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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01486
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 12/28/2010
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01486
System ID: UF00028308:01486
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text






Short-handed
Florida will be missing players in
bowl game against Penn State.

Snnr*'c 3-DIGIT 326
000016 120511 **3DI GT 326
LIB OF FLORIDA HISTORY
PO BOX 117007
05 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-1943


4
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Tuesday, December 28, 2010


K...


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www.*ecityreporter.com


Comeback win
CHS soccer opens
tourney with a victory.

Sports, I B





reporter


Vol. 136, No. 292 75 cents


SMOKE SCARE LEADS To



CITY HALL EVACUATION


Photos by JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
ABOVE: Lake City Fire Department driver/engineer Keith Mobley waits for fellow firefighters to complete a check of the City Hall building Monday
afternoon after smoke was detected on the second and third floors. Lake City and Colum ia County fire crews responded to the scene.
BELOW: Columbia County firefighter Bobby Oliver carefully climbs down a ladder from the top of the City Hall Building on Monday.

Employees taken outside for .
more tan an hour; source
could be dust burning. ,
By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
A t first, Verna Ingram thought -
someone burnt popcorn when
smoke started appearing in City..
Hall.
"But it was a little more than
that," said Ingram, a City Hall receptionist. '
City of Lake City employees were evacu- .
ated from City Hall due to smoke in the
building around 12:20 p.m. Monday.
The Lake City Fire Department, assisted
by the Columbia County Fire Department,
responded to the scene, said LCFD Asst
Fire Chief Frank Armijo. h,/ .
Smoke was coming from the second and '.
third floor of the building, he said./
The possible source for the smoke was
SMOKE continued on 3A ": .



Shoppers in a 'return mood


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
JCPenney sales associate Karen St. Louis assists
Wesley Gamble in making an exchange on Monday.


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400


55
Mostly sunny
WEATHER, 2P


Stores filled as crowds
search for bargains or
exchange Christmas gifts.
By GABRIELLE BELLAMY
Special to the Reporter
Christmas has passed and stores
are still filled, but now with the hustle
and bustle of shoppers both returning
items and catching great deals.
This is the time when customers may
return unwanted gifts or exchange gifts
that did not fit. Some stores, including
many in Lake City, take advantage of
this extra business by placing their

Opinion ............
People...........'....
Obituaries ..........
Advice & Comics .....
A '"- Puzzles .............


merchandise on sale.
William Batte, store manager at
Belk, said that they are receiving a lot
of business, but the number of returns
they received on Sunday were average
compared to a regular day. '
"A lot of customers shopped and
,bought things on clearance for them-
selves," he said.
Batte also said that a lot of custom-
ers used gift cards, which are being
used more and more often.
"Gift cards are more convenient,"


he said.
According


to' Batte, Belk is
SALES continued on 3A


.... 4A
.... 2A
5A
. .. 4B
.... 2B


Virtual Gala

to collect

donations
Catholic Charities
looks for new ways to
stimulate contributions.
By GABRIELLE BELLAMY
Special to the Reporter
A local organization is creating a
more convenient way for others to
give to charity.
Catholic Charities Lake City
Regional Office, a non-profit organi-
zation, is currently holding a Virtual
Fundraising Gala, which started on
Dec. 1 and will continue through
Jan. 31.
Catholic Charities has held other
galas in the past, but this is the first
virtual gala.
Suzanne Edwards, Chief Operating
Officer at Catholic Charities Lake City


Regional
Office, said
the idea for
a virtual
gala came
from other
Catholic
Charities
offices in
Florida who
have done
virtual galas
that resulted
in success.
"It allows
everyone to
donate and


"The Virtual
Fundraising
Gala is a nifty
way to stimu-
late dona-
tions in this
economy."
Suzanne Edwards,
Chief Operating
Officer at Catholic
Charities Lake City
Regional Office


be a central part of the organization,"
she said.
According to Edwards, there have
been more people asking for help,
but fewer donors. This is unfortu-
nately hurting the budget for Catholic
Charities.
"Some of our donors have become
a part of out client base," she said.
'The Virtual Fundraising Gala is a
nifty way to stimulate donations in
this economy."
Edwards said that Catholic Charities
has to plan ahead at least 18 months
in advance.
"I don't see the economy getting
better anytime soon," she said.
Catholic Charities chose to have
CHARITIES continued on 3A


Rare indeed:

Snow falls in

Lake City

Last appreciable
accumulation was more
than two decades ago.
From. staff reports
It snowed on Sunday in Lake City.
It was flurries, but the noticeable
flakes fell at different times through-
out the day.
Around 8 a.m. Sunday, snow was
reported falling in Lake City and also
in Wellborn. Flakes fell heavy, but
only for a short time in the morning
cold. Flakes also were reported falling
in the vicinity of the Lake City Airport
later in the morning.
Reports from the Ellisville area
said light snow fell during the morn-
ing throughout the southern part of
Columbia County.
Snow flakes fell for about 10 min-
utes in the vicinity of the Lake City
Food Lion grocery store on the west
side of Lake City at about 12:30 p.m.
At the Lake City Mall at around 1 p.m.
several shoppers stood in the parking
SNOW continued on 3A

ODAY IN COMING
SCHOOL WEDNESDAY


Writers of the
Month.


Some choice for
New Year's Eve.


I .









LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING TUESDAY, DECEMBER 28, 2010


Monday:
Afternoon: 7-9-3
Evening: 4-2-2


Monday:
Afternoon: 2-3-7-8
Evening: 9-0-8-9


t Sunday:
11-14-15-23-31


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



New members ready for first Oscar vote


BEVERLY HILLS, Calif.
T he holiday season is high
time for film fans. The
year's best pictures hit
theaters, awards buzz
begins and cold weather
and extra days off make for perfect
moviegoing conditions.
Still, some of the world's biggest
cinephiles might enjoy this season
more than most: As the newest
members of the film academy, they'll
be voting on the Oscars for the first
time.
The Academy of Motion Picture
Arts and Sciences invited 135 actors,
animators, art directors, cinematog-
raphers, documentarians, producers,
publicists, writers and other film-
makers to join its ranks in 2010, and
their first-ever Oscar ballots were
mailed out Monday.
So will having a say on the out-
come of the Oscars change the way
these folks watch movies? And how
did they end up in the film business
anyway?
The academy's class of 2010 con-
sidered these questions recently
at a private party at the Margaret
Herrick Library, where they were
welcomed to one of Hollywood's
most exclusive clubs by president
Tom Sherak, who called the event
"rookie night at the academy."
An academy member for 27 years,
Sherak said he still feels like "the
ultimate movie fan" and he still
votes like one.
"When I go to a movie, even as
an academy member, I go to be
entertained, from crying to laughing
to thinking to being angry to being
happy," he said. "I go as a fan first."
His advice to new voters? "Vote as
conscientiously as you possibly can."
"This is something we do that
the whole world pays attention to,"
Sherak told the new recruits, "and
we need you to take that seriously."
He explained the two rounds of'


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Sept. 22 photo, Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences President,
Tom Sherak speaks during the new members reception in Beverly Hills, Calif.


voting: First is the nominations bal-
lot, mailed out Monday, with the
results announced Jan. 25. Then the
final ballots arrive inFebruary, lead-
ing to the Oscar ceremony on Feb.
27.
"You do not have to vote if you
haven't seen all the movies," he said.

Portman to wed 'Black
Swan' choreographer
NEW YORK Natalie Portman
is pregnant with her first child and is
engaged to Benjamin Millepied, the
choreographer of "Black Swan." ,
A publicist for Portman confirmed
Monday that the couple are engaged


and expecting, but declined to give
any further details. People magazine
first reported the news.
The 29-year-old actress and
Millepied, a well-regarded ballet
dancer and choreographer, met dur-
ing the making of "Black Swan,"
Darren Aronofsky's psychological
thriller that stars Portman as a bal-
let dancer. She's been nominated for
best actress by the Golden Globes
and the Screen Actors Guild.
Millepied played a small on-screen
role in the film as a dancer.
Portman also stars in Ivan
Reitman's upcoming romantic com-
edy, "No Strings Attached."

M Associated Press


Celebrity Birthdays


* Comic book creator Stan
Lee is 88.
* Former United Auto
Workers union president
Owen Bieber is 81.
* Actor Martin Milner is 79.
* Actress Nichelle Nichols
is 78.
* Actress Dame Maggie
Smith is 76.
* Rock singer-musician

Daily Scripture


Edgar Winter is 64.
* Actor Denzel Washington
is 56.
* Country singer Joe Diffie
is 52.
* Country musician Mike
McGuire (Shenandoah) is 52.
* Comedian Seth Meyers is
37.
* Singer David Archuleta
(TV: "American Idol") is 20.


"Of David. Praise the Lord, my
soul; all my inmost being, praise
his holy name. Praise the Lord,
my soul, and forget not all his
benefits "

-Psalm 103:1-2


Lake City Reporter
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CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run
in this space. And thanks for reading.


Cold temperatures
worry farmers

IMMOKALEE When
frigid temperatures imperil
Florida's crops, the state's
farmworkers said their
lives become a struggle.
Many farmworkers didn't
return to the state after a
severe cold snap in January.
Since temperatures dipped
again this month, the farm-
workers who remained said
they can find only sporadic
part-time work.
"Farmers always
announce the damage they
have, but not many peo-
ple talk about the work-
ers," said Tirso Moreno,
Farmworker Association of
Florida general coordina-
tor. "It's important to take
notice of what's happening
here in Immokalee."
Many people are work-
ing, but no one. is working
full time, said Oscar Otzoy,
a member of the Coalition
of Immokalee Workers.
Normally they might work
eight or 10 hours a day, but
now many can only find
work for five hours.
The coalition estimates
there are about 15,000 to
20,000 workers around the
Immokalee area, and all of
them have been affected by
the freezes, Otzoy said.
The group works closely
with growers Pacific and 6-
L's, and according to them
they've lost about 50 per-
cent of their usual produc-
tion.
After last growing sea-
son's terrible freezes, many
workers didn't return to
Immokalee because they
were afraid it would happen
again, Otzoy said.

Men charged with
impersonating

TAMPA Hillsborough
County sheriff's deputies
have arrested two men and
charged them with falsely
impersonating an officer


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Icicles cling to an orange Dec. 14 in Dover. Farmers spray
a fine mist of water on their crops to help protect the fruit
from the sub-freezing temperatures. Temperatures in central
Florida dipped into the 20's.


after they attempted to stop
a motorist.
Deputies said a woman
was driving Sunday when a
white Crown Victoria drove
up behind her and turned
on a red flashing light. The
woman pulled over, think-
ing it was an officer, then
saw the driver wearing a
camouflage hoodie. She
drove off, but as the car
passed her, she took down
the tag number and called
authorities.
Deputies found the vehi-
cle equipped with lights
and sirens. They arrested
David Green II, 19, and
Bradley Hamel, 20. They
were booked into the
Hillsborough County jail and
released Monday on bond.
It was unclear whether they
have retained an attorney.

Motorcyclist found
by job seeker

POMPANO BEACH
- The Broward Sheriff's
Office said a woman seek-
ing a job at an industrial
complex discovered the
body of a motorcyclist who
had crashed into a nearby
pole.
The victim has been
identified as 54-year-old
Michael Patrick Cole.
Investigators said the
Pompano Beach man was
found on the grass along


the roadside. A job seeker
found his body at about 4
p.m. on Sunday and noti-
fied police.
Cole was declared dead
at the scene.,
The crash remains under
investigation.

Man appeals 25-
year robbery stint

CHARLESTON, S.C.
- A man known as the
"Limping Bandit" because
of the way he walked away
from a string of 23 bank
robberies is appealing his
25-year federal prison sen-,
tence.
Court records filed ear-
lier this month showed
that Cecil Stephen Haire of
Douglas, Ga., has filed an
appeal of his conviction and
sentence.
Haire was sentenced
last month. He pleaded
guilty earlier this year
to robberies in Alabama,
Florida, Georgia and South
Carolina.
Haire was arrested in
July 2009 after witnesses
followed him from his 13th
South Carolina bank rob-
bery. The spree started
three years earlier in Tifton,
Ga. At the time, Haire was
still on parole for a 1987
robbery conviction.

* Associated Press


THE WEATHER


MOSTLY MOSTLY PARTLY PARTLY FEW
SUNNY SUNNY1 CLOUDY CLOUDY S0SHOWERS


HI55LO27 HI63034 HI69L044 H171L047 HI 72 LO 48

-- -- -- r >.....-.... 11 in i~iiiiilowr .


Pen5cola
55/33


Tallahassee *
53/22
Panima City
51/32


TEMPERATURES
High Monday
Low 'Monday
Normal high
Normal low
Record highok
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Monday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


UVddsta
51/24
Lake City,
55/27


Gainesville *
55/28
Ocala


48
27
67
43
84 in 1942
23 in 1970

0.00"
0.69"
39.67"
2.17"
47.97"


* Jacksonville
"54/29


Da tona Beach
57 31
\


City Wednesday Thursday


Cape Canaveral
Daytona Beach
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Jacksonville


i Orlando Cape Canaveral Key West
58/32 58/33 Lake ity
T Miami
lalnpa'* Naples
573 West Palm Beah Ocala
62/43 *, Orlando
Ft Lauderdale Panama City
Ft Myeros 63/50 Pensacola
61/35 E Naples Tallahassee
60/40 Miami Tampa
63/50 Valdosta
Key West* W. Palm Beach
62/56


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise tom.
Sunset tom.


7:26 a.m.
5:39 p.m.
7:26 a.m.
5:39 p.m.


MOON
Moonrise today 12:41 a.m.
Moonset today 12:21 p.m.
Moonrise tom. 1:45 a.m.
Moonset tom. 12:59 p.m.

*()03
Jan. Jan. Jan. Jan.
4 12 19 26
New First Full Last


On this date in
1869, a post
Christmas storm
in New York and
Vermont produced
record storm totals
of 30 inches at
Burlington, Vt.,
and 39 inches. at
Montpelier, Vermont.
A public emergency
was declared in
Vermont.


4
MOmDE
45 ntesDIt bn
Today's
ultra-violet
radiation rsk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+.

>-- J


63/47/s
62/43/s
71/62/s
70/48/s
64/35/s
59/36/s
67/62/s
63/34/pc
72/62/s
71/53/s
65/39/s
65/45/s
59/48/s
59/49/pc
60/36/s
66/48/s
59/33/s
69/57/s


711571PC
70/55/pc
75/67/pc
75/55/pc
70/46/pc
68/48/pc
70/64/pc
69/44/pc
76/65/pc
76/59/pc
71/48/pc
73/54/pc
67/56/pc
66/57/pc
67/46/pc
72/55/pc
67/43/pc
74/63/pc
iommo


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.


weather.com


Forecasts, data and graph-
_ -'*' W Ics 2010 Weather Central
i LLC, Madison, Wis.
-j www.weatherpubllsher.com


GetCneted

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AROUND FLORIDA


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


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Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


LAKE CITY REPORTER


LOCAL


TUESDAY, DECEMBER 28, 2010


SMOKE: City Hall evacuated

Continued From Page IA .


dust burning in the air
vents of the emergency air
handler, which was on heat
mode, he said. The inci-
dent was minor but the fire
department wanted to be
thorough in its investiga-
tion.
Ingram made the initial
phone call to the LCFD,
said Michele Greene, depu-
ty city clerk.
"Verna was the hero
today," she said.
Gene Bullard, human
resources/ safety/risk
management director, had
left the building just before
evacuation procedures
began. About 15 employees
were evacuated.
"From what I heard,
evacuation went well," he
said.
Once he returned,
Bullard waited outside with
other employees until the
building was cleared, he
said.
Employees were back
into the building by about
1:38 p.m., according to
Ingram. The evacuation was
a little break from work.
Despite the cold, stand-
ing outside was better than
being inside with smoke,


said Audrey Sikes, city
clerk. The outside cus-
tomer service drive-thru
pi-ovided additional shelter
from the wind.
"It was tolerable," she
said. "It could have been
worse."
At least the evacuation
was at a convenient time,
Greene said. The temper-
ature was much warmer
after noon than it was ear-
lier in the day.
Utility customers arriv-
ing during the evacuation
were redirected to the


drive-thru window so they
could still accomplish city
business, she said.
After the city and coun-
ty fire departments were
done, an electrician and air
conditioner repair person
came to the building, Sikes
said.
The city and county fire
departments worked well
together on the situation
and were very thorough
in checking out the prob-
lem, she added. "We #ere
glad to see both fire depart-
ments."


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Sierra Bland (from left), 12, Sarah Anderson, 12, and Darrah Fortner, 12, all of Live Oak, sift
through merchandise at the Bath & Body Works store in the Lake City Mall.


SALES: Shoppers flock to

Continued From Page 1A


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reorter
Lake City Fire Department Assistant Chief Frank Armijo radi-
os his crew while surveying the scene at City Hall on Monday.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Michele Greene (center), the deputy city clerk, points at a firefighter as he climbs off of the
roof of the City Hall building onto a ladder. All of the City Hall employees were evacuated for
their safety.. No one was reported hurt.


currently having a three-
day Doorbusters Sale,
which started Sunday.
Michael Kassnoff, store
manager at Radio Shack,
said Radio Shack received
more business on Monday
than Sunday.
Radio Shack receives
returns every day, but yes-
terday there were more
returns than an average
day, Kassnoff said.
"Most returns are from
people who didn't want the
item or didn't have any use
for it," he said.
Kassnoff also said a lot of
customers purchased gift
cards prior to Christmas,
and many gift cards have
been used since Christmas.
He added that Radio Shack
is currently having its
weekly sale, which lasts
from Sunday to Saturday
each week.
Shoppers can also check
out radioshack.com for
more information.
Jennifer Lumbley, store
manager at Maurices, said
the store had quite a few
returns both Sunday and
Monday.
"There have been more
returns than usual because
of Christmas," Lumbley
said. "We have also had a
lot of exchanges."
According to Lumbley,


4Maurices also sold a
lot of gift cards prior to
Christmas, and customers
have been taking advan-
tage of them.
'Today has been busier
than a normal Monday,"
she said.
Maurices is currently
having their end of season
sale. All fall and winter
items are on sale to make
way for spring items.
Candy Douglas, store
manager at JC Penney, said
there has been a lot of busi-
ness since Sunday, but there
have been more exchanges
made than returns.
"We were very happy
that we had few returns,"
Douglas said.
Gift cards have also been
popular at JC Penney.
"We've had a great gift
card return," she said.
Douglas said that JC
Penney's new spring line is
rolling in and they are cur-
rently having a sale.
"We've clearanced a lot
of winter products at 50 to
75 percent off, and holiday
decor is 75 percent off,"
she said.
Shoppers can still order
items online if they are not


stores


available in the store, said
Douglas.
'We were very happy
with (Sunday and Monday),
and I think 99 percent of the
people were happy," she
said. "It was above what we
had planned."
Christine Glenn, sales
lead at Bath & Body Works,
said that Bath & Body
Works has not had a lot
of returns, but there have
been a few customers to
come in and exchange fra-
grances.
Bath & Body Works gift
cards were very popular
this year.
"We sold out of gift
cards prior to Christmas,
and many people -have
been using them since
Christmas" Glenn said.
Bath & Body Works is
currently having its Semi-
Annual Sale a time when
the store brings back many
discontinued and seasonal
products on sale. Many
items are 50 and 75 percent
off, Glenn said.
"(Monday) was the first
day of the sale, and we've
had a lot of traffic in our
store," she said.


CHARITIES: Trying new method to get donations

Continued From Page 1A


the gala during this time
because typically, donors
give in the last week in
December. Year-end con-
tributions allow people to
claim their donations for
this year's taxes..
Edwards said, "I hope
that this is received well
and people don't think
they're getting short
changed because there is
no party."
By having a virtual event,
Catholic Charities does not
have to spend money on
caterers, florists, music,
etc.
"It takes money to throw
an event, and we can use
the money that we're sav-
ing to go towards our cli-
ents," Edward said.
The virtual gala also


allows people to donate
to charity without saving
a date, getting dressed up
and going to an event.
"Everyone's busy year
round, and there's always
a tug on people's time,"
she said.
Edwards said she has
received rave reviews
about the virtual gala thus
far.
'The response I've got-
ten from the donors has
been wonderful," she
said.
The goal for the Virtual
Fundraising Gala is
$25,000. All donations will
be used to help the clients
of Catholic Charities Lake
City Regional Office, and
100 percent of all dona-
tions are tax deductible.


Donations made by I~c.
31 can be claimed on this
year's taxes.
Donations may be made
by visiting the Cathclic
Charities website at
catholiccharititslakec'ty.
org or in person at he
Lake City Office located at
258 NW Burke Ave.


4'


Catholic Charities
Lake City Regional
Office serves Columbia,
Hamilton, Suwannee and
Union Counties.
"We are needing to
donate as much as we
can towards our clients,"
Edwards said. "Our goal is'
to help the community."


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SNOW: In Lake City

Continued From Page 1A


lot, watched it mist snow,
and called friends on their
cell phones to report the
flurries.
None of the snow stuck,
as warm ground temper-
atures melted it immedi-
ately. Air temperature
highs reached into the
40s Sunday afternoon, but
gusty north winds made it
seem colder all day.
Snow flakes were report-
ed as late as 4:30 p.m. in
western Columbia County.
The flurries were part of
a sweeping cold front that
saw snow accumulate as
far south as south Alabama
and middle Georgia.
Snow flurries were
reported across North
Florida Sunday morning.
Reports from Macclenny
and the city of Jacksonville
said snow fell steadily early
Sunday, but tailed off to
occasional flurries later


in the day. There was no
accumulation reported any-
where in North Florida.
The last measureable
snow accumulation in Lake
City was in 1989, according
to reports.


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3A


I I, i













OPINION


Tuesday, December 28, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


Jose De La Isla
joseislo3@yahoo.com .


What WikiLeaks
revealed about
US-Mexican
relations
A series of 2009
diplomatic cables
released by
WikiLeaks dis-
closes discussions
between the United States and
Mexico concerning the milita-
rization of the war on the drug
cartels there.
The dispatches, dating from
late 2009, show that "a state of
exception" roughly a state
of emergency that would bend
civilian rights in light of military
operations for certain areas
came up in discussions between
the U.S. government and
Mexican Secretary of Defense
Gen. Guillermo Galvan Galvan.
One cable attributes to
Mexico's defense secretary the
suggestion of invoking "Article
29" of Mexico's Constitution
to give more solid ground for
military intervention in the
cartel fight. The'government
had launched its 2007 offensive
without much legal cover. By
2009 it was concerned follow-
ing reports about army abuses,
which included alleged torture
and arbitrary detentions, brought
by the Mexican government's
independent human rights com-
mission.
Two U.S. embassy officials
praised Mexico President Felipe
Calderon for persistence. In
January of this year, according
to the Los Angeles Times' reading
of the cable, the authors recog-
nized challenges in managing
"unwieldy" and "uncoordinated"
law enforcement agencies.
Whatever legal consequences
will follow for Julian Assange and
WikiLeaks, they have turned
a flashlight on unvarnished
strategies and approaches to the
difficult, violent situations they
influence. This is not turf the
public often gets to see, except
in history books 20 years after
the fact
* Jos6 de la Isla, author of "The
Rise of Hispanic Political Power"
writes a weekly commentary for
Hispanic Link News Service.


Lake City Reporter-
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman


LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


Mississippi governor


has a memory problem


Most of us like
to recall things
about our
hometown that
were a bit better
than they actually were, to put
the best spin possible on the
place where we grew up, sugar
coating its faults, including its
inequities. It's like the house we
remember being much larger
than it actually was.
There is nothing.wrong with
that except if you are consider-
ing running for the presidency
of the United States, come
from .the South, are white and
what you are glossing over is
an atmosphere of repression
that pervaded most hometowns
in America, North and South,
where segregation may not
have been overt but existed
just the same and was no less
shameful.
Putting a sheen of respect-
ability on his childhood home
of Yazoo City, Miss, was what
Mississippi Gov. Haley Barbour
was doing when he said he
didn't remember racial ten-
sions there "as being that bad."
The town's elders, under the
auspices of the White Citizens
Council, he said, 'would have
nothing to do with the Ku Klux
Klan and threatened to ostracize
anyone who did, including kick-
ing "their asses" out of town. In
his interview with the Weekly
Standard, he remembered that
Martin Luther King spoke at
the city's old fairgrounds and
that it was full of people, black
and white.
To a very large number of
critics around the country it
was like saying "some of my
best friends are. ." And it may
have cost the charismatic for-
mer chairman of the Republican


Dan K.Thomasson
Party some badly neeled allies
in a bid for the GOP presidential
nomination. He quickly clarified
his remarks to assureeveryone
he had no illusions about the
severity of oppressionthat led
to the civil rights revdution.
The stumbling block of racial
history is one nearly very
white Southern political aspirant
who grew up in that tra must
face.
I certainly like to tlink of
my own hometown a, enlight-
ened about race and religion
and in some instance, it was
better than other neighboring
southern Indiana small towns.
But we did have a "cobred"
grade school and othe- signs
of segregation that wejust
seemed to take for grated,
like forcing the small African
American population b sit in
the balcony of the number one
movie theater. I also d)n't recall
seeing many black children in'
the other two theatersin town,
nor black patrons in.tie white
barber shops or restaurants.
I just assumed they hal their
own places for these flings if I
thought about it at all.
On the plus side, however,
blacks joined us in middle
and high school and vere our
mates on the school's athletic
teams, not all that usual among
our peer schools in wlat once
had been an area of copper-
head sentiment during the


Civil War and later a hotbed of
KKK activity just a few miles
up the road. In fact, our high
school started three African
Americans on a team that
ended the season by winning
the storied Indiana` High School'
Basketball Tournament. One of
those young men, William Leon
Garrett, was named Indiana's
Mr. Basketball, an honor that
any kid in Indiana would have
killed for. That was 1947, an
extraordinarily early year for
such a sign of tolerance.
. Years later the distinguished
African American lawyer and
friend of presidents, Vernon
Jordan, told me that when
he was in law school at the
University of Michigan, the
only time he and his black
friends went to a basketball
game was when Michigan
played Indiana University. He
explained that IU had this
great black player named Bill
Garrett, the only member of
his race on a Big Ten team
and, for that matter, one of
only a very few on any white
college squad, big or small.
How proud I was to say I had
known him and played with his
younger brother and that we
considered Bill an early icon in
the struggle for human rights.
These are the things that
we all like to remember about
our hometowns, not the slights
and disrespects and injus-
tices of a system that we just
accepted and that perpetuated
the nation's unofficial apart-
heid far too long. But we must
not veneer over those wrongs.
Barbour has to know that.
* Dan K. Thomasson is former
editor of Scripps Howard News
Service.


'Don't Ask, Don't Tell' repeal is a mistake


Our lllth Congress,
in its lame-duck
session, has
given America a
Christmas present
in the way of repeal of the "Don't
Ask Don't Tell" law.
Signing the repeal into law,
President Obama said he's "never
been prouder."
From my point of view, I'm
feeling increasingly like a minor-
ity in our country. Not because
I'm black, but because I am a
Christian.
As a Christian, I believe in the
truth of traditional morality as
transmitted to us through our
biblical sources. And I believe,
along with George Washington,
who stated clearly in his farewell
address to the nation, that reli-
gion and traditional morality are
critical to the maintenance of our
free society.
Homosexual behavior is unac-
ceptable by these moral stan-
dards.
I also see no clash between this
conviction and individuals being
free and taking personal responsi-
bility for living as they choose in
our free country.


Star Parker
parker@urboncure.org
But private behavior aid public
sanction are different maters.
Our military is a quint(ssen-
tially public institution. It' accep-
tance of behavior unacceptable
by traditional moral standards
means official public sandion of
this behavior and, in my niew, this
is a big mistake.
Support from public opinion
drove repeal of this law.
Gallup showed 67 petent sup-
porting repeal and a Waihington
Post/ABC poll showed support
as strong as 77 percent
Behind this is ongoing change
in public sentiment regarding the
moral acceptability of honosex-
ual behavior. Just 10 yeas ago,
53 percent said it was nd morally
acceptable and 40 percent said it
was. Today this has flippd to 52


percent today saying it is morally
acceptable4and 43 percent saying
it's not
Yet, at the same time that
Americans are increasingly at
ease with homosexual behavior,
the public says that the nation is
not in good moral shape.
According to a Gallup poll from
last May, three times as many,
45 percent, say the country is
in poor moral condition than 15
percent who say its in excellent/
good moral condition.
And 76 percent say the moral
state of the nation is getting
worse compared to 14 percent
that say it's getting better.
What's going on?
Americans are becoming more
prone to believe that individuals
cannot take personal responsi-
bility for their sexual behavior.
Thirty-six percent believe today
that homosexual behavior is
genetically determined compared
to 14 percent who believed this
40 years ago.
* Star Parker is president of
CURE, Coalition
on Urban Renewal and Education
(www.urbancure.org) and author of
three books.


Phil Hudgins
phudgins@cninewspapers.com


'Sunday

Morning' TV

crew may

make Possum

Drop famous

backed up in lines
at his store, so Clay
Logan had time to
talk. I telephoned
him after hearing that a crew
from the CBS television show
"Sunday Morning" was com-
ing this weekend to catch the
Annual Possum Drop on vid-
eotape.
"Yeah, they're supposed to be
coming in Thursday to get some
of the workings-you know,
putting it together," Logan said
from his small store, Clay's .
Corner, in Brasstown, N.C. And
they'll stay over New Year's Eve
for the Possum Queen contest,
featuring local men dressed up
like local women, and the slow-
lowering of a live possum at ,
midnight, just the way they do.
it in New York City, except they.
use a big ball instead of a pos-.:r
sum.
This will be the 17th Annual
Possum Drop. If you count
those first two years, it'll be.
the 19th. But Logan doesn't
count them because they were
just for family and friends. He
took the drop public at his
store in 1994.
He decided to use a dead
possum in 2002 after some
folks with PETA-People
for the Ethical Treatment of
Animals-complained that he
was traumatizing the live crit-
ter by keeping him penned.
up and then lowering him in a'
cage. So he cleaned up a dead.
possum as best he could and.
quick-froze him on a board
to make him sit up like a live
possum. Unfortunately, the
dead possum began to thaw
out before the show was over,
causing him to tilt to one side.
But the New Year started any-
way.
The next year, Logan
changed his ways and went
back to using a live possum,
which he catches legally,
according to North Carolina
hunting laws, and which he
now keeps in a pen built by "
government specifications:
three feet wide, three feet high
and six feet long, and contain"
ing a little barrel so the pos-
sum can hide in the daytime.
He also gets four permits:
three from the state and one
from Uncle Sam.
"Everything's legal," Logan
said.
And when the drop is over,
he'll turn the well-fed pos-
sum loose to dodge cars once
again.
My conversation with Logan
was interrupted briefly when
one of the Possum Queen con-
testants dropped by the store to
leave his music, "I let them pick
their own music to dance by,"
Logan said.
Last New Year's Eve, Miss
Rainbow Springs-a false name,.
of course, like other things-
was chosen as the queen. 'We
hate to use their real names,"
Logan said, "because some of
them are not real confident in
their manhood."
A new Possum Queen will be
chosen Friday night and then
preside, with Clay Logan, over
the Annual Possum Drop.
If everything goes as expect-
ed, the drop will be televised
nationally on CBS's "Sunday
Morning" this Sunday. The cele-
bration won't be shown live, like
the big ball drop in New York
City. But it'll be nice.
And fun, too, Logan said. "It's
just good, stupid fun."
* Phil Hudgins is senior editor of
Community Newspapers Inc.


4A


-- - -- -









LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL TUESDAY, DECEMBER 28, 2010


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


* To submit your Community
Calendar item, contact Antonia
Robinson at 754-0425 or by
e-mail at arobinson@
lakecityreporter.com.


WEDNESDAY
Live Performance
:,,'Fred Perry performs
live from 11 11:45 a.m.
Wednesday in the Dining
Hall of the LifeStyle
Enrichment Center. A
game of bingo will follow
at 1 p.m. The center is
located at 628 SE Allison
Court. For more informa-
tion call 386-755-0235.

FRIDAY
New Year's Bash
The LifeStyle
Enrichment Center pres-
ents "Rocking The House"
beginning at 7 p.m. Friday.
Heavy hors d'oeuvres will
be served all night, and
professional comedians
Jamie Morgan, Chase
Holliday and Lisa Best
will entertain from 8 -10
p.m. Tickets are $50 per
person, and the event is at
628 SE Allison Court For
ticket information, con-
tact Janet at 386-755-0235
extension 124.

NYE Celebration
The Third Annual
Rotary Club of Lake City
New Year's Celebration
is 8 p.m. Friday at the
County Club at Lake
City. Tickets are $100 per
couple and available at
The County Club of Lake
City, Candler Appraisal
Services, Parks Johnson
Agency, Olympic Health
Chiropractic and the Lake
City Reporter. Attire is
black tie optional.

Joint worship service
Shiloh Missionary
Baptist Church and


Philadelphia Missionary
Baptist Church are wor-
shipping, fellowshipping
and praising the New
Year in 10 p.m.Friday at
Shiloh Missionary Baptist
Church. The church is
located at 948 Aberdeen
Ave.

NYE service
"Friday Night Live"
New Years Eve Service is
9 p.m. Friday at Miracle
Tabernacle Church. The
church is located at 1190
SW Sister's Welcome
Road. Call 386-758-8452
For transportation call
Mitch at 386-292-5850 or
Audre' 386-344-9915.

Watch Night Service
The DaySpring
Missionary Baptist Church
meets at 9:30 p.m. Friday
for a watch night service.
There will be singing,
praying, testimonies and
the word of God delivered
by Pastor Aaron T. Lewis
Sr. The church is located
at 849 NE Congress
Avenue. For more infor-
mation call Elvira at (386)
365-2911.

New Year's Service
St Paul Missionary
Baptist Church meets at
8 p.m. Friday for a watch
night service. Make
plans to come and visit
the church located at 222
Oosterhoudt Lane. For
more information call 386-
758-8486.

Watch Night Service
The Long Branch
Congregational Methodist
Church hosts a watch
night service starting at


8 p.m. Friday on County
Road 135. The Rushing
Winds from Jacksonville
will be the guest singers,
and there will also be local
singing. Refreshments will
be served and everyone is
invited. For more informa-
tion call 386-397-2673.

Midnight Watch service
Ist Haitian Baptist
Church is having midnight
watch service 9 p.m. to 12
a.m. Friday. The church
is located at 189 NW Cali
Drive. The community is
invited to attend the annu-
al event. Refreshments will
be served after service.

EVERY DAY
Mall Walkers
Rain or shine, the Lake
City Mall is open at 7 a.m.
Monday Saturday and 10
a.m. Sunday for those who
want to walk for exercise.

EVERY MONDAY
Suwannee Valley
Composite Squadron
Suwannee Valley
Composite Squadron -
Civil Air Patrol. Meets 6:30
to 9 p.m. Monday. For
more information, please
call Maj. Grant Meadows,
(386) 365-1341.

EVERY FOURTH
MONDAY
Social Duplicate Bridge
Club meeting
The Social Duplicate
Bridge Club meets from
1 to 5 p.m. every fourth
Monday at the LifeStyle
Enrichment Center, 628


SE Allison Ct. Call 755-
0235.

EVERY FIRST,
THIRD MONDAY
Weight loss support
group meets
The Thinner Me Weight
Loss Surgery Support
Group holds meetings
at 7 p.m. on the first and
third Monday of every
month in the Classrooms
at Lake City Medical
Center. Meetings are
for people that have had
weight loss surgery, con-
templating surgery or just
trying to lose weight on
their own. E-mail thethin-
nerme@gmail.com or call
(386) 288-9153 and leave a
message.

EVERY THIRD
MONDAY
MS support group to
meet
An MS support group
meets every third Monday
of the month, at the Lake
City Columbia County
Historical Museum, 157
* SE Hernando Ave. Call
Karen Cross at (386) 755-
2950 or Jane Joubert at
(386) 755-5099 for more
information.


ihe UeiiActors ait the
LifeStyle Enrichment
Center are looking for
members. Meetings are
12:45-2 p.m. Tuesday and
Thursday. Anyone retired
and interested in becom-


ing an actor or actress is
invited. Call Frank at 752-
8861.

UF Master Gardeners
are available
The University of
Florida Master Gardeners
are at the Columbia
County Extension Office
from 9 a.m. to noon
Tuesday. They answer
gardening questions and
conduct soil pH tests
free of charge. Call (386)
752-5384, or stop at the
UF/IFAS Extension Office
at the Columbia County
fairgrounds for more infor-
mation.

Lake City Lions to meet
The Lake City Lions
meet at 7 p.m. Tuesday,
at the Guangdong res-
taurant, in the Lake
City Mall. Call Truett
George at (386) 497-2050
or Marshall Barnard at
(386) 497-3536 for more
information.

Square Dancing
The Dixie Dancers
weekly dance is held at 6:30
p.m. every Tuesday at Teen
Town Community Center.
The group does square and
round dancing. Couples 12
and older are welcome. Call
(386)497-2834.


Domestic violence


iVU ors i UU1omestic vioIeIice
meets at 5:30 p.m. every
Tuesday. The location is
for them alone. Child care
is provided. Call Another
Way at (386) 719-2700 for
more information.


EVERY FIRST
TUESDAY
Habitat for Humanity to
meet
Habitat for Humanity
will meet at 7 p.m. the first
Tuesday of every month,
at Lake City. Medical
Center. Call Audre'J.
Washington at (386) 344-
9915 for more information.

Leads Club #1 meeting
The Columbia County
Chamber Leads Club
#1 meets 8 a.m. every
first and third. Tuesday
at Holiday Inn & Suites
Lake City. Leads Clubs
are dynamic groups
of Chamber partners
who meet bi-monthly to
exchange business leads
and ideas with fellow busi-
ness professionals. Call
(386) 752-3690.

EVERY SECOND
TUESDAY
Prostate cancer
support group
A support group for
prostate cancer patients
and survivors will be held,
at 7 p.m. on the second
Tuesday of every month,
at Lake City Medical
Center. Call Ron Peacock
at (386) 365-1359 for more
information.


The LifeStyle
Enrichment Center
Photography Club meets
from 2 to 4 p.m. every
second Tuesday. Call 755-
0235.


OBITUARIES


Daniel Delgado
Daniel Delgado, 50, of Jackson-
ville, FL, passed away on De-
cember 23, 2010. He was born
in Lake City, FL to Albert and
Hazel Delgado. Danny proudly
served JSO as
a Deputy Sher-
iff for the past
18.5 years.
Danny also
proudly served
his country
in the United
States Army
Retired,
SFC, Army Na-
tional Guard -
- 3rd Battalion, -
20th Special
Forces for 21 years.
He is survived by his devot-
ed wife of 23 years, Caroline
Delgado; daughters, Ashley,
Danielle and Caitlin; parents,
Albert and Hazel Delgado;
brothers, Greg Delgado and
Paul Delgado; and sister, Lisa
Cleaveland. He is predeceased
by his brother, Peter Delgado.
Visitation will be held from 6:00-
9:00 pm on'Tuesday, December
28th in the Chapel of Hardage-
Giddens Funeral Home of Man-
darin and one hour prior to ser-
vice in the church. The Funeral
Service will be held at 11:00 am
on Wednesday, December 29th
in the Church of Jesus Christ of
Latter Day Saints, 11951 Old
St. Augustine Rd, Jacksonville,
FL 32258. Interment will fol-
low the service at Oak Grove
Cemetery in Lake Butler, FL
Memorial donations may be
made in Memory of Danny to the
Jacksonville Fraternal Order of
Police, 5530 Beach Boulevard,
Jacksonville, FL 32207-5161,
or to the Community Hospice of
Northeast Florida, 4266 Sunbeam
Road, Jacksonville, FL 32257
Arrangements are under the
care and direction of Hard-
age-Giddens Funeral Home
of Mandarin, 11801 San Jose
Blvd. Jacksonville, FL 32223.
www.hgmandarin.
corn (904) 288-0025.

Shirley "Jean" Freeman
Mrs. Shirley "Jean" Freeman,
75, of Lake City, passed away
peacefully following an extend-
ed illness on
Monday mom-
ing December
27, 2010 sur-
rounded by
her family. A
native of Chi-
pley, Florida,
Mrs. Freeman
had been a
resident of Lake City from 1973
until 1993. and had returned
from Dickinson, Texas in 2003.


Mrs. Freeman had worked as a
cosmetologist until retiring. She
loved camping and doing arts
and crafts. She was a member
of the Hopeful Baptist Church
-and was active with their Senior
Adult luncheons and her Sun-
day School Class. Mrs. Freeman
was preceded in death by her
father, Allen Henry Bush and a
daughter, Bobbie Jean Bennett.
She is survived by her husband
of thirty-eight years, Joe Free-
man; a daughter and son-in-law,
Donna and Danny Hardy of
Lake City, Florida; her mother,
Mattie Lee Hodges Bush of
Chipley, Florida; and two broth-
ers, Ronald A. Bush (FeFe) of
Graceville, Florida and Donnie
R. Bush (Billie) of Irondale,
Alabama. Three grandchildren,
four great-grandchildren and
numerous other family mem-
bers and friends also survive.
Funeral services for Mrs. Free-
man will be conducted at 2:00
P.M. on Thursday, December 30,
2010 in the chapel of thq Dees-
Parrish Family Funeral Home
with Rev. Mark Cunningham of-
ficiating. Interment will follow
in the Hopeful Baptist Church
Cemetery. The family will re-
ceive friends from 5:00-7:00
Wednesday evening. Arrange-
ments are under the direction
of the DEES-PARRISH FAM-
ILY FUNERAL HOME, 458
S. Marion Ave., Lake City, FL
32025 752-1234 please sign our
on-line family guestbook at www.
parrishfamilyfuneralhome. corn


Sarah A. McMahon
Sarah A. McMahon, 87, of Lake
City passed away Monday, Dec.
20. She was the daughter of the
late Pleamon H. Reid and Mamie
Reid Boekhout. Sarah was pre-
deceased by her son, Alan Duane
McMahon, and three sisters:
Edith Storey, Ida Lee Johnson,
and Ruth McCall, and her grand-
daughter, Laira Stinson Laboy.
She is survived by her daughter,
Barbara "Teddy" and husband
Bill Pruett, her sister Kitty Reid,
grandson Jarod Pruett, great-
grandchildren Rayl Jackson and
Taren Jackson, all of Lake City.
Daughter-in-law Janet McMa-
hon, granddaughter Christy Bak-
er, grandson Shane McMahon,
all of Waynesville, NC; grand-
children Billy and wife Jackie
Pruett of Jacksonville, David
and wife Carlene. Pruett of Cla-
remont, Kay and husband Phillip
Coppola of Bradford, MA, and
thirteen great-grandchildren.
Among many beloved nieces
and nephews are Robin Mikell,
Joey Mikell, Sherry Morri-
son, and Wayne Johnson. Otey
"Sarge" McMahon also survives.
She was born in Lake City, grew
up in Wellborn, and traveled the
world as a young army wife.
Sarah loved the outdoors, and
was happiest when gardening
and playing in the dirt. She had a
quiet, unassuming grace and gen-
uine love for others that caused
her to treat everyone with a gen-
tle heart and total acceptance.
At Sarah's request for "no fuss"
a short memorial service,will be
held graveside at Mount Beulah
Baptist Church offPinemount Rd.
Wednesday, Dec 29, at 1:00 p.m.


Richard F. Stoll


Mr. Richard F. Stoll, 52, of Lake
City, passed away peacefully on
Sunday, December 26, 2010 at
his residence following a year
long illness. A native of Teaneck,
New Jersey, Mr. Stoll had been
a resident of Lake City for the
past sixteen
years having
moved here
from New Jer-
sey. He was
the son of the
late Alvin and
Dorothy Stoll
and had served
in the United s ,,
States Army for
four years, two
of which were ..
spent in Korea
in 1980 and 1981. Mr. Stoll
worked as a truck driver until
his ill health. In his spare time
he enjoyed fishing, singing and
song writing and traveling. Mr.
Stoll was of the Baptist faith.
Mr. Stoll is survived by his wife
of twenty-eight years, Stepha-
nie Green Stoll; two step-sons,
Jason Bloodworth (Alison) of
New Jersey and John Blood-
worth of Boston, Massachu-
setts; two brothers, Alan Stoll
of New Jersey and Brian Stoll
(Charlene) of Cape Coral,
Florida; and his three sisters,
Margaret Hird (Dave) of New
Jersey; Karen Tanner of Colo-
rado and Linda Stoll of New
Jersey. Two grandsons, Colin
and Owen Bloodworth; nine
nieces and nephews and numer-
otis lifelong friends also survive.
Memorial services for Mr. Stoll
will be held at a later date. Cre-
mation arrangements are under


the direction of the DEES-
PARRISH FAMILY
FUNERAL HOME, 458 S.
Marion Ave., Lake City, FL
32025 752-1234 please sign
our on-line family guestbook at
wwv.patrishfamiljfuneralhome. com


Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


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Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427








LAKE CITY REPORTER SCHOOLS TUESDAY, DECEMBER 28, 2010


Bulletin Board



Eastside's'Writers
of the Month



Eastside Elementary School's
Young Writers of the Month for
December are Gracey Hudson
(from left), Hailey Schide, Tyler
Holloway, Tommy Houk, and
KeeAna Womack. Also pictured
: ,is Jack Wiley, Mix 94.3 morning
host.






COURTESY PHOTO


STUDENT PROFILE


Name: Terrence Lloyd
Bryant
Age: 16
Parents: Wayne and
Dana Bryant
School and grade:
Fort White High School,
1~th grade
Achievements: I have
had all advanced place-
ment and honors classes
since eighth grade. I've
been an A/B Honor Roll
student most of my life,
but the last th -ee consecu-
tive semesters I've main-
tained straight A's with a
4.0 GPA current and 3.7
GPA cumulative.
What clubs or orga-
nizations do you belong
to? Health Occupation
Students of America
(HOSA), National Honor
Society, Fort White High
School Chorus, varsity
football and member of
Columbia City Church of
Christ


COURTESY PHOTO
Terrance Bryant
What do you like best
about school? It gives
me a better sense of free-
dom and independence.
Depending on the subject,,
most classes allow me to
break my shell and be
myself instead of being
shy and quiet, how I am
the majority of the time.
And last but not least, the


learning process, which
everything else branches
off of.
Teachers' comments:
I would like to nominate
Terrence Bryant t'o be
recognized as an out-
standing student. He is an
active and valued chorus
member who tried out for
All-State (we are waiting
for results), a straight-A
student who takes honor
and AP classes, and a
varsity football player.
He is a pleasure to have
in class because he par-
ticipates with enthusi-
asm and has never been
disruptive. He has good
manners and an excellent
work ethic.
Principal's com-
ments: Terrence is a
fantastic young man. He
is involved in numerous'
activities here at the
school. He is multi-tal-
ented and is a very hard


worker. He is a wonderful
asset to our school.
Student's comments
about honor: For me
to be nominated as the
Student Focus really is
an honor. Since last year
I found myself glued
to my phone, sending
1,000 text messages a
day, easy, and always on
'acebook doing typical
teenage things. But that
left my mind idle a lot
of the .time, so this year
I decided to take more
classes than normal
- including dual enroll-
ment and play varsity
football, practicing three
hours after school every
day. I maintain straight As
so that I push myself and
really stay busy. I now feel
it has really paid off that
it's been acknowledged.


COURTESY PHOTO

Young Artists of the Month
Fort White Elementary School's Young Artists of the Month
for December are Amy Bechtel (from left), Dalton Brooks,
Radley Heinze, Kenley Alvarez, Emaya Martinez and Caleb:'
Compton. Art teacher Stephanie Willcox is also pictured.


......... .... ,, .. .,. .... ., erm b od c i
Cedar Point I


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Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427









Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@lokecityreportercom


SPORTS


Tuesday, December 28,-2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


Broncos sticking with Tebow


for finale after his first win


:. .. -. ., .. .

ASSOCIATED PRESS
Denver Broncos quarterback Tim Tebow celebrates after his
fourth quarter touchdown in the closing minutes against the
Houston Texans Sunday in Denver. The Broncos beat the
Texans 24-23.


QB guides Denver
from 13-points
behind Sunday.
By ARNIE STAPLETON
Associated Press
ENGLEWOOD, Colo.
- Tim Tebow is awkward
and unpolished and even
has trouble with the sim-
plest of quarterback tasks:
taking the snap from under
center after spending his
celebrated college career in
the shotgun.
There's no denying his
productivity and passion,
though, and his efferves-
cence is infectious.
"Forget his delivery and
his arm action and his accu-
racy, he gets the job done,"
NFL Network commenta-
tor Deion Sanders said after
watching Tebow post his
first NFL win Sunday, when
he rallied the Broncos from
a 13-point fourth-quarter


deficit to a 24-23 win over
Houston.
In the process, Tebow
took the Broncos out of the
running for the top over-
all draft pick in 2011, and
Stanford's super third-year
sophomore quarterback
Andrew Luck is expected
to be snapped up by the
Carolina Panthers with the
first pick should he declare
for the NFL draft.
So, when Tebow left the
field clutching the football
from his first pro win, he
might also have tightened
his grip on the starting job.
Interim coach Eric
Studesville said he's stick-
ing with Tebow for the sea-
son finale against San Diego,
meaning the raw rookie will
head into the offseason as
the incumbent. Although a
new coach still could decide
Tebow isn't his guy, the for-
mer Florida star received
assurances from the front
office shortly after coach


Josh McDaniels' Dec. 6 fir-
ing that he's a part of the
team's future.
Despite signing an $8.8
million extension for 2011 in
training camp that includes
$5.5 million in guarantees,
Kyle Orton has no prom-
ise that he'll be back with
the Broncos after losing his
starting job two weeks ago
on the heels of two poor
performances and some
badly bruised ribs.
Tebow's passion and
poise was praised by team-
mates and opponents alike
after he guided Denver to
three touchdowns and a
field goal on the Broncos'
four second-half pos-
sessions Sunday as the
Broncos roared back from
a 17-0 halftime hole.
"He is exactly what you
thought coming out of col-
lege," Texans coach Gary
Kubiak said. "He is a win-
ner. He will find a way to
make a play. He will find a


way to move the chains. He
found a way to win a game
today and that is what this
. league is about."
Even if it doesn't look too
pretty doing it.
"I love his will to win. As
long as he has that,we'vegot
a chance. Everything else
we can work on," receiver
Jabar Gaffney said.
"He definitely brings a lot
of emotion to every play,"
deep threat Brandon Lloyd
said. "He really gives us
added incentive to do great
things for him, because we
know he's willing to do any-
thing humanly possibly to
make the most of out every
play."
Tebow threwfor 308 yards
one week after managing
just 138 yards through the
air in a loss at Oakland.
"There definitely was
progress," Studesville said
Monday. "He got much bet-
TEBOW continued on 2B


Opening success




for Tigers' soccer


By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityrefporter. com
Down at the half,
Columbia High battled
back in the opening round
of the CYSA Christmas
Tournament to take a 2-1
victory over Panama City's
Arnold High on Monday.
Eric Ihaksi gave the
Marlins the early lead, but
Arnold wasn't able to add
to it after controlling the
possession most of the first
half.
The Tigers began mak-
ing their charge back
with a Conner ,Widergren
goal at 25:51 remaining in
the contest. The ball had
been kicked around in the
box by brothers Cooper
and Cameron Hall before
Widergren's goal tied the
game.
With the scored knotted
up and under two minutes
remaining, Jimmy Blakely
came through with a goal to
give Columbia a 2-1 victory.
"It was an excellent fin-
ish," Columbia High coach
Trevor Tyler said. 'Toward
the end of the game we
were able to push the ball
on the outside and it really
opened up the midfield."
Columbia takes on
Newberry High at 11 a.m.
and Cornerstone Academy
at 3 p.m. today.


* .";'* . . .
JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High's Jimmy Blakely (13) goes up for a header against Fort White High in a
match played earlier this season.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Florida cornerback Janoris Jenkins (1) escapes a tackle by
South Carolina's T.J. Johnson (55) and C.C. Whitlock (12) in
a game in Gainesville on Nov. 13. Jenkins and three other
starters will sit out of Florida's bowl game.


Jenkins, 3 other

starters out for

Florida in bowl


Gators look for
replacements in
Meyer finale.
TAMPA- Florida will be
without cornerback Janoris
Jenkins and three other
starters against Penn State
in the Outback Bowl.
Jenkins had surgery on
his right shoulder recent-
ly and will miss the New
Year's Day game. Right
tackle Miurice Hurt and
defensive tackles Lawrence
Marsh and Terron Sanders
also will miss coach Urban


Meyer's finale. None of
them traveled with the team
to Tampa.
Hurt (right knee), Marsh
(right hip) and Sanders
(right shoulder) each had
surgery after Florida's last
game at Florida State on
Nov. 27.
Jenkins is considered the
biggest loss. The junior has
started 36 of the 39 games,
including all 11 this season.
He has eight career inter-
ceptions, including three
this season. Moses Jenkins
or Cody Riggs likely will
start in his place.


Coaching carousel claims

Singletary; more to follow


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Oct. 10 file photo, San Francisco 49ers quarterback Alex Smith (11) and head coach
Mike Singletary talk on the sidelines in San Francisco. Singletary was fired by the San
Francisco 49ers on Sunday.


49ers fire coach
hours after falling
to 5-10 vs. Rams.
By BARRY WILNER
Associated Press
Anyone who thinks
the NFL has hit its quota
for fired coaches should
sit tight and wait about a
week.
Mike Singletary became
the fourth coach canned
when the San Francisco
49ers cut ties Sunday, hours
after losing at St. Louis
to fall to 5-10. The Niners
entered the season as a


favorite in the NFC West,
got off to an 0-5 start, and
have been plagued by poor
communication on the field,
indecisiveness off it.
So Singletary joins Wade
Phillips (Dallas), Brad
Childress (Minnesota) and
Josh McDaniels (Denver)
among the unemployed.
They soon will have com-
pany likely lots of com-
pany.
"You know what, I'll put it
this way: a personal failure.
I'm the head coach of this
team and obviously wanted
us to do better, felt that we
could do better," Singletary
said after the game Sunday.


"There are some obvious
questions that I hoped
would be answered as the
season went on, and obvi-
ously were not answered.
When that happens, you
end up out of the playoffs.
"I take full responsibil-
ity for every unanswered
question."
Atop the endangered list
are Carolina's John Fox,
whose team is 2-13 and has
clinched the first pick in
April's draft; Marvin Lewis,
who didn't accept a con-
tract extension with the
Bengals earlier this year
COACHES continued on 3B












LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS TUESDAY, DECEMBER 28, 2010


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
6:30 p.m.
ESPN Champs Sports Bowl, West
Virginia vs. N.C. State, at Orlando. Fla.
10 p.m.
ESPN Insight Bowl, Missouri vs.
Iowa, at Tempe,Ariz.
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
7 p.m.
ESPN2 Minnesota at Wisconsin
9 p.m.
ESPN2 North Carolina vs. Rutgers,
at New York
NFL
8:1 p.m..
NBC Minnesota at Philadelphia
NHL HOCKEY
7:30 p.m.
VERSUS Boston at Tampa Bay
SOCCER
2:55 p.m.
ESPN2 Premier League, Manchester
United at Birmingham City


FOOTBALL

NFL standings

AMERICAN CONFERENCE


y-New England
x-N.Y. Jets
Miami
Buffalo


Indianapolis
Jacksonville
Tennessee
Houston


x-Pittsburgh
x-Baltimore
Cleveland
Cincinnati


y-Kansas City
San Diego
Oakland
Denver


East
W L
13 2
10 5
7 8
4 11
South
W L
9 6
8 7
6 9
5 10
North
W L
II 4
II 4
5 10
4 11
West
W L
10 5
8. 7
7 8
4 11


NATIONAL CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct
y-Philadelphia 10 4 0 .714
N.Y. Giants 9 6 0 .600
Washington 6 9 0 .400
Dallas .5 10 0 .333
South
W L T Pct
x-Atlanta 12 2 0 .857
New Orleans 10 4 0 .714
Tampa Bay 9 6 0 .600
Carolina 2 13 0 .133
North
W L T Pct
*y-Chicago II 4 0 .733
Green Bay 9 6 0 .600
Minnesota 5 9 0 .357
Detroit 5 10 0 .333
West
W L T Pct
St. Louis 7 8 0 .467
Seattle 6 9 0 .400
San Francisco 5 10 0 .333
Arizona 5 10 0 .333
x-clinched playoff spot
y-clinched division

Thursday's Game
Steelers 27, Panthers 3
Saturday's Game
Arizona 27, Dallas 26
Sunday's Games
Kansas City 34,Tennessee 14
St. Louis 25, San Francisco 17
Chicago 38, N.Y.Jets 34
Baltimore 20, Cleveland 10
New England 34, Buffalo 3
Detroit 34, Miami 27
Washington 20,Jacksonville 17, OT
Indianapolis 31, Oakland 26
Denver 24, Houston 23
Cincinnati 34, San Diego 20
Green Bay 45, N.Y. Giants 17
Tampa Bay 38, Seattle 15
Minnesota at Philadelphia, ppd., snow
Monday's Game
New Orleans at Atlanta (n)
Today's Game
Minnesota at Philadelphia, 8 p.m.
Sunday
Oakland at Kansas City, I p.m.
Tampa Bay at New Orleans, I p.m.
Miami at New England, I p.m.
Minnesota at Detroit, I p.m.
Carolina at Atlanta, I p.m.
Pittsburgh at Cleveland, I p.m.
Buffalo at N.Y.Jets, I p.m.
Cincinnati at Baltimore, I p.m.
Arizona at San Francisco, 4:15 p.m.
San Diego at Denver, 4:15 p.m.
Chicago at Green Bay, 4:15 p.m.
Jacksonville at Houston, 4:15 p.m.
N.Y. Giants at Washington, 4:15 p.m.
Dallas at Philadelphia, 4:15 p.m.
Tennessee at Indianapolis, 4:15 p.m.
St. Louis at Seattle, 8:20 p.m.

College bowl games

Dec.18
New Mexico Bowl
At Albuquerque
BYU 52, UTEP 24
Humanitarian Bowl
At Boise, Idaho
Northern Illinois 40, Fresno State 17
New Orleans Bowl
Troy 48, Ohio 21
Dec. 21
Beef 'O' Brady's Bowl
At St. Petersburg, Fla.
Louisville 31, Southern Mississippi 28
Dec.22
MAACO Bowl
At Las Vegas
Boise State 26, Utah 3
Dec. 23
Poinsettia Bowl
At San Diego
San Diego State 35, Navy 14
Friday
Hawaii Bowl
At Honolulu
Tulsa 62, No. 24 Hawaii 35
Sunday
Little Caesars Pizza Bowl
At Detroit


Florida International 34,Toledo 32
Monday
Independence Bowl
At Shreveport, La.
Georgia Tech (6-6) vs. Air Force
(8-4) (n)
Today
Champs Sports Bowl
At Orlando, Fla.
North Carolina State (8-4) vs. West
Virginia (9-3), 6:30 p.m. (ESPN)
Insight Bowl
At Tempe, Ariz.
Missouri (10-2) vs. Iowa (7-5), 10 p.m.
(ESPN)
Wednesday
Military Bowl
At Washington
East Carolina (6-6) vs. Maryland (8-4),
2:30 p.m. (ESPN)
Texas Bowl
At Houston
Baylor (7-5) vs. Illinois (6-6), 6 p.m.
(ESPN)
Alamo Bowl
At San Antonio
Arizona (7-5) vs. Oklahoma State (10-
2), 9:15 p.m. (ESPN)
Thursday
Armed Forces Bowl
At Dallas
SMU (7-6) vs. Army (6-6), Noon
(ESPN) .
Pinstripe Bowl
At Bronx, N.Y.
Syracuse (7-5) vs. Kansas State (7-5),
3:30 p.m. (ESPN)
Music City Bowl
At Nashville,Tenn.
North Carolina (7-5) vs. Tennessee
(6-6), 6:40 p.m. (ESPN)
Holiday Bowl
At San Diego ,
Nebraski (10-3) vs.Washington (6-6),
10 p.m. (ESPN)
Friday
Melneke Bowl
At Charlotte, N.C.
Clemson (6-6) vs. South Florida (7-5),
Noon (ESPN)
Sun Bowl
At El Paso,Texas
Notre Dame (7-5) vs. Miami (7-5), 2
p.m. (CBS)
Puberty Bowl
At Memphis,Tenn.
Georgia (6-6) vs. UCF (10-3), 3:30
p.m. (ESPN)
Chlck-fil-A Bowl
AtAtlanta
.South Carolina (9-4) vs. Florida State
(9-4), 7:30 p.m. (ESPN)
Jan. I
TicketCity Bowl
At Dallas
Northwestern (7-5) vs.Texas Tech (7-
5), Noon (ESPNU)
Capital One Bowl
At Orlando, Fla.
Michigan State (11I-I) vs. Alabama (9-
3), I p.m. (ESPN)
Outback Bowl
At Tampa, Fla.
Florida (7-5) vs. Penn State (7-5), I
p.m. (ABC)
Gator Bowl
At Jacksonville, Fla.
Michigan (7-5) vs. Mississippi State (8-
4), 1:30 p.m. (ESPN2)
Rose Bowl
At Pasadena, Calif.
TCU (12-0) vs. Wisconsin (I I-I), 5
p.m. (ESPN)
Fiesta Bowl
At Glendale,Ariz.
Connecticut (8-4) vs. Oklahoma (I I-
2), 8:30 p.m. (ESPN)
Jan.3
Orange Bowl
At Miami
Stanford (11- I) vs.VirginiaTech (11-2),
8:30 p.m. (ESPN)
Jan. 4
Sugar Bowl
At New Orleans
Ohio State (11-1) vs.Arkansas (10-2),
8:30 p.m. (ESPN)
Jan. 6
GoDaddy.com Bowl
At Mobile,Ala.
Miami (Ohio) (9-4) vs. Middle
Tennessee (6-6), 8 p.m. (ESPN)
Jan. 7
Cotton Bowl
At Arlington,Texas
Texas A&M (9-3) vs. LSU (10-2), 8
p.m. (FOX)
Jan. 8
BBVA Compass Bowl
At Birmingham,Ala.
Pittsburgh (7-5) vs. Kentucky (6-6),
Noon (ESPN)
Jan. 9
Fight Hunger Bowl
At San Francisco
Boston College (7-5) vs. Nevada (12-
I), 9 p.m. (ESPN)
Jan. I0
BCS National Championship
At Glendale,Ariz.
Auburn (13-0) vs. Oregon (12-0), 8:30
p.m. (ESPN)
Jan.22
At Orlando, Fla.
East-West Shrine Classic, 4 p.m.
Jan.29
At Mobile,Ala.
Senior Bowl, 4 p.m. (NFLN)
Feb. 5
At San Antonio
Texas vs. The Nation All-Star
Challenge, 2 p.m.


BASKETBALL

NBA standings

EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
Boston 23 5 .821 -
New York 18 12 .600 6


Philadelphia 12 18 .400 12
Toronto 10 19 ..345 13'%
New Jersey 9 21 .300 15
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
Miami 23 9 .719 -
Orlando 18 12 .600 4
Atlanta 19 13 .594 4
Charlotte 9 19 .321 12
Washington 7 21 .250 14
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Chicago 19 10 .655 -
Indiana 13 15 .464 5%
Milwaukee 12 16 .429 6h.
Detroit 10 20 .333 9'h


Cleveland 8 22 .267 I I%
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
San Antonio 26 4 .867 -
Dallas 23 5 .821 2
New Orleans 18 12 .600 8
Houston 14 15 .483 I1 '
Memphis 13 17 .433 13
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
Utah 21 9 .700 -
Oklahoma City 21 10 .677 '
Denver 16 13 .552 46
Portland 15 15 .500 6
Minnesota 7 24 .226 14'h
Pacific Division
W L Pct GB
L.A. Lakers 21 9 .700 -
Phoenix 13 16 .448 7'h
Golden State II 18 .379 9'
L.A. Clippers 9 22 .290 12'A
Sacramento 5 22 .185 14'%

NBA schedule

Sunday's Games
LA. Clippers 108, Phoenix 103
Minnesota 98, Cleveland 97
Chicago 95, Detroit 92, OT
New Orleans 93,Atlanta 86
San Antonio 94,Washington 80
Memphis 104, Indiana 90
Philadelphia 95, Denver 89
Tuesday's Games
Orlando at Cleveland, 7 p.m.
Boston at Indiana, 7 p.m.
NewYork at Miami, 7:30 p.m.
Milwaukee at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Toronto at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
LA. Lakers at San Antonio, 8:30 p.m.
Portland at Denver, 9 p.m.

AP top 25


Record
1. Duke (65)
2. Ohio St.
3. Kansas
4. Connecticut
5. Syracuse
6. Pittsburgh
7. San Diego St.
8.Villanova
9. Georgetown
10. Missouri
11. Kentucky
12. Purdue
13.Texas
14. Minnesota
15. Notre Dame
6. BYU
17. Kansas St.
18. Texas A&M
19. UCF .
20. Michigan St.
21. Memphis
22. Louisville
23. Illinois
24.Vanderbilt
25.Temple


Pvs
1,625 I
1,550 2
1,480 3
1,406 4
1,397 5
1,273 6
1,157 7
1,135 8
1,10610
1,085 9
96913
85714.
82918
71717
55922
54123
49311 I
43225
42024
40412
31916
263-
18021
127-
122-


Others receiving votes: UNLV 106,
Baylor 95, Wisconsin 84, Cincinnati 80,
Washington 73, West Virginia 52, Florida
35, Arizona 27, Tennessee 27, Butler 23,
Boston College 17,Wichita St. 17, Florida
St. 6, North Carolina 6, Oklahoma St. 6,
Old Dominion 6, Saint Mary's, Calif. 5,
Gonzaga 4, Northwestern 4,Washington
St. 4, Cleveland St. I, Southern Cal 1.



HOCKEY

NHL standings

EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W LOT Pts
Pittsburgh 37 24 II 2 50
Philadelphia 35 22 8 5 49
N.Y.Rangers 36 20 14 2 42
N.Y. Islanders 33 9 18 6 24
New Jersey 35 9 24 2 20
Northeast Division
GP W LOT Pts
Montreal 36 20 14 2 42
Boston 33 18 II 4 40
Ottawa 37 16 17 4 36
Buffalo 35 14 17 4 32
Toronto 34 13 17 4 30
Southeast Division
GP W LOT Pts
Tampa Bay 36 21 10 5 47
Washington 38 21 12 5 47
Atlanta 38 19 13 6 44
Carolina 34 15 15 4 34
Florida 33 16 17 0 32
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP W LOT Pts
Detroit 35 22 9 4 48
Chicago 37 20 14 3 43
St. Louis 35 18 12 5 41
Nashville 35 17 12 6 40
Columbus 35 17 15 3 37
Northwest Division
GP W LOT Pts
Vancouver 34 21 8 5 47
Colorado 35 19 12 4 42
Minnesota 34 16 14. 4 36
Calgary 36 15 18 3 33
Edmonton 34 12 16 6 30
Pacific Division
GP W LOT Pts
Dallas 36 21 II 4 46
Los Angeles 34 21 12 I 43
SanJose 35 19 11 5 43
Anaheim 39 18 17 4 40
Phoenix 34 16 11 7 39


NHL schedule

Sunday's Games
Toronto 4, New Jersey I
N.Y. Islanders 4, Montreal I
Washington 3, Carolina 2
Tampa Bay 3,Atlanta 2, OT
Chicago 4, Columbus I
St. Louis 2, Nashville 0
Detroit 4, Minnesota I
Ottawa 3, Pittsburgh I
Phoenix I. Dallas 0
Vancouver 3, Edmonton 2
Los Angeles 4,Anaheim I
Tuesday's Games
Carolina at Toronto, 7 p.m.
Atlanta at Pittsburgh, 7 p.m.
Montreal at Washington, 7 p.m.
Boston at Tampa Bay, 7:30 p.m.
Chicago at St. Louis, 8 p.m.
Dallas at Nashville, 8 p.m.
Buffalo at Edmonton, 9 p.m.
Anaheim at Phoenix, 9 p.m.
Philadelphia atVancouver, 10 p.m.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Denver Broncos quarterback Tim Tebow celebrates with fans after beating the Houston
Texans Sunday in Denver. His scramble for a touchdown in the closing minutes gave Denver
a 24-23 win.


TEBOW/ Gator picks up first NFL win


Continued From Page 1B


ter. He made plays and he
scrambled and did some
things. He threw the ball
well, got the ball down the
field, and he continues to
keep developing. And that's
what it is: the more he plays,
the better he'll get."
While he hit Gaffney in
stride for 50 yards and a
leaping Lloyd for 41, Tebow
also put some of his receiv-
ers at risk with throws that
left them vulnerable to
big hits from defensive
backs.
"Everything wasn't
perfect, it wasn't perfect.
But he'll get up there and
he'll look at the tape and
he'll get better from those
things and we'll get better
(production) from him and
the more he's in there,"
Studesville said.
Tebow scrambled 6 yards
for the winning score with
3 minutes left, recalling his
college career where he
was as much of a runner as
a passer.
"The guy is a born leader
and we just rallied behind
him," said tailback Correll
Buckhalter, who turned a
screen pass into a 23-yard
touchdown in the fourth
quarter that pulled Denver
to within six points.
Tebow remains a work
in progress and he's expe-
riencing growing pains
just like, any other rookie.


1
5
8
12 H
13 (
14

15 1

17
18 1
19 \

21 1
24 K
i25
25 G


His vast network of fans
wants him to be so good
so fast, yet jumping from
college to the pros takes
time and patience, even for
a Heisman Trophy winner
with two national champi-
onships.
"We all want him to .be
really, really good right
now, because that's for all
our benefit," Studesville





Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words. .

CHARP


@2010 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.

SWEYN




DORPAY/
I{-^-+-+




JITNEC l


said. "But he works as hard
as any person I've ever been
around in this game. And
the limits are, I don't know
what they are right now.
"I know this: He's going
to work as hard as he can
every day on everything
he needs to fix to give
himself and his team a
chance to win football
games."


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek


I is ,'
ST A:I


Yesterday's Jumbles
Answer:


ACROSS 39 Recipe meas.
40 Bays
Whirlpool 43 Flying fox
Pale blond 44 Rozelle or
Ship's floor Sampras
Heredity factor 46 Big ditches
Open meadow 48 Icy downpours
Statuesque 50 Playfulness
model 51 Cat's murmur
Take a quick 52 Nitpicking
ook (2 wds.) 57 Gigi's friend
Secluded 58 Lout
Pull hard 59 Paris hub
Vail amenity (2 60 Kind of pearl
wds.) 61 Rock
Twangy concert sou-
Kind of mold- venir
ng 62 Breezy
Ginza purchase refusal


26 Moths-to-be
30 Monty Hall spe-
2 cialty
32 Bridal notice
word
33 Wine valley
37 Furry red
Muppet
38 Traveler's
refuge


DOWN


(Answers tomorrow)
BERTH ABBOT ARCADE BRUTAL
This can be relaxing after a hard day at the
office A BABBLE BATH


Answer to Previous Puzzle


V R Y BBS ES L[Y
ASFA REAR TAE
LANK INGE RUN
POKES ALTARS
ELK WA
SIPIUDS T E N
A I1M L-EA FIES
0EP RITIED LAO0
D ADS I GLOO
C I T COO


U R L AVIS S OJOT
C P L NEST I R IS
K EY STA PORK


1 umelet
ingredient 7 Bowlers
2 PC key 8 Thorough
3 Double helix 9 Chew the scenery
4 Busybody 10 Portable boat
5 Shake -! 11 Felt certain
6 Most of the earth 16 Discard


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.comI


20 Campground
initials
21 Bump or knot
22 Explorer
Tasman
23 Thailand, once
27 Indigo dye
28 Lacoste of
tennis
29 Air duct
31 Hung around
34 "Fernando"
band
35 Jr.'s exam
36 Many NYC
homes
41 Party fabric
42 Black mark
44 Showy feather
45 Paranormal, to
some
47 Pizza topping
48 Health clubs
49 Kilt wearer
50 Drum's part-
ner
53 Charlotte of
"Bananas"
54 -Magnon
man
55 Peak for Heidi
56 Drain cleaner


2010 by UFS, Inc.


4 t --l I-&
















Do or die time for NFL teams


Associated Press

NEW YORK Three
division titles remain unde-
cided heading into the final
week of the NFL season:
the AFC South, NFC South
and NFC West.
Indianapolis wins the
AFC South by beating visit-
ing Tennessee on Sunday,
or if Jacksonville loses at
Houston.
Atlanta needed a victo-
ry Monday night at home
against New Orleans or
next Sunday, also at home
against Carolina, to take
the NFC South. The win-
ner of Sunday's game in
Seattle between the Rams
and Seahawks wins the
NFC West
While the AFC wild
cards belong to the Jets
and either the Ravens or
Steelers whichever
doesn't take the AFC North
- five teams have shots
at NFC wild cards: Atlanta,
New Orleans, Green Bay,
Tampa Bay and the New
York Giants.
So the AFC is not very


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Washington Redskins corner back Phillip Buchanon (31) tries to bring down Jacksonville Jaguars running back Rashad
Jennings (23) Sunday in Jacksonville. The Redskins won in overtime 20-17.


complicated, with New
England the East winner,
Kansas City champion
of the West, and either


Baltimore or Pittsburgh tak-
ing the North. The Steelers
hold the tiebreaker over the
Ravens and are at Cleveland


on Sunday. Baltimore hosts wild-card round playoff
Cincinnati. game.
The Chiefs and the AFC Thingsaremoreunsettled
South winner will host a in the NFC, where Chicago


(North) and Philadelphia
(East) own division titles.
Seattle (6-9) could become
the first division winner in
NFL history with a losing
record if it beats St. Louis
(7-8) in their finale, which
has been flexed to a Sunday
night game.
Should New Orleans win
at Atlanta and then beat vis-
iting Tampa Bay, it would
take the South and the
Falcons would be a wild
card.
But the defending Super
Bowl champion Saints could
fall right out of the picture
by losing twice. They would
then need either the Packers
or Giants to lose their finale:
Green Bay hosts archrival
Chicago, while New York is
at Washington.
The Packers (9-6) have
the inside track for a wild
card win and they are in.
The Giants and Bucs must
win Sunday to have a shot
at a wild card.
No first-round byes have
been clinched in the NFC,
either. Atlanta gets one with
a win Monday night.


..Ingram set to play



childhoodd team


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Miami Dolphins' Brandon Marshall (19) and coach Tony Sparano watch the final minute of
action against the Detroit Lions Sunday in Miami. The Lions won 34-27.


Sparano on hot seat with

one game left in Miami


By STEVEN WINE
Associated Press

DAVIE Working
against Tony Sparano's job
security are a turnover-
prone quarterback and
plodding offense, disgrun-
tled fans, Bill Cowher and
even LeBron James.
Sparano has a few things
in his favor, too. But the
Miami Dolphins' latest loss
makes it increasingly like-
ly they'll soon fire the only
coach to lead them to the
playoffs since 2001.
The decision will be
made by owner Stephen
Ross, who inherited
Sparano when he com-
pleted his purchase of the
franchise two years ago.
Sparano said Monday he
has talked by phone -with
Ross about the disappoint-
ing 2010 season, and looks
forward to further discus-
sions regarding his future
and the direction of the
team.
"I'm pretty confident that
I can get it turned around,"
Sparano said. "I feel like I
know these pieces pretty
well."
There's no doubt some
pieces need to be replaced.
The Dolphins blew a late
10-point lead Sunday in a
loss to last-place Detroit
that left them 1-7 at home,
matching the worst home
record in franchise his-
tory.
Miami (7-8) was elimi-
nated from the playoff race
more than a week ago and
will sit out the postseason
for the eighth time in nine
years. Sparano led the
Dolphins to that lone play-
off berth in 2008, his first
season as an NFL head
coach, but he's 14-17 since
then.
Sparano said he was in


his office at 2:30 Monday
morning to begin prepa-
rations for the meaning-
less season finale Sunday
at New England. But he
concedes any turnaround
must wait until 2011.
"Obviously we're out of
at-bats right now," Sparano
said.
Ross could cite plenty
of reasons for changing
coaches. Many fans find
Sparano's team not only
mediocre but dull, with a
conservative offense that
tends to settle for field
goals because the play-call-
ing is designed to limit mis-
takes by erratic QB Chad
Henne. The Dolphins are
last in the AFC in scor-
ing and especially inept at
home, which helps explain
the numerous empty seats
at recent games. While the
Dolphins have long been
South Florida's flagship
franchise, they've been
overshadowed this season
by James and the Miami
Heat.
Sparano lost a layer of job
security when Bill Parcells
gave up control of football
operations in September.
Sparano and general man-
ager Jeff Ireland were
Parcells proteges, and he
hired them after taking
over the Dolphins three
years ago.
The potential availability
of. such attractive coach-
ing candidates as Cowher
and Jon Gruden also works
against Sparano, whose
contract runs through the
2011 season.
On the other hand, this
is the same coach who took
over after the Dolphins
went 1-15 in 2007 and led
them to the AFC East title
the following season. This
year Miami is 6-1 on the
road, a level of success that


puts coaches in the Hall
of Fame rather than on
the hot seat And while the
play-calling has drawn flak,
Sparano deserves credit
for this year's improvement
by the defense under new
coordinator Mike Nolan.
Players remain firmly
in Sparano's corner, and
there's no evidence of the
locker room disunity that
plagued his predecessor,
Cam Cameron.
"We're a tight-knit team.
Nothing can tear us apart,"
linebacker Channing
Crowder said. "I talked
to Tony on Sunday night
on the phone, just shot
the bull with him, saying,
We're right here with you,
babe. I'm going, to go out
there for the next 10 years,
however long you're here,'
playing hard for you."'
Beyond the locker
room, Sparano supporters
are harder to find. There
were boos for the play-call-
ing Sunday, and a mock
cheer when Sparano went
for a first down on fourth
and 1 in the first quarter,
departing from his usual
conservative approach.
There were more cheers
when the play gained 2
yards.
As the game slipped
away in the fourth quar-
ter, a vulgar chant deriding
Henne broke out. The fate
of a coach and his quarter-
back are often intertwined,
and as the Dolphins stag-
ger to the season's end,
Sparano and Henne have
become the fans' favorite
scapegoats.
"It doesn't matter if it's
fair," tight end Anthony
Fasano said. "It's the way
the business is."
Dolphins owner Ross is
both a fan and a business-
man.


By JOHN ZENOR
Associated Press

Mark Ingram's Michigan
State ties run deep.
The Alabama tailback
and Flint, Mich., native
easily rattles off a litany
of family connections: His
parents went to' Michigan'
State, where his father and
grandfather played football;
his aunt is also an MSU
grad and his grandmother
received a master's degree.
Ingram could very, eas-
ily have been suiting up in
green and white, not crim-
son and white, when the
Crimson Tide and Spartans
meet Saturday in the Capital
One Bowl in Orlando.
"I still cheerforthemwhen
I see them on Saturdays,
especially in basketball,"
Ingram said. "It'll just be
exciting to go up against a
childhood favorite team."
The game features plen-
ty of ties between the two
programs, besides Ingram.
Saban and tight end coach
Bobby Williams are both
former Michigan State head
coaches and Tide offensive
coordinator Jim McElwain
is an ex-Spartans assistant.
"We get fired up because
coach Saban was there and
coach Bobby Williams was
there and our offensive
coordinator was there," said


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Nov. 18 file photo, Alabama's Mark Ingram (22) runs
for yardage at Bryant-Denny Stadium in Tuscaloosa, Ala.
Ingram is gearing up to face his boyhood team.


Trent Richardson, Ingram's
backfield mate. "So you
have to really realize that it
means a lot to them. At the
same time, we don't want to
go out with a loss."


It could be the final col-
lege game for Ingram. The
junior and 2009 Heisman
Trophy winner is projected
as a likely first-round NFL
draft pick.


Blizzard cancels Gator


basketball game today


Associated Press

GAINESVILLE -
Florida's game against
.Fairfield has been canceled
because of a blizzard that


slammed the Northeast with
more than 2 feet of show.
The Gators (9-3) had been
scheduled to play Fairfield
(8-3) on Tuesday night, but
the Stags could not find a


way to get to Gainesville.
Fairfield, which has won
seven consecutive games, is
located in Fairfield, Conn.
The game will not be
made up.


COACHES: More firings to come?


Continued From Page 1B

and appears destined to
leave Cincinnati; and Gary
Kubiak, whose Texans have
regressed badly just when
Houstonians felt secure
talking about their team
making the playoffs for the
first time.
The way things have dete-
riorated in Nashville, it's
highly possible Jeff Fisher,
the league's longest-tenured
coach with one franchise at
16 years, will walk.
Tony Sparano could be in
jeopardy with the Dolphins,
who went 1-7 in Miami;
coaches who don't win at
home generally don't keep
their homes or jobs.
Eric Mangini looked safe
for a while in Cleveland, but


the Browns are spiraling
again and have a Super Bowl
winner, Mike Holmgren,
as team president.
Holmgren didn't hire
Mangini, either.
Should all of them go,
that would make 10 chang-
es, equaling the bloodlet-
ting in 2006, when Kubiak
and Childress were hired.
Already gone from that
year are Herman Edwards
in Kansas City, Scott
Linehan in St. Louis, Rod
Marinelli in Detroit, Dick
Jauron in Buffalo, Art
Shell in Oakland, Mangini
(then with the Jets), and
Childress. Only Sean
Payton in New Orleans and
Mike McCarthy in Green


Bay have prospered from
the class of '06.
If that many were fired, it
would disprove the conven-
tional wisdom that owners
wouldn't want to make a
change mid-contract with a
potential lockout looming,
which would leave them
paying two coaches with
nothing to coach.
There's always the chance
the ax could fall elsewhere
in January, too.
Perhaps Tom Coughlin
isn't all that safe with the
Giants as his team plum-
mets toward not qualifying
for the playoffs with the
kind of sloppy performanc-
es that, well, get coaches
fired.


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS TUESDAY, DECEMBER 28, 2010


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420










4B


Page EdItor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS TUESDAY, DECEMBER 28, 2010


DILBERT
I CAN LOWER YOUR
CORPORATE TAXES BY
USING A STRATEGY THAT
TAX ATTORNEYS CALL
THE "DUTCH SANDWICHH"
AND I'" NOT EVEN
MAKING THAT
UP. -


BABY BLUES


BLONDIE
GET OUTTA MY FACE! GET OUTTA


STAtJD MEA 4..
THESE 0ADD -
REALIT/ i- -, EA L: -
SHOW5' II THI15 15 REAL-. :
1I LIFE STUFF ,


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE


SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS


DEAR ABBY


It's never too late in life to

find your true love


DEAR ABBY: I am re-
sponding to "Single Still in
Little Rock" (Nov. 6), the
34-year-old woman who is
anxious about whether she'll
ever marry. I married for the
first time at 67. After retiring
from a 45-year career in nurs-
ing, I met a wonderful, car-
ing and interesting man who
had lost his first wife years
earlier. Neither "Sam" nor I
was looking for a spouse at
the time. (Truthfully, I had
given up.) We were intro-
duced by a mutual friend at
church and soon knew we
were meant to be together.
My advice to "Single" is
to continue living a full and
productive life, remain open
to making new friends, look
for a man who had a happy
first marriage and don't give
in to your anxieties. My hus-
band and I know our time
together is limited. We strive
to make the most of every
day, overlooking small and
unimportant differences,
and focusing on making
each other happy. I am an
integral part of Sam's family,
including his sons and their
offspring. It's a wonderful
life, and I'm grateful I was
able to endure some loneli-
ness when I was younger for
all that I have now. ROSE
IN TUCSON
DEAR ROSE: Your let-
ter is inspiring. "Single Still"
requested that I ask readers


Abigail Van Buren
www.deorabby.com
for their success stories in
finding love "later in life,"
and true to form you re-
sponded in huge numbers.
Bless you all! Read on:
DEAR ABBY: For many
years I desperately wanted
to be married. Therefore,
I measured everyone who
asked me out as a possible
husband and either scared
them away or allowed my-
self to be used. Finally, after
living in a number of large
cities, my career moved me
to a tiny rural town. By then
I had lost hope of finding Mr.
Right, so I quit looking.
Best thing I ever did! I
learned to enjoy life for what
it offered each day, not pine
for a mate. I found myself
enjoying friendships with
men because I saw them
as friends, not potential
husbands. Out of the blue,
some pals arranged a blind
date with "the only eligible
bachelor" left, in town. We
were married less than six
months later at ages 34
and 38 and just celebrat-
ed our 21st anniversary.


- LOVING MY LIFE IN
MINNESOTA
DEAR ABBY: I consider
my "failed" relationships op-
portunities to learn some-
thing. The main lesson is
I must love who I am first
and be less concerned about
where a relationship is go-
ing. When you're happy, pur-
suing your own interests and
developing yourself as a per-
son, someone with a similar
perspective will come along.
Instead of bemoaning my
single status, I'm on Internet
dating sites a great plat-
form for meeting people who
share my interests. SON-
DRA IN TENNESSEE
DEAR ABBY: I held off
on marrying until my career
was stable. My wife and I
married when we were 35.
For years we have traveled
without worrying about baby,
sitters or being home by a
certain time. We have formed.
friendships with other child-
less couples and share "fam-
ily" holidays. We dote on
our nieces and nephews. If
"Single" still wants children
and is concerned about the:
health aspects of pregnancy;
at an older age, adoption is
available. MARRIED
MAN IN TEXAS

Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-
April 19): Size up whatever
situation you face and make
your move without hesita-
tion. Don't let emotions
play a part in your decision-
maling. Someone will try
to curtail your freedom or
take something from you
if you don't keep up your
guard. ***
TAURUS (April 20-
May 20): Communication
will play a huge role today.
Speak up; if you don't voice
your opinion you will have
no right to complain later
on. Set aside time for your
lover or attend social events.,

GEMINI (May 21-
June 20): Spending time
with someone who can of-
fer you good advice will
help you realize what you
should be doing or looking
into in the new year. Volun-
teer work will introduce you
to people you want to hang
out with and get to know
better. *****
CANCER (June 21-
July 22): Limit your plans,
spending and your interac-
tion with others. You need
a little quiet time to rejuve-
nate. Don'tgetbogged down
doing things for others. You
have enough responsibili-
ties without taking on extra
chores. **
LEO (July 23-Aug.


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

22): Address some of your
relationships and decide if
you are hanging out with
people who contribute
equally or if you are begin-
ning to feel used. It is time
to shake things up a bit if
you want to start the new
year off on the right foot

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Don't let the past cloud
your vision. Look at what
you have accomplished
and what's left to do. If you
concentrate on who and
what are important to you,
it won't be difficult to begin
next year with a positive
start. *-**
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): You'll be emotional,
sensitive and wondering
what to do next Disappoint-
ment may cloud your vision
and uncertainty your ability
to make an important deci-
sion. Nothing is as bad as it
appears and, with the knowl-
edge you gain, something
good will unfold. ***
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-
Nov. 21): Doing for those
less fortunate will enrich
your life and make you real-
ize how lucky you are. Your
dedication and loyalty will
invite giving, caring people
into your life. Open your


mind to new ideas. ***
SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): A look at
the past and the present
regarding your personal
and professional status
will get you thinking about
what you should and can
do in the new year. Set up
meetings in order to follow
through with your plans.:,
Change may be inevitable
but it doesn't have to be
bad. ****
CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): Think before
you take action. Anger will
not fix whatever problem
you face or person you must
deal with. Love, understand-
ing and compassion will
lead to success. **
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Take responsibil-
ity for your actions and you;
will be able to sort through,
a dilemma with far greater
success. Don't let an old
lover cause you to make the
same mistake twice. Move
forward, not backward.

PISCES (Feb. 19-
March 20): Consider the
feelings of others and you.
will bring joy to everyone
with whom you deal today.
There may be a need for
change; be upfront and hon-
est about what and why you
must make such alterations
in your life. ***


CELEBRITY CIPHER

by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: J equals W
" XGLF K N YX OTG E D I I LVYZI
E FGTK BYGZLI DZ J FLV FG LV I
M XG S K I Y E N Y X D Z I K E N YX D KF E I,
NYXD ZYXK FZ XW EYD SDTRZ."
D Y G T R T D D I L L
PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "Movies don't reflect how interesting and vibrant
women are. We don't treasure women as they get older." Jill Clayburgh
(c) 2010 by NEA, Inc. 12-28


FOR BETTER OR WORSE


IT'S NOT REAL! THEY'RE JUST FAKE,
OUM9 ARGUMENTS TO MAKE ,--:.
THE 'lEWEQ FEEL SMART r'-.
- 'il 12EALL /'HUH'OUR FACE!
S1f, PUTS IT IN)
S' A WHOLE ,
l NEW LIGHT I



J~~~~~~~ CA1)^^'_ ^11


* GLAD WOW, HERE THIS IS -.
WE OT COMES A l TE MOST
TAT REALLY CONVINCING
SQUARED UM .,FAKE FIGHT
AA! ARGUMENT! I'VE EVER
C'-GETf
OUTTA

T AT'S ENOT

228 FACE-
W cE!_ ./


BUT THE OFFICE NEEDS BUT I CAN'T
PAINTING, THE BARRACK FIMN ANY WORK
FLOOR NEEDs SCRUBBING OUT HERE
AND THE WINDOWS NEEP


FRANK & ERNEST


M,


Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415 LAKE CITY REPORTER


CLASSIC PEANUTS


ADVICE & COMICS TUESDAY, DECEMBER 28,2010












LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED TUESDAY, DECEMBER 28, 2010


Lake City Reporter





CLASSIFIED


ADvantage


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Reporter Classifieds!

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One Item per ad
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Limited to service type advertis-
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You can call us at 755-5440,
Monday through Friday from 8:00
a.m. to 5:00-p.m.
Some people prefer to place their
classified ads in person, and some
ad categories will require prepay-
ment. Our office is located at 180
East Duval Street.
You can also fax or email your ad
copy to the Reporter.
FAX: 386-752-9400 Please
direct your copy to the Classified
Department.
EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityre-
porter.com





Ad is to Appear Call by: Fax/Email by:
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Friday Thurs., 10:00a.m. Thurs., 9:00 a.m.
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only the charge for the ad space
In error. Please call 755-5440
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Cancellations- Normal advertising
deadlines apply for cancellation.
Billing Inquiries- Call 755-5440.
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Advertising copy is subject to
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reserves the right to edit, reject,
or classify all advertisements under
appropriate headings. Copy should
be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the first day of pub-
lication. Credit for published errors
will be allowed for the first insertion
for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the
Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nor for any general,
-special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply
with Federal, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition 6f discrimi-
nation in employment, housing and
public accommodations. Standard
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In Print ant Online
www.lakecityreportcr.comi


Legal


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 12-2010-CP-277
Division: Probate
IN RE: ESTATE OF FRANCIS E.
NAKPODIA
Deceased
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of
Francis E. Nakpodia, deceased,
whose date of death was April 15,
2010, is pending in the Circuit Court
for Columbia County, Florida Pro-
bate Division, the mailing address of
which is PO Box 2069, Lake City,
addresses of the personal representa-
tive and the personal representative's
attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and oth-
er persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate on whom a
copy of this notice is required to be
served must Ale their claims with
this court WITHIN THE LATER OF
3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AF-
TER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF
A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM.
All other creditors of the decendant
and other persons having claims or
demands against decedent's estate
must file their claims with this court
WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITH-
IN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CADE
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIODS SET ABOVE, ANY
CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECE-
DENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS
BARRED.
The date of first publication of this
notice is December 28, 2010.
Attorney for Personal Representa-
tive:
By:/s/ Kimberly A. Gossett
Attorney for Carolyn D. Nakpodia
Florida Bar Number: 123536
2902 Isabella Boulevard, Suite 30
Jacksonville Beach, FL 32250
Telephone: (904)372-0185
Fax: (904)212-0877
E-Mail:
kgossett@ beacheselderlaw.com
Personal Representative:
By:/s/ Carolyn D. Nakpodia
392 NW Scenic Lake Drive
Lake City, Florida 32055
04542807
December 28, 2010
January 4, 2011
Notice Of Abandoment
Apple Valley Storage
Located at 128 SW Birley Ave Lake
City,FL 32024
The Following unit will be auctioned
off on 1/11/11 at 10AM
Unit B7 10x15 Tommy Biggs
Owner of personal property has right
to redeem up to last minute and AVS
reserves right to bid
Contact Apple Valley Storage @
386-752-4633
04542815
December 28, 2010
January 4, 2011
PUBLIC AUCTION
2004 Dodge pick up
vin# 3D3MU48C74G185541,
in Columbia County
on January 15, 2011 at 2:00 pm
at Flash Wrecker Service
10042 South US 441
Lake City, Florida
386-755-0993
04542817
December 28, 2010

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR COLUMBIA COUN-
TY, FLORIDA
JUVENILE DIVISION
IN THE INTEREST OF:
CASE NO.: 2009-89-DP
S. J. Y. M.
DOB: 10/29/2009
MINOR CHILD.
SUMMONS AND NOTICE OF AD-
VISORY HEARING FOR TERMI-
NATION OF PARENTAL RIGHTS
AND GUARDIANSHIP
STATE OF FLORIDA:
TO: Syeisha Teresa Kilby
Address Unknown
WHEREAS, a Petition for Termina-
tion of Parental Rights under oath
has been filed in this court regarding
the above-referenced childrenn, a
copy of which is on file with the
clerk of court,
YOU ARE HEREBY COMMAND-
ED TO APPEAR before the Honora-
ble E. Vernon
Douglas, Circuit Judge, at the Co-
lumbia County Courthouse, Lake
City, Florida, on JANUARY 19,
2011, at 10:20 A.M., for a Termina-
tion of Parental Rights Advisory
Hearing.







Home Improvements

Carpentry, remodeling, paint,
repairs, additions, Lic. & Ins.
Since 1978 FREE estimates
386-497-3219 or 954-649-1037

Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.


Pool Maintenance


Legal

YOU MUST APPEAR ON THE
DATE AND AT THE TIME SPECI-
FIED.
*****FAILURE TO PERSONAL-
LY APPEAR AT THIS ADVISORY
HEARING CONSTITUTES CON-
SENT TO THE TERMINATION OF
PARENTAL RIGHTS TO THIS
CHILD (OR CHILDREN). IF YOU
FAIL TO APPEAR ON THE DATE
AND TIME SPECIFIED YOU
MAY LOSE ALL LEGAL RIGHTS
TO THE CHILD (OR CHILDREN)
NAMED IN THE PETITION ON
FILE WITH THE CLERK OF THE
COURT********
WITNESS my hand and seal of this
Court at Lake City, Columbia Coun-,
ty, Florida, on
this 10th day of December 2010.
P. DEWITT CASON
Clerk of Circuit Court
(SEAL)
By: Clerk
Tracy L. Sorcek, Esq.
Florida Bar No.46860
Lake City, FL 32055
(386) 758-1437
Special Accommodations. In ac-
cordance with the Americans With
Disabilities Act, if you are a person
with a disability who needs any ac-
commodation in order to participate
in this proceeding, you are entitled,
at no cost to you, to the provision of
certain assistance. Please contact
Carrina Cooper, Court Administra-
tion, 173 NE Hemando Avenue,
Room .408, Lake City, Florida
32055, Telephone (386) 758-2163, at
least seven (7) days before your
scheduled court appearance or imme-
diately upon receiving this notifica-
tion if the time before the scheduled
appearance is less than seven (7)
days. If you are hearing impaired or
voice impaired, call 711.
04542675
December 14, 21, 28, 2010
January 4, 2010
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
Case No.: 09-380-CA
Division: Civil
ALEX HOWARD SEVENS, JR.
Plaintiff,
vs.
ROBERT K. BROWN and CAROL
C. BROWN
Defendants/Third-Party Plaintiffs
vs.
CHAD HOWARD STEVENS,
CHRIS BROWN COLEMAN, and
CSCC MARINE INC., a Florida
Corp. Third-Party Defendants
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE
SALE
The undersigned Clerk of the Circuit
Court for Columbia County, gives
notice that he will sell the following
property to the highest bidder for
cash, or as provided in the Amended
Final Judgment of Foreclosure as to
Chris Brown Coleman Only dated
December 7, 2010, pursuant to
Chapter 45 Florida Statutes:
The description of the property to be
sold is:
TOWNSHIP 4 SOUTH, RANGE 17
EAST
Section 5: S 1/2Z of NW 1/4 of SW
1/4 lying West of State Road 47 and
North of Tracy Place Street, except
0.30 acres in Northeast comer as
"Parcel A" and except: Begin at the
West right-of-way of State Road 47
and North right-of-way of MArk
Place Street and run approximately
390 feet along West-right-way of
State Road 47; West 212.46 feet;
North 351.59 feet to the South right-
of-way of Mark Place; and East 360
feet to point of beginning "Parcel B".
Parcel No. 07679-000
Section 6: S 1/2 of SE 1/4 except the
North 1281.13 feet and also except
all lying West of McFarlane Avenue
"Parcel A" and a parcel of land ap-
proximately 2.34 acres being in the
Southeast comer of SE 1/4 lying East
of McFarlane and West of State
Road 47 and South of First Advent
Christian Church "Parcel B" and ex-
cept a parcel of land approximately
100 feet by 260 feet lying adjacent to
McFarlane and South of Tracy Place
Road and North of Mark Place Road
in the SE 1/4 of "Parcel C".
Parcel No. 08045-000
Section 6: The East 220 feet of S 1/2
of NE 1/4 of SW 1/4 and East 220
feet of SE 1/4 of SW 1/4 except the
North 1281.13 feet.
Parcel No. 08044-000
Section 7: Begin at the Northwest
comer of NE 1/4 of NE 1/4 and run
South 503 feet; East 959 feet to State
Road 47; Northeast along State Road
47, 525 feet to the section line; West
to the point of beginning. Except
0.52 acres and except 0.50 acres for
road and also except 0.32 acres and
except 0.32 acres and except 0.64
acres.
Parcel No. 08099-000
Section 7: North 615.97 feet of NW
1/4 of NE 1/4 and except a lot 280
feet North and South by 155.50 feet
East and West.
Parcel No. 08153-000
Section 7: begin at Northeast corner
of NW 1/4 of NE 1/4 and run West
276.80 feet; South 30 feet to South
right-of-way line of Brown Land and
point of beginning; run South 280
feet; West 155.50 feet; North 280
feet; East 155.50 feet to the point of
beginning.
Parcel No. 08158-001
The time and place of the foreclosure
sale is the front door of the Columbia
County Courthouse, 173 NE Heman-
do Avenue, Lake City, Florida, on
the 12th day of January, 2011, at
11:00 a.m., or as soon as possible.
The foreclosure sale by the Clerk of
the Court will be pursuant to the
Amended Final Judgment of Fore-
closure as to Chris Brown Coleman
only in the above captioned action.
The name of the Clerk making the
sale appears below.
WITNESS my hand and seal this 17
day of December, 2010.
P. DEWITT CASON
CLERK OF THE COURT


BY:/S/ B. SCIPPIO
DEPUTY CLERK
04542763
December 28, 2010
January 4, 2011


010 Announcements









020 Lost & Found

Lost 18mo old Yorkie. Recent
surgery and on medication. Has
microchip. Lost in McAlpin area.
Please call 386-362-2140

100 Job
100 Opportunities

04542702
Customer Service
Ideal Candidates with previous
experience with customer
service. Must have excellent
telephone skills. Individual
must be enthusiastic, outgoing,
have excellent computer skills
and be able to perform in a fast
pace environment.
Please fax resume to
386-758-0984 or email to
greatjobs@LCjobs.info

4 Temporary Farm Workers
needed. Tobacco, Straw/Hay,
Greenhouse/Nursery, Row Crops,
Produce & Alternative Work.
Employment dates of 02/15/11 -
12/15/11. Wage of $9.71/hr.
Worker guaranteed 3/4 of contract
hours. Tools provided at no cost.
Free housing provided to non
commuting workers.
Transportation & subsistence
reimbursed when 50% of contract
is met. Apply for this job at the
nearest One Stop Center in your
area and reference Job Order
#KY0416190.
Kermit & Ray Lewis Coffey
Partnership Monticello, KY
Cashiers needed, Experience Pre-
ferred,Drug frre workplace, allap-
plicants will be drug tested
Ellisville Exxon,
Hwy 441,- No Phone Calls Please.
Delivery driver, must be 21 yrs
old, have 6 pts or less on license
and have NO misdemeanors or fel-
onies. Must possess a Class A
CDL,apply within/no phone calls!
North Florida Sales
467 SW Ring Ct, Lake City
Experienced IT Tech/
Network Admin
Qualifications: 2+ years
experience with: win XP pro, win
7 pro, server 2003, 2008. Must
have worked within and be
familiar with active directory.
Must be capable of lifting/moving
workstations. Microsoft
certifications a plus. Clean drivers
license required. Please submit
resume to hr@chclabs.com or
fax to 386-758-1791
Family Support Specialist
(Jennings, Live Oak EHS)
Associate degree with coursework
in social work, psychology, sociol-
ogy or related subjects (preferred)
OR High School.
Diploma/GED with documented
training in family support
services, customer service princi-
ples, home visiting or community
resources, and two years experi-
ence in providing family support
services. Must be willing to work
flexible hours -
minimum of two (2) evenings a
week, Be familiar with the overall
make-up of the communities
served, Must have, experience in
records and/or case management,
Bilingual where appropriate, Must
have dependable transportation,
valid Florida driver's license and a
safe driving
record, Must pass physical and
DCF background requirements,
sick & annual leave,holiday pay,
health insurance, retirement +
add'l benefits. To apply- e-mail:
arobinson(@sv4cs.org, call (386)
754-2222 or Fax 386-754-2220,
apply in person @ 236 SW
Columbia Ave, Lake City Fl or
843 SW Marymac St, Live Oak Fl
(386) 362-4944 EOE
Mechanic needed for Truck shop,
must have own tools, apply
Southern Specialized, 1812 NW
Main Blvd., 386-752-9754
The Third Judicial Circuit
currently has the following
position available:Digital
Court Reporter
For more information go to:
www.jud3.flcourts.org

120 Medical
Employment

05524650
LEARN TO DRAW BLOOD
Local Phlebotomy Course
offered in Lake City; FLA
Certificate program.
(904)566-1328

Wanted Receptionist,
experienced. Send resume to
826 SW Main Blvd. Suite 102.
Lake City, FL. 32025

240 Schools &
Education

04542575
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-12/13/10


* Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-01/17/11

* Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com


310 Pets & Supplies

BEAGLE RABBIT DOG.
$175. Runs Good, Male
.386-249-3104 or
386-719-4802

FREE to good home,
bob-tail tabby, female kitten,
approx 6-7 months old
386-466-8248
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.

Livestock &
330 Supplies

Pigs for sale
7 weeks old
$50 each HURRY!
386-965-2215

Pony
Mini Mare, Paint
5 yrs old $400
tack included 386-965-2231


361 Farm Equipment

84 Ford 4610 Tractor. Runs good.
Solid 2WD. New front tires,
350hr on 2005 motor. Dependable.
$7500. obo. 386-867-0005


401 Antiques
ANTIQUES WANTED
Furn., China, Silver, Glassware,
Costume Jewelry & Gold. 35 years
exp. Cash Pd. Pete. 386-963-2621


402 Appliances

Kenmore Washer & Dryer Set
front load, side by side or stacka-
ble, HE model, good cond, $300
386-755-2548 or 867-0546


408 Furniture

Twin Race Car Bed with mattress.
Twin Story Book Cottage Bed
with mattress. $350.00. for both
386-965-9882


420 Wanted to Buy

K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.

Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$225 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.


430 Garage Sales







PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.



440 Miscellaneous

Tow Behind Grill/Smoker. Com-
mercial built, nice shape. $1250.
obo. 386-249-3104 or 719-4802
Great for your New Years Bash!!!


520 Boats for Sale

Bass Tender Boat
10'2",
$500 Call for details
386-965-2215

630 Mobile Homes
630 for Rent

2/2 S/W beautiful, clean freshly
painted, near college, 1 acre,
big front porch $650 mo, avail 1/1
386-697-1013 or 386-697-1900
2/2, S/W, 1 acre secluded lot
Bascom Norris Bypass, $500 dep,
$500 mo, possible owner finance
386-623-2203 or 386-623-5410
2BR/2BA MH CH/A,
Fenced in back yard and Shed.
$750. mo plus deposit.
Pets OK! 386-755-4157
3/2 DW, secluded, Columbia City
area, covered back deck, No Inside
pets, $750 mo, plus sec dep
,386-752-1941/ 386-965-0932
3br/2ba newly renovated MH on
1/2 ac. private property. Close to
college $700.mo. 1st. mo.+ Sec.
dep. Ref's. No Pets. Non smoking
environment 386-755-3288


630 Mobile Homes
630 for Rent

Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White Contact 386-623-2465
or 386-292-0114
Nice clean 2&3 bdrm, Five Points,
NO PETS, also 3 bd on the
Westside, 1 mo rent & dep
386-961-1482


Quiet Setting w/lots of oaks
2br/lba from-$450 & 3br/2ba from
$550. Includes water & sewer.
No Pets! 386-961-0017
Very clean & well maintained 2/2
units in nice park. $599.m6
w/$500. dep. Rent incl water,
sewer, trash p/u. Close to town
386-984-8448 or 623-7547
Very Clean 2 BR/1 BA, in the
country, Branford area, $450 mo.,
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleypro590-0642

64O Mobile Homes
640 for Sale

$200. MONTHLY. Remodeled
SW. 2bd/2ba. Appliances,
delivered & blocked. Owner
finance available w/$3000 down.
Call Gary Hamilton 386-758-9824
05524590
Palm Harbor Homes
has closed 2 model centers
Save up to 60K on select models
Call 800-622-2832

05524637
Gainesville-Jacobsen-Savings
Factory direct Jaconsen outlet
now open to the public 3/2 start-
ing at 39,900 complete.
Northpointemobilehomesales.co
m for complete website specials
or 352-872-5566
For the best deal in Florida!

05524638
North Pointe Homes is your
new #1 Jacobsen dealer. Take a
short drive to Gainesville and
save thousands. Five year halo
warranty, 2x6 wall, and
much more. Free energy star
package on all others.
Call Chuck at 352-872-5567

05524639 '
S-Why drive to Gainesvillo?' .-
This is Why! New 28x60 -
Jacobsen 3/2 inc FREE Furni
ture! Low as $497 month.
Drive to our dealership and Buy,
I pay for your gas!
Call Mark at 352-872-5568


650 Mobile Home
& Land

BANK REPO: Mobile Home On
15.65 ACRES IN FT. WHITE -
Including 60X40 pole barn. Listed
at $130,000.00. Call Billy Shows
After hours 386-208-8547

71.0 Unfurnished Apt.
10 U For Rent
5524443
$Holiday Cash $
NO App Fee, NO SD,
$250 off December,
*for Qualified Applicants
Windsong Apartments
(386) 758-8455

05524728
SPRING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans;
some with garages.
Call 386-454-1469
or visit our website:
www.springhillvillage.net

2/1 w/garage,
east side of town,
1st, last & sec
386-755-6867
2BR/1BA with carport,
Privacy Garden and
Utility Room Near VA.
No Pets. 386-438-8052
2BR/2BA DUPLEX
on McFarlane Ave. W/D hookup
Rent $625. per month.
Call 386-867-1212 for details.
Brick Duplex 2/1 off Baya. CH/A,
Carport, Carpet, tile, $575 mo,+
Dep. Call 386-752-0118 or
386-623-1698 or 386-292-4937
Duplex w/garage spacious, 2/1,
1300 sq ft, W/D hook up, CH/A,
$650 plus dep & bckgmd chk,
386-697-3248 or 352-514-2332
Great location W of 1-75, spacious
deluxe 2BR apts., garage, W/D
hook up. patio. $600 & up, + SD,
386 965-0276
The Lakes Apts. Studios & lBr's
from $135/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $425 + sec.
Michelle 386-752-9626


Happy


Holidays

from our S
family to yours.


28EDVLSRE
A y *LK IYF 25
EDR F URNI TU R E (86)75-170SOR


Pool Leaks/Pool Repairs
Florida Leisure Pool & Spa
352-373-0612
CPC 1457279


BUY IT.


SEL 1Tai~i


hF I lND i


Classified Department: 755-5440


PLAY TO WIM!
THE LAKE CITY
REPORTER'S SUNDAY
WORD SEARCH PUZZLE
CONTINUES IN DECEMBER










Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED TUESDAY, DECEMBER 28, 2010


710 Unfurnished Apt. 730 Unfurnished
i For Rent J Home For Rent


X-CLEAN SECOND STORY 2/2,
country acre 8 mi to VA, off Lk
Jeff Rd. $500 mo + dep. No dogs.
Deck. w/d hookups 386.961.9181

720 Furnished Apts.
2 0 For Rent
NO Lease/Deposits, ROOMS only
Utilities. Cable, WI-FI, maid,
micro-fridge, phone, Pool.
Americas Best Value Inn
(386)755-4664
Wk 1 prs. $169,2 ppl $179 + tax
Park Model Trailers (Studio), all
utils. use of pool, $500 per month,
NeverDunn's RV Park.
386-961-8540 or 755-4945
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. I person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808
730 Unfurnished
Home For Rent
2BR/1BA CH/A. Large carport,
great location, near corner of Baya
& McFarland references req'd.
Property zoned for commercial use
386-752-9144 or 755-2235
3 & 4 bedroom homes. Newly
renovated. Very nice, in town.
$750 $950 per month plus
deposit. 386-755-2423
3 Bedrm/2 Bth plus 360 sq ft Stu-
'dio on Lake Jeffery/Old Mill Rd,
very private, $1200 per mo. plus
deposit, 386-752-9303, No Pets
3/2 W/D hook up, appliances
included, $200 sec dep,
$650 month. Madison Street
386-365-2515
3/2,Brick Home, big back yard,
$900 month + Security Deposit
off of Branford Hwy & CR 242,
386-965-0276
3br/2ba Brick. Double Carport
Carpet & tile. CH/A.On small lake
2000 sqft. $950. mo + sec. 386-
752-0118, 623-1698 or 292-4937


Cozy Cottage lbr/lba S. Hwy. 41
$550/mo. + security. Includes all
utilities & satellite TV. Pets OK.
(386)758-2408
FOP, RENT: Large 3br/2ba brick
home, fenced on 5 acres on
Columbia/Suwannee County line.
$975. per month + utilities.
Perfect place for children.
Broker/Owner- Annette Land @
386-935-0824
Newer 3/2 w/2 car garage.
1800 sq ft $900 mo. plus deposit
I-10/US 41 area
(248)875-8807
750 Business &
5 Office Rentals
OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$695. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor

805 Lots for Sale
5 Acres in Lake City, FL,
low lown, easy qualifying, and
low monthly payments,
please call 512-663-0065
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the

REPORTER Classifieds
In Print and On Line
www.lakecityreporter.com


805 Lots for Sale
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

810 Home for Sale
3BR/2BA 2 story brick. 4.6 ac. in
ground pool. Lg. workshop &
2 wells. $200,000.00 obo
Old Wire Rd. (850)728-0782
FSBO, Completely Remodeled,
3bdr/lbth, fenced, new deck, shop,
new cabinets/appliances,Schools
blks away, $65K 478-391-1592
820 Farms &
Acreage
4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$69,900. $613mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
4 Ac.,Ft. White. Well, Septic &
Power. Owner Financing!
NO DOWN! $69,900.
Only $613./mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
WE FINANCE! Half to ten acre
lots. Some with w/s/pp
Deas Bullard BKL Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com

940 Trucks
1990 Ford F350 Dually
work truck, white, automatic
$1500 obo
386-965-2215
97 Chevy Z71 Extended cab. 3
door. Black w/gold trim. Local 2
owner. All service records. $4750.
obo 386-249-3104 / 386-719-4802


Contact us

at the paper.


CLASSIFIED ADS
386-755-5440


SUBSCRIPTION
386-755-5445


ALL OTHER DEPARTMENTS
386-752-1293

ELECTRONIC ADS SEND TO
ads@lakecityreporter.com

Mon.-r.: 8 a.m.- 5:00 p.m.

THIS REPORTER WORKS FOR YOU!


180 East DuvalS .
Lake City, Forida 32055


ADVERTISE IT HERE!
Bring the picture in or we will take it for you!
Advertise your car, truck, motorcycle, recreation vehicle or
boat here for 10 consecutive days. If your vehicle does not sell
within those 10 days, for an additional $15 you can place your
.ad for an additional 10 days. A picture will run everyday with
a description of your vehicle. The price of the vehicle must be
listed in the ad. Your ad must be prepaid with cash, check or
credit card. Just include a snapshot or bring your vehicle by
and we will take the picture for you. Private party only!
Price includes a 6 day/ 4 line classified ad of ihe
same vehicle in print and online.


20yAsr lll hrl-- d- IU5 ll
2001 Chevy Astro XR1200R Mirage
Van Orange and black. One
New trans., new AC, good owner, garage kept. Like
tires, runs great, clean, new, only 52 actual miles.
great work van.
$2,200 OBO $8,000
C&II Call
386-984-0571 386-752-5988j

For oreOetil.Cal May o


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Lae it Rpo ae


Adoption

ADOPTION. A childless happily married
couple seeks to adopt. Loving home. Large
extended family. Financial security. Expenses
paid. Laurel & James. (888)488-4344. Laure-
lAndJamesAdopt.com FL Bar #0150789

Are you pregnant? A childless, successful, sin-
gle woman seeks to adopt. Will be HANDS-ON
mom w/flexible work schedule. Financially se-
cure. Ellen. (888)868-8778. ellen@eeadoption.
com


Announcements


NEED MORE RESPONSE? Advertise in
Over 100 Florida Papers reaching MILLIONS
of people. Advertising Networks of Florida, Put
us to work for You! (866)742-1373 www.flori-
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Business Opportunities


ALL CASH VENDING ROUTE Be your own
boss 25-machines/ candy all for-$9,995. All ma-
jor credit cards accepted. (877)915-8222 Vend
3. AINB02653


Condos For Sale


Condo Foreclosure! Own for pennies on the
dollar! Spectacular brand new 3 bed 2-1/2 bath
condo (2,262 sf) on Amelia Island, FL. Prime lo-
cation, upscale amenities -only $249,900. Own
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club membership! Must see -call now (877)888-
6381, x 42


Financial Services


$$$ ACCESS LAWSUIT CASH NOW!!! $$$
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Need $500-$500,000++within 48/hrs? Low
rates APPLY NOW BY PHONE! Call Today!
Toll-Free: (800)568-8321 www.lawcapital.com


Help Wanted


ASAP! New Pay Increase! 34-40 cpm. Excel-
lent Benefits Need CDL-A & 3 mos recent OTR.
(877)258-8782 www.meltontruck.com

Drivers FOOD TANKER DRIVERS NEED-
ED OTR positions available NOW! CDL-A w/
Tanker REQ'D. Outstanding pay & Benefits!


Call a recruiter TODAY! (877)882-6537 www.
oakleytransport.com

Between High School and College? Over
18? Drop that entry level position. Earn what
you're worth!!!. Travel w/Successful Young
Business Group. Paid Training. Transportation,
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Drivers Earn Up to 39/mi HOME SEVER-
AL NIGHTS & WEEKENDS 1 yr OTR Flat-
bed exp. Call: (800)572-5489 Susan ext. 227
SUNBELT TRANSPORT, LLC

Regional Opportunity 100% Owner Opera-
tor Reefer Company $1,000.00 SIGN ON BO-
NUS! Home weekly. Call (800)237-8288 or
visit www.suncocarriers.com


Miscellaneous


AIRLINES ARE HIRING Train for high
paying Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA ap-
proved program. Financial aid if qualified -
Housing available. CALL Aviation Institute of
Maintenance (866)314-3769.

LICORICE LOVERS browse largest selec-
tion gourmet licorice in USA. www.Licoric-
elnternational.com. 1-800-LICORICE. Guar-
anteed fresh. Fast Delivery. Free sample with
order. Enter code A1216 for $5 thru 1-13-11.


Schools & Education


Heat & Air JOBS Ready to work? 3 week
accelerated program. Hands on environment.
Nationwide certifications and Local Job Place-
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Online HVAC Tech Training. Most cost effec-
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ing by Nationally recognized Instructors. Call:
(888)907-6250




ANF
Al)VELllSIN Ni WOPS f o I, OMIDA

C(lsjuhed I Dipley Metro Daily



Week of December 27, 2010




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