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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01481
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 12/22/2010
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01481
System ID: UF00028308:01481
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text





Top Lifters.
Fort White boasts state
champs in weightlifting.


Y'
L
*-.. ."-a --?


000016 120511 ****3-DIGIT 326
LIB OF FLORIDA HISTORY
PO BOX 117007
205 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-1943




e ity


Rating Tebow
Was he terrific
or terrible?
Sports, I B






Reporter


Wednesday, December 22, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


Vol. 136, No. 287 E 75 cents


Drug bust ends with 135 arrests


'Operation Growing
Pains' collects 17,000
pills and $3.6 million.
By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter. corn
Local and state law-enforce-
ment officials announced Tuesday
the arrest of 135 people from 10
North Florida counties, including
three people from Columbia, as


part of a joint initiative dubbed
"Operation Growing Pains."
Authorities also seized almost
17,000 prescription pills and
more than $3.6 million during the
14-week multiagency operation
aimed at smashing the prolifera-
tion of prescription drug traffick-
ing.
The three Columbia County
residents who were arrested in
the operation were not imme-
diately identified by' authorities.


Two of the Columbia County sus-
pects were arrested Oct. 28 and
the other suspect was arrested
Nov. 1.
The North Florida High
Intensity Drug Trafficking Area
task force (HIDTA) announced
the arrests as well as the seizures
during a news conference.
The North Florida HIDTA is
comprised of city, county, state
and federal law enforcement
agencies from 10 counties:


Alachua, Baker, Clay, Columbia,
Duval, Flagler, Marion, Nassau,
Putnam and St. Johns.
Keith Kameg, Florida
Department of Law Enforcement
public information officer, said
during the arrest of the three
Columbia County suspects, police
confiscated 42 Roxicodone, 551
Oxycodone and 156 Hydrocodone
pills.
Kameg said phase one of the
operation began Sept. 1 and cul-


minated with the roundup and
drug seizures on Dec. 15.
"This operation was an out-
standing law enforcement effort
across a 10-county area of the
North Florida HIDTA," said
Dominick Pape, special agent
in charge of the Jacksonville
regional operations center of
the FDLE, during a telephone
interview. "This operation had
BUST continued on 3A


Smoke from

Alachua

fires reaches

Columbia

1,000 acre controlled
bum part of the problem;
other brush blazes ignite.
By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
Smoke flowing into eastern
Columbia County Tuesday afternoon
was attributed to brush fires near Lake
Lochloosa in Alachua County, accord-
ing to Florida Division of Forestry
officials.
Kurt Wisner, Florida Division of
Forestry public information officer
and mitigation specialist, said there is
no fire hazard to people in Columbia
County from the Lake Lochloosa blaze,
but noted there are other fires in the
area.
He said there were reports of fires
being called in to the Florida Division
of Forestry Suwannee office from
Baker county.
'They are brush fires, and I don't
know how large they are, but we
are responding to them," Wisner said
Tuesday afternoon during a telephone
interview. "We also have a large fire in
Hamilton County in the area of PCS,
but we just had a ranger on it and it's
not affecting any of the roads or any-
thing."
The fire on PCS property is a con-
trolled acreage burn of about 1,000
acres, Wisner said.
"Right now with conditions as they
are, we are very susceptible to getting
fire anywhere," he said. "We've been
having small fires pop up in the after-
noons just about anywhere. Smoke is
being seen on the eastside of town,
but we have no significant fires on this
side of town. The atmospheric condi-
tions may be keeping the smoke low
and we're seeing just a small spread
of smoke of brush fires further to
the east in Baker county. There are
no fires in the eastside of Columbia
County that we are aware of."
Wisner advised that the fire dan-
ger potential remains high despite the
recent rain in the area and residents
should be cautious with flames.


PROVIDING A FEAST





FOR THOSE IN NEED


Christian Service
Center to give meals
to 400 families.
By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com
About 400 local
families in need
will have a bounti-
ful meal on their
dinner tables for
Christmas, thanks to the
Christian Service Center.
The local organization held
their first distribution of its
annual Christmas basket
giveaway Tuesday.
Baskets are given to pre-
screened families. A second
distribution will be held
today.
People receiving the bas-
kets which held a turkey,
eggs, bread, canned goods,
a dessert and beverages
- received food based on
the size of their families, said
Shirley McManus, Christian.
Service Center director.
"The baskets include a
turkey and a full meal for
Christmas day," she said.
The Christian Service
Center also held a toy dis-
tribution for more than 200
pre-screened needy children.
Toys were purchased with
funds donated from Pepsi
Beverages Company of Lake
City, McManus said.
McManus said that the
families receiving the baskets
wouldn't have a Christmas
dinner otherwise, adding
an event like the giveaway
makes the community aware
of those needs.
"People don't realize how
many people there are in
need," she said. "We have a
tendency to walk by someone
in need and not look past our


own needs to see.
"Christmas is all about
giving and sharing the love
of Jesus. And we do pray
with every family that comes
through. They all look
forward to that Christmas
prayer."
Approximately 35 Christian
Service Center volunteers
donated their time to help
with the basket and toy distri-
bution, McManus said.
Carole Brown of Lake City,
a Christian Service Center
volunteer of eight years, said
it makes her happy to help
give out the baskets.
"It's just such a joy to
give," she said.
Nick Whitehurst of Lake
City, who has been volunteer-
ing with the distribution for
BASKETS continued on 3A


Photos by JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Above: Lake City resident Teresaca Cleek thanks Charlie Suydam,
assistant director, after receiving food and toy baskets. 'I am so very
thankful and grateful.'
Below: Shirley McManus, the Christian Service Center director, prays
with Fred Gissendanner, after giving him food baskets during the
organization's annual basket giveaway Tuesday.


" Vigil held to shed light on homeless problem

Program a part of wrapped in a blanket. The woman in her Dora Several representative


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Luminaries are used during the candlelight vigil
to represent children in the school system, vet-
erans soldiers and people who have lost their
homes or are living in a shelter.


nationwide annual
candlelight service.
By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
While in Atlanta for a
Braves game, Shannon Evans,
13, got her first real glimpse at
homelessness after noticing a
woman on the side of the road


'This is real. She is real.
Homelessness is real," she
said.
Evans shared her speech,
"Homeless Americans,"
during the annual candle-
light vigil hosted by the
Homeless Services Network
of Suwannee Valley Tuesday
in Olustee Park. Nationwide
candlelight vigils were held
for homeless awareness.


the Explorer blanket was just
another face of the homeless
in America, Evans said.
"My hope is to make all of
us aware of the plight of the
homeless," she said.
United Way of Suwannee
Valley is the lead agency for
the HSN, a homeless coalition
serving Columbia, Hamilton,
Lafayette and Suwannee coun-
ties.


from agencies in the coali-
tion spoke during the pro-
gram. Mayor Stephen Witt
also issued a proclamation for
Homeless Awareness Day in
Lake City.
Less than 20 yeas ago,
Donna Fagan was homeless
on the street and lived in a
tent for three months. Now
VIGIL continued on 3A


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293


71


SUBSCRIBE TO Mostly sunny
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400 WEATHER, 2A


O pinion ................ 4A
People.................. 2A
O bituaries .............. 5A
Advice & Comics ......... 3B
Puzzles ................. 2B


TODAY IN
ACT II
Miniature train
perfection.


COMING
THURSDAY
Suwannee Park light
spectacular


Lak


es


1 li 1 2!U )!!)1I









LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2010


Play"4>


Tuesday:
Afternoon: 7-7-3
Evening: 9-9-1


Tuesday:
Afternoon: 7-0-7-2
Evening: 5-1-5-2


ezOfch.-
Monday:
12-14-15-22-25


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



Lohan accused of battery at rehab center


LOS ANGELES


Lindsay Lohan is under
investigation for an
alleged misdemeanor
battery against a female
staffer at a rehab facility
where the actress is receiving treat-
ment, authorities said Tuesday.
Riverside County sheriff's Deputy
Herlinda Valenzuela said officers
responded to a Betty Ford Center
facility in Palm Desert shortly after 1
a.m. Dec. 12 for an incident involving
Lohan.
Valenzuela said a female staffer
reported having a dispute with the
"Mean Girls" star and that she wanted
to pursue charges. No arrests were
made and Valenzuela said detectives
continue to look into the case.
Their results will be presented to
Riverside County prosecutors, who
will decide whether to file a criminal
case, Valenzuela said.
Lohan has been receiving treat-
ment at the Betty Ford Center and
its facilities, about 120 miles east of
Los Angeles, since late September.

'Spider-Man' stunt goes
awry; is show in peril?
NEW YORK "Spider-Man: Turn
Off the Dark," the most expensive
production in Broadway history, suf-
fered its fourth accident in a month
when a stuntman playing the web-
slinger fell about 30 feet into a stage
pit during a preview Monday night.
The safety tether that clips to his
back failed to prevent the spill.
The performer, identified by a
fellow cast member as 31-year-old
Christopher Tierney, was wheeled
out of the Foxwoods Theatre on a
stretcher, still in his costume, and
taken by ambulance to Bellevue
Hospital with minor injuries. He suf-
fered broken ribs and internal bleed-
ing, said the castmate, who spoke on
condition of anonymity because the


Celebrity Birthdays


* Ali Lohan (singer, actress)
is 16.
* Jordin Sparks (singer) is
20.
* Hideshi Matsuda,
Japanese racing driver, is 56.
* David Leisner, composer,
is 57.
* Maurice Gibb (singer) is
60.
* Michael Osborne, rock gui-

Daily Scripture


tarist/vocalist (Axe), is 61.
* Steve Garvey (baseball
player) is 61.
* Diane Sawyer (newcaster)
is 64.
* Roberta Speer, LPGA
golfer, is 64.
* Billie Jean King, tennis
pro, is 67.
* Joe Pyne (TV host) is 84.


"She gave birth to her first-
born, a son. She wrapped him
in cloths and placed him in a
manger, because there was no
guest room. available for them.:


Luke 2:6-7


I.


ASSOCIATED PRESS-
In this file photo, Lindsay Lohan is shown in court in Beverly Hills, Calif. Lohan is
being investigated for possible misdemeanor battery against a female staffer at a
rehab facility, where she is receiving treatment. Deputy Herlinda Valenzuela, with
the Riverside County Sheriffs Department, said deputies responded to a call at the
Betty Ford Center facility on Dec. 12 for an incident involving Lohan.


person was not authorized to speak
publicly about the musical.

Knife on jetliner delays
Paris Hilton's departure
LOS ANGELES It was a scary
moment for Paris Hilton: A knife on
a Hawaii-bound jetliner delayed her
flight out of Los Angeles.


Hilton posted two tweets
Tuesday about how she and 203
other passengers aboard a Delta
Air Lines Boeing 757 were ordered
off before takeoff.
Delta spokeswoman Susan Elliott
said it was a catering knife acciden-
tally left behind by the cabin crew
and the search was a precaution.

* Associated Press


Lake City
HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293
Fax number .............752-9400
Circulation ..............755-5445
Online... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson .....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
Assistant Editor CJ Risak..754-0427
After 1:00 p.m.
(cjrisak@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Kathryn Peterson. .754-0417
(kpeterson@lakecityreporter.com)
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440.


Reporter
BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon ... .754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7:30
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery, or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation ..............755-5445
(circulation @akecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks................ $26.32
24 Weeks.................$48.79
52 Weeks..................$83.46
Rates indude 7% sales tax.
Mail rates
12 Weeks................ $41.40
24 Weeks...................$82.80
52 Weeks..................$179.40


CORRECTION

Irving Crowetz was incorrectly identified in the Lake City
Reporter article "CRA give grants of more than $49,000"
Tuesday.


Scott names his
chief of staff

TALLAHASSEE -
Gov.-elect Rick Scott on
Tuesday tapped a retired
Army colonel and former
congressional candidate
to be his chief of staff and
announced several other
appointments, includ-
ing those of a couple
Tallahassee lobbyists.
The announcements
from Scott's transition
office come just two weeks
before he is to be sworn in
as Florida's next governor,
succeeding Charlie Crist
on Jan. 4.
The Republican's tran-
sition is proceeding so
slowly that he's asked most
of Crist's agency heads
and other top staffers to
rescind their resignations
and stay for up to three
more months.
Mike Prendergast, a
Tampa native who retired
from the Army after 31
years, will serve as chief of
staff. He served in the mili-
tary police and as a foreign
area and legislative liaison
officer.
A couple of his other
appointees, though, are
consummate Tallahassee
insiders: Hayden Dempsey
as special counsel and
Jon Costello as legislative
affairs director.
Dempsey is a lobbyist
and lawyer who was legisla-
tive affairs director during
the administration of Gov.
Jeb Bush and also served
as Bush's deputy general
counsel.
He has been serving as
public affairs director for
the Greenberg Traurig
law firm, where his duties
included lobbying.
Costello, a former Air
Force acquisition manager
who was a policy adviser to
Scott during his gubernato-
rial campaign, most recent-
ly has been a Tallahassee
lobbyist.


* I

* 'I

I


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Gov.-elect Rick Scott speaks at the state Republican Party
quarterly meeting Dec. 11 in Orlando. Scott named Mike
Prendergast as his chief of staff Tuesday.


Thieves take more
than $1 million

JACKSONVILLE -- Six
men wearing black hood-
ies and masks cut their
way into four stores at a
flea market and got away
with cash, handguns and
an estimated $1 million in
jewelry.
Authorities said a secu-
rity camera recorded the
thieves Sunday as they cut
through concrete walls
and metal locks. They also
managed to bypass secu-
rity alarms.
Peter's Gold suffered the
biggest loss. Owner Chi
Yim said the burglars stole
everything.
The robbery occurred
just before 2 a.m. Sunday.
Officials said the thieves
did their best to disable the
security system. But video
from one camera showed
sparks flying as they cut
their way into the pad-
locked door of a CD store.

Teen sentenced
in homeless death

BARTOW A 19-year-
old was sentenced to four
years in a youthful offender
facility for the beating death
of a homeless man.
Christopher Decatur


faced up to 15 years in pris-
on for the death of 52-year-
old Joseph Ruba during a
fight outside a Lakeland
restaurant earlier this year.
Circuit Judge Beth Harlan
also sentenced the teen
Monday to two years of
house arrest when he's
released.
Decatur originally
faced second-degree mur-
der charges. Prosecutors
allowed him to plead guilty
last month to the lesser
charge of manslaughter.
Two other teens accused
in the attack still face second-
degree murder charges.

$227,000 worth
of marijuana found

MELROSE A traffic
crash prompted sheriff's
deputies and federal drug
agents in north Florida to
confiscate $227,000 worth
of marijuana plants from a
home.
Authorities raided the
Melrose home Monday
after a fence surrounding
it was destroyed in a crash,
and Putnam County depu-
ties noticed a strong mari-
juana smell.
Officials said they have
not. yet found the home
owner.


TEMPERATURES
High Tuesday
Low Tuesday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Tuesday
Month total
Year total
Normal, month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


esta : '
42 acksonville Cape Canaveral
Ci 70/45 Daytona Beach
Ft. Lauderdale
inesville Daytona Beach Fort Myers
71/46 753 Gainesville
Ocala Jacksonville
73/48 *
Orlando Cape Canaveral Key West
72/54 72/55 Lake ity
Tam Miami
m/pa Naples
72/57 West Palm Beach Ocala
74/56 6 Orlando
*e Ft Lauderdale Panama City
FL Myers, 75/59 0 Pensacola
74/57 Naples Tallahassee
73/56 Miami Tampa
KeyWest 74/60 Valdosta
y West* W. Palm Beach


MOON
Moonrise today 7:13 p.m.
Moonset today 8:28 a.m.
Moonrise torn. 8:20 p.m.
Moonset tom. 9:14 a.m.


Dec. Jan. Jan. Jan.
27 4 12 19
Last New First Full


On this date in
1987, the first da
of winter was a
tranquil for much
of the nation with
the exception of
the Rockies. The
storm produced
40 inches of sno
at Pomerelle Ski
Resort, south of
Burley, Idaho.


l j Forecasts, data and graph-
S'"^. o ,o Ics d 2010 Weather Central
S LLC, Madison, Wis.
www.weatherpubllsher.com



Saynet




w


* Associated Press


(SH 3.


AROUND FLORIDA


THE WEATHER


MOSTLY MOSTLY MOSTLY
SUNNY SUNNY SUNNY


H171L044 HI62L037 HI 67 LO 44


F CHANCE
HOWERS


HI 581.030


Pensacola
71/44


Tallahassee *
72/44

Panama City
70/44


Thursday
69/50/s
66/47/s
75/62/s
74/52/s
64/39/s
60/40/s
74/66/s
62/37/s
74/62/s
74/52/s
66/41/s
71/48/s
64/43/s
62/43/pc
62/37/s
72/51/s
60/35/pc
74/57/s


Friday
69/53/s
67/51/s
75/60/pc
73/55/s
67/47/pc
65/48/pc
73/64/s
67/44/pc
76/61/s
73/56/s
69/49/pc
72/51/s
63/53/pc
64/42/pc
64/48/pc
71/54/s
63/44/pc
75/54/s


70/
Lake
71/
C Ga
,7


68
31
67
43
85 in 1931
22 in 2003

0.00"
0.17"
39.15"
1.63"
47.43"


/U0/U


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise tom.
Sunset tom.


7:23 a.m.
5:35 p.m.
7:24 a.m.
5:36 p.m.


4
MODOInE
45 nuts b bum
Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+.
.* ...S


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.



weather com


mosmB
I MOSTLY
. ,SUNNY


H1 53 0L26


Page Editor: C.J.Risak, 754-0427


mmo P 22i^^^


gill 111 01341


LallicCity Rporte


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LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2010


Blood centers need


0O-negative blood .


From staff reports

LifeSouth Community Blood Centers is
issuing an emergency appeal for O-nega-
tive blood due to a critical shortage of this
type.
"This shortage hit when usage at our
hospitals increased dramatically and dona-
tions decreased due to the holiday season
starting, making it critical for O-negative
donors to stop in to our centers or visit one
of our blood drives," said LifeSouth North
Florida District Director, JD Pettyjohn in
Gainesville.
Only about six percent of the population
has O-negative blood. Anyone of any blood
type can receive O-negative blood, so hav-


ing it available for emergencies is critical.
LifeSouth supplies 19 hospitals in north
and central Florida with blood and blood
products.
Anyone 17 or 16 with parental permis-
sion, weighing a minimum of 110 pounds
and in good health is eligible to donate. A
photo ID is also required.
. Donate at 833 SW State Road 47 in Lake
City, or to find a nearby center go to www.
lifesouth.org and click on the "Find a
Drive" tab. Enter your zip code to find any
donor center or blood drive near you.
Call toll-free at (888) 795-2707 for center
hours of operation or for more information
about blood drives in your area.


BUST: Effort nabs 135 suspects
Continued From Page 1A


overall objectives to iden-
tify, disrupt and dismantle
prescription drug traffick-
ing organizations which We
believe will have an overall
impact of reducing deaths
in our communities."
During 2010, the North
Florida HIDTA Annual
Drug Threat Assessment
identified a shift whereby
the diversion of pharma-
ceutical drugs escalated
to the region's top drug
threat.
"Clearly the increase in
illegal use of pharmaceuti-
cal drugs is attacking many
Florida communities,"
Pape said. "Only by a coor-
dinated team approach like
this can law enforcement
continue to combat this
ever-increasing threat."
The first phase focused
on identifying, disrupt-
ing and dismantling pre-
scription drug trafficking


VIGIL
From Page 1A

as the executive director of
Another Way Inc., Fagan
provides shelter for women
and children who have
.been victims of domestic
violence.
There is no homeless
shelter in Columbia County,
she said. Different agen-
cies in the coalition work to
Improve the welfare welfareof the
homeless.
"None of us can do all of
it," she said. 'We all have
our little pieces."
Support is needed from
the community to combat
homelessness in the area,
said Suzanne Edwards,
Catholic Charities' chief
operating officer.
"No one likes to talk
about the homeless issue,"
she said. "Ifs not pretty. It's
very real."
Those that are homeless
are a brother, sister, aunt,
uncle or 82-year-old grand-
mother with five children,
Edwards-said.
"Think about that the next
time you drive by and say,
'Oh they should of, would
of, could of,'" she said.
Homelessness affects
everyone, said Shirley
McManus, ChristianService
Center executive director.
Children and babies are
often without a home and
having to live in a car.
"That's heartbreaking,"
she said.
All the agencies try to
help the homeless every
day, but with the commu-
nity they can do so much
more, McManus said.
"Next time you see a
homeless person, reach out
to them," she said. "They
need you. We need you."



BASKETS
From Page 1A
the past three years, said
the baskets are needed by
the people.
"I'm sure it makes a tre-
mendous difference from
having little to nothing to
at least having something
for a meal and something
for the children," he said.


organizations and criminal
enterprises responsible
for the diversion and. the
illegal procurement and
dispensing of pharmaceuti-
cal drugs. A second phase
of this operation is being
developed, officials said.
During the first six
months of this year, 1,268
people died statewide as a
result of prescription drug


overdose, according to the
Florida Medical Examiners
on Drugs. Seven Floridians
die from a prescription
drug overdose each day, it
said. From 2003 to 2009, the
number of drug overdose
deaths in Florida increased
by 101.6 percent and each
one involved at least one
prescription drug.


* WILSON'S.
OUTFITTERS


. 0 in StoC
Cam Clothing
Adults & Children


OBY
OB/QtYN
DA NA GREENE.,MD
WOMEN'S HEALTH WITH A WOMAN'S TOUCH











*Meet with a provider the day you come in
*Same day/nextday OB appts.
*Dr. Greene is chief medical officer at Pregnancy
Care Center
*Free pregnancy tests
Call for appt. Mon.-Thurs. 8am-5:30pm
755-0500 449 SE Baya Dr. Lake City
Accepts All Insurance



LAD Soup Kitchen
5th Annual Christmas
Day Dinner
FREE FREE FREE
Thank you to the community for your
continued support of our mission.
Please join us on Saturday, Dec. 25th as
it will mark 5 years celebrating our
Annual Christmas Day Dinner.
Serving from 10am to 2pm at
127 NE Escambia St.
S Last year, over 350 dinners were served.
Menu
Ham Turkey Green Beans
Rice Pilau Yams *Assorted Desserts
Rolls Iced Tea
All donations are appreciated and can b
picked up dropped off. Volunteers are
welcomed to assist in serving. Financial
contributions can be made payable to:
SVRM, P.O. Box 2862,


Lake City, Fl 32056 Jr
Call Bro. Timothy 758-2217 or
Elder Mitch 292-5850r ----
Please /oin w and thank you
again for your support.
L \


Patrick Scott/Special to the Lake City Reporter
Two-vehicle collision at Baya and Perry


Two vehicles collided at the intersection of Southeast Baya Drive and Perry Avenue at
approximately 6:20 p.m. Wednesday when a Kia Optima, traveling north on Perry, reportedly
crossed in front of a Hummer 2, which was traveling east on Baya. The Lake County Police
Department, the Lake County Fire Department and Columbia County EMS all responded to
the accident. All passengers refused to be transported to the hospital. Seen above is Lake
County Police Sgt. Clint VanBennekom in front of the Kia Optima.


Columbia County's Most Wanted
SNario Alonso Elbert Gillins
DOB: 6/16/46 47"Hihgh t DOB: 1/22/64
AO,6/64 Height: 6' 1"- Weight: 220 lbs.
...Height: 5' 5" Hair: Black Eyes: Brown
Weight: 180 lbs. Scar: Right Arm
Tattdo: Face-Tear Drop; Left
Hair: Gray Arm-Gladys, Crown, Thorn; Right
Wanted For: VOP Aggravated Assault
Wanted For: VOP Grand on a Person 65 Years or Older
Theft *History of Violence, Prior Resisting
Arrest, Prior Use or Possession of
-J Weapon-
WANTED AS OF 12/20/10
ANYONE WITH INFORMATION ON THE WHEREABOUTS OF THESE INDIVIDUALS IS ASKED TO CALL CRIME STOPPERS OF COLUMBIA COUNTY.
WE DO NOT WANT YOUR NAME, JUST YOUR INFORMATION!
The likeness of suspects is supplied by the Columbia County Sheriff's Office Warrants Division and/or other law enforcement agencies.
The cases are active at the time of publication unless otherwise noted. Crime Stoppers of Columbia County, Inc., and their volunteers
are jointly and individually exempftfrom any and all liability which might arise as a result of the publication of public records.

CALL (386) 754-7099 OR
SUBMIT A WEB TIP AT
F COLUMBIA COUNTY www.columbiacrimestoppers.net
Funded by the Crime Stoppers Trust Fund; Administered by the Office of the Attorney General


8th Annual

NORTH HOME



O&PATIO SHOW


Call now to take advantage of this once-a-year
opportunity to showcase your business and meet
thousands of potential clients!


Call TODAY to reserve your

booth (386) 344-7592


FREE TO THE PUBLIC

Where local people can connect with local
businesses to improve their homes.

S8th Annual
Columbia County Fairgrounds
NORTH FLORIDA 2 BIG DAYS!

SSaturday, March 5th
SPATIOT 9 a.m. 5 p.m.

s I Sunday, March 6th
I I R 1 C \IKu l I,\ () I' N
__ __.)___ | _10 a.m. 4 p.m.



Co-Sponsored by:

Lake City Reporter N T ShSUNSTATE
dlkecityreportercom CIK. NT i.i 9 4 .3 i I I. "llfi
wwww.rotarycluboflakecity.com


I


Page Editor: C.J.Risak, 754-0427













OPINION


Wednesday, December 22, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


OTHER


OTHER
OPINION


Soda tax

not sweet,

hard to

swallow

No doubt, those
who believe a tax
should be placed
on soda will be
bubbling with
excitement over the results of a
new study on the controversial
idea.
Research published in
the Archives of Internal
Medicine this month showed
that a tax of 20 percent to 40
percent on regular soda and
other artificially sweetened
beverages would generate
$1.5 billion to $2.5 billion in
revenue. It also would lead
to weight loss of as much
as 1.3 pounds per person
among Americans, research-
ers said.
Those revenue figures
look sweet, no doubt.
But a soda tax is still
impossible to swallow for
practically as many reasons
as Dr Pepper has secret fla-
vors.
Let's start with the fact
that soda and other sweet-
ened beverages, in mod-
eration, aren't any more
unhealthy than many other
drinks and foods. How can it
be justified, then, to single
them out?
The answer from propo-
nents of a soda tax would be
that sweetened drinks often
aren't consumed in modera-
tion and therefore are a key
contributor to obesity.
Granted, there's no doubt
that obesity is a serious
problem in the U.S. Two-
thirds of Americans are
overweight or obese, and
sweetened beverages are
certainly part of the cause.
Those who support taxing
drinks say revenue generat-
ed could help by being used
to serve healthier foods in
schools or build parks and
recreation centers.
But just because the
funds might be put to good
use doesn't make the tax
taste any better.
This is an idea that
should be poured down
the drain.
* Topeka Capital-Journal

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman


LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,


Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


2011: The Year of Think Big.


Now more than any
time in recent
memory, the plan-
ets, moons and
stars of the political
and geopolitical universe have
aligned themselves so that all
great outcomes from middle
class prosperity to Middle East
peace can best be achieved
by following a'single New Year's
resolution:
2011 must be The Year of
Think Big.
Presidents, prime ministers,
potentates, powers elite and
political hacks will slowly but
inevitably realize that their old
ways pursuing narrow, paro-
chial self-interests to achieve
narrow but self-satisfying politi-
cal and geopolitical results is,
well, so last decade. And mainly,
it no longer works. In our online
world, leaders are discovering
they have neighborly interests
with neighbors half a world
away.
Welcome to the Age of New
Solutions. By Thinking Big, we
can finally start solving prob-
lems we used to think were
unsolvable. Such as:
1. The Middle East's most
intractable problem, the Israeli-
Palestinian stalemate.
The Bush era's incremental
pursuit of a roadmap to peace
taught us one thing this
approach won't work. Because
those extremists who oppose
peace on both sides (the
Palestinian Hamas and the
Israeli zealots of the religious
right) will use every incre-
mental step as a roadblock to
blow up the process. But this
crisis never needed a roadmap
- because the final map has
long been clear and understood
by all parties.
So all parties must think
big and draw the final map
- and then work out the
security details. There will be


Martin Schram
martin.schrom@gmrail.com
a Palestine that consists of
significant desirable territory
on the West Bank and also the
strip known as Gaza. Jerusalem
must be Israel's capital; and
East Jerusalem must be an
internationally secured home
for Arabs. Finally, the Golan
.Heights that was once Syria's
must be forever demilitarized.
The question to be resolved
comes down to creating lasting
security guarantees and long-
term prosperity to peoples who
have only known bloodshed and
bitterness.
2. The War on Terror's most
intractable problem, the mess
in Afghanistan and the terror
incubator that is the tribal lands
next door in Pakistan.
Western Europe's cities cur-
rently remain under great threat
from Muslim militants trained
in Pakistan/Afghanistan and
if anything, the threat may be
greater now than it was even
a year ago. Yet Europeans are
folding up their NATO commit-
ment to Afghanistan and going
home. They are leaving it to the
United States to keep them safe
by waging unmanned drone air
strikes in Pakistan and maybe
unspoken occasional ground
hit-and-run forays into the tribal
lands. But that can't do the job
alone. And Pakistan's govern-
ment does little to help; its intel-
ligence agency has pro-Taliban
sympathizers. Pakistan only
fears one foe: its other next-door
neighbor, India.
But Europe's capitals will


never be safe unless its lead-
ers dare to think big now. That
means new compacts guaran-
teeing Pakistan continent of
allies if it moves assertively
to turn off its terrorism incuba-
tor, Waziristan. But that first
requires Europe, the U.S. and
the world move positively
with India to solve its age-old
regional hostility by forging a
new economic prosperity on the
now-nuclear subcontinent.
3. Made in the USA: Middle
Class America's most intrac-.
table problem, reversing its
comparative economic decline
compared to wealthy Americans
and forging true prosperity.
Viewed from the eyes of the
middle class, things have got-
ten much worse. To keep their
small tax cut, the middle class
must go further into debt to pay
for tax breaks for the wealthy
- that inherit $5 million estates.
Working class union members
agree to give up salary gains
they got in their contract to
keep plants open.
Wall Street elites get million
dollar bonuses despite federal
bailouts of their companies
because, it was promised in
their contracts. Yet in tough
times, the middle class has been
increasingly (see also: mind-
bogglingly) voting for the party
whose policies are crafted to
widen the gap in favor of the
wealthy: the Republicans.
But here's the biggest of the
Big Think solutions: Totally
revamp the U.S. income tax sys-
tem by scrapping all of the
tax deductions, dodges, shelters
and loopholes and creating just
a few lower brackets.
We have arrived at the inter-
section of Think Big and Keep
It Simple. -

N Martin Schram writes
political analysis for Scripps
Howard News Service.


The Founding Fathers
thought a census was
so important they
made it almost the
first order of busi-
ness Article 1, Section 2 in
the new Constitution and decreed
that after that first count an "actu-
al Enumeration" be conducted
every 10 years thereafter.
The 2010 census, whose
results were released
Tuesday, was our 23rd. It is a
snapshot of where our nation
stood last April 1 when, we
learn, there were 308,745,538
U.S. residents, up from 281
million in 2000.
The census shows a matur-
ing country with a growth
rate moderated by two reces-
sions one of them the worst
since the Depression over
the course of the decade.
The growth for the decade
just ending was 9.7 percent,


compared to 13.2 percent
from 1990 to 2000. The largest
increases were in the South
and West, foretelling a sig-
nificant shift of political power
and federal resources to those
regions. Combined, they grew
by 23 million people, while the
older, established regions of
the Northeast and Midwest
grew by 4.2 million.
The winners: Texas will gain
four seats, bringing its delega-
tion to 36, in the 435-member
U.S. House. Florida will gain
two House members, bringing
it to 27, the same size as New
York. Arizona, Georgia, Nevada,
South Carolina and Washington
each will gain one. So will Utah,
which effectively ends the
District of Columbia's hopes of
gaining congressional represen-
tation in exchange for awarding
Utah a seat.
California, with over 37 mil-


lion people, still has the larg-
est House delegation, at 53
seats, but for the first time the
state did not gain a seat after
the census. Texas gained the
most people since the last cen-
sus its population rose by
4.2 million to over 25 million.
The immediate political
calculus was that the popu-
lation shifts to Republican-
controlled areas will help
the GOP. VQhat will help the
Republicans even more is
that the 2010 elections gave
them control of the legisla-
tures that will do the redis-
tricting. After redistricting,
each House member will rep-
resent an average of 710,767
people. In 1790, it was
34,000. The Founders would
have been astounded and, we
like to think, pleased by their
handiwork.
* Scripps Howard News Service


Sharon Randall
www.sharonrbndoll.com



Those


we care,


about

On a cold, rainy day
in the desert, rare
as the proverbial
cold day in hell,
we sloshed across
a street together, my daughter
and I, doing some last-minute
Christmas shopping, huddled
beneath an umbrella about as -
big as a decoration in a fancy ,
fruity cocktail.
"Get under here," I ordered,
a protective mother hen pulling,
her full-grown chick under her.-
Nike jacket wing.
She hated it, but complied.
Apparently, cozying up to me
was slightly less appalling than
the risk of frizzing her hair. A
glimpse of our reflection in a
store window made me laugh. .
We looked like last place in a
three-legged sack race.
It reminded me of another
soggy December more than
30 years ago, when I pulled on
my rain boots, bundled up my
daughter, put her in a backpack'
and walked' down to the beach,
splashing in puddles along the
way. I let her hold the umbrella,'
and every time I'd stomp a pud-
dle, she'd laugh so hard she'd
drop it on my head.
Can you imagine a better way:
to end one year and start the
next than splashing through
puddles with someone you
love?
My daughter flew in yesterday
from California to spend a few
days with us at our home in Las
Vegas. She will nag me to finish
my Christmas cards (hers are
all done) and the novel I started
years ago. Then she'll go home
to celebrate her first married
Christmas with my favorite son-
in-law, bless his heart
My oldest and his wife plan to
drive over from LA to eat fresh
crab with us (if Ican find it) on
Christmas.
My youngest and his wife will.
be here, Lord willing, to ring in
the New Year with their 4-month-
old, my first grandchild, whose
smile will be more dazzling to
me than the $500,000 fireworks
display over the Strip.
And we hope for a visit very
soon from my husband's boys,
who are both in their 20s and
foolishly bent on avenging my
trouncing them at Hearts.
Like so many families who are '
scattered due to jobs or other
commitments, we don't get to
see each other nearly as often
as we would like. We try, but
it's hard juggling schedules, let
alone expenses.
And it's not just our children
that we miss. We wish we could,.
live closer to both of our families,,
to his in California and mine in
Carolina.
We'd love to spend time with
all of our old friends, people who
will always be dear to us, even if
they think we've forsaken them.
We wish we were better at
staying in touch, returning calls,
answering e-mails, sending birth-
day cards being the kind of
friends our friends deserve.
We need to take the time once
in a while to remember, one by
one, the people we've loved and
lost over the years: to recall the
sound of their voices, the light
in their eyes, all the ways they
made us happy.
Who knows? Maybe some
rainy day, many Decembers frori
now, I will usher in my last year, ;
if I'm lucky, splashing puddles :
with my daughter.
She can hold the umbrella. I
will push the walker.
Sharon Randall can be con-
tacted at P.O. Box 777394,
Henderson, NV 89077.


4Ak


OTHER OPINION

Census: Growth strongest in Sun Belt







LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2010


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


* To submit your Community
Calendar item, contact Antonia
Robinson at 754-0425 or by
e-mail at arobinson@
lakecityreporter.com.


Today
Theatre performance
The Geri-Actors serve up a
Matinee Performance from 11
- 11:45 a.m. and from 12:30 1:30
p:m. today in the Dining Hall of
the LifeStyle Enrichment Center.
The performance is free to the
public. The center is located at
628 SE Allison Court For more
information call 386-755-0235.
Christmas Cantata
Bethel AME Church cel-
ebrates their Christmas Cantata
at 6 p.m. today. For more infor-
mation and for directions to the
church, contact J. Richardson at
386-623-6520.

Thursday
Blood Mobile seeks donors
The LifeSouth Blood Mobile
is seeking donors 12 to 8
p.m. Thursday at Lake City
Mall. Each donor will receive
LifeSouth's free gift wrapping
services and could possibly win
a new Apple iPad.

Saturday
Christmas Dinner
LAD Soup Kitchen celebrates
itfs fifth annual Christmas day din-
ner from 10 am. 2 p.m. Saturday
at 127 NE Escambia St The


c
Cardiac Research Institute Receives Donation
The Fort White Community Thrift Shop donated $4,000 to the Masonic Medical Research Laboratory
donation is the result of the shop volunteers' hours of service for this year. This donation will be adde
fund for the building of an MMRL wing. Receiving the check from shop volunteer Don Kinser (left) is
Martinez and his wife, Nancy Martinez.


menu includes ham, turkey, green
beans, rice pilaf, yams, rolls and
assorted desserts. Donations are
appreciated, but the meal is free
of charge. For more information,
contact Timothy at 386-758-2217.


Wednesday, Dec. 29
Live Performance
Fred Perry performs live
from 11 11:45 a.m. Dec. 29 in


the Dining Hall of the
Enrichment Center. A
of bingo will follow at
The center is located
Allison Court. For mo
tion, call 386-755-0235


., Friday, Dec. 31
'. New Year's Bash
The LifeStyle Enrichment
Center presents "Rocking The
House" beginning at 7 p.m. Dec.
31. Heavy hors d'oeuvres will be
served all night, and professional
comedians Jamie Morgan, Chase
Holliday and Lisa Best will enter-
tain frdm 8 10 p.m. Tickets are-,
$50 per person, and the event
is at 628 SE Allison Court. For
ticket information, contact Janet
Sat 386-755-0235 extension .124.

Every day
Mall Walkers
Rain or shine, the Lake City
Mall is open at 7 a.m. Monday
Saturday and 10 a.m. Sunday
for those who want to walk for
exercise. -

OURTESY PHOTO First, third Mondays
Weight-loss support group.
. The The Thinner Me Weight Loss
d to the .Surgery Support Group holds
J. Dick meetings at 7 p.m. on the first
and third Monday of every .
month in the Classrooms at Lake
City Medical Center. Meetings
LifeStyle are for people that have had
game weight loss surgery, contemplat-
1 p.m. ing surgery orjust trying to
at 628 SE lose weight on their own. E-mail
)re informa- thethinnerme@gmail.com or call
386-288-9153.


Martha Wilson Harper
Martha Wilson Harper entered
into rest on Monday, December
20, 2010 at her residence. Mrs.
Martha Wilson Harper, home-
maker age 87, wife of Elmore
Kirk Harper of Augusta, GA.
Mrs. Harper was born in Flush-
ing, Ohio and lived there until
1973 when she moved to Florida.
The last three years she has made
Augusta her home. She was a
lifelong member of the Christian
Missionary Alliance Church. She
loved to garden and cook. Most of
all she loved her family and God.
Family members include her


OBITUARIES
son: Richard Harper and wife
Carol; daughters: Judith Jackson
and husband Arthur, Linda (Bun-
nie) Doyle and husband Kevin;
grandchildren: Bryan and wife
Tiffany Jackson, the late Jay
Jackson, Stephanie and Suzette
Harper, Callie and Conner Doyle;
great grandchildren: Brianna
Harper, Ashlee Ames, Josh and
wife Elizabeth Lawrence; great-
great grandchildren: Emmalee
Poulter and Brylie Jackson.
A memorial service will be
held at 3:00 p.m. on Monday,
January 3, 2011 at First Alli-
ance Church with Rev. Robert
Thomas officiating. The fam-


ily will receive friends follow-
ing the service at the church.
Memorial contributions
may be made to First Alli-
ance Church, 2801 Ingle-
side Dr, Augusta, GA. 30909
THOMAS POTEET & SON
FUNERAL DIRECTORS,
214 Davis Rd., Augusta,
GA 30907 (706) 364-8484.
Please sign the guestbook
at www. thomaspoteet.com
Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


~jJ~


Get Conli ,i i d


0~~119 ^


wwwlakecityreporter.Cnl
.my' "


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The se


Dr. Guy S. Strauss, D.O.,FA.C.O.I
Board Certified Internal Medicine
Board Certified Critical Care
Allison B. Baris, A.R.N.P


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The Lake City Reporter


The Lake City Reporter

would like to congratulate

Sllbs*


on becoming the newest chamber member on Dec. 14, 2010.
They are located across from Walmart, next to Lowes.


I "Mon.-Fri. 10AM-6PM Sat. 10IAM-5PM
Same Day Delivery Available


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424








LAKE CITY REPORTER NATION WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2010


Stopgap spending measure clears Congress


By ANDREW TAYLOR
Associated Press

WASH' 'TON The U.S.
Congress cleared a stopgap
funding bill Tuesday to keep the
federal' vernment in operation
into M ch, a temporary truce
until publicans and President
Barack Obama rejoin the battle
over the budget next year.
The bill was passed by the
House of Representatives in the
evening just hours after speeding
through the Senate. Obama was


to sign it by midnight to avoid a
government shutdown.
The measure would freeze
agency budgets at current lev-
els.
That still is too high for
Republicans as they prepare
to take over the House. They
vow to cut many programs to
levels in place when Obama
took office. That would be dif-
ficult to achieve, even though
Republicans will control the
House and have greater strength
in the senate.


The bill also will cre-
ate hardship at the Defense
and the Homeland Security
Departments, which will be
denied funding increases until
their budgets pass next year.
The measure is needed
because the Democratic-con-
trolled Congress, in an unprec-
edented failure to complete its
most basic job on passing a bud-
get, has failed to enact a single
one of the 12 annual spend-
ing bills that fund the day-to-
day operations of every federal


agency.
The House cleared the bill for
Obama on a 193-165 vote after a
79-16 vote in the Senate.
Republicans promise to try
next year to cut most domestic
agency budgets back to pre-
Obama levels.
Such cuts would exceed 20
percent for some agencies.
Republicans said such cuts
would produce savings of $100
billion compared to Obama's
February budget request. But
with the government operating


at current levels for almost half
of the fiscal year, the actual say-
ings that Republicans might be
able to accomplish are likely to
be considerably smaller. The
budget year began Oct. 1.
Republicans will have
increased leverage, but
Democrats will retain control
of the Senate and the White
House.
The threat of a government
shutdown is real if Democrats
and resurgent Republicans can-
not agree.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Republican Whip Sen. Jon Kyl of Arizona (center) speaks as Sen. Jeff Sessions (left) and
Sen. Lindsey Graham stand nearby during a news conference about the New START Treaty
on Capitol Hill in Washington Tuesday. ,


Obama secures GOP votes

for US-Russia nuclear pact


By DONNA CASSATA
Associated Press

WASHINGTON -
President Barack Obama
locked up enough Senate
Republican votes Tuesday
to ratify a new arms con-
trol treaty with Russia that
would cap nuclear war-
heads for both former Cold
War foes and restart on-site
weapons inspections.'
Eleven Republicans
joined Democrats in a 67-28
proxy vote to wind up the
debate and hold a final tally
on Wednesday. They broke
ranks with the Senate's top
two Republicans and were
poised to give Obama a win
on his top foreign policy
priority.
"We know when we've
been beaten," Republican
Sen. Orrin Hatch of Utah
told reporters hours before
the vote.
Ratification requires two-
thirds of those voting in the
Senate and Democrats need
at least nine Republicans to
overcome the opposition
of Minority Leader Mitch
McConnell of Kentucky
and Jon Kyl of Arizona, the
party's point man on the
pact.
The Obama administra-
tion has made arms control
negotiations the center-
piece of resetting its rela-
tionship with Russia, and
the treaty was critical to


any rapprochement.
Momentum for the
accord atcelerated earlier
in the day Tuesday the
seventh day of debate
- when Lamar Alexander
of Tennessee, the No. 3
Republican in the Senate,
announced his support.
The treaty will leave the
United States "with enough
nuclear warheads to blow
any attacker, to kingdom
come," Alexander said on
the Senate floor, adding, "I'm
convinced that Americans
are safer and more secure
with the New START treaty
than without it."
Four other Republican
senators Lisa Murkowski
of Alaska, Johnny Isakson
of Georgia, Bob Corker
of Tennessee and Robert
Bennett of Utah said they
would back the pact
"We are on the brink of
writing the next chapter in
the 40-year history of wres-
tlingwith the threatof nuclear
weapons," Foreign Relations
Committee Chairman John
Kerry (D-Mass.) said after
the vote.
Obama has insisted the
treaty is a national security
imperative that will improve
cooperation with Russia, an
argument loudly echoed by
the nation's military and for-
eign policy leaders, former
Presidents George H.W.
Bush and Bill Clinton and
six Republican secretaries


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of state.
In a fresh appeal for rati-
fication, Defense Secretary
Robert Gates said Tuesday
that the treaty would
"strengthen our leadership
role in stopping the prolif-
eration of nuclear weapons,
and provide the necessary
flexibility to structure our
strategic nuclear forces to
best meet national security
interests."
Vice President Joe Biden
and Secretary of State
Hillary Rodham Clinton
made a rare visit to the
Capitol Tuesday to lobby
lawmakers.
Conservative foes of the
accord among them pos-
sible GOP presidential can-
didates Mitt Romney, Sarah
Palin, Newt Gingrich and
Tim Pawlenty argue the
treaty would restrict U.S.
options on a missile defense
system to protect America
and its allies and lacks suf-
ficient procedures to verify
Russia's adherence.


MEETS MEDICAL IMAGING.
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Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424










Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@Jakecityreportercom


Lake City Reporter





SPORTS


Wednesday, December 22, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


Individual


conquest


. .. BRANDON FINLEY/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High's Barnabus Madison (from left),.Brach Bessant, Todd Steward and Fontaine Woodbury were competitors in the Class 2A state weightlifting championship for the Tigers.


Bessant, Griffith each

won state championships


By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com
Fort White High
and Columbia
High had
impressive
individual sports
performances in 2010.
The athletes were
led by Chris Griffith at
Fort White ahd Brach
Bessant at Columbia, with
both seniors winning a
state championship in
weightlifting.
Griffith won in the Class
1A 139-pound weight
class after placing second
the last two years. It was
Griffith's sixth trip to the
weightlifting finals, his first
coming as a sixth-grader.
In addition to the
second-place finishes, he
had previously placed
fourth and sixth.


Bessant, too, advanced
to the top spot in the Class
2A 238-pound weight
class after placing second
last'year. Bessant also
made the state field as a
sophomore.
Griffith was joined by
state qualifiers Montr6
Cray (fourth at 154
pounds), Cory Railey
(fourth at 119 pounds),
Jake Summerlin (sixth at
119 pounds) and Tyler
Howard.
Todd Steward placed
second at 219 pounds
for Columbia. Barnabus
Madison and Fontaine
Woodbury placed eighth
at 154 pounds and 238
pounds, respectively.
Lady Tiger lifters who
qualified for state on the
championship team, but
did not earn team points,
were Stephanie Pilkington,


Ashley Shaw, Ashlei
Albury, Tiara
Robinson-Smith, Alix
Williams and Dana
Roberts.
Cole Schreiber, Michael
Roberts and Ronnie
Graham were district
champions in wrestling for
Columbia. Schreiber made
the state field by placing in
the top four at region, as
did Monterance Allen who
was a district runner-up.
Chad Stinnett was a
district champion for Fort
White wrestling.
Sitia Martinez (100
meters, 300-meter hurdles)
and A.J. Legree (high
jump, triple jump) were
double district champions
in track for Fort White.
Sydni Jones won district in
the 1,600 meters.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Fort White High state qualifying weightlifters Tyler Howard (from left), Chris Griffith, Montre
Cray, Corey Railey and Jacob Summerlin gathered for a photograph inside the school's


INDMDUALS continued on 4B weight room on April 19.


Eye of the beholder:

Tebow terrific or terrible?


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Denver Broncos quarterback Tim Tebow (15) breaks away from Oakland Raiders safety
Michael Huff (24) to score a touchdown in Oakland, Calif., Sunday.


Qb's first start has
provided answers,
more questions.
By ARNIE STAPLETON
Associated Press
ENGLEWOOD, Colo.
- Tim Tebow either dem-
onstrated he wasn't ready
for the NFL or provided
glimpses of greatness in his
first NFL start.
It's all in the eye of the
beholder: Denver's rookie
quarterback was either Tim
Terrific or Tim Terrible in
his debut last weekend
in Oakland. The truth is
probably smack dab in the
middle.
The Tebow haters found
plenty of flaws in his game:


his measly total of eight
completions in a paltry 16
pass attempts and a pitiful
2-for-7 performance out of
the shotgun, in manageable
down and distances no less.
They point to his 2-for-12
third-down conversion rate.
Tebow fans loved his 40-
yard touchdown jaunt- the
longest by an NFL quarter-
back in his first career start
- and learning that he was
supposed to hand the ball
off to Correll Buckhalter on
the third-and-24 play only
added to the amazement.
And they adored his 33-
yard touchdown pass that
went through a defensive
back's hands before set-
tling into Brandon Lloyd's
hands as he tumbled out of
the end zone.


Another of his passes was
dropped by running back
Lance Ball in the end zone,
although Tebow was a tad
late delivering the ball.
Tebow is probably more
realistic than either fac-
tion, saying there was some
good and some bad in his
debut, plenty to be proud of
but lots of work to do.
"I think I did OK," he said
after throwing for 138 yards
and running eight times for
78 yards in Denver's 39-23
ross to the Raiders. "We
did some things well, some
things I have to get better
at. We didn't have any turn-
overs offensively so that
always gives you a better
chance.
TEBOW continued on 2B











LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2010


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TV sports
Today
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
8 p.m.
ESPN MAACO Bowl, Utah vs.
Boise St., at Las Vegas
GOLF
3 p.m.
TGC -- Japan Golf Tour, Dunlop
Phoenix, second round, at Miyazaki. Japan
(same-day tape)
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
7 p.m.
ESPN2 -Texas at Michigan St.
9 p.m.
ESPN2 Missouri vs. Illinois, at St.
Louis
II p.m.
ESPN2 Xavier at Gonzaga
FSN Kansas at California
TENNIS
I p.m.
ESPN2 Exhibition, Match for Africa,
Rafael Nadal vs. Roger Federer, at Madrid

FOOTBALL

NFL standings

AMERICAN CONFERENCE


x-New England
N.Y. Jets
Miami
Buffalo

Indianapolis
Jacksonville
Tennessee
Houston

x-Pittsburgh
Baltimore
Cleveland
Cincinnati


Kansas City
San Diego
Oakland
Denver


East
W L
12 2
10 4
7 7
4 10
South
W L
8 6
8 6
6 8
5 9
North
W L
10 4
10 4
5 9
3 11
West
W L
9 5
8 6
7 7
3 11


TPct PF PA
0.857 446 303
0.714 295 259
0.500239 261
0.286 273 353
TPct PF PA
0.571 381 342
0.571 319 365
0.429 322 282
0.357333 386

T Pct PF PA
0.714 307 220
0.714 324 253
0.357252 271
0.214281 362

T Pct PF PA
0.643322 281
0.571 388 260
0.500353 330
0.214292 415


NATIONAL CONFERENCE


East
W L TPct PF
Philadelphia 10 4 0.714412
N.Y. Giants 9 5 0.643 360
Washington 5 9 0.357 268
Dallas 5 9 0.357 354
South
W L TPct PF
x-Atlanta 12 2 0.857369:
New Orleans 10 4 0.714354:
Tampa Bay 8 6 0.571 280:
Carolina 2 12 0.143 183
North
W L TPct PF
y-Chicago 10 4 0.714293
Green Bay 8 6 0.571 333:
Minnesota 5 9 0.357244
Detroit 4 10 0.286308:
West
W L T Pct PF
St. Louis 6 8 0.429 258
Seattle 6 8 0.429 279
San Francisco 5 9 0.357250
Arizona 4 10 0.286255
y-clinched division
x-clinched playoff spot
Monday's Game
Chicago 40, Minnesota 14
Thursday's Game
Carolina at Pittsburgh, 8:20 p.m.
Saturday's Game
Dallas at Arizona, 7:30 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Tennessee at Kansas City, I p.m.


PA
339
288
343
3?6
PA
261
270
290
350

PA
242
220
314
329

PA
295
363
314
370


San Francisco at St. Louis, I p.m.
N.Y. Jets at Chicago, I p.m.
Baltimore at Cleveland, I p.m.
New England at Buffalo, I p.m.
Detroit at Miami, I p.m.
Washington at Jacksonville, I p.m.
Indianapolis at Oakland, 4:05 p.m.
Houston at Denver, 4:05 p.m.
San Diego at Cincinnati, 4:05 p.m.
N.Y. Giants at Green Bay, 4:15 p.m.
Seattle atTampa Bay, 4:15 p.m.
Minnesota at Philadelphia, 8:20 p.m.
Monday, Dec. 27
New Orleans at Atlanta, 8:30 p.m.

College bowl games
Tuesday
Beef '0' Brady's Bowl
Louisville vs. Southern Mississippi (n)
Today
MAACO Bowl
At Las Vegas
Utah (10-2) vs. Boise State (I I 11-1),
8 p.m. (ESPN)

BASKETBALL

NBA schedule
Today's Games
Cleveland at Atlanta, 7 p.m.
Detroit atToronto, 7 p.m.
Chicago at Washington, 7 p.m.
Philadelphia at Boston, 7:30 p.m.
Oklahoma City at New York, 7:30 p.m.
Utah at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
New Jersey at New Orleans, 8 p.m.
Denver at San Antonio, 8:30 p.m.
Houston at L.A. Clippers, 10:30 p.m.
Thursday's Games
San Antonio at Orlando, 8 p.m.
Milwaukee at Sacramento, 10 p.m.
Miami at Phoenix, 10:30 p.m.

APTop 25 schedule
Today's Games
No. 3 Kansas at California, II p.m.
No. 4 Connecticut vs. Harvard at the
XL Center, Hartford, Conn., 7 p.m.
No. S Syracuse vs. Drexel, 7 p.m.
No. 6 Pittsburgh vs. American, 7 p.m.
No. 7 San Diego State vs. IUPUI at
South PointArena, Las Vegas, 10 p.m.
No. 8 Villanova at Monmouth, N.J.,
7 p.m.
No. 9 Missouri vs. No. 21 Illinois,
9 p.m.
No. 12 Michigan State vs. No. 18
Texas, 7 p.m.
No. 13 Kentucky vs.Winthrop, I p.m.
No. 15 Baylor vs. San Diego at the Stan
Sheriff Center, Honolulu, 5 p.m.
No. 20 Florida vs. Radford, 7 p.m.
No. 22 Notre Dame vs. UMBC,
7:30 p.m.
No. 24 UCF at Massachusetts,
7 p.m.

Coaching victories

Through Monday
Coaches with 800 victories who have
spent a minimum of 10 seasons in Division
I with last school listed (x-active):
I. Bob Knight, Texas Tech 902
2. Dean Smith, North Carolina 879
2. x-Mike Krzyzewski, Duke 879
4.Adolph Rupp, Kentucky 876
5. x-Jim Boeheim, Syracuse 841
6. x-Jim Calhoun, Connecticut 832
7.Jim Phelan, Mt. St. Mary's, Md. 830
8. Eddie Sutton, San Francisco 804

GOLF

Masters qualifiers

AUGUSTA, Ga. The 91 players
who have qualified and are expected to


compete in the 76th Masters, to be played
April 7-10 at Augusta National Golf Club.
Players listed in only one category for
which they are eligible:
Masters champions: Phil Mickelson,
Angel Cabrera, Trevor Immelman, Zach
Johnson, Tiger Woods, Mike Weir, Vijay
Singh, Mark O'Meara, Ben Crenshaw,
Bernhard Langer, Fred Couples, lan
Woosnam, Sandy Lyle, Larry Mize, Craig
Stadler,Tom Watson.
U.S. Open champions (five years):
Graeme McDowell, Lucas Glover, Geoff
Ogilvy.
British Open champions (five years):
Louis Oosthuizen, Stewart Cink, Padraig
Harrington.
PGA champions (five years): Martin
Kaymer,Y.E.Yang.
Players Championship (three years):
Tim Clark, Henrik Stenson, Sergio Garcia.
U.S.Amateur champion and runner-up:
a-Peter Uihlein, a-David Chung.
British Amateur champion: a-Jin Jeong.
U.S. Amateur Public Links champion:
a-Lion Kim.
U.S. Mid-Amateur champion: a-Nathan
Smith.
Asian Amateur champion: a-Hideki
Matsuyama.
Top 16 players and ties from 2010
Masters: Lee Westwood, Anthony Kim,
K.J. Choi, Nick Watney, Hunter Mahan,
Ricky Barnes, Ian Poulter, Miguel Angel
Jimenez, Jerry Kelly, Ryan Moore, David
Toms, Steve Marino.
Top eight players and ties from 2010
U.S. Open: Gregory Hayret, Ernie Els, Matt
Kuchar, Davis Love III, Brandt Snedeker,
Alex Cejka, Dustin Johnson.
Top four players and ties from 2010
British Open: Rory Mcllroy.
Top four players and ties from 2010
PGA Championship: Bubba Watson.
Top 30 players from the 2010 PGA
.Tour money list Jim Furyk, Steve Stricker,
Luke Donald, Paul Casey, Justin Rose, Jeff
Overton, Bo Van Pelt, Retief Goosen,
Camilo Villegas, Ryan Palmer, Robert
Allenby, Bill Haas,Jason Day, Rickie Fowler,
Ben Crane, Charley Hoffman,Adam Scott,
Heath Slocum.
Winners of PGA Tour events that
award full FedEx Cup points since the
2010 Masters:Jason Bohn,Carl Pettersson,
Stuart Appleby.Arjun Atwal.
The field from the 2010 Tour
Championship: Martin Laird, Kevin Na,
Kevin Streelman.
Top 50 players from the final 2010
world ranking: Francesco Molinari, Robert
Karlsson, Edoardo Molinari, K.T Kim, Ross
Fisher, Charl Schwartzel, Ryo Ishikawa,
Peter Hanson, Yuta Ikeda, Sean O'Hair,
Hiroyuki Fujita,Alvaro Quiros.
Top 50 players frpm world rank-
ing published a week before the 2011
Masters:To be determined.
a-amateur

HOCKEY

NHL schedule

Today's Games
Tampa Bay at N.Y. Islanders, 7 p.m.
Florida at Pittsburgh, 7 p.m.
Vancouver at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Nashville at Chicago, 8:30 p.m.
Thursday's Games
Atlanta at Boston, 7 p.m.
Florida at Buffalo, 7 p.m.
N.Y. Islanders at New Jersey, 7 p.m.
Tampa Bay at N.Y. Rangers, 7 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Washington, 7 p.m.
Montreal at Carolina, 7 p.m.
Vancouver at Columbus, 7 p.m.
Detroit at St. Louis, 8 p.m.
Ottawa at Nashville, 8 p.m.
Calgary at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Minnesota at Colorado, 9 p.m.
Edmonton at Los Angeles, 10:30 p.m.
Phoenix at San Jose, 10:30 p.m.


TEBOW: Will start again vs. Texans


Continued From Page 1B

"We just have to execute
a little better on third down.
Honestly, I have to go back
and look at the film to know
everything. But just be
crisper, quicker and better
with my reads."
Tebow's 100.5 passer
rating was the highest in
team history for a pro debut
and the highest among the
NFL's seven rookie quar-
terbacks who have debuted
this season.
The Raiders were
impressed by the former
Florida star who was stun-
ningly selected in the first
round of the draft by for-
mer Broncos coach Josh
McDaniels.
"People said he couldn't
be an NFL quarterback
but he made some good
throws, he had some good
runs," linebacker Quentin
Groves said. "He does what
suits him best and that's
what it is."
And what best suits
him right now is passing
prudently and running a
bunch.
But the big question
about Tebow is can he
run like he did in college
and survive in the pros?
He'll have to become more
of a pocket passer, and
to do that, he'll have to
refine his footwork and his
throwing mechanics, two
things he's spent countless
hours on.
"I thought he played
well," Raiders cornerback
Nnamdi Asomugha said.
"He ran the ball well like we


knew he would. I thought
he threw well. The passes
he was throwing, they were
on the money for the most
part. So I think he did OK."
Defensive tackle Tommy
Kelly said Tebow made the
most of the conservative
calls.
"You could tell their
game plan was specifically
for his skill set. They didn't
want to put him in too much
trouble, a lot of drop-back
passes," Kelly said. "They
put him in a lot of boot situ-
ations where he could use
his athletic ability and he
did a very good job."




Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,,
to form four ordinary words. -

NEVAK /


2010 Tribune Media Services, Inc
All Rights Reserved.
NISEG



E
CUPHICa



HECREY __

a a s^ ^^ _


Broncos interim coach
Eric Studesville, who has
already declared Tebow his
starter for Sunday when
the Houston Texans (5-9)
visit Denver (3-11), praised
his quarterback's play and
poise.
"He did a lot of the things
that we always thought he
could do. He made plays
scrambling and running the
ball on the long draw play.
He threw the ball, even
though we didn't throw it
a whole lot of times, he did
make some nice throws and
completions that we need-
ed," Studesville said.


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek


% I
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


A:
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's Jumbles: FETID HEAVY CRAYON IMPUGN
I Answer: What the tree planters did at mealtime -
THEY "DUG" IN


GOLF REPORTS



Timmons, Mehl win blitzes


Travis Timmons ended
a long dry spell in the
Wednesday blitz. He ran in
four birdies for a +9 score,
which was good for a three-
shot victory.
George Burnham fin-
ished in second place with
at +6 and Jordan Hale was
a distant third with +1.
Multiple winners abound-
ed in the Wednesday skins
game.
Bob Randall, Steve
Patterson and Burnham
each had two winners.
Three of Timmons' birdies
held up as winners. But
Burnham got the last laugh
by winning the pot hole
with the day's only par on
the devilishly tough tenth
hole.
Following the sample set
on Wednesday, only three


COUNTRY CLUB
at LAKE CITY
Ed Goff

player posted positive
numbers in the Saturday
blitz. Dave Mehl captured
first place with a +5, three
strokes better than Steve
Thomas and four shots
clear of Jim Carr.
Unlike Wednesday, skins
were scarce on Saturday.
Steve Thomas obviously
liked it that way. He took
home three of the four
winners and barely missed
a clean sweep when Scott
Kishton rolled in the only
other winner.
The Good Old Boys
played a couple of close
team matches for a
change.


Mark Risk, Tom Elmore
and Tony Branch began the
action with a 7-5 win over
Stan Woolbert, Eli Witt and
Jim Bell.
Match 2 ended with a
one-stroke win by Jerry
West, Bobby Simmons,
Joe Persons and Carl
Wilson, over Ed Snow,
Howard Whitaker and Dan
Stephens. The final tally
was 9-8.
Medalist honors went to
Mark Risk (37-37-74) for
the second straight week.
Woolbert (39-38-77) won
the battle for second by a
stroke over Whitaker (40-
38-78), Snow (37-41-78) and
Simmons (38-40-78).
West (39) took the front-
nine contest. Persons,
Elmore and Stephens knot-
ted at 39 on the back side.


The search for Woods'


best shots gets harder


By DOUG FERGUSON
Associated Press

ORLANDO At his
best, Tiger Woods hit so
many good shots in a year
that it was hard to pick
one. When his caddie,
Steve Williams, was asked
for the best shot his boss
hit in 2010, it was a dif-
ficult choice for a different
reason.
There weren't very
many.
"I'm going to have to
give that some thought,"
Williams said with a laugh.
"When making a swing
change, the list of poor
shots is greater than what
it would normally be."
After a few minutes, he
settled on a 3-wood at a
major.
But it's not what anyone
might think.
"For me, the shot that
stood out was at Whistling
Straits," Williams said. "It
was the second hole, when
he hit it in a bunker off the
tee, then way right onto
that road. He hit a 3-wood


1
5
8 F
f
12 1

13 I
14
15

16 I

18 I

20
21 1
22 I
23 I
26

29 I

30 E
31 1
33

34 I


for his third shot just short
of the green. It was that
one, and the fairway bun-
ker shot on the 18th hole
(of the third round) that
he started left of the ninth
green.
"Those were the two
shots. It's coincidental that
it was the same week."
But what about that 3-
wood on the 18th at Pebble
Beach in the U.S. Open,
the one thaf Woods carved
around a tree, out over the
ocean and onto the green
for a two-putt birdie and
a 66?
Williams shook his
head.
"That's a shot where
commentators made it
a lot harder than it was,"
Williams said. "That was a
good shot, but certainly not
a difficult shot. The result
was outstanding. The shot
itself wasn't that outstand-
ing."
Woods agreed.
"It wasn't that hard. He's
right," Woods said. '"The
angle of the camera was
too far to the right, so the


ACROSS 35 Six-shooters
36 Make possible
Ultra 38 Night sky
Neon or ozone streaker
Filly's 39 And, for
footfall Wolfgang
Drooling comics 40 Trouble
canine 41 Lasted well
Reuben bread 43 Perceived
Verdi opus 46 Wide view
Succotash 48 Vassal's land
bean 50 Confirm
Flowering 51 State VIP
shrub 52 Like some
ndia's Mother exams
- 53 Southwest fea-
Young girl ture
Dawn goddess 54 The of
Free of Aquarius
Movie part 55 Be certain of
Country par-
sons DOWN
Heavy yellow
metal 1 Library abbr.
Sponge up 2 Make revisions


That man
Water-power
org.
Is not well


to
Icy coating
Kind of sale
(hyph.)


angle brought the ocean
into play. The tree was in
the way, but it wasn't that
hard of a shot."

A long year

Steve Stricker loves play-
ing in the Presidents Cup.
He hates playing golf dur-
ing hunting season in the
fall.
Something will have to
give next year.
The Presidents Cup will
be played the week before
Thanksgiving in Australia,
which means Stricker will
have to find a way to keep
his game sharp before the
matches. That will force
him to play at least once
in November, and perhaps
even practice leading up
to that.
"When is it? Middle of
November? I don't know,"
Stricker said when asked
about his schedule. "I'll
probably have to play the
week before. Is there some-
thing the week before?
China? Maybe I'd go play-
ing something like that."


Answer to Previous Puzzle

REVMAClDOTS
IL E 0D M PUS
CLEANERS RES
H ER D g()E IN K S


TA O URAL AL
OD R RA PE
TA M INK AP
E YE ANT I POSE
G IG NT H
YAWED OiLE
EWES KATYDIDS
GRAS WH EE L I V
G YRO HAND YE P


5 Scuzzy
6 Jean Auel hero-
ine
7 Observe
8 Where Ottawa is
9 Box tops


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com
12 13 14 5 16 17 8 19 110 11I


10 Lyric poems
11 Golf term
17 Mrs. Kramden
19 Fair-hiring
abbr.
22 Splits
23 Barracks off..
24 Small bay
25 Vitality
26 Foul
27 Baba au -
28 Trig function
30 Untamed
32 Wyo. clock
setting
34 Daisy Mae's
man
35 Really likes (2
wds.)
37 Polar show
38 Take for a ride
40 Work at the
loom
41 Brandish
42 Rightmost col-
umn
43 Beijing prob-
lem
44 Gael republic
45 Wheel and -
46 Cooking spray
brand
47 Ottoman offi-
cial
49 Pass quickly


12-22 2010 by UFS, Inc.


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421











Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-O415LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2010


DILBERT


EXCUSE ME.
BY MY COUNT, YOU'VE
SAID THE SAME THING
27 TIMES, USING
DIFFERENT WORDS.
( 7KT7


BABY BLUES


BLONDIE


BEETLE BAILEY


IF I CAN GET SWORN
STATEMENTS FROM
EVERYONE HERE THAT
WJE UNDERSTAND YOUR
POINT, WILL YOU STOP
TALKING?
(-,- 7-


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE


Po w in Ir- oPNT AVE
-rI4 rT iOIVo-FILL.ep
^ WORRI6OM4
/ ,'Too?"


DEAR ABBY


Husband's sex life appears

to involve only his remote


DEAR ABBY: I'm pretty
sure my husband is addict-
ed to adult porn movies. We
have several pornographic
DVDs in the house and I
can tell when they have
been moved. He denies
he's watching them, so con-
fronting him again will only
make him more angry and
possibly push him "under-
ground."
Our sex life, which used
to be grand, has become
almost non-existent. Do
you have any suggestions?
- SUSPICIOUS IN
FLORIDA
DEAR SUSPICIOUS:
Yes. Rather than accuse
your husband of being a
porn addict, start a discus-
sion about what has hap-
pened to your sex life. He
may need to be examined
by his doctor to determine if
his problem could be physi-
cal. If that isn't the case,
then marriage counseling
with a licensed therapist
might help.
However, it doesn't seem
likely to me that a man who
views only "several" adult
DVDs is a porn addict. Porn
addicts are usually glued
to their computers at every
available spare moment.
DEAR ABBY: I am mar-
ried for the second time and
have two lovely stepsons
in their early 20s. Recently


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearobby.com
they told me that my sister
"Gloria" (age 55) had asked
them to remove their shirts
during a holiday event sev-
eral years ago. They were
teenagers at the time. She
told them she wanted to "at
least look since she couldn't
touch." After that, they no
longer wanted to participate
in family gatherings.
For the record, Gloria has
a history of poor impulse
control. She takes medica-
tion for it and also to con-
trol her temper. She would
verbally bait the older boy,
who would then antagonize
her until I stopped him from
playing a battle of wits with
an unarmed person.
My relationship with my
sister has always been con-
tentious. She used to beat
me when I was a child. She
was also controlling and
tried to order everyone
around. Should I stop having
family gatherings? Should
I ask other relatives to po-
lice her? How do I confront
her about the many things


V- ^.L


HOROSCOPES


SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS


GARFIELD


B.C.


FRANK & ERNEST


S. ONLY HANDLE COMPLAINT$---
I .WHAT YOU HAVt o


12-22o


ARIES (March 21-
April 19): Tread carefully.
It won't take much to upset
someone you have to deal
with today. Don't let a dif-
ficult partnership get you
down or cause you to do
something you wouldn't
ordinarily do. Honesty, loy-
alty and integrity will be re-
quired. **
TAURUS (April 20-
May 20): You will please
the people you love and
will enjoy the close bond
you develop. An important
personal relationship will
be enhanced by the choices
you make and what you
have to offer. Take the ini-
tiative to make your home
one of comfort, peace and
joy. ****
GEMINI (May 21-
June 20): Be careful how
much you spend and on
what. Don't let your emo-
tions cause you to donate
cash; if you want to help,
offer your time or a service
you can share. Final touch-
es to your work will sepa-
rate what you produce from
the competition. ***
CANCER (June 21-
July ?2): Show your talent
and offer your assistance.
You will attract the atten-
tion of someone you think
is special. A partnership will
enable you to get far more
done. A serious decision
will shape the direction you
take in the new year. ***-


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

LEO (July 23-Aug.
22): You will overlthink
any situation you are facing.
As long as you aren't going
over budget, you should be
able to move forward with
your plans. The less time
spent fretting over the im-
possible, the more you will
accomplish. ***
VIRGO (Aug. 23-
Sept. 22): Changes you
make will lead to a better
lifestyle and improved re-
lationships. Your outlook
regarding a cause or the
people involved in a volun-
teer project will be altered
by the way things are run.
Romance is looking good.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): Emotional upset is
apparent and must be kept
in check. Tempers will be
short and patience will be
required. Making any deci-
sions or sudden, last-min-
ute plans will not turn out
well. Stick to what you are
sure will work. **
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-
Nov. 21): Don't hold back
when there. is so much
to look forward to. Take
charge and grab at any op-
portunity to bring about
much-needed change. Love
is strengthening and will
help see you through any
disorganization you face.


SAGITARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): Try to keep
things as simple as pos-
sible. The fewer changes
you make, the more stable
you will become. Focus on
maintaining what you al-
ready have, not trying to
expand into unknown terri-
tory. ***
CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): You can find
out information that will
enable you to please some-
one you love. An unusual
look at your past will come
through the memories
someone shares with you.
Love and romance are sky-
rocketing. Don't hold back
the way you feel. ***
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Helping oth-
ers or getting involved in
a partnership will enable
both of you to excel. Mov-
ing forward is a- necessity
but it can also mean say-
ing goodbye to old habits,
friends or neighborhoods.
Change will catapult you
into a better place. ***
PISCES (Feb. 19-
March 20): Don't ques-
tion what everyone else is
doing. Concentrate on the
way you conduct your own
interests. Family gather-
ings and picking presents
for people you care about
will bring you great joy. A
financial gain is apparent.
*****


CELEBRITY CIPHER

by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: V equals W
"I N EX, CR N U N R B H MXJX U LH I U R D H

PHJX VJXABLXU HBBTWCANHD ALCD

AJONDS AH PCFX ALX XDSINRL

I CTS L. PCI B H I P PTSSXJ N U SX
PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "The sparrows are preparing for winter... dressed in a
plain brown coat and singing a cheerful song." Charles Kuralt
(c) 2010 by NEA, Inc. 12-22


FOR BETTER OR WORSE


I DON'T
THAT'S GET YOUR
s MIGHTY POINT. CAN
RUDE OF YOU REPEAT
' YOU. IT 26 MORE
) TIMES?


OMIGOODNESS? I MISS THE ''
MA DITHERS GOD0 OL' DAYS
OBB5LE HEAD! WHEN HE GAVE
OUT FROZEN





-1
n---. 4
L <^ ,~~ ^


Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415LAKE CITY REPORTER


she has done? Or should I
stop associating with her?
- VEXED IN VIRGINIA
DEAR VEXED: Because
your sister seems unable to
distinguish between what
is and isn't appropriate be-
havior, have a talk with her
and tell her what you expect
from her before the next
family gathering. I see little
to be gained from a "con-
frontation" about what she
did in the past.
If Gloria manages not to
start trouble at the party,
continue to include her. If
not, no law says you must.
If you don't, be. prepared
for questions about her ab-
sence and answer them di-
rectly and honestly.
DEAR ABBY: I am a
woman who is wondering
what to say when someone
calls me "sir" on the phone.
I have heard my voice re-
corded, and I don't think
I sound like a' man. Still, it
happens. It makes me feel
angry and mortified. What
do I say? "MA'AM" IN
CINNAMINSON, NJ.
DEAR "MA'AM": You
should say, "For your infor-
mation, I'm a woman." That
should clear up any confu-
sion.
E Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


CLASSIC PEANUTS


ADVICE & COMICS WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 22,2010









4B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2010



On the rise: UCF cracks AP


poll for 1st time at No. 24


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


By ANTONIO GONZALEZ
Associated Press

ORLANDO A.J.
Rompza got his first taste of
stardom over the weekend.
He was wearing a Central
Florida sweater at an outlet
mall when a clerk behind
a watch counter gave the
starting point guard a sec-
ond look.
"He was like, 'Oh, are you
A.J. Rompza?"' he said. "It's
pretty crazy right now."
These days, the Knights
are getting recognized
everywhere.
In the latest milestone in
a banner year for the athlet-
ics program, the UCF men's
basketball team cracked the
AP Top 25 for the first time
in school history Monday,
checking in at No. 24. The
team was informed just
before an afternoon prac-
tice, and emotions swirled
all over the place. "
"It's starting to show that
people are recognizing UCF
not just for football, but also
basketball," Rompza said.
"It's great to actually have
that honor to say we're
ranked."
The timing couldn't be


better, either.
Big East presidents unan-
imously agreed to expand
the number of football-play-
ing schools from eight to 10
in early November. A few
weeks later, TCU accept-
ed an invitation to join the
conference in all sports in
2012.
UCF, Houston and
Villanova a member in
other sports besides foot-
ball are among poten-
tial targets to be the next
program. And if it doesn't
happen for the Knights this
time, it certainly won't be
for a lack of success from
their top two sports.
UCF's football team also
earned its first ranking in
the AP poll this season and
won the Conference USA
title. Now new basketball
coach Donnie Jones has the
Knights (10-0) off to their
best start since moving up
to Division I in 1984.
"We haven't really put a
lot of focus on the Big East.
It's a lot of perception,"
Jones said. "But if you do
what you should do, and
you win, and your programs
have success, opportunities
will come your way."


The university also has
done its part.
The school has ballooned
into the second-largest uni-
versity in the country with
more than 56,000 students,
built new athletic facilities
and upgraded old ones in
recent years. The Knights
still have had trouble step-
ping out of the shadows of
the state's traditional pow-
ers, and a mediocre bas-
ketball program had been
considered one of the major
stumbling blocks for any
potential move to a BCS
automatic-qualifying con-
ference.
Maybe not anymore.
This season, the Knights
already have beaten No. 20
Florida, Miami and South
Florida and are favored in
their last major nonconfer-
ence game Wednesday at
Massachusetts. Not bad for
a team that was 15-17 last
season, had uncertainty lin-
gering after longtime coach
Kirk Speraw was fired and
has had injuries to several
key players.
Jones, a former Florida
assistant and protege of
Gators coach Billy Donovan,
was convinced that UCF


had all the makings to be t
a winning program. So he
stepped down as Marshall's
coach to come back to the
Sunshine State.
Even his mentor has
been impressed with UCF's
rapid rise under Jones.
"I'm really happy for /
him," Donovan said. "And.
also I think the thing that's J L'
probably gotten lost is he's
battled a lot of injuries. He's
had a lot of guys hurt and
everything else. I think
he's in position to have a
terrific year right now and I
couldn't be any more proud .
of him."
The Knights have
been getting 16 points a
game from sophomore
guard Marcus Jordan,
son of Michael Jordan.
Marcus' older brother,
Jeff, came to UCF over the
summer from Illinois but
has to sit out this season
because of NCAA transfer
rules.
The Knights' winning
streak could be in jeopar-
dy, however, with Marcus
Jordan nursing a sprained ASSOCIATED PRESS
left ankle. He will be a Central Florida's Marcus Jordan swoops in for a slam dunk
game-time decision against Central Florida's Marcus Jordan swoops in for a slam dunk
Massachusetts. against Louisiana-Lafayette Wednesday, in Orlando.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Sept. 25 file photo, Oregon coach Chip Kelly leads his team onto the field to face
Arizona State in Tempe, Ariz. Kelly has been voted AP Coach of the Year, Tuesday, after
leading the second-ranked Ducks to an undefeated record and a spot in the BCS national
championship game in just his second season as the team's leader.


Oregon's Chip Kelly


wins AP coach of year


By ANNE M. PETERSON
Associated Press

EUGENE, Ore. -
Oregon athletic officials
were so convinced that
Chip Kelly was destined
to be head coach of. the
Ducks they offered him
the job before it came
open.
Smart move.
In just his second season
leading Oregon, Kelly is
taking the second-ranked
Ducks to the national
championship game
on Jan. 10 against No. 1
Auburn and for that he
was voted AP Coach of the
Year on Tuesday.
Kelly received 24 votes
from the 60-member AP
football poll panel to beat
out his BCS title game
counterpart, Gene Chizik
of Auburn, who received
17 votes.
Stanford's Jim Harbaugh
was third with five votes,
TCU's Gary Patterson, last
year's winner, and Mark
Dantonio of Michigan State
each received three votes.
Getting one vote apiece
were Nevada's Chris Ault,
Oklahoma State's Mike
Gundy and Miami, Ohio's
Mike Haywood, who led the
school to a Mid-American
Conference championship
before taking the top job at
Pittsburgh last week.
One voter abstained and


four did not return ballots.
, Kelly has made a rapid
rise from I-AA coordinator
in New England to leading
the Pac-10's new power-
house program to within a
victory of its first national
championship.
Mike Bellotti, Oregon's
longtime head cohch
through the 2008 season,
hired Kelly away from
New Hampshire to run
the Ducks offense in 2007.
He installed an up-tempo,
spread-option attack that
has been growing more
potent ever since.
It didn't take long for
it to become clear that
Bellotti had hired his heir
apparent. When Bellotti
was tapped to take over as
the school's athletic direc-
tor, Oregon announced
in December 2008 as
the Ducks prepared for
the Holiday Bowl that
Bellotti would become full-
time AD at some point and
Kelly was the head-coach
in waiting.
That spring, Bellotti
made it official and Kelly
took over the Ducks.
In his first season as
head coach, Kelly led the
Ducks to a 10-3 record and
the Pac-10 championship,
tailoring his explosive
offense to the dual talents
of quarterback Jeremiah
Masoli and weathering the
storm of negative publicity


brought about when star
running back LeGarrette
Blount punched a Boise
State player after an open-
ing game loss.
Oregon regrouped and
went on to the Rose Bowl
for the first time since New
Year's 1995.
Kelly was met by more
turbulence this past spring
when both Masoli and
running back LaMichael
James got into trouble.
After Masoli pleaded
guilty to a misdemeanor
charge tied to the theft of
a campus fraternity house,
Kelly suspended him for
the season. The coach later
won praise for dismissing
Masoli considered to
be a preseason Heisman
Trophy hopeful when
he was caught with mari-
juana in his car.
With Masoli gone, Kelly
developed sophomore
Darron Thomas into not
just a replacement, but an
upgrade.
James was suspended
for the opener after plead-
ing guilty to misdemeanor
harassment for an alterca-
tion with his ex-girlfriend
- but Kelly maintained
that James was both hon-
est and contrite about what
had transpired.
Just as he had after Blount
and the punch, Kelly had
his team focused on moving
forward in fall camp.


INDIVIDUALS: Reach success in state
Continued From Page 1B


Legree qualified for state
in the high jump and tied
for eighth.
Phoebe Johnson (long
jump), Tiger Powell
(discus) and Seth Peterson
(800 meters) were district
champions for Columbia
track.
Powell also won at
region to qualify for
state and placed seventh.
Johnson qualified for state
in the 200 meters.
Columbia swimmer
Heather Burns qualified for
state in the 500 freestyle
and 200 freestyle. Lindsay
Lee qualified in the 100
backstroke. They were
joined as region qualifiers
by Katherine Mathis,
Lauren Lee and David
Morse.


Columbia's Dean -
Soucinek and Nick Jones
were region qualifiers in
golf.
Fort White's Matt
Waddington and Sydni
Jones were region
qualifiers in cross country.
Brittany Boris, Darian
Ste-Marie, Brandy
Springer, Shelby Camp
and Ashley Mixon were
members of the Lady
Tigers golf team that
advanced to region.
Members of the
CHS bowling team that
competed at state were
Linden Barney, Christine
Peters, Courtney Schmitt,
Shea Spears, Tori Wise and
Jordan Williams.
There were several
athletes who won


subjective awards.
Timmy Jernigan and
Jamal Montague were
Class 4A first-team all-state
in football for the 2009
season. Montague was
selected as Offensive MVP
in the Florida-Georgia
Border Wars all-star game.
Cameron Sweat, Powell
and Bessant were named
to the second team
and Jordan Morris was
honorable mention.
Matt Thomas of Fort.
White was a first-team
selection in Class 2B.
Alexis Blake and Roy Blake
were honorable mention.
Columbia soccer
player Chris Beardsley
was selected to play in
the FACA Senior All-Star
Game.


BRANDON FINLEY/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High swimmers Lindsay Lee (left) and Heather Burns qualified for the state
championship as individuals. Burns qualified for the 500 freestyle and 200 freestyle, while Lee
qualified in the 100 backstroke.



Lady Huskies top UCLA,


beat Florida State, 93-62


By DOUG FEINBERG
Associated Press

HARTFORD, Conn. -
One of the biggest streaks
in sports now belongs to
the UConn women's bas-
ketball team.
The No. 1-ranked
Huskies topped the 88-
game winning streak by
John Wooden's UCLA
men's team from 1971-
74, beating No. 22 Florida


State 93-62 on Tuesday
night.
Maya Moore had a dou-
ble-double with a career-
high 41 points and 10
rebounds, and Bria Hartley
added 21 points for the
Huskies, who haven't lost
since April 6, 2008, in the
NCAA tournament semi-
finals. Only twice during
the record run has a team
come within single digits of
UConn Stanford in the


NCAA championship game
last season and Baylor in
early November.
It is one more chapter
of history for UConn, and
perhaps the grandest. The
Huskies already own seven
national titles and four per-
fect seasons, and they've
produced a galaxy of stars
that includes Rebecca Lobo,
Diana Taurasi, Jennifer
Rizzotti, Sue Bird and Tina
Charles.

















Your marketplace source for Lake City and Co/umbia County


WEDNESDAYDECEMBER 22, 2010


LAKE CITY REPORTER


Christmas Eve brings last-minute shoppers


With just a few
delays left until
Christmas, many
people are wait-
ing until the last
minute to go shopping.
"That's just human nature, to
put something off as long as you
can," said Chris Pottle, owner of
Furniture Showplace.
Several local business around
town cover the gamut of gift pos-
sibilities for last minute shop-
pers.
At Furniture Showplace, cer-
tain items, such as La-Z-Boy
Recliners, are a popular last min-
ute gift, Pottle said.
"A lot of times people come
in from out of town and might
come in looking for something,"
he said.
Husbands and wives will also
make a major purchase of a sofa
or sectional just before Christmas,
but it's not usually a rushed deci-
sion, Pottle said.
Furniture Showplace is open
9:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. Christmas
Eve.
There is everything from
rings and watches to necklaces
at Joye's Gems, said Kelly Lippi,
store manager. Possible gifts are
in every price range.
"We have everything in a price
range from $10 to $1,000," she
said.
Shoppers can receive assis-


tance in picking out the perfect
gift for that special someone,
Lippi said.
Joye's Gems does receive a
lot of last minute customers, she
added. The rate of shoppers var-
ies from a slow stream of custom-
ers to "crazy busy."
"In past years we've had people
at 7 p.m. of Christmas Eve'knock-
ing on the door," Lippi said. "We
work with everybody."
Joye's Gems is open 10 a.m. to
6 p.m.
Gene Perry, co-owner of
Amygene's Embroidery Studio,
is a last minute shopper himself.
"I don't know why," he said. "I
just keep putting it off until the
last minute."
Some people wait until the
last minute to shop hoping to
take advantage of good bargains
and special sales retailers might
not offer at the beginning of the
Christmas shopping season,
Perry said.
The store offers several gift
ideas for someone who sews,
he said. There are needle and
thread combo packages that can
include one, two or as many dif-
ferent colors of threads the buyer
chooses.
Craft baskets with necessary
sewing items are also available.
"There's so many ways to put
things together of items most
(people who sew) have a need


JASON MATTHEW WALKERJLake City Reporter
Creasie Miller (left) and Jessica Smith looks at a Galian hand purse sold at Southern Exposure Boutique &
Salon. Southern Exposure is one of many local businesses open for last minute gifts until Christmas Eve.


for," Perry said. "We work with
each customer to have something
put together."
The store also has one of the
largest selections of items for
personalizing, such as diaper
bags, purses and more. It pro-
vides embroidery at no cost on
purchased items.


"That's always a good gift idea,
to have something personalized,"
Perry said.
If all else fails, gift certificates
to a person's favorite store is a
last minute shopping idea.
Perry said gift certificates
are often viewed as an easy way
out, but buying one for a specific


place, like Amygene's shows you
know the person's interests.
"You're interested in letting
them select the product they
want," he said. "A gift certificate
is always something appreciated
by (someone who sews)."
Amygene's is open 10 a.m. until'
about 3 p.m. Christmas Eve.


.CTast Minutc Gift Guide


OPEN CHRISTMAS DAY!
6 a.m. 10 p.m.





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Christmas Savings

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Son Pre-framed Art Prints
iar .\ \i l,* il r


i MERRY CHRISTMAS







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(38b) 1S8-'20 ujwwuw.ondofierpizza.com


FRAMING



S( STARTING AT


A feast of
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.. ,


.y ,
bt U L A -. ..k .

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FURNITURE SHOWPLACE
11 hI/S d. i l SLp DDi,.*mN 't, tr,

L_'S 9 \\,-' t, I..ik0 i .i ,. ^s,,--':, -')'


235 Chainsaw -
199!W5

:. ~a.' ,

125B Blower "
149.f *






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Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2010

Lake City Reporter




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Advertising language must comply
with Federal, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
nation in employment, housing and
public accommodations. Standard


abbreviations are acceptable; how-
ever, the first word of each ad may
not be abbreviated.

S *., i i 'I


020 Lost & Found

Lost 18mo old Yorkie. Recent
surgery and on medication. Has
microchip. Lost in McAlpin area.
Please call 386-362-2140

100 J10
S Opportunities

04542450
CDL A OPERATORS-
Leading Fresh/FrozeRi Company
is hiring Lease Operators!!
No New England States
100% Fuel Surcharge,
Health and Life Insurance
available, Spouse and Pet Rider
Programs, 0/O'S
And PTDI Certified Students
Are Welcome !!
CALL TODAY!!
BUEL, INC. 866-369-9744

04542743
Cook
Full time, must have experience.
Apply Baya Pointe Nursing &
Rehabilitation Center
587 SE Ermine Ave.
Lake City, Fl 32025
EOE/DFWP

04542747
LifeSouth Community Blood
Centers is seeking an independ-
ent and precise individual for a
Donor Services Specialist
phlebotomistt) position.
HS/GED and valid driver's
license required. Phlebotomy
exp prfrd. F/T, $9-10 p/h. Apply
at www.lifesouth.org. Back-
ground check req. EOE/DFWP.

04542734
OWNER-OPERATORS
< Regional Dedicated
Opportunity
Excellent Rates and Miles
Frequent Home Time
< Leading Fuel Surcharge
Paid 100%
Call Today
Greatwide Logistics Services
866-904-9228
www.driveforgreatwide.com

greatwide"
LOGISTICS SERVICES


Cashiers needed, Experience Pre-
ferred,Drug frre workplace, allap-
plicants will be drug tested
Ellisville Exxon,
Hwy 441, No Phone Calls Please.

Mechanic needed for Truck shop,
must have own tools, apply
Southern Specialized, 1812 NW
Main Blvd., 386-752-9754
Subway is now hiring.
Management Experience a plus.
Send resumes to:
lakecitymanager@yahoo.com

120 Medical
12 Employment

05523790
Medical Assistant,
Exp only need apply! Looking
for qualified indiv., quick learn-
er, good personality,dependable
Fax resume to: Cheryl
386-754-3657 or email to:
office manager@
primarycaremedic.com

05524650
LEARN TO DRAW BLOOD
Local Phlebotomy Course
offered in Lake City, FLA
Certificate program.
(904)566-1328
F/T LPN or MA needed M-F for
busy medical practice.
Please fax resume to
386-487-1232
Wanted Receptionist,
experienced. Send resume to
826 SW Main Blvd. Suite 102.
Lake City, FL. 32025


Lake City Reporter







Home Improvements

Carpentry, remodeling, paint,
repairs, additions, Lic. & Ins.
Since 1978 FREE estimates
386-497-3219 or 954-649-1037


Pool Maintenance

Pool Leaks/Pool Repairs
Florida Leisure Pool & Spa
352-373-0612
CPC 1457279


1 Medical
120 Employment

05524704
Managed Care

Provider Relations
Managers
Marion, Lake and
Sumter Counties, FL

At Freedom Health, we
continue to provide the best
quality, cost-effective benefits to
serve our Medicare and
Medicaid clients and the most
rewarding career opportunities
to our team members as we
have since our founding. Our
rapid growth has created these
outstanding opportunities!!!

The successful candidates will
work from one of Freedom's
satellite offices, and be responsi-
ble for the day-to-day oversight
of a team of provider relations
representatives charged with the
development and maintenance
of a comprehensive network of
Primary Care Providers,
Specialist Providers, Ancillary
Providers, and Allied Health
Care Professionals in an
assigned region. Responsibilities
include provider contract
negotiations and initial and
ongoing education and support.
Bachelor's degree preferred and
at least four years experience in
the managed care industry with
a focus on contracting.
Intermediate proficiency with
Microsoft Office applications, as
well as ability to navigate and
master proprietary software
programs. Must be able to travel
30% air & ground.
Freedom Health offers a
competitive compensation pack-
age including excellent benefits.
Discover true "Freedom of
Choice" by emailing your
resume referencing Job Code in
MPO the subject line to:
fhjobs@freedomh.com

Freedom Health is an equal
opportunity employer dedicated
to workforce diversity and a
drug free workplace.
Drug Screening and
Background Check required.


130 Part Time
Janitorial, seeking couple for P/T
evening work, must have reliable
transportation, clean background
and ref's 386-752-2147

140 Work Wanted
NEED A CAREGIVER? I am a
Compassionate, private duty sitter
I will care for elderly or disabled
persons. Reasonable rates and
references available, Ruth
435-469-1237 or 386-454-8697

240 Schools &
240 Education

04542575
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-12/13/10
Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-01/17/11

Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com



310 Pets & Supplies
BEAGLE RABBIT DOG.
$175. Runs Good, Male
.386-249-3104 or
386-719-4802
Chocolate Lab needs home!
reduced to.$250, AKC
Female 7 months old
386-965-2231
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.


033 Livestock &
30 Supplies
Pigs for sale
7 weeks old
$50 each HURRY!
386-965-2215
Pony
Mini Mare, Paint
5 yrs old $400
tack included 386-965-2231

361 Farm Equipment
84 Ford 4610 Tractor. Runs good.
Solid 2WD. New front tires,
350hr on 2005 motor. Dependable.
$7500. obo. 386-867-0005


401 Antiques
ANTIQUES WANTED
Fum., China, Silver, Glassware,
Costume Jewelry & Gold. 35 years
exp. Cash Pd. Pete. 386-963-2621


402 Appliances
KENMORE WASHER/DRYER.
Runs and looks good.
$175.00 for both.
386-965-0778

408 Furniture
ALMOST NEW
rocker/recliner.
$60.
386-935-4931
LARGE DRESSER
All wood.
$60.
386-935-4931
Sofa Sleeper, double bed, beige
floral pattern, excellent condition
$100
386-935-0654
TV 55inch. HD projection.
Factory remote. Works great.
Looks great.Perfect gift.
$325:00 386-719-9189
Twin Race Car Bed with mattress.
Twin Story Book Cottage Bed
with mattress. $350.00. for both
386-965-9882

413 Musical
Merchandise
100 Watt Sanyo Stereo, graphic
equalizer, dual cassette, speakers
36" high, very good condition
$50 386-935-0654


420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$225 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.
WANTED: Copies of newspaper
Columbia Gazette from
1920s and 1930s. Will buy.
512-751-4489 talter3(@uic.edu

430 Garage Sales


Big Christmas Sale. Thursday
Only Lots of gift ideas! Baskets,
Decor, wreaths, candles, home in-
terior. Store Clearance. Inside sale,
comer of 252 (Pinemount)/137,
follow signs 386-590-4085
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.


440 Miscellaneous
CONSUL 31"TV.
Good condition
$80.
386-935-4931
Tow Behind Grill/Smoker. Com-
mercial built, nice shape. $1250.
obo. 386-249-3104 or 719-4802
Great Christmas gift for hubby.
White Wardrobe. Vinyl/veneer
finish. 36W X 20D X 72H
Like new $50
386-935-0654

450 Good Things
450 to Eat
The Nut Cracker
Buy and sell, crack & shell pecans
2738 CR 252 W, Lake City 32024
Pinemount Rd/CR 252/Taylorville
Robert Taylor 386-963-4138
or 386-961-1420


520 Boats for Sale
Bass Tender Boat
10'2",
$500 Call for details
386-965-2215

630 Mobile Homes
630 for Rent
2&3 Bedroom Mobile homes.
$395 $650. mo. plus deposit.
Water & sewer furnished.
Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
2/2, S/W, 1 acre secluded lot
Bascom Norris Bypass, $500.dep,
$500 mo, possible owner finance
386-623-2203 or 386-623-5410
2BR/2BA MH CH/A,
Fenced in back yard and Shed.
$750. mo plus deposit.
Pets OK! 386-755-4157


3BR/1.5 BA
Unfurnished Mobile Home.
No pets!
386-755-0142
3br/2ba newly renovated MH on
1/2 ac. private property. Close to
college $700.mo. 1st. mo.+ Sec.
dep. Ref's. No Pets. Non smoking
environment 386-755-3288


Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White Contact 386-623-2465
or 36-292-0114
Nice clean 2&3 bdrm, Five Points,
NO PETS, also 3 bd on the
Westside, 1 mo rent & dep
386-961-1482
Quiet Setting w/lots of oaks
2br/lba from $450 & 3br/2ba from
$550. Includes water & sewer.
No Pets! 386-961-0017
Very clean & well maintained 2/2
units in nice park. $599.mo
w/$500. dep. Rent incl water,
sewer, trash p/u. Close to town
386-984-8448 or 623-7547
Very Clean 2 BR/1 BA, in the
country, Branford area, $450 mo.,
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleypro590-0642


640 Mobile Homes
640 for Sale
$200. MONTHLY. Remodeled
SW. 2bd/2ba. Appliances,
delivered & blocked. Owner
finance available w/$3000 down.
Call Gary Hamilton 386-758-9824
05524589
Palm Harbor Homes
Factory Liquidation Sale
2009 Model Homes MUST GO!
Call for FREE color brochures
800-622-2832

05524637
Gainesville-Jacobsen-Savings
Factory direct Jaconsen outlet
now open to the public 3/2 start-
ing at 39,900 complete.
Northpointemobilebomesales.co
m for complete website specials
or 352-872-5566
For the best deal in Florida!

05524638
North Pointe Homes is your
new #1 Jacobsen dealer. Take a
short drive to Gainesville and
save thousands. Five year halo
warranty, 2x6 wall, and
much more. Free energy star
package on all others.
Call Chuck at 352-872-5567

05524639
Why drive to Gainesville?
This is Why! New 28x60
Jacobsen 3/2 inc FREE Furni-
ture! Low as $497 month.
Drive to our dealership and Buy,
I pay for your gas!
Call Mark at 352-872-5568


650 Mobile Home
650 & Land
BANK REPO: Mobile Home On
15.65 ACRES IN FT. WHITE -
Including 60X40 pole barn. Listed
at $130,000.00. Call Billy Shows
After hours 386-208-8547

Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent
5524443-
$Holiday Cash $
NO App Fee, NO SD,
$250 off December,
*for Qualified Applicants
Windsong Apartments
(386) 758-8455

05524518
SPRING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans;
some with garages.
Call 386-454-1469
or visit our website:
www.springhillvillage.net

2/1 w/garage,
east side of town,
1st, last & sec
386-755-6867
2BR/2BA DUPLEX
on McFarlane Ave. W/D hookup
Rent $625. per month.
Call 386-867-1212 for details.
Brick Duplex 2/1 off Baya. CH/A,
Carport, Carpet, tile, $575 mo,+
Dep. Call 386-752-0118 or
386-623-1698 or 386-292-4937
Duplex w/garage spacious, 2/1,
1300 sq ft, W/D hook up, CH/A,
$650 plus dep & bckgmd chk,
386-697-3248 or 352-514-2332
Great location W of 1-75, spacious
deluxe 2BR apts., garage, W/D
hook up. patio. $600 & up, + SD,
386 965-0276
The Lakes Apts. Studios & lBr's
from $135/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $425 + sec.
Michelle 386-752-9626
X-CLEAN SECOND STORY 2/2,
country acre 8 mi to VA, off Lk
Jeff Rd. $500 mo + dep. No dogs.
Deck, w/d hookups 386.961.9181

720 Furnished Apts.
7 For Rent

1 BEDROOM all utilities includ-
ed. Furnished or unfurnished. East
or West side. $475. mo. +
$200 security. 386-397-3568
NO Lease/Deposits, ROOMS only
Utilities, Cable, WI-FI, maid,
micro-fridge, phone, Pool.
Americas Best Value Inn
(386)755-4664
Wk 1 prs. $169,2 ppl $179 + tax
Park Model Trailers (Studio), all
utils, use of pool, $500 per month,
NeverDunn's RV Park.
386-961-8540 or 755-4945


Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,.
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808


7 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent
2BR/1BA CH/A. Large carport,
great location, near comer of Baya
& McFarland references req'd.
386-752-9144 or 755-2235
3 & 4 bedroom homes. Newly
renovated. Very nice, in town.
$750 $950 per month plus
deposit. 386-755-2423
3 Bedrm/2 Bth plus 360 sq ft Stu-
dio on Lake Jeffery/Old Mill Rd,
very private, $1200 per mo. plus
deposit, 386-752-9303, No Pets
3/2 W/D hook up, appliances
included, $200 sec dep,
$650 month, ref check,
386-365-2515
3/2, CH/A,all appliances, back
yard fenced, carport, $825 mo, 1st,
last &sec, 560 SE St. Johns St
386-697-8893 or 305-962-2666
3/2,Brick Home, big back yard,
$900 month + Security Deposit
off of Branford Hwy & CR 242,
386-965-0276
4/1&1/2, tile floors,
kids & pets ok, close to town,
$800 dep, $875 month,
386-755-2070 or 786-436-7959
Cozy Cottage lbr/lba S. Hwy. 41
$550/mo. + security. Includes all
utilities & satellite TV. Pets OK.
(386)758-2408
FOR RENT: Large 3br/2ba brick
home, fenced on 5 acres on
Columbia/Suwannee County line.
$975. per month + utilities.
Perfect place for children.
Broker/Owner- Annette Land @
386-935-0824

Newer 3/2 w/2 car garage.
1800 sq ft $900 mo. plus deposit
1-10/US 41 area
(248)875-8807
Rural beauty and privacy near
I-10/US90 NW of Live Oak. 3Br,
1+Ba, $725/mo. Optional pasture
available. (626) 512-5374

750 Business&
SOffice Rentals

OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$695. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor


805 Lots for Sale
5 Acres in Lake City, FL,
low down, easy qualifying, and
low monthly payments,
please call 512-663-0065

PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
*on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised'in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

810 Home for Sale

3BR/2BA 2 story brick. 4.6 ac. in
ground pool. Lg. workshop &
2 wells. $200,000.00 obo
Old Wire Rd. (850)728-0782
FSBO, Completely Remodeled,
3bdr/lbth, fenced, new deck, shop,
new cabinets/appliances,Schools
blks away, $65K 478-391-1592

82O Farms &
O vAcreage
4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks! Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$69,900. $613mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
4 Ac.,Ft. White. Well, Septic &
Power. Owner Financing!
NO DOWN! $69,900.
Only $613./mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
WE FINANCE! Half to ten acre
lots. Some with w/s/pp
Deas Bullard BKL Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com


* ADvantage *


ARE YOU OUR MISSING PIECE?















Apply Online or In Persont 1152 SW Business Point Dr
SLake City, FL 32025
SoraL. 386.754.8562
SEL www.sitel.com EOE






LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2010


930 Motorcycles
09 Harley Davidson XR1200R
Mirage Orange & Black. I owner,
garage kept. Like new w/only 52
actual mi. $8,000. 386-752-5988
940 Trucks
1990 Ford F350 Dually
work truck, white, automatic
$1500 obo
386-965-2215
97 Chevy Z71 Extended cab. 3
door. Black w/gold trim. Local 2
owner. All service records. $4750.
obo 386-249-3104 / 386-719-4802

Contact us
at the paper.


CLASSIFIED ADS
386-755-5440
SUBSCRIPTION
386-755-5445
ALL OTHER DEPARTMENTS
386-752-1293
ELECTRONIC ADS SEND TO
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ale City, Rlorida te5


A monthly real estate magazine

Lak Ciy, epote


-- Il~




=~. ~


.+ -,..:+ i~;-ij+
1'""... l ,t .,


LOREN PROPER


BAND

a Variety of Music


Friday,


December 31, 2010


Show begins at 7pm- 1 am


Spirit of the Suwannee Music Park



$60 Per Couple or $35 pp

Tickets Available at


Spirit


of the Suwannee Music Park & Campground.


...to never miss a day's
worth of all the
Lake City Reporter
has to offer:
Home delivery.
To subscribe call
755-5445


E Miii


For more information call the Park Office at 386-364-1683


All You Can Eat Finger Food Buffet Party Favors
Toast at Midnight Cash Bar Dancing
Stay the night in a cabin
Start 2011 at Spirit of the Suwannee Music Park


I AgTqmml


Classified Department: 755-5440


771







LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2010


-A: V 5"PEC:'KLS i


ONDOLI

CSHIW .W. '...
*1y ipa,


Buy One Pizza Get One


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a jfl .mp. !. .. a,,.r ---


Exam and Necessary X-rays
DOI50DO330 U
First-time ;
patient -.J "
Reg. $136 SAINGS OF $107
. Expires December 30, 2010

ww.aspenlakecity.com


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...2 SL' L .q q Lake C it. '
-"" ">* "r- "o-- R'c, pa
S* f .m -


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fs15TO0


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Free Aerobics & Child Care
Westfield Square. LAKpI,qgY.
* 386-752-0749
"Lake City's Best Since I9S" 4tV


Rountree
*Rountree


( TOYOTA


4310 US
. o ',- ,' ,.,-
* '.*.', ,, 1 ,'.. -j '. ', ="- 7, ?


I Rotate &
Balance
Tires
Most cars & trucks
Plus tax & supplies
, Not valid with any other offer
expires 12/31/10


With a $ irj11 m
in rebate! BI


ii
A \$ti 5tA "ASS 5515


WITNESS
" CENTER


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,.,,,


- -























Wednesday, December 22, 2010 www.lakecityreporter.com I D


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Model train enthusiast Mason Farnell, 67, is seen behind a miniature scale farm as a couple of his trains ride the rails alongside a busy road. Farnell, a physical educa-
tion teacher at Eastside Elementary School, says he has been collecting trains since he was 4 years old. 'It carries you back to yesteryear,' he said.





MINIATURE MEMORIES

Longtime Lake City resident says train hobby more than just play


I remember getting on top of my swingset, when
the train would pull into town, and watching it
with excitement, just how it moved."


Mason Farnell
Lake City .resident


By A.C. GONZALEZ
agonzalez@lakecityreporter.comrn
Mason Farnell spent
four years creating
a miniature world,
forever stuck in the
middle of the 20th
century, and with details down to


pebbles in the railroad tracks.
Farnell, a teacher at Eastside
Elementary School for 41 years, is
an avid model train enthusiast. He
said his love for trains stems back to
the impact they held for him person-
ally and for the entire community
during his childhood.
'Trains were important to us back
then," said Farnell. "I remember


getting on top of my swingset, when
the train would pull into town, and
watching it with excitement, just how
it moved."
During those times, Farnell said,
there weren't many people spend-
ing their time indoors or not work-
ing. You could always find someone
TRAINS continued on 2D


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
A Pacific Southern steam engine passes through downtown "Lake
City" while hauling precious cargo.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Farnell's Super Chief F-7 rumbles through the city on its way to the
train station.


u4








LAKE CITY REPORTER


ACT2


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2010


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Mason Farnell explains how he refurbished his Lionel standard-gauge 1927 diesel engine, the oldest in his collection. The
train originally ran from Washington, D.C. to New York. 'Santa Claus brought me my first train,' Farnell said.


TRAINS: Collection reminds Farnell of olden days


Continued From Page 1A

filling a train car with
some load or another.
The popularity of trains
wasn't dependent upon
the economy.
Model trains were
among the most popu-
lar toys to give a child
during the 1950s, said
Farnell, who grew up in
Lake City. During his
youth, a gift of a model
engine from his father
sparked his interest in
the hobby, which has
lasted to this day with
the same thrill he held
at that moment. : ,
"I started the hobby.
when I was four years
old, and my daddy
bought me a Lionel
steam train," said


Farnell.
Fast-forward to the
present.
Farnell now owns sev-
eral model trains, decked
out with train cars and
sleek, shiny, aluminum
engines, with several
yards of track leading all
around the inside room of
a barn house.
Mountains, bridges, cit-
ies, people, cars and train
yards also line the model
landscape in exact detail
and sized to scale with
the real world.
Farnell has even gone
as far as including car
wrecks and detours in his
model city, with a super
hero chasing a villain
down a busy road.


It took about four years
to get the building done
and the trains moved into
the room, but the job
will never be done, said
Farnell. "We've built this
over a long time, and I
just hope to see it keep
growing through the
years."
Though the hobby
is a fun pastime, it also
requires patience and
basic knowledge of car-
pentry, electrical work and
landscaping, with a strong
knowledge of mathemat-
ics.
"Whoever said you would
never use math in the real
world wasn't building model
trains," said Farnell.
Reminiscent of the past,


Farnell's miniature town
brings a remembrance of
olden days., and of the
bustling importance of
the locomotive in those
times. "Making it so you
can remember yesteryear
when you were a boy,", he
said, "means more than
just a picture."
Farnell said that his.
motivation for building his
massive collection was to
build something that looks
real. It is fun and relaxing
at the same time, he said.
"The real joy is seeing
the look on kid's faces
when I light up the train,"
said Farnell. "I love telling
people about what I have,
about what God's blessed
me with."


Right at Home:

Stylish gifts with

animal motifs


By KIM COOK
Associated Press

Save the blenders and
dust busters for birthdays;
holiday gifts should be
about joy and surprise.
This year, consider tak-
ing a walk on the wild
side when choosing pres-
ents for the home. From
beautiful animal graphics
to imaginative plays on
animal shapes, there are
a lot of ways to add a bit
of beast-ly style to living
spaces.
David Dear's duck-foot-
ed mirror fits the bill, so
to speak. The designer,
known for whimsical takes
on practical products, has
placed an oval-shaped
glass on pewter casts of
duck feet sublimely
silly, yet oddly chic.
For the hip yet disorga-
nized people on your list,
consider Urban Outfitters'
owl-shaped umbrella
stand, or a. Labrador's
head wall hook, perfect
for holding scarves. At
MollaSpace, Japanese
designer Igenoki decon-
structs the cuckoo clock
*with a striking parade of
animal silhouettes. His
colorful recycled leath-
er. trays, imprinted with
images of butterflies,
tigers, rabbits and deer,
would be great for keys
and change.
Online retailer
AllModern.com has
Thai designer Supon
Phornirunlit's collection
of contemporary graphic
Animal Instinct pillows,
hand-silkscreened with
images of polar bears, deer.
and a swirling serpent
Joe Ginsberg's pillow


designs are always amaz-
ing. The Kingdom collec-
tion for Tempo features
jungle and woodland ani-
mal photographs printed
on shearling; they're soft
and spectacular, worth the
splurge for an animal-lov-
ing someone special.
DwellStudio's
' Chinoiserid and Peacock
pillows manage to look
Old World and current at
the same time. The bird
artwork is painterly, the
color accents azure,
citrine, mocha are right
on the minute.
West Elm's got birds,
squirrels and rabbits
decked out in tiny metal-
lic sequins; while they're
meant as holiday decor,
they'd make great tabletop
accessories all year. A por-
tion of sales goes to sup-
port St Jude's Children's
Hospital. Jason Polan's
painted owl and penguin
canape plates would be
a lovely hostess gift, as
would a set.of small porce-
lain plAtes with winter ani-
mals etched in platinum.
Animal-shaped lamps
can often' look kitschy,
but these find a balance
between whimsy and
great style. Anthropologie
has a squirrel and bunny
lit from the, inside a
fun fixture for a child's
room, or an entry foyer.
Naked Decor's Happy
;Hot Dog Lamp in black
or white, resin features a
dutiful dachshund balanc-
ing the lampshade on his
nose. And while he won't
fetch your newspaper, he.
will hold your fruit; he's
also available with a bowl
attached to his back,
Sherpa-style.


Worry-free wreaths you can build just in time


By JENNIFER FORKER
For The Associated Press
Tick tock," goes
the clock, and
the holidays are
near. Are you
ready?
Don't panic. There's still
time to craft a beautiful
Christmas, with wreaths
that can be made in min-
utes or a few hours. These
ideas also can be used to
create garlands, tabletop
decorations' or to deck out
the Christmas tree.
Start with a noble fir
or pine wreath, real or
synthetic, and add an
assortment of decorative
floral picks, such as red
berries. Throw in some
small ornamental balls,
add a ribbon, and presto, a
wreath is born, according
to Jo Pearson, the creative
expert at Michaels.
If using a synthetic
wreath, she recommends
weaving an additional
garland, such as brightly
colored berries, into the
wreath to give it more
interest and depth.
"There are just a lot of
pretty berry garlands,"
says Pearson. "Sometimes
they don't need a bow.
Then they're just very
natural."
The same wreath can
be changed out each year
for a fresh look. 'You
don't have to store 50,000
wreaths," says Pearson.
Other ideas: Spray pine
cones with adhesive, then
dust with glitter and add
them to the wreath. Or,
"tip" a wreath with spray
snow.
Glass ornamental balls
come in different shapes
and sizes and can be filled
with paint that's swirled
around inside before
attaching the ornaments to
a wreath.
Pearson recommends
experimenting with non-
Christmas colors, such as
pink.
"The colors are just not
traditional reds and greens
anymore," she says.


"People want their wreaths
to stand out."
Several wreaths for sale
in catalogs and online can
be reproduced with mini-
mal cost or time. Neiman
Marcus sells the "Midnight
Platinum," a 31-inch square
wreath, for $195. It weaves
in twigs, leaves, faux ber-
ries, pine cones and beaded
balls in silvery, gold and
gray, and includes a string
of white lights and a taffeta
ribbon.
Create a similar look
with a plain, green wreath
wrapped with an additional
garland. Use silver Design
Master spray paint, or any
other color, for a mono-
chromatic look. Weave in a
string of battery-operated
white lights. Add the visual
accessories: floral picks of
wire or beaded balls, ber-
ries and pine cones spray
paint these beforehand or
leave them natural. Wrap
with a beautiful bow.
For indoors, try recreat-


ing the 20-inch wool wreath
sold by Anthropologie for
$148. Start with a Styrofoam
form and wrap it with color-
ful, chunky yarn. Use wool,
or wool and another yarn
for added color and dimen-
sion, says Pearson, who
goes rogue with these addi-
tional tips: Randomly wrap
the wool wreath in metallic
thread. Or add felted balls
and crocheted ivy leaves.
Visit Etsy.com for more
yarn wreath ideas.
From Marcie
McGoldrick, editorial direc-
tor of Holiday & Crafts for
Martha Stewart Living,
come these fast and luxe
ideas for indoor wreaths
(featured in the magazine's
December issue):
Glue metallic bows in
coordinated colors to a flat,
wood wreath, covering it
About 18 bows will fill a 12-
inch form (50 for a 24-inch
wreath).
Craft a card wreath
with a 14-inch embroidery


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hoop, mini wooden clothes-
pins, wood glue and holiday
cards. Spacing them 1 1/2
inches apart, attach the
clothespins to the hoop,
alternating those that point
out with others that point in,
to give the wreath versatil-
ity. Hang it with a pretty
ribbon and clip on holiday
cards.
McGoldrick finds
unusual wreath forms at
Main Wreath Co. For basic
wreath-making instructions,
and to view 40 wreaths with
instructions, visit her mag-
azine's online Christmas
Workshop.
Finally, Etsy artist Trisha
Muhr of Sycamore, Ill.,
has an ingenious indoor
wreath idea: It's made
from the pages of thrift
store books. Muhr, who
sells her crafts at the Etsy
store Roundabout, says
the wreath takes about
35 minutes from start to
finish, once you get the
hang of it.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
This undated photo courtesy of Martha Stewart Living shows
a wreath made from favorite holiday cards. Craft a card
wreath with a 14-inch embroidery hoop, mini wooden clothes-
pins, wood glue and holiday cards.


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Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER ACT2 WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 22, 2010


tive,


vorfu


FAMILY FEATURES


T is the season for holiday parties and that means
| serving something special to your guests. These festive
recipes make the most of golden, slightly nutty-flavored
SCalimyrna figs and dark, sweet-tasting Mission figs.
These appetizers are the perfect blend of sweet and savory that will
give your guests something to celebrate.
For more festive recipes, visit www.valleyfig.com.


Fudgy Fig No-Bake Brownie Bites.


Fig and Bacon Cheddar Bites

Fudgy Fig No-Bake
Brownie Bites
Makes 24 brownies
1 package (9 ounces)
Famous Chocolate
Wafers
1 cup stemmed, finely
chopped Blue Ribbon*
Orchard Choice or
Sun-Maid Dried
California Figs
1/2 cup chopped, toasted
pecans or walnuts
3 tablespoons
confectioners'
(powdered) sugar
1/8 teaspoon salt
1/2 cup half and half
1 cup (6 ounces)
semisweet or
bittersweet chocolate
morsels
1/2 teaspoon vanilla
extract


Storing and
Using Figs
* Use a sharp knife or a
pair of kitchen scissors
to cut up figs. Run the
knife under hot water
when it gets sticky.
* Store figs in refrig-
erator after opening
for up to six months.
* Mission and
Calimyrna figs can be.
used interchangeably
in most recipes.
* Figs are the perfect
complement to all
types of cheeses.,
* Chop figs and add
to cereals and side
dishes for a hint of
sweetness.


Topping:
1/2 cup chopped figs or
toasted nuts
Line 24 mini muffin pan cups with decorative paper or foil liners (or
line an 8-inch square baking pan with foil or plastic wrap, extending
up sides); set aside.
Whirl wafers in food processor (or place in sealable plastic bag
and crush with rolling pin) to make fine crumbs. Place in large bowl.
Stir in figs, nuts, confectioners' sugar and salt. Pour half and half
into microwave-safe bowl and heat on 100% power in microwave
oven for 30 seconds or until boiling. (Or bring half and half to a boil
in small saucepan over medium-high heat.)
Add chocolate morsels and set aside for 1 minute to soften. Stir
until chocolate melts. Stir in vanilla. Pour over fig mixture and stir
until blended. While warm, spoon brownie mixture into lined muffin
cups or baking pan and press with back of oiled spoon to an even
layer. Sprinkle with topping.
Chill 2 hours or until set. If using a square pan, cut into 24 brownies.
Store in the refrigerator.


With scissors or sharp knife, cut off fig stems and
discard. Flatten each fig with palm of hand. Place .
one fig on each skewer to look like a lollipop. I
Place oranges in small bowls to hold lollipops
while chocolate cools. Microwave morsels in
microwave-safe bowl on MEDIUM (50%) power Chili-Spiced Cereal & Fig Snack Mix
for 1 to 2 minutes, stirring every 30 seconds, until
melted and smooth. Chili-Spiced Cereal & Fig Snack Mix
N n: Arp,uprAA*.,, f. i :-ne, -f~ll n ^4^, *-f*


vlp skewCereU igs, partially ur completely, into
melted chocolate. Sprinkle each with a pinch of salt,
finely chopped nuts or sugar sprinkles, as desired.
Poke skewers in oranges. Chill until set.

Fig and Bacon Cheddar Bites
Makes 20 appetizers
1 cup shredded sharp cheddar cheese
2 ounces (1/4 cup) cream cheese, softened
1/2 cup stemmed and chopped (1/4-inch)
Blue Ribbon Orchard Choice or
Sun-Maid Dried California Figs
1/3 cup thinly sliced green onions
2 tablespoons dry sherry
2/3 cup cooked, chopped bacon
20 thin slices (cut diagonally) baguette
In small bowl, stir together cheddar and cream
cheeses. Stir in figs, green onions and sherry. Can
be prepared a day ahead and stored in a covered
container in the refrigerator.
To serve, preheat oven to 3750F. Place baguette
slices on large baking sheet. Place in oven for 4 to 5
minutes or until lightly toasted. Spread fig mixture
on baguette slices. Top with bacon. Return to oven
for 4 t6 5 minutes or until cheese melts.


Makes about 7 cups
1 1/2 cups stemmed, chopped (1/2 inch) Blue Ribbon Orchard Choice
or Sun-Maid Dried California Figs
3 cups crisp cereal squares (mix equal amounts of rice, wheat and
corn varieties)
1 cup small square cheese-flavored crackers
1 cup bite-size pretzels
1 cup Spanish red-skinned peanuts or other roasted nuts
Seasoning:
3 tablespoons vegetable oil
2 teaspoons Worcestershire sauce
1 teaspoon chili powder
1/2 teaspoon seasoned salt
1/2 teaspoon ground cumin
1/4 teaspoon garlic or onion salt
1/8 teaspoon cayenne pepper (optional)
Preheat oven to 250F.
Place figs in small bowl. In separate small bowl, stir together oil and remaining
seasoning ingredients. Drizzle 2 teaspoons seasoning mixture over figs and toss to
blend; set aside.
In large bowl, combine cereal, crackers, pretzels and nuts. Drizzle with renmiin-
ing seasoning mixture. Toss to blend.
Spread on large baking sheet. Place in oven and roast for 1 hour, stirring every
20 minutes and adding figs during last 10 minutes. Spread mixture on paper towels
to cool. Store in airtight container.


LAKE CITY REPORTER ACT2 WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2010


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424








LAKE CITY REPORTER ACT2 WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2010


Peg dividers for drawers can be customized so you can fit your pots and
pans however you like.


Turn a tight fit into plenty of storage with a swing-out system.


un





CTI


FAMILY FEATURES


If cooking is a hassle for you, it may be time to do some reorganizing.
Curtis Stone, star of the reality cooking show "Take Home Chef,"
thinks that a beautiful, well-organized kitchen can make a world of
difference to home cooks.
"When I was doing 'Take Home Chef' and cooking in all these different
houses," says Stone, "I was thinking, why is it so difficult to cook in
people's homes? It was so easy in a professional kitchen. Well, one of the
main differences between a professional kitchen and residential kitchen is
organization. But with the right organizational features, cooking can be fun
and relaxing."
Get in the Zone
According to Paul Radoy, manager of design services for Merillat, the best
way to approach kitchen organization and storage is to look at the room in
sections. "All kitchens have a cooking zone and a cleanup zone," he says.
"And some kitchens may have an island or pantry. Each of these areas lends
themselves to various storage opportunities."


Chef Curtis Stone


The Cooking Zone
Food preparation and cooking are the primary
functions of a kitchen, which is why keeping
cooking items organized and within easy reach
is key.
The National Association of Professional
Organizers recommends observing the flow of
activity in your kitchen and organizing around
it. Stone agrees, saying, "I believe the kitchen
should be designed for the way you live."
Whether you're installing new cabinets or
working with your existing units, try to optimize
your space by creating specified storage areas.
Group objects by purpose and dedicate
specific storage areas for them. Having all
the bakeware together or all the pots and
pans together lets you get to what you need
quickly and efficiently.
Store pots and pans as close to the stove as
possible.
Keep utensils where you can reach them
easily while cooking. A utensil hanging
system on the backsplash, or a pull-down
knife rack under the wall cabinet next to
the cooktop keeps you from digging through
drawers.
"Now I know almost everyone has a pots and
pans cabinet, and most of them are a mess," says
Stone. "Well, Merillat has come up with an ingen-
ious solution. Peg dividers for drawers can be
customized to neatly fit all your pots and pans as
you like them. It's not one-size-fits-all, so it can
be nicely organized."
Awkward items can be stored on a Lazy Susan
or a swing-out base cabinet, both of which take
advantage of a tricky blind comer situation. The
swing-out base cabinet allows full access to the
entire cabinet with its two adjustable roll-out trays.



The Pantry Zone
If you're tired of hunting through a dozen
canned goods to find the one you really need,
or if you end up buying items you didn't know
you already had, then it's time to reorganize
the pantry.
Group similar food items together, the way you
see them on grocery store shelves. Keep canned
goods on one shelf, breakfast foods on another,
baking ingredients on another. If you don't have
a lot of built-in storage space, look for ways to
maximize what you to have.
Individual turntables are great for organizing
and storing spices and smaller pantry items.
They can be put inside cabinets or on your
counter to give you easy access.
Stacking platforms can go in taller shelf
spaces to eliminate wasted space.
Pullout shelves or baskets can utilize even
more space in a cupboard.



The Cleanup Zone
Stone says that organizing the cleanup zone can
mininiize clutter and make cleanup easier. From
the location of the sink and dishwasher to various
organizational accessories, any cleanup zone
can shine.
Things like a tilt-out sink tray, which keeps
soaps and sponges out of sight, an under sink tote
and a base waste basket help keep things well
organized. Also, a cutting board kit close to the
sink makes for easy cleanup during food prep.



"From a chef's perspective, and from a home
cook's perspective," says Stone, "when you're
working in a kitchen that makes sense, it makes
the whole cooking experience much easier -
and more fun."
For more on the latest kitchen storage solutions,
visit www.merillat.com.


A cutting board kit near the sink makes it easy to clean up during food
prep and provides easy, clutter-free storage.


Keep soap and sponges tucked away with a tilt-out sink tray.



More Organizing Tips
Get rid of what you don't use. If you haven't used the waffle
maker or Panini press in recent memory, it's time to let them go. If
they're in working order, give them to someone who will use them,
or donate them to a thrift store.
Store seasonal items. Make room for your everyday items by
storing those holiday plates and the oversized soup tureen outside
the kitchen. Label the boxes or storage containers so you can find
them when you need them.
Don't forget about the freezer. Use dividers or baskets to help you
create designated sections in the freezer. That way, you don't have
to dig around for what you need.
Look for unused or underused spaces. Look at all areas, including
above and below appliances and behind doors. Unused floor space
could be maximized with a kitchen island that adds additional storage.


A base waste basket'can help keep unsightly trash out of sight.


0 M OMNI %me (re


.."the way home care should be..."




e rvlnti'ro nlumhia Uninn Alachua Hamilton,


Making

the most

of kitchen

storage


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424




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