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UFPKY NEH LSTA



The Lake City reporter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01503
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 3/16/2011
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
System ID: UF00028308:01503
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text







Missed Chance W.
Santa Fe softball edges Fort
White r -"--L
S000017 120511 ****3-EDI.-iT -,
S LIB OF FLORIDA HISTOP1'
PO BOX 117007
205 SMA UNIV OF FLORIE.-
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-1943


Lake


First loss
Columbia's win streak
ended by Keystone Heights.
Sports, I B






)orter


.Vol. 137, No. 45 E 75 cents


Wednesday, March 16, 201 I




HISTORY*





VISITS


Library of Congress

exhibit a wealth of

treasures spending

two days in Lake City


By ANTONIA RbBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.comrn
David Herringer
of Lake City
was not disap-
pointed after
seeing the
1962 drawings for the first
Spider-Man comic book.
"I thought it was kind
of cool," he said. "I love
Spider-Man."
The comic book was
among the treasures at
The Library of Congress
Gateway to Knowledge
Travelihg Exhibiti6n


Tuesday. The exhibit is
also open 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
today at the Columbia
County Public Librairy
Main Branch.
The exhibit is inside of
an 18-wheel tractor trailer
and features facsimiles
of Library of Congress
treasures ranging from
The 1455 Gutenberg
Bible to the handwritten
manuscript of jazz pioneer
Jelly Roll Morton's "Frog-i-
More Rag,'" ,
It featured a lot of
Sthings-a person wouldn't
think was in a library,. '*


such as the rough draft
of the Declaration of
Independence, said
Lynneda King of Lake
City.
"It was very nice to see,,"
she said.
Everything in the tour is
part of history, King said.
The Columbia County
Public Library is one of
60 sites in the South and
Midwest the traveling
exhibition is visiting. The
exhibit spends two days in
each area.
Having the r'xNhibit in
Lake City is very exiting.:,


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
'Abigail Van Gelder (right) gives some background information to Mary Herndon, 15, while vis-
iting the Library of Congress 'Gateway to Knowledge' traveling exhibition.


said Deborah Paulson,'
library director.
"It's a museum-quality
exhibit," she said. 'The
Library of Congress is
really one of the finest


research institutions in
the world and the largest
library in the world."
Lake City was the first
stop out of four in Florida,
said Abigail Van Gelder,


exhibit docent.
About 400 people
came through the exhibit
Tuesday.
EXHIBIT continued on 3A


Photos by JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Above: Emma Glover, 14, looks at a display featuring President Franklin Roosevelt and
the Office of War Information. 'I've been at the Library of Congress before, but this was
well done,' Glover said. 'It has lots of information, very well put together.'
Left: Lake City residents Josh Herndon (from left), 14, Joshua Finley, 11, Tyler Velez,
1.3, and Boots Finley, 16, participate in a scavenger hunt while visiting the Library of
Congress 'Gateway to Knowledge' traveling exhibition Tuesday. -


LSHA board

considers health,

fair partnership


Could become
title sponsor
for annual event.
By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter. com
The Lake Shore Hospital
Authority Board may team-
up with the Richardson
Community Center /Annie
Mattox Park North board
to host next year's health
fair and wellness fair at the
community center. The
Hospital Authority could
become a title sponsor for
the event.
During the Lake Shore
Hospital Authority Board's
regular meeting Monday
night, Rev. Alvin Baker,
president of the Richardson
Community Center/Annie


11111 11111 CALLUS:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
1 84264l0002 1 Fax: 752-9400


Mattox Park North Board
of directors, delivered a
presentation and a funding
request
The Richardson
Community Center/Annie
Mattox Park North Board
is seeking $1,000 from the
Hospital Authority's 2011-
2012 fiscal budget for the
annual community health
and wellness fair. Baker
said the funding would be
used for advertising (T-
shirts, fruit trays and other
items), amenities and fund-
ing for the event. Baker
said the 2011 Richardson
Community Health and
Wellness Fair was operated
on a $2,000-$3,000 budget
The Richardson
Community Center Health
LSHA continued on 3A


80 47
Mostly sunny
WEATHER, 2A


Clowns with a big message

Local firefighters' FALSE
.. .....i.u uALARM unit will educate
rodeo crowd about fire safety


COURTESY PHOTO
Lt. Josh 'Nozzle' Wehinger (from left), firefighter Cody
'Hibgee' Bertram and firefighter Jeffery 'Ding, Ding'
Ballance of the Columbia County Fire-Rescue clown
unit FALSE (Fire and Life Safety Educators) ALARM
pose in full clown costumes for a photograph.

-A Opinion ......... ...... 4A
Around Florida .... ..... 2A
O bituaries .............. 5A
Advice & Comics..... 3B
Puzzles ....... . 2B i


By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com
A handful of local fire-
fighters and officers will
don colorful make-up, red
noses and oversized clothes
to advocate fire safety at
the upcoming 17th Annual
Florida Gateway Pro Rodeo.
With nicknames like
"Nozzle" and "Ding, Ding"
and skills like card tricks
and making balloon animals,
the Columbia County Fire-
Rescue clown unit will be at
the rodeo at the fairgrounds
arena Friday through Sunday
interacting with and enter-
taining rodeo audiences.
The clown unit, named
FALSE (Fire and Life Safety
Educators) ALARM, exists
to teach its audiences


TODAY IN
ACT II
Going strong


about fire safety, said David
Boozer, Columbia County
Fire-Rescue division chief.
"Anything we can do to
reach the community, thafs
what we're about," he said.
FALSE ALARM will enter-
tain rodeogoers with pre-
rodeo shows and activities,
Boozer said, and could inter-
act with rodeo clown Rudy
Burns of the Professional
Rodeo Cowboys Association,
who will also be at the
rodeo.
Performing at the rodeo,
which the clown unit will do
for the first time, is a new
opportunity with a different
venue and crowd to com-
municate the fire safety mes-
sage to, Boozer said.
CLOWNS continued on 3A


COMING
THURSDAY
Park volunteerr is
st te' :best.


k


m


Ul,








LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING WEDNESDAY, MARCH 16, 2011


3 Tuesday:
SAfternoon: 9-5-5
Evening: 3-7-4


extradited to Mexico
LOS ANGELES U.S. Justice
Department officials said former
"Survivor" reality television producer
Bruce Beresford-Redman, 39, should
be extradited to Mexico to stand trial
for the killing of his wife during a.
Cancun vacation last spring.


Piay.4 Tuesday:
Afternoon: 2-2-0-0
Evening: 5-2-4-8


GREENWICH, Conn. A long-
, time member of Howard Stern's on-
air crew has been appointed to the
parks advisory board of an affluent
Connecticut town.
The man known as Baba Booey to
fans won approval to the board at a
town meeting Monday in Greenwich.
The 119-64 vote ended two months


Monday:
3-4-8-24-26


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



Internet helps The Civil Wars find success


NASHVILLE

ere's a question the
members of the duo
The Civil Wars have
been contemplating a
lot lately: What's the
value of a star's tweet? Or two? Or
three?
For Joy Williams and John Paul
White, tweets by Taylor Swift,.
Hillary Scott of Lady Antebellum and
Sara Bareilles, among many others,
helped drive first-week sales of their
debut albpm, "Barton Hollow," to
levels they didn't expect They sold
out one tour and now have a more
ambitious schedule down the road,
had their video added by CMT, and
now have at their fingertips limitless
possibilities that good old-fashioned
word of mouth brings in the Internet
age.
"Instantly, with one click, five mil-
lion people knew our names," White
said of Swift's tweet
Swift threw her support behind
the duo when she told fans she was
listening to "Poison & Wine": "You
can't push 'repeat' on vinyl so I
keep setting the needle back on my
record player."
And that combined with other
unexpected national word-of-mouth
opportunities helped the band sell
five times as many copies of "Barton
Hollow" in its opening week in
February than expected. The album
debuted at No. 12 on the Billboard
200 with about 25,000 copies sold.
After five weeks it's climbing steadily
at 50,000.


John Paul White and Joy WilliaLns, of The'Civil Wars, pose for a photograph with
Hillary Scott of Lady Antebellum and Taylor Swift on Feb. 2, in Nashville. Pictured
are White (from left), Scott, Swift and'Williams.


A 45-page extradi-
tion memorandum
. released Monday
supports.Mexico's
-extradition request
It will be considered
at a May 16 hearing
Beresford-Redman in Los Angeles.
The body of
Monica Beresford-Redman, 41, was
found April 8 in a wastewater treat-
ment pump at a Cancun resort. An
autopsy says she was struck on the
head and asphyxiated.

Baba Booey appointed


Baba Booey


of contentious
debate on the issue.
Baba Booey's
real name is Gary
Dell'Abate. He's the
producer of Stern's
Sirius Satellite Radio
show. Dell'Abate's-
supporters separated


his professional life from his person-
al life, saying he is a family man and
16-year resident

Cameron: Shooting in
3-D beats conversion
ABU DHABI, United Arab
Emirates James Cameron said
studios that rework movies filmed
conventionally into 3-D, rather than
shooting originally in the format,
risk hurting their business.
Cameron recommends the more
expensive process because custom-
ers are willing to pay more for it

Associated Press


,Celebrity Birthdays


* Comedian-director Jerry
Lewis is 85.
* Movie director Bernardo
Bertolucci is 70.
* Game show host Chuck
Woolery is 70.
* Singer-songwriter Jerry Jeff
Walker is 69.
* Country singer Robin
Williams is 64.
* Actor Erik Estrada is 62.
* Country singer Ray Benson
(Asleep at the Wheel) is 60.

Daily Scripture


* Golfer Hollis Stacy is 57.
* Actor Clifton Powell is 55.
* Rapper/actor Flavor Flav
(Public Enemy) is 52.
* Country singer Tracy
Bonham is 44."
* Actor Alan Tudyk is 40.
* Actor Tim Kang (TV: "The
Mentalist") is 38.
* Rhythm-and-blues singer
Blu Cantrell is 35.
* Rock musician Wolfgang
Van Halen is 20.


"Then know this, you and all
the people of Israel: It is by
the name of Jesus Christ of
Nazareth, whom you crucified
but whom God raised from
the dead, that this man stands
before you healed."
-Acts 4:10


Lake City
HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293
Fax number .............752-9400
Circulation ............755-5445
Online... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056:
Publisher Todd Wilson .....754-0418
(twilson@lakectyreporter.com)
NEWS
Assistant Editor CJ Risak..754-0427
After 1 00 p.m.
(clisak@lakecityreporter.com).
ADVERTISING
Director Ashley Butcher .. .754-0417
(abutcher@lakecityreporter.com)
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440.


Reporter
BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed. by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7:30
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your,delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation ...............755-5445
(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks.................. $26.32
24 Weeks...................$48.79
52 Weeks..... ............$83.46
Rates indude 7% sales tax
Mail rates
12 Weeks..................$41.40
24 Weeks..................$82.80
52 Weeks.................$179.40


CORRECTION


The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run
in this space. And thanks for reading.


Man faces 459
sex-related charges
KISSIMMEE David
Vaughn Joseph, 40, faces,
an additional 459 sepx-relat-
ed charges involving two
teenagers. .
The Osceola County
Sheriff's Office said
Joseph was arrested Jani.
13 on a lewd and lascivi-
ous conduct charges. The
- additional charges were
announced Monday.
Deputies said the case
stems from activities that
happened late last year
involving a 14-year-old
and a 15-year-old. He was
arrested after the
15-year-old told authorities
that Joseph had exposed
himself.
The charges against
Joseph include kidnapping,
Three counts of battery, 90
counts of lewd or lascivi-
ous molestation, and 180.
counts of lewd or lascivi-
ous battery..

House advances
open carry bill
TALLAHASSEE A
bill that would allow weap-
ons to be openly carried
in Florida has cleared a
House subcommittee.
The Criminal Justice
subcommittee on Tuesday
voted 10-3 to approve the
bill (HB 517).
State Rep. Chris
Dorworth is sponsoring
the bill. The Lake Mary
Republican said the bill's
purpose is to prevent
charges against people
with concealed weapon
permits who accidentally
show their weapons.

6 prisons to close
by this summer
TALLAHASSEE -
Florida officials said they
will close six of the state's
correctional facilities for a
savings of at least $30 mil-
lion'this year.
A Florida Department


THE WEATHER


-IESD


A soldier laid to rest
The casket for Marine Corp. Johnathan W. Taylor, of
Homosassa, is brought to the burial site at Arlington
Cemetery in Arlington, Va., Tuesday during the funeral
services. Taylor died in Afghanistan.


of Corrections representa-
tive said on Tuesday that
the state is shuttering
the Brevard Correctional
Institution in Cocoa and
the Hendry Correctional
Institution in Immokalee.
It is also closing the
Hillsborough Correctional
Institution in Riverview,
the Tallahassee Road
Prison and the. Lowell
and Sumter boot camps.
Workers at those loca-
ti6ns will be offered jobs
at other facilities and the
closings will not result in
the early release of any
'inmates.

Mixed reaction to
school nutrition
TALLAHASSEE -
Agriculture Commissioner
Adam Putnam's proposed
legislation for his depart-
ment to take over respon-
sibility for school nutri-
tion got a mixed review
from the State Board of
Education.
The legislation would
strip the board of that
authority if Florida also
obtains a waiver from
the U.S. Department of
Agriculture.
Board member Rob'erto
Martinez told Putnam,
who appeared before the
board Tuesday, that he
opposed the measure
because the Department of


Agriculture's avowed pur-
pose is to protect Florida's
agriculture industry while
the board's focus is chil-
dren.

Fate of mayor on
line in recall vote
MIAMI Miami-Dade
County Mayor Carlos
Alvarez could be recalled
from office Tuesday after
a campaign led by a bil-
lionaire car dealer mobi-
lized thousands of voters
angry over property tax
increases and a simulta-
neous raise for county
employees. If successful, it
would be the largest recall
of a local official in United
States history.
"I can't see any other
that would come close,"
said Joshua Spivak, a recall
expert and senior fellow
at Wagner College in New
York.
The recall effort, led
by billionaire Norman
Braman, comes as the
county struggles to recov-
er from the recession, with
unemployment in January
at 12 percent and a fore-
closure rate that has been
one of the nation's highest.
Nearly 59,000 voters
have already cast early bal-
lots. Another 68,000 filed
by absentee in the weeks
leading up to the vote.
* Associated Press


-jlji^


Tallahassee
... ........ 78/41 .....
Pensacola "
7-2/53 Ia fiilna City
71/49


TEMPERATURES
High Tuesday
Low Tuesday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Tuesday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


.md
VI
77/
Lake
80/
SGai
"-8


79
47
75
50
89 in 1945
28 in 1926

0.00"
1.75"
9.02"
2.10"
9.00"


*1 ~*:A,;*)


sta


MOSTLY MOSTLY
A SUNNY SUNNY


HI 83.L0 53 HI182 LO 54
1 I ....,,,l '^ ,,,,1III.1 I .,i


k Jacksonville Cape Canaveral
City 79/49 Daytona Beach
e's a Ft. Lauderdale
inesville DaYta Beach Fort Myers
I7V,5'4 Fort Myers
1/47 X54 Galnesvll6
Oclala Jacksonville
'2/49 ,. Key.West
Orifando pCap Canaveralke Cty
82/57 78/57 ae lty
a Miami
Ta Naples
79/60 West Palm Bedac Ocala
81/64 Orlando
~ Ft. Lauderdal Panama City
Ft Myersi 80/68 0 Pensacola
83/61 Naples Tallahassee
\83/61 Miami Tampa
K...t. 81/68 Valdosta
K West W. Palm Beach
80/68


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise torn.
Sunset tom.


7:40 a.m.
7:39 p.m.
7:38 a.m.
7:40 p.m.


MOON
Moonrise today 4:30 p.m.
Moonset today 5:10 a.m.
Moonrise tom. 5:38 p.m.
Moonset tom. 5:51 a.m.'


March March April April
19 26 3 11
Full Last New First


On this date in
1987, softball size
hail caused millions
of dollars damage
to automobiles
at Del Rio, Texas.
Three persons
were injured when
hailstones crashed
through a shopping
mall skylight.


8

15nhimestolin
Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+.
:,


Thursday Friday


76/59/s
76/54/s
80/69/s
84/60/s
82/50/s
77/51/s
78/67/pc
82/49/s
81/67/s
84/62/s
82/51/s
82/56/s
73/52/s
75/55/s
81/44/s
80/61/s
80/48/s
81/65/s


77/59/pc
81/56/s
80/67/pc
85/61/s
83/51/s
81/53/s
79/69/s
83/50/s
81/67/s
83/61/s
83/52/s
83/57/s
77/54/s
77/56/s
82/49/s
82/62/s
84/52/s
80/65/s


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.



weather.com


-. .j. Forecasts, data and
graphics 2011 Weather
- Central, LP, Madison, Wis.
www.weatherpubllsher.com


Get Connected


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Feds: TV producer to be to town's parks board


AROUND FLORIDA


Page Editor: Jason M. Walker, 754-0430


FRIDAY


SATAJY


SUNDAY


I .....IT..L.. O M! ^


I










Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE WEDNESDAY, MARCH 16, 2011


State House ready for vote


on teachers pay, tenure


Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE-Republican-
sponsored legislation setting up
a merit pay plan for teachers and
ending tenure for new hires is
set for a final vote in the GOP-
controlled Florida House on
Wednesday 11 months after
former Gov. Charlie Crist vetoed
a similar bill.
The new version is designed to
mirror Florida's plan for a $700
million federal Race to the Top
education grant that includes a
move to merit pay. Opponents,
though, say it goes beyond that
blue print by chipping away at
teachers' due process and collec-
tive bargaining rights.
In floor action Wednesday, the
House rejected four Democratic
amendments that would have
addressed some of those issues
in the Senate-passed bill (SB
736).
The House sponsor, Rep. Erik
Fresen, R-Miami, declared them
to be "unfriendly" to the bill's
intent.
'"The purpose of crafting this
bill is actually to have an ability
to determine what a good teach-
er is," Fresen said. "That's it."


The legislation would require
school districts to develop eval-
uation schemes based half on
how much improvement each
teacher's students have shown
on the Florida Comprehensive
Assessment Test (FCAT) or
other exams over a three-year
period. 'The other half would be
based on such factors as evalu-
ations by principals. They could
include advanced degrees but
only if in a teacher's subject
area.
Those evaluations would be
used to determine which teach-
ers should get merit pay and
which should be let go.
If passed by the House as
expected the bill would go to
Republican Gov. Rick Scott, who
has made it one of his top priori-
ties. Crist, a Republican-turned-
independent, vetoed last year's
bill after widespread protests by
teachers, parents and students
as well as objections from many
local school officials.
Teachers hired after July 1
would never be able to get more
than a one-year contract
The defeated amendments
included one offered by Rep.
Reggie Fullwood, D-Jacksonville,


that would have required school
officials to give terminated teach-
ers written reasons why they
didn't get another annual con-
tract.
"It's about decency," Fullwood
said. "For your contract not to be
renewed at least tell me why."
Another failed amendment
would have allowed highly rated
teachers to get three-year con-
tracts. The Senate also rejected
that idea last week.
Existing teachers would have
the option of sticking with their
present salary plan or compet-
ing for merit pay. If they choose
the latter, the Florida Education
Association, the statewide teach-
ers union, says they'd lose
their due process right to chal-
lenge pay decisions. The union
also contends the bill unilater-
ally eliminates seniority rights
obtained through collective bar-
gaining.
House Speaker Dean Cannon,
R-Winter Park, initially sched-
uled up to 12 hours of debate
for Wednesday, but the House
on Tuesday agreed to a six-hour
limit equally divided between the
parties.


Senate approves


revenue cap


for 2012 ballot


Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE Republican-
sponsored legislation to cap state
revenue similar to Colorado's
'Taxpayer Bill of Rights" cleared
the Florida Senate on Tuesday in
a largely partisan vote and now
heads for the House, which also
is under GOP control.
If passed there as expected,
the proposed state constitutional
amendment (SJR 958) would be
placed on the November 2012 bal-
lot, where it would need 60 per-
cent voter approval.
Democrats cited Colorado's
TABOR, arguing it set back that
state's economy and pointing out
voters there eventually suspended
a key provision of the cap.
Republicans tried to distance
their proposal from the Colorado
cap, although both limit revenue
growth to just what's needed to
keep up with increases in popula-
tion and inflation.
"This is not Colorado. We have
learned from the mistakes of other
states," said Sen. Ellyn Bogdanoff,
a Fort Lauderdale Republican.


"We did not want to repeat what
they had done."
The Florida version would let
the Legislature raise the cap for
a single year by a three-fifth vote
in each chamber or for multiple
years by two-thirds votes. A third
option would to put the issue on
the ballot by a two-thirds vote in
each house. It then would take at
least 60 percent voter approval for
a cap increase.
Colorado voters, in 2005 sus-
pended for five years a portion of
their TABOR that requires excess
tax receipts to be returned to citi-
zens to avoid serious reductions
in education or other public ser-
vices. The suspension has now
expired.
"I know the sponsor says that
this is not Colorado's TABOR, but
it is close enough," said Senate
Democratic Leader Nan Rich of
Weston.
Rich said the criteria for break-
ing the cap are too stringent
and such a cap is not needed
because the Florida Legislation
has a strong track record of rev-
enue cutting.


EXHIBIT: Historic treasures brought to town

Continued From Page 1A


"We had all kinds of
members from the com-
munity," she said. "It was a
very good turnout"
Many people visiting the
exhibit were familiar with
the Library of Congress,
Van Gelder said. The
exhibit was a reintroduc-
tion to them of its trea-
sures and resources.
Gary Swift, of Lake City,
had been to the actual
Library of Congress years
ago, he said. He brought
his daughter, Kirsten, 7, to
see the traveling exhibit.
"I love history," he
said. "I try to teach her
to appreciate history and
books."
The traveling exhibit
made him even more
aware of all the famous
treasures the Library of
Congress has, Swift said.
"It makes me want to go
see it again," he said. "It's
spurred my interest."
For more informa-
tion about the Library
of Congress Gateway to
Knowledge Traveling
Exhibition, go to http://
www.loc.gov/gateway.
"There's something for
all ages, not just students
or adults," Van Gelder


k .
















JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Jessica Velez (left) and Bridget Koger thumb through a pamphlet showcasing the different
artifacts and books available in the Library of Congress. 'It's my first time seeing a lot of this
stuff,' Velez said. 'It's cool to watch and read everything.'
stuff,' Velez said. 'It's cool to watch and read everything.'


said.
The traveling exhibit
is free and the public is
invited to see it for one
more day.


'There won't be any-
thing else like it ever in
town," Paulson said. "We
encourage the community
to come see it before it


CLOWNS: Entertaining while teaching

Continued From Page 1A


"That's what our inten-
tion is, to make sure we get
the necessary fire safety
information to the kids and
reinforce fire safety," he
said.
. The unit made its debut
at the Columbia County
Fair in October and has
carried its fire prevention
message to audiences at
local events and schools
since.
Firefighters and officers
in the clown unit are pro-
fessionally certified and
have gone through specific
training on their tricks and
how to relate to children
and impact them, Boozer
said. The process of trans-






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forming from firefighter to
clown in full make-up and
costume takes about two
hours, he said.
The men involved in
FALSE ALARM are dedi-
cated to the community
and care personally about
communicating fire safety,
Boozer said. Performing at
the rodeo will benefit both


the firefighters and rodeo
audiences.
"It's one of the most awe-
some things and I know
the guys have a blast-in
interacting with the kids,"
Boozer said. "If you can get
the message across and
have fun-at the same time,
it sounds like the best of
both worlds, doesn't it?"


closes at 5 p.m."


LSHA: May sponsor fair

Continued From Page 1A


and Wellness Fair took
place in February and fea-
tured several local health-
care organizations which
provided wellness tests and
free screenings.
Board member Audre
Washington said in the past
years it was general dona-
tions that made the event
possible and the $2,000-
$3,000 was the most fund-
ing the health fair had ever
received.
Baker said the 2010
health and wellness fair
was the largest they've
ever had. He noted atten-
dance at this year's event
was reduced because the
event took place the same
day as the Martin Luther
King Jr. Parade which
had been rescheduled from
its original date.
"This particular pro-
gram was touching for me
because it hit at a major
core for me and that was
healthcare," he said. '
Board member Bruce
Naylor and other board
members asked ques-


tions about the. event's
annual .attendance and
participation from ven-
dors, and their questions
were answered by Mario
Coppock, Columbia County
Recreation Department
director.
"We have a lot of valu-
able services that are free
out there," Coppock said,
noting the event normally
draws 100-150 people. 'We
need to be able to reach as
many people as we can."
Several Hospital
Authority members said
the event could get some
funding as part of the
Hospital Authority's educa-
tion outreach services and
. Naylor also suggested that
the Lake Shore Hospital
Authority Board become
the event's title sponsor.
Board members unani-
mously voted in favor of
placing the proposal on
its budget hearing sched-
ule when discussions and
financial plans are made for
the Authority's 2011-2012
fiscal budget


8uwannee

Valley

E electric

Cooperative

Registry of Persons with Special Needs

According to Chapter 252.355 Florida Statutes, "in order to meet the
special needs of persons who would need assistance during evacuations
and sheltering because of physical, mental or sensory disabilities, each
local emergency management agency in the state shall maintain a registry
of persons with special needs located within the jurisdiction of the local
agency."

This registration helps the local Emergency Management Agency to identi-
fy those persons in need of assistance and to plan for resource allocation to
meet those needs. This program gives persons with special needs the op-
tion of preauthorizing emergency response personnel to enter their homes
during search and rescue operations if necessary to assure their safety and
welfare following disasters.

If you or someone you know has a special condition affecting eyesight,
hearing, speech, walking, breathing or has an emotional condition and
would need assistance during evacuations and sheltering, please contact
your local emergency management agency. The level of care given in spe-
cial needs shelters goes above the basic first aid care available to shelters
open to the general population.

All information given will be kept strictly confidential.

Local Emergency Management Office Phone Number:

Suwannee County Emergency Management Office (386)364-3405
Lafayette County Emergency Management Office (386)294-1950
Hamilton County Emergency Management Office (386)792-6647
Columbia County Emergency Management Office (386)758-1125


OB/ YN

DAINAGREENE, MD
WOMEN'S HEALTH WITH A WOMAN'S TOUCH







/ .





*Meet with a provider the day you come in
*Same day/next day OB appts.
*Dr. Greene is chief medical officer at Pregnancy
Care Center
*Free pregnancy tests
Call for appt. Mon.-Thurs. 8am-5:30pm
755-0500 449 SE Baya Dr. Lake City
Accepts All Insurance


LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE WEDNESDAY, MARCH 16, 2011 .


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427












OPINION


Wednesday, March 16,201 I


AN


AN
OPINIO-N


Gingrich's

'passion'

makes

headlines

nationalization is a
rare talent, yet one
that seems to be eas-
ily developed even
efined and perfected
by those in public life. Take
the case of former Speaker of
the House Newt Gingrich. The
Georgia Republican who craft-
ed Congress' "Contract with
America" will likely be among
the crowd seeking favor in the
2012 presidential primaries.
To make his case for the
nation's top job, Gingrich, who is
married to his third wife, has to
mend a few fences smashed dur-
ing his Washington days, espe-
cially with the religious right
Now there's nothing in the law
against multiple marriages, if thafs
your fancy unless some of the
unions overlap. Gingrich's didn't
But the relationships that led to
marriage? Those did, and rather
scandalously.
Gingrich married his high
school sweetheart, Jackie, after
graduation. It wasn't a traditional
high school romance in that
she wasn't a classmate. She was
seven years his senior and his
geometry teacher.
Fast-forward to the day Jackie
was served with the "terms of
their divorce." She was in the hos-
pital recovering from surgery for
cervical cancer.
A few months later, he mar-
ried his second wife, Marianne,
a congressional assistant with
whom he admitted having an
affair during his first marriage.
He's now married to his third
wife, Callista with whom he
acknowledges he had an affair in
the mid-1990s, while he was mar-
ried to Marianne.
And here's where the rational-
ization expertise comes into play.
Gingrich said in a recent inter-
view that it wasn't his fault It was
his "passion for his country" that
led to his. behavior.
"There's no question at times
of my life, partially driven by
how passionately I felt about
this country, that I worked far
too hard and things happened in
my life that were not appropri-
ate," Gingrich told the Christian
Broadcasting Network.
U Scripps Howard News Service

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874,
TheiLake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!" .
.Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman


LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,


Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


www.lakecityreporter.com


Birthday is time for reflection


occurs this
week. Which
one, precisely,
isn't important,
except tp say that while my best
years may yet be ahead of me,
they certainly will be far fewer
than those that have already
passed.
Which is fine. But it makes
one think about when and
where one happened to be born,
the cosmic slot assigned to each
of us by fate, luck, God's will -
and how our few years'on earth
mesh with civilization's ongoing,
careless advance.
Billions of people have lived.
during humanity's hardscrabble
epoch on the earth, but nearly
all of them died in the same
world, more or less, in which
they were born. My generation
may be only the second or
third to experience lifetimes
of technological and social
change so rapid that it has the
capacity to transform the world
into unrecognizability over the
course of a few decades.
My mother's life is a good
example: When she was born
near the end of 1912, her
household included an aged
aunt whose arms were still.
weakened by the effects of two
arrows that struck her during
an Indian attack early in her life
on the Texas frontier. Women
couldn't vote in 1912, and
neither could many blacks. My
mother distinctly remembered
seeing her first automobile
and rushing into the'yard
with my grandmother to gawk
in amazement at a primitive
aircraft overhead.


John Crisp
jcrisp@delmaredu


By the time she died a few
years ago, a black man and
a woman were vying for the
presidency. She had travelled
the world by jet aircraft, and
men had landed on;.the'moon. ,
And these momentous events
hardly begin to describe the
differences between the present
world and the world of 1912.
The world I was born in
has changed as much as my
mother's did during her long
life perhaps even more. But I
was luckier than she was. so far
my life hasn't included a Great
Depression or the privations of
a World War II.
In fact, I know enough about
the history of civilization to
recognize that I was extremely :
,lucky to be born when and
where I was. Timing is
everything: My mother's
younger brother came down
with paralytic polio when he
was 12. When I was born the
threat of polio was an anxiety
that besieged every parent's
spirit. But by the time I was
in first grade, the Salk vaccine,
was being administered for the
first time in schools, saving
thousands from this dreaded
disease. Perhaps I was one of
them.


In many other ways, the
prosperous 1950s were a good
time for a white male to grow up
in America. Life wasn't so grand
for many black Americans and
for women, but their conditions
were only background noise for
a world of opportunity for white
males. The demands of blacks ,
and women to share more of the
American birthright served as a
great chastening that undercut
some of the false idealism of the
'50s. So did the assassination
of John F Kennedy. So did
Vietnam and Watergate. The
nation learned a lot and became
an even better place to live.
As I grew up, good
educational opportunities were
available. Eventually, so were
jobs. Gasoline'seemed cheap,
and in endless supply. No one
worried about global. warming.
My parents got old and enjoyed
a comfortable retirement based
on pensions developed during
lifetimes of middle-class labor,
supplemented by Social Security
and Medicare. I'll probably be
able to do the same.
I'm grateful for that But
I'm uneasy about what the
world has become during my
lucky lifespan. Maybe the
aging always felt this way.
But this time civilization is
rapidly bumping up against real
limits, of energy, of climate; of
population. Action is called for,
but mostly we' rely on denial,
meaning that a fortunate life
like mine may become more
and more a thing of the past

* John M. Crisp teaches in the'
English Department at Del Mar
College in Corpus Christi, Texas.


HIGHLIGHTS IN HISTORY


today is Wednesdpy, March
16, the 75th day of 2011. There
are 290 days left in the year.
Today's Highlight in History:
On March 16, 1802,
President Thomas Jefferson
signed a measure authorizing
the establishment of the U.S.
Military Academy at West Point,
N.Y.
On this date:
In 1751, James Madison,,


LETTERS


fourth president of the United
States, was born in Port
Conway, Va.
In 1850, Nathaniel
Hawthorne's novel "The
Scarlet Letter" was first pub-
lished.
In 1926, rocket science
pioneer Robert H. Goddard suc-
cessfully tested the first liquid-
fueled rocket, in Auburn, Mass.
In 1968, during the Vietnam


War, the My Lai (mee ly)
Massacre of.Vietnamese civil-
ians was carried out by U.S.
Army troops; estimates of the
death toll vary between 347 and
504.
In 1971, former Republican
presidential candidate Thomas
E. Dewey, 68, died in Bal
Harbour, Fla.; American actress
Bebe Daniels, 70, died in
London.


TO THE EDITOR


Not all unions good for business


To the editor:
Unions. Regarding Mr.
Gerry Hale's letter praising
unions, especially electrical
unions, he may be right.
However, there are a feiv
big unions in this country that
'need to be reigned in. Those
with collective bargaining on
pay, benefits etc.
The Unions killed the steel
business, the auto industry
and are slowly but surely
killing the pocket books of
all Americans. A car that


cost $3,000 in 1957 now cost
$63,000! Something is defi-
nitely wrong with that picture!
Ninety percent of the increas-
es in products are due to
union employees striking and
demanding more money for
doing the same job they have
been doing for ions and then
companies having to increase
prices to pay their inflated
wages.
One main thing is paying
those Democrats in DC so
they can put their Nanny State


people in office to further
push the progressive agenda
of the unions in this country.
Look at their symbol balled
fist same as the Socialist
Progressive Workers Party!
High time the grip of Socialist
Unions in this country be bro-
ken and we get back to being
the number one manufacturer
in the world and not third
banana!

Manuel Enos
Lake City


4A


Jay Ambrose.
Speaktojay@ool com


Give King's

hearings

on Islam a

chance

can kill, and did in
the case of Nidal
Hassan, an Army
major whose hateful
aniti-American rants seem to
have been ignored because he
was a Muslim and his superi-
ors did not wish to appear prej-
udiced. Therefore left pretty
much to his own devices, he
ended up the only suspect in
the slaughter of 13 people at
For,t Hood.
It's terribly wrong, an invita-
tion to mayhem, to suppose
anyone's minority status,
ethnic background or reli-
gious creed should absolve
him of suspicion and prevent
.precautionary steps when his
behavior is deafening ears with
its warning signals. It would
of course be wrong, too, to
assume without evidence that
some particular group's mem-
bers are generally a threat.
Is that what Rep. Peter King .
is doing with his hearings on.
Islamic radicalization?
Conceivably. But despite the
screeches from demonstrators,,
leftist commentators and par-,
tisan politicians with their own
demonizing agendas, we will
have to wait and see exactly
what this New York congress'
man and his committee do to
know for sure. Meanwhile,
we already know homegrown
Muslim terrorists are for real.
Taking a close look at their
histories, trying to figure out
what fostered their violent
anger and seeking to deter-
mine whether more are on the
way could be a vital exercise in
saving lives as long as care is
taken not to tar. the innocent in
the process.
No less prestigious and
responsible an organization
than the Council on Foreign
Relations has pointed to an
"uptick in recent years" in
terrorist incidents involving
some 125 American Muslims.'
Where there had been six
cases a year since 9/11, there
were 13 in 2009, and experts
pronounced themselves wor-
ried. These Americans seem
ambitious; some are playing
important roles in al Qaeda
and bombing bodies abroad.
They are haters, but where did
the hate come from?
Unless we learn something
unexpected, jihadist warriors
constitute a tiny portion of
the American Muslim popula-
tion, which the council writer
puts at somewhere between 2
million and 7 million people.
Here is what still strikes me
as a special danger. These
American radicals are already
here without any difficult
arrangements, they can easily
and effectively go about prepa-
rations for killings without :
attracting much attention and
they know our vulnerabilities
better than, say, a terrorist
from Saudi Arabia.
When a.very few can com-.
mit massive mayhem, small
numbers of savvy terrorists
can still pose big risks. I have.
met experts on all of this who
say easily accessible biological
weapons could kill hundreds
of thousands, that we have
inadequateresponse plans to
contain the harm and that we
are still stumbling our way to
doing what may be undoable:
policing the possibilities.
* Jay Ambrose, formerly
Washington director of editorial
policy for Scripps Howard news-
papers and the editor of dailies"
in El Paso, Texas, and Denver, ;is
a columnist living in Colorado.








LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL WEDNESDAY, MARCH 16, 2011


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


* To submit your Community
Calendar item, contact Antonia
Robinson at 754-0425 or by
e-mail at arobinson@
lakecityreporter.com.


Today
Art on display
The Lake City Police
Department is celebrating
National Women's History
Month with artwork on
display all month 8 a.m.
to 5 p.m. in the PD Lobby
and at City Hall. Featured
artists are Dottie List,
Calandra Wise, and Leslie
Reed-McDaniel. Call
Audre' Washington at 386-
719-5742.

Building Rain Gardens
and Rain Barrels
A workshop on build-
ing rain gardens and rain
barrels is 6 to 7:30 p.m.
today at the Columbia
County Extension Office.
Learn how to construct
and plant a rain garden
that will allow storm water
to become cleansed as
it recharges the aquifer.
This is a free, open work-
shop but space is limited,
so please call to register
at 752-5384. Completed
barrels will be available
for $35 to take home and
install.

Spring Break Camps
The Florida Museum of
Natural History is offering
fun, educational spring
break day camps March
28-April 1 for students in
grades K-5. Half-day ses-
sions are $117 for museum
members and $130 for
non-members. Full-day
sessions are $225 for mem-
bers and $250 for non-
members. Register today
at www.flmnh. ufl. edu/edu-
cation/childrens_classes.
htm or call 352-273-2061.

Fair/Rodeo Scholarship
Columbia County.
Resources is now
accepting applications for
the fair/rodeo scholar-
ship. Two scholarships for
$1,000 will be awarded to
graduating seniors. Call
386-752-8822 or visit www.
columbiacountyfair.org to
download the criteria and
application. The applica-
tion is also available at


Columbia High School,
Fort White High School or
the fair office. The dead-
line is 5 p.m. April 1.

Pro Rodeo Queens
Competition
The 7th Annual
Miss Florida Gateway
Pro Rodeo Queens
Competition is Friday at
the 17th Annual Florida
Gateway Pro Rodeo. The
competition is open to
girls 4 to 18. Win scholar-
ships, tiara's, Montana sil-
ver belt buckles, trophies
and more. Applications are
available at The Money
Man, school offices, the
fair office or online atf
www. columbiacountyfair
org. Call 386-752-8822.

Feinstein challenge
Christian Service Center
is participating in the $1
million dollar giveaway
Alan Feinstein Challenge
from now until April
30. Every food item or
financial donation counts
toward receiving a per-
centage of the giveaway.
Call 386-755-1770 and
bring donations either to
the center at the corner
of Hilton and Washington
or mail to P.O. Box 2285,
Lake City, FL, 32056. -

Thursday

Backyard Composting
A Monthly Garden Talk
is 5:45 p.m. Thursday
at the new Fort White
Library. Learn tricks to
make your own compost
from yard debris and
kitchen scraps. This is a
free workshop and open to
everyone. For information,
call the Extension Office at
752-5384.

Diabetes program
UF/IFAS Columbia
and Suwannee County
Extension are offering a
nine-week educational pro-
gram for type 2 diabetes
5:30 to 7 p.m. Thursday.
The program will feature
a team of qualified educa-
tors and health profes-


signals, .and a personal
consultation with a regis-
tered dietitian. Call Jenny
Jump at the Columbia
Extension office at (386)
.. 752-5384 or Cathy Rogers
at the Suwannee County
Extension, office at (386)
362-2771 by March 25. The
$75 program fee includes
the educational classes,
nutrition consultation, pro-
gram materials and health
assessments.

YEP St. Patty's Day
social
Young Emerging
Professionals of Lake
City/Columbia County
is hosting a 2011 Kickoff
social event 5 to 7 p.m. at
the Holiday Inn in Lake
City. Cash Bar. The event
is for young professionals
working or living in Lake
City or the surrounding
areas between the ages of
21 and 40. RSVP to sonja@
lakecitychamber com.


Pottery class
A Beginning Wheel
Throwing pottery work- -
shop is Thursdays, March
17 and 24 at Stephen
Foster Folk Culture Center
State Park Craft Square,
White Springs. Students
are asked to wear old
clothes, bring apron, an
old hand towel and small
plastic bowl. The cost of
this workshop is $85. Call.
the park Gift Shop at (386)
397-1920 or visit www.ste-
phenfosterCSO.org.

Blood drive
The LifeSouth Blood
Mobile is seeking donors
12 to 7 p.m. Thursday at
Beef O'Brady's and First
Street Music. Free T-shirt,
and more.

Retired Educators meet
The Columbia County
'Retired Educators are
meeting 1 p.m. Thursday
at the School Board Adult
Center Room 120. This
will be the last chance to
get volunteer reports in.
Jim Morrison of Florida
Gateway College is the


guest speaker. Any retired
person interested in educa-
tion is welcome to come.
Call Will Brown at 752-2431.

Camera club
The Branford Camera
Club is meeting 7 p.m.
Thursday at the Branford
Public Library. The pro-
gram will be a discussion
on the skills and gear
needed for successful
nature photography, led by
Dick Madden and Edwin
McCook. A field trip to
Paynes Prairie is Saturday.
Homework for the March
meeting will be to exercise
the exposure techniques
reviewed in the January
program: depth of field,
aperture priority, shut-
ter priority. Homework
for the April meeting will
be nature photography,
which will give members
a chance to share pictures
from the Paynes Prairie
field trip. Contact Carolyn
Hogue, program chair,
386-935-2044; Dick Bryant,
technical consultant, 386-
935-1799; Dick Madden,
technical consultant, 386-
935-0296; or Skip Weigel,
technical consultant, 386-
935-1382.
r
Friday,
Rodeo
The 17th Annual
Florida Gateway Pro
Rodeo is 8 p.m. Friday
at the Columbia County
Resources Arena. Gates
open 6 p.m. Tickets are $5
for children 6-12; $10 in
advance for 13 and up; and
$13 at the gate.

Alice in Wonderland Jr.
Masterpiece
s Performing Arts under
the direction of Dede
Darby is performing Alice


in Wonderland, Jr. 7 p.m.
Friday at Florida Gateway
College. Local children
participating in the play
are third grade through
high school.

New York Day
New York Day, for all
who have lived anywhere
in NY State, is March 26 at
Epiphany Catholic Church
Social Hall. There will be.
a Social Hour with appe-
tizers, dinner catered by
Blue Roof Grill, and enter-
tainment by Tony Buzzella.
NY wines, beers, and soft
drinks will be available at
a cash bar. Cost is $17 per
person. Call the Lloyds
at 752-4885 or Shirley .
Bellows at 758-9760 by
Friday, March 18.

Finger Weaving
Workshop
A finger weaving work-
shop is 1:30 4:30 p.m.
Friday at Stephen Foster
Folk Culture Center State
Park Craft Square, White
Springs. The cost is $5 per
person and supplies will
be provided. Call the park
Gift Shop at (386) 397-1920
or visit www.stephenfoster-
CSO.org.

Guided hike
The Wild Azalea Festival
kicks off 4 to 6 p.m. Friday
with a guided hike along .
the Suwannee River.
Register for the hike by
calling 386-397-7009.

Saturday
Rodeo
The 17th Annual
Florida Gateway Pro
Rodeo is 8 p.m. Saturday
at the Columbia County
Resources Arena. Tickets
are $5 for children 6-12;


$10 in advance for 13 and
up and $13 at the gate.

Mardi Gras party
A Youth Mardi Gras
Celebration is 4:30 to
6:30 p.m. Saturday at
Richardson Community
Center. The event is
for ages 5-17 and free.
Samples of New Orleans
food will be available.
The event will also fea-
ture music, beads, masks
and entertainment from-
Dem Girls Steppers. The
event is sponsored by
the Columbia County
Recreation Department.
Contact 386-754-7095.

Alice in Wonderland Jr.
Masterpiece
Performing Arts under
the direction of Dede
Darby is performing Alice
in Wonderland, Jr. 7 p.m.'
Saturday at the Florida
Gateway College. Local
children participating in
the play are third grade
through high school.

Plant ID Workshop
The Master Gardener
Library Education Series
is hosting a plant ID
workshop 2 p.m. Saturday
at the Columbia County
Public Library main
branch. The event is free
and open to everyone.

Calling All Volunteers
A workday to clear four
lots for future Habitat for
Humanity partner families
begins 8 a.m. Saturday
at 383 Lomond Ave. SE.
Bring your gloves, rakes
and shovels. If you know
someone interested in
providing lunch, please
contact Sheila Burnham at
386-590-0766 or musicla-,
dylo@windstream. net.


OBITUARIES


Gerald August Detjens
Gerald August Detjens, 94, died
on Monday, March 14, 2011 at
the Suwannee Valley Care Cen-
ter (Haven' Hospice) after an
extended illness. He was the son
of the late August & Lillian De-
tjens. A native 'of Wisconsin he
had lived in Columbia County
for the past twenty-four years. He
loved spending time in the out-
doors, fishing, gardening, as well
as making things with his hands
woodworking. He was a loving
husband, father, grandfather, and
great grandfather. He is preceded
in death by his brothers, Henry
& David Detjens, sisters, Lillian
Nortoni & Irene Wells, grandson,
Jon Detjens and his dear wife of
fifty-nine years, Elsie Detjens.
Survivors included his sons, Den-
nis G. (Judy) Detjens of Para-
gould, AK and Duane R. (Misty)
Detjens of Wautoma, WI; daugh-
ter, Dawn D. Detjens of Phoenix,
AZ; brother, Ellis Ray (Phyllis)
Detjens of Santa Barbara, CA;
sisters, Donna (Wilburn) Drewitz
of Calimesa, CAand DorothyDe-
Buhr ofBrookfield, WI; 6 grand-
children, Jimmy Tyler, Conrad,


Parker, Derrek, & Darla; 8 great
grandchildren, Dominique, Dan-
iella, Domiana, Teegan, Devin,
Davia, Daily, & Danica; special
family friend, Evelyn Spence
of Lake City, FL also survive.
Graveside funeral services will.
be conducted at 11:00 a.m. on
'Thursday, March 17, 2011 in
Forest Lawn Memorial Gar-
dens with Chaplin Lynwood
Walters officiating. Visitation
with the family will be one
'hour prior at the funeral home.
GATEWAY-FOREST LAWN
FUNERAL HOME 3596
S. U.S. Hwy 441, Lake City,
Florida 32025,' (386) 752-1954.
please sign our guest book at
www.gatewayforestlawn.com

Elise Duncan Rossee
Mrs. Elise Duncan Rossee of
Lake City, Fla. went to be with
her Lord on Sunday, March 13,
in the Suwannee Valley Care
Center, Lake City, Fla. following
an extended illness. Mrs. Duncan
-was born in Reidsville, Ga. and
lived in Lake City for the past
75 years. She was a member of


the Duncan family of Columbia
County, a pioneer family resid-
~ng in Lake City for many gen-
erations. She was the daughter
of the late Moses Beauregard
Duncan & Eula Elizabeth Hodg-
Ses Duncan and the widow of the
late William Clem Rossee. She
was 'a homemaker and member
of the First Baptist Church of
Lake City. She is survived by
her daughter, Mary Clem Black -
of Lake City, Fla.: Her son,
Ronny D.' (Constance) Rossee
of Lake City, Fla.:' One grand-
son, 'Justin Black of Sebring,
Fla. Graveside funeral services
will be conducted Friday, March
18, at 11 A.M. in Memorial
Cemetery, Lake City, Fla. with
Rev. Valerie Duncan of Ath-
ens, Ga. officiating. GUERRY
FUNERAL HOME, 2659
S.W. Main Blvd., Lake City,
Fla. is .in charge of arrange-
rnents. www.guerryfuneral-
home.net. Phone 386-752-2414

Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


Columbia County's Most Wanted


Wayne Leonard
Harris
DOB: 6/5/65
Height: 6' 2'
Weight: 280 Ibs.
Hair: Black Eyes: Brown
Scar: Right Arm, Left Arm, Stomach
Wanted For: Uttering a Forgery,
Grand Theft III
**Violent Tendencies**


Steve Wayne
Mathis, Jr.
DOB: 6/15/82
Height: 6' 1'
Weight: 200 Ibs.
Hair Brown
Eyes: Blue
Wanted For: Sexual Battery Upon a
Child Under 12 Years of Age
**Violent Tendencies**


WANTED AS OF 3/14/11
ANYONE WITH INFORMATION ON THE WHEREABOUTS OF THESE INDIVIDUALS IS ASKED TO CALL CRIME STOPPERS OF COLUMBIA COUNTY.
WE DO NOT WANT YOUR NAME, JUST YOUR INFORMATION
The likeness of suspects is supplied by the Columbia County Sheriff's Office Warrants Division and/or other law enforcement agencies.
The cases are active at the time of publication unless otherwise noted. Crime Stoppers of Columbia County, Inc., and their volunteers
are jointly and individually exempt from any and all liability which might arise as a result of the publication of public records.


CALL (386) 754-7099 OR
jE T SUBMIT A WEB TIP AT
SCOUMWBIA NT ww.columbiacrimestoppers.net
Funded by the Crime Stoppers Trust Fund; Administered by the Office of the Attorney General


ADVANCE


PURCHASE A
REQUIRED

Sponsored by Lake City Reporter


S^ Purchase at the Lake City Reporter
office or Columbia County Fair
Office.


The Money Man


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


. t







LAKE CITY REPORTER


NATION


WEDNESDAY. MARCH 16, 2011


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Hofneland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano addresses the National Fusion Center
Conference in Denver on Tuesday. Napolitano spoke on the importance of fusion centers in
protecting communities nationwide against all types of threats. She says U.S.,emergency
agencies constantly rehearse for a disaster like the one unfolding in Japan.


Napolitano: US practices

for disasters like Japan's


Associated Press
DENVER U.S. emergency agencies
constantly rehearse for a disaster like the
one unfolding in Japan, and American first
responders will learn from the experience
of their Japanese counterparts, Homeland
Security Secretary Janet Napolitano said
Tuesday.
Napolitano, speaking at a conference in
Denver, said the United States was already
planning a drill based on a hypothetical
major earthquake along the New Madrid
fault in the central U.S. when the earth-
quake, tsunami and nuclear-reactor crisis
struck Japan.
"We are constantly practicing, using
scenarios that are worst-case scenarios, to
make sure we are. as prepared and as up-
to-date and as ready to go as we can be in
any kind of a crisis," she said.
Napolitano said her department works
with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission
to practice responding to a crisis at a
nuclear reactor.
"We think about how we would man-
age a crisis where you lose all your com-
munications. capability, all your critical
infrastructure, there's no electricity, you
can't even pump water for people to drink,"
she said.
Napolitano said it's too .early to say
whether U.S. practices or preparations


will change because of the disasters in
Japan. But she said the U.S. will learn
from Japan's experience, as it did from
Hurricane Katrina in 2005 and the oil spill
in the Gulf of Mexico last year..
The U.S. is focusing now on providing
whatever assistance the Japanese govern-
ment asks for, Napolitano said. She said
the NRC and the Energy Department have
told her Japan is responding to the nuclear
crisis the way U.S. agencies would.
She also cited NRC assurances that any
fallout from the Japanese reactors would
not put the U.S. at risk.
Napolitano spoke at a conference on
the U.S. network of "fusion centers,"
which gather and share federal, state and
local intelligence on terrorism and other
threats.
She said terrorist plots by U.S. residents
or citizens are increasing, and the centers-
are a key part of the U.S. counter-terror-
ism strategy. There are about 70 fusion
centers nationwide.
Napolitano said the Colorado fusion cen-
ter, called the Colorado Intelligence and
Analysis Center, played a "significant role"
in the arrest of Najibullah Zazi, a former
Denver airport shuttle driver who pleaded
guilty to plotting to detonate explosives in
New York City around the anniversary of
the Sept. 11. 2001. attacks.


*Our LOCAL Internet Players Have Won Over


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time. Limit 1 per person per day. May Not be
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WINNERS ARE SELECTED INSTANTLY & PRIZES OF LESS THAN S500 MAY BE REDEEMED INSTANTLY WINNERS OF PRIZES GREATER THAN $500 MAY REDEEM PRIZES AT NO MORE THAN S500 PER DAY MUST BE 18 YEARS OR OLDER TO
ENTER MUST BE 21 YEARS OR OLDER TO CONSUME ALCOHOL PHOTO I.D REQUIRED GO TO PANDA-MONI-YUM OF LAKE CITY LLC TO SEE OFFICIAL RULES & DETAILS. TO PURCHASE INTERNET TIME & TO REDEEM PRIZES. NO PURCHASE OR
CONTRIBUTION NECESSARY TO PARTICIPATE OR WIN MAIL-IN ENTRIES AVAILABLE .'2011 Tom Hunt All rights reserved


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Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?


Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@lakecityreportercom


SPORTS


Wednesday. March 16,201 I


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


BRIEFS
GOLF
ACS tournament
on March 25
The American Cancer
Society Golf Tournament
is 9 a.m. March 25 at
Suwannee Country Club.
Format is four-person
scramble. Sponsorships
are available.
For details or
registration, call Vern
Lloyd at 397-3113.
YOUTH GOLF
Junior Masters
in Louisiana
The Arrowhead Junior
Masters is March
26-27 in Baton Rouge, La.
The tournament is for
ages 12-18.
To enter, call
(318) 402-2446.
FITNESS
Intro to Zumba
class offered
The Lake City
Recreation Department is
offering an Introduction
to Zumba class at
9:30 a.m. April 9 at Teen
Town Recreation Center.
A regular Zumba class
will follow at 10 a.m. Cost
is $5 for either, or both
classes. Sarah Sandlin is
the instructor.
For details, call
Heyward Christie at
754-3607.
FORT WHITE BASEBALL
Yard sale set
for Saturday
Fort White High's
baseball programs have
a yard sale fundraiser
planned for 8 a.m. to
1 p.m. Saturday at the
high school parking lot
, Spots are available to
vendors to rent for a
$15 fee.
Donations for items to
sell are being accepted.
Call Sherry Giardina at
(386) 288-6691 or Jeanne
Howell at
(386) 288-5537 to reserve
a spot or arrange for
pick-up of donations.
E From staff reports

GAMES

Today
Columbia High
weightlifting in sectional
qualifier at Leon High,
1 p.m.
Columbia High
baseball vs. Palm Beach
Gardens High at Buchholz
High, 3:30 p.m.
Fort White High track
at Oak Hall School, TBA
Columbia High
tennis vs. Suwannee
High, 4 p.m..
Thursday
Columbia High
girls tennis vs. Eastside
High at Jonesville Tennis
Center, 3:30 p.m.
Columbia High
softball at Wolfson High,
6 p.m.
Columbia High JV
softball vs. Fort White
High, 6 p.m.
Friday
Columbia High
softball vs. Godby High in
Bell tournament, 3 p.m.
Columbia High
baseball at Union County
High, 7 p.m. (JV-4)
Fort White High
baseball vs. Santa Fe
High, 7 p.m. (JV-4:30)
Saturday
Columbia High
softball vs. Chiefland
High or Bradford High in
Bell tournament, 11 a.m.
Fort White High
track at Hamilton County


Invitational, TBA


L Lady Tigers lose


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High's Michaela Burton (88) throws to first base to get a Flemming Island runner
out in a game on Thursday.


district


Fort White drops
3-2 decision to
Santa Fe High.
By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com
FORT WHITE Fort
White High softball missed
out on an opportunity to
take control of District
5-3A. Instead, Santa Fe High
nailed down first place with
a 3-2 win in Fort White on
Tuesday.
Fort White fell to 9-3
overall and 4-2 in district
play.
Santa Fe (9-3) finished
district with a 7-1 mark.
Fort White struck first.
Caitlin Jones led off the bot-
tom of the first inning with
a single. After a sacrifice by
Ali Wrench, Cecile Gomez
singled. Kayla Williams was
hit by a pitch and Holly
Polhill walked to score
Jones.
Fort White's other run
came in the third inning.
Taylor Douglass had a
two-out double and
Williams singled her
home.
Douglass and Wrench
were both 2-for-3.
Gomez pitched all
seven-innings for the Lady
Indians. She gave up
four hits and struck out
12, but walked seven. All
of Santa Fe's run were
scored by players after free
passes.
Shelby Morgan also


first game of

regular season


Keystone Heights
beats Columbia,
4-2, Tuesday.


By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter:com
Just like Caesar's reign
in Rome, Columbia High's
quest for an undefeated sea-
son came to an end on the
Ides of March.
The Lady Tigers fell
behind 2-0 early 'before
losing, 4-2, to Keystone
Height's High.
After falling into a 2-0
hole, Columbia got one back
in the bottom of the third
inning as Kayli Kvistad sin-


gled to right field to bring in
Stephanie Pilkington, who
had reached on a single
before stealing two bases.
Keystone Heights added
single runs in the fourth and
fifth innings, but Columbia
was able to get another one
back in the bottom of the
fifth. It came from the same
duo. This time, Kvistad hit
a double to score Pilkington
from first
The Lady Tigers couldn't
overcome the deficit over
the final two innings, how-
ever, as Kelsey Waters'
six-strikeout performance
helped Keystone Heights
(11-4) give Columbia (11-1)
its first loss of the season.


decided


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Fort White catcher Holly Polhill(70) receives the ball in time to tag Santa Fe High's Megan Strickland (13) out at home during
a game Tuesday.


pitched a .complete game
for Santa Fe. She gave up
seven hits, one walk and
struck ouft10.
Santa Fe's Kwanza
Gannon scored a run in the
second inning and drove
in Morgan with an RBI-


Gainesville nets

win against

Columbia High


Hurricanes blow
Tigers away on all
courts Tuesday.
From staff reports

Columbia High couldn't
find the mojo on the tennis
courts against Gainesville
High Tuesday and as a
result the Tigers fell 0-7 to
the Hurricanes.
The Tigers were only
able to capture two points
against an experienced
Hurricane squad. Carter
Jackson scored Columbia's
only point in singles,
while Shyam Patel and
Anthony Broome scored


the Tigers' only points in
doubles.
"That was just a very good
Gainesville team," Columbia
head coach Russell Waters
said. '"They're just incred-
ible. I told the boys not to
feel defeated, they're just
a very strong, seasoned
team."
Columbia has a chance
to bounce back quickly
as Suwannee High travels
to Lake City at 4 p.m.
today.
"It's not a district match,
so I'll probably mix up the
lineup," Waters said.
The Tigers already have a
7-0 win against the Bulldogs
earlier this season.


double in the third inning.
Megan Stricklan tripled in
Gannon. Jenn Maresca
scored on a bases-load-
ed walk to Savannah
Hewett.
Fort White threw out two
Lady Raiders at third base


and Polhill picked off a pair
at first base.
"We played much bet-
ter," Fort White head coach
Cassie Sparks .said. "I told
them to get aggressive early
and they were being very
patient. We played solid


defense and didn't make
any base-running mistakes.
Unfortunately, Santa Fe is a
good team and it fell their
way."
Fort White travels to
Newberry High at 6 p.m.
March 22.


COURTESY PHOTO
Columbia High's No. 1 tennis player, Octavious Buiey, returns a serve in a game played
earlier this season in Lake City.


,qMF2N;M'.44MI









LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS WEDNESDAY, MARCH 16, 2011


TELEVISION

TV sports
Today
EXTREME SPORTS
I p.m.
ESPN2 Winter X Games, ski
superpipe men's final, at Tignes, France
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
I p.m.
ESPN Preseason, Boston vs.Atlanta,
at Orlando
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
6:30 p.m.
TRUTV NCAA Division I
tournament, first roundTexas-SanAntonio
vs. Alabama State, at Dayton, Ohio
7 p.m.
ESPN2 NIT, first round, Nebraska
vs.Wichita State
9 p.m.
ESPN2 NIT, first round, Mississippi
at California
TRUTV NCAA Division I
tournament, first round, Southern Cal vs.
Virginia Commonwealth, at Dayton, Ohio
NBA BASKETBALL
8 p.m.
ESPN Oklahoma City at Miami
10:30 p.m.
ESPN Dallas at Golden State
NHL HOCKEY
7:30 p.m.
VERSUS -Washington at Detroit

BASKETBALL

NBA schedule

Tuesday's Games
Indiana 119,NewYork 117
Atlanta 110, Milwaukee 85
Chicago 98,Washington 79
Dallas at Portland (n)
Today's Games
Denver at Atlanta, 7 p.m.
Indiana at Boston, 7:30 p.m.
Toronto at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Orlando at Milwaukee, 8 p.m.
Phoenix at New Orleans, 8 p.m.
Oklahoma City at Miami, 8 p.m.
Charlotte at Houston, 8:30 p.m.
Minnesota at Utah, 9 p.m.
Cleveland at Sacramento, 40 p.m.
Dallas at Golden State, 10:30 p.m.
Philadelphia at LA. Clippers, 10:30 p.m.
Thursday's Games
Chicago at New Jersey, 7 p.m.
Memphis at New York, 7:30 p.m.
Cleveland at Portland, 10 p.m.

NCAA tournament.

FIRST ROUND
At UD Arena
Dayton, Ohio
Tuesday
UNC Asheville 81, Arkansas-Little
Rock 77, OT "
No. 12 Seed East UAB vs. Clemson
(n)'
-- ', .'~ib. .* today ', "
No. 16 Seed East Texas-SariAntonio
(19-13) vs. Alabama State (17-17),
6:30 p.m.
No. II Seed Southwest: Southern
Cal (19-14) vs. Virginia Commonwealth
(23-11), 9 p.m.

NIT

First Round '
Tuesday
Alabama 68, Coastal Carolina 44
College of Charleston 94, Dayton 84
Cleveland State 63,Vermont 60
Oklahoma State 71, Harvard 54
Murray State at Missouri State (n)
UTEP at New Mexico (n)
Boston College at McNeese State (n)
Fairfield at Colorado State (n)
Kent State at St. Mary's, Calif. (n)
Today
Texas Southern (19-12) at Colorado
(21-13),7 p.m.
Nebraska (19-12) at Wichita State
(24-8), 7 p.m.
Florida Atlantic (21-10) at Miami
(19-14), 7:30 p.m.
Wisconsin-Milwaukee (19-13). at
Northwestern (18-13),8 p.m.
Bethune-Cookman (21-12) at
VirginiaTech (21-11 ),8 p.m.
Mississippi (20-13) at California
(17-14),9 p.m.
Long Beach State (22-12) at
Washington State (19-12), 10 p.m.

AII-SEC team

The Associated Press All-Southeastern
Conference men's basketball team with
name, school, position, height and class
(u-unanimous choice to first team):
FIRSTTEAM
u-Chandler Parsons, Florida, F,
6-10,Sr.
u-John Jenkins,Vanderbilt, G, 6-4, So.
Terrence Jones, Kentucky, F, 6-8, Fr.
JaMychal Green,Alabama, F,6-8,Jr.
Chris Warren, Mississippi, G, 5-10, Sr.
SECOND TEAM
Brandon Knight, Kentucky, G, 6-3, Fr.
Trey Thompkins, Georgia, F, 6-10, Jr.
Scotty Hopson,Tennessee, G, 6-7,Jr.
Tony Mitchell,Alabama, F, 6-6, So.
ErvingWalker, Florida, G, 5-8,Jr.
HONORABLE MENTION
Dee Bost, Mississippi St., G, 6-2, Jr.;
Tobias Harris,Tennessee, F, 6-8, Fr.; Kenny
Boynton, Florida, G, 6-2, So.; Rotnel
Clarke, Arkansas, G, 6-0, Jr.; Festus Ezeli,
Vanderbilt, C, 6-Il, Jr.; Trevor Releford,
Alabama, G, 6-1, Fr.; Jeffery Taylor,
Vanderbilt, F, 6-7,Jr.

PLAYER OF THE YEAR Chandler
Parsons, Florida
COACH OF THE YEAR Billy
Donovan, Florida
NEWCOMER OF THE YEAR -
Terrence Jones, Kentucky


BASEBALL

Spring training

Today's Games
Tampa Bay vs. Florida at Jupiter,
1:05 p.m.
Boston vs. Atlanta at Kissimmee,
1:05 p.m.
St. Louis vs. Detroit at Lakeland,
1:05 p.m.
N.Y. Mets vs. Minnesota at Fort Myers,


1:05 p.m.
Toronto vs. Pittsburgh at Bradenton,
1:05 p.m.
Washington vs. Houston at Kissimmee,
1:05 p.m.
Baltimore vs. N.Y. Yankees at Tampa,
7:05 p.m.
Colorado vs. Texas at Surprise, Ariz.,
9:05 p.m.
Thursday's Games
N.Y. Mets vs. Boston at Fort Myers,
1:05 p.m.
Toronto vs. Philadelphia at Clearwater,
1:05 p.m.
Baltimore vs. Pittsburgh at Bradenton,
1:05 p.m.
Minnesota vs. Detroit at Lakeland,
1:05 p.m.
Florida vs. St. Louis at Jupiter,
1:05 p.m.
Washington vs. Atlanta at Kissimmee,
6:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay vs. N.Y.Yankees at Tampa,
7:05 p.m.
Texas vs. San Diego at Peoria, Ariz.,
10:05 p.m.

College polls

Baseball America
DURHAM, N.C. -The top 25 teams
in the Baseball America poll with records
through March 13 and previous ranking
(voting by the staff of Baseball America):
Record Pv
1. Florida 14-2 I
2.Vanderbilt 16-1 2
3. Oklahoma 16-1 3
4. South Carolina 11-2 4
5.Texas 11-5 5
6. Florida state 15-1 8
7.Virginia 16-1 II
8. Louisiana State 15-1 16
9.Arizona State 11-3 9
I 0.TCU 10-5 7
SI.Arizona 13-3 14
12. Stanford 6-5 12
13. Cal State Fullerton 8-6 6
14.Baylor 11-5 17
15. California 10-4 20
16. Clemson 7-6 10
17. Fresno State 11-2 23
18. North Carolina 14-3 15
19. Connecticut 7-6 19
20. College of Charleston 14-3 21
21.TexasA&M 12-4 22
22.Tulane 11-4 24
23. Georgia Tech 12-4 25
24. UCLA 8-6 13
25.Rice 10-8 18
Collegiate Baseball
TUCSON, Ariz. The Collegiate
Baseball poll with records through March
13, points and. previous rank. Voting is
done by coaches, sports writers and
sports information directors:
Record Pts Pvs
1.Florida 14-2 495 I
2. Oklahoma, 16-I 494 2
3.Vahderbilt 16-1 493 3
4. Florida St. 15-1 491 5
5. Louisiana St. 15-I 489 7
6.Virginia 16-1 488 10
7. South Carolina 11-2 486 6
8.Texas' 11-5 479 II
9.TexatChristiart 10-5 477 9
I O.ArizonaSt. 11-3 475 13
SI.TexasA&M 12-4 473, 44
12.Arizona 13-3 470 15
13.Arkansas 13-2 468 18
14. U.C. Irvine 12-1 467 21
15. UCLA 8-6 466 12
16. Clemson 7-6 465 4
17. Cal. St. Fullerton 8-6 464 8
18. Stanford 6-5 463 17
19. North Carolina 14-3 460 16
20. Fresno St. 11-2 455 20


ACROSS

1 Gusted
5 Talk on and on
8 Positive.
12 Ms. Minnelli
13 Four ,
quarters
14 Boarding
school
15 Geography
abbr.
16 Beneath the
waves
18 Literary genre
20 Feeble
21 Put under
wraps
22 Grassy field
23 Vietnam's capi-
tal
26 Firm up
29 Mr. LeMond
30 Dips in gravy
31 Model,'to
begin with
33 Waiter's check
34 Upon
35 CSA soldiers


21. Louisville 11-3
22. Georgia Tech. 12-4
23. Oregon St. 13-3
24.Aubumrn I I-5
25.Tulane 11-4
26.Wichita St. 10-4
27. Baylor 11-5
28. Col. of Charleston 14-3
29. California 10-4
30. Stetson 12-3


GOLF

Golf week

PGATOUR
Transitions Championship
Site: Palm Harbor
Schedule:Thursday-Sunday.
Course: Innisbrook Resort and Golf
Club, Copperhead Course (7,332 yards,
par 71).
Purse: $5.5 million. Winner's share:
$990,000.:
Television: Golf Channel (Thursday,
3-6 p.m., 8:30-11:30 p.m.; Friday, midnight-
3 a.m., 3-6 p.m., 8:30-11:30 p.m.; Saturday,
midnight-3 a.m., 1-3 p.m., 9:36-11:30 p.m.;
Sunday, I1-3 p.m., 9:30-11:30 p.m.) and
NBC (Saturday-Sunday, 3-6 p:m.).
Online: http://www.pgatour.com
LPGATOUR.
LPGA Founders Cup.
Site: Phoenix.
Schedule: Friday-Sunday.
Course: JW Marriott Desert Ridge
Resort & Spa, Wildfire Golf Club (6,613
yards, par 72).
Purse: None.
Television: Golf Channel (Friday,
6:30-8:30 p.m.; Saturday, 6:30-9 p.m.;
Sunday, midnight-2 a.m., 7-9 p.m.; Monday,
midnight-2 a.m.).
Online: http://www.lpga.com
PGA EUROPEAN TOUR
Sicilian Open
Site: Ragusa, Sicily.
Schedule:Thursday-Sunday.
Course: Donnafugatac Golf Resort &
Spa (7,182 yards, par 71).
'Purse: $1.4 million. Winner's share:
$232,300.
Television: Golf Channel (Thursday-
Friday, 9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.; Saturday-
Sunday, 9 a.m.-noon).
Online: http://www.europeantour.com
CHAMPIONSTOUR
Next event: Mississippi Gulf Resort
Classic, April 1-3, Fallen Oak, Saucier,
Miss.
NATIONWIDE TOUR
Next event: Louisiana Open, March
24-27, Le Triomphe Country Club,
Broussard, La.

HOCKEY

NHL schedule

Tuesday's Games
Boston 3, Columbus 2, SO
New Jersey 4, Atlanta 2
.N.Y. Rangers 6, N.Y. Islanders .3
Washington 4, Montreal 2
Carolina I, Buffalo 0
Pittsburgh 5, Ottawa I
Philadelphia 3, Florida 2
Los Angeles 4, Nashyille 2
San Jose at Dallas (n)
Phoenix at Calgary (n)
Today's Games
Toronto at Carolina, 7 p.m.
Washington at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Colorado atVancouver, 10 p.m.
St. Louis at Anaheim, 10 p.m.


36 Propped up
38 Desperado's
fear
39 Kind of instinct
40 Plant sci.
411 th-grade
exam
43 Nanny from
abroad
(2 wds.)
46 Hikers' totes
48 Promote loudly
50 vera
51 Sporty truck
52 Active volcano
53 Gulls' cries
54 Whodunit her-
ring
55 Go steady

DOWN

1 Lunch counter
order
2 Reclines
3 Cornell or
Pound
4 Tusked charger
5 Natural ladle


GOLF REPORTS



Scrambles get under way


Scrambles began
Saturday with the LGA
Scramble and the Kickoff
Scramble.
. The team of Barbara
Green, VonCile Kahlich,
Carole McGraw and.
Darlene Horn won the LGA
with a 78.
The team of Susie Mick,
Amanda Grimmett, JoAnn
Lee and Sue Terlaje was
second with an 81.
The Kickoff Scramble
had nine three-person
teams.
The team of Bob Wheary,
Bill Ryan and Glen Colunga
tied with Todd Carter,
Oscar Sadvdera and Bill
Bryant,. each shooting a 65.
The sudden-death playoff


QUAIL HEIGHTS
COUNTRY CLUB
Tammy Gainey

was won by Wheary, Ryan
and Colunga.
The Wednesday Night
Scramble starts back
today. Call the pro shop by
4:30 p.m. to sign up.
Wednesday Blitz
winners:
ADivision ChetCarter
+10, first; Shelton Keeh +5,
second; Bob Wheary and
Pete Skantzos +3, tied for
third; .
B Division Randy
Hearvin 44, first; Gary
Croxton +3, second;
Emerson Darst +2, third;


C Division Jack
Tuggle +8, first; Terry
Shay +7, second; Bill Walls
and Keith Hudson +2, tied
for third;
D Division Larry
Boone +5, first; Ricky
Crawford +3, second;
Garrett Shay and Gerald
Smithy +2, tied for third.
Chet Carter, Tammy
Gainey, Todd Carter,
Hearvin and Wheary each
scored a skin. The pot car-
ried over.
JoAnn Lee won the
Ladies Blitz with +6.
Amanda Grimmett was
second at +2.
Bill Ryan won the Top of
the Hill at +14. Jack Tuggle
was second at +9.


Randall/Hunter take MGA


Bob Randall and Chad
Hunter combined for the
day's only sub-par round in
the MGA alternate shot/
better ball event to take the
A flight gross division win.
Their 3-under-par 69 was
three shots clear of the rest
of the field.
The A division net purse
went to Alan Moody and
Steve Gordon for their 63.
In B division, the' gross
winners were Scott Kishton
and Jim Carr who com-
bined for an 81. Pierre
Provencher and Nelson
Demars took the B division
net win with a 64.
Mike McCranie (+8)
cruised to a three-shot
win in the A division of the
Wednesday blitz. Dwight
Rhpdes (+5) and Chad
Hunter (+4) trailed the
winner.
Ed Higgs (+6) fought off
a serious challenge. from
Randy VanVIeck (+5) fbr
the B division win.


World Golf Ranking

I. Martin Kaymer GER 8.20
2. Lee Westwood ENG 7.84,
3. Luke Donald ENG 6.73
4. Graeme McDowellNIR 6.37
5.TigerWoods USA 6.14l
6. Phil Mickelson USA 5.99
7. Paul Casey ENG 5.93


Answer to Previous Puzzle

SH Y W11ITS P,0101F
R E V I ISIAK R ACIE
TREAS UR Y E||'TT A


R E V S
RUSTVENT OWS
AAAPE PAL
G NU DECIl C D E


EATMIEESK OACID
UH L X ROX
0O L ATITU D E
OAVID DON
SPA O0GEE RA


6 Diarist Frank
7 Cradle
8 Meal or ranch
9 Pliny's bear
10 Terrible smell
11 It banned DDT


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


17 Jugs
19 Livy's trio
22 Reindeer
herder
23 Elev.
24 Haik wearer
25 Corn Belt st.
26 Engine
cover
27 Scrapes by
28 Penpoints
30 Proofer's word
32 Mao -tung
34 Critical, as a
shortage
35 Spun around
37 Striped stones
38 Burst
40 Cleared the
dishes
41 White as a
sheet
42 Kind of flurry
43 up (pay)
44 Scintilla
45 Smallest piglet
46 Trippet
47 Afr. neighbor
49 kwon do


3-16 2011 by UFS, Inc.


COUNTRY CLUB
at LAKE CITY
Ed Goff

Hunter, picked up two
keepers in the skins game.
Lex McKeithen, Buddy
Slay, Jonathan Allen and
Jordan Hale each had one
skin.
The LGA staged 'a blind
draw to decide which nine
holes would be counted in
ladies' play.
After applying half of
each player's handicap
to her gross score, Sally
Rivers wound up on top
with a net 33. -
Katrina Counts and Carol
Felton tied for second with
35. Natalie Bryant and
Dottie Rogers tied for third
place with 36.
Both Good Old Boys
matches were won by
identical team scores. Tom
Elmore, Eli Witt, Howard
Whitaker and Jim McGriff


8. Rory Mcllroy
9. Matt Kuchar
10. Stieve Stricker
I I. Dustin Johnson
12.Jim Furyk
13. Ernie Els
14. lan Poulter


took the measure of Carl
Wilson, Jim Bell, Tom
Kennedy and Marc Risk,
.6-3, in Match 1.
Match 2 was a victory
for Bobby Simmons, Dave
Bernheim, Bill Rogers,
Dan Stephens and Monty
Montgomery; over Mike
Spencer, Sax Saxon,
Joe Persons and Don
Christensen.
Montgomery scored a
close win in the fight for
18-hole scoring honors. His
36-41-77 was a shot better
than Risk -(37-41-78).
Whitaker (38) had no
challengers in his nine-
hole win on the front side.
Elmore and Witt knotted at
39 on the back.
Weekly Wednesday and
Thursday night scrambles
begin today. Team pairings
will be 5 p.m. with a shot-
gun start at 5:30 p.m.
Callaway equipment
demo day is 11 a.m. to
3 p.m. March 26.


15. NickWatney
16. F. Molinari
17. BubbaWatson
18. Hunter Mahan
19. Retief Goosen
20. Robert Karlsson
21. MA.Jimenez


FREE ADMISSION TO THE RODEO


Veterans,

Stop byfor a free coupon to the
Florida Gateway Rodeo

Sunday, March 20, 2011

Pick up your FREE coupon at the sponsors listed below

Bring the coupon and your military ID to the rodeo
for FREE ADMISSION

Coupon good for one person Quantities Are Limited

Sponsored by


Lake City Reporter


The Money Man


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

I RCNKA I


I I k A 4, -A If EATING OUT51E
ON A RAINY PAY
USOIDT WAS ---
-Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
- suggested by the above cartoon.

Answer:
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday I Jumbles: PILOT CREEK HIDDEN LOCATE
Answer: How the man chose his new nose at the
plastic surgeon's office HE PICKED IT


SCOREBOARD


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421








Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS WEDNESDAY, MARCH 16, 2011 3B


DILBERT


BLONDIE


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE
J. ALW iAY 6Y 1-
ME14V CAN~JF OA WP 7O
5r-"LE rTIR PlrFf.P.,6M


SNUFFY SMITH


DEAR ABBY


Men lonely for companionship

should learn how to please


DEAR ABBY: I am 67
and my roommate is 62. He
and I could be out dating ev-
ery night of the week. We get
calls here like it is a fraternity
house. I think it's because we
know how to treat women.
I hear other men our age
complain they can't get a date
or find the "right" woman.
They say they are lonely, al-
ways being "used," etc. I tell
them: Get a life! Think of
someone besides yourself.
My buddy and I think in
terms of what would please
the lady. Other guys think a ro-
mantic date is grabbing a bite
at a fast-food restaurant, rent-
ing a violent movie, or flop-
ping at the woman's house and
falling asleep after she's made
him a home-cooked meal. I
say: Learn to dance, get some
new clothes, ask a woman
what her interests are. I did it,
and I've learned to enjoy art
shows, plays, visiting flea mar-
kets, etc.
A lady once told me, "You
don't need a woman. You are a
great cook, and you iron better
than I do." My answer to her
was, "Those are not the things
I need a lady for."
So, Abby, my advice to lone-
ly old men is this: Get your act
together! As Auntie Marne
said, "Life is a banquet, and
most poor suckers are starv-
ing to death." HAVING
A PEACH OF A TIME IN
GEORGIA
DEAR HAVING A
PEACH: Thank you for your
enlightened philosophy. My


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearabby.com
crystal ball tells me that nei-
ther you nor your buddy will
ever be starving for food at the
banquet of life or attention
and affection, either.
DEAR ABBY: What do
you do when your future in-
laws, tell other relatives that
they intend to ruin your up-
coming wedding? They are
upset because they were not
included in the wedding party.
My future mother-in-law let it
be known she's dressing up
like a hooker!
I have family members who
are police officers coming to
the wedding. The only idea I
can come up with to prevent
it is to ask them to guard the
door of the church, and if need
be, escort these unruly people
out before they can raise a
ruckus.
' As you might have gath-
ered, my fiance's parents don't
- want me to marry their son.
- ON THE VERGE OF A
NERVOUS BREAKDOWN
DEAR ON THE VERGE:
Take a deep breath and talk
to your fiance about eloping.
Once your in-laws accept the
fact that the knot has already
been tied, you can host a love-


ly reception. When the time
comes, give them the benefit
of the doubt and assume they'll
behave themselves. Use the
police only as a last resort, but
if it comes to that, cross your
fingers and hope your mother-
in-law solicits one of them.
DEAR ABBY: At a cocktail
party last *night, the hostess
handed me a glass of wine.
When I started to take a sip,
I noticed the glass was filthy.
My immediate reaction was,
"Alcohol kills germs." But the
thought of putting the glass to
my mouth was distasteful, so
I told her the wine was "too
sweet for my taste." She then
handed me another glass of
wine, and THAT one was as
dirty as the first! How should
I have handled it? NOT
CRYSTAL CLEAR IN WIS-
CONSIN
DEAR NOT CRYSTAL
CLEAR: The first time it hap-
pened, you should have said,
"Oops! This glass didn't make
it through the dishwasher"
and returned it to your host-
ess. When it happened again,
you should have said, "... this
one, too." Then you should
have asked for something you
could drink from the original
container. Sensible person that
you are, I'm sure you didn't
partake of the hors d'oeuvres,
and won't be partying there
again. Right?
* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


L'. 'IT
WPrs*c .


ZITS


B.C.


FRANK & ERNEST


- = ^EXTRA! DiDN'T o
M ^^ N I KNOW V
THAT TOA5T7$

UND69COATING.
-]-Z-7
11-tAVE5 >-iso


ARIES (March 21-
April 19): Look for a fun
way to spend the day. Incor-
porating a change of pace
into your life will rejuvenate
you and inspire you to take
on new challenges, leading
to more skills, a better posi-
tion or closer friendships.

TAURUS (April 20-
May 20): Work quietly
on your own and you will
bypass conflict and accom-
plish what you set out to
do. Don't let any negative
influences slow you down
or lead you astray. Separate
personal and emotional
matters from your profes-
sional responsibilities. **
GEMINI (May 21-
June 20):. Take a serious
approach to your work and
the connections you can
make while contributing to
an industry group or cause
you feel strongly about. Fa-
vors will be offered that will
enable you to surpass your
expectations. ****-
CANCER (June 21-
July 22): What's most
important right now is se-
curing your income and
earning potential. By show-
ing how intent you are to,
get things done properly,
you will instill confidence
in those you work with, re-
sulting in opportunities to
advance. ***
LEO (July 23-Aug.
22): Address any situa-
tion that you feel needs


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

tweaking. You'll be able to
express your thoughts with
a persuasive, heartfelt man-
ner that cannot be denied.
Added discipline will enable
you to take care of your re-
sponsibilities. ***
VIRGO (Aug. 23-
Sept. 22): Whether it's a
personal investment, debt
owed or a means to bring
in more cash through, a
hobby or skill, you must-fol-
low through. Do your best
to increase your potential
for profits. Put money into
something that will grow in
value. ***
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): Engage in social, com-
munity or organizational'
events and you will be
able to make a difference
with the contributions you
make. An opportunity to
partner with someone who
shares your concerns will
enable you to find solutions
and act upon them. ****
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-
Nov. 21): Make your own
decisions based on your
needs, not what someone
else wants you to do. You
will face emotional decep-
tion if you trust in someone
looking out for his or her
own interests. Take charge
of whatever situation you
face. **
SAGITTARIUS (Nov.


22-Dec. 21): You may
face a little opposition from
friends or neighbors if you
aren't willing to conform
today. However, if you stick
close to home and focus on
how you can-'accommodate
your goals for the future,
you will bypass any contro-
versy going on in your com-
munity. ***** -
CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): Expect to
be criticized if you aren't
compassionate regarding
a sensitive situation. Take
heed of how someone you
respect is handling the
situation and you will save
yourself a lot of grief and
possible isolation. ***
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Plan to have
some fun and to experiment
with activities that interest
you. Attending a reunion or
simply contacting someone
you used to know through
a social network will open
up a door that you should
probably have never let
close. Love is in the stars.

PISCES (Feb. 19-
March 20): Find ways to
expand on an idea you have
or to enhance your skills.
Getting to know people you
work with better or recon-
necting with people you
have worked with in the
past will help you get back
into the mainstream where
you belong. ***'


CELEBRITY CIPHER


by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: Y equals Z
"RTWWHJA OHTJ JNSLA AH CJP

G X C J R." B I X M X I C D U CPHJO "C
YXGJC UHXR DHA BLCDSX NAR


R W H A R "


- CI S H J X


PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "I can get sad, I can get frustrated... but I never get
depressed because there's joy in my life." Michael J. Fox
(c) 2011 by NEA, Inc. 3-16


FOR BETTER. OR WORSE
7 f ,HTSM THs RE ATmEK.
Syo u'VE. O UST IEE-T
\\KR -CRUNCH OILED,'/YOU DOM









LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS WEDNESDAY, MARCH 16, 2011


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


Lifters overpower


Hawthorne High


From staff reports

Fort White High's
weightlifters overpowered
visiting Hawthorne High on
Monday, 64-19.
The Indians had eight
class winners Colt
Pearce (119 pounds),
Devin Rorabaugh (129),
Josh Faulkner (154), AJ.
Legree (169), JR Dixon
(183), Donnell Sanders
(219), Dylan Newman (238)
and Kurtis Norris (heavy-
weight).
Placing second for the
Indians were Kyle Sullivan
(154), Terry Calloway
(169), Kellen Snider (183),
Anthony Fuller (199), Chris
Waites (219) and Anthony
Pearce (heavyweight).


Third-place finishers
were Tristan Nelson (119),
Nathan Escalante (129),
Shayne Newman (139) and
Joseph Chatman (199).
Fort White (7-0) hosts
Hamilton County High and
Chiefland High at 4 p.m.
Monday.

Columbia sports
Columbia High baseball
fell 1-0 to Melody Christian
in a road game on Tuesday.
The boys and girls
tennis matches sched-
uled against Middleburg
High on Monday were
cancelled. Both teams
return home against
Suwannee High at
4 p.m. today.


H20
08CR


Kurtis Norris makes a clean and jerk lift during a weightlifting meet on March 7.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter














olumbia

Your marketplace source for Lake City


and


Columbia County


WEDNESDAY, MARCH 16, 2011 1C



Camp Weed is perfect for meetings, celebrations


Camp Weed and the
Cerveny Conference
Center in Live Oak
offers everything
guests will need to
host their upcoming event, from
lodging and meeting rooms to
dining.
"It has the whole package,"
said Joe Chamberlain, executive
director.
Sitting on 520 acres,'the camp
is a ministry of the Episcopal
Diocese of Florida, with sepa-
rate youth camp facilities and an
adult conference center.
The camp originated almost 90
years ago in St. Augustine when
a group, of young people gath-
ered for a summer camp, which
they named Camp Weed in honor
and memory of Edwin Weed, a
bishop in the Episcopal Church
who died in 1924.
After it moved to several loca-
tions, Bishop Frank Cerveny
had a vision to put the camp
at a more central location, in
Live Oak to better serve the 75
Episcopal churches in North
Florida, Chamberlain. That vision
included an adult conference
center in addition to the youth
camp, he, said, and the Cerveny
Conference C9enter was added
in 1985.
Today, Camp Weed hosts annu-
al summer camps and Episcopal
churches use its facilities for
retreats. About 50 percent of the
activities it hosts are for churches
and denominations outside the
Episcopal Diocese, Chamberlain
said. Other entities like business-
es, governmental agencies, uni-
versities and community organi-


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Joe Chamberlain, executive director of Camp Weed and the Cerveny Conference Center, is seen in the pews at
Mandi's Chapel, where many wedding ceremonies are held throughout the year.


nations also utilize the camp and
conference center's facilities.
Large portions of the prop-
erty have been purposely left
untouched, Chamberlain said,
and all of the facilities were inten-
tionally designed with nature in
mind.
"All of our architecture keeps
you in touch with the outdoors,"
he said.
Over time, the camp became a
"premiere site" for weddings and
receptions, Chamberlain said, an
identity for which the camp is
locally known.


The grounds are home to
Mandi's Chapel, which is open
to all Christian wedding ceremo-
nies, and four different reception
areas both indoor and out-
door --that can hold different
numbers of people to give guests
a variety of options for their
event.
"We've done all sorts of recep-
tions from a wedding reception
for 750 people down to a recep-
tion for 10," he said.
Reception prices have been
changed to accommodate cus-
tomers on tighter budgets.


"I think one of the perceptions
that's/ out there is we're very
expensive and maybe too expen-
sive for a lot of people to use,
so we've modified some of our
offerings so people on a tighter
budget can rent the facilities,"
he said.
Customers can bring in their
own caterer or use the camp's
"excellent food services,"
Chamberlain said.
'We've intentionally positioned
our food services at a top level,"
he said.
Four levels of lodging are also


available for event guests more
than 50 guest rooms, almost 10
cabins that sleep 18 people each,
15 RV sites and unlimited tent
camping.
Guests should choose to host
an event at Camp Weed and the
Cerveny Conference Center
because it's flexible in its facilities
for both formal and casual events
and affordable for all budgets,
Chamberlain said.
Its layout promotes an "egali-
tarian" atmosphere, where busi-
ness people can accomplish their
work in both a meeting room and'
in a more relaxed, social setting.
"What's unique about this place
and what sets it apart, because of
the way it's laid out, as much can
be .accomplished in a couple of
rocking chairs watching the sun go
down as can be accomplished in a
meeting room," Chamberlain said.
The camp's organization also
fosters a sense of community,
Chamberlain said.
"Our spaces put you together
comfortably and you become, for
a brief time anyway, a commu-
nity," he said.
Advertising in the Lake City
Reporter's magazine, Currents, has
produced "fruitful" and "excellent"
results, Chamberlain said.
"From my experience, you (the
Reporter) have helped us position
ourselves as a premiere site for
weddings and receptions locally,"
he said.
Call the camp at (386) 364-
5250, e-mail frontdesk@campweed.
org and visit www.campweed.org.
. "There really isn't anything like
it in the area," Chamberlain said.


I'


At participating locations. Tax and delivery extra. Limited time only.










LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED WEDNESDAY, MARCH 16, 2011

Lake City Reporter





CLASSIFIED


Classified Department: 755-5440


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

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personal merhandise total e 6ee or aess.
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d d


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Limited to service type advertis-
ing only.
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$10.80 each additional line
Includes an additional $2.00 per
ad for each Wednesday insertion.

-e=

You can call us at 755-5440,
Monday through Friday from 8:00
a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Some people prefer to place their
classified ads in person, and some
ad categories will require prepay-
ment. Our office is located at 180
East Duval Street.
You can also fax or email your ad
copy to the Reporter.
FAX: 386-752-9400 Please
direct your copy to the Classified
S- Department.
- EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityre-.
porter.com





Ad is to Appear Call by: Fax/Email by:
Tuesday Mon.,10:00am. Man.,9:00a.m.
Wednesday Mon., 10:00a.m. Mo., 9:00 am.
Thursday Wed.,10:00a.m. Wed.,9:00a.m.
Friday Thuis., 10:00am. Thiurs.,9:00am.
Saturday Fi., 10:00 am. F., 9:00 am.
Sunday Fri., 10:00am. Fri., 9:00am.
These deadlines are subject to change without noUce.




Ad Errors- Please read your ad
on -the first day of publication.
We accept responsibility for only
the first incorrect insertion, and
only the charge for the ad space
in error. Please call 755-5440
immediately for prompt correc-
tion and billing adjustments.
Cancellations- Normal advertising
deadlines apply for cancellation.
Billing Inquiries- Call 755-5440.
Should further information be
required regarding payments or
credit limits, your call Will be trans-
ferred to the accounting depart-
ment.


Advertising copy is subject to
approval by the Publisher who
reserves the right to edit, reject,
or classify all advertisements under
appropriate headings. Copy should
be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the first day of pub-
lication. Credit for published errors
will be allowed for the first insertion
for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the
Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nor for any general,
special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply
with Federal, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
nation in employment, housing and
public accommodations. Standard
abbreviations are acceptable; how-
ever, the first word of each ad may
not be abbreviated.
In and 0nlne


Legal

NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR
TAX DEED
Sec. 197.241 ES.
Notice is hereby given that the
Mark or Margaret Sullivan of the fol-
lowing certificate has filed said cer-
tificate for a Tax Deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate number and
year of issuance, the description of
the property and name in which it
was assessed is as follows:
Certificate Number: 99
Year of Issuance: 2005
Description of Property: SEC 36
TWN 5S RNG 15 PARCEL NUM-
BER 00488-019 LOTS 19 & 20
BLOCK A SPRING HILLS S/D.
ORB 537-516, 672-372, 825-292,
825-1610
Name in which assessed: DEANNA
TOMLINSON
All of said property being in the
County of Columbia, State of Flori-
da. Unless said certificate shall be re-
deemed according to law, the proper-
ty described in such certificate will
be sold to the highest bidder at the
Courthouse on Monday the 21st day
of March, 2011, at 11:00A.M.
P. DEWITT CASON
CLERK OF COURTS
AMERICANS WITH DISABILI-
TIES ACT: If you are a person with
a disability who needs any accom-
modation in order to participate in
this proceeding, you are entitled, at
no cost to you, to the provision of
certain assistance. Persons with a
disability who need any accommoda-
tion to participate should contact the
ADA Coordinator, P.O. Box 1569,
Lake City, FL 32056, 386-719-7428,
within two (2) working days of your
receipt of this notice; if you are hear-
ing impaired call (800) 955-8771; if
you are voice impaired call (800)
955-8770.

'04543578
February 23, 2011
March 2,9, 16,2011
NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR
TAX DEED
Sec. 197.241 F.S.
Notice is hereby given that the
Mark Sullivan C/F Thomas Sullivan
of the following certificate has filed
said certificate for a Tax Deed to be
issued thereon. The certificate num-
ber and year of issuance, the descrip-
tion of the property and name in
which it was assessed is as follows:
Certificate Number: 1165
Year of Issuance: 2005
Description of Property: SEC 01
TWN 2S RNG 17 PARCEL NUM-
BER 04659-010 COMM SW COR
OF NW 1/4 OF NE 1/4, RUN N
432.75 FT, E 158.88 FT FOR POB,
RUN N 218.23 FT, E 223.69 FT, S
217.80 FT, W 220 FT TO POB.
(AKA LOT 34 FRANK THOMAS
S/D UNREC) ORB 353-472, 761-
1961
Name in which assessed: DICK
J(OHNSON
All of said property being in the
County of Columbia, State of Flori-
da. Unless said certificate shall be re-
deemed according to law, the proper-
ty described in such certificate will,
be sold to, the highest bidder at the
Courthouse on Monday the 21st day
of March, 2011, at 11:00 A.M.
P. DEWITN CASON
CLERK OF COURTS
'AMERICANS WITH DISABILI-
TIES ACT: If you are a person with
a disability who needs any accom-
modation in order to participate in
this proceeding, you are entitled, at
no cost to you, to the provision of
certain assistance. Persons with a
disability who need any accommoda-
tion to participate should contact the
ADA Coordinafor, P.O. Box 1569,
Lake City, FL 32056, 386-719-7428,
within two (2) working'days of your
receipt of this notice; if you are hear-
ing impaired call (800) 955-8771; if
you are voice impaired call (800)
955-8770.
04543580
February 23, 2011
March 2, 9, 16, 2011
NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR,
TAX DEED
Sec. 197.241 F.S.
Notice is hereby given that the
Mark or Margaret Sullivan of the fol-
lowing certificate has filed said cer-
tificate. for a Tax Deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate number and
. year of issuance, the description of
the property and name in which it
was assessed is as follows:
Certificate Number: 1930
Year of Issuance: 2005
Description of Property: SEC 27
TWN 6S RNG 17 PARCEL NUM-
BER 09783-000 NW 1/4 OF NW 1/4
OF NE 1/4. BAD DEED ORB 947-
1518, DC BETTY MEANS ORB
955-1838, DC H MEANS 955-1839.
ORB 1002-1983
Name in' which assessed: HOUS-
TON MEANS








Home Improvements

Carpentry, remodeling, paint,
repairs, additions, Lie. & Ins.
Since 1978 FREE estimates
386-497-3219 or 954-649-1037
Handicap accessible modifications
for veterans. 38 yrs experience.
386-752-4072 DON REED
CONSTRUCTION, INC
Licensed and insured CGC036224

Lawn & Landscape Service

Clean Pine Straw,
You pick it up, $1.85 a bale,
delivery 100 bales, $285,
386-688-9156

Services


Legal

All of said property being in the
County of Columbia, State of Flori-
da. Unless said certificate shall be re-
deemed according to law, the proper-
ty described in such certificate will
be sold to the highest bidder at the
Courthouse on Monday the 21st day
of March, 2011, at 11:00 A.M.
P. DEWITT CASON
CLERK OF COURTS
AMERICANS WITH DISABILI-
TIES ACT: If you are a person with
a disability who needs any accom-
modation in order to participate in
this proceeding, you are entitled, at
no cost to you, to the provision of
certain assistance. Persons with a
disability who need any accommoda-
tion to participate should contact the
ADA Coordinator, P.O. Box-1569,
Lake City, FL 32056, 386-719-7428,
within two (2) working days of your
receipt of this notice; if you are hear-
ing impaired call (800) 955-8771; if
you are voice impaired call (800)
955-8770.
04543569
February 23, 2011
March 2,9, 16,2011


IN THE' CIRCUIT COURT FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
IN RE: ESTATE OF ARDETH
FARMER
File No. 11-43-CP
Division
Deceased
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of
Ardeth Palmer, deceased, whose date
of death was January 8, 2011, and
whose social security number is xxx-
xx-7799, is pending in the Circuit
Court for Columbia County, Florida
32055. The names and addresses of
the personal representative and the
personal representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and oth-
er persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate on whom a
copy of this notice is required to be
served must file their claims with
this court WITHIN THE LATER OF
3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AF-
TER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF
A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent
and other persons having claims or
demands against decedent's estate
must file their claims with this court
WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITH-
IN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION 733,702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE; TIME
PERIODS. SET FORTH' ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this
notice is March 9, 2011.
Mildred Panner Crawford
10317 N.W. 10th Lane
Gainesville, Florida 32606
Richard W. Wamer
Attorney for Personal Representative
Florida Bar Number. 283134
RICHARD E. WARNER, P.A.
PO Box 501317
12221 Overseas Highway
Marathon, PL 33050
Telephone: (305) 743-6022
'Fax: (305) 743-6216
E-Mail: richard@rewamerlaw.com

05525289'
March 9, 16,2011


INVITATION TO BID
BID NO. 2011-M
REMOVAL OF WASTE TIRES
Please be advised that Columbia
County desires to accept bids on the
above referenced item. Bids will be
accepted through 2:00 P.M. on April
6,2011.
Specifications and bid forms may be
obtained by contacting the office of
the Board of County Commissioners,
Columbia County, 135 NE Hemando
Avenue Room 203, Post Office Box
1529, Lake City, Florida 32056-1529
or by calling (386)719-2028. Colum-
bia County reserves the right to re-
ject any and/or all bids and to accept
the bid in the county's best interest.
Bid packages may also be download-
ed at
http://www.columbiacountyfla.com/
PurchasingBids.asp
Dated this'16th day of March 2011.
Columbia County Board of
County Commissioners
Jody DuPree, Chairman
'04543935
March 16, 23, 2011
NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR
TAX DEED
Sec. 197.241 F.S.
Notice is hereby given that the
Mark or Margaret Sullivan of the fol-
lowing certificate has filed said cer-
tificate for a Tax Deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate number and
year of issuance, the description of
the property and name in which it
was assessed is as follows:
Certificate Number: 2750
Year of Issuance: 2004
Description of Property: SEC 33
TWN 3S RNG 17 PARCEL NUM-
BER 13461-000 S DIV: BEG 420
FT W OF NE COR OF NW 1/4 OF
SW 1/4, RUN S 143 FT, E 105 FT,
N 210 FT TO PUTNAM ST, W 105
FT, S 67 FT TO POB. ORB 961-
1340
Name in which assessed: MICHAEL
D. COX
All of said property being in the
County of Columbia, State of Flori-
da. Unless said certificate shall be re-
deemed according to law, the proper-
ty described in such certificate will
be sold to the highest bidder at the
Courthouse on Monday the 21st day
of March, 2011, at 11:00 A.M.
P. DEWIT CASON
CLERK OF COURTS
AMERICANS WITH DISABILI-
TIES ACT: If you are a person with
a disability who needs any accom-
modation in order to participate in
this proceeding, you are entitled, at
no cost to you, to the provision of
certain assistance. Persons with a
disability who need any accommoda-


Legal

tion to participate should contact the
ADA Coordinator, P.O. Box 1569,
Lake City, FL 32056, 386-719-7428,
within two (2) working days of your
receipt of this notice; if you are hear-
ing impaired call (800) 955-8771; if
you are voice impaired call (800)
955-8770.

04543579
February 23, 2011
March 2, 9, 16, 2011


NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOi
TAX DEED
Sec. 197.241 F.S.
Notice is hereby given that the
Cordele Dawson Corporation of th
following certificate has filed sai
e certificate for a Tax Deed to be is
sued thereon. The certificate number
and year of issuance, the description
of the property and name in which
was assessed is as follows:
Certificate Number: 2190
Year of Issuance: 2008
Description of Property: SEC 3
TWN 5S RNG 17 PARCEL NUM
BER 09462-002 NW 1/4 OF NW 1/
OFNE 1/4 ORB 1104-2238
Name in which assessed: RICKY 8
SONIA HICKS
All of said property being in th
County of Columbia, State of Flor
da. Unless said certificate shall be re
deemed according to law, the proper
ty described in such certificate wi
be sold to the highest bidder at thl
Courthouse on Monday the 21st da
of March, 2011, at 11:00 A.M.
P. DEWITr CASON
CLERK OF COURTS
AMERICANS WITH DISABILI
TIES ACT: If you are a person wit
a disability who needs any accorn
modation in order to participate i
this proceeding, you are entitled, a
no cost to you, to the provision c
certain assistance. Persons with
disability who need any accommodn
tion to participate should contact tht
ADA Coordinator, P.O. Box 1569
Lake City, FL 32056, 386-719-7421
within two (2) working days of yol
receipt of this notice; if you are hea
ing impaired call (800) 955-8771;
you are voice impaired call (80(
955-8770.

04543576
February 23, 2011
March 2, 9, 16, 2011


020 Lost & Found

Lost -Over the Ear Hearing
Device, around Hardee's by Wal-
mart, beginning of March, if found
call 386-292-3927 or 755-5331

Male Rottweiller lost evening of
02/21, County Road 138/Rum
Island area. REWARD.
Please call 386-454-2925
if no answer leave message

100 Job
100 U Opportunities

04543843
PC Field Technicians P/T
Lake City/Gainesville
Residential/Small Business
Base hourly rate plus
bonus/commissions
Certified/ 2-4 years experience
Email resume
jobs(a)fastteks.com or
fax 813-932-2485


04543875
Experienced Diesel/Heavy
Duty Mechanics Needed!
The City of Gainesville's
General Services Fleet
Management Division and
Regional Transit System are
currently looking experienced
diesel mechanics with
experience on Heavy Duty
Trucks and Fleet Maintenance
to fill Fleet Mechanic II
openings. To apply for these
openings please go to our
employment website
www.cityofgainesville.jobs
where you will find
the postings.

FLORIDA

f-,,,m at l.a, Cit, Coimma. iy Co1llev,
ADJUNCT INSTRUCTORS
SUMMER 2011
COLLEGE LEVEL MATHEMATICS
Master's degree in mathematics or a
Master's degree with 18 graduate
semester hours in mathematics.
Contact Paula Cifuentes at
paula.cifuentesifafc.edu
PROGRAMMABLE LOGIC CONTROL
(PLC) -
At least five years of full-time, in-field
work experience and expertise in the
installation, maintenance, operation and
troubleshooting of current technology
automated process controls and
associated systems including PLC's,
variable frequency drives, instrumentation
and process control systems, hydraulic
and pneumatic systems. Experience in
training both factory technicians and
operations personnel. For additional
information contact Bob Deckon at 386-
754-4442 or robert.deckonfafoc.edu
LOGISTICS AND WAREHOUSING
The Banner Center for Global Logistics is
seeking summer and fall adjunct
instructors for the Logistics and
Warehousing online courses. A Master's
degree with at least 18 credits in
Operations Management, Logistics,
Supply Chain or related field is required.
Email resumes to Stephanie Glenn at
stephanie.qlenn(5.fqc.edu or call the
Banner Center for Global Logistics at
386-754-4492 for more information.
NURSING CLINICAL
BSN Required. Master's degree in
nursing preferred. At least two years of
recent clinical experience required.
Contact Mattie Jones at 386-754-4368 or
mnattie.ionesifqc edu
College application und coupte of transcripts
required. AllJoreigt transicrpt.c must lit'
submitted with a tranilution und evaluation.
Application available at vAv.s c.cd
IGCi"i- d,-Hd yl1h,
Soulhin A K.iatlqt l of oIlegWW. a -41i Shl'
VPW ADAI' E)- Ol (.'l c m in .d cliil A. I- IplI,> mt


100 Job
Opportunities
AVON!!!, EARN up to 50%!!!
Only $10 for Starter Kit,
1-800-275-9945 pin #4206
www.youravon.com/tdavies
CDL A Flatbed/Van Truck
Driver needed for F/T OTR SE
area, 3 years exp or more, Contact
Melissa or Mary @ 386-935-2773
Driver: Gotta Go Transport
a flatbed Co. in High Springs
needs a Class A driver. Min 2 yrs
exp. Home weekends, safety
bonus & vac. pay. 386-454-5688
McDonald's of Alachua is
seeking qualified Management
Candidates to join our team. Wag-
es range from $9 to $15 per hour,
based on experience. Competitive
Benefits, Apply online at:
www.mcstate.com\alachua or
fax resume to 386-755-2435
Person needed to cut cloth & other
material for small sewing
operation. Other duties may be
required. Hafners 386-755-6481
Position Available
Manufacturer based in North
FL seeking Plant Manager
Duties would include overseeing
total operation of plant, including
production, personnel, mainte-
nance, receiving and shipping.
Competitive pay & benefits
available, Please send resume
and inquires to:
resumesubmission@hotmail.com
Wanted Highly motivated
individual for Sales Position.
Rountree -Moore Ford Lincoln
Mercury Great benefits, paid vaca-
tion. Exp. a plus but not necessary.
Call Chris. @ 386-755-0630

Medical
120 Employment


05524650
if LEARN TO DRAW BLOOD
0) Local Phlebotomy Course
offered in Lake City, FLA
Certificate program.
S(904)566-1328


AMIkids Family Services Program
seeks Case Managers for
community based program work-
ing w/ at risk youth &
families. Bachelor's degree req'd.
Req's travel to 7 counties.
Fax resume to 386.362.0932.
Direct Care Staff & Cooks
Lake City Cluster ICF for
Developmentally Disabled
Persons. www.rescare.com
386-755-6104 EEO/M/F/D/V
FT CNA needed.
Send resume to
826 SW Main Blvd Ste 102.
Lake City, FL. 32025.

4 Schools &
240 Education

04543680
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-03/28/10

Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-04/11/11

Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com



310 Pets & Supplies

PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.


361 Farm Equipment

84 Ford 4610 Tractor. Runs good.
Solid 2WD. New front tires,
350hr on 2005 motor. Dependable.
$7500. obo. 386-867-0005


401 Antiques

CASH CASH CASH CASH
Pre 1964 Silver Coins, Sterling,
Flatware, Costume Jewelry,
Unusual Antiques 386-963-2621
Extra Large Hard Wood
Dpor posss. antique)w/ opaque
glass & letter drop $250 obo
386-292-3927 or 755-5331


DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.


ARE YOU OUR MISSING PIECE?















Apply Online or In Persont 1152 SW Business Point Dr
GB Lake City, FL 32025
386.754.8562
S I EL ww.siltel.com EOE


i ADvantage *


402 Appliances

Dearborn Large Gas Heater
w/Blower
$50 obo
386-292-3927 or 755-5331
GM Spare Tire (285-70-16) on
Factory Rim Fits 1998-2000 P/U
or Suburban. $40. 386-292-3927
or after 6pm386-755-5331
Nice Tappan Gas Range.
White. $165. obo.
386-292-3927 or
after 6pm call 386-755-5331
Nice Tappan Gas Stove,
White
$150
Call 386-292-3927 or 755-5331
Small/medium pet carrier.
$15.00
386-292-3927 or
after 6pm call 386-755-5331
White clothes dryer. Good shape,
works great. $100.
386-292-3927 or
after 6pm call 386-755-5331


403 Auctions

04543848
ESTATE AUCTION
March 19, 2011
9:00 a.m.
Robert Hoag
6779 264th Street (off Branford
Hwy). Branford, Florida
Tools, fishing rods, household,
furniture, guns
Tom A. Johnson
Auctioneer: AU3453
Home (386) 935-3788
Cell (386) 984-7520



407 Computers

IBM Computer,
$65
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170


408 Furniture

Large (possibly antique) Hard
Wood Table, w/chairs
$200 obo
386-292-3927 or755-5331
Light Wood Cabinet,
2 doors, shelves,
$30 obo
386-292-3927 or 755-5331


420 Wanted to Buy

K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$250 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.


430 Garage Sales

PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.



440 Miscellaneous
Fixer upper
Quartet Sega Arcade Game,
$65 obo
386-292-3927 or 755-5331
FREE
Large Children's swing set
and slide, you move!
386-752-6993
Garden Prep
Need your garden harrowed
or roto-tilled?
Call 386-397-5252
Mans bicycle.
Murray American style. $40.
386-292-3927 or
after 6pm call 386-755-5331
New Central A/C, still in box,
with full ten year factory warranty
$1,795
Call 386-364-1090
Tow Behind Grill/Smoker
$1,250 OBOi
386-249-3104 or
386-719-4802

463 Building
4 Materials

ROOFING Are you bothered
by a leaking roof?
Call Reed Roofing today for a free
estimate. 386-752-4072
RCC00455399 Insured
ROOFING:Looking to replace
your Roof? Call Reed Roofing
today for a free estimate
386-752-4072 RC0055399
References available









LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED WEDNESDAY, MARCH 16, 2011


630Mobile Homes.
6 for Rent
12 x 60 SWMH, CH/A, good
location, real clean, No Pets
$395 month, $200 deposit
Call 386-755-0064/904-771-5924

2&3 BR MH. $395 $650. mo.
plus deposit. Water & sewer fur-
nished. Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
3BR/2BA Doublewide on 1 ac.
Lg. Rooms. $750 a month.
1st month and full security.
Please call 386-965-7534.
A very clean & well maintained
2/2 units in nice park. $599.mo
w/$500. dep. Rent includes water,
sewer, trash p/u. Close to town
386-984-8448 or 623-7547
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White. Contact 386-623-2465
or 386-623-3404

Mobile Homes
64 for Sale

05525135
Palm Harbor Homes
Call about our
Extreme Makeover Home Sale
As Seen On TV!!
800-622-2832
4/2 DWMH at Timberlane Park,
Long Carport, 2 porches/shed
$38,500.
386-752-4258

6 Mobile Home
650 & Land
Well kept 3/2 moble on 2+ acres..
screened front porch, covered back
porch, shed, MLS77241 $64,000
Call Brittany @ Results Realty
386-397-3473

705 Rooms for Rent
Renovated home has 2 rooms for
rent w/bath $400mo + $200. dep.
Ref. req'd. Some animals ok. Util-
ities + internet incl. (904)495-9706

710 Unfurnished Apt.
0 For Rent

05524728
SPRING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans;
some with garages.
Call 386-454-1469
or visit our website:
www.springhlllvillage.net

D5524833
DEPOSIT AS LOW AS $89 +
$200 OFF!!
BEST PRICES IN TOWN!
Windsong Apts.
386-758-8455
1, 2 & 3 Bedroom Apartments
& Mobile Homes
starting at $350 per month
386-755-2423
2br Apt. by the lake. Close to
shopping and the VA Medical
Center. $525. mo plus deposit.
386-344-2972

Great location W of 1-75, spacious
deluxe 2BR apts., garage, W/D
hook up. patio. $600 & up, + SD,
386 965-0276
The Lakes Apts. Studios & lBr's
from $135/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $525. + sec.
Call Michelle 386-752-9626

720 AFurnished Apts.
720 For Rent
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2.persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

730 Unfurnished
Home For Rent

04543969
Beautiful 3 br/2ba, spacious
home. Fenced yard. Mayfair S/D
$1,000 mo. $1000. sec. For
more info. call 386-752-4864.

3 or 4.Lrg bedroom, den w/fire-
place. Screen porch. Privacy patio.
1.09 acres. Quiet area, cul-de-sac.
Rent/lease option. 386-697-6534
3ba/2ba, Lg FR, LR & DR,New
carpet & paint: .5 ac 2 mi from
d'town. No pets. Spec lease req'd:
tenants w/fav background only.
$850 +dep. 752-8696, 752-5025.
3br/2ba. 5 beautiful ac. Huge
oaks. 1 mi west of 1-75 & US 90.
Appliances, shed, water, sewer &
lawn care furnished. $700mo $800
dep. 386-984-9992/(904)571-5001
Brick 3br/2ba on cul-de-sac.
101 SW Hummingbird Glen.
Lake City. CH/A. $900. mo +
$800 dep. 386-365-8543
House for rent. Complpetely
remodeled. 4br/2ba + bonus room.
Carport. Great area. $1000 mo.
Plus security. 386-867-2283


750 Business &
SOffice Rentals
1200 sq ft Professional Office
Space, across from Courthouse.
newly remodeled, 152 N Marion
$650 mo 386-867-4995 / 961-8466
1800 SQ FT $1100. Office
furniture available and
cubicle dividers.Water,
sewer and garbage fees included.
386-752-4072 Ready to move in!
OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$695. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor
SE Baya Ave Office Furnished
1800 Sq Ft $1125.00
Ideal for Engineers & Professional
Quiet and safe environment
Security available 386-752-4072

770 Condos For Rent

04543870
Golf Course Condo for rent,
2BR/2BA, 1420 s.f., $1000/mo.
Rent includes all appliances,
basic cable, water/sewer/
garbage, pool & tennis ct.
access. Realtor/owner
call 386-344-0433.


790 Vacation Rentals
Horseshoe Beach Spring Special
Gulf Front 2br home, w/lg water-
front porch, dock, fish sink.
Avail wkends. $345. or wk $795.
(352)498-598-5986/386-235-3633
Rental Condo on Daytona Beach,
All Inclusive, 7 day stay $675,
(Spring Break April 2-9 Avail)
386-590-0642

805 Lots for Sale
1999 3/2 DWMH on 1 ac
$55,000
Hallmark Real Estate
386-867-1613
Call Jay Sears
2 ac lot in River Access'
community. Suwanne River
1 mile away. Owner will finance.
$13,500 Hallmark Real Estate
386-867-1613 Call Jay Sears
Emerald Cove S/D, Lot # 19
Half acre lot, Only $42,000
call Millard Gillen @
386-365-7001 MLS# 75278
westfieldrealtygroup.com
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act whichmakes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is iri violafioh of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

810 Home for Sale
2/1,on nearly an acre, living/dining
rm, kitchen nook, until rm, fenced,
back porch,2 car carport close to
town, $60,000 386-754-5818


810 Home for Sale
2/1 completely updated, screened
back porch, large utility room,
MLS#77413 $59.888 Call Nancy
@ R.E.O. Realty 386-867-1271
nancytrogers@msn.com
2/2 + Bonus Room, 1749sf, 4 acre
comer lot, board fenced. det
garage/wkshp MLS#74900
$214.900 Call Pam @ Remax
386-303-2505 www.visitpam.com
2/2 -2 story, 9.7 ac. fenced & cross
fenced w/pastures. Oversized LR,
separate dining, Ig den. Workshop,
carport. 386-752-6575 $179,900.
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
2/3 on 5 acres, wrap around porch,
family rm w/fireplace, detached
garage, $179,900 MLS# 77005
call Roger Lovelady @
Westfield Realty 386-365-7039
2BR/2BA singlewide mfg home
on 1.7-ac comer lot; large yard &
paved drive $44,900 DANIEL
CRAPPS AGENCY, INC. 755-
5110 #75864
3/2 Brick Home in town, fenced
back yardw/12x12 workshop
$84,888 Call Nancy @ R.E.O.
Realty 386-867-1271MLS# 77414
nancytrogers@msn.com
3/2 Cute Home, Remodeled, on 2
acres, partially fenced $114,900
MLS# 77396 Call Nancy @R.E.O.
Realty Group 386-867-1271,
nancytrogers@msn.com
3/3 Brick. Great location, pond.
Custom built w/Florida room &
vaulted ceiling. Workshop.
$179,900 Hallmark Real Estate
386-867-1613 Call Jay Sears
3Bedrm/3bth w/2 Master Suites,
fenced back yard,fireplace
MLS#76779, $115,000
Call Missy Zecher @ 386-623-
0237 www.missyzecher.com
4/2 on 10.5 acres w/ detached
garage, patio, above ground pool,
MLS# 77410 $189,888 Call-
Nancy Rogers@ R.E.O. Realty
386-867-1271
67.5 Acre Ranch w/MH, fenced
& cross fenced, wkshop, pole barn,
2 ponds, Spacious MLS# 75607
Asking 299K, Call Patti Taylor @
386-623-6896 Access Realty
95 Acre Estate, 4/3 Farm House,
Pond, Oaks, $689,000,
MLS#76149 Call Charlie Sparks
@ Westfield Realty 386-755-0808
westfieldrealtygroup.com
A quiet neighborhood is the
perfect setting for this cute, cozy
home. Lg back yard w/1 car
garage/workshop. $84,900.
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
Beautiful Home w/custom
cabinets, 10ft ceilings, $199,900
MLS# 77188 Call
Carrie Cason @ 386-623-2806
westfieldrealtygroup.com
Brick Home in Established S/D,
3/2, Open floor plan, MLS#76121
$134,900'Call Missy Zecher @
386-623-0237 Remax
www.missyzecher.com
CBC 3/1 home, inside city limits,
fenced backyard, detached carport
w/office MLS#77411 $84,900
Call R.E.O.Realty,
Nancy'Rogers @ 386-867-1271
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Brick, split plan. Woodcrest S/D.
Screened porch, dining, living &
breakfast area.Lg backyard. Elaine
K. Tolar 386-755-6488 $139,900.
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Brick, 10 ac 3/2 split floor plan. FI
room, Ig utility, scr porch. Gazebo,
carport, fenced. $149,900. Lori
Geibeig Simpson 386-365-5678
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
New home, May Fair. Great area.
Comer lot. 4 bedroom, lots of tile,
covered porch. Split plan$214,900.
Elaine K. Tolar 386-755-6488


810 Home for Sale
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
4br/2ba on 5 ac. Lg family, Florida
room den or office. Covered patio.
23x30 workshop. $229,900. Lori
Geibeig Simpson. 386-365-5678
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
3/2 Hardwood, separate office/liv-
ing/family rm. Workshop, fenced
Lori Geibeig Simpson 386-365-
5678 Mary Whitehurst 965-0887
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Brick on 3.23 ac. New roof, win-
dows, paint. Newer AC, remod-
eled interior, fencing, good area.
Elaine K. Tolar. 386-755-6488
Colonial 4/3 + Guest House,
9.95 acres, inground pool, detach-
ed/garage, gate entry,MLS#77386
$325K Call Pam Beauchamp @
386-303-2505 Remax
Corner lot in Piccadilly S/D. Huge
living & dining room. New paint
& carpet. 2 car garage, inground
pool. 386-752-6575 $133,500
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
CUSTOM 4/2 scm porch, 16x24
workshop w/ele & water, gazebo,
fireplace, ceramic tile/wood floors.
386-752-6575 $189,900
Century 21/The Darby Rogers. Co
Custom, 3/2.5 built in 2007,
on 10.8 manicured acres,
completely fenced, Owner Fin.
avail., MLS#77382 Call Patti
386-623-6896 Access Realty
EASTSIDE VILLAGE! Owner
motivated! 3BR/2BA has large liv-
ing/dining rm combo $62,000
#77266 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY, INC. 755-5110
Family Home in Subdivision
4 bdrm Lots of space, newer
roof/carpet MLS#76283 Call
Missy Zecher @ 386-623-0237
Remax, www.missyzecher.com
FOR SALE by very motivated
owner. Just reduced $70,000. to
$129,000. Townhouse on Golf
course. 3br/3ba. Wood burning
fireplace. End unit. Remodeled
kitchen, first class appliances,
granite countertops. New Hunter
Douglas wdw treatments.
Cathedral ceiling. Pool, tennis
court. Call for appt. (904)246-6222
GREAT STARTER HOME!
3BR/2BA in Quail Ridge with
back patio, luscious lawn $84,900
#76432 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY, INC. 755-5110
Large Brick, 3/1, 4.43 acres, metal
roof, MLS# 77415 $109,888
Call Nancy Rogers @ 386-867-
1271 R.E.O. Realty Group, Inc.
nancytrogers@msn.com
LIKE NEW! 3BR/2BA mfg home
near Wellborn on 5+ acres ONLY
$79,900 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY, INC. 755-5110 #76768
Log Home, Cypress Beams,
whole house generator, $269,900
MLS# 76899 Call
Roger Lovelady @386-365-7039
westfieldrealtygroup.com
NEW FLOORING-FRESH
PAINT! 2-story 3br/2ba on 1+ ac,
Ig kitchen, family rm, fenced pond
$99,900 #75951 Daniel Crapps
Agency, Inc. 755-5110


V
C-..'


810 Home for Sale
Nice solid brick home on 5 acres,
Country feel but close to Town,
MLS 76063 $129,888 Call
Brittany Stoeckert Results Realty
386-397-3473
Nice, large 4/2 on I acre
w/florida room, granite floors,
wrap around front porch, $148,000
Call Brittany Stoeckert @
Results Realty 386-397-3473
OPEN HOUSE Sat & Sun 12
noon -4pm. 4430 NW Wisteria
Drive. Plantation S/D off 90W.
$199,900. John Denyko, Access
Realty of N.FL.Inc. 386-344-5551
Owner Fin., 3/2 on 2.5 acres, fish
pond, N of Lake City, sm down
$675 mo, 386-590-0642/867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
Owners Motivated! Multiple
dwellings. Main house and 2 mo-
bile homes Pecans, cedar & aza-
leas. $199,900. Century 21/The
Darby Rogers Co. 386-752-6575
Premier Lifestyle Community
The Preserve at Laurel Lake,
4/2, $194,900 MLS# 77257 Call
Scott Stewart @ 386-867-3498
westfieldrealtygroup.com
QUAINT 1950s home w/lots of
upgrades! Enclosed froht porch,
2BR/lBA, screened back porch
$29,900 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY, INC 755-5110 #77505
Qualified General Contractor
doing top Quality work!
386-752-4072 Licensed and
Insured CGC036224
Don Reed Construction, Inc.
Reduced in Rose Creek S/D, 5/4
on 2.2 acres, close to town
MLS#75485 $274,900 Call Pam
@ Remax 386-303-2505
www.visitpam.com
Secluded, however close to town,
3/2 Brick Ranch Home, spacious
$198,900 MLS# 74415 Call
Charlie Sparks @ 386-755-0808
westfieldrealtygroup.com
Solid home, needs updating. Nice
yard & workshop/garage! Country
kitchen w/eat in area as well as
formal 386-752L6575 $70,000
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
Totally Refurbished 2/2
w/workshop on 1.25 fenced acres
$94,900 Call Millard Gillen @
Westfield Realty 386-365-7001
MLS#75417
Two story MH, located in
Wellborn on 2.66 acres, porches
and fireplaces, 9 bdrms/3bths
$163,900 Patti Taylor MLS#71594
Access Realty 386-623-6896
Well Maintained 3/2 on 1.5
acres, fenced, porches, wkshp,
$49,900 MLS# 77309 Call Josh
Grecian 386-466-2517
westfieldrealtygroup.com

82O Farms &
20 Acreage
10 ac lots, some w/well, septic, pwr
pole. Lowered prices. Owner finance
w/low dn pmnt Deas Bullard Proper-
ties 386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com


4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$69,900. $613mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com


i


820 Farms &
2 Acreage
4 acres, Wellborn, New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down, $39,900, $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
5 WOODED acres.
Suwanee Ranchettes. $200 per mo
for 5 mo. Then $203.85 per mo
thereafter. (352)472-2879
Outdoorsman Special, near
Itchetucknee Springs St Park,
Owner fin. w/20% dn,
$54,900 MLS# 76366
Brodie Alfred 386-487-1484

830 Commercial
830 Property
Commercial Income Property,
w/national tenants, 17,000+
sq ft, additional fenced space,
Call Scott Stewart 386-867-3488
westfieldrealtygroup.com

860 Investment
6U 0 Property
Investment Property, 2 MH's on
almost acres, well & septic,
fenced $29,900 MLS# 77233
Call Josh Grecian @ Westfield
386-466-2517

951 Recreational
-951 Vehicles


2010 PUMA Travel Trailer 32 ft,
2 slide outs, air awning, King Is-
land bed, Must Sell $18,500
Call 863-660-8539 Lake City








Homestead Rancher Travel Trail-
er 28ft. One slideout Fiberglass,
Awning, sleeps 8. $10,000.
(850)322-7152

ADVERTISE YOUR
Job Opportunities in the
Lake City Reporter
Classifieds.
Enhance.Your Adwith
Your Individual Logo
For just pennies a day.
Call today,
755-5440.
I WnCT WKri. eiiZa


< 1Z9 // U 7i"v77 Z( K





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*u~wttiy- T~4t4






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Wedding.


Expo








-l


o Fashion Show
b\ C;la8,,, Slillpier Bridal

0 Door Prizes

o \Vendor Booths

o Refreslunents

0 Taste Testing


Saturday

March 19, 2011

1:00 pm- 4:00 pm
111J..UU M .- -.-J., 1... 1... wi....l ..l I 11


Let the Spirit of the Suwannee Music Park & Campground
help you plan your special day.
for more information call

F'j


Classified Department: 755-5440


. *. ,..*.'
- '^-


Me?





Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED WEDNESDAY, MARCH 16, 2011


L~.2~TF1 -~ -


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Regular '49 NOW s25 per mo.
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Located next 1o Lee's Nursery
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Spring house cleaning


ID


Wednesday, March 16, 201 I www.lakecityreporter.com


WORTH


OF


MEMORIES


Flo Bizaillon
has done a
lot and she's
not done yet

By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com
Florice "Flo"
Bizaillon of Lake
City has made
the most of
every moment
of her life all 93 years
of it. '
When her husband,
Romayo "Chico," passed
away in May.1973 -just six
months shy of their 25th
wedding anniversary when.
he and Bizaillon were both
56, Bizaillon continued
to persevere through the
older stages of her life.
She began her 38 years
as a widow earning her
cosmetology license from
Live Oak's vocational tech2
nical school at age 60 and
returning to the school
soon after to study child
care, classes she took with
the encouragement of her
sister that were paid for
through her late husband's
military benefits.
"I didn't know whether
I could make it or not
because I only finished
the sixth grade," Bizaillon
said.
But Bizaillon did make
it. She passed her exams
and employed her skills
in caring for others by
fostering and baby-sitting
children, one of which had
special needs from being


Photos by JASON MATrHEW WALKERIL it ~F'Reporter
Top left: Lake City resident Florice 'Flo' Bizaillon has experienced a lot in her 93 years of life, and she plans on going through even more good times.

Above: Florice Bizaillon has a passion for gardening in her flower beds and vegetable gardens. She said she is her happiest when she is active and not sit-
ting in front of the TV. .


brain dead at birth who
Bizaillon later adopted and
still cares for at age 35
- Jennifer.
"She's a miracle,"


Bizaillon said.
Perseverance was not
an aspect of life Bizailloni
learned only in her older
years.


Florice Bizaillon (center) poses with her adopted daughter Jennifer (left) and her oldest
daughter Barbara Griffin. Bizaillon adopted Jennifer after Jennifer was diagnosed as brain
dead at birth.


With her family,
Bizaillon moved to a farm
outside Branford in 1930 at
the beginning of the Great
Depression' .
"I went through the
Depression and I could go
through another one," she
said.
Bizaillon said she picked
cotton, strung tobacco and
watched how her parents
worked hard to support
her family.
"My mother worked in
the fields just like a man,"
she said. "She could cut
wood like a man."
The idea of working
hard was instilled in
Bizaillon.
"One of my favorite
things to say about my
mom is that she's walked
in a man's shoes ever
since Dad died in '73," said
Barbara "Bobbie" Griffin,
Bizaillon's oldest daughter.
"And she has."' .
When asked how she
has made it to 93 years
of age, Bizaillon simply
replied, "Hard work and
good living. Old-fashioned
cooking."
Bizaillon moved to Lake
City in June 1971 to the
property she still occupies
after her husband retired


from the military on 100
percent disability in 1970.
He served 31 years in the,
U.S. Army with the final 18
being in Special Forces.
"He jumped in on D-
Day," Bizaillon said. "He
fought every war we had
from D-Day to.Vietnam,
three tours. Korea, all of
them. He volunteered for' :
every one."
Romayo Bizaillon
,passed away from a severe
stroke at the Lake City VA
'Medical Center. Griffin
said Romayo Bizaillon
asked her mother to place
American Beauty roses on
his grave every Memorial
Day.
"He has been gone 38
years now and she hasn't
missed a date," Griffin
said.
Bizaillon remembers
when Lake City had only,
one two-lane street and the
Blanche Hotel was' Lake
City's first.
Now, she still invests
her time into others, her
Christian faith and her
flower and vegetable gar-
dens her favorite hobby.
"I've got to be outside,"
Bizaillon said. "Don't sit
me down on a couch."
"My husband told me if


I didn't have sand between
my toes, I wouldn't be
happy," she said.
Bizaillon said her great-
est accomplishment has
been caring for her prop-'
erty and her home.
"The biggest thing is
my place," she said. "I love
the outdoors. All of these
flowers you see, I planted
them."
She likes Lake City
because of its convenience
to her doctors and the
stores, and she plans to stay.
"It's just home,"
Bizaillon said.
Bizaillon will celebrate
her 94th birthday Monday.
"I've never been
ashamed of my age," she
said. "Never."
Griffin said her mother
tells people that she'll live
to be 100, but Bizaillon
said that decision isn't up
to her.
"That's for the Lord to
say," she said.
Bizaillon's advice: Don't
worry about tomorrow.
"I'm not a worry per-
son," she said. "I tell
everybody I don't worry
about tomorrow. It's gone.
I live today. Tomorrow's
.not here. And that is no
story."


93


YEARS








LAKE CITY REPORTER ACT2 WEDNESDAY, MARCH 16, 2011


How to choose the


right hearing aid


ne in every ten
Americans has
hearing loss.
Yet research
indicates that
most wait up to ten years
before seeking help. While
95 percent of Americans
with hearing loss couldbe
successfully treated with
hearing aids, only 22 per-
cent currently use them.
Often neglected due to
the stigma associated with
the condition, hearing loss
can create social and emo-
tional barriers for the indi-
viduals living with it, or the
families of those it affects.
When left untreated, hear-
ing loss can lead to reduced
earning power, disruptions
in family life and can cause
a wide range of other psy-
chological problems.
If you are experiencing
hearing loss, speak to a
local hearing health pro-
fessional who can do a
full hearing screening and
walk you through available
solutions. Modern hearing
aids are small, comfort-
able, nearly invisible and
work with digital technol-
ogy to ensure better sound
quality and even. wireless
connectivity.
The AudEo S Smart by
Phonak, for example, is the
world's smallest hearing
system with full wireless
functionality allowing you
to connect to telephones,
TV, MP3 music players
and other audio trans-
mitters at the push of a


button. Modern hearing
devices improve hearing
ability, speech recognition
and hearing comfort and
have made it possible for
those who need a hearing
aid to wear their devices
with ease and confidence.
The earlier you recog-
nize hearing loss and take
action, the earlier you are
able to recover your hear-
ing ability and increase
your quality of life. There
are two basic types of hear-
ing aids:

n Custom models are
made to fit the shape of
your ear canal for maxi-
mum benefit, cosmetic
appeal and the best pos-
sible comfort. These mod-
els are suitable for mild to
severe hearing loss.


the degree of hearing loss
you have, the shape of your
ear canals, your personal
needs, your taste and your
budget Your local hearing
health professional or ENT
doctor can help you answer
these questions.

Step 2: Have your
hearing aids fitted
Your hearing health pro-
fessional will adjust your
hearing aid to your hear-
ing loss and your hearing
preferences. Over the first
few days, you should wear
it for a few hours per day
to familiarize yourself with
it Take note on how you
feel in different hearing
situations. Additional fine-
tuning might be necessary
after your initial fitting.


Behind-the-ear models N Step 3: Using your
are available for all degrees new hearing aids
of hearing loss and can be Just like glasses or con-
worn comfortably behind tact lenses, a hearing' aid
the ear. Incoming signals can feel strange at first.
are amplified and transmit- This will change. Give your-
ted into the ear via very self a little time to get used
small, unobtrusive tubes. to it. You will learn how to
make the best use of your
If it's time to improve hearing aid and will soon
your hearing with a hearing be enjoying all the benefits
aid, or you need to upgrade it has to offer. However, if
to a new one, here are three
easy steps to choosing the you experience any prob-
one that's right for you. lems or pain, please contact
your local hearing health
Step 1: Consult with a professional.
hearing health professional- For more -about finding
or ENT doctor the right hearing solution
When deciding what, for you, visit www.phonak.
hearing aid is best for you, com.
it is important to consider N FamilyF
Family Features


FAMILY FEATURES
Technological advances have made it possible to house full wireless connectivity in one small
hearing aid at the push of a button, you can connect a hearing device to telephones, TV,
MP3 music players and other audio transmitters.


Recipes to feed the game day eating frenzy


What better way to
serve a hungry gang than
with two crowd-pleas-
ers: meatballs and BBQ?
Anyone hosting a big
game gathering needs to
have recipes on-hand that
are hearty and tasty, while
still being easy to prepare.
The easiest and fastest
way to find what you need
to feed the fans is by utiliz-
ing local club stores like
Sam's, where shoppers
can huddle and find great
game-day foods and enter-
tainihg items at affordable
prices. These crowd-
pleasing recipes start off
with Byron's Hand Pulled
Pork BBQ and Casa Di
Bertacchi Meatballs, both
sold at Sam's Clubs nation-
wide.
The Mini Meatball
Hamburgers are made
from fully-cooked meat-
balls crafted from an out-
standing, authentic family
recipe. The seasoned and
lightly steamed meatballs
can be warmed up quickly
and paired with a tasty
sauce for some super-star
sliders.
BBQ Nachos take game-
day appetizers to a whole
new level. Made with hick-


FAMILY FEATURES


Game-day BBQ nachos.

ory-smoked pulled pork
that's finished with a sweet
and spicy sauce, this BBQ
is ready to be warmed up
and loaded up with fan-
favorite nacho toppings for
an appetizer that will have
your guests calling for a
replay.
For more informa-
tion about Byron's Hand
Pulled Pork BBQ, Casa Di
Bertacchi Meatballs, or
for additional recipes, visit
www. ClubEntertaining.
com.

Mini Meatball
Hamburgers


Makes 26 appetizers
26 frozen Casa Di
Bertacchi fully cooked
meatballs (1 pound)
1 cup ketchup
3 tablespoons Dijon
honey mustard
26 2-inch rolls, sliced in
half horizontally
1 1/2 cups sweet pickle
relish
Preheat oven to 400-oF.
Place meatballs in 8 x 8
or 9 x 9-inch pan. Bake for
25 to 30 minutes, or until
thoroughly heated.
In a small bowl, com-
bine ketchup and mustard.
Place a heaping teaspoon,
of ketchup mixture on


the bottom of roll. Place
a meatball on top. Follow
with a rounded teaspoon of
pickle relish. Place top half
of roll over top. Repeat for
remaining meatballs and
rolls. Serve immediately
on a large platter.

Cheeseburger
Variation: Place a small
slice of cheddar. cheese
over each meatball.

BBQ Nachos
Serves 4
Byron's BBQ
1 cup shredded
Monterrey Jack cheese
1/2 cup 'red onion,
diced
1 green bell pepper,
diced
1 tomato, diced
115-ounce can black
beans, rinsed .and drained
Tortilla chips
Whole kernel corn
Sliced jalapeOo
Fresh guacamole
Sour cream
On a large oven safe
serving plate, arrange
a layer of tortilla chips;
top with BBQ. Sprinkle
with cheese, onions, bell
peppers, diced tomato


and black beans. Heat in
microwave (or in oven)
until cheese is melted.
Garnish with whole ker-
nel corn, sliced jalapeOo,
fresh guacamole, and sour


cream.

Source: Byron's BBQ
/ Casa Di Bertacchi
Meatballs


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meet your financial goals?
At Edward Jones, our business is to help people find
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Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427









Chains take a bite out of mini-dessert trend


MICHELLE LOCKE
Associated Press
Small is big when it comes to
dessert trends.
From.Mini-Blizzards at Dairy
Queen to the new line of Petites
launched by Starbucks last
week, sweets are shrinking to
fit a craving for snack-sized por-
tions.
"There's a huge trend of mini
desserts," says Annie Young-
Scrivner, global chief market-
ing officer for Starbucks. "Our
research shows that customers
are looking for that little some-
thing in the afternoon. They
don't want it to be very big.
They just want a couple of bites


of something to complement
their tea 'or espresso or other
beverage."
And so Starbucks Petites were
launched. The line features eight
items all of which pack fewer
than 200 calories each and cost
$1.50 including cake pops
(cake-on-a-stick), whoopee pies
and lemon squares.
The move toward smaller des-
serts started some years ago,
says Kathy Hayden, a food ser-
vice analyst for Chicago-based
Mintel research company. Eating
healthier was one factor. Another
was having more choices; now
you could have a bite of apple
pie and a spoonful of pudding.
And when the economy went
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sour, the smaller price tag of tiny
treats became all the sweeter.
Bite-sized desserts have made
the top five restaurant trends
for the past four years, accord-
ing to surveys by the National
Restaurant Association, though
that seems to have settled
down. The mini treats came in
as the 35th trend out of 226 in a
"What's Hot in 2011" survey of
more than 1,500 chefs.
A pioneer in petite patisserie
was Seasons 52, an Orlando,
Fla.-based chain that specializes.
in fresh, healthy options and has
nothing on the menu over 475
calories.
Coming up with a dessert was
a challenge, says Cliff Pleau,


senior director of culinary and
beverages. But then someone
suggested, "Why don't you get
the real thing and stuff it in a
little cup?"
He went out and bought des-
sert ingredients, got some shot
glasses and within a few hours
the concept of Mini Indulgences
was born.
The desserts, which include
Key lime pie and chocolate and
peanut butter mousse, cost
about $2.50. Most have between
200 and 300 calories.
The key, says Pleau, is to
make sure the flavors are
intense. "We've got 3 ounces to
really get our point across."
Mini desserts also have


been popping up at quick-serve
restaurants, like Dairy Queen,
which last summer introduced
Mini-Blizzards, 6-ounce versions
of their trademark Blizzard soft-
serve frozen dessert. The mini,
about half the size of the small-
est Blizzard, was a response
to customer feedback, says
Michael Keller, chief brand offi-
cer.
"There was a very large trend
afoot in' general with how con-
sumers were eating and, specifi-
cally, Blizzard customers were
looking for something a little
smaller and therefore easier on
their wallet and easier for some
of them on their calorie counts,"
he says.


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LAKE CITY REPORTER ACT2 WEDNESDAY, MARCH 16, 2011


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427








LAKE CITY REPORTER


ACT 2


WEDNESDAY, MARCH 16, 2011


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


Tools, tips and



techniques for r 1



spring cleaning


MELISSA KOSSLER DUTTON
For the Associated Press
Spring is the time of
year when homes often get
a thorough cleaning. Using
the right tools, techniques
and products for different
surfaces and types of dirt,
from windows to counters
to floors, is key to doing
the job easily and effec-
tively, said Debra Johnson,
training manager for the
Merry Maids houseclean-
ing company in Memphis,
Tenn.
"It makes the job easier
if you have the right prod-
ucts," she said.
Begin with the rooms
or areas that seem the
dirtiest, suggested Carolyn
Forte, director of the
Home Appliances and
Cleaning Lab at the Good
Housekeeping Research
Institute.
"Start with the thing
that bothers you most,"
she said. "Do the bigger
jobs first."
Johnson and Forte
offered the following
advice for effective spring
cleaning.
Windows: Use an
ammonia-based cleaner
and microfiber cloth,
Forte said. Make sure to
use plenty of cleaner to
remove the dirt. Change
the water and cloth as
necessary. Avoid washing
windows on sunny days
because the cleaner will
dry too quickly and leave
streaks.
Window blinds: Close
plastic blinds and wipe
with a damp cloth,
Johnson said. Reverse the
slats and clean the other
side of the blinds with a


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Merry Maids employee
Esther Jimenez cleans the
floors of a home in Burbank,
Calif. Spring cleaning is
easier and more efficient if
you use the right tools, tech-
niques and products.
clean, damp cloth. Use
a tool designed for blind
cleaning to clean between
the slats. For cloth blinds,
use a vacuum attachment
to remove dust and dirt.
Wood floors: Wash
floors with a cleaner
designed for wood surfac-
es, Forte said. Choose the
cleaner that's appropriate
for the finish on the floor,
either wax or polyure-
thane. She favors using a
microfiber cloth on a mop
with a swivel head.
Laminate floors: Since
laminate is a very durable
surface, it can be cleaned
with a variety of cleaning
products, hot water and a
mop or microfiber cloth,
Johnson said.
Rugs: Send area rugs
that cannot go in a wash-
ing machine to a profes-
sional cleaner to avoid
discoloring or damaging


them, recommended
Johnson. Set smaller rugs
outside for a good airing,
she added. When vacuum-
ing a rug located in a door-
way or other high traffic
area, turn the rug over
and run the sweeper on
the underside of the rug,
Forte said.
Dust Work from the
top down to avoid dirty-
ing areas that were just
cleaned, Johnson said. Use
.a vacuum attachment to
remove cobwebs and dust
in corners. The vacuum
also is a good way to
remove dust from lamp-
shades and upholstered
surfaces. Avoid feather
dusters, Johnson added,
as they just move the dust
around.
Wipe furniture with a
damp cloth because dust
can scratch wood surfaces,
Forte said. She suggests
spraying a microfiber cloth
with a small amount of fur-
niture polish.
Tile: Spray a foaming
bathroom cleaner on tiled
surfaces and leave it on
for a'few minutes. Remove
the cleaner with a clean .
rag or sponge. If the grout
has mildew, use a product
designed to remove it. It
may take several applica-
tions and a lot of scrub-
bing with a grout brush
to thoroughly clean the
grout, Johnson said.
Bathroom sinks and
counters: Foaming clean-
ers or those designed to
remove soap scum will
work best. Make sure the
cleaner you choose is safe
for any special stone or
countertop in the bath-
room.
Kitchen sinks and coun-


ZIMMER KNEE

REPLACEMENT ALERT
Certain High-Flex Femoral Components numade by Zimmer
uhaxv been associated \with increasing incidences of failure,
revision knee surgery and painful loosening According
to the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, the
failure rate could be as high as 9''o If you or a loved one
have -uflered pain, injury or required adduional surgery
alter ha ming a Zimmer knee replacement implanted, call
the Moody Law Firm at 1-800-598-0204.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Merry Maids employee Esther Jimenez cleans the bathroom of a home in Burbank, Calif.
Spring cleaning is easier and more efficient if you use the right tools, techniques and prod-


ters: Use cleaners that
are more acidic or anti-
bacterial in the kitchen,
Johnson said. Read the
labels on cleaners as some
may need to be left on the
surface for a few minutes
before being wiped off,
Forte added. Make sure
the cleaner is appropriate
for the counter material.
Here are a few-addi-
tional tips for successful
housecleaning from Allen
Rathey, president of the
Housekeeping Channel, a
website dedicated to effi-
cient cleaning:
Clean dry to wet.



(,MNi./f.,,, ('V


-l nt vl'o 'A,^ s ,


Always sweep a floor
before mopping. Wetting
dirt will make it harder to
remove.
More is not always
better. Follow the labels on
cleaning products to avoid
using too much. Residue
from cleaning products
can attract more dirt.
When trying to
remove a spot or clean a
dirty area, start wiping
or scrubbing gently. Too
much pressure can dam-
age the surface under the
dirt.
Get extra life out of a
clean cloth by folding it in


quarters. When one side
becomes dirty, refold the
cloth to reveal a clean side.
Purchase doormats
for the interior and exteri-
or of your home. The mats
will collect and absorb dirt
and prevent it from being.'
spread indoors.
Cleaning equipment:.
should be washed regu-
larly. Put sponges in the
dishwater or microwave to,
sterilize. Wash microfiber
rags in hot water without
fabric softener. Clean
brooms and scrub brushes
in soapy water or hydro-
gen peroxide.


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Several Hip Replacement Models Linked To Defects
Leading To Pain, Recalls, Additional Surgery
There are a growing number of hip implant models associated with
defects. These defects may lead to serious side effects including:

Joint Failure or Dislocation Popping and Grinding
Premature revision surgery Pain and Swelling
Elevated levels of Chromium and Cobalt in the blood
Pseudotumors and/or tissue necrosis
Manufacturers and hip implant models associated with defects include:
DePuy ASR RECALLED
Zimmer Durom Hip Cup, RECALLED
Stryker Trident Acetabular PSL Cup RECALLED
Stryker Trident Hemispherical Cup RECALLED
Wright Medical Profemur Z Stem NOT RECALLED
DePuy Pinnacle NOT RECALLED
If you or a loved one have experienced serious injuries or required additional surgery
after hip replacement surgery, call the Moody Law Firm at 1-800-598-0204.

You May Be Entitled To

COMPENSATION
Prior results do not guarantee future outcomes.


The Moody Law Firm, Inc.
S Virginia Office Florida Office
U Willard J. Moody, Jr. William Earl Higginbotham
500 Crawford Street, Suite 300 7400 Baymeadows Way, Suite 105
Portsmouth, VA 23704 Jacksonville, FL 32256


A

YOR LE PAN


liioflio #H HANA991,04