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The Lake City reporter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01494
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 3/5/2011
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
System ID: UF00028308:01494
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text





Bouncing Back
Tigers notch 5-1 baseball
win over Riverview.
000014 120511 ****3-DIGIT 321
LIB OF FLORIDA HISTORY
PO BOX 117007
205 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-1943


*1'


Falling Short
Fort White baseball
tumbles in extra innings.
Sports, I B


Reporter


Saturday, March 5, 201 I


www.lakecitysrvorter.com


Vol. 137, No. 36 E 75 cents


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Five Points Elementary School second grader Darbie Thomas, 7, holds a sign urg-
ing Gov. Scott not to change state policy. At least 150 local educators gathered for
a rally along U.S. Highway 90.


I_ It j, Budget cuts: For and against


Opposing crowds
protest, support
governor's plan.
By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
Residents put democracy in
action Friday as about 200 of
them carried signs in Lake
City, some protesting and
others supporting Gov. Rick
Scott's plans to handle the
Florida deficit by requiring
state employees to contrib-
ute 5 percent of their sala-
ries to the Floi-ida Retirement
System.
More than 140 teachers
wore black shirts, chanted
slogans and solicited honks
from passing vehicles in front
of Walmart in Lake City to
signify their rejection of the
governor's plan. Among the
demonstrators were students
and state employees.
A smaller group, dressed in
patriotic colors, stood across


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Alex Alrikas of Live Oak shows his support for the North Central
Florida Tea Party and Gov. Scott's efforts to balance the state bud-
get. 'There has to be some reasonable give-in here,' Alrikas said.


the street on U.S. Highway 90
to support Scott's plan.
Kevin Doyle, president
of the Columbia Teacher
Association, said the teach-
ers attended the rally because
they recognized the gover-


nor's proposed budget cuts
would be harmful to the com-
munity.
"The 5 percent is not sup-
posed to fix the budget," Doyle
RALLY continued on 3A


Two arrested

in string

of home

burglaries
17 guns, more than
$10,000 worth of
properties recovered.

By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
Authorities have thwarted the opera-
tion of a local ring that thrived on resi-
dential burglaries, arresting two suspects
and recovering more than $10,000 worth
of stolen property, including 17 firearms,
officials said Friday.
Columbia County Sheriff's Office offi-
cials said additional arrests are expected.
BURGLARIES continued on 3A


Homeless

man charged

with homicide

Allegedly beat elderly
Wellborn man to death
with meat cleaver.
By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
WELLBORN A
homeless man has been 0 i
charged with using a
meat cleaver to beat an
elderly Wellborn man
to death, with robbery
as the apparent motive,
according to authorities. Worrell
Shane Scott Worrell, 37, was charged
with murder in the death of Robert B.
HOMICIDE continued on 3A


S HOWTIME IS HERE'


Home and Patio
Show opens today
at Fairgrounds.
By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
Terry Litteral,
Florida Gateway
Landscape and
Irrigation owner,
has become a
familiar face at the home and
patio show over the years.
"I keep (participating)
because I enjoy people and
like having the opportunity to
share my products and ser-
vices," he said.
Litteral will join more than
70 vendors at the Eighth
Annual North Florida Home
& Patio Show 9 a.m. to 5
p.m. today and 10 a.m. to 4
* p.m. Sunday at the Columbia
County Fairgrounds.
The show is presented by
the Rotary Club of Lake City
Downtown and co-sponsored
by the Lake City Reporter,
Sunstate Federal Credit Union
and Newman Media Inc.
It features a "fantastic" vari-
ety of home and patio-related
businesses that are local, in- -
state and out-of-state vendors,
said Mike Gordon, show
committee chairman. Bounce
houses will be available for
children to enjoy and barbe-
cue refreshments will be sold.
Businesses will have the
opportunity to interact with
people and help them with
their needs at the show, said
Jim Allen, owner of Pool &
Spa works. It also is a great
opportunity for attendees to
see many local businesses.
"Most local businesses have
been around for a number of
years and are interested in


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Above: Morrell's Home Furnishings employees Casey Walker (left) and Landon Moorehead hold up oak
cabinets, which co-owner David Morrell (center) drills into place while setting up for the Home & Patio
Show.
Below: Bath Fitter employees Mike Gallo (left) and Casey Harter wipe down a shower display. 'This is
our first time attending,' Gallo said. 'It's our bread and butter.'

serving the local community,"
he said.
Allen has participated in
the show every year since
its inception, supporting the
Rotary Club and its interest in
the community, he said.
"Over the years they've
always proven to make it a
very good event," he said.
"I'm proud to be in there this
year." BT-
There is not a better place
for people to get ideas for
home improvement and meet .
SHOW continued on 3A


I e- I... huh .11 I


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400


75 i Opiior
Partly cloudy Obituar,
SR 2 zl Advice8
WEATHER, 2A n Puzzles


.. .. 4A
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& Cor


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..... 2B


TODAY IN COMING
PEOPLE SUNDAY


President visits
Florida school.


CHS students design
and build a robot.


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LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING SATURDAY, MARCH 5, 2011


Friday:
Afternoon: 7-9-2
Evening: 7-9-7


Friday:
" Afternoon: 2-9-3-9
Evening: 0-0-6-7


eniatch.
Friday:
2-23-25-28-30


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



Grammy leader, awards critic to meet


NEW YORK
p he chairman of the
Recording Academy and
the music industry vet-
eran who wrote a scath-
ing critique of this year's
Grammy results have agreed to start
a dialogue.
Neil Portnow, chairman and CEO
of the academy, and Steve Stoute,
a former top music executive who
now works in marketing, released a
joint statement Thursday saying they
planned discussions.
Stoute said in an interview that he
wanted to see more diversity in the
membership, culturally and artisti-
cally, and perhaps rule changes that
would make certain genres eligible
for more awards.
Stoute took out a full-page ad in
The New York Times Feb. 20 to take
the Grammys to task. During the
Feb. 13 broadcast, Eminem, who was
nominated for a leading 10 awards,
took home just two in the rap field
and lost in the prestigious record,
song and album of the year catego-
ries, despite having 2010's best-sell-
ing album with "Recovery.".
Another upset was the win of
jazz singer and bassist Esperanza
Spalding, who beat out more recog-
nizable acts, including teen pop phe-
nomenon Justin Bieber.
On Thursday night, Stoute said he
was hopeful his conversations with
Portnow and the Academy would
provide real change.

Huckabee denies
criticizing pregnancy
LITTLE ROCK, Ark. Former
Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee said he
wasn't criticizing Academy Award-win-
ning actress Natalie Portman when he
suggested her pregnancy was glamor-
izing the idea of having children out-


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Feb. 13 file photo, Esperanza Spalding. accepts the award for best new art-
ist at the 53rd annual Grammy Awards in Los Angeles.


side of marriage.
Huckabee on Friday accused "the
Hollywood media" of distorting com-
ments he made about Portman in a
radio interview Monday. Huckabee
said in that interview that it was
"troubling" to see Portman or other
celebrities having children while
unmarried.
Portman is expecting her first
child with her fiance.'
A publicist for Portman did not
respond to a request for comment.
She recently won the best actress
Oscar for her role in "Black Swan."

Love settlement shows
tweets can be costly
LOS ANGELES Courtney


Love's settlement of a case sparked
by online attacks on a fashion
designer show that Twitter posts can
be costly.
The singer has agreed to pay
Dawn Simorangkir $430,000, plus
interest, to settle a lawsuit the
designer filed in March 2009 over
comments Love made on Twitter
and her MySpace blog.
While the case didn't go to a jury,
First Amendment experts said it
highlights the need fof celebrities
and average people to watch what
they say online.
"People are getting in trouble
for Twitter postings on an almost
daily basis," said First Amendment
Attorney Doug Mirell.

* Associated Press


Celebrity Birthdays


* Actor James Noble is 89.
* Actor James B. Sikking is
77.
* Actor Dean Stockwell is
75.
* Actor Fred Williamson is
73.
* Actress Samantha Eggar
is 72.
* Violinist Eugene Fodor is
61.


* Rock musician Alan Clark
(Dire Straits) is 59.
* Magician Penn Jillette is
56.
* Rock singers Charlie and
Craig Reid (The Proclaimers)
are 49.
* Rock musician John
Frusciante (Red Hot Chili
Peppers) is 41.
* SirTger Rome is 41.


Lake City
HOW TO REACH US
Main number .'..... (386) 752-1293
Fax number..............752-9400
Circulation ..............755-5445
Online ... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.
MemberAudit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson.....754-0418
(twilsonh@akecltyreporter.com) .
NEWS
Assistant Editor CJ Risak..754-0427
After 1:00 p.m.
(crisak@lakecityreporter.com),
ADVERTISING
.........................752-1293
(dkimler@lakecityreporter.com)
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440.


Reporter
BUSINESS
'Controller Sue Brannon ....754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7.30
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where-homedelivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation .......;.........755-5445
(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks................ $26.32
24 Weeks .................. .$48.79
52 Weeks................... $83.46
Rates indude 7% sales tax.
Mail rates
12 Weeks............... $41.40
24 Weeks ...................$82.80
52 Weeks..................$179.40


CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run
in this space. And thanks for reading.


AROUND FLORIDA THE WEATHER

Court rules governor can reject funding TH E WEATHER


Associated Press
TALLAHASSEE U.S.
Transportation Secretary
Ray LaHood announced
Friday that he plans
to send $2.4 billion in
high-speed rail funding
intended for Florida to.
other states after the state
Supreme Court upheld
Gov. Rick Scott's decision.
to reject the money.
The Republican gover-
nor's decision effectively
kills the Tampa-Orlando .
route, but Sen. Bill Nelson,
D-Fla., said LaHood later
agreed to consider a last-
ditch attempt to revive the
project. His idea is to let
a regional rail authority in


Obama: Focus
now on education
MIAMI President
Barack Obama said he
won't accept failure in the
country's education sys-
tem, or listen to "naysay-
ers" who argue that some
schools are beyond repair.
Obama told high school
students in Miami on
Friday that companies hire
where the talent is and
that the single most impor-
tant thing businesses are
-looking for are skilled,
educated workers.
Giving a bipartisan
boost to his education
agenda, Obama appeared
with Florida's former
GOP Gov. Jeb Bush at
Miami Central Senior High
School. The president
said that the status quo on
education is unacceptable.
A good education equals a
good job, Obama said, and
warned his audience: "You
can't even think about
dropping out."
Miami Central is one of
hundreds of low-perform-
ing schools across the
nation that have received
federal turnaround money,
and Obama used it as an


central Florida compete
with other states for the
money Scott rejected.
"If it can't be done, then
we're done," Nelson said,
calling the proposal a "Hail
Mary pass."
Until Scott's election
in November, the Florida
route had been on track to
become a leading example
of how the Obama admin-
istration's stimulus plan is
creating jobs and reviving
the nation's passenger rail
system.
Several states,, includ-
ing New York, Virginia,
Vermont, Delaware and
Rhode Island, have asked
LaHood for Florida's rail


funds. But the only project
that would achieve the
high speeds associated
with bullet trains iniAsia
and Europe would be
California's.
"I know that states across
America are enthusiastic
about receiving addi-
tional support to help bring
America's high-speed rail
network to life and deliver
all its economic benefits to
their citizens," laHood said
in a statement
Scott submitted a formal
rejection of the funding
shortly after a Friday
morning telephone conver-
sation with LaHood. Friday
was Scott's deadline to
accept the money.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
President Barack Obama holds up a nameplate that was
made by students Peterly Casenave (left) and Esther Holland
(right) during his tour of Miami Central Senior High School in
Miami Friday.


example of how a school
can succeed.

Wildfire destroyed
17,000 acres


16,715 acres, or 26 square
miles, in Volusia and
Brevard counties.
Meanwhile, health offi-
cials in Brevard County
said anyone who is sen-
sitive to smoke should


SCOTTSMOOR stay indoors. Smol
Forestry officials said the fire has also ca
it will likely take at least intermittent closure
a week to fully contain a sections of Interst
central Florida wildfire since Monday.
. that's been burning since Parts of Florida
Monday. seen their driest fe
Measurements taken months in nearly
by the Florida Division years.
of Forestry on Thursday
show the fire has burned N Associated Press


ke from
caused
res of
ate 95

have
ew
80


PARTLY SCT. MOSTLY MOSTLY PARTLY
S CLOUDY SHOWERS SUNNY SUNNY CLOUDY
- 7 1! 1 Hi 72 LO 42 H7856
SHI 7 LO H 72 L 42 HI 72 L0 45 HI 74 LO 50 HI 78 LO 56
- .


Pensacola
71/50,


SValdosta
73'60 *
Tallahassee Lake City,
72/60 75/58
* r Gainesville *
' Panama City ,76/58
69/58 Ocala
Z,7/58


11 [ 0/ oo


Tam'*a
80/62


Ft.Myer
84/59


K


TEMPERATURES
High Friday
Low Friday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Friday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


74
51
73
48
89 in 1997
24 in 1943

0.00"
0.29"
7.56"
0.56"
7.46"


Jacksonville
"74/60

Daytona Beach
78 62
\


Orlando Cape Canaveral Key West
80/60 76/62 Lake City
S Miami
Naples
West Palm Beach Ocala
77/67 Orlando
FL tauderdale Panama City
^, 79/66 Pensacola
Naples Tallahassee
80/62 Miami Tampa
e West 79/67 Valdosta
....y West* W. Palm Beach


7// 9


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise tom.
Sunset tom.


6:52 a.m.
6:32 p.m.
6:51 a.m.
6:33 p.m.


MOON ,
Moonrise today 6:57 am.
Moonset today 7:28 p.m.
Moonrise tom. 7:26 a.m.
Moonset tom. 8:21 p.m.


March March March April
12 19 26 3
First Full Last New


tia lp 7p la 6a
Saturday Sunday







F ..casFm temptraiure "Fhe like" iwupte
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' r 7. up ',e s,,

.j.a dLo Ir, e San
inr, 24 house, an
winds gusted to 100
mph at the Wheeler
Ridge Pumping Plant
near the Tehachapi
Mountains.


8

15 nimes to bu
Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+.


Sunday
7/ 5i/ sn
76/54/sh
80/64/pc
81/58/c
73/44/t
72/46/r'
77/70/t
72/42/t
79/65/pc
78/61/c
75/45/t
78/56/sh
67/43/s
63/44/pc
70/37/pc
76/57/sh
71/40/sh
77/65/c


Monday
74159/pc
74/57/pc
81/66/pc
81/58/pc
72/48/s
67/47/pc
78/70/t
72/45/pc
80/67/pc
78/61/pc
74/48/s
79/57/pc
65/50/s
65/47/pc
71/43/pc
76/58/pc
71/46/pc
77/69/pc


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.



weather.com


S Forecasts, data and
S-.. graphics 2011. Weather
S Central, LP, MadisonWion, Ws.
" r www.weatherpubllsher.com


Get Connected

'zi,


SWH3
* -in,


Daily Scripture



"Have I not commanded you?
Be strong and courageous. Do
not be afraid; do not be discour-
aged, for the Lord your God will
be with you wherever you go."


-Joshua 1:9


City
Cape Canaveral
Daytona Beach
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Jacksonville


[lot.ui


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


MfNIlAY


W =Mtt~f~ati


0 =MB<[a)||p









LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE SATURDAY, MARCH 5, 2011


Portion of US 90 to get makeover j


By LEANNE TYO
ltyo@lakecityreporter.cori

Local drivers will encounter weekday
lane closures beginning Monday as
the four-lane section of U.S. Highway
90 East will undergo a three-month-
long facelift worth $1.5 million, officials
said.
According to a Florida Department
of Transportation news release, the 2.7-
mile-long section from State Road 100/
County Road 100A to just east of the
entrance to Florida Gateway College
will be resurfaced.
Anderson Columbia Company of
Lake City was hired by the FDOT to
handle the job.


The project includes median changes,
with the relocation of two paved medi-
an crossovers put in at the entrances of
Hudson Marine and Macatee's Mobile
Home Park, and the creation of an
additional median crossover at Easy
Street Auto Brokers' entrance, said
Gina Busscher, FDOT District Two
public information director.
Median crossovers are paved areas
where motorists can make U-turns or
left-hand turns, Busscher said.
The road's section with paved shoul-
ders will be completed first and paved
with two layers of asphalt, the news
release said. The road's urban section
with curbs and gutters will have its top
layer of asphalt removed and replaced.


Work on the resurfacing will occur
only on weekdays, Busscher said.
"Unless they get behind, they don't
expect to work on weekends," she said.
Daytime lane closures will occur after
8:30 a.m., but one lane in each direction
will remain open.
On average, more than 7,300 vehicles
travel on the roadway's urban section
daily and more than 10,000 vehicles drive
daily on its rural section.
Speeding fines are doubled in con-
struction work zones when workers are
present.
For more information, call the FDOT
Public Information Office in Lake City at
(386) 758-3714.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Motorists drive through'a railroad crossing at the
corner of U.S. Highway 90 and State Road 100
on Friday.


RALLY: Crowds gather both to protest and support cuts to education

Continued From Page 1A


said. "I think the people
across the street (Tea Party
members) probably believe
it's to fix the budget It's to
pay for a tax cut."
"If you were to cut 5 per-
cent only from school board
employees, it would be over
$1.5 million ripped from this
local economy," Doyle con-
tinued, noting that it would
cause the local school dis-
trict to lose more than $15
million in three years. "It will


amount to job loss, people
making less money and peo-
ple not being able to spend
money in local businesses
in the community." Doyle
said these are the lowest
funding levels for education
since the 2005 budget
Colin Williamson, a
Columbia High School
teacher, carried a sign in the
shape of Florida that claimed
the state is ranked fifth in
the nation in education by


a recent poll, but that trend
will not continue if Scotfs
plans are adopted.
"We're going to be in situ-
ation where we have 70 to 80
kids in a classroom where
people aren't able to do their
jobs," he said.
Michele Van Bennekom,
a Five Points Elementary
School teacher, said she
wanted to participate in the
rally because there is a lot
of incorrect information cir-


culating in the public about
the bills.
"The public needs to be
made aware this is not just
about teachers, it affects a
lot of jobs in the state," she
said. "If you don't support
us, at least come to have an
understanding."
Michael Estrella, a
Suwannee Correctional
Institute employee, stood
along side the teachers pro-
testing the proposed fiscal


BURGLARIES: Additional arrests are expected

Continued From Page 1A


Stephen Matthew Harrington, 25, of
2166 SE Jim Witt Road, faces charges
in at least six burglary cases, accord-
ing to CCSO reports. Harrington was
originally arrested on Feb. 16 and
charged with several counts of bur-
glary, grand theft, dealing in stolen
property and criminal conspiracy. He
is being held in the Columbia County
Detention Facility on $348,000 bond.
Harrington's accomplice,
Christopher Alexander Jezewski, 24,
of 221 Sandlin Ave., was also arrested
Feb. 16 and booked into the Columbia
County Detention Facility. He is
charged with burglary, dealing in sto-
len property and grand theft. He was
released from jail on a $25,000 bond.
Harrington was a suspect in local
burglary cases from as far back as


November, January and February.
CCSO detectives Jimmy Watson,
Glen Wyche and Walt Douglas began
investigating a residential burglary
on Feb. 6. They developed leads with
help from some of the victims, as well
as a suspect in the case.
"Detectives were able to link
Stephen Harrington to at least 10
residential burglaries," said Sgt Ed
Seifert, Columbia County Sheriff's
Office public information officer. "The
investigation is continuing and detec-
tives are discovering that some victims
were not aware that they had been
burglarized until detectives located
their stolen property."
Seifert said detectives estimate that
stolen items, including jewelry, collect-
ible coins, artifacts and 17 firearms,


are worth more than $15,000.
The investigation is ongoing and
Seifert said authorities are finding
more victims.
"If anyone has received property
from either Harrington or Jezewski,
there is a good possibility that the
property is stolen," Seifert said.
"Detectives will be making additional
arrests as this investigation moves
forward."
Authorities are asking people to
call Watson at 758-1095 with any infor-
mation regarding the burglaries or
suspects. Calls can also be made to
Crime Stoppers of Columbia County
at 754-7099. Callers to Crime Stoppers
will always remain anonymous and
may be eligible for a cash reward.


HOMICIDE: Elderly man killed with meat cleaver

Continued From Page 1A


Przybysz, 82, 17459 47th
Place. Worrell was arrest-
ed outside of Ocala and is
being held in the Marion
County Jail.
Suwannee County
Sheriff Tony Cameron said
a judge signed the warrant
papers Friday morning
to have Worrell brought
back to Suwannee County
to face the murder charge.
Przybysz was found dead
in his home Tuesday by his
neighbors, who brought
dinner to. his home a
camper trailer. The trailer
was on Przybysz's private
property.
Przybysz was last seen
alive Monday.
"He was last seen
'the afternoon before,"


Cameron said. "He was
seen by his neighbors who
brought him some dinner
over. Then, the next night
when they went to take
his dinner over they found
him in the trailer."
Cameron said Worrell
had stayed on the prop-
erty for a short while until
he was asked to leave by
other people who were
also living on the property
in camper trailers.
"They told him to leave
and made him leave the
day before and he came
back and went to the vic-
tim's mobile home and
technically demanded
some money from the
victim," Cameron said.
"The victim told him 'No'


and Worrell hit the vic-
tim in the head with a
meat cleaver a couple of
times."
Cameron said Przybysz
was struck in the head
with the meat cleaver at
least twice. The murder
weapon was recovered by
Suwannee County Sheriff's
Office investigators.
Cameron said one of
Worrell's friends drove
him to Macclenny a short
time later, but he is uncer-
tain how Worrell got to
Marion .County, where he
was arrested Wednesday.
Worrell was staying at a
relative's home in Marion
County.
Suwannee County law
enforcement officers were


speaking to Worrell on a
cellular phone and he told
them where he was.
"A deputy from the
Marion County Sheriff's
Office picked him up there
on the side of the road,"
Cameron. said. "Our inves-
tigators drove down, met
with him and interviewed
him."
Worrell voluntarily
agreed to be inter-
viewed by investigators
from Suwannee County
Sheriff's Office and the the
Florida Department of Law
Enforcement.
"They interviewed him
and he confessed to doing
it," Cameron said.
Worrell is not facing any
charges in Marion County.


OBITUARIES


changes.
"It's not just the five per-
cent (reduction in pay)," he
said. "They want to knock
our high-liability retirement
from, .3 percent down to 2
percent; increase the 5 per-
cent we have to contribute
to our pension and they want
to stop contributing and they
want to increase our health
insurance premiums. They
want us to work more, yet
get paid less'."
A small group of about
30 people, many Tea Party
members dressed in Stars
and Bars and other patriotic
colors stood their ground
looking for support for their
cause.
On Tuesday, Scott said
his recommended pension
changes would save $2.8 bil-
lion over two years. That
would help close a potential
budget gap that could top
$6 billion, including 2 billion
in tax cuts Scott is seeking,
for the fiscal year beginning
July 1. Florida is the only
state that doesn't require
at least some employees to
contribute to their pension
plan. Scott said that's not fair
to other taxpayers.
Suwannee County resi-
dent John Knapp held.,a ,
sign supporting Scott's pro-
posals. The sign contained
a picture of the American
flag in the shape of America
with a poison symbol in
the middle, with the word
"Liberalism" written across
the top.
"I think that Gov. Scott's
plans are a little bit of fiscal
sanity at a time when we
really need it," he said. "My
daughter is a school teach-
er in South Carolina and I


understand about teachers.
Teachers are an important
part of the deal here, but
teachers have got to under-
stand that they've got 'to
get rid of (their) union. It's
unethical that teachers and
the union can get together
and conspire against the
tax payers for higher and
higher wages and higher
benefits. That's unethical
and it's not honest."
Knapp said he is not
against good teachers, but
against bad teachers and
unions organizing with
bureaucrats while taxpay-
ers end up picking the
ticket
"It's not a black thing. It's
not a white thing. It's a lib-
eral thing. Its a conserva-
tive thing," he said. "We're
$4 billion in the hole this
year, which means whatev-
er cuts they do to bring the
budget back in line, they're
going to have to stay like
that or else the deficit is
going to come back up. It's
just common sense."
Sharon Higgins, North
Central Florida 9/12
Project secretary, also car-
ried a sign supporting the
governor's plans.
She said cuts are neces-
sary to' balance the state
budget "Maybe these are
not the right cuts, but we
want to make people aware
that there are cuts that are
going to have to be made
and we all need to be work-
ing toward doing that," she
said. "We don't want to alien-
ate the teachers we're not
against them. I know they
have a hard job, but we've
got to start somewhere with
what's going on."


SHOW: Starts today

Continued From Page 1A


businesses that can make
it a reality, Litteral said.
"I think its a wonderful
opportunity for attendees
if they want to use it and
benefit themselves," he
said. "It's always been
wonderful and every year
it gets better and better. I
think it's going to be the
best year yet"
Between 12,000 and
20,000 people are expected
to attend the show during


the two-day period, Gordon
said. All proceeds from the
show go to local charities.
Parking and admission is
free.
One-stop shopping
makes the event worth-
while for the public.
"We look forward to a
great day Saturday and
hopefully Sunday," he said.
"It's going to be a fun time.
You will have to wait and
see for yourself."


Linda L. Cembruch
Linda L. Cembruch, 61, of Lake
City, FL, died Thursday, March
3, 2011, after a lengthy illness at
Haven Hospice Suwannee Val-
ley Care Center, Lake City, FL.
She was a native of Fairdale,
KY, and the daughter of the late
Jack and Nora Pauline Zenor
Hicks. Mrs. Cembruch moved
to Lake City in 1981 from Clear-
water, FL She was a member of
Hopeful Baptist Church and was
very devoted to her family and
church and enjoyed traveling.
Survivors include her husband:
Jon Cembruch, Lake City, FL;
one son: JJ and his wife Malinda
Cembruch, Lake City, FL; one
daughter: Patty Kesead, Lake
City, FL; two brothers: Tommy
Hicks, Clearwater, FL, and Gene
Hicks, St. Petersburg, FL; one
sister: Joy Ayers, Clearwater,
FL; four grandchildren: Aman-
da, Wyatt, Karsen, and Kamryn.
Funeral services will be held on
Monday, March 7, 2011, at 11:00
A.M. at Hopeful Baptist Church
with Rev. Rodney Baker offici-
ating. Visitation with the family
will be on Sunday, March 6,2011,
from 5:00 P.M. to 8:00 P.M. at
the funeral home. GATEWAY-
FOREST LAWN FUNERAL
HOME (386-752-1954), 3596
S. US Hwy 441, Lake City, FL


is in charge of all arrangements,
Please sign the guest book at
www.gatewayforestlawn. corn

Sandra Lee (Cazel)
Lastinger
Sandra Lee (Cazel) Lastinger,
74, passed away, Monday eve-
ning, February 28, 2011 after a
long battle with breast cancer.
She vxs the daughter of the late
Ernest R. & Elizabeth J. Cazel.
Born in Illinois, lived in Hol-
lywood, Florida and settled in
Lake City in 1979. She was a
loving wife, mother, and grand-
mother who loved traveling, go-
ing to the beach and spending
time with her family. She is pre-
ceded in death by her three sons,
Kirt, Robert, & Peter Lastinger.
She leaves behind to cherish her
memory, her loving husband of
54 years, Lavon J. Lastinger;
oldest son, James Gregory Last-
inger; and her beloved daughter,
Cindy Lee Clayton (Buddy) all
of Lake City, FL; sister, Mar-
got Abernathy of Lake City; 10
grandchildren 18 great grand-
children and several neph-
ews and nieces also survive.
Informal memorial services will
be held today, March 5, 2011
at 11:00 a.m. at the Lastinger
Homestead, 352 NW Breeze


Glen, Lake City, FL. In lieu of
flowers the family asks that do-
nations in her memory be made
to help fight Breast Cancer
through either the Breast Can-
cer Society at www.breastcan-
cer.org or the Susan G. Komen
for the Cure at www.komen.org
GATEWAY-FOREST LAWN
FUNERAL HOME, 3596
U.S. Hwy 441 South, Lake
City, FL 32025 (386) 752-1954

Kenneth George
Walton
Mr. Kenneth George Walton,
74, of Alexander City, funeral
services will be Sunday, March
6, 2011 at 2:00 -
pm at the Cha-.
pel of Radney ,
Funeral Home. ,. ;.
Bro. John David "
Parker and Steve Lucas will of-
ficiate. Burial will follow in the
Hillview Memorial Park with
honors provided by the United
States Navy. The family will re-
ceive friends on Saturday, March
5, 2011 from 5:00 pm to 7:00
pm at Radney Funeral Home.
Mr. Walton passed away on
Thursday, March 3, 2011 at his
residence. He was born on July
29, 1936 in Warwick, Rhode
Island to George Walton and


Nellie Winnard Walton. He was
a member of Alex City Church
of Christ. He retired from the
United States Navy while work-
ing as an aviation electrician.
After retiring from the Navy,
he started his own business,
Ken's Lawn Irrigation. He was
an enthusiastic Florida Gators
fan, great cook, and enjoyed
hunting, fishing, gardening,
golfing, or anything outdoors.
He is survived by his wife, Ju-
dith Macera Walton of Alexan-
der City; daughters, Jean Lucas
(Steve) of Chandler, OK, Karen
Gray (Ronnie) ofAlexander City,
Patricia Park (Stephen) of Mil-
ton, FL, and Jacqueline Williams
(Mark) ofPrattville; Nine Grand-
children; Two Step Grandchil-
dren; Four Great Grandchildren;
sister, Nancy Shank of Penns-
boro, WV; brother, Thomas Wal-
ton (Francis) of Terryville, CT.
He was preceded in death by
his parents and sister, Elizabeth
Jordan. Memorial messages
may be sent to the family at
www. radneyfuneralhome. com.
RADNEY FUNERAL HOME
is in charge of the arrangements.

.Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


Happy BriEthdac 'I9 f
A special girl rom the very sanrt.
Always know I love Yoa with all my heart.



Call today to place an Call
Invitation ad for your 755.5440 or
child, grandchild,
God child or anyone 155.5441


you think deserves
something extra on
their special day!


between 8am & 4pm


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pp,., ., "' ., '. .", "..


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427











OPINION


Saturday, March 5, 201 I1


www.lakecityreporter.com


0
OP


THEIR
INION


US jobs


picture


a little bit


brighter

In what has so far largely
been a jobless recovery,
economic growth is final-
ly beginning to produce
jobs and make serious
inroads on unemployment.
All of this is good news for
President Barack Obama's
reelection hopes, which more
than any other factor are tied
to the economy. It is an axiom
of American politics that the
president gets way too much
credit for the economy when
it is good and way too much
blame when it is bad.
And the economy is clearly
improving.
The February unemploy-
ment rate fell to 8.9 percent
from 9 percent That may be
only a difference of 0.1 percent
but politically it's a big sym-
bolic difference.
That 8.9 percent rate is the
lowest since April, 2009% and
the fall from November's 9.8
percent is the steepest three-
month decline since 1983.
The Fed expects the rate to
hover in the high 8.8 to 9 per-
cent range for the rest of the
year and then drop to the 7.5
percent to 8 percent range in
2012, in time for the election.
Those numbers aren't particu-
larly inspiring but what matters
politically is their direction.
And the Fed expects the rate
to continue falling to the 5-6
percent range three years from
now.
There were other good
numbers out of February as
well. The private sector, which
counts for 70 percent of the
workforce, added 220,000 jobs,
more than making up for the
30,000 shed by state and local
governments, for a healthy net
of 192,000 jobs.
Serious problems remain:
43.9 percent of the unemployed
have been out of work six
months or more, 30.4 percent
a year or more, and the longer
one is out of a job the harder it
is to find one.
Still, it's a measure of how
hard the recession that 8.9
percent looks like and is
- good news.
* Scripps Howard News Service

Lake 'City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman


LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:


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l^V-----^^^

QUT YER
.$IPA
BE1LYA-cfI1N'-


Fame can help you look foolish


With the grand
orgy of celeb-
rity worship
known as
the Academy ,
Awards turned to' stardust for
another year, it is time for the
vast majority of us to thank high
heaven that we are not famous.
It may seem counter-intuitive
in a fame-obsessed culture to
see nonentity as a blessing, but
the Oscars are themselves proof
of what is wrong with the cult of
celebrity.
This year was especially
grotesque. The low point for
me was the appearance of Kirk
Douglas, once a magnificent
specimen of manhood but here
playing the role of decrepit
lecher.
The contrast between then
and now would have brought
tears to my eyes if I had been
properly awake, but I had
heard one too many thank you
speeches for best makeup in a
short film featuring cute kittens,
or something.
.Of course, it is no crime to
be old, which is lucky because
I would be approaching felony
status myself. But if Kirk
Douglas were not a celebrity,
Americans would have been
spared embarrassment posing
as entertainment.
As an. ordinary person, Kirk
Douglas, who was born in 1916,
would instead be doing a little
fishing, maybe playing some
golf, or perhaps sky diving,
because, you know, the 90s are
the new 80s. He would not be
out there reminding us that the
paths of glory lead but to gross
indignity.
Blessedly, this is not the
fate of we the ordinary people.
(Forgive my more-ordinary-
than-thou attitude. It is true that
I write a newspaper column,
but these days that is a rare


Reg Henry
rhenry@post-gazette.com
path to celebrity. Besides, if any
celebrations have been held for
me, I have not been informed.)
The thing about being ordinary
is that invidious comparisons
between past and present are
never made. Nobody looks at
me and remembers the glory
that was Reg.
For one thing, I never wore a
loincloth, as Kirk Douglas did
to great effect in "Spartacus."
He was splendid in that role,
but the nights were never dark
enough for me to sport a loin-
cloth and if that's not a bless-
ing, I don't know what is.
Yet when I made my anti-
celebrity speech to my wife on
Oscar night, pointing out how
this obsession with fame warps
both the recipients of adulation
and those who do the adoring,
she said that I was just jealous.
Not true. Well, it's true I
wouldn't mind the money that
goes with celebrity. Money isn't
everything, but it's better than
the nothing of having no money.
It's true that it would be nice to
be told at every turn that I am a
wonderful person, darling.
My wife does not see her own
interest in this. If I were a celeb-
rity, I would have to get a new
model wife, not only because
acquiring a new spouse is what
celebrities do but also because
my old model wife says, "You
are a lazy person, darling, and
you snore and drop food on
your tie, although not usually
at the same time." I would miss
the old model wife very much


because she is honest and tells
me useful information.
I suppose I would need a new
model dog, too. Sooner, my
sad-eyed, affectionate hound,
is not frou-frou and cannot be
carried as a fashion accessory.,
If I were to walk down Rodeo
Drive with Sooner, with his old
eyes that have seen only modest
fire hydrants, the locals would
surely call the fashion police
(dog catcher division). I would
miss Sooner, too, although not
as much as I'd miss my wife,
because he slobbers.
Maybe I'd have to get new
model friends, too. That's a
sadness because I like my old
friends. They aren't phony and
don't like me because of who
I am. Indeed, the conservative
ones like me despite who I am.
And where would I acquire
these new model friends?
Please tell me I wouldn't have to
be admitted to a celebrity rehab
clinic to meet them.
Fortunately, none of this
is even remotely likely. I am
blessed, as you are too, by
being un-celebrated. Hurrah for
us! We don't need red carpets
- we have red bath mats. Not
a chance of us turning into a
Charlie Sheen or a Lindsay
Lohan or any others among
the galaxy of stars who have
been driven to ruin by the twin
perils of celebrity hood Too
Rich Disease and Too Coddled
Malady.
It's our fault, you know, we
the ordinary people. Every time
we forget that celebrities put
on their pants just the same as
we do admittedly, they have
better pants we do their
egos and their souls no favors.
Say not for whom the paparazzi
flash, they flash for thee.

* Reg Henry is a columnist for
the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette.


OTHER OPINION


America must fight the pirates


Not long after achiev-
ing independence,
the United States
faced its first for-
eign threat pirates
off the coast of Africa seizing
American merchant ships.
As Michael Oren recounts in
"Power, Faith and Fantasy", his
sweeping history of America's
involvement in the Middle East,
beginning in 1784, American
vessels were abducted, their
crews enslaved and held for ran-
som. One local despot, Hassan
Dey, paraded his American cap-
tives "past jeering crowds" and
"spat at them, 'Now'I have got
'you, you Christian dogs, you
shall eat stones.'"
This crisis, Oren writes,
"raised fundamental questions
about the nature, identity, and
viability of the United States.
Would Americans imitate
Europe and bribe the pirates, or
would they create a revolution-


ary precedent and fight them?"
George Washington and
Thomas Jefferson both believed
it was necessary to use military
force. But not until 1794 would
Congress vote to create a Navy.
And not until 1805 would U.S.
Marines fight on the "shores of
Tripoli."
Today, American ships are
again under siege by pirates
off the African coast. This time,
however, the buccaneers are
setting sail from Somalia rather
than from the territories that
are now Libya, Tunisia, Algeria
and Morocco. Today, the U.S.
has the greatest Navy the world
has ever seen. But the debate is
exactly what it was more than
200 years ago: Do we have the
will to fight? Or would we prefer
to submit to blackmail?
Just last week, Somali pirates
seized a vessel that was being
sailed around the world by
two American couples who


were stopping along the way
to donate Bibles to far-flung
churches. As American naval'
officials attempted to negotiate
their release, all four were mur-
dered:
Secretary of State Hillary
Clinton responded: "We've got to
have a more effective approach
to maintaining security on the
seas, in the ocean lanes, that are
so essential to commerce and
travel." Ya think?
At this moment, Somali
pirates are holding more than 30
vessels and more than 600 hos-
tages. They have been collecting
hundreds of millions of dollars
in ransom the figure has
been growing year after year.
We know what Washington
and Jefferson would do. The
question now: What will
Obama and Clinton do?

* Scripps Howard News Service


Dale McFeatters
mcfeattersd@shns.com


Finding


Gadhafi


a new


career


Moammar Gadhafi
hasn't fulfilled his
career goal of mar-
tyrdom on the job
in Libya, the question arises of
what the jobless dictator does
now.
Thanks to the largely stress-
free life of a despot, he has a
'lot of years ahead of him. He's
68. If he were an American, he
would have only just started
collecting his Social Security
benefits.
First off, where would he
go?
An obvious choice is France,
a popular refuge for scoundrels
and a country well supplied
with fine restaurants, casinos, -
beaches and prostitutes and
the other support apparatus for
newly homeless Third World
leaders.
And there is even an obvi-
ous choice of a new career
for Gadhafi as a replace-
.ment for John Galliano, the
recently fired chief designer
for Christian Dior. Gadhafi is
a clotheshorse with a fashion
sense uniquely his own.
Who can forget the extrava-
gant gold robes he wore in
that televised speech where
he said the only reason there
was unrest in the country was
because al-Qaeda had drugged
his people?
What if France wouldn't take
him? Where would he go then?
How about here?
The United States grants
a fast track to residency and
citizenship for foreigners plan-
ning to invest a lot of money
here, and Gadhafi already has
$30 billion here. At least that's
the amount the Treasury froze.
Counting his two wives and
10 children, he may have a
lot more. However, you would
think $30 billion would count
for something.
There won't be a problem
with him fitting in. With the
U.S. real estate market in the
tank, he'll have no problem
buying a place to pitch his tent
with a nearby Motel 6 to house
his 40 female bodyguards and
Ukrainian nurse.
Gadhafi's governing phi-
losophy, the newspaper the
Guardian explains, is "com-
mittees." In Libya, at least
in theory, everything is run
by committee or has to go
through a committee. Heck, he '
may already be an American
for all we know.
If Gadhafi is interested in a
career change, he's come to
the right place. He can do what
every other politician who's
between gigs does and host a
show on Fox News.
Before he decamps from
Tripoli, he can have the Libyan ;
secret service's forgers gin
up some documents showing
that Barack Obama was born
in Benghazi. The viewers
will lap it up. "Mornings with
Moammar," exclusively on Fox.
Gadhafi can also serve as
insurance against unemploy-
ment in the tabloid and cable
infotainment industry. When
Charlie Sheen's head finally
explodes, Gadhafi can be
on standby to fill the gap for
embarrassing celebrity melt-
downs, just as he did back in
Libya.
* Dale McFeatters is editorial


writer for Scripps Howard News
Service.


4A












FAITH


Saturday, March 5, 20 1. v


&


VALUES


Nww.lakecityreporter.com


HEART MATTERS


Pope exonerates Jews for Jesus' death


Angie Land
angielaond3@windstream.net


Bible says

true love

always

protects
Are you a "but-
ton-pusher?"
It's a fact that
many'of us
push buttons
all day long to earn a liv-
ing: cashiers, secretaries,
writers, accountants, etc.
However, I'm not asking
about your profession, nor
are the buttons I am refer-
ring to visible. The type
of "button-pushing" I want
to discuss is the result of
being "in the know" about a
person's weakness or hang-
up and then using it against
them to win an argument
or prove a point
Recently I read a story
about a not-so-nice guy
who plotted the death of a
particular man, for no other
reason except his national-
ity and religious beliefs.
Obviously he was radi-
cally prejudiced, but was
also a family man with a
wife who was well aware
his narrow-minded per-
spective.
The other thing you
need to know about this
not-so-nice guy is that he
had a huge ego that con-
tinually needed to be fed
in order to stay inflated,
and often that job fell to his
wife.
As the story goes, the
plot to kill not only began
to unravel, but began to
look as if it would be the
downfall of the not-so-
nice guy. In response,
he ran home to receive a
little comfort and encour-,
agement from his wife.
Evidently, she had grown
tired of re-inflating that ego
of his and was fresh out of
reassurance. In fact, her
response was to predict his
ruin and point out that it
was all a result of his own
prejudice.
Button pushed. Game
over.
This story is found in
the Biblical book of Esther
and our point culminates in
6:12-13.
When read in the con-
text of the entire story, we
may be quick to point out
that the not-so-nice guy
(whose name was Haman)
got what he deserved.
True, but bad guy or not,
the point is also to be made
that his wife was privy to
his inner thoughts and
desires like no one else,
which she used to pour
salt in the wounds of his
demise.
Again, I ask: Are you a
button-pusher?
In the heat of an argu-
ment, do you turn those
weaknesses and secrets
shared in vulnerable
moments into weapons of
mass destruction?
In 1 Corinthians 13:5-7,
the Bible reminds us that,
along with many other attri-
butes, love always protects.
If those we are closest to,
(i.e. our spouse, children
and close friends) share
private thoughts and feel-
ings with us, we must pro-
tect that information as if it
were a valuable jewel, and
never allow it to be used it
as a weapon against them.
This has to be the most
painful of wounds.

Heart Matters is a weekly
column written by Angie
Land, director of the Family
Life Ministries of the Lafayette
Baptist Association, where
she teaches bible studies,
leads marriage and family
conferences, and offers bibli-
cal counseling to individuals,
couples and families.


By NICOLE WINFIELD
Associated Press
VATICAN CITY
made a sweeping exon-
eration of the Jewish
people for the death of
Jesus Christ, tackling
one of the most controversial
issues in Christianity in a new
book.
In "Jesus of Nazareth-Part II"
excerpts released Wednesday,
Benedict explains biblically and
theologically why there is no
basis in Scripture for the argu-
merit that the Jewish people as a
whole were responsible for Jesus'
death.
Interpretations to the contrary
have been used for centuries to
justify the persecution of Jews.
While the Catholic Church has
for five decades taught that Jews
weren't collectively responsible,
Jewish scholars said Wednesday
the argument laid out'by the
German-born pontiff, who has
had his share of mishaps with
Jews, was a landmark statement
from a pope that would help fight
anti-Semitism today.
'Holocaust survivors know
only too well how the centuries-
long charge of 'Christ killer'
against'the Jews created a poison-
ous climate of hate that was the
foundation of anti-Semitic perse-
cution whose ultimate expression
was realized in the Holocaust,"
said Elan Steinberg of the
American Gathering of Holocaust
Survivors and their Descendants.
The pope's book, he said, not
only confirms church teaching
refuting the decide charge "but
seals it for a new.generation of
Catholics."
The Catholic Church issued
its most authoritative teaching
on the issue in its 1965 Second
Vatican Council document


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Pope Benedict XVI greets seminarians during his annual visit of the Roman
Major Seminary in Rome on Friday.


"Nostra Aetate," which revolution-
ized the church's relations with
Jews by saying Christ's death
could not be attributed to Jews as
a whole at the time or today.
Benedict comes to the same
conclusion, but he explains how
with a thorough, Gospel-by-
Gospel analysis that leaves little
doubt that he deeply and person-
ally believes it to be the case:
That only a few Temple leaders
and a small group of supporters
were primarily responsible for
Christ's crucifixion.
That Benedict is a theologian


makes "this statement from the
Holy See that much more signifi-
cant for now and for future gen-
erations," said Anti-Defamation
League national director,
Abraham H. Foxman.
Foxman in a statement hailed
Benedict for rejecting "the previ-
ous teachings' and perversions
that have helped to foster and
reinforce anti-Semitism through
the centuries."
The book is the second install-
ment to Benedict's 2007 "Jesus of
Nazareth," his first book as pope,
which offered a very personal


meditation on the early years of
Christ's life and teachings. This
second book, set to be released
March 10, concerns the final part
of Christ's life, his death and res-
urrection.
The Vatican's*publishers pro-
vided a few excerpts Wednesday.
In the book, Benedict re-enacts
Jesus' final hours, including his
death sentence for blasphemy,
then analyzes each Gospel
account to explain why Jews as
a whole cannot be blamed for it.
Rather, Benedict concludes, it
was the 'Temple aristocracy" and
a few supporters of the figure
Barabbas who were responsible.
"How could the whole people
have been present at this moment
to clamor for Jesus' death?"
Benedict asks.
He deconstructs one particu-
lar biblical account which has K
the crowd saying, "His blood be
on us and on our children" a
phrase frequently cited as evi-
dence of the collective guilt Jews
bore and the curse that they car-
ried as a result
The phrase, from the Gospel
of Matthew, has been so incendi-
ary that director Mel Gibson was
reportedly forced to drop it from
the subtitles of his 2004 film 'The,,-.
Passion of the Christ," although it
remained in the spoken Aramaic.
But Benedict said Jesus' death
wasn't about punishment, but
rather salvation. Jesus' blood, he
said, "does not cry out for ven-
geance and punishment, it brings
reconciliation. It is not poured out
against anyone, it is poured out
for many, for all."
Benedict, who was forced to
join the Hitler Youth as a child in
Nazi Germany, has made improv-
ing relations with Jews a priority
of his pontificate. He has visited
the Auschwitz Nazi death camp in
Poland and Israel's Yad Vashem
Holocaust memorial.


CHURCH NOTES


Today
Church yard sale
Huge Yard Sale, rain or shine,
inside sale is 8 a.m. to 12 p.m.
March 5 4t St James Episcopal
Church Parish Hall. The church
is located at 2423 SW Bascom
Norris Dr. The sale will feature
many usable items and baked
goods.

Church revival
The 21 Days of Ablaze is
7:30 p.m. March 5-15 at Miracle
Tabernacle Church. There will
be dynamic speakers each night.
The church is located at 1190
S.W. Sister Welcome Road.

Tent meeting
A gospel tent meeting is 7
p.m. March 3-5 at Mercy Baptist
Church of Lake City. Contact the
Rev. Chris Hall, pastor, at (386)
466-4542. The church is located at
441 South across from Racetrack
Road. I


Yard Sale
Lake City Church of God is
having a Kids Club Yard Sale
7 a.m. to 1 p.m. March 5 in the
Family Life Center. The church
is located at 173 SE Ermine Ave.,
the corner of SE Duval Street.

Sunday
Homecoming services
Homecoming services being 11
a.m. March 6 at Trinity Praise &
Worship. Ron Brewer is the guest
singer. Dinner is on the grounds
following the morning worship.
Call 752-3706. The church is
located on Hwy. 90 East pass the
college caution lights.

Free concert
Daniel Crews, resident art-
ist at First Baptist Church in
Atlanta, Ga. is performing a a
free concert 6 p.m. March 6 at
Wellborn Baptist Church. The
church is located on Highway
90 West between Live Oak and,


Lake City at the intersection with
Lowe Lake Road in Wellborn. A
love offering for the groupwill
be received. More information on
Crews is available online at www.
wellbornbaptist.com.

Thursday
Pastor's Anniversary
Antioch Missionary Baptist
Church of Fort White holds a
four-day event celebrating the
pastor's anniversary 7:30 p.m.
on Thursday and Friday; 6 p.m.
Saturday; and 11 a.m. and 4 p.m.
Sunday. Contact Gloria Jackson at
386-497-4808.

Saturday
Yard sale
A yard sale is 8 a.m. to 1 p.m.:
Saturday at Falling Creek Chapel.
All proceeds will go toward the
children's ministry fund. The
church is located at 1290 NW
Falling Creek Road.


Church yard sale
A Yard Sale is 7:45 a.m. to noon
Saturday at First Presbyterian
Church. There will be a Pancake
Breakfast in the fellowship Hall
from 7:30 until 10 a.m. All money
collected will support the youth.
Call the church office at 752-0670

Anniversary celebration
A 100th anniversary celebra-
tion is 7 p.m. March 16-18 at
Mount Pleasant Missionary
Baptist Church. The service will
feature the Rev. Craig P. Riley Sr.,
pastor of Greater Mt. Pleasant
Baptist Church in Tallahassee.
The church is located at 3817
Suwannee Valley Road. Contact .
Gloria McIntosh at (386) 755-
1099.

Submit Church Notes items
in writing no later than 5 p.m.
Monday the week prior to an event
by e-mail to arobinson@lakecity-
reporter.com, fax to (386) 752-
9400 or drop-off at 180 E. Duval
St., Lake City.


God's grace makes the difference


Too many in the
church today
preach and
teach messages
that belittle the
work that Christ accom-
plished on the cross con-
cerning our salvation.
The questions often raised
are: Whether a Christian
can have assurance of sal-
vation in this lifetime; and,
if this salvation can ever
be lost for any reason.
Some today believe that
salvation can be lost for a
number of reasons.
The main reason some
believe it can be lost is
that one falls back into sin
and becomes disqualified
in God's eye.
When we take a close
look at this argument, we
find that what one is say-
ing is that God does His


BIBLE STUDY


Hugh Sherrill Jr.
ems-hugh43@comcast.net,
part and we must do the
rest.
But how are we saved
in the first place? Do we
come to Christ just as we
are accepting His forgive-
ness and grace? Does our
salvation depend on our
good works or our living
a sinless life? Romans 5:8
says: "But God commend-
ed His love toward us, in
that while we were yet sin-
ners, Christ dies for us."


If one can lose his salva-
tion for any reason, then
there can be no hope for
assurance of our salvation
in this lifetime.
We would have to wait
until we die to learn where
we will spend eternity. If
we could lose our salva-
tion, we would not have
time toworry about any-
one else.
We would have to spend
all our time watching out
for ourselves.
Such a doctrine could
only make for "nervous"
Christians.
We are not saved, nor
do we keep our salva-
tion, by our good work
and sinless life. We are
saved because of God's
grace (unmerited love).
We have no part in our
salvation except to believe


the testimony (record)
God gave concerning his
Son Jesus (I John'5:9-13
please read). Verse 13
says: (NKJ) 'These things
I have written to you who.
believe in the name of the
Son of God, that you may
know that you have eter-
nal life, and that you may
continue to believe in the
name of the Son of God."
It is the marvelous grace
of God that provides this
salvation for us.
John 3:17 (NKJ) "For
God did not send His son
into the world to condemn
the world, but the world
through Him might be
saved."
A most important pas-
sage on grace is found in
Ephesians 2:8&9 (NKJ)
"For by grace you have
been saved through faith,


and that not of yourselves;
it is the gift of God, not of
works, lest anyone should
boast"
The Holy Spirit gave
us these verses so we
can rest on what God
has done for us. What we
could not do.
Our salvation is based
on these words, our assur-
ance, and our certainty
that we will never lose this
salvation because God
Himself has given it to us.
(Titus 3:5 read).
There are so many
today who need to be
freed from the bondage of
incorrect doctrine.
May they discover the
wonderful message of
God's grace!
* Hugh Sherrill is a retired
preacher in Lak6 City.


' 5A








6A LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVERTISEMENT SATURDAY, MARCH 5, 2011
-I ,


J


Photo credit marcelmooij


A Then we are in trouble, what do we do?

V V Leap into action? Is doing something

better than doing nothing? It is if that something

is asking God for help.. .if we cart stop trying

to control things and listen for His guidance.

Consider what God said to Job... "Pay attention,

Job, and listen to me; be silent, and I will speak"

(Job 33.31). Worship each week and grow closer

to God, be ready to listen for His wisdom.






Scriptures Selected by The American Bible Society
@2011, Keister-Williams Newspaper Services, P.O. Box 8187, Charlottesville, VA 22906, www.kwnews.comr


North Florida
A Pharmacy
7 Locations to Serve You
SLake City, Ft. White, Branford,
Chiefland, Mayo & Keystone Heights


I ,








W Co Q..? .ma. II and -ri

To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440



Supercenter
"LOW PRICES EVERYDAY"


GWHunter, Inc.
Chevron Chevron Oil
14 Jobber




Holly/Aectnc, 'ac.
O Inc.
"Quality ,ork at a reasonable price"
We also do solar hook-ups
(386) 755-5944_


FOOD STORES
Open 7 Days a Week
1036 E. Duval St., Lake City FL.
(386) 752-0067
Fresh Meat, Fresh Produce!
"[ can do all things through Christ lhich strengthenclh me"
Philippians 4:13

To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440

To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440


RICK'S RANGE [ SERVICE
Located at 25A .'"
(Old Valdosta Hwy)
386-752-5696 or
386-867-2035
after hours

To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440


Fist Advent Christian
1881 SW McFarlane Ave.
386-752-3900
Sunday School 9:45AM
Sunday Service: 11:00AM
Wednesday Servie: '700PM

GLAD TIDINGS ASSEMBLY OF GOD
993 N' Lake eflery Rujad
386-752-0620
Sunday Worship 10:30AM & 6PM
S'" ed .Fjm Bible Srjdv '7IrM
A church wihtrle Sl. s Redl

BEREA BAPTIST CHURCH
SR47 S* 755-0900
Sunday School ,9:30AM
Sunday Worship 10:45AM & 6PM
Wednesday Eve. Service 7PM
Pastor: Larry E. Sweat
EASTSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
196 SE James Ave,. 386-752-2860
Sun Bible Study 9:45AM
Sun Worship 11AM&6PM
Wed. Prayer Mtg/Bible Study 6PM
Rev. Brandon G.Witt
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Sunday Bible Study 9:15AM
Sunday Worship 10:30AM & 6:00PM
Wed. 6:00PM Prayer Service, &
Children' %nmtry 6:15PM
Downtown Lake City 752-5422
Rev. Stephen Ahrens, Pastor
OLIVET MISSIONARYBAPFIST CHURCH
541 N.E. Davis Street
(386) 752-1990
Ronald V.Walters, Pastor
Sunday School". 9:45AM
SundayMorningWorship 11:00AM
Wed. Mid-WeekWorship 6:00PM
"In God's Word, Will & Way"

PARKVIEW BAPTIST CHURCH
268 NW Lake Jeffery Rd. *752-0681
Lake City, Florida 32055.
www.pbclc.com
Sunday School 8:30,9:45 & 11AM
SundayWorship 9:45 & 11AM & 6PM
AWANA 5:30 PM
Evening Worship 6:00 PM
Wed, Eve, Schedule
Farrily Supper IReerarironl 5PM
ChildrenrN Minstri 6PM
Youth Worship 6:00 PM
Prayer Meeting 6:00 PM
Thursday Evening Schedule- St. 8/21/08
Parkview Edge 8:30PM
Pastor: Michael A. Tatem

PINE GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH
1989N US Hwy441
386-752-2664
Sunday Bible Study 9:45AM
Sunday.Worship 11AM & 6PM
Wed. Kids &Youth Ministry 6:30PM
Pastor: Ron Thompson


SALEM PRIMITIVE BAPTIST
Sunday Services 10:30AM
Pastor: Elder Herman Griffin
752-4198
SOUTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
388 S.E. Baya Drive* 755-5553.


aunuay
Bible Study
Morning Worship
EveningWorship
AWANA
Prayer & Bible Study


9:15AM
10:30AM
f. ISPM
5:45PM
6:15 PM


TABERNACLE BAPTIST CHURCH
(Independent Baptist).
144 SE Montrose Ave, 7524274
Sunday School 10 AM
Sun. Morn. Worship 11 AM
Sunday Eve. 6PM
Wed. Prayer Meeting 7:30 PM
Pastor: Mike Norman

EPIPHANY CATHOLIC CHURCH
1905 SW Epiphany Court 752-4470
Saturday Vigil Mass 5:00 PM
Sunday Ma. 8:15 AM, 10:30 AM,
5:00 PM (Spanish/English)
Sunday School/Religious Education
9 00 AM :15 1AM

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE SOCIETY
239 SE Baya Ave..
SundayService 11:00 AM
Wednesday Evening Service 7:30 PM
LAKE CITY CHRISTIAN CHURCH
Hwy 247 S.- 755-9436
Sunday School 9:30 AM
Sun. Morn. Worship 10:30 AM
Wed, Prayer Meeting 7PM

NEW HORIZON
Church of Christ
Directions & Times 386-623-7438
Jack Exum,Jr., Minister

LAKE CITY CHURCH OF GOD
167 Ermine St*. 752-5965
Sunday School 9:45AM
Sun. Worship 10:30AM &:6:00PM
Wed. Family Night 7 PM
Wed. Youth Service 7PM
Pastor: Carroll Lee
EVANGEL CHURCH OF GOD
370 SW Monitor Glen *755-1939
Sunday School 9:45 AM
Sunday Worship 10:50 & 6:30
Wed. Spiritual Enrichment 7PM
"Shock Youth Church"
Boys and Girls Clubs
Bible Study
Pastor: Jomhn R. Hathaway

ST. JAMES EPISCOPAL CHURCH
2423 SW Bascom Norris Dr., Lake
City, F132025 386-752-2218
Email: stamesepis330@bellsouth.net
Holy Eucharist
Sun. 8 & 10AM
Wednesday: 5:15pm
Priest: The Rev. Michael Armstrong
Deacon: The Rev. limmie Hunsinger
Director of Music Dr. Alfonso Levy


-. '


LAKE CITYCHURCHOFTHE NAZARENE
Services:
Sunday School 9:45AM
SundayWorship 10:45AM;'6:30PM
Wednesday 6:30PM
Adult, Youth Ministry, Children's Ministry
Pastor: Craig Henderson
Nursery Provided
SW SR 47 and Azalea Park Place

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
629 SW Baya Drive' 752-0670
Sunday Contemporary 9:00AM
Sunday School 10:00AM
Traditional Service 11:0 AM
NURSERYPROVIDED
Pastor: Dr. Roy A. Martin
Director of Music: Bill Poplin

FIRST FULL GOSPEL CHURCH
NE Jones Way & NEWashington St.
Sunday School 10:00 AM
MorningWorship 11:00AM
Evangelistic Service 6:00 PM
Youth Services Wednesday 7:00PM
Mid-week Service-Wednesday 7:00 PM
For info ca11755-3408o Everyone Welcome
Pastor. Rev. Stan Ellis
1I[017 M]l,7ff', ri[m0]
CHRIST CENTRAL MINISTRIES
Leadership Services 9:00AM
Sunday Morning 11:00AM
Wednesday Service 7:00PM
217 Dyal Ave., from Hwy'90 take
Sisters Welcome Rd., go 5 miles, South,
church on left. *755-2525
Lead Pastor: Lonnie Johns
'A Church on the Move"
CHRISTIAN HERITAGE CHURCH
Comer SR. 47 & Hudson Circle
Sunday Celebration 10:30 AM
Pastor Chris Jones *752-9119
FALLING CREEK CHAPEL
Falling Creek Road* 755-0580
First and Third Sundays 9:30 A.M.
Second and Fourth Sundays 3:00 P.M.
Pastor: Rev. Cheryl R. Pingel


I


9 O OWu O u@w0


Call




752-m 1293!


ITadetse i hi.huc iretoy al 75-44


A lay Electric Cooperative, Inc.
Competitive rates, non-profit,
right here in your community.
Lake City District 386-752-7447
clayelectric.com
To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440


OUR REDEEMER LUTHERAN CHURCH
LCMS
1 1/2 miles S. of 1-75 on SR 47
755-4299
Sunday Services 9:30AM
(Nursery Provided)
Christian Education Hour
For all ages at 10:45AM
Pastor: Rev. Bruce Alkidre
SPIRIT OF CHRIST LUTHERAN
Hwy 90, 1.5 miles West of 1-75' 752-3807
Sunday Worship 10:00AM
NurseryAvail.
Wed. Pot Luck 6PM Worship 7PM.
Vicar John David Bryant


BETHEL UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
4869 US 441 South
Sunday Worship Services,
Traditional Services 8:30 & 11:00AM
386-755-1353
mybethelumc.com
First United Methodist Church
973 S, Marion Ave.
386-752-4488
Sunday School 9:45AM
Sunday Morning Worship
CasualWorship Service 8:50AM
Traditional Service 11:00AM
Program opportunities available in all
ft-Js fl s[ ill Jtgs..
Fir ja t:Cimplretehesdule
cionitici church utfice at

WESLEY MEIORL UNITED
1272SWMcFalarne, -52.- 3i
.Adjacerii to Slinmmer' 4.chi.oll
\V,:,f.hlp )lli & l1 JIJAM
Sunday) Schjs:,l :)1J AM
Nui.ery priuided
Praise WoistAip 6:00PM
AI V.A -\edneidays '5:00PM
Pastor The Rev. I. louieMahiey
S wmv.ie,.leyrriem .(:1n
WA-ERTOWN CONGREGATIONAL
METHODIST CHURCH
U.S. 90 E. turn on Cortez (next to Quality
S rd Id i ght on Okirj a.
Sunday Sdijol 9:45 AM
Sun.Worship 1AM & 6 PM
Wed. Night Service 7PM
Pastor, Randy Ogburn


WANDERSON COLUMBIA CO., INC.
ASPHALT PAVING
COMMERCIAL *INDUSRIAL
Site Preparation Road Building Parking Lots
Grading & Drainage
752-7585
871 NW Guerdon St., Lake City

HARRY'S
H..,.SodmSsh Heating & Air Conditioning Inc.
Harry Mosley, President

P On 752-2308 -

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this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440


Central States
Enterprises
Columbia County's Feed Headquarters
FEED PET SUPPLIES LAWN & GARDEN
ANIMAL HEALTH
668 NW Waldo St. 386-755-7445

MIKELL'S POWER EQUIPMENT, INC.
Your Lawn & Garden Headquarters
MOWERS CHAIN SAWS TRIMMERS
1152 US 90 WEST LAKE CITY, FL.
386-752-8098



LAKE CIYff
.1701 S 755-7050


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this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440


To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440

BAYWAYjanitorial Services
FIRE & Water Restoration
Floor & Carpet Care
Residenilid & Commercial
755-6142







To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440


To List





Your





Church





on the





Church


Tires for every need.
US 90 West across from Wal-Mart
752-0054

Morrell's
Your Complete decorating and
home furnishings store
SW Deputy Jeff Davis Lane (formerly Pinemount Rd.)
752-3910 or 1-800-597-3526
Mon.-Sat. 8:00-5:30 Closed Sunday








Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@aJkecityreportercom


Lake City Reporter





SPORTS


Saturday. March 5, 201 I


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


FROM THE SIDELINE


Brandon Finley
Phone: (386) 754-0420
bfinley@lakecityreportercom


Allen

wins

over

critics
critics are
everywhere
and everyone
has them.
That couldn't
be more .true than when
looking at the Columbia
High football job. No
matter who the head
coach would have been,
there would have been
those out there with their
judgments.
When the process was
taking place, I heard
more than a few opinions
on who was qualified for
the job. Brian Allen was
no different than anyone
else. He had those that
were behind him and
those that weren't. Their
main complaint Allen
comes in without head
coaching experience.
At one point, Bobby
Bowden didn't have head
coaching experience
either,, but like Allen's
former college coach,
someone had to give him
a chance. Columbia High
is Allen's chance. He's
doing everything right to
turn away the critics.
Before he was hired,
most calls I fielded
regarding Allen were
that he doesn't have the
coaching chops to step
into the role of Tigers'
head football coach. Oh,
how quickly that has
changed.
Those same people
who were saying that
Allen lacked experience
are now some of the
same people praising
him for his youth and
enthusiasm.
One thing about being
young is that Allen
hasn't had a lot of time
to build his r6sum6, but
don't think he thinks of
Columbia as a r6sume
builder. Coming home
was one of Allen's
dreams.
I hope Allen reads
this. I hope it adds fuel
to a fire that I already
feel burning inside him.
The night he was hired
I talked to him about
Tiger football, and it
wasn't two minutes into
the interview that I was
ready to get down in a
three-point stance.
A fiery attitude won't
win Allen games, and
that's ultimately what hell
be judged on. What it will
do is motivate players to
play beyond means they
thought possible. That will
turn into wins.
It's hard to talk to
him without feeling the
passion he has for the
program. That's exactly
what Columbia has been
missing.
Most importantly,
I believe the players
will respond to his fire.
Fans can criticize, but
they can't win games.
Allen has all the tools to
motivate players to do
just that.
* Brandon Finley covers
sports for the Lake City
Reporter.


Tigers bounce


back with win


over Ridgeview


By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com
After a down week,
Columbia High found a way
to head into the weekend
on a good note with a 5-1
victory against Ridgeview
High on Friday.
The Tigers were led by
a seven strikeout perfor-
mance on the mound by
J.T Gilliam in the victory.
Gilliam didn't give up an
earned run during the game,
despite Columbia allowing
one run. He went the full
seven innings and allowed
only three hits.
Ridgeview's only run
came in the first inning
when Pete Stutz scored
off a wild throw at second.
Stutz reached on a double
in the first innings.
The Tigers' bats didn't
get going until a break-
out-fourth inning, where
Columbia scored all of its
five runs.
Tracy Brinkley, which
was a pinch runner for


Gilliam, came in on a Blaine
Courson double to start
the rally. After an error,
Courson scored from third,
which he had stole earlier
in the inning.
The Tigers continued
to add. on from there with
Jacob Richardson rip-
ping a double up the mid-
dle to score Jason Plynn
and Kellan Bailey. A wild
pitch by Ridgeview led the
Tigers' final run and the 5-1
margin.
"We had a lot better at
bats tonight," Columbia
coach J.T. Clark said. "We
swung a lot better with two
strikes on us. We ran the
bases well and put pressure
on them, and when they
had pressure they kind of
kicked it around a bit. We
still have a ways to go, but
we're right in the district
at 2-1."
Columbia's game
scheduled for today at
Madison County High has
been moved to 7 p.m. on
Monday.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High's Seth Thomas throws a pitch in a game earlier this season. The Tigers
improved to 4-3 with a 5-1 win against Ridgeview High.


Extra effort


Williston beats


Fort White,


3-2,


in nine innings


By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com

FORT WHITE -
Williston High outlasted
host Fort White High in a
nine-inning baseball game
on Friday. The Red Devils
won the District 5-3A con-
test, 3-2.
Williston scored the win-
ning run without getting a
......hit. Bradley Jones was hit
by a pitch, moved to second
Son a throwing error, took
S.. third on a ground ball and
='"..r slid under the tag on a play
at the plate on a ground bail
-- by Jared Caswell.
The Indians (3-3, 0-2)
." trailed 2-0 before scoring
,.. their first run in three games
,..1 in the sixth. Kevin Dupree
.." A walked with two outs and
..:, ..=- ._ Cody Spin was hit by a pitch.
JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter Jonathan Dupree followed
Fort White's Cody Spin (9) connects with a pitch during a game against Williston High on with an RBI single.
Friday Fort White sent it into


extra innings with a run'
in the seventh. Taylor
Morgan, Bryce Beach and
Justin Kortessis walked
around a force out. Kevin
Dupree delivered a two-out
single to tie the game.
Kortessis had two dou-
bles in the game. Kevin
Dupree had two singles.
Beach had a triple.
Kortessis took the loss
in relief of Kevin Dupree.
Kortessis pitched one and
'A innings with two strike-
outs. Kevin Dupree went 7%
innings with four hits, one
earned run, two walks and
nine strikeouts.
Connor Clayton was
the winning pitcher for
Williston (3-3, 2-1 district).
He relieved Justin Baker
and went 21 innings with
two hits, six walks and three
strikeouts. Baker gave up
four hits, four walks, and
struck out 12 in 61/1 innings.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Kyle Stanley watches his ball after teeing off the sixth tee
during the second round of the Honda Classic Friday in Palm
Beach Gardens.


Winds play factor
in early rounds as
golfers struggle.
By STEVEN WINE
Associated Press
PALM BEACH
GARDENS Delighted to
be 5-underparatthe midway.
point of the windy Honda
Classic, Rory Sabbatini pre-
dicted the score would be
enough to win the tourna-
ment.
A few hours later, his lead
was gone.
The gusts of more than
20 mph abated some, and
Kyle Stanley took advan-
tage with his late tee time
Friday, shooting a 4-under
66 for a one-stroke lead
over Sabbatini.
Stanley, seeking his first
PGA Tour title, was at 6-under


134. Sabbatini shot a 64,
matching the tournament's
best round since it moved to
PGA National in 2007.
Charl Schwartzel was
third at 3 under after a 69,
and Ricky Barnes (68),
Jerry Kelly (67), Stuart
Appleby (70) and Tommy
Gainey (67) were 2 under.
Stanley had six birdies,
including three in a row, to
offset two bogeys. He was 1
under on holes 15 through
17, the daunting stretch
known as the Bear Trap.
"The wind probably
wasn't as strong as it was
Thursday," Stanley said.
"Late in my round it wasn't
really a factor."
The 23-year-old Stanley
played at Clemson, turned
pro in 2009 and had a career-
best 13th-place finish last
week in the Mayakoba Golf
Classic.


"I feel like I've been play-
ing well all year but haven't
quite put four good rounds
together," he said. "I'm get-
ting better, and that's the
main thing." ,
Among those five shots
behind at 1 under were Lee
Westwood, who fell to No.
2 in the rankings this week
behind Martin Kaymer, and
first-round leader Spencer
Levin. Westwood shot a 69,
and Levin a 72.
Matt Kuchar's tour-best
streak of 153 consecutive
holes without a three-putt
ended, but he shot a 70 and
was also 1 under. He won
the tournament in 2002.
The cut was at 6 over,
highest on the tour this year.
But the scores improved
in the second round to an
average of 72.3, compared
with 73.9 in the opening
round.


Stanley leads Honda


I


si'sl










LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SATURDAY, MARCH 5, 2011 Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
AUTO RACING
Noon
SPEED Rolex Sports Car Series,
Grand Prix of Miami, at Homestead
3 p.m.
ABC NASCAR, Nationwide Series,
Sam's Town 300, at Las Vegas
6 p.m.
SPEED NASCAR, Sprint Cup,
"Happy Hour Series," final practice for
Kobalt Tools 400, at Las Vegas (same-day
tape)
BOXING
10:30 p.m.
HBO Junior lightweights, Daniel
Ponce pe Leon (41-2-0) vs.Adrien Broner
(19-0-0);SaulAlvarez (35-0-1) vs. Matthew
Hatton (41-4-2), for vacant WBC junior
middleweight title, at Anaheim, Calif.
GOLF
I p.m.
TGC pGATour,The Honda Classic,
third round, at Palm Beach Gardens
3 p.m.
NBC PGATourThe Honda Classic,
third round, at Palm Beach Gardens
GYMNASTICS
I p.m.
NBC American Cup, at
Jacksonville
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
Noon
CBS Kansas at Missouri
ESPN Louisville atWestVirginia
ESPN2 -Virginia Tech at Clemson
2 p.m.
CBS Regional coverage, Oregon at
Arizona or Michigan St. at Michigan
ESPN Notre Dame at Connecticut
ESPN2 South Carolina at Mississippi
St.
4.p.m.
CBS -Villanova at Pittsburgh
ESPN Purdue at Iowa
ESPN2 Big South Conference,
championship game, UNC Asheville vs.
Coastal Carolina
VERSUS UNLV at Utah
5:30 p.m.
FSN UCLA atWashington St.
6 p.m.
ESPN Florida atVanderbilt
ESPN2 Atlantic Sun Conference,
championship game, at Macon, Ga.
8 p.m.
CBS Duke at North Carolina
ESPN2 Ohio Valley Conference,
championship game, at Nashville,Tenn.
9 p.m.
ESPN -Texas at Baylor
10:30. p.m.
FSN Southern Cal at Washington
MOTORSPORTS
8 p.m.
SPEED AMA Supercross, at
Daytona Beach
NBA DL BASKETBALL
II p.m.
VERSUS New Mexico at Utah
(same-day tape)
RODEO
-c .'i ...8 pm.. .
VERSUS PBR, Chicago Invitational
SOCCER
7:30 a.m.
ESPN2 Premier League, West
Bromwich Albion at Birmingham City .
WOMEN'S COLLEGE
BASKETBALL
I p.m.
FSN Atlantic Coast Conference,
semifinal, at Greensboro, N.C.
1 3:30 p.m.
FSN Atlantic Coast Conference,
semifinal, at Greensboro, N.C.
7:30 p.m.
FSN Kansas St. at Kansas

BASKETBALL

NBA schedule

Friday's Games
New Jersey 116,Toronto 103
Philadelphia III, Minnesota 100
Chicago at Orlando (n)
Oklahoma City atAtdanta (n)
Golden State at Boston (n)


Cleveland at NewYork (n)
New Orleans at Memphis (n)
Indiana at Dallas (n)
Phoenix at Milwaukee (n)
Miami at San Antonio (n)
Charlotte at L.A. Lakers (n)
Today's Games
Toronto vs. New Jersey at London,
England, 3 p.m.
Minnesota atWashington, 7 p.m.
Indiana at Houston, 8:30 p.m.
Sacramento at Utah, 9 p.m.
Charlotte at Portland, 10 p.m.
Denver at LA. Clippers, 10:30 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Chicago at Miami, I p.m.
L.A. Lakers at San Antonio, 3:30 p.m.
Washington at Detroit, 6 p.m.
Golden State at Philadelphia, 6 p.m.
New York at Atlanta, 6:30 p.m.
New Orleans at Cleveland, 6:30 p.m.
Phoenix at Oklahoma City, 7 p.m.
Memphis at Dallas, 7:30 p.m.
Boston at Milwaukee, 9 p.m.

APTop 25 schedule

Today's Games
No. 2 Kansas at No. 22 Missouri,
Noon
No. 3 BYU vs.Wyoming, 3:30 p.m.
No. 4 Pittsburgh vs. No. 19 Villanova,
4 p.m.
No.4 Duke at No. 13 North Carolina,
8 p.m.
No. 6 Purdue at Iowa, 4 p.m.
No. 7 Texas at Baylor, 9 p.m.
No. 8 Notre. Dame at No. 16
Connecticut, 2 p.m.
No. 9 San Diego State vs. Colorado
State, 10 p.m.
No. II Louisville at West Virginia,
Noon
No. 12,Syracuse vs. DePaul, 4 p.m.
No. 44 Florida at No. 21
Vanderbilt, 6 p.m.
No. 15 St.John's vs. South Florida,
8 p.m.
No. 17 Georgetown at Cincinnati,
2 p.m.
No. 18 Arizona vs. Oregon, 2 p.m.
No. 23 Xavier at Saint Louis, 2 p.m.
No. 24 Texas A&M vs. Texas Tech,
1:30 p.m.
No. 25 Utah State at Louisiana Tech,
7 p.m.
Sunday's Games
No. I Ohio State vs. No. 10 Wisconsin,
4 p.m.
No. 20 Kentucky at Tennessee, Noon

Women's SEC

At Bridgestone Arena
Nashville,Tenn.
First Round
Thursday
Florida 68,Arkansas 59
LSU 60,Alabama 36
South Carolina 62, Mississippi 50
Mississippi State 49,Aubum 47
Quarterfinals
Friday
Tennessee 92, Florida 75
Kentucky 60, LSU 58
Georgia vs. South Carolina (n)
Vanderbilt vs. Mississippi State (n)
Semifinals
Today
Tennessee vs. Georgia-South Carolina
winner, 4 p.m.
Kentucky-LSU winner vs. Vanderbilt-
Mississippi State, winner, 6:30 p.m.
Championship
Sunday
Semifinal winnePs, 5:30 p.m.

Women's ACC

At Greensboro (N.C.) Coliseum
First Round.
Thursday
Georgia Tech 81,Virginia Tech 58
Wake Forest 74;Virginia 68
N.C. State 71, Boston College 70
North Carolina 78, Clemson 64
Quarterfinals
Friday
Georgia Tech 70, No. 13 Maryland 64
Duke 79,Wake Forest 50
Miami vs. N.C. State (n)
Florida St North Carolina (n)
Semifinals
Today


Maryland-Georgia Tech winner vs.
Duke, I p.m.
Miami-N.C. State winner vs. Florida
State-North Carolina winner. 3:30 p.m.
Championship
Sunday
Semifinal winners, I p.m.

BASEBALL

Spring training

Today's Games
Detroit (ss) vs. Toronto at Dunedin,
1:05 p.m.
Minnesota vs. Tampa Bay at Port
Charlotte, 1:05 p.m.
Washington vs. N.Y.Yankees at Tampa,
1:05 p.m.
Florida vs. Boston (ss) at Fort Myers,
1:05 p.m.
Boston (ss) vs. Baltimore at Sarasota,
1:05 p.m.
Detroit (ss) vs. Houston (ss) at
Kissimmee, 1:05 p.m.
Pittsburgh vs. Philadelphia at
Clearwater, 1:05 p.m.
Houston (ss) vs. St. Louis at Jupiter,
1:05 p.m.
N.Y. Mets vs. Atlanta at Kissimmee,
1:05 p.m.
Texas vs. Arizona at Scottsdale, Ariz.,
3:10 p.m.
Sunday's Games
N.Y.Yankees vs. Houston at Kissimmee,
1:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay vs. Philadelphia (ss) at
Clearwater, 1:05 p.m.
Toronto vs. Pittsburgh at Bradenton,
1:05 p.m.
St. Louis vs. Florida at Jupiter,
1:05 p.m.
Philadelphia (ss) vs. Detroit at
Lakeland, 1:05 p.m.
Baltimore vs. Minnesota at Fort Myers,
1:05 p.m. *
Atlanta vs. Washington at Viera,
1:05 p.m.
Boston vs. N.Y. Mets at Port St. Lucie,
1:10 p.m.
Milwaukee (ss) vs. Texas at Surprise,
Ariz., 3:05 p.m.

AUTO RACING

Race week

NASCAR
SPRINT CUP
Kobalt Tools 400
Site: Las Vegas.
Schedule: Today, practice (Speed,
6-8:30 p.m.); Sunday, race, 3 p.m. (FOX,
2:30-6:30 p.m.).
Track: Las Vegas Motor Speedway
(oval, 1.5 miles).
Race distance: 400.5 miles, 267 laps.
NATIONWIDE
Sam's Town 300
Site: Las Vegas.
Schedule: Today, qualifying, race,
3 p.m. (ABC, 2:30-6 p.m.).
Track: Las Vegas Motor Speedway,
Race distance: 300 miles, 200 laps.

HOCKEY

NHL schedule

Friday's Games
New Jersey 2, Pittsburgh I
N.Y. Rangers at Ottawa (n)
Carolina at Chicago (n)
Columbus at Calgary (n)
Dallas at Anaheim (n)
Today's Games
St. Louis at N.Y. Islanders, I p.m.
Buffalo at Philadelphia, I p.m.
Vancouver at Los Angeles, 4 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Boston, 7 p.m.
Chicago at Toronto, 7 p.m.
Florida atAtlanta, 7 p.m.
Montreal at Tampa Bay, 7 p.m.
Detroit at Phoenix, 8 p.m.
Edmonton at Colorado, 10 p.m.
Dallas at San Jose, 10:30 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Philadelphia at N.Y. Rangers, 12:30 p.m.
New Jersey at N.Y. Islanders, 3 p.m.
Washington at Florida; 5 p.m.
Buffalo at Minnesota, 6 p.m.
Nashville at Calgary, 8 p.m.


BRIEFS


FORT WHITE FOOTBALL
Quarterback Club
meeting Monday
The Fort White
Quarterback Club will
meet at 7 p.m. Monday in
the teacher's lounge at the
high school.
For details, call Shayne
Morgan at 3974954.

FORT WHITE BASEBALL
Moe's Night
fundraiser set
The Fort White High
Dugout Club has a Moe's
Night fundraiser from
5-8 p.m. Thursday at Moe's
Southwest Grill in Lake
City. The team will receive
a portion of sales.
For details, call coach
Chad Bonds at 590-7362.

CHS SPORTS
FCA rally set
for March 14
A Fellowship of Christian
Athletes rally is 6 p.m.
March 14 in the Columbia
High auditorium. Cornelius
Ingram, former Gator
and current Philadelphia
Eagles player is the special
guest speaker There will


be door prizes. There is
no charge and all ages are
invited to attend.
For details, call Shayne
Barber at (386) 288-6621.

YOUTH GOLF
Junior tournament
in Louisiana
The Arrowhead Junior



Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

I NOCIT I


Golf Tour Copper Hill
Junior Classic is March
12-13 in Zachary, La. The
36-hole tournament for
ages 12-18 is ranked by
the National Junior Golf
Scoreboard.
Enter online by Sunday
at www.arrowheadjgt.com.

From staff reports

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek


Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as


k ,- 4i I \- -\A lNiL suggested by the above cartoon, ro

A: THE L 52
(Answers Monday)
Yesterday'sI Jumbles: BLINK STAFF ABRUPT FLINCH
I Answer: Alaskans like to keep their money here -
IN FAIR BANKS 3-5


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Tennessee guard Kamiko Williams (4) guards Florida guard Jaterra Bonds (10) in the
second half of an NCAA college basketball game at the Southeastern Conference
tournament on Friday in Nashville, Tenn. Tennessee won 92-75.


No.4 LadyVols beat


Florida in SEC tourney


By BETH RUCKER
Associated Press

NASHVILLE, Tenn.
- Glory Johnson scored
a career-high 25 points
and grabbed 11 rebounds
as No. 4 Tennessee beat
eighth-seeded Florida 92-
75 Friday in. the SEC tour-
nament quarterfinals.
The Lady. Volunteers
(29-2) will meet either
fourth-seeded Georgia or
fifth-seeded South Carolina
in Saturday's semifinals.,
Tennessee had a 38-36
halftime lead, but Johnson
hit a long-range jumper, a
shot in the paint and a fast-
break layup in the first 1:25


(
D
F
F


e
A

S


of the second half to give
the Lady Vols a 44-36 lead.
Jordan Jones hit a 3-point-
er from the corner to cut
the margin to five points,
but it was as close as the
Gators (18-14) would get.
The Lady Vols shot
69.2 percent in the sec-
ond half and hit 17 of 25
from the free-throw- line
after halftime. Shekinna
Stricklen added 20 points
for Tennessee.
Lanita Bartley led Florida
with 14 points.

Georgia Tech 70,
No. 13 Maryland 64

GREENSBORO, N.C. -


ACROSS 42 Home page
addr.
;oop 43 Greet the dawn
Dayofthewk 45 Loud kiss
Pat dry 48 Ms. Braxton
Floe or berg 49 Amtrak posting
kidded 52 Othello's
field, as inter- betrayer
3st 53 Zoomed
Apparitions 54 Vigor
Happy tune 55 Bad or good
Puccini genre sign
"Wild West" 56 Paving material
showman 57 Captain's milieu


Edge a doily
My, to monsieur
Beauty's swain
Shake
PD dispatch
Crack pilots
Immunity shots
Scuba-diving
site
Tingle
Wrap up
Decrees
Ranch measure
"A Boy Named
-"


DOWN


Apple seed
Yodeler's
answer
Third-quarter tide
Paradesight
Crater edge
Badges and
such
Fits in
Placed
Air France des-
tination


Georgia Tech finally found
the offensive balance it has
been seeking most of the
season.
Sasha Goodlett tied a-
season high with 18 points
to help the Yellow Jackets
rally past No. 13 Maryland
70-64 Friday in the quarter-
finals of the Atlantic Coast
Conference tournament.
"We know w6 have one of
the best backcourts in the
ACC, but one of the things
we've been lacking is an inte-
rior game," Georgia Tech
coach MaChelle Joseph said.
Alex Montgomery added
17 points, including the
clinching three-point play
down the stretch.


Answer to Previous Puzzle

,J AIGCDS PiJs
AVE HAIL SLUE
IA AYLA TALE
ARI T L. Y NI D
0R N


TRP NEATO
A RA OS
SP N IM NIB
OPAS ANTE
S LAB
BOAS GLASSFUL
L K 0N ANY
AR-ES ADE VIR
HEN MST AXE


10 Explosive let-
ters
12 Rock layers
15 Makes after
taxes
18 Gear tooth


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


20 File label,
maybe
21 Disqualify
22 Thrust-and-
parry sword
23 Under the cov-
ers
24 Jumbo planes
25 Wanton look
26 Type
of eagle
29 Quote from
31 Billboard dis-
plays
33 U235
phenomenon
35 Injured
38 Billiard stick
40 Dressed
42 Seat
formally
43 Travel far and
wide
44 "Bus Stop"
author
46 Saucers'
mates
47 "Fish Magic"
artist
48 Padre's her-
mano
49 Former JFK
arrival
50 Auditor
51 Clean water
org.


2011 by UFS, Inc.


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SATURDAY, MARCH 5, 2011


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


TLGIHC



HPENEW/
7T7- r' r












NFL, players agree to 7-day extension on CBA


By BARRY WILNER
Associated Press

WASHINGTON That
reprieve in NFL labor nego-
tiations will last another
week.
The league and the play-'
ers' union agreed Friday
on a seven-day extension
of the collective bargaining
agreement. The CBA was
set to run out on Thursday
before a 24-hour extension
was granted.
Federal mediator George
Cohen announced the new
arrangement, under which
talks will resume Monday.
"We are continuing to
work hard, to identify solu-
tions," NFL Commissioner
Roger Goodell said. "We
believe that, as I've said
many times before, that
this will be solved through
negotiations and that's what
we're focused on."
"Well continue to work
hard, and we'll be back next
week."
NFL Players Association
executive director
DeMaurice Smith noted
both sides had committed
to giving the talks a chance
to move ahead. "We look
forward to a deal coming
out of that," he said.
Both sides met for the
11th day with Cohen before
settling on a plan to keep
"talking. If the CBA expires
the owners could lock out
the players, and the union
could decertify to try and
prevent that through the
courts something the
NFLPA did in 1989.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
NFLPA Executive Director DeMaurice Smith speaks during a news conference about labor talks Friday in Washington.


'Talking is better than
litigating," Goodell said.
For the moment, talking
at least staves off the NFL's
first work stoppage since
the 1987 players' strike. It
certainly indicates neither
the owners nor the players
are ready to make a bold
move to shut down a league
that rakes in $9 billion a
year.
But the extension doesn't
mean the sides have gotten,


close on the key issues:
How to divide the
league's revenues, includ-
ing what cut team owners
should get up front to help
cover certain costs, such
as stadium construction.
Under the old deal, owners
received about $1 billion off
the top. They entered these
negotiations seeking to add
another $1 billion to that.
A rookie wage scale,
and how much of the money


saved by the owners under
such a system would go to
veteran players.
The owners' push to
'expand the regular season
from 16 games to 18 while
reducing the preseason
by two games. The play-
ers oppose that idea, citing
health factors, especially the
number of injuries already
sustained during a 16-game
regular season. 0
Benefits for retired


players.
'We've got very serious
issues. We've got signifi-
cant differences," NFL lead
negotiator Jeff Pash said.
Still, he added, "there's
been enough serious dis-
cussion to warrant both
sides taking this step." Pash
also said he wouldn't be sur-
prised if NFL owners were
at the sessions next week,
a step that would strongly
indicate discussions were


reaching a critical stage.
President Barack Obama
urged the sides to keep talk-
ing when asked Thursday
about the NFL labor dis-
pute.
"I'm a big football fan,"
Obama said, "but I also
think that for an industry
that's making $9 billion a
year in revenue, they can
figure out how to divide it
up in a sensible way and
be true to their fans, who
are the ones who obviously
allow for all the money that
they're making."
Smith was cautious when
describing the tenoi of the
talks. Asked if he thinks the
league has been negotiat-
ing in good faith, he said,
"When you say something
about trust or when you
raise issues about things
like confidence, none of
those things are repaired
quickly."
Reaction from around the
league was swift and mildly
upbeat.
"It's good they're talk-
ing. ... I don't know exactly
what's being done or what's
being said or why it's being
extended, butatleastthey're
talking," said Ravens safety
Tom Zbikowski.
"Whether it's dor.e by
next week, I'm not sure
about that," he said, "but at
least it's moving."
Added player agent
Ralph Cindrich: "Any. time
you have an extension in
a negotiating process, it is
positive. All the more so
now because there is a
mediator involved."


Some states to


be shut out of


NCAA tourney


By JEFF LATZKE
Associated Press

*OKLAHOMA CITY -
When. the NCAA tourna-
ment bracket comes out
on Selection Sunday, Ray
Hoyt is already prepared
for the likelihood that no
Oklahoma team will be in
the 68-team field.
As it stands now, none
of the state's four Division
I teams Oklahoma,
Oklahoma State, Tulsa
and Oral Roberts fig-
ure to make the Big Dance'
without a surprising run
in their conference tourna-
ments. It would be the first
time that's happened since
1981 in a state that loves
basketball, if not as much
as football.
And perhaps bad timing
for Tulsa, which will be
hosting early round NCAA
games for the first time
since 1985.
"You always like to have
a local team but I think
this year that's really not
going to come to fruition,"
said Hoyt, the Tulsa Sports
Commission's executive
director. "I still think if
we get Texas or Kansas
pr some of those other
(regional) teams ... that'll
really sell tickets for us as
well."
Not every state can put
a handful of teams into
the field, as New York,
Ohio, Virginia, Florida
and California figure to do'.
Traditional powers North
Carolina and Arizona


should be back in along
with Kansas, UCLA, Duke
and Georgetown giving
the District of Columbia
representation that many
states won't.
Oklahoma isn't alone.
Among the other states
that could be underrepre-
sented in the field:
Iowa. Neither Iowa or
Iowa State has made the
NCAA tournament or
the NIT, for that matter
- since 2006, when the
third-seeded Hawkeyes
were stunned in the first
round by Northwestern
State 64-63. In recent years,
it's been Northern Iowa
- remember that stunner
over top-seeded Kansas
last year? and Drake
that have represented the
state in the Big Dance. But
this year none may make
it.
Illinois. The fading
Illini may be the only rep-
resentative for a state that's
been shut out two of the past
three years. Northwestern
started the season 9-0 but
has wilted in Big Ten play
and DePaul with just
one win in conference play
- is not among nearly a
dozen Big East teams hop-
ing to get in.
Mississippi.-
Mississippi State nearly
made it to the NCAAs last
season but lost by one
to Kentucky in the SEC
championship game and
had to settle for a top seed
in the NIT. This year could
become the second in a


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Oklahoma's Carl Blair shoots over Texas Tech's John
Roberson during their NCAA college basketball game at
United Spirit Arena in Lubbock, Texas, Wednesday.


row the state is shut out if
the Bulldogs, Ole Miss or
Southern Miss don't win an
automatic bid.
Oregon. It's shaping up
to be the fourth time in five
years that neither Oregon
or Oregon State will be on
the bracket, with the Ducks
making the only appearance
in that span. And much of
the rest of the Northwest
could go unrepresented,
too. Minnesota, Idaho,
Montana, the Dakotas, and
Wyoming could all get shut


out this year.
None of those states
have been represented in
the tournament as consis-
tently as Oklahoma.
The Sooners have made
it to the tournament 22
times in the past 28 years,
Oklahoma State has been
there 16 times and there's
been only one year when
both didn't make the field.
Oral Roberts kept the
streak going in 2007 with
one of its three consecutive
NCAA berths.


Vick, teammates plan to work out on own


Associated Press

ATLANTIC CITY, N.J.
- Michael Vick is making
plans to get ready for next
season despite the NFL's
labor situation.
The Philadelphia Eagles'
Pro Bowl quarterback says
he'll work out with some
of his teammates on their
own if there's a lockout.
The league and the play-
ers' union agreed Friday
on a seven-day extension
of the collective bargaining


agreement.
"Wherever we agree to
be collectively. It may be
Florida, it may be Hawaii.
We'll get our work in,"
Vick said. "Being on the
same page, timing, which
is very important. I think
everybody has to be on
one accord, all thinking
the same. Practice and film
study are important, but
just familiarizing ourselves
with each other, that's
going to be big for us."
Vick was in Atlantic City


to receive the Maxwell
Award for outstanding
professional player. Eagles
coach Andy Reid also was
to be honored as the out-
standing coach in a Friday
night ceremony.
Vick, who signed a one-
year contract with the
Eagles after being desig-
nated the franchise play-
er, said a long-term deal
hasn't been discussed yet.
However, it's likely that
would happen once the
new CBA is agreed upon.


Under rules of the cur-
rent agreement, a team
must pay a franchise play-
er the average of the top
five salaries at his position.
. Vick would make at least
$16 million under this tag.
"We haven't talked about
long-term negotiations or
my future. We just talked
about what can get done
this year," Vick said. "I
think that anything else
that happens is solely on
me. I think I dictate the sit-
uation based on my play."


Hurricanes


ready for start


of spring ball


By TIM REYNOLDS
Associated Press

CORAL GABLES A
few weeks ago, Miami
coach Al Golden was still
learning everyone's name.
The strengths and weak-
nesses of the Hurricanes
were complete mysteries.
Offensive and defensive
philosophies were still
being hammered out. Plans
were not in place for how
things would work in the
coming weeks.
That's all changed.
"We're light years ahead
from three weeks ago,"
Golden said.
And he'll have a far better
feel for his team 15 practices
.from now, when the spring
season for the Hurricanes
ends. The first formal
workout of the new season
- and Golden's Miami era
- is Saturday morning, and
nearly three months after
getting hired, the program's
22nd coach is ready to call
his opening play.
"I just(want to go coach,"
Golden said. "I want to go
coach for a little bit and
have a little fun."
Golden warned that the
opening depth chart for the
spring would have some
"wake-up calls," and he
wasn't kidding.
At quarterback, where
Jacory Harris and Stephen
Morris are ultimately
expected to compete for the
starting job in the fall, it's
Spencer Whipple the son
of former offensive coordi-
nator Mark Whipple list-
ed as the first-stringer going
into spring ball. Harris is
second, Morris third.
Another major surprise
comes at left tackle, where
6-foot-8, 340-pound Seantrel
Henderson is No. 2 on
the chart behind Malcolm
Bunche. Some other
eyeraising moves include
converted fullback John
Calhoun as the first-string
tight end (where Asante
Cleveland will miss the
spring because of an injury)
and Jimmy Gaines getting
the early nod over Jordan
Futch at middle linebacker.
"Some guys got their
butts beat out in the offsea-


son program,", Golden said.
"And now it's going to be
up to them to try to win this
second phase. We made
sure the kids knew how it
was going to be declared,
how the depth was going to
be listed going into spring,
and that was based on the
offseason."
Golden and his staff
have been able to do some
coaching already, albeit in
highly limited forms under
NCAA rules. They've held
a number of pre-dawn con-
ditioning workouts, where
no footballs are allowed. In
short, guys can run around
and whistles can be blown.
That all changes
Saturday.
"There's a lot of excite-
ment going on," center
Tyler Horn said. "I thank
God I never had to deal with
this before, these coaching
changes. But a lot of times
with coaching changes you
see guys who don't want
to buy into the program or
are unsure. I feel like the
air around here right now
is that everybody is buying
into it."
In Golden's mind, the
Hurricanes will have no
returning starters on the
field when spring practice
starts Saturday.
The way he sees it, every
job is open. With good rea-
son.
The Hurricanes went
7-6 last season and again
fell short in the Atlantic
Coast Conference. Golden
is promising to change the
way Miami does certain
things, and sees the 15 prac-
tices of the spring session
as vital building blocks.
So do his players.
'There's a huge chance
here for a great turn-
around," Horn said.
As always, many eyes
will be on the quarterback
situation. Harris (1,793
yards, 14 touchdowns, 15
interceptions) and Morris
(1,240 yards, seven TDs,
nine interceptions) could
both claim the returning-
starter tag from 2010, when
Harris had the job until get-
ting hurt and Morris shone
at times in relief of the two-
year starter.


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SATURDAY, MARCH 5, 2011


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420
Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420











4B LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS SATURDAY, MARCH 5, 2011 Page Editor: Emogene Jraham, 754-0415


DILBERT
E
AT THE TRADE SHOW 8
ARE YOU ACTUALLY E
INTERESTED IN THIS
PRODUCT OR ARE YOU
JUST TRYING TO CHAT
ME UP?


BABY BLUES


BLONDIE


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE


SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS


GARFIELD


FRANK & ERNEST


DEAR ABBY


Girl's phlegmatic fits dampen

enjoyment for theatergoers


DEAR ABBY: I recently
attended a play with my
mother and daughter. We
were looking forward to
an evening together. After
we were seated, a young
girl and her mother came
and sat directly behind us.
The girl was sick and she
coughed hacked, really
- throughout the entire
performance. Not only was
it disturbing, but the cough-
ing was so loud we missed a
lot of the dialogue.
Those tickets were not
cheap and we did not en-
joy the play as much as we
could have. What would
have been the proper way
to handle that situation? -
ANNOYED THEATER-
GOER IN CHICAGO
DEAR ANNOYED: Un-
less the house was sold out,
you should have spoken to
an usher or the theater man-
ager and asked to be seated
elsewhere. And if you were
concerned about catching
something, you should have
asked to exchange the tick-
ets for another performance
and left.
DEAR ABBY: I have an
ex-boyfriend with whom I
have remained friends since
we broke up two years ago.
We see each other a few
times a year, but I haven't
seen him in six months.


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearabby.com
Last Christmas, as a gift, I
bought him a bottle of wine I
know he enjoys. I have men-
tioned several times that we
should get together so I can
give it to him, but he is mak-
ing no effort to hang out
At what point do I put
the bottle to better use and
drink it myself? MIKE
IN ST. PAUL
DEAR MIKE: How
about tonight? And be sure
to share it with someone
who will appreciate your
company as well as the
wine.
DEAR ABBY: I am the
mother of a beautiful daugh-
ter who has never met her
real father. I wasn't sure
about who he was, a fact
I'm not proud of. I tried to
convince myself that her
dad was the one guy I re-
ally liked at the time, but as
she has grown older, many
of her mannerisms and little
habits reflect characteristics
of the other guy ("Bobby")
who was also in my life then.
I parted ways with both men


while I was pregnant
I am currently married,
although we are strug-
gling. I am now questioning
whether I should try to lo-
cate Bobby to see if he is the
father. I don't expect any-
thing from him, but I would
like a resolution. This could
strain my relationship with
my husband, but if Bobby is
the father, I strongly feel he
has a right to know. Please
help me figure out what to
do. UNSURE IN ILLI-
NOIS
DEAR UNSURE: Be-
cause you are willing to risk
straining the relationship
you have with your current.
husband, explain to him that:,
you need to be sure of the
identity of your daughter's
father because the man's I
medical history could one!
day be important for her to !
have. It's the truth.
Then contact BOTH men
you were seeing at the time'
of her conception, explain,
the situation, and request!
a DNA test If you let them;:
know that you don't expect
anything from them but
their medical history, they.
may be willing to comply:
- and you'll have your an-,
swer.


* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-
April 19): Good fortune
will come to you through
the people you know and
have helped in the past
Your reluctance to ask for
what you deserve will be
your downfall. Everyone
needs a little help some of
the time. ***
TAURUS (April 20-
May 20): Put greater em-
phasis on the way you ex-
plain what you want done
or intend to do. You will re-
ceive the push you require
if you take care of the pa-
perwork prior to presenting
your case. Don't hesitate to
show emotion. ****
GEMINI (May21-June
20): You may be thinking
big and wanting more but
what you receive will be up
to those you have to deal
with. Take extra time and-
care with your presentation
and strategy. Financial sup-
port is within reach if you
are prudent **
CANCER (June 21-
July 22): Keep things
in perspective. Favorable
change is within reach, so
plan to make a move, either
personally or profession-
ally. Your status is on the
upswing and your ability to
force issues and get your
way is prevalent. --****
LEO (July 23-Aug.
22): Friends, family and


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

personal relationships
should be your main focus.
Doing something that can
benefit you mentally, physi-
'cally or financially should
be your plan. Don't let
someone else call the shots.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): What you do should
be directly linked to your
own emotional and physical
well-being. Don't let what
others do or say catch you
off-guard or lead you down
a path that doesn't suit you.
Put your own needs first

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): Preparation will en-
sure that you do well on an
upcoming interview or a
project. Put time aside for
someone you love, so he
or she doesn't feel left out
A social evening filled with
unusual entertainment will
lead to interesting conver-
sations. ***
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-
Nov. 21): You may not get
along with everyone you
meet today but the people
who really count will be
there for you. Expect things
to be hectic, no matter what
you do. Overall satisfaction
will be yours by the end of
the day. ***


SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): Look beyond
what others do or say. Fo-
cus more on your home and
what you can do to make it?
a better place to live. An old
friendship or love relation-
ship will help you see the
possibilities that exist. **
CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19):'Bring tht
past and present together
to reach the goals set for
the future. Ift's how you re-
late to old and new friends
and acquaintances that will
enable you to better under-
stand who you are and what
you want Let patience and
prudence be your friends.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): You know what
you are capable of doing so
don't hold back now when,
there is so much to gain.,'
Don't allow anyone else's;
reluctance or reservations
to hold you back. Fair play
and intuition will lead to
your victory. ***
PISCES (Feb. 19-
March 20): Don't let your,
anxious behavior cause you
to overstep your bounds or
create a rift with someone
you need on your team.
Your emotions wjll chal-
lenge your integrity and
make others question what
you really want Stick to the
truth. ***


CELEBRITY CIPHER


by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: J equals C
" ITEWEPN E K EWK YIP TSI MTU."
- RSPTZ FEDDST "IRZ UY ITEWSTK
ITEWS? GSJMBKS EW EKP'W


W R ST S "


- WRY.FMK GSTNST


PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "I had uterine cancer... the most under-funded and
under-researched of all the female cancers." Fran Drescher
(c) 2011 by NEA, Inc. 3-5


CLASSIC PEANUTS


WEAL60FIGHT AND SUPPORT BUT NOT ONE
THETERRORISTS GOVERNMENT WORDABOUT
ANP PROVIDE / PEACE OUR BASEBALL
HUMANITARIA CAMPAIGN TEAWINNINe
RELIEF LAST YAR! -I

Ge6 +
A4fZ


Page Editor: EmogenetGraham, 754-0415 '


4B LAKE CITY REPORTER


ADVICE & COMICS SATURDAY, MARCH 5,2011











LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SATURDAY, MARCH 5, 2011


Lake City Reporter




CLASSIFIED


I ADvantage


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

755-5440


One item per ad $250
4 ines* ys ne S.25
Rate applies to private individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling $100 or ls.
This Is a non-refundable rate.




4 lines 6 days line $110






One Item per ad additional
4 lines 6 days ain al
eline $1.15
Rate applies to private Individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling $1,00 or less.





persaEach additional
4liences 6p a~ys Ine $1.45
persona nse totalling $2 ,500 or less.
1Thi ts n ot e pr




One Item per ad 7
4 lines 6 days Each additional
Rate applies to private11 Indlvlduls selling
personal merchandise totalling S1,000 or less.
Each Item must include a price.
This Is a non-refundable rate.



One Item per3ad 3O
4 line s pe 6 ays Each additional
4 lines 6 days line $1.65
Rate applies to private Individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling $ 00 or less.
r ..te u Ine. lud a pri I
c One Ite p ad |


4 lines 750
3 days 1 5
Includes 2 Signs a hMn aditial lirn.i5


Limited to service type advertis-
ing only.
4 lines, one month....192.00
$10.80 each additional line
Includes an additional $2.00 per
ad for each Wednesday insertion.


You can call us at 755-5440,
Monday through Friday from 8:00
a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Some people prefer to place their
classified ads in person, and some
ad categories will require prepay-
ment. Our office is located at 180
East Duval Street.
You can also fax or email your ad
copy to the Reporter.
FAX: 386-752-9400 Please
direct your copy to the Classified
Department.
EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityre- .
porter.com





Ad is to Appear: Call by: Fax/Emall by:
Tuesday Mon.,10:00 a.m. Mon.,9:00 a.m.
Wednesday Mon., 10:00 a.m. Mon., 9:00 a.m.
Thursday Wed., 10:00 am. Wed., 9:00 a.m.
Friday Thurs., 10:00 am. Thurs., 9:00 a.m.
Saturday Fri., 10:00 a.m. Fri., 9:00 a.m.
Sunday Fri., 10:00 a.m. Fri., 9:00 a.m.
These deadlines are subject to change without notice.




Ad Errors- Please read your ad
on the first day of publication.
We accept responsibility for only
the first incorrect insertion, and
only the charge for the ad space
in error. Please call 755-5440
immediately for prompt correc-
tion and billing adjustments.
Cancellations- Normal advertising
deadlines apply for cancellation.'
Billing Inquiries- Call 755-5440.
Should further information be
required regarding payments or
credit limits, your call will be trans-
ferred to the accounting depart-
ment.


Advertising copy is subject to
, approval by the Publisher who
reserves the right to edit, reject,
or classify all advertisements under
appropriate headings. Copy should
be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the first day of pub-
lication. Credit for published errors
will be allowed for the first insertion
for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the
Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nor for any general,
special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply
with Federal, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
nation in employment, housing and
public accommodations. Standard
abbreviations are acceptable; how-
ever, the first word of each ad may
not be abbreviated.

In Print and Oniliine
wwWe.laieityreporter.com


010 Announcements








020 Lost & Found
Austrailian Cattle Dog male, lost
on Feb 18th, Microchipped, family
misses terribly, brown collar
w/blue tags 386-935-2920 Reward







Found Cat, Gum Swap Rd.
Osceola Nat'l Forest. Very
friendly, gray., 386-758-9880
or check with LC Animal shelter
Lost intact male Blue Heeler,
last seen at Belk's on Feb 24th,
45 lbs, brown collar w/tags,
Reward offered 386-935-2920
Male Rottweiller lost evening of
02/21, County Road 138/Rum
Island area. REWARD.
Please call 386-454-2925
if no answer leave message

n100 Job
Ir w Opportunities
04543759
Join our family of
caring professionals!
-.-.


Community Education
Manager
Responsible for assisting in
planning and coordinating
special projects and events to
provide Hospice Education
throughout the service area.
Minimum of a Bachelor's
degree with at least 3 to 5 years
experience and a proven track
record within the development
services arena.
Job summary as well and
application can be found at:
www.hospiceofcitruscounty.org
email:
hrtahospiceofcitruscountv.org
Hospice of the Nature Coast
P.O. Box 641270
BevrlSy Hills,' FL 14464' '
Fax: 352-527-9366
DFWP/EOE

04543812
Family Services Analyst
Non-Profit organization is
seeking highly motivated
professional for
VPK/School Readiness/Parent
Education Position. Experience'
in Social Services or related
field preferred salary
$9.62-$12.98 plus benefits.
Fluently Bilingual in
English/Spanish preferred
Send resumes by
February 14, 2011 to:
Early Learning Coalition
Attn: HR, 1104 SW Main Blvd
Lake City, FL 32025 or fax to
386-752-8094

05525200
Field Service Technician,
Service medical equipment in
North Florida,
established company, will train,
knowledge of electricity a plus,
Send resume to
PO Box 494273
Port Charlotte, FL 33949

05525235
Automotive/RV Warranty
Writer-Administrator
Travel Country RV is looking
for a warranty writer or service
writer experienced in automo-
bile or RV warranty writing or
administration. Some account-
ing knowledge and excellent
computer skills required.
Applicant must be able to work
closely with service technicians,
administrative and sales
personnel. Competitive salary
and benefits. Fax resume to:
Travel Country RV
386-755-5170 attn:Ron Fleming
or email to
ron@travelcountryrv.com
All inquiries will be kept in
Strict confidence







Home Improvements

Carpentry, remodeling, paint,
repairs, additions, Lic. & Ins.
Since 1978 FREE estimates
386-497-3219 .or 954-649-1037

Lawn & Landscape Service

Clean Pine Straw,
You pick it up, $1.85 a bale,
delivery 100 bales, $285,
386-688-9156

Services


100 Job
Opportunities
AVON!!!, EARN up to 50%!!!
Only $10 for Starter Kit,
1-800-275-9945 pin #4206
www.youravon.com/tdavies

CDL A Flatbed/Van Truck
Driver needed for F/T OTR SE
area, 3 years exp or more, Contact
Melissa or Mary @ 386-935-2773
Groundman/Truck driver for tree
work. Class "B" CDL w/air
breaks. Part Time/work available
Clean driving record,
386-963-5026, Drug Test.

McDonald's of Alachua is seek-
ing qualified management candi-
dates to join our team. Wages
range from $9 to $15 per hr, based
on exp., competitive benefits
apply online at
www.mcstate.com/alachua or fax
resume to 386-755-2435

Mobile Waiters Needed-
Immediate interviews, Make your
own schedule, Flexible hours,
Avg $40-$50 per 3-5 hr. shift!
Must have own vehicle,
Be 21 years old &
Have cell phone w/texting,
Call 888-DDI-WORK ext 1
SECURITY OFFICERS
FT/PT, Great Pay and Benefits.
Lake City/Alachua Area.
Must have Sec. Lic.,' clean
background, pass drug screen.
Call: 866-458-9523 EOE
Subway is now hiring.
Management Experience a plus.
Send resumes to:
lakecitymanager@yahoo.com'
Tire Tech/Serv Truck Operator
Exp w/car, truck, tractor tire re-
pairs. Clean DL req'd. Avail for
night & weekend calls. Pay based
on exp. Apply at Thomas Tire
CR 25A. 386-752-8648
Wanted Highly motivated
individual for Sales Position.
Rountree -Moore Ford Lincoln
Mercury Great benefits, paid vaca-
tion. Exp. a plus but not necessary.
Call Chris. @ 386-755-0630

120 Medical
Employment

05525260
Medical Assistant,
Exp only need apply! Looking
for qualified indiv., quick learn-
er, good personality,dependable
Fax resume to: Cheryl
386-754-3657 or email to:
office manager@
primarycaremedic.com

AMIkids Family Services Program
seeks Case Managers for
community based program work-
*ing w/ at risk youth &
families. Bachelor's degree req'd.
Req's travel to 7 counties.
Fax resume to 386.362.0932.

AMIkids Family Services Program
seeks Case Managers for
community based program work-
ing w/ at risk youth &
families. Bachelor's degree req'd.
Req's travel to 7 counties.
Fax resume to 386.362.0932.

240 Schools &
Education

04543680
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-03/28/10

Phlebotomy national certifict-
tion, $800 next class-04/11/11
Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com


310 Pets & Supplies
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free fromb intestinal and exterfel
parasites. Many species of wild- .
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.

361 Farm Equipment
84 Ford 4610 Tractor. Runs good.
Solid 2WD. New front tires,
350hr on 2005 motor. Dependable.
$7500. obo. 386-867-0005

401 Antiques
CASH CASH CASH CASH
Pre 1964 Silver Coins, Sterling,
Flatware, Costume Jewelry.
Unusual Antiques 386-963-2621

407 Computers
DELL COMPUTER
$100.
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170


408 Furniture
Captain's Bed twin size with
mattress. It has 6 drawers and a
cubby underneath. Oak. $250 obo
386-963-1296


420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$250 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.

430 Garage Sales
Annual Yard Sale
March 5th, 7a-2p
Bethel United Methodist Church
Hwy 441 S
Big Sale Sat. 8-noon. 90 W to
Brown Rd. to Emerald Lake To
Lakeside. Look for signs. Furni-
ture, clothes, books, toys & more





Fri & Sat, 8-?, women & baby
clothes, variety of household
items, Colquitt Way,
Plantation Subdivision
Fri & Sat. 8-? Fantasy Glen off CR
135 across from Stewarts. Look
for signs. Scooter, appliances,
electronics, hshold, lots of misc.




HUGE GARAGE SALE Fri/Sat
8a-2p,_Yard, electrical tools, laser
disc/4.tubs of movies, furn, Anti-
que tools, nice clothes and much
more, 438 Clubview Cir (behind
LC Medical Center)386-590-2423






PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.

Sat Only, 8-?, Moving Sale, Ev-
erything needs to go! 412 SW
Deanna Terr,off of Marvin Burnett
between Bascom Norris & 47
SAT. 8-? 41 S. turn left on 131C,
follow signs. home interior,
household items, rug,
kitchen, purses, etc.
YARD SALE!!!
@2463 SW. Mayo Rd.
Off Pinemount. Look for signs
SAT Only 8am-2pm


440 Miscellaneous
2002 EZ Go Golf Cart
w/like new 5x8 trailer.
$1000.
SOLD
King Comforter Set. Shams,
bedskirt, 3 designer pillows.
French Country design.
Excellent condition. Paid $250
Asking $65.386-454-4947
New Central A/C, still in box,
with full ten year factory warranty
$1,795
Call 386-364-1090
Tow Behind Grill/Smoker
$1,250 OBO.
386-249-3104 or
386-719-4802

630 Mobile Homes
630 for Rent
14 Wide, 2/2-$475. mo. + dep.
Clean, Quiet Country Park
Water, septic, garbage included
758-2280 References, NO PETS!
2&3 BR MH. $395- $650. mo.
plus deposit. Water & sewer fur-
nished. Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
3/2 MH 1064 sq ft,remodeled in
small/quiet park, near FGC, Small
pets ok, $500 dep $500 mo
386-752-1971 or 352-281-2450
3BR/2BA Doublewide on 1 ac.
Lg. Rooms. $750 a month.
1st month and full security.
Please call 386-965-7534.


f630 Mobile Homes
630 for Rent
A very clean & well maintained
2/2 units in nice park. $599.mo
w/$500. dep. Rent includes water,
sewer, trash p/u. Close to town
386-984-8448 or 623-7547
DWMH. Lg. newer 3/2 on 1 ac.
Porch, carport & fenced yard.
Some pets ok. Ellisville area.
$850. mo, $650. sec 386-752-5450
For Rent/Sale, Owner Finance..
3br/2ba. Lg DWMH. remodeled,
new AC, 2 ac. 10 mi SW Branford
Hwy. No pets 1st + sec. 984-7478.
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White Contact 386-623-2465
or 386-623-3404







64A Mobile Homes
64U for Sale
$216 a month remodeled,
like new, 2Bd/2Ba S Wide
Delivered & blocked, appliances,
A/C $2500 down, 8 year fin.
Possible owner financing. Ready
now. Call Gary 386 758-9824
05525133
Palm Harbor Homes
Has 3 Modular Homes
Available at HUGE Savings
Over'40K Off
Call Today! 800-622-2832

Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent

05524728
SPRING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans;
some with garages.
Call 386-454-1469.
or visit our website:
www.springhillvillage.net


05524833
DEPOSIT AS LOW AS $89 +
$200 OFF!!
BEST PRICES IN TOWN!
Windsong Apts.
386-758-8455


1, 2 & 3 Bedroom Apartments
& Mobile Homes
starting at $350 per month
386-755-2423
2 /1 Apt in duplex for rent, very
clean. $585 mo. w/$585 dep. no
pets, w/carport, off Branford Hwy
(5 miles from town) 386-752-7578
A Landlord You Can Love!
2 br Apts $575. & up + sec. Great
area. CH/A washer/dryer hookups.
386-758-9351/352-208-2421
Brandywine Apartments
Now Renting
1, 2 and 3 bedrooms
Central Heat and Air
Ph. 386-752-3033
W. Grandview Ave. 32055
Equal Housing Opportunity
Great location W of 1-75, spacious
deluxe 2BR apts., garage, W/D
hook up. patio. $600 & up, + SD,
386 965-0276
The Lakes Apts. Studios & lBr's
from $135/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly.
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $525. + sec.
Call Michelle 386-752-9626

720 Furnished Apts.
720 For Rent

New furnished studio apt in a
home, private entrance & bath,
,incl all utilities, trash, cable, frig
and pest control. $450 mo + dep;
immediate avail. 386-752-2020
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge; microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808


73O Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent
3/2 on 2.1 acres, 2 car garage,
ceramic tile, front & rear porches,
$995 mo, plus 2 mo sec.
Lease with the option to buy
386-758-9996 or 386-365-5434
3BR/1.5BA. BLOCK HOME.
Fenced (privacy) back yard.
Nice area. $825. mo $825. dep.
References req'd. 386-364-2897
3br/2ba new const.in nice S/D
Lease Opt. to buy. $900/Mo. $700
Dep, + 1st & last Req'd., Credit
Check No Pets (386)755-9476
Attractive 3br/2ba Brick home.
Excellent location View of
Lake Montgomery. No Pets.
$950. mo. 386-965-0763
Close to Wellborn, nice & cozy
2/1, very private,
$625 mo, sec dep $500, app fee,
call 386-935-1482
House for rent. Everything new.
4br/2ba plus study. Carport. Great
neighborhood. $1000 mo last plus
security. 386-867-2283
TOWNHOUSE 2br plus
bonus room. w/1.5 bath.
Quail Heights CC. $750. mo plus
$250 damage dep. 386-752-8553

750 Business &
Office Rentals
1200 sq ft Professional Office
Space, across from Courthouse,
newly remodeled, 152 N Marion
$650 mo 386-867-4995 / 961-8466
OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$695. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor

770 Condos For Rent

04543782
Golf Course Condo for rent,
2BR/2BA, 1420 s.f., $1200/mo.
Rent includes all appliances,
basic cable, water/sewer/
garbage, pool & tennis ct.
access. Realtor/owner
call 386-344-0433.


790 Vacation Rentals
Horseshoe Beach Spring Special
Gulf l rnFt hr hnomeaw/2 water-


front porch, dock, fish sink.
Avail wkends. $345. or wk $795.
(352)498-5986/386-235-3633

805 Lotifor Sale-

PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an.equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

810 Home for Sale
2/1,on nearly an acre, living/dining
rm, kitchen nook, util rm, fenced,
back porch,2 car carport close to
town, $60,000 386-754-5818
3/2 w/garage, needs TLC, great lo-
cation, owner financing, $2000 dn,
$701 mo.,352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
Owner Fin., 3/2 on 2.5 acres, fish
pond, N of Lake City, sm down
$675 mo, 386-590-0642/867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com


DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.


Looking for Experienced


SERVICE MANAGER


See Jay Johnson


Apply in Person


2018 SW Main Blvd.'

Lake City, FL


jBUIr~n^


fcSELIfTTii


FIN IT~iii


Classified Department: 755-5440


I


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Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SATURDAY, MARCH 5, 2011


820 Farms &
o Acreage
10 ac lots, some w/well, septic, pwr
pole. Lowered prices. Owner finance
w/low dn pmnt Deas Bullard Proper-
ties 386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com
4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$69,900. $613mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
4 acres, Wellborn, New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down, $39,900. $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com

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2006 EF250
Ford Van
3/4 ton, metal work
shelves/ladder rack,
60K miles, exc. cond.
$10,500
Call
386-555-5555
If you don't sell your vehicle
during the first 10 days, you
can run the same vehicle ad
for 10 additional days for
only $15.00
Terms and conditions remain the
same for the additional run.

To Ge You
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2010 Puma Travel
Trailer 32ft.
2 slide outs, air awning,
King Island bed. Many
extras.
$18,900
Call
863-660-8539


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HEELS & WATERCRAFT




'04 Rialta Motorhome
58k mi. Self-contained,
generator. Like new. Too
many goodies to list.
Open for offers.
$19,800
Call
386-758-7683


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