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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01485
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 12/26/2010
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01485
System ID: UF00028308:01485
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text







Fighting for Popularity
Boxing in silver screen

000016 120511 ****3-DIGIT 326
LIB OF FLORIDA HISTORY
PO BOX 117007 -
205 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-1943


atCe


Journey

Continues
Jernigan draws attention
to CHS football.
Sports, I B



Drter


Sunday, December 26, 2010


136, No. 291 U $1.00


At Soup Kitchen, it's like Thanksgiving Day

Suwanne Valley "Five years ago we learned there people out there, just like -
Rescue Mission are people out there, just like on on Thanksgiving Day, who
-L'.. F%.....mL... are hungry. We're in the


serves 300 meals.
By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter. corn
Five years ago, a woman
drove from Lulu with her
child hoping to find a free
Christmas Day meal.
The woman and her child
were the first people to
receive a Christmas meal
at Lad's Soup Kitchen.
The Lad's Soup Kitchen
Christmas dinner tradition


I nanKsgiving Di.ay, wnou are ungr y.
Mitchell Steele
Suwannee Valley Rescue Mission director
The Lad's Soup Kitchen


continued Saturday with
volunteers serving more
than 300 meals to local resi-
dents.
Mitchell Steele,
Suwannee Valley Rescue
Mission director, said that
by 1:30 p.m. he and his


staff had taken 217 plates
to the local motels and he
expected to feed at least
100 people at the facility.
"We're going to average
serving around 320 peo-
ple," he said. "Five years
ago we learned there are


giving business. We feed
and a lot. of people forget
about people on Christmas
just like they forget about
people on Thanksgiving."
On Saturday, about a
dozen people sat in Lad's
Soup Kitchen, a service
of the Suwannee Valley
Rescue Mission, and qui-
etly ate t4eir meals while
sharing holiday well-wish-
es with other people who
KITCHEN continued on 3A


TONY BRITTILake City Reporter
Mitchell Steele, Suwannee Valley Rescue Mission director,
is served a Christmas meal at Lad's Soup Kitchen by Kathy
Poirier, Angelica Peeples, Laura Buchanan and Teresa Newton.


TARGET IS SAFETY


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Lake City police officer Juan Cruz stands guard outside of the City Council Chambers at City Hall. ,

Panama City board siege could happen

here, but probability remote, officials say


Sheriff and LCPD
chief share views
about incident
By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.comrn
n the wake of a ter-
rifying shooting dur-
ing a school board
meeting in Panama
City, local officials
and law-
enforce-
government
agenciesZ
have
taken
notice:c
How Hunter
should
government authorities
handle the fragile balance
between public access and
security?


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia County Sheriffs Deputy Tracy Stephens checks
Shawn Miller by using a hand-held metal detector at the
Columbia County Courthouse on Wednesday.


Locally, the Dec. 14
shooting incident has
spurred at least one pub-
lic government group
to request security at its
meetings.


Columbia County
Sheriff Mark Hunter said
the his office has received
a request from the Lake
Shore Hospital Authority
Board to provide security


at its meetings.
The sheriff's office
also provides secu-
rity at Columbia County
Conunmmission meetings.
"In the county commis-
sion meetings, it's in their
bylaws that they have
security," Hunter said.
"Security at the county
commission meetings had
already been provided. We
provide a sworn officer
that is off-
duty at the
meetings.
The sworn
deputy
sheriff is
always
Gilmore armed."
Gilmore Hunter
said the sheriff's office
has a policy where an off-
SAFETY continued on 3A


Ready to welcome

2011 with rhythm

or rocking music?


County residents
can choose from
two local venues.
By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@.akecityreporter.com
Columbia County has
two celebrations to choose
from to kick-off the New
Year.
The "Rockin The House"
celebration begins 7 p.m.
Friday at the LifeStyle
Enrichment Center. The
Third Annual Rotary Club
of Lake City New Year's
Celebration is 8 p.m. Friday
at the County Club at Lake
City.
"Rockin The House" is
something different for
Lake City, said Debbie
Griffin, event organizer.
It will feature heavy hors
d'oeuvres, dancing and per-
formances from three pro-


fessional comedians Lisa
Best, Chase Holliday and
Jamie Morgan.
The event is an opportu-
nity to promote and raise
money for the LifeStyle
Enrichment Center, she
said.
"It's not a senior event,"
she said. "Ifs for anybody
who wants to come and
have a good time."
Event sponsors include:
C/C and Associates Inc.,
CMS Professional Staffing
Inc., The Blue Roof Grill,
Brightway Insurance, Pro
Motion Physical Therapy,
Mederi CAREtenders, Lake
City Florist and Design,
The Move Connection and
The Advertiser.
The Rotary New Year's
Celebration was created
to provide people a place
to go locally and have a
NEW YEAR continued on 3A


Christmas 2010:

The year US retail

came back to life


By ANNE D'INNOCENZIO
AP Retail Writer
NEW YORK Shoppers
came back in force for the
holidays, right to the end.
After two dreary years,
Christmas 2010 will go down
as the holiday Americans
rediscovered how much
they like to shop.
People spent more than
expected on family and
friends and splurged on
themselves, too, an ingredi-
ent missing for two years.
Clothing such as fur vests and
beaded sweaters replaced
practical items like pots and
pans. Even the family dog
is getting a little something
extra.
"You saw joy back in the
holiday season," said Sherif
Mityas, partner in the retail
practice at AT. Kearney.
A strong Christmas Eve
augmented a great season
for retailers. The National
Retail Federation predicts
spending this holiday season
will reach $451.5 billion, up
3.3 percent over last year.
That would be the biggest
increase since 2006, and the


largest total since a record
$452.8 billion in 2007. The
holiday season runs from
Nov. 1 through Dec. 31, so a
strong week after Christmas
could still make this the big-
gest of all time. Spending
numbers through Dec. 24
won't be available until next
week and final numbers,
through Dec. 31, arrive next
month.
The economy hasn't
improved significantly from
last year. Unemployment is
9.8 percent, credit remains
tight and the housing mar-
ket is moribund. But recent
economic reports suggest
employers are laying off
fewer workers and busi-
nesses are spending more.
Consumer confidence is ris-
ing.
"I was unemployed last
year, so I'm feeling better,"
said Hope Jackson, who
was at Maryland's Mall in
Columbia on Friday morn-
ing. Jackson bought laptops
and PlayStation 2 games for
her three daughters earlier
in the season but was at the
mall on Christmas Eve to
grab marked-down shirts.


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBETO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
8 Fax: 752-9400


47-
Mostly Sunny
WEATHER, 2A


c~"p


Opinion ................
Business ................
Obituaries ...............
A dvice .................
Puzzles .................


TODAY
IN LIFE
Local Rotarian scores
perfect attendance.


COMING
TUESDAY
Are you ready for
New Year events?.


L










LAKE CITY REPORTER SUNDAY REPORT SUNDAY, DECEMBER 26, 2010


C -, (ASH 3. VA 0c-ta

Friday: Friday: Friday: Friday: Wednesday: Wednesday:
4-22-30-37 22 16-21-26-29-36 Afternoon: 9-6-5 Afternoon: 5-1-2-1 6-12-16-37-46-52 11-33-44-46-47-12
Evening: 1-3-1 Evening: 0-7-0-4


AROUND FLORIDA


Go-cart frame becomes dog sled in St. Augustine


ST. AUGUSTINE A lack
of snow doesn't stop a Florida
couple from hitching their 10
Siberian huskies to a dog sled.
Debi Vaughan of St. Augustine
said there's no easy way to walk
all the big, rowdy dogs at the
same time. So, she and her hus-
band converted a go-cart frame
into a sled to "mush" the dogs
around the block.
A sign at the edge of their
driveway reads "Dog sled cross-
ing." Around the holidays,
the sled gets decorated with
Christmas lights.
Vaughn said pulling a sled
comes naturally to the breed.
All 10 dogs come from animal
shelters around the country.
The lead sled dog is named
Wolfgang.

2 thefts rob Orlando
food bank of $10K
ORLANDO It's a bleak
Christmas at an Orlando food
bank where thieves have made
off with more than $10,000 in
two robberies.
Authorities said Thursday
night, thieves pried a safe from
the wall at the Community Food
and Outreach Center and stole
$7,000. Power to the building
was reportedly cut, so the alarm
system was disabled.

Gold nugget donated
in SA kettle in Miami
CORAL GABLES A gold
nugget worth $2,800 has been
found in a Miami-area Salvation
Army kettle.
Officials said the 2.2 ounce
nugget was donated anonymous-
ly at a Coral Gables supermarket
on Wednesday.
A volunteer found the nugget
in a plastic bag containing a note


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Debi Vaughan is pulled into her driveway behind her team of rescued Huskies in St. Augustine on Friday.


that read: "This gold nugget is a
family keepsake. Please use its
value to help those in need with
The Salvation Army." The note
was signed simply, "a friend."
Six gold coins have been
found in Lee County kettles this
season. The coins include a $20
Liberty Eagle and five South
African Krugerrands. Most of
the coins were wrapped in notes
containing Bible verses.

firl fatally estrO i-


they were crossing an Orlando
intersection.
According to Florida Highway
Patrol, the girls were running
across the intersection Thursday
evening when they were struck
by a car. Troopers said 11-year-
old Reina Rios was struck by a
second car while she was lying
in the road.
Reina was pronounced dead at
the scene. Her 17-year-old sister
Jacquelyn Melchor remained
hospitalized in critical condition.


%Alll I Nallly *ll R
twice in intersection Oil still washing up,
ORLANDO- An 11-year-old on Panhandle beaches
v Panhandle beaches


girl is dead and her 17-year-old
sister is hospitalized after the
pair were struck by a car while


PANAMA CITY Bits of oil
vare still washing up on some


Florida Panhandle beaches,
months after BP's leaking under-
sea well was plugged.
Bay County's chief of emer-
gency services, Mark Bowen,
said crews are still finding a
quarter of a pound to half a
pound of oil product along the
beaches every day.
Bowen said BP's subcontrac-
tor is doing daily sweeps to pick
up the debris.
The government said some
200 million gallons of oil were
released into the Gulf of Mexico
after a rig exploded April 20,
killing 11 workers. The runaway
well was capped in July and per-
manently plugged in September.
Bowen said the county has
asked BP to continue its efforts


I '


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS


Boxing in silver screen seeks silver lining


NEW YORK

filled theaters across the
country last weekend
to see Mark Wahlberg's
stirring portrayal of
Micky Ward in "The Fighter."
The film about the hard-scrabble
Boston-area boxer raked in more
than $12 million its first full week-
end, has been nominated for six
Golden Globes and figures to be
an Oscar darling when nomina-
tions are announced next month.
Wahlberg and co-star Christian Bale
even graced the cover of Sports
Illustrated, which trumpeted the
film as an instant classic.
The sport itself only wishes it
could get the same kind of publicity.
While boxing remains one of
the great storytelling backdrops,
with its inherent drama and truth-
ful cliches about long odds and
overcoming adversity, the sport
continues to suffer. Empty seats
greeted fighters stepping into the
ring in 2010, and the one fight that
many hoped would generate some
verve Manny Pacquiao against
Floyd Mayweather Jr. still hasn't
happened.
It creates this seemingly incon-
gruous juxtaposition: Boxing has
never been more popular on the
big screen, and perhaps never less
popular in real life.
"You've got a couple things hap-
pening, you've got mixed martial
arts and you've got no great heavy-
weight champion. You're going to
need great boxers to bring people
back to the sport," said Wahlberg,
who first met Ward about two
decades ago and has spent plenty of
time with him at Arthur Ramalho's
unpretentious West End Gym in
Lowell, Mass.
"My thing is, every boxer that
I've ever met has a story worth tell-
ing on the big screen or a book or
television," Wahlberg said. "It takes
a very special individual to choose
boxing as a career, and usually the
sport chooses them anyway, not
having any alternatives."
Perhaps that is why boxing has


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this April 13, 1996, file photo, junior welterweight Mickey Ward (right) of Lowell,
Mass., lands a punch to the face of Lewis Veader, of Providence, R.I., during a
World Boxing Union Championship bout in Boston. Thousands of movie-goers
filled theaters across the country last weekend to see Mark Wahlberg's stirring
portrayal of Ward in 'The Fighter.'


been a formula for cinematic suc-
cess.
Martin Scorsese's epic "Raging
Bull," which landed Robert DeNiro
the Academy Award for best actor
in 1981, is still considered a mas-
terpiece. "Cinderella Man" got
three Oscar nominations in 2006,
two years after "Million Dollar
Baby" nabbed golden statuettes for
best picture, best director (Clint
Eastwood), best actress (Hilary
Swank) and supporting actor
(Morgan Freeman).
Then there's the film that started
it all, the original "Rocky," which
took home two Oscars in 1976 and
is still spawning sequels. Sylvester
Stallone's portrayal of the fictional
fighter from Philadelphia even got
him elected to the International
Boxing Hall of Fame this year.
On the small screen, former
heavyweight champion Mike Tyson
stars in a reality show about his pas-
sion for pigeon racing on Animal
Planet next year. And cable channel
FX has filmed the first season of
the drama "Lights Out," debuting


in January, about a former heavy-
weight champion who struggles to
find an identity and support his fam-
ily outside the ring.
"I don't know that boxing is com-
ing back, but drama about boxing
is coming back," said the show's
executive producer, Warren Leight

Bristol Palin buys home
in Arizona for $172K
MARICOPA, Ariz. Bristol Palin
has bought a five-bedroom home in
Pinal County south of Phoenix.
Paperwork shows the recent
"Dancing With the Stars" diva
and daughter of Sarah Palin is the
sole purchaser of the house in the
town of Maricopa. She bought it
for $172,000 from a North Dakota
couple.
It's not clear if Bristol Palin will
be a seasonal visitor or permanent
resident at the home, in a develop-
ment called Cobblestone Farms.

* Associated Press


* Actor Donald Moffat is 80.
* Record producer Phil
Spector is 71.
* "America's Most Wanted"
host John Walsh is 65.
* Baseball Hall of Fame
catcher Carlton Fisk is 63.
* Retired MLB All-Star Chris
Chambliss is 62.


HOW TO REACH US
Main number........(386) 752-1293
Fax number .............752-9400
Circulation ..............755-5445
Online... www.lakecltyreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Ra.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson .....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
If you have a news tip, call any member
of the news staff or 752-5295.

ADVERTISING
Director Kathryn Peterson. .754-0417
(kpeterson@lakecityreporter.com)
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440.


* Baseball Hall of Famer
Ozzie Smith is 56.
* Rock musician Lars Ulrich
(Metallica) is 47.
* Actress Nadia Dajani is 45.
* Rock musician J is 43.
* Country singer Audrey
Wiggins is 43.
* Actor Zach Mills is 15.


BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7:30
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation ...............755-5445
(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks .................. $26.32
24 Weeks................... $48.79
52 Weeks ................... $83.46
Rates indude 7% sales tax.
Mall rates
12 Weeks .................. $41.40
24 Weeks................ $82.80
52 Weeks ..................$179.40


CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion,
please call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifica-
tions will run in this space. And thanks for reading.


Celebrity Birthdays


Daily Scripture


"For to us a child is born,
to us a son is given, and the
government will be on his
shoulders.And he will be called
Wonderful Counselor, Mighty
God, Everlasting Father, Prince
of Peace." Isaiah 9:6



Lake City Reporter


to recover any oil that may
remain floating in the Gulf or on
its bottom.

Police: Man had
loaded gun in bag
MIAMI A man headed
to Cuba has been arrested at
Miami International Airport after
security screeners said they
found a loaded gun in his carry-
on bag.
Miami-Dade Police arrested
48-year-old Juan Manuel
Baldoquin of West Palm Beach
on charges of carrying a con-
cealed weapon and grand theft of
a firearm. He was being held on
$10,000 bond.
Police said Baldoquin was
going through security Friday
morning when screeners spotted
the gun while X-raying his bag.
Baldoquin reportedly told offi-
cers that he had forgotten that
the gun was in the bag.
Police said a records check
showed the gun had been
reported stolen in 1996. Police
say Baldoquin was headed to
Cuba with his family on a char-
ter flight.

Red light cameras will
be turned on Jan. 1
MIAMI The city of Miami
will celebrate the new year by
turning on its red light cameras.
Assistant transportation coor-
dinator Jose Gonzalez said that
starting Jan. 1, drivers caught
on camera running red lights
will be issued $158 citations.
Warnings will not be issued.
A city contractor and a police
officer will review video clips
and photographs from,the cam-
eras to confirm each violation.

* Associated Press


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424














SAFETY: Sheriff confirms receipt of request for security from LSHA Board
Continued From Page 1A


duty deputy can provide
security at meetings.
"That's what we con-
sider as an off-duty assign-
ment," he said. "If an
organization has a board
meeting and they request
security, they are certainly
welcome to contract with
the sheriff's office for a
sworn, off-duty officer to
provide security at their
meetings."
Lake City Police
Department Chief Argatha
Gilmore said the Lake City
Police Department provides
security at City Council
meetings and she assigns
department captains and/or
lieutenants to attend the
local public meetings.
"We already have securi-
ty at our City Council meet-
ings," she said. "That's been
in place for a while and
we'll continue to do that



KITCHEN
From Page 1A
cared to share a conversa-
tion with them.
Volunteers serving and
preparing the food wished
many of the patrons a merry
Christmas as people visited
the facility.
Steele said some people
are lodging at motels with
no kitchens or microwave
ovens and they don't have
access to a good meal.
The meals consisted of
turkey, ham, rice, sweet
potatoes, green beans and
collard greens.
Steele referred to the
need to give people good
meals as his reason for con-
tinuing to take part in the
holiday feeding event.
"That woman and her
child had just enough gas
to make it to Lake City, hop-
ing they could find some
place to eat," he said. "That
year was our year serving
food on Christmas. When. ,
they came in and we saw
the need, we decided that
day to do Christmas meals
every year."



NEW YEAR
From Page 1A
good time, said Chase
Moses, club treasurer. It
also serves as a fundraiser
for the organization which
supports various causes in
the community.
"It's an opportunity to
get out in the community
and enjoy time with people
that are from Lake City," he
said. "At the same time it's
supporting a local organiza-
tion involved in local and
international fundraisers."
The event will feature
live .music provided by the
Starlight Rhythm Section,
heavy appetizers, a cash bar
and a free champagne toast
at midnight provided by the
club.
Past celebrations have
received great reviews
from everyone in atten-
dance, Moses said. Starlight
Rhythm Section will appeal
to everyone in attendance.
'"This group plays music
,for everyone," he said.
S"They don't focus on one
particular era of music."
Tickets are $50 per per-
son for "Rockin The House."
' The majority of ticket sales
Swill go to the LifeStyle
, Enrichment Center.
SCall the LEC at 386-755-
0235 ext. 124, Hearing
Solutions Inc. at 386-758-
3222 or any of thesponsors
' for tickets.
' There's going to be great
food, lots of laughs and a DJ
with dancing," Griffin said.
"Come out and have a great
time."
The Rotary New Year's
Celebration is $100 per cou-
ple. Tickets are available at


The County Club of Lake
City, Candler Appraisal
Services, Parks Johnson
Agency, Olympic Health
Chiropractic and the Lake
City Reporter
Attire is black tie option-
al.


"Come out and spend a
great time," Moses said.


Certainly if any of the other
city public meetings thinks
there could possibly be
an issue or whatever, they
will make us aware of that
before hand. We really don't
have an issue with security
because we have someone
there."
Gilmore said the depart-
ment has not received


any requests to provide
security at additional pub-
lic meetings as a result of
the Panama City incident
However, she said the inci-
dent has caused everyone
to heighten their level of
safety awareness.
'We have a venue where
people can come and talk
with their public officials


and we will take whatever
precautions we need to
ensure that we have safety
within our public meetings,"
she said.
Hunter said he doesn't
foresee any additional gov-
ernmental groups request-
ing security for their meet-
ings.
"I feel like that was an


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Coupons Excluded Orig. 49.00-89.00, Sale 19.60-35.60
*Excludes Rampage rain. Coupons Excluded


199"
Clearance handbags from Nine West,
Etienne Aigner, The SAK, Anne Klein
and more. Orig. 45.00-179.00
Coupons Excluded


















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Men's outerwear by Saddlebred, Izod,
Chaps, Columbia, Pepry Ellis, Boston
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Also in Big & Tall sizes at slightly higher prices
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isolated incident out there,"
he said of the Panama City
incident "'These things are
tragic when they happen
anywhere."
No school board member
was hurt in the Panama
City shooting, but the gun-
man traded gunfire with
a security guard and later
shot and killed himself,.


police said.
"Can it happen in our
community? Yes it can, but
the probability of it hap-
pening is very little," Huter
said. "I don't foresee that,
unless there is an event in
our community that would
cause people to be upset
and at that point we would
definitely assist anybody."


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LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, DECEMBER 26, 2010


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424













OPINION


Sunday, December 26, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


0
OP


THEIR
INION


Obama

reaches out

to former

adversaries

A year ago, President
Barack Obama railed
against "fat-cat bank-
ers" and described
Wall Street bonus-
es as "obscene."
The tone was decidedly dif-
ferent Wednesday when the
president held a private meet-
ing with 20 corporate chieftains
to hear their ideas about jump-
starting the economy.
"Those of you around the
table represent why American is
unique, what is best about our
entrepreneurial spirit, and I want
to dispel any notion that we want
to inhibit your success," the pres-
ident told the assembled CEOs,
who included Eric Schmidt
of Google, Indra K Nooyi of
PepsiCo, and Jeffrey Immelt of
General Electric Co.
So why is the president sud-
denly fawning over Corporate
America? The economic recov-
ery is wobbling, and Corporate
America has the means to help.
U.S. corporations are sitting
on nearly $2 trillion in cash,
representing 7.4 percent of total
assets, according to the Federal
Reserve. That's the highest
level since 1959, The Wall Street
Journal reported. Companies
are sitting on their wallets rather
than investing in new plants,
equipment or hiring. They're
waiting for the economic recov-
ery to pick up, and with it, con-
sumer spending.
Obama is trying to persuade
them to start spending now, to
reduce the nation's 9.8 percent
unemployment rate arid thus
stoke consumer spending.
There was no word on specific
advice from the CEOs or con-
crete proposals from the White
House, prompting incoming
House Speaker John Boehner
to call the meeting a "nothing-
burger."
While substance is important,
so are the optics. The CEO sum-
mit shows Obama recalibrating
his course in light of Republican
victories in November. He's
reaching out to former adversar-
ies, seeking their advice rather
than delivering a lecture. And
who knows, maybe a good idea
or two will emerge from the cor-
porate mind-meld.
* Syracuse (N.Y.) Post-Standard

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman


LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
SBY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:


news@lakecityreporter.com


"Green car of the year!"




What can we expect in 2011?


Nancy Pelosi shep-
herded everything
that President
Obama asked
Congress for
through the House. Her poll
ratings are way less than his
seven out of 10 Americans
say they don't like her. In 2011,
she will no longer be speaker of
the House but will remain the
. leader of House Democrats.
The highly unpopular
Harry Reid will still be Senate
majority leader but will have
a much tougher time getting
Democratic bills passed.
The Congress that ended an
amazing lame-duck session by
passing a flurry of legislation
once thought to be dead will be
replaced. The new Congress
includes tea partiers whose
exact agenda remains murky
but who are coming to town
determined to change the status
quo.
So, what can we expect from
Washington in 2011?
There will be an incredible
uproar over money. Obama will
send his proposed budget for
fiscal year 2012 to Congress in
early February even though
Congress never even passed a
2011 budget.
Republicans, who pushed
for and won an extension of
tax breaks for the wealthiest
Americans, will demand cuts in
dozens of social programs. Even
if they win, however, the savings
will be a drop in the bucket; the
national debt is headed toward
$15 trillion. What we have done
is take the private debt that
nearly crippled the financial
system and add it to the public
debt.
As for legislation, it will be
a hold-the-line year. No more


Ann -McFeatters
amcfeatters@nationolpress.com
major new programs such as
health care or financial reform
will pass. There will be no solu-
tion to the problem of Social
Security and Medicare drain-
ing us dry. Unemployment
will remain abnormally high.
The housing market will stag-
ger along but will not fully
recover. The war in Iraq may be
winding down, but the war in
Afghanistan is not.
After his colossal 11th hour
wins (the new arms control
treaty, the free-health-care law
for 9/11 responders, the repeal
of "Don't Ask Don't Tell," a
new food safety law, expansion
of middle-class tax cuts and
unemployment compensation),
Obama will again be human,
attacked by those on the left
and the right as he tries to steer
the ship of state somewhere in
the middle.
A leader must be visionary, so
Obama will again try to pursue
simplifying the tax code, giv-
ing undocumented workers a
chance at citizenship, improving
education and infrastructure.
But he will have a tough time
getting anything through a bit-
terly divided, strenuously par-
tisan Congress, and the usual
cries that he is a weak leader
will return.
The reason Obama got his
string of last-minute legislative
victories is that he caved on
giving the richest a $700 billion


tax cut. Yes, politics is the art
of compromise, but in this case
it came at the expense of good
public policy. What will he com-
promise on next? "We celebrate
wealth," he said at his Victory
R Us press conference before
flying off to a gated estate in
Hawaii. We're left to ponder
what that means.
Sometime in the next few
months, Republican candidates
for president in 2012 will start
making I-am-running announce-
ments. That's another huge
diversion for our one-trick politi-
cal pony away from grappling
with the very real economic
binds in which we Pave entan-
gled ourselves.
Congress just spent another
trillion dollars of money we
don't have, which apparently is
very easy to do. Once again we
kicked the can down the road,
pretending the economy will
magically grow, tax coffers will
be replenished and there will
be enough money to pay baby
boomers' Social Security ben-
efits and medical bills.'
Obama boasted that the
gridlock widely predicted after
the November election, which
slapped so many Democrats
upside the head, did not come
to pass. But the hundred new
legislators who defeated many
of his supporters have not yet
been sworn into office. January
could be a rude awakening.
Republicans painted Pelosi
and Reid as evildoers. But their
Democratic confreres owe them
a hearty Congratulations. Now
show us what you can do in
2011.
* Scripps Howard columnist
Ann McFeatters has covered
the White House and national
politics since 1986.


he commander of the
college tasked with
training America's
future military lead-
ers recently learned
a lesson from his son, a young
Army officer.
The topic was the discrimina-
tory U.S. policy of "don't ask,
don't tell," which allowed gay
men and lesbians to serve their
country only if they kept their
sexual identity a secret.
Lt. Gen. Robert Caslen
Jr., the commander of Fort
Leavenworth and the Command
and General Staff College,
recalls his son saying, "Dad,
you might not think we already
know which soldiers are gay,
but we do. We all know, and it's
no big deal."
Polls measuring public opin-
ion and military opinion con-
firmed that. Politically, however,


it was a very big deal, unwisely
used as a conservative-liberal
litmus test. Now that Congress
has properly repealed the
flawed policy, which began as a
temporary compromise under
President Bill Clinton, the mili-
tary will take several months to
figure out how best to put the
new rules into practice.
But as a recent and com-
prehensive Pentagon study
indicates, and the story from a
general's son confirms, the big-
gest hurdle in this effort was
repealing an outdated and failed
policy.
"Don't ask, don't tell" gave us
maddening stories, such as that
of Amy Brian. She was kicked
out of the Kansas National
Guard despite an excellent
record both in Iraq and state-
side. An exemplary member
of the guard, she was removed


from the military because a
civilian co-worker saw her kiss
another woman at a Walmart.
Exactly how does this nation
benefit from barring qualified
patriots from service?
Repealing "don't ask, don't
tell" was the only proper deci-
sion this Congress could make.
Military leaders must now come
up with a plan for enacting it (as
they have pledged to do).
More than any nation on
Earth, the United States is built
on diversity, the proverbial
melting pot. To deny any will-
ing citizen the chance to openly
and honestly serve their coun-
try goes against the American
national identity. This action,
furthering the interest of human
rights, is a good and timely holi-
day gift.
* The Kansas City Star


Jay Ambrose
Speaktojay@aol.corn


Christmas

spirit shown

through the

red kettle

The stories were
about red kettles,
the Salvation Army
donation containers
you see in front of
stores with a volunteer ring-
ing a bell or maybe a bunch of
happy little girls singing carols.
In Louisville, Ky., it's reported,
someone dropped a South
African Krugerrand worth
$1,400 in one red kettle. In Fort
Oglethorpe, Ga., the anonymous
kettle gift came in the form of
cashier checks. The amount was
$5,500. It was cashier checks
again in Joplin, Mo. There were
five, wrapped in $1 bills and
signed by Santa Claus. They
added up to $100,000.
A literary character named
Fred, nephew of Ebenezer
Scrooge in Charles Dickens' "A
Christmas Carol," tells his uncle
what underlies such acts, saying
that Christmas is "a kind, forgiv-
ing, charitable, pleasant time; the
only time I know of, in the long
calendar of the year, when men
and women seem by one consent
to open their-shut-up hearts
freely and to think of people
below them as if they really were
fellow-passengers to the grave,
'and not another race of creatures
bound on other journeys."
Scrooge, we all know, is a bah,
humbug kind of guy and isn't
buying any, but then come the
visiting ghosts, including that
of Jacob Marley, his regretful,
dejected, deceased former part-
ner. Trying to buck him up, one
online discussion of the story
reminds us, Scrooge says to the
old fellow that he was after all
good at business. The death-
refashioned Marley responds
with Dickensian eloquence.
"Mankind was my busi-
ness," he cries.. "The common
welfare was my business; char-
ity, mercy, forbearance, and
benevolence, were, all, my busi-
ness. The dealings, of my trade
were but a drop of water in the
comprehensive ocean of my
business!"
We all feel that way, don't we,
.that goodness to others is our
business?
James Q. Wilson, a superb
social scientist of our own era,
explores aspects of the idea in
'The Moral Sense," arguing
that sympathy is a key element
in our moral apprehensions,
serving as a powerful motivator
in some instances, though weak
or even absent in others.
For most of us, it definitely is
there. It is evident as one exam-
ple in charitable giving that is
higher per capital in American
than anyplace else in the
.world, that has been picking up
this year after a recessionary
decline and that is especially
pronounced during this special
holy day season.
Even many outside the
Christian faith seem to find
themselves moved by the story
of amazing grace and a humble
birth that would bring vast new,
loving possibilities into our
lives. And with visions of doing
unto others dancing in their
heads, great numbers slow
down in traffic so someone in
front of them can change lanes,
or drop a few dollars or even
many thousands in a red kettle
somewhere, scuttling through
anonymity any accusation of
merely seeking praise.
Bah, humbug? No. Joy to the
world.
* Jay Ambrose, formerly
Washington director of editorial
policy for Scripps Howard news-
papers and the editor of dailies in
El Paso, Texas, and Denver, is a
columnist living in Colorado.


4A


44 t7


OTHER OPINION


Repeal was timely holiday gift









LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, DECEMBER 26, 2010


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


* To submit your Community
Calendar item, contact Antonia
Robinson at 754-0425 or by
e-mail at arobinson@
lakecityreporter.com.


Wednesday
Live Performance
Fred Perry performs
live from 11 11:45 a.m.
Wednesday in the Dining
Hall of the LifeStyle
Enrichment Center. A
game of bingo will follow
at 1 p.m. The center is
located at 628 SE Allison
Court. For more informa-
tion call 386-755-0235.

Friday
New Year's Bash
The LifeStyle
Enrichment Center pres-
ents "Rocking The House"
beginning at 7 p.m. Friday.
Heavy hors d'oeuvres will
be served all night, and
professional comedians
Jamie Morgan, Chase
Holliday and Lisa Best
will entertain from 8 10
p.m. Tickets are $50 per
person, and the event is at
628 SE Allison Court For
ticket information, con-
tact Janet at 386-755-0235
extension 124. *

NYE Celebration
The Third Annual
Rotary Club of Lake City
New Year's Celebration
is 8 p.m. Friday at the
County Club at Lake
City. Tickets are $100 per
couple and available at
The County Club of Lake
City, Candler Appraisal
Services, Parks Johnson
Agency, Olympic Health
Chiropractic and the Lake
City Reporter. Attire is
black tie optional.

Joint worship service
Shiloh Missionary
Baptist Church and
Philadelphia Missionary
Baptist Church are wor-
shipping, fellowshipping
and praising the New
Year in 10 p.m. Friday at
Shiloh Missionary Baptist
Church. The church is
located at 948 Aberdeen
Ave.

Miracle Tabernacle
Church service
"Friday Night Live"
New Years Eve Service is
9 p.m. Friday at Miracle
Tabernacle Church. The
church is located at 1190
SW Sister's Welcome
Road. Call 386-758-8452
For transportation call,
Mitch at 386-292-5850 or
Audre' 386-344-9915.

Watch Night Service
The DaySpring
Missionary Baptist Church
meets at 9:30 p.m. Friday
for a watch night service.


PATRICK SCOTT/Special to the Lake City Reporter

Two injured in two-vehicle crash in Lake City
FHP Trooper John Tillie gathers information after two people suffered injuries in a two-vehicle crash Friday in Lake City.
Investigators said the Infiniti G35 shown.in the picture was struck from behind by a Pontiac. The Infiniti was traveling north on
US Highway 41 and its driver was attempting to make a left turn onto NW Baughn Street when the crash occurred.


There will be singing, pray-
ing, testimonies and the
word of God delivered by
Pastor Aaron T. Lewis Sr.
The church is located at 849
NE Congress Avenue. Call
Elvira at 386-365-2911.

New Year's Service
St. Paul Missionary
Baptist Church meets at
8 p.m. Friday for a watch
night service. Make plans to
come and visit the church
located at 222 Oosterhoudt
Lane. For more information
call 386-758-8486.

Watch Night Service
The Long Branch
Congregational Methodist
Church hosts a watch
night service starting at
8 p.m. Friday on County
Road 135. The Rushing
Winds from Jacksonville
will be the guest singers,
and there will also be local
singing. Refreshments will
be served and everyone is
invited. For more informa-
tion call 386-397-2673.


City Mall is open at 7 a.m.
Monday Saturday and 10
a.m. Sunday for those who
want to walk for exercise.

EVERY MONDAY
Civil Air Patrol
Suwannee Valley
Composite Squadron -
Civil Air Patrol meets 6:30
to 9 p.m. Monday. For
more information, please
call Maj. Grant Meadows,
365-1341.

EVERY THIRD
MONDAY
MS support group
An MS support group
meets every third Monday
of the month, at the Lake
City Columbia County
Historical Museum, 157
SE-Hernando Ave. Call
Karen Cross at (386) 755-
2950 or Jane Joubert at
(386) 755-5099 for more
information.


EVERY FIRST,
Midnight Watch service THIRD MONDAY


Ist Haitian Baptist
Church is having midnight
watch service 9 p.m. to 12
a.m. Friday. The church
is located at 189 NW Cali
Drive. The community is
invited to attend the annu-
al event. Refreshments will
be served after service.

EVERY DAY
Mall Walkers
Rain or shine, the Lake


nerme@gmail.com or call
(386) 288-9153 and leave a
message.

EVERY FOURTH
MONDAY


Social Duplicate Bridge
Club meeting
The Social Duplicate
Bridge Club meets from
1 to 5 p.m. every fourth
Monday at the LifeStyle


Enrichment Center, 628 SE
Allison Ct Call 755-0235.

EVERY TUESDAY
AND THURSDAY
Geri Actors
The Geri Actors at the
LifeStyle Enrichment
Center are looking for
members. Meetings are
12:45-2 p.m. Tuesday and
Thursday. Anyone retired
and interested in becoming
an actor or actress is invit-
ed. Call Frank at 752-8861.

EVERY TUESDAY
Domestic violence
support group
A support group for
survivors of domestic vio-
lence meets at 5:30 p.m.
Tuesday. Child care is pro-
vided. Call 386-719-2700.

UF Master Gardeners
are available
The University of Florida
Master Gardeners are
at the Columbia County
Extension Office from 9
a.m. to noon Tuesday. They
answer gardening questions
and conduct soil pH tests
free of charge. Call 386-752-
5384.


,




Accepting New Patients

Specializing in adult medical care including:
Primary Gare Arthritis
High Blood Pressure Backache Evaluation
Heart Disease and Treatment
Lung Disease Full Dizziness,
Gastrointestinal vertigo and balance
High Cholesterol diagnosis and
Diabetes treatment
Women's Health Optifast" Weight
Headache Evaluation Loss System
and Treatment

Medicare, Blue Cross and most insurance
plans accepted, worker compensation


Weight loss support
group meets
The Thinner Me Weight
Loss Surgery Support
Group holds meetings at 7
p.m. on the first and third
Monday of every month in
the classrooms at Lake City
Medical Center. Meetings
are for people that have
had weight loss surgery,
contemplating surgery or
just trying to lose weight on
their own. E-mail thethin-


Alven Conway
Ret. Msgt., Alven M. Conway,
79, of Lake City, passed away
peacefully late Thursday evening
December 23, 2010 in the Shands
at the University of Florida Hos-
pital following a sudden illness.
A native of Tampa, Florida, Mr.
Conway had been a resident of
Lake City for ,
the past twenty- .. .
three years hav- .. .
ing moved here -f '
from Tampa. Mr.
Conway was the son of the late
James Archie & Mary Marie
Livingston Conway. Following
high school Mr. Conway served
in the United States Air Force
for twenty-two years including
time spent in the Korean Con-
flict, Japan and the Vietnam
Conflict. He then worked for
Mutual of Omaha in Tampa,
Florida for several years. Af-
ter relocating with his wife to
Lake City, Mr. Conway worked
with the Community National
Bank and then for Anderson-
Columbia prior to retiring. In
his spare time he enjoyed golf-
ing, walking, playing computer
games and was an avid walker.
Mr. Conway was a member of
the Lantern Park Baptist Church.
Mr. Conway is survived by his
wife of forty-eight years, Jack-
lyn Conway; his two-daughters,


OBITUARIES

Peggy Shoemaker and her hus-
band James C. Shoemaker of
Bonneau, South Carolina; and
Betty Conway of Rockton, Il-
linois; a brother, Sam Conway
and his wife, Sandi of Albany,
Texas. A grand-daughter, Ash-
ley Shoemaker also survives.
Funeral services for Mr. Con-
way will be conducted at 3:00
P.M. on Monday, December 27,
2010 in the chapel of the Dees-
Parrish Family Funeral Home
with Rev. Neal Howard officiat-
ing. Interment will follow in the
Corinth Cemetery. The family


will receive friends in the cha-
pel of the funeral home for one
hour prior to the funeral service.
Arrangements are under the di-
rection of the DEES-PARRISH
FAMILY FUNERAL HOME,
458 South Marion Ave., Lake
City, FL 32025 386-752-
1234 Please sign the on-
line family guestbook at par-
rishfamilyfuneralhome.com

Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


WILSON'S

OUTFITTER


f BROWNING

Large selection of Tervis Tumblers# & Case Knivesr


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424









Page Editor: Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


6A LAKE CITY REPORTER NATION & WORLD SUNDAY, DECEMBER 26, 2010


BRIEFS


Pope to Chinese:
Have courage

VATICAN CITY Pope
Benedict XVI urged loyal
Catholics in China to have
courage in the face of com-
munist limits on religious
freedom and conscience,
a Christmas Day message
highlighting the tensions
between Beijing and the
Vatican.
In Bethlehem, the larg-
est number of pilgrims in
a decade gathered to cel-
ebrate Christmas, with tens
of thousands flocking to
the Church of the Nativity
for prayers. Bombings in
Nigeria and the Philippines
left 11 dead and 11 injured,
however, and fear in Iraq
also marred the Christmas
festivities.
Benedict used his tradi-
tional holiday speech, deliv-
ered from the central bal-
cony of St. Peter's Basilica
to tourists and pilgrims in
the rain-soaked square, to
encourage people living in
the world's troublespots to
take hope from the "comfort-
ing message" of Christmas.
Those areas range from
strife-torn Afghanistan to
the volatile Korean penin-
*sula to the Holy Land where
Jesus was born and even
.to China.

Female bomber
kills 43 in Pakistan

KHAR, Pakistan A
female suicide bomber
detonated her explosives-
laden vest killing at least
43 people at an aid distribu-
tion center in northwestern
Pakistan on Saturday, while
army helicopter gunships
and artillery killed a simi-
lar number of Islamic mili-
tants in neighboring tribal
regions near the Afghan
border, officials said.
The bombing appeared
to be the first suicide
attack staged by a woman
in Pakistan, and it under-
scored the resilience of mili-
tant groups in the country's
tribal belt despite ongoing
military operations against
them.
The bomber struck in
the main city in Bajur, a
region near the Afghan
border where the military
has twice declared victory
over Taliban and al-Qaida
insurgents. It also came a
day after some 150 mili-
tants killed 11 soldiers in a
coordinated assault in the
adjoining tribal region of
Mohmand where the army
also has carried out opera-
tions.
Top government official
in Mohmand, Amjad Ali
Khan, said helicopter gun-
ships backed by artillery
pounded militants hideouts
on Saturday, killing 40 mili-
tants.

First lady fields
calls at NORAD

PETERSON AIR FORCE
BASE, Colo. Some
kids who call NORAD
on Christmas Eve to find
out where Santa is hang
up as soon as a volunteer
answers the phone prob-
ably because they expected
a recording and not a real
person, veteran Santa track-
ers say.
There were some espe-
cially awed kids Friday,
when one of the people
answering the phone was
first lady Michelle Obama.
A telephone link from
Hawaii, where the Obamas
are on vacation, allowed her
to pitch in with volunteers
at Peterson Air Force Base,
Colo., who were answering
phone calls and e-mails for the
North American Aerospace
Defense Command's Santa-
tracking program.


"I was ecstatic because
I was talking to the pres-
ident's wife," said Evan
Race, 10, of Springfield, Ill.
He and his family were in
North Carolina for the holi-
days when they decided to
call NORAD. "I was really
,irprised," said his 8-year-
6old sister, Anna.

* Associated Press


Flights canceled as storm heads northeast


By LUCAS L. JOHNSON II
Associated Press

NASHVILLE, Tenn. With a
rare white Christmas in parts of
the Southeast and snow predicted
for the nation's Capital, airlines
canceled hundreds of flights and
urged travelers to rethink their
plans, while travel authorities
warned of potentially dangerous
roads.
' After blanketing sections of the
Midwest and hampering motorists
there on Christmas Eve, the storm
dipped south late Friday. Winter
weather advisories were in effect
Saturday morning from Arkansas
to the, Carolinas and from West
Virginia to central Alabama. Much
of North Carolina was under a
winter storm warning.
The National Weather Service
said the storm could bring more
than 5 inches of snow to the
Washington region. Meteorologist
Stephen Konarik said the storm
could hit the area Sunday morn-
ing and end Sunday night or early
Monday, with the peak snowfall
Sunday afternoon and early eve-
ning.
The wintry weather is the result
of a low pressure system moving
along the Gulf coast. It is expected
to intensify and move northeast on
Sunday to the mid-Atlantic states
and New England.
The weather service was fore-
casting possible snow for the New
York and Boston areas, start-
ing Sunday and continuing into
Sunday night, with overnight tem-
peratures in the 20s and wind
gusts up to 30 mph.
Delta Air Lines spokesman Kent
Landers said 500 weather-related
flight cancellations were planned
for Saturday nationwide. That
included 300 of the 800 scheduled
departures from the Atlanta hub.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Eleven-year-old twins, Cameron and Danielle Whitlock, make a snowman
in their front yard in Decatur, Ala. on an unusually snowy Christmas morn-
ing, Saturday. Winter weather advisories were in effect Saturday morning
from Arkansas to the Carolinas and from West Virginia to central Alabama.


The airline was monitoring the
storm's path, Landers said, and
would decide on possible addi-
tional Sunday cancellations as the
time approaches. Landers said the
airline is encouraging customers
to consider changing flight plans
as a result of the snow. Anyone
with travel plans through Boston,
New York, Baltimore, Washington
and Newark, N.J., on Sunday or
Monday can change their flight
without a penalty as long as they
travel by Dec. 29.


AirTran spokeswoman Judy
Graham-Weaver said Saturday that
the carrier had canceled seven
Saturday flights and that after-
noon flights from Atlanta would
be delayed because of required
de-icing of planes. AirTran too
offered to waive ticket-change
fees for some flights scheduled
for this weekend and Monday in
the South and Mid-Atlantic.
The Nashville area had an inch
or so of snow overnight, and roads
appeared to be clear. There was


also snow in northern Alabama.
By Saturday morning, 4 to 5
inches of snow had fallen over sev-
eral hours in Bowling Green, Ky.,
according to the Weather Service.
Louisville had about an inch.
Louisville last had snowfall on
Christmas in 2002, when a half-
inch fell.
Snow was falling Christmas
morning in Cleveland in northern
Georgia. -
"It's snowing, but there's none
sticking yet," said Miranda Smith
at the Kangaroo Express conve-
nience store.
Snow wasn't expected in Atlanta
until later in the day.
In parts of Tennessee, Georgia
and the Carolinas, the snow was
likely to be mixed with sleet and
rain before turning entirely to
snow.
Temperatures in Georgia were
expected to dip into the 20s on
Christmas night, possibly leading
to slick road conditions.
"If roads aren't able to dry
up during the day, that's what
will freeze up Saturday night
into Sunday morning," said the
weather service's Vaughn Smith
in Atlanta.
Lon Anderson, a spokesman
for AAA Mid-Atlantic, said people
traveling by car on the East Coast
over the holidays .should check
the weather forecasts.
"The fact is Mother Nature is
going to be a big factor" in holiday
travel, he said. "She's calling the
shots this holiday season and in
many places it will be very tough
going."
He said motorists should make
sure their car is ready, especially
their tires, and that they have
enough windshield wiper fluid.
"It doesn't take much in the
Mid-Atlantic area to cause may-
hem," Anderson said.


Associated Press

HONOLULU -
President Barack Obama's
Christmas wish may sim-
ply be to have a quieter
holiday than last year.
Obama was with his
family in the same ocean-
front neighborhood on
the island of Oahu last
December, when a 23-year-
old Nigerian man alleg-
edly attempted to blow up
a plane bound for Detroit.
The incident raised ques-
tions about the nation's
terror readiness and con-
sumed the rest of Obama's
vacation.
This year's presiden-
tial holiday is off to a far
more low-key start, and
the White House is hoping
it stays that way. Obama
plans to spend Christmas
at his rented oceanfront
home in Kailua with his
family and his sister, Maya
Soetoro-Ng, who lives on
Oahu. Several of Obama's
childhood friends are also
in town, along witT family
friends from Chicago.
On the first family's
Christmas Day menu:
steak, roasted potatoes,
green beans and pie.
Thus far, Obama's excur-
sions in Hawaii have been
limited to the gym, golf
course, and a Christmas
Eve trip to the beach with
his daughters. .
Mrs. Obama skipped
the beach so she could
give some lucky children
a Christmas surprise. The
first lady answered calls
for the 'Tracking Santa"
program, a Christmas tra-
dition .run by the North
American Aerospace
Defense Command
(NORAD). With help from
NORAD's Santa Route
Schedule, Mrs. Obama
was able to tell children
Santa's whereabouts as he
made his Christmas Eve
rounds.
Last Christmas, the
president and first lady
surprised troops stationed
at Marine Corps Base
Hawaii, greeting service
members during their hol-
iday dinner. White House
officials wouldn't say
whether Obama planned


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ASSOCIATED PRESS
President Barack Obama travels in a motorcade through
the neighborhood where he is spending his holiday vaca-
tion in Kailua, Hawaii on Friday.


ASSOCIATED PRESS.
A secret service agent prepares to draw her pistol along a
street near where President Barack Obama is spending his
holiday vacation in Kailua, Hawaii on Thursday. Security
near Obama's home was briefly heightened Thursday
when a man evading arrest by Honolulu police led offi-
cers on a high-speed chase that went through a security
checkpoint near the neighborhood where the president is
staying.


to visit the troops again
this Christmas.
In his weekly radio
and Internet address, the
president encouraged
Americans to find ways
to support U.S. service
members, many of whom
are spending the holidays
away from their families.
"Let's all remind them
this holiday season that
we're thinking of them,
and that America will for-
ever be here for them, just
as they've been there for
us," Obama said.
The first lady, who has
made working with mili-
tary families one of her top
priorities as first lady, said
Americans don't need to be
experts in military life in
order to give back to those
who serve their country.


She urged the public to
reach out through their
schools and churches, or
volunteer with organiza-
tions that support military
families.
"Anybody can send a
care package or pre-paid
calling card to the front
lines, or give what's some-
times the most important
gift of all: simply saying
thank you," Mrs. Obama
said.
The first family has no
public events planned
during their vacation.
The president, though,
is receiving daily brief-
ings, beginning work on
January's State of the
Union address, and evalu-
ating a staff review head-
ed by interim chief of staff
Pete Rouse.


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for peaceful holidays ,E

By JULIE PACE MA EDICINI


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 26, 2010


6A LAKE CITY REPORTER NATION & WORLD





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LAKE CITY REPORTER WEATHER SUNDAY, DECEMBER 26, 2010


THE WEATHER



MOLYI SUNNY j SUNNY! MOSTLY PARTLY
SLiNY SUNNY CLOUDY



H H147LO24 | HI15022 HI158O29 H1I65L040 HI 69 LO-


NATIONAL FORECAST: An intense winter storm will bring heavy snow and blizzard conditions
to much of the Northeast today. Snow showers will be widespread from the Great Lakes to
the Appalachians, as well. A frontal boundary crossing the Pacific Coast will be responsible
for widespread cloudy, wet and windy conditions across the Northwest, extending eastwards
into the Intermountain West.


rio o
9' ,4
T o era .


Valdosta
44/25 Jacksonville

Tallahassee Lake Cty 48/27
44/25 47/24
Gainesville Daytona Beach
Panama City 49/25 55V30
46/27 Ocala *
51/26 *


Tampa *
56/35


Ft Myer
61/40


City
Cape Canaveral
Daytona Beach
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Jacksonville
Key West


Orlando Cape Canaveral "..ke....
57/31 59/32 ake City
Ivilami
Naples
West Palm Beach Ocala
66/33 0 Orlando
FtL Lauderdale Panama City
s 68/37 0 Pensacola
e Naples Tallahassee
60/37 Miami Tampa


S 68/40 Valdosta
Key West* w. Palm Beach
66/51


Monday
5 /33/s
5 /30/s
'. .S :.
58/34/s
50/22/s
5b/25/s
5g/48/pc
Sb/22/s
58/36/s
56/33/s
52/22/s
56/32/s
40/28/s
L9/29/s
L9/22/s
i6/34/s
49/22/s
56/34/s


Tuesday
60/43/s
58/36/s
67/54/s
64/45/s
58/30/s
56/32/s
59/54/s
58/29/s
68/55/s
64/46/s
59/31/s
61/36/s
55/37/s
55/38/s
56/21/s
61/43/s
53/20/s
65/49/s


YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL EXTREMES


Saturday Today


H M.M3T,i ,'P y,




High: 770, Mesa, Anz. Low: -130, Big Piney, Wyo.


Saturday Today


Saturday Today


TEMPERATURES
High Saturday
Low Saturday.
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Saturday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


71
34
67
43
82 in 1981
15 in 1983


0.00"
0.17"
39.15"
1.99"
47.79"


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise tom.
Sunset tom.


7:25 a.m.
5:37 p.m.
.7:25 a.m.
5:38 p.m.


MOON
Moonrise today 11:36 p.m.
Moonset today 11:09 a.m.
Moonrise tom.
Moonset tom. 11:44 a.m.



Dec. Jan. Jan. Jan.
27 4 12 19
Last New First Full


2

60 nitesto ibu
Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+.

, -


An e.shiii,
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather





weather.com


i. Forecasts, data and graph-
, ics @2010 Weather Central
S" LLC, adson, Wis.
ty www.leatherpublisher.com


CITY HI/Lo/PPp.
Albany NY 24/15/0
Albuquerque 48/30/0
Anchorage 8/2/0
Atlanta 40/32/.07
Baltimore 34/28/.01
Billings 39/22/0
Birmingham 39/33/.26
Bismarck 19/16/0
Boise 45/31/0
Boston 30/23/0
Buffalo' 26/22/.02
Charleston SC 55/27/0
Charleston WV 29/26/.09
Charlotte 42/33/0
Cheyenne 46/13/0
Chicago 31/20/.01
Cincinnati 29/24/.01
Cleveland 29/27/0
Columbia SC 50/26/0
Dallas 41/36/0
D.,ytona Beach 71/39/0
Denver 51/17/0


HI/Lo/W
28/18/sn
54/29/s
21/10/sn
33/19/sn
32/23/sn
40/27/pc
34/22/sf
21/11/s
42/29/sn
35/28/sn
24/16/sn
41/29/sh
29/24/sn
35/20/sn
50/27/s
29/11/sn
27/18/sn
28/23/sn
38/23/sn
47/28/s
55/30/pc
53/28/s


CITY Hi/Lo/Pcp.
Des Molnes 25/18/0
Detroit 30/24/0
El Paso 57/37/0
Fairbanks -1/-23/0
Greensboro 40/32/.10
Hartford 31/21/0
Honolulu 79/70/0
Houston 46/42/0
Indianapolis 30/24/.03
Jackson MS 43/37/.10
Jacksonville 70/28/0
Kansas City 30/24/0
Las Vegas 55/41/0
Uttle Rock 39/37/.01
Los Angeles 59/47/0
Memphis 36/34/0
Miami 75/57/0
Minneapolis 20/17/0
Mobile 50/42/.35
New Orleans 54/44/.63
New York 32/25/0
Oklahoma City 34/30/0


Saturday Today Saturday Today Saturday Today
CITY HI/Lo/Pcp. HI/Lo/W CITY HI/Lo/Pcp. HI/Lo/W CITY Hi/Lo/Pcp. HI/Lo/W
Acapulco 84/70/0 85/68/s La Paz 52/39/.78 59/43/sh Rio 91/79/0 87/76/pc
Amsterdam 34/23/0 35/26/pc Uma 75/64/0 74/64/pc Rome 54/48/0 48/35/sh
Athens 67/59/0 62/51/pc London 32/25/0 34/30/pc St. Thomas VI 79/72/0 82/74/t
Auckland 68/61/0 73/63/s Madrid 45/30/0 44/26/s San Juan PR 80/69/0 83/73/t
Beljing 27/9/0 33/14/pc Mexico City 63/43/0 69/38/pc Santiago 88/57/0 84/54/s
Berlin 28/21/0 22/12/pc Montreal 19/7/0 16/10/pc Seoul 21/7/0 30/15/sf
Buenos Aires 97/63/0 93/67/s Moscow 28/19/.13 45/24/sn Singapore 86/73/.07 87/76/t
Cairo 75/52/0 76/54/s Nairobi 82/61/0 79/59/t Sydney 82/61/0 85/67/t
Geneva 30/27/.06 28/12/s Nassau 77/57/0 74/61/sh Tel Aviv 72/52/0 75/52/s
Havana 77/52/0 74/51/sh New Delhi 50/48/0 69/45/s Tokyo 48/37/0 50/37/s
Helsinki 16/5/0 24/15/sf Oslo 9/-6/0 12/4/pc Toronto 23/19/0 27/14/sf -
Hong Kong 66/50/0 69/59/pc Panama 82/75/0 84/73/t Vienna 37/28/.08 26/21/pc
. Hfltiton .,. 8.L'0.Q _.8, 72'1cP Paris 32 23, 30 5 13 L Warsaw 37/30/.06 30/17/sf
.. ,ElMTO CONDmONS: (-,loudy. o=r-dncLir. -i=tai,, i= lc, r-n .=na -. : =partly cloudy, r=rain, s=sunny,
I1" ' "r, hni'.:,.e *jn=;.nrfo,, l'L=lllijr,,iF'hr:,,:n',: = i,,,i,,1)


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S. 6 I, I RomH16 nhlsCm os90 W3t v.Oaa39 S olg d atOaa24 .Sle pig ld es ain115S 9r or d u mrill96S w.4


Pensacola
45/26


Hi/Lo/W
17/4/s
29/18/sn
61/35/s
-22/-34/c
34/21/sn
32/21/sn
80/71/r
50/31/s
25/11/sn
38/19/pc
48/27/pc
26/14/s
56/42/sh
39/22/pc
60/50/s
35/23/sn
68/40/sh
18/4/pe
45/23/s
46/29/s
33/24/sn
41/20/s


CITY
Omaha
Orlando
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland ME
Portland OR
Raleigh
Rapid City
Reno
Richmond
Sacramento
St. Louis
Salt Lake City
San Antonio
San Diego
San Francisco.
Seattle
Spokane
Tampa
Tucson
Washington


Hi/Lo/Pcp.
25/19/0
72/40/0
33/26/0
73/48/0
29/23/.06
33/17/.01
47/40/0
43/32/0
27/23/0
45/25/0
37/31/0
52/48/0
31/28/.05
39/31/0
52/40/0
61/50/0
56/49/.03
54/45/.18
35/26/0
69/45/0
69/52/0
36/32/0


Hi/Lo/W
20/10/s
57/31/s
34/23/sn
69/49/pc
26/18/sn
25/25/pc
43/39/sh
33/22/sn
40/23/s
43/25/c
34/23/sn
55/44/sh
27/13/sf
46/30/sh
. 55/30/s
59/50/s
55/46/sh
47/37/sh
38/27/rs
56/35/s
68/41/pc
32/23/sn


CAMPUS


JaUSA
^* ^' t. ~~i i*r I nn! o i


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Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424









Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421


SPORTS


Sunday, December 26, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


Old reliables


falter, potential


new stars emerge


Favre, Woods
among past
favorites falling.
By NANCY ARMOUR
Associated Press
Spot Tiger Woods a four-
stroke lead going into the
final round at his own
tournament, no less and
the winner's check is a
gimme.
At least, it used to be.
Not only did Woods fail
to cash in at the Chevron
World Challenge this
month, he went the entire
year without winning a sin-
gle tournament, a first in
his career and a drought
unthinkable just 13 months
ago. But Woods was hhrd-
ly the only one to have a
rough year. From Brett
Favre to Roger Federer to
Derek Jeter to the Texas
Longhorns, many of the old
reliables looked, well, old.


It's a new decade, and
the sports stars are bound
to change. In many ways,
2010 felt like the year the
big shift began.
Sure, Woods will (proba-
bly) win again and Michael
Phelps is in no danger of
being lapped. Yet their
struggles, coupled with the
emergence of some new
phenoms, have given us a
glimpse of what the sports
world might look like a few
years down the road.
Imagine -a Super Bowl
where Clay Matthews III is
chasing down Sam Bradford
or Andrew Luck. Rory
McIlroy and Rickie Fowler
battling it out for golf's No.
1 ranking, perhaps. Kevin
Durant, Derrick Rose and
John Wall could be the
NBA's Big Three for the
20teens.
And did anyone happen
to notice how many med-
als China and South Korea
hauled in at the Vancouver


Olympics?
"The takeaway on the
competition side of 2010,
more than anything else,
was the tremendous inter-
est in young players coming
up," PGA Tour commission-
er Tim Finchem said this
month. "I've never in my
tenure seen so much buzz
and interest about rookies
and young players creat-
ing exciting performances.
Actually, it has led us to con-
clude that we really need to
focus on that dynamic as we
go into 2011."
Before we say goodbye
to 2010, however, let's take
a look at some oldies, and
a few who may be the new
goodies:
The Thanksgiving
night car crash in 2009 that
revealed Woods' infideli-
ties wrecked his marriage
and made a mess of his
personal life. No surprise
STARS continued on 3B


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Minnesota Vikings quarterback Brett Favre walks off the field after being hit during the first
half an NFL football game against the Chicago Bears on Monday in Minneapolis.


Jernigan 's journey continues


Star recruit has
drawn attention
to CHS football.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter. corn
C olumbia High
may have
finished 6-4
and out of the
playoffs during
2010, but unlike many
other high school seniors,
Timmy Jernigan's journey
is just beginning.
One of the nation's
highest-rated defensive
tackles according to Rivals.
com, Scout.com and ESPN.
corn, Jernigan has been
receiving attention from
around the nation dating
back to his junior season.
Before the 2010 season
even kicked off, Jernigan
had received more than
50 offers to play at the top
programs from throughout
the nation.
The star had looks from
Alabama, Florida, Florida
State, LSU, Michigan,
Tennesee and many
other perennially great
programs. With the season


BRANDON FINLEY/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High's Timmy Jernigan speaks during a presentation to announce that he was selected to play in the U.S. Army
All-American Bowl on Nov. 5 in Lake City.


over, he's had time to
narrow his choices to three
with Alabama, Florida


State and LSU still in the
mix. He'll likely take some
time before making his'


final decision, but there's
still a possibility that he
could commit on national


television.
Jernigan became the
first player in'Tigers'


history to be selected to
participate in the U.S.
Army All-American Bowl
in San Antonio, Texas on
Jan. 8. He'll compete with
other top seniors from
throughout the nation in
one of the most prestigious
All-American games for
high school seniors.
Columbia coach Craig
Howard offered up a little
of what makes Jernigan
stand out from other
football players.
"He's got a passion
to play," Howard said.
"He plays like he's on a
mission and sometimes
he can't be blocked. He
believes in himself and
can be unstoppable with
his ability when he turns
it on. It doesn't matter if
there's one guy blocking
him, two guys or three
guys. He's going to get to
the quarterback or ball
carrier."
Jernigan has said all
along that he hopes the
recognition that he has
received helps other
players from Columbia
move on to the next level.
JERNIGAN continued on 2B


Top NFL draft picks have


already made huge impact


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Nov. 7 file photo, Detroit Lions defensive tackle
Ndamukong Suh rushes the line against the New York Jets,
at Ford Field.


Bradford, Suh
paying off for
Rams, Lions.
By BARRY WILNER
Associated Press
Get in there kid, and
make a difference.
Few NFL drafts work
out better at the top than
this year's grab bag. Look
no further for reasons the
St. Louis Rams and Detroit
Lions have become com-
petitive than No. 1 overall
pick Sam Bradford and No.
2 Ndamukong Suh.
While it no longer is
strange for a quarterback


to step directly from college
into an NFL starting job -
Ben Roethlisberger, Matt
Ryan, Joe Flacco, Matthew
Stafford, Josh Freeman
and Mark Sanchez did so
recently seeing a rookie
lift a team from the worst
record in football to playoff
contention is notable. That
Bradford has done it with
a cast of obscure receiv-
ers makes his early impact
remarkable.
Suh has been the domi-
nant player on a Lions team
that has broken a pair of
ignominious skids in the
past two weeks (19 consec-
utive division defeats and 26
straight road losses). The


defensive tackle has eight
sacks, the most at his posi-
tion in the league rook-
ies or veterans. He's also
a solid run-stopper and the
kind of player opponents
must scheme to stop from
the outset.
"Both of those players
have had a big role for their
teams and they look like
the type of players their
teams can build around,"
says NFL draft consultant
Gil Brandt.
Bradford, who has taken
every snap for St. Louis and
has the Rams (6-8) in posi-
tion to take the NFC West
- wins in the final two
games will do it after they


went 1-15 in 2009 is,
by far, the most impressive
quarterback in the rookie
crop. Jimmy Clausen, Max
Hall, John Skelton, Rusty
Smith, Tony Pike, Joe
Webb, Tim Tebow and Colt
McCoy have played, with
only McCoy having moder-
ate success.
"Sam is poised, he's calm,
he's assertive," Rams cen-
ter Jason Brown says.
"He's a great player and
he's going to continue to
play great," adds St. Louis
receiver Danny Amendola.
Other impressive rook-
ies on offense range from
ROOKIES continued on 3B










LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, DECEMBER 26. 2010


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
8:30 p.m.
ESPN Little Caesars Pizza Bowl, Fla.
International vs.Toledo, at Detroit
NFL FOOTBALL
I p.m.
CBS Regional coverage
FOX Regional coverage, double-
header
4 p.m.
CBS Regional coverage
4:15 p.m.
FOX Regional coverage, double-
header-game
8:15 p.m.
NBC San Diego at Cincinnati

FOOTBALL

NFL standings

AMERICAN CONFERENCE
East
W L TPct PF PA
x-New England 12 2 0.857446 303
N.Y,Jets 10 4 0.714295 259
Miami 7 7 .0.500239 261
Buffalo 4 10 0.286273 353
South


Indianapolis
Jacksonville
Tennessee
Houston


x-Pittsburgh
Baltimore
Cleveland
Cincinnati


Kansas City
San Diego
Oakland
Denver


Phila
N.Y
Was
Dall

x-At
Nev
Tam
Carol


W L TPct PF PA
8 6 0.571 381 342
8 6 .0.571319 365
6 8 0.429 322 282
5 9 0.357333 386
North
W L TPct PF PA
10 4 0.714307 220
10 4 0.714324 253
5 9 0.357252 271
3 II 0.214281 362
West
W L TPct PF PA
9 5 0.643 322 281
8 6 0.571 388 260
7 7 0.500 353 330
3 ii 0.214292 415


NATIONAL CONFERENCE
East
W L TPct PF I
idelphia 10 4 0.714412 3:
. Giants 9 5 0.643 360 21
shington 5 9 0.357268 3
as 5 9 0.357354 3
South
W L TPct PF 1
Mlanta 12 2 0.857369 2i
w Orleans 10 4 0.714 3542
ipa Bay 8 6 0.571280 2
olina 2 12 0.143 183 35
North


PA
39
88
43
96
PA
61
70
90
50


W L TPct PF PA
y-Chicago 10 4 0.714293 242
Green Bay 8 6 0.571 333 220
Minnesota 5 9 0.357244 314
Detroit 4 10 0.286308 329
West
W L TPct PF PA
St. Louis 6 8 0.429 258 295
Seattle 6 8 0.429 279 363
'San Firancscd" "-*'""1 '0.357 250 314
Arizona 4 10 0.286 255 370
y-clinched division
x-clinched playoff spot
Thursday's Game
Steelers 27, Panthers 3
Saturday's Game
Dallas atArizona (n)
Today's Games
Tennessee at Kansas City, I p.m.
San Francisco at St. Louis, I p.m.
N.Y.Jets at Chicago, I p.m.
Baltimore at Cleveland, I p.m.
New England at Buffalo, I p.m.
Detroit at Miami, I p.m.
Washington at Jacksonville, I p.m.
Indianapolis at Oakland, 4:05 p.m.
Houston at Denver, 4:05 p.m.
San Diego at Cincinnati; 4:05 p.m.
N.Y. Giants at Green Bay, 4:15 p.m.
Seattle at Tampa Bay, 4:15 p.m.
Minnesota at Philadelphia. 8:20 p.m.
Monday's Game
New Orleans at Atlanta, 8:30 p.m.


College bowl games

Dec. 18
New Mexico Bowl
At Albuquerque
BYU 52, UTEP 24
Humanitarian Bowl
At Boise, Idaho
Northern Illinois 40, Fresno State 17
New Orleans Bowl
Troy 48, Ohio 21
Dec. 21
Beef 'O' Brady's Bowl
At St. Petersburg, Fla.
Louisville 31, Southern Mississippi 28
Dec. 22
MAACO Bowl
At LasVegas
Boise State 26, Utah 3
Dec. 23
Poinsettia Bowl
At San Diego
San Diego State 35, Navy 14
Friday
Hawaii Bowl
At Honolulu
Hawaii (10-3) vs. Tulsa (9-3), 8 p.m.
(ESPN)
Sunday
Little Caesars Pizza Bowl
At Detroit
Tulsa 62, No. 24 Hawaii,35
Monday
Independence Bowl
At Shreveport, La.
Georgia Tech (6-6) vs. Air Force (8-4),
5 p.m. (ESPN2)
Tuesday
Champs Sports Bowl
At Orlando, Fla.
North Carolina State (8-4) vs. West
Virginia (9-3), 6:30 p.m. (ESPN)
Insight Bowl
AtTempe,Ariz.
Missouri (10-2) vs. Iowa (7-5), 10 p.m.
(ESPN)
Wednesday
Military Bowl
At Washington
East Carolina (6-6) vs. Maryland (8-4),
2:30 p.m. (ESPN)
Texas Bowl
At Houston
Baylor (7-5) vs. Illinois (6-6), 6 p.m.
(ESPN)
Alamo Bowl
At San Antonio
Arizona (7-5) vs. Oklahoma State (10-
2), 9:15 p.m. (ESPN)
Thursday
Armed Forces Bowl
At Dallas
SMU (7-6) vs. Army (6-6), Noon
(ESPN)
Pinstripe Bowl
At Bronx, N.Y.
Syracuse (7-5) vs. Kansas State (7-5),
3:30 p.m. (ESPN),
Music City Bowl
At Nashville,Tenn.
North Carolina (7-5) vs. Tennessee
(6-6), 6:40 p.m. (ESPN)
Holiday Bowl
At San Diego
Nebraska (10-3) vs.Washington (6-6),
10 p.m. (ESPN)
Friday
Meineke Bowl
At Charlotte, N.C.
Clemson (6-6) vs. South Florida (7-5),
Noon (ESPN)
Sun Bowl
At El Paso,Texas
Notre Dame (7-5) vs. Miami (7-5), 2
p.m.(CBS)
Liberty Bowl
At Memphis,Tenn.
Georgia (6-6) .vs. UCF (10-3), 3:30
p.m. (ESPN)
Chick-fil-A Bowl
At Atlanta
South Carolina (9-4) vs. Florida State
(9-4), 7:30 p.m. (ESPN)
Jan. I
TicketCity Bowl
At Dallas
Northwestern (7-5) vs.Texas Tech (7-
5), Noon (ESPNU)
Capital One Bowl:
At Orlando, Fla.
Michigan State (I I-1) vs. Alabama (9-


3), I p.m. (ESPN)
Outback Bowl
At Tampa, Fla.
Florida (7-5) vs. Penn State (7-5), I
p.m. (ABC)
Gator Bowl
At Jacksonville, Fla.
Michigan (7-5) vs. Mississippi State (8-
4), 1:30 p.m. (ESPN2)
Rose Bowl
At Pasadena, Calif.
TCU (12-0) vs. Wisconsin (11-1), 5
p.m. (ESPN)
Fiesta Bowl
At Glendale,Ariz.
Connecticut (8-4) vs. Oklahoma (II-
2), 8:30 p.m. (ESPN)
Jan. 3
Orange Bowl
At Miami
Stanford (1 I-) vs.VirginiaTech (11-2),
8:30 p.m. (ESPN)
Jan.4
Sugar Bowl
At New Orleans
Ohio State (11-I) vs.Arkansas (10-2),
8:30 p.m. (ESPN)
Jan.6
GoDaddy.com Bowl
At Mobile,Ala.
Miami (Ohio)' (9-4) vs. Middle
Tennessee (6-6), 8 p.m. (ESPN)
Jan. 7
Cotton Bowl
At Arlington,Texas
Texas A&M (9-3) vs. LSU (10-2), 8
p.m. (FOX)
Jan. 8
BBVA Compass Bowl
At Birmingham,Ala.
Pittsburgh (7-5) vs. Kentucky (6-6),
Noon (ESPN)
Jan. 9
Fight Hunger Bowl
At San Francisco
Boston College (7-5) vs, Nevada (12-
I), 9 p.m. (ESPN)
Jan. 10
BCS National Championship
At Glendale,Ariz.
Auburn (13-0) vs. Oregon (12-0), 8:30
p.m. (ESPN)
Jan. 22
At Orlando, Fla.
East-West Shrine Classic, 4 p.m.
Jan. 29
At Mobile,Ala.
Senior Bowl, 4 p.m. (NFLN)
Feb. 5
At San Antonio
Texas vs. The Nation All-Star
Challenge, 2 p.m.

BASKETBALL

NBA schedule

Today's Games
Knicks 103, Bulls 95
Boston at Orlando (n)
Miami at L.A. Lakers (n)
Denver at Oklahoma City (n)
Portland at Golden State (n)
Sunday's Games
Phoenix at L.A. Clippers, 3 p.m.
Minnesota at Cleveland, 6 p.m.
Chicago atDetroit, 6 p.m.
Atlanta at New Orleans. 7 p.m.
Washington at San Antonio, 7 p.m.
Memphis.at Indiana. 7 p.m.
Philadelphia at Denver, 8 p.m.

HOCKEY

NHL schedule

Today's Games
Pittsburgh at Ottawa, 7 p.m,
Toronto at New Jersey, 7 p.m.
Montreal at N.Y. Islanders, 7 p.m.
Washington at Carolina, 7 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Atlanta, 7 p.m.
Columbus at Chicago, 7 p.m.
Nashville at St. Louis, 7 p.m.
Detroit at Minnesota, 7 p.m.
Phoenix at Dallas, 8 p.m.
Edmonton atVancouver, 9 p.m.
Anaheim at Los Angeles, 9 p.m.


JERNIGAN: Recruitment continues

Continued From Page 1B


When Jernigan was
visited by USC prior to
the beginning of the 2010
season, it helped Laremy
Tunsil receive an offer to
play for the Trojans.
It may be just the
beginning for Tunsil, but
Jernigan's been going
through the phone calls
on a daily basis. With so
much to sort through, he
didn't rush into his college
decision. Jernigan wanted
to make sure he had all
the facts straight before
giving his pledge.
With nearly two months
left in the recruiting game,
time is running out for the
Tiger, but he feels that
his final three could all be
good fits in the long run.
Surprisingly, Jernigan
doesn't list the University
of Florida on that final
list. He grew up a Gator,
but realizes that picking a
college has to be the right
fit. Still, he admitted that
there's still time for things
to change.
"It's college football, so
crazy things happen late in
the season," Jernigan said.
And while Florida may
have fallen off his radar,
Florida State remains
clearly in sight. Much of
that can be contributed to
his relationship with the
Seminoles' defensive line


coach, Odell Haggans.
Jernigan has known
Haggans from football
camps for quite some
time and their relationship
extends beyond the
borders of a football field.
"He's real cool," Jernigan
said. "He came to the house
for an in-home visit and we
didn't even talk football. We
just talked about ourselves
and how much we can




Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

THERB


@2010 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
TOBAB








TRAULB
^^ 7~^ ^
^^ __ __ ^' __ ^


relate to each other."
Jernigan is looking into
more than just scores on,
Saturday with a decision
looming that he has said
could not only effect the
next four years of his life,
but also the next 50 years.
Whether he'll end up
wearing Garnet and Gold
or keep wearing Purple
and Gold, he'll always be a
Columbia Tiger.

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek


Ans: A
(Answers tomorrow)
Saturday's Jumbles: AROMA USURP SPONGE GRASSY
Answer: What the producer ended up with when the
movie bombed A "GROSS" GROSS


12-27


I ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Nov. 21 file photo, Philadelphia Eagles quarterback Michael Vick smiling as he leaves
the field after an NFL football game against the New York Giants in Philadelphia.



Vick on his MVP pick:


'I would take ... myself'


Associated Press

PHILADELPHIA -
Michael Vick's MVP pick?
That would be Michael
Vick.
Asked after practice
Friday who he would
select if he had a vote,, the
Philadelphia Eagles quar-
terback said, "You put me
on the spot."
Then he added with
a smile: "I would take ...
myself."
Vick and Patriots quarter-
back Tom Brady are widely
considered the top two can-
didates for the award, which
has been won or shared by
a quarterback 17 of the last
23 years.
Brady leads the NFL with
a 109.9 passer rating. In
his last nine games, he's
thrown 21 touchdowns
and no interceptions. The
Patriots (12-2) have won 11
of their last 12.
Vick's 103.6 passer rat-
ing is third-highest in the
NFL and leads the NFC. He
also has 613 yards rushing
and has run for eight TDs
- more than all but nine
NFL running backs.

ACROSS 41 Vo
43 ML
1 Fluctuate 44 Pri
5 Air rifle ammo ca
8 Sneaky 46 Ex
11 Bewildered 49 W(
12 Car mirror view 50 Ra
14 kwon do 52 Ch
15 Gaunt 54 Mi
16 He wrote 55 Ro
"Picnic" 56 Pu
17 Compete in a 57 Cu
10K 'ne
18 Elbows 58 De
20 Wedding sites 59 Kiu
22 North Woods
Sroamer
23 Ottumwa's
state 1 Ac
24 Baked goodies 2 PC
27 After that 3 Ga
29 Intend 4 Tie
30 Most ph
verdant 5 ln\
34 Banished 6 Pa
37 -tzu ("Tao" 7 He
author) 8 Co
38 Family men 9 Ge
39 Dome home m(


Vick spent Christmas in
2007 and 2008 incarcerated
atLeavenworthPenitentiary
in Kansas while serving an
18-month sentence on fed-
eral charges of running an
illegal dogfighting ring.
"I'm just blessed to be
here," Vick said. "I spent
two Christmases in Kansas,
and that was by far the
toughest thing I've had to
do. Each and every year I
reflect on that, and I think it
will always make the holiday
season more gratifying.
"(I'm) just thankful for a
lot, thankful for the oppor-
tunity that' I've been given,
thankful for the blessings,
and hopefully they'll con-
tinue to come."
The Eagles (10-4) would
clinch the NFC East title
Sunday either with a home
win over the Vikings (5-8)
or a Packers victory over
the Giants in Green Bay.
"We all know what's on
the line," Vick said. 'We
know. what's at stake. Like
I say each and every week,
every game is going to be
a tough game. You'have to
go and play as hard as you
can. You can't let up and

Ducher
irmur Answe
etty and deli-
te LAP
pels CUR L
eb addr. D A N U
ra --
himney dust S U E T
I. rank 0
bin's domain
rple flower E P A
istodian's G E N I
ed G
pot (abbr.)
nd of chop RE I

DOWN DS

tor Kilmer P A L E
DQ SW I R
imbler's town
ed up the E N T R
one
vigorating 10 Desires
SCartwright 13 Kind of m
roic tale 19 Loop trail
wstallbedding 21 Pop's Te
ene Tierney 24 Heartrenc
movie 25 Dessert c


you can't go into a game
sure you're going to win.
You have to earn it. That's
our mentality and that's our
mindset, and this week is
no different."
Notes: The Eagles signed
cornerback Gerard Lawson
on Friday to replace kick
returned Jorrick Calvin, out
for the year with a back inju-
r'y. Lawson averaged 14.4
yards on eight kick returns
during his two-year stay
with the Cleveland Browns.
Lawson was released in
late August, three weeks
after he was arrested near
Browns training camp
when police saw him drive
his vehicle into a parked
car. Lawson pleaded no con-
test to driving under the
influence and accepted a
plea agreement that includ-
ed a year of probation, 20
hours of community ser-
vice and a $500 fine but no
jail time.
Coach Andy Reid said
undrafted rookie Chad
Hall would probably return
kicks Sunday against the
Vikings. Jeremy Maclin has
also practiced returning
kicks.


er to Previous Puzzle

D SHAMS
ED MARLIN
BE ASSIS


STRICH
QED HUSH
US HALTER
IT AFLOAT
N CUE PRE
TRANDS
ONT WETS
ST ERASER
LS DELTAS
Y SEAL


lap
ins
nnille
ling
choice


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


26 Ref's cousin
27 Golf ball
stands
28 Suffered from
30 Business suff.
31 HQuse
addition
32 Paulo
33 Also
35 Wednesday's
god
36 Wickerwork
39 Debtor's note
40 Loose talk
41 diem
42 Mountainous
43 Rica
44 Canvasback
45 Jacques -
Cousteau
47 Bullring bull
48 Matin's oppo-
' site
51 Devotee's suf-
fix
53 For shame!


@2010 by UFS, Inc.


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


k






'I













STARS: New names rise, old names begin to fall during 2010 sports year
Continued From Page 1B


the turmoil spilled over into
his golf game, too. At one
point, Woods went seven
starts without a top-10 fin-
ish, the longest stretch of
his career. He posted the
worst score of his PGA
Tour career with an 18-over
298 at Bridgestone, a place
he's won seven times.
And on Oct. 31, for the
first time in 281 weeks,
someone other than Woods
was No. 1 in the world.
"Harder than anyone
could ever imagine unless
you've actually gone
through it before yourself,"
he said of trying to focus on
golf when the rest of his life
was upside down.
Woods' divorce was com-
pleted in late August. With
help from new swing coach
Sean Foley, his golf game is
slowly taking shape again.
He had back-to-back top-
10 finishes at the HSBC
Champions at Shanghai
and Australian Masters,
then was in contention
for the first time this year
at Chevron. But Woods
couldn't keep it together,
blowing that four-shot
lead and losing to Graeme
McDowell on the first hole
of a playoff.
Now, as Woods turns
35 before the 2011 sea-
son starts, all those career
marks he's supposed to hit
don't necessarily look like
such a certainty.
E Favre insists he is done
after this year, and he might
really mean it this time.
He might not have a
choice.
A season of hard hits,
broken bones and missed
chances has taken its toll
on the former MVP, topped
by the sprained throwing
shoulder he got when the.
Bills' Arthur Moats decleat-
ed him. That ended the
QB's epic streak of consec-
utive starts at 297.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Feb. 19 file photo, Tiger Woods, hugs and kisses his mother, Kultida Woods, during a news conference in Ponte
Vedra Beach.


"Relief, in one sense.
There wasn't a whole lot
of pressure on me today,"
Favre said after his first
game on the sidelines since
1992. "I'd much rather
be playing, that's just my
nature. I don't want to say
it was time, but it's prob-
ably been long overdue.
There's probably been a lot
of times the streak should
have ended."
He made one last rally,
returning a week later to
start against the Chicago
Bears, only to be knocked
out of the game, suffering
what he called a concussion
when he was slammed to
the frigid turf.
Even before that, Favre
was looking every bit of
his 41 years. A year after
taking the Minnesota
Vikings within one play of
the Super Bowl, Favre was
picked off 18 times in the


first 12 games of the sea-
son while throwing just 10
touchdowns.
And there's no way to
gauge the personal cost of
an NFL investigation into
allegations he sent lewd
photos and inappropriate
messages to a game-day
hostess when both worked
for the New York Jets in
2008.
Oh, Favre and his Vikings
teammates got coach Brad
Childress fired, too.
Federer opened the
year by winning his 16th
major title at the Australian
Open but didn't look very
mighty in the months that
followed.
The French Open is
the major that has given
Federer the most trouble
over the years, but his loss
to Robin Soderling in the
quarterfinals at Roland
Garros was simply stun-


ning. It had been six years
since he'd failed to reach
the semifinals at a major, a
record span of 23 straight
Grand Slams.
An even bigger shock
was in store at Wimbledon,
where, the six-time cham-
pion was beaten handily
in the quarters by Tomas
Berdych. It was the first
time since 2002 he'd failed
to reach the final at the All
England Club. The loss also
dropped him to No. 3 in
the rankings, the first time
since November 2003 he'd
been that low.
Federer then lost to
Novak Djokovic in the
semifinals at the U.S. Open,
unable to hold his lead
when he was up two sets to
one and again when he was
a point from victory in the
fifth set.
Federer finished the year
strong with a commanding,


victory over Nadal at the
ATP World Tour Finals. He
will end the year at No. 2,
behind Nadal.
"Every time people write
me off or try to write me
off I'm able to bounce
back," the 29-year-old told
The Associated Press after-
ward.
Jeter continues to be
the poster boy for athlete
decorum. "I was pretty
angry" was the worst he
could muster after the New
York Yankees pointed out
his advancing age and
declining numbers during
contract negotiations. But
the Yankees have a point.
The plays come fast and
furious at shortstop and,
' at 36, Jeter's arm and legs
have a lot of innings on
them.
His numbers at the plate
were down significantly last
season, too.


. "You'd like to think that
last year was a hiccup, I
guess," Jeter said. "But it's
my job to go out there and
prove that it was."
With the London
Olympics still 18 months
away, Phelps didn't need
to be in gold-medal form.
Still, ift's strange to see the
14-time Olympic champion
race and not win. Ryan
Lochte beat Phelps in the
200 individual medley and
200 backstroke finals at
the U.S. championships,
then won six gold medals
to Phelps' five at the Pan
Pacific championships.
"Obviously, Ryan Lochte
is the best swimmer in the
world this year. No ques--
tion," Phelps' longtime
coach Bob Bowman said.
"That will be a huge chal-
lenge for Michael going
forward, hopefully a moti-
vator."
Because, as these ath-
letes reminded us this year,
there's always some new-
comer ready to step in:
It's a challenge for
any rookie quarterback
to adapt to the NFL, let
alone one who carries the
burden of being the No. 1
draft pick and is recover-
ing from shoulder su- ery.
But Bradford has managed
quite nicely and is giving
St. Louis Rams fans reason
to cheer something they
haven't had in a long, long
time. Even if the Rams miss
the playoffs, this season has
been a huge improvement
from last year's 1-15 finish.
If the Green Bay
Packers make the playoffs,
much of the credit will have
to go to M.,chews. The
former USC walk-on has
developed into one of the
NFL's best linebackers, and
he was so disruptive the
first half of the season he
generated some MVP
buzz.


Stoutfland says Miami has

'bittersweet' opportunity


By TIM REYNOLDS
Associated Press

CORAL GABLES Jeff
Stoutland has a new boss
at Miami.
Still, for one more game,
the majority of Stoutland's
thoughts will be with his
former one.
When Miami arrives in
El Paso, Texas on Sunday
to begin final prepara-
tions for the Sun Bowl on
New Year's Eve against
Notre Dame, Randy
Shannon won't be with the
Hurricanes. Fired nearly
a month ago, Shannon is
gone after four seasons-
but to Stoutland and many
Miami players, he's not
forgotten.
The way the Hurricanes
see it, in many respects,
this one's for Shannon.
'This is an important
game and I'll tell you
why it's an important
game," Stoutland told
The Associated Press after
a recent practice. "Randy
Shannon set the founda-
tion here. He's the one that
brought us all together.
He's the one that brought
us all here. When we kick
this game off, without even
having to say it to any of
the players, we're all play-
ing this game to win it and
he's part of that."
A confusing time has
finally provided Stoutland
with some clarity. Miami's
offensive line coach for
the past four years, he
took over as interim head
coach the morning after
Shannon's firing. At that
time, he and the rest of
the Miami staff all agreed
to remain with the team
for the bowl game even
though all faced very
uncertain futures.
Stoutland, linebackers
coach Micheal Barrow
and wide receivers coach
Aubrey Hill now know
they'll be retained by new
coach Al Golden for 2011.
Defensive coordinatorJohn


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Notre Dame head coach Brian Kelly (left) and Miami head
coach Jeff Stoutland pose with the 77th annual Hyundai
Sun Bowl Trophy Dec. 9 in El Paso, Texas.


Lovett, defensive backs
coach Wesley McGriff and
defensive line coach Rick
Petri have since learned
that the Sun Bowl will end
their tenures at Miami.
The fates of other assis-
tants, most notably offen-
sive coordinator Mark
Whipple and special teams
coordinator Joe Pannunzio,
have not been revealed,
although Golden has hired
Brennan Carroll to coach
tight ends going forward
- a job Pannunzio held
this season. Carroll, the
son of Seattle Seahawks
coach Pete Carroll, also
will lead national recruit-
ing efforts.
Whipple and Pannunzio
want to stay, but like the
rest of the staff, neither
has let their own futures
cloud the task of getting
the Hurricanes ready for
Notre Dame.
"We're going to coach
the same way," Whipple


said. "We told them, "We're
going to try to get you bet-
ter.' That's what the whole
thing is about as a coach,
improvingtheirlives.That's
been the focus. Everybody
wants to win and you want
to be successful, but from
the beginning of the year
here, our motto has been
'Finish.' That's what we're
trying to do."
In some circles, there
were suspicions that
many of the assistants
on Shannon's staff would
leave immediately after he
got fired.
*In actuality, the thought
never truly crossed their
minds.
"I've got to tell you,
at the end of each day, I
shake my head," Stoutland
said. "There's so much
pride with the coaches
I've been around. There's
nobody that has splintered
from this operation. That's
the big story, to me."


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Kansas City Chiefs linebacker Derrick Johnson (left) leaps to knock down a pass by St. Louis
Rams quarterback Sam Bradford Dec. 19 in St. Louis.


ROOKIES: Impact league during 2010


Continued From Page 1B

receivers Jordan Shipley
of Cincinnati, Mike
Williams of Tampa. Bay,
Jacoby Ford of Oakland
and Dez Bryant of Dallas,
to tight ends Jermaine
Gresham of Cincinnati,
Aaron Hernandez and
Rob Gronkowski of New
England, and Tony Moeaki
of Kansas City, to run-
ning backs LeGarrette
Blount of Tampa Bay, Ryan
Mathews of San Diego,
Chris Ivory of New Orleans
and Jahvid Best of Detroit.
Linemen Mike lupati of
San Francisco, Maurkice
Pouncey of Pittsburgh,
Rodger Saffold of St. Louis,
Zane Beadles of Denver and
Jared Veldheer of Oakland
have been key regulars.
But Bradford has stood
out, particularly with run-
ning back Steven Jackson
as the only proven com-
modity on offense. The
rookie from Oklahoma has
struggled recently, with five
interceptions and no touch-
downs, and St. Louis just as
easily can finish 6-10 as 8-8
and in the playoffs.
Still, Bradford's skills and
decision making have been


solid for such a difficult
position and on a rebuild-
ing team.
"He's a very focused
individual," coach Steve
Spagnuolo says. "He takes
care of his body and he
realizes the length of this
whole thing. You're talking
about the rookie walls, but
he played at Oklahoma,
where they're still practic-
ing now."
Should Bradford win
The Associated Press NFL
Offensive Rookie of the
Year award to be announced
after the season, he would
become the fourth quarter-
back voted top rookie in
seven years. Before that, no
QB had won it.
And if Suh takes the top
defensive award, it would
mark only the second time
the top two choices have
swept the rookie honors:
running back George
Rogers and linebacker
Lawrence Taylor did it in
1981.
Suh, from Nebraska, was
the most disruptive defen-
sive player in college a year
ago. He's barely missed a
step in the pros, and the


Lions' vast improvement on
defense they allowed a
league-worst 494 points in
2009 and are on track to
yield 376 can be directly
attributed to his impact.
Suh, who needs three
sacks to set a rookie mark
for his position, also has an
interception and a fumble
return for a touchdown.
"He's a beast," says
Freeman, Tampa Bay's
quarterback who went to
Kansas State and faced Suh
every season. "As a player,
knowing him on a personal
level, I know he gets after
it. He's got a personal ven-
detta against every offense
he plays. He's going to
make something happen,
whether it's stopping the
rur, whether it's getting a
sack ... he can do it all. He's
a complete player."
And he's only a rookie.
"I've never seen one
like him before," Lions
defensive coordinator
Gunther Cunningham says.
Cunningham has worked
with such Hall of Famers as
Derrick Thomas and Howie
Long. 'That guy's never
played in this league."


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, DECEMBER 26, 2010


" Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420











LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, DECEMBER 26, 2010

Lake City Reporter




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S. ndd Online
Wv w.Ii'tc'ityrtcportcr.eoni


Legal

ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS
THE DISTRICT BOARD OF
TRUSTEES OF FLORIDA GATE-
WAY COLLEGE WILL RECEIVE
BIDS FOR THE FOLLOWING:
F.G.C. BID NO. 11-1-02
L&MC AUDIO VISUAL PROJECT
HARVARD JOLLY, INC. PROJ-
ECT NO. 08085.00
PROJECT DESCRIPTION:
Florida Gateway College has award-
ed a bid to Marcobay Construction,
Inc. to construct a new 38,000 square
foot Library and Media Center on the
main campus of the College. That
construction of that facility is ap-
proximately 50% complete.
The Florida Gateway College Audio
Visual Department currently pro-
vides live and pre-programmed ana-
log content to the local Comcast Ca-
ble system for play-out to the com-
munity. The feed to the cable head-
end is accomplished via fiber. In ad-
dition, Florida Gateway College
streams audio to the local radio sta-
tions as well as programming to
WCJB Channel 20 in Gainesville,
FL. Operationally, the workflow and
play-out process is mostly automated
with manual override capability. Ex-
isting production and broadcast sys-
tems consist predominantly of analog
video and audio technology.
Florida Gateway College will contin-
ue to support Comcast Cable from
the new facility. The infrastructure
will be digital. As a result, Comcast
will need to upgrade the current Flor-
ida Gateway College fiber transmis-
sion system to accept a 270 MB/sec
Standard Definition (SD) digital sig-
nal.
The new broadcast system will sup-
port either a High Definition (HD) or
Standard Definition (SD) broadcast
stream. Initially, Florida Gateway
College will operate as an SD, plant
with discreet audio processing. The
final system design will have a sim-
ple upgrade path to support HD in
the future.
A file-based production and playout
system workflow will be adopted in
the new facility. Content streaming
to the internet and throughout the
Florida Gateway College campus
will be included as part of the new
system design. Broadcast depart-
ment wants to increase its support of
the college by expanding classroom
learning and special event production
projects. The new workflow will
support this goal.
There are three primary areas identi-
fied to support broadcast operations.
They include a production control
area, a studio, and the Master Con-
trol/Network Operations Center
(MCR/NOC). In addition, a digital
signage system will be designed and
installed in the new facility. This
system will be used to communicate
with faculty and students throughout
the building.
ELIGIBLE BIDDERS:
In order to be eligible to be awarded
this project a Bidder must have dem-,
onstrated expertise and experience
that is relevant to this project. Such
expertise and experience will be evi-
denced by the successful completion
of five (5) projects within the past
five (5) years similar in scope;
knowledge and experience in the
Broadcast and Audio Visual indus-
try; an understanding of latest tech-
nologies, products and services is es-
sential and required. Bidder must
possess a valid Low Voltage Li-
cense, an InfoComm sanctioned,
Emerald Level-or higher (CAVSP)-'
certification rating. Additionally, a
minimum of 50% of Bidder's em-
ployees shall be InfoComm Interna-
tional CTS certified or above. Bidder
must be licensed to do business in
the State of Florida.
TIME AND DATE FOR RECEIV-
ING BIDS:
2:00 P.M. E.S.T. TUESDAY JANU-
ARY 18, 2011
PLACE FOR RECEIVING BIDS:
Bids may be mailed as follows:
Florida Gateway College
Purchasing Department
149 S.E. College Place
Lake City, Florida 32025-8703
Hand delivered bids are to be pre-
sented to:
Florida Gateway College
Purchasing Department
198 S.E. Staff Way
Administration Building 001, Room
138
Lake City, Florida 32025-8703
All bids must arrive and be date/time
stamped by a Purchasing Department
representative prior to the specified
bid opening date/time. The College
will not be responsible for Postal or
other delivery service delays that
cause a bid to arrive at Room 138,
Building 001 after the designated bid
opening date/time. Bids that are
mailed must be clearly marked on
the outside of the envelope.
FGC BID# 11-1-02,
L&MC AUDIO VISUAL PROJECT
HARVARD JOLLY, INC. PROJ-
ECT NO. 08085.00
JANUARY 18, 2011
PRE-BID CONFERENCE:
There will be a MANDATORY pre-
bid meeting beginning at 1:30 PM
EST THURSDAY, JANUARY 06,







Home Improvements

Carpentry, remodeling, paint,
repairs, additions, Lic. & Ins.
Since 1978 FREE estimates
386-497-3219 or 954-649-1037

Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.


Pool Maintenance

Pool Leaks/Pool Repairs
Florida Leisure Pool & Spa
352-373-0612
CPC 1457279


Legal

2011 in the Board Room located in
the Administration Building (001) on
the main campus of Florida Gateway
College.
BID DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE
FROM:
Phil Trezza
Harvard Jolly Architects
5201 W. Kennedy Blvd
Tampa, Florida 33704
Telephone (727) 896-4611
E-Mail:
P.Trezza@harvardjolly.com
RIGHT TO WAIVE IRREGULARI-
TIES AND TECHNICALITIES:
Florida Gateway College reserves
the right to waive minor irregulari-
ties and/or technicalities associated
with this solicitation. The Director of
Purchasing of Florida Gateway Col-
lege shall be the final authority re-
garding waivers of irregularities and
technicalities.
FOR FLORIDA GATEWAY COL-
LEGE
Bill Brown, Director of Purchasing
04542720
December 19, 26, 2010
January 02, 2011

010 Announcements









020 Lost & Found
Lost 18mo old Yorkie. Recent
surgery and on medication. Has
microchip. Lost in McAlpin area.
Please call 386-362-2140

100 Jobr


04542702
Customer Service
Ideal Candidates with previous
experience with customer
service. Must have excellent
telephone skills. Individual
must be enthusiastic, outgoing,
have excellent computer skills
and be able to perform in a fast
pace environment.
Please fax resume to
386-758-0984 or email to
greatjobs@LCjobs.info

04542747
LifeSouth Community Blood
Centers is seeking an independ-
ent and precise individual for a
Donor Services Specialist
phlebotomistt) position.
HS/GED and valid driver's
license required. Phlebotomy
exp prfrd. F/T, $9-10 p/h. Apply
at www.lifesouth.org. Back-
ground check req. EOE/DFWP.

04542748
Another Way Inc. needs
Shelter Coordinator (full-time
w/benefits) in Chiefland
supervisory experience required
and two part-time advocates
(one Chiefland & one Lake
City) bi-lingual preferred for all
positions. Minorities and
formerly battered women
encouraged to apply. EOE.
Send resume w/cover letter
identifying position of interest to
hr@anotherwayinc.net or P. 0.
Box 1028, Lake City, FL 32056
or Fax 386-719-2758.
No phone calls accepted.

04542804
Auditor
Camp Weed and the Cerveny
Conference Center located in
Live Oak, Florida is seeking an
Accounting Auditor. The facility
offers 53 guestrooms, 8 cabins
arid a full conference center.
Candidate must have prior
accounting experience in similar
facility. Key responsibilities will
include accounts receivable/
payable oversight/management,
cash management, inventory
control, credit card reconcilia-
tion, profit and loss statement
inputting, etc. Must have
excellent verbal and written
communication skills. Competi-
tive salary and benefits. Email
resume t6 joe@campweed.org.

Cashiers needed, Experience Pre-
ferred,Drug frre workplace, allap-
plicants will be drug tested
Ellisville Exxon,
Hwy 441, No Phone Calls Please.
The Third Judicial Circuit
currently has the following
position available:Digital
Court Reporter
For more information go to:
www.jud3.flcourts.org


100 Job
Opportunities
Hiring Locally This Week
Liberty National Life
Insurance Company
Full Training Provided Potential
of $60K+ Annually. 401K, BCBS
Insurance & Pension for those who
Qualify. Call 1-800-257-5500
to set up an interview.
Delivery driver, must he 21 yrs
old, have 6 pts or less on license
and have NO misdemeanors or fel-
onies. Must possess a Class A
CDL,apply within/no phone calls!
North Florida Sales
467 SW Ring Ct, Lake City
Experienced IT Tech/
Network Admin
Qualifications: 2+ years
experience with: win XP pro, win
7 pro, server 2003, 2008. Must
have worked within and be
familiar with active directory.
Must be capable of lifting/moving
workstations. Microsoft
certifications a plus. Clean drivers
license required. Please submit
resume to hr@chclabs.com or
fax to 386-758-1791
Family Support Specialist
(Jennings, Live Oak EHS)
Associate degree with coursework
in social work, psychology, sociol-
ogy or related subjects (preferred)
OR High School,
Diploma/GED with documented
training in family support
services, customer service princi-
ples, home visiting or community
resources, and two years experi-
ence in providing family support
services. Must be willing to work
flexible hours -
minimum of two (2) evenings a
week, Be familiar with the overall
make-up of the communities
served, Must have experience in
records and/or case management,
Bilingual where appropriate, Must
have dependable transportation,
valid Florida driver's license and a
safe driving,
record, Must pass physical and
DCF background requirements,
.sick & annual leave,holiday pay,
health insurance, retirement +
add'l benefits. To apply- e-mail:
arobinson(5sv4cs.ore, call (386)
754-2222 or Fax 386-754-2220,
apply in person @ 236 SW
Columbia Ave, Lake City F1 or
843 SW Marymac St, Live Oak FI
(386) 362-4944 EOE


60 Temp Farm Workers needed
1/17/11-11/1/11. Duties include
pruning &thinning peach trees,
planting, cultivating, picking,
grading & packing fruits &
vegetables, general orchard
maintenance, farm & field
sanitation, tractor & forklift
operation. Guaranteed 3/4 of
contract hours. All tools, supplies,
equipment provided at no cost.
Free housing provided for
non-commuting workers.
Transportation & subsistence
reimbursed to worker upon
completion of 50% of contract.
$9.11/hr. Worksite in Spartanburg
& Cherokee Co's SC. Applicants
report/send a resume to the nearest
FL Agency for Workforce
Innovation office & ref.
job order # SC 492606.
JE Cooley Farms / Cooley Gals
Peach Farms / Carolina's Best
Blackberries
Mechanic needed for Truck shop,
must have own tools, apply
Southern Specialized, 1812 NW
Main Blvd., 386-752-9754

120 Medical
120^ Employment
Ff/T LPN or MA needefl M:F for
busy medical practice.
Please fax resume to
386-487-1232
05524650
LEARN TO DRAW BLOOD
Local Phlebotomy Course .
offered in Lake City, FLA
Certificate program.
(904)566-1328

Wanted Receptionist,
experienced. Send resume to
826 SW Main Blvd. Suite 102.
Lake City, FL. 32025


ADVERTISE YOUR
Job Opportunities in the
Lake City Reporter
Classifieds.
Enhance Your Ad with
Your Individual Logo
For just pennies a day.
Call today,
755-5440.


120 Medical
120 Employment

04542810
Advent Christian Village
Current JOBS Line
Advertisement
call 658-5627 or visit
www.acvillage.net
24 hrs/day, 7 days/week
Find a Job/Become Part
of a Community

LPN/RN Supervisor
Night Shift, long-term care
setting; unrestricted Florida
license & knowledge of LTC
regs & management skills"
required, prior supervisory
experience preferred; prior
experience in long-term care
setting a plus.
LPN/RN Direct Care
Unrestricted Florida license &
knowledge of LTC regs
required, prior experience in
long-term care setting a plus.
Assistant Postal Clerk
PT, high school diploma or
equivalent preferred. Simple
math skills, strong customer
service skills, & attention to
detail required. Must work
some Saturdays.
Desk Clerk/Guest
Registration
PT, high school diploma or
equivalent preferred. Good
working knowledge of MS
Office/spreadsheet software,
strong customer service, basic
math, & good communication
skills required. Hours vary &
include some weekends.
Excellent benefits
competitive pay. Apply in
person at Personnel Office
Monday through Friday from
9:00 a.m. until 4:00 p.m., or fax
resume/ credentials to
(386)658-5160. EOE/
Drug-Free Workplace /Criminal
background checks required.

05524720

^101

MERIDIAN
BEHAVIORAL
HEALTHCARE
Lake City
RN's & LPN's
PRN/1 yr experience
CNA
F/T & PRN
ARNP Outpatient Svcs
Starke/Tri County
Recovery Specialist
Recovery Center

Prevention Specialist
STrenton/Starke

Adult Substance Abuse
Licensed Therapists
Live Oak
Adult Case Manager
Live Oak/Gainesville

Psychiatrist
Outpatient Clinics
Live Oak/Jasper
Lake City
Custodial/Maintenance
Lake City
Meridian is an active partner
with the National Health
Service Corps
www.mbhci.or
to see our current needs and
online applications
EOE,DFWP


240 Schools &
2 Education

04542575
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-12/13/10
Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-01/17/11
Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com



310 Pets & Supplies
BEAGLE RABBIT DOG.
$175. Runs Good, Male
.386-249-3104 or
386-719-4802
FREE to good home,
bob-tail tabby, female kitten,
approx 6-7 months old
386-466-8248
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.


REPORTER Classifieds

In Print and On Line

www.lakecityreporter.com


330 Livestock &
33 Supplies
Pigs for sale
7 weeks old
$50 each HURRY!
386-965-2215
Pony
Mini Mare, Paint
5 yrs old $400
tack included 386-965-2231

361 Farm Equipment
84 Ford 4610 Tractor. Runs good.
Solid 2WD. New front tires,
350hr on 2005 motor. Dependable.
$7500. obo. 386-867-0005

401 Antiques
ANTIQUES WANTED
Fum., China, Silver, Glassware,
Costume Jewelry & Gold. 35 years
exp. Cash Pd. Pete. 386-963-2621

402 Appliances

Kenmore Washer & Dryer Set
front load, side by side or stacka-
ble, HE model, good cond, $300
386-755-2548 or 867-0546


408 Furniture
ALMOST NEW
rocker/recliner.
$6a.
386-935-4931
LARGE DRESSER
All wood.
$60.
386-935-4931
TV 55inch. HD projection.
Factory remote. Works great.
Looks great.Perfect gift.
$325.00 386-719-9189
Twin Race Car Bed with mattress.
Twin Story Book Cottage Bed
with mattress. $350.00. for both
386-965-9882

413 Musical
4DU Merchandise
100 Watt Sanyo Stereo, graphic
equalizer, dual cassette, speakers
36" high, very good condition
$50 386-935-0654

420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$225 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.

430 Garage Sales







PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.



440 Miscellaneous
CONSUL 31"TV.
Good condition
$80.
386-935-4931
Tow Behind Grill/Smoker. Com-
mercial built, nice shape. $1250.
obo. 386-249-3104 or 719-4802
Great for your New Years Bash!!!

520 Boats for Sale
Bass Tender Boat
10'2",
$500 Call for details
386-965-2215

Mobile Homes
630 for Rent
2/2 S/W beautiful, clean freshly
painted, near college, I acre,
big front porch $650 mo, avail 1/1
386-697-1013 or 386-697-1900
2/2, S/W, 1 acre secluded lot
Bascom Norris Bypass, $500 dep,
$500 mo, possible owner finance
386-623-2203 or 386-623-5410
2BR/2BA MH CH/A,
Fenced in back yard and Shed.
$750. mo plus deposit.
Pets OK! 386-755-4157
3/2 DW, secluded, Columbia City
area, covered back deck, No Inside
pets, $750 mo, plus sec dep
386-752-1941/ 386-965-0932
3br/2ba newly renovated MH on
1/2 ac. private property. Close to
college $700.mo. 1st. mo.+ Sec.
dep. Ref's. No Pets. Non smoking
environment 386-755-3288
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White Contact 386-623-2465
or 386-292-0114
Nice clean 2&3 bdrm, Five Points,
NO PETS, also 3 bd on the
Westside, 1 mo rent & dep
386-961-1482


Quiet Setting w/lots of oaks
2br/lba from $450 & 3br/2ba from
$550. Includes water & sewer.
No Pets! 386-961-0017


ARE YOU OUR MISSING PIECE?





).Your skills

Spaositive attitude.






Apply Online or In Personi 1152 SW Business Point Dr
Lake City, FL 32025
386.754.8562
S T EL www.sitel.com EOE


IBUI^




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LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, DECEMBER 26, 2010


630 Mobile Homes
630 for Rent
Very clean & well maintained 2/2
units in nice park. $599.mo
w/$500. dep. Rent incl water,
sewer, trash p/u. Close to town
386-984-8448 or 623-7547
Very Clean 2 BR/1 BA, in the
country, Branford area, $450 mo.,
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleypro590-0642
640 Mobile Homes
64 for Sale
$200. MONTHLY. Remodeled
SW. 2bd/2ba. Appliances,
delivered & blocked. Owner
finance available w/$3000 down.
Call Gary Hamilton 386-758-9824
05524589
Palm Harbor Homes
Factory Liquidation Sale
2009 Model Homes MUST GO!
Call for FREE color brochures
800-622-2832

05524637
Gainesville-Jacobsen-Savings
Factory direct Jaconsen outlet
now open to the public 3/2 start-
ing at 39,900 complete.
Northpointemobilehomesales.co
m for complete website specials
or 352-872-5566
For the best deal in Florida!

05524638
North Pointe Homes is your
new #1 Jacobsen dealer. Take a
short drive to Gainesville and
save thousands. Five year halo
warranty, 2x6 wall, and
much more. Free energy star
package on all others.
Call Chuck at 352-872-5567

05524639
Why drive to Gainesville?
This is Why! New 28x60
Jacobsen 3/2 inc FREE Furni-
ture! Low as $497 month.
Drive to our dealership and Buy,
I pay for your gas!
Call Mark at 352-872-5568

650 Mobile Home
& Land
BANK REPO: Mobile Home On
15.65 ACRES IN FT. WHITE -
Including 60X40 pole barn. Listed
at $130,000.00. Call Billy Shows
After hours 386-208-8547


720 Furnished Apts.
SFor Rent
Park Model Trailers (Studio), all
utils, use of pool, $500 per month,
NeverDunn's RV Park.
386-961-8540 or 755-4945
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808
730 Unfurnished
30 Home For Rent
2BR/1BA CH/A. Large carport,
great location, near corner of Baya
& McFarland references req'd.
Property zoned for commercial use
386-752-9144 or 755-2235
3 & 4 bedroom homes. Newly
renovated. Very nice, in town.
$750 $950 per month plus
deposit. 386-755-2423
3 Bedrm/2 Bth plus 360 sq ft Stu-
dio on Lake Jeffery/Old Mill Rd,
very private, $1200 per mo. plus
deposit, 386-752-9303, No Pets
3/2 W/D hook up, appliances
included, $200 sec dep,
$650 month. Madison Street
386-365-2515
3/2,Brick Home, big back yard,
$900 month + Security Deposit
off of Branford Hwy & CR 242,
386-965-0276
3br/2ba Brick. Double Carport
Carpet & tile. CH/A.On small lake
2000 sqft. $950. mo + sec. 386-
752-0118, 623-1698 or 292-4937
Cozy Cottage lbr/lba S. Hwy. 41
$550/mo. + security. Includes all
utilities & satellite TV. Pets OK.
(386)758-2408
FOR RENT: Large 3br/2ba brick
home, fenced on 5 acres on
Columbia/Suwannee County line.
$975. per'month + utilities.
Perfect place for children.
Broker/Owner- Annette Land @
386-935-0824
Newer 3/2 w/2 car garage.
1800 sq ft $900 mo. plus deposit
1-10/US 41 area
(248)875-8807
Rural beauty and privacy near
I-10/US90 NW of Live Oak. 3Br,
1+Ba, $725/mo. Optional pasture
available. (626) 512-5374


10 Unfurnished Apt. Business &
ForRent 750Off BusinessRentals
______For__Re__t_____ / Office Rentals


D5524443
$Holiday Cash $,
NO App Fee, NO SD,
$250 off December,
*for Qualified Applicants
Windsong Apartments
(386) 758-8455
05524728
SPRING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans;
some with garages.
Call 386-454-1469
or visit our website:,.
www.springhillvillage.net
2/1 w/garage,
east side of town,
1st, last & sec
386-755-6867
2BR/2BA DUPLEX
on McFarlane Ave. W/D hookup
Rent $625. per month.
Call 386-867-121.2 for details.
A Landlord You Can Love!
2 br Apts $550. & up + sec. Great
area. CH/A washer/dryer hookups.
386-758-9351/352-208-2421
Brick Duplex 2/1 off Baya. CH/A,
Carport, Carpet, tile, $575 mo,+
Dep. Call 386-752-0118 or
386-623-1698 or 386-292-4937'
Duplex w/garage spacious, 2/1,
1300 sq ft, W/D hook up, CH/A,
$650 plus dep & bckgrnd chk,
386-697-3248 or 352-514-2332
Great location W of 1-75, spacious
deluxe 2BR apts., garage, W/D
hook up. patio. $600 & up, + SD,
386 965-0276
The Lakes Apts. Studios & lBr's
from $135/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $425 + sec.
Michelle 386-752-9626


X-CLEAN SECOND STORY 2/2,
country acre 8 mi to VA, off Lk
Jeff Rd. $500 mo + dep. No dogs.
Deck, w/d hookups 386.961.9181

720 Furnished Apts.
S For Rent
1 BEDROOM all utilities includ-
ed. Furnished or unfurnished. East
or. West side. $475. mo. +
$200 security. 386-397-3568
NO Lease/Deposits, ROOMS only
Utilities, Cable, WI-FI, maid,
.micro-fridge, phone, Pool.
Americas Best Value Inn
(386)755-4664
Wk 1 prs. $169,2 ppl $179 + tax


OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$695. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor

805 Lots for Sale
5 Acres in Lake City, FL,
low down, easy qualifying, and
low monthly payments,
please call 512-663-0065
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al'origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living, with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

810 Home for Sale
3BR/2BA 2 story brick. 4.6 ac. in
ground pool. Lg. workshop &
2 wvells. $200,000.00 obo
Old Wire Rd. (850)728-0782
FSBO, Completely Remodeled,
3bdr/lbth, fenced, new deck, shop,
new cabinets/appliances,Schools
blks away, $65K 478-391-1592


820 Farms&
2 Acreage
4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$69,900. $613mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
4 Ac.,Ft. White. Well, Septic &
Power. Owner Financing!
NO DOWN! $69,900.
Only $613./mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
WE FINANCE! Half to ten acre
lots. Some with w/s/pp
Deas Bullard BKL Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com


ADVERTISE IT HERE!
Bring the picture in or we will take it for youl
Advertise your car, truck, motorcycle, recreation vehicle or
boat here for 10 consecutive days. If your vehicle does not sell
within those 10 days, for an additional $15 you can place your
ad for an additional 10 days. A picture will run everyday with
a description of your vehicle. The price of the vehicle must be
listed in the ad. Your ad must be prepaid with cash, check or
credit card. Just include a snapshot or bring your vehicle by
and we will take the picture for you. Private party only
Price includes a 6 day/ 4 line classified ad of the
same vehicle in print and online.



2009 Harley Davldson
XR1200R Mirage 2001 Chevy Astro
Orange and black. One Van
owner, garage kept. Like New trans., new AC, good
new, only 52 actual miles, tires, runs great, clean,
great work van.
$8,000 $2,200 OBO'
Call C0ll
386-752-5988 386-984-0571
For Mo e et ilsCal -ar o
Bridge at 38-755-54A


940 Trucks
1990 Ford F350 Dually
work truck, white, automatic
$1500 obo
386-965-2215
97 Chevy Z71 Extended cab. 3
door. Black w/gold trim. Local 2
owner. All service records. $4750.
obo 386-249-3104 / 386-719-4802


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Classified Department: 755-5440







6B LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, DECEMBER 26, 2010


-5


p TO1 5 00


L Free Aerobics & Child Care


IclITNESS
'CENTER


Wesffield Square LAKE C
386-752-0749-,i
"Lake City's Best Since 1I9


(W -,-,- -.-.- -.-. -.--- -..
'7,C. -1
Exam and Necessarn X-ravys
.DO(150, DO)330
First-time
S patient
. ; I '
I Reg. $1361
a Reg. $16 SAVINGS OF $107
Expires December 30 2010

S.' ,. .www.aspenlakecity.com


III


IHIlIr


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Rountree
-. TOYOTA

Parts & Service
4310 W US Hwy 90
(386) 755-0631
Monday-Friday 7am-s5pm


I Rotate &
Balance
Tires
Most cars & trucks ,
Plus tax & supplies
Not valid with any other offer
expires 12/31/10
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a'


It


e ant toTha Our Cu ers" for entrusing
their family Safety andCo to us sn 50.

RoisoGet Bui MC was built uponl a reputation
Rof Relisoablet B Seric Qualit Workmanship and
Depf elable Service. Qae commitment to service
r ur cters as and still is ou motto for success.
for our Customers \% C,.


Our customs are our friends and neighbors that
come back ustoearrs afte or tri because they recognize we
do everything toa satisfy their automotive needs.

The Ro et have alwa been community
The Ronsone haea-" ldig a "een stronger
minded and work towards hildiflg an even stronger
community today. When yoOI purchase a vehicle from
uIs or \iit our Service Depamet rest assured you are
helping s keep this tadition alie.
We have been serving Columbia County
for 4 generatios and over 60 years an
plan to be here 60 ,ore


The RoisoiL' Family is looking w20P
seeing aIg l 0o1 curstl' ierS 2011

The., 9 ,t ,,e? t Tamiv


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Story ideas?

Contact
C.J. Risak
Assistant editor
754-0427
cnsak@Jakecityreportercom


Lake City Reporter






BUSINESS


Sunday, December 26, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section C


Home Show finds home in Columbia County


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com

Participation
in the annual
North Florida
Home and Patio
Show proves
to be a win-win situation
for vendors, according to
event organizers.
"Vendors might not see
this many folks come into
their establishment on a
regular basis," said Mike
Gordon, show chairman.
The 8th annual North
Florida Home and Patio
Show is 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
March 5 and 10 a.m.
to 4 p.m. March 6 at
the Columbia County
Fairgrounds. Proceeds
from the home and patio
show go to local charities
in the community.
The event is presented
by the Rotary Club of Lake
City Downtown. Co-spon-
sors are The Lake City
Reporter, Newman Media
and Sunstate Federal
Credit Union.
Each year the show
features businesses in
industries related to the
home and patio. There is
no entrance or parking fee
to enter the event.
Tens of thousands of
people attend the show
during the two-day period,
giving businesses expo-
sure, Gordon said.
"It's a lot of bang for
your buck," he said.
Vann Carpet One wasn't
in the home and patio
show during its first year,
said Marc Vann,; co-owner. -
Now the business has par-


FILE PHOTO
Penny Williams, director of pharmacy operations at Baya Pharmacy, organizes Dr. Comfort
sneakers and shoes in a display during last year's North Florida Home and Patio Show.


"It's a lot of bang for your buck."

Mike Gordon
Show chairman


ticipated every year since
for about five years.
"We did it to see what
type of response there
was, not knowing really
about it," he said. "It was a
good turnout."
The exposure for a busi-
ness is tremendous during
the two days of the show,
Vann said. His business


started with one booth and
has since expanded to two
and three to show more of
its products.
"We couldn't be more
happier," he said. "We've
been really, really satisfied.
The home and patio
show brings a lot of peo-
ple to one spot.
"It gives a lot of people


the opportunity to see
all the new items and
products they might have
in mind," Vann said. "It
reminds them of how
many things there are in
Lake City and gives them
awareness of how many
local businesses have the
things they need."
Vann Carpet One will be
HOME continued on 2C


FILE PHOTO
Andi (left) and Vince Richardson, owners of Richardson
Aluminum LLC, inspect a window display last year while
setting up their booth for the Seventh Annual North Florida
Home and Patio Show at thb Columbia CoOnty Fairgrounds.


FILE PHOTO
Greg Benson, a manager at the Rec Warehouse located in
Jacksonville, installs a filter in a hot tub at last year's show.


uJ U a IIr O~lPLuhE i uiu s nDI/
2BA brick home w/2,146
SqFt! Screened Fla rm, living
rm, family rm w/FP, dining
rm plus Ig laundry rm; fenced
back yard ONLY $159,900
#76826


CUTE HOME in great
location is MOVE IN ready!
3BR/2BA w/1,225 SqFt on
corner lot of quiet subdivi-
sion; 12x16 wkshop w/elec;
several upgrades thru-out
for only $75,000 #75824


RESIDENTIAL


IMMACULATE HOME! 3BR/ NEW FLOORING & FRESH
2BA home w/1,330 SqFt PAINT! 2-story built in 1983
built in 1997 offers new tile on 1+ acre has 3BR/2BA,
in kitchen, newer central vac large kitchen, family room
system, new CH&A inside w/FP, fenced pond in back-
& out, sprinkler system, yard REDUCED TO $99,00
screened back porch & so yard REDUCED TO $99,900
much more ONLY $92,900 #75951
#76787


LARGE GREAT ROOM over- MOTIVATED SELLER! 2BR/
looks patio; large kitchen 2BA singlewide mfg home
w/lots of cabinets & break- w/1,216 SqFt on almost 2
fast room; split floor plan; acres in Lake City; large yard
very nice home FOR ONLY for family, screened front
$115,000 #75794 porch, paved driveway ONLY
$55,000 #75864


ACREAGE


157.58 SQUARE ACRES in 65- ACRES in Suwannee 114.67 ACRES in Suwannee
Columbia County on Old Wire Co offers ez access to Lake County! Wooded property
Road; well on property; only City, Live Oak & Branford; close to Suwannee River
$471,713 #75539 frontage on CR-49 & 150th south of Live Oak great for
St just north of CR-252; hunting &/or recreational
ideal tract for small farm tract ONLY $171,432
ONLY $98,760 #76636 #74967


DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY, INC.
Land Development Investments Residcntial-
2806 West US Highway 90, Suite 101
Lake City, Florida, 32055
ms (386) 755-5110 www.danielcrapps.com


PACKAGE INCLUDES:
$3500 FREE PLAY
Plus S5 Meal Voucher &
Roundtrip Transportation


CACH (. IAN, S
4 Ray a

VALDOSTA MALL
VALDOSTA, GA
1700 Norman Drive


YOU PAY: YOU PAY:

$4000 $3500
From Valdosta From Lake City & Gainesville


For more information call FABULOUS COACH LINES at
1.866.352.7295
or visit their website at fabulouscoach.com


LAKE CITY MALL
LAKE CITY
2469 West
US Hwy. 90


OAKS MALL
GAINESVILLE
6419 Newberry Road


For group charter information, please call the Seminole Hard Rock Hotel & Casino 877.529.7653


~4vv


TAMPA


"See Player's Club for complete details Must be at least 21 years old and a Seminole Player's Club member to participate Valid ID required. Management reserves all nghts. Offers
are non-negotiable, non-transferable and must be redeemed in person at the Seminole Hard Rock Hotel and Casino Tampa Offer is for the slot and gaming machine of your choice,
not valid for lve Poker or Table Games No cash value Persons who have been trespassed or banned by the Seminole Tribe of Florinda or those who have opted into the self-exclusion
program are not eligible. If you or someone you know has a gambling problem, please call 1-888-ADMIT-IT 2010 Seminole Hard Rock Hotel & Casino. All rights reserved.


PICK-UP LOCATIONS & TIMES
Service from Valdosta/Lake City/Gainesville
TUEDAS SAURAY


1-4 AT NORTH ORIENT ROAD 813.627.ROCK
SEMINOLEHARDROCKTAMPA.COM









LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS SUNDAY, DECEMBER 26, 2010


Social Security
Timing
Q Is it better to start receiving
Social Security benefits early,
or late? JD., Providence, RI.
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answer. Collecting early
means you'll receive less each
month, but you'll receive payments
for more months. The difference
between age 62 and age 66 is
48 payments. If you have any
reason to believe you won't live
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best, but it can also make sense
for other folks. After all, money
you receive early, can be invested,
or can permit you to leave other
investments in place longer. Also,
some people have little choice;
they simply need the income
before retirement age.
There's a significant upside
to delaying your benefit, though:
For every year that you delay it,
the value of your payout rises
about 8 percent. That's not a small
sum, and it can add up consider-
ably over a few years. Given that:
many of us will live a very long
time, it can end up being well
worth having waited.
There are other considerations,
too. If your income surpasses a
threshold, some of your benefit will
be taxed. If you plan to work a little
before your retirement age, your
benefits may be temporarily
reduced. Look at the question from
many angles, and perhaps consult a
financial planner as well.

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HOME: Community benefits by helping businesses in Columbia County


Continued From Page 1C
returning to the home and patio
show this year.
"I think it's a great idea," he
said. "We're just excited some-
body came up with the idea of
doing it,here. We're glad to be a
part of it."
. This will be the third year A
Proud Plumber has participated
in the home and patio show, said
George Deglar, owner. Success
from previous years keeps him
returning to the event
"It really helped my company,"
he said. "I met some of my big-


"In today's economy, people are choosing to
remodel and upgrade instead of buying new
homes."

George Deglar
Owner
A Proud Plumber


gest clients last year."
The home show's one-stop
shop is a successful approach for
attracting visitors.
"In today's economy, people


are choosing to remodel and
upgrade instead of buying new
homes," he said.
Businesses get their names
out to the community and show


what they have available and
can do for a home, Deglar said.
Customers can talk to a specific
business representative face-to-
face.
"Ifs a great time, and I'm glad
to be a part of it," he said. "It
benefits the community by help-
ing businesses and people get
together."
The Rotary Club is apprecia-
tive of all the vendors that par-
ticipate in the show.
"Without having good ven-
dors, we would not have the


turnout," Gordon said. "We have
to thank the vendors and the
public for being so supportive of
the event."
A good bit of booth space is
available for the upcoming show,
Gordon said. Interested vendors
can call 386-935-3496 or visit
www. rotarycluboflakecity-down-
town.com for more information.
History proves that booths sell
out for the show, Gordon said.
"Get in contact and call as
soon as possible," he said. "You
don't want to miss out on this."


Holiday shoppers sprint to end; retail revenue up


By MICHELLE CHAPMAN
AP Retail Writer

NEW YORK Holiday
shoppers are racing to the
end of the season at a more
feverish pace this year, with
retail revenue up 5.5 per-
cent during the last week-
end before Christmas.
The figure, released
by ShopperTrak on
Wednesday, is a drastic
improvement from the
same weekend last year,
when revenue dropped 6.2
percent because a big East
Coast snowstorm closed
malls and kept shoppers
at home.
This year's improvement
is especially encouraging
for retailers, for whom a big
weekend all but sealed a
shopping season of healthy
revenue gains.
ShopperTrak reported
shoppers spent $18.83
billion Dec. 17-19. That
includes $7.58 billion spent
on what retailers call "Super
Saturday" the Saturday
before Christmas.
The number of shoppers
rose 3 percent over the
weekend before Christmas
last year.
ShopperTrak expects
retail spending to rise 4 per-


cent for the holiday season.
It fell 0.4 percent during
the 2009 season. Anything
over 4 percent is consid-
ered a healthy gain.
The final days leading
up to Christmas are impor-
tant for retailers. Some do
a third of their annual busi-
ness during the season.
The final countdown to
Christmas is .especially
important. ShopperTrak
estimates that the 10 days
before Christmas usually
make up 31 percent to 34
percent of holiday-season
retail revenue.
Consumers appeared to
be in the mood to hit just
one location for their shop-
ping needs, with Thomson
Reuters reporting that traf-
fic at malls was higher on
Super Saturday than a year
ago.
But ShopperTrak antici-
pates this Thursday will
likely edge out Super
Saturday to become the
second-biggest sales day
this season behind Black
Friday, as last-minute shop-
pers scramble to pick up
gifts. Black Friday sales
were $10.69 billion, accord-
ing to ShopperTrak.
The Walking Co. store at
Circle Centre Mall in down-


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Shoppers are photographed on 34th Street in New York last Saturday. Holiday shoppers are
racing to the end of the season at a more feverish pace this year, with retail revenue up 5.5
percent during the last weekend before Christmas.


town Indianapolis has seen
a steady flow of customers.
"We're at least breaking
even with where we were
last year, if not better,"
manager Robert Stapleton
said.


Recent data from
MasterCard Advisors'
SpendingPulse, which
tracks spending across
all transactions including
cash, shows Americans
were spending more on


clothing, luxury goods
and even furniture during
the period from Oct. 31
through Saturday.
Online spending has also
been strong. As of Friday,
shoppers have spent $27.46


billion online since Nov. 1,
up 12 percent from a year
ago, according to research
firm comScore Inc.
Improved spending is
also a sign that the econ-
omy may be regaining its
footing.
The Commerce
Department reported
earlier this month that
November retail sales rose
0.8 percent, marking the
fifth straight monthly gain.
Department stores led the
way with a 2.8 percent gain,
the biggest for this category
since a 3S percent increase
in November 2008.
Retailers are expected to
have a strong December,
with Thomson Reuters
predicting that revenue
at stores open at least a
year will be up 3.6 per-
cent on average for the
month. Discount stores
like Target Corp. and BJ's
Wholesale Club Inc. are
expected to do well, along
with teen clothing retail-
ers like Abercrombie &
Fitch Co. and Zumiez Inc.
This figure is a key
gauge of a retailer's health
because it measures
results at existing stores
instead of newly opened
ones.


I Asklthe


What Is This Thing Called
The Motley Fool?
Remember Shakespeare?
Remember "As You Like It"?
In Elizabethan days, Fools were the only
people who could get away with telling the
tneth to the King or Queen.
The Motley Fool tells the truth about invest-
ing, and hopes you 'Il laugh all
the way to the bank
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Merck Smartens Up
Merck's (NYSE: MRK) acquisi-
tion of privately held SmartCells
looks like a smart move assum-
ing it didn't overpay.
SmartCells' draw, its SmartInsulin,
is only in preclinical development It
has a long way to go before it's on
the market, if it gets there. Ideally,
Merck was smart enough to hedge
some of the development risk by
tying a large portion of the $500-mil-
lion-plus milestone payments to clin-
ical advancements far in the future.
SmartInsulin is rather risky, since
it uses an unproven technology, but
it's a potential blockbuster if it
works. The drug senses the concen-
tration of glucose and then releases
insulin as the glucose levels fall.
Rather than constantly pricking their
fingers to get glucose levels, and
then injecting insulin, diabetics
might only haveto inject the drug
once a day and let the SmartInsulin
release as necessary.
Merck already sells Januvia, its
very successful diabetes drug, so
SmartInsulin would be a good fit.
The Smart technology could even
extend beyond insulin. It could be
used to sense any molecule and
Then release a drug. Drugs that have
a tight therapeutic window -
where too much is bad and too little
doesn't do enough would be
good candidates.
If SmartC.ells succeeds, its.
purchase will make Merck look
like a downright genius no matter
how much it paid upfront to buy
the company.


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


F









Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER HOME SUNDAY, DECEMBER 26, 2010


on mine FE


Tips for



parents



and kids



FAMILY FEATURES
Parents' concerns about Internet
safety used to be confined to the
computer..Today, kids have more
access to the Internet through
smart phones and gaming
devices so the potential for cyberbullying.
is greater than ever.
Cyberbullying is when one minor
uses technology as a weapon to target
another young person. According to
StopCyberbullying.org, elementary and
middle schools report cyberbullying as
the most frequent problem they face.
Most people think of cyberbullying as girl
to girl. Girls become the more prevalent
cyberbullies in middle school, harassing
other girls and boys. Cyberbullying at the
elementary school level is typically boy to
boy due to the higher percentage of boys
who play online games as opposed to girls.
Twenty percent of kids in the fourth
through sixth grade have reported one
type of cyberbullying when playing games,
including:
Password theft
Accessing and stealing virtual items
Mean messages


1' -~


~j'.


Photo courtesy of Getty Images


A place where families
can play together online
For a fun and safe place for kids, parents and even grand-
parents to play together online, visit buildabearville.com,
the Build-A-Bear Workshop virtual world. Build-A-Bear
Workshop is committed to working together with kids,
parents, educators, industry experts, policymakers, and law d
enforcement officials to make the Internet a safer place for _
kids through education and awareness. The tools that are
currently available at buildabearville.com for kids to learn -
about Internet safety include:
Cyber Safety Quiz
a Landing page with tips and suggestions on playing
safe online
a Events throughout the year to promote safe play
In 2010, Build-A-Bearville received the Inaugural StopCyberbullying Award
from StopCyberbullying.org. In 2009 the site earned the WiredKids Best of the
Web Award sponsored by WiredSafety.org and in 2008, Build-A-Bearville received
the I-Parenting Award.


-. -What parents can do
Parental involvement is key to-preventing
cyberbullying and keeping kids safe
online. Marsali Hancock, president and
l K ^ CEO of the Internet Keep Safe Coalition
(www.ikeepsafe.org), recommends the
following tips for parents to keep their
children safe online:
n. Keep current with technology. You
don't have to be an expert, but a little
understanding goes a long way
towards keeping your child safe
online. Get basic technical training
and learn about new products as they
are released.
SKeep communicating with your child
about what he or she is experiencing
on the Internet and with technology
in general. Know their lingo, and ask
when you don't understand some-
thing. Work to keep communication
lines open.
n Keep checking your child's Internet
activity. Know where they go online.
Let them know that you will keep
checking because you want them to
understand that the Internet is a public
forum and never truly private.
n Keep participating with your child's
online activities. They are the experts,
so you can ask them to help you.
Not only will your knowledge of
the digital world be strengthened -
so will your relationship with your
children.
"When we ask our kids what is going
on at school they often reply 'not much,'
but when we play online games with them,
they start to talk about other things going
on in their lives, too it is a great way
to ease into conversations that may other-
n wise be difficult to get started," said Mary
Heston, director of the Wiredsafety's
Wiredmoms program:

What kids can do
"Cyberbullying starts early and lasts a lifetime," said Parry Aftab, founder
and Executive Director of WiredSafety, home of StopCyberbullying.org and
Wiredkids.org. "We have to teach our children good digital hygiene about
password safety and following the Intemrnet Golden Rule don't do anything
online that you wouldn't do offline."
Here are some other things kids can do to help prevent cyberbullying:
m Protect your identity and reputation by being careful not to share your
name, contact information, or pictures.
m Realize that what is put in the digital world can stay there forever. Only
post pictures that you would want your parents, peers and school to see.
n Create secure passwords. Passwords should be easy to remember, hard
to guess. If you have to write it down, it's too hard to remember. If it's
a pet's name, your middle name, your favorite sports team, etc., it's
too easy to guess. Remember, a combination of numbers and letters is
always best.
m Don't share your passwords. Don't allow kids to give out their password
to others. Eighty-five percent of elementary school students and 70 per-
cent of teens polled said they shared their password with at least one
friend. That's one friend too many. Friends can be cyberbullies too, sign-
ing onto your account, impersonating you and possibly embarrassing you.
They can also change your password, locking you out of your account.


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


, ,,
,4


LAKE CITY REPORTER HOME SUNDAY, DECEMBER 26, 2010








LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS SUNDAY, DECEMBER 26, 2010


Tax cuts raise expectations for economy in 2011


By JEANNINE AVERSA
AP Economics I writerr
Expectations
for economic
growth next
ear are turning
more optimistic
now thi Americans will
have a little more cash in
their pockets.
A cut in workers' Social
Security taxes and rising
consumer spending have
led economists to predict
a strong start for 2011.
Still, most people won't
feel much better until
employers ramp up hir-
ing and people buy more
homes.
Analysts are predicting
economic growth next
year will come in next
year close to 4 percent. It
would mark an improve-
ment from the 2.8 percent
growth expected for this
year and would be the
strongest showing since
2000.
"Looking ahead, cir-
cumstances are ripe for
the economy to develop
additional traction," said
Joshua Shapiro, chief U.S.
economist at MFR Inc. in
New York. He is estimat-
ing growth for 2011 to be


above 3.5 percent.
The economy grew
at a moderate pace
last summer, reflecting
stronger spending by
businesses to replenish
stockpiles, the Commerce
Department reported
Wednesday. Gross domes-
tic product increased at a
2.6 percent annual rate in
the July-September quar-
ter. That's up from the 2.5
percent pace estimated a
month ago. While busi-
nesses spent more to
build inventories, con-
sumers spent a bit less.
Many analysts predict
the economy strength-
ened in the October-
December quarter. They
think the economy is
growing at a 3.5 percent
pace or better mainly
because consumers are
spending more freely
again.
Still, the housing mar-
ket remains a drag on
the slowly improving
economy.
The National
Association of Realtors
reported Wednesday
that more people bought
previously owned homes
rose in November. The
sales pace rose 5.6


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Nov. 11 photo, outgoing shippers toss packages into the proper outbound bins at an
Amazon.com fulfillment center in Phoenix.


percent to a seasonally
adjusted annual rate of
4.68 million units. Even
with the gain, sales are
still well below what ana-
lysts consider a healthy
pace.
Even if analysts are


right about 2011 being a
better year for the econo-
my, growth still wouldn't
be strong enough to dra-
matically lower the 9.8
percent unemployment
rate.
By some estimates, the


economy would need to
grow by 5 percent for a
full year to push down
the unemployment rate
by a full percentage
point. Even with growth
at around 4 percent, as
many analysts predict,


the unemployment rate
is still expected to hover
around 9 percent.
The third-quarter's
performance marks an
improvement from the
feeble 1.7 percent growth
logged in the April-June
quarter. The economy's
growth slowed sharply
then. Fears about the
European debt crisis
roiled Wall Street and
prompted businesses to
limit their spending.
"It sure looks like the
'soft patch' is over," said
Nariman Behravesh, chief
economist at IHS Global
Insight.
In the third quarter,
greater spending by busi-
nesses on replenishing
their stocks was the main
factor behind the slight
upward revision to GDP.
Consumers boosted
their spending at a 2.4 per-
cent pace. That was down
from a 2.8 percent growth
rate previously estimated.
Even so, consumers
increased their spending
at the fastest pace in four
years. The slight down-
ward revision reflected
less spending on health
care and financial services
than previously estimated.


Sales of previously

occupied homes

up in November


By MARTIN CRUTSINGER
AP Economics Writer
WASHINGTON More
people. bought previously
owned homes in November,
the third increase in four
months after the worst sum-
mer season in more than a
decade.
Still, economists say it
could take years for home
sales to return to healthy
levels.
Puyers bought homes
at a seasonally adjusted
annual rate of 4.68 million,
the National Association of
Realtors said Wednesday.
Even with the rise, this year
is shaping up to be the worst
for home sales since 1997.
Economists say it could
take at least two years or lon-
ger to return to a more nor-
mal level for sales of around
6 million units a year.
'The housing market is
still flat on its back, but there
are signs that it is starting
to pick itself up," said Mark
Zandi, chief economist at
Moody's Analytics. "Even
with the improvements we
expect, next year will still be
a very weak market"
The housing market is still
struggling to recover from
a boom-bust cycle which
helped trigger a severe
economic recession. Home
prices have tumbled in most
markets and many potential
buyers worry that prices
could fall further.
The median price of a
home sold in November was
$170,600.


I hope alf ou
minutebe-f ildwt
*, bep e ec


Zandi said he expects pric-
es will fall another 5 percent
from where, they are now,
hitting a bottom in the sum-
mer of next year.
A major problem is the
glut of unsold homes on
, the market Those numbers
fell to 3.71 million units in
November. It would take 9.5
months to clear them off the
market at the November
sales pace. Most analysts say
a six to seven-month supply
represents a healthy supply
of homes.
Analysts said the situa-
tion is much worse when
the "shadow inventory" of
homes is taken into account.
These are homes that are in
the early stages of the fore-
closure process but have not
been put on the market yet
for resale.
David Wyss, chief econo-
mist at Standard & Poor's in
New York, said when these
homes are added, the inven-
tory level would actually
be about double where it is
now.
'There is a big shadow
inventory out there of hous-
es that are in the process of
foreclosure or are underwa-
ter and will go into foreclo-
sure," Wyss said. "We are
still bouncing along the bot-
tom in housing."
Patrick Newport, a hous-
ing economist, said he
believed sales of previously
owned homes could actually
drop farther in 2011, dipping
to 4.6 million units and then
begin a gradual recovery
in 2012.


Don't Miss

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the word search above. Words can be found in the banners
on the ads shown here. Complete the puzzle and return it
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ENTRY FORM
Name:
Phone Number:
Address:
Subscriber: D Yes D No
Deadline is Monday, December 27, 2010 at 5:00 p.m.
Lake City Reporter


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Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424












Story ideas?

Contact
C.J. Risak
Assistant editor
754-0427
cnsak(jakectyreporter com


Lake City Reporter





LIFE


Sunday, December


26, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section D


Nichelle Demorest
dndemorest@ufl.edu


Planting

a holly

this time

of year

What bet-
ter time
of year
than right
now to
consider planting a holly in
the landscape? Holly leaves
and berries are traditional
symbols of winter and the
Christmas season. The ber-
ries are plump and bright,
and are looking pretty tasty
to neighborhood birds out
in search for dinner.
With over 500 cultivated
varieties, hollies are widely
adapted to areas through-
out the United States.
Besides manly cultivars
that grow well in Florida,
there are eleven native
Florida species. Sizes range
from upright trees to low,
spreading shrubs. Most
are evergreen, but there
are some deciduous hollies
that grow well in our cli-
mate. The result is 'a holly
for every landscape'.
The holly leaves that are
best known for Christmas
d6cor are from the
American holly, Ilex opaca.
This upright evergreen has
the typical spiny leaves and
bright red fruit. This native
plant is commonly found
in the wooded hills and
river floodplains of north
Florida.
It is often commercially
grown as a specimen plant
for use in landscape.
Male and female flowers
appear on separate trees,
and the male plants will not
produce showy berries.
Hundreds of cultivars
have been developed and
hybridized over the years
to provide a wide selection
of sizes and fruit color.
Several heavy-fruiting
female cultivars which are
adapted well to the south
include "Amy," "Bountiful,"
and "Miss Helen."
I recently had an inquiry
about East Palatka holly.
This holly is actually a
cross between two native
plants, American holly
and dahoon holly. It was
first found growing near
the town of East Palatka,
Florida, in 1927. This ever-
green grows up to 45 feet
and has a pleasing pyrami-
dal shape. If grown without
shearing, it develops into a
beautiful pyramidal speci-
men with graceful, droop-
ing branches.
When you purchase your
East Palatka holly, how will
you know if it will have ber-
ries? This holly is a female
plant, and all selections will
produce berries. Plants are
propagated commercially
by cuttings or grafting.
In Johnny Appleseed
country, there are plenty of
wild trees around for apple
pollination. Unless our
bees disappear, our female
holly cultivars should give
you and your birds plenty
of colorful winter berries.
To read more, go to http://
solutionsforyourlife. cornm.
* D. Nichelle Demorest is
a horticulture agent with the
Columbia County Extension
of the University of Florida
Institute of Food and
Agricultural Sciences.


COURTESY PHOTO
Lake City resident Perley Richardson (center) accepts a plaque and his third Paul Harris Fellow pin at a Rotary Club of Lake City Downtown meeting on
Dec. 15. Richardson was recognized for his perfect attendance for the past 40 years 2,080 weeks as a Rotarian. 'In all honesty, I didn't intend to
make a perfect attendance record, but I did,' Richardson said. Pictured are Assistant District Governor Clarence Cannon (from left, Richardson and Past
District Governor John Kuykendall.


Perfect


record


Rotarian accomplishes 2,080 weeks of flawless attendance


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.comrn


Having 40 years of
perfect attendance
in the Rotary Club
was not an inten-
tional feat for Perley
Richardson.
"When one enters Rotary, part
of (his) duties are to maintain as
good an attendance as possible,"
he said.
Richardson was honored for
his accomplishment on Dec. 15
at the Rotary Club of Lake City'
Downtown. That's 40 years after
his membership was accepted
in the Rotary Club of Miami in
December 1970.
His mindset was "if I'm not at
the meeting, I don't know what's
going on," he said.
Becoming president of the club
for the 1982-1983 year further
fueled a good attendance record.
"Because of that, I thought I
ought to keep up attendance,"


COURTESY PHOTO
Perley Richardson joined the Rotary
Club of Miami 40 years ago.
Richardson said.
After moving to Lake City in
1985, he transferred his member-
ship to the Rotary Club of Lake
City Downtown and continued to
consistently attend meetings.
Then in 1990-1991 Richardson


was elected District Governor.
"Since I became the governor I
thought I really ought to keep up
attendance," he said.
Rotarians don't have to main-
tain attendance just through
their specific club, Richardson
said. He and his wife, Jean, have
attended Rotary Club meetings
in 16 countries and every state
in the nation, except Arizona and
Alaska.
"No matter where it is, Rotary
is pretty widespread as far as
clubs are concerned," he said.
There have been many memo-
rable moments during his years
of perfect attendance.
Richardson had his most
expensive lunch ever in Paris for
$86, he said. The then president
of Rotary International intro-
duced him and his wife to the
Rotary Club of Paris.
While at a Rotary Club meeting
in Germany, the guest speaker
was a wine maker.
"He had probably 12 to 15
different wines, and we were to


Jobless get another benefit


By JEANNIE NUSS
Associated Press
COLUMBUS, Ohio The
women snuggle into nests of pil-
lows and blankets.
A light breeze, like a mother
blowing on a baby's boo-boo, falls
from ceiling fans and tickles their
backs. The room is dark, silent,
until they crawl out of child's
pose and chant, "Omm."
This is free yoga for the unem-
ployed: a different kind of jobless
benefit where former managers,
laid-off limo drivers and others
can turn to the grown-up version
of nap time to ease the stress of
being out of work.
With national unemployment
just below 10 percent, $20 yoga
classes don't qualify as necessi-
ties for many out-of-work people
who've pruned luxuries from
their budgets. So in a gesture
that's part send-good-vibes-to-the-
universe and part community out-
reach, a handful of yoga studios
have decided to cut the unem-
ployed a break.
"We didn't want them to have
to choose, 'Should I eat today or


ASSOCIA
Yoga instructor Zack Lynn teaches at Yoga on High yoga center in Colu
Ohio. Yoga on High has free yoga classes for people who are unemploy


go take this class?' We wanted to
give them the ability to do both,"
said Zack Lynn, a computer
techie by day who teaches a free
yoga class for people out of work
in Columbus.
The Integral Yoga Institute in
New York started offering free
weekly classes last year when
some students lost their jobs
and couldn't afford to pay $17


per course. Now, a dozen
jobseekers drop in for free
salutations and other street
every week.
"It helps to quiet the miu
helps people realize that th
a temporary situation," sai
Sgammato, the studio's ge
manager.
Yogis say breathing exe
can reduce the stress of jo


taste all the wines that evening,"
Richardson said.
Perfect attendance for 40 years
is an achievement made by few
members, he said.
"But when you reach that
pinnacle, it isn't really all that
important," Richardson said.
'There are many other things
Rotary stands for."
Rotary is an organization that
is similar to a person's Christian
beliefs, he said.
"It means that you are duty
bound to help those that are
less fortunate than you are,"
Richardson said. "That's our
goal. We want to be available
and make life easier for those
not as fortunate as we have
been."
With 40 years of perfect
attendance, Richardson plans
on continuing his consistent
involvement.
"I have no intentions of dis-
rupting my past procedures as
long as my health holds up," he
said.


- free yoga

views and post-stretching tea
time is good for networking.
"You're not really thinking
about other things," said Quinn
Johnson, a 42-year-old former
limo driver who started attend-
ing Integral Yoga's free classes
earlier this year. "You're relaxing.
You're stretching."
Some students have found
work and switched to paid class-
es. But employment experts and
yogis alike are quick to point out
that yoga shouldn't get all the
credit.
S"Yoga's not getting anybody
a job," said Wendy Enelow, an
TED PRESS executive career consultant
mbus, in Coleman Falls, Va. "What
yed. the yoga studios do and I
think kudos to them is if you
or two physically feel better, your head's
sun going to feel better and you're in
ches a better place to manage your job
search."
nd and Practicing yoga is believed to
his is reduce stress and improve con-
d Jo centration. Some studios offer
neral special classes to help veterans
work through traumatic experi-
rcises ences and women cope with
b inter- pregnancies.


I 91K









LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, DECEMBER 26, 2010


Great movies for Christmas and New Year's


Well, it's
Dec.
26, and
Christmas
is over,
but it's still the holiday
season, even if all the radio
stations have prematurely
stopped playing carols.
I've pretty much cov-
ered Christmas movies the
last few years, but there
are several movies of dif-
ferent types set between
Christmas and New Year's
Day, which are just right
for this time.
While not really holiday
movies, they still have
enough of a holiday patina
to count.
Give them a look; I'm
sure none will disappoint
you. And oh yes, Happy
New Year!

"The Apartment"
(1960)
The big Oscar win-
ner (five, including best
picture) of its year, this
biting, bitter look at the
corporate world showcases
some great performances
from a fine cast: Jack
Lemmon as the lowly
office worker who, to
rise up the ladder faster,
lends out his apartment
to his superiors for trysts
with their women (not
their wives, as you can
guess); Shirley MacLaine
as the elevator operator
for whom he pines, and
Fred MacMurray as the
boss who also pines for
her but not enough to
leave his wife and begin
anew. Producer-writer-


director Billy Wilder (he
got Oscars for all three
chores) was rarely, if ever,
more cynical than here,
but Lemmon and especial-
ly MacLaine bring some
needed humanity into the
movie.

"The Facts of Life"
(1960)
A good double fea-
ture to see with "The
Apartment."
This tale of two lonely
people in boring marriages
wanting to commit adul-
tery racked up five Oscar
nominations (winning for
best costume design).
What's amazing is that
the would-be cheaters are
played by Bob Hope and
Lucille Ball, not the type
of roles you'd expect these
two to play.
Ball biographer
Kathleen Brady correctly
calls this film "one of
the sexless sex farces of
the period" but nonethe-
less it's a funny, unjustly
forgotten film with many
delightful and even sweet
moments and the two
stars, always a good team,
play their atypical roles
very well (especially
Lucy),

"Diner" (1982)
The story of six friends
in their early twenties. One
is getting married, but
only if his fiancee passes
a football trivia test (so
they'll have something to
talk about), one already
is married and has noth-


Mark Kirby
mark.kirby@fgc.edu
ing to talk about with his
wife, one is in debt to a
loan shark, one drowns
his misery in alcohol, one
is going to be an unwed
father, and one is a genial
moocher. Writer-director
Barry Levinson crafts a
beautiful film out of his
remembrances of his salad
days in Baltimore in the
'50s.
The performances
are all excellent; this
was the springboard
for many stars-to-be:
Mickey Rourke, Kevin
Bacon, Paul Reiser, Ellen
Barkin, Timothy Daly,
Daniel Stern, and Steve
Guttenberg.

"The. Thin Man" (1934)
"After the Thin Man"
(1936)
The first two entries in
this unique series star one
of the rare perfect teams
in movie history: William
Powell and Myrna Loy as
Nick and Nora Charles.
By now murder mysteries
with witty banter among
couples is standard fare
but take a look at the film
that started it all and its
first sequel. Powell and
Loy not only complement-
ed one another to a tee as


actors but they also loved
working together and it
shows. Forget the murder
mystery plots (Nick will
cover all the details for
you in both films) and just
watch two of the screen's
most elegant and witty
players display their skill.

"The Poseidon
Adventure" (1972)
The granddaddy of the
all-star disaster film genre
takes place on New Year's
Eve.
See what was consid-
ered the ultimate in special
effects back in 1972. The
film's budget was only
$5 million admittedly,
worth a lot more then.
In fact the lion's share
of the publicity consisted
on listing all the Oscar
winners in the film:
Gene Hackman, Shelley
Winters, Red Buttons,
Ernest Borgnine, among
others. Worth checking
out if just to compare it
with the remake and to see
how disaster movies have
changed yet stayed the
same over all these years.

"Entrapment" ((1999)
Sean Connery,
Catherine Zeta-Jones,
art forgery, theft, double
crossings, and a heist
caper to be pulled off at
the stroke of midnight
at the new millennium.
(Remember how'everyone
worried what would hap-
pen when 1999 turned to
2000?) "Entrapment" is
an entertaining time-killer


and Sean and Catherine
work well together.

"Holiday Inn" (1942)
Yes, it's the film that
gave us "White Christmas"
but it is set on many
holidays, and has two New
Year's Eve scenes, so I've
got to include it. If you
missed it at Christmas
(perhaps you were watch-
ing its quasi-remake,


"White Christmas," over
and over) rectify your
error and watch it. Bing
Crosby and Fred Astaire
team up and sing an Irving
Berlin score. The movie
was released in the early
days of World War II and
made millions.

* Mark Kirby is coordina-
tor for Community Cultural
Resources at Florida
Gateway College.


Riley
Dee and Don Riley of
Iowa were united in mar-
riage Dec. 23, 1950. The
couple will celebrate their
60th wedding anniversary


Dee and Don Riley.


Fouraker
Nadine Kirby Fouraker
of Live Oak and James
K. "Bubba" Fouraker of
Wellborn were united in
marriage Dec. 26, 1960 at
the First Baptist Church in
Live Oak.
They will celebrate their
50th anniversary with
extended family during
the Christmas holidays.
The couple have two chil-
dren, Laura Ann Fouraker-
Gardner of Lake City and
Jeanie Lynn Fouraker of
St. Augustine. They have
one grandchild, Madelyn
Gardner.
The bride was a teach-
er in Columbia County
for six years and retired
as the director of the
Vocational Center Child
Care Program in Live Oak
after 30 years.
The groom was a real
estate salesman in Lake


during the holiday season.
The couple have three
children and many grand-
children.
They have lived in Lake
City for more than 10
years.


COURTESY PHOTO


ENGAGEMENTS


Crisp Taylor
Bobby and Edwynna
Crisp of Branford
announce the engagement
and approaching marriage
of their daughter, Tabitha
Marie Crisp of Branford,
to Matthew Avery Taylor
of Wellborn. He is the son
of Buckie and Janet Taylor
of Wellborn.
The bride-elect is a 2008
graduate of BHS.' She
graduated in 2010 with an
AA in pre-nursing from
Santa Fe College in 2010.
Currently she is a full-time
college student pursuing a
degree in nursing.
The future groom is
a 2007 graduate of BHS.
He currently is in active
duty with the 75th Ranger
Regiment of the United
States Army.
The wedding is planed
from 4 p.m. Jan. 1 at


COURTESY PHOTO
Tabitha Marie Crisp and Matthew Avery Taylor.

Gateway Baptist Church, and Garden Club on 257
located at Hwy. 247 in Lake S.E. Hernando Ave.
City. A reception will follow All friends and family
at the Lake City Women's are invited.


COURTESY PHOTO
Nadine Kirby Fouraker and
James Fouraker.

City for six years and owns
and operated a farm in
Wellborn.
The couple have lived in
Columbia County for five
years and Wellborn for 45.


BIRTH ANNOUNCEMENT


Kapri Elaine
Trespalacios

Chad and Katie
Trespalacios of Lake City
announce the birth of their
daughter, Kapri Elaine
Trespalacios Nov. 9 in Lake
City.
She weighed 8 pounds
and 1 and a half ounces and


measured 20 inches.
Grandparents are Rafael
and Mitzi Trespalacios of
Lake City, Robby Shaffer of
Mayo and Cindy Gaylord of
Lake City.
Great-grandparents are
Judy and the late Charles
Robarts Sr. of Lake City,
Kathy Kessel of Mayo and
Bob Shaffer of Colorado
Springs, Co.


China, Crystal,
Flatware and Gifts
Couples registered:
Sarah Butler
Michael O'Rourke
February 26, 2011


Tiffany Torrans
Kyle Malone
March 19, 2011


Shannon McRae
Michael Bishop
March 19, 2011


Dianna Roberts
Jay Swisher
March 26, 2011


Dorrie Sloan
James Albritton, Jr.
April 2, 2011
/-

Joanna Watson
Dustin King
April 15, 2011


Christine Moses
David Moor
May 21, 2011
We know exactly what
they want in a wedding or
shower gift. We update their
list as gifts are purchased,
and gift wrap.
WARD'S
JEWELRY & GIFTS
156 N. Marion Ave.
Lake City
752-5470


ANNIVERSARIES


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424












Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & CROSSWORD SUNDAY, DECEMBER 26, 2010


DEAR ABBY


If caller ID says husband,


wife should take his call


DEAR ABBY: When my
husband, "Mac," calls me on
the phone, he expects me to
look at the caller ID and im-
mediately interrupt whatever
conversation I'm having to
take his call.
Unless I expect an impor-
tant call (from a doctor or my
children's school), I do not
look at the caller ID. I give my
full attention to the person I'm
speaking to. If I hear someone
"beep," I'll attempt to quickly
bring the conversation to a
polite and natural end before
calling back the person who
tried to reach me.
Mac believes that anyone
I'm talking to should under-
stand that he takes priority.
Today, he called seven times
in two minutes to then berate
me for not instantly taking
his call about an unimportant
matter.
Abby, in Mac's defense,
he's a high-level executive
with limited free time during
the day. He is not otherwise
demanding and usually calls
me only once a day. I make ev-
ery effort to quickly wrap up
my phone calls and return his
within minutes. Who is right?
- ON A SHORT PHONE
LEASH
DEAR ON A SHORT
PHONE LEASH: As your
husband is a high-level ex-
ecutive, his time may be tight-
ly scheduled. Because he calls
you only once a day, it's not


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearabby.com

too much to ask that you take
the call. I can understand that
he finds it frustrating that you
refuse. If I were you, I'd start
taking these calls unless
you would prefer getting your
messages from your husband
via his personal assistant.
DEARABBY: My mother-
in-law, '"Thelma," came to live
with us two years ago because
at 82, she was no longer finan-
cially able to support herself.
Because she likes to cook,
she has done most of the meal
preparation.'It has been a big
help since my husband and I
work full time.
Over the last year, Thel-
ma's judgment has deterio-
rated and so have her cook-
ing skills. She'll often prepare
meals by 2 p.m. that won't be
served until 6:00 or 7:00. The
food sits on the stove or kitch-
en counter for hours. She also
overcooks to the point of burn-
ing and meats are tough and
difficult to eat. If she doesn't
have something on. hand that
goes into a recipe or she
can't remember shell "sub-


stitute." Her choices gener-
ally do not work. Everything
has become increasingly less
appetizing, to put it mildly.
My mother-in-law is so
kind, I don't want to offend
her. My husband refuses to
discuss it with her because
he doesn't want to upset her.
Please help. I'm worried about
the length of time the food
sits out after being prepared.
Plus, I'd really like to have a
good meal! HUNGRY IN
MISSOURI
DEAR HUNGRY: Food
is the least of your problems.
Your mother-in-law is show-
ing signs of dementia. Does
her doctor know about this
change in her? If not, that
should be the first thing on
your agenda. If so, then you
and your husband need to
understand that what's hap-
pening may be progressive.
A point may come when, if a
fire should start while she's
cooking, she would no longer
remember what to do.
You and your husband
should consult his mother's
physician and a geriatric spe-
cialist. You should also con-
tact the Alzheimer's Associa-
tion. And at the end of the day,
you should "all" prepare your
evening meals together.

* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-April
19): Don't let anyone bully
you into doing something
when what you need is rest,
relaxation and a moment to
gather your thoughts. Spend
time going over what needs to
be done before the year ends.
Discuss plans with your part-
ner. ***
TAURUS (April 20-May
20): The more traveling you
do, the better. You can research
a destination or a hobby you
want to begin in the new year
or get together with friends or
relatives for more festivities.
Love is on the rise. *****
GEMINI (May 21-June
20): Listen to what your heart
tells you about the relation-
ships you have and you will
know what you must do in the
new year. Cutting ties with
people who ask for too much
or restrict what you can do will
be liberating. **
CANCER (June 21-July
22): Consider the changes
you want to make with re-
gard to your work, your status
and your life goals. Entertain
friends and spend time with
that special person and you
will enhance your relation-
ships. Make home alterations


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last
conducive to your changing
lifestyle. ****
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):
Don't lock yourself away when
you have friends and relatives
who really want you to take
part in the festivities. Get what
you want to do out of the way
early so you can be a partici-
pant and contribute to the fun
and games. ***
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Travel plans can be made
or executed. Spending qual-
ity time with youngsters will
give you a better sense of the
younger generation. Some-
thing you discover will lead
you to consider offering a ser-
vice for today's kids. ***
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): Stick close to home and
get things done that will ease
your stress and prepare you
for the upcoming week. Seri-
ous talks with someone you
feel can help you get ahead or
shed light on a situation you
face will be beneficial. ***
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov.
21): Walking down memory
lane will bring both happy and


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present,
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: T equals F
" BHC KG Y Z H O' S X GTAGIS PHU
KOSG X G Y SK OR WOZ C K LX WOS U H BGO
WXG. UG ZHO'S SXGWYJXG U H BGO
W Y SPG D R GS HAZ G X V K A A
IAWD LJXR P
PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "Christmas waves a magic wand over this world, and
behold, everything is softer and more beautiful." Norman Vincent Peale


sad emotions to the surface.
Remembering your losses and
gains will help you size up your
year and assess your situation.
This is a good day to orga-
nize, complete and prepare. 4

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-
Dec. 21): Take care of details
with agencies, banks and insti-
tutions, in order to avoid extra
cost. You don't want to leave
too much time to think about
emotional issues or you may
make a mistake or say some-
thing you'll regret. **
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-
Jan. 19): Money will come to
you from an unusual source.
You will realize how to close a
deal you've been working on
for a long time. A relationship
you cherish can be enhanced
if you offer special thanks and
a token of your appreciation.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Sort through your
personal papers and figure out
your best course of action with
regard to finances, medical
issues or legal matters. Once
you make a decision, you will
feel better about your future
and be in a better position to
help the people who can use
your knowledge and services.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): Love and happiness
can be yours if you do a lit-
tle give and take today. Re-
membering old friends and
touching base with people
you miss will help you re-
connect, catch up and make
plans. ***


SUNDAY CROSSWORD


HOPE FOR CLEAR SKIES By Kevin G. Der / Edited by Will Shortz [1 2 3 4 5 6E 78 9 10 11 12 13 14 1 15 16 17 18 19 20


Across
1 Not live
7 Author Roald
11 Shop dresser
15 How something
may be veiled
21 "Ball Four"
author
22 Big name in
athletic footwear
23 Rama's kingdom
24 Whence the line
"I fear Greeks
even when they
bring gifts"
25 Feature of some
pool balls
26 A long time past
28 Enthrones
29 At night
31 Football's
Sanders
32 Long-shot
candidate
33 ___-to
34 ___ Kippur
35 What the focus of
a 125-Across
will do at its
climax
37 said..."
38 Glossy black bird
40 One way to stop
42 Mil. address
44 Driller?: Abbr.
45 Kisser
47 Clone of an
optical medium's
contents
49 Wang of fashion
50 Lulus
52 Drinking and
gambling
54 Basic solutions
55 Breach
57 Dummies
. 61 Six-time All-Star
third baseman .
for the 1970s
Dodgers
63 Remove drapes
from, as a room
For any three answers,
call from a touch-tone
phone: 1-900-285-5656,
1.49 each minute; or,
with a credit card, 1-800-
814-5554.


66 Objects of
interest in a 125-
Across
69 First female U.S.
secretary of state
72 Not yet delivered
74 How some things
are made
75 Jackie's #2
77 Think probable
78 Pliny possessive
79 Beach seen from
Diamond Head
80 Once, in the past
81 1914 Edgar Rice
Burroughs novel
set in an
underground
land
88 Like many cakes
89 "Honor is
scutcheon :
Shak.
91 Bygone European
capital
92 Subterfuge
93 Track star Owens
94 Many an. avid
observer of a
125-Across
100 Atlantic City
locale, with
"ithe" .
103 Loser to-
McKinley
104 Duff Beer
vendor
1.05 Spaceship attire
106 Slump,
109 Slugger Roberto
111,Jackie's #1
114 Proust's "_
Wdy"
116 Book set?
119 Italian lover's
coo
120 Indian royal
122 Deep-dish
dishes
123 Heads outside
together?
124 Novelty glasses
125 Event on Dec.
21, 2010,
viewable in
North and South
America,
depicted visually
in this puzzle


128 Turkish pooh-
bahs
131 Flying Cloud,
e.g.
132 Student's stat.
133 Dub
137 With 146-
Across, what the
center of this
puzzle is doing
during a 125-
Across
140 Folds
146 See 137-Across
149 To whom
Hamlet says
"Get thee to a
nunnery"
150 There from the
start
151 It marks the
target on a
curling rink
1,52' Munchkins
153 Pardner, say
154 Commodore's
insignia

Down
: 1 Delivery people,
briefly
2 Zero
3 Battle over
domain
4 Haggling
5 Sailor who
debuted in a
1929 comic.
6 Juan's January
7 Glen Canyon _'__
8 Actress Gardner
9 Dharma follower
10 Tiramisu features
11 Catalog
12 Steak _
13 Veer back
14 Comic Philips
15 Aircraft gauges
16 Kind of couplet
for Chaucer
17 out?"
18 Paper for which
Murray Kempton
and Jim Dwyer
won Pulitzers
19 Trace of blood?
20 Football meas.
27 Youthful prank in
a car


30 Superhero played
by Liam Neeson
in a 1990 film
32 Era of ignorance
33 Kind of lane
35 How things may
be laid
36 Key of Bach's
"The Art of
Fugue"
39 Director
Anderson
41 Yankee great Joe,
colloquially
43 Amorous skunk
in cartoons
46 Golden State
campus inits.
48 How things may
be lit or
remembered
50 Lincoln Center
production
51 1974 Japanese
Nobelist
52 Feeling
53 Extended solo
56 Crackerjacks
58 Tundra or
wetland
59 Terbium or
thulium
60 Father-and-son
actors
*62 Actor Morales
63 Promising
proposal
64 Prepare to fight
65 "Grey's
Anatomy" extra
67 One of the
Islamic virtues
68 Grateful response
69 Big name in
athletic footwear
70 Column in a
dating
questionnaire
71 Optimist's focus
73 Aquarium fish
76 One getting a
lift?
82 "___ yellow
ribbon ..."
83 Place to put bags
84 Laugh part


85 E.M.T.'s training
86 Science
87 Reagan and
others
90 Tactic used
against Britain
by Napoleon
93 Boarding aids
95 Out-and-out
96 Protective
membrane
97 Beethoven's
"Appassionata,"
e.g.
98 One that
overflows


99 Fender bender,
e.g.
100 Towering
101 Jordan's Queen
International
Airport
102 Smidgens
106 [Just like that!l
107 One of the
Brontes
108 E.U. group
110 Pot-au-feu, e.g.
112 Classic rebuke
113 Observatory
feature
115 Powder rooms?


117 It may be shot
during a riot
118 Castaway's
locale
120 The year 1045
121 Japanese
"thanks"
126 Need for
KenKen
127 Bistro offering
128 Rent-__
129 Hang open
130 1968 U.S. Open
champ
134 Mine entrance


135 Bart Simpson's
grandmother
136 Pitcher
138 Suffix with vir-
139 Never: Ger.
141 Lennon's lady
142 "Charlotte's
Web" inits.
143 Dawn
144 Italian God
145 Forest game
147 Clinton or
Obama, once:
Abbr.
148 Laugh part


Answers to last Sunday's Crossword.


SHAM TUT.U ASPERA ALAE
HARPSpEED T SH N IST E R S

NASANU O HIONCLLI
NAS G L0BALHARMl I NG T STS
ASP SIVA ESCS O RT AD H 0 C
SPAM SUMMER ACHES EERO
SARI LAX DDAY ABLEST

TRA A I EMO ADECREPIT
DESERTED LANA BROILER
EMILIE LILT R AM NOTE
BALL REINA SPORE GOAL
R SR INNGRAMCAGAL PLYI


E | SH IDIVTCi
RHINE EL 0 TRI AGEl
ETHANS THERE HITMEN



N|E'SR PA R BE D sc R A


1 3 2 6


43 9


8 6 74


29 5


9 1 7


6 75 9


1 8 2


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LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & CROSSWORD SUNDAY, DECEMBER 26, 2010


Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415









LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, DECEMBER 26, 2010


A year of iPads, Betty and multiple Palins


By JOCELYN 'NOVECK
AP National Writer
Politics and pop culture.
Remember when they
used to be, well, separate?
In recent years these two
worlds have seemed to inch
ever closer, or maybe to
overlap, but in 2010, nobody
traveled between them
more successfully than
Sarah Palin.
No longer Alaska gov-
ernor (wow, that does
seem a long time ago) but
omnipresent on the political
scene nonetheless, she also
had a multi-format pres-
ence in our culture: as a TV
commentator, a best-selling
author, and of course, a
reality show star. Heck, she
even almost won "Dancing
With the Stars" oh wait,
that was daughter Bristol.
No matter. In our
annual look at pop culture
moments, Sarah Palin, with
some help from her family,
gets star billing.

JANUARY:
The iPAD tablet debuts,
briefly raising the vexing
philosophical question: Do
we really need yet another
gadget? Answer: Yup,
apparently we do. Ending
a dreadfully botched
experiment, NBC removes
Jay Leno from 10 p.m.,
restoring him to 11:35 and
thus displacing CONAN
O'BRIEN, who is, shall
we say, a little annoyed.
SARAH PALN, no doubt
annoying opponents who
were hoping she'd eventu-
ally disappear, becomes a
commentator at Fox News
Channel. An actual career
shift, or a canny step toward
a 2012 run? She's not tell-
ing. Maybe by the end of
the year ...

FEBRUARY:


Snickers Super Bowl ad,
beginning an incredible
year for the 88-year-old
actress that will include
a Facebook-generated
"Saturday Night Live" host-
ing gig. As Betty rises,
TIGER speaks: "What I did
was not acceptable," the
fallen golf great says with
economical understatement
in a carefully stage-man-
* aged appearance that will
be analyzed ad nauseam.
PALIN watch: During a
speech to tea party activists,
the words "energy," "tax"
and "lift American spirits"
are seen scribbled on her
hand. Later, White House
spokesman Robert Gibbs
will mock her with the
words "hope" and "change"
scribbled on his own palm.
Somehow, we think Palin
will not only recover but
turn this into a catchy joke.

MARCH:
We were right On Leno's
'Tonight Show," Palin
flashes "Good evening and
welcome to The Tonight
Show"' on her palm. She
also says she's going to play
TINA FEY in an upcoming
Vegas show (ba dum-dum.)
But there's much more
from Palin this month:
Publishers announce she's
working on her second
book. Heavyweight TV pro-
ducer Mark Burnett pitches
her Alaska-themed reality
show, which lands at TLC.

APRIL
A month of reprises.
WOODS returns to golf
at the Masters, his first
competition in nearly
five months. (He ends
up tying for fourth.) And
FEY, who made so much
hay out of her 2008 "SNL"
run as Palin "I can see
Dr>~ 4;- A-... 1-.-- l.. "


ixssia urom my hioCuse
The spry, sly BETIY reprises the role as guest
WHITE scores big in a host, introducing a mock


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Bristol Palin (left) and her partner Mark Ballas perform during the
celebrity dance competition television series 'Dancing with the


Stars' in Los Angeles on Oct. 18.
"Sarah Palin Network"
with shows like 'Tea Party
Wheel of Fortune," "Are
You Smarter than a Half-
Term Governor?" and "Hey
Journalist, I Gotcha."

MAY:.
After a disappointing
"American Idol" season,
SIMON COWELL exits
the formidable but slump-
ing franchise. Speaking of
slumping franchises, the
second "Sex and the City"
movie, set largely in Abu
Dhabi, debuts to some of
the most scathing reviews
in memory, not to mention
accusations that it lampoons
Muslims. PALIN watch:
Bristol Palin, perhaps fore-
seeing she'll be a hit on
the upcoming "Dancing
With the Stars," signs
with a speakers agency.
Her mom tells a crowd: "If
you thought pit bulls were
tough, you don't want to


mess with mama grizzlies."

JUNE:
Winner, most ill-advised
remark: BP's Tony
Hayward, who apologizes'
this month for his "I'd like
my life back" comment
Winner, most ill-advised
media interview: Gen.
Stanley McChrystal, fired
after criticizing the Obama
administration in Rolling
Stone. Winners, most
surprising marital split: Al
and Tipper Gore, previous
winners of most surpris-
ing liplock at a political
convention, who announce
their separation after 40
years of marriage.

JULY:
WONDER WOMAN
gets a wardrobe change
from DC Comics no
more star-spangled hot
pants. Once an awkward-


looking teen, Chelsea
Clinton is a beautiful bride
in Rhinebeck, N.Y. and
Americans are clearly still
obsessed with royal wed-
dings. President Obama
goes on "'The View,"
revealing a huge gap in
his pop culture knowledge
when he can't say who
Snooki and The Situation
are.

AUGUST:
RIHANNA, who made..
headlines in 2009 when
she was assaulted by then
boyfriend Chris Brown,
collaborates with rapper
Eminem in a chart-top-
ping song, "Love the Way
You Lie," that graphi-
cally depicts a physically
abusive relationship. The
debate: Is the song a tool
to fight domestic violence,
or does it glorify it? And
remember the party-crash-
ing Salahis? Well, they're
baaaack ... this time as
reality stars, in 'The Real
Housewives of DC."

SEPTEMBER:
You're LADY GAGA and
you want to make a sarto-
rial statement at the VMA
awards. Tough proposi-
tion, since you look pretty
unique all the time. What
are you gonna do, dress up
in raw meat or something?,
(Y'up.) The movie "SOCIAL
NETWORK" debuts,
becoming an instant Oscar
front-rufiner and begin-
ning Facebook co-founder
MARK ZUCKERBERG's
year of pop culture fame.
PALIN watch: Apparently
they wanted Todd Palin
first, but it's Bristol who
makes her debut on
"Dancing with the Stars."
Mama apparently didn't tell
her not to come so she
dances a cha-cha, to Three
Dog Night's "Mama Told -
Me (Not To Come)."


OCTOBER:
So many of us love
the fun, creative Fox hit
"GLEE." But those ultra-
sexed-up photos a couple
of cast members pose for
in Esquire this month? Not
so much, especially Lea
Michele's spread-eagled
number in panties in a
high school locker room.
And we've seen strange
political ads before, but
maybe not THIS strange:
"I'm not a witch," says
Delaware Senate hopeful
Christine O'Donnell. "I'm
you." In November, voters
would decide not to elect...
themselves.

NOVEMBER:
There will be a real royal
wedding! Britain's Prince
William proposes to Kate
Middleton, promising an
April 29 extravaganza.
But otherwise, on our
pop culture clock, ifs
a Palin month. "Sarah
Palin's Alaska" premieres
on TLC, and her second
book, "America by Heart.
Reflections on Family, Faith
S aid Flag," hits stores. A
reality show, a best-selling
Book, and a bunch of her
"mamma grizzlies" headed
for office after the midterm
elections... what more can
you ask?

DECEMBER:
Sorry, JULIAN
ASSANGE: Facebook
may be nearly 7 years old,
but ZUCKERBERG, its
26-year-old CEO, is Time
magazine's Person of the
Year, the youngest since
Charles Lindbergh in 1927.
Assange, the WikiLeaks
founder and a top con-
tender for the honor, sure
is ticked off oh wait,
that's the faux Assange, in
a popular SNL skit skewer-
ing both of them.


Be a Lucky Dog.*


*(or cat)

























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Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424










I SUNDAY, DECEMBER 26, 2010


CLASSIC PEANUTS/ by Charles Schulz


B9, YOU MAKE ME MAD,
CHARLIE BROWON!


I W15H THERE (DA)$ SOME
SNOW ON THE GROUND ... I'D
MAKE A 5NOWDALL,AND ID
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THAT YOU DRANK A BEER AND TOOK A NAP."


"I DON'T MEAN TO BE UNGRATEFUL, LEROY,
BUT YOUR PRESENTS FORCE ME TO BE."


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