<%BANNER%>






The Lake City reporter
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS MAP IT! PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01484
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 12/25/2010
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01484
System ID: UF00028308:01484
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text







Looking Strong
Columbia County athletes
shine in 2010.


iiE
L7-


000016 120511 ****3-DIGIT 326
LIB OF FLORIDA HISTORY
PO BOX 117007
205 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-1943


iIiAL~


Reporter


Saturday, December 25, 2010 www.lakecityreporter.com Vol. 136, No. 290 E 75 cents


DISCOVERING







CHRISTMAS


Natives of Finland share their holiday

traditions which include spying elves


By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com
imagine celebrat-
ing Christmas on
Christmas Eve and
receiving a face-to-
face visit from Santa
Claus right in your living
room that day.
These are just a few of
the differences in what
a Christmas celebration
would look like in Finland,
shared by two special visi-
tors who decided to spend
their 2010 holiday in Lake
City.
Kristina Henriksson of
Helsinki, Finland, and her
daughter Irene, 22, a stu-
dent and soccer player at
William Carey University
in Hattiesburg, Miss.,
are spending Christmas
in Lake City with fam-
ily friend Sheri Carder, a
Florida Gateway College
business professor.
Carder, who spent time
in Finland as an exchange
professor, met Kristina
Henriksson in 2005 when
they worked.together at


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Irene Henriksson holds ornaments shaped as tonttu figures, commonly known as Santa's
helpers. During the winter, Finland receives only four hours of sunlight, which gives the per-
fect cover for tonttus to sneak around the house, peeking in windows to see if children have
been naughty or nice.
Laurea University, which in Finland, and especially remind their children that
is near Helsinki, Finland's in the days approach- tonttus or elves are
capital. ing Christmas, Kristina
Throughout the year Henriksson said parents FINLAND continued on 3A


Irene (left) and
Kristina Henriksson
exchange presents on
Christmas Eve, a cus-
tom Americans usually
reserve for Christmas
Day. In Finland, the resi-
dents believe that Santa'
Claus leaves his home,
Korvatunturi, in the Arctic
Circle to deliver gifts
usually from 6-9 p.m.
Parents leave presents
outside their front door
so when 'Santa' does
arrive, the family will see
him enter the home with
everyone's gifts.
JASON MATTHEW WALKER/
Lake City Reporter


Elks make a Christmas Eve delivery


Lodge gives toys
to 200 kids, a
60-year tradition.
By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@Iakecityreporter.com
The Benevolent &
Protective Order of Elks
Lake City Lodge #893
played Santa's helpers to
more than 200 children in
the community.
The lodge hosted its
annual Christmas toy give-
away Friday evening.
The Elks have provided
Christmas toys for 60 years,
said Barbara Hollingsworth,

(386) 752-12'
SUBSCRIBE'
THE REPORT
Voice: 755-54
I Fax: 752-94


lodge secretary.
"One of the things we
want to do is serve the com-
munity," she said.
Children were able to see
Santa Claus and take pic-
tures with him, then they
moved to a room to pick out
one special big toy. Their
next stop was to grab a puz-
zle or stuffed animal before
receiving a goody bag and
one more small toys.
Toy donations came
from lodge members,
the Rotary Club of Lake
City, the Columbia County
Courthouse, and the
ELKS continued on 3A


ANTONIA ROBINSON/ Lake City Reporter
Barbara Hollingsworth arranges toys that were distributed to
more than 200 children during the Benevolent & Protective
Order of Elks Lake City Lodge #893 annual Christmas toy
giveaway Friday.


6 3 Opinion ................ 4A '\
6 3 g, .B People.................. 2A
Isolated showers Obituaries .............. 5A
Advice & Comics......... 4B
W EATHER, 2A Puzzles .................2B


Sunday is the day

to take back what

was purchased


Extended hours
to help in return
of Christmas gifts.
By GABRIELLE BELLAMY
Special to the Reporter
The day after Christmas
is often known as the day to
return gifts.
Although Dec. 26 falls
on a Sunday this year, Lake
City stores are still plan-
ning to open early and are
prepared for the hustle and
bustle of gift returns.
JC Penney is open 7
a.m. to 8 p.m.
Customers must return
clothing items within 90
days and have a receipt
available, according to store
policy. Jewelry items must
be returned within 60 days
with a receipt.
Belk is open 7 a.m. to
10 p.m. Customers must
have a receipt or gift re-
ceipt, according to store
policy. They can exchange
their item, receive a refund,
or even get the amount
credited to a Belk gift card.
Customers without a re-
ceipt can receive an even
exchange for their item,
get an item of lesser value
or receive a refund with the
amount of money credited
on a Belk gift card.
T.J. Maxx is open 9
a.m. to 9:30 p.m. According
to store reports, custom-
ers can return items at T.J.
Maxx within 30 days to re-
ceive a full refund. Items


returned after more than 30
days will receive a refund
on a gift card.
Rue21 is open 8 a.m. to
10 p.m. Customers can re-
turn items within 30 days,
according to store reports.
They must have a receipt,
and the tag has to be on the
item. -
Big Lots is open 9 a.m.
to 9 p.m. Sunday. Custom-
ers may return items within
30 days, according to store
reports. They must have a
receipt, and the item must
be in its original packaging.
Radio Shack is open 8
a.m. to 8 p.m. According to
store policy, customers may
return items within 30 days
with a receipt and packag-
ing.
Office Max is open
noon to 6 p.m. Customers
can return items at Office
Max within 14 days, accord-
ing to store policy.
For electronics, they
must have a receipt and the
item must not be open. If
the customer does not have
a receipt, there will be a 15
percent deduction from the
refund.
For non-electronic items,
customers may return items
with or without a receipt.
Sears is open 7 a.m. to
6 p.m.
To return items at Sears,
customers must have a re-
ceipt, according to store
policy. Electronics and ap-
pliances can be returned
RETURNS continued on 3A


FHP 'wolfpacks'

to be watching for

impaired drivers


Emphasis to stop
drunk driving
during holidays.
By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter. corn
Florida Highway Patrol
troopers will have a notice-
able presence on the state's
roadways this holiday sea-
son as part of a crackdown
on the impaired driving
campaign.
On Dec. 16, the FHP
began participating in
the National Drunk
and Drugged Driving
Prevention Month cam-
paign. The campaign runs
through Jan. 3.
"We recognize there is
going to be a lot of cel-
ebrations for Christmas
and New Year's Eve par-
ties and that alcohol is
going to be a part of a
lot of those celebrations,"
said Lt. Patrick Riordan,
FHP public affairs offi-
cer for Troop B. "We're
encouraging our troopers
to be proactive in look-
ing for the impaired driv-
er, for people that don't
plan ahead. If motorists
are driving in an impaired

0 TODAY II
WORLD
NORAD keep
track of Santa


condition, they're (troop-
ers) prepared to make an
arrest for DUI."
Patrol officers will be in
concentrated groups, aka
"wolfpacks," looking for
impaired drivers.
Riordan said FHP crash
records indicated several
wrecks that occurred dur-
ing the holiday period last
year were alcohol related.
"During the 2009 New
Year's Day holiday .travel
period, over 56 percent
of the traffic fatalities in
Florida were alcohol relat-
ed," he said. "It's an easy
thing for us to recognize we
need to make it a priority
during this time period."
Riordan noted that the
don't-drink-and-drive cam-
paign is familiar to older
motorists, but new gen-
erations of motorists who
just started driving need to
understand they don't need
to drive if they have been
drinking.
He said alternatives to
driving while impaired
include: Calling a taxi, using
mass transit, getting a des-
ignated driver or using the
Tow-and-Go program.
IMPAIRED continued on 3A

N COMING
SUNDAY
ps How secure are
a. public meetings?


%'AILY










LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING SATURDAY, DECEMBER 25, 2010


Thursday:
Afternoon: 5-6-2-4
Evening: 0-8-7-0


Thursday:
3-7-15-18-27


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



UK: Royal Christmas without William


LONDON
Queen Elizabeth II and
her family gathered at
Sandringham Estate
to exchange gifts on
Christmas Eve
without Prince William,
who's on military duty.
The royals' Christmas will include
a Christmas Day church service
at the estate, 110 miles north of
London, followed by a gala meal
and the broadcast of the Queen's
Christmas message.
William and his fiancee Kate
Middleton won't be there because
William is on Royal Air Force duty in
Wales. The couple plan to wed in April
Buckingham Palace said Prince
Harry isn't on military assignment
and is expected to be with the family
at Sandringham.
The royal Christmas schedule is
usually private except for the church
service, which typically draws locals
hoping for a glimpse of the queen
and her family.

'SVU' star's manager
accused of fraud
NEW YORK A star of the TV
series "Law & Order: Special Victims
Unit" is getting her own taste of law
and order in real life.
New York City prosecutors said
Tamara Tunie was swindled of more
than $1 million by her business man-
ager. Tunie plays medical examiner
Melinda Warner on the NBC show.
According to court papers, Joseph
Cilibrasi and his accounting firm
started stealing from Tunie in 2002,
listing himself as her husband to
secure a credit card tied to her
account. He is also accused of writ-
ing checks to himself.
The 50-year-old Manhattan man
pleaded not guilty earlier this week
and is being held on $100,000 bail.


-.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Queen Elizabeth II, seen here with Prince Philip as a gold musical Faberge-style
egg is presented to them from the Sultan of Oman, Sultan Qaboos bin Said, in
Muscat, Oman Nov. 26, will celebrate Christmas without Prince William. He's on


military duty in Wales.
Cilibrasi's attorney said Tunie was
"fully aware" of the transactions and
he'll fight the charges.
He faces up to 25 years in prison if
convicted.

Police: Thief tunneled
into NYC home, stole art
NEW YORK Police are look-
ing for the person who tunneled
through a wall into a New York City
apartment while the owner was away
around Thanksgiving and made
off with hundreds of thousands of
dollars worth of artworks by Andy
Warhol and other, notable artists.
They said the thief broke through
a hallway wall into the Manhattan
apartment and stole limited-edition
artworks, watches and other jewelry
worth a total of about $750,000. A
video recorder connected to surveil-
lance cameras also was taken..


The stolen items include the Roy
Lichtenstein prints 'Thinking Nude"
and "Moonscape," the Carl Fudge
oil painting "Live Cat," the Warhol
prints "The Truck" and "Superman"
and a set of eight signed Warhol
prints in various colors called
"Camouflage."

New Mexico lands
Marvel Studio's movie
SANTA FE, N.M. New Mexico
has landed what Gov. Bill Richardson's
office is billing as the largest movie
production in state history.
Richardson and Marvel Studios'
co-president Louis D'Esposito
announced this week that the comic
book-based adventure film "The
Avengers" will be shot primarily in
New Mexico.

* Associated Press


Celebrity Birthdays


* Singer Tony Martin is 97.
* Actor Dick Miller is 82.
* Author Anne Roiphe is 75.
* Rhythm-and-blues singer
John Edwards (The Spinners)
is 66.
* Singer Jimmy Buffett is 64.
* Pro and College Football
Hall-of-Famer Larry Csonka
is 64.
* Country singer Barbara


Mandrell is 62.
* Actress Sissy Spacek is
61.
* Former White House advis-
er Karl Rove is 60.
* Actress CCH Pounder is
58.
* Baseball Hall of Famer
Rickey Henderson is 52.
* Rock musician Noel Hogan
(The Cranberries) is 39.


Lake City
HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293
Fax number..............752-9400
Circulation ................755-5445
Online... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Ra. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson.....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
Assistant Editor CJ Risak..754-0427
After 1:00 p.m.
(cjrisak@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Kathryn Peterson..754-0417
(kpeterson@lakecityreporter.com)
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440.


Reporter
BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon....754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7:30
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report ariy
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 10:30, a.m. to report a ser-
vice error same day re-delivery. After
10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation ..............755-5445
(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks.................. $26.32
24 Weeks ................... $48.79
52 Weeks .................. $83.46
Rates indude 7% sales tax.
Mail rates
12 Weeks .................. $41.40
24 Weeks ...................$82.80
52 Weeks.................$179.40


CORRECTION


The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run
in this space. And thanks for reading.


Challenge: Trim
wardrobe to 33

MIAMI Courtney
Carver was trying to find
ways to simplify her life
when she decided to pare
down her wardrobe to 33
items to be worn over three
months.
Once she launched the
concept on her blog and
Facebook page in October,
she realized she wasn't the
only one who wanted to
dress with less. She says.
the challenge has done
more than just save her
money.
Carver, 41, isn't alone.
Virginia Smith, Vogue's
fashion market director,
said more people are mak-
ing do with less in their
closets. "I do think it is a
new thought in fashion that
is getting out to the more
mainstream," she said.
But, she said, challenges
like Carver's are too severe
for most people.
The first phase of
Carver's Project 333 ends
this month. In January,
she'll do it for another three
months, replacing whatev-
er is inappropriate for the
season. She included acces-
sories like sunglasses and
purses on her list of 33.
About 440 people on
Facebook are participating
in her challenge and more
than 40 are blogging about
the experience, Carver said.
She's launching a website
early next month and later
on will offer seasonal par-
ing-down guides, for a fee,
to people who want to fol-
low her clothing diet but
need help.

Skeletons of
adult, child found

WINTER HAVEN
- Winter Haven police
believe the skeletons of an
adult and child found in a
shallow grave are those of a
29-year-old woman and her


This Dec. 18 photo courtesy.of Heidi Larsen shows Courtney
Carver posing for a photograph with some pieces from her
wardrobe in Salt Lake City, Utah. Carver was trying to find
ways to simplify her life when she decided to pare down her
wardrobe to 33 items to be worn over three months.


3-year-old daughter.
Forensic pathologists
still need to examine and
perform tests on the bones
to make a positive identifi-
cation. But Police Chief
Gary Hester said investi-
gators have good reason
to believe the remains
are those of Ronkeya
Holmes and her daughter,
Masarah Ross.
Both were reported
missing in October, 2009.
Police received a tip
Wednesday that the moth-
er and daughter were bur-
ied in a shallow grave in a
grove.
Masarah's father,
Lester Ross, was arrested
Wednesday on witness
tampering charges. No
other charges have been
filed. He's being held in
the Polk County Jail with-
out bail.


Man charged with
murder, assault
PENSACOLA A
grand jury has indicted a
Pensacola man accused of
murdering a woman whose
decomposing body was
found near a power station
substation.
Authorities said Tuesday
they've not decided wheth-
er to seek the death pen-
alty for 22-year-old Joshua
Wayne Douglas. He is
charged with first-degree
murder and sexual battery
in the death of 25-year-old
Jamie Broxson. Her body
was found Nov. 29.
Arraignment is set for
Dec. 29.
Authorities said DNA
evidence links Douglas to
Broxson.

* Associated Press


THE WEATHER


-=


ISO. B ,EEZY & SUNNY SUNNY PARTLY
SHOWERS COLDER AND COLD CLOUDY


HI63LO41 HI 51 L 24 HI 50 LO 25 HI 56 LO 27 HI 62 LO 37


Pensacola
59/33


Tallahassee *
62/34
*PadainaCity
61/35


TEMPERATURES
High Friday
Low Friday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Friday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


63 Jk city Sunday
0/34 Jacksonville Cape Canaveral 62/35/sh
Lake City 67/41 Daytona Beach 61/32/pc
S.Da a Beah Ft. Lauderdale 73/39/t
Gainesville Dayona each Fort Myers 66/39/pc
,69/45 71V52 Gainesville 54/26/pc
Ocala Jacksonville 51/26/pc
9 Key West 68/61/sh
Orlando Cape Canaveral Lake City 51/24/p
; 74/53 7I 59 Lake City
Miami 73/41/t
Tatp a" Naples 64/42/t
70/54 West Palm B iac Ocala 55/26/pc
73/62 S* Orlando 60/31/pc
S Ft. LauderdalN Panama City 47/28/s
Ft. Myersl. 74/62. Pensacola 46/26/s
75/58 *Naples Tallahassee 46/24/s
73/61 Miami Tampa 60/37/s
Key West 74/64 Valdosta 47/23/pc
74/65 W. Palm Beach 70/34/t
74/65


63
27
67
43
85 in 1956
16 in 1989

0.00"
0.17"
39.15"
1.90"
47.70"


SUN
Sunrise tod.
Sunset today
Sunrise torm
Sunset tom

MOON
Moonrise to
Moonset to
Moonrise to
Moonset tor

(3
Dec. Jai
27 4
Last Ne


ay 7:24 a.m.
ay 5:37 p.m.
n. 7:25 a.m. MO
5:37 p.m. 45r
To
ull
)day 10:32 p.m. xra
day '10:33 a.m. fol
im. 11:36 p.m. toa
m. 11:09 a.m.

NCO
n. Jan. Jan.
12 19
w First Full


18,iwst
On this date in
1980, it was the
coldest Christmas
Day of modern
record in the
northeastern U.S.
Temperatures as
cold as 36 degrees
below zero were
reported in New
York State.


4

milestomu
day's
tra-violet
diation risk
r the area on
scale from 0
10+.


Monday
56/36/s
55/33/s
61/41/s
59/38/s
50/25/s
50/27/s
65/55/s
50/25/s
61/41/s
58/37/s
52/25/s
57/33/s
51/29/s
48/28/s
50/19/s
56/36/s
48/22/s
57/37/s


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.



weather.com


.. Forecasts, data and graph-
SIcs 2010Weather Central
- "- LLC, Madison, WIs.
www.weatherpubllsher.com




Get Connected



"- >'


Thursday:
Afternoon :4-2-9
Evening: 5-1-3


I .. a


Daily Scripture

"But Mary treasured up all
these things and pondered
them in her heart.The shep-
herds returned, glorifying and
praising God for all the things
they had heard and seen, which
were just as they had been told."
Luke 2:16-20


AROUND FLORIDA


I I .i.1i


M=


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


1 rA
127


M=


CEXE~I3


I









Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427 -


LAKE CITY REPORTER


LOCAL & WORLD


SATURDAY, DECEMBER 25, 2010


Pilgrims, clergy


make trek to Holy


Land at Christmas


DALIA NAMMARI and
TIA GOLDENBERG
Associated Press

BETHLEHEM, West
Bank The traditional
birthplace of Jesus is cel-
ebrating its merriest
Christmas in years, as tens
of thousands of tourists
thronged Bethlehem on
Friday for the annual holi-
day festivities in this biblical
West Bank town.
Officials said the turnout
was shaping up to be the larg-
est since 2000. Unseasonably
mild weather, a virtual halt in
Israeli-Palestinian violence
and a burgeoning economic
revival in the West Bank all
added to the holiday cheer.
By nightfall, a packed
Manger Square was awash
in red, blue, green and yel-
low Christmas lights.
Merrymakers blasted
horns, bands sang traditional
Christmas carols in Arabic,
boy scout marching bands
performed and Palestinian
policemen deployed around
the town to keep the peace.
A group of 30 tourists


from Papua New Guinea,
all wearing red Santa hats,
walked around the nearby
Church of the Nativity, built
on the site where tradition
holds Jesus was born. Both
church officials and the
Palestinian president voiced
hopes for peace.
Pat Olmsted, a 64-year-old
teacher from Sugar Land,
Texas, was celebrating her
first Christmas in Bethlehem
and broke into tears as she
stood in Manger Square. "It
just gives me a whole true
meaning of the Bible. As I
read the pages, it will mean
so much more to me," she
said.
Bethlehem used to attract
tens of thousands of tourists
from around the world for
Christmas celebrations, but
attendance dropped sharply
following the outbreak of the
second Palestinian uprising
in 2000.
As the fighting tapered
off over the last five years,
attendance steadily climbed.
The town's 2,750 hotel
rooms were booked solid for
Christmas week, and town


officials say more hotels are
under construction.
Israeli officials have said
they expect about 90,000 vis-
itors in Bethlehem during
the current two-week holi-
day season, up from 70,000
last year.
But the bloodshed has left
its mark. Visitors entering
the town must cross through
a massive metal gate in the
separation barrier Israel
built between Jerusalem and
Bethlehem during a wave
of Palestinian attacks last
decade.
The Roman Catholic
Church's top clergyman
in the Holy Land, Latin
Patriarch Fouad Twal,
crossed through the gate
in a traditional midday pro-
cession from Jerusalem.
Later, he was to celebrate
Midnight Mass, the peak of
the holiday's events in town.
Speaking to reporters,
Twal expressed his tradi-
tional wishes for "peace, love
and unity among us." But on
the sunny, warm day, with
temperatures approaching
70 degrees Fahrenheit (20


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Palestinian girls in traditional dresses attend a Christmas parade in Manger Square, outside
the Church of Nativity, traditionally believed by Christians to be the birthplace of Jesus Christ,
in the West Bank town of Bethlehem Friday. Thousands of tourists, pilgrims and clergy con-
verged on Bethlehem as the town of Jesus' birth prepared to celebrate Christmas Eve.


degrees Celsius), he added
another wish to his list- "to
ask God to send us rain and
winter besides peace and
justice and dignity for all."
The normally rainy
autumn and winter season
in the Holy Land has been
warm and dry raising
fears that the water shortage
plaguing the parched region
could worsen next year.
The crowds continued to
swell throughout the day.
Israeli military officials, who


coordinate movement in and
out of the West Bank, said
the number was expected to
rise above last year's mark of
50,000 people on Christmas
Eve alone.
Raed Arafat, the 40-year-
old owner of the "Stars
and Bucks Cafe," played
Christmas songs over loud-
speakers and handed out
free Arabic coffee at his
shop near Manger Square.
Tourists snapped photos
and bought mugs embla-


zoned, with the cafe chain's
green logo, modeled after
the American Starbucks
company.
"There are more people
this year," an ecstatic Arafat
said. "Christmas this year is
not like every year because
now there is more quiet"
The holiday,had its sur-
real moments. Many visi-
tors were local Palestinians,
including a large number
of Muslim women whose
faces were covered by veils.


FINLAND: A look at how the holidays are celebrated by the Finns

Continued From Page 1A


watching them through
the windows, checking
to see if their behavior is
good or bad.
She and Irene
Henriksson noted that a
winter season in Finland
has only four hours of day-
light each day.
When Christmas Eve
arrives, the majorityof
the Christmas celebration
takes place, she said.
"On Christmas Eve,
that's the biggest day
when we celebrate
Christmas," Kristina
Henrikkson said.
All Finnish families have
a Christmas tree, usually a
live'tree, she said, but the
tree isn't brought into the
home or decorated until
Christmas Eve.
The tree's decorations
are most likely homemade
by the family's children


and are saved from year
to year.
S"The trees are usu-
ally very personal," Irene
Henriksson said.
People will spend time
in the sauna, which can
be found in every Finnish
home and are used regular-
ly, and will then partake in
Christmas dinner, Kristina
Henriksson said.
While an Americaxi family
may have turkey or ham for
Christmas dinner, a Finnish
Christmas dinner consists
of those and more.
The traditional holiday
dishes include dried fish,
salmon, pickled herring
and small boiled potatoes,
Kristina Henriksson said,
but the main foods are
three different casseroles
- carrots with rice, ruta-
baga and potato. The meal
is enough food to last the


RETURNS: Stores open

Continued From Page 1A


within 30 days, and other
items may be returned
within 90 days.
Video games may be re-
turned within 30 days and
can only be fully refunded
if they are unopened. If
opened, they cannot be re-
turned, but exchanged with
the same item.
0 GameStop opens 10
a.m. to 9 p.m. Customers
have. until Jan. 15 to return
new games, which must


be in the original packag-
ing. Used games can be re-
turned until Jan 14.
Walmart opens 6 a.m.
Returns are accepted within
90 days after purchase for
most items. Items may be
returned without a receipt,
and customers can receive
cash for items less than $25,
a shopping card for items
more than $25 or an even
exchange for a product.


entirety of the Christmas
celebration, which lasts 13
days in Finland, she said.
After the meal, every
Finnish home receives a
visit from Santa Claus -
or Joulupukki in Finnish,
which means "Christmas
goat." The children greet
him, sing him a song and
Santa passes out their
gifts, Kristina Henriksson
said, which can number
more than 14 per child.
"Santa actually visits
every family," she said.
In Finland, Santa Claus'
home is a place called
Korvatunturi, instead of
the North Pole, Kristina
Henriksson said, which is
in the Arctic Circle.
The children promise
Santa they will be good
next year before he leaves,
and the family enjoys des-
sert and coffee, games or
maybe a Christmas movie
on TV, Irene and Kristina
Henriksson said.
Other Finnish
Christmas Eve traditions
include visiting the graves
of loved ones, attending
church and eating warm,
rice porridge in the morn-
ing, which has an almond
hidden in it that signifies
good luck.
"You hide an almond
inside of it and then the
one who gets the almond
gets good luck for the
rest of the year," Irene
Henrikssoh said.
The actual Christmas
day is usually quiet,
Kristina Henriksson said,


ELKS: Toy deliveries

Continued From Page 1A


Christmas Dream Machine,
Hollingsworth said. More
than 500 toys were avail-
able.
Toys included dolls,
board games, action figures
and more.
"We're always excited to
have so many toys," she
said.
Often families that don't
qualify for Christmas Dream
Machine are referred to the
lodge's giveaway.
The event has always
been very successful,
Hollingsworth said.


Members of the lodge
and their family members
volunteered their time to
help with the event.
"We all have just a lot of
fun," she said. "We're happy
to be able to do it."
Hollingsworth said she
hopes between the lodge
and other groups having
toy drives all children in
need have been reached so
they will have a wonderful
Christmas.
"I hope they still believe
in Santa and the joy of
Christmas," she said.


IMPAIRED: FHP watch

Continued From Page 1A

"People who are not the type of driver we're
going to use good judg- looking to arrest and take
ment from the get go and
they decide to drive in an off the roads," Riordan
impaired condition, that's said.


S each day
so special
and sWeet,
much more ,
' in our future
y ifyou will

Marry Me!


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Kristina Henriksson shows her daughter Irene and Larry Gunter an online recipe of Karelian
pie, which is Gunter's favorite Finnish dish, as they attempt to make it. Karelian pie consists
of a crust made from rye flour stuffed with rice porridge, and is sometimes served with egg
butter. Traditional Finnish Christmas dishes are vegetable casseroles and rice pudding with
an almond in it, signifying good luck for the year.


and is spent with family.
The day after Christmas
is Boxing day, an official
Finnish holiday, which is
the day people travel long
distances to see other fam-
ily, she said.
. Counting Christmas Eve
as day one, a Finnish fam-
ily will finish celebrating
the 13th day after, Kristina
Henriksson said. They will
finish the holiday food,
dance around the tree,
undress it from its deco-
rations and take the tree
out, she said.
Kristina Henriksson







Do You Need to

POP TIHE

QUESTION?
CALL Mary or
Bridget
TODAY to place a
surprise ad for
someone you Love!

755-5440 or
755-5441
between 8:00am & 5:00pm
^4t7W


said she will most miss
seeing her extended family
this Christmas and Irene
Henriksson said she'll
most miss the snow.
"We're always used to
a white Christmas," Irene
Henriksson said. "There's
something magical about
that."
Having an American
Christmas in Lake City is
still an experience, Kristina


Henriksson said.
"We do like to experience
how Americans prepare
themselves for Christmas,"
she said; "just by being in
the shops and seeing what
people do and looking at
the Christmas decorations,
looking at the countdown
in the ads, like 'Now only
two days shopping for
Christmas.' This is all very
interesting."


//anti to t, eall2 1 n, ou te

Jo1.days Y/iJ hyear?














Then give yourself a wonderful gift and do your business bank-
ing at Peoples. At Peoples State Bank we understand what it
takes to make a business successful in our community. And
success is rarely achieved alone. Let our experienced banking
professionals provide financial solutions to helpyou grow
your business. With a little financial assistance from Peoples
you can spend less time worrying aboutyour business financ-
es and more time doing what you do best, running your busi-
ness. Stop by Peoples today and experience friendly service
and better banking foryourself. Peoples State Bank. Now
that's banking!


350 SW Main Blvd., Lake City, FL 32025
3882 W. US Hwy 90. Lake City, FL 32055
Telephone 386.754.0002
www.psb.biz Member FDIC


PEOPLES
STATE BANK


Ads have to b e pace by4pm
|ll-daysprior t J^appearance in
DEALIe'heLakeAJ(it Reporite~nnr.I













OPINION


Saturday, December 25, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


OTHER


OTHER
OPINION


BP should

be held fully

accountable

for oil spill

People in the Gulf
Coast have much
at stake in the law-
suit the U.S. Justice
Department filed
recently against BP and some
of its partners at the ill-fated
Macondo well and not just
because the case may likely
settle how much the companies
owe to repair the direct effects of
the spill on our environment
A much broader issue is
whether BP and the other firms
will be held accountable for the full
extent of the spill and made to pay
appropriate fines that can help pay
for the long-term restoration of the
coast
The federal lawsuit seeks to
hold BP and other companies lia-
ble without limitation under the Oil
Pollution Act of 1990 for the spill's
cleanup costs and for the result-
ing environmental and economic
damage.
The government is also suing
under the Clean Water Act, which
allows for civil fines of up to $1,000
per barrel of oil spilled or $4,300
per barrel if the companies are
found guilty of "gross negligence
or willful misconduct"
BP said it will respond to the
suit "in a timely manner and will
continue to cooperate with all
government investigations and
inquiries." The company also
noted its pledge of $20 billion for a
compensation fund.
But already BP is trying to
limit its liability by challenging the
governments estimate of the spill
- and thafs not surprising.
BP is now saying the true
figure is 20 percent to 50 percent
lower, arguing that the flow rate
increased over time as the riser
pipe and the inside of the blowout
preventer were eroded.
BP's new argument contradicts
evidence from the governments
technical group and from other
independent scientists.
In filing the suit, Attorney
General Eric Holder referred to it
as part of the governments "work
to ensure that the American tax-
payers are not forced to bear the
costs of restoring the Gulf area
- and its economy."
That should be the nation's top
interest in this lawsuit and thafs
also why this case will be crucial
for the future of our region.
0 The Times Picayune

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
Sget things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman


LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,


Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


End the immigration lottery


L ast week, the DREAM
Act failed. DREAM is
the cutesy acronym
for Development,
Relief and Education
for Alien Minors. Had Congress,
in its lame duck session, passed
the bill, young people in the
U.S. illegally would have been
able to acquire citizenship just
by spending a couple of years in
college.
President Obama called the
vote to block the DREAM Act
"incredibly disappointing." He
had pushed for the law, his
spokesmen said, because it was
an "education bill." that would
bring "benefits to the country."
But Congress held not a single
hearing at which experts might
have testified as to whether that
claim holds water.
Senate Majority Leader Harry
Reid championed the DREAM
Act during his re-election cam-
paign in Nevada and probably
won critical Hispanic votes as
a result But let's put politics
aside and find consensus where
we can: Obama's remarks carry
the implication that U.S. immi-
gration laws and policy ought to
benefit U.S. citizens.
So start with this:
In the current era, a time of
global conflict and economic
dislocation, why in the world
do we still maintain a "green-
card lottery," a program that
allows tens of thousands of
people to come live in the U.S.
based on dumb luck? This year
alone a record 15 million people
entered America's luck-of-the-
draw immigration program that
offers a quick path to legal and
permanent residence to 50,000
aliens a year.
The "green-card lottery" was


LETTER


Cliff May


initially justified as yet another
way to promote "diversity." I
agree that diversity is nice. I
disagree that it should trump all
other values. And does no one
see a racist assumption behind
the notion that we won't end
up with diversity if we open our
doors (1) mainly to immigrants
who have skills America needs
and (2) only to immigrants
who are eager to embrace such
American ideals as individual
freedom. Constitutional govern-
ment arid the rule of law?
I'm sure some of those who
win the lottery make important
contributions to their adopted
nation. But not all: Hesham
Mohammed Ali Hedayet, the
Egyptian-born attacker at Los
Angeles Airport in 2002 he
killed two people at an El Al
ticket counter was in the U.S.
legally despite the fact that he
had overstayed his visitor's visa
because his wife was a green-
card lottery winner.
According to the State
Department, those who come
to the U.S. through the lottery
receive the same stringent
review as do other immigrants.
But how stringent is that? Faisal
Shahzad was naturalized as a
U.S. citizen only months before
he attempted to set off a bomb
in Times Square. At sentenc-
ing, the judge asked if he hadn't


sworn allegiance to America.
"I did swear but I did not mean
it," Shahzad said. Was no one
aware that Shahzad had recent-
ly spent five months in North
Waziristan, where al-Qaeda and
the Taliban have taken refuge?
Did no one try to find out what
he was doing there? (In fact, he
was studying Bomb-making 101
at a terrorist training camp.)
Surely, as President Obama
suggested, Americans deserve
an immigration policy that,
furthers the American national
interest. Surely, that means our
lawmakers do not needlessly
increase national security risks
or further weigh down a limping
economy.
That does not mean locking
all the nation's doors. Indeed,
economic analyst Amity
Shlaes has argued that one
way to rescue Social Security
would be to bring in "100,000
additional skilled immigrants
who pay Social Security up to
the cap." Do that while also
resetting the base pension to
rise no faster than inflation
and: "Voila the pension
program's shortfall is gone as
fast as a Crumb's cupcake at a
Christmas party."
Immigration reform should
be a top priority item for the
new Congress. Almost every-
one agrees on that. But would
it not make sense to start with
repeal of the green-card lot-
tery as well as serious border
security? Wise nations, like
wise individuals, do not leave
such critical issues to chance.
* Clifford D. May is president of
the Foundation for the Defense
of Democracies, a policy institute
focusing on terrorism.


TO THE EDITOR


What I want for Christmas


Dear Santa,

I have been fairly good this
year so I thought maybe you
could give me a few things.
Thanks for reading my letter.
Please consider these requests:
1. Stop our politicians from
buying their elected offices.
2. Stop the media from their
biases in reporting on politi-
cians.
3. Politicians must resign if
caught telling lies, intentionally.
4. Politicians must love
America or resign.
5. Politicians must not speak ill
about America while abroad.
5. Politicians must put America
first instead of their self interest.
7. Politicians must not be arro-
gant.
8. Politicians must manage
our money as it were their own.
If they waste any on frivolous


spending they must repay it per-
sonally.
9. Politicians must be limited
to 10 years in elected office.
10. Politicians must live with
us regular folks for two years and
serve in the military two years to


qualify for public office.
That's about it Santa, for this
year. I'm sure I will have more
next year, if America as we know
it, survives.
Merry Christmas,
Bill Glover


Deroy Murdock
deroy.murdock@gmail.com


America's

wealthy

aren't

Scrooges

In this season of giving,
the words hurled at
America's wealthiest citi-
zens have been far from
generous.
The recent debate over the
Obama-GOP tax-cut compro-
mise featured language best
described as "affluphobic."
Self-styled socialist Sen.
Bernie Sanders of Vermont,
for instance, spent nearly nine
hours on Dec. 10 excoriating
affluent Americans. Sanders
complained to colleagues that
"when the rich get richer
... they say: 'I am not rich
enough. I need to be richer.'
What motivates some of these
people is greed and greed and
more greed." Sanders further
filibustered: "Greed is, in my
view, like a sickness. It's like
an addiction. We know people
on heroin. They can't stop.
They need more and more."
Sanders wailed that the
top 1 percent of taxpay-
ers (who made more than
$380,354) earned 20 percent
of America's Adjusted Gross
Income (AGI) in 2008, accord-
ing to IRS data. True. They
also paid 38 percent of all fed-
eral income taxes. The top 10
percent (with incomes above
$113,799) earned 45.8 percent
of AGI and paid 69.9 percent
of federal income taxes.
So, do these rich people
pay their "fair share?" If not,
should the top 10 percent
finance 75 percent of income
taxes? Eighty percent?
High-income taxpayers
also cough up state and local
levies and often taxes on
sales, property, capital gains,
dividends, partnerships and
corporate income. Their
wealth floods public coffers
and flows into government
programs, many targeted at
low-income Americans.
So what? Generosity is'a
snap when tax authorities
demand tribute. How do the
rich behave absent govern-
ment coercion?
Sanders stated on the
Senate floor, "There is virtue
in sharing, in reaching out..."
He should appreciate these
IRS data: In 2008 alone, the
top 10 percent of taxpay-
ers (who earned at least
$200,000) paid 42 percent
of all charitable deductions,
worth some $72.3 billion.
To understand wealthy
Americans' "virtue in shar-
ing," consider The 2010 Bank
of America Merrill Lynch
Study of High Net Worth
Philanthropy. This fascinating
document finds rich people
doing what Senator Sanders
asked.
While most wealthy people
legally acquire their money,
greedy crooks like Bernie
Madoff exist, alas, and should
be imprisoned and impover-
ished. Also, capitalism should
be cleansed of the bailouts,
subsidies, and special favors
that perversely find roofers
and waitresses underwriting
financiers and speculators.
But these are exceptions,
not the rule. Despite today's
destructive anti-rich slogans,
the data demonstrate that
wealthy Americans are much
less like Scrooge and much
more like Santa.
* New York commentator
Deroy Murdock is a columnist
with the Scripps Howard News
Service and a media fellow with
the Hoover Institution on War,
Revolution and Peace at Stanford
University.


4A


EMAIL: hpayne@detnews.com (9io pT'ioT% rm4'e" w












Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & NATION SATURDAY, DECEMBER 25, 2010


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


* To submit your Community
Calendar item, contact Antonia
Robinson at 754-0425 or by
e-mail at arobinson@
lakecityreporter., com.


Today
Christmas Dinner
LAD Soup Kitchen cel-
ebrates it's fifth annual
Christmas day dinner
from 10 a.m. 2 p.m. today
at 127 NE Escambia St.
The menu includes ham,
turkey, green beans,
rice pilaf, yams, rolls
and assorted desserts.
Donations are appreciated,
but the meal is free of
charge. For more informa-
tion, contact Timothy at
386-758-2217.

Wednesday.
Uve Performance
Fred Perry performs
live from 11 11:45 a.m.
Wednesday in the Dining
Hall of the LifeStyle
Enrichment Center. A
game of bingo will follow
at 1 p.m. The center is
located at 628 SE Allison
Court. For more informa-
tion call 386-755-0235.

Friday
New Year's Bash
The LifeStyle
Enrichment Center pres-
ents "Rocking The House"
beginning at 7 p.m. Friday.
Heavy hors d'oeuvres will
be served all night, and
professional comedians
Jamie Morgan, Chase
Holliday and Lisa Best
will entertain from 8 10
p.m. Tickets are $50 per
person, and the event is at
628 SE Allison Court. For
ticket information, con-
tact Janet at 386-755-0235
extension 124.

NYE Celebration
The Third Annual
Rotary Club of Lake City
New Year's Celebration
is 8 p.m. Friday at the
County Club at Lake
City. Tickets are $100 per
couple and available at
The County Club of Lake
City, Candler Appraisal
Services, Parks Johnson
Agency, Olympic Health
Chiropractic and the Lake
City Reporter. Attire is
black tie optional.

Joint worship service
Shiloh Missionary
Baptist Church and
Philadelphia Missionary


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter

Volunteers share the holiday Christian spirit with the needy
Christian Service Center volunteers Blaine Wheeler (from left), Ann Hadsall and Randy Cox carry bags and boxes of food to
some of the agency's clients. About 400 local families received food for Christmas dinner.


Baptist Church are wor-
shipping, fellowshipping
and praising the New
Year in 10 p.m. Friday at
Shiloh Missionary Baptist
Church. The church is
located at 948 Aberdeen
Ave.

Miracle Tabernacle
Church service
"Friday Night Live"
New Years Eve Service is
9 p.m. Friday at Miracle
Tabernacle Church. The
church is located at 1190
SW Sister's Welcome
Road. Call 386-758-8452
For transportation call
Mitch at 386-292-5850 or
Audre' 386-344-9915.

Watch Night Service
The DaySpring
Missionary Baptist Church
meets at 9:30 p.m. Friday
for a watch night service.
There will be singing, pray-
ing, testimonies and the
word of God delivered by
Pastor Aaron T. Lewis Sr.
The church is located at 849
NE Congress Avenue. For
more information call Elvira
at 386-365-2911.


New Year's Service
St Paul Missionary
Baptist Church meets at
8 p.m. Friday for a watch
night service. Make plans to
come and visit the church
located at 222 Oosterhoudt
Lane. For more information
call 386-758-8486.

Watch Night Service
The Long Branch
Congregational Methodist
Church hosts a watch
night service starting at
8 p.m. Friday on County
Road 135. The Rushing
Winds from Jacksonville
will be the guest singers,
and there will also be local
singing. Refreshrhents will
be served and everyone is
invited. For more informa-
tion call 386-397-2673.


Midnight Watch service
Ist Haitian Baptist
Church is having midnight
watch service 9 p.m. to 12
a.m. Friday. The church
is located at 189 NW Cali
Drive. The community is
invited to attend the annu-
al event. Refreshments will


be served after service.

EVERY DAY
Mall Walkers
Rain or shine, the Lake
City Mall is open at 7 a.m.
Monday Saturday and 10
a.m. Sunday for those who
want to walk for exercise.

EVERY MONDAY
Civil Air Patrol
Suwannee Valley
Composite Squadron -
Civil Air Patrol meets 6:30
to 9 p.m. Monday. For
more information, please
call Maj. Grant Meadows,
365-1341.

EVERY THIRD
MONDAY

MS support group
An MS support group
meets every third Monday
of the month, at the Lake
City Columbia County
Historical Museum, 157
SE Hernando Ave. Call
Karen Cross at (386) 755-


2950 or Jane Joubert at
(386) 755-5099 for more
information.

EVERY FIRST,
THIRD MONDAY
Weight loss support
group meets
The Thinner Me Weight
Loss Surgery Support
Group holds meetings at 7
p.m. on the first and third
Monday of every month in
the classrooms at Lake City
Medical Center. Meetings
are for people that have
had weight loss surgery,
contemplating surgery or
just trying to lose weight on
their own. E-mail thethin-
nerme@gmail.com or call
(386) 288-9153 and leave a
message.

EVERY FOURTH
MONDAY

Social Duplicate Bridge
Club meeting
The Social Duplicate
Bridge Club meets from
1 to 5.p.m. every fourth


Monday at the LifeStyle
Enrichment Center, 628 SE
Allison Ct. Call 755-0235.

EVERY TUESDAY
AND THURSDAY

Geri Actors
The Geri Actors at the
LifeStyle Enrichment
Center are looking for
members. Meetings are
12:45-2 p.m. Tuesday and
Thursday. Anyone retired
and interested in becoming
an actor or actress is invit-
ed. Call Frank at 752-8861.


EVERY TUESDAY

Domestic violence
support group
A support group for
survivors of domestic vio-
lence meets at 5:30 p.m.
Tuesday. Child care is pro-
vided. Call Another Way at
386-719-2700.

UF Master Gardeners
are available
The University of Florida
Master Gardeners are
at the Columbia County
Extension Office from 9
a.m. to noon Tuesday. They
answer gardening ques-
tions and conduct soil pH
tests free of charge. Call
386-752-5384, or stop at the
UF/IFAS Extension Office
at the Columbia County
fairgrounds for more infor-
mation.

Lake City Lions to meet
The Lake City Lions
meet at 7 p.m. Tuesday, at
the Guangdong restaurant,
in the Lake City Mall. Call
Truett George at (386)
497-2050 or Marshall
Barnard at 386-497-3536
for more information.

Square Dancing
The Dixie" Dancers
weekly dance is held at
6:30 p.m. every Tuesday
at Teen Town Community
Center. The group does
square and round dancing.
Couples 12 and older are
welcome. Call (386)497-
2834.


Biden says repeal makes gay marriage 'inevitable'


By LAURIE KELLMAN
Associated Press

WASHINGTON Vice
President Joe Biden predicted
Friday the evolution in thinking
that will permitgays to soon serve
openly in the military eventually
will bring about a national con-
sensus for same-sex marriage.
Changes in attitudes by mili-
tary leaders, those in the service
and the public allowed the repeal
by Congress of the "don't ask,
don't tell' policy, Biden noted in a
nationally broadcast interview on
Christmas eve.
"I think the country's evolv-
ing," he said on ABC's "Good
Morning America.:" And I think
you're going to see, you know,
the next effort is probably going


to be to deal with so-called DOMA
(Defense of Marriage Act). He
said he agreed with Obama that
his position in gay marriage is
"evolving."
Gay marriage is legal in only
a handful of states, mostly in the
Northeast, and in Iowa. President
Barack Obama recently said his
feelings on the gay marriage
issue were in a state of transition.
But he also said he still believes
in allowing strong civil unions
that provide certain protections
and legal rights that married cou-
ples have.
Obama said he is still wrestling
with whether gay couples should
have the right to marry, now that
the change in the law will allow
them to serve openly in combat.
Presidents in recent years


have struggled with this issue.
President Bill Clinton developed
the "don't ask, don't tell" poli-
cy for the military, and Obama
promised. repeatedly in his 2008
campaign for the presidency that
his administration would have a
more supportive attitude toward
gays. But gay rights groups
also have said frequently they
have been disappointed with the
administration's performance on
this issue.
The question about same-sex
marriage came at Obama's news
conference Wednesday, just
hours after he signed landmark
legislation repealing the ban on
gays serving openly in the mili-
tary. The law ends the 17-year-
old "don't ask, don't tell" policy
that forced gays to hide their


sexual orientation or face dis-
missal. Before that, there was an
outright ban on service by gays
in the military.
But in letters to the troops after
the new bill was signed into law,
the four military service chiefs
warned that the ban was still
in place, and that implementing
the policy change in full was still
months away.
Recommendations to put the
new policy into place were out-
lined in a report last month, and
now these steps must be written
into concrete regulations govern-
ing the military. Defense officials
say that they still don't know
how long it will take before the.
Pentagon completes its, imple-
mentation plan and certifies the
change will not damage combat


readiness. Once certified, the
implementation would begin 60
days later.
In his interview with ABC news-
man George Stephanopoulos,
Biden brought up the Defense of
Marriage Act, a law that Congress
passed in 1996 that defines mar-
riage as between a man and a
woman.
Obama has repeatedly said he
would like to see the law repealed,
but the Justice Department
has defended its constitutional-
ity, which the agency is required
to do. As recently as October,
the department defended
DOMA, appealing two rulings in
Massachusetts by a judge who
called the law unconstitutional
for denying federal benefits to
gay marriage couples.


OBITUARIES


Annie Euree Redish
Annie Euree Redish, 83, a
resident of Lake City, Fl died,
peacefully, at her earthly home
on December 22, 2010. A native
of Clarksville, TN., born Octo-
ber 25th, 1927 to the late Her-
man and LuElla Street, Indian
Mound, TN, Stewart County.
On October 5, 1946, Ann mar-
ried Edgar Redish in Hop-
kinsville, Ky., moving to Lake
City in 1953. Ann and Edgar
celebrated their 64th wed-
ding anniversary in 2010.
Ann was a born again Chris-
tian, loving her Lord, fam-
ily and friends. She has been a
devoted member of Southside
Baptist Church since 1953. She
loved collecting angels, and


was the photographer for her
family, and friends, until her
eyesight failed her. .She was
preceded in death by her only
son, Eddie Tim Redish in 1988.
Survivors include her loving
husband and caregiver for many
years, Edgar Redish; one daugh-
ter, Peggy Ann Lewis (Frank)
of Lake City;
sister, Flor-
ence Darnell i
and brother,
Glenn Street
of Clarksville,
TN. Grand-
children:
Priscilla Ann
Jaime of Lake City; Todd Re-.
dish (Charlene) of Live Oak;
Angie Williamson (Timmy) of
Lake City. Step Grandchildren:


Frankie Lewis (Lisa); Alyssa
Tiller and Eric Lewis. Great
Grandchildren: Chloe Bennett,
Alden Jamie, Tucker William-
son; Skylar and Bryson Zasada.
Step-Great grandchildren: Parker
and Erica Lewis and Zoe Tiller.
Funeral services will be con-
ducted on Tuesday, December
28th, 2010, at 11AM, Southside
Baptist Church, with Dr. Ralph
Rodriguez officiating. Inter-
ment will follow in the Forest
Lawn Memorial Gardens. The
family will receive friends from
6 to 8 PM on Monday, Decem-
ber 27th, 2010, at GATEWAY
FOREST LAWN FUNERAL
HOME, Lake City, FI In lieu of
flowers, Ann's request was for
expressions of love be shown
by making a donation to the


building Fund, c/o Southside
Baptist Church, 388 SE Baya
Drive, Lake City, Fl. 32025.
Please sign our guestbook @
www.gatewayforestlawn.comrn
John Wayne Richards
John Wayne Richards, 62, a
resident of Ocala, Florida passed
away December 23; 2010 at
the Acosta Rua Center for Car-
ing, Jacksonville, Florida.
Mr. Richards was a native of
Lake City, Florida and has lived
in Ocala for the past ten years. He
was employed with the JBS En-
gineering in Oveida, Florida and
was also retired from the Florida
Dept. of Transportation. He
was a graduate of the Columbia
High School class of 1965 was


in the National Guard and loved
to hunt and fish. Mr. Richards
is preceded in death by his wife
Sharon Elaine Richards in 2008.
Survivors include two sons: Eric
Richards, Ocala, Florida and
Phillip Wayne Richards, Lake
City, Fl. His mother: Ella Mae
Richards, Lake City, Fl. Two
Sisters: Beverly (Paul) McK-
eithen, Lake City and Mary
Ann (Gene) Courtney, Alachua,
Fl. Two Brothers: Buck (Patri-
cia) Richards and Ray (Cathy)
Richards both of Lake City,
Florida. Four Grandchildren,
Angel Richards, Ocala, Fl.,
Amber Richards, North Man-
chester, IN., Kayla Richards,
North Manchester, IN and Si-


erra Richards, Princeton, TX.
Funeral services for Mr. Rich-
ards will be conducted Monday,
December 27, 2010 at 1:00 P.M.
in the Chapel of Guerry Funeral
Home with the Rev. Lowell
O'Steen, officiating. Interment
will follow at a later date. The
family will receive friends Mon-
day December 27, 2010 from
11:00-1:00 just prior to the ser-
vice. Guerry Funeral Home,
2659 SW. Main Blvd. Lake City,
Florida is in charge of all arrange-
ments. Please sign. the guest
book at guerryfiineralhome.net.
Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


SATURDAY, DECEMBER 25, 2010


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & NATION













FAITH


25, 2010


&


VALUES


www.lakecityreporter.com


HEART MATTERS ,3.


Angie Land
angieland3@windstreamrn.net


New Year

sparkling

with God's

purpose


Year! What
are you look-
ing forward
to in 2011?
Like every other year, my
favorite thing about this
New Year are those fresh
clean pages of a new calen-
dar. Depending on how you
look at it, those pages can
represent days full of dread
and demands or they can
shine with possibility and
opportunities.
The Bible records the
Apostle Paul saying it best:
"I press on to take hold
of that for which Christ
Jesus took hold of me. ...
But one thing I do: forget-
ting what is behind and
straining toward what is
ahead, I press on toward
the goal to win the prize
for which God has called
me heavenward in Christ
Jesus." (Philippians 3:13-
14)
Paul says we have to
"press on" or keep moving
forward to fulfill God's plan
in our life. Then he gives
us instruction on how to do
just that.
Forgetting what is
behind doesn't mean that
we can't remember our
past. ... what it does mean
is that the past shouldn't
take priority over the pres-
ent and future.
Too many of-us live
continually with the hurt
and failures of the past,
or maybe we believe they
were our best days.
Actually, God's plan is for
us to give the present and
future our energy, and our
faith, believing that He will
do "immeasurably more
than all we ask or imagine,
according to His power
that is at work within us."
(Ephesians 3:20)
The second part of the
instruction is just as criti-
cal; "straining toward what
is ahead" is something we
need to give special atten-
tion.
Webster's dictionary
defines strain as "to strug-
gle; to make a desperate
effort." This is our first
clue that moving forward
will not be an easy thing
to do.
"Easy" usually means
staying right in that com-
fortable spot. It may not
even be a great spot, but
we often stay because at
least we know what to
expect.
But we do have the
choice: we can take the
easy way and spend the
rest of our lives wonder-
ing if there was more or
we can start making that
desperate effort to find
and live in the purpose for
which God planned our
whole life.
I hope so much that you
will grab those new calen-
dar pages and see them as
fresh new opportunities to
be everything that God cre-
ated you to be.
* Heart Matters is a weekly
column written by Angie
Land, director of the Family
Life Ministries of the Lafayette
Baptist Association, where
she teaches bible studies,
leads marriage and family
conferences, and offers bibli-
cal counseling to individuals,
couples and families.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Nov. 19 photo, Sister Joyce Richter, S.C. (center) discusses a measurement on a sheet of drywall with fellow Catholic nuns while volunteering to
rebuild a Hurricane Katrina-damaged house in New Orleans. A group of Catholic nuns and associates made their third trip to the New Orleans area since
Katrina to spend a week rebuilding houses.


NUNS


Catholic program rehabilitates Katrina-damaged homes


By MARY FOSTER
Associated Press

NEW ORLEANS
S ister Paula Gonzalez
dressed in sweats
and sneakers was
directing a fellow nun to
the ceiling of a closet ,
the last area in need of insulation
before the group begins-hanging
drywall in a house that has stood
empty since Hurricane Katrina
flooded it.
"We're all glad to be done with
that nasty stuff," Gonzalez said.
"Everyone has been itching for
days."
Gonzalez, 78, of Cincinnati,
is one of 86 nuns from various
Roman Catholic orders around
the United States and Canada
who took part in the latest edi-
tion of Nuns Build. The program,
begun in 2009, brings nuns to
New Orleans twice a year to help
rebuild houses flooded by Katrina
in 2005, but are structurally
sound and can be renovated.
There are still thousands of the
houses in the metropolitan area.
Many were owned by elderly or
poor people without flood insur-
ance and left with no means of


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Sister Louise Smith,, S.C.N., left, and Sister Anita Gagnon, S.C.H, cut a
sheet of drywall while volunteering to rebuild a Hurricane Katrina-damaged
house in New Orleans.


reclaiming their homes.
The nuns worked with the
St. Bernard Project, a nonprofit
disaster recovery organization
dedicated to rebuilding homes
destroyed by Katrina.
The nuns have been part
more than 23,000 volunteers
have helped St. Bernard Project
rebuild 319 families' homes.
Money for the supplies is raised
through donations.
In the latest effort, the nuns


worked on 17 houses swinging
hammers, working saws, insulat-
ing, hanging drywall, painting,
putting in flooring and installing
doors and windows.
"We do it all," laughed
Sister Winnie Brubach, 64, of
Cincinnati, as she taped insula-
tion into a closet ceiling. "We just
showed up and started in on what
they told us to do."
The sisters finished up their
stay working at Patricia Gardner's


CHURCH NOTES


Friday, Dec. 31
Joint worship service
Shiloh Missionary
Baptist Church and
Philadelphia Missionary
Baptist Church are wor-
shipping, fellowshipping
and praising the New
Year in 10 p.m. Dec. 31 at
Shiloh Missionary Baptist
Church. The church is
located at 948 Aberdeen
Ave.

NYE service
"Friday Night Live"
New Years Eve Service is
9 p.m. Dec. 31 at Miracle
Tabernacle Church. The
church is located at 1190
SW Sister's Welcome
Road. Call 386-758-8452
For transportation call
Mitch at 386-292-5850 or
Audre' at 386-344-9915.

Watch Night Service
The DaySpring
Missionary Baptist
Church meets at 9:30 p.m.


Dec. 31 for a watch night
service. There will be
singing, praying, testimo-
nies and the word 9f God
delivered by Pastor Aaron
T. Lewis Sr. The church
is located at 849 NE
Congress Ave. For more
information, call Elvira at
386-365-2911.

New Year's Service
St Paul Missionary
Baptist Church meets
at 8 p.m. Dec. 31 for a
watch night service. Make
plans to come and visit
the church located at 222
Oosterhoudt Lane. For
more information, call
386-758-8486.

Watch' Night Service
The Long Branch
Congregational Methodist
Church hosts a watch
night service starting at
8 p.m. Dec. 31 on County
Road 135. The Rushing
Winds from Jacksonville
will be the guest singers,
and there will also be local


singing. Refreshments will
be served and everyone is
invited. For more informa-
tion call 386-397-2673.

Midnight Watch
service
Ist Haitian Baptist
Church is having mid-
night watch service 9
p.m. to 12 a.m. Dec. 31.
The church is located at
189 NW Cali Drive. The
community is invited to
attend the annual event.
Refreshments will be
served after service.

Saturday/ Jan. 8
Prayer Breakfast
Antioch Missionary
Baptist Church and the
Pastor's Care Committee
present the Words of
Worship and Praise
Prayer Breakfast at 8 a.m.
Jan. 8. Tickets are $10 per
person for the breakfast,
and featured speaker
Rev. Marie Herring will
be bringing a message.


For more information call
Marilyn at 352-318-3441.

Every Tuesday


home in the Gentilly section of
New Orleans. The house, which
was flooded to the roof by the fail-
ure of the city's levees following
Katrina, was gutted when they
arrived. By the time they left at
the end of the week, the house
had been completely insulated
and ceilings and walls covered
with dry wall.
"It will be one of our 'Homes
for the Holidays' houses," said
Amanda Catalani of the St.
Bernard Project, said. The agen-
cy is working to have 25 houses
restored in time for families to
return to them before Christmas.
A group of volunteers will pick up
where the nuns left off at the end
of their stay.
"It's doable, definitely doable,"
Catalani said. "We could use
more volunteers, but we have 13
done so we believe we will get
them all done."
The nuns working on
Gardner's house ranged in age
from 62 to 78. All acknowledged
'that when they entered their
orders as young women they
would never have imagined them-
selves involved in such a project.
Every nun working in the
house wore full habits when they
took orders.


7524135 between 8:30
a.m. and 4 p.m.

Every Thursday


group
Greater Visions Support
Group hosts a faith-based
addictions support group
at 7 p.m. every Tuesday
in the fellowship hall of
Christ Central Ministries,
217 SW Duval Ave. The
group provides spiritual
and emotional support in
a non-judgmental setting.
Call 755-2525.

Free Biblical counseling
is available
Free Biblical counsel-
ing is available at Hopeful
Baptist Church. Many
are struggling with prob-
lems including marital,
financial, communication,
emotional, spiritual and
addiction. To make an
appointment, call (386)


Free English speaking
and literacy classes pro-
vided by Columbia County
School District's Career
and Adult Education
Program is from 5:30 to
8 p.m. every Thursday at
Unity of God Ministries,
Inc. in Wellborn. Activities
for children will be pro-
vided. Call (386) 755-8190.
The church is located at
12270 County Road 137.
Submit Church Notes
items in writing no later
than 5 p.m. Monday the
week prior to an event
by e-mail to arobinson@
lakecityreporter.com, fax to
(386) 752-9400 or drop-off
at 180 E. Duval St., Lake
City. Call (386) 754-0425
with questions. Church
Notes run as space is avail-
able each Saturday.


Saturday, December


6A


Greater Visions hosts English and literacy
addiction support classes


HANDY









LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVERTISEMENT SATURDAY, DECEMBER 25, 2010


1:111


A brand new year is
beginning! Can we change
those unhealthy habits that
have been a part of us for
so long? Can we keep our
New Years' resolutions?
There is one resolution that
can be a great help to us as
we try to reach our desired
goals. That is the practice of
attending our chosen house eF
of worship each week to
give thanks and praise to
God. Through prayer and
meditation, He will provide ., .
the strength and guidance .
we need to make positive :


OUR REDEEMER LUTHERAN CHURCH
LCMS
11/2 miles S. of 1-75 on SR 47
755-4299
Sunday Services 9:30AM
(Nursery Provided)
Christian Education Hour
For all ages at 10:45AM
Pastor Rev. Bruce Alidre


64,





1 -'
I


changes in our lives. With
God's help we can have a
new life!


Scriptures Selected by -.he Ameiican Bible Society
Copyright 2010, Keister-Williams Newspaper Services, P. O. Box 8187, Charlottesville, VA 22906, www.kwnews.com


386-754-555B s


To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440



Supercenter
"LOW PRICES EVERYDAY"
US90WEST755-2421


Hunter, Inc.
Chevron Oil
Jobber


, Inc.
"Quality ,work at a reasonable price"
We also do solar hook-ups
(386) 755-5944_


FOOD STORES
Open 7 Days a Week
1036 E. Duval St., Lake City FL.
(386) 752-0067
Fresh Meal, Fresh Produce!
I can do all ings through Chris llch sirengthenedh me"
I'hlllppians 4 13

To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440

To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440


RICK'S CRANE SERVICE
Located at 25A -
(Old Valdosta Hwy)
386-752-5696 or
386-867-2035
after hours

To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440


First Adventm Christian
1881 SWMcFarlane Ave.
386-752-3900
Sunday School: 9:45AM
Sunday Service: 11:00AM
Wednesday Service: 7:00PM

GLAD TIDINGS ASSEMBLY OF GOD
993 NW Lake Jeffery Road
386-752-0620
Sunday Worship 10:30AM & 6PM
Wed. Fami. Bible Study 7:00PM
"A church where JESUS-is Real"

BEREABAPTISTCHURCH
SR47 S* 755-0900
SundaySchool 9:30AM
Sunday Worship 10:45AM & 6PM,
Wednesday Eve Service :7PM
Pastor: Larry E. Sweat
EASTSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
196 SE lames Ave. *386-752-2860
Sun. Bible Study 9:45AM
Sun. Worship IJ l AM 6PM
Wed. Prayer Mtg/Bible Study 6PM
Rev. Brandon G.Witt
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Sunday Bible Study 9:15AM
SundayWorship 10:30AM & 6:00PM
Wed, 6:00PM Prayer Service, &
Children Ministry 6:15PM
Downtown Lale Ci' ,-422
Rev Stephen Ahren,. Pasior
OLIVET MISSIONARY BAFIIST CHURCH
541 N.E. Davis Street
(386) 752-1990
Ronald V. Walters, Pastor
SundaySchool 9:45AM
Sunday Moming Worship 11:00AM
Wed. Mid-WeekWorship 6:00PM
"In God's Word, Will &Way"

PARKVJEW BAPTIST CHURCH
268 NW Lake Jeffery Rd. *752-0681
Lake City, Florida 32055
www.pbclc.com
Sunday School 8:30,9:45 & 11AM
SundayWorship 9:45 & 11AM &6PM
AWANA 5.30 PM
Evrring Worship 6:00 PM
Wed, Eve. Schedule
Family Supper (Reservation) 5 PM
Children's Ministry 6 PM
Youth Worship 6:00 PM
Prayer Meeting 6:00 PM
Thursday Evening Schedule St. 8/21/08
Parkview Edge 8:30PM
Pastor: Michael A. Tatem
PINE GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH
1989 N US Hwy 441
386-752-2664
Sunday Bible Study 9:45AM
Sunday Worship 11AM & 6PM
Wed. Kids & Youth Ministry 6:30PM
Pastor: Ron Thompson


SALFMPRIMITMITVE BAPTIST
Sunday Servitces 10 3i AM
Pastor: Elder Herman Griffin
752-4198
SOUTHSIDE BAPTIST.CHURCH
388 S.E. Baya Drive*'755-5553
Sunday
Bible Study 9:15 AM
Morning Worship 10:30AM
EveningWorship 6:15PM
AWANA 5'45PM
Prayer & Bible Study 61 IPM
TABERNACLE BAPTIST CHURCH
(Independent Baptist)
144 SE.Montrose Ave..* 752-4274
Sunday Schuil 10AM
Sun Mornu Wthp .11AM
Sunday Evew 6PM
Wed. Prayer Meeing 7:30 PM
Pajior MNke Noiman

EPIPHANY CATHOLIC CHURCH
1905 SWEpiphan Court- 752-4470
Sarurday Vigil Mass 5 00 PM
Suoa)ide Ma 8:15AM, 10.30AM,
5:00 PM (Spanish/English)
Sunday Sthoul/Relgious Education
9J00AM-I01 '15A

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE SOCIETY
3] SE Bayd Ave
Sunday Service 11:00AM
Wednesdd\ Eenirig Servue 7 31) PM
LAKE Cm CHRISTIAN CHURCH
Hw) 247> *755 9436
Sunday School 9:30 AM
Sun, Mom, Worship 10:30AM
Wed. Prayer Meeting 7 PM

NEW HORIZON
church of Christ
Directions & Times 755-1320
Jack Exum,lr., Minister

LAKE CITY CHURCH OF GOD
167 Ermine St. *752-5965
Sunday School 9:45 AM
Sun. Worship 10:30AM & 6:00PM
Wed. Family Night 7PM
Wed. Youth Service 7PM
Pastor: Carroll Lee
EVANGEL CHURCH OF GOD
370 SW Monitor Glen *755-1939
Sunday School 9:45 AM
SundayWorship 10:50 & 6:30
Wed. Spiritual Enrichment 7PM
'Shock Youth Church"
Boys and Girls Clubs
Bible Study
Pastor: John R.Hathaway

ST. JAMES EPISCOPAL CHURCH
2423 SW Bascom Norris Dr., Lake
City, Fl 32025- 386-752-2218
Email: stjamesepis330@bellsouth.net
Holy Eucharist
Sun. 8 & 10AM
Wednesday: 5:15pm
Priest: The Rev. Michael Armstrong
Deacon: The Rev. limmie Hunsinger
Director of Music. Dr. Alfonso Levy
r .'


SPIRIT OF CHRIST LUTHERAN
Hwy 90,1.5 miles West of 1-75 ,752-3807
Sunday Worship 10:00AM
Nursery Avail.
Wed. Pot Luck 6PM Worship 7PM
Vicar John David Bryant


BETHEL UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
4869 LIS 441 South
Sunday Worship Services,
Traditional Services 8:30 & 11:00AM
386-755-1353
mybethelumc.com
First United Methodist Church
973 S. Marion Ave.
386-752-4488
Sunday School 9:45AM
Sunday Morning Worship
Contemporary Sermce 8:30AM
Traditional Servce 11:00AM
Program opportunities, jdijble in all
Ai'ed0 foi all dgV,
'For a complete schedule
cnnaii church office di
752. 488
WESLEY MEMORIAL UNITED
1272 SW McFaIldne* 752 3513
(AdlLerint i' Suimmern Scliull
Sunday Schiool 9 iliAM
W)1'i4p t'i Ri0 l.W.I
Nur'mr provided
Prane & Worship 6:00PM
AWANA anIhi 911 S Wed. 5:u0PM
Pastor The Rv.1. .Loute Mabrev
Ww.ev.weyeinem com)
WATERTOWN CONGREGATIONAL
METHODIST CHURCH
U S. 9u E rum un Corez Ine.it to Quality
Ind right on Okinavna
Sunday School 9 45 AMI
Sun. Worship 1 IAM & F. PM
Wed Night Semce 7 PM,
Pastor, Randy Ogburn

LAKE CITY CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE
Ser ice-"
Sunday School 9:45AM
'SundayWorship 10:45AM, 6:30PM
Wednesday 6:30PM
Adult, Youth Ministry, Children's Ministry
Pastor Craig Henderson
Nursery Provided
SWSR 4 and Azalea Park Place -

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
629 SW\' Baya Driver* 52.06-0
Sunday Conmempcrarn 9:00AM
Sunday School 10:00AM
Traditional Service 11:00AM
NUSERY PROVIDED
Pastor: Dr Roy A. Martin
Director of Music: Bill Poplin

FIRST FULLGOSPELCHURCH
NE Jones Way & NE Washington St.
Sunday School 10:00 AM
MomingWorship 11:00AM
Evangelistic Service 6:00 PM
Youth SerIces Wednesday 7:00PM
Mid-week Service Wednesday, 7:00 PM
For infrccall 7.553488.* EverioneWekloime
Pastor Hev Sian E1lis


Sunday 9:00AM
Sunday Morning '11:00AM
Wvednesda% Service 7:00PM
217 Dyal Ave., from Hwy 90 take
Sisters Welcome Rd go 5 mides. South.
church on leh *755-2525
Lead Pastor: Lonnie Johns
'AChurc h n the Mome"
CHRISTIAN HERITAGE CHURCH
Comer SR, 47 & Hudson Circle
Sunday Celebration 10:30 AM
Pastor Chris Jones' 752-9119
FALLING CREEK CHAPEL
Falling Creek Road *755-0580
First -..id Third Sundays 9:30 A.M.
Second and Fourth Sundays 3:00 EM.
Pastor: Rev. Cheryl R. Pingel
IGLESIA EVANGELICAL
APOSENTOALTO
17077 25th Rd LIC FL 32055
Service Fri: 7:00PM, Sun:. 1:00PM
Arturo Suarez 386-754-1836
NEW BEGINNING CHURCH
Highway 242 E. of Branford Highway
Sunday School 10:00AM
MorningWorship 11:00AM
Sunday Evening 6:00PM
Wednesday 7:00PM
A Full Gospel Church- EveryoneWelcomed
(386)755-5197
MEADE MINISTRIES
Dir: Hwy 47 to Columbia City,
one mile East on CR 240
Sunday 10AM and 7PM
Thursday 8PM
No Nursery Available
Spirit Filled Worship
Healing and Deliverance


To dvrtseinthi Curh irctoy al 75-44


Lwlay Electric Cooperative, Inc.
Competitive rates, non-profit,
right here in your community.
Lake City District 386-752-7447
clayelectric.com
To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440


Tires for every need.
US 90 West across from Wal-Mart
752-0054

Morrell's
Your Complete decorating and
home furnishings store
SW Deputy Jeff Davis Lane (formerly Pinemount Rd.)
752-3910 or 1-800-597-3526
Mon.-Sat. 8:00-5:30 Closed Sunday


ANDERSON COLUMBIA CO., INC.
COMMERCIAL 'INDUSTRIAL
Site Preparation Road Building Parking Lots
Grading & Drainage
752-7585
871 NW Guerdon St., Lake City

HARRY'S
Kes. as *m Heating &Air Conditioning Inc.
Harry Mosley, President

P OIR. 752-2308 -

To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440


Central States
Enterprises
Columbia County's Feed Headquarters
FEED PET SUPPLIES LAWN & GARDEN
ANIMAL HEALTH
668 NW Waldo St. 386-755-7445

MIKELL'S POWER EQUIPMENT, INC.
Your Lawn & Garden Headquarters
MOWERS CHAIN SAWS TRIMMERS









To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440
755-5440


To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440

BAYWAYjanitorial Services
FIRE & Water Restoration
Floor & Carpet Care
Residential & Comimercial
755-6142



.- -~ ... .'-
-it. ~^


ki rIM


North Florida
Pharmacy
7 Locations to Serve You
Lake City, Ft. White, Branford,
Chiefland, Mayo & Keystone Heights


7)
9.
'1


'or: .


To List





Your





Church





on the





Church





Directory





Call





752M1293!


GW


To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440









LAKE CITY REPORTER NATION & WORLD SATURDAY, DECEMBER 25, 2010


BRIEFS


Pakistan clash
kills 35 people

KHAR, I .stan Some
150 Islamist militants
attacked five security posts
Friday ii unusually large
and cc dinated assault
close t, he Afghan border,
sparking hours, of fighting
that killed 11 soldiers and
24 insurgents, officials said.
Al-Qaida and Taliban
militants often stage attacks
in northwest Pakistan, but
the overnight assaults were
notable for their size and the
level of planning needed.
They underlined that insur-
gents in the tribal areas
along the frontier retain sig-
nificant capabilities despite
multiple military offensives
in the region since 2008.
The top government offi-
cial in Mohmand, Amjad Ali
Khan, said 11 soldiers were
killed and 12 wounded in
the fighting.

Lawyer: Accusers
are WikiLeaks fans

STOCKHOLM The
two Swedish women accus-
ing Julian Assange of sex
crimes are supporters of
WikiLeaks, not pawns of
the CIA, and they simply
seek justice for, a violation
of their "sexual integrity,"'
their lawyer says.
Claes Borgstrom, a
self-professed -feminist
who used to be Sweden's
ombudsman for gender
equality, told The Associated
Press he finds it "very upset-
ting" that Assange, his law-
yers and some -upporters
are suggesting the case is
a smear campaign against
WikiLeaks, the s, cret-spill-
ing website Assange found-
ed.
"He's been spreading
false rumors that he knows
are untrue. It's reckless
against these two women,"
Borgstrom said by phone
Thursday. "They, too, are
supporters of WikiLeaks.
They support its work."
Assange denies the alle-
gntions of sexual miscon-
duct, which his lawyers say
stem from a dispute over
"consensual but unprotect-
ed sex." He has not been
charged.

Pope leads Mass
to open Christmas

VATICAN CITY Pope
Benedict XVI is ushering in
Christmas with an evening
Mass on Friday amid height-
ened security concerns fol-
lowing the package bomb-
ings at two Rome embassies
and Christmas Eve security
breaches at the Vatican the
past two years running.
Benedict kicked off the
holiday as night fell by
silently lighting a candle
in his studio window over-
looking St. Peter's Square.
Heavy rains kept the tradi-
tionally large crowds to a
minimum.
At 2100 GMT, Benedict
will celebrate Mass in St.
Peter's Basilica. During that
service in 2008 and 2009, a
mentally disturbed woman
lunged at the pope and
last year managed to pull
him to the ground as he
processed down the aisle.

Obama goes for
Hawaiian vacation

HONOLULU A politi-
cally rejuvenated President
Barack Obama arrived here
late Wednesday for an 11-
day family vacation in his
home state.
Air Force One touched
down shortly before mid-
night local time. The
president headed to the
rented oceanfront home
in Kailua Bay where his


wife, Michelle, daughters
Malia and Sasha, and dog
Bo have been vacationing
since Saturday. The presi-
dent had planned to arrive
Saturday, too, but pushed
back his departure to stay
in Washington while law-
makers wrapped up a fren-
zied and productive lame-
duck session.
* Associated Press


Travelers brace for several inches of snow


By LUCAS L. JOHNSON II
Associated Press

NASHVILLE, Tenn. A
Christmas Eve snow storm that
blanketed parts of the Midwest
was headed southeast, expected
to bring rare Christmas Day snow-
fall to Kentucky, Tennessee and
even Georgia.
After dumping 9 inches of
snow in Iowa by Friday morn-
ing, the storm was likely to dip
south into Tennessee and Georgia
on Saturday, then perhaps move
north Sunday. Winter weather
advisories were in effect from
Kansas east to Kentucky and from
Minnesota south to Arkansas on
Friday.
The National Weather Service
said that for the first Christmas
in 17 years, Nashville and Atlanta
could get more than just a dusting
of snow.
. Karla Winfrey returned to
Nashville from her current home
in Atlanta to do some last minute
running around Thursday for her
mother who's cooking Christmas
dinner.
"I wanted to make sure I was
here before it started accumulat-
ing," said Winfrey, a multimedia
journalist. "I've only missed one
Christmas in my entire life from


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Sydney Baltyn, 9, slides off a snow jump as she sleds with her family at
Stephens Lake Park in Columbia, Mo. on Friday. Christmas Eve snow blan-
keted the area.


being home, so it was important
for me to be here to get a taste of
Tennessee for Christmas."
In the Atlanta suburb of Decatur,
Vincenzo Tortorici said the pros-
pect of snow evoked the memory
of childhood Christmas visits to
his relatives in Ohio.
"Snow was like frozen white
icing on the cake of a magical time
of my childhood," he said. "I'm
glad the weather might cooper-
ate to give my own son a white
Christmas this year."


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Air Force Lt. Col. David Hanson, of Chicago, takes a
phone call from a youngster in Florida at the Santa
Tracking Operations Center at Peterson Air Force Base
near Colorado Springs, Colo., on Friday, Dec. 24, 2010.
Volunteers take as many as 80,000 phone calls from
youngsters and adults around the world with questions
about Santa and his travels.


NORAD stays


secret on how


it tracks Santa


-By DAN ELLIOTT
Associated Press

PETERSON AIR
FORCE BASE, Colo.
Tens of thousands of
children call NORAD on
Christmas Eve always.
eager to hear how far Santa
is from their town, but the
volunteers answering the
phones have a welcome
bit of news for parents,
too: St. Nick won't stop at
homes unless all the kids
are asleep.
Volunteer Liz Anderson
said that when that hap-
pens, she will sometimes
hear parents say, "See! I
told you."
Tracking Santa's travels
is a celebrated tradition
at the North American
Aerospace Defense
Command. The operation
unfolded Friday for the
55th year with volunteers
and officials again track-
ing Santa's Christmas Eve
flight path on computer
screens.
It takes four months
of planning to marshal
the 1,200 volunteers, 100
telephones, 30 laptops
and two big projection
TV screens the exercise
requires, NORAD spokes-
woman Joyce Frankovis
said. All the labor is volun-
teer. Google, Verizon, Air
Canada, defense contractor
Booz Allen Hamilton and
others chip in.
On Friday, volunteers
answered phone calls and e-
mails from two conference
rooms in a building not far


The snow made traveling tough
Friday in northeastern Iowa,
where the bulk of the storm hov-
ered.
Scott and Lori Whiting left
Chicago for Colorado Springs,
Colo., with their nine children
Thursday evening. By morn-
ing, they had only reached Des
Moines, a trip that normally takes
about four hours, Lori Whiting
said.
'The cars are really sliding-
around up there," Lori Whiting


said. "It's kind of slushy. Some
parts it's packed, and you don't
think it's going to be slick and all
of a sudden your car is fishtail-
ing."
Scott Whiting got into a fender
bender at a Des Moines truck
stop. Still, the family was in good
spirits and the children were sing-
ing carols.
Lori Whiting said they hoped
to make it to Colorado Springs for
Christmas Eve.
"Depending on the number of
potty breaks, *you understand,"
she said.
Many people traveled Thursday
in hope of beating the foul weath-
er.
Eric and Tatiana Chodkowski,
of Boston, drove with their chil-
dren, ages 2 and 4, to see relatives
in New York. They deemed the
roads congested but manageable
Thursday, and most people found
the nation's airports to be the
same way.
Planes took off into windy but
accommodating skies at New
York's LaGuardia Airport as Steve
Kent prepared to fly to Denver for
a family ski trip, scoffing at the
puny lines.
"I don't find it that difficult,"
he said. "I think Thanksgiving is
harder."


New tax law packed with

obscure business tax cuts


By STEPHEN OHLEMACHER
Associated Press

WASHINGTON
- The massive new tax
bill signed into law by
President Barack Obama
is filled with all kinds of
holiday stocking stuffers
for businesses: tax breaks
for producing TV shows,
grants for putting up wind-
mills, rum subsidies for
Puerto Rico and the Virgin
Islands.
There is even a tax
break for people who buy
race horses.
Millions of homeowners,
however, might feel like
they got a lump of coal.


Homeowners who don't
itemize their deductions
will lose a tax break for pay-
ing local property taxes.
The business tax breaks
are part of sweeping legisla-
tion that extends Bush era
tax cuts for families at every
income level through 2012.
Obama signed the $858 bil-
lion measure a week ago. It
also provides a new payroll
tax cut for wage earners and
extends jobless benefits to
the long-term unemployed.
Most of the business tax
breaks about 50 in all
- are part of a package that
expires each year, creating
uncertainty for tax plhnmers
but lots of business for lob-


byists. Many of these tax
breaks have been around
for years but expired at the
end of 2009 because law-
makers couldn't agree how
to pay for them.
The new law extends
most of them through 2011,
some through 2012. They
will be paid for with bor-
rowed money.
Nearly 1,300 businesses
and trade groups formed a
coalition urging Congress
to extend the business tax
breaks. Others lobbied for
specific provisions, includ-
ing a generous tax credit for
research and development
and subsidies to produce
alternative energy.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Volunteer Kim Watson talks
with a youngster asking
about Santa's whereabouts
at the Santa Tracking
Operations Center at
Peterson Air Force Base
near Colorado Springs,
Colo., on Friday.

from NORAD's headquar-
ters. In a separate room, a
three-member team fired
out tweets and Facebook
updates, checking against
a schedule marked with a
secrecy warning that said
"Santa's Eye Only."
Civilian and military staff
wore blue Santa hats with
"Special Operations Elf'
written on the white trim.
"It is tremendously fun,"
said Jim Jenista, NORAD's
deputy chief for joint train-
ing exercises who has
volunteered to answer
the phones for nearly a
decade.


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424









Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com


Saturday, December


Lake City Reporter


SPORTS


25, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


FROM THE SIDELINE


Brandon Finley
Phone:(386) 754-0420
bfinley@lakecityreportercom


Ratliff


gains


offers
Columbia High
has another
football
player
sneaking into
scholarship talks.
Danny Ratliff has
recently been getting
interest after a solid
campaign as the Tigers'
center.
Ratliff has recently
caught the eye of
Webber International
where another
Columbia football player,
Vince Anderson,
recently concluded his
career.
Besides Webber, Ratliff
also has interest from
Georgia Southern and
Charleston Southern.
Right now, Ratliff
appears to be leaning
toward Georgia
Southern and
Charleston Southern,
but he's leaving the
door open. One of the
reasons he's big on
Charleston Southern
is former Columbia
player Levi McFadder's
endorsement.
Despite being one of
Columbia's best football
players, Ratliff also
has the grades in the
classroom to help him
reach his college goals.
The former Tiger won
the team's academic
award each of his four
years with Columbia
and that could help
him land at one of the
nation's more prestigious
schools..
Due to his grades,
schools like Georgia
Tech and Florida State
are trying to convince
Ratliff to play his hand
as a walk-on with an
academic scholarship. If
Ratliff's play on the
field at the next level
matches his dedication in
the classroom a
football scholarship
could follow.
Right now, however,
Webber International is
the only school offering
a full scholarship, bit
it may come with a few
changes.
At Columbia, Ratliff
excelled as a center for
the Tigers' offense and
didn't see the defensive
side of the ball after
his ninth-grade season.
Webber may look to
change, that.
Ratliff is being courted
as a defensive tackle,
a position he played
through middle school
and early into his
high-school career. He's
open to the possibility of
playing a new
position with the
Warriors, because for
Ratliff, it's all about
continuing to play the
game.
And if football doesn't
work out at least he's
got a good head on his
shoulders.
* Brandon Finley covers
sports for the Lake City
Reporter.


Haley speaks


to swimmers


Columbia High
holds end of year
awards banquet.
From staff reports

Columbia High's swim
team recently celebrated its
2010 season with an awards
banquet.
Jimbo Haley, a CHS
graduate and alumnus of
the swim team, was guest
speaker. Haley, who repre-
sented the United States
in the Modern Pentathlon
in the 1992 Olympics in
Barcelona, Spain, encour-
aged the swimmers to work
hard and not give up.
Juniors Heather Burns
and David Morse received
the Most Valuable Swimmer


award.
Morse earned his points
with his many victories for
the boys and by qualifying
for region. Burns swam her
way to the award with victo-
ries for the girls and mak-
ing the state field in two
events.
Seniors Katherine Mathis
and Alan Henry were run-
ners-up for most valuable
and each received a Captain
Award. They led their teams
to 8-2 records.
The Rookie Award is
presented to swimmers
who shined in their first
season of competition and
was received by freshmen
Lindsay Lee and Jackson
Nettles and junior Justin
CHS continued on 3B


COURTESY PHOTO
Columbia High swim team award winners are (front row, from left) Kayla Williams, Alan Henry,
Heather Burns, Jonathan Smith and Cody Smith. Back row (from left) are Syndey Morse,
Dave Morse, Lindsay Lee, Katherine Mathis, Lauren Lee, Carlos Diaz, Justin Tompkins and
Jordyn Smith. Jackson Nettles and Cheyenne Brown also won awards.


ell


BRANDON FINLEY/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High's Colleen Heeney (right) and Timmy Jernigan (middle) answer questions from the media on Nov. 5 at announcement that both students were
selected to participate int he U.S. Army All-American Bowl in San Antonio, Texas on Jan. 8.


Columbik
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com
From the U.S. Army
All-American Bowl
to the U.S. Amateur,,
Columbia county
athletes have been all
over the map in 2010.
,The county has shined
across the map from athletic
accomplishments to giving back
to the community, and some


i county al
stars from outside Lake City have
even ventured in for a few guest
appearances.
High school seniors Timmy
Jernigan and Colleen Heeney
were selected to participate in the
U.S. Army All-American Bowl.
They became the first members of
Columbia High to be invited to the
event, which will be held on Jan. 8
in San Antonio.
Jernigan will compete as one of
the nation's most highly recruited


athletes shine in 2010


football players. Heeney will make
up part of the color guard, which
will perform at halftime.
Another football player, LaJavier
Baker, moved up the ranks
from semipro football with the
Columbia County Falcons to the
Southern Indoor Football League.
He joined the Albany Panthers.
-Former Columbia Tiger, Florida
State Seminole and NFL player
Jerome Carter continued to make
his annual stop in Lake City for


the Jerome Carter Football Camp.
Carter makes it a point to show
in Lake City each summer and
set an example that hard work
can pay off. Carter also brings in
the likes of former Florida State
players Brian Allen and Renard
Wilson and current Tampa Bay
Buccaneer, Vince Anderson.
The hardwood saw the return
of big-time hoops as Philadelphia
NOTABLES continued on 2B


Louisville foundation

now in place under

first-year coach Strong


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Louisville coach Charlie Strong holds up the trophy after
Louisville won the Beef 'O0' Brady's Bowl, 31-28, over
Southern Mississippi on Tuesday in St. Petersburg.


Gators former
defensive guru
finishes 7-6.
By WILL GRAVES
Associated Press
LOUISVILLE, Ky. -
Louisville coach Charlie
Strong just shrugged his
shoulders over the summer
when the Cardinals were
picked to finish last in the
Big East.
Strong had never been
picked to finish last in any-
thing before, but he under-
stood why some would
doubt the struggling pro-
gram he inherited.
So Strong did what he's
always done, he .went to


work. His staff spent the
summer helping the
Cardinals forge a new,
aggressive, in-your-face
identity.
His team responded
by surprising everyone
- even themselves with
a resurgent season that
Strong views as a jumping
off point. Louisville had
its first winning campaign
since 2006 after a 31-28 win
over Southern Miss in the
Beef 'O' Brady's Bowl.
The Cardinals finished 7-
6 and were competitive in
every nearly every game,
a rarity in the two seasons
before Strong arrived.
"Nobody ever gave us a
chance," Strong said. "And
to watch this football team


fight through so much
adversity, go work so hard,
develop trust, develop com-
mitment that's what it's
all about, getting a founda-
tion within this program."
The giddy celebration on
the field at Tropicana Field
was hard to imagine in
September when Kentucky
scored twice in the first
quarter against its archri-
val.
"I hit our defensive coor-
dinator over the headset
and I said, 'Vance (Bedford)
this is going to be a long
season because of those
two drives,"' Strong said.
He was wrong.
The Cardinals. steadied
STRONG continued on 3B


Section B


represented










LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SATURDAY, DECEMBER 25, 2010


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
7:30 p.m.
ESPN2 Diamond Head Classic,
third place game, teams TBD, at Honolulu
9:30 p.m.
ESPN2 Diamond Head Classic,
championship game, teams TBD, at
Honolulu
NBA BASKETBALL
Noon
ESPN Chicago at NewYork
2:30 p.m.
ABC Boston at Orlando
5 p.m.
ABC Miami at L.A. Lakers
8 p.m.
ESPN Denver at Oklahoma City
10:30 p.m.
ESPN Portland at Golden State
NFL FOOTBALL
7:30 p.m.
NFL Dallas at Arizona

'Sunday
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
8:30 p.m.
ESPN Little Caesars Pizza Bowl, Fla.
International vs.Toledo, at Detroit
NFL FOOTBALL
I p.m.
CBS Regional coverage
FOX Regional coverage, double-
header
4 p.m.
CBS Regional coverage
4:15 p.m.
FOX Regional coverage, double-
header game
8:15 p.m.
NBC San Diego at Cincinnati

FOOTBALL

NFL standings

AMERICAN CONFERENCE
East
W L TPct PF PA
x-New England 12 2 0.857446 303
N.Y.Jets 10 4 0.714195 259
Miami 7 7 0.500 2391261
Buffalo 4 10 0.286273 353
South
W L TPct PF PA
Indianapolis 8 6 0.571 381 342
Jacksonville 8 6 0.571 319 365
Tennessee 6 8 0.429 322 282
Houston 5 9 0.357 333 386
North


x-Pittsburgh
Baltimore
Cleveland
Cincinnati


Kansas City
San Diego
Oakland
Denver


1W0 L
10 4
10 4
5 9
3 I1
West
W L
9 5
8 6
7 7
3 I1


T Pct PF PA
0.714 307 220
0.714324 253
0.357 252 271
0.214281 362

T Pct PF PA
0.643 322 281
0.571 388 260
0.500 353 330
0.214292 415


NATIONAL CONFERENCE
East
W L TPct PF PA
Philadelphia 10 4 0.714412 339
N.Y. Giants 9 5 0.643 360 288
Washington 5 9 0.357268 343
Dallas 5 9 0.357354 396
South
W LT Pct PF PA
x-Atlanta 12 2 0.857369 261
New Orleans 10 4 0.714 354 270
Tampa Bay 8 6 0.571 280 290
Carolina 2 12 0.143 183 350
North
W L TPct PF PA
y-Chicago 10 4 0.714293 242
Green Bay 8 6 0.571 333 220
Minnesota 5 9 0.357244 314
Detroit 4 10 0.286308 329
West
W L TPct PF PA
St. Louis 6 8 0.429258 295
Seattle 6 8 0.429279 363
San Francisco 5 9 0.357250 314
Arizona 4 10 0.286255 370
y-clinched division
x-clinched playoff spot
Thursday's Game
Steelers 27, Panthers 3
Today's Ganme
Dallas at Arizona, 7:30 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Tennessee at Kansas City, I p.m.
San Francisco at St. Louis, I p.m.
N.Y.Jets at Chicago, I p.m.
Baltimore at Cleveland, I p.m.
New England at Buffalo, I p.m.
Detroit at Miami, I p.m.
Washington at Jacksonville, I p.m.




Fay to


retire



from



USGA

By DOUG FERGUSON
Associated Press

David Fay has decided
to retire from the U.S. Golf
Association after 21 years
as the executive director,
leaving behind a legacy
that includes his success-
ful push to stage the U.S.
Open on golf courses where
everyone can play.
Fay turned 60 two months
ago and said Friday that
the USGA was in a good
place for him to leave. Mike
Butz, the deputy executive
director, will take over until
the USGA can conduct a
national search for Fay's
replacement.


Indianapolis at Oakland, 4:05 p.m.
Houston at Denver, 4:05 p.m.
San Diego at Cincinnati, 4:05 p.m.
N.Y. Giants at Green Bay, 4:15 p.m.
Seattle atTampa Bay, 4:15 p.m.
Minnesota at Philadelphia, 8:20 p.m.
Monday's Game
New Orleans at Atlanta, 8:30 p.m.

College bowl games

Dec. 18
New Mexico Bowl
At Albuquerque
BYU 52, UTEP 24
Humanitarian Bowl
At Boise, Idaho
Northern Illinois 40, Fresno State 17
New Orleans Bowl
Troy 48, Ohio 21
Dec. 21
Beef 'O' Brady's Bowl
At St. Petersburg, Fla.
Louisville 31, Southern Mississippi 28
Dec. 22
MAACO Bowl
At Las Vegas
Boise State 26, Utah 3
Dec. 23
Poinsettia Bowl
At San Diego
San Diego State 35, Navy 14
Friday
Hawaii Bowl
At Honolulu
Hawaii (10-3) vs. Tulsa (9-3), 8 p.m.
(ESPN)
Sunday
Little Caesars Pizza Bowl
At Detroit
Toledo (8-4) vs. Florida International
(6-6), 8:30 p.m. (ESPN)
Monday
Independence Bowl
At Shreveport, La.
GeorgiaTech (6-6) vs.Air Force (8-4),
5 p.m. (ESPN2)
Tuesday
Champs Sports Bowl
At Orlando, Fla.
North Carolina State (8-4) vs. West
Virginia (9-3), 6:30 p.m. (ESPN)
Insight Bowl
At Tempe,Ariz.
Missouri (10-2) vs. Iowa (7-5), 10 p.m.
(ESPN)
Wednesday
Military Bowl
At Washington
East Carolina (6-6) vs. Maryland (8-4),
2:30 p.m. (ESPN)
Texas Bowl
At Houston
Baylor (7-5) vs. Illinois (6-6), 6 p.m.
(ESPN)
Alamo Bowl
At San Antonio
Arizona (7-5) vs. Oklahoma State (10-
2), 9:15 p.m. (ESPN)
Thursday
Armed Forces Bowl
At Dallas
SMU (7-6) vs. Army (6-6), Noon
(ESPN)
Pinstripe Bowl
At Bronx, N.Y.
Syracuse (7-5) vs. Kansas State (7-5),
3:30 p.m. (ESPN)
Music City Bowl
At Nashville,Tenn.
North Carolina (7-5) vs. Tennessee
(6-6), 6:40 p.m. (ESPN)
Holiday Bowl.
At San Diego
Nebraska (10-3) vs.Washington (6-6),
10 p.m. (ESPN)
Friday
Meineke Bowl
At Charlotte, N.C.
Clemson (6-6) vs. South Florida (7-5),
Noon (ESPN)
Sun Bowl
At El Paso,Texas
Notre Dame (7-5) vs. Miami (7-5), 2
p.m. (CBS)
Liberty Bowl
At Memphis,Tenn.
Georgia (6-6) vs. UCF (10-3), 3:30
p.m. (ESPN)
Chick-fil-A Bowl
At Atlanta
South Carolina (9-4) vs. Florida State
(9-4), 7:30 p.m. (ESPN)
jan. I
TicketCity Bowl
At Dallas
Northwestern (7-5) vs. Texas Tech (7-
5), Noon (ESPNU)
Capital One Bowl
At Orlando, Fla.
Michigan State (I 1-1) vs.Alabama (9-
3), I p.m. (ESPN)
Outback Bowl
At Tampa, Fla.
Florida (7-5) vs. Penn State (7-5), I
p.m. (ABC)


Gator Bowl
At Jacksonville, Fla.
Michigan (7-5) vs. Mississippi State (8-
4), 1:30 p.m. (ESPN2)
Rose Bowl
At Pasadena, Calif.
TCU (12-0) vs. Wisconsin ( 11-1), 5
p.m. (ESPN)
Fiesta Bowl
At Glendale,Ariz.
Connecticut (8-4) vs. Oklahoma (I I-
2), 8:30 p.m. (ESPN)
Jan. 3
Orange Bowl
At Miami
Stanford (11-1) vs.VirginiaTech (11-2),
8:30 p.m. (ESPN)
Jan.4'
Sugar Bowl
At New Orleans
Ohio State (I I-I) vs.Arkansas (10-2),
8:30 p.m. (ESPN)
Jan. 6
GoDaddy.com Bowl
At Mobile,Ala.
Miami (Ohio) (9-4) vs. Middle
Tennessee (6-6), 8 p.m. (ESPN)
Jan. 7
Cotton Bowl
At Arlington,Texas
Texas A&M (9-3) vs. LSU (10-2), 8
p.m. (FOX)
Jan. 8
BBVA Compass Bowl
At Birmingham,Ala.
Pittsburgh (7-5) vs. Kentucky (6-6),
Noon (ESPN)
Jan. 9
Fight Hunger Bowl
At San Francisco
Boston College (7-5) vs. Nevada (12-
I), 9 p.m. (ESPN)
Jan.10
BCS National Championship
At Glendale,Ariz.
Auburn (13-0) vs. Oregon (12-0), 8:30
p.m. (ESPN)
Jan. 22
At Orlando, Fla.
East-West Shrine Classic, 4 p.m.
Jan.29
At Mobile,Ala.
Senior Bowl, 4 p.m. (NFLN)
Feb. 5
At San Antonio
Texas vs, The Nation All-Star
Challenge, 2 p.m.


BASKETBALL

NBA schedule

Today's Games
Chicago at NewYork, noon
Boston at Orlando, 2:30 p.m.
Miami at LA. Lakers, 5 p.m.
Denver at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m.
Portland at Golden State, 10:30 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Phoenix at L.A. Clippers, 3 p.m.
Minnesota at Cleveland, 6 p.m.
Chicago at Detroit, 6 p.m.
Atlanta at New Orleans, 7 p.m.
Washington at San Antonio, 7 p.m.
Memphis at Indiana, 7 p.m.
Philadelphia at Denver, 8 p.m.

AP Top 25 schedule

Today's Game
No. IS Baylor vs. TBA at the Stan
Sheriff Center, HonoluluTBD


HOCKEY

NHL schedule

Saturday's Games
No games scheduled
Sunday's Games
Pittsburgh at Ottawa, 7 p.m.
Toronto at New Jersey, 7 p.m.
Montreal at N.Y. Islanders, 7 p.m.
Washington at Carolina, 7 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Atlanta, 7 p.m.
Columbus at Chicago, 7 p.m.
Nashville at St. Louis, 7 p.m.
Detroit at Minnesota, 7 p.m.
Phoenix at Dallas, 8 p.m.
Edmonton atVancouver, 9 p.m.
Anaheim at Los Angeles, 9 p.m.


League reports
Results of Lake City Bowl league
play follow.
WATERGUARD
High scratch game: 1. Mary
Lobaugh 219; 2. Joyce Hooper 190;
3. Linda Andrews 173. 1. Adam
Alford 240; 2. Zech Strohl 237; 3. Jim
Lobaugh 212.
High scratch series: 1. Mary
Lobaugh 627; 2. Joyce Hooper 517;
3. Linda Andrews 514. 1. Zech Strohl
649; 2. Adam Alford 645; 3. Jim
Lobaugh 573.
High handicap game: 1. Pat
Frazier 249; 2. Lorie Niquette 227;
3. GloriaDennis225.1.(tie)ZechStrohl,
Jim Lobaugh 245; 3. Bill Marks 242;
4. Nick Niquette 236.
High handicap series: 1. Mary
Lobaugh 708; 2. Joyce Hooper 667;
3. Linda Andrews 661. 1. Adam Alford
708; 2. Raleigh Lilley 627; 3. Vernon
Black 624.
High average: 1. Mary Lobaugh
176. 1. Zech Strohl 203.
(results from Dec. 14)
SEXY SENIORS
Team standings: 1. Perky Pals
(49-23); 2. Farmers (42-30, 42,560
pins); 3. Pink Panthers (42-30, 41,613
pins)..
High scratch game: 1. Barbara
Griner 190; 2. Yvonne Finley 184;
3. Barbara Griner 175. 1. Ross Meyers
210; 2. Earl Hayward 205; 3. Dan
Ritter 200.
High scratch series: 1. Barbara
Griner 495; 2. Yvonne Finley 477;
3. Amy Musselwhite 449. 1. Ross
Meyers 548; 2. Dan Ritter 546; 3. Art
Joubert 492.
High handicap game: 1. Barbara
Griner 245; 2. (tie) Yvonne Finley,.
Janet Nash 234.. 1. Ross Meyers
243; 2. Earl Hayward 233; 3. Wendel
Shay 228.
High handicap series: 1. Pat Hale
644; 2. Barbara Croft 635; 3. Yvonne
Osborn 622. 1. Ray Denton 656;
2. (tie) C.W. Reddick, Dan Ritter 630.
High average: 1. Betty Brown
147.55; 2. Yvonne Finley 145.35;
3. Louise Atwood. 144.27. 1. Art
Joubert 171.67; 2. Dan Ritter 168.81;
3. Earl Hayward 167.67.
(results from Dec. 21)


76ers star and former
Florida Gator, Marreese
Speights as he competed
as part of the Lake City
All-Stars. Unfortunately,
Speights couldn't
bring the home team
through as the All-Stars
fell in the NBA Charity
Challenge against
the Gainesville
Untouchables.
Overseas Boney
Watson was representing
Lake City with a MVP
performance in the
finals of the Emir's Cup
in the Qatar Basketball


ACROSS 38 G
S
1 West Coast 39 MI
police 42 B
5 Pillow covers 45 T
10 Got frizzy 46 D
12 Saltwater catch 50 IV
13 River in a waltz 53 P
14 St. Francis' 55 E
home 56 S
15 Bird-feeder 57 B
treat tr
16 "American 58 Z
Idol" network
18 False front
19 Big bird
23 MPG, 1 R
monitor re
26 Theorem ender 2 B
27 Silence! p
30 Einstein, e.g. 3 D
32 Summer 4 C
top o
34 Understands 5 E
(2 wds.) 6 C
35 Still OK finan- 7 E
cially e
36 Harness piece 8 F
37 Pool hall item la


COURTESY PHOTO

Bowling blessings

Ladies in the Tuesday morning Hit & Miss League replaced
their Christmas party gift exchange to each other. They
donated gifts to children supported by Guardian Ad Litem.


SUNDAY NITE MERCHANTS
Team standings: 1. Steam Rollers
(49-23); 2. Average Joe's (43-29);
3. McGhghy's Navy (40.5-31.5).
High scratch game: 1. Liz Randall
214; 2. Donna Duncan 191; 3. Cheryl
Jacks 180. 1. Joe Cohrs 264; 2. Chris
Schneiders 261; 3. Bill Duncan 256.
High scratch series: 1. Liz Randall
504; 2. Cheryl Jacks 498; 3. Donna
Duncan 469. 1. Bill Duncan 684;
2. Joe Cohrs 674; 3. Bryan Taylor
624.
(results from Dec. 19)
MONDAY NIGHT MAVERICKS
Team standings: 1. Fullhouse
(285-195); 2. Team 12 (283-'197);
3. Ronsonet Buick (278-202).
High scratch game: 1. Curtis
Gutzmer 258; 2. Dale Coleman 257;
3. Steve Fancy 255.
High scratch series: 1. Dale
Coleman 737; 2. Mike Koon 657;
3. Chris Napolitono 644.
High handicap game: 1. Steve
Fancy 291; 2. Boaty Boatwright
279; 3. (tie) David Hamilton, Mike
Rogosienski 269.


High handicap series: 1. Dale
Coleman 737; 2. Horace Parsons 724;
3. Bob Shrum 706.
High average: 1. Dale Coleman
220.26; 2. Zech Strohl 211.95; 3. J.J.
Hilbert 207.36.
(results from Dec. 13)
GOLDEN ROLLERS
Team standings: 1. Gamblers
(43-21); 2. Golden Niners (39-25);
3. Wild Things (34-30, 37,535 pins);
4. Bea's Bunch (34-30, 36,947 pins).
High handicap game: 1: Shirley
Highsmith 234; 2. Louise Atwood
231; 3. Bertha Black 222. 1. James
Burnett 238; 2. Bill Dolly 236; 3. Bill
Price 233.
High handicap series: 1. Cookie
Reddick 636; 2. Joyce Hoooper
623; 3. Jane Sommerfeld 615. 1.
Jack Stanfield 645; 2. Jerry Ellis 641;
3. Lee Evert 639.
High average: 1. Shirley Highsmith
153.38; 2. Jane. Sommerfeld 150.5;
3. Elaine Nemeth 148.81. 1. David
Duncan 184.25; 2. Bill Dolly 182.79;
3. George Mulligan 179.79.
(results from Dec. 16)


Federation League.
Watson scored 22 points in
the final for Al Rayyan.
Kahnayla Taylor, from
Fort White Elementary,
won the Elks Hoop Shoot
state competition in
Umatilla with 16 of 25 free
throws made.
On the links, Blayne.
Barber's star continued *
to rise as the former
Columbia High and
current Auburn Tiger
golfer qualified foi- the U.S.
Amateur for the second
time in three years.
Barber failed to win


iame or sea-
on opener
laroons
billboards
oronto's prov.
)renches
lost faded
encil end
ddies
ilt deposits
bookkeeping
transaction
oo barker

DOWN

loast pig
past
iritish com-
oser
lisney dog
;otillion hon-


the tournament, but has a
chance to add to his
list of golf
accomplishments with
a possible Walker Cup
appearance looming in
2011. The Walker Cup is
the amateur equivalent of
the Ryder Cup.
Lake City was even
represented in the
bowling community.
Dale Coleman placed
sixth in the USBC Junior
Gold Championships in
Indianapolis. Coleman was
among 982 participants in
his division.


Answer to Previous Puzzle

BU CHB E A[$1
ZMAZ ED 0G ALIEI
IIAIi-RA INSECT
SA MIR NOB

SAMTAE GO0B
ADA AGARaRE
VO YAGER HE DI
ORA E TIN E R
RE NTi EWEAU
YDS BLTA


L IE 1TE .LO F A H
CRAT D EM NE
D E DR INAN NY
i i i


ree
ur. airline 9 Agitated state
,oll. credits 10 LP successors
t (and oth- 11 Most skillful
rs) 12 Long dress
ile folder 17 California fort
ibel 20 Strain to see


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words. -

I MAROA i8


S \I 1 Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.

A: A
(Answers Monday)
Yesterday'sI Jumbles: JOLLY VAPOR CRABBY FUTILE
I Answer: The very top can be achieved from this -
POVERTY


21 Rubbed
against
22 Cargo space
23 Poultry prod-
uct
24 Jury member
25 Feed the kitty
28 Cease
29 Eavesdrop
31 Nile
goddess
32 Like some
houses
33 AAA sugges-
tion
37 Knows how
40 Goes bad, as
fruit
41 Marshy
hollow
42 Basilica part
43 Sunrise
44 Gash
47 This, in
Tijuana
48 Wild duck
49 Almost grads
51 Be mistaken
52 Conniving
54 Legal matter


SCOREBOARD


BOWLING


NOTABLES: Barber on national stage

Continued From Page 1B


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


J















Jaguars chasing Colts again


By MARK LONG
Associated Press

JACKSONVILLE The
Jacksonville Jaguars can't
afford a hangover after
losing the biggest regular-
season game in franchise
history.
They can't think about
what might have been
against Indianapolis. They
can't watch the scoreboard
and hope for help. They
can't worry about any-
thing except the reeling
Washington Redskins.
"If you're still dwelling
on the last game, you'll get
your butt kicked in the next
game," tight end Marcedes
Lewis said.
The Jaguars (8-6) are
well aware of the postsea-
son scenarios. They also
realize all of them include
beating the Redskins (5-9)
on Sunday.
"I love our chances,"
Lewis said. "First and fore-
most, we have to take care
of our business and let the
chips fall where they fall.
We've had an up-and-down
year. We went on a nice
little run, had a tough one
last week, but we're ready
to finish this year strong.
We want to win these final
two game and we'll live with
the results."
Jacksonville had a
chance to clinch the AFC
South against the Colts last
week. But turnovers, penal-
ties, botched plays, missed
opportunities and too much
pressure on David Garrard
contributed to a 34-24 loss
that left the Jaguars in the
all-too-familiar chase mode.
They need to win their
final two games and have
the Colts lose either at


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Indianapolis Colts running back Donald Brown (right) scores a touchdown in front of Jacksonville Jaguars cornerback Don
Carey in the second half in Indianapolis, Sunday. The Colts defeated the Jaguars 34-24.


Oakland on Sunday or next
week against Tennessee.
Adding to their concerns,
the Jags would like to have
the Titans beat Kansas City
on Sunday, which would
keep the Raiders in the
AFC West hunt for their
game against Indy.
"The hope is there,"
Garrard said. "As long. as
there is some hope and
there are some scenarios
for us, you've got to have
a little faith. You've got, to
have faith that things will
come your way. As long as
we can continue to do our


job and go out and try to'
get a win this weekend, at
least we're giving ourselves
the best chance possible."
The Redskins have lost
four in a row and seem
to be in disarray, between
defensive tackle Albert
Haynesworth's suspen-
sion, quarterback Donovan
McNabb's benching and
coach Mike Shanahan's
handling of the situations.
"I got to make decisions
sometimes that's in the best
decision for the football
team," Shanahan said.
Shanahan turned


the offense over
Grossman last
Grossman threw


to Rex
week.
for 322


yards and four touchdowns
in a loss at Dallas. The
former Florida star will
make his second start at
Jacksonville, where he has
fond memories from his
college days. He's 3-0 as a
starter in Jacksonville, win-
ning every Florida-Georgia
game.
A first-round draft pick by
.Chicago in 2003, Grossman
believes he's better pre-.
pared for the spotlight now
than when he helped the


Bears reach the Super Bowl
in 2007.
"I'm just a little bit smart-
er as far as what to expect
on the defensive side of
the ball, a little bit smart-
er on how that relates to
our offense," he said. "I'm
quicker to read things. Any
time you get a chance to not
play .and sit back and wait,
you get to think about all
the things you can get bet-
ter at and how you would
attack a team differently
and all sorts of things.
"I just feel like that's how
I've matured since I'm a


little bit older."
The Jaguars feel like
they've matured since los-
ing consecutive games by
25 points early in the sea-
son. They won five of six to
move atop the AFC South
and set up a critical game
against the Colts. But they
came up. short. Running
back Maurice Jones-Drew
took the blame, saying his
fumble, his failed short-
yardage runs and his 46
'yards rushing weren't good
enough.
He refused to use his
injured right knee as an
excuse, but it was clear
the NFL's second-leading.
rusher wasn't his usual
self against the Colts. He
missed practice again this
week, but hopes to play.
"I'm just trying to do
everything I can to get back
out there and be ready,'"
Jones-Drew said.
With or without Jones-
Drew, the Jaguars
know what they have to do
to have happen to reach
the postseason for the
third time in the last 11
years.
-"Obviously, ad that stuff's
in the back of your rind,"
Lewis said. "But we, have
to handle wha's in front
of us. If we go out there
and win these two games, I
think we've got a good shot.
That Oakland team,
they're no slouches
. and they're playing for
something. You're not going
to shove them around. So
Indy has a tough road. But
it would be a shame if we
didn't take ca- c of our busi-
ness and that other stuff
did happen. Our mindset
is to get this win and keep
moving."


| STRONG: Rubbing off on program


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Buffalo Bills' Drayton Florence (29) tackles Miami Dolphins' Brandon Marshall (19) during
the second half on Sunday in Miami.

Dolphins say lack of speed

has hampered years' success


Associated Press

DAVIE A lack of an
offensive punch has hurt
the Miami Dolphins, espe-
cially in their last three
games when they only
scored a combined 34
points.
Now out of the playoffs,
the team is fighting to sal-
vage a winning record at 7-7
heading into Sunday's home
finale against Detroit.
The plan is to see what
can be done against the
Lions and then the follow-
ing week at New England
to send head coach Tony
Sparano and offensive
coordinator Dan Henning
into the offseason with
optimism about the direc-
tion of the offense.
That might be a diffi-
cult task. Henning says the
team this season hasn't had
more than three dynamic
plays on offense out of
"about 800 or so." The
Dolphins offense ranks
22nd overall and 31st in
scoring.
"On our football team
overall, we're missing
dynamics," said Henning,
who was the architect of


the Dolphins' offense in
2008 that helped Miami
win the AFC East for the
first time in eight years
with an 11-5 record.
He said there are other
things missing from the
Dolphins' game, includ-
ing dynamic kickoff or
punt returns that give the
offense excellent field
position or an interception
return for a touchdown.
Despite having the
same coaches from the
2008 team and even hav-
ing some players on the
current roster who are
more dynamic than previ-
ous Dolphins personnel,
Henning said there is a
difference between this
season's team and the AFC
East winners.
"As a team, we're not
as efficient, consistent or
effective as we were in
2008," he said.
Henning says the team
needs speed. One reason
behind the offense's lack of
speed has to do with the
hand injury second-year
wide receiver Brian Hartline
suffered in the 13-10 home
loss to Cleveland on Dec. 5.
"I would just tell you that


some of our speed is sitting
on the sideline right now
and in the locker room in
Brian Hartline," Sparano
said. "You don't have to
be a coach to figure that
out, I mean, he runs fast
and he's been behind peo-
ple probably the most out
of any player that we've
had. ... Now of course we
haven't executed some of
those plays."
Speed has been a diffi-
cult issue for the Dolphins
without Hartline this sea-
son. Brandon Marshall -
brought in via trade with
the Denver Broncos in the
offseason because of his
size and ability to run after
making a catch only has
three touchdown catches
and has been slowed by
a right hamstring injury.
Slot receiver Davone Bess
is tied with Marshall with
71 receptions but doesn't
have breakaway speed.
Sparano previously has
noted other hurdles with
the offense, including
that'the Dolphins running
game struggled with sec-
ond-level blocking and that
red zone efficiency was a
concern.


Continued From Page 1B

themselves against the
Wildcats, though their
rally came up a touchdown
short. Still, the message
had been sent. This wasn't
Steve Kragthorpe's team
anymore.
Louisville's undersized
defense compensated
by swarming opponents
behind the seemingly end-
less variation of blitz pack-
ages dreamed up by Strong
and Bedford. The Cardinals
finished 12th in the Football
Bowl Subdivision in total
defense and fourth in sacks
(3.17 per game).
The offense at times was
nearly as good after figuring
out the best way to move
the ball was by giving it to
senior running back Bilal
Powell. The player who
spent three years toiling
in anonymity on the bench
rushed for 1,405 yards and
11 touchdowns.
When he went down,
freshman Jeremy Wright
filled in capably and the
passing game a major
question mark when the
season began was effi-


cient if not always spectacu-
lar. Adam Froman threw for
1,633 yards and 11 scores
before suffering a thigh
injury.
Replacement' Justin
Burke was steady, throw-
ing just three interceptions
over the last five games and
his presence calmed the
jittery Cardinals after they
fell behind early against
Southern Miss. He passed
for 178 yards and two scores
as Louisville roared back.
"We didn't know how to
go to a bowl and get ready
at the start, but we fought,"
Burke said. "Thafs what we,
did all year and that's what
we're about."
The Cardinals will need
to lean oh that resiliency
over the next eight months.
Strong saved most of his
praise for Louisville's turn-
around on the 25 seniors
who embraced his way of
thinking.
Now that they're leaving,
there are major holes to fill.
The offensive line, which
he called the team's glue,
loses four starters. Powell,


Froman and Burke are also
leaving, as are defensive
stars Brandon Heath and
Johnny Patrick.
Strong has hit the recruit-
ing trail hard and is expect-
ed to sign Louisville's best
class since former coach
Bobby Petrino was on cam-
pus.
He acknowledges it will
take time for the influx of
talent to mature. Yet he
remains optimistic he'll be
able to. keep his coaching
staff intact during the offsea-
son. Considering how quick-
ly his team progressed this
fall, he sees no reason for
the upward trend to slow.
"I'm so excited about
next season because you
like to end the season on a
win, which we did, so it can
carry you on to the offsea-
son and get ready for next
season," he said.
Wright feels Strong did
more than simply return the
Cardinals to respectability.
He also brought back pride
in the program and a fear-
less attitude that rubbed off
on his players.


CHS: Diaz claims coaches award
Continued From Page 1B


Tompkins.
The Most Improved
award winners, given for
improvement in times,
strokes and attitude, were
Kayla Williams and Cody
Smith.
The Coaches Award rep-
resented all the qualities
sought by coaches Mary
Kay Mathis and Sabrina
Sibbernsen. Carlos Diaz
won the award.
"It was a hard decision
with a great group of swim-
mers," Mathis said. "Carlos
came ready to swim and
never wanted to stop until
his set was completed. He
had a great attitude and
wanted to always lead the
team in prayer."
Senior Jordyn Smith won
the Tiger Award, which is
given to "the person that
represents CHS off the pool
deck as well as on the pool


deck; a person well-round-
ed in the community and
involved in school activi-
ties."
Sophomore Cheyenne
Brown and Mathis won the
Fundraiser Award. They
combined to raise $1,800
for the program.
The Academic Award
was shared by Jonathan
Smith and Burns, the first
time there was a tie for the
award.
Burns also received the
Record Breaker Award, for
lowering the 500 freestyle
mark previously held by
Hillary Leonard.
Lindsay Lee broke the
100 backstroke record held
by Burns. Mathis, Burns,
Lauren Lee and Lindsay Lee
broke the 400 freestyle relay
award set by Ashley Fortier,
Marilee Sherrod, Leonard
and Heather Smith in 2006.


All new swimmers
received a Columbia let-
ter, pin and certificate.
Returning swimmers
received a bar, certificate
and medal. Lindsay Lee
and Burns were awarded
a certificate and trophy for
qualifying for state.
Team captains ended the
evening by awarding certifi-
cates as last will and testa-
ments that made the season
special.
"We are sad to see
seniors Cyntaria Anderson,
Alan Henry, Jonathan
Smith, Jordyn Smith and
Katherine Mathis go,"
coach Mathis said. "It was a
wonderful year. We had our
biggest group to swim and
we look forward to next
year. We'll start condi-
tioning in June and start
practice two weeks before
school starts."


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SATURDAY, DECEMBER 25, 2010


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420









LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS SATURDAY, DECEMBER 25, 2010


DILBERT


BABY BLUES


BLONDIE
I CAN'T BELIEVE
HERB GAVE ME A
BARBECUE GRILL L
,-% \r THAT I HAVE To,
ASSEMBLE /
-MYSELF
aF fdp./ ^


I IMAGINE I IMAGINE
GIVING YOU GIVING
A SWEATER YOU A TOOL
THAT THAT YOU
DOESN'T ALREADY
FIT. HAVE.


MAYBE HE'PO BE HAPPV TO HELP
-V OU PUT IT TOGETHER
NO WAY! IO'L
4 FIGURE IT OUT
IP IT TAKES THE
REST OF MY LIFE!!


S' MERRY
SCHRISTMAS,
SDOGBERT.

STUPID
SWEATER.



!R -


WHY ARE YOU SO -
DETERMINED TO FIGURE
IT OUT YOURSELF?
BECAUSE IT'S THEIR
VERY SAME GRILL
GAVE HERB5 .
FOR HIS "
BIRTHPAY.I ^^


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE
I KNOW JIT'6 0eE A TollI6 YEAR,
OUT AT L.A7" We'Re ALU. TO65e7T"e
FOR c4RI6T4MA6 OWNER !

7.. eg
< 1 A u9 W6I l \
^rrr^^ ^i^,2

^^v^


ZITS


B.C.


FRANK & ERNEST


FOR BETTER OR WORSE


DEAR ABBY


Girl is betwixt and between

friend and her soon-to-be-ex


ARE YOU
READY TO E
DO MENTAL
GIFTING?
YOU
FGO.
FIRST.

E


.


. L


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-
April 19): Stay calm, avoid
disagreements and, most of
all, take it easy if you have
to go visit relatives. Keep
festivities low key, simple
and modest You will have
a lot to put behind you and
need some time to yourself.

TAURUS (April 20-
May 20): Whether visiting
family and friends or hav-
ing everyone gather at your
place, you will be able to
please as well as be pleased.
Accept and enjoy what you
have coming your way. Love
is in the stars. *****
GEMINI (May 21-
June 20): Be careful what
you share regarding your
personal and professional
life. Having people over to
your place will keep you
busy and out of trouble but,
if you spend this holiday
at someone else's place
you can always leave when
you've had enough. **
CANCER (June 21-
July 22): You will change
your mind about someone
you haven't seen for a long
time. Talks will give you
perspective on something
you've thought about doing
in the new year. Discussions
will lead to special plans for
two. ****
LEO (July 23-Aug.
22): Sit back, observe and


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

enjoy the festivities going
on around you. You don't
always have to be the cen-
ter of attention. You'll have
plenty of time next year to
show off, so take pleasure
in being able to leave the
entertaining to someone
else. ***
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): You'll be the one ev-
eryone looks to for answers
and to organize and hold
things together. Make sure
you share a special moment
with the person who makes
your heartbeat fast. ***
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): No matter whether
you are with family, friends
or volunteering your time,
you should be offering
help, keeping busy and
staying out of any conver-
sations that might lead to a
disagreement. You'll walk a
fine line today; avoid overin-
dulgence and overreacting.

SCORPIO (Oct 23-
Nov. 21): You'll be remi-
niscing and catching up
with people you love and
miss. Someone who has al-
ways been there for you will
need you to reciprocate.
Do all you can to help. Say
goodbye to deadweight and
hello to new beginnings.


**
SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): Accept the
inevitable and don't make
a fuss. Offering your help
or spending part of the day
driving people around will
give you time to think and
help you avoid someone
who is trying to cause trou-
ble. *****
CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): You'll be re-
sponsible for others and
must keep a clear head so
that you can function prop-
erly. A false sense of your fi-
nancial position may cause
you to be overly generous.
Consider the cost in time
and money. ***
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Help those less
privileged. You have lots to
offer. The feeling of satis-
faction you get and the re-
alization of how lucky you
are will clear your head of
any negative thoughts and
help you prepare for new
ventures. ***
PISCES (Feb. 19-
March 20): Getting to-
gether with family may be
required but putting time
aside will be a must Share
something special with
someone you love. Making
future plans will help you
adjust to whatever change
is going on in your life.
***


CELEBRITY CIPHER


by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: P equals Y
"YWMFXOLGX JGBTX G LGVFY JGKA
CBTM OWFX JCM H A GKA ITWCHA,
TBTMPOWFKV FX XCDOTM GKA LCMT
ITGROFDRH." KCMLGK BFKYTKO
E T G H T
PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "I didn't know the full dimensions of forever, but I
knew it was longer than waiting for Christmas to come." Richard Brautigan
(c) 2010 by NEA, Inc. 12-25

CLASSIC PEANUTS


a


DEAR ABBY: I really
need some help. One of my
friends and her boyfriend,
"Jake," have been having
problems and he wants to
break up with her. I have had
a crush on him since I first
met him. My friend knew it
and dated him anyway.
Jake has been flirting
with me for a while now, and
I feel uncomfortable because
I flirted back. I'm afraid my
girlfriend will think he broke
up with her for me. Please
help! STUCK IN THE
MIDDLE
DEAR STUCK: Be
warned. Jake appears to be
someone with a roving eye
and a short attention span.
While he may have his eye on
you, play it cool and hold off
dating him until he has first
dated one or two other girls.
Even then, your girlfriend
may not like the idea of your
seeing him but she won't
be able to accuse you of hav-
ing had any involvement in
their breakup.
DEAR ABBY: My hus-
band started smoking two
years ago, and it's driving
me crazy especially the
wasted time and money. I try
not to nag him, but it's hard.
Because most restaurants
are now non-smoking, when
we go out to dinner, instead
of smoking right before he
goes in, then after we leave,
hell get up a few minutes
after we order to go outside
and smoke leaving me


ANPTHVANK F IN F
NEWTUjgEOFIQIVXFttMFf.g y-
OF' iVR NEXTf EA I'M
cKPN. FRRFORnN
O.RHPPNOAPU1R


quit Then all I can advise is
to appreciate him while you
can, because his habit will
eventually compromise his
health.
DEAR ABBY: I am an
intellectual giant. I have
nothing in common with my
peers. I am smarter than
all of them. I am in a gifted-
and-talented program in my
school, and I am still unable
to carry on a conversation
that everyone in the room
can understand. Please help
me. HEADS ABOVE
THE REST IN IDAHO
DEAR HEADS ABOVE
THE REST: Being intellec-
tually gifted is an asset un-
less it isolates you because
you can't relate to others. If
you're as smart as you say
you are, you should try to do
what other "intellectual gi-
ants" have done learn to
analogize what you're trying
to communicate so that oth-
ers of lesser intelligence can
understand yoi. It is a skill
and it may take practice, but
the alternative is being un-
able to share your valuable
insights with others.
If you cannot manage
what I am suggesting on
your own, you may need
some pointers from a psy-
chologist to gain the tools
you need.

N Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearobby.com
alone for five to 10 minutes.
Sometimes he does it more
than once.
It makes me really un-
comfortable. I feel like peo-
ple are staring at me. I have
asked him repeatedly hot to
leave me sitting there, but
he won't stop. I told him it's
rude and he should respect
me enough to remain with
me through an entire meal,
but he refuses. Please tell
me what you think, about
this. SMOKING MAD
IN VIRGINIA
DEAR SMOKING.
MAD: Your husband isn't
being willfully disrespectful.
He is so addicted to nicotine
that he cannot sit through
an entire meal with you be-
cause he must have another
"fix"! While your suggestion
that he have a cigarette be-,
fore entering the restaurant
is logical, he is UNABLE to
go without smoking for that
relatively short length of
time.
It's very sad. Because
you can't convince him to
recognize he has a problem,
ask his doctor to help him


-L. L.


4 Erg


'A r


Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415











Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SATURDAY, DECEMBER 25, 2010

Lake City Reporter





CLASSIFIED


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

755-5440


- ADvantage


One Item perad c260
4 lines 6 days InEahd |.5
Rate applies to private individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling $100 or less.







Each item must Include a price.
This is a non-refun




One item per ad 12 37
4 lines 6 days tonal
Rate applies to private individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling $1,000 or less.
This is a non-refundable rate.








One item per ad
4 lines 6 daysEach additional
line $1.15
Rate applies to private individualsselling
personal merchandise totalling $2,500 or less.
Each Item mst include a price.








S One Item per ad S
4 lines 6 days Each additional
14 line $1.55
Rate applies to private individuals selling
Each item must Include a price.
personaThis mriso toaon-refungable rt l




4 lines 6 days Each|additional
Rate applies to private Individuals selling |
, personal merchandise totalling $6,000 or less. J
Each item must include a price.


3day 1750
Includes 2 1 Sgns E[ dl a l m iinfl1 I6



Limited to service type advertis-
ing only.
4 lines, one month....s92.00
$10.80 each additional line
Includes an additional $2.00 per
"ad for each Wednesday insertion.



You can call us at 755-5440,
Monday through Friday from 8:00
a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Some people prefer to place their
classified ads in person, and some
ad categories will require prepay-
ment. Our office is located at 180
East Duval Street.
You can also fax or email your ad
copy to the Reporter.
FAX: 386-752-9400 Please
direct your copy to the Classified
Department.
EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityre-
porter.com





Ad is to Appear: Call by: Fax/Email by:
Tuesday Mon., 10:00 a.m. Mon., 9:00 a.m
Wednesday Mon., 10:00 a.m. Mon., 9:00a.m.
Thursday Wed., 10:00 am. Wed., 9:00 a.m.
Friday Thurs.,10:00arm. Thrs., 9:00 a.m
Saturday Fri, 10:00a.m. Fn.,9:00a.m.
Sunday Fri, 10:00a.m. Fr.,9:00a.m.
These deadlines are subject to change without notice




Ad Errors- Please read your ad
on the first day of publication.
We accept responsibility for only
the first incorrect insertion, and
only the charge for the ad space
in error. Please call 755-5440
immediately for prompt correc-
tion and billing adjustments.
Cancellations- Normal advertising
deadlines apply for cancellation.
Billing Inquiries- Call 755-5440.
Should further information be
required regarding payments or
credit limits, your call will be trans-
ferred to the accounting depart-
ment.


Advertising copy is subject to
approval by the Publisher who
reserves the right to edit, reject,
or classify all advertisements under
appropriate headings. Copy should
be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the first day of pub-
lication. Credit for published errors
will be allowed for the first insertion
for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further; the
Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nor for any general,
special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply
with Federal, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
nation in employment, housing and
public accommodations. Standard
abbreviations are acceptable; how-
ever, the first word of each ad may
not be abbreviated.

In Print il Online
www,.laliecltyreporter.comn


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND
FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO: 10-674-CA
DIVISION
BRIGHT VISION INVESTMENTS,
LLC, etc.,
Plaintiff,
EUGENE ALBRIGHT, et al.,
Defendants
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO:
Joe Persons, Trustee of Marion C.
Persons Living Trust
Last Known Address
P.O. Box 808
Lake City, Florida 32056
Richard A. Lozano
Last Known Address
788 S. Marion Ave.
Lake City, Florida 32025
Plymouth Park Tax Services, LLC
Last Known Address
35 Airport Road
Morristown, NJ 07960
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action
to foreclose a mortgage on the fol-
lowing property in Columbia Coun-
ty, Florida: Sect 00 Twn 00 Rng 00
Parcel Number 14130-000
S Div: Lots 10 &1l Block 4 Baya
S/D, Block 325, ORB 504-419, 785-
808, 921-1319
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to it on
Lance Paul Cohen, the Plaintiff's at-
torney, whose address is Cohen &
Thurston, PA., 1723 Blanding Bou-
levard, Suite 102, Jacksonville, Flor-
ida 32210, within thirty (30) days
from the original with the Clerk of
this Court wither before service on
the Plaintiff's attorney or immediate-
ly thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or peti-
tion.
DATED on this 9th day of Decem-
ber, 2010.
P. DEWITT CASON
CLERK OF THE COURT
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
By:/s/ B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
Lance Paul Cohen, Esquire
COHEN & THURSTON, P.A.
1723 Blanding Boulevard, suite 102
Jacksonville, Florida 32210
(904)388-6500
Attorney for Plaintiff
04542703
December 18, 25, 2010


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
IN AND FOR COLUMBIA COUN-
TY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 10-112-CA
RBC BANK (USA),
Plaintiff,
v.
SOUTHEAST DEVELOPERS"
GROUP, INC., a Florida corpora-
tion; DAVID W. BLANK, an indi-
vidual; TREVOR W. BLANK, an in-
dividual; JOSHUA A. NICKEL-
SON, an individual; JACOB KIRSH,
an individual; TRINITY MATERI-
ALS, LLC, successor by merger with
ANDERSON MATERIAL CO.,
INC., a Florida limited liability com-
pany; and A&B WELL DRILLING,
INC., a Florida corporation,
Defendants.
AMENDED NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
pursuant to a Final Judgment as to
Foreclosure rendered on October 27,
2010, in that certain cause pending in
the Circuit Court in and for Colum-
bia County, Florida, wherein RBC
BANK (USA) is the Plaintiff, and
granted against the Defendants,
SOUTHEAST DEVELOPERS
GROUP, INC., a Florida corpora-
tion; TRINITY MATERIALS, LLC,
SUCCESSOR by merger with AN-
DERSON MATERIAL CO., INC., a
Florida limited liability company,
and A&B WELL DRILLING, INC,
a Florida corporation, in Case No.
2010-112-CA, P. DeWitt Cason,
Clerk of the Court of the aforesaid
Court, will at 11:00 a.m., on January
12th, 2011, offer for sale and sell to
the highest and best bidder for cash
at the Columbia County Courthouse,,
173 N.E. Hernando Avenue, Third
Floor, Lake City, Florida 32055, the
following described real and person-
al property, situate and being in Co-
lumbia County, Florida to-wit:
REAL PROPERTY DESCRIP-
TION: SEE ATTACHED EXHIBIT
"A"
REAL PROPERTY DESCRIPTION
Lot 32 of Rolling Meadows, a subdi-
vision according to the plat thereof
as recorded in Plat Book 8, Pages 45
and 46, of the Public Records of Co-
lumbia County Florida.
The W 220 Ft of S 1/2 of SE 1/4 of
NW 1/4 & the W 220 Ft of S 1/2 of
N 1/2 of SE 1/4 of NW 1/4.
Lot 57 of Rolling Meadows, a subdi-
vision according to the plat thereof
as recorded in Plat Book 8, Pages 45
and 46, of the Public records of Co-
lumbia County, Florida.
Lot 58 of Rolling Meadows, a subdi-
vision according to the plat thereof
as recorded in Plat Book 8, Pages 45
and 46, of the Public Records of Co-







Home Improvements

Carpentry, remodeling, paint,
repairs, additions, Lic. & Ins.
Since 1978 FREE estimates
386-497-3219 or 954-649-1037

Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.


Pool Maintenance

Pool Leaks/Pool Repairs
Florida Leisure Pool & Spa
352-373-0612
CPC 1457279


Legal

lumbia County Florida.
EXHIBIT "A"
PERSONAL PROPERTY DE-
SCRIPTION:
SEE ATTACHED EXHIBIT "B"
PERSONAL PROPERTY DE-
SCRIPTION
All right, title and interest of Debtor
in and to the following described real
and other property, together with all
substitutions for all replacements, re-
versions and remainders of such
property and all appurtenances and
additions thereto, whether now
owned or hereafter acquired by
Debtor (collectively, the "Property"):
(a) All of the land in the County of
Columbia, Florida described below
(the "Land"):
Lot 32 of Rolling Meadows, a subdi-
vision according to the plat thereof
as recorded in Plat Book 8, Pages 45
and 46, of the Public Records of Co-
lumbia County Florida.
The W 220 Ft of S r/2 of SE 1/4 of
NW 1/4 & the W 220 Ft of S 1/2 of
N 1/2 of SE 1/4 of NW 1/4.
Lot 57 of Rolling Meadows, a subdi-
vision according to the plat thereof
as recorded in Plat Book 8, Pages 45
and 46, of the Public Records of Co-
lumbia County Florida.
Lot 58 of Rolling Meadows, a subdi-
vision according to the plat thereof
as recorded in Plat Book 8, Pages 45
and 46, of the Public Records of Co-
lumbia County Florida.
together with all the improvements
now or hereafter erected on the Land
and all fixtures now or hereafter at-
tached thereto, together with each
and every tenements, hereditaments,
easements, rights, powers, privileges,
immunities and appurtenances here-
unto belonging or in anywise apper-
taining and the reversion and rever-
sions, remainder and remainders, and
also all the estate, right, title, interest,.
homestead, right of dower, separate
estate, property, possession and
claim whatsoever in law as well as in
equity of Debtor of, in and to the
same in every part and parcel thereof
unto secured Party in fee simple;
(b) Together with a security interest
in all personal property, excluding
household goods, which are not pur-
chased with the proceeds of the
Note, and fixtures affixed to or lo-
cated on the Land;
(c) Together with and a perfected se-
curity interest in all rents, leases, re-
ceivables, issues, profits, revenue, in-
come proceeds, contract rights, and
other benefits from the property de-
scribed in Paragraph (a) hereof to be
applied to the indebtedness secured
hereby, provided however, that per-
mission is hereby given to Debtor so
long as no default has occurred here-
under, to collect, receive, and use
such benefits from the property as
they become due and payable, but
not in advance thereof; ,
(d) All insurance policies and pro-
ceeds thereof arid all condemnation
proceeds, awards, damages, and
claims relating to or derived from the
Land;
(e) Everything referred to in Para-
graph (a), (b), (c), and (d) hereof and
any additional property hereafter ac-.
quired by Debtor and subject to the
lien of the Mortgage or any part of
these properties is herein referred to
as the "Mortgage Property."
EXHIBIT "B"
Said sale will be made pursuant to
and in order to satisfy the terms of
said Final Judgment as to Foreclo-
sure.
Any person claiming an interest in
the surplus from the sale, if any, oth-
er than the property owner as of the
date of the lis pendens must file a
claim within 60 days after the sale.
DATED this 28 day of October,
2010.
P. DeWitt Cason
Clerk of the Court
By:/s/ B. Scippio
As Deputy Clerk
NOTICE-AMERICANS WITH DIS-
ABILITIES ACT OF 1990 ADMIN-
ISTRATIVE ORDER NO. 93-37
IF YOU ARE A PERSON WITH A
DISABILITY WHO NEEDS ANY
ACCOMMODATION IN ORDER
TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PRO-
CEEDING, YOU ARE ENTITLED,
AT NO COST TO YOU, TO THE
PROVISION OF CERTAIN ASSIS-
TANCE. PLEASE CONTACT ADA
COORDINATOR, 173 NE HER-
NANDO AVENUE, ROOM 408,
LAKE CITY, FLORIDA 32055,
(386)719-7428, AT LEAST 7 DAYS
BEFORE YOUR SCHEDULED
COURT APPEARANCE, OR IM2
MEDIATELY UPON RECEIVING
THIS NOTIFICATION IF THE
TIME BEFORE THE SCHEDULED
APPEARANCE IS LESS THAN 7
DAYS; IF YOU ARE HEARING
OR VOICE IMPAIRED, CALL 711.
04542682
December 18, 25 ,2010



010 Announcements









020 Lost & Found

Lost 18mo old Yorkie. Recent
surgery and on medication. Has
microchip. Lost in McAlpin area.
Please call 386-362-2140


100v Opportunities

Mechanic needed for Truck shop,
must have own tools, apply
Southern Specialized, 1812 NW
Main Blvd., 386-752-9754


Cashiers needed, Experience Pre-
ferred,Drug frre workplace, allap-
plicants will be drug tested
Ellisville Exxon,
Hwy 441, No Phone Calls Please.


100 J'Opbportunities

04542702
Customer Service
Ideal Candidates with previous
experience with customer
service. Must have excellent
telephone skills. Individual
must be enthusiastic, outgoing,
have excellent computer skills
and be able to perform in a fast
pace environment.
Please fax resume to
386-758-0984 or e-mail to
greatjobs@LCjobs.info

04542747
LifeSouth Community Blood
Centers is seeking an independ-
ent and precise individual for a
Donor Services Specialist
phlebotomistt) position.
HS/GED and valid driver's
license required. Phlebotomy
exp prfrd. F/T, $9-10 p/h. Apply
at www.lifesouth.org. Back-
ground check req. EOE/DFWP.

04542748
Another Way Inc. needs
Shelter Coordinator (full-time
w/benefits) in Chiefland
supervisory experience required
and two part-time advocates
(one Chiefland & one Lake
City) bi-lingual preferred for all
positions. Minorities and.
formerly battered women
encouraged to apply. EOE.
Send resume w/cover letter
identifying position of interest to
hr@anotherwayinc.net or P. 0.
Box 1028, Lake City, FL 32056
or Fax 386-719-2758.
No phone calls accepted.

Experienced IT Tech/
Network Admin
Qualifications: 2+ years
experience with: win XP pro, win
7 pro, server 2003, 2008. Must
have worked within and be
familiar with active directory.
Must be capable of lifting/moving
workstations. Microsoft
certifications a plus. Clean drivers
license required. Please submit
resume to hr@chclabs.com or
fax to 386-758-1791

120 Medical
120 Employment

05524650
LEARN TO DRAW BLOOD
Local Phlebotomy Course
offered in Lake City, FLA
Certificate program.
(904)566-1328

FfT LPN or MA needed M-F for
busy medical practice.
Please fax resume to
386-487-1232
Wanted Receptionist,
experienced. Send resume to
826 SW Main Blvd. Suite 102.
Lake City, FL. 32025

2 Schools &
2 Education

04542575
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-12/13/10 .

Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-01/17/11

Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com



310 Pets & Supplies

FREE to good home,
bob-tail tabby, female kitten,
approx 6-7 months old
386-466-8248
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.
330 Livestock &
Supplies
Pigs for sale
7 weeks old
$50 each HURRY!
386-965-2215
Pony
Mini Mare, Paint
5 yrs old $400
tack included 386-965-2231


401 Antiques
ANTIQUES WANTED
Fumrn., China, Silver, Glassware,
Costume Jewelry & Gold. 35 years
exp. Cash Pd. Pete. 386-963-2621

408 Furniture

ALMOST NEW
rocker/recliner.
$60.
386-935-4931
LARGE DRESSER
All wood.


$60.
386-935-4931
TV 55inch. HD projection.
Factory remote. Works great.
Looks great.Perfect gift.
$325.00 386-719-9189


408 Furniture
Twin Race Car Bed with mattress.
Twin Story Book Cottage Bed
with mattress. $350.00. for both
386-965-9882

413 Musical
Merchandise
100 Watt Sanyo Stereo, graphic
equalizer, dual cassette, speakers
36" high, very good condition
$50 386-935-0654


420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$225 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.


430 Garage Sales







PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.



440 Miscellaneous

CONSUL 31"TV.
Good condition
$80.
386-935-4931


520 Boats for Sale

Bass Tender Boat
10'2",
$500 Call for details
386-965-2215

r63 Mobile Homes
63V for Rent
2/2, S/W, 1 acre secluded lot
Bascom Norris Bypass, $500 dep,
$500 mo, possible owner finance
386-623-2203 or 386-623-5410
2BR/2BA MH CH/A,
Fenced in back yard and Shed.
$750. mo plus deposit.
Pets OK! 386-755-4157
3br/2ba newly renovated MH on
1/2 ac. private property. Close to
college $700.mo. 1st. mo.+ Sec.
dep. Ref's. No Pets. Non smoking
environment 386-755-3288
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White. Contact 386-623-2465
or 386-292-0114
Nice clean 2&3 bdrm, Five Points,
NO PETS, also 3 bd on the
Westside, 1 mo rent & dep
386-961-1482







2br/lba from $450 & 3br/2ba from
$550. Includes water & sewer.
No Pets! 386-961-0017
Very clean & well maintained 2/2
units in nice park. $599.mo
w/$500. dep. Rent incl water,
sewer, trash p/u. Close to town
386-984-8448 or 623-7547
Very. Clean 2 BR/1 BA, in the
country, Branford area, $450 mo.,
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleypro590-0642

640 Mobile Homes
0 for Sale
$200. MONTHLY. Remodeled .
SW. 2bd/2ba. Appliances,
delivered & blocked. Owner
finance available w/$3000 down.
Call Gary Hamilton 386-758-9824
05524589
Palm Harbor Homes
Factory Liquidation Sale
2009 Model Homes MUST GO!
Call for FREE color brochures
800-622-2832

05524637
Gainesville-Jacobsen-Savings
Factory direct Jaconsen outlet
now open to the public 3/2 start-
ing at 39,900 complete.
Northpointemobilehomesales.co
m for complete website specials
or 352-872-5566
For the best deal in Florida!

05524638
North Pointe Homes is your
new #1 Jacobsen dealer. Take a
short drive to Gainesville and
save thousands. Five year halo
warranty, 2x6 wall, and
much more. Free energy star
package on all others.
Call Chuck at 352-872-5567

05524639
Why drive to Gainesville?
This is Why! New 28x60
Jacobsen 3/2 inc FREE Furni-
ture! Low as $497 month.
Drive to our dealership and Buy,
I pay for your gas!
Call Mark at 352-872-5568


f650 Mobile Home
650 &Land
BANK REPO: Mobile Home On
15.65 ACRES IN FT. WHITE -
Including 60X40 pole barn. Listed
at $130,000.00. Call Billy Shows
After hours 386-208-8547

70n Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent
D5524443
$Holiday Cash $
NO App Fee, NO SD,
$250 off December,
*for Qualified Applicants
Windsong Apartments
(386) 758-8455

05524728
SPRING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans;
some with garages.
Call 386-454-1469
or visit our website:
www.springhillvillage.net

2/1 w/garage,
east side of town,
1st, last & sec
386-755-6867
2BR/2BA DUPLEX
on McFarlane Ave. W/D hookup
Rent $625. per month.
Call 386-867-212 for details.
A Landlord You Can Love!
2 br Apts $550. & up + sec. Great
area. CH/A washer/dryer hookups.
386-758-9351/352-208-2421
Brick Duplex 2/1 off Baya. CH/A,
Carport, Carpet, tile, $575 mo,+
Dep. Call 386-752-0118 or
386-623-1698 or 386-292-4937
Duplex w/garage spacious, 2/1,
1300 sq ft, W/D hook up, CH/A,
$650 plus dep &'bckgmd chk,
386-697-3248 or 352-514-2332
Great location W of 1-75, spacious
deluxe 2BR apts., garage, W/D
hook up. patio. $600 & up, + SD,
386 965-0276
The Lakes Apts. Studios & IBr's
from $135/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers. accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $425 + sec.
Michelle 386-752-9626
X-CLEAN SECOND STORY 2/2,
country acre 8 mi to VA, off Lk
Jeff Rd. $500 mo + dep. No dogs.
Deck, w/d hookups 386.961.9181

0 Furnished Apts.
720 For Rent
1 BEDROOM all utilities includ-
ed. Furnished or unfurnished. East
or West side. $475. mo. +
$200 security. 386-397-3568
NO Lease/Deposits, ROOMS only
Utilities, Cable, WI-FI, maid,
micro-fridge, phone, Pool.
Americas Best Value Inn
(386)755-4664
Wk 1 prs. $169,2 ppl $179 + tax
Park Model Trailers (Studio), all
utils, use of pool, $500 per month,
NeverDunn's RV Park. .
386-961-8540 or 755-4945
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

730 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent

2BR/1BA CH/A. Large carport,
great location, near comer of Baya
& McFarland references req'd.
Property zoned for commercial use
386-752-9144 or 755-2235
3 & 4 bedroom homes. Newly
renovated. Very nice, in town.
$750 $950 per month phis
deposit. 386-755-2423
3 Bedrm/2 Bth plus 360 sq ft Stu-
dio on Lake Jeffery/Old Mill Rd,
very private, $1200 per mo. plug
deposit, 386-752-9303, No Pets
3/2 W/D hook up, appliances
included, $200 sec dep,
$650 month. Madison Street
386-365-2515
3/2,Brick Home, big back yard,
$900 month + Security Deposit
off of Branford Hwy & CR 242,
386-965-0276
Cozy Cottage lbr/lba S. Hwy. 41
$550/mo. + security. Includes all
utilities & satellite TV. Pets OK.
(386)758-2408
FOR RENT: Large 3br/2ba brick
home, fenced on 5 acres on
Columbia/Suwannee County line.
$975. per month + utilities.
Perfect place for children.
Broker/Owner- Annette Land @
386-935-0824
Newer 3/2 w/2 car garage.
1800 sq ft $900 mo. plus deposit
1-10/US 41 area
(248)875-8807
Rural beauty and privacy near
I-10/US90 NW of Live Oak. 3Br,
l+Ba, $725/mo. Optional pasture
available. (626) 512-5374

750 Business &
Office Rentals
OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$695. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor


805 Lots for Sale
5 Acres in Lake City, FL,
low down, easy qualifying, and
low monthly payments,
please call 512-663-0065


To place your
classified ad call

755-5440


I


I BUYgI


kISEL11


IhFINDIT^


I









6B

805 Lots for Sale
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status. or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

810 Home for Sale-
3BR/2BA 2 story brick. 4.6 ac. in
ground pool. Lg. workshop &
2 wells. $200,000.00 obo
Old Wire Rd. (850)728-0782
FSBO, Completely Remodeled,
3bdr/lbth, fenced, new deck, shop,
new cabinets/appliances,Schools
blks away, $65K 478-391-1592

820 Farms &
2 Acreage
4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$69,900. $613mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
4 Ac.,Ft. White. Well, Selptic &
Power. Owner Financing!
NO DOWN! $69,900.
Only $613./mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
WE FINANCE! Half to ten acre
lots. Some with w/s/pp
Deas Bullard BKL Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com

940 Trucks
1990 Ford F350 Dually
work truck, white, automatic
$1500 obo
386-965-2215

COM NGY


LAKE CITY REPORTER


...to never miss a day's
worth of all the
Lake City Reporter
has to offer:
Home delivery.
To subscribe call
755-5445


MIME


CLASSIFIED


SATURDAY, DECEMBER 25,.2010


Classified Department: 755-5440


Tell 'em L.C. Reporter sent ya.





-SUBSCRIBERS-


Sign up today for EasyPaY* and receive

one month FREE added to your subscription.



3e a de4ad386.755.5445


ADVERTISE IT HERE.!
Bring the picture in or we will take it for you!
Advertise your car, truck, motorcycle, recreation vehicle or
boat here for 10 consecutive days. If your vehicle does not sell
within those 10 days, for an additional $15 you can place your
ad for an additional 10 days. A picture will run everyday with
a description of your vehicle. The price of the vehicle must be
listed in the ad. Your ad must be prepaid with cash, check or
credit card. Just include a snapshot or bring your vehicle by
and we will take the picture for you. Private party only!
Price includes a 6 day/ 4 line classified ad of the
same vehicle in print and online.


2009 Harley Davidson -
XR1200R Mirage 2001 Chevy Astro

$8,000 $2,200 OBO
386-752-5988 386-984-0571
For Mo e -er ilsCal- ar- o
Bridet. a 38-75 40


Ca"$1h


ADVERTISE YOUR


GARAGE SALE

WITH THE
LAKE CITY REPORTER

Only





4 LINES 3 DAYS
2 FREE SIGNS!


(386) 755-5440


S* 4 .4 ..-.

." ' :",. " .. *
> i " *i >"- '" ; ,*; "'.*' .
**- i' :i ? .".:* ;". ;' '.- : "* ,


.. ;, "' ;1&% ^S ^ -!:..







'-.; '-*. :: .^': ^ ^ ....
I, -. ., ,: ..



,, '- ': .- l ' .t ". i ;
* '* '/ *.; b ;"." .


-7 .' ,..- "' *. ',; o '.. .^ ,- "* ".,



















'* ",'


., -


2": \j; "


i '' "':3": '"Nor F" lo'


4- ~. .


...Y '* S 1 .' * '; .'*i'. , ..,...^' .* i- .. : -^ .' .-'-..

'* .. '- '; "' .' i, : ':.


.. .. "^ '..' ^ -:; ^ ', '.: .' ",'


.* - ' : ,'* ; ,



. I-I : :'=''. ? ;


I 1L14


4







-J .5,.


published monthly by


2




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2011 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Powered by SobekCM