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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01482
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 12/23/2010
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01482
System ID: UF00028308:01482
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text





State standouts
Local players to be part of HS
All-Star Football Game
000016 120511 H***3DIGIT 326
LIB OF FLORIDASTO
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Lake ii


Thursday, December 23, 2010


LCPD hosts toy drive

for families in need


Donated money, help
from local businesses
make effort a success.
By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter. com
The Lake City Police Department
got its chance to play Santa Claus,
and it delivered,. providing more
than 60 children with toys.
The department started deliver-


ing the gifts last week.
"I am proud that we were able to
work together with the businesses
and the citizens of Lake City to
help these children have a better
Christmas this year," said Police
Chief Argatha Gilmore.
The department started col-
lecting money for toys at the end
of November, said Capt. John
DRIVE continued on 3A


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Lake City Police Capts. John Blanchard IV (left) and
Robert Smith is seen with donated toys that the agency
will be giving to needy children.


SUWANNEE LIGHTS


Park's Christmas
display is one of
areas largest.
From staff reports
LIVE OAK
There's still time
to check out
one of the larg-
est Christmas
lights displays.
The last night of the
10th Annual Suwannee
Lights is 6 10 p.m.
'Friday at the Spirit of the
Suwannee Music Park in
Live Oak.
The annual extravaganza
features more than 2 miles
of lighted, handmade
Christmas displays built by
the SOSMP's Christmas .
elves.
Guests can view the
light display from their
own vehicles.
Each year Suwannee
Lights gets bigger.
Along the winding, 2-
mile long magical road are
Christmas scenes includ-
ing Nutcracker soldiers,
swans, animals, Christmas


JASON MATTHEW WALKERILake City Reporter
A motorist passes through the 'Tunnel of Lights' Wednesday night while admiring the six million lights
strung up at the Suwannee Festival of Lights at the Spirit of the Suwannee Music Park.


Photos by JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Above: Logan Hingson, 10, of Live Oak, watches as a small flame engulfs
a marshmallow at the Craft Village at the end of the Festival of Lights tour.
Left: A couple skate around a penguin on a frozen pond.


ANTONIA ROBINSON/ Lake City Reporter
Paula Griffin, Jim Johnston, Pam Knighton and Lindsay
Patton arrange toys that Catholic Charities has been distribut-
ing this week to families in need.


It's more than food

- toys given out, too


Catholic Charities
gives needy families
Christmas presents.
By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
Clients coming to Catholic
Charities this week got some-
thing extra to go with the food
they received brand new toys.
"We've given toys out to each
and every family that's come in


for food," said Suzanne Edwards,
chief operating officer.
'The Today Show" in New York
gets companies to donate new
items directly from the manufac-
turer, she said.
A tractor-trailer load of items
was shipped to the Catholic
Charities regional office in St.
Augustine, which then shared
items with the Lake City office,
Edwards said. This is the second


TOYS continued on 3A


State health

officials: Flu

activity on

the increase

Levels remain low, but
vaccinations recommended
for those over 3-years-old.

By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityrepor ter. com
State health officials urged local residents
Wednesday to get flu vaccinations after sta-
tistics showed a recent spike in the number
of influenza cases across the state.
According to Centers for Disease Control
and Prevention in Atlanta, low levels of
influenza were reported around the county
last week.
Florida officials reported influenza-like ill-
ness activity is low to moderate, but increas-
ing. State statistics indicate no counties
reported widespread activity and two coun-
ties reported moderate activity. However,
16 counties reported increasing influenza
activity.
Marjorie Rigdon, Columbia County
Health Department director of nursing,
said Columbia County health officials have
not noted an increase in influenza activity
cases.
"Locally we have not been seeing any
increase currently here at the Columbia
County Health Department," she said.
She said local officials were not aware of
the increasing numbers of influenza cases
across the state until media notification
from the Florida Department of Health
Wednesday morning.
'There was a slight increase in the per-
cent of emergency department visits due to
influenza-like illness," Rigdon said.
Rigdon urged residents to get flu vaccina-
tions.
"There is plenty of flu vaccinations here
at the heatlh department and I believe
many of the local pharmacies are continu-
ing to offer the flu vaccination," she said.
'"We're providing flu vaccines by walk-ins or
appointments. The flu vaccinations are $25
and vaccinations for children between the
ages of 3-18 years old are free."
According to the Associated Press, Florida
has had three small influenza outbreaks
since the season began. One was in a
FLU continued on 3A


HOLIDAY HOURS
County Office
Closed Dec. 23 and 24.
n Closed Dec. 31. *

City Office
Closed Dec. 23 and 24.
Closed Dec. 31.


Tax Collector
* Closed Dec. 23 and 24.
SOpen Dec. 31.

Post Office
" Closed Dec. 24 after noon.
* Closed Dec. 25.
* Closed Dec. 31 after noon.

Library
* Closed Dec. 23 to.Dec. 26.
* Closed Dec. 31 to Jan. 2.

Trash
* Regular pick-up schedule for
Christmas and New Year's.


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
1 Fax: 752-9400


60
Sunny
WEATHER, 2A


Opinion ................ 4A
People.................. 2A
Events .................. 5A
Advice & Comics ......... 4B
Puzzles ................. 2B


TODAY IN
HEALTH
New technology
gets gir an eat:


COMING
FRIDAY
Charitable donations
:till pouring in.


Easy win
Gators roll to victory over
outmanned Radford, 66-55.

Sports, I B





.porter


Vol. 136, No. 288 N 75 cents









LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING THURSDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2010


W 3 Wednesday:
Afternoon: 0-7-3
S Evening: 5-5-5


Play 4) Wednesday:
*:;. ~ Afternoon: 6-1-4-6
Evening: 1-1-5-4


.I1KA$1~Sen
ezrna~ch-
-i %~
1~


Tuesday:
-22-23-35-36


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS.



Bale to star in Nanjing project


BEIJING


Christian Bale will star
in Chinese filmmaker
Zhang Yimou's new
project about 13 young
prostitutes who help save
compatriots from Japanese troops
rampaging Nanjing, the latest film
exploring a World War II-era atrocity
that stirs nationalism in China.
Bale, currently co-starring in the
boxing drama "The Fighter," will
portray an American priest in the
movie, which is expected to start
filming in Nanjing on Jan. 10, the
Chinese director told reporters
Wednesday.
The film is an adaptation of a
Chinese-language novel by contem-
porary writer Yan Geling about 13
sex workers in Nanjing who volun-
teered to replace university students
as escorts for invading Japanese
soldiers. In the novel, the American
priest presides over a Catholic
church that shelters a group of pros-
titutes and young female students
during the invasion.
Historians said the massacre,
-known in the West as the "Rape of
Nanking," resulted in the slaughter
of at least 150,000 civilians. China
puts the number killed at 300,000,
making it one of the worst atrocities
of the WWII era.

Jamie Foxx: Daughter
helped my music career
NEW YORK Call her the guard-
ian angel for Jamie Foxx's music
career.
Oscar and Grammy winner Jamie
Foxx said Tuesday his 16-year-old
daughter, Corinne, gave him the best
advice when he began recording
music.
"When I first started I was doing
this little slow music, you know, just
R&B ... and my daughter walked in


ASSOCIATED PRESS
A man stands near a screen as photos of British actor Christian Bale, left, and
Chinese director Zhang Yimou are shown during a news conference to promote
Zhang's new movie in Beijing, China, Wednesday.


and said, 'What you doing?' I said,
'I'm working on the album.' She said,
'I hope you don't put that on there
because you going to put everybody to
sleep,"' Foxx said.
His daughter told him to reach out
to younger artists to aid in his music
career. And thafs exactly what the 43-
year-old performer did.
In 2005 Foxx released
"Unpredictable," a double-platinum
album that featured production work
and guest appearances from Kanye
West, Ludacris and Tank. He fol-
lowed that with 2008's "Intuition,"
another platinum CD that featured the
Grammy-winning party jam, "Blame
It." And this week Foxx released "Best.
Night of My Life"; the album has col-
laborations with top acts like Drake,
Justin Timberlake, Rick Ross and TI.
"A lot of times in order to be suc-
cessful with music, you have to listen
and sometimes allow other people to
sort of steer you in the right direc-


tion," Foxx said.

MW college network:
Gates 'Man of the Year'
NEW YORK Sorry Justin
Bieber, but college students aren't
your audience.
MTV's college network, mtvU, has
crowned Secretary of Defense Robert
Gates as its "Man of the Year."
Gates was given the honor
because he "became a role model for
public service, proving that it's pos-
sible to work within an institution to
impart change," mtvU said in a state-
ment Wednesday.
The network also commended
the 67-year-old Republican for his
focus on the youth, gender bias
and the "Don't Ask, Don't Tell"
policy.

E Associated Press


Celebrity Birthdays


* Actor Gerald S. O'Loughlin
is 89.
* Actor Ronnie Schell is 79.
* Emperor Akihito of Japan
is 77.
* Pro Football Hall of Famer
Paul Hornung is 75.
* Actor Frederic 'Forrest is
74.
* Actor James Stacy is 74.
* Rock musician Jorma


Kaukonen is 70.
* Rock musician Ron Bushy
is 69.
* Actor-comedian Harry
Shearer is 67.
* Gen. Wesley K. Clark (ret.)
is 66.
* Actress Joan Severance
is 52.
* Rock singer Eddie Vedder
(Pearl Jam) is 46.


Daily Scripture

"The angel said to them, "Do
not be afraid. I bring you good
news that will cause great joy
for all the people.Today in the
town of David a Savior has been
born to you; he is the Messiah,
the Lord."
--Luke 2:8- I


Lake City Reporter
HOW TO REACH US BUSINESS
Main number ........(386) 752-1293 Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
Fax number .............752-9400 (sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
Circulation ...............755-5445
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CORRECTION


The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run
in this space. And thanks for reading.


Transition team
fields requests

TALLAHASSEE -
Governor-elect Rick Scott's
transition teams are flood-
ing him with suggestions
for drastic changes includ-
ing private school vouchers
for all children and merg-
ing state agencies.
The voucher proposal
drew immediate, although
not unexpected, opposi-
tion from public school and
teachers union representa-
tives Wednesday.
The proposal would give
parents 85 percent of what
the state spends on each
child in public schools if
they go instead to a private
school. One critic called it
a simplistic solution to a
complex problem.
An environmental leader
praised proposals to do away
with some growth manage-
ment requirements but
also questioned a proposal
for merging the depart-
ments of Environmental
Protection, Community
Affairs and Transportation.


Reinforced tiger
exhibit reopens
MIAMI A tiger that
jumped out of its habitat
at a South Florida animal
attraction was back on
public display Wednesday
behind taller fences.
Mahesh.the Bengal tiger
jumped over a 12-foot fence
in August in pursuit of a
gibbon that also slipped out
of its enclosure at Miami's
Jungle Island.
The park's Tiger/
Liger Exhibit reopened
Wednesday after an over-
haul that includes 20-foot-
tall fences. The new enclo-
sure was unveiled with the
tiger Mahesh, a 900-pound
male liger named Vulcan
and two new female tigers
inside.
"Historically tigers
climbing out of 12-foot


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Governor-elect Rick Scott (left), seen here with current Gov.
Charlie Christ, is already getting plenty of proposals, some
asking for drastic changes.


cages is just about unheard
of," said Bhagavan Antle,
who operates Jungle
Island's Big Cat Habitat. "I
believe that this now goes
to such an excess that the
ability of him to get out is
highly unlikely. I would
say impossible."
The Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation
Commission charged the
president of the park with
two misdemeanors after
concluding that the ape
escaped due to human
and mechanical error, and
the tiger's previous cage
did not meet state require-
ments.
Park officials maintained
that the fencing exceeded
state and federal guide-
lines but they also said
they would accept any rec-
ommendations from the
conservation commission.
Hundreds of visitors
and staff scrambled for
safety after the 500-pound,
3-year-old tiger escaped,
but no one was injured in
the Aug. 5 breakout, and
both animals were quickly
recaptured. Mahesh was
confined out of view while
the escape was investigat-
ed and the enclosure was
redesigned.


"We were shocked this
happened, as was every-
one else, because we were
above state regulations,"
said Jason Chatfield, gen-
eral curator for Jungle
Island. "Given that, we do
not want that to ever hap-
pen again."

Model charged
in fatal wreck

CORAL GABLES A
South Florida model faces
charges for leaving the
scene of an accident that
killed a University of Miami
student.
Police arrested 45-year-
old Valentina Hubsch of
Coral Gables Tuesday.
They said she was behind
the wheel of a 2004 silver
Hyundai that hit 21-year-
old Jared Paul Jones on
Nov. 13.
Jones, of Maryland, died
from his injuries 10 days
later. The junior was cross-
ing a street near campus
when the car struck him.
Authorities said Hubsch
gave a taped statement on
Nov. 24 and has cooperated
with the investigation.


THE WEATHER


SUNNY SUNNY U CHANCE MOSTLY MOSTLY
SHOWERS SUNNY SUNNY


HI 60 O1.03 HI 63 L043 H163L036 HI53L027 H1I53L026
..s77tw


TEMPERATURES
High Wednesday
Low Wednesday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Wednesday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


Valdosta
55/31 *
allahassee Lake City,
57/32 60/32
,, Gainesville *
Panama City P61/34
54/36 Ocala
1,64/35
S 6
Tampa


'7a lp 7p ',. 6aa
SThursday friday







IA -Frecasted tenqerabr "Feas ike t"mr


City
Jacksonville Cape Canaveral
'58/34 Daytona Beach
Ft. Lauderdale
Daytona Beach Fort Myers
64i45 Gainesville
\ Jacksonville

riando Cape Canaveral Key West
8/46 66/48 Lake City
Miami
Naples
West Palm Beach Ocala
72/53 Orlando
Ft Lauderdale Panama City
74/58 Pensacola
Naples Tallahassee
,73/50 Mimi Tampa


On this date in
1983, the tempera-
ture plunged to 50
degrees below zero
at Williston, N.D., to
equal their all-time
record. Minneapolis,
Minn., reported an
afternoon high of 17
degrees below zero.


S. Forecasts, data and graph-
-- Ics 2010 Weather Central
' _-, LLC, Madison, WIs.
www.weatherpublisher.com


GetConnected



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* Associated Press


AROUND FLORIDA


I


Pensacola
57/39


07/


49
0;
FtL Myers
72/50


Friday
66/51/s
66/47/s
72/59/pc
73/53/s
64/46/s
60/45/s
70/62/s
63/43/s
72/58/pc
72/51/s
65/48/s
69/49/s
56/47/s
61/47/pc
58/38/s
71/52/s
56/38/s
70/54/pc


Saturday
70/56/pc
69/46/pc
74/63/pc
74/55/pc
65/40/pc
65/39/pc
70/62/pc
63/36/pc
75/62/pc
74/59/pc
67/41/pc
72/49/pc
58/37/sh
59/33/pc
59/37/sh
69/52/pc
58/37/pc
73/59/pc


ey West 74/57 Valdosta
74/64Key West W. Palm Beach


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise torn.
Sunset tom.

MOON
Moonrise today
Moonset today
Moonrise tom.
Moonset tom.


75
39
67
43
82 in 1998
24 in 1960

0.00"
0.17"
39.15"
1.72"
47.52"


7:24 a.m.
5:36 p.m.
7:24 a.m.
5:36 p.m.

8:20 p.m.
9:14 a.m.
9:27 p.m.
9:55 a.m.


5
MO0EMIE*
30 mites to um
Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+.


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.



weathercom


@(00
Dec. Jan. Jan.
27 4 12
Last New First


0
Jan.
19
Full


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


. It











Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE THURSDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2010


TOYS: Go with food

Continued From Page 1A


year the local office has
received items.
There were 16 different
items, ranging from games
and dolls to flat irons and
fishing boxes, she said.
Items were available for
every age group.
"Christmas is so special
to children and the magic
it brings when they open
gifts," she said.
The Columbia County
4-H Livestock Club also
donated toys to the cen-
ter and volunteered time to
help distribute them.
The organization's motto
is 'To Make The Best
Better," said Paula Griffin,


4-H parent and Catholic
Charities intake specialist.
"It gave them an oppor-
tunity to come in here as
a community group and
look at what they can do
to make it better," she said.
"The kids can see it's so
much better to give than
receive."
Edwards said she hopes
the children believe in
Santa Claus after receiving
their gifts.
"It's all about giving and
not receiving," she said.
"Maybe one day they'll turn
around and teach their chil-
dren how to give."


DRIVE: Cops give toys

Continued From Page 1A


Blanchard, public infor-
mation officer. Other toy
drives have been held in
the past and been very suc-
cessful.
Initially the department
tried to identify 20 families
in need.
"We thought it Was a
reachable goal," he said.
Local businesses-includ-
ing Walmart, S&S Food
Stores, Dollar General and
employees of Family Dollar
- came forward with dona-
tions to help with the toy
drive, Blanchard said.
Two department employ-
ees, Destiny Hill and
Samantha Driggers, aided


in coordinating the buy-
ing of toys, putting them
together by age group and
having the families pick
them up, he said.
Providing gifts to the
families made the chil-
dren smile a little more,
Blanchard said, adding, "It
makes us feel really good."
The department hopes to
do as much, if not more,
next year for children in
the community during the
holidays, Blanchard said.
"The children are our
innocent future," he said.
"For Christmas, we all sort
of have more emotion on
our sleeve."


POLICE REPORTS


The following informa-
tion was provided by local
law enforcement agencies.
The following people have
been arrested but not con-
victed. All people are inno-
cent unless proven guilty.

Thursday, Dec. 16
Lake City
Police Department
m Charles Lynn Foster,
no age given, 503 NE
Washington Street, bur-
glary of a church, grand


theft and dealing in stolen
property.

Tuesday, Dec. 21
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office
Jessie Brett, 36, 1238
NW Moore Road, warrant:
Aggravated Assault.
Altony Bernard
'Tony" Coles, 42, 648 SW
Tustenuggee Avenue, pos-
session of cocaine, pos-
session of controlled sub-
stance and possession of


drug paraphernalia.
Brandon Andrew
Dicks, 25, 11199 County
Road 240, driving while
license suspended/revoked
(two counts), possession
of methamphetamine with
intent to sell, possession
of less than 20 grams of
cannabis and possession of
drug paraphernalia.
William Olin Escue,
54, 210 SW Richmond Way,
Fort White, carrying a con-
cealed firearm without a


license.
Brandon J. O'Neal, 21,
7431 County Road 795, Live
Oak, warrant: Violation
of probation on original
charge of credit card fraud
(two counts).

Lake City
Police Department
Lucas Carlos Richardson,
noagegiven,677NWRedding
Avenue, warrant Violation of
probation on original charge
of burglary of a structure.


Medicare bilked for inhaler drugs


KELLI KENNEDY
Associated Press

MIAMI A scam
tricked Medicare into pay-
ing for nearly 10 times
more units of an inhaler
drug than were available in
South Florida, costing tax-
payers millions, according
to a federal investigation
released Wednesday.
The scams over an 18-
month period are the
latest to be pulled off in
Miami and its surrounding
communities, which are
the national epicenter for
Medicare fraud.
According to investiga-
tors, Medicare paid for 7
million units of the drug
arformoterol, even though
the manufacturer and the
three largest wholesalers
sold only 750,000 units in
the area in 2008 and the
first half of 2009.


The drug is used to treat
chronic bronchitis and
emphysema and legitimate
sales to patients should have
cost about $3.7 million dur-
ing that time period.
Instead, South Florida
providers, mainly in Miami-
Dade County, were paid $34
million, according to the
report by the Department of
Health and Human Services
Office of Inspector General
that was first obtained by
The Associated Press.
That's just more than half of
the $62 million worth of the
drug that was billed, though
Medicare typically only pays
for a portion of such drug
costs.
Miami is responsible for
roughly $3 billion of the esti-
mated $60 billion to $90 bil-
lion a year in Medicare fraud
committed nationally. The
spike in arformoterol only
came after authorities tried


FLU: Vaccinations still available and recommended

Continued From Page 1A


long-term care facility in Brevard
County, where about 15 percent
of residents and 5 percent of staff
got sick. Fewer than 20 cases were
reported at a skilled nursing facil-
ity in Palm Beach County and at
least eight children came down
with the flu at a Hendry County
school.
"I would suggest everyone who


is three years old or older get a flu
vaccination because this year the flu
vaccine has the H1N1 vaccination
and that's the main reason everyone
needs to be vacccinated," Ridgon
said. "We continue to have out-
breaks of the swine flu (H1N1)."
Health experts said the normal
flu season typically begins in late
September or early October, but


Rigdon said the H1N1 has proven
to be unpredictable.
"It's really hard to tell when the
peak of the flu season is because the
H1N1 is not following the previous
patterns of influenza outbreaks," she
said. "What the alert is telling us is,
we haven't seen our peak yet, but
they are seeing increases through-
out the state."


to crack down on another
inhaler drug, and illustrates
a constant problem plagu-
ing investigators. As authori-
ties have caught onto one
scam, crooks have moved on
to another, such as by shifting
from durable medical equip-
ment and HIV drug scams to
physical therapy and home
health care fraud.
The Centers for Medicare
and Medicaid Services devel-
oped a system in 2008 that
red-flagged claims showing


whether another inhaler
drug, budesonide, exceed-
ed the maximum amount
a doctor could prescribe.
Sales dropped by nearly 50
percent over the next six
months.
Fraudulent provid-
ers quickly realized they
couldn't get as much money
for that drug and began
billing Medicare for arfor-
moterol at rates exceeding
the amount of drugs avail-
able.


-w ~
~.


Apply online at campuscu.com or call 754-2219 today! CAM PUS

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Clay, Columbia, Lake, Marion and Sumter countiesP W credit union


1 Offer does not apply to existing CAMPUS loans. Offer is for new loans only. Credit approval, sufficient income, adequate properly valuation (maximum LTV of 70%), and first mortgage position are
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Lae it 13 W asomNori D.- a ll- Cmps a20 ~ v. W apu,, 0S 3t't.Jnsvleg. *.h .g utrs ak515N 3r t Twr Sur 75S 7t t
ShnstU omH- pighlsCo mn 200W3thAe caa397S oleeREatOaa 44E.Sle SrnsBld0es ain 11 W.r ortR.Sunnri.d 75US w.4


YouIre invited to the



SThe First
resbyterian Church
S'"^ invites the

& community to the
Christmas Eve services.
DECEMBER 24 at 7:00 p.m.
A Christmas pageant led by the Praise
Team and Joy Singers.

DECEMBER 24 at 10:00 p.m
7.g Christmas Eve Service of Lessons and
Carols led by The Chancel Choir and the
Chancel Bell Ringers.

FIRST PRESBYTERANC U H

697 W Bya riv, Lae CtyFL 202


NCUA


LENDER


LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE THURSDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2010


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427













OPINION


Thursday. December 23. 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


0
OP


TH
IN


ER
ION


US strategy

vs. Taliban

shows hints

of doubt


Barack Obama
did his best to put
a positive spin on
the review of the
Afghanistan war, the report
itself offers scant hope that the
United States can achieve its
goals within an acceptable time
frame and at an acceptable cost
The president gamely said that
U.S. strategy was "on track" and
that "considerable gains" were
being made against the Taliban
and al-Qaida, and there is some
evidence of that But the report
makes clear that the gains are
fragile, the momentum reversible
and the conditions going forward
are challenging. In short, it's still
dicey.
The reasons for the lingering
doubts about what is turning out
to be America's longest war are
no mystery.
Absent a commitment to
remain for years, which a war-
weary American public would
find unacceptable, the United
States and its allies cannot fix
what really ails Afghanistan.
In a sense, Obama confirmed
as much, insisting that the
United States would begin a
"responsible reduction" of U.S.
troops from Afghanistan in
mid-2011, a message both to
his domestic audience and to
President Karzai that, yes, the
United States is committed to a
withdrawal even amid the uncer-
tainty.
This is a message that
Afghanistan's president needs to
hear and digest Perhaps this is
his way of putting Karzai at ease,
reassuring the notoriously inse-
cure leader thathe can rely on
American support
Obama faces a delicate balanc-
ing act- staying true to the
withdrawal timeline but ensuring
that Afghanistan never again
becomes a safe haven for ter-
rorists who can threaten U.S.
interests.
He is due to make a decision
next spring on whether to pro-
ceed with the scale-down. By
then, U.S. troops will have been
fighting in Afghanistan for nearly
10 years. Surely that is long
enough.

* The Miami Herald

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman


LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:


news@lakecityreporter.com


Bah humbug to opponents


of season's 'happy holidays'


Tis the season and
one thing 'tis the
season for is people
demanding the end
to the commercializa-
tion of Christmas and the use of
the term "happy holidays."
I say "merry Christmas" to
them for caring. And "happy
holidays" as well, because the
derivation of the word "holi-
days" is "holy days." You can
look it up in a dictionary if you
have any doubts, although real-
ly, you should save your doubts
for the next paragraph.
You see, I have it on doubtful
authority that in olden times
someone with a lisp or an
accent (I trust not Australian)
mangled holy days and it
became "holidays." It may have
been the same unfortunate per-
son who made a mess of "It's
the season" and abbreviated it
as Tis, a ridiculous word but
not the subject of protests.
Ah, yes, protests nothing
quite speaks of Christmas like
well-meaning Christian folk giv-
ing heck to those who dare to
call the holy days holidays.
The American Family
Association is a leading agitator
in opposing the imaginary war
on Christmas. Annually, it runs
a "Naughty or Nice" list of com-
panies that dare to be inclusive
and use "holidays" instead of
Christmas.
This is what the Taliban
would do if they had a family
association, although admitted-
ly, the Taliban, being none too
jolly, might call for the behead-
ing of Santa as well.
But curious people should
wonder why a Christian-asser-
tive group dedicated to making
Jesus the reason for the season
would bring Santa into the dis-
cussion. Naughty or nice is not
an expression found in St Luke,
not even in the newer transla-
tions. In fact, little about what
we associate with Christmas
is in the Gospels, not even the
date Dec. 25.
In fact, if the American Family
Association got its way, then


Reg Henry
rhenry@post-gazette.com
logically Santa, the elves, the
reindeer, the trees, the wreaths,
the mistletoe, the fruitcake,
the illuminated houses and the
stockings hung with care would
be sent to a Devil's Island of cul-
tural isolation because they do
not have biblical sanction.
Christmas would be scrubbed
down to the most basic form.
It would resemble an old-
fashioned Sabbath of infinite
boredom, the sort that gave
Christianity a bad name for so
long.
Because the wise men
brought gifts to the manger,
some gift giving might be
allowed in a pure Christmas,
provided the gifts were frank-
incense and myrrh and not
bought at the mall.
On that dreary day, someone
would start a campaign to put
the commercialization back into
Christmas.
I don't want a Christmas like
that.
With apologies to the
American Family Association, I
want an American Christmas.
I want a religious and a com-
mercial Christmas. I want a
Nativity scene and a blow-up
Santa, preferably Bart Simpson.
I want the midnight services
and the fruitcake the next day,
because nothing makes me sad-
der than to think of an orphan
confectionery with no one to
love it.
I do not want Santa to be
kicked out of Christmas celebra-
tions, because old fat jolly men
must have gainful employment
They can't all write newspaper
columns.
The truth is that two
Christmases exist and they com-


plement each other. The reli-
gious Christmas warms many
a heart and swells the spirit;
the commercial Christmas fills
many a cash register and boosts
the economy.
In America, we are free to
choose our Christmas.
Christians should rejoice and
take it as a compliment that
the teacher who lived 2,000
years ago is remembered even
by those who do not follow
him. If they thought about it,
they might consider Christmas
an opportunity to show what
Christians are made of.
Unfortunately, some give the
impression they are all about
arrogance and bad temper. In
falling over themselves to iden-
tify plots against Christmas,
they forget the Christmas mes-
sage of peace on Earth and
good will among men. It's not
about scolding people for saying
"happy holidays."
People can wish me any
good wishes they like: merry
Christmas, happy holidays,
happy Hanukkah or Kwanza. I
am glad of any good wishes and
I do not presume to dictate to
people the precise sort of good
wishes they must give me.
Maybe it is silly to say "happy
holidays." You can call it politi-
cal correctness, if you like. I call
it simply courtesy the worthy
desire to be inclusive. In any
event, it's not worth making a
fuss about
So what should religious
people do when someone says
"happy holidays"?
How about saying "merry
Christmas" and smiling warmly?
That might make a better
impression than acting like a
jerk and starting a boycott of a
store.
Peace on Earth, goodwill
among men.
That's the ticket to making
the holidays holy days..
Merry Christmas to all and to
all a good night.

* Reg Henry is a columnist for
the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette.


It is amazing that of the
four writings of the
Gospel: Matthew, Mark,
Luke and John, only two
give the story of the birth
of Jesus. Each writer of the
Gospel presents our Lord in a
different way. Matthew presents
our Lord as the King of Israel
and the fact is established that
Jesus is the rightful heir of
the throne of David. Matthew
records the incident of the com-
ing Wise Men from the east to
pay homage and to bring their
gifts to the King.
The Gospel of Luke reports
nothing about those Wise Men.


Instead, Luke records that
which Matthew does not, the
visit of the poor shepherds.
The reason is clear. Matthew
tells us about Jesus, the King,
while Luke records the birth
of a savior who comes to die
on the cross for our sins. Mark
says nothing about the birth. He
writes about Jesus as a servant.
A birth record was not required
for servants in those days.
John has nothing to say about
the birth of Jesus. He presents
Jesus as the eternal, pre-exist-
ing Word of God.
"Thou shalt call his name
Jesus, for he shall save his peo-


ple from their sins" (Matthew
1:21).
Have we forgotten today why
He was born? He came to die,
to give His life so that we might
live. The birth of Christ is not
the important event in the story
of Jesus. His birth was neces-
sary to prepare Him for His
death on the cross.
Remember Christmas is
never celebrated in the Bible.
We are not told to remember
His birth, but we as Christians
are commanded to remember
His death.
Hugh G. Sherrill Jr.
Lake City


Bonnie Erbe
bonnieerbe@compuserve.com


The real

reason

why we


celebrate

t's nice to know there are
still a few pockets and
hollers where Americans
gather to celebrate the
true spirit of Christmas,
not the monster of consumer-
ism run amok that our gift-giv-
ing holiday season has become.
The Zanesville (Ohio) Times
Recorder recounts that 200
people gathered in the town of
White Cottage this past week-
end, to celebrate Christmas as
history says it should be cel-
ebrated:
"I've decided it's time to get
back to the real reason we cel-
ebrate Christmas," the Recorder.
quotes one Christina Fowler
as saying. "As Christians, we
should be concerned with
celebrating the birth of Jesus
not how much crap we can
stuff under a tree. I've tried to
explain to the boys that Santa
is leaving just one gift this year.:,
It's been hard, but I'm sticking
with it"
Religious sentiments aside,
I find Fowler's attitude quite
astute. Would that she were in .
the majority, rather than in the
distinct minority.
We all know the American
economy is built on the backs
of consumers, consumerism,
and the seemingly unquenched
thirst we have for item after
item after item. As Christmas
sales tallies start even well
before Thanksgiving, the media
remind us over and over that
most retailers make more
money in the six weeks preced-
ing Christmas than in the entire
rest of the year. Christmas
sales literally make or break
the U.S. economy and without
consumers' hefty demand for
things, we wouldn't have an
economy.
As far as future generations
go, it's a sorry state of affairs:
iPads and iPhones and barbell
sets and Christmas tree orna-
ments and so on are created at
great cost to the environment
Their inevitable disposal comes
at an even greater cost We're
sucking raw elements out of
the Earth, converting them into
refined materials and producing
saleable goods at a pace way
out of Earth's ability to replen-
ish those raw materials. We're
disposing of used and broken
products in landfills and dumps
at such a rate as to make not
only one's head spin but also
the entire planet
We have two choices: We can
continue to rely on an economy
that is bound to destroy our
habitat and our way of life over
time. Or we can come up with
a new way to build a stronger,
more environmentally friendly
economic base. Personally I
cannot fathom precisely how
the second alternative might
work.
We've already made the con-
version to a knowledge- and
informadon-based economy.
But that hasn't quenched our
thirst for an excess of expen-
sive and environmentally
destructive consumer goods.
We're working on bringing the
country up to speed on green
energy.
We can remind ourselves
that when we are dead and bur-
ied, it won't matter if we drove
a Hyundai or a Ferrari, but it
will matter to future genera-
tions if we leave them an envi-
ronment where they can thrive.


M Bonnie Erbe is a TV host and
writes this column for Scripps
Howard News Service.


4A


OTHER OPINION

Thou shalt call his name Jesus









LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & NATION THURSDAY. DECEMBER 23, 2010


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


Today
Blood Mobile seeks donors '
The LifeSouth Blood Mobile
is seeking donors 12 to 8 p.m.
today at Lake City Mall. Each
donor will receive LifeSouth's
free gift wrapping services and
could possibly win a new Apple
iPad.

Saturday
Christmas Dinner
LAD Soup Kitchen celebrates
it's fifth annual Christmas day din-
ner from 10 a.m. 2 p.m. Saturday
at 127 NE Escambia St. The
menu includes ham, turkey, green
beans, rice pilaf, yams, rolls and
assorted desserts. Donations are
appreciated, but the meal is free
of charge. For more information,
contact Timothy at 386-758-2217.

Wednesday LCMS
Live Performance Lake City
Austin Mor
Fred Perry performs live from dents repre
11 11:45 a.m. Wednesday in
the Dining Hall of the LifeStyle Saturday
Enrichment Center. A game for those
of bingo will follow at 1 p.m. or those
The center is located at 628 SE exercise.
Allison Court. For more informa-
tion, call 386-755-0235. First, t

Friday, Dec. 31 Weight-lu
The Thi
New Year's Bash Surgery S
The LifeStyle Enrichment meetings
Center presents "Rocking The and third
House" beginning at 7 p.m. Dec. month in t
31. Heavy hors d'oeuvres will be City Medi1
served all night, and professional are for pe(
comedians Jamie Morgan, Chase weight los
Holliday and Lisa Best will enter- ing surgery
tain from 8 10 p.m. Tickets are lose weigh
$50 per person, and the event thethinner
is at 628 SE Allison Court. For 386-288-91
ticket information, contact Janet
at 386-755-0235 extension 124. Fverv 1


Every day
Mall Walkers
Rain or shine, the Lake City. -,
Mall is open at 7 a.m. Monday


MS suppO
An MSi
meets eve:
the month
Columbia


COURTESY PHOTO

2 students battle tobacco and hunger
Middle School students Cole Arthor (from left), Kyle Arthor, Haley Cunningham, Brinslee Crews and
ris present donated food items to Scott Elkins, director of the Suwannee Valley Food Bank. The stu-
esented the SWAT Club (Students Working Against Tobacco).


and 10 a.m. Sunday
who want to walk for


Museum, 157 SE Hernando Ave.
Call Karen Cross at (386) 75.5-
2950 or Jane Joubert at (386)
755-5099 for more information.


hird Mondays
Every Tuesday


Dss support group
nner Me Weight Loss
support Group holds
at 7 p.m. on the first
Monday of every
he Classrooms at Lake
cal Center. Meetings
ople that have had
s surgery, contemplat-
ry or just trying to
it on their own. E-mail
me@gmail.com or call
53.

rhird Monday
ort group to meet
support group
ry third Monday of
; at the- Lake City.
County Historical


Geri Actors
The Geri Actors at the
LifeStyle Enrichment Center are
looking for members. Meetings
are 12:45-2 p.m. Tuesday and
Thursday. Anyone hired and
interested in becoming an actor
or actress is invited. Call Frank
at 752-8861.

Domestic violence support
group to meet
A support group for survivors
of domestic violence meets at
5:30 p.m. Tuesday. Child care is
provided. Call Another Way at
386-719-2700.

. Master Gardeners available
The University of Florida ,


Master Gardeners are at the
Columbia County Extension
Office from 9 a.m. to noon
Tuesday. They answer garden-
ing questions and conduct soil
pH tests free of charge. Call
(386) 752-5384, or stop at the
UF/IFAS Extension Office
at the Columbia County fair-
grounds for more information.

Lake City Lions to meet
The Lake City Lions meet at 7
p.m. Tuesday at the Guangdong
restaurant, in the Lake City Mall.
Call Truett George at 386-497-
2050 or Marshall Barnard at 386-
497-3536 for more information.

Square Dancing
The Dixie Dancers weekly
dance is held at 6:30 p.m.
every Tuesday at Teen Town
Community Center. The group
does square and round dancing.
Couples 12 and older are wel-
come. Call 386497-2834.


* To submit your Community
Calendar item, contact Antonia
Robinson at 754-0425 or by
e-mail at arobinson@
lakecityreporter, com.

Every first Tuesday
Habitat for Humanity to meet
Habitat for Humanity will
meet at 7 p.m. the first Tuesday
of every month, at Lake City
Medical Center. Call Audre' J.
Washington at 386-344-9915 for
more information.

Every second Tuesday
Prostate cancer support
group
A support group for prostate
cancer patients and survivors
will be held at 7 p.m. on the sec-
ond Tuesday of every month at
Lake City Medical Center. Call
Ron Peacock at (386) 365-1359
for more information.

LEC Photography Club meets
The LifeStyle Enrichment
Center Photography Club meets
from 2 to 4 p.m. every second
Tuesday. Call 755-0235.

Every third Tuesday
Senator office hours monthly
Legislative staff for State
Senator Steve Oelrich (R-
Gainesville) will hold monthly
office hours the third Tuesday
of each month from 10 a.m. 12'
p.m. in the County Commission
Conference Room and from 2
- 4 p.m. in the Fort White Town'
Hall. Persons interested in meet-
ing with staff may set an appoint-
ment time by calling 352-375-
3555 or walk-ins are welcomed. '

Community Traffic Safety
Team meeting
I The Columbia Community
Traffic Safety Team meets the
third Tuesday of each month at
10 a.m. at the FDOT Operations
Complex, 710 NW Lake Jeffery
Road. The Team discusses traf-
fic hazards and issues on all
roads in Columbia County. Call
the FDOT Public Information
Office for more information at
758-3714. .


Obama signs repeal


of 'don't ask, don't tell'


By PAULINE JELINEK
Associated Press

WASHINGTON -
President Barack Obama
signed a new law Wednesday
that will allow gays for the
first time in history to serve
openly in America's military.
And he urged those kicked
out under the old law to re-
enlist.
Framing the issue as a
matter of civil rights long
denied, Obama said that "we
are a nation that welcomes
the service of every patriot
... a nation that believes that
all men and women are cre-
ated equal."
Repealing the 17-year-old
policy known as "don't ask,
don't tell" in a ceremony that
was alternately emotional
and rousing, the president
said "this law I'm about to
sign will strengthen our
national security and uphold
the ideals that our fighting
men and women risk their
lives to defend."
The new law ends a policy
that forced gays to hide their
sexual orientation or face
dismissal. More than 13,500
people were discharged
under the rule since 1993.
"I hope those ... who've
been discharged under this
discriminatory policy will
seek to re-enlist once the
repeal is implemented,"
Obama said.
"I hope so too," agreed
Zoe Dunning, a former naval
officer now with the advoca-
cy group Servicemembers
Legal Defense Fund.
"We are in two wars and
we need qualified candi-
dates," Dunning said after
the ceremony. She said it
was unclear how many dis-
charged under the old law
might seek to rejoin and
whether all "have complete-
ly healed ... trust the military


is going to treat them fairly."
The question of reinstat-
ing those previously dis-
charged was addressed in
a months-long study done
by the Pentagon earlier this
year on how the armed forc-
es might go about imple-
menting a repeal of don't ask


don't tell.
The study recommend-
ed that the Department of
Defense issue guidance to
all the service branches
permitting those previous-
ly separated on the basis of
homosexual conduct "to be
considered for re-entry."


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Merry Christmas and Happy New Year
from your good neighbor agents.
John Kasak and John Burns.


F' -


John A. Kasak CLU CPCU
State Farm Agent
Lake City, FL 32025
Bus: 386-752-7521 4


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Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424









LAKE CITY REPORTER


HEALTH


THURSDAY. DECEMBER 23, 2010


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


ON HEALTH


Dr. Peter Gott


Teflon

wrapped

in safety

concerns

DEAR DR.
GOTF: My
wife is sys-
tematically
discarding
all of our Teflon-coated
pots, pans and utensils in
response to a perceived
concern that Teflon is a
health risk. Furthermore,
we are significantly reduc-
ing our purchases of
canned goods because of
the plastic lining or thin
film placed inside cans.
Plastic ware is also being
replaced with glass. Are
there any realistic or
measurable health issues
associated with Teflon and
plastic to justify such a
concern?
DEAR READER: I had
to research the topic care-
fully because of so many
conflicting views on the
subject. Let's determine
whether we can make
some sense of the findings.
In January 2005, CBS
Healthwatch covered the
Teflon issue, reporting
that people throughout the
United States could face "a
potential risk of develop-
mental and other adverse
effects" from exposure to
low levels of a chemical
used in making the non-
stick substance Teflon.
The EPA issued a draft
assessment of the possible
risks of perfluorooctanoic
acid and its salts, known as
PFOA, or C8.
The agency emphasized
its assessment was prelimi-
nary and that there were
significant uncertainties
in its quantitative assess-
ment of the risks of PFOA.
Studies performed on ani-
mals revealed that PFOA
is carcinogenic in rats, but
the potential hazard for
humans is less certain.
The assessment sug-
gested that the chemical
targets the liver of rodents
and went on to indicate
PFOA could raise choles-
terol and triglyceride levels
in people. DuPont, the
maker of Teflon, reported
that their study failed to
disclose any health prob-,
lems.
They further stated that
their study failed to find an
association between elevat-
ed PFOA blood levels and
liver function, blood counts,
prostate cancer, leukemia
or multiple myeloma.
Health Watch Center
indicates Teflon has
received a bad rap of late.
The connection between
Teflon and serious health
problems is tenuous. PFOA
is used in the manufacture
of the coating, rather than
being found in the final
product. So it seems coated
products can be safe to use
as long as we buy good-
quality products, don't heat
pans to very high tem-
peratures (above 500 F),
and use wooden or plastic
. spoons and spatulas when
stirring or turning foods.
Nonstick coatings may
begin to deteriorate at
temperatures above 500 EF
Coatings may decompose
and emit fumes.
DuPont indicates that
Teflon will not decompose
until temperatures reach
about 600 F, and cook-
ing anything at that tem-
perature would burn food
beyond any edible state.

* Dr. Peter Gott is a retired
physician and the author of
the book "Dr. Gott's No Flour,


No Sugar Diet," available at
most chain and independent
bookstores, and the recently
published "Dr. Gott's No
Flour, No Sugar Cookbook."


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Elise Lutz looks into a mirror and admires her new prosthetic ear at the Anaplastology Clinic in Durham, N.C. 'It kind of
took forever, but it was worth it,' says Elise, 14, as she headed to show her transformation to her dad and sisters. 'I'm
so excited, I'm more than 100 percent excited.'



Hollywood-style special


effects give girl new ear


By LAURAN NEERGAARD
AP Medical Writer
WASHINGTON
Elise Lutz never
let her friends
see what was
left of her ear.
She'd care-
fully style her long hair
into a one-sided ponytail,
or swelter under a swim
cap for hours at meets,
to cover the molten lump
from a severe burn as
a toddler in her native
China.
But as a teenager,
the North Carolina girl
expressed her desire
to be whole again with
a simple request: She
really wanted pierced
earrings. Thus began a
months-long quest for a
new right ear, one made
of silicone but so lifelike
that it even glows a bit in
the sun like real skin.
Elise benefited from a
little known field called
anaplastology, where
medical artists make
Hollywood-like special
effects come alive to
fix disfigurements that
standard plastic surgery
cannot.
"It kind of took forever,
but it was worth it," says
Elise, 14, as she headed
to show her transforma-
tion to her dad and sis-


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386-719-9663


ters. "I'm more than 100
percent excited."
No messy glue-on
prosthetic that she might
accidentally knock off.
Elise had tried that once
and hated it. This time,
she would go under
the knife to have rods
implanted in her skull
to snap her new ear into
place and hold it even
when this passionate
swimmer dives into the
pool.
"People who have
implant-retained ears or
noses or whatever usu-
ally think of them really
as their own body," says
Jerry Schoendorf, who
with his colleague at The
Anaplastology Clinic in
Durham, N.C., and
surgeons at nearby
Duke University Medical
Center created Elise's
ear.
"It's the Rolls Royce of
what we can offer," adds
fellow anaplastologist Jay
McClennen.
Facial prosthetics
- made to counter dam-
age from cancer, trauma,
birth defects haven't
gained the attention of
artificial legs and arms.
The specialists who craft
them can be hard to
find: The International
Anaplastology
Association counts just


150 members worldwide.
But facial prosthetics
are becoming more real-
istic and longer-lasting,
and Elise's journey offers
a glimpse of the tricks
that help: Titanium rods
adapted from dentistry
that bond with bone to
hold them in place. More
flexible silicones. Even
"flocking," using those
nylon particles that make
the velvety insides of
jewelry boxes can help
give silicone "skin" more
dimension and not in
flesh tones, but flecks of
bright reds, plums, blues,
oranges.
Patients "can't believe
all those colors go into
making that skin," says
McClennen, who now
fixes faces using tech-
niques honed in previous
careers to "age" actors in
the movies, and in foren-
sic reconstruction.
No one knows for sure
how Elise was burned.
Probably, boiling water
sloshed down her head
and right side, says Kim
Williams of Wake Forest,
N.C., who with her hus-
band adopted Elise from
a Chinese orphanage at
age 9. Plastic surgery
enabled hair to cover the
scar-riddled right side
of her scalp, a shield as


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Elise learned English
and met new friends.
Plastic surgeons
started but abandoned
ear reconstruction.
Prosthetics made to glue
on daily are a more com-
mon option, especially
for cancer patients whose
doctors need to regularly
check for recurrences.
But that didn't work for
Elise. Her scars inter-
fered with a straight fit,
and crusty adhesive lined
edges where she didn't
clean the prosthetic well
enough.
Then Schoendorf
suggested an implant-
.retained ear: It would
cost about $8,000 to
$10,000, nearly double
an adhesive-retained
prosthesis, plus surgery.
But where a glue-on ear
prosthetic might last
about three years before
wearing out, the implant-
retained one should last
twice as long, he says.
Replacements will fit onto
those same rods, mak-
ing surgery a one-time
hurdle.


BRIEFS

Abbott recalls
testing strips
WASHINGTON
- The Food and Drug
Administration said
Wednesday that Abbott
Laboratories is recalling up
to 359 million testing strips
used by diabetics because
they can give falsely low
blood sugar readings.
The testing strips are
used to help diabetes
patients check their blood
sugar levels. But the FDA
says the products being
recalled by Abbott can give
inaccurately low measure-
ments. As a result, patients
may try to raise their blood
sugar levels unnecessarily
or fail to detect dangerously
high blood sugar levels.
The FDA said the prob-
lems are caused by a defect
that limits the amount of
blood absorbed by each
strip.
North Chicago-based
Abbott is recalling 359 lots
marketed under a half-
dozen brand names, includ-
ing: Precision Xceed Pro,
Precision Xtra, Medisense
Optium, Optium, OptiumEZ
and ReliOn Ultima.

Study: Echinacea
won't treat colds
NEW YORK Got the
sniffles? The largest study
of the popular herbal rem-
edy echinacea finds it won't
help you get better any
sooner.
The study of more than
700 adults and children sug-
gests the tiniest possible
benefit about a half-day
shaved off a weeklong cold
and slightly milder symp-
toms. But that could have
occurred by chance.
For most people, the
potential to get relief a few
hours sooner probably isn't
worth the trouble and cost
of taking the supplement,
researchers said.
With no cure for the com-
mon cold, Americans spend
billions on over-the-counter
pills, drops, sprays and
other concoctions to battle
their runny noses, scratchy
throats and nagging coughs,
Some turn to echinacea,
a top seller marketed as
a product that helps the
immune system fight infec-
tions.
In the past, some studies
found it did nothing to pre-
vent or treat colds; others
showed modest benefit.
* Associated Press


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Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@oakectyreportercom


Lake City Reporter




SPORTS


Thursday. December 23. 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


Broncos cast fortunes


with Tebow rest of way


Former Gator to start
no matter whether
Orton healthy or not.
By PAT GRAHAM
Associated Press
ENGLEWOOD, Colo. It's
Tim Tebow time for the remain-,
der of the season whether Kyle
Orton likes the situation or not.
Orton said he was informed
by the Denver Broncos that the'
rookie will start not only Sunday
against Houston, but in the sea-
son finale the following week
when San Diego visits Invesco
Field.
Even with his bruised ribs
almost healed, Orton, who was
in the midst of his most pro-
lific passing season, will watch
Tebow just like everyone else.
Orton was unhappy over the
decision that leaves .his future
with the organization quite
hazy, especially with a new front


office likely coming in after a
dismal season that cost Josh
McDaniels his job.
"I said I'd like to finish the
season. That wasn't the option
that was presented," said
Orton, who signed an extension
through 2011 last summer. "I
don't know if I'll be here next
year. We'll justhave to wait and
see what shakes out with the
organization."
For now, the Broncos (3-11)
are casting their fortunes with
Tebow.
The first-round pick out of
Florida was solid in his first
start last weekend in Oakland,
even if the playbook was scaled
back for him.
Tebow threw for a pedestrian
138 yards, most of his throws of
the nice and safe variety to the
outside.
But he did make plays hap-
pen with his legs, including a
40-yard TD scamper on a missed
assignment that was intended to


be a draw to Correll Buckhalter.
Tebow finished with 78 yards
rushing, the second-highest sin-
gle game total ever by a Broncos
quarterback.
His performance did come
with some friendly advice from
interim coach Eric Studesville
- slide more.
At 6-foot-3 and 245 pounds,
Tebow may be built more like a
fullback, but all those hits from
linebackers and defensive line-
men tend to take a toll.
"You can talk to him about
things like that but those
instincts are just in him,"
Studesville said. "Hopefully we
can keep him healthy as long
as possible doing those things
because we know the violence
of this game. But he plays this
game how it's supposed to be
played and some- of that is himn
getting bounced around out
there."
Tebow insists that's simply
the way he's wired.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Denver Broncos quarterback Tim Tebow (15) is sacked by Oakland Raiders
defensive tackle Tommy Kelly (93) and defensive end Matt Shaughnessy
Sunday in Oakland, Calif.


Local


effort for


All-Stars


Columbia, Fort
White will take
part in game.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com
For the fourth-consecu-
tive year, the Columbia
Youth Football Association
will host the East-West
Senior All-Star Football
Game at Memorial Stadium
on Jan. 15. This year, the
CYFA will add a premium
sponsor as Dick's Sporting
Goods steps in as primary
sponsor.
To achieve the sponsor-
ship, the CYFA reached out
to a familiar source. Bryant
Crews, who graduated from
Columbia High; felt hon-
ored to be able to help the
All-Star game secure a pre-.
mium sponsorship.
"Being from Lake City
I wanted to do anything I
could to help out the com-
munity," Crews said. "When
I first asked about it, there
wasn't a lot of interest,
because there's not a Dick's
in the area. We put together
a new marketing plan, and
I was able to express that a
lot of people from Lake City
travel to Jacksonville. The
new marketing helped out,
ALL-STAR continued on 2B


4th Annual HS All-Star

Football Game



S DICK '


)


SPORTING 80008


January 15, 2011
at Memorial Stadium Lake City, FL

BRANDON FINLEY/Lake City Reporter
Sponsors and committee members come together for the unveiling of the Dick's Sporting Goods Fourth Annual East-West High School All-Star Football Game
on Jan. 15 in Lake City. Members (from left) include William Murphy, Marquis Morgan, Tara Black, Mario Coppock, Paulette Lord, Harvey Campbell,
Adee Farmer, Bryant Crews and Clara Crews.


AP: Temple hires

Florida offensive

coordinator Addazio


Gators assistant
replaces Golden
as head coach.
By MARK LONG
Associated Press
GAINESVILLE After
losing Al Golden to Miami,
Temple turned to the
Sunshine State to find his
replacement.
The Owls hired Florida
offensive coordinator Steve
Addazio to replace Golden,
according to a person
familiar with the situation.
The person spoke to The
Associated Press on condition
of anonymity Wednesday
because Temple has not
publicly announced the hir-
ing.


Addazio is expected to
be formally introduced at a
news conference Thursday,
but remain at Florida
through the Outback Bowl
against Penn State on
Jan. 1.
The 51-year-old Addazio
has been a member of Urban
Meyer's staff at Florida the
last six years. He has was
an assistant at Syracuse
(1995-98), Notre Dame
(1999-2001) and Indiana
(2002-04). His only head
coaching experience came
at Cheshire High School in
Connecticut (1988-94).
Addazio was one of
Florida's best recruit-,
ers under Meyer, landing
some of the top talent in the
ADDAZIO continued on 2B


Gators bounce

back with win

over Radford


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Florida's Chandler Parsons (25) goes up for two points
against Raford during the first half Wednesday in
Gainesville.


Walker's 20 points
leads UF after loss
to Jacksonville.
By MARK LONG
Associated Press
GAINESVILLE- Erving
Walker scored 20 points,
Kenny Boynton added 11
arid No. 20 Florida beat
overmatched Radford 66-55
on Wednesday night.
The Gators bounced back
from a numbing home loss
to Jacksonville, but prob-
ably did little to avoid falling
out of the rankings for the
second time this season.
Chandler Parsons fin-


ished with nine points, eight
rebounds and five assists for
Florida (9-3), which opened
the season ranked ninth but
dropped steadily after close
wins over Morehead State,
Florida Atlantic and Florida
State. The Gators fell out
of the AP poll following a
three-point loss to Central
Florida earlier this month.
Florida regained its rank-
ing after upsetting then-
No. 6 Kansas State last
weekend, but followed that
with the lackluster loss to
Jacksonville on Monday.
Florida had little trou-
ble with Radford (2-9),
which got 15 points from
Johnathan Edwards.


I


v












LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS THURSDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2010 Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TV sports
Today
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
8 p.m.
ESPN Poinsettia Bowl, Navy at San
Diego St.
GOLF
3 p.m.
TGC Japan Golf Tour, Dunlop
Phoenix, third round, at Miyazaki, Japan
(same-day tape)
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
8 p.m.
ESPN2 Georgetown at Memphis
10 p.m.
ESPN2 Diamond Head Classic,
semifinal, at Honolulu
NBA BASKETBALL
8:15 p.m.
TNT San Antonio at Orlando
10:30 p.m.
TNT Miami at Phoenix
NFL FOOTBALL
8 p.m.
NFL Carolina at Pittsburgh

FOOTBALL

College bowl games
Tuesday
Beef 'O' Brady's Bowl
Louisville 31, Southern Mississippi 28
Wednesday
MAACO Bowl
At Las Vegas
Utah vs. Boise State (n)
Today
Poinsettia Bowl
At San Diego
San Diego State (8-4) vs. Navy (9-3),
8 p.m. (ESPN)
Friday
Hawaii Bowl
At Honolulu
Hawaii (10-3) vs. Tulsa (9-3), 8 p.m.
(ESPN)

NFL standings
AMERICAN CONFERENCE
East
W L TPct PF PA
x-New England 12 2 0.857446 303


N.Y. Jets
Miami
Buffalo

Indianapolis
Jacksonville
Tennessee
Houston

x-Pittsburgh
Baltimore
Cleveland
Cincinnati

Kansas City
San Diego
Oakland
Denver


10 4 0.714295 259
7 7 0.500239 261
4 10 0.286273 353
South
W L TPct PF PA
8 6 0.571 381 342
8 6 0.571 319 365
6 8 0.429 322 282
5 9 0.357 333 386
North
W L TPct PF PA
10 4 0.714307 220
10 4 0.714324 253
5 9 0.357252 271
3 II 0.214281 362
West
W L TPct PF PA
9 5 0.643322 281
8 6 0.571 388 260
7 7 0.500 353 330
3 11I 0.214292 415


NATIONAL CONFERENCE


Philadelphia
N.Y. Giants
Washington
Dallas

x-Atlanta
New Orleans
Tampa Bay
Carolina

y-Chicago
Green Bay
Minnesota
Detroit

St. Louis
Seattle
San Francisco
Arizona


East
W L
10 4
9 5
5 9
5 9
South
12 2
10 4
8 6
2 12
North
W L
10 4
8 6
5 9
4 10
West
W L
6 8
6 8
5 9
4 10


TPct PF PA
0.714412 339
0.643 360 288
0.357 268 343
0.357 354 396
T Pct PF PA
0.857369 261
0.714 354 270
0.571 280 290
0.143 183 350
T Pct PF PA
0.714293 242
0.571 333 220
0.357244 314
0.286 308 329

T Pct PF PA
0.429 258 295
0.429 279 363
0.357250 314
0.286 255 370


y-clinched division
x-clinched playoff spot
Today's Game
Carolina at Pittsburgh, 8:20 p.m.
Saturday's Game
Dallas at Arizona, 7:30 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Tennessee at Kansas City, I p.m.
San Francisco at St. Louis, I p.m.
SN.Y.Jets at Chicago, I'p.m.
Baltimore at Cleveland, I p.m.
New England at Buffalo, I p.m.
Detroit at Miami, I p.m.
Washington at Jacksonville, I p.m.


Indianapolis at Oakland, 4:05 p.m.
Houston at Denver, 4:05 p.m.
San Diego at Cincinnati, 4:05 p.m.
N.Y. Giants at Green Bay, 4:15 p.m.
Seattle at Tampa Bay, 4:15 p.m.
Minnesota at Philadelphia, 8:20 p.m.
Monday's Game
New Orleans at Atlanta, 8:30 p.m.

BASKETBALL

NBA schedule
Today's Games
San Antonio at Orlando, 8 p.m.
Milwaukee at Sacramento, 10 p.m.
Miami at Phoenix, 10:30 p.m.
Friday's Games
No games scheduled

AP Top 25 schedule
Today's Games
No. 2 Ohio State vs. Oakland, Mich.,
8 p.m.
No. 10 Georgetown at No. 16
Memphis, 8 p.m. '
No. I i Kansas State vs. UMKC, 8 p.m.
No. 15 Baylor vs. Mississippi State
or Washington State at the Stan Sheriff
Center, Honolulu, 4:30 or 6:30 p.m.
No. 17 Minnesota vs. South Dakota
State, 8 p.m.
No. 19 Tennessee, vs. Belmont,
7:30 p.m.
No. 23 BYU vs. UTEP, 9 p.m.

HOCKEY

NHL schedule
Today's Games
Atlanta at Boston, 7 p.m.
Florida at Buffalo, 7 p.m.
N.Y. Islanders at New Jersey, 7 p.m.
Tampa Bay at N.Y. Rangers, 7 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Washington, 7 p.m.
Montreal at Carolina, 7 p.m.
Vancouver at Columbus, 7 p.m.
Detroit at St. Louis, 8 p.m.
Ottawa at Nashville, 8 p.m.
Calgary at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Minnesota at Colorado, 9 p.m.
Edmonton at Los Angeles, 10:30 p.m.
Phoenix at San Jose, 10:30 p.m.
Friday's Games
No games scheduled


Grant's 25 pace Miami


to 73-67 victory over Rice


Associated Press

LAS VEGAS Malcolm
Grant scored 25 points,
highlighted by six 3-point-
ers, to lead Miami over
Rice 73-67 on Wednesday
in the third round of the
Las Vegas Holiday Hoops
Classic.
Grant, who missed just
two shots from behind the
arc, also went 5 of 6 from
the free throw line for the


Hurricanes (9-3).
"I'm trying to get the
win," said Grant, whose
team is playing three games
in three days in front of
sparse crowds at the South
Point Casino. "Ift's difficult.
We're out there playing for
each other."
Grant was one point shy
of a career high and had
his streak of consecutive
free throws stopped at 33
when he missed with 4:04.


left.
"Grant was outstand-
ing," Miami coach Frank
Haith said. "He made some
big shots. He got loose,
and he also drove the
ball."
Sophomore forward
Arsalan Kazemi led the
Owls (5-5) with a career-
high 26 points. With his 14
rebounds, Kazemi had his
seventh double-double this
season.


ADDAZIO: Takes over as Temple coach


Continued From Page 1B

northeast and earning an
associate head coach title
this year after he helped
keep the program's recruit-
ing class together during
Meyer's leave of absence.
He also was a key moti-
vator, with his "Vitamin
Addazio" speeches getting
rave reviews.
But Addazio was under
fire most of this season,
getting the blame for an
offense that sputtered in
just about every game.
Many felt Addazio should
have done more to tweak
the offense around quarter-
back John Brantley. Others
said Addazio was spread
too thin, pointing out the
offensive line's sub-par play


and some questionable play
calling in clutch situations.
The Gators rank 80th in
the country in total offense
(356.8 yards a game)
and tied for 61st in sacks
allowed (23).
He joined Meyer's staff
as tight ends coach in 2005
and has steadily increased
his role in the offense.
He became offensive line
coach in 2007, assistant
head coach in 2008, then
took over play-calling duties
last season.
The Gators haven't been
the same since.
In 2007, Florida aver-
aged 38.1 points and 436.5
yards in conference play.
In 2008, scoring increased


to 44.9 points while yards
dropped slightly to 429
yards a game.
With Tim Tebow return-
ing for his senior season
and Addazio taking over the
offense in 2009, the Gators
averaged 27.6 points and
375 yards. Although points
were about the same this
season, yards were down
considerably.
At Temple, Addazio can
only hope to build upon
what Golden accom-
plished.
The Owls went 3-31 in
the three seasons before
Golden arrived. They went
1-11 in his first season
there, then won 26 games
over the past four years.


ALL-STAR: Game features local teams

Continued From Page 1B


and in the end, it's all about
getting kids a chance to go
to college."
Dick's part will be played
by helping with jerseys and
coaching packets.
The game will feature
Baker, Columbia, Fort
White, Hamilton Stake and
Union County high schools
on the East side and Bell,
Branford, Dixie, Madison,
Mayo, Perry, Suwannee
and Trenton County high
schools for the West.
William Murphy contin-
ues to serve as chairman
of the game after serving
in the same capacity for the


previous three outings.
-"The point is to give
the small schools another
chance to play and devel-
op film against better ath-
letes," Murphy said. "Most
teams only have three or
four really good athletes,
and this is a chance to play.
against the best. For some
seniors, it's just the chance
to play one more game,
meet people and have fun."
Murphy said that there
have been at least five play-
ers who went on to play
college after the exposure
of the game.
Columbia and Fort White


will be among the teams
with the most players repre-
sented. Columbia will send
over Ben Bell, Devonte
Bell, Justin Kennedy,
Cameron Wimberly, Jordan
Morris, Danny Ratliff,
Alex Sromlski, Markem
Gaskins, Altris Henry and
Timmy Jernigani.
Fort White will be rep-
resented by Kurtis Norris,
JR Dixon, Donnell Sanders,
Josh Faulkner, Xavier
Wyche, Zach Bentley, Kyle
Lelarid, Darius Pollard,
Adonis Simmons, Dylan
Newman and Anthony
Pearce.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Oct. 5 file photo, Penn State coach Joe Paterno answers a question at his weekly
news conference in State College, Pa. Paterno is looking at the Outback Bowl as a
combination of this season's final game and the opener of the 2011 campaign.


Paterno hopes win over


Gators jump starts 2011


Associated Press

CLEARWATER Penn
State coach Joe Paterno
is looking at the Outback
Bowl as a combination of
this season's final game and
the opener of the 2011 cam-
paign.
The Nittany Lions con-
tinued their preparation on
Wednesday for the New
Year's Day game against
Florida with a practice ses-
sion at the Philadelphia
Phillies' spring training
complex.
"We've got a very young
team," a spry-looking
Paterno said the day after
his 84th birthday. "We've
got about 60 kids here that
are freshmen and sopho-
mores. Some of them are
pretty good athletes that
need some work. So I think
in that sense, you're hop-
ing that you can get some
things developed that are
going to carry over to next
year. But no matter what,
you've got to play a team
like Florida, you ought to
try and win."
Florida's Urban Meyer
will be coaching his last
game with the Gators on
Jan. 1. He announced his
resignation earlier this
month to spend more time
with his family and because
of health concerns.
"It ought to be an inter-
esting game because of
that," Paterno said. "I hate
to see Urban get out of it


because he's been a good
coach and he's been a good
person. You hate to see col-
lege (football) lose guys like
that. I feel fortunate that
we're here and particularly
playing against a team with
the tradition of Florida."
Paterno, major college
football's winningest coach
is wrapping up his record
45th season on the side-
line and shows no signs
of stepping down anytime
soon. He's also the all-time
leader in bowl wins with 24.
Paterno is under contract




Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
DEVEL


through the 2011 season.
Both teams have 7-5
records.
"Florida's got a team with
a lot of ability," Paterno
said. "A little bit inconsis-
tent, and that's about the
same as we are. We've been
a little bit inconsistent. At
times we've looked like a
decent football team. We've
got to play our game and
we've got to be ready for
anything. I think it matches
up as a really good football
game. I think it's going to
be a fun game to watch."

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek


Ans:
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday'sI Jumbles: KNAVE SINGE HICCUP CHEERY
I Answer: An autumn walk in the park can lead to this
SCENIC "CHANGE"


ACROSS

1 Energy
4 Galloped
8 Mild oath
12 Santa winds
'13 Big Dipperbear
14 Eggnog time
15 Disagreement
17 Part of GTO
18 Exercise togs
19 Zorro's
farewell
21 Edible roots
23 Porgy's love
24 Memento
27 Potter's need
29 GI mail drop
30 Trauma after-
math
32 Fictional gov-
erness
36 Fix up
38 Salt Lake state
40 SOS word
41 Lavish bash
43 Urgent
45 Slangy
courage


47 Clammy
49 Stand in good

51 Fishing ves-
sels
55 Destroy
56 TV coverage
58 Friendly
59 With, to Yves
60 Baby fox
61 Galaxy unit
62 Stoolie
63 Road twist

DOWN

1 Felt boots
2 Plenty,
to a poet
3 Window part
4 Harem
owners
5 Light
refractor
6 PC button
7 Information
8 School subject
9 Common
Market money


Answer to Previous Puzzle

VER Y GAS 'CLO
ODI E RYE AIDA
L MA OLEANDER
TERESA LASS
ES RID

ESNA V I CAAGRSM

TVA I L GU NS
ENAB LE-OIT


ANO AMA FIIE F


V E A GEIO RE
IM^SAB--IREB^ '


10 Seminar
11 Mammoth Cave
loc.
16 Ms. Dunaway
20 Two-bagger
(abbr.)


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QulllDrlverBooks.comI


22 Coasted
24 Blacken
25 Unfold, in
verse
26 Down for the
count
28 Mr. Levin
31 Snipped off
33 That means -

34 Muddy track
35 Before
37 More frequent-
ly
39 Place to laze
42 That
muchacha
44 Form 1040
experts
45 Astronaut's
garb (hyph.)
46 City on the
Mohawk
48 Quaking tree
50 Hard of hear-
ing
52 Salad veggie
53 Mr. Kristoff-
erson
54 Tennis units
55 HMO staffers
57 Roman six-
teen


12-23 2010 by UFS, Inc.


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS THURSDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2010


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420














Auburn QB Newton


wins AP Player of Year M .


By JOHN ZENOR
Associated Press

AUBURN, Ala. Cam
Newton lifted Auburn from
the back of the Top 25 to
No. 1 in the nation.
The Heisman Trophy-
winning quarterback led the
Tigers into the national title
game against No. 2 Oregon
with a mix of flair and poise
and enough highlight reel
plays to widely split the vote
among a handful of coaches
and teammates asked for
their favorite.
Newton has already raked
in the Heisman Trophy and
Davey O'Brien and Maxwell
awards for his spectacular
season. He added AP Player
of the Year to his collection
on Wednesday.
An NCAA investigation
into Newton's recruit-
ment, which threw his eli-
gibility into doubt during
November, had no effect
on how he played down the
stretch or the voting for
the AP award. It was about
as lopsided as the Heisman
vote.
Newton received 51 votes
from the 60-memberAPfoot-
ball poll panel. Boise State
quarterback Kellen Moore
received three, Stanford
quarterback Andrew Luck
got two and four ballots
went unreturned.
In less .than a year,
Newton has gone from
the obscurity of junior col-
lege to helping transform'
a team that went 8-5 last
season and started this one
ranked No. 22 to a perfect
Southeastern Conference
championship.
It wasn't all about the big
plays, though. Offensive
coordinator Gus Malzahn


said he was more impressed
by Newton's leadership in
repeatedly bringing the
team from behind, including
a 24-0 deficit at Alabama.
"The sign of a special
quarterback is one that has
the abilities to make his
teammates better and make
his teammates believe in
things that maybe they
wouldn't believe without
him," Malzahn said. "We've
faced some major adversity
earlier in the year when we
didn't know each other that
well.
"We were down to
Clemson 17-0 at home and
it was ugly as all get out.
But he didn't change then.
He's a rock, as far as all
that's concerned. Doesn't
panic."
It doesn't hurt that
Newton's 6-foot-6 and
250 pounds with decep-
tive speed, nifty? open-field
moves, power and a nice
arm. He broke the single-
season SEC rushing record
for a quarterback in the
eighth game, a 28-carry,
217-yard effort against LSU.
Malzahn also says Newton
has proven he's "not a good
thrower, he's an excellent
thrower."
As the season wore on,
Newton's skills bloomed
and not even a scandal
could slow him.
He deftly played through
an NCAA investigation
into a pay-for-play recruit-
ing attempt involving his
father, Cecil, at Mississippi
State. The NCAA said Cecil
Newton sought payment
from the Bulldogs, but
there was no evidence that
his son or Auburn knew
about it.
The week before the SEC


title game, the NCAA said
Newton could play and he
accounted for six touch-
downs in a 56-17 victory
against South Carolina.
That locked up a spot in the
BCS title game on Jan. 10 in
Glendale, Ariz.
It's the second straight
season Newton has led his
team to the national cham-
pionship game. He guided
Blinn College in Brenham,
Texas, to the JUCO cham-
pionship last year only
few noticed.
"'We probably have more
people in this room here
alone than the whole junior
college national champion-
ship. game," Newton, said
recently.
Auburn coach Gene
Chizik was asked about the
highs and lows of Newton's
season. He confined his
answer to the field.
"I don't recall a lot of
lows with him, but I recall
a lot of highs," Chizik said.
"I'm just impressed with
him period, both as a per-
son on and off the field and
the way he has progressed
as a football player for us in
this system week by week.
Obviously, he's one of the
huge reasons why we're
here, along with many oth-
ers."
A snapshot view Newton's
on-the-field exploits
includes a handful of plays
that helped a player whose
bio consumes a scant quar-
ter of a page in Auburn's
media guide become the
biggest thing on The Plains
since Bo Jackson.
Newton's choice for his
top play is TBA.
"I hope my favorite play
comes during this BCS
championship game," he


..... ......
:. '

ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Sept. 9 file photo, Auburn quarterback Cameron Newton (2) struggles to ward off a
tackle by Mississippi State linebacker Chris White (50) in Starkville, Miss.


said. "I still have one more
game to play and I prob-
ably could tell you after this
game."
Other players have
already picked favorites
going into the game.
Against Kentucky,
Newton leapt in the air
and, falling backward out
of bounds, managed to flick
the ball downfield for a 33-
yard completion to Kodi
Burns.
"He scrambled out of the
pocket and had guys all over
him, fell out of bounds and
threw it sideways about 45
yards on a scramble play,"
Malzahn said. "It's one of


those plays when it hap-
pens right in front of you,
you say did that really just
happen?"
. Not surprisingly, that was
also Burns' choice for favor-
ite play.
A 71-yard touchdown
run in the opener against
Arkansas State before
Malzahn really turned
Newton loose as a runner
20-30 times a game.
"We had like a play-action
rollout to the right side, and
I think they just blitzed into
where he was supposed to
be rolling out and he just
took off up the middle and
basically followed (tailback


Onterio McCalebb) where
the fake was going ard just
took off down the sideline,"
recalled backup quarter-
back Barrett Trotter. "It
was a long, long run. That
being the first game of the
year, I think that was one of
the most impressive plays I
can think of."
M Guard Byron Isom
chose a much shorter
power run when Newton
steamrolled Arkansas line-
backer Jerico Nelson for a
touchdown.
"It was a counter play,
and I had pulled, and he ran
over the linebacker into the
end zone," Isom said.


What comes after streak for UConn?


DOUG FEINBERG
Associated Press

HARTFORD, Conn.
- All the excitement
that came with eclipsing
the UCLA men's mark of
88-straight wins has qui-
eted down, and top-ranked
Connecticut presses on.
The next significant mile-
stone is an even 100, and
after that, another national
title.
Coach Geno Auriemma
has always preached that it
is championships his team
chases, not streaks. No. 89
certainly had a champion-
ship feel to it, though, from
the way the team danced at
midcourt in celebration to
the congratulatory phone
call from President Barack
Obama.
How could it not? The
Huskies passed one of the
most revered marks in
sports Tuesday night.
Still, UConn is only 11
games into their young
season and has a lot of
basketball left to be played
before trying for their third


straight national champion-
ship and eighth overall.
"It's kind of cool that this
game happened not even in
the middle of our season,"
said Maya Moore, who had
a career-high 41 points in
the 93-62 win- over Florida
State. "Now we have this
high, but we can still play.
So I love it. I'm ready to
play the next game, actu-
ally."
After a few days off for
the holidays, UConn will
travel to California to face
Pacific before a show-
down with No. 8 Stanford
on Dec. 30. The Cardinal
were one of two teams to
come within single digits of
beating the Huskies during
their record-setting run.
Stanford also was the last
team to hand them a loss,
beating them in the 2008
national semifinals.
The schedule doesn't get
any easier after the New
Year, when the Big East
season kicks into full gear.
The conference has seven
teams in the Top 25.
January also brings a trip


to No. 10 North Carolina. If
UConn can make it to the
end of that month unbeaten,
win No. 100 would come at
home against third-ranked
Duke on Jan. 31.
Then again, ranked
opponents haven't provid-
ed much of a challenge the
past couple of years.
UConn has won by an
average of nearly 25 points
against Top 25 teams, and
rarely have found them-
selves in trouble in those
31 games. There's no rea-
son to think anything will
change for the Huskies,
not as long as Moore is in
uniform.
"We value the intangi-
bles," she said. 'To come
to practice, to work as hard
as we do, to focus as much
as we do, to be aware, to
pay attention, to put that
much emotional energy
and effort into everything
we do on the court, it's
remarkable."
If winning streaks were
the motivation, Auriemma
could use the 131 straight
games that Wayland Baptist


won from 1953-58 to keep
spurring his team on. Then
again, that was before the
NCAA took over women's
basketball and those games
were played 6-on-6.
The excellence and con-
fidence that defines great
teams defines this one
because Auriemma won't
have it any other way.
Perfection is expected, not
simply a goal.
Auriemma and his staff
will have Tuesday's rout
of the Seminoles broken
down on video for his team
to watch when they return
from the holidays. He'll
point otit every little thing
they did wrong, just as he's
done after the previous 88
victories.
With that kind of drive,
who knows when this
streak will end?
Auriemma joked
with the president after
beating -Florida State
that the Huskies haven't
lost since Obama was
inaugurated. They just
might not until he leaves
office.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Connecticut head coach Geno Auriemma (left) poses with his team after their 93-62 win over Florida State during an NCAA
basketball game in Hartford, Conn., Tuesday. Connecticut set the NCAA record with 89 consecutive wins by a college
basketball team.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Charlotte Bobcats coach Larry Brown speaks during a news
conference after an NBA basketball game in Charlotte, N.C.,
Tuesday.


Brown is out as


Bobcats coach


By MIKE CRANSTON
Associated Press

CHARLOTTE, N.C. -
After a miserable start to
the season in which he took
shots at his players and
himself, Larry Brown is out
as coach of the Charlotte
Bobcats in another messy
exit in his well-traveled
career.
Owner Michael Jordan
announced the move in
a release by the team on
Wednesday, a day after the
Bobcats were outscored 31-
12 in the fourth quarter in
their fourth straight loss.
No successor was named
and members of Brown's
staff won't be considered.
"I met with Coach Brown
two weeks ago about
the team's performance
and what we could do to
improve it," Jordan said.
"We met again this morning
after practice. The team has
clearly not lived up to either
of our expectations and we
both agreed that a change
was necessary."
The 70-year-old Brown, a
Hall of Fame coach who was
in the third season of his
13th professional and col-
lege head coaching job, had
been upset with the make-
up and effort of his team for
weeks. The Bobcats (9-19)
had lost three games by 31
or more points in 10 days


before Tuesday's fourth-
quarter meltdown against
Oklahoma City.
Brown, whose contract
runs through the end of
the 2011-12 season, didn't
immediately return a mes-
sage on his cell phone seek-
ing comment. But his agent,
Joe Glass, said Brown will
be back on the bench soon.
"Larry is going to coach
again," Glass said. "He's
got plenty of strength and
energy."
Glass declined to discuss
details of any buyout or if
Brown will be paid through
the end of his original four-
year contract.
"This was a difficult deci-
sion for both of us, but one
that needed to be made,"
Jordan said. "I want to
thank Larry for everything
he has done for our team.
He has played a key role
in this organization's devel-
opment including coaching
us to our first-ever playoff
appearance last season.
"Larry will continue to
be a valuable advisor to me
regarding the team."
Jordan said a search
would begin immediately
and he was huddled with
general manager Rod
Higgins Wednesday night.
One possible candidate is
former Charlotte Hornets
coach Paul Silas, who lives
in the area.


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS THURSDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2010


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420










LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS THURSDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2010


DILBERT

I KNOW WHAT I'M
TALKING ABOUT. I
HAVE THIRTY YEARS
IN THIS INDUSTRY!
cl/


BABY BLUES


BLONDIE


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE
I FINALLY FOL/JNO L
TE PERFECT /cc
CHRiTMA4 TREES/ I '


BUT HE 010 HAVE
HIS OWN MUSICAL
ACCOMPANIMENT i






S 223/


DEAR ABBY


Vegetarians and vegans


weigh in on meaty issues


HOW DOES THAT HELP
YOU UNDERSTAND
TECHNOLOGY THAT IS
SSIX MONTHS OLD IN A
S YOUTH-ORIENTED
CULTURE?
| Ul ^

o C'3^ ^ ^^ ^ ^ __ ^ ^ _


PLEASE DON'T
HIT ME LJITH
YOUR MODEM.
6 R.. \\1


DEARABBY: I am writ-
ing about the letter from
'Turkey Eater in Texas"
(Nov. 12), who resented
having a vegan Thanksgiv-
ing to accommodate two
family members. I think
your answer missed what
being a gracious host is
about. The entire meal
shouldn't have to consist
of vegan items. However,
it wouldn't be a big deal to
serve a vegan main dish
and have those individu-
als also bring their favorite
items. Making them bring
a complete meal excludes
them from a family gather-
ing, and what fun is that?
After your column ran,
my father called to tell me
that holiday dinners would
no longer accommodate
my daughter's celiac dis-
ease. She's 9 and struggles
with being "different."
When she ingests gluten,
she has cramps and vomit-
ing, loses weight and risks
significant long-term con-
sequences.
Next year, we will host
the holiday dinners. Our
extended family can join
us or not. The bottom
line is that if you exclude
family (for being vegan
or having celiac disease),
you've done the opposite


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-
April 19): Spend time
with the person you can
share and reflect with or
who makes you laugh and
feel good about yourself.
Change is heading your
way and clearing the dead
weight in your life is a must.

TAURUS (April 20-
May 20): You may not like
what someone at home is
doing but grin and bear it
or emotions will flare up
and make your world dif-
ficult No matter what it is
that you do not like, know
that it will pass or change
very quickly if you don't
make a fuss. **
GEMINI (May 21-
June 20): Money matters
will be of concern. Stay
within your budget and you
will enjoy the last week of
the year. A pending agree-
ment can be settled if you
work fast and hard to do
whatever legwork is re-
quired. ****
CANCER (June 21-
July 22): A last-minute
change will be the icing on
the cake this festive season.
Use your imagination and
you will thrill the people
you love. Taking on a work
responsibility to ensure
that it's finished on time
may require your taking it
home with you. ***


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

LEO (July 23-Aug.
22): Your interest will lead
to something you least ex-
pect. Putting your best foot
forward and showing your
generous spirit and charm
to everyone you come in
contact with will teach you
a valuable lesson about life,
love and success. ***
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Elaborate all you want
but, when it comes to the
bottom line, doing will
make what you say believ-
able. Go the distance. Your
thoughtfulness will be well
received and rewarded in
ways you cannot imagine.
- **
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): Don't overdo it or let
anyone push responsibili-
ties on your shoulders that
you really cannot handle.
Less will be more this year
when it comes to spending
money, travel and commit-
ments. Follow your intu-
ition. **
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-
Nov. 21): It's not too late
to make changes. If you
aren't happy with some-
thing or someone, make
it clear what you want and
expect. You have the upper
hand but must act upon it if
you want things to turn in


your favor. *****
SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): You may feel
as if you have to explain
your current position but,
the more you talk, the more
complicated things will get.
Be entertaining and cheer-
ful but avoid discussing any,
of your considerations for
the new year. ***
CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): Get to the
bottom of any emotional sit-
uation that is looming. This
is not the time to let on that
you are disappointed but
it is the time to make sure
you don't let someone else
down. A change of plans is
likely. 3 stars
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Not everyone
will share your opinion or
your attitude. Observe be-
fore you make a move that
may not be in your best
long-term interest. You can
stabilize your situation by
accommodating someone
who helped you in the past.

PISCES (Feb. 19-
March 20): Don't leave
work unfinished even if you
have to put in extra hours.
Unless you finish what you
started, it will be difficult to
enjoy the festivities. Some-
one you love will be proud
of you and will reward you
accordingly. ***


CELEBRITY CIPHER


FRANK & ERNEST


by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: U equals W
"YBBVZMO L NFDB FT FJS LNFDBL
K M S L N K D L OBRRZMO BABM KMS
FMB-PVVZMO, KJ U KIL H KYBL IFP
J B LL RC KM I FP KDB. H KJ N FJ H
T F D W B L

PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "Life, as I discovered, holds no more wretched
occupation than trying to make the English laugh." Malcolm Muggeridge
(c) 2010 by NEA, Inc. 12-23


FOR BETTER OR WORSE


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearobby.com
of what holidays are about.
- KAYE IN ALABAMA
DEAR KAYE: That's
true. What bothered me
about the letter from "'Tur-
key Eater" was the idea
that his brother expected
him to cater the entire
Thanksgiving dinner, to
his nieces' preference to
eat vegan. If the writer had
said he had been asked to
ensure there were dishes
that would'not inflame (lit-
erally) his nieces' serious
medical condition, I would
have answered differently.
What has surprised
me about the comments I
have received from read-
ers about that letter has
been the amount of preju-
dice and anger expressed
against vegetarians by
more than a few. But read
on for some responses
from vegans:
DEAR ABBY: I am a
vegan' in a meat and pota-
toes family. For 15 years I


have spent every holiday
and family gathering lis-
tening to them degrade
my food choices and try
to "convert" me back to
my "senses." I have never
expected them to cook
for me. I always pack my,
own' foods since they are
unwilling to branch out.'
and try new foods. When,.
I have brought a dish, they:
all loved it, as long as they
didn't know it was vegan
and that I had prepared it.
I find many people are
resentful if we host a din-'
ner party with only vegan
food. They expect us to
accommodate them by
cooking meat, but feel we
should fend for ourselves
at a function they hold. I
encourage people to please
get over the stigma of veg-
an/vegetarian and sample
something new once in a'
while. If I can endure ev-
ery family gathering tak-
ing place at a steakhouse,
I don't think it's unrea-
sonable to have one night
when they experience how
tasty food without meat in
it can be. RACHEL IN
SEATTLE
M Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS


GARFIELD


B.C.


WOAT'- Te MMATTeRW HAVeNTr YOU
,, e 0e 5EN A
For\ H 90VL u;
i^0-^ ^ WOWI


Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415


CLASSIC PEANUTS












LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED THURSDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2010


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Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 10-246-CP
Division Probate
IN RE: ESTATE OF
WARREN JUNIOR CLYATT
Deceased
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of
Warren Junior Clyatt, deceased,
whose date of death was April 30,
2010, is pending in the Circuit Court
for Columbia County, Florida, Pro-
bate Division, the address of which
is 173 NE Hernando Avenue, Lake
City, Florida 32055. The names and
addresses of the personal representa-
tive and the personal representative's
attorney are set forth below. All
creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate on whom a
copy of this notice is required to be
served must file their claims with
this court WITHIN THE LATER OF
3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AF-
TER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF
A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM. All other creditors of the de-
cedent and other persons having
claims or demands against dece-
dent's estate must file their claims
with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE FJRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITH-
IN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED. The date of first publi-
cation of this notice is December 16,
2010.
Personal Representative:
/s/: Nancy L. Chauncey
473 SW Kicklighter Terrace
Lake City, Florida 32024
/s/ Melvalee Yvonne Petty
946 SW Cannon Creek Drive
Lake City, Florida 32024
Attorney for Personal Representa-
tive:
/s/: John J. Kendron
Attorney for Personal Representative
Florida Bar Number 0306850
Robinson, Kennon & Kendron, P.A.
PO Box 1178
Lake City, FL 32056-1178
Telephone: (386) 755-1334
Fax (386) 755-1336

05524603
December 16, 23, 2010


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number: 10-281-CP
In Re The Estate Of:
ANN MARIE CALLAN,
Deceased,
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE:
The administration of the estate of
ANN MARIE CALLAN, deceased,
File Number 10-281-CP, is pending
in the probate Court, Columbia'
County, Florida, the address of
which is:
173 NE Hemando Avenue
Lake City, FL 32055
The names and addresses of the Per-
sonal.Representative and the Person-
al Representative's attorney are set
forth below.
ALL INTERESTED PERSONS
ARE NOTIFIED THAT:
All creditors of the decedent-and oth-
er persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate, or whom a
copy of this notice is required to be
served, must file their claims with
this court WITHIN THE LATER OF
THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIR-
TY (30) DAYS AFTER THE DATE
OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent
and persons having claims or de-
mands against the decedent's estate
must file their claims with this court
WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITH-
IN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of the first publication of
this Notice is December 21, 2010
Personal Representative:
Donna Marie Belice
315 SW Montgomery Drive
Lake City, FL 33025
Attorney for Personal Representa-
tive:
Jennie E. Poore, Esquire
Attorney for Personal Representative
311 SE 10th Court
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33316
(954) 763-3392
Florida Bar Number: 466700

05524679
December 23, 30, 2010


Home Improvements

Carpentry, remodeling, paint,
repairs, additions, Lic. & Ins.
Since 1978 FREE estimates
386-497-3219 or 954-649-1037


Pool Maintenance

Pool Leaks/Pool Repairs
Florida Leisure Pool & Spa
352-373-0612
CPC 1457279


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 10-631-CA
DEAS-BULLARD PROPERTIES
a Florida general partnership
Plaintiff
vs.
RICHARD V. SEXTON, a/k/a
RICHARD VERNON SEXTON,
SHANNON MARIE DELAIR
FOLLMANN SEXTON, CAPITAL
CITY BANK, and COLUMBIA
BANK, f/k/a COLUMBIA COUN-
TY BANK,
Defendants
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
Notice is hereby given that the fol-
lowing described real property:
Lot 13, Cedar Hills, a subdivision as
recorded in Plat Book 5, Page 134,
public records of COLUMBIA
County, Florida.
shall be sold by the, Clerk of this
Court, at public sale, pursuant to the
Final Judgment in the above styled
action dated December 13, 2010, at
the Columbia County Courthouse in
Lake City, Columbia County, Flori-
da, at 11:00 A.M., on Wednesday,
January 19, 2011, to the best and
highest bidder for cash. Any person
claiming an interest in any surplus
from the sale, other than the property
owner, as of the date of thenotice of
lis pendens, must file a claim within
60 days after the sale.
WITNESS my hand and official seal
in the State and County aforesaid this
13th day of December, 2010.
P. DEWITT CASON,
Clerk of Court
By:/s/ B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
04542693
December 16, 23, 2010
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA.
CASE NO. 122009000853CAXXX
FIRST AMERICAN MORTGAGE
TRUST,
PLAINTIFF,
VS.
SCOTT L. PALM, ET AL.
DEFENDANTS)
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE
SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to the Final Judgment of Fore-
closure dated June 22, 2010 in the
above action, I will sell to the highest
and best bidder for cash at Columbia,
Florida, on February 2, 2011, at
11:00 AM, at 3rd Floor of court-
house 173 N.E. Hemando Ave.,
Lake City, FL 32055 for the follow-
ing described property"
COMMENCE AT THE SOUTH-
EAST CORNER OF THE SOUTH-
EAST 1/4 SECTION 31 TOWN-
SHIP 5 SOUTH RANGE 16 EAST
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
AND RUN THENCE SOUTH 89
DEGREES 19'30 WEST ALONG
THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID SEC-
,TION 31, 538.43 FEET THENCE
NORTH 00 DEGREES 24'47 WEST
57.79 FEET TO THE NORTH
RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF
FAULKNER!iROAD AND TO THE


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT 0
3RD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, I
FOR COLUMBIA CO
FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION:
CASE NO.: 12-2010-CA-0005

BANK OF AMERICA, N.A.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
JOHN ROGERS A/K/A
ROGERS JR, et al,
Defendants

NOTICE OF ACTION
TO:
JOHN ROGERS A/K/A
ROGERS JR.
Last Known Address: 173 SE
la Place, Lake City, FL 32025
Attempted Address At: 2150
ble Gum Ln., Carrollton, VA
3825 And 3324 W Universi
Apt 266..
Gainesville, FL 32607 2540
Current Residence Unknown
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
ROGERS A/K/A JOHN R(
JR.
Last Known Address: 173 SE
la Place, Lake City, FL 32025
Attempted Address At: 2150
ble Gum Ln., Carrollton, VA
3825 And 3324 W Universi
Apt 266.,
Gainesville, FL 32607 2540
Current Residence Unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
for Foreclosuie of Mortgage
following described property:
LOT 13, BLOCK 5, OF OAK
REPLAT, A SUBDIVISION
CORDING TO THE PLAT T
OF RECORDED IN PLAT
3, PAGE 52, PUBLIC REC
OF COLUMBIA COUNTY,
IDA.
has been filed against you a
are required to serve a copy
written defenses, if any, to
Marshall C. Watson, P.A. A
for Plaintiff, whose address
NW 49th STREET, SUITE 1
LAUDERDALE FL 33309 on
fore January 3, 2011, a date w
within thirty (30) days after t
publication of this notice
LAKE CITY REPORTER a
the original with the Clerk
Court either before service on
tiff's attorney or immediately
after; otherwise a default will
tered against you for the re]
manded in the complaint.
In accordance with the Amr
with Disabilities Act of 1990 (
disabled persons who, beca
their disabilities, need spec
commodation to participate
proceeding should contact th
Coordinator at 145 N. He
Street, Lake City, FL 32055
phone (386) 758-1041 prior
proceeding. ,
WITNESS my hand and the
this Court this 1st day of Dec
2010.
P. DEWITT CASON
As Clerk of the Court
BY: B. Scippio
As Deputy Clerk
10-29528

05524653
December 16, 23, 2010


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.:09-750-CA
SEDGEFIELD LAND COMPANY,
a Florida corporation,
Plaintiff,
vs.
YARRA N. GALLON a/k/a YAR-
RA GALLON MATHIS,
Defendants,
NOTICE OF JUDICIAL SALE BY
THE CLERK
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
pursuant to an Order or Final Judg-
ment entered in the above-styled
cause now pending in said court, that
I will sell to the highest and best bid-
der for cash on the third floor of the
Columbia County Courthouse, 173
N.E. Hernando Avenue, Lake City,
Florida 32055, at 11:00 o'clock, a.m.
on January 19, 2011, the following
property located in Columbia Coun-
ty, Florida:
Lot 3 SEDGEFIELD PHASE I, as
per plat thereof recorded in Plat
Book 7, Page 87-92, of the Public
Records of Columbia County, Flori-
da.
Said sale will be made pursuant to
and in order to satisfy the terms of
said Final Summary Judgment of
Foreclosure. Any person claiming an
interest in the surplus from the sale,
if any, other than the property owner
as of the date of the lis pendens must
file a claim within 60 days after the
sale.
Dated: December 17, 2010.
P. DEWITT CASON, Clerk of the
Court
By/s/B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk

05524711
December 23, 30, 2010
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.
10-06-CA
COLUMBIA BANK, formerly know
as COLUMBIA COUNTY BANK
Plaintiffs,
vs.
4 MILE PROPERTY SERVICES ,
LLC, a Florida Limited Liability
company, CHARLES B. BROWN,
III, MICHAEL J. McCRANIE,
PHILL1P B. BAXLEY, JAMES L.
CUMMINGS, JAY WATERBURY,
SARAH WATERBURY, DEREK
PRIBBLE, and DIANN DAVIS.
Defendants
CLERK'S NOTICE OF SALE UN-
DER F.S. CHAPTER 45
NOTICE ID GIVEN that, in accord-
ance with the Order of Final Summa-
ry Judgment of Foreclosure dated
November 29, 2010, in the above-
styled cause, I will sell to the highest
and best bidder for cash in Court-
room 1 Columbia County Court-
house, 173 Northeast Hemando Ave-
nue, Lake City, Florida 32055 at
11:00 a.m. on January 12, 2011, the
following described real property:
Tract 1: The West 1/2 of Lot 2,
Block 2, Quail Heights, a subdivi-
sion according to the map or plat
thereof recorded in Plat Book 3, page
104, public records of Columbia
County, Florida. Together with and
including a 1997 Cougar General
ID#GMHGA3419613697A and
#GMHGA3419613697B, which is
located on and affixed to the above
described real property.
Tract 2: The East 1/2 of Lot 2, Block
2, Quail Heights, a subdivision ac-


resume to hr@chclabs.com or
fax to 386-758-1791

Mechanic needed for Truck shop,
must have own tools, apply
Southern Specialized, 1812 NW
Main Blvd., 386-752-9754


Legal

)F THE POINT 0 BEGINNING THENCE
N AND CONTINUE NORTH 00 DEGREES
UNTY, 24'47 WEST 547.97 FEET
THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES
19'13 WEST 227.14 FEET
585 THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES
38'37 WEST 634.56 FEET TO THE
EASTERLY RIGHT OF WAY
LINE OF FAULKNER ROAD;
THENCE SOUTH 11 DEGREES
JOHN 43'40" EAST ALONG SAID EAST-
ERLY RIGHT AWAY LINE, 87.34
FEET, THENCE SOUTH 12 DE-
GREES 37'10" EAST ALONG
SAID EASTERLY RIGHT OF
WAY LINE, 319.81 FEET TO THE
JOHN BEGINNING OF A CURVE,
THENCE SOUTHEASTERLY
Osceo- ALONG SAID EASTERLY RIGHT
OF WAY LINE ALONG SAID
9 Bub- CURVE CONCAVE TO.THE LEFT
23314- HAVING A RADIUS OF 200.00
ty Ave FEET AND A CENTRAL ANGLE
OF 78 DEGREES 03'20", AN ARC
DISTANCE OF 272.47 FEET
(CHORD BEARING OF SOUTH 51
JOHN DEGREES 38'50" EAST AND DIS-
)GERS TANCE OF 251.88 FEET) TO THE
NORTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY
Osceo- LINE OF- FAULKNER ROAD,
THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES
9 Bub- 19'30" EAST ALONG SAID
23314- NORTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY
ity Ave LINE, 443.65 FEET, THENCE 89
DEGREES 46'19" EAST ALONG
SAID NORTHERLY RIGHT OF
WAY LINE, 136.85 FEET TO THE
n action POINT OF BEGINNING. CON-
on the TRAINING 10.01 ACRES, MORE
OR LESS
K HILL Any person claiming an interest in
N AC- the surplus corm the sale, if any, oth-
HERE- er than the property owner as of the
BOOK date of the lis pendens must file a
:ORDS claim within sixty (60) days after the
FLOR- sale. The Court, in its discretion,
may enlarge the time of the sale. No-
nd you tice of the changed time of sale shall
of your be published as provided herein.
it, on DATED December 7, 2010
attorney Clerk of the Circuit Court
is 1800 By:/s/ B. Scippio
20, FT. Deputy Clerk of the Court
n or be- Prepared by:
whichh is Gladstone Law Group, P.A.
he first 1499 W. Palmetto Park Rd, suite 300
in the Boca Raton, FL 33486
nd file "If you are a person with a disability
of this who needs any accommodation in
n Plain- order to participate in this proceed-
y there- ing, you are entitled, at no cost to
I be en- you, to the provision of certain assis-
lief de- tance. Please contact the ADA Coor-
dinator, Ms. Barbara Dawicke at
aericans P.O. Box 1569, 173 N.E. Hernando
(ADA), St., Room 408, Lake City, FL 32056;
cause of telephone number 386-758-2163 two
ial ac- (2) working days of your receipt of
in this this notice; if you are hearing im-
e ADA paired, call the Florida Relay Serv-
emando ices at 1-800-955-8771 (TTY); if
or Tele- you are voice impaired, call the Flor-
to such ida Relay Services at 1-800-955-
8770"
seal of
member, 04542683
December 23, 30, 2010


Legal

cording to the map or plat thereof re-
corded in Plat Book 3, page 104,
public records of Columbia County,
Florida. Together with and including
a 2000 Peachstate Navigator
ID#PSH2GA1757A and
ID#PSH2GA1757B, which is located
on and affixed to the above described
real property.
Tract 3: Lot 28, Forest Towne, as set
forth in Plat Book 3, page 1, public
records of Hamilton County, Florida.
Together with and including a 1997
Fleetwood mobile home, ID#s
GAFLT34A24206 and
GAFLT34B24206, which is located
of and affixed to be the above descri-
bed property. Tract 4: Lot 34, Block
A, Unit 1, Woodgate Village, a sub-
division according to the plat thereof
recorded at Plat Book 5, page 16,
public records of Columbia County,
Florida. Together with arid including
a 1990 Fleetwood Pine Manor mo-
bile home, ID#s
GAFLK34A126498H and
GAFLK34B 126498H which is locat-
ed on and affixed to the above de-
scribed property.
Tract 5: Lot 25, Loblolly Addition, a
subdivision according to the plat
thereof recorded at Plat Book 6, page
35-35A, public records of Columbia
County, Florida. Together with and
including a 1985 Vega mobile home,
ID#s KH40D3FB5478GA and
KH40D3FB5478GB, which is locat-
ed on and affixed to the above de-
scribed property.
Tract 6: Commence at the SW comer
of the NW 1/4 of NE 1/4, Section 20,
Township 3 South, Range 17 East,
Columbia County, Florida, and run
thence N 89*05'E along the South
line of said NW 1/4 of NE 1/4,
400.00 feet to the SW comer of Lot
23 of Sunnybrook Subdivision, an
unrecorded subdivision and to the
POINT OF BEGINNING; thence
continue N 8905'E along said South
line 145.68 feet to the West line of
Double Run Road; thence N
25'22'01"E along Said West line,
82.27 feet; thence N 78'25'04" W,
192.38 feet to the East line of Lot 24
of said Sunnybrook Subdivision;
thence S 3'44'56" E along said East
line, 115.54 feet to the POINT OF
BEGINNING. Said lands being a
part of Lots 22 and 23 of Sunny-
brook Subdivision, according to an
unrecorded plat thereof Together
with and including a 1990 Fleetwood
Springhill Mobile Home, ID#s
GAFLL34A128739H and
GAFLL34B 128739H, which is locat-
ed on and affixed to the above de-
scribed property.
Tract 7: Lot 23, Plantation Park Sub-
division, as recorded in Plat Book 4,
page 120, public records of Colum-
bia County, Florida. Together with a
1999 Cougar 16x76 single wide mo-
bile home,
VIN#GMHGA2439822562'.
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN IN-
TEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM
THE SALE, IF ANY OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER
AS OF THE SATE OF THE LIS
PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE
SALE.
Dated: November 9, 2010
The Honorable Dewitt Cason
Clerk of Court
By: /s/ Belinda Scippio
Deputy Clerk
(Court Seal)

04542680
December 16, 23, 2010



010 Announcements










020 Lost & Found

Lost 18mo old Yorkie. Recent
surgery and on medication. Has *
microchip. Lost in McAlpin area.
Please call 386-362-2140

100 Job
Opportunities

(4542743
Cook
Full time, must have experience.
Apply Baya Pointe Nursing &
Rehabilitation Center
587 SE Ermine Ave.
Lake City, Fl 32025
EOE/DFWP

(0542747
LifeSouth Community Blood
Centers is seeking an independ-
ent and precise individual for a
Donor Services Specialist
phlebotomistt) position.
HS/GED and valid driver's
license required. Phlebotomy
exp prfrd. F/T, $9-10 p/h. Apply
at www.lifesouth.org. Back-
ground check req. EOE/DFWP.

Cashiers needed, Experience Pre-
ferred,Drug frre workplace, allap-
plicants will be drug tested
Ellisville Exxon,
Hwy 441, No Phone Calls Please.

Experienced IT Tech/
Network Admin
Qualifications: 2+ years
experience with: win XP pro, win
7 pro, server 2003, 2008. Must
have worked within and be
familiar witli active directory.
Must be capable of lifting/moving
workstations. Microsoft
certifications a plus. Clean drivers
license required. Please submit


1 Medical
120 Employment

05523790
Medical Assistant,
Exp only need apply! Looking
for qualified indiv., quick learn-
er, good personality,dependable
Fax resume to: Cheryl
386-754-3657 or email to:
office manager@
primarycaremedic.com

05524650
LEARN TO DRAW BLOOD
Local Phlebotomy Course
offered in Lake City, FLA
Certificate program.
(904)566-1328

F/T LPN or MA needed M-F for
busy medical practice.
Please fax resume to
386-487-1232
Wanted Receptionist,
experienced. Send resume to
826 SW Main Blvd. Suite 102.
Lake City, FL. 32025

24 Schools &
240 Education

04542575
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-12/13/10

Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-01/17/11

Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com



310 Pets & Supplies

BEAGLE RABBIT DOG.
$175. Runs Good, Male
.386-249-3104 or
386-719-4802
Chocolate Lab needs home!
reduced to $250, AKC
Female 7 months old
386-965-2231
FREE to good home,
bob-tail tabby, female kitten,
approx 6-7 months old
386-466-8248
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs.
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be.licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.

330 Livestock &
30 Supplies

Pigs for sale
7 weeks old
$50 eadh HURRY!
386-965-2215
Pony
Mini Mare, Paint
5 yrs old $400
tack included 386-965-2231


361 Farm Equipment

84 Ford 4610 Tractor. Runs good.
Solid 2WD. New front tires,
350hr on 2005 motor. Dependable.
$7500. obo. 386-867-0005


401 Antiques

ANTIQUES WANTED
Furn., China, Silver, Glassware,
Costume Jewelry & Gold. 35 years
exp. Cash Pd. Pete. 386-963-2621


402 Appliances

KENMORE WASHER/DRYER.
Runs and looks good.
$175.00 for both.
386-965-0778


403 Auctions

05524723
Auction Thursday.
Dec 23rd, 2010
6:30 pm, prev. all day
3-bed full/twin/trundle bunk bed
unit, Surround-sound systems,
Smith & Wesson .44 magnum,
Wii game accessories, Chippen-
dale china cabinet, DeWalt
radial arm saw,shop tools,
contemporary BR group,
Hotpoint side-by-side fridge,
more!Pictures weekly @
www.auctionzip.com,ID #19590
Phoenix Auction Services,
416 N. Main St. Trenton FL.
Ph: 352 463 0707
AB2866AU1437 10% BP



408 Furniture

ALMOST NEW
rocker/recliner.
$60.
386-935-4931
LARGE DRESSER
All wood.
$60.
386-935-4931
Sofa Sleeper, double bed, beige


P-07-1- =-- I


in


Classified Department: 755-5440


floral pattern, excellent condition
$100
386-935-0654
TV 55inch. HD projection.
Factory remote. Works great.
Looks great.Perfect gift.
$325.00 386-719-9189










Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED THURSDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2010


408 Furniture
Twin Race Car Bed with mattress.
Twin Story Book Cottage Bed
with mattress. $350.00. for both
386-965-9882

413 I Musical
413 Merchandise
100 Watt Sanyo Stereo, graphic
equalizer, dual cassette, speakers
36" high, very good condition
$50 386-935-0654

420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$225 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.
WANTED: Copies of newspaper
Columbia Gazette from
1920s and 1930s. Will buy.
512-751-4489 talter3()uic.edu

430 Garage Sales
Big Christmas Sale. Thursday
Only Lots of gift ideas! Baskets,
Decor, wreaths, candles, home in-
terior. Store Clearance. Inside sale,
comer of 252 (Pinemount)/137,
follow signs 386-590-4085






PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.


440 Miscellaneous
CONSUL 31"TV.
Good condition
$80.
386-935-4931
Tow Behind Grill/Smoker. Com-
mercial built, nice shape. $1250.
obo. 386-249-3104 or 719-4802
Great Christmas gift for hubby.
White Wardrobe. Vinyl/veneer
finish. 36W X 20D X 72H
Like new $50
386-935-0654

450 Good Things
Sto Eat
The Nut Cracker
Buy and sell, crack & shell pecans
2738 CR 252 W, Lake City 32024
Pinemount Rd/CR 252/Taylorville
Robert Taylor 386-963-4138
or 386-961-1420

520 Boats for Sale
Bass Tender Boat
10'2",
$500 Call for details
386-965-2215

630 Mobile Homes
630 for Rent
2/2, S/W, 1 acre secluded lot
Bascom Norris Bypass, $500 dep,
$500 mo, possible owner finance
386-623-2203 or 386-623-5410
2BR/2BA MH CH/A,
Fenced in back yard and Shed.
$750. mo plus deposit.
Pets OK! 386-755-4157
3BR/1.5 BA
Unfurnished Mobile Home.
No pets!
386-755-0142,
3br/2ba newly renovated MH on
1/2 ac. private property. Close to
college $700.mo. 1st. mo.+ Sec.
dep. Ref's. No Pets. Non smoking
environment 386-755-3288
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White. Contact 386-623-2465
or 386-292-0114
Nice clean 2&3 bdrm, Five Points,
NO PETS, also 3 bd on the
Westside, 1 mo rent & dep
386-961-1482
PAY OWN!

U LK CT


Quiet Setting w/lots of oaks
2br/lba from $450 & 3br/2ba from
$550. Includes water & sewer.
No Pets! 386-961-0017
Very clean & well maintained 2/2
units in nice park. $599.mo
w/$500. dep. Rent incl water,
sewer, trash p/u. Close to town
386-984-8448 or 623-7547
Very Clean 2 BR/1 BA, in the
country, Branford area, $450 mo.,
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleypro590-0642

640 Mobile Homes
0 for Sale
$200. MONTHLY. Remodeled
SW. 2bd/2ba. Appliances,
delivered & blocked. Owner
finance available w/$3000 down.
Call.Gary Hamilton 386-758-9824
05524589
Palm Harbor Homes
Factory Liquidation Sale
2009 Model Homes MUST GO!
Call for FREE color brochures
800-622-2832

05524637
Gainesville-Jacobsen-Savings
Factory direct Jaconsen outlet
now open to the public 3/2 start-
ing at 39,900 complete.
Northpointemobilehomesales.co
m for complete website specials
or 352-872-5566
For the best deal in Florida!


640 0 Mobile Homes
S for Sale

North Pointe Homes is your
new #1 Jacobsen dealer. Take a
short drive to Gaines\ ille and
save thousands. Five year halo
warranty. 2x6 wall. and
much more. Free energy star
package on all others.
Call Chuck at 352-872-5567

0O552-16tI
Why drive to Gainesville?
This is Why! New 28x60
Jacobsen 3/2 inc FREE Furni-
ture! Low as $497 month.
Drive to our dealership and Buy.
I pay for your gas!
Call Mark at 352-872-5568

650 Mobile Home
650 & Land
BANK REPO: Mobile Home On
15.65 ACRES IN FT. WHITE -
Including 60X40 pole barn. Listed
at $130,000.00. Call Billy Shows
After hours 386-208-8547
710 Unfurnished Apt.
For Rent
05524.-14
$Holiday Cash $
NO App Fee, NO SD,
$250 off December,
*for Qualified Applicants
Windsong Apartments
(386) 758-8455

05524728
SPRING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans:
some with garages.
Call 386-454-1469
or visit our website:
www.springhillvillage.net
2/1 w/garage,
east side of town,
1st, last & sec
386-755-6867
2BR/2BA DUPLEX
on McFarlane Ave. W/D hookup
Rent $625. per month.
Call 386-867-1212 for details.
Brick Duplex 2/1 off Baya. CH/A.
Carport. Carpet. tile, $575 mo,+
Dep. Call 386-752-0118 or
386-623-1698 or 386-292-4937
Duplex w/garage spacious, 2/1,
1300 sq ft. W/D hook up, CH/A.
$650 plus dep & bckgmd chk.
386-697-3248 or 352-514-2332
Great location W of 1-75, spacious
deluxe 2BR apts., garage, W/D
hook up. patio. $600 & up, + SD,
386 965-0276
The Lakes Apts. Studios & IBr's
from $135/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $425 + sec.
Michelle 386-752-9626
X-CLEAN SECOND STORY 2/2.
country acre 8 mi to VA, off Lk
Jeff Rd. $500 mo + dep. No clogs.
Deck, w/d hookups 386.961.9181

720 Furnished Apts.
2 For Rent
1 BEDROOM all utilities includ-
ed. Furnished or unfurnished. East
or West side. $475. imo. +
$200 security. 386-397-3568
NO Lease/Deposits, ROOMS only
Utilities, Cable, WI-FI, maid.
micro-fridge, phone. Pool.
Americas Best Value Inn
(386)755-4664
Wk 1 prs. $169,2 ppl $179 + tax
Park Model Trailers (Studio), all
utils, use of pool. $500 per month.
NeverDunn's RV Park.
386-961-8540 or 755-4945
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest. Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

SUnfurnished
730 Home For Rent
2BR/IBA CH/A. Large carport.
great location, near corner of Baya
& McFarland references req'd.
386-752-9144 or 755-2235


3 & 4 bedroom homes. Newly
'renovated. Very nice, in town.
$750 $950 per month plus
deposit. 386-755-2423
3 Bedrm/2 Bth plus 360 sq ft Stu-
dio on Lake Jeffery/Old Mill Rd,
very private, $1200 per mo. plus
deposit, 386-752-9303. No Pets
3/2 W/D hook up, appliances
included, $200 sec dep,
$650 month, ref check,
386-365-2515
3/2, CH/A,all appliances, back
yard fenced, carport. $825 mo, Ist.
last &sec, 560 SE St. Johns St
386-697-8893 or 305-962-2666
3/2,Brick Home, big back yard,
$900 month + Security Deposit
off of Branford Hwy & CR 242,
386-965-0276
4/1&1/2, tile floors,
kids & pets ok, close to town,
$800 dep, $875 month,
386-755-2070 or 786-436-7959
Cozy Cottage lbr/lba S. Hwy. 41
$550/mo. + security. Includes all
utilities & satellite TV. Pets OK.
(386)758-2408
FOR RENT: Large 3br/2ba brick
home, fenced on 5 acres on
Columbia/Suwannee County line.
$975. per month + utilities.
Perfect place for children.
Broker/Owner- Annette Land @
386-935-0824
Newer 3/2 w/2 car garage.
1800 sq ft $900 mno. plus deposit
1-101/US 41 area
(248)875-8807
Rural beauty and privacy near
I-10/US90 NW of Live Oak. 3Br,
1+Ba, $725/mo. Optional pasture
available. (626) 512-5374


To place your 750 Business &
classified ad call '- Office Rentals
OFFICE SPACE lor lease.
755-5440Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqlft
$675mo/$695. sec dep.
U"MM "[T= Tom 386-961 I (186'DCA Realtoi


805 Lots for Sale
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
new spaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race. color, religion, sex.
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin: or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaperare are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

810 Home for Sale
3BR/2BA 2 story brick. 4.6 ac. in
ground pool. Lg. workshop &
2 wells. $200,000.00 obo
Old Wire Rd. (850)728-0782
FSBO, Completely Remodeled,
3bdr/lbth, fenced, new deck, shop,
new cabinets/appliances,Schools
blks away, $65K'478-391-1592

82n Farms &
2O Acreage
4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$69,900. $613mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancine.com
4 Ac.,Ft. White. Well, Septic &
Power. Owner Financing!
NO DOWN! $69,900.
Only $613./mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
WE FINANCE! Half to ten acre
lots. Some with w/s/pp
Deas Bullard BKL Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com

930 Motorcycles

09 Harley Davidson XRI200R
Mirage Orange & Black. 1 owner,
garage kept. Like new w/only 52
actual mi. $8,000. 386-752-5988

940 Trucks
1990 Ford F350 Dually
work truck, white, automatic
$1500 obo
386-965-2215
97 Chevy Z71 Extended cab. 3
door. Black w/gold trim. Local 2
owner. All service records. $4750.
obo 386-249-3104 / 386-719-4802

CO EONGY


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ADVERTISE IT HERE!

Bring the picture in or we will take it for you!
Advertise your car, truck, motorcycle, recreation vehicle or boat here for 10 consecutive days.
If your vehicle does not sell within those 10 days, for an additional $15 you can place your ad for
an additional 10 days. A picture will run everyday with a description of your vehicle. The price of
the vehicle must be listed in the ad. Your ad must be prepaid with cash, check or credit card. Just
include a snapshot or bring your vehicle by and we will take the picture for you. Private party only!
Price includes a 6 day! 4 line classified ad of the same vehicle in print and online.


2005 PT Cruiser
Touring Edition
PS, PW, PM, CC, AC,
white, 55,500 miles.
$7,900
Call
386-965-8656


.2001 Chevy Astro
Van
New trans., new AC, good
tires, runs great, clean,
great work van.
$2,200 OBO
Call
386-984-0571


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