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The Lake City reporter
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Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01488
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 12/30/2010
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01488
System ID: UF00028308:01488
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text







Auburn favored
Top-ranked Tigers picked to
beat Oregon.


000016
LIE OF
205 Sf4.




LarKe


Thursday, December 30, 2010


7lOf.- :-ST ST
i17007


Maryland rolls
Terps beat East Carolina
in Military Bowl, 51-20.

Sports, I B


LS reporter

mot


www.lakecityreporter.com


Vol. 136, No. 294 0 75 cents


DESTROYING




OLD EVIDENCE


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Lt. Jerry Bullard (right) of the Florida Department of Transportation Motor Carrier Compliance Office hands Staff Sgt. William
Beasley 46 grams of marijuana Wednesday while Chief Assistant State Attorney Wiliarn Whitley watches. Evidence was
double-checked before it was burned at the Tampa Armature Works Building in take City. The agency disposed of evidence
such as drugs and drug paraphernalia taken from Hamilton, Suwannee and Madison counties.


FDOT officers
bum drugs, other
items used to
prosecute cases.

By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
tate officials
Wednesday led
the burning of
confiscated meth-
amphetamine,
marijuana, crack cocaine
and other old seized evi-
dence at Tampa Armature
Works in Lake City.
The items had accumu-
lated in the evidence room
of the Florida Department
of Transportation Motor
Compliance Office.
It was the second evi-
dence burn for the Lake
City field office, said Lt.
Jerry Bullard. The evi-
dence represented 62 cases
from Hamilton, Madison
and Suwannee counties.
Majority of the drug-


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Five unidentified pills are tossed aside before being burned. FDOT officials said that the
majority of offenses stem from commercial truck drivers.


related items involved
commercial truck drivers,
Bullard said.
"They use it a lot to stay
awake, but, in turn, it really


makes them unsafe," he
said, referring to the con-
fiscated drugs.
He said requests are
made to the court to dis-


pose of evidence after it is
no longer needed.
"We keep the evidence
BURN continued on 3A





Lt. Jerry Bullard
pulls a plastic bag
containing meth-
amphetamine out
of an evidence
bag. Evidence from
62 cases, dating
from 2001 to 2007,
was destroyed in a
burn-out oven that
reached more than
900 degrees.



JASON MATTHEW WALKER/
Lake City Reporter


Tax collector's

office to be

open Friday


Business at end of
the year expected
to be heavy.
By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com
Although county offic-
es will be closed on New
Year's Eve, the county tax
collector's office will be
open for business as usual.
Ronnie Brannon,
Columbia County tax col-.
lector, said the main office
and West branch will be
open during normal busi-
ness hours Friday.
The main office, locat-
ed at the Courthouse
Annex building at 135 NE
Hernando Ave:, and the
West Branch, located at
the Highway Patrol Office
at 1350 U.S. Highway 90,
will be open from 8 a.m. to
4:30 p.m. The main office's


drive-through will be open
from 7:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.
Brannon said the office
will stay open because end-
of-the-year business is par-
ticularly busy, with services
like large truck tags and
mobile home renewals, ser-
vices the office sees regu-
larly in December.
And Fridays are typically
a busy day, he said.
'The fact that Dec. 31
falls on a Friday kind of
compounds all of that,"
Brannon said.
Residents also want to
pay their property taxes
by the end of the year, he
said.
"It's the last day of the
month and year and we just
expect a lot of people to
pay on the last day, since
they normally do," Brannon
said.
TAX continued on 3A


Bowl games

should make

Lake City busy


Fans will stop on
their way to see
favorite teams.
By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
College football bowl
games, always prominent
in Florida as one year ends
and another begins, should
also have an impact on
Columbia County.
"You just have to drive
through the intersection or
even see the white shoe
polish or flags on cars to
get a sense of who's here,"
said Harvey Campbell,
Columbia County Tourist
Development Council exec-


utive director.
Who's playing and in
which bowl often are deter-
mining factors on what kind
of an impact there will be in
this area.
Example: Upcomingbowl
games include the Capital
One Bowl in Orlando, with
Michigan State vs. Alabama
Saturday; the Outback Bowl
in Tampa, with Florida vs.
Penn State Saturday; the
Gator Bowl in Jacksonville,
with Michigan vs.
Mississippi State Saturday;
and the Orange Bowl in
Miami, with Stanford vs.
Virginia Tech Monday.
The Gator Bowl in
BOWLS continued on 3A


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Kyle Noegel (from left), Drew Heulitt and Miguel Hurtado dis-
cuss their top picks for the college football bowls at Kazbor's
Grille on Wednesday.


HOUDAY HOURS


County Office
Closed Friday.
City Office
Closed Friday.
Tax Collector
Open 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m.
Friday.


Post Office
Close at noon Friday.
Library
Closed Dec. 31-Jan. 2.
Trash
Regular pick up for
New Year's.


CALL US: : 6 Opinion ................
(386) 752-1293 6 97 : People ..................
SUBSCRIBE TO Partly oudy Obituaries ..............
THE REPORTER: y cou Advice & Comics........
Voice: 755-5445 WEATH A Pue. .....
SFax: 752-9400 WEATHER, 2A 2 Puzzles.................


TODAY IN
HEALTH
Riding through
cancer


COMING
FRIDAY
Top Lake City
stories of 2010.


UT-_T











LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING THURSDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2010


Wednesday:
Afternoon: 0-2-1
Evening: 9-0-3


Wednesday:
SAfternoon: 7-5-4-1
Evening: 8-5-0-0


Tuesday:
2-4-6-8-12


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



Reese Witherspoon to wed for 2nd time


NEW YORK


Reese Witherspoon is
engaged to Hollywood
agent Jim Toth.
A representative for
the actress confirmed
that the couple will wed and says
they're "extremely happy." The
engagement was first reported by Us
Weekly.
The 34-year-old actress from New
Orleans was previously married to
actor Ryan Phillippe. She had two
children with him and they divorced
in 2008.
Witherspoon won an Oscar for her
performance in 'Walk the Line." She
stars in the recently released com-
edy "How Do You Know."
Toth is an agent for Creative
Artists Agency. Witherspoon is a
CAA client but is represented by
another agent

John Leguizamo to
return to Broadway
NEW YORK John Leguizamo is
readying the latest installment of his
life for a Broadway run.
The 46-year-old comedian-actor
will bring a new one-man autobio-
graphical show, "Ghetto Klown," to
the Lyceum Theater beginning Feb.
21. The show officially opens March
22 and runs 12 weeks.
"Ghetto Klown" will delve into
the early days of Leguizamo's acting
career and his roles in Hollywood.
It will follow in the tradition of his
shows "Spic-O-Rama," "Freak" and
"Sexaholix."
The new one, to be fine-tuned in
Chicago in February, will be directed
by Fisher Stevens.
Leguizamo won an Emmy for his
monologue "Freak," which originally
appeared on Broadway in 1998.
He was nominated for a Golden
Globe Award for his, supporting role


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Reese Witherspoon, a cast member in 'How Do You Know,' arrives at the premiere
of the film in Los Angeles Dec. 13. Witherspoon announced she will marry agent
Jim Toth, her second marriage.


in 1995's 'To Wong Foo Thanks for
Everything, Julie Newmar."

Member of 'Sound of
Music' family dies
TOWSON, Md. A longtime
friend said a woman whose family
inspired the movie 'The Sound of
Music" has died. Agathe von Trapp
was 97.
Mary Louise Kane said
Wednesday that von Trapp died
the previous day at a hospice in the
Baltimore suburb of Towson after
suffering congestive heart failure in
November. ,
Von Trapp was the oldest daugh-
ter of Austrian naval officer Capt
Georg Ritter von Trapp. His seven
children by his first wife were the
basis for the singing family in the
1965 film.
Kane lived with Agathe von Trapp
for five decades and ran a kinder-


garten with her at the Sacred Heart
Catholic parish in Glyndon, Md.

Clooney, Google, UN to
watch Sudan border
WASHINGTON A group
founded by American actor George
Clooney said Tuesday it has teamed
up with Google, a U.N. agency and
anti-genocide organizations to launch
satellite surveillance of the border
between north and south Sudan to
try to prevent a new civil war after
the south votes in a secession refer-
endum next month.
Clooney's Not On Our Watch is
funding the start-up phase Satellite
Sentinel Project that will collect real-
time satellite imagery and combine it
with field analysis from the Enough
Project and the Harvard Humanitarian
Initiative, organizers said.

* Associated Press


Celebrity Birthdays


* Actor Joseph Bologna is
76.
* Actor Russ Tamblyn is 76.
* Baseball Hall-of-Famer
Sandy Koufax is 75.
* Actor Fred Ward is 68.
* Singer-musician Michael
Nesmith is 68.
* Singer Davy Jones is 65.
* Country singer Suzy
Bogguss is 54.


* "Today" show co-host Matt
Lauer is 53.
* Actress-comedian Tracey
Ullman is 51.
* Radio-TV commentator
Sean Hannity is 49.
* Sprinter Ben Johnson is
49.
* Golfer Tiger Woods is 35.
* NBA player LeBron James
is 26.


Lake City
HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293
Fax number ............. 752-9400
Circulation ...............755-6445
Online... www.lakecltyreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part Is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056.
PublisherTodd Wilson .... .754-0418
(twilson@lakedtyreporter.com)
NEWS
Assistant Editor CJ Risak..754-0427
After 1.00 p.m.
(cjrisak@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Kathryn Peterson..754-0417
(kpeterson@lakectyreporter.com)
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440.


Reporter
BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 730
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 10:30 am. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery.After
10:30 am., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be Issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
Is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits wil be Issued.
Circulation ..............755-445
(circulation@lakectyreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks ................ $26.32
24 Weeks.... ............ $48.79
52 Weeks ..... .............$83.46
Rates indude7% salestax
Mail rates
12 Weeks .............. $41.40
24 Weeks ..................$82.80
52 Weeks....... ........... $179.40


CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run
in this space. And thanks for reading.


Book brings life
to child's story

JUPITER The little
girl's white, four-post bed
is empty, her favorite doll
Natalie atop it. Her pink
plate and cup are set on
the kitchen table; her. vita-
mins await The last CD
she listened to is in her
little stereo, the last les-
son she learned on the
blackboard, the last month
she was alive frozen on the
unturned page of the cal-
endar.
Since a relative's
Thanksgiving Day 2009
shooting rampage at their
home, Jim and Muriel
Sitton have faced a horrific
balancing act moving on
past the time-stopping grief
of losing their 6-year-old
daughter Makayla Joy, and
helping to realize her unful-
filled dreams.
One of Makayla's hopes
- to someday publish a
book has now come to
life in "The Bear's Castle,"
a simple story of a little
bear who wants to make all
his wishes come true. It is
accompanied by a record-
ing of the girl's initial tell-
ing of the story.
"We are trying to bring
something good out of the
ashes that is our life at this
point," Jim Sitton said.
A foundation bearing
Makayla's name carries
on her love of dance and
music, and it receives all
profits from sales of the
book. An annual concert
has been started in her
honor. And her plans for
a Christmas pageant are
coming to fruition.
Her parents hope chil-
dren who open the story-
book will find some joy
in one of her creations, a
tiny fragment of the hap-
piness she brought to her
family. Yet they can't paper
over the past, so it simply
remains untouched in their
home in a manicured devel-
opment in this beachside


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this undated photo provided by Jim Sitton, his daughter
Makayla Joy Sitton is shown. Since a relative's Thanksgiving
Day 2009 shooting rampage at their home, Jim and Muriel
Sitton have tried to move past the grief of losing their 6-year-
old daughter while realizing her unfilled dream of someday
publishing a book.


town since the night a fam-
ily tradition turned into a
massacre.

Man in court
after bag ignites

MIAMI A 37-year-old
naturalized U.S. citizen will
make a first appearance in
court a day after his bag
ignited while being unload-
ed at Miami International
Airport
Orville Andrew Braham
told investigators he had
hid some 700 rounds of
ammunition and a reloader
in his suitcase to keep it
away from his children.
Braham was scheduled
to appear before a federal
judge Wednesday after-
noon.
Braham said he forgot
to remove the ammunition
when he packed for the
trip to Jamaica. He was on a
flight from Boston to Miami
to Jamaica when some of
the ammunition ignited. No
one was injured.

24 winning tickets
in Fantasy 5 lotto

TALLAHASSEE The


good news? You selected all
five numbers in the latest
Fantasy 5 drawing. The bad
news? So did 23 others.
Florida Lottery officials
said the winners will share
the wealth from Tuesday
night's drawing, with each
ticket worth $8,552.30.
A lottery spokeswoman
said it's unusual to have
24 winners in the nightly
Fantasy 5 drawing.
Tuesday's winning num-
bers were 2-4-6-8-12.

Farmers lose
$115 million

DOVER Florida farm-
ers have lost at least $115
million in this winter's cold
blast And it's not over yet
According to the St.
Petersburg Times, reports
show the losses through
Dec. 20 affected fruits,
vegetables, citrus, foliage
and aquaculture. Almost
9,000 acres of farmland was
deemed a total loss.
Florida Department of
Agriculture spokeswoman
Sarah Criser said $115 mil-
lion is a conservative figure
that will likely rise.


Pesacola
66/57


Tallahassee *
67/46 ,,

P64ma Cty
64/51


TEMPERATURES
High Wednesday
Low Wednesday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Wednesday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


67/
Lake
69/
\Ga


61
23
66
43
82 in 1946
23 in 1961

0.00"
0.69"
39.67"
2.36"
48.16"


2 I ,


vista
144 -. City
SCi* cksM87 Cape Canaveral
C, 458/47 Daytona Beach
'45 ,Pt. Lauderdale
imOSI Da 5aB Fort Myers
'0/47 69j53 Ganesville
" Ocaa Jacksonville
,69/50 K West
Odando Capl Caawal "K
S72/53 70(56 Lake Cty
Miami
Tap. Naples
72/5t WestP Beh Ocala
\ 74/62 O Orlando
*? FL Lauderda Panama City
FL Myrs 75/66 Pensacola
75/57 *Naples Tallahassee
74/57 Mliai Tampa
Ic72 70/64 Valdosta
Key5Wet* W.Palm Beach
72/65


SUN
Sundse today
Sunset today
Sunrise tomn
Sunset torm.

MOON
Moonrise today
Moonset today
Moonrse tom.
Moonset tom.


7:26 am.
5:40 p.m.
7:27 amr
5:41 p.m.

2:50 am.'
1:41 p.m.
S3:54 am.
2:28 p.m.


Today's
ultraviolet
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 1,
jifUWPke


Friday
74.160.'pc
74/57/pc
77/69/s
79/59/pc
75/51/pc
74/52/pc
76/67/pc
74/50/pc
78/67/s
79/60/pc
77/52/pc
77/56/pc
69/58/pc
68/60/sh
72/55/pc
77/59/pc
73/53/pc
76/66/s


Saturday
75/61,'pc
75/58/pc
78/67/pc
78/58/pc
75/53/pc
74/53/pc
78/69/pc
74/52/pc
79/66/s
80/60/pc
76/54/pc
77/60/pc
66/55/sh
67/49/sh
68/56/sh
76/60/pc
70/56/sh
78/64/pp


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.
I.


Jan. Jan. Jan. Jan. ecats, data and iph-
4 12 19 26 Ic 2010 Weaother Centra
New First Full at M il LLC, Madon, Wis.
-- ww~w.weatmpubther.cc n


On this date in
1879. the tem-
perature at Dayville,
Ore.. nit 81 degrees
to establish a
state record for
December. .


* Associated Press


Daily Scripture

"Do not let your hearts be
troubled.You believe in God;
believe also in me. My Father's
house has many rooms; if that
were not so, would I have told
you that I am going there to
prepare a place for you?"
John 14:1-3


AROUND FLORIDA


THE WEATHER


PARTLY
CLOUDY


HI 69 LB45


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


3B3


REIOAmBsL FRCS A frTusa, eebr3


I LAE CIY ALANA


VINEE3


~H3













Report urges crackdown BURN: Evidence destroyed
Continued From Page 1A


on public corruption


BRENT KALLESTAD
Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE Florida's
Legislature should impose tougher
criminal penalties and strengthen
the hand of a state ethics commis-
sion to help crack down on public
corruption, a statewide grand jury
recommended Wednesday.
Noting that cadets at the nation's
military academies take oaths
to not lie, steal, cheat or tolerate
those who do so the grand jury
said Wednesday that public offi-
cials should be held to an equally
high standard.
The 127-page report calls for
legislative changes to strengthen
civil and criminal laws for viola-
tions, including for bid-rigging or
tampering.
'The time for action is now," the
report says, urging lawmakers to
do something in the coming 2011
session that begins in March.
"Reform is essential," the report
notes. "When the legislature fails
to a9t after its own members fla-
grantly abuse their positions, the
citizens lose respect, faith, and
interest in the government."
Several Florida lawmakers
have had ethical run-ins in recent
years, the most notable resulting
in Destin Republican Ray Sansom
being forced out as House speaker
after he was indicted by a grand


jury. He later was charged with
grand theft for allegedly disguis-
ing a $6 million appropriation to
build a hangar at Destin's airport
for a political supporter as a joint
use emergency management facil-
ity for Northwest Florida State
College.
Gov.-elect Rick Scott, who takes
office Tuesday, was told of the
grand jury report as he wrapped
up a preinaugural tour across part
of north Florida.
"Clearly I believe in accountabil-
ity so I'm going to do everything
I can to make sure that the citi-
zens of the state feel comfortable
that the things the state's involved
in are done fairly, honestly and
with transparency," Scott told The
Associated Press.
Pam Bondi, who becomes
Florida's attorney general on
Tuesday, said public corruption
is widespread across Florida and
that fighting it is one of her high-
est priorities.
"I will do everything in my
power as attorney general to put
a stop to it," Bondi told The AP
while traveling with Scott. "I talked
about it in the campaign and that
will be a priority."
One recommendation would
authorize the Ethics Commission
to launch investigations with a
supermajority vote of its commis-
sion members. That panel has


largely been a paper tiger with
little authority.
The report also recommends:
Establishing harsher sen-
tences for officials who use their
public position to facilitate crimi-
nal activity.
Expanding the definition of
public employees to include pri-
vate employees contracted by
government entities that perform
government services.
Creating an independent
State Office of Inspector General,
responsible for hiring and firing
agency Inspectors General.
During 10 months of delibera-
tion, the grand jury was charged
with investigating public corrup-
tion in Florida and its term is
set to expire in February. It was
impaneled at the behest of outgo-
ing Gov. Charlie Crist, who said
at the time he had had to remove
30 public officials during his first
three years as governor.
Three prominent Broward politi-
cians were arrested in September
2009 on federal corruption charg-
es of accepting thousands in cash
from undercover FBI agents pos-
ing as businessmen seeking illegal
favors.
'The public is tired of officials
who abuse their position or ignore
conflicts of interest," the grand
jury concludes.


Police offer reward in slaying


BRENT KALLESTAD
Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE Tallahassee
authorities offered a $10,000
reward Wednesday for informa-
tion that could help them solve the
slaying of a young mother and
her three children.
Deputy police chief Cheryl
Stewart said Wednesday that
authorities hope the reward money
.might bring someone forwardwith.:
helpful information aboutthe kiUll-
ings of 27-year-old Brandi Peters;
her 6-year-old twin daughters,
Tamiyah .and Taniyah Peters; and


3-year-old son, Jovante Segura.
"We believe that someone has
information about this crime,"
Stewart said. 'We need that infor-
mation."
The bodies of Peters and, her
children were found Nov. 20.
"In my 23 years of law enforce-
ment, I have never had to deal with
a more disturbing and emotional
crime," Stewart said Wednesday.
Stewart said the reward money
,;:comesfrom seized assets and for-
feiture- money in a law enforce-
ment trust fund, but she did not
answer questions about the status
of the investigation.


Police have not released the
autopsy results, although they
have said the deaths were homi-
cides. They also said there was no
sign anyone broke into the home
rented by Peters. The single-story
home is in a subdivision built about
five years ago, and not far from the
state Capitol and the campuses
of Florida State University and
Florida A&M University.
The crime was reminiscent of a
March 2005 slaying in Marianna,
where a 19-year-old mother and
her three boys were killed in the
woman's apartInent.


until a case is closed," Bullard
said.
FDOT officers had a list
of evidence and physically
checked each piece, he said.
Checked items were then
placed into a burn box.
William E. Whitley, chief
assistant state attorney for
the Third Judicial Circuit of
Florida, said the items, includ-
ing drugs and related para-
phernalia, were confiscated
from suspects during traffic
stops made by the officers
from 2001 to 2007.
Cases ranged from felonies
to misdemeanor, he said. The
possible maximum sentenc-
ing for some was five years
and could include fines and
more.
Scott Carter, a mechanic, said
illegal substances and drug par-
aphernalia were loaded into the
burnout oven at the company.
It takes the oven, which usu-
ally burns electric motors, about


Office employees will receive
their paid holiday at a later
date, he said.
Brannon noted that he want-
ed to stay open to offer resi-
dents tie services they need.
"I just expect a lot of people


20 minutes with temperatures
ranging more than 750 degrees,
to finish the job.
Once the evidence is burned,
the oven is vacuumed to col-
lect leftover ash and put in a
drum, he said. A hazardous
waste company is then called
in to dispose of the drum.
Tampa Armature Works also
burns evidence for the Florida
Highway Patrol.
The burn is overseen by offi-
cials from the state attorney's
office to make sure the evi-
dence has been properly dis-
posed, Whitley said. A signed
affidavit is presented back to
the court documenting the
burn.
The disposed materials are
now out of the FDOT office's
system and able to make room
for more evidence, Bullard
said.
"It helps expedite the pro-
cess of cleaning up the evi-
dence locker," he said.


will need to see us and I want
to be able to (see them), if
they need to come," he said.
"We're here to serve. Our job
is service and we want to be
available to the citizens of our
county."


BOWLS: Impact on county

Continued From Page 1A


Jacksonville many times does
not impact the area because
fans travel along 1-95, Campbell
said. This year, with Mississippi
State playing, a lot of fans will
come across 1-10.
.Fans going to bowl games
in Orlando and Tampa may
spread their trip over several
days, not only following their
favorite team but spending
some vacation time in Florida,
he said.
"They're a little more free
spending," Campbell said.
Campbell said he has already


seen some out-of-state fans
.in the area from out-of-state
schools, such as Penn State.
In years past, bands per-
forming in bowl games spent
the night in the area, he said.
Gas stations and restaurants
often have visitors following
a team, Campbell said. Some
fans may choose to stay close
to the interstate, but others will
venture out into town. ;:
"I'm one of the folks that
likes to eat where the locals
eat," he said.


Apply online at campuscu.com or call 754-2219 today!

Membership is open to everyone in Alachua,
Clay, Columbia, Lake, Marion and Sumter counties!3


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payments of $1842.04 and one final payment of $1787.83, total finance charge of $10,468 19; for a total of payment of $110,468.19. The amount financed is $99,833 00 the APR is 4.072%. APR=Annual Percentage Rate
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LakeCity83SWBascmNorrisD.E.Campus1200SW5thAve. W.Cmu190S 34h


TAX: Office open Friday

Continued From Page 1A


NCUA


LENDER
LENDER


LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE THURSDAY. DECEMBER 30, 2010


Page Editor: C.J.Risak, 754-0427













OPINION


Thursday, December 30, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


OTHER


OTHER
OPINION


Health care

reform gives

headaches,

pain in neck

lexible spending
accounts, which
have given American
workers a small dose
of relief from the
rising cost of health care, are
about to become a little less
lucrative, thanks to the health
care reform act passed earlier
this year.
Where consumers have been
able to use the tax-exempt
accounts to pay for doctor's
visits, medical care and all man-
ners of medicine, beginning
Jan. 1, they'll no longer be able
to buy most over-the-counter
medications unless they have
a doctor's prescription. That's
right. If you want to buy aspirin,
a stomach remedy or allergy
medication, you'll have to pay
at the pharmacy with cash, and
won't be able to use your FSA
for reimbursement unless
you get a prescription. Talk
about a headache!
.'What this will do is send peo-
ple to their doctors for the most
minor ailments, either to get
prescriptions for over-the-coun-
ter medications or for stronger
ones that in many cases are
unnecessary. That's going to
bog down already-busy doctors'
offices, creating more paper-
work for them as well as phar-
macies. Higher costs, passed
on to consumers, are inevitable
- ironic because health care
inflation was one of the reasons
Congress created FSAs seven
years ago.
Doctors aren't crazy about
the change, even though it is
likely to steer more business
their way; pharmacies and non-
prescription drug-makers don't
like it; and consumers with
FSAs are sure to hate it as they
will no longer be able to spend
down their unused account bal-
ances at the end of every year
by filling up their medicine
cabinet.
The change was enacted
for financial reasons it will
reportedly save the govern-
ment $5 billion over 10 years by
reducing the purchase of tax-
exempt drugs but it hardly
seems worth the pain in the
neck it will cause.
* The Daily Gazette (N.Y)

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman


LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,


Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


START spells trouble for America


hawks lost a battle
last week when 71
members of the
Senate not all
of them Democrats- voted to
ratify New START. The treaty
limits America's non-nuclear
long-range weapons. Its verifica-
tion provisions are not as rigor-
ous as those negotiated in the
1991 START treaty.
And, perhaps most troubling,
the Russians have made clear
that they view the agreement as
limiting America's deployment
of a comprehensive system of
defenses against missile attacks.
President Obama insists that
the treaty does not mandate
such constraints. What's more,
he has gone on record, for
the first time, unambiguously
supporting missile defense.
National security hawks not
all of them Republicans -
should now ask him to back that
up with funds for development,
testing and deployment
A world without nuclear
weapons is a lovely dream but
one that will not be realized dur-
ing the lifetime of anyone read-
ing this column.
What is feasible in the fore-
seeable future: a world in which
aggressors know that America
has the means to prevent
missiles armed with nuclear
warheads from reaching their
intended victims.
In September, Sen. Jim
DeMint (R-SC) offered an
amendment to the resolution to
ratify New START that would
have committed the U.S. to
exactly this goal: deploying "as
rapidly as technology permits
an effective and layered mis-
sile defense system capable
of defending the territory of
the United States and its allies
against all ballistic missile
attacks."
Why would anyone oppose
that? During the Cold War,
we relied on MAD: Mutually


OTHER


Some say it's our last Happy New Year


appy New Year. We
say that sincerely
because a sub-spe-
cies of dark pes-
simists known as
"doomers" believes 2011 will be
our last year together and Earth
will come to an end in 2012.
One apocalyptic theory
even has a specific date
- Dec. 21, 2012, suppos-
edly based on a reading of
an ancient Mayan calendar.
On that day, according to
one theory, Armageddon
will come and the world will
be destroyed or, according
to another theory, we will
undergo a spiritual transfor-
mation and enter an age of
enlightenment. Anyway, one
of those two.
The British newspaper The
Telegraph helpfully compiled
a list of the more popular
theories about how we're
going to meet our end. Sadly
for the Mayan theory, the


Cliff May


Assured Destruction. The idea
was that so long as both we and
the Soviets left ourselves vulner-
able, neither would see ben-
efit in being the first to strike.
Proponents of "strategic deter-
rence" argue that the doctrine
served us well then and that it
would be a mistake to abandon
it now.
I would argue that MAD
was not crazy pot at a time
when effective missile defense
was barely a twinkle in Ronald
Reagan's eye and the Soviet
Union, though an evil empire,
was not an irrational one.
Soviet rulers did not believe
that martyrs for communism
would be greeted in paradise
by black-eyed virgins or that an
apocalypse would summon the
Mahdi (the Islamic messiah)
from occultation.
This, too, has changed: Since
the collapse of the Berlin Wall,
American scientists have made
astonishing progress in missile
defense technology.
Not long ago, there were
those who insisted it was impos-
sible to hit a bullet with a bullet.
Now we have the means to hit
a spot on a bullet. The DeMint
amendment never came to a
vote, but the approach it encap-
sulates ought to be debated.
Do most Americans want
to remain vulnerable to
Russia and China as well as to
Iranian President Mahmoud
Ahmadinejad? Should we not
have a defense against the pos-
sibility that terrorists aboard
a ship off the American coast
might launch an EMP (electro-


paper contacted a Mayan
elder who said the world will
not end in 2012 and, more-
over, he's "fed up with this
stuff." For what it's worth,
NASA also says the world
will not end in 2012.
One doughty band of
doomers believes the world
will be destroyed or enslaved
by an invasion of space
aliens. As evidence of this,
they cite what they say is an
increasing number of UFO
sightings.
Another popular version
of the death-from-outer-
space theory is that a rogue
planet, variously named
Nibiru or Planet X, will col-
lide or pass catastrophically
close to Earth. That is, if a
massive solar flare doesn't
wipe out life on Earth first.
Astronomers do say that the
sun will eventually turn into
a massive red ball and engulf
the Earth but not for another


5 billion years.
That would leave 2012
clear for a sudden reversal of
the Earth's magnetic poles,
causing the planet's rotation
to reverse with all the havoc
that would entail. Scientists
say that the North Pole does,
in fact, move but over a time
frame of millions of years.
Taking a broader view,
The Telegraph posits, "A
total environmental collapse
brought about by runaway
warming, toxic poisoning
of the seas ... or a tipping
point with some of the most
crucial species (the paper
cites the disappearance of
bees) would have a huge
impact upon civilisation and
could render parts of the
world near uninhabitable."
Happy New Year and just
think how good you'll feel
when none of this happens.

* Scripps Howard News Service


magnetic pulse) attack? Henry
E Cooper, former director of the
Strategic Defense Initiative, and
Robert L. Pfaltzgraff Jr., presi-
dent of the Institute for Foreign
Policy Analysis, recently noted
that "no national strategy
addresses this threat or under-
writes a serious program to
counter its effects."
A "layered" missile defense
program would be designed to
stop ballistic missiles in all stag-
es of flight boost, midcourse
and terminal. It would include
land- and sea-based defenses as
well "interceptors" that would
destroy ballistic missiles in
space. Some call that "weapon-
izing" space, but it's really the
opposite: It's preventing space
from being used as a nuclear
weapons highway.
Were we to deploy such a
system, offensive nuclear-armed
ballistic missiles would become
obsolete.
Those who hope to rid the
world of nuclear weapons
entirely should think of mis-
sile defense as a means toward
that end a better means than
reducing our own nuclear arse-
nal in the hope that foreign des-
pots will be moved to emulate
us rather than seek advantages
over us. What if the U.S. takes
this approach and, in response,
the Russians withdraw from
New START in protest? Then
we'll know for certain that the
American and Russian inter-
pretations of the treaty were at
odds.
Meanwhile, President Obama
says he agrees with national
security hawks on the need for
serious missile defense.
He should be given an oppor-
tunity, between now and 2012,
to demonstrate that he means
what he says.
* Clifford D. May is president of
the Foundation for the Defense
of Democracies, a policy institute
focusing on terrorism.


Bonnie Erbe
bonnieerbe@compuserve.com


A rape


victim's


story

Discussion of sur-
viving rape is not
normal fare for the
holiday season. But
what better time to
consider these, stunning dat4
from the Justice Department
and to make a New Year's reso-
lution to publicize the perpetra-
tors of this horrible crime.
I am inspired to raise the topic
after reading author and anti-sex-
ual abuse activist Liz Seccuro's
story in her book, "Crash Into
Me." She was interviewed by
producers of my PBS show, 'To
the Contrary with Bonnie Erbe."
Seccuro's story is as follows.
She was a 17-year-old freshman
at the University of Virginia
when she was drugged and
raped by men she did not know
at a fraternity party. Seccuro
reported the incident to uni-
versity and medical officials.
University officials told her the
local police had no jurisdiction
over the crime, but then took
no legal action and no charges '
were pressed. Seccuro struggled
for years with the nightmare of
having not only. been drugged,
abused and violated, but since
she was drugged, she could not
completely recall what had hap- '
opened to her. t
Then in 2005, more than tiwo
decades later, she received an
apology letter from William
Nottingham Beebe, one of the
men who raped her. It began,
she recalls, "'Dear Elizabeth, In
October of 1984, I harmed you,
I can only imagine the pain in
which through your eyes, my
actions caused you and I stand
ready to answer your questions,
whatever they may be and to
make amends.' Then he signed it
and enclosed a business card."
She did not know what to do
about this and struggled with it,
finally launching an e-mail con-
versation with Beebe. After six
months his responses became
more erratic, so she contacted
the Charlottesville, Va, police
department Unlike what she and-
her parents had been told when
she was a freshman, the local
Police could indeed prosecute,
and she decided to have Beebe
prosecuted for the crime. He
went to jail for 18 months, and
became state's witness against
other men who had raped
Seccuro.
Seccuro is one of the lucky
ones. She told our producers
that Beebe contacted her while
he was going through Alcoholics
Anonymous' famous 12 step
program to recovery. In that
program, followers are taught
that in order to recover from
their addictions, they must make
amends to people whom they
have harmed.
According to the Justice
Department, one in six American:
women will be sexually assaulted
in her lifetime. Female college
students are four times more
likely to be raped or sexu-
ally assaulted. According to the
Justice Department, 60 percent
of rapes are not reported to the
police. A mere 6 percent of rap-
ists serve time in prison.
Seccuro survived her trau-
ma, went on to graduate from
the University of Virginia
and now advocates for rape
victims.
She and her husband
formed a donor-advised
fund called Sisters Together
Assisting Rape Survivors
(STARS) to help all victims
of rape, sexual abuse and
incest.
a Bonnie Erbe is a TV host and
writes this column for Scripps
Howard News Service.


4A.


OPINION












Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL THURSDAY DECEMBER 30. 2010


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


Friday
New Year's Bash
The LifeStyle
Enrichment Center pres-
ents "Rocking The House"
beginning at 7 p.m. Friday.
Heavy hors d'oeuvres will
be served all night, and
professional comedians
Jamie Morgan, Chase
Holliday and Lisa Best
will entertain from 8 10
p.m. Tickets are $50 per
person, and the event is at
628 SE Allison Court For
ticket information, contact
Janet at 386-755-0235 ext.
124.

NYE Celebration
The Third Annual
Rotary Club of Lake City
New Year's Celebration
is 8 p.m. Friday at the
County Club at Lake
City. Tickets are $100 per
couple and available at
The County Club of Lake
City, Candler Appraisal
Services, Parks Johnson
Agency, Olympic Health
Chiropractic and the Lake
City Reporter. Attire is
black tie optional.

Joint worship service
Shiloh Missionary Baptist
Church and Philadelphia
Missionary Baptist Church
are worshipping, fellowship-
ping and praising the New
Year in 10 p.m. Friday at
Shiloh Missionary Baptist


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter

Pretty swan glide across mirrored lake
Hundreds of lights were used to design a baby swan following its mother around a lake at
the Suwannee Festival of Lights, which ended on Friday, at the Spirit of the Suwannee Music
Park. Dozens of similar displays, using more than six million lights, illuminated the park.


Church. The church is
located at 948 Aberdeen
Ave.


NYE service
"Friday Night Live"


* To submit your Community
Calendar item, contact Antonia
Robinson at 754-0425 or by
e-mail at arobinson @
lakecityreporter.com.


church is located at 1190
SW Sister's Welcome
Road. Call 386-758-8452
For transportation call
Mitch at 386-292-5850 or
Audre' 386-344-9915.

Watch Night Service
The DaySpring
Missionary Baptist
Church meets at 9:30
p.m. Friday for a watch
night service. There will
be singing, praying, tes-
timonies and the word of
God delivered by Pastor
Aaron T. Lewis Sr. The
church is located at 849
NE Congress Avenue.
For more information call
Elvira at 386-365-2911.

New Year's Service
St. Paul Missionary
Baptist Church meets at
8 p.m. Friday for a watch
night service. Make
plans to come and visit
the church located at 222
Oosterhoudt Lane. For
more information, call
386-758-8486.

Watch Night Service
The Long Branch
Congregational
Methodist Church hosts
a watch night service
starting at 8 p.m. Friday
on County Road 135. The


Rushing Winds from
Jacksonville will be the
guest singers, and there
will also be local sing-
ing. Refreshments will
be served and everyone
is invited. For more
information, call 386-
397-2673.

Midnight Watch
service
Ist Haitian Baptist
Church is-having mid-
night watch service 9
p.m. to noon Friday.
The church is located at
189 NW Cali Drive. The
community is invited to
attend the annual event.
Refreshments will be
served after service.

New Year's Dance
The Lake City Elk's
Lodge is hosting a New
Year's Eve Dance for
members and guests
only beginning at 8 p.m.
Friday. Come join the fun
and dancing to music pro-
vided by DJ Scott Carroll
at the lodge, located >
at 259 NE Hernando
Ave. There will be hours
d'oeuvres, Champaign
and party favors all for
$12.50 per person for
admission. Call 386-752-
2284 after 4 p.m.


New Years Eve Service is
9 p.m. Friday at Miracle
Tabernacle Church. The


OBITUARIES


Stephen Lorenzo Bennett
Stephen Lorenzo Bennett, 51 of
North Miami,-went home to be
with the Lord on Sunday, De-
cember 19, 2010. He was born to
the late Stephen ,
Bennett and Le-
ander Strawder
Ben nett. ,"- *
Stevie as he was
affectionately called attended
public school in Dade County.
He was 1977 graduate of North-
west High. He was also trumpet
player in the high school band.
He was of the Baptist Faith.
A U S Army Veteran.
He leaves to cherish his memo-
ries a wife of 15 years Alice
Bennett of Miami, 2 daughters
India and Zipporah Bennett of
Valdosta, GA; mother Leander
Strawder Bennett of Fort White;
god brother Larry C. Brown
of Little River, SC; 2 step chil-
dren Sunsaray Wynn and Regi-
nald Pace both of Miami; 4'step
grandchildren; 5 aunts Bertha
Phillips of Fort White, Mildred
S. Brown of High Springs, Ma-
zel Hall, Evelyn Hayward both
of Green Cove Springs, and
Blondia Mae White of Atlanta,
GA; two uncles Jasper (Ma-
mie) Strawder of Miami and
Eugene Strawder of Fort White;
a host of cousins and friends.
All services will be
held in Miami, FL.
Local acknowledgement made
by A. JEROME BROWN
FUNERAL HOME,
High Springs.

Bell Denson
Mrs. Bell Denson age 91, resi-
dent of 219 N.W. Jacquez Place,
Lake City, Florida. Born in Lake
Park, Geor-
gia, she was
the daughter
nest and Mrs.
Fanny Waters,
and was the
widow of the
late Mr. James
Denson, Sr. To
this union seven children were
born. Margie (Curtis) Hanks,


Valdosta, Georgia., Lillian (Ber-
nard) Bailey, Lake City, Florida,
Revonia Newton, Lake City,
Florida, Willie Mae Williams,
Lake City, Florida, Veria Den-
son, Lake City, Florida, James
Jr. (Loretta) Denson, Lake City,
Florida, Willie Frank Denson,
Lake City, Florida. She also
leaves to cherish her memory
a host of GQqnds and Great
Grands, nieces, nephews, cous-
ins and loving friends Clep Jerry.
She departed this life on Fri-
day, December 24, 2010 at
Haven .Hospice terminat-
ing an extended illness. She
was a member of Mt. Tabor
A.M.E. Church in Lake City,
Florida where she served faith-
fully until her health failed her.
Funeral services for Mrs. Bell.
Denson will be held at 11:00
am Saturday, January 1, 2011
at Mt. Tabor A.M.E. 'Church
with Rev. Phenic Aaron of-
ficiating, Rev. Jbhnny Smith,
Pastor. Interment will follow
in the Mt. Tabor A.M.E. Cem-
etery. Arrangement entrusted to
COOPER FUNERAL HOME
251 N.E. Washington Street,
Lake City, Florida, 32055
Willis O. Cooper, L.F.D.

Marcus Ray Dice
Marcus Ray Dice, 49, died unex-
pectedly Tuesday, December 28,
2010. Born in Baker County, Mr.
Dice had spent all of his life in
Lake City. He is the son of Ray
Dice and Geri Hall Carr. He was
a loving father that enjoyed fish-
ing, watching football, and rac-
ing, but most all he loved spend-
ingtime playing with his children.
He is survived by his wife,
Kathy Dice of Lake City, FL;
sons, Dallas Dice & Jagger Dice
both of Lake City, FL and Chris
Dice of Valdosta, GA; daughter,
Kaley Dice (Aaron) Whiting of
Valdosta, GA; sister, Debi Za-
kany of Lakeland, -FL; father,
Ray Dice of Lake City, FL;
mother, Gerri Hall (Ken) Carr
of Homossa Springs, FL; grand-
children, Christian Blain Whit-
ing & Braedon William Hamm;
niece, Casey Bariel and nephew,
Bradley Zakany also survive.


Funeral services for Mr. Mark
Ray Dice will be conducted at
2:00 p.m. on Friday, Decem-
ber 31, 2010 in the chapel of
GATEWAY-FOREST LAWN
FUNERAL HOME, 3596 U.S.
Hwy 441 S. Lake City, FL with
Pastor Shawn Boone officiating.
Interment will follow in Memo-
rial Cemetery, Lake City, FL.
Visitation with the family will
be held one hour prior to ser-
vice time at the funeral home.
Please sign our guestbook at
www.gatewayforestlawn. corn

Kesha Evans
Ms. Kesha Evans, age 37 resi-
dent of 239 N.W. Ashley Street,
Lake City, Florida, departed this
life on Monday, December 27,
2010 at her
residence ter-
minating an
extended ill-
ness. She was
a native and
life long resi-
dent of Co-
lumbia Coun-
ty and was a member of Christ
Central Ministries and Soul
Harbor Church of God in Christ.
Survivors include: two Sons;
Bernard McNeil (Simone Wil-
liamson), Amos Washington;
three daughters; Jessica Queen,
(Flemming), Jamaica High, and
Jada Molette. Mother; Velma
Author. Father; Eugene Gil-
yard. Two sisters; Ruby Shepa-
red (Mark), Anjela McFadden
(Ronald). Three brothers; Eu-
gene Evans, Oshawn Author,
Robert Author (Lavonya). One
Grandson; Malchi Fleming.
Funeral services will be at
1:00pm Saturday, January 1,
2011 at New Day Springs Mis-
sionary Baptist Church, Rev.
Lantz Mills, pastor, eulogy. In-
terment will follow in the Gar-
den of Rest Cemetery, Lake
Jeffery Rd., Lake City, Florida.
The family will receive friends
on Friday, December 31, 2010 at
the Cooper Funeral Home Cha-
pel from 6:00 pm until 8:00pm.
Arrangements entrusted to
COOPER FUNERAL HOME
251 N.E. Washington Street,


Lake City, Florida, 32055.
Willis O. Cooper, L.F.D.

Mother, Juanita Hunter
Mother Juanita Hunter, after 91
years of a vibrant, enjoyable life,
went to be with the Lord on Fri-
day, December .24, 2010 at her
residence. With many pleasant
memories,
she leaves to
mourn her
three daugh-
ters; Vera ,
B r u nson ,
Lake City,
FL., Charlene
(Elbert) Walk-
er Jr. and Carolyn Montgomery,
Atlanta, GA. Five grandchil-
dren, eight great grandchildren,
one niece, Carol (Ronnie) Heath.
Two nephews; Robert (Lisa)
Home and Lewis Home, Jr.
Visitation for family and
friends will be Thursday,
December 30, 2010 from 4-
8PM at the funeral home.
Funeral services will be held Fri-
day, December 31, 2010 at 11:00
A.M. at St. Paul Missionary Bap-
tist Church with Rev. Alvin Green
officiating. Interment will follow
at the Garden of Rest Cemetery.
MIZELL FUNERAL HOME,
365 N.W. Washington Street,
Lake City is in charge of arrange-
ments. Phone (386)752-3166,
E-mail rudolmize@aol.com.
Please sign the guest register
at www.mizelfuneralhome.com

Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
mentat 752-1293.


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LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL THURSDAY. DECEMBER 30. 2010


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


I Mon.-Fri. O1AM-6PM Sat. O1AM-5PM
Same Day Delivery Available --

BEDS BD BE DS ^ I

^^^^^ 1472 Hwy 90 Wes'MtH^^^^^


--4s~


;-
-- -
r









LAKE CITY REPORTER HEALTH THURSDAY. DECEMBER 30. 2010


ON HEALTH






Dr. Peter Gott


SCowgirl riding high with



cancer now in remission


PAX S may

be cause of

abdominal

pain

DEAR DR. GOIT: Like
the 15-year-old described
in the letter you published,
my 14-year-old daughter
suffered with chronic
abdominal pain and nausea
for nearly a year. We took
her to three gastroenter-
ologists, subjected her to
every test known to man,
and ended up having her
gallbladder removed an
unnecessary surgery, as
it turned out. The doctors
speculated that she had
one of the many gastro
disorders you mentioned,
but when none was identi-
fied and none of the dozen
or Fo drugs they tried
worked, they basically gave
up on us.
Finally, one wonder-
ful doctor referred us to
a specialist at Children's
Hospital in New' Orleans,
La. He is a pioneer and
specialist in pain-associ-
ated disability syndrome,
or PADS. It is essentially
a disability in which the
brain creates a mountain
out of a molehill, making a
little pain or digestive dis-
tress into sometiiing much
worse.
Believe me when I tell
you that I was extremely
skeptical. But having tried
every possible way to help
my child, I decided to put
my trust in this doctor, and
we've been forever grate-
ful. Within three months of
intense cognitive-behavior
therapy, my daughter was
almost pain- and nausea-
free, or at least able to
control those symptoms
v-'en they cropped up.
Now, a year later, it is
rare for her to feel ill. The
therapy returned not only
her health but also her self-
confidence.
Obviously, not every
child with chronic pain has
PADS, but it may be worth
looking into when all else
fails. There is a good body
of research on it. I certainly
understand the helpless-
ness a mother feels when
she can't make her child
better.

DEAR READER:
Pain-associated disability
syndrome is a fairly new
term. It is defined as
chronic pain that causes
more severe restrictions
than what the underlying
condition would cause. As
you put it, the body truly
Makes a mountain out of
a molehill. Imagine not
being able to use your
arm because of a sliver in
your finger. This is essen-
tially what PADS does. A
usually minor condition,
such as acid reflux, sud-
denly causes severe pain,
nausea, vomiting and an
inability to eat and do
other normal daily activi-
ties. Normal treatment
fails, and there is no other
explanation for the sever-
ity of symptoms.
I found one small analy-
sis of 40 patients ages 7 to
21. Thirty had abdominal
pain, five had regurgita-
tion, three had nausea,
and two had chest pain.
All met symptom-based
criteria for functional gas-
trointestinal disorders,
such as irritable bowel
syndrome or acid reflux.
Thirty-nine of the people
also had trouble sleeping.
Most underwent mental-
health evaluations to rule
out eating disorders and
psychosis.
Dr. Peter Gott is a retired
physician and the author of


the book "Dr. Gott's No Flour,
No Sugar Diet,"'available at
most chain and independent
bookstores, and the recently
published "Dr. Gott's No
Flour, No Sugar Cookbook."


GIB MATHERS
Powell Tribune

POWELL, Wyo. -
Though diagnosed with
breast cancer at the age
of 29 in 2002, there is no
quit in Beau Badura. The
Clark cowgirl faces her dis-
ease head-on with grit and
a grin.
Now Badura's cancer
is in remission, but she is
by no means out of the
woods.
"Even when they say
you're in remission,"
Badura said, "it doesn't
mean you're cured."
Badura smiles often and
maintains an optimistic out-
look.
"I never want to be
remembered as the girl
that died of cancer. I want
to be remembered as the
girl that went down smil-
ing, riding her horses."
Indeed, Badura is a mem-
ber of Chaps and Chapeaus,
a women's riding group
that stands out at parades
in 19th century garb.
Nicole Michaels, co-
administrator for Chaps
and Chapeaus, described
Badura as a "very plucky
gal who also barrel races
and ranches for a living."
Badura also is a member
of You are a Barrel Racing
Champion (YBRC), similar
to the Professional Rodeo
Cowboys Association.
The cancer is in remission,
but it hasn't relinquished it's
hold on Badura.
Her cancer was diagnosed
as HER2+ (human epider-
mal growth factor receptor
2), the nastiest breast cancer
gene, she said.
"They didn't know if I was
going to come back from
it," she said. "It was pretty
aggressive."
She was treated at the
Mayo Clinic and Billings,
Powell and Cody hospitals.
She endured one year of
chemotherapy and radiation
treatment plus 16 surgeries
in four years to rid her body
of cancer cells that insidi-
ously kept emerging.
"The scars are battle
wounds," Badura said.
"They're my Purple
Hearts."
Since her right side was


-4





-. /

subjected to radiation treat-
ment, it now feels like her
ribs are permanently bro-
ken, she said.
Chemotherapy causes
patients to lose skin pig-
mentation and all body hair,
Badura said.
Some folks act as though
cancer is contagious, she said.
When the chemo claimed
her hair, she feared the wind
would snatch her hat and thus
frighten children.
Badura met her husband,
Mark, a fourth generation
rancher, while she was bat-
tling her disease.
Doctors said she couldn't
bear children, but she had
two: Logun, 3, and Reigan,
5.
"There's days when I
wake up and I'm in so much
pain," Badura said. "Oh my
gosh, I can't do it."
Then Mark steps in.
"'Come on,'" Mark exhorts,
"'you can do it!'"
"He knows what I need,"
Badura said.
Like a bronco-busting
wrangler being thrown
from the saddle, she plants
her feet in the stirrups and
climbs back on.
When Badura was sick
from chemo and radiation,


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she still climbed into the
saddle, even if it required
strapping her in.
"Once I'm up there, I'm
good. I just need that sup-
port system," Badura said.
Fetching a stool to lift
her into the saddle or hoist-
ir-_ her onboard is sort of
emblematic of her support
Her husband, children,
horses, God, Chaps and
Chapeaus those are
Badura's boosters, plus
many other good people,
she said.
The Chaps and Chapeaus
ladies are true-blue
friends.
'They're just great peo-
ple," Badura said. "It's a
Shoot. I love it."
Like successful barrel


racers everywhere, Badura
is one with her horse.
Badura and her horses
wear pink the symbol
for breast cancer with
pride. She sewed a bright
pink Christmas horse blan-
ket, complete with ribbons
and other adornment. It
captures the eye, making
it unlikely observers will
miss the fact that Badura
is facing her cancer tena-
ciously.
Adorned with her pink
blanket atop her horse,
Badura joined her Chaps
and Chapeaus colleagues in
the Cody Christmas Parade
Nov. 27.
Back at the ranch,
Badura eased into the sad-
dle with the aid of a stool.


This Dec. 10 photo
shows. Beau Badura
of Clark, Wyo. Badura
was diagnosed with
breast cancer in 2002
at the age of 29, but
I that has not stopped
the barrel-racing cow-
girl from living a full
life kiith tenacity and
courage.










ASSOCIATED PRESS

Her horse, Buddy, stepped
about nervously, eager to
race across the snow-cov-
ered pasture.
A squall had dumped a
fresh two inches of snow,
but the storm passed, and
.the ranch and valley spar-
kled under its fresh mantle
of snow in the bright sun-
light.
Badura hopes .to reach
her goal of seeing her boys
graduate from high school,
and perhaps more.
"It makes you think,
how do I want to help oth-
ers? How can I be remem-
bered?" Badura said.
Badura's advice to one
late-night caller with can-
cer is her axiom: "Don't
give up."


I1 E J ILI Ut I l fAkIeBGtyR


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


',


'1









Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@ jtkecityreportercorn


SPORTS


Thursday, December 30, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


BRIEFS

CHS SOFTBALL
Lady Tiger
tryouts Jan. 10
Columbia High
softball tryouts are
3:30 p.m. Jan. 10 at the
CHS field.
Players will need a
current physical, and
random drug testing and
parent consent forms.
For details, call coach
Jimmy Williams at
303-1192.

FLAG FOOTBALL
Registration for
co-ed football
Christ Central Sports
is offering co-ed flag
football for ages 5-12.
Cost is $40 and
registration continues
through Jan. 15.
For details, call Ronny
at 365-2128 or the church
office at 755-2525.

CHS SOCCER
Fundraiser set
for Jan. 8
Columbia High's
junior varsity soccer
teams have a breakfast
fundraiser planned for
7:30-10:30 a.m. Jan. 8
at Kazbor's Grille in
Lake City.
Tickets are $6 at the
door, or may be
purchased in advance
from players.
For details, call
365-1877.

* From staff reports

GAMES

Today
Columbia High boys
basketball vs. Hamilton
County High, 7:30 p.m.
(JV-6)
Monday
Columbia High girls
basketball vs. Hamilton
County High, 7:30 p.m.
(JV-6)
Tuesday
Fort White High
girls soccer vs. Oak Hall
School, 6 p.m.
Columbia High boys
soccer vs. Buchholz High,
7 p.m. (JV-5)
Fort.White High boys
soccer at Lafayette High,
7 p.m. (JV-5)
Columbia High girls
soccer at Gainesville
High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-5:30)
Columbia High boys
basketball at Ed White
High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6)
Jan. 6
Fort White High girls
soccer vs. Lafayette High,
7 p.m. (JV-5)
Fort White High boys
soccer at Santa Fe High,
7 p.m. (JV-5)
Columbia High boys
basketball vs. Middleburg
High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6)
Jan. 7
Columbia High
wrestling at Clay High
tournament, TBA
Fort White High girls
basketball at Trenton
High, 6 p.m. (JV-4:30)
Columbia High girls
soccer at Santa Fe High,
7 p.m. (JV-5)
Fort White High
girls soccer at Madison
County High, 7 p.m.
Fort White High boys
soccer vs. Columbia
High, 7 p.m. (JV-5)
Columbia High girls
basketball at Fleming
Island High, 7:30 p.m.
(JV-6)
Fort White High boys
basketball at Trenton
High, 7:30 p.m.
Jan. 8
Columbia High
wrestling at Clay High


tournament, TBA


Maryland routs East Carolina


Terrapins give
coach Friedgen
going-away gift.
By JOSEPH WHITE
Associated Press
WASHINGTON
Maryland coach Ralph
Friedgen is heading into
unemployment as a winner.
Already the Atlantic
Coast Conference coach of
the year, already the engi-
neer of the second-biggest
regular season turnaround
in the country, Friedgen
ended his 10-year run at
his alma mater Wednesday
with a 51-20 victory over
East Carolina in the Military
Bowl.
The Terrapins forced
four turnovers, and Da'Rel
Scott ran for 200 yards.
New Maryland athletic
director Kevin Anderson
announced last week that
Friedgen was being fired,
effective after the bowl
game, with the school buy-
ing out the final year of the
63-year-old coach's contract


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Maryland running back D.J. Adams (10) reacts after scoring one of his four touchdowns
against East Carolina during the Military Bowl football game Wednesday in Washington.


for $2 million. Friedgen said
preparing for the game was
like "a slow death," and he
found it hard to hold back
his emotions.
He patrolled the Mary-


Another


Auburn picked to
win; Gators are
upset special.
By RALPH D. RUSSO
' Associated Press

The days of putting the
college football season
away as you clean up the
mess from a New Year's
Eve party are long gone.
For better or worse, the
*Bowl Championship Series
put an end to that.
Now, bowls linger in the
new year for days. Some
are marquee matchups:
No. 6 Ohio State plays
No. 8 Arkansas on Jan. 4
in the Sugar Bowl. Some
mere filler for a television.
schedule: Pittsburgh vs.
Kentucky on Jan. 8 in BBVA
Compass Bowl.
The way the calendar
broke this season means
nine days between Jan. 1
and the BCS national cham-
pionship game between
No. 1 Auburn and No. 2
Oregon in Glendale, Ariz.,
and six days between the
last BCS game the Sugar
Bowl and Tigers-Ducks
on Jan. 10.
With all that time to kill,
ESPN and Fox decided to
fill some of those poten-
tially football-less nights.
"We just don't want to
go dark," ESPN vice presi-
dent of programming Dave
Brown said. "We want to
televise the games and keep
college football at the top of
fans' minds."
ESPN, in its first year as
the TV home for the BCS,
owns broadcast rights to
33 of 35 bowl games. So
it wasn't all that tough to
find three minor bowls to
agree to be the only college
football game on television
during three nights from
Jan. 6-9.
The GoDaddy.com Bowl
on Jan. 6 at Mobile, Ala.,
will feature Miami (Ohio)
against Middle Tennessee.
A couple days later in
Birmingham, Ala., Pitt plays
Kentucky at noon, before
the NFL playoff games
start.
The day before the nation-
al championship game, The
Kraft Fight Hunger Bowl
in San Francisco matches
Boston College and Nevada
and kicks off at 9 p.m.


land sideline one last time,
holding his customary play-
sheet and wearing a white
cap with the word "Terps"
in red. Fans held up signs
saying-'Thanks Ralph" and


chanted his name. He got
the customary, ice-bucket
bath from the players with
2'k minutes to play.
TERPS continued on 2B


SEC


Illinois

beats

Baylor

Leshoure scores
3 TDs to lead
Zooks charges.
By KRISTIE RIEKEN
Associated Press

HOUSTON Mikel
Leshoure ran for 184
yards and three touch-
downs as Illinois earned
its first bowl victory since
1999, beating Baylor
38-14 Wednesday night in
the Texas Bowl.
The Illini spoiled the
Bears' first bowl appear-
ance in 16 seasons.
Leshoure had a 5-yard
TD run in the second
quarter, a 13-yard score
in the third quarter and
another 5-yardtouchdown
run in the fourth period.
The performance gave
him the school single-
season rushing record
with 1,697 yards.


title


... .: ..*, :




4.

JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Florida cornerback Janoris Jenkins (1) escapes a tackle by South Carolina's T.J. Johnson (55) and C.C. Whitlock (12) in a


game in Gainesville on Nov. 13

Wedging in a college
game on a Sunday night
after a day of NFL playoffs
might seem like stranding
it on an island, until you
start thinking of that game
as a part of the BCS cham-
pionship game preview.
'There are a lot of fans
looking for college football
the night before the champi-
onship game," Brown said.
"It's just a natural place for
us to do a game."
Last season, ESPN
placed the game in Mobile
on the night before the
national title game between
Alabama and Texas. Central
Michigan's 44-41 double-
overtime win against Troy
in what was then called the
GMAC Bowl drew a respect-
able 2.8 rating, Brown said.
The Cotton Bowl also
decided to wait it out this
season. Now in its sec-
ond season at the Dallas
Cowboys' lavish stadium
in Arlington, Texas, the
75th edition of the Cotton
Bowl will match No. 11 LSU
and No. 18 Texas A&M on


Jan. 7.
Why leave Jan. 1?
"Simple answer in our
case," Cotton Bowl spokes-
man Michael Konradi said.
"Fox wanted to put us on
in primetime. We had a few
choices of dates and the
others were in the middle
of the week. Friday we
thought would be best to
allow our fans to come to
the game."
The time slot also
allows Cotton Bowl orga-
nizers, who would love to
have their game as part of
the BCS some day, to put
their tradition-rich event on
equal footing with the other
marquee games.
"If it's good enough for
the BCS it should be good
enough for us," Konradi
said.
The picks:
Saturday
TicketCity Bowl
At Dallas
Northwestern (plus 91')
vs. Texas Tech
Total defense rankings:
Wildcats, 93rd. Red Raiders,


116th ... TEXAS TECH
42-24.

Capital One Bowl
At Orlando
Michigan State (plus 10)
vs. Alabama
Big Ten has won five of
last six Cap One Bowls vs.
SEC ... ALABAMA 28-20.
Upset special:
Outback Bowl
At Tampa
Florida (minus 7) vs.
Penn State
Total offense rankings:
Gators, 80th, Nittany Lions,
63rd ... PENN STATE
20-17.
Gator Bowl
At Jacksonville
Michigan (plus 5) vs.
Mississippi State
Is this really a must-
win game for Wolverines
coach Rich Rodriguez? ...
MICHIGAN 35-31.
Rose Bowl
At Pasadena, Calif.
TCU (minus 2'-) vs.
Wisconsin
Badgers' power vs.
Horned Frogs' speed ...


WISCONSIN 31-23.
Best bet
Fiesta Bowl
At Glendale, Ariz.
Connecticut (plus 17) vs.
Oklahoma
If Sooners let BCS los-
ing streak hit six, this
will be worse loss yet ...
OKLAHOMA 45-14.
Monday
Orange Bowl
At Miami
Stanford (minus 3') vs.
Virginia Tech
If this is Andrew Luck's
last college game, hell go
out a winner ... STANFORD
35-24.
Tuesday
Sugar Bowl
At New Orleans
Ohio State (minus 3') vs.
Arkansas
Buckeyes are 0-9 vs. SEC
teams in bowl games ...
ARKANSAS 28-21.
Jan. 6
GoDaddy.com Bowl
At Mobile, Ala.
Miami, Ohio (minus .1)
PICKS continued on 2B


__











LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS THURSDAY, DECEMBER 30. 2010


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
Noon
ESPN Armed Forces Bowl, Army
at SMU
3:20 p.m.
ESPN Pinstripe Bowl, Kansas St. vs.
Syracuse, at New York
6:40 p.m.
ESPN Music City Bowl, North
Carolina vs.Tennessee, at Nashville,Tenn.
10 p.m.
ESPN Holiday Bowl, Nebraska vs.
Washington, at San Diego
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
7 p.m.
ESPN2 -Temple atVillanova
NBA BASKETBALL
7 p.m.
TNT New York at Orlando
9:30 p.m.
TNT San Antonio at Dallas
WOMEN'S COLLEGE
BASKETBALL
9 p.m.
ESPN2 Connecticut at Stanford

FOOTBALL

NFL standings

AMERICAN CONFERENCE


y-New England
x-N.Y. Jets
Miami
Buffalo


Indianapolis
Jacksonville
Tennessee
Houston


x-Pittsburgh
x-Baltimore
Cleveland
Cincinnati


y-Kansas City
San Diego
Oakland
Denver


East
W L
13 2
10 5
7 8
4 11
South
W L
9 6
8 7
6 9
5 10
North
"W L
II 4
II 4
5 10
4 I1
West
W L
10 5
8 7
7 8
4 II


T Pct PF PA
0.867 480 306
0.667329 297
0.467 266 295
0.267276 387

T Pct PF PA
0.600412 368
0.533 336 385
0.400336 316
0.333 356 410

T Pct PF PA
0.733 334 223
0.733 344 263
0.333 262 291
0.267315 382

TPct PF PA
0.667 356 295
0.533 408 294
0.467 379 361
0.267316 438


NATIONAL CONFERENCE


y-Philadelphia
N.Y. Giants
Washington
Dallas


x-Atlanta
x-New Orleans
Tampa Bay
Carolina


y-Chicago
Green Bay
Minnesota
Detroit


East
W L
10 5
9 6
6 9
5 10
South
W L
12 3
11 4
9 6
2 13
North
W L
II 4
9 6
6 9
5 10


T Pct PF PA
0.667426 363-
0.600 377 333
0.400288 360
0.333 380 423

T Pct PF PA
0.800383 278
0.733371 284
0.600318 305
0.133 186 377

T Pct PF PA
0.733 331 276
0.600 378 237
0.400268 328
0.333 342 356


West
W L TPct PF.PA
St. Louis 7 8 0.467283 312
Seattle 6 9 0.400 294 401
San Francisco 5 10 0.333 267 339
Arizona 5 10 0.333 282 396
x-clinched playoff spot
y-clinched division
Tuesday's Game
Minnesota 24, Philadelphia 14
Sunday's Games
Oakland at Kansas City, I p.m.
Tampa Bay at New Orleans, I p.m.
Miamf at New England, I p.m.
Minnesota at Detroit, I p.m.
.Carolina at Atlanta, I p.m.
Pittsburgh at Cleveland, I p.m.
Buffalo at N.Y. Jets, I p.m.
Cincinnati at Baltimore, I p.m.
Arizona at San Francisco, 4:15 p.m.
San Diego at Denver, 4:15 p.m.
Chicago at Green Bay, 4:15 p.m.
Jacksonville at Houston, 4:15 p.m.
N.Y. Giants atWashington, 4:15 p.m.
Dallas at Philadelphia, 4:15 p.m.
Tennessee at Indianapolis, 4:15 p.m.
St. Louis at Seattle, 8:20 p.m.

NFL playoff scenarios

AFC
CLINCHED: New England, AFC East


and homefield advantage; Kansas City.
AFC West; Baltimore, playoff spot; N.Y.
Jets, playoff spot; Pittsburgh, playoff spot.
ELIMINATED: Buffalo, Cincinnati,
Denver, Cleveland. Houston, Miami,
Oakland, San Diego.Tennessee.
PITTSBURGH
Clinches AFC North and a first-
round bye with:
1) Win OR
2) Tie and Baltimore loss or tie OR
3) Baltimore loss
BALTIMORE
Clinches AFC North and a first-
round bye with:
1)Win and Pittsburgh loss or tie OR
2) Tie and Pittsburgh loss
INDIANAPOLIS
Clinches AFC South with:
1) Win or tie OR
2) Jacksonvile loss or tie
JACKSONVILLE
Clinches AFC South with:
I)Win and Indianapolis loss
NFC
CLINCHED: Chicago, NFC North
and a first-round bye; Philadelphia, NFC
East; Atlanta, playoff spot; New Orleans,
playoff spot-
ELIMINATED: Arizona, Carolina,
Dallas, Detroit, Minnesota, San Francisco,
Washington.
ATLANTA
Clinches NFC South and a first-
round bye with:
[)Win or tie OR
2) New Orleans loss or tie
Clinches homefield advantage
with:
1) Win or tie OR
2) New Orleans loss or tie and
Chicago loss or tie
CHICAGO
Clinched the NFC North and a
first-round bye and, clinches homefield
advantage with: :
I) Win and Atlanta loss and New
Orleans loss or tie
NEW ORLEANS
Clinches the NFC South and
homefield advantage with:
I) Win and Atlanta loss
GREEN BAY
Clinches a playoff spot with:
1) Win OR
2) Tie and N.Y. Giants loss or tie and
Tampa Bay loss or tie OR
3) N.Y. Giants loss and Tampa Bay
loss
NEWYORK GIANTS
Clinch a playoff spot with:
I) Win. and Green Bay loss or tie OR
3) Tie and Green Bay loss and Tampa
Bay loss or tie
TAMPA BAY
Clinches a playoff spot with:
3) Win and N.Y. Giants loss or tie and
Green Bay loss or tie OR
4) Tie and N.Y. Giants loss and Green
Bay loss
ST. LOUIS
Clinches NFC West with:
l)Win or tie
SEATTLE
Clinches NFC West with:
I)Win

College bowl games

Tuesday
Champs Sports Bowl
N.C. State 23,WestVirginia 7
Insight Bowl
Iowa 27, Missouri 24
Wednesday
Military Bowl
At Washington
Maryland 51, East Carolina 20
Texas Bowl
At Houston
Illinois 38, Baylor 14
Alamo Bowl
At San Antonio
Arizona vs. Oklahoma State (n)
Today
Armed Forces Bowl
At Dallas
SMU (7-6) vs. Army (6-6), Noon
(ESPN)
Pinstripe Bowl
At Bronx, N.Y.
Syracuse (7-5) vs. Kansas State (7-5),
3:30 p.m. (ESPN)
Music City Bowl
At Nashville,Tenn.
North Carolina (7-5) vs. Tennessee
(6-6), 6:40 p.m. (ESPN)
Holiday Bowl
At San Diego
Nebraska (10-3) vs.Washington (6-6),
10 p.m. (ESPN)
Friday
Meineke Bowl


At Charlotte. N.C.
Clemson (6-6) vs. South Florida
(7-5), Noon (ESPN)
Sun Bowl
At El Paso, Texas
Notre Dame (7-5) vs. Miami
(7-5), 2 p.m. (CBS)
Liberty Bowl
At MemphisTenn.
Georgia (6-6) vs. UCF (10-3),
3:30 p.m. (ESPN)
Chick-fil-A Bowl
At Atlanta
South Carolina (9-4) vs. Florida
State (9-4), 7:30 p.m. (ESPN)
Saturday
TicketCity Bowl
At Dallas
Northwestern (7-5) vs. Texas Tech
(7-5), Noon (ESPNU)
Capital One Bowl
At Orlando
Michigan State (il-I) vs. Alabama
(9-3), I p.m. (ESPN)
Outback Bowl
AtTampa
Florida (7-5) vs. Penn State (7-5),
I p.m. (ABC)
Gator Bowl
At Jacksonville
Michigan (7-5) vs. Mississippi State
(8-4), 1:30 p.m. (ESPN2)
Rose Bowl
At Pasadena, Calif.
TCU (12-0) vs. Wisconsin (11-1),
5 p.m. (ESPN)
Fiesta Bowl
At Glendale,Ariz.
Connecticut (8-4) vs. Oklahoma
(1 -2), 8:30 p.m. (ESPN)

BASKETBALL

NBA schedule

Wednesday's Games
Atlanta 103, Golden State 93
Washington 104, Indiana 90
Charlotte 101, Cleveland 92
Boston at Detroit (n)
Denver at Minnesota (n)
LA. Lakers at New Orleans (n)
New Jersey at Oklahoma City (n)
Miami at Houston (n)
Philadelphia at Phoenix (n)
Memphis at Sacramento (n)
Utah at L.A. Clippers (n)
Today's Games
New York at Orlando, 7 p.m.
San Antonio at Dallas, 9:30 p.m.
Utah at Portland, 10 p.m.
Friday's Games
New Jersey at Chicago, 3 p.m.'
New Orleans at Boston, 3 p.m.
Golden State at Charlotte, 3 p.m.
Washington at Indiana, 3 p.m.
Toronto at Houston, 7 p.m.
Atlanta at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m.
Detroit at Phoenix, 9 p.m.
Philadelphia at LA. Lakers, 10:30 p.m.

AP Top 25 schedule

Today's Games
No. 8 Villanova vs. No. 25 Temple,
7 p.m.
No. 10 Missouri vs. Old Dominion,
8 p.m.
No. 16 BYU at Buffalo, 7 p.m.
No. 19 UCF vs. Northeastern or
Princeton, 5 or 7:30 p.m.
No. 21 Memphis vs. Lipscomb, 8 p.m.

HOCKEY

NHL schedule

Wednesday's Games
N.Y. Rangers 3, New Jersey I
N.Y. Islanders 2, Pittsburgh I SO
Carolina at Ottawa (n)
San Jose at Minnesota (n)
Detroit at Dallas (n) '
Los Angeles at Phoenix (n)
Today's Games
Columbus at Toronto, 7 p.m.
Boston at Atlanta, 7 p.m.
Montreal atTampa Bay, 7:30 p.m.
San Jose at Chicago, 8:30 p.m.
Colorado at Edmonton, 9:30 p.m.
Philadelphia at Los Angeles, 10:30 p.m.
Friday's Games
Atlanta at New Jersey, 5 p.m.
Montreal at Florida, 5 p.m.
Nashville at Minnesota, 6 p.m.
N.Y. Islanders at Detroit, 7 p.m..
Ottawa at Columbus, 7 p.m.
Philadelphia at Anaheim, 8 p.m.
Vancouver at Dallas, 8 p.m.
Phoenix at St. Louis, 8:30 p.m.
Colorado at Calgary, 9 p.m.


PICKS: Nightly games next week


Continued From Page 1B

vs. Middle Tennessee
Sun Belt already has
beaten MAC twice this bowl
season ... MIAMI 31-21.
Jan. 7
Cotton Bowl
At Arlington, Texas
Texas A&M (plus 1) vs.
LSU
Meeting No. 50 between
Tigers and Aggies, but only
second time in bowl game
... LSU 21-16.
Jan. 8
BBVA Compass Bowl
At Birmingham, Ala.
Pittsburgh (minus 3) vs.
Kentucky
Win one for Wanny?
Sure, now that it's too late
... PITTSBURGH 27-17.
Jan. 9
Fight Hunger Bowl
At San Francisco
Boston College (plus 7')
vs. Nevada
Over/under on tackles
for BC All-American LB
Luke Kuechly vs. the Pistol:
15 ... NEVADA 35-23.
Jan. 10
BCS National


Championship
At Glendale, Ariz.
Auburn (minus 3) vs.




Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

YARRT I


SMOTED




WAHLIE
^~^ L / ^ \ /


A:

V-t-r-- .' I Jumbles: ARRAY


Oregon
SEC! SEC!
AUBURN 38-24.


SEC!


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek


Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.

A
(Answers tomorrow)
Y KETCH CRAFTY JACKAL


stei y 'LS I- J Answer: This will spruce up a press agent's
wardrobe A "FLACK" JACKET


GOLF REPORTS



Herring wins Top of the Hill


We had 30 men come out
and enjoy the nice weather
last Wednesday.
Blitz winners were:
A Division Chet Carter
+8, first; Pete Skantzos + 6,
second; Bob Wheary +1,
third;
B Division Mike
Kahlich and Randy Heavrin
+9, 'tied for first; Emerson
Darst +5, third;
C Division Ronnie Ash


QUAIL HEIGHTS
COUNTRY CLUB
Tammy Gainey

+8, first; Alan Phillips +2,
second; Richard Skipper -1,
third;
D Division -Terry Shay
and Gerald Smithy +6, tied
for first; Codey Blackwell
+5, third.
The skins game had a


large pot with only three
skins out there. Kahlich,
Skantzos and Carter each
captured one.
The pot hole (Dunes No.
1) carried over to today.
Joe Herring won the Top
of the Hill with +6.
Upcoming events:
Monday, MGA
meeting;
Tuesday, LGA
meeting.


Walkovers in Good Old Boys


The Good Old Boys had
some serious competition
for individual honors, but
not much in team play.
Match 1 was a walk-
over for Ed Snow, Howard
Whitaker and Dan Stephens
by a 9-5 margin over Monty
Montgomery, Eli Witt and
Tom Elmore.
Match 2 was equally one-
sided. Jerry West, Bobby
Simmons, Merle Hibbard
and Carl Wilson breezed
to an easy 4-1 win over
Derrick Tuell, Joe Persons,
Jim Bell and Tony Branch.
In individual play, Snow
was a stroke ahead of four
competitors at the turn, but
Bell shot even par on the
back to forge a tie for first
place at 75.


COUNTRY CLUB
at LAKE CITY
Ed Goff

Witt, West and
Montgomery all shot 39 on
the back to finish in a three-
way tie for third at 78.
Stephens took front nine
honors with a 37. Hibbard
found his game on the back
side for a winning 38.
The Timmons family
made it two in a row in the
Wednesday blitz.
This week it was the
elder Charlie's turn. Mike
McCranie and Bob Randall
had the pressure on all day,
but Charlie pulled out a
one shot win at +6 with
a late birdie. Randall and


McCranie shared second
place a shot back.
In a unusual twist, none
of the three top blitz fin-
ishers scored in the skins
game. Jordan Hale had the
best of that action with two
winners. Travis Timmons,
Steve Patterson and Dennis
Crawford shared the
other three winners with
Crawford's coming on an
eagle at No. 9.
After a string of wins the
pot hole finally carried over
for a week.
The LGA event and the
Saturday blitz both fell to
inclement weather.
The Chamber of
Commerce scramble is
Jan. 28 with a 1 p.m. shot-
gun start


TERPS: Friedgen had 75-50 record


Continued From Page 1B

Friedgen's last act was
the second-biggest mar-
gin of victory in Maryland
bowl history as well as the
most points the school has
scored in a bowl. Friedgen
went 5-2 in bowl games at
the school.
Scott had second-half
touchdown runs of 61 and
91 yards on back-to-back
Terrapins offensive plays
and posted the school's
first 200-yard rushing game
since 2003. D.J. Adams had
four short touchdown runs
for the'Terrapins, who fin-
ished 9-4 to give Friedgen
a 75-50 mark in his decade
at Maryland.


ACROSS

1 Send else-
where
6 board
11 Manly
12 Funny TV show
13 Like Dolly, the
sheep
14 Thing
15 Myrrh, e.g.
16 Reebokrival
17 Envelope abbr.
19 Boulder
23 Hen or mare
26 Cry of delight
28 Alphabet ender
29 Black magic
31 Cheech's part-
ner
33 Match job
34 Saddle horses
35 Rent out
36 Byron's works
39 Drakes and
ganders
40 Southpaws'
stats
42 Not taken in by


Dominique Davis com-
pleted 35 of 57 passes for
268 yards with one touch-
down and two interceptions
for East Carolina (6-7),
which committed 15 pen-
alties and had its second
lowest point total of the'
season.
The temperatures were
in the mid-40s, a tolerable
break from a mostly frozen
December in the nation's
capital but nothing liked
from the balmier destina-
tions Maryland expected
after tying for third in the
Atlantic Coast Conference.
Bowl after bowl bypassed
the Terrapins until they


44 Cornfield nois-
es
46 Shores up
51 Focus on
(2 wds.)
* 54 Not as dull
55 Coral islands
56 Melee
57 Remains on
hold
58 Dromedary

DOWN


Irritate
Love god
Foreign film
ender
"Maria -"
Whodunit her-
ring
Cry from the
sty
Unmitigated
Here, for mon-
sieur
Scribble
Singer Grant
DVD predecessor


were chosen by the Military
Bowl with the No. 8 ACC
selection, a disappointment
caused mainly by concerns
about the waning fan base
at College Park.
The game was supposed
to be a shootout from the
start East Carolina came
in averaging 38 points per
game and allowing 43/'-
but the Pirates', no-hudille
attack was disjointed all
game, and the Terrapins
initially failed to take full
advantage of prime scoring
chances against a defense
that had been giving up
an 478.8 yards per game
- most in the nation.


Answer to Previous Puzzle

TOAD AV OID
PEP LUM S| V-ELTE
ARETHA HEALER
LINE TIA LAM
SRESA S E
TURNS NECTAR
ISAAC HOMIER
PESTO ORATE
SHERPA ETHEL
TUX

CUB R ISPY
HOTELS B SHED
EMERGE EINS
TAST SP N


12 Fishing net
16 Highest degree
18 Couple
20 Endangered
layer
21 Dollar fractions


C h a Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.comI


22 Barbecue
extras
23 More peeved
24 Shade-loving
plant
25 Tokyo, to
shoguns
27 Environmental
prefix
29 Hollow
30 Plastic-
Band
32 Say what?
34 Colo. setting
37 Football plays
38 Dash widths
41 Chew out
43 Musical work
45 Has the flu
47 Widen a hole
48 Almost never
49 Clap of thun-
der
50 Grad. class
51 Pop in the
microwave
52 Riviera sum-
mer
53 Prez after
Jimmy
54 Fast-food let-
ters


12-30 @2010by UFS,-lnc.


SCOREBOARD


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421










LAKE CITY REPORTER FOOTBALL THURSDAY. DECEMBER 30, 2010


SeRams pickedoin

Fil weird showdown


ASSOCIATED PRESS'
LEFT: Philadelphia Eagles quarterback Michael Vick runs the ball against the New York Giants at New Meadowlands Stadium
in East Rutherford, N.J. on Sunday.
RIGHT: New England Patriots quarterback Tom Brady passes against Green Bay in Foxborough, Mass., on Dec. 19.




Brady, Vick voted





Pro Bowl starters


By DAN GELSTON
Associated Press -

PHILADELPHIA -
Michael Vick's odyssey has
taken him from Pro Bowl
star to prison and back
again.
Transforming from dog-
fighting ringleader to leader
of the Philadelphia Eagles
made a big impression with
players and fans of the NFL
- and not just in the city
that .chants "MVP!" at the
sight of Vick's No. 7.
The Eagles quarterback,
who sat out two seasons
while serving a federal sen-
tence for dogfighting, was
voted to start for the NFC
in the Jan. 30 Pro Bowl in
Honolulu.
Vick was selected
Tuesday in a leaguewide

Pro Bowl rosters-
(x-starter)
AFC
OFFENSE
WIDE RECEIVERS x-Andre
Johnson, Houston; x-Reggie Wayne,
Indianapolis; Dwayne Bowe, Kansas City;
Brandon Lloyd, Denver
TACKLES x-Jake Long, Miami; x-
Joe Thomas, Cleveland; D'Brickashaw
Ferguson, N.Y. Jets
GUARDS x-Kris Dielman, San
Diego; x-Logan Mankins, New England;
Brian Waters, Kansas City
CENTERS x-Nick Mangold, N.Y.
jets; Maurkice Pouncey, Pittsburgh
TIGHT ENDS x-Antonio Gates,
San Diego; Marcedes Lewis, Jacksonville
QUARTERBACKS x-Tom Brady,
New England; Peyton Manning, Indianapolis;
Philip Rivers, San Diego
RUNNING BACKS x-Maurice
Jones-Drew, Jacksonville; Jamaal Charles,
Kansas City;Arian Foster, Houston
FULLBACK x-Vonta Leach,


vote by NFL players, coach-
es and fans.
He made three Pro Bowls
with Atlanta before he was
suspended by the league
and served jail time for run-
ning a dogfighting ring. This
season, he has gone from a
seldom-used backup to the
NFC's leading passer, the
catalyst for Philadelphia's
dynamic offense.
He wasn't really interest-
ed in talking about the Pro
Bowl after the Minnesota
Vikings upset the NFC East
champion Eagles 24-14 on
Tuesday.
"I'm not worried about
the Pro Bowl right now,"
he said. "There's so many
things going on in my head.
I appreciate the Pro Bowl,
but as of right now, I can't
even focus on that It's in
Houston
DEFENSE
ENDS x-Dwight Freeney,
Indianapolis; x-Robert Mathis, Indianapolis;
Jason Babin,Tennessee
INTERIOR LINEMAN x-Haloti
Ngata, Baltimore; x-Vince Wilfork, New
England; Richard Seymour, Oakland
OUTSIDE LINEBACKERS x-James
Harrison, Pittsburgh; x-Cameron Wake,
Miami;Terrell Suggs, Baltimore
INSIDE/MIDDLE LINEBACKERS x-
Ray Lewis, Baltimore; Jerod Mayo, New
England
CORNERBACKS x-Nnamdi
Asomugha, Oakland; x-Darrelle Revis, N.Y.
Jets; Devin McCourty, New England
STRONG SAFETY x-Troy Polamalu,
Pittsburgh
FREE SAFTIES x-Ed Reed, Baltimore;
Brandon Meriweather, New England
SPECIALISTS
PUNTER Shane Lechler, Oakland
PLACEKICKER Billy Cundiff,
Baltimore
KICK RETURN SPECIALIST Marc
Mariani,Tennessee -


oblivion right now."
Vick set career highs this
season in yards passing
(3,018), touchdowns pass-
ing (21) and touchdowns
rushing (nine).
Besides Vick, the Eagles
had four other players
selected.
Atlanta, which leads the
NFC at 12-3, had the most
Pro Bowlers with seven.
New England (13-2),
the AFC leader, had six
Pro Bowlers, led by QB
Tom Brady, the league's
top passer who will make
his sixth trip to the game
- providing the Patriots
don't make the Super Bowl.
The game will be played
the Sunday before the title
game at Dallas Cowboys
Stadium.
Baltimore, Green Bay
SPECIAL TEAMER Montell Owens,
Jacksonville'
NFC
OFFENSE
WIDE RECEIVERS-x-CalvinJohnson,
Detroit; x-Roddy White, Atlanta; DeSean
Jackson, Philadelphia; Greg Jennings, Green
Bay
TACKLES x-Jordan Gross, Carolina;
x-Jason Peters, Philadelphia; Chad Clifton,
Green Bay
GUARDS x-Jahri Evans, New
Orleans; x-Chris Snee, N.Y. Giants; Carl
Nicks, New Orleans
CENTERS x-Andre Gurode, Dallas;
Shaun O'Hara, N.Y. Giants
TIGHT ENDS x-Jason Witten,
Dallas;Tony Gonzalez,Atlanta
QUARTERBACKS x-Michael Vick,
Philadelphia; Drew Brees, New Orleans;
Matt Ryan,Atlanta
RUNNING BACKS x-Michael
Turner, Atlanta; Steven Jackson, St. Louis;
Adrian Peterson, Minnesota
FULLBACK x-Ovie Mughelli,
Atlanta
DEFENSE


and Dallas also had five
players voted in.
Four rookies were
chosen, including former
Gator Maurkice Pouncey of
Pittsburgh.
Altogether, there were
seven first-timers on
the NFC squad and 14 new-
comers for the AFC.
Teams not represented
were Buffalo, Cincinnati,
Seattle and Tampa Bay.
Backup quarterbacks for
the NFC are Matt Ryan and
Drew Brees.
Colts quarterback Peyton
Manning made his 11th Pro
Bowl as a backup to Brady.
He joined Brett Favre as the
only quarterbacks selected
to at least 11 games.
San Diego's Philip
Rivers is the other AFC
quarterback.
ENDS x-John Abraham, Atlanta; x-
Julius Peppers, Chicago; Justin Tuck, N.Y.
Giants
INTERIOR LINEMEN x-Jay Ratliff,
Dallas; x-Ndamukong Suh, Detroit; Justin
Smith, San Francisco
OUTSIDE LINEBACKERS x-Clay
Matthews, Green Bay; x-DeMarcus Ware,
Dallas; Lance Briggs, Chicago;
INSIDE/MIDDLE LINEBACKERS
- x-Patrick Willis, San Francisco; Brian
Urlacher, Chicago
CORNERBACKS x-Asante Samuel,
Philadelphia; x-Charles Woodson, Green
Bay; DeAngelo Hall,Washington
STRONG SAFETY x-Adrian Wilson,
Arizona
FREE SAFTIES x-Nick Collins,
Green Bay;Antrel Rolle, N.Y. Giants
SPECIALISTS
PUNTER Mat McBriar, Dallas
PLACEKICKER David Akers,
Philadelphia
KICK RETURN SPECIALIST Devin
Hester, Chicago
SPECIAL TEAMER Eric Weems,
Atlanta


Garrard out for season finale


By MARK LONG
Associated Press

JACKSONVILLE -
Jacksonville Jaguars quar-
terback David Garrard will
miss the season finale at
Houston because of a finger
injury.
Garrard will have sur-
gery on the middle finger of
his right hand today. Trent
Edwards is likely to start in
Garrard's place, essentially
giving the former Buffalo
Bills starter an audition
with Jacksonville.
Garrard injured his fin-
ger when he hit it on an
opposing player's helmet
at Indianapolis on Dec. 19.
He threw a crucial intercep-
tion late in the that game,
and threw two more picks
in a 20-17 overtime loss to
Washington on Sunday. He
also fumbled twice.
Garrard likely would miss
a first-round playoff game if
the Jaguars (8-7) make the
postseason.
Making that even more
improbable, the Jaguars
likely will be without star
running back Maurice
Jones-Drew. He missed his
fourth consecutive prac-


tice Wednesday because of
an injured right knee that
probably will need bffsea-
son surgery.
Garrard set the franchise
record for touchdown pass-
es in a season, enjoyed five
of the best eight games of
his nine-year career and
led the team to several late
wins.
But his final two games,
which included two costly
turnovers late, had fans
calling for a quarterback
change.
Garrard's injury prob-
ably might not do much
to dampen those feelings.
After all, he's just 39-37 as a
starter and has one playoff
victory.
This season was one of
his best, though. .He com-
pleted 64.5 percent of his
passes for 2,734 yards, with
23 TD passes and 15 inter-
ceptions and a passer rating
of 90.8.
He led the team to late
wins against Indianapolis,
Buffalo, Houston and
Cleveland. But he showed
more inconsistency in losses
to San Diego, Philadelphia,
Tennessee, the New York
Giants and Washington.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Jacksonville Jaguars quarterback David Garrard (9) is sacked
by Washington Redskins defensive end Adam Carriker (94)
and linebacker Andre Carter (99) in Jacksonville on Sunday.


By BARRY WILNER
Associated Press

For the final Sunday of
the regular season, the
NFL reserves the right
to wait to flex a game to
prime time. The league
waited for this: St Louis
(7-8) at Seattle (6-9).
Don't cringe it's the
most significant game on
the schedule.
The victor takes the
NFC Worst, uh, West title,
and if it is the Seahawks,
they become the first divi-
sion winner with a losing
record in, well, forever.
None of the Seahawks
is embarrassed by that
prospect
"So this is something
that we've aimed for," first-
year Seattle coach Pete
Carroll said. "It's come in
kind of an unusual man-
ner, but the fact that we're
there, we're going to go
for it and be excited about
it and see if we can put
together a great game."
That would be unique.
Seattle has lost seven of
its last nine, and even its
mastery at Qwest Field
has faded. That's why the
Rams, who finished 1-15
a year ago, are a 1-point
favorite.
We can see the Rams fin-
ishing off one of the most
impressive turnarounds in
league annals by capturing
the division even if they
will get creamed in the
playoffs.
RAMS, 22-13
Many games are off the
board as teams are expect-
ed to rest starters.
Tennessee (plus 8k) at
Indianapolis
Colts will storm into
the playoffs against one
of the league's most disap-
pointing teams. Could be
Jeff Fisher's last game as
Titans coach,
COLTS, 30-16.,..
Oakland (plus 4) at
Kansas City
Too bad this version of
the NFL's nastiest rivalry
doesn't mean much. Chiefs
are in the playoffs, want to
stay healthy. Raiders are
shooting for .500 season.
RAIDERS 27-24
Pittsburgh (minus 6) at
Cleveland
Do Browns players want
to save Eric Mangini's
coaching job? If so, they
will test the Steelers, wh6
clinch the AFC North with
a victory.
STEELERS, 20-10
Cincinnati (plus 9k) 'at
Baltimore
Carson Palmer looks
better without Ochocinco
and TO. At least he did
against San Diego; the


Ravens are a different
animal.
RAVENS, 24-13
N.Y. Giants (minus 31')
at Washington
Even with a victory,
Giants might be on outside
of playoff picture. Redskins
rarely are in that picture.
GIANTS, 27-21
Carolina (plus 1412) at
Atlanta
Falcons clinch best NFC
record.
FALCONS, 24-9
Tampa Bay (plus 8) at
New Orleans
Buccaneers have shot at
wild card if things break
right. But they have to
beat the Saints.
They won't
SAINTS, 24-17
San Diego (minus 3%) at
Denver
Tim Tebow's education
continues. So does the
Chargers' fall into medi-
ocrity.
BRONCOS, 24-20
Arizona (plus 7) at San
Francisco
How hard are each of
these teams kicking tfem-
selves? Even a decent
season would have won
the NFC West
49ERS, 14-13
Miami (plus 2) at New
England
Patriots are cruising,
having clinched every-
thing they can for postsea-
son. Even with little incen-
tive ...
PATRIOTS, 23-10
Jacksonville (minus 2k)
at Houston
Jaguars blew their shot at
a division ti"i- with succes-
sive defeats. Houston blew
its chance months ago.
With no David Garrard,
Jags will struggle.
TEXANS, 20-17
Minnesota at Detroit
A rare second visit to
the Motor City for the
Vikings. Don't be fooled
by their- winuTuesday over
flat Eagles.
LIONS, 17-13
Chicago at Green Bay
Dilemma for Bears: play
the starters and try to keep
archrivals out of the play-
offs? Or play it safe, keep ,
key guys healthy? Packers
need this much more.
PACKERS, 21-17
Dallas at Philadelphia
Eagles are stuck at No.
3 seed, Michael Vick and
DeSean Jackson are some-
what hobbled. Cowboys
solidify Jason Garrett's job
security.
COWBOYS, 24-17
Buffalo at N.Y. Jets
Barring something
strange, Jets will be sixth
seed in AFC. Time to get
healthy for playoffs.
BILLS, 16-13


Favre beats rap,

but fined $50,000


By BARRY WILNER
Associated Press

NEW YORK Brett
Favre has been fined
$50,000 by the NFL for
a "failure to cooperate"
with the investigation into
allegations he sent inap-
propriate messages and
lewd photos to former
New York Jets game-day
hostess Jenn Sterger.
The league said
Commissioner Roger
Goodell "could not con-
clude" that Favre violated
the league's personal con-
duct policy based on the
evidence currently avail-
able to him.
"The forensic analysis
could not establish that
Favre sentthe objectionable
photographs to Sterger,"
the statement said.
'The review found no
evidence to contradict the
statements of both Favre
and Sterger that they never
met in person, nor was
there anything to suggest
that Sterger engaged in any
inappropriate conductt"
Goodell determined
Favre was "not candid in
several respects during the


investigation resulting in a
longer review and addition-
al negative public attention
for Favre, Sterger and the
NFL," the statement said.
The fine was announced
Wednesday.
The NFL also reviewed
media reports that Favre
pursued two massage ther-
apists who worked at the
Jets' facility in 2008, when
Favre played for the team.
But the league said that
claim could not be sub-
stantiated because people
with "potentially relevant
information" declined to
be interviewed or cooper-
ate with investigators.
Reaching a conclusion
in the case dragged out
because of difficulties in
setting up interviews with
"certain key individu-
als," the complication of
retrieving and review-
ing electronic records
and Goodell's decision to
meet with both Favre and
Sterger before reaching
a conclusion, the NFL's
statement said.
The league said its sole
focus was on whether
Favre violated workplace
conduct policy.


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421











LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS THURSDAY. DECEMBER 30, 2010 Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415


DILBERT
A COMPETITOR FROM
THE FUTURE IS SENDING
ROBOTS BACK IN TIME
TO TERMINATE OUR
COMPANY.



\f


BABY BLUES


BLONDIE


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE


DEAR ABBY


Brusque behavior provokes

road rage in cubicle aisles


DEAR ABBY: There is
a situation at work that has
smoke coming out of my
ears. I'm past the age of re-
tirement, but need to contin-
ue working. I'm with a great
company and enjoy what I
do.
The fly in the ointment is
one of our salespeople. He's
a big, strapping guy who
comes barreling down the
narrow aisles between cu-
bicles. On more than one oc-
casion I have had to execute
a quick side step in order not
to be run over. After the most
recent near miss, I'told him
in no uncertain terms that if
it ever happened again, I'd let
him plow into me and take
the consequences.
My question is, if I don't
get out of his way and do
get knocked down, what
recourse do I have? Good
manners would dictate that
the younger man allow me to
pass first, but are there any
legal ramifications? I would
love to smack him (like Bette
Davis would in an old mov-
ie), but with my luck, I'd be
charged with assault. What
say you, Abby? ON A
COLLISION COURSE IN
WISCONSIN
DEAR ON A COLLI-
SION COURSE: Good man-
ners would, indeed, dictate
that the younger man allow
you to pass first, if the young-
er man has been taught ba-
sic manners by his parents.


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearobby.com
Apparently, this salesman's
parents didn't do that. So
rather than smacking the ig-
noramus, you should address
your concerns to your super-
visor, so he or she can tell
him to slow down and watch
where he's going. If you were
injured on company proper-
ty, the liability would be the
company's, and the physical
ramifications for you could
be serious.
DEAR ABBY: A few
weeks ago I had one of the
greatest days of my life when
I married my fiancee, "Joy."
The ceremony was interrupt-
ed when my brother-in-law's
cell phone rang. I was so an-
noyed I turned around and
asked him if he'd like us to
wait while he took the call.
The backlash at the recep-
tion later was all directed at
me! Joy and my side of the
family laughed about it. But
Joy's family was angry and
said I should have ignored
it. What are your thoughts
or advice? Should I apologize
even if I'm not sorry? ON
HOLD IN CHANDLER,
ARIZ.


DEAR ON HOLD: Your
brother-in-law owes both
you and Joy the apology. He
should have turned his cell
phone off before the cere-
mony. If he's in a field where
he's on call 24/7, then the
phone should have been set
to vibrate rather than ring.
P.S. Please tell me he didn't
actually answer it. Readers,
has this happened to you?
DEAR ABBY: We live
in a retirement community
that includes some single
men. On a couple of occa-
sions, one of the gentlemen
has come into the clubhouse
with his zipper down. If there
are no other men in the area,
what would be the appropri-
ate way to handle something
like this? I know it would be
embarrassing if the problem
was addressed in a public
manner. Whafs your sug-
gestion? BLUSHING IN
ARIZONA
DEAR BLUSHING:
Take the person aside and
tell him quietly that his fly is
open. (It's not unlike telling
someone of either sex that he
or she has a bit of salad stuck
between his or her front
teeth.) This way the problem
can be remedied quickly and
efficiently, with the least em-
barrassment to either party.

Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
,P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS


GARFIELD


B.C.


LOOK, see. see SPOT
,ULMP ONM THr TABLe,







02010John L. Hart FLP
FRANK & ERNEST


S SPOT DP-AIM
THE- TotLT BOWL.


wwwJohnHartStudos.com


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-
April 19): Arguing will not
solve anything. Blowing a
situation out of proportion
or exaggerating will result
in your being blamed for
:,*what happens. Chill out and
* refuse to let anyone get the
T better of you. ***
TAURUS (April 20-
May 20): Get involved in
any challenge or competi-
tion that will inspire or stim-
ulate you to make positive
moves. Love is in the. stars.
Don't fight change or you
will miss out on something
good. ***
GEMINI (May21-June
20): The more you talk, the
harder it will be to reverse
what develops. Incorporate
diplomacy or you may end
up in a precarious position
with little room to maneu-
ver. Spend time on self-im-
provement, not trying to
change others. ***
CANCER (June 21-
July 22): Love is on the
rise. You can meet someone
special if you are single by
getting involved in year-end
festivities. Putting a little ex-
tra effort into your appear-
ance will pay off. Activities
involving youngsters will be
rewarding. *****
LEO (July 23-Aug.
22): Keep things simple,
to the point and honest. An
older individual may put de-
mands on you. Before you


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

promise to. give up some-
thing you want to do, con-
sider how you can take care
of whatever burden you've
been handed. **
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Say what's on your
mind and you will put confu-
sion behind you. Your open-
ness will enhance a relation-
ship that means a lot to you.
You can impress others by
taking on a challenge and
standing up to anyone who
opposes you. ****
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): Do whatever it takes
to get along with family and
close friends. Refrain from
saying what you think; it
will be worth your while to
take a back seat today. The
more creative you are, the
better you will feel about
yourself. ***
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-
Nov. 21): Let your
emotions lead the way. Start
a project with the potential'
to change the way you do
things. Your dedication 'and
determination to put your
skills to proper use will en-
sure a lucrative endeavor.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): You may
have insight into other peo-
ple's problems but, when it


comes to your own person-
al dilemmas, you will face
sorrow if you try to evade
issues that concern the
people you live with or are
in love with. Spare yourself
grief by being honest about
your feelings. ***
CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): There isn't
anything you cannot achieve
if you set your mind to it and
you forge ahead with gusto.
Your ideas will gather inter-
est and your ability to make
the changes others cannot
seem to adjust to will place
you in a good position. Love
is in the stars. ****
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): If you concen-
trate more on professional
goals and less on your per-
sonal life, you will fare bet-
ter in both areas. You'll be
limited financially if you
allow someone to take ad-
vantage of your generos-
ity. Don't believe someone
promising you love and
happiness. **
PISCES (Feb. 19-
March 20): Make some
personal changes to en-
hance your looks and give
you added confidence.
Look into ways you can put
your skills and talent to bet-
ter use. Jealousy is likely to
be at the root of any adver-
sity you face. Rise above it.
*****


by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: K equals V
"YE YJG OZD PJE EDIF JZU. Z
JZOOGB HD YJG YEEILHY, GKGBF
M B E A IG O I E E L U I H LG Z DZHI." -
ZABZJZO J. OZUIEP

PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "True, a little learning is a dangerous thing, but it still
beats total ignorance." Abigail Van Buren
(c) 2010 by NEA, Inc. 12-30


FOR BETTER OR WORSE


SO FAR IT'S NOT MUCH
E OF AN ISSUE BECAUSE
THEIR TIME TRAVEL
TECHNOLOGY IS WAY
8 AHEAD OF THEIR
S ROBOT-BUILDING
S-I ~ SKILLS.
I < -ii-


IS THAT TOTALLY.
AS FUN THEY'RE LIKE
AS IT ZOMBIES. BUT
LOOKS? CRUNCHIER.
I ^
IW /^


CELEBRITY CIPHER


LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS THURSDAY. DECEMBER 30, 2010


Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415


CLASSIC PEANUTS











Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED THURSDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2010

Lake City Reporter





CLASSIFIED


- ADvantage


d =-7M .l 7 7Tt


Limited to service type advertis-
ing only.
4 lines, one month....s92.00
$10.80 each additional line
Includes an additional $2.00 per
ad for each Wednesday insertion.



You can call us at 755-5440,
Monday through Friday from 8:00
a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Some people prefer to place their
classified ads in person, and some
ad categories will require prepay-
ment. Our office is located at 180
East Duval Street.
You can also fax or email your ad
copy to the Reporter.
FAX: 386-752-9400 Please
direct your copy to the Classified
Department.
EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityre-
porter.com




U..0
Ad istoAppear: Call by: Fax/Email by:
Tuesday Mn., 10:00 a.m. Mon.,9:00 a.m.
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Thursday Wed., 10:00 a.m. Wed., 9:00 a.m.
Friday Thurs., 10:00 a.m. Thurs., 9:00 a.m.
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These deadlines are subject to change without notice




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on the first day of publication.
We accept responsibility for only
the first incorrect insertion, and
only the charge for the ad space
in error. Please call 755-5440
, immediately for prompt correc-
tion and billing adjustments.
Cancellations- Normal advertising
deadlines apply for cancellation.
Billing Inquiries- Call 755-5440.
Should further information be
required regarding payments or
credit limits, your call will be trans-
ferred to the accounting depart-
ment.


Advertising copy is subject to
approval by the Publisher who
reserves the right to edit, reject,
or classify all advertisements under
appropriate headings. Copy should
be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the first day of pub-
lication. Credit for published errors
will be allowed for the first insertion
for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the
Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nor for any general,
special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply
with Federal, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
nation in employment, housing and
public accommodations. Standard
abbreviations are acceptable; how-
ever, the first word of each ad may
not be abbreviated.

In Print and Online
viiv.lakecityreportcr.comi


Legal


Th i$Spo-redbr$250
One h item per ad i
4 lines, 6 days s d-11,05
Rate applies to private individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling $00 or less.
This Is a non-refundable rate






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person al merchandise totaling $00 or less.
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4 lines 6 days line 1.5
Rate applies to private Individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling $4,000 or less.
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This Is a non-refundable rate.
This Is a non-refundable rate.


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number: 10-281-CP
In Re The Estate Of:
ANN MARIE CALLAN,
Deceased,
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE:
The administration of the estate of
ANN MARIE CALLAN, deceased,
File Number 10-281-CP, is pending
in the probate Court, Columbia
County, Florida, the address of
which is:
173 NE Hemrnando Avenue
Lake City, FL 32055
The names and addresses of the Per-
sonal Representative and the Person-
al Representative's attorney are set
forth below.
ALL INTERESTED PERSONS
ARE NOTIFIED THAT:
All creditors of the decedent and oth-
er persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate, or whom a
copy of this notice is required to be
served, must file their claims with
this court WITHIN THE LATER OF
THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIR-
TY (30) DAYS AFTER THE DATE
OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent
and persons having claims or de-
mands against the decedent's estate
must file their claims with this court
WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITH-
IN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of the first publication of
this Notice is December 21, 2010
Personal Representative:
Donna Marie Belice
315 SW Montgomery Drive
Lake City, FL 33025
Attorney for Personal Representa-
tive:
Jennie E. Poore, Esquire
Attorney for Personal Representative
311 SE 10th Court
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33316
(954) 763-3392
Florida Bar Number: 466700
05524679
December 23, 30, 2010

PUBLIC NOTICE.
CONCERNING FAIR HOUSING
On January 7, 1988, the Board of
County Commissioners of Columbia
County, Florida adopted Ordinance
No. 88-1, which established the poli-
cy of the County to promote equal
opportunity to obtain adequate hous-
ing by all persons, regardless of race,
color, religion, ancestry, sex, place
of birth, physical handicap or nation-
al origin. On February 17, 1994, the
Board of County Commissioners of
Columbia County, Florida adopted
an Ordinance No. 94-3 amending Or-
dinance No. 88-1 to add familial sta-
tus as a protected class from discrim-
ination in the sale or rental of hous-
ing.
These ordinances are available for
public inspection at the Office of the
County Manager, County Adminis-
trative Offices located at 135 North-
east Hernando Street, Lake City,
Florida Monday through Friday be-
tween the hours of 8:00 A.M. and
5:00 P.M.
Any aggrieved person may file a
complaint of a housing discrimina-
tion act with the:
Florida Commission on Human Re-
lations
325 John Knox Road, Bldg. F, Suite
240 Tallahassee, Florida 32303-4149
Toll-free Telephone: 1-800-342-.
8170
or
U.S. Department of Housing and Ur-
ban Development 451 7th Street,
S.W. Washington, D.C. 20410
Toil-free Telephone: 1-800-424-
8590
To request information or assistance
locally, you may contact the County
Manager, at the County Administra-
tive Offices or telephone (386) 755-
4100.

04542826
December 30, 2010
Public Auction
Will be held by Gainey Automotive,
Inc, in Columbia County at 3468
S.W. CR 138, Fort White, Fl. 32038
Date 01/10/2011
Time: 8:00 A.M.
1998 Buick
VIN# IG4HR52KOWH446112
04542839
December 30, 2010







Home Improvements

Carpentry, remodeling, paint,
repairs, additions, Lic. & Ins.
Since 1978 FREE estimates
386-497-3219 or 954-649-1037

Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.


Pool Maintenance


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA.
CASE NO. 122009000853CAXXX
FIRST AMERICAN MORTGAGE
TRUST,
PLAINTIFF,
VS.
SCOTT L. PALM, ETAL.
DEFENDANTS)
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE
SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to the Final Judgment of Fore-
closure dated June 22, 2010 in the
above action, I will sell to the highest
and best bidder for cash at Columbia,
Florida, on February 2, 2011, at
11:00 AM, at 3rd Floor of court-
house 173 N.E. Hernando Ave.,
Lake City, FL 32055 for the follow-
ing described property"
COMMENCE AT THE SOUTH-
EAST CORNER OF THE SOUTH-
EAST 1/4 SECTION 31 TOWN-
SHIP 5 SOUTH RANGE 16 EAST
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
AND RUN THENCE SOUTH 89
DEGREES 19'30 WEST ALONG
THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID SEC-
TION 31, 538.43 FEET THENCE
NORTH 00 DEGREES 24'47 WEST
57.79 FEET TO THE NORTH
RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF
FAULKNER ROAD AND TO THE
POINT 0 BEGINNING THENCE
CONTINUE NORTH 00 DEGREES
24'47 WEST 547.97 FEET
THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES
19'13 WEST 227.14 FEET
THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES
38'37 WEST 634.56 FEET TO THE
EASTERLY RIGHT OF WAY
LINE OF FAULKNER ROAD;
THENCE SOUTH 11 DEGREES
43'40" EAST ALONG SAID EAST-
ERLY RIGHT AWAY LINE, 87.34
FEET, THENCE SOUTH 12 DE-
GREES 37'10" EAST ALONG
SAID EASTERLY RIGHT OF
WAY LINE, 319.81 FEET TO THE,
BEGINNING OF A CURVE,
THENCE SOUTHEASTERLY
ALONG SAID EASTERLY RIGHT
OF WAY LINE ALONG SAID
CURVE CONCAVE TO THE LEFT
HAVING A RADIUS OF 200.00
FEET AND A CENTRAL ANGLE
OF 78 DEGREES 03'20", AN ARC
DISTANCE OF 272.47 FEET
(CHORD BEARING OF SOUTH 51
DEGREES 38'50" EAST AND DIS-
TANCE OF 251.88 FEET) TO THE
NORTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY
LINE OF FAULKNER ROAD,
THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES
19'30" EAST ALONG SAID
NORTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY
LINE, 443.65 FEET, THENCE 89
DEGREES 46'19" EAST ALONG
SAID NORTHERLY RIGHT OF
WAY LINE, 136.85 FEET TO THE
POINT OF BEGINNING. CON-
TAINING 10.01 ACRES, MORE
OR LESS
Any person claiming an interest in
the surplus corm the sale, if any, oth-
er than the property owner as of the
date of the lis pendens must file a
claim within sixty (60) days after the
sale. The Court, in its discretion,
may enlarge the time of the sale. No-
tice of the changed time of sale shall
be published as provided herein.
DATED December 7, 2010
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By:/s/B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk of the Court
Prepared by:
Gladstone Law Group, PA.
1499 W. Palmetto Park Rd, suite 300
Boca Raton, FL 33486
"If you are a person with a disability
who needs any accommodation in
order to participate in this proceed-
ing, you are entitled, at no cost to
you, to the provision of certain assis-
tance. Please contact the ADA Coor-
dinator, Ms. Barbara Dawicke at
P.O. Box 1569, 173 N.E. Hemando
St., Room 408, Lake City, FL 32056;
telephone number 386-758-2163 two
(2) working days of your receipt of
this notice; if you are hearing im-
paired, call the Florida Relay Serv-
ices at 1-800-955-8771 (TTY); if
you are voice impaired, call the Flor-
ida Relay Services at 1-800-955-
8770"
04542683
'December 23, 30, 2010
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.:09-750-CA
SEDGEFIELD LAND COMPANY,
a Florida corporation,
Plaintiff,
vs.
YARRA N. GALLON a/k/a YAR-
RA GALLON MATHIS,
Defendants,
NOTICE OF JUDICIAL SALE BY
THE CLERK
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
pursuant to an Order or Final Judg-
ment entered in the above-styled
cause now pending in said court, that
I will sell to the highest and best bid-
der for cash on the third floor of the
Columbia County Courthouse, 173
N.E. Hemando Avenue, Lake City,
Florida 32055, at 11:00 o'clock, a.m.
on January 19, 2011, the following
property located in Columbia Coun-
ty, Florida:
Lot 3 SEDGEFIELD PHASE I, as
per plat thereof recorded in Plat
Book 7, Page 87-92, of the Public
Records of Columbia County, Flori-
da.
Said sale will be made pursuant to
and in order to satisfy the terms of
said Final Summary Judgment of
Foreclosure. Any person claiming an
interest in the surplus from the sale,
if any, other than the property owner
as of the date of the lis pendens must
file a claim within 60 days after the
sale.
Dated: December 17, 2010.
P. DEWITT CASON, Clerk of the
Court
By/s/B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
05524711
December 23, 30, 2010


04542857
Doctor's office is looking for a
full time Office Assistant/Front
Desk Clerk. Please fax resume
to 386-755-1744 or call
386-755-1703 ask for Margaret


120 Medical
120 Employment

055246-50
LEARN TO DRAW BLOOD
Local Phlebotomy Course
offered in Lake City, FLA
Certificate program.
(904)566-1328

05524735

Medical Personnel

LPN and MA
Needed for Correction &
Mental Health Facilities, top
pay, instant pay, sign on bonus,
877-630-6988


Wanted Receptionist,
experienced. Send resume to
826 SW Main Blvd. Suite 102.
Lake City, FL. 32025


Legal

NOTICE OF BOARD MEETING
TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN
The District Board of Trustees, Flori-
da Gateway College, will hold a pub-
lic meeting at 4:00 p.m. on Tuesday,
January 11, 2011, in the Board Room
of the Administration Building,
(Building 001) of Florida Gateway
College.
Topics of consideration will be rou-
tine college business. In addition to
routine college business the follow-
ing items will be considered: Board
Policy 6Hx1l2:05-13, Billings for
Agency- Sponsored Courses. Any
person wishing to be heard on any
agenda matter will be provided an
opportunity to do so by appearing
before the Board in the Board Room
of the Administration Building of
Florida Gateway College.
All objections to this notice and pro-
priety of the scheduled Meeting
should be filed with Florida Gateway
College prior to noon, Friday, Janu-
ary 7, 2011. All legal issues should
be brought to the Trustees' attention
and an attempt made to resolve them
prior to the meeting.
Please notify the President's Office
immediately if you require accom-
modation for participation in the
meeting.
A reception will be held at 3:30 p.m.
in the lobby of the Administration
Building prior to the regular Board
meeting.
04542710
December 30, 2010

NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS
NAME LAW PURSUANT TO
SECTION 865.09, FLORIDA
STATUTES
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned,
desiring to engage in business under
the fictitious name of
Lake Shore Orthopaedic and Sports
Medicine Center located at: 348 NE
Methodist Terrace, Suite 101, Lake
City, FL 32055 in the County of Co-
lumbia in the City of Lake City,
Florida 32055
intends to register the said name with
the Division of Corporations of the
Florida Department of State, Talla-
hassee, Florida.
Dated at Naples, Florida, this 15th
day of December, 2009.
Signed By: Shaina McDonald, Nota-
ry Public
04542647
December 30, 2010


010 Announcements









020 Lost & Found

05524732
Reward Two Lost Jack Russell
Terriers,female w/blind eye,
male neutered,
missing since 12/21
386-497-4325 or 365-3970

FOUND 12/25: Boxer mix dog.
Approx. 1 yr. old. Very friendly &
taken care of. Found in Hidden
acres off 245. 386-754-1407

100 Job
100 Opportunities

04542702
Customer Service
Ideal Candidates with previous
experience with customer
service. Must have excellent
telephone skills. Individual
must be enthusiastic, outgoing,
have excellent computer skills
and be able to perform in a fast
pace environment.
Please fax resume to
386-758-0984 or email to
greatjobs@LCjobs.info

Cashiers needed, Experience
Preferred, Drug free workplace,
all applicants will be drug tested
Ellisville Exxon,
Hwy 441, No Phone Calls Please.
Customer Service Experience
and Golf Knowledge a must.
Drug free workplace.
Apply in person @ Quail
Heights Country Club.
Delivery driver, must be 21 yrs
old, have 6 pts or less on license
and have NO misdemeanors or fel-
onies. Must possess a Class A
CDL,apply within/no phone calls!
North Florida Sales
467 SW Ring Ct, Lake City
Experienced IT Tech/
Network Admin
Qualifications: 2+ years
experience with: win XP pro, win
7 pro, server 2003, 2008. Must
have worked within and be
familiar with active directory.
Must be capable of lifting/moving
workstations. Microsoft
certifications a plus. Clean drivers
license required. Please submit
resume to hr@chclabs.com or
fax to 386-758-1791
Experienced Stylist
needed, apply at
Southern Exposure Salon
386-752-4614

120 Medical
Employment


630 Mobile Homes
6 for Rent

2/2 S/W beautiful, clean freshly
painted. near college, 1 acre,
big front porch $650 mo. avail 1/1
386-697-1013 or 386-697-1900
2/2, S/W. 1 acre secluded lot
Bascom Norris Bypass. $500 dep,
$500 mo, possible owner finance
386-623-2203 or 386-623-5410
3/2 DW, secluded, Columbia City
area, covered back deck. No Inside
pets, $750 mo, plus sec dep
386-752-1941/ 386-965-0932
3br/2ba newly renovated MH on
1/2 ac. private property. Close to
college $700.mo. 1st. mo.+ Sec.
dep. Ref's. No Pets. Non smoking
environment 386-755-3288


DWMH, $850 mo plus $300 sec.
Spacious 4/2, on 5 ac, south of LC,
clean, quiet, great area, shed, 3
386-462-1138, No Cats/Pitbulls


2 Schools &
240 Education

04542861
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-01/17/10

Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-01/17/11

Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com



310 Pets & Supplies

BEAGLE RABBIT DOG.
-$175. Runs Good, Male
.386-249-3104 or
386-719-4802

POMERANIAN
10 weeks old.
$250. Paper trained.
386-438-3885
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.

T330 Livestock &
330 Supplies
Pigs for sale
9 weeks old
$50 each
386-965-2215


361 Farm Equipment

84 Ford 4610 Tractor. Runs good.
Solid 2WD. New front tires,
350hr on 2005 motor. Dependable.
$7500. obo. 386-867-0005


401 Antiques

ANTIQUES WANTED
Fum., China, Silver, Glassware,
Costume Jewelry & Gold. 35 years
exp. Cash Pd. Pete. 386-963-2621


402 Appliances

Kenmore Washer & Dryer Set
front load, side by side or stacka-
ble, HE model, good cond, $300
386-755-2548 or 867-0546


420 Wanted to Buy

K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.

Scrap Lead Acid Batteries. Pay-
ing $8.00ea & up. (Excludes lawn
mower batteries.) Minimum pick-
up 20 batteries. Art 352-262-6202
EPA# FLR000 134601

Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$250 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.


430 Garage Sales







PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.



440 Miscellaneous

4 TICKETS (together)
to the Florida/Penn State
Outback Bowl.
386-752-0699

Tow Behind Grill/Smoker. Com-
mercial built, nice shape. $1250.
obo. 386-249-3104 or 719-4802
Great for your New Years Bash!!!


520 Boats for Sale

Bass Tender Boat
10'2",
$500 Call for details
386-965-2215


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

755-5440


Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White Contact 386-623-2465
or 386-292-0114
Nice clean 2&3 bdrm, Five Points,
NO PETS, also 3 bd on the
Westside, 1 mo rent & dep
386-961-1482






Quiet Setting w/lots of oaks
2br/lba from $450 & 3br/2ba from
$550. Includes water & sewer.
No Pets! 386-961-0017
Very clean & well maintained 2/2
units in nice park. $599.mo
w/$500. dep. Rent incl water,
sewer, trash p/u. Close to town
386-984-8448 or 623-7547
Very Clean 2 BR/1 BA, in the
country, Branford area, $450 mo.,
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleypro590-0642

640 Mobile Homes
640 for Sale

$200. MONTHLY. Remodeled
SW. 2bd/2ba. Appliances,
delivered & blocked. Owner
finance available w/$3000 dowri.
Call Gary Hamilton 386-758-9824
05524590
Palm Harbor Homes
has closed 2 model centers
Save up to 60K on select models
SCall 800-622-2832


Gainesvile-JYacobsei-mSavins
Factory direct .laot.nen outlet
now open to the public 3/2 start-
ing at 39,900 complete.
Northpointemobilehomesales.co
m for complete website specials
or 352-872-5566
For the best deal in Florida!

05524638
North Pointe Homes is your
new #1 Jacobsen dealer. Take a
short drive to Gainesville and
save thousands. Five year halo
warranty, 2x6 wall, and
much more. Free energy star
package on all others.
Call Chuck at 352-872-5567

05524639
Why drive to Gainesville?
This is Why! New 28x60
Jacobsen 3/2 inc FREE Furni-
ture! Low as $497 month.
Drive to our dealership and Buy,
I pay for your.gas!
Call Mark at 352-872-5568


710A Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent
D5524443
$Holiday Cash $
NO App Fee, NO SD,
$250 off December,
*for Qualified Applicants
Windsong Apartments
(386) 758-8455

05524728
SPRING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans;
some with garages.
Call 386-454-1469
or visit our website:
www.springhillvillage.net

2/1 w/garage,
east side of town,
1st, last & sec
386-755-6867
2BR/1BA with carport,
Privacy Garden and
Utility Room Near VA.
No Pets. 386-438-8052
2BR/2BA DUPLEX
on McFarlane Ave. W/D hookup
Rent $625. per month.
Call 386-867-1212 for details.
Brick Duplex 2/1 off Baya. CH/A,
Carport, Carpet, tile, $575 mo.+
Dep. Call 386-752-0118 or
386-623-1698 or 386-292-4937
Duplex w/garage spacious, 2/1,
1300 sq ft, W/D hook up, CH/A,
$650 plus dep & bckgrnd chk.
386-697-3248 or 352-514-2332
Great location W of 1-75, spacious
deluxe 2BR apts., garage, W/D
hook up. patio. $600 & up. + SD.
386 965-0276
The Lakes Apts. Studios & IBr's
from $135/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $425 + sec.
Michelle 386-752-9626
X.CLEAN SECOND STORY 2/2.
country acre 8 mi to VA, off Lk
Jeff Rd. $500 mo + dep. No dogs.
Deck, w/d hookups 386.961.9181


Pool Leaks/Pool Repairs
Florida Leisure Pool & Spa
352-373-0612
CPC 1457279


To place your
classified ad call

755-U5440


IBUI



SELL


FIgNDII 4









LAKE CITY REPORTER


CLASSIFIED


THURSDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2010


Classified Department: 755-5440


720 Furnished Apts.
12 For Rent
NO Lease/Deposits, ROOMS only
Utilities, Cable, WI-FI. maid,
micro-fridge, phone, Pool.
Americas Best Value Inn
(386)755-4664
Wk 1 prs. $169,2 ppl $179 + tax
Park Model Trailers (Studio), all
utils, use of pool, $500 per month,
NeverDunn's RV Park.
386-961-8540 or 755-4945
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808
730 Unfurnished
7 Home For Rent
2BR/1BA CH/A. Large carport,
great location, near corner of Baya
& McFarland references req'd.
Property zoned for commercial use
386-752-9144 or 755-2235
3 & 4 bedroom homes. Newly
renovated. Very nice, in town.
$750 $950 per month plus
deposit. 386-755-2423
3 Bedrm/2 Bth plus 360 sq ft Stu-
dio on Lake Jeffery/Old Mill Rd,
very private, $1200 per mo. plus
deposit, 386-752-9303, No Pets
3/2 W/D hook up, appliances
included, $200 sec dep,
$650 month. Madison Street
386-365-2515
3/2,Brick Home, big back yard,
$900 month + Security Deposit
off of Branford Hwy & CR 242,
386-965-0276
3br/2ba Brick. Double Carport
Carpet & tile. CH/A.On small lake
2000 sqft. $950. mo + sec. 386-
752-0118, 623-1698 or 292-4937
Cozy Cottage lbr/lba S. Hwy.Al
$550/mo. + security. Includes all
utilities & satellite TV. Pets OK.
(386)758-2408

805 Lots for Sale
5 Acres in Lake City, FL,
low down, easy qualifying, and
low monthly,payments,
please call 512-663-0065
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination.", Familial status-
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that"all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble oan equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

810 Home for Sale
3BR/2BA 2 story brick. 4.6 ac. in
ground pool. Lg. workshop &
2 wells. $200,000.00 obo
Old Wire Rd. (850)728-0782
FSBO, Completely Remodeled,
3bdr/lbth, fenced, new deck, shop,
new cabinets/appliances,Schools
blks away, $65K 478-391-1592

820 Farms &
2 Acreage,
4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd'
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$69,900. $613mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
4 Ac.,Ft. White. Well, Septic &
Power. Owner Financing!
NO DOWN! $69,900.
Only $613./mo 352-215-1018.,
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
WE FINANCE! Half to ten acre
lots. Some with w/s/pp
Deas Bullard BKL Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com


940 Trucks
1990 Ford F350 Dually
work truck. white, automatic
$1500 obo
386-965-2215
1995 F-150 Ford
Pick Up
Nice truck for $3,900 CASH
386-752-1677
97 Chevy Z71 Extended cab. 3
door. Black w/gold trim. Local 2
owner. All service records. $4750.
obo 386-249-3104 / 386-719-4802


...to never miss a day's
worth of all the
Lake City Reporter
has to offer:
Home delivery.
To subscribe call
755-5445




-U^ ^ ^


ADVERTISE IT HERE!
Bring the picture in or we will take it for you!
Advertise your car, truck, motorcycle, recreation vehicle or
boat here for 10 consecutive days. If your vehicle does not sell
within those 10 days, for an additional $15 you can place your
ad for an additional 10 days. A picture will run everyday with
a description of your vehicle. The price of the vehicle must be
listed in the ad. Your ad must be prepaid with cash, check or
credit card. Just include a snapshot or bring your vehicle by
and we will take the picture for you. Private party only!
Price includes a 6 day/ 4 line classified ad of the
same vehicle in print and online.


2005 PT Cruiser
Touring Edition
PS, PW, PM, CC, AC,
white, 55,500 miles.
$7,900
Call
386-965-8656


2009 Harley Davidson
XR1200R Mirage
Orange and black. One
owner, garage kept. Like
new, only 52 actual miles.
$8,000
Call
386-752-5988


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