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The Lake City reporter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01493
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 3/4/2011
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
System ID: UF00028308:01493
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text






On a Roll
CHS softball team collects
000015 120511 ****3-DIGIT 326
LIB OF FLORIDA HISTORY
PO BOX 117007
205 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-1943




Laie '


Friday, March 4, 201 I ww


Shutout victory
Fort White blanks
Gainesville.
Sports, I B






orter


Vol. 137, No. 35 E 75 cents


GATOR FRENZY


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
An alligator, measuring about four feet, suns itself on a bank at Alligator Lake on Thursday. The state record according to
the Florida Fish and Wildlife Commission for the longest alligator is 14-feet, 3.5-inches.


Above: An alligator
scampers along a strip
of land at Alligator
Lake before crawling
back into the water.
Left: A group of
visitors take a stroll
along a dike that cuts
through Alligator Lake
Thursday.
JASON MATTHEW WALKER
Lake City Reporter


Warmer weather
and mating
season resulting
in more sightings.
By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
pringtime temperatures have
settled in across North Florida
and one of the more noticeable
side effects is increased wild-
life activity.
At Alligator Lake Public Recreation
Airea, those warmer temperatures have
provided visual evidence how the lake
got its name. Alligators, scarcely seen
during the cold weather periods, are
making their presence known at the
lake as they enjoy warm sunny days and
prepare for their mating season.
"It is warming up, which means the
gators will be coming out of their winter
lethargy and begin to move around and
feed," said Karen Parker, Florida Fish
and Wildlife Conservation Commission
public information coordinator. "Mating
season is during the April-May time
frame and the gators will be on the

GATORS continued on 3A


County to enter negotiations for EMS


Lifeguard Ambulance
Service is first choice in
privatization plan.
By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com
The county will soon be enter-
ing into negotiations with Lifeguard
Ambulance Service of Florida as it
continues to take steps in considering
the privatization of local Emergency


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBETO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-S445
Fax: 752-9400


Medical Services.
The Columbia County Board of
County Commissioners unanimous-
ly approved accepting staff's final
rankings of EMS providers with
Lifeguard as the highest-ranked
choice to provide the services in the
county's unincorporated areas and
the Town of Fort White at its regular
meeting Thursday. In the same vote,
the commission approved beginning
negotiations with Lifeguard.
Lifeguard was ranked by a county


76
Sprinkles
WEATHER, 2A


committee as the top choice out
of several service providers who
responded after the county, put out
a Request for Qualifications for inter-
ested companies to provide EMS in
lieu of the county.
The 'county is considering the
privatization for cost reasons. On
an annual average, the county sub-
sidizes EMS between $1 million and
$1.2 million.
EMS continued on 3A


O pinion .. ........... 4A
Around Florida ....... 2A
Obituaries ....... 5A
Advice & Comics. ..4B1
Puzzles ... .... 2B


County gets

unexpected $1M

housing grant


Federal funds
will help improve
neighborhoods.
By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.comr
The county has official-
ly received more than $1
million in federal stimulus
grant dollars to put toward
housing improvement.
The Columbia
County Board of County
Commissioners unani-
mously approved accept-
ing the grant at its regular
meeting Thursday.
Titled the Neighborhood
Stabilization Program, the
grant provides funds to pur-
chase foreclosed and aban-
doned homes for resale or
redevelopment with the
intent of sustaining neigh-
borhoods and keeping
neighboring house values
from decreasing.
The Department of


Community Affairs admin-
isters the NSP grant for the
U.S. Departmentof Housing
and Urban Development.
NSP is also a compo-
nent of the Community
from which
received a
$750,o00
portion in
November.
While
Williams the county
I can create
its own programs to use the
NSP money, 50 percent of
the funds must be utilized
for rental housing with no
less than 25 percent of the
rental housing funds being
used for low income fami-
lies.
Dale Williams, county
manager, said the county did
not apply for the NSP but
was one of eight counties
GRANT continued on 3A


PATRICK SCOTT/Lake City Reporter
A Lake City firefighter extinguishes a Columbia County sheriff
deputy's patrol'vehicle after it caught fire during the chase of
a suspect near Summers Elementary School Thursday.


Sheriff's vehicle

catches fire

during chase


Blaze starts while
officers pursue
suspect on foot.
By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.9om
A Columbia County
Sheriff's Office deputy
escaped injury Thursday
morning while helping'
apprehend a suspect, but
her vehicle wasn't so lucky.
Her patrol cruiser was com-
pletely destroyed when it
caught fire, sheriff's depart-
ment officials said.
According to Sheriff's
Office reports, around
10:45 a.m. Thursday
Deputy Winston Warner
was attempting to serve an
arrest warrant on Corey
Butts when Butts fled on
foot. Deputy Kim Fabian


TODAY IN
PEOPLE
Embairas-ed
Hlarlah Care,


was assisting in the capture
of the suspect when her
patrol cruiser caught fire.
Sgt. Ed Seifert, County
Sheriff's Office public infor-
mation officer, said Fabian
parked her patrol car in
a vacant lot off Southwest
Yorktown Court when it
caught fire.
"It appears that the cata-
lytic converter of the patrol
car caught the dried grass
on fire," he said.
The fire consumed the
vehicle and the Lake City
Fire Department was called
to the scene to douse the
blaze.
"The Columbia County
Sheriff's Office is await-
ing an evaluation from the
insurance company on the
2009 Ford Crown Victoria,"
BLAZE continued on 3A


COMING
SATURDAY
S)etlting up Home
danl- Patio hO: ...


...: *4e' .
- p -
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MRs








LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING FRIDAY, MARCH 4, 2011


Thursday:
Afternoon: 6-3-2
Evening: 1-3-3"


. 4 '. Thursday:
Afternoon: 0-7-4-5
Evening: 6-4-7-9


evzatch_
Wednesday:
13-23-25-28-33


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS
Gadhafilinked concert embarrass

Gadhafi-linked concert embarrassing


NEW YORK
Mariah Carey said she
was unaware that
she was booked to
perform a concert
linked to Gadhafi's
clan and she's embarrassed "to
- have participated in this mess."
Carey is among a handful of enter-
- tainers who were paid handsome
fees to give exclusive private con-
certs. It was later revealed the peo-
ple behind those concerts were the
family of Libyan leader Moammar
Gadhafi, whost country is in an open
revolt against him and who faces an
investigation for possible war crimes.
This week, Nelly Furtado
announced she is giving the $1
million fee she was paid in 2007 to
charity; Beyonce said in a statement
Wednesday that she donated her
fees for a 2009 New Year's Eve per-
formance in St. Bart's to Haiti earth-
quake relief once she discovered the
Gadhafi link.
Carey performed in St. Bart's in
2008, but in a statement released to
The Associated Press on Thursday,
she said she didn't know she was
performing for an infamous family.

'Glee' could cover more
Michael, Janet, ABBA
NEW YORK Scream!
The cast of "Glee" could be plan-
ning a Michael or Janet Jackson
tribute that's if "Glee" star Amber
Riley can get her way.
Riley said it would be "prolific"
if the Fox TV series performed a
tribute to Janet. She also said a trib-
ute to the King of Pop is overdue
because "his music is so timeless."
The "Glee" cast will release its
sixth CD, "Glee: The Music, Vol. 5,"
on Tuesday. It will feature covers
of Michael's "Thriller" and "PY.T.,"
as well as ,the original songs "Loser


Celebrity Birthdays


* Actress Paula Prentiss is
73.
* Movie director Adrian Lyne
is 70.
* Singer Bobby Womack is
67.
* Rock musician Chris
Squire (Yes) is 63.
* Singer Chris Rea is 60.
* Actress Kay Lenz is 58.
* Musician'Emilio Estefan

Daily Scripture


is 58.
* Actress Catherine O'Hara
is 57.
* Actor Steven Weber is 50.
* Actress Staoy Edwards is
46.
* Rock singer Evan Dando
(Lemonheads) is 44.
* Actress Patsy Kensit is 43.
* Country singer Jason
Sellers is 40.


"For my thoughts are not your
thoughts, neither are your ways
my ways," declares the Lord.
"As the heavens are higher
than the earth, so are my ways
higher than your ways and my
thoughts than your thoughts."
Isaiah 55:8-9


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this file photo, Mariah Carey arrives at the 82nd Academy Awards in the
.Hollywood section of Los Angeles. Carey's publicist said Thursday that the enter-
tainer was unaware that a private concert she performed in St. Barts was linked to
Moammar Gadhafi's clan and she's embarrassed about it.


Like Me" and "Get It Right," a first
for the Grammy-nominated act.
Adam Anders, the show's execu-
tiye music producer, is more inter-
ested in covering "some ABBA
because I'm Swedish."

Ten-year-old girl set
to perform with Gaga
TORONTO A ten-year-old
Canadian YouTube star said she
can't wait to join Lady Gaga onstage


in Toronto.
Winnipeg-native Maria Aragon
posted a cover of Lady Gaga's "Born
This Way" to YouTube, one of doz-
ens of videos she's put online.
But this one exploded in popular-
ity after Lady Gaga herself saw the
video and posted a link on Twitter.
Aragon has been on a whirlwind
media tour ever since and her
video now has more than 17 million
views.

* Associated Press


Lake City
HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293
Fax number..............752-9400
'Circulation ................755-5445
Online... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, RFa. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson.....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter,com)
NEWS
Assistant Editor CJ Risak..754-0427
After 1:00 p.m.
(crisak@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Kathryn Peterson..754-0417
(kpeterson@lakecityreporter.com)
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440..


Reporter
BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
(sbranrion@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION,
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7:30
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 10.30 a.m. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation ........ ...755-5445
(circulafon@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks................. $26.32
24 Weeks..................$48.79
52 Weeks................... $83.46
Rates indude 7% sales tax
Mail rates
12 Weeks.................. $41.40
24 Weeks..................$82.80
52 Weeks..................$179.40


CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run
in this space. And thanks for reading.


Bodies of 2 kids
found in canal
DELRAY BEACH, -
Police said Thursday they
think they have identified
two children whose bodies
were stuffed into luggage
and dumped in a South
Florida canal.
Authorities believe the
children a girl between
6 and 10 and a boy
between 10 and 12 were
;, siblings, but they have not
released their names.
They said they have
made no arrests, though
they could be seen
Thursday afternoon
searching a nearby house.
A police spokeswoman
said authorities believe the
children were the victims
of some sort of domestic
situation, but she declined
to elaborate.
It is still not known how
long the bodies were in
the canal, and autopsy
reports haven't been
released.
The girl's body was
found in a duffel bag
Wednesday morning. The
boy's was discovered later
in the day, folded into a
suitcase about a half-mile
away.
Divers from three agen-
cies used sonar and a
remote-controlled subma-
rine to scour the canal for
clues Thursday.
"They are trying to see
if there is anything that
is going to help us move
further on this," Delray
Beach Police spokeswom-
an Nicole Guerriero said.
The wide canal flows
east to west through this
oceanside town south-
east of West Palm Beach,
stretching between U.S.
441 and the Intracoastal
Waterway and passing
beneath Florida's Turnpike
and Interstate 95.
It is bordered by modest
homes, tiny wooden docks
Ai nd small motor boats, and
dotted on either side with
the lush green of palms


SPRINKLES



HI 76 LO 53
176


A diver from the Delray Beach Police Department boards a
police boat; looking for evidence after two children were dis-
covered in a canal in Delray Beach Wednesday.


and other trees.
Debbie Duarte, who
lives along the canal, said
the neighborhood is usu-
ally very quiet. Before
now, she said, the most
surprising thing to turn up
in the waterway was a bag
of marijuana.
"For parents not to say
Their children are miss-
ing," she said, "either the
parents are dead or the
parents did it."

Justices hearing
rail dispute
TALLAHASSEE The
Florida Supreme Court is
hearing oral arguments
in a lawsuit challenging
Gov. Rick Scott's refusal to
accept $2.4 billion in feder-
al money for the proposed
Tampa-Orlando high speed
rail line.
The justices are hold-
ing the expedited hearing
Thursday, just a day before
the deadline for accepting
the stimulus money.
It'll be sent to high
speed projects in other
states if Florida doesn't
take it.
Two state senators,
one a Democrat and the
other a Republican, sued.
They said state law gives
the Republican governor
no choice but to take the
money.


Scott disagreed and
said the project will leave
Florida taxpayers on the
hook for cost overruns and
operating subsidies. Rail
boosters said he's wrpng.

Firefighters still
fighting wildfire
MIMS Crews from
across Florida will give
firefighters a break as the
state's first significant wild-
, fire of the year continues
to burn.
On Thursday, officials
were keeping a close
watch on the winds,
which forced a brief clo-
sure of Interstate 95 on
Wednesday. Authorities
said intermittent road clo-
sures could occur for the
rest of the week.
The fire has burned 25
square miles since it was
first reported about noon
Monday. Officials said the
fire is about 25 percent
contained.
The blaze is about
25 miles north of the
Kennedy Space Center, but
NASA has said operations
there are not affected.
Parts of Florida have
seen their driest few
months in nearly 80 years,
setting the stage for a very
active fire season.


TEMPERATURES
High Thursday
Low Thursday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Thursday,
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


AM MOSTLY MOSTLY
.-STORMS SUNNY SUNNY


HI 72 L047 HI 73 L0 46 HI 77 LO 51


S*ildesta I city
73/56 Jacksonville Cape Canaveral
Lake City, 69/55 Daytona Beach
76/53 Ft. Lauderdale
Gainesville Dajtna Beach Fort Myers
\76/53 73'60 Gainesville
Ocala Jacksonville
,78/54 Wet
Orlando Capt Canaveral Key West
79/56 74/63 Lake City
S Miami
Tampla,' \ Naples
80/60 West Palm Badi .Ocala
77/65 *: Orlando
F FL Lauderdale Panama City
Ft Myers 77/69 0 Pensacola
82/57 Naples Tallahassee
'3/59 Miami Tampa
Key West 7/67 Valdosta
le Wst W. Palm Beach


MOON
Moonrise today 6:29 a.m.
Moonset today 6:36 p.m.
Moonrise tom. 6:57 a.m.
Moonset tom. 7:28 p.m.

,o0o
March March March March
4 12 19 26
New First Full Last


On this date in
1990, up to eleven
inches of snow
blanketed the val-
leys of northwest
Utah, while 12 to 25
inches fell across
the mountains of
northern Utah.


\ w Forecasts, data and
S- graphics 2011 Weather
S Central, LP, MadisonWion, Ws.
www.weatherpubllsher.com


Get Connected



L -',q 1k Ci Reporter
Lake 9..


M Associated Press


CA$H 3.


AROUND FLORIDA


THE WEATHER


ECASTMAP for FridayAMarc6`
IP^^ffi^Wlfovs' ^Tflow


Pensacola
68/60


Tallahassee *
76/56

Panama City
71/59


Saturday
76/61/pc
76/59/pc
78/68/pc
81/61/pc
77/57/pc
74/59/c
75/68/pc
76/56/pc
80/67/pc
83/61/pc
79/58/pc
81/58/pc
70/58/t
71/50/t
74/57/t
81/62/pc
.74/56/t
79/66/pc


Sunday
75/62/sh
76/59/sh
79/64/pc
81/61/pc
73/49/t
71/50/t
77/70/t
72/47/t
83/65/t
79/61/pc
75/51/t
79/59/sh
67/45/pc
62/44/pc
71/40/pc
77/60/sh
72/52/t
82/62/t


I e/b


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise tom.
Sunset tornm.


6:54 a.m.
6:31 p.m.
6:52 a.m.
6:32 p.m.


75'
49
73
48
89 in 1951
22 in 1980

0.00"
0.29"
7.56"
0.42"
7.32"


7

15 nud*btbu m
Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+.


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.


friday saturday 6


- -Forecastdtemperantu


*FeelsBe" tempera


--I- ,.,- ..00


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


SATU^f


MONS3


T|ESID.JAH


TI V ALMANA- -


E23 H I E I s









LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL FRIDAY, MARCH 4, 2011


GATORS: More active

Continued From Page 1A


move. If people are seeing
what they may consider
a large number of gators
in the lake, it could be
because the gators have
emerged from their winter
hiding places and are mov-
ing about FWC always
gets the largest number of
calls about gators during
the spring when the gators
are on the move."
Parker said no recent
research has been con-
ducted at the lake indicat-
ing an alligator population
increase.
"We know there are
gators out there and have
photos of the gators," she
said. "In fact, when I've
flown over the lake with
my pilot, I've seen and
photographed some large
gators out there. However,
I don't have any hard data
supporting any large popu-
lation increase."
She said recent weather
conditions may have also
contributed to the large
volume of alligator sight-
ings at the lake.
"There is more water
in the lake right now then
there has been," Parker


said. "So, with the increase
in water levels, we could
see more gators moving in
to the area. But remember,
this is Florida and in the
spring especially, if you
have a body of water, i.e.
a lake, retention pond or
river, there's a good pos-
sibility you'll have gators in
the area."
In 2010, FWC received
14,419 nuisance alligator
complaints (an alligator
may be considered a nui-
sance if it is at least four
feet in length and poses
a threat to people, pets
or property). Nuisance
alligator trappers were
issued 10,768 permits and
removed 6,155 nuisance
alligators.
Alligators have inhab-
ited Florida's marshes,
swamps, rivers and lakes
for many centuries, and
are found in all 67 coun-
ties.
Although many
Floridians have learned
to co-exist with alligators,
the opportunity for more
frequent alligator-human
interactions and potential
conflict always exists.


QUICK ALLIGATOR FACTS


If you need to report
a nuisance alligator, call
866-FWC-GATOR (866-392-
4286).
Never feed alligators.
- it's dangerous and ille-
gal. When fed, alligators
can overcome their natu-
ral wariness and learn to
associate people with food.
When this happens, some
of these alligators have to
be removed and killed.
Dispose of fish scraps
in garbage cans at boat .
ramps and fish camps. Do
not throw them into the
water. Although you are
not intentionally feeding
alligators when you do
this, the results can be the
same.
M, Observe and photo-
graph alligators only from
a distance. Remember,
they're an important part
of Florida's natural his-
tory as well as an integral
component of aquatic eco-
systems.
In the past decade,
the FWC has received an
average of nearly 16,000


alligator-related complaints
per year.
Generally, alligators
less than four feet in length
are not large enough to be
dangerous unless handled.
Be aware of the pos-
sibility of alligators when
you are in or near fresh or
brackish water.
Do not swim outside
of posted swimming areas
or in water that might be
inhabited by large alligators.
Alligators are most
active between dusk and
dawn; therefore, avoid
swimming at night
Dogs and cats are
similar in size to the natu-
ral prey of alligators. Don't
allow pets to swim, exer-
cise or drink in or near
waters that may contain
alligators.
The state's longest .
documented alligator
measured 14-ft.- 3.5 inches
long. It was taken Nov. 1,
2010, besting the previous
record which had stood for
13 years.
Source: FWC


Seifert said. "It does appear
that the vehicle is a total
loss."
Deputies were able to
capture and arrest Butts.
He was wanted on an active


warrant from Suwannee
County for a charge of
violation of probation.
"He was arrested with-
out incident and is cur-
rently being held in


Motorists injured in head-on collision


From staff reports

Two motorists were
taken to a local hospital
after they suffered injuries
Thursday when their vehi-
cles collided, head-on, as
they were traveling on U.S.
Highway 441.
Richard A. Cook, 55,
of Orange Park, suffered
serious injuries in the


wreck, while the driver of
the other vehicle, James
C. May Jr., 21, of Lake City,
was taken to the hospital
with minor injuries.
The wreck occurred
about 2 p.m. Thursday on
U.S. Highway 441 at SE
Burns Lane.
According to Florida
Highway Patrol reports,
May was driving south on


the roadway in a 2004 Ford
Ranger.
At the same time, Cook
was traveling north on the
roadway in a 1994 Mazda
three-door. Reports said as
the vehicles were travel-
ing, May's vehicle drifted
into the northbound lane,
which resulted in the front
side of his truck striking
the front left side of Cook's


car.
After the impact, both
vehicles spun counter-
clockwise and came to
rest.
May and Cook were
taken to Lake City Medical
Center for treatment.
Charges in connection
with the wreck are pend-
ing completion of an FHP
traffic crash investigation,


CSC seeks donations to help victims of fires


By A.C. GONZALEZ
Special to the Reporter

More than local 20 families are
homeless due to fire since October
last year and the leader of a local
organization helping the victims
rebuild their lives seeks donations
from the community.
Shirley McManus, executive
director of the Christian Service
Center, said the Lighthouse Disaster
Recovery Center, an annexed build-
ing of the CSC, is running short on
household items for the victims.
Five families picked up everything
they needed for their new homes a
few weeks ago, McManus said.
'With all of those supplies leav-
ing at once, we're getting low, and
I don't want to not have enough for


the other families," she said.
The disaster warehouse opened
last October and was doing well in
donations until this year, McManus
said. CSC is asking for more dona-
tions to the disaster warehouse.
'MWe want to encourage those who
can give to give," she said. "We can
use all sorts of household items here
at the warehouse. Anything to make
a house a home."
Major necessities for the ware-
housei includes beds, couches and
chairs, tables, lamps, cribs, linens
and electronic appliances.
"One thing we are able to do is
give everything to these families
without charging a cent, she said.
The warehouse includes the,
Lighthouse store, which generates
money for the disaster relief project.


'"The Lighthouse store sells a wide
variety of rare and beautiful items
in order to provide us with funds
necessary to also give these fami-
lies something other than the fur-
niture," McManus said. "At times
these people will need money for
food, for. deposits on a new house or
for rent."
Volunteers man the store. All the
money goes toward the disaster
recovery fund, she said.
Donations to the CSC disaster
warehouse are asked to be in good
working order. CSC volunteers are
also able to come to any home and
pick up items.
The CSC is located at 441 NW
Washington St. For more informa-
tion, or to ask for a donation pick up,
call the CSC at 386-755-1770.


GRANT:

From Page 1A


statistically chosen to
receive the funding.
'To my knowledge, the
county has never received a
grant like this," he said.
Staff was notified of the
available grant funding
Thursday, Williams said,
and has suggested that the
NSP funds be coupled with
the county's CDBG funds, a
suggestion the county will
consider.
'They want to sort of use
the two grants together," he
said, "because they feel like
if they do, they're able. to
help inore people."


Dale Williams, county
manager, said if negotia-
tions with Lifeguard are
not successful, the county
will move on to negoti-
ate with the second-high-
est ranked company
-- CeAtury Ambulance
Service and so forth.
He also noted that
Lifeguard offers air trans-
port and that out of all the
ranked service providers,
the company was offering
the most money to lease
the county's EMS ambu-
lances and facilities.
-In the meeting's pub-
lic comments, Marc .
Kazmierksi of Lake City
spoke against the priva-
tization of EMS.
"I feel the benefits will
be short-lived," he said.
Kazmierski said the
county should consider
the money it has already
spent on merging its
fire and EMS depart-
ments and see how the


the Columbia County
Detention Facility with-
out bond," Seifert said.
"Butts will be transferred
to the Suwannee County
Jail in the coming days."


see what


sunday

Ahas in store



Family Blessings
,, A In an exclusive interview, Emily Procter talks
about growing up adopted, her hard-won
pregnancy, and how both have shaped her love
4r? of family.
'b Intelligence Report:
Remember the Alamo
On the 175th anniversary of the Battle of the
Alamo, find out some interesting tidbits on a few
Texan celebrities.

Our Towns: The Whole World in His Arms
Find out how a high school athlete's simple act of kindness gave a lift to a
disabled child and his family.

Sunday Dinner: Grilled to Perfection
Maroon 5's Adam Levine, a "meat-and-potatoes guy," serves up his favorite
rib eye.

Views: Coming Back to Life
As the nation roots for Gabrielle Giffords's recovery, the wife of ABC's Bob
Woodruff talks about the long road back from brain injury.


Lake City, March 6, 2011www.parade.com
Lake City Reporter www.parade.com


merged departments can
be enhanced.
Commissioner Ron
Williams said while
the board previously
approved issuing the
RFQ, neither he nor the
board have yet approved
.the privatization.
"I have not voted to
privatize EMS," he said.
The county is trying to
save money while still pro-
viding the same quality of
EMS, Ron Williams said.
Herb Sellers, Century
Ambulance Service presi-
dent, said he was grateful


for the chance to reply to
the RFQ.
"We stand ready to
serve all the residents
of Columbia County in
the area of Emergency
Medical Services," he
said.
Dale Williams also said
the county is checking
into the status of a request.
from the local union to
continue negotiations on
the matter with Michael
Grogan, the county's
labor attorney and lead
negotiator with unions
within the county.


ZIMMER KNEE

REPLACEMENT ALERT
Certain High-Flex Femoral Components made by Zimme'r
have-been associated with increasingincidences of failure,
revision knee surgery and painful loosening According to
the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, the fail-
ure rate could be as high as 9% If you or a loved one have
suffered pain, injury or required additional surgery after
having a Zimmer knee replacement implanted, call the
Moody Law Firm at 1-800-598-0204.


.
,
:...:-;.f


SSeveral Hip Replacement Models Linked To Defects
Leading To Pain, Recalls, Additional Surgery
B There are a growing number of hip implant models associated with
defects. These defects may lead to serious side effects including:

Joint Failure or Dislocation Popping and Grinding
Premature revision surgery Pain and Swelling
Elevated levels of Chromium and Cobalt in the blood
Pseudotumors and/or tissue necrosis

Manufacturers and hip implant models associated with defects include:
DePuy ASR RECALLED
Zimmer Durom Hip Cup RECALLED
Stryker Trident Acetabular PSL Cup RECALLED
Stryker Trident Hemispherical Cup RECALLED
Wright Medical Profemur Z Stem NOT RECALLED
DePuy Pinnacle NOT RECALLED
If you or a loved one have experienced serious injuries or required additional surgery
after hip replacement surgery, call the Moody Law Firm at 1-800-598-0204.

You May Be Entitled To

COMPENSATION
Prior results do not guarantee future outcomes.


The Moody Law Firm, Inc.


Virginia Office
500 Crawford Street, Suite 300
Portsmouth, VA 23704


Florida Office
7400 Baymeadows Way, Suite 105
Jacksonville, FL 32256


CALL 1 m840m598mO2O4


EMS: Negotiations ready to begin

Continued From Page 1A


BLAZE: Sheriff's car bums in brush

Continued From Page 1A


I


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427











OPINION


Friday, March 4, 201 I


www.lakecityreporter.com


0
SOP


INION


Keep


US exit


strategy


in Iraq

As Americans
watched the unrest
unfold in some
Middle Eastern
countries, now
including Oman, they may not
have noticed that the ferment
extends to Iraq, where 50,000
U.S. troops remain until the
end of the year.
Theoretically the United
States is no longer responsible
for what happens there, eight
years after it invaded in March
2003. The government headed
by Prime Minister Nouri Kamal
al-Maliki is elected, its parlia-
ment is in place (although it
seems to be tied in more knots
than Congress) and U.S. forces
continue to train Iraqis to main-
tain security, a role played by
Americans before the troop
drawdown.
The presence of a democrati-
cally elected, majority-based
regime in Baghdad in
principle what the Tunisians,
Egyptians, Libyans, Bahrainis
and others are seeking
should mean that it is no
longer necessary for Iraqis to
demonstrate or to take other
violent actions to make their
views known.
Nonetheless the level of
violence in Iraq seems to be
rising. Iraqis are discontented
with the al-Maliki government
for various reasons. The osten-
sible one is economic. Baghdad
arid most of the country are not
served by a reliable, continuing
electric supply.
.All the United States can
do: at this point is to continue
tmnarch toward the door,
with a withdrawal to be com-
pleted by the end of 2011. If
the Iraqis want to fight among
themselves and destroy the
country's infrastructure, the
results will have to be their
concern, not America's. The
United States has plenty to do
at home without involving itself
in Iraq's misbegotten violence,
regardless of degree to which
the United States can be said to
be responsible for it.

N Pittsburghm Post-Gazette

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman


LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:


. news@lakecityreporter.com


Obama must be more decisive


o in the
I I world is advis-
I j ing President
W Barack Obama?
TV If the answer to
that is no one, then the ques-
tion becomes why not and the
obvious reply to that would be
because he doesn't want any,
which puts a whole different
light on the situation.
Confused? If you are, it's
probably no more than the
White House seems to be on a
variety of issues.
Moving into the last half of
his first term and facing the
rigors of being elected to a
second in less than two years,
this president shows none of
the aggressive decisiveness at
home or abroad promised in
his miraculous campaign of two
years ago. Now his focus seems
strictly on 2012:
His foreign policy is almost
incoherent. His responses to
the Middle Eastern turmoil
have been sluggish and unco-
ordinated, often leaving those
charged with carrying it out,
including Secretary of State
Hillary Clinton, at their wits'
end. His hesitancy in both the
Egyptian crisis arid the one in
Libya may ultimately come back
to haunt us as those seeking to
oust dictatorial regimes begin
to doubt our commitments. The
war in Afghanistan becomes
less defensible daily. Iran is
scary and Pakistan is no bet-
ter considering the feuding
between U.S. and Paki intelli-
gence forces.
Domestically, Obama is beset
by enormous deficit problems
and a House Republican major-
ity that wants to exploit his
weaknesses. And while the
national debt is not of his mak-
ing, he has done little the last
two years even to emphasize


Dan K.Thomasson
its seriousness. He opened this
year by submitting a plan for
ultimate resolution that even he
admitted was inadequate.
He has done little or nothing
to interrupt the flow of guns
from here to Mexican drug car-
tels, paying only lip service to
helping solve the carnage they
cause and infuriating besieged
Mexican officials. Problems
like Social Security, Medicare
and immigration apparently are
off limits. In fact, his economic
spokesmen deny entitlements
have an impact on short-term
debt reduction.
Obama obsessively spent
enormous political capital on
overhauling health care despite
the opposition of a majority of
Americans. With the courts now
threatening to pick apart his
masterpiece on constitutional
grounds in a tidal wave of suits
launched by financially strapped
states, the president moved
to take some of the heat off.
He offered a "compromise" to
complaining governors that is
as shameless an act of political
pandering as Washington has
seen in some time.
He said he would go along
with amending the reform
plan to allow states to opt out
of its controversial points if
they could find another way
to accomplish the same thing
without driving up health costs,
which critics quickly pointed
out was highly unlikely even
under the best political circum-


stances. Republicans are dedi-
cated to repealing the law not
amending it
This is a president who more
than most needs all the good
help he can get. He majored
in charisma and minored in
political realities. Voters reacted
passionately to him despite a
resume that would have placed
him in middle management in
most private corporations. No
one seemed to mind that he had
served only two years in the
Senate. Voters ignored the fact
that he got there because the
leading candidate, a Republican,
self-destructed and withdrew,
leaving the opposition unable to
field a viable alternative. He also
was a member of the Illinois
legislature.
For us to believe that this
utter lack of experience could
be overcome quickly is fool-
ish. And before someone cites
an Ivy League education as an
indicator that Obama's inad-
equacies are just superficial and
easily resolvable remember that
George W. Bush went to Yale
and look where that took us.
There is still time for the
president to step up to the
promise of his campaign, to
carry out in style all those
pledges so eloquently handed
down before and after Grant
Park.
It may be that his own pro-
nouncement that he would
rather be a good president for
one term than a bad one for two
should pertain here. That's not
bad advice and it may be the
reason that an army of potential
Republican candidates optimisti-
cally seems to be massing for a
shot at the job.

M Dan K. Thomasson is former
editor of SCripps Howard News
Service.


OTHER OPINION


Allow same-sex weddings, now


Although the fed-
eral courts expedited
their handling of the
lawsuit challenging
Proposition 8, the
issues are far from resolved.
And now that the California
Supreme Court has been asked
to weigh in, the case could be
delayed for another year or
more.
Enough already. Gay and les-
bian couples should be allowed
to wed while the case works its
way through the system.
The state Supreme Court
was asked by the U.S. 9th
Circuit Court of Appeals to
rule on whether supporters of
Proposition 8 have the right
- known as "standing" to
continue with their case. It indi-
cated that it would hear argu-
ments late this year, with a rul-
ing likely to follow a few months
later. Meanwhile, a stay pending


the outcome of the appeal has
kept gay weddings from going
forward. Now, however, the law-
yers challenging Proposition 8
have asked the 9th Circuit to lift
the stay and allow the weddings
to take place. We agree that it
should.
Every day that the case drags
on, gay and lesbian couples
who would like to marry are
being deprived of their civil
rights. That's not our wording;
the federal trial judge decided
that issue, at least for now. The
denial of constitutional rights,
even temporarily, is a deplorable
situation that must meet high
legal standards to be allowed to
continue.
In our view, those conditions
have not been met.
First, a stay should be issued
only if there is a strong likeli-
hood that the appealing party
- in this case, the supporters


of Proposition 8 will prevail
in court. Yet there are seri-
ous questions about whether
they even have the standing to
appeal, so the outcome is very
uncertain.
Certainly it would be messy if
California were to resume per-
forming wedding ceremonies for
gay and lesbian couples, only to
have to stop again when another
ruling comes down.
But there may be no other
option.
Right now, same-sex couples
are being deprived of their con-
stitutional right to marry, and
every indication is that unless
the stay is lifted, they'll have to
keep waiting for more than a
year.
That is real harm, and there
is no valid reason to allow it to
continue.
* Los Angeles Times


Deroy Murdock
deroy.murdock@gmoil.com


Some

unionists

turning

thuggish

Every once in a while,
you need to get out
on the streets and
get a little bloody
when necessary,"
Rep. Michael Capuano (D-
Mass.) told a Feb. 22 union
rally in Boston. Even if union
members and their supporters
missed Capuano's call to may-
hem or his subsequent tepid
apology, many of them are on
thmesame brutal wavelength.
Although Rep. Gabrielle
Giffords (D-Ariz.) still is
recovering from a Jan. 8 assas-
sination attempt, the Leftfs
post-Tucson civility campaign
has vanished like gun smoke
in a desert breeze. Rather than
make nice, labor activists and
fans star in YouTube videos,
preaching and perpetrating
violence.
On Feb. 23, unionized
government employees held
a Providence, RI., solidarity
rally. As columnist Michelle
Malkin reports, a local TV
cameraman named Adam Cole
was recording the event. After
about seven and a half minutes,
a YouTube video shows a pro-
union thug scream at Cole,
"I'll f** you in the ass, you fag-
got!" whereupon he forcefully
smacks Cole's camera with his
right hand.
Holding a sign that reads
"CWA Taking a Stand for
Justice," a Communications
Workers of America mem-
ber protested that day at the
Washington, D.C. offices of
pro-market Freedom Works.
As its employee Tabitha
Hale recorded him exchang-
ing words with an opponent,
the CWA member physically
attacked her, as her iPhone
video confirmed.
In Atlanta that day, Dr.
William Greene and several
other free-marketers protest-
ed near the Georgia State
Capitol in favor of GOP Gov.
Scott Walker of Wisconsin.
According to Greene, two pro-
union activists at a competing
MoveOn.org demonstration
crossed their anti-union picket
line.
"Out of nowhere, all of a
sudden, I get slammed to the
side against a wrought iron
fence and down onto the pave-
ment, by one of these guys
who wanted to push through,"
Greene said online. "The guy
came through and cold-cocked
me from behind," Greene
recalled, which slammed him
into an older woman who stood
nearby. "When he shoved me,
he shoved her, too."
Like a Labor Day parade
in reverse, unions are losing
ground. They represent a
shrinking share of America's
work force.
When their Democratic
allies show up for work, they
have started to lose legislative
votes to right size their privi-
leges. The "labor" movement
looks like a leisure movement,
given union activists' evidently
infinite time to abandon their
classrooms and other work
sites so they can scream in
the streets. And now, they
have revealed themselves as
the Brown Shirt element in
America's public life.
* New York commentator


Deroy Murdock is a columnist
with the Scripps Howard News
Service and a media fellow with
the Hoover Institution on War,
Revolution and Peace at Stanford
University.


4A









LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL FRIDAY, MARCH 4, 2011


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


* To submit your Community
Calendar item, contact Antonia
Robinson at 754-0425 or by
e-mail at arobinson@
lakecityreporter.com.


Today
HSCT production
The High Springs Community
Theater presents "Sherlock's
Last Case," a play by Charles
Marowitz 8 p.m. today The the-
ater is located in High Springs
at 130 NE First Ave. Tickets
are available at The Framery in
Lake City on Baya, 386-754-2780,
at The Coffee Clutch in High
Springs, 386-454-7593, online
at highspringscommunitytheater.
corn or at the door. Prices are $11
adults, $8 youth 12 and younger;
and Seniors Sunday $9.

Saturday
Home and Patio show
The Eighth Annual North
Florida Home and Patio Show is
9 a.m. 5 p.m. Saturday at the
Columbia County Fairgrounds
and presented by the Rotary
Club of Lake City Downtown.
Event co-sponsors are the Lake
City Reporter, Sunstate Federal
Credit Union and Newman
Media. Businesses in the home
and patio industry are featured
in the show.

Car show
The Fort White CF Car Show
to benefit the Cystic Fibrosis
Foundation is 9, a.m. to 1 p.m.
Saturday at the Fort White
Community Center. Registration
fee during the day of the show is
$25. Call 386-497-1481.

HSCT production
The High Springs Community


COU

Enjoying Dr. Seuss' ,specialty: Green eggs and ham
Jordan Wade, a member of the Lake City Kiwanis Club, reads 'Green Eggs and Ham' by Dr. Seuss to s
at Summers Elementary School for the National Education Association's Read Across America Day on


Theater presents "Sherlock's
Last Case," a play by Charles
Marowitz 2 p.m. Saturday.
The theater is located in High
Springs at 130 NE First Ave.
Tickets are available at The
Framery in Lake City on Baya,
386-754-2780, at The Coffee
Clutch in High Springs, 386-454-
7593, online at highspringscom-
munitytheater.com or at the door.
Prices are $11 adults, $8 youth
12 and younger; and Seniors
Sunday $9.


Sunday
Home and Patio Show
The Eighth Annual North
Florida Home and Patio Show
is 10 a.m. 4 p.m. Sunday at the
Columbia County Fairgrounds
and presented by the Rotary
Club of Lake City Downtown.
Event co-sponsors are the Lake
City Reporter, Sunstate Federal
Credit Union and Newman
Media. Businesses in the home


and patio industry are 1
in the show.

Monday
Photography workshop
Workshops in Beginn
Digital Photography are
a.m. 12:30 p.m. Monday
April 11 and Advanced I
Photography are 2 4:3(
Monday and April 11 at
Foster Folk Culture Cer


S ii State Park Craft Square,
White Springs. A hands-on
outdoor photography session
is planned. Participants should
bring their own camera, film or
digital. The cost of the work-
shop is $25 and includes park
admission. Call the park Gift
Shop at (386) 397-1920 or visit
-. www.stephenfosterCSO.org.

Tuesday

Photoshop Workshop
Photoshop workshops ar 6:30'
8:30 p.m. Tuesday and April 12
at Stephen Foster Folk Culture
Center State Park Craft Square,
White Springs.
A laptop computer with
Photoshop Creative Suite,
. Photoshop Elements or some
editing software is recom-
mended, but not required. The
software demonstrated in class
will be Photoshop Elements.
RTESY PHOTO The cost of the workshop is $25
and includes park admission.
Call the park Gift Shop at (386)
students 397-1920 or visit www.stephenfos-
Tuesday. terCSO.org.

featured Thursday
Free Medicaid workshop
A free Medicaid workshop is
10 a.m. Thursday in the LifeStyle
ps Enrichment Center, 628 S.E.
Allison Court. The workshop
ing on Medicaid planning is led by
10 Teresa Byrd Morgan of Morgan
y and Law Center for Estate & Legacy
Digital Planning. It will discuss the
0 p.m. myths and opportunities avail-
Stephen able. Call Shana Miller at 386-
nter 755-1977.


POLICE REPORTS


The following informa-
tion was provided by local
law enforcement agencies.
The following people have
been arrested but not con-
victed. All people are inno-
cent unless proven guilty.

Wednesday, Feb. 23
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office
Michael A Allen, 44,
516 Santa Fe St, Live Oak,
warrant Third-degree
grand theft.
John Robert Dortch,
27, 1086 SW Mt. Carmel


Ave., possession of
cocaine, possession of
drug paraphernalia and
warrant: Violation of
probation on the original
charge of DUI.
M Daniel Carlson
Jessup, 24, 649 SW Heron
Dr., Fort White, warrant:
Violation of probation on
original charge of felony
driving while license
suspended/revoked and
possession of a controlled
substance.
David John Norell,
23, 3841 U.S. Highway


90, warrant: Burglary of a
structure/conveyance and
third-degree grand theft.
Teresa Marie Perez,
22, 2844 SW Elim Church
Road, Fort White, warrant:
Neglect of a child.
Thursday, Feb. 24
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office
Toni Lynne Craig,
32, 27025 NW 62nd Ave.,
High Springs, warrant:
Possession of a controlled
substance.

E From Staff Reports


OBITUARIES


Doris Elizabeth Baldwin
Doris Elizabeth Baldwin, 66,
died Wednesday, March 2, 2011
at the Mayo Clinic in Jackson-
ville, Florida after an extended
illness. She was the daughter
of the late Green and Vera W.
Higginbotham. Born in Lake
City she had lived in Jackson-
ville for the past twenty years.
She was a loving wife, mother,
grand mother and great grand
mother who enjoyed gardening,
boating, fishing, shopping and
story telling, but above all she
adored her family, especially the
grandchildren. She is preceded
in death by her brothers, Johnny,
Ralph,' Leslie, & Jimmy Hig-
ginbotham and her sister, Glad-
ys Higginbotham Mastrucci.
Survivors include her husband
of twenty-one years, James
Baldwin of Middleburg, FL;
son, Billy (Denise) King of
Lake City, FL; sister, Betty
Jean Ruth of St. Augustine, FL;
grand daughters, Ashley King &
her fiance6, Jason Woodworth &
Holly King; great grand daugh-
ter, Kayden King; several niec-
es and nephews also survive.
Funeral services for Mrs. Bald-
win will be conducted at 11:00
a.m. on Saturday, March 5, 2011
in the chapel of Gateway-Forest
Lawn Funeral Home with Pas-
tor John Hathaway officiating.
Intermet will follow in Corinth
Cemetery. Visitation with the
family will be held Friday eve-
ning, March 4, 2011 from 5:00
p.m. until 7:00 p.m. at the funer-
al home. GATEWAY-FOREST
LAWN FUNERAL HOME,
3596 South U.S. Hwy 441, Lake
City, FL 32025 (386) 752-1954


Sandra Lee (Cazel)
Lastinger
Sandra Lee (Cazel) Lastinger,
74, passed away, Monday eve-
ning, February 28, 2011 after
a long battle with breast can-
cer. She was the daughter of
the late Ernest R. & Elizabeth
J. Cazel. Born in Illinois, but
eventually settled here in Lake
City. She was a loving wife,
mother, and grandmother who
traveling, going to the beach
and spending time,with her fam-
ily. She is preceded in death by
her sons, Kirt Lastinger, Robertr
Lastinger, & Peter Lastinger.
She leaves behind to cherish her
memory, her husband of 54 years,
Lavon J. Lastinger; oldest son,
Greg Lastinger; and her beloved
daughter, Cindy Lee (Buddy)
Clayton all of Lake City, FL;
sister, Margot Abernathy of
Lake City; 10 grandchildren, 18
great grandchildren and several
nephews and neices also survive.
Informal memorial services
will be held at 11:00 a.m., on
Saturday, March 5, 2011 at the
Lastinger Homestead, 352 NW


.HangQn
a minute

Our customers receive
,a Complimentary
copy of the
Lake City Reporter
when they drop off&
pickup their cleaning
While Su lies Last

3


Breeze Glen, Lake City, FL. In
lieu of flowers the family asks
that donations in her memory be
made to help fight Breast Cancer
through either the Breast Cancer
Society at www.breastcancer.
org or the Susan G,. Komen for
the Cure at www.komen.org
'GATEWAY-FOREST LAWN
FUNERAL HOME, 3596
U.S. Hwy 441 South, Lake
City, FL 32025 (386) 752-1954



Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.



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[ 6E EM ER
INSUANC


NOTICE OF MEETING OF THE LAKE CITY COMMUNITY
REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY TO BE HELD ON MONDAY,
MARCH 7, 2011 AT 6:00 PM, IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBERS
LOCATED ON THE SECOND FLOOR OF CITY HALL AT 205
NORTH MARION AVENUE, LAKE CITY, FLORIDA.


THE FOLLOWING ITEMS ARE TO BE DISCUSSED:

Facade Grant Program Applications
FY 2010 Annual Report

In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if any accommodations are needed for
persons with disabilities, please contact Joyce Bruner, Office of City Manager, 386-719-5768.

AUDREY E SIKES
City Clerk


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424








Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


6A LAKE CITY REPORTER STATE FRIDAY, MARCH 4, 2011


Obama to visit Miami school on road to reform


- tu .4 'r.. ,u. - - -. -


By CHRISTINE ARMARIO
Associated Press
MIAMI
At the Miami high
school that President
Barack Obama will
visit on today, neon-
colored flyers taped
to the walls quiz students on
tough vocabulary words.
Three years ago, Miami
Central Senior High School
- for five years given an "F"
on state reports began a
transformation. The principal
was replaced and in the last two
years, nearly 50 percent of the
staff.
Students moved in to a new,
modern building around the
same time.
Scores on state assessments
show both progress, but also
the difficulty of turning around
a persistently low-performing
school. Last year, 58 percent of
sophomores were rated as pro-
ficient in math, up from 17 per-
cent in 2001. But only 12 percent
scored at grade level in reading
- up from 5 percent nearly a'
decade before.
School officials acknowledge
that progress is often measured
in small steps.
"The way in which the stu-
dents are receiving instruction,
the engagement we see the
students in currently that will
improve and it has improved,"
said Renina Turner, the school's
principal.
Miami Central's story illus-
trates the challenges faced by
public schools that have been
rated as "failing" since the No
Child Left Behind Act was
passed into the law during the
Bush administration. Despite
frustrating efforts to turn them
around, administrators and
researchers still haven't reached
a consensus over what works.
Many schools have made
significant strides in student
achievement in short spans of
time, but how these solutions
can be applied to solve a nation-
wide problem remains unan- .


- i ._ r-'? "


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Four teachers help 20 students prepare for the upcoming FCAT by giving them reading strategies, in a read-
ing push-in class at Miami Central Senior High School in Miami in this 2009 file photo. When President Barack
Obama and former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush stand side by side today at Miami Central, it will be an opportunity for
the Democrat to show a bipartisan approach to education reform while allowing the Republican to push his own


nationwide message on the issue.

swered.
The Obama administration
is trying to turn around the
nation's 5,000 lowest-perform-
ing public schools with a nearly
$4 billion infusion to the School
Improvement Grant program.
Schools awarded grants must
choose one of four intervention
models: Closure; reopening as a
charter; replacing the principal
and a majority of the staff; and
hiring a new principal while pro-
viding further teacher develop-
ment and learning time.
"The challenge with the four
models is there really isn't good
evidence to suggest that num- ,
ber one, these are effective,
and two, they are effective in
the time frame being required,"
said Thomas Hatch, a profes-
sor of education at Columbia


University's Teachers College
and co-director of the National
Center for Restructuring
Education, Schools, and
Teaching.
"Unfortunately, it's not as if
there's other approaches that
you could say, 'Oh those are defi-
nitely more effective,' because
I think part of the fundamental
problem here is we're trying to
do this on a significant scale," he
added.
In announcing Obama's
planned visit to the school along-
side former Florida Gov. Jeb
Bush and Education Secretary
Arne Duncan, White House
Press Secretary Jay Carney
said Bush picked Miami Central
because it "tells an incredible
story of the impact successful
turnaround strategies and mod-


els can have on persistently low-
performing schools."
Miami Central is located in
the West Little River neighbor-
hood, which is populated with
strip malls, gas stations and gar-
den nurseries. For a decade, the
school scored no higher than a
"D" on Florida's annual school
accountability report. The school
, battled drug and discipline prob-
lems.
Ashley Wynche, 18, an aspir-
ing artist and senior at the
school, recalls entering her
freshmen year and learning
the school had been repeatedly
given an "F" by the state. Her
immediate reaction: Concern
that a transcript from Miami
Central would taint her college
and career aspirations.
"Get.me out," she told her


A-. .


Girl in

toxic truck

likely died

in Miami

By KELLI KENNEDY
Associated Press

BOCA RATON A 10-
year-old girl whose body
was found doused with
chemicals and partially
decomposing in the back
of her father's truck likely
died in Miami, police said
Thursday.
Authorities are treating
the Miami home of Nubia
Docter's adoptive parents
as a crime scene, but would
not say what evidence they
found or whether the girl
died there.
Her father, Jorge
Barahona, has pleaded not
guilty to the attempted first-
degree murder of her twin
brother. Victor Docter was
found Feb. 14 in the truck
along Interstate 95 in West
Palm Beach, also doused
with a toxic chemical.
No one has been charged
in Nubia's death, but child
welfare officials have said
Jorge Barahona admitted to
starving his daughter. It's
unclear how the girl died
or how long she had been
missing. Child welfare offi-
cials have said they also
expect her mother, Carmen
Barahona, to be charged.
Two people called the
Department of Children
and Families abuse hotline
in the days before Nubia's
death. One warned the
Barahonas were tying the
twins by their hands and
feet and keeping them in.
the bathtub. Another frantic
caller said something was
wrong because he hadn't
seen Nubia and her brother
had a split lip that needed
stitches, but the Barahonas
refused to take him to the
emergency room.
A child protective inves-
tigator went to, the home,
but never found the twins
and the agency never called
police.


US drug czar: Florida drug

database may go online


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Florida Gov. Rick Scott (center) and Attorney General Pam
Bondi attend the funeral services for St. Petersburg police
officer David S. Crawford at First Baptist Church in St.
Petersburg on Tuesday. Scott says a planned statewide
database, which would monitor the dispensing of prescrip-
tion drugs, should be scrapped.


I'


Associated Press
TALLAHASSEE -
White House drug czar
Gil Kerlikowske said
on Thursday that he is
encouraged that' Florida
may move forward with a
planned statewide database
for tracking prescription
drugs.
Gov. Rick Scott wanted
to scrap plans for the data-
base, which would monitor
the dispensing of prescrip-
tion drugs. Scott called it a
waste of state money and
an invasion of privacy.
Kerlikowske disagreed
with Scott's assessment
"I clearly believe (data-
bases) are an effective
tool in dealing with the
prescription drug prob-
lem," Kerlikowske told an
audience at Florida State
University's law school.
South Florida has gained


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a reputation for clinics
known as "pill mills," which
dispense prescription pain-
killers such as oxycodone.
State officials have said that
85 percent of all oxycodone
sold in the U.S. comes from
Florida and the nation's
top 50 prescribers of the
medication are based in the
state.
Kerlikowske's visit comes


a week after raids on South
Florida pain clinics led by
the U.S. Druk Enforcement
Administration resulted
in 20 people arrested.
Kerlikowske said he had
been concerned that the
state was not moving
toward 'setting up tracking
databases, but after meet-
ings this week,, he believes
something will get done.


*.. .






Stephen foster Folk Culture Center State Park
Visit with Florida's artists and craftsmen as they
demonstrate their skill at handcrahs and studio art.






Aromatherapti
-








Browse among the artists and in the
gift shop for unique one-of-a-kind items.

Get hands on with the craters
and-sign up fora workshop.
Admission $5 per car
Adrhonaifee les ror

C31l i"-1 20Fl


.,
S, .* .,



Stephen roster rolk
p nPotr o Culture Center State Park
S*11016 Lillian Saunders Prive/ Hwu 41
wke Spnng^., -Onda 32.09o

S i TA TP P r i '. a flondastatepa or stepsntost er
..... n... er i.,,. ome ofle Annu Florida Folk Festial


_- i ILi nA I n ni1' I nto1''11m


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.- I- -


mother, the teenager recalled.
As she began her sophomore
year, an energetic new principal,
David Rodriguez, took the helm.
He'd been the state's "Principal
of the Year" and had experience
turning around low-performing
schools. He focused on restor-
ing discipline, and transferred a
number of students to alterna-
tive and technical programs. He
also went about trying to change
a culture of low expectations to
one where everyone was expect-
ed to do-well and pass.
Rodriguez recalled that the
message he sent to staff and stu-
dents was, "It wafthe content of
your character and not your zip
code that determined whether
or not you were going to be suc-
cessful."
The staff examined test data
to determine' the academic
needs of students, and created
an in-house dual enrollment
program for students to be able
to take college-level classes.
Rodriguez said that by the end
of his second year, there were
200 students taking college-level
courses at Miami Central.
He also helped create a part-
nership with Teach For America
and brought in nearly 40 new
teachers.
"Mr. Rodriguez gave no option
for failure," said Alex Favela,
17, another senior at the school,
who has applied to Ivy League
colleges and aspires to become
a pastor.
The efforts pulled the school
up to a "D" grade on the state's
annual school accountability
report. The percent of students
meeting high standards in math
jumped from 38 to 51 percent
Reading performance also
improved, though at a smaller
scale, from 13 to 17 percent of
students meeting high stan-
dards.
"I don't think anybody is
under the premonition that
the work at Central is done,"
Rodriguez said. "I think what we
were able to do in those first two
years is get the school rolling in
the right direction."


-:g,4g -gygggg4pggypp







Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@oakeatyreportercom


Friday. March 4. 201 I


SPORTS


www.lakecityreporter.com


CHEAP SEATS







Tim Kirby
Phone:(386) 754-0421
tkirby@lakecityreportercom

Taking a

call from

home
They were
disturbing
statements,
especially
coming from
two of the most
hard-nosed players to
wear the purple and gold,
and both big supporters
of Tiger football.
One said Columbia
High football was a myth
dating back to 1967 (state
championship year). The
other said we should tear
down Columbia's
"winningest football
program" sign because
it only fires up the other
teams.
CHS football is in some
disarray. The record of
Craig Howard was the
worst three-year run
since the mid-1980s. Still,
Howard won a district
title and a playoff game.
Columbia has made
20 playoff appearances.
since 1982. In the nine
years from 1995-2003, the
Tigers advanced to the
third round of the
playoffs five times, made
the state semifinals once
and lost in the 1997 state
final by three points.
Fans got spoiled and
decided it wasn't enough.
The last seven years
have been a struggle, by
Columbia High terms.
The Tigers did make the
playoffs four of those
years, but never got past
the second round.
Columbia has turned
the program over to
Brian Allen, a native of
Lake City. When his alma
mater needed him, Allen
answered the call.
"I guess I'm part of
that myth," said Allen,
who compared the
Columbia situation to the
struggles at FSU, where
he played. "The kids
don't know about being a
dynasty. The leaders who
taught them the year
before start to wither
out. I am young with a
lot of energy. We have to
develop leaders to start
that spark over again."
Since leaving the pros,
Allen has coached in the
Orlando area.
"The last 3-4 years
coaching have been hard
on me," Allen said. "I
don't have all the wins,
but it would be a travesty
if I had spent all this time
under great people and
not learned something.
It is the same scenario
again and that motivates
me. It is time to go out
now and show they did
,not make a mistake."
Allen is eager to
defend the "winningest
"tag.
"I want teams to be
fired up about that,"
Allen said. "It will lead us
to competitive greatness.
I only know one way and
that is work, discipline
and play their hearts out.
"They are over the
edge. I hold the rope and
will not let go. If parents
trust what we are doing,
we will be all right."

Tim Kirby is sports editor


ofr the Lake City Reporter.


Fort White


High is ready


for showdown


Lady Indians
shuit down
Gainesville, 5-0.
By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com
FORT WHITE Fort
White High softball
appeared showdown
ready in its 5-0 home.win
over Gainesville High on
Thursday.
Fort White High (7-0, 3-
0) plays Santa Fe High at
7 p.m. today with first place
in District 5-3A on the line.
The Lady Indians pound-
ed out 11 hits against
Gainesville and scored in
four of their six innings.
The 1-2 punch on the
mound of Cecile Gomez
and Taylor Douglass had
the Hurricanes stymied all
night. Gomez struck out
seven in four innings and
Douglass struck out eight in
three innings. Both allowed


one hit and there were no
walks or errors.
"Our pitchers struck
out 15," .Fort White head
coach Cassie Sparks said.
"I talked to the pitchers and
told them they need to have
confidence in the defense.
The defense is doing what
it needs to do. We are
really playing together as
a team."
Fort White jumped out
with two runs in the first
inning. Ali Wrench and
Douglass singled and pulled
off a double steal. Kayla
Williams ripped a two-run
triple to the gap in left-cen-
ter field.
Caitlin Jones and Wrench
singled with two outs in the
second innings, but were
stranded.
Douglass led off the
third inning with a double
off the glove of the diving
center fielder. Holly Polhill
INDIANS continued on 2B


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Fort White's Cecile Gomez (12) follows the ball after hitting it in a game against Newberry
High on Tuesday.


CHS keeps



rolling, 9-5


I~ I

JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Buchholz High's Erin Eiland (9) is ruled out at third as Columbia High's Lauren Eaker (16)
catches the ball from second base.


Kvistad's early
bomb helps Lady
Tigers ease to win..
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com
Columbia High ended
its streak of slow starts
while keeping its win-
ning streak intact against
Buchholz High in a 9-5 win
on Thursday in Lake City.
The Lady Tigers start-
ed the first inning with a
bomb as Kayli Kvistad hit
a three-run homer off the
scoreboard in right field.
Michaela Burton and
Stephanie Pilkington came
in to score on the ding-
er. Both had reached on
walks.
"Kvistad's going to make
me get a new scoreboard,"
head coach Jimmy Williams
said of the shot.
Columbia added two
more runs in the bottom of
the second with Pilkington
and Kvistad scoring again.
This time it came off pitch-
er Jessica Keene's double
up the middle.
Keene provided the Lady
Tigers with a solid night


of work on the mound as
Columbia moved to 7-0
(4-0, District 4-5A). Keene
gave up three runs in 6'
innings with three strike-
outs and three walks.
Jordan Williams recorded
the final two outs for the
Lady Tigers.
Buchholz started to rally
in the third inning when
Kayla Cord hit a ball up
the middle to score Marie
Thomas. The Lady Bobcats
would add one more in the
bottom of the fourth off a
wild throw, which allowed
Kaylee Smith to come in
from third.
Needing insurance in
the sixth inning, Columbia
added four more runs to
its lead.
"We started quick, but
got in a situation where we
needed to get one or two
more," Williams said. "I
told them we needed to get
two more runs, but we were
able to get a few more."
Burton started the move-
ment by taking home on
a wild throw. Payton Sund
then scored Pilkington with
the bases loaded to give


CHS continued on 2B


Gainesville tops

Columbia, 7-6,

in road contest


Tigers look to
bounce back
against Buchholz.
From staff reports

A four-run first inning
cost the Columbia High
baseball team in its first
district game of the season.
Gainesville High used the
early success on its way to a
7-6 win against the Tigers.
Columbia High was only
able to produce one multi-
ple hitter in the game as the
Hurricanes' Tyler Perkins
dominated on the mound to


the tune of eight strikeouts
to pick up the win.
Mikey Kirkman had
the biggest night at the
plate for the Tigers going
3-for-4 with two runs and a
double. Dylan Alvey had a
home run, Zach Espenship
squeezed out a triple and
Blaine Courson had a dou-
ble.
Gainesville improved to
4-2 (2-1, district) while the
Tigers fell to 3-3 (0-1) fol-
lowing the 7-6 game.
The Tigers will try to
rebound tonight as they
host Ridgeview. High at
6 p.m. in Lake City.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High's Mikey Kirkman (18) looks on after colliding with a Santa Fe High third
baseman Monday while safely making it to third base.


Section B









2B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS FRIDAY, MARCH 4, 2011


TELEVISION

TV sports
Today
AUTO RACING
Noon
SPEED NASCAR, Nationwide
Series, practice for Sam's Town 300, at
Las Vegas
1:30 p.m.
SPEED NASCAR, Nationwide
Series, final practice for Sam's Town 300,
at Las Vegas
3 p.m.
SPEED NASCAR, Sprint Cup,
practice for Kobalt Tools 400, at Las
Vegas
6:30 p.m.
SPEED NASCAR, Sprint Cup, pole
qualifying for Kobalt Tools 400, at Las.
Vegas
BOXING
9 p.m.
ESPN2 Light heavyweights, Ismayl
Syllakh (14-0-0) vs. Yordanis Despaigne
(8-0-0), at Kissimmee
GOLF
3 p.m.
TGC PGATour,The Honda Classic,
second round, at Palm Beach Gardens
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
7 p.m.
ESPN2 -Akron at Kent St.
NBA BASKETBALL
7 p.m.
ESPN Chicago at Orlando
9:30 p.m.
ESPN Miami at San Antonio

BASKETBALL

NBA schedule

Today's Games
Toronto vs. New Jersey at Berlin,
Germany, 3 p.m.
Chicago at Orlando, 7 p.m.
Minnesota at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Oklahoma City at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m.
Golden State at Boston, 7:30 p.m.
Cleveland at New York, 7:30 p.m.
New Orleans at Memphis, 8 p.m.
Indiana at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Phoenix at Milwaukee, 8:30 p.m.
Miami at San Antonio, 9:30 p.m.
Charlotte at L.A. Lakers, 10:30 p.m.
Saturday's Games
Toronto vs. New Jersey at London,
England, 3 p.m.
Minnesota at Washington, 7 p.m.
Indiana at Houston, 8:30 p.m.
Sacramento at Utah, 9 p.m.
Charlotte at Portland, 10 p.m.
Denver at LA. Clippers, 10:30 p.m.

APTop 25 schedule
Saturday's Games
No. 2 Kansas at No. 22 Missouri,
Noon
No.'3 BYU vsWyoming, 3:30 p.m.
No. 4 *ittsburgfi'vs.: No:'r9'ViOanova,
4 p.m.
No.4 Duke at No. 13 North Carolina,
8 p.m.
No. 6 Purdue at Iowa, 4 p.m.
No. 7 Texas at Baylor, 9 p.m.
No. 8 Notre Dame at No. 16


Connecticut, 2 p.m.
No. 9 San Diego State vs. Colorado
State, 10 p.m.
No. I I Louisville at West Virginia,
Noon
No. 12 Syracuse vs. DePaul, 4 p.m.
No. 14 Florida at No. 21
Vanderbilt, 6 p.m.
No. 15 St.john's vs. South Florida,
8 p.m.
No. 17 Georgetown at Cincinnati,
2 p.m.
No. 18 Arizona vs. Oregon. 2 p.m.
No. 23 Xavier at Saint Louis, 2 p.m.
No. 24 Texas A&M vs. Texas Tech,
1:30 p.m.
No. 25 Utah State at Louisiana Tech,
7 p.m.

Women's SEC

At Bridgestone Arena
Nashville,Tenn.
First Round
Thursday
Florida 68,Arkansas 59
LSU 60,Alabama 36
South Carolina vs. Mississippi (n)
Auburn vs. Mississippi State (n)
Quarterfinals
Today
Tennessee vs. Florida, I p.m.
Kentucky vs. LSU3:30 p.m.
Georgia vs. South Carolina-Mississippi
winner, 7:30 p.m.
Vanderbilt vs.Auburn-Mississippi State
winner, 10 p.m.

Women's ACC

At Greensboro (N.C.) Coliseum
First Round
Thursday
GeorgiaTech 81,VirginiaTech 58
Wake Forest 74,Virginia 68
Boston College vs. N.C. State (n)
North Carolina vs. Clemson (n)
Quarterfinals
Today
Maryland vs. Georgia Tech, II a.m.
Duke vs.Wake Forest, 3 p.m.
Miami vs. Boston College-N.C. State
winner, 6 p.m.
Florida State vs. North Carolina-
Clemson winner, 8 p.m.

BASEBALL

Spring training
Today's Games
Atlanta (ss) vs. Washington at Viera,
1:05 p.m.
Baltimore vs. Detroit at Lakeland,
1:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay vs. Minnesota at Fort
Myers, 1:05 p.m.
Toronto vs.Atlanta (ss) at Kissimmee,
.1:05 p.m.
St. Louis vs. Houston at Kissimmee,
1:05 p.m.
N.Y. Mets vs. Florida at Jupiter,
1:05 p.m.
Philadelphia vs. Pittsburgh at
Bradenton, 1:05 p.m.
Texas vs. Oakland at Phoenix,
3:05 p.m.
Boston vs. N.Y. Yankees at Tampa,
7:05 p.m.
Saturday's Games


Detroit (ss) vs. Toronto at Dunedin,
1:05 p.m.
Minnesota vs. Tampa Bay at Port
Charlotte, 1:05 p.m.
Washington vs. N.Y.Yankees at Tampa,
1:05 p.m.
Boston (ss) vs. Baltimore at Sarasota,
1:05 p.m.
Florida vs. Boston (ss) at Fort Myers,
1:05 p.m.
Houston (ss) vs. St. Louis at Jupiter,
1:05 p.m.
Detroit (ss) vs. Houston (ss) at
Kissimmee, 1:05 p.m.
Pittsburgh vs. Philadelphia at
Clearwater, 1:05 p.m.
N.Y. Mets vs. Atlanta at Kissimmee,
1:05 p.m. _
Texas vs. Arizona at Scottsdale, Ariz.,
3:10 p.m.

AUTO RACING

Race week

NASCAR
SPRINT CUP
KobaltTools 400
Site: Las Vegas.
Schedule: Today, practice (Speed,
4-4:30 p.m.), qualifying. (Speed, 6:30-
8:30 p.m.; Saturday, practice (Speed,
6-8:30 p.m.); Sunday, race, 3 p.m. (FOX,
2:30-6:30 p.m.).
Track: Las Vegas Motor Speedway
(oval, 1.5 miles).
Race distance: 400.5 miles, 267 laps.
NATIONWIDE
Sam's Town 300
Site: Las Vegas.
Schedule: Today, practice (Speed,
noon-3 p.m.); Saturday, qualifying, race,
3 p.m. (ABC, 2:30-6 p.m.).
Track: Las Vegas Motor Speedway
(oval, 1.5 miles).
Race distance: 300 miles, 200 laps.

HOCKEY

NHL schedule

Thursday's Games
Boston 2,Tampa Bay I
Minnesota 3, N.Y. Rangers I
Toronto 3, Philadelphia 2
Washington 3, St. Louis 2
Carolina 3, Buffalo 2, OT.
Ottawa 3,Atlanta I
Montreal 4, Florida 0
Columbus at Edmonton (n)
Nashville atVancouver (n)
Phoenix at Los Angeles (n)
Detroit at San Jose (n)
Today's Games
Pittsburgh at New Jersey, 7 p.m.
N.Y. Rangers at Ottawa, 7:30 p.m.
Carolina at Chicago, 8:30 p.m.
Columbus at Calgary, 9 p.m.
Dallas at Anaheim, 10 p.m.
Saturday's Games
St. Louis at N.Y. Islanders, I p.m.
Buffalo at Philadelphia, I p.m.
Vancouver at Los Angeles, 4 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Boston, 7 p.m.
Chicago at Toronto, 7 p.m.
Florida at Atlanta, 7 p.m.
Montreal at Tampa Bay, 7 p.m.
Detroit at Phoenix, 8 p.m.
Edmonton at Colorado, 10 p.m.
Dallas at San Jose, 10:30 p.m.


INDIANS: Up headed into Santa Fe

Continued From Page 1B


brought in Douglass with
a fly ball to center that was
dropped.
Wrench added her third
single of the game in the
fourth inning, but Fort
White went quietly.
Douglass opened the
fifth inning with a shot off
the scoreboard behind the
left-field fence her sec-
ond home run in as many
games. Brett Sealey (error)
and Sarah Conners (infield


hit) reached later in the
inning and both stole a
base.
In the sixth inning, Jones
singled and stole second.
Gomez singled her to third
and she scored on a squeeze
bunt by Douglass.
Jesse Ely went the dis-
tance for Gainesville (3-4).
She walked one and struck
out four, and four of the
runs were earned.'
Ashley Burt and Grace
I


Rohan had the hits for the
Hurricanes.
"We played a good
game," Sparks said. "We
were putting the ball on
the bat and making the
plays. Tomorrow will be
tough and we need to get
our. minds right and that
preparation begins tonight
Hopefully we will be
focused and our confi-
dence will be up going into
tomorrow."


Columbia JV softball moves

to 6-0 with four victories


From staff reports

Columbia High's junior
varsity softball team has
tacked on four wins to
improve to 6-0.
The Lady Tigers had a
test at Keystone Heights
High on Friday, winning 5-3
to sweep the season series.
Katie Dooley pitched a
complete' game with eight
strikeouts, one walk and
two earned runs.
Caleigh McCauley was
3-for-4 and both Jessica


Shimmel and Dooley were
2-for-3.
The other three wins
were lopsided 18-0 at
Middleburg High on Feb.
24, 18-1 over visiting Ed
White High on Feb. 22 and
13-2 at Gainesville High on
Feb. 17.
Dooley and Amelia White
combined for a no-hitter
against Middleburg. They
totaled four strikeouts and
three walks.
McCauley was 3-for-3,
while Kaitlyn Hill,'Brittany


Morgan and Savannah
were each 2-for-3.
Shimmel was 3-for-3, all
doubles, against Ed White.
Sha Spears and Morgan
were 2-for-3.
Dooley and White shared
the pitching duties against
Gainesville and threw a
one-hitter.
Shimmel, McCauley and
Thomas were 2-for-3.
The JV opens for the
varsity against Suwannee
High at 5 p.m. today in
Live Oak.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Florida guard Jaterra Bonds (right) drives against Arkansas forward Chrisstasia Walter (left)
in the second half of an NCAA college basketball game at the Southeastern Conference
tournament on Thursday in Nashville, Tenn. Florida won 68-59.


Florida beats Arkansas


68-59 in SEC first round


By BETH RUCKER
Associated Press

NASHVILLE, Tenn.
- Ndidi Madu scored
12 points and grabbed 10
rebounds as eighth-seeded
Florida beat ninth-seeded
Arkansas 68-59 onThursday
in the first round of the
Southeastern Conference
tournament.


The Gators (18-13) will
face the top seed, No. 4
Tennessee, in the quarter-
finals on Friday. The Lady
Volunteers beat them twice
during the regular season
by an average 32.5 points.
Florida and Arkansas (18-
11) were tied at59 points with
3 minutes left to play, but the
Gators scored the final nine
points of the game.


ACROSS 44 Chemist's lair
46 Fluffy wraps
Ruin a nylon 47 Drink serving
DJ's supply 52 Enjoy
Slumber party 53 Smoke-detec-
attire tor output
Forum hello 54 day now
Grab a cab 55 Greek war god
Pivot 56 "Promise"
Hamm band
of soccer 57 Man, in old
Auel heroine Rome
Yarn 58 Barnyard
Deftly female
Camelot lady 59 Denver hrs:
Pizarro's quest 60 Bunyan's tool


Sr -
Capture
Groovy
Mr. Kilmer
Cat's prey
Honshu city
Porcupine quill
Face the target
Ballpoint point
Gemstones
Poker stake
North Woods
roamer


DOWN

1 MD's mag
2 Eager, plus
3 Paraphernalia
4 Seat with a
back
5 500 auto
race
6 Window part
7 Thick board
8 Ms. Child


Arkansas' Lyndsay
Harris, who had a team-
leading 18 points, left with
1:20 left after hitting the
floor and injuring her right
knee.
The Gators led by as
many as 17 points and shot
60.7 percent in the first half,
but the Lady Razorbacks hit
6 of 14 from 3 before half-
time to erase the margin.


Answer to Previous Puzzle

CHOK E J IFF Y
AM AN A OLL IE
VOTER' BELONG
ALAR S G IG
G A1 CE E


EN I FRA S WORMS


R'TA E I RSCA POE C 0


E L K GEN AL


BLOOM ENDO W
AL TOS STOnL E


9 Nursery buy
12 Clapton tune
13 Dictation pros,
18 Caveman from
Moo
22 It may be split


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


; .. k.,


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Dirt streams into the face of Columbia High's Michaela Burton (88) while safely sliding to
second base in a game against Buchholz High on Thursday. '


CHS: Travels to Suwannee tonight


Continued From Page 1B

the Lady Tigers a 7-2 edge.
Lauren Eaker would pro-
vide the final RBIs with an
infield hit to score Holly
Boris and Sund.
Buchholz scored three


runs in the bottom of the
seventh, but Columbia's
lead was too large to
overcome as the Lady
Tigers came away with a
9-5 win.


The Lady Tigers don't
get much time to breathe
as Columbia travels to
Suwannee High with its
undefeated record on the
line at 7 p.m. tonight.


23 VCR hookups
24 Knock sharply
25 "The
Greatest"
27 Footnote abbr.
(2 wds.)
29 Account
execs
31 Singer Miller
32 Hobby shop
buy
33 Honest prez
35 Bronco snag-
gers
37 Gas-pump
platforms
40 Patronage
41 Weightlifter's
pride
42 Ripple pattern
43 Bucket of
song
45 Investment
46 Humdrum
48 Rich soil
49 Falafel bean
50 PC system
51 Ancient harp


3-4 2011. by UFS, Inc.


SCOREBOARD


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


I
l


F
(
!
!

1

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(
[








LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS FRIDAY, MARCH 4, 2011


Levin takes early lead


at windy Honda Classic


By STEVEN WINE
Associated Press
PALM BEACH
GARDENS Spencer
Levin would have needed a
9-iron to reach the decora-
tive fountains in the lake
near the 18th fairway, and
yet as he-walked toward the
green he could feel their
mist.
It was that windy
Thursday at the Honda
Classic. Pins rattled, putters
shook and scores soared
as the PGA Tour began
its annual Florida swing
in breezes blustery rather
than balmy.
Levin handled the con-
ditions best, shooting
a 3-under 67 for a 1-shot
lead over five others. The
first round was suspended
because of darkness with 12
players still on the course.
Even by the standards of
the Sunshine State, where
wind is par for the course,
the gusts of more than 20
mph at PGA National were
unusual.
"It's a different kind of
golf," said Levin, who is
seeking his first tour title.
"You get in a par mode, real-
ly, where you just have to
take what the course gives
you. If you hit a good drive,
you don't want to get too
cute and try to go at a pin,
because you know pars are
going to be a good score."
They were. The average


score was the highest for
any round this year: 73.8.
That made 3 over better
than average, which hap-
pened only once last year
- the U.S. Open at Pebble
Beach.
The toughest hole was
the 186-yard, par-3 17th,
where more than a dozen
tee shots into the wind
landed in the lake fronting
the green. At least three
players waded in to hit
their second shot bare-
foot. Brett Quigley kept his
shoes on but had to chip
three times from the muck
before he reached the
green.
Holes 15 through 17
are nicknamed the Bear
Trap in honor of course
designer Jack Nicklaus,
and they played a com-
bined 1.6 strokes above par.
Adam Scott played the
three holes 7 over," with
three shots into the water.
He had a quintuple-bogey 8
on No. 17.
Y.E. Yang, the 2009 cham-
pion, parred all three holes,
then said they might form
the toughest stretch on the
tour. He shot a 68,
The first five holes were
mostly downwind, and
Michael Bradley played
them 4 under. He had six
bogeys and two double
bogeys the rest of the way
to shoot a 76.
Defending champion
Camilo Villegas had a 79.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Spencer Levin reacts after missing a putt on the 17th green
during the first round of the Honda Classic golf tournament in
Palm Beach Gardens Thursday.


NFL, players union agree to


24-hour. deadline extension


By HOWARD FENDRICH
Associated Press
WASHINGTON -
America's favorite sport
is still in business for
another day.
The NFL and the players'
union agreed Thursday to
a 24-hour extension of the
current collective bargain-
ing agreement so that nego-
tiations can continue.
Indianapolis Colts cen-
ter Jeff Saturday, a mem-
ber of the NFL Players
Association's execu-
tive committee, told The
Associated Press about the
extension after the sides
met for about eight hours
before a federal mediator.
The CBA was set to expire
at midnight, which would
likely have prompted the
first work stoppage since
1987 for a league that rakes
in $9 billion a year.
"We just know right now
that we granted a 24-hour
extension," Saturday said as
he and Steelers quarterback
Charlie Batch left the session.
Failing to make a deal
could put the two sides on
the road to a year without
football, even though open-
ing kickoff of the 2011 sea-
son is still six months away.
The labor unrest comes as
the NFL is at the height
of its popularity, breaking
records for TV ratings: This
year's Super Bowl was the
most-watched program in


ASSOCIATED PRESS
NFL players association members including New Orleans Saints quarterback Drew Brees
(second from right) arrive for football labor negotiations with the NfL involving a federal
mediator in Washington Thursday. The NFL and the players' union sat down Thursday,
morning for a last-ditch effort to avoid a work stoppage in America's most popular sport.


U.S. history.
Without a new CBA, the
owners could lock out the
players, and the union could
decertify to try and prevent
through the courts some-
thing the NFLPA did in 1989.
It formed again in 1993.
While the league and
players' union met for a 10th
day with mediator George
Cohen, even President
Barack Obama weighed
in when asked if he would
intervene in the dispute.
"I'm a big football fan,"


Obama said, "but I also think
that for an industry that's
making $9 billion a year in
revenue, they can figure out
how to divide it up in a sen-
sible way and be true to
their fans, who are the ones
who obviously allow for all
the money that they're mak-
ing. So my expectation and
hope is that they will resolve
it without me intervening,
because it turns out I've got
a lot of other stuff to do."
With the clock ticking
down, Commissioner Roger


Goodell and the NFL's
negotiating team arrived at
a federal mediator's head-
quarters about 45 minutes
ahead of NFLPA executive
director DeMaurice Smith
and his group.
Also on hand for the NFL
were Pash, outside counsel
Bob Batterman, New York
Giants owner John Mara,
Green Bay Packers president
Mark Murphy, Washington
Redskins general manager
Bruce Allen and several
other league executives.


BRIEFS


WOLVES CHEERLEADING
Tryout packets
available today
Richardson Middle
School cheerleading
tryout packet will be
available in the front
offices at RMS, Niblack
Elementary, Melrose Park
Elementary, Five Points
Elementary and Eastside
Elementary beginning
today. All packets must be
returned by 3 p.m.
March 25. The
cheerleading clinic will be
3:15-5:15 p.m.
April 18-20, and tryouts
will be 3:30 p.m.
April 21 in the Richardson
Middle School gym.
For details call sponsor
Shannon Hall at 6234058
or e-mail shannonhall73@
gmail.com.
FISHING
Brody Stevens
Open Saturday
The Brody Stevens
Open Bass Tournament is
Saturday at Clay Landing
in Chiefland. Entry fee is
$70 plus a $10 optional big
bass pot.
For details, call Chris
Starling at (386) 984-5639
or Derriel Cribbs at
965-0720.
RUNNING
Tortoise 5K at
O'Leno Park
The third annual Race
the Tortoise 5K/walk is
8 a.m. Saturday at O'Leno
State Park. Entry fee is
$14 for age 14 and
younger and $25 for oth-
ers. The race is limited to
the first 300 registrants.
To register, go to www. ,
floridastateparks. org/
oleno/Events. cfn.
For details, call Park
Manager V. Morgan
Tyrone at (386) 454-0723.
FORT WHITE FOOTBALL
Q-back Club
meeting Monday
The Fort White
Quarterback Club will
meet at 7 p.m. Monday in


Day bydaymy
Love does grow,
But there is
something I
need to know.
I will show my
- love for all to v
vsee if you would
agree to mary' me!


the teacher's lounge at the
high school.
For details, call Shayne
Morgan at 3974954 or
e-mail shaynetrayne@
hotmail.com.

CHS SPORTS
FCA rally planned
for March 14
A Fellowship of
Christian Athletes rally is
* planned for 6 p.m.
March 14 in the Columbia
High auditorium. There
will be guest speakers and
door prizes. There is no
charge and all are invited.
For details, call Shayne
Barber at (386) 288-6621
or e-mail
sbarber93@gmail. com.

ADULT SOFTBALL
League sign-up
through March 18
The Lake City
Recreation Department's
church, commercial and
women's adult softball
league registration
continues through
March 18. Registration
is 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.
weekdays at Teen Town
Recreation Center. Fees
are $350 for a minimum of
10 games. Rosters are at
Teen Town and due with
fees by March 18.
For details, call
Heyward Christie at
754-3607.
T-BALL
City registration
March 12, 19
Lake City Kecreation
Department has T-ball
registration set for
March 12 (returning
players) and March
19 (new players).
Registration is 8:30 to
5 p.m. at Teen Town
Recreation Center. Age
divisions offered are
4-5 and 6-7. Cost is $40
and a birth certificate is
required at registration.
For details, call
Heyward Christie at
754-3607.
E From staff reports


4'"


Do You Need to

POPTIHE
QUESTION?
CALL Mary or
Bridget
TODAY to place a
surprise ad for
someone you Lovel
755-5440 or
755-5441
between 8:00am & 5:00pm
^itkL


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek


Hernandez named

Miami's acting

athletic director


Associated Press

CORAL GABLES
- Miami has made Tony
Hernandez its acting ath-
letic director until a per-
manent hire is made, likely
later this year.
Hernandez has been
Miami's deputy athletic
director and has been with
the Hurricanes for 13 years.
He's filling the spot held by
Kirby Hocutt, who resigned
last week to become athletic
director at Texas Tech.


Hernandez is a Miami
graduate and started work-
ing in athletics at the school
in 1998 as a graduate assis-
tant in academic services.
He was named an assistant
athletic director in 2004, an
associate athletic director"
in 2005 and has overseen
several key departments
such as compliance and
video operations since.
Miami expects to
name Hocutt's succes-
sor by the start of the fall
semester.


Shockey agrees to

one-year deal with

Carolina Panthers


Associated Press

CHARLOTTE, N.C.
- The Carolina Panthers
have found a potential
boost for the NFL's worst
offense by coming to
terms with four-time Pro
Bowl tight end Jeremy
Shockey on a one-year
deal, a person with knowl-
edge of the decision said
Thursday.
The person spoke to The
Associated Press on condi-
tion of anonymity because
the contract had not been


signed. The deal was
expected to be in place
before any potential work
stoppage later Thursday
once the old labor deal
expires.
The 30-year-old Shockey,
who was released by
New Orleans last week,
had also received inter-
est from the Miami
Dolphins. He will be
reunited in Carolina with
offensive coordinator
Rob Chudzinski, who was
his position coach at the
University of Miami.


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary,words.
NIBKL I


UPATBR


NCFIHL
/ \\ < N


3-

ALASKAN5 LIKE TO
KEP ,THEIR MONEY

Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


A:
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's Jumbles: FRONT PLUMP PURPLE SHOULD
I Answer: Why the tow truck driver was able to help -
LOTS OF PULL


-.A


^^^^^Ads h^^Tavetobe laced by 4pm
11-dy pro to aperac in itT j^
DEMfmTADLIN th Lake_ lity Rporter.B''ffH^


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


i


I







LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS FRIDAY, MARCH 4, 2011


DILBERT


I SEE YOU HAVE YOUR
GIANT-SIZED BARF
BAG. YOU rNUST BE
GOING TO THE CONSUMER
ELECTRONICS SHOW.


BLONDIE
| EITHER FINISH THE
Ir OGGENFELDT
REPORT TONIGHT
S,.) OR DON'T BOTHER
COMING IN
TOMORROW!!


-- 0 ,


BEETLE BAILEY


SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS


GARFIELD


EVERY TIMrE I SEE A
NEW PRODUCT THAT IS
COOLER THAN ANY-
THING WE'RE WORKING
ON, I'LL GO TO THE BAG.


B.C.


FRANK & ERNEST


DEAR ABBY


Charity fundraisers may be

walking away with donations


DEAR ABBY: For sev-
eral years, a group of ladies
at work have held fundrais-
ers so they could participate
in cancer charity walks. We
have all donated willingly, but
someone recently pointed out
something disturbing.
Every year, this group
travels to a different location
for the walk, using the funds
they have raised for the char-
ity. There is a walk within
driving distance. The funds
they raise could be donated
to the cause instead of spent
on flights, hotels, meals, etc.
One of them commented that
they "might as well get some-
thing out of it."
Are we wrong to feel this
is not a good thing? Some-
one said we're paying for
their vacation. At this point
we are confused about the
whole mess. Any comments?
- BAFFLED IN NEW
ENGLAND
DEAR BAFFLED:
You're not wrong. Any mon-
ies raised the way these "la-
dies" have done should have
been donated to cancer re-
search. The comment your
co-worker made to you was
revealing. What you have
described sounds like fraud.
What those women should
have "gotten out of it" was the
satisfaction of knowing they
were doing something for a
worthy cause. This would not
include treating themselves
to a group vacation. If you
continue to support this ef-


Abigail Van Buren
www.deorabby.com
fort, the checks) should be
made payable to the charity.
DEAR ABBY: Are there
any rules of etiquette involv-
ing unwanted guests at funer-
als? While I have many loved
ones and friends, I have also
made a few enemies in my
life. I have made clear to my
husband that I do not want
"certain people" to be al-
lowed to attend my funeral
when I die.
I have always found it dis-
tasteful when folks show up
at funerals for someone they
disliked or didn't know well.
It ruins it for those who re-
ally did love the deceased. I
do not want my enemies try-
ing to make themselves feel
better by showing up and
pretending they cared.
My husband is against the
idea. I made him promise that
he'd do this for me because,
even though I'll be dead and
may not care then, I do care
very much now.
P.S. My husband wants to
know how one would keep
people away from a funeral
in the first place. PLAN-
NIN' AHEAD IN SODDY-
DAISY, TENN.


DEAR PLANNING : Let's
hold a good thought that
you'll be around for a long,
long time and outlive your
enemies. However, if that
doesn't happen, a way to en-
sure that only those you want
to attend your funeral will be
there is to make it "invitation
only." And when your death
is announced in the newspa-
per, it should be stated that
the service will be private.
DEAR ABBY: I have been
seeing the same gynecologist
for eight years. I trust her
with my health and my pri-
vacy. She recently moved to a
new practice and I would like
to follow her. My problem is
the wife of one of my co-worlk-
ers is an employee in the new
office, and I'm worried that
patient confidentiality may
not extend to "pillow talk."
How do I handle this deli-
cate situation? VALUES
MY PRIVACY IN SOUTH
CAROLINA
DEAR VALUES: Handle
it by having a frank talk with
your gynecologist, explain-
ing that,one of your co-work-
ers is married to an employee
in the new office, and asking
her how she plans to guar-
antee your privacy. Explain
that you would like to remain
her patient, but that this has
raised a red flag for you.

E Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or i
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-
April 19): A quick once-
over won't cut it today. Do
your due diligence if you
don't want to lose ground
professionally, financially
or physically. Don't let pres-
sure put on you by others
speed up a process that re-
quires time. ***
TAURUS (April 20-
May 20): Ask for favors,
listen and learn and pick up
new skills and you will be
prepared for any unexpect-
ed professional changes
that develop. Being versa-
tile, coupled with what and
whom you know will lead to
your success. ****
GEMINI (May 21-
June 20): Showing off will
backfire. You are better off
observing what others do
and refraining from trying
to be in control. Taking on a
job that is not suited to you
will lead to greater uncer-
tainty. Ask for assistance.
**
CANCER (June 21-
July 22): Make your mon-
ey work for you. Safe in-
vestments or putting what
you'can into a home and
personal security will ease
stress. Look for ways to
lower your overhead while
increasing your earning po-
tential. *****
LEO (July 23-Aug.
22): There is more to con-


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

sider with regard to your
personal and professional
partnerships. Map out what
you have to offer and what
you need in return. Estab-
lish the parameters so you
can move forward fearless-
ly. ***
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): You'll be pushed and
pulled emotionally, finan-
cially and mentally. Don't
let anyone take advantage
of you or pressure you.
Trying to buy someone's
attention will lead to loss.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): Stick close to home
and family. You can beautify
your surroundings cheaply
if you do the work. A rela-
tionship can take on a new
life if you include this per-
son in your plans and share
what you have. ***
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-
Nov. 21); You can't please
everyone but you can fol-
low through with your
ideas and plans, bringing
you the success and happi-
ness you deserve. Change
is good and, although it is
accompanied by struggle
and stress, it will turn out
better than you anticipate.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov.


22-Dec. 21): Stick close
to home. Avoid anyone put-
ting pressure on you or try-
ing to manipulate what you
do. Friends, relatives and
neighbors will play a role in
upsetting your plans. The
less you reveal, the easier it
will be to get things done.

CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): Bring what
you have learned in the
past up to date. Move ahead
on projects you want to pur-
sue. There is money to be
made in an unusual way.
You don't have to go all
out to be successful. Keep
things simple and afford-
able. ****
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Doors will open
if you are willing to do the
work first. Ifs what you
present and how that will
make a difference, but don t
give away all your secrets.
You may be enthusiastic but
caution coupled with strate-
gic tactics will lure the right
people and support. ***
PISCES (Feb. 19-
March 20): Shake off any
bad feelings you have or you
will miss your mark when
it comes to what you want
to achieve. Your emotions
will get you into trouble if
you refuse to see all sides
of an issue. Work with, not
against, the grain. ***


CELEBRITY CIPHER

by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: B equals 0


"X KMF PYTLXGT SMGSTL...


Y K T


UBZY PGFTL-NPGFTF MGF PGFTL-
LTZTMLSKTF BN. MHH YKT NTUMHT


S M G S T L Z "


- NLMG FLTZSKTL


PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "You can't please all the people all the time... and last
night, all those people were at my show." Comedian Mitch Hedberg
(c) 20.11 by NEA, Inc. 3-4


FOR BETTER OR WORSE


AT THE SHOW
AND IT
ONLY WEIGHS
ONE OUNCE!
I .0M
^M;"


WHAT 010 YOUR BOSS SAY, DEAR?
i THE SAME1 ',
SLONG-WIN ED .
"SLAH-5LAH-BLAH'
THAT THE OLD
GOAT ALWA / 3
SAYS! !-


-6 rb


ANO YOU MIGHT WANTA START
i By MAKING SURE YOUR
I PHONE IS HUNG UP,
(iYOU O .8LEHEAO!!!
-


(

BE REASONABLE, SNUFFY !!
IF WE FOLLERED THAT RULE
STHAR WOULDN'T BE NO
_________ -LAWYERS!!


Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415


CLASSIC PEANUTS










Classified Department: 755-5440


BUY Ti


dinT~i

idtaELLi


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED FRIDAY, MARCH 4, 2011

Lake City Reporter





CLASSIFIED


- ADvantage


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

755.5440


One item per ad





4 lines 6 days onal
Rate applies to private Individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling $500 or less.
SThis isa non.reundab
One item per ad $ d1 0 i





4 lines 6 days Each additional
Rate applies to private individuals selling
personal merchandise totaling $1, or less.




S- line 6 da Each additional
j4 lines 6 y line 1.g45

SRate applies to private Individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling $2,0 or less.
Each Item must include a pce.
a This a is pnonrivtendi alein



One item u per ad le re.
4 lines 6 days ch additional




Rate applies to private Individuals selling
persona merchandise totalling $4,000 orless.
Each item must include a price.
This is anon-refundableat i




One item per ad $ 7 4i

Rate applies to private individuals selling
personal merchandise totaIllng $40 or less.




Each Item must Include a price.
This isa non-refundable rate.


/ /1750
3 days
Includes 2 SIgns Ea|h addr' nalr 165



Limited to'service type advertis-
ing only.
4 lines, one month....'92.00
$10.80 each additional line
Includes an additional $2.00 per
ad for each Wednesday insertion.



You can call us at 755-5440,
Monday through Friday from 8:00
a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Some people prefer to place their
classified ads in person, and some
.ad categories will require prepay-
;ment. Our office is located at 180
East Duval Street.
You can also fax or email your ad
,copy to the Reporter.
FAX: 386-752-9400 Please
direct your copy to the Classified
Department.
EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityre-
porter.com





Ad is to Appear: Call by: FaxJEmail by:
Tuesday Mon., 10:00a.m. Mon.,9:00a.m.
Wednesday Mon., 10:00a.m. Mon.,9:00a.m.
Thursday Wed.,10:00a.m. Wed.,9:00 a.m.
Friday Thurs., 10:00a.m. Thurs.,9:00a.m.
Saturday Fi., 10:00a.m. Fi., 9:00 a.m.
Sunday Fri., 10:00 a.m. Fn., 9:00 a.m.
These deadlines are subject to change without notice




Ad Errors- Please read your ad
on the first day of publication.
We accept responsibility for only
the first incorrect insertion, and
only the charge for the ad space
in error. Please call 755-5440
immediately for prompt correc-
tion and billing adjustments.
Cancellations- Normal advertising
deadlines apply for cancellation.
Billing Inquiries- Call 755-5440.
Should further information be
required regarding payments or
credit limits, your call will be trans-
ferred to the accounting depart-
ment.


Advertising copy is subject to
approval by the Publisher who
reserves the right to edit, reject,
or classify all advertisements under
appropriate headings. Copy should
be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the first day of pub-
lication. Credit for published errors
will be allowed for the first insertion
for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the
Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nor for any general,
special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply
with Federal, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
nation in employment, housing and
public accommodations. Standard
abbreviations are acceptable; how-
ever,'the first word of each ad may
not be abbreviated.

In Print mid Online
www.lalicit tyreg)orter.coni


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
3RD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND
FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO.: 10-72-CA
VICKI L. HARRELL
Plaintiff,
vs.
GINETTE GRAEF,
ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PAR-
TIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH,
UNDER, AND AGAINST THE
HEREIN NAMED
DEFENDANTS) WHO ARE NOT
KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR
ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UN-
KNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM
AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES,
HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES
OR OTHER CLAIMANTS
Defendant,
CLERK'S NOTICE'OF SALE UN-
DER F.S. CHAPTER 45
NOTICE GIVEN that, in accordance
with the Default Final Judgment of
Foreclosure dated March 1, 2011 in
the above-styled cause, I will sell to
the highest and best bidder for cash
at the Columbia County Courthouse
,173 NE Hemando Ave., Lake City,
FL 32055 at 11 am. on March 30,
2011, the following described prop-
erty:
LOT 6, BRANDEN ESTATE, AC-
CORDING TO THE PLAT THERE-
OF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK
6, PAGE 159, PUBLIC RECORDS
OF COLUMBIA COUNTY,
055252397552475FLORIDA.
Dated: March 1, 2011
P. Dewitt Cason
Clerk of Court
By:/s/B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk

CERTIFICATE OF SERVICE
I certify that a copy hereof has been
furnished to the following parties by
U.S. Certified Mail, Return Receipt
Requested and Regular Mail on
March 1, 2011.

Ginette Graef
4483 Timber Ridge Lane
Ft. Pierce, FL 34982

By:/s/ Branden Strickland
Attorney for Plaintiff
121 Alhambra Plaza, Suite 1500
Coral Gables, Florida 33134
Telephone (305)779-5660
Florida Bar number: 12169

05525239
March 4, 11, 2011

PUBLIC HEARING
NOTICE OF PROPOSED BOARD
ACTION TO CONSIDER
ORDER APPROVING PROVI-
SIONAL FRANCHISE AND
WASTEWATER' RATE ADJUST-,
MENTS FOR KIRBY D. MOR-
GAN, INC.
TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN:
The Board of County Commissioners
of Columbia County, Florida will at
its regular meeting on MARCH 17,
2011, in the Columbia County
School Board Administration Build-
ing, 372 West Duval Street, Lake
City, Florida at 7:00 p.m. hold a pub-
lic hearing to consider a Proposed
Board Action entitled: I
PROPOSED BOARD ACTION BY
THE BOARD OF
COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF
COLUMBIA COUNTY
FLORIDA
ORDER APPROVING PROVI-
SIONAL FRANCHISE AND
WASTEWATER RATE ADJUST-
MENTS FOR KIRBY D. MOR-
GAN, INC.
The substance of the above-named
ordinance is as provided in its name.
Copies of the proposed ordinance are
available for inspection at the office
of the County Manager located in the
County Administration Complex,
135 NE Hernando Avenue, Lake
City, Florida between the hours of
8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m., Monday
through Friday. Any interested party
may appear and be heard at this pub-
lic hearing.
In the event any person decides to
appeal any decision of the Board of
County Commissioners with respect
to any matter relating to the consid-
eration of the ordinance at the above
references public hearing a record
of the proceedings may be needed
and in such event, such person may
need to ensure that a verbatim record
of the public hearing is made, which
record includes the testimony and
evidence on which the appeal is to be
based.
In accordance with the Americans
With Disabilities Act, a person need-
ing special accommodations or an in-
terpreter to participate in this pro-
ceeding should contact Lisa Roberts
386/752-1006 or T.D. Services
386/758-2139, at least seven (7) days
prior to the date of the hearing.
DATED this 22nd day of February,
2011
P. DEWITT CASON
Clerk of Court

04543676
March 4, 2011







Home Improvements

Carpentry, remodeling, paint,
repairs, additions, Lic. & Ins.
Since 1978 FREE estimates
386-497-3219 or 954-649-1037


Lawn & Landscape Service

Clean Pine Straw,
You pick it up, $1.85 a bale,
delivery 100 bales, $285,
386-688-9156


Services


Legal


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE NOTICE OF ]
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT ORDINANCE
IN AND FOR COLUMBIA COUN- TO WHOM IT
TY, FLORIDA The Board of C
JUVENILE DIVISION of Columbia C
IN THE INTEREST OF: its regular m
CASE NO.: 2010-18-DP March 17, 20
N.D. County School
DOB: 8/29/2004 Building, 372
K.W. Lake City, Flo:
DOB: 7/27/2006 sider the adopt
MINOR CHILDREN. entitled:
SUMMONS.AND NOTICE OF AD- AN ORDIN
VISORY HEARING FOR TERMI- BOARD OF (
NATION OF PARENTAL RIGHTS SIONERS OF
AND GUARDIANSHIP TY, FLORIDA
STATE OF FLORIDA: ECONOMIC I
TO: Jemilla Dortly VALOREM TA
(address unknown) NEW MILLE
WHEREAS, a Petition for Termina- SYSTEMS, LI
tion of Parental Rights under oath ACTMENT A
has been filed in this court regarding VIDING THE
the above-referenced childrenn, a EXEMPTION;
copy of which is on file with the TERM OF
Clerk of the Court, FINDING TH
YOU ARE HEREBY COMMAND- MEETS THE I
ED TO APPEAR before the Honora- SECTION 1
ble E. Vernon STATUTES;
Douglas, Circuit Judge, at the Co- PROOF OF
lumbia County Courthouse, Lake EXEMPTION;
City, Florida, on MARCH 16, 2011, AN ANNUAL
at 10:20 A.M., for a Termination of ING FOR RE
Parental Rights Advisory Hearing. EMPTION Al
YOU MUST APPEAR ON THE FUNDS; PRC
DATE AND AT THE TIME SPECI- BILITY; PRC
FlED HEREIN. CLUSION II
*****FAILURE. TO PERSONAL- CODE OF
LY APPEAR AT THIS ADVISORY PEAL OF LA
HEARING CONSTITUTES CON- PROVIDING
SENT TO THE TERMINATION OF DATE.
PARENTAL RIGHTS TO THIS The substance
CHILD (OR CHILDREN). IF YOU ordinance is as
FAIL TO APPEAR ON THE DATE Copies of the p
AND TIME SPECIFIED YOU available for ii
MAY LOSE ALL LEGAL RIGHTS of the County 1
TO THE CHILD (OR CHILDREN) County Adm
NAMED IN THE PETITION ON 135 NE Hen
FILE WITH THE CLERK OF THE City, Florida,
COURT***** 8:00 a.m. and
WITNESS my hand and seal of this through Friday
Court at Lake City, Columbia Coun- may appear ani
ty, Florida, on this 8th day of Febru- lic hearing.
ary 2011. In the event a
P. DEWITT CASON appeal any dec
Clerk of Circuit Court County Comm
(SEAL) to any matter ]
By: /s/:Trisha Brewington, Deputy eration of the o
Clerk referenced put
Tracy L. Sorcek, Esq. of the proceed
Florida Bar No. 46860 in such event,
Children's Legal Services to ensure that
1389 West US Highway 90, Suite the public hear
110 cord includes t
Lake City, FL 32055 dence on which
(386) 758-1437 based.
Special Accommodations. In ac- In accordance
cordance with the Americans with With Disabiliti
Disabilities Act, if you are a person ing special acc
with a disability who needs any ac- terpreter to pa
commodation in order to participate ceeding should
in this proceeding, you are entitled, 386/752-1006
at no cost to you, to the provision of 386/758-2139,
certain assistance. Please contact prior to the dat
Carrina Cooper, Court Administra- DATED this 2
tion, .173 NE Hernando Avenue, 2011.
Room 408, Lake City, Florida /s/ P. DeWitt
32055, Telephone (386) 758-2163, at P. DEWITT Ct
East seven (7) days before your Clerk of Court
scheduled court appearance or imme-
diately upon receiving this notifica- 04543733
tion if the time before the scheduled March 4, 2011
appearance is less than seven (7) NOTICE OF
days. If you are hearing impaired or ORDINANCEOF
voice, impaired, call 711. ORDNANCE


04543468
February 11, 18, 25, 2011
March 4, 2011

NOTICE OF INTENT TO
ORDINANCE
TO WHOM IT MAY CONC
The Board of County Comm
of Columbia County, Florid
its regular meeting on 1
March 17, 2011, in the (
County School Board Admin
Building, 372 West Duva
Lake City, Florida at 7:00 p
sider the adoption of an c
entitled:
AN ORDINANCE OF
BOARD OF COUNTY CC
SIONERS OF COLUMBIA
TY, FLORIDA, GRANT
ECONOMIC DEVELOP]
VALOREM TAX EXEMPT
HUNTER. PANELS, LLC
VIDING ENACTMENT Al
ITY; PROVIDING THE A
OF THE EXEMPTION; P
ING THE TERM OF THE ]
TION; FINDING THAT TH
NESS MEETS THE RE
MENTS OF SECTION
FLORIDA STATUTES; P
ING FOR PROOF OF EL
TY FOR EXEMPTION; P
ING FOR AN ANNUAL F
PROVIDING FOR REVO
OF .EXEMPTION AND
ERY OF FUNDS; PRO
SEVERABILITY; PRO
FOR INCLUSION IN THE
TY CODE OF ORDINANCE
PEAL OF LAW AND CO]
PROVIDING AN EFF
DATE.
The substance of the above
ordinance is as provided ini
Copies of the proposed ordin
available for inspection at t
of the County Manager local
County Administration (
135 NE Hemrando Avenu
City, Florida, between the
8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m.,
through Friday. Any interest
may appear and be heard at
lic hearing.
In the event any person de
appeal any decision by the
County Commissioners with
to any matter relating to the
eration of the ordinance at thl
referenced public hearing,
of the proceeding may be ne
in such event, such person r
to ensure that a verbatim r
the public hearing is made,
cord includes the testimony
dence on which the appeal
based.
In accordance with the A
With Disabilities Act, a pers
ing special accommodations
terpreter to participate in t
ceeding should contact Lisa
386/752-1006 or T.D.
386/758-2139, at least seven
prior to the date of the hearing
DATED this 28th day of F
2011.
/s/P. DeWitt Cason
P. DEWITT CASON
Clerk of Court

04543732
March 4, 2011


TO WHOM -l IT IMAY CONCERN:
The Board of County Commissioners
of Columbia County, Florida will at
its regular meeting on Thursday,
March 17, 2011, in the Columbia
ADOPT County School Board Administration
Building, 372 West Duval Street,
-ERN: Lake City, Florida at 7:00 p.m. con-
issioners side the adoption of an ordinance
la will at entitled:
Thursday, AN ORDINANCE OF THE
Columbia BOARD OF' COUNTY COMMIS-
iistration SIONERS OF COLUMBIA COUN-
al Street, TY, FLORIDA, GRANTING AN
m. con- ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT AD
ordinance VALOREM TAX EXEMPTION TO
MAYO FERTILIZER, INCORPO-
THE' RATED; PROVIDING ENACT-
OMMIS- MENT AUTHORITY; PROVIDING
COUN- THE AMOUNT OF THE EXEMP-
ING AN TION; PROVIDING THE TERM
ENT AD OF THE EXEMPTION; FINDING
ION TO THAT THE BUSINESS MEETS
' PRO- THE REQUIREMENTS OF SEC-
UTHOR- TION 196.012, FLORIDA STAT-
MOUNT UTES; PROVIDING FOR PROOF
?ROVID- OF ELIGIBILITY FOR EXEMP-
EXEMP- TION; PROVIDING FOR AN AN-
E BUSI- NUAL REPORT; PROVIDING
EQUIRE- FOR REVOCATION OF EXEMP-
196.012 TION AND RECOVERY OF
?ROVID- FUNDS; PROVIDING SEVERA-
IGIBILI- ABILITY; PROVIDING FOR IN-
?ROVID- CLUSION IN THE COUNTY
REPORT; CODE OF ORDINANCES, RE-
CATION PEAL OF LAW AND CONFLICT;
RECOV- PROVIDING AN EFFECTIVE
VIDING DATE.
VIDING The substance of the above-named
COUN- ordinance is as provided in its name.
ES, RE- Copies of the proposed ordinance are
NFLICT available for inspection at the office
ECTIVE of the County Manager located in the
County Administration Complex,
'e-named 135 NE Hemando Avenue, Lake
its name. City, Florida, between the hours of
nance are 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m., Monday
he office through Friday. Any interested party
ted in the may appear and be heard at this pub-
Complex, lic hearing.
ie, Lake In the event any person decides to
hours of appeal .any decision by the Board of
Monday County Commissioners with respect
ted party to any matter relating to the consid-
this pub- eration of the ordinance at the above-
referenced public hearing, a record
decides to of the proceeding may be needed and
Board of in such event, such person may need
h respect to ensure that a verbatim record of
e consid- the public hearing is made, which re-
he above- cord includes the testimony and evi-
a record dence on which the appeal is to be
eded and based.
may need In accordance with the Americans
record of With Disabilities Act, a person need-
which re- ing special accommodations or an in-
and evi- terpreter to participate in this pro-
is to be ceeding should contact Lisa Roberts
386/752-1006 or T.D. Services
mericans 386/758-2139, at least seven (7) days
on need- prior to the date of the hearing.
or an in- DATED this 28th day of February,
this pro- 2011.
Roberts /s/ P. DeWitt Cason
Services P. DEWITT CASON
(7) days Clerk of Court
g. 04543735
e March 4, 2011

REPORTER Classifieds

In Print and On Line
www.Ilakecityreporter.com


Legal

INTENT TO ADOPT

MAY CONCERN:
County Commissioners
County, Florida will at
meeting on Thursday,
11, in the Columbia
Board Administration
West Duval Street,
rida at 7:00 p.m. con-
ition of an ordinance

ANCE OF THE
COUNTY COMMIS-
COLUMBIA COUN-
A, GRANTING AN
DEVELOPMENT AD
AX EXEMPTION TO
NNIUM BUILDING
LC; PROVIDING EN-
AUTHORITY; PRO-
AMOUNT OF THE
PROVIDING THE
THE EXEMPTION;
AT THE BUSINESS
REQUIREMENTS OF
96.012, FLORIDA
PROVIDING FOR
ELIGIBILITY FOR
PROVIDING FOR
REPORT; PROVID-
VOCATION OF EX-
ND RECOVERY OF
)VIDING SEVERA-
)VIDING FOR IN-
N THE COUNTY
ORDINANCES, RE-
W AND CONFLICT;
AN EFFECTIVE

of the above-named
provided in its name.
proposed ordinance are
inspection at the office
Manager located in the
inistration Complex,
nando Avenue, Lake
between the hours of
d 5:00 p.m., Monday
. Any interested party
d be heard at this pub-

any person decides to
vision by the Board of
issioners with respect
relating to the consid-
ordinance at the above-
blic hearing, a record
ng may be needed and
such person may need
a verbatim record of
ing is made, which re-
he testimony and evi-
ch the appeal is to be

with the Americans
es Act, a person need-
ommodations or an in-
articipate in this pro-
1 contact Lisa Roberts
or T.D.. Services
at least seven (7) days
e of the hearing.
28th day of February,

Cason
ASON




INTENT TO ADOPT
rm Y Ay IVO (nTjc.Lm.


TERRELL JOHNSON K-3
Household goods

CHARLOTTE EAGLE AA-5
Household Goods


Legal

NOTICE OF INTENT TO ADOPT
ORDINANCE
TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN:
The Board of County Commissioners
of Columbia County, Florida will at
its regular meeting on Thursday,
March 17, 2011, in the Columbia
County School Board Administration
Building, 372 West Duval Street,
Lake City, Florida at 7:00 p.m. con-
sider the adoption of an ordinance
entitled:
AN ORDINANCE OF THE
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMIS-
SIONERS OF COLUMBIA COUN-
TY, FLORIDA, GRANTING AN
ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT AD .
VALOREM TAX EXEMPTION TO
TARGET CORPORATION; PRO-
VIDING ENACTMENT AUTHOR-
ITY; PROVIDING THE AMOUNT
OF THE EXEMPTION; PROVID-
ING THE TERM OF THE EXEMP-
TION; FINDING THAT THE BUSI-
NESS MEETS THE REQUIRE-
MENTS OF SECTION 196.012,
FLORIDA STATUTES; PROVID-
ING FOR PROOF OF ELIGIBILI-
TY FOR EXEMPTION; PROVID-
ING FOR AN ANNUAL REPORT;
PROVIDING FOR REVOCATION
OF EXEMPTION AND- RECOV-
ERY OF FUNDS; PROVIDING
SEVERABILITY; PROVIDING
FOR INCLUSION IN THE COUN-
TY CODE OF ORDINANCES, RE-
PEAL OF LAW AND CONFLICT;
PROVIDING AN EFFECTIVE
DATE.
The substance of the above-named
ordinance is as provided in its name.
Copies of the proposed ordinance are
available for inspection at the office
of the County Manager located in the
County Administration Complex,
135 NE Hemando Avenue, Lake
City, Florida, between the hours of
8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m., Monday
through Friday. Any interested party
may appear and be heard at this pub-
lic hearing.
In the event any person decides to
appeal any decision by the Board of
County Commissioners with respect
to any matter relating to the consid-
eration of the ordinance at the above-
referenced public hearing, a record
of the -proceeding may be needed and
in such event, such person may need
to ensure that a verbatim record of
the public hearing is made, which re-
cord includes the testimony and evi-
dence on which the appeal is to be
based.
In accordance with the Americans
With Disabilities Act, a person need-
ing special accommodations or an in-
terpreter to participate in this pro-
ceeding should contact Lisa Roberts
386/752-1006 or T.D. Services
386/758-2139, at least seven (7) days
prior to the date of the hearing.
DATED this 28th day of February,
2011.
/s/P. DeWitt Cason
P. DEWITT CASON
Clerk of Court

04543736
March 4, 2011
Registration of Fictitious Names
We the undersigned, being duly
sworn, do hereby declare under oath
that the names of all persons interest-
ed in the business or profession car-
ried on under the name of The Wash
at 3270 N US 441
Lake City, FL
32055
Contact Phone Number:
386-292-4110 and the extent of the
interest of each, is as follows:
Name: Abram Rossin
Extent of Interest: 100%
by:/s/ Abram Rossin

STATE OF FLORIDA
COUNTY OF COLUMBIA
Sworn to and subscribed before me
-this 2nd day of March, A.D. 2011.
by:/s/ KATHLEEN A. RIOTTO

05525259
March 4, 2011

Registration of Fictitious Names
We the undersigned, being duly
sworn, do hereby declare under oath
that the names of all persons interest-
ed in the business or profession car-
ried on under the name of Timeless
Memories Furniture & Antiques at
1034 SW Main Blvd
Lake City, FL
32025
Contact Phone Number:
386-438-5259 and the extent of the
interest of each, is as follows:
Name: Jackie Briscoe
Extent of Interest: 100%
by:/s/ Jackie Briscoe

STATE OF FLORIDA
COUNTY OF COLUMBIA
Sworn to and subscribed before me
this 2nd day of March, A.D. 2011.
by:/s/ Sandra Swilley

05525262
March 4, 2011

We will sell the following units at
Community Self Storage 814 SW
State Road 247/Branford Hwy.,
March 18, 2011 at 10:00 A.M.
WE SELL FOR CASH ONLY
386-961-9926

JAMES GERMANY B-3
Household Goods

SIERRA GOODBREAD C-12
Household Goods

CHRISTOPHER SIMMONS C-15
Household Goods

JOSH W. CAPUTO D-2
Household Goods

LYNDA MEDARIES E-3
Household goods

HOWARD STEVENS F-1
Household Goods

RASHIETTA JONES K-2
Household Goods


ing qualified management candi-
dates to join our team. Wages
range from $9 to $15 per hr, based
on exp., competitive benefits
apply online at
www.mcstate.com/alachua or fax
resume to 386-755-2435


DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.


Legal

PATRICIA KING BB-33
Household Goods

WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO
REFUSE ALL BIDS.

04543556
February 25, 2011
March 4, 2011


010 Announcements









020 Lost & Found

Austrailian Cattle Dog male, lost
on Feb 18th, Microchipped, family
misses terribly, brown collar
w/blue tags 386-935-2920 Reward








Found Cat, Gum Swap Rd.
Osceola Nat'l Forest. Very friend-
ly, black & white. 386-758-9880
or check with LC Animal shelter

Lost intact male Blue Heeler,
last seen at Belk's on Feb 24th,
45 lbs, brown collar w/tags,
Reward offered 386-935-2920
Male Rottweiller lost evening of
02/21, County Road 138/Rum
Island area. REWARD.
Please call 386-454-2925
if no answer leave message

100 Job
Opportunities

04543759
Join our family of
caring professionals!


-.


Community Education
Manager
Responsible for assisting in
planning and coordinating
special projects 'anievehts to
provide Hospice Education
throughout the service area.
Minimum of a Bachelor's
degree with at least 3 to 5 years
experience and a proven track
record within the development
services arena.
Job summary as well and
application can be found at:
www.hospiceofcitruscounty.org
email:
hr(Shospiceofcitruscountv.org
Hospice of the Nature Coast
P.O. Box 641270
Beverly Hills, FL 34464
Fax: 352-527-9366
DFWP/EOE

05525200
Field Service Technician,
Service medical equipment in
North Florida,
established company, will train,
knowledge of electricity a plus,
Send resume to
PO Box 494273
Port Charlotte, FL 33949

05525221
PRODUCT ADVISOR
Travel Country RV is accepting
applications for product advisors
in our Lake City, FL location.
No experience necessary. We're
looking for personality, charac-
ter, and energy. Applicants must
be outgoing and have the ability
to interact and communicate
with our loyal customers.
This is an excellent opportunity
to learn a new career in a
thriving industry. Salary plus
bonuses with an excellent
employee benefit plan. Call Jeff
at 888-664-4268 or email to
jeff@travelcountryrv.com
for further information

05525235
Automotive/RV Warranty
Writer-Administrator
Travel Country RV is looking
for a warranty writer or service
writer experienced in automo-
bile or RV warranty writing or
administration. Some accodnt-
ing knowledge and excellent
computer skills required.
Applicant must be able to work
closely with service technicians,
administrative and sales
personnel. Competitive salary
and benefits. Fax resume to:
Travel Country RV
386-755-5170 attn:Ron Fleming
or email to
ron@travelcountryrv.com
All inquiries will be kept in
strict confidence

* AVON!!!, EARN up to 50%!!!
Only $10 for Starter Kit,
1-800-275-9945 pin #4206
www.youravon.com/tdavies

CDL A Flatbed/Van Truck
Driver needed for Ff/T OTR SE
area, 3 years exp or more, Contact
Melissa or Mary @ 386-935-2773

McDonald's of Alachua is seek-







Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED FRIDAY, MARCH 4, 2011


i10 Job
00Opportunities
140 Temp Farm Workers needed
3/28/11 9/10/11. Duties include:
picking, pruning, thinning, &
packing peaches & general orchard
maintenance. Cultivating, picking
& packing vegetables & operating
tractors. Random drug testing at
employer's expense. Worksites in
Aiken Co. SC. Guaranteed 3/4 of
contract hours. All tools, supplies,
& equip provided at no cost.
Free housing provided for
non-commuting workers.
Transportation & subsistence
reimbursed to worker upon
completion of 50% of contract, or
earlier, if appropriate. $9.11 '
including piece rates depending on
crop activity. Report or send a
resume to the nearest FL Agency
of Workforce Innovation office &
reference job # SC496118.
Cotton Hope Orchards -
Monetta, SC
Groundman/Truck driver for tree
work. Class "B" CDL w/air
breaks. Part Time/work available
Clean driving record,
386-963-5026, Drug Test.
SECURITY OFFICERS
FT/PT, Great Pay and Benefits.
Lake City/Alachua Area.
Must have Sec. Lie., clean
background, pass drug screen.
Call: 866-458-9523 EOE
Subway is now hiring.
Management Experience a plus.
Send resumes to:
lakecitymanager@yahoo.com
Tire Tech/Serv Truck Operator
Exp w/car, truck, tractor tire re-
pairs. Clean DL req'd. Avail for
night & weekend calls. Pay based
on exp. Apply at Thomas Tire
CR 25A. 386-752-8648
22 Temp Farmworkers needed
3/30/11 11/1/11. Workers will
cultivate, harvest, grade & pack
peaches & strawberries according
to supervisor's instructions.
Random drug testing at employer's
expense. Guaranteed 3/4 of
contract hours. Tools provided at
no cost. Free housing provided for
non-commuting workers.
Transportation & subsistence
reimbursed to worker upon
completion of 50% of contract, or
earlier, if appropriate. $9.11/hr.
Report or send a resume to the
nearest FL Agency of Workforce
Innovation office & ref.
job # SC 496397.
Triple C Farms Chesnee, SC
Wanted Highly motivated
individual for Sales Position.
Rountree -Moore Ford Lincoln
Mercury Great benefits, paid vaca-
tion. Exp. a plus but not necessary.
Call Chris. @ 386-755-0630

120 Medical
120 Employment

05525260
Medical Assistant,
Exp only need apply! Looking
for qualified indiv., quick learn-
er, good personality,dependable
Fax resume to: Cheryl
386-754-3657 or email to:
office manager@
primarycaremedic.com

AMIcids Family Services Program
seeks Case Managers for
community based program work-
ing w/ at risk youth &
families. Bachelor's degree req'd.
Req's travel to 7 counties.
Fax resume to 386.362.0932.

240 Schools &
2 Education
04543680
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-03/28/10
Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-04/11/11
Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com


310 Pets & Supplies
CKC Toy Poodle
8 wks, Hith Cert/Shots, $400,
386-719-4900 or
386-288-7403

To place your
classified ad call

755-5440


310 Pets & Supplies
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.


361 Farm Equipment
84 Ford 4610 Tractor. Runs good.
Solid 2WD. New front tires,
350hr on 2005 motor. Dependable.
$7500. obo. 386-867-0005

401 Antiques
CASH CASH CASH CASH
Pre 1964 Silver Coins, Sterling,
Flatware, Costume Jewelry,
Unusual Antiques. 386-963-2621

407 Computers
DELL COMPUTER
$100.
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170

420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.

Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$250 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.

430 Garage Sales
Annual Yard Sale
March 5th, 7a-2p
Bethel United Methodist Church
Hwy 441 S





Fri & Sat, 8-?, ,women & baby
'clothes, variety of household
items, Colquitt Way, -a
Plantation Subdivision
Fri & Sat. 8-? Fantasy Glen off CR
135 across from Stewarts. Look
for signs. Scooter, appliances,
electronics, hshold, lots of misc.
Friday March 4, 8a-4p,
household, clothes, party dresses,
near Cannon Creek Airport
2077 SW Sisters Welcome Rd




HUGE GARAGE SALE Fri/Sat
8a-2p,.Yard, electrical tools, laser
disc/4 tubs of movies, furn, Anti-
que tools, nice clothes and much
more, 438 Clubview Cir (behind
LC Medical Center)386-590-2423






PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.

Sat Only, 8-?, Moving Sale, Ev-
erything needs to go! 412 SW
Deanna Terr,off of Marvin Burnett
between Bascom Norris & 47
SAT. 8-? 41 S. turn left on 131C,
follow signs. home interior,
household items, rug,
kitchen, purses, etc.
YARD SALE!!!
@2463 SW. Mayo Rd.
Off Pinemount Look for signs
SAT Only 8am-2pm

440 Miscellaneous
2002 EZ Go Golf Cart
w/like new 5x8 trailer
$1000.
SOLD


Tow Behind Grill/Smoker
$1,250 OBO.
386-249-3104 or
386-719-4802


630 Mobile Homes
630 for Rent
14 Wide, 2/2-$475. mo. + dep.
Clean, Quiet Country Park
Water, septic, garbage included
758-2280 References, NO PETS!
2&3 BR MH. $395 $650. mo.
plus deposit. Water & sewer fur-
nished. Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
3/2 MH 1064 sq ft,remodeled in
small/quiet park, near FGC, Small
pets ok, $500 dep $500 mo
386-752-1971 or 352-281-2450
3BR/2BA Doublewide on 1 ac.
Lg. Rooms. $750 a month.
1st month and full security.
Please call 386-965-7534.
A very clean & well maintained
2/2 units in nice park. $599.mo
w/$500. dep. Rent includes water,
sewer, trash p/u. Close to town
386-984-8448 or 623-7547
DWMH. Lg. newer 3/2 on 1 ac.
Porch, carport & fenced yard.
Some pets ok. Ellisville area.
$850. mo, $650. sec 386-752-5450
For Rent/Sale. Owner Finance.
3hr/2ba. Lg DWMH. remodeled,
new AC, 2 ac. 10 mi SW Branford
Hwy. No pets 1st + sec. 984-7478.
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White. Contact 386-623-2465
or 386-623-3404







Mobile Homes
640 for Sale
$216 a month remodeled,
like new, 2Bd/2Ba S Wide
Delivered & blocked, appliances,
A/C $2500 down, 8 year fin.
Possible owner financing. Ready
now. Call Gary 386 758-9824
05525133
Palm Harbor Homes
Has 3 Modular Homes
Available at HUGE Savings
Over 40K Off
Call Today! 800-622-2832


705 Rooms for Rent
FURNISHED ROOM.
Private entrance & bath.
Utilities & cable incl $450 mo.
References req'd. 352-284-2338

Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent

05524728
SPRING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans;
some with garages.
Call 386-454-1469
or visit our website:
www.springhillvillage.net
0.5524833
DEPOSIT AS LOW AS $89 +
$200 OFF!!
BEST PRICES IN TOWN!
Windsong Apts.
386-758-8455
1, 2 & 3 Bedroom Apartments
& Mobile Homes
starting at $350 per month
386-755-2423
2/1 Apt in duplex for rent, very
clean. $585 mo. w/$585 dep. no
pets, w/carport, off Branford Hwy
(5 miles from town) 386-752-7578
A Landlord You Can Love!
2 br Apts $575. & up + sec. Great
area. CH/A washer/dryer hookups.
386-758-9351/352-208-2421
Brandywine Apartments
Now Renting
1, 2 and 3 bedrooms
Central Heat and Air .
Ph, 386-752-3033
W. Grandview Ave. 32055
Equal Housing Opportunity
Great location W of 1-75, spacious
deluxe 2BR apts., garage, W/D
hook up. patio. $600 & up, + SD,
386 965-0276
Nice Apt. downtown. Remodeled,
kit., l/bd, ba, LR, dining & extra
386-362-8075 or 386-754-2951.

The Lakes Apts. Studios & 1Br's
from $135/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call386-752-2741
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $525. + sec.
Call Michelle 386-752-9626


720 Furnished Apts.
2 For Rent
Apt, Ft. White, FL 2/1,
screen porch, W/D hook up,
$550 mo plus Sec Dep,
386-497-1116
New furnished studio apt in a
home, private entrance & bath,
incl all utilities, trash, cable, frig
and pest control. $450 mo + dep;
immediate avail. 386-752-2020
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

730 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent

04543719
LANDLORDS, let our gold
standard work for you!
Call today for additional
information on managing your
residential rentals.
16884 53rd Wellborn
3/2 well kept DWMH with great
floor plan and 2 car garage
$850./mo. + $800 security
642 Chris Terrace Lake City
Nice upscale 3/2 with 1623 sf.
Close to Town but far enough
out for privacy. $1150./mo
$1150./security.
143 Zebra Terrace Lake City
3/2 well maintained brick home
on 1 acre +. Bonus room. could
be 4th bedroom or nice family
room. $900./mo. +
$900. security.
B.J. Federico 386-365-5884
Kayla Carbono 386-623-9650
(habla espaiol)
Century 21
The Darby Rogers Co.

3/2 on 2.1 acres, 2 car garage,
ceramic tile, front & rear porches,
$995 mo, plus 2 mo sec.
Lease with the option to buy
386-758-9996 or 386-365-5434
3BR/1.5BA. BLOCK HOME.
Fenced (privacy) back yard.
Nice area. $825. mo $825. dep.
References req'd. 386-364-2897
Attractive 3br/2ba Brick home.
Excellent location View of
Lake Montgomery. No Pets.
$950. mo. 386-965-0763
Close to Wellborn, nice & cozy
2/1, very private,
$625 mo, sec dep $500, app fee,
call 386-935-1482
House for rent. Everything new.
4br/2ba plus study. Carport. Great
neighborhood. $1000 mo last plus
security. 386-867-2283
TOWNHOUSE 2br plus
bonus room. w/1.5 bath.
Quail Heights CC. $750. mo plus
$250 damage dep. 386-752-8553

750 Business &
/ Office Rentals
1200 sq ft Professional Office
Space, across from Courthouse,
newly remodeled, 152 N Marion
$650 mo 386-867-4995 / 961-8466
OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$695. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor

770 Condos For Rent

04543782
Golf Course Condo for rent,
2BR/2BA, 1420 s.f., $1200/mo.
Rent includes all appliances,
basic cable, water/sewer/
garbage, pool & tennis ct.
access. Realtor/owner
call 386-344-0433.


790 Vacation Rentals
Horseshoe Beach Spring Special
Gulf Front 2br home, w/Ig water-
front porch, dock, fish sink.
Avail wkends. $345. or wk $795.
(352)498-5986/386-235-3633

805 Lots for Sale
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
Impaired is 1-800-927-9275.


810 Home for Sale
2/1,on nearly an acre, living/dining
rm, kitchen nook, util rmi, fenced,
back porch,2 car carport close to
town, $60,000 386-754-5818
3/2 w/garage, needs TLC, great lo-
cation, owner financing, $2000 dn,
$701 mo.,352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com

820 Farms&
O V Acreage
10 ac lots, some w/well, septic, pwr
pole. Lowered prices. Owner finance
w/low dn pmnt Deas Bullard Proper-
ties 386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com
4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!.
$69,900. $613mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
4 acres, Wellborn, New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site; owner fin,
no down, $39,900, $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com

940 Trucks


f l eWSHCK


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2006 EF250
Ford Van
3/4 ton, metal work
shelves/ladder rack, .
60K miles, exc. cond.
$10,500
Casl
386-555-5555
If you don't sell your vehicle
during the first 10 days, you
can run the same vehicle ad
for 10 additional days for
only $15.00
Terms and conditions remain the
same for the additional run.




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