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UFPKY NEH LSTA



The Lake City reporter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01498
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 3/10/2011
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
System ID: UF00028308:01498
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text





Track Action
Lady Indians, CHS boys
-'-;m victories.
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Lake


Life Master
Local bridge players
reach milestone.
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Thursday, March 10, 201 I www.akecityrepo


.com


Vol. 137, No. 40 1 75 cents


Bank robber eludes

police, escapes on foot


PATRICK SCOTT/Lake City Reporter
A Lake City Police vehicle blocks an entrance to the Bank of America Wednesday evening
after it was robbed just after 4 p.m.


Police request
arrest warrant
for Carl I. Little.
By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
Law enforcement offi-
cers believe a man they've
labeled as "dangerous" is
their prime suspect in a


Wednesday afternoon bank
robbery. Authorities contin-
ue the search for the man
who allegedly walked into a
local bank, passed the teller
a note demanding money
and fled from the bank on
foot into a wooded area east
of Main Boulevard.
The Bank of America
branch office, 355 Bentley
Place, was robbed by a nian


authorities
identified
as Carl I,
Little, 45,
no address
provided.
LCPD
investiga- Little
tor Andy
Miles was able to get a pic-
BANK continued on 3A


SUPPORTING SCOTT


Local tea party
members take
views to capitol.
By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com
haron Higgins
of Lake City said
Wednesday that
she endorses Gov.
Rick Scott's pro-
posed budget, an endorse-
ment she took to Florida's
old Capitol to defend.
On a bus with almost 30
other North Central Florida
Tea Party members from
Columbia and Suwannee
County, Higgins traveled to
Tallahassee Tuesday for a
rally organized by an alli-
ance of Florida tea parties
as legislators opened the
regular 2011 session.
"The rally was a tea party
'rally," Higgins said. "It was
to support Scott's proposed
budget for the coming two
years."
While approximately 300
tea party supporters were
in its rally's crowd, about
the same number of pro-
union demonstrators ral-
lied across the street at the
Leon County Courthouse
to voice opposing views
on government spending,
according to the Associated
Press.
Higgins attended the
tea party rally to cheer on
Scott's budget-making deci-
sions.
"I wanted to make sure
that there's plenty of people
to support, that there is the
other side," she said.
"I just know Florida
has got to become fiscally
responsible," Higgins said.


COURTESY PHOTO
Wilbur Corbitt (left) and another Vietnam Veteran who served in the war at the same time.


Scott and Lt. Gov. Jennifer
Carroll made a surprise
appearance at the tea party
rally.
"He (Scott) thanked us
for being there and let us
know that it really is just
the beginning'because the
Legislature will be the one
to actually do the budget,"
Higgins said. "I think they
(Scott and Carroll) appreci-
ated that there was some
support there for some of
the hard decisions he's had
to make. I don't think he
would do these things if
he didn't think they were
necessary."
Scott's budget propos-
al submits that spending
should be cut by about $5
billion, with $3.3 billion of
RALLY continued on 3A


Lt. Gov. Carroll introducing Gov.


COURTESY PHOTO
Scott to the rally.


Broadband close to execution


Equipment will be
deployed April 4, with it
running in 18 months.
By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
LIVE OAK The North Florida
Broadband Authority approved sev-
eral contracts Wednesday, as the
organization moved from the plan-
ning stage to the execution stage in
its plans to provide broadband access
to rural areas of North Florida.
The NFBA approved at least four
contracts and authorized payment
for tower usage during its month-
ly meeting Wednesday. The meet-


ing took place at the Suwannee
River Water Management District
Headquarters.
When the NFBA initially applied
for the federal stimulus fund grants
to provide broadband services to the
region, the group had just organized
in Aug. 2009, and didn't have any
financial contributions to meet the
matching fund requirements of the
grant.
Local governments, rather than
give financial contributions, offered
in-kind services, including space on
communication and water towers to
satisfy their in-kind commitments.
Wednesday, NFBA members gave
authorization to execute the con-
tracts to collect on the in-kind con-


tributions.
"We're going to start a sweep
across the region doing one county
, at a time sign-up all of these in-kind
towers," Crystie Carey, NFBA gen-
eral counsel.
The NFBA has a core network
with a total of 93 towers. The core of
the NFBA network is composed of
commercially-owned towers, 40 tow-
ers owned by American Tower, 40
towers owned by Crown Castle and
remainder owned by various other
businesses. Board members unani-
mously approved contract lengths
and payment amounts for the tower
owners. Officials agreed to a 5-year
BROADBAND continued on 3A


FGC plans to offer

baccalaureate

degrees by 2012


Board of Trustees
passes proposals
for 3 programs.
By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com
Florida Gateway
College has gone through
what President Charles
Hall called "a historical
moment."



unanimous-
ly approved,
three pro-
posals at Hall
its regular
meeting Tuesday to hope-
fully begin offering three
separate baccalaureate pro-


grams in the fall semester
of 2012.
"It was a historical
moment," Hall said. "It was
the first time the college
has voted on baccalaureate
programs and we're excited
about it."
The proposals for the
bachelor's degree programs
- Bachelor of Science
in Nursing, Bachelor of
Science in Early Childhood
Education and Bachelor
FGC continued on 3A


Antique store

in White Springs

wrecked by fire


Officials: Tree
falling on backof
house led to blaze.
By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com '
WHITE SPRINGS-A his-
torical landmark in 'White
Springs was destroyed by
fire Tuesday night.
Spring Street Antiques,


owned by Howard and
* Patty Tower, was complete-
ly destroyed, said Robert
Townsend, town. manager.
The fire occurred around
7:30 p.m.
A large oak tree fell on
the back of the building
across the power lines, he
said. The lines sparked the
fire.
The business was closed
FRE continued on 3A


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
A water oak lies in the charred remains of the Springs Street
Antique, located at 16543 U.S. Highway 41, in White Springs.
The tree is said to have sparked a fire after falling onto the
back porch of the building Wednesday. Columbia County,
White Springs and Genoa fire fighters responded to the fire.
4. V -


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBETO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
S'.1 1 iFax: 752-9400


70
T-Storm Chance
WEATHER, 2A


cy


4


Opinion ...........
Around Florida........
Obituaries
Advice & Comics.....
Puzzles


TODAY IN
HEALTH
SuJI el n'.-. tl.i e
I'le.'. Pl, ,*,:":,-JIJ[ '


COMING
FRIDAY


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LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING THURSDAY, MARCH 10, 2011


PIay4)


A$n3 Wednesday:
Afternoon: 9-7-8
rH Evening: 1-0-4


Wednesday:
Afternoon: 6-3-9-6
Evening: 5-0-3-6


ezatch.
.Ti., Tuesday:
12-17-18-22-27


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS


Broadway's 'Spider-Man' possibly shutting down


NEW YORK
SAspokesman for the trou-
bled "Spider-Man" musi-
cal on Broadway insisted
Wednesday that the show
is still scheduled to open
next week, as talk swirled that the
production will shut down for several
weeks and the opening will be put
off for months.
Rick Miramontez, spokesman for
"Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark,"
said, "We are not confirming or com-
menting on the recent reports" in
The New York Times and elsewhere.
The $65 million show, he said, is still
scheduled to open March 15.
Published reports, citing anony-
mous sources in the production,
have also said that director Julie
Taymor may already be on the way
out, after struggling for months to
revamp the show amid scathing
reviews from some theater critics.
A new'delay would be the sixth for
Broadway's most expensive show.
The latest postponement would also
make it ineligible for theater's big-
gest prize, a Tony Award. Shows
must open by April 28 this year to be
considered for a Tony.
"Spider-Man" has already had the
longest preview period in Broadway
musical history. Many critics got
fed up and reviewed it last month,
largely panning the musical.
The stunt-heavy show was written
by director Taymor and Glen Berger,
and has music by U2's Bono and
The Edge.

Actor Mel Gibson to
plead in LA battery case
LOS ANGELES A person
familiar with a pending criminal
case against Mel Gibson said the
Academy Award winner will be
charged with misdemeanor battery
over a fight last year with his then-
girlfriend and has reached a plea
agreement with prosecutors.


In this theater publicity image released by The 0 and M Co., the Spider-Man char-
acter is suspended in the air in a scene from the musical 'Spider-Man: Turn Off the
Dark,' in New York.


The person said
Gibson will be
S charged with bat-
b tery over a January
2010 dispute with
Oksana Grigorieva.
Prosecutors have
Gibson not yet announced a
decision on whether
to charge Grigorieva with extortion,
which Gibson has been seeking.


making a donation to UNICEF to
help with that organization's relief
efforts during the turmoil in Libya.
50 Cent performed at a private
event during the 2005 Venice Film
Festival that was later linked to the
Gadhafi clan. Gadhafi is battling
rebels who are revolting against his
rule, and faces an investigation for
possible war crimes.


Ja Rule to go to prison
50 Cent donates money in June in NYC gun case
,fnm I~ldhkfi aant'r


iVm iii aunniIi wnmII
NEW YORK 50 Cent is the
latest artist to make a donation to
charity after it was
revealed he per-
formed at an event
linked to the clan
of Libyan leader
Moammar Gadhafi.
The rapper, who
has his own G-Unity
Jackson foundation, will be


NEW YORK Ja Rule is set to go
to prison for two years in June in a
New York City gun case.'
On Wednesday, a judge set a
June 8 date for the platinum-sell-
ing rapper-actor's sentencing. His
lawyer said he'll spend the interven-
ing months finishing a new album,
"Renaissance Project," and taking
Scare of tax matters.

* Associated Press


Celebrity Birthdays


* Talk show host Ralph
Emery is 78.
* Actor Chuck Norris is 71.
* Playwright David Rabe is
71.
* Actress Katharine
Houghton is 66.
* Actress Sharon Stone is
53.
* Magician Lance Burton is
51.
* Actress Jasmine Guy is 49.

Daily Scripture


* Britain's Prince Edward is
47.
* Actor Jon Hamm (TV: "Mad
Men") is 40.
* Country singer Daryle
Singletary is 40.
* Rapper-producer
Timbaland is 39.
* Rock musician Jerry
Horton (Papa Roach) is 36.
* Singer Robin Thicke is 34.
* Actress Olivia Wilde is 27.


"He has saved us and called us
to a holy life not because
of anything we have done but
because of his own purpose and
grace.This grace was given us
in Christ Jesus before the.
beginning of time."
2 Timothy I:9


Lake City
HOW TO REACH US
Main number .......(386) 752-1293
Fax number ............ 752-9400
Circulation ............755-5445
Online... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of,
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St, Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056.
PublisherTodd Wilson .....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
Assistant Editor CJ Risak..754-0427
After 1:00 p.m.
(crisak@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
........................752-1293
(dkimler@lakecityreporter.com)
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440.


Reporter
BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon....754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 730
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 1030 a.m. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery.After
,10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation .............755-5445
(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks ............... $26.32
24 Weeks ............... $48.79
52 Weeks ............... $83.46
Rates indude 7% sales tax.
Mail rates
12Weeks ................ $41.40
24 Weeks .................$82.80
52 Weeks....... .........$179.40


CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run
in this space. And thanks for reading.


Ex-officer admits
to pedophelia
PALATKA A former
Palatka police officer has
told a judge that he's a
pedophile who has molest-
ed hundreds of children.
Paul Joseph Blair, 60,
was sentenced Tuesday to
25 years in state prison for
two counts of sexual bat-
tery on a minor.
He told the judge that
he has been a pedophile
most of his life and has
molested 200-300 girls.
Blair pleaded guilty to
two counts of sexual bat-
tery of a minor on Feb.
18. The plea agreement he
reached with prosecutors
called for a 25-year prison
sentence.

Felons must wait
for restored rights
TALLAHASSEE Gov.
Rick Scott and the Florida
Cabinet have ended the
automatic restoration
of voting and other civil
rights to nonviolent felons
once their sentences are
up.
Sitting as the Board of
Executive Clemency, they
voted 4-0 on Wednesday to
change the panel's rules
and require at least a five-
year waiting period before
ex-convicts can apply to
get their rights back.
Law enforcement offi-
cials and state prosecutors
favored the change, saying
people who have broken
the law need more time to
prove themselves.

Agency seeks
debt on Facebook
ST. PETERSBURG A
Florida judge has ordered
a debt collection agency to
not contact a woman, her
family or her friends on
Facebook regarding the
woman's debt.
Melanie Beacham, who
is suing the debt collection
agency Mark One LLC in a


... :
-- riim .---------- - 11- *-* iftiimiafiT-
ASSOCIATED PRESS

Discovery finds way back to.Earth
Space shuttle Discovery lands at the Kennedy Space Center
in Cape Canaveral Wednesday. Discovery ended its career
as the world's most flown spaceship Wednesday, returning
from orbit for the last time and taking off in a new direction as
a museum piece. 'I


Florida court, said last fall
that the agency sent mes-
sages to her friends and
family regarding an unpaid
$362 car loan. Her lawyer
said those messages were
a violation of Florida's pri-
vacy and consumer protec-
tion laws.
On Friday, a Pinellas
County judge ruled that
Mark One cannot contact
Beacham, her family or
her friends on any social
media site.

Senate to vote
on teacher bill
TALLAHASSEE The
Florida Senate is set to
vote on a modified version
of a teacher merit pay and
tenure bill that former
Gov. Charlie Crist vetoed
last year after widespread
protests.
The measure (SB
736) will be up for a vote
Thursday.
In debate Wednesday,
the Republican-con-
trolled Senate rejected
Democratic Sen. Bill
Montford's effort to soften
a ban on tenure for teach-
ers hired after July 1.
His amendment would
have let highly rated teach-


ers get three-year con-
tracts after a third year in
the classroom.

$1M offered for
drug tracking
TALLAHASSEE The
company that makes the
widely abused painkiller
Oxycontin has offered to
contribute $1 million to
fund a prescription drug
tracking system in Florida.
Purdue Pharma LP
made the announcement
Wednesday to help crack
down on Florida pill mills.
They provide illicit pre-
scription medications to
addicts and drug dealers,
many if not most from out
of state.

Panhandle expects
severe weather
PENSACOLA The
National Weather Service
has posted various severe
weather watches and
warnings for the Florida
Panhandle. A tornado
watch has been issued
for the Panhandle from
Fort Walton Beach area
through Tallahassee.


THE WEATHER



CHANCE SUNNY MOSTLY
-STORMS SUNNY


HI170L36 HI1661033 HI73040Y


Pensacola
64/41


Tallahassee *
68/37 ,..
Panama City
65/41 '


V ald
66/
Lake
70,
SGa
'\j


osta
'37
.Nuf.


Jacksonvile
0\7 /In


MOSUNDLY P
^^^^mi^^ ^V


, MOSTLY c PARTLY
. SUNNY CLOUDY


H76L047 HI 77 LO 48


City Friday
Cape Canaveral 67,44is


66/41/s
74/54/s
71/47/s
65/35/s
64/38/s
74/66/s
66/33/s
73/54/s
71/47/s
66/36/s
69/43/s-
61/43/s
64/43/s
64/34/s
67/47/s
64/35/s
72/49/s


I I


TEMPERATURES
High Wednesday
Low Wednesday
! Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Wednesday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


81
58
74
.49
89 in 1907
28 in 1996


0:00"
0.42"
7.69"
1.26"
8.16"


SUN
Sunrise today 6:47 a.m.
Sunset today 6:35 p.m.
Sunrise tom. 6:46 a.m.
Sunset tom. 6:36 p.m.

MOON
Moonrise today 9:44 a.m.
Moonset today
Moonrise tom. 10:29 a.m.
Moonsettom. 12:00 a.m.


March March March April
12 19 26 3
First Full Last New


1989, the high
of 85 degrees at
Hanksville, Utah,
was a record for
March, and Pueblo,
Colo., equaled their
March record of 86
degrees. Hill City,
Kan., warmed from
a morning low of 30
degrees to an after-
noon high of 89.


4

45 nitestolbum
Today's
ultraviolet
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+.


Saturday
73/49,'s
69/46/s
75/60/s
74/52/s
72/40/s
70/43/s
78/67/s
73/40/s
76/60/s
75/53/s
72/40/s
74/48/s
68/49/s
69/51/s
72/41/s
71/52/s
72/42/s
73/55/s


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.



weather.com


I( Forecasts, data and
"'^-.J graphics 2011 Weather
'-Jp Central. Madison, Wis.
www.weatherpubllsher.com


Get Connected


;.'# Q- -r:I ..,
PM1.


* Associated Press


AROUND FLORIDA


iy U, "/9 Daytona Beach
/36 Ft. Lauderdale
inesville Daytpna Beach t Myers
72/37 75^44 Galnesvllle
SOcala Jacksonville
73/38 Key West
Orlando Cape Canaveral Lke Ct
75/46 75/47 akeCity
Tamn "a Naples
71/50 West Palm Beach Ocala
82/51 Orlando
\e Ft Lauderdale Panama City
Ft Myers,, 82/56 Pensacola
76/50 Naples 4 Tallahassee
\79/53 Miami Tampa
83/58 Valdosta
KeyWest* W. Palm Beach
77/70


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14 MONDA


~~~~~~~""~""~"""~"~""~""~""~


Page Editor: Jason M. Walker, 754-0430


I~~:


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Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL THURSDAY, MARCH 10, 2011


BANK: Arrest warrant requested for Carl I. Little
Continued From Page 1A


ture of the suspect from the bank's
security video and the suspect was
identified by two law enforcement
officers as Little.
The State Attorney's Office was
contacted and a warrant is being
requested for Little's arrest.
"Statements are still being col-
lected and witnesses are being inter-
viewed," said Capt. John Blanchard,
LCPD public information officer.
"Evidence from the scene was col-
lected and will be sent to the Florida
Department of Law Enforcement for
processing."
Authorities, believe Little acted
alone.
"At this point we have no reason
to believe there are more suspects
involved, but the investigation is
ongoing," Blanchard said.
According to Lake, City Police
Department reports, around 4:11
p.m. officers were dispatched to the
bank regarding a robbery and spoke
to bank employees and the teller
who had been robbed.
"The employee stated that a white
male had walked up to her and pro-
duced a note demanding money,"
Blanchard said. 'The teller complied
and gave an unspecified amount of
money to the suspect. The suspect
then fled."
The suspect has been described
as a white man, in his forties, stand-
ing about 5-foot- 7 with gray and


PATRICK SCOTT/Lake City Reporter
Lake City Police officers patrol South
Marion St. Wednesday evening look-
ing for a suspect who allegedly robbed
the Bank of America.

black hair. The suspect may have
been wearing a denim jacket.
"Nobody was hurt and no weapon
was implied or displayed," Blanchard
said, noting the teller was visibly
shaken after the robbery. "Anybody
going through a robbery would be
shaken up."
Authorities have not released
information regarding the number
of people who were in the bank when
the robbery took place.
"Immediately after the robbery,
there was quite a few people who
realized a robbery had occurred,"
Blanchard said.
Authorities issued a "Be On the
Lookout" alert for the suspect, but
were unable to capture him in the
immediate vicinity of the bank.'


Officers then set up a perime-
ter before enlisting aid from the
Columbia County Sheriff's Office and
Florida Department of Corrections.
Officers and K-9s searched the area
for more than an hour foi the sus-
pect, who fled east towards Main
Boulevard. Perimeters were estab-
lished with at least three police or
law enforcement vehicles at various
locations within the area.
'There were multiple agencies
that assisted in setting up the perim-
eter," Blanchard said.
Authorities used K-9 units from the
LCPD, Columbia County Sheriff's
Office and Florida Department of
Corrections before they realized
the suspect was probably out of the
area.
Despite the presence of law
enforcement officers, a steady
stream of bank customers continued
to drive into the bank until its closing
hours. The bank was closed follow-
ing the incident.
"There is nothing from us prevent-
ing the bank from being open tomor-
row (Thursday)," Blanchard said.
Authorities said Little should be
considered dangerous and if he is
seen, authorities should be contact-
ed by calling 911.
Anyone having information about
the robbery is asked to call the
LCPD anonymously on the TIP line
at 719-2068.


BROADBAND: Up and running in 18 months
Continued From Page 1A


lease, $60,000 per term
agreement with American
Towers. The amount will
be paid up front The con-
tract starts this month and
will run end April 2015.-
At the end of the term,
the NFBA agreed to pay
$1,100 per month for use
of tower space.
The board then autho-
rized its existing engineer-
ing firm to serve as the
general contractor for the
entire project. The engi,
neer firm will now be
tasked with securing per-
mits, supervising local and
electrical contractors and
supervising operations.
A permitting/investiga- '


tive services arm was then
established to perform
analysis for permitting
requirements in each of
the counties where broad-
band authority equipment
is slated to be deployed.
The permitting/invesgita-
tive services arm will also
be in charge of submitting
drawings that will be used
for the permitting process.
The NFBA received a
$30 million federal stimu-
lus package grant Feb. 18,
2010, to provide broadband
access to the rural areas of
North Florida.
'We have a little bit less
than two years to go," Carey
said. "We have to be substan-


tially complete, 80 percent
completion, by February
2012. We basically have one
year to get the majority of
the construction finalized
and we have a little less
than two years to complete
the process."
Pat Lien, NFBA system
manager, said the cur-
rent plan is to start in the
Chiefland area and add
customers as the core net-
work expands.
He said equipmentdeploy-
ment is slated to begin April
4 and they expect to have
the network up and run-
ning within 18 months. The
radios will be set-up in pairs
on a link-by-link basis. The


link-ups will take place in
a four-phased process con-
necting nearly 100 sites.
'The first phase will
cover about 22-25 sites and
it is likely to start around
the Chiefland area," he
said. "The next two sites
we are likely to deploy are
Monticello and Live Oak."
He said delays with-
standing, it could be some-
time this summer before
Columbia County is added
to the network.
In December equipment
was purchased for the net-
work and the equipment
is currently being tested
before its deployed and
installed.


FGC: Bachelors program
Continued From Page 1A


of Science in Industrial
Logistics will now go
before both the Florida
Department of Education's
Board of Education and
the Southern Association
of Colleges and Schools for
final voting.
Hall said FGC has been
working with the state
and SACS on the process
of offering the programs
since April 2010.
"We came to this first
level within the year, which
we're excited about, and
we're ready to go on to the
next step," he said.
Nursing, early childhood
education and industrial
logistics were the programs
the college chose to begin
offering bachelor's degrees
in because officials predict-
ed those programs would
get a "good response," Hall
said.
Early childhood educa-
tion and industrial logis-
tics may not begin in Fall


2012 depending on student
response and the school's
budget at that time, Hall
said, but pending the neces-
sary state and SACS approv-
als, nursing will be the
college's priority because
students are already seek-
ing it.
"It will be without ques-
tion the first program we're
going to do," Hall said.
'The others we're wait-
ing on what the response
will be and what the budget
will be to make it happen,"
he said.
Hall noted that the pass-
ing of the proposals came
within the first year of the
college being renamed as
FGC, but most thrilling is
that students will be able to
obtain a bachelor's degree
close to home.
"Because the college is
offering baccalaureate pro-
grams," he said, "they don't
have to go away to major
universities to do it"


FIRE: Landmark gone
Continued From Page 1A


at the time and no sur-
rounding structures were
damaged, Townsend said.
"Ifs a great loss to the
community, and we're all
pulling together to assist
the Towers any way we
can," he said.
The structure was known
as the Paxton/Saunders
House and was originally
built in 1900, Townsend
said. The Towers restored
it to its original condition.


"Howard and Patty ran a
very upscale antique store
and helped renovate the
structure," he said.
The White Springs Fire
Department was assisted by
the Genoa, Suwannee County
and Columbia County fire
departments.
"Most buildings in White
Springs are wooden," he said.
'We thank them for such a
quick response to save the
surrounding buildings."


RALLY: Support of Scott
Continued From Page 1A

that for education, AP said. police reported no arrests
Scott wants $1.7 billion in or incidents from Tuesday's
tax and fee reductions, so Capitol rallies.
proposed cuts surpass the "It was very peaceful,"
projected $3.6 billion bud- Higgins said. "Nothing at
get shortfall. ;" ," all 'hatt IPsaw caused any
AP said local Tallahassee trouble."


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LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL THURSDAY, MARCH 10, 2011


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


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OPINION


Thursday, March 10, 201 I


AN


A N
OPINION


Bashing


muslims


an abuse

of power

B ashing the Muslim
faith has become all
too common in this
country. In South
Florida, there is
U.S. Rep. Allen West, who has
often indulged in Islamic-bait-
ing and in a town hall meeting
in Pompano Beach last month
told a Muslim-American in the
audience who was challenging
his attacks on Islam to "put
that microphone down and go
home." Needless to say, the
questioner, who was born in
the United States, never got a
satisfactory answer.
Yet the facts do not back Mr.
West's attempts to link one faith
to terrorist acts in the United
States.
In fact, Muslim-inspired
domestic terrorism in the
United States had declined
sharply, from 18 plots in 2009
to 10 in 2010. A study, spon-
sored by the Triangle Center
on Terrorism and Homeland
Security, also found that tips
from the Muslim-American
community provided the infor-
mation that led to plots being
thwarted in 48 of 120 cases
involving U.S. Muslims.
Their record of cooperation,
especially in high-profile cases,
is undeniable.'
It was the father of the
Muslim-American terrorist who
tried to blowup an airliner over
Detroit who first alerted author--
ities about his son's bizarre -
behavior and suspect activity.
A Muslim-American.vendor
in New York's Times Square
helped to thwart that plot
before it claimed any lives. In
Oregon, a young man who plot-
ted to blow up a Christmas tree
lighting ceremony was turned
in by his own Muslim father.
Instead of trumpeting this
good news, however, U.S. Rep.
Peter King, chairman of the
House Committee on Homeland
Security, has called an ill-advised
hearing on Thursday that,
Muslim Americans fear, will
demonize Islamic believers and
fuel ethnic and religious
hatred.
* Miami Herald

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman


LETTERS.
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.


BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


www.lakecityreporter.com


On the shores of Erie,


let the duckpins roll


be celebrated in
different ways.
The would-be
reveler can
wear feathered costumes, drink
lots of adult beverages, bare the
breasts or my own preference
for inducing the bacchanalia
mood play in a duckpin
bowling tournament. In Erie,
Pa.
As it turns out (and who
knew?),.Erie is a hot nest of
duckpin bowling. Once upon a
time, when men were men and
women *ere justly irritated,
duckpin bowling was popular all
over Western Pennsylvania and
elsewhere.
For those too young to
remember this bygone era,
duckpin bowling is the close
cousin of the better-known 10-
pin bowling. The dimensions of
the lanes are the same but the
duckpin balls are smaller and
have no finger holes.
The pins so favored by ducks
have rubber bands on them
- gum bands, in Pittsburghese
- and this is said to affect pin
action. Not that I would know.
My pins tend to remain inactive,
despite my best efforts.
You may ask why duckpin
bowling is called duckpin
bowling. Do the participants
waddle up to the lane and
deliver the ball while making
low quacking sounds? Only in
my case. No, the reason is that
before pin-setting machines,
trained ducks would pick up the
pins in their little beaks.
OK, I made that last bit up,
because we duckpin bowlers
like to amuse ourselves between
frames. In fact, this is the one
aspect of the sport I am good
at. My experience has been
limited to a mixed league, which
I was recruited to join about
six years ago on the strength
of my potato chip eating and
beer drinking skills. Alas, these
helpful talents did not make me


a champion.
So I was honored to be
asked to play at the interclub
tournament in Erie this past
weekend. Among certain
duckpin bowlers, Erie is
considered the holy of holies -
well, not so.holy considering the'
open bar, but certainly a mecca
of duckpin pilgrims.
The interclub tournament
was first held 61 years ago, and
in the early years four clubs
would take turns hosting the
tournament. But the years have
put duckpin bowling to flight
and now only Erie Maennerchor
and the Edgeworth Club
compete.
This year was Erie
Maennerchor's turn to
host, as it happens in the
140th anniversary year of
its founding. I am told that
(ital) Maennerchor (endital)
translates from the German
as "men's choir," and what a
sadness it is that no ducks sang
with them. The duckpin bowling
takes place in the basement of
an outwardly staid but inwardly
magnificent building.
My bowling guru who shall
remain nameless, because you
know the old saying: What
happens in Erie, stays in Erie
- had seen something in my
bowling that others had missed:
I was breathing and could fill
out the roster. In gratitude, I
agreed to share a room in a
local hotel to defray expenses.
No doubt Erie has some fine
hotels, but we didn't stay in one
of those. We stayed in a hotel
so run-down that it was beneath


Sthe dignity of bedbugs to live
there, which I recognize isn't
necessarily cause for complaint.
However, this hotel had the
tiniest towels I have ever. seen.
Apparently a group of poor
jockeys were the.hotel's last
known guests.
I didn't care. I was ready to
go. I had my bowling shoes.
I had my monogrammed
bowling shirt with my name
unfortunately misspelled as
(ital) Res (endital) instead of
Reg an error I was forced to
accept because someone from a
newspaper does not have much
standing to complain about a
typo on a'shirt. "
With'liadvice from my guiru
roommate to "just bowl your
average," I proceeded to bowl
under my average and the
next day did worse than that.
It was a performance so bad
that everybody was moved to
give friendly advice, such as
"Have you thought of taking up
cards?" That night I slept fitfully
in the fleabag hotel. Now even
the fleas were giving me advice.
The guru said I snored very
loudly, but he did too. Between
the two of us, we recreated
the cannon fire of the Battle of
Lake Erie in 1813, after which
the American commander
Oliver Hazard Perry famously
wrote: "We have met the
enemy, and they are ours. Have
now gone duckpin bowling."
(Careful readers will note some
embroidery of the historical
record.)
The next day I arrived at the
club as a man inspired. I met
the lanes and they were mine.
All the good fellows cheered my
hard-won battle for respectable
mediocrity. In the spirit of
Mardi Gras, I then had an adult
beverage but I did not wear
feathers or show body parts. It
was the least I could do to repay
Erie's abundant hospitality.
Reg Henry is a columnist for
the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette.


AN OPINION


National Public Radio hates you


re you a white,'mid-
dle class, gun-own-
ing, church-going
conservative? Then
NPR hates you.,
This stark but unsurprising
revelation came in an under-
cover investigative video by
conservative activist James
O'Keefe targeting NPR senior
executive Ron Schiller. Mr.
Schiller thought he was chatting
up Muslim activists promising
a $5 million donation to the
embattled publicly funded net-
work, and he sought to appeal
to them by disparaging people
who disagree with his liberal
worldview.
"The current Republican
Party, particularly the Tea Party,
is fanatically involved with
people's personal lives," he said.


They are "very fundamentalist
Christian I wouldn't even call
it Christian, it's this weird evan-
gelical kind of move." People
on the right are "white, middle
America, gun-toting," not to
mention "seriously racist peo-
Sple." He also said that conserva-
tives are "anti-intellectual," in
contrast to the "more educated,
fair and balanced" liberals.
When the tape was aired,
Mr. Schiller issued a statement
that his offensive language
was "counter to NPR's values"
and, incredibly, "not reflec-
tive of [his] own beliefs." NPR
President and CEO Vivian
Schiller, who is an ideological
sister but not a blood relative of
Mr. Schiller, rushed out a state-
ment saying his remarks were
"contrary to what NPR stands


for and are deeply distressing
to reporters, editors and oth-
ers who bring fairness, civility
and respect for a wide variety of
viewpoints to their work every-
day." Does any thoughtful person
believe either of these announce-
ments? It is extremely doubtful
that anyone including the
flacks who wrote the statements
- believes a word of them. Both
Schillers are now out of a job and
the public broadcasting damage-
control effort is in overdrive.
Mr. Schiller's biased and
snooty view of conservatives
is the type of thing one would
expect from a senior NPR exec-
utive. But he also said that he
felt that the network "would be
better off in the long run with-
out federal funding."
* Washington Post


4A"


Bonnie Erbe
bonnieerbe@compuserve.com


Do men

have role

in women's

movement?

U.S.-Swiss Bilateral
Conference of
Women called,
"Building Bridges,"
sported a dazzling array of
female powerhouses from both
nations. For two days, female '
ambassadors, corporate titans,
politicians and journalists
compared notes on women's
Advancement in both nations,
where we are and where we
need to go.
Sponsored by U.S.
Ambassador to Switzerland :,:
Donald S. Beyer, and orches-
trated by his wife Megan,
Ambassador Beyer's closing
remarks were noteworthy. He.,
said the next step for women is
to, "engage the men."
I'm sure there are feminist
leaders in the United States
who could recite thousands
of instances where men have
been engaged and active in the,
women's movement But true
enough, I agree with Beyer that.
more fully engaging men to .
work toward women's advance-
ment is a fantastic next step.
Doris Leuthard recently
stepped down as Switzerland's.
chair of the Governing
'Council. She was one of .
Switzerland' first female presi-
dents and the first woman to :<
lead it when the majority of
council members were womeq.
The Swiss governing council is
comprised of seven members
who rotate in and out of the
presidency. Four of them are --
women. Another woman is the
current president.
Clearly the Swiss have done
a better job of engaging the
men than American women -;
have done, at least on the polit-
ical front. Though Switzerland"-
beats us when it comes to
promoting female politicians,. ,
advancement of Swiss women-,,
has not extended into the pay'
and business realms.
Oddly enough, the United
States and Switzerland have
just-about-equal pay gaps
(women earn just under 80
cents for each dollar earned by:
men in both nations) and simi-.
lar numbers of women sitting
on corporate boards (fewer
than 15 percent of board seats
are filled by women in both
countries.) But Swiss women
comprise a much greater
percentage of members of
Parliament than we have
women in Congress we
boast a mere 17 percent:
I interviewed Leuthard and
asked her how she was able to
rise to the top of Swiss politics.
Switzerland, like the U.S., she
told me, is a relatively con-
servative country. The word,
"quota" is not popular and even
Swiss women abhor the idea
of being pushed to the apex of
political power as tokens.
Nonetheless, she told me
the Swiss party system allows
party leaders to list their favor-
ite candidates at the top of
voters' ballots, and the parties
believe in proportional repre-
sentation. This commitment
to proportional representation'
(as opposed to quotas) is what
allowed her to get elected to
Parliament in the first place,
and then rise within the ranks
of power once she arrived.
So, too, she said, was the
understanding on the part of'
Leuthard and her husband
that they were a team and they,
would split household chores
so that each could pursue his
or her chosen career.
Bonnie Erbe is a TV host and
writes this column for Scripps
Howard News Service.








LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE THURSDAY, MARCH 10, 2011


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


* To submit your Community
Calendar item, contact Antonia
Robinson at 754-0425 or by
e-mail at arobinson@
lakecityreporter.com.


Today

Diabetes program
UF/IFAS Columbia
and Suwannee County
Extension are offering a
nine-week educational pro-
gram for type 2 diabetes
5:30 to 7 p.m. Thursday
beginning today. The pro-
gram will feature a team "
of qualified educators and
health professionals, and
a personal consultation
with a registered dietitian.
Call Jenny Jump at the
Columbia Extension office
at (386) 758-5384 or Cathy
Rogers at the Suwannee
County Extension office
at (386) 362-2771. The
$75 program fee includes
the educational classes,
nutrition consultation, pro-
gram materials and health
assessments.


Landlord's meeting
The monthly Landlord's
meeting is 6 p.m.
Thursday at Shands Lake
Shore Hospital Conference
Room. Sheriff Mark
Hunter is the guest speak-
er. Rental managers are
welcome. Call 755-0110.

DAR monthly meeting

The Edward Rutledge
DAR (Daughters of the
American Revolution)
Chapter meeting is 10:30
a.m. Thursday at the
Guangdong Chinese
Restaurant (located inside.
Lake City Mall behind TJ
Maxx). Water Management
is the program topic, pre-
sented by the Suwannee
River Water Maiagement
District Visitors and pro-
spective members are
welcome. For.more infor-
mation, please call 386-755-
5579 in the Lake City area
or 386-362-2180 in the Live
Oak area. Visit the chapter
website at http://fssdarchap-
ters.org/edwardrutledge/

Throwing pottery

A Beginning Wheel


Throwing pottery three-day
workshop is Thursdays,
March 10, 17 and 24
at Stephen Foster Folk
Culture Center State
Park Craft Square, White
Springs. Students are asked
to wear old clothes, bring
apron, an old hand towel
and small plastic bowl. The
cost of this workshop is $85.
Call the park Gift Shop at
(386) 397-1920 or visit www.
stephenfosterCSO.org.


Garden Club
The Lake City Garden
Club will hold its monthly
meeting at 10 a.m. on
Thursday at the Woman's
Club. The program will be
'Tough Plants for North
Florida" by Bruce Cavey.
Visitors are welcome.


Friday

FFA fundraiser
The Columbia and Ft.
White High FFA Chapters
will be hosting a joint fund-
raising auction at 6:30 p.m.
Friday in the CHS cafete-
ria. The proceeds collected
will be used to benefit
the chapter members in
attending competitions and
State Convention. Please
support both schools in
their fundraising efforts.
For more information or if
you would like to donate
items, please call either
of the FFA advisors, Ms.
Patricia Starnes (CHS)
755-8080 or Jill Huesman
(Ft. White) 497-5952.


Saturday

RHS alumni meeting
There will be a RHS
alumni meeting at noon
Saturday at the Richardson
Center. For additional
information contact CJ at
(386) 752-0815.

FCAT tutoring
FCAT reading, math


LEANNE TYO/Lake City Reporter

Scholastic ability recognized

Jacob Simmons (center), a Columbia High School senior, is
pictured with Linard Johnson (left), Columbia County School
Board chairman, and Mike Millikin, superintendent of schools,
after being chosen as the county's only representative for
the Department of Education's February Sunshine State
Scholars Program. Simmons received a standing ovation for
the recognition at Tuesday's school board meeting. He was
chosen for his many achievements in science, technology,


engineering and math (STEM).

and science tutoring is
available 9 a.m. to 12 p.m.
March 12, 19 and April 9
at Columbia High School.
Modified bus transporta-
tion is provided. Morning
snack and drink is pro-
vided. Call Wendy Stevens
at 755-8080 ext. 229.

Yard sale
A huge spring yard sale
is 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday
at Christian Service
Center, corner of Hilton
and Washington Street
All kinds of goodies will
be available. Call 755-1770.
Rain date is March 19.

Medical fundraiser
A fundraiser is 8 10:30
a.m. Saturday at Kazbors
for Cadence (Cady) Drain.
She is a kindergartner at
Westside Elementary and
suffered a stroke while at
school Jan. 28. Tickets for
a pancake breakfast are
$6 each. Those interested
may call Andy Bennett,
physical ed instructor,
at 623-3350. An account
has also been set up at


Mercantile Bank and First
Federal Bank to help with
medical expenses.

Writing group
The Lake City
Writers Group, a part
of the Florida Writers
Association, is having its
first meeting 3 -5 p.m.
March 12 at the Columbia
County Public Library,
Main Branch. Richard
Burt, Professor of
English at the University
of Florida is the guest
speaker Submit a short
500 words or less writing
sample prior to the meet-
ing for an introduction.
The writing prompt is "It
was the funniest thing.".
Contact Marley Andretti
at (386) 438-3610. E-mail
inquiries and writing sam-
ples to editor@afinaldraft.
com.


Police Ball
The 18th Lake City
Police Department Ball
is 7 p.m. to midnight
Saturday at the Lake City
County Club. All proceeds


from this year's ball will
go toward the purchase
of a Firearms Training
Simulator. Tickets are
$50 a person. The black
tie event will feature
finger food, entertain-
ment, music, dancing
and door prizes. Contact
Destiny Hill at 758-5484 or
Samantha Driggers at 758-
5483 for ticket information.


Sunday

Extension Office PSA
For all growers involved
in the Florida Farmers'
Market Nutrition Program,
all previous Growers
agreements have expired.
You must sign new agree-
ments and meet annual
training requirements to
accept FMNP checks.
Contact the Columbia
County Extension Office
for .training locations at
752-5384.

Spring Break Camps
The Florida Museum of
Natural History is offering
fun, educational spring
break day camps March
28-April 1 for students in
grades K-5. Half-day ses-
sions are $117 for museum
members and $130 for
non-members. Full-day


sessions are $225 for mem-
bers and $250 for non-
members. Register today
at www.flmnrh.ufl.edu/edu-
cation/childrensclasses.
htm or call 352-273-2061.


Fair/Rodeo Scholarship
Columbia County
Resources is now accept-
ing applications for the
fair/rodeo scholarship.
Two scholarships for
$1,000 will be awarded
to graduating seniors.
Call 386-752-8822 or visit
www. columbiacountyfair
org to download the cri-
teria and application. The
application is also avail-
able at Columbia High
School, Fort White High
School or the fair office.
The deadline is 5 p.m.
April 1.


Pro Rodeo Queens
The 7th Annual
Miss Florida Gateway
Pro Rodeo Queens
Competition is March 18
at the 17th Annual Florida
Gateway Pro Rodeo.
Applications are available
at The Money Man, school
offices, the fair office or
online at www.columbia-
countyfairorg. Call 386-752-
8822.


[ NoDRunrourid -- NScHassle
No Rundroun'd -- No Hassle


GBIS Disability, Inc.


Free Consultation


OBITUARIES


Mattie Lucille Miller Levy
Mrs. Mattie Lucille Miller Levy
was born on October 7, 1920
to the late Henry Miller and
Emma Lil-
lian Miller in
Forest Glenn,
Georgia. She
attended the
Public Schools
of Colum-
bia 4 County
and Cos-
metology Business School,
Harlem, New York.
Early in life, Mrs. Levy ac-
cepted Christ and became a
member of Trinity United Meth-
odist Church, currently under
the pastorate of Fatha Desue.
Mrs. Levy was self-employed
as the owner and operator of her
own Beauty.Salon in Lake City,
Florida until her retirement in
the late eighties. She was known
as the "Lady of the City"; she
loved dressing and she loved her
clothes, shoes with matching hats
and hand bags. She will be great-
ly missed by all who knew her.
Mrs. Mattie Lucille Miller Levy
departed this life on Monday,
March 7, 2011. Mrs. Levy was
formerly married to Mr. Alphon-
so Levy and to this union two
sons were born. Her five siblings
preceded her in death. She leaves
to cherish her memory three de-
voted sons, Carl Walker, Queens,
New York; Dekoven Levy, Fort
Lauderdale, florida; and Wayne
Levy, Lake City, Florida. Broth-
er-in-law John Levy (Carla),
Tampa, Florida; devoted neph-
ews, Jerome Scott (Betty), Buf-
falo, New York; Rudolph Scott
of Lake City, Florida; John Levy
Jr. (Jennifer), Washington D.C.;
Roy Milledge (Claudia), Spring
Hill, Florida. devoted niece An-
drea Reddick, Virginia; sister-in-



<'New York Day
Ever Live in NY State?
Join us Saturday, March 26th
12-4 PM
Epiphany Church Social Hall
Catered by Blue Roof Grill
Entertainment:
Tony Buzzela
Call: Vern Lloyd 752-4885
Shirley Bellows 758-9760
Deadline March 18


law, Mrs. Ruth Miller, Buffalo;
New York; devoted grandchil-
dren, Barry Brown (Sonia),
Jacksonville, Florida; .Michele
Bell (James), Orlando, Florida;
Billy Walker, Lakeland, Flori-
da; Mona Jones (Glenn), Fort
Meade, Maryland; Deron Levy,
Lake City, FL; Jason Butler,
Dallas, TX; Demika Levy, Fort
Lauderdale, Fl; LaShon Brown,
Pew Hampshire; and Savannah
Ouinn Levy, Boise, Idaho. Kay-
Sana, Denatra, Amara and Delay-
na Lewis, Tallahassee, Florida
and several godchildren includ-
ing, Ms. Bea White, Lake City,
Florida. Numerous great grand-
children and other relatives and
sorrowing friends to include de-
voted friends and care givers Ms.,
Ella Mae Jones, and Ms. Debo-.
rah McPhee, Lake City, Florida.
Funeral services for Mrs. Mat-
tie Lucille Miller Levy will be
conducted at 11:00 A.M. Satur-
day, March 12, 2011 at Trinity
United Methodist Church, Lake
City, Florida. interment will fol-
low in the Garden of Rest Cem-
etery. The family will receive
friends from 6:00-8:00 p.m.
Friday evening at Trinity United


Methodist Church. Arrange-
ments are under the direction
of the MIZELL FUNERAL
HOME 365 N.W. Washington,
Lake City, FL ph. # (386) 752-
3166 e-mail rudolmize@aol.
com, please sign guest register
at www.mizellfuneralhome.com

Clyde BroWn Lites
Clyde Brown Lites, age 88, of
Ellisville, owner of the Pecan
House, passed away on Wednes-
day, March 2, 2011, at Ocala
Health and
Rehabilitation
Center after a
brief illness.
Clyde was
a native of
Florida and
lived in the
Lake City area
his entire life. He enjoyed hav-
ing breakfast with his friends at
the Huddle House, visiting with
his customers all day and then
having supper with his family
or at Sonny's or Brown's. He
had many talents and abilities,


but always considered him-
self a farmer and continued
to enjoy planting and grow-
ing something every chance
he got. He was also a builder
for many years in Gaines-
ville and the surrounding area.
He is survived by his three
daughters, Laura Davis (Dar-
old), of Ocala, Vicki Johnston
(Malcolm), of Ocala, and Don-
na Barnes (Ronnie) of Alachua,
and his brother Richard Lites
(Myrtice) of Jacksonville, as
well as his grandchildren, great-
grandchildren, many nieces and
nephews and friends too numer-
ous to mention. He was much
loved and will be greatly missed.
A memorial service is being
held at 11:00 a.m. on Satur-
day, March 12th at the cem-
etery adjacent to the Mikes-
ville Presbyterian Church.
In lieu of flowers, some may
wish to maKe a donation to the
American Cancer Society or
their favorite charity in his name.
Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


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March 12th 7:45am until Noon
Pancake Breakfast 7:30-10am
$5.00
Money goes to support the youth. CALL 752-0670 for information
First Presbyterian Church WORSHIP
697 SW Baya Dr., Lake City, Fla. Contemporary Worship 900am
752-0670 fpclc@bellsouth.net Traditional Worship 11:00am
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Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


IOBLE !S


11


111








LAKE CITY REPORTER HEALTH THURSDAY, MARCH 10, 2011


Alternative needed

to off-the-market

medication


DEAR DR. GOTr: I
am 73 years old. Owing to
arthritis and many broken
bones, I have been tak-
ing Darvocet with good
results. Now the Food
and Drug Administration
(thanks to Public Citizen)
has removed it from the
market. I have now been
put on a stronger drug
(Vicodin). Are there any
other medicines you could
mention? I have not had
much success with the
new medication.

DEAR READER: In
November 2010, the FDA.
removed Darvon (pro-
poxyphene) and Darvocet
(propoxyphene/acetamino-
phen) from the market.
'They also asked generic-
drug makers to stop mar-
keting medications that
contained propoxyphene.
This came after the manu-
facturer of the drugs com-
pleted a new study (at the
request of the FDA) that
showed propoxyphene put.
patients at risk of potential-
ly serious and sometimes
fatal heart-rhythm abnor-
malities. Propoxyphene
was banned in the United
Kingdom in 2005 and in
Europe a few years later.
It has been a controversial
medication for decades.
Known side effects
include constipation, dizzi-
ness, headache, vomiting,
allergic reaction, sedation,
coma, hallucinations, car-
diac arrest, drug toxicity,
convulsions, accidental
and intentional overdose,
respiratory arrest, suicide,-
dependence, mental-status
changes, cardiac-rhythm
abnormalities, heart attack,
congestive heart failure
and death.
According to its website,
www.citizen.org, Public
Citizen is a nonprofit
organization dedicated
to ensuring "that all citi-
zens are represented in
the halls of power." It has
taken on and successfully.
challenged several indus-
tries including pharma-
ceuticals and automobiles.
In regards to propoxy-
phene, the organization
petitioned the FDA to ban
the substance in 1978 and
again in 2006. In a press
release, Public Citizen says
that its February 2006 peti-
tion, which followed the
U.K ban announcement,
did not even result in' an
FDA advisory-committee
hearing until they sued the
agency in 2008, forcing a
response to the petition.
The hearing wasn't held
until January 2009, in which
a 14-to-12 vote favored ban-
ning the drug; however, in
July 2009, just weeks after
the European propoxyphene
. ban, the FDA denied the
petition, instead opting to
mandate a black-box warn-
ing and ordering a human
study to determine whether
the drug truly put patients
at risk.
It is unclear to me
why, if both the United
Kingdom and Europe
Found sufficient evidence
to ban propoxyphene, the
U.S. FDA did not take
steps earlier.
Now to your arthritis
pain. In my opinion, nar-
cotic pain relievers typi-
cally are not a good option
for treating arthritis pain.
They carry several side
effects, including depen-
dence, and should be
used only as a last resort
Based on your brief letter


ON HEALTH
SI p


Dr. Peter Gott


and without knowing what
other options you have
tried, what other medi-
cal conditions you may
.have and what joints are
affected, I can provide only
general advice.
I assume because you
are taking a narcotic, your
arthritis is fairly advanced.
If it is affecting your hips
or knees, are you a candi-
date for joint replacement?
Have you tried cortisone
injection? Replacement-car-
tilage injections? Do over-
the-counter anti-inflamma-
tory drugs, such as ibu-
profen or naproxen, work
to ease your pain? Have
you tried physical therapy,
water aerobics or yoga? All
of these options may be
beneficial to you and may
reduce your pain level.
In regards to your "bro-
ken bones," I am unclear
what you mean. Are you
currently, suffering from
several broken bones
because of an accident or.
.fall? Are these healed inju-
ries? Are they a result of
osteoporQsis? Which bones
are or were broken that
are now causing you pain?
SIf you are suffering from
spinal fractures due to
osteoporosis, you should
increase your calcium
and vitamin D intake and
consider taking a medica-
tion to try to restore some
of your bone loss. If the
fractures are new and the
result of injury, healing
will take several weeks and
pain should subside dur-
ing that time. If these are
old fractures that are now
healed, lingering pain may'
never completely go away
but often isn't severe and
is generally described as
an achy feeling, especially
during cold, damp weather.
If the fractures weren't set
correctly, the bones may
have grown abnormally,
putting pressure on mus-
cles and nerves.
I suggest that you seek
the assistance of a pain
clinic or pain special-
ist, who may be able to
offer you other treatment
options. He or she can
work with you to find.the
right therapy or therapies
that allow you to func-
tion well on a daily basis
- hopefully without medi-
cation or with a drug that
doesn't carry so many side
effects.
U Dr. Peter H. Gott is a
retired physician. His website
is .www.AskDrGottMD.corn.


Local surgeons offer special procedure


From staff reports

The first procedure for
incisionless reconstructive
surgical treatment of gas-
troesophageal reflux dis-
ease (GERD) is now avail-
able at Lake City Medical
Center and Gateway
Surgical Specialists.
Dr. Edwin Gonzalez and
Dr. Alex Soler, leaders in
the treatment of GERD, are
the first specialists in the
area to be trained and to
perform the EsophyX pro-
cedure.
"EsophyX can signifi-
cantly improve quality of
life for our patients," said
Gonzalez. "Many reflux
patients are unable to drink
carbonated or caffeinated
beverages or eat rich foods
or fruit without triggering
reflux. They also sleep sit-
ting up to reduce nighttime
reflux. After the EsophyX
procedure, clinical trials
show that most patients can
eat and drink foods they
avoided for many years.
Reflux no longer impacts
their life like it previously
did."
EsophyX TIF is based on
the principals of surgical
repair of the gastroesopha-
geal junction, and it repre-
sents the third generation
of surgery. The transition
from open surgery to lapa-
roscopy has been regard-
ed as the major advance
in the last two decades.
Laparoscopy reduced the
skin incisions typical of
"open" surgery to only
three to five "port" holes.
However, laparoscopy
still involves the same
internal incisions and
organ dissection as open
surgery. EsophyX is a
major advancement, avoid-
ing incisions and dissec-
tion altogether. Because of
this reduced invasiveness,
EsophyX lowers the hurdle
for receiving an anatomical
restoration of the antireflux
barrier and allows earlier
intervention.
Widely recognized as the
next step in the evolution.
of minimally invasive tech-
niques, the EsophyX device
is introduced into the body,
not through an incision,.
but through a "natural"
body orifice, the mouth.
The EsophyX device and
the TIF procedure reduce
hiatal hernia and create a
valve between the stom-
ach and the esophagus to
restore the natural, physio-
logical anatomy to reduce/
prevent gastroesophageal
reflux. Because the proce-
dure is incisionless, there
is no visible scar and the
risk of adverse effects is
reduced.
For the millions of
Americans diagnosed with
GERD and not fully satis-
fied with their treatment
options, EsophyX offers an
excellent alternative.
"Recent studies of
EsophyX have shown that
the procedure can reduce


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Surgeons at Gateway Surgical Specialists treat a patient with GE
IIAL-. !- enn


patients' dependency on
medications, with 70 per-
cent of patients remaining
symptom free after two
years and experiencing a
dramatic improvement in
their quality of life," said
Gonzalez. "We are very
excited to be able to offer
our patients the same
incredible benefits with
minimal risk."
The surgeons at Gateway
Surgical Specialists treat
a wide range of medical
needs with advanced surgi-
cal treatments, everything
from cancer detection and
treatment to hernias, thy-
roids and gastrointestinal
problems.


wnat is UiKUG


If you have heartburn
twice a week or more,
yqu may have GERD.
Heartburn is the most com-
mon symptom, but you may
also experience:
- Hoarseness or sore
throat;
Frequent swallowing
Asthma or asthma-like
symptoms;
Pain or discomfort in
the chest;
Sleep disruption
(unable to sleep lying
down);
Bloating;
Excessive clearing of
the throat;
Persistent cough;


COURTESY PHOTO
ERD.
Burning in the mouth
or throat;
Intolerance of certain
foods;
Dental erosions or
therapy-resistant gum dis-
ease or inflammation.


Normally, after swal-
lowing, a valve between
the esophagus and stom-
ach opens to allow food
to pass, then it closes to
prevent stomach contents
from refluxingg" back into
the esophagus, causing a
burning sensation in the
chest For people who suf-
fer from GERD, the valve is
dysfunctional and unable to
prevent acid from refluxing
into the esophagus.


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Page Editor: C.J.Risak, 754-0427


~nn~m~


im00 MM








Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@lakecityreportercom


Lake City Reporter





SPORTS


Thursday March 10 20 II


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


BRIEFS

FORT WHITE BASEBALL
Moe's Night
fundraiser today
The Fort White High
Dugout Club has a .
Moe's Night fundraiser
from 5-8 p.m. today at
Moe's Southwest Grill in
Lake City.
For details, call coach
Chad Bonds at 590-7362.
CARC
Bowl-a-thon set
for Saturday
CARC-Advocates for
Citizens with Disabilities
has its 18th annual
bowl-a-thon at Lake City
Bowl on Saturday. Teams
of five bowlers can
.compete for a grand
prize with a $50 donation
that will help pay the cost
of providing services for
local citizens with
disabilities. Bowling is at
1:30 p.m. and 3:30 p.m.
All are invited.
For details or to
register a team, call
752-1880, Ext. 103 or 104.
GIRLS SOFTBALL
Lake City Babe
Ruth sign-up
Lake City Babe Ruth
Softball registration is
under way for ages 9-15.
Cost is $75.
For details, call Wendy
Dohrn at 623-3641 and
leave a message.
CHS SR ,..
FCA rally Monday
at auditorium
A Fellowship of
Christian Athletes rally
is 6 p.m. Monday in the
Columbia High
auditorium. Cornelius
Ingram, former Gator
Sand current Philadelphia
Eagles player is the
special guest speaker.
There is no charge and
all ages are invited.
For details, call Shayne
Barber at (386) 288-6621.
T-BALL
City registration
March 12, 19
The Lake City
Recreation Department
has T-ball registration
Saturday for returning
players and March 19 for
new players. Registration
is 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. at
Teen Town Recreation
Center. Age divisions
offered are 4-5 and 6-7.
Cost is $40 and a birth
certificate is required
at registration.
For details, call
Heyward Christie at
754-3607.
From staff reports

GAMES

Today
Columbia High
tennis at Ridgeview High,
3:30 p.m.
Columbia High
softball vs. Fleming Island
High, 6 p.m. (JV-4)
Fort White High
softball at Bradford High,
7 p.m. (JV-5)
Friday
Fort White High
softball at P.K. Yonge
School, 6 p.m.
Fort White High
baseball at Santa Fe
High, 7 p.m. (JV-4:30)
Columbia High
softball at Lafayette High,
7 p.m. (JV-5)
Columbia High
baseball at Buchholz


High, 7 p.m. (JV-6 vs.
Buchholz)


Lady Indians

capture 4-team

track meet


CHS dominates
boys' competition
with 124 points.
From staff reports

Fort White High hosted
Columbia High, Newberry
High and Union County
High in a track meet on
Tuesday.
The Lady Indians won
with 77 points, followed
by Columbia with 54,
Newberry with 48 and
Union County with 35.
Columbia dominated the
boys competition with 124
points. Newberry scored
48, while Fort White had 32


and Union County had 31.
Fort White's A.J. Legree
won the long jump (20.45),
high jump (5-10) and 100-
meter hurdles (15.59)'. Trey
Phillips was second in the
400 meters and Colt Pearce
was fourth in the 300-meter
hurdles. The Indians placed
third in the 4 x 800 relay.
For the Lady Indians;
Sitia Martinez was a double
winner in the long jump
(15-8) and 200 meters
(25.77). Other winners
were Rykia Jackson in the
discus (78-11), Brittani
Cason in the high jump
(5-6) and Sydni Jones in the
TRACK continued on 2B


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High's Dalvin Kelly and Fort White High's A.J. Legree compete in the hurdles at a
track meet at Fort White on Wednesday.


Life Master milestone


Lake City bridge
players achieve
high ACBL rank
By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com
S ports, clubs and
organizations
have standards
that indicate
In bridge, that is the
Srank of Life Master and
Carolyn Brown and Leo
Carignan recently achieved
that milestone.
Brown and Carignan
are members of the Lake
City Duplicate Bridge Club
and believed to be the first
representatives of the club
to receive the ranking.
"Life Master, it is hard
to break that," Brown said.
'That is the biggie."
The American Contract
Bridge League monitors
tournament play and sets
the standards for Life
Master. A player must
achieve 300 master points
with a certain number of
silver, red and gold.
Gold points can only
be won at regional
competition or higher, and
Brown and Carignan finally
made the grade at the
Sarasota Regional at the
Bradenton Civic Center.
Brown played with Jane
Weatherby of Gainesville,
an ACBL Silver Life
Master. Carignan was


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Lake City bridge players Leo Carignan and Carolyn Brown achieved the American Contract Bridge League's Life Master
ranking for their success at the game.


paired with Eric Taylor, the
director for the Lake City
DBC and the Gainesville
Bridge Club.
Taylor is closing in on
Life Master, needing a
handful of gold points.
"Our next goal is to get
Eric over the top," Brown
said. "You know how many


points you need from the
ACBL magazine."
Brown, a state-ranked
tennis player and a former
coach for the Lady Tigers,
learned party bridge
as a new teacher in her
hometown of Lexington,
Ky. She was introduced
to duplicate bridge after


COURTESY PHOTO

Tigers hold soccer awards banquet
Columbia High's boys varsity soccer team held a banquet at The Country Club at Lake City
on Saturday to honor the Tigers for last season. Award winners are (front row, from left)
Dylan Sessions, Young Gun Award; Bryce McCarthy, Academic Award; Hunter Grow,
Tiger Pride Award and Grayson Housch, Most Improve Award. Back row (from left) are
coach Brad Carpenter; Jimmy Blakely, Outstanding Offense Award; Drew Waller,
Outstanding Defense Award; Nick Tuttle, Most Valuable Player Award; Conner Widergren,
Coach's Award and head coach Trevor Tyler. Not pictured are Cooper Hall (Outstanding
Offense Award) and Cameron Hall (Coach's Award).


moving to Florida in 1983.
"I learned to play at the
kitchen table, watching
my mother and father play
with friends and hoping
one of them would have
to go to the rest room so I
could sit in," said Carignan
of South Portland, Maine.
He learned about duplicate


in college, but did not play
until after he moved to
Lake City in 1980.
While Brown spends
much of her retirement
time as a teacher with
tennis, Carignan is an
advocate of EverQuest II.

MASTERS continued on 2B


SEC tourney


could bolster


NCAA hopes


Bubble teams
look to add to
yearly resume.
By PAUL NEWBERRY
Associated Press
ATLANTA As soon
as the regular season was
over, Mark Fox spent
some time going over his
bracket.
Who's already in with
an automatic bid? Who's
struggled down the
stretch? Who's making a
late push to grab a bid?
As things stand now, the
Georgia coach figures his
team has done enough to
lock up its NCAA spot.
But Fox, of course, isn't


the one making the call.
So, it would probably
behoove the Bulldogs
to win at least one more
game in the Southeastern
Conference tournament,
which begins Thursday at
the Georgia Dome.
Ditto for Alabama and
Tennessee.
Not to confuse sports,
but this tournament
should probably be called
the Bubble Bowl.
"I don't know what
assures us of getting in,"
Fox said. "With our RPI
and strength of schedule,
you could make an argu-
ment that we don't have
to do anything more to get
SEC continued on 2B


IyII U I ,C V1M T-II1wI









Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS THURSDAY, MARCH 10, 2011


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TV sports
Today
CYCLING
4 p.m.
VERSUS Paris-Nice, stage 5, Saint-
Symphorien-sur-Coise to Vernoux-en-
Vivarals, France (same-day tape)
GOLF
2 p.m.
TGC PGA Tour/WGC, Cadillac
Championship, first round, at Doral
6:30 p.m.
TGC PGATour, Puerto Rico Open,
first round, at Rio Grande, Puerto Rico
(same-day tape)
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
Noon
ESPN Big East Conference,
quarterfinal, Pittsburgh vs. Connecticut,
at NewYork
12:30 p.m.
ESPN2 Big 12 Conference,
quarterfinal, Kansas vs. Oklahoma State, at
Kansas City, Mo.
2 p.m.
ESPN Big East Conference,
quarterfinal, Syracuse vs. St. John's, at
-NewYork
2:30 p.m.
ESPN2 Big Ten Conference, first
round, Northwestern vs. Minnesota, at
Indianapolis
3 p.m.
FSN Pac- 10 Conference,
quarterfinal, Southern Cal vs. California,
at Los Angeles
4:30 p.m.
ESPN2 Big Ten Conference,
first round, Michigan State vs. Iowa, at
Indianapolis
5:30 p.m.
FSN -. Pac- 10 Conference,
quarterfinal, Arizona vs. Stanford-Oregon
State winner, at Los Angeles
7 p.m.
ESPN Big East Conference,
quarterfinal, Notre Dame vs. Cincinnati-
South Florida winner at New York
ESPN2 -Atlantic Coast Conference,
first round, Maryland vs. N.C. State, at
Greensboro, N.C.
9 p.m.
ESPN Big East Conference,
quarterfinal, Louisville vs. West Virginia-
Marquette winner, at NewYork
FSN Pac-10 Conference,
quarterfinal, UCLA vs. Oregon-Arizona
State winner, at Los Angeles
9:30 p.m.
ESPN2 -- Big 12 Conference,
quarterfinal,Texas A&M vs. Missouri-Texas
Tech winner, at Kansas City, Mo.
11:30 p.m.
FSN -- Pac-10 Conference,
quarterfinal, Washington vs. Washington
State, at Los Angeles
NBA BASKETBALL
7 p.m.
TNT LA. Lakers at Miami
.9:30 p.m.
TNT NewYork at Dalls

BASEBALL

Spring training
Today's Games
N.Y. Mets vs. Florida at .Jupiter,
1:05 p.m..
Toronto vs. Minnesota at Fort Myers,
1:05 p.m.
'Boston vs. Tampa Bay at Port
Charlotte, 1:05 p.m. .
St. Louis vs. Atlanta at Kissimmee,
1:05 p.m.
N.Y. Yankees vs. Philadelphia at
Clearwater, 1:05 p.m.
N.Y. Mets vs.Washington (ss) atViera,"
1:05 p.m.
Chicago White Sox (ss) vs. Texas, at
Surprise,Ariz., 3:05 p.m..
Baltimore vs. Pittsburgh at Bradenton,
7:05 p.m.
Washington (ss) vs. Houston at
Kissimmee, 7:05 p.m.
Detroit vs. Florida at Jupiter, 7:05 p.m.
Friday's Games
Philadelphia vs. Baltimore at Sarasota,
1:05 p.m.


Boston (ss) vs. Houston (ss) at
Kissimmee, 1:05 p.m.
Detroit vs. St. Louis at Jupiter,
1:05 p.m.
Pittsburgh vs. Tampa Bay at Port
Charlotte, 1:05 p.m.
Boston (ss) vs. Minnesota at Fort
Myers, 1:05 p.m.
Atlanta vs. N.Y.Yankees (ss) at Tampa,
1:05 p.m.
N.Y. Yankees (ss) vs. Toronto at
Dunedin; 1:05 p.m.
Florida vs. N.Y. Mets at Port St. Lucie,
1:10 p.m.
Cincinnati vs. Texas at Surprise, Ariza
3:05 p.m.
Houston (ss) vs. Washington at Viera
6:05 p.m. ,

BASKETBALL,

NBA schedule
Today's Games
LA. Lakers at Miami, 7 p.m.
New York at Dallas, 9:30 p.m.
Denver at Phoenix, 10:30 p.m.
Friday' Games
Portland at Charlotte, 7 p.m.
LA. Clippers at New Jersey, 7 p.m.
Indiana at Toronto, 7 p.m.
Boston at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Atlanta at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Utah at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Detroit at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m.
Sacramento at San Antonio, 8:30 p.m,
Orlando at Golden State, 10:30 p.m.

SEC tournament

At The Georgia Dome
Atlanta
First Round
Today
Georgia vs.Auburn, I p.m.
Mississippi vs. South Carolina, 3:30 p.m.
Arkansas vs.Tennessee, 7:30 p.m.
Vanderbilt vs. LSU. 10 p.m.
Quarterfinals
Friday
Alabama vs. Georgia-Auburn winner.
I p.m.
Kentucky vs. Mississippi-South
Carolina winner, 3:30 p.m.
Florida vs.Arkansas-Tennessee winner,
7:30 p.m.
Mississippi State vs. Vanderbilt-LSU
winner, 10 p.m.

ACC tournament

At Greensboro Coliseum
Greensboro, N.C.
First Round
Today
Virginia vs. Miami, Noon
Boston" College vs. Wake Forest.
2:30 p.m.
Maryland vs. N.C. State, 7 p.m.
Virginia Tech vs. Georgia Tech,
9:30 p.m.
Quarterfinals
Friday
North Carolina vs. Virginia-Miami
winner. Noon.
Clemson vs. Boston College-Wake
Forest winner, 2:30 p.m.
Duke vs. Maryland-N.C. State
winner, 7 p.m.
Florida State vs.VirginiaTech-Georgli
Tech winner, 9:30 p.m.

ACC awards

GREENSBORO, N.C.-The voting for
the 2010-11 Atlantic Coast Conference
men's basketball individual awards, as
determined by 75 members of theAdantdi
Coast Sports Media Association.
Player of the year
Nolan Smith, Duke (73)
Kyle Singler, Duke (I)
Jordan Williams, Maryland (I)
Coach of the year w
Roy Williams, North Carolina (52)
Brad Brownell, Clemson (8)
Steve Donahue, Boston College (6)
Leonard Hamilton, FSU (4)
Mike Krzyzewski, Duke (3)
Seth Greenberg,VirginlaTech (I)
Tony BennettVirginia (I)
Roolde of the year


Harrison Barnes, North Carolina (64)
Kendall Marshall, North Carolina (7)
Travis McKie,Wake Forest (2)
Terrell Stoglin, Maryland (I)
Defensive player of the year
John Henson, North Carolina (49)
Chris Singleton, FSU (16)
Inian Shumpert, Georgia Tech (2)
Jordan Williams, Maryland (2)
Malcolm Delaney, Virginia Tech (I)
Jeff Allen,Virginia Tech (I)
Demodtez Stlta Clemson (I)
Kyle Singer, Duke (I)
Nolan Smith, Duke (I)

Top 25 schedule

TodA QGames
ka 2Kisa' vs. Oklahoma State
at the Spri-nt Cetr, lKansas City, Mo.,
12:30 p.m: ,
S-No.3Jltsburghvs.No.21 Connecticut
-at Madison Square Garden, Noon
No 4. Notre Dame In Big East
quarterfinals at Madison Square Garden,
7 p.m.
No. 7 SatDlego State vs. Utah at the
Thomas & Mack Center, LasVegas, 9 p.m.
No.8 BYU vs.Wyomlng orTCU at the
Thomas Ma&'k Center, LasVegas, 3 p.m.
No. 10 Texas vs. Baylor or Oklahoma
at the Sprint Center, Kansas City, Mo.,
7 p.m. .
No. II- Syracuse Ih 'Big 'East
quarterfinals at Madison Square Garden,
2 p.m ., .;_, : .
N' 14 Loufi4llle In Big East
quarterfinals at Madison Square Garden,
9 p.m.
No. 16 Ariona vs. Stanford or Oregon
State at the Staples Center, 5:40 p.m.
No. 19'KahbasState vs. Colorado or
Iowa State at .the Sprint Center, Kansas
City, Mo., 3 p.m.

AUTO RACING

Race week

NHRA FULL THROTTLE
NHRA Gatornationals
Site- Gainesville
Schedule: Friday, qualifying; Saturday,
qualifying (ESPN2, midnight-1:30 a.m.;
Sunday, final eliminations (ESPN2,
6-9 p.m.).
Track Gainesville Raceway.
Next race: SummltRaclng.com NHRA
Nationals,Aprll l-3.The Strip at LasVegas
Motor Speedway, Las Vegas.
Online: http:/l/www.nhro.com
NASCAR
CAMPING WORLD TRUCKS
Too Tough to Tame 200
Site: Darlington, S.C.
Schedule: Saturday, practice, qualifying,
race, 5 p.m. (Speed, 3:30-7:30 p.m.)
TrackdDarlington Raceway (oval, 1.366
mils)..
Race distance: 200.8 miles, 147 laps.
Next race: Kroger 250, April 2,
Martinsvllle Speedway, Martinsvllle,Va.
Online: http:J/www.nascar.com
SPRINT CUP
Next race: Jeff Byrd 500, March 20,
Bristol Motor Speedway, Bristol,Tenn.
NATIONWIDE
Next race: Scotts EZ Seed 300. March
19, Bristol Motor Speedway, Bristol,Tenn.

HOCKEY

NHL schedule

Tofatbs Games
Buffalo tBbs n,'7 pm.,
Philadelphia at Toronto,7 p.m.
Ottawa at Florida,7:30 p.m.
Montreal at St Louls. 8 p.m
Minnesota at Nashville, 8 pm.
Calgary at Phoenix. 9 p.m.
Vancouver at San Jose. 1030 p.m.
Frd'. y's Games
Boston at N.Y. Islands, 7 p.nm
Carolina at Washington, 7 p.m.
Los Angeles at Columbus, 7 p.m.
Edmonton at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
New Jersey at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m.
Ottawa at Ta pa Bay, 7:30 p.m.
Minnesota at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Anaheim at Colorado, 9 p.m.


SEC: UF, Kentucky are locks for NCAA


Continued From Page 1B
in. But I certainly don't feel
comfortable saying that"
Only three SEC teams
seem assured of NCAA
bids, no matter what they
do in Atlanta: No. 12 Florida,
the regular-season cham-
pion; No. 15 Kentucky; and
Vanderbilt, which has an
RPI rating inside the top
30.
Beyond that, it's all guess-
work:
Tennessee (18-13, 8-
8) has an RPI in the mid-
30s and played one of the
nation's toughest sched-
ules, including huge wins
over Big East powerhouses
Pittsburgh and Villanova.
But the Vols are still tainted
by a one-point defeat to 20-
loss Charlotte and they only
finished fifth in the SEC
East
Georgia (20-10, 9-7)
also has a solid RPI (No.


39) and no ugly losses on its
resume. On the down side,
the Bulldogs lack a bunch.
of signature wins, outside of
beating Kentucky at home.,
Also, their national repu-
tation is lacking, having
reached the NCAAs only
once since an academic
and pay-for-play scandal
brought down former coach
Jim Harrick in 2003.
Alabama (20-10, 12-4)
won the SEC West with the
second-best mark within
the league. But its schedule
was weak, its RPI a dismal
83rd. The selection commit-
tee will not look favorably
on hideous losses early in
the year to Seton Hall, Iowa
and Saint Peters.
"I think this next week
will kind of answer some
questions for everybody,"
Crimson Tide coach
Anthony Grant said. "We


can'treally focus on the past
We've just got to make sure
we take care of today, and
hopefully at the end of the
day the selection commit-
tee will feel that (Alabama
is deserving) with us going
12-4 in the SEC and winning
15 of the last 19."
Tennessee certainly isn't
taking anything for granted,
even though its RP[ would
normally be considered
well within the range for an
at-large bid.
"Yout never want to feel
like you've dtne enough,"
coach Bruce Pearl said. "We
feel like we've got some-
thing to play for. We know
the more we win, the more
we'llimprove our resume."
The toiurnament starts
off with four games, includ-
ing a downright crucial one
for Georgia. The Bulldogs
talke.on last-place Auburn.


TRACK: Lady Indians win 4 X 800


Continued From Page 1B

3200 meters (12.58).
Shania Pelham, Seaira
Fletcher, Danielle Wooley
and Hannah Chamberlain
were 2-3-4-5 in the 400
meters.


Ashley Jones was second
in the 800 meters. Fletcher
was second and Carolee
Morrow was fourth in the
1600 meters.
Pelham was second and


Stephanie Bicknell was
third in the 100 meters.
Jackson was fifth in the
shot put- Morrow, Fletcher,
Ashley Jones and Sydni
Jones won the 4 x 800.


COURTESY PHOTO


Falcon among 'Ghosts'

Tyson Ellis (center, holding the trophy with his right hand), a sixth-grader at Lake City Middle
School, is a member of the Gainesville Ghosts 10-under travel baseball team. The Ghosts
won the 11AAA NIT New Era Tournament in Leesburg on Sunday. The Ghosts are state and
nationally ranked. Ellis is one of three sixth-graders to make the Falcons baseball team, and
a straight A student. Ellis has been playing baseball in Lake City since he was. 5 years old.


COURTESY PHOTO


Dream Team at Tortoise 5K

Staff and family members of the Pulmonary and Sleep Center's Dream Team of Lake City
participated in the Race the Tortoise 5K at O'Leno State Park on Saturday. The run was
organized by Friends of the Park; sponsors were Advanst Technologies, Capital City Bank
and Pangea Adventure Racing..Dream Team runners are (front row, from left)
Natalia Duarte, Eliana Duarte and Jack Duarte. Back row (from left) are Diogenes Duarte,
,Russell Davis, Misti Davis, Diann'Capone, Giann Capone, Theresa Duarte and Ben Gottlieb.
Eliana Duarte brought home a trophy for placing third in her age division. Dominic Capone
also ran for the Dream.Team.
,


s ..e d Ads 01


ACROSS

1 Springs
6 Break ground,
10 de corps
12 Tour schlepper
14 Papeete's
island
15 Most venerable
16 Noisy insect
18 Exercise place
19 Visible
21 Grant a mort-
gage
23 Comrade
24 AM or FM slot
26 Wharf
29 Part of the
range.
31 Equator seg-
ment
33 Benefit,
often
35 Ready to serve
36 Ref's cousin
37 Fabric sample
38,Unusual
40 Fleming of 007
fame


42 Hill builder
43 Yours and'
mine
45 Eye boldly
47 alai
50 FIruit cake
",ingredient
52 Disparage
54 Ms. Sanford of
TV
58 Baezor.Seeger
59 Wish
60 Must-have
61 Coastline

DOWN

1 Travel option
2 Dos Passos
trilogy
3 Radar meas.
4 Buyer's con-
cern
5 Mild protests
(hyph.)
6 Chopin's
homeland
7 Aberdeen boy
8 Lyric poems


Get co .,. ..- V l
'.' mi M 1Lake City
1n 11,0 Reporter



Answer to Previous Puzzle


Ev A E HU LAS
RA I SED SANEST
OSSIF 'Y TRASH Y
SEAMY NUMB
ALSO AID LINT
VOLT DEMUR
SIP G UPPY ADE
ADO EMI LE NEE
FLUKE CUDS
E YRE WKS CAT S
EVES ERNI E
YOWLED CR I NGE
ROVERS BABIED
SHAD Y STEE R


9 Trace of smoke
11 Involuntary
movement
12 Did not walk
13 Sweater letter
17 Panicky one


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


19 Enjoy the
taste
20 "Maria -"
22 Keeps follow-
ing
23 Pea's place
25 Frat letter
27 Barge route
28 "Soapdish"
actor
30 Despot who
fiddled
32 Excel pro
34 Quick to learn
39 Geometry pio-
neer
41 Lassos
44 Formal
observance
46 Grind one's
teeth
47 Skippy rival
48 Familiar auth.
49 Castaway's
refuge
51 Cast aside
53 Hula accom-
paniment
55 Profile
56 Drop the ball
57 Civil War gen-
eral


2011 by UFS, Inc.


3-10


-










Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


LAKE CITY REPORTER


SPORTS


THURSDAY, MARCH 10, 2011


FSU heads to


tourney with


star gimpy


By BRENT KALLESTAD
Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE-When
Florida State coach Leonard
Hamilton gets ready to put
his starting lineup on the
court he checks the train-
ing room first to see who is
available.
The Seminoles (21-9,11-5
Atlantic Coast Conference)
have played 18 games this
season without at least one
member of their, original
starting unit because of an
injury. Only two regulars,
guards Derwin Kitchen
and Michael Snaer, have
not missed time because
of injury.
And they appear to be
headed to the ACC tour-
nament without their top
scorer and rebounder,
who doubles as one of the
-nation's top defenders.
Chris Singleton, who was
last year's ACC Defensive
Player of the Year, missed
the Seminoles final regu-
lar season games with a
Broken right foot. The
6-foot-9 forward's availabil-
ity for Friday's quarterfinal
game against the winner of
a first-round game between
Virginia Tech and Georgia
Tech remains in question.
"We're going to proceed
optimistic, but cautious,"
said Hamilton, whose pro-
gram has now matured to a
point it can win in the face
of adversity.
Florida State is 68-29
over the past three sea-
sons, 31-17 in ACC play.
This time it was Florida
State's youngest player,
18-year-old Okaro White
who was called on when


Singleton was hurt
"My teammates pushed
me in practice everyday
to make me feel like, 'hey
you're not a freshman any-
more,"' said White, who
shared scoring honors with
Deividas Dulkys in a' Feb.
26 win over Miami. "It's
good for me not to feel
that way (like a freshman)
so I can go out there and
produce."
The 6-8 White respond-
ed along with fellow fresh-
man Ian Miller and the
Seminoles won three. of
those games -.including
two on the road.
Singleton's loss also
inspired the team's oldest
player, 25-year-old Derwin
Kitchen, who led the team
in scoring in three of those
five games.
And if Singleton (13.8
points, 7.3 rebounds)
can't play this weekend,
Hamilton will go into the
tournament with Kitchen
his lone player averaging
in double figures and
that's just barely at 10.1
points a game.
"It created a scenario
with our guys that they
understood they needed
to be more focused," said
Hamilton, who has used a
half dozen different start-
ing lineups this season to
counter injuries.
The veteran coach has
traditionally been protec-
tive of his players, reluctant
to letthem risk further dam-
age to ar injury. Hamilton
said he would have to be
completely confident that
Singleton wouldn't reinjure
himself before putting him
back into a game.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Tiger Woods hits from the 11th tee during practice for
the Cadillac Championship golf tournament in Doral
SWednesday.


SWoods' playing

schedule limited

by time with kids


By DOUG FERGUSON
Associated Press

DORAL Tiger Woods
is hitting some of his best
shots when no one is
watching.
That's typically the case
when Woods tries to build
a new golf swing, and his
third major swing change
is no exception. Put him
on the practice range at
home in Isleworth and he
says he goes through long
stretches of hitting the ball
how he wants. Put him
inside the ropes, with a
scorecard in hand and TV
cameras in the towers, and
he has stretches of looking
ordinary.
But there is one big dif-
ference this time around.
Woods isn't playing very
much.
When he tees it up
Thursday in the Cadillac
Championship at Doral, it
will be only his 10th com-


petitive round of the year,
an unusually low number
with the Masters around the
corner. Woods talks about
needing more competi-
tion, and most would agree
that would speed along the
process of revamping his
swing. It also leads to a
natural question.
Why not play more tour-
naments?
"Because I have a fam-
ily. I'm divorced," Woods
replied solemnly. "If you've
been divorced with kids,
then you would under-
stand."
It spoke to a personal
life that remains as much
a work in progress as his
golf swing.
There was speculation
after Woods lost in the
first round of the Match
Play Championship that
he would play the Honda
Classic, especially since he
is close to moving to south
Florida.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
North Carolia State's Javier Gonzalez (10) looks to pass
around Florida State's Bernard James during the first half of
an NCAA college basketball game Sunday in Raleigh, N.C.


Center Xavier Gibson
returned on a limited basis
in mid-February after sit-
ting out nine games iith a
knee injury. However, the
6-11 junior has been unable
to reclaim his starting job
from newcomer Bernard
James, who has turned
into one of the ACC's best
inside defenders while
shooting 64.2 percent. And
7-foot Jon Kreft has been
weaved into the inside rota-
tion since becoming eligi-
ble at midseason.
The rash of injuries
didn't, end with Hamilton's
starters. Miller missed 10
games in the middle of the
year with a groin injury
and sophomore Terrance


Shannon missed seven
games with two separate
injuries.
Dulkys missed one
game when he had a finger
nail on his shooting hand
ripped off at practice and
junior backup guard Luke
Loucks began the year
after having offseason foot
surgery.
"I think we're at the point
right now where it doesn't
matter who starts or comes
off the bench," White said.
"We're just trying to get
some wins."
And while Hamilton
won't argue with wins, he's
like to see his team get
healthy and stay that way
- at least for awhile.


Earn"hardtintent

on making 2011

season a success


By JENNA FRYER
Associated Press

CHARLOTTE, N.C. -
Dale Earnhardt Jr.'s view
is matter-of-fact when it
comes to the task ahead:
He must get his career
back on track.
NASCAR's most popu-
lar driver saw his losing
streak hit 96 races at Las
Vegas, but his eighth-
place finish Sunday was
encouraging enough to
make Earnhardt believe
he is finally making strides
toward Victory Lane
after three rocky years at
Hendrick Motorsports.
It was the second con-
secutive top-10 finish for
Earnhardt, who had not
strung together two solid
runs since NewHampshire-
Daytona last summer. It
also moved him to 10th in
the points, the first time
he's been inside the top 10
since the ninth race of last
season.
The finish was a testa-
ment to his budding rela-
tionship with Steve Letarte,
his third crew chief since
joining HMS in 2008. After
qualifying 35th at Las Vegas
and struggling through
the first day of practice,
the duo worked together


to find more speed on the
Chevrolet.
"It's obvious that it is
working, when you really
look at it," Earnhardt said.
"I was sitting there in the
middle of the race saying,
'You know, this really ain't
a fluke. This is how it's
supposed to go and how it
should go and how it went
in the past when things
were good.'"
But it's been a long time
since things were good,
and team owner Rick
Hendrick has so far failed
to figure out how to fix the
problem. He's character-
ized every move he's made
with Earnhardt as one that
won't fail, only to see the
struggles continue.
So he blew up his orga-
nization. during the offsea-
son, shuffling the driver-
crew chief lineup for three
of his four teams. The
move paid off in just the
second week of the season,
when Jeff Gordon snapped
his 66-race winless streak
with new crew chief Alan
Gustafson.
Now Earnhardt hopes to
end his long drought with
Letarte, who has proven
to be the in-race cheer-
leader that Earnhardt
needs.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Feb. 12 file photo, car owner Rick Hendrick (left) and
driver Dale Earnhardt Jr. talk on pit road prior to the start
of the Budweiser Shootout NASCAR auto race at Daytona
International Speedway in Daytona Beach.


Union asked NFL

for full financial

data back in 2009


By HOWARD FENDRICH
Associated Press

WASHINGTON The
financial information the
NFL has offered to turn
over during labor negotia-
tions doesn't include the
data requested nearly two
years ago by the head of the
players' union.
In a letter dated May 18,
2009 a copy of which was
obtaifted Wednesday: by
The Associated Press NFL
Players Association execu-
tive director DeMaurice
Smith asked Commissioner
Roger Goodell to "provide
audited financial statements


concerning the operations
of the 32 clubs and the
league."
Smith attached a
list of 10 categories of
information he sought,
including: -
total operating income;
total operating expens-
es;
profit from operations;
net income;
cash and investment
assets.
The NFL proposed this
week to provide new finan-
cial data, but the union said
it wasn't enough to satisfy
the players' call for full dis-
closure.


MASTERS: 2-year quest


Continued From Page 1B

Both love bridge and got
the bug for bigger things
2'/2 years ago.
'We went to Gainesville
to see how we matched
up," Carignan said. "They
were tough, but we could
hold ourown."
The two are now
members of all three
Gainesville clubs, in
addition to Lake City.
"It is amazing how many
Gainesville players ask
us to partner with them,"
Brown said. "That was a
revelation."
The foursome hit the
tournament trail, playing
regionals throughout
Florida.
Brown played in a
national tournament in
Gatlinburg, Tenn., with
partner Evelyn Kleinsasser
of Gainesville and got a
points jump on Carignan
and Taylor.
Carignan answered with
a solo trip to a regional in
Naples ana' was partnered
with Cathy Simpson,
a visiting player from
Michigan.
The players focus
mostly on knockout
events and Swiss teams.
Brown and Carignan


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
I SECSH I


played a pairs event
in Daytona Beach and
faced bridge professional
Mike Cappelletti and a
student. The Lake City
pair dominated the three
hands against the pro and
went on to win the entire
session.
SBoth suggest lessons for
any aspiring players.
"You can go online, but
having a live person is
nice," said Brown, who is
taking a class. "They can
explain it better and
play the hands out You
can buy programs and play
online with pEople all over
the world and at all
levels, or you -.n just
watch."
"If you got to
ACBL.org, they have free
downloadable programs
that are very well done,"
Carignan said.
Life Master is the
bridge milestone, but also
a steppingstone to more
laur .
'We plan-to keep en
keeping on," Brown said.
"Why should we quit, we
are having too much fun,"
Carignan said.
"Someday we will get
bronze."


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek


AOWENP .
o WHAT THE
ENGINEER'S
KWIEC LUNCH WAS.
KWIECD
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
Answer here: F I I I
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's Jumbles: ERUPT GAUZE ISLAND UPROAR
Answer: What the conceited preacher had -
AN ALTAR EGO










Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415 LAKE CITY REPORTER


DILBERT


BABY BLUES


.BLONDIE


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE
AS A $GAOOPWi. 6EfIErK, (7.. .aLrYoi VlrA r 0 1
s'e KMG HVi -4E ALL 4i PAII YOU 7Y -,., 7-0 vro
UB7JECTS To vl /mVI1 T I4I-..,, allm a


DEAR ABBY


Promise of secrecy is sacred

to cooks who relish mystery


DEAR ABBY: I'm re-
sponding to the letter
from "Craving the Cakes
in Florida" (Jan. 30), com-
plaining that her sister-
in-law wouldn't reveal the
secret ingredient in a late
relative's pancake recipe.
As a cook who has many
of my own kitchen secrets,
I'd be upset if one of my
family members were to
reveal them to anyone I
didn't authorize. A promise
is a promise, and it should
never be broken!
Believe it or not, recipes
are intellectual property.
How presumptuous for
"Craving" to expect her
in-law to divulge a secret
from the family's tradition.
She should enjoy the meal
when she's at her sister-in-
law's, and work on develop-
ing her own mystery dish.
- STAYING MUM IN
CHARLESTON, S.C.
DEAR STAYING
MUM: Many readers
agreed with you about the
importance of keeping a
promise. Some of them
also were sure they knew
the secret ingredient that
made the cakes so memo-
rable: buttermilk, ricotta
cheese, nutmeg, vanilla
extract, Irish Cream, Kah-
lua, lemon juice, oatmeal,
yogurt, cinnamon, malted


Abigail Van Buren
www.deorabby.com
milk, cornmeal, sour cream
and cardamom. (This is
making me hungry) Read
on:
DEAR ABBY: I ob-
tained a recipe upon the
death of an aunt who
wouldn't share it until she
passed away. I did not think
she was selfish. I fondly re-
member her serving these
cookies the few times a
year we saw her.
I bake them for special
occasions holidays,
birthdays, graduations, etc.
- and mail them to fam-
ily and friends out of state.
The treats are special and
everyone looks forward to
receiving them. If everyone
had the recipe, it would lose
its distinction.
When I am no longer
able to bake them, I will
happily pass the recipe on
to a relative to continue
the tradition. BETH IN
PENNSYLVANIA
DEAR ABBY: I was
taught a promise is sacred.
Do you really think the in-


law should sacrifice her
honor.over a pancake reci-
pe? They may be delicious,
but breaking my word
would leave a bitter taste;
in my mouth. PROMISEI
KEEPER IN VIRGINIA
DEAR ABBY: A friend
gave me a cinnamon bun!
recipe that had been in his
family for as long as anyone'
could remember. About 11
years ago, his house caught'
fire and he lost most of his
possessions, including that;
recipe. His siblings had
misplaced it and the only
person to have it was me.
Sometimes it's good to
share something, if only'
with one other person.;
That way, treasures aren't
lost forever. LISA IN
RENO
DEAR ABBY: Becaus&i
the relative had shared the
recipe with "Craving's"!'
sister-in-law, technically it
was no longer a secret. If
it was to be kept a secret,
then shouldn't the relative
have told no one? 4I feel
the in-law is free to share,
the secret with a clear con-
science. I'd like to know
what it is, too! FOODIE
IN TENNESSEE
N Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS


GARFIELD


B.C.


FRANK & ERNEST


ARIES (March 21-
April 19): You may feel
like pushing and shoving in
order to get your way but it
won't help. You are better
off showing what you have
to offer first Romance can
change the way you are
treated. Do something spe-
cial for someone you love.

TAURUS (April 20-
May 20): Don't make de-
cisions based on what you
want to believe; get the
facts and figures. If you let
your heart rule your head,
you are likely to lose emo-
tionally and financially or
with regard to your status
and reputation. ***
GEMINI (May 21-
June 20): Back away from
anyone trying to get some-
thing from you. Do not lend,
borrow or donate. Compli-
ments will get you further
than complaints. Boost
your confidence by updat-
ing your image. ***
CANCER (June 21-
July 22): You've got more
control than you realize.
Voice your opinions and
plans and you will get the
go-ahead from people you
need in your corner. Don't
let uncertainties in your
personal life cause you to
miss out on an opportunity.

LEO (July 23-Aug.
22): It's OK to brag a little


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

but be prepared to do the
legwork. You will disap-
point someone you are try-
ing to impress, making it
difficult to redeem your po-
sition. Positive thought and
progressive action will help
you avoid loss. **
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Spend more time on
the projects, hobbies and
interests you enjoy and it
will lessen your stress and
help you make personal
and professional choices
that will help you advance.
Turn what you know and
do best into a moneymak-
ing endeavor. *-***
LIBRA (Sept 23-Oct.
22): Take a break. Enjoy
the company of friends or.
get involved in a creative
hobby that inspires you.
Participate in social activi-
ties or events geared to-
ward making new friends.
Love is on the rise. Now is
the time to expand creative-
ly and personally. ***
SCORPIO (Oct 23-
Nov. 21): Don't fold under
pressure. Not everyone has
to like what you are doing.
Make decisions that will
suit you best and, if that
means personal or profes-
sional changes, you should
forge ahead. ***


SAGlITARIUS (Nov.,
22-Dec. 21): You'll be
torn between two options.
Take the path that excites
you the most. The past will
haunt you if you don't re-
connect with the interests
and people you miss. Fol-
low your heart. ***
CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): Put more
time and effort into your
home and family. Keeping
track of old friends or at-
tending a reunion will help
you with a decision you
need to make now. You may
be tricked by someone's
sentimentality. ****
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Do something
that makes you happy with-
out- being too extravagant,
like having dinner with a
friend or getting in touch
with someone you miss.
Don't let emotional matters1
take you down a path that
will lead to upset. If some-
thing isn't going your way,.
just walk away. **
PISCES (Feb. 19-
March 20): Mix the old
with the new and you will
come up with something
that works for you in the
present. Make a point to let
everyone know your plan
and your intentions before
you put pressure on anyone
who is hesitant to help out.


CELEBRITY CIPHER


by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
'Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: U equals F
"Ell LZVB NHINRH IWHDWZRJH OPZE
EPHB ZDH VIE ZVC JVCHDWZRJH


O P'ZE E P H B Z D H.


LZR Y I R L A.


U I DG H A
PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "Lent is the time for trimming the soul and scrapping
the sludge off a life turned slipshod." Sister Joan Chittister
(c) 2011 by NEA, Inc. 3-10


FOR BETTER ORWORSE
you SHOULD NEV-ER BUrV SHE CRIME OVE
FIWRVEbOLD CONNIE To TE-LL ME- HO
(HRoT YOO RFERLLY ROTTN --HE HAD
THIAOoGHTOFTD, BEEN-TO HER


CLASSIC PEANUTS


ADVICE & COMICS THURSDAY, MARCH 10, 2011











Classified Department: 755-5440


BU- IT


Ibflili^
SELL I1m


F ) T


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED' THURSDAY, MARCH 10, 2011

Lake City Reporter





CLASSIFIED


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

755-5440


- ADvantage
A~vantag


ra Mcan


Limited to service typeadveQr jS.-._..
ing only.
4 lines, one month.... 92.00 "'
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Includes an additional $2.00 per
ad for each Wednesday insertion.


You can call us at 755-5440,
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a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Some people prefer to place their
classified ads in person, and some.
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East Duval Street.
You can also fax or email your ad
copy to the Reporter.
FAX: 386-752-9400 Please
direct your copy to the Classified
Department.
EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityre-
porter.com


AdIstoAppear: Call by: Fax/Email by;
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these deadlines are subject to change without notice.




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on the first day of publication.
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only the charge for the ad space
in error. Please call 755-5440
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tion and billing adjustments.
Cancellations- Normal advertising
deadlines apply for cancellation.
Billing Inquiries- Call 755-5440.
Should further information be
required regarding payments or
credit limits, your call will be trans-
ferred to the accounting depart-
ment.


Advertising copy is subject to
approval by the Publisher who
reserves the right to edit, reject,
or classify all advertisements under
appropriate headings. Copy should
be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the first day of pub-
lication. Credit for published errors
will be allowed for the first insertion
for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the
Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nor for any general,
special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply
with Federal, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
nation in employment, housing and
public accommodations. Standard
abbreviations are acceptable; how-
ever, the first word of each ad may
not be abbreviated.

In Print and Online
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Legal


One Item per ad u.O
4 lines 6 days itchadditional
Rate applies to private individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling $100or less.
Each Item must Include a price
This Is a non-refundable rate.




One Item per ad ea6 i
4 lines 6 daysline $1.10
t Rate applies to private Individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling $500 or les.
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Rate apples to private Indduals selling
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One tem per ad addit
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4 1 6 dHays Each additional
Lines *6 days ine $1.65
Rate applies to private Individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling $6,000 or less.
Each item must include a price.
This Is a non-refundable rate.


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 09-31-CA
DLC CATTLE COMPANY, INC.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
LOWELL D. HUFF, JR., CATHER-
INE J. HUFF, and COLUMBIA
COUNTY, FLORIDA,
Defendants
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
Noticeis hereby given that the fol-
lowing described real property;
Lot 6, English Acres, a recorded sub-
division with a 1983 KIMB Mobile
Home Serial Number
KH40D3F80725GAB
shall be sold by the Clerk of this
Court, at public sale, pursuant to the
Final Judgment in the above styled
action dated February 28, 2011, at
the Columbia County Courthouse in
Lake City, Columbia County, Flori-
da, at 11:00 A.M., on Wednesday,
March 30, 2011, to the best and
highest bidder for cash. Any person
claiming an interest in any surplus
from the sale, other than the property
owner as of the date of the notice of
lis pendens, must file a claim within
60 says after the sale.
WITNESS my hand and official seal
in the State and County aforesaid this
28th day of February, 2011
P. DEWITT CASON
Clerk of Court
By:/s/B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
04543767
March 3, 10, 2011
Registration of Fictitious Names
We the undersigned, being duly
sworn, do hereby declare under oath
that the names of all persons interest-
Ui in the business or profession car-
ried on under the name of TOP
NOTCH BOUTIQUE at
130 N Marion Avenue,
Lake City, FL 32055
Contact Phone Number: 386-984-
6454 and the extent of the interest of
each, is as follows:
Name: Mindy Darmin
Extent of Interest: 100%
by:/s/ Mindy Darmin
STATE OF FLORIDA
COUNTY OF COLUMBIA
Sworn to and subscribed before me
this 8th day of March, A.D. 2011.
by:/s/ KATHLEEN A. RIOTTO
05525312
March 10,2011



REPORTER Classifieds

In Print and On Line
www.lakecityreporter.com







Home Improvements

Carpentry, remodeling, paint,
repairs, additions, Lic. & Ins.
Since 1978 FREE estimates
386-497-3219 or 954-649-1037

Lawn & Landscape Service

Clean Pine Straw,
You pick it up, $1.85 a bale,
delivery 100 bales, $285,
386-688-9156

Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA.
CASE NO.: 08-43-CA
DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL
TRUST COMPANY AS TRUSTEE
FOR THE REGISTERED HOLD-
ERS OF ARGENT SECURITIES,
INC., ASSET BACKED PASS
THROUGH CERTIFICATES SER-
IES 2006-W3,
Plaintiff,
vs.
LUIS FERNANDO SILVA, et al.,
Defendants
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given pursuant to
the Final Judgment of Foreclosure
entered in Case No.: 2008-43-CA of
the Circuit Court of the Third Judi-
cial Circuit in and for Columbia
County, Florida in which Deutsche
Bank National Trust Company, as
Trustee for the Registered Holders of
Argent Securities, Inc., Asset Backed
Pass Through Certificates Series
2006-W3, is the Plaintiff and Luis
Femando Silva, et al., is the defend-
ant, I will sell to the highest cash
bidder at the Columbia County
Courthouse, Third Floor, 173 N.E.
Hemando Avenue, Lake City, Flori-
da, at 11:00 o'clock a.m., on Wed-
nesday the 30 day of March, 2011,
following described property as set
forth in the Final Judgment of Fore-
closure, t o wit:
Lot 9, OPALS ADDITION, as per
plat thereof, recorded in Plat Book 3,
Page 7, of the Public Records of Co-
lumbia County, Florida.
Property address: 363 SE Hanover
Place, Lake City, Florida 32025
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN IN-
TEREST IN THE SURPLUS FORM
THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER,
AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS
PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE
SALE.
Witness my hand and seal of this
Court on February 23, 2011.
Clerk of the Circuit Court
P. DeWIT CASON
By:/s/ B. Scippio
04543722
March 3, 10, 2011


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 11-55-CA
ROBERT W. HOLLINGSWORTH,
Plaintiff,
V.
E. S. FUTCH, including any un-
known spouses of said Defendant,
heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees,
lienors, creditors, trustees, or other
claimants by, through, under or
against any of them, and all un-
known natural persons, if alive, and
if dead or not known to be dead or
alive, their unknown spouses, heirs,
devisees, grantees, creditors or other
persons claiming by, through or un-
der them, and against all persons
claiming any right, title or interest in
and to the lands described herein,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: E. S. FUTCH
'Address Unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action
to quiet title and confirm title of
Plaintiff has been filed against you
and you are required to serve a copy
of your written defenses, if any, to it
on MARK E. FEAGLE, ESQUIRE,
Feagle & Feagle, Attorneys, P.A.,
Plaintiffs attorney, whose address is
Post Office Box 1653, Lake City,
Florida 32056-1653, on or before
April 14, 2011, and file the original
with the Clerk of Court either before
service on Plaintiffs attorney or im-
mediately thereafter; otherwise, a de-
fault will be entered against you for
the relief demanded in the petition.
WITNESS my hand and seal of this
Court on March 4, 2011.
P. DeWIT TCASON
Clerk of Court
By:/s/B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
(SEAL)
04543838
March 10, 17, 24, 31, 2011
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE: DAN-
NY'S AUTO & TRUCK REPAIR
gives Notice of Foreclosure of Lien
and intent to sell this vehicle on
04/02/2011, 10:00 am at 190 SW
MONTGOMERY DRIVE. LAKE
CITY, FL 32025, pursuant to subsec-
tion 713.78 of the Florida Statutes.
DANNY'S AUTO & TRUCK RE-
PAIR reserves the right to accept or
reject any and/or all bids.
KM8SB82B41U015199
2001 HYUNDAI SANTA FE
05525300
March 10, 2011
Public Auction
Will be held by Gainey Automotive,
Inc, in Columbia County at 3468
S.W. CR 138, Fort White, Fl. 32038
-Dato03/22/2t0l : .
Time: 8:00 A.M.
1994 Ford ''
VIN# 1FALP42T8RF233924
04543841
March 10, 2011


010 Announcements
407 Computers


020 Lost & Found








Male Rottweiller lost evening of
02/21, County Road 138/Rum
Island area. REWARD.
Please call 386-454-2925
if no answer leave message

100 Job
Opportunities
Accountant/Office Manager
position in North Florida. CPA
experience a plus but not required.
Competitive pay and
benefits available.
Email inquiries and resumes to
resumesubmission@hotmail.com.
AVON!!!, EARN up to 50%!!!
Only $10 for Starter Kit,
1-800-275-9945 pin #4206
www.youravon.com/tdavies
CDL A Flatbed/Van Truck
Driver needed for F/T OTR SE
area, 3 years exp or more, Contact
Melissa or Mary @ 386-935-2773
Groundman/Truck driver for tree
work. Class "B" CDL w/air
breaks. Part Time/work available
Clean driving record,
386-963-5026, Drug Test.
Mobile Waiters Needed-
Immediate interviews, Make your
own schedule, Flexible hours,
Avg $40-$50 per 3-5 hr. shift!
Must have own vehicle,
o Be 21 years old &
Have cell phone w/texting,
Call 888-DDI-WORK ext 1
Wanted Highly motivated
individual for Sales Position.
Rountree -Moore Ford Lincoln
Mercury Great benefits, paid vaca-
tion. Exp. a plus but not necessary.
Call Chris. @ 386-755-0630

120 Medical
120 Employment
AMIkids Family Services Program
seeks Case Managers for
community based program work-
ing w/ at risk youth &
families. Bachelor's degree req'd.
Req's travel to 7 counties.
Fax resume to 386.362.0932.
FT CNA needed.
Send resume to
826 SW Main Blvd Ste 102.
Lake City, FL. 32025.


DELL COMPUTER
$65
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170
IBM Computer,
$80
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170


408 Furniture

Captain's Bed twin size with
mattress. It has 6 drawers and a
cubby underneath. Oak. $250 obo
386-963-1296
Small Dinette Table,
$35
386-292-3927 or
386-755-5331


420 Wanted to Buy

K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$250 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.


430 Garage Sales






Estate & Yard Sale Th, Fr, Sat &
Sun,8 am 3 pm, Everything Must
Go! Tools, clocks, antiques, furni-
ture, 142 SW Mackinaw Way,
Edgewood Estates






PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.

SAT. MARCH 12. 8-1p
Falling Creek Chapel 1290 NW
Falling Creek Rd. All proceeds go
to our Childrens Ministry


440 Miscellaneous

King Comforter Set. Shams,
bedskirt, 3 designer pillows.
French Country design.
Excellent condition. Paid $250
Asking $65.386-454-4947
New Central A/C, still in box,
with full ten year factory warranty
$1,795
Call 386-364-1090


12 Medical
120 Employment
Direct Care Staff & Cooks
Lake City Cluster ICFifor
Developmentally Disabled
Persons. www.rescare.com
386-755-6104 EEO/M/F/D/V
Infusion Nurses needed PRN IN
Swannnee,Columbia,
Hamilton,Dixie, and Bradford
County 352-244-0216

240 Schools &
S Education

04543680
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-03/28/10

Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-04/11/J 1

Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com



310 Pets & Supplies
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.

361 Farm Equipment

84 Ford 4610 Tractor. Runs good.
Solid 2WD. New front tires,
350hr on 2005 motor. Dependable.
$7500. obo. 386-867-0005

401 Antiques

CASH CASH CASH CASH
Pre 1964 Silver Coins, Sterling,
Flatware, Costume Jewelry,
Unusual Antiques 386-963-2621


402 Appliances
20 cu ft Refrigerator,
-White $250 obo
386-292-3927 or
386-755-5331
Whirlpool Washer & Dryer Set,
large capacity, white
$250 obo
386-292-3927 or 755-5331


newly remodeled, 152 N Marion
$650 mo 386-867-4995 / 961-8466

OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$695. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor


440 Miscellaneous
Tow Behind Grill/Smoker
$1,250 OBO.
386-249-3104 or
386-719-4802

630 aMobile Homes
630 for Rent
14 Wide, 2/2-$475. mo. + dep.
Clean, Quiet Country Park
Water, septic, garbage included
758-2280 References, NO PETS!

2 bedroom DWMH, secluded,
$500 month,
Call
386-752-7887

2&3 BR MH. $395 $650. mo.
plus deposit. Water & sewer fur-
nished. Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422

3/2 SW on 1 ac off 41 on 246.
Between I-10 & 75. Just renovated
$575 mo plus security. NO PETS.
386-330-2316 after 5pm

3BR/2BA Doublewide on 1 ac.
Lg. Rooms. $750 a month.
1st month and full security.
Please call 386-965-7534.

A very clean & well maintained'
2/2 units in nice'park. $599.mo
w/$500. dep. Rent includes water,
sewer, trash p/u. Close to town
386-984-8448 or 623-7547

Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White. Contact 386-623-2465
or 386-623-3404








640 for Sale
$216 a month remodeled,
like new, 2Bd/2Ba S Wide
Delivered & blocked, appliances,
A/C $2500 down, 8 year fin.
Possible owner financing. Ready
now. Call Gary 386 758-9824
05525134
Palm Harbor Homes
Repo's/Used Homes/Short Sales
3 or 4 Bedroom Doublewides
Won't Last!! 3,500-40K
Call Today! 800-622-2832


650 Mobile Home
650 & Land

Well kept 3/2 moble on 2+ acres.
screened front porch, covered back
porch, shed, MLS77241 $64,000
Call Brittany @ Results Realty
386-397-3473

710 Unfurnished Apt.
7.1v For Rent

05524728
SPRING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans;
some with garages.
Call 386-454-1469
or visit our website:
www.springhillvillage.net

05524833
DEPOSIT AS LOWAS $89 +
$200 OFF!!
BEST PRICES IN TOWN!
Windsong Apts.
386-758-8455
1, 2 & 3 Bedroom Apartments
& Mobile Homes
starting at $350 per month
386-755-2423

2br Apt. by the lake. Close to
shopping and the VA Medical
Center. $525. mo plus deposit.
386-344-2972

Great location W of 1-75, spacious '
deluxe 2BR apts., garage, W/D
hook up. patio. $600 & up, + SD,
386 965-0276

The Lakes Apts. Studios & 1Br's
from $135/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741

Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $525. + sec.
Call Michelle 386-752-9626

720 A Furnished Apts.
7 For Rent

Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

7 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent

3/2 on 2.1 acres, 2 car garage,
ceramic tile, front & rear porches,
$995 mo, plus 2 mo sec.
Lease with the option to buy
386-758-9996 or 386-365-5434

3br/2ba new const.in nice S/D
Lease Opt. to buy. $900/Mo. $700
Dep, + 1st & last Req'd., Credit
Check No Pets (386)755-9476

750 Business &
750Office Rentals
1200 sq ft Professional Office
Space, across from Courthouse,


Cathedral ceiling. Pool, tennis
court. Call for appt. (904)246-6222
Large Brick, 3/1,4.43 acres, metal
roof, MLS# 77415 $109,888
Call Nancy Rogers @ 386-867-
1271 R.E.O. Realty Group, Inc.
nancytrogers@msn.com


770 Condos For Rent

04543870
Golf Course Condo for rent,
2BR/2BA, 1420 s.f., $1000/mo.
Rent includes all appliances,
basic cable, water/sewer/
garbage, pool & tennis ct.
access. Realtor/owner
call 386-344-0433.


790 Vacation Rentals
Horseshoe Beach Spring Special
Gulf Front 2br home, w/lg water-
front porch, dock, fish sink.
Avail wkends. $345. or wk $795.
(352)498-5986/386-235-3633

805 Lots for Sale
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion,.sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living,with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.


810 Home for Sale
2/1 completely updated, screened
back porch, large utility room,
MLS#77413 $59,888 Call Nancy
@ R.E.O. Realty 386-867-1271
nancytrogers@msn.com
2/1,on nearly an acre, living/dining
rm, kitchen nook, util rm, fenced,
back porch,2 car carport close to
town, $60,000 386-754-5818
2/2 -2 story, 9.7 ac. fenced & cross
fenced w/pastures. Oversized LR,
separate dining, Ig den. Workshop,
carport. 386-752-65757$l79,900.
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
3/2.Brick Home in town, fenced
back yard w/12x12 workshop
$84,888 Call Nancy @ R.E.O.
Realty 386-867-1271MLS# 77414
nancytrogers@msn.com
3/2 cute home, remodeled, on 2
acres, partially fenced $114,900
MLS# 77396 Call Nancy @R.E.O.
Realty Group 386-867-1271,
nancytrogers@msn.com
4/2 on 10.5 acres w/ detached
garage, patio, above ground pool,
MLES#77410 $189,888 Call-
Nancy Rogers@ R.E.O. Realty
386-867-1271
A quiet neighborhood is the
perfect setting for this cute, cozy
home. Lg back yard w/1 car
garage/workshop. $84,900.
Century 21/The.Darby Rogers Co.
CBC 3/L home, inside city limits,
fenced backyard, detached carport
w/office MLS#77411 $84,900
Call R.E.O.Realty,
Nancy Rogers @ 386-867-1271
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Brick, split plan. Woodcrest S/D.
Screened porch, dining, living &
breakfast area.Lg backyard. Elaine
K. Tolar 386-755-6488 $139,900.
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Brick, 10 ac 3/2 split floor plan. Fl
room, Ig utility, scr porch. Gazebo,
carport, fenced. $149,900. Lori
Geibeig Simpson 386-365-5678
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
New home, May Fair. Great area.
Comer lot. 4 bedroom, lots of tile,
covered porch. Split plan$214,900.
Elaine K. Tolar 386-755-6488'
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
4br/2ba on 5 ac. Lg family, Florida
room den or office. Covered patio.
23x30 workshop. $229,900. Lori
Geibeig Simpson. 386-365-5678
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty.
3/2 Hardwood, separate office/liv-
ing/family rm. Workshop, fenced
Lori Geibeig Simpson 386-365-
5678 Mary Whitehurst 965-0887
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Brick on 3.23 ac. New roof, win-
dows, paint. Newer AC, remod-
eled interior, fencing, good area.
Elaine K. Tolar. 386-755-6488
Comer lot in Piccadilly S/D. Huge
living & dining room. New paint
& carpet. 2 car garage, inground
pool. 386-752-6575 $133,500
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
CUSTOM 4/2 scm porch, 16x24
workshop w/ele & water, gazebo,
fireplace, ceramic tile/wood floors.
386-752-6575 $189,900
Century 21/The Darby Rogers. Co
FOR SALE by very motivated
owner. Just reduced $70,000. to
$129,000. Townhouse on Golf
course. 3br/3ba. Wood burning
fireplace. End unit. Remodeled
kitchen, first class appliances,
granite countertops. New Hunter
Douglas wdw treatments.


I


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LAKE CITY REPORTER


CLASSIFIED


THURSDAY, MARCH 10, 2011


Classified Department: 755-5440


810 Home for Sale
Nice solid brick home on 5 acres,
Country feel but close to Town,
MLS 76063 $129,888 Call
Brittany Stoeckert Results Realty
386-397-3473
Nice, large 4/2 on 1 acre
w/florida room, granite floors,
wrap around front porch, $148,000
Call Brittany Stoeckert @
Results Realty 386-397-3473
Owner Fin., 3/2 on 2.5 acres, fish
pond, N of Lake City, sm down
$675 mo, 386-590-0642/867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
Owners Motivated! Multiple
dwellings. Main house and 2 mo-
bile homes Pecans, cedar & aza-
leas. $199,900. Century 21/The
Darby Rogers Co. 386-752-6575
Solid home, needs updating. Nice
yard & workshop/garage! Country
kitchen w/eat in area as well as
formal. 386-752-6575 $70,000
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.

820 Farms&
Acreage
10 ac lots, some w/well, septic, pwr
pole. Lowered prices. Owner finance
w/low dn pmnt Deas Bullard Proper-
ties 386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com
4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$69,900. $613mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
4 acres, Wellborn, New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down, $39,900, $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
5 WOODED acres.
Suwanee Ranchettes. $200 per mo
for 5 mo. Then $203.85 per mo
thereafter. (352)472-2879

940 Trucks





951 Recreational
5 Vehicles
s fts;--.--~-^"_




1998 Coachmen Class C Motor
home. Generator, awning, jacks,
25" TV. Very clean 45,650 m iles.
$17,900. 386-935-1863/288-2078


Homestead Ranger Travel Trailer
28ft. One slideout Fiberglass,
Awning, sleeps 8. $10,000.
(850)322-7152



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at the paper.


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386-755-5440


SUBSCRIPTION
386-755-5445


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2006 EF250
Ford Van
3/4 ton, metal work
shelves/ladder rack,
60K miles, exc. cond.
$10,500
Call
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1998 Coachman
Class C Motorhome
Generator, awning, jacks, 25"
TV, very clean, 45,650 mi.
$17,900
Call
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386-288-2078


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