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The Lake City reporter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01478
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 12/18/2010
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01478
System ID: UF00028308:01478
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text







Fort White

Falls
Technical fouls doom Indians
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LIB OF FLORIDA HISTORY
PO BOX 117007
205 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA


GAINESVILLE FL 32611


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Flawless

Victories
CHS boys and girls soccer teams
dominate their games.
Sports, I B


-1943 '


on, 'Reoporter


Saturday, December 18, 2010


www.Iakecitypr- .om


Vol. 136, No. 284 E 75 cents


Christmas gift for the dogs


2,000 pounds of dog,
food donated to
Humane Society.
GABRIELLE BELLAMY
Special to the Reporter
Local homeless hounds received
"a ton" of a 'Christmas gift this
year.
Von Seestadt Kennels and Elf Pet
Products donated 2,000 pounds of
Enhance dog food to the Lake City
Humane Society Friday.
The Humane Society has about
80 stray dogs in its kennel and
will be able to feed them with the


donated food for a month, said
Terry Marques, Humane Society
executive director.
The kennel has
,0' donated food to
the humane soci-
ety for the past 30
years, said John
%.. Hickey, co-owner.
J He and his wife,
Peggy, give the
Marques dog food as a as
a Christmas gift
each year to support the local
shelter.
'"With the way the economy was
last year, we weren't able to donate
as much, but this year we were


able to donate more," he said.,
Von Seestadt Kennels is located
in Lake City, and Elf Pet Products
is a national pet food company.
Each year Elf Pet Products
donates 40- and 50-pound bags of
dog food, Peggy Hickey said. The
Florida Canine Association hosts
a fundraiser and Von Seestadt
Kennels matches the amount
raised.-
The kennel feels good about
donating the dog food each year,
Hickey said. "This is a good cause
because the dogs have to eat year-
round," she said.
HUMANE continued on 3A


JASON MATHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Von Seestadt Kennels co-owner John Hickey (center) and his wife
Peggy give bags of Enhance dog food to Terry Marques, the execu-
tive director for the Lake City Humane Society, on Friday.


rTtir
festhals and etien


Today -
Youth Christmas party
The Gold Standard
Chapter #48 Order of the
Eastern Star is hosting
a Youth Christmas Party
2 5 p.m. today at the Lake
City Women's Club on
MLK Drive. All children
under the age of 8 must be
chaperoned by an adult.

FACS Christmas Party
The Filipino American
Cultural Society of Lake
City will have a Christmas
Party from 6:30 10:30
p.m. today at the Epiphany
Catholic Church Social
Hall. Enjoy a night of
culture, dancing, and
entertainment, and pos-
sibly become a member of
FACS. For more informa-
tion, contact Bob Gavette at
386-965-5905.

Pancake breakfast
The RCC/AMN Inc. is
having a pancake breakfast
7 11 a.m. today at the
Richardson Community
Center. Tickets are $5 and
the breakfast will consist of
pancakes, Nettle's sausage,
grits, eggs and orange
juice..All proceeds will
benefit the 14-and-younger
and 12-and-younger boys
basketball teams. To make
a donation or for more
information, contact Mario
Coppock or Nicole Smith at
386-754-7096.

Theatrical Play
The Historic Columbia
Theatre hosts "The Life of
a Christian Teenager" at
6:15 p.m. today. The theater
is located at 348 N. Marion
Ave. Call 386-344-0319.

Flapjack breakfast
A Relay For Life fundrais-
ing flapjack breakfast is 8 -
10 a.m. today at Applebee's.
The all-you-can-eat meal will
include pancakes, scrambled
eggs, homefries, bacon, sau-
sage, juices, coffee and tea.
Tickets are $10, with $7 of
the proceeds going to Relay
for Life.


EXCITED


S


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Maddy Keen, 7, (from left) and 6-year-olds Javan Smith and Hunter Neeley attempt to guess what Santa Claus brought
them by shaking their presents.

Holiday bells ring early for local children


By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.comrn

Children don-
ning cozy
pajamas at
school was
just one way
classes across the district
celebrated the season
on Friday their final
school day before holiday.
break.
"At this point,
they're so hyper before
Christmas that you're
not going to work with
them," said Ashley
Feagle, a kindergarten
teacher at Five Points
Elementary School.
"They're so excited for
Christmas, they can't wait
to go home."
Feagle, who also
dressed in pajamas
along with her students,
said her class celebrated
with a party and a
visit from Santa Claus
Thursday. Wearing


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Ashley Feagle (from left), a kindergarten teacher at Five
Points Elementary School, helps Dalton Thomas, 6, and
Austin Esing, 5, hang Christmas ornaments Friday .


pajamas Friday was a
way for the students to
relax during a viewing of
"The Polar Express" and
enjoy popcorn and hot
chocolate before they
were sent off for the
holidays.
"They get to do some-
thing different," Feagle
said. "It's not the same
old routine. They can


do something fun for
Christmas."
Sandra Sweat's first-
grade class at Melrose
Park Elementary spent
the day comparing and
contrasting "The Polar
Express" film with its
book equivalent, writ-
ing stories about how
they would celebrate
Christmas, finishing up


curriculum reviews and
enjoying hot chocolate
and cookies.
"Along with having
fun with Christmas activ-
ities, we've done our
reviews," Sweat said.
Michael Holt, 6,
and Maddy Keen, 7,
first-grade students in
Sweat's class, both said
they most liked watch-
ing the movie and drink-
ing hot chocolate.
"They're very excited
that it's Christmas,"
Sweat said, referring to
her students.
Mike Millikin, super-
intendent of schools,
said younger students
have spent the last
holiday school days
with Christmas parties
and Santa Claus visits,
while the high school
students have been fin-
ishing end-of-semester
exams.
Students return to
school Tuesday, Jan. 4.


Officials

initiate

water

advisory
Suwannee Water
District appeals
for conservation.
By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
Lack of rainfall has forced
Suwannee River Water
Management District offi-
cials to implement volun-
tary water use restrictions
in Columbia and several
other counties.
The Phase I Water
Shortage Advisory was
initiated Tuesday by the
Suwannee River Water
Management District
Governing Board and will
remain in effect until further
notice, officials said.
The Water Management
District, which is a taxing
authority, governs water qual-
ity issues in 15 counties. The
agency is in charge of water
quality, water supply, flood
control and natural (water)
WATER continued on 3A


Family's

Christmas

wish is

fulfilled

Will spend first
holiday in their
new home.
By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
All the Scippio family
wanted for Christmas was
to be in their own house
- and they got their wish.
"I didn't think we would
be in before Christmas,"
said Lacoya Scippio.
Habitat for Humanity
of Lake City/Columbia
County, Inc. held a dedica-
tion ceremony for the fami-
ly's new house Friday. This
is the fourth Habitat House
built in Columbia County
since 2003.
The home is 1,200 square
feet and includes three
bedrooms and two baths,
HOME continued on 3A


1 ,26 0002l 1


CALLUS:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBETO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400


SOpinion ................ 4A *4
,A ) r '' : 6' Advice & Comics......... 4B
Showers likely Puzzles .................2B
Faith & Values............ 6A
WEATHER, 2A Around Florida........... 2A V.


TODAY IN
RELIGION
Refugees aim
to preserve faith.


COMING
SUNDAY
Christmas lights
brighten LC homes.









LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING SATURDAY, DECEMBER 18, 2010


~~ay4)


Friday:
Afternoon: 2-7-4
Evening: 5-7-8


King's finale draws more than


NEW YORK
Larry King ended his 25-
year run at CNN where
he used to be all the time
on top of the ratings.
The Nielsen Co. said
Friday that an estimated 2.24 mil-
lion people watched the last episode
of "Larry King Live." He beat the
usual leader in cable news during
that time slot, Fox News Channel's
Sean Hannity, who had 2.16 million
viewers.
King had been averaging 672,000
viewers a night this year, typically
third in his time slot behind Hannity
and MSNBC's Rachel Maddow -
and sometimes even fourth behind
HLN's Joy Behar.
King, a pioneer in cable television
news, had President Barack Obama
and former President Bill Clinton
wish him well on his final daily CNN
show.

Uma Thurman's stalker
charged again, jailed
NEW YORK A former psychiat-
ric patient convicted of stalking Uma
Thurman was jailed Friday after he
was charged with again trying to
contact the Oscar-nominated actress.
Jack Jordan was arraigned on
charges of stalking and criminal
contempt for violating a restraining
order. Jordan pleaded not guilty in
front of the same judge who warned
the 39-year-old he would go to jail if
he tried to contact Thurman after his
2008 conviction for stalking the "Kill
Bill" actress.
Prosecutors said he made several
calls to Thurman on Oct. 29 and Oct.
30. He was arrested shortly before
Thanksgiving at his family's home
in North Potomac, Md. A police
spokeswoman with the suburban
Washington, D.C., department, said
officers sent to arrest Jordan found
him sitting in front of a computer


Friday:
Afternoon: 3-9-9-5
Evening: 9-6-3-3


tThursday:
. r 12-14-17-25-28


2 million


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this April 19, 2007 file photo supplied by CNN, Larry King interviews former
President Bill Clinton, right, on CNN's 'Larry King Live,' in New York. After 25 years
of 'Larry King Live,' Larry King had his last broadcast Thursday.


with Thurman's name in a Google
search box.
Jordan was extradited to New
York on Thursday. He told police,
according to prosecutors, that the
calls were a drunken mistake.
Jordan was being held without bail
until his next court date, scheduled
for Wednesday.
The former psychiatric patient
was convicted of stalking and harass-
ing the actress from 2005 to 2007.
He was sentenced in 2008 to three
years' probation and told not to try
to contact Thurman for five years.

Paul McCartney plays
gig at tiny London club
LONDON Former Beatle Paul
McCartney played his smallest gig
in more than a decade Friday in a
bid to save a landmark London club
faced with closure because of a steep
rent increase.
McCartney played a lunchtime
show before about 300 fans at the


100 Club in central London, wooing
the crowd with "Magical Mystery
Tour," "All My Loving" and a host of
other favorites.
It marked the first time
McCartney had played the 100
Club, which once hosted the Rolling
Stones, the Who, Metallica and oth-
ers, including American jazz great
Louis Armstrong.
"Who wants to save the 100 Club?,"
McCartney asked fans after he and
his band walked on stage singing an a
cappella version of "Hey Jude."
Tickets for the gig cost 60 pounds
($90). Fans started lining up hours
before the show in hopes of getting
a seat.
"It's a great little venue so we
were happy to be part of the cam-
paign to save it. It's too good to
lose," McCartney said after the con-
cert "We had a great time. It's great
playing those little clubs and the
audience is so up close it's like
you're having dinner with them."

* Associated Press


Celebrity Birthdays


* Television writer-producer
Hal Kanter is 92.
* Former U.S. Attorney
General Ramsey Clark is 83.
* Actor Roger Smith is 78.
* Actor Roger Mosley is 72.
* Rock singer-musician Keith
Richards is 67.
* Writer-director Alan
Rudolph is 67.
* Movie producer-director


Steven Spielberg is 64.
* Blues artist Ron Piazza is
63.
* Movie reviewer Leonard
Maltin is 60.
* Actor Ray Liotta is 55.
* Comedian Ron White is 54.
* Actor Brad Pitt is 47.
6 Professional wrestler-
turned-actor "Stone Cold"
Steve Austin is 46.


Daily Scripture


"The Lord appeared to him in
a dream and said, "Joseph son
of David, do not be afraid to
take Mary home as your wife,
because what is conceived in
her is from the Holy Spirit."

Matthew 1:20-21


.Lake City Reporter
HOW TO REACH US BUSINESS
Main number ........(386) 752-1293 Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
FaCi number.............. 752-9400 (sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
Circulation ............... 755-5445
Online... www.lakecityreporter.com CIRCULATION
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub- should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180 Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7:30
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055. a.m. on Sunday.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, RFla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
The Associated Press. problems with your delivery service.,
All material herein is property of the Lake In Columbia County, customers should
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or call before 10:30 a;m. to report a ser-
in part is forbidden withhe permis- vice error for samepermis- vice error for same day re-delivery. After
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service 10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
No. 310-880. vice related credits will be issued.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes In all other counties where home delivery
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
Lake City, Fla. 32056. vice related credits will be issued.
Publisher Todd Wilson .....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com) Circulation ...............755-5445
(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS Home delivery rates
Assistant Editor CJ Risak..754-0427 (Tuesday through Sunday)
After 1:00 p.m. 12 Weeks................ $26.32
(cjrisak@lakecityreporter.com) 24 Weeks...................$48.79
52 Weeks................... $83.46
ADVERTISING Rates indude 7% sales tax.
Director Kathryn Peterson. .754-0417 Mail rates
(kpeterson@lakecityreporter.com) 12 Weeks ................ $41.40
CLASSIFIED 24 Weeks...................$82.80
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440. 52 Weeks.................. $179.40


CORRECTION


The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fabt in news
items. If you have a-concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run
in this' space. And thanks for reading.


Tourism industry
reeling from 2010

MADEIRA BEACH -
The Hubbard family, own-
ers of a marina complex
and seafood restaurant on
Florida's Gulf coast near
Tampa, would just as soon
forget that 2010 ever hap-
pened.
The lingering economic
recession, a record cold
Florida winter and the
effects of the Gulf oil spill
stalled the tourist traffic
this year at Madeira Beach,
where the Hubbards have
been a presence since the
1970s. All that came after
the lousy economy landed
a gut punch to their busi-
nesses in 2009.
"It was incredibly scary,
because we didn't know
if we were going to get
oil" on nearby teachers,
said Kathleen McDole, a
Hubbard sister whose
Friendly Fisherman res-
taurant saw a 20-percent
decline in' business this
year. "And neither did the
rest of the United States
and our visitors who come
here. So they didn't come."
The family's struggles
this year mirrored those of
most of Florida's tourism
industry, which employs
around 1 million people
and accounts for more than
one-fifth of the state's total
sales tax revenue. The year
was even more disappoint-
ing because people in the
industry originally had
high hopes for recovery in
2010 after two straight bad
years due to the recession.
But then came a rare
extended freeze last
January, and the BP
Deepwater Horizon acci-
dent and oil spill on April
20. Throughout the spring
and summer, would-be visi-
tors changed their plans
amid visions of oil fouling
the beaches and spoiling
their holiday.
Deep discounts and
strategic marketing were


THE WEATHER


SHOWERSS
LIKELY


I 66 LO 43L
Afwffml r


IL
:= .. _


ASSOCIATED PRESS
This Friday photo shows crews as they work along Pensacola
Beach removing deposits of crude oil from under the sand in
Pensacola.


required to persuade more
people to come to Florida,
cutting deep into profits.
When vacationers got here,
they spent less at restau-
rants and attractions.
The number of visitors to
the state roughly 80 mil-
lion annually has stayed
flat the past three years,
following years of solid
growth throughout the
decade, according to sta-
tistics kept by Visit Florida.
But the discounting neces-
sary this past year took an
even bigger bite.

Hit-and-run driver
violates probation

BARTOW A woman
responsible for the fatal hit-.
and-run death of a teenage
girl last year is heading to
prison on violation of pro-
bation charges.
A judge on Thursday sen-
tenced 22-year-old Candy
Marie Cummings to three
years after she-broke the
terms of her house arrest.
Cummings pleaded
guilty in 2009 to leaving the
scene of a crash involving a
death. She was sentenced
to two years of house arrest
followed by probation.
Officials said she wasn't
home when probation offi-
cers paid a visit in May and
she was sentenced to two


months in the Polk County
Jail. Then, in October, pro-
bation officers discovered
she had left her home
again.
Cummings was driving
without a valid driver's
license in January 2009
when she struck 17-year-
old Samantha Hasting.

Sergeant charged
with hitting inmate

BROOKSVILLE A
Hernando County Sheriff's
Office detention sergeant
was fired and charged with
hitting an inmate in the
face.
Authorities said 41-year-
old David Dixon struck an
inmate with an open hand
in the booking section of
the jail Tuesday. The inmate
had been booked earlier
by Brooksville police for
obstruction without vio-
lence. Authorities said the
inmate was being moved
into the housing unit when
Dixon walked up and struck
him. It wasn't immediately
known what instigated the
situation.
Video shows the inmate
standing still when he was hit
Dixon was arrested
Thursday on a battery
charge.


Pensacola
57/37


PARTLY MOSTLY MOSTLY MOSTLY
CLOUDY SUNNY SUNNY SUNNY


H1 60L032 HI62L035 H169L044 HI59L036


Tallahassee *
59/38

'Panama City
57/37


* Valdosta
59/38
Lake City
66/43
SGainesv
\69/4


Taml
73/,


TEMPERATURES
High Friday '
Low Friday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Friday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


78
44
68
44
85 in 1956
25 in 1968

0.00"
0.17"
39.15"
1.30"
47.10"


Sunday
68/48/pc
64/44/pc
75/58/pc
72/48/pc
62/34/pc
59/34/pc
69/59/s
60/32/pc
75/58/pc
70/49/pc
64/35/pc
67/44/pc
54/37/s
61/48/s
56/32/pc
67/46/pc
55/32/s
74/54/pc


Monday
66/47/s
64/44/s
74/59/s
71/50/s
63/36/s
61/36/s
67/58/s
62/35/s
74/58/s
71/51/s
64/38/s
67/46/s
62/45/s
64/45/pc
62/36/s
68/48/s
59/34/s
7.1/54/s


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.



. weather.com


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hit the north central
states. At Havre,
Mont. the mercury
plunged to a record
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PEOPLE IN THE NEWS


City
SJacksonville Cape Canaveral
S66/45 Daytona Beach
Ft. Lauderdale
lie Daytona Beach Fort Myers
7 70j53 Gainesville
cala Jacksonville
,72/49 *
2 Orlando Cape Canaveral Key West.
/ 74/56 73/57 ke City
Miami
pae \ Naples
57' West Palm Beach Ocala
78/60 Orlando
i Ft. Lauderdale Panama City
Ft. Myers' 79/64 Pensacola
77/60 Naples Tallahassee
77/61 Miami Tampa


", 71/65 Valdosta
Key West W. Paini Beach
77/68


AROUND FLORIDA


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Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427 .


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LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SATURDAY, DECEMBER 18, 2010


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Paul Leclair, project manager, presents the Scippios with a set of keys to their 1,200-square-foot, three-bedroom, two-bath-
room house. Pictured are Leclair (from left), Jeremy and Lacoya Scippio, Habitat board chairman George Burnham, Shania
Canady and Martayvius Scippio.

HOME: Volunteers build local family's dream


Continued From Page 1A

said George Burnham,
Habitat board chairman.
Construction began in
April.
Getting the family in their
home before Christmas put
the pressure on skilled
workers to perform, he
said.
Dedicated volunteers
made it possible. Several
came to the site everyday
to work on the house.
"We're jubilant we were
able to get the children
in their own home before
Christmas," Burnham said.
"It truly is more blessed to
give than to receive."
Helping build their
home was a good learning
experience for her and her
husband, Jeremy, Lacoya
Scippio said. Also moving
into the home are their'four
children.
"The time went by fast
and I'm glad it happened,"
she said.
Jeremy Scippio said it was
through all the help of the
volunteers and the grace of
God his family was able to
move into their home.
"It's a blessing," he said.
Working on the house
was rough at times, but the
family can sleep and rest
in a place of their own, he
said.
The goal for Habitat is to
meet the physical needs of
people by providing decent
and simple, affordable
homes, Burnham said. The


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
The Scippio family pose for a photograph on Friday in front of their new home, located at 971
NW Dyson Terrace, during a dedication ceremony. Their home, built by Habitat for Humanity
of Lake City/Columbia County, Inc., is the fourth built by the organization since 2003. Pictured
are Jeremy Scippio Sr. (from top left, clockwise), Lacoya Scippio, Martayvius Burch, 13,
Shania Canady, 9, and Jeremy Scippio Jr., 4. Not pictured is Dejuan Scippio, 12.


board looks for qualified
families to partner with the
affiliate.
"Jesus always met the
physical needs of people,"
he said. "This is exactly
what this ministry is for;
meeting physical needs."
Partner families provide
350 hours of "sweat equi-
ty" and have a mortgage
payment with no interest


on the loan.
Before the start of each
home, there has to be two
qualified partner families,
80 percent of the con-
struction funding and a
construction chairman.
Corporate and private
donors, as well as volun-
teers are needed to help
start work on the next
Habitat House, Burnham


said. Also a construction
chairman is needed.
To get involved with
the organization visit
http://www. hfhlakecity.
org/ or call 386-755-0014
"I thank everyone
who had a part," Jeremy
Scippio said. "We are
very grateful and thank-
ful to be moving in before
Christmas."


WATER: Shortage advisory initiated on Tuesday


Continued From Page 1A

systems issues.
The advisory calls on all
residential, commercial,
agricultural and industrial
users to voluntarily reduce
both indoor and outdoor
water use through conserva-
tion measures.
"The Phase I Water
Shortage Advisory was
implemented because of the
extended dry conditions,"
said Carlos Herd, Suwannee
River Water Management
District senior hydro geolo-
gist manager. "These adviso-
ries are implemented when-
ever we go into a drought
situation. Since about 2000,
the advisories have been
fairly common because it's
been so dry."
On Jan. 6, 2010, water
management district officials
implemented year-round
water use restrictions on
landscape irrigation, limiting
lawn and landscape watering
to one day per week during
fall and winter, and two days
a week during spring and
summer.
Herd said some of the
suggested voluntary water
restrictions include cutting
back on lawn irrigation
and reducing indoor water
usage.
According to Water
Management District
reports, once drought


conditions improve and
groundwater and surface-
water levels rebound, the
governing board may can-
cel the Phase I Advisory.
However, should condi-
tions worsen, the govern-
ing board may declare .a
Phase II Advisory, which
imposes mandatory water-
use restrictions.
Water shortage advi-
sories are issued by
the Water Management
District in accordance
with Florida Statutes and
the Florida Administrative
Code, which gives officials
authority to implement
water shortage plans.
Reports indicate that
in November flows for
the Suwannee River and
its tributaries fell below
the 5th percentile for the
period of record, meaning
more than 95 percent of
the time since the 1930's
they were higher for this
time of year than current
readings.
The average groundwa-
ter levels fell to the 33rd
percentile in November,
based on records begin-
ning in 1978.
Total rain for October
and November was 1.33
inches, the lowest since
2001 and the eighth low-
est since 1932. Gauges


at Usher Tower (near
Chiefland) and Starke
reported no rainfall in
October, making it the dri-
est October on record in
those areas.
Herd said he was
uncertain how harsh the
drought would have to
get before officials imple-


mented a Phase 2 Water
Shortage Advisory.
"If it continues to be dry
for a longer period of time,
then chances are we would
ask to implement phase 2,"
he said. "A Phase 2 Water
Shortage Advisory would
be a little more restric-
tive."


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.' 'A ( C'hl srni.as l+-,C t,:tla1 led t:i the Christmas
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P,- DECEMBER 24 at 7:00 p.m.
A Cllrirs.n-i,_ pagarint [leo 0, the Praise
Te. anm .r, 1 Ji, ir' tei s.

,i DECEMBER 24 at 10:00 p.m
.' (. t 1..nas E'.e Ser ,7- I e of Lessons and
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Public Library


collects 4,277


items for fines


From staff reports

In just seven days, the
Columbia County Public
Library collected 4,277
items during its Food for
Fines project.
The project ended Dec.
4 and equaled $3,903.14
in fines.
"I was surprised with
the total this year and
did not expect that much
food to be collected in
just one week," said
Debbie Paulson, library
director.
The program allowed
library patrons to pay off
fines by donating sealed,
non-perishable, non-
expired food items. One
food item equal to one
dollar in fines.
Food donated at
the Main and West
branches were given to
the Christian Service
Center. The Main branch
received 3,426 items and
there was a total of 512 at
West branch.
The Fort White branch


collection went to the
Fort White Food Shelf.
A total of 339 items were
collected.
The number of items
received in a week were
amazing compared to lon-
ger collections, Paulson
said.
Food for Fines was
held for 21 days in 2009
and collected 5,303 items,
the equivalent of more
than $4,700 in fines. In
2008 the program ran
for 16 days and collected
2,469 items or more than
$2,200 in fines.
Some patrons just
brought in food without
having any fines, she
said. Others brought in
large amounts of food,
for smaller fines.
"Our partners and
recipients of the food,
the Christian Service
Center and the Fort
White food shelf, have
been thrilled with our.
donations as the need
is so great this year,"
Paulson said.


LC woman battles

cancer, seeks help

from community


By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com

A Lake City woman bat-
tling cancer needs the help
of the community as she
undergoes chemotherapy
treatments and faces an
upcoming surgery.
Ashley Wilson, 22, a
mother of two children
ages 3 and 4, was diag-
nosed with Hodgkin's lym-
phoma a cancer of the
lymphatic system eight
months ago. Angel Meeks,
Wilson's mother, said her
daughter is in need of
donations to pay for che-
motherapy and surgery
to remove tumors around
her brain and heart.


"We're just trying to get
the word out and trying to
get donations from anyone
who will help us," Meeks
said.
An account has been
set up with VyStar Credit
Union for donations.
Those wishing to donate
can visit any VyStar
Credit Union branch and
specify that they wish to
put money into a dona-
tion account listed under
the names of Wilson and
Meeks.
The Lake City branch
is located at 411 NW
Commons Loop.
"Any kind of help we
can get is very appreci-
ated," Meeks said.


HUMANE: Adopt pets


Continued From Page 1A

The Humane Society
is home to about 8,500
to 9,000 pets throughout
the year, Hickey said. The
community is encouraged
to adopt, spade, neuter
and train pets.
Tractor Supply of
Lake City is also donat-
ing money to the Humane


Society by hosting a raffle
for a child's John Deere
Gator HPX. Raffle tick-
ets can be purchased at
Tractor Supply, and all
proceeds will be donated
to the Humane Society.
'"We feel appreciated to
receive the donations,"
Marques said.


H/ant to /Teah ,O ie

iol dau6 7k /ear?


Then give yourself a wonderful gift and do your business bank-
ing at Peoples. At Peoples State Bank we understand what it
takes to make a business successful in our community. And
success is rarely achieved alone. Let our experienced banking
professionals provide financial solutions to help you grow
your business. With a little financial assistance from Peoples
you can spend less time worrying about your business financ-
es and more time doing what you do best, running your busi-
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and better banking foryourself. Peoples State Bank. Now
that's banking


350 SW Main Blvd., Lake City, FL 32025
3882 W. US Hwy 90. Lake City, FL 32055
Telephone 386.754.0002
www.psb.biz Member FDIC


PEOPLES

STATE BANK


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424













OPINION


Saturday, December 18, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


0
0
OP


THEIR
INION


EPA needs

crucial

legislative

support

Environmental
Protection Agency
has been the regula-
tory scourge of U.S.
polluters of air, land and water.
Created on Dec. 2, 1970, with
an executive order by President
Richard Nixon, the EPA's pri-
mary mandate is to enforce
clean air and water laws. These
landmark laws needed a tough
sheriff. The EPA by and large
has been up to the challenge.
Inevitably, it has had and still
does have stiff opposition.
For instance, some members
of Florida's congressional delega-
tion this year opposed the agen-
cy's proposed nutrient standards
for the state's rivers, lakes and
streams. The lawmakers, and
business and agricultural groups,
say the proposed standards for
acceptable phosphorus and nitro-
gen in water will cost billions and
aren't based on sound science.
The EPA agreed to delay final-
izing the criteria until August
2011 and submit them to more
, scientific scrutiny. But Attorney
General Bill McCollum and his
successor, Pam Bondi, filed a
lawsuit challenging the EPA pro-
posals anyway.
The South Florida Water
Management District Board also
sharply criticized the EPA for
its court-ordered plan to stem
pollution in the Everglades. The
board decried it as infringing on
state rights to set water-quality
laws, having an unrealistic time
line for massive construction
projects and saddling South
Florida taxpayers with the $1.5
billion-plus cost
Clearly, when it comes to
Florida water-quality issues, the
EPA must work with state offi-
cials to find solutions both sides
agree are practical and that will
be effective.
Climate change is real, and
Florida's coastline will see its
bad effects for real in the next
50 years. The EPA is the right
agency to deal with'reducing
greenhouse gas emissions to
slow climate change. Congress
should be supporting the EPA at
this crucial time, not threaten-
ing to tie its hands.
N The Miami Herald

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president .
Tom Wood, chairman


LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:


news@lakecityreporter.com


Health-care turns into


nightmare for Obama


President Obama had
this big idea. He
would kick off his
White House tour
with a giant initiative
like overhauling the nation's
health care system, something
his last Democratic predecessor
tried to do but failed miserably.
The best way to do that he fig-
ured was to let his Democratic
allies in.the Congress actually
map out how to accomplish
such a monumental task. it was
an enormous mistake made on
bad advice.
Two years later the giant plan
they finally hatched in their
liberal wisdom and he signed
into law amid huge fanfare has
cost his party much of its clout
in the legislature, a sizable loss
in his popularity and at least one
declaration of unconstitutional-
ity by a federal district judge in
Virginia who ruled just recently
that the nation's governing
document didn't allow forcing
health insurance on everyone, a
key component of the new act.
So much in turmoil is Obama's
health care "reform" that it will
occupy much of his domestic
attention for the rest of his term
along with the deficit
The Justice Department has
declared its intention to seek
an appeal in the next highest
court The federal barristers
may be busy for some time see-
ing that there are 24 such suits
and probably more to come.
Ultimately, of course, the whole
mess will have to be sorted out
by the U.S. Supreme Court.
However long that will take is
anyone's guess, but the sooner
the better.
In the meantime, the newly


Dan K.Thom;


asson


enhanced Republican forces in
the House and Senate prom-
ise a full-blown assault on the
act. If they fail to overturn it
completely, they hope to chip ,
away at what they consider the
more odious parts, adding more
confusion to what only can be
described as a potentially hid-
eous nightmare of unintended
consequences. The Republicans
argue not unconvincingly that
such action has been mandated
by the November elections
that returned them to control
of the House and gave them
much more clout in the Senate.
Whether or not that was the
sole reason for the GOP resur-
gence is arguable, but the
unpopularity of the initiative
and the stubbornness of the
Democrats in the face of that
can't be discounted.
For instance, the polls show
that two thirds of Americans,
some 7 out of 10, believe that
forcing them to buy health
insurance under the threat of
fine is just plain wrong. They
believe it is a flagrant violation
of their constitutional liberties
and to borrow a famous movie
phrase, they're mad as hell and
not going to take it anymore.
Well, we'll see. Lest we forget,
the president himself didn't
favor trying to force insurance
on those who didn't want it and


actually campaigned against that
approach in 20u8. But that is
what happens when one makes
a decision not to involve one's
self in the details of the initiative
one has hatched. Something
gets lost in the lack of leader-'
ship andthere are political con-
sequences.
There is little doubt the liber-
al wing of the party saw the entire
package as the first step toward
a universal single payer plan, an.
idea they have been pushing for
decades without much success.
Those supporting the compul-
sory insurance section contend
it is the only way to make certain
all those now without insurance
are covered and to do 'away with
it would gut the package. Others
say it is not that important Some
say they believe paying the fine
would be cheaper than the insur-
ance premiums they would be
forced to pay. Others say without
the larger pool of insured the
compulsory section would bring,
rates would have to go up for
everyone to cover those who
don't have coverage. Some say
blah, blah, blah. Others say the
same thing.
In the end what this all comes
down to is the election of a bright,
young man with only two years
experience in the Congress and
small time on-the-job training
before that. Under those circum-
stances he was bound to make
mistakes and nothing shows that
more than this half-baked, overly
complex, monstrous piece of leg-
islation that has dragged him and
his party through the political
briar patch.
* Dan K. Thomasson is former
editor of Scripps Howard News
Service.


President Barack
Obama's national-
security team has
finished its assess-
ment of the war in
Afghanistan, and it's likely to
leave liberal Democrats and a
disenchanted public deeply dis-
satisfied.
The administration reports
that its strategy basically, the
surge to over 100,000 troops is
largely working well.
Al-Qaida's senior leadership in
Pakistan "is weaker and under
more sustained pressure since it
fled Afghanistan in 2001."
In always-problematic Pakistan,
which continues to drag its feet
on suppressing insurgents in its
tribal areas, "we are laying the
foundation for a strategic partner-
ship ..."
And in Afghanistan, the
Taliban's momentum has been


stopped and even reversed in
key areas. Indeed, U.S. troops
in the Taliban's old stronghold
of Kandahar now operate out of
their enemy's old headquarters
building. However, the assess-
ment cautions, "these gains
remain fragile and reversible."
The upshot is that the admin-
istration plans to stick with
the strategy hammered out by
Obama and the U.S. commander,
Gen. David Petraeus, meaning
that the July 2011 date for the
U.S. to begin withdrawal is not
the hard-and-fast deadline it once
seemed.
The assessment left substan-
tial wiggle room in meeting that
target date. Any troop reduction
then would be "responsible" and
"conditions-based."
The real date, assuming the
administration stands by this
assessment, is more like 2014. By


the end of that year, the Afghan
National Security Forces are to
assume complete responsibility
for the country's security. Just in
case, the assessment speaks of
"NATO's enduring commitment
beyond 2014."
Obama has shown himself ded-
icated to the prosecution of the
war in Afghanistan, even overrid-
ing the strenuous urging of Vice
President Joe Biden that the U.S.
force be reduced in favor of spe-
cial-operations units conducting
tightly targeted strikes.
By resetting the key date from
2011 to 2014, the president is nec-
essarily banking on his still being
in the Oval Office to witness the
successful completion of what
has become known as "Obama's
War."
* Scripps Howard News Service


Deroy Murdock
deroy.murdock@gmoil.com


WikiLeaks

will get

US troops

shot dead

On Christmas night
1776, George
Washington
and his troops
silently crossed
the Delaware River from
Pennsylvania east into New
Jersey. They pounced on snor-
ing Hessian mercenaries at
their barracks in Trenton.
Washington's surprise attack
vanquished the pro-British unit
This unexpected victory rejuve-
nated the American Revolution
just when the cause looked lost
Were they alive back then,
Army Private Bradley Manning
(alleged purveyor of some
250,000 secret diplomatic
cables to WikiLeaks) might
have forwarded Washington's
covert plans to Julian Assange,
WikiLeaks' founder. Assange
would have galloped on
horseback through Trenton's
snow-clogged streets yelling,
"The Yankees are coming! The
Yankees are coming!" all to
"inform the public."
Roused from their sleep, the
Hessians might have crushed
Washington and his men and,
thus, the Revolution. If so, we
now would drink warm beer at
cricket matches.
SWil~Leakers and their
increasingly vocal apologists
are stunningly oblivious to mili-
tary and diplomatic secrecy's
role in preserving freedom and
national security. Informing
the American people is a noble
objective. Unfortunately, our
enemies listen in.
Germany was unaware that
Winston Churchill and Franklin
Roosevelt read Adolf Hitler's
military commands, thanks to
captured Nazi Enigma coding
machines. England kept this
secret until 1974 29 years
after Hitler committed suicide
in Berlin.
WikiLeaks about Jimmy
Doolittle's post-Pearl Harbor
raid on Tokyo would have
knocked American air-
planes from Japanese skies.
Likewise, "the public's right
to know" about D-Day would
have told the .Nazis that
Eisenhower was en route and
turned Normandy beach into.
an American Waterloo.
WikiLeaks' operators and
supporters either recklessly
disregard the implications of
their revelations or actively
subvert U.S. interests, while
risking mayhem against
Americans and our allies:
WikiLeaks disclosed that
a major Mediterranean city
has become an al-Qaeda hot-
bed. (To limit further damage,
I have excluded its name.)
Consequently, American dip-
lomats there have redoubled
their counter-terror efforts.
WikiLeaks exposed this to
America's biggest enemy,
placing a giant bull's-eye on
the relevant U.S. outpost and
jeopardizing the country that
hosts it.
WikiLeaks posted diplo-
matic cables detailing critical
infrastructure overseas, such
as pipelines and vaccine fac-
tories. What a perfect target
list for those who want to see
"infidels" sick or dead.
Incredible.
WikiLeaks will snuff inno-
cent lives, if it has not done so
already.

* New York commentator
Deroy Murdock is a columnist
with the Scripps Howard News
Service and a media fellow with
the Hoover Institution on War,
Revolution and Peace at Stanford
University.


4A


OTHER OPINION


Stay the course in Afghanistan











Page EdItor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427LAKE CITY REPORTER STATE SATURDAY, DECEMBER 18, 2010


NASA fuels shuttle


Discovery in test


for cracks in tank


MARCIA DUNN
AP, Aerospace Writer

CAPE CANAVERAL -
NASA fueled space shuttle
Discovery at the pad Friday,
not for a flight but for tests
to help understand mysteri-
ous cracks that appeared
in the fuel tank during a
launch attempt last month.
Discovery is grounded
until at least the beginning
of February because, while
the cracks have been fixed,
engineers still do not know
what caused them.
In a countdown test that
began at sunrise and last-
ed well into the afternoon,
the launch team pumped
more than 500,000 gallons
of liquid hydrogen and
oxygen into Discovery's
external fuel tank. The
tank was rigged with
sensors and other equip-
ment.
"We're not committing
to flying anytime soon.
We've got to wait until
we know we have a good
answer to go fly," launch
manager Mike Moses'said
as Discovery's 15-story
tank filled up. "We want
to make sure we know
the risk we have in front'


of us."
The concern is that
cracks could cause chunks
of foam to pop off and, in
the worst case, slam into
the Discovery at liftoff. A
large slab of foam doomed
space shuttle Columbia in
2003.
When Discovery does
fly, the trip will be its last.
Just two or three missions
remain before NASA ends
its shuttle program next
year. Endeavour is due to
fly in April, and Atlantis
may follow in the summer
if funding is forthcoming.
Discovery is load-
ed with supplies for the
International Space Station
as well as ,an experimental
humanoid robot
Back on Nov. 5, NASA
halted the countdown for
Discovery because of leak-
ing hydrogen gas. An unre-
lated problem the crack-
ing later was discovered
in the insulating foam of the
fuel tank, in the ribbed cen-
tral portion thatholds instru-
ments. When the foam was
removed, cracks were found-
in two of the more than 100
aluminum ribs, or brackets,
making up that area. The
two damaged ribs each


21 feet long were next to
each other.
Both the leak and
cracks were fixed, and
NASA aimed for a possi-
ble December flight. But
engineers were stumped
by the cracks. They now
believe there may have
been a buildup of stress in
the brackets during assem-
bly, which caused them to
crack when the super-cold
fuel was loaded into the
tank, Moses said.
Besides stringing cables
with gauges and sensors
on the suspect portion of
the tank, technicians also
painted small black dots
- 10,000 to 12,000 of them
- on the exposed white
foam over the repaired
area. Technicians worked
in freezing temperatures,
dipping their gloved fingers
in paint and then pressing
them gently onto the foam.
The dots were part of
an optics test. A pair of
cameras provided visuals
of the dots, recording the
motions of the tank in that
area and hopefully provid-
ing additional clues to the
cracking.
There were no leaks
and no immediate signs of


ASSOCIATED PRESS
This image provided by NASA TV shows the space shuttle Discovery on the launch pad at
Kennedy Space Center Friday as a tanking test begins. Teams will fill the spacecraft's exter-
nal fuel tank with liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen just as they do during a launch attempt
to verify repairs made to the tank, Technicians added 89 sensors to the outside of the tank
recently including strain gauges to gather precise measurements of how much the tank
moves during the fueling process.


cracking as the test con-
cluded Friday afternoon.
Discovery will be
taken back to the Vehicle


Assembly Building next
week so engineers can X-
ray the brAckets on the
back of the fuel tank.


The goal is to launch
'Discovery as early as Feb.
3 or at least by month's
end, Moses said.


Florida's unemployment


numbers worse in November


BRENT KALLESTAD
Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE Florida's sea-
sonally adjusted unemployment rate
worsened in November with nearly,
one of every eight eligible workers
jobless, state labor officials reported
Friday.
Twelve percent of Florida's eligible
work force, which translates to more
than 1.1 million people, did not have
jobs last month, the state Agency for
Workforce Innovation said.
It wasn't the news that either offi-
cials or the unemployed had hoped
for with the holidays at hand.
State economist Rebecca Rust said
last month that anecdotal reports
indicated that holiday season hiring
from October through December
could create 40,000 additional jobs,
but that apparently didn't materialize
in November.
Gov.-elect Rick Scott called the 12
percent rate "inexcusable and further
proof that reform is needed.
'We need to put jobs first and make
sure all government expenditures are
justified," Scott said Friday. "I am
committed to getting Florida back
to work by making Florida the best
place to do business."
Florida's unemployment rate stood
at 11.9 percent in October and the
bleak November figures were far
worse than the national unemploy-
ment average of 9.8 percent.
The tax-cut bill that went to
President Obama on Friday extends
unemployment benefits, but not for
those who have exhausted them. In
Florida, 105,011 people have run out
of unemployment benefits.
"We are prepared to immediately
begin processing payments as soon
as the president signs the bill,"
AWI Director Cynthia. Lorenzo said
Friday.
Friday's gloomy unemployment


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Felicia Robbins talks about the expiration of her jobless benefits and her life with
her five children at a Pensacola homeless shelter on Tuesday, Nov. 30. Robbins
lost her job as a juvenile justice worker in 2009 and her last $235 unemployment
check arrived Dec. 13. Her 10-year-old car isn't running, and she walks each day
to the local unemployment office to look for work.


report comes on the heels of anoth-
er by legislative economists that
tax revenues continue to fall and
that Florida's economy will recover
from the recession more slowly than
hoped.
That revision announced Tuesday
adds at least $1 billion to a potential
$2.5 billion budget shortfall for the
next fiscal year, another economic
challenge for Scott, who will use
the revenue estimates to formulate
his budget recommendation to the
Legislature.
Officials noted that the counties
with the lowest unemployment rates
were those with relatively high pro-
portions of government employ-
ment. Rural Liberty County in the
Florida Panhandle, home to a state


prison, reported the lowest unem-
ployment in the state with 8.1 per-
cent of eligible workers looking for
jobs last month.
The agency says 55 of Florida's 67'
counties reported double-digit unem-
ployment in November, up from 48
in October when Florida's unemploy-
ment rate stood at 11.9 percent for
the second straight month.
Hendry County in southwest
Florida continued to have the highest
unemployment with 17.9 percent of
its work force idled.
State economists predicted double-
digit unemployment would continue
in Florida until sometime during the
fiscal year that begins on July 1 2012
- just as the presidential campaign
rolls into high gear.


Capsule docks

with space

station, bringing

3 new tenants


MARCIA DUNN
AP Aerospace Writer ,.

CAPE CANAVERAL -
The International Space
Station got three new ten-
ants Friday, doubling in
crew size with the arrival
of a Russian Soyuz cap-
sule.
The Soyuz delivered an
American, an Italian and
a Russian for a five-month
stay. They floated into
the orbiting lab two days
after their launch from
Kazakhstan.
Officials at Russia's
Mission Control outside
Moscow radioed congratu-
lations, as did the families
of the new residents.
The docking took place
220 miles above Mali in
western Africa, just as
NASA was wrapping up a
fueling test of space shut-
tle Discovery on its Florida
launch pad. Discovery
should have flown to the
space station in November,
but is grounded until
February because of fuel
tank cracks.
The newest space station
residents are Catherine
Coleman, Paolo Nespoli
and Dmitry Kondratyev.


Two Russians and one
American already are on
board.
The young sons of
Kondratyev and Coleman
sat side by side inside
Mission Control, chatting
by radio with their orbit-
ing parents.
"We are so glad that
you're on the space sta-
tion," said Coleman's hus-
band, Josh Simpson, a
glass artist. "For the last
three years, we have been
trying to figure out where
you are, whether it's in
Germany or Moscow
or Star City or Japan or
Canada or Texas," he said,
referring to all her trips
during training.
"And now, we know
exactly where you are ...
you seem close to us now.
Our hearts are with you."
Replied Coleman: "I
love you guys." She added
that the space station was
amazing.
NASA's deputy space
station program manager,
Kirk Shireman, urged the
crew to have fun and told
them to expect lots of visit-
ing vessels in the next few
months, primarily cargo
ships.


NOTICE OF SPECIAL CALLED MEETING OF THE
LAKE CITY COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY TO
BE HELD ON MONDAY, DECEMBER 20, 2010 AT 6:00 PM, IN
THE COUNCIL CHAMBERS LOCATED ON THE SECOND
FLOOR OF CITY HALL AT 205 NORTH MARION AVENUE,
LAKE CITY, FLORIDA.

THE PURPOSE OF THE MEETING IS TO REVIEW FACADE GRANT APPLICATIONS.

In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if any accommodations are needed for
persons with disabilities, please contact Joyce Bruner, Office of City Manager, 386-719-5768.

AUDREY E SIKES
City Clerk


--I


LAKE CITY REPORTER STATE SATURDAY, DECEMBER 18, 2010


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427













FAITH


Saturday, December 18, 2010 v


&


VALUES


www.lakecityreporter.com


Carlton McPeak
carlton_mc@msn.com


'The King'

identified

by three

Wise Men

scholars of the
stars came to
Jerusalem look-
ing for the "King
of the Jews." Wanting to
"worship" this "King,"
these wise men began to
inquire where in Jerusalem
they might find "the
Christ." A star led them to
the very house where "the
Child" was living.
The Old Testament proph-
et Micah had foretold of the
birthplace of this "Child"
saying that He would be
born in Bethlehem of Judah.
The religious leaders of the
Jews (the chief priests and
the scribes of the people
Matthew 2:4) told Herod,
the Roman king of Judah,
that "the Christ" would be
born in this city.
ringg a meeting with
wise men, Herod told
them to go to Bethlehem,
find out where this "King"
was located so that he could
go and worship this "King"
also. Herod was not being
honest with his directive
because after the Magi did
not return with the infor-
mation that he requested,
"he became very enraged,
and sent and slew all the
male children (two years
and under) who were in
Bethlehem" (Matthew 2:16).
The reason these men did
not return to Herod was
because God had warned
them "in a dream not to
return to Herod" (Matthew
2:12).
Upon arriving at the
house in Bethlehem where
"the Child with Mary, His
mother" was living "they fell
down and worshipped Him"
(Matthew 2:11). After pay-
ing homage to this "Child"
the visitors from the east
presented to Him "gifts of
gold and frankincense and
myrrh" items that were in
"their treasures."
Matthew is the only
gospel writer to include
this story associated with
the birth of Jesus. So what
purpose does it serve in
Matthew's gospel?
It seems that Matthew
is trying to identify who
this "king" is. Previously,
Matthew spoke of the royal
descendants of King David.
Also, an angel appeared to
Joseph, the betrothed hus-
band of Mary, and told him
that her pregnancy was OK
Matthew wants his read-
ers to understand that this
"child" is someone special
even from birth.
As we read this story we
also should be impressed
with the ancestry of this
individual. His place of
birth, His parentage and the
announcement of His birth
were not "normal" for roy-
alty. However, Jesus was still
to be a king!
How far would we travel
to pay "homage" to this
king? Would we give in
abundance such precious,
expensive gifts to this king?
Would people call us "wise
men?" Would you identify
Jesus as a king?

* Carlton G. McPeak is an
evangelist working in the
Lake City area. All Scirtujral
quotations are from the New
American Standard Bible,
Holman Bible Publishers,
unless otherwise stated.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Cao Dai followers pray during a weekly worship service at at Cao Dai Temple of California in Garden Grove, Calif., Sunday. Cao Dai, a dynamic religion
that emerged in Vietnam during French colonial rule, is flourishing in Vietnam amid a renewed religious freedom there, ,but refugees who brought the
colorful and eccentric faith with them to the U.S. now worry it is dying out in the immigrant community as second- and third-generation Vietnamese-
Americans assimilate and lose their native tongue.


Refugees aim to preserve unique faith


Associated Press
POMONA, Calif
As darkness fell on a
recent night, Duc Le
donned a long white
tunic and black cap,
slipped off his shoes
and joined other aging refugees
to honor the new moon with the
chanted prayers and offerings
that mark the Vietnamese reli-
gion of Cao Dai.
As Le worshipped, his 25-year-
old son stood nearby in sweat
pants and chatted with his young
bride before slipping away to
study for his mid-term exams.
The college senior said he visits
the temple to teach martial arts
more often than to worship and
struggles to observe the elabo-
rate rituals of his elders' faith.
"Usually I don't get too
involved. I think it's the language
barrier," said Thuan Le, who
finds the higher-level Vietnamese
used in Cao Dai prayers difficult
to understand. "I definitely see
it as a hindrance with all the
ceremonies. You have to follow
all these procedures to get to the
truth of it and that's really hard."
Le's ambivalence is echoed
by many young Vietnamese
and marks a turning point for
the thousands of refugees who
brought their religion with them
to the U.S. and have nurtured
it for decades in their adopted
homeland.
Now, as the original follow-
ers age, Cao Dai's most learned
scholars in the U.S. are sFram-


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Cao Dai follower Tuoi Nguyen prays during a weekly worship service at Cao
Dai Temple of California in Garden Grove, Calif., Sunday.


bling to build interest among
their children and grandchil-
dren while trying to widen the
faith's appeal to gain new, non-
Vietnamese worshippers as well.
But Cao Dai's unusual history
and a colorful blending of beliefs
that earned its most prominent
temple in Vietnam the nickname
"Walt Disney fantasia of the East"
could make that a challenge. ,
The faith, born in 1926 out
of a series of spirit seances, is
monotheistic but incorporates
elements of the oldest and most
established religions in its com-
plex DNA. It took root in French
Indochina, in part as a way for
the country's intellectual elite to
reconcile the Christian beliefs of
their colonial rulers and ancient
Eastern traditions, said Janet
Hoskins, an anthropology profes-


sor and Cao Dai expert at the
University of Southern California.
Practitioners today believe the
founders of the world's major
religions are all messengers of
the same God and point to similar
teachings on peace and love in all
religions. As a result, the faith-
ful pay homage to a cornucopia
of religious and philosophical ,
figures, including Jesus, Moses,
Muhammad, Lao Tzu, Buddha
and Confucius.
Among their saints is the
French author Victor Hugo,
who is believed to have spoken
to spirit mediums from beyond
the grave. Hugo's image, along
with the French slogan "Liberty,
Equality and Brotherhood,"
appears at the front of many
Cao Dai temples along with the
Chinese revolutionary Sun Yat-


sen and the Vietnamese sage
Khiem Binh Nguyen.
Practitioners also believe Joan
of Arc guided the first Cao Dai
disciples in their seances and is
one of nine female fairies associ-
ated with the Mother Goddess.
Five levels of carved and
brightly painted figures depicting
Cao Dai's saints, prophets and
immortals sit above the altar in.
its temples, where worshippers
also burn incense and place tea,
-wine, fruit and flowers to rep-
resent the different aspects of
being.
The faith's complex history and
its emphasis on ritual and hier-
archy make it difficult for young
people to embrace, even without
a language barrier, said Hum Dac:
Bui, a Cao Dai scholar, author
and retired surgeon who lives in
Redlands.
Southern California, one of the
largest Cao Dai hubs in the U.S.,
boasts a dozen temples and about
10,000 worshippers, Hoskins said,
but even here the elders worry
the religion could fade away with
time. Cao Dai temples in Vietnam
attract thousands and have
become tourist draws, but there
the religion is censored by the
government and spirit seances
are banned.
"When the older generation
dies, we will hot have leaders," said
Bui, who meditates four times a
day. "There are a lot of youths who
come to the temple and they don't
understand a single word. They
don't even understand the prayers.
That is my worry."


CHURCH NOTES


-Today
Musical drama
Wesley Memorial
United Methodist Church
is presenting a Christmas
story of family, friend-
ship, forgiveness and
faith at 4 p.m. today
and 6 p.m. Sunday, The
church is located at 1272
SW McFarlane next to
Summers Elementary
School. There is no
charge and the commu-
nity is invited.

Sunday
Candlelight Service
The community is invit-
ed to attend the annual
Candlelight Service 5:30
p.m. Sunday at New
Bethel Missionary Baptist
Church. The church is
located at 550 NE Martin
Luther King St. Pastor
Desi Nixon of Oak Grove
Missionary Baptist will
deliver the message.


Hark The Herald
The Music and Drama
Ministries of Southside
Baptist Church is present-
ing the pageant "Hark
The Herald" 10:30 a.m.
Sunday. Nursery will be
available for children 4
and under. The church
is located at 388 SE Baya
Drive.

Christmas Play
The production
of Searching For
"Christ"mas is at 6
p.m. Sunday at First
Full Gospel Church.
Admission is free to this
play. The church is locat-
ed at Washington Street
and Jones Way. For more
information, call 386-365-
4501.

Christmas Cantata
A Christmas Cantata led
by the Christmas Choir
and instrumental soloists
is 10 a.m. Sunday at First
Presbyterian Church.


There is only one service
this Sunday.

Friday
Christmas pageant
A Christmas pag-
eant led by the Praise
Team and Joy Singers
is 7 p.m. Friday at First
Presbyterian Church. A
Christmas Eve Service of
Lessons and Carols led by
the Chancel Choir and the
Chancel Bell Ringers is
10 p.m.

Spirit of Christ service
A Christmas Eve ser-
vice with Eucharist is 5
p.m. at Spirit of Christ
Lutheran Church. Light
refreshments to follow at
6 p.m. Contact 386-752-
3807.

Candlelight Service
Faith-in-Christ Anglican
Church is holding a can-
dlelight service at 11 p.m.
on Christmas Eve. The


service ends at midnight
with the Holy Eucharist.
Call Fr. Don Wilson at
754-2827 or 208-9882. The
church is located 5 miles
east of the B&B and 6.5
miles West of 1-75, next to
Star Tech on Highway 90.

Dec. 31
Joint worship service
Shiloh Missionary
Baptist Church and
Philadelphia Missionary
Baptist Church are wor-
shipping, fellowshipping
and praising the New Year
10 p.m. Dec. 31 at Shiloh
Missionary Baptist Church.
The church is located at
948 Aberdeen Ave.

NYE service
"Friday Night Live"
New Years Eve Service is
9 p.m. Dec. 31 at Miracle
Tabernacle Church. The
church is located at 1190
SW Sister's Welcome
Road. Call 386-758-8452.
For transportation, call


Mitch at 386-292-5850 or
Audre' at 386-344-9915.

Abortion regret
support group
Crossroads Pregnancy
Center is starting a sup-
port group for people with
abortion regrets. The
group is free and confi-
dential. Call Catherine at
386-497-4978.

Free Biblical counseling
Free Biblical counsel-
ing is available at Hopeful
Baptist Church. To make
an appointment, call 386-
7524135 between 8:30
a.m. and 4 p.m.
Submit Church Notes
items in writing no later
than 5 p.m. Monday the
week prior to an event. E-
mail them to arobinson@
lakecityreporter.com or fax
them to (386) 752-9400 or
drop-off at 180 E. Duval St.,
Lake City. Call (386) 754-
0425 with questions. Church
Notes run as space is avail-
able each Saturday.









LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVERTISEMENT SATURDAY, DECEMBER 18, 2010 71
....


He entered the world in a humble setting, but would grow to

be called the Son of God...the Prince of Peace. Jesus would

bring a message of forgiveness and love; His life and teach-

ings would change the world. As you worship this Christmas

season, may the words of the angel of the Lord ring in your

heart: "I bring you good news of great joy that will be.for

all the people. Today in the town of David a Savior has been

born to you; he is Christ the Lord." (Luke 2:10-11)


Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday
Jude Isaiah Luke Luke Luke Luke John


1.1-25 1.26-56 1.57-80 2.1-20 1.1-18


Scripures Selected by The American Bible Society
Copyright 2010, Keister-Williams Newspaper Services, P. 0. Box 8187, Chauloliesville, VA 22906, www.kwnews.com
ll


North Florida
Pharmacy
7 Locations to Serve You
Lake City, Ft. White, Branford,
Chiefland, Mayo & Keystone Heights











ae -. .


To Advertise in
this-Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440



Supercenter
"LOW PRICES EVERYDAY"


GWHunter, Inc.
Chevron Chevron Oil
Jobber




b 2C
BollyJectric, Inc.
"Quality ork at a reasonable price"
We also do solar hook-ups
(386) 755-5944


FOOD STORES
Open 7 Days a Week
1036 E.Duval St., Lake City FL.
(386) 752-0067
Fresh Meat, Fresh Produce!
I1 can do all things through Christ which strcngtheneth me"
Philippians 4:13

To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440

To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440


RICK'S (RANE SERVICE
Located at 25A ; .
(Old Valdosta Hwy)
386-752-5696 or
386-867-2035
after hours

To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440


First Advent Christian
1881 SW Mlcarlane Au
386-752-3900
Sunday School 9 45AM
Sunday. Service II 10(A
Wednesday Service: 7:00PM
-I1
GLAD TIDINGS ASSEMBLY OF GOD.
993 NW Lake lefferv Road
386-752-062U
SundayWorship 10 30AM I 6PMt
Wed. Famn. Bible Srudy '.OuPMN
'A church where IESUS is Real"

BEREA BAPTIST CHURCH
SR47 S@ 755-0900
Sunday School 9:30AM
Sunday Worship 10.45,\M & 6PM
Wednesday, Eve Service 7PM
Pasior: Larry E Sweat
EASTSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
196 SE lames Ave. *386-752-2860
Sun Bible Study 9 45AM
Sun. Worship I1AM 6PM
Lived. Prayer Mig/Bible Study 6PM
Re, Brandun G Wina
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Sunday Bible Stud. 9 15AM
Sunday tWorLhip 10.30AM1 & 6 0PM
Wed. 6 iIPM Praver Service. &
.hildiens Minisrry 6:ISPM
Downtown Lake Ciry *75-M5422
Rev. Stephen Ahrens, Pastor.
OLIVE MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH
541 N.E. Daus Street
(3861 752 1990
Ronald V.Walters, Pastor
Sunday School 9:45AM
Sunday Morning Worship 11:00AM
Wed Mid-.WeekWortsip 6:00PM
"In God'sWord, Will &Way"

PARKYIEW BAPTIST CHURCH
268 NW Lake Jeffery Rd. 752-0681
lake Ciry. Florida '2055
wr\,v.pb[lk Cim
Sunday School 8:30,9:45 & IIAM
Sunday Worship q:45 & 11AM& 6PM


iWANA
EveningWorship
Wed. Eve. Schedule
Family Supper (Reservation) ,
Children's Ministry
Youth Worship
Prayer Meeting


5:30 PM
6:00 PM

5PM
6PM
6:00 PM
6:00 PM


Thursday Evening Schedule St. 8/21/08
Paikview Edge 8:30PM
Pastor: Michael A. Tatem

PINE GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH
1989 N US Hwy 441
386-752-2664
Sunday Bible Study 9:45AM
Sunday Worship llAM & 6PM
Wed. Kids &Youth Ministry 6:30PM
Pastor: Ron Thompson


SALEM PRIMITIVE BAPTIST
Sunday Services 10 ) oAM
Pa.smu Elder Hernian Griffin
752-4198 ,
SOUTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
388 i E Bava Drive 755.5553
Sunday
Bible Sridy 9:15 AM
Moving Worship 10:30AM
EveningWorship 6:15PM
Wednesday


AWANA
Prayer & Bible Study


5:45PM
6:15 PM


TABERNACLE BAPTIST CHURCH
independent Bapusi)
111 5E MonoseAve. 752-4274
Sunday School 10 AM
Sun. Mom. Worship 11AM
Sunday Ese 6PM
Wed Pta er Meenng 7:30 PM
Pastor Mike Norman

EPIPHANY CATHOLIC CHURCH
1905 SW Epiphanv Courn ;52.4470
Sa.rrdal Vigil Mass 5 0L PM
Sunday Md's 8 I1 AM, 10 3J, A,
5.111 PM Sp.ianishEnglhhl
Sunday Schol Relhgous Educanror
[ 9JO 81-O l15i [ M

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE SOCIETY
*3q SE Ba) a Ave
Sunday Service I I.00 AM
Wednesday Everang Servit 7 30 PM
lAKE CITY HRISrIAN CHURCH
Hw) 247S @7559436


Sunday School
Sim. Mom. Worship
Wed. Prayer Meeting


9:30 AM
10:30 AM,
7PM


NEWHORIZON
church of Christ
Directions &Times 755-1320
Jack Exum,Jr., Minister

LAKE CITY CHURCH OF GOD
167 Ermine St. 752-5965
Sunday School 9:45 AM
Sun. Worship l jitiAM I.00F'M
Wed. Family Night 7PM
Wed. Youth Service. 7PM
Fa.,ir Canol lee
EVANGEL CHURCH OF GOD
370 SW Monitor Glen'755-1939
Sunday School 9:45 AM
Sunday Worship 10:50 & 6:30
Wed. Spiritual Enrichment 7PM
"Shock Youth Church
Boys and Girls Clubs
Bible Study
Pastoi: John R. Hathaway

ST. JAMES EPISCOPAL CHURCH
2423 SW Bascom Norris Dr., Lake
City, Fl 32025- 386-752-2218
Email: stamesepis330@bellsouth.net
Holy Eucharist
Sun. 8 & 10AM
Wednesday: 5:15pm
Priest: The Rev. MichaelArmstrong
Deacon: The Rev. limmie Hunsinger
Director of Music Dr. Alfonso Levy





4-,." it


OUR REDEEMER LUTHERAN CHURCH
LCMS
11/2 miles S. of 1-75 on SR 47
755-4299
Sunday Services 9:30AM
(Nursery Provided)
Christian Education Hour
For all ages at 10:45AM
Pastor: Rev, Bruce Alkire
SPIRIT OF CHRIST LUTHERAN
Hwy 90,1.5 miles West of 1-75*752-3807
Sunday Worship 10:00AM
Nursery Avail.
Wed. Pot Luck 6PM Worship 7PM
VicarJohn David Bryant


BETHEL UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
4869 US 441 South
Sunday Worship Services,
Traditional Services 8:30 & 11:00AM
386-755-135
inybethelumr corm
First United Methodis Church
973 S. Marion Ave.
386-752-4488
Sunday School 'j 45,yM
Sunday Mormns Worship
Corrtemporary Serice 8-30AMN
Trjdilional Sen ice 1 :0rLAM
Prorarri opportunmues available in all
a.reds for all ages.
For a cumpleie schedule
contact church office ,i
752. M88

WESLEY MEMORIAL UNITED
127.S MctFdrlane 75. j513
(Adjacent to Summers School i
Sunday School 9.00.M
Wotstup & Ki I 00ANI
Nurser, proevded
Prdit & Worhip f,'riPM
AWANA sitarblS 15 Wed. 5 00PM
Pastor Ihe Rev I Lowe Mabrev
ww..wesleyQriem mcarr

WATERTOWN CONGREGATIONAL
METHODIST CHURCH
U.S 90 E rum on Cortez ine.u o Quality
Ind I right ,}n Okirinaa
Sunday School 9 45 AM
Sun. Worship llAM & 6 PM
Wed Night Semrae 7 PM
Pastor, Randy Ogburn


LAKE CITY CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE
Services
Sunday School 9:45AM
Sunday Worship lO 45AM, 6-3uPM
Wednesday 6-30PM
Adult, Youth Ministry, Children's Ministry
Pastor Craig Henderson
Nursery Provided
SW SR 47 and Azalea Park Place

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
629 SW Baya Drive *.752-0670
Sunday School 9:00AM
Sunday Service ,10:00AM
NURSERYPROVIDED
Pastor. Dr. Roy A. Martin
Director of Music: Bill Poplin


FIRST FULL GOSPEL CHURCH
N E Jones Way & N E Wa singion S[
Sunday Schoo! l0.110 A.I
Morning Worship 11:00 AM
Evangelis Service 6 (0 PM
bYuti Services Wednesdayv 7 iiUPM
Mid-week Serice Wednesday 7.00 PM
F roi i .ro .] a ',.'r4il* r Erry'ne Wel..ornie
Pastor Rev Stan Ells

CHRIST CENTR-IL MINISTRIES
Sunday 9 J00AM
Sunday Morning I 00ANi
Wednesday Service 7 1n1PM
217 Dyal Ave, from Hwy 90 ilke
SisitersWeliome Rd.. go:, 5 rmilei. south,
church on left, 7'5525-5
lead Pato. L.onnie Iohns
"A Church on the Move"
CHRISTIANHERITAGE CHURCH
Corner SR 4 7 & Hudson Circle
Sunday Celebration 10:30 AM
S Pastor Chris Jones' 752-9119
FALLING CREEK CHAPEL
Falling Creek Road .755-0580
First..uid Third Sundays 9:30 A.M.
Second and Fourth Sundays 3:00 P.M.
Pastor: Rev. Cheryl R. Pingel
IGLESIAEVANGELICA
APOSENTO ALTO
17u77 25th Rd. L/C FL 32055
Service Fn: 7 OPM, Sun I lOFPM
,Arturu Sudrrz' .lti.-7.- 18i 6
NEW BEGINNING CHURCH
Highway 242 E. ofBranford Highway
Sunday School 10:00AM
MomrningWorship 11:0O0AM
Sunda' E.ening 6:00PM
Wednesday 7:00PM
A Full Gospel Church- EveryoneWelcomed
(386) 755-5197
MEADE MINISTRIES
Dir:Hwy 47 to Columbia City,
one mile East on CR 240
Sunday 10AMand 7PM


Thursday 8PM
No Nursery Available
Spirit Filled Worship
Healing and Deliverance


9 *(



/


To List





Your





Church





on the





Church


Call





752- 1293!


Toaderie n-hi h-c iretr a l75-40


fIlay Electric Cooperative, Inc.
Competitive rates, non-profit,
right here in your community.
Lake City District 386-752-7447
clayelectric.com
To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
75-5440







D4WON


Tires for every need.
US 90 West across from Wal-Mart
752-0054

Morrell's
Your Complete decorating and
home furnishings store
SW Deputy Jeff Davis Lane (formerly Pinemount Rd.)
752-3910 or 1-800-597-3526
Mon.-Sat. 8:00-5:30 Closed Sunday


ANDERSON COLUMBIA CO., INC.
ASPHALT PAVING
COMMERCIAL *INDUSTRIAL
Site Preparation Road Building Parking Lots
Grading & Drainage
752-7585
871 NW Guerdon St., Lake City

HARRY'S
, Heating &Air Conditioning Inc.
Harry Mosley, President


MPmn 752-2308 14-1

To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440


Central States
Enterprises
Columbia County's Feed Headquarters
FEED PET SUPPLIES LAWN & GARDEN
ANIMAL HEALTH
668 NW Waldo St. 386-755-7445

MIKELLS POWER EQUIPMENT, INC.
Your Lawn & Garden Headquarters
MOWERS CHAIN SAWS* TRIMMERS
1152 US 90 WEST LAKE CITY, FL.
386-752-8098



LAKE CITY
:SE... 755-7050


To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440


9.1-7


Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440


i I I IIII









LAKE CITY REPORTER NATION SATURDAY, DECEMBER 18, 2010


LAPD deluged with calls in 'Grim Sleeper' case


Associated Press

LOS P 3ELES Investi-
gators received hundreds of calls
after releasing photographs of
women ,'.zed at the home of a
mechar accused of the "Grim
Sleepc serial killings, authori-
ties said Friday.
Detective Dennis Kilcoyne
expected the tally of calls to reach
1,000 by the day's end. Several
callers said they were among the
women in the photographs, but
detectives must interview each
one to make sure.
Police want to know who the
women in the photographs are
and fear some of them could have
been victims of a crime.
"By the end of the weekend,
we will be buried in work," said
Kilcoyne, noting he has canceled
leaves for the eight homicide
detectives who worked the case.
Police Chief Charlie Beck told
the Los Angeles Times that five


"By the end
of the weekend,
we will be buried
in work."

Dennis Kilcoyne
Detective
women had been tentatively iden-
tified, but he would not discuss
their well-being or status.
The photos and videos were
found in the home and garage
of suspect Lonnie Franklin Jr.
during a three-day search after
his July arrest. Many of the close-
ly cropped images had depict-
ed women in sexually explicit
poses.
Investigators spent years try-
ing to crack the "Grim Sleeper"
case in which at least 10 women
were killed from 1985 to 1988 and
from 2002 to 2007. The apparent
pause in slaying led a newspa-
per to dub the killer the "Grim


Sleeper."
The arrest came when
Franklin's son was swabbed for
DNA after being arrested on an
unrelated matter. Using a tech-
nique known as a familial DNA
search, the sample came back as
similar to evidence in the serial
killings, ultimately leading police
to Franklin.
Detectives now say they doubt
the killer took a hiatus and are
reviewing more than 30 cold-case
files to see if they can make any
connections.
Police on Thursday released
images of about 160 women and
asked anyone who recognized
them to come forward.
Franklin has pleaded not guilty
to the murders of 10 women. His
attorney, Louisa Pensanti, did not
return a message Friday.
None of the images depicted any
of Franklin's 10 alleged victims.
Anyone who recognized a photo
was asked to call 1-877-527-3247.


I grpI t




rP1; u4) 11 guf








ASSOCIATED PRESS
Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa (left) looks at photographs found
in the possession of Lonnie David Franklin Jr. during a news conference
in Los Angeles Thursday.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
President Barack Obama looks over at Republican and Democratic lawmakers waiting for him to sign the bipartisan tax pack-
aoe that extends tax cuts for families at all income levels, during a signing ceremony at the Eisenhower Executive Office
Building in the White House complex Friday in Washington.






Tax bill signed


Obama salutes spirit of compromise


By JIM KUHNHENN
Associated Press

WASHINGTON -
President Barack Obama
signed into law a huge, hol-
iday-season tax bill extend-
ing cuts for all Americans on
Friday, saluting a new spirit
of political compromise as
Republicans applauded and
liberals seethed. The ben-
efits range from tax cuts for
milliQnaires. and the middle
class to-longer help for the
jobless.
The most significant
tax legislation in nearly
a decade will avert big
increases that would have
hit millions of people
starting in two weeks on
New Year's Day. Declared
Obama: '"We are here with
some good news for the
American people this holi-
day season."
'"This is progress and
that's what they sent us
here to achieve," Obama
said as a rare bipartisan
assembly of lawmakers
looked on at the White
House.
The package retains
Bush-era tax rates for all
taxpayers, including the
wealthiest Americans, a
provision Obama and con-
gressional liberals opposed.
It also offers 13 months
of extended benefits to the
unemployed and attempts
to stimulate the economy
with a Social Security pay-
roll tax cut for all workers.
At a cost of $858 bil-
lion over two years, the
deal contains provisions
dear to both Democrats
and Republicans. It repre-
sents the most money that


ASSOCIATED PRESS
President Barack Obama signs the bipartisan tax package
during a signing ceremony at the Eisenhower Executive
Office Building in the White House complex Friday.


Obama was likely to have
been able to dedicate over
the next year to the slowly
recovering economy. Yet it
also increases the federal
deficit at a time when the
country is growing increas-
ingly anxious about the red
ink.
Dramatic both as an eco-
nomic and a political accom-
plishment, the agreement
sets the stage for Obama's
new relationship with
Congress in the aftermath
of a midterm election wave
that devastated Democrats
and stripped them of con-
trol of the House.
Obama called for main-
taining the spirit of coop-


eration, declaring he was
hopeful "that we might
refresh the American peo-
ple's faith in the capability
of their leaders to govern in
challenging times."
He conceded that the
White House and Congress
face a difficult challenge
when it comes to control-
ling the deficit and tackling
the nation's debt.
"In some ways this
was easier than some of
the tougher choices we're
going to have to make next
year," he said.
To strike the bargain,
Obama set aside his vow
to extend tax cuts only for
the middle class and lower


wage earners. The mea-
sure also enacts an estate
tax that is more generous
to the wealthy than Obama
had sought. ,
The extended tax cuts
include rates lower than
those that would have gone
into effect Jan. 1, a $1,000-
per-child tax credit, tax
breaks for college students
and lower taxes on capital
gains and dividends. The
bill also extends through
2011, a series of business
tax breaks designed to
encourage investment that
expired at the end of 2009.
Social Security taxes
would be cut by nearly a
third, from 6.2 percent to
4.2 percent, for this com-
ing year. A worker making
$50,000 would save $1,000;
one making $100,000 would
save $2,000.
But the payroll tax cut
also means that workers
will face an increase in 2012
if the full 6.2 percent rate is
restored. And by schedul-
ing President George W.
' Bush's 2001 and 2003 tax
rates to expire in two years,
the law ensures that taxes
will be a top issue in the
2012 presidential election.
Republicans boasted that
their success in extending
tax cuts for all was a sign of
things to come.
'The American people
are seeing change here
in Washington; they can
expect more in the new
year," said Senate GOP
leader Mitch McConnell
of Kentucky, who was
singled out for praise by
Obama and shook hands
with the president after
the signing.


Bones found on


island might be

Amelia Earhart's


By SEAN MURPHY
Associated Press
NORMAN, Okla.
- The three bone frag-
ments turned up on a
deserted South Pacific
island that lay along the
course Amelia Earhart
was following when she
vanished. Nearby were
several tantalizing arti-
facts: some old makeup,
some glass bottles and
shells that had been cut
open.
Now scientists at the
University of Oklahoma
hope to extract DNA
from the tiny bone chips
in tests that could prove
Earhart died as a cast-
away after failing in her
1937 quest to become the
first woman to fly around
the world.
'There's no guarantee,"
said Ric Gillespie, director
of the International Group
for Historic Aircraft
Recovery, a group of
aviation enthusiasts in
Delaware that found the
pieces of bone this year
while on an expedition
to Nikumaroro Island,
about 1,800 miles south of
Hawaii.
. "You only have to say
you have a bone that
may be human and may
be linked to Earhart and
people get excited. But
it is true that, if they can


get DNA, and if they
can match it to Amelia
Earhart's DNA, that's
pretty good."
It could be months
before scientists know for
sure and it could turn
out the bones are from
a turtle. The fragments
were' found near a hol-
lowed-out turtle shell that
might have been used -
to collect rain water, but
there were no other turtle
parts nearby.'
Earhart's disappear-
ance on July 2, 1937,
remains one of the 20th
century's most enduring
mysteries. Did*she run
out of fuel and crash at
sea? Did her Lockheed
Electra develop engine
trouble? Did she spot
the island from the sky
and attempt to land on a
nearby reef?
"What were her last
moments like? What was
she doing? What hap-
pened?" asked Robin
Jensen, an associate pro-
fessor of communications
at Purdue Uniyersity in
West Lafayette, Ind., who
has studied Earhart's
writings and speeches.
Since 1989, Gillespie's
group has made 10 trips
to the island, trying each
time to find clues that
might help determine the
fate of Earhart and her
navigator, Fred Noonan.


Senate prepares

for historic vote

on military gays


By ANNE FLAHERTY
Associated Press

WASHINGTON -.The
Senate was headed toward
a landmark vote Saturday
on legislation that would
let gays serve openly in
the military, testing wan-
ing opposition among
Republicans and putting
Democrats within striking
distance of overturning
"don't ask, don't tell."
Passage would be a his-
toric victory for President
Barack Obama, who made
repeal of the 17-year-old
law a campaign promise in
2008. It also would be a
political win for congressio-
nal Democrats who have
struggled repeatedly in
the final hours of the lame-
duck session to overcome
Republican objections.
A procedural vote was
expected by noon. If at least
60 senators vote to advance
the bill as expected, the
legislation could pass as
early as late afternoon.
Republicans could demand
extended debate time, but
early indications were that
they may not draw the pro-


cess out further.
Gay rights groups said
Saturday's vote was their
best shot at changing the
law because a new GOP-
dominated Congress will
take control in January.
Despite signs the bill was
close to passage, advocates
vowed to leave nothing up to
chance and stepped up lob-
bying efforts in the hours
before the vote, including
a silent protest in the visi-
tor seats overlooking the
Senate floor.
"We simply cannot
let the clock run out and
lose this historic opportu-
nity," said Aubrey Sarvis,
executive director of the
Servicemembers Legal
Defense Network, whose
supporters vowed to sit in
the Senate gallery until the
law was repealed.
"If senators support
repeal they will vote yes.
No more excuses," Sarvis
said.
Repeal would mean that,
for the first time in U.S. his-
tory, gays would be openly
accepted by the military
without fear of being
kicked out.


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424









Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com


SPORTS


Saturday, December 18, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


FROM THE SIDELINE


Brandon Finley
Phone:(386) 754-0420
bfinley@Iokecityreportercom

Decision

a heavy

one for

Jernigan

It's hard to
underestimate
the importance of
picking the right
college, but for
Timmy Jerniganr the
decision weighs heavily.
When most students
graduate, the options
are limited. The choice
many times comes down
to which state school or
community college they'd
like to attend.
For Jernigan, the
choices are unlimited.
That's what makes the
decision so important
Not only does Jernigan
have to make a decision
on his education, but
he's also got to make a
decision based on where
he'll fit in on the football
field.
With the list of
schools that have offered
scholarships to Jernigan,
there's no doubt that hell
receive a great education,
but the dream of playing
in the NFL lingers for the
Columbia Tiger.
Jernigan has the build
to be a next-level guy,
but choosing the right
fit for a college will have
a lot to do with it. I've
been around high school.
recruiting for some time
now.
In my time with Rivals.
com, I was able to see
recruiting work out
for some players (Tim
Tebow), while other
players were left trying
to fit their square peg
into a round hole (John
Brantley).
Jernigan Alust make
sure that he fits into the
system and what the
coaching staff has in
store for the defensive
tackle.
He's got the size and
speed that he could play
multiple positions in
college.
But which school will
offer him the best chance
to succeed?
He's noted Alabama,
Florida State and LSU
as his top three choices
for a college destination,
and hell likely receive
excellent exposure
no matter which school
he chooses.
The schools also offer
reputable diplomas for
the star if Jernigan's
playing days end four
years from now.
He has a good head
on his shoulders when
it comes to picking a
school, and unlike
many recruits, he's
taking his time with the
process. Jernigan has
said that the decision
may not impact only the
next four years of his life,
but the next 50.
With a decision of
this magnitude, it's good
to see that he's willing
to wait until signing
day on Feb. 2 to
direct the path of his
future.
* Brandon Finley covers
sports for the Lake City
Reporter.


College football's f

bowl-nanza is |

about to start I


Florida State plays
in final game of
2010 vs. USC.
By RALPH D. RUSSO
Associated Press
The pre-New Year's Day
bowl picks:
TODAY
New Mexico Bowl
UTEP (plus 11l%) vs.
BYU
Cougars won five of final
seven to get bowl eligible
for sixth straight season ...
BYU 35-14.
Humanitarian Bowl
N. Illinois (minus 1)
vs. Fresno State
Huskies were upset in
MAC title game; Bulldogs


tend to roll over on Boise
State's blue turf. ... NIU
28-24.
New Orleans Bowl
Ohio (plus 212) vs. Troy
The first of three MAC-
Sun Belt showdowns .
TROY 35-21.
TUESDAY
Beef'O'Brady's Bowl
Louisville (minus 3)
vs. Southern Mississippi
Nice first season for
Cardinals coach Charlie
Strong, but ... SOUTHERN
MISS 37-28.
WEDNESDAY
MAACO Bowl
No. 20 Utah (plus 17/)
vs. No. 10 Boise State
The all-business Broncos
BOWL continued on 2B


Flawless


Boys soccer
cruises to 8-0
mercy-rule win.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com
Columbia High needed
little more.than hf aga game
to pick up a district victory
against Robert E. Lee High
at Tiger Stadium Friday.
The Tigers cruised to an
8-0 victory over the Generals
when Caleb Hill's goal three
minutes into the second half
gave Columbia a mercy-rule
victory.
Jimmy Blakely had two
goals in the contest to lead
the Tigers, both coming in
the first half. His first goal
was less than three minutes
into the game.
Cooper Hall scored from
18 yards out with 35:31
remaining in the first half
for an early 2-0 edge. Conner
Widergren and Blakely's
second goal gave the Tigers
a 4-0 lead less than 20 min-
utes into the game.
Cody Beadles, C.J. McRae
and Nick Tuttle added goals
before the end of the first
half and Columbia built a
7-0 lead.
"We had strong midfield
play tonight," Columbia
coach Trevor Tyler said.
"I don't know how many
opportunities we "had, but
it seemed like the ones we
had we were putting into
the back of the net. We were
able to finish well."
Columbia improves to
8-4-1 with the win and will
take a week off before host-
ing the CYSA Christmas
Tournament beginning on
Dec. 27 at the CYSA fields
in Lake City.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Florida State safety Terrance Parks (4) tackles Florida's Chris Rainey (3) during a game in
Tallahassee on Nov. 27.


victories


Photos by JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
TOP: Columbia High's Conner Widergren (10) beats Fort White's Bobby Trimble (15) to the
ball in a game on Nov. 9. Widergren scored a goal in the 8-0 win against Lee High.

BOTTOM: Columbia High's Heather Rountree (5) kicks the ball to teammates after saving the
ball from out-of-bounds in a aame against Buchholz Hiah on Nov. 16.


Lady Tigers are.
dominant in 7-0
beatdown of Lee.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter. corn
Columbia High's Lady
Tigers soccer team evened
out their regular season
record as they head into
the Christmas break.
The Lady Tigers
dominated in a 7-0 win
against Robert E. Lee
High Friday at Tiger
Stadium.
Columbia built a 4-0
edge in the first half before
adding three goals in the
second half for the 7-0
final.
. Two Lady Tigers had
multiple goals in the game
as Michaela Burton and
Joanne Ortiz each found the
back of the net twice.
Haley Dicks scored off a
free kick early in the con-
test
Ruth Ruiz and Christy
Everett added Columbia's
other two goals.
'This is pretty much what
we expected to happen in
this game," Columbia
High head coach Ashley
Brown said following the
match. "We played with
a lot of intensity tonight
and we're able to finish. It
was good to see the balls
finding the back of the
bucket."
Columbia is 6-6-1 after the
win entering the Christmas
break.
The Lady Tigers will
have the week off before
returning to action
during the CYSA Christmas
Tournament on Dec. 27 and
28.


Fort White falls to Santa Fe, 68-54


Technical fouls
doom Indians
in district loss.
By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com
FORT WHITE Fort
White High played a
strong game against Santa
Fe High for three quar-
ters, but fooled and fouled
around in the fourth quar-
ter to lose 68-54 at home on
Friday.
Fort White fell to 1-7, 0-4
with the district loss. Santa
Fe is 6-3, (4-0 district).


The Raiders beat Fort
White by 33 points earlier
in the season. This time,
the Indians were within two
points with five minutes left
in the game.
However, Santa Fe scored
14 of the final 16 points,
11 were from the-free throw
line. Fort White's Wes
Osterhoudt and Donnell
Sanders were both called
for technical fouls down the
stretch.
"We had the game tied
up and gave up two techni-
cal fouls and he made all
of the free throws," Fort
White head coach Isiah


Phillips said. "I am proud
of our guys for playing with
heart and intensity. They
blew us out down there. I
am real pleased with the
effort and determination.
Santa Fe has a real good
team and we stayed with
them. We need to build
from that."
The Indians earlier lost
A.J. Legree when he fouled
out with 6:14 left to play
in the game. He had a
technical foul of his own in
the third quarter.
Jordan Talley led
Fort' White with 24
points. Legree scored 11


points.
Talley and Legree both
scored six points in the first
quarter and the Indians led
17-14 at the end of the first
period.
Talley added seven
points in the second quar-
ter and Fort White went
into intermission with a
30-28 lead.
Trey Phillips and Sanders
each scored five points,
while Raul Colon scored
four, Ousterhoudt scored
three and Dominique
Carter scored two.
C.J Wakeley, who scored
38 points against Fort


White in the first meet-
ing, had two points at
halftime. He benefited
from most of the fouls and
finished with 23 points.
Diante Davis (16), Ashton
Lee (12) and Marcus
Gaddy (10) also hit double
figures.
Fort White lost at
Newberry High, 71-58,
on Dec. 10. Talley scored
17 points in the game and
Legree scored 14.
Talley led the Indians
with 25 points in a
56-53 home loss to
Hamilton County High on
Monday.











LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SATURDAY, DECEMBER 18, 2010


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
II a.m.
ESPN2 NCAA, Division II, playoffs,
championship game, Delta St. vs. Minn.-
Duluth, at Florence,Ala.
2 p.m.
ESPN New Mexico 'Bowl, BYU vs.
UTEP, at Albuquerque, N.M.
5:30 p.m.
ESPN HUmanitarian Bowl, Northern
Illinois vs. Fresno State, at Boise, Idaho
9 p.m.
ESPN New Orleans Bowl, Ohio
vs. Troy
EXTREME SPORTS
2:30 p.m.
NBC Winter Dew Tour, Nike 6.0
Open, at Breckenridge,.Colo.
GOLF
9:30 a-m.
TGC European PGA Tour, South
African Open, third round, at Western
Cape, South Africa (same-day tape)
*MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
Noon
ESPN Southern Cal at Kansas
I p.m.
FSN Miami'vs. UCF, at Sunrise
2 p.m.
CBS Regional coverage, Stanford at
Butler or South Carolina at Ohio State
ESPN2 Arkansas vs. Texas A&M,
at Dallas
3:30 p.m.
FSN Florida vs. Kansas St., at
Sunrise
4 p.m.
CBS Texas vs. North Carolina, at
Greensboro, N.C.
ESPN2 Gonzaga vs. Baylor, at Dallas
5:30 p.m.
FSN Wooden Classic, UCLA vs.
BYU, at Anaheim, Calif.
6:30 p.m.
ESPN2 Alabama vs. Oklahoma
State, at Oklahoma City
SOCCER
7:30 a.m.
ESPN2 Premier League, Bolton at
Sunderland
WOMEN'S COLLEGE
VOLLEYBALL
8:30 p.m.
ESPN2 NCAA, Division I
tournament, championship match, Penn
State vs. California, at Kansas City, Mo.

FOOTBALL

NFL standings

AMERICAN CONFERENCE


East
W L
x-New England II 2
N.Y. Jets 9 4
Miami 7 6
Buffalo.. ... -. .3 10
South
WL T
Jacksonville 8 5
Indianapolis 7 6
Houston 5 8
Tennessee 5 8
North
W L
Pittsburgh 10 3
Baltimore 9 4
Cleveland 5 8
Cincinnati 2 I
West
W L
Kansas City 8 5
San Diego 8 6
Oakland 6 7
Denver 3 10


T Pct PF PA,
0.846 415 276
0.692 273 242
0.538225 244
0.231 256-339

Pct PF PA
0.615295 331
0.538347 318
0.385 316 355
0.385291 265

T Pct PF PA
0.769290 198
0.692 294 229
0.385 235 252
0.154262 345

T Pct PF PA
0.615295 268
0.571 388 260
0.462 314 307T
0.231269 376


NATIONAL CONFERENCE
East
W L TPct PF PA


N.Y. Giants
Philadelphia
Washington
Dallas


Atlanta
New Orleans
Tampa Bay
Carolina


Chicago
Green Bay
Minnesota
Detroit


Seattle
St. Louis
San Francisco
Arizona


9 4
9 4
5 8
4 9
South
W L
II 2
10 3
8 5
I 12
North
W L
9 4
8 5
5 8
3 10
West
W L
6 7
6 7
5 9
4 9


0.692 329 250
0.692374 308
0.385 238 310
0.308321 366

T Pct PF PA
0.846 335 243
0.769 330 240
0.615 260 267
0.077 164 338

TPct PF PA
0.692253 228
0.615306 189
0.385230 274
0.231 285 309

T Pct PF PA
0.462261 329
0.462 245 268
0.357250 314
0.308 243 351


x-clinched playoff spot
Thursday's Game
San Diego 34, San Francisco 7
Sunday's Games
Kansas City at St. Louis, I p.m.
Washington at Dallas, I p.m.
Houston at Tennessee, I p.m.
Arizona at Carolina, I p.m.
Philadelphia at N.Y. Giants, I p.m.
Detroit at Tampa Bay, I p.m.
Cleveland at Cincinnati, I p.m.
Buffalo at Miami, I p.m.
Jacksonville at Indianapolis, I p.m.
New Orleans at Baltimore, I p.m.
Atlanta at Seattle, 4:05 p.m.
Denver at Oakland, 4:15 p.m.
N.Y. Jets at Pittsburgh, 4:15 p.m.
Green Bay at New England, 8:20 p.m.
Monday's Game
Chicago at Minnesota, 8:30 p.m.
Thursday, Dec. 23
Carolina at Pittsburgh, 8:20 p.m.
Saturday, Dec. 25
Dallas at Arizona, 7:30 p.m.
Sunday, Dec. 26
Tennessee at Kansas City, I p.m.
San Francisco at St. Louis, I p.m.
N.Y.Jets at Chicago,. I p.m.
Baltimore at Cleveland, I p.m.
New England at Buffalo, I p.m.
Detroit at Miami, I p.m.
Washington at Jacksonville, I p.m.
Indianapolis at Oakland, 4:05 p.m.
Houston at Denver, 4:05 p.m.
San Diego at Cincinnati, 4:05 p.m.
N.Y. Giants at Green Bay, 4:15 p.m.
Seattle atTampa Bay, 4:15 p.m.
Minnesota at Philadelphia, 8:20 p.m.
Monday, Dec. 27
New Orleans at Atlanta, 8:30 p.m.

College bowl games

Today
New Mexico Bowl
At Albuquerque
UTEP (6-6) vs. BYU (6-6), 2 p.m.
(ESPN)
Humanitarian Bowl
At Boise, Idaho
Northern Illinois (10-3) vs. Fresno
State (8-4), 5:30 p.m. (ESPN)
New Orleis 'Bdw" -
Ohio (8-4) vs. Troy (7-5), 9 p.m.
(ESPN)

College playoffs

NCAA-FCS
Semifinals
Today
Georgia Southern (10-4) at Delaware
(1 I1-2), Noon
NCAA DIVISION II
Today
At Braly Municipal Stadium
.Florence,Ala.
Delta State (11-3) vs. Minnesota-
Duluth (14-0), I1 a.m.
NCAA DIVISION III
Amos Alonzo Stagg Bowl
Today
At Salem (Va.) Stadium


Mount Union (14-0) vs. Wisconsin-
Whitewater (14-0), 3:30 p.m.
NAIA
Championship
Today
At Barron Stadium
Rome, Ga.
Sioux Falls (13-0) vs. Carroll, Mont.
(13-0),4:30 p.m.

BASKETBALL

NBA schedule

Today's Games
Philadelphia at Orlando, 7 p.m.
Miami at Washington, 7 p.m.
NewYork at Cleveland, 7:30 p.m.
LA. Clippers at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Utah at Milwaukee, 8:30 p.m.
Memphis at San Antonio, 8:30 p.m.
Minnesota at Denver, 9 p.m.
Golden State at Portland, 10 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Indiana at Boston, I p.m.
Atlanta at New Jersey, I p.m.
LA. Lakers atToronto, I p.m.
Houston at Sacramento, 6 p.m.
New Orleans at Detroit, 6 p.m.
Phoenix at Oklahoma City, 7 p.m.

APTop 25 schedule

Today's Games
No. 2 Ohio State vs. South Carolina,
2 p.m.
No. 3 Kansas vs. Southern Cal, Noon
No. 5 Syracuse vs. Iona, 7 p.m.
No. 6 Kansas State vs. Florida
at BankAtlantic Center, Sunrise,
5:30 p.m.
No. 8 Pittsburgh vs. Maryland-Eastern
Shore, 7 p.m.
No. 9 Baylor vs. Gonzaga at American
Airlines Center, Dallas, 4:30 p.m.
No. 10 Villanova vs. Delaware,
7:30 p.m.
No. II San Diego State vs. UC Santa
Barbara, 10 p.m.
No. 12 Illinois vs. Illinois-Chicago at
the United Center, 2 p.m.
No. 13 Missouri vs. Central Arkansas
at Missouri, 8 p.m.
No. 14 Michigan State vs. Prairie View,
6:30 p.m.
No. 15 Georgetown vs. Loyola, Md.,
Noon t
No. 16 BYU vs. UCLA at the Honda
CenterAnaheim, Calif., 5:30 p.m.
No. 17 Kentucky vs. MVSU, 8 p.m.
No. 19 Purdue vs. Indiana State at
Conseco Fieldhouse, 4 p.m.
No. 20 Louisville vs. Gardner-Webb,
3:30 p.m.
No. 22 Texas vs. North Carolina at
Greensboro (N.C.) Coliseum, 4 p.m.
No. 22 UNLV vs. Southern. Utah,
10p.m.
No. 25 Texas A&M vs. Arkansas at
American Airlines Center, Dallas, 2 p.m.

.-.HOCKEY

NHL schedule

Today's Games
N.Y. Rangers at Philadelphia, I p.m.
Washington at Boston, 7 p.m.
Phoenix at N.Y. Islanders, 7 p.m.
Anaheim at Carolina, 7 p.m.
New Jersey at Atlanta, 7 p.m.
Dallas at Columbus, 7 p.m.
Toronto atVancouver, 7 p.m.
Buffalo at Tampa Bay, 7:30 p.m.
San Jose at St. Louis, 8 p.m.
Los Angeles at Nashville, 8 p.m.
Minnesota at Calgary, 10 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Washington at Ottawa, 5 p.m.
Dallas at Detroit, 5 p.m.
Los Angeles at Chicago, 7 p.m.
Montreal at Colorado, 8 p.m.


League reports
Results of Lake City Bowl league
play follow.
WATERGUARD
High scratch game: 1. Mary
Lobaugh 227; 2. Joyce Hooper 182;
3. Susie Flick 177. 1. Mark Davis 266;
2. Mark Koppa 246; 3. Tom Sewejkis
244.
High scratch series: 1. Mary
Lobaugh 571; 2. Lori Davis 487;
3. Susie Flick 448. 1. Mark Koppa
667; 2, Mark Davis 661; 3. Bill Dolly
646.
High handicap game: 1. Joyce
Hooper 232; 2. Karen Moody 229;
3. Debbie Walters 228. 1. Mark Davis
279; 2. Michael Mclnally 271; 3. Bill
Prince 268.
High handicap series: 1. Mary
Lobaugh 655; 2. Staci Greaves 631;
3. Beth Koppa 623. 1. Mark Koppa
736; 2. Bill Dolly 706; 3. Jim Lobaugh
685.
High average: 1. Mary Lobaugh
176. 1. Tom Sewejkis 197.
(results from Dec. 7)
HIT & MISS
Team standings: 1. Lucky Strikers
(42-26); 2. Legal Ladies (40-28, 579
average); 3. Spare Us (40-28, 548
average).
High handicap game: 1. Susan
Newbern 255; 2. Judy Daniels 235;
3. Susan Mears 226.
High handicap series: 1. Judy
Daniels 661; 2. Susan Newbern 652;
3. Angie Meek 615,
(results from Dec. 14)
SEXY SENIORS


BOWLING

Team standings: 1. Perky Pals
(46-22); 2. Farmers (41-27, 584
average); 3. Pink Panthers (41-27,
583 average).
High scratch game: 1. Jeanne
Sireci 201; 2. Sandra Johns 180;
3. Jeanne Sireci 167. 1. Art Joubert
211; 2. Earl Hayward 201; 2. Keith
Herbster 194.
High scratch series: 1. Jeanne
Sireci 505; 2. Sandra Johns 474;
3. Louise Atwood 438. 1. Ross
Meyers 551; 2. Art Joubert 541;
3. Rick Yates 539.
High handicap game: 1. Jeanne
Sireci 261; 2. Janet Nash 234; 3. Pat
Hale 218. 1. Keith Herbster 248; 2. Art
Joubert 237; 3. Earl Hayward 229.
High handicap series: 1. Sandra
Johns 633; 2. Barbara Croft 607;
3. Barbara Griner 604. 1. Wendel
Shay 678; 2. Ross Meyers 653;
3. Rick Yates 629.
High average: 1. Betty Brown
147.55; 2. Louise Atwood 144.6;
3. Yvonne Finley 144.55. 1. Art
Joubert 172.18; 2. Dan Ritter 168.04;
3. Earl Hayward 168.
(results from Dec. 14)
SUNDAY NITE MERCHANTS
Team standings: 1. Steam Rollers
(46-22); 2. Average Joe's (42-26);
3. Team #1 (39-29).
High scratch game: 1. Donna
Duncan 192; 2. Gloria Dennis 186;
3. Norma Yeingst 184. 1. Bill Duncan
258; 2. Bryan Taylor 255; 3. Bobby
Trunnell 248.
High scratch series: 1. Donna
Duncan 549; 2. Norma Yeingst 500;
3. Gloria Dennis 497. 1. Bill Duncan
692; 2. Robert Pond 643; 3. Carl


McGhghy 639.
(results from Dec. 12)
MONDAY NIGHT MAVERICKS
Team standings: 1. Fullhouse
(267-183); 2. Team 8 (264-186);
3. Ronsonet Buick (256-194).
High scratch game: 1. Horace
Parsons 258; 2. Bill Duncan 255;
3. John Croft III 254.
High scratch series: 1. Bill Duncan
693; 2. Tanner Wayne 672; 3. Gregg
Moravec 667.
High handicap game: 1. John
Croft III 290; 2. Horace Parsons 288;
3. Boaty Boatwright 278.
High handicap series: 1. John
Croft III 756; 2. Tanner Wayne 753;
3. Stene Madsen 725.
High average: 1. Dale Coleman
218.31; 2. Zech Strohl 214.03; 3. J.J.
Hilbert 206.88.
(results from Dec. 6)
GOLDEN ROLLERS
Team standings: 1. Gamblers
(40-20); 2. Golden Niners (38-22);
3. Wild Things (32-28).
High handicap game: 1. Joan
Carman 260; 2. Joanne Denton 244;
3. Ruth Lott 219. 1. Lee Evert 244;
2. Jack Stanfield 238; 3. George
Mulligan 230.
High handicap series: 1. Janie
Posey 658; 2. Shirley Highsmith 653;
3. Roberta Giordano 613. 1. (tie) Lee
McKinney, Bill Price 658; 3. Vernon
Black 646.
High average: 1. Shirley Highsmith
152.48; 2. Jane Sommerfeld 149.87;
3. Bea Purdy 149.13. 1. David Duncan
185.18; 2. Bill Dolly 182.73; 3. George
Mulligan 181.07.
(results from Dec. 9)


Golden putting pieces


together for Miami staff


By TIM REYNOLDS
Associated Press

CORAL GABLES Al
Golden's first wave of staff
hirings at Miami were easy.
All five worked with the
Hurricanes' new coach at
Temple.
Golden announced hir-
ings Thursday of defen-
sive coordinator Mark
D'Onofrio, defensive line
coach Jethro Franklin and
defensive backs coach
Paul Williams. They will
not begin coaching Miami
players until Jan. 1 but have
obtained permission from
the NCAA to start recruit-
ing immediately.
"I felt it was important
that they be able to hit
the. ground running and
start recruiting imme-
diately," Golden said in a
statement. "The NCAA
waiver gave us that oppor-
tunity and should be tre-


1
5

81
12

13
141


Harvin says he'll be back 16


with Vikings this week 18
9 ~03.


By DAVE CAMPBELL
Associated Press

EDEN PRAIRIE, Minn.
- Vikings receiver
Percy Harvin says he'll
"definitely" play in Monday
night's game against
Chicago.
The receiver and kick-
off returned has missed
the last two games because
of another episode with



Packers


won't


rule out


Rodgers

Associated Press


GREEN BAY, Wis. -
The Green Bay Packers
have listed quarterback
Aaron Rodgers as doubtful
to play Sunday night at New
England, a week after he
suffered his second concus-
sion of the season.
Coach Mike McCarthy,
however, said Friday the
door is open for Rodgers to
play. He is hoping to make
a decision on the starter by
Saturday.


migraine headaches, but
Harvin was back at prac-
tice Thursday and said
Friday that he's feeling'bet-
ter.
Harvin says last
week's absence was
precautionary, while doc-
tors advised waiting to see
how his body reacted to
new medication.
Harvin says he met
with interim coach Leslie




Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

ONES i


2010 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.

DUNOB




DROAFE




DIRTOR
7, 7 I I
L / i_


Frazier and team owner
Zygi Wilf to talk about his
condition and find "the best
doctor we could possibly
find."
Harvin says he visit-
ed a branch of the Mayo
Clinic in Arizona to see a
specialist who previously
treated former NFL star
Terrell Davis, who also
dealt with the condition
during his career.


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek


Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


Answer here:
(Answers Monday)
Yesterday's Jumbles: SORRY SILKY MATURE WOEFUL
I Answer: When the captain ordered crew cuts, the ship
had FEWER SAILORS


2I
22
25


mendous benefit"
In addition to the three
assistant coaches, Golden
has also hired Tom Deahn
as director of football oper-
ations and Ryan McNamee
as director of player devel-
opment, the roles they had
at Temple.
"On a personal note,
they are great friends and
coaches that I respect tre-
mendously," Golden said.
"They know the type of pro-
gram we want to run on
and off the field and
could not be more excited
about joining the proud tra-
dition at The U:"'
Golden was hired Sunday.
by the Hurricanes and com-
pleted the agreement on a
five-year contract Tuesday.
He has been recruiting and
is not expected to see his
first Miami practice until
Friday or Saturday. Interim
head coach Jeff Stoutland,
who was Miami's offensive


ACROSS 41 Practical ques-
tion
Romance 42 Less reputable
Novelist 45 45 or 78
Follett 48 Roswell crash-
Rider's shout er
Sporty 49 Kind of cat
vehicles 53 Optician's aid
Veld grazer (2 wds.)
Wine casks 56 Admirer
Processes cot- 57 Young lady of
ton Sp.
Cameos 58 Cheerful color
(2 wds.) 59 "- do for
Helena rival now"
Truck mfr. 60 Bristle with
Fleck 61 NASA
Type of twin destination
Weather term 62 Cowgirl Evans


28 Tow along
29 Exec degrees
33 Up and about
35 Milk
purchase
36 Not as rosy
37 Biceps
38 Did in the drag-
on
39 Hindu attire


DOWN


line coach, is leading the
Hurricanes through their
Dec. 31 appearance in the
Sun Bowl against Notre
Dame.
"It's a huge game for
these kids, for this pro-
gram," Stoutland said after
practice Thursday.
Golden is taking over for
Randy Shannon,. who was
fired Nov. 27 after going
28-22 in four seasons.
The hirings mean three
current Miami coaches
defensive coordina-
tor John Lovett, defensive
line coach Rick Petri and
defensive, backs coach
.Wesley McGriff. ,--' will
not be retained after the
Hurricanes face Notre
Dame in the Sun Bowl on
Dec. 31. Corey Bell, who
was the football opera-
tions director, and football
relations director Cindy
Abraham-Garcia have left
the program.


Answer to Previous Puzzle



MESH PLA Y OAR
AREA COLLAPSE
IVANHOE OBIES
GOT ONE








DWVEL A V I ANT
ORDAINED TREE


Racing sled.
Cornelia 6 Baffling thing
Skinner 7 Spice rack item
Skirt slit 8 Charleston's st.
Hairpin curves 9 Difficult
Frequent 007 10 von Bismarck
foe 11 Helper (abbr.)


17 Desktops
19 Fluffy quilt
23 Aleta's son
24 Grounded
birds
25 Pool lengths
26 hygiene
27 Ruse
30 Fugue com-
poser
31 Woody's son
32 Rabbit dish
34 Makes a
blouse
35 Like most
libraries
37 Medical pic
39 Bwana's trek
40 Delights in
43 Absent-mind-
ed murmur
44 Fanatical
45 Take a break
46 Fiery heap
47 Give out spar-
ingly
50 Phi Kappa
51 Formal dance
52 Gift-giving
tim?
54 Engine part
55 Gridiron stats


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com
S12 13 14 5 6 17 8 19 110 Il l


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


1















Grossman over McNabb


for rest of Redskins' season


By JOSEPH WHITE
Associated Press

ASHBURN, Va. -
Donovan McNabb to sec-
ond-string. Then to third-
string. Then no guarantee
that he'll be back next sea-
son.
Maybe he's no John
Elway after all.
The ever-dramatic
Washington Redskins
upset the NFL apple cart
once again Friday when
coach Mike Shanahan
announced Rex Grossman
as his starter for the rest of
the season, beginning with
Sunday's game at Dallas.
McNabb will be the No.
2 quarterback against the
Cowboys, then drop to No.
3 behind Grossman and
John Beck for the final two
games of the season.
And after that?
"I also told him,"
Shanahan said, "that I can-
not guarantee him that he
will be back next year."
That's how far the 34-
year-old, six-time Pro Bowl
* quarterback has fallen. The
player acquired with such
, fanfare in an April trade
the quarterback who
would do for Shanahan in
Washington what Elway
did for him in Denver -
is benched in a season in
which he has been ivoe-
fully inconsistent, throwing
a career-high 15 intercep-
Stions and ranking 25th in
the NFL with a 77.1 rating.
Asked if getting McNabb
was a mistake, Shanahan
said: "I think there's a lot
of mistakes that you make.
You really don't know if
you made a mistake, but
if you do make one, you
make it and you go on.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Oct. 31 file photo, Washington Redskins
quarterback Donovan McNabb stands on the sidelines
after being benched during the fourth quarter against the
Detroit Lions, in Detroit. A person with knowledge of the
situation says .the Redskins plan to start Rex Grossman at
quarterback over McNabb on Sunday, against the Dallas
Cowboys.


What I want to do is evalu-
ate where we're at the end
of the season, then I will
tell you if we erred or not."
McNabb's performance
has the coach leaving all
options open at the team's
most important position for
2011. Shanahan said he had
been planning to make the
move after the Redskins
(5-8) were mathematically
eliminated from the play-
offs, which happened last
weekend after a 17-16 loss
to Tampa Bay.
"I've got to find where


Rex Grossman is, where
John Beck is. I want a
chance to evaluate these
guys," Shanahan said., "I
told Donovan that there's
nothing he could do in the
three games that would
influence me over what
he's done over the last 13
games. I said, 'I'm not sure
what I'm going to do in the
college draft, if we're able
to get the top quarterback
in the draft, if there was a
young Donovan McNabb
or maybe a Sam Bradford,
someone like that.' There's


a lot of possibilities."
McNabb did not com-
ment Friday, saying "No!
No! No!" to reporters as
he entered Redskins Park
after practice. McNabb's
wife abruptly canceled a
scheduled interview with
The Associated Press in
which she planned to pro-
mote a charity event involv-
ing NFL wives.
Grossman did speak,
however, and he's aware
that fans and pundits
nationwide are ridiculing
his promotion. He wants to
shut his critics up.
"I think everybody has
doubters," said Grossman,
who led Chicago to a Super
Bowl during the 2006 sea-
son but has thrown 33
touchdown passes and 36
interceptions in 31 career
starts. "And any situation,
until you prove yourself on
a consistent basis, you're
always going to have doubt-
ers, no matter what profes-
sion you're in. It's moti-
vation. I'm human. How
could you not be motivated
to show everybody who's
mocking this, or talking on
the radio or TV thinking
they're smart?
"I'm totally motivated to
go out and prove not only
to them but myself and my
teammates that I'm a bona
fide starter in this league
and can lead this team to a
championship one day."
McNabb was benched
only once in 11 years with
Philadelphia, and he's
already doubled that total
with the Redskins in less
than one season. Shanahan
infamously yanked
McNabb for Grossman
in the final two minutes
against Detroit in October.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Sept. 10 file photo, boxer Floyd Mayweather Jr., leaves
the Clark County Detention Center, in Las Vegas.

Mayweather jailed, freed

in Las Vegas battery case


By KEN RITTER
Associated Press

LAS VEGAS Floyd
Mayweather Jr. spent a
night in a Las Vegas jail
before his release Friday
on a misdemeanor battery
warrant stemming from an
allegation that the boxer
poked a security guard in
the face last month outside
his home.
The second arrest in
three months for the unde-
feated prizefighter drew
allegations from his lawyer
that police and prosecu-
tors overreacted to a minor
criminal accusation and that
the 33-year-old Mayweather
was getting "unequal puni-
tive exaggerated treat-
ment."
"This is a misdemeanor,"
attorney Richard Wright
told The Associated Press.


He noted that police usually
write a ticket for a misde-
meanor, or issue a court
summons at the jail.
Wright accused District
Attorney David Rogei of
"going out of his way to
treat (Mayweather) differ-
ently than anyone elsQ'.'
Roger didn't immediately
respond to messages seek-
ing comment
Mayweather was arrest-
ed just before midnight
Thursday -at the posh
Bellagio resort on the Las
Vegas Strip and booked
early Friday .into the Clark
County jail without bail.
Police initially said the
boxer might remain in jail
pending a ILonday court
date. But defense attorney
Karen Winckler intervened,
and Mayweather was freed
less than 12 hours after his
arrest.


BOWLS: Football games begin today


Continued From Page 11

won't come to Las Vegas
sulking. ... BOISE STATE
42-21.
THURSDAY
Poinsettia Bowl
San Diego State
(minus 6) vs. Navy
Aztecs are home, have
time to prepare for triple-
option, but it's never easy
vs. Middies. ... SDSU 30-
28.
FRIDAY
Hawaii Bowl
No. 24 Hawaii (minus
10%l) vs. Tulsa
Golden Hurricane own
119th-ranked pass defense
in nation.... HAWAII 55-35.
; SUNDAY
Little Caesars Pizza
SBowl
Toledo (minus 11) vs.
SFlorida International
Rockets score one for
SMAC over Sun Belters.
Player to watch: Toledo
WR Eric Page. ... TOLEDO
31-17.
MONDAY, DEC. 29
Independence Bowl
Georgia Tech (plus 3)
vs. Air Force
Triple-option every-
where. Teams combine for
645 yards on ground per
game. ... GEORGIA TECH
28-21.
TUESDAY, DEC. 28
Champs Sports Bowl
North Carolina State
(plus 21) vs. No. 22
West Virginia
Underrated QB match-
up: Wolfpack's Russell
Wilson vs. Mountaineers'
Geno Smith. ... WVU 27-
21.
INSIGHT BOWL
No. 14 Missouri
(minus 1') vs. Iowa
Hawkeyes seem
like team in turmoil ...
MISSOURI 24-14.
WEDNESDAY, DEC. 29
Military Bowl
East Carolina (plus 7)
vs. Maryland
Terps and WR Torrey
Smith should feast on
nation's worst defense ...
MARYLAND 42-28.
Texas Bowl
Baylor (minus 112) vs.
Illinois
Two teams that fizzled
late. Bears had only one


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Florida State's Taiwan Easterling (8) runs into the end zone
for a touchdown against Florida Nov. 27.


win against winning team.
... ILLINOIS 41-27.
Alamo Bowl
Arizona (plus .5/2) vs.
No. 16 Oklahoma State
Last team with the ball
wins? ... OKLAHOMA
STATE 42-38.
THURSDAY, DEC. 30
Armed Forces Bowl
SMU (minus 8) vs.
Army
Cadets pass defense has
been solid, 24th in nation,
but SMU out of their
league. ... SMU 35-17.
Pinstripe Bowl
Syracuse (pick) vs.
Kansas State
Long-range forecast:
High of 40 degrees, low of
28. :... SYRACUSE 24-21.
Music City Bowl
North Carolina (minus
2) vs. Tennessee
Vols psyched just to be
playing; Tar Heels' sea-
son has been a mess ...
TENNESSEE 24-21.
Holiday Bowl
No. 17 Nebraska
(minus 14) vs.
Washington
Remember when they
played in regular season


and Huskers ran wild?
Same deal. ... NEBRASKA
42-21.
FRIDAY, DEC. 31
Meineke Bowl
Clemson (minus 5)
vs. South Florida
Talented but enigmatic
Tigers trying to avoid los-
ing season. ... CLEMSON
24-10.
UPSET SPECIAL
Sun Bowl
Notre Dame (plus 4)
vs. Miami
It's a long way from the
glory days of the rivalry,
but still a neat matchup ...
NOTRE DAME 24-17.
Liberty Bowl
Georgia (minus 6/2)
vs. UCF
Knights won 10 games,
one against a winning team
(7-6 SMU). ... GEORGIA
27-17.
Chick-fil-A Bowl
No. 19 South Carolina
(minus 3) vs. No. 23
Florida State
Jimbo Fisher can put
a topper on first season
by beating former 'Noles
nemesis Steve Spurrier....
FSU 28-24.


F -
ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Dec. 12 file photo, New Orleans Saints' quarterback Drew Brees (9) signals in the
second half against the St. Louis Rams, at the Louisiana Superdome in New Orleans.


Brees is the APs Male


Athlete of the Year


By BRETT MARTEL
Associated Press

NEW ORLEANS Drew
Brees has New Orleans
swinging, singing and
trumpeting their Saints like
never before.
When the Rebirth Brass
Band tears it up during one
of their late night shows at
a funky old neighborhood
bar, the tin-walled place
bounces to a drum beat and
a tuba's bass line.
Their song goes like this:
"We used to say 'Who dat'
since way back when / Now
we're saying 'We dat' every
time we win / You can write
it down, take a picture, tell a
friend / We already done it.
We're gonna do it again."
Brees is a big reason
New Orleanians can smile
and boast. Not only did the
reigning Super Bowl MVP
turn around the Saints'
football fortunes and bring
the city its first NFL cham-
pionship in February, he's
become a civic leader as his
adoptive hometown recov-
ers from a time of turmoil
and suffering.
That record of accom-
plishment is why the down-
to-earth quarterback was
voted the 2010 Male Athlete
of the Year, chosen by


members of The Associated
Press.
There were 176 ballots
submitted from U.S. news
organizations that make up
theAP's membership. Brees
received 48 votes, while the
2009 AP Male Athlete of the
Year, NASCAR champion
Jimmie Johnson, finished
second with 31. Boxer
Manny Pacquiao was third
with 21 votes, followed
by Philadelphia Phillies
pitcher Roy Halladay with
17. Philadelphia Eagles
quarterback Michael
Vick, a comeback story
himself, rounded out the
top five vote-getters with
10.
"I've always tried to visu-
alize myself in that position
of being considered one of
the best and winning cham-
pionships," said Brees, who
won his first title in his ninth
NFL season. "Certainly the
way you're perceived, the
way people talk about you,
the kind of category they
put you in that stuff
changes and it's flattering,
certainly humbling."
Brees is only the fourth
quarterback to receive
the honor in the past four
decades, along with the
Patriots' Tom Brady in 2007,
the 49ers' Joe Montana


in 1989 and 1990, and the
Raiders' George Blanda in
19.70.
The place Brees finds
himself now is even more
remarkable when you con-
sider that he came to New
Orleans having been uncer-
emoniously discarded by
the San Diego Chargers
after a career-threaten-
ing injury to his throwing-
shoulder. New Orleans was
at its nadir in the aftermath
of Hurricane Katrina, the
Saints needed a lift and
their new, undersized quar-
terback was looking for a
second chance.
Brees embraces the
chance to talk about those
moments, because in his
mind, they are linked with
the success that followed.
"I believe that 100 per-
cent. New Orleans is the
last place I ever thought
I'd be," Brees said. "The
Saints organization and
team didn't have that great
a reputation prior to (2006)
and so it was probably not
the most attractive place
for anybody to come. Then
right after the storm, the
city's destroyed and every-
body's displaced and I look
back on those times and
it was like we were really
starting over."


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SATURDAY, DECEMBER 18, 2010


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420











B LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS SATURDAY, DECEMBER 18, 2010 Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415


DILBERT


BABY BLUES


41Thl'N, MINE,
ITe Ofr UNS

Bwel- foO
FT 5 '^S II


BLONDIE


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGAR THE HORRIBLE


DEAR ABBY: I'm a se-
nior in high school and I have
a problem. I'm in a parasitic
relationship. A boy at my
school, "Dan," believes him-
! 9 self to be my best friend. It
t is sad because everyone acts
as if he is invisible. I noticed
that he was an outcast and
went out of my way to be kind
3 to him. He latched onto me
and now follows me around
at school.
I have a boyfriend who
-- is really concerned, but nei-
ther of us knows how to ap-
proach this. Dan calls me at
r" ONE home and always asks if we
can hang out "as friends." (I
keep coming up with excuses
to avoid it) Dan is a nice guy,
but this has been going on for
I two years and his attachment
has only increased. I have no
j idea how to let him know our
"friendship" has become too
Ii suffocating for me. Please
help. OVERWHELMED
IN OHIO
DEAR OVER-
WHELMED: Because he has
been excluded by everyone
else at school, it's not surpris-
ing that Dan is emotionally
go dependent on you. However,
you have a boyfriend, your
studies and a social life, and
you need to explain that to
Dan when he asks to "hang
out" Those aren't excuses;
they are facts. Say it kindly
aim but firmly, and do not be de-
ef"n fensive. If he persists, talk to.
a counselor at school.


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearabby.com
In a few months high
school will be over and Dan
can move on and start build-
ing a life. Many successful
adults Weren't popular in high
school. Perhaps when he
thinks back, Dan will remem-
ber you as the one bright spot
in a miserable experience.
DEAR ABBY: When I
was a little girl, my family's
idea of celebrating Christmas
was opening some presents
and renting a movie. I'm 15
now, and my parents barely
acknowledge the holiday.
Last, year on Christmas
Day, my mother slept until
after noon, then handed me
$100. Dad did the same. I was
grateful for the money, but a
little hurt that they put no ef-
fort into buying gifts.
I am tired of trying to think
up thoughtful gifts while all I
get is a check handed to me
without so much as a "Merry
Christmas." Would I sound
ungrateful if I asked my
parents to put a little more
thought into celebrating the
holidays this year? NOT
SO JOLLY CHRISTMAS
DEAR NOT SO JOLLY:


Yes, you would. You might
get a better result if you sim-
ply told your parents that you
miss celebrating the holidays
with them the way you have
in the past,'and ask them why
things have changed. I'm sure
you will -find their answer to
be enlightening.
DEAR ABBY: I know the
holidays can be a stressful
time of year and even more
sol when there has been a
death in someone's family.
When a friend or fam-
ily member loses a loved
one, such as a child or close
friend, what is the proper
etiquette regarding gifts you
may have sent or have sitting
under the tree? What should
the bereaved family do with
the gifts? I must admit, I am
curious especially being a
member of the armed forces.
- MARIE IN CANADA
DEAR MARIE: If you are
asking whether the gift(s)
should be returned to the
sender, I am sure the griev-
ing family (or close friend)
will have other things to think
about that take precedence.
Once a gift is sent, it should be
up to the surviving relatives
to decide whether to keep it
or dispose of it whether
by donating it, selling it or re-
turning it to the sender.

* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-
April 19): Don't let change
throw you off your game.
Listen to what's being said
but don't take it to heart.
Use your past experience,
to carry you through any
problems you face. Your
stamina and intuition are
strong. ***
TAURUS (April 20-
May 20): Share thoughts
and be affectionate with the
ones you love. Short trips
or attending a social gath-
ering will remind you what
life is all about The more
you reveal about your feel-
ings, the deeper your rela-
tionships with others will
grow. ***
GEMINI (May 21-
June 20): Make a com-
mitment to someone you
care for. Get serious about
taking care of your health
and your finances. Think-
ing you must do something
on too big a scale will stand
in the way of your progress.

CANCER (June 21-
July 22): Plan for the
future; there is plenty to
consider. Don't make an
impulsive move. Weigh all
the pros and cons and you
will eventually come to the
right decision. Love is on
the rise. ****
LEO (July 23-Aug.
22): Do your best to help
others even if they aren't


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

appreciative. A problem at
home will surface if you
h'"h'tpaitd enough atten-
. tio to your family or lover.
Overspending, overindulg-
ing and overdoing will all be
met with complaints. **
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): You may be faced with
unexpected personal or
partnership changes. Keep
a poker face and go about
your business.' Remaining
calm and not taking action
will save the day. A good
friend will help you see
through any manipulation
you face. *****
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): Take a breather from
the people you are usually
with. You need a little "me"
time. Don't let someone you
love talk you into spending
on something you don't
want or putting money into
an investment you know
little about ***
SCORPIO (Oct 23-
Nov. 21): You will be en-
tertaining and will draw
interest and attention to
your ideas and plans for
the future. Your mysterious
way of presenting what you
have to offer will intrigue
someone who has plenty to
offer in return. Love is in
the stars. ***
SAGITTARIUS (Nov.


22-Dec. 21): You may be
feeling the need to move on
but, if you jump too quickly,
you will lose out financially.
Someone you care for will
find time to give you some-
thing special that will help
you get through any trou-
bled times you face. ***
CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): Spend more
time at home with family
and friends. Making inqui-
ries about property that
interests you will pay off.
Someone from your past
will surprise you. Be care-
ful not to fall into an old
trap. *****
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Emotions will
be hard to control when
you are around people you
feel are judging you. Don't
let on how you feel. You
should do what you can to
help someone who honestly
needs your assistance and
understands your needs.
Don't put up with emotional
blackmail. **
PISCES (Feb. 19-
March 20): Don't make
a decision that will affect
your job or your personal
status. Keeping secrets will
pay off. A greater interest
in someone who can com-
plement you professionally
or personally will develop,
but that doesn't mean you
should share your inten-
tions. ****


CELEBRITY CIPHER

by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: L equals B
"RT V 0 OUOID WTSI TA RWO. CHMWR
BZX XBIF HP B VHIBECO, OUOI D
ESLHE HZEW TA PJBEO HP B


V HI B E CO."


- YBCR YW H RVB Z


PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "I try to believe like I believed when I was five... when
your heart tells you everything you need to know." Lucy Liu
(c) 2010 by NEA, Inc. 12-18


FOR BETTER OR WORSE


DEAR ABBY


Girl feels like hanging up

when boy calls to hang out


SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS


GARFIELD


B.C.


FRANK & ERNEST


l


CLASSIC PEANUTS











Classified Department: 755-5440


IHBUYI


SELLhi


FIND I---11^


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SATURDAY, DECEMBER 18, 2010

Lake City Reporter





CLASSIFIED


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

755-5440


- ADvantage


4 lines 6 days national
Rate applies to private Individuals selling



personal merchandise totalling $500 or less.
Each item must Includeaprice
This is a non-refundable rate.













4 ns 6 Eachadditional
y line $1.15


One Item per ad ,0
4 lines 6 days h tional
Rate applies to private Individuals selling
person mechandisetotalling $500 or less.
Each Item must inclu ac pie.
This Is a non-refundable rate.









ad fo days inea tional
This isp a nop-refedtolae athe
One item per ad in 6 |








14 lines 6 dayswl r re 1a
Rate appes to private individuals selling
pera merchandise toallg $000oress.
Each item must include a price







This is a non-refundable rate.













One Item per ad di tn
4 lines 6 days |aadtn
Rate appiie to pRivarte I ndividr s Ing







personal mehandise tota or less.
r Each o item mot Include a price
This Is a non-refundable rate.














4 lines 6 days t










l :clades 2 Signs lakecityre-



LimRaite appes to service type advertis-

4 lines, one month.... $92.00
$10.80 ea merchaddis total line $4000 ess
Includes an additional $2.Op per













Tad f or each Wednes.day insertfon.



You can call us at 755-5440,
Monday through Friday from 8:00
a.m. to 5:00Item per ad.m.
Some peoples to private ito place their
Wpersl mechanise totoing for onl


























classified ads inoreerson, and some


East Duval Street.

copyLimited to the e porte advertis-
4 lines, one month....92.0ease
direct your copy to the Classifiedc
$10.80 each adrtmenditional line
EMncludes lan additioneds@al akeityre-








Wead fonesr each Wednesday insertion.
ThYou can ca Well 10:00 us at 755-5440,
FrMonday t hrough Friday from 8.m. s.,:00a.m.
Sunday. to 5 :00 p.m. Fr.,9:00a.m.
Some deadlines arefsubjetr to plachange without notieir


ad categories will require prepay-ns













Easdt DuvErrors- Please read your adet.
You can also fax or mail your ad














copy to the harge for the ad spacer.
nFAX: 386-752-9error. Please call 755-5440
direct your copy to the Classifiedorrec-













tion and billiment.
Cancellations Normal advertising
EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityre-e n
bportercomhe for o b



cAd is oi A ypea Call by: FabEmail by:
Tuesday Mo n., 1:a.m. Mon.,t :0a.mert .


F dicy ti ors,,I a.m. Flurrs., 9: ta.m.
Saplurday Fhi., 1: b liam. fr. 9: am.
These deadline ore subfcct ti change wittrot rotice




Ad Errors- Pleaseread your ad











aon th e first day of publication.
We accept responsibi for lity feor only
the first incorrect insertion, and
only the charge for the ad space












special error conPlease cquential damages.755-5440

Canellatising language must complying
with Federal, State or locallawstion.

requigarding the prohibition of discrimi-
nacredit limits, your call will be trans-
ferredpublic accommodauntions. Standepart-










public accommodations. Standard


abbreviations are acceptable; how-
ever, the first word of each ad may
not be abbreviated.

Ill Print and Online
www.Itkecityreporter.com


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND
FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO: 10-674-CA
DIVISION
BRIGHT VISION INVESTMENTS,
LLC, etc.,
Plaintiff,
EUGENE ALBRIGHT, et al.,
Defendants
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO:
Joe Persons, Trustee of Marion C.
Persons Living Trust
Last Known Address
P.O. Box 808
Lake City, Florida 32056
Richard A. Lozano
Last Known Address
788 S. Marion Ave.
Lake City, Florida 32025
Plymouth Park Tax Services, LLC
Last Known Address
35 Airport Road
Morristown, NJ 07960
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action
to foreclose a mortgage on the fol-
lowing property in Columbia Coun-
ty, Florida: Sect 00 Twn 00 Rng 00
Parcel Number 14130-000
S Div: Lots 10 &11 Block 4 Baya
S/D, Block 325, ORB 504-419, 785-
808,921-1319
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to it on
Lance Paul Cohen, the Plaintiff's at-
torney, whose address is Cohen &
Thurston, PA., 1723 Blanding Bou-
levard, Suite 102, Jacksonville, Flor-
ida 32210, within thirty (30) days
from the original with the Clerk of
this Court wither before service on
the Plaintiff's attorney or immediate-
ly thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or peti-
tion.
DATED on this 9th day of Decem-
ber, 2010.
P. DEWITr CASON
CLERK OF THE COURT
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
By:/s/ B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
Lance Paul Cohen, Esquire
COHEN & THURSTON, P.A.
1723 Blanding Boulevard, suite 102
Jacksonville, Florida 32210
(904)388-6500
Attorney for Plaintiff
04542703
December 18, 25, 2010

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
IN AND FOR COLUMBIA COUN-
TY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 10-112-CA
RBC BANK (USA),
Plaintiff,
v.
SOUTHEAST DEVELOPERS'
GROUP, INC., a Florida corpora-
tion; DAVID W. BLANK, an' indi-
vidual; TREVOR W. BLANK, an in-
dividual; JOSHUA A. NICKEL-
SON, an individual; JACOB KIRSH,
an individual; TRINITY MATERI-
ALS, LLC, successor by merger with
ANDERSON MATERIAL CO.,
INC., a Florida limited liability com-
pany; and A&B WELL DRILLING,
INC., a Florida corporation,
Defendants.
AMENDED NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
pursuant to a Final Judgment as to
Foreclosure rendered on October 27,
2010, in that certain cause pending in
the Circuit Court in and for Colum-
bia County, Florida, wherein RBC
BANK (USA) is the Plaintiff, and
granted against the Defendants,
SOUTHEAST. DEVELOPERS
GROUP, INC., a Florida corpora-
tion; TRINITY MATERIALS, LLC,
SUCCESSOR by merger with AN-
DERSON MATERIAL CO., INC., a
Florida limited liability company,
and A&B WELL DRILLING, INC,
a Florida corporation, in Case No.
2010-112-CA, P. DeWitt .Cason,
Clerk of the Court of the aforesaid
Court, will at 11:00 a.m., on January
12th, 2011, offer for sale and sell to
the highest and best bidder for cash
at the Columbia County Courthouse,,
173 N.E. Hernando Avenue, Third
Floor, Lake City, Florida 32055, the
following described real and person-
al property, situate and being in Co-
lumbia County, Florida to-wit:
REAL PROPERTY DESCRIP-
TION: SEE ATTACHED EXHIBIT
"A"
REAL PROPERTY DESCRIPTION
Lot 32 of Rolling Meadows, a subdi-
vision according to the plat thereof
as recorded in Plat Book 8, Pages 45
and 46, of the Public Records of Co-
lumbia County Florida.
The W 220 Ft of S 1/2 of SE 1/4 of
NW 1/4 & the W 220 Ft of S 1/2 of
N 1/2 of SE 1/4 of NW 1/4.
Lot 57 of Rolling Meadows, a subdi-
vision according to the plat thereof
as recorded in Plat Book 8, Pages 45
and 46, of the Public records of Co-
lumbia County, Florida.
Lot 58 of Rolling Meadows, a subdi-
vision according to the plat thereof
as recorded in Plat Book 8, Pages 45
and 46, of the Public Records of Co-
lumbia County Florida.
EXHIBIT "A"
PERSONAL PROPERTY DE-
SCRIPTION:
SEE ATTACHED EXHIBIT "B"
PERSONAL PROPERTY DE-
SCRIPTION
All right, title and interest of Debtor
in and to the following described real








Home Improvements

Carpentry, remodeling, paint,
repairs, additions, Lic. & Ins.
Since 1978 FREE estimates
386-497-3219 or 954-649-1037

Pool Maintenance


Legal

and other property, together with all
substitutions for all replacements, re-
versions and remainders of such
property and all appurtenances and
additions thereto, whether now
owned or hereafter acquired by
Debtor (collectively, the "Property"):
(a) All of the land in the County of
Columbia, Florida described below
(the "Land"):
Lot 32 of Rolling Meadows, a subdi-
vision according to the plat .thereof
as recorded in Plat Book 8, Pages 45
and 46, of the Public Records of Co-
lumbia County Florida.
The W 220 Ft of S 1/2 of SE 1/4 of
NW 1/4 & the W 220 Ft of S 1/2 of
N 1/2 of SE 1/4 of NW 1/4.
Lot 57 of Rolling Meadows, a subdi-
vision according to the plat thereof
as recorded in Plat Book 8, Pages 45
and 46, of the Public Records of Co-
lumbia County Florida.
Lot 58 of Rolling Meadows, a subdi-
vision according to the plat thereof
as recorded in Plat BOok 8, Pages 45
and 46, of the Public Records of Co-
lumbia County Florida. I
together with all the improvements
now or hereafter erected on the Land
and all fixtures now or hereafter at-
tached thereto, together with each
and every tenements, hereditaments,
easements, rights, powers, privileges,
immunities and appurtenances here-
unto belonging or in anywise apper-
taining and the reversion and rever-
sions, remainder and remainders, and
also all the estate, right, title, interest,
homestead, right of dower, separate
estate, property, possession and
claim whatsoever in law as well as in
equity of Debtor of, in and to the
same in every part and parcel thereof
unto secured Party in fee simple;
(b) Together with a security interest
in all personal property, excluding
household goods, which are not pur-
chased with the proceeds of the
Note, and fixtures affixed to or lo-
cated on the Land;
(c) Together with and a perfected se-
curity interest in all rents, leases, re-
ceivables, issues, profits, revenue, in-
come proceeds, contract rights, and
other benefits from the property de-
scribed in Paragraph (a) hereof to be
applied to the indebtedness secured
hereby, provided however, that per-
mission is hereby given to Debtor so
long as no default has occurred here-
under, to collect, receive, and use
such benefits from the property as
they become due and payable, but
not in advance thereof;
(d) All insurance policies and pro-
ceeds thereof and all condemnation
proceeds, awards, damages, and
claims relating to or derived from the
Land;
(e) Everything referred to in Para-
graph (a), (b), (c), and (d) hereof and
any additional property hereafter ac-
quired by Debtor and' subject to the
lien of the Mortgage or any part of
these properties is herein referred to
as the "Mortgage Property."
EXHIBIT "B"
Said sale will be made pursuant to
and in order to satisfy the terms of
said Final Judgment as to Foreclo-
sure.
Any person claiming an interest in
the surplus from the sale, if any, oth-
er than the property owner as of the
date of the lis pendens must file a
claim within 60 days after the sale.
DATED this 28 day of October,
2010.
P. DeWitt Cason
Clerk of the Court
By:/s/ B. Scippio
As -Deputy Clerk
NOTICE-AMERICANS WITH DIS-
ABILITIES ACT OF 1990 ADMIN-
ISTRATIVE ORDER NO. 93-37
IF YOU ARE A PERSON WITH A
DISABILITY WHO NEEDS ANY
ACCOMMODATION IN ORDER
TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PRO-
CEEDING, YOU ARE ENTITLED,
AT NO COST TO YOU, TO THE
PROVISION OF CERTAIN ASSIS-
TANCE. PLEASE CONTACT ADA
COORDINATOR, 173 NE HER-
NANDO AVENUE, ROOM 408,
LAKE CITY, FLORIDA 32055,
(386)719-7428, AT LEAST 7 DAYS
BEFORE YOUR SCHEDULED
COURT APPEARANCE, OR IM-
MEDIATELY UPON RECEIVING
THIS NOTIFICATION IF THE
TIME BEFORE THE SCHEDULED
APPEARANCE IS LESS THAN 7
DAYS; IF YOU ARE HEARING
OR VOICE IMPAIRED, CALL 711.
04542682
December 18, 25, 2010



010 Announcements








The Truth
Some people fall short
of one thing in life, Integrity.
Martin Riero


070 Rewards

LOST DOGS: Black Labrador
Retriever and Black and White
Boston Terrier in Hwy 245-A area,
REWARD! 386-365-1946


100 Opportunities

04542450
CDL A OPERATORS-
Leading Fresh/Frozen Company
is hiring Lease Operators!!
No New England States
100% Fuel Surcharge,
Health and Life Insurance


100 Job
100 'Opportunities

04542623
The Columbia County Sheriff's
Office is accepting applications
for the following position:
INFORMATION SYSTEM
ADMINISTRATOR
Application deadline is 5:00
PM, December 22, 2010.
Associate's Degree required
with preferred Major(s) in
Computer Science, Data
Processing, or related field.
Five years experience in
network management and PC
maintenance. Hardware and
software experience required.
Windows Server Operating
System required. Experience
with Database and Web based
applications connectivity and
operating systems, token-ring
and Ethernet preferred.
Bachelors Degree may
substitute for three years
experience. Applications may be
obtained at the Columbia
County Sheriff's Office
Operations Center at 4917 East
U.S. Hwy. 90 or on-line at
www.columbiasheriff.com.
The C.C.S.O. is an
EEO .Employer

04542689
FANTASTIC
OPPORTUNITY
Housekeeping position
Part/full time. Great working
environment. MUST have strong
work ethic and be dependable.
Must be a Professional team
player. Ability to work a flexible
schedule including weekends and
holidays a must. Experience
preferred but not required. Apply
in person at Comfort Suites
located 3690 W US Hwy 90,
Lake City. Please do not call
regarding application.

04542705
Experienced
Sales Person
Excellent starting D'ET A
pay/Great Benefits. pr.TLS
Paid training. Send resume to or
apply in person at: 536 SE Baya
Drive, Lake City 32025
or fax resume to: 386-752-0171
or e-mail to: fjobs@flapest.com
M/F, EOE, DFWP, H, V

05524564
S & S Food Stores
(Food Service Only) *
Accepting applications
Part-Time/Full-Time/
Management
Our Food Service is
growing & we offer the
opportunity for advancement.
Benefits available for
Full-Time employees
(Health, dental & life
insurance, vacation, sick leave)
Apply in person at the
S & S Office:
134 SE Colburn Ave.
Lake City, FL 32025
NO PHONE CALLS DRUG-
FREE WORKPLACE

05524634
CUSTOMER SERVICE
REPRESENTATIVE
Fast Paced Call Center looking
for outgoing, positive candidate
bi-lingual a plus,basic computer
experience needed
Send Resume to: Joey Kitaif;
P.O. Box 3116
Lake City, FL 32056.

EXECUTIVE BOOKKEEPER
Multi-company high volume office
Must be expert w/ QuickBooks
/MS Office & multi-tasking.
Apply at jobs.jtbmedia.com

Mechanic needed for Truck shop,
must have own tools, apply
Southern Specialized, 1812 NW
Main Blvd., 386-752-9754

Subway is now hiring.
Management Experience a plus.
Send resumes to:
lakecitymanager@yahoo.com

120 Medical
A Employment

05523790
Medical Assistant,
Exp only need apply! Looking
for qualified indiv., quick learn-
er, good personality,dependable
Fax resume to: Cheryl
386-754-3657 or email to:
office manager@
primarycaremedic.com

05524555

Medical Personnel

LPN
Needed for Correction &
Mental Health Facilities, top
pay, instant pay, sign on bonus,
877-630-6988

05524650
LEARN TO DRAW BLOOD
Local Phlebotomy Course
offered in Lake City, FLA
Certificate program.
(904)566-1328

Wanted Receptionist,
experienced. Send resume to
826 SW Main Blvd. Suite 102.
Lake City, FL. 32025


130 Part Time


Janitorial, seeking couple for P/T
evening work, must have reliable
transportation, clean background
and ref's 386-752-2147


140 Work Wanted

NEED A CAREGIVER? I am a
Compassionate, private duty sitter
I will care for elderly or disabled
persons. Reasonable rates and
references available, Ruth
435-469-1237 or 386-454-8697

240 Schools &
240 Education

04542575
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-12/13/10

Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-01/17/11

Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com



310 Pets & Supplies

BEAGLE RABBIT DOG.
$175. Runs Good, Male
386-249-3104 or
386-719-4802

Chocolate Lab
$300, AKC
Female 7 months old
386-965-2231
Mini-Dachshunds, toy poodles,
Yorkie-Poos. Males & Females of
each. Shih-tzu female. Ashleys Pet
Palace. 386-755-8668 Health Certs
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.

3 0 Livestock &
330 Supplies

Christmas Pony
Mini Mare, Paint
5 yrs old $400
tack included 386-965-2231

Pigs for sale
6 weeks old
$50 each HURRY!
386-965-2215

361 Farm Equipment

84 Ford 4610 Tractor. Runs good.
Solid 2WD. New front tires,
350hr on 2005 motor. Dependable.
$7500. obo. 386-867-0005


401 Antiques


ANTIQUES WANTED
Fum., China, Silver, Glassware,
Costume Jewelry & Gold. 35 years
exp. Cash Pd. Pete. 386-963-2621


402 Appliances

KENMORE WASHER/DRYER.
Runs and looks good.
$175.00 for both.
386-965-0778


407 Computers

Dell computer tower
$80. firm
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170


408 Furniture

Ashley Furniture Living Room set,
includes 2 oversized sofa's & table
Dura-Pella fabric, dark green,
exc cond $500 386-288-4690

Sofa Sleeper, double bed, beige
floral pattern, excellent condition
$100
386-935-0654


420 Wanted to Buy.

K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.

Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$225 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.
WANTED: Copies of newspaper
Columbia Gazette from
1920s and 1930s. Will buy.
512-751-4489 talter3(a@uic.edu


430 Garage Sales

MOVING SALE. Sat. Only.
West on 90, 3.4 mi from 1-75, to
427 SW Arbor Ln. Furniture,
household junque and much more.

Moving Sale Fri & Sat 8-? Ellis-
ville, by the Pecan house. 395
Rolling Hills Dr 42" TV,freezer,
Hshold &more! 813-477-9503






PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.


430 Garage Sales

Sat &Sun, 9-4, appliances, elec-
tronics & more! 225 S.W. Wise
Dr., CR242 between 47 & Sisters
Welcome follow signs


440 Miscellaneous

Tow Behind Grill/Smoker. Com-
mercial built, nice shape. $1250.
obo. 386-249-3104 or 719-4802
Great Christmas gift for hubby.

White Wardrobe. Vinyl/veneer
finish. 36W X 20D X 72H
Like new $50
386-935-0654

450 Good Things
450 to Eat

The Nut Cracker
Buy and sell, crack & shell pecans
2738 CR 252 W, Lake City 32024
Pinemount Rd/CR 252/Taylorville
Robert Taylor 386-963-4138
or 386-961-1420

Mobile Homes
630 for Rent
2&3 Bedroom Mobile homes.
$395 $650. mo. plus deposit.
Water & sewer furnished.
Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422

2/2 S/W beautiful, clean freshly
painted, near college, 1 acre,
big front porch $650 mo, avail 1/1
386-697-1013 or 386-697-1900

2/2, S/W, 1 acre secluded lot
Bascom Norris Bypass, $500 dep,
$500 mo, possible owner finance
386-623-2203 or 386-623-5410

2BR/2BA MH CH/A,
Fenced in back yard and Shed.
$750. mo plus deposit.
Pets OK! 386-755-4157

3 bd/3 bth MH, on approx 1 acre
of private property, 5 miles out
Pinemount Rd., $600 mon + dep,
call Debi 352-317-0995

3BR/1.5 BA
Unfurnished Mobile Home.
No pets!
386-755-0142

3BR/2BA Double wide on 1 ac.
Lg. Rooms. $750 a month. 1st
month and full security.
Please call 386-965-7534.

3br/2ba newly renovated MH on
S1/2 ao..privateproperty. Close to
college $700.mo. 1st. mo.+ Sec.
dep. References. 386-755-3288

Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White Contact 386-623-2465
or 386-292-0114


Nice clean 2&3 bdrm, Five Points,
NO PETS, also 3 bd on the
Westside, 1 mo rent & dep
386-961-1482






Quiet Setting w/lots of oaks
2br/lba from $450 & 3br/2ba from
$550. Includes water & sewer.
No Pets! 386-961-0017

Very clean & well maintained 2/2
units in nice park. $599.mo
w/$500. dep. Rent incl water,
sewer, trash p/u. Close to town
386-984-8448 or 623-7547

Very Clean 2 BR/1 BA, in the
country, Branford area, $450 mo.,
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleypro590-0642

64A0 Mobile Homes
640 for Sale

$200. MONTHLY. Remodeled
SW. 2bd/2ba. Appliances,
delivered & blocked. Owner
finance available w/$3000 down.
Call Gary Hamilton 386-758-9824
05524588
Palm Harbor Homes
has closed 2 model centers Save
up to 60K on select models
Call 800-622-2832

05524637
Gainesville-Jacobsen-Savings
Factory direct Jaconsen outlet
now open to the public 3/2 start-
ing at 39,900 complete.
Northpointemobilehomesales.co
m for complete website specials
or 352-872-5566
For the best deal in Florida!

05524638
North Pointe Homes is your
new #1 Jacobsen dealer. Take a
short drive to Gainesville and
save thousands. Five year halo
warranty, 2x6 wall, and
much more. Free energy star
package on all others.
Call Chuck at 352-872-5567

05524639
Why drive to Gainesville?
This is Why! New 28x60
Jacobsen 3/2 inc FREE Furni-
ture! Low as $497 month.
Drive to our dealership and Buy,
I pay for your gas!
Call Mark at 352-872-5568


60n Mobile Home
650 & Land

BANK REPO: Mobile Home On
15.65 ACRES IN FT. WHITE -
Including 60X40 pole barn. Listed
at $130,000.00. Call Billy Shows
After hours 386-208-8547


Pool Leaks/Pool Repairs
Florida Leisure Pool & Spa
352-373-0612
CPC 1457279


available, Spouse and Pet Rider
Programs, O/O'S
And PTDI Certified Students
Are Welcome !!
CALL TODAY!!
BUEL, INC. 866-369-9744









Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SATURDAY, DECEMBER 18, 2010


710 Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent
05524443
$Holiday Cash $
NO App Fee, NO SD,
$250 off December,
*for Qualified Applicants
Windsong Apartments
(386) 758-8455
05524518
SPRING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans;
some with garages.
Call 386-454-1469
or visit our website:
www.springhillvillage.net
2 bdrm/1 bath, 1 car garage, W/D
hook up, $520 month,
no pets I month sec,
386-961-8075
2/1 w/garage,
east side of town,
1st, last & sec
386-755-6867


2BR/2BA DUPLEX
on McFarlane Ave. W/D hookup
Rent $625. per month.
Call 386-867-1212 for details.
A Landlord You Can Love!
2 br Apts $550. & up + sec. Great
area. CH/A washer/dryer hookups.
386-758-9351/352-208-2421
Brick Duplex 2/1 off Baya. CH/A,
Carport, Carpet, tile, $575 mo,+
Dep. Call 386-752-0118 or
386-623-1698 or 386-292-4937
Duplex w/garage spacious, 2/1,
1300 sq ft, W/D hook up, CH/A,
$650 plus dep & bckgrnd chk,
386-697-3248 or 352-514-2332
Great location W of 1-75, spacious
deluxe 2BR apts., garage, W/D
hook up. patio. $600 & up, + SD,
386 965-0276,
The Lakes Apts. Studios & IBr's
from $135/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $425 + sec.
Michelle 386-752-9626
X-CLEAN SECOND STORY 2/2,
country acre 8 mi to VA, off Lk
Jeff Rd. $500 mo + dep. No dogs.
Deck, w/d hookups 386.961.9181
720 Furnished Apts.
2 For Rent
1 BEDROOM all utilities includ-
ed. Furnished or unfurnished. East
or West side. $475. mo. +
$200 security. 386-397-3568
lbr Apt. incl. water, elec, & cable.
$595. mo. Close to college &
Timco. Good area. References &
sec. req'd. No pets. 386-719-4808
NO Lease/Deposits, ROOMS only
Utilities, Cable, WI-FI, maid,
micro-fridge, phone, Pool.
Americas Best Value Inn
(386)755-4664
Wk 1 prs. $169,2 ppl $179 +.tax


Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

J730 Unfurnished
730Home For Rent
05524431
Move in for Christmas, lease to
own, 3000 sq ft, 4 br. 3 ba., new
model home, nice sub div, 2
miles S. of city limit, 5 % int,
tax deduc, consider trade-ins,
386-752-1364

05524577
Move in Now! Take over pymts
on 3 br/2 ba, all brick, custom
home, with detached 1000
sq ft bldg for apt. etc.,
on 5 beautiful acres, close to
"The Oaks Equest Sub.",
5% int, tax deduc.,
consider trade-ins,
386-752-1364
2BR/1BA CH/A. Large carport,
great location, near comer of Baya
& McFarland references req'd.
386-752-9144 or 755-2235
3 & 4 bedroom homes. Newly
renovated. Very nice, in town.
$750 $950 per month plus
deposit. 386-755-2423
3 Bedrm/2 Bth plus 360 sq ft Stu-
dio on Lake Jeffery/Old Mill Rd,
very private, $1200 per mo. plus
deposit, 386-752-9303, No Pets
3/2 W/D hook up, appliances
included, $200 sec dep,
$650 month, ref check,
386-365-2515


73 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent
3/2, CH/A,all appliances, back
yard fenced, carport, $825 mo, 1st,
last &sec, 560 SE St. Johns St
386-697-8893 or 305-962-2666
3/2,Brick Home, big back yard,
$900 month + Security Deposit
off of Branford Hwy & CR 242,
386-965-0276
Cozy Cottage lbr/lba S. Hwy. 41
$550/mo. + security. Includes all
utilities & satellite TV. Pets OK.
(386)758-2408
FOR RENT: Large 3br/2ba brick
home, fenced on 5 acres on
Columbia/Suwannee County line.
$975. per month + utilities.
Perfect place for children.
Broker/Owner- Annette Land @
386-935-0824
Newer 3/2 w/2 car garage.
1800 sq ft $900 mo. plus deposit
I-10/US 41 area
(248)875-8807


Rural beauty and privacy near
I-10/US90 NW of Live Oak. 3Br,
1+Ba, $725/mo. Optional pasture
available. (626) 512-5374

7 0 Business &
I iOffice Rentals
OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$695. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor

805 Lots for Sale
5 Acres in Lake City, FL,
low down, easy qualifying, and
low monthly payments,
please call 512-663-0065
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

810 Home for Sale
3BR/2BA 2 story brick. 4.6 ac. in
ground pool. Lg. workshop &
2 wells. $200,000.00 obo
Old Wire Rd. (850)728-0782


930 Motorcycles
09 Harley Davidson XR I200R
Mirage Orange & Black. 1 owner.
garage kept. Like new w/only 52
actual mi. $8,000. 386-752-5988

940 Trucks
97 Chevy Z71 Extended cab. 3
door. Black w/gold trim. Local 2
owner. All service records. $4750.
obo 386-249-3104/386-719-4802





952 Vans & Sport
952 Util. Vehicles
2001 Chevy Astro Van,
new trans., newAC, good tires,
runs great, clean,great work van
$2200 obo, 386-984-0572


FSBO, Completely R"emodeled,
3bdr/lbth, fenced, new deck, shop,
new cabinets/appliances,Schools
blks away, $65K 478-391-1592
Live Oak 2bd/lba remodeled.
I acre. Fence, large utility room,
walk in closet/computer room.
o Metal roof, new AC/Heat. $365.
mo w/$10K down or $468 w/5K
down. Owner Finance Negotiable.
Gary Hamilton 386-963-4000
Owner finance, (MH), 4/2 on
3+ac,quiet, fenced, S. of Lake
City, small down, $800 mo
386-867-1833/386-590-0642
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com

820 Farms&
Acreage
05524426
10 acres for price of 5!
Rolling, grassed field, 3 miles E ..t never a ay's
of Col City School, 5% interest ...toevermiss a day s
$495 per month, 386-752-1364 worth of all the
4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road. Lake City Reporter
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd has to offer:
Owner Financing! NO DOWN! s t ffer
$69,900. $613mo 352-215-1018. Home delivery.
www.LandOwnerFinancine.com
4 Ac.,Ft. White. Well, Septic & To subscribe call
Power. Owner Financing! 755-5445
NO DOWN! $69,900.
Only $613./mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com


WE FINANCE! Half to ten acre
lots. Some*with w/s/pp
Deas Bullard BKL Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com


-LakeCty


ADVERTISE IT HERE!

Bring the picture in or we will take it for you!
Advertise your car, truck, motorcycle, recreation vehicle or boat here for 10 consecutive days.
If your vehicle does not sell within those 10 days, for an additional $15 you can place your ad for
an additional 10 days. A picture will run everyday with a description of your vehicle. The price of
the vehicle must be listed in the ad. Your ad must be prepaid with cash, check or credit card. Just
include a snapshot or bring your vehicle by and we will take the picture for you. Private party only!
Price includes a 6 day/ 4 line classified ad of the same vehicle in print and online.




2008 Toyota Tacoma In Plint,
2001 Chevy Astro 4DR access cab 2005 PT Cruiser & Online
2001 Chevy Astro 17,250 mi., AT, all power, Touring Edition & li
Van Tonneau cover, bedliner, PS, PW, PM, CC, AC
New trans., new AC, good class III hitch, ner bars, white, 55,500 miles.' One Low
tires, runs great, clean, AM-FM stereo w/CD, ne L w
great work van. $17,-995 rice
$2,200 OBO $16,995 $7,900
Call Call 386-965-8656
386-984-0571 386-752-8227

Fo MoreDetals all ary -r B idge


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GARAGE SALE


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