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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01477
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 12/17/2010
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01477
System ID: UF00028308:01477
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text







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Lakl >


Friday, December 17, 20 10


oo"h


County's attempts to acquire connector rights stall


Commission, owner
remain at odds over
property's value.
By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
Completing the Bascom Norris
Road connector project could
require the county to head to
court before the project can be


put out to bid.
The Columbia County Board
of County Commissioners unani-
mously voted to authorize staff
to get appraisals on the manda-
tory needs of the Giles prop-
erty Thursday night. An offer
will then be made based on the
appraisal, and the Giles will have
30 days to respond before the
county exercises the right of emi-
nent domain.


The board approved right-
of-way acquisitions for eminent
domain of the Giles property in
August. Eminent domain is the
power of governmental entities to
seize private property for public
use without the owner's consent.
The county previously offered
$1.4 million for the parcel, which
includes an existing house and 20
acres of land, said Greg Stewart,
attorney for Nabors, Giblin and


Nickerson PA., speaking on
behalf of the county. The project
cannot be put out to bid until all
land rights are acquired.
The attorney for the Giles
property made a counter offer of
$2.15 million, excluding attorney
and expert witness fees, based on
preliminary appraisal and plan-
ning work, Stewart said.
After discussing with engi-
neers, the house does not need


to be taken as a part of the con-
demnation, he said.
"I believe we can build the
roadway without taking the house
itself," Stewart said.
The project should have gone
to bid in April, said Commissioner
Ron Williams.
"Whatever we've got to do to
build the bypass is what I want
COMMISSION continued on 3A


VOICING CONCERNS To




OUR STATE LEADERS

Legislators listen to a '
wide range of problems
troubling local citizens.


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.comn

tives got an ear-
ful of concerns
and issues from
local residents
and elected officials
Thursday morning as part
of the Columbia County
Legislative Delegation
Hearing.
Several local officials
complained about too many
legislative mandates that
are not funded. Others
addressing state senators
Steve Oelrich and Charlie
Dean and state represen-
tatives Elizabeth Porter
and Leonard Bembry -
who represent Columbia
County citizens in the
Florida Legislature were
troubled over reductions
in state funding which are
impacting local services,
asking for no additional
budget cuts.
During the meeting, 18
people addressed the legis-
lative delegation.,The hear-
ing was scheduled to allow
residents and local officials
an opportunity to voice
their concerns leading up to
the next legislative session,
which convenes March 8.
The meeting lasted near-
ly three hours, covering
a variety of topics. Some
of the topics addressed
included reduced fund-


ing for mental health and
substance abuse services,
from Dr. Maggie Labarta of
Meridian Behavioral Health
Care Services; a shrinking
budget at the Department
of Children and Family
Services, from Ester Tibbs;
and too much paperwork
and documentation for
Florida drivers licenses,
from Paul Henry, execu-
tive director of Floridians
Against Real ID Inc.
Officials asked
questions about finan-
MEETING continued on 3A


Photos by JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Above: State Sen. Steve Oelrich, chairman of the Columbia County Legislative
Delegation Hearing, addresses a question during Thursday's hearing.
Below: Ester Tibbs, of the Department of Children and Family Services, is one of
18 people who voiced concerns Thursday,


Photos by JASON MATTHEW WALKERILake City Reporter
Above: Dr. Maggie Labarta, of Meridian Behavorial
Healthcare Inc., brought up issues about the reduc-
tion in funding for mental health and substance
abuse services.
Left: Sen. Charlie Dean (right) asks a question dur-
ing the hearing.


Maryland

man injured

in car, truck

collision

Rear-end accident on
1-75 Thursday morning;
man taken to hospital.
From staff reports
A Maryland man was seriously
injured in a Thursday morning crash
when his car rear-ended a transfer
truck, then left the road and struck
a tree.
Edwin Simaze, 35, of Germantown,
Md., was taken to the hospital with
injuries suffered in the wreck.
The wreck occurred at 12:30 a.m.
Thursday on Interstate 75 south-
bound near the 408 mile-marker.
According to Florida Highway
Patrol reports, Simaze was traveling
southbound on 1-75 in a 2010 Toyota
Corolla as a 2007 Freightliner truck,
driven by Mark Long, 50, of Orlando,
traveled in front of him.
The front of Simaze's car collided
with the rear of the truck before
rolling onto the roadway's western
shoulder. It then struck a tree.
Simaze was taken to Shands
Hospital in Gainesville with injuries
suffered in the wreck.
Long was not injured.
Charges in connection with the
wreck are pending completion of an
FHP investigation, reports said.



Eastern Star

to host Youth

Christmas

Party

Part of statewide effort
aimed at giving back
to local communities.

By GABRIELLE BELLAMY
Special to the Reporter
Helping local youth have a bright
and festive Christmas is the goal for a
group of "Stars."
The Gold Standard Chapter #48
Order of the Eastern Star is hosting
its inaugural Youth Christmas Party
from 2-5 p.m. Saturday at the Lake
City Women's Club on Martin Luther
King Drive.
"This will be our first party, and we
want it to become an annual event,"
said Leondria Fleming, event orga-
nizer.
The chapter is a nonprofit organiza-
tion which performs various service
activities in the community.
The Christmas party is in cel-
ebration of Eastern Star Weekend,
Fleming said. Across Florida, chap-
STAR continued on 3A


CALL US: f9 Opinion ................
(386) 752-1293 2 Events..................
SUBSCRIBE TO Showers Obituaries ..............
THE REPORTER: Advice & Comics.........
Voice: 755-5445 \AvicATH E RCm uz ........
V Fax: 752-9400 W EATHER, 2A Puzzles .................


4 A


TODAY IN
PEOPLE
SAG announces
nominees.


COMING
SATURDAY
Christmas break has
arrived.


Honor time
Columbia High hands
out football accolades.

Sports, I B





)orter


I Vol. 136, No. 283 E 75 cents










LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING FRIDAY, DECEMBER 17, 2010 -


. .,3 3 Thursday:
Afternoon: 3-8-5
Evening: 3-3-5


Thursday:
Afternoon: 9-4-7-7
Evening: 2-6-0-2


Wednesday:
W 14-16-17-19-28


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



SAG announces nominations


LOS ANGELES
The British monarchy
drama "The King's
Speech" and the boxing
tale "The Fighter" led
the Screen Actors Guild
Awards with four nominations each
Thursday, among them honors
for Colin Firth, Christian Bale and
Helena Bonham Carter.
While "The King's Speech"
star Firth was among best-actor
nominees, "The Fighter" star Mark
Wahlberg missed out in that cat-
egory. His co-stars Bale, Amy Adams
and Melissa Leo all earned support-
ing nominations, along with Bonham
Carter and Geoffrey Rush for "The
King's Speech."
Firth and Bale have emerged as
front-runners this Academy Awards'
season.
Other nominees include best-
actress favorites Annette Bening
for the lesbian-family tale "The Kids
Are All Right" and Natalie Portman
for the psychosexual thriller "Black
Swan." They are up against Nicole
Kidman for the grieving-parent
drama "Rabbit Hole"; Jennifer
Lawrence for the Ozarks crime yarn
"Winter's Bone"; and Hilary Swank
for the legal saga "Conviction."
Along with Firth, best-actor
nominees are Jeff Bridges for the
Western 'True Grit"; Robert Duvall
for the backwoods romp ."Get Low";
Jesse Eisenberg for the Facebook
drama "The Social Network"; and
James Franco for the survival story
"127 Hours."

Husband says Mariah
Carey expecting twins
NEW YORK Mariah Carey is
going to be a mom twice over.
Nick Cannon announced on his
radio show Thursday that his wife is


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Christian Bale (lef) and Mark Wahlberg are shown in a scene from, 'The Fighter.'


expecting twins.
Said Cannon on New York's 92.3
station: "I haven't even told my wife
I'm doing this so I'm probably gonna
get yelled at for not getting permis-
sion. ... We are having twins!"
Mariah Carey's publicist Cindi
Berger confirmed the news as well.
Cannon said two VIPs did get the
scoop:,President Barack Obama
and wife Michelle. Carey told the
first couple during a taping of a
"Christmas in Washington" show.
Cannon added: "Both babies are
healthy, in tiptop shape."
Carey, 40, and Cannon, 30, have
been the subject of a baby watch
since they got married after a whirl-
wind romance two years ago.'

Spacey's impressions
highlight 'Casino Jack'
WASHINGTON Kevin Spacey
not only transformed into disgraced
lobbyist Jack Abramoff in "Casino
Jack," he got to imitate former


Presidents Clinton and Reagan, Al
Pacino and many others.
In an interview with the Associated
Press, Spacey said "Everyone talked
about how he (Abramoff) always
did impressions, he was always. ,
quoting movies, he was very, very
personable, very funny, and I didn't
think there was enough of that in
the script," so Spacey added several
impersonations.
Spacey said he developed his
own knack for imitating other peo-
ple when he was young.
Spacey, who earned a Golden
Globe nomination for his per-
formance, absorbed Abramoff's
personality and mannerisms while
visiting him in prison for several
hours.
Though Abramoff served 3 1/2
years in federal custody for fraud,
corruption and conspiracy, Spacey
said "the most surprising thing to
me was how charming and very
funny he was and( is."

* Associated Press


Celebrity Birthdays


* Actor Armin Mueller-Stahl
is 80.
* Singer-actor Tommy Steele
is 74.
* Actor Ernie Hudson is 65.
N-Political commentator
Chris Matthews is 65.
* Comedian-actor Eugene
Levy is 64.
* Actor Wes Studi is 63.
* Pop musician Jim Bohfanti


(The Raspberries) is 62.
M Rhythm-and-blues singer
Wanda Hutchinson (The
Emotions) is 59.
* Actor Bill Pullman is 57.
* Actor Barry Livingston is
57.
* Country singer Sharon
White is 57.
* Producer-director-writer
Peter Farrelly is 54.


Daily Scripture

"[Mary's Song] And Mary said:
"My soul glorifies the Lord
and my spirit rejoices in God
my Savior, for the Mighty One
has done great things for me
holy is his name."

Luke 1:46-47,49


Lake City Reporter
HOW TO REACH US BUSINESS
Main number ........(386) 752-1293 Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
Fax number..............752-9400 (sbrannon@lakecltyreporter.com)
Circulation ...............755-5445
Online... www.lakecityreporter.com CIRCULATION
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub- should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180 Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7.30
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055 a.m. on Sunday.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, RFla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
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All material herein is property of the Lake In Columbia County, customers should
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser-
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CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run
in this space. And thanks for reading.


Gunman dead by
end of 911 call

TALLAHASSEE A
school official calmly talk-
ed with a Florida 911 opera-
tor while a gunman held
school board members
hostage, exchanging fire
with a security guard and
then taking his own life.
Nancy Boyd, assis-
tant superintendent of
Bay County schools, had
fled the meeting' room
where the ordeal unfolded
Tuesday to call authorities.
Her roughly six-minute call
was released Wednesday.
Boyd described what she
saw on a video feed of the
meeting room, as Clay Duke
fired at several board mem-
bers. Boyd told the 911 dis-
patcher "there's some man
here with a gun."
Authorities said 56-year-
old Duke was distraught
that his wife had been fired
by the school district ear-
lier this year. He was the
only one injured Tuesday.

Coec s guard,
son were targets

MIAMI A corrections
guard and her 2-year-old son
were not the intended targets
of a barrage of bullets that
killed them as they slept
Police said gunmen wield-
ing high-powered rifles may
have mistakenly thought the
person they were chasing
ran inside the Miami home
early Tuesday.
The shooting spree
stretched through much of
the Miami neighborhood.
More than 70 casings were
scattered inside the home
where 24-year-old Ciara Lee
and Devin Franklin died.
Police said every window
in the house was shot.
Four other relatives were
at the home when the shoot-
ing broke out One was treat-
ed for minor injuries.
The family had returned
from McDonald's about an


COURTESY PHOTO

2010 Kiwanian of the Year
Koby Adams (from right) of the Adams Agency presents
Norbie Ronsonet of Ronsonet GMC Trucks with the 2010


Kiwanian of the Year Award.

hour before the shooting.

Farmers assess
cold weather

PLANT CITY- Farmers
around the state are still
assessing how this week's
cold weather affected
crops, as forecasts call for
rising temperatures for the
next few days.
Tropical fish and straw-
berry farmers in central
Florida reported some
losses Wednesday, but the
full extent of the cold dam-
age won't be known for a
few weeks. Citrus growers
were more optimistic, saying
they avoided a citrus freeze,
which requires a tempera-
ture under 28 degrees for at
least four hours.
Corn and bean growers
in South Florida were less
optimistic.

Man killed when
train hits him

PORT ORANGE A
man stranded inside a
sports utility vehicle in cen-
tral Florida was killed when
a train hit it
Authorities said a pass-


ing motorist saw the SUV
stalled on the tracks of the
Florida East Coast Railway
in Port Orange early
Thursday. He tried to get
the SUV driver out but had
to stop when the oncoming
train approached.
The victim's name has
not been released.
Police said the driver
apparently lost control of his
vehicle and crashed into the
base of the railroad crossing
arm. The train was traveling
at 48 mph when it hit the
vehicle about 2:30 a.m. The
driver died at the scene.

Donor boosts
Salvation Army

FORT MYERS An
anonymous donor has
again provided a big boost
for The Salvation Army.
Officials said the donor
left the coin in a red kettle
Tuesday. It was wrapped in
a note that simply read, "In
loving memory of Mimi."
The Double Eagle coin
is a Saint-Gaudens design
printed in 1928. Authorities
said it worth an estimated
$1,400.


THE WEATHER


ISO. CHANCE MOSTLY :, MOSTLY -, PARTLY
'SHOWERS STORMS SUNNYNY SUNNY CLOUDY


HI 69 L055 HI 63 L041 Hi160L0 31 H162L32 HI 69L042

.. I u. ,~


* Vadosta
67/48 Jacksonville
Lake City 69/54
69/55 '1
Gainesville Daytona Beach
S,73/55 75556
'\ Ocala \
,75/54 *
S Orando Capi Canaveral
S 76/55 74/56
Tampas, \


Cape Canaveral
Daytona Beach
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Jacksonville
Key West
Lake City
Miami
Nanipe


75/59/ West Palm Beach Ocala
77/61 Orlando
93 Ft.Lauderdale Panama City
Ft. lyers 78/64 *4 Pensacola
77/58 Naples Tallahassee
-7/58 .Miami Tampa
e West, '. 7/63 Valdosta
S, -, .,r C-. W. Palm Beach


TEMPERATURES
High Thursday
Low Thursday
Normal-high
Normal low
Record high
Record low
PRECIPITATION
Thursday '
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


Moonrise tom. 3:18 p.m.
Moonset tom. 4:42 a.m.
eN /-Ik ^k. A


On this date in
1884, a three week
blockade of snow
began at Portland,
Ore. A record
December total
of 34 inches was
received.


* Associated Press


AROUND FLORIDA


a-
Pesacola
62/45


Tallahassee*
68/50 ,.,
P6ma City
63/49


Saturday Sunday


74 57. sh
74/53/t
79/64/t
77/59/t
68/44/sh
66/43/t
75/68/sh
63/41/sh
79/65/t
77/61/t
71/47/sh
75/55/t
57/40/sh
55/36/sh
59/41/sh
74/57/t
58/38/sh
79/61/t


68.47,pc
66/44/s
77/58/pc
73/48/pc
62/32/pc
59/34/pc
70/60/pc
60/31/pc
77/59/pc
73/52/pc
64/34/pc
69/45/s
55/40/s
57/37/s
59/32/s
69/47/s
57/31/pc
75/54/pc


lu/U'


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise tom.
Sunset tom.

MOON
Moonrise today
Moonset today


7:20 a.m.
5:33 p.m.
7:21 a.m.
5:33 p.m.,

"2:35 p.m.
3:44 a.m.


69
28
68
44
85 in 1956
22 in 1968

0.00"
0.17"
39.15"
1.22"
47.02"


4

45 nimlesi a b
Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+.
;


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.


S I 0 eathercom
Dec. Dec. Jan. Jan. Forecasts, data and graph-
21 27 4 12 "'V' Ics 0 2010 Weather Central
Full Last New First LLC, Madison, Wls.
Wi www.weatherpubllsher.com


~e Conneotul


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


r LAKE CITY ALMANAC


ER3 HITOY SPONSORED5S3 BBY


I WETEY-N NU I


I









LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE FRIDAY, DECEMBER 17, 2010


HOPE program graduates three in first ceremony


From staff reports
WHITESPRINGS-TheHOPE
office of Adult and Community
Education held its first gradu-
ation ceremony last week with
three students graduating.
White Springs mayor Helen
Miller said high school diplomas
were awarded by the Florida
Gateway College and presented
to Jessie Henderson, Tammy
Jones and Katelyn Day Powell.
The ceremony was held Dec. 9
at the White Springs Community


Center.
"Family, friends and town offi-
cials were on hand to congratu-
late the new graduates," Miller
said, in a prepared statement.
"All three young women plan to
embark on post-secondary edu-
cation and training.
The Helping Our People
Excel (HOPE): Reaching Out,
Not Out of Reach program, is
a multi-pronged plan designed
to promote education in White
Springs.


The HOPE Office of Adult and
Community Education began in
February as a volunteer com-
munity initiative to promote life-
long learning for White Springs'
residents.
Robin Luger works as the direc-
tor of Adult Education for the
HOPE program and expressed
her appreciation to the program
sponsors, the White Springs Faith
Base organization, local civil ser-
vants and program volunteers.
"All three young women are


exemplary students juggling
school with their family and work
commitmentss" she said in a pre-
pard statement.
Miller said the Office of
Education deals with residents
who didn't make it through the
traditional school system and
attempts to offer alternative ave-
nues to education.
As part of the HOPE program
there are two adult-education ses-
sions where residents can work
on continuing their education,


a morning and evening session.
The first classes started at the
beginning of March. The pro-
, gram had 14 students, which
ranged from 17 to 35 years old.
"The community is very proud
of the adult education office,"
Miller said. "Ms. Luger is a role
model for the community, vol-
unteering her efforts to provide
instruction for both day and
nighttime students here in White
Springs."


COMMISSION: Connector property value debated

Continued From Page 1A

to do," he said. "It's what we've prom-
ised the citizens of the county."
Williams said he just wants to see
the project done.
"I don't care how we pick a chick-
en," he said. "I want it picked and to
'build a road."
Fl iThe offer of $1.4 million from the
county is more than reasonable, said
Chairman Jody DuPree. Paying the
counter offer for a house and 20 acres
of land is unreasonable and a waste of
taxpayers' money.
"I am certain it is no way worth
$2.15 million," he said.
Theconnectorroadwillrunbetween
Lowe's on Northwest Bascom Norris
Drive and New Millenium on Lake
Jeffrey Road.
In other business:
*The county accepted an Economic
ANTONIA ROBINSON/ Lake City Reporter Development Transportation Trust
The Columbia County Board of County Commissioners and staff members sung a Fund grant on behalf of Columbia
Christmas carol to the audience at the close of its meeting Thursday night. Front Technology Inc. The grant is for proj-
row from left, Commissioner Rusty DePratter, Commissioner Stephen Bailey, ect costs of up to $900,000.
Commissioner Stephen Bailey, Commissioner Scarlet Frisina and Assistant County a Closing the Fort White Branch of
M Lissa Roberts.t Baick, Commissioner SRon Williams and Chairmant Jody the Columbia County Public Library
Manager Lisa Roberts. Back, Commissioner Ron Williams and Chairman Jody Jan. 5 to move into it's new facility
DuPree. was approved.



Florida man arrested in body parts murder


DAVIE - A South
Florida man allegedly
used a sledgehammer and
backyard cutting tools to
kill and dismember an
acquaintance, then used
the. victim's credit card to
pay for college tuition for
his daughter, a set of tires
and other items, police said
Wednesday.
The suspect, 51-year-old
Jamie. Saffran of Davie,
was being held without
bail in the Broward County
Jail following his arrest
Tuesday. Court records
did not indicate that he
had an attorney.
The investigation began
after a man's body parts


were found between Nov.
6 and Nov. 26, covered
in concrete in plastic con-
tainers in two locations in
Broward County and one
in Miami-Dade County.
DNA testing determined
that all were from the
same person and a finger-
print led police to the vic-
tim's identity. The man's
name was being withheld
Wednesday pending noti-
fication of relatives.
The containers also con-
tained leaves from trees
like those in Saffran's
backyard and a blue rope
similar to one found out-
side his residence, accord-
ing to a Fort Lauderdale


police affidavit. Cadaver
dogs found blood on a
sledgehammer and cut-
ting tools belonging to
Saffran, as well as bags
of cement identical to that
used in the containers.
The victim's credit card
was used to purchase tires
for a Jeep a 2002 Jeep
is registered to Saffran
- and to pay tuition for
Saffran's daughter at
FloridaAtlantic University,
police said. An employee
at the tire shop identified
Saffran as the buyer.
Prior to his arrest and
after discovery of the body
parts, Saffran told detec-
tives that he had known


the victim for many years
and that he lived in the
Dominican Republic, but
had used Saffran's home
as his U.S. address. Saffran
also told police the victim
was now in Colombia and
"that he had received email
correspondence from (the
victim) recently," the affi-
davit said.
Police determined that
the victim did fly to South
Florida from the Dominican
Republic on Nov. 2, but his
return flight was canceled
by someone who used
Saffran's cell phone. Saffran
had that same phone when
he was arrested.


MEETING: Leaders listen to citizens concerns

Continued From Page 1A


cial issues for the school
district's transportation
department after Columbia
School's superintendent
Mike Millikin's presen-
tation. And Columbia
County Commissioner Ron
Williams asked legislators
to look into equal funding
for bridge costs, when a
bridge adjoins two coun-
ties.
Oelrich, who chaired the
meeting, explained to the
audience in the hearing's
opening that legislators
would not discuss fund-
ing for community budget
issue requests because of
financial constraints.
He said the meeting went
well and he encouraged res-
idents to visit Tallahassee
with their concerns.
He also spoke about the
concerns several local offi-


cials had regarding unfund-
ed mandates, when the state
government issues require-
ments and regulations but
does not supply funding to
implement them.
"What we have on the
books right now is prob-
ably too many laws and reg-
ulations," he said. "Each
one of those comes, if not
with enforcement, certain-
ly with recordkeeping or
regulation. A lot of senators
and representatives now
throughout the state gauge
themselves on how many
bills they may have and I
think sometimes that's mis-
guided. We have enough
laws and let's be cautious
about what we want to see
make a law, because each
one costs some taxpayer
money."
State Rep. Elizabeth


Porter, District 11, was
named the Columbia
County Legislative
Delegation chairman.
"I am honored," she said
of the nomination, noting
Dean nominated her as
chairman at the last two
legislative delegation meet-
ings. "It's always an honor
to be able to serve the dis-
trict however I can."
Porter said she was
familiar with several of the
issues and concerns voiced
during the meeting, but
information from Millikin
regarding transportation
costs and reduced spar-
city funding were more in-
depth than expected.
"I know a lot of issues
the school board is facing,
I just wasn't aware of the
depth of financial issues
that our school district is


facing in regards to their
transportation funding and
other funding," she said.
"At the other delegation
meetings I've been to, their
school districts are facing
some of the same issues,
but not at the same finan-
cial level."


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this 1994 photo, renowned fantasy artist Frank Frazetta
sits next to one of his paintings in East Stroudsburg, Pa.



Family's feud


over artist's


assets renewed


MITCH STACY
Associated Press

ST. PETERSBURG A
son of late fantasy artist
Frank Frazetta has filed
a lawsuit in Florida that
rekindles a nasty family
feud over his pioneering,
body of work, estimated to
be worth tens of millions
of dollars.
Frank Frazetta Jr.'s
action, filed 'against his
three siblings Wednesday
in Fort Myers, is just the
latest legal blow landed
in a dispute that once
saw him use a back hoe
to break into his father's
museum in northeastern
Pennsylvania and attempt
to steal 90 paintings. He
insisted he was trying to
safeguard the art from his
scheming siblings.
The family announced
in April that the siblings
and their father had set-
tled the dispute over the
estate. The elder Frazetta
died the next month at the
age of 82 after suffering a
stroke.
Frazetta Jr.'s latest
complaint alleges that his
siblings -- Billy Frazetta,
Holly Frazetta Taylor and
Heidi Grabin had vio-


lated the terms of the set-
tlement by failing to pay
him the 25-percent share
of the estate his father
intended him to have.
He also claims they have
not provided an accurate
accounting of the busi-
ness dealings involving
his father's art and have
not involved him in their
decisions as agreed.
"It's been continuous
pleading with them to try
to figure out what's going
on," said Frazetta Jr.'s Miami
attorney, Diana L. Fitzgerald.
The suit was filed in Florida
because Frazetta Jr.'s sisters
live here.
A Boston attorney for
the three siblings did not
immediately respond to
phone and e-mail messag-
es Thursday.
Frazetta Sr. was cel-
ebrated for his sci-fi and
fantasy art, creating cov-
ers and illustrations for
more than 150 books and
comic books as well as
album covers, movie post-
ers and original paintings.
His work on iconic char-
acters including Conan
the Barbarian, Tarzan and
Vampirella influenced gen-
erations of artists.


STAR: Youth Christmas Party planned

Continued From Page 1A


ters were asked to host an
event this weekend in their
city to give back to the
community.
"We decided to focus our
event on the youth in our
community," Fleming said.
The party is geared
toward children 3-13, she
said. Children under the
age of 8 must be accompa-
nied by an adult.
Festivities include
refreshments, music,


games and door prizes,
such as bicycles and play-
ers, Fleming said.
The Gold Standard
Lodge #167 Masons will
also help out at the event.
As many as 100 children
are expected to attend the
event, she said. The com-
munity is invited to cele-
brate the season with Gold
Standard Chapter #48.
"We want everyone
to come out and have a


good time," Fleming said.
"Hopefully it will get better
and bigger each year."



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Adv. T7x on Sale LITTLE FOCKERS
TRON: LEGACY IN REALD 3D EVENT
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YOGI BEAR (PG) (1210220) 430 720 930
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Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427













OPINION


Friday, December 17, 2010


OTHER
OPINION


Diversify

sources

of energy


oal is one of the
united States' most
important, reliable
energy resources.
We continue to
wonder why President Barack
Obama and others in govern-
ment fail to recognize the value
of the industry.
We agree, however, that ener-
gy diversification is prudent,
too. That is why the Energy
Department has recommended
reevaluation of federal policy
that now discourages construc-
tion of nuclear power plants.
A first step in that move
should be establishing a nation-
al nuclear waste repository.
Without it, nuclear waste will
remain a national security and
environmental concern.
But there are those in gov-
ernment led by Senate
Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-
Nev. who will not allow that.
Plans for a repository at Yucca
Mountain, Nev., have been
blocked by Reid and company.
If Obama is serious about a
rational energy policy, he will
put pressure on Reid to reverse
course. The Yucca Mountain
plan appears to be a good one
- and should be pursued. A
nuclear waste repository is
needed now, and may be even
more important in the future.

* The Journal (W. Va.)

HIG.HLIG H TS
IN HISTORY

Today is Friday, Dec. 17, the
351st day of 2010. There are 14
days left in the year. -
Oh Dec. 17, 1903, Wilbur
and Orville Wright of Dayton,
Ohio, conducted the first suc-
cessful manned powered-air-
plane flights, near Kitty Hawk,
N.C., using their experimental
craft, the Wright Flyer.
In 1777, France recognized
American independence.
In 1969, the U.S. Air Force
closed its Project "Blue Book"
by concluding there was no evi-
dence of extraterrestrial space-
ships behind thousands of UFO
sightings.

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman


LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of


the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


Earlier this month,
the White House
instructed federal
employees and gov-
ernment contractors
not to read the leaked classified
documents posted worldwide
by WikiLeaks even though the
information was readily avail-
able on their home computers
and even delivered to their
doorsteps.
It was a warning that the
White House was more or less
compelled to deliver.
Classified information is
still technically classified,
even though it has been made
public.But the warning was
really a formality. The docu-
ments were now in the public
domain;, the toothpaste was not
going back into the tube.
The Air Force, however, has


www.lakecityreporter.com


This era can make us weep


Speaking as a guy,
I say bully for
John Boehner, the
Republican leader
destined to be next
speaker of the House.
He has redefined what it is
to be a man. I am getting a little
weepy just thinking about it.
Count me as one who was
taught to believe that crying
was not a manly pursuit. Big
boys don't cry; there's no cry-
ing in baseball; don't cry in your
beer these are the sort of
primitive stereotypes that I was
fed in my early years.
But Boehner has a big heart
unrestrained by cultural preju-
dices and, better yet, he has
tear ducts bigger than saddle-
bags to give vent to his feelings.
He appeared on "60 Minutes"
the other day and blubbered up
a storm. He did this on election
night, too.
In fact, he has been putting in
a bid to be Kleenex Man of the
Year, which I had not previously
realized was such an important
honor.
Oh, the scoffers will come
out, pretending they are so
tough. They will sit around
being sarcastic and repressing
their feelings. If they continue
with this mocking, I promise to
burst into tears in solidarity with
the lachrymose Boehner.
For too long, I have denied
my inner waterworks. I have
confused misting up with weak-
ness.
Outside of funerals, where
everyone has a reason to reach
for the old hankie, I have been
holding in my sentiments for
fear that my rough-hewn image
would suffer salt erosion.
I admit that, from time to
time, I suffer a slight attack of
the sniffles say, when listen-
ing to Irish music or when sud-
denly presented with a large


Reg Henry
rhenry@post-gazette.com
check for an ordinary dinner.
But I always get a grip and start
laughing, observing that in this
life if you don't laugh, you have
to cry.
I realize now that was exactly
backwards. If you don't cry,
you have to laugh. Wait! Is that
the same thing? Let me console
myself for a moment while I
think about it with some timely
sobbing. Boo-hoo! That's better.
Boehner has shown me that real
men can be fountains of feeling
- and have a cool tan to boot!
In light of his splendidly moist
example, I intend in the future
to cry at the drop of a hat.
However, please give me some
advance notice if you intend to
drop your hat, because it's nice
to have the tissues handy.
What makes Boehner such
a good crying role model is
that he is a leader in the party
of testosterone. Conservatives '
are tough, tough, tough. Just as
it took Richard Nixon to go to
China, it takes a John Boehner
to go into the spotlight and bawl
his eyes,out.
You know the new saying:
When the going gets tough, the
tough start crying.
Now if a liberal Democrat
were to cry, it would be proof
that he was a girly man, of
course.
Real Americans understand
that their tears are shed by
socialist crocodiles as they idle
on the left bank of the river
dreaming nostalgic thoughts of


ACORN. They are not motivated
by the same patriotic feelings
that Boehner has stirring deep
beneath his tan.
He has lived the American
Dream.
He came from a humble back-
ground and as a boy had a pasty
complexion with zits.
But by dint of dedication and
hard work, he became a politi-
cian and rose through the ranks
to become beloved by all -,
many.of them special interests.
Talk about American exception-
alism! Put your eyelids together
for John Boehner, the champion
of maudlin America!
Yes, Glenn Beck is famously
tearful too I suppose it is the
burden of being so patriotic. But
his crying jags appear more a
rehearsal for a nervous break-
down,,whereas Boehner is the
breaking voice of we the emo-
tional people.
Yet while he has been an
inspiration for me when it
comes to breaking down uncon-
trollably in various situations, I
do confess to some fears.
I don't have to cry in my beer,
do I? That would be a problem
for me. If I want salt with my
beer, I'll order a pretzel.
And I hope I don't need self-
esteem or empathy to go on
crying jags. I have done without
those for years and I'd hate to
get in touch with my feelings at
this late stage.
But I am confident that, being
a Republican, Boehner isn't
much for touchy-feely stuff. He
just wants to cut taxes and all
social programs that help soft
people who only cry because
they are losers. I want to cry
like a winner.
I want to cry all the way to
the bank.
N Reg Henry is a columnist for
the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette.


taken that directive a step, a
big step, further. It blocked
access to more than 25 web-
sites to keep its members from
using government computers
to read the documents.
The Army, Navy and
Marines have not followed
suit, and the Pentagon was
at pains to say that the
Department of Defense had
not ordered it.
The Air Force says it has an
interest in keeping classified
information off its unclassified
computers. But whether these
documents are effectively clas-
sified is now purely academic.
The Air Force also has an
interest in its personnel being
literate and well-informed, and
the websites it has blocked
include some of the world's
great news organizations: The


New York Times, the Guardian
in Britain, Le Monde in France,
Der Spiegel in Germany, El
Pais in Spain.
Also, it seems somewhat
condescending for the Air
Force to tell its people that
they can't have access to this
information when everybody
else in the world does.
This professed concern for
security is somewhat vitiated
by the Air Force's blocking
only sites that posted the full
classified documents, not
those, like The Washington
Post, that ran only extensive
excerpts.
You would like to think that
the Air Force would trust the
discretion and good sense of
its own people.
* Scripps Howard News Service


4A


Bonnie Erbe
bonnieerbe@compuserve.com


When


armed


crazies


show up

A s I write this, I am
watching CNN's
live coverage of
an impromptu
news conference
by Panama City school board
members and other school sys-
tem officials. They are recount-
ing the Tuesday incident in
which they almost lost their
lives. A lone gunman entered a
school board meeting and shot,
at and threatened to kill the
members, allegedly for having
fired his wife.
The gunman ultimately suc-
ceeded in killing no one but him-
self. Fifty-six-year-old Clay Duke
was the perpetrator, who was at
first wounded by a school secu-
rity officer and then took his own
life with his own weapon. The
security officer was wounded by
Duke, but late reports show him
rallying at a local hospital and not
in danger of dying.
When lone, obviously
depressed and mentally ill per-
sons go on shooting sprees in
public places, Americans react
with surprise, shock and regret
A CNN anchor noted that Duke's
background is being investigated
to try to find out why Duke acted
as he did so future incidents
such as these can be prevented.
The fact is we already know
why Duke acted as he did and
how these incidents could be
prevented in the future.
Duke was obviously mentally
ill as he had a history of violence.
and a criminal record. CNN,
citing the Panama City News
Herald as its source, reported,
"after six months of stalking a
former girlfriend, Duke con-
fronted the woman outside her
home on Oct. 20, 1999. He was
wearing a mask and vest and
holding two .22-caliber guns. He
threatened to kill her, then kill
several others and then himself,
the newspaper said. When the
woman tried to drive away, Duke
shot out a rear tire.",
As someone with a back-
ground of mental illness coupled
with a history of illegal gun own-
ership, Duke probably should
have been in prison or institu-
tionalized. Duke's case makes
it crystal clear that despite laws
preventing gun ownership by the
mentally ill, those laws are easily
circumvented and inadequate.
During the impromptu news
conference by school officials
whose lives were threatened by
Duke, several attributed their
salvation to God. CNN quoted
the school board superintendent
as saying, "The good Lord was
standing in front of me."
I hear this type of reaction all
the time, not just by survivors
of shooting sprees, but also by
survivors of tornadoes, hur-
ricanes, car wrecks and so on.
I always wonder why people
who credit the good Lord for
saving them don't also see that
if the good Lord is all powerful
(to wit, able to save them,) the
good Lord must have placed
them in a dangerous situation
in the first place.
I hold out no hope that
people will stop crediting
God with saving them.
I just wish those who use
this terminology would peer
more deeply into the circum-
stance and examine the logic
behind giving God credit
without placing the blame
with God as well.
Bonnie Erbe is a TV host and
writes this column for Scripps
Howard News Service.


OTHER OPINION

Air Force decision doesn't seem to fly










Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


LAKE CITY REPORTER


LOCAL & STATE


FRIDAY, DECEMBER 17, 2010


C COMMUNITY CALENDAR


* To submit your Community
Calendar item, contact Antonia
Robinson at 754-0425 or by
e-mail at arobinson@
lakecityreporter., com.


Today
Cultural Presentation

A cultural presentation at the
LifeStyle Enrichment Center is 1
p.m. today in the Reading Room.
The center is located at 628 SE
Allison Court. For more informa-
tion call 386-755-0235.

A Christmas Carol
A performance of the radio-
on-stage dramatic adaptation of
Charles Dickens' "A Christmas
Carol" is 8 p.m. today at the High
Springs Community Theater.
Tickets are available at The
Framery on W. Baya and at high-
springscommunitytheater.com.

Saturday
Youth Christmas Party
The Gold Standard Chapter
#48 Order of the Eastern Star is
hosting a Youth Christmas Party
2-5 p.m. Saturday at the Lake City
Women's Club on MLK Drive. All
children under the age of 8 must
be chaperoned by an adult.

FACS Christmas Party
The Filipino American Cultural
Society of Lake City announces a
Christmas party taking place from
6:30 pm.-10:30 p.m. Saturday at the
Epiphany Catholic Church Social
Hall. Enjoy a night of culture, danc-
ing, and entertainment, and pos-
sibly become a member of FACS.
For more information, contact Bob
Gavette at 386-965-5905.

Pancake breakfast
The RCC/AMN Inc. is hav-
ing a pancake breakfast 7-11
a.m. Saturday at the Richardson
Community C,enter. The tickets
are $5 and the breakfast will con-
sist of pancakes, Nettle's sausage,
grits, eggs and orange juice. All
proceeds will benefit the 14-and-
younger and 12-and-younger
boys basketball teams. To make a
donation or for more information,
-contact Mario Coppock or Nicole
Smith at 386-754-7096.

Cartwheel-a-thon
BARD Gymnastics is hosting


DAR members enjoy festive Christmas coffee
Members and guests of the Edward Rutledge Chapter of the NSDAR attended a special Christmas coffee Dec. 4
in Live Oak. Betsy Burch, chapter regent, and her husband, Donald, hosted the event in their home. The house
was adorned with Christmas decorations.Guests were served food, coffee and punch.


a cartwheel-a-thon 2 p.m.-4
p.m. Saturday at the Lake City
Mall. Sponsors may pledge so
much money per cartwheel
or make a one-time donation.
Checks can be made to the
Christian Service Center and
the donation is tax deductible.
Call BARD Gymnastics at 386-
752-1710.

Flapjack breakfast
A Relay For Life fundraising
flapjack breakfast is 8 a.m. to 10
a.m. Saturday at Applebee's. The
all-you-can-eat meal will include
pancakes, scrambled eggs, home-
fries, bacon, sausage, juices, cof-
fee and tea. Tickets are $10. Of
the proceeds $7 will go to Relay
for Life.

Gift wrapping
Servepro is hosting a gift wrap-
ping fundraiser from 8 a.m. 1
p.m. Saturday atLowes. Donations
will be accepted. Money raised
will go toward Relay For Life.


A Christmas Carol

A performance of the radio-
on-stage dramatic adaptation of
Charles Dickens' "A Christmas
Carol" is 8 p.m. Saturday and 2
p.m. Sunday at the High Springs
Community Theater. Tickets are
available at The Framery on W.
Baya and at highspringscommuni-
tytheater.com.

Theatrical Play
The Historic Columbia Theatre
hosts "The Life of a Christian
Teenager" at 6:15 p.m. Saturday.
The theater is located at 348 N.
Marion Ave. Call 386-344-0319.

Sunday

Monday
Blood Mobile seeks donors
The LifeSouth Blood Mobile is
seeking donors 12-6 p.m. Monday
at Taco Bell on Highway 90.
Each donor will receive a free


Combo Meal and could win a new
Apple iPad.

Tuesday
Leads Club #1 meeting
The next Columbia County
Chamber Leads Club #1 meet
ing is 8 a.m. Tuesday at Holida3
Inn & Suites. Breakfast is $6 pei
person. Leads Clubs are dynamic
groups of Chamber Partners wh(
meet bi-monthly to exchange(
business leads and ideas with fel
low business professionals. Cal
386-752-3690.

Theatre performance
Come watch the Geri-Actor
perform live on stage at 6:30 p.m
Tuesday in the Dining Hall of the
LifeStyle Enrichment Center. 'h(
center is located at 628 SE Allisor
Court Call Patrick at 386-7550235.

Christmas lunch
The National Active and Retired


Federal Employees Christmas
luncheon is 1 p.m. Tuesday at
the fellowship hall of Parkview
Baptist Church. The church is
located .at 268 NW Lake Jeffery
Road. Contact Jim Purvis at 386-
752-8570.

Wednesday
Theatre performance
The Geri-Actors serve up a
Matinee Performance from 11
11:45 a.m. and from 12:30 1:30
p.m. Wednesday in the Dining
Hall of the LifeStyle Enrichment
Center. The performance is free
to the public. The center is locat-
ed at 628 SE Allison Court For
more information call 386-755-
0235.

Friday, Dec. 24
Blood Mobile seeks donors
The LifeSouth Blood Mobile is
o seeking donors 7 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Dec. 22 at Lake City Mall. Each
donor will receive LifeSouth's free
gift wrapping services and could
possibly win an Apple iPad.

Wednesday, Dec. 29
v Live Performance
Fred Perry performs live
from 11 11:45 a.m. Dec. 29 in
the Dining Hall of the LifeStyle
Enrichment Center. A game of
bingo will follow at 1 p.m. The
y center is located at 628 SE Allison
- Court. For more information call
y 386-755-0235.
r
c Every Monday
Composite Squadron
[-
1 Suwannee Valley Composite
Squadron-Civil Air Patrol. Meets
6:30 to 9 p.m. Monday. For
more information, call Maj. Grant
Meadows, 386-365-1341.
s
- Every Fourth Monday
e Bridge Club meeting
The Social Duplicate Bridge
Club meets from 1 to 5 p.m.
every fourth Monday at the
LifeStyle Enrichment Center, 628
1 SE Allison Ct Call 755-0235.


'Stand-your-ground' rulings must be pretrial


By BILL KACZOR
Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE -
Judges must rule before
trial on claims of immu-
nity from prosecution
under Florida's "stand-
your-ground" law, which
permits the use of deadly
force for self-defense, the
Florida Supreme .Court
said Thursday.
' The justices ruled 7-
0 that Clarence Dennis
had wrongly been denied
a pretrial hearing on his
stand-your-ground claim in
Okeechobee County, but
they still upheld his felony
battery conviction and five-
year prison sentence.
It was a harmless error
because a jury later found


Dennis guilty "beyond a
reasonable doubt," Chief
Justice Charles Canady
wrote for the court.
The ruling. also resolved
the case of Jimmy Hair that
the Supreme Court had put
on hold pending its deci-
sion on Dennis' appeal, said
Hair's lawyer John Leace.
The state also had raised
the pretrial hearing issue
in challenging a 1st District
Court of Appeal decision
to release Hair from jail in
August 2009 on first-degree
murder charge.
"Jimmy's case is exactly
what the law was created
for," Leace said.
A three-judge panel of
the Tallahassee appeal
court freed Hair after he
had spent two years behind


bars awaiting trial in the
fatal shooting of Charles
Harper. Hair wag a passen-
ger in a car parked outside
a Tallahassee nightclub
when Harper forced his
way into the vehicle.
A trial judge refused
to grant Hair immunity
because of conflicting evi-
dence on whether Harper
was being pulled out of the
car by a friend when he
was shot.
In reversing that deci-
sion, a three-judge appellate
panel said Hair was entitled
to immunity because the
law makes no exception for
cases in which an attacker
or intruder is in retreat.
The state, though, did not
appeal that finding.
In the Dennis case,


Dennis contended he was
*defending himself from a
woman who had hit him in
the head with a long-neck
beer bottle during a domes-
tic dispute in August 2006.
He said she subse-
quently was injured by
the broken, jagged bottle
she still clutched as they
struggled, but the state
disputed his story.
The judge denied his
hearing request and sum-
marily rejected his immu-
nity claim because the facts
.were in dispute, but Canady
wrote that doesn't matter.
The law "grants a sub-
stantive right to assert
immunity from prosecu-
tion to avoid being sub-
jected to trial," Canady
wrote. That means judges


must rule before trial on
stand-your-ground immu-
nity claims.
The opinion rejected
an argument by Attorney
General Bill McCollum's
office that such factual
disputes should be left to
juries.
McCollum spokes-
woman Sandi Copes
said the case involved
procedure rather than
the substance of the law
passed in 2005 at the urg-
ing of the National Rifle
Association.
It created a new right
of "self defense without
the duty to retreat." Until
then, Floridians had
a common law right to
"meet force with force"
only in their homes with-


out first giving ground to
try to avoid death, seri-
ous injury or the commis-
sion of a violent crime.
The Dennis and Hair
. cases are among sev-
eral stand-your-ground
appeals that have gone
to the Supreme Court or
district courts of appeal.
The justices in 2007
ruled the law was not
,retroactive to cases that
occurred before it was
passed.
The high court's opin-
ion Thursday reversed a
ruling by the 4th District
Court of Appeal in West
Palm Beach.
The justices instead
endorsed a 2008 decision
by the 1st District in sim-
ilar case.


Wesley Aubrey Salmans Sr.
Wesley Aubrey Salmans Sr.,
August 26, 1920 December
14, 2010, Resident of Lake City
since 1992. A '
little over one
year after a
fall broke his
hip, W.A., as
he preferred i
being called,
passed away
peacefully in
his room in a e
Serenity Place
in the Lake City
VA Medical e
Center. W. A.
was born in Sapulpa, Oklahoma.
He grew up working hard and
living on his own from an early
age. He served in the United
States Army Air Corps, (which
was later designated the US
Air Force), from September 21,
1937 until his discharge in 1949.
W. A. is survived by his sons
and their wives, John Aubrey
Salmans and Aretes, and Wes-
ley Aubrey Salmans Jr., two
daughters, Betty Kennedy and


Teena Smith and her husband
Jim, seven grandchildren, six-
teen great grandchildren, and
eleven great-great grandchildren.
He enjoyed spending time with
his family and friends, and loved
going to new and unusual res-
taurants and trying new foods.
He served as a cook and mess
sergeant and truck driver dur-
ing his time in the military.
His generosity and goodwill to
others was a wonderful supple-
ment to his marvelous sense
of humor. He really enjoyed


SHang On
a minutes .1

Our customers receive
a Complimentary
copy of the
Lake City Reporter
when they drop off&
pickup their cleaning
.While Su lies Last


"putting one over on ya", a
lot. "Pulling your leg", was
one of his favorite pastimes.
He really enjoyed attending Sun-
day School and church services
at Parkview Baptist Church,
where he was baptized at the ripe
age of 86. His friends and family
are invited to attend a memorial
service in his honor at 2:30 P.M.
Friday, December 17, 2010 at
Parkview Baptist Church in Lake
City. The family requests in lieu
of flowers, donations be made


to the Gideons International
to place Bibles in his memory.
Arrangements are under the di-
rection of the DEES-PARRISH
FAMILY FUNERAL HOME,
458 S. Marion Ave., Lake City,
FL 32025 please sign the on-
line family guestbook at www.
parrishfamilyfuneralhome. corn

Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


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141"Vlo









LAKE CITY REPORTER NATION FRIDAY. DECEMBER 17, 2010


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Senate Majority Leader Sen. Harry Reid of Nev., holds a copy of the Constitution and
Declaration of Independence during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington
Thursday as Congress moved to pass the bipartisan tax legislation.


Final hurdle for tax bill:

Legislative OK in sight?


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By DAVID ESPO
Associated Press
WASHINGTON -
Acting with uncommon
speed, Congress moved
toward final passage
Thursday night of sweep-
ing, bipartisan legislation
to avoid a Jan. 1 spike in
income taxes for millions
and renew jobless benefits
for victims of the worst
recession in 80 years.
The measure also will
cut Social Security taxes for
nearly every wage-earner
and pump billion s of dollars
into the economy.
The legislation was the
result of a reach across
party lines by President
Barack Obama and top
Republicans in Congress
- stubborn adversaries
during two years of political
combat that ended when
the GOP emerged the
undisputed winner in mid-
term elections on Nov. 2.
Rep. Ginny Brown-Waite


(R-Fla.) called the legisla-
tion "a bipartisan moment
of clarity" as the House
moved toward an expected
late-night vote.
After forcing a delay ear-'
lier in the day, Democratic
critics conceded the bill
was on track to pass.
"The president will be
able to sign it as soon as
he likes," said Rep. Rob
Andrews of New Jersey,
one of several members of
the party's rank and file
who objected to an estate
tax provision they-called a
giveaway to the rich.
The Senate passed the
legislation Wednesday, 81-
19.
"This bill is largely a mish-
mash of rejected Republican
ideas that cost too much to
accomplish too little," said
Rep. Lloyd Doggett (D-
Texas). "The ,Republicans
will rule the House for the
next two years; let's not give
them an early start today."
Doggett made his com-


ments as the House began
debate, but the speechmak-
ing was interrupted after. an
hour so leaders could reas-
sess the legislation's pros-
pects.
Numerous officials said a
vote was still likely Thursday
evening, but a postponement
to Friday also appeared pos-
sible.
The bill provides a two-
year extension of tax cuts
enacted when George W.
Bush was president, avoid-
ing an increase at all income
levels that would otherwise
occur on New Year's Day.
It would also renew an
expiring program of benefits
for the' long-term unem-
ployed, and enact a reduc-
tion in Social Security taxes
for 2011 that would amount
to $1,000 for an individual
earning $50,000 a year. The
bill's cost, $858 billion over
two years, would be tacked
on to the federal deficit, a
sore spot with deficit hawks
in both parties.


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Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


0











Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@lakecityreportercom


Friday. December


Lake City Reporter





SPORTS


17.2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


CHEAP SEATS


Tebow time coming?


Tim Kirby
Phone: (386) 754-0421
tkirby@okecityreportercom


Time to

honor

another

coach

There was a
lot of time to
think during
new Florida
head coach .
Will Muschamp's
soliloquy press
conference on Tuesday.
It looks like the
Gators landed on their
feet, at least as far as
enthusiasm.
Muschamp put a good
spin on his days living in
Gainesville and watching
games from the north
end zone of Florida
Field.
Muschamp praised
selected coaches all the
way back to Ray Graves,
touching on Steve
Spurrier and especially
Urban Meyer whom he
welcomed to. the
program and facilities
any time.
Florida also came out
good with its Outback
Bowl invitation. Despite
a 7-5 season, the Gators
will get to play on New
Year's Day against Joe
Paterno and Penn State.
Paterno was solid gold
gracious following his
400th win this season.
On the field after the
game, he thanked "all
the guys who played for
us, and when I say us, I
mean Penn State. People
ask why I stayed here so
long, look around, look
around. I love all of you."
The juxtaposition of
Paterno's long career
and Meyer's health
concerns will provide a
good backdrop to the
bowl game.
There is another tie
between Florida and
Penn State, one that
Muschamp did not
mention.
The assistant coach,
offense/running backs
for the Nittany Lions is
Galen Hall, the
one-time head coach of
the Gators.
Hall took over when
Charley Pell was fired
in 1984 and won eight
straight games with a
team that started 1-1-1.
The Gators rolled over
Auburn and shut out
Georgia along the
way to the SEC
championship. The title
was later stripped by
SEC officials, who have
never had dirt on their
hands.
Hall was a hoot at
Florida. He coached
without a cap at the first
home game and his
bald dome was burned
orange.
Florida finished as
national champions in
The New York Times
computer poll that
season and Hall was
voted Associated Press
Coach of the Year.
Hall went 9-1-1 the
next season that saw
Florida rise to No. 1 in
the AP poll before a loss
to Georgia. The 1985
SEATS continued on 3B


QB could play
Sundaywith
Orton hurting.
By ARNIE STAPLETON
Associated Press

ENGLEWOOD, Colo. -
The debate over whether
Tim Tebow is ready for this
might just be moot.
Tebow is getting more
snaps at practice with
starter Kyle Orton nurs-
ing bruised ribs and the
rookie might even get his
first extended action of the
season if not his first
start when the Denver
Broncos visit Oakland this
weekend.
Offensive coordina-
tor Mike McCoy said he
thought Orton would be
ready by Sunday, but some
of his teammates weren't
so sure.
Deep threat Brandon
Lloyd suggested Tebow


Time is close at hand.
"It's something that's
going to happen. It's unfor-
tunate that Kyle is banged
up now. But Tebow playing
is inevitable and so it's bet-
ter now than maybe the last
game of the season," Lloyd
said. "I think it will be good
for him and be good to ease
the fans' minds. It will be
good to ease all the play-
ers' minds of how well he
can play in game-time situ-
ations."
Lloyd has been adamant
in his support of Orton fin-
ishing out the season in the
face of fans clamoring for
Tebow to get a crack at run-
ning Denver's offense, but
now he seems resigned to
helping Tebow get through
this.
Champ Bailey said he
trusts Tebow, who's less
than a year removed from
one of the greatest college


careers ever.
"I think he


can take on


anything thrown at him,"
Bailey said. "He's a guy
who's seen a lot, especially
through his college days. I
think everybody is a little
anxious to see what he does
in the league."
After missing all of
Wednesday's workout,
Orton ran gingerly and
slowly tossed a couple of
5-yard throws to a staffer at
the beginning of Thursday's
practice but otherwise
didn't participate in the
few drills the media were
allowed to watch.
Tebow took the bulk of
the snaps in his -absence
with third quarterback
Brady Quinn also getting
some work.
Tehow has made only
cameo appearances this
season and thrown ,just
one NFL pass since for-
mer coach Josh McDaniels
selected him in the first
TEBOW continued on 3B


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this photo taken Dec. 12, Denver Broncos quarterback
Tim Tebow watches from the sideline against the Arizona
Cardinals in Glendale, Ariz. Denver Broncos interim coach
Eric Studesville left the door open just a crack to the
possibility that first-round draft pick Tebow could get more
action with the Broncos (3-10) heading for what could be
their worst season since 1964.


3 named permanent captains


Jernigan named
Columbia High
football MVP

By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com

The names Ben Bell,
Justin Kennedy and Danny
Ratliff will forever be
associated with Columbia
High football as the three
seniors were named per-
manent captains during
the 2010 Columbia High
School Football Banquet on
Thursday.
The three seniors won
the most prestigious award
given to the football team
at the end of Thursday's
program at Columbia High
School.
Timmy Jernigan was
named the team's Most
Valuable Player.
Bell was also the winner
of Columbia's Character
Strength and Honor Award
for the second-consecutive
season.
Devontae Bell claimed
the Best Tackier Award.
Soloman Bell was
named the Most Improved
Player for the 2010 football
season.
Defensive back Darius
Williams was given the
Best Back Award, which
is awarded to the best
overall back out of the
offensive and defensive
backfields.
Kennedy received the


BRANDON FINLEY/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High seniors (from left) Justin Kennedy, Ben Bell and Danny Ratliff were honored as permanent captains of the
Tigers' football team during the 2010 Columbia High School Football Banquet on Thursday.


Most Inspirational Award
to go along with being cho-
sen as a permanent captain
after playing the final three
games of his senior season
with a broken foot.
Freshman Rakeem Battle
was given the Outstanding
Special Teams Player
Award.


Offensive and Defensive
Players of the Year were
Nigel Atkinson and Austin
Reiter.
The junior varsity also
gave out two awards.
The Most Valuable
Defensive Player for the
junior varsity team was
Jesse Stokes. Braxton


Stockton received the Most
Valuable Offensive Player
Award for the junior varsity.
He also spent time with the
varsity squad late in the
season.
For the Freshman team,
J.T Bradley claimed the
Freshman Offensive Most
Valuable Player Award.


Tyrone Sands earned the
Freshman Defensive Player
of the Year Award.
The good news for the
Columbia football program
is that many of the award
winners will make up part
of the 2011 football 'team.
Those that graduate will
surely be missed.


Volleyball hands out

postseason awards


Dicks wins team
MVP for play
last season.
From staff reports

Columbia High held their
postseason awards banquet
on Dec. 6 with Haley Dicks
taking home the teams'
most prestigious award.
Coach Casie McCallister
was on hand to honor the
varsity and junior varsity
Lady Tigers.
Dicks was named Miss
Columbia Volleyball for
the 2010 season, which is
given to the team's MVP.
She also brought home
Columbia's. Academic
award.
Jessica Shimmel was
given the junior varsity's
Academic Award and


Hollianne Dohrn received
the junior varsity's Most
Valuable Player.
Ashley Cordner won
the junior varsity's Most
Outstanding Defensive
Player Award. Taylor
Baldwin won the Most
Outstanding Offensive
Player Award for the junior
varsity.
ArdenSibbernsenwonthe
varsity's Most Outstanding
Defensive Player Award.
Kelbie Ronsonet wag the
Most Valuable Defensive
Player.
Annie Milton grabbed
the honor for Freshman of
the Year after competing
with the varsity throughout
the season.
Taking home the Most COURTESY PHOTO
Outstanding Offensive Columbia High volleyball award winners are: (front row, from left) Jessica Shimmel, Hollianne
Player award for the varsity Dohrn and Ashley Cordner. (Back row, from left) are Arden Sibbernsen, Haley Dicks,
was Taylor Messer. Kelbie Ronsonet and Annie Milton.


Section B


I












LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS FRIDAY, DECEMBER 17, 2010 Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


TELEVISION

TV sports
Today
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
8 p.m.
ESPN2 NCAA, FCS tournament.
semifinal,Villanova at Eastern Washington
GOLF
9:30 a.m.
TGC European PGA Tour, South
African Open, second round, at Western
Cape, South Africa (same-day tape)
NBA BASKETBALL
7 p.m.
ESPN Miami at New York
9:30 p.m.
ESPN Phoenix at Dallas

FOOTBALL

NFL standings


x-N
N.Y
Mia
Buf

Jac
Indi
Ho
Ten


AMERICAN CONFERENCE
East
W L TPct PF PA
lew England II 2 0.846415 276
'.Jets 9 4 0.692273 242
mi 7 6 0.538 225 244
falo 3 10 0.231256339
South
W L T Pct PF PA
ksonville 8 5 0.615295 331
ianapolis 7 6 0.538347 318
uston 5 8 0.385316 355
inessee 5 8 0.385 291 265
North


Pittsburgh
Baltimore
Cleveland
Cincinnati

Kansas City
San Diego
Oakland
Denver


W L
10 3
9 4
5 8
2 I1
West
W L
8 5
7 6
6 7
3 10


T Pct PF PA
0.769290 198
0.692294 229
0.385235 252
0.154262 345

T Pct PF PA
0.615 295 268
0.538 354 253
0.462314 307
0.231 269 376


NATIONAL CONFERENCE
East
W L TPct PF PA
N.Y. Giants 9 4 0.692 329 250
Philadelphia 9 4 0.692 374 308
Washington 5 8 0.385238 310
Dallas 4 9 0.308321 366
South
W L TPct PF PA
Atlanta II 2 0.846 335 243
New Orleans 10 3 0.769 330 240
Tampa Bay 8 5 0.615260 267
Carolina I 12 0.077 164 338
North
W L TPct PF PA
Chicago 9 4 0.692253 228
Green Bay 8 5 0.615306 189
Minnesota 5 8 0.385 230 274
Detroit 3 10 0.231285 309
West
W L TPct PF PA
Seattle 6 7 0.462261 329
St. Louis 6 7 0.462245 268
San Francisco 5 8 0.385 243 280
Arizona 4 9 0.308 243 351
x-clinched playoff spot
Thursday's Game
San Francisco at San Diego (n)
Sunday's Games
Kansas City at St Louis, I p.m.
Washington at Dallas, I p.m. -
Houston atTennessee, I p.m.
Arizona at Carolina, I p.m.
Philadelphia at N.Y. Giants, I p.m.
Detroit atTampa Bay, I p.m.
Cleveland at Cincinnati, I p.m.


Buffalo at Miami, I p.m.
Jacksonville at Indianapolis, I p.m.
New Orleans at Baltimore, I p.m.
Atlanta at Seattle, 4:05 p.m.
Denver at Oakland, 4:15 p.m.
N.Y. Jets at Pittsburgh, 4:15 p.m.
Green Bay at New England, 8:20 p.m.
Monday's Game
Chicago at Minnesota, 8:30 p.m.
Thursday, Dec. 23
Carolina at Pittsburgh, 8:20 p.m.
Saturday, Dec. 25
Dallas at Arizona, 7:30 p.m.
Sunday, Dec. 26
Tennessee at Kansas City, I p.m.
San Francisco at St. Louis, I p.m.
N.Y. Jets at Chicago, I p.m.
Baltimore at Cleveland, I p.m.
New England at Buffalo, I p.m.
Detroit at Miami, I p.m.
Washington at Jacksonville, I p.m.
Indianapolis at Oakland, 4:05 p.m.
Houston at Denver, 4:05 p.m.
San Diego at Cincinnati, 4:05 p.m.
N.Y. Giants at Green Bay, 4:15 p.m.
Seattle atTampa Bay, 4:15 p.m.
Minnesota at Philadelphia, 8:20 p.m.
Monday, Dec. 27
New Orleans at Atlanta, 8:30 p.m.

College bowl games
Saturday
New Mexico Bowl
At Albuquerque
UTEP (6-6) vs. BYU (6-6), 2 p.m.
(ESPN)
Humanitarian Bowl
At Boise, Idaho
Northern Illinois (10-3) vs. Fresno
State (8-4), 5:30 p.m. (ESPN)
New Orleans Bowl
Ohio (8-4) vs. Troy (7-5), 9 p.m.
(ESPN)

College playoffs
NCAA-FCS
Semifinals
Today
Villanova (9-4) at Eastern Washington
(I 1-2), 8 p.m.
Saturday
Georgia Southern (10-4) at Delaware
( 11-2), Noon
NCAA DIVISION II
Championship
Saturday
At Braly Municipal Stadium
Florence,Ala.
Delta State (11-3) vs. Minnesota-
Duluth (14-0), 11 a.m.
NCAA DIVISION III
Amos Alonzo Stagg Bowl
Championship
Saturday
At Salem Stadium
Salem,Va.
Mount Union (14-0) vs. Wisconsin-
Whitewater (14-0), 3:30 p.m.
NAIA
Championship
Saturday
At Barron Stadium
Rome, Ga.
Sioux Falls (13-0) vs. Carroll, Mont.
(13-0), 4:30 p.m.

BASKETBALL

NBA schedule
Today's Games
Cleveland at Indiana, 7 p.m.
Miami at New York, 7 p.m.


LA. Lakers at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
New Jersey at Toronto, 7 p.m.
Charlotte at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m.
LA Clippers at Detroit. 7:30 p.m.
Utah at New Orleans, 8 p.m.
Sacramento at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m.
Memphis at Houston, 8:30 p.m.
Phoenix at Dallas, 9:30 p.m.
Minnesota at Portland, 10 p.m.
Saturday's Games
Philadelphia at Orlando, 7 p.m.
Miami at Washington, 7 p.m.
New York at Cleveland, 7:30 p.m.
LA Clippers at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Utah at Milwaukee, 8:30 p.m.
Memphis at San Antonio, 8:30 p.m.
Minnesota at Denver, 9 p.m.
Golden State at Portland, 10 p.m.

AP Top 25 schedule
Today's Game
No. 7 Tennessee at Charlotte, 8 p.m.
Saturday's Games
No. 2 Ohio State vs. South Carolina,
2 p.m.
No. 3 Kansas vs. Southern Cal, Noon
No. 5 Syracuse vs. Iona, 7 p.m.
No. 6 Kansas State vs. Florida
at BankAtlantic Center, Sunrise,
5:30 p.m.
No. 8 Pittsburgh vs. Maryland-Eastern
Shore, 7 p.m.
No. 9 Baylor vs. Gonzaga at American
Airlines Center, Dallas, 4:30 p.m.
No. 10 Villanova vs. Delaware,
7:30 p.m.
No. II San Diego State vs. UC Santa
Barbara, 10 p.m.
No. 12" Illinois vs. Illinois-Chicago at
the United Center, 2 p.m.
No. 13 Missouri vs. Central Arkansas
at Missouri, 8 p.m.
No. 14 Michigan State vs. Prairie View,
6:30 p.m.
No. 15 Georgetown vs. Loyola, Md.,
Noon
No. 16 BYU vs. UCLA at the Honda
CenterAnaheim, Calif., 5:30 p.m.
No. 17 Kentucky vs. MVSU, 8 p.m.
No. 19 Purdue vs. Indiana State at
Conseco Fieldhouse, 4 p.m.
No. 20 Louisville vs. Gardner-Webb,
3:30 p.m.
No. 22 Texas vs. North Carolina at
Greensboro (N.C.) Coliseum, 4 p.m.
No. 22 UNLV vs. Southern Utah,
10 p.m.
No. 25 Texas A&M vs. Arkansas at
American Airlines Center, Dallas, 2 p.m.
Sunday's Game
No. 24 Notre Dame vs. Stony Brook,
4:30 p.m.

HOCKEY

NHL schedule
Today's Games
Nashville at New Jersey, 7 p.m.
Buffalo at Florida, 7:30 p.m.
Detroit at Chicago, 8:30 p.m.
Ottawa at Colorado, 9 p.m.
Saturday's Games
N.Y. Rangers at Philadelphia, I p.m.
Washington at Boston, 7 p.m.
Phoenix at N.Y. Islanders, 7 p.m.
Anaheim at Carolina, 7 p.m.
New Jersey at Atlanta, 7 p.m.
Dallas at Columbus, 7 p.m.
Toronto atVancouver, 7 p.m.
Buffalo atTampa Bay, 7:30 p.m.
San Jose at St. Louis, 8 p.m.
Los Angeles at Nashville, 8 p.m.
Minnesota at Calgary, 10 p.m.


Vick says he would like a


pet dog, renewing debate


By GEOFF MULVIHILL
Associated Press

PHILADELPHIA -
Michael Vick is barred
from owning a dog for a
year and a half, but the star
quarterback's comment
that he'd like to bring one
into his house generated
renewed outrage and
support
The convicted dogfight-
ing ring operator told the
news site TheGrio.com
that he genuinely cares
about animals and would
like to-have one for a pet
again.
"I think it would be a big
step for me in the rehabili-
tation process," he said.
Vick has made similar
statements before, but this
time it seemed to have
grabbed the world's atten-
tion. For example, the
gambling website Bodog.
corn is offering bets on
what breed of dog Vick
might own in the next two
years.
Vick served 18 months
in prison after being
convicted in 2007. A
federal judge also sen-
tenced him to three years
probation, ending in May
2012. One of the terms: He
could not own dogs during
that time.
Since Vick was released
from prison, he's become
a touchstone for a deep
debate: Can people who do
bad things be redeemed?
"I really mean what I say.
I don't have a problem. I'm
not a psychopath. I'm not
crazy. I'm a human being,"
Vick told The Associated
Press on Thursday. "What
happened in my past and
what I did in the culture I
grew up in doesn't shape
and mold me as the person
I am now. I said it before
that I wish I can own a dog,
and I'll continue to say it.
I'm not allowed to, but I'm
just saying I wish I could
because my kids ask me
every day. It's more so for
them than for me."
When he was signed by
the Philadelphia Eagles last
year, criticism seemed to
outweigh cheers. But now
that he's again a top NFL


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Philadelphia Eagles quarterback Michael Vick (7) celebrates
after throwing a touchdown during the first half of an NFL
football game Sunday in Arlington, Texas.


player and has spent time
speaking with at-risk kids,
he's gained a bigger follow-
ing of fans.
Ray Morales, of
Philadelphia, said that Vick
has worked to turn his life
around and deserves a sec-
ond chance.
"They're just trying to
scrutinize him way too
much because of his popu-
larity," he said. "It's hard
for people to believe that
someone can turn their life
around, but they can."
Morales said in his home
state of Florida, a friend
stopped participating in
dogfighting after hearing
Vick talk about why it was
wrong.
"He's been doing a lot
to educate people about
dogfighting," Morales said.
"He knows he's done some-
thing wrong, people just
really need to get past it
and stop casting stones."
Erik Brown, a 25-year-old
student from Chicago, also


defended Vick online.'
"I'm sure he'd be one
of the most-watched dog
owners on the planet, so I
highly doubt he could par-
ticipate in the activities that
landed him in this mess in
the first place," he told the
AP in an e-mail interview.
Vick's comments, howev-
er, brought out plenty of crit-
ics. Many took to Twitter to
lambaste the quarterback
with tweets like, "Michael
Vick says he'd like to own
a dog someday. I'd like to
own a brewery, too, but it's
probably not a good idea."
Jane Dollinger, spokes-
woman for People for
the Ethical Treatment of
Animals, said Vick should
be banned from owning
dogs for life.
Meanwhile, Humane
Society of the United States
President Wayne Pacelle
said it's too early for Vick
to have a dog, but says it
could be appropriate after
his probation ends.


Cuban considers trying


to break BCS with cash ,


Associated Press

NEW YORK BCS
executive director Bill
Hancock doubts "finan-
cial inducements," such as
the one Dallas Mavericks
owner Mark Cuban is con-
sidering, will lead to a major
college football playoff.
Cuban told ESPNDallas.
corn on Wednesday that he
was "actively interested but
in the exploratory stage" of
trying to bankroll a 12- or
16-team playoff to replace
the controversial Bowl
Championship Series.
Hancock responded to
Cuban's comments in an e-
mail to the AP on Thursday,
saying, "Given how much
support our current sys-
tem has among university
presidents, athletics direc-
tors, coaches and athletes,
I don't think any amount
of financial inducement will
make people abandon" the
BCS.
Cuban, who has made
unsuccessful attempts to
buy the Chicago Cubs and
Texas Rangers in recent
years, said he's spoken to
-two athletic directors from
conferences with auto-
matic BCS bids who were
enthusiastic about his idea.
He intends to contact sev-
eral school presidents and
state senators to determine
whether the idea is worth
pursuing.
"Put $50,0 million in
the bank and go to all
the schools and pay them
money as an option," Cuban
said. "Say, 'Look, I'm going
to give you X amount every
five years. In exchange, you


say if you're picked for the
playoff system, you'll go."'
The BCS, using polls
and computer rankings,
matches the top two teams
in the country after the
regular season in a
national title game. No. 1
Auburn and No. 2 Oregon
meet on Jan. 10 in Glendale,
Ariz.
The BCS is wildly unpop-
ular among fans, but the
leadership of the six most
powerful conferences -
the Big Ten, Big East, Big
12, ACC, SEC and Pac-10
- support it and the bowl
system, making any radical
changes in the near future
highly unlikely.
"It speaks to the power




Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

ROSYR


@2010 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
YILSK



RETAUMI



FULOWE
?~ 7~ / 71/ \ ~
L / __ AL ^^ ^ _


and popularity of college
football that a successful
businessman and innova-
tor like Mark Cuban would
have this level of interest
in investing in college foot-
ball," Pac-10 commission-
er Larry Scott said in an
e-mail.
"But the fact is that col-
lege football has never been
more popular in its current
format, and it's a mistake
to assume the impediment
to a playoff is money. We
could get a lot more money
tomorrow from lots of folks
by moving to an expan-
sive playoff; this is about
a broader set of priorities
benefiting schools and stu-
dent-athletes."


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek


Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


A:
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterda'sI Jumbles: BRASS QUEER HARBOR SICKEN
Y Answer: Why he bet the minimum on the race -
HORSE SENSE


12

13
14
15
17

19
20


12-17


ACROSS 40 Deep fissure
42 Burning
Big burger 43 Diamond -
Sports channel 44 Resided
Showtime 47 Stout-hearted
rival 51 Meant to be
Chicken wire 53 Chart
Have a little bit of ancestry
of fun 54 Practical joke
Rowboat need 55 Hammer
Territory target
Cave in 56 Sped off
Sir Walter 57 Mole, maybe
Scott novel 58 It may be
Drama prizes spliced
Figured out 59 Flair for music


21 1300 hours
22 Better
equipped
25 Red Sox city
28 Garden tool
29 Barter
31 Distort,
as data
33 Sir Guinness
35 Pipe down
37 Devoured
38 Located,
maybe


DOWN

1 Griffin of TV
2 Between ports
3 Nickels and
dimes
4 Orlando attrac-
tion
5 Blackthorn
fruit
6 Close friend
7 Sheer legwear


Answer to Previous Puzzle


AWAKEN MOHAIAR
LE VITY HISSED
NACHOS ENS
GIGI USES
FIG NOM DIBS
ERLE BOB GOAL
ETON IRA HIDE
HODS IDA LAG


NlTH ZTTHER
PROBED G N 0 M E S
RESCUE TUMULT
MKIE.E A GILZk
BI'I M


8 Kachina doll
maker
9 Army installa-
tion
10 Mine yields
11 tai cocktail


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


16 Supports in
wrongdoing
18 d'oeuvres
21 Klutz's mutter
22 Gleeful cry
23 Clap of thun-
der
24 Ogle
25 Modem-speed
unit
26 All right
27 Party fabrics
30 Grind
32 NBA coach
Unseld
34 Showy lily
36 Crop hazard
39 Quoting
41 Cheerful
43 King-sized
spoon
44 Some vet
patients
45 Coat or
sweater
46 Tense
47 Marble streak
48 Diva's tune
49 Not e'en once
50 Slugger
Williams
52 Lassie's
refusal


@2010 by UFS, Inc.


SCOREBOARD


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS FRIDAY, DECEMBER 17, 2010


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


I

I










Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


LAKE CITY REPORTER


SPORTS


FRIDAY, DECEMBER 17, 2010


ASSOCIATED PRESS
NASCAR Sprint Cup drivers Jamie McMurray (1), Trevor Bayne (21) and Reed Sorenson
(right) race around the newly-paved track surface at Dayt6na International Speedway in
Daytona Beach on Thursday. The testing was the first time race cars turned laps on the new
asphalt.


New surface could wreak


havoc at Daytona 500


By MARK LONG
Associated Press

DAYTONA BEACH
The Daytona 500 could
have higher speeds, wilder
races and closer finishes.
Drivers testing Daytona
International Speedway for
the first time since it was
completely repaved agreed
Thursday that NASCAR's
premier event will feature
tighter packs cars run-
ning three wide at nearly
200 mph and increase
the possibility for breath-
taking wrecks.
"It's going to be a lot
tighter packs than I've ever
seen," defending Daytona
500winnerJamie McMurray
said. "It's certainly going
to be more Talladega-type,
really close, restrictor-plate
racing.... You've got to hope
that you're going to make it
to the end because the odds
(of big wrecks) are going to
be really good I'd say."
The sport's most famous
track recently completed
its second repaving project,
the first since 1979, and
drivers turned laps on the
2 1/2-mile superspeedway
Wednesday and Thursday
as part of Goodyear's tire
test
The notorious bumps
in turns two and four are
gone, so is the pesky pot-
hole that plagued the race
last February, and pit road
is wider for increased safe-
ty. The result is a smoother
track that causes less tire
wear, creates faster laps and
more tight-knit racing.
"It's going to be more like
Talladega," veteran driver
Bobby Labonte said. "It's
going to lend to more push-
ing, more shoving, more
drafting like that. Obviously,
that's going to lend to
more things that could
happen. Nobody knows
that. If you sat here on a
, Monday and ran a 500-mile
race with 43 cars and you
did it again Wednesday and
again Friday, you'd have
three different races prob-
ably.
"It's not a recipe. It just


kind of folds out the way it
folds out. You don't really
know, but it definitely lends
to that."
Eighteen drivers from
six teams, including Jeff
Gordon, Dale Earnhardt
Jr., Mark Martin, Matt
Kenseth, Kurt Busch and
Juan Pablo Montoya, took
part in the test Some teams
brought cars and engines
from last season. Others
tested their latest and great-
est technology, including
ethanol-blended fuel.
All the teams used a
slightly smaller restrictor
plate than the one bolted
on engines at Daytona last
season. The top speed was
197.5 mph, and NASCAR
vice president of competi-
tion Robin Pemberton' said
officials will evaluate test-
ing results before deciding
whether to reduce the plate
even further.
"We may need to come
down a little bit off of that,
which would be like a 64th
of an inch or something,"
Pemberton said. "We'll
have to go back and talk
to the teams and we'll look
at the speeds from the last'
two days of testing."
Teams will return to
Daytona for a three-day test
in late January.
Not much is expected
to change before then.
Goodyear seemingly nailed
the tire in the Daytona test.
Although analysts had lim-
ited access to the new pave-
ment, they used Talladega's
recently repaved surface as
a starting point and tweaked
a few things from there.
They ended up with the
same left-side tire used at
Talladega and a right-side
tire more like ones used at
Las Vegas and Charlotte.
The combination resulted
in the least tire wear drivers
could remember.
'Tires, from what we've
seen so far, are not going
to be an issue," McMurray
said. "You'll see two tires,
four tires and you might see
fuel only."
Since tires haven't shown
the kind of wear typically


seen at Daytona, speeds
have remained fast and han-
dling has been relatively
tame. McMurray said he
turned the steering, wheel
half as much as he used to.
That kind of smooth driv-
ing should allow drivers to
stay tightly packed for 500
miles.
That kind of racing usu-
ally makes for big wrecks.
"Three wide is not going
to be an issue," McMurray
said. "It's just running real-
ly close together. It's going
to be not running over the
guy. It sounds really easy,
but it's really hard to do."
The old surface proved
challenging for drivers.
Between the treacher-
ous bumps to the slippery
seams, cars often were a
handful to keep straight.
They won't be. nearly as
difficult now.
"This is more of chess
game, 'When do I get
aggressive, when do I not
get aggressive?"' Burton
said. "A lot of times on the
old surface, your car dic-
tated when you could and
when you couldn't (take a
chance). What's going to
dictate this time is how
many laps are left. The
workload's actually going
to be less. I think your brain
will be tired, but I don't
think anything else will be
tired."
Aside from the smooth
surface, pit road was the
other 'notable difference.
The repaving project
included widening pit road
considerably, creating more
room for everyone.
"This pit road was the
most treacherous of all the
pit roads that we raced on,"
Kurt Busch said. "It .looks
like green acres out there.
It's really a safer place on
pit road. The environment
for the crew guys will be
much better and you won't
necessarily have to worry
as much about getting the
fender dings. I'm excited
about it."
Little else changed,
drawing praise from
drivers.


SEATS: Coach won first SEC title
Continued From Page 1B


SEC title also was not
allowed.
Sanctions began to
take a toll in 1986, but the
Gators did list Auburn,
Georgia and Florida State
among their six wins.
Hall bought on Emmitt
Smith in 1987 and
showcased the running
back for three seasons, all
the white building up by
not pressing players into
action too early.
After a win at LSU in
1989, when time was put
back on the clock to allow
for a winning field goal,
Gators fans learned on the
way home Hall had been
fired.
His transgressions
- supplementing assistant
coaches out of his own
pocket and possibly paying
child support payments
for a player seem minor


today.
But, Florida was
running scared after the
Pell transgressions and cut
him loose.
When Hall was basically
blacklisted in the coaching
ranks, Paterno took him in
at Penn State.
Hall later won two NFL
Europe championships
with the Rhein Fire and
was coach of the year three
times in the league. He
also coached in the World
League and Arena League
Football. He was offensive
coordinator at Oklahoma
from 1966-83.
Hall was a quarterback
at Penn State in the early
'60s, when the Lions won
the Gator Bowl and Liberty
Bowl. He played in a few
NFL games.
Hall was the running
backs coach at Dallas in


2002, the year Emmitt
broke the NFL rushing
record.
After that 17-1-1 start,
Hall's career record at
Florida was 40-18-1. He left
enough talent that Spurrier
came in and won the SEC
in his first season of 1990.
Oh yeah, that title was
also stripped by the
conference.
Hall has been back with
Paterno and Penn State for
seven seasons.
When Florida is
handing out accolades to
Meyer during bowl season,
this would be the time to
recognize another great
Florida coach.
Just as Muschamp once
was, Hall will be on the
other side of the field.

* Tim Kirby is sports editor of
the Lake City Reporter.


LITTLE LEAGUE FOOTBALL


COURTESY PHOTO
Annie Mattox Eagles won the Little League Football Midget League championship for the
2010 regular season. Team members are (by jersey numbers): 10-Noah Tuten,
12-Keith Denson, 22-Drew Green, 25-LaQuavious Paul, 26-Derante Jordan,
36-Kyle Lee, 39-Hunter Wortman, 50-Christian Thompson, 51-Dustin Hayes,
52-Seth Register, 55-James Olin, 56-Jatavious Johnson, 63-Dyllan Cason,
69-Chris Williams, 72-Jacob Murrill, 73-Dakota Garrow, 74-Keonte' Cuyler-Angeles,
80-Quantel Leavell, 81-Meashack Hughes, 83-Nicolas Anshultz, 85-Brandon Maxwell,
86-Robeh Moon, 93-Lowell Reed, 99-Nicolas Drew. Bud Parker is head coach.
J.T. Brown and Ryan Tuten are assistant coaches.


COURTESY PHOTO
Glen Presley Wolves won the Little League Football Midget League's 2010 Memorial Bowl.
Team members are (by jersey numbers): 3-Roger Cray, 5-Dallon Washington, 7-Tyler
Bragdon, 8-Latell Williams, 10-De'Von Fleming, 12-Colten Reed, 20-Ternous Baker,
22-Jacquez Baker, 33-Alec Norton, 40-Davion Smith, 44-Dylan Mederios, 46-Jacob
Acosta, 55-John Gaylord, 56-George Kelsey, 63-Josh Kurtz, 64-Nicholas Sealey,
73-Eli Rosell, 74-Josh Rosell, 81-Michael Kelly, 83-Josh Pollard, 88-Donald Shiver,
95-Zachary Trimble, 99-Kaylon Jonas. Michael Kelly is head coach. James Fleming,
Amy Shiver, Bubba Norton and Robert Reed are assistant coaches.


-- ,.~-. ..~e.rt -,


COURTESY PHOTO
Brian's Sports Wildcats played in the 2010 Little League Football Midget League. Team
members are (by jersey numbers): 1-Darren Brock, 2-Jacob Law, 3-Austin Robinson,
4-Nathan Acosta, 5-Daylon Sheppard, 6-Aubrey Mederies, 7-Justin Bridges, 8-
Everett Godbold, 9-Brock Townsend, 10-Alfonzo Battle, 11-Dylan Wadford, 15-Kyle
Richardson, 18-Nathan Conley, 22--Steve Statham, 41-Dusty Wooten, 51-Eli Parrish,
55-Michael Facher, 62-James Hickey, 65-Logan Creamer, 67-Jackson Thompson,
70-Joseph Caputo, 75-Peyton MacDonald, 77-Bo Simmons, 82-Austin Cambell. '
Travis Lamonda is head coach. Vince Richardson, Josh Capputo and Aubrey Medaries are
assistant coaches.


COURTESY PHOTO
CYSA Lions played in the 2010 Little League Football Midget League. Team members are
(by jersey numbers): 5-Kamario Bell, 10-Nicholas Jerome, 12-Zachary Smithy, 22-
Samuel Aymond, 26-Charlie Parker, 36-N.ick Nydam, 39-Dalton Howes, 50-Tarrace
Baker, 51-Dylan Thomas, 52-Cristian Higgins, 55-Rhys McKinze, 72-Hunter Sweet,
73-Quincy Ross, 74-Josua Aymond, 80-Jakob Ehler, 81-Quartez Soloman, 83-
Tyrese Peterson, 85-Dustin Davis, 86-Kejaun Coleman, 93-Tavion Steward, 93-Doug
Johnson, 99-Dylan Thomas. Curtis Burgess is head coach. Anfhony Perry, Jeff Jerome,
Quartez Perry and Larry Williams are assistant coaches.



TEBOW: Still morphing into pro QB


Continued From Page 11
round of the draft in April
following his much-cel-
ebrated career at Florida,
where he won two nation-
al titles and a Heisman
Trophy.


Tebow still has a long
way to go in morphing
from a college quarterback
who ran the ball as much
as he threw it into a proto-
typical pro passer.


McDaniels was fired
Dec. 6 with the Broncos
(3-10) in the midst of their
worst slide in four decades
and the Spygate II video-
tape scandal.


1I











4B LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS FRIDAY, DECEMBER 17, 2010 Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415


DILBERT

HI,
MY DON'T
NAME BOTHER.
IS...



c~2i


BABY BLUES


BLONDIE


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE


DEAR ABBY


Widowed mother's demands

push daughter to the limit


MY APP DOES FACIAL
RECOGNITION AND
SEARCHES ALL SOCIAL
YOUR FULL BIOGRAPHY.
MEI TO GIV M


DEAR ABBY: My father
died this year. My husband
and I were his primary care-
givers. I was with him until his
dying breath. After his pass-
ing, Mom asked us to move
in so she wouldn't be alone.
She has post-polio syndrome,
but her biggest problem is
her "princess syndrome."
She 'has trouble getting
around, but is able to do some
things while I'm at work all
day. As soon as I walk in the
door, she's all over me to do
simple tasks that she could
have done during the day.
She complains the house
isn't clean enough, or that
this and that aren't done up
to her standards.
Abby, it was easier to take
care of all my dad's needs
than it is to take care of hers!
Her day consists of getting
up at 10 a.m., watching soap
operas and eating herself to
more than 300 pounds. How
do I deal with a mother with
a major princess complex?
- NOT CINDERELIA
DEAR NOT CINDER-
ELLA: Do it by having a
frank conversation with your
mother and telling her ex-
actly what you have told me,
WITHOUT labeling her a
princess. You should also in-
sist that she be screened by
her doctor for depression.
If her demands are more
than you and your husband
can deliver, then consider
moving into a place of your


just settle and be happy with
what I have? WANTING
MORE IN THE SOUTH
DEAR WANTING
MORE: You are obviously
not happy with "what you
have." And a man who engag-
es the services of a prostitute
DOES have a sex drive. You
both need to be completely
truthful with each other
Once you have reached that
point, you will know what to
do, and you won't have to ask
me to make the decision for
you.
DEAR ABBY: My boy-
friend and I have reached an
impasse. He says that break-
fast, brunch or lunch is an ac-
ceptable time to spend witl-
my girlfriends, but dinner is
"family time" and should be
spent at home with him.
He also says that girl-
friends who spend a weekend
away together are "up to nc
good." I see no problem with
it. What are your thoughts?
- UNSURE IN THE MID-
WEST
DEAR UNSURE: Your
boyfriend appears to be inse-
cure, controlling and have a
dim view of women. If you're
smart, you will find someone
who is less easily threatened
by female bonding and let
this one go.

* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS


GARFIELD


B.C.


FRANK & ERNEST


HP, AE5 12-17-to


ARIES (March 21-
April 19): Reflect on the
experiences you had the
past year. Learning from
what's happened already,
will help you better under-
stand what's required of
you in the future. You can
acquire the knowledge and
wisdom you need to im-
prove your life. ***
TAURUS (April 20-
May 20): You will learn'
a lot from the people you
hang out with or while trav-
eling to visit friends, fam-
ily or your lover. Listen to
what's being said, throw in
your thoughts and discuss
possibilities for the upcom-
ing year. Romance is high-
lighted. ***
GEMINI (May 21-
June 20): A sudden re-
versal of fortune is likely
if you haven't been care-
ful when making financial
investments. Added disci-
pline will help you stick to a
budget. An idea for a small
service business should be
looked at closely. ***
CANCER (June 21-
July 22): Don't let anyone
discourage you. You'll be
the one who comes out on
top if you practice diploma-
cy and good faith in the way
you handle things. Com-
pleting a job you've been
assigned will allow you to
enjoy the spirit of the sea-,
son. ****
LEO (July 23-Aug.


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

22): Emotional issues will
surface if yot have forgot-
ten, to do something for
someone special. A simple
gesture will help smooth
things over. Pick up a cou-
ple of last-minute items that
can boost your ego or com-
plete an outfit you want to
wear. **
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Time spent with in-
teresting people or hosting
a group meeting at home
will be rewarding. Friends,
family and neighbors can
all play an important role
if you share your ideas
and plans. Someone you
love will touch your heart.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): Work on something
that will please the people
you love most Don't sub-
ject yourself to negativity,
arguments or anyone who
is pushy. Your creative
ideas will make the dif-
ference without too much
cost. ***
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-
Nov. 21): Memories of the
years gone by will come to
mind. Get together with old
friends. Love is in the stars,
so show off your partner or
reunite with someone you
care for. Share your feel-


ings. ***
SAGHITARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): Do some-
thing for those less fortu-
nate. Volunteering and so-
cializing with people from
all walks of life will broaden
your outlook and help yoc
put your own life back int.
perspective. A situation at
home will cause a life-alter-
ing change. ***
CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): You can turn
an investment you made
into a goldmine if you do
what's necessary before
year's end. The information
you share and the loyalty
you show will raise your
self-esteem and boost your
reputation. *****
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): An involvement
you have with a group you
believe in will introduce
you to someone who sparks
ideas you can implement in
the new year. Seeing oli
friends or revisiting an old
neighborhood will have its
good and its bad moments.
**
PISCES (Feb. 19-
March 20): Tie up loose
ends so you can enjoy thi.
special time of year. Call
old friends and share ideas.
Surprisingly enough, an in-
teresting position will cross
your path that can help to
solve a lot of the problems
you've faced the past couple
of years. ****


CELEBRITY CIPHER


by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: V equals B
"M EPK ES VUBMULU BMTU M
VU B M U LUR JYUA M JG N WMLU . .
JYUA KSDP YUGPE EUBBN KSD
U LU P KEYM A I KS D A U U R ES TASJ "
- B D 0 K B M D
PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "Life is short, and it is here to be lived... there's more
to life than cheekbones." Kate Winslet
(c) 2010 by NEA, Inc. 12-17


FOR BETTER OR WORSE


Abigail Van Buren
www.deorabby.com
own. However, if your mother
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HOW'S YOU'RE
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4B LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS FRIDAY, DECEMBER 17, 2010


Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415


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Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO/: 09-772-CA
ELKIN P. COOK, JR as TRUSTEE
Plaintiff
vs.
BARBARA SANDLIN; STATE and
COUNTY CONSTRUCTION &
ROOFING of FLORIDA, INC.;
KENNETH REHMS BARBARA
REHMS; DENNIS GUENTHER;
DENNIS NEEL; CAPITAL ONE
BANK; AIS SERVICES, LLC;
LVNV FUNDING, LLC 21ST
MORTGAGE CORPORATION
Defendants
To : DENNIS GUENTHER and all
those claiming by, through or under
him
last known address 12758 Dennis
Drive
Fort Myers, Florida 33908
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action to foreclose a mort-
gage on real property located in Co-
lumbia County, Florida, and more
particularly described as:
See Attached "Exhibit A"
PARCEL #1
Begin at the SW Comer of the SW
1/4 of the SE 1/4 of Section 24,
Township 7 South, Range 16 East
and run North 105 feet for a Point of
Beginning: Thence run East 420 feet;
Thence North 105 feet; Thence West
420 feet; Thence South 105 feet to
the Point of Beginning, all lying and
being in SW 1/4 of the SE 1/4 of
Section 24, Township 7 South,
Range 16 East, Columbia County,
Florida
Also:
PARCEL #2
Began at the SW Comer of the SW
1/4 of the SE 1/4 of Section 24,
Township 7 South, Range 16 East,
and run in a Northerly direction 210
feet for a Point of Beginning; Thence
continue in a Northerly direction 315
feet; Thence in an Easterly direction
420 feet; Thence in a Southerly di-
rection 315 feet Thence in a Wester-
ly direction 420 feet to the Point of
Beginning, Columbia County, Flori-
da
Also:
PARCEL #3
Begin at the SW Comer of the SW
1/4 of the SE 1/4 of Section 24,
Township 7 South, Range 16 East,
for the Point of Beginning; thence
run East 420 feet; Thence North 105
feet; Thence West 420 feet; thence
South 105 feet to the Point of Begin-
ning, Columbia County, Florida
has been filed against you in the
above styled Court in the above
styled action. You must file written
defenses with the clerk of the court
and serve a copy not later than Janu-
ary 3, 2011 on Plaintiffs attorney,
whose name and address appear be-
low. If you fail to do so a Default
will be entered against you and a
judgment entered thereafter. Dated
this 2nd day of December, 2010.
P. DeWitt Cason, Clerk of the Court
By: B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
Plaintiff's Attorney: :
Thomas R. Weller
23327 NW County Road 236
Suite 50
High Springs, Florida 32643
(386) 454-3163
05524581
December 10, 17, 2010
NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETINGS
The North Florida Broadband Au-
thority ("NFBA") announces their
public meetings to which all interest-
ed persons are invited. The NFBA is
a legal entity and public body created
pursuant to the provisions of Section
163.01, Florida Statutes, and an In-
terlocal Agreement among: Baker,
Bradford, Columbia, Gilchrist, Ham-
ilton, Jefferson, Lafayette, Levy,
Madison, Putnam, Suwannee, Tay-
lor, Union and Wakulla Counties and
municipalities of Cedar Key, Cross
City, Lake City, Live Oak, Monticel-
lo, Perry, White Springs and Wor-
thington Springs, Florida. The regu-
lar meetings will be held at 2:00 p.m.
on the second Wednesdays of each
month at the Suwannee River Water
Management District, Suwannee
Room, 9225 County Road 49, Live
Oak, Florida 32060. The specific
dates are as follows: January 12,
February 9, March 9, 2011, April 13,
May 11, June 8, July 13, August 10,
September 14, October 12, Novem-
ber 9, and December 14, 2011. Meet-
ing agendas will be posted to the
NFBA website www.nfba-fl.org at
least 48 hours prior to the scheduled
meeting. The NFBA Board will ad-
dress general operating issues of the
NFBA. If a person decides to appeal
any decision made by the NFBA
with respect to any matter considered
at the meeting, such person will need
a record of the proceedings and may
need to ensure that a verbatim record
is made, including the testimony and
evidence upon which the appeal is to
be made. In accordance with the
Americans with Disabilities Act, per-
sons needing special accommoda-
tions or an interpreter to participate
in this proceeding, or if you have any
questions regarding this meeting,
please contact the Clerk to the NFBA
Board at (877) 552-3482, at least two
business days prior to the date of the
meeting.
05524671
December 17, 2010







Home Improvements

Carpentry, remodeling, paint,
repairs, additions, Lic. & Ins.
Since 1978 FREE estimates
386-497-3219 or 954-649-1037


Pool Maintenance

Pool Leaks/Pool Repairs
Florida Leisure Pool & Spa
352-373-0612
CPC 1457279


Legal

NOTICE OF ADOPTION OF RES-
OLUTION
BY THE BOARD OF COUNTY
COMMISSIONERS
OF COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLOR-
IDA
TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN:
YOU WILL PLEASE TAKE NO-
TICE that the BOARD OF COUN-
TY COMMISSIONERS OF CO-
LUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA, at
its regular session on December 2,
2010 at 372 West Duval Street, Lake
City, Florida, held a public hearing at
7:00 p.m., pursuant to a previous no-
tice of said hearing published in the
Lake City Reporter, Lake City, Flori-
da, on the advisability of vacating,
abandoning and discontinuing the
following described roads located in
Columbia County,Florida, to-wit:
The following streets in Columbia
City, as recorded in Plat Book B,
Page 47 of the Public Records of Co-
lumbia County, Florida, said land ly-
ing in Section 10, Township 5 South,
Range 16 East, Columbia County,
Florida, and being more particularly
described as follows:
That part of Reynolds Street lying
East of the Easterly Right-of-Way
line of State Road No. 47 and West
of the Easterly Right-of-Way line of
Water Street.
AND ALSO that part of Water Street
lying South of the Southerly Right-
of-Way line of Reynolds Street and
North of the Northerly Right-of-Way
line of State Road No. 240.
AND ALSO that part of Hunter
Street lying South of the Southerly
Right-of-Way line of Reynolds
Street and North of the Northerly
Right-of-Way line of State Road No.
240.
and said hearing was held pursuant
to a resolution adopted by the
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMIS-
SIONERS OF COLUMBIA COUN-
TY, FLORIDA, at a hearing on Oc-
tober 7, 2010. At said public hearing
on December 2, 2010, proof of publi-
cation of a notice of said hearing as it
appeared in the Lake City Reporter
was filed with the BOARD OF
COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA,
and no legal-objections were made to
the closing of said roads.
The BOARD OF COUNTY COM-
MISSIONERS OF COLUMBIA
COUNTY, FLORIDA, at its regular
meeting on December 2, 2010,
adopted a resolution vacating, aban-
doning and discontinuing the herei-
nabove described roads located in
Columbia County, Florida.
DATED this 2nd day of December,
2010.
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMIS-
SIONERS
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
By: /s/ Ronald W. Williams Ro-
nald W. Williams, Chairman
ATTEST:
/s/ P. DeWitt Cason
P. DeWitt Cason
Clerk of Court
04542672
December 17, 2010
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE: CO-
LUMBIA AUTO SALVAGE, INC.
gives Notice of Foreclosure of Lien
and intent to sell these vehicles on
01/03/2011, 08:30am at 1694 SE
COUNTRY CLUB ROAD 252
LAKE CITY, FL 32025-1707, pur-
suant to subsection 713.78 of the
Florida Statutes. COLUMBIA AU-
TO SALVAGE, INC. reserves the
right to accept or reject any and/or
all bids.
1GCCS1445YK139180
2000 CHEVROLET
04542587
December 17, 2010
SUWANNEE RIVER WATER
MANAGEMENT DISTRICT
PUBLIC NOTICE OF APPLICA-
TION
Notice is hereby given that pursuant
to Chapter 373, Florida Statutes, the
following application for permit was
received on December 7, 2010, for:
City of Lake City, 205 North Marion
Ave., Lake City, FL 32055, has sub-
mitted an application for modifica-
tion of Water Use Permit Number 2-
92-00037RM, for public supply
wells with an average daily use of
5.0000 million gallons, a maximum
daily withdrawal of 16.4088 million
gallons, and a maximum annual
withdrawal of 1,825.0000 million
gallons. The project is located in
Township 3 South, Range 16 East,
Section 21, Township 3 South,
Range 17 East, Sections 32 & 33,
Township 4 South, Range 17 East,
Section 1 and Township 4 South,
Range 18 East, Section 6, Columbia
County.
Interested persons may comment
upon the application or submit a
training proposed agency action re-
garding the application by writing to
the Suwannee River Water Manage-
ment District, Attn: Water Supply &
Resource Management, 9225 C.R.
49, Live Oak, Florida 32060. Such
comments or requests must be re-
ceived by 5:00 PM within 14 days
from the date of publication.
No further public notice will be pro-
vided regarding this application. A
copy of the staff report must be re-
quested in order to remain advised of
further proceedings. Substantially
affected persons are entitled to re-
quest an administrative hearing, pur-
suant to Title 28, Florida Administra-
tive Code, regarding the proposed
agency action by submitting a writ-
ten request after reviewing the staff
report.
05524662
December 17. 2010


010 Announcements


The Truth
Some people fall short
of one thing in life, Integrity.
Martin Rivero


070 Rewards

LOST DOGS: Black Labrador
Retriever and Black and White
Boston Terrier in Hwy 245-A area,
REWARD! 386-365-1946

100 Job
100 Opportunities

04542450
CDL A OPERATORS-
Leading Fresh/Frozen Company
is hiring Lease Operators!!
No New England States
100% Fuel Surcharge,
Health and Life Insurance
available, Spouse and Pet Rider
Programs, O/O'S
And PTDI Certified Students
Are Welcome !!
CALL TODAY "
BUEL, INC. 866-369-9744

04542623
The Columbia County Sheriff's
Office is accepting applications
for the following position:
INFORMATION SYSTEM
ADMINISTRATOR
Application deadline is 5:00
PM, December 22, 2010.
Associate's Degree required
with preferred Major(s) in
Computer Science, Data
Processing, or related field.
Five years experience in
network management and PC
maintenance. Hardware and
software experience required.
Windows Server Operating
System required. Experience
with Database and Web based
applications connectivity and
operating systems, token-ring
and Ethernet preferred.
Bachelors Degree may
substitute for three years
experience. Applications may be
obtained at the Columbia
County Sheriff's Office
Operations Center at 4917 East
U.S. Hwy. 90 or on-line at
www.columbiasheriff.com.
The C.C.S.O. is an
EEO .Employer

04542689
FANTASTIC
OPPORTUNITY
Housekeeping position
Part/full time. Great working
environment. MUST have strong
work ethic and be dependable.
Must be a Professional team
player. Ability to work a flexible
schedule including weekends and
holidays a must. Experience
preferred.but not required. Apply
in person at Comfort Suites
located 3690 W US Hwy 90,
Lake City. Please do not call
regarding application.

04542705
Experienced
Sales Person
Excellent starting p7 T
pay/Great Benefits. POTlrlnh
Paid training. Send resume to or
apply in person at: 536 SE Baya
Drive, Lake City 32025
or fax resume to: 386-752-0171
or e-mail to: fjobs@flapest.com
M/F, EOE, DFWP, H, V

05524564
S & S Food Stores
(Food Service Only)
Accepting applications
Part-Time/Full-Time/
Management
Our Food Service is
growing & we offer the
opportunity for advancement.
Benefits available for
Full-Time employees
(Health, dental & life
insurance, vacation, sick leave)
Apply in person at the
S & S Office:
134 SE Colbum Ave.
Lake City, FL 32025
NO PHONE CALLS DRUG-
FREE WORKPLACE

05524634
CUSTOMER SERVICE
REPRESENTATIVE
Fast Paced Call Center,looking
for outgoing, positive candidate
,bi-lingual a plus,basic computer
experience needed
Send Resume to: Joey Kitaif;
P.O. Box 3116
Lake City, FL 32056.

32 Temp Nursery Workers needed
1/17/11 11/17/11. Workers will
plant, cultivate, harvest, propagate,
grade, store & ship container &
field grown plants, trees, & shrubs.
Guaranteed 3/4 of contract hours.
All tools, supplies, equipment
provided at no cost. Free housing
provided for non-commuting
workers. Transportation &
subsistence reimbursed to worker
upon completion of 50% of
contract. Pay rate is $9.11/hr.
Applicants should report or send a
resume to the nearest FL Agency
for Workforce Innovation office
ref job order #AL 615684.
Cottage Hill Nursery -
Irvington, AL
EXECUTIVE BOOKKEEPER
Multi-company high volume office
Must b expert w/ QuickBooks
/MS Office & multi-tasking.
Apply at jobs.jtbmedia.com
Mechanic needed for Truck shop,
must have own tools/apply
Southern Specialized, 1812 NW
Main Blvd., 386-752-9754
Subway is now hiring.
Management Experience a plus.
Send resumes to:
lakecitymanager@yahoo.com


REPORTER Classifieds

In Print and On Line
www.lakecityreporter.com


100 Job
100 'Opportunities

3 Temp Horticultural Workers
needed 1/3/11 11/1/11. Workers
will plant, cultivate, harvest,
propagate, grade, store & ship
container & field grown
horticultural products. Guaranteed
3/4 of contract hours. All tools,
supplies & equip provided at no
cost. Free housing provided for
non-commuting workers.
Transportation & subsistence
reimbursed to worker upon
completion of 50% of contract.
Pay rate is $9.10/hr. Applicants
should report or send a resume to
the nearest FL Agency of
Workforce Innovation office &
reference job # MS 25735.
G & H Nursery Moss Point, MS

16 Temp Farm Workers needed
1/15/11 11/15/11. 1 mo.
verifiable experience working w/
horses. Workers will be required
to perform a variety of duties in-
volved with caring for horses to
protect their health & improve
their appearance. Other duties
include general farm maintenance
& upkeep. Guaranteed 3/4 of
contract hours. All tools, supplies,
equipment provided at no cost.
Free housing provided for
non-commuting workers.
Transportation & subsistence
reimbursed to worker upon
completion of 50% of contract.
Pay rate is $9.71/hr. Report or
send a resume to the nearest FL
Agency of Workforce Innovation
office & ref. job order # KY
0414446.
G. Watts Humphrey Jr. dba Shaw-
nee Farms Harrodsburg, KY
3 Temp Horticultural Workers
needed 12/27/10 6/30/11.
Hickory Hill Greenhouses. Must
have 3 mo. verifiable exp.
operating 55 + HP nursery
equipment. Worksites in various
greenhouses, fields in Olmstead,
KY Plants, cultivates, & harvests
horticultural specialties, such as
flowers & vegetables, & performs
related duties in environmentally
controlled structure. Guaranteed
3/4 of contract hours. All tools,
supplies, equipment provided at no
cost. Free housing provided for
non-commuting workers.
Transportation & subsistence
reimbursed to worker upon
completion of 50% of contract.
$9.71/hr. Applicants should re-
port/send resume to nearest FL
Agency of Workforce Innovation
office & ref. job order #
KY0414614.
I


240 nSchools &
240 Education

04542575
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-12/13/10

Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-01/17/11

Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com



310 Pets & Supplies

Chocolate Lab
$300, AKC
Female 7 months old
386-965-2231
Mini-Dachshunds, toy poodles,
Yorkie-Poos. Males & Females of
each. Shih-tzu female. Ashleys Pet
Palace. 386-755-8668 Health Certs
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.

330 Livestock &
330 Supplies

Christmas Pony
Mini Mare, Paint
5 yrs old $400
tack included 386-965-2231
Pigs for sale
6 weeks old
$50 each HURRY!
386-965-2215


401 Antiques

ANTIQUES WANTED
Fum., China, Silver, Glassware,
Costume Jewelry & Gold. 35 years
exp. Cash Pd. Pete. 386-963-2621


404 Baby Items

Baby Crib, converts to toddler bed,
large drawer 'OUder bed,
A t-- t. .,-i 01uc


d te eeatta esser do en
120 Medical $300 obo 386-688-
SEmployment

105524555 407 Computers


Medical Personnel

LPN
Needed for Correction &
Mental Health Facilities, top
pay, instant pay, sign on bonus,
877-630-6988

05524650
LEARN TO DRAW BLOOD
Local Phlebotomy Course
offered in Lake City, FLA
Certificate program.
(904)566-1328
Wanted Medical Biller/Scheduler,
experienced. Send resume to
826 SW.Main Blvd. Suite 102.
Lake City, FL. 32025

Wanted Receptionist,
experienced. Send resume to
826 SW Main Blvd. Suite 102.
Lake City, FL. 32025


130 Part Time

Janitorial, seeking couple for P/T
evening work, must have reliable
transportation, clean background
and ref's 386-752-2147

Pianist needed,
for historic rural
non-denominational church.
386-755-0580


140 Work Wanted

CAREGIVER
Compassionate, private duty sitter
to care for elderly or disabled
persons, reasonable rates and
references available, Ruth
435-469-1237 or 386-454-8697


Sbed0334,
-0334-


Dell computer tower
$80. firm
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170


408 Furniture

Ashley Furniture Living Room set,
includes 2 oversized sofa's & table
Dura-Pella fabric, dark green,
exc cond $500 386-288-4690


420 Wanted to Buy

K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$225 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.


430 Garage Sales

MOVING SALE Sat. Only.
West on 90, 3.4 mi from 1-75, to
427 SW Arbor Ln. Furniture,
household junque and much more.
Moving Sale Fri & Sat 8-? Ellis-
ville, by the Pecan house. 395
Rolling Hills Dr 42" TV,freezer,
Hshold &more! 813-477-9503






PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.


Member Service Manager
Suwannee Valley Electric Coop., Inc. (SVEC) has
an opening for the position of Member Services
Manager. This is a full-time position responsible
for managing the Member Services Department.
A minimum of 6 years customer service with su-
pervisory experience required. Applications and
job descriptions may be picked up at the SVEC
administration building, 11340 100th St., Live Oak
or reviewed on www.svec-coop.com. Applica-
tions should be turned in, to attention Vicky, at
the above address, mailed to PO Box 160, Live
Oak, FL 32064 or emailed to vickyt@svec-coop.
com. The deadline for accepting applications
is Wednesday, December 22, 2010. SVEC is an
equal opportunity employer.

G8 uwannee
Valley

E electric

Cooperative


SSSI










Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED 'FRIDAY, DECEMBER 17, 2010


430 Garage Sales
Sat &Sun, 9-4, appliances, elec-
tronics & more! 225 S.W. Wise
Dr., CR242 between 47 & Sisters
Welcome follow signs
SHOP HERE FOR XMAS!
Unique gifts, jewelry, antiques, de-
cor, ladies plus sizes, prices you'll
love 695 SE Johns St.,Sat 9-2
941-567-7919

450 Good Things
45 to Eat
The Nut Cracker
Buy and sell, crack & shell pecans
2738 CR 252 W, Lake City 32024
Pinemount Rd/CR 252/Taylorville
Robert Taylor 386-963-4138
or 386-961-1420

630 Mobile Homes
for Rent
2&3 Bedroom Mobile homes.
$395 $650. mo. plus deposit.
Water & sewer furnished.
Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
2/2 S/W beautiful, clean freshly
painted, near college, 1 acre,
big front porch $650 mo, avail 1/1
386-697-1013 or 386-697-1900
2/2, S/W, 1 acre secluded lot
Bascom Norris Bypass, $500 dep,
$500 mo, possible owner finance
386-623-2203 or 386-623-5410
2BR/2BA MH CH/A,
Fenced in back yard and Shed.
$750. mo plus deposit.
Pets OK! 386-755-4157
3 bd/3 bth MH, on approx 1 acre
of private property, 5 miles out
Pinemount Rd., $600 mon + dep,
call Debi 352-317-0995
3BR/1.5 BA
Unfurnished Mobile Home.
No pets!
386-755-0142
3BR/2BA Double wide on I ac.
Lg. Rooms. $750 a month. 1st
month and full security.
Please call 386-965-7534.
3br/2ba newly renovated MH on
1/2 ac. private property. Close to
college $700.mo. 1st. mo.+ Sec.
dep. References. 386-755-3288
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White Contact 386-623-2465
or 386-292-0114
Nice clean2&3 bdrm, Five Points,
NO PETS, also 3 bd on the
Westside, 1 mo rent & dep
386-961-1482





Quiet Setting w/lots of oaks
2br/lba from $450 & 3br/2ba from
$550. Includes water & sewer.
No Pets! 386-961-0017
Remodeled 2/1 w/screen porch.
Lg yard in quiet, clean, safe, well
maintained 10 unit park. Water,
garbage incl. $475.mo $475.dep.
386-965-3003
Very clean & well maintained 2/2
units in nice park. $599.mo
w/$500. dep. Rent incl water,
sewer, trash p/u. Close to town
386-984-8448 or 623-7547
Very Clean 2 BR/1 BA, in the
country, Branford area, $450.mo.,
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleypro590-0642

,40A Mobile Homes
6 0v for Sale
$200. MONTHLY. Remodeled
SW. 2bd/2ba. Appliances,
delivered & blocked. Owner
finance available w/$3000 down.
Call Gary Hamilton 386-758-9824
05524588
Palm Harbor Homes
has closed 2 model centers Save
up to 60K on select models
Call 800-622-2832

05524637
Gainesville-Jacobsen-Savings
Factory direct Jaconsen outlet
now open to the public 3/2 start-
ing at 39,900 complete.
Northpointemobilehomesales.co
mrn for complete website specials
or 352-872-5566
For the best deal in Florida!


640 Mobile Homes
0 for Sale
05 2463,S
North Pointe Homes is your
new #1 Jacobsen dealer. Take a
short drive to Gainesville and
save thousands. Five year halo
warranty. 2x6 wall. and
much more. Free energy star
package on all others.
Call Chuck at 352-872-5567

05524639
Why drive to Gainesville?
This is Why! New 28x60
Jacobsen 3/2 inc FREE Furni-
ture! Low as $497 month.
Drive to our dealership and Buy.
I pay for your gas!
Call Mark at 352-872-5568

650 Mobile Home
Q650& Land
BANK REPO: Mobile Home On
15.65 ACRES IN FT. WHITE -
Including 60X40 pole barn. Listed
at $130,000.00. Call Billy Shows
After hours 386-208-8547
Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent

$Holiday Cash $
NOApp Fee, NO SD,
$250 off December,
*for Qualified Applicants
Windsong Apartments
(386) 758-8455
05524518
SPRING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans;
some with garages.
Call 386-454-1469
or visit our website:
www.springhillvillage.net
2 bdrm/1 bath, I car garage, W/D
hook up, $520 month,
no pets 1 month sec,
386-961-8075
2/1 w/garage,
east side of town.
1st, last & sec
386-755-6867
2BR/2BA DUPLEX
on McFarlane Ave. W/D hookup
Rent $625. per month.
Call 386-867-1212 for details.
A Landlord You Can Love!
2 brApts $550. & up + sec. Great
area. CH/A washer/dryer hookups.
386-758-9351/352-208-2421
Brick Duplex 2/1 off Baya. CH/A,
Carport, Carpet, tile, $575 mo,+
Dep. Call 386-752-0118 or
386-623-1698 or 386-292-4937
Duplex w/garage spacious, 2/1,
1300 sq ft, W/D hook up, CH/A,
$650 plus dep & bckgmd chk,
386-697-3248 or 352-514-2332
Great location W of 1-75, spacious
deluxe 2BR apts., garage, W/D
hook up. patio. $600 & up, + SD,
386 965-0276
The Lakes Apts. Studios & IBr's
from $135/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $425 + sec.
Michelle 386-752-9626
X-CLEAN SECOND STORY 2/2,
country acre 8 mi to VA, off Lk
Jeff Rd. $500 mo + dep. No dogs.
Deck, w/d hookups 386.961.9181

7 0 Furnished Apts.
2V For Rent
1 BEDROOM all utilities includ-
ed. Furnished or unfurnished. East
or West side. $475. mo. +
$200 security. 386-397-3568
Furnished Studio Apt
w/cable & all utilities included.
$500. mo. & $300. Sec Dep.
386-697-9950
NO Lease/beposits, ROOMS only
Utilities, Cable, WI-FI, maid,
micro-fridge, phone, Pool.
Americas Best Value Inn
(386)755-4664
Wk 1 prs. $179,2 ppl $189 + tax
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808


7 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent

e n244',
Move in for Christmas. lease to
own. 3000 sq ft. 4 br. 3 ba.. new
model home. nice sub div. 2
miles S. of city limit. 5 % int.
tax deduc. consider trade-ins.
386-752-1364

O552457
Move in Now! Take over pymts
on 3 br/2 ba. all brick, custom
home, with detached 1000
sq ft bldg for apt. etc.,
on 5 beautiful acres, close to
"The Oaks Equest Sub.",
5% int. tax deduc..
consider trade-ins.
386-752-1364
1/1 Cottage pool access, no pets,
country setting, $675 mon includes
elec., $300 sec.,near SR 47 &
75 overpass 386-719-5616
2/1 House, near Elementary
School. $700.00 month,
$350.00 dep.
386-755-3649
2BR/1BA CH/A. Large carport,
great location, near corner of Baya
& McFarland references req'd.
386-752-9144 or 755-2235
3 & 4 bedroom homes. Newly
renovated. Very nice, in town.
$750 $950 per month plus
deposit. 386-755-2423
3 Bedrm/2 Bth plus 360 sq ft Stu-
dio on Lake Jeffery/Old Mill Rd,
very private, $1200 per mo. plus
deposit, 386-752-9303, No Pets
3/2 W/D hook up, appliances
included, $200 sec dep,
$650 month, ref check,
386-365-2515
3/2,Brick Home, big back yard,
$900 month + Security Deposit
off of Branford Hwy & CR 242,
386-965-0276
Cozy Cottage lbr/lba S. Hwy. 41
$550/mo. + security. Includes all
utilities & satellite TV. Pets OK.
(386)758-2408
FOR RENT: Large 3br/2ba brick
home, fenced on 5 acres on
Columbia/Suwannee County line.
$975. per month + utilities.
Perfect place for children.
Broker/Owner- Annette Land @
386-935-0824
Newer 3/2 w/2 car garage.
1800 sq'ft $900 mo. plus deposit
1-10/US 41 area
(248)875-8807
Rural beauty and privacy near
I-10/US90 NW of Live Oak. 3Br,
l+Ba, $725/mo. Optional pasture
available. (626) 512-5374

750 Business &
75 Office Rentals
OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$695. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor

805 Lots for Sale
5 Acres in Lake City, FL,
low down, easy qualifying, and
low monthly payments,
please call 512-663-0065
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
.law. -Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.


810 Home for Sale
* 3BR/2BA 2 story brick. 4.6 ac. in
ground pool. Lg. workshop &
2 wells. $200,000.00 obo
Old Wire Rd. (850)728-0782


ADVERTISE IT HERE!

Bring the picture in or we will take it for you!
Advertise your car, truck, motorcycle, recreation vehicle or boat here for 10 consecutive days.
If your vehicle does not sell within those 10 days, for an additional $15 you can place your ad for
an additional 10 days. A picture will run everyday with a description of your vehicle. The price of
the vehicle must be listed in the ad. Your ad must be prepaid with cash, check or credit card. Just
include a snapshot or bring your vehicle by and we will take the picture for you. Private party only!
Price includes a 6 day/ 4 line classified ad of the same vehicle in print and online.


m ln P .nt,


r 2008 Toyota Tacoma n Print,
2001 Chevy Astro 4DR, access cab. 2005 PT Cruiser & Oni-- 1
2001 Chevy Astro 7,250 mi., AT, all power, Touring Edition O ine11
Van Tonneau cover, bedliner, PS PW PM CC AC I
New trans., new AC, good class III hitch, nerf bars, white, 55,500 miles I LOW
tires, runs great, clean, AM-FM stereo w/CD, OI n w
great work van. 7,995 $7,900
$2,200n0 10 $16,995 II Cal Price!
Call Call 386-965-8656
386-984-0571 386-752-8227
For ore etals Cll Mry r Brdge

MJat 386-75.5m5440.


810 Home for Sale
FSBO. Completely Remodeled.
3bdr/lbth. fenced. new deck. shop.
new cabinets/appliances.Schools
biks away. S65K 478-391-1592
Live Oak 2bd/lba remodeled. 1
acre. Fence, large utility room.
walk in closet/computer room.
Metal roof. new AC/Heat. $365.
mo w/S 10K down or $468 w/5K
down. Owner Finance Negotiable.
Gary Hamilton 386-963-4000
Owner finance. (MH). 4/2 on
3+ac.quiet, fenced. S. of Lake
City. small down. $800 mo
386-867-1833/386-590-0642
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com

820 Farms&
SAcreage
05524426
10 acres for price of 5!
Rolling, grassed field, 3 miles E.
of Col City School, 5% interest
$495 per month, 386-752-1364

4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$69,900. $613mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
4 Ac.,Ft. White, Well, Septic &
Power. Ovsifr Financing!
NO DOWN! $69,900.
Only $613./mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
WE FINANCE! Half to ten acre
lots. Some with w/s/pp
Deas Bullard BKL Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com

940 Trucks






950 Cars for Sale
2005 PT Cruiser Touring Edition
PS/PW/PM, white, 55, 500
miles,Auto, Cruise Control, AC
$7900 386-965-8656

Vans & Sport
952 Util. Vehicles
2001 Chevy Astro Van,
new trans., new AC, good tires,
runs great, clean,great work van
$2200 obo, 386-984-0572


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