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UFPKY NEH LSTA



The Lake City reporter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01500
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 3/12/2011
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
System ID: UF00028308:01500
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text






Indians fall 0 -
Santa Fe rolls over
Fort White in baseball.
Spo-- A
000017 120511 ****3-DIGIT 326
LIB OF FLORIDA HISTORY
PO BOX 117007
205 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA
('7\ TlT?\T CT-E T T r-' TT -C -3


L aI- ..r.-i-L i' j,, v LLJ.j r
Fa IV


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Saturday, March 12, 201 I


A ^A


Tourney Craze
Florida beats Tennessee
in SEC Tournament, FSU
loses in final second.
Sports, I B


Time Change
Daylight Savings takes
effect at 2 a.m. Sunday,
so don't forget to
change your clocks.


IL, ^Reporter


Swww.Iakecityreporter. Vol. 137, No. 42 M 75 cents


Fire destroys structure at

Falling Creeks Falls Park


TONY BRITT/Lake City Reporter
Clint Pittman, Columbia County Landscapes and Parks director, cordons off an
area of Falling Creek Falls Park where a tobacco barn burned Friday. Officials say
the fire was intentionally set and are investigating the blaze.


Investigation under
way to see if it was
set intentionally.
By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
A historic landmark at the
Falling Creek Falls Park was
destroyed by fire Friday and
local officials think the fire
was intentionally set. An inves-
tigation has been launched.
The tobacco barn on the
Falling Creek Falls Park prop-
erty, a wooden structure near-
ly 100 years old, was destroyed
by the fire.
"Somebody set fire to the


tobacco barn that was on dis-
play at the Falling Creek Falls
Park," said Clint Pittman,
Columbia County Landscapes
and Parks director. "The fire
was called in about 2 a.m.
Friday morning."
The tobacco barn was a
20x20 structure, built in the
late 1920s or early 1930s, con-
structed of timber and with a
tin roof. The building stood
close to two stories.
"A lot of the wood in it
was the old lighter type pine
wood and some cypress
wood," Pittman said. "From
what I understand it was fully
engulfed and on the ground
when the fire department got


here."
Pittman said the fire most
likely was intentionally set
because there was no elec-
trical power to the building
that could cause fire. He said
there was no lightening or
other extraordinary events
that could have caused the
fire either.
"There's no doubt that
somebody had to set the fire
to it," he said.
A police report has been
filed with the Columbia
County Sheriff's Office and'
the Columbia County Fire-
Rescue also filed a report
FIRE continued on 3A


Lake City man

on motorcycle

killed in collision


Log truck
overturns while
entering highway.
From staff reports
Local roads proved to
be treacherous Friday as
one man was. injured in a
Friday morning wreck in
Suwannee County, and a
Lake City man died from
injuries suffered in a local
wreck later Friday night.
James C. Dowd, 70, of
Lake City, died at a local
hospital Friday night from
injuries he suffered in
the crash when a driver
attempting to make a U-
turn crashed into his
motorcycle. The wreck
occurred around 5:10 p.m.
on U.S. Highway 441.
The driver of the other
vehicle, William Robert
Hewes, 40, was not injured
in the crash.
According to Florida
Highway Patrol reports,
Hewes was traveling south
on U.S. Highway 441 in a
1999 Ford Escort.
At the same time, Dowd
was traveling north on
the roadway on a 2009


Yamaha motorcycle.
As -the vehicles were
traveling, Hewes pulled off
the west shoulder of the
roadway and attempted to
make a U-turn. As Hewes
was making the U-turn his
car pulled into the path of
Dowd's motorcycle.
The front right side
of Hewes' car struck the
front of the motorcycle,
throwing Dowd from the
motorcycle from the force
of the impact.
Dowd was- taken to
Shands at Lake Shore and
later pronounced dead by
hospital staff.
. Charges in connection
with the wreck are pend-
ing the conclusion of an
FHP investigation.
Earlier in the day, a log
truck driver from Georgia
suffered serious injuries
when the truck he was
driving skidded off the
roadway and the truck
overturned.
Darriet Leonard Perry,
42, of Valdosta, Ga., was
injured in the mishap.
The incident occurred
WRECK continued on 3A


Obama: Japan

earthquake

'catastrophic'


Hundreds dead
or missing after
Friday's 8.9 quake.
JULIE PACE
Associated Press
WASHINGTON -
President Barack Obama
said he was "heartbroken"
by images of devastation
in Japan following Friday's
deadly earthquake and
tsunami, and pledged
U.S. assistance to help the
country recover.
"Our hearts go out to
our friends in Japan and
across the region, and


we're going to stand with
them as they recover and
rebuild from this trage-
dy," Obama said during a
White House news confer-
ence.
Hundreds were dead
or missing in Japan fol-
lowing Friday's 8.9 mag-
nitude earthquake the
largest in Japan's history
- and the accompany-
ing tsunami. The West
Coast and several islands
in the Pacific were also
under tsunami warnings,
through no major damage
was reported in the U.S.
QUAKE continued on 3A


CARROLL SPEAKS OUT


New lieutenant
governor favors
budget cuts,
not more taxes.

By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
Jennifer Carroll, Florida's
lieutenant governor, was a
guest speaker at the Columbia
County Republican Executive
Committee Lincoln/Reagan
Dinner Friday at Florida
Gateway College.
She spoke with the media prior to
the private event.
The state's legislative session
started Tuesday, and the house and
senate will have to reach an agree-
ment on issues brought up during
session, Carroll said. Minds have to
come together to produce a better
climate for the people of the state.
The state budget is a mess and
there is a $3 billion shortfall, she
said. The state may have to cut some
services; however, Carroll and Scott
are not in favor of increasing taxes of
the people
"It's not an option," she said.


JASON MATTHEW WALKERILake City Reporter
Florida Lt. Gov. Jennifer Carroll speaks with members of the media Friday night.


One of the things she and Gov.
Rick Scott have been working on
is creating jobs in the state, Carroll
said. They have been contacting
businesses to come to the state.
Carroll said she would be speak-
ing from the heart during the func-
tion to inform the audience of the
governor's plans.
She said she hoped the group


would take the message that every
citizen needs to be engaged and
involved in finding the truth and
facts of what is going on with their
government.
"We want to m*e sure citizens
realize these are tough times and
we are going to make the right deci-
sions to benefit the state in the long
term," Carroll said.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Florida Lt. Gov. Jennifer Carroll speaks to members of the Columbia County Republican Executive Committee during the
Columbia County Lincoln/Reagan Dinner Friday held at the Florida Gateway College Howard Conference Center.


1 84264 0002 I 1


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400


7 .

Sunny
WEATHER, 2A


O pinion ................ 4A
Around Florida............ 2A
Obituaries .............. 3A
Advice & Comics ......... 4B
Puzzles ................. 2B


TODAY IN
FAITH
Ash Wednesday
observed.


COMING
SUNDAY
The Rodeo is
coming to town.










LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING SATURDAY, MARCH 12, 2011


ASH 3 Friday:
Afternoon: 6-6-1
Evening: 5-9-8


.,2 4 Friday:
'" Afternoon: 1-3-5-2
Evening: 9-8-8-2


eimatch.
Thursday:
1-17-19-21-24


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



Lachey writes song for Big East tourney


NEW YORK

is so big, it apparently
needs its own theme song
and it's getting one,
courtesy, of Nick Lachey.
The 37-year-old pop singer and
Cincinnati Bearcats fan penned
"Last One Standing," a tribute to the
men's basketball tournament being
played out this week at Madison
Square Garden. The song will make
its national debut during the champi-
onship game on Saturday.
"My two biggest passions prob-
ably in life are sports and music, so
for me it was a good opportunity to
marry both in this song," Lachey
said during a break in Big East tour-
nament play on Thursday. "I think
the Big East conference is the best
in the country, especially this year. I
think we're going to break a record
for the most teams sent to the NCAA
tournament this year."
'Writing it, I kept seeing these
highlight packages, dunk after dunk
after dunk," the former "Newlyweds"
reality star said. "Sports is so much
about energy and all the excitement
you get being there live at a game,
and I wanted to capture it in a song."
He believes "Last One Standing"
might be the first theme song for an
athletic conference. After the tourna-
ment is over, he hopes the Big East
will use the song for its other sports
tournaments as well.

Ne-Yo creates show
for Cartoon Network
NEW YORK Ne-Yo has writ-
ten many hit songs
and'now he's tak-
ing writing to a new
level.
The Grammy
winner said that he
closed a deal with
Cartoon Network
Ne-Yo to produce his own


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Nick Lachey and Vanessa Minnilo arrive at the Pre-Grammy Gala & Salute to


Industry Icons with Clive Davis honoring
Calif.

show.
The cartoon is called ,"I Heart
Tuesday" and Ne-Yo said produc-
tion starts soon.
He said the show is about "a
16-year-old girl that inherits the
curse of her bloodline and she's
forced to save the world from the
unknown evil every Tuesday for the
rest of her life."

Sheen strikes custody
pact; police search home
LOS ANGELES Charlie Sheen
and his estranged wife have struck
an accord that
settles any custody
issues and ends the
pursuit of a restrain-
ing order against the
actor, according to
their attorneys.
Sheen and Brooke
Sheen Mueller "reached
an agreement that resolves their dif-
ferences," lawyers for the pair said
Thursday night.


David Geffen on Saturday in Beverly Hills,


The statement said the details of
the arrangement were being kept
confidential for the benefit of their
twin sons.
Mueller obtained a temporary
restraining order against Sheen
earlier this month, claiming he
threatened her on a recent trip to the
Bahamas.

Prince announces 6
concerts in Carolinas
COLUMBIA, S.C. "Purple Rain"
might start falling in the Carolinas,
but it's no reason for alarm.
Prince announced Friday that
he will play six concerts in the
Carolinas later this month.
The series begins March 21 in
Columbia.'Three North Carolina
shows are scheduled for March 23 in
Raleigh, March 24 in Charlotte and
March 26 in Greensboro.
The concerts are part of the
"Welcome 2 America" tour.

i Associated Press


Celebrity Birthdays


* Playwright Edward Albee
is 83.
* Former Atlanta Mayor
Andrew Young is 79.
* Actress-singer Liza Minnelli
is 65.
* Former Massachusetts
Gov. Mitt Romney is 64.
* Sen. Kent Conrad, D-N.D.,
is 63.
* Rock singer-musician Bill
Payne (Little Feat) is 62.
* Actor Jon Provost

Daily Scripture


("Lassie") is 61.
* Singer Marion Jackson
(The Jackson Five) is 54.
* Actor Courtney B. Vance
is 51.
* Former MLB All-Star Darryl
Strawberry is 49.
* Actor Aaron Eckhart is 43.
* Country singer Holly
Williams is 30.
* Actress Kendall Applegate
(TV: "Desperate
Housewives") is 12.


"Know therefore that the Lord
your God is God; he is the faith-
ful God, keeping his covenant of
love to a thousand generations
of those who love him and keep
his commandments."
Deuteronomy 7:9


Lake City
HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........ (386) 752-1293
Fax number .............752-9400
Circulation ..............755-5445
Online... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press. .
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson .....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
Assistant Editor CJ Risak..754-0427
After 1:00 p.m.
(crisak@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
............ ............ .752-1293
(dkimler@lakecityreporter.com)
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440.


Reporter
BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7:30
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation ............ 755-5445
(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks................. $26.32
24 Weeks............ .......$48.79
52 Weeks................$83.46
Rates indude 7% sales tax.
Mail rates
12 Weeks. ............... $41.40
24 Weeks..................$82.80
52 Weeks................ $179.40


CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run
in this space. And thanks for reading.


AROUND FLORIDA


Florida Lottery
profits falling


TALLAHASSEE -
Florida Lottery profits
declined by $41 million last
fiscal year and are project-
ed to drop another $106
million by the end of this
fiscal year, according to a
report by the Legislature's
watchdog arm.
But the report,
released Friday by the
Office of Program Policy
Analysis and Government
Accountability, or ,
OPPAGA, said the Lottery
still managed to transfer
more than $1 billion into
the state's educational
trust fund last year.
The profits of the
Florida Lottery benefit
public education.

Man convicted
twice for death
CRESTVIEW A
Panhandle man whose
murder conviction was
overturned because of
problems with FBI bullet
testing has been found
guilty for a second time
in the 1991 murder of his
wife.
An Okaloosa County
judge sentenced Jimmy
Ates, 64, to life in prison,
on Friday. Jurors found
him guilty late Thursday of
first-degree murder.
Ates was originally con-
victed in 1998, but that was
overturned in 2008.
Prosecutors said the for-
mer preacher and school
teacher staged a burglary
and set fire to his home
to ensure his wife's body
would be found while he
was at a school ceremony.

2 teens escape
detention center
OCALA Authorities
in north Florida have
captured one teen who
escaped from a juvenile
detention center, but
another teen is still on the


i'--:.. p r*j


AMOOUuIMIU r1-DRO


Burning rubber and taking names
Kurt Busch heats up the tires on his car before attempt-
ing his first drag racing qualifying attempt at the NHRA
Gatornationals iji Gainesville Friday. Busch botched both
qualifying attempts in his professional debut in drag racing.


loose.
The teens a
17-year-old'and a
15-year-old were in an
outdoor physical fitness
area of the Marion County
facility around 7:30 p.m.
Thursday. They were
reported missing shortly
after that
The 15-year-old was cap-
tured at a CVS on Friday.

Man fatally shot
fleeing police
APOPKA Officials
said Kenneth Winne, 50,
who police initially thought
was shot by an officer,
actually committed suicide.
Apopka police reported
Friday that Winne shot
himself in the head on
Thursday.
Police said Winne drove
at an officer who was on
foot, and the officer shot at
Winne. Police had initially
assumed that the officer
hit Winne, but a medical
examiner determined the
bullet came from Winne's
gun.

Triplets hit by
Jeep, 1 dead
HUDSON A Tampa
Bay-area woman who
authorities said hit a group


of young girls with her
Jeep killing one faces
several charges.
The Florida Highway
Patrol arrested Betty-Jo
Tagerson, 39, on Friday
and charged her with
vehicular homicide, reck-
less driving and driving
involving property dam-
age.
A girl who was part of
a set of triplets, Delany
Rossman, 5, died a day
after the crash. Another
triplet sustained critical
injuries but recovered. A
third sister and a neighbor
girl had minor injuries.

Man sentenced in
shooting death
FORT LAUDERDALE
- Carlos Martin, 27, has
been sentenced to six
years in prison for acci-
dentally killing Tiffany
Littlepage, 21, while he
played with a gun.
A Broward County
judge sentenced Martin
Thursday after he pleaded
guilty to manslaughter
with a firearm. Martin
could have faced up to 30
years.
Littlepage was driving
when shot in the back, but
managed to pull over.
N Associated Press


THE WEATHER


SUNNY



HI 75 L0 i
". f

^~


Tallahassee*
72/38 ,.,
Pensacola "'* .. ..
69/53 ,Panma City
68/47


TEMPERATURES
High Friday
Low Friday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Friday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


EpO
,7a lp
7 Saturday





A c. "


I,,


SValdosta
73/40
Lake City,
75/40
,,Gainesville *
:75/39
Ocala
74/39


Tampa "
70/50,


FL Myei
76/52


65
41
74
49
88 in 1974
30 in 1934


0.00"
1.75"
9.02"
1.54"
8.44"


MOSTLY
SUNNY I


HI 79 L045


City
* cksonlle Cape Canaveral
,71/42 Daytona Beach
Ft. Lauderdale
DaonaBeach Fort Myers
65,'3 Gainesville
S \ Jacksonville

Ordando Cap e Canaveral Key West
71/45 66/49 Lake City
S Miami
Naples
West Palm Beach Ocala
73/54 Orlando
S Ft Lauderdale Panama City
rS 74/59 Pensacola
2 Naples Tallahassee
q'5/51 Miami Tampa


Key West 74/60 Valdosta
ey West W Palm Beach
72/64


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise tom.
Sunset tom.

MOON
Moonrise today
Moonset today
Moonrise tom.
Moonset tornm.


6:44 a.m.
6:37 p.m.
7:43 a.m.
7:37 p.m.


11:20 a.m.
12:55 a.m.
1:16 p.m.
2:48 a.m.


OOO
March March March April
12 19 26 3
First Full Last New


Sunday








S 'Fiee ietnpituie


On this date in
1987, unseasonably
cold weather pre-
vailed in the south-
eastern U.S. Gale
force winds were
also experienced
along the Mid-
Atlantic Coast.



i.


MOSTLY MOSTLY
SUNNY [ SUNNY


HI 79.L0 4 HI80L049


Sunday
71/50/s
71/47/s
77/64/s
79/55/s
80/42/s
77/46/s
78/68/s
78/43/s
78/63/s
79/56/s
78/43/s
77/49/s
71/51/s
72/53/pc
77/42/s
76/54/s
77/45/s
77/59/s


Monday
74/55/s
76/51/s
78/65/pc
80/57/s
79/45/s
76/48/pc
78/69/s
79/45/pc
79/65/s
81/58/pc
79/46/s
79/53/s
72/52/pc
72/53/pc
78/44/pc
78/57/s
78/45/pc
77/61/s


An exclusive
| service
8 brought to
VEINMlI our readers
15 nutestobu by
Today's
ultra-violet The Weather
radiation risk Channel.
for the area on
to 10+,

weather.com

v Forecasts, data and
'--- graphics 2011 Weather
Central, LP, Madison, Wis.
www.weatherpubllsher.com


Gel Connectel




.,2A', 1 |'jl II i1d I[.1 Qt(1


,Lr-i P,


Page Editor: Jason M. Walker, 754-0430


M.:x
-all
I








Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


LAKE CITY REPORTER


LOCAL & WORLD


SATURDAY, MARCH 12, 2011


QUAKE: Japan ravaged

Continued From Page 1A


as the first waves swamped
Hawaii's beaches and
grazed the coastline of the
mainland.
Obama said he was con-
fident that Japan would suc-
cessfully rebound from the
potentially "catastrophic"
disaster, and offered his
condolences to the families
of those who were killed.
"When you see what's
happening in Japan, you
are reminded that for all
our differences in culture
or language or religion,
that ultimately humanity is
one," Obama said.
Obama spoke with
Japanese Prime Minister
Naoto Kan earlier Friday,
and said the Japanese
leader told him there were
no radiation leaks from
Japan's nuclear power
plants. The Japanese
government ordered
thousands of residents
near a plant in the city of
Onahama to move back at
least two miles from the
plant. The reactor was not
leaking radiation but its


core remained hot even
after a shutdown.
One U.S. aircraft car-
rier is already in Japan,
and a second is on its way
to assist with the recov-
ery efforts. A U.S. ship
was also heading to the
Marianas Islands.
With West Coast resi-
dents anxiously watching
tsunami warnings in their
area, Obama offered his
assurances that his admin-
istration was taking the
threat seriously and moni-
toring the situation close-
ly. He urged residents in
the affected areas to heed
warnings from local offi-
cials and evacuate if told
to do so.
The military was prepar-
ing to offer aid to Hawaii
and the West Coast, if
needed. The Coast Guard
said cutter and aircraft
crews were positioning
themselves in the area
to be ready to conduct
response and survey mis-
sions as soon as condi-
tions allow.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Firefighters and others watch smoke from burning buildings in Kesennuma, Miyagi Prefecture, Saturday after Japan's biggest
recorded earthquake slammed into its eastern coast Friday.


Obama's chief of staff Bill
Daley notified the president
about the earthquake in


ASSOCIATED PRESS
A house burns amid already burnt down others in Kesennuma, Miyagi Prefecture, Saturday
after Japan's biggest recorded earthquake slammed into its eastern coast Friday.


Japan at 4 a.m. Washington
time. Obama activated
the Federal Emergency..
Management Agency, and
huddled with senior advis-
ers at the White House
to discuss plans to assist
Japan, as well as the U.S.
states and territories that
could be affected.
Pentagon spokesman
Col. David Lapan said
U.S. and Japanese officials
are talking constantly to
determine what type of
assistance is needed. He
said' aid could include
food, water, shelter, and
medical supplies.
The State Department
said no Americans were
killed or injured in Japan;
there were also no reports
of damage to U.S. installa-
tions or ships in the area.
The department issued a
travel alert, strongly urg-
ing U.S. citizens to avoid
non-essential travel to
Japan.
"Tokyo airports are
currently closed," it said.
"Other airports in Japan
may be closed or have
restricted access. Public
transportation, including
trains and subways, are
closed in the Tokyo area,
and service has been
interrupted in many other
areas."
"Strong aftershocks
are likely for weeks," the
department said. It urged
U.S. citizens currently in
Japan to "contact family
and friends in the United
States to confirm their
well-being at the earliest
opportunity."
Spokesman P.J. Crowley
tweeted early Friday that


ambassador John Roos
"has moved our U.S.
Embassy's command cen-
ter to an alternate loca-
tion as a precaution, given
the many aftershocks in
Tokyo."
"We have been watch-
ing a hopeful tsunami
sweep across the Middle
East. Now we are seeing
a tsunami of a different
kind sweep across Japan,"
Crowley said.
At home, FEMA
Administrator Craig
Fugate said that "our
immediate priority is the
safety of the people and
communities in the affect-
ed areas."
"FEMA is closely moni-
toring the effects of the
earthquake and subse-
quent tsunami that struck
Japan," he said, "and
through our regional offic-
es in the West Coast and
the Pacific area, we are in
close contact and coordi-
nation with state and local
officials and stand ready
to support them in any
way needed."
Vice President Joe
Biden, making a joint
appearance at a news
conference in Chisinau,
Moldova Friday with
Prime Minister Vlad Filat,
said "the thoughts and
prayers of the American
people" are with the
Japanese, who he said had
suffered through a Megaa
earthquake."
"We, the United States,
stand ready to do any-
thing we can to help our
Japanese friends as they
deal with the aftermath of
this tragedy," Biden said.


OBITUARIES
Luther Lee Joyner, Jr.
Luther Lee Joyner, Jr., 88, died
Wednesday, March 9, in Lake
City, Florida. Born in Charles,
ton, SC, on December 20, 1922,
he was the son of the late Glen-
nie Ellen Miller Joyner and Lu-
ther Lee Joyner, Sr. He lived
most of his life in Andrews, SC,
and moved to Florida after retire-
ment. He is predeceased by a sis-
ter, Helen Lee Joyner Cox.
Mr. Joyner was a U.S. Army
veteran and served in the Italian
Campaign dur-
ing World War
II. He was re-
tired from the -
Seaboard-Coast-
line Railroad. He was a faithful
member of First Baptist Church,
Lake City.
Mr. Joyner is survived by his wife
of 70 years, Dorothy Elizabeth
McDaniel Joyner; a son, Luther
Lee Joyner, III, of Lynchburg,*
Virginia; a daughter, Rebecca
Elizabeth Joyner Moseley(Dr.
William "Bill") of Lake City,
Florida; six grandchildren,
twelve great-grandchildren, two
nephews and one niece.
A graveside, service will be held
Saturday, March 12, at 11:30 a.m.
at the Andrews Memorial Ceme-
tery iq Andrews, South Carolina.
In lieu of flowers, the family re-
quests that contributions be made
to The Gideons International,;.
P.O. Box 140800, Nashville, TN
37214 or First Baptist Church,
182 NE Justice Street, Lake City,
FL 32055. Arrangements are un-
der the direction of the DEES-:
PARRISH FAMILY FUNERAL
HOME, 458 South Marion Ave.,
Lake City, FL 32025. (386)752-
1234 please sign our online fam-
ily guestbook at
parrishfamilyfuneralhome.com
Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


Quake wrecks Japan


By MALCOLM FOSTER
Associated Press

TOKYO Japan's northeastern
coast was a swampy wasteland of bro-
iken houses, overturned cars, sludge
and dirty water Saturday as the nation
awoke to the devastating aftermath of
one of its greatest disasters, a pow-
erful tsunami created by one of the
strongest earthquakes ever recorded.
The death toll from Friday's mas-
sive magnitude 8.9 quake stood at
more than 200, but an untold number
of bodies were believed to be lying in
the rubble and debris, and Japanese
were bracing for more bad news as
authorities tried to reach the hardest-
hit areas.
Aerial footage showed military
helicopters lifting people on rescue
tethers from rooftops and partially
submerged buildings surrounded by
water and debris. At one school, a
large white "SOS" had been spelled.
out in English.


The earthquake that struck off the
northeastern shore was the biggest
recorded quake ever to hit Japan.
It ranked as the fifth-largest earth-
quake in the world since 1900 and was
nearly 8,000 times stronger than one
that devastated Christchurch, New
Zealand, last month, scientists said.
Chief Cabinet Secretary Yukio
Edano said an initial assessment found
"enormous damage," adding that the
Defense Ministry was sending troops
to the hardest-hit region.
The official casualty toll was 236
dead, 725 missing and 1,028 injured,
although police said 200-300 bod-
ies were found along the coast in
Sendai, the biggest city in the area.
Authorities said they weren't able to
reach the area because of damage to
the roads.
Black smoke could still be seen in
the skies around Sendai, presumably
from gas pipes snapped by the quake
or tsunami.


WRECK: Truck

Continued From Page 1A

7:25 a.m. Friday on Interstate
10 and the eastbound entrance
ramp from U.S. Highway 90 in
Suwannee County.
According to Florida Highway
Patrol reports, Perry was travel-
ing on the eastbound entrance
ramp of 1-10 coming from U.S.
Highway 90 in Suwannee County
in a 2006 Mack semi, towing a log
trailer loaded with cypress logs.
As the truck was rounding the
curve on the entrance ramp, Perry.
failed to make the curve and the
truck started to skid off the road-
way. It then overturned onto its
left side and stopped partly on the
roadway.
Perry was taken to Shands of
Live Oak for treatment of his inju-
ries.
Perry was charged with speed
too fast for conditions on a curve
in the roadway, according to
reports.


FIRE: Investigation launched into cause of blaze

Continued From Page 1A


regarding the incident.
"There were no witness-
es or anybody here, but
hopefully somebody saw
something and eventually
will give us some tips on
finding out who did set fire
to the building," Pittman
said. "At that time I'm sure
county will move forward


with charges against those
people if we find who did it."
The Falling Creek Falls
Park, which houses the
only waterfall in Columbia
County, is the result of a
partnership between the
Suwannee River Water
Management District and
Columbia County Board


of County Commissioners.
The property was pur-
chased less than 10 years.
ago in order to preserve
the area around the falls
and adjacent property and
structures on the property.
"This was one of the only
tobacco barns in the area
in this condition that we


were able to preserve and
let people know how it was
done years ago," Pittman
said. "It also served as a
major photo prop for fam-
ily photos just because it
was an old piece of history.
There's no way to replace
it. You can rebuilt it, but it
won't be the same."


Happg Birthday Brianna
A special girl from the very start.
Always know I love you with al my heart.
Lo'e. Dad


Call today to place an
Invitation ad for your
child, grandchild,
God child or anyone
you think deserves
something extra on
their special dayi


Call

755.5440 or

755.5441
between 8am & 4pm


IODeadline:
Ads have to be placed by 4pm, 3-days prior
to appearance in the Lake City Reoorter.


No Monthly Payments EVER
Get Cash! Live Better!
SFrank McElhaney, GMA
S,. Reverse Mortgage Specialist
a ,2 *291 SW Sisters Welcome Rd., Suite 101
Lake City, FL
I S_ ~(386) 984-5217
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Your Local Mortgage Connection -u._M













OPINION


Saturday, March 12, 201 I1


AN


AN
OPINION



Don't


blame


teachers

Once upon a time,
cheating was a
problem among
students. Teachers
were the enforcers
of honesty, and most still are.
But under pressure to meet
rising standards, measured by
high-stakes testing, the tables
are turning. Some teachers and
school officials have become
the cheaters and students the
police.
That's what happened at
Charles Seipelt Elementary
School in Ohio, where teacher
Scott Mueller took an early
peek at the state's 2010 math
tests and wrote a "study guide"
for his fifth-graders using
some identical questions. At
Groveland Elementary near
Orlando, school district docu-
ments show, teaching assistant
Johanna Munoz erased wrong
answers and whispered correc-
tions to fourth-graders as they
took the exam.
Both were caught after stu-
dents revealed what happened.
Both faced sanctions, and both
resigned. But what they did
exposes a much larger problem,
according to a USA TODAY
investigation of millions of stu-
dents' standardized tests in six
states and Washington, D.C.
The investigative team found
statistical indications of cheating
in 1,610 cases in selected school
districts in Arizona, California,
Colorado, Florida, Michigan,
Ohio and Washington, D.C.
There were large numbers of
erasures, with answers changed
from wrong to right, as well as
huge jumps in scores for an
entire class followed by huge
plunges the next year anoma-
lies so rare that they should raise
red flags about cheating.
Ways already'exist to police
testing effectively. Last spring,
Georgia put independent moni-
tors at 74 schools that were on
a "severe concern" list in 2009
because of high numbers of era-
sures. The list promptly dropped
to nine.
States could also shorten the
amount of time schools have
access to the tests both before
and after they are given.
N USA Today

Lake City Reporter.
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman


LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,


Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


www.lakecityreporter.com


America sends mixed


messages to Muslims


When Rep. Keith
Ellison, D-
Minn., broke
down in tears,
Rep. Peter
King, R-N.Y., had the grace to
look chagrined briefly. Another
legislator said in disgust, "This
(hearing) is'an outrage."
King's badly timed
congressional hearing on
radicalization in the American
Muslim community combined
with President Barack Obama's
hand wringing on what to do
about Libya's leader waging
war on his people and the
recognition that Guantanamo
prison will not be closed have
shown how clueless we are.
Nearly a decade after the
Sept. 11 attacks, we in America'
still don't understand that while
there are radicalized Muslims
who want to destroy the United
States, hundreds of millions
of people around the world
believe passionately in the Islam
religion and don't hate us. But
they are growing increasingly
confused about what our
policies are.
King convened his
controversial hearing as
chairman of the House
Homeland Security Committee
to probe the extent of terrorist
intent among Muslims in
America. Ellison, the first
Muslim American elected to
Congress, said the hearing was
the height of stereotyping and
scapegoating. Others charged
that the hearing was a portrait
in bigotry in a country founded
on freedom of religion.
Ellison tearfully recalled a
boyhood friend, also a Muslim,
who was killed at the World
Trade Center while trying to
rescue victims of the attacks
of 9/11. Solely because of his
religion, some tried to vilify
him, suggesting he might have


Ann McFeatters
amcfeatters@nationoalpress.com


been involved.
Democrats on the committee
complained there was no factual
basis for King's hearing and
that it will only stir antagonism
against America's 3 million
Muslims. Some recalled the
government's cruel internment
of Japanese Americans during
World War II.
The problem with King,
who, by the way, supported the
Irish Republican Army when
the United States deemed
it a terrorist organization,
which killed innocent people,
is that his hearing had no
point. What does he want to
happen? Monitor what goes
on in mosques? Tear down
mosques? Imprison young
Muslim American men? Stoke
fear of Muslim Americans?
Have neighbors spying on each
other?
With the help and warnings
of Muslim Americans, law
enforcement officials have
prevented at least 43 home-
grown terror plots from
succeeding. The FBI keeps tabs
on domestic suspects. We need
to keep out foreign terrorists
rather than devoting scarce
resources on surveillance,of our
citizens' religiosity.
And, by the way, why
hasn't there been a more
aggressive effort to address
'the brainwashing of young
American children who
join gangs and ravage their
communities and get into


drugs? Isn't that a much wider
problem in society?
This all comes just as the
White House is trying to figure
out what to do about Libya.
Obama said flatly that Libyan
leader Moammar Gadhafi
must relinquish power but is
considered an international
criminal, meaning he has no
alternative but to fight. Yet,
Obama also doesn't want to
send planes to bomb Gadhafi's
airfields, which are being used
to bomb his own people.
It is understandable that
the United States, involved in
two wars in the Middle East
that it shouldn't have started,
does not want another military
engagement, let alone, heaven
forbid, boots on the ground. But
sending medical supplies and
weapons to the Libyan rebels
and sending planes to bomb
Libyan fighter planes (short
of a full no-fly zone) have now
become a moral obligation.
At the same time we are
trying to convince the world
we are not at war with Islam,
Obama has conceded that
closing Guantanamo (sending
its inmates elsewhere) will not
happen any time soon despite
his promise to shut it down.
Because hundreds of Muslims
were held there without legal
charges or a day in court,
Guantanamo symbolizes the
point where America's ideals fall
to pragmatism.
In June 2009 Obama gave a
well-received speech in Cairo
titled "A New Beginning" to
tell the world we are not and
never will be at war with the
Islam religion. Now, many are
wondering.

N Scripps Howard columnist
Ann McFeatters has covered
the White House and national
politics since 1986.


AN OPINION


Problems arise when everyone's average


T he alarm clock
is sounding on
American education.
While China's emer-
gence as an educa-
tional powerhouse is relatively
new, the continued poor perfor-
mance by US students though
improved, still 31st place in
math on the most recent inter-
national test is not. Today,
Shanghai tops the charts, but
yesterday, it was other nations.
Even a casual observer of edu-
cation news knows the US long
ago ceded its place as world
leader in student performance.
It's an unsettling state of affairs.
But what's more unsettling
is how prominent educa-
tion leaders like Education
Secretary Arne Duncan have
called America's sorry stand-
ing a "wakeup call." President
Obama has called for a new


"Sputnik moment" to reignite
the nation's commitment to sci-
ence education. But the wakeup
alarm didn't just start going off.
It sounded decades ago; the
US has just repeatedly hit the
snooze button.
The crisis in American educa-
tion includes both our overall
poor national performance and
the miniscule numbers of US
students achieving at the high-
est levels. Even our best stu-
dents are less competitive. The
problem with previous educa-
tion reform efforts is that they
have poured time, money, and
resources into bringing all stu-
dents up to proficiency at the
expense of our most gifted stu-
dents. If we want the best edu-
cational performance, we have
to target our brightest students,
not ignore them in the fight to
help everyone reach "average."


We've been inundated with
reams of reports, studies, and
expert panels advising us how
to fix this problem. During
one week last fall, two govern-
ment-convened panels released
reports full of prescriptions for
what the nation must due to
reclaim its position as a leading
innovator.
The reports by the
President's Council of Advisors
on Science and Technology
(PCAST) and the National
Science Board offer a plethora
of recommendations including
better teacher training, creating
1,000 new STEM-focused (sci-
ence, technology, engineering,
and mathematics) schools, and
holding schools accountable for
the performance of high-achiev-
ing students.

* The Christian Science Monitor


4A


Lisa Hoffman
lischoffman@shns.com


Obama to

serve 'first

beer' on

St. Patty's.


gest secrets in
Washington one
that is the subject
of a growing list
of poorly sourced guesses is
this: Will the White House
serve its new home brew for
its St. Patrick's Day party, and,
if so, tint it green?
The back story: At the i
White House Super Bowl
get-together, the first couple
unveiled "White House Honey'
Ale," apparently the first alco-
holic beverage ever brewed
in the Executive Mansion's
history.
The blog Obama Foodorama
broke the new-brew news, say-
ing the Obamas used their per-'
sonal money to buy the equip-
ment. To create the ale, White,
House chefs used a pound of -.
honey from the first lady's bee-.
hives on the South Lawn.
A White House spokesman ,
called the debut a success
and indicated the beverage
would likely make another
appearance at a special event.
Somehow, that comment
morphed into a March 4 report
by IrishCentral.com that the.
president would break out the
new brew at the upcoming
St. Patrick's fest. The blogi-
verse picked up the item and,
trumpeted it as fact from India.
to the United Kingdom and
beyond.
The White House remains,.-.
mum on whether WHHA wilL',
be on tap March 17. If so,
odds are better than even that
the Obamas transplanted
Chicagoans will color it
green in that city's storied
fashion.


The new crop of freshman
House and Senate members
may court the impression
that they are a fresh breed
of lawmakers more in touch.
with regular folks, but a study
shows that they are decidedly
better off financially than most
Americans.
A study by the nonpartisan
Center for Responsive Politics
shows 60 percent of the new
senators and more than 40
percent of the first-year House
members are millionaires.
Among the rest of us, just 1
percent rank in that financial
category.
The combined wealth of all
94 House and 10 Senate fresh-
men in the 112th Congress
is an estimated $533 million,
according to the study, which
analyzed personal financial
disclosure reports. The esti-
mated median wealth is almost
$4 million for new senators
and $570,418 for congressional
freshmen.
The richest newcomer is
Sen. Richard Blumenthal,
D-Conn., with an estimated
worth of nearly $95 million.


After business drooped for'
several years due to the sag-
ging economy, cosmetic plastic
surgery procedures were on
the rise again in 2010, accord-
ing to recent stats released by
the American Society of Plastic
Surgery.
The number of cosmetic pro-
cedures overall rose from 12.5
million in 2009 to 13.1 million
last year, a 5 percent increase.
Scripps Howard News Service













FAITH


Saturday, March 12, 2011 v


&


VALUES


www.lakecityreporter.com


BIBLICAL MEDITATION


Carlton McPeak
carltonmc@rnsn.com

Discovery

helps bring

God's

creations

into focus

The Discovery
Space Shuttle
has landed for
the last time.
Some have said
the end of an era.
The space program has
been a'great thing. It has
provided jobs for so many
people. It has provided an
opportunity to discover a
lot of things, things we take
for granted in our everyday
life. Do you remember
Tang? That powdered
drink that the "astronauts"
drank?
What about computers,
telecommunication devises
or microwaves?
What about the satel-
lite images of the most
recent hurricane or snow
storm? Your GPS devise?
Or Google images of your
property? The list could go
on and on.
One of my favorite
images was taken by the
astronauts as they looked
upon that blue and white
ball we call earth. That is
just amazing. King David
as a boy lay on the ground
looking up at the stars and
thought about the power of
God. Do we think about the
power of God when we see
our earth? Is the "eternal
power" (Romans 1:20) of
God impressed upon us
because of all of this space
exploration?
Solomon wrote about the
regularity of the movement
of the sun (Ecclesiastes
1:5). Because of this con-
sistency, workers at NASA
have been able to predict
where the moon will be at
a given point in time and
thereby have been able
to predict when a space
launch should be made.
There are great state-
ments recorded in the
book of Psalm about God
creating the heavens. The
moon and stars are the
work of the "finger" of God
(8:3). 'The heavens are
telling of the glory of God;
and their expanse is declar-
ing the work of His hands"
(19:1). And to think "by
the word of the Lord the
heavens were made, and
by the breath of His mouth
all their host" (33:6). God
even "established the earth
upon its foundations, so
that it will not totter forever
and ever" (104:5).
As the Discovery moves
to the Smithsonian for
the world to view such a
great work of man, let us
not miss the opportunity
to discover God's marvel-
ous works that we can see
from the sky. The next time
that we use our computer
and think how much they
have improved over the
years, let us remember that
before we discovered elec-
tricity, God had made it.
We can discover some
of the wonders of God just
by looking at our world
from our back porch or by
sitting somewhere reading
the Bible.
* Carlton G. McPeak is an
evangelist working with the
Lakeview Church of Christ in
Lake City. All Scriptural
quotations are from the New
American Standard Bible,
Holman Bible Publishers,
unless otherwise stated.


Ash Wednesday


Several Christian faiths

observe traditional

beginning of Lent


From staff reports
Christians around
the globe marked
the beginning of
Lent Wednesday by
attending services
for Ash Wednesday,
the traditional first
day of prayer and
fasting associated
with Lent.
At Epiphany
Catholic Church in
Lake City, people
attended mass to
have ashes put on
their forhead, a
sign of mourning
and repentance to
God. Anglicans,
Episcopalians,
Lutherans,
Methodists and
Presbyterians also
observe the day.
Ash Wednesday is
not an annual date
on the calendar.


Church parishioners return to their seats after'
having ashes spread across their foreheads.


Epiphany Catholic School eighth-grader Christopher Belibasis, 14, partakes of
communal wine on Wednesday.

Photos by JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake .City Reporter


Above: Third-graders Lily Conley (left), 9, and Faith Weekley,
10, discuss what they will be sacrificing during Lent.

Left: Father Mike Pendergraft wipes ashes on the forehead of
Epiphany Catholic School kindergartner Luis Duterte, 5, dur-
ing Ash Wednesday mass.


CHURCH NOTES


Today
Church revival
The 21 Days of Ablaze
is 7:30 p.m. March 12-15
at Miracle Tabernacle
Church. There will be
dynamic speakers each
night The church is
located at 1190 S.W. Sister
Welcome Road.

Yard sale
A yard sale is 8 a.m. to 1
p.m. today at Falling Creek
Chapel. All proceeds will
go toward the children's.
ministry fund. The church
is located at 1290 NW


Falling Creek Road.

Church yard sale
A Yard Sale is 7:45 a.m.
to noon today at First
Presbyterian Church.
There willibe a Pancake
Breakfast in the fellowship
Hall from 7:30 until 10 a.m.
All money collected will
support the youth. Call the
church office at 752-0670

Sunday
Appreciation service
Dayspring Missionary
Baptist Church is having
an appreciation service


Those prayers
he Bible is the believ- BIBLE STUDY
her's prayer guide. It : .j --
speaks of the nature
and necessity of prayer
and is forceful and per-
suasive with praise as to its privi-
lege and power. Within the covers
of the Bible, God's Inspired Word,
is all we need to know of the many
aspects of our approach to God
through Christ. It gives atten- Hugh Sherr
tion to all the exhortations and ems-hugh43@comcas
examples of Jesus in His prayer
life. We discover that the secret Moses prayed to ent(
to blessings in the Christian life is of promise (Deuteroi
found in prayer. What believer has 29), but had to wait fi
not been perplexed at some time for the answer (Matti
or another with the problem of 4). David prayed mu
unanswered prayers? the erection of a tern
The Bible teaches that the prayers had to wait fo
answers to some prayers are day.
delayed, but God's delays are The Bible is also e:
not denials, as Mary and Martha the matter of prayers
had to learn (John 11:6). The answer. Prayers in ac
needy woman prayed and prayed, with His will and for:
until she got what she wanted always answered. Pr
(Matthew 15:21-29; I Peter 1:7). His holy mind and pi


for Minister Janeth
Harrison 4 p.m. Sunday.
, The speaker is the Rev.
Melvin Wintons. Dinner
will be served after the
service. The church
is located at 849 NE
Congress Ave. The Rev.
Aaron Thomas Sr. is pas-
tor.

Revival services
Singing Evangelist
John Lanier is perform-
ing 10:30 a.m. and 6 p.mp.
Sunday at Glad Tidings
Assembly of God, 933
N.W. Lake Jeffery Road.
Revival continues 7 p.m.
March 14-16. Call 755-


3552 or 365-1533.


Wednesday
Anniversary celebration
A 100th anniversary cel-
ebration is 7 p.m. March
16-18 at Mount Pleasant
Missionary Baptist
Church. The service will
feature the Rev. Craig P.
Riley Sr., pastor of Greater
Mt. Pleasant Baptist
Church in Tallahassee.
The church is located at
3817 Suwannee Valley
Road. Contact Gloria
McIntosh at (386) -755-
1099.


Thursday
Musical and anniversary
celebration
A musical extravaganza
is 7 p.m. March 17-18 at
Greater Truevine Baptist
Church. The church is
also celebrating the Rev.
Antonio Carlisle's eight
pastoral anniversary 11
a.m. and 3 p.m. March 20.
The morning speaker is
Mattie Jones. The evening
speaker is the Rev. Alvin
Green and the St. Paul
church is in charge of
service.


God does not answer


rill Jr.
t.net


er the land
nomy 3:23-
ifteen years
hew 17:1-
ch about
ple, but his
or Solomon's
explicit on
God cannot
accordance
His glory are
ayers alien to
irpose, find


no echo, for "our prayers must be
as clean as our hearts."
Prayer goes unanswered
when: it is substituted for nec-
essary action (Exodus 14:15;
Joshua 7:7-15); it seeks to change
God's declared decrees. God
cannot act contrary to Himself
(Deuteronomy 3:23-27); it ascends
from an unclean heart. The holier
the heart, the purer its prayers
(Psalm 66:18; Lamentations 3:8,
40-44); it seeks to avert deserved
and necessary chastisement (II
Samuel 12; 16-18; II Corinthians
12:7-9); it totally disregards the
known, revealed will of God (I
Samuel 8:9, 10); it is offered in
arrogance and foolish pride.
Phariseism in prayer is an abomi-
nation to God (Proverbs 8:13); it
is prompted by selfish, ulterior
motives. (Matthew 6:5; James 4:2,
3); it arises out of a heart full of
ill will and hatred toward others.
(Matthew 5:24); it simply express-
es meaningless and repetitious


phrases. (Matthew 6:7); it lacks
sincerity and faith. (Matthew 6:5,
7; Hebrews 11:6; James 1:6, 7); it
is inspired by carnal motives, and
not by the Spirit. (James 4:2, 3);
't is unaccompanied by confessed,
conscious sin. (I John 1:8-10); or
it seeks the recall of lost oppor-
tunities. (Luke 13:25-28). Once
doors are closed from the divine
side, it is useless to pray for their
opening.
Only when we have a right rela-
tionship with God will our prayer
life be effective. When we don't.
have such a relationship, God's
word says He will not answer our
prayer.
So to have a prayer life that
we can have assurance God will
answer, we must first of all know
Him as our Personal Savior; then
strive to live God's way and to
pray God's way. (John 15).
* Hugh Sherrill is a preacher in Lake
City available for pulpit supply and
revivals.


5A










6A LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVERTISEMENT SATURDAY, MARCH 12, 2011


^.r ? .- *.
-' . .,

. .. 1 ', .. ,

7-' .w d


If a new blossom is not protected from
harm, the future of the flower is lost but with

the right tending and nourishment it blooms

beautifully. Those of us who have children realize

how difficult it is to protect a child from any harm.

No matter how we try, at times we feel inadequate.

We may become frustrated and sad as we see our

perfect infant grow up and be influenced in ways

we cannot control. God can help. This week, visit

your chosen place of worship as a family and

grow together in the garden of the Creator.





Scriptures Selected by The Americah Bible Society
@2011, Keister-Williams Newspaper Services, P.O. Box 8187, Charlottesville, VA 22906, www.kwnews.com


North Florida
Pharmacy
7 Locations to Serve You
Lake City, Ft. White, Branford,
Chiefland, Mayo & Keystone Heights


T ..L..... Q*.r

To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440



Supercenter
"LOW PRICES EVERY DAY"F
US 90 WEST755-2427

GWHunter, Inc.
Chevron Oil
f Jobber





"Qualt a4ork at a reasonable price"
We. also do solar hook-ups
(386) 755-5944


FOOD STORES
Open 7 Days a Week
1036 E. Duval St., Lake City FL.
(386) 752-0067
Fresh Meat, Fresh Produce!
ca& do all thll igs hro ib Christ hi ch srengthenclh ine"
Phlippr'"s 4:13

To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440

To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440


RICK'S CRANE SERVICE
Located at 25A *'" .
(Old Valdosta Hwy) i,
386-752-5696 or :; L,,
386-867-2035 .'
after hours

To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440


First Advent Christian
1881 SWMcFarlane Ave.
386-752-3900
Sunday School: 9:45AM
Sunday Service: 11:00AM
Wednesday Service: 7:00PM

GLAD TIDINGS ASSEMBLY OF GOD
993 NW Lake Jeffery Road
386-752-0620 .
Sunday Worship 10:30AM & 6PM
Wed. Fam. Bible Study 7:00PM
"A church where JESUS is Real"

BEREA BAPTIST CHURCH
SR47 S 755-0900
Sunday School 9:30AM
Sunday Worship 10:45AM & 6PM
Wednesday Eve. Service 7PM
Pastor: Larry E. Sweat
EASTSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
196 SE James Ave. 386-752-2860
Sun. Bible Study 9:45AM
Sun. Worship 11AM & 6PM
Wed. Prayer Mtg/Bible Study 6PM
Rev. Brandon G. Witt
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Sunday Bible Study 9:15AM
Sunday Worship 10:30AM & 6:00PM
Wed. 6:00PM Prayer Service, &
Children Ministry 6:15PM
Downtown Lake City 752-5422
Rev. Stephen Ahrens, Pastor
OLIVET MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH
541 N.E. Davis Street
(386) 752-1990
Ronald V. Walters, Pastor
Sunday School 9:45AM
Sunday MomingWorship 11:00AM
Wed. Mid-WeekWorship 6:00PM
"In God'sWord, Will & Way"

PARKVIEW BAPTIST CHURCH
268 NW Lake Jeffery Rd. 752-0681
Lake City, Florida 32055
vww.pbclc.com
Sunday School 8:30,9:45 & 11AM
Sunday Worship 9:45 & 11AM & 6PM


AWANA
Evening Worship
Wed. Eve. Schedule
Family Supper (Reservation)
Children's Ministry
Youth Worship
Prayer Meeting


5:30 PM
6:00 PM

5PM
6PM
6:00 PM
6:00 PM


Thursday Evening Schedule St. 8/21/08
Parkview Edge 8:30PM
Pastor: Michael A. Tatem

PINE GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH
1989 N US Hwy 441
386-752-2664
Sunday Bible Study 9:45AM
Sunday Worship 11AM & 6PM
Wed. Kids & Youth Ministry 6:30PM
Pastor: Ron Thompson
S^ sas ~


SALEM PRIMITIVE BAPTIST
Sunday Services 10:30 AM
Pastor: Elder Herman Griffin
752-4198
SOUTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
388 S.E.Baya Drive* 755-5553
Sunday


Bible Study
Morning Worship
EveningWorship
'Wednesday:
AWANA
Prayer & Bible Study


9:15AM
10:30AM
6:15PM
5:45PM
6:15PM


TABERNACLE BAPTIST CHURCH
(Independent Baptist)
144 SE Montrose Ave. *752-4274
Sunday School 10 AM
Sun. Morn. Worship 11AM
Sunday Eve. 6PM
Wed. Prayer Meeting 7:30 PM
Pastor: Mike Norman

EPIPHANY CATHOLIC CHURCH
1905 SWEpiphany Court 752-4470
Saturday Vigil Mass 5:00 PM
Sunday Mass. 8 i h)1, I," ,i 'i.1,
'5:00 PM (Spanishl/English)
Sunday School/Religious Education
9:00AM-10:15AM

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE SOCIETY
239 SE Baya Ave..
Sunday Service 11:00AM
Wednesday Evening Service 7:30 PM


LAKE CITY CHRISTIAN CHURCH
Hwy 247 S.s 755-9436


Sunday School
Sun. Morn. Worship
Wed. Prayer Meeting


9:30 AM
10:30AM
7PM


NEW HORIZON
Church of Christ
Directions & Times 386-623-7438
Jack Exumn,Jr., Minister

LAKE CITY CHURCH OF GOD
167 Ermine St:* 752-5965
Sunday School 9:45 AM
Sun. Worship 10:30AM & 6:00PM
Wed. Family Night 7 PM
Wed. Youth Service 7 PM
Pastor: Carroll Lee
EVANGEL CHURCH OF GOD
370 SW Monitor Glen *755-1939
Sunday School 9:45 AM
Sunday Worship 10:50 & 6:30
Wed. Spiritual Enrichment 7PM
"ShockYouth Church"
Boys and Girls Clubs
Bible Study
Pastor: John R. Hathaway

ST. JAMES EPISCOPAL CHURCH
2423 SW Bascom Norris Dr., Lake
City, Fl 32025- 386-752-2218
Email: stjamesepis330l@bellsouth.net
Holy Eucharist
Sun. 8 & 10AM
Wednesday: 5:15pm
Priest: The Rev. Michael Armstrong
Deacon:The Rev. limmie Hunsinger
Director of Music Dr. Alfonso Levy
h \ ' ,'
f'M /1'' *


OUR REDEEMER LUTHERAN CHURCH
LCMS
1 12 miles S. of 1-75 on SR 47
755-4299
Sunday Services 9:30AM
(Nursery Provided)
Christian Education Hour
For all ages at 10:45AM
Pastor: Rev. BruceAlkidre
SPIRIT OF CHRIST LUTHERAN
Hwy 90, 1.5 miles West of 1-75 752-3807
Sunday Worship 10:00AM
Nursery Avail.
Wed. Pot Luck 6PM Worship 7PM
Vicar John David Bryant


BETHEL UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
4869 US 441 South
Sunday Worship Services,
Traditional Services 8:30 & 11:00AM
386-755-1353
mybethelumc.com.
First United Methodist Church
973 S. Marion Ave.
S 386-752-4488
Sunday School 9:45AM
Sunday Morning Worship
CasualWorship Service 8:50AM
Traditional Service 11:00AM
Program opportunities available in all
areas for all ages, .
For a complete schedule
contact church office at
752.4488
WESLEI MEMORIAL UNITED
1272 SW McFarlane 752-3513
(Adjacent to Summers School)
Worship 8:00 & 10:00AM
Sunday School 9:00AM
liul,.. r, p ,i in- d
AWANA-Wednesdays 1iliI'M
Pastor: The Rev. J. Louie Mabrey
www.wesleymem.com
Wi-ER1(jUWN CONGREGATIONAL
METHODIST CHURCH
U.S. 90 E. turn on Cortez (next to Quality
Ind.) right on Okinawa.
Sunday School 9:45 AM
Sun. Worship 11AM & 6PM
Wed. Night Service 7PM
Pastor, Randy Ogburn

LAKE CITY CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE
Services:
Sunday School 9:45AM
SundayWorship, 10:45AM, 6:30PM
Wednesday 6:30PM
Adult, Youth Ministry, Children's Ministry
Pastor: Craig Henderson
Nursery Provided
SW SR 47 and Azalea Park Place

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
629 SW Baya Drive 752-0670
Sunday Contemporary 9:00AM
Sunday School 10:00AM
Traditional Service 11:00AM
SNURSERYPROVIDED
Pastor: Dr. Roy A. Martin
Director of Music: Bill Poplin

FIRST FULL GOSPEL CHURCH
NE JonesWay & NEWashington St.
Sunday School 10:00AM
Morning Worship 11:00 AM
Evangelistic Service 6:00 PM
Youth Services Wednesday 7:00PM
Mid-week Service Wednesday 7:00 PM
For info call 755-3408* Everyone Welcome
Pastor: Rev. Stan Ellis


CHRIST CENTRAL MINISTRIES
Leadership Services 9:00AM
Sunday Morning 11:00AM
Wednesday Service 7:00PM
217 Dyal Ave., from Hwy 90 take
Sisters Welcome Rd., go 5 miles, South,
church on left., 755-2525,
Lead Pastor: Lonnie Johns
"A Church on the Move'
CHRISTIAN HERITAGE CHURCH
Corner SR. 47 & Hudson Circle
Sunday Celebration 10:30 AM
Pastor Chris Jones 752-9119
FALLING CREEK CHAPEL
SFalling Creek Road *755-0580
First and Third Sundays 9:30 A.M.
Second and Fourth Sundays 3:00 P.M.
Pastor: Rev. Cheryl R. Pingel
NEWBEGINNING CHURCH
Highway 242 E. of Branford Highway
Sunday School 10:00AM
Morning Worship 11:00AM
Sunday Eveniing 6:00PM
Wednesday 7:00PM
A Full Gospel Church Everyone Welcomed
(386) 755-5197





- c -


To List





Your.





Church





on the



Church


Call


752-1293


Su4.


To.dets nti h~ iectory C a ll 55-440


Clay! Electric Cooperative, Inc.
Competitive rates, non-profit,
right here in your community.
Lake City District 386-752-7447
clayelectric.com
To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440










Tires for every need.
US 90 West across from Wal-Mart
752-0054

Morrell's
Your Complete decorating and
home furnishings store
SW Deputy Jeff Davis Lane (formerly Pinemount Rd.)
752-3910 or 1-800-597-3526
Mon.-Sat. 8:00-5:30 Closed Sunday







SNDEILSON COLUMBIA CO., INC.
1' PHALT PAVING
(.OMMI RACIAL .INDUSTRIAL
Site Preparation Road Building Parking Lots
Grading & Drainage
752-7585
871 NW Guerdon St., Lake City

HARRY'S
,B 'coW i,, Heating & Air Conditioning Inc.
Harry Mosley, President

Pion. 752-2308 P 1

To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440


Central States
Enterprises
Columbia County's Feed Headquarters
FEED PET SUPPLIES LAWN & GARDEN
ANIMAL HEALTH
668 NW Waldo St. 386-755-7445

MIKELLS POWER EQUIPMENT, INC.
Your Lawn & Garden Headquarters
MOWERS CHAIN SAWS TRIMMERS
1152 US 90 WEST* LAKE CITY, FL.
386-752-8098








this Directory

Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440



S.'-" ...


To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440

BAYWAYjantorial Services
FIRE & Water Restoration
Floor & Carpet Care
Iiesidletial & Conmiercial
755-6142


To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440


111.1








Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
i ',by'.Q'i' eoa rfepotro t con


SPORTS


Saturday, March 12, 201 I


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


FROM THE SIDELINE


Brandon Finley
Phone: (386) 754-0420
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com

Debuts

right

around

corner
It may seem like
the Super Bowl
was only last
month (it was),
but to me football
has been out of mind for
far too long.
I'm just way to excited
about next season to wait
another five months to
see meaningful football.
Luckily, I don't have to
wait that long.
The University of
Florida will begin its
spring practice next
week and Columbia High.
has less than a month
before spring begins.
Both of these teams
have interesting
storylines for fans to
follow.
Both bring in new
coaches and both
teams will switch up
philosophies.
The Gators will break
in an unproven guy in
Will Muschamp that
brings fire and passion.
Columbia breaks in
another unproven guy
that brings youth and
enthusiasm in Brian
Allen.
Each coach will be
thrown into the fire and
fans will expect results.
We aren't talking about
pansy programs here.
We're talking about a
team that has won
three national
championships at the
collegiate level and
a team that has the
moniker of being the
winningest program
in Florida high school
football history.
Expectations are going
to be high. I don't think
either coach would have
went after the jobs if
they didn't want it that
way. They came to the
schools to win, and
that's what is going to
be expected of them
immediately.
Coaches coach to win.
It's the same reason
players play the game.
It's not about how you
play the game. That's
what you hear in little
league as you learn
respect for the game.
You'll never hear Brett
Favre come of the field
talking about how he
didn't perform well, but
loved how he played the
game.
Make no mistake
about it. These coaches
want to win, and they
want to win now.
People expect winning
from them. It's not a
matter of what they
do in the spring, but
I can't wait to see the
foundation forming
layers.
These coaches make
me want to get down
in a three-point stance.
Unfortunately, I can't,
but I can't wait to see
what kind of product
they put on the field.
U Brandon Finley covers
sports for the Lake City
Reporter.


Boynton scores 22,


Florida bounces Vols


Five starters score
in double figures
for Gators in win.
By PAUL NEWBERRY
Associated Press
ATLANTA Kenny
Boynton scored 22 points
and No. 12 Florida rebound-
ed after going more than 6
minutes at the end of the
first half without scoring,
beating Tennessee 85-74
Friday night in the quar-
terfinals of the SEC tourna-
ment.
All five starters were
in double figures for the
Gators (25-6), who picked
up their trophy for win-
ning the SEC regular-sea-
son title, then played like
champions after that dis-
mal stretch.
Tennessee (19-14) closed
the first half on a 21-4 run
and went to the locker room
up 34-29. The Gators didn't
even score over the final
6:24, dragging off the court
as if they weren't sure what
hit them.
But Florida shook it off
in the second half. Boynton


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Florida forward Alex Tyus (23) loses control of the ball
as Tennessee forward Steven Pearl (22) defends during
the first half of an NCAA college basketball game at the
Southeastern Conference tournament on Friday.


delivered a crushing blow, a
3-pointer with 4:26 remain-
ing, posing with his hand
outstretched in front of the
Gators' bench.
Tobias Harris led
Tennessee with 25 points.
Florida advanced to face
Vanderbilt or Mississippi'
State in Saturday's semifi-
nals, while Tennessee will
await its fate on Selection
Sunday. Despite the loss
and a fifth-place finish in


the SEC East, the Vols
could land a spot in the
68-team NCAA tournament
field based on their solid
RPI and one of the nation's
toughest schedules.
The Gators were about
as efficient as a team could
be over the final 20 min-
utes. They had only three
misses in 17 shots from the
field, but it was' at the foul
line where the points really
piled up.


Douglass goes the
distance for Fort
White in victory.
From staff reports

Fort White High's softball
team slipped past the Lady
Tornadoes, 3-2, at Bradford
High on Thursday.
Taylor Douglass went the
distance and picked up the
win. She gave up four hits,
walked six and struck out
10.
Kayla Williams, Holly
Polhill and Stacie Scott


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Virginia Tech's Jeff Allen (0) shoots as Florida State's Xavier
Gibson (1) defends in the first half of the Atlantic Coast
Conference tournament in Greensboro, N.C., Friday.

Game winner waved

off as Virginia Tech

beats Florida State


Green's go-ahead.
jumper ends up
being difference.
Associated Press

GREENSBORO, N.C.
- Erick Green hit the
go-ahead jumper with 4.7
seconds left, while Derwin
Kitchen's desperation shot


at the buzzer was waved
off as Virginia Tech edged
Florida State 52-51 in the
quarterfinals of the ACC
tournament Friday night.
Green was just 1 for 12
from the field for the sixth-
seeded Hokies (21-10)
before taking a feed from
Malcolm Delaney and calm-
ly sinking a jumper near the
3-point arc.


Raiders overrun Fort White


Santa Fe pads
district lead over
Indians, 14-6.
By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com
ALACHUA Santa Fe
High's baseball team pad-
ded its district lead at the
halfway point with a 14-6
win over Fort White High
in Alachua on Friday.
Fort White finally found
some offense, particularly
in the third inning when the
Indians scored four runs to
take a 4-2 lead.
Brandon Brooks was
hit by a pitch to open the
inning. Anthony Gonzalez
bunted him to second base.
.Bryce Beach had an RBI-
single and Justin Kortessis
followed that with a home
run blast.
Cody Spinn and Josh
Faulkner singled later in
the inning. Faulkner's hit
scored Jonathan Dupree,
who had walked. Faulkner
had two hits for the Indians.
Jonathan Dupree had a
two-run double in the sixth
inning, scoring Gonzalez
(single) and Kevin Dupree
(error).
Santa Fe scored 'two
runs in the first inning and
tied the game at 4-4 with
two more runs in the third
inning.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Fort White's Josh Faulkner (14) eyes the ball after hitting a pitch against Williston High on March 4.


In the fourth inning, Kyle
Brooks and Zack Lightsee
both had two-run home
runs. The Raiders, added
four ignore runs in the fifth
inning and two in the sixth.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Fort White first baseman Cecile Gomez (12) watches as a
Newberry High hitter receives a pitch from Taylor Douglass in
a game on March 1.


Kevin Dupree started
for Fort White. H1 pitched
3`3/ innings with eight hits,
eight runs (six earned), two
walks and three strikeouts.
Brandon Sharpe finished


on the mound with five
hits, six runs, four walks
and three strikeouts in 2'&/
innings.
Stephen Papia-Ruano
improved to 4-0 with the


victory. Santa Fe is 6-1 over-
all and 4-0 in district play.
FortWhite (4-4,1-3) hosts
Hamilton County High at
7 p.m. Monday.


had hits for Fort White.
Cecile Gomez, Williams
and Polhill scored runs.
Douglass, Scott and Polhill
had RBIs.
"Hitting-wise we were
not as solid'" said coach
Cassie Sparks, whose team
improved to 9-1. "We had a
few base running mistakes
where runners got picked
off at first."
Fort White traveled to
PK. Yonge School on Friday
and will host Santa Fe High
at 7 p.m. Tuesday, preceded
by the junior varsity game
at 5 p.m.


FortWhite'sjunior varsity
dropped its last two games,
falling 4-1 at Bradford on
Thursday and losing at
home to Suwannee High on
Tuesday, 9-5.
Alex Walker pitched
against Bradford and struck
out four. Ayla Gonzalez
drove in the Lady Indians'
run.
Against Suwannee,
Sydney Walker was 3-for-3
with a triple, double and
RBI.
Ashley D'Antonio had
a hit and RBI and Hollee
Beach had an RBI.


Lady Indians win nail-biter,

3-2, against Bradford High












LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SATURDAY, MARCH 12, 2011


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
AUTO RACING
3:30 p.m.
SPEED NASCAR,Truck Series, pole
qualifying for Too Tough to Tame 200, at
Darlington, S.C.
5 p.m.
SPEED NASCAR, Truck Series,Too
Tough to Tame 200, at Darlington, S.C.
12 Midnight
ESPN2 NHRA, qualifying for
Gatornationals, at Gainesville (same-day
tape)
BOXING
10:30 p.m.
HBO Middleweights, Andy Lee
(24-1-0) vs. Craig McEwan (19-0-0);
champion Sergio Martinez (46-2-2) vs.
Sergiy Dzinziruk (37-0-0), for WBC
middleweight title, at Mashantucket,
Conn.
CYCLING
2 p.m.
VERSUS Paris-Nice, stage 7,
Brignoles to Biot-Sophia Antipolis, France
(same-day tape)
GOLF
Noon
TGC PGA Tour/WGC, Cadillac
Championship, third round, at Doral
2 p.m.
NBC PGA Tour/WGC, Cadillac
Championship, third round, at Doral
6:30 p.m.
TGC PGA Tour, Puerto Rico Open,
third round, at Rio Grande, Puerto Rico
(same-day tape)
9:30 p.m.
TGC Champions Tour, Toshiba
Classic, second round, at Newport Beach,
Calif. (same-day tape)
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
4 p.m.
WGN Preseason. Chicago Cubs vs.
Cincinnati, at Las Vegas
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
I 1:30 a.m.
CBS Conference USA,
championship game, at El Paso,Texas
Noon
ESPN2 America East Conference,
championship game, Stony Brook at
Boston University
I p.m.
ABC Southeastern Conference.
semifinal, at Atlanta
ESPN Atlantic Coast Conference,
semifinal, at Greensboro, N.C.
1:40 p.m.
CBS Big Ten Conference, semifinal,
at Indianapolis
2 p.m.
ESPN2 Mid-Eastern Athletic
Conference, championship game, at
Winston-Salem, N.C.
3 p.m.
ABC Southeastern Conference,
semifinal, at Atlanta
ESPN AtiiCi..c Coast Conferen.ce.
sernfnal, at Greensboro.'ll' "
4 p.m.
CBS Big Ten Conference, semifinal,
at Indianapolis
ESPN2 Southland Conference,
championship game,Texas-San Antonio vs.
McNeese State, at Katy, Texas
6 p.m.
CBS Pac-10 Conference,
championship game, at Los Angeles
ESPN Big 12 Conference,
championship game, at Kansas City, Mo.
ESPN2 1Mid-American Conference,
championship game, at Cleveland
VERSUS Mountain West
Conference, championship game, at Las
Vegas
8 p.m.
ESPN2 Big West Conference,
championship game, at Anaheim, Calif.
9 p.m.
ESPN Big East Conference,
championship game, at NewYork
10 p.m.
ESPN2 Western Athletic
Conference, championship game, at Las
Vegas
MOTORSPORTS
I p.m.
SPEED AMA Pro Road Racing,
Daytona 200, at Daytona Beach
7:30 p.m.


T-BALL

Sign-up today for

returning players

The Lake City
Recreation Department
has T-ball registration
today for returning players.
Registration is 8:30.a.m.
to 5 p.m. at Teen Town
Recreation Center. Age
divisions offered are 4-5
and 6-7. Cost is $40 and a
birth certificate is required
at registration.
For details; call Heyward
Christie at 754-3607.

GIRLS SOFTBALL

Lake City Babe

Ruth sign-up

Lake City Babe Ruth
Softball registration is
under way for ages 9-15.
Cost is $75.
For details, call Wendy
Dohrn at 623-3641 and
leave a message.

CHS SPORTS

FCA rally Monday

at CHS auditorium

A Fellowship of Christian
Athletes rally is 6 p.m.
Monday in the Columbia


SPEED AMA Supercross, at
Indianapolis
12 Midnight
SPEED -AMA Pro Racing, at Daytona
Beach (same-day tape)
NBA BASKETBALL
8 p.m.
WGN Utah at Chicago
NBA DL BASKETBALL
II p.m.
VERSUS Austin at Texas (same-
day tape)
RODEO
9 p.m.
VERSUS PBR, Glendale Invitational,
at Glendale, Ariz.
WOMEN'S COLLEGE
BASKETBALL
Noon
FSN Big 12 Conference,
championship game, at Kansas City, Mo.
2:30 p.m.
FSN Pac-10 Conference,
championship game, at Los Angeles
4 p.m.
VERSUS Mountain West
Conference, championship game, at Las
Vegas

BASKETBALL

NBA schedule

Friday's Games
Charlotte 97, Portland 92
New Jersey 102, L.A. Clippers 98, OT
Toronto 108, Indiana 98
Philadelphia 89, Boston 86
Chicago 94,Atlanta 76
Minnesota 122, Utah 101
Oklahoma City 104, Detroit 94
Sacramento at San Antonio (n)
Orlando at Golden State (n)
Today's Games
Memphis at Miami, 3:30 p.m.
Portland at Atlanta, 7 p.m.
LA. Clippers at Washington, 7 p.m.
Utah at'Chicago, 8 p.m.
Philadelphia at Milwaukee, 8 p.m.
Sacramento at New Orleans, 8 p.m.
L.A. Lakers at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
San Antonio at Houston, 8i30 p.m.
Detroit at Denver, 9 p.m:
Sunday's Games
Oklahoma City at Cleveland, I p.m.
Charlotte'atToronto, I p.m.
Orlando at Phoenix, 3:30 p.m.
Milwaukee at Boston, 6 p.m.
Indiana at NewYork, 6 p.m.
Minnesota at Golden State, 9 p.m.

SEC tournament

At The Georgia Dome
Atlanta
First Round
Georgia 69,Auburn 51
Mississippi 66, South Carolina 55
Tennessee 74,Arkansas 68 *
Vanderbilt 62, LSU 50
Quarterfinals
Friday
AnbArma 65. Georgia 59, OT
Kentucky 75. M..s ssippi 66
Florda'85, Tennessee 74
Mississippi State vs.Vanderbilt (n)
Semifinals
Today
Alabama-Georgia vs. Kentucky-
Mississippi winner, I p.m.
Florida-Tennessee winner vs.


Mississippi State-Vanderbilt
3:30 p.m.
Championship
Sunday
Semifinal winners, I p.m.

ACC tournament


winner,


At Greensboro (N.C.) Coliseum
First Round
Miami 69,Virginia 62, OT
Boston College 81 ,Wake Forest 67
Maryland 75, N.C. State 67
Virginia Tech 59, Georgia Tech 43
Quarterfinals
Friday
North Carolina 61, Miami 59
Clemson 70, Boston College 47
Duke 87, Maryland 71
Florida State vs.Virginia Tech (n)
Semifinals
Today
North Carolina-Miami winner vs.


BRIEFS


High auditorium. There is
no charge.
For details, call Shayne
Barber at (386) 288-6621.

GOLF

ACS tournament

on March 25

The American Cancer



Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

HOCSAI


Clemson-Boston College winner, I p.m.
Duke-Maryland winner vs. Florida
State-Virginia Tech winner, 3:30 p.m.
Championship
Sunday
Semifinal winners, I p.m.

BASEBALL

Spring training

Today's Games
Pittsburgh (ss) vs. Toronto (ss) at
Dunedin, 1:05 p.m.
N.Y. Yankees vs. Washington at Viera,
1:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay vs. Philadelphia (ss) at
Clearwater, 1:05 p.m.
Baltimore vs. Houston at Kissimmee,
1:05 p.m.
Philadelphia (ss) vs. Pittsburgh (ss) at
Bradenton, 1:05 p.m.
N.Y. Mets vs. Atlanta at Kissimmee,
1:05 p.m.
Minnesota vs. St. Louis at Jupiter,
1:05 p.m.
Florida vs. Boston at Fort Myers,
1:05 p.m.
Toronto (ss) vs. Detroit at Lakeland,
1:05 p.m.
Texas vs. Chicago White Sox at
Glendale,Ariz., 3:05 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Houston (ss) vs.Atlanta at Kissimmee,
1:05 p.m.
Philadelphia vs. Minnesota (ss) at Fort
Myers, 1:05 p.m.
Houston (ss) vs. Detroit (ss) at
Lakeland, 1:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay vs. Toronto at Dunedin,
1:05 p.m.
Minnesota (ss) vs. N.Y. Yankees at
Tampa, 1:05 p.m.
Detroit (ss) vs. Baltimore at Sarasota,
1:05 p.m.
Washington vs. Florida at Jupiter,
1:05 p.m.
Boston vs. Pittsburgh at Bradenton,
1:05 p.m.
St. Louis vs. N.Y. Mets at Port St. Lucie,
1:10 p.m.
San Francisco vs. Texas at Surprise,
Ariz., 4:05 p.m.

AUTO RACING

Race week

NHRA FULLTHROTTLE
NHRA Gatornationals
Site: Gainesville
Schedule: Today, qualifying (ESPN2,
midnight-1:30 a.m.; Sunday, final elimina-
tions (ESPN2,6-9 p.m.).
Track: Gainesville Raceway.
NASCAR
CAMPING WORLD TRUCKS
Too Tough to Tame 200
Site: Darlington, S.C.
Schedule: Today, practice, qualifying,
race, 5 p.m. (Speed, 3:30-7:30 p.m.)
Track: Darlington Raceway (oval, 1.366
miles)
Race distance: 200.8 miles, 147 laps,

HOCKEY

NHL schedule

Friday's Games
N.Y. Islanders 4, Boston 2
Washington 2, Carolina I
Los Angeles 4, Columbus 2
Detroit 2, Edmonton I, OT
New Jersey 3,Atlanta 2, OT
Ottawa 2,Tampa Bay I
Minnesota at Dallas (n)
Anaheim at Colorado (n)'
Today's Games
Montreal at Pittsburgh, 2 p.m.
Buffalo at Toronto, 7 p.m.
N.Y. Islanders at New Jersey, 7 p.m.
Atlanta at Philadelphia, 7 p.m,
Columbus at Carolina, 7 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Florida, 7 p.m.
Detroit at St. Louis, 8 p.m.
Colorado at Nashville, 8 p.m.
Vancouver at Calgary, 10 p.m.
N.Y. Rangers at San Jose, 10:30 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Chicago at Washington, 12:30 p.m.
Edmonton at Pittsburgh, 3 p.m.
Los Angeles at Dallas, 3 p.m.


Society Golf Tournament
is 9 a.m. March 25 at
Suwannee Country Club.
Format is four-person
scramble. Sponsorships
are available.
For details and
registration, call
Vern Lloyd at 397-3113.

E From staff reports
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek


ASIOCL PEC5
- ~ ^-- ~ Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.

Ans: A
(Answers Monday)
Yesterday's Jumbles: BASIS GUESS AROUND DOCKET
Answer: The veterinarian went to the doctor because
he was SICK AS A DOG


BOWLING



Schmitt second in Florida High

School Singles Championships


From staff reports


Sophomore Courtney Schmitt repre-
sented Columbia High and coach Brian
Saunders at the 4th Annual Florida High
School Singles Championships on Jan. 8
at Boardwalk Bowl in Orlando.
Returning to the site of the FHSAA
Finals, Schmitt rolled qualifying games
of 181, 206, 183, 152 and 207. She placed
fourth and advanced to the next round.
The next round was a best 2-of-3 com-
petition and Schmitt earned the two points
with games of 183, 184 and 192.
Schmitt advanced to the final match to
decide the sophomore champion and was
defeated by Leanne Huckins of Tampa.
Schmitt emerged as Florida High School
Singles Sophomore Girls First Runner-up.
Schmitt has bowled 11 years and carries
a 177 average in the Youth Majors Scratch
League at Lake City Bowl.
Schmitt thanked Lake City Bowl owners
Angie and Brian Meek and coach Karen


League reports

Results of Lake City Bowl league
play follow. '
WATERGUARD
High scratch game: 1. Mary
Lobaugh 253; 2. (tie) Maggie Battle,
Carla Nyssen 222; 4. Lori Davis 204.
1. Mark Koppa 258; 2. Bill Dolly 248;
3. Tom Sewejkis 246.
High scratch series: 1. Mary
Lobaugh 643; 2. Lori Davis 580;
3. Maggie Battle,559.1. Tom Sewejkis
693; 2. Bill Dolly 657; 3. Mark Koppa
651.
High handicap game: 1. Carla
Nyssen 280; 2. Maggie Battle 266;
3. Staci Greaves 259. 1. Mark Koppa
277; 2. Jack Stanfield 249; 3. Jim
Lobaugh 243.
High handicap series: 1. Mary
Lobaugh 715; 2. Lori Davis 694;
3. Lorie Niquette 669. 1. Tom Sewejkis
729; 2. Bill Dolly 708; 3. Adam Alford
683.
High average: 1. Mary'Lobaugh
181. 1. Zech Strohl 205.
(results from March 1)
SEXY SENIORS
Team standings: 1. Farmers
(70-42); 2. Perky Pals (69.5-42.5);
3. Pin Droppers (62-50).
High scratch game: 1. Yvonne
Finley 192; 2. Betty Brown 183;
3. Louise Atwood 172. 1'. Dan Ritter
219; 2. Jim Connors 215; 3. Rick
Yates 209.
High scratch series: 1. Betty Brown
467; 2. Louise Atwood 451; 3. Yvonne
Finley 444. 1. Dan Ritter 574; 2. Jim
Connors 565; 3. Art Joubgrt 540.


1

1

1
1
1

1


COURTESY PHOTO
Courtney Schmitt was first runner-up at the
Florida High School Singles Championships
at Boardwalk Bowl in Orlando.

Coleman and Shannon Howard for their
support of the youth leagues.


High handicap game: 1. Yvonne
Finley 240; 2. Betty Brown 230;
3. (tie) Jeanne Sireci, Sandra Johns
226. 1. Dan Ritter 242; 2. Charles
Pressler 239; 3. Rick Yates 238.
High handicap series: 1. Sabrina
Herbster 627; 2. Pat Hale 616; 3. Amy
Musselwhite 606. 1. Jerry Crandal
639; 2. Johnnie Croft 622; 3. Art
Joubert 621.
High average: 1. Betty Brown
147.85; 2. Louise Atwood 146.56;
3. Yvonne Finley 146.35. 1. Dan Ritter
174.86; 2. Art Joubert 171.25; 3. Earl
Hayward 171.09.
(results from March 1)
GOLDEN ROLLERS
Team standings: 1. Golden Niners
(63-41); 2. Gamblers (60-44); 3. Knock
'em Down (56-48).
High handicap game: 1. Yvonne
Finley 241; 2. Joyce Hooper 239;
3. Louise Atwood 220. 1. Winton
Brewer 240; 2. Jack Stanfield 233;
3. Jerry Ellis 229.
High handicap series: 1. Janie
Posey'621; 2. Dee Dee Young 617;
3. Debbie Walters 611. 1. Bill Price
679; 2. George Mulligan 641; 3. Sal
Annello 636.
High average: 1. Shirley Highsmith
155.39; 2. Elaine Nemeth 151.47;
3. Jane Sommerfeld 150.63. 1. David
Duncan 188.74; 2. Bill Dolly 183.82;
3. George Mulligan 182.5.
(results from Feb. 24)
HIT & MISS
Team standings: 1. Alley Oops
(23-9); 2. The Sandbaggers (22-10);
3. Spare Us (21-11).
High handicap game: 1. Charlene


Surfi UW




ACROSS 39 fu
41 Oolong
1 Hatha- 42 Talk on and on
5 Links org. 45 Car grill cover
8 Clump of dirt 48 Tattoo site
2 Still-life sub- 49 Pine
ject 53 Light meal
3 Blast-furnace 56 Actor Donahue
input 57 India's locale
4 Lap dog 58 That, to Pedro
5 Cot spot 59 Charity .
6 Small song- 60 Detained
birds 61 Cable choice
8 That is, in 62 Soared


Latin
20 Ms. Peeples
21 Mai-
22 Gridiron gain
25 Blvd.
28 New Yorker
film critic
Pauline
29 Do dock work
33 Crumpled up
35 Wisent
36 Chicago sub-
urb
37 Nice and warm
38 Poor grades


DOWN


1 Hairy
humanoid
2 Ran up a tab
3 Trait carrier
4 -craftsy (


Moss 252; 2. Elsie Huddleston 241;
3. Angie Meek 231.
High handicap series: 1. Sandy
Black 620; 2. Charlene Moss 610;
3. Betty Schneiders 602.
(results from March 1)
SUNDAY NITE MERCHANTS
Team standings: 1. TAZ (25.5-
10.5); 2. Spare Us (22-14); 3. Train
Wreck (21-15).
High scratch game: 1. Norma
Yeingst 213; 2. Linda Sutton 193;
3. Cara Lashley 181. 1. Mark
Schneiders 246; 2. Robert Pond 243;
3. Robert Pond 228.
High scratch series: 1. Norma
.Yeingst 513; 2. Cara Lashley 499;
3. Linda Sutton 486. 1. Robert Pond
694; 2. Bill Duncan 652; 3. Mark
Schneiders 603.
(results from March 6)
MONDAY NIGHT MAVERICKS
Team standings: 1. Neil Hoffman's
Auto (201.5-68.5); 2. Team 8 (164-
106); 3. TownHomes LLC (162-108).
High scratch game: 1. Timmy
Harris 279; 2. David Duncan 267;
3. Brian Meek 257.
High scratch series: 1. Bobby
Smith 713; 2. Dale Coleman 700;
3. David Duncan 699.
High handicap game: 1. Timmy
Harris 299; 2. David Duncan 279;
3. (tie) Bob Shrum, Rick Cahill 276.
High handicap series: 1. John
McFeely Jr. 745; 2. David Duncan
735; 3. Bobby Smith 728.
High average: 1. Zech Strohl
219.35; 2. Dale Coleman 217.29;
3. Brian Meek 206.5.
(results from Feb. 28)


et *wwW.lakecityrepo rter.com

-- ... Lake City
S.... Reporter



Answer to Previous Puzzle


LAMA LOIS LIM

ORAN ENRICHES
MARACAS RHINO
DAD P E
AMOUR FOSSIL
BID PAIR STAB
SLIP GATE EMU
K NIGHT LUMPS
AHA BAN
AMINO RENTALS
J ALOUSIE OLEC
ALE LOFT LOGS
R SUE ESDUO


5 Bam!
6 Rio (border 11 He loved Lucy
river) 17 Luggage
7 Kind of survey 19 Occupied, as a
8 An NCO seat
9 Medieval court 23 Groovy,today
10 Gumbo veggie 24 Charles Lamb


Wanrt more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


25 Thunderstruck
26 Goodbye, to
Gaius
27 Razor feature
30 Helper (abbr.)
31 Be overly fond
32 "Orinoco
Flow" singer
34 Kind of brake
35 One over par
37 Explosive let-
ters
39 Abdul-
Jabbar
40 Level best
43 Dream on!
44 Pave over
45 Dull
46 Trick
47 Indigo dye
50 Woody's son
51 CD- (com-
puter inserts)
52 Big Board let-
ters
54 Rotter
55 Fall mo.


3-12 2011 by UFS, Inc.


I


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421









LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SATURDAY, MARCH 12, 2011


Fort White track competes

- at UNF, Santa Fe meets


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Hunter Mahan hits from a 13th hole bunker during the second round of the'Cadillac
Championship golf tournament, Friday in Doral.


Mahan loses his cushion


but keeps lead at Doral


By DOUG FERGUSON
Associated Press

DORAL-The only thing
Hunter Mahan liked about
the end of his round was his
name atop the leaderboard
at Doral.
Mahan stretched his lead
to four shots Friday in the
Cadillac Championship
until he stumbled with a
pair of bogeys toward the
end of his second round,
had to settle for a 1-under
71 and suddenly had the
No. 1 player right on his
heels.
PGA champion Martin
Kaymer, in his second
week atop the world
ranking, played bogey-
free in a steady breeze
for a 70 that put him one
shot behind Mahan and
in the final group, a posi-
tion that is becoming
familiar,
"I hit a lot of good shots,
just didn't finish as strong
as I would have hoped,"
said Mahan, who was at 9-
under 135. "But I'm pretty
happy with where I am."
Francesco Molinari,
going after his second
World Golf Championship,
had a 68 and joined Kaymer
at 8 under.
Mahan brought more
than Kaymer back into the
game. Dropping those two


shots one of them one a
long three-putt at the 14th,
the other on a poor tee shot
at the 16th brought a
host of others into the mix
on the Blue Monster.
Rory Mcllroy (69), Matt
Kuchar (69) and Nick
Watney (70) were among
those two shots behind,
while Dustin Johnson (69)
and Adam Scott (70) were
another stroke back.
Tiger Woods, a three-
time winner at Doral, was
not among them. Neither
was Phil Mickelson.
Woods again struggled
with his putter, missing
four birdie putts inside 10
feet and looking bad at the
end. A pair of 6-foot birdie
attempts at the 16th and
18th holes never had much
of a chance and he wound
up with a 74, nine shots
behind.
Even so, the lasting
image of Woods will be a
pair of tee slots.
He hit a smother hook
with the driver on the sec-
ond hole, which traveled
only 122 yards about the
same distance he typically
hits a sand wedge. Then
came a pop-up on the 14th
hole and a 188-yard drive.
"It's pretty tough not to
giggle," U.S. Open champi-
on Graeme McDowell said
about Woods' tee shot on


No. 2. "We all hit bad shots.
Hit a couple of those in my
time. The guy is working
on his golf swing, and every
now and again, you have a
few weird ones in there."
When someone suggest-
ed he didn't appear to be
having fun, Woods didn't
look like he was having fun
answering the question.
"You're not going to have
a lot of fun when you're
nine back," he said. "I don't
know if a lot of people are
very happy with that"
Mickelson dropped three
shots when he returned to
finish the storm-delayed
first round, including two
shots in the water on the
par-5 eighth for a double
bogey that led to 73. He was
slightly better in the second
round with a 71.
McDowell called a pen-
alty on himself when he
noticed the ball move dur-
ing his putting stroke on
the ninth. That gave him
a 73
Woods and Mickelson
will be paired Saturday, the
first time they have ever
been in the same group for
three straight rounds. They
could be just a warmup act,
however, being so far out of
contention.
Kaymer is becoming an
intimidating name on the
leaderboard.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
A large group of NFL Players Association members arrive for negotiations with the NFL
involving a federal mediator Friday in Washington.


Players' union decertifies as

talks break down at deadline


By HOWARD FENDRICH
Associated Press

WASHINGTON NFL
labor talks broke down
just hours before the latest
contract extension expired
Friday, putting America's
most popular sport on a
path to its first work stop-
page since 1987.
The NFL players' union
decertified effectively
ceasing to operate as a cer-
tified union and players
including Tom Brady and
Peyton Manning sued the
league.
Despite 16 days of negoti-
ations with a federal media-
tor and previous months
of stop-and-start bargain-
ing the sides could not
agree on a new deal. The


league said it hadn't decid-
ed whether to lock out the
players, who, meanwhile,
went to court to request an
injunction to block such a
move.
"The parties have not
achieved an overall agree-
ment, nor have they been
able to resolve the strongly
held competing positions
that separated them on core
issues," mediator George
Cohen said. "No useful pur-
pose would be served by
requesting the parties to
continue the mediation pro-
cess at this time."
By dissolving and
announcing it no longer
represents the players in
collective bargaining, the
NFL Players Association
cleared the way for class-


action lawsuits against the
NFL, which opted out of the
CBA in 2008.
The CBA originally was
due to expire last week,
then was extended twice, in
hopes that the sides could
find common ground on the
key issues: how to divide
more than $9 billion in
annual revenues, and how
much financial information
the league would be willing
to turn over.
It all set the stage for
a lengthy court fight that
eventually could threaten
the 2011 season. The last
work stoppage came when
the players struck 24 years
ago, leading to games with
replacement players.
The NFLPA also decerti-
fied in 1989.


From staff reports

Fort White High's track
team competed in the
University of North Florida
Spring Break Invitational
on March 4.
A smaller group of
Indians went to the Santa
Fe Invitational on March 5.
Brittani Cason won
the high jump (5-2) at Santa
Fe and Rykia Jackson
placed third in the discus
(75 feet).
A.J. Legree cleared
6-foot-8 to win the high
jump at UNE Coach
Bill Jones said Legree's
personal best qualified him
for MileSplit First Team
National Elite. Legree
also placed sixth in the
long jump and 10th in the
300-meter hurdles.
Matt Waddington placed
15th in the 800 meters and
23rd in the 3200 meters.
Sitia Martinez placed
fourth in the 100 meters,
sixth in the 200 meters and
15th in the 400 meters.
She had personal bests in
the 100 and 200, and it
was her first timing in the
400. Martinez long jumped
at the Junior Olympics in
2010 and anchored the
Gainesville Strider's 4x100
relay team.
Sydni Jones had a per-
sonal best in the 800 meters
and placed 13th. Jones won
district in the 1600 meters
last year as a sixth-grader.
Seaira Fletcher placed
35th in the 800 meters, cut-
ting 14 seconds off her best
time. Ashley Jones dropped
down from distance run-


COURTESY PHOTOS
ABOVE: Fort White High's Brittani Cason competes in the
high jump at the UNF Spring Break Invitational on March 4
.in Jacksonville.

BELOW: Sydni Jones runs for the Lady Indians' 4x800
relay team at the UNF Invitational.


ning to try the 400 meters
for the first time and placed
35th. Cason tied for eighth
in the high jump.
Sydni Jones, Ashley


Jones, Fletcher and Carolee
Marrow placed 14th in the
4x800 in 10.50.
Fort White is at Oak Hall
School on Weunesday.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
North Carolina's Tyler Zeller (left) and Miami's Reggie Johnson battle for a rebound in the
first half of an NCAA college basketball game at the Atlantic Coast Conference tournament
in Greensboro, N.C., Friday.


No. 6 UNC escapes against

Miami in ACC quarterfinal


By AARON BEARD
Associated Press

GREENSBORO, N.C.
- Tyler Zeller had just
enough time to catch
Kendall Marshall's pass
under the basket and put
up a shot before the horn
sounded.
The layup saved sixth-
ranked North Carolina
from a shocking exit
from the Atlantic Coast
Conference tournament.
Marshall penetrated into
the lane and found Zeller
for the buzzer-beating bas-
ket as the Tar Heels rallied
from 19 down in the second
half to beat Miami 61-59 in
Friday's quarterfinals.
The top-seeded Tar
Heels (25-6) spent most
of the day playing nothing
like the team that had lost
just twice since December,
including a rousing win
against rival Duke less than
a week earlier to clinch
the regular-season title
outright. They threw away
passes against Miami's
zone, couldn't establish
their big men in the lane
and couldn't get out in
transition for easy baskets


to build momentum.
Yet a frantic rally in the
final 8 minutes sent North
Carolina on to Saturday's
semifinals against
Clemson.
"We feel as lucky as we
can possibly be," coach
Roy Williams said. '"Those
kinds of things happen in
tournament time."
It was North Carolina's
biggest comeback since
rallying from 20 down in
the firsthalf to beat Georgia
Tech in 2006 and its big-
gest second-half comeback
since rallying from 21
down against Florida State
in 1993. It is also believed
to be the program's big-
gest comeback in any ACC
tournament game.
"That's the thing about
this team: we just keep
fighting and fighting,"
sophomore John Henson
said. "We came back good
today, and that's what we
do. I'm just glad we hit
some shots."
Zeller came through
twice for the Tar Heels in
the final minute, first scor-
ing on a hook shot against
Reggie Johnson to tie it at
59 with 45.3 seconds left.


Then, after a Miami turn-
over, Marshall penetrated
past Julian Gamble and
drew Johnson away from
Zeller.
Marshall's pass found
Zeller almost directly
under the basket, and he
quickly put it up as Durand
Scott rotated down from
the foul line in a last-ditch
attempt to block the shot.
"It's one of those things
that people have made
fun of me for not dunk-
ing, but it paid off on that
possession'," Zeller said. "I
just caught it, and I had to
shoot it as fast as possible.
I knew as soon as I let it
go that I had gotten it off
in time because I knew the
buzzer had gone tff after it
was out of my hands."
The officials had no
doubts either, immediately
signaling the basket was
good to send the home-
state crowd filled with
plenty of light blue into a
loud roar of delight.
The final play gave North
Carolina its only lead of the
game and left the ninth-
seeded Hurricanes (19-14)
to walk dejectedly off the
court a day.


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420










Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS SATURDAY, MARCH 12, 2011


DILBERT


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DEAR ABBY


Worry for childhood friend

overshadows happy reunion


DEAR ABBY: I recently
ran into "Grace," who was a
dear friend back in elemen-
tary school. Back then my
parents helped her mother
flee and divorce her abusive
husband. At age 12 we lost
touch because Grace moved
to another school and joined
a "bad crowd."
Eighteen years later I was
happy to see her again, and
gave her my phone number.
I have the feeling something
is a bit "off' about Grace
now. She has called me re-
peatedly and in her messag-
es she sounds nervous and
stumbles over her words.
When I called her back, she
told me she was in a serious
car accident nine years ago
and hasn't held a job since.
The entire conversation was
strange, and my gut is tell-
ing me Grace has a drug
problem.
She has asked me to
lunch to "catch up." I'm a
stay-at-home mom and not
comfortable meeting her
in person, especially with
my kids. I feel guilty for not
wanting to see someone I
was so close to when I was
young, and for assuming
she has a drug problem.
Am I wrong in making
this assumption? Should I
stop returning her calls and
ignore her, or should I see


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearobby.com
her to make a determina-
tion? ALL GROWN UP
IN VEGAS
DEAR ALL GROWN
UP: You are wrong to pre-
judge the woman. While it's
possible Grace has a drug
problem, it is also possible
that the car accident left her
with an injury that has af-
fected her speech. See her
without your children and
make a determination.
If she is impaired because
of injury, would that make a
difference in how you feel
about her? Your lives have
gone in different directions.
She appears to be needy.
With your responsibilities
as a parent, how much time
and effort would you be able
to devote to her? Only you
can answer these questions.
But to take the coward's way
out and ignore her would be
cruel.
DEAR ABBY: I am a 40-
year-old single mom who
is just getting back intq the
dating scene after being
divorced for a year and a


half. There is a guy, "Hank,"
I'm interested in getting to
know better. We both have
kids who go to the same
high school. We have gone
to several out-of-town foot-
ball games with our kids
and have texted each other
often.
What's bothering me is
Hank has never asked me on
a one-on-one date. Should I
ask him, or should I wait for
him to make the first move?
I don't want to appear des-
perate, but I really would
like to get closer. STEP-
PING BACK INTO THE
SCENE
DEAR STEPPING
BACK: I wish you had given
me a little more information
about Hank such as why
he's raising his children
alone and for how long,
and whether he dates at
all. However, I don't think
it would be overly aggres-
sive to say (casually) to him,
"You know, we never get a
chance to talk one-on-one,
and I'd like to get to know
you better. Why don't we
have dinner one night?" It's
not an obvious proposition,
and if he's at all interested
he'll agree.
* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los.
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-
April 19): Don't hold back
if there is something you
want Rely on old friends to
come to the rescue. You can
overcome any obstacle, so
hurry up and make things
happen. You'll make a lasting
impression and can enhance
your love life. ****
TAURUS (April 20-
May 20): If you aren't hap-
py with the way things are
going or you feel you are
being treated wrongly, con-
front the situation so that
you can get on with your
life. You cannot move for-
ward until you lighten your
baggage. ***
GEMINI (May 21-
June 20): Help someone
in need and it will lead to in-
teresting people, places and
possibilities. Love is in the
stars and whether you are
in a relationship or not, yoti
must enhance the prospects
by engaging in social activi-
ties conducive to romance.

CANCER (June 21-
July 22): Put forth an ef-
fort or you will be criticized
for not doing enough. Ex-
pect to face opposition. You
may be forced to make a de-
cision that leads to a parting
of the Ways. Focus on what
you want and the best way
to get it ***
LEO (July 23-Aug.


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

22): You need a change
of scenery. Include some-
one you love or, if you are
single, keep your eyes open
for someone who appeals.
to you. Love and lifestyle
change is apparent and can
lead to an exciting new be-
ginning. ****
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Not everyone will see
things your way. Find out
as much as possible about
a part time business ven-
ture that can subsidize any
cash flow problems you
face. Hard work should be
enough to get you moving
in the right direction. **
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): Utilizing your charm,
intuition and creative imagi-
nation will help you attract
both personal and profes-
sional interest in you and
what you want to develop.
Romance is apparent and
can lead to an interest-
ing evening emotionally.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-
Nov. 21): Fix up your sur-
roundings. Once you have
a space that is conducive to
the type of work you want to
produce or the hobby you
want to pursue, you will feel
at ease about spending a lit-
tle cash to get things up and


running. ***
SAGHITARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): You may
have to answer some ques-
tions about information you
have been handing out Mat-
ters will escalate if you argue
with anyone who is emo-
tional about a situation that
has developed. Listen, but
refrain from getting more
deeply involved. ***
CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): Stick to the
people and places you know
and trust Problems while
traveling or conversing with
acquaintances will develop.
Know the facts before you
embark on an argument
that may damage your repu-
tation. ***
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): You can make
positive changes to your
home and love life. Greater
stability will develop if you
discuss your feelings. Finan-
cial benefits will be intro-
duced if you are willing to
share your time, space and
knowledge with someone
compatible. *****
PISCES '(Feb. 19-
March 20): Expect to be
questioned about your per-
sonal life and your plans for
the future. A secret needs
to be revealed so you aren't
wrongly blamed. Make a
commitment and get things
out in the open. **


CELEBRITY CIPHER

by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: Y equals M
"XMPZP FN V UVA XW RWWL VX X MP
HVNX. EWO'X MFEP TZWY FX.FX
.UFRR OWX GVXGM AWI 'FT AWI EWO'X
ZPHPVX FX." HPVZR SVFRPA
PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "Performing doesn't turn me on. It's an egomaniac
business, filled with prima donnas including this one." Dan Rather
(c) 2011 by NEA, Inc. 3-12


CLASSIC PEANUTS


Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415 LAKE CITY REPORTER


ADVICE & COMICS SATURDAY, MARCH 12,2011










Classified Department: 755-5440


BU I


EL'1 S ITIl


FIND ITfc


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SATURDAY, MARCH 12, 2011

Lake City Reporter





CLASSIFIED


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

755-5440


- ADvantage


14 linte's days Irne $ 0"25
Rate applies to private Indl'duals selling
personal merchandise totaling $100 or less.
Each item must include a price.
This isa non-refundable rate.




One Item per ad
4 lines e daysinesi onal
,ines =7 line $1.10
Rate applies to private individuals selling
Spersonal mechandse totalling 500 or less.
Etch Item must include a price.




One item per ad ?
4 lines 6 H6 Each additional
lines ys ine$1.15
j| Rte aplis topriate Individuals selling
pesnal ha totaling $1,000 or less.
E Eachie t Include a price.
'f This .......n-refundable rate.3 7



One item per ad
4 lines 6 days Each additional
line $1.45
Rate applies to private individuals selling
personal menchardise totalling $2,500 or less.
Thsi o-refundable rate.
Each item must Include a price. ,




One Item per ad $2 d
4 lines 6 days, Each additional
4 in s dayo line $1.55
pRate applies to private individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling $4,000 or less.
Each item must Include a price.
Thls Is a non-refundable rate.




| IO? Item per ad 17V
I ne at 6s day I Each additional .
Rate applies to private individuals selling
Personal merchandise totalling $6,000 or less.
Each Item must include a price.
d This f non-refundable rtie.






4 lines S1 750
3 days
Inclues 2 Signs .-hi n, 1


limited to service type advertis-
': ing only.
-1 4 lines, one month....$92.00
$10.80 each additional line
.Includes an additional $2.00 per
Iad for each Wednesday insertion.
,Ij^h^^^ ^


SYou can call us at 755-5440,
? Monday through Friday from 8:00
v a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Some people prefer to place their
classified ads in person, and some
C ad categories will require prepay-
ment. Our office is located at 180
East Duval Street.
You can also fax or email your ad
Ji copy to the Reporter.
.; FAX: 386-752-9400 Please
direct your copy to the Classified
Department.
-, EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityre-
., porter.com


Ad is to Appear: Call by: Fax/Email by:
'Tuesday Mon.,10:00a.m. Mon., 9:00 a.m.
CWednesday Mon., 10:00a.m. Mpn., 9:00 a.m.
f Thursday Wed., 10:00 a.m. Wed., 9:00a.m.
Friday Thurs.,10:00a.m. Thurs., 9:00a.m.
Saturday Fri.,10:00a.m. Fri.,9:001a.m.
Sunday' Fri., 10:00 a.m. F., 9:00 a.m.
These deadlines are subject to change without notice.




Ad Errors- Please read your ad
on the first day of publication.
j We accept responsibility for only
the first incorrect insertion, and
only the charge for the ad space
C in error. Please call 755-5440
immediately for prompt correc-
tion and billing adjustments.
Cancellations- Normal advertising
deadlines apply for cancellation.
Billing Inquiries- Call 755-5440.
Should further information be
required regarding payments or
credit limits, your call will be trans-
ferred to the accounting depart-
ment.


Advertising copy is subject to
approval by the Publisher who
reserves the right to edit, reject,
or classify all advertisements under
appropriate headings. Copy should
be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the first day of pub-
lication. Credit for published errors
will be allowed for the first insertion
for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the
Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nor for any general,
special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply
with Federal, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
nation in employment, housing and
public accommodations. Standard
abbreviations are acceptable; how-
ever, the first word df each ad may
not be abbreviated.

In Print Oh l'n 1
WW.J-! .*: . .Ioa"I


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR COLUMBIA COUN-
TY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
IN RE: ESTATE OF
CASE NO.: 11-25-CP
LILILAN HESS,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of
LILLIAN HESS, deceased, whose
date of death was December 31,
2010, is pending in the Circuit Court
for Columbia County, Florida, Pro-
bate Division; File Number 11-25-
CP; the address of which is 173 NE
Hemando Street, Lake City, FL
32056. The name and address of the
personal representative and the per-
sonal representative's .attorney are
set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and oth-
er persons, who have claims or de-
mands against decedent's estate in-
cluding unmatured, contingent or un-
liquidated claims, must file their
claims with this court WITHIN
'THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM NOT
FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR
MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S
*DATE OF DEATH IS
BARRED.
THE DATE OF FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE IS: March
12, 2011.
BROOKS C. MILLER, ESQ.
Attorney for Personal Representative.
Florida Bar No. 316695
1690 Southeast Financial Center
200 South Biscayne Boulevard
Miami, Florida 33131
Telephone: (305) 372-0900
Facsimile: (305) 372-0660
Email: bmiller@brooksmiller.com
04543884
March 12, 19, 2011
NOTICE OF PUBLIC AUCTION
1990 FORD
VIN# 1FACP42E4LF153710
1990 Chevy Pickup
VIN# 1GCDK14HXLE139920
1988 Plymouth
VIN# 1P4FH5030JX215795
1996 Chevy
VIN# 2G1WL52MOT9259671
To be held on April 11, 2010.
At Daniel's Towing & Recovery
Arrowhead Road Lake City, Florida
32056-3026
At 9:00 am
04543925
March12, 2011
NOTICE OF PUBLIC AUCTION
1998 Mercury
VIN# 1MEFM13POWW605203
To be held on April 4,'2010.'
At Daniel's Towing & Recovery
Arrowhead Road Lake City, Florida
32056-3026
At 9:00 am
04543924
March 12,2011


010 Announcements









020 Lost & Found








Lost -Over the Ear Hearing
Device, around Hardee's by Wal-
mart, beginning of March, if found
call 386-292-3927 or 755-5331
Male Rottweiller lost evening of
02/21, County Road 138/Rum
Island area. REWARD.
Please call 386-454-2925
if no answer leave message

To place your
classified ad call

755-5440


Home Improvements'

Carpentry, remodeling, paint,
repairs, additions, Lic. & Ins.
Since 1978 FREE estimates
386-497-3219 or 954-649-1037
Handicap accessible modifications
for veterans. 38 yrs experience.
386-752-4072 DON REED
CONSTRUCTION, INC
Licensed and insured CGC036224

Lawn & Landscape Service

Clean Pine Straw,
You pick it up, $1.85 a bale,
delivery 100 bales, $285,
386-688-9156

Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.


100 Job
100 Opportunities

05525284
EXP. DRIVERS OTR
SERVICE TRUCKING, INC.,
MUST BE 25 YRS OR
OLDER, CLASS A LICENSE'
REQUIRED, CLEAN DRIV-
ING RECORD, NO CHARGE
ACC WITHIN THE LAST
YEAR, EXC EQUIPMENT,
GREAT PAY/BENEFITS,
CALL 1-800-899-1300,
EXT 201 MON-FRI, 8-5,
DRUG SCREEN REQUIRED,
EOE

05525311
Teacher Positions

Head Start/Early Head Start,
Lake City-FCCPC /CDA; 3 yrs
of classroom experience
preferred (individuals w/ HS
dip/GED and DCF 40 hrs. may
also apply). Excellent benefits-
paid holidays, sick/annual leave,
health insurance, retirement +
add'I benefits; Apply in person
at 236 SW Columbia Ave
(754-2222) or mail resume to
SV4Cs PO Box 2637,
Lake City, FL 32056-2637, by
email: arobinson@sv4cs.org
or Fax (386) 754-2220. EOE

Accountant/Office Manager
position in North Florida. CPA
experience a plus but not required.
Competitive pay and
benefits available..
Email inquiries and resumes to
resumesubmission@hotmail.com.
AVON!!!, EARN up to 50%!!!
Only $10 for Starter Kit,
1-800-275-9945 pin #4206
www.youravon.com/tdavies
CDL A Flatbed/Van Truck
Driver needed for F/ OTR SE
area, 3 years exp or more, Contact
Melissa or Mary @ 386-935-2773
7 Temporary Farm Workers
needed. Employer: Joe Spalding -
Marion Co, KY. Tobacco,
Straw/Hay, Row Crop, &
Alternative Work. Employment
Dates: 04/22/11 12/30/11.
Wage of $9.48/hr. Worker guaran-
teed 3/4 of contract hours. Tools
provided at no cost. Free housing
provided to ion commuting
workers. Transportation &
subsistence reimbursed when 50%
of contract is met. Apply for this
job at the nearest One Stop Center
in your area and reference
Job Order # KY0421027.
6 Temporary Farm Workers
needed. Employer: Mackey
Enterprises Hardin Co, KY.
Tobacco, Straw/Hay, Row Crop,
Row Crop Produce,
Greenhouse/Nursery & Alternative
Work. Employment Dates:
04/25/11 12/31/11. Wage of
$9.48/hr. Worker guaranteed 3/4
of contract hours. Tools provided
at no cost. Free housing provided
to non commuting workers.
Transportation & subsistence
reimbursed when 50% of contract
is met. Apply for this job at the
nearest One Stop Center in your
area and reference
Job Order # KY0421823.
7 Temporary Farm Workers
needed. Employer: Mark Coleman
Logan Co, KY. Tobacco,
Straw/Hay, Row Crop, Row Crop
- Produce, Greenhouse Nursery &
Alternative Work. Employment
Dates: 04/25/11 02/25/12. Wage
of $9.48/hr. Worker guaranteed
3/4 of contract hours. Tools
provided at no cost. Free housing
provided to non commuting
workers. Transportation &
subsistence reimbursed when 50%
of contract is met. Apply for this
job at the nearest One Stop Center
in your area and reference
Job Order # KY0422476.
McDonald's of Alachua is'
seeking qualified Management
Candidates to join our team. Wag-
es range from $9 to $15 per hour,
based on experience. Competitive
Benefits, Apply online at:
www.mcstate.com\alachua or
fax resume to 386-755-2435
4 Temporary Farm Workers
needed. Employer: Michael T.
Mitchell Woodford Co, KY.
Tobacco, Straw/Hay, Row Crop,
& Alternative Work. Employment
Dates: 04/28/11 11/01/11. Wage
of $9.48/hr. Worker guaranteed
3/4 of contract hours. Tools
provided at no cost. Free housing
provided to non commuting
workers. Transportation &
subsistence reimbursed when 50%
of contract is met. Apply for this
job at the nearest One Stop Center
in your area and reference
Job Order # KY0422483.
Position Available
Manufacturer based in North
FL seeking Plant Manager
Duties would include overseeing
total operation of plant, including
production, personnel, mainte-
nance, receiving and shipping.
Competitive pay & benefits
available, Please send resume
and inquires to:
resumesubmission@hotmail.com
12 Temporary Farm Workers
needed. Employer: Rex Cook
Farms Caldwell Co, KY.
Tobacco, Straw/Hay, Row Crop,
Row Crop Produce, Greenhouse
Nursery & Alternative Work.
Employment Dates: 04/20/11 -
11/30/11. Wage of $9.48/hr.
Worker guaranteed 3/4 of contract
hours. Tools provided at no


cost. Free housing provided to
non commuting workers.
Transportation & subsistence
reimbursed when 50% of contract
is met. Apply for this job at the
nearest One Stop Center in your
area and reference
Job Order # KY0421474.


100 Job
1i00 Opportunities
16 Temporary Farm Workers
needed. Employer: Rolling Ridge
Farms Simpson Co, KY.
Tobacco, Row Crop, &
Alternative Work. Employment
Dates: 04/20/11 -.12/31/11. Wage
of $9:48/hr. Worker guaranteed
3/4 of contract hours. Tools
provided at no cost. Free housing
provided to non commuting
workers. Transportation'&
subsistence reimbursed when 50%
of contract is met. Apply for this
job at the nearest One Stop Center
in your area and reference
Job Order # KY0421341.
Wanted Highly motivated
individual for Sales Position.
Rountree -Moore Ford Lincoln
Mercury Great benefits, paid vaca-
tion. Exp. a plus but not necessary.
Call Chris. @ 386-755-0630

120 Medial
120 Employment

AMIkids Family Services Program
seeks Case Managers for
community based program work-
ing w/ at risk youth &
families. Bachelor's degree req'd.
Req's travel to 7 counties..
Fax resume to 386.362.0932.
Direct Care Staff & Cooks.
Lake City Cluster ICF for
Developmentally Disabled
Persons: www.rescare.com
386-755-6104 EEO/M/F/D/V
F/T Medical Billing/Coding & F/U
Specialist, Ins Verifications & Pt
collections also required,
experienced applicants only,
fax resume to 386-487-3988
FT CNA needed.
Send resume to
826 SW Main Blvd Ste 102.
Lake City, FL. 32025.
Infusion Nurses needed PRN IN
Swannnee,Columbia,
Hamilton,Dixie, and Bradford
County 352-244-0216

Schools &
240 Education

04543680
Interested in a Medical.Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-03/28/10

Phlebotomy national certifica-'
tion, $800 next class-04/11/11
Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com



310 Pets & Supplies

PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.

361 Farm Equipment

84 Ford 4610 Tractor. Runs good.
Solid 2WD. New front tires,
350hr on 2005 motor. Dependable.
$7500. obo. 386-867-0005

401 Antiques

CASH CASH CASH CASH
Pre 1964 Silver Coins, Sterling,
Flatware, Costume Jewelry,
Unusual Antiques 386-963-2621
Extra Large Hard Wood'
Door posss. antique)w/ opaque
glass & letter drop $250 obo
386-292-3927 or 755,5331


402 Appliances

20 cu ft Refrigerator,
White $250 obo
386-292-3927 or
386-755-5331
Dearborn Large Gas Heater
w/Blower
$50 obo
386-292-3927 or 755-5331
Nice Tappan Gas Stove,
White
$150
Call 386-292-3927 or 755-5331
Whirlpool Washer & Dryer Set,
large capacity, white
$250 obo
386-292-3927 or 755-5331


407 Computers
DELL COMPUTER
$65
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170
IBM Computer,
$80
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170


408 Furniture


Large (possibly antique) Hard
Wood Table, w/chairs
$200 obo
386-292-3927 or755-5331
Light Wood Cabinet,
2 doors, shelves,
$30 obo
386-292-3927 or 755-5331


408 Furniture

Small Dinette Table,
$35
386-292-3927 or
386-755-5331


420 Wanted to Buy

K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$250 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.


430 Garage Sales






Estate & Yard Sale Th, Fr, Sat &
Sun,8 am 3 pm, Everything
Must Go! Tools, clocks, antiques,
furniture, 142 SW Mackinaw Way,
Edgewood Estates (47 South)






PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.

Sat & Sun 8am-?, 2178 N Hwy
441 (comer of 441 & Albritton)
Side by side refrig/freezer, other
appliances, lots of miscellaneous!
SAT. MARCH 12. 8-lp
Falling Creek Chapel 1290 NW
Falling Creek Rd. All proceeds go
to our Childrens Ministry


440 Miscellaneous

Fixer upper
Quartet Sega Arcade Game,
$65 obo
386-292-3927 or 755-5331
New Central A/C, still in box,
with full ten year factory warranty
$1,795
Call 386-364-1090
Tow Behind Grill/Smoker"
$1,250 OBO.
386-249-3104 or
386-719-4802

463 Buildi
63vj Materials
ROOFING Are you bothered
by a leaking roof?
Call Reed Roofing today for a free
estimate. 386-752-4072
RCC00455399 Insured
IOOFING:Looking to replace
your Roof? Call Reed Roofing
today for a free estimate
386-752-4072 RC0055399
References available

630 Mobile Homes
6 for Rent

14 Wide, 2/2-$475. mo. + dep.
Clean,.Quiet Country Park
Water, septic, garbage included
758-2280 References, NO PETS!
2&3 BR MH. $395 $650. mo.
plus deposit. Water & sewer fur-
nished. Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
2/1 1/2,SWMH, water,sewage,gar-
bage pick up included, W/D hook-
up, screened deck, $450 md,
$200 dep, NO pets 386-292-0050
'3/2 SW on 1 ac off41 on 246.
Between 1-10 & 75. Just renovated
$575 mo plus security. NO PETS.
386-330-2316 after 5pm
3BR/2BA Doublewide on 1 ac.
Lg. Rooms. $750 a month.
1st month and full security.
Please call 386-965-7534.
A very clean & well maintained
2/2 units in nice park. $599.mo
w/$500. dep. Rent includes water,
sewer,.trash p/u. Close to town
S386-984-8448 or 623-7547


DWMH. Lg. newer 3/2,on 1 ac.
Porch, carport & fenced yard.
Some pets ok. Ellisville area.
$850. mo, $650. sec 386-752-5450
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White Contact 386-623-2465
or 386-623-3404







640 Mobile Homes
60 for Sale "

$216 a month remodeled,
like new, 2Bd/2Ba S Wide
Delivered & blocked, appliances,
A/C $2500 down, 8 year fin.
Possible owner financing. Ready
now. Call Gary 386 758-9824
05525134
Palm Harbor Homes
Repo's/Used Homes/Short Sales
3 or 4 Bedroom Doublewides
Won't Last!! 3,500-40K
Call Today! 800-622-2832


650 Mobile Home
650 & Land
Well kept 3/2 moble on 2+ acres.
screened front porch, covered back
porch, shed, MLS77241 $64,000
Call Brittany @ Results Realty
386-397-3473


710 iUnfurnished Apt.
10U For Rent

05524728
SPRING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans;
some with garages.
Call 386-454-1469
or visit our website:
www.springhillvillage.net
05524833
DEPOSIT AS LOW AS $89 +
$200 OFF!!
BEST PRICES IN TOWN!
Windsong Apts.
386-758-8455
1, 2 & 3 Bedroom Apartments
& Mobile Homes
starting at $350 per month
386-755-2423
2br Apt. by the lake. Close to
shopping and the VA Medical
Center. $525. mo plus deposit.
386-344-2972
A Landlord You Can Love!
2 br Apts $575. & up + sec. Great
area. CH/A washer/dryer hookups.
386-758-9351/352-208-2421
Great location W of 1-75, spacious
deluxe 2BR apts., garage, W/D
hook up. patio. $600 & up, + SD,
386 965-0276
The Lakes Apts. Studios & lBr's
from $135/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $525. + sec.
Call Michelle 386-752-9626

720 Furnished Apts.
72 For Rent

Apt, Ft. White, FL 2/1,
screen porch, W/D hook up,
$550 mo plus Sec Dep,
386-497-1116
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

730 Unfurnished
3 0Home For Rent
3BR/1.5BA. BLOCK HOME.
Fenced (privacy) bk yard. CH/A
Nice area. $825. mo $825. dep.
Ref's req'd. 386-364-2897
3br/2ba new const.in nice S/D
Lease Opt. to buy. $900/Mo. $700
Dep, + 1st & last Req'd., Credit
Check, No Pets (386)755-9476
Brick 3br/2ba on cul-de-sac.
101 SW Hummingbird Glen.
Lake City. CH/A. $900. mo +
$800 dep. 386-365-8543
House for rent. Completely
remodeled. 4br/2ba + bonus room.
Carport. Great area. $1000 mo.
Plus security. 386-86-867-2283

750 Business &
SOffice Rentals
1200 sq ft Professional Office
Space, across from Courthouse,
newly remodeled, 152 N Marion
$650 mo 386-867-4995 / 961-8466
1800 SQFT $1100.'Office
furniture available and
cubicle dividers.Water,
sewer and garbage fees included.
386-752-4072 Ready to move in!
OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$695. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor
SE Baya Ave Office Furnished
1800 Sq Ft $1125.00
Ideal for Engineers & Professional
Quiet and safe environment
Security available 386-752-4072


770 Condos For Rent

04543870
Golf Course Condo for rent,
2BR/2BA, 1420 s.f., $1000/mo.
Rent includes all appliances,
basic cable, water/sewer/
garbage, pool & tennis ct.
access. Realtor/owner
call 386-344-0433.
*


790 Vacation Rentals
Horseshoe Beath Spring Special
Gulf Front 2br home, w/lg water-
front porch, dock, fish sink.
Avail wkends. $345. or wk $795.
(352)498-5986/386-235-3633
Rental Condo on Daytona Beach,
All Inclusive, 7 day stay $675,
(Spring Break April 2-9 Avail)
386-590-0642


805 Lots for Sale
1999 3/2 DWMH on 1 ac
$55,000
Hallmark Real Estate
386-867-1613
Call Jay Sears
2 ac lot in River Access
community. Suwanne River
1 mile away. Owner will finance.
$13,500 Hallmark Real Estate
386-867-1613 Call Jay Sears
Emerald Cove S/D, Lot # 19
Half acre lot, Only $42,000
call Millard Gillen @
386-365-7001 MLS# 75278
westfieldrealtygroup.com








Lake City Reporter











Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SATURDAY, MARCH 12, 2011


805 Lots for Sale
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.


810 Home for Sale
2/1 completely updated, screened
back porch, large utility room,
MLS#77413 $59,888 Call Nancy
@ R.E.O. Realty 386-867-1271
nancytrogers@msn.com
2/1,on nearly an acre, living/dining
rm, kitchen nook, util rm, fenced,
back porch,2 car carport close to
town, $60,000 386-754-5818
2/2 + Bonus Room, 1749sf, 4 acre
comer lot, board fenced, det.
garage/wkshp MLS#74900
$214,900 Call Pam @ Remax
386-303-2505 www.visitpam.com
2/2 -2 story, 9.7 ac. fenced & cross
fenced w/pastures. Oversized LR,
separate dining, Ig den. Workshop,
carport. 386-752-6575 $179,900.
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
2/3 on 5 acres, wrap around porch,
family rm w/fireplace, detached
garage, $179,900 MLS# 77005
call Roger Lovelady @
Westfield Realty 386-365-7039
2BR/2BA singlewide mfg home
on 1.7-ac comer lot; large yard &
paved drive $44,900 DANIEL
CRAPPS AGENCY, INC. 755-
5110 #75864
3/2 Brick Home in town, fenced
back yard w/12x12 workshop
$84,888 Call Nancy @ R.E.O.
Realty 386-867-1271MLS# 77414
nancytrogers@msn.com
3/2 Cute Home, Remodeled, on 2
acres, partially fenced $114,900
MLS# 77396 Call Nancy @R.E.O.
Realty Group 386-867-1271,
nancytrogers@msn.com
3/3 Brick. Great location, pond.
Custom built w/Florida room &
vaulted ceiling. Workshop.
$179,900 Hallmark Real Estate
386-867-1613 Call Jay Sears
3Bedrm/3bth w/2 Master Suites,
fenced back yard,fireplace
MLS#76779, $115,000
Call Missy Zecher @ 386-623-
0237 www.missyzecher.com
4/2 on 10.5 acres w/ detached
garage, patio, above ground pool,
MLS# 77410 $189,888 Call-
Nancy Rogers@ R.E.O. Realty
386-867-1271
67.5 Acre Ranch w/MH, fenced
& cross fenced, wkshop, pole barn,
2 ponds, Spacious MLS# 75607
Asking 299K, Call Patti Taylor @
386-623-6896 Access Realty
95 Acre Estate, 4/3 Farm House,
Pond, Oaks, $689,000,
MLS#76149 Call Charlie Sparks
@ Westfield Realty 386-755-0808
westfieldrealtygroup.com
A quiet neighborhood is the
perfect setting for this.cute, cozy
home. Lg back yard w/1 car
garage/workshop. $84,900.
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
Beautiful Home w/custom
cabinets, 10ft ceilings, $199,900
MLS# 77188 Call
Carrie Cason @ 386-623-2806
westfieldrealtygroup.com
Brick Home in Established S/D,
3/2, Open floor plan, MLS#76121
$134,900 Call Missy Zecher @
386-623-0237 Remax
www.missyzecher.com
CBC 3/1 home, inside city limits,
fenced backyard, detached carport
w/office MLS#77411 $84,900
Call R.E.O.Realty,
Nancy Rogers @ 386-867-1271
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Brick, split plan. Woodcrest S/D.
Screened porch, dining, living &
breakfast area.Lg backyard. Elaine
K. Tolar 386-755-6488 $139,900.
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Brick, 10 ac 3/2 split floor plan. FIl
room, Ig utility, scr porch. Gazebo,
carport, fenced. $149,900. Lori
Geibeig Simpson 386-365-5678
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
New home, May Fair. Great area.
Comer lot. 4 bedroom, lots of tile,
covered porch. Split plan$214,900.
Elaine K. Tolar 386-755-6488
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
4br/2ba on 5 ac. Lg family, Florida
room den or office. Covered patio.
23x30 workshop. $229,900. Lori
Geibeig Simpson. 386-365-5678
LIKE NEW! 3BR/2BA mfg home
near Wellborn on 5+ acres ONLY
$79,900 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY, INC. 755-5110 #76768


1998 Coachman
Class C Motorhome
Generator, awning, jacks, 25"
TV, very clean, 45,650 mi.
$17,900
Call
386-935-1863
386-288-2078


810 Home for Sale
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
3/2 Hardwood, separate office/liv-
ing/family rm. Workshop, fenced
Lori Geibeig Simpson 386-365-
5678 Mary Whitehurst 965-0887
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Brick on 3.23 ac. New roof, win-
dows, paint. Newer AC, remod-
eled interior, fencing, good area.
Elaine K. Tolar. 386-755-6488
Colonial 4/3 + Guest House,
9.95 acres, inground pool, detach-
ed/garage, gate entry,MLS#77386
$3-25K Call Pam Beauchamp @
386-303-2505 Remax
Comer lot in Piccadilly S/D. Huge
living & dining room. New paint
& carpet. 2 car garage, inground
pool. 386-752-6575 $133,500
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
CUSTOM 4/2 scm porch, 16x24
workshop w/ele & water, gazebo,
fireplace, ceramic tile/wood floors.
386-752-6575 $189,900
Century 21/The Darby Rogers. Co
Custom, 3/2.5 built in 2007,
on 10.8 manicured acres,
completely fenced, Owner Fin.
avail., MLS#77382 Call Patti
386-623-6896 Access Realty
EASTSIDE VILLAGE! Owner
motivated! 3BR/2BA has large liv-
ing/dining rm combo $62,000
#77266 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY, INC. 755-5110
Family Home in Subdivision
4 bdrm Lots of space, newer
roof/carpet MLS#76283 Call
Missy Zecher @ 386-623-0237
Remax, www.missyzecher.com
FOR SALE by very motivated
owner. Just reduced $70,000. to
$129,000. Townhouse on Golf
course. 3br/3ba. Wood burning
fireplace. End unit. Remodeled
kitchen, first class appliances,
granite countertops. New Hunter
Douglas wdw treatments.
Cathedral ceiling. Pool, tennis
court. Call for appt. (904)246-6222
GREAT STARTER HOME!
3BR/2BA in Quail Ridge with
back patio, luscious lawn $84,900
#76432 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY, INC. 755-5110
Large Brick, 3/1, 4.43 acres, metal
roof, MLS# 77415 $109,888
Call Nancy Rogers @ 386-867-
1271 R.E.O. Realty Group, Inc.
nancytrogers@msn.com
Log Home, Cypress Beams,
whole house generator, $269,900
MLS# 76899 Call
Roger Lovelady @386-365-7039
westfieldrealtygroup.com
NEW FLOORING-FRESH
PAINT! 2-story 3br/2ba on 1+ ac,
Ig kitchen, family rm, fenced pond
$99,900 #75951 Daniel Crapps
Agency, Inc. 755-5110
Nice solid brick home on 5 acres, -
Country feel but close to Town,
MLS 76063 $129,888 Call
Brittany Stoeckert Results Realty
386-397-3473
NIice, large 4/2 on 1 acre
w/florida room, granite floors,
wrap around front porch, $148,000
Call Brittany Stoeckert @
Results Realty 386-397-3473
Owner Fin., 3/2 on 2.5 acres, fish
pond, N of Lake City, sm down
$675 mo, 386-590-0642/867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
Owners Motivated! Multiple
dwellings. Main house and 2 mo-
bile homes Pecans, cedar & aza-
leas. $199,900. Century 21/The
Darby Rogers Co. 386-752-6575
, Premier Lifestyle Community
The Preserve at Laurel Lake,
4/2, $194,900 MLS# 77257 Call
Scott Stewart @ 386-867-3498
westfieldrealtygroup.com
QUAINT 1950s home w/lots of
upgrades! Enclosed front porch,
2BR/1BA, screened back porch
$29,900 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY, INC 755-5110 #77505
Qualified General Contractor
doing top Quality work!
386-752-4072 Licensed and
Insured CPC036224
Don Reed Construction, Inc.
Reduced 4/2, 2634 sq ft, quiet,
pool, fla rm, garage $199,900,
close to shopping/hospital/golf,
Call Owner 352-284-3469
Reduced in Rose Creek S/D, 5/4
on 2.2 acres, close to town
MLS#75485 $274,900 Call Pam
@ Remax 386-303-2505
www.visitpam.com
Secluded, however close to town,
3/2 Brick Ranch Home, spacious
$198,900 MLS# 74415 Call
Charlie Sparks @ 386-755-0808
westfieldrealtygroup.com
Solid home, needs updating. Nice
yard & workshop/garage! Country
kitchen w/eat in area as well as
formal. 386-752-6575 $70,000
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
Totally Refurbished 2/2
w/workshop on 1.25 fenced acres
$94,900 Call Millard Gillen @
Westfield Realty 386-365-7001
MLS#75417
Two story MH, located in
Wellborn on 2.66 acres, porches
and fireplaces, 9 bdrms/3bths
$163,900 Patti Taylor MLS#71594
Access Realty 386-623-6896
Well Maintained 3/2 on 1.5
acres, fenced, porches, wkshp,
$49,900 MLS# 77309 Call Josh
Ggecian 386-466-2517
westfieldrealtygroup.com


Homestead Ranger
Travel Trailer
28ft. One slideout
fiberglass, awning,
sleeps 8.
$10,000
Call
850-322-7152


820 Farms &
SAcreage
10 ac lots, some w/well, septic, pwr
pole. Lowered prices. Owner finance
w/low dn pmnt Deas Bullard Proper-
ties 386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com ,
4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$69,900. $613mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
4 acres, Wellborn, New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down, $39,900, $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
5 WOODED acres.
Suwanee Ranchettes. $200 per mo
for 5 mo. Then $203.85 per mo
thereafter. (352)472-2879
Outdoorsman Special, near
Itchetucknee Springs St Park,
Owner fin. w/20% dn,
$54,900 MLS# 76366
Brodie Alfred 386-487-1484
Unique 5.5 acres, w/a clear stream,
nice view,homesite is cleared,well,
septic & power pole, includes
26 ft RV, Owner will be on prop-
erty Sun 3/13 & Mon 3/14
727-808-7236, $49,500

830 Commercial
Property
Commercial Income Property,
w/national tenants, 17,000+
sq ft, additional fenced space,
Call Scott Stewart 386-867-3488
westfieldrealtygroup.com
Q860 Investment
Property
Investment Property, 2 MH's on
almost 2acres, well & septic,
fenced $29,900 MLS# 77233
Call Josh Grecian @ Westfield
386-466-2517

940 Trucks








Vehicles
am^!^amm----""-------






1998 Coachmen Class C Motor
' home. Generator, awning, jacks,
25" TV. Very clean 45,650 m iles.
$17,900. 386-935-1863/288-2078


2010 PUMA Travel Trailer 32 ft,
2 slide outs, air awning, King Is-
land bed, Must Sell $18,500
Call 863-660-8539 Lake City








Homestead Ranger Travel Trailer
28ft. One slideout Fiberglass,
Awning, sleeps 8. $10,000.
(850)322-7152



















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2006 EF250
Ford Van
3/4 ton, metal work
shelves/ladder rack,
60K miles, exc. cond.

$10,500
Call
386-555-5555
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during the first 10 days, you
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