<%BANNER%>






The Lake City reporter
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS MAP IT! PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01483
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 12/24/2010
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01483
System ID: UF00028308:01483
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text








Title Defense


Columbia
tour


"-'- ;ernas


HISTORyIGIT 326


ake


Friday, December 24, 2010


Next Level
Sixteen athletes signed -
scholarships in 2010.
Sports, I B





7 Repor


tyreporter.com Vol. 136, No. 289 E 75 cen".


LC man faces false imprisonment charges


Ex-girlfriend says
she was taken to
White Springs.
From staff reports

A Lake City man was
arrested and faces multiple
charges for allegedly hold-
ing his former girlfriend
against her will, authorities


said.
Anthony Antonio
Henderson, 35, 5292 NW
Jeffrey
Road, is
charged
with false
imprison-
ment and
battery y
Henderson stemming


from the case. He was
booked into the Columbia
County Detention Facility
on $11,000 bond.
According to Lake
City Police Department
reports, officer David
Broom was called to
the Lake City Police
Department around 6:19
a.m. Wednesday to take a
report from a woman who


reported that her former
boyfriend, Henderson,
arrived at her Lake City
home around 1 a.m. and
confronted her "about
seeing other people."
The woman reported
that Henderson started a
fight with her and then
reportedly used a knife to
force her into his vehicle.
Henderson reportedly


drove her to a home in
White Springs and after
several hours in the home,
the woman, was able to
plead with him to return
her to Lake City.
When Henderson left,
the victim went to the
police station to report
the incident.
Officers went to the
woman's home and report-


edly saw signs of damage,
indicating that a struggle
took place, police reports
said.
LCPD Sgt. Andy Miles,
who was tasked to inves-
tigate the case, got a
warrant for Henderson's
arrest.
The suspect was arrest-
ed around midnight in
Hamilton County.


RED KETTLE RINGS


6 '-.: _________ MMI10


JASON MATTHEW WALKERILake City Reporter
Jill Adams, a member of Altrusa International of Lake City Inc., waves to customers as she rings a bell for The Salvation
Army. 'It's a blessing to tell people Merry Christmas and watch people give from the heart to The Salvation Army,' Adams said.


Salvation Army battles tough economy


Bell-ringers say
donors continue
to show generosity.
By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter. corn
Lake City's civic
groups have
been ringing
the Salvation
Army bell again
this holiday season at
local businesses, bring-
ing in donations even in a
hard economy.
"I just think they
(donors) realize there's
a lot of people who need
help," said Kenneth
Watson, the Salvation
Army's Columbia County
kettle coordinator.
"They're doing what they
can because they know
there's a lot of people who
need it even more with
the way the economy is."
The Rotary Club of
Lake City rings the bell- .
at Walmart's shopping
entrance and has raised

CALL US:
(386) 752-12
SUBSCRIBE
THE REPOI
Voice 755-_S
1 8 21Fax: 752-9


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Lake City residents Pat Hale (left) and Carol Minshew make
a donation to the Salvation Army at the Publix Supermarket
Wednesday morning. 'It's for a good cause,' Minshew said.


more than $5,000 thus far,
said Carlton Jones, Rotary
Club president.
People are still giving
despite the economy, he
said.
"It's quite surprising,"
Jones said. "We don't
feel like there's been any
less donating to our bell-
ringing cause than in the
past."
Walmart's grocery


- 60
ETO Sunny
RTER:
40 WEATHER, 2A


entrance is shared by
Lake City's Knights of
Columbus club and Lake
City Masonic Lodge No.
27.
Donations are about'
the same as last year, said
Larry LaTour, Knights of
Columbus chancellor, and
Robert Fowler, Masonic
Lodge secretary.
LaTour and Fowler said
they encountered donors

Opinion ...
/ .,. '- Obituaries .
Advice & Co
-, / Puzzles ....
Around Flori


omi
ida


who told stories of being
previously helped by the
Salvation Army.
"An amazing thing I
learned," Fowler said,
"was how much the
Salvation Army helped
military personnel over-
seas or here who needed
help, and that was quite
surprising."
Fowler also noted that
many people teach their
children to donate.
Jan Smithey, president
of Altrusa International of
Lake City, said her club
- which rings the bell at
Publix has done well
with donations this year.
"I think people are
just giving because they
know there's a lot of need
out there because of the
economy," she said. "And
it all adds up."
The Kiwanis Club of
Lake City manned the
Winn-Dixie post. Kyle
Keen, Kiwanis Club
president, said donations
KETTLE continued on 3A

........... 4A
........... 5A
cs .......... 3B
........... 2B
........... 2A


Stands issues


safety tips to


avoid injuries


Hospital officials
warn parents on
hazardous toys.
By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
Christmas is a joyous day
for many children who have
received new toys and gifts,
but each year an estimated
169,300 toy-related injuries
are reported at hospital
emergency departments
across the country, accord-
ing to information from the
Shands Healthcare media
department.
Local hospital officials
are reminding parents to be
vigilant in supervising their
children with Christmas
gifts to reduce the amount
of potential injuries.
According to Preeti Joi,


an assistant professor in the
Department of Emergency
Medicine at Shands at the
University of Florida, the
most common visits from
children to the emergency
room on Christmas include
(in no particular order):
Cold/cough symp-
toms;
Vomiting/diarrhea;
Injuries from new toys,
such as falling off roller-
blades, trampoline, bicycle,
etc.;
Injuries at home
- splash burns from hot
water on stove during cook-
ing, stepping on charcoal
remnants in yard.
Debora Fulton, Shands
Safe Kids of North Central
Florida coordinator, said
shoppers should make sure
SHANDS continued on 3A


By Francis P. Church this g
(First published in The New York man is
Sun in 1897.) in his
with
We take pleasure in about
answering thus prominently the in
the communication below, grasp
expressing at the same time and k
our great gratification that Yes
its faithful author is num- Santa
bered among the friends of certain
The Sun: erosit
and
Dear Editor: abound
I am 8 years old. Some of life it
my little friends say there is joy. Al
no Santa Claus. Papa says, be thi
"If you see it in The Sun, it's no Sa
so." Please tell me the truth,
is there a- Santa Claus?
Virginia O'Hanlon
Virginia, your little
friends are 'nrong
They have been
affected by the
skepticism of a
skeptical age
They do not
believe except
they see.
They think
that noth-
ing can be
which is not
comprehen-
sible by their
little minds.
All minds,
Virginia,
whether they
be men's or chil-
dren's, are little. In

I AROUND
FLORIDA
Widow of gunman can't
:, / what happened.


reat universe of ours,
s a mere insect, an ant,
intellect as compared
the boundless world
him, as measured by
itelligence capable of
ing the whole of truth
knowledge.
, Virginia, there is a
Claus. He exists as
nly as love and gen-
y and devotion exist,
you know that they
id and give to your
s highest beauty and
las! how dreary would
e world if there were
anta Claus! It would
SANTA continued on 3A


COMING
SATURDAY
Christmas
in Finland.


r


Yes, Virginia, there

is a Santa Claus










LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING FRIDAY, DECEMBER 24, 2010


nH3o 0 Thursday:
Afternoon: 4-2-9
Evening: 5-1-3


a(ay,4 Thursday:
Afternoon: 5-6-2-4
Evening: 0-8-7-0


"vtez-
N Wednesday:
3-4-9-24-25


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



'Spider-Man' resumes performances


Celebrity Birthdays
* Author Mary Higgins Clark Afghai
is 83. is 53.
* Federal health administra- N Actc
tor Anthony S. Fauci is 70. 0 Actc
* Rock singer-musician 0 Actc
Lemmy (Motorhead) is 65. E Act(
* Actor Clarence Gilyard is Sing
55. 0 Auti
* Actress Stephanie Hodge ("Twilii
is 54. M "Am
* The president of Seacr

Daily Scripture


nistan, Hamid Karzai,

or Anil Kapoor is 51.
or Wade Williams is 49.
or Mark Valley is 46.
or Diedrich Bader is 44.
ier Ricky Martin is 39.
hor Stephenie Meyer
ght") is 37.
nerican Idol" host Ryan
est is 36.


NEW YORK
The curtain was to rise
again on "Spider-Man:
Turn Off the Dark" after
producers of the accident-
plagued Broadway musi-
cal agreed to new safety precautions
to prevent another fall such as the'
one that left a stuntman seriously
injured.
Leo Rosales, spokesman for the
state Department of Labor, said the
show's producers would check in
with the department later Thursday
to confirm they had put into place all
the protocols they had promised on
Wednesday. That confirmation was
mandatory before the show could
go forward with all 38 planned aerial
maneuvers, he said.
Wednesday night's performance
of the $65 million musical was can-
celed so that the cast and crew could
rehearse the new precautions, which
include a requirement that a second
person ensure that the harnesses
used by performers during the
show's high-flying stunts have been
put on properly.
The fourth accident came Monday
night, when Christopher W. Tierney,
a stunt double playing Spider-Man,
plunged about 30 feet into a stage
pit, despite a safety harness that
should have prevented the spill.
Tierney was scheduled for back sur-
gery Wednesday, his brother Patrick
said.

FBI releases files on
NPR's Daniel Schorr
WASHINGTON Newly released
FBI files depict the Nixon White
House role in ordering an investiga-
tion into newsman Daniel Schorr,
whose tough reporting got him on
the president's infamous enemies
list.
According to one section among


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Reeve Carney (right), who plays Spider-man in the theatrical version "Spider-man
Turn off the Dark" is seen outside the Foxwoods Theatre in Times Square with
Patrick Page (left) who plays The Green Goblin Wednesday in New York. The cur-
tain went up again Thursday after the producers of the accident-plagued Broadway
musical agreed to new safety precautions to prevent another fall like the one that
left a stuntman seriously injured.


hundreds of pages from Schorr's
FBI file, the Nixon White House
had the bureau conduct a back-
ground investigation in 1971. The
White House said it was considering
Schorr for a presidential appoint-
ment in the environmental area. A
day later, the investigation was .can-
celed by the White House.
The 93-year-old Schorr died in
July after a six-decade career with
CBS and other media. He believed
the White House tried to intimidate
him for his hard-hitting coverage of
the Nixon Administration.

Baldwin sues Costner
over BP centrifuge
NEW ORLEANS Stephen
Baldwin is suing Kevin Costner over


their investments in a device that BP
used to try to clean up the massive
Gulf oil spill.
A federal lawsuit filed Wednesday
in New Orleans by Baldwin and a
friend claimed Costner and a busi-
ness partner duped them out of their
shares of an $18 million deal for BP
to buy oil-separating centrifuges
from a company they formed after
.the April 20 spill.
BP ordered 32 of the centrifuges,
which separate oil from water, and
deployed a few of the devices on a
barge in June.
Costner's publicist, Arnold
Robinson, declined to comment
Thursday on the suit's allegations.
The lawsuit seeks unspecified
damages.

Associated Press


"Today in the town of David a
Savior has been born-to you; he
is the Messiah, the Lord.This
will be a sign to you:You will
find a baby wrapped in cloths
and lying in a manger."

Luke 2:11-14


Lake City
HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........ (386) 752-1293
Fax number...............752-9400
Circulation ...............755-5445
Online... www.lakecltyreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Ra. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson.....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
Assistant Editor CJ Risak. .754-0427
After 1:00 p.m. 0
(cjrisak@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Kathryn Peterson. .754-0417
(kpeterson@lakecityreporter.com)
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440..


Reporter
BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7:30
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
10.30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is,available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation ..............755-5445
(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks.................. $26.32
24 Weeks........... ..... $48.79
52 Weeks..................$83.46
Rates indude 7% sales tax.
Mail rates
12Weeks................ $41.40
24 Weeks...................$82.80
52 Weeks..................$179.40


CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run
in this space. And thanks for reading.


AROUND FLORIDA


Widow can't say d y
what happened |
7 1;


PANAMA CITY The
widow of the man who held
a Florida school board at
gunpoint and fired shots
before killing himself said
she still doesn't know why
it happened.
Rebecca Duke told CBS'
"The Early Show" in an
interview shown Thursday
that she'll spend the rest
of her life wondering what
made her husband, Clay
Duke, interrupt a school
board meeting in Panama
City, paint a red "V" on a
wall and start shooting. No
one else was hurt.
Rebecca Duke had lost
her job in the school dis-
trict and her unemploy-
ment benefits were run-
ning out, but it wasn't clear
if that was what prompted
the incident
In the interview, she
remembered her husband
as gentle and compassionate
with a good sense of humor.
She had told The Associated
Press earlier that he was a
gentle giant who always
wanted to protect her.
Rebecca Duke also said
she felt for the people at
the school board meeting
and for Mike Jones, -the
security guard who shot
and wounded Clay Duke
before Duke turned the
gun on himself.
Meanwhile, school board
members have tried to turn
the incident into some-
thing good. School board
member Ginger Littleton
auctioned the purse she
used in an unsuccessful
attempt to disarm Duke by
sneaking up behind him
and whacking his arm. The
money will go to a char-
ity Jones founded to help
needy kids.
The brown Brahmin
handbag sold for $13,100
on eBay late Wednesday.
The buyer, who lives in
Alexandria, Va., asked to
remain anonymous.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this image taken from video released by WJHG-TV on
Dec. 15, Ginger Littleton (right) sneaks up behind Clay Duke
before hitting him with her purse, while he holds Bay City
school board members hostage in Panama City. The purse
that Littleton. used in the incident has sold for more than


$13,000 in an online auction.

Man charged
with child porn

PEMBROKE PINES
- A speech pathologist
has been charged with 50
counts of possessing child
pornography.
Authorities said 66-
year-old Warren Day
was viewing porn on his
computer when Broward
Sheriff's deputies arrived
at his home to arrest him
Wednesday.
The National Center
for Missing and Exploited
Children alerted the sher-
iffs office about a computer
user who was uploading and
sharing child pornography.
Investigators said an ini-
tial check found hundreds
of images on Day's comput-
er and that more charges
may be filed.
Day has worked as a
speech pathologist at a
rehabilitation facility for
several months. He was
previously employed by the
Miami-Dade County pub-
lic school system where
officials believe he had
contact with children from
kindergarten through high
school.


Abduction attempt
made on cop's wife

TAMPA Authorities
said a man tried to abduct
the wife of a Tampa
Police officer after she
walked out of a depart-
ment store.
The woman, who wasn't
injured and whose name
wasn't released, had just
left a Bealls Department
store in Tampa when a man
approached Wednesday
night.
According to the
Hillsborough Sheriff's
Office, the woman thought
someone was playing a
joke when she felt some-
thing placed on her back
and heard someone say-
ing, "Don't scream and
you won't get hurt."
Thinking she knew
the person, the woman
quickly turned around
and realized she didn't
know the man behind
her. She screamed and
the suspect tried to grab
her arm. She swung her
arms and the suspect
fled the scene.


MOSTLY
SUNNY


HI 52 LO 26


RE I A #f*C S MAP for Frida, eemeI......... -l,"I-l-~l",,,


City
* Jacksonvie Cape Canaveral
\57/37 Daytona Beach
Ft. Lauderdale
Daytna Beach Fort Myers
63J43 Gainesville
S \ Jacksonville
,* Key West
Odrando Capo Canaveral Key Wesit
67/44 65/47 Lake City
,1 Miami


'. FL Lauderdale Panama City
FL Myes 71/58 Pensacola
72/53 0 Naples Tallahassee
"71/50 Miami "Tampa
KeyWe 71/57 Valdosta
Key West, W. Palm Beach
S70/61b


AECIYALMANAC


TEMPERATURES
High Thursday
Low Thursday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Thursday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


MOON
Moonrise today 9:27 p.m.
Moonset today 9:55 a.m.
Moonrise tom. 10:32 p.m.
Moonset tom. 10:33 a.m.


Dec. Jan. Jan. Jan.
27 4 12 19
Last New First Full


7p On this date in
Friday 7p turday 1872, extreme
cold gripped the
SUpper Midwest on
Christmas Eve.
Downtown Chicago
Reported an all-time
record low of 23
degrees below zero,
which stood until
January 1982.


THE WEATHER


SUNNY



HI 60 LD 35


.;S SUNNY



HI 53 28
153 L028


Pensacola
59/33


Tallahassee *
57/37
5Pa/ma Cit
55/44


, VaMsta
56/36
Lake City,
60/35
Gainesville .
,61/37
Ocala
,6f3/38

Tamna*
69/52.


West Pahnlm Beach
rQ/9o *0


Naples
Ocala
nriandn.


Saturday
71/53/sh
71/45/pc
74/62/pc
75/56/pc
68/45/pc
68/45/sh
68/61/pc
66/41/pc
74/62/pc
72/59/pc
71/46/pc
71/50/pc
58/35/sh
49/29/s
57/35/sh
70/53/pc
58/36/sh
73/60/pc


Sunday
61/40/pc
59/35/pc
69/42/sh
67/42/pc
54/29/pc
52/30/pc
68/60 sh
52/26/pc
69/43/sh
63/40/pc
56/29/pc
61/37/pc
48/29/pc
51/29/s
48/24/pc
61/40/pc
47/25/pc
67/35/sh


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise tom.
Sunset tornm.


7:24 a.m.
5:36 p.m.
7:24 a.m.
5:37 p.m.


59
45.
67
43
83 in 1931
22 in 1989

0.00"
0.17"
39.15"
1.81"
47.61"


4

45 abestbblum
Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+.


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.


weatherncom


U-


S x- Forecasts, data and graph-
SIcs 2010 Weather Central
-' LLC, Madison, WIs.
S www.weatherpubllsher.com




Get Connelth


1 bald


N Associated Press


S- a Fmcn tatm m


"Felsbel tewMinb


MWAW-MM.O


[2 7 HNUS


SiEB


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


rmh"


.











Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & NATION FRIDAY, DECEMBER 24, 2010


Soup kitchen sprinkles meals with fellowship


By GABRIELLE BELLAMY
Special to the Reporter

For many people, food and
fellowship are what make the
Christmas season special.
Lad's Soup Kitchen, a service
of the Suwannee Valley Rescue
Mission, will serve up a dose of


both during its annual Christmas
lunch 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday.
The soup kitchen prepares
meals everyday, but has its big-
gest meal on Christmas, said
Timothy Denson, cook for Lad's
Soup Kitchen.
More than 400 people are
expected to attend the meal.


"That's triple the amount of an
average day," he said.
Denson is the only cook at
the kitchen, but other volunteers
are cooking food to bring in.
Volunteers will also help serve
the meal.
"So many people have called
saying they're coming to volun-


teer," he said.
The menu for the meal includes
turkey, ham, green beans, canned
yams, tea and much more, Denson
said. The meal is similar to the
one the soup kitchen served on
Thanksgiving, but with more food
Meals will also be delived to
people unable to make it to the


soup kitchen.
Lad's Soup Kitchen is located at
127 NW Escambia St
"We cook more because it's
the holidays and more people are
going to come," he said. "It's not
only for homeless people, ifs for
everyone, which includes those
who don't feel like cooking."


Christmas Eve shoppers may lead to spending.record


By ELLEN GIBSON
and ANNE D'INNOCENZIO
Associated Press
NEW YORK
It's Black Friday, The
Sequel. Stores are rolling
out deals and expect to be
swimming in shoppers on
Christmas Eve as strag-
glers take advantage of a day off
work. For retailers, the last-min-
ute rush caps the best year since
2007, and possibly ever.
With Christmas falling on a
Saturday this year, Friday is a holi-
day for most U.S. workers. That
lets shoppers hit the stores first
thing in the morning.
"I'm calling it Fantastic Friday,
because I really do think it's going
to be one of the busiest days of
the year," said Marshal Cohen,
chief fashion industry analyst with
researcher NPD Group.
A strong Christmas Eve would
round out a surprisingly success-
ful holiday season for retailers.
The National Retail Federation
predicts that holiday spending will
reach $451.5 billion this year, up
3.3 percent over last year. That
would be the biggest year-over-
year increase since 2006, and the
largest total since spending hit a
record $452.8 billion in 2007. A -
strong finish could even give 2010
the crown.
While both are heavy shopping
days, Christmas Eve draws a dif-
ferent breed of buyer than Black
Friday, the day after Thanksgiving
and the unofficial start to the holi-
day shopping season.
"Those who get up and brave
the cold on Black Friday are
usually looking for hot items,
not only to buy gifts but to score
something for themselves," said


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Shoppers are photographed on 34th Street, in New York Thursday. Call it Black Friday, Part II. Stores are rolling
out the deals and expect to be swimming in shoppers on Christmas Eve as shopping stragglers take advantage
of a day off work. For retailers, the last-minute rush caps a 'back-to-normal' holiday season.


Kathy Grannis, a spokeswoman
for the National Retail Federation.
"They're planners, and they map
out what they want to buy."
Shoppers who come out on
Christmas Eve, on the other hand,
were either waiting for the biggest
discounts or they didn't have the
money to spend earlier, she said.
Or they just tend to dilly-dally.
While many Black Friday shop-
pers relish the hunt, last-minute
buyers are harried and focused on
getting things done.


And true to stereotype, they
are mostly men, said Dan Jasper,
spokesman for Mall of America in
Bloomington, Minn.
Accordingly, stores push men's
and women's sweaters in their cir- .
culars, while shoes and children's
apparel take a back seat Jewelry
also tends to be a top last-minute
gift item, though that category
has been strong throughout the
season.
E-commerce has driven much
of the holiday's spending growth.


For the season to-date, $28.36 bil-
lion has been spent online, a 12
increase over last year, according
to research firm comScore. Online
shoppers spent $900 million last
weekend alone.
Many people who postponed
their shopping this year blame
busy schedules. The number of
hours U.S. workers are putting in
at the office each week has been
on the upswing since the official
end of the recession in June 2009,
according to data from the Bureau


of Labor Statistics. That leaves
less time for shopping during the
week.
Vivian Lowe, 34, works for
an ad agency in Atlanta and
didn't start her shopping until
Wednesday. "It just caught up with
me this year," she said.
She spent Thursday at the
Lenox Square Mall in Atlanta and
plans to hit Target on Christmas
Eve because she sees it as a one-
stop shop.
Procrastinators like Lowe
shouldn't hit too many snags.
Store inventories are not as
depleted as last year, when mer-
chants scared about having too
many leftovers saw some empty
shelves near the end of the sea-
son. But shoppers are not seeing
the 75-percent-off-everything fire
sales that characterized the 2008
holiday.
Still, many stores are offering
discounts this week. Express's
store at the Manhattan Mall in
midtown had a huge yellow sign
in its storefront window promot-
ing an "end of the season 50 per-
cent sale" on selected items.
Macy's is offering 30 percent
off some bags and jewelry, while
the Gap is applying that mark-
down to everything irthe store.
At CVS, there are buy-two-get-one
free deals on bath-and-body gift
sets and discounts on a 7-inch
LCD TV and DVD player combo.
Ron and Lisa Johnson of
Indianapolis came to Circle Center
Mall Thursday morning just to
buy boots for their 20-year-old
daughter, Kaitlyn Shirar. Nearly
four hours later, they sat on a
bench with a pile of bags from
Nine West, H&M and Forever 21.
'We haven't found anything that
wasn't on sale," Lisa said.


SANTA: 'There would be no childlike faith then, no poetry, no romance...'


Continued From Page 1A
be as dreary as if there were
no Virginias. There would be no
childlike faith then, no poetry,
no romance to make tolerable
this existence. We should have
no enjoyment, except in sense
and sight The eternal light with
which childhood fills the world
would be extinguished.
Not believe in Santa Claus!


You might as well not believe
in fairies. You might get your
papa to hire men to watch in
all the chimneys on Christmas
eve to catch Santa Claus, but
even if you did not see Santa
Claus coming down, what would
that prove? Nobody sees Santa
Claus, but that is no sign that
there is no Santa Claus. The


most real things in the world are
those that neither children nor
men can see. Did you ever see
fairies. dancing on the lawn? Of
course not, but that's no proof
that they are not there. Nobody
can conceive or imagine all the
wonders there are unseen and
unseeable in the world.
You tear apart the baby's


rattle and see what makes the
noise inside, but there is a veil
covering the unseen world
which not the strongest man,
nor even the united strength
of all the strongest men that
ever lived could tear apart. Only
faith, poetry, love, romance, can
push aside that curtain and view
and picture the supernal beauty


and glory beyond. Is it all real?
Ah, Virginia, in all this world
there is nothing else real and
abiding.
No Santa Claus! Thank God!
he lives and lives forever. A thou-
sand years from now, Virginia,
nay 10 times 10,000 years from
now, he will continue to make
glad the heart of childhood.


SHANDS: Parents should buy age-appropriate toys, hospital officials warn


Continued From Page 1A
they are buying age-appro-
priate toys and, following
important toy-safety guide-
lines.
Shands Safe Kids of
North Central Florida
reminds parents that most
toys are safe, especially 'if
bought from a reputable
retailer.
'"That doesn't mean you
have to go to a 'big box'
store" Fulton said in a pre-


pared statement. "But if
you shop at a locally-owned
toy store, make sure that
the owner is aware and vig-
ilant about getting recalled
items off the shelves."
Shands Safe Kids of
North Central Florida top
five tips for making sure
children's toys are safe
during this holiday season
include:
Before shopping for


toys, consider the child's
age, interest and skill level.
A fun, but inappropriate toy
for a particular child can be
dangerous;
Make sure toys intend-
ed for older children are
stored separately from
those for younger chil-
dren;
Keep toys with small
parts away from children
under age 3. They can


choke on small toys and
toy parts;
Check regularly for
damage that could create
small pieces, which are
choking hazards. Make any
necessary repairs immedi-
ately, or discard damaged


toys;
Actively supervise chil-
dren when they are play-
ing with riding toys as well
as any toy that has small
balls and small parts, mag-
nets, electrical or battery
power, cords and strings


or any potential hazard.
Simply being in the same
room as your child is not
necessarily supervising.
Active supervision means
keeping the child in sight
and in reach while paying
undivided attention.


KETTLE: Community shows support


Continued From Page 1A

seemed to be higher than
the past year.
"I actually thought they
gave more," he said. '"They
feel people needed more
in this type of economy
so they're more generous
with their giving."
Jones agreed.
"I just think we have a
giving county," he said.
"I think the people in
Columbia County realize
there's a lot of people suf-



TRUE GRIT (PG-13) *(
(1230 PM) 440 PM 750 PN
LITTLE FOCKERS (PG-13) *(1205 230) 500 741
HOW DO YOU KNOW (PG-13)
(1240 PM) 420 PM 730 Ph
YOGI BEAR (PG) (1210 220) 430 721
TRON: LEGACY IN REALD 3D EVENT
PRICING (PG) (1250 PM) 350 PM 700 Ph
CHRONICLES NARNIA: VOYAGE IN REALD 3X
-EVENT PRICE (PG) (1200 235) 510 74!


fearing at this point in time,
and I just feel like the giv-
ing spirit is still there and
people want to help during
the holiday season."
The bell-ringing project
raised more than $27,000
last year, Watson said. He
hopes to meet that amount
again or exceed it, he said.
Funds raised will be


spent on local people in
need, helping them to
pay for prescriptions, utili-
ties and sometimes rent,
Watson said.
Volunteers from the civic
groups are essential to the
bell-ringing, he,said.
'Without them, we
couldn't really do what we
do," Watson said.


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & NATION FRIDAY, DECEMBER 24, 2010













OPINION


Friday, December 24, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


OTHER
OPINION


Wondering

if Obama

should be

re-elected?

f you step back and look
at it dispassionately,
perhaps you won't be
surprised that President
Barack Obama has fallen
rather "low" in the popularity
polls.
It is perhaps more appropri-
ate to wonder how and why he
managed to get elected president
of the United States in the first
place.
We have to admit that we have
had some unusual, surprising,
pitiful and some gigantic
- presidents in our history.
We obviously do not have a
sterling record of excellence in
electing our presidents.
What it takes to be a serious
presidential candidate and what it
takes to get elected are wonders.
And then what it takes actually to
serve under the conditions that
arise, with support and opposi-
tion, is something else.
The government of our nation
has such an impact upon our
economy, welfare, personalities,
war, peace, aVd the world. It is
a wonder that anyone can really
function effectively as president
in this controversial age.
Many wonder how in the
world "we, the people," chose
President Obama. Now, many
are wondering whether we will
re-elect him in 2012.
If not a second term for
President Obama, who?
Several names may come to
mind. But do you see one of
them as a giant of character,
intellect, judgment and ability?
Who can win and deserve
to win? What giant prospect with
tremendous ability will emerge
and gain our confidence to be
elected in 2012?
Or will just "somebody else"
do?
What do you like about the
leadership that President Obama
has provided? What about our
economics? What do you wish he
would do now or avoid?
We have had some really great
presidents. And we have had
some others.
Well, it's nearly 2011. The
campaign surely will start next
year. Whom do you want to
elect president in 2012?
* Chattanooga Times Free Press

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!'
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman


LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:


news@lakecityreporter.com


A lesson in disappointment


Slot of high school
seniors can expect to
get a lump of coal in
their Christmas
stockings if they
already haven't been treated
to an early dose of disappoint-
ment. These are the brightest
of the bright kids seeking early
admission to the college they
have coveted through four long
years of high school only to get
a rejection notice.
The chances are slim to
none they will ever really
know what went into the
decision that spoiled their
holiday. It is enough to
understand that the selection
system is notoriously capri-
cious and frequently dishon-
est dedicated less to excel-
lence than the building of
endowments and the curry-
ing of favor with the influen-
tial. Doing everything right
in and out of the secondary
school classroom frequently
plays an insignificant role.
And it isn't always the
"elite" private institutions
that are playing this game.
Thanks to a major Midwest
newspaper it was discovered
recently that the admissions
office of a highly regarded
state university had color-
coded applications folders
to designate those who were
politically advantages, likely
to contribute generously,
legacies etc.
It is often a wretched pro-
cess that regards young men
and women as only a means
to further a dubious agenda
- one that in many cases
rewards those who are aca-
demically undeserving. The
schools of the Ivy League
have built enormous amounts
of cash on this system.
Haven't you heard of the
gazillionaire's son who was
so dumb that only Harvard
and Yale would accept him?


LETTER


Dan K.Thomasson
Perhaps the best exam-
ple of this disingenuous
approach can be heard in a
conversation a mother told
me she had with her daugh-
ter who had applied for early
admission to Yale. She was
from a Fairfax County, Va.,
public high school noted for
its excellence and had been
summarily rejected no
waiting list, no encourage-
ment to apply later.
"I'm glad you tried," the
mother said. "But we both
knew that your chances were
not good because there were
considerations outside your
control. You did all you could
do."
The mother recited a ster-
ling record of academic and
extracurricular achievement.
Her daughter has a 4.39
average, superb test scores,
2,300 on her SATs and 35
of 36 on her ACTs. From K
through 12 she never had a
B and the grading system in
Fairfax County is among the
nation's toughest with only
a 5-point window for an A
- not the 10 points of most
schools. She plays in two
bands marching and con-
cert and was selected for
a prestigious congressional
internship. She also belongs
to a community service orga-
nization, plays basketball and
swims, and has a boyfriend.
She is personally very attrac-
tive and appealing and inter-
views well, her mother said.
She said her daughter had
taken it in stride, but with


obvious disappointment. She
just wasn't the daughter or
granddaughter of someone
who had gone to Yale where
that often is most important.
A large number of admis-
sions come from that source.
"Look at George W. Bush,"
she said to me. "Do you
think his prep school grades
were near as good as hers?
I of course don't know but I
would wager a year's income
they weren't."
Her mother also noted that
she had not gone to one of
the Ivy preps that aren't a bit
better than the public school
she attended but have that
reputation and connections
nevertheless.
If one needs further
proof, I was explaining at
lunch to a "Yaley" of my vin-
tage that somehow it seems
incongruous for the Ivies to
claim such status in under-
graduate education when
they turn down such incred-
ible achievements for appli-
cants with far less on their
resumes.
"It is a problem," he
replied honestly. "I didn't
have anywhere near a four
point average but I had both
a father and grandfather
on my application. I readily
admit it. So did a large num-
ber of my classmates."
The moral of this tale is
simple. Rejection can be
a good early lesson in the
unfairness that life often
brings no matter how well
one has performed.
The tragedy comes when
our children follow our
accepted prescriptions for
success only to be told in the
end that it doesn't matter.
Merry Christmas.

* Dan K. Thomasson is former
editor of Scripps Howard News
Service.


TO THE EDITOR


Sickened by foolish decisions


The state of our Nation
is still in dire straits
as our newly elected
officials try to pull in
the reigns of some
of the ridiculous management of
previous officials. I am sickened
by the misjudgment and foolish
decisions that have been made by
people who were supposed to be
sworn to run our government with
integrity and intellect
I read in a Fox News report
that there is a last-minute, $1.27
trillion spending bill that the
Senate is trying to pass before
Christmas. The problem is that it
is 2,000 pages long and is loaded
with incorrigible earmarks such
as $247,000 for virus-free wine
grapes in Washington State,
$413,000 for peanut research in
Alabama, $235,000 for noxious
weed management in Nevada and
$400,000 for solar parking cano-


pies and plug-in electric stations
in Kansas. Are we electing igno-
rant people who are really good
at telling us what we want to hear
and then validate their idiotic
decisions by lying to themselves
and saying it is for the people?
We have nursing homes across
our country that are shutting
their doors because there is no
funding to keep them operational.
Our education systems are failing
because there is not enough fund-
ing. Our children are not being
properly protected because there
is not enough funding. Our fire-
fighters stand on the street sides
once a year to raise money for
their departments because there
isn't enough funding.
How can people we trusted
to run our country say we can
spend hundreds of thousands
of dollars on grapes, weeds,
peanuts, and solar parking when


what we really need is funding to
take care of our loved ones and
our civil servants?
I pay taxes on everything and
I expect my money to be well
spent That means I expect my
children to get the best possible
education they can; my elders to
be taken care of when it is time
for us to take care of them and
our military personnel, as well
as our civil servants, to be paid
decent wages for what they sac-
rifice. Now is not the time to sit
back and see what happens, we
must continue to stand up and
demand an honorable govern-
ment A government where integ-
rity and common sense is upheld
over all selfish gains.
Get it right senators and repre-
sentatives or get out

Stephanie Polhamus
Lake City


Dale McFeatters
mcfeattersd@shns.com


How not

to run an

airport


ondon's Heathrow
is an object lesson
in how not to run an
airport and Europe's
vaunted high-speed
rail system isn't looking so hot
either.
It snowed in Britain last
weekend. In a northern
European country the same
latitude as Labrador, who
knew?
The snowfall that.shut
down Heathrow was five
inches.
We here in Washington,
D.C., yield to no one in our
panic and timidity when it
comes to snow, but even we
can handle five inches not
well, mind you, but still
handle it. ,,
Heathrow is the world's
-busiest airport so you would
think they've had some
experience in handling these
matters. Apparently not.
The planes were packed
so tightly around the termi-
nals that the plows couldn't
do their work, we were told.
OK, fair enough. But that
doesn't explain why the two
main runways were shut
down.
An airport runway should
be pretty easy work for any .
reasonably competent snow-
plow operator. They're flat
and free of the usual winter
obstructions, like over-
turned tractor-trailers. And,
remember, this is five inches
of snow we're talking about.
Swedish airport authori-
ties helpfully told The
Associated Press that they
can clear their runways in
6 to 10 minutes instead of
the nearly four days it took.
Heathrow. And even then
the Brits were only up to
two-thirds capacity, mean-
ing that, given Heathrow's
volume, a million or so pas-
sengers were left to wander
around the terminal.
We on this side of the
pond weren't the only ones.
puzzled.
Amanda Brown told the
Christian Science Monitor,
"No one in Britain can
understand how a smattering
of snow could bring us all to
such a screeching halt right
before Christmas."
The British press had
its own explanation: BAA,
the company that operates
Heathrow, was too cheap
to invest in plows and ade-
quate stocks of deicer.
Last year it spent
$650,000 on snow removal
equipment, a fraction of
what rival and function-
ing Gatwick airport
spent.
BAA's CEO, Colin
Matthews, who apparently
attended the same business
school as former BP CEO
Tony "I Want My Life Back"
Hayward, had his own
explanation for the jammed
terminals: "The trouble is
that airlines and passengers
had unreal expectations of
airlines and departures."
Those wacky Brits. Imagine
expecting a timetable to
mean something.
Matthews said he will
not accept his bonus this
year. His salary and bonus
last year was $1.46 mil-
lion, more than twice what
the company spent to be
unprepared for five inches
of snow.
Dale McFeatters is editorial
writer for Scripps Howard News
Service.


4A











Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL FRIDAY, DECEMBER 24, 2010


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


* To submit your Community
Calendar item, contact Antonia
Robinson at 754-0425 or by
e-mail at arobinson@
lakecityreporter. com.


Today
Friday
The LifeSouth Blood
Mobile is seeking
donors 7 a.m. to 2 p.m.
today at Lake City Mall.
Each donor will receive
LifeSouth's free gift wrap-
ping services and could
possibly win a new Apple
iPad.

Christmas pageant
A Christmas pageant
led by the Praise Team
and Joy Singers is 7 p.m.
today at First Presbyterian
Church. A Christmas Eve
Service of Lessons and
Carols led by the Chancel
Choir and the Chancel Bell
Ringers is 10 p.m.

Spirit of Christ service
A Christmas Eve service
with Eucharist is 5 p.m.
today at Spirit of Christ
Lutheran Church. Light
refreshments will follow
at 6 p.m. Contact 386-752-
3807.

Christmas Eve
Candlelight Service
Faith-in-Christ Anglican
Church is holding a
candlelight service at 11
p.m. today. The service
ends at midnight with the
Holy Eucharist Call Fr.
Don Wilson at 754-2827 or
208-9882. The church is
located 5 miles .east of the
B&B and 6.5 miles West of
1-75, next to Star Tech on
Hwy. 90.

Saturday
Christmas Dinner
LAD Soup Kitchen cel-
ebrates it's fifth annual
Christmas day dinner from
10 a.m. 2 p.m. Saturday
at 127 NE Escambia St.
The menu includes ham,
turkey, green beans,
rice pilaf, yams, rolls
and assorted desserts.
Donations are accepted
and appreciated, but the
meal is free of charge. For
more information, contact
Timothy at 386-758-2217.

Wednesday
Live Performance
Fred Perry performs
live from 11 -11:45 a.m.
Wednesday in the Dining


Hall of the LifeStyle
Enrichment Center. A
game of bingo will follow
at 1 p.m. The center is
located at 628 SE Allison
Court For more informa-
tion call 386-755-0235.

Friday, Dec. 31
New Year's Bash
The LifeStyle
Enrichment Center pres-
ents "Rocking The House"
beginning at 7 p.m. Dec.
31. Heavy hors d'oeuvres
will be served all night,
and professional comedi-
ans Jamie Morgan, Chase
Holliday and Lisa Best
will entertain from 8 10
p.m. Tickets are $50 per
person, and the event is at
628 SE Allison Court. For
ticket information, con-
tact Janet at 386-755-0235
extension 124.

NYE Celebration
The Third Annual
Rotary Club of Lake City
New Year's Celebration
is 8 p.m. Dec. 31 at the
County Club at Lake
City. Tickets are $100 per
couple and available at
The County Club of Lake
City, Candler Appraisal
Services, Parks Johnson
Agency, Olympic Health
Chiropractic and the Lake
City Reporter. Attire is
black tie optional.

Joint worship service
Shiloh Missionary
Baptist Church and
Philadelphia Missionary
Baptist Church are wor-
shipping, fellowshipping
and praising the New
Year in 10 p.m. Dec. 31 at
Shiloh Missionary Baptist
Church. The church is
located at 948 Aberdeen
Ave.

NYE service
"Friday Night Live"
New Years Eve Service is
9 p.m. Dec. 31 at Miracle
Tabernacle Church. The
church is located at 1190
SW Sister's Welcome
Road. Call 386-758-8452
For transportation call
Mitch at 386-292-5850 or
Audre' 386-344-9915.

Watch Night Service
The DaySpring
Missionary Baptist Church,
meets at 9:30 p.m. Dec. 31


TODD WILSON/Lake City Reporter

Rotary donation for Elks Club Toy Drive
Lake City Rotary Club members Tom Brown (left), Interact student Andrew Johnson, and
George Brannon collect toys donated by the club for the annual Elks Club Toy Drive that
concludes tonight. Lake City Rotarians filled an SUV with donated toys to help the club help
children in need.


for a watch night service.
Therd will be singing, pray-
ing, testimonies and the
word of God delivered by
Pastor Aaron T Lewis Sr.
The church is located at 849
NE Congress Avenue. For
more information call Elvira
at 386-365-2911.

New Year's Service
St Paul Missionary
Baptist Church meets at
8 p.m. Dec. 31 for a watch
night service. Make plans to
come and visit the church
located at 222 Oosterhoudt
Lane. For more information
call 386-758-8486.

Watch Night Service
The Long Branch
Congregational Methodist
Church hosts a watch
night service starting at
8 p.m. Dec. 31 on County
Road 135. The Rushing
Winds from Jacksonville
will be the guest singers,
and there will also be local
singing. Refreshments will
be served and everyone is
invited. For more informa-
tion call 386-397-2673.

Midnight Watch service
Ist Haitian Baptist


Church is having midnight
watch service 9 p.m. to 12
a.m. Dec. 31. The church'
is located at 189 NW Cali
Drive. The community is
invited to attend the annu-
al event. Refreshments will
be served after service.

EVERY DAY
Mall Walkers
Rain or shine, the Lake
City Mall is open at 7 a.m.
Monday Saturday and 10
a.m. Sunday for those who
want to walk for exercise.

EVERY MONDAY
Civil Air Patrol
Suwannee Valley
Composite Squadron -
Civil Air Patrol meets 6:30
to 9 p.m. Monday. For
more information, please
call Maj. Grant Mleadows,
365-1341.

EVERY THIRD
MONDAY
MS support group
An MS support group
meets every third Monday
of the month, at the Lake


City Columbia County
Historical Museum, 157
SE Hernando Ave. Call
Karen Cross at (386) 755-
2950 or Jane Joubert at
(386) 755-5099 for more
information.

EVERY FIRST,
THIRD MONDAY
Weight loss support
group meets
The Thinner Me Weight
Loss Surgery Support
Group holds meetings at 7
p.m. on the first and third
Monday of every month in
the classrooms at Lake City
Medical Center. Meetings
are for people that have
had weight loss surgery,
contemplating surgery or
just trying to lose weight on
their own. E-mail thethin-
nerme@gmail.comn or call
(386) 288-9153 and leave a
message.

EVERY FOURTH
MONDAY
Social Duplicate Bridge
Club meeting
The Social Duplicate
Bridge Club meets from


1 to 5 p.m. every fourth
Monday at the LifeStyle
Enrichment Center, 628 SE
Allison Ct Call 755-0235.

EVERY TUESDAY
AND THURSDAY

Geri Actors
The Geri Actors at the
LifeStyle Enrichment
Center are looking for
members. Meetings are
12:45-2 p.m. Tuesday and
Thursday. Anyone retired
and interested in becoming
an actor or actress is invit-
ed. Call Frank at 752-8861.


EVERY TUESDAY

Domestic violence
support group
A support group for
survivors of domestic vio-
lence meets at 5:30 p.m.
Tuesday. Child care is pro-
vided. Call Another Way at
(386) 719-2700.

UF Master Gardeners
are available
The University of Florida
Master Gardeners are
at the Columbia County
Extension Office from 9
a.m. to noon Tuesday. They
answer gardening questions
and conduct soil pH tests
free of charge. Call (386)
752-5384, or stop at the
UF/IFAS Extension Office
at the Columbia County
fairgrounds for more infor-
mation.

Lake City Lions to meet
The Lake City Lions
meet at 7 p.m. Tuesday, at
the Guangdong restaurant,
in the Lake City Mall. Call
Truett George at (386)
497-2050 or Marshall
Barnard at (386) 497-3536
for more information.

Square Dancing
The Dixie Dancers
weekly dance is held at
6:30 p.m. every Tuesday *
at Teen Town Community
. Center. The group does
square and round dancing.
Couples 12 and older are
welcome. Call (386)497-
2834.


OBITUARIES


Milton Duane Howell
Mr. Milton Duane Howell, 84,
died on Wednesday, December
22, 2010 at North Florida Re-
gional Medical
Center. He was
born in Grant,
Florida to the
late Ervin & "
Mary R. Howell.
In his free time he lived to hunt,
was a skilled craftsman in wood-
working but most importantly he
was a loving husband, father, and
grandfather that enjoyed spend-
ing time with his family and
church family. He served faith-
fully in the United States Marine
Corps. As a "China Marine" dur-
ing World War II. He lived most
of his life in Pompano Beach,
Florida before moving to Lake
City in 1990. He was a mem-
ber of Parkview Baptist Church
who will be missed. He was
preceded in death by his broth-
ers, Lowell & Gene Howell.
Survivors include his wife of 61
years, Esther Howell of Lake
City, FL; sons, Mark Duane
(Jayne) Howell of Clewiston, FL
and John Randall (Jenna) How-
ell of Okeechobee, FL; daugh-
ters, Becky (John) Michael of
Warner-Robins, GA and Kath-
erine (Dean) Clement of Lake
City, FL; 9 grandchildren & 4
great grandchildren also survive.
Funeral services for Milton D.
Howell will be conducted on
Monday, December 27, 2010,
at 11:00 a.m. in the chapel of
GATEWAY-FOREST LAWN
FUNERAL HOME, 3596 U.S.
Hwy 441 S., Lake City, FL
32025 (386) 752-1954 with
Pastor Mike Tatum officiating.
Visitation with the family will
be held Sunday: December 26,
2010 from 2:00 p.m. 4:00
p.m. at the funeral home. In
lieu of flowers the family asks
that donations be made in Mr.
Howells honor to Parkview
Baptist Church, 268 NW Lake


Jeffery Rd. Lake City, FL 32055.
Please sign our guest book at
www.gatewayforestlawn. corn

Annie Euree Redish
Annie Euree Redish, 83, a
resident of Lake City, Fl died,
peacefully, at her earthly home
on December 22, 2010. A native
of Clarksville,
TN., born Oc-
tober 25th,
1927 to the late
Herman and
LuElla Street,
Indian Mound,
TN, Stew-
art County.
On October 5, 1946, Ann mar-
ried Edgar Redish in Hop-
kinsville, Ky., moving to Lake
City in 1953. Ann and Edgar
celebrated their 64th wed-
ding anniversary in 2010.
Ann was a born again Chris-
tian, loving her Lord, fam-
ily and friends. She has been a
devoted member of Southside
Baptist Church since 1953. She
loved collecting angels, and
was the photographer for her
family, and friends, until her
eyesight failed her. She was
preceded in death by her only
son, Eddie Tim Redish in 1988.
Survivors include her loving
husband and caregiver for many


IHang(n
a minute 2-

Our customers receive
a Complimentary
copy of the
Lake City Reporter
when they drop off&
pickup their cleaning


years, Edgar Redish; one daugh-
ter, Peggy Ann Lewis (Frank) of
Lake City; sister, Florence Dar-
nell and brother, Glenn Street of
Clarksville, TN. Grandchildren:
PriscillaAnn Jaime of Lake City;
Todd Redish (Charlene) of Live
Oak; Angie Williamson (Timmy)
of Lake City. Step Grandchil-
dren: Frankie Lewis (Lisa); Alys-
sa Tiller and Eric Lewis. Great
Grandchildren: Chloe Bennett,
Alden Jamie, Tucker William-
son; Skylar and Bryson Zasada.
Step-Great grandchildren: Parker


and Erica Lewis and Zoe Tiller.
Funeral services will be con-
ducted on Tuesday, December
28th, 2010, at 11AM, Southside
Baptist Church, with Dr. Ralph
Rodriguez officiating. Inter-
ment will follow in the Forest.
Lawn Memorial Gardens. The
family will receive friends from
6 to 8 PM on Monday, Decem-
ber 27th, 2010, at GATEWAY
FOREST LAWN FUNERAL
HOME, Lake City, FI In lieu of
flowers, Ann's request was for
expressions of love be shown


by making a donation to the
building Fund, c/o Southside
Baptist Church, 388 SE Baya
Drive, Lake City, Fl. 32025.
Please sign our guestbook @
\


www. gatewayforestlawn. corn
Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


^- --













Call today to place a surprise ad for your child,
grandchild, God child or anyone you think
deserves something extra on their special day!


>Deadline:
t, \ Ads have to be placed by 4pm, 3-days
Prior to appearance in the Lake City Reporter.

Call 755.5440 or 755.5441
between 8am & 4pm


LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL FRIDAY, DECEMBER 24, 2010


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427









Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & NATION FRIDAY, DECEMBER 24, 2010


What's been the

biggest sellers this

holiday season?


By A.C. GONZALEZ
agonzalezr, akecityrepor ter. corn

It's Christmas Eve and the
countdown has begun for last-
minute shoppers. Though the
burden of finding the perfect
gift rests upon the consumer,
several top-selling items nation-
ally that have made the local
list could make that decision-
making easier.
According to ezinearticles.
corn and national sales polls,
several children's toys are
among the top five. In the No.
1 top-sales position comes
the "Friends 4 Ever Bracelet
Making Kit" from Alex Toys,
which according to alextoys.
corn offers "children the ability
to make personalized brace-
lets for themselves and friends,
while giving them a productive
means to craft together their
own gifts."
In second place is the "3-
Channel Remote Control
Indoor Helicopter" from Syma,
catering to the aviation-loving
child or adult on the list.
Coming in position No. 3
is the "LEGO City Advent
Calendar 2824" from LEGO,
giving children the ability to
build a scene with Lego blocks,
and according to shop.lego.
com grants them the means to
"Deck the halls of LEGO City
with buildable holiday novel-
ties."
Fourth place goes to "Spy
Net: Secret Mission Video
Watch" from Jakks Pacific,
a wristwatch with a working
video camera and microphone
that, according to toysrus.com,
"records over 20 minutes of
video, 2,000 photos or four
hours of audio."
And in the fifth and final
national top-sales position is the
"Scrabble Flash Cubes" from
Hasbro Games. According to
hasbro.com, it is "an innova-
tive new way to play the clas-
sic crossword game without


a game board, on electronic
cubed letter tiles."
Though these national best-
sellers are still available, local
stores have seen several differ-
ent hot items during the sea-
son.
Hibbett Sports has sold
several pairs of their Jordan
Retro-11 sneakers, said store
manager Tyler Rockey, adding,
"Hibbett has the most Jordans
for sale, with the biggest selec-
tion in our area, and Christmas
is our biggest sales season for
these shoes."
At the Hallmark store, owned
by Gary Frampton and managed
by his wife Barbara Frampton,
the biggest sellers in the store
were the "Jelly Watches," a
wristwatch with a rubber wrist-
band that can be customized
to the buyers liking, with sev-
eral shades and designs, and
the "DaVinci charms," meant
to fit on Pandora bracelets,
with an affordable price tag.
"We also have some Keepsake
Ornaments left, and some new
Yankee Candles that just came
in for Christmas, in a wide
variety of scents," Barbara
Frampton said.
At Bath & Body Works Sales,
Christine Glenn said the store's
best sellers rotated around
body care products. "For the
men, we have the 'Twilight
Woods' line, and for the women
the 'Secret Wonderland' line
for this season," said Glenn.
'These are the best fragrances
for the holiday season."
Blair Davis, sales associate
at Chastain's Jewelry, said that
the store's top-sellers were
"definitely the 'Pandora' brace-
lets and charms. We have so
many choices for them, and
people are always coming in
and buying them."
The Lake City Mall is located
at 4297 W. U.S. Highway 90.


FACES & PLACES


TODD WILSON/Lake City Reporter

Almost Christmas!

The home of Joe Miller at 235 SW Little
Road, just off County Road 240 east of
Columbia City, shows off thousands of
Christmas lights for onlookers. Children
across Columbia County impatiently
await the arrival of Santa and his sleigh
of goodies tonight.


A.C. GONZALEZ/Lake City Reporter

Just checking
in with Santa
Landon McCray, 8, wants to
be certain Santa knows what
he really wants for Christmas
Thursday at the Lake City Mall.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter

Lights fantastic
Rudolph poses for a photograph for
passing motorists as a frightened .
reindeer shuffles back into the for-'
est at the Suwannee Festival of .:
Lights at the Spirit of the Suwannee
Music Park. The three-mile trail
snakes around the park and fea-
tures various light displays, nativity;
scenes and a Craft Village. Tickets:
range from $2 for children and $8 :
for adults. Today is the last day of '.
the light show.


Introducing MY LINCOLN TOUCH"
Exclusive to the 2011 LINCOLN MKX
Voice and touch technology unlike anything you've ever seen before.
What's even more incredible is that it's standard equipment on the 2011 Lincoln MKX.
2011 Lincoln MKX FWD
49a month$0
for 24 months cash due
4 4 9 Red Carpet Lease' at signing
Security deposit waived.
Excludes tax, title and license fees,
* 24 Month Lease


* 10,500 Miles per year lease


Best-in-class fuel efficiency' Best-in-class horsepower
Standard voice-activialed SYNC") technology Available panoramic Vista Rooft allows breathtaking views


2011 Lincoln MKZ


$29 9 a month
$ 9 for 24 months
Red Carpet Lease'


$ cash due
at signing
Security deposit waived.
Excludes tax, title and license fees
RCL Renewal Required


11/tw, 1 LEFT




2010 Lincoln MKS
MSRP $48,885 Discount $8,896 O financing
3 989 or 60 months
Security deposit waived
3 9 9 8 9 Excludes tax. title and license fees


* More standard features than Lexus ES 350 -Available 41-city-mpg hybrid'
Voice-activiated SYNC technology standard'


- .


2010 Lincoln MKT AWD


MSRP $50,940


Discount $5,945


$44,995
SAvailable EcoBoost" engine technology delivers V8 performance
with V6 fuel economy -Available active park assist makes parallel
parking easy Standard voice-activated SYNC technology'


AND YOU'LL ALSO GET A 4-YEAR/50,OO-MILE MAINTENANCE PLANt
WITH THE PURCHASE OR LEASE OF ANY NEW LINCOLN (INCLUDES: OIL CHANGES/TIRE ROTATIONS/MULTI-POINT INSPECTION)
It's not luxury. It's smarter than that. I
Learn more about the Lincoln vehicles and MyLincoln Touch'"at I LINCO LN. COM


Ask dealer for information on Red Carpet Lease 'EPA eshimaled 19 city/26 hwy/21 comblneld mpg FWD Class is ol.... LuxLu ry M i, ]rm nvers v 201012011 or!ptlhnt D-irn whl voice commands, when it is safe to do so 'EPA- estimated 41 city/36 hwy/39 combined mpg Actual mileage wd-lvw ry S me features ari unvl bllHV wh lllednrvini S rvrith,18 ti ; l DC Sentr iw, r,iffi ind Sirius Travel Link" are trademarks of Sirius SM Radios,
Inc tSee Dealer for details





JAC -,7 7 M


RCL Renewal Required


-At
/ v^HB


aiMgB R ^










Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkrby@lakeatyreporter corn


Friday. December


Lake City Reporter





SPORTS


24.2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


CHEAP SEATS


Tigers look to defend title

in Christmas tournament


Tim Kirby
Phone: (386) 754-0421
tkirby@iakecityreporter.com


Former
signee


surfaces

B because they
are a small
percentage
of all players,
high school
athletes who earn a
college scholarship are
special.
For those who receive
scholarships, some end
up not qualifying, some
transfer and some never
make the trip. With a
new set of prep athletes
coming along each year,
it is hard to keep up with
those in college.
Often we lose track
and it is exciting if one
surfaces.
That happened
recently when Rashaun
Jones called with an
update on his career.
Jones was a great
player for Columbia
High. He was first-team
all-state as a senior in
2003 and honorable
mention his junior year.
As a senior he caught 24
passes for 313 yards d '
five touchdowns, and had
seven interceptions on
defense.
Jones and George
Timmons shared the
Most Versatile Award
and both were signed by
Miami. Miami's golden
days are so far back, it
was known as "The V" at
the time, but this double
signing was impressive.
Jones was called off a
redshirt plan and played
as a freshman. He scored
a touchdown by
recovering a blocked
punt in the end zone. He
played in eight games
as a sophomore, then
went through a period of
injuries and two shoulder
surgeries.
With one year of
eligibility remaining,
Jones went searching.
"I couldn't go to I-AA
with one year left to
play," Jones said. "I had
to go down two divisions
to play."
Jones ended up at
Winston-Salem State
University where he
knew defensive coach
Kienus Boulware.
"He invited me to play.
and I joined the team in
January," Jones said. "I
was going to Grambling,
but I didn't have enough
time."
Jones played corner
and tied for the team
lead in interceptions
with two. Winston-Salem
started out 6-0, but lost
two games by a total of
nine points and finished
8-2. That left the Ranms
one game out of first
place in the Central
Intercollegiate Athletic
Association.
Jones planned to be in
Lake City this week. He
had some good advice for
players at all levels.
"Never give up," Jones
said. "Continue to work
for your goals."
As for his future, "I
plan on entering the
league (NFL) this year."
* Tim Kirby is sports editor
of the Lake City Reporter.


Columbia has
won tourney on
three occasions.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com
Columbia High returns
to defend their title as
the CYSA Christmas
Tournament beginning
Monday. The Tigers will
host the round-robin tour-
ney for the seventh-consec-
utive year and coach Trevor
Tyler looks for good things
from the Tigers.
The event will be split into'
two fields with Columbia,
Cornerstone, Newberry
and Panama City Arnold


high schools making up one
half of the field. Hamilton
County, McClay, St Francis
and Taylor County high
schools will compete in
the other half of the round
robin.
Columbia opens the tour-
nament against Arnold at
8 p.m. on Monday. The
'Tigers will double dip
on Tuesday with an
11 a.m. game against
Newberry High and fol-
low it up with a 3 p.m.
game against Cornerstone
Academy.
The games will not only
present a tournament
atmosphere to the Tigers'
team, but they will also give
Columbia another chance


to get ready for the feel of a
district tournament.
' "We'll be able to play a
bunch of games in a row,
and' when you : do that
it's not always the best
team that wins, it's the
team that's left standing,"
Tyler said. "When you're
tired, it's how bad you want
it."
Tyler also views the tour-
nament as. a way to keep
soccer fresh in the mind
of his team during the
Christmas break.
"It makes it so that they
have to be there," he said.
"They're going to get a
lot of touches on the ball
CHS continued on 2B


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High's Dylan Sessions dribbles the ball down the
field during a game against Fort White earlier this season.


Photos by JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
LEFT: Columbia High's Brach Bessant (left) makes a tackle on Fort White High's Montre Cray during the two team's kickoff classic. Bessant signed to play
football at Troy University.

RIGHT: Fort White High's Levi Hatcher makes a pitch for the Indians' baseball team. Hatcher signed to play with Florida State College at Jacksonville.


Sixteen athletes signed scholarships in 2010


By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com
In addition to life lessons that can be learned
through sports, athletes take advantage of finan-
cial aid from scholarships.
From total free rides to tuition and books, any
college help from the athletic side is welcome.
Columbia High and Fort White High combined
for 16 scholarship signing during 2010.
Columbia had a football bonanza on nation-
al signing day with three athletes going


Division I. Brach Bessant signed with Troy
University, while Tiger Powell and Jamal
Montague signed with South Florida.
South Florida also produced the other D-I
prospect when Columbia's Shelby Widergren
signed a soccer scholarship.
Webber International continued to target
Columbia athletes. The Warriors snapped up
Jabari Thompson and Fontaine Woodbury in
football and Brandon Scott in track and cross
country.
Fort White's Levi Hatcher inked the first


scholarship of the year when he signed in
January to play baseball at Florida State College
at Jacksonville.
Columbia's Cameron Sweat will see Hatcher
during the Mid-Florida Conference baseball
season, as he signed a scholarship with St
Johns River State College.
Columbia's Cody Blackwell signed with
Morton College in Illinois.
Softball provided several opportunities for
SIGNEES continued on 2B


Addazio leaves UF to


I ake over at Temple


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Steve Addazio displays a jersey during a news conference
Thursday at Temple University in Philadelphia. Temple hired
Florida offensive coordinator Addazio to replace Al Golden as
its football coach.


Former Gator
coach introduced
on Thursday.
Associated Press

PHILADEILPHIA -
Steve Addazio spent the last
15 years as a major col-
lege assistant, working at
programs such as Syracuse
and Notre Dame before
spending the last six sea-
sons winning two national


championships with Urban
Meyer at Florida.
Now Addazio is taking
over at Temple, returning to
his roots in the Nor.theast.
"I've waited a long time
to be a head football coach,"
he said. "I've paid my dues
in this business. It's been
my pleasure to serve some
great players and coaches.
I feel they've helped guide
me."
The Connecticut native
and Florida offensive .coor-


dinator was introduced as
Temple's 25th coach at a
news conference Thursday.
"Urban knew my goal
from the beginning has been
to be a head football coach
in the Northeast," said
Addazio, who will remain
with the Gators through
the Outback Bowl on
Jan. 1 against Penn State.
"I'm grateful this opportu-
nity came up."
ADDAZIO continued on 2B


Section B


F









Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


2B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS FRIDAY, DECEMBER 24, 2010


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TV sports
Today
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
8 p.m.
ESPN Hawaii Bowl.Tulsa at Hawaii
GOLF
3 p.m.
TGC Japan Golf Tour, Dunlop
Phoenix, final round, at Miyazaki, Japan
(same-day tape)
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
7 p.m.
ESPN2 Cancun Governor's Cup,
third place game, at Cancun, Mexicb
9 p.m.
ESPN2 Cancun Governor's Cup.
championship game, at Cancun, Mexico

FOOTBALL

NFL standings
AMERICAN CONFERENCE
East
W L TPct PF PA
x-New England 12 2 0.857446 303
N.Y.Jets 10 4 0.714295 259
Miami 7 7 0.500239 261
Buffalo 4 10 0.286273 353
South
W L TPct PF PA
Indianapolis 8 6 0.571 381 342
Jacksonville 8 6 0.57.1 319 365
Tennessee 6 8 0.429 322 282
Houston 5 9 0.357 333 386
North
W L TPct PF PA
x-Pittsburgh 10 4 0.714 307 220
Baltimore 10 4 0.714324 253
Cleveland 5 9 -0.357252 271
Cincinnati 3 11 0.214281 362
West
W L TPct PF PA
Kansas City 9 5 0.643 322 281
San Diego 8 6 0.571 388 260
Oakland 7 7 0.500 353 330
Denver 3 II 0.214292 415
NATIONAL CONFERENCE
East


Philadelphia
N.Y. Giants
Washington
Dallas

x-Atlanta
New Orleans
Tampa Bay
Carolina

y-Chicago
Green Bay
Minnesota
Detroit

St. Louis
Seattle
San Francisco
Arizona


W L
10 4
9 5
5 9
5 9
South
W L
12 2
10 4
8 6
2 12
North
W L
10 4
8 6
5 9
4 10
West
W L
6 8
6 8
5 9
4 10


TPct PF PA
0.714412 339
0.643 360 288
0.357 268 343
0.357354 396
T Pct PF PA
0.857 369 261
0.714354 270
0.571 280 290
0.143 183 350
T Pct PF PA
0.714293 242
0.571 333 220
0.357244 314
0.286 308 329
T Pct PF PA
0.429 258 295
0.429 279 363
0.357250 314
0.286 255 370


y-clinched division
x-clinched playoff spot
Thursday's Game
Carolina at Pittsburgh (n)
Saturday's Game
Dallas at Arizona, 7:30 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Tennessee at Kansas City, I p.m.
San Francisco at St. Louis, I p.m.
N.Y.jets at Chicago, I p.m.
Baltimore at Cleveland, I p.m.
New England at Buffalo, I p.m.
Detroit at Miami, I p.m.
Washington at Jacksonville, I p.m.
Indianapolis at Oakland, 4:05 p.m.
Houston at Denver, 4:05 p.m.
San Diego at Cincinnati, 4:05 p.m.
N.Y. Giants at Green Bay, 4:15 p.m.
Seattle at Tampa Bay, 4:15 p.m.
Minnesota at Philadelphia, 8:20 p.m.
Monday's Game
New Orleans at Atlanta, 8:30 p.m.

College bowl games
Wednesday
MAACO Bowl
Boise State 26, Utah 3
Thursday
Poinsettia Bowl
San Diego State vs. Navy (n)


Hawaii
(ESPN)


Today
Hawaii Bowl
(10-3) vs. Tulsa (9-3), 8 p.m.


Sunday
Little Caesars Pizza Bowl
At Detroit
Toledo (8-4) vs. Florida
International (6-6), 8:30 p.m. (ESPN)
Monday
Independence Bowl
At Shreveport, La.
Georgia Tech (6-6) vs.Air Force (8-4),
5 p.m. (ESPN2)
Tuesday
Champs Sports Bowl
At Orlando
North Carolina State (8-4) vs. West
Virginia (9-3), 6:30 p.m. (ESPN)
Insight Bowl
At Tempe,Ariz.
Missouri (10-2) vs. Iowa (7-5), 10 p.m.
(ESPN)

BASKETBALL

NBA schedule
Today's Games
No games scheduled
Saturday's Games
Chicago at New York, noon
Boston at Orlando, 2:30 p.m.
Miami at LA. Lakers, 5 p.m.
Denver at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m.
Portland at Golden State, 10:30 p.m.

AP Top 25 schedule
Today's Game
No. 15 Baylor vs. TBA at the Stan
Sheriff Center, Honolulu,TBD

HOCKEY

NHL schedule
Today's Games
No games scheduled
Saturday's Games
No games scheduled


Pryor, 4 other Buckeyes


suspended next season


By RUSTY MILLER
Associated Press

COLUMBUS, Ohio
- Ohio State quarterback
Terrelle Pryor and four
other Buckeyes were sus-
pended by the NCAA for
the first five games of next
season for selling champi-
onship rings, jerseys and
awards, and receiving
improper benefits from a
tattoo parlor. All can still
play in the Sugar Bowl
against Arkansas.
Along with Pryor, run-
ning back Daniel Herron,
wide receiver DeVier
Posey, offensive lineman
Mike Adams and defensive
end Solomon Thomas must
sit out and repay between
$1,000 to $2,500 to charity.
Pryor must repay $2,500
for selling his 2008 Big
Ten championship ring,
Fiesta Bowl sportsmanship
award and his 2008 gold
pants, a trinket given to
players who are a part of
a team which beats rival
Michigan.
Ohio State athletic direc-
tor Gene Smith said the
school will appeal the sus-
pensions.
"While we believe sanc-
tions should be rendered,
we do believe they are


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Nov. 27 file photo, Ohio State's Terrelle Pryor (left)
celebrates with quarterbacks coach Nick Siciliano after
beating Michigan, in Columbus, Ohio. Pryor and four other
Buckeyes were suspended by the NCAA on Thursday for the
first five games of next season for selling championship rings,
jerseys and awards, and receiving improper benefits from a
tattoo parlor.


severe," he said Thursday
at a news conference. "We
do believe we can give miti-
gating circumstances for
the NCAA to consider."
The NCAA did not
suspend the players for


Jan. 4 Sugar Bowl againstthe
eighth-ranked Razorbacks
because the "student-ath-
letes did not receive ade-
quate rules education dur-
ing the time period the vio-
lations occurred."


CHS: Plays Gainesville after break


Continued From Page 1B
during those two days of
play."
Tyler plans on giving the




SIGNEES
Continued From Page 1B
local athletes.
Columbia's Kaitlin
Scott signed with
College of Coastal Georgia
and Chelsey Waters
signed with South Georgia
College.
Not all softball play-
ers went out of state. Fort
White's Alex Nieland signed
with Pasco-Hernando
Community College and
Columbia's Amanda Roach
signed with College of
Central Florida.
Two Columbia athletes
signed volleyball schol-
arships DaBrea Hill
at Brevard Community
College and Hannah
Sullivan at Tennessee
Temple University.


Tigers the remainder of the
week off at the conclusion
of play on Tuesday before




Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words. I
I OJYLL


resuming action against
Gainesville High following
the Christmas break.

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek


Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


Print answer here: (IIIIII
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's Jumbles: DELVE THICK BECAME EMBODY
Yesterday's Answer: What the ironworkers did when they built the
tower THEY "BEAMED"


QB Grossman aims to


shed inconsistent label


By JOSEPH WHITE
Associated Press

ASHBURN, Va. Rex
Grossman has no delu-
sions about his reputation.
"I think I'm definitely
stereotyped as an incon-
sistent quarterback," he
said Wednesday, "and I'm
doing everything possible
to change that perception.
And the only way you can
change that perception is
to play consistently."
Grossman threw for
322 yards and four touch-
downs in his debut as
the Washington Redskins
starter, leading a 20-point
second-half comeback
Sunday before the Dallas
Cowboys kicked a late
field goal for a 33-30 victo-
ry. His rating for the game "
was 93.4, enough to create
genuine momentum for
the thought that he could
return as the No. 1 quarter-
back next year.
But check Grossman's
game-by-game history. In
2006, the year he quarter-
backed the defense-heavy
Chicago Bears to the NFC
title, he had one four-game
stretch in which his ratings
yo-yoed from 101.2 to 10.2
to 137.4 to 36.8.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Washington Redskins quarterback Rex Grossman is sacked
by Dallas Cowboys' DeMarcus Ware Sunday in Arlington,
Texas.


One week he wouldn't
'have an interception; the
next week he'd have four.
He could very well be
the most maligned quar-
terback ever to start in a
Super Bowl. His opponent
that year? Peyton Manning


and the Indianapolis
Colts.
"Any time you go 15-4
and go to the Super Bowl,
you have to play well on
offense and you have to
play well as a quarterback,"
Grossman said.


ADDAZIO: Gators slipped under coach
Continued From Page 1B


The 51-year-old Addazio
was hired to replace the
departed Al Golden, follow-
ing a 10-day search. Golden
took the top job at Miami,
but he left behind a pro-
gram that is in much better
shape than he found it.
Temple went 3-31 in
the three seasons before
Golden arrived. The Owls
went 1-11 in his first season
there, then won 26 games
over the past four years.
"I couldn't write a better
script for myself," Addazio
said. "Al Golden has done
a fantastic job. It's our
responsibility to come here
and build on that."
Athletic director Bill
Bradshaw said Addazio's
name came up early in his


ACROSS

1 Cluster
6 Wild animal
11 Flabbergasted
13 Puck stopper
14 Dune locale
15 Antenna user
16 Wheel part
17 Peace gesture
18 "Cheers" bar
owner
21 Broke a bronc
23 Dollop
26 Tooth-fillers'
org.
27 Culture medi-
um
28 Decoy
29 Seafarer
31 Children's
classic
32 Take the podi-
um
33 Coach
35 Budget item
36 Sigh of relief
37 de cologne
38 Fabric meas.


discussions after Golden
informed him he'd be head-
ing to Miami.
"In the back of .my mind
I knew this might be com-
ing," Bradshaw said of
Golden's departure. "So I
had to be ready. I'm grate-
ful Al gave us five years.
"The interest for this
job was extraordinary. But
Steve matched our vision
for what Temple football
can become."
Addazio says he'll take
his time putting together
a staff and will try to build
his offense and defense
around the strengths of his
players, rather than trying
to fit them into a system.
"I don't want to put a
square peg into a round


39 Crow
40 Elev.
41 Flair for music
42 Electrical unit
44 "The Engine
That Could"
47 Vegetable
sponge
51 Boxed up
52 Luxury fur
53 Exclude or
prohibit
54 Au pair

DOWN

1 -relief
2 "Pulp Fiction"
name
3 Uh-uh!
4 Movie mogul
5 Ancestry
6 Prepared fish
7 Inch forward
8 Yeasty brew
9 Set the dog on
10 Lunar new
year
12 Cause harm to


hole," he said. "I want to
have balance on the field
on offense, defense and
special teams.
. "We want to run the foot-
ball and be aggressive. Play
with a relentless mindset."
Addazio is known as a
top recruiter and a stron-
ger motivator. During his
coaching stints at Syracuse,
Notre Dame and Indiana,
he mostly coached offen-
sive line and tight ends..
He was promoted to
offensive coordinator at
Florida in 2009, but this
season he became the tar-
get of criticism by fans and
media as the Gators slipped
to 7-5 and finished ranked
80th in the nation in yards
per game.


Answer to Previous PuzZle

EIPM SPED HElCK
ANA RSA YULE
ONFL I CT GRAND
WEATS ADOS
YA BE S B
N EN K ILN
RP CAIR ER


ETTE A CpUSTE
GT S DAM
S E AD SMACK
UIN EX POS
I CE AV
TAR FI K ESS


13 Philanthropist
18 Appetizing
19 Loved madly
20 Pyramid
builders'
22 Zany Raye


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.comI


23 Kind of pig
24 Nightmare
25 Lebanese port
28 Grass-skirt
accessory
30 LL.B. holder
31 Flowering
hedge
34 Mend a pump
36 Read
intently
39 Farm
machine
41 Soul singer
James
43 NYC art cen-
ter
44 Arith. term
45 Temper
46 Dinner check
48 Shark warning
49 Dear Abby's
sister
50 "- Jude"


12-24 2010 by UFS, Inc.


BYRBAC



FLUTIE

I Ll/










Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS FRIDAY, DECEMER 24, 2010 3B


DILBERT


I'VE DECIDED TO
ESCALATE MY ANTI-
SOCIAL BEHAVIOR FROM
NOT LISTENING, TO
ACTIVELY TALKING
OVER OTHER
PEOPLE.


BABY BLUES


BLONDIE


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE


DEAR ABBY


Small acts of kindness can

give hope to those in need


DEAR ABBY: From time
to time you print letters about
random acts of kindness.
May I share something that
happened to me? On Jan. 30,
2009, my husband and I took
our three kids to a restaurant
for breakfast to celebrate our
twins' fourth birthday. When
it was time to pay our bill, the
waiter told us that a couple
who had been sitting behind
us had taken care of our tab.
What that couple didn't
know was that the day be-
fore, my doctor had informed
me a lump in my neck was
probably lymphoma and that
he needed to do a biopsy
as soon as possible. He had
wanted me to meet with a
surgeon that morning, but I
told him no. It was the twins'
birthday, and I didn't want
them to associate their birth-
day with the day Mommy got
sick.
What that couple did was
more than pay for our meal;
it gave me hope. I felt it was
a sign that everything would
be "taken care of." To pay it
forward, we left the waiter a
large tip.
I did end up with Hodg-
kin's disease, but I have
been in remission since Au-
gust 2009. BLESSED IN
WISCONSIN
DEAR BLESSED: Your
letter made me smile. Your
hope was rewarded and ev-
erything WAS "taken care


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearabby.com
of." And because Hodgkin's
lymphoma is a treatable can-
cer, I hope you will continue
to enjoy good health for
many decades to come.
DEAR ABBY: I have a
big problem. My father re-
fuses to spend time with me.
He is a firefighter and says
he has a busy schedule. I un-
derstand that. But when he
has extra time, he will find
anything else to do. I tried
talking to him it was like
talking to a brick wall.
My mom has comforted
me a lot, but I feel there is
something missing in my life.
That missing part is my dad.
Please help me to figure out
how I can make the situation
better. GIRL IN NEED
IN BALTIMORE
DEAR GIRL IN NEED:
You have already done as
much as you can. It is now up
to your mother and/or your
grandparents to help your fa-
ther understand that there is
more to being a parent than
providing financial support.
I hope he gets the message
before it's too late for


him, not you.
DEAR ABBY: An odd
custom is beginning to sur-
face in my local church.
Showers for new brides and
new mothers are being an-
nounced from the pulpit at
Sunday services. All church
members are invited to at-
tend, and in one or two in-
stances even told what to
bring for gifts.
I have always understood
that showers are given by
close friends, relatives, asso-
ciates, etc. Just what is prop-
er procedure for this? How
does one respond to these
"open" invitations? I have
not responded. Am I wrong?
Please help. SOCIALLY
NAIVE IN SOUTH CARO-
LINA
'DEAR SOCIALLY NA-
IVE: You are not wrong; you
are correct Approach your
pastor and ask why this is be-
ing done. If the reason is that
the bride-to-be or mother-to-
be is financially needy, and
you would like to contribute,
then attend the showers. If
not, then treat the announce-
ment as you would any open
invitation. If you choose not
to attend, you are not obli-
gated to give a gift.
P.S. I agree with you. It is
an "odd" custom.
Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ZITS
MW- 1(?FAS
S5KAM )


GARFIELD


B.C.


FRANK & ERNEST


ARIES (March 21-
April 19): Don't let the
hustle and bustle get to you.
Chill out and enjoy yuletide
cheer with a confidant.
Love, travel and intrigue are
heading your way, bringing
about a new beginning that
will lead to a brighter future.

TAURUS (April 20-
May 20): Doing something
with someone you love will
lead to a commitment to
one another, concerning
the upcoming year. Avoid
making an impulsive pur-
chase. Changes you make
to your home will add to its
festive and entertaining ap-
peal. **
GEMINI (May 21-
June 20): Added respon-
sibilities will get you down.
Clear your head of anything
that is going to interfere
with your family and the fes-
tivities you have planned. A
crush on someone who is
off-limits is a waste of time.
You can do much better.

CANCER (June 21-
July 22): Love is in your
heart and relationships
can be enhanced by the
gestures you make. Don't
worry about any changes in
your professional life. Now
is a time to be thankful for
what you have and to trust
in your ability to have con-


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

tinued success. ***
LEO (July 23-Aug.
22): You should probably
stick close to home. Invite
friends or family over to en-
joy a little festive cheer. The
less running around you do,
the easier it will be to get
through the next couple of
days. Don't make an impul-
sive move. ***
VIRGO (Aug. 23-
Sept. 22): Sharing with
the people who contribute
to your life will allow you
to thank them for the help
and encouragement you've
received. A chat with some-
one you love will lead to a
late-night surprise, making
the end of this year very
special. ***
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): The less aggressive
you are, the better the out-
come. Don't let unexpected
change ruin your plans for
the future. Focus on the
positive. Delays or prob-
lems with neighbors or
friends are likely. ****
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-
Nov. 21): Gettogetherwith
people you don't see often
enough and enjoy catching
up. Short trips, picking up
last-minute items and enjoy-
ing turning your home into
a festive party palace will all


get you in the mood for up-
coming activities. **
SAGITARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): An interest-
ing and creative idea will
be offered based on the
information you share with
friends and family you don't
get to see very often. Don't
feel responsible for some-
one who puts the blame on
everyone else. *****
CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): You can ex-
pect to be surprised by what
someone does for you. Re-
flecting on where you have
been and what you have
done will confirm that you
are doing the right thing.
Love is on the rise; enjoy
the moment. ***
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Emotional issues
will surface as you recall
what and whom you have
gained and lost this past
year. A lesson learned will
be valuable as you head
down a new path. There
are plenty of opportunities,
so take advantage of what's
available. ***
PISCES (Feb. 19-
March 20): Changing your
mind will confuse the peo-
ple to whom you are closest
and who want the best for
you. An explanation will be
required and speaking from
the heart is the best route
to take. ***


CELEBRITY CIPHER

by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: R equals V
"G EGEM'P HMZF PVK JNYY
EGLKMOGZMO ZJ JZAKRKA, WNP G
HMKF GP FUO YZMTKA PVUM
FUGPGMT JZA DVAGOPLUO PZ


D Z L K "


- AGDVUAE WAUNPGTUM


PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "Keeping score of old scores and scars, getting even
and one-upping, always makes you less than you are." Malcolm Forbes
(c) 2010 by NEA, Inc. 12-24


FOR BETTER ORWORSE
DDRL DADD/! WRKE-, IDIUHERRSMEA SoNE--, I1 GUESS HE DIDN.
UP 1 WREKE UP, DHDDY S~IINGhOi O,HO~o
L~--D
I N E


CLASSIC PEANUTS


IT ALL CAME
TOGETHER WHEN
S I REALIZED THAT
LISTENING ISN'T
THE FUN PART.


"...AND TH1 5LITTLf, P6Y PLAYfD
\ L^ .., III, VI ALt-
DAAY

S LON6."


HOW cbgV _
THE
OF 0 ERT
.










LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED FRIDAY, DECEMBER 24, 2010

Lake City Reporter




CLASSIFIED


MW
[BUY I

SELL IT^

FIND ITi


Legal

NOTICE OF ENACTMENT OF
ORDINANCE BY THE BOARD
OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
OF COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLOR-
IDA
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
an ordinance, which title hereinafter
appears, will be considered for enact-
ment by the Board of County Com-
missioners of Columbia County,
Florida, at a public hearing on Janu-
ary 6, 2011 at 7:00 p.m., or as soon
thereafter as the matter can be heard,
in the School Board Administrative
Complex located at 372 West Duval
Street, Lake City, Florida. Copies of
said ordinance may be inspected by
any member of the public at the Of-
fice of the County Manager, County
Administrative Offices located at
135 Northeast Hemando Avenue,
Lake City, Florida, during regular
business hours. On the date, time
and place first above mentioned, all
interested persons may appear and be
heard with respect to the ordinance.
AN ORDINANCE OF COLUMBIA
COUNTY, FLORIDA, AMENDING
ORDINANCE NO. 98-1, COLUM-
BIA COUNTY LAND DEVELOP-
MENT REGULATIONS, AS
AMENDED; RELATING TO AN
AMENDMENT OF LESS THAN
TEN CONTIGUOUS ACRES OF
LAND TO THE OFFICIAL ZON-
ING ATLAS OF THE COLUMBIA
COUNTY LAND DEVELOPMENT
REGULATIONS, AS AMENDED,
PURSUANT TO AN APPLICA-
TION, Z 0524, BY THE PROPER-
TY OWNERS OF SAID ACRE-
AGE; PROVIDING FOR REZON-
ING FROM RESIDENTIAL SIN-
GLE FAMILY-1 (RSF-1) TO COM-
MERCIAL INTENSIVE (CI) OF
CERTAIN LANDS WITHIN THE
UNINCORPORATED AREA OF
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA;
PROVIDING SEVERABILITY;
REPEALING ALL ORDINANCES
IN CONFLICT; AND PROVIDING
AN EFFECTIVE DATE
The public hearing may be continued
to one or more future dates. Any in-
terested party shall be advised that
the date, time and place of any con-
tinuation of the public hearing shall
be announced during the public hear-
ing and that no further notice con-
cerning the matter will be published.
All persons are advised that, if they
decide to appeal any decisions made
at the public hearing, they will need
a record of the proceedings and, for
such purpose, they may need to en-
sure that a verbatim record of the
proceedings are made, which record
includes the testimony and evidence
upon which the appeal is to be based.
In accordance with the Americans
with Disabilities Act, persons need-
ing a special accommodation or an
interpreter to participate in the pro-
ceeding should contact Lisa K. B.
Roberts, at least seven (7) days prior
to the date of the hearing. Ms. Rob-
erts may be contacted by telephone
at (386)758-1005 or by Telecommu-
nication Device for Deaf at
(386)758-2139.
04542751
December 24, 2010


NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
CONCERNING A SPECIAL EX-
CEPTION AS PROVIDED FOR IN
THE CITY OF LAKE CITY LAND
DEVELOPMENT REGULATIONS
BY THE BOARD OF ADJUST-
MENTS OF THE CITY OF LAKE
CITY, FLORIDA, NOTICE IS
HEREBY GIVEN that, pursuant to
the City of Lake City Land Develop-
ment Regulations, as amended, here-
inafter referred to as the Land Devel-
opment Regulations, objections, rec-
ommendations, and comments con-
cerning a special exception, as de-
scribed below, will be heard by the
Board of Adjustments of the City of
Lake City, at a public hearing on
Tuesday, January 4, 2011 at 6:30
P.M., or as soon thereafter as the
matter can be heard, in the City
Council room on the second floor of
City Hall located at 205 North Mari-
on Avenue, Lake City, Florida.
Pursuant to a petition, SE 10-02, by
The Orchard Community Church,
Inc as agents for Forrest Welling
and Edna Summers owner, request-
ing a special exception be granted as
provided for in. Section 4.12.5(9) of
the Land Development Regulations
to permit a Church in a Commercial
General (CG) zoning district, specifi-
cally described as: Columbia Coun-
ty Parcel Number 02484-050 &
02484-003
The public hearing may be continued
to one pr more future dates. Any in-
terested party shall be advised that
the date, time, and place of any con-
tinuation of the public hearing shall
be announced during the public hear-
ing and that no further notice con-
cerning the matter will be published,
unless said continuation exceeds six
(6) calendar weeks from the date of
the above referenced public hearing.
At the aforementioned public hear-
ing, all interested parties may appear
to be heard with respect to the
amendment.
Copies of the special exception are
available for public inspection at the
Office of Growth Management, City
Hall, located on the second floor at
205 North Marion Avenue, Lake
City, Florida, during regular business
hours.
All persons are advised that if they
decide to appeal any decision made
at the above referenced public hear-
ing, they will need record of the pro-
ceedings, and that, for such purpose,
they may need to ensure that a verba-
tim record of the proceedings is
made, which record includes the tes-
timony and evidence upon which the
appeal is to be based.
04542723
December 24, 2010



010 Announcements


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

755-5440


ADvantage


020 Lost & Found

Lost 18mo old Yorkie. Recent
surgery and on medication. Has
microchip. Lost in McAlpin area.
Please call 386-362-2140
100 Job
100 Opportunities

04542747
LifeSouth Community Blood
Centers is seeking an independ-
ent and precise individual for a
Donor Services Specialist
phlebotomistt) position.
HS/GED and valid driver's
license required. Phlebotomy'
exp prfrd. F/T, $9-10 p/h. Apply
at www.lifesouth.org. Back-
ground check req. EOE/DFWP.

04542748
Another Way Inc. needs
Shelter Coordinator (full-time
w/benefits) in Chiefland
supervisory experience required
and two part-time advocates
(one Chiefland & one Lake
City) bi-lingual preferred for all
positions. Minorities and
formerly battered women
encouraged to apply. EOE.
Send resume w/cover letter
identifying position of interest to
hr@anotherwayinc.net or P. 0.
Box 1028, Lake City, FL 32056
or Fax 386-719-2758.
No phone calls accepted.

Cashiers needed, Experience Pre-
ferred,Drug frre workplace, allap-
plicants will be drug tested
Ellisville Exxon,
Hwy 441, No Phone Calls Please.

Experienced IT Tech/
Network Admin
Qualifications: 2+ years
experience with: win XP pro, win
7 pro, server 2003, 2008. Must
have worked within and be
familiar with active directory.
Must be capable of lifting/moving
workstations. Microsoft
certifications a plus. Clean drivers
license required. Please submit
resume to hr@chclabs.com or
fax to 386-758-1791
Mechanic needed for Truck shop,
must have own tools, apply
Southern Specialized, 1812 NW
Main Blvd., 386-752-9754

120 'Medical
120 Employment

05524650
LEARN TO DRAW BLOOD
Local Phlebotomy Course
offered in Lake City, FLA
Certificate program.
(904)566-1328
F/T LPN or MA needed M-F for
busy medical practice.
Please fax resume to
386-487-1232


Wanted Receptionist,
experienced. Send resume to
826 SW Main Blvd. Suite 102.
Lake City, FL. 32025

240 Schools &
240 Education

04542575
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
* Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-12/13/10
* Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-01/17/11
* Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com


310 Pets & Supplies

BEAGLE RABBIT DOG.
$175. Runs Good, Male
.386-249-3104 or
386-719-4802

Chocolate Lab needs home!
reduced to $250, AKC
Female 7 months old
386-965-2231
FREE to good home,
bob-tail tabby, female kitten,
approx 6-7 months old
386-466-8248
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.

330 Livestock &
33 Supplies

Pigs for sale
7 weeks old
$50 each HURRY!
386-965-2215

Pony
Mini Mare, Paint
5 yrs old $400
tack included 386-965-2231


361 Farm Equipment

84 Ford 4610 Tractor. Runs good.
Solid 2WD. New front tires,
350hr on 2005 motor. Dependable.
$7500. obo. 386-867-0005


401 Antiques
ANTIQUES WANTED
Fum., China, Silver, Glassware,
Costume Jewelry & Gold. 35 years
exp. Cash Pd. Pete. 386-963-2621

402 Appliances
KENMORE WASHER/DRYER.
Runs and looks good.
$175.00 for both.
386-965-0778

408 Furniture

ALMOST NEW
rocker/recliner.
$60.
386-935-4931
LARGE DRESSER
All wood.
$60.
386-935-4931
Sofa Sleeper, double bed, beige
floral pattern, excellent condition
$100
386-935-0654
TV 55inch. HD projection.
Factory remote. Works great.
Looks great.Perfect gift.
$325.00 386-719-9189
Twin Race Car Bed'with mattress.
Twin Story Book Cottage Bed
with mattress. $350.00. for both
386-965-9882

413 Musical
413' Merchandise
100 Watt Sanyo Stereo, graphic
equalizer, dual cassette, speakers
36" high, very good condition
$50 386-935-0654

420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$225 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.
WANTED: Copies of newspaper
Columbia Gazette from
1920s and 1930s. Will buy.
512-751-4489 talter3(S)uic.edu

430 Garage Sales







PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.



440 Miscellaneous
CONSUL 31"TV.
Good condition
$80.
386-935-4931
Tow Behind Grill/Smoker. Com-
mercial built, nice shape. $1250.
obo. 386-249-3104 or 719-4802
Great Christmas gift for hubby.
White Wardrobe. Vinyl/veneer
finish. 36W X 20D X 72H
Like new $50
386-935-0654
450 Good Things
450 to Eat
The Nut Cracker
Buy and sell, crack & shell pecans
2738 CR 252 W, Lake City 32024
Pinemount Rd/CR 252/Taylorville
Robert Taylor 386-963-4138
or 386-961-1420

520 Boats for Sale
Bass Tender Boat
10'2", .
$500 Call for details
386-965-2215

630 Mobile Homes
630 for Rent
2/2, S/W, 1 acre secluded lot
Bascom Norris Bypass, $500 dep,
$500 mo, possible owner finance
386-623-2203 or 386-623-5410
2BR/2BA MH CH/A,
Fenced in back yard and Shed.
$750. mo plus deposit.
Pets OK! 386-755-4157
3br/2ba newly renovated MH on
1/2 ac. private property. Close to
college $700.mo. 1st. mo.+ Sec.
dep. Ref's. No Pets. Non smoking
environment 386-755-3288
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White Contact 386-623-2465
or 386-292-0114
Nice clean 2&3 bdrm, Five Points,
NO PETS, also 3 bd on the
Westside, 1 mo rent & dep
386-961-1482





a


Quiet Setting w/lots of oaks
2br/lba from $450 & 3br/2batrom
$550. Includes water & sewer.
No Pets! 386-961-0017
Very clean & well maintained 2/2
units in nice park. $599.mo
w/$500. dep. Rent incl water,
sewer, trash p/u. Close to town
386-984-8448 or 623-7547


630 Mobile Homes
6 for Rent
Very Clean 2 BR/1 BA, in the
country, Branford area, $450 mo.,
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleypro590-0642

640 A Mobile Homes
6 for Sale
$200. MONTHLY. Remodeled
SW. 2bd/2ba. Appliances,
delivered & blocked. Owner
finance available w/$3000 down.
Call Gary Hamilton 386-758-9824
05524589
Palm Harbor Homes
Factory Liquidation Sale
2009 Model Homes MUST GO!
Call for FREE color brochures
800-622-2832

05524637
Gainesville-Jacobsen-Savings
Factory direct Jaconsen outlet
now open to the public 3/2 start-
ing at 39,900 complete.
Northpointemobilehoinesales.co
m for complete website specials
or 352-872-5566
For the best deal in Florida!

05524638
North Pointe Homes is your
new #1 Jacobsen dealer. Take a
short drive to Gainesville and
save thousands. Five year halo
warranty, 2x6 wall, and
much more. Free energy star
package on all others.
Call Chuck at 352-872-5567

05524639
Why drive to Gainesville?
This is Why! New 28x60
Jacobsen 3/2 inc FREE Furni-
ture! Low as $497 month.
Drive to our dealership and Buy,
I pay for your gas!
Call Mark at 352-872-5568

650 Mobile Home
Q650& Land
BANK REPO: Mobile Home On
15.65 ACRES IN FT. WHITE -
Including 60X40 pole barn. Listed
at $130,000.00. Call Billy Shows
After hours 386-208-8547

710 Unfurnished Apt.
For Rent
05524443
$Holiday Cash $
NO App Fee, NO SD,
$250 off December,
*for Qualified Applicants
Windsong Apartments
(386) 758-8455
05524728
SPRING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans;
some with garages.
Call 386-454-1469
or visit our website:
www.springhillvillage.net
2/1 w/garage,
east side of town,
1st, last & sec
386-755-6867
2BR/2BA DUPLEX
on McFarlane Ave. W/D hookup
Rent $625. per month.
Call 386-867-1212 for details.
A Landlord You Can Love!
2 br Apts $550. & up + sec. Great
area. CH/A washer/dryer'hookups.
386-758-9351/352-208-2421
Brick Duplex 2/1 off Baya. CH/A,
Carport, Carpet, tile, $575 mo,+
Dep. Call 386-752-0118 or
386-623-1698 or 386-292-4937
Duplex w/garage spacious, 2/1,
1300 sq ft, W/D hook up, CH/A,
$650 plus dep & bckgrnd chk,
386-697-3248 or 352-514-2332
Great location W of 1-75, spacious
deluxe 2BR apts., garage, W/D
hook up. patio. $600 & up, + SD,
386 965-0276
The Lakes Apts. Studios & lBr's
from $135/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741


710 Unfurnished Apt.
7 For Rent

Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $425 + sec.
Michelle 386-752-9626

X-CLEAN SECOND STORY 2/2,
country acre 8 mi to VA, off Lk
Jeff Rd. $500 mo + dep. No dogs.
Deck, w/d hookups 386.961.9181

7 0 Furnished Apts.
2iv For Rent

1 BEDROOM all utilities includ-
ed. Furnished or unfurnished. East
or West side. $475. mo. +
$200 security. 386-397-3568

NO Lease/Deposits, ROOMS only
Utilities, Cable, WI-FI, maid,
micro-fridge, phone, Pool.
Americas Best Value Inn
(386)755-4664
Wk 1 prs. $169,2 ppl $179 + tax
Park Model Trailers (Studio), all
utils, use of pool, $500 per month,
NeverDunn's RV Park.
386-961-8540 or 755-4945
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

730 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent

2BR/1BA CH/A. Large carport,
great location, near comer of Baya
& McFarland references req'd.
Property zoned for commercial use
386-752-9144 or 755-2235

3 & 4 bedroom homes. Newly
renovated. Very nice, in town.
$750 $950 per month plus
deposit. 386-755-2423
3 Bedrm/2 Bth plus 360 sq ft Stu-
dio on Lake Jeffery/Old Mill Rd,
very private, $1200 per mo. plus
deposit, 386-752-9303, No Pets

3/2 W/D hook up, appliances
included, $200 sec dep,
$650 month. Madison Street
386-365-2515
3/2, CH/A,all appliances, back
yard fenced, carport, $825 mo, 1st,
last &sec, 560 SE St. Johns St
386-697-8893 or 305-962-2666
3/2,Brick Home, big back yard,
$900 month + Security Deposit
off of Branford Hwy & CR 242,
386-965-0276
Cozy Cottage lbr/lba S. Hwy. 41
$550/mo. + security. Includes all
utilities & satellite TV. Pets OK.
(386)758-2408
FOR RENT: Large 3br/2ba brick
home, fenced on 5 acres on
Colunibia/Suwannee County line.
$975. per month + utilities.
Perfect place for children.
Broker/Owner- Annette Land @
386-935-0824
Newer 3/2 w/2 car garage.
1800 sq ft $900 mo. plus deposit
1-10/US 41 area
(248)875-8807
Rural beauty and privacy near
I-10/US90 NW of Live Oak. 3Br,
I+Ba, $725/mo. Optional pasture
available. (626) 512-5374

750 Business &
Office Rentals

OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$695. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor


805 Lots for Sale

5 Acres in Lake City, FL,
low down, easy qualifying, and
low monthly payments,
please call 512-663-0065


Classified Department: 755-5440


805 Lots for Sale


I


ADVERTISE IT HERE!

Bring the picture in or we will take it for you!
Advertise your car, truck, motorcycle, recreation vehicle or boat here for 10 consecutive days.
If your vehicle does not sell within those 10 days, for an additional $15 you can place your ad for
an additional 10 days. A picture will run everyday with a description of your vehicle. The price of
the vehicle must be listed in the ad. Your ad must be prepaid with cash, check or credit card. Just
include a snapshot or bring your vehicle by and we will take the picture for you. Private party only!
Price includes a 6 day/ 4 line classified ad of the same vehicle in print and online.






2005 PT Cruiser 2009 Harley Davidson 2001 Che Astro O rine,
Touring Edition XR1200R Mirage 2001 ChevyeAstro & Onl e
PS, PW, PM, CC, AC, Orange and black. One Van
white, 55,500 miles. owner, garage kept. Like New trans., new AC, good One Low
new, only 52 actual miles, tires, runs great, clean, One LoW
$7,900 $grat work van.Pri
Call $8,000 $2,200 OBO PriCe.
386-965-8656 call c all
386-752-5988 386-984-0571


Fo Mor DtalsCalUar o -Bidge

at38-75-44


PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain' of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.


810 Home for Sale

3BR/2BA 2 story brick. 4.6 ac. in
ground pool. Lg. workshop &
2 wells. $200,000.00 obo
Old Wire Rd. (850)728-0782

FSBO, Completely Remodeled,
3bdr/lbth, fenced, new deck, shop,
new cabinets/appliances,Schools
blks away, $65K 478-391-1592

82O Farms&
Acreage

4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$69,900. $613mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com

4 Ac.,Ft. White. Well, Septic &
Power. Owner Financing!
NO DOWN! $69,900.
Only $613./mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com

WE FINANCE! Half to ten acre
lots. Some with w/s/pp
Deas Bullard BKL Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com


930 Motorcycles

09 Harley Davidson XR1200R
Mirage Orange & Black. 1 owner,
garage kept. Like new w/only 52
actual mi. $8,000. 386-752-5988


940 Trucks

1990 Ford F350 Dually
work truck, white, automatic
S$1500 obo
386-965-2215

97 Chevy Z71 Extended cab. 3
door. Black w/gold trim. Local 2
owner. All service records. $4750.
obo 386-249-3104 / 386-719-4802












Home Improvements

Carpentry, remodeling, paint,
repairs, additions, Lic. & Ins.
Since 1978 FREE estimates
386-497-3219 or 954-649-1037

Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.


Pool Maintenance

Pool Leaks/Pool Repairs
Florida Leisure Pool & Spa
352-373-0612
CPC 1457279




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2011 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Powered by SobekCM