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The Lake City reporter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01501
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 3/13/2011
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
System ID: UF00028308:01501
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text








Enlightening
Local group pays i
Holy Land a visit.
****3-D-IGT 326
00017 20511 STORY
LIEBOF OR F -LOA. DA.
OT17I E FL 32611-1943



Lase"u


To the Finals
Florida overtakes
Vanderbilt, advances to
SEC Final.
Sports, I B


TODAY'S



Lake ( C Reporter
- - - - - -- - -


Reporter


Sunday, March 13,201


.7 'www.Iakecityreporter.com


Vol. 137, No. 43 E $ 1.00


RODEO FUN FOR ALL


Shriners provide
an inside look
to those with
special needs.

By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
There is no
doubt that
Andrea and
Bob Smith love
rodeo and the
rodeo lifestyle. The Lake
City couple lives it every
day.
The two are annual
sponsors of the Florida
Gateway Pro Rodeo, they
host rodeo roping events
in the arena behind their
Smitty's Western Wear
store, but more impor-
tantly the two provide a
slice of the rodeo lifestyle'
to mentally and physically
handicapped children.
Working in partner-
ship with the Lake City
Shrine Club, the Smiths
have taken it upon them-
selves to work with the
club members to have a
special rodeo for the chil-
dren before the Sunday
performance of the Florida
Gateway Pro Rodeo.
"Our special thing is the
Shriner's Rodeo for the
children," Andrea Smith
said.
Each year the Shriners
invite about 13-14 children
to the rodeo arena, where
the children are treated to
their own rodeo com-
plete with horses, rodeo
clowns and rodeo atmo-
sphere.
'We have horses and


FILE PHOTO
There's an abundance of things for kids, who don't often get such chances, to do and see
during the Shriner's special rodeo.
barrels set-up where they
ride the horses and pre-
tend like they are roping
the steers," she said. "A lot .
of them are in wheelchairs -- -
and they can't get around
and we have people from.
the clowns to the announc-
er and our personal friends
that come out and help us. .
We're like one big family
and we get together and
put on a rodeo for these
children."
The Shriners rodeo
event for the children
takes place at 10 a.m.
Sunday before the final
rodeo competition that
afternoon.


RODEO continued on 3A


Andrea and Bob
Smith (above) of
Lake City work
with the Lake City
Shrine Club to help
organize the annual
Shriner's Rodeo that
allows physically and
.mentally challenged
children the chance
to experience rodeo
events. The Shriner's
Rodeo is held each
year before the final
performance of the
Florida Gateway Pro
Rodeo.-The rodeo is
set for next weekend
at the fairgrounds.
JASON MATTHEW WALKER
Lake City Reporter


Chief Argatha .
Gilmore of the
Lake City Police
Department thanks
community mem-
bers and sponsors
for their support
at the 18th Annual
LCPD Ball at the
Lake City Country
Club Saturday.

LEANNE TYO
Lake City Reporter


LCPD hosts


18th annual


fundraiser


Money to go
toward purchase
of simulator.
By LEANNE TYO.
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com
About 150 community
members had the chance
to interact with Lake City
Police Department offi-
cials and officers while
financially supporting
a special project at the


18th Annual LCPD' Ball
at the Lake City Country
Club Saturday.
That project: The hope-
ful purchase of a firearms
training simulator by the
LCPD to aid in training
its officers, local residents
at its upcoming Citizens
Police Academy and Third
Judicial Circuit officers.
Capt. John Blanchard,
LCPD public information
BALL continued on 3A


PATRICK SCOTT/Lake City Reporter
Lake City Police .Officers Elijha Serrano and Louis
Troiano inspect the damage to a motorcycle after a motor-
cyclist was injured Saturday following a collision with a car
at the intersection of SR 247 and HWY 90.

Man injured

as motorcycle

strikes vehicle


Police: Rider had
'incapacitating
injuries'.
From staff reports
A Jacksonville man on
a motorcycle was injured
when he struck a vehicle
turning in front of him
at the intersection of
Highway 90 and State


Road 247 Saturday in Lake
City.
Katron Marquis Jones,
28, of Jacksonville, driver
of the motorcycle, was
transported to Lake City
Medical Center with what
were reported as incapaci-
tating injuries.
* Don Leon Lynch, 80, of
ACCIDENT continued on 3A


CARC Bowl-A-Thon draws 30 teams, 130 participants


Raises funds for those with disabilities


LEANNE TYO/Lake City Reporter
Blake Benton, 25, of Lake City prepares to bowl
at CARC-Advocates for Citizens with Disabilities
Inc.'s 18th Annual Bowl-A-Thon at Lake City Bowl
Saturday.


By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com
Blake Benton of Lake City had
a personal connection and reason
for participating in the CARC's
18th Annual Bowl-A-Thon at Lake
City Bowl Saturday.
His younger brother, Tyler, 17,
has Down syndrome, and Benton
supports how CARC-Advocates for
Citizens with Disabilities Inc. helps
to provide services for Columbia
County residents with disabilities
through its Bowl-A-Thon fund-
raiser.


"It adds participation to their life
and makes them active,"- Benton
said.
CARC is a nonprofit organiza-
tion providing services for resi-
dents with disabilities so they can
function like everyday citizens,
said Mike Belle, CARC executive
director.
"We're trying to give people
with disabilities the opportunity
for growth and more independent
functioning," he said.
The Bowl-A-Thon drew almost
BOWL continued on 3A


LEANNE TYO/Lake City Reporter
Jeffery Woolfolk (right), a CARC client, smiles as
he gives a 'high-five' to Don Jenkins of Celebrate
Your Life, a CARC client provider, at CARC's 18th
Annual Bowl-A-Thon at Lake City Bowl Saturday.


CALL US: 80
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO Sunny
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445 8A A
Fax: 752-9400 WEATHER, BA


Opinion .........
State News.......
Obituaries .......
Advice & Comics..
- -" Puzzles ..........


TODAY IN
BUSINESS
r. :, ,---;., ,


COMING
TUESDAY
MADDFest is
on the horizon.


1 84264 0021 8


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2A LAKE CITY REPORTER SUNDAY REPORT SUNDAY MARCH 13, 2011


(AH"

Saturday:
Afternoon: 0-1-4
Evening: 2-7-7


4-

Saturday:
Afternoon: 8-9-4-6
Evening: 5-0-1-3


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


FLORIDA


Wednesday:
6-9-17-38-43-52


Wednesday:
12-20-28-40-48 PB8


AROUND FLORIDA



Sunshine Hero fights for citizens to be heard


PENSACOLA
Sharon Barnett
has no trouble
speaking up
when she's got
an opinion.
And she's also sticking
up for the rights of citizens
to be heard at public meet-
ings.
Barnett was nominated
last year for the First
Amendment Foundation's
Sunshine Brigade, made
up of people willing to
fight for open government,
mainly for her efforts
fighting for residents' right
.to speak at meetings of
the board overseeing the
building of Community
Maritime Park in down-
town Pensacola.
, She represented
'Pensacola residents Byron
Keesler and Leroy Boyd
in their lawsuit against
the park board, claiming
;that the board violated
'Florida's Sunshine Law
when it did not give citi-
zens the right to partici-
pate in its meeting.
An Escambia Circuit
'Court judge and the First
'District Court of Appeal
,in Tallahassee ruled in
the park board's favor,
saying the Sunshine Law
gives the public the right
to be present but not to
speak at public meet-
ings. Then in October, the
Florida Supreme Court
denied Barnett's request
for review of the case, a
decision that has statewide
implications for citizens.
But she's not giving up.
Last year, Barnett filed
a friend of the court brief
in the Fifth District Court


of Appeal on behalf of the
Florida First Amendment
Foundation in a similar
case in Seminole County
involving the public's right
to be heard at public meet-
ings.
"Sunshine in govern-
ment is crucial to a
healthy, productive gov-
ernment," Barnett said.
"Sunshine Week focuses
attention on the fact that
in our form of govern-
ment authority is originally
derived from citizens.
"The week itself high-
lights awareness of the
Sunshine Law for citizens
and elected officials who
can then better apply
Sunshine principles the
rest of the year."

3 injured in
shooting
JACKSONVILLE
- Jacksonville police have
charged a 26-year-old man
with attempted murder for
a shooting at an apartment
complex.
Jail records showed
Saturday that Adrian
Derrick Hagans was also
charged with aggravated
assault on a law enforce-
ment officer.
According to the
sheriff's office, officers
responded to the scene
Friday night and found
Hagans shooting at three
people. Most of the gun-
fire stopped when police
arrived, but authorities say
Hagans kept firing even
when officers ordered him
to drop his weapon. One
officer fired two shots at


COURTESY PHOTO

Learning through biology
Epiphany Catholic School seventh-graders Andrea Bedoya
(left) and Masi Williams dissect a bullfrog in Joanne Kasak's
science class.


him. Hagans is in critical
condition in the hospital.
The two people Hagans
is accused of shooting are
also in critical condition.

Out-of-town
meetings allowed
TALLAHASSEE
- Florida Senate Budget
Committee Chairman JD


Alexander is sponsoring
a bill that would let his
hometown of Highland
Park fold its tent. ,
The Polk County ham-
let of about 250 residents
rents a tent for town meet-
ings because a taxpayer
objected to holding them
at the city clerk's home.
Alexander's committee
on Friday unanimously
approved his bill (SB 298).


It would let cities with pop-
ulations of 500 or less hold
public meetings up to five
miles outside city limits.
That would let Highland
Park hold its town meet-
ings at the Lake Wales
City Hall about three miles
away.
About 40 other small
towns also would be cov-
ered by the bill that next
goes to the Senate floor.
Highland Park doesn't
have a post office, so
Alexander has a Lake
Wales address.

SeaWorld releases
1,000 sea turtle
TITUSVILLE
- SeaWorld in Florida
has released its 1,000th.
rehabilitated sea turtle
at Canaveral National
Seashore.
The loggerhead turtle
put back in the Atlantic
on Friday was brought to
SeaWorld in September. It
suffered from lockjaw and
weighed 70 pounds.
After rehabilitation, it .
regained normal function
of its jaw and is back to
a normal weight of 102
pounds.
The park's Animal
Rescue & Rehabilitation
Team has cared for more
than 1,500 turtles since
its sea turtle rescue pro-
gram began at SeaWorld
Orlando in 1980.
Turtles most often suffer
from injuries from fishing
line, hooks and nets, eating-
trash and plastic bags, boat
strikes, natural illnesses and
oil contamination.


Man dies after
dive in Keys
MARATHON -
Autopsy results are pend-
ing for a Michigan man
who died shortly after
completing a dive offshore
of the Florida Keys.
The Monroe County
Sheriff's Office reports
that 56-year-old Richard
Snow was on a dive trip on
board the Reef Hopper on
Thursday morning. He and
others on the boat were
diving about 60 feet of
water at a location known
as "Edge of Darkness."
At some point, Snow
began having trouble. The
captain of the boat threw
out a safety line. Although
Snow was unable to grab
it, the line caught on his
tank and the captain was
able to tow him to the
boat.

Anti-fraud unit
ready for vote
MIAMI Miami-Dade
County's top prosecutor
has activated an anti-fraud
unit to watch for irregu-
larities in Tuesday's recall
election.
The vote will decide
whether to.recall Mayor
Carlos Alvarez and a coun-
ty commissioner.
State Attorney Katherine
Fernandez Rundle said
investigators and civilian
employees will be out full
force at voting sites across
the county to ensure a fair
election.

Associated Press


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS


'Wire' actress shocked by drug charges


BALTIMORE
Actress Felicia "Snoop"
Pearson, who played a
murderous member of
a Baltimore drug gang
in the hit HBO series
"The Wire," is shocked to be facing
charges of conspiring to sell heroin,
her attorney said Friday.
"She's,a little bit dismayed at
being in position that she didn't
place herself in," attorney Paul
Gardner said.
Pearson, 30, who was ordered
held without bail Friday, denies the
charges. Her attorney plans to file a
writ of habeas corpus and motion for
bail review Monday.
Pearson is one of 64 people
charged Thursday in "Operation
Usual Suspects," a joint state-fed-
eral prosecution of an alleged east
Baltimore drug gang. Of the 38
people arrested by Thursday, 22,
including Pearson, are facing state
charges. An indictment charges
her with conspiring with two men
to distribute heroin and aiding and
abetting.
The federal indictment states
that since 2008, members of the
conspiracy bought heroin from New
York and marijuana from California
and sold the drugs on the streets of
Baltimore neighborhoods. As part
of the conspiracy, the indictment
alleges, members discussed how
those who failed to perform required
tasks were dealt with violently.

New opening for 'Spidey,;'
Green Goblin gets stuck
NEW YORK Broadway's stunt-
heavy, $65 million "Spider-Man"
musical will shut down for more than
three weeks this spring to overhaul
the troubled production, a show that
has been in previews for a record
103 performances.
Lead producers Michael Cohl
and Jeremiah J. Harris said in a
statement Friday that "Spider-Man:
Turn Off the Dark" would officially
open June 14. The show's opening,
delayed an astounding six times, was


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this frame grab from video released by WBAL-TV 11, Drug Enforcement
Administration agents escort Felicia 'Snoop' Pearson, who played a killer of the
same name on the hit HBO series 'The Wire,' as she was among dozens arrested
in an early morning drug raid Thursday in Baltimore.


to have opened last on March 15.
On Wednesday, producers
announced that Tony Award-winning
director Julie Taymor would no lon-
ger, direct the show, and a new cre-
ative team was brought in to change
and polish the flawed musical, which
has also been plagued with a series
of injuries to cast members and
aerial stunt mishaps.
The latest occurred Friday when
the Green Goblin's flight system
failed during a fight scene, leaving
him hanging over the stage for about
three minutes before stagehands
lowered him down. It was the second
time this week that
The replacement of Taymor in
her day-to-day duties was a stun-
ning development for the heralded
director of "The Lion King," a mega-
hit that is No. 3 at the box office
more than a decade after it opened.
Taymor, known for her bold and
creative artistic vision, is believed
to have been pushed aside because
she wouldn't accept the need for out-
side help and significant changes to


"Spider-Man," which she co-wrote.

'Merry Little Christmas'
songwriter Martin dies
LOS ANGELES -- Hugh Martin,
the composer-songwriter whose works
included "Have Yourself a Merry Little
Christmas" and "The Trolley Song,"
died Friday. He was 96.
He died from natural causes at
his home in Encinitas, Calif., said
Martin's niece Suzanne Hanners.
Martin and songwriting partner
Ralph Blane co-wrote such catchy
tunes as "Have Yourself a Merry
Little Christmas," "The Trolley
Song" and "The Boy Next Door"
from the musical "Meet Me in St
Louis."
He was nominated for best origi-
nal song Academy Awards for "The
Trolley Song" in 1944 and "Pass the
Peace Pipe" from "Good News" in
1947.

* Associated Press


* Jazz musician Roy Haynes
is 86.
* Country singer Jan
Howard is 81.
* Singer-songwriter Neil
Sedaka is 72.
* Actor William H. Macy is
61.
* Actress Deborah Raffin is
58.


Lake City
HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293
Fax number ..............752-9400
Circulation ................755-5445
Online ... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Ra.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Ra. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson.... 754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
Assistant Editor CJ Risak..754-0427
After 100 p.m.
(crisak@lakectyreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
. ....................... 752-1293
(dkimler@lakecityreporter.com)
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad. call 755-5440.


* Actress Glenne Headly is
56.
* Actress Dana Delany is 55.
* Rock musician Adam
Clayton (U2) is 51.
* Jazz musician Terence
Blanchard is 49.
* Actor Christopher Collet
is 43.
* Actress Tracy Wells is 40.


Reporter
BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7.30
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 10.30 a.m. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation ..............755-5445
(circulation@lakectyreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks.................. $26.32
24 Weeks................... $48.79
52 Weeks ............... $83.46
Rates include 7% sales tax.
Mail rates
12 Weeks ................ $41.40
24 Weeks................... $8280
52 Weeks.................. $179.40


CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion,
please call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifica-
tions will run in this space. And thanks for reading.


Friday:
16-17-27-36


ez'natch -

Friday:
2-3-13-18-19


Celebrity Birthdays


Daily Scripture


"Through these he has given
us his very great and precious
promises, so that through them
you may participate in the
divine.nature, having escaped
the corruption in the world
caused by evil desires."
2 Peter 1:4















New threat after quake: Nuclear meltdown


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this video image taken from NTV Japan via APTN, smoke
raises from Fukushima Daiichi power plant's Unit 1 in
Okumamachi, Fukushima prefecture, Japan Saturday. The
walls of a building at the nuclear power station crumbled
Saturday as smoke poured out, and Japanese officials said
they feared the reactor could melt down following the failure
of its cooling system in a powerful earthquake and tsunami.


ERIC TALMADGE and
YURI KAGEYAMA
Associated Press

IWAKI. Japan A partial melt-
down was likely under way at a second
nuclear reactor, a top Japanese official
said Sunday, as authorities frantically
tried to prevent a similar threat from
nearby unit following a catastrophic
earthquake and tsunami.
Some 170,000 people have been
ordered to evacuate the area covering
a radius of 12 miles (20 kilometers)
around the plant in Fukushima near
Iwaki. A meltdown refers to a very
serious collapse of a power plant's
systems and its ability to manage
temperatures. A complete meltdown
would release uranium and danger-
ous byproducts into the environment
that can pose serious health risks.


Japan dealt with the nuclear threat
as it struggled to determine the scope
of the twin disasters Friday, when an
8.9-magnitude earthquake, the most
powerful in its recorded history, was
followed by a tsunami that ravaged its
northeastern coast with breathtaking
speed and power.
The official count of the dead was
763, but the government said the
figure could far exceed 1,000. Media
reports said some 10,000 people were
missing or unaccounted for.
The quake and tsunami damaged
three reactors at the Fukushima Dai-
ichi nuclear plant, which lost their
cooling functions necessary to keep
the fuel rods functioning properly.
At first the Unit 1 reactor was in
trouble with an explosion destroying
the walls of the room in which it is
placed. Later, Unit 3 also began to


experience problems.
Chief Cabinet Secretary Yukio Edano
said operators released slightly radioac-
tive air from Unit 3 Sunday, while inject-
ing water into it as an effort to reduce
pressure and temperature to save the
reactor from a possible meltdown.
Still, a partial meltdown in the unit is
"-highly possible," he told reporters.
"Because it's inside the reactor, we
cannot directly check it but we are tak-
ing measures on the assumption of the
possible partial meltdown," he said. '
Edano said radiation levels briefly
rose above legal limits, but that it has
since declined significantly. Also, fuel
rods were exposed briefly, he said,
indicating that coolant water didn't
cover the rods for some time. That
would contribute further to raising
the temperature in the reactor ves-
sel.


Tsunami surge

deals blow to

struggling town


JEFF BARNARD
Associated Press

CRESCENT CITY,
Calif. Fishermen who
had escaped to sea before
the tsunami hit this strug-
gling coastal town landed
small loads of crab on
Saturday, while crews
surveyed damage and a
family combed the beach
for any sign of a man who
was swept away a day ago
as he photographed the
waves.
"This harbor is the life-
blood of our community
and the soul of our com-
munity," said Del Norte
County Sheriff Dean
Wilson as he looked
across what was left of
the Crescent City boat
basin, which last year
saw landings of crab and
fish worth $12.5 million.
"The fishing industry is
fthe identity and soul of
this community, besides
tourism."
The region has never
recovered from the loss


of the timber industry
in the 1980s and 1990s,
and downturns in salm-.
on fishing, said Wilson,
who fished on his father's
boats as a young man.
"It's going to be hard to
recover here," he said.
A series of powerful
surges generated by the
devastating earthquake in
Japan arrived about 7:30
a.m. Friday and pounded
the harbor through the
day and night. Eight boats
were believed sunk and
dozens of others dam-
aged; an unmanned sail-
boat sucked out of the
harbor ran aground on
the coast.
About 20 miles south,
the family of a 25-year-old
Oregon man combed the
beach looking for signs
of him. Authorities say
Dustin Weber was swept
away as he and .two friends.
photographed-the waves.
"He just, didn't, respect
the ocean and didn't
understand the tsunami,"
his father, Jon Weber.


RODEO: Fun for all

Continued From Page 1A


"Anyone can attend,
watch them participate
an Andrea Smith said.
It takes three adults to
help one of the children
ride a horse. One adult
leads the horse, while the
other two adults stand on
either side of the horse.
"It's just so reward-
ing to take one of those
children that can't really
communicate. It takes a
lot of effort and work,"
Bob Smith said. "But
when you lead then the
length of that rodeo
arena and you bring them


back, they may not be
able to say, "Thank you,"
but they don't have to
because they are smiling
from ear-to-ear. It's very
rewarding. If you've got a
heart, you'll find it right
then."
In addition to riding,
the horses, the children
are also given prizes for
taking part in the event.
"We feel it's important
to take part in the event
because we love children
and we like to do things
for our community -
that's what we're about,"
Andrea Smith said.


BALL: Money generated to help buy simulator

Continued From Page 1A


officer, said the depart-
ment recognized a need for
the simulator, which can
cost up to $80,000, after
previously renting one and
using it to train more than
100 officers.
Chief of Police Argatha
Gilmore said the simulator's
training allows residents to
become aware of the "split-
second decisions" officers
face daily, whether they are
dealing with a traffic stop
or an active shooter.
A portable version of the
simulator was available for
ball attendees to use and
sample its training.
"What we want to do is
give them (civilians and
officers) as much of a real-
life training scenario as we
can," Gilmore said. "That's
what this does."
Blanchard said when
residents undergo the
simulator's training, they
will also understand how to
best help law enforcement
on actions such as what to
call the police for and being
more prepared to answer
the police's questions.
In addition to raising
money for the simulator's
purchase, the ball also
allowed residents to spend
time with the police depart-
ment in a social setting,
Gilmore and Blanchard
said.
"Ifs good to be able to just
come and sit and talk with
citizens and have a relaxed
evening," Gilmore said.
When Gilmore addressed
the ball's attendees, she
thanked them for their sup-
port.
. "If you had not been here
tonight, this event would


LEANNE TYO/Lake City Reporter
Mary Summerall (right) of Lake City shoots a practice, laser handgun at a simulated target
at the 18th Annual Lake City Police Department Ball while Shannon Lightsey of Laser Shot
looks on. The simulator Summerall practiced with was a portable version of a firearms training
simulator the LCPD wants to purchase, a purchase the ball raised money for. The simulator
will be used to help train LCPD officers, local residents and Third Judicial Circuit officers.


not be as special as it is,"
she said.
During the ball, Gilmore
recognized Chief Frank
Owens, who previously
served as an LCPD chief.
Special awards were also
presented to LCPD offi-
cers. 6
The Officer of the Year
award went to Officer
Juan Cruz and Destiny
Hill, Gilmore's adminis- -
trative assistant, won the
Civilian of the Year award.
Officer Michael Delcastillo
earned the Unsung Officer
award and the Chief and
Commanders award went
to Officer Steve Shaw.
Ball-goers, which includ-
ed community sponsors


ACCIDENT: One injury


Continued From Page 1A

Lake City, was no injured.
He was cited for failing to
yield the right of way.
According to Lake City
Police Department officials,


BOWL: Fundraiser for CARC

Continued From Page 1A


Lynch was attempting to
turn south onto State Road
247 from the westbound
side of U.S. Highway 90.
Jones was traveling east
on U.S. 90. Lynch turned
in front of Jones, who then
struck Lynch's vehicle.
No further information
regarding Jones' injuries
was released.


and both city and county
officials, said they were
proud to attend the event
and support the LCPD.,;
"Anything we can do to
help expand on the training
for law enforcement, I think
that's fantastic," said Rob
Summerall of Lake City.
"We supportthe Lake City


Police Department because
we appreciate what they do
for our city," said-Beverly
Reed of Lake City. "I enjoy
meeting people from, the
city and seeing so: many
people support the Lake
City Police Department is
a good feeling and I'm glad
that I'm here."


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30 teams, with 130 partici-
pants to support the cause.
"CARC's goal is to pro-
vide very essential, but
very expensive, services
to people with disabilities
in Columbia County and
to bring our local citizens
with disabilities together
with their community,"
Belle said, "and this (event)
accomplishes both of those
things."
Teams who were
made up of individual com-
munity members, commu-
nity businesses and CARC
clients and staff paid
$50 each to register for the
event and team members
were encouraged to raise
$100 each through pledg-
es, Belle said.
Local businesses donat-
ed more than 50 door
prizes and other prizes for
teams that raised the most
money, Belle said. New
this year were 30 bowling
pins, donated by Lake City
Bowl, that CARC clients
decorated to give to busi-
nesses to display.


Calvin Griffin, a CARC
client who participates
annually in the Bowl-A-
Thon, said his favorite part
of the event is "cheering
on" other teams as they
bowl.
"It's a good event for
everyone to participate in
and have fun in," he said.
Candice Carter, who
bowled with Columbia
Bank's team, said the Bowl-
A-Thon involves the com-
munity in raising money
for CARC.
"I really believe in what
CARC stands for," she said,
before she took her first


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turn at bowling.
"You just get to let loose
outside of work while still
supporting CARC," Carter
said.



nI In Loving m emory
Sof my wife, and
S my friend!


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My memories of you will linger
forever. I appreciate what seems
like such a short time we had
together. But, five years is a
lifetime for some. I thank God for
those years that He shared you
with me. I wish that it could have
been much longer, but God has
His plan for you. So, I thank God,
and pray for strength to accept
His will and His way. Because
there's no other way
Thank you for the memories.
Your loving husband
[ "Sonny"


LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & WORLD SUNDAY. MARCH 13. 2011


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


i a














OPINION


Sunday, March 13, 2011


OUR


OUR
OPINION


-College's

program

growth

boon to

region

his is why they
changed the name.
Growth. Vision.
An expanded
curriculum.
The pathways to excellence
continue to unfold upon a
solid educational foundation at
Florida Gateway College.
The institution this week
.released plans to add its first-
four-year degree programs in
2012, an historic announcement
and advancement at the school
that has been an educational
mainstay in the North Florida
region since 1947.
FGC is proposing adding
;.a trio of four-year degree
.programs, including bachelor
of science in nursing, bachelor
of science in early childhood
education and bachelor of
science in industrial logistics.
SWe believe these are the
ip-demand, perfect degrees to
launch a baccalaureate program
at the school.
When officials at the
former Lake City Community
College 18 months ago began
discussing the name change,
one of the reasons behind the
maneuver was to expand on
the two-year degree programs
offered by the "community"
college and prepare an
expanded future offering
several four-year degree
programs..
School officials have said
nursing is the priority degree
right now and that's no
* surprise. Student interest and
future budget structure will
determine how quickly the
others materialize.
: Marking its position as the
go-to regional college that
serves its community with
an expanded curriculum was
promised by officials during
the entire renaming process.
Last week, we see the big
announcement that FGC is
achieving its goals.
Florida Gateway College
continues to be a catalyst to
the future growth and strength
of Columbia County and the
North Florida region.



Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities--"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
.through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
'work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman


LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.


BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


www.lakecityreporter.com


No one should be forced to join unions


Even as they scream
for "workers' rights,"
the one workers'
right that union
bosses despise is the
right to work. Big Labor and
its overwhelmingly Democratic
allies oppose a woman's right to
choose whether or not to join a
union. Instead, they prefer that
predominantly male employers
and labor leaders make that "
choice for her.
The American Left has
hoisted "choice" onto a pedes-
tal taller than the Washington
Monument. Liberals and their
Big'Labor buddies will race to
their battle stations to defend
a woman's right to choose
to abort her unborn child.
Meanwhile, they holler them-
selves hoarse to prevent her
(and her male counterparts)
from freely choosing to accept
or avoid union membership.
Sen. Jim DeMint, R-S.C.,
understands that exercising this
choice is a basic human right,
and neither private employment
nor government work should
require joining or paying dues
to a union.
"Many Americans already are
struggling just to put food on
the table," DeMint said, "and
they shouldn't have to fear los-
ing their jobs or face discrimina-
tion if they don't want to join
a union." Thus, on Tuesday,
DeMint introduced the National
Right to Work Act. If not today,
then soon, a federally protected
individual right to work should
be signed into law.
The Act's economic rationale


LETTERS


Deroy Murdock
deroy.murdock@gmoil.com
is compelling:

Among America's 22
right-to-work states (including
Florida, Georgia, and Texas),
non-farm private-sector employ-
ment grew 3.7 percent from
1999 to 2009, while it shrank
2.8 percent among America's
28 forced-unionism states (e.g.
California, Illinois, and New
York).
During those 10 years,
real personal income rose 28.3
percent in right-to-work states
and sank 14.7 percent in forced-
unionism states.
In 2009, cost-of-living-
adjusted, per-capita, disposable,
personal income was $35,543
in right-to-work states versus
$33,389 in forced-unionism
states. Americans in right-to-
work states enjoyed more free-
dom, plus this $2,154 premium.
Notwithstanding that right-
to-work states are compara-
tively prosperous engines of
job growth, the case for right-
to-work is not merely economic
but also moral.
"Government has granted
union officials the unprec-
edented power to force indi-
vidual employees to pay up or
be fired and to coerce workers


into subsidizing union speech,"
says the National Right to Work
Committee's Patrick Semmens.
'This fundamental violation of
individual liberty an infringe-
ment on freedom of speech and
freedom of association finally
would end with passage of the
NRTWA."
"Compulsory unionism...
should not be lawful under a
free government or tolerated
by a free people," Donald R.
Richberg argued in his book,
"Compulsory Unionism: The
New Slavery". As a labor
attorney and federal official,
Richberg helped draft landmark
union laws, including the 1926
Railway Labor Act, the 1933
National Industrial Recovery
Act, and the 1947 Taft-Hartley
Act Later in his career, how-
ever, Richberg considered such
legislation authoritarian.
Richberg added: "A volun-
tary organization of workers
united for self-help is inherently
a much stronger organization
than a union composed, to a
considerable extent, of unwilling
members."
Indeed, labor leaders should
not fear voluntary membership.
If their talents for securing
higher wages, richer pensions,
and cozier working conditions
are truly as impressive as adver-
tised, Americans should line up
to sign up.
B New York commentator Deroy
Murdock is a columnist with the
Scripps Howard News Service and
a media fellow with the Hoover
Institution on War, Revolution and
Peace at Stanford University.


TO THE EDITOR


Changes: Sooner the better


To the editor:
This is in regards to Tony
Britt's article on March 5, titled
"Budget cuts: For and against"
and "Rally: Crowds gather both
to protest and support cuts to
education."
The article and the titles were
both somewhat misleading.
In the very first paragraph, it
states "Gov. Scott's plans to han-
dle the Florida deficit by requir-
ing state employees to contrib-
ute 5 percent of their salaries to
the Florida Retirement System."
That is true only in part That 5
percent contribution would be
only part of a much larger plan
to handle the $4 billion deficit
and it specifically excludes fire-
men and police. Although I dis-
agree with the statements made
by Kevin Doyle, president of the
Columbia Teachers Association;
Colin Williamson, CHS teacher;
Michele Van Bennekem, Five
Points Elementary School
teacher; and Michael Estrella,
Suwannee Correctional Institute
employee, I will not address
their statements individually.
It is important to understand
what we, the people on the


other side, were about inas-
much as the article did not give
much space to us. I was there
and basically from conversa-
tions I participated in, and heard
others engage in, the reason we
were there can be simply stated
this way.
We object to the state of
Florida obligating ourselves,
and our future generations, to
an obscene indebtedness on the
part of the state of Florida. A
large part of this will be caused
by the payment, by taxpayers,
for the retirement benefits of
state employees without any
employee contribution to the
costs. Further, the same applies
to employee health insurance
benefits to which only a portion
is paid for by employees. That
is simply an unsustainable situ-
ation. Even Federal and most
other states do not have such
obligations for the entire life of
an employee. That is what the
people on my side of U.S. 90
were talking about Of course,
in private employment, this situ-
ation is almost unheard of as no
business could survive.
In addition, we support Gov.


Scott's efforts to remove the
state government from being
the collection agency for union
dues. This results in a situation
whereby the taxpayer pays the
state worker's salary, then the
state government takes a por-
tion of the salary to give to the
unions, which then give a por-
tion (sometimes a very large
portion) to their political favor-
ites, usually Democrats, to help
them get elected or re-elected to
state office, then raise the tax-
payers' taxes to cover the raises
of the employees, ad infinitum.
In other words, it is a never-
ending process of the taxpayer
being penalized.
There simply has to be some
sanity in play here. Everyone
has to understand that our liv-
ing beyond our means today will
seriously damage future genera-
tions to the extent they will not
live in the America we lived in.
This is not a situation of wanting
to do this. We have no choice.
The sooner we starting making
corrections, the better chance
we will have to succeed.
Wilbur G. Corbitt
Lake City


4A


Dale McFeatters
mcfeattersd@shns.com


Set your

watch. It's

daylight

saving time

Remember: Daylight
saving time begins
today, technically
at 2 a.m. local time,
but just so you get
around to setting your clocks
an hour ahead unless you're
so rich and powerful or such
a complete slacker it doesn't
matter whether you show up
for things an hour late.
You may not need this
reminder, but Americans of
a certain vintage do because
Congress kept changing DST
on them.
We had daylight saving dur-
ing World War I not that this
affected anybody here, but we
have to start the story some-
where and then repealed it
until World War II, when it was
re-imposed for three years.
After the war, states and
counties were free to set their
clocks where and when they
liked, resulting in predictable
confusion and, ultimately, the
Uniform Time Act of 1966,
which set DST from the last
Sunday in April until the last
Sunday in October.
The energy crisis of the '70s
gave Congress a new opportu-
nity to tinker with our clocks.
In 1974, DST began on Jan.
6; in 1975, on Feb. 23; then it
reverted to the last Sunday in
April; but, in 1987, it was reset
to the first Sunday in April.
After Indiana rejoined a sin-
gle time zone in 2006 don't
ask; it confuses even Hoosiers
Congress in 2007 decreed
that DST would extend from
the second Sunday in March
until the first Monday in
November. And this time the
lawmakers believe they really
mean it. And they do, except
for Hawaii, most of Arizona,
the Virgin Islands, Guam and
Samoa.
The coming of DST every
spring allows the comfortable
illusion that we're sacrificing
an hour of sleep in exchange
for an extra hour of daylight in
the evening. Everybody knows
that's not literally the case, but
we like to believe it anyway.
There's a handy mnemonic
for setting your clocks: Spring
forward for daylight saving;
and fall back for the return to
Standard Time, assuming, of
course, that you remember
which weekend to do it

Dale McFeatters is editorial
writer for Scripps Howard News
Service.


HIGHLIGHTS
IN HISTORY
Today is Sunday, March 13,
the 72nd day of 2011. There
are 293 days left in the year.
On March 13, 1781, the
seventh planet of the solar sys-
tem, Uranus, was discovered
by Sir William Herschel.
In 1884, Congress
officially adopted Eastern
Standard Time for the District
of Columbia.
In 1933, banks began
to reopen after a "holiday"
declared by President Franklin
D. Roosevelt.
In 1969, the Apollo 9 astro-
nauts splashed down, ending a
mission that included the success-
ful testing of the Lunar Module.
In 1980, Ford Motor
Chairman Henry Ford II
announced he was stepping down,
the same day a jury in Wminamac,
Ind., found Ford Motor Co.
innocent of reckless homicide in
the fiery deaths of three young
women in a Ford Pinto.













Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


LAKE CITY REPORTER


STATE


SUNDAY. MARCH 13. 2011


Senate panel


limits pension


contributions


Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE The
Florida Senate may be on
a collision course with Gov.
Rick Scott and the House
over how much public
employees should contrib-
ute to their pensions.
Scott wants more than
570,000 state employees,
teachers and local govern-
ment workers who cur-
rently do not pay into the
Florida Retirement System
to contribute 5 percent of
their wages.
The Senate Government
Oversight and
Accountability Committee
on Thursday, though, voted
to require contributions only
from those making more
than $40,000. That would
exempt nearly 75 percent
of state workers, accord-
ing to the Department of
Management Services.
The bill (SB 1130) would
require only 2 percent con-
tributions from workers
making $40,000 to $75,000
and 4 percent for those
who bring home more than
$75,000.
"Unlike the governor,
this bill does not balance
the budget on the backs of
state workers," said Sen.
Mike Fasano, R-New Port
Richey.
The bill next goes to the


Budget Committee chaired
by Sen. JD Alexander, who
said on Friday that he plans
to put it on hold until the
panel has a better handle
on what kind of spending
cuts can be made.
Scott's budget proposal
would use the employee
pension contributions to
free up state contributions
and help close a potential
$3.6 billion shortfall in the
budget year beginning July
1.
"It's not something
I care to do or want to
do," Alexander said. But
the Lake Wales Republican
added, "I have to tell you
I don't think it's possible
to put a balanced budget
together without new reve-
nues and not ask associates
to take some reductions."
Legislative leaders have
put tax and fee increases
off the table.
Alexander said he antici-
pated some changes will be
made in the bill and that
one matter under scrutiny
will be whether ifs legal
and constitutional to treat
some employees different-
ly than others.
Scott's proposal is in a
House bill (HB 1405) that
has yet to receive a -com-
mittee hearing. It would
amount to a 5 percent
pay cut for public employ-


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Gov. Rick Scott applauds as the Florida Senate begins its
2011 Legislative session in Tallahassee Tuesday. Scott and
the State Senate could be on a collision course over hbw
much state employees should contribute to their pension
fund.


ees, although state work-
ers have gone without an
across-the-board raise for
five years.
The Florida Retirement
System is one of the nation's
strongest public pension
plans. Scott, though, says
requiring employee contri-
butions is a matter of fair-
ness because most private
sector employees must
contribute to their pension
plans, if they even have
one.


The Government
Oversight and
Accountability Committee
voted 12-1 for its bill. That's
more than half of the 21
votes it'll need for passage
in the 40-member Senate.
"We tried our hardest
and our best not to demon-
ize state workers," said
the panel's chairman, Sen.
Jeremy Ring, D-Margate.
"This committee does not
believe state workers are
the enemy."


Lawmaker files medical marijuana amendment


Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE A state law-
maker has introduced a proposed
state constitutional amendment that
would legalize medical marijuana in ,
Florida.


Rep. Jeff Clemens, a Lake Worth against Clemens getting three-fifths of
Democrat, said Thursday that there's the House and Senate, both Republican-
no good reason to let people use syn- controlled, to pass his amendment
thetic drugs such as methadone and If he does, it would go on the
oxycodone while banning a natural, November 2012 ballot, where it
safer drug. would need at least 60 percent voter
.The odds, though, are stacked approval.


Committee OKs bill on union dues, gov't pay


Lawmaker

wants to reduce

state-backed

insurer's role


By BRENT KALLESTAD
Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE-
Florida's state-backed
property insurer should
be prohibited from sell-
ing policies to cover new
construction or remodel-
ing of existing homes in
environmentally sensi-
tive and high-risk coastal
areas, a state lawmaker
said Friday.
Sen. Alan Hays, R-
Umatilla, said the time
has come to get Citizens
Property Insurance Corp.
- and-many Florida resi-
dents by extension out
of the business of insuring
such high-risk properties.
"The people of Florida
need the full truth about
the extent of our property
insurance dilemma," Hays
said. "We need to correct
the errors of our previous
years and start rebuild-
ing the private insurance
market."
The dilemma he
referred to is one that
could cost private citizens
billions of dollars in sur-
charges on their insurance
policies if Citizens fails to
meet .its obligations in the
wake of a major hurricane
or a series of devastating
storms.
Citizens, which was
originally created as an
insurer of last resort, is
Florida's largest property
insurer with more than 1.2
million policies in force.
But its total exposure of
some $400 billion dramati-
cally exceeds the compa-,
ny's present surplus of
$4.5 billion, and one major
storm could bankrupt the
company.
"Florida taxpayers
already haye enough


challenges," said Charles
Pattison, president of 1000
Friends of Florida and one
of several environmental-
ists on hand to support
Hays' proposed amend-
ment that would keep
Citizens from selling new
policies in the high-risk or
environmentally sensitive
areas.
Hays plans to add the
prohibitions to a bill (SB
1714) that allows Citizens
to increase residential
policyholders' rates by 25
percent for any single pol-
icy, excluding coverage
changes and surcharges.
It also restricts who would
be eligible to buy from
Citizens, but it does not
affect existing coverages.
Sam Miller, execu-
tive vice president of
the Florida Insurance
Council, an industry
group, applauded Hays'
proposal, that the senator
said also has the backing
of Gov. Rick Scott.
"We think Citizens
should be made a lot
smaller and that it should
no longer compete with
the private market when
private insurers are will-
ing to write," Miller said.
"You need to figure out
what Citizens' appropriate
role is and what it should
be writing and make sure
that it does that and no
more."
Citizens was created by
the Legislature in 2002 to
provide insurance to hom-
eowners in high-risk areas
and those who cannot find
coverage in the private
market It was largely an
offshoot of 'an underwrit-
ing association formed by
the state in the aftermath
of Hurricane Andrew in
August 1992.


By JAMES L. ROSICA
Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE A
bill that prohibits the
automatic payroll deduc-
tion of union dues from
government workers' pay
cleared a House committee
Thursday and critics called
the measure an attempt at
union-busting.
The State Affairs
Committee voted along
party lines on Thursday,
recommending House Bill
1021 by a tally of 12-6. The
bill also requires unions to
get written permission from
members before their dues
could be used for political
contributions.
Several representatives
of police, firefighter and
public-employee unions
opposed the measure,
including a fiery condem-
nation from Jeff McAdams,
president of Gainesville's
Fraternal Order of Police.
McAdams said he'd never
heard complaints about
union dues being used for
political purposes.
"That is absolutely a
smoke screen for the true
purpose here, and that is to
eliminate unions, and I won't
stand for it," he told the com-
mittee.
After they had all
addressed the committee,
the union representatives
got up and left the room.
"... It was clear that the
majority had already made
up their minds on the
issue," the Florida AFL-CIO
explained in a press release.
State Rep. Chris
Dorworth, who is sponsor-
ing the bill, said he just
wants to get government
out of the business of col-
lecting union dues.
He said some union mem-
bers even told him they
liked the bill, though he
didn't name them. Florida's
business lobby, including
the Chamber of Commerce,
supports the bill.
"It's absolutely not
a union-busting bill,"
Dorworth, a Lake Mary
Republican, said after the


hearing. .
"All it says is, if you want
to collect dues, do it directly,"
he added. "And if you want
to spend dues on something,
make sure your members
know what that is."
But state Rep. Alan
Williams, a Democrat
from Tallahassee, asked
Dorworth if the bill would
adversely affect unions.
"I don't know," Dorworth


said. "It'll cause them to
change the way they collect
dues. I suspect that ... some
groups will rise to that task,
and others may not be as
successful."
State Rep. Rick Kriseman,
D-St. Petersburg, had tried
unsuccessfully to amend
the bill to prohibit all pay-
check deductions.
"Why just unions?" he
asked. "Why not the United


Way. Let's be honest: it's
about who (unions) politi-
cally support."
Labor unions have his-
torically though not
exclusively supported
Democratic candidates
for office. Gary Rainey,
president of the Florida
Professional Firefighters,
mentioned that his union
had given money to
Dorworth in the past


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Lake City Reporter


SCHOOL READINESS OPEN ENROLLMENT

LIMITED FUNDING, LIMITED AVAILABILITY!

Need Childcare, Afterschool Care, Extended
Care for your childrenn?

Parents will be able to apply for the Early Learning
Coalition of Florida's Gateway, Inc., School Readiness
Program during Open Enrollment, effective immediately.
Open enrollment is first come, first serve and parents
need to call 866-752-9770 or go to www.elc-fg.org for
a complete list of items to bring for school readiness
enrollment.

SCHOOL READINESS OPEN ENROLLMENT

Early Learning Coalition of Florida's Gateway, Inc.
1104 SW Main Blvd
Lake City, FL 32025
866-752-9770

School Readiness is a state and federally funded program
targeting children birth through age 12 from low income
families in Columbia, Hamilton, Lafayette, Suwannee
and Union counties. School Readiness programs
provide quality learning experiences and instruction for
children. There is limited enrollment space, so parents are
encouraged to apply now.


"I've been very pleased by all the
positive comments I've received from
customers, stating that they saw my ads
in the Home Seller and Lake City
Reporter. And to those customers that
made that call-- thank you!

My success is created by great customers
and a great customer base was
created by advertising in the Home
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representative, JeffPressley."


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Consistent marketing
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Find out more by
calling 752-1293.


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LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY. MARCH 13. 2011


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


* To submit your Community
Calendar item, contact Antonia
Robinson at 754-0425 or by
e-mail at arobinson@
lakecityreporter.com.


Sunday
Extension Office PSA
For all growers involved
in the Florida Farmers'
Market Nutrition Program,
all previous Growers
agreements have expired.
You must sign new agree-
ments and meet annual
training requirements to
accept FMNP checks.
Contact the Columbia
County Extension Office
for training locations at
752-5384.


Monday
Cancer support group
The Women's Cancer
Support Group of Lake
City is meeting 5:30 to
6:30 p.m. Monday at Baya
Pharmacy East, 780 SE
Baya Drive. The guest
speaker is Carolyn Long
of Haven Hospice. Learn
of new opportunities for
Empowerment and the
importance of the deci-
sions made with Five
Wishes. Call 386-752-4198
or 386-755-0522.


Blood Drive
The LifeSouth Blood
Mobile is seeking donors
12 to 6 p.m. Monday. Free.
coupons and T-shirts.


COURTESY PHOTO

Farm Bureau has Leadership Conference

The 2011 Florida Farm Bureau Women's Leadership Conference was held February 28 to
March 2 at the Hotel Duval in Tallahassee. The Columbia County Farm Bureau was rep-
resented by Carol Terry (left) and Sarabeth Barthle-Simmons. Carol Terry is the Columbia
County Farm Bureau Women's chairperson. Sarabeth Barthle-Simmons represented the
Young Farmers and Ranchers of Columbia County.


fun, educational spring .
break day camps March
28-April 1 for students in
grades K-5. Half-day ses-
sions are $117 for museum
members and $130 for
non-members. Full-day
sessions are $225 for mem-
bers and $250 for non-
members. Register today
at www.flmnh.ufl.edu/edu-
cation/childrens_classes.
htm or call 352-273-2061.


million dollar giveaway
Alan Feinstein Challenge
from now until April
30. Every food item or
financial donation counts
toward receiving a per-
centage of the giveaway.
Call 386-755-1770 and
bring donations either to
the center at the corner
of Hilton and Washington
or mail to P.O. Box 2285,
Lake City, FL, 32056.


Tuesday
E monthly meeting Fair/Rodeo Scholarship Wednesday


The next regular month-
ly meeting of the National
Active and Retired Federal
Employees is 1 p.m.
Tuesday at the LifeStyle
Enrichment Center, 628
SE Allison Court Shirley
McManus, Christian
Service Center director is
the guest speaker. Contact
Miriam Stanford at 755-
0907 or Jim Purvis at 752-
8570.


Florida Native Plant
Society meeting
The Florida Native
Plant Society Pineywoods
Chapter is meeting 7 p.m.
Tuesday at the Columbia
County Putlic Library
Main Branmn.


Spring Break Camps
The Florida Museum of
Natural History is offering


OBITUARIES
lBayard (Bardy) Austin
Bayard (Bardy) Austin, 77, a
resident of Lake City has passed
away on March 8 in Hospice at
the VA Hospital, after a lengthy
illness.
Born and raised in Wilmington
Delaware.
He is survived
by his wife Anne
Austin and two
children from
a previous marriage, and four
grandchildren.
Son: Bardy Austin, his daughter
Courtney and son Derek. Daugh-
ter Tina and her husband Sdott
and their children, Jordyn and
Austin. A nephew Michael Aus-
tin and his wife Mary Ellen from
Delaware.
He is preceded in death by his
Father, Mother, two brothers and
two sisters.
Bardy, enlisted in the military
to serve our country on the year
1951 as a gunner in the Air Force
in Vietnam.
He carried that passion with him
and continued working on air-
crafts until he retired. He was
a member of the Moose Lodge
where he loved to hang out with
his fellow members.
The memorial service will be
held at the Moose Lodge in Lake
City on March 22 at 11:00 A.M.
A Military burial Service will be
held at the VA Cemetery in Bush-
nell Florida on April Ist at 2:30
P.M. Everyone is welcome.
A special Thanks to the Angels
in the 3rd floor at the V
Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


Columbia County
Resources is now accept-
ing applications for the
fair/rodeo scholarship.
Two scholarships for
$1,000 will be awarded to
graduating seniors. Call
386-752-8822 or visit www.
columbiacountyfairorg to
download the criteria and
application. The applica-
tion is also available at
Columbia High School,
Fort White High School or
the fair office. The dead-
line is 5 p.m. April 1.


Pro Rodeo Queens
Competition
The 7th Annual
Miss Florida Gateway
Pro Rodeo Queens
Competition is Friday at
the 17th Annual Florida
Gateway Pro Rodeo. The
competition is open to
girls 4 to 18. Win scholar-
ships, tiara's, Montana sil-
ver belt buckles, trophies
and more. Applications are
available at The Money
Man, school offices, the
fair office or online at
www. columbiacountyfair.
org. Call 386-752-8822.


Feinstein challenge
Christian Service Center
is participating in the $1




Honoring

Those We Love!


CALL Mary or Bridget
TODAY to place an
In Memory Ad for
someone you miss!

755-5440 or
755-5441
between 8:00am & 5:00pmr

^c


Building Rain Gardens
and Rain Barrels
A workshop on build-
ing rain gardens and
rain barrels is 6 to 7:30
p.m. Wednesday at
the Columbia County
Extension Office. Learn
how to construct and
plant a rain garden that
will allow.storm water
to become cleansed as
it recharges the aquifer.
This is a free, open work-
shop but space is limited,
so please call to register
at 752-538,4. Completed
barrels will be available
for $35 to take home and
install.


Thursday


Backyard Composting
A Monthly Garden Talk
is 5:45 p.m. Thursday
at the new Fort White
Library. Learn tricks to
make your own compost
from yard debris and
kitchen scraps. This is a
free workshop and open
to everyone. For informa-
tion, call the Extension
Office at 752-5384.


Diabetes program
UF/IFAS Columbia


I.




In Loving Memory
You served with
honor, love & pride.
You gave your all
from deep inside.
Now we go on
without you here.
But know our child
we miss you dear.


Your Family


and Suwannee County
Extension are offering a
nine-week educational pro-
gram for type 2 diabetes
5:30 to 7 p.m. Thursday. .
The program will feature
a team of qualified educa-
tors and health profes-
sionals, and a personal
consultation with a regis-
tered dietitian. Call Jenny
Jump at the Columbia
Extension office at (386)
752-5384 or Cathy Rogers
at the Suwannee County
Extension office at (386)
362-2771 by March 25. The
$75 program fee includes
the educational classes,
nutrition consultation, pro-
gram materials and health
assessments.


YEP St. Patty's Day
social
Young Emerging
Professionals of Lake
City/Columbia County
is hosting a 2011
Kickoff social event 5 to 7
p.m. at the Holiday Inn in
Lake City. Cash Bar. The
event is for young profes-
sionals working or living in
Lake City or the surround-
ing areas between the ages
of 21 and 40. Please RSVP
to sonja@lakecitychamber.
comn.


Wheel Throwing pottery
A Beginning Wheel
Throwing pottery .
three-day workshop is
Thursday, March 10, 17
and 24 at Stephen Foster
Folk Culture Center State
Park Craft Square, White
Springs. Students are
asked to wear old clothes,
bring apron, an old hand
towel and small plastic
bowl. The cost of this
workshop is $85. Call the
park Gift Shop at (386)
397-1920 or visit www.ste-
phenfosterCSO.org.


Blood drive
The LifeSouth Blood
Mobile is seeking donors
12 to 7 p.m. Thursday at
Beef O'Brady's and First
Street Music. Free T-shirts
and more.


Friday
Alice in Wonderland Jr.
Masterpiece Performing
Arts under the direction .
of Dede Darby is perform-
ing Alice in Wonderland,
Jr. 7 p.m. Friday and 2
and 7 p.m. Saturday at the


Florida Gateway College.
Local children participating
in the play are third grade
through high school.


Finger Weaving
Workshop
A finger weaving work-
shop is 1:30 4:30 p.m.
Friday at Stephen Foster
Folk Culture Center State
Park Craft Square, White
Springs. The cost will be
$5 per perse-n and supplies
will be provided. Call the
park Gift Shop at (386)
397-1920 or visit www.ste-
phenfosterCSO.org.


Wild Azalea Festival
The Wild Azalea Festival
Friday, with a guided hike
along.the Suwannee River
from 4:00 p.m. to 6:00
p.m. Friday to view the
beautiful and aromatic wild
azaleas growing along the
river banks. Register for
the wild azalea hike by
calling 386-397-7009.


Saturday
Wild Azalea Festival
The Eleventh Annual
White Springs Wild Azalea
Festival is 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Saturday at The Nature
and Heritage Tourism
Center, White Springs.
Festival highlights include:
musical performances,
arts and crafts, the Little
Miss Azalea Contest, the
Suwannee River Duck
Race, rock-climbing wall
and other outdoor rec-
reational opportunities.
Call Bob Giarda at (386)
3974478 or visit www.
floridastateparks. org/ste-
phenfoster.


Personalized care
Personalized care


done your way.


Our unique CancerHome program provides a specialized
guide dedicated to serving the individual needs of
each of our patients.

A vital member of the cancer care team, the Patient Guide
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supportive friend.

At Community Cancer Center, we provide the best
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Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


(rD














Sponsor says revenue cap looser than Colorado's


By BILL KACZOR
Associated Press
TALLAHASSEE A pro-
posed "'Taxpayer Bill of Rights"
for Florida won't have the same
dire consequences as Colorado's
TABOR, the sponsor said during
Senate floor debate Thursday.
The concept of limiting state
revenue and spending is being pro-
moted across the nation by con-
servative and libertarian groups,
but so far it hasn't spread beyond
Colorado, which adopted its cap
in 1992. Colorado voters, though,
suspended their TABOR provision
in 2005 for five years to avoid sharp
cuts in public services.
Critics have pointed to problems


in Colorado to oppose similar pro-
posals in other states, including
Florida.
"It was disastrous for them, for
their education, for their health
care," said Senate Democratic
Leader Nan Rich of Weston.
Sen. Ellyn Bogdanoff, a Fort
Lauderdale Republican, responded
that "this is not the Colorado" plan,
although both include revenue lim-
its based on inflation and popula-
tion growth.
'There's a recognition in the
constitutional amendment that
things happen, that perhaps maybe
the cap is not realistic in all cir-
cumstances," Bogdanoff said. "It's
going to be easier for the state
of Florida, versus the citizens of


Colorado. to make sure that we
can bust the cap."
Her proposal (SJR 958) would
allow the Legislature to raise the
cap for a single year by a three-fifth
vote in each chamber or for mul-
tiple years by two-thirds votes. A
third option would to put the issue
on the ballot by a two-thirds vote in
each house. It then would take at
least 60 percent voter approval for
a cap increase.
The Colorado TABOR also
requires voter approval of tax
increases, which is not in the
Florida proposal.
The Senate is set to vote Tuesday
on the amendment, which needs a
three-fifths majority in each cham-
ber. Thaft's 24 votes in the 40-mem-


ber Senate. No similar legislation
yet has been filed in the House.
If approved by the Legislature, it
would got on the November 2012
ballot, where it would need 60 per-
cent voter approval.
The Senate rejected a motion
by Sen. Gwen Margolis, D-North
Miami Beach. to exclude bonding
from the cap. She argued TABOR
would reduce Florida's bond rating
and increase the cost of borrowing
for such projects as highways and
school buildings.
. "You start showing the world
that we're-going to limit our gen-
eral revenue money and we are
going to have a major problem sell-
ing bonds," Margolis said.
Bogdanoff opposed her motion,


arguing the effect would be mini-
mal. She also said including bond-
ing is a matter of philosophy.
The amendment would replace
an existing constitutional cap that
allows revenue growth based on
personal income. Florida voters
adopted it in 1994, but the state
has never come close the limit as
personal income has grown more
than revenues.
A Senate staff analysis also
shows the state would not exceed
the TABOR cap at least until the
2019-20 budget year.
The FloridaTaxation and Budget
Reform Commission considered
a TABOR proposal in 2008 but
decided against putting it on the
ballot


THINK

OUTSIDE
THE BUN. ":O

386-755-9673


W.W. Feed

& Farm
16139 S.W. St. Rd. 47 -
Ft. White, Fl. 32038 PurnaMills
(386) 497-1376
"We Are More Than Just A Feed Store"









(386) 752-7034


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Insurance zAgenc


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Full Service Agency
Auto, Home, Life,
Annuities,'-Boat,
Motorcycle, Employee
Benefits and Commercial
Insurance


Connie Eadie, Insurance Agent
386-752-9117

In an emergency ,
we're here for you!
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AUTOMOTIVE
& TOWING
3468 SW CR 138 Ft. White
(386) 454-3580

,@ NORTH FLORIDA
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1189 SW Wendy Terrace
Lake City, FL 32025

386-755-5941
"Quality 1st, Price 2ndd"


V.I.P. Give-A-Way


I

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L


Deadline for entries is Thursday, March 17, 2011 at 5:00 p.m.
Register at the Lake City Reporter. 180 E. Duval St., Lake City, FL 32055
W.a e .---------------
Name: ___
---,- Address:____________
-Phone: _

Lake City Reporter Subscriber? J Yes J No


/- - - -/ / ---


Updated
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I


LAKE CITY REPORTER STATE SUNDAY. MARCH 13. 2011


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427













LAKE CITY REPORTER WEATHER SUNDAY. MARCH 13, 2011


THE WEATHER




SUNNY MOSTLY MOSTLY
SUNNY SUNNY



HI 180 L044 HI8004S 1L
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MOSTLY
SUNNY



HI 79LO


MOSTLY
SUNNY


NATIONAL FORECAST: A powerful storm system over the Pacific will send heavy rain into the
Pacific Northwest today, with snow expected in the Cascades and the Sierra Nevada. Much
lighter rain and isolated thunderstorms will be possible in the central Plains, the Ozarks and
the Tennessee Valley due to a weak frontal boundary to the south. Some light snow will also
be possible in parts of the Northeast.

.


HI 82LO0


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76/45
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T a iassee 8 0 44' i
77 43 44
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76,


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76.4I6


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7.47
7-14


City
Cape Canaveral
Daytona Beach
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Jacksonville


Monday
73 519 .,
76 51




( 48 r,,




80 47 ;
9-? 53 5
72 5e. ,:1
73 55 p7.
79 47. pi:

79 50 pc
7S 61 -


Tuesday
76 57
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80 55 :

?5252 Dr
76 50 pc
78'59 i
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TEMPERATURES
High Saturday
Low Saturday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Saturday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


74
33
74
49
89 in 1974
32 in 1969


0.00"
1.75"
9.02"
1.68"
8.58",


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise tom.
Sunset tom.

MOON
Moonrise today
Moonset today
Moonrise torn.
Moonset tom.


7:43 a.m.
7:37 p.m.
7:42 a.m.
7:38 p.m.


1:16 p.m.
2:48 a.m.
2:18 p.m.
3:39 a.m.


I


0000
March March April April
19 26 3 11
Full Last New First


15 ngAsin Wbu
Today's 0
ultra-violet
radiation risk .
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 0+.,




I graphics 20 Weather
.Central, LP, Madison, Wis.
S www.weatherpublisher.com


Sno Biers


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Warm, Fr .-.1

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Front


YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL EXTREMES


Saturday Today
CITY HI/Lo/Pcp. HI/Lo/W
Albany NY 44/35/0 42/24/c
Albuquerque 70/43/0 72/31/pc
Anchorage 19/1/0 23/5/s
Atlanta 72/38/0 72/52/pc
Baltimore 58/36/0 57/33/pc
Billings 45/28/0 56/32/pc
Birmingham 72/36/0 72/52/pc
Bismarck 20/14/0 28/20/pc
Boise 51/28/0 57/41/pc
Boston 51/37/0 51/30/c
Buffalo 41/30/0 35/22/sn
Charleston SC 72/38/0 75/52/s
Charleston WV 67/35/0 54/33/pc
Charlotte 71/28/0 71/48/pc
Cheyenne 49/25/0 52/29/pc
Chicago 44/36/0 38/25/pc
Cincinnati 66/31/0 48/30/pc
Cleveland 49/29/0 35/22/sn
Columbia SC 74/30/0 75/49/s
Dallas 77/55/0 71/54/c
Daytona Beach 66/38/0 72/47/s
Denver 58/24/0 58/33/pc


1






1
I'


High: 900, Laredo, Texas Low: 30, Devils Lake, N.D.


Saturday Today


CITY
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Fairbanks
Greensboro
Hartford
Honolulu
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson MS
Jacksonville
Kansas City
Las Vegas
Uttle Rock
Los Angeles
Memphis
Miami
Minneapolis
Mobile
New Orleans
New York
Oklahoma City


HI/Lo/Pcp.
44/33/0
47/30/0
76/54/0
6/-20/0
68/30/0
49/34/0
81/67/.01
77/56/0
58/41/0
75/41/0
73/32/0
54/37/0
74/56/0
74/42/0
62/50/0
71/48/0
74/53/0
31/16/0
69/40/0
73/47/0
55/37/0
71/46/0


HI/Lo/W
43/28/pc
39/21/pc
82/45/s
11/-20/s
69/39/pc
51/27/c
82/69/s
74/61/c
44/30/pc
71/57/pc
76/46/s
49/35/c
77/56/pc
62/47/t
66 54 pr,
5. 1 r. .r.
78/63/s
31/20/pc
75/53/pc
75/59/pc
53/32/pc
60/47/t


CITY
Omaha
Orlando
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland ME
Portland OR
Raleigh
Rapid City
Reno
Richmond
Sacramento
St. Louis
Salt Lake City
San Antonio
San Diego
San Francisco
Seattle
Spokane
Tampa
Tucson
Washington


Saturday Today


HI/Lo/Pcp.
44/31/0
73/40/0
55/41/0
82/56/0
58/30/0
45/36/0
48/42/.26
69/31/0
37/24/0
58/35/0
65/32/0
61/46/0
64/44/0
49/39/.04
81/56/0
61/57/0
59/45/0
47/42/.25
47/29/0
69/47/0
82/53/0
57/34/0


HI/Lo/W
43/28/c
77/49/s
55/34/pc
85/57/s
40/25/t
46/24/c
53/43/r
71/39/pc
41/27/pc
62/37/sh
69/36/pc
63/49/sh
50/34/pc
59/44/pc
76/63/c
64/53/pc
60/50/r
50/41/r
55/38/sh
76/54/s
83/48/s
59/35/pc


'8'
Saturday Today Saturday Today 1


Saturday
HI/Lo/Pcp.
84/64/0
55/37/0
61/41/0
73/55/0
63/34/0
55/30/0
84/70/0
.66/46/0
52/36/,0
79/46/0
37/25/0
70/63/0
81/73/0


Today
HI/Lo/W
87/69/pc
48/41/sh
61/47/s
73/53/s
66/34/pc
59/39/c
72/54/s
73/59/s
57/37/sh
80/59/pc
33/28/s
71/64/s
83/71/pc


CITY
La Paz
ULima
London
Madrid
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Nairobi
Nassau
New Delhi
Oslo
Panama
'Paris


Saturday
HI/Lo/Pcp.
55/39/0
81/68/0
55/45/0
57/43/.66
77/43/0
37/32/.07
36/19/.10
88/59/0
73/64/0
82/55/0
37/19/0
90/72/0
59/36/0


Today
HI/Lo/W
56/40/sh
80/68/pc
54/39/sh
57/43/sh
78/51/s
36/18/sf
39/26/s
84/63/t
77/66/pc
84/59/s
34/26/sf
90/73/pc
-.4 46 snr


CITY
Rio
Rome
St. Thomas VI
San Juan PR
Santiago
Seoul
Singapore
Sydney
Tel'Avlv
Tokyo
Toronto
Vienna
Warsaw


Saturday
HI/Lo/Pcp.
88/77/0
57/39/0
81/71/0
83/71/0
72/55/0
55/32/0
88/75/0
81/70/0
63/48/0
54/36/0
37/32/.03
59/28/0
54/28/0


KEY TO CONDITIONS: c-cloudy, dr=drizzIe, f-fair, fg=fog, h-hazy, i-ic, pcpartly cloudy, r=rain, s-sunny,
sh-showers, sn-snow, ts=thunderstorms, w-windy.


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73,54


7 43 s
Orlando Cape Canaveral Key West
-7 49 71 53 Lake City
Miami
npa Naples
54 West Palmn Beach Ocala
76'58 Orlando
Ft Lauderdale Panama City
FL Myers 77 63 0 Pensacola
81, 52 Naples Tallahassee
79.55 Miami Tampa
78 63 Valdosta
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LAKE CITY ALMANAC


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


uvwI ake mityrep er oii

Lake Cit Reporte
'^^ff!1^^^^"t


A


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Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
r}.,,, *, 1 :] "* "


Lake City Reporter





SPORTS


Sunday, March 13, 201 I


www.lakecityreporter.co m


Section B


BRIEFS

CMS SPORTS
FCA rally Monday
at auditorium
A Fellowship of
Christian Athletes rally
is planned for 6 p.m.
Monday in the Columbia
High auditorium.
Cornelius Ingram,
former Gator and current
Philadelphia Eagles
player is the special
guest speaker. There will
be door prizes. There is
no charge and all ages
are invited to attend.
For details, call Shayne
Barber at (386) 288-6621
or e-mail
sbarber93@gmail. com.

FORT WHITE BASEBALL
Yard sale set
for Saturday
Fort White High's
baseball programs have
a yard sale fundraiser
planned for 8 a.m. to
1 p.m. Saturday at the
high school parking
lot. Spots are available
to vendors to rent for a
$15 fee. Donations for
items to sell are being
accepted.
Call Sherry Giardina
at (386) 288-6691 or
Jeanne Howell at
(386) 288-5537 to reserve
a spot or arrange for
pick-up of donations.
* From staff reports

GAMES

Monday
Columbia High
tennis vs. Middleburg
High, 2:30 p.m.
Fort White High.
weightlifting vs.
Hawthorne High, 4 p.m.
Fort White High
baseball vs. Hamilton
County High, 7 p.m.
Tuesday
Columbia High
baseball at Melody
Christian Academy,
3:30 p.m. (JV-6 vs.
Gainesville High)
Columbia High boys
tennis vs. Gainesville
High, 3:30 p.m. ,
Columbia High
softball vs. Keystone
Heights High, 6 p.m.
Fort White High
softball vs. Santa Fe
High, 7 p.m. (JV-5)
Wednesday
Columbia High
Weightlifting in sectional
qualifier at Leon High,
1 p.m.
Columbia High
baseball vs. Palm Beach
Gardens High at Buchholz
High, 3:30 p.m.
Fort White High track
at Oak Hall School, TBA
Columbia High
tennis vs. Suwannee
High, 4 p.m.
Thursday
Columbia High
girls tennis vs. Eastside
High at Jonesville Tennis
Center, 3:30 p.m.
Columbia High
softball at Wolfson High,
6 p.m.
Columbia High JV
softball vs. Fort White
High, 6 p.m.
Friday
Columbia High
softball vs. Godby High in
Bell tournament, 3 p.m.
Columbia High
baseball at Union County
High, 7 p.m. (JV-4)
Fort White High
baseball vs. Santa Fe
High, 7 p.m. (JV-4:30)
Saturday
Columbia High
softball vs. Chiefland
High or Bradford High in
Bell tournament, 11 a.m.
Fort White High
track at Hamilton County


Invitational, TBA


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Fort White's Holly Polhill (70) attempts to steal third base
while playing against Newberry High School on March 1.


Lady Indians drop second

game of season on Friday


Tigers baseball
falls, 4-0, at
Buchholz High.
From staff reports

PK. Yonge School's soft-
ball team beat visiting Fort
White High 3-2 on Friday.
The Blue Wave stayed
undefeated at 12-0,
while the Lady Indians
dropped their second
game.
Fort White jumped out
with two runs in the first
inning. P.K Yonge got one


run back in the bottom of
the first and scored the
tying and go-ahead runs in
the second inning.
Taylor Douglass was 2-
for-3 with a double and RBI-
single in the first inning.
Cecile Gomez had an RBI
on a sacrifice fly. Caitlin
Jones had a single in the
seventh inning.
Douglass pitched four
innings and allowed five
hits. Gomez struck out six
batters in two innings.
Fort White (9-2, 4-1)
hosts Santa Fe High at
7 p.m. Tuesday.


Williams reaches


Columbia baseball

Columbia High dropped
a road district game against
Buchholz High, 4-0, on
Friday in Gainesville.
The Tigers struggled at
the plate as J.T Gilliam and
Blaine Courson each went
1-for-3 in the contest for
Columbia's only two hits.
Columbia will try to
regroup for a day game
at 3:30 p.m. on Tuesday
as the Tigers travel to
Melody Christian Academy
in a rematch of Melody
Christian's early-season win.


100


COURTESY PHOTO
Columbia High head coach Jimmy Williams (seventh from left) celebrates his 100th win as Lady Tigers' head coach after defeating Lafayette High, 11-0,
Friday.


Lady Tigers stay undefeated on season


By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com
Six years after being
handed the keys to the
Columbia High softball
program, head coach
Jimmy Williams is firmly
planted in the driver's seat.
Williams is Columbia High
softball and he became even more
engrained in the tradition on
Friday as the coach picked up his


100th win as skipper of the Lady
Tigers.
Williams imagined he would
get the win this season, needing
only 11 heading into the season
and having the core back from
a team that won 18 games in an
undefeated regular season in
district play. He just didn't know
that he would get it so soon.
"I've been thinking about it
for a couple of weeks," Williams
admitted. "As a coach, it kind


of confirms that we're on the
right track and do a lot of things
that put the program in the
right direction. It's also a little
easier when you have such good
players."
Williams also benefits from a
fine coaching staff that he was
sure to give credit to.
"They all do a phenomenal job
(Robbie Crews, Greg Sund and
Michele Bissacia)," Williams said.
"I used to be one of those people


that likes to do everything himself,
but Robbie kind of taught me how
to use them as assets. They're
one of the big reasons I've been
successful."
Some of Williams most
successful seasons have come
since the arrival of this year's class
of juniors. Williams knows that
players are an essential part of the
winning formula.
WILLIAMS continued on 2B


Father involvement

always a plus for

Little League teams


BRANDON FINLEY/Lake C'y Reporter
Todd Green helps sons Brody, 7, (left) and Bryant, 8, with their gear following the Lake City
Police Department's game Saturday.


Wno says
that there
aren't any
good dads
out there?
I met more than a few
that easily qualified as
outstanding father figures
during the opening day
of Lake City's Babe Ruth
Baseball season.
It's always to see the
fathers pass down their
knowledge through the
generations. Nothing
inspires youth like a father
sharing not only his love,
but his love for the game.
As always, there were
more than a few groups
of fathers that have taken
time out of their busy
schedules to share in the
experience for the next
generation of Lake City.
Fathers like Todd Green,


FROM THE SIDELINE


Brandon Finley
Ph:,r,- "-- 754-0420
bfinley@lokecityreporter.com
Keith Jackson and Brian
Scott are great examples.
Speaking with each
of them, I realized that
they're after a common
theme. This is the age in
which players must learn
to respect the game. They
simply won't have time
to do it once they begin
competing at the scholastic
BASEBALL continued on 4B










LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY MARCH 13. 2011


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TV sports
Today
AUTO RACING
6 p.m.
ESPN2 NHRA, Gatornationals. at
Gainesville (same-day tape)
CYCLING
4 p.m.
VERSUS Paris-Nice, final stage, at
Nice, France (same-day tape)
GOLF
I p.m.
TGC PGA Tour/WGC, Cadillac
Championship, final round, at Doral
3 p.m.
NBC PGA Tour/WGC, Cadillac
Championship, final round, at Doral
7:30 p.m.
TGC PGA Tour, Puerto Rico Open,
final round, at Rio Grande, Puerto Rico
(same-day tape)
10:30 p.m.
TGC Champions Tour, Toshiba
Classic, final round, at Newport Beach,
Calif. (same-day tape)
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
4 p.m.
WGN Preseason, Chicago Cubs vs.
LA. Dodgers, at Las Vegas
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
I p.m.
ABC Southeastern Conference,
championship game, at Atlanta
CBS Atlantic 10 Conference,
championship game, at Atlantic City, N.J.
ESPN Atlantic Coast Conference,
championship game, at Greensboro, N.C.
3:30 p.m.
CBS Big Ten Conference,
championship game, at Indianapolis
6 p.m.
CBS Men's Division I tournament
Selection Show, at Indianapolis
NBA BASKETBALL
3:30 p.m.
ABC Orlando at Phoenix
NHL HOCKEY
12:30 p.m.
NBC Chicago at Washington
RODEO
9 p.m.
VERSUS PBR, Glendale Invitational,
at Glendale,Ariz. (same-day tape)
WINTER SPORTS
4:30 p.m.
ESPN2 U.S. Open Snowboard
Championships, at Stratton, Vt. (same-
day tape)
Monday
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
7 p.m.
ESPN2 Preseason, N.Y.Yankees vs.
Boston, at Fort Myers
NBA BASKETBALL
8 p.m.
ESPN San Antonio at Miami
10:30 p.m.
ESPN Orlando at LA. Lakers
NHL HOCKEY
8 p.m.
VERSUS San Jose at Chicago
WOMEN'S COLLEGE
BASKETBALL
7 p.m.


ESPN Division I tournament
Selection Show, at Bristol, Conn.

BASKETBALL

NBA schedule
Saturday's Games
Miami 118, Memphis 85
Portland at Atlanta (n)
L.A. Clippers at Washington (n)
Utah at Chicago (n)
Philadelphia at Milwaukee (n)
Sacramento at New Orleans (n)
LA. Lakers at Dallas (n)
San Antonio at Houston (n)
Detroit at Denver (n)
Today's Games
Oklahoma City at Cleveland, I p.m.
Charlotte at Toronto. I p.m.
Orlando at Phoenix, 3:30 p.m.
Milwaukee at Boston, 6 p.m.
Indiana at New York, 6 p.m.
Minnesota at Golden State, 9 p.m.
Monday's Games
Boston at New Jersey, 7 p.m.
Oklahoma City at Washington, 7 p.m.
LA. Clippers at Memphis. 8 p.m.
Denver at New Orleans, 8 p.m.
San Antonio at Miami, 8 p.m.
Phoenix at Houston, 8:30 p.m.
Philadelphia at Utah, 9 p.m.
Golden State at Sacramento, 10 p.m.
Orlando at LA. Lakers, 10:30 p.m.

SEC tournament
At The Georgia Dome
Atlanta
First Round
Georgia 69,Auburn 51
Miissippi 66, South Carolina 55
Tennessee 74,Arkansas 68
-Vanderbilt 62, LSU 50
Quarterfinals
Alabama 65, Georgia 59, OT
Kentucky 75, Mississippi 66
Florida 85,Tennessee 74
Vanderbilt 87, Mississippi State 81
Semifinals
Saturday
Kentucky 72,Alabama 58
Florida,77;Vanderbilt 66 .
Championship
Sunday .
Kentucky vs. Florida, I p.m.

ACC tournament
At Greensboro Coliseum
Greensboro, N.C.
First Round
Miami 69,Virginia 62, OT
Boston College 81,Wake Forest 67
Maryland 75, N.C. State 67
Virginia Tech 59, Georgia Tech 43
Quarterfinals
North Carolina 61, Miami 59.
Clemson 70, Boston College 47
Duke 87, Maryland 71
VirginiaTech 52, Florida State 51
Semifinals
Saturday
North Carolina 92, Clemson 87, OT
Duke, 77,Virginia Tech 63
Championship
N Today
North Carolina vs. Duke, I p.m.


BASEBALL

Spring training
Today's Games
Washington vs. Florida at Jupiter,
1:05 p.m.
Houston (ss) vs.Atlanta at Kissimmee,
1:05 p.m.
Detroit (ss) vs. Baltimore at Sarasota,
1:05 p.m.
Minnesota (ss) vs. N.Y. Yankees at
'Tampa, 1-05 p.m.
Tampa Bay vs. Toronto at Dunedin,
1:05 p.m.
Boston vs. Pittsburgh at Bradenton,
1:05 p.m.
Houston (ss) vs. Detroit (ss) at
Lakeland, 1:05 p.m.
Philadelphia vs. Minnesota (ss) at Fort
Myers, 1:05 p.m.
St. Louis vs. N.Y. Mets at Port St. Lucie,
1:10 p.m..
San Francisco vs. Texas at Surprise,
Ariz., 4:05 p.m.
Monday's Games
Atlanta vs. St. Louis at Jupiter,
1:05 p.m.
Philadelphia vs. Houston at Kissimmee,
1:05 p.m.
Florida vs. Minnesota at Fort Myers,
1:05 p.m.
Pittsburgh vs. Baltimore at Sarasota,
1:05 p.m.
Detroit vs. Washington at Viera,
1:05 p.m.
LA. Dodgers vs. Texas at Surprise,
Ariz., 4:05 p.m.
N.Y.Yankees vs. Boston at Fort Myers,
7:05 p.m.

AUTO RACING

Race week
NHRA FULL THROTTLE
NHRA Gatornationals
Track: Gainesville Raceway.
SSchedule: Today, final eliminations
(ESPN2, 6-9 p.m.).

HOCKEY

NHL schedule
Saturday's Games
Montreal 3, Pittsburgh 0
Buffalo at Toronto (n)
N.Y. Islanders at New Jersey (n)
Atlanta at Philadelphia (n)
Columbus at Carolina (n)
Tampa Bay at Florida (n)
Detroit at St. Louis (n)
Colorado at Nashville (n)
Vancouver at Calgary (n)
N.Y. Rangers at San Jose (n)
Today's Games
Chicago at Washington, 12:30 p.m.
Edmonton at Pittsburgh, 3 p.m.
Los Angeles at Dallas, 3 p.m.
Ottawa at Buffalo, 5 p.m.
Phoenix at Anaheim, 8 p.m.
Monday's Games
Tampa Bay at Toronto, 7 p.m.
San Jose at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Minnesota at Vancouver, 10 p.m.


Japanese players try to


get news after earthquake


COURTESY PHOTO
Columbia High coach Jimmy Williams celebrates his 100th win with daughter/player Jordan
Williams and wife Sherry Williams.

WILLIAMS: Reaches career win 100
Continued From Page 1B


"They bought into what
we do, the style we want
to play and the parents
bought in too," he said.
One of the most
rewarding things for ,
Williams as a coach
has been to watch the
,development of these
players over the last three
seasons.
"Jessica (Keene) has
bought into the pitches
I tried to teach her,"
Williams said. "When she
came in, she only had a
fastball. Now, she's got
the drop and the curve. In
her last two games she's
thrown a no-hitter and a
one-hitter."
Keene is one of the
.-players that Williams takes
the most pride in after
seeing her development.
"I watched her start
developing as a freshman,
and she's just got better
and better," he said. "Her
whole life she had been
behind another girl, but
now she doesn't play
second fiddle. She's going


to win us a championship
this year."
It's not just the juniors,
however, as Williams
is thankful to have key
players in all age groups.
"This is the greatest
group I've.ever beexi
around," he said. '"They
can be as good as they.,
want to be. I wouldn't trade
them for another team in
the state of Florida."
The team has been off
to a hot start this season
on its way to an 11-0
record with an 11-0 win
against Lafayette High.
Keene pitched a
one-hitter in the effort.
The junior also struck out
five batters while going
3-for-3 from the plate.
Stephanie Pilkington led
the game off with her frst
career home run as a Lady
Tiger. Columbia wouldn't
look back.
"It's been a special
week," Williams said. "We
had Jessica throw her first
no-hitter and then a one-
hitter. We had Stephanie


hit her first home run
and I got my 100th win
on the same night. That's
a moment we'll always
remember."
And Williams is quick to
point out that he's not the
only one giving lessons.
One of the most valuable
things he has learned as a
coach is patience, a lesson
learned from his daughter,
Jordan, who plays first'
base.
"She's helped me learn
that things are not always
as bad as it seems," he
said. "She's taught me
calmness and patience.
Players see that calmness
in me and know that we're
going to play the same as
we always do no matter
what."
With one milestone
down, the coach, who
self proclaims to bleed
purple and gold gave an
indication that he'll be
around for quite a while.
"I'm going to stick
around until I win at least
200," Williams said.


Associated Press

Boston pitcher Daisuke
Matsuzaka tried to get in
touch with his grandmoth-
er. Oakland slugger Hideki
Matsui prayed for the vic-
tims. Mets reliever Ryota
Igarashi stayed up all night
to see the devastation.
*All across spring train-
ing, Japanese ballplay-
ers worried Friday about
those at home. Hundreds of
people were killed or miss-
ing after Japan was struck
by its biggest recorded
earthquake and a massive
tsunami.
"It's a tough situation,"
Red Sox reliever Hideki
Okajima said through a
translator. "You can't con-
trol nature, but when some-
thing like this happens, you
really realize the power of
nature."
Matsuzaka said his par-
ents in Tokyo'were all right,
but "I haven't been able to
get in touch with my grand-
mother," he said.
At the Texas camp,
pitcher Yoshinori Tateyama
stood in front of a TV tuned
to CNN. As he watched
the pictures, he used his
fingers to draw a map of
Japan on a table, trying to
show Rangers teammates
Josh Hamilton and Mitch
Moreland where the dam-
age occurred.
Tateyama said he found
out what happened in an e-
mail from a friend after the
morning workouts.
"At that time I realized
how big it was," he said
through a translator.
More than a dozen play-
ers from Japan played in the
majors last season. Through
his translator, Seattle star
Ichiro Suzuki said he hadn't
been able to reach his fam-
ily with so many cell phone


towers down.
"I am deeply concerned
and affected by what is hap-
pening in Japan," Matsui
said in a statement before
his A's played the Dodgers.
"I pray for the safety of all
the people that have been
affected and continue to be
affected by this disaster."
Commissioner Bud Selig
said his staff had been in
contact with its office in
Tokyo. In Japan, baseball
games in Tokyo, Chiba and
Yokohama were called off,
as were all pro sports in the
country.
"Major League Baseball
will certainly provide aid
with the relief efforts in the
days and weeks, ahead. We
will do everything we can
to help Japan," Selig said in
a statement.
The New York Yankees
donated $100,000 for relief
and rescue efforts in Japan,




Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
LABKN


2011 Tribune Media Services, Inc. '
All Rights Reserved.
ACTFR /-



WESRDH





TT L^


splitting the total between
the Salvation Army and Red
Cross.
The Oakland Athletics
said they would help relief
aid by adding a fundrais-
ing effort to the previ-
ously scheduled Japanese
Heritage Day on April
3, when Ichiro and the
Mariners visit Matsui and
the A's at the Coliseum.
The San Diego Padres are
pledged to raise money dur-
ing their Japanese Heritage
Night on May 20 against
Seattle.
Beyond baseball, other
sports were affected by the
magnitude-8.9 earthquake.
Golfer Ryo Ishikawa
woke up and heard
about the destruction.
He managed to keep his
focus and shot a 7-under
65 at the first round of the
Cadillac Championship in
Doral.

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek


Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


Answer:
(Answers tomorrow)
Saturday's Jumbles: CHAOS TEMPT THEORY SOCIAL
Answer: What began when the body builders started
comparing pecs A CHEST MATCH


ACROSS

1 out (relax)
4 Pick over
8 Defective fire,
work
.11 Buy
12 A crowd?
13 Greek P
14 Doctrines
16 Long time
17 Admires
18 Feathery
20 Caustic
solution
21 Snapshot
22 Yakked
25 Monday or
Tuesday
29 Whaler of fic-
tion
30 Hang back
31 Motelfreebie
32 Caught on
33 What
bartenders
check
34 Square-dance
site


35 Computer net-
works
38 Tractor
preceders
39 007's -
Fleming
40 That woman
41 Bugs Bunny
and Popeye
44 Evening gowns
48 Drivers' org.
49 Turnpike exits
51 A-Team mem-
ber (2 wds.)
52 Recital piece
53 Poetic adverb
54 Winding curve
55 66 and 1-80
56 Rockies, e.g.

DOWN

1 November word
2 Bleaters
3 Tiny fly
4 Doorbell sound
5 Coffee brewers
6 Turkey part
7 Mr. Nielsen


Answer to Previous Puzzle

YOGA PGA CLOD
EWER ORE PE K E
TENT WARBLERS
IDEST N A TAI


AVE KAE LLAD E.
WADDE B ISON


DEESSKUNGTE A
CHA T T ER A
BRA ARM YEARN
LUNCHEON ROY
ASI ES O AL M S
HELD MTV RO S E


8 Remnant
9 Oops! (hyph.)
10 Toddler's warn-
ing
12 I thought-
never leave!


Want more puzzles?
at QuillDriverBooks.com


15 Media star
19 Ugh!
21 Tent holders
22 Ruins a nylon
23 Hello, matey!
24 Long-distance
line
25 Fat cats' bun-
dles
26 Indicator
27 Farm unit
28 Urges
30 Sketch
34 Where
Mandalay is
36 Cookie sheet
37 Egg rolling
time
38 Combine
40 Wrestlers'
grips
41 Blah
42 Dinghy's need
43 Feed for horses
44 Outlet for
smoke
45 Bohr's study
46 Remaining
47 Former JFK
arrivals
50 Baseball's Mel


3-14 2011 by UFS, Inc.


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420








3B


Boynton, Walker lead


Florida's comeback


By PAUL NEWBERRY
Associated Press

ATLANTA Kenny
Boynton scored 24 points,
Erving Walker added 17 and
No. 12 Florida recovered
from another slow start to
beat Vanderbilt 77-66 in the
Southeastern Conference
semifinals Saturday.
The Gators (26-6)
matched their biggest
comeback of the season,
overcoming a 12-point defi-
cit early in the second half.
They will meet Kentucky
in the championship game
Sunday.
Florida beat the
Commodores (23-10) at
their 3-point game. Boynton
hit five shots beyond the
arc, Walker made three and
the Gators finished 11 of 21
overall.
Vanderbilt was just 6 of
33, and SEC leading scorer
John Jenkins had a partic-
ularly tough day. Coming
off a 29-point performance
in the quarterfinals, he
looked as though an ail-
ing left foot was bother-
ing him more than it did
against Mississippi State.
He scored just 10 points on
3-of-15 shooting.
Jeffery Taylor led the
Commodores with 21
points.
Florida trailed at halftime
for the second day in a row
before equaling its come-
back from 12 points down
against Kansas State on
Dec. 18.
The Gators were down
34-29 to Tennessee in the
quarterfinals, then put up a
56-point second half their
highest-scoring period of
the season.
This one, was nearly as
good.
Vanderbilt was up 36-28
at the break and pushed
it to 40-28 in the opening
minutes of the second half.
Apparently, the Gators are
just slow starters. Once
Walker and Boynton got
going, the league's regular-
season champs were hard
to stop.
Walker rallied Florida


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Florida guard Kenny Boynton (1) works under pressure from
Vanderbilt center Festus Ezeli (3) during the first half of the
Southeastern Conference tournament, Saturday in Atlanta.


almost single-handedly
early on, making a couple of
3s, then back-to-back, jump-
ers from a little closer, and
finally a layup, banked in
high off the glass, after a
steal by Scottie Wilbekin.
Just like that, Vandy's big
lead had been whittled to
48-47.
Down the stretch,
Boynton and Walker
teamed up to help put away
the Commodores. Boynton
knocked down a pair of
3-pointers sandwiched
around a nifty reverse lay-
in flying off the baseline.
Then Walker swished a 3
from the corner, stretching
Florida's lead t6 68-61 with
3:47 remaining.
Vandy called timeout.


Boynton and Walker chest-
bumped each other and
hopped toward the bench.
The Commodores resort-
ed to desperately flinging
up 3s at the end. Jenkins
was just 2 of 12 outside
the arc, and the Gators had
someone in his face at*all
times..
Boynton even swatted
one jumper away, which led
Jenkins to plead for a foul.
The official said Boynton
got nothing but ball -
and it looked like he was
right.
Vanderbilt was denied
just its second trip "to the
final of the SEC tourna-
ment. The Commodores
won their only appearance
in 1951.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Kentucky forward Terrence Jones (3) and Alabama forward Chris Hines (44) wait for a ball
. during the second half of the Southeastern Conference tournament, Saturday in Atlanta.

Knight leads Wildcats into

SEC title game against UF


Associated Press

ATLANTA Brandon
Knight finally got roll-
ing at the Southeastern
Conference tournament
and No. 15 Kentucky looked
like a young team peaking
at just the right time with a
72-58 semifinal victory over
Alabama on Saturday.
Knight scored 10'straight
points to blow it open for
the Wildcats (24-8), who
have won seven out of eight.
They will play in the SEC
title game Sunday against
either regular-season cham-
pion Florida or Vanderbilt.
Kentucky raced to a 37-
21 halftime lead, even with
Knight missing all four of
his shots. Alabama (21-11)
scored two quick baskets to
start the second half before
the freshman guard put


an end to any thought of
another big comeback by
the Crimson Tide.
He knocked down his
first two 3-pointers of the
tournament, bolted into the
lane for a layin and came off
a screen to swish another
jumper with a hand in his
face, stretching Kentucky's
lead to'51-30.

No. 1 Ohio State 68,
Michigan 61
INDIANAPOLIS Jared
Sullinger had 14 points and
13 rebounds, and No. 1
Ohio State boosted its bid
for the NCAA tournament's
top overall seed with a 68-61
victory over rival Michigan
in the Big Ten semifinals.
The regular-season
league champs and defend-
ing tournament champs will


play in a record-tying third
straight championship
game Sunday against either
sixth-seeded Penn State or
seventh-seeded Michigan
State.
Ohio State (31-2) has won
six straight games overall and
all three matchups this sea-
son with Michigan (20-13).

No. 6 UNC 92,
Clemson 87, OT
GREENSBORO, N.C. -
Freshman Harrison Barnes
had a season-high 40 points
as No. 6 North Carolina
escaped again at the
Atlantic Coast Conference
tournament, rallying past
Clemson 92-87 in overtime
in Saturday's semifinals.
Barnes. hit the go-ahead
3-pointer with 4:13 left as
part of a 9-0 spurt


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Roger Goodell, NFL commissioner (left) and Jerry Jones, owner of the Dallas Cowboys talk
as they leave after negotiations with the NFL Players Association involving a federal
mediator broke down without an agreement Friday in Washington.


Goodell slices salary


to $1 during lockout


By BARRY WILNER
Associated Press

NEW YORK .NFL
Commissioner Roger
Goodell and league gen-
eral counsel Jeff Pash are
slashing their salaries to $1
each during the lockout
Goodell and Pash prom-
ised in January they would
take salary -cuts if there
was a work stoppage..
Goodell earns about $10.
million, a year, including
bonuses, and Pash nearly
$5 million.
Goodell also has asked
the league's compensation
committee to delay any
bonus payments to him
until there is a deal with
the players' union.
Also taking cuts will be
all league personnel at
the New York headquar-
ters, NFL Films in Mount
Laurel, N.J., and at NFL
Network and NFL.com in
Culver City, Calif. For now,
salaries for those league


employees will be reduced
by 12 percent, an amount
equal to two weeks' pay.
If the work stoppage
continues into August, sal-
ary reductions for manage-
ment-level employees will
range from, 25 percent for
executive vice presidents
to 20 percent for senior
VPS and 15 percent for
VPs. Directors will take a
10 percent cut and. manag-
ers will be reduced by 5
percent
In 2009, Goodell took a
20 percent pay cut and the
league staff was trimmed
by 15 percent.
Several teams have insti-
tuted furloughs and pay
cuts because of the lock-
out, which began Saturday
morning after the players'
union decertified and the
owners locked them out.
The Kansas City Chiefs
have a plan to reduce sala-
ries by less than 10 percent
during a prolonged labor
stoppage while letting all


personnel keep their jobs.
Those making the most
money, including general
manager Scott Pioli and
coach. Todd Haley, are tak-
ing the biggest hit, but no
ehiployees will be laid off
or furloughed. If there is
a full 2011 season, employ-
ees would be reimbursed
for money lost.
" The New York Jets have
said business-side employ-
'ees were asked to take one
week's unpaid furlough
every month during a
work stoppage. They also
will make reimbursements
should the entire 2011 sea-
son be played.
"While we have every
reason to believe that
the season will go on as
planned, it makes sense to
adjust our policies to reflect
that uncertainty-. around
exactly when an agree-
ment will be reached," Jets
executive vice present of
business operations Matt
Higgins said.


NFL season in limbo


after talks break off


By HOWARD FENDRICH
Associated Press

,WASHINGTON All
along, the NFL said it was
certain the union would
dissolve itself and players
would head to court for
antitrust lawsuits.
All along, the union
insisted the league's own-
ers were planning to lock
out the players.
And that's exactly what
happened.
Unable to decide how to
divvy up $9 billion a year,
NFLowners and players put
the country's most popular
sport in limbo by break-
ing off labor negotiations
hours before their contract
expired. At midnight, as
Friday became Saturday,
the owners locked out-the
players creating the
NFL's first work stoppage
since 1987 and putting the
2011 season in jeopardy.
The league said in a
statement Saturday it was
"taking the difficult but
necessary step of exercis-
ing its right under federal
labor low to impose a lock-
out of the union."
On Friday,, the union
decertified, meaning it
declared itself out of the
business of represent-
ing players. In exchange
for giving up their rights
under labor law, the play-
ers became able to take
their chances in court
under antitrust law.
That paved the way for
10 players, including MVP
quarterbacks Tom Brady
and Peyton Manning, to
sue the owners in federal
court in Minneapolis in
a class-action claim. The


players also sought an hard times," NFLPA exec-
injunction to block a lock- utive director DeMaurice
out even before one had Smith said. "The last 14
been imposed. days, the National Football
Despite two extensions League has said, Trust us.'
to the collective bargaining But When it came time for
agreement during 16 days verification, they told us it
of talks overseen by a fed-, was none of our business."
eral mediator following By dissolving and
months of stop-and-start announcing it no longer
negotiating -. the sides represents the players in
could not agree on a new collective bargaining, the
deal. union cleared the way for
The league's statement class-actionlawsuitsagainst
Saturday called the NFL the NFL, which exercised a
Players Association's CBA opt-out clause in 2008.
decertification a "sham" The antitrust suit for-
and said the players' court ever to be known as Brady
action is "built on the et al vs. National Football
indisputably false prem- League et al- attacked
ise that the NFLPA -has the leagues policies on the
stopped being a union and draft, salary cap and free-
will merely delay the pro- agent restrictions such as
cess of reaching an agree- franchise-player tags.
ment." Invoking the Sherman
The statement told Act, a federal antitrust stat-
fans: "We know that you ute from 1890 that limits
want football. You will monopolies and restric-
have football. This will be tions on commerce, the
resolved." players are seeking triple
As was clear all along, the amount of damages
the dispute came down they've incurred. That
to money. In the end, it means the stakes could be
appeared the sides were in the hundreds of millions
about $185 million apart on of dollars.
how much owners should It could take a month for
get up front each sea- there to be a ruling on the
son for certain operating union's injunction request,
expenses before splitting and antitrust judgments
the rest of the revenues should take longer.
with players a far cry Depending on what
from the $1 billion that happens in court a
separated the sides for Minnesota judge has held
months. jurisdiction over NFL labor
But the union refused to matters since the early
budge any further without 1990s next season could
getting detailed financial be threatened. The last
information for each team. time NFL games were lost
"I would dare any one to a work stoppage came
of you to pull out any eco- when the players struck
iomic indicator that would 24 years ago, leading to
suggest that the National games with replacement
Football League is falling on players.


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY. MARCH 13. 2011


Page Editor: Brandon Finley. 754-0420








SPORTS AY MARCH 132011


4 B L A K E C I T Y R E P O R T E R aI -% U I I6 U N U A Y N l~h l, ] 1 Z U I Ir- ,- u ,u -, u, , ,1 U,

Busch makes elimination

rounds at NHRA event
Associated Press champion bounced back Busch will face Erica
from two error-filled quali- Enders in the first round
GAINESVILLE f, iri. runs Friday with two of the 16-car field Sunday.
Former NASCAR cham- solid passes Saturday at The winner will advance
pion Kurt Busch has the NHRA Gatornationals. to the next round, and the
advanced to the elinmina- He covered the quarter- loser will go home.
tion rounds in his profes- mile strip in 6.532 seconds Making the eliminations
sional drag-racing debut and reached 211.46 mph in was exactly what Busch
The 2004 Sprint Cup the Pro Stock division, had hoped for.









BRANDON FINLEY/Lake City Reporter
Father Keith Jackson helps out with batting practice his son Kade Jackson, 7, takes fielding
before the Prosperity Bank Red Sox game Saturday.

BASEBALL
Continued From Page 1B
levels.
"If they can't learn these
things at this age, they For more informalkO
never will," Scott said. "The please call Jan Smigthe
older they get the more it
becomes about winning." 38g6-941 -3217
The players learn at thisE
age that you can still be
successful later down theOa
road, even if they're notaf nb a
winning at the moment
"We want them to learpTe a
that just because they don'tL
win, doesn't mean theyak
won't succeed," JacksonM a n y
said. "We're trying to build M ed .
character."
That character will go a
long way in helping them
develop on the next level.
In so many sports team-0
work, sportmanship ando 0 0
hard work will go just as 0000
far as athletic ability. Ifs ..
these fathers that teach the
youth of Lake City these
fundamental things.
And of course the moms
have a lot to do with it, too.

N Brandon Finley covers BRANDON FINLEY/Lake City Reporter
sports for the Lake City Members of the KC's Produce youth baseball team look on
Reporter. during a game Saturday.



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Pa e Editor: Brand 0









Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

Contact
Tom Mayer
Editor
754-0428


BUSINESS


Sunday, March 13, 201 I


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section C


Tourism News


Harvey Campbell
(386) 758-1397


Tourism

Award

Luncheon

upcoming

T he Columbia
County Tourist
Development
Council (TDC)
is proud to
announce its annual
Tourism Week Awards
Luncheon will be held on
Wednesday, May 18 begin-
ning at noon. Tourism
Week will be celebrated in
the Suwannee River Valley
during the week of May
15-22. Award winners will
be named in each of six
categories with all hospital-
ity industry employees in
Columbia, Hamilton and
Suwannee County eligible
for nomination.
A hospitality industry
panel will review the nomi-
nations and select the win-
ner in each category. The
categories include the fol-
lowing: Outstanding Hotel
Employee; Outstanding
Campground Employee;
Outstanding Management

CAMPBELL continued on 2C


Former resident

invents smokeless

tobacco alternate


By TONY BRITT
tbritO@lakecityreporter. corn
Lee Lewis began using
smokeless tobacco when
he was a kid hanging
around baseball players as
a Florida State University
baseball team bat boy.
"At the tender age of 12,
I took my first dip of Skoal,"
he said. "12 years-old and I
got hooked. I wanted to be
like the college guys."
However, Lewis' addic-
tion to the smokeless
tobacco didn't end when he
finished his college base-
ball career, and the addic-
tion followed him into his
life as an adult and parent.
"I was a 25-year
Copenhagen addict," Lewis
said, noting he knew he
needed to make a change
in his lifestyle.
That change was the
founding and inventing of
NiP Energy Dip, a natural
alternative to smokeless
tobacco.
Lewis, 41, worked as a
bank administrator in Lake
City before inventing the
smokeless tobacco alterna-
tive.
Lewis said the Lord gave
him the vision for the NiP
the Grip Energy Dip.
"Jesus Christ, my Lord
and savior, delivered me,"
he said.
Lee said he was moti-
vated in Augiust '2006 to
give up tobacco products
and had a dream which
inspired him to trust in his


faith.
His epiphany included
writing a memo to God,
where he explained how he
had a dream about appear-
ing on the "Oprah" show,
"'explaining to Oprah and
her worldwide audience
that God gave me a vision
to help people and deliver
them from the bondage of
smokeless tobacco."
"From the deer stands
to the ballfields, to the
executive board rooms
of America, dip does not
discriminate," Lewis said,
describing part of his
dream. "This is no Lee
Lewis story, this is a God
story it's a God-sized
story."

The product
The NiP the Grip is
available in North Central
Florida.
The product was intro-
duced at all 47 S&S Stores
last month, and Lewis said
the stores have placed a'
re-order.
The NiP the Grip Energy
Dip will also be in at least
three major league baseball
team clubhouses for play-
ers, coaches and managers
looking for an alternative to
tobacco products.'
"We just put it in 11 test
markets in Texas, and it
sold out in a week no
marketing and no advertis-
ing," Lewis said.
In addition, a line of
sporting goods stores in


Arizona plans to add the
product to its shelves.' He
said distributors in North
Carolina, South Carolina
and Virginia are also call-
ing for it.
The NiP the Grip Energy
Dip is currently marketed
in a "mint ice" flavor. Other
flavors are being tested
through product research
and development.
The product is spit-free,
tobacco-free and contains
no nicotine, carbohydrates
or sugars.
The product contains
shredded sea sponge,
which resembles long cut
smokeless tobacco prod-
ucts.
Dusty Rhodes, former
University of North.Florida
baseball coach, purchased
the machine that cuts the
sea sponge for the prod-
uct.


After the machine cuts
the sea sponge, it's infused
with caffeine, Vitamin B-12,
an amino acid called beta
alanine and the "mint ice"
flavoring.
Lewis said NiP The Grip
is a viable tobacco substi-
tute that is all natural.
"I don't have to go


Left: Nip the Dip
Energy Dip, a
product Lee Lewis
invented.

COURTESY PHOTO
Below: Lee Lewis,
inventor and found-
er of the NiP The
Grip tobacco- and
niccotine-free ener-
gy dip, stands with
his wife, Meredith
and daughters
Sarah Katherine
and Caroline.


through the FDA because
there is no nicotine and no,
tobacco," he said. "Every
ingredient is FDA approved
and ready. I'm not invent-
ing a new wheel."
Lewis is using Liberty
Distribution,' of Chandler,
DIP continued on 2C


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LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS SUNDAY, MARCH 13, 2011


The Scoop
on Arbitrage
Q What's arbitrage? E.M,
Dalton, Ga.
A t's the practice of profiting
from short-term differences in
price. Imagine that in the United
States, you can buy stock in Mete-
orite Insurance (ticker: HEDSUP)
for $30 per share. Meanwhile, you
see that it's currently selling for
$30.50 per share in England. If you
simultaneously buy shares in Amer-
ica and sell the same number of
shares in England, you've earned a
profit of 50 cents per share (not
counting commission costs).
This may not seem like much,
but those who engage in arbitrage
are usually large institutional
investors with millions to invest in
big positions.

Q Can you explain what "FFO"
Q refers to in relation to REITs?
M.R., Adrian, Mich.
A AREIT (Real Estate Invest-
ment Trust) may look and act
like an ordinary stock, but it's really
a rather different kind of company.
REITs typically own many proper-
ties, such as offices, hotels, shopping
centers or apartments.
With most companies, net income
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According to accounting rules,
the value of REIT properties is
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tion charged against net income,
reducing it. In reality, however, real
estate properties are probably not
falling in value and may even be
appreciating. So a REIT's net
income tends to understate its health.
This is why, with REITs, you should
look at the "funds from operation,"
or FFO, instead. It ignores the effect
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Az., as a national distributor.

Product concept
Months before the vision, as he
was going though a divorce, Lewis
met with a former college friend to
play a round of golf. One of men in
the golf foursome was the largest
sea sponge distributor in the world,
and he was from Tarpon Springs.
Shortly after, while walking down
the aisles of a pharmacy, Lewis hap-
pened to see some "sea sponge on a
rope" in the cosmetics section.
"I plucked off a pinch of it because
I'm trying to develop a natural prod-
uct," he said. "There's a lot of alter-
native dips out there made of grass,
herbs and other products, (and) it
looks like dip, but it tastes like saw-
dust I plucked off a pinch and put
it in my cheek and gum and said,
'hallelujah'. That was my epiphany. I
raised my hand with my finger point-


TI AsktheT


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0 2011 THE MOnEEY FOOIDIST. BY UNIVERSAL UCUCK (FOR RELEASE 3/10/2011)


CAMPBELL: Heroes deserve attention

Continued From Page 1C


Employee; the "Always
There Award;" Best Strategic
Partner Award; and Director's
Award for Excellence in
Tburism. The deadline for
nominations is Wednesday,
April 27th, at 5:00 p.m.
Nomination forms can
be downloaded from our
web site at www.springsrus.
com, or by calling Brenda
Clemente in our office at 386-
758-1312. We encourage you
to participate in this great
opportunity to recognize out-
standing achievement by our
hospitality industry family in
the Suwannee River Valley.

Who is the membership of
the Columbia County TDC?.
Many of you have read
newspaper articles or heard
radio discussions about the
Columbia County Tourist
Development Council and
tourism promotional activities
produced by the organization.
In addition to a three-person
staff and industry partners
. in Columbia, Hamilton and
Suwannee Counties, who are
the members of the Columbia
County TDC and how are
they appointed to the board?
The composition of the
nine-member Columbia
County TDC is established
by state law and requires a
minimum of three, and a
maximum of four, representa-
tives of the lodging indus-
try (collectors of the Local
Option Tourist Development
Tax), who are residents of
the county.
Those representatives
include Nick Patel (co-owner
of Lake City Hotels which
owns five local properties);
Mahendra Patel, owner of
the Lake City Holiday Inn
& Suites; Allison Gravely,
General Manager of the
Hampton Inn Hotel & Suites;
and Cecil Shaw, owner of E-Z
Stop Campground.
Three members of the
TDC board must be elected
officials and one of those
must serve on the council for
Columbia County's largest


municipality (Lake City).
Those members are County
Commissioners Jody DuPree
and Ron Williams, along with
City Council member Jake
Hill.
Finally, a minimum of two,
and no more than three, TDC
members represent the cate-
gory of "having an interest in
the tourism industry." Those
members are Mike Collins,
owner of C & G Mobile
Homes; and Brian Bickel, co-
owner of Texas Roadhouse
Restaurant. All of the mem-
bers of the Columbia County
TDC Board are appointed
by the Board of County
Commissioners for staggered
three-year terms, with the
exception of the elected offi-
cials who serve based upon
annual appointment by their
individual boards.

Unsung heroes deserve
some recognition
Just about everyone who
runs a governmental agency
for an extended period of time
eventually becomes the face
of that organization. Like oth-
ers in that role, we like to con-
sider our respective depart-
ment or agency to be a model
for productivity, creativity and
innovative thinking.
The truth is that seldom, if
ever, is the department head
the sole source, or even the
primary source, for the suc-
cess of that agency. Typically,
it's a core group of talented,
loyal and caring co-workers
and partners. I can certainly
vouch for that being the case
with the Columbia County
TDC staff and the Suwannee
River Valley Marketing
Group.
We are in the middle of
perhaps the busiest quar-
ter of tourism marketing
efforts for 2011. Marketing
director Paulette Lord and
information specialist Brenda
Clemente deserve a tremen-
dous amount of credit for
successfully juggling all of
the activities and events in a
manner which both reflects


favorable on our industry and
is improving our tourism mar-
keting effectiveness.
Ms. Lord has been with
our department for more than
15 years. Her. graphic skills,
organizational abilities and
pride in carrying out her job
duties, and so much more,
make her both extremely
essential to the success of our
agency and has allowed us to
stretch our marketing dollars
several fold.
Ms. Clemente has been
with the TDC for just over a
year and has added an enthu-
siasm and willingness to learn
that is allowing us to expand
our programs and outreach.
Finally, we are blessed to
have several great partners
in the Suwannee River Valley
. In Columbia County, I can't
say enough good things
about Nick and PJ. Patel and
their five hotels; Rod Butler
has been a great ally at the
Holiday Inn; Michael Tubbs
and the Fairfield Inn staff
has been a strong resource;
Suzanne Moses has been a
great addition at the Super 8
Motel. Thanks to all of them
for their support for many of
our marketing efforts.
Words alone won't do
justice to the great relation-
ship we have developed
with Teena Peavy and James
Cornett at Spirit of the
Suwannee Music Park and
Greg Scott with the Suwannee
County TDC. Ms. Peavy has
played a key role in expand-
ing our marketing efforts and
helping the park's many music
festivals become a larger eco-
nomic benefit to all elements of
the tri-county area.
In closing, I would also
like to acknowledge the sup-
port and friendship of Ben
Faure, Bob Giarda and Elaine
McGrath at Stephen Foster
Folk Culture Center State
Park for support of our mar-
keting programs, particularly
as they relate to press trips.
All of these "Unsung Heroes"
deserve the bulk of the credit
for the success for our tourism
marketing efforts.


Obama prepared


to tap petroleum


reserve if needed


ERICA WERNER
Associated Press

WASHINGTON President
Barack Obama said Friday he's pre-
pared to tap the country's emer-
gency oil reserve should the situ-
ation demand it. But as gas prices
climbed toward $4 a gallon, the
president said the U.S. must adopt
a long-term strategy of conservation
and domestic production to wean
itself off foreign oil.
"We've been having this conver-
sation for nearly four decades now.
Every few years gas prices go up,
politicians pull out the same political
playbook, and then nothing changes,"
Obama said at a White House news
conference. "And when prices go back
down, we slip back into a trance."
"I don't want to leave this to the
next president," he said. "And none
of us should want to leave it for our
kids."


Some in Congress have been call-
ing on Obama to tap the Strategic
Petroleum Reserve. And the presi-
dent made clear Friday that that was
an option, although he indicated he
wasn't yet prepared to exercise it
He declined to specify the condi-
tions that would trigger the step, but
said it was teed up and could happen
quickly if he chooses to call for it
The government is cautious about
going to the petroleum reserVe, typ-
ically holding off except in very
extreme cases such as hurricanes.
The reserves 727 million bar-
rels stored in salt caverns along
the Texas and Louisiana coasts
- were created in response to the
Arab oil embargo in the 1970s and
last tapped in 2008 after hurricanes
Gustav and Ike hit
Oil prices have surged 24 percent
since the middle of February. as
unrest in the Middle East rattled
world markets.


ed to the heavens, and said 'Thank
you God for delivering."
The NiP the Grip label comes
from a saying that Lewis' grand-
mother repeatedly told him. As a
smokeless tobacco user, he needed
to nip that bad habit in the bud, she
always chided him.
"She would see me with a dip
in my mouth and say, 'nip it in the
bud,'" he said. "I honored her legacy
because I named the product in her
honor."
He said the project is called NiP
the Grip because it is for users to be
able to nip the grip of addiction from
tobacco products.
"Research shows that nicotine
is the most addictive drug on the
planet," he said. "NiP the grip of
addiction."
For additional information about
the product, visit www.nipthegrip.
com.


DIP: Smokeless tobacco

Continued From Page 1C


What Is This Thing Called
The Motley Fool?
Remember Shakespeare?
Remember "'s You Like It"?
In Elizabethan days. Fools were the only
people who could get away with telling the
truth to the King or Queen.
The Motley Fool tells the truth about invest-
ing, and hopes you'll laugh all
the way to the bank.
...... ......... ............


Comcast Losing Ground
Investors adored Comcast's (Nas-
daq: CMCSA) recent quarterly
report: Revenue grew by 7 percent.
Operating profits climbed even
higher. Share buybacks will be
beefed up. The dividend is rising
considerably. But look closer.
The country's largest cable provider
closed out the year with 22.8 million
video subscribers. That may be a big
number, but it's 135,000 fewer than
last quarter, and marks 757,000 net
defections through 2010.
Comcast is making up for the
shortcoming by selling more Inter-
net access and broadband telephone
services and upgrading accounts to
pricier digital cable offerings. But
it's still losing couch potatoes.
Netflix may have only 20 million
subscribers now, but if it tacks on
another 3.1 million this quarter, as
it did last quarter, it will become the
country's leading premium enter-
tainment service.
Satellite television juggernaut
DIRECTV may also surpass Com-
cast soon, gaining ground that
Comcast is yielding. It has more
than 19 million subscribers, having
added 493,000 over the past year.
There's also satellite radio player
Sirius XM, which closed out 2010
with 20.2 million subscribers and is
targeting an audience of 2f.6 million
accounts by the end of this year.
Are you still excited by Comcast's
report? Today's premium entertain-
ment golden child could soon settle
for silver. By the end of the year, it
may not even be fit to be bronzed.
(Netflix is a "Motley Fool Stock
Advisor" selection.)


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427

















THE WEEK IN REVIEW *THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW *THE WEEK IN REVIEW


The Week in Review


Y NYSE
8,248.53 -164.52


Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
AtlasEngy 21.12 +4.47 +26.8'
iDSOXBrr 64.04+11.88 +22.8
KVPhBIf 12.04 +2.07 +20.8
99 Cents 19.58 +332 +20.4
KV PhmA 11.99 +1.99 +19.9
ChinaSejcr 496 +.76 +18.1
BarcShtD 18.14 +2.53 +16.2
SpintNex 5.00 +.66 +15.2
'TRCCos 4.88 +.63 +14.8
WDig"tal 34.40 +4.39 +14.6

Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
NeoPhoton 10.56 -5.02 -32.2
Godcpwl 3.00 -1.38 -31.4
Fabdnetn 20.09 -8.91 -30.7
Medifast 16.63.-5.69 -25.5
DrxSOXBII 53.91 -13.73 -20.3
Cameltlnf n 15.42 -3.83 -19.9
EvergE rs 3.12 -.67 -17.7
Inphi n 21.37 -4.23 -16.5
ECDangn 23.02 -4.38 -16.0
AmrRity 3.30 -.60 -15.4

Most Active ($1si or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
Cii rp 19094634 4.57 +.03
S&P500ETF8982392130.84-1.63
BkofAm 7828314 14.38 +.26
SprintNex 4747190 5.00 +.668
FordM 4508375 14.36 -.06
SPDR Fncl3914637 16.54 +.02
iShR2K 3480651 80.18-2.26
iShEMkts 3118213 46.03 -.87
GenElec 3012897 20.36 -.01
AlcatelLuc2000657 5.33 -.33

Diary
Advanced 1,156
Declined 1,990
New Highs 340
New Lows 55
Total issues 3,194
Unchanged 48
Volume 20,832,744,039


Y Amex
2,306.64 -113.10


Gainers (s2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
Innovaro .2.08 +28 +15.6
SagaCcrn33.00 +4.00 +13.8
BovMed 3.06 +.36 +13.3
AmShrd 3.57 +.28 +8.5
DGSE 4.54 +.30 +7.1
1HMG 5.43 +.35 +6.9
IPr-nAh 3.49 +,19 +5.8
ATSCorp 4.39 +.24 +5.7
ASgpecRlts 19.11 +1.03 +5.7
iChiMetlur 4.41 +.21 +5.0

\ LoserS ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
Accelr8 2.75 -1.60 -36.8
NewConcEn 3.55 -1.30 -26.8
CheniereEn 7.25 -2.62 -26.5
lEngySvcs 3.28 -1.02 -23.7
EngySvc un 4.22 -1.28 -23.3
LucasEngy 3.26 -.98 -23.1
PyramidOil 6.49 -1.91 -22.7
ChinaShen 4.12 -1.11 -21.2
MexcoEn 12.20 -3.24 -21.0
UraniumEn 4.85 -1.16 -19.3

Most Active ($1 or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
CheniereEn488628 7.25-2.62
SamsO&G 466772 3.49 -.59
LucasEngy 466033 3.26 -.98
OpkoHlth 372506 3.75 -.22
GtPanSilvg323518 4.43 -.12
KodiakOg 322690 6.28 -.70
EndvSilvg 255022 9.21 -.13
NovaGldg 243173 12.74-1.43
NwGold g 235944 10.07 -.65
GoldStr g 224058 2.85 -.09

Diary
Advanced 157
Declined 375
New Highs 42
New Lows 15
Tolal issues 547
Unchanged 15
Volume 1,072,846,357


SNasdaq
2,715.61 -69.06


Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
Majesco 2.66 +1.02 +62.2
StarSident 2.95 +1.13 +62.1
Atrinsic rs 4.74 +1.76 +58.8
GreenMtC s58.86 +17.11 +41.0
BioLase 4.95 +1 35 +37.3
PrimoWt n 14.04 +3 41 +32.1
RC2 28.31 +6.64 +30.6
Pharmasset63.97+14.20 +28.5
Advocat 6.80 +1.43 +26.6
TomoThera 4.60 +.93 +25.3

Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
Finisar 23.21 -20.01 -46.3
Sigmabt 5.30 -3.19 -37.6
FXEner 7.46 -3.79 -33.7
Opnext 2.63 -1.13 -30.1
Odaro rs 12.64 -5.36 -29.8
EngyConv 2.48 -1.04 -29.5
FuweiFlm 3.82 -1.58 -29.3
BluDolprs 5.99 -2.43 -28.9
RoyaleEn 5.28 -2.11 -28.6
Repign 3.65 -1.26 -25.7

Most Active ($1 or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
PwShs QQQ000412401856.49-1.48
Cisco 3078063 17.95 -.45
SiriusXM 2845673 1.79 -.02
Intel 2844139 20.87 -.69
Microsoft 2695589 25.68 -.27
MicronT 2572845 10.24-1.40
Nvidia 1862004 18.05-2.71
JDS Uniph1310559 21.26-6.11
ApldMatl 1235960 15.00-1.73
Orade 1117806 31.91 -.86

Diary
Advanced 756
Declined 2,028
New Highs 230
New Lows 119
Total issues 2,846
Unchanged 62
Volume 10,248,415,3851


STOCKS OF LOCAL INTEREST


Wdy Wsdy YTD
Name Es OD Last Chg tChg %Chg


AT&T inc N "72
AMD NY
Ocateli-Lc NY
A5ickat I asc' 32
AutoZore NY
BkofArn NY .4
ar iPx rs NY
BobEvars Nasc .8C
CNBFnPA Nase 66
ZSX NY :.
Cemex NY .43
Chevron NY 2.88
Cisco Nas ..
Cibgrp NY
CocaCola NY 1.88
Delhaize NY 2.02
Deltair NY
DrxFBull s NY
FamilyDir NY .72
FordM NY
FMCGs NY 1.00
GenElec NY .56
HomeDp NY 1.00
iShJapn NY .14
iShSilver NY
iShEMkis NY ..64
iShR2K NY .89
Intel Nasd .72


28.46 54 -' 9 -3
865 -58 -62 -5.7
.33 -3-5. +K.'

2655.93 +C.2 -2-4
14.38 +-26 +-8 +7.8
330: -135 -.3 -'2.2
30.97 31 1.0 -60
1427 ,16 i 1 -3.6
74.89 -.07 -0.1 + 59
8.78 -.11 -1 2 -18.0
99.93 -3.82 -37 +9.5
17.95 -.45 -2.4 -11.3
4.57 +.03 +0.7 -3.4
64.81 +.07 +0.1 -1 5
82.81 +4.09 +5.2 +12.3
11.23 +1.32 +13.3 -10.9
30.47 -.25 -0.8 +9.4
51.27 +.90 +1.8 +3.1
14.36 -.06 -0.4 -14.5
49.48 -2.23 -4.3 -17.6
20.36 -.01 ... +11.3
37.14 +.17 +0.5 +5.9
10.81 -.63 -5.5 -.9
35.03 +.34 +1.0 +16.1
46.03 -.87 -1.8 -3.4
80.18 -2.26 -2.7 +2.5
20.87 -.69 -3.2 -.8


Name Ex Div
SS U.pn Nasa
I P9lorgCn Y 20
L LvSaros NY
Lowes NY .44
McOrncs NY 2.44
MconT Nasd ...
Microsoft Nasdl .64
NY Trmes NY
NextEraEn NY 2.20
NobftyH Nasd ...
Nvidia Nasd ...
OcciPet NY 1.84
Penney NY .80
PepsiCo NY 1.92
Pfizer NY .80
Potash wi NY .28
PwShsQOQNasd .36
PrUShS&PNY
Ryder NY 1.08
S&P500ETFNY 2.37
SearsHldgs Nasd ...
SiriusXM Nasd ...
SouthnCo NY 1.82
SprintNex NY
SPDR FndNY .16
TimeWam NY .94
WalMart NY 1.46
WellsFargo NY .20


Last


WldyWkty YTD
Chg %Chgi Cn
-6 .- -22.3 +46.8
.+22 +0.5 +7.8
-3.59 -8.2 -12.8
+.70 +2.7 +7.4
+.70 +0.9
-1.40 -12.0 +27.7
-27 -1.1 -8.0
-88 -8.6 -4.5
+.94 +1.7 +7.1
-.49 -5.8 -1.2
-271 -13.0 +17.2
-3.94 -3.8 +.7
+3.56 +10.4 +16.6
+1.25 +2.0 -1.0
-.19 -1.0 +11.2
-6.93 -11.3 +4.9
-1.48 -2.5 +3.7
+.50 +2.4 -8.5
-.21 -0.4 -9.1
-1.63 -1.2 +4.0
-.57 -0.7 +142
-.02 -1.1 +9.8
+.31 +0.8 +.1
+.66 +15.2 +182
+.02 +0.1 +3.7
-.92 -2.5 +12.9
+.89 +1.7 -2.5
+.47 +1.5 +4.5


Stock Footnotes: g = Dividends and earnings in Canadian dollars. h = Does not meet continued-listing standards.
If = Late fiing with SEC. n = New in past 52 weeks. pt = Preferred. rs = Stock has undergone a reverse stock split
of at least 50 percent within the past year. rt = Right to buy security at a specified price. s = Stock has split by at
least 20 percent within the last year. un = Units. vi = In bankruptcy or receivership. wd = When distributed. wi
When issued. wt = Warrants.
Mutual Fund Footnotes: b = Fee covering market costs is paid tora fund assets, d = Deferred sales charge, or
redemption fee. f = front load (sales charges). m = Multiple fees are charged. NA= not available. p = previous day's
net asset value. s= fund spit shares during the week. x = fund paid a distribution during the week.Gsainers and
Losers must be worth at least $2 to be listed in tables at left. Most Actives must be worth at least $1. Volume in
hundreds of shares. Source: The Associated Press. Sales figures are unofficial.


Money Rates
Last Pvs Week
Prime Rate 3.25 3.25
Discount Rate 0.75 0.75
Federal Funds Rate .00-25 .00-25
Treasuries
3-month 0.08 0.12
6-month 0.13 0.15
5-year 2.04 2.17
10-year 3.39 3.48
30-year 4.54 4.60


Currencies
Last Pvs Day
Australia .9857 .9997
Britain 1.6071 1.6054
Canada .9729 .9748
Euro .7200 .7250
Japan 81.88 83.02
|Mexico 11.9118 11.9739
Switzerlnd .9298 .9322
British pound expressed in U.S. dollars. All oth-
ers show dollar in foreign currency.


Dow Jones Industrials -79.85 124.35 -1.29 -228.48 59.79
Close: 12,044.40 -) ED 0
1-week change: -125.48 (-1.0%) MON TUES WED THUR FRI



12,000

11,500 ... ..... ..


11,000


10,500 D


MUTUAL FUNDS .- .

Total Assets Total Return/Rnmk Pet En 1i1t
Name Obj ($Mlns) NAV 4-wk 12-mo 5-year Load Ivt1
PIMCOTotRefls Cl 136,837 10.91 +1.6 +7.4/B +8.4/A NL 1,000,000
American Funds GrthAmA m LG 68,135 31.31 -1.6 +12.3/D +2.8/C 5.75 250
Fidelity Contra LG 63,315 69.40 -2.4 +16.5/B +5.0/A NL 2,500
Vanguard TotStidx LB 59,764 32.83 -1.8 +16.7/A +3.1/B NL 3,000
American Funds CaplncBuA m IH 59,201 50.57 +0.5 +9.8/D +3.9/C 5.75 250
Vanguard InstIdxl LB 58,180 119.76 -1.7 +15.6/B +2.5/B NL 5,000,000
American Funds CpWIdGrtA m WS 56,032 36.23 -0.8 +10.1/E +4.3/B 5.75 250
Vanguard 500Adml LB 54,664 120.61 -1.7 +15.6/B +2.5/B NL 10,000
American Funds IncAmerA m MA 54,193 17.11 +0.2 +13.7/A +4.3/B 5.75 250
Vanguard TotStlAdm LB 50,992 32.84 -1.9 +16.8/A +3.2/B NL 10,000
American Funds InvCoAmA m LB 50,354 28.80 -1.6 +11.8/D +2.4/8 5.75 250
Dodge & Cox IntStk FV 45,918 36.07 -1.5 +13.2/A +4.1/A NL 2,500
Dodge & Cox Stock LV 45,667 112.86 -2.5 +13.7/C +02/M NL 2,500
American Funds WAMutinvA m LV 40,241 28.28 -0.6 +15.2/B +2.1/B 5.75 250
Vanguard Totintl d FB 39,597 15.88 -1.1 +11.7/C +3.5/B NL 3,000
American Funds EurPacGrA m FB 39,490 41.69 -0.6 +11.2/C +4.9/A 5.75 250
Vanguard InstPlus LB 37,376 119.77 -1.7 +15.7/B +2.6/B NL 200,000,000
FrankTemp-Franklin Income A m CA 36,259 2.24 +0.1 +15.2/A +6.1/A 4.25 1,000
American Funds FnlnvA m LB 35,007 37.98 -1.2 +15.2/B +4.3/A 5.75 250
American Funds NewPerspA m WS 34,131 29.12 -1.4 +13.4/C +5.8/A 5.75 250
Vanguard 5001nv LB 33,274 120.58 -1.7 +15.5/13 +2.4/B NL 3,000
PIMCOTotRetAdm b Cl 33,054 10.91 +1.5 +7.1/B +8.1/A NL 1,000,000
American Funds BalA m MA 32,523 18.38 -0.9 +13.0/A +4.1/B 5.75 250
Fidelity GrowCo LG 29,316 86.64 -3.0 +19.6/A +5.8/A NL 2,500
Vanguard WeltnAdm MA 28,884 55.37 -0.6 +12.0/C +5.9/A NL 50,000
Fidelity LowPriStk d MB 28,175 39.71 -0.8 +16.9/D +5.1/B NL 2,500
Harbor lntllnstl d FB 28,149 61.52 -0.9 +14.2/A +6.3/A NL 50,000
CA -CosevavemAlocaloo C -Intenmeiate-Tern Bond, ES -Europe Stodi.FB -ralLar g Bled, G -Foregn Lu r, FV
Large Value, IH -Wod Allocation, LB Large BBlend, LG me Growt. LV 4 = e Value. MA -Mdxeral lmocati, MB-Wd.al.tMV-
oCap Value, SH -Speoalhealt, WS *nod Slockl Tl Return: Chinn mV with dividends rinsed, Rank: How und p
Others win same ojecdive: A is in top 20%, E in bolnttomn 20%. Min Init Invi Munn $ needled to Is ivest fund. S ,. Engi


New York Stock Exchange


Name Div YId PE


AES Corp ...
AFLAC 1.20 2.2
AK Steel .20 1.3
AMR
AT&T Inc 1.72 6.0
AbtLab 1.92 4.0
AberFitc' .70 1.3
AMD
Aeropostl ...
Aetna .60 1.6
Agilent
AlcatelLuc .
Alcoa .12 .7
Allstate .84 2.6
AlphaNRs ...
Altria 1.52 6.1
AEagleOut .44 2.8
AEP 1.84 5.1
AmExp .72 1.6
AmlnlGr ...
AmTower ...
Anadarko .36 .5
AnalogDev .88 2.3
AnnTaylr
Annaly 2.65 15.0
ArcelorMit .75 2.2
ArchCoal .40 1.2
ArchDan .64 1.8
ATMOS 1.36 4.0
Avon .92 3.4
BB&TCp .60 2.2
BHP BilILt 1.82 2.0
BakrHu .60 .9
BcoBrades .82 4.4
BcoSantand .79 7.0
BcoSBrasil .70 6.0
BkofAm .04 .3
Bklrelnd 1.04 ...
BkNYMel .36 1.2
Bar iPVix rs... ...
BarrickG .48 .9
Baxter 1.24 2.4
BerkH B ...
BestBuy .60 1.9
Blackstone .40 2.3
BlockHR .60 3.8
Boeing 1.68 2.3
BostonSci ...
BrMySq 1.32 5.0
BrkfldPrp .56 3.2
CB REIlis ... ...
CBS B .20 .8
CF Inds .40 .3
CSX 1.04 1.4
CVS Care .50 1.5
CdnNRs gs .36 ...
CapOne .20 .4
CapitlSrce .04 .5
Carnival 1.00 2.5
Caterpillar 1:76 1.8
Cemex .43 ...
CenterPnt .79 4.9
CntryUnk 2.90 7.2
ChesEng .30 .9
Chevron 2.88 2.9
Chicos .20 1.5
Chimera .69 16.3
ChinaSecur...
Citigrp
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Coeur
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Coming .20 .9
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CrwnCstle ...
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Wkly YTD Wkly
Cha %Chg Last


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Name Div YId PE Cha %Cha Last


ARYxTh ...
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Amarin
Amazon
ACapAgy 5.60
AmCapLtd ..
Amgen
Apple Inc ...
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Atmel
Autodesk ...
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AvagoTch .32
AvanirPhm ..
Baidu s
BedBath ...
BrigExp
Broadcom .36
BrcdeCm ...
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Cadence ...
CdnSolar ...
CpstnTrbh ...
Ceigene
CellTher rsh..
CienaCorp ...
Cirrus
Cisco
CitzRepBh ...
Clearwire ...
CognizTech...
Comcast .45


... -.19
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Name Div
DR Horton .15
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FMCGs 1.00
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FrontierOil .24
GMX Rs ...
GameStop ...
Gannett .16
Gap .45
GenGrPrn ...
GenMot n ..
GenOnEn...
Genworth ...
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Goodyear ...
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HeclaM
Hertz
Hess .40
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Name Div
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Dndreon
DirecTVA ...
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eBay
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ElectArts
Emcore If ...
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ExpScrips ...
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Finisar
Flextm ..
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Google
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TAX-FREE


INCOME IS THE BEST GIFT

YOU CAN GIVE YOURSELF AT RETIREMENT.

With an Edward Jones Roth IRA, any earnings are tax-free,
and distributions can be taken free of penalties or taxes.*
You may even benefit from converting a traditional IRA to a
Roth IRA. .*

* Distributions of earnings from a Roth IRA could be subject to taxes and a 10% penalty if the
account is less than five years old and the owner is under age 591/2.


At Edward Jones, we spend time getting to know your
goals so we can help you reach them. To learn more
about why an Edward Jones Roth IRA can make sense
for you, call or visit your local financial advisor today.

Steve Jones, CFP
Finaw.inn,, 1 "d,isor
S 2"'w sVi ., U ;Highway 90

_.l, C,, FL '.2055
..4'~. www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC


IntPap .75 2.9
Interpublic .24 1.9
Invesco .44 1.7
IronMtn .75 2.6
ltauUnibH .67 3.1
JPMorgCh .20 .4
Jabil .28 1.4
JacksnHw h.
JanusCap .04 .3
JohnJn 2.16 3.6
JohnsnCtl .64 1.6
JnprNtwk ...
KB Home .25 1.9
KV PhmA ...
Keycorp .04 .4
Kimco .72 4.0
Kinross g .10 .7
Kohls 1.00 1.8
Kraft 1.16 3.7
LDK Solar ... ...
LSI Corp ...
LVSands ...
LennarA .16 .8
UllyEli 1.96 5.6
Limited .80 2.5
UoydBkg ...
LaPac
LyonBasA ...
MBIA ... ...
MEMC
MFAFncI .94 11.5
MGIC


Nasdaq Most Active


Wkly YTD Wkly
YId PE Chg %Chg Last
1.9 19 -.55 +13.6 23.53
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Name Div
JA Solar ...
JDS Uniph ...
JamesRiv ...
JetBlue
KLA Tnc 1.00
LECG
LawsnSft ...
LeapWidrss ...
Level3
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MarvelT
Mattel .92
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MicronT
Microsoft .64
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NetApp
Netflix
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Oclaro rs
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Popular
Power-One...


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Name


Wkly YTD Wkly
Div YId PE Cha %Chg Last


PwShs OQQQ.36
Qualcom .86
RF MicD ...
RAM Engy ...
RschMotr ...
Riverbed s ...
RoyaleEn
SanDisk
Satcon h ...
SeagateT ...
SIcnware .41
Sina
SiriusXM ...
SkywksSol ...
Sonus
Staples .40
StarScient ...
Starbucks .52
StiDynam .40
SunPowerA ...
Symantec ...
TD Ameritr .20
Tellabs .08
TevaPhrm .78
TiVo Inc
TomoThera ...
TriQuint
UrbanOut ...
VertxPh
VirgnMdah .16
Vodafone 1.33
WamerCh s8.50
Windstrm 1.00
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Yahoo
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MasseyEn .24
MedcoHIth ...
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Merck 1.52
MetUfe .74
MetroPCS ...
MitsuUFJ ...
MobileTel s ...
Molycorpn ...
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MotriaSol n .n
MotrlaMon ...
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Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last


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PSAgri
Pridelntl ...
PrUShS&P...
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PrUShQQQ rs..
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ProUShL20 ...
ProUSSP500...
ProUSSIv rs...
PrUltCrde rs...
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ProLogis .45 2.9
ProUSR2Krs...
Prudent 1.15 1.8
PulteGrp ...
QntmDSS ... ...
QksilvRes ...
QwestCm .32 4.8
RadianGrp .01 .1
RadioShk .25 1.7
Raytheon 1.50 2.9
RegionsFn .04 .5
ReneSola ...
RepubSvc .80 2.7
RioTinto s 1.08 1.7
RiteAidh ...
RylCarb ... ...
SLM Cp ... ...
SpdrDJIA 2.96 2.5
SpdrGold ...
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Saks
SandRdge... ...
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Schlmbrg 1.00 1.2
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SilvWhtn g .12 .3
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SwstnEngy ...


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... 68.75
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Name DIv
SpectraEn 1.04
SprintNex ...
SP Matls 1.17
SP HIthC .57
SP CnSt .78
SP Consum .49
SP Engy .99
SPDR Fncl .16
SP Inds .60
SPTech .32
SPUtil 1.27
StdPac
StillwtrM ...
Suncor gs .40
Sunoco .60
Suntech
SunTrst .04
Supvalu .35
Synovus .04
Sysco 1.04
TCF Fncl .20
TaiwSemi .47
Target 1.00
TeckResg .60
TenetHIth ...
Teradyn
Tesoro ...
Texinst .52
Textron .08
ThermoRs ...
ThomCrkg ...
3M Co 2.20
TimeWam .94
Total SA 3.16
Transocn ...
Travelers 1.44
TrinaSolar ...
TwoHrbInv 1.52
Tycolntl 1.00
Tyson .16
UBS AG ...
US Airwy ...
UnilevNV 1.12
UtdContl ...
UPS B 2.08
US Bancrp .20
US NGs rs ...
USOilFd ..
USSteel .20
UtdhlthGp .50
UnumGrp .37
Vale SA .76
Vale SA pf .76
ValeroE .20
VangEmg .82
VerizonCm 1.95
ViacomB .60
Visa .60
Vonage
Walgm .70
Weathflntl ...
WellPoint 1.00
WellsFargo .20
WendyArby .08
WDigital ...
WstnRefin
WstnUnion .28
Weyerh .60
WmsCos .50
XLGrp .44
Xerox .17
Yamana g .12
YingliGm ..
YumBmds 1.00


AMEX Most Active


Wkly YTD
Cha %Chg


AlexcoR g ...
ArcadiaRs ...
ArmourRsdl.44
Augusta g ...
Aurizon g ...
AvalRaren ...
BMB Munai ...
Banks.com ...
BarcGSOil ...
Brigus grs .
CAMAC En ...
CanoPet ...
CeiSci
CFCda g .01
CheniereEn...
CheniereE 1.70
ChinaShen ...
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Fronteerg ...
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Metalico
Metalline ...


Wkly
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8.38 MdwGoldg ...
.14 NeoStem ...
7.38 Neoprobe ...
5.08 Nevsung ...
7.04 NwGold g ...
7.11 NAPallg ...
1.00 NDynMng ...
.33 NthnO&G ...
26.89 NthgtMg ...
1.57 NovaGldg ...
1.51 Oilsandsg ...
.56 OpkoHIth ...
.59 Palatinrs ...
21.65 ParaG&S ...
7.25 PhrmAth ...
17.15 PionDrill ...
4.12 PudaCoal ...
.16 Quepasa ...
.16 RadientPh
.37 RareEleg .
37 Rentech
9.21 Rubicon g
15.08 SamsO&G
.43 SulphCo ...
5.13 Taseko ...
.71 Tengco ...
2.85 TimbednR
8.05 TmsatlPet ...
2.51 TdValley
4.43 TriangPet ...
5.60 Ur-Energy ...
51.25 Uranerz
6.28 UraniumEn ...
3.26 VantageDr ...
1.78 WizzardSft ...
5.68 YMBiog ...
1.10 ZBBEnv ...


Wkly YTD Wkly
YId PE Chg %Chq Last


17 -.74
.. +.66
... -1.14
... -.44
... +.15
... -.20
... -3.23
... +.02
.. -.17
... -.62
+.52
... -.04
43 -3.59
33 -4.12
23 +.95
6 -1.39
:.. -.40
... -.49
+. 02
14 +.27
15 -.52
... -.20
13 -.12
... -3.18
3 -.09
9 -1.99
12 -.41
13 -1.88
89 -.31
22 -1.77
15 -.89
16 -.58
15 -.92
... -2.76
10 -4.48
9 +.06
6 -2.88
9 -.40
19 -.23
9 +1.07
... -.77
4 +.90
... -.23
16 +2.47
21 +1.65
18 +.12
.. +.26
.. -1.64
... -.68
11 -.86
10 +.30
... -2.33
... -1.71
60 -.69
... -1.02
27 -.23
15 -1.35
17 -2.18
... +.16
19 -.30
51 +.14
10 +.24
15 +.47
+.01
7 +4.39
... -1.54
16 -.56
... +.81
23 -.73
21 -.62
15 -.09
21 -.06
8 -.75
21 +1.61


26.22
5.00
37.91
32.70
29.73
39.01
75.11
16.54
36.67
25.80
32.52
3.81
21.92
43.61
43.33
8.04
29.00
7.56
2.55
27.83
15.57
12.21
51.53
52.45
7.09
16.99
24.51
34.39
26.66
55.25- '
12.24
91.61
36.33
58.83
80.47
58.88'
24.23
10.39
45.03
19.49,
18.59
9.18
30.37
24.73
74.09
27.16
10.40
40.69
55.14
43.59
26.32
32.17
28.36
27.98
46.37
35.85
45.19 -
72.51
4.36
41.93
20.73
67.98
32.38
,5,02
34.40
15.30
21.16
24.38
29.98
22.22
10.40
12.73
10.50
52.58


Wkly YTD Wdy
Yld PE Chg %Chg ast
...... -.32+114.3 1.80
... ... +.14 +15.6 1.63
...... -.71 +55.3 3.20
...... -.67 -30.4 5.24
...... -.65 +3.2 10.07
...... -.98 -8.6 6.34
...... -2.80 +7.8 15.41
... 87 -3.21 +8.3 29.48
... 34 -.11 -14.4 2.74
...... -1.43 -10.7 12.74
... ... -.09 +21.7 .51
...... -.22 +2.2 3.75
... ... +.18 -25.9 1.00
... ... -.18 -.5 3.97
...... +.19 -17.5 3.49
... ... +.11 +37.1 12.08
... 10 -.51 -18.2 11.66
...... -1.29 -48.0 6.08
-.16 -59.4 .41
-.13 -29.6 11.31
-.03 ... 122
-.51 -18.6 4.65
-.59+164.4 3.49
..... -.02 -4.1 .16
-.47 +9.9 5.77
... .. -.22 +64.6 1.04.
-.06 -16.0 1.00
... ... -.24 -4.8 3.17
... ... -.18 -12.3 .50
...... -1.58 +16.6 7.58
... ... -.02 -16.1 2.51
... ... -.87 -1.0 3.95
...... -1.16 -19.7 4.85
...... -.16 -4.9 1.93
...... +.01 +6.0 .26
... ... -.17 +11.6 2.60
... ... -.01 +16.7 1.26


Weekly Stock Exchange Highlights _


Weekly Dow Jones '


T


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


maN e Div YId PE C g


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LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS & HOME SUNDAY, MARCH 13, 2011









LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY. MARCH 13., 2011

Lake City Reporter




CLASSIFIED


Classified Department: 755-5440


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

755-5440


UYIT"'N


S y Tif
ELLTfl~


010 Announcements


Limited to service type advertis-
ing only.,
4 lines, one month....s92.00
$10.80 each additional line
Includes an additional $2.00 per
ad for each Wednesday insertion.



You can call us at 755-5440,
Monday through Friday from 8:00
a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Some people prefer to place their
classified ads in person, and some
ad categories will require prepay-
ment. Our office is located at 180
East Duval Street.
You can also fax or email your ad
copy to the Reporter.
FAX: 386-752-9400 Please
direct your copy to the Classified
Department.
EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityre-
porter.com





Ad Is to Appear: Call by: Fax/Email by:
Tuesday Mon, 10:00 a.m. Mon.,9:00a.m.
Wednesday Mon., 10:00a.m. Mon.,9:001a.m.
Thursday Wed.,10:00a.m. Wed.,9:00 a.m.
Friday Thurs.,10:00a.m. Thui., 9:00a.m.
Saturday Fri., 10:00 am. Fri.,9:00a.m.
Sunday Fri., 10:00am. Fri., 9:00a.m.
These deadlines are subject to change without notice.




Ad Errors- Please read your ad
on the first day of publication.
We accept responsibility for only
the first incorrect insertion, and
only the charge for the ad space
In error. Please call 755-5440
Immediately for prompt correc-
tion and billing adjustments.
Cancellations- Normal advertising
deadlines apply for cancellation.
Billing Inquiries- Call 755-5440.
Should further information be
required regarding payments or
credit limits, your call will be trans-
ferred to the accounting depart-
ment.


Advertising copy is subject to
approval by the Publisher who
reserves the right to edit, reject,
or classify all advertisements under
appropriate headings. Copy should
be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the first day of pub-
Ilcation. Credit for published errors
will be allowed for the first insertion
for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the
Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nor for any general,
special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply
with Federal, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
nation in employment, housing and
public accommodations. Standard
abbreviations are acceptable; how-
ever, the first word of each ad may
not be abbreviated.

In Print and Online
Sww .hiiliccityrcportcr.coni


One Kom per ad ^
4 lines a 6 days 1 ad tonal

Eachttm must Includea ri




One -m peraaddditional
4 lines 6 days ine s1.15
," ~ ~ ln Sr1, '?.10
Rate appiles to private individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling $,00 or less.
& Each tRmn mus include a price. A







Rate applies to private Individuals selling
cheroalmrchandise totalling2pt50or less. J
Each Item must Include a price'
This Is a non-refundable rate.








One temper ad r


4 lines 6 Each additional








This Is a non-refundable rate.
Rate applies to private Individuals selling


4 in s .*a .days ln e $. 6
personal merchandise totalling ,i or ess.
Each item must Include a price.
This is a non-refundable rate. .



One Ham pair ad 23J
41 lines 6 days Eah ldiioa
Rate applies to private individuals selling
Personal merchandise totalling S2300 or less.J
L Each Item must Include a price'
^^ _This Is nori-rehinclable rate^^.^


OneImpe ad 2-

4 ines 6 days Eac aditina
Flats applies to private individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling S4,000 or less.
L Each Item must include a price.
^f,_ This Is a non-refundable rate. .fl



One e per ad. ^ V
4 Lines 6 days Eac aditina
Rate applies 1o private Individuals selling |
personal merchandise totalling S6,000 or less. j
L Each Item mus Include a rice. J
^^ This Is a non-refundable rate.. ^B


020 Lost & Found








Lost -Over the Ear Hearing
Device, around Hardee's by Wal-
mart, beginning of March, if found
call 386-292-3927 or 755-5331
Male Rottweiller lost evening of
02/21, County Road 138/Rum
Island area. REWARD.
Please call 386-454-2925
if no answer leave message
100 Job
Opportunities

04543711
The Columbia County Sheriff's
Office is accepting applications
for the following positions:
L.P.N.
DETENTION OFFICER
*,DEPUTY SHERIFF
Applications will be accepted
on a continuous basis.
All applicants must have a high
school diploma or its equivalent
and be Florida State Certified in
their field. Applications may be
obtained at the Columbia
County Sheriff's Office
Operations Center at 4917 East
U. S. Hwy. 90 or on-line at
www.columbiasheriff.org
The C.C.S.O. is an
EEO Employer


04543743
Ladies and Gentleman
if you have A Class A CDL,
we have a Lease/with a lease
purchase plan.
We accept PTD! Certified
students. O/Operators. No
New England States, 100%
fuel surcharge. Carolinas to
the great NW!
Call today to join us! -
Buel Inc
866-369-9744

04543843
PC Field Technicians P/T
Lake City/Gainesville
Residential/Small Business
Base hourly rate plus
bonus/commissions
Certified/ 2-4 years experience
Email resume
jobs(a)fastteks.com or
fax 813-932-2485

04543875
Experienced Diesel/Heavy
Duty Mechanics Needed!
The City of Gainesville's
General Services Fleet
Management Division and
Regional Transit System are
currently looking experienced
diesel mechanics with
experience on Heavy Duty
Trucks and Fleet Maintenance
to fill Fleet Mechanic II
openings. To apply for these
openings please go to our
employment website
www.cityofgainesville.jobs
where you will find
the postings.

05525284
EXP. DRIVERS OTR
SERVICE TRUCKING, INC.,
MUST BE 25 YRS OR
OLDER, CLASS A LICENSE
REQUIRED, CLEAN DRIV-
ING RECORD, NO CHARGE
ACC WITHIN THE LAST
YEAR, EXC EQUIPMENT,
GREAT PAY/BENEFITS,
CALL 1-800-899-1300,
EXT 201 MON-FRI, 8-5,
DRUG SCREEN REQUIRED,
EOE







Home Improvements

Carpentry, remodeling, paint,
repairs, additions, Lic. & Ins.
Since 1978 FREE estimates
386-497-3219 or 954-649-1037

Handicap accessible modifications
for veterans. 38 yrs experience.
386-752-4072 DON REED
CONSTRUCTION, INC
Licensed and insured CGC036224


Lawn & Landscape Service

Clean Pine Straw.
You pick it up, $1.85 a bale.
delivery 100 bales, $285.
386-688-9156

Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.


F/T Medical Billing/Coding & F/U
Specialist, Ins Verifications & Pt
collections also required,
experienced applicants only,
fax resume to 386-487-3988


100 Job
Opportunities

Teacher Positions

Head Start/Early Head Start,
Lake City-FCCPC /CDA; 3 yrs
of classroom experience
preferred (individuals w/ HS
dip/GED and DCF 40 hrs. may
also apply). Excellent benefits-
paid holidays, sick/annual leave,
health insurance, retirement +
add'l benefits: Apply in person
at 236 SW Columbia Ave
(754-2222) or mail resume to
SV4Cs PO Box 2637,
Lake City, FL 32056-2637, by
email: arobinson@sv4cs.org
or Fax (386) 754-2220. EOE

Accountant/Office Manager
position in North Florida. CPA
experience a plus but not required.
Competitive pay and
benefits available.
Email inquiries and resumes to
resumesubmissioni@hotmail.com.
AVON!!!, EARN up to 50%!!!
Only $10 for Starter Kit,
1-800-275-9945 pin #4206
www.youravon.com/tdavies
CDL A Flatbed/Van Truck
Driver needed for F/T OTR SE
area, 3 years exp or more, Contact
Melissa or Mary @ 386-935-2773
Hiring Locally This Week
Liberty National Life
Insurance Company
Full Training Provided Potential
of $60K+ Annually. 401K, BCBS
Insurance & Pension for those who
Qualify. Call 1-800-257-5500
to set up an interview.
Driver: Gotta Go Transport
a flatbed Co. in High Springs
needs a Class A driver. Min 2 yrs
exp. Home weekends, safety
bonus & vac. pay. 386-454-5688
McDonald's ofMAlachua is
seeking qualified Management
Candidates to join our team. Wag-
es range from $9 to $15 per hour,
based on experience. Competitive
Benefits, Apply online at:
www.mcstate.com\alachua or
fax resume to 386-755-2435
Person needed to cut cloth & other
material for small sewing ,,
operation. Other duties may be'
required. Hafners 386-755-6481
Position Available
Manufacturer based in North
FL seeking Plant Manager-
Duties would include overseeing
total operation of plant, including
production, personnel, mainte-
nance, receiving and shipping.
Competitive pay & benefits
available, Please send resume
and inquires to:
resumesubmission@hotmail.com
Wanted Highly motivated
individual for Sales Position.
Rountree -Moore Ford Lincoln
Mercury Great benefits, paid vaca-
tion. Exp. a plus but not necessary.
Call Chris. @'386-755-0630

120 Medical
2 Employment

05525367



Meridian Behavioral
Healthcare, Inc.
www.mbhci.org

Please visit our website to view
current open opportunities
and to apply online:

Therapists:
Licensed, or Master's Level
in Outpatient
Bachelor's-Level in
Counselor Support
Case Management
(adult & child)
Prevention

Administration
Director of Human
Resources
Director of Development
Director of Finance &
Accounting
VP of IT
Program Manager -
Outpatient
Program Manager-
Addictions
Medical Services
Psychiatrist
CSU RN Nursing Manager
ARNP (Psych, exp, Child Pref)
RN, LPN, C.N.A.
Recovery Specialist
(Direct Care)

Meridian is an active partner
with the National Health
Service Corps
To see onr current openings in
Mental Health and to apply
online, please go to:
www.mbhci.org
EOE, DFWP, E-Verify

AMIkids Family Services Program
seeks Case Managers for
community based program work-
ing w/ at risk youth &
families. Bachelor's degree req'd.
Req's travel to 7 counties.
Fax resume to 386.362.0932.
Direct Care Staff & Cooks
Lake City Cluster ICF for
Developmentally Disabled
Persons. www.rescare.com
386-755-6104 EEO/M/F/D/V


120 Medical
120v Employment
FT CNA needed.
Send resume to
826 SW Main Blvd Ste 102.
Lake City. FL. 32025.

240 Schools &
240 Education

04543680
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant. $479
next class-03/28/10

Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-04/1l1/11

*.Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com



310 Pets & Supplies

PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.

S361 Farm Equipment

84 Ford 4610 Tractor. Runs good.
Solid 2WD. New front tires,
350hr on 2005 motor. Dependable.
$7500. obo. 386-867-0005


401 Antiques

CASH CASH CASH CASH '
Pre 1964 Silver Coins, Sterling,
Flatware, Costume Jewelry,
Unusual Antiques. 386-963-2621
Extra Large Hard Wood
Door posss. antique)w/ opaque
glass & letter drop $250 obo
386-292-3927 or 755-5331

402 Appliances
20 cu ft Refrigerator,
White $250 obo
386-292-3927 or
386-755-5331 .
Dearborn Large Gas Heater
w/Blower
$50 obo
386-292-3927 or 755-5331
Nice Tappan Gas Stove,
White
$150
Call 386-292-3927 or 755-5331
Whirlpool Washer & Dryer Set,
large capacity, white
$250 obo
386-292-3927 or 755-5331


407 Computers
DELL COMPUTER
$65
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170
IBM Computer,
a $80
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170


ARE YOU OUR MISSING PIECE?
*


t Conmforitamble
work
Senwronmeni



j Career
C. Opportunities



Apply Online or In Person!


SiTEL


"o our skills
J' 4 and


1152 SW Business Point Dr
Lake City, FL 32025
386.754.8562
www.sitel.com EOE


408 Furniture

Large (possibly antique) Hard
Wood Table. w/chairs
$200 obo
386-292-3927 or755-5331
Light Wood Cabinet.
2 doors, shelves.
$30 obo
386-292-3927 or 755-5331
Small Dinette Table,
$35
386-292-3927 or
386-755-5331


420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$250 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.


430 Garage Sales












PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.

Sat & Sun 8am-?, 2178 N Hwy
441 cornerr of 441 & Albritton)
Side by side refrig/freezer, other
appliances, lots of miscellaneous!


440 Miscellaneous
Fixer upper
Quartet Sega Arcade Game,
$65 obo
386-292-3927 or 755-5331
New Central A/C, still in box,
with full ten year factory warranty
$1,795
Call 386-364-1090
Tow Behind Grill/Smoker
$1,250 OBO.
386-249-3104 or ..
386-71i9-4802';
THEBuiLdin TY

463 Materials
ROOFING Are you bothered
by a leakirig roof?
Call Reed Roofing today for a free
estimate. 386-752-4072
RCC00455399 Insured
ROOFING:Looking to replace
your Roof? Call Reed Roofing)
today for a free estimate
386-752-4072 RC0055399
References available
630 Mobile Homes
Fx for Rent
14 Wide, 2/2-$475. mo. dep.
Clean, Quiet Country Park
Water, septic, garbage included
758-2280 References, NO PETS!
2&3 BR MH. $395 $650. mo.
plus deposit. Water & sewer fur-
nished. Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422


Lender REO Auctions 100+ FL Properties Mar 21-Mar 29

lar 28 3P Auction Location: The Millennium Center Ste. 204
8 0 4340 WNewberryRd. Gainesville, FL 32635
DG351026 Millennium Ctr Dental Off. Condo Gainesville Preview: 3/17/11 at Noon! 4340 W. Newberry Rd.
DG396929 3,100 SF Meridian Ctr Off. Condo Preview: 3/17/11 at 10:OOAM 2750-A NW 43rd St.
DG361209 Pine Ridge Plantation 240 AC Gilchrist Co Drive by anytime! East Side of SR47
DG457007 100 AC near Live Oak McAlpin Drive by anytime! 14502 176th St.
DG297875A 5 AC Homesite Newberry Drive by anytime! NW 22nd Road, Lot 1
DG297875B 8 AC Homesite Newberry Drive by anytime! NW 22nd Road, Lot 2
Plus: 3BR/2BA Belmont home and vacant bldg lot call for details
Homes Horse Farms Homesites Acreage Industrial Bldgs Commercial Bldgs
Condos PUDs Development Sites Waterfront More! Visit our website for details:


N 888-334-3952 www.tranzon.com

Tranzon Driggers, Walter J. Driggers ill, Lic. Real Estate Broker, FL Uc. AU707, AB1237 10% Buyer's Premium


- ADvantage *


630 Mobile Homes
6 for Rent
2/1 1/2,SWMH. water.sewage.gar-
bage pick up included, W/D hook-
up, screened deck. $450 mo.
$200 dep, NO pets 386-292-0050
3BR/2BA Doublewide on 1 ac.
Lg. Rooms. $750 a month.
1st month and full security.
Please call 386-965-7534.
A very clean & well maintained
2/2 units in nice park. $599.mo
w/$500. dep. Rent includes water.
sewer, trash p/u. Close to town
386-984-8448 or 623-7547
DWMH. Lg. newer 3/2 on I ac.
Porch, carport & fenced yard.
Some pets ok. Ellisville area.
$850. mo, $650. sec 386-752-5450.
Mobile Homes for rent in.
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White Contact 386-623-2465
or 386-623-3404







f640 Mobile Homes
640 for Sale

$216 a month remodeled,,
like new, 2Bd/2Ba S Wide
Delivered & blocked, appliances,
A/C $2500 down, 8 year fin.
Possible owner financing. Ready
now. Call Gary 386 758-9824
05525134
Palm Harbor Homes
Repo's/Used Homes/Short Sales
3 or 4 Bedroom Doublewides
Won't Last!! 3,500-40K
Call.Today! 800-622-2832


Mobile Home
650 & Land

Well kept 3/2 moble on 2+ acres.
screened front porch, covered back
porch, shed, MLS77241 $64,000 .
Call Brittany @ Results Realty
386-397-3473

0 Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent

05524728
SPRING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans;
some with garages.
Call 386-454-1469
or visit our website:
:wwwy.springhillvillageanet,I

1, 2 & 3 Bedroom Apartments
"& Mobile Homnies
starting at $350 per month
386-755-2423

FLORIDA
GATEWAY
COLLEGE
* * *
Irtnerh, vc lio Ci,'wic C -olla
ADJUNCT INSTRUCTORS
SUMMER 2011
COLLEGE LEVEL MATHEMATICS
Master's degree in mathematics or a
Master's degree with 18 graduate
semester hours in mathematics.
Contact Paula Cifuentes at
paula.cifuenles ifn edii
PROGRAMMABLE LOGIC CONTROL
(PLC)
At least five years of full-time, in-field
work experience and expertise in the
installation, maintenance, operation and
troubleshooting of current technology
automated process controls and
associated systems including PLC's.
variable frequency drives, instrumentation
and process control systems, hydraulic
and pneumatic systems, Experience in
training both factory technicians and
operations personnel. For additional
information contact Bob Deckon at 386-
754-4442 or robert.deckon ifgcedu
LOGISTICS AND WAREHOUSING
The Banner Center for Global Logistics is
seeking summer and fall adjunct
instructors for the Logistics and
Warehousing online courses. A Master's
degree with at least 18 credits in
.Operations Management. Logistics,
Supply Chain or relate d is required.
Email resumes to Stephanie Glenn at
stephanie.oleni'n(i'fqc.edu or call the
Banner Center for Global Logistics at
386-754-4492 for more information.
NURSING CLINICAL
BSN Required. Master's degree in
nursing preferred. At least two years of
recent clinical experience required.
Contact Mattie Jones at 386-754-4368 or
matlie .ones@fo c edu
Cohl'ge ipHteationf (aniot fiu's of r ttsc'rtpqis
required Al foreign transcript ii nit he
,s bnuiltedi with t rriins fioti uad ev'ainutioni
Application available at v -. t"' c. iu


other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.










LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, MARCH 13, 2011


710 AUnfurnished Apt.
1iv For Rent
U5524833
DEPOSIT AS LOW AS $89 +
$200 OFF!!
BEST PRICES IN TOWN!
Windsong Apts.
386-758-8455
2br Apt by the lake. Close to
shopping and the VA Medical
Center. $525. mo plus deposit-
386-344-2972
A Landlord You Can Love!
2 br Apts $575. & up + sec. Great
area. CH/A washer/dryer hookups.
386-758-9351/352-208-2421
Great location W of 1-75, spacious
deluxe 2BR apts., garage, W/D
hook up. patio. $600 & up, + SD,
386 965-0276
The Lakes Apts. Studios & IBr's
from $135/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $525. + sec.
Call Michelle 386-752-9626

720 Furnished Apts.
720 For Rent
Apt, Ft. White, FL 2/1,
screen porch, W/D hook up,
$550 mo plus Sec Dep,
386-497-1116
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
.or monthly rates. I person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

730 Unfurnished
3 Home For Rent
3BR/1.5BA. BLOCK HOME.
Fenced (privacy) bk yard. CH/A
Nice area. $825. mo $825. dep.
Ref's req'd. 386-364-2897
3br/2ba new const.in nice S/D
Lease Opt. to buy. $900/Mo. $700
Dep, + 1st & last Req'd., Credit
Check, No Pets (386)755-9476
Brick 3br/2ba on cul-de-sac.
101 SW Hummingbird Glen.
Lake City. CH/A. $900. mo +
$800 dep. 386-365-8543
House for rent. Complpetely
remodeled. 4br/2ba + bonus room.
Carport. Great area. $1000 mo.
Plus security. 386-867-2283

750 Business &
5 Office Rentals
1200 sq ft Professional Office
Space, across from Courthouse,
newly,remodeled, 152 N Marion
$650 mo 386-867-4995 / 961-8466
1800 SQ FT $1100. Office
furniture available and
cubicle dividers.Water,
sewer and garbage fees included.,
386-752-4072' Ready to move in!
OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$695. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor
SE Baya Ave Office Furnished
1800 Sq Ft $1125.00
Ideal for Engineers & Professional
Quiet and safe environment
Security available 386-752-4072

770 Condos For Rent
04543870
Golf Course Condo for rent,
2BR/2BA, 1420 s.f., $1000/mo.
Rent includes all appliances,
basic cable, water/sewer/
garbage, pool & tennis ct.'
access. Realtor/owner
call 386-344-0433.


790 Vacation Rentals
Horseshoe Beach Spring Special
Gulf Front 2br home, w/lg water-
front porch, dock, fish sink.
Avail wkends. $345. or wk $795.
(352)498-5986/386-235-3633
Rental Condo on Daytona Beach,
All Inclusive, 7 day stay $675,
(Spring Break April 2-9 Avail)
386-590-0642

805 Lots for Sale
1999 3/2 DWMH on 1 ac
$55,000
Hallmark Real Estate
386-867-1613
Call Jay Sears
2 ac lot in River Access
community. Suwanne River
1 mile away. Owner will finance.
$13,500 Hallmark Real Estate
386-867-1613 Call Jay Sears
Emerald Cove S/D, Lot # 19
Half acre lot, Only $42,000
call Millard Gillen @
386-365-7001 MLS# 75278
westfieldrealtygroup.com
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on iace, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-


dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

810 Home for Sale
2/1 completely updated, screened
back porch, large utility room,
MLS#77413 $59,888 Call Nancy
@ R.E.O. Realty 386-867-1271
nancytrogers@msn.com


810 Home for Sale
2/1,on nearly an acre, living/dining
rm, kitchen nook, util rm, fenced,
back porch,2 car carport close to
town, $60,000 386-754-5818
2/2 + Bonus Room, 1749sf, 4 acre
comer lot, board fenced, det
garage/wkshp MLS#74900
$214,900 Call Pam @ Remax
386-303-2505 www.visitpam.com
2/2 -2 story, 9.7 ac. fenced & cross
fenced w/pastures. Oversized LR,
separate dining, Ig den. Workshop,
carport. 386-752-6575 $179,900.
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
2/3 on 5 acres, wrap around porch,
family rm w/fireplace, detached
garage, $179,900 MLS# 77005
call Roger Lovelady @
Westfield Realty 386-365-7039
2BR/2BA singlewide mfg home
on 1.7-ac corner lot; large yard &
paved drive $44,900 DANIEL
CRAPPS AGENCY, INC. 755- '
5110 #75864
3/2 Brick Home in town, fenced
back yard w/12x12 workshop
$84,888 Call Nancy @ R.E.O.
Realty 386-867-1271MLS# 77414
nancytrogers@msn.com
3/2 Cute Home, Remodeled, on 2
acres, partially fenced $114,900
MLS# 77396 Call Nancy @R.E.O.
Realty Group 386-867-1271,
nancytrogers@msn.com
3/3 Brick. Great location, pond..
Custom built w/Florida room &
vaulted ceiling. Workshop.
$179,900 Hallmark Real Estate
386-867-1613 Call Jay Sears
3Bedrm/3bth w/2 Master Suites,
fenced back yard,fireplace
MLS#76779, $115,000
Call Missy Zecher @ 386-623-
0237 www.missyzecher.com
4/2 on 10.5 acres w/ detached
garage, patio, above ground pool,
MLS# 77410 $189,888 Call-
Nancy Rogers@ R.E.O. Realty
386-867-1271
67.5 Acre Ranch w/MH, fenced
& cross fenced, wkshop, pole barn,
2 ponds, Spacious MLS# 75607
Asking 299K, Call Patti Taylor @
386-623-6896 Access Realty
95 Acre Estate, 4/3 Farm House,
Pond, Oaks, $689,000,
MLS#76149 Call Charlie Sparks
@ Westfield Realty 386-755-0808
westfieldrealtygroup.com
A quiet neighborhood is the
perfect setting for this cute, cozy
home. Lg back yard w/1 car
garage/workshop. $84,900.
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
BANK OWNED ON-SITE
Real Estate Auction
Live Oak
1223 S. Ohio Ave.
5br/3ba. 3296 sqft. on .36 acres
Sale Date: Sat. Mar 19 at 12 noon.
FREE COLOR BROCHURE
www.AuctionServicesIntl.com
Jay Lloyd AU2073/AB1172
Beautiful Home w/custom
cabinets, 10ft ceilings, $199,900
MLS# 77188 Call
Carrie Cason @ 386-623-2806
westfieldrealtygroup.com
Brick Home in Established S/D,
3/2, Open floor plan, MLS#76121
$134,900 Call Missy Zecher @
386-623-0237 Remax
www.mniissyzecher.com
CBC 3/1 home, inside city limits,
fenced backyard, detached carport
w/office MLS#77411 $84,900 .
Call R.E.O.Realty,
Nancy Rogers @ 386-867-1271
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Brick, split plan. Woodcrest S/D.
Screened porch, dining, living &
breakfast area.Lg backyard. Elaine
K. Tolar 386-755-6488 $139,900.
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty,
Brick, 10 ac 3/2 split floor plan. Fl
room, Ig utility, scr porch. Gazebo,
carport, fenced. $149,900. Lori
Geibeig Simpson 386-365-5678
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
New home, May Fair. Great area.
Comer lot. 4 bedroom, lots of tile,
covered porch. Split plan$214,900.
Elaine K. Tolar 386-755-6488
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
4br/2ba on 5 ac. Lg family, Florida
room den or office. Covered patio.
23x30 workshop. $229,900. Lori
Geibeig Simpson. 386-365-5678
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
3/2 Hardwood, separate offi.e/liv-
ing/family rm. Workshop, fenced
Lori Geibeig Simpson 386-365-
5678 Mary Whitehurst 965-0887
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Brick on 3.23 ac. New roof, win-
dows, paint. Newer AC, remod-
eled interior, fencing, good area.
Elaine K. Tolar. 386-755-6488
Colonial 4/3 + Guest House,
9.95 acres, inground pool, detach-
ed/garage, gate entry,MLS#77386
$325K Call Pam Beauchamp @
386-303-2505 Remax
Corner lot in Piccadilly S/D. Huge
living & dining room. New paint
& carpet. 2 car garage, inground
pool. 386-752-6575 $133,500
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
CUSTOM 4/2 scmrn porch, 16x24
workshop w/ele & water, gazebo,
fireplace, ceramic tile/wood floors.
386-752-6575 $189,900
Century 21/The Darby Rogers. Co
Custom, 3/2.5 built in 2007,
on 10.8 manicured acres,
completely fenced, Owner Fin.
avail., MLS#77382 Call Patti
386-623-6896 Access Realty


EASTSIDE VILLAGE! Owner
motivated! 3BR/2BA has large liv-
ing/dining rm combo $62,000
#77266 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY, INC. 755-5110
Family Home in Subdivision
4 bdrm Lots of space, newer
roof/carpet MLS#76283 Call
Missy Zecher @ 386-623-0237
Remax, www.missyzecher.com
FOR SALE by very motivated
owner. Just reduced $70,000. to
$129,000. Townhouse on Golf
course. 3br/3ba. Wood burning
fireplace. End unit. Remodeled
kitchen, first class appliances,
granite countertops. New Hunter
Douglas wdw treatments.
Cathedral ceiling. Pool, tennis
court. Call for appt. (904)246-6222


810 Home for Sale
GREAT STARTER HOME!
3BR/2BA in Quail Ridge with
back patio. luscious lawn $84.900
#76432 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY. INC. 755-5110
Large Brick. 3/1. 4.43 acres. metal
roof, MLS# 77415 S109.888
Call Nancy Rogers @ 386-867-
1271 R.E.O. Realty Group, Inc.
nancytrogers@msn.com
LIKE NEW! 3BR/2BA mfg home
near Wellborn on 5+ acres ONLY
$79,900 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY, INC. 755-5110 #76768
Log Home, Cypress Beams,
whole house generator, $269,900
MLS# 76899 Call
Roger Lovelady @386-365-7039
westfieldrealtygroup.com
NEW FLOORING-FRESH
PAINT! 2-story 3br/2ba on 1+ ac,
Ig kitchen, family rm, fenced pond
$99,900 #75951 Daniel Crapps
Agency, Inc. 755-5110
Nice solid brick home on 5 acres,
Country feel but close to Town,
MLS 76063 $129,888 Call
Brittany Stoeckert Results Realty
386-397-3473


GREEN .



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OPEN IOURS
When you mention this ad. I P





386-208-247

OPEN24. HOURS E


New Life '

5IlBLE 50OKSTORE
V
I.

1102 Ohio Ave. South B
Live Oak, FL 32064 N

386-362-4851
Mon.-Fri. 9am-6pm T
Sat. 9am-5pm m
S. CE LTi







I

3322 W US Hwy 90
386-755-2502
N
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810 Home for Sale
Nice, large 4/2 on 1 acre
w/florida room, granite floors.
wrap around front porch. $148.000
Call Brittany Stoeckert @
Results Realty 386-397-3473
Owner Fin., 3/2 on 2.5 acres, fish
pond, N of Lake City, sm down
S675 mo, 386-590-0642/867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
Owners Motivated! Multiple
dwellings. Main house and 2 mo-
bile homes Pecans, cedar & aza-
leas. $199,900. Century 2 I/The
Darby Rogers Co. 386-752-6575
Premier Lifestyle Community
The Preserve at Laurel Lake,
4/2, $194,900 MLS# 77257 Call
Scott Stewart @ 386-867-3498
westfieldrealtygroup.com
QUAINT 1950s home w/lots of
upgrades! Enclosed front porch,
2BR/1BA, screened back porch
$29,900 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY, INC 755-5110 #77505
Qualified General Contractor
doing top Quality work!
386-752-4072 Licensed and
Insured CGC036224
Don Reed Construction, Inc.




vNJ R


Classified Department: 755-5440


810 Home for Sale
Reduced 4/2. 2634 sq ft, quiet.
pool. fla rm. garage S199,900,
close to shopping/hospital/golf,
Call Owner 352-284-3469
Reduced in Rose Creek S/D, 5/4
on 2.2 acres, close to town
MLS#75485 $274,900 Call Pam
@ Remax 386-303-2505
www.visitpam.com
Secluded, however close to town,
3/2 Brick Ranch Home, spacious
$198,900 MLS# 74415 Call
Charlie Sparks @ 386-755-0808
westfieldrealtygroup.com
Solid home, needs updating. Nice
yard & workshop/garage! Country
kitchen w/eat in area as well as
formal. 386-752-6575 $70,000
Century 2 1/The Darby Rogers Co.
Totally Refurbished 2/2
w/workshop on 1.25 fenced acres
$94,900 Call Millard Gillen @
Westfield Realty 386-365-7001
MLS#75417
Two story MH, located in
Wellborn on 2.66 acres, porches
and fireplaces, 9 bdrms/3bths
$163,900 Patti Taylor MLS#71594
Access Realty 386-623-6896


DOJORH


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Subscriber: 0 Yes No

Deadline is Wednesday, March 16th, 2011 at 5:00 p.m.
ALL JUNK JOE Find all26 of the 'St Patrck'sDay'relatedwords hkden in the word search
a .--j above. Words can be found in the banners on the ads shown here. Com-
plete the puzzle and return it to the Lake City Reporter, 180 E. Duval Street,
Lake City, FL by Wednesday, March 9th 5:00pm, for your chance to winl


HERITAGE










Herbert C.Mantooth, D S., PA
GENERAL AND RESTORATIVE DENTISTRY
(386) 362-6556
CHRISTIANITY

Dees-Parrish

Family Funeral Ijome





458 Souti Marion Avenue
Lke CityFor, Foia 32025
Phone:(386)752-1234 Fax:(386)752-7006
www.parrisifsmifuneralihme.com

-TRAPITIOO


TACO
BELL-
36-755-9673

FAPDY


I


(386) 752-7034


VMla Pediatrics
and A .ociates, Inc.

Specializing in
Pdialris andllnlid e Mi'enledi
Most Insurance Accepted


I .- .


810 Home for Sale

Well Maintained 3/2 on 1.5
acres, fenced, porches, wkshp.
$49.900 MLS# 77309 Call Josh
Grecian 386-466-2517
westfieldrealtygroup.com


820 Farms&
SAcreage

10 ac lots, some w/well, septic, pwr
pole. Lowered prices. Owner finance
w/low dn pmnt Deas Bullard Proper-
ties 386-752-4339 ww*.landnfl.com

4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$69,900. $613mo 352-215-1018.'
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
4 acres, Wellborn, New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down, $39,900, $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
5 WOODED acres.
Suwanee Ranchettes. $200 per mo
for 5 mo. Then $203.85 per mo
thereafter. (352)472-2879


allj*

_ ^ ^ __ AeWl








LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY. MARCH 13. 2011


Classified Department: 755-5440


820 Farms &
SAcreage
Outdoorsman Special. near
Itchetucknee Springs St Park,
Owner fin. w/20% dn.
$54,900 MLS# 76366
Brodie Alfred 386-487-1484
Unique 5.5 acres, w/a clear stream,
nice view,homesite is cleared,well,
septic & power pole, includes
26 ft RV, Owner will be on prop-
erty Sun 3/13 & Mon 3/14
727-808-7236, $49.500
830 Commercial
8 Property
Commercial Income Property,
w/national tenants, 17,000+
so ft, additional fenced space,
C:.l Scott Stewart 386-867-3488
westfieldrealtygroup.com
860 Investment
Property
Investment Property, 2 MH's on
almost 2acres, well & septic,
fenced $29,900 MLS# 77233
Call Josh Grecian @ Westfield
386-466-2517

940 Trucks




Recreational
951 Vehicles





1998 Coachmen Class C Motor
home. Generator, awning, jacks,
25" TV. Very clean 45,650 m iles.
$17,900. 386-935-1863/288-2078


9n1 Recreational
51 Vehicles


S - *J.
2011) Pt\I~lI Tr.,' -l rr.,Ic r '2 ft,
2 slide outs. air awning, King Is-
land bed, Must Sell S 18,500
Call 863-660-8539 Lake City


Homestead Ranger Travel Trailer
28ft. One slideout Fiberglass,
Awning, sleeps 8. $10,000.
(850)322-7152


ADVERTISE YOUR
GARAGE SALE
WITH THE
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* Ad runs 10 consecutive days
with a description and photo in the
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2006 EF250
Ford Van
3/4 ton, metal work
shelves/ladder rack,
60K miles, exc. cond.
$10,500
Call
386-555-5555
If you don't sell your vehicle
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Sunday, March 13, 2011


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section D


GARDEN TALK


Nichelle Demorest
dndemorest@ufl.edu

Making
a garden
beautiful
and edible
R place some
ornamental
plants with
attractive
edible plants
and you'll have an "edible
landscape." An edible
landscape stretches your
fertilizer and water budget
by making plants do double
duty for you. Edibles offer
colorful booms, fruits and
foliage for the landscape as
well as nutritious food for
your table.
The practice of double
duty landscaping has
come and gone many
times throughout the ages.
Gardens in ancient Egypt
were pleasant mixtures
of arbors, fruit trees and
flowers. A strong rebirth
of edible gardens started
more recently during the
1970's.
There have been past
eras when gardens were
segregated into separate
areas. Vegetable~lherbs,
fruits and flowers all
needed their own separate,
formal spaces. Distinct
medicinal gardens were
important to royal families
of the not-so-distant past.
Many lovely plants in our
gardens today are the
result of the hybridizing
work done by the curators
of royal gardens.
Besides being attrac-
tive, edible landscapes are
convenient. They provide
fresh, nutritious food
within a few steps of your
door. You and your family
can actually have fun and
stay in shape while work-
ing outside in a 'healthy'
landscape.
What can you do now to
get started with an edible
"landscape? If your yard is
already established, it's
just a matter of making a
few changes as you work
outside. Bring some soil
samples to the UF Master
Gardeners for free pH
testing so you can prepare
your soil with needed com-
post and amendments.
Try planting a few veg-
etables and herbs among
your annual flowers.
Choose from many attrac-
tive and useful herbs, but
use plants that are suited
for the conditions of your
yard. Inter-planted vegeta-
bles will attract fewer pests
than a traditional vegetable
garden.
Mix it up a little with a
blueberry here and there
in place of a shrub. Plant
an uncommon fruit tree
such as a persimmon or
pawpaw. Have fun.
Need ideas on using
or redirecting rainwater?
Attend "Building Rain
Gardens and Rain Barrels,"
a free workshop at 6 p.m.
March 16 at the Extension
Office. Composting and
Plant ID classes will also be
held this week. Check our
calendar :":. :,::.-
__ :__ or call 752-5384.
Nichelle Demorest is a
horticulture agent with the
Columbia County Extension
of the University of Florida
Institute of Food and
Agricultural Sciences.


COURTESY PHOTO


Freddie Johnson get baptized by the Rev. Lonnie Johns in the Jordan River.


CLOSER


Christ Central
Ministries
group visits
Holy Land.
By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobnrson@lak is first trip to the
Holy Land was much
more than just a tour
of historical sites for
Herb Ellis of Lake
City it was a spiritual pilgrim-
age.
"It made me closer to God," he
said.
Ellis joined a group of 40 oth-
ers from Christ Central Ministries
of Lake City on a 10-day trip Jan.
10 through 19 to the Holy Land in
parts of Israel and Jordan.
Ellis was invited by Richard
Powell. trip organizer, to join the
group. He had traveled to Europe
five times, but had never been to
Israel.
"I've always wanted to do that,"
Ellis said.
Powell and his wife have gone
there five times to the Holy Land.
"It gives us a great pleasure to
see other people that hadn't been
there before experience it," he
said. "It's a life-changing trip."
The first time the Rev. Lonnie
Johns, Christ Central pastor, went
to the Holy Land was in 2001
with Powell. He wanted to take
as many church members as pos-


To


The Holy Land group stopped by the arena in Jeresh, Jordan.


sible fdr this trip.
Powell worked with a travel
company called Educational
Opportunities to plan out the trip.
Each day was filled with a vari-
ety of sites' to see, such as: The
Church of the Holy Sepulchre
where Jesus was said to be cruci-
fied and buried; the Sea of Galilee
where much of Jesus' ministry
occurred; and the Church of


the Nativity where it is believed
Jesus was born in the manger.
Churches are built over sacred
places in the Holy Land to pre-
serve them, Powell said.
. The group visited the Wailing
Wall in Jerusalem, Johns said.
Visitors leave their written peti-
tions in its crevices, and he
placed a prayer for Lake City in
the wall.


GOD


COURTESY PHOTO


Another attraction was the
Dead Sea, which is located at the
lowest elevation on the Earth.
The minerals in the mud are said
to have healing powers, and Ellis
swam in the sea's waters.
"I thought I looked a little
younger when I came out," he
said.
HOLY LAND continued on 2D


One of the stops on
the Holy Land trip was
Petra, a city in Jordan
that is known for its
rock-cut architecture
and water conduit sys-


COURTESY PHOTO








LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, MARCH 13. 2011


Message to students: Don't place limitations


On average, who do
you think makes
more money in our
workforce area, a
graphic artist (with
a two-year degree) or a legisla-
tor? An instructional coordinator
(with a master's degree) or an
electronics repairer (with some
community college training)?
How about a family/school
social worker (with a master's
degree) or a computer sup-
port specialist (with a two-year
degree)? Some of the answers
might surprise you.
Yearly, the Florida Gateway
Career Pathways Consortium,
a collaborative effort between
our local school districts (Baker,
Columbia, Gilchrist, Dixie, and
Union) and Florida Gateway
College (FGC), designates a col-
lective project that will serve the
diverse needs of a wide swath
of students. As we planned this
year's project, we kept the fol-
lowing goals in mind:
To provide students with
in-depth, hands-on experiences
with FGC faculty
To give students exposure
to the plethora of burgeoning
high-tech/high-wage professions
created by Florida's changing
economy
The result On February 28,
FGC hosted high school stu-


Kristi Cheyney
Kristi.cheyney@fgc.edu


dents and teachers from all over
the surrounding area for our
annual Career Pathways Festival.
While on campus, students
were able to choose areas of
interest, and then spend quality
time with college faculty, delv-
ing deep into the types of activi-
ties FGC students experience
within their major. Nursing track
students helped deliver a baby
in the nursing simulations lab.
Engineering students were able
to investigate our state-of the art
Mobile Engineering Technology
Lab. Global Logistics students
had a chance to see what it
would be like to sit behind the
wheel of a semi in our simula-
tor. Early Childhood students
left with children's books and
a brand new appreciation for
teachers. Additionally, students


had experiences in welding,
student government, golf course
mechanics and forestry, busi-
ness and entrepreneurship,
website development ... the list
goes on.
What is Career Pathways? The
Florida Crown Career Pathways
Consortium is a collaborative
group of the entities listed
above, whose goal is to create
a smooth pipeline, from high
school to college to work, for
students involved in career and
technical programs. Students-
that have enrolled in a Career
Pathways program in their high
school (through a site-based
Career Academy such as Allied
Health, Business, etc.) are given
the opportunity to continue their
training and educational explora-
tion after high school.
Career Pathways programs
consist of four years of high-level
academic and technical courses
articulated or connected with
an occupational or technical
program at colleges in the con-
sortium or neighboring counties.
With Career Pathways, students
can choose a career field early
in high school and start focusing
on academic skills and tech-
nology to prepare for college
and their chosen career. After
graduation from high school,
students can attend college to


.learn advanced technical skills
in their chosen field. FGC also
allows Career Pathways students
the opportunity to earn college
credit while still attending high
school. *
Let's return to the ques-
tions from earlier. Who makes
more on average? According
to the Florida Agency for
Workforce Innovation, Labor
Market Statistics, a Graphic
Artist (with a 2-year degree)
makes more than a Legislator.
An Electronics Repairer (with
some community college
training) makes more than
an Instructional Coordinator
(with a master's .degree). A
Computer Support Specialist
(with a 2-year degree) makes
more than a Family and School
Social Worker (with a master's
degree). Are you sensing a
trend? As the global economy
has changed, the job market
in the state of Florida has
also changed, swinging in the
direction of highly technical
professions that require spe-
cialized training. Traditional
ideas about the highest paying
careers have changed irrevo-
cably.
So here's the caveat I work as
an "Instructional Coordinator"
and I know that many FGC
A.S. degree graduates make


more money than I do. But I
love teaching college students!
I remember how I felt the first
time I got up in front of a group
of adult students. I remember
the sense of "This is it! This is
what I was made to do."
Does it matter that I could be
making more money elsewhere?
Nope. Not one bit I wouldn't
trade one single class or student
even for a bundle of cash. There
is nothing more rewarding than
doing what you love. Thus, the
message we sent to each student
on our campus for this year's
Career Pathways Festival was
this:
Students Take this time
while you are young to discover
what you love and what you
are good at. Don't make limita-
tions on your dreams based on
which professions earn the most
money, because often traditional
ideas on the highest paying
careers are wrong and if you are
miserable in your day to day life,
the money won't matter. Make a
commitment to further your edu-
cation through some type of col-
lege level work so that you can
make your dream a reality. FGC
is here to help you do that

* Contact Kristi Cheyney at Kristi.
cheyney@fgc.edu or at (386) 754-
4271.


Samantha Burdick of
Lake City announces the
birth of her son, Landon
Bryce Burdick on Feb. 12
in Shands at Lake Shore.


Margie Van Vleck and
Lowell Van Vleck were
united in marriage Feb. 25,
1955 at Southside Assembly
of God in Jacksonville.
They celebrated their
56th wedding anniversary
with a family dinner in
Jacksonville Feb. 25.
The couple have X chil-
dren Vicky (Mike) Baldree,
Randy Van Vleck of Lake
City, Valerie (Richard)
Brinkley of Tallahassee,
Denise (Rufus) Lawrence
of Jacksonville, Sonya
(Patrick) Nealon of St.
Augustine and Tonya
(Chris) Forbes of
Groveland. They have eight
grandchildren and two
great-grandchildren.
The couple met in


Barbra MUer and Tony
Martin Kurtz were united
in marriage March 18,
1961 in Jacksonville. The
will celebrate their 50th
anniversary Saturday,
March 12 with a party in
their honor given by their
children.
The couple have two
children: Kristi (J.D.)
Smith and Marty (Tracy)
Kurtz. They have seven
grandchildren.
The couple has lived in
Lake City for 49 years.


Sloan Albritton
Dori and Debra Sloan
of Lake City announce the
engagement and approach-
ing marriage of their
daughter, Dorrie Alyssa
Sloan of Lake City, to
James Michael Albritton Jr.
of Lake City.
He is the son of Jamie
and Kim Albritton of Lake
City and James and Sonia
Edgley of Lake Butler.
The bride-elect is a 2005
graduate of Columbia High
School, and works as a
hairstylist for Melanie Co.
The future groom is
a 2007 graduate from
Columbia High School
and works as a firefighter/
EMT for Columbia County


He weighed 7 pounds, 11
ounces and measured 20
inches.
He joins his loving aunt,
Amber Burdick.


Jacksonville in 1954 while
the groom was stationed at
the Naval Air Station and
the bride was secretary to
Judge Tyrie Boyer.
They pastor Glad Tidings
Assembly of God and have
pastored three Florida
churches during their more
than 40 years of ministry.


COURTESY PHOTO
James Michael Albritton Jr.
and Dorrie Alyssa Sloan.
Fire Department.
The wedding is planned
for 5:30 p.m. Saturday,
April, 2. 2011.


HOLY LAND: Trip helps bring scripture to life

Continued From Page 1D


Professors or teach-
ers shared the historical
significance of a site and
he connected it to what
it meant for a Christian,
Johns said. The group
also held worship servic-
es at several sites during
the trip.
Powell said he wanted
it to be the best trip ever
for the group.
"When you go on this
trip it's not really like a
relaxing vacation,",he.
said. "You leave every
morning at 8,a. m.-and
get back at 5 p.m. It's a
lot of walking, a lot of
lectures and trying to
see everything possible
that could be seen."
Going to the Holy
Land illuminates Biblical
events and locations,
Powell said.
"The Bible isn't really
that descriptive," he said.
"It adds the physical part
and gives a deeper and
greater understanding of
what occurred in those
times."
The trip brings scrip-
ture to life, Johns said.
Christians visiting the
Holy Land see where'
Jesus lived a sinless life


in the region and walked
as an example to all
people.
Visitors not only
receive a Biblical per-
spective on the trip but
a historical one as well,
he said. There are olive
trees in the Garden of
Gethsemane older than
the United States of
America.
'"There is so much
world history that has'
been written there,"
Johns said. -.
Sometimes the ;first
trip to the Holy Land is
overwhelming and many.
people return for several
more, he said.
Months later, he is still
processing everything
from the trip, Ellis said.
It was wonderful to be
in the same places that
Jesus walked.
"It was such a moving
experience in my life,"
he said.
He hopes to visit the
Holy Land again with his
wife after she retires,
Ellis said
People can always
come up with several
reasons why they can't
go to the Holy Land


Tour members rub ornmud at ti

such as the fear of the
unknown or the cost,
Powell said. The trip
was extremely safe and
cost $3,000 per person
which included the
flight, hotel, meals and
bus for all 10 days.
The only thing that
could possibly limit
a person is physical
disabilities, he said.
Planning a trip to the
Holy Land would be
worthwhile for anyone.
"I would encourage
' everyone to go to the
Holy Land whenever
they are able to," Powell
said. "It's a life-chang-
ing experience."


COURTESY PHOTO
Barbra and Tony Kurtz


COURTESY PHOTO
he Dead Sea.









rM .


China, Crystal,
Flatware and Gifts
Couples registered:
Heather Johnson
JR Perry
March 12, 2011

Tiffany Torrans
Kyle Malone
March 19, 2011

Shannon McRae
Michael Bishop
March 19, 2011

Dianna Roberts
Jay Swisher
March 26, 2011

Dorrie Sloan
James Albritton, Jr.
April 2, 2011

Joanna Watson .
Dustin King
April 15, 2011

Christine Moses
David Moor
May 21, 2011

Casey McDuffle
Tony de Moya
May 21, 2011

Laurie Little
Robert Evans, Jr.
June 4, 2011
We know exactly what
they want in a wedding or
shower gift. We update their
list as gifts are purchased,
and gift wrap.
WARD'S
JEWELRY & GIFTS
/156 N. Marion Ave.
Lake City
752-5470


BIRTH

Landon Bryce Burdick


ANNIVERSARIES

Margie and Lowell Van Vieck


Barbra and Tony Kurtz


ENGAGEMENT


Page Editor: C.J. Risak,.754-0427









LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & CROSSWORD SUNDAY, MARCH 13, 2011


DEAR ABBY: I'm the
mother of a U.S. Navy sailor
who has been the recipient
of random acts of kindness
from complete strangers. I
was most affected personally
when a woman stopped us
in a large parking garage in
Chicago to say, "Thank you
for your service, young man."
And there was a stranger who
paid for my son's meal in an
airport when he had a layover
on his way home for Christ-
mas. Another time, we were
in a line to see a movie and
the attendant waved us to the
front of the line and every-
one smiled about it.
Whenever my son goes
anywhere in uniform, he's
stopped by people who just
want to say thank you.
I'm amazed and thrilled.
Part of the reason I am so
touched is I was a teenager
living in San Diego during
the Vietnam era. At that time,
young people in the military
were cursed and reviled. It
was a shameful time in our
history when people serving
their country could not be
proud of their service. Today,
I am proud of my son, and he
is able to be proud of himself
and his decision to enlist in
the Navy.
So, thank you to all you
folks who show your grati-
tude to our service members
by the little things you do.
You not only touch that per-


Abigail Van Buren
www.deorabby.com

son, but their extended family
as well. PROUD MOM IN
OVERLAND PARK, KAN.
DEAR PROUD MOM:
I'm pleased to pass along your
sentiments and honored you
chose me to be the messen-
ger. All of us owe our thanks
and support to those brave
young men and women who
have dedicated themselves
and who risk their lives in
service to our country. Not
only should we thank them
when we see them, but we
should also pray for their safe
return.
DEAR ABBY: I work in
a large department store at-
tached to a shopping mall. Be-
cause many of the stores have
no restrooms, customers
come into our store to use the
* facilities. I'm happy they do
because it gives us more busi-
ness. However, I'm confused
by some of the patrons.
I think it shows good man-
ners to end a cell phone call
when visiting a restroom.
While I was in there today, a
woman entered the stall next


to me and continued talking
on her phone the entire time
she was in there! It's disgust-
ing, but it happens all the time.
I'm uncomfortable using the
restroom while someone is
on the phone, and I'd be very
offended if I was on the other
end of the line.
What's proper etiquette re-
garding cell phones in public
restrooms? Is there anything
I could say to someone who
does this? TRYING TO DO
MY BUSINESS
DEAR TRYING: Your
complaint is one I'm hearing
increasingly often. For your
safety, I do not advise correct-
ing the manners of a stranger.
While common sense and
consideration for others (in-
cluding the person on the
other end of the line as well as
the occupant of the next stall)
would dictate conversation be
put on hold while on the toilet
nothing you or I can do will
prevent this invasion of per-
sonal privacy short of bring-
ing a loud whoopee cushion
with you during breaks and
squeezing it in self-defense.
P.S. If you think we have
it bad in the ladies' room, I
have also heard about men
talking on their cell phones
while standing at the urinals.
Heaven help us.
* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com br
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


DEAR ABBY



Sailor's mom is touched


by public's appreciation


ARIES (March 21-April
19): Hold your thoughts.
Overreacting will only make
matters worse. Use your
imagination, originality and
charm and you will overcome
objections and avoid criticism
or blame for being too de-
manding. **
TAURUS (April 20-May
20): Put more emphasis on
how you treat others and the
activities and events you at-
tend. You can make or break
a relationship, depending on
how you approach controver-
sial subjects. It's best to just
listen for now. ***
GEMINI (May 21-June
20): Everyone else is wait-
ing to see what you'll do next.
The more engaged you are
in truth, your beliefs and the
approach you want to take to
help others, the better you
will do and the more support
you will receive. Love.is in the
stars. ***
CANCER (June 21-July
22): Expect the unexpected.
Taking control of a situation
that can affect your personal
well-being and status is a
must if you want to show you
are reliable. ***
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: V equals C
"WN KFBY NWH IGMB M KFNC KZMWUI
IF BB X F WH FI ... M K Z NW L K Z Y
FWMRYBIY DX B KZN K YRYBO H NO XD
JO CMD Y TNVL CNCNWWY
PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "There is a way to look at the past. Don't hide from it.
It will not catch you if you don't repeat it." Pearl Bailey
(c) 2011 by NEA, Inc. 3-14


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Word
You've got what it takes to
make a big splash and im-
press whoever you come in
contact with. Present, pro-
mote and even brag and you
will drum up a healthy fol-
lowing. You can change the
way you do things with the
additional help being offered.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Before you assist oth-
ers, recognize who needs
your help and the kind of help
you should offer. Do not pay
for others' mistakes or do a
job for someone who should
be accountable. Offer sug-
gestions but don't take over.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): Don't let your emotions
get in the way of a decision
you have to make. Overreact-
ing will lead to an argument.
Focus more. on a hobby or
creative interest or doing
things with children. Steer
clear of anyone who upsets
you. **
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-
Nov. 21): Take a day trip or


SUNDAY CROSSWORD


FOR YOUR EDIFICATION By David Levinson Wilk / Edited by Will Shortz 1[ 2 3 4 5116 7 18 19 10In1 12 13 14 115 16 0 17 118 119


Across
1 Thicken
10 Pirates' home
17 Venezuelan's
"very" - .
20 1994 biography
of Calvin Klein
21 1937 Cole Porter
tune
22 Serpent's tail?
23 Be willing to
apprehend Mr.
Bradley at any
cost?
25 Original "I Love
Lucy" airer
26 "What !"
27 Doo-wop syllable
28 "Oh, baloney!"
30 One awaiting a
shipment, maybe
31 Punish Mr.
Harris in a
medieval way?
39 Person with a
mortgage, e.g.
41 Menotti's
"Lullaby," for
one
42 Epitome of
thinness
43 Get Mr. Koch
addicted to a
modern reading
method?
48 Fashion's Gucci
49 To the point
50 "Pictures
Exhibition"
51 Down a
submarine, say
53 Evade


57 Barrel in a bar
61 Kind of wave
For any three answers,
call from a touch-tone
hone: 1-900-285-5656,
1.49 each minute; or,
with a credit card, 1-800-
814-5554.


65 Hungarian city
known for its
thermal baths
66 Preside over Mr.
O'Neill's
baptism?-
69 ___ Long, Union
general in the
Civil War
70 Carter III,"
best-selling
album of 2008
71 Smallest member
of the European
Union
72 Idle
73 Criminalize
74 Letters on Ozzie
Smith's cap
75 Do Mr.
Sullivan's stand-
up material?
79 French weapon
80 Montaigne work
82 "That seems to
be the case"
83 Act of coming
out
85 Madre's hermano
87 Fur fighters?
89 Opinion pieces
90 Made in France?
93 Prohibit Mr.
McMahon from
ever socializing
again?
100 Pool organism
101 12-Down
soldiers, for
short
102 Set as a goal
103 Perform brain
surgery on Mr.
Begley?
108 Mgr.'s aide
112 Singer ___
Khan
113 Virginia ___
114 Military march
115 Suffix with
Ecuador or
Euclid


116 Put Mr. Meese
in an Armani
suit?
125 Mauna
126 Treater's phrase
"'j Where the stars
might be
pointing?
128 Longtime 25-
Across president
Moonves
129 Brand name that
used to be
spelled out in
commercials
130 Star Alliance
member

Down
1 Lee of NBC News
2 U.S. president
whose mother's
first name was
Stanley
3 109-Down
portrayer in
2003's "Elf"
4 Approaches
5 Purposes
6 "Turn On, Tune In,
Drop Out"
. subject
7 Give a leg up
8 Part of Italy where
Cape Spartivento
is
9 Disney doe
10 Haughty
11 "The Divorcee"
actress Shearer
12 Civil War org.
13 Bud
14 Noted Cosell
interviewee
15 Colorado, e.g.:
Abbr.
16 Doesn't give up
17 One of the
Jackson 5
18 Not yet in the
oven


19 One side's retort
to "No, you
don't!"
24 R.M.N. served
under him
* 29 Some clouds
31 Apiphobiac's fear
32 Grand Forks sch.
33 Auto last made in
1936
34 "99 Luftballons"
singer, 1984
35 Noted John
Boehner feature
36 Prefix with
Cities
37 Souse's sound
38 Slip (into)
40 Mike and
(some
jellybeans,
informally)
43 Brooklyn ___
44 Trying
experiences
45 Mom-and-pop
grps.
46 Fit
47 Linear
49 "Mogambo"
threat
52 Fax cover sheet
abbr.
54 Transport on a
slope
55 Greece, to
Greeks
56 Retailer with a
cat and dog in its
logo
58 Numbers game
59 Call up
60 while
they're hot!"
62 Interrogatp, in a
way
63 Dessert menu
phrase
64 Sheets and such
67 "Esm6" writer
68 Beak or beat


71 Early 12th-
century year
76 Sister company
of ABC
77 Title
78 Ballet leap
79 Hope
81 Take the
offensive
84 Caramel-filled
treat
86 Figure in Tom
Thumb tales
88 Wife of Esau


90 Adipocyte
91 Elvis sings it in
"Blue Hawaii"
92 Household pets
that need
ultraviolet light
in their cages
94 Buttons on the
big screen
95 Geisha's
accessory
96 "Top Gun" org.
97 Disgusted cry
98 Medical suffix


99 "Mayberry _-_"
104 Welcomed, as a
guest at the door
105 Motif
106 Epitome of
hotness
107 911 responder
109 See 3-Down
110 1994 action
flick with the
tagline "Get
ready for rush
hour"


111 "The Constant
Gardener"
heroine
114 Sicilian city
117 Way to go:
Abbr.
118 Un-P.C. suffix
119 Souse
120 TV 'show filmed
at 30 Rock
121 sort
122 You: Fr.
123 Not vert.
124 And the rest:
Abbr.


Answers to last Sunday's Crossword.
H UIMIVIE E S M I X E S CH V I E D
E N TIT E ARE N U IN L A
TE A C.H. E R T 0 N A L S P A NN E D
HA R E V IETNAMVETS C 0 M E
R AVE E E EOINS RA CE
CHAT RULES R 0 L S EV E


AGATES V FEEDME
CTH ARLE L E S F A N I
C H I E0PV0 TNC'CsHA CRKE


BEATIT MST EUR DUNCAN

ED V E D S AN S
LOVEDONES V WHITENESS
1 0TI0 UELE FIAT R SVPS
MR VESTALVIRGINS EE G
A E C E DE L A V Emo U N T
S S EmR|U;R H A T E DmNiA emN T SI


indulge in a sport activity or
event. Most of all, don't let
personal matters you face at
home bring you down. Meet-
ing new people can lead to
an opportunity to expand
your professional interests.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): Stick close to
home. Problems while travel-
ing or dealing with authority
figures will disrupt your day,
causing emotional problems.
Move things around at home
to accommodate a hobby or
family project you want to
pursue. ***
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-
Jan. 19): Easy does it Do
the work before you start talk-
ing about your plans. Putting
things behind you will allow
you to indulge in the activities
you want to pursue. Today, it's
a matter of being responsible
and productive. ***
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): You can make a
difference to friends, your
children or your lover by
making special plans that will
bring you closer together.
There is money heading your
way and greater security will
result if you are willing to
invest in your own skills and
talents. *****
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): Accept the inevitable
,and life will be easier. Feel-
ings must not be kept a secret
if you want a relationship to
flourish. Emotions will be
high and honesty must pre-
vail. You cannot move for-
ward until you address what's
holding you back. **


8 3 9


2 4 1


4 5 36


9 1 8


5 9 2


85 4


7 3 6 2 8


7 9 6


5 21 7


C 6 L 8 19 L 9 9


1 9 L 9 6 8 E L


8 9 z 9 CL 6 L 4


6 L 6 7 LZ 9 9 8


ZL 9 6 8 9 L V I


9 17 8 8 L 9 L Z 6


9 8 6 9 Z 817 L- L


L 8 9 L 9 6 8 6 8


L 17 L6 989


Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415







4D LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE SUNDAY. MARCH 13, 2011


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