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The Lake City reporter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01495
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 3/6/2011
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
System ID: UF00028308:01495
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text





Helping Hand
Fort White grad making
fifth trip to help in Haiti.


000015 120511


SEC clincher ---TODA
Florida beats Vanderbilt TODAYSu
to clinch conference title. -. ,
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Sunday, March 6, 2011


Vol. 137, No. 37 N $1.00


ROBOT




MANIA


CHS team to
compete at
PRC regionals.
By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com
Most 30
Columbia
High School
students have
spent the past
six weeks working on
an unusual project that
weighs 120 pounds, can
extend up to 10 feet high
and specializes in scooping
inflated inner tubes off the
floor.
That project a student-
built robot designed to
play a competitive game
in the For Inspiration and
Recognition of Science
and Technology (FIRS7)
Robotics Competition.
Columbia High's robot-


ics team will compete with
its robot for the first time
at the Florida FRC regional
preliminary Tuesday
through Thursday against
more than 60 other high
school teams at the
University of Central
Florida in Orlando. It will
be one of the competition's
more than 50 regional
ROBOT continued on 3A


Above: The robot built by
the team at Columbia High
School.

Left: Bryce McCarthy
(left), 16, and Mackenzie
Beatrice, 18, makes some
adjustments to a minibot.

Photos by JASON MATTHEW WALKER
Lake City Reporter


COURTESY PHOTO
Columbia High .School students Bryce McCarthy (from left), Jacob Simmons, Chris Nettles and Justin Kennedy put some
finishing touches on a robot they are building.


Lake City man

killed after

motorcycle crash


Rider thrown
from bike when
it hits sign post.
From staff reports
A Lake City motorcyclist
was killed Saturday morn-
ing in a single vehicle crash
when he failed to make a
curve and his motorcycle
struck a sign in Suwannee
County..
Robert Stone Grice, 29,
was killed in the mishap.
The wreck occurred
at 12:10 a.m. ,Saturday
on County Road 250 in
Suwannee County.
According to Florida
Highway Patrol -reports,


Grice was driving a 1999
Honda motorcycle head-
ing north on County Road
250 when the motorcycle
went off the right side of
the road after Grice was
unable to make a curve on,
the left.
The motorcycle's left
handlebar clipped a sign
post' and the motorcycle
began overturning. The
motorcycle came to rest
on the road's right of way
when it struck a woven
wire fence.
Grice was tossed from
the bike as it began to over-
turn. He was pronounced.
dead at the scene, reports
said.


Plenty to do in

Porter's first term

in state legislature


$4 billion budget
deficit must be
addressed.
By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.comrn
State legislators have
their work cut out for them
when the Florida Legislative
Session begins Tuesday.
There is a $4, billion
shortfall they have to con-
sider.
"It will be a difficult ses-
sion, but it's something
we, have to do," said Rep.
Elizabeth Porter (R-Dist.
11).
Legislators will have to
cut where they can to make
the budget as least painful
as possible, she said.
"We're constitutionally
required to have a balanced
budget," Porter said.
More than 50 state
parks, such as the Olustee
Battlefield Historic State
Park, are being considered
for closing because of the
budget.
But Porter said she
doesn't think the parks will
be closed.


"There are other places
that can be trimmed that
don't affect the parks," she
said.
There are huge
amounts of money going
into Department of
Environmental Protection
programs, such as air test-
ing for $28 million, which
could easily be .reduced,
Porter said.
"That's
just one
example,"
she said.
She is
not on any
of the edu-
cation sub-
commit- Porter
tees, but
when that topic comes up
for discussion, "I'll be pay-
ing close attention," Porter
said.
Being on different sub-
committees has helped
her learn a lot in prepara-
tion for session, she said.
Sponsoring bills have also
been beneficial in the learn-
ing process as a new legis-
lator.
PORTER continued on 3A


Big crowd visits Home & Patio Show
Variety of the more North Florida Home & Patio Credit Union and Newman free stuff and lots of good
th 70 vendors a Show. Media Inc. information," she said.
than vs a The event featured exhib- Event organizers were Amparo, who was visiting
major attraction, it booths with products for expecting 12,000 to 20,000 the display booths with her
___3 -!_ -I----momerL* -sAia sne s A -Aen


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
Thousands of people
trekked through the build-
ings at the Columbia County
Fairgrounds looking at vari-
ous displays during the first
day of the Eighth Annual


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I84264 00021 8


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400


home and patio improve-
ments as well as items for
personal health, electronics
and new products in the do-it-
yourself arena.
The show is presented
by the Rotary Club of Lake
City Downtown and co-
sponsored by the Lake City
Reporter, Sunstate Federal


74
Thunderstorms
WEATHER, 8A


people to attend this years
event, which featured more
than 70 vendors.
Lisa Amparo stopped at the
A2Z catering service display
booth where she met an old
friend and. got information
about the catering business.
"The home and patio show
is wonderful. There's lots of


Opinion ......
State ............
W world ............
Advice & Comics.
Puzzles ......... ..


mother, said. snes attended
the North Florida Home &
Patio Show for about five
years.
"I keep coming back
because we get to see every-
body and see the local busi-
nesses and see what kinds of


SHOW continued on 3A


4A
5A
. 7A
. 3D
.. 2B


TONY BRITT/Lake City Reporter
Shawn Thomas (from left) gives a flier about A2Z
catering service to Lisa Amparo during Saturday's
Eighth Annual North Florida Home & Patio Show.
e- .1


TODAY IN
BUSINESS
special exhibit
to visit library ,.


COMING
TUESDAY
State legislature gets
dc'..r to busirneis


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- 1 *e-.-'t.,?X-%.-1 "A,: ...


!








LAKE CITY REPORTER SUNDAY REPORT SUNDAY, MARCH 6, 2011


\p^d' '- ^FLORIDA


Friday: Friday: Saturday: Saturday: Wednesday: Wednesday:
2-6-9-27 7 2-23-25-28-30 Afternoon: 6-6-2 Afternoon: 7-2-6-6 3-7-11-19-40-41 7-31-50-51-58 PB6
Evening: 8-6-3 Evening: 9-4-8-2


AROUND FLORIDA



Space crews mark one week together in orbit


CAPE CANAVERAL
The 12 astro-
nauts aboard
the orbiting
shuttle-station
complex shared
a few more maintenance
chores Saturday, taking
out the trash and doing
their part for clean air as
their weeklong visit wound
down.
The hatches between
Discovery and the
International Space Station
will close Sunday after-
noon, and the shuttle will
undock first thing Monday.
Both crews worked
to rejuvenate the space
station's air system. The
oxygen generator as well
as the carbon dioxide
removal system have been
acting up.
They also made sure
a Japanese cargo carrier
was loaded properly with
garbage.
The supply ship will
be let loose at the end of
this month and plunge
through the atmosphere,
burning up. The vessel is
full of packing foam from
all the equipment that was
delivered by Discovery.
The foam encasing the
humanoid robot R2 will be
stuffed in as well, once the
astronauts unwrap it
R2 is the first humanoid
robot in space. It was part
of the new stowage unit
delivered last Saturday by
shuttle Discovery.
Mission Control gave
Discovery's six astronauts
,two extra days at the 220-
mile-high lab for a total
of nine days to help
with all the unloading and
repair work.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Thursday photo provided by NASA, astronauts Scott Kelly (left), Expedition 26
commander; Cady Coleman (center), Expedition 26 flight engineer; and Michael Barratt,
STS-133 mission specialist, watch a monitor in the Unity node ofthe International
Space Station while space shuttle Discovery remains docked with the station.


, "Hope you are enjoying
your extended stay in your
out-of-this-world accom-
modations. The innkeeper
says you can stay a couple
more days if you behave,"
Mission Control joked.
It's the last voyage for
Discovery, NASA's old-
est and most traveled
shuttle. The spaceship
will be retired following
Wednesday's planned
touchdown and sent to the
Smithsonian Institution for
display.

FPL opens solar
energy center
INDIANTOWN, -
Florida Power & Light Co.
has its first hybrid solar


energy center.
Gov. Rick Scott will
attend Saturday's dedi-
cation in Indiantown
- about 30 miles north of
West Palm Beach.
FPL's Martin Next
Generation Solar Energy
Center is a 75-megawatt
solar thermal array that
connects to an existing
high-efficiency natural gas
plant.
The company said the
facility began offsetting
fossil fuel consumption
last year by harnessing the
sun's rays to create elec-
tricity, helping diversify
Florida's energy supply,
lessening emissions and
reducing FPL customers'
fuel costs.


The project created
1,000 jobs.
FPL serves South
Florida and most of the
state's east coast

Car hits, kills 4
pedestrians
MIAMI Four people
were killed after they were
struck by a car on a busy
South Florida interstate.
Florida Highway Patrol
officials said the victims
were in a car accident
early Saturday morning.
They survived the crash
and left their car to check
on everyone's condition.
As they were walking
along Interstate 95 in
Miami, they were hit by a


car.
Four people were killed
instantly. Another pedes-
trian was hospitalized in
critical condition.
Authorities shut down
the northbound lanes of
1-95 in that area Saturday
morning.

Helicopter crashes
in Everglades
FORT LAUDERDALE
- Authorities are working
to rescue a helicopter pilot
who crashed in the Florida
Everglades.
Broward Sheriff's
spokesman Mike Jachles
said authorities initially
had trouble locating the,
helicopter after it crashed
in a remote area Saturday
morning.
Officials later found
the injured pilot and sent
a medic to treat him.
Authorities also sent an air
boat to the scene and said
it may be the only way to
transport the pilot to the
hospital.
He has not been identi-
fied and his condition is
not known.

184 dogs, 2 cats
taken from home
LAKELAND Polk
. County Sheriff's deputies
removed 184 dogs and
two cats and charged two
Lakeland residents on
40 counts each of animal
cruelty.
Authorities seized
the animals Wednesday
and charged 71-year-old
Elizabeth H. Roden and


69-year-old Bradley M.
Roden.
After obtaining a search
warrant, deputies found
the dogs and cats living in
and outside the home, with
some of them confined to
small cages. A report said
the home was in poor con-
dition, with dog feces on
the floor, cockroaches and
an infestation of flies.
The Rodens were cited
in 2008 for owning 109
dogs without rabies vac-
cinations or tags. Polk offi-
cials said the pair had been
investigated on animal cru-
elty and neglect charges in
the past. Elizabeth Roden
was issued a citation due
to her age and medical
condition. Bradley Roden
is being held at the Polk
County Jail.

Prince Albert
attends opening
FORT MYERS Prince
Albert of Monaco has
arrived in southwest
Florida where he is
attending the Art of the
Olympians museum open-
ing.
The prince arrived with
little fanfare Saturday
morning. He competed in
five Winter Olympics as
part of Monaco's bobsled
team and is a member of
the International Olympic
Committee.
The program works with
Olympic athletes to inspire
and display art through
gallery exhibitions, inter-
active museum displays
and outreach programs.

Associated Press


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS


Publicist: Arquette 'OK' after crash


BEVERLY HILLS, California
A ctor David Arquette's
Cadillac crashed head-on
with another vehicle in
Beverly Hills on Friday,
but the actor was not
seriously hurt and even joked about
the collision on Twitter just a few
hours later.
Arquette, 39, was "OK" after the
crash, and was on his way to being
treated, publicist Cindy Guagenti
told The Associated Press in an e-mail.
"I got into a car accident but I'm
fine. Luckily I have dragon's blood
running through my veins," Arquette
quipped on his Twitter account
about two hours after the accident.
Arquette apparently deleted that
Tweet. It did not appear on his page
later Friday night, but several others
referring to the crash did.
"Remember to wear your seatbelt
- wish I was," he said in one.
Another read: "It was a miracle the
woman I hit was uninjured Thank
God!"
Arquette said that he was headed
to the airport to catch a plane to
Las Vegas for a friend's restaurant *
opening at the time of the crash on
Doheny Drive just north of Santa
Monica Boulevard along the West
Hollywood and Beverly Hills city
limits.
Arquette and the other driver
were the only two people involved,
Beverly Hills police and fire officials
said. There was no immediate word
on what caused the collision.
Both were taken to Cedars-Sinai
Medical Center in Los Angeles with
injuries that were not considered
serious.

Penn says he'd welcome
Sheen's help in Haiti
LOS ANGELES Sean Penn said
he thinks Charlie Sheen could do a
lot of good in Haiti, both for himself
and the nation struggling to recover
from a devastating earthquake.
The Academy Award winner said
in a statement that he'd like to "show
my old friend the world of needs on
the ground in Haiti."


l "- A r-
ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this file photo, David Arquette arrives
at the Scream Awards in Los Angeles.

Sheen told "Access Hollywood".
that he and Penn were planning
a trip to the Caribbean nation,
although no date for their travel has
been announced.
Penn said, "If he chooses to give
support, I'll trust it."
Sheen, who has been on a media
blitz since Monday, said he would
like to bring the attention of the
world back to Haiti, where Penn has
been a fixture since a January 2010
earthquake destroyed more than
500,000 homes.

'Drugstore Cowboy'
author sentenced
SEATTLE The author of
"Drugstore Cowboy," a crime saga
that led to a Hollywood movie, has
been sentenced to nearly 16 years in
prison for holding up a pharmacy in
a Seattle suburb.
The Seattle Times reported that
74-year-old James Fogle was sen-
tenced Friday in King Superior
Court for last May's Redmond rob-
bery. The ailing man was brought to
court in a wheelchair, breathing with


the aid of an oxygen tank.
Fogle was armed with a BB gun,
while his co-defendant, Shannon
Benn, had a handgun. Benn pleaded
guilty in September.
Fogle has spent much of his
adult life in prison, which is where
he wrote "Drugstore Cowboy."
Filmmaker Gus Van Sant turned the
novel into the acclaimed 1989 film
starring Matt Dillon. The work was
loosely based on Fogle's life robbing
pharmacies to feed his addictions.

British director Charles
Jarrott dies in LA at 83
LOS ANGELES British director
Charles Jarrott, who worked in film
and television for nearly 50 years and
won a Golden Globe for directing
Richard Burton in 1969's "Anne of
the Thousand Days," has died.
Motion Picture & Television
Fund spokeswoman Jaime Larkin
said Jarrott died in Los Angeles on
Friday. He was 83.
His movies included "Anne of
the Thousand Days" and another
British royalty drama,-"Mary Queen
of Scots," in 1971. Jarrott won an
Emmy for 1995's "A Promise Kept:
The Oksana Baiul Story."

Theater celebrates TV
icon Tammy Faye Bakker
MINNEAPOLIS The Loring
Theater in Minneapolis, where tel-
evangelists Jim and Tammy Faye
Bakker were wed 50 years ago, will
celebrate "Where Tammy Tied the
Knot" on April 1.
On April 1, 1961, Jim and the
mascara-loving Tammy Faye Bakker
were married at the Loring.
The couple went on to host tele-
vision's "The PTL Club." But their
empire collapsed in the 1980s when
Jim Bakker went to prison for fraud
after a sex scandal.
The couple divorced and Tammy
Faye remarried. She died of cancer
in 2007.

N Associated Press


Celebrity Birthdays


* Orchestra conductor Julius
Rudel is 90.
* Former Federal Reserve
Chairman Alan Greenspan
is 85.
* Country singer Doug
Dillard is 74.
* Actor Ben Murphy is 69.
* Singer Mary Wilson (The -
Supremes) is 67.


Daily Scripture


* Rock musician Hugh
Grundy (The Zombies) is 66.
* Rock singer-musician
David Gilmour (Pink Floyd)
is 65.
* Actor-director Rob Reiner
is,64.
A Singer.Kiki Dee is 64.
M NBA player Shaquille
O'Neal is 39.


"These commandments that
I give you today are to be on
your hearts. Impress them on
your children.Talk about them
when you sit at home, when
you lie down and when you get
up:.
Deuteronomy 6:6-7


Lake City
HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293
Fax number............ 752-9400
Circulation ............... 755-5445
Online ... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property df the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City.Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson.....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
Assistant Editor CJ Risak..754-0427
After 1:00 p.m.
(crisak@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
. ........................ 752-1293
(dkimler@lakecityreporter.com)
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440.


Reporter
BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)


CIRCULATION
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Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7:30
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
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vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
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Circulation ...............755-5445
(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks .................. $26.32
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Rates include 7% sales tax.
Mail rates
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52 Weeks................. $179.40


CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion,
please call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifica-
tions will run in this space. And thanks for reading.


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427











Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, MARCH 6, 2011


ROBOT: CHS team gets ready for upcoming competition


Continued From Page 1A

matches.
According to the FIRST website, the FRC
is an annual worldwide robotics competition
that pairs high school students with adult
mentors to design and build game-playing
robots for an assigned game created by
FIRST each year. The competitions, known
as "Coopertitions," combine the practical
application of technology and science with
the energy of a sporting event
Based on points the robots score while
playing the games against each other,
respective qualifying teams from the inde-
pendent regional events will move on to
the FRC championship held April 27 to 30
in St. Louis, Mo.
Nicknamed GET SMART Gateway
Engineering Team of Students Mastering
Animation, Robotics and Technology
- the CHS robotics team jokes that the
competition isn't just about the robot, said
Celena Crews, CHS teacher and robotics
team coach.
"And it's really not," she said. "It's
about the process and what they (the
students) learn and how they grow and
what skills they develop."
That process began Jan. 8 when this
year's game footage was revealed, kits
of robot parts were distributed and the
student teams commenced on a challenge
to design and build a working robot in six
weeks.
"You have only six weeks and then it
(the robot) ships off," Crews said.
The GET SMART team worked tire-
lessly after school and during many late
nights to. create a robot with the ability to
play this year's game, Crews said.
Called Logomotion," the timed game
requires student teams to drive their
robots back and forth across a playing
field, scoring points by hanging game
pieces inflated inner tubes in the shapes
and colors of the FIRST logo on pegs
at different heights. When all tubes are
hung, the robot must have the capability
to unleash a "Mini-bot," or mini robot,
to climb a pole and signal the end of the
team's game-play.
"I still can't believe we did it, but we
did," Crews said. "We built a working


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Control teams captain Chris Nettles (left), 14, operates a pole-climbing minibot while Micheala
Polhamus, 16, attempts to stabilize it.


robot in six weeks."
Technical aspects like learning how to,
use tools, practice machining and employ
programming weren't the only parts of
the six-week process. GET SMART team
members also fundraised, wrote award
essays and designed team T-shirts, but-
tons and a website.
"They've just learned so much and not
just about robotics," Crews said. 'We have
students that have been able to really
show their creativity."
Building the robot has been a unifying
experience for the GET SMART team,
Crews said, which is made up of students
of all grades and types.
'We've got star athletes; AP students,
seniors all the way down to 14-year-old
freshmen, we have band members, we
have boy scouts, we've got kids really
involved in student government, just *
from all different walks of life and they
really did become a team and become a
family," she said. 'We've spent every wak-
ing moment just about outside of school
together. We ate dinner together every
night and they really did become a family.


They've worked really, really well together
and I've had the pleasure of actually watch-
ing them grow close."
Working on the project has allowed
Mackenzie Beatrice, 18, to learn about the.
importance of relying on others and work-
ing as a team.
"It's definitely taught me how to trust in
other people," she said.
"Watching it all come together as one
was really amazing," Beatrice said.
Students have done an "amazing job"
on the project, Crews said, and did all the
work on their own under the guidance of
mentors.
'We've had a lot of help from our techni-
cal mentors, but the students really did
design and build this robot," she said.
Working through the process gave stu-
dents a purpose, Crews said.
"It's very inspiring for the kids," she
said. "For some of them that weren't really
into school, it gave them a reason to want
to be here every day and then some."
Chris Nettles, 14, GET SMART Controls
Team captain, said he was glad to see the
robot completed in time for the competition.


Lake City

attorney

gets 60-day

suspension

From staff reports

A Lake City attorney has been
suspended from practicing law for 60
.days, according to Florida Supreme
Court documents.
John Lyon Broling, 42, was sus-
pended Jan. 27, but the suspension
did not become effective until Feb.
28. Broling was given 30 days from
the suspension notice to close out his
practice and protect the interests of
existing clients.
According to information from the
Florida Bar website, Broling was sus-
pended because he did not respond
to three unrelated cases on appeal to
the United States Court of Appeals
for the 11th Circuit.
Broling is not allowed to accept
new business from the date of the
court order until he is reinstated. He
was also required to pay $1,325 in
recovery costs to the Florida Bar.
Broling was a practicing attorney
in the United States Court of Appeals
for the i1th Circuit and was subject
to the disciplinary authority of that
court.
On April 23, 2010, the chief judge
of the 11th Circuit Court of Appeals
indefinitely suspended Broling from
practicing in the circuit, reportedly
for misconduct.
Florida Bar records indicate that
on March 4, 2010, 11th Circuit Couit
of Appeals officials filed paperwork
saying Broling should be suspended
for his conduct, failure to comply
with the rules of the Court and fail-
ure to respond with regard to three
unrelated appeals.
Broling was admitted to the Florida
Bar Oct. 11. 1996.


PORTER: Budget deficit just one issue to tackle

Continued From Page 1A


Porter submitted repeal
bills .she hopes, to .get
through along with stan-
dards ones.
"I'm certainly hopping
those will be successful,"


Porter said.
Once .session is, complete
there will be a balanced bud-
get for the ,state,' she said.
The session ends May 6
unless there is an extension.


"I'm going to be as fis-
cally. responsible as (my
constituents) have to be in
their homes," Porter said.
The legislators have to
be just as conservative in


spending as their constitu-
ents.
"I look forward to get-
ting up there, getting start-
ed and getting through the
rough times," she said.


SHOW: Variety of vendors attracts large crowds


Continued From Page 1A

deals they have and what
kinds of specials they're
offering."
Amparo, also said she
plans to attend next year's
show.
"This is part of our cul-
ture," she said. "'Every year
we have to .come to the,
home and patio show."
Mike Gordan, chairman
of the Eighth Annual North
Florida Home & Patio
Show, said the event was
progressing fine with this
year's event featuring sev-
eral vendors from outside
of Lake City. '
"We had many first tim-
ers here," he said, not-
ing some new vendors
came from Jacksonville,
Gainesville and there was
even one from Texas. "A
couple of the vendors from
Jacksonville said this is way
better, considering what
they pay for in Jacksonville
and the amount of traffic
that they're seeing. They
are very pleased and if
they are pleased, we're
pleased."
Eddie Evert walked
around the vendors' booths
with his family looking at
the various products on
display, enjoying a bag of
popcorn.
"I love the home and patio
show," he said. "I come
out every year. I come out,
check everything out and
see what's going on. My
family and I are enjoying


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12-4 PM
Epiphany Church Social Hall
Catered by Blue Roof Grill
Entertainment:
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Deadline March 18


TONY BRITT/Lake City Reporter
Jared Evert (from left) and Eddie Evert, watch as Selke Evert
gets a free. bag of popcorn from Kellie Brown of North Florida
Glass during the weekend's home and patio show.


this it's something to
do when you don't have a
whole lot of money to do
a lot."


He said he attended last
year's event and stopped at
Live Oak Pest Control both
and now he utilizes their


services.
'They've been coming
out for a year now," he
said.
Gordan was pleased
with the way the event was
unfolding.
"This is an awesome
year and I guarantee you
that next year it will be
even bigger and better,"
Gordan said, noting several
businesses have already
signed up for next year's
event. "This is the most
diversified show we've had
yet. It doesn't necessarily
match the numbers we had
two years ago, but diversi-
fication is better than any
year."
The Eighth Annual
North Florida Home &
Patio Show will continue
today from 10 a.m. 4 p.m.
a-


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LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, MARCH 6, 2011


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


am


The Money Man


Lake City Reporter












OPINION


Sunday, March 6, 201 I


OUR


OUR
OPINION


Be careful

with new

EMS plan


something normally
associated with
government But
Columbia County's
Board of Commissioners
believes it has found a way,
by privatizing its Emergency
Medical Service. The county is
pushing forward with this plan,
having already selected a com-
pany to begin negotiating with:
Lifeguard Ambulance Service
of Florida.
Let's give the commissioners
some credit. The county has
spent between $1 million and
$1.2 million annually subsidiz-
ing EMS. Now the commission-
ers believe they can get even
better service for less money.
That sound like a no-lose
deal.
But this is not a situation in
which one can afford to gamble.
Assurances made by the poten-
tial provider are attractive for
instance, Lifeguad offers air trans-
port for victims, and it has prom-
ised the most money to lease the
county's ambulances and EMS
facilities.
Yet guarantees are only good
if the provider delivers. Lifeguard
does have experience, currently
servicing four Southern states. Of
course, then the question arises,
can the company give Columbia
County proper attention?
And what about the current
EMS employees? Will they lose
their jobs?
Also, the county has moved
ahead with this plan without
much consideration for Lake
City residents. A letter was
sent to the city's administration
explaining the county's plan,
leaving the city to get on board
or find its own way.
City residents pay county
taxes too. So another question:
Will they be included? Does the
city administration have any
say in this at all?
It's a welcome development
when government truly seems
to be working for the people,
and the county does seem to
have our best interests in mind
with this plan. Saving money
and getting equal, or better, ser-
vice is always a good idea.
But make certain all the ques-
tions are answered, including
how the city fits in.

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman


LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,


Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


www.lakecityreporter.com


a'1STT .&I'coM


Home-care service is one


way to trim Medicaid costs


By BOBBY LOLLEY
Special to the Reporter
A s the state's legisla-
tive session opens,
Medicaid reform
is one of the big-
gest issues that
legislators will have to address
to balance the budget. Florida
Medicaid as we know it is
unsustainable.
This year, 2.9 million
Floridians will receive Medicaid,
the health program for indi-
viduals and families with low
incomes and poor resources,
which is jointly funded by
the state and federal govern-
ment By 2019, that number is
expected o swell to 4.8 million
because of federal health care
reform. Of last year's $70.4 bil-
lion state budget, $20.2 billion,
or 28 percent, was spent on
Medicaid alone.
If the Legislature is serious
about controlling Medicaid
costs, it must consider rebalanc-
ing long-term care spending,
which covers certain health
services, nursing home care
and health services at home
and ini the community. Nursing
home funding is required by the
federal government, yet cheaper
home- and community-based


services (HCBS) funding is
optional.
A 2009 analysis conducted
by the American Association
of Retired Persons reported
that only 14 percent of Florida
Medicaid long-term care fund-
ing is spent on HCBS compared
to a national average of 27 per-
cent. The rest of the funding
goes to more costly nursing
homes.
Additionally, accord-
ing to the Florida House of
Representatives Health &
Human Services Committee,
$2.2 billion is appropriated this
year to serve 40,000 Floridians
in nursing homes, which is an
average of $55,000 per person.
In comparison, $1.4 billion
will be spent this year to serve
65,123 Floridians at home and
in the community at an average
cost of $21,497 per person. That
is 61 percent of Medicaid's long-
term care budget serving about
25,000 fewer Floridians.
Consider the following cost
comparisons, provided by
the Centers for Medicare and
Medicaid Services (CMS), to
treat patients in their home
instead of a nursing home:
Stroke patient. Home care:
$2,478; nursing home: $8,527.


Heart failure patient. Home
care: $1,611; nursing home:
$6,462.
Cardiac bypass with cath-
eterization patient. Home care:
$1,778; nursing home: $6,462.
Although nursing homes
cost about four times more
than home care, Florida has no
systemic way to get patients
into home care instead of nurs-
ing homes, which is the default
setting for care. Besides the
cost savings that home care
provides, studies also gener-
ally show that patients prefer to
receive care at home instead of
in a nursing home, rehabilita-
tion facility or hospital.
The Home Care Association
, of Florida represents the state's
2,280 home health agencies that
are providing care to 150,000
Floridians in their homes on
\any given day. The upcoming
session provides an ideal oppor-
tunity for legislators to address
the ever-increasing Medicaid
budget by looking to home care
as the answer for controlling
costs and maintaining qual-
ity care for Floridians in their
homes.
N Bobby Lolley is execu-
tive director of the Home Care
Association of Florida.


Paul's budget cut plan severe,

but it's better than Obama's


R republican Senator
Rand Paul's pro-
posed $500 billion
in budget cuts in
a single year goes
too far, hitting some targets too
quickly and perhaps severely,
but there's seriousness in his
ideas, a plan to save America,
and that's more than you can
'say for what President Barack
Obama has been up to lately.
First there was his budget
proposal, an irresponsible
dodge suggesting that either he
just doesn't get it or just doesn't
care. We're in a crisis and he's
making it worse, adding $10
trillion over 10 years to a debt
already perilously large, setting
all time borrowing records and
ignoring crucial issues such as
entitlements.
Yes, he would freeze some
spending in areas he has
already elevated to all-time
highs, but then he would
increase spending elsewhere by
a whole lot more, and what that
adds up to is not savings, not
austerity, but craftiness.
What we need instead is
leadership of a kind that would
consider real revisions of a reg-
ulation-heavy, expense-freighted
health care law that would strip
away freedoms while right now
scaring businesses out of hiring
more workers.
On this front, we get more
craftiness, a presidential willing-
ness for states to fund this mon-
strosity through means other


Jay Ambrose
Speaktojay@aol.com
than insurance-buying require-
ments if they choose. But they
can't because any means of
funding this monstrosity would
be onerous.
Obama is good at such pho-
niness. Remember when he
said additional spending by
Congress would have to be
offset by additional revenue
or commensurate cuts else-
where? Remember what hap-
pened when he then sought
an increase for unemploy-
ment insurance payments and
Republicans said they would
like to see the cuts first? Obama
and the Democrats were peeved
and the cuts never happened.
The Democrats insisted i't
would be really, really hard to
make those cuts on the spur
of the moment. No it wouldn't.
Wasteful, ridiculous, counterpro-
ductive spending is always just a
glance away. A recent report by
the General Accounting Office
found duplicative programs
all over the place. When the
government has a task to do, it
will often divide the responsibil-
ity up among a dozen or more


agencies, and it's not hard to
guess at the contradictions that
ensue or to deduce that, at the
end of the day, the government
will have spent fortunes to move
an inch backwards.
Straightening that out could
maybe save $100 billion or twice
that if the assignment were not
divided up and parceled out to
50 agencies with a deadline of
January, 2099. In the meantime,
we have Tea Party hero Rand
Paul looking at further reach-
ing possibilities for budgetary
rescue and edging us closer to
limited government
Among his goals, he would
obliterate most of the education
and energy departments (stick-
ing some energy programs in
the Pentagon) while whacking
away at EPA and agriculture
and scotching funds for the arts
and public broadcasting.
Some of this is definitely good,
and when you combine these
proposals with his longer-term
ambitions such as addressing
Social Security, it would seem a
really promising way to get us out
of our fiscal mess. But the plan
goes too fast, it contains no hint
of compromise with competing
philosophies and nothing very
much like it will make it into law
anytime soon.
* Jay Ambrose, formerly
Washington director of editorial
policy for Scripps Howard news-
papers and the editor of dailies in
El Paso, Texas, and Denver, is a
columnist living in Colorado.


4A


Betsy Hart
betsysblog.com


Honor rolls

suffer with

lowered bar
When my
high-school
freshman's
"I'm Proud
of My Honor
Roll Student" bumper sticker
arrived a few weeks ago, I
told her, "There is no way I'm
putting this on our car." She
'knows me. She wasn't expect-
ing me to.
In general, of course, I don't
like bumper stickers. The
same goes for slogans on T-
shirts and, for that matter, smi-
ley faces in e-mails, but such is
a different column.
These bumper stickers are
on what seems like most cars
in my community. At our high
school, a GPA of just 3.125
out of 4.0 lands a student on
the honor roll. Nor is the dif-
ficulty of the classes taken into
account In fact, 60 percent of
kids typically make the honor
roll there, which to me sug-
gests there's not a whole lot of
unique -"honor" to it. Certainly
none worth boasting about on
a bumper sticker.
This isn't about my local
high school, by the way, Which
is actually pretty typical in this
regard and which I'm gener-
ally happy with. It's about a
weird culture that wants to
brag of mediocrity, largely so
we can make our kids and our
own egos feel good. But it all
comes at a cost of incredible,
well, smallness.
Now, before I go further
and really tick people off, I
will remind that I'm the one
who always says, "I'm more
concerned about whether my
children go to heaven than to
Harvard." And I'm open about
the fact that there's not a lot
of evidence any of my chil-
dren are headed for the latter.
Moreover, that's just fine with
me. When they do their best
in school whatever the end
game of grades that is what
I consider significant.
But not only do I still believe
there is such a thing as excel-
lence in this world, I think it
ought to be valued, appreci-
ated and elevated. Not for the
smallness of ego or primarily
even for the self-esteem of the
child (or parents!) involved.
But because it is right to honor
who and what is supremely
good, and, rightly done, it lifts
up and ennobles those who
* contemplate such excellence.
That's true whether in academ-
ics, art, business, music, cer-
tainly in character and more.
Look, Mozart and, yes, the
Beatles will be appreciated
centuries after Lady Gaga is
forgotten, thank goodness.
Excellence transcends medi-
ocrity, and meditating on that
is a blessing and a credit to the
human spirit wherever we are
on that continuum ourselves.
Lumping kids who barely
get above a "B" average taking
easy classes with those who
score over a 4.0 yes, that's
possible in all honors work?
Such isn't ennobling for
anyone.
In today's culture, it seems,
we don't want to honor real
excellence for the sake of look-
ing up to, learning from, being
inspired by and celebrating
such excellence. Instead, we
too often want to lower the
bar and then boast about what
is mediocrity for the sake of
something as small as personal
ego.
Betsy Hart hosts the "It Takes
a Parent" radio show on
WYLL-AM 1160 in Chicago.










LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE SUNDAY, MARCH 6, 2011


The following informa-
tion was provided by local
law enforcement agencies.
The following people have
been arrested but not con-
victed. All people are inno-
cent unless proven guilty.

Tuesday, March 1
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office
Ronald Paul Cogle,
34, 163 SW Lasso Drive,
warrant: Violation of pro-
bation on original charge
of unlawful sexual activity
with minor.
Martin Asa Law Jr.,
41, 152 SE Cardinal Place,
grand theft and dealing in
stolen property.
Ronald C. Maudlin,
36, 2880 NW U.S.
Highway 441, warrant:
Possession of a controlled
substance and possession
of drug paraphernalia.
Robert Odell
McCurry, 33, 125 SW
Jensen Way, Fort White,
warrant: Violation of pro-
bation on original charge
of grand theft.
Franklin Newton,
60, 132 SW Marion
Mann Terrace, warrant:
Violation of probation on
original charge of felony
worthless bank check.
DamarcusA.
Williams, 20, 619 SE
Country Club Road, war-
rant: Violation of proba-
tion on original charge of
dealing in stolen property
(two counts).

Wednesday, March 2
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office
Raul Alexander
Joglar, 22, 290 NE
Howard St., warrant:
Violation of probation on
original charge of felony
grand theft.
David Alan Tyler
Nash, 21, 900 SW Kirby
Road, warrant: Sell/
deliver/purchase of a
controlled substance and
possession of drug para-
phernalia.
Galven Wynn


Parrish, 31, 8745 NW
43rd Lane, Lake Butler,
warrant: Third-degree
grand theft and dealing in
stolen property.
Daniel Lafayette
Retherford, no age given,
823 SW County Road 138,
Fort White, burglary and
grand theft.
Donald Bradley
Slaten, 40, 235 NE
Howard St., possession of
marijuana, introduction of
contraband into a correc-
tional facility and warrant:
Violation of probation on
original charges of utter-
ing a forgery and third-
degree grand theft.
Maurice Lavon
Thomas, 34, 1285 SW
Haygood Loop, warrant:
Driving while license sus-
pended/revoked.

Florida Highway
Patrol
Christa Rararo,
33, 2350 Phillips Road,
Tallahassee, obstructing
information sought by
warrant/subpoena order.

Thursday, March 3
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office
John Richard Bailey,
24, 21079 49th Drive, war-
rant DUI with serious
bodily injury.
Corey Butts, 21,
1379 SW Zesty Circle,
resisting arrest without
violence and warrant:
Violation of probation on
original charges of bur-
glary of a structure and
third-degree grand theft.
Jonathan Leigh
Crary, 28, 517 Sixth Ave.,
Wellborn, grand theft
auto and attaching tag not
assigned to vehicle.
Alexander Daies, 20,'
654 NE St. Clair St., war-
rant: Violation of proba-
tion on original charge of
carjacking.
Jennifer L. Kimbrell,
27, 158 NW Jerri Place,
warrant: Violation of pro-
bation.


Book replacement program gets attention


DOMINICK TAO
St. Petersburg Times

CLEARWATER As experiments
go, Clearwater High School's pilot
program to put a Kindle e-reader in
the hands of every student, with the
hope of replacing textbooks entirely,
was a bold one.
At stake: Can kids learn as well as
they play on digital devices? Will edu-
cation technology help cash-strapped
schools? Are textbooks dead or is this
just a blip on a screen?
The jury is still out on whether
digital books improve student per-
formance a semester and a half of
grades is not a large enough sample
for that.
But six months into an effort
that has attracted national atten-
tion, students and teachers say the
"Kindlezation" of their school has
yielded clear benefits and limitations.
Some classes are book-free, others
are still book-bound as publishers
scramble to digitize materials. Some
teachers have been slow to adopt,
others have eagerly embraced it. And
even the digital natives students are
divided, with some using the Kindle
more than others.
But one thing was clear in a visit to
the school this week: The devices are
blending in, being used as often as a
pen or pencil.


"I think the whole teen
population is a digital
native. We're used to
texting and typing on
little keyboards."
Bennie Niles
Senior, Clearwater HS

"I tell my kids, 'You're ahead of the
curve right now,' said social studies
teacher Kathy Biddle.
In fact, Florida education officials
rolled out a five-year proposal this
month that calls for all students in K-
12 to use only "electronic materials"
delivered by Kindles, iPads and other
similar technology by 2015.
"I think it's the way of the future,"
said Biddle, an educator for 32 years.
She said she has found students
pushing her harder to grade tests
faster because as soon as the grades
are entered on her computer, students
can see the scores on their Kindle,
which is connected to the Internet
and the school board's servers.
Students said a plus for them has
been the ease of studying on the go
hard to do with a hulking textbook.
"I can just easily flip through. Study
anywhere," said senior Nikki Hux.
Hux, who is dual-enrolled at St.
Petersburg College, said many col-


lege-level e-books are less expensive
or free, saving her money.
Many other students at the high
school have accepted the grayscale-
screened device into their menagerie
of electronic companions, like yet
another cell phone or iPod.
"I think the whole teen population
is a digital native," said senior Bennie
Niles. 'We're used to texting and typ-
ing on little keyboards."
And by native, he means native-
born. IBM stopped producing type-
writers three years before Niles was
born.
That many students take notes on
the Kindle is something school prin-
cipal Keith Mastorides said he was
surprised by.
"I didn't expect a lot of use from.
those keyboards," he said.
Mastorides, who invested much of
his school's textbook budget into the
experiment and has been the driving
force behind it, has a lot riding on his
brainchild.
The Kindles were assigned at the
beginning of fall semester 2010, a
world first, according to Kindle manu-
facturer Amazon.
Money from a downsizing school
district has been on the line: 2,200
machines, at $177 each. But the cost
is seen as worthwhile if one device
is able to help both gifted and strug-
gling students.


Farmworkers target Tampa Publix stores in protest


TAMPA More than
1,500 farmworkers and
their advocates rallied4 for
better pay at Publix stores
Saturday, calling for the
supermarket chain to pay
workers a penny more per
pound for tomatoes.
The. Coalition of
Immokalee Workers group
wrapped up a five-city nation-
al tour Saturday.
Around 30,000 workers
harvest Florida's $619 mil-
lion tomato crop. Protesters
wore green T-shirts and
hoisted large signs call-
ing for "food justice." The
coalition held three sepa-
rate marches in downtown
Tampa before ending at a
Publix store.
"It's not a question of


whether we will win, but
when. And when we do
win, we will not only help
free workers from oppres-
sive conditions in the fields,


but we will also free Publix
from the impossible burden
of supporting and justify-
ing that oppression," Lucas
Benitez told the crowd.


Lakeland-based Publix,
with 1,032 stores in the"
southeast, has so far
refused to pay workers an
extra penny per pound.


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I


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4 I 1
S *Hq > <


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427










LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, MARCH 6, 2011


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


Today
Home and Patio Show
The Eighth Annual
North Florida Home and
Patio Show is 10 a.m. 4
p.m. today at the Columbia
County Fairgrounds
and presented by the
Rotary Club of Lake City
Downtown. Event co-spon-
sors are the Lake City
Reporter, Sunstate Federal
Credit Union and Newman
Media. Businesses in the
home and patio industry
are featured in the show.

$1 million giveaway
Christian Service Center
is participating in the $1
million dollar giveaway
Alan Feinstein Challenge
from now until April
30. Every food item or
financial donation counts
toward receiving a percent-
age of the giveaway. Call
386-755-1770 and bring
donations either to the
center at the corner of
Hilton and Washington
or mail to P.O. Box 2285,
Lake City, FL, 32056.

HSCT production
The High Springs
Community Theater pres-
ent "" -rlock's Last Case,"
a play by Charles Marowitz
Z p.m. today. The theater
is located in Historic High
Springs at 130 NE First
;Ave. Tickets are available
' at The Framery in Lake
:City on Baya, 386-754-2780,
Sat The Coffee Clutch in
: 1-'- Springs, 386-454-
online at highspring-
scommunitytheater.com or
,at the door. Prices are $11
'adults, $8 youth 12 and
under; and Seniors Sunday
only $9.

Monday
Photography workshops
Workshops in Beginning
Digital Photography are 10
a.m. 12:30 p.m. Monday
and April 11 and Advanced
Digital Photography are
2 4:30 p.m. Monday and
April 11 at Stephen Foster
Folk Culture Center State
Park Craft Square, White
.Springs. A hands-on out-
door photography session
is planned. Participants
should b-' g their own
camera, film or digital.
The cost of the workshop
is $25 and includes park
admis 'on. Call the park
Gift Shop at (386) 397-
1920 or visit www.stephen-
fosterC'O.org.


Tuesday
Photoshop Workshop
Photoshop workshops
ar 6:30 8:30 p.m. Tuesday
and April 12 at Stephen
Foster Folk Culture Center
State Park Craft Square,
White Springs.
A laptop computer with
Photoshop Creative Suite,
Photoshop Elements or
some editing software is
recommended, but not
required. The software
demonstrated in class will
be Photoshop Elements.
The cost of the workshop
is $25 and includes park
Admission. Call the park
Gift Shop at (386) 397-1920
or visit www.stephenfoster-
CSO.org.

Lions Club meeting
The Lake City Lions
'.;lub is meeting 7:30 p.m.
Tuesday at the Lake City
County Club. Visitors are
welcome.


committee chars and mem-
bers are asked to attended.
Call Faye at 755-1097.

Landlord's meeting
The monthly Landlord's
meeting is 6 p.m.
Wednesday at Shands
Lake Shore Hospital
Conference Room. Sheriff
Mark "Hunter is the guest
speaker. Rental managers
are welcome. Call 755-
0110.

Knights of Columbus
Meeting
I All Members of the
Knights of Columbus
Council #7589 of Lake
City, please plan to attend
the monthly meeting
Wednesday March 9th
at 8:00 p.m. at Epiphany
Catholic Church Social
Hall. For more informa-
tion contact Bob Gavette
386-965-5905.

Thursday


tion, program materials
and health assessments.

Throwing pottery
A Beginning Wheel
Throwing pottery
three-day workshop is
Thursday, March 10; 17
and 24. at Stephen Foster
Folk Culture Center State
Park Craft Square, White
Springs. Students are
asked to wear old clothes,
bring apron, an old hand
towel and small plastic
bowl. The cost of this
workshop is $85.
Call the park Gift Shop
at (386) 397-1920 or visit
www.stephenfosterCSO.org.

Garden Club meeting
The Lake City Garden
Club will hold its monthly
meeting at 10 a.m.
Thursday at the Woman's
Club.
The program will be
'Tough Plants for North
Florida" by Bruce Cavey.
Visitors are welcome.


aUlEI Uay
Medical fundraiser
A fundraiser is 8 10:30
a.m. Saturday at Kazbors
for Cadence (Cady) Drain.
She is a kindergartner at
Westside Elementary and
suffered a stroke while at
school Jan. 28. Tickets for
a pancake breakfast are
$6 each. Those interested
may call Andy Bennett,
physical ed instructor,
at 623-3350. An account
has also been set up at
Mercantile Bank and First
Federal Bank to help with
medical expenses.

Writing group
The Lake City
Writers Group, a part
of the Florida Writers
Association, is having its
first meeting 3 -5 p.m.
Saturday at the Columbia
County Public Library,
Main Branch. Richard
Burt, professor of English
at the University of-
Florida, is the guest speak-
er Submit a short 500
words or less writing sam-
ple prior to the meeting for
an introduction. The writ-
ing prompt is "It was the


A free Medicaid
workshop is 10 a.m.
Thursday in the LifeStyle
Enrichment Center, 628
S.E. Allison Court. The
workshop on Medicaid
planning is led by Teresa
Byrd Morgan of Morgan
Law Center for Estate &
Legacy Planning. It will
discuss the myths and
opportunities available.
Call Shana Miller at 386-
755-1977.

Diabetes program
UF/IFAS Columbia
and Suwannee County
Extension are offering a
nine-week educational pro-
gram for Type 2 diabetes
5:30 to 7 p.m. Thursday
beginning March 10. The
program will feature a
team of qualified, educators
and health professionals,
and a personal consultation
with a registered dietitian.
Call Jenny Jump at the
Columbia Extension office
at (386) 758-5384 or Cathy
Rogers at the Suwannee
County Extension office at
(386) 362-2771 by March
8. The $75 program fee
includes the educational
classes, nutrition consulta-


To submit your Community
calendar item, contact Antonia
obinson at 754-0425 or by e-mail
arobinson @ lakecityreporter. com.

funniest thing." Contact
Marley Andretti at (386)
438-3610. E-mail inquiries'
and writing samples to edi-
tor@afinaldraft.com

Police Ball
The 18th Lake City Police
Department Ball is 7 p.m.
to midnight Saturday at
the Lake City County Club.
All proceeds from this
year's ball will go toward
the purchase of a Firearms
Training Simulator. Tickets
are $50 a person. The black
tie event will feature finger
food, entertainment, music,
dancing and door prizes.
Contact Destiny Hill at 758-
5484 or Samantha Driggers
at 758-5483 for ticket infor-
mation.

March 18
Finger weaving
workshop
A finger weaving work-
shop is 1:30 4:30 p.m.
March 18 at Stephen
Foster Folk Culture Center
State Park Craft Square,
White Springs. The cost
will be $5 per person and
supplies will be provided.
Call the park Gift Shop
at (886) 397-1920 or visit
www.stephenfosterCSO. org.

Wild Azalea Festival
The Wild Azalea Festival
kicks off Friday afternoon,
March 18, with a guided
hike along the Suwannee
River from 4:00 p.m. to
6:00 p.m. to view the beau-
tiful and aromatic wild
azaleas growing along the
river banks. Register for
the wild azalea hike by
calling 386-397-7009.

March 19
Calling All Volunteers
A workday to clear four
lotsfor future Habitat for
Humanity partner families
begins 8 a.m. March 19383
Lomond Ave. SE. Bring
your gloves, rakes and shov-
els. If you or your church,
group, business, organiza-
tion, etc. is interested in pro-
viding lunch for the work-
ers, please contact Sheila
Burnham at 386-590-0766.


.. .b'1 . ,1--,.
t b'imlr~t ((ll [r*


COURTESY PHOTO
Llamas will be everywhere next week at the ALSA Llama "
and Alpaca Show at Suwannee Music Park.

Llama competition

coming to Suwannee

Music Park this week


From staff reports

LIVE OAK The
Florida National ALSA
Llama and Alpaca Show
and Competition will be
9 a.m. 5 p.m. March 12
- 13 at the Spirit of the
Suwannee Music Park
(SOSMP). Exhibitors
from various southeastern
states will compete.
The animals will com-
pete in halter competition,
obstacles and pack com-
petition, negotiating obsta-
cles people face when
backpacking with llamas;
PR obstacles, obstacles
faced when owners take
llamas out in public to
schools, nursing homes,
hospitals and parades; reg-
ular .obstacles; and show-
manship, demonstrating
how the llama and handler
work together. This will
be a double point with two
judges.


During this national
competition show there
will also be spinning and
weaving demonstrations,
since one of the primary
reasons for raising llamas
is their wool. There will
also be raffles and a silent
auction. Llamas and alpac-
as will be available for visi-
tors to pet and for photo-
graphs, while owners will
be available to answer any
questions.
The Spirit of the
Suwannee Music Park
is located at 3076 95th
Drive 4.5 miles north of
Live Oak off US 129 at
the Suwannee River. The
park is 4.5 miles south of
Interstate 75 and 4.5 miles
north of Interstate 10 off
US 129.
For information about
SOSMP, call 386-364-
1683, email spirit@musi-
cliveshere.com, or go to
www. musicliveshere. com


1 I 11 ,.. i, ;





HOMECOMING

Berea Baptist Church

Sunday, March 13, 2011
Service Begins 10:45 A.M.
Guest Speaker:
Former Pastor Larry Sweat
Special Music
Dinner on the grounds following service.

755-0900
162 SW Ridge Rd., Hwy 47


- .. i ayI M ac 3


Sml.BuiesAwrsFiait


Wednesday
Blue Grey Army meeting
The Blue Grey Army
SInc. is holding a Wran Up
Meeting of the Olub,
Battle Festival 2011 Event
5:30 p.m. Wednesday in
the School Board annex
building room 153. All


Free Medicaid workshop
Sqatulrdau


Large Busines-s Av.,ards Filialists


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427









LAKE CITY REPORTER WORLD & NATION SUNDAY, MARCH 6, 2011


Rebel, Gadhafi forces make gains


MAGGIE MICHAEL and
PAUL SCHEMM
Associated Press
TRIPOLI, Libya -
Government forces in
tanks rolled into the oppo-
sition-held city closest to
Tripoli after blasting it with
artillery and mortar fire,
while rebels captured a key
oil port and pushed toward
Moammar Gadhafi's home-
town in a seesaw Saturday
for both sides .in the bloody
battle for control of Libya.
i With the Gadhafi
regime's tanks prowling
the center of the, city of
Zawiya, west of Tripoli, res-
idents ferried the wounded
from the fierce fighting in
private cars to a makeshift
clinic in a mosque, fear-
ing that any injured taken
to the military-controlled
hospital "will be killed for
sure," one rebel said after
nightfall.
The rival successes
- by Gadhafi's forces in
entering resistant Zawiya,
and by the rebels in taking
over the port of Ras Lanouf
- signaled an increasingly
long and violent battle that


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Libyan men mourn during the funeral Saturday for seven
men killed in a massive explosion Friday in Benghazi, Libya.
Hospital officials say an explosion at an ammunition depot in
Libya's rebel stronghold has killed at least 17 people.


could last weeks or months
and veered the country
ever closer to civil war.
Rebels in the east
advanced from their east-
ern stronghold toward
Sirte, setting the stage for
fierce fighting with pro-
Gadhafi forces who hold
sway in the tribal area.
. Western leaders focused
on humanitarian aid instead
of military intervention,
and the Italian naval ves-
sel Libra left from Catania,


Sicily, for the rebel-held
port of Benghazi in eastern
Libya, with 25 tons of emer-
gency aid, including milk,
rice, blankets, emergency
generators, water purifying
devices and tents. It is due
to arrive early Monday.
The crisis in Libya has
distinguished itself from
the other uprisings sweep-
ing the Arab world, with
Gadhafi unleashing a vio-
lent crackdown against his
political opponents, who


themselves have taken up
arms in their attempt to
remove him from office after
ruling the country for more
than 41 years. Hundreds
have been killed.
Gadhafi has drawn inter-
national condemnation
for his actions. President
Barack Obama has insisted
that Gadhafi must leave
and said Washington was
considering a full range
of options, including the
imposition of a "no-fly"
zone over Libya.
The storming of Zawiya,
a city of some 200,000 peo-
ple just 30 miles (50 kilome-
ters) west of Tripoli, began
with a surprise dawn attack
by pro-Gadhafi forces firing
mortar shells and machine
guns.
"The number of people
killed is so big. The number
of the wounded is so big.
The number of tanks that
entered the city is big," the
rebel in Zawiya said, speak-
ing on condition of ano-
nymity because he feared
government reprisal. The
rebels vowed to keep up
the fight in the city.


1 killed as tornado hits Louisiana


Associated Press

RAYNE, La. A tor-
nado slammed a south-
western Louisiana town
Saturday, killing a woman
and injuring 11 other peo-
ple. More than 100 homes
were damaged, many of
them destroyed, authori-
ties said, and about 1,500
people were evacuated
because of natural gas
leaks.
The 21-year-old woman
was killed when a tree fell
on her house, said Maxine
Trahan, a spokeswoman
for the Acadia Parish sher-
iff., Debris was littered
throughout Rayne, a town


Lake C


135


of about 8,500 people,
after ha line of violent thun-
derstorms moved through
the area and left behind a
swath of damage about a
quarter of a mile wide to
three miles long. Pieces of.
homes were strewn about
the tops of trees, and
power lines were down. A
U.S. Postal Service truck
was flipped on to its side.
Trahan said the natural
gas leaks, which were later
fixed, delayed authorities
trying to count how many
homes and businesses
were damaged. About
1,500 people were ordered
out of the area for the
night, she said, because


ity Police Depart


2nn1ual


officials feared more gas
leaks could occur. A tem-
porary shelter was set up
at a fire station and offi-
cials were working to find
other shelters.
"There are houses off
their foundations," said
State Police Trooper
Stephen Hammons.
"There are houses that
have been destroyed."
The National Weather
Service sent a team to
investigate and confirmed
a tornado had struck the
area.
The system that hit
Rayne quickly moved,
east and drenched New
Orleans, where several


ment's


Mardi Gras parades either
were delayed, started ear-
lier or canceled because
of the severe weather.


' SPONSOR
$10

Includes a reserve
which accommc
S10 guests in a pr
near the dance f
releases prior to
ing the event, ev
and acknowled.
throughout the
* our emcee.


The attire for the evening will be formal.
)RSHIP RESERVED TABLES INDIVIDUAL
00 4 PEOPLE $240 TICKETS
6 PEOPLE $360 $50
ved table 8 PEOPLE $480
dates 8 to
rime location Business groups and friends { i
floor, press are invited to join together
and follow- and reserve a table for the
ent programs evening.
cement ,,-
evening by i"-.' '


( Reserve early by calling: '
Destiny Hill 758-5484 Samantha Driggers 758-5843
This event is organized by the Lake City Police Department. This year all proceeds
will go towards the purchase of a Firearms Training Simulator. The training simulator
will be used by the Lake City Police Department and officers from the Third Judicial
Circuit. This simulator gives officers realistic "shoot-don't shoot" training which is
difficult to reproduce with just actors alone. The Firearms Training Simulator will be
utilized during the Lake City Police Department Citizens Police Academy to allow
citizens to experience some of the split second decisions officers must make during
calls for service.

We hope that you will choose to join us for this fun-filled evening. If you have any
questions, please do not hesitate to call.

Sincerely,

Argatha Gilmore
Chief of Police


SPONSORS
Dees-Parrish Family Funeral Home
Florida Narcotic Officers'Association
American Pawn
Don Reed Construction
Don Reed Roofing
First Federal Bank of Florida
Power Country 102.1
Allie's Event Planning


PARTICIPANTS
John W. Burns III (State Farm Insurance)
A-1 Bail Bonds
Baya Pharmacy
Sunbelt Honda
Dewitt and Sherri Cason
Scott's Gunsmithing & Sales
CCA-Lake City Correctional Facility


Air Force launches
space plane

CAPE CANAVERAL
- The Air Force has
launched a second experi-
mental space plane that
resembles a small shuttle.
An Atlas 5 rocket blast-
ed off with the unmanned
space plane Saturday after-
noon from Cape Canaveral.
Air Force officials aren't
saying much about the X-
37B orbital test vehicle. It's
the second of its type to be
launched. The first rock-
eted into orbit last spring.
It landed in California in
December following a 270-
day mission.
The X-37B is 29 feet
long with a wing span of
15 feet.
The Air Force said the
newest craft will serve as
a test platform for satel-
lite sensors and systems.
Officials say the voyage
will build upon what was
learned during the first
mission, though they won't
say what that was.

Michael Moore
rallies protesters
MADISON, Wis. -
Liberal filmmaker Michael
Moore urged Wisconsin
residents Saturday to
fight against Republican
efforts to strip most public
workers of their collective


Senior Living Residence


)


bargaining rights, telling
thousands of protesters
that "Madison is only the
beginning."
The crowd roared
in approval as Moore
implored demonstrators
to keep up their struggle
against Republican Gov.
Scott Walker's legislation,
saying they've galvanized
the -nation against the
wealthy elite and compar-
ing their fight to Egypt's
revolt. He also thanked the
14 state Democratic sena-
tors who fled Wisconsin
to block a vote on the bill,
saying they'll go down in
history books.

US push not
halting gun flow
BROWNSVILLE, Texas
Federal agents are
barely able to slow the
river of American guns
flowing into Mexico.
In two years, a new
effort to increase, inspec-
tions of travelers -cross-
ing the border has netted
just 386 guns an almost
infinitesimal amount given
that an estimated 2,000
slip across each day.
Stopping the flow of
American guns, bullets
and cash has long bedev-
iled authorities on both'
sides of the border.
, U Associated Press

S ^2 W p. I


Food!
Fun!
Music


Grand Opening Celebrationi
Saturday, March 12* 10 am to 4 pm


Please Join Us for This Special Event!

Public Open House

Saturday, March 12, 2011

10 am- 4 pm

Continuous Tours!
Entertainment! Food! Fun!

Assisted Living





Senior Living Residence H


9 Senior Day Program Short-Term Stays
Assisted Living Facility License # Pending
201 NE 1st Avenue
High Springs, FL 32643
(386) 243-2022
fighSpringsSeniorLiving.com


BRIEFS


The Lake City Police Department would like to present the 18th Annual
Lake City Police Department Ball.This year's event will be held on

March 12, 2011
7:00pm to 12:00am
at Country Club at Lake City


A REAL LIFE DRAMA PRESENTATION
YOU WILL NEVER FORGET!
SUNDAY Thru TUESDAY
March 13, 14 & 15, 2011
7P. M.- NIGHTLY


ay lor Church
26389 Coity Road 250 Sanderson, Florida 32087

FREE ADMISSION
Nursery Provided Kindergarten & Under Children's Church Service lst-3rd Grade
For more information call: (904) 259-7324
Website: www.taylorchurch.net


poor
prizes!


:,pkZa

V


...j


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


,'
't











LAKE CITY REPORTER WEATHER SUNDAY, MARCH 6, 2011


THE WEATHER



STORMS MOSTLY PARTLY'. SHOWERS CHC OF
SUNNY., CLOUDY LATE -STORMS



-174L042 HI72L45 HI75LOtJ HITSWLO,; H176L01


-~ ..


Pensaca
61/41


70
aldiassee Lake
70.39 1

Pan City
64/43


TEMPERATURES
High Saturday
Low Saturday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Saturday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


78
53
73
48
,,87 in 1997
28 In 2002


0.00"
'0.29"
7,.56"
O.0"
7:60"


-A-


NU City
40 Jacksonville Cape Canaveral
e City 75,46 Daytona Beach
42 Ft. Lauderdale
inesville Daytona Beach Fort Myers
76 44 78 56 Gainesville
Ocala 0 Jacksonville
78.46 0 Key West
Orlando Cape Canaveral Lake Cty
80 59 79. 54 Miami
Tampa Naples
76/53 West Palm Beach Ocala
81/60 Orlando
S Ft. Lauderdale Panama City
Ft. Myers 81/64 Pensacola
82/56 Naples Tallahassee
'80/60 Miami Tampa
82/65 Valdosta
Key West* W. Palm Beach


78/ t9


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise tom.
Sunset torn.

MOON
Moonrise today
Moonset today
Moohrise tom.
Moonset torn.


6:51 a.m.
6:33 p.m.
6:50 a.m.
6:33 p.m.


7:26 a.m.
8:21 p.m.
7:57 a.m.
9:14 p.m.


March March March April
12s 19 26 3
Frst Full Last New


30 miites tfm
Today's
ultra-violet '
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+.
1 ,v i\ ...j~


Monday Tuesday
72 57 716'63 0.:
73 57 74 59 p.
,i 67 p.: 80 69 p:
79 58s s3 60 p.:'
72.4 4 75 52 p':4
67 47 70 52 pCe
76. 68., 78 71 s,
72. 45's 75 50.pci
80 64 pc 80 6S pr
78 60 pc 83.63 pc
74/48/s 76/54/pc
79/57/s 79/59/pc
66/53/s 68/59/pc
64/51/s 67/60/pc
70/48/s 71/58/pe
74/58/s 79/61/pc
70/46/s 71/54/pc
78/64/pc 80/67/pc


our reaOe 's
by






weather.com


Forecasts, data and
Graphics 2011 Weather
Central, LP, Madison, WIs.
www.weatherpubltsher.com


NATIONAL FORECAST: A moist and slow-moving storm system will produce torrential rain
across the eastern United States today. Rain will turn to snow on the western flank of the
system, and it may be heavy at times this afternoon. Strong thunderstorms will affect parts
of the Southeast. Expect rain and mountain snow from the Rockies to portions of California,
as well.


YESTERDAYS NATIONAL EXTREMES High: 820, Plant City, Fa. Low -129, Huron, SD.


Saturday Today


CITY
Albany NY
Albuquerque
Anchorage
Atlanta
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Bismarck
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Charleston SC
Charleston WV
Charlotte
Cheyenne
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland,
Columbia SC
Dallas
Daytona Beach
Denver


HI/Lo/Pcp. HI/Lo/W
48/34/.02 50/27/r
48/26/0 66/38/pc
16/7/0 29/17/s
59/48/.48 57/35/sh,
63/39/0 59/36/t
29/19/0 22/7/sn
61/54/.18 56/33/pc
12/3/.01 17/-4/sn
47/40/.04 47/34/rs
55/29/0 56/41/sh
48/43/.65* 35/19/sn
73/52/0 73/46/t
59/54/.07 47/25/r
62/50/.01 65/35/t
42/19/0 46/20/rs
36/30/.10 35/27/pc
56/49/.17 38/25/pc
51/47/.50 32/17/pc
68/50/0 68/40/t
57/39/0 63142/s
74/60/0 78/56/t
48/14/0 52/?8/c


Saturday Today
CITY HI/Lo/Pcp. HI/Lo/W CITY
Des MoInes 29/22/0 37/26/pc Omah
Detroit 46/33/.70 34/19/pc Orlan4
El Paso 58/42/0 74/46/pc Phlilad
Fairbanks 4/-21/0 13/-20/s Phoer
Greensboro 63/46/0 64/35/t Pittsb
Hartford 54/35/0 50/37/r Portla
Honolulu 73/69/0 81/69/pc Portla
Houston 66/52/.03 66/47/s Raleig
Indianapolis 52/37/1.55 42/25/pc Rapid
Jackson MS 63/57/1.66 57/35/s Reno
Jacksonville 77/57/0 75/46/t Richn
Kansas City 35/21/0 46/34/pc Sacra
Les Vegas 64/46/0 72/53/pc St. Lo
Little Rock 64/45/1.70 55/38/s Salt L
Los Angeles 75/53/0 Z3/53/c San A
Memphis 61/45/1.31 50/36/pc San D
Miami 80/70/0, 82/65/t San F
Minneapolis 27/17/0 29/21/c Seattl
Mobile 67/61/.69 62/38/s Spoka
New Orleans 75/63/2.56 62/45/s Tampa
New York 60/41/0 54/38/r Tucso
Oklahoma City 48/27/0 60/36/pc Washi


Saturday Today


a
do
lelphia
mix
aurgh
ind ME
ind OR
gh
City
nond
mento
ouls
ake City
ntonio
lego
rancisco
e
Lne
a
nton
ington


HI/Lo/Pcp.
31/13/0
81/60/0
63/40/0
75/50/0
53/45/.22
43/31/.04
50/39/.06
67/43/0
23/9/0
56/37/0
67/39/0
64/43/0
53/36/.36
53/37/0
68/52/0
75/54/0
D 56/46/0
48/39/.02
38/32/.09
81/63/0
73/45/0
59/42/0


HI/Lo/W
38/28/pc
80/59/t
58/37/r
83/54/pc
40/20/rs
46/37/sh
50/37/pc
68/37/t
24/4/sn
54/34/sh
64/34/t
61/45/sh
45/32/pc
52/40/sh
70/46/s
64/53/c
59/46/sh
46/33/pc
43/26/pc
76/53/t
80/5i/pc
60/37/t


E ATOAL


I : e '~ s ~. e *


- On this date in
7p .Monday 6a 1987. unseasonaLr.I
warm air pushed
into the upper
Midwest, seeing
numerous record
nighs for ire day.
Saint Cloua. Minn.
recorded a nigh 01
71 degrees. exceed.
ing its previous
record nigh Iy 21
degrees."


CITY "
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Amsterdam
Athens
Auckland
BelJIng
Berlin
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Cairo
Geneva
Havana
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Hong Kong
Kingston


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HI/Lo/Pcp. HI/Lo/W CITY
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72/64/0 68/60/r Madrid
55/36/0 50/28/pc Mexico City
41/23/0 41/21/s Montreal
84/68/0 82/67/s Moscow
81/55/0 85/62/s Nairobi
48/27/0 49/29/s Nassau,
84/61/0 85/60/t New Delhi
36/28/0 -24/10/s Oslo
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82/73/0 84/72/pc Paris


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Saturday
HI/Lo/Pcp.
54/41/.07
82/70/0
45/34/0
54/36/.06
81/50/0
37/34/.22
32/27/.14
84/61/0
77/68/0
79/54/0
37/18/0
86/75/0
46/32/0


Today
HI/Lo/W
52/41/sh
.80/67/pc
45/31/s
57/30/pc
73/48/pc
34/21/rs
33/22/sn
85/62/s
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29/19/s
86/70/t
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CITY
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St. Thomas VI
San Juan PR
Santiago
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Saturday
HI/Lo/Pcp.
77/73/0
54/45/0
80/71/0
84/72/0
79/55/0'
43/25/0
91/77/.69
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52/34/0
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Today I
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61/38/pc
80/72/t
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90/77/t
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KEY TO CONDITIONS: c-cloudy, dr-drizzle, f-fair, fg-fog, h-hazy, i-ice, pc-partly cloudy, r-rain, s-sunny,
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Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427










Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@laokecityreportercom


Sunday. March 6. 201 I


Lake City Reporter





SPORTS


www.lakecityreporter.com


BRIEFS

FORT WHITE FOOTBALL
Q-back Club
meeting Monday
The Fort White
Quarterback Club will
meet at 7 p.m. Monday
in the teacher's lounge at
the high school.
For details, call Shayne
Morgan at 397-4954.

FORT WHITE BASEBALL
Moe's Night
on Thursday
The Fort White High
Dugout Club has a Moe's
Night fundraiser from
5-8 p.m. Thursday at
Moe's Southwest Grill in
Lake City.
For details, call coach
Chad Bonds at 590-7362.

ADULT BASKETBALL
Men's games
at Richardson
Open basketball games
for men 18 and older are
played at Richardson
Community Center from
5-8 p.m. on Sundays. Cost
is $3 per session.
For details, call John
Henry Young Jr. at
623-4817.

ADULT SOFTBALL
League sign-up,
is under way
The Lake City
Recreation Department's
church, commercial and
women's adult softball
league registration
continues through
March 18. Registration
is 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.
weekdays at Teen Town
Recreation Center. Fees
are $350 for a minimum
of 10 games.
For details, call
Heyward Christie at
754-3607.
* From staff reports

GAMES

Monday
Fort White High
weightlifting vs. Columbia
High, Bradford High,
4 p.m.
Columbia High JV
baseball vs. Melody
Christian Academy,
5 p.m.
Columbia High
baseball at Madison
County High, 7 p.m.
Tuesday
Fort White High hosts
track meet, 4 p.m.
Columbia High
softball vs. Robert E. Lee
High, 5 p.m.
Columbia High
baseball vs. Suwannee
High, 6 p.m. (JV-6 at
Suwannee)
Fort White High
baseball vs. Newberry
High, 7 p.m. (JV-4:30)
Fort White High
softball vs. Suwannee
High, 7 p.m. (JV-5)
Thursday
Columbia High
tennis at Ridgeview High,
3:30 p.m.
Columbia High
softball vs. Fleming Island
High, 6 p.m. (JV-4)
Fort White High
softball at Bradford High,
7 p.m. (JV-5)
Friday
Fort White High
softball at P.K. Yonge
School, 6 p.m.
Fort White High
baseball at Santa Fe
High, 7 p.m. (JV-4:30)
Columbia High
softball at Lafayette High,
7 p.m. (JV-5)
Columbia High
baseball at Buchholz
High, 7 p.m. (JV-6 vs.


Buchholz)


Distinguished trainer


Lake City native

Walker receives

national award


By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com
athletic
training is the
third leg of
successful
sports
programs and Bill Walker's
career has spanned its rise
to importance.
The Lake City native was
recently honored by the
National Athletic Trainers'
Association with his
selection to receive a
2011 Most Distinguished
Athletic Trainer Award.
Walker will be
presented the award at the
NATA Annual Meeting
and Clinical Symposium in
New Orleans on June 21.
"I am one of 21
recipients," Walker said
this week. "It is the second
highest award that NATA
gives. It was an honor just
to be nominated."
Walker, the general
operations manager with
Oxford Physical Therapy
and Rehabilitation, Inc.
in Ohio, was nominated
for the award by,pone6f
hisformerstudentsat the .,
University of Cincinnati.
Walker was asked to
submit letters of
recommendations and two
of his supporters were
former Florida State
Athletic Director Bob
Goins and Chris Patrick,
University of Florida
assistant athletic director
for Sports Health.


"I was pleased with the
people who agreed to write
letters for me," Walker
said. "Chris Patrick has
been a mentor of mine
since the early '70s and we
used to send students back
and forth."

Cincinnati institution
Walker is a member of
the Ohio Athletic Trainers
Association Hall of Fame
and has
received
many
other
awards
in the
32 years
he spent
Walker with the
Bearcats
at Cincinnati. He was the
assistant athletic director
for Sports Medicine and
head athletic trainer for the
university.
Walker also was a
professor in the college of
medicine and college of
education. He published
articles on athletic ,
training in addition to
numerous presentations.
Walker retired from
Cincinnati in 2007.
Walker came to
Cincinnati after a
short-lived career in
professional sports. He had
worked at Austin Peay for
track coach Joe Jordan and
graduated with a Bachelor
of Science in Health
Education. He earned a


COURTESY PHOTO
Bill Walker was inducted into the Ohio Athletic Trainers' Association Hall of Fame in 1998.


masters at Tennesse Tech
in 1975, where he received
his NATA certification.
Later that year, Walker
was head athletic trainer


COURTESY PHOTO
Bill Walker checks out a Bearcats football player during his time as Assistant Athletic Director,
Sports Medicine and Head Athletic Trainer for the University of Cincinnati.


Raiders take first

round from Fort

White in district


Unearned run
proves costly for
Lady Indians, 1-0.
From staff reports

Santa Fe High softball
eked out a 1-0 win over
visiting Fort White High in
the teams' first matchup for
supremacy in District 5-3A.
The Raiders scored a
run in the second inning.
Pitcher Shelby Morgan
made it stand up, pitching
a three-hitter with one walk
and 13 strikeouts.
Taylor Douglass (four
innings) and Cecile Gomez


(two innings) split the pitch-
ing duties for Fort White.
Ali Wrench, Holly Polhill
and Douglass had hits.
Savanna Hewett had a
double and single for Santa
Fe (6-2, 5-0).
"We knew it would be a
tough game and the girls
weren't as aggressive as I
want them to be," coach
Cassie Sparks said. "We
made one error and that
girl ended up scoring. The
good thing is I don't feel
like we played as well as we
have been playing and we
only lost 1-0. It shows what
INDIANS continued on 2B


for the Shreveport Steamer
in the World Football
League.
"We had played on
Saturday and had a normal
Monday and Tuesday,"
Walker said. "I got to work
Taping on Wednesday and
just stopped. We heard on
the radio about the league
closing. One of the players
said, 'You need to put a
lock on the door because
you may have to sell this
stuff to get out of town.'"
Walker got wind of the
opening at Cincinnati and
"went up there with the
attitude that it was my job."
That decision worked
out well for both parties.

Beginning the journey
Walker's storied career
had its humble hometown
beginnings in Lake City,
where he will be
remembered as Ricky.
He and John, Mary and
Patty were the children of


Bill and Martha Walker.
Bill was chief radio
operator for the Florida
Highway Patrol and
Martha was a nurse for
Dr. Lou Landrum.
Walker was a member
of the 1960 Lake City
Midgets, a football
forerunner of junior high
teams. There were a lot of
good players and Walker
saw limited playing time in
the big game of the season.
Football began at Lake
City Junior High when
Walker was in the eighth
grade and he had a desire
to be part of the program.
"Joe Fields asked me
if I wanted to handle the
equipment and carry the
first aid kit," Walker said.
Walker continued as a
manager in high school
under football coaches
Wink Criswell and Paul
Quinn. He also was a
manager for track for four

WALKER continued on 2B


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Fort White High's Caitlin Jones (23) focuses on the ball while preparing to swing in the Lady
Indians' 10-0 win over Newberry High on Tuesday.


Section B












LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, MARCH 6, 2011 Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421
0~


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
AUTO RACING
3 p.m.
FOX NASCAR, Sprint Cup, Kobalt
Tools 400, at Las Vegas
BOWLING
I p.m.
ESPN PBA, Mark Roth Plastic Ball
Championship, at Cheektowaga, N.Y.
CYCLING
4 p.m.
VERSUS Paris-Nice, stage I, at
Houdan, France (same-day tape)
GOLF
I p.m.
TGC PGATour, The Honda Classic,
final round, at Palm Beach Gardens
3 p.m.
NBC PGATour,The Honda Classic,
final round, at Palm Beach Gardens
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
3 p.m.
WGN Preseason, Chicago Cubs vs.
LA. Dodgers, at Mesa,Ariz:
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
Noon
CBS Kentucky at Tennessee
2 p.m.
CBS Missouri Valley Conference,
championship game, at St. Louis
4 p.m.
CBS -Wisconsin at ohio St.
6 p.m.
FSN Florida St. at N.C. State
8 p.m.
ESPN2 West Coast Conference,
semifinal,, at Las Vegas
10p.m.
ESPN2 West Coast Conference,
semifinal, at Las Vegas
NBA BASKETBALL
I p.m.
ABC Chicago at Miami
3:30 p.m.
ABC L.A. Lakers at San Antonio
6:30 p.m.
ESPN New York at Atlanta
9 p.m.
ESPN Boston at Milwaukee
NHL HOCKEY
12:30 p.m.
NBC Philadelphia at N.Y. Ringers
RODEO
8 p.m.
VERSUS PBR, Chicago invitational
(same-day tape)
WOMEN'S COLLEGE
BASKETBALL
I p.m.
FSN Atlantic Coast Conference,
championship game, at Greensboro, N.C.
3:30 p.m.
ESPN2 Big Ten Conference,
championship game, at Indianapolis
FSN -Washington at Southern Cal
5:30 p.m.
ESPN2 Southeastern Conference,
championship game, at Nashville,Tenn.
Monday
CYC'LING'"I .
4 p.m.
VERSUS .Paris-Nice, stage 2,
Montfort I'Amaury t6 Amilly, France
(same-day tape)
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
7 p.m.
ESPN Colonial Athletic Association,
championship game, at Richmond,Va.
ESPN2 Metro Atlantic Athletic
Conference, championship game, at
Bridgeport, Conn.
9 p.m.
ESPN West Coast Conference,
championship game, at Las Vegas
ESPN2 Southern Conference, cham-
pionship game, at Chattanooga,Tenn.
NHL HOCKEY
7 p.m.
VERSUS -Washington at Tampa Bay
SOCCER
2:55 p.m.
ESPN2 .Premier League, Chelsea
at Blackpool
WOMEN'S COLLEGE
BASKETBALL
5 p.m.
ESPN2 Atlantic 10 Conference,
championship game, at Lowell, Mass.

BASKETBALL

NBA schedule

Saturday's Games
New Jersey 137,Toronto 136,30T
Washington 103, Minnesota 96


Indiana at Houston (n)
Sacramento at Utah (n)
Charlotte at Portland (n)
Denver at LA. Clippers (n)
Today's Games
Chicago at Miami, I p.m.
LA. Lakers at San Antonio, 3:30 p.m.
Washington at Detroit, 6 p.m.
Golden State at Philadelphia, 6 p.rh.
New York at Atlanta, 6:30 p.m.
New Orleans at Cleveland, 6:30 p.m.
Phoenix at Oklahoma City, 7 p.m.
Memphis at Dallas, 7:30 p.m.
Boston at Milwaukee, 9 p.m.
Monday's Games
LA. Clippers at Charlotte, 7 p.m.
Portland at Orlando, 7 p.m.
Utah at New York, 7:30 p.m.
New Orleans at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Oklahoma City at Memphis, 8 p.m.
Dallas at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Houston at Sacramento, 10 p.m.

AP Top 25 schedule

Today's Games
No. I Ohio State vs. No. I OWisconsin,
4 p.m.
No. 20 Kentucky at Tennessee, Noon

Women's SEC
Quarterfinals
Tennessee 92, Florida 75
Kentucky 60, LSU 58
Georgia 66, South Carolina 34
Vanderbilt 69, Mississippi State 55
Semifinals
Saturday
Tennessee 82, Georgia 58
Kentucky 69,Vanderbilt 56
Championship
Today
Tennessee vs. Kentucky, 5:30 p.m.

Women's ACC

Quarterfinals
Georgia Tech 70, Maryland 64
Duke 79,Wake Forest 50
Miami 93, N.C. State 85
North Carolina 78, Florida St. 65
Semifinals
Saturday
Duke 74, Georgia Tech 66
North Carolina 83, Miami 57
Championship
Today
Duke vs. North Carolina, I p.m.

AUTO RACING

Race week

NASCAR
SPRINT CUP
KobaltTools 400
Site: Las Vegas.
Schedule: Today, race, 3 p.m. (FOX,
2:30-6:30 p.m.).
Track: Las Vegas Motor Speedway
(oval, 1.5 miles).
Race distance: 400.5 miles, 267 laps.

Koba tools qualifying

Friday qualifying; race today
(Car number in parentheses)
I. (17) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 188.884
mph.
2. (9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 188.166.
3. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 188.127.
4. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 187.97.
5. (18) Kyle Busch,Toyota, 187.565.
6. (20) Joey Logano, Toyota, 187.318.
7. (43) A J Allmendinger, Ford,
187.253.
8. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet,
187.22.
9. (56) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota,
187.201.
10. (5) Mark Martin, Chevrolet,
187.195.
11. (I) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet,
187.084.
12. (78) Regan Smith, Chevrolet,
187.084.
13. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet,
186.903.
14. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet,
186.728.
15. (14) Tony Stewart,. Chevrolet,
186.528.
16. (21 I) Trevor Bayne, Ford, 186.528.
17. (II) Denny Hamlin, Toyota,
186.464.
18. (27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet,
186.445.
19.(83) Brian Vickers,Toyota, 186.335.
20. (2) Brad Keselowski, Dodge,
186.079.


21. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet,
186.053.
22. (22) Kurt Busch, Dodge, 186.002.
23.(42) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet,
185.97.
24. (47) Bobby Labonte, Toyota,
185.688.
25. (00) David Reutimann, Toyota,
185.567.
26. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet,
185.478.
27.(13) Casey Mears,Toyota, 185.217.
28. (33) Clint Bowyer, Chevrolet,
185.103.
29. (32) Mike Skinner, Ford, 184.742.
30. (4) Kasey Kahne,Toyota, 184.47.
31. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota,
184.464.
32. (46) J.J.Yeley, Chevrolet, 184.2.
33. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet,
183.949.
34. (36) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet,
183.014.
35. (34) David Gilliland, Ford, 183.007.
36. (60) Landon Cassill, Toyota,
182.07.
37. (09) Bill Elliott, Chevrolet,
181.977.
38. (7) Robby Gordon, Dodge,
181.403.
39. (38) Travis Kvapil, Ford, 181.269.
40. (71) Andy Lally, Chevrolet,
179.414.
41. (37) Tony Raines, Ford, Owner
Points.
42. (6) David Ragan, Ford, Owner
Points.
43. (66) Michael McDowell, Toyota,
181.769.
Failed to Qualify
44. (92) Brian Keselowski, Dodge,
179.7.

BASEBALL

Spring training

Today's Games
Philadelphia (ss) vs. Detroit at
Lakeland, 1:05 p.m.
Baltimore vs. Minnesota at Fort Myers,
1:05 p.m.
St. Louis vs., Florida at Jupiter,
J:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay vs.- Philadelphia .(ss) at
Clearwater, 1:05 p.m.
Atlanta vs: Washington at Viera,
1:05 p.m.
N.Y.Yankees vs.Houstor at Kissimmee,
1:05 p.m.
Toronto vs. Pittsburgh at Bradenton,
1:05 p.m.
Boston vs. N.Y. Mets at Port St.Lucie,
1:10 p.m.
Milwaukee (ss) vs. Texas at Surprise,
Ariz., 3:05 p.m.
Monday's Games
Atlanta vs. Florida at Jupiter, 1:05 p.m.
Philadelphia vs. N.Y. Yankees (ss) at-
Tampa, 1:05 p.m.
Baltimore (ss) vs. Boston at Fort
Myers, 1:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay vs. Pittsburgh at Bradenton,
1:05 p.m.
St. Louis vs. Minnesota at Fort Myers,
1:05 p.m.
Houston vs. Washington at Viera,
1:05 p.m.
Detroit Vs. N.Y. Mets at Port St. Lucie,
1:10 p.m.
N.Y.Yankees (ss) vs. Baltimore (ss) at
Sarasota, 7:05 p.m.
Texas vs. San Francisco at Scottsdale,
Ariz., 9:05 p.m.

HOCKEY

NHL schedule

Saturday's Games
N.Y. Islanders 5, St. Louis 2
Buffalo 5, Philadelphia 3
Vancouver 3, Los Angeles I
Pittsburgh 3, Boston 2, OT
Chicago 5,Toronto 3
Atlanta 4, Florida 3, OT'
Montreal 4,Tampa Bay 2
Detroit at Phoenix (n)
Edmonton at Colorado (n)
Dallas at San Jose (n)
Today's Games
Philadelphia at N.Y. Rangers, 12:30 p.m.
New Jersey at N.Y. Islanders, 3 p.m.
Washington at Florida, 5 p.m.
Buffalo at Minnesota, 6 p.m.
Nashville at Calgary, 9 p.m.
Vancouver at Anaheim, 8 p.m.
Monday's Games
Washington atTampa Bay, 7 p.m.
Columbus at St. Louis, 9 p.m.
Dallas at Los Angeles, 10:30 p.m.


WALKER: Served as medic in Army


Continued From Page 1B
years and was manager in
basketball for Earl Hill in
his senior year.
Walker graduated from ,
Columbia High in 1965.
"I followed Joe to Lake
City Community College
and kept on doing it," said
Walker, who took a student
athletic trainer
correspondence course.
Walker received one of
those "Greetings" letters
from the draft board while
at LCCC and ended up
enlisting in the Army.
As a medic, Walker
served three years that
included two tours of duty
in Vietnam. He received
a Bronze Star, Combat
Medical Badge, Army
Commendation, Vietnam
Campaign medal (three
stars) and Vietnam Service
medal (three stars).
Walker was a few credits
short of a degree when he
got out of the Army. That
led him to Austin Peay and
eventually to Ohio.
"At Cincinnati I liked


being a mentor and
teacher and I continued to
do it," Walker said. "I was
more of an administrator



Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

I SGETU I


than anything else."
He is now, officially,
a Most Distinguished
Athletic Trainer.


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek


I I I THE ASTRONAUT
S- NEVER L-05T A MATCH
A3.EC.AU5F HE WA5 --
ANMRNE c os I ws-_
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
Suggested by the above cartoon.

Answer: (I L I1 11
(Answers tomorrow)
Saturday's I Jumbles: TONIC DRAWN GLITCH NEPHEW
Answer: The Beaver's dam was this when it was
blown away GONE WITH THE WIND


Team Tumblemania's Halbrook,

Hammen make AAU National

Trampoline & Tumbling Team


From staff reports

Kayley Halbrook .and
Casey Hammen of Team
Tumblemania claimed
two of the 36 spots on
the 2011-12 AAU National
Trampoline & Tumbling
Team in competition at the
AAU National Team Trials
on Feb. 18-19 in Winter
Haven.
Halbrook of High Springs
won the Intermediate
Tumbling event to secure
her place on the team, while
Hammen of Newberry
placed second in Advanced
Double-Mini. The top three
in individual events made
the nationalteam.
Halbrook and Hammen
will be featured with the
AAU National Team at the
Junior Olympic Games in
New Orleans in July.
Tumblemania assistant
coach Joshua Gillen, an
Elite Level Athlete and cur-
rent member of the USTA
National Trampoline &
Tumbling Team, placed
second in the All American
Athlete Competition held
in conjunction with the
AAU trials.
The All American team
will compete in the USTA
National Championships in
Charleston, W.Va., in June.
Three Fort White ath-
letes placed for Team


COURTESY PHOTO
Kayley Halbrook (left) and Casey Hammen of Team
Tumblemania qualified for the 2011-12 AAU National
Trampoline & Tumbling Team.


Tumblemania: Austin
Benkoczy was second in
Intermediate Double-
Mini Trampoline; Briley
Larsen was sixth in Novice
Double-Mini Trampoline;
and, Mary Jo McGrath was
seventh in Sub-Advanced
Trampoline.
Katie Vaughn, Emma
Scott and Brooke
Gillingham of High Springs,
respectively, placed fifth
in Sub-Novice Tumbling,
sixth in Sub-Novice
Tumbling and Intermediate
Trampoline, and 16th, in
Sub-Advanced Trampoline.
Sophie Allen and Allison
Vargas, both of Newberry,


Horton, Wieber give U.S.

sweep in American Cup


Associated Press

JACKSONVILLE-
Jonathan Horton and
Jordyn Wieber gave the
United States a sweep
at the American Cup on
Saturday.
Horton finished in the
top three in five of six
events en route to his third
American Cup. The silver
medalist at the Beijing
Olympics moved from sec-.
ond to first place with a
solid performance on the
parallel bars, then held on
with a mostly error-free


1
4
8
11
13

14
15 I

16
18 I

20 I


routine on the high bar.
"Major confidence
boost," said Horton, who
also won this event in 2006
and 2007.
Wieber topped the
women's field in three of
four event, and claimed her
second American Cup.
World champion Aliya
Mustafina of Russia fin-
ished second. Alexandra
Raisman of ,the United
States was third.
Ukraine's Mykola
Kuksenkov was second on
the men's side, followed by
American Jake Dalton.


ACROSS 39 Long skirts
40 Charged parti-
Bleacher shout cle
Prompts 41 Feedbag bit
Picture border 42 Hidden valley
Now - it! 45 Wound spirally
Thin Man's ter- 49 Cool star
rier (2 wds.)
Student stat 53 Lyra star
Kirk's helms- 54 Ms. Merkel
man 55 Chop fine
Averred 56 Thames school
Early ')I 57 Loud noise
astronomer 58 Oodles (2 wds.)
Meat-grading 59 Compass pt.


org.
21 Domino pip.
22 Paramedic's
skill .
24 Office worker
of yore
27 Cafe --
30 Room price
31 Grand Ole -
32 Lillie or Arthur
34 Not delay
35 Put out heat
36 Social dud'
37 Calcify


DOWN


Jeopardy
Shivery feeling
Rescue
Tight-knit team
Exploit
Handy abbr.
-.ammoniac
Baseball VIPs
Imitated
Mock fanfare
(hyph.)


placed 11th in Sub-Novice
Tumbling and Trampoline,
and 11th in Sub-Novice
Tumbling, respec-
tively. Madison Weber
(Alachua) placed 11th in
Advanced Trampoline.
From Gainesville, Bailey
Davis placed seventh in
Intermediate Trampoline,
Hannah Paul placed 10th in
Sub-Advanced Trampoline,
and Olivia Paul placed fifth
in Sub-Advanced Double-
Mini.
Team Tumblemania
trains under Marci
Schneider and assistant
coaches Clint Carroll and
Gillen.


INDIANS

Continued From Page lB

we need to work harder
on next time."
Fort White's junior
varsity won the early
game, 8-5. Alex Walker
pitched five innings and
struck out five.
Jessica Widlan was
4-for-4 with a double and
four RBIs. Alexa Hatcher
(two RBIs) and Ayla
Gonzales (RBI) were both
2-for-3.
Fort White (6-1, 4-1)
' hosts Suwannee High at
7 p.m. Tuesday in another
district game. The Lady
Indians won the first
meeting, 4-3, in Live Oak.


Answer to Previous Puzzle

PEN FRI -.LO
ICE SL D E ARIN
rT 0 LI IL






APR ACES SERA
IREE F ITCH END
EDICTS ACRES
SUEE UR L
RISE SMACK
TONI SCHEDULE
IAGO SPED PEP
OMEN TAR SEA


12 New Orleans
campus
17 Mystique
19 Kind of system
22 Abrupt
23 Tissue layer


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


24 Madrid Mrs.
25 Muscle-car
dial
26 Sundance
Kid's girl
27. Neat as

28 Wild goat
29 Ms. Garr of
films
31 Black cat,
maybe
33 Blurbs
35 Ancient Tokyo
36 Aborigine
38 Circus arena
39 1960s
Chairman
41 Eight voices
42 Beetle larva
43 "One For My
Baby" singer
44 Party-tray
cheese
46 Authorizes
47 They often
clash
48 Hamlet, e.g.
50 Eddie Cantor's
wife
51 Have the flu
52 Sgt.


3-7 2011 by UFS, Inc.


SCOREBOARD


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, MARCH 6, 2011


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421


-












OUTDOORS


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Florida's Alex Tyus (left) saves the ball from going out of bounds in front of Vanderbilt's Festus
Ezeli (3) during the second half of the Gators' 86-76 win Saturday in Nashville, Tenn.



Gators win SEC
.-


Associated Press

NASHVILLE, Tenn.-
Kenny Boynton scored 17
points, all three of. Florida's
seniors reached double
figures and the 14th-
ranked Gators clinched the
Southeastern Conference
regular-season title with
an 86-76 victory over
No. 21 Vanderbilt on
Saturday night.
Florida (24-6, 13-3) set a
school record for confer-
ence wins and earned its
third outright SEC title -
its first since 2007.
In coach Billy Donovan's
500th game with the Gatbrs,
Florida pulled away after a
technical foul on Vanderbilt
coach Kevin Stallings mid-
way through the second
half. That wiped out a poten-
tial tie for the Commodores
(21-9, 9-7) and gave the
Gators a six-point swing.
Florida seniors Chandler
Parsons, Alex Tyus and
Vernon Macklin each scored
13 points and spurred a
first-half comeback that
wiped Out Vanderbilt's big-
gest lead.
Vanderbilt was led by
John Jenkins' 22 points. .
Walker had 16 points and
six assists for the Gators and
Parsonsadded 10 rebounds,
helping Florida to a 35-22
rebounding advantage.

No. 13 North Carolina
81, No. 4 Duke 67
CHAPEL HILL, N.C. -
Harrison Barnes scored 18
points to help No. 13 North
Carolina beat No. 4 Duke,
clinching the Atlantic Coast
Conference regular-season
championship.
Kendall Marshall had
15 points and 11 assists as
the Tar Heels (24-6, 14-2)
ended a three-game losing
streak to their fierce rival.

No. 2 Kansas 70,
No. 22 Missouri 66
COLUMBIA, Mo.-
Marcus Morris and Thomas
Robinson had double-


doubles and No. 2 Kansas
wrapped up its seventh
straight Big 12 champion-
ship by holding on for a win
over No. 22 Missouri.
Robinson had 15 points
and 13 rebounds. Morris
had 21 points and 10
rebounds for Kansas.
The Jayhawks (29-2, 14-2)
committed a season-worst
24 turnovers, but dominat-
ed inside and held Missouri
(22-9, 8-8) to season-worst
29.3 percent shooting.

No. 3 BYU 102,
Wyoming 78
PROVO, Utah Jimmer
Fredette scored 38 points to
lead BYU ovei Wyoming.
Charles Abouo scored 21
of his 25 points in the sec-
ond half for the Cougars
(28-3, 14-2 Mountain West
Conference).
Francisco Cruz scored
13 of his 18 points, in the
first half for Wyoming
(10-20, 3-13).

No. 4 Pittsburgh 60,
No. 19 Villanova 50
PITTSBURGH Ashton
Gibbs had 18 points to help
Pittsburgh clinch the but-
right Big East title.
Pitt (27-4, 15-3) needed a
-victory to secure the No. 1
seed for the Big East tour-
nament for the first time
since 2004.
Villanova (21-10, 9-9)
was without Corey Stokes
(left hamstring) and lead-
ing scorer Corey Fisher
was limited due to early
foul trouble. Maalik Wayns
had 23 of his career-high 27
points in the second half. '

Iowa 67,
No. 6 Purdue 65
IOWA CITY, Iowa -
Jarryd Cole had 16 points
and 10 rebounds in his
final home game and Iowa
stunned Purdue, clinching
the Big Ten title for top-
ranked Ohio State.
Bryce Cartwright and
Matt Gatens each added


13 points for the Hawkeyes
(11-19, 4-14), who snapped
the Boilermakers' seven-
game winning streak.
Jajuan Johnson had 22
points and 12 rebounds for
Purdue (25-6, 14-4).

No. 8 Notre Dame 70,
No. 16 Connecticut 67
STORRS, Conn. Ben
Hansbrough scored 21
points and Notre Dame
held on for the win.
Kemba Walker scored 34
points for Connecticut.
Carleton Scott and
Tyrone Nash each had 13
points for the Fighting Irish
(25-5, 14-4), who closed the
regular season with four
straight wins and have won
11 of 12 overall.
UConn (22-9, 9-9) has lost
four of five.

West Virginia 72,
No. 11 Louisville 70
MORGANTOWN, W.Va.:
- Truck Bryant sank two
free throws with 1 second
left to lift West Virginia to
the win.
West Virginia (20-10,11-7
Big East) earned its fourth
consecutive 20-win season
under coach Bob Huggins.
Kevin Jones had a
career-high 25 points
and 16 rebounds for the
Mountaineers.
Kyle Kuric scored 21
points for Louisville (23-8,
12-6).

No. 12.Syracuse 107,
DePaul 59
SYRACUSE, N.Y. Rick
Jackson had 14 points,.
seven rebounds and four
blocks for Syracuse.
It was the fifth straight
win for Syracuse (25-6, 12-6
Big East).

Cincinnati 69, No. 17
Georgetown 47
CINCINNATI Yancy
Gates scored 13 points and
Cincinnati completed a
sweep of Georgetown.


Sabbatini leads Honda


By STEVEN WINE
Associated Press

PALM BEACH
GARDENS After mak-
ing consecutive bird-
ies, Honda. Classic leader
Rory Sabbatini stood in
the rough along the sixth
fairway, complaining to a
PGA Tour official about a
delay in play.
He was wondering what
had become of the group
just ahead of him.
The strange interrup-
tion could have halted
Sabbatini's momentum.
Instead, after a long wait
he hit an iron 200 yards to
10 feet of the pin, one of his
better shots among the 66
Saturday that gave him a
cushy lead.
Sabbatini will enter the
final round at 9-under 201,
five shots ahead of Jerry
Kelly and 2009 winner Y.E.


Yang.
The wvait at No. 6
occurred when Kelly, play-
ing two groups ahead of
Sabbatini, lodged a shot in
a palm tree. A newspaper
photographer's zoom lens
was used to identify the ball
as Kelly's, allowing him to
avoid being penalized for a
lost ball.
The inspection took time,
so the twosome behind
Kelly played through.
"It was a little bit of dazed
and confused," Sabbatini
said. "We're like, 'OK,
where did he come from?'
And we're trying to figure
out what's going on."
Yang birdied the last two
holes for a 3-under 67 and
moved into a tie for sec-
ond with Kelly, who shot
a roller-coaster 68. Gary
Woodland also had a 68
and was fourth, six shots
behind.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Rory Sabbatini of South
Africa attempts to will his ball
in the cup on the ninth hole
during the third round of the
Honda Classic on Saturday
in Palm Beach Gardens.


Whitaker Shooting



Range is first class


By MONTY STEPHENS
Special to the Reporter
f you would like
to work on your
marksmanship
skills, the Lewis D.
Whitaker Shooting
Range in the Osceola
National Forest is a good
place to start.
This range is located
east of Lake City, off
Forest Road 278. It
consists of two 50-yard
handgun sections and a
200-yard rifle section. It's
free and open for public
use from sunrise to
sunset, 365 days a year.
Oversight for the
range falls under
the Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation
Commission.
The range is named in
honor of the late Lewis
D. Whitaker, who was
a USDA Forest Service
Ranger and served on
a volunteer basis as the
FWC Regional Reserve
Coordinator.
Lawrence Rossignol,
retired FWC employee
and long time friend
of Whitacre, saidthat
Whitacre did a lot to \
promote the outdoor life in
Lake City.
Whitaker was an
accomplished hunter,
gunsmith and reloader. He
wrote an outdoors column
in the Lake City Reporter
for several years.


Whitacre helped
create Lake City's Mission'
Trail Gun Club that held
matches and seminars
at the range during the
1970s. Many of the major
improvements that were
accomplished at the range
were attributable to him.
If you decide to go, take
a moment to think about
gun safety. The range has
never had a serious
"accident." To keep it that
way, everyone should
abide by basic gun safety
rules.
The foremost rule is to
always treat every gun as
if it were loaded and never
point the muzzle in the
direction of something you
don't intend to shoot
Only paper targets
are allowed (no tin cans,
bottles, metal targets, or
anything that will ricochet
a bullet). Lastly, hearing
protection is definitely
recommended'when on
the range.
Should you visit the
range, expect to see some
individuals with serious
shooting equipment
alongside folks who are
there to see if grandpa's
old .22 still works. Either
way, everyone is welcome.,
One caveat, the range
does get very busy on
Saturday and Sundays.
This range is a big deal
and has all cif the
amenities that top-notch
ranges possess. For this


reason, you may need to
wait for a spot on the
firing line, so be patient.
Also, the target frames
are made from 2x4s and a
weekend's barrage leaves
them in rickety condition.
If you are able and can
bring your own frame (set
up on a 20" center) or
some fresh cardboard to
staple onto the frame, you
will be able to start
shooting much faster.
So sometime soon, get
some targets, pack up the
old .22 and take the kids
shooting at the range.
Or consider this as
something to do for a
Sunday afternoon date.
You won't be disappointed.
We are lucky to have
this range so enjoy and be
safe.
Other shooting ranges
'in the North Florida area
which are open for public
use are:
M Ocala Public Shooting
Range, on Forest Road 88
(north of State Road 40) in
the Ocala National Forest;
Apalachicola
.Shoo tng Range, on Forest
Road 305, southwest of
Tallahassee off Springhill
Road in the Apalachicola
National Forest;
FWC Public Shooting
Range, 6850 Quintette
Road in Pace.

Monty Stephens, an
avid hunter and fisherman,
lives in Lake City.


Special to the Reporter

PALATKA The
Putnam County Chamber
announced that the
Power Pole Citrus Slam
Tournament plans have
been finalized and the pub-
lic is invited to participate.
The festival surround-
ing the tournament, from
10 a.m. to 9 p.m. March
19 and noon to 6 p.m.
March 20 is free and open
to the. public. .Activities
include a Kids Zonie featur-,
ing a rock-climbing wall,.
bungee, water walkers,
casting contest, demon-
strations and food.
;This event is part of
the B.AS.S. Bassmaster
Elite :Series, a televised
tournament leading up to
the "super bowl" of tour-


naments, the Bassmaster
Classic. BAS.S. has a long!
history' on the St.' Johns
River and the Citrus Slam
will 'add another chapter
as it is the first Elite Series
tournament conducted
here.
Top anglers from all
across the U.S., and one
from as far away as Japan,
will be competing for the
$100,000 grand prize. All
the big name. pros will be
here, including Palatka's
own Terry "the Big Show"
Scroggins and Shaw
Grigsby from Gainesville.
The event kicks off with
the first official weigh-
in at 4 p.m. March 17 at
Riverfront Park just south
of the bridge. Daily launch
time Thursday to Sunday is
7:30 a.m., and weigh-in cer-


emonies are all at 4 p.m.
The public is invited to
watch the anglers as they
launch and be on hand at
every weigh-in. Be sure to
bring a lawn chair.
This televised tourna-
ment airs on ESPN at least
four times and regional TV
coverage may be onsite as
well. The Putnam County
Chamber of Commerce
wants big crowds in atten-
dance to show BAS.S. and
the rest of the world that
we appreciate them for
selecting our community
for this prestigious event.
Mark your calendar
now, and encourage your
employees and friends,
and bring your family to
Palatka's Riverfront.
For details, call Dana
Jones at (386) 328-1503.


FWC proposes increase to red drum bag limit


Commission release

The Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation
Commission has proposed
a draft rule that would


raise the recreational daily
red drum '(redfish) bag
limit from one fish to two
per person in northern
Florida.
Information regarding


the draft rule proposals is
available online at MyFWC.
corn/Commission, .and
a final public hearing on
these rule proposals will
take .place in April.


BOWLING


League reports
SResults of Lake City Bowl leaguO
play follow.
WATERGUARD
High scratch game: 1. Lori Davis
234; 2. Mary Lobaugh 223; 3. Debbie
Walters 215.1. Dave Ward 244; 2. Jim
Lobaugh 234; 3. Mark Davis 228.
High scratch series: 1. Mary
Lobaugh 548; 2. Lori Davis 547;
3. Debbie Walters 543. 1. Mark Davis
627; 2. Tom Sewejkis 626; 3. Zech
Strohl 614.
High handicap game: 1. Lori
Davis 273; 2. Mary Lobaugh 247; 3.
Amanda Meng 238. 1. Dave Ward
279; 2. Jim Lobaugh 262; 3. Dess
Fennell 245.
High handicap series: 1. Debbie
Walters 705; 2. Gloria Dennis 660;
3. Joyce Hooper 659; 4. Pat Fennell
658. 1. Michael Mclnally 674; 2. (tie)
Mark Davis, Frank Miller 663; 4. Tom
Sewejkis 662.
High average: 1. Mary Lobaugh
180. 1. Zech Strohl 206.
(results from Feb. 22)
SEXY SENIORS
Team standings: 1. Perky Pals
(68-40, 64,186 pins); 2. Farmers
(68-40, 64,077 pins); 3. Pin Droppers
(59.5-48.5).
High scratch game: 1. Joanne
Denton 206; 2. Bea Purdy 205;


3. Louise Atwood 179. 1. Jim Connors
210; 2. Dan Ritter 205; 3. Rick Yates
203. -
High scratch series: 1. Yvonne
Finley 509; 2. Louise Atwood 498;
3. Barbara Griner 492.1. Jim Connors
558; 2. Dan Ritter 551; 3. Rick Yates
547.
High handicap game: 1. Joanne
Denton 259; 2. Bea Purdy 258;
3. Janie Posey 238. 1. Rick Yates
232; 2. (tie) Keith Herbster, John
Quinn 231.
High handicap series: 1. Yvonne
Finley 656; 2. (tie) Louise Atwood,
Barbara Griner 645. 1. Ray Deton
644; 2. Dan Ritter 623; 3. Earl
Hayward 617.
High average: 1. Betty Brown
147.44; 2. Louise Atwood 146.4;
3. Yvonne Finley 146.28. 1. Dan Ritter
174.25; 2. Earl Hayward 171.81; 3.
Art Joubert 170.89.
(results from Feb. 22)
GOLDEN ROLLERS
Team standings: 1. Golden Niners
(60-40); 2. Gamblers (59-41); 3.
Knock 'em Down (54-46).
High handicap game: 1. Judy
Sanders 246; 2. (tie) Louise Atwood,
Joan Carman 239. 1. David Duncan
263; 2. Lee Evert 236; 3. Jerry Ellis
227.
High handicap series: 1. Joanne
Denton 693; 2. Bea Purdy 653; 3.


Debble Walters 643. 1. Bill Dolly 664;
2. Bill Price 639; 3. Dan Ritter 603.
High average: 1. Shirley Highsmith
155.33; 2. Elaine Nemeth 151.47;
3. Jane Sommerfeld 150.63. 1. David
Duncan 189.03; 2. Bill Dolly 184.6;
3. George Mulligan 181.93.
(results from Feb. 17)
HIT & MISS
Team standings: 1. The
Sandbaggers (21-7, 564 average);
2. Alley Oops- (21-7, 512. average);
3. Spare Us (18-10).
High handicap game: 1. LUnda
Herndon 254; 2. Susan Mears 237;
3. Joyce Crandall 236.
High handicap series: 1. Unda
Herndon 682; 2. Susan Mears 643;
3. Joyce Crandall 634.
(results from Feb. 22)
SUNDAY NITE MERCHANTS
Team standings: 1. TAZ
(22.5-9.5); 2. Fantastic Four (21-11);
3. McGhghy's Navy (18-14).
High scratch game: 1. Norma
Yelngst 189; 2. Donna Duncan 183;
3. Cheryl Jacks 180. 1. Mark Moore
247; 2. Boaty Boatwright 242; 3. Bill
Duncan 235.
High scratch series: 1. Donna
Duncan 498; 2. Norma Yeingst 494;
3. Cheryl Jacks 479. 1. Mark Moore
649; 2. Bill Duncan 629; 3. Joe Cohrs
603.
(results from Feb. 27)


Bassmaster Elite coming

to Palatka for Citrus Slam


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, MARCH 6, 2011


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421








4B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, MARCH 6, 2011


Martin wins Nationwide race;


Patrick sets record with finish


By JENNA FRYER
Associated Press
LAS VEGAS Mark
Martin knew he had to save
gas to have any chance of
winning the Nationwide
Series race at Las Vegas
Motor Speedway.
Even then, he was going
to need some help.
He got it when leader
Brad Keselowski cut a tire
on the final lap of Saturday's
race, and Martin sailed
past him for the victory.
It was the fourth win in
six Nationwide races at Las
Vegas for Martin.
"I can't gloat. If Brad.
hadn't of had a tire prob-
lem, he looked like he
would win," Martin said.
"All I could do is make sure
we didn't run out of gas."
The race will most likely
be remembered for Danica
Patrick's history-making
run and not the last-lap
dramatics.
Patrick placed fourth, the
best finish for a woman in
a national NASCAR race
since Sara Christian was
fifth at Pittsburgh in 1949.
"Awesome!" Martin said
when told of Patrick's fin-
ish. "I am really happy for
her. That's fantastic.".
It was a turnaround for
Patrick, who struggled all
weekend at Las Vegas and
fell a lap down in Saturday's
race. But she put herself
in position to get back on
the lead lap, then steadily
worked her way into the
top 10.
Fuel strategy did the rest,
as many of the cars in front
of her had to make late stops
for gas and Patrick slid all
the way up to fourth.
"We just had a good car,
that's all I can say. That's
what makes a difference in
these things," said Patrick.
"I know I haven't had the
best results, especially in
NASCAR, but we're getting
them now."
Patrick, who has only


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Danica Patrick (left) comes around turn one while driving in the NASCAR Nationwide'Series
auto race Saturday in Las Vegas. Patrick finished fourth in the race.


"I don't think about trying to achieve
the highest finish of a female. I think
about trying to win the race."


-Danica Patrick,
NASCAR driver


16 races in her NASCAR
career, improved on her
previous career-best finish
of 14th, earned at Daytona
last month.
'I don't know. I don'tthink
about trying to achieve the
highest finish of a female,"
she said. "I think about
trying to win the race."
The fuel issues, and a
midrace crash by Kyle
Busch, shuffled the final
running order and put
,Keselowski in position to
win the race. But the defend-
ing Nationwide champion
got a flat tire on the final lap
and his Dodge darted into
the wall.
"Must have run over
something because it went
down pretty quick," he
said.
Martin, who didn't think
he had enough gas to get to
the finish, then said by for
his Nationwide-leading 49th
career victory.
"We really only had one
chance to win the race and
that was to make it on fuel,
and some of the guys in
front of us not," Martin said.


"When I caught Brad, I real-
ized it was going to take all
the gas I had to get by him
because he wanted to race.
Had to wait and see if Brad
would make it our not, and
that would be the determi-
nation- because I didn't feel
confident I could make it
(on gas) and pass him."
Justin Allgaier finished
second to give Turner
Motorsports, a Nationwide
Series team competing
against Sprint Cup teams
every weekend, a 1-2 finish.
The new scoring rules,
which prevent Cup driv-
ers from earning points in
lower series, has helped
Turner put three of its
drivers in the top five of
the Nationwide standings.
Reed Sorenson is the points
leader, Jason Leffler is third
and Allgaier is fifth.
Keselowski was third.
"It's got to come back
around," he said. "We're
just on downside of the roll-
er coaster. I'm ready for it
to come back up."
Trevor Bayne was fifth
and Carl Edwards, who had


to give up the lead late to
stop for gas, settled for sixth
after leading 68 laps. Denny
Hamlin was seventh, while
Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Jason
Leffler and Kenny Wallace
rounded out the top 10.
Busch led a race-high 84
laps, but wrecked when he
tried to make a three-wide
pass around Keselowski.
He ducked his car into
the grass, lost control and
couldn't save it as ,he ran
into an interior wall. He fin-
ished 30th.
"I know the grass typi-
cally doesn't work, so I look
kind of stupid doing that,"
he said. "I screwed up."
Had he not wrecked,
Busch likely would have
contended for his 45th
Nationwide victory. He's
chasing Martin for the all-
time mark, and Martin'has
already conceded.
"It's pointless to really
talk much about that streak.
Kyle will pass me probably
by midseason and that will
be that," he said. "It's been
a good ride. That record
is going to fall. Soon. I am
sure it will fall this year."


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Lake City's Michael Kirkman in his 2011 Texas Rangers
picture taken Feb. 25 in Surprise, Ariz.

Kirkman tosses 3

impressive innings


By JEFF CAPLAN
ESPN Dallas.
SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. -
After pitching out of a two-
on, two-out jam in the third
inning Saturday, Michael
Kirkman faced the mini-
mum six batters over his
next two innings.
He gave up a lead-off
walk in his second inning
of work, but catcher Yorvit
Torrealba threw out Justin
Upton attempting to steal
second. .In the sixth,


Kirkman got three quick
outs on on a fly ball, a
strike out and ground out
to second.
In his three innings;
Kirkman allowed two hits,
a walk and he struck out
two.
,. "He did really well," said
Torrealba, who caught
the first two of Kirkman's
innings. "I really like
what I saw from him. He
pounded the strike zone
and [his pitches] had some
life to it."


UF legend Carnes dies


Associated Press

GAINESVILLE -
Former U.S. Olympic track
and field coach Jimmy
Carnes has died at 76.


Carnes, a member of
the USA Track and Field
Hall of Fame, was Florida's
track and field coach from
1965-76, where his teams
went 93-3. in dual meets.


BOAT & ATV SALE
March 10, 11, 12, 13, 2011
Office Max Parking Lot, West US Hwy. 90
Lake City, FL


When: Thursiday, March 10th
mwu Sunday, Maroh 13th
Tm:nw Thursday -Saturday
9amItopm
Sunday 9 am to 4 pm
Locaton:
I Hwy.0Woo
Office Mix Pa*ng Lot
i Aero-from Le" City MoN


Quality
Pre-owned
Boats
in Stock


Best prices
Of The
vear.


3ebhOte


BEST PRICES

OF THE
YEAgl


SYAMAHA








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Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421










Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

Contact
C.J. Risak
Assistant editor
754-0427
crisak@akecityreportercom

Sunday, March 6, 201 I


BUSINESS


www.lakecityreporter.com


Mobile history exhibit traveling to Columbia


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
The Library
of Congress
Gateway to
Knowledge
Traveling
Exhibition is visiting the
area from 9 a.m. to 5
p.m. March 15-16 at the
Columbia County Public
Library Main Branch. A
ribbon-cutting ceremony is
9 a.m. March 15.
"It's pretty exciting,"
said Katrina Evans, library
assistant director.
The Columbia County
Public Library is one of
60 sites in the South and
Midwest the traveling
exhibition is visiting. The
exhibit will set up in the
south parking lot.
The library received
a call from Rep. Ander
Crenshaw's office asking
if it would like to have the
exhibit stop there, Evans
said.
'We're most delighted
to have this opportunity,"
she said.
The Library of Congress
is the nation's oldest fed-
eral cultural institution and
was founded in 1800. It
provides access to knowl-
edge through collections,
programs and exhibitions.
The exhibition was fund-
ed by Bernie and Audre
Rapoport, founding mem-
bers of the James Madison
Council, the library's pri-
vate-sector advisory group.
The couple had a desire
for a project to take their
love of the Library of
Congress and introduce
it to rural communities


a'
./ ,'.1


JASON MATTHEW WALKER'i l ep:,,a -p.:,l
Columbia County Public Library patron Gary Swift reads a Spider-Man graphic novel to his daughter Kirsten, 7, on Friday.. The
'Library of Congress Gateway to Knowledge Exhibit,' which will feature 1962 drawings from the Spider-Man comic book, will
be rolling out in front of the main branch on March 14-15.


throughout the United
States, said Abigail Van
Gelder, exhibit docent.
A lot of people might
never have the opportu-
nity to visit the Library of
Congress, Evans said.
"'This brings a little
piece of the Library of
Congress to Lake City,"


she said.
The traveling exhibit
first debuted in September
at the National Book
Festival in D.C. It spends
two days in each area.
An 18-wheeler tractor
trailer houses the exhibit
that features facsimiles
of treasures such as:


The 1455 Gutenberg
Bible; the rough draft
of the Declaration of.
Independence in Thomas
Jefferson's handwriting
with edits by Benjamin


Franklin and John Adams;
and the 1962 drawings
for the Spider-Man comic
book. It expands three
times its road width to
1,000 square feet of exhibi-


tion space.
"You can go through
it and get a sense of how
diverse a collection the
Library of Congress has
available," Van Gelder said.
She and another docent
will be available to answer
questions.
"We're here to introduce
people to the Library of
Congress and help them
understand what resources
are available," she said.
The exhibit is free and
open to the public and
everyone in the commu-
nity is encouraged to come
out, Van Gelder said.
"Why would you not
come out to the traveling,
exhibit?" she said. "This is
the only visit of the exhibit
in our area. It's a once-in-a-
lifetime opportunity to get
up close with the Library
of Congress-upless you go
there."
Evans said she hopes
a lot of people will take
advantage of the oppor-
tunity available to visit
the exhibition and then
stop inside the Columbia
County Public Library.
School groups are
encouraged to cal the
library at 386-758-1018 to
schedule trips in advance.
For more information about
the Library of Congress
Gateway to Knowledge
Traveling Exhibition, go to
http://www.loc.gov/gateway.
"There's something for
everyone inside," Gelder
said.


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By MATTHEW CRAFT
and DAVID K. RANDALL
AP Business Writers

NEW YORK Stocks
dropped Friday after
another spike in oil prices
overshadowed a report
that the unemployment
rate fell to its lowest level
in nearly two years.
Crude oil rose 2.5 per-
cent to more than $104
a barrel, its highest level
since September 2008,
after fighting in Libya esca-
lated. Markets have been
rattled over the past two
weeks as higher oil prices
threaten to undermine
the economic recovery by
increasing transportation


and production costs.
Higher energy prices
sent stocks lower despite
news that the U.S. job mar-
ketis iniproving. The Labor
Department reported that
unemployment rate dipped
to 8.9 percent in February
from 9 percent the previ-
ous month. The rate has
dropped for three months
in a row and is now at
its lowest level since April
2009. Employers added
192,000 jobs in February,
the fastest pace in almost
a year.
'They're tugging at
each other, employment
and oil," said Jack Ablin,
chief investment officer of
Harris Private Bank. "Oil is


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Oil prices hit highest


level since Sept. 2008


By CHRIS KAHN
AP Energy Writer


NEW YORK Oil pric-
es rose past $104 a barrel
to end the week at a 29-
month high, as fighting in
Libya intensified and the
world's largest petroleum
consumer, the U.S., report-
ed that employers added
nearly 200,000 new jobs in
February.
The Labor Department
said Friday that the unem-
ployment rate dropped to
8.9 percent in February.
While that's positive news
for the economy, the report
also suggests that more
people are driving to work
at a time when world oil
supplies are under pres-
sure because of unrest in
Libya and the Middle East
Benchmark West Texas
Intermediate crude for,
April delivery gained $2.51
to settle, at $104.42 per bar-
rel in New York, the highest
level since Sept. 26, 2008.
Gasoline prices have


shot up an average of 35
cents per gallon since an
uprising in Libya began in
mid-February. A gallon of
regular gained another 4.4
cents overnight to a new
national' average of $3.471
per gallon, according to
AAA, Wright Express and
the Oil Price Information
Service.
Pump prices are soar-
ing much faster than ana-
lysts expected as rebellions
sweeps across North Africa
and the Middle East. Prices
should peak between $3.50
and $3.75 per gallon this
spring, according to Tom
Kloza, OPIS chief oil ana-
lyst
Most of Libya's oil pro-
duction has been shut down
because of the crisis, and
experts say the country's
oil fields will be threatened
as long as there's no clear
leader in charge.
Tensions escalated on
Friday as forces loyal to
Moammar Gadhafi used
tear gas against protest-
ers in Tripoli. Rebels also


attacked the oil port of Ras
Lanouf, about 380 miles east
of Tripoli. They battled with
about 3.,000 pro-Gadhafi
troops, mainly around the
facility's airstrip. As night
fell it was not clear who was
in control of the complex.
Earlier in the week, rebels
pushed back Gadhafi forces
from a larger oil facility.
Saudi Arabia has
increased production to
makee up for the loss of
Libyan crude, but a lengthy
struggle could put signifi-
cant pressure on world
supplies. Traders are con-
cerned that anti-govern.-
ment protesters will fur-
ther challenge neighbor-
ing regimes in the region.
North Africa and the
Middle East are home to
the largest oil producers on
earth and export a quarter
of the world's oil.
Meanwhile anxious trad-
ers prepared for a weekend
of uncertainty. Two weeks
ago oil surged more than
$7 per barrel in electronic
weekend trading.


Hospice seeks volunteers


From staff reports

Hospice of the Nature
Coast is searching for indi-
viduals who are interested
in volunteering in the Lake
City area.
Volunteers are needed
to provide general office
support and non-medical
assistance to patients and
th6ir families. Hospice vol-
unteers provide services
such as: telephone calls,
socialization, light meal
preparation, shopping or


errands, and staffing infor-
mation booths at seasonal
festivals. Specialized train-
ing will be provided.
To volunteer for Hospice
of the Nature Coast in the
Lake City area, contact
Volunteer Manager Ronnie
Richardson at 386-935-4520
or email: rlrichardson@hos-
piceofthenaturecoast. org.
Hospice of the Nature
Coast is a not-for-profit
charitable organization with
offices in High Springs,
Palatka and Branford. It


offers healthcare profes-
sionals who specialize in
end-of-life care, including
physicians, registered nurs-
es, home health aids, social
workers, chaplains and
trained volunteers special-
izing in medical, emotional
and spiritual care as well as
social support The hospice
care team provides,medical
services, equipment, medi-
cal supplies, medications
and training to manage
care of patients and their
families.


high enough that it has to
be a concern. The longer
it remains at this level the
greater, the chance that it
upends our recovery."
The Dow Jones industri-
al average dropped 88.32
points, or 0.7 percent, to
12,169.88. The Dow had
been down as many as 178
points earlier.
The Standard & Poor's
500 index fell 9.82, or 0.7
percent, to 1,321.15. The
Nasdaq composite index
fell 14.07, or 0.5 percent,
to 2,784.67.
All 10 company groups
that make up the S&P
index fell. Financial com-
panies fell 1.3 percent, the
largest drop.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Trader Richard Jenna works on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange Friday.



Surge in oil prices


sends stocks lower


LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS SUNDAY, MARCH 6, 2011


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424














Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424 -


LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS SUNDAY, MARCH 6, 2011


THE WEEK IN REVIEW *THE WEEK IN REVIEW -THE WEEK IN REVIEW -THE WEEK IN REVIEW *THE WEEK IN REVIEW



The Week in Review


Weekly Stock Exchange HighlightsI


A NYSE A Amex
8,413.05 +35.01 2,419.74 +60.96


Gainers ($2 or more) Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg
Goldcpwt 4.38 +1.39 +46.4 LucasEngy 4.24 +2.24 +112.0
SauerDanf 39.77 +9.87 +33.0 Accelr8 4,35 +1.75 +67.4
Bitauto n 12.70 +2.67 +26.6 Wstmind pf 27.50 +7.31 +36.2
KV PhB If 9.97 +2.03 +25.6 SamsO&G 4.08 +.99 +32.0
Coeur 34.70 +7.05 +25.5 GtPanSilvg 4.55 +1.09 +31.5
KVPhmnA 10.00 +2.00 +25.0 EndvSilvg 9.34 +2.16 +30.1
Midas 9.20 +1.79 +24.2 ChiMarFd 4.73 +1.03 +27.8
B&GFoods17.78 +3.41 +23.7 MdwGoldg 2.12 +.41 +24.0
LSBInds 36.28 +6.77 +22.9 Inuvors 3.49 +.63 +22.0
Medicis 31.24 +5.42 +21.0 Procerars 10.31 +1.81 +21.3


Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
Dex One 4.23 -1.51 -26.3
GettyRty 22.01 -7.38 -25.1
ReneSola 9.26 -2.28 -19.8
W&T Off 20.58 -4.81 -18.9
CampCC n 11.79 -2.43 -17.1
TNS Inc 15.79 -3.06 -16.2
CtrySCkg n 17.94 -3.41 -16.0
MediaGen 5.86 -1.03 -14.9
Weathflntl 20.59 -3.37 -14.1
NeoPhoton 15.58 -2.53 -14.0

Most Active ($1 or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
Citigrp 23116590 4.54 -.16
S&P500ETF8306603132.47+.14
BkofAm 6506657 14.12 -.07
SPDR Fnd3854911 16.52 -.25
FordM 3249299 14.42 -.65
AlcatelLuc2926419 5.66 +.81
iShR2K 2878286 82.44 +.26
iShEMkts 2867875 46.90 +1.38
Pfizer 2480925 19.66 +.80
GenElec 2435448 20.37 -.45

Diary
Advanced 1,988
Declined 1,159
New Highs 477
New Lows 40
Total issues 3,198
Unchanged 51
Volume 21,451,821,783


Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
Aerocntry 16.61 -7.14 -30.1
Quepasa 7.37 -2.76 -27.2
iBio 3.25 -.61 -15.8
TellnstEl 7.22 -1.28 -15.1
IncOpR 3.84 -.68 -15.0
B&HO 4.20 -.71 -14.4
Protalix 6.57 -1.06 -13.9
Compx 13.16 -1.84 -12.3
CheniereE 19.76 -2.74 -12.2
OpkoHlth 3.97 -.53 -11.8

Most Active ($1 or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
LucasEngy 525944 4.24 +2.24
SamsO&G 302118 4.08 +.99
GtPanSilv 9g269618 4.55+1.09
KodiakO g 265563 6.98 -.24
GoldStr g 227826 2.94 -.18
NovaGld g 218837 14.17 +,36
EndvSilv g 206660 9.34+2.16
NwGoldg 187576 10.72+1.10
VantageDr 152054 2.09 +.02
Tengsco 150125 1.26 +.40

Diary
Advanced 314
Declined 227
New Highs 59
New Lows 7
Total issues 553
Unchanged 12
Volume 939,454,266


SNasdaq
S2,784.67 +3.62


Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
EssexR wt 2.33 +1.00 +75.2
MediciNova 5.33 +1.73 +43.1
RoyaleEn 7.39 +2.37 +47.2
Syntroleum 2.26 +.70 +44.9
ReprosTrs 6.41 +1.92 +42.8
GlobDefr 24.25 +7.21 +42.3
GeoMet pf 15.00 +4.44 +42.0
AmerSvc 25.65 +7.46 +41.0
Edgewater 3.25 +.89 +37.7
Zion wt12-122.43 +.63 +35.0

Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg' %Chg
CentEuro 12.79 -9.68 -43.1
SuperMda 6.29 -2.53 -28.7
Amylin 11.07 -4.44 -28.6
YRCWwrs 2.50 -.92 -26.9
Kendle 9.07 -3.06 -25.2
McC&Sch 7.70 -2.35 -23.4
Iddium un 11.52 -3.48 -23.2
Macatawa 2.92 -.85 -22.5
FrstPIce If 2.55 -.70 -21.5
Bsquare 9.07 -2.45 -21.3

Most Active ($1 or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
PwShs QQQ308735557.97 +.32
Microsoft 2866627 25.95 -.60
Cisco 2853855 18.40 -.24
Intel 2771920 21.56 -.30
SiriusXM 2152088 1.81 +.04
MicronT 1749144 11.64 +.20
Nvidia 1491349 20.76-2.37
MarvellT 1163629 16.13-2.79
Dell Inc 1143995 15.60 +.47
Oracle 1130685 32.77 -.19

Diary
Advanced 1,366
Declined 1,413
New Highs 328
New Lows 83
Total issues 2,856
Unchanged 77
Volume 9.870.417.212


Wkly Wkly YTD
Name Ex Div Last Chg %Chg %Chg
AT&T Inc NY 1.72 27.92 -.21 -0.8 -5.0
AlcatelLuc NY 5.66 +.81 +16.7 +91.2
AutoZone NY ... 265.42+10.03 +3.9 -2.6
BkofAm NY .04 14.12 -.07 -0.5 +5.8
BariPVixrsNY ... 31.66 +.15 +0.5 -15.8
BobEvans Nasd .80 30.66 -.14 -0.5 -7.0
CNBFnPANasd .66 14.11 +.20 +1.4 -4.7
CSX NY 1.04 74.96 +1.64 +2.2 +16.0
Chevron NY 2.88 103.75 +1.65 +1.6 +13.7
Cisco Nasd ... 18.40 -.24-1.3 -9.0
CiEigrp NY 4.54 -.16 -3.4 -4.0
CocaCola NY 1.88 65.21 +.90 +1.4 -.9
Covidien NY .80 52.98 +2.25 +4.4 +16.0
Delhaize NY 2.02 78.72 +1.63 +2.1 +6.8
DrxFBull s NY ... 30.72 -1.30 -4.1 +10.3
EMCCp NY ... 27.32 +.42 +1.6 +19.3
FamilyDir NY .72 50.55 +.01 ... +1.7
FordM NY ... 14.42-.65 -. 4.3 -14.1
GenElec NY .56 20.37 -.45 -2.2 +11.4
HomeDp NY 1.00 37.22 +.14 +0.4 +6.2
iShJapn NY .14 11.44 +.03 +0.2 +4.9
iShSilver NY ... 34.69 +2.13 +6.6 +15.0
iShEMkts NY .64 46.90 +1.38 +3.0 -1.6
iShR2K NY .89 82.44 +.26 +0.3 +5.4
Intel Nasd .72 21.56 -.30 -1.4 +2.5
JPMorgChNY .20 45.52 -1.16 -2.5 +7.3
LVSands NY ... 43.65 -2.35 -5.1 -5.0
Lowes NY .44 26.24 +.97 +3.8 +4.6


Name Ex Div


Wkly Wkly YTD
Last Cha %Cho %Chq


MarveilT Nasd ... 16.13 -2.79 -14.7 -13.0
McDnlds NY 2.44 76.03 +1.59 +2.1 -1.0
Merck NY 1.52 33.06 +.87 +2.7 -8.3
MetLife NY .74 45.57 -1.21 -2.6 +2.5
MicronT Nasd ... 11.64 +.20 +1.7 +45.1
Microsoft Nasd .64 25.95 -.60 -2.2 -7.0
NYTimes NY ... 10.24 +.16 +1.6 +4.5
NextEraEnNY 2.20 54.75 +.61 +1.1 +5.3
NobltyH Nasd ... 8.50 +.50 +6.3 +4.8
Nvidia Nasd ... 20.76 -2.37-10.2 +34.8
OcciPet NY 1.64 103.15 +.05 ... +5.1
Penney NY .80 34.11 -.05 -0.1 +5.6
PepsiCo NY 1.92 63.40 +.28 +0.4 -3.0
Pfizer NY .80 19.66 +.80 +4.2 +12.3
Potash wi NY .28 61.09 +1.09 +1.8 +18.4
PwShsQQQNasd .36 57.97 +.32 +0.6 +6.4
PrUShS&PNY ... 21.25 -.08 -0.4 -10.6
Ryder NY 1.08 48.06 +.59 +1.2 -8.7
S&P500ETFNY 2.37 132.47 +.14 +0.1 +5.3
SearsHldgsNasd ... 84.76 +1.66 +2.0 +14.9
SiriusXM Nasd ... 1.81 +.04 +2.3 +11.0
SouthnCo NY 1.82 37.97 -.09 -0.2 -.7
SprintNex NY ... 4.34 +.03 +0.7 +2.6
SPDRFnclNY .16 16,52 -.25 -1,5 +3.6
TimeWam NY .94 37.25 -.65 -1.7 +15.8
WalMart NY 1.46 52.07 +.32 +0.6 -3.4
Weathflnfi NY ... 20.59 -3.37 -14.1 -9,7
WellsFargo NY .20 31.91 -.49 -1.5 +3.0


Stock Footnotes: o = Dvidends and earnings in Canadian dollars. h = Does not meet continued-listng standards.
If = Late filing with SE. n = New in past 52 weeks, pf = Preferred. rs = Stock has undergone a reverse stock split
of at least 50 percent within the past year. rt = Right to buy security at a specified price. s = Stock has split by at
least 20 percent within the last year. un = Units. vi = In bankruptcy or receivership. wd = When distributed, wi
When Issued. wt = Warrants.
Mutual Fund Footnotes: b = Fee covering market costs is paid from fund assets, d = Deferred sales charge, or
redemption fee. f = front load (sales charges). m = Multiple fees are charged. NA = not available. p = previous day's
net asset value, s = fund split shares during the week. x = fund paid a distribution during the week.Galners and
Losers must be worth at least $2 to be listed in tables at left. Most Actives must be worth at least $1. Volume in
hundreds of shares. Source: The Associated Press. Sales figures are unofficial.


Money Rates
Last Pvs Week
Pmrr, He ir "_ 2
Ll i.:..urni H+.il 07 '. 5 "'
F.T. r 3al Fund.: Rn.je ('- 1O.'- 2 "
Treasuries
3-month 0.12 0.13
6-month 0.15 0.16
5-year 2.17 2.16
10-year 3.48 3.42
30-year 4.60 4.51


Dow Jones Industrials


95.89 -168.32 8.78 191.40 -88.32


Close: 12,169.88 g) 4W
1-week change: 39.43 (0.3%) MON TUES WED THUR FRI
112 ,50 0 .... ........... ... ..... ......... ............. ......... .........








10,500 ............. ....... ..........


10,000


"S 0' "* "" ",'" N


0D.........J'


MUTUAL FUNDS
Total Assets Total Return/Rank Pet MinInn
Name Ohj ISMinms NAV 4-wk 12-mo 5-year Load Invt
P'lIC T,iil. 1: .1 I 83 i 1 89. ,1 .72 B l 3/A IL I (Xi.()
r-jr Furd. OGrAA m L M. ~, U .O i '" IrlD 8C 5"5 2T.1.1
Fidelity Contra LG 63,315 71.23 +2.1 +22.8/B +5.2/A NL 2,500
Vanguard TotStldx LB 59,764 33.30 +1.2 +21.5/A +3.2/B NL 3,000
American Funds CaplncBuA m IH 58,498 50.99 +1.3 +12.6/D +4.0/C 5.75 250
Vanguard Instldxl LB 58,180 121.23 +1.0 +20.0/B +2.7/B NL 5,000,000
American Funds CpWIdGrIA m WS 55,337 36.83 +1.0 +15.2/D +4.5/B 5.75 250
Vanguard 500AdmI LB 54,664 122.09 +1.0 +20.0/B +2.7/B NL 10,000
American Funds IncAmerA m MA 52,903 17.21 +1.5 +16.4/A +4.4/B 5.75 250
Vanguard TotStlAdm LB 50,992 33.32 +1.2 +21.7/A +3.3/B NL 10,000
American Funds InvCoAmA x LB 49,487 29.19 +0.8 +15.7/E. +2.6/B 5.75 250
Dodge & Cox Stock LV 44,056 114.35 +0.3 +18.5/B +0.4/D NL 2,500
Dodge & Cox IntlStk FV 43,842 37.07 +1.0 +20.1/A +4.6/A NL 2,500
Vanguard Totlntl d FB 39,597 16.36 +1.1 +18.2/C +4.0/B NL 3,000
American Funds WAMutlnvA m LV 39,232 28.54 +1.6 +18.7/B +2.3/B 5.75 250
American Funds EurPacGrA m FB 38,777 42.83 +2.0 +17.7/C +5.2/A 5.75 250
Vanguard InstPlus LB 37,376 121.24 +1.0 +20.0/B +2.7/B NL 200,000,000
FrankTemp-Franklin Income A m CA 36,259 2.25 +1.0 +17.4/A +6.1/A 4.25 1,000
American Funds FnlnvA x LB 33,807 38.77 +2.1 +20.3/B +4.4/A 5.75 250
Vanguard 5001nv LB 33,274 122.06 +1.0 +19.8/B +2.6/B NL 3,000
American Funds NewPerspA m WS 33,217 29.81 +2.0 +19.1/C +6.11A 5.75 250
PIMCOTotRetAdm b Cl 33,054 10.89 +1.3 +7.0/B +8.0/A NL 1,000,000
American Funds BalA x MA 31,913 18.55 +1.0 +15.6/B +4.3/B 5.75- 250
Fidelity GrowCo LG 29,316 88.19 +1.0 +26.2/A +5.7/A NL 2,500
Vanguard WelltnAdm MA 28,884 55.84 +1.0 +14.4/C +6.0/A NL 50,000
Fidelity LowPriStk d MB 28,175 40.39 +1.7 +22.0/D +5.2/B NL 2,500
Harbor Intllnsti d FB 28,149 63.08 +1.5 +20.4/B +6.5/A NL 50,000
CA-ConservativeAocaltin, Cl -Intenmedate-Term Bond, ES -Europe Stock FB -F rgnLarge Blnd, FGoreign LargeGow, FV-Foreign
Large Value. IH -World Aloaacalo, LB -Large Bend, LG-Large Growlh, LV-Lage Value, MA .Moderate Aocaion MB -tCap Blend, MV
MdCap Value, SH -Specilatyeath, WS -World Stock To Return: Chng with dividends reinvested. Rank: tHo fund pedormed vs.
others withsame objectie:Aisin top20%,E in bottom20%.MinlntIn t: nimum $ needed toive stinid.Source:Moringslar.


New York Stock Exchanqe


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div Yld PE Chg %Chg Last


AESCorp ...
AFLAC 1.20 2.1
AK Steel .20 1.3
AMR
AT&T Inc 1.72 6.2
AbtLab 1.92 3.9
AMD
Aetna .60 1.6
Agilent
AlcatelLuc ...
Alcoa .12 .7
Allstate .84 2.6
AlphaNRs ...
Altria 1.52 6.0
AmBevs .99 3.5
AEagleOut .44 2.9
AEP 1.84 5.2
AmEip .72 1.6
AmlntlGrp ...
Anadarko .36 .4
Annaly 2.65 14.8
ArcelorMit .75 2.1
ArchCoal .40 1.1
ArchDan .64 1.7
ATMOS 1.36 3.9
Avon .92 3.4
BB&TCp .60 2.3
.BHP Billt 1.82 1.9
BakrHu .60 .9
BcoBrades .82 4.1
BcoSantand .78 6,7
BcoSBrasil .45 3.7
BkofAm .04 .3
BkNYMel .36 1.2
BariPVixrs...
BarrickG .48 .9
Baxter 1.24 2.3
BerkH B ...
BestBuy .60 1.8
Blackstone .40 2.2
BlockHR .60 4.1
Boeing 1.68 2.3
BostonSci ...
BoydGm ...
BrMySq 1.32 5.0
CBS B .20 .8
CNO Fincl ...
'CSX 1.04 1.4
CVR Engy ...
CVS Care .50 1.5
CdnNRsgs .36 ...
CapOne .20 .4
CapitlSrce .04 .5
Carnival 1.00 2.5
Caterpillar 1.76 1.7
Cemex .43 .
CenterPnt .79 5.0
CntryUnk 2.90 7.2
ChesEng .30 .9
Chevron 2.88 2.8
Chicos .20 1.5
Chimera .69 16.3
Citigrp
CliffsNRs .56 .6
CocaCola 1.88 2.9
CocaCE .48 1.9
Coeur
ConAgra .92 4.0
ConocPhil 2.64 3.3
ConsolEngy .40 .8
ConEd 2.40 4.8
ConstellEn .96 3.2
Coming .20 .9
Covidien .80 1.5
"DCT Indl .28 5.3
DR Horton .15 1.3
DTE 2.24 4.7
Danahers .08 .2
DeanFds ...


17 +.83 +7:5
11 -.42 +1.8
-.24 -5.2
... -.50 -21.2
8 -.21 -5.0
13 +1.05 +1.6
14 -.07 +12.8
9 +1.01 +25.7
22 +4.39 +12.8
... +.81 +91.2
69 -.11 +7.7
18 +.23 -.5
71 +2.12 -5.4
13 +.38 +2.8
... +1.56 -9.6
19 +.07 +5.3
14 +.05 -1.8
13 +.19 +1.9
... -1.15 -22.5
53 -.20 +6.4
13 +.13 -.2
11 +.55 -4.1
35 +2.59 +2.7
12 +.07 +22.8
17 +1.02 +11.4
20 -.59 -5.9
23 -1.28 +.3
... +1.85 +3.1
35 -1.77 +22.0
... +.63 -2.0
... -.63 +9.3
... +.11 -11.0
21 -.07 +5.8
15 -.57 -.5
... +.15'-15.8
16 +.95 -.7
15 +1.38 +6.3
18 +.63 +6.7
10 +.32 -4.7
... +.42 +28.5
10 -.71 +21.5
16 -.50 +10.0
... +.35 -.5
84 -.60 -4.4
15 +.94 -.2
25 +.42 +25.8
11 +.24 +7.1
18 +1.64 +16.0
... +1.82 +36.0
13 +.07 -5.1
... +1.75 +15.1
8 -1.46 +14.0
... -.16 +5.2
16 -2.42 -12.5
25 +1.04 +10.0
... -.16 -17.0
14 +.20 +1.0
12 -.04 -12.5
11 -1.80 +29.6
11 +1.65 +13.7
21 -.17 +13.5
6 -.07 +3.2
13 -.16 -4.0
13 +3.89 +27.1
13 +.90 -.9
14 -.74 +3.2
... +7.05 +27.0
16 +.16 -+2.6
12 +2.70 +17.4
31 +2.67 +7.7
15 +.30 +.3
10 +.21 -.8
10 +.32 +18.6
... +2.25 +16.0
... -.23 -.6
82 -.46 -3.9
13 +.74 +5.3
19 +.25 +7.6
18 -.39 +12.9


Name Div
Deere 1.40
DelMnte .36
DeltaAir
DenburyR ...
DevelDiv .16
DrSCBr rs ...
DirFnBr rs ...
DrxFBull s ...
DirxSCBull .11
Discover .08
Disney .40
DomRescs 1.97
DowChm .60
DukeEngy .98
EMCCp ..:
EOG Res .64
Edisonlnt 1.28
EIPasoCp .04
EmersonEl 1.38
EnCana g .80
ENSCO 1.40
Exelon 2.10
ExxonMbl 1.76
FedExCp .48
FirstEngy 2.20
FootLockr .66
FordM
Fortress
FMCG s 1.00
FrontierCm .75
GMXRs ...
Gafisa s .14
Gannett .16
Gap .45
GenGrPrn ...
GenMills s 1.12
GenMotn ...
GenOn En ...
Genworth ...
Gerdau .32
GoldFLtd .19
Goldcrp g .40
GoldmanS 1.40
Goodyear ...
GrafTech ...
HCP Inc 1.92
HSBC 1.80
Hallibrtn .36
HartfdFn .40
HItCrREIT 2.76
HitMgmt ...
HeclaM
HewlettP .32
HomeDp 1.00
Honwlllntl 1.33
HostHotls .04
IAMGId g .08
iShGolds ...
iSAstla .82
iShBraz 2.53
iSCan .50
iSh HK .45
iShJapn .14
iSh Kor .44
iShSing .43
iSTaiwn .29
iShSilver ...
iShChina25 .63
iShEMkts .64
iShB20 T 3.86
iS Eafe 1.42
iShR2K .89
iShREst 1.97
IngerRd .28
IBM 2.60
Intl Coal
IntlGame .24
IntPap .75
Interpublic .24


Wkly YTD Wkly
YId PE Chg %Chg Last
1.5 19 +1.86 +11.2 92.35
1.9 15 +.05 +1.0 18.99
... 14 -1.21 -21.3 9.91
34 -.20 +26.3 24.12
1.1 ... ... -.9 13.96
...... -.69 -18.4 38.22
...... +1.22 -14.3 40.49
...... -1.30 +10.3 30.72
.1 ... +.66 +14.7 83.10
.4 18 -.21 +16.6 21.61
.9 19 +.60 +16.1 43.55
4.3 15 +1.04 +6.6 45.54
1.6 21 +1.20 +9.9 37.52
6.5 13 +.11 +1.0 17.98
... 31 +.42 +19.3 27.32
.6 ... -2.37 +19.7 109.38
3.4 10 +1.44 -3.0 37.45
.2 16 -.15 +33.2 18.33
2.3 22 -.23 +4.5 59.74.
2.5 17 +.02 +11.0 32.31
2.5 14 +1.93 +6.8 56.99
5.1 14 -.16 -1.2 41.13
2.1 14 -.26 +16.4 85.08
.5 20 -1.19 -4.6 88.69
5.9 14 -.18 ... 37.01
3.3 1 +.86 +2.7 20.15
... 7 -.65 -14.1 14.42
... ... -.32 +10.2 6.28
1.9 11 -.74 -13.9 51.71
9.2 17 -.29 -16.4 8.13
... ... +.12 +.2 5.53
1.1 ... -.20 -13.4 12.59
1.0 7 -.06 +7.6 16.24
2.1 11 -1.16 -2.0 21.59
... .:. -.45 -2.3 15.13
3.0 15 -.38 +3.3 '36.76
... 11 -.86 -12.1 32.39
.. -.04 +1.6 3:87
... 56 -.43 -2.1 12.87
2.3 ... +.32 -1.3 13.81
1.1 3 -.05 -3.0 17.58
:8 ... +3.09 +8.9 50.07
.9 9 -3.77 -4.3 161.00
... ... -.22 +15.4 13.68
... 15 +.31 +3.5 20.53
5.2 37 -.10 +.4 36.94
3.4 ... -3.82 +4.7 53.45
.8 23 -.10 +14.7 46.84
1.4 10 -.81 +8.0 28.61
5.4 61 +.57 +8.0 51.43
... 16 +.60 +6.4 10.15
...78 -.67 -10.1 10.12
.8 11 -.07 +1.2 42.61
2.7 18 +.14 +6.2 37.22
2.4 22 -.77 +6.3 56.51
.2 ... -.71 -1.1 17.67
... 29 +1.25 +24.7 22.19
... ... +.19 +.4 13.96
3.2 ... -.08 +2.0 25.95
3.3 ... +1.82 -2.2 75.71
1.5 ... +.80 +9.6 33.98
2.4 ... +21 -.9 18.75
1.2 ... +.03 +4.9 11.44
.7 ... +1.62Z -1.7 60.12
3.2 ... +.07 -4.4 13.24
... ... +.51 -3.1 15.14
... +2.13 +15.0 34.69
1.5 ... 60 +160 +.8 43.44
1.4 ... +1.38 -1.6 46.90
4.3 ...-1.17 -3.5 90.81
2.3 ... +.23 +5.2 61.23
1.1 ... +.26 +5,4 82.44
3.3 ... -.53 +5.1 58.81
.6 26 -.31 -4.7 44.87
1.6 14 -.45 +10.3 161.83
70 +.78 +36.2 10.54
1.4 22 +.43 -5.7 16.69
2.8 18 -1.30 -1.7 26.78
1.8 30 +.46 +22.7 13.03


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last


Name Div
Invesco .44
ItauUnibH .67
JCrew
JPMorgCh .20
Jabil .28
JanusCap :04
JohnJn 2.16
JohnsnCtl .64
JnprNtwk
KB Home .25
Keyborp .04
KimbClk 2.80
Kimco .72
Kinross g .10
Kohls 1.00
Kraft 1.16
LDK Solar ...
LSI Corp
LVSands ...
LennarA .16
ULillyEli 1.96
Limited .80
LincNat .20
UoydBkg ...
LyonBas A ..
MBIA
MEMC
MGIC
MGM Rsts ..
Macys .20
Manpwl .74
Manulife g .52


Wkly YTD. Wkly
YId PE Chg %Chg Last
1.7 30 +.20 +10.6 26.60
2.9 ... +.81 -4.4 22.85
18 +.29 +.9 43.51
.4 11 -1.16 +7.3 45.52
1.3 19 +.86 +8.5 21.79
t .3 15 -.46 +.9 13.09
3.5 13 +1.42 -1.3 61.06
1.5 19 +.63 +8.1 41.31
52 +.21 +19.5 44.11
1.9 ... -.44 -3.0 13.08
.4 20 -.03 +4.6 9.26
4.3 14 +.35 +2.7 64.77
4.0 79 -.69 +.8 18.19
.6 27 -.36 -17.5 15.64
1.8 14 +.74 -.5 54.08
3.7 13 -.13 +.2 31.58
... 12 -1.52 +24.2 12.57
... ... -.14 +4.8 6.28
... 87-2.35 -5.0 43.65
.8 39 -.53 +5.5 19.79
5.7 8 +.51 -1.3 34.60
2.5 16 -.01 +5.1 32.31
.6 12 -.66 +11.2 30.92
... ... -.05 -2.7 4.00
.. +1.47 +15.2 39.64
40 -.82 -12.6 10.48
... 86 -1.52 +15.0 12,95
... ... -.23 -18.2 8.34
-.30 -7.3 13.76
.9 12 -.24 -7.7 23.36
1.1 ... +.93 +4.3 65.44
... ... +.15 +9.9 18.88


Name Div
MarathonO 1.00
MktVGold .40
MktVRus .18
MarlntA .35
MarshM .84
Marshlls .04
Masco .30
MasseyEn .24
McDrmlnts ...
MedcoHith ...
Medtmic .90
Merck 1.52
MetLife .74
MetroPCS ...
MitsuUFJ ...
MobileTel s ...
Molycorpn ...
Monsanto 1.12
MonstrWw ...
MorgStan .20
Mosaic .20
MotrlaSoln ...
MotrlaMo n ..
NCR Corp ...
NYSE Eur 1.20
Nabors ,
NBkGreece .29
NatGrid 7.04
NOilVarco .44
NatSemi .40
NatwHP 1.92
NY CmtyB 1.00


Wkly YTD Wkly
YId PE Chg %Chg Last
1.9 15 +3.04 +39.5 51.66
.7 ... +1.45 -1.7 60.40
.4 ... +1.40 +9.8 41.64
.9 33 -1.31 -8.5 38.00
2.8 20 +.04 +10.6 30.24
.5 ... +.03 +11.3 7.70
2.3 ... +.12 +5.1 13.31
.4 ... +1.34 +21.8 65.33
20 +2.86 +23.9 25.64
... 20 +.96 +3.8 63.59
2.3 12 -.62 +5.9 39.26
4.6 16 +.87 -8.3 33.06
1.6 14 -1.21 +2.5 45.57
... 28 +.80 +18.1 14.91
... ... -.04 +.9 5.46
... 34 +1.15 -5.4 19.74
... ... +.61 -1.3 49.26
1.5 32 +.85 +4.9 73.06
... ... -1.55 -32.7 15.90
, .7 12 -1.43 +4.5 28.44
.2 20 +.57 +12.0 85.50
21 +2.01 +5.5 40.15
99 -3.96 -8.4 26.65
.. 16 +.08 +25.0 19.21
3.3 17 -1.00 +20.1 36.00
... ... -.08 +20.5 28.26
... ... -.11 +9.5 1.84
5.9 ... +.74 +6.3 47.17
.5 20 +.91 +20.1 80.74
2.6 12 -.09 +12.7 15.51
4.7 35 +1.63 +11.6 40.59
5.6 14 -.88 -5.8 17.75


NewellRub .20
NewmtM .60
Nexen g .20
NextEraEn 2.20
NiSource .92
NobleCorp .98
NokiaCp .55
NorflkSo 1.60
Nucor 1.45
OcciPet 1.84
OfficeDpt
OilSvHT 2.40
OldRepub .70
PG&ECp 1.82
PMIGrp
PNC .40
PPL Corp 1.40
PatriotCoal ...
PeabdyE .34
Penney .80
PepsiCo 1.92
Petrohawk ...
PetrbrsA 1.20
Petrobras 1.20
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PhilipMor 2.56
PlainsEx
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PS USDBull...
Pridelntl
PrUShS&P ...
ProUltQQQ ...
PrUShQQQ rs...
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ProUShL20 ...
ProUSSP500...
PrUltCrde rs...
ProgsvCp 1.40
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PulteGrp ....
QntmDSS ....
QksilvRes ..
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RiteAidh ..
Rowan
RylCarb .
SAIC
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Teradyn
Tesoro
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37.85
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36.84
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Novell
Novlus
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OmniVisn ...
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BarcUBS36 ...
BarcGSOil ..
Brgus grs ...
CAMAC En ..
CanoPet
CelSci
CFCdag .01
CheniereEn...
ChiMarFd
ChinaShen ...
ClaudeRg ...
Crystallx g ..
DejourE g ...
DenisnM g ...
EndvSilvg ...
Fronteerg ...
GascoEngy ...
GenMoly ...
GeoGloblR ..
GoldStr g
GranTrrag .
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MadCatzg ...
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OpkoHlth
ParaG&S
PhrmAth .
PionDrill
Protalix
Quepasa
RadientPh
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Rentech
Rubicon g ...
SamsO&G ..
SulphCo ...
TanzRyg ...
Taseko
Tengsco
TimberdnR ...
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TriValley ...
Ur-Energy ...
Uranerz
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STOCKS OF LOCAL INTEREST


Weekly Dow Jones


Currencies
Last Pvs Day
Australia .9870 .9853
Britain 1.6262 1.6273
Canada .9724 .9719
Euro .7150 .7164
Japan 82.32 82.37
Mexico 11.9952 11.9919
Switzerlnd .9264 .9319
British pound expressed in U.S. dollars. All oth-
ers show dollar in foreign currency.


ActivsBliz .17
AdobeSy ...
AkamaiT ...
AlteraCp If .24
Amazon
AmCapLd ...
Amgen ...
Amylin
A123 Sys ...
Apple Inc ...
ApldMatl .28
ArmHId .09
ArubaNet ...
Atmel
'Autodesk
AutoData 1.44
AvagoTch .07
AvanirPhm ...
Baidu s
BioSante ...
BrigExp
Broadcom .36
BrcdeCm
CA Inc .16
Cadence ...
CpstnTrbh ...
Celgene
CellTherrsh...
CentEuro ...
ChinaMda ...
CienaCorp ...
Cirrus
Cisco
CitzRepBh ...
Clearwire
Comcast .45
Comc spcl .45
CodnthC


IR









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in error. Please call 755-5440
immediately for prompt correc-
tion and billing adjustments.
Cancellations- Normal advertising
deadlines apply for cancellation.
Billing Inquiries- Call 755-5440.
Should further information be
required regarding payments or
credit limits, your call will be trins-
ferred to the accounting depart-
ment.


Advertising copy is subject to
approval by the Publisher who
reserves the right to edit, reject,
or classify all advertisements under
appropriate headings. Copy should
be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the first day of pub-
lication. Credit for published errors
will be allowed for the first insertion
for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the
Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nor for any general,
special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply
with Federal, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
nation in employment, housing and
public accommodations. Standard
abbreviations are acceptable; how-
ever, the first word of each ad may
not be abbreviated.

In h Il'I1 didid Onlin1e
www~la~iiwitv rejMr~~lLT.t'o


NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETING
OF THE SCHOOL BOARD OF CO-
LUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
The School District of Columbia
County, Florida announces they will
hold a
workshop, to which all persons are
invited to attend as follows:
DATE: Tuesday, March 22, 2011
TIME: 5:00 p.m.
PLACE: Columbia County School
District Administrative Complex Au-
ditorium .
372 West Duval Street
Lake City, FL 32055
PURPOSE:
Workshop to discuss budget issues.
No action will be taken at this meet-
ing.
Pursuant to the provisions of the
American with Disabilities Act, any
person requiring special accommo-
dations to participate in the above
workshop is asked to advise the
School Board at least 48 hours be-
fore the workshop by contacting
Mrs. Lynda Croft at (386)-755-8003.
School Board of Columbia County,
Florida
By: Michael F. Millikin
Superintendent of Schools
04543746
March 6, 2011

010 Announcements









020 Lost & Found
Austrailian Cattle Dog male, lost
on Feb 18th, Microchipped, family
misses terribly, brown collar
w/blue tags 386-935-2920 Reward


Found Cat, Gum Swap Rd.
Osceola Nat'l Forest. Very
friendly, gray. 386-758-9880
or check with LC Animal shelter
Lost intact male Blue Heeler,
last seen at Belk's on Feb 24th,
45 lbs, brown collar w/tags,
Reward offered 386-935-2920
Male Rottweiller lost evening of
02/21, County Road 138/Rum
Island area. REWARD.
Please call 386-454-2925
if no answer leave message

SJob
1 Opportunities

04543711
The Columbia County Sheriff's
Office-is accepting applications
for the following positions:

L.P.N.
DETENTION OFFICER
DEPUTY SHERIFF
Applications will be accepted
on a continuous basis.
All applicants must have a high
school diploma or its equivalent
and be Florida State Certified in
their field. Applications may be
obtained at the Columbia
County Sheriff's Office
Operations Center at 4917 East
U. S. Hwy. 90 or on-line at
www.columbiasheriff.org
The C.C.S.O. is an
EEO Employer


04543743
Ladies and Gentleman
if you have A Class A CDL,
we have a Lease/with a lease
purchase plan.
We accept PTD! Certified
students. O/Operators. No
New England States, 100%
fuel surcharge. Carolinas to
the great NW!
Call today to join us!
Buel Inc
866-369-9744

McDonald's of Alachua is seek-
ing qualified management candi-
dates to join our team. Wages
range from $9 to $15 per hr, based
on exp., competitive benefits
apply online at
www.mcstate.com/alachua or fax
resume to 386-155-2435








Home Improvements

Carpentry, remodeling, paint,
repairs, additions, Lic. & Ins.
Since 1978 FREE estimates
386-497-3219 or 954-649-1037

Lawn & Landscape Service

Clean Pine Straw,
You pick it up, $1.85 a bale,
delivery 100 bales, $285,
386-688-9156

Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.


G=M=


Lake City, FL 32025-2007
Phone (386) 7544314
Fax (386) 754-4814
E-Mail: humair(@fqgcedu
'C1 i acredited b Ihrc ConiC n sin onr n ,) Cnllegei iof
vl Ao9,riir rA ,ou C on(ll e ,ie s and ScOaoin
VI`ADA;[LA 0 OCollege I I]du'awio ;uW


100 Job
10 Opportunities

04543759
Join our family of
caring professionals!




Community Education
Manager
Responsible for assisting in
planning and coordinating
special projects and events to
provide Hospice Education
throughout the service area.
Minimum of a Bachelor's
degree with at least 3 to 5 years
experience and a proven track
record within the development
services arena.
Job summary as well and
application can be found at:
www.hospiceofcitruscounty.org
email:
hr(ahospiceofcitruscountv.org
Hospice of the Nature Coast
P.O. Box 641270
Beverly Hills, FL 34464
Fax: 352-527-9366
DFWP/EOE

04543812
Family Services Analyst
Non-Profit organization is
seeking highly motivated
professional for
VPK/School Readiness/Parent
Education Position. Experience
in Social Services or related
field preferred salary
$9.62-$ 12.98 plus benefits.
Fluently Bilingual in
English/Spanish preferred
Send resumes by
February 14, 2011 to:
Early Learning Coalition
Attn: HR, 1104 SW Main Blvd
Lake City, FL 32025 or fax to
386-752-8094

05524962
Comcast Outside Sales
Contractor T'or Comcast needs
outside sales reps to sell
cable to homeowners.
Earn $600+ weekly, will train.
Call 904-405-2210

05525200
Field Service Technician,
Service medical equipment in
North Florida,
established company, will train,
knowledge of electricity a plus,
Send resume to
PO Box 494273
Port Charlotte, FL 33949

05525235
Automotive/RV Warranty
Writer-Administrator
Travel Country RV is looking
for a warranty writer or service
writer experienced in automo-
bile or RV warranty writing or
administration. Some account-
ing knowledge and excellent
computer skills required.
Applicant must be able to work
closely with service technicians,
administrative and sales
personnel. Competitive salary
and benefits. Fax resume to:
Travel Country RV
386-755-5170 attn:Ron Fleming
or e-mail to
ron@travelcountryrv.com
All inquiries will be kept in
strict confidence

Assistant Manager Needed
Fast Track Foods is looking for a
full time Asst Mgr with experience
in convenience store industry for
our Lake City location. Call 866-
539-7685 ext 43 or fax resume to
Tammy at 352-333-1161

AVON!!!, EARN up to 50%!!!
Only $10 for Starter Kit,
1-800-275-9945 pin #4206
www.youravon.com/tdavies


FLORIDA
GATEWAY
COLLEGE
(Formerly Lake City Community College)
ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR,
GRAPHIC DESIGN, GAMING, AND
SIMULATION
164 Duty Days Tenured Track
to Commence Fall 2011
Teach a variety of courses in the
Computer Science Department to
include digital media, gaming, and
computer programming. Minimum
Qualifications: Master's Degree in
Graphic Design, Computer
Programming, Instructional Systems
or related field with emphasis on
gaming and simulation. Demonstrated
background and understanding in the
application of software in the areas of
design, web, interactive media, game,
audio, and video. Desirable
Qualifications: Doctorate in Graphic
Design, Computer Programming,
Instructional Systems or related field
with emphasis on gaming and
simulation. Demonstrated skills in
Maya, Motion capture, 2D and 3D
computer modeling and animation.
Salary: Based on Degree and
Experience
Application Deadline: 3/18/11
Persons interested should provide
College application, vita, and
photocopies of transcripts. All foreign
transcripts must be submitted with
official translation and evaluation.
Position details and applications
available on web at: www.fgc.edu
Human Resources
Florida Gateway College
149 S.E. College Place


100 Job
Opportunities
CDL A Flatbed/Van Truck
Driver needed for F/T OTR SE
area, 3 years exp or more, Contact
Melissa or Mary @ 386-935-2773
Hiring Locally This Week
Liberty National Life
Insurance Company
Full Training Provided Potential
of $60K+ Annually. 401K, BCBS
Insurance & Pension for those who
Qualify. Call 1-800-257-5500 -
to set up an interview.
Groundman/Truck driver for tree
work. Class "B" CDL w/air
breaks. Part Time/work available
Clean driving record,
386-963-5026, Drug Test.
Mobile Waiters Needed-
Immediate interviews, Make your
own schedule, Flexible hours,
Avg $40-$50 per 3-5 hr. shift!
Must have own vehicle,
Be 21 years old &
Have cell phone w/texting,
Call 888-DDI-WORK ext 1
SECURITY OFFICERS
FT/PT, Great Pay and Benefits.
Lake City/Alachua Area.
Must have Sec. Lic., clean
background, pass drug screen.
Call: 866-458-9523 EOE
Subway is now hiring.
Management Experience a plus.
Send resumes to:
lakecitymanager@yahoo.com
Tire Tech/Serv Truck Operator
Exp w/car, truck, tractor tire re-
pairs. Clean DL req'd. Avail for
night & weekend calls. Pay based
on exp. Apply at Thomas Tire
CR 25A. 386-752-8648
Wanted Highly motivated
individual for Sales Position.
Rountree -Moore Ford Lincoln
Mercury Great benefits, paid vaca-
tion. Exp. a plus but not necessary.
Call Chris. @ 386-755-0630

120 Medical
120 Employment

04543770
Advent Christian Village
call 658-5627 or visit www.ac-
villae.net
24 hrs/day, 7 days/week
Be your BEST,
Among the BEST
Laundry Supervisor FT
Long-term care setting; HSD
or equivalent desired; prior
laundry and supervisory
experience strongly desired.
Position leads institutional
laundry service; flexible hours
with weekend shift rotation
required Must work
cooperatively in a team setting.
Accounting A/R/
Supervisor FT
HSD or equivalent required; AA
degree or certificate in
accounting, medical billing, or
relevant field strongly desired.
Prior experience in insurance
billing and coding, accounting,
supervision, PC operation with
MS applications, including word
processor, spreadsheet, and
database required.
Therapeutic Activities
Coordinator FT
Must be creative, energetic, a
self starter, and enjoy working
with elderly and demeptia
patients in LTC setting. HSD or
equivalent required. Knowledge
of LTC regulations
required. Bachelor's in health-
care, social service, or related
field desired. Prior relevant
experience desired.

Patient-Centered Healthcare
FT/PT
RN/LPN/CNA/Resident Aide
Valid FL license/certificate.
required for RN/LPN & CNA.
Medical Mgmt training required
for Resident Aide. All positions
in LTC & ALF. Knowledge of
FL regs & prior relevant
experience helpful. Must be
committed to team approach &
compassionate care.
Benefits include health, dental,
life, disability, supplemental
insurance; 403b retirement
account; paid time off, access to
onsite daycare and fitness
facilities. Apply in person at
Personnel Office Monday
through Friday from 9:00 a.m.
until 4:00 p.m., or fax
resume/credentials to
(386)658-5160.
EOE/DFW /Criminal
background checks required.
Excellent work environment.

Infusion Nurses needed PRN IN
Swannnee,Columbia,
Hamilton,Dixie, and Bradford
County 352-244-0216


ARE YOU OUR MISSING PIECE?


I Conoforrahle
wiorL
en ,ironmeni




Opporlunilies




Apply Online or In Person!


SiTEL


Your ',kills
.. ) and
)ositie arllitude


Recognition



1152 SW Business Point Dr
Lake City, FL 32025
386.754.8562
www.sitel.com EOE


120 Medical
120 Employment

04543804
Occupational Therapist/
Occupational Therapy
Assistant
Hiring F/T licensed OT or
COTA in Jasper; $5,000 Bonus!
Call Jennifer at 888-531-2204 or
janderson@fprehab.com

05525260
Medical Assistant,
Exp only need apply! Looking
for qualified indiv., quick learn-
er, good personality,dependable
Fax resume to: Cheryl
386-754-3657 or email to:
office manager@
primarycaremedic.com

05525265



Meridian Behavioral
Healthcare, Inc.
www.mbhci.org

Please visit our website to view
current open opportunities
and to apply online:

Therapists:
Licensed, or Master's Level
in Outpatient
Bachelor's-Level in
Counselor Support
Case Management
(adult & child)
Prevention

Administration
Director of Human
Resources
Director of Development
Director of Finance &
Accounting
VP of IT
Program Manager -
Outpatient
Program Manager -
Addictions
Medical Services
Psychiatrist
CSU RN Nursing Manager
ARNP (Psych, exp, Child Pref)
RN, LPN, C.N.A.
Recovery Specialist
(Direct Care)

Meridian is an active partner
with the National Health
Service Corps

To see our current openings in
Mental Health and to apply
online, please go to:
www.mbhci.ore
EOE, DFWP, E-Verify

AMIkids Family Services Program
seeks Case Managers for
community based program work-
-ing w/ at risk youth & '
families. Bachelor's degree req'd.
Req's travel to 7 counties.
Fax resume to 386.362.0932.

Ultrasound Technician
for primary care office, PRN
Fax. Resume to
386-462-9278

240 Schools &
2 Education

04543680
Interested in a Medical Career?
'Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-03/28/10

Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-04/11/11

Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com


310 Pets & Supplies

PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.


361 Farm Equipment

84 Ford 4610 Tractor. Runs good.
Solid 2WD. New front tires,
350hr on 2005 motor. Dependable.
$7500. obo. 386-867-0005


0552.1728
SPRING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans;
some with garages.
Call 386-454-1469
or visit our website:
www.springhillvillage.net


- ADvantage


401 Antiques

CASH CASH CASH CASH
Pre 1964 Silver Coins, Sterling,
Flatware, Costume Jewelry,
Unusual Antiques. 386-963-2621


407 Computers

DELL COMPUTER
$100.
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170


408 Furniture

Captain's Bed twin size with
mattress. It has 6 drawers and a
cubby underneath. Oak. $250 obo
386-963-1296


420 Wanted to Buy

K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.

Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$250 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.


430 Garage Sales












PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.

SAT. 8-? 41 S. turn left on 131C,
follow signs, home interior,
household items, rug,
kitchen, purses, etc.


440 Miscellaneous
2002 EZ Go Golf Cart
w/like new 5x8 trailer.
$1000.
SOLD
King Comforter Set. Shams,
bedskirt, 3 designer pillows.
French Country design.
Excellent condition. Paid $250
Asking $65.386-454-4947
New Central A/C, still in box,
with full ten year factory warranty
$1,795
Call 386-364-1090
Tow Behind Grill/Smoker
$1,250 OBO.
386-249-3104 or
Akg386-719-48025-

6/3 a Mobile Homes
0itf for Rent

14 Wide, 2/2-$475. mo. + dep.
Clean, Quiet Country Park
Water, septic, garbage included
758-2280 References, NO PETS!

2&3 BR MH. $395 $650. mo.
plus deposit. Water & sewer fur-
nished. Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422

3/2 MH 1064 sq ft,remodeled in
small/quiet park, near FGC, Small
pets ok, $500 dep $500 mo
386-752-1971 or 352-281-2450
3BR/2BA Doublewide on 1 ac.
Lg. Rooms. $750 a month.
1st month and full security.
Please call 386-965-7534.
A very clean & well maintained
2/2 units in nice park. $599.mo
w/$500. dep. Rent includes water,
sewer, trash p/u. Close to town
386-984-8448 or 623-7547
DWMH. Lg. newer 3/2 on 1 ac.
Porch, carport & fenced yard.
Some pets ok. Ellisville area.
$850. mo, $650. sec 386-752-5450
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White Contact 386-623-2465
or 386-623-3404







e640 Mobile Homes
6 0 for Sale

$216 a month remodeled,
like new. 2Bd/2Ba S Wide
Delivered & blocked, appliances,
A/C $2500 down, 8 year fin.
Possible owner financing. Ready
now. Call Gary 386 758-9824
05525133
Palm Harbor Homes
Has 3 Modular Homes
Available at HUGE Savings
Over 40K Off
Call Today! 800-622-2832


710 Unfurnished Apt.
For Rent









LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, MARCH 6, 2011


710 RUnfurnished Apt.
7 For Rent

DEPOSIT AS LOW AS $89 +
$200 OFF!!
BEST PRICES IN TOWN!
Windsong Apts.
386-758-8455
1, 2 & 3 Bedroom Apartments
& Mobile Homes
starting at $350 per month
386-755-2423
2/1 Apt in duplex for rent, very
clean. $585 mo. w/$585 dep. no
pets, w/carport, off Branford Hwy
(5 miles from town) 386-752-7578
A Landlord You Can Love!
2 br Apts $575. & up + sec. Great
area. CH/A washer/dryer hookups.
386-758-9351/352-208-2421
Brandywine Apartments
Now Renting
1, 2 and 3 bedrooms
Central Heat and Air
Ph. 386-752-3033
W. Grandview Ave. 32055
Equal Housing Opportunity
Great location W of 1-75, spacious
deluxe 2BR apts., garage, W/D
hook up. patio. $600 & up, + SD,
386 965-0276
The Lakes Apts. Studios & 1Br's
from $135/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $525. + sec.
Call Michelle 386-752-9626
72 Furnished Apts.
720 For Rent
New furnished studio apt in a
home, private entrance & bath,
incl all utilities, trash, cable, frig
and pest control. $450 mo + dep;
immediate avail. 386-752-2020
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly.
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

730 Unfurnished
Home For Rent
3/2 on 2.1 acres, 2 car garage,
ceramic tile, front & rear porches,
$995 mo, plus 2 mo sec.
Lease with the option to buy
386-758-9996 or 386-365-5434
3/2, fenced back yard, nice
neighborhood, near CHS.
$800 per month.
386-623-2848
3BR/1.5BA. BLOCK HOME.
Fenced (privacy) back yard.
Nice area. $825. mo $825. dep.
References req'd. 386-364-2897
3br/2ba new const.in nice S/D
Lease Opt. to buy. $900/Mo. $700
Dep, + 1st & last Req'd., Credit
Check No Pets (386)755-9476
Attractive 3br/2ba Brick home.
Excellent location View of
Lake Montgomery. No Pets.
$950. mo. 386-965-0763
Close to Wellborn, nice & cozy
2/1, very private,
$625 mo, sec dep $500, app fee,
call 386-935-1482
House for rent. Everything new.
4br/2ba plus study. Carport. Great
neighborhood. $1000 mo last plus
security. 386-867-2283
Sale/Rent 3br/2ba w/front deck &
Ig Florida room, garage & out
bldgs, 9 beautiful fenced ac. 1st
mo + sec. Wellborn 386-754-0732
TOWNHOUSE 2br plus
bonus room. w/1.5 bath.
Quail Heights CC. $750. mo plus
$250 damage dep. 386-752-8553
750 Business &
750v Office Rentals
1200 sq ft Professional Office
Space, across from Courthouse,
newly remodeled, 152 N Marion
$650 mo 386-867-4995 / 961-8466
OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$695. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor



| Walpole, Inc. is
looking for Class
A-CDL drivers with
2 years OTR
driving experience
and clean MVR.
Full benefits
package available.
800-741-6500
Or apply online
www.walpoleinc.com




Honie~cile


770 Condos For Rent

(54 3782
Golf Course Condo for rent,
2BR/2BA, 1420 s.f., $1200/mo.
Rent includes all appliances,
basic cable, water/sewer/
garbage, pool & tennis ct.
access. Realtor/owner
call 386-344-0433.


790 Vacation Rentals
Horseshoe Beach Spring Special
Gulf Front 2br home, w/lg water-
front porch, dock, fish sink.
-Avail wkends. $345. or wk $795.
(352)498-5986/386-235-3633

805 Lots for Sale
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1,-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.


810 Home for Sale

2/1,on nearly an acre, living/dining
rm, kitchen nook, util rm, fenced,
back porch,2 car carport close to
town, $60,000 386-754-5818

3/2 w/garage, needs TLC, great lo-
cation, owner financing, $2000 dn,
$701 mo.,352-215-1018
www.LandQwnerFinancing.com
BANK OWNED ON-SITE
Real Estate Auction
Live Oak
1223 S. Ohio Ave.
5br/3ba. 3296 sqft. on .36 acres
Sale Date: Sal. Mar 19 at 12 noon.
FREE COLOR BROCHURE
www.AuctionServicesIntl.com
Jay Lloyd AU2073/AB1172
Owner Fin., 3/2 on 2.5 acres, fish
pond, N of Lake City, sm down
$675 mo, 386-590-0642/867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com


Bring the picture in or
we will take it for you!
* Ad runs 10 consecutive days
with a description and photo in the
newspaper and online E-edition.
* Ad runs 10 consecutive days as a
classified line ad online.
* You must include vehicle price.
* All ads are prepaid.
* Private party only.
.



2006 EF250
Ford Van
3/4 ton, metal work
shelves/ladder rack,
60K miles, exc. cond.
$10,500
Call
386-555-5555
If you don't sell your vehicle
during the first 10 days, you
can run the same vehicle ad
for 10 additional days for
only $15.00
Terms and conditions remain the
same for the additional run.



Mayor Bidge


820 Farms &
2 Acreage
10 ac lots, some w/well, septic, pwr
pole. Lowered prices. Owner finance
w/low dn pmnt Deas Bullard Proper-
ties 386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com
4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$69,900. $613mo 352-2.15-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
4 acres, Wellborn, New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down, $39,900, $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com

940 Trucks






To place your
classified ad call
755T-5440


PLAY TO WIN!


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MARDI GRAS


REAPS


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Lake City Reporter





LIFE


Sunday, March 6, 2011


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section D


GARDEN TALK


Nichelle Demorest
dndemorest@ufl.edu

Warm

weather

springs

colors

t may be that time
again for love bugs
and yellow pollen
I to coat your car and
ignite your allergies.
But take a second and con-
sider what else arrives with
warm weather; an explo-
sion of life, a kaleidoscope
of spring color, and a joyful
exhibition of nature.
Two beautiful native
trees that are joining in this
spring celebration are the
flowering dogwood and the
redbud.
Both are small trees that
are found growing in rich
hammock soils in north
Florida.
These trees are used
often in the home land-
scape as specimens, in bor-
ders, or in small spaces.
The flowering dogwood
is a small tree with a sym-
metrical shape.
It can be grown in full
sun or in lightly dappled
shade. Not only is it lovely
in the spring with its snowy
white flower bracts, but it
enhances the fall landscape
as well.
Autumn leaves turn red
and yellow, and the attrac-
tive red berries are enjoyed
by birds.
The tree blooming now
with lavender blossoms is
one of my all time favorites,
the redbud tree.,
Yes, the redbud has
lavender flowers, not red
ones.
The early blooms appear
along the dark branches
before the leaves.
In full bloom, it makes a
striking silhouette of grace-
ful lavender branches.
The redbud has all-sea-
sonal interest in the land-
scape.
Spring blossoms are
followed by large heart
shaped leaves which turn
yellow in the fall.
The irregular shape of
this low branched tree is an
attractive silhouette in the
winter.
The Callery pear is a
dense, oval tree with white
spring blooms. Although
it's not a native, this small
tree does'well in our soils
and is drought tolerant
The leaves first emerge
with a bronze tinge after
the flowers have faded.
They are a dark glossy
green through the summer,
turning purple in the fall.
The best known and
most often planted cultivar
is the 'Bradford' Callery
Pear.
There are other culti-
vars, however, such as
'Aristocrat', 'Capitol' and
'Autumn Blaze' with much
stronger branch angles.
Visit http://edis.ifas.ufl.
edu/topiclandscapetree-
varieties for UF publica-
tions on Landscape Trees
from A-Z.
Call the UF/IFAS Master
Gardeners with your gar-
dening questions at 752-
5384.

* D. Nichelle Demorest is
a horticulture agent with the
Columbia County Extension
of the University of Florida
Institute of Food and
Agricultural Sciences.


COURTESY PHOTO


Corey Wilson (left) and his sister, Caitlyn Wilson, strike a pose while working in the clinic in Pinon, Haiti, in July.


I


I


Fort White HS grad helps rebuild lives again


BY C.J. RISAK
crisak@lakecityreporter.com
C orey Wilson recalls
when his interest was
initially riveted by
Haiti.
"I remember in the
back of our church, there was a
poster on the board saying they
were looking for volunteers to
help the people in Haiti," Wilson
said. "I was intrigued by Haiti. I
could see the need the people had
in the pictures."
. Still, Wilson was just 13 years-
old. The question was, would they
allow him to go?
"I thought I could help," the
2005 Fort White HS graduate
said.
Wilson made the trip. He made
it again the next year during
spring break, and the next, when
he was 14 and 15. After taking.
a few years off to devote to his
studies, Wilson made a return
trip last spring with his sister,
Caitlyn.
And on Saturday, Wilson, who
is currently in his second year of
niedical school at the University
of Florida, will go once again
to try and help the Haitians,
although this time he'll be part
of the University of Florida's
Foundation for Global Health and
Project Haiti, which has been in
operation since 1995, sending
groups annually except the year
of the earthquake.


COURTESY PHOTO
Corey Wilson treats a Haitian boy with a foot injury during his trip to the
island last July. Foot injuries are prevalent among the population due to lack
of proper footware.


His trips have revealed some-
thing that, a decade ago, would
not have occurred to him. Call it
self-discovery.
"The Haitian people are so
resilient," Wilson said when
asked how attitudes had changed
on the island post-earthquake.
"They never really get down
about anything.
"They have so much they could
complain about, but they never
do. That's when I realized they've
actually helped me more than I


helped them."
It was a difficult concept,
Wilson said, finding that a coun-
try of such poverty could offer
something to someone coming
from a country of abundance.
"I've been fortunate," he said.
"It's not what you have, but what
you can give, what you believe in
and who you are as a person.
'They have a much better
understanding of that than we
have."
This year will be different for


Wilson. In the past, he's done a
lot of construction work; this year,
hell concentrate on medical.
"I hope I can help," he said.
"I'm only a second year medical
student, and this is the first year
I've been on a medical trip.
"I hope my ability to interact
with the Haitian people will help."
Technically, he won't be trav-
eling to Haiti. His previous trips
have been to a small village
called Pinon. But the university-
sponsored trip can't go to Haiti
due to a U.S. travel bah. Instead,
they'll set up camp in La
Descubierta in the Dominican
Republic.
From there, the 28-person
team of college students will fan
out in mobile labs aboard two
trucks, traveling from one town
to the other, spending a day at
each.
"We have 40 duffel bags filled
with medications," he said. "It's
probably the only medical atten-
tion they'll receive for the next
year."
The medical needs of the
Haitians are numerous, but
among the more prevalent are
foot injuries.
"They do so much walking,
and they have no proper foot-
ware," said Wilson.
The 10- to 12-day trip figures
to include long work days, very
labor intensive. But Wilson
said it'll be well worth the trip
- again.


Palace keeps wedding gown secret so far


By GREGORY KATZ
Associated Press
LONDON Fashion Week
has .come and gone, the carnival
is moving on to Paris and Milan,
and still there has been no clarity
on the pressing issue of the day:
Who, exactly, is designing Kate
Middleton's wedding gown?
Some of the people who are not
designing the dress stepped for-
ward after their London catwalk
shows to say so including punk


priestess Vivienne Westwood and
Christopher Bailey of Burberry
- but no one has come forward
to say they are the one.
More surprisingly, perhaps,
the word has not leaked out, even
in the gossipy fashion world. A
few hundred journalists, several
dozen designers and legions of
overdressed fashion types have
just spent six days together drink-
ing buckets of free champagne
and icy vodka cocktails at various
parties and receptions, but no one


seems to have spilled the beans.
Bob Woodward and the brass
at the Washington Post pro-
tected Deep Throat's identity for
decades, but Buckingham Palace
only has to protect this secret for
another 70 days qr so to allow
Middleton to achieve her stated
goal of surprising Prince William,
and the rest of the world, when
she walks down the aisle in her
mystery gown.
She just might pull it off if
the chosen one can resist the


natural impulse to boast a bit to
his or her closest friend, with the
whispered admonition not to tell
a soul, a tactic that would likely
lead to worldwide disclosure
within days.
Caroline Rush, chief executive
of the British Fashion Council
that stages Fashion Week, said it
is not surprising that the informa-
tion has been tightly held.
"Whoever has the honor will
be sure not to leak it, that's the
agreement," she said.









LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, MARCH 6, 2011


Don't be anxious to prune plants too soon


here is an old
horticultural
saying, "prune
whenever the
knife is sharp,"
which would indicate that
anytime is an appropriate
time to prune any plant.
This, of course, is not true..
After a cold winter like we
are having, some people
get too anxious to prune
what they think is dead
wood.
Plants that are margin-
ally cold hardy in our
area may be damaged by
temperatures below 30
degrees, but they may not
be killed.
Some branches may
be brown and look like
they are completely dead.
Starting in late January or
early February, we can get
temperatures that often
go up and down so that is
28 degrees-one night with
low 60s during the day
and then there are a few
days in the 70s with.40s at
night In fact, it can seem
like spring all of a sudden
in February, yet our aver-
age last frost date is mid-


March. On the nice days,
out come the pruners with
people pruning all those
dead-looking branches.
A good way to check if
a branch is dead is to use
a thumbnail to slightly
scrape through the bark
to see if there is live green
wood inside. If so, the
branch at that point is not
dead.
Only prune off branch
tips that are brown on
the inside and show no
signs of life. 'Another fool-
proof way to prune, is to
wait until the plant starts
to grow so one can see
where the new growth is
coming along the branch;
then prune the dead area
above that point.
* Even herbaceous peren-
nial plants that seem like
they are completely dead
may have live roots, and
they may come back. An
example is lantana ground
cover.
The tops of the plant
that had the flowers all
spring, summer, and fall
get winter killed making
the plant look dead. If one


John Piersol
john.piersol@fgc.edu
started pulling the plants
out, live roots would be
evident The best tech-
nique is to leave the dead
tops on the plant until one
sees green new growth at
the bottom of the plant
Then, prune all the dead
tops and discard them and
allow the plant to grow.
In severe winters, some
lantanas may be complete-
ly killed, but not usually.
I have had plants "come
back'from the dead" for
over five years and live to
, provide me with another
growing season of colorful
blooms.
Lantana is a drought
tolerant groundcover that
provides color for an entire
growing season until cold
temperatures finally kill


the tops. Lantana is an
environmentally friendly
plant in that it needs little
water and fertilizer and is
resistant to insects and dis-
eases. The varieties "New
Gold" and "Gold Mound"
are especially good.
Plants like crape myrtle
are deciduous, so they lose
all of their leaves in winter
as a natural occurrence.
Crape myrtle can be
pruned as a shrub or a
tree-form, and there are
dwarf varieties that can be
used as a hanging basket
plant.
Incorrect pruning of*
crape myrtles is a big
,point of aggravation for
horticulturists.
Too often people drasti-
cally prune crape myrtle
branches back to stubs
which ruins the natural
growth habit of the plant
whether it is meant to be a
large shrub or a tree.
The stubbed branches
do not die, but the ends of
the branches callus over
and numerous sucker
branches are produced
from the callused area.


Crape myrtles flower on
new wood, so new growth
develops in spring fol-
lowed by blooms on the
ends of that growth in
summer.
Summer flowering
plants usually flower on
new wood. So the stubbed
crape myrtles produce
numerous sucker branch-
es that then flower, and
the flowers on the ends of
the weak branches droop
over.
This may be a desired
effect in certain situations
where one wants that look,
but usually it destroys
the growth habit of a nice
shrub, and it definitely
ruins a tree-form.
So, why do people con-
stantly stub crape myrtles?
I think it is just because
they have seen other
people do it without know-
ing why. -
I have seen many nice
crape myrtles "butchered"
which is especially hurtful
'when this is done to a nice
tree.
Pruning is part horticul-


ture and part art.
It takes an artful eye
and an understanding of
the design intent for the
plant to be pruned prop-
erly.
Determining what is
dead wood and what is not
is also important.
When in doubt, ask a
horticultural professional
for help or check the book-
stores for pruning books.
The Cooperative
Extension Service has
many free publications on
pruning many of which
can be seen online now by
going to www.ifas.ufl.edu.
Keeping your pruning
equipment sharp is impor-
tant, but just because the
knife is sharp, it does not
mean it is time to prune.

John R. Piersol is the -
director of golf and land-
scape operations at Florida
Gateway College, where he
has been since 1974. He
has a bachelor's in plant
science from the University
of Delaware and a master's
in horticulture from Colorado
State University.


ENGAGEMENTS


Michelle Lynn Godsmark and Trav

Green Godsmark
Wayne and Joann
Godsmark and Dennis and
Deborah Lee announce
the engagement and
approaching marriage of
their daughter, Michelle
Lynn Godsmark, to Travis
"Aaron" Green.


vis Green.

He is the son of Betty
Hamilton and Earl and
Wanda Green.
The wedding is 3 p.m.
Saturday, March 19,
2011 at Christ Central
Ministries in Live Oak.
Close family and
friends are invited to
attend.


COURTESY PHOTO
Dorrie Alyssa Sloan and James Michael Albritton Jr.

Sloan Albritton
Dori and Debra Sloan of Lake City announce the
engagement and approaching marriage of their daugh-
ter, Dorrie Alyssa Sloan of Lake City, to James Michael
Albritton Jr. of Lake City.
He is the son of Jamie and Kim Albritton of Lake City
and James and Sonia Edgley of Lake Butler.
The bride-elect is a 2005 graduate of Columbia High
School, and works as a hairstylist for Melanie Co.
The future groom is a 2007 graduate from Columbia
High School and works as a firefighter/EMT for
Columbia County Fire Department.
The wedding is planned for 5:30 p.m. Saturday, April,
2, 2011.


Book

explores

origins

of kissing

By LEANNE ITALIE
Associated Press
NEW YORK Birds
do it. Bees do it. No, not
that! We're talking about
kissing, the simple ges-
ture with a wallop that
spans time and place but
remains largely unex-
plained.
Anthropologists have
their theories. So do
neurologists, biologists,
psychologists and endp-
crinologists. Einstein, was
interested. Darwin, too.
So why doesn't anybody
know how it all began
and why we do it in the
first place?
Sheril Kirshenbaum,
a researcher at the
University of Texas at
Austin, has compiled a
motherlode of fragment-
ed studies and observa-
tions from historians
and sociologists, brain
experts and animal-
watchers in a surpris-
ingly slim and definitely
curious new book, '"The
Science of Kissing: What
Our Lips Are Telling Us."
Her conclusion?
Inconclusive.
The act of "osculation"'
in technical parlance
is ingrained in more
than 90 percent of cul-
tures around the world.
If they don't place lips on
lips or lips elsewhere
they lick or nibble
with the same goals in
mind.
If we could unravel its
origins, Kirshenbaum
surmises, we could
unlock a trove of evolu-
tionary and physiological
mysteries that might
carry the kiss from
merely interesting to
incredibly valuable.


BIRTH


Brandtley Tate
Bass

ScottandKimberlyBass
of Lake City announce
the birth of their son,
Brandtley Tate Bass,
Feb. 14 at North Florida
Regional Women's Center
in Gainesville.
He weighted 7 pounds,
12 ounces and measured
20 inches.
He joins siblings: Dylan
Bass, 15; Kelsey Bass, .12;
Seth Register, 11; and
Gage Register, 8.
Grandparents are
Claudia Bass and the
late Jamie W. Bass and
Margie and Theo St. John
all of Lake City.


Tiffany Ann Torrans and Jonathan Kyle Malone.

Torrans Malone
Al and JoAnn Torrans of Lake City
announce the engagement and approach-
ing marriage of their daughter, Tiffany
Ann Torrans of Tallahassee, to Jonathan
Kyle Malone of Tallahassee.
He is- the son of Kevin Malone
of Atlanta, Ga. and Diane Miller of
Tallahassee.
The bride-elect is a 1997 graduate
of Coluinbia High School and received
a Doctorate of Optometry from Nova
Southeastern University in 2004. She
is currently employed at Palmer Eye


COURTESY PHOTO


Center of Tallahassee and involved in
the Junior League and Extra Point Club
in Tallahassee.
The future groom is a 1996 gradu-
ate of Wayne County High School in
Jbssup, Ga. and attended Valdosta
State University. He is co-owner of
More Space Place in Tallahassee and
involved in the Tallahassee Chamber of
Commerce.
The wedding is planned for 7 p.m.
Saturday, March 19 at Epiphany Catholic
Church. A reception will follow at the
Columbia County Fairgrounds Banquet
Hall.


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ENGAGEMENT


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Page Editor: Roni Toldanes,.754-0424










LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & CROSSWORD SUNDAY, MARCH 6, 2011


DEAR ABBY


Tasty temptations can be


deadly to pets and kids


DEAR ABBY: In our
family, pets are irreplace-
able, full-fledged, beloved
members. One of them
was a beautiful, very affec-
tionate cat we had rescued
as an abandoned kitten.
Tragically, he didn't make
it through an operation we
hoped would save his life.
His death was a needless
accident, and we are writ-
ing this in the hope that you
will print it to warn other
readers so no other animals
will die in a similar fashion.
' On the day before he
died, he suddenly stopped
eating and drinking. He be-
came lethargic and vomited
several times. Our vet di-
agnosed him with a bowel
obstruction. Apparently, he
had eaten a piece of a palm
from Palm Sunday. Unable
to pass through his system,
it had perforated his bowel.
The damage was too exten-
sive to fix.
,f The vet later told us
about many other items
he had removed through-
out his experience: Q-tips,
cotton balls, coins, twist
ties, string, buttons, Easter
grass, Christmas tree ici-


Abigail Van Buren
www.deorobby.com

cles, etc. Abby, please warn
your readers to pick up any-
thing that's small enough
for a pet to put in its mouth,
and to keep anything a pet
might be tempted to taste
out of reach. If you do, per-
haps our precious kitty's
death will not have been in
vain. IN MOURNING
IN PENNSYLVANIA
DEAR IN MOURN-
ING: I'm sorry about the
untimely'loss of your adored
pet. I, too, hope your letter
will alert pet owners as
well as parents and caregiy-
ers of small children.
. DEAR ABBY: Do
dreams have a meaning? I
have the same disturbing
dream over and over again.
It happens often. The sce-
nario is the same, but the
place in the dream varies.
I wake up .feeling anxious
and can't fall back to sleep.


Do you have any advice
or suggestion on what I can
do about this? You have
helped many people; can
you help me? SLEEP-
LESS IN KANSAS CITY
DEAR SLEEPLESS:
Some dreams have a "mean-
ing" others do not. Your
dream may be an attempt
by your subconscious to
work through something
in your life that you haven't
been able *to resolve con-
sciously, which is why the
dream is recurring. i
However, it's important
that you understand that
dreams usually aren'tliteral.
An example would be a per-
son who dreams he or she
is naked in a public place. It
could be caused by fear of
"exposure" of s9me secret,
or wish fulfillment having
completed a successful diet
and exercise program. Be-
cause the dream is causing
sleeplessness and anxiety, it
may help to discuss it with
a psychologist Just talking
about it may help the prob-
lem go away.


* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES,


AR
April
to ovi
the w
indulge
the p(
possil
a bus
flourish
know
TA
20):
or
others
to fin
that -
you h
some(
take c
own.
GE
June
chang
look,
lifesty
agenda
some
make!
A day
ease y
CA
July
little
the da
cons


UES (March 21-
19): You'll be inclined


THE LAST WORD


erreact or take things Eugenia Last
vrong way. Try not to nancial position in jeopardy.
ge in self-pity. Look at Don't feel you have to jump
possibilities, not the im- through hoops to impress
ble. Love, friendship or someone. **
siness partnership will LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):
sh if you offer what you You'll be feeling pretty good
you dobest. *** if you indulge in a physical
LURUS (April 20-May challenge that inspires, moti-
Don't give in to a bully vates and stimulates. Taking
manipulation. Letting part in a new experience, trip
s take over will lead or activity will bring you add-
ancial costs or delays ed confidence. Share your
vill stifle your plans. If plans and form new partner-
ave reservations about ships. A-*****.
one, back away and VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
care of matters on your 22): Put your time, energy,
love and compassion into
EMINI (May 21- dealing with the people you
20): Making personal care about most. Making
oes :to enhance your your home more conducive
your attitude or your' to your lifestyle will help you
le should be on your speed up your everyday rou-
[a. Don't overspend on tine but, before you make a
one or something that purchase, do your research.
s unrealistic promises. ,*
y trip or spa visit will LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct
our stress. **** 22): It's all about love, ro-
LNCER (June 21- mance, family, friends and
22): Too much or too your home. Have a fun day
will be the question of with the people you cherish.
ay. Weigh the pyos and The approval you receive
but don't put your fi- from others will result in

CELEBRITY CIPHER


by Luis Campos
Celebrty Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: S equals C
" P B J I J L JS ZAD P Y P Y LA\Z B J L Z
ZA EJOG JL PN.J MG T G IG GL J I Z EG
TC. KG-GVGY, MACYGL-E JPDGY
PLMGLKG I K I J LL JE VADR
PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "Writing is its own reward." Henry Miller "Why do
writers write? Because it isn't there." Thomas Berger
(c) 2011 by NEA, Inc. 3-7


financial and personal free-
dom. ***
SCORPIO (Oct 23-Nov.
21): Take time to flush out
an idea or work on a project
that will make your life bet-
ter. Be the one to take ac-
tion first and everyone who
counts will follow. Believe in
your ability.***
SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): Don't let
someone else's change of
plans throw you off-course.
Let a dispute pass without
retaliation. There is no point
in fighting a battle with some-
one who is not willing to com-
promise. Focus on those who
appreciate you. --*****
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-
Jan. 19): Don't over- or un-
derestimate anything or any-
one you care about. Looking
at whatever you face honestly
is the only way you can possi-
bly come out unscathed. Rely
on your past to help you make
the right choice now. **
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18); Do for others
what has been done for you
in the past. Offer your assis-
tance and understanding by
listening and giving encour-
agement. An interesting rela-
tionship will develop with the
potential for a serious com-
mitment. ****
PISCES (Feb. 19-
March 20): Don't take on
someone else's burden. It's
better to start fresh. Aggres-
sive action will be necessary.
Be prepared to face adversity
by relying on your versatility
to outmaneuver an opponent.


SUNDAY CROSSWORD


V-2 By Peter A. Collins / Edited by Will Shortz 11 12 13 14 1516 I 7 8 |9 110 Il 112 M 13 114 115 116 117 118 19


;. Across
1 Desert Storm
transports
8 Is sociable
13 Annoyed with
persistent petty
attacks
20 Qualify
21 Contest site
22 1994 Red Hot
Cliili Peppers
album
23 Rabbi or mullah
24 Like most
Western music
25 Went over
completely
26 March
27 John McCain and
John Kerry
30 Dog command
31 Gig Tor a deejay
33 Sped
34 For-EV-er
35 Steeplechase,
e.g.
36 Idle
38 Emulated a
hungry wolf
40 Common rolls
42 River crossed by
the Longfellow
Bridge
44 Clogs at the
bottom?
45 Arrive at by air
46 Repair shop figs.
47 British P.M. after
Lloyd George
49 Ward, to the
Beaver,
50 Payday, often:
Abbr.
For any three answers,
call from a touch-tone
phone: 1-900-285-5656,
1.49 each minute; or,
with a credit card, 1-800-
814-5554.


51 Crash-
investigating
org..
52 Striped stones
55 What "Arf!'Arf!"
or "Meow!" may
mean
57 "The Real World"
airer
60 2009 hit film
with subtitled
scenes
62 Earn
63 Word on either
side of "A"
66 Contributes
68 Transfer, as at a
nursery
70 "The Charge of
the Light
Brigade'." figure
72 Block component
73'"Wedding
Crashers" co-
star, 2005
76 Evolutionary
chart
.77 Key of Chopin's
"Polonaise-
Fantaisie"
79 Tina Fey and
.Amy Poehler,
once, on
"S.N.L."
80 "Spider-Man"
director
81 "Get lost!"
83 Ft. Collins
setting
84 Abbr: on a
currency
exchange board
85 Toy company
behind yo-yos
86 Entered carefully
88 Canyonlands '
National Park
features
90 Bands on the
run?


91 Aircraft control
surface
93 Good name for a
surveyor?
94 Some Muslims
95 Those near and
dear
98 Quality of new-
fallen snow.
101 "___ Pieces"
(Peter and
Gordon hit)
102 Congolese river
104 Nondemocratic
rule
105 Short answers?
106 Kind of scan,
for short
107 Keepers of the
flame?
111 E.R. readout
112 Old nuclear
watchdog: Abbr.
113 Dutch city ESE
of Utrecht
114 Toil
115 The Beavers of
the N.C.A.A.
116 QB's miscue
117 Newcastle-to-
London dir.
118 Play that
introduced the
word "robot"
119 Anathematic
120 Break, of a sort
121 Some Windows
systems

Down
1 Eighth Hebrew
letter
2 Discovers
3 Post-flood locale
4 The other way
around
5 Old verb ending
6 About 16,900 ft.,
for 3-Down


7 Letter's end?
, 8 The situation
9 Tree with very
hard timber
10 TV title character
who said "I'm
not an Amazon"
11 Covered, as
,cookware
12 Some gunfire
13 Overhead ___
14 Cadence
syllables
15 "Let's make
true Daily
Double"
16 Plant with purple
flowers
17 Name of 13
popes
18 Gold and silver,
but not bronze
19 ___ City, Fla.
28 Antiquity,
poetically
29 Demise
32 Course for new
U.S. arrivals
35 King on un trono
36 A-one service?
37 Setting for part
of 2005's
"Munich"
39 Royal name in
Norway
40 Use for skating
41 Break down
43 Infernal
45 Big name in
mustard
48 Sloppy, as a kiss
50 Sword: Fr.
53 -X
54 "Oh, joy!," e.g.,
typically
55 Inane
56 ___ Miller (Julie
Christie title
role with 57-
Down)


57 Warren Beatty
title role with
56-Down
58 Group with a
board of
governors
59 Weekly since
1955, with "The"
61 Type in again, as
a password
62 "After you"
63 Vessel seen just
below the
surface?


64 Hired gun, in
gang slang
65 Coils
67 Clotting agent
69 Plastic used in
piping
71 Subs
74 Marcel Marceau,
e.g.
75 [This makes me
mad!]
78 Satisfied, for a
while at least
80 #2's


82 Home recorder
85 Repair shop job
87T eetotaler
89 U.S.S.R. part:
Abbr.
90 What may help
one live and
learn?
92 Classic hair
removal brand
94 Catch some flies
95 Some beans
96'Meanies


97 Hack
98 Overly
caffeinated
99 Pooped
100 Some NCOs
103 "__
Enchanted"
(2004 film)
104 V
108 U.R.L. ender
109 Brewhouse
fixture
110 Code-breaking
grp.


Answers to last Sunday's Crossword.
YO UPAY ADREPS BR I NES
D Y NAMO PEOR A O CTOMOM
SLOP E D PALMED SASH IMI
ENAK EDLADIlES. G O.R AN
S MARR E A S SLYER A T
D0 G H N T L B E T I E
ST A EAST SUI GOAHEAD


TA BL CGODSEND AN TA
A SSE R EDB INER S T
I NT A LB |I DlAN T A


NU CR1I LEONI TIDILY

E N HAY E MT O L LT M

Mil ETlEl 0 LOMAN TVSET


T LARGE DEILRI BORDEN
A T RDE E I E ES ET


7 5 1


2 3


4 6 1 2 8


1 9 6


1 8 6 3


63 87


8 7 9 2


5 4 9 2


5 8 4


L 6 9 8 Z L6 V 9

S 91 6 9 L 17 L 6 81



L 8 L l iL8 9 6


9 6 CL,9 8 L 17


9 V Z C 6 L 9 8 L


8 9 LL 9176 S


6 9 L 9 8 8 L 9Z

6 Lt 16S88L9


Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415






4D LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE SUNDAY, MARCH 6,2011


To LAK CI RE E L S E s


Serta


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C & G MOBILE HOMES'
would like to thank all of

OUR WONDERFUL CUSTOMERS &

TOWN HOMES
(The only locally owned and built factory in Lake City)
For once again allowing C&G Mobile Homes to
be the #1 ranked dealership of sales of-manufactured
homes in the state of Florida for 5 years in a row.
Thanks to the hard work of Town Homes employees, C&G is
able to offer our customers, the highest quality at the best
prices with service second to no one.


TWO LOCATIONS TO SERVE YOU BETTER
Hwy 90 W Lake City Pinemount Rd
(Across from Wal-Mart) Lake City
386-752-3743 386-755-8885


4A 4-,- "











SUNDAY. MARCH 6, 2011


CLASSIC PEANUTS/ by Charles Schulz


GARFIELD/ by Jim Davis


00**












GRASPING DESPERATELY FOR ANY
WEAPON-A SPLIT SECOND FROM
THE DEATHBLOW- THE PRINCE'S
FINGERS CLOSE IN ON CRYSTALLINE
PARTICLES...


TO CONTRIBUTE


...SALT! HE HURLS IT IN THE BERSERKER'S
HOLLOW EYES...


&


I kkVEA. QUESTION I WNNT TO WK,6UT
VA AFRM 0 YOU'LL TRINK IT'5
_______ __. ~5TUP10,


- YOU 5A ou YOU WOULD PAk, AF
BACK FOR A N"( EAL
EXPENSES NERILE TI
WA ( KASONAKEWYOVK
\U5HE.55TR\P, WELL,
I |Fh >E, DUP GOING
TO A KNCKS GARE
MNO EATING& TICE,..


KEMAEABEF-. WRNAE I 5AI
TRIERE WANS NO SUCR TTIING
ro ,A A. STUPID QUESTION,,,


i 0*


and


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BRIAN
and
WALKER


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HAGAR THE HORRIBLE/ byDikBrowne


_ Wa/A.? "EC / TF FAMoAd ,
rArCHAP ? A VY FReppY", OY .


OM TH.IAT MEl.LOWO OVER

dir\ tegA


WiFHY1 He1 CALLEP
"FA^rT FREPPY"'?


FOR YfARg.95 //4 AP re
INcRE001. Ai/Iry 7VOKi A 6i~
.o QUc/ g oeseilfKiPV H


NOW NEsAS.E 7TO 6W A PIECE OF FRIED CPIlCKE
ANP OAT IT BEFORE 7 eio!7E i aNlO
-' ,r '^&OMe ,-n


5Y .EAN \I ulN JOHN M/ARSHAU=


B.C./ by Mastroianni & Hart


x2


I\JuubJL..


, ," / >K


t(o.


SHOE/ by Chris Cassatt & Gary Brookins


2011 King Features Syndicate Inc. World Rights Reserved.


* .


Mort Walker's

beetle

bailey


www.blondie.com


N
NUDGE.


I


DID YOU FALL
SOFFP THIS SAME
CLIFF A&AIN,
/ rSARGE


& kwcr--,


* *







FOXTROT/ by Bill Amend
0 0


REON
TETRAS ,









o
*O * .0 0.
BY- BUNNY- HOE -TAN --JOHN- REI- UI

RED 4 :
SWPORTAiLS _
LrP--'' **BM


DCKHORNS PUT A WHOLE NE
ON 'LOVE THINE ENEMIES.'"


PAIR ALREADY! THEY [ON7
TO MATCH YOUR OUTFIT!"


Co- 0
0. o


GUPPIES
I I 0.









BABY

^.<\0


*'. 8 6 a 0 .0


0o 0 .0 oC


CLOSE TO HOME/


DANG IT! YOU DON'T
EVERY TIME SUPPOSE THE
WE coME PET STORE
HERE, THAT iS MESSING
e=a = STUPID TANK WITH US,
IS EMPTY! Do YOUA
Sminuma \ .


by John McPherson


ONCE AGAIN, OUR FILMS "IN A THRILi-.g, A $N
WERi NOT APPRfClATD 15 TH9RORIZfD BY /
AND v DIDN'T WIN MO?--- IT'$ CA
4 AN ACADEMY gUyT W/e 6,
,- AkAgRD. / HAVe -


FOR gNXT
.. Y AR!
D OF "FINALL-Y, vW 6AVW A TOgY OF
AN ASTRONAUTS MAROONHD ON A PLANfET
Hf POPULATED ENTIRfLY Y SUP69KROE$...."
A ,- ,' -. ., - ^ "


"FASHION POLICE? LEROY NEEDS A FASHION SWAT TEAM."


GET FUZZY/ by Darby Conley
SAFTICLE N WHAT I'D REALLY RMHER
WHT' CAAANI PoE TAT NOT N SCUSS
THAT) LITEATURe. EcxoMise MAOtDEKN
m s rR THAM C AtAN
THE LEA<' UTeA.TURe
-I ?coRe / \, w 0<


WELLo, U I MAT
CAN'T tIDICUS R KSCT
SOMETIt N THIS, NUT
THAT OWA'T ..,NHAXT?
EX ST.





ECT. SEE. MOST HOT I
COURSE, PLACES BUILT
Of THEM CVILZATIONS A
Ke6P MA LN~ TIMe AGo
TTLE ANP TRUThFULLY,
KY NoIAI. e(1 NEED A I1T
OF A LIE PCMI.
bm&.i MIS
^^ W" c~l.^^
7NICym-Lr


fe1'S No Y lcN So?
AS MAODER
CANA1DWA
ANTThING,
MNT. TheR'K
ALL bTU C-K IN/ i
'THE PAST. K.



YOu'E A REAL Th-ImKINl
TRA\K TANK. IMUS
UNCERTAINTIY
I'M A
KNOW


w
la
A

14



R

s4
Af


"I'D PREFER NOT TO SHOW YOU THE CREDIT
CARD STATEMENT UNTIL YOU'VE HAD
YOUR MORNING COFFEE."


15Y.THAT LoGIC, EVRYT CO
WARM PLACE c~m c
AMTH IS MoKe / 6oST
A1VANC. THA Age
CAMNPK. A LA
CRAM<