shands Lakeshore
Hospital Auxiliary is
having a Gold & Silver
Exchange 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Tuesday in the cafeteria.
The company coming
is Noble Jewelers from


IT'S EASY TO GROW YOUR OWN DELICIOUS VEGETABLES!


If want to grow your own fresh vegetables
make Nobles your first stop! Our seed racks
are stocked and our benches are filled
with beautiful vegetable plants! Tomatoes,
peppers, eggplant, squash, cucumbers
and much more! Let us help you get your
garden off to a great start!

$1 2 9
Pack with 2 vegetable plants only JL did


i0 -- 1


WE MAKE LANDSCAPING DECISIONS EASY!
Stop by with pictures and measurements of the area you want to work on uuld we'll draw
you a free planting sketch that'll include all the trees and shrubs you like the best!


Z4A9 8 1t R/ULADL l UVE OUAK
(386) 362-2333
Monday thru Friday 9:00 a.m. 6:00 p.m.
Saturday 9:00 a-m. 5:00 p.m.
Sunday 1:00-i:00 p.m.
www.noblesgreenhouse.comn


_________ I I1TH STREET
amS py
.. 5+
yeo <-
? ^>- x i (


Ft. Myers and they offer
top prices for broken or
unwanted Gold and Silver
in any condition, even
Silver flatware. They have
a certified jeweler who
will remove any stones in
the settings and then pres-
ent a check immediately.
Proceeds from the sale will
be used for the hospital.

Fundraiser
Operation Christmas
Child is having a fundrais-
er 5 to 8 p.m. Tuesday at.
Moe's Southwest Grill.

Wednesday
Gold, silver exchange
Shands Lakeshore
Hospital Auxiliary is
having a Gold & Silver
Exchange 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Wednesday in the cafete-
ria. The company coming


is Noble Jewelers from
Ft. Myers and they offer
top prices for broken or
unwanted Gold and Silver
in any condition, even
Silver flatware. They have
a certified jeweler who
will remove any stones in
the settings and then pres-
ent a check immediately.
Proceeds from the sale will
be used for the hospital.

SCORE workshop
SCORE is hosting its
first workshop for 2011,
Managing the Cost of
Unemployment, 11 a.m. to
1:30 plm. Wednesday at the
Guangdong Restaurant in
the Lake City Mall. Cost is
$20 and includes lunch and
material. Tickets are avail-
able at Peoples' State Bank
and Guangdong Restaurant.
Seating is limited for the
workshop, which will fea-


* To submit your Community
Calendar item, contact Antonia
Robinson at 754-0425 or by
e-mail at arobinson@
lakecityreporter.com.


ture three expert speakers. -

Quilting Guild meeting
Lady of the Lake
Quilting Guild is meet-
ing 10 a.m. Wednesday
at Teen Town, 533 NW
Desoto St. Social time
begins at 9:30 a.m. The
guild meets the fourth
Wednesday of the month.

Thursday
MOAA meeting
The Suwannee River
Valley Chapter of the
Military Officer's
Association of America
is meeting 6:30 p.m.
Thursday at the Lake
City Elk's Lodge, 259 NE
Hernando St. Retired or
former military officers
are invited. RSVP to Susan
Palmer at 697-6928 or
Vernon Lloyd at 752-4885.


"With the Ielp and support of the
Lake City Reporter, we have gained
new and repeat customers, as they
always make sure our advertising
is up to date. The Reporter staff is
always polite and courteous, and
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you for always being there for us."














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COMMUNITY CALENDAR


NOTICE OF MEETING OF AD HOC COMMITTEE
LAKE SHORE HOSPITAL AUTHORITY
*

TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN:

An Ad Hoc Committee of the Lake Shore Hospital Authority will hold a meeting
on March 23, 2011 in the conference room at the Lake Shore Hospital Authority
Administrative Complex, 259 NE Franklin Street. Lake City, Florida, beginning at
2:00p.m. The purpose of the meeting is to discuss the terms and conditions of the full
time employment contract of the Lake Shore Hospital Authority Manager.

In the event any person decides to appeal any action by the Committee with
respect to any matter relating to the meeting, a record of the proceeding may be needed
and in such event, such person may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the meeting
is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence on which the appeal is to be
based.

In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, a person needing special
accommodations or an interpreter to participate in this proceeding should contact Sue
Fraze at 386/755-1090 prior to the date of the hearing.

DATED this Ih day of March, 2011.


Print:,("/ Berry


I


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427











6A LAKE CITY REPORTER WEATHER SUNDAY, MARCH 20, 2011


THE WEATHER


ki '''


I 9


PARTLY MOSTLY MOSTLY MOSTLY CHANCE
CLOUDY SUNNY SUNNY SUNNY T-STORMS



HI 82 LO 53 HI 053 HI 83 LOS HI 84L059 HI 80L0 51


Tal ahassee
81/51
Pensacola \
77/59 Panama City
78/57


TEMPERATURES
High Spturday
Low Saturday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Saturday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


Valdosta
80/53 Jacksonville
Lake City, 76/55
82/53
Gainesville Daytona Beach
81/53 75J58
Ocala 0
Ol tl-il -


88
48
76
50
93 In 1934
32 in 1985


0.00"
1.75"
9.02"
2.66"
9.56"


City
Cape Canaveral
Daytona Beach
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Jacksonville


03/, A+ Key West
Orlando Cape Canaveral Lke City
80/59 74/63 MiamI
Tampa Naples
84/62 West Palm Beach Ocala
82/69 Orlando
FL Lauderdale Panama City
Ft Myers 82/70 0 Pensacola
86/62 Naples Tallahassee
85/63 Miami Tampa
82/68 Valdosta
Key West W. Palm Beach
80/68


Monday
73/59/pc
79/52/s
', '67/s
84/60/s
83/52/pc
81/56/s
80/70/pc
84/53/pc
80/67/s
83/62/s
84/53/pc
81/53/s
77/54/s
77/57/s
80/50/s
82/58/s
80/54/pc
80/64/s


Tuesday
78/60/pc
79/57/s
81/67/pc
85/61/s
83/55/pc
80/59/pc
79/68/pc
83/56/pc
80/67/s
82/61/s
83/55/s
83/58/s
74/58/s
76/61/s
82/55/s
81/59/s
83/54/pc
81/62/s


An exclusive
SUN
Sunrise today 7:35 a.m. service
Sunset today 7:42 p.m. brought to
Sunrise tom. 7.34 am. MWIM E our readers
Sunsettom. 7:42 p.m. 301ainbltelmn
Today's by
MOON ultraviolet The Weather
Moonrise today 9:07 p.m. radiation risk Channel.
Moonset today 7:48 a.m. for the area on
Moorrise tom. 1017 p.m. a scale from 0
Moonset torn. 8:30 a.m.



March April April April Forecasts, data and
26 3 11 17 ? ut grsphig g 2011 Wether
Last New Frst Full Central, LP, Madson, Wis.
www.weath rpublishwe.con


SNATIONAL FORECAST: A potent storm system will bring heavy rain to parts of California
today, but expect heavy snow across the Sierra Nevada and Cascades. Showers will over-
spread much of the remainder of the West as this system comes ashore. Meanwhile, look for
numerous showers and thunderstorms over the Upper Midwest, where locally heavy rain will
also be possible.

11 1 1I 1 1


Warm Front

Stationary
Front
Occluded
Front


YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL EXTREMES


Saturday Today


CITY
Albany NY
Albuquerque
Anchorage
Atlanta
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Bismarck

Boston
Buffalo
Charleston SC
Charleston WV
Charlotte
Cheyenne
Chicago
Cncinnati
Cleveland
Columbia SC
Dallas
Daytona Beach
Denver


HI/Lo/Pcp.
45/36/0
70/51/0
26/16/0
81/56/0
66/51/0
51/33/0
82/53/0
45/29/0
50/38/.02
48/40/0
37/33/0
85/61/0
60/45/0
77/51/0
60/25/0
50/28/0
58/38/0
41/34/0
85/55/0
80/64/0
85/55/0
71/34/0


HI/Lo/W
45/28/s
73/40/s
35/26/c
70/52/c
52/39/s
57/30/pc
75/57/pc
44/25/pc
58/39/c
42/29/s
47/37/pc
68/52/pc
63/49/c
61/43/c
58/33/pc
50/46/t
60/55/t
52/48/pc
63/47/c
82/63/pc
75/58/pc
69/37/pc


High: 91, Laredo, Texas Low. 60, Int'l Falls, Minn. '


Saturday Today


CITY
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Fairbanks
Greensboro
Hartford
Honolulu
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson MS
Jacksonville
Kansas City
Las Vegas
Uttle Rock
Los Angeles
Memphis
Miami
Minneapolis
Mobile
New Orleans
New York
Oklahoma City


HI/Lo/Pcp.
57/31/0
49/29/0
80/51/0
13/-4/0
72/56/0
51/44/0
77/72/.01
79/64/0
55/35/0
81/56/0
87/49/0
52/40/.20
59/52/0
67/56/0
57/53/.11
72/58/0
81/63/0
48/24/0
86/57/0
78/59/0
58/45/0
76/51/0


HI/Lo/W
68/48/t
46/41/sh
82/50/s
28/0/s
60/46/pc
46/28/s
83/72/s
81/64/s
59/54/t
85/54/pc
76/55/pc
78/58/t
64/50/pc
82/57/pc
61/51/r
82/61/pc
82/68/pc
49/36/sh
81/58/s
80/60/s
48/32/s
80/56/pc


CITY
Omaha
Orlando
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland ME
Portland OR
Raleigh
Rapid City
Reno
Richmond
Sacramento
St. Louis
Salt Lake City
San Antonio
San Diego
San Francisco
Seattle
Spokane
Tampa
Tucson
Washington


Saturday
HI/Lo/Pcp.
59/34/0
85/56/0
66/50/0
78/57/0 .
49/37/0
44/33/.12
49/36/.01
74/57/0
60/34/0
43/27/.03
68/59/.06
48/43/.27
58/42/0
54/43/0
78/65/0
63/54/0
48/45/.19
49/36/0
43/33/.06
80/62/0
77/51/0
68/52/0


Today
HI/Lo/W
68/43/t
80/59/pc
51/34/s
82/59/pc
55/43/pc
41/25/s
50/42/sh
61/43/pc
64/32/pc
53/32/sh
58/39/pc
57/44/sh
76/57/pc
58/42/c
83/65/pc
63/54/f
55/47/sh
52/40/pc
50/35/pc
84/62/pc
81/53/s-.
53/40/pc


J 7a lp'
7..nday


U


7p Mid 6ay


On this date in 1990,
the northeastern U.S.
was in the midst of a
snowstorm as spring
officially began.
Snowfall totals in the
Green Mountains of
Vermont ranged up
to 30 inches. and
up to 15 inches of
snow was reported
in the Catskills and
Adirondacks of east
ern New York Stale.


vw~a~wgwi


ket~omneded


p.! ~


INTERN~ATOA
ISaturday Today Saturday Today Satrday Todany


CITY
Acapulco
Amsterdam
Athena
Auckland
Being
Belnrn
BuenoseMAIr
Cako
Geneve
Havana

HongKo
ingiton


M/Lo/Pcp.
90/70/0
50/34/02
64/46/.02
72/59 0
59/32/0
50/36/0
79/45/0
86 59/0
54t411.ll

30/27/31,
66,55b 61
82/13/0


HI/Lo/W
87/70/pc
51/37/pc
61/50/sh
73/65/pc
58/35/pc
48/36/s
81/60/s
80/65/c
48/25/c
81/63/pc
36,'2J.c
12I66/sIt
827/O0pc


CITY
La Paz
Umrns
Loodon
Madrid
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Nairobi

New Deft
Oslo
Panama
Parws
Paris


HI/Lo/Pcp.
50/43/.07
73/64/0
54/28/0
70/37/0
79/43/0
34 25/0
34/25/M02
77/59/1.59
75/64/0
93 66/0
39/14/0
86/75/0
48/43/.14


HI/Lo/W
53/40/sh
77/65/pc
54/37/pc
68/37/s
80/49/pc
41/32/pc
41/25/c
81/63/1
80/68/pc
89/61/s
41/19/pc
92/73/1
52/32/c


CITY
Rio
Rome
St. Thomas VI
San Juan PR
Seoul

Sydney
T1 AvIv
Tokyo
Toronto
Vwenna
Wi-mw


jil/Lo/P
88/75/0
61/45/0
83/73/0
83/72/.17
82/52/0
57/39/0
88/75/1.22
73/66/0
79/55/0
64/48/C0
41/30/0
45/39/.14
37/32/.07


KE 1 CONDMfIONS; i0 "--i3;1l 1.-> n:. (-1.11 i-l.g IIj.-' ,,i r "I.' l,i dI'u-1, r-1ain, s-sunny.
an-rnr. -hih indrr s .n-midy ,. -


NO-Closing-Cost Mortgage' from CAMPUS.


As

as


APR'


FIXED RATE


* No points or origination fees


Typical Closing Costs
on a $250,000 Mortgage


$4,741


* For purchase or refinance


* Ask us about discounted closing 0 Loans with as little as 10% down
costs on construction loans available at slightly higher rates


4


CAMPUS Closing Costs
on a $250,000 Mortgage


No Costt


CAMPUS


AUSA
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Call 754-9088 and pre .s 7 or apply online at campuscu.com today!

Membership is open to everyone in Alachua, Clay, Columbia, Lak,, Marion and Sunmcr counties!
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E2ENOEt

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LaeCt 13S aso ori r 'vle-E.Cmu610 W5t vW.Cm u 10 W34hSJoevle 0 W14t orac HnersW l 51 W1,dSToe qar'7SMV7t t
Shands at UF Ro m -1- 1 Spring i ICo mo s I20 N 39h ve ,Oal 397 WCle eR Es cl 4 4E ivrS rnsBv W s aro 1 5S 3dC tr d un efed1 90O w ,4


I l I


p. HI/Lo/W
D 90/73/pc
I 59/45/pc
I 79/72/sh
80/73/sh
I 84/54/s
I 55/39/sh
86/76/t
) 75/69/sh
I 74/59/c
62/51/pc
I 40/34/pc
S 45/32/pc
45/30/c


.nlag* i --1-h mmah'1 nk


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


[Ir i LAK -'JE C ITY ALMANAC


sH IY-i3ZKHOUR









Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421


Lake City Reporter





SPORTS


Sunday, March 20, 2011


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


GAMES
Monday
Columbia High
boys tennis vs. Eastside
High at Jonesville Tennis
Center, 3:30 p.m.
Fort White High
weightlifting vs. Hamilton
County High, Chiefland
High, 4 p.m.
Tuesday
Columbia High girls
tennis vs. Gainesville
High, 3 p.m.
Fort White High track
at Santa Fe High, 4 p.m.
Fort White High'
softball at Newberry High,
6 p.m.
Columbia High
softball vs. Gainesville
High, 7 p.m. (JV-5)
Columbia High
baseball at Santa Fe
High, 7 p.m.
Fort White High
baseball at Hamilton
County High, 7 p.m.
Wednesday
Columbia High
weightlifting at Baker
County High, 4 p.m.
Thursday
Columbia High
tennis vs.' Vanguard
'High at Jonesville Tennis
Center, 3:30 p.m.
Columbia High
softball at P.K. Yonge
School, 6 p.m.
Fort White High
softball at Hamilton Cty.
High, 7 p.m. (JV-5)
Friday
Columbia High
baseball vs. Ed White
High, 6 p.m.
Fort White High
softball vs. Oak Hall
School, 6 p.m.


FIGHT

Gym members
endure boot
camp for fitness.
By BRANDON RNLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.comn
Mike lik. ,""
Morrison 1
and Ben
Miller are
trying to
help Lake City fight the
war against fat
As part of the American
Family Fitness Center, the
two trainers are conducting -.
a six-week boot camp to
help members and non-
members sweat into shape.
The hour-long program
combines a mixture of
exercises throughout
the workout to help
participants maximize their
fat-burning efforts:
A normal boot camp
begins with five minutes of
stretching and 10 minutes
of calisthenics. That's
when the fun begins.
From push-ups to power
knees, the group kicks
their workout into high Jonathan Morgan
gear. It's not uncommon Thursday.
for members of the boot
camp to start sweating through runs, spi
during the stretching relays. The cardiac
exercises. Most of them of the exercises s
were by the end of suicide take their toll fror
jumps, log-carry drills to
The fun doesn't stop flipping, there's n
there. During the next 10 for a breather. At
minutes groups will go point, members a


AGAINST


FAT


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
gets low while performing power squats during the American Family Fitness Center's Boot Camp on


rints and ,we.tling their butts off.
o portion "Over the first week
start to people avcragctd losing
m between four and five
Satire percent body fat," Miller
no room said.
this The program runs three
are literally times per week, and the


trainers can already notice
a huge difference after the
second week.
Amanda Manske, one of
the personal trainers, noted
that the ahlount of fat and
weight lost depended on
the individual.


"It's hard to guestimate,
and depends on the
person." she said. "We
have seen some lose as
many as 10 pounds."
Of course, it's not all
CAMP continued on 3B









Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


2B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, MARCH 20, 2011


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
AUTO RACING
12:30 p.m.
FOX NASCAR, Sprint Cup, Jeff
Byrd 500, at Bristol,Tenn.
GOLF
9 a.m.
TGC European PGA Tour, Sicilian
Open, final round, at Ragusa, Sicily
3 p.m.
NBC PGA Tour, Transitions
Championship, final round, at Tampa
7 p.m.
TGC LPGA Founders Cup, final
round, at Phoenix
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
4 p.m.
WGN Preseason, Chicago White
Sox vs. L.A. Dodgers, at GlendaleAriz.
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
II a.m.
ESPN NIT, second round, Wichita
State at Virginia Tech
Noon
CBS NCAA Division I tournament,
third round, tripleheader, at Charlotte,
N.C.; Cleveland; Chicago; or Tulsa, Okla.
6 p.m.
TNT NCAA Qivislon I
tournament, third round, doubleheader
7 p.m.
TBS NCAA Division I tournament.
third round, doubleheader
7:30 p.m.
TRUTV NCAA Division I
tournament, third round
MOTORSPORTS
3 p.m.
SPEED MotoGP World
Championship, at Doha. Qatar
NHL HOCKEY
12:30 p.m.
NBC N.Y. Rangers it Pittsburgh
TENNIS
2 p.m.
ABC ATP/WTA Tour. BNP Paribas
Open, men's & women's championship
matches, at Indian Wells, Calif.
WOMEN'S COLLEGE
BASKETBALL
Noon
ESPN2 NCAA Division I
tournament. first round. Gardner-Webb
vs. Miami at Charlottesville.Va.;Vanderbilt
vs. Louisville at Cincinnati; St. Francis, Pa.
at Maryland; Hartford at Connecticut
2:30 p.m.
ESPN2 NCAA Division I
tournament, first round, James Madison
vs. Oklahoma at Charlottesville, Va.;
South Dakota St. at Xavier; Princeton vs.
Georgetown at College Park. Md.; Purdue
vs. Kansas St. at Storrs,. Conn.
5 p.m.
ESPN2 NCAA Division I
tournament, first round. Samford vs.
Florida State at Auburn. Ala.; McNeese
State vs. Texas A&M at Shreveport. La.;
Virginia vs. Houston at Waco, Texas;
Arkansas-Little Rock vs.Wlsconsin-Green
Bay at Wichita.Kan.
7:30 p.m.
ESPN2 NCAA Division I
tournament, first round. Middle Tennessee
vs. Georgia at Auburn.Ala.; Louisiana Tech
vs. Rutgers at Shreveport, La.; PrairieVlew
at Baylor; Northern Iowa vs. MIchgan St.
atWichita. Kan.

Monday
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
I p.m.
ESPN Preseason. Boston vs.
Philadelphia. at Clearwater
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
7 p.m.
ESPN NIT, second round, Missouri
State at Miami
9 p.m.
ESPN NIT, second round. New
Mexico at Alabama
11 .30 p.m.
ESPN2 NIT, second round.
Oklahoma State at Washington State
NHL HOCKEY
7-JO p.m.
VERSUS Pittsburgh at Detroit
WOMEN'S COLLEGE
BASKETBALL
7 p.m.
ESPN2 NCAA Division I
tournament, second round, teams to be
determined
9 p.m.
ESPN2 NCAA Division I
tournament, second round

BASKETBALL

NBA schedule

Saturday's Games
LA. Clippers 100, Cleveland 92
Denver at Miami (n)
Indiana at Memphis (n)
Boston at New Odrleans (n)
Charlotte at San Antonio (n)
Philadelphia at Portland (n)
Today's Games
NewJersey at Washington, I p.m.
Detroit at Atlanta, 2 p.m.
New York at Milwaukee, 3 p.m.
Phoenix at LA. Clippers, 3:30 p.m.
Sacramento at Minnesota, 3:30 p.m.
Utah at Houston, 7 p.m.
Toronto at Oklahoma City, 7 p.m.
Golden State at Dallas, 7:30 p.m.
Portland at LA. Lakers, 9:30 p.m.
Monday's Games
Orlando at Cleveland, 7 p.m.
Indiana at New Jersey, 7 p.m.
Boston at NewYork, 7:30 p.m.
Sacramento at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Utah at Memphis, 8 p.m.
Golden State at San Antonio, 8:30 p.m.
Toronto at Denver, 9 p.m.

NCAA tournament

S EAST REGIONAL
Second Round


Friday
North Carolina 102, LIU 87
Washington 68, Georgia 65
George Mason 61,Vllanova 57
Ohio State 75.Texas-San Antonio 46
Marquette 66, Xavier 55
Syracuse 77, Indiana State 60)
Third Round
Saturday
Kentucky 71,West Virginia 63
Today
North Carolina (27-7) vs.Washington
(24-10), 12:15 p.m.


Ohio State (33-2) vs. George Mason
(27-6), 5:15 p.m.
Syracuse (27-7) vs. Marquette (21-14),
7:45 p.m.
SOUTHEAST REGIONAL
Third Round
Saturday
Florida vs. UCLA
Pittsburgh vs. Butler (n)
BYU vs. Gonzaga (n)
Kansas State vs.Wisconsin (n)
SOUTHWEST REGIONAL
Second Round
Friday
Notre Dame 69,Akron 56
Florida State 57,Texas A&M 50
Purdue 65, St. Peter's 43
Va. Commonwealth 74; G'rgetown 56
Kansas 72, Boston University 53
Illinois 73, UNLV 62
Third Round
Saturday
Morehead State vs. Richmond
Today
Purdue (26-7) vs. Virginia
Commonwealth (25-11),7:10 p.m.
Kansas (33-2) vs. Illinois (20-13),
8:40 p.m.
Notre Dame (27-6) vs. Florida
State (22-10), 9:40 p.m.
WEST REGIONAL
Second Round
Friday
Texas 85, Oakland, Mich. 81
Arizona 77, Memphis 75
Michigan 75,Tennessee 45
Duke 87, Hampton 45
Third Round
Saturday
San Diego State vs.Temple (n)
Connecticut vs. Cincinnati (n)
Today


Duke (31-4)
2:45 p.m.
Texas (28-7)
6:10 p.m.


vs. Michigan (21-13),

vs. Arizona (28-7),


NIT

Second Round
Friday
Colorado 89, California 72
Saturday
Northwestern 85, Boston College 67
College of Charleston 64. Cleveland
State 56
Today
Wichita Sate (25-8) at Virginia Tech
(22-11),. I a.m.
Kent State (24-1 I) at Fairfield (25-7).
12-30 p.m.
Monday
Missouri State (27 6) at Miami
(20-14),7 p.m.
New Mexlco (22-12) at Alabama
(22-11I).9 p.m.
Oklahonma State (20-13) atWashington
Sate (20-12). 11:30 p.m

Women's NCAA

PHILADELPHIA REdIONAL
First Round
Saturday
Penn State 75.vs Dayton 66
DePaul 56. Navy 43
Mann 74. iowa State 64
Duke 90.Tennetsee-Marun 45
Today
Connectckut (32-1) vs Hartford
(17-.15). 12.)OS p.m.
Kansas State (21.10) vs. Purdue
(20-I ). 30 minutes following
Maryland (23-7) vs. St. Francis, a.
(22-I I). 1220 prn.
Georgetown (22.10) vs. Princeton
(24-4).30 minutes following
DAYTON REGIONAL
First Round
Saturday
Tennessee 99. Steaon 34
Maiquett 68.Texas 65
GeorgiaTech 69. Bowling Green 58
Ohio State 80. UCF 69
Arizona State vs.Temple (n)
Notre Dame vs.L Utah (n)
Today
Miami (27-4) vs. GardnesWebVb
(23-10), 12:15 p.m.
Oldahoma (21-11) vs. James Madison
(26-7). 30 minutes foaow*(
SPOKANE REGIONAL
First Round

Texas Tch vs. St. John's (n)
Stanford UC Davis (n)
North Carolina vs. Fresno State (n)
Kentucky vs Hampton (n)
Iowa vs. Gonzap (n)
UCLA vs. Montana (n)
Today
Louisville (20-12) vs. Vanderbilt
(20-11 ). 12:10 p.m.
Xavier (28-2) vs. South Dakota State
(19-13). 30 minutes following
DALLAS REGIONAL
First Round
Today
Houston (26-5) vs. West Virginia
(23-9)., 5:10 p.m.
Baylor (31-2) vs. Prairie View (21 11).
30 minutes following
Wisconsin-Green Bay (32-1) vs.
Arkansas-Uttle Rock (23-7), 5:20 p.m.
Michigan State (26-5) vs. Northern
Iowa (27-5), 30 minutes following
Florida State (23-7) vs. Samford
(25-7), 5:15 p.m.
Georgia (21-10) vs. Middle Tennessee
(23-7)., 30 minutes following
Texas A&M (27-5) vs. McNese State
(26-6), 5:05 p.m.
Rutgers (19-12) vs. Louisiana Tech
(24-7), 30 minutes following

Women's NIT

Second Round
Saturday
Toledo 67,Auburn 52
Boston College 86 St. Joseph's 59
Utah State at BYU (n)
Duquesne at Kansas (n)
Today
Charlotte (24-9) at South Carolina
(18-14),2 p.m.
Illinois State (21-10) at Wisconsin
(16-14), 2 p.m.
Arkanias (20-11) at Missouri State
(24-10), 3 p.m.
Alabama (17-14) at Northwestern
(19-13), 3 p.m.
Virginia (17-15) at Loyola-Maryland
(21-12),4 p.m.
Southern Cal (20-12) vs. Nevada
(22-10), 5 p.m.
Monday
St. Bonaventure (21-11) vs. Syracuse
(23-9), 7 p.m.
Eastern Michigan (23-12) vs. UNC


Wilmington (24-8), 7 p.m.
Florida (19-14) at Florida Gulf
Coast (28-3), 7:05 p.m.
Tulane (23-10) at Oral Roberts
(22-10), 8 p.m.
Oklahoma State (17-14) at Wyomlng
(23-8), 9 p.m. :
California (18-15) at Colorado
(16-15),9 p.m.,

BASEBALL

Spring training

Today's Games
N.Y. Yankees vs. Philadelphia at
Clearwater, 1:05 p.m.
Minnesota vs. Toronto at Dunedin,
1:05 p.m.
Houston (ss) vs.Atlanta at Kissimmee,
1:05 p.m.
St. Louis vs. Boston at Fort Myers.
1:05 p.m.
Baltimore vs. Tampa Bay at Port
Charlotte, 1:05 p.m.
N.Y. Mets vs. Florida at Jupiter,
1:05 p.m.
Pittsburgh .vs. Houston (ss) at
KIsslmmee, 1:05 p.m.
Detroit vs. Washington at Viera,
1:05 p.m.
Texas vs. Kansas City at Surprise,Arlz.,
4:05 p.m.
Monday's Games
Washington vs. St. Louis at Jupiter,
1:05 p.m.
Minnesota vs. Pittsburgh at Bradenton,
1:05 p.m.
Detroit vs. Houston at Kissimmee,
1:05 p.m.
Boston vs. Philadelphia at Clearwater,
1:05 p.m.
Atlanta vs. N.Y. Mets at Port St. Luceia,
1:10 p.m.
Texas vs. Milwaukee at Phoenix,
4:05 p.m.
N.Y. Yankees vs. Tampa Bay at Port
Charlotte, 7:05 p.m.

AUTO RACING

Jeff Byrd 500 qualifying

At Bristol Motor Speedway
Bristol.TeAn.
Friday qualifying; race today
(Car number in parentheses)
1. (99) Carl Edwards. Ford. 128.014
mph.
2. (16) Greg Biffle. Ford. 127.622.
3. (78) Regan Smith. Chevrolet.
127.58.
4. (27) Paul Menard. Chevrolet.
127r537.
5 (6) David Ragan., Ford. 127.453
6 (48) Jimmle Johnson. Chevrolet.
127.419.
7. (24) Jeff Gordon. Chevrolet.
127.275.
8 (56) Martin Truex Jr. Toyota.
127,039
9, (5) Mark Martn, Chevrolet.
127,006
10 (4) Kasey Kahne.Toyota. 126 947
11 (17) Matt Kn aset. Ford. 126 896
12. (18) Kyle Butch.Toyota. 126 88
13 (14) Tony Stewart. Chevrolet.
126.829.
14. (9) Marcos Ambrose. Ford.
126.813.
15. (29) Kevin Harvick. Chevrolet
126.653.
16. (47) Bobby Labonte. Toyota.
126.637.
17. (31) Jeff Burton. Chevrolet.
126.478.
18. (20) Joey LopnoToyota. 126.478
19. (21) Trvor Beyne. Ford. 126.453.
20. (22) Kurt Busch. Dodge. 126,395
21. (39) Ryan Newman. Chevrolet.
126.395.
22. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr. Ch, rot
126.312.
23. (2) Brad Kaselowskl. Dodge.
126.112.
24. (I) Jamie McMurra~y Chevrolet.
126.104.
25. (II) Denny Hamliin. Toyota.
126.079.
26. (00) David Reutimrnn, Toyota.
126.005.
27. (33) Clint Bowyer, Chevrolet.
125.963.
28. (43) A J Allmendinger. Ford.
125.765.
29. (34) David Gilliland. Ford. 125.757.
30. (83) Brian Vicker.Toyota. 125.609.
31. (09) Bill Elliott. Chevrolet.
125.207.
32. (60) Landon Cassill. Toyota.
125.117.
33. (7) Robby Gordon. Dodge.
124,832.
34. (87) Joe Namechek. Toyota,
124.484.
35. (38) Travis Kvapl, Ford. 124.307.
36. (42) Juan Pablo Montoya.Chevrolet.
124.299.
37. (36) Dave Blaney. Chevrolet,
124.098.
38. (46) J.j.Yeley. Chevrolet, 124.01.
39. (66) Michael McDowell, Toyota,
123.994.
40. (92) Dennis Setzer, Dodge,
123.277.
4 1. (37) Tony Raines. Ford, 122.874.
42. (71) Andy Lally, Chevrolet, owner
points.
43. (13) Casey Mears.Toyota, 122.921.
Felled to Qualify
44. (32) Ken Schrader, Ford, 122.529.

HOCKEY

NHL schedule

Saturday's Games
Columbus 5, Minnesota 4, OT
Atlanta at Buffalo (n)
Boston at Toronto (n)
Tampa Bay at Ottawa (n)
N.Y. Islanders at Florida (n)
Detroit at Nashville (n)


Philadelphia at Dallas (n)
Colorado at Edmonton (n)
Anaheim at Los Angeles (n)
St. Louis at San Jose (n)
Today's Games
N.Y. Rangers at Pittsburgh, 12:30 p.m.
Nashville at Buffalo, 5 p.m.
New Jersey at Columbus, 5 p.m.
Montreal at Minnesota, 6 p.m.
Chicago at Phoenix, 8 p.m.
Calgary at Anaheim, 8 p.m.
Monday's Games
Pittsburgh at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Calgary at Los Angeles, 10:30 p.m.


Bristol drivers thrown


curveball with tire change


By JENNA FRYER
Associated Press

BRISTOL, Tenn. Carl
Edwards had every rea-
son to believe he had one
of the best cars at Bristol
Motor Speedway.
Then Goodyear called
for a rare tire change in
the middle of a race week-
end, sending every team
back to square one in their
preparations for Sunday's
race.
'"The tire is a lot slower
and it's going to be a little
more difficult to drive,"
said Edwards, who is on
the pole. "It's a challenge
for everybody."
Goodyear learned there
was a problem Friday
when the tires did not
lay enough rubber on the
track surface. The right-
side tires were subjected
to considerable wear and
lasted only about 30 laps
before they began to dis-
integrate into a powdery
substance.
So Goodyear called for
nearly 1,300 right-side
tires to be shipped to Bristol
from North Carolina, and
they arrived in time for
Saturday's practice. Teams
were given only one set to
use over the two practice
sessions.
"It's'not an optimal situ-
ation for anybody," four-
time series champion Jeff
Gordon said. "I feel like
Goodyear is responding
quickly and has created a
safer environment for tis.
But anytime you change
the tire the second day into
the weekend, it's going to
be a pretty major change.
And it has been. The car
balance is completely dif-
ferent, the grip level is
completely different."
The tire now being used
was raced at California and
Kansas last year, and has
the same outer tra(ld ;is
the tire raced at Bristol last
August. But there was no
testing data on the tires for
use at Bristol, and teams
need that information to
properly set the handling
of the car.
How were teams
preparing?


1 1
5
8

11

12 I

14 E
15

17 I
18 (

19 I


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Crews work on cars after practice for the NASCAR Sprint
Cup Series Jeff Byrd 500 race at Bristol Motor Speedway
Friday in Bristol, Tenn.


"A lot of reading and a
little bit of guessing," said
Greg Erwin, crew chief
for Greg Biffle. "The car
doesn't drive anything
like it did most of the 'day
(Friday)."
Biffle qualified his Ford
second behind his Roush
Fenway Racing teammate,
but didn't get much work in
Saturday because of a flat
in one of the new right-side
tires. Since tennis had only
one set to use, he wasn't
able to finish the practice.
"We ran over something
and we only got one set of
tires, so there's nothing we
can do about it." Biffle said.
"We got a flat so unfortu-
nately we didn't get a fair
shake at it like everybody
else."
But it's not as if Biffle
or anyone else could
even measure themselves
against the competition.
Although speeds were
registered Tony Stewart
was fastest in the first prac-


ACROSS 41 Comic-strip
mutants
Trick (hyph.)
Balloon sound 43 Business degs.
Playback 45 It makes jelly
machine jell
Andy's radio 47 P.D. exams
pal 50 Fortune 500
From square abbr.
one 51 Morning per-
Before son(2 wds.)
Where quakes 54 Cote murmur
originate 55 Uprising
PBS founder 56 Jazzy James
Concrete foun- 57 Whichever
nations 58 Fleur-de- -
Picked up 59 Pencil point


21 Is worth It
23 Job
24 Stodgy one
27 Centurion's
road
29 Gold, in Peru
30 More unsettled
34 Drill
37 Munched on
38 Port near
Mauna Loa
39 Winery's need


DOWN


"Norma -"
Foul callers


tice, Mark Martin paced
the second nobody knew
for certain who was using
which tires. It's believed
most teams saved the new
tires for the final practice
session. But how long they
used them and during
which portion of the hour-
long session was not that
easy to figure.
'That new tire, at very
best, is probably three- or
four-tenths a lap slower,"
Erwin said.
Gordon said the speed
was (own enough to "get
your attention, and not
make you very happy.
"But once we get out
there and we're all the
same it took me a little
while to understand I just
needed to slow the car
down because the grip had
changed. Once I did that,
I thought we were pretty
good against the compe-
tition. Probably even bet-
ter than we were with the
other tire."


Answer to Previous Puzzle










BAZAAR DT IL
STINGS TIDE







CHEEPS OUEL
A IASPENT SNAE
AV RS E G ODII VIA
PES ROT EjL




BAZAAR D ETA11
S I NGS I NSIIDIE
0OK E L G E TIAI
ASCENDS
SAW POI AIDDS
P AE L LA T IN IER
CHEEPS YOK ELS
ASPEN NAME


Erosion loss
Go on the lam 9 Stream
Bright flower 10 Library slogan
Sudbury's 13 Journalist
prov. 16 Online auction
Rind 20 Old MacDonald's
Jacket features place


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


22 TV fare
24 Popinjay
25 Ex-Bruin
Bobby
26 - few
rounds
28 Finger oppo-
site
30 RSVP word
31 Holm or
Woosnam
32 Riviera sum-
mer
33 Thing, in law
35 Guitarist
Atkins
36 Smaller
39 Change
40 Ms. Sanford of
TV
41 Kin of argon
and neon
42 The real -
44 Fabric rolls
45 Bigger than
elite
46 Wield a 1am-
mer
48 Lo-cal
49 MIle. in
Barcelona
52 Vive le -!
53 Male parent


3-21 (c 2011 bv 1I S, Inc.


SCOREBOARD









LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, MARCH 20, 2011


League reports
Results of Lake City Bowl league
play follow.
WATERGUARD
High scratch game: 1. Mary
Lobaugh 214; 2. Marty Sanders 195;
3. Susie Flick 189. 1. Bill Price 266;
2, (tie) Bill Dolly, Zech Strohl 264;
4. Tom Sewejkis 238.
High scratch series: 1. Mary
Lobaugh 595; 2. Joyce Hooper 526;
3. Susie Flick 511. 1. Zech Strohl 736;
2. Willie Frazier 723; 3. Tom Sewejkis
669.
High handicap game: 1. Marty
Sanders 250; 2. Amanda Meng 238;
3. Dani Fair 234. 1. Bill Dolly 280;
2. Bill Price 266; 3. (tie) Mark Davis,
Scott Thompson 246.
High handicap series: 1. Joyce
Hooper 670; 2. Mary Lobaugh 664; 3.
Susie Flick 649. 1. Willie Frazier 810; 2.
Zech Strohl 748; 3. Tom Sewejkis 699.
High average: 1. Mary Lobaugh
182. 1. Zech Strohl 207.
(results from March 8)
SEXY SENIORS
Team standings: 1. Farmers (73-
43); 2. Perky Pals (72.5-43.5); 3. Pin
Droppers (62-54).
High scratch game: 1. Bea Purdy
181; 2. Diane Madison 177;.3, Amy
Musselwhite 170. 1. Dan Ritter 204; 2.
(tie) Ross Meyers, Earl Hayward 190.
High scratch series: 1, Bea Purdy
481; 2. Diane Madison 464; 3. Amy
Musselwhite 462. 1. Earl Hayward
529; 2. Dan Ritter 515; 3. Jim Connors
506.
High handicap game: 1. Sabrina
Herbster 240; 2. Bea Purdy 234; 3.
Janet Nash 219. 1. Wendel Shay 235;
2. Dan Ritter 227; 3. John Quinn 225.
High handicap series: 1. Ruth
Lott 641; 2. Amy Musselwhite 627;
3. Barbara Croft 626. 1. Earl Hayward
607; 2. Morrell Atwood 600;" 3. Jim
Hawkins 599.
High average: 1. Betty Brown
147.85; 2. Louise Atwood 146.63; 3.
Yvonne Finley 146.18. 1. Dan Ritter
174.75; 2. Earl Hayward 171.27; 3. Art
Joubert 170.83.
(results from March 8)
GOLDEN ROLLERS
Team standings: 1. Golden Niners
(67-41); 2. Gamblers (63-45); 3. Wild
Things (58.5-49.5).
High handicap game: 1. Louise
Atwood 247; 2. Vy Ritter 237; 3. Joyce
Hooper 232. 1. Dan Ritter 227; 2. Sal


Annello 225; 3. Bill Dolly 222.
High handicap series: 1. Betty
Carmlchael 652; 2. Shirley Highsmith
650; 3. Dee Dee Young 635. 1. Ross
Meyers 640; 2. (tie) Sandy Sanders,
Bill Price 628.
High average: 1. Shirley Highsmlth
156.21; 2. Elaine Nemeth 151.47; 3.
Betty Carmichael 151.43. 1. David
Duncan 188.75; 2. Bill Dolly 184.12; 3.
George Mulllgan 181.24.
(results from March 3)
HIT & MISS.
Team standings: 1. The
Sandbaggers (25-11); 2. Alley Oops
(23-13); 3. Spare Us (22-14).
High handicap game: 1. Pat Warne
219; 2. Karen Clampett 217; 3. Linda
Herndon 214.
High handicap series: 1. Karen
Clampett 620; 2. Rose Brown 617; 3.
Susan Mears 606.
(results from March 8)
SUNDAY NITE MERCHANTS
Team standings: 1. TAZ (28.5-11.5);
2. Grady's Automotive (23.5-16.5); 3.
Spare Us (23-17).
High scratch game: 1. Norma
Yeingst 200; 2. Norma Yeingst 195; 3.
Donna Duncan 172. 1. Bobby Trunnell
255; 2. Joe Cohrs 254; 3. Bill Duncan
234.
High scratch series: 1. Norma
Yelngst 563; 2. Linda Sutton 481; 3.
Gloria Dennis 460. 1. Bobby Trunnell
679; 2. Joe Cohrs 674; 3. Bill Duncan
652,
(results from March 13)
TGIF
Team standings: 1. The Pacers (27-
9); 2. Strike Zone (26-10); 3. Waterbury
Builders (23-13).
High scratch game: 1. Ida
Hollingsworth 235; 2. Shannon Brown
226; 3. Jennifer Freeman 204. 1. Dale
Coleman 255; 2. Rich Madden 245; 3.
(tie) Zech'Strohl, Wally Howard 236.
High scratch series: 1. Ida
Hollingsworth 596; 2. Shannon Brown
559; 3. Pat Galegos 552. 1. Rich
Madden 681 ; 2. Wally Howard 660; 3.
Dale Coleman 657.
High handicap game: 1. (tie) Ida
Hollingsworth, Jennifer Freeman 261;
3. Katie Catlett 249. 1. John Stem
267; 2. Rich Madden 260; 3. Joe
Ganser 259.
High handicap series: 1. Jennifer
Freeman 702; 2. Chi Snipes 684; 3.
Roberta Stem 675. 1. John Stem
728; 2. Rich Madden 726; 3. Wally
Howard 678.
(results from March 11)


Women's handgun safety


From staff reports

The 2011 Women's
Handgun Safety Day is
10 a.m. to 3 p.m. April 9 at
the Osceola Rifle and Pistol
Range.
Participants are urged to
bring their own handgun
with ammunition; hand-
guns will be provided for
those who do not own one.
Attendees will receive a
certificate of participation,


which can be used to sat-
isfy the safety class require-
ment to obtain a Florida
concealed weapons permit.
Cost is a $5 donation to
the Friends of the Osceola
and one box of ammunition,
either .38 special or 9nunm.
Lunch will be provided.
Call the FWC regional
office at 754-1051. Ext.
125) to register or e-mail
Karen. Little@MyFWC. com.
Registration is limited.


Happ9 Birthday Brinna
A special irl frorm thevery start.
Always know I love you with all my heart.


Call today to place an
Invitation ad for your
child, grandchild,
God child or anyone
you think Ie e
something extra on
their special dayl


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.


Call

755.5440 or

755.5441
between 8am & 4pm


61Deadline:
Ads have to be placed by 4prn, 3-days prior
to appearance in the Lake City Reporter.


BOWLING


Chlwfo


Chevron
Oil
Jobber


CAMP
Continued From Page 1B
about the boot camp.
Nutrition played a key
role on how
each individual was
affected.
"It's about 50 percent
of it," Morrison said.
"We're not a nutrition
center so we have to be
vague in suggestions.
We tell them what food
groups are good to
combine."
Morrison maintained
that the program is
for everyone from the
physically fit to the couch
potato.
"This program is for
anybody that wants to
lose weight or tone. It's Lake
for anyone that wants to patina
be healthy," He said. Duck!




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SHOWERS



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Subscriber: 1 1 Yes 1 1 No
Deadline is Wednesday, March 23rd, 2011 at 5:00 p.m.
Find all 25 of the 'Spring' mlated words hidden in the word search above.
CALL JUNK JOE I Words can be found In the banners on the ads shown here. Complete the
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THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek


Helping Dream Comnr True
Onir Smile aI( n Tnre


MARSEE FLINN
A professional limited liability company
Attorneys at Law
J. Daniel Marsee
Certified Family Law Mediator

Location
359 N.W. DeSoto Street
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Phone: (386) 758-2080

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to form the surprise answer, as
Suggested by the above cartoon.

Ans:
(Answers tomorrow)
Salurday'i Jumbles: PIECE TRUTH RADIAL TYCOON
Annwor: Whal the math toachor did when he wrecked
his car HE TOTALED IT


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JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
City resident Frederic Ducksworth, 42, powers through a tire-flipping drill while partici-
g in a boot camp at American Family Fitness Center Thursday. 'This feels good to me,'
worth said. 'I hadn't had any exercise irf 14 years. It's hard but good.'


ENTRY FORM

Name:

Phone Number:____
Address:


City, FL by Wednesday, March 23rd 5:00pm, for your chance to winil

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LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, MARCH 20, 2011 Page EdItor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


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ASSOCIATED PRESS
Florida guard Erving Walker (11) goes to the basket against UCLA during a Southeast
regional third-round NCAA college basketball game Saturday in Tampa. Walker scored 21
points in Florida's 73-65 win.


Walker stands tall,


Gators beat UCLA


Shortest ER

Wait Times in Town


Text ER


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to 23.Q0 for Average ER Wait Times


FI AS ARV "JME UNTIL SEEN BY QUAUMED MEDICAL PROFE


Associated Press
TAMPA Florida's
little man Erving Walker
came up big again, scoring
21 points and hitting sev-
eral clutch shots down the
stretch as the Gators beat
UCLA 73-65 in the NCAA
tournament Saturday.
Walker scored 10 of
his team's final 12 points,
including four free throws
in the final 33 seconds. His
most significant basket was
a 3-pointer with about a min-
ute remaining. That shot
gave the second-seeded
Gators (28-7) a 69-65 lead
and forced the No. 7 seed
Bruins (23-11) into despera-
tion mode.
UCLA wasted chances
from the free-throw line,
much like it did Thursday
against Michigan State.
The Bruins survived that


one. They had no such luck
against Florida.
Kenny Boynton added
12 points and five assists
for the Gators. Alex Tyus
chipped in eight points and
a season-high 13 rebounds,
Josh Smith and Reeves
Nelson led UCLA with 16
points apiece.
Kentucky 71, West
Virginia 63
TAMPA, Freshman
Brandon Knight scored a
career-high 30 points and
Josh Harrellson delivered
eight of his 15 during a
pivotal stretch of the sec-
ond half, helping fourth-
seeded Kentucky beat No.
5 seed West Virginia 71-63
in the NCAA tournament
Saturday.
Knight made six free
throws in the final min-


ute as the Wildcats (27-8)
pulled away to advance to
East regional semifinals
against either No. 1 seed
Ohio State or eighth-seeded
George Mason. It's the sec-
ond trip to the round of 16
in as many seasons under
coach John Calipari.
Richmond 65,
Morehead State 48
DENVER Justin
Harper scored 19 points
and Kevin Anderson added
14, hl'lping 12tli-sveded
Richmond advance to the
round of 16 for the first
time since 1988 with a 65-18
win over No. 13 Morehead
State on Saturday.
The Spiders (29-7) will
play the winner of Kansas-
Illinois in the Southwest
regional semifinals next
Fridtla in San Antonio.


Need a physician referral or have a health
question? Speak to a Registered Nurse.

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SPORTS SUNDAY, MARCH 20, 2011


LAKE CITY REPORTER


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


e ee'S,
2,:8 w,$ U* av#Atg frd"Applb


SSIONAL






Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

Contact
C.J. Risak
Assistant editor
754-0427
crisak@aikecityreportet:com


BUSINESS


Sunday, March 20,2011


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section C


Cooking School to serve up tasty delights


Will feature 10 recipes
cooked by a professional,
from entrees to desserts.


By LEANNE TYO
ltyo@lakecityreporter.com

Members of
the com-
munity will
get a pro-
fessional
cooking demonstration
they can see, with a hand-
ful of prize giveaways at
this year's 2011 Taste of
Home Cooking School, set
to take place April 12.
The cooking school
will provide guests with a
live, professional cooking
demonstration featuring
10 recipes that range from
breakfast foods and snacks
to main entrees and des-
serts, said Josh Blackmon,
Lake City Reporter creative
designer and event coordi-
nator.
"This event in particular
and events like it are a
great opportunity for peo-
ple to get out of the house,
have fun and experience
a sense of camaraderie,"
he said. "It's always fun to
find new recipes or share
recipes with other people."
Delectable delights such
as berry puff pancakes,
hot cheesy mushroom dip
and mango-basil chicken
and rice salad will be pre-
pared and made on stage
by Michelle Roberts, a
Taste of Home culinary
specialist.
"The recipes this year


are fantastic," Blackmon
said. "They're not your
normal pot pie or sand-
wiches. These are really
interesting and fun recipes
that will liven up any week-
day meal."
For the audience's "bet-
ter viewing," Roberts' dem-
onstration will be shown
on six big-screen TVs pro-
vided by Buddy's Home
Furnishings, Blackmon
said.
"We have listened to
our audience and we are
providing more TVs for
better viewing of the dem-
onstration to make this as
enjoyable as we can for
everyone there," he said.
Food for the event's
demonstration will be pro-
vided by Publix and the
show's appliances will be
furnished by Lowe's.
Prize giveaways, from
local businesses and the
cooking school's national
sponsors, will be part of
the event, Blackmon said.
Larger prizes include a gas
grill from Sears and cook-
ware sets compliments of
JCPenney and Belk.
"We are very excited
this year to have some
major prizes like nothing
we've given away before,"
Blackmon said.
People can win those
prizes simply "by showing
up," he said, and filling out
the information on their


Left: Taste of Home
Cooking School chef
Michelle Roberts
adds green peppers
to a zesty penne
dish she made at
a demonstration
last year at Florida
Gateway College.

Below: More than
600 residents
attended the event,
during which
Roberts made dish-
es including aspara-
gus tomato salad,
orange chocolate
tart and angel hair
pasta with chicken
and artichokes.

FILE PHOTOS


tickets to enter in the priz-
es' random drawings.
The Lake City Reporter
will also give out reusable,
cloth shopping bags filled
with coupons and gift
certificates from local and
national businesses and a
Taste of Home magazine
to every cookiniig school
guest.
Local businesses will
set up vendor booths prior
to the event, some with
food samples, for guests to
peruse.
The cooking school is
sponsored by the Lake
City Reporter and Florida .
Gateway College It will be
April 12 at FGC's Howard W
Conference Center. Event
doors will open at 5 p.m. 1. .


SCHOOL contiiuedon 2C


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LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS & HOME SUNDAY, MARCH 20, 2011


On Tax Efficiency
Q Does a mutual fund's tax effi-
ciency matter in tax-deferred
accounts? JR., Bilxi, Aliss.
A Not so much. Tax efficiency
is generally important. It's
tied to a fund's turnover ratio,
which reflects buying and selling
activity Within the fund. Funds
with low turnover are hanging onto
their shares longer, making fewer
ot smaller taxable distributions of
gains to shareholders. That's usu-
ally good. (Funds' after-tax returns
are now required to be listed along
with pre-tax returns.):
In tax-deferred accounts such
as 401(k) plans or traditional IRAS,
dividends and capital gains accumu-
late tax-deferred until you withdraw
your money. Favor them with your
least tax-efficient investments, such
as high-yield bonds, funds with
significant short-term capital gains,
taxable bonds, real estate investment
trusts (REITs), and stocks you plan
to hold for less than a year,
Learn more at
www.fool.com/mutualftunds/
mutualfunds.htm.

Q Is itOKto hang on tomy
loser stocks, waiting for them
to recover before I sell, so that I can
get back some of my lost money?
G.Z., Canton, Ohio.
A Not really. Imagine that
your shares of Tattoo Adver-
tising (ticker: YOWCH) are under-
water by $1,000 and that you've
found some companies with good
potential to appreciate. If you sell
your Tattoo shares for a loss and
move what's left into one of those
companies, you're more likely to
earn back that $1,000 or more.
Why try to earn a certain amount
in a stock you've lost faith in when
you can more reliably earn that .
same amount or more elsewhere?
Keep your money invested in
your best ideas.
Hanging onto a stinker can be
smart if the company merely hit a
temporary snag and your research
suggests it still has strong prospects.
Got a question for the Fool? Send it in
see Write to Us


BUSINESS BRIEFS


Moses part

of Chairman's

Council

From staff reports

Philip J. Moses, Jr., CPA/PFS,
financial advisor at Raymond James
Financial Services located at First
Federal Bank of Florida in Lake
City, was recently named a mem-
ber of the 2011 Chairman's Council.
Chairman's Council
honors are presented
only to those finan-
ci.al advisors who
have demonstrated a
commitment to per-
sonal service and
professional integ-
rity. Members of the Moses
Chairman's Council represent the
top echelon of the firm's financial
advisors.
Moses, who joined Raymond James
in 1998, has more than 38 years of
experience in the financial services
industry. Through a joint marketing
arrangement between First Federal
Bank of Florida and the Financial
Institutions Division of Raymond
James Financial Services, Inc., mem-
ber FINRA/SIPC, the investment
program offers a comprehensive
range of investment services to bank
customers, as well as individuals and
businesses.

Saucer earns accredited senior
appraiser designation from ASA
Lawrence H. Saucer, ARA, ASA
of Saucer Valuation Associates in
Lake City, was recently awarded the
"Accredited Senior Appraiser" profes-

business valuation
from the American
Society of Appraisers.
The American
Society of Appraisers
is a multi-discipline
appraisal organization A_
located in Washington, Saucer
D.C. Saucer Valuation
Associates specializes in the valuation
of commercial real estate and closely-
held businesses for various purposes
including litigation, tax reporting,
and employee stock ownership plan
reporting.


The Motley Footl

To Educate, A muse & Enrich


Tracking Stocks
You may not know what a track-
ing stock is, but you've probably
run across some. A tracking stock is
like a spin-off- sort of. A com-
pany issues a tracking stock for one
of its business divisions, but the
division isn't formally separated
from the company.
Imagine having a portfolio of blue
chip stocks and small high- R
fliers. In order to get a N
clearer picture of how the
two kinds of stocks are per-
forming, you might separate the
two groups on paper. In reality,
they're still in one brokerage
account, but by setting up separate
sub-portfolios, you can see how
each of the two groups is doing and
can compare one to the other.
When a company issues a tracking
stock, it has to prepare three sets of
financial statements (such as balance
sheets and income statements)
instead of one. One set will reflect
the company as a whole, as before. -
The second will reflect the business
line being tracked, while the third
will reflect the company's operations


excluding those belonging to the
tracking stock. The company hasn't
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poses, its assets, expenses, income
and cash flow are allocated between
the company and its tracking stock.
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just thinking of AT&T as a slow-
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less operations. That allowed the divi-
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another firm or forge an alliance.
Tracking stocks are generally out
of favor today, but, some companies
still have them. Liberty Media, for
instance, has separated its QVC,
Starz and movie studio businesses
via tracking stocks.
Learn more at
www.sec.gov/answers/track.htm
and www.ibtimes.com/articles/
42398/20100811/stocks.htm.


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I was born in 1985 when
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world's first international mobile
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350 million customers globally. I recently
introduced a money transfer system to
permit people in emerging markets to send
and receive money safely and easily using
their mobile phone. My name incorporates
data, voice and telecommunications, and I rake


$270 Per Share
Was Cheap
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when they hit the $270 range. --
J.A., online
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Associated Press

WASHINGTON Inflation
spooked the nation in the early
1980s. It surged and kept rising
until it topped 13 percent.
These days, inflation is much
lower. Yet to many Americans,
it feels worse now. And for a
good reason: Their income has
been even flatter than inflation.
Back in the '80's, the money
people made typically more
than made up for high inflation.
In 1981, banks would pay nearly
16 percent on a six-month CD.
And workers typically got pay
raises to match their higher
living costs.
No more.
Over the 12 months that
ended in February, consumer
prices increased just 2.1 per-
cent. Yet wages for many peo-
ple have risen even less if
they're not actually frozen.
Social Security recipients
have gone two straight years
with no increase in benefits.
Money market rates) You need
a magnifying glass to find
them.
That's why even moderate
inflation hurts more now. And
it's why if food and gas prices
lift inflation even slightly above
current rates, consumer spend-
ing could weaken and slow the
economy.
"It feels far more painful
now than in the '80s," says
Judy Bates, who lives near
Birmingham, Ala. "Money in
the bank was growing like
crazy because interest rates
were high. My husband had a
uniion job at a steel company
and was getting cost-of-living
raises and working overtime
galore."
Bates, 58, makes her living
writing and speaking about
how people can stretch their
dollars. Her husband, 61, is
retired. They've paid off their
mortgage and have no car pay-
ments. But they're facing high-
er prices for food, gas, utili-
ties, insurance and health care,
while fetching measly returns
on their savings.
"You want to weep," Bates
says.
Consumer inflation did pick
up in February, rising 0.5 per-


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this photo taken Feb. 20, Judy Bates prepares a meal to eat
in with family and friends after church instead of going out to eat
Sunday, in Dora, Ala.


cent, because of costlier food
and gas. Still, looked at over the
past 12 months, price increases
have remained low. Problem is,
these days any inflation tends
to hurt.
Not that everyone has been
squeezed the same. It depends
on personal circumstances.
Some families with low expens-
es or generous pay increases
have been little affected.
Others who are heavy users
of items whose prices have
jumped tuition, medical care,
gasoline have been hurt
badly. But almost everyone is
being pinched because nation-
ally, income has stagnated.
The median U.S. inflation-
adjusted household income -
wages and investment income
fell to $49,777 in 2009, the
most recent year for which fig-
ures are available, the Census
Bureau says. That was 0.7 per-
cent less than in 2008.
Incomes probably dipped last
year to $49,650, estimates Lynn
Reaser, chief economist at Point
Lonma Nazarene UIniversity in
San Diego and a board menl-
her of the National Association
for Business Economics. That
would mark a 0.3 percent drop
from 2009. And incomes are
likely to fall again this year
to $49,300, she says.
Significant pay raises are


rare during periods of high
unemployment because work-
ers have little bargaining power
to demand them.
They surely aren't making it
up at the bank. Last year, the
average nationwide rate on a
six-month CD was 0.44 per-
cent. 'The rate on a money mar-
ket account was even. lower:
0.21 percent.
Now go back three decades,
a time of galloping inflation,
interest rates and bond yields.
When Paul Volcker took over
the, Federal Reserve in 1979,
consumer inflation was 13.3 per-
cent, the highest since 1946. To
. . . - -


I Amskth


LAST WEEK'S TRIVIA ANSWER
I began as an apothecary purchased in Germany in 1668. By the 1800s I
was not only selling drugs, but also making them. I set up operations in the
U.S. in the late 1800s and first published my famous "Manual of Diagnosis :
and Therapy" in 1899. It appears in 17 languages today. My German and
U.S. divisions split during World War I, and in the 1940s my labs discovered
vitamin 812, cortisone and streptomycin. I introduced measles and mumps
vaccines in the 1960s, and merged with Schering-Plough in 2009. Outside
the U.S. and Canada, I'm known as MSD. Who am I? (Answer: Merck)


shrink inflation, Volcker raised
interest rates to levels not seen
since the Civil War.
As interest rates soared, CD
and money-market rates did,
too. The average rate on money
market accounts topped 9 per-
cent Treasury yields surged,
pushing up rates on consumer
and business loans. The 10-
year Treasury note yielded
more than 13 percent; today,
it's 3.5 percent.
By 1984, consumers were
enjoying a sweet spot Lower
prices but rising incomes and
still-historically high rates on
CDs and other savings invest-
ments. Consumer inflation had
slid to 3.9 percent Yet you
could still get 10.7 percent on a
six-month CD.
Even after accounting for
inflation, the median income
rose 3.1 percent from 1983
to 1984. At the time, workers
were demanding and receiv-
ing higher wages.
More than 20 percent of U.S.
workers belonged to a union
in 1983. Labor contracts typi-
cally provided cost-of-living
adjustments tied to inflation.
And competition for workers
meant those union pay increas-
es helped push up income for
nonl-union workers, too.
Last year, just 12 percent of
U.S. workers belonged to unions.
And among union members, a
majority now work for the gov-
ernment, not private companies.
Wages of government workers
are under assault.


SCHOOL: Recipes introduced

Continued From Page IC


and the cooking show begins
at 6:30 p.m.
Tickets will be sold until
they sell out at the Lake City
Reporter office beginning at 7
a.n. Tuesday. General admis-
sion tickets are $12 and VIP
tickets are $20. Tickets can be
purchased by cash or check
only and are first come, first
serve.
"We're very excited to
once again bring the 'Taste
of Ilome Cooking School to
ourtt coniniunity," said Todd


Wilson, Lake City Reporter
publisher. "This is one of the
most popular events in Lake
City. For those interested in
cooking or eating, it's a can't-
miss event.
"It's great entertainment
and you will learn a lot of new
dishes and kitchen tricks. Get
your tickets quickly because it
will certainly sell out."
"It's bigger and better than
last year." Blackmon said. "I
think it's going to be a good
show."


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Svou 11be entered into a drawing lbr a mlinv prt:-' Motlcy Ft.l. Sory. c can t provide individual financial advice.
* *C]........ I ... ... .....* ... ** .,, ** ** ***'. , I' .* .. ......... .. ...S** ****** **** ********


Americans search for ways to stretch dollars


..................... .1, .......................... I ............


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Deere's Expectations
With its latest quarterly earnings
report, farming and forestry equip-
ment maker John Deere (NYSE:
DE) trounced analysts' expectations
and then expanded its forecasts.
Net earnings more than doubled
over year-ago levels, to $514 million,
while revenue advanced 27 percent to
$6.1 billion. Worldwide total equip-
ment operations' net sales increased
by 30 percent year over year, with the
U.S. and Canada rising 35 percent,
and other areas climbing 22 percent.
Operating profit for equipment
operations more than doubled.
Agriculture and Turf sales expanded
by 21 percent, while Construction
and Forestry sales grew by a whop-
ping 81 percent. Operating margins
expanded nicely across the board.
Agriculture and Turf sales are
expected to increase by about 16
percent in 2011, based on anticipated
strength in global farm conditions.
That's up from a previous expected
increase of about 8 percent. Con-
struction and Forestry sales are seen
rising by about 35 percent, up from a
25 percent to 30 percent expectation.
Challenges do lie ahead for the
industry, such as substantially higher
raw material costs. Nevertheless,
management believes that higher
sales volumes will largely offset
those increases, along with improved
factory utilization and increased
prices. All in all, the company has
raised its 2011 profit forecast nearly
20 percent to $2.5 billion, compared
with its $2.1 billion expectation as
recently as November.
Deere has recorded a solid quarter
and appears to be headed even higher.


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427












Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


LAKE CITY REPORTER STOCKS SUNDAY, MARCH 20, 2011


THE WEEK IN REVIEW *THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW *THEWEEK IN REVIEW


Weekly Stock Exchange Highlights


NYSE 3 Amex Nasdaq

,116.40 -132.13 ^ 2,272.34 -34.30 2,643.67 -71.94


Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
Lubrizol 133.75+28.31 +26.8
K-Sea 8.09 +1.62 +25.0
Supedorind 24.12 +4.62 +23.7
BarcShtD 22.28 +4.14 +22.8
Dex One 5.23 +.97 +22.8
Theragen 2.00 +.33 +19.8
NY&CO 6.61 +1.09 +19.7
SWSGrp 6.15 +.94 +18.0
BasicEnSv 23.00 +3.40 +17.3
TejonRnch 35.85 +4.90 +15.8

Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
KV PhmA 8.50 -3,49 -29.1
KV PhB If 8.58 -3.46 -28.7
RAIT Fin 2,29 -.87 -27.5
BrownShoe 10.65 -3.69 -25.7
BamesNob 8.89 -2.85 -24.3
GblXUran 14.85 -4.19 -22.0
Camecog 29.40 -7.98 -21.3
KidBrands 7.42 -1.79 -19.4
Raythnwt 11.77 -2.61 -18.2
ECDangn 19.12 -3.90 -16.9

Most Active ($1 or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
Ciatp 23275649 4.50 -.07
S&P500ETF12606829127.76-2.52
iShJapn 10076229 10.37 -.44
BkofAm 7693206 14.04 -.34
SPDR Fnd5818792 16.27 -.22
GenElec1 4995702 19.25-1.11
Pftzer 4551986 20.18 +,71
FordM 4364458 14.49 +.13
iShEMkts 4026460 45.23 -.80
iShR2K 3673022 79.46 -.72

Diary
Advanced 1,124
Declined .. 2,040
New Highs 115
New Lows 110
Total issues 3,201
Unchanged 37
Volume 24,563,425,557





Wkly
Name Div YId PE Cha


AESCorp ...
AFLAC 1.20 2.4
AK Steel .20 1.3
AMR
AT&T Inc 1.72 6.2
AbtLab 1.92 4.0
Accenture .90 1.8
AMD
Aetna .60 1.7
Agdient
AlcalelLuc ...
Alcoa .12 7
Allstate .84 2.7
AlphaNRs ...
Aftna 1 52 6.1
AEageOul .44 2.9
AEP 1.84 54
AmExp 72 1 6
AmlntlGrp ..
Anadarko .36 5
AnalogDev .88 2.3
Annaly 2.65 148
Apache 60 5
ArcelorMit .75 22
ArchCoal .40 1.2
ArchDan 64. 1 8
ATMOS 1 36 41
BB&T Cp 64 2 4
BHPB IIU 182 2.1
BPZ Res
BakrHu 60 9
BcBdVArg 55 4 6
BcoBrades 82 4 4
BcoSantand.79 6 8
BcoSBrasl .70 6.1
BkofAm .04 3
BkNYMel .36 12
Bar iPVix rs ..
BarnckG .48 1.0
Baxter 1.24 2.4
BeazerHm ..
BerkH B ...
BestBuy .60 1.9
Blackstone .40 2.4
BlockHR .60 3.7
Boeing 1.68 2.4
BostonSci ...
BrMySq 1.32 5.1
CB RElis ...
CBS B .20 9
CSX 1.04 1.4
CVSCare .50 1.5
Calpine
Camecog .40
CdnNRsgs .36
CapOne .20 .4
CapillSrce .04 .6
Carnival 1.00 2.5
Caterpillar 1.76 1.7
Cemex 43
CenterPnt .79 47
CntryULnk 2.90 6.9
ChesEng 30 9
Chevron 2.88 2.8
Chicos .20 1.4
Chimera .69 162
Ciigrp
CliffsNRs .56 .6
Coach .60 1 2
CocaCola 188 3.0
Coeur
ConAgra .92 4 0
ConocPhil 2.64 3.5
ConsolEngy .40 .7
ConEd 2.40 4.8
ConstellEn .96 3.1
Coming .20 1.0
Covidien .80 1.5
DCTIndl .28 5.4


Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
IntellgSys 2.72 +.90 +49.5
Accelr8 3.63 +.88 +32.0
IBio 3.60 +.59 +19.6
EngySvcs 3.88 +.60 +18.3
ClaudeRg 2.55 +.31 +13,8
EngySvcun 4.70 +.48 +11.4
SLInd 18.99 +1.93 +11.3
CheniereEn 8.01 +.76 +10.5
BreezeE 8.00 +.66 +9.0
Miiefndg 11.28 +.92 +8.9

Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
GSE Sy 2,05 -1.09 -34.7
HQ SustM 2.90 -1.03 -26.2
SinoHub 2.11 -.59 -21.9
Uranerz 3.10 -.85 -21,5
MinesM t 2.41 -.64 -21.0
DenisnMg 2.61 -.68 -20,7
LGLGrp 13.91 -3.51 -20.1
NewEnSys 4.17 -1.00 -19.3
ChinaShen 3.40 -.72 -17.5
Aerocntry 13.12 -2.62 -16.6

Most Active ($1 or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
DenisnMg 646430 261 -.68
Ur-Energy 314109 1.70 -.81
UraniumEn 289503 4.28 57
CheniereEn282060 8.01 +.76
NwGoldg 280959 10.40 +.33
VantageDd 268106 1.92 -.01
Uranerz 243081 3.10 -.85
GoldStrg 234057 3.00 +.15
KodiakOg 215984 6.45 +.17
GtPanSilvg212887 4.10 -.33

Diary
Advanced 202
Declined 324
New Highs 6
New Lows 24
Total issues 550
Unchanged 24
Volume 936.987.120,


Gainers ($2 or more)__
Name Last Chg %Chg
CoffeeH 7.73 +3.17 +69.5
ICO Glb A 2.83 +.89 +45.9
NexxusLtg 3.97 +1.15 +40.8
Multiband 5.14 +1.39 +36.9
FFBcA1r 3.15 +.83 +35.8
CeleraGrp 8.40 +2.10 +33.3
EcolEn 19.06 +3.97 +26.3
Maxygens 5.06 +1.01 +24.9
Unilife 5.31 +1.06 +24.9
GulfportE 31.36 +5.99 +23.6

Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
Subaye If 3.47 -2.97 -46.1
TBS IntliA 2.00 -1.35 +40.3
OnlineRes 388 -2.48 -39.0
ChinalntEn 3.84 -2.21 -36.5
Readg ntB 604 -2.09 -25,7
Sanmina 10.50 -3462 -25.6
ChinaSky 3.92 -1 30 -24.9
MedicINova 3,59 -1.16 -24.4
Tokmirag 3.71 -1.16 -23.8
Fuqi Inl It 3.42 -1.04 -23.3

Most Active ($1 or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
PwShs 00QQQ514124054.45-196
Cisco 4209090 17.14 -.81
Microsoft 3675711 24.80 -.88
Intel 3406921 19.93 -.94
SirusXM 2611913 1.71 -.08
MicronT 2180859? 10.07 -.17
Yahoo 1739202 16.03-1 39
Oracle 1554842 30.76-1.15
Nvidia 1430957 17.62 -.43
Qualcom 1397601 51.71 -1.90

Diary
Advanced 954
Declined 1,826
New Highs 119
New Lows 195
Total sses 2.839
Unchanged 59
,Volume 11.408.541.200i
____-_____I


II,


Wkly Wkly YTD
Name Ex DIv Last Chg %Chg %Chg


AT&T Inc NY 1.72 27.94
AlcatelLuc NY .., 5.07
AutoZone NY ... 262.98
BkofAm NY .04 14.04
Bar IPVix rsNY 35.36
BobEvans Nasd .80 30,55
CNBFnPA Nasd .66 14,05
CSX NY 1.04 76.22
CellThor rsh Nasd .44
Chevron NY 2.88 102.80
Cisco Nasd .24 17.14
Citigrp NY ... 4,50
CocaCola NY 1.88 62.70
Delhaize NY 2.02 80.14
DrxFBull s NY ... 28.97
FamilyDIr NY .72 51.26
FordM NY ... 14.49
FMCGs NY 1.00 51.78
GenElec NY .56 19,25
HomeDp NY 1.00 36.00
iShJapn NY .14 10,37
iShEMkts NY .64 45.23
S Eale NY 1.42 57.92
IShR2K NY .89 79.46
Intol Nasd .72 19.93
JPMorgCh NY 1.00 45.74
Lowes NY .44 26.20
McDnlds NY 2.44 72.99


-1.8 -4.9
-4.9 +71.3
-1.1 -3.5
-2.4 +5.2
+7.1 -6.0
-1.4 -7.3
-1.5 -5.1
+1.8 +18.0
+46.7 +20.5
+2.9 +12.7
-4.5 -15.3
-1.5 -4.9
-3.3 -4.7
-3.2 +8.7
-4,9 +4.0
+3.1
+0.9 -13.7
+4.6 -13.8
-5,5 +5.2
-3.1 +2.7
-4.1 -4.9
-1.7 -5,1
-2.4 -.5
-0,9 +1.6
-4.5 -5.2
... +7.8
-2.7 +4.5
-4.9 -4.9


Name Ex DIv


MicronT Nasd ...
Microsoft Nasd .64
NY Times NY
NextEraEnNY 2.20
NobltyH Nasd
NokiaCp NY .55
Nvidia Nasd ..
OcciPet NY 1.84
Oracle Nasd .20
Penney NY ,80
PepsiCo NY 1.92
Plizer NY .80
Potash wi NY .28
PwShs QQNasd .39
PrUShS&PNY
Oualcom Nasd .86
Ryder NY t1.08
SPSO00ETF NY 2.34
SoarsHIdgsNasd
SirlusXM Nasd
SoullinCo NY 1,82
SprlnlNox NY
SPDR FnlNY .16
TinoWarn NY .94
VangEmg NY 82
WalMart NY 1.46
WollsFargo NY .20
Yahoo Nasd


Wkly Wkly YTD
Last Chg%Chg %Chg


10.07 -.17
24.80 -.88
9.18 -.18
52.76 -2.93
8.48 +.47
8.28 -.21
17.62 -.43
98.33 -.42
30.76 -1.15
36.22 -1.45
63.24 -1.41
20.18 +.71
54.52 +.36
54.45 -1.96
22,55 +.80
51.71 -1.90
47.81 -.04
127.76 -2.52
81.81 -238
1.71 -.08
37.00 -1.28
5.05 +.05
16.27 -.22
34.72 -1.61
45.74 -.63
51.52 -1.07
31.83 -.55
16.03 -1.39


-1.7 +25.6
-3.4 -11.1
-1.9 -6.3
-5.3 +1.5
+5.9 +4.6
-2.5 -19.8
-2.4 +14.4
-0.4 +.2
-3.6 -1.7
-3.8 +12.1
-2.2 -3.2
+3.6 +15.2
+0.7 +5.6
-3.5
+3.7 -5.1
-3.5 +4.5
-0.1 -9.2
-1.9 +1.6
-2.8 +10.9
-4.5 +4.9
-3.3 -3.2
+1.0 +19.4
-1.3 +2.0
-4.4 +7.9
-1.4 -5.0
-2,0 -4.5
-1.7 +2.7
-8.0 -3.6


Stock Footnotes: = Dividends and earnings In Canadian dollars. h Does not meet continuedlistIng standards.
It = Late flIIng with SEC, n = New in past 52 weeks, pI Preferred. ras Stock has undergone a reverse stock spitd
of at least 50 percent within the past year. rt Right to buy security at a specified price, a = Stock has split by at
least 20 percent within the last year. un Units, vi = In bankruptcy orTeceivershlp. wd When distributed, wl
When issued. wt a Warrants,
Mutual Fend Footnotes: b = Fee covering market costs Is paid from fund assets. d = Deterred sales charge, or
redeniption fee. I = front load (sales charges). m Multiple fees are charged. NA. not available, p previous day's
net asset value, s fund split shares during the week, x fund paid a distribution during the week.Galern eand
Loasem must be worth at least $2 to be listed in tables at left. Most Actives must be worth at least $1. Volume in
hundreds of shares. Source: The Associated Press. Sales figures are unoffcitl.


Money Rates
Last Pva Week
Prime Rate 3.25 3.25
Discount Rate 0.75 0.75
Federal Funds Rate .00-25 .00-.25
Treasunes ______
3-month 0.07 0.08
6-month 0.14 0.13
5-year 1.94 2.04
1-year 3.27 3.39
30-year 4.43 4.54


Currencies
Last Pvs Day
Australia 1.0035 1.0198
Britain 1.6219 1.6136
Canada .9861 .9871
Euro .7063 .7139
Janan 80.96 79.05


Mexico


12.0652


12.1165


The Week in Review


II STOCKS OF LOCAL INTEREST


PIMCO TotRells
American Funds GrthAmA m
Fidelity Contra
Vanguard TolStldx
American Funds CaplncBuA m
Vanguard Instldxl
American Funds CpWIdGrlA x
Vanguard 500Adml
American Funds IncAmerA m
Vanguard TotSIlAdm
American Funds invCoAmA m
Dodge & Cox InStk I
Dodge & Cox Stock
American Funds WAMutnvA x
Vanguard Totlnt d
American Funds EurPacGrA m
Vanguard InstPlus
FrankTemp-Franklin Income A m
American Funds FnlnvA m
American Funds NewPerspA m
Vanguard 5001nv
PIMC0 TotRelAdm b
American Funds BalA m
Fidelity GrowCo
Vanguard WeltnAdm
Fidearborty LowPrS d
Harbor Inlanst d


136,837
68,135
63,315
59,764
59,201
58,180
56,032
54,664
54,193
50,992
50,354
45,918
45,667
40,241
39,597
39,490
37,376
36,259
35,007
34,131
33,274
33,054
32,523
29,316
28,884
28,175
28,149


+7.0/B
+9.5/D
+13.3/B
+13.2/A
+7.9/D
+11.9/B
+7.7/D
+11.9/B
+11.6/A
+13.3/A
+8.4/E
+8.5/B
+9.7/D
+11.8/B
+8.5/C
+8.4/C
+11.9/B
+12.6/A
+12.6/A
+10.3/C
+11.8/B
+6.8/B
+10.7/B
+16.0/A
+9.5/C
+13.7/E
+11.5/A


+6.2/A
+2.0/C
+4.1/A
+2.3/B
+3.3/C
+1.7/B
+3.5/B
+1.7/B
+3.7/B.
+2.4/B
+1.7/B
+2.9/A
-0.6/D
+1.4/B
+2.4/B
+4.0/A
+1.7/B
+5.5/A
+3.6/A
+4.9/A
+1.6/B
+8.0/A
+3.6tB
+4.8/A
+5.3/A
+42JB
+5.2/A


NL 1,000,000
5.75 250
NL 2,500
NL 3,000
5.75 250
NL 5,000,000
5.75 250
NL 10,000
5.75 250
NL 10,000
5.75 250
NL 2.500
NL 2,500
5.75 250
NL 3,000
5.75 250
NL 200,000,000
4.25 1,000
5.75 250
5.75 250
NL 3,000
NL 1,000,000
5.75 250
NL 2,500
NL 50,000
NL 2,500
NL 50,000


Switzerind .9017 .9002 CA -CneMal ka+na. Ca -Nraaed*Termn B5r ES -Etre Sia FB -Fore [Laoe enda, FG -woepG Lgoe5 w -FRe
Lage vue. 5 -Word Aklocnt LB 4Lg7 B [LG-la Gr. wth, LV 4LMe vtae. MA -wdea b tAk An 44p lend, MV
Bntish pound expressed in U.S dollars. All oth- uGC4p vae,. wSH -Speai -Sly ca. WS aWlStOW a n R wldtl iddenid rimxaN Rark H fuod peraoned vs
ers show dollar in foreign currency. oMheu.e, rBiarMe Acne A ltop 20,Er m bln20Ok~.rin it t xen Snrededtod ws ineurt.S mor bWreigstar.


New York Stock Exchange


WkLsy Nae
Last Name


16 -.79
10 -4.88
... -.19
... -.01
8 -.52
13 -.55
19 -1.33
13 -.10
8 -1.39
20 -2.40
... -26
67 +.08
18 -.84
69 +4.19
13 -25
21 -1.01
13 -200
13 -.11
1 -2.40
51 +.02
14 -33
13 +.14
14 +1.29
11 -06
33 +199
12 -1 13
17 /d
23 -09
-103
95
34 -49
+24
.+29
+36
S -13
21 -34
14 -08
.. +235
15 -1.41
14 -82
... -26
17 -1.82
10 +.01
... -.67
13 +.25
16 -2.54
... -.31
14 -.68
41 -.65
25 -.57
19 +1.33
13 -.39
-.47
.. -7.98
+2.22
8 +1.48
... -.40
16 -.31
25 +5.04
.. -.20
15 +.57
12 +138
11 +.56
11 +2.87
21 +.14
6 +.02
13 -.07
12 +.26
18 -6.25
12 -2.11
... -1.69
15 -60
11 -.95
32 +5.32
15 -.76
10 -1.79
9 -.56
.. -1.09
+.01


Wy YTD Wkly
Div Yld PE Chg SCthg Last


DR Horton 15
DTE 2.24
Danahers 08
DeanFds
Deees 1.40
DeltaAjr
DeotsrytR
Devon 66
DrSCBr rs
DvFnBr rs
DnFBsis
DFSC~d 11
Dscowe 06
Dsney 40
DomRascs 197
DoeChen 60
D4keEngY 98
DLeRly 68
EMC Cp
Ecasonin 128
EiPasoCp 04
EkriG og 10
EmersonEl 38
EnCara g 80
Enrtegy 332
Eawxr 2 '0
Eux5irc : 1*
FticECp 4
FnEsEnry 220
ForMll
F),KCGs 1 00
FrorleOrCm 75
GamneStk
Gan 16
Gap 45
GenGaPy n
GenMart 04
GenMas s 1 12
GenMol n
GenOn En .
Genworth
Gerdau 25
Goldapg 41
Godkr.anS 1.40
Goodyear
HCA Hid n ..
HSBC 180
Hatrtn 36
HartllFn .40

HeckTanm .
HedaM
Hertz
HeweftP 32
HorneOp 100
Hornwlall 133
HostHolts 08
IAMGtIdg 06
iSAsla 82
iShBraz 2.53
iSCan 50
iShGer 29
iSh HK 45
iShJapn 14
iSh Kor 44
iShMex 54
iShSing 43
iSToiwn 29
IShSver .
IShChina25 .63
iSSPS00 236
iShEMkts 64
iShB20 T 386
iS Eafe 1.42
iShR2K 89
iShREst 1.97
IBM 2.60
Intl Coal
IntlGame 24


1.3 85 +07
4.8 13 -1.40
2 19 -99
18 + 17
1 6 18 +231
15 -99
32 +21
8 9 .209
,94
v1 80
-150

4 18 17
10 18 -1 70
4 5 14 -I 73
17 ,N -94
56 12 -860
50 -26
29 -96
36 9 -205
2 15 19
42 .39
24 2' -227
23 18 +341
51 9 -805
22 .

5 -"Q 3:
60 4 -' .3
7 13
1 9 11 .230
92 17 .21
9 .1 19
10 6 -35
2 1 12 10
.32
17 -30
31 15 -66
11 -08
07
55 -24
19 +14
9 -12
9 9 -72
16
+1.94
36 -204
8 22 -27
1 6 9 -211
16 + 19
+35
64 -66
30 +22
8 11 -33
28 18 -1 14
24 22 -41
5 -04
28 + 25
34 -57
35 + 16
1 5 11
12 -79
25 -82
13 -44
7 +86
9 -1.76
34 -56
-36
76
1 5 -185
18 -264
14 -80
4 1 +191
25 -142
1 1 -72
34 -64
1 7 13 -6.54
.. 67 +22
1.5 21 -.03


LIFE DOESN'T STAND STILL

AND NEITHER SHOULD


YOUR INVESTMENTS.


Tim[l. ,. allf. *n t mul,,a l. h .a. Milli ant.i-li*a.I tIt. \\ hilh
S I r tai' l hl .I aig i ill .l l.ai i lmakl. i r l tir r I in1' --
111 I-I11ll ilia litt, ti t ltni rillt all l .ti n a*s- 1 jIr flltW 'ni. ,

I n'rt1II nl ;ll t.l ll) r i. ll t rrllt I i ,- s ,111 a I .1 n '1' I ll tld ll 11 t
tiI 'ina i.aIl .ail i \ I Ial Ir, I rtf i I ,itn 111 I iln ia l
I, "' n.- ,r. hI ll l .I tall' I S rt.i lu il m nt t,1 1 t Iataa v1,1atlal I an
'lll .I t., a.\ r .all- \ld hIllI | t ln r.k *I t M i la r l '.

1' sIc lltihdui- al (itim limit ntriii Inrtfatlim Itrni., -nill
. aN ir Itcaln fia ninri-il ialn i-.nr tailma .

B Steve Jones, CFPt
FianciIl Advisor

292') W-"t LJ) S Hight,.,y ')90
SuiteI 1 4
t ake Ci(l. 1I I OJ!)
386.7 wr2,38ct/
ww .odwardjones.com *... ". ,


Name
IntPap
Interpublic
Invesco
ItauUnrbH
JPMorgCh
Jabd
JanusCap
JohnJrin
JohnsnCtl
JnpdNtwk
KB Home
Keycorp
Kinxco
Kinross g
Kohls
Kraflt
LDK Solar
LSI Corp
I.VSrxnds
LonnarA
LdlyEli
LincNal
I loydlkgt
Lnrillanid
l.tiilir tol
MFMC
MFA Fiol
MAGIC
MGM Rsts
Macys
Manpwl
Manulifo g


Wky YTD Wky
Div Yid PE Chg %Chg Last


75 28
24 20
44 18
67 31
.00 22
28 15
04 3
2.16 37
.64 16

25 19
04 4
72 4 1
.10 7
00 19
16 37



16 8
96 57
20 7

720 60
I44 1 1

I4 I 1 6


.20 .9
74 1 2
.52


18 +88
27 -79
28 -99
19
12
16 -189
14 -48
12 -1 12
18 -1 X
47 -263
10
19 16
77 -37
25 -62
14 -1 69
13 71
11 +83
-21
73 -3172
39 -10
8 -38
12 72
08
13 *7 76
13 *28 31
82 291
9 03
06
-58
12 -75
-3 84
S-86


Div YId PE


MarathonO 1 00
MkklVGo-d 40
MkaVRun 18
MarintA 35
MarnhNM 84
Marshis 04
Masco 30
MasseyEn 24

ktetmac 90
MWrck 152
MkelLie 74
kletroPCS
MdlsuUFJ
MobdleTel s
Monycorpn
Monsanto 1 12
MonstrWw
MoroSlan 20
Mosaic 20
MolriaMo n
NCR Corp
NRG Egy
NYSE Lur 1 20
Natxor
NilkGroee 219
NalGrri / 04
NODlVaro 44
NnlSomi 40
NY Cmlylt I 00
NerwlrtM 60
Noxon11 20


Wky YTD Wkly
r %Ct) .Last


20 14 -52
7 -1 16
4 +29
9 33 -18
29 19 -108
5 10
22 +08
4 +256
16 -844
24 11 -57
48 15 -.82
1 7 13 -183
28 -08
-35
36 +02
-284
1 7 30 +.33
+,52
7 11 -.91
3 17 -.75
97 +.91
15 -23
11 +93
35 16 -38
24
4 12
5 9 +.82
6 19 76
29 11 173
S7 14 08
1 2 11 -1.23
4.55S


Wkly
Name DIv Yid PE Chg


NextEraEn 2.20
NiSource 92
NikeB 1.24
NobCoUrp 98
NokiaCp .55
Notdsrm 92
NoftxtSo 160
Novartis 253
Nuoor 145
OcoPt 184
Off"Dpl
OCSvHT 242
PG&ECp 182
PNC 40
PPL Cop 1 40
PatnotCoal
Pl'.atyE 34
PoeWn) 80
PepsiCo 192

PeortrsA 141
Peiotras 1 41

Ptrwpkx 256
Piash wV 28
Pu ALn
I S Li:,41s.

PruslS4%p

PriASOOO

ProMtSP 43


tNhVltsYon
Prtx,)CS 1 40
Protogs 45
ProUSR2IK rs
Pnruowt 1 15
PSEG 137
PuoteGrp
OntmDSS
OkstftRes
OQestCm 32
RAIT Fin .03
RaoanGrp .01
RangeRs 16
Ramtheon 1.50
RegionsFn 04
ReneSola
RepubSvc 80
RPteAid h
RyvCarbt
SLM Cp
SpdrOJiA 298
SpdrGold .
SP Mid 155
S&PSOOETF2 34
SpdrHome 31
SpdrKbwBk 15
SpdtLehHY4 51
SpdrRett .50
SpdrOGEx 49
SpdrMetM .41
STMicro .28
Salewey .48
Saks
Salestoce .
SarxdRdge
Sarnfi 1 63
SaraLeo 46
Scrhlrmbri 1.00
Schwab .24
SemiHTr .55
ShawGip
SkldiNacs .58
SilvWhin g .12
SouthinCo 1.82


Wly
LastI Name


4.2 13 -93
5.0 18 -.40
1.6 18 -9.58
2.3 10 -.77
6.6 .. -.21
22 15 -3.13
2.4 17 -25
4 7 12 -1 14
32 -1 72
19 18 -42
-30
11 -72
42 15 -266
6 11 15
57 12 -67
+184
5 24 .707
22 22 -145
30 16 -1 41
52 .190
42 -45
36 -56
40 20 *71
4 1 16 -206
5 27 36

-31
'9
.80
.52
-597
*367
9 -205
-1.54
.91
52
1 9 13 18
30 -67
+ 76
19 9 -2 47
45 10 -195
+ 11
-21
6 -51
46 +.25
1.3 2 -.67
.1 ... -29
.3 ... +3.83
30 8 -2.40
6 -37
.. 5 +32
27 19 -42
-.23
18 -1.55
8 -20
215 -1.92
. +.15
9 .. -1.81
t.8 -2.52
1.7 -.05
6 -.26
10.5 ... -05
1.0 -1.28
8 .+156
6 +20
24 13 -.87
2.1 14 -43
39 -,92
-7 86
13 +.14
49 ... -1 16
27 33 -07
12 25 -31
1.4 42 -1.13
1.7 89
1 18 -589
3.7
3 48 -1.99
4.1 16 -1.28


Wky YTD Wk
Dlv Yld PE Chg %Chg Lat


SwstAirl .02
SwsnEngy ...
SpectraEn 1.04
SprintNex ...
SP Mails 1.23
SP HfthC .61
SP CnSt .81
SP Consum .56
SP Engy 1.05
SPDRFnd .16
SPInds 64
SP Tech .33
SP Ud 1.31
StateSir .72
StilwtrM ..
Suncor gs .40
Suntech
SunTrst .04
Supvalu 35
Synovus 04
Sysco 1.04
TarwSemi .47
Talbols
Target 100
TeckRos g 60
TenelHIth
T dM-yn -
Tosoro
Tetlnsl 52
Textron 08
ThermoFis
3MCo 220
Tiflany 1 00
TimeWam 94
Total SA 3 16
Transocn .
Traveers 1 44
TrnnaSolar ..
Tycolntl 100
Tyson .16
UBS AG ...
US Arwy ...
USEC
UldConti .
UPS B 2.08
US Bancrp .50
US NGs rs ...
USO1Fd ...
USSteel .20
UtdhIthGp ,50
Vale SA .76
ValeSApt .76
ValeroE .20
VangEmg .82
VenzonCm 1.95
ViacomB .60
VimpelC n .65
Visa .60
Vonage ...
Waigm .70
Weathfnti .,
WellPoint 1.00
WellsFargo .20
WendyAtry .08
WDigital
WstnRefin
WstnUnion .28
Weyerh .60
WmsCos ,50
XL Grp ,44
XcclEngy 1.01
Xerox .17
Yamana g .12
YingliGmn


20 -.52
24 +4.22
16 -.21
... +.05
... -.05
... -.58
... -.51
.. -1.30
... +.54
... -.22
... -.61
.. -.81
-1.33
14 +1.03
41 -1.20
33 +17
6 +.50
+.59
S+57
-04
14 -.13
-46
11 -94
12 -1.54
+177
3 -.08
-9- -.06
12 +.11
13 -1 03
85 -1.16
21 -267
16 -2.63
22 -565
14 -1 61
-1.25
10 -203
9 -82
6 +2.32
19 -1.13
9 -.43
... -.58
4 -.22
66 -.56
15 -1.36
20 -2.49
17 -.51
... +.71
... +.28
... -1.71
10 -.99
... -.03
-.13
58 -.64

27 -.01
15 -1.24
... -.74
17 -1.09
... -.18
18 -1.02
... -.18
10 -1,33
14 -.55
-.-12
7 -.51
+.06
16
... +01
22 -.29
21 -.25
14 -.86
14 -.28
20 -.63
8 +1.03


12.20
41.12
26.01
5.05
37.73
31.97
29.05
37.58
75.39
16.27
35.97
24.90
30.88
44.37
20.72
43.78
8.54
29.59
8.13
2.50
27.70
11.75
4.87
49.99
5422
7.01
16.94
24.62
33.36
25.50
52.58
88.98
57.29
34.72
57.58
78.44
58.06
26.55
43.90
19.06
18.01
8.96
4.60
23.37
71.60
26.65
11.11
40.97
53.43
42.60
32.14
28.23
27.34
45.74
35.84
43.95
13.71
71.42
4.18
40.91
20.55
66.65
31.83
4.90
33.89
15.36
21.09
24.39
2969
21,97
23.45
10.12
12.10
11.53


Nasdaq Most Active


+9.4 18.31
+2.4 4.68
-14,7 10.61
+3.9 31.99
-23.1 36.19
+11.9 39.80
-10.1 161.82
+6.7 30.67
+16.7 8.82
-3.6 52.94
+2.5 330,67
+5,6 14,84
+25,5 6.40
+19.8 24.85
+24.0 44.53
-7,6 11.38
+3.1 39.40
+6.5 49.31
+6.7 30,32
-6.9 3.80
+24.8 120.50
-7.3 45.58
+24.3 33.87
-8.9 39.67
-37.2 1.45
+10.4 5.84
-6.4 22.87
+15.7 9.56
+91.7 1.84
+33.3 8.40
-10.4 52.98
+20.5 .44
-47.6 3.84
+9.7 23.10
+25.0 19.97
-15.3 17.14
O35 0 .83
2.11 66.64


Div YId PE


CleanEngy...
Clearwire
Comcast .45
Comc spcl .45
Compuwre ...
ConnlhC
Costco .82
Cree Inc
Crocs ...
CypSemi
Dell Inc
DellaPIr h ...
Dndreon
DirecTVA ..A
DonlleyRR 1.04
DryShips
ETrade rs
eBay
ElectArts
EngyConv ...
EntropCom ...
EricsnTol .35
Expedia .28
ExpScrip s ..
F5 Netwks
FifthThird .04
Finisar
FstSolar
Flextm ...
FuelCell
GTSolar ...
Genzyme ...
GiloadSci
Google
GronnMIC s
HercOffsh
Holoqic
HudCitly 80


Wkly YTD Wkly
Chg %Chg Last


. -1.34
... -47
1.9 18 -1.09
2.0 18 -1.11
23 -.41
-.07
1.2 22-1.89
26 +27
24 -2.30
37 -.39
10 -.77
. -.08
... .. -.91
18 -1.08
5.9 12 -1.01
22 -.22
... -39
22 -.45
... +.05
... .. -,28
... 10 -.59
2.9 ... -.09
1.3 15 -.48
24 -.39
45-14.08
.3 23 +.14
19 -2.07
.. 19 +9,92
.. 14 -.34
... ... + 02
.. 10 +.82
.. .. -.40
12 -,68
21 -15.65
.+185
-.38
... + 12
61 9 -03


-5.4 13.09
+2.7 5.29
+9.1 23.86
+83 2242
-6.b 10.98
-142 4.47
-2.1 70,66
-26.2 48.65
-5.7 16.14
+1.3 18.83
+7.1 14.51
+16.4 .89
-6.1 32.79
+12.2 44.80
+1.5 17.73
-17.7 4,52
-56 15.11
+9.5 30,47
+13.5 18.59
-52.2 2.20
-37.5 7.55
+5.3 12,15
-15.0 21,32
-3.6 52 11
-25.5 96.92
-4.4 14.03
-28.8 21.14
+15.0 149.06
-8.2 7.21
-14.7 1.97
+15.7 10.55
+6,2 75.59
+10,8 40.15
-5.5 561.06
+84.8 60.71
+58.0 5.50
.15. 1 21.66
-22.4 9.89


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name DIv YId PE Chg %Chg Last
HumGon ... ...... -93 +13 1 27,01
IntgDv ... .. 26 -,t4 +42 6,94
Intol .72 3.6 10 -.94 -5.2 19.93
Intuit ... ... 30 -.416 +1.3 49.92
JA Solar ... ... 6 +.26 -5.1 6.57
JDS Uniph .. ... ... -233 +30.7 18.93
JolBluo ... ... 19 -40 -14.1 5.68
LECG ... .. ... -.04 -84.7 .21
LawsnSIt ... ... 72 +.03 +25,2 11.58
Lovol3 ... ... 10 .29.6 127
LIblyMInA ... ... 14 --.75 -1.1 15.59
LifoToch ... ... 21 -1.16 -9.5 50.25
LinoarTch .96 3.0 15 -1.01 -6.2 32.46
lululemng ... 45 -94 +10,4 75.56
MarvollT 17 -.05 -15.8 15.62
Mallol .92 3.7 13 -.43 -3.1 24.64
Maximlntg .84 3.5 29 -1.37 .2.4 2419
MolcoCrwn ... ... .. -.51 +7,5 6.84
MIcronT ... ... 5 -.17 +25,6 1007
Mlcrosoft .64 2.6 6 -.88 -11.1 24806
NasdOMX ... ... 12 -2.40 44.15 24.79
NotApp ... 30 11.17 -11.4 48.609
Nottlix ... 71 44.186 19,2 209.40
NowsCpA .15 ,9 16 -.65 12.2 16.33
NownCpBl .15 .9 16 -72 404 17.1!,
Novnll ... 5 .03 20 5 110
Nvlidna ... 41: .43 14.4 1/ i62
Oclaro rs ... .. 4:13 1.98 18. 10t 66
OnSmnlcd .. 13 -.62 -2',2 i.66
Oracleo .20 .7 23 -1.11 -17 30.7B6
PMC Sr ... .. 21 -.16 --II, 7/.60
Paccar .48 1.0 39 -.31 -151 -18,461
Paychox 1.24 3,9 23 -1.61 +2.2 31,60
PoopUltdF .62 5.0 38 -.09 -11.1 12.46
Popular ... ... ... -09 -4.5 3.00
Power-One ... ... 9 108 -18.1 8.35
PwShs QQQ.39 .7 ...-1.96 ... 54.45
fPowrwa ... .. .. +.18 +50.4 3,82


Name Dlv
PrinctnR
Qualcom .86
RFMicD ..
RschMoln .
Riverbed s ...
SanDisk
Satconh In
SoegaleT ...
Sina
SiriusXM ..
SkywksSol ...
Sonus
Staples .40
SlarSciont ...
Starbucks .52
StlDynam ,.40
SunPoworA...
Symantc ...
TD Amorllr .20
THQ .
Tollabs .08
Tovalh'itm .78
TiVo Inc
Tdil( lnl .
LIhlCBksOn .,
Ulii(n ll([t .
UbalinOu i
VirlnMda;i 11
Vodilafo l.33
W artrill l h s .li
WolSoil ..
Windstrnm 1.00
Xilinx .76
YRCWwi s .
Yahoo ..,
ZionBco .04


Wkly YTD
Yld PE Chg_%Ch _
... ... +02 -65,1
1.7 24 -1.90 +4,5
... 13 -.21 -17.8
10 -2.47 +4.8
.. ...-4,37 +6.7
8 -1,76 -13.1
+.01 -29.6
.. 4 -.35 -12.2
.. 12 -6.79 +28.1
... -,08 44.9
.. 33 -1,87 +4.7
.. -.25 +28.8
2.0 16 -.38 -12.6
.. 4.69 186.7
1.5 26 -1.60 +8.8
2.2 28 -.45 -1.1
36 +1.11 419,8
... 22 -,85 +3.2
1.0 20-1.14 +7.7
S .. -.92 --23.1
1.6 12 .:..0 -26.-1
1.6 14 --1.22 -8.1
... -.33 -2, 1
10 -21 1 3..4

S .. .. 1 6 ,







24 14 -.56 ,9.t6
S -.501 ;1 1

,, ;19 .',/ i.3;
. 1( .45 1.8
7.7 18 1.09 -7.2
.'.4 14 -,56 +9.1i
. ... -.50 -49.5
... 18 -1.39 -3.61
.2 ... -.52 -5.8


Name Div vYId
AbdAsPac .42 6.3
AloxcoRg ... ...
AIldNevG ...
AlphaPro ...
ArcadiaRs ..
Aurizon g ..
AvalRare n ......
BarcUBS36.. ...
BarcGSOil ..
Brdgus grs ...
CanoPot
CapGold
ColSci ...
CFCdang .01
ChelniorEn ...
ChinlaShon ...
ClaudoRg .9
CrosshgIs ...

DnnisnMg ...
Frontoong .
GSESy .
niscoEnIgy ...
GonMoly ...
GoldSlIrg ...

Glinsn l g .. .
(illanSils v ...9
Ilo l lSA ...
Hvpordynl
Imt lllokl / ... ...
iodilnkO 11
I ongwnllalnl
Suli as ngy ...
MadCat g .
Molalico ..
MdwGol ...y
Minolndti ...


AMEX Most Active


Wkly YTD Wkly
- PE__ Ch_ %Ch Last
.. -.08 -.4 6,72
... -,24 -.6 8.14
...+2,07 +25.0 32.90
22 +.06 -15.2 1.51
... -.04 -66.4 .10
... -.04 -4.4 7.00
... -.67 +3.2 6.44
... +.61 +1.8 49,99
... +.17 +5.6 27,05
,., -.03 -26,7 1.54
... -.03 +38.8 .53
17 +.10 +7.7 5,46
... -,02 -31.2 .57
.17 +5.3 21,82
S+.76 415.1 801
10 -.72 -59.5 3.40
4.31 +16.4 2.55
29 -29 -5.2 1.38
.. -.00 +153 37
-,68--23.7 2.61
., -43 .24.9 14.65
.-1,09 -43,4 2.05
02 28611 ,45
,13 -18,8 5.26
21 -.15 -34.6 3,00
2. -3 -29 7.82
Ili -10,1 2.66
.. 3 45.9 4,10
011 46,'.' 49

I 1 .2.1 50./I
.. 1 / -2',3 6..IS


) 13 tl61 1 6'
17 +.12 1 4 5i80
. -.08 104 11 1.72,
63 4,92 l'.2 11 2'8


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name DIv YId PE Chg %Chg Last
Nooprobe ... ... ... +.12 +61,2 332
Nevsiung ... .. +.12 -28.8 5,36
NDragon .. ... ... -.00 -11,1 .04
NwGold g ... ...... +.33 +6.6 10.40
NAPallg ... .. ... -,16 -11.0 6,18
NDynMngg ... ......-1.56 -3,1 13.85
NIhnOG .. ... 83-1,23 +3.8 28125
NthglMg ... 34 -.05 -15,9 2.69
NovaGIdg ... -.19 -121 12.55
Oilsandsg ... +.00 +22,6 .52
OpoHIh ... ... -.08 .. 3.67
ParaG&S ... ...... -23 -6,3 3.74
PhimAth .... -18 -21,7 3.31
PionDrill ... +.40 +41.7 12,48
PlatGpMot .. -.11 -23.7 2.03
Pralix ....-.42 -41.6 5.83
PudiCoal 10 -.26 -20,0 11.40
RadlenlPh ... ... -59,4 .41
RaleElog ... -.91 -35.2 10.40
Renloch .... -.07 -5.7 1.15
Rubicon g .... -.09 -20,1 4.56
SamsO&G ,., +.10+172.0 3.59
SinoHub 3 -.59 -19.2 2.11
SulphC ... ... -.01 -8.2 ,16
lenzfly .g .. -.11 -14,1 6,27
Tasokon ., +.17 +13.1 5.94
Tongswo ... +.01 +66 .1 1.05
lTnsnatlPot -.11 -8.1 306.
1 iV ll v .07 .. 57
ian)Poi'l 19 +19.1,5 7.77
Ull ,., 02 -41 ,8 06
LUi [Irgt nn vy ,, -.81 -43 1 170
liirn ; -.85 22 3 3.10
Ulranlumi n 11 57 -29.1 4 28
VanltagoDII ... -.01 5.4 1 92
VislaGokli .22 ,+5 6 3 24
WizanIdSt 01


Weekly Dow Jones'

Dow Jones Industrials -51.24 -137.74 -242.12 161.29 83.93
Close: 11,858.52 Wj '4) 41 ) 1
1-week change:-185.88 (-1.5%) MON TUES WED THUR FRI
12,500


12,000


11,500 '


11,000


10,500 S O N D J F M



MUTUAL FUNDS
Total Assets Total Return/Rank Pct MIn Init
Name Obj ($Mins) NAV 4-wk 12-mo 5-year Load Invt


Wkly YTD Wky
Name DIv Yld PE Chg %Chg Last


ATPO&G ...
Abraxas ... ...
ActivsBliz .17 1.6
AdobeSy ...
AkamaiT ...
AlteraCp lf .24 .6
Amazon
ACapAgy 5.60 18.3
AmCapLId...
Amgen
Apple Inc ...
ApldMatll .32 2.2
AriadP
ArmHId .09 .4
Atheros ... ...
Atmel
Autodesk ...
AutoData 1.44 2.9
AvagoTch ,.32 1,1
AvanirPhm ......
Baidus ...
BedBalh ...
BrigExp ..
Broadcom .36 .9
Broadwind ...
BrcdeCm ...
CA Inc .16 .7
Cadence
CpstnTrbh ...
CeleraGrp ...
Colgone
CollThor rsh .
ChinalnlEn .
CionaCorp ..
Cirrru.
Ci,,o .24 1.4
(,ilt/f pl)i h
(ACirix'iv'


... +.11
... -.24
34 -.27
21 -2.62
40 -.01
16 -.66
64 -6.25
4 +.65
3 -.12
11 -.59
18-21.32
15 -.16
9 +.69
... -.90
59 -.24
13 -.71
44 -.71
21 -1.10
18 -.83
... -.23
80 -4.46
16 -.24
89 +.74
20 -.48
... +.21
28 -.26
16 -.21
15 +.08
... +.14
+2.10
28 -.20
... +.14
3 -2.21
.. -1.83
15 -1.03
13 -.81
.. -04
4f -5.10


I1


9
9
2u


-


-- .- -N________ __- -IV -


- 1 ... -______________-11.v_ _____


I I








Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, MARCH 20, 2011

Lake City Reporter




CLASSIFIED


Take Al)vantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

755-5440


I WBtlI


MSEiLL T


FIN IJTI


Legal


1 One2om0per H2
4 lnes 6 days Eachdditional
Rat aples to private Individual i ellng
npersn erheandletotallngS100orilet.
Each n ni ust include a price.
This Isa non-reftundabtoe rate


r$ 010
IOne Hem pead I~vO
4lines a6 days a onal
Rat p ato e Individual. i selling
4pon 7mmhans- tdota lling $0 or .
Each Ita" n r ud a price.
This Is a non-rehind.o rat..








RBB dabi t1
One 1am per ad 16
4 lines 6 days Ec"sddtion"'
Rat*appll to privt indlv dual pulling
p lwloulll a n gt 1,dtsi rl 00 las
& ESch Itoi ouia Include 0 price.
Ia a osarmtfndab ratni



I2One Iem ad 2370
4llnes.6days Eacadial
Rt appil is o pri vaitdua s selling
,parsotial n re tIad totilling $2,500 or lass.
Each tam nust Inoluda j price..
Thiais as non-mtsndab rota



$27
14 lines 6 days $
Rate appli- to p ia hndiduals "aing
pareonti m schadi = =otalg 04,0XX or l ass
SEach Itun raios Inluode rc. A
Thi sIs a n rx- iodabl mit. ra.


BH$3
|One Each padad tio
14linesl6 days
Ra.f apiU tma to pnta hidl vdeamo Mlling
*paroonat nwinhandisa total lg 50000 or laa.J
SEsch win sat foud. a p.il,
h. las Is non-roiondai rota.


White Springs Public Auction By
Sealed Bid,
Thursday, March 31, 2011
10363 Bridge St White Springs
The Town of White Springs will ac-
cept sealed bids to dispose of equip-
ment which the council has declared
surplus. Sealed Bids must be re-
ceived before 9:00 a.m. March 31,
2011. The bids will be opened March
31, 2011 at 2:00 p.m.
Items include: 2002 Ford Crown
Victoria Car and one military gener-
ator with a trailer.
All items are sold "as is-where is"
and no warranty is expressed or im-
plied. Terns are casti. personal
check, certified check or company
check. Items niustrt be paid or in full
before removal front l tile city coim-
pound and must be removed within
ten calendar days. Any items not re-
moved within tile specified time will
revert to the city and funds forfeited
to the city. The townt reserves the
right to reject any otter.
Items may be inspected from 9:00
a.m. to 4:00 p.m. March 21 through
Marth 29, 2011
0552536b
March 20. ,2011

010 Announcements








020 Lost & Found







Lost: Small male Terrier. Black &
gray had on a, red collar. Missing
since. 03/12 trout 242/247 area.
Neir Arrowhead FOUND


I


t 1750.



Limited to service type advertis-
ing only.
4 lines, one month... .92.00
$10.80 each additional line
Includes an additional $2.00 per
ad for each Wednesday insertion.



You can call us at 755-5440.
Monday through Friday from 8 00
a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Some people prefer to place their
classified ads in person, and some
ad categories will require prepay-
ment. Our office is located at 180
East Duval Street.
You can also fax or email your ad
copy to the Reporter.
FAX: 386-752-9400 Please
direct your copy to the Classified
Department.
EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityre-
porter.crm
FDedlne


Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Friday
Saturday
Sunday


Ca by:

Mo TOOam,
WidM TiOOam
ThUnitslOan
ft., 1Ia00 a.m
Fn, 10 a.m


Fam/Emalifby

Men,900am

Fn. 9 00 a inm
En, 9 0am
in.900)11


Tr-s de ntdl.T 1 t sub)sr.l tV rtin wil5 0, t -




Ad Errors- Please read your ad
on the first day of publication.
We accept responsiblllty for only
the first incorrect Insertion, and
only the charge for the ad space
In error. Please call 755-5440
Immediately for prompt correc-
tion and billing adjustments.
Cancellations- Normal advertising
deadlines apply for cancellation.
0lllng-jJnfqulrles- Call 755-5440.
Should further information be
required regarding payments or
credit limits, your call will be trans-
ferred to the accounting depart-
ment.


Advertising copy is subject to
approval by the Publisher who
reserves the right to edit, reject,
or classify all advertisements under
appropriate headings. Copy should
be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the first day of pub-
lication. Credit for published errors
will be allowed for the first insertion
for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the
Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nor for any general,
special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply
with Federal, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
nation in employment, housing and
public accommodations. Standard
abbreviations are acceptable; how-
ever, the first word of each ad may
not be abbreviated.

In Print and Online
wi h.Ilceil Vr|C)rlltr.o'litl


100 oOpportunities


Ladies and Gentleman
if ou have A Class A CDIL.
we have a Lease/with a leasew
purchase plan.
We accept PTD' ('crificd
,t dt ', (1 ) .'x-r.ato r .. N o
Nev 'ngla.du Slate.s. I1X);
fuel surcharge C.troltna.i. to
the great NW!
C.i(l lod.i to )outn ius
Buld Inc
866-369-9744


I


Home Improvements

Handicap accessible modifications
for veterans. 38 yrs experience.
386-752-4072 DON REED
CONSTRUCTION, INC
Licensed and insured CGC036224

Lawn & Landscape Service

Clean Pine Straw,
You pick it up, $1.85 a hale
Delivery of 100 hales $285
386-688-9156

Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
oiler court approved forms-
386-961-5896.


[Personal Merchandise]


Direct Catre Staff & Cooks
Lake City Cluster ICF for
Developmentally Disabled
Persons. www.rescare.com
386-755-6104 EEO/M/F/I)/V


100 Job
100 'Opportunities
i4.4 I') ?---------
95,43973



Holiday Inn
Lake City's only full service hotel
is seeking the following:
* Cook
a Cafe Server
* Front Desk Agent 3-llpmr
Experience required. Apply
in person. Mon-Fri 12-5pin
213 SW Commerce Dr.
EOE/DFWP.

0S5 III
Teacher Positions
Head Start/Early Head'Start,
Lake City-FCCPC /CDA; 3 yrs
of classroom experience
preferred (individuals w/ HS
dip/GED and DCF 40 hrs.'may
also apply). Excellent benefits-
paid holidays, sick/annual leave,
health insurance, retirement +
add'l benefits; Apply in person
at 236 SW Columbia Ave
(754-2222) or mail resume to
SV4Cs PO Box 2637,
Lake City. FL 32056-2637, by
e-mail: arobinson@sv4cs.org
or Fax (386) 754-2220. EOE

3 yr old Childcare Teacher
needed, FI', staff credential
preferred, Apply at Wee Care
in Columbia City
AVON!!!. EARN up to 50%!!!
Only $10 for Starter Kit,
1-800-275-9945 pin #4206
www.youravon.com/tdavies
Burntable Operator: Flame
cutting heavy metals using a CNC
Oxyfuel Burntable. Basic shop
skills req'd, exp. a plus. Apply in
person @ Grizzly Mfg. 174 N.E.
Cortez Terr. Lake City. Fl.
Cashiers needed. Experience
Preferred, Drug free workplace.
all applicants will be drug tested
Ellisville Exxon,
Hwy 441. No Phone Calls Please.
CDL A Flatbed/Van Truck
Driver needed for F/T OTR SE
area. 3 years exp or more. Contact
Melissa or Mary C( 386-935-2773
Hiirng Locally This Week
Liberty National .lfe
Insurance Company
Full Training Provided Potentital
of $6IK+ Annually. 401 K. BCHBS
In isuraince & 1'enision for those who
Quahlit ..all I-800-257-5.5 '
to sct up .uI interviews
Experienced Heavy Duly
Diesel Mcchanic needed,
Please call Mary ,at
380-.15.2773
G ;ENERA. AtI 'OMOTIVE
MliCINI( with tools.
Call I l.fners
386-755-641
Inside Salesman Needed
Industrial Pans Knowledge
Preferred. Apply in Person-
3631 E US Hwy 90 Lake City. FL
Local contractor is taking applica-
tions for a Class A CDL Truck
Driver w/tanker endorsement.
Must be drug free & willing to
travel to various projects through-
out SE US. Gone from home 2-3
wks at a time. Start at $15 an hr.
ins & 401K. EOE. Only Serious
and Drug-free Call John at
386-752-0141. Mon -Fri 8-4
Need Laborers
Call FJ Hill Construction
386-752-7887

Sales/Marketlng-Aftermarket
auto parts mnfg company is
looking for an experienced
sales/mnurketing person. Highly
motivated and works independent-
ly. Experience a must.
Remit Resume to Sales Position
1'O BOX 425. ilakc City.FL
32056.
Sewing Machine Operator
will parltally trained
if sonic experience or ability
('ll llilfiners 386-755-6481
Wanted Iiigaly motivated
individual for Sales Position,
Rounlree -Moore Ford lincoln
Mercury Great benefits, paid vaca-
tion. Exp. a plus but not necessary.
Call Chris. @ 386-755-0630
WANTED LICENSED
Life and Health
Insurance Agent.
Call 386-755-6800

1 n Medical
120 Employment

RN/LPN
Avlon Ilealthcare is
currently accepting
applications for the following
positions:
Full Time RN or LPN
3p/lip shift
Part 'Iime RN or LPN
7a/3p shift lip/7a shin
PRN
RN or LPN Positions
also available.
Long term care experience
a plus.
Come join our team!
P'lense apply:
Avalon I lealthcare and
Rehabilitation Center
1270 SW Main Ilvd.
Lake C(ity, I lorida 32025
386-752-7000. 1Il )


120 Medical
120 Employment

0454401')
Rehab Manager/Therapist
Hiring F/T Rehab Mgr at SNF
in North FL. Licensed
Occupational Therapists and
Occupational Therapy
Assistants may apply.
Send resumes to
rehabrecruiting@(gginazil.comi

.552.100'O
LEARN TO DRAW BLOOD
Local Phllehotonty Course
offered in Lake City, FLA
certificate e program.
(904)566-1328





Meridian Behavioral
Healthcare, Inc.
www.mbhci.org
Please visit our website to view
current open opportunities
and to apply online:

Therapists:
Licensed, or Master's Level
in Outpatient .
Bachelor's-Level in
Counselor Support
Case Management
(adult & child)
Outpatient
Medical Services
Psychiatrist
CSU RN Nursing Manager
ARNP tPsych exp. Child Pref)
RN. LPN. C.N.A.
Recovery Specialist
(Direct Care)
Meridian is an active partner
with the National Hlealih
Service Corps
To see our current openings in
Mental Health and to apply
online, please go to:
www.mbhcl.ory
EOF, DFWP, o-Verify

AMikds Faminly Scrviccs IP'rogr.n
seeks C,'c, MN.na;>ger for
connunity b.iased progr.iun work-
ing w/ at risk youth &.l
funtilcs ltachelor's degree rcqi'd
Req's travel to 7 countie..
Fax\ rcsutie ito 186. t.2 t 92

F"l CNA ntedcd
Send rrmuine to
826 SW M.un llvd Sit 1022
Lake City. FL 320t25


240 Schools &
240 Education

M5,13680
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-03/28/10
Plhlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-04/1 1/11
Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expressirainingservices.com


310 Pets & Supplies
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free frofn intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.


361 Farm Equipment

84 Ford 4610 Tractor. Runs good.
Solid 2WD. New front tires,
350hr on 2005 motor. Dependable.
$7500. obo. 386-867-0005


401 Antiques

CASH CASH CASH CASH
Pre 1964 Silver Coins. Sterling,
Flatware. Costume Jewelry.
I Unusual Antiques 386-963-2621


402 Appliances

;IM Spaire T're (285-70-16) on.
F.ctorv. Rinm Fits 1998-20(X) P/U
or Suburban. $40. 386-292-3927
or after 6pm386-755-5331

Nice Tappan G(;as Range.
White. $165. obo.
386-292-3927 or
.liier opin call 386-755-5331
Sotill/mediuum pet carrier.
$15.00
18- 292-3927 or
alter rtpm cadl 386-755-5331
White c.ltllc, di,,cr. Good shape.
work, gr.iat. $1()1
38t.-2-. 3927 or
alIter opm call 380-755-5331


A1 m


Your community call center is now

hiring 120 Customer Service Agents.



No Telemarketing!


Come to our Job Fair on

Wednesday, March 23, 2011w

between 3:00 pm and 7:00 pm

at the Holiday Inn, 213 SW Commerce
Dr., in Lake City


Come talk to us about our full and part time
career opportunities. If you are unable to

attend the job fair, you may apply on-line at:



www.sitel.com

or in person at:

1152 SW Business Point Drive, Lake City

(Between Sisters Welcome Road and Hwy 47)
Equal Opportunity Employer





ADvantage


FLORIDA


ADJUNCT INSTRUCTORS
SUMMER 2011
COLLEGE LEVEL MATHEMATICS
Master s degree in mathematics or a
Master s degree with 18 graduate
semester hours in mathematics
Contact Paua Cifuentes at
; 1 I : L I' kc ed,'.
PROGRAMMABLE LOGIC CONTROL
(PLC)
At Feast five years of full-time, in-field
work o xpenence and expertise in the
installation maintenance operation and
troubleshooting of current technology
automated process controls andi
associated systems including PLC's.
variable frequency drives. instrumtentation
and process control systems hydraulic
and pneumatic systoms Experninco in
training both factory technicians iand
operations personnocl For additional
information contact Bob oeckon at 386.
754 4442 or rtL it drJ .-( -ij', ; rii0
LOGISTICS AND WAREHOUSING
The Binnmr Cente, for Glohal I OqslK;- is
s ir, i srrumrni r annd fl l lndpiitir:
firstruc ,torr for Ihn I t)li<.t ;and
Warehohfisig nli,,, r.o iriqo A Mnsler'q
dogrno with atl lrt 18 ;rnd its in
Opernhons Man.rltinmenfl Lorjnlc
Supply Chain or rolatnd field is requirrod
Em riaursiimin to Stophtinm Glonni at
'.'rp .i. .n .1 .l'"f" i ,1'-io, ror call Ih
Banner Center for Global I t(Sislici an
386-754-4492 for moro information
NURSING CLINICAL
BSN Required Masters degree in
nursing preferred At luest two yoars of
recent clinical exprnonco roquirod
Contact Mattle Jones at 386-754-4368 or
(II.iltln jnnuRl ( f.fJr: tdil
w ..n.inn t. ic in l l "I,/
,nqiircllrr' tnirnn rii i rt rlri inurl In-
i iii i...... and I ,ii. ih
% r , -. e.I{.1 m' ,, .iI Id


407 Computers
HP Computer,
$100.00
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170
IBM Computer,
$65
386-755-9984 or
'.386-292-21701

420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$250 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.


430 Garage Sales
4 Families Sat. 7-? By high school'
off 252, 342 Mill Creek. Furniture,
lots of good stuff, household, vin-
tage, baby items. 386-755-2227











PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.

Sat -8-2. Lots of fishing, camping,
tools, household, collectibles.
1/2 mi. S of CR 8 on
Tustenuggee Ave. 386-965-1308
Saturday Only. 7a-12p.
Harmony Ln. Off Hwy 47S.
Electronics. Furniture. Household
Items. Toys. Much more.

440 Miscellaneous
FREE
Large Children's swing set
and slide, you move
Already Gone. Thank You!
Mans bicycle.
Murray American style. $40.
386-292-3927 or
after pm call 386-755-5331
Tow Behind Grill/Smoker
$1.250 OBO.
386-249-3104 or
386-719-4802









LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY,.MARCH 20, 2011


4 Buildinm
463 Materials
ROOFING Are you bothered
by a leaking roolt'?
Call Reed Roofing today for a free
estimate. 386-752-4072
RCC00455399 Insured
ROOFING :Looking to replace
your Roof? Call Reed Roofing
today for a free estimate
386-752-4072 RC0055399
References available

63O Mobile Homes
6 U for Rent
12 x 60 SWMH. CH/A, good
location, real clean, No Pets
$395 month, $200 deposit.
Call 386-755-0064/904-771-5924
2&3 BR MH. $395 $650. mo.
plus deposit. Water & sewer fur-
nished. Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
3BR/2BA Doublewide on I ac.
Lg. Rooms. $750 a month.
1st month and full security.
Please call 386-965-7534.
A very clean ,& well maintained
2/2 units in nice park. $599.imo
w/$500. dep. Rent includes water.
sewer, trash p/u. Close to town
386-984-8448
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White Contact 386-623-3404
or 386-365-1919






SWMH 3/2, Just Remodeled,
Located off 41, on 246,
$550 per month, $550 security,
NO Pets Call 386-330-2316

Mobile Homes
640 for Sale

05525135
Palm Harbor Homes
Call about our
Extreme Makeover Home Sale
As Seen On TV!!
800-622-2832

06 Homes of Merit. 3br/2ba. Open
floor plan w/lg kitchen. 3 Rivers
Estate. River access. MLS#75661
Eastside Village Realty. Denise
Milligan-Bose. 386-752-5290
4/2 DWMH at Timberlane Park,
Long Carport, 2 porches/shed
$38.500.
386-752-4258
Owner Fin. 3/2P S of Lake City,
quiet, wooded. 1.5 ac. sml dn $7(00)
mo, 386-590-0642/386-8671833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.comni

Mobile Home
650 &Land
Well kept 3/2 moble on 2+ acres.
screened front porch, covered back
porch, shed, MLS77241 $64.000
Call Brittany @( Results Realty
386-397-3473

705 Rooms for Rent

Renovated home has 2 rooms for
rent w/bath $401(no + $2(X). dep.
Ref. req'd. Some animals ok. Uitd-
ities + internet incl. (9(1)495-9706

710l Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent

0552472;
SPRING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans:
some with garages.
Call 386-454-1469
or visit our website:
www.springhillvillage.net

Move in as low as $325
Call today for details!
386-758-8455
Windsong Apts
1 & 2 Bedroom Homes
Move in for as low as
$199
386-755-2423
2br Apt. by the lake. Close to
shopping and the VA Medical
Center. $525. mo plus deposit.
386-344-2972
A Landlord You Can Love!
2 brApts $575. & up + sec. Great
area. CH/A washer/dryer hookups.
386-758-9351/352-208-2421
Great location W of 1-75, spacious
deluxe 2BR apts., garage. W/D
hook up. patio. $600 & up, + SD,
386 965-0276
The Lakes Apts. Studios & I Br's
from $135/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $525. + sec.
Call Michelle 386-752-9626


720 Furnished Apts.
720 For Rent

Apt, Ft. White, FL 2/1,
screen porch, W/D hook up,
$550 mo plus Sec Dep,
386-497-1116

Rooms for Rent. lillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric.
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. I person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

730 Unfurnished
JU Home For Rent

2/1 MH in town, w/CH/A, $500
month plus deposit, no pets!, pls
leave message 386-365-1920 or
386-454-7764 after 6pmo

3ba/2ba, Lg FR, LR & DR,New
carpet & paint: .5 ac 2 mi from
d'town. No pets. Spec lease req'd:
tenants w/fav background only.
$850 +dep. 752-8696, 752-5025.
3br/2ba new const.in nice S/D
Lease Opt. to buy. $900/Mo. $700
Dep, + 1st & last Req'd., Credit
Check No Pets (386)755-9476
3br/2ba. 5 beautiful ac. Huge
oaks. I mi west of 1-75 & I IS 90.
Appliances, shed, water, sewer &
lawn care furnished. $700mo $800
dep. 386-984-9992/(904)571-5001
4/2,on 10 acres, w/lake access, off
of South Marion, $1,000) per
month. $500 security,
Call 386-752-3066
House for rent. Complpetely
remodeled. 4br/2ba + bonus room.
Carport. Great area. $1000 mo.
Plus security. 386-867-2283
Small 2/1 newly remodeled, near
school, $500 month. + deposit, no
pets!. pis leave message 386-365-
1920 or 386-454-7764 after 6pm

750 Business &
75 Office Rentals


2.000 sq ft. I mile S of 1-75 on
47. includes warehousee & mini
golf.3 bth (incl handicap).
unlimited possibilities could
convert to Senior Daycare. etc.
386-752-1364 or 965-4.340

1200 sq ft Professional Office
Space, across from Courthouse.
newly remodeled. 152 N Marion
$650 mo 386-8674995 / 961-8466

1800 SQ FT $1100. Office
furniture available and
cubicle dividers. Water,
sewer and garbage fees included.
386-752-4072 Ready to move inl!
OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sift
S675nmo/$695. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor
SE Baya Ave Office Furnished
1800 Sq Ft $1125.00
Ideal for Engineers & Professional
Quiet and s fe environment
Sex urlt .e.ul.ible 186 "7 .' .1II) ?


770 Condos For Rent


Golf rCourse Condo to1 rrnl.
2BR12BA. 1420 st SH(lO/inlo
Rent includes .ill .applh.inces,.
basic cable, w .iter/sewecr/
garbage. p tool & tennis ct
access Realtor/owner
call 386-344-0433.


790 Vacation Rentals

Horseshoe Beach Spring Special
Gulf Front 2br home. w/lg water-
front porch, dock. fish sink.
Avail wkends. 5$345. or wk 5795.
(352)498-5986/386-235-3633

Rental Condo on Daytona Beach.
All Inclusive. 7 day stay $675.
ISpring Break Apnl 2-9 As.uil
386-5)90-(1W642


805 Lots for Sale

1999 3/2 DWMII on I ac
$55.0)()
Hallmark Real Estate
386-867-1613
Call lay Sears
2 ac lot in River Access
community. Suiwainnec River
1 mile away. Owner will finnIceo
$13.500 HIlallmark Real Eslate
386-867-1613 Call Jay Sears
Emerald Cove S/DI), Lot # li9
Half acre lot. Only $42.000(
call Millard Gillen ()
386-365-7001 MLS# 75278
westfieldrea.iltygrouip.comn
High & Dry buildable, wooded in
Forest Country. MLS#76668
Eastside Village Realty, Inc.
Call Denise Milligan-Bose
386-752-5290


805 Lots for Sale
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitalion, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, fainilial stalus or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discriminationn" Familial status
includes children under thile age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under tlie age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver,
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.


810 Home for Sale

2/I completely updated, screened
back porch, large utility room,
MLS#77413 $59,888 Call Nancy
@ R.E.O. Really 386-867-1271
nancytrogers@mnsn.comn
2/1,011 nearly an acre, living/dining
rm, kitchen nook, until rm, fenced,
back porch,2 car carport close to
town, $60,000 386-754-5818
2/2 + Bonus Room, 1749sf, 4 acre
corner lot. board fenced, det
garage/wkshp MLS#74900
$214.900 Call Paum @ Remax
386-303-2505 www.visitpam.com
2/2 -2 story, 9.7 ac. fenced & cross
fenced w/pastures. Oversized LR,
separate dining. Ig den. Workshop,
carport. 386-752-6575 $179,900.
Century 2 I/The Darby Rogers Co.
2/3 on 5 acres, wrap around porch,
family rm w/fireplace, detached
garage. $179,900 MLS# 77005
call Roger Lovelady @
Westfield Realty 386-365-7039
2BR/2BA singlewide mfg home
on 1.7-ac comer lot; large yard &
paved drive $44.900 DANIEL
CRAPPS AGENCY. INC. 755-
5110 #75864
3/2 Brick Home in town. fenced
back yard w/12x12 workshop
S84.888 Call Nancy @( R.E.O.
Realty 386-867-1271 MLS# 77414
nancytrogers@nlsn.coni
3/2 Cute Home, Remodeled. on 2
acres, partially fenced $114,900
MLS# 77396 Call Nancy @(aR.E t
Realty Group 386-867-1271.
nancytrogers@msn coin
3/3 Brick. Great location, pond.
Custom built w/Florida room &
vaulted ceiling. Workshop.N MILS
75222 $179,900 386-67-1613
Jay Scars Hallmark Real Kstate
3Bedrm/3bth w/2 Master Sultes.
fenced back yird.firrplacc
MIS#76779. 11 5.(XX)
C('.ll M .11, /c, h/ tii (Si t1'6 (
(12 l \\ i w nu ss\ /rt'che c in
.12 on 10 5 icC-," etac h Icl-cd
g.ir.agc, p.all ,tA .i v glounld |Hol.
MI.S# 77.110 $189.888 ('.ll -
Nanci Rogers(a R.E.O. Realty
386 8,67 1271
67.5 Acre Runch w MiH. Icnerd
& crmiss tenccd, kshop. Iple ba.irl.
2 ponds, Spac ious MI.S# 759t07
Asking 29)9K. (.all IP.itti i ylor (n
3S(-2 6896 \Access Rcally
95 Acre Estate, 43 Farm House.
Pond. Oaks. $689.0(,1.
MILS#76149 (.ill Charlie Sparks
(' Westfield Rea.ilty 386-755-0808
w estfieldrealti group.corn
A quiet neighborhood is the
perfect setting for this cute. cozy
home. Lg back yard \w/I car
garage/w orkshop. S84.9{1)
Century 21/rhie Darb\ Rogers Co.
Beautiful Home \/custom
cabinets. 10ft ceilings. $199)90(0
MIL.S# 77188 Call
('arrie (.ason (a' 38-623-2806
wedstiildrea.llygroup.com
Brick IHone in Estahlished S/I).
3/2. ()pen floor plin. Ml..S#7(il 21
$134.9(X) Call Mi ss\ Zecher (a'
386-62.1-0237 Renax
\ ww.missviecher.com
('(, 3/I hlomnr. inside city Imils.
fenced lbckyard. detached carport
w/olice Ml ,S#77411 $84.191)
('all R.E.O.Reailtv.
Nancy Rogers (0 186 86h7 127 I
( Oldss ell lhinker/llishollp Reanlty
Illock. s.ilt pla||n WoodIcicsl S/I).
Scueelled piiulch, u1lllllg. living &
bllaklasl ar'a.I .g backv.uid. lillne
K, 'lTolar t86-755 .18,S $1 19.900.
(oldwdell liliiker/llishiop Rieallty
Brick. 10 ac 3/2 split floor plan, FIl
roomn Ig utility, scr porchl. (ia:.ebo.
carport, fenceId. $149.9(X). l.ori
(cibeig Simtnpson 386-365-5678
LIKE NFEW! 31R/2BA mfig home
near Wellborn on 5+ acres ONLYI
$79,900 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY, INC. 755-5110 #76768


810 Home for Sale
Coldwell Ilanker/Bishop Really
New home, May Fair. Greal area.
Corner lot. 4 bedrooni, lots of tile,
covered porch. Split plan$214,900.
Elaine K. Tolar 386-755-6488
Coldwell 1h5nker/lBishop Really
4br/2ba on 5 ac. Lg family, IFlorida
room den or office. Covered patio.
23x30 workshop. $229,900. Lori
Geibeig Simpson. 386-365-5678
Coldwell hlinker/Bishop Realty
3/2 Hardwood, seperate olfice/liv-
ing/family rm. Workshop, fenced
Lori Geibeig Simpson 386-365-
5678 Mary Whilehurst 965-0887
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Brick on 3.23 ac. New roof, win-
dows, paint. Newer AC, remod-
eled interior, fencing, good area.
Elaine K. Tolar. 386-755-6488
Colonial 4/3 + Guest House,
9,95 acres, inground pool, detachi-
ed/garage, gate entry,MLS#t77386
$325K ('Call Pain Beauchamp 0()
386-303-2505 Reimax
Corner lot in Piccadilly S/D. I luge
living & diining ro6ni. New paint
& carpet. 2 car garage, ingroundi
pool. 386-752-6575 $133,500
Century 21 fl1e' Darby Rogers Co.'
CUSTOM 4/2 scrni porch, 16x24
workshop w/ele & water, gazebo,
fireplace, ceramic tile/wood floors.
386-752-6575 $189,900)
Century 21/Tfhe Darby Rogers. Co
Custom, 3/2.5 built in 2007,
on 10.8 manicured acres,
completely fenced, Owner Fin.
avail., MLS#77382 Call Patti
386-623-6896 Access Realty
EASTSIDE VILLAGE! Owner
motivated! 3BR/2BA has large liv-
ing/dining mi combo $62,000
#77266 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY. INC. 755-5110
Family Home in Subdivision
4 bdrm Lots of space, newer
roof/carpet MLS#76283 Call
Missy Zecher @ 386-623-0237
Remax, www.missyzecher.com
FOR SALE by very motivated
owner. Just reduced $70,000. to
$129.000. Townhouse on Golf
course. 3br/3ba. Wood burning
fireplace. End unit. Remodeled
kitchen, first class appliances.
granite countertops. New Ilunter
Douglas wdw treatments.
Cathedral ceiling. Pool. tennis
court. Call for appt. (194)246-6222
GREAT STARTER HOME!
3BR/2BA in Quail Ridge withll
back patio, luscious lawn $84.901)
#76432 DANIEL C'RAPPS
AGENCY. INC. 755-51I10
large Brick, 3/I.4.43 acrese, metal
roof. MLS# 77415 $109.888
Call Nanc\ Roger. C(' .3,6-867-
1271 R.E.O. Really Group, Inc
nI.ulcytro er il lin'ln co1nl
1.g hollic (1ll COnier lotl wN/O s\M/cdi
g.airge F.ijstsdoe Rclnenincit
Village. lcatcd Pool clubhouse.
MLS 71901 386.752-52 10
olaslde Ve village Realty. Inc.

,,11, 1 lioiise P, elci.l101. $21.'' 8i i
MI.S 76899C ('.dl
Rogrr los cl.idl a tSo ( 165 7)00%
w est'llicldreallt giOup 1'oun
NEW 1 .(x)RlNG;IRFSI
PAIN P 2 ,slor\ lbr/2b.i on I # .ac.
Ig kiltl ll. t.111n is 1111. tenccd Xtl lnd
$99,, l #N759,) I .m I u clt ".ipl,
A.\geii lnc 5' 5 t110
Nice solid brick honi on il5 .cres.
Couinlr\ l el t but close to lo' Iwn.
MtLS 76063 $129.88S ('.ill
Bnlt.iny Sto.ckcrt Results Really
38o-317-3473
Nice. large 4/2 on I acre
w/flonda roim. granite floors.
wr rap around front porchi. $148.000
Call Brittany Stocckert (C&
Results Realty 386-397-3473
Owner Fin.. 3/2 on 2.5 acres. fish
xond. N of Lake City. sm down
$675 mo. 386-590-0642/867-1833
w0 w w su0wannccvallcyproperties C-011o
Owners Motivated! Multiple
dwellings. Main Ihouse and 2 mo-
bile homes Pecans. cedar & a/a-
leas. $199.9(1, CenilurN 21/ile
Darby Rogers Co. 386-752-6575


810 Home for Sale
Premiier Lifestyle ( Conmmnitly
The Preserve at Lamlurel I ake,
4/2, $194,900 MLSIl 77257 Call
Scott Stewartl a) 386-867-3498
weslfieldrealtygrouip.coli
JjAINT 1950s Ilome w/lots oft
upgrades! uEnclosed front porch,
211R/I BA, screened back porch
$29,900 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY, INC 755-5110 #77505
Qualified General Contractor
doing top Quality work!
386-752-4072 Licensed and
Insured CGC036224
Don Reed Construction, Inc.
Reduced in Rose Creek S/D, 5/4
on 2.2 acres, close to town
MLS#75485 $274,900 Call Pain
@ Reinax 386-303-2505
www.visilpani.coim
Secluded, however close to Iown,
3/2 Brick Ranch I Ionie, spacious
$198,900 MIS I 74415 ('all
Charlie Sparks (a) 386-755-0808
westlfieldrealtygroup.comi
Solid hlome, needs up|daling. Nice
yard & workshop/garage! Country
kitchen w/eat in area as well as
formal. 386-752-6575 $70,000
Century 2 1/'lie Darby Rogers Co.
'Totally Refurbished 2/2
w/workshop on 1.25 fenced acres
$94,900 Call Millard Gillen @
Westfield Really 386-365-7001
MLS#75417
Two story MH, located in
Wellborn on 2.66 acres, porches
and fireplaces, 9 bdrms/3bths
$163,900 Patti Taylor MLS#71594
Access Realty 386-623-6896
Well Maintained 3/2 on 1.5
acres, fenced, porches, wkshp,
$49,900 MLS# 77309 Call Josh
Grecian 386466-2517
westfieldrealtygroup.com

820 Farms &
Acreage

t(5525391
Take Over Pvmt's
10 Ac $74.500. 20 Ac $139.500
$6,975 P/A. Fine Neighborhood.
3 miles W of Col. City School.
Owner Fin 5c;. Rolling Pasture
386-752-1364 or 965-4340

10 ac lots. somile w/well. septic. pwr
pile. Lowered prices. Owner finance
sw/low dni pnnil Deas Bullard Proper-
tics 186-752-433'1 ww) \linilnfl
4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$69.9(). $613nmo 352-215-1018.
". Lu.LIld. t erEl,,.iucjlqcoljfl
Acres. Vellbomn. New Well
installed. leiautifull\ wooded
sw/clearcd I lonic Site. owncr fin.
no doiwni. $ h')(S9 $410 nion
C.ill 352-215- I.
so s so I ..lnd( )\ nerlinnli llclng.lcou
5 \WOODEI).icres
Suwance R.uawheltes $200 per nlo
for 5 ln 1 Then S203.85 per mo
thelrr.iatllter. t3521472-2879
IOutdoorsman Special. nc.i
1lit hltlukllCe Spl Ii s l St I'.uk.
f\in-l tlU \,20' >lll,
Blithile :\led S .4S7 1.184

83Q 'Commercial
830V Property
commerciall Income Properly.
\ /nl,iton.l teilanlts. I '.(X )t1
s> tfI..iddittonl1 Icnccdt sp.ce.
('.Call Scott Stewtl .11 186 817 3488
wesitfichreialtlgrou coin

860 Investment
860 Property
In e.stment Property. 2 MH's on
almost acres. well & septic.
fenced $29.900 MLS# 77233
Call Josh Grecian C(" Westfield
386-466-2517

940 Trucks


EA &n
ON WHEELS & WATERCRAFT ** *


1 ^W ,e^ "
&^ a L (JE -- -.


Homestead Rancher
Travel Trailer
28ft. Ono slideout
fiberglass, awning,
sleeps 8.
$10,000
Call
850-322-7152


2010 Puma Travel
Trailer 32ft.
2 slide outs, nir owning,
King Island beod. Many
extras. Must soil. Lako City.
$18,500
Call
863-660-8539


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Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, MARCH 20, 2011


c~1g0 g4,


Rotate &
Balance
Tires
Most cars & trucks
Plus tax & supplies
Not valid with any other offer
expires 3/31/11


*


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Serta


e'


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TOP-OF-THE-LINE Resten c.t Firnn S2 r
Perfect Sleeper Finnna, e
Pillowtop or super Fir, YOUR CHOICE
se 999orFull aor Queelt Sti $ 9
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,.aL Ncand Necessary X-rays
1 R g $1

,,1 ',ll' .s\\l:(.. ,O F 107
S\pires March31, 2011
". www. a peml. -a ,'-.y.
" " www.aspenlakeclty.com


GUITARS AMPs DRUMS PIANOS
SOUND SYSTEMS -RENTALS REPAIRS
KEYBOARDS SHEET MUSIC
BAND INSTRUMENTS LESSONS
$t100 OFF


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L ', Located next to Lee's Nursery
--, 'R- -' A\j v[ '-16 Ls H. -s. H..%,2--i t. QFL
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MSRP $2,94900
SFRE $9 2RD-7OOX7
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o Lake Ct-v. FL
386-755-2060
950 SW MAmN BLVD
M-F 9:OOAM-6:OOP
SAT 9: 00m-4:OOp
WWW.I'IRSTSTREL-LTMUSIC.COM


Psychic Readings Jennifer Miller;I
Helps In All Problems Psychic M


\ ..I
*B ' 4---- -


I7


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And Say


Cew


Just Say 'No' to
Lesser Quality
Poor Construction
@ Paying Freight from out of State
No Service after the Sale and the Fat Cat Corporations
that couldn't care less about your family.


to


"4x \t =V (The only factory
outlet for the only
locally owned Factory)

Town Homes

DARE TO COMPARE OUR SPECIAL
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ODULAR I A MOBILE HOME PRICE


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Hwy 90 W Lake City (Across from Wal-Mart) 386-752-3743 Pinemount Rd Lake City 386-755-8885


0m


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Story ideas?

Contact
C.J. Risak
Assistant editor
754-0427
coisk<.i(h Ike( it epoft tet:c.cot in


Lake City Reporter





LIFE


Sunday, March 20, 2011


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section D


GARDEN TALK






Nichelle Demorest


Picking

the right

palm

for your

landscape

What plant
symbolizes
a tropical
paradise
better than
the palm? We may not
live in the tropics, but we
can get that look in our
landscapes. Here are some
tips on how to choose the
right palms for your own
paradise.
Palms that grow well in
Columbia County must be
able to withstand possible
winter temperature dips
of 15 degrees E You may
have a high spot on your
property that stays a few
degrees warmer, or even
a low area where colder
air collects. Deteriniiiing
where your warm and cold
pockets are will help when
selecting the right palm.
Right plant, right place.
Florida's ol icial state
tre .-t',-t Mh a~-ir-PNIm, ,
an excellent native palm
that withstands tempera-
tures to 10 degrees F TIlis
tree is adaptable to wet
or dry soil in full sun. It
grows tll and erect, and
is easy to transplant if it
has developed a trunk.
The cabbage palm makes
a nice specimen tree with
its attractive fan-shaped
leaves.


PALMS continued on 2D


Volunteer of the


Local CSO

leader earns

statewide

,recognition
By TONY BRITT
tv(.iff "l, lfr i f't r ( 'r fr o t- i'1
WHITE SPRINGS -- In the
world Khrys Kantarze lives in,
she is accustomed to seeing the
big picture a picture of success
where things co-exist.
From the peace symbol taped
to her state-issued license plate
to placing Christmas decorations,
volunteering as a canoe/kayak
paddling guide on the Suwannee
River to coordinating dinners or
providing ideas for Stephen Foster
Folk Culture Center State Park
Citizen Support Organization to
help the park she wants things
to successfully co-exist and be in
harmony.
Kantarze's drive for success has
helped the Stephen Foster Folk
Culture Center State Park deal
with less funding from the state
and spurred improved programs
for park patrons and visitors.
Her vision of the big picture
was also noticed by Florida Park
Service officials who named
Kantarze the 2011 Florida Park
Service Adult Volunteer of the
Year.
A semi-retired leadership con-
sultant and trainer, as well as a
hypnotherapist. Kantarze is the
Stephen Folrer Folk Culture
Center ftte Pirlk CifT'rr'Siilpntt
Org,iii.,ititi' president. The CSO(
is a volunteer gri mp that supports
approximately Mii percent of the
events at Stcpli-ii Foster andl the
Big Shoals State Park.
Park manager Ben Faure was
first notified that Kantarze had
won the award in February, but
he and others who knew she was
the winner kept it a secret until
last weekend.
During a volunteer appreciation
luncheon for district state park
awards last week, Kantarze was


Year


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Above: Khrys Kantarze, the Citizens Support Organization president at the Stephen Foster Folk Culture Center
State Park, has been named the Florida Park Systems Adult Volunteer of the Year.
Below: Kantarze hangs upside down on playground equipment located at the park's campgrounds. She played an
important role in having the playground built closer to the campers for their convenience.


shocked to learn she had been
named the 2011 Florida Parks
Association Adult Volunteer of the
Year.
"I was surprised,." she said. "I
had no idea he (Faure) had even
nominated me. let alone that I was
the winnl.er"
*"- ffnrl7'" i.i-"beenT pnrk vonln-
teer for four years and during that
time the CSO membership 'has
si.Idil\ increased, going from
less than 50 members to 1.1S in a
four-year period.
"IKhrys is priceless in many
efforts," Faure said. "'lle primary
thing that she brings is leadership
to manage the volunteers in the
CSO, and her coordination and
collaboration with the park is their
other key thing "
Faure said he and Kantarze
work closely on ways to help


support the Stephen Foster Folk
Culture Center State Park finan-
cially and through volunteers.
"She's not only a volunteer,
she's part of our family of the
Florida Park Service Family, and
that's really an important thing."
Faure said. "All of our volunteers
nre, hut Khryv is especially valu-
able to us from that aspect."
Through Kantarze's work the
CSO has added a playground to
the camping area of the park.
'There are also plans to add a
:3 1.0(X) picnic pavilion as well as
developing a new mountain bike
trail, Faure said.
Faure said Kantarze's contri-
butions are helping the park get
back into an era where it isn't only
recognized for the carillon tower
KANTARZE continued on 2D


r








LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE SUNDAY, MARCH 20, 2011


SCORE offers mentoring, counseling to small businesses


Jelly Belly Candies?
Vermont Teddy Bear
Company? What
do these businesses
have in common? They all
attribute their success to their
free mentoring from SCORE.
SCORE is an acronym which
once stood for Service Corps
of Retired Executives volun-
teers who retired from business
and who wanted to share their
knowledge and love of business
to new and struggling small
businesses.
Over 11,000 that's how
many volunteers now serve as ,
mentors. SCORE began in the
1960s, under the direction of the
Small Business Administration.
These volunteers represent 600
business skills, so it is quite pos-
sible that they know the very
issue your business may be
struggling over.
You can get free mentoring/
counseling in 389 face-to-face
offices, and Lake City and the
Suwannee River area is lucky
enough to have,had one here for
the last five years. The office is
located on West Highway 90, in
the strip mall, across from the
Highway Police Station. They
can be reached by phone at 752-
2000 or you can log-on to the


Kristi Cheyney
Kristi.cheyney@fgc.edu

national site at www.score.org
You can ask for 24/7 e-mail men-
toring at the national web site
or you can ask for confidential,
free, one-on-one counseling at
the local office.
Better yet, think about attend-
ing the newest seminar to be
held Wednesday, March 23,
"Managing Unemployment
Costs." For only $20, you can
network over lunch and hear
from a Panel of Experts. The fee
also includes all materials along
with the luncheon.
The Panel of Experts includes
a state mediator of unemploy-
ment claims, Human Resource
personnel from a larger busi-
ness, and an entrepreneur of a
smaller business.
Sonje good tips for holding


down unemployment costs:
Keep turnover to a minimum by
using fair and competitive busi-
ness practices. Second, keep
detailed and secure employment
records. Provide employees with
copies of company policies. If
you must lay off employees,
help them with a job search so
they become re-employed more
quickly. Finally, if you feel a
former employee is making an
unfair claim, challenge it.
Many people don't realize who
pays for unemployment benefits:
it's your employer you don't
pay anything for unemployment
insurance. .Your boss pays a cer-
tain percentage of your pay into
federal and state funds. That tax
rate goes up for the employer
when former employees file for
unemployment.
Unemplloyment insurance
(created in 1935 by the Social
Security Act) was never consid-
ered to be a permanent source
of income. It's to be used to "tide
one over" until new employment
can be found.
,Following the Panel of
Experts, attendees can network
during the lunch at Guangdong
Restaurant. Following lunch,
a question and answer session
will allow the experts to answer
questions from the floor from
0


the attendees.
The senminar/workshop time
is 11:00 1:30. Attendees are
urged to come early to get reg-
istered, look over the materials,
and be seated before the panel
begins at 11:00.
SCORE is also providing a
limited number of free tickets
to students registered in Florida
Gateway College business
courses; contact Dr. Carder at
754-4407 for more information.
So, how did SCORE help Vera
Bradley designs? It's a long
way from the basement to the
big time, but larbara Bradley
Baekgaard and Patricia Miller
have taken their line of women's
luggage, accessories and cloth-
ing from trunk sales in their
homes to major markets around
the globe. The story began when
the two neighbors discovered
they shared an interest in fash-
ion design. They soon noticed
that women lacked functional,
attractive luggage for business
trips. With $500 and the name
of Barbara's mother, they devel-
oped some prototypes for soft,
quilted duffel bags and purses.
The items were the hit of
an in-home clothing show, and
demand grew. Barbara and Pa-
tricia soon found themselves


searching for experienced seam-
stresses, deals on wholesale fab-
ric, and--perhaps most impor-
tant-sound business advice.
The two designing women con-
tacted the Ft. Wayne chapter of
SCORE.
Today, Vera Bradley Designs'
200 employees produce over 800
products from a 25,000-square-
foot manufacturing center in Ft.
Wayne. The number of buyers
has grown from local stores to
thousands of retailers through-
out the U.S. and overseas (story
taken from www.score.org web
page).
So, about the name "SCORE":
it did, indeed, pattern itself on a
business model which relied on
retired business executives to
mentor new businesses. Over
the years, however, it attracted
other mentors who were still
'very active in their own busi-
nesses but were willing to share
advice.
Ergo, SCORE has subtitled
itself, "Counselor to America's
Small Business." The SCORE
mentors in the local branch
include a banker, radio station
owner, business consultant,
contractor, retailers, success-
ful small business owners and
business leaders, in addition to
retired executives.


\ Adolescent medicine: Teen patients


ASSOCIATED PRESS
This undated photo courtesy of the Children's Hospital
Medical Center of Cincinnati shows the Teen Health Center at
the hospital in Cincinnati, Ohio. Some parents choose to have
their teens treated in practices that focus on teen medicine
rather than sticking with the pediatricians their kids have used
since birth or early childhood.


ANNE WALLACE ALLEN
For The Associated Press
Laurel Carignan was
tilling out some insurance
paperwork in her pedi-
atrician's office recently
when site overheard a
conversation between her
12-year-old daughter, who
was chatting with a toddler
in the waiting room, andl a
nurse who had just walked
into the room.
"The nurse copies up
to her and says. 'Are you
the mom?'" recounted
Carignan, whose daughter
is as tall as an adult. "If
V0o II 'Id t'vind -ince that we
probably don't belong (at
the pediatrician) anymore.,
there you go."
Luckily for Carignan
and other parents, there's
somewhere else to take
kids who are in the phase
between childhood and
adulthood. A specialty
known as adolescent inedi-
cine, or teen medicine,
fills the gap for parents
and young people who feel
out of place in the brightly
decorated waiting room of


ENGAGEMENT


Don and Debra Sloan
of Lake City announce the
engagement and approach-
ing marriage of their
daughter, Dorrie Alyssa
Sloan of Lake City, to '
James Michael Albritton Jr.
of Lake City.
He is the son of Jamie
and Kim Albritton of Lake
City and James and Sonia
Edgley of Lake Butler.
The bride-elect is a 2005


graduate of Columbia High
School, and works as a
hairstylist for Melanie Co.
The future groom is
a 2007 graduate from
Columbia High School
and works as a firefighter/
EMT for Columbia County
Fire Departmient.
IIThe wedding is planned
for 5:30 p.m. Saturday,
April, 2, 2011.


the pediatrician's office,
but unready for the pri-
mary care physicians and
specialists who see mostly
adults.
Adolescent medicine is
an official sub-spx'cialty of
pediatrics, witli board cer-
tification. But it's relatively
little-known, and has only
about 500 board-certified
practitioners around the
country, said Margaret
Blythe, an adolescent
medicine specialist who
is chairwoman of the'
adolescent committee for
tihe American Academy of
Pediatrics.
I'li six'ciahy has its
own association: tlihe
lHinois-based Society for
Adolescent health and
Medicine. which aims at
care for young pw'ople ages
10 to 25. and carries out
education, research, clini-
cal services and advocacy
activities.
SAHM issues position
papers on topics that affect
adolescents such as sexu-
ally transmitted diseases,
vaccinations, and nutrition
that are of particular inter-
est to doctors who care for
young people.
Some regular pediatri-
cians make a point of talk-
ing with teenage patients
without parents or caregiv-
ers listening in, but those
private chats between


doctor and patient are an
essential component of
adolescent medicine.
"We always spend time
alone with the teen," said
Blythe. a professor of pedi-
atrics at Indiana University
School of Medicine in
Indianapolis.
"Thlis is a time frame in
life where we know a lot of
kids are going to be mak-
ing decisions that impact
their health, regardless of
what the family wishes or
wants them to do," Blythe
said. "We're really try-
ing to spend some time
to answer questions they
have that tlley ulhnd totally
eimbarrassing."
Parents are sometimes
surprised to find them-
selves on the otiler side
of lhe exam room door,,
but most accept the time
has come for their child to
talk to the physician alone,
Blythe said.
"A parent that is really
understanding of teenage
life appreciates this," she
said.
Carignan, of Boise, said
it was her son. a tall 17-
year-old who is active in
sports, who first asked her
if he could start seeing
a new physician. It hap-
pened about a year and
a half ago in the waiting
room of the pediatrician
he had been seeing for 11


COURTESY PHOTO
James Michael Albritton Jr.
and Dorrie Alyssa Sloan.


years, around the time the
two of them had seated
themselves on an under-
sized plastic couch. The
walls were accessorized
with colorful borders
showing soccer balls and
dolls.
"It was awkward,"
Carignan said. "He was
like, 'I don't want to go
here anymore.'"
A waiting room for an
adolescent health special-
ist can make the patient
feel more at home with
pamphlets and brochures
about health topics such
as risky behavior, sexual-
ity, and mental health. But
beyond the look of the
office, adolescent medi-
cine really does address
needs that are different
from those of children and
full-grown adults. Blythe
said.
One important differ-
ence is that adolescents
are growing rapidly and
reaching puberty, a time of
enormous change. A large
element of Blythe's prac-
tice focuses on menstrual
disorders, contraception,
and evaluation of growth
and development in those
areas.
Mental health is also
another big topic in ado-
lescent medicine; one in
five young people has a
mental health problem.




r u


KANTARZE: Volunteer of the Year

Continued From Page 1D


and museum, but also for
the recreational opportuni-
ties the area has to offer.
"We're trying to mod-
ernize the park and still
keep the culture and his-
tory alive, but make the


place more attractive for
visitors to come," he said.
"T'he CSO helps us )pro-
vide better visitor services
to the park visitors and
guests here. It allows us
to do things we normally


couldn't do within our state
budget. If you count up the
four years of direct support
from the CSO, it's over $1
million of direct support to
this park."


PALMS: Which one to plant

Continued From Page ID


The Dwarf Palmetto,
Sabal minor, is also a
native palm with bluish
fan-shaped leaves. This
palm is short and shrub-
like, reaching about 3 to
5 feet in height. An ideal
use for this palm is as a
border plant in a shady
site. Another short palm
for shady moist sites is the
Needle Palm. Because
of its slower growth, the
Needle Palm makes a
great specimen or patio
plant. Both of these short


palms are cold hardy to 5
degrees IF, and rarely suf-
fer winter damage.
The Pindo Palm, or jelly
palm, is a medium sized
palm reaching tip to 20 feet
tall. It is very adaptable to
most soil types and toler-
ates winner temperature
lows to 14 degrees IF. The
narrow bluish leaves make
this tree a beautiful speci-
men tree in the landscape,
or a roadside tree iitl has
plenty of space to develop.
'ile best tlimne to plant


palms is during the rainy
summer season, so make
your plans now. Read
about other palms that
thrive in North Florida
at http://edis.ifas. ufl.
edu/EP019 Tlie Master
(Gardeners perfotrmi
free soil pHl tests at the
Extension office.
* Nichelle Demorest is a
horticulture agent with the
Columbia County Extension
of the University of Florida
Institute of Food and
Agricultural Sciences.


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427










LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & CROSSWORD SUNDAY, MARCH 20, 2011


DEAR ABBY


Family flees in face of man s

angry obsession with sports


DEARABBY: I have been
married for many years to a
man who is a good husband
and father in many respects.
However, he is obsessed with
professional sports, especially
football. It is .affecting our
home and social life.
Over the years, "Louie"
has punched holes in walls
and broken the bones in his
hands because he became so
angry when his favorite team
lost. He also has strong hatred
toward rival teams. His argu-
ments with people with op-
posing opinions have cost him
friendships.
His behavior is so annoying
and embarrassing the kids and
I don't want to be around him
on Sunday during games.
What's worse is that some of
Louie's friends are amused by
his tantrums and egg him on,
making him even angrier. For-
tunately, he never hits anyone.
I don't want a divorce, but
I don't want to be around Lou-
ie, either. Louie's "problem"
makes him unpleasant to be
around. When I visit friends
and family without him, they
wonder if we're separated. If
he could shrug off people's
comments and realize the out-
come of a game shouldn't af-
fect him, we could be happier.
What should I do? BAD
SPORT IN NEW JERSEY
DEAR BAD SPORT: It's
time you, your children and
anyone else who cares at all
about your husband stage an


Abigail Van Buren
www.deoambby.com

intervention and point out to
Louie that there are more im-
portant things in life than his
favorite football team. Chief
among them is learning im-
pulse control so he doesn't do
further harm to his body and
his relationships. It's one thing
to feel passion for a sport, but
he is creating a situation where
he doesn't enjoy it.
What you have described is
not normal, or healthy. He has
crossed the line and is risking
harm to his family, his rela-
tionships and his reputation.
This is beyond "kooky" -- it's
a little bit sick, and the person
who needs to step in is you.
DEAR ABBY: I went
through a difficult depression
during the time I was pregnant
with my daughter. As a result,
I seriously considered plac-
ing her for adoption and kept
the pregnancy hidden from
friends and co-workers. Dur-
ing my third trimester I took
a leave of absence and cut off
contact with my friends com-
pletely.
Now, two years later, I'm
happy to report that I received


therapy and treatment for my
depression and anxiety. I am
living a happy life with my
baby girl.
The problem is, I told no
one outside my family about
my daughter or the situation,
even though everyone noticed
my abrupt change in behavior.
How do 1 begin to share my
story? Will people be able to
forgive me for cutting them
out of myn life during a diffi-
cult time? BEGINNING
AGAIN WITH BABY IN
TEXAS
DEAR BEGINNING
AGAIN: Because of extreme.
cases in the news, most of us
are familiar with the hormonal
imbalance tliat causes postpar-
tum depression. A condition
called PRE-partum depression
is not as well known, but is also
well-documented. I'm pleased
you were able to get treatment
and resolve yours.
Share your story and
end your isolation by tell-
ing your closest friends about
your experience. If they are
truly friends and care about
you, they will embrace and
accept you and your daughter
and give you the support you
need after your illness. And
if they don't then you will
have to accept they are not
true friends and go on with
your life.
M Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-April
19): You'll be doing a balanc-
ing act so much to do and
you continue to take more
on. Something will give if you
don'l start prioritizing. A mis-
hap due to overload can be
expected and could influence
your personal or professional
position. ***
TAURUS (April 20-May
20): There will be hidden
factors that you need to flush
out before you make an ir-
reversible decision. Pull in
favors if it will help you finish
something with a strict time-
line involved. Stubbornness
will be your downfall. ***
GEMINI (May 21-June
20): There is nothing you
cannot accomplish if you put
your mind to it. ,Focus on
what's important to you and
don't slop until you are satis-
fied with the results. Follow
your own path. *****
CANCER (June 21-July
22): You'll face a dilemma.
What you want to do and
what you should do will con-
flict. Ask someone with more
experience to help you. Orga-
nizing your day properly will
bring you the best of both
worlds. **


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Word
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):
Take a day trip or sign up for
a lecture, conference or trade-
show. What you learn and the
people you meet will inspire
you to take on old goals that
you had all but forgotten.
Strive for the best. Love is
highlighted. ****,
VIRGO' (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Offer someone' a pro-
posal and you are likely to
get a surprise counteroffer
with even greater.potential.
You can develop a good wo k-
ing partnership as long as
you strive for equality and
delegate who takes care of
what before you actually get
started. ***
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): Put everything you've
got into friends, family, chil-
dren or your lover. Interact-
ing with others will bring the
highest returns. Socializing
and sharing ideas will lead
to an interesting partnership
that crosses personal and pro-
fessional borders. ***
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov.
21): You'll have to use a lot


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celeony Cipher cryptograms are created from qu otaiorns by famous people, pas and present,
Each leter in the Cipher stands lor another
Today's clue: P equals F
SR J U FU V Z IZV H J I 'G SU H VI IS UV U
GLVRJDG RJ ISU UJC ISRG LTRGTJ,
ISHI S U B HJ JTI IVXGI H PVRUJ C ."
- HUGBSZYXG
PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "Behold, my friends. the spring Is come: the earth has
gladly received the embraces of the sun." Sitting Bull
(c) 2011 by NEA. Inc. 3.21


of energy in order to get what
you need to do out of the way.
Minor injury will occur if you'
try something physical for
which you require help. Deal-
ing with contracts or people
you are depending on will be
difficult. ***
SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): You'll be in the
winner's circle as long as you
don't argue. Your path is clear
and your popularity will grow
as long as you are fun to be
with. Step into the limelight
and enjoy the recognition you
receive. ****
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-
Jan. 19): Talk less and do
more. This is a good time to
look up someone you used to
work alongside. An opportu-
nity to do something together
in the future looks bright.
' Teaming up will ensure great-
er performance and success.

-AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): You can formulate
ideas and contracts or put to-
gether a new set of financial
rules to help you save. An
opportunity to get something
back from someone you used
to know must be taken advan-
tage of immediately. It may be
awkward but it will be worth
your while. *****
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): A partnership.you want
to develop should be .kept a
secret for now. Too much in-
formation will allow others to
criticize your choice. Estab-
lish your position so there is
little room for others to med-
dle in your affairs. ***


SUNDAY CROSSWORD


REVEREND SPOONER, U.S.P.S. By Patrick Berry / Edited by Will Shortz [t--'1-" "1 17 1 N 1011 112 1 415 1 16 171


Across
I Roast V.I.P..'s
4 Overall
composition?
9 Military funeral
concluded
13 Cars with floor-
mounted
ignitions
18 Density symbol.
in physics
19 By itself
20 Kaaba visitor's
faith
22 Say grudgingly
23 "1 suppose it
might seem odd
that a reverend
like myself
would suddenly
begin ___ ..."
26 Top-- (golf
ball brand)
27 "Dirt cake"
ingredients
28 Equine-related
29 Gun it
31 "... but I've
always thought
___ had a more
fun job than I
do"
35 "For an avid
philatelist like
me, sorting
envelopes is
thrilling- I
might spot a

37 Kind of
ceremony
38 Show no modesty
39 Marvin of "Cat
Ballou"
40 Friday's rank:
Abbr.

For any three answers,
call from a touch-tone
phone: 1-900-285-5656,
1.49 each minute; or,
with a credit card, 1-800-
814-5554.


43 Had
44 Poor writer's
scribbling?
45 Indo-European.s
48 When,:i a mi,n ,
nervolA ii. abo
shipping
breakables,. I tell
him. '___
carefully. sir'

52 Domino's order
53 Whirlybird
54 Actress Pecplec.
55 Big name in rum
59 Round-trippers.
in sports lingo
60 "... and I write
'__'on the box.
which seems to
reassure him "
64 Cambridgeshire's
__ Cathedral
65 Viking's
destination
66 Don Juan's
mother
67 had
enough"
68- "The best part of
the job. of
course, is when
I'm out on the
street ___
73 Drawers of war?
76 Mesabi Range
export
77 Tee-___
78 Remote place
79 Food label no.
80 "I'm a bit leery
of dogs it's
unsettling to
enter a yard and
hear some ___ at
me ...
84 From scratch
87 Lover of light
88 Distress
89 Old inits. in
telecommunicati
on


90 Vega.' ca.si lll
hotel. ith "t(hc"
1) The Bahama '
( re.il It ClaId
,% \o\ 1 l t e 11 uir l
the Nobel I' IIc
chi ". iibut ,I i
nttut h I t'/l/r'V
eill n I/I : Iilr tlld
I II Olw '
l)mn "H ko tro le-r.% getl
tc itcr well
their er mie
opening their

104 Least bright
105 Eighty-eight
107 Dry out
108 "The Hot Zone"
topic
109 "... and when I
hand-deliver a
package, the
recipients art
positively -
Sit s very
satisfying.'
114 Fountain drinks
115 Berry of
"Frankic and
Alice"
116 Histrionics
117 Poetic
preposition
118 Daisy variety
119 Ugly situation
120 Matches
timewise.
informally
121 Acid

Down
I 1983 Michael
Keaton comedy
2 Single-named
"Hollywood
Squares" regular
3 Results of chafing
4 Place to get a
facial


5 Film director Roth
6 Tour,- liirndo, in
7 Having one i.hairp
S Manner
i 1 Inrle t e i

I I" ni 'llhe'
I llillonilia
I1 More guarded
14 Onctinic lFrud
coll.ilborator
15 Queen inI thc
"Star Wars" W aga
16 Asphiilt
ingredicnt
17 Open terrain
21 Desert lindforms
24 Flummery
25 ___ dc combat
30 Lt comes from the
heart
32 Comes to
33 Forest flutist
34 Palm phone
36 Hit with a charge
38 Flapper's wrap
40 Bookish type
41 Soviet foreign
affairs minister
during the Cuban
missile crisis
42 Answering
machine insert
44 2010 Apple
release
46 Rolling in green
47 Triumphant cry
49) Revivalism'?
50 l.cave
weitponlcss
51 Bygone Tide
rival
53 French sweetic
55 Industry, sliingily
56 Wardrobe items
57 Fork
58 Dunne ofi "My
Favorite Wife"
60 Small island


61 It's closeted
62 Put the kibosh on
63 Film director
Craven
65 Title for de
Stall: Abbr.
60 On the subject of
70 Moves a head? ,
71 Golden
(General Mills
product)
72 "Forget itl"
73 Striking player


74 Symbol of
Athena
75 Lincoln while in
Congress, e.g.
78 Babel
80 Car financing
inits.
8 I Where prisoners
swing picks
82 Ear: Prefix
83 ___ monde
84 Like the GE
Building
85 Locomotive
furnace


86 Lost Colony's
island
92 Companion of
Rex and Rover
93 Bird that may
nest on volcanic
ash
94 Unable to agree'
95 Pack leaders
97 R&B's ___
Brothers
98 Car dealer's
offering
99 Farinland rolls


100 Bungling fool
101 Fishing
accoutrement
102 1980s-'90s
Chrysler
offerings
103 Iota
106 Woes
110 Mugger on stage
111 Not straight
112 Novelist
McEwan
113 Station for
cinephiles


Answers to last Sunday's Crossword.
CO.A.G.ULAT E PNCP'ARIK MUY
OBSESS I ON ROSA LI E I N E
WANTEDDEADORALIVE CBS

N A R C B NEE D A R AK E


EGER BLESSEDEVENT ELI


THA MALTA NOTION BAN
H 0 0 K:E P H 0





STL CRACKEDJOKES ARME
ESSAI SOISEE EMERSIGT ION
T AL A LE OJA TALN

E G S LoE D S

A G R UNDED FORL FE

TOUCHED INTHEHEAD ASST
CHAKA HAM |E T A P E
E A N DRESS EDT0 T H E N I NE S
LOACI SON E FOOTNOTES
LESE S TA I R IC A N A D A


3 7 4


7 1 5


8 1'


2 15 6


2 9 8


8 6 9 5 .2


7 3 6 5


2 3 7 8


5 4 3 9


L 'L 9 Ll 9 8 c Z6





SLZ 9 8 C 6 9 8



8 9-- 6 9 L V C


9 9t 6 L 8 9 L Z


ILI Z 8 61V 919


V 6 8 8 9 9 L Z L


9 9 Z 17 L L 8 6 6


Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415





LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE SUNDAY, MARCH 20, 2011


m m'RJ
RIO,,W.


Chamber music at its finest
For ticket information call the
Levy Performing Arts Center
at 386-754-4340


A ~,'


TU "m m NIGHm


I